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Sample records for inhibiting metabolite flux

  1. Inhibition of Non-flux-Controlling Enzymes Deters Cancer Glycolysis by Accumulation of Regulatory Metabolites of Controlling Steps.

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    Marín-Hernández, Álvaro; Rodríguez-Zavala, José S; Del Mazo-Monsalvo, Isis; Rodríguez-Enríquez, Sara; Moreno-Sánchez, Rafael; Saavedra, Emma

    2016-01-01

    Glycolysis provides precursors for the synthesis of macromolecules and may contribute to the ATP supply required for the constant and accelerated cellular duplication in cancer cells. In consequence, inhibition of glycolysis has been reiteratively considered as an anti-cancer therapeutic option. In previous studies, kinetic modeling of glycolysis in cancer cells allowed the identification of the main steps that control the glycolytic flux: glucose transporter, hexokinase (HK), hexose phosphate isomerase (HPI), and glycogen degradation in human cervix HeLa cancer cells and rat AS-30D ascites hepatocarcinoma. It was also previously experimentally determined that simultaneous inhibition of the non-controlling enzymes lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), pyruvate kinase (PYK), and enolase (ENO) brings about significant decrease in the glycolytic flux of cancer cells and accumulation of intermediate metabolites, mainly fructose-1,6-bisphosphate (Fru1,6BP), and dihydroxyacetone phosphate (DHAP), which are inhibitors of HK and HPI, respectively. Here it was found by kinetic modeling that inhibition of cancer glycolysis can be attained by blocking downstream non flux-controlling steps as long as Fru1,6BP and DHAP, regulatory metabolites of flux-controlling enzymes, are accumulated. Furthermore, experimental results and further modeling showed that oxamate and iodoacetate inhibitions of PYK, ENO, and glyceraldehyde3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH), but not of LDH and phosphoglycerate kinase, induced accumulation of Fru1,6BP and DHAP in AS-30D hepatoma cells. Indeed, PYK, ENO, and GAPDH exerted the highest control on the Fru1,6BP and DHAP concentrations. The high levels of these metabolites inhibited HK and HPI and led to glycolytic flux inhibition, ATP diminution, and accumulation of toxic methylglyoxal. Hence, the anticancer effects of downstream glycolytic inhibitors are very likely mediated by this mechanism. In parallel, it was also found that uncompetitive inhibition of the

  2. Metabolite Depletion Affects Flux Profiling of Cell Lines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nilsson, A.; Haanstra, J. R.; Teusink, B.

    2018-01-01

    Quantifying the rate of consumption and release of metabolites (i.e., flux profiling) has become integral to the study of cancer. The fluxes as well as the growth of the cells may be affected by metabolite depletion during cultivation.......Quantifying the rate of consumption and release of metabolites (i.e., flux profiling) has become integral to the study of cancer. The fluxes as well as the growth of the cells may be affected by metabolite depletion during cultivation....

  3. Tryptophan-2,3-dioxygenase (TDO) inhibition ameliorates neurodegeneration by modulation of kynurenine pathway metabolites.

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    Breda, Carlo; Sathyasaikumar, Korrapati V; Sograte Idrissi, Shama; Notarangelo, Francesca M; Estranero, Jasper G; Moore, Gareth G L; Green, Edward W; Kyriacou, Charalambos P; Schwarcz, Robert; Giorgini, Flaviano

    2016-05-10

    Metabolites of the kynurenine pathway (KP) of tryptophan (TRP) degradation have been closely linked to the pathogenesis of several neurodegenerative disorders. Recent work has highlighted the therapeutic potential of inhibiting two critical regulatory enzymes in this pathway-kynurenine-3-monooxygenase (KMO) and tryptophan-2,3-dioxygenase (TDO). Much evidence indicates that the efficacy of KMO inhibition arises from normalizing an imbalance between neurotoxic [3-hydroxykynurenine (3-HK); quinolinic acid (QUIN)] and neuroprotective [kynurenic acid (KYNA)] KP metabolites. However, it is not clear if TDO inhibition is protective via a similar mechanism or if this is instead due to increased levels of TRP-the substrate of TDO. Here, we find that increased levels of KYNA relative to 3-HK are likely central to the protection conferred by TDO inhibition in a fruit fly model of Huntington's disease and that TRP treatment strongly reduces neurodegeneration by shifting KP flux toward KYNA synthesis. In fly models of Alzheimer's and Parkinson's disease, we provide genetic evidence that inhibition of TDO or KMO improves locomotor performance and ameliorates shortened life span, as well as reducing neurodegeneration in Alzheimer's model flies. Critically, we find that treatment with a chemical TDO inhibitor is robustly protective in these models. Consequently, our work strongly supports targeting of the KP as a potential treatment strategy for several major neurodegenerative disorders and suggests that alterations in the levels of neuroactive KP metabolites could underlie several therapeutic benefits.

  4. Comparison of Acute Toxicity of Algal Metabolites Using Bioluminescence Inhibition Assay

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    Hansa Jeswani

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Microalgae are reported to degrade hazardous compounds. However, algae, especially cyanobacteria are known to produce secondary metabolites which may be toxic to flora, fauna and human beings. The aim of this study was selection of an appropriate algal culture for biological treatment of biomass gasification wastewater based on acute toxicity considerations. The three algae that were selected were Spirulina sp., Scenedesmus abundans and a fresh water algal consortium. Acute toxicity of the metabolites produced by these algal cultures was tested at the end of log phase using the standard bioluminescence inhibition assay based on Vibrio fischeri NRRLB 11174. Scenedesmus abundans and a fresh water algal consortium dominated by cyanobacteria such as Phormidium, Chroococcus and Oscillatoria did not release much toxic metabolites at the end of log phase and caused only about 20% inhibition in bioluminescence. In comparison, Spirulina sp. released toxic metabolites and caused 50% bioluminescence inhibition at 3/5 times dilution of the culture supernatant (EC50.

  5. The Role of Drug Metabolites in the Inhibition of Cytochrome P450 Enzymes.

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    Mikov, Momir; Đanić, Maja; Pavlović, Nebojša; Stanimirov, Bojan; Goločorbin-Kon, Svetlana; Stankov, Karmen; Al-Salami, Hani

    2017-12-01

    Following the drug administration, patients are exposed not only to the parent drug itself, but also to the metabolites generated by drug-metabolizing enzymes. The role of drug metabolites in cytochrome P450 (CYP) inhibition and subsequent drug-drug interactions (DDIs) have recently become a topic of considerable interest and scientific debate. The list of metabolites that were found to significantly contribute to clinically relevant DDIs is constantly being expanded and reported in the literature. New strategies have been developed for better understanding how different metabolites of a drug candidate contribute to its pharmacokinetic properties and pharmacological as well as its toxicological effects. However, the testing of the role of metabolites in CYP inhibition is still not routinely performed during the process of drug development, although the evaluation of time-dependent CYP inhibition during the clinical candidate selection process may provide information on possible effects of metabolites in CYP inhibition. Due to large number of compounds to be tested in the early stages of drug discovery, the experimental approaches for assessment of CYP-mediated metabolic profiles are particularly resource demanding. Consequently, a large number of in silico or computational tools have been developed as useful complement to experimental approaches. In summary, circulating metabolites may be recognized as significant CYP inhibitors. Current data may suggest the need for an optimized effort to characterize the inhibitory potential of parent drugs metabolites on CYP, as well as the necessity to develop the advanced in vitro models that would allow a better quantitative predictive value of in vivo studies.

  6. Metabolite-balancing techniques vs. 13C tracer experiments to determine metabolic fluxes in hybridoma cells.

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    Bonarius, H P; Timmerarends, B; de Gooijer, C D; Tramper, J

    The estimation of intracellular fluxes of mammalian cells using only mass balances of the relevant metabolites is not possible because the set of linear equations defined by these mass balances is underdetermined. In order to quantify fluxes in cyclic pathways the mass balance equations can be complemented with several constraints: (1) the mass balances of co-metabolites, such as ATP or NAD(P)H, (2) linear objective functions, (3) flux data obtained by isotopic-tracer experiments. Here, these three methods are compared for the analysis of fluxes in the primary metabolism of continuously cultured hybridoma cells. The significance of different theoretical constraints and different objective functions is discussed after comparing their resulting flux distributions to the fluxes determined using 13CO2 and 13C-lactate measurements of 1 - 13C-glucose-fed hybridoma cells. Metabolic fluxes estimated using the objective functions "maximize ATP" and "maximize NADH" are relatively similar to the experimentally determined fluxes. This is consistent with the observation that cancer cells, such as hybridomas, are metabolically hyperactive, and produce ATP and NADH regardless of the need for these cofactors. Copyright 1998 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  7. Inhibition of endocannabinoid metabolism by the metabolites of ibuprofen and flurbiprofen.

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    Karlsson, Jessica; Fowler, Christopher J

    2014-01-01

    In addition to their effects upon prostaglandin synthesis, the non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs ibuprofen and flurbiprofen inhibit the metabolism of the endocannabinoids 2-arachidonoylglycerol (2-AG) and anandamide (AEA) by cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) and fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH), respectively. Here, we investigated whether these effects upon endocannabinoid metabolism are shared by the main metabolites of ibuprofen and flurbiprofen. COX activities were measured via changes in oxygen consumption due to oxygenation of arachidonic acid (for COX-1) and arachidonic acid and 2-AG (for COX-2). FAAH activity was quantified by measuring hydrolysis of tritium labelled AEA in rat brain homogenates. The ability of ibuprofen and flurbiprofen to inhibit COX-2-catalysed oxygenation of 2-AG at lower concentrations than the oxygenation of arachidonic acid was seen with 4'-hydroxyflurbiprofen and possibly also 3'-hydroxyibuprofen, albeit at lower potencies than the parent compounds. All ibuprofen and flurbiprofen metabolites retained the ability to inhibit FAAH in a pH-dependent manner, although the potency was lower than seen with the parent compounds. It is concluded that the primary metabolites of ibuprofen and flurbiprofen retain some of the properties of the parent compound with respect to inhibition of endocannabinoid metabolism. However, these effects are unlikely to contribute to the actions of the parent compounds in vivo.

  8. Inhibition of endocannabinoid metabolism by the metabolites of ibuprofen and flurbiprofen.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica Karlsson

    Full Text Available In addition to their effects upon prostaglandin synthesis, the non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs ibuprofen and flurbiprofen inhibit the metabolism of the endocannabinoids 2-arachidonoylglycerol (2-AG and anandamide (AEA by cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2 and fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH, respectively. Here, we investigated whether these effects upon endocannabinoid metabolism are shared by the main metabolites of ibuprofen and flurbiprofen.COX activities were measured via changes in oxygen consumption due to oxygenation of arachidonic acid (for COX-1 and arachidonic acid and 2-AG (for COX-2. FAAH activity was quantified by measuring hydrolysis of tritium labelled AEA in rat brain homogenates. The ability of ibuprofen and flurbiprofen to inhibit COX-2-catalysed oxygenation of 2-AG at lower concentrations than the oxygenation of arachidonic acid was seen with 4'-hydroxyflurbiprofen and possibly also 3'-hydroxyibuprofen, albeit at lower potencies than the parent compounds. All ibuprofen and flurbiprofen metabolites retained the ability to inhibit FAAH in a pH-dependent manner, although the potency was lower than seen with the parent compounds.It is concluded that the primary metabolites of ibuprofen and flurbiprofen retain some of the properties of the parent compound with respect to inhibition of endocannabinoid metabolism. However, these effects are unlikely to contribute to the actions of the parent compounds in vivo.

  9. Sulindac metabolites inhibit epidermal growth factor receptor activation and expression

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    Ahnen Dennis

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Regular use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs is associated with a decreased mortality from colorectal cancer (CRC. NSAIDs induce apoptotic cell death in colon cancer cells in vitro and inhibit growth of neoplastic colonic mucosa in vivo however, the biochemical mechanisms required for these growth inhibitory effects are not well defined. We previously reported that metabolites of the NSAID sulindac downregulate extracellular-signal regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2 signaling and that this effect is both necessary and sufficient for the apoptotic effects of these drugs. The goal of this project was to specifically test the hypothesis that sulindac metabolites block activation and/or expression of the epidermal growth factor (EGF receptor (EGFR. Methods HT29 human colon cancer cells were treated with EGF, alone, or in the presence of sulindac sulfide or sulindac sulfone. Cells lysates were assayed by immunoblotting for phosphorylated EGFR (pEGFR, pY1068, total EGFR, phosphorylated ERK1/2 (pERK1/2, total ERK1/2, activated caspase-3, and α-tubulin. Results EGF treatment rapidly induced phosphorylation of both EGFR and ERK1/2 in HT29 colon cancer cells. Pretreatment with sulindac metabolites for 24 h blocked EGF-induced phosphorylation of both EGFR and ERK1/2 and decreased total EGFR protein expression. Under basal conditions, downregulation of pEGFR and total EGFR was detected as early as 12 h following sulindac sulfide treatment and persisted through at least 48 h. Sulindac sulfone induced downregulation of pEGFR and total EGFR was detected as early as 1 h and 24 h, respectively, following drug treatment, and persisted through at least 72 h. EGFR downregulation by sulindac metabolites was observed in three different CRC cell lines, occurred prior to the observed downregulation of pERK1/2 and induction of apoptosis by these drugs, and was not dependent of caspase activation. Conclusion These results suggest that

  10. ESAT6 inhibits autophagy flux and promotes BCG proliferation through MTOR

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    Dong, Hu, E-mail: austhudong@126.com [Department of Medical Immunology, Medical School, Anhui University of Science and Technology (China); Medical Inspection Center, Anhui University of Science and Technology, Huainan (China); Jing, Wu, E-mail: wujing8008@126.com [Department of Medical Immunology, Medical School, Anhui University of Science and Technology (China); Medical Inspection Center, Anhui University of Science and Technology, Huainan (China); Runpeng, Zhao; Xuewei, Xu; Min, Mu; Ru, Cai [Department of Medical Immunology, Medical School, Anhui University of Science and Technology (China); Yingru, Xing; Shengfa, Ni [Affiliated Cancer Hospital, Anhui University of Science and Technology (China); Rongbo, Zhang [Department of Medical Immunology, Medical School, Anhui University of Science and Technology (China); Medical Inspection Center, Anhui University of Science and Technology, Huainan (China)

    2016-08-19

    In recent years, increasing studies have found that pathogenic Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) inhibits autophagy, which mediates the anti-mycobacterial response, but the mechanism is not clear. We previously reported that secretory acid phosphatase (SapM) of Mtb can negatively regulate autophagy flux. Recently, another virulence factor of Mtb, early secretory antigenic target 6 (ESAT6), has been found to be involved in inhibiting autophagy, but the mechanism remains unclear. In this study, we show that ESAT6 hampers autophagy flux to boost bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG) proliferation and reveals a mechanism by which ESAT6 blocks autophagosome-lysosome fusion in a mammalian target of rapamycin (MTOR)-dependent manner. In both Raw264.7 cells and primary macrophages derived from the murine abdominal cavity (ACM), ESAT6 repressed autophagy flux by interfering with the autophagosome-lysosome fusion, which resulted in an increased load of BCG. Impaired degradation of LC3Ⅱ and SQSTM1 by ESAT6 was related to the upregulated activity of MTOR. Contrarily, inhibiting MTOR with Torin1 removed the ESAT6-induced autophagy block and lysosome dysfunction. Furthermore, in both Raw264.7 and ACM cells, MTOR inhibition significantly suppressed the survival of BCG. In conclusion, our study highlights how ESAT6 blocks autophagy and promotes BCG survival in a way that activates MTOR. - Highlights: • A mechanism for disruping autophagy flux induced by ESAT6. • ESAT6-inhibited autophagy is MTOR-dependent. • ESAT6-boosted BCG is MTOR-dependent.

  11. Salicylic acid metabolites and derivatives inhibit CDK activity: Novel insights into aspirin's chemopreventive effects against colorectal cancer

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    Dachineni, Rakesh; Kumar, D. Ramesh; Callegari, Eduardo; Kesharwani, Siddharth S.; Sankaranarayanan, Ranjini; Seefeldt, Teresa; Tummala, Hemachand; Bhat, G. Jayarama

    2017-01-01

    Aspirin's potential as a drug continues to be evaluated for the prevention of colorectal cancer (CRC). Although multiple targets for aspirin and its metabolite, salicylic acid, have been identified, no unifying mechanism has been proposed to clearly explain its chemopreventive effects. Our goal here was to investigate the ability of salicylic acid metabolites, known to be generated through cytochrome P450 (CYP450) enzymes, and its derivatives as cyclin dependent kinase (CDK) inhibitors to gain new insights into aspirin's chemopreventive actions. Using in vitro kinase assays, for the first time, we demonstrate that salicylic acid metabolites, 2,3-dihydroxy-benzoic acid (2,3-DHBA) and 2,5-dihydroxybenzoic acid (2,5-DHBA), as well as derivatives 2,4-dihydroxybenzoic acid (2,4-DHBA), 2,6-dihydroxybenzoic acid (2,6-DHBA), inhibited CDK1 enzyme activity. 2,3-DHBA and 2,6-DHBA did not inhibit CDK2 and 4; however, both inhibited CDK-6 activity. Interestingly, another derivative, 2,4,6-trihydroxybenzoic acid (2,4,6-THBA) was highly effective in inhibiting CDK1, 2, 4 and 6 activity. Molecular docking studies showed that these compounds potentially interact with CDK1. Immunoblotting experiments showed that aspirin acetylated CDK1, and pre-incubation with salicylic acid and its derivatives prevented aspirin-mediated CDK1 acetylation, which supported the data obtained from molecular docking studies. We suggest that intracellularly generated salicylic acid metabolites through CYP450 enzymes within the colonic epithelial cells, or the salicylic acid metabolites generated by gut microflora may significantly contribute to the preferential chemopreventive effect of aspirin against CRC through inhibition of CDKs. This novel hypothesis and mechanism of action in aspirin's chemopreventive effects opens a new area for future research. In addition, structural modification to salicylic acid derivatives may prove useful in the development of novel CDK inhibitors in cancer prevention and

  12. Inhibiting effect of bioactive metabolites produced by mushroom cultivation on bacterial quorum sensing-regulated behaviors.

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    Zhu, Hu; Wang, Shou-Xian; Zhang, Shuai-Shuai; Cao, Chun-Xu

    2011-01-01

    This study aimed to search for novel quorum sensing (QS) inhibitors from mushroom and to analyze their inhibitory activity, with a view to their possible use in controlling detrimental infections. The bioactive metabolites produced by mushroom cultivation were tested for their abilities to inhibit QS-regulated behavior. All mushroom strains were cultivated in potato-dextrose medium by large-scale submerged fermentation. The culture supernatant was condensed into 0.2 vol by freeze-drying. The condensed supernatant was sterilized by filtration through a 0.22-μm membrane filter and added to Chromobacterium violaceum CV026 cultures, which were used to monitor QS inhibition. Inhibitory activity was measured by quantifying violacein production using a microplate reader. The results have revealed that, of 102 mushroom strains, the bioactive metabolites produced by 14 basidiomycetes were found to inhibit violacein production, a QS-regulated behavior in C. violaceum. Higher fungi can produce QS-inhibitory compounds. Copyright © 2011 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  13. Inhibition of ATP synthesis by fenbufen and its conjugated metabolites in rat liver mitochondria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Syed, Muzeeb; Skonberg, Christian; Hansen, Steen Honoré

    2016-01-01

    in the drug induced liver injury (DILI) by fenbufen, the inhibitory effect of fenbufen and its conjugated metabolites on oxidative phosphorylation (ATP synthesis) in rat liver mitochondria was investigated. Fenbufen glucuronide (F-GlcA), fenbufen-N-acetyl cysteine-thioester (F-NAC) and fenbufen...... and fenbufen show any protective effect on fenbufen mediated inhibition of oxidative phosphorylation. Inclusion of NADPH in mitochondrial preparations with fenbufen did not modulate the inhibitory effects, suggesting no role of CYP mediated oxidative metabolites on the ATP synthesis in isolated mitochondria...

  14. Metabolites inhibiting germination of Orobanche ramosa seeds produced by Myrothecium verrucaria and Fusarium compactum.

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    Andolfi, Anna; Boari, Angela; Evidente, Antonio; Vurro, Maurizio

    2005-03-09

    Myrothecium verrucaria and Fusarium compactum were isolated from diseased Orobanche ramosa plants collected in southern Italy to find potential biocontrol agents of this parasitic weed. Both fungi grown in liquid culture produced metabolites that inhibited the germination of O. ramosa seeds at 1-10 muM. Eight metabolites were isolated from M. verrucaria culture extracts. The main metabolite was identified as verrucarin E, a disubstituted pyrrole not belonging to the trichothecene group. Seven compounds were identified by spectroscopic methods as macrocyclic trichothecenes, namely, verrucarins A, B, M, and L acetate, roridin A, isotrichoverrin B, and trichoverrol B. The main metabolite produced by F. compactum was neosoloaniol monoacetate, a trichothecene. All the trichothecenes proved to be potent inhibitors of O. ramosa seed germination and possess strong zootoxic activity when assayed on Artemia salina brine shrimps. Verrucarin E is inactive on both seed germination and zootoxic assay.

  15. Puerariae radix isoflavones and their metabolites inhibit growth and induce apoptosis in breast cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, Y.-J.; Hou, Y.C.; Lin, C.-H.; Hsu, Y.-A.; Sheu, Jim J.C.; Lai, C.-H.; Chen, B.-H.; Lee Chao, Pei-Dawn; Wan Lei; Tsai, F.-J.

    2009-01-01

    Puerariae radix (PR) is a popular natural herb and a traditional food in Asia, which has antithrombotic and anti-allergic properties and stimulates estrogenic activity. In the present study, we investigated the effects of the PR isoflavones puerarin, daidzein, and genistein on the growth of breast cancer cells. Our data revealed that after treatment with PR isoflavones, a dose-dependent inhibition of cell growth occurred in HS578T, MDA-MB-231, and MCF-7 cell lines. Results from cell cycle distribution and apoptosis assays revealed that PR isoflavones induced cell apoptosis through a caspase-3-dependent pathway and mediated cell cycle arrest in the G2/M phase. Furthermore, we observed that the serum metabolites of PR (daidzein sulfates/glucuronides) inhibited proliferation of the breast cancer cells at a 50% cell growth inhibition (GI 50 ) concentration of 2.35 μM. These results indicate that the daidzein constituent of PR can be metabolized to daidzein sulfates or daidzein glucuronides that exhibit anticancer activities. The protein expression levels of the active forms of caspase-9 and Bax in breast cancer cells were significantly increased by treatment with PR metabolites. These metabolites also increased the protein expression levels of p53 and p21. We therefore suggest that PR may act as a chemopreventive and/or chemotherapeutic agent against breast cancer by reducing cell viability and inducing apoptosis.

  16. Correlations between calcineurin phosphatase inhibition and cyclosporine metabolites concentrations in kidney transplant recipients: Implications for immunoassays

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Kaj Anker; Karamperis, Nikolaos; Koefoed-Nielsen, Pernille Bundgaard

    2006-01-01

    by inhibiting the enzyme calcineurin phosphatase. Determination of the enzyme's activity is one of the most promising pharmacodynamic markers. It is unknown how calcineurin phosphatase inhibition correlates with various cyclosporine monitoring assays and what is the potential impact of metabolites...... by the enzyme multiplied immunoassay technique (EMIT) and by the polyclonal fluorescence polarization immunoassay (pFPIA). Calcineurin phosphatase activity was measured by its ability to dephosphorylate a previously phosphorylated 19-amino acid peptide. We found that calcineurin phosphatase inhibition...

  17. Correlations between calcineurin phosphatase inhibition and cyclosporine metabolites concentrations in kidney transplant recipients: implications for immunoassays

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karamperis, N; Koefoed-Nielsen, PB; Brahe, P

    2006-01-01

    by inhibiting the enzyme calcineurin phosphatase. Determination of the enzyme's activity is one of the most promising pharmacodynamic markers. It is unknown how calcineurin phosphatase inhibition correlates with various cyclosporine monitoring assays and what is the potential impact of metabolites...... by the enzyme multiplied immunoassay technique (EMIT) and by the polyclonal fluorescence polarization immunoassay (pFPIA). Calcineurin phosphatase activity was measured by its ability to dephosphorylate a previously phosphorylated 19-amino acid peptide. We found that calcineurin phosphatase inhibition...

  18. Flux networks in metabolic graphs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Warren, P B; Queiros, S M Duarte; Jones, J L

    2009-01-01

    A metabolic model can be represented as a bipartite graph comprising linked reaction and metabolite nodes. Here it is shown how a network of conserved fluxes can be assigned to the edges of such a graph by combining the reaction fluxes with a conserved metabolite property such as molecular weight. A similar flux network can be constructed by combining the primal and dual solutions to the linear programming problem that typically arises in constraint-based modelling. Such constructions may help with the visualization of flux distributions in complex metabolic networks. The analysis also explains the strong correlation observed between metabolite shadow prices (the dual linear programming variables) and conserved metabolite properties. The methods were applied to recent metabolic models for Escherichia coli, Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Methanosarcina barkeri. Detailed results are reported for E. coli; similar results were found for other organisms

  19. Inhibiting mitochondrial β-oxidation selectively reduces levels of nonenzymatic oxidative polyunsaturated fatty acid metabolites in the brain.

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    Chen, Chuck T; Trépanier, Marc-Olivier; Hopperton, Kathryn E; Domenichiello, Anthony F; Masoodi, Mojgan; Bazinet, Richard P

    2014-03-01

    Schönfeld and Reiser recently hypothesized that fatty acid β-oxidation is a source of oxidative stress in the brain. To test this hypothesis, we inhibited brain mitochondrial β-oxidation with methyl palmoxirate (MEP) and measured oxidative polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) metabolites in the rat brain. Upon MEP treatment, levels of several nonenzymatic auto-oxidative PUFA metabolites were reduced with few effects on enzymatically derived metabolites. Our finding confirms the hypothesis that reduced fatty acid β-oxidation decreases oxidative stress in the brain and β-oxidation inhibitors may be a novel therapeutic approach for brain disorders associated with oxidative stress.

  20. Metabolites from invasive pests inhibit mitochondrial complex II: A potential strategy for the treatment of human ovarian carcinoma?

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    Ferramosca, Alessandra, E-mail: alessandra.ferramosca@unisalento.it [Dipartimento di Scienze e Tecnologie Biologiche ed Ambientali, Università del Salento, Lecce (Italy); Conte, Annalea; Guerra, Flora; Felline, Serena [Dipartimento di Scienze e Tecnologie Biologiche ed Ambientali, Università del Salento, Lecce (Italy); Rimoli, Maria Grazia [Dipartimento di Farmacia, Università di Napoli Federico II, Napoli (Italy); Mollo, Ernesto [Istituto di Chimica Biomolecolare, Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, Pozzuoli (Italy); Zara, Vincenzo [Dipartimento di Scienze e Tecnologie Biologiche ed Ambientali, Università del Salento, Lecce (Italy); Terlizzi, Antonio [Dipartimento di Scienze e Tecnologie Biologiche ed Ambientali, Università del Salento, Lecce (Italy); Stazione Zoologica Anton Dohrn, Napoli (Italy)

    2016-05-13

    The red pigment caulerpin, a secondary metabolite from the marine invasive green algae Caulerpa cylindracea can be accumulated and transferred along the trophic chain, with detrimental consequences on biodiversity and ecosystem functioning. Despite increasing research efforts to understand how caulerpin modifies fish physiology, little is known on the effects of algal metabolites on mammalian cells. Here we report for the first time the mitochondrial targeting activity of both caulerpin, and its closely related derivative caulerpinic acid, by using as experimental model rat liver mitochondria, a system in which bioenergetics mechanisms are not altered. Mitochondrial function was tested by polarographic and spectrophotometric methods. Both compounds were found to selectively inhibit respiratory complex II activity, while complexes I, III, and IV remained functional. These results led us to hypothesize that both algal metabolites could be used as antitumor agents in cell lines with defects in mitochondrial complex I. Ovarian cancer cisplatin-resistant cells are a good example of cell lines with a defective complex I function on which these molecules seem to have a toxic effect on proliferation. This provided novel insight toward the potential use of metabolites from invasive Caulerpa species for the treatment of human ovarian carcinoma cisplatin-resistant cells. -- Highlights: •Novel insight toward the potential use of the algal metabolites for the treatment of human diseases. •Caulerpin and caulerpinic acid inhibit respiratory complex II activity. •Both algal metabolites could be used as antitumor agents in ovarian cancer cisplatin-resistant cells.

  1. Metabolites from invasive pests inhibit mitochondrial complex II: A potential strategy for the treatment of human ovarian carcinoma?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferramosca, Alessandra; Conte, Annalea; Guerra, Flora; Felline, Serena; Rimoli, Maria Grazia; Mollo, Ernesto; Zara, Vincenzo; Terlizzi, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    The red pigment caulerpin, a secondary metabolite from the marine invasive green algae Caulerpa cylindracea can be accumulated and transferred along the trophic chain, with detrimental consequences on biodiversity and ecosystem functioning. Despite increasing research efforts to understand how caulerpin modifies fish physiology, little is known on the effects of algal metabolites on mammalian cells. Here we report for the first time the mitochondrial targeting activity of both caulerpin, and its closely related derivative caulerpinic acid, by using as experimental model rat liver mitochondria, a system in which bioenergetics mechanisms are not altered. Mitochondrial function was tested by polarographic and spectrophotometric methods. Both compounds were found to selectively inhibit respiratory complex II activity, while complexes I, III, and IV remained functional. These results led us to hypothesize that both algal metabolites could be used as antitumor agents in cell lines with defects in mitochondrial complex I. Ovarian cancer cisplatin-resistant cells are a good example of cell lines with a defective complex I function on which these molecules seem to have a toxic effect on proliferation. This provided novel insight toward the potential use of metabolites from invasive Caulerpa species for the treatment of human ovarian carcinoma cisplatin-resistant cells. -- Highlights: •Novel insight toward the potential use of the algal metabolites for the treatment of human diseases. •Caulerpin and caulerpinic acid inhibit respiratory complex II activity. •Both algal metabolites could be used as antitumor agents in ovarian cancer cisplatin-resistant cells.

  2. Lichen Secondary Metabolite, Physciosporin, Inhibits Lung Cancer Cell Motility

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    Yang, Yi; Park, So-Yeon; Nguyen, Thanh Thi; Yu, Young Hyun; Nguyen, Tru Van; Sun, Eun Gene; Udeni, Jayalal; Jeong, Min-Hye; Pereira, Iris; Moon, Cheol; Ha, Hyung-Ho; Kim, Kyung Keun; Hur, Jae-Seoun; Kim, Hangun

    2015-01-01

    Lichens produce various unique chemicals that can be used for pharmaceutical purposes. To screen for novel lichen secondary metabolites showing inhibitory activity against lung cancer cell motility, we tested acetone extracts of 13 lichen samples collected in Chile. Physciosporin, isolated from Pseudocyphellaria coriacea (Hook f. & Taylor) D.J. Galloway & P. James, was identified as an effective compound and showed significant inhibitory activity in migration and invasion assays against human lung cancer cells. Physciosporin treatment reduced both protein and mRNA levels of N-cadherin with concomitant decreases in the levels of epithelial-mesenchymal transition markers such as snail and twist. Physciosporin also suppressed KITENIN (KAI1 C-terminal interacting tetraspanin)-mediated AP-1 activity in both the absence and presence of epidermal growth factor stimulation. Quantitative real-time PCR analysis showed that the expression of the metastasis suppressor gene, KAI1, was increased while that of the metastasis enhancer gene, KITENIN, was dramatically decreased by physciosporin. Particularly, the activity of 3’-untranslated region of KITENIN was decreased by physciosporin. Moreover, Cdc42 and Rac1 activities were decreased by physciosporin. These results demonstrated that the lichen secondary metabolite, physciosporin, inhibits lung cancer cell motility through novel mechanisms of action. PMID:26371759

  3. NMDAR inhibition-independent antidepressant actions of ketamine metabolites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanos, Panos; Moaddel, Ruin; Morris, Patrick J.; Georgiou, Polymnia; Fischell, Jonathan; Elmer, Greg I.; Alkondon, Manickavasagom; Yuan, Peixiong; Pribut, Heather J.; Singh, Nagendra S.; Dossou, Katina S.S.; Fang, Yuhong; Huang, Xi-Ping; Mayo, Cheryl L.; Wainer, Irving W.; Albuquerque, Edson X.; Thompson, Scott M.; Thomas, Craig J.; Zarate, Carlos A.; Gould, Todd D.

    2016-01-01

    Major depressive disorder afflicts ~16 percent of the world population at some point in their lives. Despite a number of available monoaminergic-based antidepressants, most patients require many weeks, if not months, to respond to these treatments, and many patients never attain sustained remission of their symptoms. The non-competitive glutamatergic N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) antagonist, (R,S)-ketamine (ketamine), exerts rapid and sustained antidepressant effects following a single dose in depressed patients. Here we show that the metabolism of ketamine to (2S,6S;2R,6R)-hydroxynorketamine (HNK) is essential for its antidepressant effects, and that the (2R,6R)-HNK enantiomer exerts behavioural, electroencephalographic, electrophysiological and cellular antidepressant actions in vivo. Notably, we demonstrate that these antidepressant actions are NMDAR inhibition-independent but they involve early and sustained α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazole propionic acid (AMPA) receptor activation. We also establish that (2R,6R)-HNK lacks ketamine-related side-effects. Our results indicate a novel mechanism underlying ketamine’s unique antidepressant properties, which involves the required activity of a distinct metabolite and is independent of NMDAR inhibition. These findings have relevance for the development of next generation, rapid-acting antidepressants. PMID:27144355

  4. Changing flux of xylose metabolites by altering expression of xylose reductase and xylitol dehydrogenase in recombinant Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yong-Su Jin; Thomas W. Jeffries

    2003-01-01

    We changed the fluxes of xylose metabolites in recombinant Saccharomyces cerevisiae by manipulating expression of Pichia stipitis genes(XYL1 and XYL2) coding for xylose reductase (XR) and xylitol dehydrogenase (XDH), respectively. XYL1 copy number was kept constant by integrating it into the chromosome. Copy numbers of XYL2 were varied either by integrating XYL2 into...

  5. Mitochondrial toxicity of diclofenac and its metabolites via inhibition of oxidative phosphorylation (ATP synthesis) in rat liver mitochondria: Possible role in drug induced liver injury (DILI).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syed, Muzeeb; Skonberg, Christian; Hansen, Steen Honoré

    2016-03-01

    Diclofenac is a widely prescribed NSAID, which by itself and its reactive metabolites (Phase-I and Phase-II) may be involved in serious idiosyncratic hepatotoxicity. Mitochondrial injury is one of the mechanisms of drug induced liver injury (DILI). In the present work, an investigation of the inhibitory effects of diclofenac (Dic) and its phase I [4-hydroxy diclofenac (4'-OH-Dic) and 5-hydroxy diclofenac (5-OH-dic)] and Phase-II [diclofenac acyl glucuronide (DicGluA) and diclofenac glutathione thioester (DicSG)] metabolites, on ATP synthesis in rat liver mitochondria was carried out. A mechanism based inhibition of ATP synthesis is exerted by diclofenac and its metabolites. Phase-I metabolite (4'-OH-Dic) and Phase-II metabolites (DicGluA and DicSG) showed potent inhibition (2-5 fold) of ATP synthesis, where as 5-OH-Dic, one of the Phase-I metabolite, was a less potent inhibitor as compared to Dic. The calculated kinetic constants of mechanism based inhibition of ATP synthesis by Dic showed maximal rate of inactivation (Kinact) of 2.64 ± 0.15 min(-1) and half maximal rate of inactivation (KI) of 7.69 ± 2.48 μM with Kinact/KI ratio of 0.343 min(-1) μM(-1). Co-incubation of mitochondria with Dic and reduced GSH exhibited a protective effect on Dic mediated inhibition of ATP synthesis. Our data from this study strongly indicate that Dic as well as its metabolites could be involved in the hepato-toxic action through inhibition of ATP synthesis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Selective inhibition of CYP2C8 by fisetin and its methylated metabolite, geraldol, in human liver microsomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrestha, Riya; Kim, Ju-Hyun; Nam, Wongshik; Lee, Hye Suk; Lee, Jae-Mok; Lee, Sangkyu

    2018-04-01

    Fisetin is a flavonol compound commonly found in edible vegetables and fruits. It has anti-tumor, antioxidant, and anti-inflammatory effects. Geraldol, the O-methyl metabolite of fisetin in mice, is reported to suppress endothelial cell migration and proliferation. Although the in vivo and in vitro effects of fisetin and its metabolites are frequently reported, studies on herb-drug interactions have not yet been performed. This study was designed to investigate the inhibitory effect of fisetin and geraldol on eight isoforms of human cytochrome P450 (CYP) by using cocktail assay and LC-MS/MS analysis. The selective inhibition of CYP2C8-catalyzed paclitaxel hydroxylation by fisetin and geraldol were confirmed in pooled human liver microsomes (HLMs). In addition, an IC 50 shift assay under different pre-incubation conditions confirmed that fisetin and geraldol shows a reversible concentration-dependent, but not mechanism-based, inhibition of CYP2C8. Moreover, Michaelis-Menten, Lineweaver-burk plots, Dixon and Eadie-Hofstee showed a non-competitive inhibition mode with an equilibrium dissociation constant of 4.1 μM for fisetin and 11.5 μM for geraldol, determined from secondary plot of the Lineweaver-Burk plot. In conclusion, our results indicate that fisetin showed selective reversible and non-competitive inhibition of CYP2C8 more than its main metabolite, geraldol, in HLMs. Copyright © 2018 The Japanese Society for the Study of Xenobiotics. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Effect of overall feedback inhibition in unbranched biosynthetic pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alves, R; Savageau, M A

    2000-11-01

    We have determined the effects of control by overall feedback inhibition on the systemic behavior of unbranched metabolic pathways with an arbitrary pattern of other feedback inhibitions by using a recently developed numerical generalization of Mathematically Controlled Comparisons, a method for comparing the function of alternative molecular designs. This method allows the rigorous determination of the changes in systemic properties that can be exclusively attributed to overall feedback inhibition. Analytical results show that the unbranched pathway can achieve the same steady-state flux, concentrations, and logarithmic gains with respect to changes in substrate, with or without overall feedback inhibition. The analytical approach also shows that control by overall feedback inhibition amplifies the regulation of flux by the demand for end product while attenuating the sensitivity of the concentrations to the same demand. This approach does not provide a clear answer regarding the effect of overall feedback inhibition on the robustness, stability, and transient time of the pathway. However, the generalized numerical method we have used does clarify the answers to these questions. On average, an unbranched pathway with control by overall feedback inhibition is less sensitive to perturbations in the values of the parameters that define the system. The difference in robustness can range from a few percent to fifty percent or more, depending on the length of the pathway and on the metabolite one considers. On average, overall feedback inhibition decreases the stability margins by a minimal amount (typically less than 5%). Finally, and again on average, stable systems with overall feedback inhibition respond faster to fluctuations in the metabolite concentrations. Taken together, these results show that control by overall feedback inhibition confers several functional advantages upon unbranched pathways. These advantages provide a rationale for the prevalence of this

  8. Drug-Drug Interactions Potential of Icariin and Its Intestinal Metabolites via Inhibition of Intestinal UDP-Glucuronosyltransferases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yun-Feng Cao

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Icariin is known as an indicative constituent of the Epimedium genus, which has been commonly used in Chinese herbal medicine to enhance treat impotence and improve sexual function, as well as for several other indications for over 2000 years. In this study, we aimed to investigate the effects of icariin and its intestinal metabolites on the activities of human UDP-glucuronosyltransferase (UGT activities. Using a panel of recombinant human UGT isoforms, we found that icariin exhibited potent inhibition against UGT1A3. It is interesting that the intestinal metabolites of icariin exhibited a different inhibition profile compared with icariin. Different from icariin, icariside II was a potent inhibitor of UGT1A4, UGT1A7, UGT1A9, and UGT2B7, and icaritin was a potent inhibitor of UGT1A7 and UGT1A9. The potential for drug interactions in vivo was also quantitatively predicted and compared. The quantitative prediction of risks indicated that in vivo inhibition against intestinal UGT1A3, UGT1A4, and UGT1A7 would likely occur after oral administration of icariin products.

  9. Steady-state metabolite concentrations reflect a balance between maximizing enzyme efficiency and minimizing total metabolite load.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naama Tepper

    Full Text Available Steady-state metabolite concentrations in a microorganism typically span several orders of magnitude. The underlying principles governing these concentrations remain poorly understood. Here, we hypothesize that observed variation can be explained in terms of a compromise between factors that favor minimizing metabolite pool sizes (e.g. limited solvent capacity and the need to effectively utilize existing enzymes. The latter requires adequate thermodynamic driving force in metabolic reactions so that forward flux substantially exceeds reverse flux. To test this hypothesis, we developed a method, metabolic tug-of-war (mTOW, which computes steady-state metabolite concentrations in microorganisms on a genome-scale. mTOW is shown to explain up to 55% of the observed variation in measured metabolite concentrations in E. coli and C. acetobutylicum across various growth media. Our approach, based strictly on first thermodynamic principles, is the first method that successfully predicts high-throughput metabolite concentration data in bacteria across conditions.

  10. The methoxychlor metabolite, HPTE, inhibits rat luteal cell progesterone production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akgul, Yucel; Derk, Raymond C; Meighan, Terence; Rao, K Murali Krishna; Murono, Eisuke P

    2011-07-01

    The methoxychlor metabolite, HPTE, was shown to inhibit P450-cholesterol side-chain cleavage (P450scc) activity resulting in decreased progesterone production by cultured ovarian follicular cells in previous studies. It is not known whether HPTE has any effect on progesterone formation by the corpus luteum. Exposure to 100 nM HPTE reduced progesterone production by luteal cells with progressive declines to progesterone formation and P450scc catalytic activity of hCG- or 8 Br-cAMP-stimulated luteal cells. However, HPTE did not alter mRNA and protein levels of P450scc. Compounds acting as estrogen (17 β-estradiol, bisphenol-A or octylphenol), antiestrogen (ICI) or antiandrogen (monobutyl phthalate, flutamide or M-2) added alone to luteal cells did not mimic the action of HPTE on progesterone and P450scc activity. These results suggest that HPTE directly inhibits P450scc catalytic activity resulting in reduced progesterone formation, and this action was not mediated through estrogen or androgen receptors. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  11. Benzene: a case study in parent chemical and metabolite interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medinsky, M A; Kenyon, E M; Schlosser, P M

    1995-12-28

    Benzene, an important industrial solvent, is also present in unleaded gasoline and cigarette smoke. The hematotoxic effects of benzene in humans are well documented and include aplastic anemia and pancytopenia, and acute myelogenous leukemia. A combination of metabolites (hydroquinone and phenol for example) is apparently necessary to duplicate the hematotoxic effect of benzene, perhaps due in part to the synergistic effect of phenol on myeloperoxidase-mediated oxidation of hydroquinone to the reactive metabolite benzoquinone. Since benzene and its hydroxylated metabolites (phenol, hydroquinone and catechol) are substrates for the same cytochrome P450 enzymes, competitive interactions among the metabolites are possible. In vivo data on metabolite formation by mice exposed to various benzene concentrations are consistent with competitive inhibition of phenol oxidation by benzene. In vitro studies of the metabolic oxidation of benzene, phenol and hydroquinone are consistent with the mechanism of competitive interaction among the metabolites. The dosimetry of benzene and its metabolites in the target tissue, bone marrow, depends on the balance of activation processes such as enzymatic oxidation and deactivation processes such as conjugation and excretion. Phenol, the primary benzene metabolite, can undergo both oxidation and conjugation. Thus, the potential exists for competition among various enzymes for phenol. However, zonal localization of Phase I and Phase II enzymes in various regions of the liver acinus regulates this competition. Biologically-based dosimetry models that incorporate the important determinants of benzene flux, including interactions with other chemicals, will enable prediction of target tissue doses of benzene and metabolites at low exposure concentrations relevant for humans.

  12. The ethanol metabolite acetaldehyde inhibits the induction of long-term potentiation in the rat dentate gyrus in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abe, Kazuho; Yamaguchi, Shinichi; Sugiura, Minoru; Saito, Hiroshi

    1999-01-01

    Ethanol has been reported to inhibit the induction of long-term potentiation (LTP) in the hippocampus. However, the correlation between the effects of ethanol in vivo and in vitro remained unclear. In addition, previous works have little considered the possibility that the effect of ethanol is mediated by its metabolites. To solve these problems, we investigated the effects of ethanol and acetaldehyde, the first metabolite in the metabolism of ethanol, on the induction of LTP at medial perforant path-granule cell synapses in the dentate gyrus of anaesthetized rats in vivo.Oral administration of 1 g kg−1 ethanol significantly inhibited the induction of LTP, confirming the effectiveness of ethanol in vivo.A lower dose of ethanol (0.5 g kg−1) failed to inhibit the induction of LTP in intact rats, but significantly inhibited LTP in rats treated with disulfiram, an inhibitor of aldehyde dehydrogenase, demonstrating that LTP is inhibited by acetaldehyde accumulation following ethanol administration.Intravenous injection of acetaldehyde (0.06 g kg−1) significantly inhibited the induction of LTP.The inhibitory effect of acetaldehyde on LTP induction was also observed when it was injected into the cerebroventricules, suggesting that acetaldehyde has a direct effect on the brain. The intracerebroventricular dose of acetaldehyde effective in inhibiting LTP induction (0.1–0.15 mg brain−1) was approximately 10 fold lower than that of ethanol (1.0–1.5 mg brain−1).It is possible that acetaldehyde is partly responsible for memory impairments induced by ethanol intoxication. PMID:10482910

  13. OpenFLUX: efficient modelling software for 13C-based metabolic flux analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nielsen Lars K

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The quantitative analysis of metabolic fluxes, i.e., in vivo activities of intracellular enzymes and pathways, provides key information on biological systems in systems biology and metabolic engineering. It is based on a comprehensive approach combining (i tracer cultivation on 13C substrates, (ii 13C labelling analysis by mass spectrometry and (iii mathematical modelling for experimental design, data processing, flux calculation and statistics. Whereas the cultivation and the analytical part is fairly advanced, a lack of appropriate modelling software solutions for all modelling aspects in flux studies is limiting the application of metabolic flux analysis. Results We have developed OpenFLUX as a user friendly, yet flexible software application for small and large scale 13C metabolic flux analysis. The application is based on the new Elementary Metabolite Unit (EMU framework, significantly enhancing computation speed for flux calculation. From simple notation of metabolic reaction networks defined in a spreadsheet, the OpenFLUX parser automatically generates MATLAB-readable metabolite and isotopomer balances, thus strongly facilitating model creation. The model can be used to perform experimental design, parameter estimation and sensitivity analysis either using the built-in gradient-based search or Monte Carlo algorithms or in user-defined algorithms. Exemplified for a microbial flux study with 71 reactions, 8 free flux parameters and mass isotopomer distribution of 10 metabolites, OpenFLUX allowed to automatically compile the EMU-based model from an Excel file containing metabolic reactions and carbon transfer mechanisms, showing it's user-friendliness. It reliably reproduced the published data and optimum flux distributions for the network under study were found quickly ( Conclusion We have developed a fast, accurate application to perform steady-state 13C metabolic flux analysis. OpenFLUX will strongly facilitate and

  14. Thermodynamics-based Metabolite Sensitivity Analysis in metabolic networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiparissides, A; Hatzimanikatis, V

    2017-01-01

    The increasing availability of large metabolomics datasets enhances the need for computational methodologies that can organize the data in a way that can lead to the inference of meaningful relationships. Knowledge of the metabolic state of a cell and how it responds to various stimuli and extracellular conditions can offer significant insight in the regulatory functions and how to manipulate them. Constraint based methods, such as Flux Balance Analysis (FBA) and Thermodynamics-based flux analysis (TFA), are commonly used to estimate the flow of metabolites through genome-wide metabolic networks, making it possible to identify the ranges of flux values that are consistent with the studied physiological and thermodynamic conditions. However, unless key intracellular fluxes and metabolite concentrations are known, constraint-based models lead to underdetermined problem formulations. This lack of information propagates as uncertainty in the estimation of fluxes and basic reaction properties such as the determination of reaction directionalities. Therefore, knowledge of which metabolites, if measured, would contribute the most to reducing this uncertainty can significantly improve our ability to define the internal state of the cell. In the present work we combine constraint based modeling, Design of Experiments (DoE) and Global Sensitivity Analysis (GSA) into the Thermodynamics-based Metabolite Sensitivity Analysis (TMSA) method. TMSA ranks metabolites comprising a metabolic network based on their ability to constrain the gamut of possible solutions to a limited, thermodynamically consistent set of internal states. TMSA is modular and can be applied to a single reaction, a metabolic pathway or an entire metabolic network. This is, to our knowledge, the first attempt to use metabolic modeling in order to provide a significance ranking of metabolites to guide experimental measurements. Copyright © 2016 International Metabolic Engineering Society. Published by Elsevier

  15. Metabolite damage and repair in metabolic engineering design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, Jiayi; Jeffryes, James G.; Henry, Christopher S.; Bruner, Steven D.; Hanson, Andrew D.

    2017-11-01

    The necessarily sharp focus of metabolic engineering and metabolic synthetic biology on pathways and their fluxes has tended to divert attention from the damaging enzymatic and chemical side-reactions that pathway metabolites can undergo. Although historically overlooked and underappreciated, such metabolite damage reactions are now known to occur throughout metabolism and to generate (formerly enigmatic) peaks detected in metabolomics datasets. It is also now known that metabolite damage is often countered by dedicated repair enzymes that undo or prevent it. Metabolite damage and repair are highly relevant to engineered pathway design: metabolite damage reactions can reduce flux rates and product yields, and repair enzymes can provide robust, host-independent solutions. Herein, after introducing the core principles of metabolite damage and repair, we use case histories to document how damage and repair processes affect efficient operation of engineered pathways - particularly those that are heterologous, non-natural, or cell-free. We then review how metabolite damage reactions can be predicted, how repair reactions can be prospected, and how metabolite damage and repair can be built into genome-scale metabolic models. Lastly, we propose a versatile 'plug and play' set of well-characterized metabolite repair enzymes to solve metabolite damage problems known or likely to occur in metabolic engineering and synthetic biology projects.

  16. Metabolite damage and repair in metabolic engineering design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Jiayi; Jeffryes, James G; Henry, Christopher S; Bruner, Steven D; Hanson, Andrew D

    2017-11-01

    The necessarily sharp focus of metabolic engineering and metabolic synthetic biology on pathways and their fluxes has tended to divert attention from the damaging enzymatic and chemical side-reactions that pathway metabolites can undergo. Although historically overlooked and underappreciated, such metabolite damage reactions are now known to occur throughout metabolism and to generate (formerly enigmatic) peaks detected in metabolomics datasets. It is also now known that metabolite damage is often countered by dedicated repair enzymes that undo or prevent it. Metabolite damage and repair are highly relevant to engineered pathway design: metabolite damage reactions can reduce flux rates and product yields, and repair enzymes can provide robust, host-independent solutions. Herein, after introducing the core principles of metabolite damage and repair, we use case histories to document how damage and repair processes affect efficient operation of engineered pathways - particularly those that are heterologous, non-natural, or cell-free. We then review how metabolite damage reactions can be predicted, how repair reactions can be prospected, and how metabolite damage and repair can be built into genome-scale metabolic models. Lastly, we propose a versatile 'plug and play' set of well-characterized metabolite repair enzymes to solve metabolite damage problems known or likely to occur in metabolic engineering and synthetic biology projects. Copyright © 2017 International Metabolic Engineering Society. All rights reserved.

  17. k-OptForce: integrating kinetics with flux balance analysis for strain design.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anupam Chowdhury

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Computational strain design protocols aim at the system-wide identification of intervention strategies for the enhanced production of biochemicals in microorganisms. Existing approaches relying solely on stoichiometry and rudimentary constraint-based regulation overlook the effects of metabolite concentrations and substrate-level enzyme regulation while identifying metabolic interventions. In this paper, we introduce k-OptForce, which integrates the available kinetic descriptions of metabolic steps with stoichiometric models to sharpen the prediction of intervention strategies for improving the bio-production of a chemical of interest. It enables identification of a minimal set of interventions comprised of both enzymatic parameter changes (for reactions with available kinetics and reaction flux changes (for reactions with only stoichiometric information. Application of k-OptForce to the overproduction of L-serine in E. coli and triacetic acid lactone (TAL in S. cerevisiae revealed that the identified interventions tend to cause less dramatic rearrangements of the flux distribution so as not to violate concentration bounds. In some cases the incorporation of kinetic information leads to the need for additional interventions as kinetic expressions render stoichiometry-only derived interventions infeasible by violating concentration bounds, whereas in other cases the kinetic expressions impart flux changes that favor the overproduction of the target product thereby requiring fewer direct interventions. A sensitivity analysis on metabolite concentrations shows that the required number of interventions can be significantly affected by changing the imposed bounds on metabolite concentrations. Furthermore, k-OptForce was capable of finding non-intuitive interventions aiming at alleviating the substrate-level inhibition of key enzymes in order to enhance the flux towards the product of interest, which cannot be captured by stoichiometry-alone analysis

  18. 12(R)-hydroxyicosatetraenoic acid: a cytochrome P450-dependent arachidonate metabolite that inhibits Na+, K+-ATPase in the cornea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwartzman, M.L.; Balazy, M.; Masferrer, J.; Abraham, N.G.; McGiff, J.C.; Murphy, R.C.

    1987-01-01

    When corneal microsomes were incubated with arachidonic acid in the presence of an NADPH-generating system, four polar metabolites (compounds A-D) were formed. Synthesis of these metabolites could be inhibited by carbon monoxide, SKF 525A, and anti-cytochrome c reductase antibodies. One of the metabolites, compound C, was found to inhibit partially purified Na + , K + -ATPase from the corneal epithelium in a dose-dependent manner. After compound C was purified by TLC and HPLC, it was found to have a UV absorption spectrum with a maximum absorbance at 236 nm suggesting the presence of a conjugated diene. Mass spectrometric analysis using positive- and negative-ionization modes was carried out on derivatized compound C. Abundant fragment ions were consistent with compound C being a monooxygenated derivative of arachidonic acid with a hydroxyl substituent at carbon-12 of the icosanoid backbone; all deuterium atoms from [ 2 H 8 ]arachidonate were retained in the structure. Compound C was characterized as a 12-hydroxyicosatetraenoic acid. However, only 12(R) isomer was found to be an inhibitor of the Na + , K + -ATPase from the corneal epithelium, suggesting that the biologically active compound C was 12(R)-hydroxyy-5,8,10,14-icosatetraenoic acid. Such an inhibitor of Na + , K + -ATPase synthesized in the cornea may have an important role in regulating ocular transparency and aqueous human secretion

  19. Construction and completion of flux balance models from pathway databases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latendresse, Mario; Krummenacker, Markus; Trupp, Miles; Karp, Peter D

    2012-02-01

    Flux balance analysis (FBA) is a well-known technique for genome-scale modeling of metabolic flux. Typically, an FBA formulation requires the accurate specification of four sets: biochemical reactions, biomass metabolites, nutrients and secreted metabolites. The development of FBA models can be time consuming and tedious because of the difficulty in assembling completely accurate descriptions of these sets, and in identifying errors in the composition of these sets. For example, the presence of a single non-producible metabolite in the biomass will make the entire model infeasible. Other difficulties in FBA modeling are that model distributions, and predicted fluxes, can be cryptic and difficult to understand. We present a multiple gap-filling method to accelerate the development of FBA models using a new tool, called MetaFlux, based on mixed integer linear programming (MILP). The method suggests corrections to the sets of reactions, biomass metabolites, nutrients and secretions. The method generates FBA models directly from Pathway/Genome Databases. Thus, FBA models developed in this framework are easily queried and visualized using the Pathway Tools software. Predicted fluxes are more easily comprehended by visualizing them on diagrams of individual metabolic pathways or of metabolic maps. MetaFlux can also remove redundant high-flux loops, solve FBA models once they are generated and model the effects of gene knockouts. MetaFlux has been validated through construction of FBA models for Escherichia coli and Homo sapiens. Pathway Tools with MetaFlux is freely available to academic users, and for a fee to commercial users. Download from: biocyc.org/download.shtml. mario.latendresse@sri.com Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online.

  20. Impact of CHO Metabolism on Cell Growth and Protein Production: An Overview of Toxic and Inhibiting Metabolites and Nutrients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pereira, Sara; Kildegaard, Helene F.; Andersen, Mikael R.

    2018-01-01

    and process optimization and monitoring to perform efficiently. One of the main reasons for this is the production and accumulation of toxic and growth-inhibiting metabolites during culture. Lactate and ammonium are the most known, but many more have been identified. In this review, we present an overview...... of metabolites that deplete and accumulate throughout the course of cultivations with toxic and growth inhibitory effects to the cells. We further provide an overview of the CHO metabolism with emphasis to metabolic pathways of amino acids, glutathione (GSH), and related compounds which have growth...... of resources that describe the cellular mechanisms of CHO and are available on-line. Finally, we discuss the application of this knowledge for bioprocess and medium development and cell line engineering....

  1. Inhibition of aromatase activity by methyl sulfonyl PCB metabolites in primary culture of human mammary fibroblasts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berg, M. van den; Heneweer, M.; Geest, M. de; Sanderson, T. [Inst. for Risk Assessment Sciences and Utrecht Univ. (Netherlands); Jong, P. de [St. Antonius Hospital, Nieuwegein (Netherlands); Bergman, A. [Stockholm Univ., Stockholm (Sweden)

    2004-09-15

    Methyl sulfonyl PCB metabolites (MeSO2-PCBs) are persistent contaminants and are ubiquitously present in humans and the environment. Lipophilicity of MeSO2- PCB metabolites is similar to the parent compounds and they have been detected in human milk, adipose, liver and lung tissue. 4- MeSO2-PCB-149 is the most abundant PCB metabolite in human adipose tissue and milk at a level of 1.5 ng/g lipids. Human blood concentration of 4-MeSO2-PCB-149 is approximately 0.03 nM. 3- MeSO2-PCB-101 is the predominant PCB metabolite in muscle and blubber in wildlife, such as otter, mink and grey seal. In the environment, they have been linked to chronic and reproductive toxicity in exposed mink. Additionaly, some MeSO{sub 2}-PCBs have been shown to be glucocorticoid receptor (GR) antagonists. Since approximately 60% of all breast tumors are estrogen responsive, exposure to compounds that are able to alter estrogen synthesis through interference with the aromatase enzyme, can lead to changes in estrogen levels and possibly to accelerated or inhibit breast tumor growth. Therefore, it is important to identify exogenous compounds that can alter aromatase activity in addition to those compounds which have direct interaction with the estrogen receptor (ER). Aromatase (CYP19) comprises the ubiquitous flavoprotein, NADPH-cytochrome P450 reductase, and a unique cytochrome P450 that is exclusively expressed in estrogen producing cells. Previous studies have revealed that expression of the aromatase gene is regulated in a species- and tissue specific manner. In healthy breast tissue, the predominantly active aromatase promoter region I.4 is regulated by glucocorticoids and class I cytokines. Therefore, it is important to investigate possible aromatase inhibiting properties of MeSO{sub 2}-PCBs (as anti glucocorticoids?) in relevant human tissues. We used primary human mammary fibroblasts because of their role in breast cancer development. We compared the results in primary fibroblasts with

  2. SECONDARY METABOLITES FROM MARINE PENICILLIUM BREVICOMPACTUM

    OpenAIRE

    ROVIROSA, JUANA; DIAZ-MARRERO, ANA; DARIAS, JOSE; PAINEMAL, KARIN; SAN MARTIN, AURELIO

    2006-01-01

    In a screening of Basidiomycete cultures isolated from marine invertebrates collected along the Chilean coastline for the production of antibiotics we identified a Penicillium brevicompactum strain as a producer of metabolites inhibiting the growth of bacteria and fungi. Bioactivity guided purification resulted in the isolation of four known metabolites. Their structures were elucidated by spectroscopic methods.

  3. Deciphering flux adjustments of engineered E. coli cells during fermentation with changing growth conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    He, Lian [Washington Univ., St. Louis, MO (United States); Xiu, Yu [Rensselaer Polytechnic Inst., Troy, NY (United States); Beijing Univ. of Chemical Technology (China); Jones, J. Andrew [Rensselaer Polytechnic Inst., Troy, NY (United States); Hamilton College, Clinton, NY (United States); Baidoo, Edward E. K. [Joint BioEnergy Inst. (JBEI), Emeryville, CA (United States); Keasling, Jay D. [Joint BioEnergy Inst. (JBEI), Emeryville, CA (United States); Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States); Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Technical Univ. of Denmark, Lyngby (Denmark); Tang, Yinjie J. [Washington Univ., St. Louis, MO (United States); Koffas, Mattheos A. G. [Rensselaer Polytechnic Inst., Troy, NY (United States)

    2016-12-23

    Microbial fermentation conditions are dynamic, due to transcriptional induction, nutrient consumption, or changes to incubation conditions. In this paper, 13C-metabolic flux analysis was used to characterize two violacein-producing E. coli strains with vastly different productivities, and to profile their metabolic adjustments resulting from external perturbations during fermentation. The two strains were first grown at 37 °C in stage 1, and then the temperature was transitioned to 20 °C in stage 2 for the optimal expression of the violacein synthesis pathway. After induction, violacein production was minimal in stage 3, but accelerated in stage 4 (early production phase) and 5 (late production phase) in the high producing strain, reaching a final concentration of 1.5 mmol/L. On the contrary, ~0.02 mmol/L of violacein was obtained from the low producing strain. To have a snapshot of the temporal metabolic changes in each stage, we performed 13C-MFA via isotopomer analysis of fast-turnover free metabolites. The results indicate strikingly stable flux ratios in the central metabolism throughout the early growth stages. In the late stages, however, the high producer rewired its flux distribution significantly, which featured an upregulated pentose phosphate pathway and TCA cycle, reflux from acetate utilization, negligible anabolic fluxes, and elevated maintenance loss, to compensate for nutrient depletion and drainage of some building blocks due to violacein overproduction. The low producer with stronger promoters shifted its relative fluxes in stage 5 by enhancing the flux through the TCA cycle and acetate overflow, while exhibiting a reduced biomass growth and a minimal flux towards violacein synthesis. Finally, interestingly, the addition of the violacein precursor (tryptophan) in the medium inhibited high producer but enhanced low producer's productivity, leading to hypotheses of unknown pathway regulations (such as metabolite

  4. Stereoselective Inhibition of CYP2C19 and CYP3A4 by Fluoxetine and Its Metabolite: Implications for Risk Assessment of Multiple Time-Dependent Inhibitor Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lutz, Justin D.; VandenBrink, Brooke M.; Babu, Katipudi N.; Nelson, Wendel L.; Kunze, Kent L.

    2013-01-01

    Recent guidance on drug-drug interaction (DDI) testing recommends evaluation of circulating metabolites. However, there is little consensus on how to quantitatively predict and/or assess the risk of in vivo DDIs by multiple time-dependent inhibitors (TDIs) including metabolites from in vitro data. Fluoxetine was chosen as the model drug to evaluate the role of TDI metabolites in DDI prediction because it is a TDI of both CYP3A4 and CYP2C19 with a circulating N-dealkylated inhibitory metabolite, norfluoxetine. In pooled human liver microsomes, both enantiomers of fluoxetine and norfluoxetine were TDIs of CYP2C19, (S)-norfluoxetine was the most potent inhibitor with time-dependent inhibition affinity constant (KI) of 7 μM, and apparent maximum time-dependent inhibition rate (kinact,app) of 0.059 min−1. Only (S)-fluoxetine and (R)-norfluoxetine were TDIs of CYP3A4, with (R)-norfluoxetine being the most potent (KI = 8 μM, and kinact,app = 0.011 min−1). Based on in-vitro-to-in-vivo predictions, (S)-norfluoxetine plays the most important role in in vivo CYP2C19 DDIs, whereas (R)-norfluoxetine is most important in CYP3A4 DDIs. Comparison of two multiple TDI prediction models demonstrated significant differences between them in in-vitro-to-in-vitro predictions but not in in-vitro-to-in-vivo predictions. Inclusion of all four inhibitors predicted an in vivo decrease in CYP2C19 (95%) and CYP3A4 (60–62%) activity. The results of this study suggest that adequate worst-case risk assessment for in vivo DDIs by multiple TDI systems can be achieved by incorporating time-dependent inhibition by both parent and metabolite via simple addition of the in vivo time-dependent inhibition rate/cytochrome P450 degradation rate constant (λ/kdeg) values, but quantitative DDI predictions will require a more thorough understanding of TDI mechanisms. PMID:23785064

  5. Flagella-Driven Flows Circumvent Diffusive Bottlenecks that Inhibit Metabolite Exchange

    Science.gov (United States)

    Short, Martin; Solari, Cristian; Ganguly, Sujoy; Kessler, John; Goldstein, Raymond; Powers, Thomas

    2006-03-01

    The evolution of single cells to large and multicellular organisms requires matching the organisms' needs to the rate of exchange of metabolites with the environment. This logistic problem can be a severe constraint on development. For organisms with a body plan that approximates a spherical shell, such as colonies of the volvocine green algae, the required current of metabolites grows quadratically with colony radius whereas the rate at which diffusion can exchange metabolites grows only linearly with radius. Hence, there is a bottleneck radius beyond which the diffusive current cannot keep up with metabolic demands. Using Volvox carteri as a model organism, we examine experimentally and theoretically the role that advection of fluid by surface-mounted flagella plays in enhancing nutrient uptake. We show that fluid flow driven by the coordinated beating of flagella produces a convective boundary layer in the concentration of a diffusing solute which in turn renders the metabolite exchange rate quadratic in the colony radius. This enhanced transport circumvents the diffusive bottleneck, allowing increase in size and thus evolutionary transitions to multicellularity in the Volvocales.

  6. The role of metabolic engineering in the production of secondary metabolites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jens Bredal

    1998-01-01

    In the production of secondary metabolites yield and productivity are the most important design parameters. The focus is therefore to direct the carbon fluxes towards the product of interest, and this can be obtained through metabolic engineering whereby directed genetic changes are introduced...... into the production strain. In this process it is, however, important to analyze the metabolic network through measurement of the intracellular metabolites and the flux distributions. Besides playing an important role in the optimization of existing processes, metabolic engineering also offers the possibility...

  7. Dipyrone metabolite 4-MAA induces hypothermia and inhibits PGE2 -dependent and -independent fever while 4-AA only blocks PGE2 -dependent fever.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malvar, David do C; Aguiar, Fernando A; Vaz, Artur de L L; Assis, Débora C R; de Melo, Miriam C C; Jabor, Valquíria A P; Kalapothakis, Evanguedes; Ferreira, Sérgio H; Clososki, Giuliano C; de Souza, Glória E P

    2014-08-01

    The antipyretic and hypothermic prodrug dipyrone prevents PGE2 -dependent and -independent fever induced by LPS from Escherichia coli and Tityus serrulatus venom (Tsv) respectively. We aimed to identify the dipyrone metabolites responsible for the antipyretic and hypothermic effects. Male Wistar rats were treated i.p. with indomethacin (2 mg·kg(-1) ), dipyrone, 4-methylaminoantipyrine (4-MAA), 4-aminoantipyrine (4-AA) (60-360 mg·kg(-1) ), 4-formylaminoantipyrine, 4-acethylaminoantipyrine (120-360 mg·kg(-1) ) or vehicle 30 min before i.p. injection of LPS (50 μg·kg(-1) ), Tsv (150 μg·kg(-1) ) or saline. Rectal temperatures were measured by tele-thermometry and dipyrone metabolite concentrations determined in the plasma, CSF and hypothalamus by LC-MS/MS. PGE2 concentrations were determined in the CSF and hypothalamus by elisa. In contrast to LPS, Tsv-induced fever was not followed by increased PGE2 in the CSF or hypothalamus. The antipyretic time-course of 4-MAA and 4-AA on LPS-induced fever overlapped with the period of the highest concentrations of 4-MAA and 4-AA in the hypothalamus, CSF and plasma. These metabolites reduced LPS-induced fever and the PGE2 increase in the plasma, CSF and hypothalamus. Only 4-MAA inhibited Tsv-induced fever. The higher doses of dipyrone and 4-MAA also induced hypothermia. The presence of 4-MAA and 4-AA in the CSF and hypothalamus was associated with PGE2 synthesis inhibition and a decrease in LPS-induced fever. 4-MAA was also shown to be an antipyretic metabolite for PGE2 -independent fever induced by Tsv suggesting that it is responsible for the additional antipyretic mechanism of dipyrone. Moreover, 4-MAA is the hypothermic metabolite of dipyrone. © 2014 The British Pharmacological Society.

  8. Tangeretin and its metabolite 4'-hydroxytetramethoxyflavone attenuate EGF-stimulated cell cycle progression in hepatocytes; role of inhibition at the level of mTOR/p70S6K.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Z; Surichan, S; Ruparelia, K; Arroo, R; Boarder, M R

    2011-04-01

    The mechanisms by which the dietary compound tangeretin has anticancer effects may include acting as a prodrug, forming an antiproliferative product in cancer cells. Here we show that tangeretin also inhibits cell cycle progression in hepatocytes and investigate the role of its primary metabolite 4'-hydroxy-5,6,7,8-tetramethoxyflavone (4'-OH-TMF) in this effect. We used epidermal growth factor (EGF)-stimulated rat hepatocytes, with [(3)H]-thymidine incorporation into DNA as an index of progression to S-phase of the cell cycle, and Western blots for phospho-proteins involved in the cell signalling cascade. Incubation of tangeretin with microsomes expressing CYP1A, or with hepatocytes, generated a primary product we identified as 4'-OH-TMF. Low micromolar concentrations of tangeretin or 4'-OH-TMF gave a concentration-dependent inhibition of EGF-stimulated progression to S-phase while having little effect on cell viability. To determine whether time for conversion of tangeretin to an active metabolite would enhance the inhibitory effect we used long pre-incubations; this reduced the inhibitory effect, in parallel with a reduction in the concentration of tangeretin. The EGF-stimulation of hepatocyte cell cycle progression requires signalling through Akt/mTOR/p70S6K kinase cascades. The tangeretin metabolite 4'-OH-TMF selectively inhibited S6K phosphorylation in the absence of significant inhibition of upstream Akt activity, suggesting an effect at the level of mTOR. Tangeretin and 4'-OH-TMF both inhibit cell cycle progression in primary hepatocytes. The inhibition of p70S6K phosphorylation by 4'-OH-TMF raises the possibility that inhibition of the mTOR pathway may contribute to the anticancer influence of a flavonoid-rich diet. © 2011 The Authors. British Journal of Pharmacology © 2011 The British Pharmacological Society.

  9. 12(R)-hydroxyicosatetraenoic acid: a cytochrome P450-dependent arachidonate metabolite that inhibits Na/sup +/, K/sup +/-ATPase in the cornea

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schwartzman, M.L.; Balazy, M.; Masferrer, J.; Abraham, N.G.; McGiff, J.C.; Murphy, R.C.

    1987-11-01

    When corneal microsomes were incubated with arachidonic acid in the presence of an NADPH-generating system, four polar metabolites (compounds A-D) were formed. Synthesis of these metabolites could be inhibited by carbon monoxide, SKF 525A, and anti-cytochrome c reductase antibodies. One of the metabolites, compound C, was found to inhibit partially purified Na/sup +/, K/sup +/-ATPase from the corneal epithelium in a dose-dependent manner. After compound C was purified by TLC and HPLC, it was found to have a UV absorption spectrum with a maximum absorbance at 236 nm suggesting the presence of a conjugated diene. Mass spectrometric analysis using positive- and negative-ionization modes was carried out on derivatized compound C. Abundant fragment ions were consistent with compound C being a monooxygenated derivative of arachidonic acid with a hydroxyl substituent at carbon-12 of the icosanoid backbone; all deuterium atoms from (/sup 2/H/sub 8/)arachidonate were retained in the structure. Compound C was characterized as a 12-hydroxyicosatetraenoic acid. However, only 12(R) isomer was found to be an inhibitor of the Na/sup +/, K/sup +/-ATPase from the corneal epithelium, suggesting that the biologically active compound C was 12(R)-hydroxyy-5,8,10,14-icosatetraenoic acid. Such an inhibitor of Na/sup +/, K/sup +/-ATPase synthesized in the cornea may have an important role in regulating ocular transparency and aqueous human secretion.

  10. Heat Flux Inhibition by Whistlers: Experimental Confirmation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eichler, D.

    2002-01-01

    Heat flux in weakly magnetized collisionless plasma is, according to theoretical predictions, limited by whistler turbulence that is generated by heat flux instabilities near threshold. Observations of solar wind electrons by Gary and coworkers appear to confirm the limit on heat flux as being roughly the product of the magnetic energy density and the electron thermal velocity, in agreement with prediction (Pistinner and Eichler 1998)

  11. Tangeretin and its metabolite 4′-hydroxytetramethoxyflavone attenuate EGF-stimulated cell cycle progression in hepatocytes; role of inhibition at the level of mTOR/p70S6K

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Z; Surichan, S; Ruparelia, K; Arroo, R; Boarder, MR

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE The mechanisms by which the dietary compound tangeretin has anticancer effects may include acting as a prodrug, forming an antiproliferative product in cancer cells. Here we show that tangeretin also inhibits cell cycle progression in hepatocytes and investigate the role of its primary metabolite 4′-hydroxy-5,6,7,8-tetramethoxyflavone (4′-OH-TMF) in this effect. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH We used epidermal growth factor (EGF)-stimulated rat hepatocytes, with [3H]-thymidine incorporation into DNA as an index of progression to S-phase of the cell cycle, and Western blots for phospho-proteins involved in the cell signalling cascade. KEY RESULTS Incubation of tangeretin with microsomes expressing CYP1A, or with hepatocytes, generated a primary product we identified as 4′-OH-TMF. Low micromolar concentrations of tangeretin or 4′-OH-TMF gave a concentration-dependent inhibition of EGF-stimulated progression to S-phase while having little effect on cell viability. To determine whether time for conversion of tangeretin to an active metabolite would enhance the inhibitory effect we used long pre-incubations; this reduced the inhibitory effect, in parallel with a reduction in the concentration of tangeretin. The EGF-stimulation of hepatocyte cell cycle progression requires signalling through Akt/mTOR/p70S6K kinase cascades. The tangeretin metabolite 4′-OH-TMF selectively inhibited S6K phosphorylation in the absence of significant inhibition of upstream Akt activity, suggesting an effect at the level of mTOR. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS Tangeretin and 4′-OH-TMF both inhibit cell cycle progression in primary hepatocytes. The inhibition of p70S6K phosphorylation by 4′-OH-TMF raises the possibility that inhibition of the mTOR pathway may contribute to the anticancer influence of a flavonoid-rich diet. PMID:21198542

  12. The nutritional status of Methanosarcina acetivorans regulates glycogen metabolism and gluconeogenesis and glycolysis fluxes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santiago-Martínez, Michel Geovanni; Encalada, Rusely; Lira-Silva, Elizabeth; Pineda, Erika; Gallardo-Pérez, Juan Carlos; Reyes-García, Marco Antonio; Saavedra, Emma; Moreno-Sánchez, Rafael; Marín-Hernández, Alvaro; Jasso-Chávez, Ricardo

    2016-05-01

    Gluconeogenesis is an essential pathway in methanogens because they are unable to use exogenous hexoses as carbon source for cell growth. With the aim of understanding the regulatory mechanisms of central carbon metabolism in Methanosarcina acetivorans, the present study investigated gene expression, the activities and metabolic regulation of key enzymes, metabolite contents and fluxes of gluconeogenesis, as well as glycolysis and glycogen synthesis/degradation pathways. Cells were grown with methanol as a carbon source. Key enzymes were kinetically characterized at physiological pH/temperature. Active consumption of methanol during exponential cell growth correlated with significant methanogenesis, gluconeogenic flux and steady glycogen synthesis. After methanol exhaustion, cells reached the stationary growth phase, which correlated with the rise in glycogen consumption and glycolytic flux, decreased methanogenesis, negligible acetate production and an absence of gluconeogenesis. Elevated activities of carbon monoxide dehydrogenase/acetyl-CoA synthetase complex and pyruvate: ferredoxin oxidoreductase suggested the generation of acetyl-CoA and pyruvate for glycogen synthesis. In the early stationary growth phase, the transcript contents and activities of pyruvate phosphate dikinase, fructose 1,6-bisphosphatase and glycogen synthase decreased, whereas those of glycogen phosphorylase, ADP-phosphofructokinase and pyruvate kinase increased. Therefore, glycogen and gluconeogenic metabolites were synthesized when an external carbon source was provided. Once such a carbon source became depleted, glycolysis and methanogenesis fed by glycogen degradation provided the ATP supply. Weak inhibition of key enzymes by metabolites suggested that the pathways evaluated were mainly transcriptionally regulated. Because glycogen metabolism and glycolysis/gluconeogenesis are not present in all methanogens, the overall data suggest that glycogen storage might represent an environmental

  13. Interactions between amphibians’ symbiotic bacteria cause the production of emergent anti-fungal metabolites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew Howard Loudon

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Amphibians possess beneficial skin bacteria that protect against the disease chytridiomycosis by producing secondary metabolites that inhibit the pathogen Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (Bd. Metabolite production may be a mechanism of competition between bacterial species that results in host protection as a by-product. We expect that some co-cultures of bacterial species or strains will result in greater Bd inhibition than mono-cultures. To test this, we cultured four bacterial isolates (Bacillus sp., Janthinobacterium sp., Pseudomonas sp. and Chitinophaga arvensicola from red-backed salamanders (Plethodon cinereus and cultured isolates both alone and together to collect their cell-free supernatants (CFS. We challenged Bd with CFSs from four bacterial species in varying combinations. This resulted in three experimental treatments: 1 CFSs of single isolates; 2 combined CFSs of two isolates; and 3 CFSs from co-cultures. Pair-wise combinations of four bacterial isolates CFSs were assayed against Bd and revealed additive Bd inhibition in 42.2% of trials, synergistic inhibition in 42.2% and no effect in 16.6% of trials. When bacteria isolates were grown in co-cultures, complete Bd inhibition was generally observed, and synergistic inhibition occurred in four out of six trials. A metabolite profile of the most potent co-culture, Bacillus sp. and Chitinophaga arvensicola, was determined with LC-MS and compared with the profiles of each isolate in mono-culture. Emergent metabolites appearing in the co-culture were inhibitory to Bd, and the most potent inhibitor was identified as tryptophol. Thus mono-cultures of bacteria cultured from red-backed salamanders interacted synergistically and additively to inhibit Bd, and such bacteria produced emergent metabolites when cultured together, with even greater pathogen inhibition. Knowledge of how bacterial species interact to inhibit Bd can be used to select probiotics to provide amphibians with protection

  14. Linking high-resolution metabolic flux phenotypes and transcriptional regulation in yeast modulated by the global regulator Gcn4p

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moxley, Joel F.; Jewett, Michael Christopher; Antoniewicz, Maciek R.

    2009-01-01

    . However, the potential of systems biology approaches is limited by difficulties in integrating metabolic measurements across the functional levels of the cell despite their being most closely linked to cellular phenotype. To address this limitation, we developed a model-based approach to correlate m......RNA and metabolic flux data that combines information from both interaction network models and flux determination models. We started by quantifying 5,764 mRNAs, 54 metabolites, and 83 experimental C-13-based reaction fluxes in continuous cultures of yeast under stress in the absence or presence of global regulator...... of metabolic flux (i.e., use of different reaction pathways) by transcriptional regulation and metabolite interaction density (i.e., level of pairwise metabolite-protein interactions) as a key biosynthetic control determinant. Furthermore, this model predicted flux rewiring in studies of follow...

  15. Selective and specific inhibition of the plasmodium falciparum lysyl-tRNA synthetase by the fungal secondary metabolite cladosporin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoepfner, Dominic; McNamara, Case W; Lim, Chek Shik; Studer, Christian; Riedl, Ralph; Aust, Thomas; McCormack, Susan L; Plouffe, David M; Meister, Stephan; Schuierer, Sven; Plikat, Uwe; Hartmann, Nicole; Staedtler, Frank; Cotesta, Simona; Schmitt, Esther K; Petersen, Frank; Supek, Frantisek; Glynne, Richard J; Tallarico, John A; Porter, Jeffrey A; Fishman, Mark C; Bodenreider, Christophe; Diagana, Thierry T; Movva, N Rao; Winzeler, Elizabeth A

    2012-06-14

    With renewed calls for malaria eradication, next-generation antimalarials need be active against drug-resistant parasites and efficacious against both liver- and blood-stage infections. We screened a natural product library to identify inhibitors of Plasmodium falciparum blood- and liver-stage proliferation. Cladosporin, a fungal secondary metabolite whose target and mechanism of action are not known for any species, was identified as having potent, nanomolar, antiparasitic activity against both blood and liver stages. Using postgenomic methods, including a yeast deletion strains collection, we show that cladosporin specifically inhibits protein synthesis by directly targeting P. falciparum cytosolic lysyl-tRNA synthetase. Further, cladosporin is >100-fold more potent against parasite lysyl-tRNA synthetase relative to the human enzyme, which is conferred by the identity of two amino acids within the enzyme active site. Our data indicate that lysyl-tRNA synthetase is an attractive, druggable, antimalarial target that can be selectively inhibited. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. The insecticide fipronil and its metabolite fipronil sulphone inhibit the rat α1β2γ2L GABAA receptor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, P; Akk, G

    2008-01-01

    Background and purpose: Fipronil is the active ingredient in a number of widely used insecticides. Human exposure to fipronil leads to symptoms (headache, nausea and seizures) typically associated with the antagonism of GABAA receptors in the brain. In this study, we have examined the modulation of the common brain GABAA receptor subtype by fipronil and its major metabolite, fipronil sulphone. Experimental approach: Whole-cell and single-channel recordings were made from HEK 293 cells transiently expressing rat α1β2γ2L GABAA receptors. Key results: The major effect of fipronil was to increase the rate of current decay in macroscopic recordings. In single-channel recordings, the presence of fipronil resulted in shorter cluster durations without affecting the intracluster open and closed time distributions or the single-channel conductance. The α1V256S mutation, previously shown alleviate channel inhibition by inhibitory steroids and several insecticides, had a relatively small effect on channel block by fipronil. The mode of action of fipronil sulphone was similar to that of its parent compound but the metabolite was less potent at inhibiting the α1β2γ2L receptor. Conclusions and implications: We conclude that exposure to fipronil induces accumulation of receptors in a novel, long-lived blocked state. This process proceeds in parallel with and independently of, channel desensitization. The lower potency of fipronil sulphone indicates that the conversion serves as a detoxifying process in mammalian brain. PMID:18660823

  17. Examining Escherichia coli glycolytic pathways, catabolite repression, and metabolite channeling using Δpfk mutants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hollinshead, Whitney D.; Rodriguez, Sarah; Martin, Hector Garcia

    2016-01-01

    Background: Glycolysis breakdowns glucose into essential building blocks and ATP/NAD(P)H for the cell, occupying a central role in its growth and bio-production. Among glycolytic pathways, the Entner Doudoroff pathway (EDP) is a more thermodynamically favorable pathway with fewer enzymatic steps...... directed through the EDP (~20 % of glycolysis flux). Disrupting the EMPP by phosphofructokinase I (pfkA) knockout increased flux through OPPP (~60 % of glycolysis flux) and the native EDP (~14 % of glycolysis flux), while overexpressing edd and eda in this ΔpfkA mutant directed ~70 % of glycolytic flux...... in glycolysis intermediates, possibly suggesting metabolite channeling (metabolites in glycolysis are pass from enzyme to enzyme without fully equilibrating within the cytosol medium). Conclusions: We engineered E. coli to redistribute its native glycolytic flux. The replacement of EMPP by EDP did not improve E...

  18. Tibolone and its metabolites acutely relax rabbit coronary arteries in vitro

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Claus Otto; Nilas, Lisbeth; Pedersen, Susan Helene

    2004-01-01

    under curve (AUC). RESULTS: Tibolone and its metabolites induced a concentration-dependent vasodilatation comparable to that of 17 beta-estradiol with the rank of potency: 3 beta-OH-tibolone approximately = to tibolone>3 alpha-OH-tibolone>Delta 4-isomer (ANOVA). l-NAME partly inhibited the relaxation.......05, ANOVA). CONCLUSIONS: Our data indicate that the acute relaxation induced by tibolone and its metabolites in coronary arteries in vitro are probably mediated by endothelium independent inhibition of calcium channels but may also involve an endothelium-dependent mechanism via nitric oxide. The effect...

  19. Inhibition potential of 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA) and its metabolites on the in vitro monoamine oxidase (MAO)-catalyzed deamination of the neurotransmitters serotonin and dopamine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steuer, Andrea E; Boxler, Martina I; Stock, Lorena; Kraemer, Thomas

    2016-01-22

    Neurotoxicity of 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA) is still controversially discussed. Formation of reactive oxygen species e.g. based on elevated dopamine (DA) concentrations and DA quinone formation is discussed among others. Inhibition potential of MDMA metabolites regarding neurotransmitter degradation by catechol-O-methyltransferase and sulfotransferase was described previously. Their influence on monoamine oxidase (MAO) - the major DA degradation pathway-has not yet been studied in humans. Therefore the inhibition potential of MDMA and its metabolites on the deamination of the neurotransmitters DA and serotonin (5-HT) by MAO-A and B using recombinant human enzymes in vitro should be investigated. In initial studies, MDMA and MDA showed relevant inhibition (>30%) toward MAO A for 5-HT and DA. No relevant effects toward MAO B were observed. Further investigation on MAO-A revealed MDMA as a competitive inhibitor of 5-HT and DA deamination with Ki 24.5±7.1 μM and 18.6±4.3 μM respectively and MDA as a mixed-type inhibitor with Ki 7.8±2.6 μM and 8.4±3.2 μM respectively. Although prediction of in vivo relevance needs to be done with care, relevant inhibitory effects at expected plasma concentrations after recreational MDMA consumption seems unlikely based on the obtained data. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Cell-Free Protein Synthesis Enhancement from Real-Time NMR Metabolite Kinetics: Redirecting Energy Fluxes in Hybrid RRL Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panthu, Baptiste; Ohlmann, Théophile; Perrier, Johan; Schlattner, Uwe; Jalinot, Pierre; Elena-Herrmann, Bénédicte; Rautureau, Gilles J P

    2018-01-19

    A counterintuitive cell-free protein synthesis (CFPS) strategy, based on reducing the ribosomal fraction in rabbit reticulocyte lysate (RRL), triggers the development of hybrid systems composed of RRL ribosome-free supernatant complemented with ribosomes from different mammalian cell-types. Hybrid RRL systems maintain translational properties of the original ribosome cell types, and deliver protein expression levels similar to RRL. Here, we show that persistent ribosome-associated metabolic activity consuming ATP is a major obstacle for maximal protein yield. We provide a detailed picture of hybrid CFPS systems energetic metabolism based on real-time nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) investigation of metabolites kinetics. We demonstrate that protein synthesis capacity has an upper limit at native ribosome concentration and that lower amounts of the ribosomal fraction optimize energy fluxes toward protein translation, consequently increasing CFPS yield. These results provide a rationalized strategy for further mammalian CFPS developments and reveal the potential of real-time NMR metabolism phenotyping for optimization of cell-free protein expression systems.

  1. Metabolic-flux dependent regulation of microbial physiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Litsios, Athanasios; Ortega, Álvaro D; Wit, Ernst C; Heinemann, Matthias

    2018-04-01

    According to the most prevalent notion, changes in cellular physiology primarily occur in response to altered environmental conditions. Yet, recent studies have shown that changes in metabolic fluxes can also trigger phenotypic changes even when environmental conditions are unchanged. This suggests that cells have mechanisms in place to assess the magnitude of metabolic fluxes, that is, the rate of metabolic reactions, and use this information to regulate their physiology. In this review, we describe recent evidence for metabolic flux-sensing and flux-dependent regulation. Furthermore, we discuss how such sensing and regulation can be mechanistically achieved and present a set of new candidates for flux-signaling metabolites. Similar to metabolic-flux sensing, we argue that cells can also sense protein translation flux. Finally, we elaborate on the advantages that flux-based regulation can confer to cells. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  2. C-13 Tracer experiments and metabolite balancing for metabolic flux analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Karsten; Marx, A.; de Graaf, A. A.

    1998-01-01

    performed independently for a wild-type strain of Aspergillus oryzae producing alpha-amylase. Two different nitrogen sources, NH4+ and NO3-, have been used to investigate the influence of the NADPH requirements on the intracellular flux distribution. The two different approaches to the calculation of fluxes...

  3. Prostaglandin A1 metabolism and inhibition of cyclic AMP extrusion by avian erythrocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heasley, L.E.; Brunton, L.L.

    1985-01-01

    Prostaglandins (PG) inhibit active cyclic AMP export from pigeon red cells, PGA1 and PGA2 most potently. To probe the mechanism of this action of PGA1, the authors have studied the interaction of [ 3 H]PGA1 with suspensions of pigeon red cells. The interaction of PGA1 with pigeon red cells is a multistep process of uptake, metabolism, and secretion. [ 3 H] PGA1 rapidly enters red cells and is promptly metabolized to a compound(s) that remains in the aqueous layer after ethylacetate extraction. The glutathione-depleting agent, diamide, inhibits formation of the PGA1 metabolite. The red cells secrete the polar metabolite of PGA1 by a saturable mechanism that lowered temperatures inhibit. Because uptake and metabolism progress with much greater rates than metabolite secretion, red cells transiently concentrate the polar compound intracellularly. Onset and reversal of inhibition of cyclic AMP export by PGA1 coincide with accumulation and secretion of PGA1 metabolite, suggesting that the polar metabolite acts at an intracellular site to inhibit cyclic AMP efflux

  4. Metabolites produced by antagonistic microbes inhibit the principal avocado pathogens in vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Ramírez R.

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The demand for Hass avocado in the global market exceeds the supply by over 50%. Colombia has a remarkable advantage as a producer in the region due to its high yields. However, the productivity of this crop can be seriously affected by diseases such as root rot, caused by Phytophthora cinnamomi, postharvest body rot and stem end rot, caused by Colletotrichum sp. and Phomopsis sp., respectively. The potential of 76 bacterial isolates obtained from avocado rhizosphere to produce inhibitory metabolites against avocado's pathogens was evaluated. The antagonistic effect of the rhizobacteria against P. cinnamomi, Colletotrichum sp. and Phomopsis sp. was tested through dual cultures. Thirty-six percent of the tested isolates presented inhibition halos against P. cinnamomi, 36% against Colletotrichum sp. and 67% against Phomopsis sp. Additionally, three isolates were selected for fermentation tests using different broth cultures. The extracts obtained from fermentations in the minimal medium of isolates ARP5.1 and AED06 showed inhibitory activity against the evaluated pathogens, but this effect was not observed with the AED26 extract. The media supplemented with copper chloride did not enhance activity of the extracts. These results suggest that using microbial metabolic extracts is a viable alternative for controlling avocado pathogens in vitro.

  5. The insecticide fipronil and its metabolite fipronil sulphone inhibit the rat alpha1beta2gamma2L GABA(A) receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, P; Akk, G

    2008-11-01

    Fipronil is the active ingredient in a number of widely used insecticides. Human exposure to fipronil leads to symptoms (headache, nausea and seizures) typically associated with the antagonism of GABA(A) receptors in the brain. In this study, we have examined the modulation of the common brain GABA(A) receptor subtype by fipronil and its major metabolite, fipronil sulphone. Whole-cell and single-channel recordings were made from HEK 293 cells transiently expressing rat alpha1beta2gamma2L GABA(A) receptors. The major effect of fipronil was to increase the rate of current decay in macroscopic recordings. In single-channel recordings, the presence of fipronil resulted in shorter cluster durations without affecting the intracluster open and closed time distributions or the single-channel conductance. The alpha1V256S mutation, previously shown alleviate channel inhibition by inhibitory steroids and several insecticides, had a relatively small effect on channel block by fipronil. The mode of action of fipronil sulphone was similar to that of its parent compound but the metabolite was less potent at inhibiting the alpha1beta2gamma2L receptor. We conclude that exposure to fipronil induces accumulation of receptors in a novel, long-lived blocked state. This process proceeds in parallel with and independently of, channel desensitization. The lower potency of fipronil sulphone indicates that the conversion serves as a detoxifying process in mammalian brain.

  6. The inotropic effect of the active metabolite of levosimendan, OR-1896, is mediated through inhibition of PDE3 in rat ventricular myocardium.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Øivind Ørstavik

    Full Text Available We recently published that the positive inotropic response (PIR to levosimendan can be fully accounted for by phosphodiesterase (PDE inhibition in both failing human heart and normal rat heart. To determine if the PIR of the active metabolite OR-1896, an important mediator of the long-term clinical effects of levosimendan, also results from PDE3 inhibition, we compared the effects of OR-1896, a representative Ca2+ sensitizer EMD57033 (EMD, levosimendan and other PDE inhibitors.Contractile force was measured in rat ventricular strips. PDE assay was conducted on rat ventricular homogenate. cAMP was measured using RII_epac FRET-based sensors.OR-1896 evoked a maximum PIR of 33 ± 10% above basal at 1 μM. This response was amplified in the presence of the PDE4 inhibitor rolipram (89 ± 14% and absent in the presence of the PDE3 inhibitors cilostamide (0.5 ± 5.3% or milrinone (3.2 ± 4.4%. The PIR was accompanied by a lusitropic response, and both were reversed by muscarinic receptor stimulation with carbachol and absent in the presence of β-AR blockade with timolol. OR-1896 inhibited PDE activity and increased cAMP levels at concentrations giving PIRs. OR-1896 did not sensitize the concentration-response relationship to extracellular Ca2+. Levosimendan, OR-1896 and EMD all increased the sensitivity to β-AR stimulation. The combination of either EMD and levosimendan or EMD and OR-1896 further sensitized the response, indicating at least two different mechanisms responsible for the sensitization. Only EMD sensitized the α1-AR response.The observed PIR to OR-1896 in rat ventricular strips is mediated through PDE3 inhibition, enhancing cAMP-mediated effects. These results further reinforce our previous finding that Ca2+ sensitization does not play a significant role in the inotropic (and lusitropic effect of levosimendan, nor of its main metabolite OR-1896.

  7. Compound K, a Ginsenoside Metabolite, Inhibits Colon Cancer Growth via Multiple Pathways Including p53-p21 Interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eugene B. Chang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Compound K (20-O-beta-D-glucopyranosyl-20(S-protopanaxadiol, CK, an intestinal bacterial metabolite of ginseng protopanaxadiol saponins, has been shown to inhibit cell growth in a variety of cancers. However, the mechanisms are not completely understood, especially in colorectal cancer (CRC. A xenograft tumor model was used first to examine the anti-CRC effect of CK in vivo. Then, multiple in vitro assays were applied to investigate the anticancer effects of CK including antiproliferation, apoptosis and cell cycle distribution. In addition, a qPCR array and western blot analysis were executed to screen and validate the molecules and pathways involved. We observed that CK significantly inhibited the growth of HCT-116 tumors in an athymic nude mouse xenograft model. CK significantly inhibited the proliferation of human CRC cell lines HCT-116, SW-480, and HT-29 in a dose- and time-dependent manner. We also observed that CK induced cell apoptosis and arrested the cell cycle in the G1 phase in HCT-116 cells. The processes were related to the upregulation of p53/p21, FoxO3a-p27/p15 and Smad3, and downregulation of cdc25A, CDK4/6 and cyclin D1/3. The major regulated targets of CK were cyclin dependent inhibitors, including p21, p27, and p15. These results indicate that CK inhibits transcriptional activation of multiple tumor-promoting pathways in CRC, suggesting that CK could be an active compound in the prevention or treatment of CRC.

  8. Temporal behaviour of self generated magnetic field and its influence on inhibition of thermal flux in ICF plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jha, L.N.

    1989-06-01

    The self generated magnetic field of megagauss order is reported to play a crucial role in ICF target designs because of its strong influence on the transport of energy from the critical density region to the ablation layer. The inhibition of the thermal flux due to such a field, thus, affects the whole of the other phenomenon of ICF. The knowledge of the proper variation of the magnetic field may help in assigning the existing controversial value of flux limit, f. Many papers dealing with the spatial variation of such a field exist and are well documented but the study on the variation of self generated field with time is rare. Here, the spatial variation of the megagauss field generated in the corona of a wire target irradiated by a laser as well as a model to study the temporal nature of the B-field at the peak have been obtained by solving the self inhibited diffusion which is regarded as the most dominant mechanism by which the thermal transport is influenced. The field exists for about ten nanoseconds even after the laser is switched off. The ratio of the two components of the thermal conductivity is also plotted against time and shows the inhibition. So, a track on the B-field variation both in space and time is necessary to keep for at least a few nanoseconds for computation of f. (author). 19 refs, 4 figs

  9. Preliminary Study and Improve the Production of Metabolites with Antifungal Activity by A Bacillus Sp Strain IBA 33

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Antonieta Gordillo

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Bacillus sp strain IBA 33 metabolites, isolated from decaying lemon fruits, were evaluated for the control of pathogenic and non-pathogenic fungi (Penicillium digitatum, Geotrichum candidum, Penicillium expansum, Aspergillus clavatus, Aspergillus flavus, Aspergillus niger, and Fusarium moniliforme. These metabolites were recovered from Landy medium (LM without aminoacids. In order to optimize metabolites production the LM was modified by adding different concentrations and sources of amino acids and carbohydrates at different culture conditions.Bacillus sp strain IBA 33 metabolites efficacy to control fungi were evaluated with in vitro and in vivo assays. A. flavus growth inhibition was 52% with the metabolites of Bacillus sp strain IBA 33 recovered from LM (MBLM in vitro assays. MBLM supplemented with 0.5% glutamic acid, inhibited the growth of P. digitatum, G. candidum, A. clavatus, A. niger and F. moniliforme by 65%, 88.44%, 84%, 34% and 92% respectively. The highest inhibition of P. expansum was 45% with MBLM supplemented with 0.5% aspartic acid. Similar results were obtained in vivo assays. These results showed that Bacillus sp strain IBA 33 metabolites specificity against fungi depended on the composition of the LM.

  10. Preliminary Study and Improve the Production of Metabolites with Antifungal Activity by A Bacillus Sp Strain IBA 33

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Antonieta Gordillo

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Bacillus sp strain IBA 33 metabolites, isolated from decaying lemon fruits, were evaluated for the control of pathogenic and non-pathogenic fungi (Penicillium digitatum, Geotrichum candidum, Penicillium expansum, Aspergillus clavatus, Aspergillus flavus, Aspergillus niger, and Fusarium moniliforme. These metabolites were recovered from Landy medium (LM without aminoacids. In order to optimize metabolites production the LM was modified by adding different concentrations and sources of amino acids and carbohydrates at different culture conditions. Bacillus sp strain IBA 33 metabolites efficacy to control fungi were evaluated with in vitro and in vivo assays. A. flavus growth inhibition was 52% with the metabolites of Bacillus sp strain IBA 33 recovered from LM (MBLM in vitro assays. MBLM supplemented with 0.5% glutamic acid, inhibited the growth of P. digitatum, G. candidum, A. clavatus, A. niger and F. moniliforme by 65%, 88.44%, 84%, 34% and 92% respectively. The highest inhibition of P. expansum was 45% with MBLM supplemented with 0.5% aspartic acid. Similar results were obtained in vivo assays. These results showed that Bacillus sp strain IBA 33 metabolites specificity against fungi depended on the composition of the LM.

  11. Inhibitory effect of benzene metabolites on nuclear DNA synthesis in bone marrow cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, E.W.; Johnson, J.T.; Garner, C.D.

    1989-01-01

    Effects of endogenously produced and exogenously added benzene metabolites on the nuclear DNA synthetic activity were investigated using a culture system of mouse bone marrow cells. Effects of the metabolites were evaluated by a 30-min incorporation of [ 3 H]thymidine into DNA following a 30-min interaction with the cells in McCoy's 5a medium with 10% fetal calf serum. Phenol and muconic acid did not inhibit nuclear DNA synthesis. However, catechol, 1,2,4-benzenetriol, hydroquinone, and p-benzoquinone were able to inhibit 52, 64, 79, and 98% of the nuclear DNA synthetic activity, respectively, at 24 μM. In a cell-free DNA synthetic system, catechol and hydroquinone did not inhibit the incorporation of [ 3 H]thymidine triphosphate into DNA up to 24 μM but 1,2,4-benzenetriol and p-benzoquinone did. The effect of the latter two benzene metabolites was completely blocked in the presence of 1,4-dithiothreitol (1 mM) in the cell-free assay system. Furthermore, when DNA polymerase α, which requires a sulfhydryl (SH) group as an active site, was replaced by DNA polymerase 1, which does not require an SH group for its catalytic activity, p-benzoquinone and 1,2,4-benzenetriol were unable to inhibit DNA synthesis. Thus, the data imply the p-benzoquinone and 1,2,4-benzenetriol inhibited DNA polymerase α, consequently resulting in inhibition of DNA synthesis in both cellular and cell-free DNA synthetic systems. The present study identifies catechol, hydroquinone, p-benzoquinone, and 1,2,4-benzenetriol as toxic benzene metabolites in bone marrow cells and also suggests that their inhibitory action on DNA synthesis is mediated by mechanism(s) other than that involving DNA damage as a primary cause

  12. Gingival tissue-produced inhibition of platelet aggregation and the loss of inhibition in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kawamura, Keiichiroh; Tamai, Kazuharu; Shirakawa, Masaharu; Okamoto, Hiroshi; Dohi, Toshihiro; Tsujimoto, Akira

    1988-01-01

    Addition of medium incubated with normal rat gingival tissue to platelet-rich plasma inhibited ADP-induced platelet aggregation. The ability of rat gingiva to produce activity inhibiting platelet aggregation was enhanced by the addition of arachidonic acid. Diabetic rat gingiva failed to inhibit platelet aggregation but did produce the anti-platelet aggregating activity in the presence of arachidonic acid. Indomethacin blocked the production of anti-platelet aggregating activity. There was no difference in conversion of (1-/sup 14/C)arachidonic acid to prostaglandins by normal and diabetic rat gingiva. These results suggest that an arachidonic acid metabolite released from gingiva during incubation inhibits platelet aggregation, and the synthesis of the metabolite is impaired in diabetic rat gingiva. A decrease in availability of arachidonic acid may be a causal factor of the defect in diabetic rat gingiva.

  13. Gingival tissue-produced inhibition of platelet aggregation and the loss of inhibition in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawamura, Keiichiroh; Tamai, Kazuharu; Shirakawa, Masaharu; Okamoto, Hiroshi; Dohi, Toshihiro; Tsujimoto, Akira

    1988-01-01

    Addition of medium incubated with normal rat gingival tissue to platelet-rich plasma inhibited ADP-induced platelet aggregation. The ability of rat gingiva to produce activity inhibiting platelet aggregation was enhanced by the addition of arachidonic acid. Diabetic rat gingiva failed to inhibit platelet aggregation but did produce the anti-platelet aggregating activity in the presence of arachidonic acid. Indomethacin blocked the production of anti-platelet aggregating activity. There was no difference in conversion of [1- 14 C]arachidonic acid to prostaglandins by normal and diabetic rat gingiva. These results suggest that an arachidonic acid metabolite released from gingiva during incubation inhibits platelet aggregation, and the synthesis of the metabolite is impaired in diabetic rat gingiva. A decrease in availability of arachidonic acid may be a causal factor of the defect in diabetic rat gingiva. (author)

  14. Antibacterial activity of secondary metabolites isolated from ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Aghomotsegin

    2015-10-28

    Oct 28, 2015 ... Alternaria spp. are cosmopolitan mould fungi and can be found in soils ... the secondary metabolites products from A. alternata and ..... Zone of inhibition (mm) of test bacterial strains to fungal products and standard antibiotics. Fungal ... marine actinomycetes from pulicat, Muttukadu, and Ennore estuaries.

  15. Non-stationary (13)C-metabolic flux ratio analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hörl, Manuel; Schnidder, Julian; Sauer, Uwe; Zamboni, Nicola

    2013-12-01

    (13)C-metabolic flux analysis ((13)C-MFA) has become a key method for metabolic engineering and systems biology. In the most common methodology, fluxes are calculated by global isotopomer balancing and iterative fitting to stationary (13)C-labeling data. This approach requires a closed carbon balance, long-lasting metabolic steady state, and the detection of (13)C-patterns in a large number of metabolites. These restrictions mostly reduced the application of (13)C-MFA to the central carbon metabolism of well-studied model organisms grown in minimal media with a single carbon source. Here we introduce non-stationary (13)C-metabolic flux ratio analysis as a novel method for (13)C-MFA to allow estimating local, relative fluxes from ultra-short (13)C-labeling experiments and without the need for global isotopomer balancing. The approach relies on the acquisition of non-stationary (13)C-labeling data exclusively for metabolites in the proximity of a node of converging fluxes and a local parameter estimation with a system of ordinary differential equations. We developed a generalized workflow that takes into account reaction types and the availability of mass spectrometric data on molecular ions or fragments for data processing, modeling, parameter and error estimation. We demonstrated the approach by analyzing three key nodes of converging fluxes in central metabolism of Bacillus subtilis. We obtained flux estimates that are in agreement with published results obtained from steady state experiments, but reduced the duration of the necessary (13)C-labeling experiment to less than a minute. These results show that our strategy enables to formally estimate relative pathway fluxes on extremely short time scale, neglecting cellular carbon balancing. Hence this approach paves the road to targeted (13)C-MFA in dynamic systems with multiple carbon sources and towards rich media. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Inhibition of Bacillus cereus Strains by Antimicrobial Metabolites from Lactobacillus johnsonii CRL1647 and Enterococcus faecium SM21.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soria, M Cecilia; Audisio, M Carina

    2014-12-01

    Bacillus cereus is an endospore-forming, Gram-positive bacterium able to cause foodborne diseases. Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) are known for their ability to synthesize organic acids and bacteriocins, but the potential of these compounds against B. cereus has been scarcely documented in food models. The present study has examined the effect of the metabolites produced by Lactobacillus johnsonii CRL1647 and Enterococcus faecium SM21 on the viability of select B. cereus strains. Furthermore, the effect of E. faecium SM21 metabolites against B. cereus strains has also been investigated on a rice food model. L. johnsonii CRL1647 produced 128 mmol/L of lactic acid, 38 mmol/L of acetic acid and 0.3 mmol/L of phenyl-lactic acid. These organic acids reduced the number of vegetative cells and spores of the B. cereus strains tested. However, the antagonistic effect disappeared at pH 6.5. On the other hand, E. faecium SM21 produced only lactic and acetic acid (24.5 and 12.2 mmol/L, respectively) and was able to inhibit both vegetative cells and spores of the B. cereus strains, at a final fermentation pH of 5.0 and at pH 6.5. This would indicate the action of other metabolites, different from organic acids, present in the cell-free supernatant. On cooked rice grains, the E. faecium SM21 bacteriocin(s) were tested against two B. cereus strains. Both of them were significantly affected within the first 4 h of contact; whereas B. cereus BAC1 cells recovered after 24 h, the effect on B. cereus 1 remained up to the end of the assay. The LAB studied may thus be considered to define future strategies for biological control of B. cereus.

  17. FluxPyt: a Python-based free and open-source software for 13C-metabolic flux analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desai, Trunil S; Srivastava, Shireesh

    2018-01-01

    13 C-Metabolic flux analysis (MFA) is a powerful approach to estimate intracellular reaction rates which could be used in strain analysis and design. Processing and analysis of labeling data for calculation of fluxes and associated statistics is an essential part of MFA. However, various software currently available for data analysis employ proprietary platforms and thus limit accessibility. We developed FluxPyt, a Python-based truly open-source software package for conducting stationary 13 C-MFA data analysis. The software is based on the efficient elementary metabolite unit framework. The standard deviations in the calculated fluxes are estimated using the Monte-Carlo analysis. FluxPyt also automatically creates flux maps based on a template for visualization of the MFA results. The flux distributions calculated by FluxPyt for two separate models: a small tricarboxylic acid cycle model and a larger Corynebacterium glutamicum model, were found to be in good agreement with those calculated by a previously published software. FluxPyt was tested in Microsoft™ Windows 7 and 10, as well as in Linux Mint 18.2. The availability of a free and open 13 C-MFA software that works in various operating systems will enable more researchers to perform 13 C-MFA and to further modify and develop the package.

  18. Studying inhibition of calcium oxalate stone formation: an in vitro approach for screening hydrogen sulfide and its metabolites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Vaitheeswari

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACTPurpose:Calcium oxalate urolithiasis is one of the most common urinary tract diseases and is of high prevalence. The present study proposes to evaluate the antilithiatic property of hydrogen sulfide and its metabolites like thiosulfate & sulfate in an in vitro model.Materials and Methods:The antilithiatic activity of sodium hydrogen sulfide (NaSH, sodium thiosulfate (Na2S2O3 and sodium sulfate (Na2SO4 on the kinetics of calcium oxalate crystal formation was investigated both in physiological buffer and in urine from normal and recurrent stone forming volunteers. The stones were characterized by optical and spectroscopic techniques.Results:The stones were characterized to be monoclinic, prismatic and bipyramidal habit which is of calcium monohydrate and dihydrate nature. The FTIR displayed fingerprint corresponding to calcium oxalate in the control while in NaSH treated, S=O vibrations were visible in the spectrum. The order of percentage inhibition was NaSH>Na2S2O3>Na2SO4.Conclusion:Our study indicates that sodium hydrogen sulfide and its metabolite thiosulfate are inhibitors of calcium oxalate stone agglomeration which makes them unstable both in physiological buffer and in urine. This effect is attributed to pH changes and complexing of calcium by S2O32-and SO42- moiety produced by the test compounds.

  19. Graphene oxide quantum dots disrupt autophagic flux by inhibiting lysosome activity in GC-2 and TM4 cell lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ji, Xiaoli; Xu, Bo; Yao, Mengmeng; Mao, Zhilei; Zhang, Yuqing; Xu, Guofeng; Tang, Qiusha; Wang, Xinru; Xia, Yankai

    2016-01-01

    Graphene oxide quantum dots (GOQDs) have broad application prospects in many areas including bioimaging, drug delivery, DNA cleavage system, sensors and photocatalyst. Recently, increasing concerns have been raised about their biocompatibility, but studies about the effects of GOQDs on male reproductive system are still lacking. In this work, we explored the effects and molecular mechanisms of GOQDs on GC-2 and TM4 cells. We found autophagosome accumulation in GC-2 and TM4 cells after GOQDs treatment. Both LC3-II/LC3-I ratio and p62 levels increased, and the chloroquine-induced accumulation of LC3-II didn’t enhance in the presence of GOQDs, which indicated that GOQDs blocked autophagic flux. Further studies found that the fusion between autophagosome and lysosome was not inhibited by GOQDs, but the proteolytic capacity of lysosome was weakened and both the expression and activity of cathepsin B reduced. Taken together, these results suggested that GOQDs blocked autophagic flux by decreasing the amount and enzymatic activity of cathepsin B and inhibiting lysosome proteolytic capacity in GC-2 and TM4 cells, which might have a potential hazard to male reproduction.

  20. Secondary metabolite from Nostoc XPORK14A inhibits photosynthesis and growth of Synechocystis PCC 6803.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shunmugam, Sumathy; Jokela, Jouni; Wahlsten, Matti; Battchikova, Natalia; Ateeq ur Rehman; Vass, Imre; Karonen, Maarit; Sinkkonen, Jari; Permi, Perttu; Sivonen, Kaarina; Aro, Eva-Mari; Allahverdiyeva, Yagut

    2014-06-01

    Screening of 55 different cyanobacterial strains revealed that an extract from Nostoc XPORK14A drastically modifies the amplitude and kinetics of chlorophyll a fluorescence induction of Synechocystis PCC6803 cells.After 2 d exposure to the Nostoc XPORK14A extract, Synechocystis PCC 6803 cells displayed reduced net photosynthetic activity and significantly modified electron transport properties of photosystem II under both light and dark conditions. However, the maximum oxidizable amount of P700 was not strongly affected. The extract also induced strong oxidative stress in Synechocystis PCC 6803 cells in both light and darkness. We identified the secondary metabolite of Nostoc XPORK14A causing these pronounced effects on Synechocystis cells. Mass spectrometry and nuclear magnetic resonance analyses revealed that this compound, designated as M22, has a non-peptide structure. We propose that M22 possesses a dualaction mechanism: firstly, by photogeneration of reactive oxygen species in the presence of light, which in turn affects the photosynthetic machinery of Synechocystis PCC 6803; and secondly, by altering the in vivo redox status of cells, possibly through inhibition of protein kinases.

  1. Control of Chinese-kale damping-off caused by Pythium aphanidermatum by antifungal metabolites of Trichoderma virens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chiradej Chamswarng

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Seven strains of Trichoderma virens were isolated from Chinese-kale planting soil in Nakhon Si Thammarat province. Efficacy of those isolates to inhibit mycelial growth and overgrow on mycelia ofPythium aphanidermatum, a causal agent of damping-off on Chinese-kale, were determined by a dual culture test. All strains significantly inhibited growth and overgrew on mycelia of P. aphanidermatum on potato dextrose agar (PDA as compared with the control. Strains T-NST-01, T-NST-05 and T-NST-07 gave high values of inhibition by 85.5, 82.5 and 78.5%, respectively. For efficacy to overgrow on mycelia of pathogen test, strains T-NST-05, T-NST-07 and T-NST-01 provided 48.3, 47.0 and 46.1% of mycelial overgrowth, respectively. Antifungal metabolites were extracted from three promising strains and tested against mycelial growth and sporangium production of P. aphanidermatum. The results showed that 1,000 mg/L of all metabolites completely inhibited mycelial growth and sporangium production. Under laboratory condition, all metabolites (1,000 mg/L significantly increased the number of Chinese-kale seedling germination, especially the metabolites from T-NST-01 and T-NST-07 provided germination of 92.5 and 87.5%, respectively. Under glasshouse conditions, Chinese-kale seedlings treated with 1,000 mg/L of metabolites from strains T-NST-01 and T-NST-07 survived by 90.5 and 87.5%, respectively, while the control 1 (sterile water and control 2 (2% methanol had 19.0 and 18.5% of survived seedlings, respectively. In P. aphanidermatum viability test, mycelia of P. aphanidermatum treated with antifungal metabolites from three strains of T. virens showed no visible growth, while the control with 2% methanol or sterile water, mycelia of P. aphanidermatum rapidly grew and covered whole surface of PDA in of the Petri dish within 4 days.

  2. Thermogenic effects of sibutramine and its metabolites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connoley, Ian P; Liu, Yong-Ling; Frost, Ian; Reckless, Ian P; Heal, David J; Stock, Michael J

    1999-01-01

    The thermogenic activity of the serotonin and noradrenaline reuptake inhibitor sibutramine (BTS 54524; Reductil) was investigated by measuring oxygen consumption (VO2) in rats treated with sibutramine or its two pharmacologically-active metabolites. Sibutramine caused a dose-dependent rise in VO2, with a dose of 10 mg kg−1 of sibutramine or its metabolites producing increases of up to 30% that were sustained for at least 6 h, and accompanied by significant increases (0.5–1.0°C) in body temperature. Based on the accumulation in vivo of radiolabelled 2-deoxy-[3H]-glucose, sibutramine had little or no effect on glucose utilization in most tissues, but caused an 18 fold increase in brown adipose tissue (BAT). Combined high, non-selective doses (20 mg kg−1) of the β-adrenoceptor antagonists, atenolol and ICI 118551, inhibited completely the VO2 response to sibutramine, but the response was unaffected by low, β1-adrenoceptor-selective (atenolol) or β2-adrenoceptor-selective (ICI 118551) doses (1 mg kg−1). The ganglionic blocking agent, chlorisondamine (15 mg kg−1), inhibited completely the VO2 response to the metabolites of sibutramine, but had no effect on the thermogenic response to the β3-adrenoceptor-selective agonist BRL 35135. Similar thermogenic responses were produced by simultaneous injection of nisoxetine and fluoxetine at doses (30 mg kg−1) that had no effect on VO2 when injected individually. It is concluded that stimulation of thermogenesis by sibutramine requires central reuptake inhibition of both serotonin and noradrenaline, resulting in increased efferent sympathetic activation of BAT thermogenesis via β3-adrenoceptor, and that this contributes to the compound's activity as an anti-obesity agent. PMID:10217544

  3. Identification of a tryptanthrin metabolite in rat liver microsomes by liquid chromatography/electrospray ionization-tandem mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sang Kyu; Kim, Ghee Hwan; Kim, Dong Hyeon; Kim, Dong Hyun; Jahng, Yurngdong; Jeong, Tae Cheon

    2007-10-01

    Tryptanthrin originally isolated from Isatis tinctoria L. has been characterized to have anti-inflammatory activities through the dual inhibition of cyclooxygenase-2 and 5-lipoxygenase mediated prostaglandin and leukotriene syntheses. To characterize phase I metabolite(s), tryptanthrin was incubated with rat liver microsomes in the presence of NADPH-generating system. One metabolite was identified by liquid chromatography/electrospray ionization-tandem mass spectrometry. M1 could be identified as a metabolite mono-hydroxylated on the aromatic ring of indole moiety from the MS(2) spectra of protonated tryptanthrin and M1. The structure of metabolite was confirmed as 8-hydroxytryptanthrin with a chemically synthesized authentic standard. The formation of M1 was NADPH-dependent and was inhibited by SKF-525A, a general CYP-inhibitor, indicating the cytochrome P450 (CYP)-mediated reaction. In addition, it was proposed that M1 might be formed by CYP 1A in rat liver microsomes from the experiments with enriched rat liver microsomes.

  4. Prediction of Relative In Vivo Metabolite Exposure from In Vitro Data Using Two Model Drugs: Dextromethorphan and Omeprazole

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lutz, Justin D.

    2012-01-01

    Metabolites can have pharmacological or toxicological effects, inhibit metabolic enzymes, and be used as probes of drug-drug interactions or specific cytochrome P450 (P450) phenotypes. Thus, better understanding and prediction methods are needed to characterize metabolite exposures in vivo. This study aimed to test whether in vitro data could be used to predict and rationalize in vivo metabolite exposures using two model drugs and P450 probes: dextromethorphan and omeprazole with their primary metabolites dextrorphan, 5-hydroxyomeprazole (5OH-omeprazole), and omeprazole sulfone. Relative metabolite exposures were predicted using metabolite formation and elimination clearances. For dextrorphan, the formation clearances of dextrorphan glucuronide and 3-hydroxymorphinan from dextrorphan in human liver microsomes were used to predict metabolite (dextrorphan) clearance. For 5OH-omeprazole and omeprazole sulfone, the depletion rates of the metabolites in human hepatocytes were used to predict metabolite clearance. Dextrorphan/dextromethorphan in vivo metabolite/parent area under the plasma concentration versus time curve ratio (AUCm/AUCp) was overpredicted by 2.1-fold, whereas 5OH-omeprazole/omeprazole and omeprazole sulfone/omeprazole were predicted within 0.75- and 1.1-fold, respectively. The effect of inhibition or induction of the metabolite's formation and elimination on the AUCm/AUCp ratio was simulated. The simulations showed that unless metabolite clearance pathways are characterized, interpretation of the metabolic ratios is exceedingly difficult. This study shows that relative in vivo metabolite exposure can be predicted from in vitro data and characterization of secondary metabolism of probe metabolites is critical for interpretation of phenotypic data. PMID:22010218

  5. Silencing VDAC1 Expression by siRNA Inhibits Cancer Cell Proliferation and Tumor Growth In Vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tasleem Arif

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Alterations in cellular metabolism and bioenergetics are vital for cancer cell growth and motility. Here, the role of the mitochondrial protein voltage-dependent anion channel (VDAC1, a master gatekeeper regulating the flux of metabolites and ions between mitochondria and the cytoplasm, in regulating the growth of several cancer cell lines was investigated by silencing VDAC1 expression using small interfering RNA (siRNA. A single siRNA specific to the human VDAC1 sequence at nanomolar concentrations led to some 90% decrease in VDAC1 levels in the lung A549 and H358, prostate PC-3, colon HCT116, glioblastoma U87, liver HepG2, and pancreas Panc-1 cancer cell lines. VDAC1 silencing persisted 144 hours post-transfection and resulted in profound inhibition of cell growth in cancer but not in noncancerous cells, with up to 90% inhibition being observed over 5 days that was prolonged by a second transfection. Cells expressing low VDAC1 levels showed decreased mitochondrial membrane potential and adenoside triphosphate (ATP levels, suggesting limited metabolite exchange between mitochondria and cytosol. Moreover, cells silenced for VDAC1 expression showed decreased migration, even in the presence of the wound healing accelerator basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF. VDAC1-siRNA inhibited cancer cell growth in a Matrigel-based assay in host nude mice. Finally, in a xenograft lung cancer mouse model, chemically modified VDAC1-siRNA not only inhibited tumor growth but also resulted in tumor regression. This study thus shows that VDAC1 silencing by means of RNA interference (RNAi dramatically inhibits cancer cell growth and tumor development by disabling the abnormal metabolic behavior of cancer cells, potentially paving the way for a more effective pipeline of anticancer drugs.

  6. Secondary metabolites from Bacillus amyloliquefaciens isolated from soil can kill Burkholderia pseudomallei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boottanun, Patcharaporn; Potisap, Chotima; Hurdle, Julian G; Sermswan, Rasana W

    2017-12-01

    Bacillus species are Gram-positive bacteria found in abundance in nature and their secondary metabolites were found to possess various potential activities, notably antimicrobial. In this study, Bacillus amyloliquefaciens N2-4 and N3-8 were isolated from soil and their metabolites could kill Burkholderia pseudomallei, a Gram-negative pathogenic bacterium also found in soil in its endemic areas. Moreover, the metabolites were able to kill drug resistant isolates of B. pseudomallei and also inhibit other pathogenic bacteria such as Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli and Acinetobacter baumannii but not the non-pathogenic Burkholderia thailandensis, which is closely related to B. pseudomallei. Since the antimicrobial activity of N3-8 was not partially decreased or abolished when treated with proteolytic enzymes or autoclaved, but N2-4 was, these two strains should have produced different compounds. The N3-8 metabolites with antimicrobial activity consisted of both protein and non-protein compounds. The inhibition spectrum of the precipitated proteins compared to the culture supernatant indicated a possible synergistic effect of the non-protein and peptide compounds of N3-8 isolates against other pathogens. When either N2-4 or N3-8 isolates was co-cultured with B. pseudomallei the numbers of the bacteria decreased by 5 log 10 within 72 h. Further purification and characterization of the metabolites is required for future use of the bacteria or their metabolites as biological controls of B. pseudomallei in the environment or for development as new drugs for problematic pathogenic bacteria.

  7. The neurotoxicity of pyridinium metabolites of haloperidol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agnieszka Górska

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Haloperydol is a butyrophenone, typical neuroleptic agent characterized as a high antipsychotics effects in the treatment of schizophrenia and in palliative care to alleviation many syndromes, such as naursea, vomiting and delirium. Clinical problems occurs during and after administration of the drug are side effects, particularly extrapyrramidal symptoms (EPS. The neurotoxicity of haloperydol may be initiated by the cationic metabolites of haloperydol, HPP+, RHPP+, formed by oxidation and reduction pathways. These metabolites are transported by human organic cation transporters (hOCT to several brain structures for exapmle, in substantia nigra, striatum, caudate nucleus, hippocampus. After reaching the dopaminergic neurons inhibits mitochondrial complex I, evidence for free radical involvement, thus leading to neurodegeneration.

  8. Acute inhibition of hepatic glucose-6-phosphatase does not affect gluconeogenesis but directs gluconeogenic flux toward glycogen in fasted rats. A pharmacological study with the chlorogenic acid derivative S4048

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Dijk, T. H.; van der Sluijs, F. H.; Wiegman, C. H.; Baller, J. F.; Gustafson, L. A.; Burger, H. J.; Herling, A. W.; Kuipers, F.; Meijer, A. J.; Reijngoud, D. J.

    2001-01-01

    Effects of acute inhibition of glucose-6-phosphatase activity by the chlorogenic acid derivative S4048 on hepatic carbohydrate fluxes were examined in isolated rat hepatocytes and in vivo in rats. Fluxes were calculated using tracer dilution techniques and mass isotopomer distribution analysis in

  9. Acute inhibition of hepatic glucose-6-phosphatase does not affect gluconeogenesis but directs gluconeogenic flux toward glycogen in fasted rats - A pharmacological study with the chlorogenic acid derivative S4048

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Dijk, TH; van der Sluijs, FH; Wiegman, CH; Baller, JFW; Gustafson, LA; Burger, HJ; Herling, AW; Kuipers, F; Meijer, AJ; Reijngoud, DJ

    2001-01-01

    Effects of acute inhibition of glucose-6-phosphatase activity by the chlorogenic acid derivative S4048 on hepatic carbohydrate fluxes were examined in isolated rat hepatocytes and in vivo in rats. Fluxes were calculated using tracer dilution techniques and mass isotopomer distribution analysis in

  10. Metabolic cartography: experimental quantification of metabolic fluxes from isotopic labelling studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Grady, John; Schwender, Jörg; Shachar-Hill, Yair; Morgan, John A

    2012-03-01

    For the past decade, flux maps have provided researchers with an in-depth perspective on plant metabolism. As a rapidly developing field, significant headway has been made recently in computation, experimentation, and overall understanding of metabolic flux analysis. These advances are particularly applicable to the study of plant metabolism. New dynamic computational methods such as non-stationary metabolic flux analysis are finding their place in the toolbox of metabolic engineering, allowing more organisms to be studied and decreasing the time necessary for experimentation, thereby opening new avenues by which to explore the vast diversity of plant metabolism. Also, improved methods of metabolite detection and measurement have been developed, enabling increasingly greater resolution of flux measurements and the analysis of a greater number of the multitude of plant metabolic pathways. Methods to deconvolute organelle-specific metabolism are employed with increasing effectiveness, elucidating the compartmental specificity inherent in plant metabolism. Advances in metabolite measurements have also enabled new types of experiments, such as the calculation of metabolic fluxes based on (13)CO(2) dynamic labelling data, and will continue to direct plant metabolic engineering. Newly calculated metabolic flux maps reveal surprising and useful information about plant metabolism, guiding future genetic engineering of crops to higher yields. Due to the significant level of complexity in plants, these methods in combination with other systems biology measurements are necessary to guide plant metabolic engineering in the future.

  11. Metabolomics and Cheminformatics Analysis of Antifungal Function of Plant Metabolites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuperlovic-Culf, Miroslava; Rajagopalan, NandhaKishore; Tulpan, Dan; Loewen, Michele C

    2016-09-30

    Fusarium head blight (FHB), primarily caused by Fusarium graminearum , is a devastating disease of wheat. Partial resistance to FHB of several wheat cultivars includes specific metabolic responses to inoculation. Previously published studies have determined major metabolic changes induced by pathogens in resistant and susceptible plants. Functionality of the majority of these metabolites in resistance remains unknown. In this work we have made a compilation of all metabolites determined as selectively accumulated following FHB inoculation in resistant plants. Characteristics, as well as possible functions and targets of these metabolites, are investigated using cheminformatics approaches with focus on the likelihood of these metabolites acting as drug-like molecules against fungal pathogens. Results of computational analyses of binding properties of several representative metabolites to homology models of fungal proteins are presented. Theoretical analysis highlights the possibility for strong inhibitory activity of several metabolites against some major proteins in Fusarium graminearum , such as carbonic anhydrases and cytochrome P450s. Activity of several of these compounds has been experimentally confirmed in fungal growth inhibition assays. Analysis of anti-fungal properties of plant metabolites can lead to the development of more resistant wheat varieties while showing novel application of cheminformatics approaches in the analysis of plant/pathogen interactions.

  12. Bioactivity of Turmeric-Derived Curcuminoids and Related Metabolites in Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Laura E.; Frye, Jen B.; Gorti, Bhavana; Timmermann, Barbara N.; Funk, Janet L.

    2013-01-01

    While the chemotherapeutic effect of curcumin, one of three major curcuminoids derived from turmeric, has been reported, largely unexplored are the effects of complex turmeric extracts more analogous to traditional medicinal preparations, as well as the relative importance of the three curcuminoids and their metabolites as anti-cancer agents. These studies document the pharmacodynamic effects of chemically-complex turmeric extracts relative to curcuminoids on human breast cancer cell growth and tumor cell secretion of parathyroid hormone-related protein (PTHrP), an important driver of cancer bone metastasis. Finally, relative effects of structurally-related metabolites of curcuminoids were assessed on the same endpoints. We report that 3 curcuminoid-containing turmeric extracts differing with respect to the inclusion of additional naturally occurring chemicals (essential oils and/or polar compounds) were equipotent in inhibiting human breast cancer MDA-MB-231 cell growth (IC50=10–16μg/mL) and secretion of osteolytic PTHrP (IC50=2–3μg/mL) when concentrations were normalized to curcuminoid content. Moreover, these effects were curcuminoid-specific, as botanically-related gingerol containing extracts had no effect. While curcumin and bis-demethoxycurcumin were equipotent to each other and to the naturally occurring curcuminoid mixture (IC50=58 μM), demethoxycurcumin was without effect on cell growth. However, each of the individual curcuminoids inhibited PTHrP secretion (IC50=22–31μM) to the same degree as the curcuminoid mixture (IC50=16 μM). Degradative curcuminoid metabolites (vanillin and ferulic acid) did not inhibit cell growth or PTHrP, while reduced metabolites (tetrahydrocurcuminoids) had inhibitory effects on cell growth and PTHrP secretion but only at concentrations ≥10-fold higher than the curcuminoids. These studies emphasize the structural and biological importance of curcuminoids in the anti-breast cancer effects of turmeric and contradict

  13. Equol, a Clinically Important Metabolite, Inhibits the Development and Pathogenicity of Magnaporthe oryzae, the Causal Agent of Rice Blast Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiaoyu Wang

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Equol, a metabolite of soybean isoflavone daidzein, has been proven to have various bioactivities related to human health, but little is known on its antifungal activity to plant fungal pathogens. Magnaporthe oryzae is a phytopathogenic fungus that causes rice blast, a devastating disease on rice. Here, we demonstrated that equol influences the development and pathogenicity of M. oryzae. Equol showed a significant inhibition to the mycelial growth, conidial generation and germination, and appressorial formation of M. oryzae. As a result, equol greatly reduced the virulence of M. oryzae on rice and barley leaves. The antifungal activity of equol was also found in several other plant fungal pathogens. These findings expand our knowledge on the bioactivities of equol.

  14. Estimating biological elementary flux modes that decompose a flux distribution by the minimal branching property

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chan, Siu Hung Joshua; Solem, Christian; Jensen, Peter Ruhdal

    2014-01-01

    biologically feasible EFMs by considering their graphical properties. A previous study on the transcriptional regulation of metabolic genes found that distinct branches at a branch point metabolite usually belong to distinct metabolic pathways. This suggests an intuitive property of biologically feasible EFMs......, i.e. minimal branching. RESULTS: We developed the concept of minimal branching EFM and derived the minimal branching decomposition (MBD) to decompose flux distributions. Testing in the core Escherichia coli metabolic network indicated that MBD can distinguish branches at branch points and greatly...... knowledge, which facilitates interpretation. Comparison of the methods applied to a complex flux distribution in Lactococcus lactis similarly showed the advantages of MBD. The minimal branching EFM concept underlying MBD should be useful in other applications....

  15. Production of fungal and bacterial growth modulating secondary metabolites is widespread among mycorrhiza-associated streptomycetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Studies on mycorrhiza associated bacteria suggest that bacterial-fungal interactions play important roles during mycorrhiza formation and affect plant health. We surveyed Streptomyces Actinobacteria, known as antibiotic producers and antagonists of fungi, from Norway spruce mycorrhizas with predominantly Piloderma species as the fungal partner. Results Fifteen Streptomyces isolates exhibited substantial variation in inhibition of tested mycorrhizal and plant pathogenic fungi (Amanita muscaria, Fusarium oxysporum, Hebeloma cylindrosporum, Heterobasidion abietinum, Heterobasidion annosum, Laccaria bicolor, Piloderma croceum). The growth of the mycorrhiza-forming fungus Laccaria bicolor was stimulated by some of the streptomycetes, and Piloderma croceum was only moderately affected. Bacteria responded to the streptomycetes differently than the fungi. For instance the strain Streptomyces sp. AcM11, which inhibited most tested fungi, was less inhibitory to bacteria than other tested streptomycetes. The determined patterns of Streptomyces-microbe interactions were associated with distinct patterns of secondary metabolite production. Notably, potentially novel metabolites were produced by strains that were less antagonistic to fungi. Most of the identified metabolites were antibiotics (e.g. cycloheximide, actiphenol) and siderophores (e.g. ferulic acid, desferroxiamines). Plant disease resistance was activated by a single streptomycete strain only. Conclusions Mycorrhiza associated streptomycetes appear to have an important role in inhibiting the growth of fungi and bacteria. Additionally, our study indicates that the Streptomyces strains, which are not general antagonists of fungi, may produce still un-described metabolites. PMID:22852578

  16. Inhibition of Orobanche crenata seed germination and radicle growth by allelochemicals identified in cereals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Aparicio, Mónica; Cimmino, Alessio; Evidente, Antonio; Rubiales, Diego

    2013-10-16

    Orobanche crenata is a parasitic weed that causes severe yield losses in important grain and forage legume crops. Cereals have been reported to inhibit O. crenata parasitism when grown intercropped with susceptible legumes, but the responsible metabolites have not been identified. A number of metabolites have been reported in cereals that have allelopathic properties against weeds, pests, and pathogens. We tested the effect of several allelochemicals identified in cereals on O. crenata seed germination and radicle development. We found that 2-benzoxazolinone, its derivative 6-chloroacetyl-2-benzoxazolinone, and scopoletin significantly inhibited O. crenata seed germination. Benzoxazolinones, l-tryptophan, and coumalic acid caused the stronger inhibition of radicle growth. Also, other metabolites reduced radicle length, this inhibition being dose-dependent. Only scopoletin caused cell necrotic-like darkening in the young radicles. Prospects for their application to parasitic weed management are discussed.

  17. Biological responses of progestogen metabolites in normal and cancerous human breast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasqualini, Jorge R; Chetrite, Gérard S

    2010-12-01

    At present, more than 200 progestogen molecules are available, but their biological response is a function of various factors: affinity to progesterone or other receptors, their structure, the target tissues considered, biological response, experimental conditions, dose, method of administration and metabolic transformations. Metabolic transformation is of huge importance because in various biological processes the metabolic product(s) not only control the activity of the maternal hormone but also have an important activity of its own. In this regard, it was observed that the 20-dihydro derivative of the progestogen dydrogesterone (Duphaston®) is significantly more active than the parent compound in inhibiting sulfatase and 17β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase in human breast cancer cells. Estrone sulfatase activity is also inhibited by norelgestromin, a norgestimate metabolite. Interesting information was obtained with a similar progestogen, tibolone, which is rapidly metabolized into the active 3α/3β-hydroxy and 4-ene metabolites. All these metabolites can inhibit sulfatase and 17β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase and stimulate sulfotransferase in human breast cancer cells. Another attractive aspect is the metabolic transformation of progesterone itself in human breast tissues. In the normal breast progesterone is mainly converted to 4-ene derivatives, whereas in the tumor tissue it is converted mostly to 5α-pregnane derivatives. 20α-Dihydroprogesterone is found mainly in normal breast tissue and possesses antiproliferative properties as well as the ability to act as an anti-aromatase agent. Consequently, this progesterone metabolite could be involved in the control of estradiol production in the normal breast and therefore implicated in one of the multifactorial mechanisms of the breast carcinogenesis process. In conclusion, a better understanding of both natural and synthetic hormone metabolic transformations and their control could potentially provide

  18. Natural metabolites for parasitic weed management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vurro, Maurizio; Boari, Angela; Evidente, Antonio; Andolfi, Anna; Zermane, Nadjia

    2009-05-01

    Compounds of natural origin, such as phytotoxins produced by fungi or natural amino acids, could be used in parasitic weed management strategies by interfering with the early growth stages of the parasites. These metabolites could inhibit seed germination or germ tube elongation, so preventing attachment to the host plant, or, conversely, stimulate seed germination in the absence of the host, contributing to a reduction in the parasite seed bank. Some of the fungal metabolites assayed were very active even at very low concentrations, such as some macrocyclic trichothecenes, which at 0.1 microM strongly suppressed the germination of Orobanche ramosa L. seeds. Interesting results were also obtained with some novel toxins, such as phyllostictine A, highly active in reducing germ tube elongation and seed germination both of O. ramosa and of Cuscuta campestris Yuncker. Among the amino acids tested, methionine and arginine were particularly interesting, as they were able to suppress seed germination at concentrations lower than 1 mM. Some of the fungal metabolites tested were also able to stimulate the germination of O. ramosa seeds. The major findings in this research field are described and discussed.

  19. The Protein Cost of Metabolic Fluxes: Prediction from Enzymatic Rate Laws and Cost Minimization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elad Noor

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Bacterial growth depends crucially on metabolic fluxes, which are limited by the cell's capacity to maintain metabolic enzymes. The necessary enzyme amount per unit flux is a major determinant of metabolic strategies both in evolution and bioengineering. It depends on enzyme parameters (such as kcat and KM constants, but also on metabolite concentrations. Moreover, similar amounts of different enzymes might incur different costs for the cell, depending on enzyme-specific properties such as protein size and half-life. Here, we developed enzyme cost minimization (ECM, a scalable method for computing enzyme amounts that support a given metabolic flux at a minimal protein cost. The complex interplay of enzyme and metabolite concentrations, e.g. through thermodynamic driving forces and enzyme saturation, would make it hard to solve this optimization problem directly. By treating enzyme cost as a function of metabolite levels, we formulated ECM as a numerically tractable, convex optimization problem. Its tiered approach allows for building models at different levels of detail, depending on the amount of available data. Validating our method with measured metabolite and protein levels in E. coli central metabolism, we found typical prediction fold errors of 4.1 and 2.6, respectively, for the two kinds of data. This result from the cost-optimized metabolic state is significantly better than randomly sampled metabolite profiles, supporting the hypothesis that enzyme cost is important for the fitness of E. coli. ECM can be used to predict enzyme levels and protein cost in natural and engineered pathways, and could be a valuable computational tool to assist metabolic engineering projects. Furthermore, it establishes a direct connection between protein cost and thermodynamics, and provides a physically plausible and computationally tractable way to include enzyme kinetics into constraint-based metabolic models, where kinetics have usually been ignored or

  20. Biodegradation of clofibric acid and identification of its metabolites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salgado, R.; Oehmen, A.; Carvalho, G.; Noronha, J.P.; Reis, M.A.M.

    2012-01-01

    Graphical abstract: Metabolites produced during clofibric acid biodegradation. Highlights: ► Clofibric acid is biodegradable. ► Mainly heterotrophic bacteria degraded the clofibric acid. ► Metabolites of clofibric acid biodegradation were identified. ► The metabolic pathway of clofibric acid biodegradation is proposed. - Abstract: Clofibric acid (CLF) is the pharmaceutically active metabolite of lipid regulators clofibrate, etofibrate and etofyllinclofibrate, and it is considered both environmentally persistent and refractory. This work studied the biotransformation of CLF in aerobic sequencing batch reactors (SBRs) with mixed microbial cultures, monitoring the efficiency of biotransformation of CLF and the production of metabolites. The maximum removal achieved was 51% biodegradation (initial CLF concentration = 2 mg L −1 ), where adsorption and abiotic removal mechanisms were shown to be negligible, showing that CLF is indeed biodegradable. Tests showed that the observed CLF biodegradation was mainly carried out by heterotrophic bacteria. Three main metabolites were identified, including α-hydroxyisobutyric acid, lactic acid and 4-chlorophenol. The latter is known to exhibit higher toxicity than the parent compound, but it did not accumulate in the SBRs. α-Hydroxyisobutyric acid and lactic acid accumulated for a period, where nitrite accumulation may have been responsible for inhibiting their degradation. A metabolic pathway for the biodegradation of CLF is proposed in this study.

  1. Differential metabolite profiles during fruit development in high-yielding oil palm mesocarp.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huey Fang Teh

    Full Text Available To better understand lipid biosynthesis in oil palm mesocarp, in particular the differences in gene regulation leading to and including de novo fatty acid biosynthesis, a multi-platform metabolomics technology was used to profile mesocarp metabolites during six critical stages of fruit development in comparatively high- and low-yielding oil palm populations. Significantly higher amino acid levels preceding lipid biosynthesis and nucleosides during lipid biosynthesis were observed in a higher yielding commercial palm population. Levels of metabolites involved in glycolysis revealed interesting divergence of flux towards glycerol-3-phosphate, while carbon utilization differences in the TCA cycle were proven by an increase in malic acid/citric acid ratio. Apart from insights into the regulation of enhanced lipid production in oil palm, these results provide potentially useful metabolite yield markers and genes of interest for use in breeding programmes.

  2. Metabolite Damage and Metabolite Damage Control in Plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hanson, Andrew D. [Horticultural Sciences Department and; Henry, Christopher S. [Mathematics and Computer Science Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439, email:; Computation Institute, University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois 60637; Fiehn, Oliver [Genome Center, University of California, Davis, California 95616, email:; de Crécy-Lagard, Valérie [Microbiology and Cell Science Department, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611, email: ,

    2016-04-29

    It is increasingly clear that (a) many metabolites undergo spontaneous or enzyme-catalyzed side reactions in vivo, (b) the damaged metabolites formed by these reactions can be harmful, and (c) organisms have biochemical systems that limit the buildup of damaged metabolites. These damage-control systems either return a damaged molecule to its pristine state (metabolite repair) or convert harmful molecules to harmless ones (damage preemption). Because all organisms share a core set of metabolites that suffer the same chemical and enzymatic damage reactions, certain damage-control systems are widely conserved across the kingdoms of life. Relatively few damage reactions and damage-control systems are well known. Uncovering new damage reactions and identifying the corresponding damaged metabolites, damage-control genes, and enzymes demands a coordinated mix of chemistry, metabolomics, cheminformatics, biochemistry, and comparative genomics. This review illustrates the above points using examples from plants, which are at least as prone to metabolite damage as other organisms.

  3. Equol inhibits growth, induces atresia, and inhibits steroidogenesis of mouse antral follicles in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahalingam, Sharada; Gao, Liying; Gonnering, Marni; Helferich, William; Flaws, Jodi A.

    2016-01-01

    Equol is a non-steroidal estrogen metabolite produced by microbial conversion of daidzein, a major soy isoflavone, in the gut of some humans and many animal species. Isoflavones and their metabolites can affect endogenous estradiol production, action, and metabolism, potentially influencing ovarian follicle function. However, no studies have examined the effects of equol on intact ovarian antral follicles, which are responsible for sex steroid synthesis and further development into ovulatory follicles. Thus, the present study tested the hypothesis that equol inhibits antral follicle growth, increases follicle atresia, and inhibits steroidogenesis in the adult mouse ovary. To test this hypothesis, antral follicles isolated from adult CD-1 mice were cultured with vehicle control (dimethyl sulfoxide; DMSO) or equol (600 nM, 6 μM, 36 μM, and 100 μM) for 48 and 96 h. Every 24 h, follicle diameters were measured to monitor growth. At 48 and 96 h, the culture medium was subjected to measurement of hormone levels, and the cultured follicles were subjected to gene expression analysis. Additionally, follicles were histologically evaluated for signs of atresia after 96 h of culture. The results indicate that equol (100 μM) inhibited follicle growth, altered the mRNA levels of bcl2-associated X protein and B cell leukemia/lymphoma 2, and induced follicle atresia. Further, equol decreased the levels of estradiol, testosterone, androstenedione, and progesterone, and it decreased mRNA levels of cholesterol side-chain cleavage, steroid 17-α-hydroxalase, and aromatase. Collectively, these data indicate that equol inhibits growth, increases atresia, and inhibits steroidogenesis of cultured mouse antral follicles. - Highlights: • Equol exposure inhibits antral follicle growth. • Equol exposure increases follicle atresia. • Equol exposure inhibits sex steroid hormone levels. • Equol exposure inhibits mRNA levels of certain steroidogenic enzymes.

  4. Equol inhibits growth, induces atresia, and inhibits steroidogenesis of mouse antral follicles in vitro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mahalingam, Sharada, E-mail: mahalin2@illinois.edu [Department of Comparative Biosciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Illinois, 2001 S. Lincoln Ave, Urbana, IL 61802 (United States); Gao, Liying, E-mail: lgao@uiuc.edu [Department of Comparative Biosciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Illinois, 2001 S. Lincoln Ave, Urbana, IL 61802 (United States); Gonnering, Marni, E-mail: mgonne2@illinois.edu [Department of Comparative Biosciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Illinois, 2001 S. Lincoln Ave, Urbana, IL 61802 (United States); Helferich, William, E-mail: helferic@illinois.edu [Department of Food Science and Human Nutrition, University of Illinois, 905 S. Goodwin, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States); Flaws, Jodi A., E-mail: jflaws@illinois.edu [Department of Comparative Biosciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Illinois, 2001 S. Lincoln Ave, Urbana, IL 61802 (United States)

    2016-03-15

    Equol is a non-steroidal estrogen metabolite produced by microbial conversion of daidzein, a major soy isoflavone, in the gut of some humans and many animal species. Isoflavones and their metabolites can affect endogenous estradiol production, action, and metabolism, potentially influencing ovarian follicle function. However, no studies have examined the effects of equol on intact ovarian antral follicles, which are responsible for sex steroid synthesis and further development into ovulatory follicles. Thus, the present study tested the hypothesis that equol inhibits antral follicle growth, increases follicle atresia, and inhibits steroidogenesis in the adult mouse ovary. To test this hypothesis, antral follicles isolated from adult CD-1 mice were cultured with vehicle control (dimethyl sulfoxide; DMSO) or equol (600 nM, 6 μM, 36 μM, and 100 μM) for 48 and 96 h. Every 24 h, follicle diameters were measured to monitor growth. At 48 and 96 h, the culture medium was subjected to measurement of hormone levels, and the cultured follicles were subjected to gene expression analysis. Additionally, follicles were histologically evaluated for signs of atresia after 96 h of culture. The results indicate that equol (100 μM) inhibited follicle growth, altered the mRNA levels of bcl2-associated X protein and B cell leukemia/lymphoma 2, and induced follicle atresia. Further, equol decreased the levels of estradiol, testosterone, androstenedione, and progesterone, and it decreased mRNA levels of cholesterol side-chain cleavage, steroid 17-α-hydroxalase, and aromatase. Collectively, these data indicate that equol inhibits growth, increases atresia, and inhibits steroidogenesis of cultured mouse antral follicles. - Highlights: • Equol exposure inhibits antral follicle growth. • Equol exposure increases follicle atresia. • Equol exposure inhibits sex steroid hormone levels. • Equol exposure inhibits mRNA levels of certain steroidogenic enzymes.

  5. Production of fungal and bacterial growth modulating secondary metabolites is widespread among mycorrhiza-associated streptomycetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schrey Silvia D

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Studies on mycorrhiza associated bacteria suggest that bacterial-fungal interactions play important roles during mycorrhiza formation and affect plant health. We surveyed Streptomyces Actinobacteria, known as antibiotic producers and antagonists of fungi, from Norway spruce mycorrhizas with predominantly Piloderma species as the fungal partner. Results Fifteen Streptomyces isolates exhibited substantial variation in inhibition of tested mycorrhizal and plant pathogenic fungi (Amanita muscaria, Fusarium oxysporum, Hebeloma cylindrosporum, Heterobasidion abietinum, Heterobasidion annosum, Laccaria bicolor, Piloderma croceum. The growth of the mycorrhiza-forming fungus Laccaria bicolor was stimulated by some of the streptomycetes, and Piloderma croceum was only moderately affected. Bacteria responded to the streptomycetes differently than the fungi. For instance the strain Streptomyces sp. AcM11, which inhibited most tested fungi, was less inhibitory to bacteria than other tested streptomycetes. The determined patterns of Streptomyces-microbe interactions were associated with distinct patterns of secondary metabolite production. Notably, potentially novel metabolites were produced by strains that were less antagonistic to fungi. Most of the identified metabolites were antibiotics (e.g. cycloheximide, actiphenol and siderophores (e.g. ferulic acid, desferroxiamines. Plant disease resistance was activated by a single streptomycete strain only. Conclusions Mycorrhiza associated streptomycetes appear to have an important role in inhibiting the growth of fungi and bacteria. Additionally, our study indicates that the Streptomyces strains, which are not general antagonists of fungi, may produce still un-described metabolites.

  6. α-Glucosidase Inhibition and Antibacterial Activity of Secondary Metabolites from the Ecuadorian Species Clinopodium taxifolium (Kunth Govaerts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladimir Morocho

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The phytochemical investigation of both volatile and fixed metabolites of Clinopodium taxifolium (Kunth Govaerts (Lamiaceae was performed for the first time. It allowed the isolation and characterization of the essential oil and six known compounds: carvacrol (1, squalane (2, uvaol (3, erythrodiol (4, ursolic acid (5, and salvigenin (6. Their structures were identified and characterized by Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR and Gas Chromatography coupled to Mass Spectroscopy (GC-MS, and corroborated by literature. The essential oil of the leaves was obtained by hydrodistillation in two different periods and analyzed by GC-MS and GC coupled to Flame Ionization Detector (GC-FID. A total of 54 compounds were detected, of which 42 were identified (including trace constituents. The major constituents were carvacrol methyl ether (18.9–23.2%, carvacrol (13.8–16.3% and, carvacryl acetate (11.4–4.8%. The antibacterial activities were determined as Minimum Inhibition Concentration (MIC against Staphylococcus aureus, Enterococcus faecalis, Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Proteus vulgaris, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Micrococcus luteus. The hexane and methanol extracts exhibited activity only against Klebsiella pneumoniae (250 and 500 μg/mL respectively, while the ethyl acetate extract was inactive. The hypoglycemic activity was evaluated by the in vitro inhibition of α-glucosidase. The ethyl acetate (EtOAc extract showed strong inhibitory activity with IC50 = 24.88 µg/mL, however methanolic and hexanic extracts showed weak activity. As a pure compound, only ursolic acid showed a strong inhibitory activity, with IC50 = 72.71 μM.

  7. Sulindac Sulfide, but Not Sulindac Sulfone, Inhibits Colorectal Cancer Growth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher S. Williams

    1999-06-01

    Full Text Available Sulindac sulfide, a metabolite of the nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drug (NSAID sulindac sulfoxide, is effective at reducing tumor burden in both familial adenomatous polyposis patients and in animals with colorectal cancer. Another sulindac sulfoxide metabolite, sulindac sulfone, has been reported to have antitumor properties without inhibiting cyclooxygenase activity. Here we report the effect of sulindac sulfone treatment on the growth of colorectal carcinoma cells. We observed that sulindac sulfide or sulfone treatment of HCA-7 cells led to inhibition of prostaglandin E2 production. Both sulindac sulfide and sulfone inhibited HCA-7 and HCT-116 cell growth in vitro. Sulindac sulfone had no effect on the growth of either HCA-7 or HCT-116 xenografts, whereas the sulfide derivative inhibited HCA-7 growth in vivo. Both sulindac sulfide and sulfone inhibited colon carcinoma cell growth and prostaglandin production in vitro, but sulindac sulfone had no effect on the growth of colon cancer cell xenografts in nude mice.

  8. Lichen secondary metabolites affect growth of Physcomitrella patens by allelopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goga, Michal; Antreich, Sebastian J; Bačkor, Martin; Weckwerth, Wolfram; Lang, Ingeborg

    2017-05-01

    Lichen secondary metabolites can function as allelochemicals and affect the development and growth of neighboring bryophytes, fungi, vascular plants, microorganisms, and even other lichens. Lichen overgrowth on bryophytes is frequently observed in nature even though mosses grow faster than lichens, but there is still little information on the interactions between lichens and bryophytes.In the present study, we used extracts from six lichen thalli containing secondary metabolites like usnic acid, protocetraric acid, atranorin, lecanoric acid, nortistic acid, and thamnolic acid. To observe the influence of these metabolites on bryophytes, the moss Physcomitrella patens was cultivated for 5 weeks under laboratory conditions and treated with lichen extracts. Toxicity of natural mixtures of secondary metabolites was tested at three selected doses (0.001, 0.01, and 0.1 %). When the mixture contained substantial amounts of usnic acid, we observed growth inhibition of protonemata and reduced development of gametophores. Significant differences in cell lengths and widths were also noticed. Furthermore, usnic acid had a strong effect on cell division in protonemata suggesting a strong impact on the early stages of bryophyte development by allelochemicals contained in the lichen secondary metabolites.Biological activities of lichen secondary metabolites were confirmed in several studies such as antiviral, antibacterial, antitumor, antiherbivore, antioxidant, antipyretic, and analgetic action or photoprotection. This work aimed to expand the knowledge on allelopathic effects on bryophyte growth.

  9. Serotonergic neurotoxic metabolites of ecstasy identified in rat brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Douglas C; Duvauchelle, Christine; Ikegami, Aiko; Olsen, Christopher M; Lau, Serrine S; de la Torre, Rafael; Monks, Terrence J

    2005-04-01

    The selective serotonergic neurotoxicity of 3,4-methylenedioxyamphetamine (MDA) and 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA, ecstasy) depends on their systemic metabolism. We have recently shown that inhibition of brain endothelial cell gamma-glutamyl transpeptidase (gamma-GT) potentiates the neurotoxicity of both MDMA and MDA, indicating that metabolites that are substrates for this enzyme contribute to the neurotoxicity. Consistent with this view, glutathione (GSH) and N-acetylcysteine conjugates of alpha-methyl dopamine (alpha-MeDA) are selective neurotoxicants. However, neurotoxic metabolites of MDMA or MDA have yet to be identified in brain. Using in vivo microdialysis coupled to liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectroscopy and a high-performance liquid chromatography-coulometric electrode array system, we now show that GSH and N-acetylcysteine conjugates of N-methyl-alpha-MeDA are present in the striatum of rats administered MDMA by subcutaneous injection. Moreover, inhibition of gamma-GT with acivicin increases the concentration of GSH and N-acetylcysteine conjugates of N-methyl-alpha-MeDA in brain dialysate, and there is a direct correlation between the concentrations of metabolites in dialysate and the extent of neurotoxicity, measured by decreases in serotonin (5-HT) and 5-hydroxyindole acetic (5-HIAA) levels. Importantly, the effects of acivicin are independent of MDMA-induced hyperthermia, since acivicin-mediated potentiation of MDMA neurotoxicity occurs in the context of acivicin-mediated decreases in body temperature. Finally, we have synthesized 5-(N-acetylcystein-S-yl)-N-methyl-alpha-MeDA and established that it is a relatively potent serotonergic neurotoxicant. Together, the data support the contention that MDMA-mediated serotonergic neurotoxicity is mediated by the systemic formation of GSH and N-acetylcysteine conjugates of N-methyl-alpha-MeDA (and alpha-MeDA). The mechanisms by which such metabolites access the brain and produce selective

  10. The formation of estrogen-like tamoxifen metabolites and their influence on enzyme activity and gene expression of ADME genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johänning, Janina; Kröner, Patrick; Thomas, Maria; Zanger, Ulrich M; Nörenberg, Astrid; Eichelbaum, Michel; Schwab, Matthias; Brauch, Hiltrud; Schroth, Werner; Mürdter, Thomas E

    2018-03-01

    Tamoxifen, a standard therapy for breast cancer, is metabolized to compounds with anti-estrogenic as well as estrogen-like action at the estrogen receptor. Little is known about the formation of estrogen-like metabolites and their biological impact. Thus, we characterized the estrogen-like metabolites tamoxifen bisphenol and metabolite E for their metabolic pathway and their influence on cytochrome P450 activity and ADME gene expression. The formation of tamoxifen bisphenol and metabolite E was studied in human liver microsomes and Supersomes™. Cellular metabolism and impact on CYP enzymes was analyzed in upcyte® hepatocytes. The influence of 5 µM of tamoxifen, anti-estrogenic and estrogen-like metabolites on CYP activity was measured by HPLC MS/MS and on ADME gene expression using RT-PCR analyses. Metabolite E was formed from tamoxifen by CYP2C19, 3A and 1A2 and from desmethyltamoxifen by CYP2D6, 1A2 and 3A. Tamoxifen bisphenol was mainly formed from (E)- and (Z)-metabolite E by CYP2B6 and CYP2C19, respectively. Regarding phase II metabolism, UGT2B7, 1A8 and 1A3 showed highest activity in glucuronidation of tamoxifen bisphenol and metabolite E. Anti-estrogenic metabolites (Z)-4-hydroxytamoxifen, (Z)-endoxifen and (Z)-norendoxifen inhibited the activity of CYP2C enzymes while tamoxifen bisphenol consistently induced CYPs similar to rifampicin and phenobarbital. On the transcript level, highest induction up to 5.6-fold was observed for CYP3A4 by tamoxifen, (Z)-4-hydroxytamoxifen, tamoxifen bisphenol and (E)-metabolite E. Estrogen-like tamoxifen metabolites are formed in CYP-dependent reactions and are further metabolized by glucuronidation. The induction of CYP activity by tamoxifen bisphenol and the inhibition of CYP2C enzymes by anti-estrogenic metabolites may lead to drug-drug-interactions.

  11. Biodegradation of clofibric acid and identification of its metabolites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salgado, R. [REQUIMTE/CQFB, Chemistry Department, FCT, Universidade Nova de Lisboa, 2829-516 Caparica (Portugal); ESTS-IPS, Escola Superior de Tecnologia de Setubal do Instituto Politecnico de Setubal, Rua Vale de Chaves, Campus do IPS, Estefanilha, 2910-761 Setubal (Portugal); Oehmen, A. [REQUIMTE/CQFB, Chemistry Department, FCT, Universidade Nova de Lisboa, 2829-516 Caparica (Portugal); Carvalho, G. [REQUIMTE/CQFB, Chemistry Department, FCT, Universidade Nova de Lisboa, 2829-516 Caparica (Portugal); Instituto de Biologia Experimental e Tecnologica (IBET), Av. da Republica (EAN), 2784-505 Oeiras (Portugal); Noronha, J.P. [REQUIMTE/CQFB, Chemistry Department, FCT, Universidade Nova de Lisboa, 2829-516 Caparica (Portugal); Reis, M.A.M., E-mail: amr@fct.unl.pt [REQUIMTE/CQFB, Chemistry Department, FCT, Universidade Nova de Lisboa, 2829-516 Caparica (Portugal)

    2012-11-30

    Graphical abstract: Metabolites produced during clofibric acid biodegradation. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Clofibric acid is biodegradable. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Mainly heterotrophic bacteria degraded the clofibric acid. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Metabolites of clofibric acid biodegradation were identified. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The metabolic pathway of clofibric acid biodegradation is proposed. - Abstract: Clofibric acid (CLF) is the pharmaceutically active metabolite of lipid regulators clofibrate, etofibrate and etofyllinclofibrate, and it is considered both environmentally persistent and refractory. This work studied the biotransformation of CLF in aerobic sequencing batch reactors (SBRs) with mixed microbial cultures, monitoring the efficiency of biotransformation of CLF and the production of metabolites. The maximum removal achieved was 51% biodegradation (initial CLF concentration = 2 mg L{sup -1}), where adsorption and abiotic removal mechanisms were shown to be negligible, showing that CLF is indeed biodegradable. Tests showed that the observed CLF biodegradation was mainly carried out by heterotrophic bacteria. Three main metabolites were identified, including {alpha}-hydroxyisobutyric acid, lactic acid and 4-chlorophenol. The latter is known to exhibit higher toxicity than the parent compound, but it did not accumulate in the SBRs. {alpha}-Hydroxyisobutyric acid and lactic acid accumulated for a period, where nitrite accumulation may have been responsible for inhibiting their degradation. A metabolic pathway for the biodegradation of CLF is proposed in this study.

  12. Regulatory metabolites of vitamin E and their putative relevance for atherogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Wallert

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Vitamin E is likely the most important antioxidant in the human diet and α-tocopherol is the most active isomer. α-Tocopherol exhibits anti-oxidative capacity in vitro, and inhibits oxidation of LDL. Beside this, α-tocopherol shows anti-inflammatory activity and modulates expression of proteins involved in uptake, transport and degradation of tocopherols, as well as the uptake, storage and export of lipids such as cholesterol. Despite promising anti-atherogenic features in vitro, vitamin E failed to be atheroprotective in clinical trials in humans. Recent studies highlight the importance of long-chain metabolites of α-tocopherol, which are formed as catabolic intermediate products in the liver and occur in human plasma. These metabolites modulate inflammatory processes and macrophage foam cell formation via mechanisms different than that of their metabolic precursor α-tocopherol and at lower concentrations. Here we summarize the controversial role of vitamin E as a preventive agent against atherosclerosis and point the attention to recent findings that highlight a role of these long-chain metabolites of vitamin E as a proposed new class of regulatory metabolites. We speculate that the metabolites contribute to physiological as well as pathophysiological processes.

  13. Inhibition of poliovirus RNA synthesis by brefeldin A.

    OpenAIRE

    Maynell, L A; Kirkegaard, K; Klymkowsky, M W

    1992-01-01

    Brefeldin A (BFA), a fungal metabolite that blocks transport of newly synthesized proteins from the endoplasmic reticulum, was found to inhibit poliovirus replication 10(5)- to 10(6)-fold. BFA does not inhibit entry of poliovirus into the cell or translation of viral RNA. Poliovirus RNA synthesis, however, is completely inhibited by BFA. A specific class of membranous vesicles, with which the poliovirus replication complex is physically associated, is known to proliferate in poliovirus-infect...

  14. Potential of small-molecule fungal metabolites in antiviral chemotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Biswajit G

    2017-08-01

    Various viral diseases, such as acquired immunodeficiency syndrome, influenza, and hepatitis, have emerged as leading causes of human death worldwide. Scientific endeavor since invention of DNA-dependent RNA polymerase of pox virus in 1967 resulted in better understanding of virus replication and development of various novel therapeutic strategies. Despite considerable advancement in every facet of drug discovery process, development of commercially viable, safe, and effective drugs for these viruses still remains a big challenge. Decades of intense research yielded a handful of natural and synthetic therapeutic options. But emergence of new viruses and drug-resistant viral strains had made new drug development process a never-ending battle. Small-molecule fungal metabolites due to their vast diversity, stereochemical complexity, and preapproved biocompatibility always remain an attractive source for new drug discovery. Though, exploration of therapeutic importance of fungal metabolites has started early with discovery of penicillin, recent prediction asserted that only a small percentage (5-10%) of fungal species have been identified and much less have been scientifically investigated. Therefore, exploration of new fungal metabolites, their bioassay, and subsequent mechanistic study bears huge importance in new drug discovery endeavors. Though no fungal metabolites so far approved for antiviral treatment, many of these exhibited high potential against various viral diseases. This review comprehensively discussed about antiviral activities of fungal metabolites of diverse origin against some important viral diseases. This also highlighted the mechanistic details of inhibition of viral replication along with structure-activity relationship of some common and important classes of fungal metabolites.

  15. Chemopreventive Activities of Sulforaphane and Its Metabolites in Human Hepatoma HepG2 Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peng Liu

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Sulforaphane (SFN exhibits chemopreventive effects through various mechanisms. However, few studies have focused on the bioactivities of its metabolites. Here, three metabolites derived from SFN were studied, known as sulforaphane glutathione, sulforaphane cysteine and sulforaphane-N-acetylcysteine. Their effects on cell viability, DNA damage, tumorigenicity, cell migration and adhesion were measured in human hepatoma HepG2 cells, and their anti-angiogenetic effects were determined in a 3D co-culture model of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs and pericytes. Results indicated that these metabolites at high doses decreased cancer cell viability, induced DNA damage and inhibited motility, and impaired endothelial cell migration and tube formation. Additionally, pre-treatment with low doses of SFN metabolites protected against H2O2 challenge. The activation of the nuclear factor E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2-antioxidant response element (ARE pathway and the induction of intracellular glutathione (GSH played an important role in the cytoprotective effects of SFN metabolites. In conclusion, SFN metabolites exhibited similar cytotoxic and cytoprotective effects to SFN, which proves the necessity to study the mechanisms of action of not only SFN but also of its metabolites. Based on the different tissue distribution profiles of these metabolites, the most relevant chemical forms can be selected for targeted chemoprevention.

  16. Methylselenol, a selenium metabolite, modulates p53 pathway and inhibits the growth of colon cancer xenografts in Balb/c mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Huawei; Cheng, Wen-Hsing; Johnson, Luann K

    2013-05-01

    It is has been hypothesized that methylselenol is a critical selenium metabolite for anticancer activity in vivo. In this study, we used a protein array which contained 112 different antibodies known to be involved in the p53 pathway to investigate the molecular targets of methylselenol in human HCT116 colon cancer cells. The array analysis indicated that methylselenol exposure changed the expression of 11 protein targets related to the regulation of cell cycle and apoptosis. Subsequently, we confirmed these proteins with the Western blotting approach, and found that methylselenol increased the expression of GADD 153 and p21 but reduced the level of c-Myc, E2F1 and Phos p38 MAP kinase. Similar to our previous report on human HCT116 colon cancer cells, methylselenol also inhibited cell growth and led to an increase in G1 and G2 fractions with a concomitant drop in S-phase in mouse colon cancer MC26 cells. When the MC26 cells were transplanted to their immune-competent Balb/c mice, methylselenol-treated MC26 cells had significantly less tumor growth potential than that of untreated MC26 cells. Taken together, our data suggest that methylselenol modulates the expression of key genes related to cell cycle and apoptosis and inhibits colon cancer cell proliferation and tumor growth. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  17. Sesquiterpene-derived metabolites from the deep water marine sponge Poecillastra sollasi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Killday, K B; Longley, R; McCarthy, P J; Pomponi, S A; Wright, A E; Neale, R F; Sills, M A

    1993-04-01

    Six sesquiterpene-derived compounds, 1-6, which we call sollasins a-f, have been isolated from a deep water specimen of the sponge Poecillastra sollasi. The structures were elucidated by comparison of spectral data to related metabolites and confirmed using spectroscopic methods. The compounds inhibit the growth of the pathogenic fungi Candida albicans and Cryptococcus neoformans and the P-388 and A-549 tumor cell lines. Compounds 3 and 4 show weak inhibition of binding of [125I] angiotensin II to rat aorta smooth muscle cell membranes.

  18. A Novel Fungal Metabolite with Beneficial Properties for Agricultural Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Vinale

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Trichoderma are ubiquitous soil fungi that include species widely used as biocontrol agents in agriculture. Many isolates are known to secrete several secondary metabolites with different biological activities towards plants and other microbes. Harzianic acid (HA is a T. harzianum metabolite able to promote plant growth and strongly bind iron. In this work, we isolated from the culture filtrate of a T. harzianum strain a new metabolite, named isoharzianic acid (iso-HA, a stereoisomer of HA. The structure and absolute configuration of this compound has been determined by spectroscopic methods, including UV-Vis, MS, 1D and 2D NMR analyses. In vitro applications of iso-HA inhibited the mycelium radial growth of Sclerotinia sclerotiorum and Rhizoctonia solani. Moreover, iso HA improved the germination of tomato seeds and induced disease resistance. HPLC-DAD experiments showed that the production of HA and iso HA was affected by the presence of plant tissue in the liquid medium. In particular, tomato tissue elicited the production of HA but negatively modulated the biosynthesis of its analogue iso-HA, suggesting that different forms of the same Trichoderma secondary metabolite have specific roles in the molecular mechanism regulating the Trichoderma plant interaction.

  19. A novel fungal metabolite with beneficial properties for agricultural applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinale, Francesco; Manganiello, Gelsomina; Nigro, Marco; Mazzei, Pierluigi; Piccolo, Alessandro; Pascale, Alberto; Ruocco, Michelina; Marra, Roberta; Lombardi, Nadia; Lanzuise, Stefania; Varlese, Rosaria; Cavallo, Pierpaolo; Lorito, Matteo; Woo, Sheridan L

    2014-07-08

    Trichoderma are ubiquitous soil fungi that include species widely used as biocontrol agents in agriculture. Many isolates are known to secrete several secondary metabolites with different biological activities towards plants and other microbes. Harzianic acid (HA) is a T. harzianum metabolite able to promote plant growth and strongly bind iron. In this work, we isolated from the culture filtrate of a T. harzianum strain a new metabolite, named isoharzianic acid (iso-HA), a stereoisomer of HA. The structure and absolute configuration of this compound has been determined by spectroscopic methods, including UV-Vis, MS, 1D and 2D NMR analyses. In vitro applications of iso-HA inhibited the mycelium radial growth of Sclerotinia sclerotiorum and Rhizoctonia solani. Moreover, iso HA improved the germination of tomato seeds and induced disease resistance. HPLC-DAD experiments showed that the production of HA and iso HA was affected by the presence of plant tissue in the liquid medium. In particular, tomato tissue elicited the production of HA but negatively modulated the biosynthesis of its analogue iso-HA, suggesting that different forms of the same Trichoderma secondary metabolite have specific roles in the molecular mechanism regulating the Trichoderma plant interaction.

  20. Intermittent fasting is neuroprotective in focal cerebral ischemia by minimizing autophagic flux disturbance and inhibiting apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Ji Heun; Yu, Kwang Sik; Bak, Dong Ho; Lee, Je Hun; Lee, Nam Seob; Jeong, Young Gil; Kim, Dong Kwan; Kim, Jwa-Jin; Han, Seung-Yun

    2016-11-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that autophagy induced by caloric restriction (CR) is neuroprotective against cerebral ischemia. However, it has not been determined whether intermittent fasting (IF), a variation of CR, can exert autophagy-related neuroprotection against cerebral ischemia. Therefore, the neuroprotective effect of IF was evaluated over the course of two weeks in a rat model of focal cerebral ischemia, which was induced by middle cerebral artery occlusion and reperfusion (MCAO/R). Specifically, the role of autophagy modulation as a potential underlying mechanism for this phenomenon was investigated. It was demonstrated that IF reduced infarct volume and brain edema, improved neurobehavioral deficits, and rescued neuronal loss after MCAO/R. Furthermore, neuronal apoptosis was decreased by IF in the rat cortex. An increase in the number of autophagosomes (APs) was demonstrated in the cortices of IF-treated rats, using immunofluorescence staining and transmission electron microscopy. Using immunoblots, an IF-induced increase was detected in microtubule-associated protein 1 light chain 3 (LC3)-II, Rab7, and cathepsin D protein levels, which corroborated previous morphological studies. Notably, IF reduced the accumulation of APs and p62, demonstrating that IF attenuated the MCAO/R-induced disturbance of autophagic flux in neurons. The findings of the present study suggest that IF-induced neuroprotection in focal cerebral ischemia is due, at least in part, to the minimization of autophagic flux disturbance and inhibition of apoptosis.

  1. Biodegradation of clofibric acid and identification of its metabolites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salgado, R; Oehmen, A; Carvalho, G; Noronha, J P; Reis, M A M

    2012-11-30

    Clofibric acid (CLF) is the pharmaceutically active metabolite of lipid regulators clofibrate, etofibrate and etofyllinclofibrate, and it is considered both environmentally persistent and refractory. This work studied the biotransformation of CLF in aerobic sequencing batch reactors (SBRs) with mixed microbial cultures, monitoring the efficiency of biotransformation of CLF and the production of metabolites. The maximum removal achieved was 51% biodegradation (initial CLF concentration=2 mg L(-1)), where adsorption and abiotic removal mechanisms were shown to be negligible, showing that CLF is indeed biodegradable. Tests showed that the observed CLF biodegradation was mainly carried out by heterotrophic bacteria. Three main metabolites were identified, including α-hydroxyisobutyric acid, lactic acid and 4-chlorophenol. The latter is known to exhibit higher toxicity than the parent compound, but it did not accumulate in the SBRs. α-Hydroxyisobutyric acid and lactic acid accumulated for a period, where nitrite accumulation may have been responsible for inhibiting their degradation. A metabolic pathway for the biodegradation of CLF is proposed in this study. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. An in silico platform for the design of heterologous pathways in nonnative metabolite production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chatsurachai Sunisa

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Microorganisms are used as cell factories to produce valuable compounds in pharmaceuticals, biofuels, and other industrial processes. Incorporating heterologous metabolic pathways into well-characterized hosts is a major strategy for obtaining these target metabolites and improving productivity. However, selecting appropriate heterologous metabolic pathways for a host microorganism remains difficult owing to the complexity of metabolic networks. Hence, metabolic network design could benefit greatly from the availability of an in silico platform for heterologous pathway searching. Results We developed an algorithm for finding feasible heterologous pathways by which nonnative target metabolites are produced by host microorganisms, using Escherichia coli, Corynebacterium glutamicum, and Saccharomyces cerevisiae as templates. Using this algorithm, we screened heterologous pathways for the production of all possible nonnative target metabolites contained within databases. We then assessed the feasibility of the target productions using flux balance analysis, by which we could identify target metabolites associated with maximum cellular growth rate. Conclusions This in silico platform, designed for targeted searching of heterologous metabolic reactions, provides essential information for cell factory improvement.

  3. Chloride flux from blood to CSF: inhibition by furosemide and bumetanide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, D.C.; Singer, S.; Hoop, B.; Kazemi, H.

    1987-01-01

    Movement of chloride from blood to cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) is one of the factors that may be involved in regulation of CSF [Cl-], which is important to CSF acid-base balance. We made quantitative measurements of the unidirectional flux of radiolabeled chloride between blood and CSF in anesthetized dogs, using 38 Cl, a short-lived isotope (half-life 37.3 min). This allowed multiple studies to be performed in a given animal. A three-compartment model for the blood, CSF, brain extracellular fluid, and ventriculocisternal perfusion system was used to determine the flux rate. With normocapnia, the flux was 0.01.1 min-1. The influx could be reproducibly measured for three separate determinations in the same animal over a period of 6 h, being 98 +/- 6% of the control first run on the second run and 113 +/- 6% on the third. Furosemide and bumetanide, inhibitors of sodium-coupled chloride movement, lowered the flux to 43 +/- 3% and 55 +/- 6% of control, respectively. The combination of hypercapnia and furosemide lowered the influx to 63 +/- 9% of control. These results indicate that a major mechanism of chloride entry into CSF is sodium-coupled chloride transport

  4. Opposite Regulation of Ghrelin and Glucagon-like Peptide-1 by Metabolite G-Protein-Coupled Receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engelstoft, M S; Schwartz, T W

    2016-01-01

    Gut hormones send information about incoming nutrients to the rest of the body and thereby control many aspects of metabolism. The secretion of ghrelin and glucagon-like protein (GLP)-1, two hormones with opposite secretory patterns and opposite actions on multiple targets, is controlled by a lim......Gut hormones send information about incoming nutrients to the rest of the body and thereby control many aspects of metabolism. The secretion of ghrelin and glucagon-like protein (GLP)-1, two hormones with opposite secretory patterns and opposite actions on multiple targets, is controlled...... by a limited number of G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs); half of which recognize and bind dietary nutrient metabolites, metabolites generated by gut microbiota, and metabolites of the host's intermediary metabolism. Most metabolite GPCRs controlling ghrelin secretion are inhibitory, whereas all metabolite...... receptors controlling GLP-1 secretion are stimulatory. This dichotomy in metabolite sensor function, which is obtained through a combination of differential expression and cell-dependent signaling bias, offers pharmacological targets to stimulate GLP-1 and inhibit ghrelin through the same mechanism....

  5. Modification of Turbulence Structures in a Channel Flow by Uniform Magnetic Fluxes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, D.; Choi, H.; Kim, J.

    1997-11-01

    Effects of electromagnetic forcing on the near-wall turbulence are investigated by applying a uniform magnetic flux in a turbulent channel flow in the streamwise and spanwise directions, respectively. The base flow is a fully developed turbulent channel flow and the direct numerical simulation technique is used. The electromagnetic force induced from the magnetic fluxes reduces the intensity of the wall-layer structures and thus drag is significantly reduced. The wall-normal and spanwise velocity fluctuations and the Reynolds shear stress decrease with the increased magnetic flux in both directions. The streamwise velocity fluctuations increase with the streamwise magnetic flux, whereas they decrease with the spanwise magnetic flux. It is also shown that the spanwise magnetic flux is much more effective than the streamwise magnetic flux in reducing the skin-friction drag. Instantaneous Lorentz force vectors show that the flow motions by the near-wall vortices are directly inhibited by the spanwise magnetic flux, while they are less effectively inhibited by the streamwise magnetic flux. Other turbulence statistics that reveal the effects of the applied magnetic forcing will be presented. ^* Supported by KOSEF Contract No. 965-1008-003-2 and ONR Grant No. N00014-95-1-0352.

  6. Activation of dormant secondary metabolite production by introducing neomycin resistance into the deep-sea fungus, Aspergillus versicolor ZBY-3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Yuan; Cui, Cheng-Bin; Li, Chang-Wei; Hua, Wei; Wu, Chang-Jing; Zhu, Tian-Jiao; Gu, Qian-Qun

    2014-07-29

    A new ultrasound-mediated approach has been developed to introduce neomycin-resistance to activate silent pathways for secondary metabolite production in a bio-inactive, deep-sea fungus, Aspergillus versicolor ZBY-3. Upon treatment of the ZBY-3 spores with a high concentration of neomycin by proper ultrasound irradiation, a total of 30 mutants were obtained by single colony isolation. The acquired resistance of the mutants to neomycin was confirmed by a resistance test. In contrast to the ZBY-3 strain, the EtOAc extracts of 22 of the 30 mutants inhibited the human cancer K562 cells, indicating that these mutants acquired a capability to produce antitumor metabolites. HPLC-photodiode array detector (PDAD)-UV and HPLC-electron spray ionization (ESI)-MS analyses of the EtOAc extracts of seven bioactive mutants and the ZBY-3 strain indicated that diverse secondary metabolites have been newly produced in the mutant extracts in contrast to the ZBY-3 extract. The followed isolation and characterization demonstrated that six metabolites, cyclo(D-Pro-D-Phe) (1), cyclo(D-Tyr-D-Pro) (2), phenethyl 5-oxo-L-prolinate (3), cyclo(L-Ile-L-Pro) (4), cyclo(L-Leu-L-Pro) (5) and 3β,5α,9α-trihydroxy-(22E,24R)-ergosta-7,22-dien-6-one (6), were newly produced by the mutant u2n2h3-3 compared to the parent ZBY-3 strain. Compound 3 was a new compound; 2 was isolated from a natural source for the first time, and all of these compounds were also not yet found in the metabolites of other A. versicolor strains. Compounds 1-6 inhibited the K562 cells, with inhibition rates of 54.6% (1), 72.9% (2), 23.5% (3), 29.6% (4), 30.9% (5) and 51.1% (6) at 100 μg/mL, and inhibited also other human cancer HL-60, BGC-823 and HeLa cells, to some extent. The present study demonstrated the effectiveness of the ultrasound-mediated approach to activate silent metabolite production in fungi by introducing acquired resistance to aminoglycosides and its potential for discovering new compounds from silent fungal

  7. Isolation and screening of proangiogenic and antiangiogenic metabolites producing rare actinobacteria from soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azarakhsh, Y; Mohammadipanah, F; Nassiri, S M; Siavashi, V; Hamedi, J

    2017-06-01

    Angiogenesis is a physiological process that has important impacts on the pathology and healing of various diseases, and its induction or inhibition by bioactive actinobacterial metabolites can help the treatment of some diseases. In this study, the effects of actinobacterial extract in the process of angiogenesis have been explored. In this research, proangiogenic and antiangiogenic metabolites producing actinobacteria were isolated from soil samples and their fermentation broth were extracted and after evaluation of their toxicity by MTT assay, antiangiogenic and proangiogenic activities were screened against human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) by in vitro tube formation and migration assay. Isolated strains were identified through molecular techniques. The results showed that Nocardiopsis arvandica UTMC 103 and Nonomuraea sp. UTMC 2180 extracts had a high potential of anti-angiogenic activity on HUVECs. For the first time proangiogenic potency of a rare actinobacterium, Kribbella sp. UTMC 522, was reported, and N. arvandica UTMC 103 and Nonomuraea sp. UTMC 2180 extracts inhibits the proliferation, migration and angiogenesis activity of HUVECs with reasonable potency. Metabolites of the introduced rare actinobacteria are potent proangiogenic and angiogenic inhibitors. Identification of angiogenic-antiangiogenic mechanisms and purification of the extracts would be useful in therapeutic angiogenesis. © 2017 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  8. Gestational or acute restraint in adulthood reduces levels of 5α-reduced testosterone metabolites in the hippocampus and produces behavioral inhibition of adult male rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alicia A Walf

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Stressors, during early life or adulthood, can alter steroid-sensitive behaviors, such as exploration, anxiety, and/or cognitive processes. We investigated if exposure to acute stressors in adulthood may alter behavioral and neuroendocrine responses of male rats that were exposed to gestational stress or not. We hypothesized that rats exposed to gestational and acute stress may show behavioral inhibition, increased corticosterone, and altered androgen levels in the hippocampus. Subjects were adult, male offspring of rat dams that were restrained daily on gestational days 14-20, or did not experience this manipulation. Immediately before testing, rats were restraint-stressed for 20 minutes or not. During week 1, rats were tested in a battery of tasks, including the open field, elevated plus maze, social interaction, tailflick, pawlick, and defensive burying tasks. During week 2, rats were trained and tested 24 hours later in the inhibitory avoidance task. Plasma corticosterone and androgen levels, and hippocampal androgen levels, were measured in all subjects. Gestational and acute restraint stress increased plasma levels of corticosterone, and reduced levels of testosterone’s 5α-reduced metabolites, dihydrotestosterone and 3α-androstanediol, but not the aromatized metabolite, estradiol, in plasma or the hippocampus. Gestational and acute restraint stress reduced central entries made in the open field, and latencies to enter the shock-associated side of the inhibitory avoidance chamber during testing. Gestational stress reduced time spent interacting with a conspecific. These data suggest that gestational and acute restraint stress can have actions to produce behavioral inhibition coincident with increased corticosterone and decreased 5α-reduced androgens of adult male rats. Thus, gestational stress altered neural circuits involved in the neuroendocrine response to acute stress in early adulthood.

  9. The role of arachidonic acid metabolites in signal transduction in an identified neural network mediating presynaptic inhibition in Aplysia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shapiro, E.; Piomelli, D.; Feinmark, S.; Vogel, S.; Chin, G.; Schwartz, J.H.

    1988-01-01

    Neuromodulation is a form of signal transduction that results in the biochemical control of neuronal excitability. Many neurotransmitters act through second messengers, and the examination of biochemical cascades initiated by neurotransmitter-receptor interaction has advanced the understanding of how information is acquired and stored in the nervous system. For example, 5-HT and other facilitory transmitters increase cAMP in sensory neurons of Aplysia, which enhances excitability and facilitates transmitter output. The authors have examined the role of arachidonic acid metabolites in a neuronal circuit mediating presynaptic inhibition. L32 cells are a cluster of putative histaminergic neurons that each make dual-action synaptic potentials onto two follower neurons, L10 and L14. The synaptic connections, biophysical properties, and roles in behavior of the L10 and L14 follower cells have been well studied. The types of ion channels causing each component of the L32-L10 and L32-L14 dual actions have been characterized and application of histamine mimics the effects of stimulating L32 in both L10 and L14

  10. Direct and irreversible inhibition of cyclooxygenase-1 by nitroaspirin (NCX 4016).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corazzi, Teresa; Leone, Mario; Maucci, Raffaella; Corazzi, Lanfranco; Gresele, Paolo

    2005-12-01

    Benzoic acid, 2-(acetyl-oxy)-3-[(nitrooxy)methyl]phenyl ester (NCX 4016), a new drug made by an aspirin molecule linked, through a spacer, to a nitric oxide (NO)-donating moiety, is now under clinical testing for the treatment of atherothrombotic conditions. Aspirin exerts its antithrombotic activity by irreversibly inactivating platelet cyclooxygenase (COX)-1. NCX 4016 in vivo undergoes metabolism into deacetylated and/or denitrated metabolites, and it is not known whether NCX 4016 needs to liberate aspirin to inhibit COX-1, or whether it can block it as a whole molecule. The aim of our study was to evaluate the effects of NCX 4016 and its analog or metabolites on platelet COX-1 and whole blood COX-2 and on purified ovine COX (oCOX)-1 and oCOX-2. In particular, we have compared the mechanism by which NCX 4016 inhibits purified oCOX enzymes with that of aspirin using a spectrophotometric assay. All the NCX 4016 derivatives containing acetylsalicylic acid inhibited the activity of oCOX-1 and oCOX-2, whereas the deacetylated metabolites and the nitric oxide-donating moiety were inactive. Dialysis experiments showed that oCOX-1 inhibition by NCX 4016, similar to aspirin, is irreversible. Reversible COX inhibitors (indomethacin) or salicylic acid incubated with the enzyme before NCX 4016 prevent the irreversible inhibition of oCOX-1 by NCX 4016 as well as by aspirin. In conclusion, our data show that NCX 4016 acts as a direct and irreversible inhibitor of COX-1 and that the presence of a spacer and NO-donating moiety in the molecule slows the kinetics of COX-1 inhibition by NCX 4016, compared with aspirin.

  11. Secondary metabolites of Mirabilis jalapa structurally inhibit Lactate Dehydrogenase A in silico: a potential cancer treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kusumawati, R.; Nasrullah, A. H.; Pesik, R. N.; Muthmainah; Indarto, D.

    2018-03-01

    Altered energy metabolism from phosphorylated oxidation to aerobic glycolysis is one of the cancer hallmarks. Lactate dehydrogenase A (LDHA) is a major enzyme that catalyses pyruvate to lactate in such condition. The aim of this study was to explore LDHA inhibitors derived from Indonesian herbal plants. In this study, LDHA and oxamate molecular structures were obtained from protein data bank. As a standard ligand inhibitor, oxamate was molecularly re-validated using Autodock Vina 1.1.2 software and showed binding energy -4.26 ± 0.006 kcal/mol and interacted with LDHA at Gln99, Arg105, Asn137, Arg168, His192, and Thr247 residues. Molecular docking was used to visualize interaction between Indonesian phytochemicals and LDHA. Indonesian phytochemicals with the lowest binding energy and similar residues with standard ligand was Miraxanthin-III (-8.53 ± 0.006 kcal/mol), Vulgaxanthin-I (-8.46 ± 0.006 kcal/mol), Miraxanthin-II (-7.9 ± 0.2 kcal/mol) and Miraxanthin-V (-7.96 ± kcal/mol). Lower energy binding to LDHA and binding site at these residues was predicted to inhibit LDHA activity better than standard ligand. All phytochemicals were found in Mirabilis jalapa plant. Secondary metabolites in Mirabilis jalapa have LDHA inhibitor property in silico. Further in vitro study should be performed to confirm this result.

  12. Interleukin-1 inhibits the synthesis of collagen by fibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatnagar, R; Penfornis, H; Mauviel, A; Loyau, G; Saklatvala, J; Pujol, J P

    1986-10-01

    Human dermal fibroblasts, exposed to human or porcine Interleukin-1, responded by an inhibition of collagen synthesis in a dose dependent manner. Incubation with Il-1 for more than 8 h was required to see an appreciable effect. The phenomenon was not dependent on the presence of serum in the culture medium. Since a stimulation of prostaglandin E2 secretion was also observed in presence of Il-1, we investigated the eventual role of arachidonic acid metabolites in the phenomenon. Inhibitors interfering with arachidonate metabolism, namely indomethacin, acetyl salicylic acid, BW 755 C and NDGA had no influence on the inhibition of collagen synthesis caused by Il-1. These data suggest that both cyclooxygenase and lipoxygenase derived metabolites of arachidonic acid are unlikely to play a role in the mechanism.

  13. Activation of the Silent Secondary Metabolite Production by Introducing Neomycin-Resistance in a Marine-Derived Penicillium purpurogenum G59

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chang-Jing Wu

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction of neomycin-resistance into a marine-derived, wild-type Penicillium purpurogenum G59 resulted in activation of silent biosynthetic pathways for the secondary metabolite production. Upon treatment of G59 spores with neomycin and dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO, a total of 56 mutants were obtained by single colony isolation. The acquired resistance of mutants to neomycin was testified by the resistance test. In contrast to the G59 strain, the EtOAc extracts of 28 mutants inhibited the human cancer K562 cells, indicating that the 28 mutants have acquired the capability to produce bioactive metabolites. HPLC-photodiode array detector (PDAD-UV and HPLC-electron spray ionization (ESI-MS analyses further indicated that diverse secondary metabolites have been newly produced in the bioactive mutant extracts. Followed isolation and characterization demonstrated that five bioactive secondary metabolites, curvularin (1, citrinin (2, penicitrinone A (3, erythro-23-O-methylneocyclocitrinol (4 and 22E-7α-methoxy-5α, 6α-epoxyergosta-8(14,22-dien-3β-ol (5, were newly produced by a mutant, 4-30, compared to the G59 strain. All 1–5 were also not yet found in the secondary metabolites of other wild type P. purpurogenum strains. Compounds 1–5 inhibited human cancer K562, HL-60, HeLa and BGC-823 cells to varying extents. Both present bioassays and chemical investigations demonstrated that the introduction of neomycin-resistance into the marine-derived fungal G59 strain could activate silent secondary metabolite production. The present work not only extended the previous DMSO-mediated method for introducing drug-resistance in fungi both in DMSO concentrations and antibiotics, but also additionally exemplified effectiveness of this method for activating silent fungal secondary metabolites. This method could be applied to other fungal isolates to elicit their metabolic potentials to investigate secondary metabolites from silent biosynthetic pathways.

  14. Effect of fungal and plant metabolites on broomrapes (Orobanche and Phelipanche spp.) seed germination and radicle growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cimmino, Alessio; Fernández-Aparicio, Mónica; Andolfi, Anna; Basso, Sara; Rubiales, Diego; Evidente, Antonio

    2014-10-29

    Orobanche and Phelipanche species (the broomrapes) are root parasitic plants, some of which cause heavy yield losses on important crops. The development of herbicides based on natural metabolites from microbial and plant origin, targeting early stages on parasitic plant development, might contribute to the reduction of broomrape seed bank in agricultural soils. Therefore, the effect of metabolites belonging to different classes of natural compounds on broomrape seed germination and radicle development was assayed in vitro. Among the metabolites tested, epi-sphaeropsidone, cyclopaldic acid, and those belonging to the sesquiterpene class induced broomrape germination in a species-specific manner. epi-Epoformin, sphaeropsidin A, and cytochalasans inhibited germination of GR24-treated broomrape seeds. The growth of broomrape radicle was strongly inhibited by sphaeropsidin A and compounds belonging to cyclohexene epoxide and cytochalasan classes. Broomrape radicles treated with epi-sphaeropsidone developed a layer of papillae while radicles treated with cytochalasans or with sphaeropsidin A turned necrotic. These findings allow new lead natural herbicides for the management of parasitic weeds to be identified.

  15. Decrease of intracellular pH as possible mechanism of embryotoxicity of glycol ether alkoxyacetic acid metabolites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Louisse, Jochem; Bai Yanqing; Verwei, Miriam; Sandt, Johannes J.M. van de; Blaauboer, Bas J.; Rietjens, Ivonne M.C.M.

    2010-01-01

    Embryotoxicity of glycol ethers is caused by their alkoxyacetic acid metabolites, but the mechanism underlying the embryotoxicity of these acid metabolites is so far not known. The present study investigates a possible mechanism underlying the embryotoxicity of glycol ether alkoxyacetic acid metabolites using the methoxyacetic acid (MAA) metabolite of ethylene glycol monomethyl ether as the model compound. The results obtained demonstrate an MAA-induced decrease of the intracellular pH (pH i ) of embryonic BALB/c-3T3 cells as well as of embryonic stem (ES)-D3 cells, at concentrations that affect ES-D3 cell differentiation. These results suggest a mechanism for MAA-mediated embryotoxicity similar to the mechanism of embryotoxicity of the drugs valproic acid and acetazolamide (ACZ), known to decrease the pH i in vivo, and therefore used as positive controls. The embryotoxic alkoxyacetic acid metabolites ethoxyacetic acid, butoxyacetic acid and phenoxyacetic acid also caused an intracellular acidification of BALB/c-3T3 cells at concentrations that are known to inhibit ES-D3 cell differentiation. Two other embryotoxic compounds, all-trans-retinoic acid and 5-fluorouracil, did not decrease the pH i of embryonic cells at concentrations that affect ES-D3 cell differentiation, pointing at a different mechanism of embryotoxicity of these compounds. MAA and ACZ induced a concentration-dependent inhibition of ES-D3 cell differentiation, which was enhanced by amiloride, an inhibitor of the Na + /H + -antiporter, corroborating an important role of the pH i in the embryotoxic mechanism of both compounds. Together, the results presented indicate that a decrease of the pH i may be the mechanism of embryotoxicity of the alkoxyacetic acid metabolites of the glycol ethers.

  16. [Antagonism against Beauveria bassiana by lipopeptide metabolites produced by entophyte Bacillus amyloliquefaciens strain SWB16].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jingjie; Zhao, Dongyang; Liu, Yonggui; Ao, Xiang; Fan, Rui; Duan, Zhengqiao; Liu, Yanping; Chen, Qianqian; Jin, Zhixiong; Wan, Yongji

    2014-07-04

    We screened bacterial strains that have strong antagonism against Beauveria bassiana, an important pathogen of silkworm industry, and detected the antagonistic activity of lipopeptide metabolites. We identified bacterium SWB16 by morphological observation, physiological and biochemical experiments, 16SrRNA, and gyrA gene sequence analysis, tested antagonistic activity of strain SWB16 against Beauveria bassiana by measuring the inhibition zone diameter using filter paper diffusion method (Kirby-Bauer method), obtained lipopeptide metabolites of the strain using methanol extraction and observed the antagonism of strain SWB16 lipopeptide extracts against the conidia and hyphae of Beauveria bassiana, detected main ingredients and genes of lipopeptide metabolites by high-performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry and PCR amplification. SWB16 isolated from tissue of plant Dioscorea zingiberensis C. H. Wright belongs to Bacillus amyloliquefaciens and showed high antagonistic activity to Beauveria bassiana, and the lipopeptide extracts of isolate SWB16 exhibited significant inhibition to conidial germination and mycelial growth of Beauveria bassiana. The result of mass spectrometric detection indicated main component of the lipopeptide metabolites were fengcin and iturin, and genes fenB, ituA involved in the synthesis of them were amplified in the genome. Bacillus amyloliquefaciens strain SWB16 could produce lipopeptide antibiotics with strong antagonism to the entomopathogenic fungus Beauveria bassiana, and the results suggested that strain SWB16 has potential application value for controlling white muscardine of economic insects including silkworm.

  17. Translational step inhibited in vivo by aflatoxin B1 in rat-liver polysomes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sarasin, A.; Moule, Y.

    1975-01-01

    Aflatoxin B 1 strongly inhibits protein synthesis in rat liver cells. This paper confirms the foregoing results and represents an attempt to localize the translational step inhibited in vivo by aflatoxin B 1 . We used the simulation study developed by Li, Kisilevsky, Wasan and Hammond, 1972 (Biochim. Biophys. Acta, 272, 451-462) to determine precisely the site inhibited in vivo after drug intoxication. This analysis is based on two parameters: the kinetics of polysome labeling to follow the nascent peptide synthesis, and the kinetics of supernatant labeling to follow the completed protein synthesis. Up to 5 h after dosing, aflatoxin specifically inhibits the elongation and/or termination steps during protein synthesis; after longer periods of time inhibition occurs essentially at the initiation step. When the intracellular concentration of aflatoxin is too high, particularly 2 h after dosing, each step of protein synthesis is blocked. Polypeptide synthesis by the postmitochondrial supernatants isolated from aflatoxin-treated animals is impaired in the same proportion as protein synthesis in vivo. The damage caused by aflatoxin is mostly observed on microsomes. However, purified polysomes isolated from aflatoxin-treated rats synthesize proteins in vitro to the same extent as those from controls. These results suggest that aflatoxin metabolite(s) are bound to polysomes with noncovalent bonds. These active metabolites are probably lost during polysome isolation procedures. Finally, relationships between protein metabolism and aflatoxin carcinogenesis are discussed. (orig./BSC) [de

  18. Effects of quartz on crystallization behavior of mold fluxes and microstructural characteristics of flux film.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Liu; Xiuli, Han; Mingduo, Li; Di, Zhang

    2018-01-01

    Mold fluxes are mainly prepared using cement clinker, quartz, wollastonite, borax, fluorite, soda ash and other mineral materials. Quartz, as one of the most common and essential materials, was chosen for this study to analyze itseffects on crystallization temperature, critical cooling rate, crystal incubation time, crystallization ratio and phases of flux film. We used the research methods of process mineralogy with the application of the single hot thermocouple technique, heat flux simulator, polarizing microscope, X-ray diffraction, etc. Results: By increasing the quartz content from 16 mass% to 24 mass%, the crystallization temperature, critical cooling rate and crystallization ratio of flux film decreased, and the crystal incubation time was extended. Meanwhile, the mineralogical structure of the flux film changed, with a large amount of wollastonite precipitation and a significant decrease in the cuspidine content until it reached zero. This showed a steady decline in the heat transfer control capacity of the flux film. The reason for the results above is that, by increasing the quartz content, the silicon-oxygen tetrahedron network structure promoted a rise in viscosity and restrained ion migration, inhibiting crystal nucleation and growth, leading to the weakening of the crystallization and a decline in the crystallization ratio.

  19. Metabolic flux analysis of heterotrophic growth in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nanette R Boyle

    Full Text Available Despite the wealth of knowledge available for C. reinhardtii, the central metabolic fluxes of growth on acetate have not yet been determined. In this study, 13C-metabolic flux analysis (13C-MFA was used to determine and quantify the metabolic pathways of primary metabolism in C. reinhardtii cells grown under heterotrophic conditions with acetate as the sole carbon source. Isotopic labeling patterns of compartment specific biomass derived metabolites were used to calculate the fluxes. It was found that acetate is ligated with coenzyme A in the three subcellular compartments (cytosol, mitochondria and plastid included in the model. Two citrate synthases were found to potentially be involved in acetyl-coA metabolism; one localized in the mitochondria and the other acting outside the mitochondria. Labeling patterns demonstrate that Acetyl-coA synthesized in the plastid is directly incorporated in synthesis of fatty acids. Despite having a complete TCA cycle in the mitochondria, it was also found that a majority of the malate flux is shuttled to the cytosol and plastid where it is converted to oxaloacetate providing reducing equivalents to these compartments. When compared to predictions by flux balance analysis, fluxes measured with 13C-MFA were found to be suboptimal with respect to biomass yield; C. reinhardtii sacrifices biomass yield to produce ATP and reducing equivalents.

  20. Mitochondrial toxicity of diclofenac and its metabolites via inhibition of oxidative phosphorylation (ATP synthesis) in rat liver mitochondria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Syed, Muzeeb; Skonberg, Christian; Hansen, Steen Honoré

    2016-01-01

    Diclofenac is a widely prescribed NSAID, which by itself and its reactive metabolites (Phase-I and Phase-II) may be involved in serious idiosyncratic hepatotoxicity. Mitochondrial injury is one of the mechanisms of drug induced liver injury (DILI). In the present work, an investigation of the inh......Diclofenac is a widely prescribed NSAID, which by itself and its reactive metabolites (Phase-I and Phase-II) may be involved in serious idiosyncratic hepatotoxicity. Mitochondrial injury is one of the mechanisms of drug induced liver injury (DILI). In the present work, an investigation...... of the inhibitory effects of diclofenac (Dic) and its phase I [4-hydroxy diclofenac (4'-OH-Dic) and 5-hydroxy diclofenac (5-OH-dic)] and Phase-II [diclofenac acyl glucuronide (DicGluA) and diclofenac glutathione thioester (DicSG)] metabolites, on ATP synthesis in rat liver mitochondria was carried out. A mechanism...

  1. Artemisinin inhibits chloroplast electron transport activity: mode of action.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adyasha Bharati

    Full Text Available Artemisinin, a secondary metabolite produced in Artemisia plant species, besides having antimalarial properties is also phytotoxic. Although, the phytotoxic activity of the compound has been long recognized, no information is available on the mechanism of action of the compound on photosynthetic activity of the plant. In this report, we have evaluated the effect of artemisinin on photoelectron transport activity of chloroplast thylakoid membrane. The inhibitory effect of the compound, under in vitro condition, was pronounced in loosely and fully coupled thylakoids; being strong in the former. The extent of inhibition was drastically reduced in the presence of uncouplers like ammonium chloride or gramicidin; a characteristic feature described for energy transfer inhibitors. The compound, on the other hand, when applied to plants (in vivo, behaved as a potent inhibitor of photosynthetic electron transport. The major site of its action was identified to be the Q(B; the secondary quinone moiety of photosystemII complex. Analysis of photoreduction kinetics of para-benzoquinone and duroquinone suggest that the inhibition leads to formation of low pool of plastoquinol, which becomes limiting for electron flow through photosystemI. Further it was ascertained that the in vivo inhibitory effect appeared as a consequence of the formation of an unidentified artemisinin-metabolite rather than by the interaction of the compound per se. The putative metabolite of artemisinin is highly reactive in instituting the inhibition of photosynthetic electron flow eventually reducing the plant growth.

  2. Tests of biological activity of metabolites from Penicillium expansum (Link Thom various isolates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Halina Borecka

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Aqrobacterium tumefaciens and cucumber, mustard and linseeds were compared as test organisms for evaluation of the biological activity of patulin. It was found that the reaction of cucumber seeds and linseed to the patulin concentrations was more pronounced than that of mustard and Aqrobacterium tumefaciens. The activity of metabolites produced by Penicillium expansum was investigated with the use of cucumber seeds. As measure of activity served the percentage of radicule growth inhibition was compared with the growth in control seeds. The biological activity of the metabolites was specific for the isolates, those from apples being more active. Thirty two isolates from pears and 34 from apples were examined.

  3. A new paradigm for known metabolite identification in metabonomics/metabolomics: metabolite identification efficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Everett, Jeremy R

    2015-01-01

    A new paradigm is proposed for assessing confidence in the identification of known metabolites in metabonomics studies using NMR spectroscopy approaches. This new paradigm is based upon the analysis of the amount of metabolite identification information retrieved from NMR spectra relative to the molecular size of the metabolite. Several new indices are proposed including: metabolite identification efficiency (MIE) and metabolite identification carbon efficiency (MICE), both of which can be easily calculated. These indices, together with some guidelines, can be used to provide a better indication of known metabolite identification confidence in metabonomics studies than existing methods. Since known metabolite identification in untargeted metabonomics studies is one of the key bottlenecks facing the science currently, it is hoped that these concepts based on molecular spectroscopic informatics, will find utility in the field.

  4. A New Paradigm for Known Metabolite Identification in Metabonomics/Metabolomics: Metabolite Identification Efficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeremy R. Everett

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A new paradigm is proposed for assessing confidence in the identification of known metabolites in metabonomics studies using NMR spectroscopy approaches. This new paradigm is based upon the analysis of the amount of metabolite identification information retrieved from NMR spectra relative to the molecular size of the metabolite. Several new indices are proposed including: metabolite identification efficiency (MIE and metabolite identification carbon efficiency (MICE, both of which can be easily calculated. These indices, together with some guidelines, can be used to provide a better indication of known metabolite identification confidence in metabonomics studies than existing methods. Since known metabolite identification in untargeted metabonomics studies is one of the key bottlenecks facing the science currently, it is hoped that these concepts based on molecular spectroscopic informatics, will find utility in the field.

  5. Redistribution of metabolic fluxes in Chlorella protothecoides by variation of media nitrogen concentration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saratram Gopalakrishnan

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the Elementary Metabolite Unit (EMU algorithm was employed to calculate intracellular fluxes for Chlorella protothecoides using previously generated growth and mass spec data. While the flux through glycolysis remained relatively constant, the pentose phosphate pathway (PPP flux increased from 3% to 20% of the glucose uptake during nitrogen-limited growth. The TCA cycle flux decreased from 94% to 38% during nitrogen-limited growth while the flux of acetyl-CoA into lipids increased from 58% to 109% of the glucose uptake, increasing total lipid accumulation. Phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPCase activity was higher during nitrogen-sufficient growth. The glyoxylate shunt was found to be partially active in both cases, indicating the nutrient nature has an impact on flux distribution. It was found that the total NADPH supply within the cell remained almost constant under both conditions. In summary, algal cells substantially reorganize their metabolism during the switch from carbon-limited (nitrogen-sufficient to nitrogen-limited (carbon-sufficient growth. Keywords: Microalgae, Biofuels, Chlorella, MFA, EMU algorithm

  6. Reduced TCA flux in diabetic myotubes: A governing influence on the diabetic phenotype?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaster, Michael

    2009-10-02

    The diabetic phenotype is complex, requiring elucidation of key initiating defects. It is unknown whether the reduced tricarboxylic acid cycle (TCA) flux in skeletal muscle of obese and obese type 2 diabetic (T2D) subjects is of primary origin. Acetate oxidation (measurement of TCA-flux) was significantly reduced in primary myotube cultures established from T2D versus lean subjects. Acetate oxidation was acutely stimulated by insulin and respiratory uncoupling. Inhibition of TCA flux in lean myotubes by malonate was followed by a measured decline in; acetate oxidation, complete palmitate oxidation, lipid uptake, glycogen synthesis, ATP content and increased glucose uptake, while glucose oxidation was unaffected. Acute TCA inhibition did not induce insulin resistance. Thus the reduced TCA cycle flux in T2D skeletal muscle may be of primary origin. The diabetic phenotype of increased basal glucose uptake and glucose oxidation, the reduced complete lipid oxidation and increased respiratory quotient, are likely to be adaptive responses to the reduced TCA cycle flux.

  7. Finasteride inhibited brain dopaminergic system and open-field behaviors in adolescent male rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Li; Kang, Yun-Xiao; Ji, Xiao-Ming; Li, Ying-Kun; Li, Shuang-Cheng; Zhang, Xiang-Jian; Cui, Hui-Xian; Shi, Ge-Ming

    2018-02-01

    Finasteride inhibits the conversion of testosterone to dihydrotestosterone. Because androgen regulates dopaminergic system in the brain, it could be hypothesized that finasteride may inhibit dopaminergic system. The present study therefore investigates the effects of finasteride in adolescent and early developmental rats on dopaminergic system, including contents of dopamine and its metabolites (dihydroxy phenyl acetic acid and homovanillic acid) and tyrosine hydroxylase expressions both at gene and protein levels. Meanwhile, open-field behaviors of the rats are examined because of the regulatory effect of dopaminergic system on the behaviors. Open-field behaviors were evaluated by exploratory and motor behaviors. Dopamine and its metabolites were assayed by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. Tyrosine hydroxylase mRNA and protein expressions were determined by real-time qRT-PCR and western blot, respectively. It was found that in adolescent male rats, administration of finasteride at doses of 25 and 50 mg/kg for 14 days dose dependently inhibited open-field behaviors, reduced contents of dopamine and its metabolites in frontal cortex, hippocampus, caudate putamen, nucleus accumbens, and down-regulated tyrosine hydroxylase mRNA and protein expressions in substantia nigra and ventral tegmental area. However, there was no significant change of these parameters in early developmental rats after finasteride treatment. These results suggest that finasteride inhibits dopaminergic system and open-field behaviors in adolescent male rats by inhibiting the conversion of testosterone to dihydrotestosterone, and imply finasteride as a potential therapeutic option for neuropsychiatric disorders associated with hyperactivities of dopaminergic system and androgen. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Chemotaxonomic Metabolite Profiling of 62 Indigenous Plant Species and Its Correlation with Bioactivities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah Lee

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Chemotaxonomic metabolite profiling of 62 indigenous Korean plant species was performed by ultrahigh performance liquid chromatography (UHPLC-linear trap quadrupole-ion trap (LTQ-IT mass spectrometry/mass spectrometry (MS/MS combined with multivariate statistical analysis. In partial least squares discriminant analysis (PLS-DA, the 62 species clustered depending on their phylogenetic family, in particular, Aceraceae, Betulaceae, and Fagaceae were distinguished from Rosaceae, Fabaceae, and Asteraceae. Quinic acid, gallic acid, quercetin, quercetin derivatives, kaempferol, and kaempferol derivatives were identified as family-specific metabolites, and were found in relatively high concentrations in Aceraceae, Betulaceae, and Fagaceae. Fagaceae and Asteraceae were selected based on results of PLS-DA and bioactivities to determine the correlation between metabolic differences among plant families and bioactivities. Quinic acid, quercetin, kaempferol, quercetin derivatives, and kaempferol derivatives were found in higher concentrations in Fagaceae than in Asteraceae, and were positively correlated with antioxidant and tyrosinase inhibition activities. These results suggest that metabolite profiling was a useful tool for finding the different metabolic states of each plant family and understanding the correlation between metabolites and bioactivities in accordance with plant family.

  9. Lactate turnover in fast-moving vertebrates: The control of plasma metabolite fluxes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weber, J.M.

    1987-01-01

    The goals of this thesis were: (1) to investigate the major factors involved in the regulation of plasma metabolite turnover at the whole-organism level-using lactate as a model, and (2) to determine whether endurance-adapted animals can support higher lactate turnover rates than sedentary animals. Lactate turnover was measured by bolus injection of (U{sup {minus}14}C)lacetate in skipjack tuna, Katsuwonus pelamis, and in thoroughbred race horses, Equus caballus. In tuna, turnover rates ranged from 112 to 431 umol min{sup {minus}1} kg{sup {minus}1}, and they were positively correlated with (lactate). These rates were higher than expected for a mammal of equivalent size. Plots of resting lactate and glucose turnover rates vs body mass on a log-log scale were linear for a wide range mammalian body sizes, and they showed the same slope as the classic body mass vs metabolic rate relationship.

  10. A hydroxylated flavonol, fisetin inhibits the formation of a carcinogenic estrogen metabolite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Xin; Sun, Hui; Yang, Lianrong; Yin, Rui; Qi, Lehui

    2017-03-01

    Fisetin can be found in a wide variety of plants and possesses strong efficacy against many cancers. 17β-Estradiol (E2) is hydrolyzed to 4-hydroxy-E2 (4-OHE2) via cytochrome P450 (CYP) 1B1 in vivo. In estrogen target tissues including the mammary gland, ovaries, and uterus, CYP1B1 is highly expressed, and 4-OHE2 is predominantly formed in cancerous tissues. Herein, we investigated the inhibitory activity of fisetin and flavone against CYP1B1 using estrogen E2 as substrate in vitro to reveal structure-activity relationship between structure of flavonoids and inhibition. The results showed that fisetin possessed inhibitory effect on CYP1B1 activity. Compared with flavone, the inhibition of fisetin was stronger. The V max and K i values were 1.950±0.157pmol/μgprotein/min and 4.925±0.689nM for fisetin and 2.277±0.231pmol/μgprotein/min and 9.148±2.150nM for flavone, respectively. By kinetic analyses, both fisetin and flavone displayed mixed inhibition. Taken together the data suggested that fisetin is able to inhibit the formation of carcinogenic 4-OHE2 from E2, which reveals one of its anti-cancer mechanisms and helps to reveal the relationship between the structure of flavonoids and the inhibition CYP1B1 for discovering new drugs in cancer therapy and prevention. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Pyometra in Bitches Induces Elevated Plasma Endotoxin and Prostaglandin F2α Metabolite Levels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hagman R

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Endotoxemia in bitches with pyometra can cause severe systemic effects directly or via the release of inflammatory mediators. Plasma endotoxin concentrations were measured in ten bitches suffering from pyometra with moderately to severely deteriorated general condition, and in nine bitches admitted to surgery for non-infectious reasons. Endotoxin samples were taken on five occasions before, during and after surgery. In addition, urine and uterine bacteriology was performed and hematological, blood biochemical parameters, prostaglandin F2α metabolite 15-ketodihydro-PGF2α (PG-metabolite, progesterone and oestradiol (E2-17β levels were analysed. The results confirm significantly increased plasma levels of endotoxin in bitches with pyometra and support previous reports of endotoxin involvement in the pathogenesis of the disease. Plasma concentrations of PG-metabolite were elevated in pyometra bitches and provide a good indicator of endotoxin release since the concentrations were significantly correlated to the endotoxin levels and many other hematological and chemistry parameters. The γ-globulin serum protein electrophoresis fraction and analysis of PG-metabolite can be valuable in the diagnosis of endotoxin involvement if a reliable, rapid and cost-effective test for PG-metabolite analysis becomes readily available in the future. Treatment inhibiting prostaglandin biosynthesis and related compounds could be beneficial for bitches suffering from pyometra.

  12. Medicinal Plants: A Source of Anti-Parasitic Secondary Metabolites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Wink

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available This review summarizes human infections caused by endoparasites, including protozoa, nematodes, trematodes, and cestodes, which affect more than 30% of the human population, and medicinal plants of potential use in their treatment. Because vaccinations do not work in most instances and the parasites have sometimes become resistant to the available synthetic therapeutics, it is important to search for alternative sources of anti-parasitic drugs. Plants produce a high diversity of secondary metabolites with interesting biological activities, such as cytotoxic, anti-parasitic and anti-microbial properties. These drugs often interfere with central targets in parasites, such as DNA (intercalation, alkylation, membrane integrity, microtubules and neuronal signal transduction. Plant extracts and isolated secondary metabolites which can inhibit protozoan parasites, such as Plasmodium, Trypanosoma, Leishmania, Trichomonas and intestinal worms are discussed. The identified plants and compounds offer a chance to develop new drugs against parasitic diseases. Most of them need to be tested in more detail, especially in animal models and if successful, in clinical trials.

  13. Inhibition of trypsin by condensed tannins and wine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonçalves, Rui; Soares, Susana; Mateus, Nuno; de Freitas, Victor

    2007-09-05

    Phenolic compounds are abundant vegetable secondary metabolites in the human diet. The ability of procyanidin oligomers and wine polyphenols to inhibit trypsin activity was studied using a versatile and reliable in vitro method. The hydrolysis of the chromogenic substrate N-benzoyl-d,l-arginine-p-nitroanilide (BApNA) by trypsin was followed by spectrophotometry in the presence and absence of condensed tannins and wine. A clear relationship between the degree of polymerization of procyanidins and enzymatic inhibition was observed. Trypsin activity inhibition was also detected in several types of wine. In general, the inhibition increased with the concentration of phenolic compounds in wines. These results may be relevant when considering these compounds as antinutritional factors, thereby contributing to a reduced absorption of nutrients.

  14. Development of an in vitro cytochrome P450 cocktail inhibition assay for assessing the inhibition risk of drugs of abuse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinger, Julia; Meyer, Markus R; Maurer, Hans H

    2014-10-01

    Drugs of abuse are not tested for cytochrome P450 (CYP) inhibition potential before distribution. Therefore, a cocktail assay should be developed for testing the inhibition potential for all relevant CYPs. The following CYP test substrates and selective inhibitors were incubated in pooled human liver microsomes: phenacetin (alpha-naphthoflavone for CYP1A2), coumarin (tranylcypromine, CYP2A6), bupropion (sertraline, CYP2B6), amodiaquine (trimethoprim, CYP2C8), diclofenac (sulfaphenazole, CYP2C9), omeprazole (fluconazole, CYP2C19), dextromethorphan (quinidine, CYP2D6), chlorzoxazone (clomethiazole, CYP2E1), testosterone (verapamil, CYP3A). Samples were analyzed after protein precipitation using a Thermo Fisher Q-Exactive LC-high-resolution-MS/MS. The IC50 values were calculated by plotting the concentration of the formed metabolite, relative to the control sample, over the logarithm of the inhibitor concentration. They were determined either for single substrate or the cocktail incubation. Unfortunately, the cocktail assay had to be split because of interferences during incubation caused by substrates or metabolites, but the mixture of both incubates could be analyzed in one analytical run. The IC50 values determined in the single substrate or both cocktail incubations were comparable among themselves and with published data. In conclusion, the new inhibition cocktail assay was reproducible and applicable for testing the inhibition potential of drugs of abuse as exemplified for 2,5-dimethoxy-4-iodo-amfetamine (DOI). Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Insights into the mechanisms of Promysalin, a secondary metabolite with genus-specific antibacterial activity against Pseudomonas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Promysalin, a secondary metabolite produced by Pseudomonas putida RW10S1, has antibacterial activity against a wide variety of Pseudomonas sp., including both human and plant pathogens. Promysalin induces swarming and biofilm formation in the producing species, and inhibits growth of susceptible sp...

  16. Prediction of Drug-Drug Interactions with Bupropion and Its Metabolites as CYP2D6 Inhibitors Using a Physiologically-Based Pharmacokinetic Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Caifu; Zhang, Xunjie; Cai, Weimin

    2017-12-21

    The potential of inhibitory metabolites of perpetrator drugs to contribute to drug-drug interactions (DDIs) is uncommon and underestimated. However, the occurrence of unexpected DDI suggests the potential contribution of metabolites to the observed DDI. The aim of this study was to develop a physiologically-based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model for bupropion and its three primary metabolites-hydroxybupropion, threohydrobupropion and erythrohydrobupropion-based on a mixed "bottom-up" and "top-down" approach and to contribute to the understanding of the involvement and impact of inhibitory metabolites for DDIs observed in the clinic. PK profiles from clinical researches of different dosages were used to verify the bupropion model. Reasonable PK profiles of bupropion and its metabolites were captured in the PBPK model. Confidence in the DDI prediction involving bupropion and co-administered CYP2D6 substrates could be maximized. The predicted maximum concentration (C max ) area under the concentration-time curve (AUC) values and C max and AUC ratios were consistent with clinically observed data. The addition of the inhibitory metabolites into the PBPK model resulted in a more accurate prediction of DDIs (AUC and C max ratio) than that which only considered parent drug (bupropion) P450 inhibition. The simulation suggests that bupropion and its metabolites contribute to the DDI between bupropion and CYP2D6 substrates. The inhibitory potency from strong to weak is hydroxybupropion, threohydrobupropion, erythrohydrobupropion, and bupropion, respectively. The present bupropion PBPK model can be useful for predicting inhibition from bupropion in other clinical studies. This study highlights the need for caution and dosage adjustment when combining bupropion with medications metabolized by CYP2D6. It also demonstrates the feasibility of applying the PBPK approach to predict the DDI potential of drugs undergoing complex metabolism, especially in the DDI involving inhibitory

  17. Antifungal Metabolites (Monorden, Monocillin IV, and Cerebrosides) from Humicola fuscoatra Traaen NRRL 22980, a Mycoparasite of Aspergillus flavus Sclerotia

    OpenAIRE

    Wicklow, Donald T.; Joshi, Biren K.; Gamble, William R.; Gloer, James B.; Dowd, Patrick F.

    1998-01-01

    The mycoparasite Humicola fuscoatra NRRL 22980 was isolated from a sclerotium of Aspergillus flavus that had been buried in a cornfield near Tifton, Ga. When grown on autoclaved rice, this fungus produced the antifungal metabolites monorden, monocillin IV, and a new monorden analog. Each metabolite produced a clear zone of inhibition surrounding paper assay disks on agar plates seeded with conidia of A. flavus. Monorden was twice as inhibitory to A. flavus mycelium extension (MIC > 28 μg/ml) ...

  18. Complicating factors in safety testing of drug metabolites: Kinetic differences between generated and preformed metabolites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prueksaritanont, Thomayant; Lin, Jiunn H.; Baillie, Thomas A.

    2006-01-01

    This paper aims to provide a scientifically based perspective on issues surrounding the proposed toxicology testing of synthetic drug metabolites as a means of ensuring adequate nonclinical safety evaluation of drug candidates that generate metabolites considered either to be unique to humans or are present at much higher levels in humans than in preclinical species. We put forward a number of theoretical considerations and present several specific examples where the kinetic behavior of a preformed metabolite given to animals or humans differs from that of the corresponding metabolite generated endogenously from its parent. The potential ramifications of this phenomenon are that the results of toxicity testing of the preformed metabolite may be misleading and fail to characterize the true toxicological contribution of the metabolite when formed from the parent. It is anticipated that such complications would be evident in situations where (a) differences exist in the accumulation of the preformed versus generated metabolites in specific tissues, and (b) the metabolite undergoes sequential metabolism to a downstream product that is toxic, leading to differences in tissue-specific toxicity. Owing to the complex nature of this subject, there is a need to treat drug metabolite issues in safety assessment on a case-by-case basis, in which a knowledge of metabolite kinetics is employed to validate experimental paradigms that entail administration of preformed metabolites to animal models

  19. Doxorubicin Blocks Cardiomyocyte Autophagic Flux by Inhibiting Lysosome Acidification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Dan L; Wang, Zhao V; Ding, Guanqiao; Tan, Wei; Luo, Xiang; Criollo, Alfredo; Xie, Min; Jiang, Nan; May, Herman; Kyrychenko, Viktoriia; Schneider, Jay W; Gillette, Thomas G; Hill, Joseph A

    2016-04-26

    The clinical use of doxorubicin is limited by cardiotoxicity. Histopathological changes include interstitial myocardial fibrosis and the appearance of vacuolated cardiomyocytes. Whereas dysregulation of autophagy in the myocardium has been implicated in a variety of cardiovascular diseases, the role of autophagy in doxorubicin cardiomyopathy remains poorly defined. Most models of doxorubicin cardiotoxicity involve intraperitoneal injection of high-dose drug, which elicits lethargy, anorexia, weight loss, and peritoneal fibrosis, all of which confound the interpretation of autophagy. Given this, we first established a model that provokes modest and progressive cardiotoxicity without constitutional symptoms, reminiscent of the effects seen in patients. We report that doxorubicin blocks cardiomyocyte autophagic flux in vivo and in cardiomyocytes in culture. This block was accompanied by robust accumulation of undegraded autolysosomes. We go on to localize the site of block as a defect in lysosome acidification. To test the functional relevance of doxorubicin-triggered autolysosome accumulation, we studied animals with diminished autophagic activity resulting from haploinsufficiency for Beclin 1. Beclin 1(+/-) mice exposed to doxorubicin were protected in terms of structural and functional changes within the myocardium. Conversely, animals overexpressing Beclin 1 manifested an amplified cardiotoxic response. Doxorubicin blocks autophagic flux in cardiomyocytes by impairing lysosome acidification and lysosomal function. Reducing autophagy initiation protects against doxorubicin cardiotoxicity. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  20. [Study on Precursors for Synthesis of Anthraquinone Metabolites from Rheum tanguticum].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasi, Qi-mei-ge; Lj, Hai-ling; Cheng, Yan; Menggen, Qi-qi-ge; Zhang, Yang

    2015-01-01

    To explore the potential precursors of the anthraquinone metabolites from Rheum tanguticum and preliminanly identify the synthesis pathway thereof. Sterile seedlings sprouted from the seeds of Rheum tanguticum were chosen as materials for inducing callus. The effects of different precursors and feeding duration on the callus of Rheum tanguticum and the anthraquinone yield in adult rheum were studied. The greatest improvement of anthraquinone yield was achieved by acetic acid, increasing 43. 9% for the callus and 45. 8% in the adult rheum; the second greatest improvement was achieved by malonic acid, increasing 15. 8% for the callus and only 3. 6% in the adult rheum. The yield of anthraquinone was not influenced significantly by benzoic acid and p-benzoquinone, and in contrast, was inhibited in some degree by shikimic acid and α-ketoglutaric acid. A suitable feeding duration was 36 h, which worked well for the effects of precursors. The precursor for synthesis of anthraquinone metabolites from Rheum tan- guticum is acetic acid, which improves the yields of callus and anthraquinone in adult rheum, concluding that the anthraquinone metabolites are synthesized via polyketone pathway.

  1. Thiopurines inhibit bovine viral diarrhea virus production in a thiopurine methyltransferase-dependent manner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoover, Spencer; Striker, Rob

    2008-04-01

    The family Flaviviridae comprises positive-strand RNA viral pathogens of humans and livestock with few treatment options. We have previously shown that azathioprine (AZA) has in vitro activity against bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV). While the mechanism of inhibition is unknown, AZA and related thiopurine nucleoside analogues have been used as immunosuppressants for decades and both AZA metabolites and cellular genes involved in AZA metabolism have been extensively characterized. Here, we show that only certain riboside metabolites have antiviral activity and identify the most potent known antiviral AZA metabolite as 6-methylmercaptopurine riboside (6MMPr). The antiviral activity of 6MMPr is antagonized by adenosine, and is specific to BVDV and not to the related yellow fever virus. An essential step in the conversion of AZA to 6MMPr is the addition of a methyl group onto the sulfur atom attached to position six of the purine ring. Intracellularly, the methyl group is added by thiopurine methyltransferase (TPMT), an S-adenosyl methionine-dependent methyltransferase. Either chemically bypassing or inhibiting TPMT modulates antiviral activity of AZA metabolites. TPMT exists in several variants with varying levels of activity and since 6MMPr is a potent antiviral, the antiviral activity of AZA may be modulated by host genetics.

  2. Glyphosate-Induced Specific and Widespread Perturbations in the Metabolome of Soil Pseudomonas Species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ludmilla Aristilde

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Previous studies have reported adverse effects of glyphosate on crop-beneficial soil bacterial species, including several soil Pseudomonas species. Of particular interest is the elucidation of the metabolic consequences of glyphosate toxicity in these species. Here we investigated the growth and metabolic responses of soil Pseudomonas species grown on succinate, a common root exudate, and glyphosate at different concentrations. We conducted our experiments with one agricultural soil isolate, P. fluorescens RA12, and three model species, P. putida KT2440, P. putida S12, and P. protegens Pf-5. Our results demonstrated both species- and strain-dependent growth responses to glyphosate. Following exposure to a range of glyphosate concentrations (up to 5 mM, the growth rate of both P. protegens Pf-5 and P. fluorescens RA12 remained unchanged whereas the two P. putida strains exhibited from 0 to 100% growth inhibition. We employed a 13C-assisted metabolomics approach using liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry to monitor disruptions in metabolic homeostasis and fluxes. Profiling of the whole-cell metabolome captured deviations in metabolite levels involved in the tricarboxylic acid cycle, ribonucleotide biosynthesis, and protein biosynthesis. Altered metabolite levels specifically in the biosynthetic pathway of aromatic amino acids (AAs, the target of toxicity for glyphosate in plants, implied the same toxicity target in the soil bacterium. Kinetic flux experiments with 13C-labeled succinate revealed that biosynthetic fluxes of the aromatic AAs were not inhibited in P. fluorescens Pf-5 in the presence of low and high glyphosate doses but these fluxes were inhibited by up to 60% in P. putida KT2440, even at sub-lethal glyphosate exposure. Notably, the greatest inhibition was found for the aromatic AA tryptophan, an important precursor to secondary metabolites. When the growth medium was supplemented with aromatic AAs, P. putida S12 exposed to a lethal

  3. Identification and Characterization of CINPA1 Metabolites Facilitates Structure-Activity Studies of the Constitutive Androstane Receptor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherian, Milu T.; Yang, Lei; Chai, Sergio C.; Lin, Wenwei

    2016-01-01

    The constitutive androstane receptor (CAR) regulates the expression of genes involved in drug metabolism and other processes. A specific inhibitor of CAR is critical for modulating constitutive CAR activity. We recently described a specific small-molecule inhibitor of CAR, CINPA1 (ethyl (5-(diethylglycyl)-10,11-dihydro-5H-dibenzo[b,f]azepin-3-yl)carbamate), which is capable of reducing CAR-mediated transcription by changing the coregulator recruitment pattern and reducing CAR occupancy at the promoter regions of its target genes. In this study, we showed that CINPA1 is converted to two main metabolites in human liver microsomes. By using cell-based reporter gene and biochemical coregulator recruitment assays, we showed that although metabolite 1 was very weak in inhibiting CAR function and disrupting CAR-coactivator interaction, metabolite 2 was inactive in this regard. Docking studies using the CAR ligand-binding domain structure showed that although CINPA1 and metabolite 1 can bind in the CAR ligand-binding pocket, metabolite 2 may be incapable of the molecular interactions required for binding. These results indicate that the metabolites of CINPA1 may not interfere with the action of CINPA1. We also used in vitro enzyme assays to identify the cytochrome P450 enzymes responsible for metabolizing CINPA1 in human liver microsomes and showed that CINPA1 was first converted to metabolite 1 by CYP3A4 and then further metabolized by CYP2D6 to metabolite 2. Identification and characterization of the metabolites of CINPA1 enabled structure-activity relationship studies of this family of small molecules and provided information to guide in vivo pharmacological studies. PMID:27519550

  4. Mixture toxicity of the antiviral drug Tamiflu (oseltamivir ethylester) and its active metabolite oseltamivir acid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Escher, Beate I., E-mail: b.escher@uq.edu.au [University of Queensland, National Research Centre for Environmental Toxicology (Entox), 39 Kessels Rd, Brisbane, Qld 4108 (Australia); Eawag, Swiss Federal Institute of Aquatic Science and Technology, 8600 Duebendorf (Switzerland); Bramaz, Nadine; Lienert, Judit; Neuwoehner, Judith [Eawag, Swiss Federal Institute of Aquatic Science and Technology, 8600 Duebendorf (Switzerland); Straub, Juerg Oliver [F.Hoffmann-La Roche Ltd, Corporate Safety, Health and Environmental Protection, 4070 Basel (Switzerland)

    2010-02-18

    Tamiflu (oseltamivir ethylester) is an antiviral agent for the treatment of influenza A and B. The pro-drug Tamiflu is converted in the human body to the pharmacologically active metabolite, oseltamivir acid, with a yield of 75%. Oseltamivir acid is indirectly photodegradable and slowly biodegradable in sewage works and sediment/water systems. A previous environmental risk assessment has concluded that there is no bioaccumulation potential of either of the compounds. However, little was known about the ecotoxicity of the metabolite. Ester hydrolysis typically reduces the hydrophobicity and thus the toxicity of a compound. In this case, a zwitterionic, but overall neutral species is formed from the charged parent compound. If the speciation and predicted partitioning into biological membranes is considered, the metabolite may have a relevant contribution to the overall toxicity. These theoretical considerations triggered a study to investigate the toxicity of oseltamivir acid (OA), alone and in binary mixtures with its parent compound oseltamivir ethylester (OE). OE and OA were found to be baseline toxicants in the bioluminescence inhibition test with Vibrio fischeri. Their mixture effect lay between predictions for concentration addition and independent action for the mixture ratio excreted in urine and nine additional mixture ratios of OE and OA. In contrast, OE was an order of magnitude more toxic than OA towards algae, with a more pronounced effect when the direct inhibition of photosystem II was used as toxicity endpoint opposed to the 24 h growth rate endpoint. The binary mixtures in this assay yielded experimental mixture effects that agreed with predictions for independent action. This is consistent with the finding that OE exhibits slightly enhanced toxicity, while OA acts as baseline toxicant. Therefore, with respect to mixture classification, the two compounds can be considered as acting according to different modes of toxic action, although there are

  5. Determination of monoamine neurotransmitters and their metabolites in a mouse brain microdialysate by coupling high-performance liquid chromatography with gold nanoparticle-initiated chemiluminescence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li Na; Guo Jizhao; Liu Bo; Yu Yuqi [Department of Chemistry, University of Science and Technology of China (USTC), JinZhai Road No: 96, 230026 Hefei, Anhui (China); Cui Hua, E-mail: hcui@ustc.edu.cn [Department of Chemistry, University of Science and Technology of China (USTC), JinZhai Road No: 96, 230026 Hefei, Anhui (China); Mao Lanqun; Lin Yuqing [Beijing National Laboratory for Molecular Sciences, Institute of Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS), 100080 Beijing (China)

    2009-07-10

    Our previous work showed that gold nanoparticles could trigger chemiluminescence (CL) between luminol and AgNO{sub 3}. In the present work, the effect of some biologically important reductive compounds, including monoamine neurotransmitters and their metabolites, reductive amino acids, ascorbic acid, uric acid, and glutathione, on the novel CL reaction were investigated for analytical purpose. It was found that all of them could inhibit the CL from the luminol-AgNO{sub 3}-Au colloid system. Among them, monoamine neurotransmitters and their metabolites exhibited strong inhibition effect. Taking dopamine as a model compound, the CL mechanism was studied by measuring absorption spectra during the CL reaction and the reaction kinetics via stopped-flow technique. The CL inhibition mechanism is proposed to be due to that these tested compounds competed with luminol for AgNO{sub 3} to inhibit the formation of luminol radicals and to accelerate deposition of Ag atoms on surface of gold nanoparticles, leading to a decrease in CL intensity. Based on the inhibited CL, a novel method for simultaneous determination of monoamine neurotransmitters and their metabolites was developed by coupling high-performance liquid chromatography with this CL reaction. The new method was successfully applied to determine the compounds in a mouse brain microdialysate. Compared with the reported HPLC-CL methods, the proposed method is simple, fast, and could determine more analytes. Moreover, the limits of linear ranges for NE, E, and DA using the proposed method were one order of magnitude lower than the luminol system without gold nanoparticles.

  6. Determination of monoamine neurotransmitters and their metabolites in a mouse brain microdialysate by coupling high-performance liquid chromatography with gold nanoparticle-initiated chemiluminescence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Na; Guo Jizhao; Liu Bo; Yu Yuqi; Cui Hua; Mao Lanqun; Lin Yuqing

    2009-01-01

    Our previous work showed that gold nanoparticles could trigger chemiluminescence (CL) between luminol and AgNO 3 . In the present work, the effect of some biologically important reductive compounds, including monoamine neurotransmitters and their metabolites, reductive amino acids, ascorbic acid, uric acid, and glutathione, on the novel CL reaction were investigated for analytical purpose. It was found that all of them could inhibit the CL from the luminol-AgNO 3 -Au colloid system. Among them, monoamine neurotransmitters and their metabolites exhibited strong inhibition effect. Taking dopamine as a model compound, the CL mechanism was studied by measuring absorption spectra during the CL reaction and the reaction kinetics via stopped-flow technique. The CL inhibition mechanism is proposed to be due to that these tested compounds competed with luminol for AgNO 3 to inhibit the formation of luminol radicals and to accelerate deposition of Ag atoms on surface of gold nanoparticles, leading to a decrease in CL intensity. Based on the inhibited CL, a novel method for simultaneous determination of monoamine neurotransmitters and their metabolites was developed by coupling high-performance liquid chromatography with this CL reaction. The new method was successfully applied to determine the compounds in a mouse brain microdialysate. Compared with the reported HPLC-CL methods, the proposed method is simple, fast, and could determine more analytes. Moreover, the limits of linear ranges for NE, E, and DA using the proposed method were one order of magnitude lower than the luminol system without gold nanoparticles.

  7. Cultivar-Specific Changes in Primary and Secondary Metabolites in Pak Choi (Brassica Rapa, Chinensis Group by Methyl Jasmonate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moo Jung Kim

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Glucosinolates, their hydrolysis products and primary metabolites were analyzed in five pak choi cultivars to determine the effect of methyl jasmonate (MeJA on metabolite flux from primary metabolites to glucosinolates and their hydrolysis products. Among detected glucosinolates (total 14 glucosinolates; 9 aliphatic, 4 indole and 1 aromatic glucosinolates, indole glucosinolate concentrations (153–229% and their hydrolysis products increased with MeJA treatment. Changes in the total isothiocyanates by MeJA were associated with epithiospecifier protein activity estimated as nitrile formation. Goitrin, a goitrogenic compound, significantly decreased by MeJA treatment in all cultivars. Changes in glucosinolates, especially aliphatic, significantly differed among cultivars. Primary metabolites including amino acids, organic acids and sugars also changed with MeJA treatment in a cultivar-specific manner. A decreased sugar level suggests that they might be a carbon source for secondary metabolite biosynthesis in MeJA-treated pak choi. The result of the present study suggests that MeJA can be an effective agent to elevate indole glucosinolates and their hydrolysis products and to reduce a goitrogenic compound in pak choi. The total glucosinolate concentration was the highest in “Chinese cabbage” in the control group (32.5 µmol/g DW, but indole glucosinolates increased the greatest in “Asian” when treated with MeJA.

  8. Mutagenic azide metabolite is azidoalanine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Owais, W.M.; Rosichan, J.L.; Ronald, R.C.; Kleinhofs, A.; Nilan, R.A.

    1981-01-01

    Sodium axide produces high mutation rates in a number of species. Azide mutagenicity is mediated through a metabolite in barley and bacteria. Many studies showed that azide affects the L-cysteine biosynthesis pathway. Cell-free extracts of Salmonella typhimurium convert azide and O-acetylserine to the mutagenic metabolite. O-acetylserine sulfhydrylase was identified as the enzyme responsible for the metabolite biosynthesis. To confirm the conclusion that the azide metabolite is formed through the β-substitution pathway of L-cysteine, we radioactively labeled the azide metabolite using 14 C-labeled precursors. Moreover, the mutagenic azide metabolite was purified and identified as azidoalanine based on mass spectroscopy and elemental analysis. 26 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab

  9. Effects of clopidogrel on the pharmacokinetics of sibutramine and its active metabolites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bae, Jung-Woo; Jang, Choon-Gon; Lee, Seok-Young

    2011-12-01

    Sibutramine is metabolized by the enzymes CYP2B6 and CYP2C19 into 2 active metabolites, M1 (mono-desmethyl sibutramine) and M2 (di-desmethyl sibutramine). Clopidogrel is a mechanism-based inhibitor of CYP2B6 and CYP2C19. In this study, 13 extensive metabolizers of CYP2B6 and CYP2C19 were evaluated to clarify whether clopidogrel inhibits the formation of the active metabolites of sibutramine. In the control phase, each subject received a 15-mg oral dose of sibutramine. After a washout period of 2 weeks, in the clopidogrel phase, the subjects received 300 mg of clopidogrel on the first day and then 75-mg once daily for 6 days. One hour after the last dosing of clopidogrel, all subjects received 15-mg of sibutramine. Compared with the control phase, the mean sibutramine and M1 plasma concentrations were higher after clopidogrel treatment. Clopidogrel significantly increased the half-life (242% of control phase) and area under the plasma concentration-time curve from 0 to infinity (AUC(inf)) (227% of control phase) of sibutramine and decreased the apparent oral clearance (31% of control phase) of sibutramine. Pharmacokinetic analysis showed significant increases in the AUC(inf) (162% of control phase) of M1. The CYP2B6 and CYP2C19 inhibitor clopidogrel significantly inhibited the formations of M1 from sibutramine and M2 from sibutramine by 37% and 64%, respectively. Therefore, CYP2B6 and CYP2C19 are in vivo catalysts for the formation of the 2 active metabolites of sibutramine.

  10. Immune regulation by microbiome metabolites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Chang H

    2018-03-22

    Commensal microbes and the host immune system have been co-evolved for mutual regulation. Microbes regulate the host immune system, in part, by producing metabolites. A mounting body of evidence indicates that diverse microbial metabolites profoundly regulate the immune system via host receptors and other target molecules. Immune cells express metabolite-specific receptors such as P2X 7 , GPR41, GPR43, GPR109A, aryl hydrocarbon receptor precursor (AhR), pregnane X receptor (PXR), farnesoid X receptor (FXR), TGR5 and other molecular targets. Microbial metabolites and their receptors form an extensive array of signals to respond to changes in nutrition, health and immunological status. As a consequence, microbial metabolite signals contribute to nutrient harvest from diet, and regulate host metabolism and the immune system. Importantly, microbial metabolites bidirectionally function to promote both tolerance and immunity to effectively fight infection without developing inflammatory diseases. In pathogenic conditions, adverse effects of microbial metabolites have been observed as well. Key immune-regulatory functions of the metabolites, generated from carbohydrates, proteins and bile acids, are reviewed in this article. © 2018 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Inhibition of beet molasses alcoholic fermentation by lactobacilli

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Essia Ngang, J.J.; Letourneau, F.; Wolniewicz, E.; Villa, P. (Amiens Univ., 80 (France). Lab. de Chimie Organique et Cinetique)

    1990-08-01

    Alcohol production rate decreases as the concentration of bacterial contaminants increases. In complex medium, such as beet molasses, an alternative mechanism can be used by homofermentative lactic bacteria (Lactobacillus casei). Lactic acid and associated products, especially acetic acid, are liberated into the medium. The inhibition induced by these metabolites was reinforced by the presence of viable lactobacilli. (orig.).

  12. New Methodology for Known Metabolite Identification in Metabonomics/Metabolomics: Topological Metabolite Identification Carbon Efficiency (tMICE).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchon-Lopez, Beatriz; Everett, Jeremy R

    2016-09-02

    A new, simple-to-implement and quantitative approach to assessing the confidence in NMR-based identification of known metabolites is introduced. The approach is based on a topological analysis of metabolite identification information available from NMR spectroscopy studies and is a development of the metabolite identification carbon efficiency (MICE) method. New topological metabolite identification indices are introduced, analyzed, and proposed for general use, including topological metabolite identification carbon efficiency (tMICE). Because known metabolite identification is one of the key bottlenecks in either NMR-spectroscopy- or mass spectrometry-based metabonomics/metabolomics studies, and given the fact that there is no current consensus on how to assess metabolite identification confidence, it is hoped that these new approaches and the topological indices will find utility.

  13. The bifunctional autophagic flux by 2-deoxyglucose to control survival or growth of prostate cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeon, Jeong Yong; Kim, Seung Won; Park, Ki Cheong; Yun, Mijin

    2015-01-01

    Recent reports using metabolism regulating drugs showed that nutrient deprivation was an efficient tool to suppress cancer progression. In addition, autophagy control is emerging to prevent cancer cell survival. Autophagy breaks down the unnecessary cytoplasmic components into anabolic units and energy sources, which are the most important sources for making the ATP that maintains homeostasis in cancer cell growth and survival. Therefore, the glucose analog 2-deoxyglucose (2DG) has been used as an anticancer reagent due to its inhibition of glycolysis. Prostate cancer cells (PC3) were treated with 2DG for 6 h or 48 h to analyze the changing of cell cycle and autophagic flux. Rapamycin and LC3B overexpressing vectors were administered to PC3 cells for autophagy induction and chloroquine and shBeclin1 plasmid were used to inhibit autophagy in PC3 cells to analyze PC3 cells growth and survival. The samples for western blotting were prepared in each culture condition to confirm the expression level of autophagy related and regulating proteins. We demonstrated that 2DG inhibits PC3 cells growth and had discriminating effects on autophagy regulation based on the different time period of 2DG treatment to control cell survival. Short-term treatment of 2DG induced autophagic flux, which increased microtubule associated protein 1 light chain 3B (LC3B) conversion rates and reduced p62 levels. However, 2DG induced autophagic flux is remarkably reduced over an extended time period of 2DG treatment for 48 h despite autophagy inducing internal signaling being maintained. The relationship between cell growth and autophagy was proved. Increased autophagic flux by rapamycin or LC3B overexpression powerfully reduced cell growth, while autophagy inhibition with shBeclin1 plasmid or chloroquine had no significant effect on regulating cell growth. Given these results, maintaining increased autophagic flux was more effective at inhibiting cancer cell progression than inhibition of

  14. Identification and Characterization of CINPA1 Metabolites Facilitates Structure-Activity Studies of the Constitutive Androstane Receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherian, Milu T; Yang, Lei; Chai, Sergio C; Lin, Wenwei; Chen, Taosheng

    2016-11-01

    The constitutive androstane receptor (CAR) regulates the expression of genes involved in drug metabolism and other processes. A specific inhibitor of CAR is critical for modulating constitutive CAR activity. We recently described a specific small-molecule inhibitor of CAR, CINPA1 (ethyl (5-(diethylglycyl)-10,11-dihydro-5H-dibenzo[b,f]azepin-3-yl)carbamate), which is capable of reducing CAR-mediated transcription by changing the coregulator recruitment pattern and reducing CAR occupancy at the promoter regions of its target genes. In this study, we showed that CINPA1 is converted to two main metabolites in human liver microsomes. By using cell-based reporter gene and biochemical coregulator recruitment assays, we showed that although metabolite 1 was very weak in inhibiting CAR function and disrupting CAR-coactivator interaction, metabolite 2 was inactive in this regard. Docking studies using the CAR ligand-binding domain structure showed that although CINPA1 and metabolite 1 can bind in the CAR ligand-binding pocket, metabolite 2 may be incapable of the molecular interactions required for binding. These results indicate that the metabolites of CINPA1 may not interfere with the action of CINPA1. We also used in vitro enzyme assays to identify the cytochrome P450 enzymes responsible for metabolizing CINPA1 in human liver microsomes and showed that CINPA1 was first converted to metabolite 1 by CYP3A4 and then further metabolized by CYP2D6 to metabolite 2. Identification and characterization of the metabolites of CINPA1 enabled structure-activity relationship studies of this family of small molecules and provided information to guide in vivo pharmacological studies. Copyright © 2016 by The American Society for Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics.

  15. Metabolite coupling in genome-scale metabolic networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Palsson Bernhard Ø

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Biochemically detailed stoichiometric matrices have now been reconstructed for various bacteria, yeast, and for the human cardiac mitochondrion based on genomic and proteomic data. These networks have been manually curated based on legacy data and elementally and charge balanced. Comparative analysis of these well curated networks is now possible. Pairs of metabolites often appear together in several network reactions, linking them topologically. This co-occurrence of pairs of metabolites in metabolic reactions is termed herein "metabolite coupling." These metabolite pairs can be directly computed from the stoichiometric matrix, S. Metabolite coupling is derived from the matrix ŜŜT, whose off-diagonal elements indicate the number of reactions in which any two metabolites participate together, where Ŝ is the binary form of S. Results Metabolite coupling in the studied networks was found to be dominated by a relatively small group of highly interacting pairs of metabolites. As would be expected, metabolites with high individual metabolite connectivity also tended to be those with the highest metabolite coupling, as the most connected metabolites couple more often. For metabolite pairs that are not highly coupled, we show that the number of reactions a pair of metabolites shares across a metabolic network closely approximates a line on a log-log scale. We also show that the preferential coupling of two metabolites with each other is spread across the spectrum of metabolites and is not unique to the most connected metabolites. We provide a measure for determining which metabolite pairs couple more often than would be expected based on their individual connectivity in the network and show that these metabolites often derive their principal biological functions from existing in pairs. Thus, analysis of metabolite coupling provides information beyond that which is found from studying the individual connectivity of individual

  16. Analysis of metabolic networks of Streptomyces leeuwenhoekii C34 by means of a genome scale model: Prediction of modifications that enhance the production of specialized metabolites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razmilic, Valeria; Castro, Jean F; Andrews, Barbara; Asenjo, Juan A

    2018-07-01

    The first genome scale model (GSM) for Streptomyces leeuwenhoekii C34 was developed to study the biosynthesis pathways of specialized metabolites and to find metabolic engineering targets for enhancing their production. The model, iVR1007, consists of 1,722 reactions, 1,463 metabolites, and 1,007 genes, it includes the biosynthesis pathways of chaxamycins, chaxalactins, desferrioxamines, ectoine, and other specialized metabolites. iVR1007 was validated using experimental information of growth on 166 different sources of carbon, nitrogen and phosphorous, showing an 83.7% accuracy. The model was used to predict metabolic engineering targets for enhancing the biosynthesis of chaxamycins and chaxalactins. Gene knockouts, such as sle03600 (L-homoserine O-acetyltransferase), and sle39090 (trehalose-phosphate synthase), that enhance the production of the specialized metabolites by increasing the pool of precursors were identified. Using the algorithm of flux scanning based on enforced objective flux (FSEOF) implemented in python, 35 and 25 over-expression targets for increasing the production of chaxamycin A and chaxalactin A, respectively, that were not directly associated with their biosynthesis routes were identified. Nineteen over-expression targets that were common to the two specialized metabolites studied, like the over-expression of the acetyl carboxylase complex (sle47660 (accA) and any of the following genes: sle44630 (accA_1) or sle39830 (accA_2) or sle27560 (bccA) or sle59710) were identified. The predicted knockouts and over-expression targets will be used to perform metabolic engineering of S. leeuwenhoekii C34 and obtain overproducer strains. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Cellular Immune Reactions of the Sunn Pest, Eurygaster integriceps, to the Entomopathogenic Fungus, Beauveria bassiana and Its Secondary Metabolites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zibaee, Arash; Bandani, Ali Reza; Talaei-Hassanlouei, Reza; Malagoli, Davide

    2011-01-01

    In this study, five morphological types of circulating hemocytes were recognized in the hemolymph of the adult sunn pest, Eurygaster integriceps Puton (Hemiptera: Scutelleridae), namely prohemocytes, plasmatocytes, granulocytes, adipohemocytes, and oenocytoids. The effects of the secondary metabolites of the entomopathogenic fungus Beauveria bassiana on cellular immune defenses of Eurygaster integriceps were investigated. The results showed that the fungal secondary metabolites inhibited phagocytic activity of E. integriceps hemocytes and hampered nodule formation. A reduction of phenoloxidase activity was also observed. The data suggest that B. bassiana produce secondary metabolites that disable several immune mechanisms allowing the fungus to overcome and then kill its host. This characteristic makes B. bassiana a promising model for biological control of insect pests such as E. integriceps. PMID:22233481

  18. Trigoxazonane, a monosubstituted trioxazonane from Trigonella foenum-graecum root exudate, inhibits Orobanche crenata seed germination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evidente, Antonio; Fernández-Aparicio, Mónica; Andolfi, Anna; Rubiales, Diego; Motta, Andrea

    2007-10-01

    Orobanche crenata is a major threat to grain legume production. Fenugreek (Trigonella foenum-graecum) is an annual legume that has been shown to effectively reduce O. crenata infection when intercropped with grain legumes. In this paper, we point that this can be attributed to allelopathy, through inhibition of the germination of O. crenata by fenugreek root exudates. The main inhibitory metabolite was isolated and characterized. Allelopathy was demonstrated in different bioassays, by inhibition of O. crenata seeds germination both by growing fenugreek and pea plants together (intercropped), and by application of fenugreek root exudates. Fenugreek root exudates were extracted with organic solvent and fractionated giving several fractions, two of which showed moderate (27%) and strong (54%) inhibition of O. crenata seed germination, respectively. The most active metabolite is a new monosubstituted trioxazonane, characterized by spectroscopic methods as the 2-butyl-[1,4,7,2]trioxazonane and named trigoxazonane.

  19. Engineering Microbial Metabolite Dynamics and Heterogeneity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitz, Alexander C; Hartline, Christopher J; Zhang, Fuzhong

    2017-10-01

    As yields for biological chemical production in microorganisms approach their theoretical maximum, metabolic engineering requires new tools, and approaches for improvements beyond what traditional strategies can achieve. Engineering metabolite dynamics and metabolite heterogeneity is necessary to achieve further improvements in product titers, productivities, and yields. Metabolite dynamics, the ensemble change in metabolite concentration over time, arise from the need for microbes to adapt their metabolism in response to the extracellular environment and are important for controlling growth and productivity in industrial fermentations. Metabolite heterogeneity, the cell-to-cell variation in a metabolite concentration in an isoclonal population, has a significant impact on ensemble productivity. Recent advances in single cell analysis enable a more complete understanding of the processes driving metabolite heterogeneity and reveal metabolic engineering targets. The authors present an overview of the mechanistic origins of metabolite dynamics and heterogeneity, why they are important, their potential effects in chemical production processes, and tools and strategies for engineering metabolite dynamics and heterogeneity. The authors emphasize that the ability to control metabolite dynamics and heterogeneity will bring new avenues of engineering to increase productivity of microbial strains. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. Low Water Activity Induces the Production of Bioactive Metabolites in Halophilic and Halotolerant Fungi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nina Gunde-Cimerman

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study was to investigate indigenous fungal communities isolated from extreme environments (hypersaline waters of solar salterns and subglacial ice, for the production of metabolic compounds with selected biological activities: hemolysis, antibacterial, and acetylcholinesterase inhibition. In their natural habitats, the selected fungi are exposed to environmental extremes, and therefore the production of bioactive metabolites was tested under both standard growth conditions for mesophilic microorganisms, and at high NaCl and sugar concentrations and low growth temperatures. The results indicate that selected halotolerant and halophilic species synthesize specific bioactive metabolites under conditions that represent stress for non-adapted species. Furthermore, adaptation at the level of the chemical nature of the solute lowering the water activity of the medium was observed. Increased salt concentrations resulted in higher hemolytic activity, particularly within species dominating the salterns. The appearance of antibacterial potential under stress conditions was seen in the similar pattern of fungal species as for hemolysis. The active extracts exclusively affected the growth of the Gram-positive bacterium tested, Bacillus subtilis. None of the extracts tested showed inhibition of acetylcholinesterase activity.

  1. Global transcriptional, physiological and metabolite analyses of Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough responses to salt adaptation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    He, Z.; Zhou, A.; Baidoo, E.; He, Q.; Joachimiak, M. P.; Benke, P.; Phan, R.; Mukhopadhyay, A.; Hemme, C.L.; Huang, K.; Alm, E.J.; Fields, M.W.; Wall, J.; Stahl, D.; Hazen, T.C.; Keasling, J.D.; Arkin, A.P.; Zhou, J.

    2009-12-01

    The response of Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough to salt adaptation (long-term NaCl exposure) was examined by physiological, global transcriptional, and metabolite analyses. The growth of D. vulgaris was inhibited by high levels of NaCl, and the growth inhibition could be relieved by the addition of exogenous amino acids (e.g., glutamate, alanine, tryptophan) or yeast extract. Salt adaptation induced the expression of genes involved in amino acid biosynthesis and transport, electron transfer, hydrogen oxidation, and general stress responses (e.g., heat shock proteins, phage shock proteins, and oxidative stress response proteins). Genes involved in carbon metabolism, cell motility, and phage structures were repressed. Comparison of transcriptomic profiles of D. vulgaris responses to salt adaptation with those of salt shock (short-term NaCl exposure) showed some similarity as well as a significant difference. Metabolite assays showed that glutamate and alanine were accumulated under salt adaptation, suggesting that they may be used as osmoprotectants in D. vulgaris. A conceptual model is proposed to link the observed results to currently available knowledge for further understanding the mechanisms of D. vulgaris adaptation to elevated NaCl.

  2. Redistribution of carbon flux in Torulopsis glabrata by altering vitamin and calcium level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Liming; Li, Yin; Zhu, Yang; Du, Guocheng; Chen, Jian

    2007-01-01

    Manipulation of cofactor (thiamine, biotin and Ca(2+)) levels as a potential tool to redistribute carbon flux was studied in Torulopsis glabrata. With sub-optimization of vitamin in fermentation medium, the carbon flux was blocked at the key node of pyruvate, and 69 g/L pyruvate was accumulated. Increasing the concentrations of thiamine and biotin could selectively open the valve of carbon flux from pyruvate to pyruvate dehydrogenase complex, the pyruvate carboxylase (PC) pathway and the channel into the TCA cycle, leading to the over-production of alpha-ketoglutarate. In addition, the activity of PC was enhanced with Ca(2+) present in fermentation medium. By combining high concentration's vitamins and CaCO(3) as the pH buffer, a batch culture was conducted in a 7-L fermentor, with the pyruvate concentration decreased to 21.8 g/L while alpha-ketoglutarate concentration increased to 43.7 g/L. Our study indicated that the metabolic flux could be redistributed to overproduce desired metabolites with manipulating the cofactor levels. Furthermore, the manipulation of vitamin level provided an alternative tool to realize metabolic engineering goals.

  3. Quantification of Stable Isotope Traces Close to Natural Enrichment in Human Plasma Metabolites Using Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krämer, Lisa; Jäger, Christian; Trezzi, Jean-Pierre; Jacobs, Doris M; Hiller, Karsten

    2018-02-14

    Currently, changes in metabolic fluxes following consumption of stable isotope-enriched foods are usually limited to the analysis of postprandial kinetics of glucose. Kinetic information on a larger diversity of metabolites is often lacking, mainly due to the marginal percentage of fully isotopically enriched plant material in the administered food product, and hence, an even weaker 13 C enrichment in downstream plasma metabolites. Therefore, we developed an analytical workflow to determine weak 13 C enrichments of diverse plasma metabolites with conventional gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). The limit of quantification was increased by optimizing (1) the metabolite extraction from plasma, (2) the GC-MS measurement, and (3) most importantly, the computational data processing. We applied our workflow to study the catabolic dynamics of 13 C-enriched wheat bread in three human subjects. For that purpose, we collected time-resolved human plasma samples at 16 timepoints after the consumption of 13 C-labeled bread and quantified 13 C enrichment of 12 metabolites (glucose, lactate, alanine, glycine, serine, citrate, glutamate, glutamine, valine, isoleucine, tyrosine, and threonine). Based on isotopomer specific analysis, we were able to distinguish catabolic profiles of starch and protein hydrolysis. More generally, our study highlights that conventional GC-MS equipment is sufficient to detect isotope traces below 1% if an appropriate data processing is integrated.

  4. Quantification of Stable Isotope Traces Close to Natural Enrichment in Human Plasma Metabolites Using Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krämer, Lisa; Jäger, Christian; Jacobs, Doris M.; Hiller, Karsten

    2018-01-01

    Currently, changes in metabolic fluxes following consumption of stable isotope-enriched foods are usually limited to the analysis of postprandial kinetics of glucose. Kinetic information on a larger diversity of metabolites is often lacking, mainly due to the marginal percentage of fully isotopically enriched plant material in the administered food product, and hence, an even weaker 13C enrichment in downstream plasma metabolites. Therefore, we developed an analytical workflow to determine weak 13C enrichments of diverse plasma metabolites with conventional gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). The limit of quantification was increased by optimizing (1) the metabolite extraction from plasma, (2) the GC-MS measurement, and (3) most importantly, the computational data processing. We applied our workflow to study the catabolic dynamics of 13C-enriched wheat bread in three human subjects. For that purpose, we collected time-resolved human plasma samples at 16 timepoints after the consumption of 13C-labeled bread and quantified 13C enrichment of 12 metabolites (glucose, lactate, alanine, glycine, serine, citrate, glutamate, glutamine, valine, isoleucine, tyrosine, and threonine). Based on isotopomer specific analysis, we were able to distinguish catabolic profiles of starch and protein hydrolysis. More generally, our study highlights that conventional GC-MS equipment is sufficient to detect isotope traces below 1% if an appropriate data processing is integrated. PMID:29443915

  5. Quantification of Stable Isotope Traces Close to Natural Enrichment in Human Plasma Metabolites Using Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa Krämer

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Currently, changes in metabolic fluxes following consumption of stable isotope-enriched foods are usually limited to the analysis of postprandial kinetics of glucose. Kinetic information on a larger diversity of metabolites is often lacking, mainly due to the marginal percentage of fully isotopically enriched plant material in the administered food product, and hence, an even weaker 13C enrichment in downstream plasma metabolites. Therefore, we developed an analytical workflow to determine weak 13C enrichments of diverse plasma metabolites with conventional gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS. The limit of quantification was increased by optimizing (1 the metabolite extraction from plasma, (2 the GC-MS measurement, and (3 most importantly, the computational data processing. We applied our workflow to study the catabolic dynamics of 13C-enriched wheat bread in three human subjects. For that purpose, we collected time-resolved human plasma samples at 16 timepoints after the consumption of 13C-labeled bread and quantified 13C enrichment of 12 metabolites (glucose, lactate, alanine, glycine, serine, citrate, glutamate, glutamine, valine, isoleucine, tyrosine, and threonine. Based on isotopomer specific analysis, we were able to distinguish catabolic profiles of starch and protein hydrolysis. More generally, our study highlights that conventional GC-MS equipment is sufficient to detect isotope traces below 1% if an appropriate data processing is integrated.

  6. Modeling and Simulation of Optimal Resource Management during the Diurnal Cycle in Emiliania huxleyi by Genome-Scale Reconstruction and an Extended Flux Balance Analysis Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knies, David; Wittmüß, Philipp; Appel, Sebastian; Sawodny, Oliver; Ederer, Michael; Feuer, Ronny

    2015-10-28

    The coccolithophorid unicellular alga Emiliania huxleyi is known to form large blooms, which have a strong effect on the marine carbon cycle. As a photosynthetic organism, it is subjected to a circadian rhythm due to the changing light conditions throughout the day. For a better understanding of the metabolic processes under these periodically-changing environmental conditions, a genome-scale model based on a genome reconstruction of the E. huxleyi strain CCMP 1516 was created. It comprises 410 reactions and 363 metabolites. Biomass composition is variable based on the differentiation into functional biomass components and storage metabolites. The model is analyzed with a flux balance analysis approach called diurnal flux balance analysis (diuFBA) that was designed for organisms with a circadian rhythm. It allows storage metabolites to accumulate or be consumed over the diurnal cycle, while keeping the structure of a classical FBA problem. A feature of this approach is that the production and consumption of storage metabolites is not defined externally via the biomass composition, but the result of optimal resource management adapted to the diurnally-changing environmental conditions. The model in combination with this approach is able to simulate the variable biomass composition during the diurnal cycle in proximity to literature data.

  7. Modeling and Simulation of Optimal Resource Management during the Diurnal Cycle in Emiliania huxleyi by Genome-Scale Reconstruction and an Extended Flux Balance Analysis Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Knies

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The coccolithophorid unicellular alga Emiliania huxleyi is known to form large blooms, which have a strong effect on the marine carbon cycle. As a photosynthetic organism, it is subjected to a circadian rhythm due to the changing light conditions throughout the day. For a better understanding of the metabolic processes under these periodically-changing environmental conditions, a genome-scale model based on a genome reconstruction of the E. huxleyi strain CCMP 1516 was created. It comprises 410 reactions and 363 metabolites. Biomass composition is variable based on the differentiation into functional biomass components and storage metabolites. The model is analyzed with a flux balance analysis approach called diurnal flux balance analysis (diuFBA that was designed for organisms with a circadian rhythm. It allows storage metabolites to accumulate or be consumed over the diurnal cycle, while keeping the structure of a classical FBA problem. A feature of this approach is that the production and consumption of storage metabolites is not defined externally via the biomass composition, but the result of optimal resource management adapted to the diurnally-changing environmental conditions. The model in combination with this approach is able to simulate the variable biomass composition during the diurnal cycle in proximity to literature data.

  8. KoFlux: Korean Regional Flux Network in AsiaFlux

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, J.

    2002-12-01

    AsiaFlux, the Asian arm of FLUXNET, held the Second International Workshop on Advanced Flux Network and Flux Evaluation in Jeju Island, Korea on 9-11 January 2002. In order to facilitate comprehensive Asia-wide studies of ecosystem fluxes, the meeting launched KoFlux, a new Korean regional network of long-term micrometeorological flux sites. For a successful assessment of carbon exchange between terrestrial ecosystems and the atmosphere, an accurate measurement of surface fluxes of energy and water is one of the prerequisites. During the 7th Global Energy and Water Cycle Experiment (GEWEX) Asian Monsoon Experiment (GAME) held in Nagoya, Japan on 1-2 October 2001, the Implementation Committee of the Coordinated Enhanced Observing Period (CEOP) was established. One of the immediate tasks of CEOP was and is to identify the reference sites to monitor energy and water fluxes over the Asian continent. Subsequently, to advance the regional and global network of these reference sites in the context of both FLUXNET and CEOP, the Korean flux community has re-organized the available resources to establish a new regional network, KoFlux. We have built up domestic network sites (equipped with wind profiler and radiosonde measurements) over deciduous and coniferous forests, urban and rural rice paddies and coastal farmland. As an outreach through collaborations with research groups in Japan, China and Thailand, we also proposed international flux sites at ecologically and climatologically important locations such as a prairie on the Tibetan plateau, tropical forest with mixed and rapid land use change in northern Thailand. Several sites in KoFlux already begun to accumulate interesting data and some highlights are presented at the meeting. The sciences generated by flux networks in other continents have proven the worthiness of a global array of micrometeorological flux towers. It is our intent that the launch of KoFlux would encourage other scientists to initiate and

  9. Mitochondrial toxicity of selective COX-2 inhibitors via inhibition of oxidative phosphorylation (ATP synthesis) in rat liver mitochondria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Syed, Muzeeb; Skonberg, Christian; Hansen, Steen Honoré

    2016-01-01

    Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) inhibitors (coxibs) are non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) designed to selectively inhibit COX-2. However, drugs of this therapeutic class are associated with drug induced liver injury (DILI) and mitochondrial injury is likely to play a role. The effects...... of selective COX-2 inhibitors on inhibition of oxidative phosphorylation (ATP synthesis) in rat liver mitochondria were investigated. The order of potency of inhibition of ATP synthesis was: lumiracoxib (IC50: 6.48 ± 2.74 μM)>celecoxib (IC50: 14.92 ± 6.40 μM)>valdecoxib (IC50: 161.4 ± 28.6 μM)>rofecoxib (IC50...... correlation (with r(2)=0.921) was observed between the potency of inhibition of ATP synthesis and the log P values. The in vitro metabolism of coxibs in rat liver mitochondria yielded for each drug substance a major single metabolite and identified a hydroxy metabolite with each of the coxibs...

  10. Effects of atorvastatin metabolites on induction of drug-metabolizing enzymes and membrane transporters through human pregnane X receptor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffart, E; Ghebreghiorghis, L; Nussler, AK; Thasler, WE; Weiss, TS; Schwab, M; Burk, O

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Atorvastatin metabolites differ in their potential for drug interaction because of differential inhibition of drug-metabolizing enzymes and transporters. We here investigate whether they exert differential effects on the induction of these genes via activation of pregnane X receptor (PXR) and constitutive androstane receptor (CAR). EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH Ligand binding to PXR or CAR was analysed by mammalian two-hybrid assembly and promoter/reporter gene assays. Additionally, surface plasmon resonance was used to analyse ligand binding to CAR. Primary human hepatocytes were treated with atorvastatin metabolites, and mRNA and protein expression of PXR-regulated genes was measured. Two-hybrid co-activator interaction and co-repressor release assays were utilized to elucidate the molecular mechanism of PXR activation. KEY RESULTS All atorvastatin metabolites induced the assembly of PXR and activated CYP3A4 promoter activity. Ligand binding to CAR could not be proven. In primary human hepatocytes, the para-hydroxy metabolite markedly reduced or abolished induction of cytochrome P450 and transporter genes. While significant differences in co-activator recruitment were not observed, para-hydroxy atorvastatin demonstrated only 50% release of co-repressors. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS Atorvastatin metabolites are ligands of PXR but not of CAR. Atorvastatin metabolites demonstrate differential induction of PXR target genes, which results from impaired release of co-repressors. Consequently, the properties of drug metabolites have to be taken into account when analysing PXR-dependent induction of drug metabolism and transport. The drug interaction potential of the active metabolite, para-hydroxy atorvastatin, might be lower than that of the parent compound. PMID:21913896

  11. Apoptosis of human tongue squamous cell carcinoma cell (CAL-27 induced by Lactobacillus sp. A-2 metabolites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guoliang ZHANG

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To study the effect of Lactobacillus sp. A-2 metabolites on viability of CAL-27 cells and apoptosis in CAL-27 cells. Methods: Lactobacillus sp. A-2 metabolites 1 and 2 (LM1 and LM2 were obtained by culturing Lactobacillus sp. A-2 in reconstituted whey medium and whey-inulin medium; the cultured CAL-27 cells were treated with different concentrations of LM1 and LM2 (0, 3, 6, 12, 24, 48 mg/mL and assayed by methyl thiazolyltetrazolium (MTT method; morphological changes of apoptotic cell were observed under fluorescence microscopy by acridine orange (Ao fluorescent staining; flow cytometry method (FCM and agarose gel electrophoresis were used to detect the apoptosis of CAL-27 cells treated LM1 and LM2. Results: The different concentrations of LM1 and LM2 could restrain the growth of CAL-27 cells, and in a dose-dependent manner; the apoptosis of CAL-27 cells was obviously induced and was time-dependent. Conclusions: Viability of CAL-27 cells was inhibited by Lactobacillus sp. A-2 metabolites; Lactobacillus sp. A-2 metabolites could induce CAL-27 cells apoptosis; study on the bioactive compounds in the Lactobacillus sp. A-2 metabolites and their molecular mechanism is in progress.

  12. Rationalization and prediction of in vivo metabolite exposures: The role of metabolite kinetics, clearance predictions and in vitro parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lutz, Justin D.; Fujioka, Yasushi; Isoherranen, Nina

    2010-01-01

    Importance of the field Due to growing concerns over toxic or active metabolites, significant efforts have been focused on qualitative identification of potential in vivo metabolites from in vitro data. However, limited tools are available to quantitatively predict their human exposures. Areas covered in this review Theory of clearance predictions and metabolite kinetics is reviewed together with supporting experimental data. In vitro and in vivo data of known circulating metabolites and their parent drugs was collected and the predictions of in vivo exposures of the metabolites were evaluated. What the reader will gain The theory and data reviewed will be useful in early identification of human metabolites that will circulate at significant levels in vivo and help in designing in vivo studies that focus on characterization of metabolites. It will also assist in rationalization of metabolite-to-parent ratios used as markers of specific enzyme activity. Take home message The relative importance of a metabolite in comparison to the parent compound as well as other metabolites in vivo can only be predicted using the metabolites in vitro formation and elimination clearances, and the in vivo disposition of a metabolite can only be rationalized when the elimination pathways of that metabolite are known. PMID:20557268

  13. Antifungal metabolites (monorden, monocillin IV, and cerebrosides) from Humicola fuscoatra traaen NRRL 22980, a mycoparasite of Aspergillus flavus sclerotia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wicklow, D T; Joshi, B K; Gamble, W R; Gloer, J B; Dowd, P F

    1998-11-01

    The mycoparasite Humicola fuscoatra NRRL 22980 was isolated from a sclerotium of Aspergillus flavus that had been buried in a cornfield near Tifton, Ga. When grown on autoclaved rice, this fungus produced the antifungal metabolites monorden, monocillin IV, and a new monorden analog. Each metabolite produced a clear zone of inhibition surrounding paper assay disks on agar plates seeded with conidia of A. flavus. Monorden was twice as inhibitory to A. flavus mycelium extension (MIC > 28 microg/ml) as monocillin IV (MIC > 56 microg/ml). Cerebrosides C and D, metabolites known to potentiate the activity of cell wall-active antibiotics, were separated from the ethyl acetate extract but were not inhibitory to A. flavus when tested as pure compounds. This is the first report of natural products from H. fuscoatra.

  14. PENDISC: a simple method for constructing a mathematical model from time-series data of metabolite concentrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sriyudthsak, Kansuporn; Iwata, Michio; Hirai, Masami Yokota; Shiraishi, Fumihide

    2014-06-01

    The availability of large-scale datasets has led to more effort being made to understand characteristics of metabolic reaction networks. However, because the large-scale data are semi-quantitative, and may contain biological variations and/or analytical errors, it remains a challenge to construct a mathematical model with precise parameters using only these data. The present work proposes a simple method, referred to as PENDISC (Parameter Estimation in a N on- DImensionalized S-system with Constraints), to assist the complex process of parameter estimation in the construction of a mathematical model for a given metabolic reaction system. The PENDISC method was evaluated using two simple mathematical models: a linear metabolic pathway model with inhibition and a branched metabolic pathway model with inhibition and activation. The results indicate that a smaller number of data points and rate constant parameters enhances the agreement between calculated values and time-series data of metabolite concentrations, and leads to faster convergence when the same initial estimates are used for the fitting. This method is also shown to be applicable to noisy time-series data and to unmeasurable metabolite concentrations in a network, and to have a potential to handle metabolome data of a relatively large-scale metabolic reaction system. Furthermore, it was applied to aspartate-derived amino acid biosynthesis in Arabidopsis thaliana plant. The result provides confirmation that the mathematical model constructed satisfactorily agrees with the time-series datasets of seven metabolite concentrations.

  15. Metabolite Profiling of Red Sea Corals

    KAUST Repository

    Ortega, Jovhana Alejandra

    2016-12-01

    Looking at the metabolite profile of an organism provides insights into the metabolomic state of a cell and hence also into pathways employed. Little is known about the metabolites produced by corals and their algal symbionts. In particular, corals from the central Red Sea are understudied, but interesting study objects, as they live in one of the warmest and most saline environments and can provide clues as to the adjustment of corals to environmental change. In this study, we applied gas chromatography – mass spectrometry (GC–MS) metabolite profiling to analyze the metabolic profile of four coral species and their associated symbionts: Fungia granulosa, Acropora hemprichii, Porites lutea, and Pocillopora verrucosa. We identified and quantified 102 compounds among primary and secondary metabolites across all samples. F. granulosa and its symbiont showed a total of 59 metabolites which were similar to the 51 displayed by P. verrucosa. P. lutea and A. hemprichii both harbored 40 compounds in conjunction with their respective isolated algae. Comparing across species, 28 metabolites were exclusively present in algae, while 38 were exclusive to corals. A principal component and cluster analyses revealed that metabolite profiles clustered between corals and algae, but each species harbored a distinct catalog of metabolites. The major classes of compounds were carbohydrates and amino acids. Taken together, this study provides a first description of metabolites of Red Sea corals and their associated symbionts. As expected, the metabolites of coral hosts differ from their algal symbionts, but each host and algal species harbor a unique set of metabolites. This corroborates that host-symbiont species pairs display a fine-tuned complementary metabolism that provide insights into the specific nature of the symbiosis. Our analysis also revealed aquatic pollutants, which suggests that metabolite profiling might be used for monitoring pollution levels and assessing

  16. Salicylate, diflunisal and their metabolites inhibit CBP/p300 and exhibit anticancer activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirakawa, Kotaro; Wang, Lan; Man, Na; Maksimoska, Jasna; Sorum, Alexander W; Lim, Hyung W; Lee, Intelly S; Shimazu, Tadahiro; Newman, John C; Schröder, Sebastian; Ott, Melanie; Marmorstein, Ronen; Meier, Jordan; Nimer, Stephen; Verdin, Eric

    2016-05-31

    Salicylate and acetylsalicylic acid are potent and widely used anti-inflammatory drugs. They are thought to exert their therapeutic effects through multiple mechanisms, including the inhibition of cyclo-oxygenases, modulation of NF-κB activity, and direct activation of AMPK. However, the full spectrum of their activities is incompletely understood. Here we show that salicylate specifically inhibits CBP and p300 lysine acetyltransferase activity in vitro by direct competition with acetyl-Coenzyme A at the catalytic site. We used a chemical structure-similarity search to identify another anti-inflammatory drug, diflunisal, that inhibits p300 more potently than salicylate. At concentrations attainable in human plasma after oral administration, both salicylate and diflunisal blocked the acetylation of lysine residues on histone and non-histone proteins in cells. Finally, we found that diflunisal suppressed the growth of p300-dependent leukemia cell lines expressing AML1-ETO fusion protein in vitro and in vivo. These results highlight a novel epigenetic regulatory mechanism of action for salicylate and derivative drugs.

  17. Anti-Biofilm and Antivirulence Activities of Metabolites from Plectosphaerella cucumerina against Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinwei Zhou

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available This study reported the efficacy of the metabolites of Plectosphaerella cucumerina, one phyllosphere fungus from Orychophragmus violaceus, against Pseudomonas aeruginosa quorum sensing (QS and QS-regulated biofilms. The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC of the ethyl acetate (EtOAc extract from P. cucumerina against P. aeruginosa PAO1 was 1.25 mg mL−1. At sub-MIC concentrations, P. cucumerina extract (0.25–1 mg mL−1 not only inhibited biofilm formation but also disrupted preformed biofilms of P. aeruginosa PAO1 without affecting its growth. Fluorescence and scanning electron microscope (SEM showed architectural disruption of the biofilms when treated with P. cucumerina metabolites. Further investigation demonstrated that metabolites in P. cucumerina attenuated the QS-dependent virulence factors. LC-MS/MS spectra coupled with experimentally standard samples suggested that patulin and emodin might act as the principal components possessing anti-biofilm and antivirulence activities. This is the first report of (1 the isolation of P. cucumerina from the phyllosphere of O. violaceus and (2 anti-biofilm, antivirulence, and biofilm disruption activities of this fungus. Thus, this study provides fascinating new pathways for screening antipathogenic agents.

  18. Secondary metabolites from marine microorganisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelecom, Alphonse

    2002-03-01

    After 40 years of intensive research, chemistry of marine natural products has become a mature field. Since 1995, there are signals of decreased interest in the search of new metabolites from traditional sources such as macroalgae and octocorals, and the number of annual reports on marine sponges stabilized. On the contrary, metabolites from microorganisms is a rapidly growing field, due, at least in part, to the suspicion that a number of metabolites obtained from algae and invertebrates may be produced by associated microorganisms. Studies are concerned with bacteria and fungi, isolated from seawater, sediments, algae, fish and mainly from marine invertebrates such as sponges, mollusks, tunicates, coelenterates and crustaceans. Although it is still to early to define tendencies, it may be stated that the metabolites from microorganisms are in most cases quite different from those produced by the invertebrate hosts. Nitrogenated metabolites predominate over acetate derivatives, and terpenes are uncommon. Among the latter, sesquiterpenes, diterpenes and carotenes have been isolated; among nitrogenated metabolites, amides, cyclic peptides and indole alkaloids predominate.

  19. Secondary metabolites from marine microorganisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    KELECOM ALPHONSE

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available After 40 years of intensive research, chemistry of marine natural products has become a mature field. Since 1995, there are signals of decreased interest in the search of new metabolites from traditional sources such as macroalgae and octocorals, and the number of annual reports on marine sponges stabilized. On the contrary, metabolites from microorganisms is a rapidly growing field, due, at least in part, to the suspicion that a number of metabolites obtained from algae and invertebrates may be produced by associated microorganisms. Studies are concerned with bacteria and fungi, isolated from seawater, sediments, algae, fish and mainly from marine invertebrates such as sponges, mollusks, tunicates, coelenterates and crustaceans. Although it is still to early to define tendencies, it may be stated that the metabolites from microorganisms are in most cases quite different from those produced by the invertebrate hosts. Nitrogenated metabolites predominate over acetate derivatives, and terpenes are uncommon. Among the latter, sesquiterpenes, diterpenes and carotenes have been isolated; among nitrogenated metabolites, amides, cyclic peptides and indole alkaloids predominate.

  20. PTP1B inhibitory secondary metabolites from marine-derived fungal strains Penicillium spp. and Eurotium sp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sohn, Jae Hak; Lee, Yu-Ri; Lee, Dong-Sung; Kim, Youn-Chul; Oh, Hyuncheol

    2013-09-28

    The selective inhibition of PTP1B has been widely recognized as a potential drug target for the treatment of type 2 diabetes and obesity. In the course of screening for PTP1B inhibitory fungal metabolites, the organic extracts of several fungal species isolated from marine environments were found to exhibit significant inhibitory effects, and the bioassay-guided investigation of these extracts resulted in the isolation of fructigenine A (1), cyclopenol (2), echinulin (3), flavoglaucin (4), and viridicatol (5). The structures of these compounds were determined mainly by analysis of NMR and MS data. These compounds inhibited PTP1B activity with 50% inhibitory concentration values of 10.7, 30.0, 29.4, 13.4, and 64.0 micrometer, respectively. Furthermore, the kinetic analysis of PTP1B inhibition by compounds 1 and 5 suggested that compound 1 inhibited PTP1B activity in a noncompetitive manner, whereas compound 5 inhibited PTP1B activity in a competitive manner.

  1. Kynurenine 3-monooxygenase inhibition in blood ameliorates neurodegeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zwilling, Daniel; Huang, Shao-Yi; Sathyasaikumar, Korrapati V.; Notarangelo, Francesca M.; Guidetti, Paolo; Wu, Hui-Qiu; Lee, Jason; Truong, Jennifer; Andrews-Zwilling, Yaisa; Hsieh, Eric W.; Louie, Jamie Y.; Wu, Tiffany; Scearce-Levie, Kimberly; Patrick, Christina; Adame, Anthony; Giorgini, Flaviano; Moussaoui, Saliha; Laue, Grit; Rassoulpour, Arash; Flik, Gunnar; Huang, Yadong; Muchowski, Joseph M.; Masliah, Eliezer; Schwarcz, Robert; Muchowski, Paul J.

    2011-01-01

    SUMMARY Metabolites in the kynurenine pathway of tryptophan degradation are thought to play an important role in neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer’s disease and Huntington’s disease. Metabolites that cause glutamate receptor-mediated excitotoxicity and free radical formation are elevated in the blood and vulnerable brain regions in these diseases, while levels of the neuroprotective metabolite kynurenic acid are often decreased. Here we describe the synthesis and characterization of JM6, a novel small-molecule pro-drug inhibitor of kynurenine 3-monooxygenase (KMO). JM6 raises kynurenic acid and reduces extracellular glutamate in the brain after chronic oral administration by inhibiting KMO in blood. In a transgenic mouse model of Alzheimer’s disease, JM6 prevented spatial memory deficits, anxiety-related behavior, and synaptic loss. JM6 also extended life span, prevented synaptic loss, and decreased microglial activation in a mouse model of Huntington’s disease. These findings support a critical link between blood cells and neurodegeneration that is mediated by KMO and the kynurenine pathway. PMID:21640374

  2. Application of quantitative time-lapse imaging (QTLI) for evaluation of Mrp2-based drug–drug interaction induced by liver metabolites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakanishi, Takeo; Ikenaga, Miho; Fukuda, Hajime; Matsunaga, Norikazu; Tamai, Ikumi

    2012-01-01

    We previously reported a quantitative time-lapse imaging (QTLI)-based analysis method to assess drug–drug interactions (DDI) at multidrug resistance-associated protein 2 (Mrp2) in rat sandwich-cultured hepatocyte (SCH) system, utilizing the fluorescent Mrp2 substrate, 5-(and 6)-carboxy-2′,7′-dichlorofluorescein (CDF). Here, we aimed to examine the feasibility of using QTLI to evaluate DDI involving drug metabolite(s) generated in hepatocytes. We used estradiol (E2) and bilirubin as model compounds; both are not substrates of MRP2, whereas their hepatic metabolites, estradiol-17β-glucuronide (E17G) or bilirubin glucuronides, are known to be its substrates as well as inhibitors. When rat SCHs were pre-exposed with E2, fluorescence of CDF accumulated in bile canaliculi decreased depending upon both the duration of pre-exposure and the concentration of extracellular E2. The decrease corresponded with the increase in intracellular concentration of E17G in hepatocytes. Furthermore, cytotoxicity of vinblastine, a substrate of MRP2, was enhanced in SCHs treated with E2. Similarly, CDF accumulated in bile canaliculi was significantly reduced in rat SCHs pre-exposed with bilirubin. In conclusion, these results suggest that phase II biotransformation of a competitor is reflected in alteration of MRP2-mediated CDF transport detected in QTLI. The QTLI might provide a convenient platform to evaluate transporter-based DDIs involving hepatic metabolites of drug candidates without the need to identify the metabolites. -- Highlights: ► Mrp2-mediated CDF transport is inhibited by E2, but not E17G in vesicle study. ► Both E2 and E17G do not compromise CDF formation from CDFDA in hepatocytes. ► CDF accumulation in bile canaliculi is inhibited by E2 or E17G in QTLI. ► Increasing exposure to E2 decreases CDF accumulation in bile canaliculi in QTLI. ► QTLI is feasible to assess Mrp2-based DDI involving drug metabolite in hepatocytes.

  3. Application of quantitative time-lapse imaging (QTLI) for evaluation of Mrp2-based drug–drug interaction induced by liver metabolites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakanishi, Takeo; Ikenaga, Miho; Fukuda, Hajime; Matsunaga, Norikazu; Tamai, Ikumi, E-mail: tamai@p.kanazawa-w.ac.jp

    2012-09-01

    We previously reported a quantitative time-lapse imaging (QTLI)-based analysis method to assess drug–drug interactions (DDI) at multidrug resistance-associated protein 2 (Mrp2) in rat sandwich-cultured hepatocyte (SCH) system, utilizing the fluorescent Mrp2 substrate, 5-(and 6)-carboxy-2′,7′-dichlorofluorescein (CDF). Here, we aimed to examine the feasibility of using QTLI to evaluate DDI involving drug metabolite(s) generated in hepatocytes. We used estradiol (E2) and bilirubin as model compounds; both are not substrates of MRP2, whereas their hepatic metabolites, estradiol-17β-glucuronide (E17G) or bilirubin glucuronides, are known to be its substrates as well as inhibitors. When rat SCHs were pre-exposed with E2, fluorescence of CDF accumulated in bile canaliculi decreased depending upon both the duration of pre-exposure and the concentration of extracellular E2. The decrease corresponded with the increase in intracellular concentration of E17G in hepatocytes. Furthermore, cytotoxicity of vinblastine, a substrate of MRP2, was enhanced in SCHs treated with E2. Similarly, CDF accumulated in bile canaliculi was significantly reduced in rat SCHs pre-exposed with bilirubin. In conclusion, these results suggest that phase II biotransformation of a competitor is reflected in alteration of MRP2-mediated CDF transport detected in QTLI. The QTLI might provide a convenient platform to evaluate transporter-based DDIs involving hepatic metabolites of drug candidates without the need to identify the metabolites. -- Highlights: ► Mrp2-mediated CDF transport is inhibited by E2, but not E17G in vesicle study. ► Both E2 and E17G do not compromise CDF formation from CDFDA in hepatocytes. ► CDF accumulation in bile canaliculi is inhibited by E2 or E17G in QTLI. ► Increasing exposure to E2 decreases CDF accumulation in bile canaliculi in QTLI. ► QTLI is feasible to assess Mrp2-based DDI involving drug metabolite in hepatocytes.

  4. Role of metabolites and calcineurin inhibition on C2 monitoring in renal transplant patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karamperis, N.; Koefoed-Nielsen, P.; Bagger, Sorensen A.

    2005-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Many transplantation centres have switched to C2 monitoring of cyclosporin-treated renal transplant patients. The rationale is that the C2 correlates best with AUC0-4 (area under the concentration-time curve), which again correlates with rejection and nephrotoxicity. It has also been...... metabolites were added to whole blood from healthy volunteers and the calcineurin phosphatase activity (CaN) was determined. Twenty renal transplant patients at varying times after transplantation had blood samples drawn in the morning before and 1, 2, 3 and 4 h after intake of their usual dose of cyclosporin...

  5. Identification of N-acyl-fumonisin B1 as new cytotoxic metabolites of fumonisin mycotoxins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrer, Henning; Laviad, Elad L; Humpf, Hans Ulrich; Futerman, Anthony H

    2013-03-01

    Fumonisins are mycotoxins produced by Fusarium species. The predominant derivative, fumonisin B1 (FB1), occurs in food and feed and is of health concern due to its hepatotoxic and carcinogenic effects. However, the role of FB1 metabolites on the mechanism of the toxicity, the inhibition of the ceramide synthesis, is unknown. The aim of this study was to identify new fumonisin metabolites and to evaluate their cytotoxic potential. MS, molecular biology, and in vitro enzyme assays were used to investigate fumonisin metabolism in mammalian cells overexpressing human ceramide synthase (CerS) genes. N-acyl-FB1 derivatives were detected as new metabolites in cultured cells at levels of up to 10 pmol/mg of protein. The N-acylation of FB1 and hydrolyzed FB1 was analyzed in several cell lines, including cells overexpressing CerS. The acyl-chain length of the N-acyl fumonisins depends on the CerS isoform acylating them. The N-acyl fumonisins are more cytotoxic than the parent fumonisin B1. The identification of N-acyl fumonisins with various acyl chain lengths together with the observed cytotoxicity of these compounds is a new aspect of fumonisin-related toxicity. Therefore, these new metabolites might play an important role in the mode of action of fumonisins. © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  6. Mechanism of carbon tetrachloride-induced hepatotoxicity. Hepatocellular damage by reactive carbon tetrachloride metabolites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boll, M.; Weber, L.W.D.; Becker, E.; Stampfl, A. [Inst. of Toxicology, GSF - National Research Center for Environment and Health, Muenchen, Neuherberg (Germany)

    2001-08-01

    CCl{sub 4}-induced liver damage was modeled in monolayer cultures of rat primary hepatocytes with a focus on involvement of covalent binding of CCl{sub 4} metabolites to cell components and/or peroxidative damage as the cause of injury. (1) Covalent binding of {sup 14}C-labeled metabolites was detected in hepatocytes immediately after exposure to CCl{sub 4}. (2) Low oxygen partial pressure increased the reductive metabolism of CCl{sub 4} and thus covalent binding. (3) [{sup 14}C]-CCl{sub 4} was bound to lipids and to proteins throughout subcellular fractions. Binding occurred preferentially to triacylglycerols and phospholipids, with phosphatidylcholine containing the highest amount of label. (4) The lipid peroxidation potency of CCl{sub 4} revealed subtle differences compared to other peroxidative substances, viz., ADP-Fe{sup 3+} and cumol hydroperoxide, respectively. (5) CCl{sub 4}, but not the other peroxidative substances, decreased the rate of triacylglycerol secretion as very low density lipoproteins. (6) The anti-oxidant vitamin E ({alpha}-tocopherol) blocked lipid peroxidation, but not covalent binding, and secretion of lipoproteins remained inhibited. (7) The radical scavenger piperonyl butoxide prevented CCl{sub 4}-induced lipid peroxidation as well as covalent binding of CCl{sub 4} metabolites to cell components, and also restored lipoprotein metabolism. The results confirm that covalent binding of the CCl{sub 3}{sup *} radical to cell components initiates the inhibition of lipoprotein secretion and thus steatosis, whereas the reaction with oxygen, to form CCl{sub 3}-OO{sup *}, initiates lipid peroxidation. The two processes are independent of each other, and the extent to which either process occurs depends on partial oxygen pressure. The former process may result in adduct formation and, ultimately, cancer initiation, whereas the latter results in loss of calcium homeostasis and, ultimately, apoptosis and cell death. (orig.)

  7. Protection by fungal starters against growth and secondary metabolite production of fungal spoilers of cheese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, M S; Frisvad, J C; Nielsen, P V

    1998-06-30

    The influence of fungal starter cultures on growth and secondary metabolite production of fungal contaminants associated with cheese was studied on laboratory media and Camembert cheese. Isolates of the species Penicillium nalgiovense, P. camemberti, P. roqueforti and Geotrichum candidum were used as fungal starters. The species P. commune, P. caseifulvum, P. verrucosum, P. discolor, P. solitum, P. coprophilum and Aspergillus versicolor were selected as contaminants. The fungal starters showed different competitive ability on laboratory media and Camembert cheese. The presence of the Penicillium species, especially P. nalgiovense, showed an inhibitory effect on the growth of the fungal contaminants on laboratory media. G. candidum caused a significant inhibition of the fungal contaminants on Camembert cheese. The results indicate that G. candidum plays an important role in competition with undesirable microorganisms in mould fermented cheeses. Among the starters, P. nalgiovense caused the largest reduction in secondary metabolite production of the fungal contaminants on the laboratory medium. On Camembert cheese no significant changes in metabolite production of the fungal contaminants was observed in the presence of the starters.

  8. Dietary supplementation of branched-chain amino acids increases muscle net amino acid fluxes through elevating their substrate availability and intramuscular catabolism in young pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Liufeng; Zuo, Fangrui; Zhao, Shengjun; He, Pingli; Wei, Hongkui; Xiang, Quanhang; Pang, Jiaman; Peng, Jian

    2017-04-01

    Branched-chain amino acids (BCAA) have been clearly demonstrated to have anabolic effects on muscle protein synthesis. However, little is known about their roles in the regulation of net AA fluxes across skeletal muscle in vivo. This study was aimed to investigate the effect and related mechanisms of dietary supplementation of BCAA on muscle net amino acid (AA) fluxes using the hindlimb flux model. In all fourteen 4-week-old barrows were fed reduced-protein diets with or without supplemental BCAA for 28 d. Pigs were implanted with carotid arterial, femoral arterial and venous catheters, and fed once hourly with intraarterial infusion of p-amino hippurate. Arterial and venous plasma and muscle samples were obtained for the measurement of AA, branched-chain α-keto acids (BCKA) and 3-methylhistidine (3-MH). Metabolomes of venous plasma were determined by HPLC-quadrupole time-of-flight-MS. BCAA-supplemented group showed elevated muscle net fluxes of total essential AA, non-essential AA and AA. As for individual AA, muscle net fluxes of each BCAA and their metabolites (alanine, glutamate and glutamine), along with those of histidine, methionine and several functional non-essential AA (glycine, proline and serine), were increased by BCAA supplementation. The elevated muscle net AA fluxes were associated with the increase in arterial and intramuscular concentrations of BCAA and venous metabolites including BCKA and free fatty acids, and were also related to the decrease in the intramuscular concentration of 3-MH. Correlation analysis indicated that muscle net AA fluxes are highly and positively correlated with arterial BCAA concentrations and muscle net BCKA production. In conclusion, supplementing BCAA to reduced-protein diet increases the arterial concentrations and intramuscular catabolism of BCAA, both of which would contribute to an increase of muscle net AA fluxes in young pigs.

  9. Transportable hyperpolarized metabolites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Xiao; Bornet, Aurélien; Vuichoud, Basile; Milani, Jonas; Gajan, David; Rossini, Aaron J.; Emsley, Lyndon; Bodenhausen, Geoffrey; Jannin, Sami

    2017-01-01

    Nuclear spin hyperpolarization of 13C-labelled metabolites by dissolution dynamic nuclear polarization can enhance the NMR signals of metabolites by several orders of magnitude, which has enabled in vivo metabolic imaging by MRI. However, because of the short lifetime of the hyperpolarized magnetization (typically <1 min), the polarization process must be carried out close to the point of use. Here we introduce a concept that markedly extends hyperpolarization lifetimes and enables the transportation of hyperpolarized metabolites. The hyperpolarized sample can thus be removed from the polarizer and stored or transported for use at remote MRI or NMR sites. We show that hyperpolarization in alanine and glycine survives 16 h storage and transport, maintaining overall polarization enhancements of up to three orders of magnitude. PMID:28072398

  10. Microsomal metabolism of trenbolone acetate metabolites ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trenbolone acetate (TBA) is a synthetic growth promoter widely used in animal agriculture, and its metabolites are suspected endocrine disrupting compounds in agriculturally impacted receiving waters. However, beyond the three widely recognized TBA metabolites (17-trenbolone, 17-trenbolone and trendione), little is known about other metabolites formed in vivo and subsequently discharged into the environment, with some evidence suggesting these unknown metabolites comprise a majority of the TBA mass dosed to the animal. Here, we explored the metabolism of the three known TBA metabolites using rat liver microsome studies. All TBA metabolites are transformed into a complex mixture of monohydroxylated products. Based on product characterization, the majority are more polar than the parent metabolites but maintain their characteristic trienone backbone. A minor degree of interconversion between known metabolites was also observed, as were higher order hydroxylated products with a greater extent of reaction. Notably, the distribution and yield of products were generally comparable across a series of variably induced rat liver microsomes, as well as during additional studies with human and bovine liver microsomes. Bioassays conducted with mixtures of these transformation products suggest that androgen receptor (AR) binding activity is diminished as a result of the microsomal treatment, suggesting that the transformation products are generally less potent than

  11. A cellular system for quantitation of vitamin K cycle activity: structure-activity effects on vitamin K antagonism by warfarin metabolites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haque, Jamil A.; McDonald, Matthew G.; Kulman, John D.

    2014-01-01

    Warfarin and other 4-hydroxycoumarins inhibit vitamin K epoxide reductase (VKOR) by depleting reduced vitamin K that is required for posttranslational modification of vitamin K–dependent clotting factors. In vitro prediction of the in vivo potency of vitamin K antagonists is complicated by the complex multicomponent nature of the vitamin K cycle. Here we describe a sensitive assay that enables quantitative analysis of γ-glutamyl carboxylation and its antagonism in live cells. We engineered a human embryonic kidney (HEK) 293–derived cell line (HEK 293-C3) to express a chimeric protein (F9CH) comprising the Gla domain of factor IX fused to the transmembrane and cytoplasmic regions of proline-rich Gla protein 2. Maximal γ-glutamyl carboxylation of F9CH required vitamin K supplementation, and was dose-dependently inhibited by racemic warfarin at a physiologically relevant concentration. Cellular γ-glutamyl carboxylation also exhibited differential VKOR inhibition by warfarin enantiomers (S > R) consistent with their in vivo potencies. We further analyzed the structure-activity relationship for inhibition of γ-glutamyl carboxylation by warfarin metabolites, observing tolerance to phenolic substitution at the C-5 and especially C-6, but not C-7 or C-8, positions on the 4-hydroxycoumarin nucleus. After correction for in vivo concentration and protein binding, 10-hydroxywarfarin and warfarin alcohols were predicted to be the most potent inhibitory metabolites in vivo. PMID:24297869

  12. Invariability of Central Metabolic Flux Distribution in Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 Under Environmental or Genetic Perturbations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang, Yinjie; Martin, Hector Garcia; Deutschbauer, Adam; Feng, Xueyang; Huang, Rick; Llora, Xavier; Arkin, Adam; Keasling, Jay D.

    2009-04-21

    An environmentally important bacterium with versatile respiration, Shewanella oneidensis MR-1, displayed significantly different growth rates under three culture conditions: minimal medium (doubling time {approx} 3 hrs), salt stressed minimal medium (doubling time {approx} 6 hrs), and minimal medium with amino acid supplementation (doubling time {approx}1.5 hrs). {sup 13}C-based metabolic flux analysis indicated that fluxes of central metabolic reactions remained relatively constant under the three growth conditions, which is in stark contrast to the reported significant changes in the transcript and metabolite profiles under various growth conditions. Furthermore, ten transposon mutants of S. oneidensis MR-1 were randomly chosen from a transposon library and their flux distributions through central metabolic pathways were revealed to be identical, even though such mutational processes altered the secondary metabolism, for example, glycine and C1 (5,10-Me-THF) metabolism.

  13. Critical flux determination by flux-stepping

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beier, Søren; Jonsson, Gunnar Eigil

    2010-01-01

    In membrane filtration related scientific literature, often step-by-step determined critical fluxes are reported. Using a dynamic microfiltration device, it is shown that critical fluxes determined from two different flux-stepping methods are dependent upon operational parameters such as step...... length, step height, and.flux start level. Filtrating 8 kg/m(3) yeast cell suspensions by a vibrating 0.45 x 10(-6) m pore size microfiltration hollow fiber module, critical fluxes from 5.6 x 10(-6) to 1.2 x 10(-5) m/s have been measured using various step lengths from 300 to 1200 seconds. Thus......, such values are more or less useless in itself as critical flux predictors, and constant flux verification experiments have to be conducted to check if the determined critical fluxes call predict sustainable flux regimes. However, it is shown that using the step-by-step predicted critical fluxes as start...

  14. Identifying diseases-related metabolites using random walk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Yang; Zhao, Tianyi; Zhang, Ningyi; Zang, Tianyi; Zhang, Jun; Cheng, Liang

    2018-04-11

    Metabolites disrupted by abnormal state of human body are deemed as the effect of diseases. In comparison with the cause of diseases like genes, these markers are easier to be captured for the prevention and diagnosis of metabolic diseases. Currently, a large number of metabolic markers of diseases need to be explored, which drive us to do this work. The existing metabolite-disease associations were extracted from Human Metabolome Database (HMDB) using a text mining tool NCBO annotator as priori knowledge. Next we calculated the similarity of a pair-wise metabolites based on the similarity of disease sets of them. Then, all the similarities of metabolite pairs were utilized for constructing a weighted metabolite association network (WMAN). Subsequently, the network was utilized for predicting novel metabolic markers of diseases using random walk. Totally, 604 metabolites and 228 diseases were extracted from HMDB. From 604 metabolites, 453 metabolites are selected to construct the WMAN, where each metabolite is deemed as a node, and the similarity of two metabolites as the weight of the edge linking them. The performance of the network is validated using the leave one out method. As a result, the high area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) (0.7048) is achieved. The further case studies for identifying novel metabolites of diabetes mellitus were validated in the recent studies. In this paper, we presented a novel method for prioritizing metabolite-disease pairs. The superior performance validates its reliability for exploring novel metabolic markers of diseases.

  15. The influence of arachidonic acid metabolites on cell division in the intestinal epithelium and in colonic tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petry, F M; Tutton, P J; Barkla, D H

    1984-09-01

    Various metabolites of arachidonic acid are now known to influence cell division. In this paper the effects on cell proliferation of arachidonic acid, some inhibitors of arachidonic acid metabolism and some analogs of arachidonic acid metabolites is described. The epithelial cell proliferation rate in the jejunum, in the descending colon and in dimethylhydrazine-induced tumors of rat colon was measured using a stathmokinetic technique. Administration of arachidonic acid resulted in retardation of cell proliferation in each of the tissues examined. A cyclooxygenase inhibitor (Flurbiprofen) prevented this effect of arachidonic acid in the jejunal crypts and in colonic tumors, but not in colonic crypts. In contrast, inhibitors of both cyclooxygenase and lipoxygenase (Benoxaprofen and BW755c) prevented the effect of arachidonic acid in the colonic crypts and reduced its effect on colonic tumours but did not alter its effect on the jejunum. An inhibitor of thromoboxane A2 synthetase (U51,605) was also able to prevent the inhibitory effect of arachidonic acid on colonic tumors. Treatment with 16,16-dimethyl PGE2 inhibited cell proliferation in jejunal crypts and in colonic tumors, as did a thromboxane A2 mimicking agent, U46619. Nafazatrom, an agent that stimulates prostacyclin synthesis and inhibits lypoxygenase, promoted cell proliferation in the jejunal crypts and colonic crypts, but inhibited cell proliferation in colonic tumours.

  16. Cooperative effects for CYP2E1 differ between styrene and its metabolites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartman, Jessica H.; Boysen, Gunnar; Miller, Grover P.

    2014-01-01

    Cooperative interactions are frequently observed in the metabolism of drugs and pollutants by cytochrome P450s; nevertheless, the molecular determinants for cooperativity remain elusive. Previously, we demonstrated that steady-state styrene metabolism by CYP2E1 exhibits positive cooperativity.We hypothesized that styrene metabolites have lower affinity than styrene toward CYP2E1 and limited ability to induce cooperative effects during metabolism. To test the hypothesis, we determined the potency and mechanism of inhibition for styrene and its metabolites toward oxidation of 4-nitrophenol using CYP2E1 Supersomes® and human liver microsomes.Styrene inhibited the reaction through a mixed cooperative mechanism with high affinity for the catalytic site (67 μM) and lower affinity for the cooperative site (1100 μM), while increasing substrate turnover at high concentrations. Styrene oxide and 4-vinylphenol possessed similar affinity for CYP2E1. Styrene oxide behaved cooperatively like styrene, but 4-vinylphenol decreased turnover at high concentrations. Styrene glycol was a very poor competitive inhibitor. Among all compounds, there was a positive correlation with binding and hydrophobicity.Taken together, these findings for CYP2E1 further validate contributions of cooperative mechanisms to metabolic processes, demonstrate the role of molecular structure on those mechanisms and underscore the potential for heterotropic cooperative effects between different compounds. PMID:23327532

  17. Dung-inhabiting fungi: a potential reservoir of novel secondary metabolites for the control of plant pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarrocco, Sabrina

    2016-04-01

    Coprophilous fungi are a large group of saprotrophic fungi mostly found in herbivore dung. The number of these fungi undergoing investigation is continually increasing, and new species and genera continue to be described. Dung-inhabiting fungi play an important ecological role in decomposing and recycling nutrients from animal dung. They produce a large array of bioactive secondary metabolites and have a potent enzymatic arsenal able to utilise even complex molecules. Bioactive secondary metabolites are actively involved in interaction with and defence against other organisms whose growth can be inhibited, resulting in an enhanced ecological fitness of producer strains. Currently, these antibiotics and bioactive secondary metabolites are of interest in medicine in particular, while very little information is available concerning their potential use in agriculture. This review introduces the ecology of dung-inhabiting fungi, with particular emphasis on the production of antibiotic compounds as a means to compete with other microorganisms. Owing to the fast pace of technological progress, new approaches to predicting the biosynthesis of bioactive metabolites are proposed. Coprophilous fungi should be considered as elite candidate organisms for the discovery of novel antifungal compounds, above all in view of their exploitation for crop protection. © 2015 Society of Chemical Industry.

  18. Choline Phospholipid Metabolites of Human Vascular Endothelial Cells Altered by Cyclooxygenase Inhibition, Growth Factor Depletion, and Paracrine Factors Secreted by Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noriko Mori

    2003-04-01

    Full Text Available Magnetic resonance studies have previously shown that solid tumors and cancer cells in culture typically exhibit high phosphocholine and total choline. Treatment of cancer cells with the anti-inflammatory agent, indomethacin (INDO, reverted the phenotype of choline phospholipid metabolites in cancer cells towards a less malignant phenotype. Since endothelial cells form a key component of tumor vasculature, in this study, we used MR spectroscopy to characterize the phenotype of choline phospholipid metabolites in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs. We determined the effect of growth factors, the anti-inflammatory agent INDO, and conditioned media obtained from a malignant cell line, on choline phospholipid metabolites. Growth factor depletion or treatment with INDO induced similar changes in the choline phospholipid metabolites of HUVECs. Treatment with conditioned medium obtained from MDA-MB-231 cancer cells induced changes similar to the presence of growth factor supplements. These results suggest that cancer cells secrete growth factors and/or other molecules that influence the choline phospholipid metabolism of HUVECs. The ability of INDO to alter choline phospholipid metabolism in the presence of growth factor supplements suggests that the inflammatory response pathways of HUVECs may play a role in cancer cell-HUVEC interaction and in the response of HUVECs to growth factors.

  19. SIRT1 protects cardiac cells against apoptosis induced by zearalenone or its metabolites α- and β-zearalenol through an autophagy-dependent pathway

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ben Salem, Intidhar; Boussabbeh, Manel; Da Silva, Julie Pires; Guilbert, Arnaud; Bacha, Hassen; Abid-Essefi, Salwa; Lemaire, Christophe

    2017-01-01

    Zearalenone (ZEN) is a non-steroidal estrogenic mycotoxin produced by several species of Fusarium in cereals and agricultural products. The major ZEN metabolites are α-zearalenol (α-ZOL) and β-zearalenol (β-ZOL). In the present study, we investigated the underlying mechanism of the toxicity induced by ZEN, α-ZOL and β-ZOL in cardiac cells (H9c2). We show that treatment with ZEN or its metabolites induces the activation of the mitochondrial pathway of apoptosis as characterized by an increase in ROS generation, a loss of mitochondrial transmembrane potential (ΔΨm) and an activation of caspases. Besides, we demonstrate that these mycotoxins promote the activation of autophagy before the onset of apoptosis. Indeed, we observed that a short-time (6 h) treatment with ZEN, α-ZOL or β-ZOL, increased the level of Beclin-1 and LC3-II and induced the accumulation of the CytoID® autophagy detection probe. Moreover, the inhibition of autophagy by Chloroquine significantly increased cell death induced by ZEN, α-ZOL or β-ZOL, suggesting that the activation of autophagy serves as a cardioprotective mechanism against these mycotoxins. In addition, we found that the inhibition (EX527) or the knockdown of SIRT1 (siRNA) significantly increased apoptosis induced by ZEN or its derivatives, whereas SIRT1 activation with RSV greatly prevents the cytotoxic effects of these mycotoxins. By contrast, when autophagy was inhibited by CQ, the activation of SIRT1 by RSV had no protection against the cardiotoxicity of ZEN or its metabolites, suggesting that SIRT1 protects cardiac cells by an autophagy-dependent pathway. - Highlights: • ZEN, α- and β-ZOL induce the mitochondrial pathway of apoptosis in cardiac cells. • Inhibition of autophagy enhanced ZEN-, α-ZOL- and β-ZOL-induced apoptosis. • SIRT1 activates autophagy to protect cells from ZEN, α- and β-ZOL-induced toxicity.

  20. Plasmodium falciparum spermidine synthase inhibition results in unique perturbation-specific effects observed on transcript, protein and metabolite levels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Louw Abraham I

    2010-04-01

    polyamine biosynthesis was also observed. Most notably, uridine phosphorylase, adenosine deaminase, lysine decarboxylase (LDC and S-adenosylmethionine synthetase were differentially expressed at the transcript and/or protein level. Several genes in associated metabolic pathways (purine metabolism and various methyltransferases were also affected. The specific nature of the perturbation was additionally reflected by changes in polyamine metabolite levels. Conclusions This study details the malaria parasite's response to PfSpdSyn inhibition on the transcriptomic, proteomic and metabolic levels. The results corroborate and significantly expand previous functional genomics studies relating to polyamine depletion in this parasite. Moreover, they confirm the role of transcriptional regulation in P. falciparum, particularly in this pathway. The findings promote this essential pathway as a target for antimalarial chemotherapeutic intervention strategies.

  1. The oxygen-centered radicals scavenging activity of sulfasalazine and its metabolites. A direct protection of the bowel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prónai, L; Yukinobu, I; Láng, I; Fehér, J

    1992-01-01

    Oxygen-centered radicals, such as superoxide (O2-) and hydroxyl radicals (.OH) generated by phagocytes have been suggested to be involved in the pathogenesis of chronic inflammations of the bowel, such as Crohn's disease and colitis ulcerosa. Recently, sulfasalazine (SASP) and its metabolites have been reported to exert their effects as a direct scavenger of oxygen-centered radicals in the bowel. To scavenge oxygen-centered radicals in vivo, however, SASP and its metabolites have to react with O2- and/or .OH in vitro very rapidly, furthermore they have to reach an appropriate (possible millimolar) concentration range at the site of inflammation. To test this possibility, we investigated the direct O2- and .OH scavenging activity of SASP and its metabolites using the specific electron paramagnetic resonance/spin trapping method, and we compared the 50% inhibition rates of SASP and its metabolites with their known concentrations in the bowel and in the human plasma. It was found that SASP and its metabolites, such as 5-amino-salicylic acid (5-ASA), and acetyl-5-amino-salicylic acid (AC-5-ASA), but not sulfapyridine (SP) and acetyl-sulfapyridine (Ac-SP) have a direct O2- and .OH scavenging activity in vitro systems. Among the compounds, SASP and 5-ASA can reach a concentration which is appropriate to scavenge oxygen-centered radicals in the bowel but not in the human plasma. It was concluded that the in vivo antiinflammatory effects of SASP and its metabolites are, at least partly, due to the direct oxygen-centered scavenging activity of these drugs.

  2. Kynurenine 3-monooxygenase mediates inhibition of Th17 differentiation via catabolism of endogenous aryl hydrocarbon receptor ligands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephens, Geoffrey L; Wang, Qun; Swerdlow, Bonnie; Bhat, Geetha; Kolbeck, Roland; Fung, Michael

    2013-07-01

    The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) is a key transcriptional regulator of Th17-cell differentiation. Although endogenous ligands have yet to be identified, evidence suggests that tryptophan metabolites can act as agonists for the AhR. Tryptophan metabolites are abundant in circulation, so we hypothesized that cell intrinsic factors might exist to regulate the exposure of Th17 cells to AhR-dependent activities. Here, we find that Th17 cells preferentially express kynurenine 3-monooxygenase (KMO), which is an enzyme involved in catabolism of the tryptophan metabolite kynurenine. KMO inhibition, either with a specific inhibitor or via siRNA-mediated silencing, markedly increased IL-17 production in vitro, whereas IFN-γ production by Th1 cells was unaffected. Inhibition of KMO significantly exacerbated disease in a Th17-driven model of autoimmune gastritis, suggesting that expression of KMO by Th17 cells serves to limit their continuous exposure to physiological levels of endogenous AhR ligands in vivo. © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. Evidence that metformin exerts its anti-diabetic effects through inhibition of complex 1 of the mitochondrial respiratory chain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owen, M R; Doran, E; Halestrap, A P

    2000-06-15

    Although metformin is widely used for the treatment of non-insulin-dependent diabetes, its mode of action remains unclear. Here we provide evidence that its primary site of action is through a direct inhibition of complex 1 of the respiratory chain. Metformin(50 microM) inhibited mitochondrial oxidation of glutamate+malate in hepatoma cells by 13 and 30% after 24 and 60 h exposure respectively, but succinate oxidation was unaffected. Metformin also caused time-dependent inhibition of complex 1 in isolated mitochondria, whereas in sub-mitochondrial particles inhibition was immediate but required very high metformin concentrations (K(0.5),79 mM). These data are compatible with the slow membrane-potential-driven accumulation of the positively charged drug within the mitochondrial matrix leading to inhibition of complex 1. Metformin inhibition of gluconeogenesis from L-lactate in isolated rat hepatocytes was also time- and concentration-dependent, and accompanied by changes in metabolite levels similar to those induced by other inhibitors of gluconeogenesis acting on complex 1. Freeze-clamped livers from metformin-treated rats exhibited similar changes in metabolite concentrations. We conclude that the drug's pharmacological effects are mediated, at least in part, through a time-dependent, self-limiting inhibition of the respiratory chain that restrains hepatic gluconeogenesis while increasing glucose utilization in peripheral tissues. Lactic acidosis, an occasional side effect, canal so be explained in this way.

  4. Prioritizing Candidate Disease Metabolites Based on Global Functional Relationships between Metabolites in the Context of Metabolic Pathways

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Haixiu; Xu, Yanjun; Han, Junwei; Li, Jing; Su, Fei; Zhang, Yunpeng; Zhang, Chunlong; Li, Dongguo; Li, Xia

    2014-01-01

    Identification of key metabolites for complex diseases is a challenging task in today's medicine and biology. A special disease is usually caused by the alteration of a series of functional related metabolites having a global influence on the metabolic network. Moreover, the metabolites in the same metabolic pathway are often associated with the same or similar disease. Based on these functional relationships between metabolites in the context of metabolic pathways, we here presented a pathway-based random walk method called PROFANCY for prioritization of candidate disease metabolites. Our strategy not only takes advantage of the global functional relationships between metabolites but also sufficiently exploits the functionally modular nature of metabolic networks. Our approach proved successful in prioritizing known metabolites for 71 diseases with an AUC value of 0.895. We also assessed the performance of PROFANCY on 16 disease classes and found that 4 classes achieved an AUC value over 0.95. To investigate the robustness of the PROFANCY, we repeated all the analyses in two metabolic networks and obtained similar results. Then we applied our approach to Alzheimer's disease (AD) and found that a top ranked candidate was potentially related to AD but had not been reported previously. Furthermore, our method was applicable to prioritize the metabolites from metabolomic profiles of prostate cancer. The PROFANCY could identify prostate cancer related-metabolites that are supported by literatures but not considered to be significantly differential by traditional differential analysis. We also developed a freely accessible web-based and R-based tool at http://bioinfo.hrbmu.edu.cn/PROFANCY. PMID:25153931

  5. GanedenBC30 cell wall and metabolites: anti-inflammatory and immune modulating effects in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Gitte S; Benson, Kathleen F; Carter, Steve G; Endres, John R

    2010-03-24

    This study was performed to evaluate anti-inflammatory and immune modulating properties of the probiotic, spore-forming bacterial strain: Bacillus coagulans: GBI-30, (PTA-6086, GanedenBC30TM). In addition, cell wall and metabolite fractions were assayed separately to address whether biological effects were due to cell wall components only, or whether secreted compounds from live bacteria had additional biological properties. The spores were heat-activated, and bacterial cultures were grown. The culture supernatant was harvested as a source of metabolites (MTB), and the bacteria were used to isolate cell wall fragments (CW). Both of these fractions were compared in a series of in vitro assays. Both MTB and CW inhibited spontaneous and oxidative stress-induced ROS formation in human PMN cells and increased the phagocytic activity of PMN cells in response to bacteria-like carboxylated fluorospheres. Both fractions supported random PMN and f-MLP-directed PMN cell migration, indicating a support of immune surveillance and antibacterial defense mechanisms. In contrast, low doses of both fractions inhibited PMN cell migration towards the inflammatory mediators IL-8 and LTB4. The anti-inflammatory activity was strongest for CW, where the PMN migration towards IL-8 was inhibited down to dilutions of 1010.Both MTB and CW induced the expression of the CD69 activation marker on human CD3- CD56+ NK cells, and enhanced the expression of CD107a when exposed to K562 tumor cells in vitro.The fractions directly modulated cytokine production, inducing production of the Th2 cytokines IL-4, IL-6, and IL-10, and inhibiting production of IL-2.Both fractions further modulated mitogen-induced cytokine production in the following manner: Both fractions enhanced the PHA-induced production of IL-6 and reduced the PHA-induced production of TNF-alpha. Both fractions enhanced the PWM-induced production of TNF-alpha and IFN-gamma. In addition, MTB also enhanced both the PHA- and the PWM

  6. Extracorporeal shock wave therapy with low-energy flux density inhibits hypertrophic scar formation in an animal model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jing-Chun; Zhang, Bo-Ru; Hong, Lei; Shi, Kai; Wu, Wei-Wei; Yu, Jia-Ao

    2018-04-01

    Hypertrophic scar is characterized by excessive deposits of collagen during skin wound healing, which could become a challenge to clinicians. This study assessed the effects of the extracorporeal shock wave therapy (ESWT) on hypertrophic scar formation and the underlying gene regu-lation. A rabbit ear hypertrophic scar model was generated and randomly divided into three groups: L-ESWT group to receive L-ESWT (energy flux density of 0.1 mJ/mm2), H-ESWT (energy flux density of 0.2 mJ/mm2) and sham ESWT group (S-ESWT). Hypertrophic scar tissues were then collected and stained with hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) and Masson's trichrome staining, respectively, to assess scar elevation index (SEI), fibroblast density and collagen fiber arrangement. Expression of cell proliferation marker proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) and α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) were assessed using RT-PCR and immunohistochemistry in hypertrophic scar tissues. H&E staining sections showed significant reduction of SEI and fibroblast density in both ESWT treatment groups compared to S-ESWT, but there was no dramatic difference between L-ESWT and H-ESWT groups. Masson's trichrome staining showed that collagen fibers were more slender and broader and oriented in parallel to skin surface after administration of ESWT compared to control tissues. At the gene level, PCNA‑positive fibroblasts and α-SMA-positive myofibroblasts were significantly decreased after L-ESWT or H-ESWT compared to the controls. Furthermore, there was no significant difference in expression of PCNA mRNA between L-ESWT or H-ESWT and S-ESWT, whereas expression of α-SMA mRNA significantly decreased in L-ESWT compared to that of H-ESWT and S-ESWT (P=0.002 and P=0.030, respectively). In conclusion, L-ESWT could be effective on suppression of hypertrophic scar formation by inhibition of scar elevation index and fibroblast density as well as α-SMA expression in hypertrophic scar tissues of the rabbit model.

  7. Metabolites of hirsuteine and hirsutine, the major indole alkaloids of Uncaria rhynchophylla, in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakazawa, Takahiro; Banba, Koh-ichi; Hata, Kazumasa; Nihei, Yutaka; Hoshikawa, Ayumi; Ohsawa, Keisuke

    2006-08-01

    The metabolic fate of hirsuteine (HT) and hirsutine (HS), the major indole alkaloids of Uncaria rhynchophylla, was investigated using rats. On HPLC analysis, urine from rats orally administered HT were found to contain two metabolites (HT1 and HT2) together with unchanged HT. Similarly HS also was metabolized to two compounds (HS1 and HS2). Metabolite structures were determined to be 11-hydroxyhirsuteine-11-O-beta-D-glucuronide (HT1), 11-hydroxyhirsuteine (HT2), 11-hydroxyhirsutine-11-O-beta-D-glucuronide (HS1) and 11-hydroxyhirsutine (HS2), based on spectroscopic and chemical data. HT1 and HS1 were also detected in bile from rats administered HT and HS, respectively. Total cumulative urinary excretion within 72 h of oral administration was approximately 14% and 26% of the HT and HS doses, respectively, while total cumulative biliary excretion was 35% and 46%, respectively. HT and HS 11-hydroxylation were catalyzed by rat liver microsomes. This 11-hydroxylation activity was inhibited by addition of SKF-525A (a nonselective CYP inhibitor) or cimetidine (a CYP2C inhibitor). These results indicate that orally administered HT and HS are converted to 11-hydroxy metabolites in rats, and that the metabolites are predominantly excreted in bile rather than urine following glucuronidation. Furthermore, the results suggest that CYP2C enzymes are involved, at least in part, in the specific 11-hydroxylation of HT and HS.

  8. In vitro fermentation of prebiotics by Lactobacillus plantarum CFR 2194: selectivity, viability and effect of metabolites on β-glucuronidase activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arenahalli Ningegowda, Madhu; Siddalingaiya Gurudutt, Prapulla

    2012-03-01

    Prebiotic Fructooligosaccharides (FOS) escape metabolism in upper GI tract undergo microbial metabolism in colon and thereby influence the nature, type and number of intestinal microbiota to improve host's health. The present study focuses on the ability of Lactobacillus plantarum CFR 2194 to utilize FOS as a selective carbon and energy source. The effect of fermentative metabolites of L. plantarum on the β-glucuronidase was also investigated. A total of 16 strains of lactobacilli were assessed for their ability to ferment oligosaccharides. L. plantarum CFR 2194, an isolate from kanjika was found to utilize FOS effectively. Lactic acid was the main metabolic end product, followed by acetic acid, butyric acid, formic acid and ethanol. The inhibitory effects of these metabolites have been confirmed through the reduction of β-glucuronidase activity. L. plantarum when co-cultured with β-glucuronidase producing E. coli, in a basal media containing FOS as an energy source, could inhibit the growth of the pathogen during the course of fermentation. The results showed that L. plantarum CFR 2194 has the ability to utilize the prebiotic FOS as a selective carbon and energy source. The organism could inhibit the growth of the pathogen which produces β-glucuronidase and lowered its activity by the metabolites of FOS which indicates the probable use of L. plantarum through dietary intervention in combating colon carcinogenesis.

  9. The effects of TYB-2285 and its metabolites on eosinophil adhesion to tumor necrosis factor α-stimulated human umbilical vein endothelial cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takanari Tominaga

    1996-01-01

    The results of the present study demonstrate that TYB-2285 and its metabolites selectively inhibit the adhesion of eosinophils to HUVECs stimulated with TNF-α and also suggest that TYB-2285, TC-286 and TC-326 might block the VLA-4/VCAM-1 pathway selectively.

  10. Synthesis of Linezolid Metabolites PNU-142300 and PNU-142586 toward the Exploration of Metabolite-Related Events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanaya, Kengo; Matsumoto, Kazuaki; Yokoyama, Yuta; Kizu, Junko; Shoji, Mitsuru; Sugai, Takeshi

    2017-01-01

    Linezolid (1) is an oxazolidinone antibiotic that is partially metabolized in vivo via ring cleavage of its morpholine moiety to mainly form two metabolites, PNU-142300 (2) and PNU-142586 (3). It is supposed that accumulation of 2 and 3 in patients with renal insufficiency may cause thrombocytopenia, one of the adverse effects of linezolid. However, the poor availability of 2 and 3 has hindered further investigation of the clinical significance of the accumulation of these metabolites. In this paper, we synthesized metabolites 2 and 3 via a common synthetic intermediate, 4; this will encourage further exploration of events related to these metabolites and lead to improved clinical use of linezolid.

  11. Common Phenolic Metabolites of Flavonoids, but Not Their Unmetabolized Precursors, Reduce the Secretion of Vascular Cellular Adhesion Molecules by Human Endothelial Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warner, Emily F; Zhang, Qingzhi; Raheem, K Saki; O'Hagan, David; O'Connell, Maria A; Kay, Colin D

    2016-03-01

    Flavonoids have been implicated in the prevention of cardiovascular disease; however, their mechanisms of action have yet to be elucidated, possibly because most previous in vitro studies have used supraphysiological concentrations of unmetabolized flavonoids, overlooking their more bioavailable phenolic metabolites. We aimed to explore the effects of phenolic metabolites and their precursor flavonoids at physiologically achievable concentrations, in isolation and combination, on soluble vascular cellular adhesion molecule-1 (sVCAM-1). Fourteen phenolic acid metabolites and 6 flavonoids were screened at 1 μM for their relative effects on sVCAM-1 secretion by human umbilical vein endothelial cells stimulated with tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α). The active metabolites were further studied for their response at different concentrations (0.01 μM-100 μM), structure-activity relationships, and effect on vascular cellular adhesion molecule (VCAM)-1 mRNA expression. In addition, the additive activity of the metabolites and flavonoids was investigated by screening 25 unique mixtures at cumulative equimolar concentrations of 1 μM. Of the 20 compounds screened at 1 μM, inhibition of sVCAM-1 secretion was elicited by 4 phenolic metabolites, of which protocatechuic acid (PCA) was the most active (-17.2%, P = 0.05). Investigations into their responses at different concentrations showed that PCA significantly reduced sVCAM-1 15.2-36.5% between 1 and 100 μM, protocatechuic acid-3-sulfate and isovanillic acid reduced sVCAM-1 levels 12.2-54.7% between 10 and 100 μM, and protocatechuic acid-4-sulfate and isovanillic acid-3-glucuronide reduced sVCAM-1 secretion 27.6% and 42.8%, respectively, only at 100 μM. PCA demonstrated the strongest protein response and was therefore explored for its effect on VCAM-1 mRNA, where 78.4% inhibition was observed only after treatment with 100 μM PCA. Mixtures of the metabolites showed no activity toward sVCAM-1, suggesting no additive

  12. Somatic transposition in the brain has the potential to influence the biosynthesis of metabolites involved in Parkinson’s disease and schizophrenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abrusán György

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract It has been recently discovered that transposable elements show high activity in the brain of mammals, however, the magnitude of their influence on its functioning is unclear so far. In this paper, I use flux balance analysis to examine the influence of somatic retrotransposition on brain metabolism, and the biosynthesis of its key metabolites, including neurotransmitters. The analysis shows that somatic transposition in the human brain can influence the biosynthesis of more than 250 metabolites, including dopamine, serotonin and glutamate, shows large inter-individual variability in metabolic effects, and may contribute to the development of Parkinson’s disease and schizophrenia. Reviewers This article was reviewed by Dr Kenji Kojima (nominated by Dr Jerzy Jurka and Dr Eugene Koonin.

  13. Plant Polyphenols and Oxidative Metabolites of the Herbal Alkenylbenzene Methyleugenol Suppress Histone Deacetylase Activity in Human Colon Carcinoma Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabel Anna Maria Groh

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Evidence has been provided that diet and environmental factors directly influence epigenetic mechanisms associated with cancer development in humans. The inhibition of histone deacetylase (HDAC activity and the disruption of the HDAC complex have been recognized as a potent strategy for cancer therapy and chemoprevention. In the present study, we investigated whether selected plant constituents affect HDAC activity or HDAC1 protein status in the human colon carcinoma cell line HT29. The polyphenols (−-epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG and genistein (GEN as well as two oxidative methyleugenol (ME metabolites were shown to inhibit HDAC activity in intact HT29 cells. Concomitantly, a significant decrease of the HDAC1 protein level was observed after incubation with EGCG and GEN, whereas the investigated ME metabolites did not affect HDAC1 protein status. In conclusion, dietary compounds were found to possess promising HDAC-inhibitory properties, contributing to epigenetic alterations in colon tumor cells, which should be taken into account in further risk/benefit assessments of polyphenols and alkenylbenzenes.

  14. Metabolic flux analysis of Cyanothece sp. ATCC 51142 under mixotrophic conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alagesan, Swathi; Gaudana, Sandeep B; Sinha, Avinash; Wangikar, Pramod P

    2013-11-01

    Cyanobacteria are a group of photosynthetic prokaryotes capable of utilizing solar energy to fix atmospheric carbon dioxide to biomass. Despite several "proof of principle" studies, low product yield is an impediment in commercialization of cyanobacteria-derived biofuels. Estimation of intracellular reaction rates by (13)C metabolic flux analysis ((13)C-MFA) would be a step toward enhancing biofuel yield via metabolic engineering. We report (13)C-MFA for Cyanothece sp. ATCC 51142, a unicellular nitrogen-fixing cyanobacterium, known for enhanced hydrogen yield under mixotrophic conditions. Rates of reactions in the central carbon metabolism under nitrogen-fixing and -non-fixing conditions were estimated by monitoring the competitive incorporation of (12)C and (13)C from unlabeled CO2 and uniformly labeled glycerol, respectively, into terminal metabolites such as amino acids. The observed labeling patterns suggest mixotrophic growth under both the conditions, with a larger fraction of unlabeled carbon in nitrate-sufficient cultures asserting a greater contribution of carbon fixation by photosynthesis and an anaplerotic pathway. Indeed, flux analysis complements the higher growth observed under nitrate-sufficient conditions. On the other hand, the flux through the oxidative pentose phosphate pathway and tricarboxylic acid cycle was greater in nitrate-deficient conditions, possibly to supply the precursors and reducing equivalents needed for nitrogen fixation. In addition, an enhanced flux through fructose-6-phosphate phosphoketolase possibly suggests the organism's preferred mode under nitrogen-fixing conditions. The (13)C-MFA results complement the reported predictions by flux balance analysis and provide quantitative insight into the organism's distinct metabolic features under nitrogen-fixing and -non-fixing conditions.

  15. Comparison of the inhibition of biliary excretion produced by certain inducing agents including 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berman, E.F.; Schaus, P.; Fujimoto, J.M.

    1986-01-01

    Rats were treated with chlordecone, mirex, 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD), and respective solvent vehicle. Under urethane or pentobarbital anesthesia, the bile duct was cannulated and radioactive morphine, imipramine, or ouabain was given by segmented retrograde intrabiliary injection. The spectrum of inhibition of biliary excretion by chlordecone and mirex were similar in that morphine glucuronide and in part polar imipramine metabolite recoveries in bile were decreased; ouabain recovery was unaffected. TCDD was different in that it markedly decreased the recovery of ouabain. Thus, it appears that chlordecone, mirex, and TCDD inhibit the canalicular transport of the glucuronide metabolites of morphine and imipramine into bile, and TCDD affects in addition the canalicular transport of ouabain into bile.

  16. Identification of drug metabolites in human plasma or serum integrating metabolite prediction, LC-HRMS and untargeted data processing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jacobs, P.L.; Ridder, L.; Ruijken, M.; Rosing, H.; Jager, N.G.L.; Beijnen, J.H.; Bas, R.R.; Dongen, W.D. van

    2013-01-01

    Background: Comprehensive identification of human drug metabolites in first-in-man studies is crucial to avoid delays in later stages of drug development. We developed an efficient workflow for systematic identification of human metabolites in plasma or serum that combines metabolite prediction,

  17. Improvement of succinate production by release of end-product inhibition in Corynebacterium glutamicum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Soon-Chun; Park, Joon-Song; Yun, Jiae; Park, Jin Hwan

    2017-03-01

    Succinate is a renewable-based platform chemical that may be used to produce a wide range of chemicals including 1,4-butanediol, tetrahydrofurane, and γ-butyrolactone. However, industrial fermentation of organic acids is often subject to end-product inhibition, which significantly retards cell growth and limits metabolic activities and final productivity. In this study, we report the development of metabolically engineered Corynebacterium glutamicum for high production of succinate by release of end-product inhibition coupled with an increase of key metabolic flux. It was found that the rates of glucose consumption and succinate production were significantly reduced by extracellular succinate in an engineered strain, S003. To understand the mechanism underlying the inhibition by succinate, comparative transcriptome analysis was performed. Among the downregulated genes, overexpression of the NCgl0275 gene was found to suppress the inhibition of glucose consumption and succinate production, resulting in a 37.7% increase in succinate production up to 55.4g/L in fed-batch fermentation. Further improvement was achieved by increasing the metabolic flux from PEP to OAA. The final engineered strain was able to produce 152.2g/L succinate, the highest production reported to date, with a yield of 1.1g/g glucose under anaerobic condition. These results suggest that the release of end-product inhibition coupled with an increase in key metabolic flux is a promising strategy for enhancing production of succinate. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  18. The rate of aucubin, a secondary metabolite in Plantago lanceolata and potential nitrification inhibitor, needed to reduce ruminant urine patch nitrous oxide emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardiner, C. A.; Clough, T.; Cameron, K.; Di, H.; Edwards, G. R.

    2017-12-01

    Nitrous oxide (N2O) losses derived from grazing ruminant livestock urine patches account for 40% of global N2O emissions. It has been shown that Plantago lanceolata, an herb species used in grazed pastures, contains an active secondary metabolite (aucubin) that has the potential to be excreted by grazing ruminants and inhibit nitrification in the urine patch, a key step in soil N2O production. However, the urinary excretion rate of aucubin needed to significantly reduce urine patch N2O emissions remains unknown. Aucubin was dissolved in bovine urine at three rates (47, 243, and 486 kg ha-1), based on rates used in Dietz et al. (2013) and the calculated highest potential aucubin application rate, from Gardiner et al. (2017). A control, along with a urine treatment and the three aucubin treatments (all urine applied at 700 kg N ha-1), was applied to 20 g soil and incubated in the laboratory for 35 d. Soils were monitored for surface pH, inorganic N concentration (NH4+/NO3-), and gas (N2O and CO2) fluxes. This experiment is currently underway and the results will be presented at the conference. Dietz M, Machill S, Hoffmann H, Schmidtke K 2013. Inhibitory effects of Plantago lanceolata L. on soil N mineralization. Plant and Soil 368: 445-458. Gardiner CA, Clough TJ, Cameron KC, Di HJ, Edwards GR, de Klein CAM 2017. The potential inhibitory effects of Plantago lanceolata and its active secondary metabolite aucubin on soil nitrification and nitrous oxide emissions under ruminant urine patch conditions. Manuscript submitted for publication.

  19. MID Max: LC–MS/MS Method for Measuring the Precursor and Product Mass Isotopomer Distributions of Metabolic Intermediates and Cofactors for Metabolic Flux Analysis Applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McCloskey, Douglas; Young, Jamey D.; Xu, Sibei

    2016-01-01

    The analytical challenges to acquire accurate isotopic data of intracellular metabolic intermediates for stationary, nonstationary, and dynamic metabolic flux analysis (MFA) are numerous. This work presents MID Max, a novel LC–MS/MS workflow, acquisition, and isotopomer deconvolution method for MFA...... that takes advantage of additional scan types that maximizes the number of mass isotopomer distributions (MIDs) that can be acquired in a given experiment. The analytical method was found to measure the MIDs of 97 metabolites, corresponding to 74 unique metabolite-fragment pairs (32 precursor spectra and 42...

  20. Functional metabolite assemblies—a review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aizen, Ruth; Tao, Kai; Rencus-Lazar, Sigal; Gazit, Ehud

    2018-05-01

    Metabolites are essential for the normal operation of cells and fulfill various physiological functions. It was recently found that in several metabolic disorders, the associated metabolites could self-assemble to generate amyloid-like structures, similar to canonical protein amyloids that have a role in neurodegenerative disorders. Yet, assemblies with typical amyloid characteristics are also known to have physiological function. In addition, many non-natural proteins and peptides presenting amyloidal properties have been used for the fabrication of functional nanomaterials. Similarly, functional metabolite assemblies are also found in nature, demonstrating various physiological roles. A notable example is the structural color formed by guanine crystals or fluorescent crystals in feline eyes responsible for enhanced night vision. Moreover, some metabolites have been used for the in vitro fabrication of functional materials, such as glycine crystals presenting remarkable piezoelectric properties or indigo films used to assemble organic semi-conductive electronic devices. Therefore, we believe that the study of metabolite assemblies is not only important in order to understand their role in normal physiology and in pathology, but also paves a new route in exploring the fabrication of organic, bio-compatible materials.

  1. Renal excretion of prostaglandin metabolites, arginine vasopressin, and sodium during endotoxin and endogenous pyrogen induced fever in the goat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jónasson, H; Basu, S; Andersson, B; Kindahl, H

    1984-04-01

    Responses to intravenous injections of an endotoxin (E. coli-lipopolysaccharide, 1 microgram/kg b.wt.) and endogenous pyrogen were studied in euhydrated and hyperhydrated goats. The biphasic febrile response to the endotoxin was associated with a pronounced increase in the renal excretion of measured prostaglandin (PG) metabolites (11-ketotetranor PGF metabolites). This increase was time-correlated with the elevation of the rectal temperature, and (in hyperhydrated animals) with an inhibition of the water diuresis and an increase in renal excretion of arginine vasopressin (AVP). Other effects of the endotoxin were an immediate depression of renal Na and K excretion followed by the development of pronounced natriuresis, and a reduction of plasma Fe and Zn concentrations. The appearance of the febrile reactions (peripheral vasoconstriction and shivering) was accompanied by miosis. The maximum elevation of the rectal temperature was significantly greater during euhydration than during hyperhydration. Also endogenous pyrogen elicited miosis concomitant with febrile reactions, and an elevation of the renal excretion of PG metabolites which was closely correlated in time with the monophasic febrile response, and (during hyperhydration) with temporary inhibition of the water diuresis and an increase in the renal AVP excretion. However, the responses were much weaker than the corresponding endotoxin effects. No appreciable changes in renal excretion of Na and K were observed in response to the endogenous pyrogen. It is concluded that the observed effects on renal cation excretion were manifestations of direct endotoxin influences on kidney function.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  2. Metabolomic Analysis and Mode of Action of Metabolites of Tea Tree Oil Involved in the Suppression of Botrytis cinerea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiayu Xu

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Tea tree oil (TTO, a volatile essential oil, has been widely used as an antimicrobial agent. However, the mechanism underlying TTO antifungal activity is not fully understood. In this study, a comprehensive metabolomics survey was undertaken to identify changes in metabolite production in Botrytis cinerea cells treated with TTO. Significant differences in 91 metabolites were observed, including 8 upregulated and 83 downregulated metabolites in TTO-treated cells. The results indicate that TTO inhibits primary metabolic pathways through the suppression of the tricarboxylic acid (TCA cycle and fatty acid metabolism. Further experiments show that TTO treatment decreases the activities of key enzymes in the TCA cycle and increases the level of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2. Membrane damage is also induced by TTO treatment. We hypothesize that the effect of TTO on B. cinerea is achieved mainly by disruption of the TCA cycle and fatty acid metabolism, resulting in mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative stress.

  3. GanedenBC30™ cell wall and metabolites: anti-inflammatory and immune modulating effects in vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carter Steve G

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This study was performed to evaluate anti-inflammatory and immune modulating properties of the probiotic, spore-forming bacterial strain: Bacillus coagulans: GBI-30, (PTA-6086, GanedenBC30TM. In addition, cell wall and metabolite fractions were assayed separately to address whether biological effects were due to cell wall components only, or whether secreted compounds from live bacteria had additional biological properties. The spores were heat-activated, and bacterial cultures were grown. The culture supernatant was harvested as a source of metabolites (MTB, and the bacteria were used to isolate cell wall fragments (CW. Both of these fractions were compared in a series of in vitro assays. Results Both MTB and CW inhibited spontaneous and oxidative stress-induced ROS formation in human PMN cells and increased the phagocytic activity of PMN cells in response to bacteria-like carboxylated fluorospheres. Both fractions supported random PMN and f-MLP-directed PMN cell migration, indicating a support of immune surveillance and antibacterial defense mechanisms. In contrast, low doses of both fractions inhibited PMN cell migration towards the inflammatory mediators IL-8 and LTB4. The anti-inflammatory activity was strongest for CW, where the PMN migration towards IL-8 was inhibited down to dilutions of 1010. Both MTB and CW induced the expression of the CD69 activation marker on human CD3- CD56+ NK cells, and enhanced the expression of CD107a when exposed to K562 tumor cells in vitro. The fractions directly modulated cytokine production, inducing production of the Th2 cytokines IL-4, IL-6, and IL-10, and inhibiting production of IL-2. Both fractions further modulated mitogen-induced cytokine production in the following manner: Both fractions enhanced the PHA-induced production of IL-6 and reduced the PHA-induced production of TNF-alpha. Both fractions enhanced the PWM-induced production of TNF-alpha and IFN-gamma. In addition, MTB

  4. GanedenBC30™ cell wall and metabolites: anti-inflammatory and immune modulating effects in vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Background This study was performed to evaluate anti-inflammatory and immune modulating properties of the probiotic, spore-forming bacterial strain: Bacillus coagulans: GBI-30, (PTA-6086, GanedenBC30TM). In addition, cell wall and metabolite fractions were assayed separately to address whether biological effects were due to cell wall components only, or whether secreted compounds from live bacteria had additional biological properties. The spores were heat-activated, and bacterial cultures were grown. The culture supernatant was harvested as a source of metabolites (MTB), and the bacteria were used to isolate cell wall fragments (CW). Both of these fractions were compared in a series of in vitro assays. Results Both MTB and CW inhibited spontaneous and oxidative stress-induced ROS formation in human PMN cells and increased the phagocytic activity of PMN cells in response to bacteria-like carboxylated fluorospheres. Both fractions supported random PMN and f-MLP-directed PMN cell migration, indicating a support of immune surveillance and antibacterial defense mechanisms. In contrast, low doses of both fractions inhibited PMN cell migration towards the inflammatory mediators IL-8 and LTB4. The anti-inflammatory activity was strongest for CW, where the PMN migration towards IL-8 was inhibited down to dilutions of 1010. Both MTB and CW induced the expression of the CD69 activation marker on human CD3- CD56+ NK cells, and enhanced the expression of CD107a when exposed to K562 tumor cells in vitro. The fractions directly modulated cytokine production, inducing production of the Th2 cytokines IL-4, IL-6, and IL-10, and inhibiting production of IL-2. Both fractions further modulated mitogen-induced cytokine production in the following manner: Both fractions enhanced the PHA-induced production of IL-6 and reduced the PHA-induced production of TNF-alpha. Both fractions enhanced the PWM-induced production of TNF-alpha and IFN-gamma. In addition, MTB also enhanced both the PHA

  5. Formation of glutathione conjugates by reactive metabolites of vinylidene chloride in microsomes and isolated hepatocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liebler, D.C.; Meredith, M.J.; Guengerich, F.P.

    1985-01-01

    Oxidation of the vinyl halide carcinogen and hepatotoxin vinylidene chloride (VDC) by microsomal cytochrome P-450 yields 2,2-dichloroacetaldehyde, 2-chloroacetyl chloride, 2-chloroacetic acid, and 1,1-dichloroethylene oxide. The roles of these metabolites in covalent modification of proteins and reduced glutathione (GSH) were examined. 2-Chloroacetyl chloride reacted with model thiols at least 10(3)-fold faster than did 1,1-dichloroethylene oxide and at least 10(5)-fold faster than did 2,2-dichloroacetaldehyde or 2-chloroacetic acid. Microsomal covalent binding of [ 14 C]VDC was inhibited by GSH but not by lysine, suggesting that protein thiols, rather than amino groups, are major targets. Liver microsomes catalyzed the formation of three GSH:VDC metabolite conjugates, identified as S-(2,2-dichloro-1-hydroxy)ethylglutathione, 2-(S-glutathionyl)acetate, and S-(2-glutathionyl)acetylglutathione, a novel conjugate containing both stable (thioether) and labile (thioester) linkages. The latter two conjugates also were formed in isolated rat hepatocytes and measurable amounts of 2-(S-glutathionyl)acetate were released into the incubation medium. Both 2-(S-glutathionyl)acetate and S-(2-glutathionyl)acetylglutathione were formed with [ 35 S]GSH added to the hepatic medium, indicating that reactive VDC metabolites are capable of crossing the plasma membrane to react with extracellular targets. Unlabeled S-(2-glutathionyl)-acetylglutathione underwent carbonyl substitution with added [ 35 S]GSH, suggesting that this conjugate may participate in modification of protein thiols. This conjugate also underwent hydrolysis with a half-life of approximately 3 hr. GSH:VDC metabolite conjugates may serve as accessible models for labile covalent adducts formed between VDC metabolites and protein thiols

  6. The interactions of azure B, a metabolite of methylene blue, with acetylcholinesterase and butyrylcholinesterase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petzer, Anél; Harvey, Brian H.; Petzer, Jacobus P.

    2014-01-01

    Methylene blue (MB) is reported to possess diverse pharmacological actions and is attracting increasing attention for the treatment of neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer's disease. Among the pharmacological actions of MB, is the significant inhibition of acetylcholinesterase (AChE) and butyrylcholinesterase (BuChE). These activities may, at least in part, underlie MB's beneficial effects in Alzheimer's disease. MB is metabolized to yield N-demethylated products of which azure B, the monodemethyl metabolite, is the predominant species. Azure B has been shown to be pharmacologically active and also possesses a variety of biological actions. Azure B therefore may contribute to the pharmacological profile of MB. Based on these considerations, the present study investigates the possibility that azure B may, similar to MB, act as an inhibitor of human AChE and BuChE. The results document that azure B inhibits AChE and BuChE with IC 50 values of 0.486 μM and 1.99 μM, respectively. The results further show that azure B inhibits AChE and BuChE reversibly, and that the modes of inhibition are most likely competitive. Although the AChE and BuChE inhibitory activities of azure B are twofold and fivefold, respectively, less potent than those recorded for MB [IC 50 (AChE) = 0.214 μM; IC 50 (BuChE) = 0.389 μM] under identical conditions, azure B may be a contributor to MB's in vivo activation of the cholinergic system and beneficial effects in Alzheimer's disease. - Highlights: • Methylene blue (MB) is a known inhibitor of AChE and BuChE. • Azure B, the major metabolite of MB, also is an inhibitor of AChE and BuChE. • Azure B may be a contributor to MB's in vivo activation of the cholinergic system. • Azure B may contribute to MB's potential in Alzheimer's disease therapy

  7. Role of the phosphopantetheinyltransferase enzyme, PswP, in the biosynthesis of antimicrobial secondary metabolites by Serratia marcescens Db10.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerc, Amy J; Stanley-Wall, Nicola R; Coulthurst, Sarah J

    2014-08-01

    Phosphopantetheinyltransferase (PPTase) enzymes fulfil essential roles in primary and secondary metabolism in prokaryotes, archaea and eukaryotes. PPTase enzymes catalyse the essential modification of the carrier protein domain of fatty acid synthases, polyketide synthases (PKSs) and non-ribosomal peptide synthetases (NRPSs). In bacteria and fungi, NRPS and PKS enzymes are often responsible for the biosynthesis of secondary metabolites with clinically relevant properties; these secondary metabolites include a variety of antimicrobial peptides. We have previously shown that in the Gram-negative bacterium Serratia marcescens Db10, the PPTase enzyme PswP is essential for the biosynthesis of an NRPS-PKS dependent antibiotic called althiomycin. In this work we utilize bioinformatic analyses to classify PswP as belonging to the F/KES subfamily of Sfp type PPTases and to putatively identify additional NRPS substrates of PswP, in addition to the althiomycin NRPS-PKS, in Ser. marcescens Db10. We show that PswP is required for the production of three diffusible metabolites by this organism, each possessing antimicrobial activity against Staphylococcus aureus. Genetic analyses identify the three metabolites as althiomycin, serrawettin W2 and an as-yet-uncharacterized siderophore, which may be related to enterobactin. Our results highlight the use of an individual PPTase enzyme in multiple biosynthetic pathways, each contributing to the ability of Ser. marcescens to inhibit competitor bacteria by the production of antimicrobial secondary metabolites. © 2014 The Authors.

  8. Assessing pesticide concentrations and fluxes in the stream of a small vineyard catchment - Effect of sampling frequency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rabiet, M.; Margoum, C.; Gouy, V.; Carluer, N.; Coquery, M.

    2010-01-01

    This study reports on the occurrence and behaviour of six pesticides and one metabolite in a small stream draining a vineyard catchment. Base flow and flood events were monitored in order to assess the variability of pesticide concentrations according to the season and to evaluate the role of sampling frequency on the evaluation of fluxes estimates. Results showed that dissolved pesticide concentrations displayed a strong temporal and spatial variability. A large mobilisation of pesticides was observed during floods, with total dissolved pesticide fluxes per event ranging from 5.7 x 10 -3 g/Ha to 0.34 g/Ha. These results highlight the major role of floods in the transport of pesticides in this small stream which contributed to more than 89% of the total load of diuron during August 2007. The evaluation of pesticide loads using different sampling strategies and method calculation, showed that grab sampling largely underestimated pesticide concentrations and fluxes transiting through the stream. - This work brings new insights about the fluxes of pesticides in surface water of a vineyard catchment, notably during flood events.

  9. Assessing pesticide concentrations and fluxes in the stream of a small vineyard catchment - Effect of sampling frequency

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rabiet, M., E-mail: marion.rabiet@unilim.f [Cemagref, UR QELY, 3bis quai Chauveau, CP 220, F-69336 Lyon (France); Margoum, C.; Gouy, V.; Carluer, N.; Coquery, M. [Cemagref, UR QELY, 3bis quai Chauveau, CP 220, F-69336 Lyon (France)

    2010-03-15

    This study reports on the occurrence and behaviour of six pesticides and one metabolite in a small stream draining a vineyard catchment. Base flow and flood events were monitored in order to assess the variability of pesticide concentrations according to the season and to evaluate the role of sampling frequency on the evaluation of fluxes estimates. Results showed that dissolved pesticide concentrations displayed a strong temporal and spatial variability. A large mobilisation of pesticides was observed during floods, with total dissolved pesticide fluxes per event ranging from 5.7 x 10{sup -3} g/Ha to 0.34 g/Ha. These results highlight the major role of floods in the transport of pesticides in this small stream which contributed to more than 89% of the total load of diuron during August 2007. The evaluation of pesticide loads using different sampling strategies and method calculation, showed that grab sampling largely underestimated pesticide concentrations and fluxes transiting through the stream. - This work brings new insights about the fluxes of pesticides in surface water of a vineyard catchment, notably during flood events.

  10. Urinary excretion of androgen metabolites, comparison with excretion of radioactive metabolites after injection of [4-14C]testosterone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deslypere, J.P.; Sayed, A.; Vermeulen, A.; Wiers, P.W.

    1981-01-01

    The influence of age on the metabolic pattern of [4- 14 C]testosterone was studied in 20 young and 8 elderly males and compared to the metabolic pattern of endogenous androgens; the latter was also studied in 16 young and 8 elderly women. In both young and elderly males, androsterone and aetiocholanolone glucuronide represent 65% of [4- 14 C]testosterone metabolites: together with their suephoconjugates as well as with 5α- and 5β-androstane-3α, 17β-diol they represent even more than 75% of total urinary metabolites. The 5α/5β ratio of metabolites of [4- 14 C]testosterone was significantly (P 14 C]testosterone metabolites was generally higher than the ratio of metabolites of endogenous androgens, suggesting that the transformation of T to ring A saturated metabolites occurs at least partially in another compartment than the transformation of DHEA to these metabolites. For both [4- 14 C]testosterone and endogenous androgen metabolites we observed a statistically significant reduction of the 5α/5β ratio with age, a general phenomenon in both males and females. This reduction concern also 11-OH-androst-4-ene-3.17-dione metabolism. Neither sex hormone levels, nor specific binding seems to determine this age dependent shift; neither is there convincing evidence for latent hypothyroisism or liver dysfunction in the elderly. An age associated primary decrease of the 5α-reductase activity seems the most likely explanation. (author)

  11. Secondary metabolites in fungus-plant interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pusztahelyi, Tünde; Holb, Imre J.; Pócsi, István

    2015-01-01

    Fungi and plants are rich sources of thousands of secondary metabolites. The genetically coded possibilities for secondary metabolite production, the stimuli of the production, and the special phytotoxins basically determine the microscopic fungi-host plant interactions and the pathogenic lifestyle of fungi. The review introduces plant secondary metabolites usually with antifungal effect as well as the importance of signaling molecules in induced systemic resistance and systemic acquired resistance processes. The review also concerns the mimicking of plant effector molecules like auxins, gibberellins and abscisic acid by fungal secondary metabolites that modulate plant growth or even can subvert the plant defense responses such as programmed cell death to gain nutrients for fungal growth and colonization. It also looks through the special secondary metabolite production and host selective toxins of some significant fungal pathogens and the plant response in form of phytoalexin production. New results coming from genome and transcriptional analyses in context of selected fungal pathogens and their hosts are also discussed. PMID:26300892

  12. Metabolic flux rearrangement in the amino acid metabolism reduces ammonia stress in the α1-antitrypsin producing human AGE1.HN cell line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Priesnitz, Christian; Niklas, Jens; Rose, Thomas; Sandig, Volker; Heinzle, Elmar

    2012-03-01

    This study focused on metabolic changes in the neuronal human cell line AGE1.HN upon increased ammonia stress. Batch cultivations of α(1)-antitrypsin (A1AT) producing AGE1.HN cells were carried out in media with initial ammonia concentrations ranging from 0mM to 5mM. Growth, A1AT production, metabolite dynamics and finally metabolic fluxes calculated by metabolite balancing were compared. Growth and A1AT production decreased with increasing ammonia concentration. The maximum A1AT concentration decreased from 0.63g/l to 0.51g/l. Central energy metabolism remained relatively unaffected exhibiting only slightly increased glycolytic flux at high initial ammonia concentration in the medium. However, the amino acid metabolism was significantly changed. Fluxes through transaminases involved in amino acid degradation were reduced concurrently with a reduced uptake of amino acids. On the other hand fluxes through transaminases working in the direction of amino acid synthesis, i.e., alanine and phosphoserine, were increased leading to increased storage of excess nitrogen in extracellular alanine and serine. Glutamate dehydrogenase flux was reversed increasingly fixing free ammonia with increasing ammonia concentration. Urea production additionally observed was associated with arginine uptake by the cells and did not increase at high ammonia stress. It was therefore not used as nitrogen sink to remove excess ammonia. The results indicate that the AGE1.HN cell line can adapt to ammonia concentrations usually present during the cultivation process to a large extent by changing metabolism but with slightly reduced A1AT production and growth. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Characterization of urinary metabolites from four synthetic bradykinin potentiating peptides (BPPs) in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Carlos A; Ianzer, Danielle A; Portaro, Fernanda C V; Konno, Katsuhiro; Faria, Marcella; Fernandes, Beatriz L; Camargo, Antonio C M

    2008-09-01

    BPPs have been identified in the venom of the Bothrops jararaca snake, or deduced from precursor proteins expressed either in the venom gland or in the brain of the snake. Their potentiating activity on bradykinin (Bk) is assumed to occur through a somatic angiotensin-converting enzyme (sACE) inhibitory mechanism. We have demonstrated that synthetic BPPs show remarkable functional differences, despite their high amino acid sequence similarities. Recently, we demonstrated that BPP-10c, after i.p. administration, was found in its intact form and in the form of a unique metabolite (des-Pro(10) BPP-10c) in mouse urine. Given this finding, we selected a number of BPPs with different structure-activities - BPP-5a (BPP-7a (BPP-9a (BPP-12b (BPP metabolites in mouse urine by MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry. Biotransformation results indicated the following: BPP-7a showed a higher resistance to proteolytic cleavage; BPP-5a is metabolized in tripeptides (BPP-9a was identified in the intact form and in the form of two metabolites (BPP-12a proved to be very susceptible to hydrolysis by proteolytic enzymes. Thus, the results obtained support the hypothesis that diverse biological functions for each BPP could be mediated by different interactions with alternative targets, and not only by sACE inhibition.

  14. Cytoplasmic Acidification and Secondary Metabolite Production in Different Plant Cell Suspensions (A Comparative Study).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagendoorn, MJM.; Wagner, A. M.; Segers, G.; Van Der Plas, LHW.; Oostdam, A.; Van Walraven, H. S.

    1994-10-01

    In this study, a correlation is described between low cytoplasmic pH, measured with the fluorescent probes 2[prime],7[prime]-bis-(2-carboxyethyl)-5-(and-6)-carboxyfluorescein (acetoxymethyl ester) and bis- [3-propyl-5-oxoisoxazol-4-yl]pentamethine oxonol, and the production of secondary metabolites for several plant cell-suspension systems. Anthraquinone production in Morinda citrifolia suspensions is negligible in the presence of 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D), whereas with naphthalene acetic acid (NAA) a significant accumulation is realized. NAA-grown cells showed a lower cytoplasmic pH than did 2,4-D-grown cells. Addition of 2,4-D or parachlorophenoxy acetic acid to NAA-grown cells resulted in an inhibition of anthraquinone production and an increase of the cytoplasmic pH, whereas addition of parachlorophenyl acetic acid had no effect on either parameter. Lignin production in Petunia hybrida cells could be induced by subculturing them in a medium without iron. These cells showed a lower cytoplasmic pH than control cells. Addition of Fe3+ led to a decreased lignin content and an increased cytoplasmic pH. Two cell lines of Linum flavum showed a different level of coniferin and lignin concentration in their cells. Cells that accumulated coniferin and lignin had a lower cytoplasmic pH than cells that did not accumulate these secondary metabolites. Apparently, in different species and after different kinds of treatment there is a correlation between acidification of the cytoplasm and the production of different secondary metabolites. The possible role of this acidification in secondary metabolite production is discussed.

  15. SPE-NMR metabolite sub-profiling of urine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jacobs, D.M.; Spiesser, L.; Garnier, M.; Roo, de N.; Dorsten, van F.; Hollebrands, B.; Velzen, van E.; Draijer, R.; Duynhoven, van J.P.M.

    2012-01-01

    NMR-based metabolite profiling of urine is a fast and reproducible method for detection of numerous metabolites with diverse chemical properties. However, signal overlap in the (1)H NMR profiles of human urine may hamper quantification and identification of metabolites. Therefore, a new method has

  16. Trophic transfer of pyrene metabolites between aquatic invertebrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carrasco Navarro, V.; Leppänen, M.T.; Kukkonen, J.V.K.; Godoy Olmos, S.

    2013-01-01

    The trophic transfer of pyrene metabolites was studied using Gammarus setosus as a predator and the invertebrates Lumbriculus variegatus and Chironomus riparius as prey. The results obtained by liquid scintillation counting confirmed that the pyrene metabolites produced by the aquatic invertebrates L. variegatus and C. riparius were transferred to G. setosus through the diet. More detailed analyses by liquid chromatography discovered that two of the metabolites produced by C. riparius appeared in the chromatograms of G. setosus tissue extracts, proving their trophic transfer. These metabolites were not present in chromatograms of G. setosus exclusively exposed to pyrene. The present study supports the trophic transfer of PAH metabolites between benthic macroinvertebrates and common species of an arctic amphipod. As some PAH metabolites are more toxic than the parent compounds, the present study raises concerns about the consequences of their trophic transfer and the fate and effects of PAHs in natural environments. - Highlights: ► The trophic transfer of pyrene metabolites between invertebrates was evaluated. ► Biotransformation of pyrene by L. variegatus and C. riparius is different. ► Metabolites produced by L. variegatus and C. riparius are transferred to G. setosus. ► Specifically, two metabolites produced by C. riparius were transferred. - Some of the pyrene metabolites produced by the model invertebrates L. variegatus and C. riparius are transferred to G. setosus through the diet, proving their trophic transfer.

  17. Genome-scale modeling using flux ratio constraints to enable metabolic engineering of clostridial metabolism in silico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAnulty, Michael J; Yen, Jiun Y; Freedman, Benjamin G; Senger, Ryan S

    2012-05-14

    Genome-scale metabolic networks and flux models are an effective platform for linking an organism genotype to its phenotype. However, few modeling approaches offer predictive capabilities to evaluate potential metabolic engineering strategies in silico. A new method called "flux balance analysis with flux ratios (FBrAtio)" was developed in this research and applied to a new genome-scale model of Clostridium acetobutylicum ATCC 824 (iCAC490) that contains 707 metabolites and 794 reactions. FBrAtio was used to model wild-type metabolism and metabolically engineered strains of C. acetobutylicum where only flux ratio constraints and thermodynamic reversibility of reactions were required. The FBrAtio approach allowed solutions to be found through standard linear programming. Five flux ratio constraints were required to achieve a qualitative picture of wild-type metabolism for C. acetobutylicum for the production of: (i) acetate, (ii) lactate, (iii) butyrate, (iv) acetone, (v) butanol, (vi) ethanol, (vii) CO2 and (viii) H2. Results of this simulation study coincide with published experimental results and show the knockdown of the acetoacetyl-CoA transferase increases butanol to acetone selectivity, while the simultaneous over-expression of the aldehyde/alcohol dehydrogenase greatly increases ethanol production. FBrAtio is a promising new method for constraining genome-scale models using internal flux ratios. The method was effective for modeling wild-type and engineered strains of C. acetobutylicum.

  18. Potential of Icariin Metabolites from Epimedium koreanum Nakai as Antidiabetic Therapeutic Agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Da Hye Kim

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The therapeutic properties of Epimedium koreanum are presumed to be due to the flavonoid component icariin, which has been reported to have broad pharmacological potential and has demonstrated anti-diabetic, anti-Alzheimer’s disease, anti-tumor, and hepatoprotective activities. Considering these therapeutic properties of icariin, its deglycosylated icaritin and glycosylated flavonoids (icaeriside II, epimedin A, epimedin B, and epimedin C were evaluated for their ability to inhibit protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B and α-glucosidase. The results show that icaritin and icariside II exhibit potent inhibitory activities, with 50% inhibition concentration (IC50 values of 11.59 ± 1.39 μM and 9.94 ± 0.15 μM against PTP1B and 74.42 ± 0.01 and 106.59 ± 0.44 μM against α-glucosidase, respectively. With the exceptions of icaritin and icariside II, glycosylated flavonoids did not exhibit any inhibitory effects in the two assays. Enzyme kinetics analyses revealed that icaritin and icariside II demonstrated noncompetitive-type inhibition against PTP1B, with inhibition constant (Ki values of 11.41 and 11.66 μM, respectively. Moreover, molecular docking analysis confirmed that icaritin and icariside II both occupy the same site as allosteric ligand. Thus, the molecular docking simulation results were in close agreement with the experimental data with respect to inhibition activity. In conclusion, deglycosylated metabolites of icariin from E. koreanum might offer therapeutic potential for the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus.

  19. Nitric oxide inhibits glycogen synthesis in isolated rat hepatocytes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sprangers, F.; Sauerwein, H. P.; Romijn, J. A.; van Woerkom, G. M.; Meijer, A. J.

    1998-01-01

    There is increasing evidence for the existence of intrahepatic regulation of glucose metabolism by Kupffer cell products. Nitric oxide (NO) is known to inhibit gluconeogenic flux through pyruvate carboxylase and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase. However, NO may also influence glucose metabolism at

  20. An invasive plant promotes its arbuscular mycorrhizal symbioses and competitiveness through its secondary metabolites: indirect evidence from activated carbon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Yongge; Tang, Jianjun; Leng, Dong; Hu, Shuijin; Yong, Jean W H; Chen, Xin

    2014-01-01

    Secondary metabolites released by invasive plants can increase their competitive ability by affecting native plants, herbivores, and pathogens at the invaded land. Whether these secondary metabolites affect the invasive plant itself, directly or indirectly through microorganisms, however, has not been well documented. Here we tested whether activated carbon (AC), a well-known absorbent for secondary metabolites, affect arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) symbioses and competitive ability in an invasive plant. We conducted three experiments (experiments 1-3) with the invasive forb Solidago canadensis and the native Kummerowia striata. Experiment 1 determined whether AC altered soil properties, levels of the main secondary metabolites in the soil, plant growth, and AMF communities associated with S. canadensis and K. striata. Experiment 2 determined whether AC affected colonization of S. canadensis by five AMF, which were added to sterilized soil. Experiment 3 determined the competitive ability of S. canadensis in the presence and absence of AMF and AC. In experiment 1, AC greatly decreased the concentrations of the main secondary metabolites in soil, and the changes in concentrations were closely related with the changes of AMF in S. canadensis roots. In experiment 2, AC inhibited the AMF Glomus versiforme and G. geosporum but promoted G. mosseae and G. diaphanum in the soil and also in S. canadensis roots. In experiment 3, AC reduced S. canadensis competitive ability in the presence but not in the absence of AMF. Our results provided indirect evidence that the secondary metabolites (which can be absorbed by AC) of the invasive plant S. canadensis may promote S. canadensis competitiveness by enhancing its own AMF symbionts.

  1. Influence of mineral salts upon activity of Trichoderma harzianum non-volatile metabolites on Armillaria spp. rhizomorphs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krystyna Przybył

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Effect of non-volatile metabolites of Trichoderma harzianum together with certain salts containing Mg++, Fe+++, Mn++, Cu++, Al+++, Ca++, K++, Na+, PO4--- and SO3--- on the production and length of rhizomorphs of Armillaria borealis, A. gallica and A. ostoyae was studied. In pure medium, T. harzianum exhibited stimulating effect on rhizomorphs of A. borealis (both number and length and A. ostoyae (only initiation. Cu++ salt totaly inhibited the initiation of rhizomorphs of Armillaria borealis, A. gallica and A. ostoyae. Effect of other compounds on the activity of T. harzianum depended on Armillaria species. The majority of chemical compounds tested supressed the activity of non-volatile metabolites of T. harzianum. Evident stimulating effect was observed under influence of sulphate salts consisting Al++ and Fe+++ on the rhizomorph number of A. borealis and A. gallica, respectively.

  2. δ-Tocopherol Is More Active than α- or γ-Tocopherol in Inhibiting Lung Tumorigenesis In Vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Guang Xun; Lee, Mao-Jung; Liu, Anna Ba; Yang, Zhihong; Lin, Yong; Shih, Weichung Joe; Yang, Chung S.

    2011-01-01

    In contrast to strong epidemiologic, preclinical, and secondary clinical evidence for vitamin E (tocopherols) in reducing cancer risk, large-scale clinical cancer-prevention trials of α-tocopherol have been negative. This vexing contrast helped spur substantial preclinical efforts to better understand and improve the antineoplastic activity of tocopherol through, for example, the study of different tocopherol forms. We previously showed that the γ-tocopherol–rich mixture (γ-TmT) effectively inhibited colon and lung carcinogenesis and the growth of transplanted lung-cancer cells in mice. We designed the present study to determine the relative activities of different forms of tocopherol in a xenograft model, comparing the anticancer activities of δ-tocopherol with those of α- and γ-tocopherols. We subcutaneously injected human lung cancer H1299 cells into NCr nu/nu mice, which then received α-, γ-, or δ-tocopherol or γ-TmT in the diet (each at 0.17% and 0.3%) for 49 days. δ-Tocopherol inhibited tumor growth most strongly. γ-Tocopherol and γ-TmT (at 0.3%) also inhibited growth significantly, but α-tocopherol did not. δ-Tocopherol also effectively decreased oxidative DNA damage and nitrotyrosine formation and enhanced apoptosis in tumor cells; again, γ-tocopherol also was active in these regards but less so, and α-tocopherol was not. Each supplemented diet increased serum levels of its tocopherol—up to 45 µM for α-tocopherol, 9.7 µM for γ-tocopherol, and 1.2 µM for δ-tocopherol; dietary γ- or δ-tocopherol, however, decreased serum α-tocopherol levels, and dietary α-tocopherol decreased serum levels of γ-tocopherol. Each dietary tocopherol also increased its corresponding side-chain–degradation metabolites, with concentrations of δ-tocopherol metabolites greater than γ-tocopherol and far greater than α-tocopherol metabolites in serum and tumors. The present study is the first in vivo assessment of δ-tocopherol in tumorigenesis and

  3. Phytochemical analysis of Binahong (Anredera Cordifolia) leaves extract to inhibit In Vitro growth of Aeromonas Hydrophila

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basyuni, Mohammad; Ginting, Prita Yulianti Anasta Br; Lesmana, Indra

    2017-11-01

    Binahong (Anredera cordifolia) is one of the medicinal plants commonly used to treat the disease of living organisms. The secondary metabolite of A. cordifolia leaves has been shown antibacterial activity. This study aimed to investigate the secondary metabolite of A. cordifolia leaves showing antibacterial and analysis the effectiveness of antibacterial to inhibit the growth of bacteria Aeromonas hydrophila. A paper disc soaked in a solution of A. cordifolia leaves extract was used to test in vitro at a concentration of 0% (w/v), 0.2%, 0.4%, 0.6%, 0.8%, and positive control of antibiotic (oxytetracycline), respectively. The extracts then placed on a tryptone soy agar (TSA) medium containing bacteria A. hydrophila and incubated at 37 °C for 24 hours. In vitro test showed that A. cordifolia leaves extract inhibited the growth of bacteria A. hydrophila with an inhibition area around the paper disc. The inhibition growth of A. hydrophila increased with the increasing of extract concentration. Bacterial growth was inhibited in the diameter zone of A. hydrophila under different levels of the extracts were 0 mm (0 % negative control), 8.4 mm (0.2 %), 9.4 mm (0.4 %), 10.5 mm (0.6 %), 11.9 mm (0.8 %), 27.5 mm (positive control), respectively. Phytochemical screening of A. cordifolia leaves extract indicated that the extracts contained flavonoid, phenol, saponin, alkaloid, triterpenoid, and β-sitosterol. Our in vitro study demonstrated the inhibition growth of A. hydrophila that caused the disease of motile Aeromonas septicemia (MAS).

  4. Production of Secondary Metabolites in Extreme Environments: Food- and Airborne Wallemia spp. Produce Toxic Metabolites at Hypersaline Conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jančič, Sašo; Frisvad, Jens Christian; Kocev, Dragi

    2016-01-01

    the genome data analysis of W. mellicola (previously W. sebi sensu lato) and W. ichthyophaga revealed a low number of secondary metabolites clusters, a substantial number of secondary metabolites were detected at different conditions. Machine learning analysis of the obtained dataset showed that NaCl has...... of salt or sugar. In relation to food safety, the effect of high salt and sugar concentrations on the production of secondary metabolites by this toxigenic fungus was investigated. The secondary metabolite profiles of 30 strains of the listed species were examined using general growth media, known...... to support the production of secondary metabolites, supplemented with different concentrations of NaCl, glucose and MgCl2. In more than two hundred extracts approximately one hundred different compounds were detected using high-performance liquid chromatography-diode array detection (HPLC-DAD). Although...

  5. Secondary metabolites from Ganoderma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baby, Sabulal; Johnson, Anil John; Govindan, Balaji

    2015-06-01

    Ganoderma is a genus of medicinal mushrooms. This review deals with secondary metabolites isolated from Ganoderma and their biological significance. Phytochemical studies over the last 40years led to the isolation of 431 secondary metabolites from various Ganoderma species. The major secondary compounds isolated are (a) C30 lanostanes (ganoderic acids), (b) C30 lanostanes (aldehydes, alcohols, esters, glycosides, lactones, ketones), (c) C27 lanostanes (lucidenic acids), (d) C27 lanostanes (alcohols, lactones, esters), (e) C24, C25 lanostanes (f) C30 pentacyclic triterpenes, (g) meroterpenoids, (h) farnesyl hydroquinones (meroterpenoids), (i) C15 sesquiterpenoids, (j) steroids, (k) alkaloids, (l) prenyl hydroquinone (m) benzofurans, (n) benzopyran-4-one derivatives and (o) benzenoid derivatives. Ganoderma lucidum is the species extensively studied for its secondary metabolites and biological activities. Ganoderma applanatum, Ganoderma colossum, Ganoderma sinense, Ganoderma cochlear, Ganoderma tsugae, Ganoderma amboinense, Ganoderma orbiforme, Ganoderma resinaceum, Ganoderma hainanense, Ganoderma concinna, Ganoderma pfeifferi, Ganoderma neo-japonicum, Ganoderma tropicum, Ganoderma australe, Ganoderma carnosum, Ganoderma fornicatum, Ganoderma lipsiense (synonym G. applanatum), Ganoderma mastoporum, Ganoderma theaecolum, Ganoderma boninense, Ganoderma capense and Ganoderma annulare are the other Ganoderma species subjected to phytochemical studies. Further phytochemical studies on Ganoderma could lead to the discovery of hitherto unknown biologically active secondary metabolites. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. [Secondary metabolites of a marine mangrove fungus (Penicillium sp. no. 2556) from South China Sea].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chun-Yuan; Ding, Wei-Jia; Shao, Chang-Lun; She, Zhi-Gang; Lin, Yong-Cheng

    2008-07-01

    The metabolites of a marine mangrove fungus (Penicillium sp. No. 2556) were studied in this paper and six compounds were isolated from the fermentation liquid. Their structures were elucidated by spectroscopy methods as Sch54796 (1), Sch54794 (2), 4-hydroxybenzoic acid (3), urail (4), succinic acid (5), Vermopyrone (6). Among them, compounds 1, 2 and 6 were firstly isolated from Penicillium sp., Coumpounds 1 and 2 remarkably inhibited the growth of cancer cell lines hep2 and hepG2.

  7. A dynamic metabolic flux analysis of ABE (acetone-butanol-ethanol) fermentation by Clostridium acetobutylicum ATCC 824, with riboflavin as a by-product.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xinhe; Kasbi, Mayssa; Chen, Jingkui; Peres, Sabine; Jolicoeur, Mario

    2017-12-01

    The present study reveals that supplementing sodium acetate (NaAc) strongly stimulates riboflavin production in acetone-butanol-ethanol (ABE) fermentation by Clostridium acetobutylicum ATCC 824 with xylose as carbon source. Riboflavin production increased from undetectable concentrations to ∼0.2 g L -1 (0.53 mM) when supplementing 60 mM NaAc. Of interest, solvents production and biomass yield were also promoted with fivefold acetone, 2.6-fold butanol, and 2.4-fold biomass adding NaAc. A kinetic metabolic model, developed to simulate ABE biosystem, with riboflavin production, revealed from a dynamic metabolic flux analysis (dMFA) simultaneous increase of riboflavin (ribA) and GTP (precursor of riboflavin) (PurM) synthesis flux rates under NaAc supplementation. The model includes 23 fluxes, 24 metabolites, and 72 kinetic parameters. It also suggested that NaAc condition has first stimulated the accumulation of intracellular metabolite intermediates during the acidogenic phase, which have then fed the solventogenic phase leading to increased ABE production. In addition, NaAc resulted in higher intracellular levels of NADH during the whole culture. Moreover, lower GTP-to-adenosine phosphates (ATP, ADP, AMP) ratio under NaAc supplemented condition suggests that GTP may have a minor role in the cell energetic metabolism compared to its contribution to riboflavin synthesis. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Human metabolites of synthetic cannabinoids JWH-018 and JWH-073 bind with high affinity and act as potent agonists at cannabinoid type-2 receptors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rajasekaran, Maheswari; Brents, Lisa K.; Franks, Lirit N.; Moran, Jeffery H.; Prather, Paul L.

    2013-01-01

    K2 or Spice is an emerging drug of abuse that contains synthetic cannabinoids, including JWH-018 and JWH-073. Recent reports indicate that monohydroxylated metabolites of JWH-018 and JWH-073 retain high affinity and activity at cannabinoid type-1 receptors (CB 1 Rs), potentially contributing to the enhanced toxicity of K2 compared to marijuana. Since the parent compounds also bind to cannabinoid type-2 receptors (CB 2 Rs), this study investigated the affinity and intrinsic activity of JWH-018, JWH-073 and several monohydroxylated metabolites at human CB 2 Rs (hCB 2 Rs). The affinity of cannabinoids for hCB 2 Rs was determined by competition binding studies employing CHO-hCB 2 membranes. Intrinsic activity of compounds was assessed by G-protein activation and adenylyl cyclase (AC)-inhibition in CHO-hCB 2 cells. JWH-073, JWH-018 and several of their human metabolites exhibit nanomolar affinity and act as potent agonists at hCB 2 Rs. Furthermore, a major omega hydroxyl metabolite of JWH-073 (JWH-073-M5) binds to CB 2 Rs with 10-fold less affinity than the parent molecule, but unexpectedly, is equipotent in regulating AC-activity when compared to the parent molecule. Finally, when compared to CP-55,940 and Δ 9 -tetrahydrocannabinol (Δ 9 -THC), JWH-018, JWH-018-M5 and JWH-073-M5 require significantly less CB 2 R occupancy to produce similar levels of AC-inhibition, indicating that these compounds may more efficiently couple CB 2 Rs to AC than the well characterized cannabinoid agonists examined. These results indicate that JWH-018, JWH-073 and several major human metabolites of these compounds exhibit high affinity and demonstrate distinctive signaling properties at CB 2 Rs. Therefore, future studies examining pharmacological and toxicological properties of synthetic cannabinoids present in K2 products should consider potential actions of these drugs at both CB 1 and CB 2 Rs. - Highlights: • JWH-018 and JWH-073 are synthetic cannabinoids present in abused K2

  9. Isolated tumoral pyruvate dehydrogenase can synthesize acetoin which inhibits pyruvate oxidation as well as other aldehydes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baggetto, L G; Lehninger, A L

    1987-05-29

    Oxidation of 1 mM pyruvate by Ehrlich and AS30-D tumor mitochondria is inhibited by acetoin, an unusual and important metabolite of pyruvate utilization by cancer cells, by acetaldehyde, methylglyoxal and excess pyruvate. The respiratory inhibition is reversed by other substrates added to pyruvate and also by 0.5 mM ATP. Kinetic properties of pyruvate dehydrogenase complex isolated from these tumor mitochondria have been studied. This complex appears to be able to synthesize acetoin from acetaldehyde plus pyruvate and is competitively inhibited by acetoin. The role of a new regulatory pattern for tumoral pyruvate dehydrogenase is presented.

  10. Secondary metabolites produced by marine streptomyces as antibiofilm and quorum-sensing inhibitor of uropathogen Proteus mirabilis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Younis, Khansa Mohammed; Usup, Gires; Ahmad, Asmat

    2016-03-01

    Quorum-sensing regulates bacterial biofilm formation and virulence factors, thereby making it an interesting target for attenuating pathogens. In this study, we investigated anti-biofilm and anti-quorum-sensing compounds from secondary metabolites of halophiles marine streptomyces against urinary catheter biofilm forming Proteus mirabilis without effect on growth viability. A total of 40 actinomycetes were isolated from samples collected from different places in Iraq including marine sediments and soil samples. Fifteen isolates identified as streptomyces and their supernatant screened as anti-quorum-sensing by inhibiting quorum-sensing regulated prodigiosin biosynthesis of Serratia marcescens strain Smj-11 as a reporter strain. Isolate Sediment Lake Iraq (sdLi) showed potential anti-quorum-sensing activity. Out of 35 clinical isolates obtained from Urinary catheter used by patient at the Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia Medical Center, 22 isolates were characterized and identified as Proteus mirabilis. Isolate Urinary Catheter B4 (UCB4) showed the highest biofilm formation with highest resistance to used antibiotic and was chosen for further studies. Ethyl acetate secondary metabolites extract was produced from sdLi isolate. First, we determined the Minimum Inhibitory Concentration (MIC) of sdLi crude extract against UCB4 isolate, and all further experiments used concentrations below the MIC. Tests of subinhibitory concentrations of sdLi crude extract showed good inhibition against UCB4 isolate biofilm formation on urinary catheter and cover glass using Scanning electron microscopy and light microscopy respectively. The influence of sub-MIC of sdLi crude extract was also found to attenuate the quorum sensing (QS)-dependent factors such as hemolysin activity, urease activity, pH value, and motility of UCB4 isolate. Evidence is presented that these nontoxic secondary metabolites may act as antagonists of bacterial quorum sensing by competing with quorum-sensing signals

  11. Polyamines as mediators of insulin's action on pyruvate dehydrogenase, 45Ca2+ fluxes, and membrane transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldstone, A.D.; Koenig, H.; Lu, C.Y.

    1986-01-01

    Insulin (IN) induces a rapid stimulation of Ca 2+ fluxes and membrane transport in mouse kidney cortex which involves rapid polyamine synthesis. 1.3 nM (IN) induced an early ( 45 Ca 2+ influx and efflux peaked at 1-2 min and returned to basal levels by 5-10 min. The ODC inhibitor α-difluoromethylornithine (DFMO, 5 mM) abolished IN stimulation of PDH, 45 Ca 2+ fluxes and membrane transport, and putrescine (.5 mM) nullified DFMO inhibition. IN (50 mUnits/kg) in rats induced an early ( 2+ fluxes, and membrane transport

  12. MicroRNAs and Metabolites in Serum Change after Chemotherapy: Impact on Hematopoietic Stem and Progenitor Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Walenda

    Full Text Available Hematopoietic regeneration after high dose chemotherapy necessitates activation of the stem cell pool. There is evidence that serum taken after chemotherapy comprises factors stimulating proliferation and self-renewal of CD34(+ hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs--however, the nature of these feedback signals is yet unclear. Here, we addressed the question if specific microRNAs (miRNAs or metabolites are affected after high dose chemotherapy. Serum taken from the same patients before and after chemotherapy was supplemented for in vitro cultivation of HSPCs. Serum taken after chemotherapy significantly enhanced HSPC proliferation, better maintained a CD34(+ immunophenotype, and stimulated colony forming units. Microarray analysis revealed that 23 miRNAs changed in serum after chemotherapy--particularly, miRNA-320c and miRNA-1275 were down-regulated whereas miRNA-3663-3p was up-regulated. miRNA-320c was exemplarily inhibited by an antagomiR, which seemed to increase proliferation. Metabolomic profiling demonstrated that 44 metabolites were less abundant, whereas three (including 2-hydroxybutyrate and taurocholenate sulphate increased in serum upon chemotherapy. Nine of these metabolites were subsequently tested for effects on HSPCs in vitro, but none of them exerted a clear concentration dependent effect on proliferation, immunophenotype and colony forming unit formation. Taken together, serum profiles of miRNAs and metabolites changed after chemotherapy. Rather than individually, these factors may act in concert to recruit HSPCs into action for hematopoietic regeneration.

  13. Hydrogen peroxide impairs autophagic flux in a cell model of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiang, Pengtao [National Laboratory of Biomacromolecules, Institute of Biophysics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 15 Datun Road, Chaoyang District, Beijing 100101 (China); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, 19 Yuquan Road, Shijingshan District, Beijing 100049 (China); Huang, Zhen [Department of Abdominal Surgical Oncology, Cancer Hospital, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences, 17 Panjiayuan Nanli, Chaoyang District, Beijing 100021 (China); Zhao, Hong, E-mail: zhaohong9@sina.com [Department of Abdominal Surgical Oncology, Cancer Hospital, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences, 17 Panjiayuan Nanli, Chaoyang District, Beijing 100021 (China); Wei, Taotao, E-mail: weitt@moon.ibp.ac.cn [National Laboratory of Biomacromolecules, Institute of Biophysics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 15 Datun Road, Chaoyang District, Beijing 100101 (China)

    2013-04-19

    Highlights: •Free fatty acids exposure induces elevated autophagy. •H{sub 2}O{sub 2} inhibits autophagic flux through impairing the fusion between autophagosomes and lysosomes. •Inhibition of autophagy potentiates H{sub 2}O{sub 2}-induced cell death. -- Abstract: Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) has become the leading cause of chronic liver disease, but the pathogenesis of NAFLD is not fully clear. The aim of this study was to determine whether autophagy plays a role in the pathogenesis of NAFLD. We found that the levels of autophagy were elevated in hepatoma cells upon exposure to free fatty acids, as confirmed by the increase in the number of autophagosomes. However, exposure of hepatoma cells to H{sub 2}O{sub 2} and TNF-α, two typical “second hit” factors, increased the initiation of autophagy but inhibited the autophagic flux. The inhibition of autophagy sensitized cells to pro-apoptotic stimuli. Taken together, our results suggest that autophagy acts as a protective mechanism in the pathogenesis of NAFLD and that impairment of autophagy might induce more severe lesions of the liver. These findings will be a benefit to the understanding of the pathogenesis of NAFLD and might suggest a strategy for the prevention and cure of NAFLD.

  14. Vitamin K3 (menadione) redox cycling inhibits cytochrome P450-mediated metabolism and inhibits parathion intoxication

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jan, Yi-Hua [Department of Environmental and Occupational Medicine, Rutgers Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, Piscataway, NJ (United States); Richardson, Jason R., E-mail: jricha3@eohsi.rutgers.edu [Department of Environmental and Occupational Medicine, Rutgers Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, Piscataway, NJ (United States); Baker, Angela A. [Department of Environmental and Occupational Medicine, Rutgers Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, Piscataway, NJ (United States); Mishin, Vladimir [Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, Rutgers University, Piscataway, NJ (United States); Heck, Diane E. [Department of Environmental Health Science, New York Medical College, Valhalla, NY (United States); Laskin, Debra L. [Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, Rutgers University, Piscataway, NJ (United States); Laskin, Jeffrey D., E-mail: jlaskin@eohsi.rutgers.edu [Department of Environmental and Occupational Medicine, Rutgers Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, Piscataway, NJ (United States)

    2015-10-01

    Parathion, a widely used organophosphate insecticide, is considered a high priority chemical threat. Parathion toxicity is dependent on its metabolism by the cytochrome P450 system to paraoxon (diethyl 4-nitrophenyl phosphate), a cytotoxic metabolite. As an effective inhibitor of cholinesterases, paraoxon causes the accumulation of acetylcholine in synapses and overstimulation of nicotinic and muscarinic cholinergic receptors, leading to characteristic signs of organophosphate poisoning. Inhibition of parathion metabolism to paraoxon represents a potential approach to counter parathion toxicity. Herein, we demonstrate that menadione (methyl-1,4-naphthoquinone, vitamin K3) is a potent inhibitor of cytochrome P450-mediated metabolism of parathion. Menadione is active in redox cycling, a reaction mediated by NADPH-cytochrome P450 reductase that preferentially uses electrons from NADPH at the expense of their supply to the P450s. Using human recombinant CYP 1A2, 2B6, 3A4 and human liver microsomes, menadione was found to inhibit the formation of paraoxon from parathion. Administration of menadione bisulfite (40 mg/kg, ip) to rats also reduced parathion-induced inhibition of brain cholinesterase activity, as well as parathion-induced tremors and the progression of other signs and symptoms of parathion poisoning. These data suggest that redox cycling compounds, such as menadione, have the potential to effectively mitigate the toxicity of organophosphorus pesticides including parathion which require cytochrome P450-mediated activation. - Highlights: • Menadione redox cycles with cytochrome P450 reductase and generates reactive oxygen species. • Redox cycling inhibits cytochrome P450-mediated parathion metabolism. • Short term administration of menadione inhibits parathion toxicity by inhibiting paraoxon formation.

  15. Vitamin K3 (menadione) redox cycling inhibits cytochrome P450-mediated metabolism and inhibits parathion intoxication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jan, Yi-Hua; Richardson, Jason R.; Baker, Angela A.; Mishin, Vladimir; Heck, Diane E.; Laskin, Debra L.; Laskin, Jeffrey D.

    2015-01-01

    Parathion, a widely used organophosphate insecticide, is considered a high priority chemical threat. Parathion toxicity is dependent on its metabolism by the cytochrome P450 system to paraoxon (diethyl 4-nitrophenyl phosphate), a cytotoxic metabolite. As an effective inhibitor of cholinesterases, paraoxon causes the accumulation of acetylcholine in synapses and overstimulation of nicotinic and muscarinic cholinergic receptors, leading to characteristic signs of organophosphate poisoning. Inhibition of parathion metabolism to paraoxon represents a potential approach to counter parathion toxicity. Herein, we demonstrate that menadione (methyl-1,4-naphthoquinone, vitamin K3) is a potent inhibitor of cytochrome P450-mediated metabolism of parathion. Menadione is active in redox cycling, a reaction mediated by NADPH-cytochrome P450 reductase that preferentially uses electrons from NADPH at the expense of their supply to the P450s. Using human recombinant CYP 1A2, 2B6, 3A4 and human liver microsomes, menadione was found to inhibit the formation of paraoxon from parathion. Administration of menadione bisulfite (40 mg/kg, ip) to rats also reduced parathion-induced inhibition of brain cholinesterase activity, as well as parathion-induced tremors and the progression of other signs and symptoms of parathion poisoning. These data suggest that redox cycling compounds, such as menadione, have the potential to effectively mitigate the toxicity of organophosphorus pesticides including parathion which require cytochrome P450-mediated activation. - Highlights: • Menadione redox cycles with cytochrome P450 reductase and generates reactive oxygen species. • Redox cycling inhibits cytochrome P450-mediated parathion metabolism. • Short term administration of menadione inhibits parathion toxicity by inhibiting paraoxon formation.

  16. In vitro assessment of competitive and time-dependent inhibition of the nevirapine metabolism by nortriptyline in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usach, Iris; Ferrer, José-Maria; Peris, José-Esteban

    2018-04-17

    Nevirapine (NVP) is a non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) widely used as a component of High Active Antiretroviral Therapy (HAART) since it is inexpensive, readily absorbed after oral administration and non-teratogenic. In the present work, the mechanism of a previously described pharmacokinetic interaction between NVP and the antidepressant drug nortriptyline (NT) was studied using rat hepatic microsomes. The obtained results showed a competitive inhibition of the NVP metabolism by NT. The three main NVP metabolites (2-OH-NVP, 3-OH-NVP and 12-OH-NVP) where competitively inhibited with similar inhibitory constant values (K i  = 4.01, 3.97 and 4.40 μM, respectively). Time-dependent inhibition of the NVP metabolism was also detected, with a 2.5-fold reduction in the IC 50 values of NT for 2-, 3-, and 12-OH-NVP formation when NT was preincubated with the microsomal suspension in the presence of an NADPH-generating system. A concentration-dependent inhibition of the formation of NVP metabolites by the main NT metabolite (10-OH-NT) was also observed, however, the inhibitory potency of 10-OH-NT was much lower than that of the parent drug. The apparent hepatic intrinsic clearance of NVP determined in these in vitro experiments was used to predict the in vivo clearance of NVP using the "well-stirred" and the "parallel-tube" models, resulting in values close to those previously observed in vivo clearance. Finally, a good prediction of the increase in the plasma concentrations of NVP when co-administered with NT was obtained employing the inhibitory constant of NT determined in vitro and the estimated plasma concentration of NT entering the liver. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  17. Chemical mediation of bacterial surface colonisation by secondary metabolites from the red alga Delisea pulchra

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maximilien, Ria; de Nys, Rocky; Holmström, Carola

    1998-01-01

    -occurring algal species, all of which lack furanones. There was also a strong inverse correlation between bacterial abundance and furanone content (previously determined) for different sections of the thallus of D. pulchra, consistent with inhibition of bacteria by furanones. Based on these observations we....... pulchra the most. As inhibition of growth did not provide an adequate explanation for the inverse relationship between levels of furanones and bacteria abundance on D. pulchra, we proceeded to investigate the effects of these metabolites on other bacterial characteristics relevant to colonisation...... of different bacterial isolates or phenotypes by furanones, as well as affecting overall bacterial abundance on the alga, should have strong effects on the species composition of the bacterial community on the alga's surface. The effects of furanones on specific bacterial colonisation traits are discussed...

  18. Yeast synthetic biology for high-value metabolites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Zhubo; Liu, Yi; Guo, Juan; Huang, Luqi; Zhang, Xueli

    2015-02-01

    Traditionally, high-value metabolites have been produced through direct extraction from natural biological sources which are inefficient, given the low abundance of these compounds. On the other hand, these high-value metabolites are usually difficult to be synthesized chemically, due to their complex structures. In the last few years, the discovery of genes involved in the synthetic pathways of these metabolites, combined with advances in synthetic biology tools, has allowed the construction of increasing numbers of yeast cell factories for production of these metabolites from renewable biomass. This review summarizes recent advances in synthetic biology in terms of the use of yeasts as microbial hosts for the identification of the pathways involved in the synthesis, as well as for the production of high-value metabolites. © FEMS 2015. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permission@oup.com.

  19. Azure B, a metabolite of methylene blue, is a high-potency, reversible inhibitor of monoamine oxidase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petzer, Anél, E-mail: 12264954@nwu.ac.za [Unit for Drug Research and Development, School of Pharmacy, North-West University, Private Bag X6001, Potchefstroom, 2520 (South Africa); Harvey, Brian H. [Division of Pharmacology, School of Pharmacy, North-West University, Private Bag X6001, Potchefstroom, 2520 (South Africa); Wegener, Gregers [Centre for Psychiatric Research, Aarhus University Hospital-Risskov, Skovagervej 2, 8240 Risskov (Denmark); Petzer, Jacobus P. [Division of Pharmaceutical Chemistry, School of Pharmacy, North-West University, Private Bag X6001, Potchefstroom, 2520 (South Africa)

    2012-02-01

    Methylene blue (MB) has been shown to act at multiple cellular and molecular targets and as a result possesses diverse medical applications. Among these is a high potency reversible inhibition of monoamine oxidase A (MAO-A) that may, at least in part, underlie its adverse effects but also its psycho- and neuromodulatory actions. MB is metabolized to yield N-demethylated products of which azure B, the monodemethyl species, is the major metabolite. Similar to MB, azure B also displays a variety of biological activities and may therefore contribute to the pharmacological profile of MB. Based on these observations, the present study examines the interactions of azure B with recombinant human MAO-A and -B. The results show that azure B is a potent MAO-A inhibitor (IC{sub 50} = 11 nM), approximately 6-fold more potent than is MB (IC{sub 50} = 70 nM) under identical conditions. Measurements of the time-dependency of inhibition suggest that the interaction of azure B with MAO-A is reversible. Azure B also reversibly inhibits the MAO-B isozyme with an IC{sub 50} value of 968 nM. These results suggest that azure B may be a hitherto under recognized contributor to the pharmacology and toxicology of MB by blocking central and peripheral MAO-A activity and as such needs to be considered during its use in humans and animals. Highlights: ► Methylene blue (MB) is a known potent MAO-A inhibitor. ► Azure B, the major metabolite of MB, is more potent as a MAO-A inhibitor. ► Azure B may be a contributor to the CNS pharmacology and toxicology of MB.

  20. MicrobesFlux: a web platform for drafting metabolic models from the KEGG database

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feng Xueyang

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Concurrent with the efforts currently underway in mapping microbial genomes using high-throughput sequencing methods, systems biologists are building metabolic models to characterize and predict cell metabolisms. One of the key steps in building a metabolic model is using multiple databases to collect and assemble essential information about genome-annotations and the architecture of the metabolic network for a specific organism. To speed up metabolic model development for a large number of microorganisms, we need a user-friendly platform to construct metabolic networks and to perform constraint-based flux balance analysis based on genome databases and experimental results. Results We have developed a semi-automatic, web-based platform (MicrobesFlux for generating and reconstructing metabolic models for annotated microorganisms. MicrobesFlux is able to automatically download the metabolic network (including enzymatic reactions and metabolites of ~1,200 species from the KEGG database (Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes and then convert it to a metabolic model draft. The platform also provides diverse customized tools, such as gene knockouts and the introduction of heterologous pathways, for users to reconstruct the model network. The reconstructed metabolic network can be formulated to a constraint-based flux model to predict and analyze the carbon fluxes in microbial metabolisms. The simulation results can be exported in the SBML format (The Systems Biology Markup Language. Furthermore, we also demonstrated the platform functionalities by developing an FBA model (including 229 reactions for a recent annotated bioethanol producer, Thermoanaerobacter sp. strain X514, to predict its biomass growth and ethanol production. Conclusion MicrobesFlux is an installation-free and open-source platform that enables biologists without prior programming knowledge to develop metabolic models for annotated microorganisms in the KEGG

  1. Screening of the in vitro antileishmanial activities of compounds and secondary metabolites isolated from Maytenus guianensis Klotzsch ex Reissek (Celastraceae) chichuá Amazon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meneguetti, Dionatas Ulises de Oliveira; Lima, Renato Abreu; Hurtado, Fernanda Bay; Passarini, Guilherme Matos; Macedo, Sharon Rose Aragão; Barros, Neuza Biguinati de; Oliveira, Flávio Augusto de Souza; Medeiros, Patrícia Soares de Maria de; Militão, Júlio Sancho Linhares Teixeira; Nicolete, Roberto; Facundo, Valdir Alves

    2016-01-01

    Maytenus guianensis is a member of the Celastraceae family that is used in traditional medicine, particularly for its anti-parasitic and anti-cancer effects. To explore the ethnopharmacological potential of this plant, the present study was designed to screen the in vitro antileishmanial activities of extracts and compounds isolated from M. guianensis. Maytenus guianensis stems and leaves were extracted in acetone, followed by the preparation of eluates and isolation of secondary metabolites using chromatography on a glass column with silica gel as the fixed phase. The chemical components were identified using spectroscopic methods, including one- and two-dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance of hydrogen-1 and carbon-13, mass spectroscopy, and infrared spectroscopy. The anti-Leishmania amazonensis activities of these eluates and compounds were evaluated by direct promastigote counting and viability assays. It was found that the hexane bark eluate produced the strongest anti-L. amazonensis effect, with 90-100% inhibition of the promastigote form. The isolated metabolite that produced the best result was tingenone B, followed by a compound formed by the union of tingenone and tingenone B (80-90% inhibition). Maytenus guianensis shows anti-parasite activity that warrants further investigation to determine the mechanisms underlying this antileishmanial effect and to evaluate the pharmacological potential of these eluates and isolated secondary metabolites, while minimizing any adverse effects.

  2. Screening of the in vitro antileishmanial activities of compounds and secondary metabolites isolated from Maytenus guianensis Klotzsch ex Reissek (Celastraceae chichuá Amazon

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    Dionatas Ulises de Oliveira Meneguetti

    Full Text Available Abstract INTRODUCTION Maytenus guianensis is a member of the Celastraceae family that is used in traditional medicine, particularly for its anti-parasitic and anti-cancer effects. To explore the ethnopharmacological potential of this plant, the present study was designed to screen the in vitro antileishmanial activities of extracts and compounds isolated from M. guianensis. METHODS Maytenus guianensis stems and leaves were extracted in acetone, followed by the preparation of eluates and isolation of secondary metabolites using chromatography on a glass column with silica gel as the fixed phase. The chemical components were identified using spectroscopic methods, including one- and two-dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance of hydrogen-1 and carbon-13, mass spectroscopy, and infrared spectroscopy. The anti-Leishmania amazonensis activities of these eluates and compounds were evaluated by direct promastigote counting and viability assays. RESULTS It was found that the hexane bark eluate produced the strongest anti-L. amazonensis effect, with 90-100% inhibition of the promastigote form. The isolated metabolite that produced the best result was tingenone B, followed by a compound formed by the union of tingenone and tingenone B (80-90% inhibition. CONCLUSIONS Maytenus guianensis shows anti-parasite activity that warrants further investigation to determine the mechanisms underlying this antileishmanial effect and to evaluate the pharmacological potential of these eluates and isolated secondary metabolites, while minimizing any adverse effects.

  3. Metabolic interactions between acetaminophen (paracetamol) and two flavonoids, luteolin and quercetin, through in-vitro inhibition studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Lei; Kwara, Awewura; Greenblatt, David J

    2017-12-01

    Excessive exposure to acetaminophen (APAP, paracetamol) can cause liver injury through formation of a reactive metabolite that depletes hepatic glutathione and causes hepatocellular oxidative stress and damage. Generation of this metabolite is mediated by Cytochrome-P450 (CYP) isoforms, mainly CYP2E1. A number of naturally occurring flavonoids can mitigate APAP-induced hepatotoxicity in experimental animal models. Our objective was to determine the mechanism of these protective effects and to evaluate possible human applicability. Two flavonoids, luteolin and quercetin, were evaluated as potential inhibitors of eight human CYP isoforms, of six UDP-glucuronosyltransferase (UGT) isoforms and of APAP glucuronidation and sulfation. The experimental model was based on in-vitro metabolism by human liver microsomes, using isoform-specific substrates. Luteolin and quercetin inhibited human CYP isoforms to varying degrees, with greatest potency towards CYP1A2 and CYP2C8. However, 50% inhibitory concentrations (IC 50 values) were generally in the micromolar range. UGT isoforms were minimally inhibited. Both luteolin and quercetin inhibited APAP sulfation but not glucuronidation. Inhibition of human CYP activity by luteolin and quercetin occurred with IC 50 values exceeding customary in-vivo human exposure with tolerable supplemental doses of these compounds. The findings indicate that luteolin and quercetin are not likely to be of clinical value for preventing or treating APAP-induced hepatotoxicity. © 2017 Royal Pharmaceutical Society.

  4. Effect of organophosphorus insecticides and their metabolites on astroglial cell proliferation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guizzetti, Marina; Pathak, Shantha; Giordano, Gennaro; Costa, Lucio G.

    2005-01-01

    Though little attention has been given to the possibility that glial cells may represent a target for the developmental neurotoxicity of organophosphorus (OP) insecticides, recent evidence, obtained in particular with chlorpyrifos (CP), suggests that developmental exposure to this compound may indeed target astrocytes. To substantiate and expand these observations, we carried out a series of in vitro studies utilizing fetal rat astrocytes and a human astrocytoma cell line, 1321N1 cells, to investigate the effect of the OPs CP, diazinon (DZ) and parathion (P), their oxygen analogs chlorpyrifos oxon (CPO), diazoxon (DZO) and paraoxon (PO), and their metabolites 3,5,6-trichloro-2-pyridinol (TCP), 2-isopropyl-6-methyl-4-pyrimidol (IMP) and para-nitrophenol (PNP), on cell proliferation. In fetal rat astrocytes and astrocytoma cells maintained in serum, CP, DZ, P, CPO, DZO, and PO induced a concentration-dependent inhibition in [ 3 H]thymidine incorporation with a very similar potency (IC 50 between 45 and 57 μM). Among the other metabolites, PNP was the most potent (IC 50 = 70-80 μM), while TCP and IMP were much less effective (IC 50 > 100 μM). Cytotoxicity appears to account only for a small part of the effect on DNA synthesis. OP insecticides and their oxons were three- to six-fold more potent in inhibiting [ 3 H]thymidine incorporation when cells were synchronized in the G 0 /G 1 phase of the cell cycle and re-stimulated by carbachol or epidermal growth factor. These results suggest that OP insecticides and their oxons affect astroglial cell proliferation and that the transition from the G 0 /G 1 to the S/G 2 phase of the cell cycle may be particularly sensitive to the action of these compounds

  5. Dextromethorphan inhibition of voltage-gated proton currents in BV2 microglial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Jin-Ho; Yeh, Jay Z

    2012-05-10

    Dextromethorphan, an antitussive drug, has a neuroprotective property as evidenced by its inhibition of microglial production of pro-inflammatory cytokines and reactive oxygen species. The microglial activation requires NADPH oxidase activity, which is sustained by voltage-gated proton channels in microglia as they dissipate an intracellular acid buildup. In the present study, we examined the effect of dextromethorphan on proton currents in microglial BV2 cells. Dextromethorphan reversibly inhibited proton currents with an IC(50) value of 51.7 μM at an intracellular/extracellular pH gradient of 5.5/7.3. Dextromethorphan did not change the reversal potential or the voltage dependence of the gating. Dextrorphan and 3-hydroxymorphinan, major metabolites of dextromethorphan, and dextromethorphan methiodide were ineffective in inhibiting proton currents. The results indicate that dextromethorphan inhibition of proton currents would suppress NADPH oxidase activity and, eventually, microglial activation. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Metabolic-flux analysis of hydrogen production pathway in Citrobacter amalonaticus Y19

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oh, You-Kwan; Kim, Mi-Sun [Bioenergy Research Center, Korea Institute of Energy Research, Daejeon 305-343 (Korea); Kim, Heung-Joo; Park, Sunghoon [Department of Chemical and Biochemical Engineering and Institute for Environmental Technology and Industry, Pusan National University, Busan 609-735 (Korea); Ryu, Dewey D.Y. [Biochemical Engineering Program, Department of Chemical Engineering and Material Science, University of California, Davis, CA 95616 (United States)

    2008-03-15

    For the newly isolated chemoheterotrophic bacterium Citrobacter amalonaticus Y19, anaerobic glucose metabolism and hydrogen (H{sub 2}) production pathway were studied using batch cultivation and an in silico metabolic-flux analysis. Batch cultivation was conducted under varying initial glucose concentration between 1.5 and 9.5 g/L with quantitative measurement of major metabolites to obtain accurate carbon material balance. The metabolic flux of Y19 was analyzed using a metabolic-pathway model which was constructed from 81 biochemical reactions. The linear optimization program MetaFluxNet was employed for the analysis. When the specific growth rate of cells was chosen as an objective function, the model described the batch culture characteristics of Ci. amalonaticus Y19 reasonably well. When the specific H{sub 2} production rate was selected as an objective function, on the other hand, the achievable maximal H{sub 2} production yield (8.7molH{sub 2}/mol glucose) and the metabolic pathway enabling the high H{sub 2} yield were identified. The pathway involved non-native NAD(P)-linked hydrogenase and H{sub 2} production from NAD(P)H which were supplied at a high rate from glucose degradation through the pentose phosphate pathway. (author)

  7. An invasive plant promotes its arbuscular mycorrhizal symbioses and competitiveness through its secondary metabolites: indirect evidence from activated carbon.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongge Yuan

    Full Text Available Secondary metabolites released by invasive plants can increase their competitive ability by affecting native plants, herbivores, and pathogens at the invaded land. Whether these secondary metabolites affect the invasive plant itself, directly or indirectly through microorganisms, however, has not been well documented. Here we tested whether activated carbon (AC, a well-known absorbent for secondary metabolites, affect arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM symbioses and competitive ability in an invasive plant. We conducted three experiments (experiments 1-3 with the invasive forb Solidago canadensis and the native Kummerowia striata. Experiment 1 determined whether AC altered soil properties, levels of the main secondary metabolites in the soil, plant growth, and AMF communities associated with S. canadensis and K. striata. Experiment 2 determined whether AC affected colonization of S. canadensis by five AMF, which were added to sterilized soil. Experiment 3 determined the competitive ability of S. canadensis in the presence and absence of AMF and AC. In experiment 1, AC greatly decreased the concentrations of the main secondary metabolites in soil, and the changes in concentrations were closely related with the changes of AMF in S. canadensis roots. In experiment 2, AC inhibited the AMF Glomus versiforme and G. geosporum but promoted G. mosseae and G. diaphanum in the soil and also in S. canadensis roots. In experiment 3, AC reduced S. canadensis competitive ability in the presence but not in the absence of AMF. Our results provided indirect evidence that the secondary metabolites (which can be absorbed by AC of the invasive plant S. canadensis may promote S. canadensis competitiveness by enhancing its own AMF symbionts.

  8. Quantitative Rationalization of Gemfibrozil Drug Interactions: Consideration of Transporters-Enzyme Interplay and the Role of Circulating Metabolite Gemfibrozil 1-O-β-Glucuronide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varma, Manthena V S; Lin, Jian; Bi, Yi-an; Kimoto, Emi; Rodrigues, A David

    2015-07-01

    Gemfibrozil has been suggested as a sensitive cytochrome P450 2C8 (CYP2C8) inhibitor for clinical investigation by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration and the European Medicines Agency. However, gemfibrozil drug-drug interactions (DDIs) are complex; its major circulating metabolite, gemfibrozil 1-O-β-glucuronide (Gem-Glu), exhibits time-dependent inhibition of CYP2C8, and both parent and metabolite also behave as moderate inhibitors of organic anion transporting polypeptide 1B1 (OATP1B1) in vitro. Additionally, parent and metabolite also inhibit renal transport mediated by OAT3. Here, in vitro inhibition data for gemfibrozil and Gem-Glu were used to assess their impact on the pharmacokinetics of several victim drugs (including rosiglitazone, pioglitazone, cerivastatin, and repaglinide) by employing both static mechanistic and dynamic physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) models. Of the 48 cases evaluated using the static models, about 75% and 98% of the DDIs were predicted within 1.5- and 2-fold of the observed values, respectively, when incorporating the interaction potential of both gemfibrozil and its 1-O-β-glucuronide. Moreover, the PBPK model was able to recover the plasma profiles of rosiglitazone, pioglitazone, cerivastatin, and repaglinide under control and gemfibrozil treatment conditions. Analyses suggest that Gem-Glu is the major contributor to the DDIs, and its exposure needed to bring about complete inactivation of CYP2C8 is only a fraction of that achieved in the clinic after a therapeutic gemfibrozil dose. Overall, the complex interactions of gemfibrozil can be quantitatively rationalized, and the learnings from this analysis can be applied in support of future predictions of gemfibrozil DDIs. Copyright © 2015 by The American Society for Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics.

  9. Identification of metabolites of the tryptase inhibitor CRA-9249: observation of a metabolite derived from an unexpected hydroxylation pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Walter; Dener, Jeffrey M; Dickman, Daniel A; Grothaus, Paul; Ling, Yun; Liu, Liang; Havel, Chris; Malesky, Kimberly; Mahajan, Tania; O'Brian, Colin; Shelton, Emma J; Sperandio, David; Tong, Zhiwei; Yee, Robert; Mordenti, Joyce J

    2006-08-01

    The metabolites of the tryptase inhibitor CRA-9249 were identified after exposure to liver microsomes. CRA-9249 was found to be degraded rapidly in liver microsomes from rabbit, dog, cynomolgus monkey, and human, and less rapidly in microsomes from rat. The key metabolites included cleavage of an aryl ether, in addition to an unexpected hydroxylation of the amide side chain adjacent to the amide nitrogen. The chemical structures of both metabolites were confirmed by synthesis and comparison to material isolated from the liver microsomes. Several suspected hydroxylated metabolites were also synthesized and analyzed as part of the structure identification process.

  10. Extraction and Identification of Secondary Metabolites Produced by Trichoderma atroviridae (6022 and Evaluating of their Antifungal Effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Shahiri Tabarestani

    2017-08-01

    capacity of Trichoderma species in crop protection and promoting vegetative growth, they are marketed as biopesticides, biofungicides and biofertilizers. The identification of molecules with such biological activities can support the development of new biopesticides and biofertilizers based on Trichoderma metabolites. The aim of this study was to investigate antifungal effects and chemical composition of secondary metabolites produced by Trichoderma atroviridae(6022 against Macrophomina phaseolina and Sclerotinia sclerotiorum. Materials and Methods: Antifungal effects of isolate 6022 against M. phaseolina and S. sclerotiorum were evaluated under invitro condition by dual culture technique, volatile (Dennis & Webster 1971 and non-volatile (Vinal 2006 metabolites. Volatile metabolites tests were done in 4 cases: Co-culture, 24, 48 and 72 hour cultures. For considering non-volatile metabolites of this isolate, different concentrations of culture filtrate and mycelial mass have been prepared in (autoclaved potato dextrose agar (PDA, individually. Secondary metabolites were extracted via 4 processes by using of organic solvents (Siddiquee 2012, Headspace technique (Stoppacher 2010 and soxhlet water bath distillation methods for mycelial mass (Dubey 2011 and identified by using the GC-MS device with nonpolar column (DB-5. Results and Discussion: In dual culture test, isolate 6022 inhibited the mycelial growth of the pathogen, then over ran and sporulated on the mycelia. The related results for the volatile test in 24, 48, 72h and Co-cultures, indicated that the antagonist inhibited the mycelial growth of the pathogen and production of sclerotia in culture media (PDA. Results of the non-volatile test (in different concentrations showed significant inhibitory effects on mycelial growth and production of sclerotia. After extraction and GC separation, the constituents of mixtures can be detected via mass spectrometry (MS by comparison of mass spectra with library spectra searching

  11. Hydrophobicity and charge shape cellular metabolite concentrations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arren Bar-Even

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available What governs the concentrations of metabolites within living cells? Beyond specific metabolic and enzymatic considerations, are there global trends that affect their values? We hypothesize that the physico-chemical properties of metabolites considerably affect their in-vivo concentrations. The recently achieved experimental capability to measure the concentrations of many metabolites simultaneously has made the testing of this hypothesis possible. Here, we analyze such recently available data sets of metabolite concentrations within E. coli, S. cerevisiae, B. subtilis and human. Overall, these data sets encompass more than twenty conditions, each containing dozens (28-108 of simultaneously measured metabolites. We test for correlations with various physico-chemical properties and find that the number of charged atoms, non-polar surface area, lipophilicity and solubility consistently correlate with concentration. In most data sets, a change in one of these properties elicits a ~100 fold increase in metabolite concentrations. We find that the non-polar surface area and number of charged atoms account for almost half of the variation in concentrations in the most reliable and comprehensive data set. Analyzing specific groups of metabolites, such as amino-acids or phosphorylated nucleotides, reveals even a higher dependence of concentration on hydrophobicity. We suggest that these findings can be explained by evolutionary constraints imposed on metabolite concentrations and discuss possible selective pressures that can account for them. These include the reduction of solute leakage through the lipid membrane, avoidance of deleterious aggregates and reduction of non-specific hydrophobic binding. By highlighting the global constraints imposed on metabolic pathways, future research could shed light onto aspects of biochemical evolution and the chemical constraints that bound metabolic engineering efforts.

  12. The Marine Metabolite SZ-685C Induces Apoptosis in Primary Human Nonfunctioning Pituitary Adenoma Cells by Inhibition of the Akt Pathway in Vitro

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    Xin Wang

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Nonfunctioning pituitary adenoma (NFPA is one of the most common types of pituitary adenoma. The marine anthraquinone derivative SZ-685C has been isolated from the secondary metabolites of the mangrove endophytic fungus Halorosellinia sp. (No. 1403 which is found in the South China Sea. Recent research has shown that SZ-685C possesses anticancer and tumor suppressive effects. The tetrazolium-based colorimetric assay (MTT assay to investigate the different effect of the marine compound SZ-685C on the proliferation of primary human NFPA cells, rat normal pituitary cells (RPCs and rat prolactinoma MMQ cell lines. Hoechst 33342 dye/propidium iodide (PI double staining and fluorescein isothiocyanate-conjugated Annexin V/PI (Annexin V-FITC/PI apoptosis assays detected an enhanced rate of apoptosis in cells treated with SZ-685C. Enhanced expression levels of caspase 3 and phosphate and tensin homolog (PTEN were determined by Western blotting. Notably, the protein expression levels of Akt were decreased when the primary human NFPA cells were treated with SZ-685C. Here, we show that SZ-685C induces apoptosis of human NFPA cells through inhibition of the Akt pathway in vitro. The understanding of apoptosis has provided the basis for novel targeted therapies that can induce death in cancer cells or sensitize them to established cytotoxic agents and radiation therapy.

  13. Interaction and Transport of Methamphetamine and its Primary Metabolites by Organic Cation and Multidrug and Toxin Extrusion Transporters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, David J; Sager, Jennifer E; Duan, Haichuan; Isoherranen, Nina; Wang, Joanne

    2017-07-01

    Methamphetamine is one of the most abused illicit drugs with roughly 1.2 million users in the United States alone. A large portion of methamphetamine and its metabolites is eliminated by the kidney with renal clearance larger than glomerular filtration clearance. Yet the mechanism of active renal secretion is poorly understood. The goals of this study were to characterize the interaction of methamphetamine and its major metabolites with organic cation transporters (OCTs) and multidrug and toxin extrusion (MATE) transporters and to identify the major transporters involved in the disposition of methamphetamine and its major metabolites, amphetamine and para -hydroxymethamphetamine ( p -OHMA). We used cell lines stably expressing relevant transporters to show that methamphetamine and its metabolites inhibit human OCTs 1-3 (hOCT1-3) and hMATE1/2-K with the greatest potencies against hOCT1 and hOCT2. Methamphetamine and amphetamine are substrates of hOCT2, hMATE1, and hMATE2-K, but not hOCT1 and hOCT3. p -OHMA is transported by hOCT1-3 and hMATE1, but not hMATE2-K. In contrast, organic anion transporters 1 and 3 do not interact with or transport these compounds. Methamphetamine and its metabolites exhibited complex interactions with hOCT1 and hOCT2, suggesting the existence of multiple binding sites. Our studies suggest the involvement of the renal OCT2/MATE pathway in tubular secretion of methamphetamine and its major metabolites and the potential of drug-drug interactions with substrates or inhibitors of the OCTs. This information may be considered when prescribing medications to suspected or known abusers of methamphetamine to mitigate the risk of increased toxicity or reduced therapeutic efficacy. Copyright © 2017 by The American Society for Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics.

  14. New metabolites of hongdenafil, homosildenafil and hydroxyhomosildenafil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeo, Miseon; Park, Yujin; Lee, Heesang; Choe, Sanggil; Baek, Seung-Hoon; Kim, Hye Kyung; Pyo, Jae Sung

    2018-02-05

    Recently, illegal sildenafil analogues have emerged, causing serious social issues. In spite of the importance of sildenafil analogues, their metabolic profiles or clinical effects have not been reported yet. In this study, new metabolites of illegal sildenafil analogues such as hongdenafil, homosildenafil, and hydroxyhomosildenafil were determined using liquid chromatography quadrupole-time of flight mass spectrometry (LC-Q-TOF-MS) and tandem mass spectrometry (LC-Q-TOF-MS/MS). To prepare metabolic samples, in vitro and in vivo studies were performed. For in vivo metabolites analysis, urine and feces samples of rats treated with sildenafil analogues were analyzed. For in vitro metabolites analysis, human liver microsomes incubated with sildenafil analogues were extracted and analyzed. All metabolites were characterized by LC-Q-TOF-MS and LC-Q-TOF-MS/MS. As a result, five, six, and seven metabolites were determined in hongdenafil, homosildenafil, and hydroxyhomosildenafil treated samples, respectively. These results could be applied to forensic science and other analytical fields. Moreover, these newly identified metabolites could be used as fundamental data to determine the side effect and toxicity of illegal sildenafil analogues. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Effects of Mixed Layer Shear on Vertical Heat Flux

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-12-01

    risks from seawater steric expansion, increased export of fresh water to the Northern Atlantic, ocean conveyor belt inhibition, permafrost melting...and an Autonomous Ocean Flux Buoy (AOFB) designed by Tim Stanton at the Naval Postgraduate School (NPS). 1. Ice-Tethered Profilers The ITP is an...automated, moderately priced, expendable, CTD profiling system designed to be deployed on perennial sea ice in the Arctic Ocean (Figure 8). It was

  16. Selective and Specific Inhibition of the Plasmodium falciparum Lysyl-tRNA Synthetase by the Fungal Secondary Metabolite Cladosporin

    OpenAIRE

    Hoepfner, Dominic; McNamara, Case W.; Lim, Chek Shik; Studer, Christian; Riedl, Ralph; Aust, Thomas; McCormack, Susan L.; Plouffe, David M.; Meister, Stephan; Schuierer, Sven; Plikat, Uwe; Hartmann, Nicole; Staedtler, Frank; Cotesta, Simona; Schmitt, Esther K.

    2012-01-01

    Summary With renewed calls for malaria eradication, next-generation antimalarials need be active against drug-resistant parasites and efficacious against both liver- and blood-stage infections. We screened a natural product library to identify inhibitors of Plasmodium falciparum blood- and liver-stage proliferation. Cladosporin, a fungal secondary metabolite whose target and mechanism of action are not known for any species, was identified as having potent, nanomolar, antiparasitic activity a...

  17. Familial Resemblance for Serum Metabolite Concentrations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Draisma, H.H.M.; Beekman, M.; Pool, R.; van Ommen, G.J.B; Vaarhorst, A.A.M.; de Craen, A.J.; Willemsen, G.; Slagboom, P.E.; Boomsma, D.I.

    2013-01-01

    Metabolomics is the comprehensive study of metabolites, which are the substrates, intermediate, and end products of cellular metabolism. The heritability of the concentrations of circulating metabolites bears relevance for evaluating their suitability as biomarkers for disease. We report aspects of

  18. In vitro antiprogestational/antiglucocorticoid activity and progestin and glucocorticoid receptor binding of the putative metabolites and synthetic derivatives of CDB-2914, CDB-4124, and mifepristone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attardi, Barbara J; Burgenson, Janet; Hild, Sheri A; Reel, Jerry R

    2004-03-01

    In determining the biological profiles of various antiprogestins, it is important to assess the hormonal and antihormonal activity, selectivity, and potency of their proximal metabolites. The early metabolism of mifepristone is characterized by rapid demethylation and hydroxylation. Similar initial metabolic pathways have been proposed for CDB-2914 (CDB: Contraceptive Development Branch of NICHD) and CDB-4124, and their putative metabolites have been synthesized. We have examined the functional activities and potencies, in various cell-based assays, and relative binding affinities (RBAs) for progesterone receptors (PR) and glucocorticoid receptors (GR) of the putative mono- and didemethylated metabolites of CDB-2914, CDB-4124, and mifepristone and of the 17alpha-hydroxy and aromatic A-ring derivatives of CDB-2914 and CDB-4124. The binding affinities of the monodemethylated metabolites for rabbit uterine PR and human PR-A and PR-B were similar to those of the parent compounds. Monodemethylated mifepristone bound to rabbit thymic GR with higher affinity than monodemethylated CDB-2914 or CDB-4124. T47D-CO cells were used to assess inhibition of R5020-stimulated endogenous alkaline phosphatase activity and transactivation of the PRE(2)-thymidine kinase (tk)-luciferase (LUC) reporter plasmid in transient transfections. The antiprogestational potency was as follows: mifepristone/CDB-2914/CDB-4124/monodemethylated metabolites (IC(50)'s approximately 10(-9)M) > aromatic A-ring derivatives (IC(50)'s approximately 10(-8)M) > didemethylated/17alpha-hydroxy derivatives (IC(50)'s approximately 10(-7)M). Antiglucocorticoid activity was determined by inhibition of dexamethasone-stimulated transcriptional activity in HepG2 cells. The mono- and didemethylated metabolites of CDB-2914 and CDB-4124 had less antiglucocorticoid activity (IC(50)'s approximately 10(-6)M) than monodemethylated mifepristone (IC(50) approximately 10(-8)M) or the other test compounds. At 10(-6)M in

  19. IDENTIFIKASI METABOLIT SEKUNDER DAN AKTIVITAS ANTIBAKTERI EKSTRAK DAUN SUNGKAI (Peronema canescens JACK. TERHADAP BEBERAPA BAKTERI PATOGEN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arsyik Ibrahim

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available A research which identification of secondary metabolites and antibacterial activity test from methanol exstract of leaf Sungkai (Peronema canencens Jack to several pathogens bacterial, which aims to identification of secondary methabolites and determine the antibacterial activity from crude methanol extract of leaf Sungkai (P. canencens Jack. against Streptococcus mutans, Salmonella thyposa, Bacillus subtilis and Staphylococcus aureus bacteria. Material test obtained by maceration with methanol, then tested for activity. Minimum Inhibition Concentration (MIC value extract was determined by liquid dilution and the followed by scratches on solid media method.  Minimum Kill Concentration (KBM value extracts was determined by agar diffusion method with using paper disks.The results secondary metabolite identify form extracts of leaves P. canencens obtainable derived alkaloid, terpenoids - steroids, flavonoids, and tannin compounds. Methanol extract have the antibacterial activity. Minimum Inhibition Concentration (MIC value of extract is concentration of 20% for bacteria S. mutans, S.thiposa and S.aureus, while for the B. subtilis is konsentration of 15%. Minimum Kill Concentration (KBM values exstract at a concentration of 5% effective at killing S. mutans and S. thyposa bacteria, while the concentration of 1% effective to bacteria B.subtilis and S.aureus. Key words: P. canencens Jack,  antibacteria activity, S. mutans, S. thiposa, B. subtillis, S. aureus   ABSTRAK   Telah dilakukan penelitian identifikasi metabolit sekunder dan aktivitas antibakteri ekstrak metanol daun Sungkai (P.canencens Jack terhadap beberapa bakteri patogen. Penelitian ini bertujuan untuk mengidentifikasi metabolit sekunder dan mengetahui aktifitas antibakteri dan Kadar Hambat Minimum (KHM dan Nilai Kadar Bunuh Minimum (KBM ekstrak kasar metanol daun Sungkai (P.canencens Jack. terhadap bakteri  Streptococcus mutans, Salmonella thyposa, Bacillus subtilis dan

  20. The hepatic metabolism of two carcinogenic dimethylbenz[c]acridines in control and induced rats: the distribution and the mutagenicity of metabolites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Y; Scharping, C E; Holder, G M

    1995-04-01

    The major and minor metabolites of the potent polycyclic aza-aromatic carcinogens 7,9-dimethylbenz[c]acridine and 7,10-dimethylbenz[c]acridine, and the stereochemistry of the dihydrodiol metabolites have been previously described. The metabolite distributions produced in incubations of the aza-aromatic compounds with liver microsomes from phenobarbital- and 3-methylcholanthrene-pretreated and untreated rats, and the mutagenicity in the Ames test are described in this paper. The major metabolites of each were the alcohols produced by oxidation of the methyl group on the 8,9,10,11-ring for control and phenobarbital-induced preparations, while with 3-methylcholanthrene-induced preparations both the 7- and 9- (or 10-) monoalcohols were formed. Total monofunctionalized dihydrodiol metabolites, the 5,6- and 3,4-isomers for 7,9-dimethylbenz[c]acridine, and the 3,4-, 5,6- and 8,9-isomers for 7,10-dimethylbenz[c]acridine, constituted approximately 10% of total metabolites. As well, the K-region arene oxide was formed in substantial amounts with both compounds, accompanied in the case of 7,10-dimethylbenz[c]acridine with some 8,9-oxide. When incubations were carried out in the presence of the epoxide hydrase inhibitor 3,3,3-trichloropropane-1,2-oxide, dihydrodiol formation was almost completely inhibited and relative amounts of both phenols and oxides increased. Secondary metabolites were also formed to approximately 10% of the total products. The mutagenicity of synthetic alcohols and isolated purified metabolites was determined in the Salmonella mammalian microsome plate assay (Ames test) with strain TA100. Limited amounts of metabolites isolated precluded extensive testing, but high mutagenicities were noted for all 3,4-dihydrodiol derivatives isolated. These exceeded those of the parent aza-aromatic hydrocarbons. Alcohols were also active but less so than the parent compounds. The activation of these two dimethylbenz[c]acridines to mutagens appears to be through bay

  1. PTP1B Inhibitory and Anti-Inflammatory Effects of Secondary Metabolites Isolated from the Marine-Derived Fungus Penicillium sp. JF-55

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Dong-Sung; Jang, Jae-Hyuk; Ko, Wonmin; Kim, Kyoung-Su; Sohn, Jae Hak; Kang, Myeong-Suk; Ahn, Jong Seog; Kim, Youn-Chul; Oh, Hyuncheol

    2013-01-01

    Protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B) plays a major role in the negative regulation of insulin signaling, and is thus considered as an attractive therapeutic target for the treatment of diabetes. Bioassay-guided investigation of the methylethylketone extract of marine-derived fungus Penicillium sp. JF-55 cultures afforded a new PTP1B inhibitory styrylpyrone-type metabolite named penstyrylpyrone (1), and two known metabolites, anhydrofulvic acid (2) and citromycetin (3). Compounds 1 and 2 inhibited PTP1B activity in a dose-dependent manner, and kinetic analyses of PTP1B inhibition suggested that these compounds inhibited PTP1B activity in a competitive manner. In an effort to gain more biological potential of the isolated compounds, the anti-inflammatory effects of compounds 1–3 were also evaluated. Among the tested compounds, only compound 1 inhibited the production of NO and PGE2, due to the inhibition of the expression of iNOS and COX-2. Penstyrylpyrone (1) also reduced TNF-α and IL-1β production, and these anti-inflammatory effects were shown to be correlated with the suppression of the phosphorylation and degradation of IκB-α, NF-κB nuclear translocation, and NF-κB DNA binding activity. In addition, using inhibitor tin protoporphyrin (SnPP), an inhibitor of HO-1, it was verified that the inhibitory effects of penstyrylpyrone (1) on the pro-inflammatory mediators and NF-κB DNA binding activity were associated with the HO-1 expression. Therefore, these results suggest that penstyrylpyrone (1) suppresses PTP1B activity, as well as the production of pro-inflammatory mediators via NF-κB pathway, through expression of anti-inflammatory HO-1. PMID:23612372

  2. PTP1B Inhibitory and Anti-Inflammatory Effects of Secondary Metabolites Isolated from the Marine-Derived Fungus Penicillium sp. JF-55

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Youn-Chul Kim

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B plays a major role in the negative regulation of insulin signaling, and is thus considered as an attractive therapeutic target for the treatment of diabetes. Bioassay-guided investigation of the methylethylketone extract of marine-derived fungus Penicillium sp. JF-55 cultures afforded a new PTP1B inhibitory styrylpyrone-type metabolite named penstyrylpyrone (1, and two known metabolites, anhydrofulvic acid (2 and citromycetin (3. Compounds 1 and 2 inhibited PTP1B activity in a dose-dependent manner, and kinetic analyses of PTP1B inhibition suggested that these compounds inhibited PTP1B activity in a competitive manner. In an effort to gain more biological potential of the isolated compounds, the anti-inflammatory effects of compounds 1–3 were also evaluated. Among the tested compounds, only compound 1 inhibited the production of NO and PGE2, due to the inhibition of the expression of iNOS and COX-2. Penstyrylpyrone (1 also reduced TNF-α and IL-1β production, and these anti-inflammatory effects were shown to be correlated with the suppression of the phosphorylation and degradation of IκB-α, NF-κB nuclear translocation, and NF-κB DNA binding activity. In addition, using inhibitor tin protoporphyrin (SnPP, an inhibitor of HO-1, it was verified that the inhibitory effects of penstyrylpyrone (1 on the pro-inflammatory mediators and NF-κB DNA binding activity were associated with the HO-1 expression. Therefore, these results suggest that penstyrylpyrone (1 suppresses PTP1B activity, as well as the production of pro-inflammatory mediators via NF-κB pathway, through expression of anti-inflammatory HO-1.

  3. Postprandial changes in plasma acylcarnitine concentrations as markers of fatty acid flux in overweight and obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos-Roman, Maria A; Sweetman, Lawrence; Valdez, Maressa J; Parks, Elizabeth J

    2012-02-01

    This study determined whether reductions in postprandial plasma nonesterified fatty acid (FFA) flux would lead to reductions in plasma acylcarnitine (AC) concentrations. Plasma AC was measured by liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry in the fasting state and over 6 hours after a high-fat (50% energy) meal was fed to 16 overweight and obese subjects with a wide range of insulin sensitivities. Body composition was measured by dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry; insulin sensitivity by insulin-modified, frequently sampled intravenous glucose tolerance test; substrate oxidation by indirect calorimetry; blood metabolite and hormone concentrations biochemically; and fatty acid flux by using stable isotope tracers. Lean body mass and fasting fat oxidation correlated positively (r > 0.522, P 0.515, P Conditions that impact fatty acid flux contribute to the control of postprandial plasma AC concentrations. These data underscore the need for a better understanding of postprandial fatty acid oxidation and dietary fat delivery in the setting of adipose insulin resistance to determine how postprandial lipemia contributes to chronic disease risk. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Simvastatin (SV) metabolites in mouse tissues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duncan, C.A.; Vickers, S.

    1990-01-01

    SV, a semisynthetic analog of lovastatin, is hydrolyzed in vivo to its hydroxy acid (SVA), a potent inhibitor of HMG CoA reductase (HR). Thus SV lowers plasma cholesterol. SV is a substrate for mixed function oxidases whereas SVA undergoes lactonization and β-oxidation. Male CD-1 mice were dosed orally with a combination of ( 14 C)SV and ( 3 H)SVA at 25 mg/kg of each, bled and killed at 0.5, 2 and 4 hours. Labeled SV, SVA, 6'exomethylene SV (I), 6'CH 2 OH-SV (II), 6'COOH-SV (III) and a β-oxidized metabolite (IV) were assayed in liver, bile, kidneys, testes and plasma by RIDA. Levels of potential and active HR inhibitors in liver were 10 to 40 fold higher than in other tissues. II and III, in which the configuration at 6' is inverted, may be 2 metabolites of I. Metabolites I-III are inhibitors of HR in their hydroxy acid forms. Qualitatively ( 14 C)SV and ( 3 H)SVA were metabolized similarly (consistent with their proposed interconversion). However 3 H-SVA, I-III (including hydroxy acid forms) achieved higher concentrations than corresponding 14 C compounds (except in gall bladder bile). Major radioactive metabolites in liver were II-IV (including hydroxy acid forms). These metabolites have also been reported in rat tissues. In bile a large fraction of either label was unidentified polar metabolites. The presence of IV indicated that mice (like rats) are not good models for SV metabolism in man

  5. Drug repositioning for enzyme modulator based on human metabolite-likeness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yoon Hyeok; Choi, Hojae; Park, Seongyong; Lee, Boah; Yi, Gwan-Su

    2017-05-31

    Recently, the metabolite-likeness of the drug space has emerged and has opened a new possibility for exploring human metabolite-like candidates in drug discovery. However, the applicability of metabolite-likeness in drug discovery has been largely unexplored. Moreover, there are no reports on its applications for the repositioning of drugs to possible enzyme modulators, although enzyme-drug relations could be directly inferred from the similarity relationships between enzyme's metabolites and drugs. We constructed a drug-metabolite structural similarity matrix, which contains 1,861 FDA-approved drugs and 1,110 human intermediary metabolites scored with the Tanimoto similarity. To verify the metabolite-likeness measure for drug repositioning, we analyzed 17 known antimetabolite drugs that resemble the innate metabolites of their eleven target enzymes as the gold standard positives. Highly scored drugs were selected as possible modulators of enzymes for their corresponding metabolites. Then, we assessed the performance of metabolite-likeness with a receiver operating characteristic analysis and compared it with other drug-target prediction methods. We set the similarity threshold for drug repositioning candidates of new enzyme modulators based on maximization of the Youden's index. We also carried out literature surveys for supporting the drug repositioning results based on the metabolite-likeness. In this paper, we applied metabolite-likeness to repurpose FDA-approved drugs to disease-associated enzyme modulators that resemble human innate metabolites. All antimetabolite drugs were mapped with their known 11 target enzymes with statistically significant similarity values to the corresponding metabolites. The comparison with other drug-target prediction methods showed the higher performance of metabolite-likeness for predicting enzyme modulators. After that, the drugs scored higher than similarity score of 0.654 were selected as possible modulators of enzymes for

  6. Hydrocortisone selectively inhibits IgE-dependent arachidonic acid release from rat peritoneal mast cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heiman, A.S.; Crews, F.T.

    1984-01-01

    Purified rat mst cells were used to study the effects of antiinflammatory steroids on the release of [1-14C]-arachidonic acid ([1-14C]AA) and metabolites. Mast cell were incubated overnight with glucocorticoids, [1-14C]AA incorporated into cellular phospholipids and the release of [1-14C]AA, and metabolites determined using a variety of secretagogues. Release of [1-14C]AA and metabolites by concanavalin A, the antigen ovalbumin and anti-immunoglobulin E antibody was markedly reduced by glucocorticoid treatment. Neither the total incorporation of [1-14C]AA nor the distribution into phospholipids was altered by hydrocortisone pretreatment. Glucocorticoid pretreatment did not alter [1-14C]AA release stimulated by somatostatin, compound 48/80, or the calcium ionophore, A23187. These data indicate that antiinflammatory steroids selectively inhibit immunoglobulin dependent release of arachidonic acid from rat mast cells. These findings question the role of lipomodulin and macrocortin as general phospholipase inhibitors and suggest that they may be restricted to immunoglobulin stimuli

  7. Metabolites of cannabidiol identified in human urine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harvey, D J; Mechoulam, R

    1990-03-01

    1. Urine from a dystonic patient treated with cannabidiol (CBD) was examined by g.l.c.-mass spectrometry for CBD metabolites. Metabolites were identified as their trimethylsilyl (TMS), [2H9]TMS, and methyl ester/TMS derivatives and as the TMS derivatives of the product of lithium aluminium deuteride reduction. 2. Thirty-three metabolites were identified in addition to unmetabolized CBD, and a further four metabolites were partially characterized. 3. The major metabolic route was hydroxylation and oxidation at C-7 followed by further hydroxylation in the pentyl and propenyl groups to give 1"-, 2"-, 3"-, 4"- and 10-hydroxy derivatives of CBD-7-oic acid. Other metabolites, mainly acids, were formed by beta-oxidation and related biotransformations from the pentyl side-chain and these were also hydroxylated at C-6 or C-7. The major oxidized metabolite was CBD-7-oic acid containing a hydroxyethyl side-chain. 4. Two 8,9-dihydroxy compounds, presumably derived from the corresponding epoxide were identified. 5. Also present were several cyclized cannabinoids including delta-6- and delta-1-tetrahydrocannabinol and cannabinol. 6. This is the first metabolic study of CBD in humans; most observed metabolic routes were typical of those found for CBD and related cannabinoids in other species.

  8. Pulsed neural networks consisting of single-flux-quantum spiking neurons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirose, T.; Asai, T.; Amemiya, Y.

    2007-01-01

    An inhibitory pulsed neural network was developed for brain-like information processing, by using single-flux-quantum (SFQ) circuits. It consists of spiking neuron devices that are coupled to each other through all-to-all inhibitory connections. The network selects neural activity. The operation of the neural network was confirmed by computer simulation. SFQ neuron devices can imitate the operation of the inhibition phenomenon of neural networks

  9. Metabolic flux analysis of the phenylpropanoid pathway in wound-healing potato tuber tissue using stable isotope-labeled tracer and LC-MS spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsuda, Fumio; Morino, Keiko; Miyashita, Masahiro; Miyagawa, Hisashi [Kyoto Univ. (Japan). Department of Agriculture

    2003-05-01

    The metabolic flux of two phenylpropanoid metabolites, N-p-coumaroyloctopamine (p-CO) and chlorogenic acid (CGA), in the wound-healing potato tuber tissue was quantitatively analyzed by a newly developed method based upon the tracer experiment using stable isotope-labeled compounds and LC-MS. Tuber disks were treated with aqueous solution of L-phenyl-d{sub 5}-alanine, and the change in the ratio of stable isotope-labeled compound to non-labeled (isotope abundance) was monitored for p-CO and CGA in the tissue extract by LC-MS. The time-dependent change in the isotope abundance of each metabolite was fitted to an equation that was derived from the formation and conversion kinetics of each compound. Good correlations were obtained between the observed and calculated isotope abundances for both p-CO and CGA. The rates of p-CO formation and conversion (i.e. fluxes) were 1.15 and 0.96 nmol (g FW){sup -1}h{sup -1}, respectively, and for CGA, the rates 4.63 and 0.42 nmol (g FW){sup -1}h{sup -1}, respectively. This analysis enabled a direct comparison of the biosynthetic activity between these two compounds. (author)

  10. Modeling Lactococcus lactis using a genome-scale flux model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nielsen Jens

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Genome-scale flux models are useful tools to represent and analyze microbial metabolism. In this work we reconstructed the metabolic network of the lactic acid bacteria Lactococcus lactis and developed a genome-scale flux model able to simulate and analyze network capabilities and whole-cell function under aerobic and anaerobic continuous cultures. Flux balance analysis (FBA and minimization of metabolic adjustment (MOMA were used as modeling frameworks. Results The metabolic network was reconstructed using the annotated genome sequence from L. lactis ssp. lactis IL1403 together with physiological and biochemical information. The established network comprised a total of 621 reactions and 509 metabolites, representing the overall metabolism of L. lactis. Experimental data reported in the literature was used to fit the model to phenotypic observations. Regulatory constraints had to be included to simulate certain metabolic features, such as the shift from homo to heterolactic fermentation. A minimal medium for in silico growth was identified, indicating the requirement of four amino acids in addition to a sugar. Remarkably, de novo biosynthesis of four other amino acids was observed even when all amino acids were supplied, which is in good agreement with experimental observations. Additionally, enhanced metabolic engineering strategies for improved diacetyl producing strains were designed. Conclusion The L. lactis metabolic network can now be used for a better understanding of lactococcal metabolic capabilities and potential, for the design of enhanced metabolic engineering strategies and for integration with other types of 'omic' data, to assist in finding new information on cellular organization and function.

  11. Harmane inhibits serotonergic dorsal raphe neurons in the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Touiki, Khalid; Rat, Pascal; Molimard, Robert; Chait, Abderrahman; de Beaurepaire, Renaud

    2005-11-01

    Harmane and norharmane (two beta-carbolines) are tobacco components or products. The effects of harmane and norharmane on serotonergic raphe neurons remain unknown. Harmane and norharmane are inhibitors of the monoamine oxidases A (MAO-A) and B (MAO-B), respectively. To study the effects of harmane, norharmane, befloxatone (MAOI-A), and selegiline (MAOI-B) on the firing of serotonergic neurons. To compare the effects of these compounds to those of nicotine (whose inhibitory action on serotonergic neurons has been previously described). The effects of cotinine, a metabolite of nicotine known to interact with serotonergic systems, are also tested. In vivo electrophysiological recordings of serotonergic dorsal raphe neurons in the anaesthetized rat. Nicotine, harmane, and befloxatone inhibited serotonergic dorsal raphe neurons. The other compounds had no effects. The inhibitory effect of harmane (rapid and long-lasting inhibition) differed from that of nicotine (short and rapidly reversed inhibition) and from that of befloxatone (slow, progressive, and long-lasting inhibition). The inhibitory effects of harmane and befloxatone were reversed by the 5-HT1A antagonist WAY 100 635. Pretreatment of animals with p-chlorophenylalanine abolished the inhibitory effect of befloxatone, but not that of harmane. Nicotine, harmane, and befloxatone inhibit the activity of raphe serotonergic neurons. Therefore, at least two tobacco compounds, nicotine and harmane, inhibit the activity of serotonergic neurons. The mechanism by which harmane inhibits serotonergic dorsal raphe neurons is likely unrelated to a MAO-A inhibitory effect.

  12. Prostacyclin production in rabbit arteries in situ: inhibition by arachidonic acid-induced endothelial cell damage or by low-dose aspirin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingerman-Wojenski, C; Silver, M J; Smith, J B; Nissenbaum, M; Sedar, A W

    1981-04-01

    The central artery of the rabbit ear was perfused in situ and effluent fractions from the artery were assayed for 6-keto-prostaglandin F1 alpha (6-K-PGF1 alpha) and thromboxane B2 (TxB2), the stable metabolites of prostacyclin (PGI2) and TxA2, using specific radioimmunoassays. These metabolites of arachidonic acid (AA) were not detected in the effluent during infusion of Tyrode's solution but both metabolites were detected when small amounts of AA were infused into the artery. Examination of the arteries by scanning electron microscopy revealed that high concentrations of AA which caused a short burst of 6-K-PGF1 alpha and TxB2 production damaged the endothelial cells while lower concentrations which stimulated continuous production did not cause damage. When a non-damaging concentration of AA was infused into an artery that had previously received a damaging concentration, PG production was greatly reduced. Pretreatment of the rabbits with 4 mg/kg acetyl-salicylic acid (ASA) inhibited 6-K-PGF1 alpha production by the rabbit ear artery in response to AA and 70% inhibition was still evident 18 hours after ASA.

  13. Morphine metabolites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christrup, Lona Louring

    1997-01-01

    , morphine-3-glucuronide (M3G) and morphine-6-glucuronide (M6G) are the major metabolites of morphine. The metabolism of morphine occurs not only in the liver, but may also take place in the brain and the kidneys. The glucuronides are mainly eliminated via bile and urine. Glucuronides as a rule...... are considered as highly polar metabolites unable to cross the blood-brain barrier. Although morphine glucuronidation has been demonstrated in human brain tissue, the capacity is very low compared to that of the liver, indicating that the M3G and M6G concentrations observed in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) after...... systemic administration reflect hepatic metabolism of morphine and that the morphine glucuronides, despite their high polarity, can penetrate into the brain. Like morphine, M6G has been shown to be relatively more selective for mu-receptors than for delta- and kappa-receptors while M3G does not appear...

  14. Dynamic flux balancing elucidates NAD(P)H production as limiting response to furfural inhibition in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pornkamol, Unrean; Franzen, Carl J

    2015-08-01

    Achieving efficient and economical lignocellulose-based bioprocess requires a robust organism tolerant to furfural, a major inhibitory compound present in lignocellulosic hydrolysate. The aim of this study was to develop a model that could generate quantitative descriptions of cell metabolism for elucidating the cell's adaptive response to furfural. Such a modelling tool could provide strategies for the design of more robust cells. A dynamic flux balance (dFBA) model of Saccharomyces cerevisiae was created by coupling a kinetic fermentation model with a previously published genome-scale stoichiometric model. The dFBA model was used for studying intracellular and extracellular flux responses to furfural perturbations under steady state and dynamic conditions. The predicted effects of furfural on dynamic flux profiles agreed well with previously published experimental results. The model showed that the yeast cell adjusts its metabolism in response to furfural challenge by increasing fluxes through the pentose phosphate pathway, TCA cycle, and proline and serine biosynthesis in order to meet the high demand of NAD(P)H cofactors. The model described here can be used to aid in systematic optimization of the yeast, as well as of the fermentation process, for efficient lignocellulosic ethanol production. Copyright © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  15. Human metabolites of synthetic cannabinoids JWH-018 and JWH-073 bind with high affinity and act as potent agonists at cannabinoid type-2 receptors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rajasekaran, Maheswari; Brents, Lisa K.; Franks, Lirit N. [Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Little Rock, AR 72205 (United States); Moran, Jeffery H. [Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Little Rock, AR 72205 (United States); Arkansas Department of Public Health, Public Health Laboratory, Little Rock, AR 72205 (United States); Prather, Paul L., E-mail: pratherpaull@uams.edu [Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Little Rock, AR 72205 (United States)

    2013-06-01

    K2 or Spice is an emerging drug of abuse that contains synthetic cannabinoids, including JWH-018 and JWH-073. Recent reports indicate that monohydroxylated metabolites of JWH-018 and JWH-073 retain high affinity and activity at cannabinoid type-1 receptors (CB{sub 1}Rs), potentially contributing to the enhanced toxicity of K2 compared to marijuana. Since the parent compounds also bind to cannabinoid type-2 receptors (CB{sub 2}Rs), this study investigated the affinity and intrinsic activity of JWH-018, JWH-073 and several monohydroxylated metabolites at human CB{sub 2}Rs (hCB{sub 2}Rs). The affinity of cannabinoids for hCB{sub 2}Rs was determined by competition binding studies employing CHO-hCB{sub 2} membranes. Intrinsic activity of compounds was assessed by G-protein activation and adenylyl cyclase (AC)-inhibition in CHO-hCB{sub 2} cells. JWH-073, JWH-018 and several of their human metabolites exhibit nanomolar affinity and act as potent agonists at hCB{sub 2}Rs. Furthermore, a major omega hydroxyl metabolite of JWH-073 (JWH-073-M5) binds to CB{sub 2}Rs with 10-fold less affinity than the parent molecule, but unexpectedly, is equipotent in regulating AC-activity when compared to the parent molecule. Finally, when compared to CP-55,940 and Δ{sup 9}-tetrahydrocannabinol (Δ{sup 9}-THC), JWH-018, JWH-018-M5 and JWH-073-M5 require significantly less CB{sub 2}R occupancy to produce similar levels of AC-inhibition, indicating that these compounds may more efficiently couple CB{sub 2}Rs to AC than the well characterized cannabinoid agonists examined. These results indicate that JWH-018, JWH-073 and several major human metabolites of these compounds exhibit high affinity and demonstrate distinctive signaling properties at CB{sub 2}Rs. Therefore, future studies examining pharmacological and toxicological properties of synthetic cannabinoids present in K2 products should consider potential actions of these drugs at both CB{sub 1} and CB{sub 2}Rs. - Highlights: • JWH-018

  16. Quantitative Metabolomics and Instationary 13C-Metabolic Flux Analysis Reveals Impact of Recombinant Protein Production on Trehalose and Energy Metabolism in Pichia pastoris

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joel Jordà

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Pichia pastoris has been recognized as an effective host for recombinant protein production. In this work, we combine metabolomics and instationary 13C metabolic flux analysis (INST 13C-MFA using GC-MS and LC-MS/MS to evaluate the potential impact of the production of a Rhizopus oryzae lipase (Rol on P. pastoris central carbon metabolism. Higher oxygen uptake and CO2 production rates and slightly reduced biomass yield suggest an increased energy demand for the producing strain. This observation is further confirmed by 13C-based metabolic flux analysis. In particular, the flux through the methanol oxidation pathway and the TCA cycle was increased in the Rol-producing strain compared to the reference strain. Next to changes in the flux distribution, significant variations in intracellular metabolite concentrations were observed. Most notably, the pools of trehalose, which is related to cellular stress response, and xylose, which is linked to methanol assimilation, were significantly increased in the recombinant strain.

  17. Swelling and eicosanoid metabolites differentially gate TRPV4 channels in retinal neurons and glia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ryskamp, Daniel A; Jo, Andrew O; Frye, Amber M

    2014-01-01

    that were inhibited by TRPV4 antagonists and absent in TRPV4(-/-) Müller cells. Glial TRPV4 signals were phospholipase A2- and cytochrome P450-dependent, characterized by slow-onset and Ca(2+) waves, and, in excess, were sufficient to induce reactive gliosis. In contrast, neurons responded to TRPV4 agonists...... and swelling with fast, inactivating Ca(2+) signals that were independent of phospholipase A2. Our results support a model whereby swelling and proinflammatory signals associated with arachidonic acid metabolites differentially gate TRPV4 in retinal neurons and glia, with potentially significant consequences...

  18. (1) H-MRS processing parameters affect metabolite quantification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bhogal, Alex A; Schür, Remmelt R; Houtepen, Lotte C

    2017-01-01

    investigated the influence of model parameters and spectral quantification software on fitted metabolite concentration values. Sixty spectra in 30 individuals (repeated measures) were acquired using a 7-T MRI scanner. Data were processed by four independent research groups with the freedom to choose their own...... + NAAG/Cr + PCr and Glu/Cr + PCr, respectively. Metabolite quantification using identical (1) H-MRS data was influenced by processing parameters, basis sets and software choice. Locally preferred processing choices affected metabolite quantification, even when using identical software. Our results......Proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy ((1) H-MRS) can be used to quantify in vivo metabolite levels, such as lactate, γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and glutamate (Glu). However, there are considerable analysis choices which can alter the accuracy or precision of (1) H-MRS metabolite quantification...

  19. Expanding a dynamic flux balance model of yeast fermentation to genome-scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background Yeast is considered to be a workhorse of the biotechnology industry for the production of many value-added chemicals, alcoholic beverages and biofuels. Optimization of the fermentation is a challenging task that greatly benefits from dynamic models able to accurately describe and predict the fermentation profile and resulting products under different genetic and environmental conditions. In this article, we developed and validated a genome-scale dynamic flux balance model, using experimentally determined kinetic constraints. Results Appropriate equations for maintenance, biomass composition, anaerobic metabolism and nutrient uptake are key to improve model performance, especially for predicting glycerol and ethanol synthesis. Prediction profiles of synthesis and consumption of the main metabolites involved in alcoholic fermentation closely agreed with experimental data obtained from numerous lab and industrial fermentations under different environmental conditions. Finally, fermentation simulations of genetically engineered yeasts closely reproduced previously reported experimental results regarding final concentrations of the main fermentation products such as ethanol and glycerol. Conclusion A useful tool to describe, understand and predict metabolite production in batch yeast cultures was developed. The resulting model, if used wisely, could help to search for new metabolic engineering strategies to manage ethanol content in batch fermentations. PMID:21595919

  20. Metabolism of trans, trans-muconaldehyde, a cytotoxic metabolite of benzene, in mouse liver by alcohol dehydrogenase Adh1 and aldehyde reductase AKR1A4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Short, Duncan M.; Lyon, Robert; Watson, David G.; Barski, Oleg A.; McGarvie, Gail; Ellis, Elizabeth M.

    2006-01-01

    The reductive metabolism of trans, trans-muconaldehyde, a cytotoxic metabolite of benzene, was studied in mouse liver. Using an HPLC-based stopped assay, the primary reduced metabolite was identified as 6-hydroxy-trans, trans-2,4-hexadienal (OH/CHO) and the secondary metabolite as 1,6-dihydroxy-trans, trans-2,4-hexadiene (OH/OH). The main enzymes responsible for the highest levels of reductase activity towards trans, trans-muconaldehyde were purified from mouse liver soluble fraction first by Q-sepharose chromatography followed by either blue or red dye affinity chromatography. In mouse liver, trans, trans-muconaldehyde is predominantly reduced by an NADH-dependent enzyme, which was identified as alcohol dehydrogenase (Adh1). Kinetic constants obtained for trans, trans-muconaldehyde with the native Adh1 enzyme showed a V max of 2141 ± 500 nmol/min/mg and a K m of 11 ± 4 μM. This enzyme was inhibited by pyrazole with a K I of 3.1 ± 0.57 μM. Other fractions were found to contain muconaldehyde reductase activity independent of Adh1, and one enzyme was identified as the NADPH-dependent aldehyde reductase AKR1A4. This showed a V max of 115 nmol/min/mg and a K m of 15 ± 2 μM and was not inhibited by pyrazole

  1. Effect of different in vitro culture extracts of black pepper (Piper nigrum L.) on toxic metabolites-producing strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Nisar; Abbasi, Bilal Haider; Fazal, Hina

    2016-03-01

    In the present study, the effect of different in vitro cultures (callus, in vitro shoots) and commercially available peppercorn extract was investigated for its activity against toxic metabolite-producing strains (Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeroginosa, Salmonella typhi, Bacillus subtilis, Bacillus cereus, Staphylococcus aureus, and Candida albicans). These in vitro cultures were extracted with ethanol, hexane, and chloroform, and the antipathogenic activity was determined by well-diffusion method. Hexane extract of callus showed 22 mm zone of inhibition against B. cereus, 23 mm against S. aureus, while regenerated shoots and seeds have shown 24.3 and 26 mm zones of inhibition. The ethanolic extracts of regenerated Piper shoots have shown 25 mm activity against S. aureus, 21 mm against B. cereus, and 16 mm in the case of C. albicans in comparison with standard antibiotics. Peppercorn extracts in chloroform and ethanol had shown activities against B. cereus (23.6 mm) and B. subtilis (23.5 mm). During in vitro organogenesis and morphogenesis, cells and tissues produced a comparable phytochemicals profile like mother plant. Morphogenesis is critically controlled by the application of exogenous plant-growth regulators. Such addition alters the hormonal transduction pathways, and cells under in vitro conditions regenerate tissues, which are dependant on the physiological state of cells, and finally enhance the production of secondary metabolites. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report to compare the antimicrobial potential of in vitro regenerated tissues and peppercorn with standard antibiotics. In conclusion, most of the extracts showed pronounced activities against all the pathogenic microbes. This is a preliminary work, and the minimum inhibitory concentration values needs to be further explored. Regenerated tissues of P. nigrum are a good source of biologically active metabolites for antimicrobial activities, and callus culture presented itself as

  2. Estimation of dynamic flux profiles from metabolic time series data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chou I-Chun

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Advances in modern high-throughput techniques of molecular biology have enabled top-down approaches for the estimation of parameter values in metabolic systems, based on time series data. Special among them is the recent method of dynamic flux estimation (DFE, which uses such data not only for parameter estimation but also for the identification of functional forms of the processes governing a metabolic system. DFE furthermore provides diagnostic tools for the evaluation of model validity and of the quality of a model fit beyond residual errors. Unfortunately, DFE works only when the data are more or less complete and the system contains as many independent fluxes as metabolites. These drawbacks may be ameliorated with other types of estimation and information. However, such supplementations incur their own limitations. In particular, assumptions must be made regarding the functional forms of some processes and detailed kinetic information must be available, in addition to the time series data. Results The authors propose here a systematic approach that supplements DFE and overcomes some of its shortcomings. Like DFE, the approach is model-free and requires only minimal assumptions. If sufficient time series data are available, the approach allows the determination of a subset of fluxes that enables the subsequent applicability of DFE to the rest of the flux system. The authors demonstrate the procedure with three artificial pathway systems exhibiting distinct characteristics and with actual data of the trehalose pathway in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Conclusions The results demonstrate that the proposed method successfully complements DFE under various situations and without a priori assumptions regarding the model representation. The proposed method also permits an examination of whether at all, to what degree, or within what range the available time series data can be validly represented in a particular functional format of

  3. Repaglinide-gemfibrozil drug interaction: inhibition of repaglinide glucuronidation as a potential additional contributing mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gan, Jinping; Chen, Weiqi; Shen, Hong; Gao, Ling; Hong, Yang; Tian, Yuan; Li, Wenying; Zhang, Yueping; Tang, Yuwei; Zhang, Hongjian; Humphreys, William Griffith; Rodrigues, A David

    2010-12-01

    To further explore the mechanism underlying the interaction between repaglinide and gemfibrozil, alone or in combination with itraconazole. Repaglinide metabolism was assessed in vitro (human liver subcellular fractions, fresh human hepatocytes, and recombinant enzymes) and the resulting incubates were analyzed, by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) and radioactivity counting, to identify and quantify the different metabolites therein. Chemical inhibitors, in addition to a trapping agent, were also employed to elucidate the importance of each metabolic pathway. Finally, a panel of human liver microsomes (genotyped for UGT1A1*28 allele status) was used to determine the importance of UGT1A1 in the direct glucuronidation of repaglinide. The results of the present study demonstrate that repaglinide can undergo direct glucuronidation, a pathway that can possibly contribute to the interaction with gemfibrozil. For example, [³H]-repaglinide formed glucuronide and oxidative metabolites (M2 and M4) when incubated with primary human hepatocytes. Gemfibrozil effectively inhibited (∼78%) both glucuronide and M4 formation, but had a minor effect on M2 formation. Concomitantly, the overall turnover of repaglinide was also inhibited (∼80%), and was completely abolished when gemfibrozil was co-incubated with itraconazole. These observations are in qualitative agreement with the in vivo findings. UGT1A1 plays a significant role in the glucuronidation of repaglinide. In addition, gemfibrozil and its glucuronide inhibit repaglinide glucuronidation and the inhibition by gemfibrozil glucuronide is time-dependent. Inhibition of UGT enzymes, especially UGT1A1, by gemfibrozil and its glucuronide is an additional mechanism to consider when rationalizing the interaction between repaglinide and gemfibrozil. © 2010 The Authors. British Journal of Clinical Pharmacology © 2010 The British Pharmacological Society.

  4. Growth and Accumulation of Secondary Metabolites in Perilla as Affected by Photosynthetic Photon Flux Density and Electrical Conductivity of the Nutrient Solution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Na Lu

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The global demand for medicinal plants is increasing. The quality of plants grown outdoors, however, is difficult to control. Myriad environmental factors influence plant growth and directly impact biosynthetic pathways, thus affecting the secondary metabolism of bioactive compounds. Plant factories use artificial lighting to increase the quality of medicinal plants and stabilize production. Photosynthetic photon flux density (PPFD and electrical conductivity (EC of nutrient solutions are two important factors that substantially influence perilla (Perilla frutescens, Labiatae plant growth and quality. To identify suitable levels of PPFD and EC for perilla plants grown in a plant factory, the growth, photosynthesis, and accumulation of secondary metabolites in red and green perilla plants were measured at PPFD values of 100, 200, and 300 μmol m-2 s-1 in nutrient solutions with EC values of 1.0, 2.0, and 3.0 dS m-1. The results showed significant interactive effects between PPFD and EC for both the fresh and dry weights of green perilla, but not for red perilla. The fresh and dry weights of shoots and leafy areas were affected more by EC than by PPFD in green perilla, whereas they were affected more by PPFD than by EC in red perilla. Leaf net photosynthetic rates were increased as PPFD increased in both perilla varieties, regardless of EC. The perillaldehyde concentration (mg g-1 in red perilla was unaffected by the treatments, but accumulation in plants (mg per plant was significantly enhanced as the weight of dry leaves increased. Perillaldehyde concentrations in green perilla showed significant differences between combinations of the highest PPFD with the highest EC and the lowest PPFD with the lowest EC. Rosmarinic acid concentration (mg g-1 was increased in a combination of low EC and high PPFD conditions. Optimal cultivation conditions of red and green perilla in plant factory will be discussed in terms of plant growth and contents of

  5. A Decade in the MIST: Learnings from Investigations of Drug Metabolites in Drug Development under the "Metabolites in Safety Testing" Regulatory Guidance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schadt, Simone; Bister, Bojan; Chowdhury, Swapan K; Funk, Christoph; Hop, Cornelis E C A; Humphreys, W Griffith; Igarashi, Fumihiko; James, Alexander D; Kagan, Mark; Khojasteh, S Cyrus; Nedderman, Angus N R; Prakash, Chandra; Runge, Frank; Scheible, Holger; Spracklin, Douglas K; Swart, Piet; Tse, Susanna; Yuan, Josh; Obach, R Scott

    2018-06-01

    Since the introduction of metabolites in safety testing (MIST) guidance by the Food and Drug Administration in 2008, major changes have occurred in the experimental methods for the identification and quantification of metabolites, ways to evaluate coverage of metabolites, and the timing of critical clinical and nonclinical studies to generate this information. In this cross-industry review, we discuss how the increased focus on human drug metabolites and their potential contribution to safety and drug-drug interactions has influenced the approaches taken by industry for the identification and quantitation of human drug metabolites. Before the MIST guidance was issued, the method of choice for generating comprehensive metabolite profile was radio chromatography. The MIST guidance increased the focus on human drug metabolites and their potential contribution to safety and drug-drug interactions and led to changes in the practices of drug metabolism scientists. In addition, the guidance suggested that human metabolism studies should also be accelerated, which has led to more frequent determination of human metabolite profiles from multiple ascending-dose clinical studies. Generating a comprehensive and quantitative profile of human metabolites has become a more urgent task. Together with technological advances, these events have led to a general shift of focus toward earlier human metabolism studies using high-resolution mass spectrometry and to a reduction in animal radiolabel absorption/distribution/metabolism/excretion studies. The changes induced by the MIST guidance are highlighted by six case studies included herein, reflecting different stages of implementation of the MIST guidance within the pharmaceutical industry. Copyright © 2018 by The American Society for Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics.

  6. Reactive metabolites and antioxidant gene polymorphisms in Type 2 diabetes mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monisha Banerjee

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM, by definition is a heterogeneous, multifactorial, polygenic syndrome which results from insulin receptor dysfunction. It is an outcome of oxidative stress caused by interactions of reactive metabolites (RMs interactions with lipids, proteins and other mechanisms of human body. Production of RMs mainly superoxide (O2·− has been found in a variety of predominating cellular enzyme systems including NAD(PH oxidase, xanthine oxidase (XO, cyclooxygenase (COX, uncoupled endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS and myeloperoxidase (MPO. The four main RM related molecular mechanisms are: increased polyol pathway flux; increased advanced glycation end-product (AGE formation; activation of protein kinase C (PKC isoforms and increased hexosamine pathway flux which have been implicated in glucose-mediated vascular damage. Superoxide dismutase (SOD, catalase (CAT, glutathione peroxidase (GPx, glutathione-S-transferase (GST, nitric oxide synthase (NOS are antioxidant enzymes involved in scavenging RMs in normal individuals. Functional polymorphisms of these antioxidant enzymes have been reported to be involved in pathogenesis of T2DM individuals. The low levels of antioxidant enzymes or their non-functionality results in excessive RMs which initiate stress related pathways thereby leading to insulin resistance and T2DM. An attempt has been made to review the role of RMs and antioxidant enzymes in oxidative stress resulting in T2DM.

  7. Cinnamic acid amides from Tribulus terrestris displaying uncompetitive α-glucosidase inhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Yeong Hun; Kim, Dae Wook; Curtis-Long, Marcus J; Park, Chanin; Son, Minky; Kim, Jeong Yoon; Yuk, Heung Joo; Lee, Keun Woo; Park, Ki Hun

    2016-05-23

    The α-glucosidase inhibitory potential of Tribulus terrestris extracts has been reported but as yet the active ingredients are unknown. This study attempted to isolate the responsible metabolites and elucidate their inhibition mechanism of α-glucosidase. By fractionating T. terristris extracts, three cinnamic acid amide derivatives (1-3) were ascertained to be active components against α-glucosidase. The lead structure, N-trans-coumaroyltyramine 1, showed significant inhibition of α-glucosidase (IC50 = 0.42 μM). Moreover, all active compounds displayed uncompetitive inhibition mechanisms that have rarely been reported for α-glucosidase inhibitors. This kinetic behavior was fully demonstrated by showing a decrease of both Km and Vmax, and Kik/Kiv ratio ranging between 1.029 and 1.053. We progressed to study how chemical modifications to the lead structure 1 may impact inhibition. An α, β-unsaturation carbonyl group and hydroxyl group in A-ring of cinnamic acid amide emerged to be critical functionalities for α-glucosidase inhibition. The molecular modeling study revealed that the inhibitory activities are tightly related to π-π interaction as well as hydrogen bond interaction between enzyme and inhibitors. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  8. GPCR-Mediated Signaling of Metabolites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Husted, Anna Sofie; Trauelsen, Mette; Rudenko, Olga

    2017-01-01

    microbiota target primarily enteroendocrine, neuronal, and immune cells in the lamina propria of the gut mucosa and the liver and, through these tissues, the rest of the body. In contrast, metabolites from the intermediary metabolism act mainly as metabolic stress-induced autocrine and paracrine signals...... and obesity. The concept of key metabolites as ligands for specific GPCRs has broadened our understanding of metabolic signaling significantly and provides a number of novel potential drug targets....

  9. Histamine stimulates chloride secretion in omeprazole-inhibited frog gastric mucosa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McGreevy, J.; Barton, R.; Housinger, T.

    1986-01-01

    Omeprazole (OME) stops hydrogen ion (H) secretion in the histamine (HIST)-stimulated gastric mucosa while the chloride (Cl) which had accompanied the H continues to be pumped into the lumen. This finding suggests that the Cl pump is independent of the H/K ATP-ase driven H pump. To test this hypothesis, 16 Ussing-chambered frog mucosas were exposed to OME prior to HIST stimulation. If the Cl pump is independent, HIST should stimulate Cl secretion in the OME-inhibited mucosa. A 1 hr control (CON) interval preceded exposure to OME (10 -4 M) in the nutrient solution. Potential difference (PD), short-circuit current (Isc), resistance (R), H flux (J/sup H/) and Cl flux (J/sup Cl/ with 36 Cl) were measured every 15 min. After 1 hr of OME exposure, HIST (10 -5 M) was added to the nutrient solution. The findings demonstrate that HIST stimulates Cl secretion in the OME-inhibited bullfrog gastric mucosa

  10. Procaine rapidly inactivates acetylcholine receptors from Torpedo and competes with agonist for inhibition sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forman, S.A.; Miller, K.W.

    1989-01-01

    The relationship between the high-affinity procaine channel inhibition site and the agonist self-inhibition site on acetylcholine receptors (AChRs) from Torpedo electroplaque was investigated by using rapid 86 Rb + quenched-flux assays at 4 degree C in native AChR-rich vesicles on which 50-60% of ACh activation sites were blocked with α-bungarotoxin (α-BTX). In the presence of channel-activating acetylcholine (ACh) concentrations alone, AChR undergoes one phase of inactivation in under a second. Addition of procaine produces two-phase inactivation similar to that seen with self-inhibiting ACh concentrations rapid inactivation complete in 30-75 ms is followed by fast desensitization at the same k d observed without procaine. The dependence of k r on [procaine] is consistent with a bimolecular association between procaine and its AChR site. Inhibition of AChR function by mixtures of procaine plus self-inhibiting concentrations of ACh or suberyldicholine was studied by reducing the level of α-BTX block in vesicles. The data support a mechanism where procaine binds preferentially to the open-channel AChR state, since no procaine-induced inactivation is observed without agonist and k r 's dependence on [ACh] in channel-activating range closely parallels that of 86 Rb + flux response to ACh

  11. Effects of Olive Metabolites on DNA Cleavage Mediated by Human Type II Topoisomerases

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Several naturally occurring dietary polyphenols with chemopreventive or anticancer properties are topoisomerase II poisons. To identify additional phytochemicals that enhance topoisomerase II-mediated DNA cleavage, a library of 341 Mediterranean plant extracts was screened for activity against human topoisomerase IIα. An extract from Phillyrea latifolia L., a member of the olive tree family, displayed high activity against the human enzyme. On the basis of previous metabolomics studies, we identified several polyphenols (hydroxytyrosol, oleuropein, verbascoside, tyrosol, and caffeic acid) as potential candidates for topoisomerase II poisons. Of these, hydroxytyrosol, oleuropein, and verbascoside enhanced topoisomerase II-mediated DNA cleavage. The potency of these olive metabolites increased 10–100-fold in the presence of an oxidant. Hydroxytyrosol, oleuropein, and verbascoside displayed hallmark characteristics of covalent topoisomerase II poisons. (1) The activity of the metabolites was abrogated by a reducing agent. (2) Compounds inhibited topoisomerase II activity when they were incubated with the enzyme prior to the addition of DNA. (3) Compounds were unable to poison a topoisomerase IIα construct that lacked the N-terminal domain. Because hydroxytyrosol, oleuropein, and verbascoside are broadly distributed across the olive family, extracts from the leaves, bark, and fruit of 11 olive tree species were tested for activity against human topoisomerase IIα. Several of the extracts enhanced enzyme-mediated DNA cleavage. Finally, a commercial olive leaf supplement and extra virgin olive oils pressed from a variety of Olea europea subspecies enhanced DNA cleavage mediated by topoisomerase IIα. Thus, olive metabolites appear to act as topoisomerase II poisons in complex formulations intended for human dietary consumption. PMID:26132160

  12. 21 CFR 862.3250 - Cocaine and cocaine metabolite test system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Cocaine and cocaine metabolite test system. 862... Test Systems § 862.3250 Cocaine and cocaine metabolite test system. (a) Identification. A cocaine and cocaine metabolite test system is a device intended to measure cocaine and a cocaine metabolite...

  13. Urinary excretion of androgen metabolites, comparison with excretion of radioactive metabolites after injection of (4-/sup 14/C)testosterone. Influence of age

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deslypere, J P; Sayed, A; Vermeulen, A [Department of Internal Medicine, Section of Endocrinology, State University Academic Hospital, De Pintelaan, 135, Ghent, Belgium; Wiers, P W [Department of Internal Medicine, Section of Pneumology, State University Academic Hospital, The Netherlands

    1981-01-01

    The influence of age on the metabolic pattern of (4-/sup 14/C)testosterone was studied in 20 young and 8 elderly males and compared to the metabolic pattern of endogenous androgens; the latter was also studied in 16 young and 8 elderly women. In both young and elderly males, androsterone and aetiocholanolone glucuronide represent 65% of (4-/sup 14/C)testosterone metabolites: together with their suephoconjugates as well as with 5..cap alpha..- and 5..beta..-androstane-3..cap alpha.., 17..beta..-diol they represent even more than 75% of total urinary metabolites. The 5..cap alpha../5..beta.. ratio of metabolites of (4-/sup 14/C)testosterone was significantly (P<0.01) correlated with the 5..cap alpha../5..beta.. ratio of the metabolites of the endogenous androgens, mainly dehydroepiandrosterone and androstenedione. The 5..cap alpha../5..beta.. ratio of (4-/sup 14/C)testosterone metabolites was generally higher than the ratio of metabolites of endogenous androgens, suggesting that the transformation of T to ring A saturated metabolites occurs at least partially in another compartment than the transformation of DHEA to these metabolites. For both (4-/sup 14/C)testosterone and endogenous androgen metabolites we observed a statistically significant reduction of the 5..cap alpha../5..beta.. ratio with age, a general phenomenon in both males and females. This reduction concern also 11-OH-androst-4-ene-3.17-dione metabolism. Neither sex hormone levels, nor specific binding seems to determine this age dependent shift; neither is there convincing evidence for latent hypothyroisism or liver dysfunction in the elderly. An age associated primary decrease of the 5..cap alpha..-reductase activity seems the most likely explanation.

  14. Atrazine and its metabolites degradation in mineral salts medium and soil using an enrichment culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Anup; Singh, Neera

    2016-03-01

    An atrazine-degrading enrichment culture was used to study degradation of atrazine metabolites viz. hydroxyatrazine, deethylatrazine, and deisopropylatrazine in mineral salts medium. Results suggested that the enrichment culture was able to degrade only hydroxyatrazine, and it was used as the sole source of carbon and nitrogen. Hydroxyatrazine degradation slowed down when sucrose and/or ammonium hydrogen phosphate were supplemented as the additional sources of carbon and nitrogen, respectively. The enrichment culture could degrade high concentrations of atrazine (up to 110 μg/mL) in mineral salts medium, and neutral pH was optimum for atrazine degradation. Further, except in an acidic soil, enrichment culture was able to degrade atrazine in three soil types having different physico-chemical properties. Raising the pH of acidic soil to neutral or alkaline enabled the enrichment culture to degrade atrazine suggesting that acidic pH inhibited atrazine-degrading ability. The study suggested that the enrichment culture can be successfully utilized to achieve complete degradation of atrazine and its persistent metabolite hydroxyatrazine in the contaminated soil and water.

  15. Plant metabolites and nutritional quality of vegetables.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hounsome, N; Hounsome, B; Tomos, D; Edwards-Jones, G

    2008-05-01

    Vegetables are an important part of the human diet and a major source of biologically active substances such as vitamins, dietary fiber, antioxidants, and cholesterol-lowering compounds. Despite a large amount of information on this topic, the nutritional quality of vegetables has not been defined. Historically, the value of many plant nutrients and health-promoting compounds was discovered by trial and error. By the turn of the century, the application of chromatography, mass spectrometry, infrared spectrometry, and nuclear magnetic resonance allowed quantitative and qualitative measurements of a large number of plant metabolites. Approximately 50000 metabolites have been elucidated in plants, and it is predicted that the final number will exceed 200000. Most of them have unknown function. Metabolites such as carbohydrates, organic and amino acids, vitamins, hormones, flavonoids, phenolics, and glucosinolates are essential for plant growth, development, stress adaptation, and defense. Besides the importance for the plant itself, such metabolites determine the nutritional quality of food, color, taste, smell, antioxidative, anticarcinogenic, antihypertension, anti-inflammatory, antimicrobial, immunostimulating, and cholesterol-lowering properties. This review is focused on major plant metabolites that characterize the nutritional quality of vegetables, and methods of their analysis.

  16. β-Orcinol Metabolites from the Lichen Hypotrachyna revoluta

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Panagiota Papadopoulou

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Four new β-orcinol metabolites, hypotrachynic acid (1, deoxystictic acid (2, cryptostictinolide (3 and 8 ́-methylconstictic acid (4 along with the metabolites 8 ́-methylstictic acid (5, 8 ́-methylmenegazziaic acid (6, stictic acid (7, 8 ́-ethylstictic acid (8 and atranorin (9, that have been previously described, were isolated for the first time from the tissue extracts of the lichen Hypotrachyna revoluta (Flörke Hale. The structures of the new metabolites were elucidated on the basis of extensive spectroscopic analyses. Radical scavenging activity (RSA of the metabolites isolated in adequate amounts, was evaluated using luminol chemiluminescence and comparison with Trolox®.

  17. Ketamine Metabolites Enantioselectively Decrease Intracellular D-Serine Concentrations in PC-12 Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nagendra S Singh

    Full Text Available D-Serine is an endogenous NMDA receptor co-agonist that activates synaptic NMDA receptors modulating neuronal networks in the cerebral cortex and plays a key role in long-term potentiation of synaptic transmission. D-serine is associated with NMDA receptor neurotoxicity and neurodegeneration and elevated D-serine concentrations have been associated with Alzheimer's and Parkinsons' diseases and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Previous studies have demonstrated that the ketamine metabolites (rac-dehydronorketamine and (2S,6S-hydroxynorketamine decrease intracellular D-serine concentrations in a concentration dependent manner in PC-12 cells. In the current study, PC-12 cells were incubated with a series of ketamine metabolites and the IC50 values associated with attenuated intracellular D-serine concentrations were determined. The results demonstrate that structural and stereochemical features of the studied compounds contribute to the magnitude of the inhibitory effect with (2S,6S-hydroxynorketamine and (2R,6R-hydroxynorketamine displaying the most potent inhibition with IC50 values of 0.18 ± 0.04 nM and 0.68 ± 0.09 nM. The data was utilized to construct a preliminary 3D-QSAR/pharmacophore model for use in the design of new and more efficient modulators of D-serine.

  18. Analysis of Intracellular Metabolites from Microorganisms: Quenching and Extraction Protocols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinu, Farhana R; Villas-Boas, Silas G; Aggio, Raphael

    2017-10-23

    Sample preparation is one of the most important steps in metabolome analysis. The challenges of determining microbial metabolome have been well discussed within the research community and many improvements have already been achieved in last decade. The analysis of intracellular metabolites is particularly challenging. Environmental perturbations may considerably affect microbial metabolism, which results in intracellular metabolites being rapidly degraded or metabolized by enzymatic reactions. Therefore, quenching or the complete stop of cell metabolism is a pre-requisite for accurate intracellular metabolite analysis. After quenching, metabolites need to be extracted from the intracellular compartment. The choice of the most suitable metabolite extraction method/s is another crucial step. The literature indicates that specific classes of metabolites are better extracted by different extraction protocols. In this review, we discuss the technical aspects and advancements of quenching and extraction of intracellular metabolite analysis from microbial cells.

  19. Detecting beer intake by unique metabolite patterns

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gürdeniz, Gözde; Jensen, Morten Georg; Meier, Sebastian

    2016-01-01

    Evaluation of health related effects of beer intake is hampered by the lack of accurate tools for assessing intakes (biomarkers). Therefore, we identified plasma and urine metabolites associated with recent beer intake by untargeted metabolomics and established a characteristic metabolite pattern...... representing raw materials and beer production as a qualitative biomarker of beer intake. In a randomized, crossover, single-blinded meal study (MSt1) 18 participants were given one at a time four different test beverages: strong, regular and non-alcoholic beers and a soft drink. Four participants were...... assigned to have two additional beers (MSt2). In addition to plasma and urine samples, test beverages, wort and hops extract were analyzed by UPLC-QTOF. A unique metabolite pattern reflecting beer metabolome, including metabolites derived from beer raw material (i.e. N-methyl tyramine sulfate and the sum...

  20. Marine metabolites: The sterols of soft coral

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Sarma, N.S.; Krishna, M.S.; Pasha, Sk.G.; Rao, T.S.P.; Venkateswarlu, Y.; Parameswaran, P.S.

    Sterols constitute a major group of secondary metabolites of soft corals. Several of these compounds have the 'usual' 3 beta-hydroxy, delta sup(5) (or delta sup(0)) cholestane skeleton, a large number of these metabolites are polar sterols...

  1. MIDAS: a database-searching algorithm for metabolite identification in metabolomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yingfeng; Kora, Guruprasad; Bowen, Benjamin P; Pan, Chongle

    2014-10-07

    A database searching approach can be used for metabolite identification in metabolomics by matching measured tandem mass spectra (MS/MS) against the predicted fragments of metabolites in a database. Here, we present the open-source MIDAS algorithm (Metabolite Identification via Database Searching). To evaluate a metabolite-spectrum match (MSM), MIDAS first enumerates possible fragments from a metabolite by systematic bond dissociation, then calculates the plausibility of the fragments based on their fragmentation pathways, and finally scores the MSM to assess how well the experimental MS/MS spectrum from collision-induced dissociation (CID) is explained by the metabolite's predicted CID MS/MS spectrum. MIDAS was designed to search high-resolution tandem mass spectra acquired on time-of-flight or Orbitrap mass spectrometer against a metabolite database in an automated and high-throughput manner. The accuracy of metabolite identification by MIDAS was benchmarked using four sets of standard tandem mass spectra from MassBank. On average, for 77% of original spectra and 84% of composite spectra, MIDAS correctly ranked the true compounds as the first MSMs out of all MetaCyc metabolites as decoys. MIDAS correctly identified 46% more original spectra and 59% more composite spectra at the first MSMs than an existing database-searching algorithm, MetFrag. MIDAS was showcased by searching a published real-world measurement of a metabolome from Synechococcus sp. PCC 7002 against the MetaCyc metabolite database. MIDAS identified many metabolites missed in the previous study. MIDAS identifications should be considered only as candidate metabolites, which need to be confirmed using standard compounds. To facilitate manual validation, MIDAS provides annotated spectra for MSMs and labels observed mass spectral peaks with predicted fragments. The database searching and manual validation can be performed online at http://midas.omicsbio.org.

  2. From elementary flux modes to elementary flux vectors: Metabolic pathway analysis with arbitrary linear flux constraints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klamt, Steffen; Gerstl, Matthias P.; Jungreuthmayer, Christian; Mahadevan, Radhakrishnan; Müller, Stefan

    2017-01-01

    Elementary flux modes (EFMs) emerged as a formal concept to describe metabolic pathways and have become an established tool for constraint-based modeling and metabolic network analysis. EFMs are characteristic (support-minimal) vectors of the flux cone that contains all feasible steady-state flux vectors of a given metabolic network. EFMs account for (homogeneous) linear constraints arising from reaction irreversibilities and the assumption of steady state; however, other (inhomogeneous) linear constraints, such as minimal and maximal reaction rates frequently used by other constraint-based techniques (such as flux balance analysis [FBA]), cannot be directly integrated. These additional constraints further restrict the space of feasible flux vectors and turn the flux cone into a general flux polyhedron in which the concept of EFMs is not directly applicable anymore. For this reason, there has been a conceptual gap between EFM-based (pathway) analysis methods and linear optimization (FBA) techniques, as they operate on different geometric objects. One approach to overcome these limitations was proposed ten years ago and is based on the concept of elementary flux vectors (EFVs). Only recently has the community started to recognize the potential of EFVs for metabolic network analysis. In fact, EFVs exactly represent the conceptual development required to generalize the idea of EFMs from flux cones to flux polyhedra. This work aims to present a concise theoretical and practical introduction to EFVs that is accessible to a broad audience. We highlight the close relationship between EFMs and EFVs and demonstrate that almost all applications of EFMs (in flux cones) are possible for EFVs (in flux polyhedra) as well. In fact, certain properties can only be studied with EFVs. Thus, we conclude that EFVs provide a powerful and unifying framework for constraint-based modeling of metabolic networks. PMID:28406903

  3. 40 CFR 159.179 - Metabolites, degradates, contaminants, and impurities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Metabolites, degradates, contaminants.../Benefit Information § 159.179 Metabolites, degradates, contaminants, and impurities. (a) Metabolites and... degradation of less than 10 percent in a 30-day period. (b) Contaminants and impurities. The presence in any...

  4. Inhibition of human anthracycline reductases by emodin — A possible remedy for anthracycline resistance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hintzpeter, Jan; Seliger, Jan Moritz; Hofman, Jakub; Martin, Hans-Joerg; Wsol, Vladimir; Maser, Edmund

    2016-01-01

    The clinical application of anthracyclines, like daunorubicin and doxorubicin, is limited by two factors: dose-related cardiotoxicity and drug resistance. Both have been linked to reductive metabolism of the parent drug to their metabolites daunorubicinol and doxorubicinol, respectively. These metabolites show significantly less anti-neoplastic properties as their parent drugs and accumulate in cardiac tissue leading to chronic cardiotoxicity. Therefore, we aimed to identify novel and potent natural inhibitors for anthracycline reductases, which enhance the anticancer effect of anthracyclines by preventing the development of anthracycline resistance. Human enzymes responsible for the reductive metabolism of daunorubicin were tested for their sensitivity towards anthrachinones, in particular emodin and anthraflavic acid. Intense inhibition kinetic data for the most effective daunorubicin reductases, including IC 50 - and K i -values, the mode of inhibition, as well as molecular docking, were compiled. Subsequently, a cytotoxicity profile and the ability of emodin to reverse daunorubicin resistance were determined using multiresistant A549 lung cancer and HepG2 liver cancer cells. Emodin potently inhibited the four main human daunorubicin reductases in vitro. Further, we could demonstrate that emodin is able to synergistically sensitize human cancer cells towards daunorubicin at clinically relevant concentrations. Therefore, emodin may yield the potential to enhance the therapeutic effectiveness of anthracyclines by preventing anthracycline resistance via inhibition of the anthracycline reductases. In symphony with its known pharmacological properties, emodin might be a compound of particular interest in the management of anthracycline chemotherapy efficacy and their adverse effects. - Highlights: • Natural and synthetic compounds were identified as inhibitors for human daunorubicin reductases. • Emodin is a potent inhibitor for human daunorubicin reductases.

  5. Analysis of Intracellular Metabolites from Microorganisms: Quenching and Extraction Protocols

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farhana R. Pinu

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Sample preparation is one of the most important steps in metabolome analysis. The challenges of determining microbial metabolome have been well discussed within the research community and many improvements have already been achieved in last decade. The analysis of intracellular metabolites is particularly challenging. Environmental perturbations may considerably affect microbial metabolism, which results in intracellular metabolites being rapidly degraded or metabolized by enzymatic reactions. Therefore, quenching or the complete stop of cell metabolism is a pre-requisite for accurate intracellular metabolite analysis. After quenching, metabolites need to be extracted from the intracellular compartment. The choice of the most suitable metabolite extraction method/s is another crucial step. The literature indicates that specific classes of metabolites are better extracted by different extraction protocols. In this review, we discuss the technical aspects and advancements of quenching and extraction of intracellular metabolite analysis from microbial cells.

  6. Investigation of metabolites for estimating blood deposition time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lech, Karolina; Liu, Fan; Davies, Sarah K; Ackermann, Katrin; Ang, Joo Ern; Middleton, Benita; Revell, Victoria L; Raynaud, Florence J; Hoveijn, Igor; Hut, Roelof A; Skene, Debra J; Kayser, Manfred

    2018-01-01

    Trace deposition timing reflects a novel concept in forensic molecular biology involving the use of rhythmic biomarkers for estimating the time within a 24-h day/night cycle a human biological sample was left at the crime scene, which in principle allows verifying a sample donor's alibi. Previously, we introduced two circadian hormones for trace deposition timing and recently demonstrated that messenger RNA (mRNA) biomarkers significantly improve time prediction accuracy. Here, we investigate the suitability of metabolites measured using a targeted metabolomics approach, for trace deposition timing. Analysis of 171 plasma metabolites collected around the clock at 2-h intervals for 36 h from 12 male participants under controlled laboratory conditions identified 56 metabolites showing statistically significant oscillations, with peak times falling into three day/night time categories: morning/noon, afternoon/evening and night/early morning. Time prediction modelling identified 10 independently contributing metabolite biomarkers, which together achieved prediction accuracies expressed as AUC of 0.81, 0.86 and 0.90 for these three time categories respectively. Combining metabolites with previously established hormone and mRNA biomarkers in time prediction modelling resulted in an improved prediction accuracy reaching AUCs of 0.85, 0.89 and 0.96 respectively. The additional impact of metabolite biomarkers, however, was rather minor as the previously established model with melatonin, cortisol and three mRNA biomarkers achieved AUC values of 0.88, 0.88 and 0.95 for the same three time categories respectively. Nevertheless, the selected metabolites could become practically useful in scenarios where RNA marker information is unavailable such as due to RNA degradation. This is the first metabolomics study investigating circulating metabolites for trace deposition timing, and more work is needed to fully establish their usefulness for this forensic purpose.

  7. Ruta graveolens Extracts and Metabolites against Spodoptera frugiperda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayil-Gutiérrez, Benjamin A; Villegas-Mendoza, Jesús M; Santes-Hernndez, Zuridai; Paz-González, Alma D; Mireles-Martínez, Maribel; Rosas-García, Ninfa M; Rivera, Gildardo

    2015-11-01

    The biological activity of Ruta graveolens leaf tissue extracts obtained with different solvents (ethyl acetate, ethanol, and water) and metabolites (psoralen, 2- undecanone and rutin) against Spodoptera frugiperda was evaluated. Metabolites levels in extracts were quantified by HPLC and GC. Ethyl acetate and ethanol extracts showed 94% and 78% mortality, respectively. Additionally, psoralen metabolite showed a high mortality as cypermethrin. Metabolite quantification in extracts shows the presence of 2-undecanone (87.9 µmoles mg(-1) DW), psoralen (3.6 µmoles mg(-1) DW) and rutin (0.001 pmoles mg(-1) DW). We suggest that these concentrations of 2-undecanone and psoralen in R. graveolens leaf tissue extracts could be responsible for S. frugiperda mortality.

  8. Radioprotection offered by bacterial secondary metabolite RK-IP-006.G to the mice by oral route of administration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gupta, Ashutosh K.; Malhotra, Poonam; Singh, Praveen K.; Chhachhia, Neha; Singh, Shravan K.; Kumar, Raj

    2014-01-01

    Ionizing radiation is known to cause oxidative damage in biological system primarily by generating reactive oxygen species (ROS). Gastrointestinal system is considered one of the most radiosensitive biological systems. The most radiosensitive cells type found in the intestine are continuously proliferative crypt cells. Damage to intestinal crypt cells lead to gastrointestinal functions impairment that contribute to mortality. In the present study, whole body radioprotective efficacy of bacterial secondary metabolite RK-IP-006.G was evaluated in C57BL/6 male mice. To determine free radical scavenging properties of RK-IP-006.G 2',7'-dichlorodihydrofluorescein diacetate (DCFDA) assay was performed. Radiation induced lipid peroxidation and its inhibition by RK-IP-006.G pretreatment was assessed in intestinal tissue homogenate. To find out cellular antioxidant status of the irradiated and RK-IP- 006.G treated mice, SOD, Catalase, and Glutathion-S-Transferase activity were estimated in intestinal tissue homogenate. Anti-apoptotic and mitochondrial membrane hypopolarization effect of the RK-IP-006.G was also analyzed using fluorescent probes Acridine Orange and Rhodamine123 respectively. Results of the study demonstrated that, RK-IP-006.G pretreatment (∼2h; 150 mg/kg.b.wt. oral administration) to the lethally irradiated (9 Gy) C57BL/6 male mice contributes to >83% whole body radioprotection in mice. Significant (P>0.05%) inhibition in lipid peroxidation was observed in intestinal tissue of irradiated mice pretreated with RK-IP-006.G compared to only irradiated controls. Significant (P>0.05%) increase in antioxidant enzyme i.e. Catalase, SOD and GST activities was reported in irradiated mice pretreated with RK-IP-006.G compared to irradiated control groups. RK-IP-006.G pretreatment also found to be instrumental in inhibiting radiation induced apoptosis and mitochondrial membrane hyperpolarization. In conclusion, present study revealed that bacterial secondary

  9. Potential antiproliferative activity of polyphenol metabolites against human breast cancer cells and their urine excretion pattern in healthy subjects following acute intake of a polyphenol-rich juice of grumixama (Eugenia brasiliensis Lam.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teixeira, L L; Costa, G R; Dörr, F A; Ong, T P; Pinto, E; Lajolo, F M; Hassimotto, N M A

    2017-06-21

    The bioavailability and metabolism of anthocyanins and ellagitannins following acute intake of grumixama fruit, native Brazilian cherry, by humans, and its in vitro antiproliferative activity against breast cancer cells (MDA-MB-231) were investigated. A single dose of grumixama juice was administered to healthy women (n = 10) and polyphenol metabolites were analyzed in urine and plasma samples collected over 24 h. The majority of the metabolites circulating and excreted in urine were phenolic acids and urolithin conjugates, the gut microbiota catabolites of both classes of polyphenols, respectively. According to pharmacokinetic parameters, the subjects were divided into two distinct groups, high and low urinary metabolite excretors. The pool of polyphenol metabolites found in urine samples showed a significant inhibition of cell proliferation and G2/M cell cycle arrest in MDA-MB-231 cells. Our findings demonstrate the large interindividual variability concerning the polyphenol metabolism, which possibly could reflect in health promotion.

  10. Water and salinity stress in grapevines: early and late changes in transcript and metabolite profiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cramer, Grant R; Ergül, Ali; Grimplet, Jerome; Tillett, Richard L; Tattersall, Elizabeth A R; Bohlman, Marlene C; Vincent, Delphine; Sonderegger, Justin; Evans, Jason; Osborne, Craig; Quilici, David; Schlauch, Karen A; Schooley, David A; Cushman, John C

    2007-04-01

    Grapes are grown in semiarid environments, where drought and salinity are common problems. Microarray transcript profiling, quantitative reverse transcription-PCR, and metabolite profiling were used to define genes and metabolic pathways in Vitis vinifera cv. Cabernet Sauvignon with shared and divergent responses to a gradually applied and long-term (16 days) water-deficit stress and equivalent salinity stress. In this first-of-a-kind study, distinct differences between water deficit and salinity were revealed. Water deficit caused more rapid and greater inhibition of shoot growth than did salinity at equivalent stem water potentials. One of the earliest responses to water deficit was an increase in the transcript abundance of RuBisCo activase (day 4), but this increase occurred much later in salt-stressed plants (day 12). As water deficit progressed, a greater number of affected transcripts were involved in metabolism, transport, and the biogenesis of cellular components than did salinity. Salinity affected a higher percentage of transcripts involved in transcription, protein synthesis, and protein fate than did water deficit. Metabolite profiling revealed that there were higher concentrations of glucose, malate, and proline in water-deficit-treated plants as compared to salinized plants. The metabolite differences were linked to differences in transcript abundance of many genes involved in energy metabolism and nitrogen assimilation, particularly photosynthesis, gluconeogenesis, and photorespiration. Water-deficit-treated plants appear to have a higher demand than salinized plants to adjust osmotically, detoxify free radicals (reactive oxygen species), and cope with photoinhibition.

  11. NMNAT1 inhibits axon degeneration via blockade of SARM1-mediated NAD+ depletion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasaki, Yo; Nakagawa, Takashi; Mao, Xianrong; DiAntonio, Aaron; Milbrandt, Jeffrey

    2016-01-01

    Overexpression of the NAD+ biosynthetic enzyme NMNAT1 leads to preservation of injured axons. While increased NAD+ or decreased NMN levels are thought to be critical to this process, the mechanism(s) of this axon protection remain obscure. Using steady-state and flux analysis of NAD+ metabolites in healthy and injured mouse dorsal root ganglion axons, we find that rather than altering NAD+ synthesis, NMNAT1 instead blocks the injury-induced, SARM1-dependent NAD+ consumption that is central to axon degeneration. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.19749.001 PMID:27735788

  12. FluxVisualizer, a Software to Visualize Fluxes through Metabolic Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tim Daniel Rose

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available FluxVisualizer (Version 1.0, 2017, freely available at https://fluxvisualizer.ibgc.cnrs.fr is a software to visualize fluxes values on a scalable vector graphic (SVG representation of a metabolic network by colouring or increasing the width of reaction arrows of the SVG file. FluxVisualizer does not aim to draw metabolic networks but to use a customer’s SVG file allowing him to exploit his representation standards with a minimum of constraints. FluxVisualizer is especially suitable for small to medium size metabolic networks, where a visual representation of the fluxes makes sense. The flux distribution can either be an elementary flux mode (EFM, a flux balance analysis (FBA result or any other flux distribution. It allows the automatic visualization of a series of pathways of the same network as is needed for a set of EFMs. The software is coded in python3 and provides a graphical user interface (GUI and an application programming interface (API. All functionalities of the program can be used from the API and the GUI and allows advanced users to add their own functionalities. The software is able to work with various formats of flux distributions (Metatool, CellNetAnalyzer, COPASI and FAME export files as well as with Excel files. This simple software can save a lot of time when evaluating fluxes simulations on a metabolic network.

  13. The selenium metabolite methylselenol regulates the expression of ligands that trigger immune activation through the lymphocyte receptor NKG2D

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hagemann-Jensen, Michael Henrik; Uhlenbrock, Franziska Katharina; Kehlet, Stephanie

    2014-01-01

    For decades Selenium (Se) research has been focused on the identification of active metabolites, which are crucial for Se chemoprevention of cancer. In this context, the metabolite methylselenol (CH3SeH) is known for its action to selectively kill transformed cells through mechanisms that include...... ligands. A balanced cell-surface expression of NKG2D ligands is considered as an innate barrier against tumor development. Our work therefore indicates that the application of selenium compounds, which are metabolized to CH3SeH, could improve NKG2D-based immune therapy.......: Increased formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), induction of DNA damage, triggering of apoptosis and the inhibition of angiogenesis. Here, we revealed that CH3SeH modulates cell surface expression of NKG2D ligands. The expression of NKG2D ligands is induced by stress-associated pathways, which occur...

  14. Urine and Serum Metabolite Profiling of Rats Fed a High-Fat Diet and the Anti-Obesity Effects of Caffeine Consumption

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyang Yeon Kim

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we investigated the clinical changes induced by a high fat diet (HFD and caffeine consumption in a rat model. The mean body weight of the HFD with caffeine (HFDC-fed rat was decreased compared to that of the HFD-fed rat without caffeine. The levels of cholesterol, triglycerides (TGs, and free fatty acid, as well as the size of adipose tissue altered by HFD, were improved by caffeine consumption. To investigate the metabolites that affected the change of the clinical factors, the urine and serum of rats fed a normal diet (ND, HFD, and HFDC were analyzed using ultra performance liquid chromatography quadruple time-of-flight mass spectrometry (UPLC-Q-TOF-MS, gas chromatography (GC-TOF-MS, and linear trap quadruple mass spectrometry (LTQ-XL-MS combined with multivariate analysis. A total of 68 and 52 metabolites were found to be different in urine and serum, respectively. After being fed caffeine, some glucuronide-conjugated compounds, lysoPCs, CEs, DGs, TGs, taurine, and hippuric acid were altered compared to the HFD group. In this study, caffeine might potentially inhibit HFD-induced obesity and we suggest possible biomarker candidates using MS-based metabolite profiling.

  15. Biochemical and secondary metabolites changes under moisture ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The study showed the importance of carbohydrate and nitrogen cycle related metabolites in mediating tolerance in cassava by affecting their phenotypic expression in the plant. Keywords: Hydrothermal stress, bio-chemicals, pigments, secondary metabolites, cassava. African Journal of Biotechnology, Vol 13(31) 3173-3186 ...

  16. Flux Analysis of Free Amino Sugars and Amino Acids in Soils by Isotope Tracing with a Novel Liquid Chromatography/High Resolution Mass Spectrometry Platform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Yuntao; Zheng, Qing; Wanek, Wolfgang

    2017-09-05

    Soil fluxomics analysis can provide pivotal information for understanding soil biochemical pathways and their regulation, but direct measurement methods are rare. Here, we describe an approach to measure soil extracellular metabolite (amino sugar and amino acid) concentrations and fluxes based on a 15 N isotope pool dilution technique via liquid chromatography and high-resolution mass spectrometry. We produced commercially unavailable 15 N and 13 C labeled amino sugars and amino acids by hydrolyzing peptidoglycan isolated from isotopically labeled bacterial biomass and used them as tracers ( 15 N) and internal standards ( 13 C). High-resolution (Orbitrap Exactive) MS with a resolution of 50 000 allowed us to separate different stable isotope labeled analogues across a large range of metabolites. The utilization of 13 C internal standards greatly improved the accuracy and reliability of absolute quantification. We successfully applied this method to two types of soils and quantified the extracellular gross fluxes of 2 amino sugars, 18 amino acids, and 4 amino acid enantiomers. Compared to the influx and efflux rates of most amino acids, similar ones were found for glucosamine, indicating that this amino sugar is released through peptidoglycan and chitin decomposition and serves as an important nitrogen source for soil microorganisms. d-Alanine and d-glutamic acid derived from peptidoglycan decomposition exhibited similar turnover rates as their l-enantiomers. This novel approach offers new strategies to advance our understanding of the production and transformation pathways of soil organic N metabolites, including the unknown contributions of peptidoglycan and chitin decomposition to soil organic N cycling.

  17. Flux Analysis of Free Amino Sugars and Amino Acids in Soils by Isotope Tracing with a Novel Liquid Chromatography/High Resolution Mass Spectrometry Platform

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    Soil fluxomics analysis can provide pivotal information for understanding soil biochemical pathways and their regulation, but direct measurement methods are rare. Here, we describe an approach to measure soil extracellular metabolite (amino sugar and amino acid) concentrations and fluxes based on a 15N isotope pool dilution technique via liquid chromatography and high-resolution mass spectrometry. We produced commercially unavailable 15N and 13C labeled amino sugars and amino acids by hydrolyzing peptidoglycan isolated from isotopically labeled bacterial biomass and used them as tracers (15N) and internal standards (13C). High-resolution (Orbitrap Exactive) MS with a resolution of 50 000 allowed us to separate different stable isotope labeled analogues across a large range of metabolites. The utilization of 13C internal standards greatly improved the accuracy and reliability of absolute quantification. We successfully applied this method to two types of soils and quantified the extracellular gross fluxes of 2 amino sugars, 18 amino acids, and 4 amino acid enantiomers. Compared to the influx and efflux rates of most amino acids, similar ones were found for glucosamine, indicating that this amino sugar is released through peptidoglycan and chitin decomposition and serves as an important nitrogen source for soil microorganisms. d-Alanine and d-glutamic acid derived from peptidoglycan decomposition exhibited similar turnover rates as their l-enantiomers. This novel approach offers new strategies to advance our understanding of the production and transformation pathways of soil organic N metabolites, including the unknown contributions of peptidoglycan and chitin decomposition to soil organic N cycling. PMID:28776982

  18. Lithium fluxes indicate presence of Na-Cl cotransport (NCC) in human lens epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauf, Peter K; Chimote, Ameet A; Adragna, Norma C

    2008-01-01

    During regulatory volume decrease (RVD) of human lens epithelial cells (hLECs) by clotrimazole (CTZ)-sensitive K fluxes, Na-K-2Cl cotransport (NKCC) remains active and K-Cl cotransport (KCC) inactive. To determine whether such an abnormal behavior was caused by RVD-induced cell shrinkage, NKCC was measured in the presence of either CTZ or in high K media to prevent RVD. NKCC transports RbCl + NaCl, and LiCl + KCl; thus ouabain-insensitive, bumetanide-sensitive (BS) or Cl-dependent (ClD) Rb and Li fluxes were determined in hyposmotic high NaCl media with CTZ, or in high KCl media alone, or with sulfamate (Sf) or nitrate as Cl replacement at varying Rb, Li or Cl mol fractions (MF). Unexpectedly, NKCC was inhibited by 80% with CTZ (IC(50) = 31 microM). In isosmotic (300 mOsM) K, Li influx was approximately 1/3 of Rb influx in Na, 50% lower in Sf, and bumetanide-insensitive (BI). In hypotonic (200 mOsM) K, only the ClD but not BS Li fluxes were detected. At Li MFs from 0.1-1, Li fluxes fitted a bell-shaped curve maxing at approximately 0.6 Li MF, with the BS fluxes equaling approximately 1/4 of the ClD-Li influx. The difference, i.e. the BI/ClD Li influx, saturated with increasing Li and Cl MFs, with K(ms) for Li of 11 with, and 7 mM without K, and of approximately 46 mM for Cl. Inhibition of this K-independent Li influx by thiazides was weak whilst furosemide (<100 microM) was ineffective. Reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction and Western blots verified presence of both NKCC1 and Na-Cl cotransport (NCC). In conclusion, in hyposmotic high K media, which prevents CTZ-sensitive K flux-mediated RVD in hLECs, NKCC1, though molecularly expressed, was functionally silent. However, a K-independent and moderately thiazide-sensitive ClD-Li flux, i.e. LiCC, likely occurring through NCC was detected operationally and molecularly. (c) 2008 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  19. Inhibition of gap-junctional intercellular communication and activation of mitogen-activated protein kinases by cyanobacterial extracts--indications of novel tumor-promoting cyanotoxins?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bláha, Ludĕk; Babica, Pavel; Hilscherová, Klára; Upham, Brad L

    2010-01-01

    Toxicity and liver tumor promotion of cyanotoxins microcystins have been extensively studied. However, recent studies document that other metabolites present in the complex cyanobacterial water blooms may also have adverse health effects. In this study we used rat liver epithelial stem-like cells (WB-F344) to examine the effects of cyanobacterial extracts on two established markers of tumor promotion, inhibition of gap-junctional intercellular communication (GJIC) and activation of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) - ERK1/2. Extracts of cyanobacteria (laboratory cultures of Microcystis aeruginosa and Aphanizomenon flos-aquae and water blooms dominated by these species) inhibited GJIC and activated MAPKs in a dose-dependent manner (effective concentrations ranging 0.5-5mgd.w./mL). Effects were independent of the microcystin content and the strongest responses were elicited by the extracts of Aphanizomenon sp. Neither pure microcystin-LR nor cylindrospermopsin inhibited GJIC or activated MAPKs. Modulations of GJIC and MAPKs appeared to be specific to cyanobacterial extracts since extracts from green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, heterotrophic bacterium Klebsiella terrigena, and isolated bacterial lipopolysaccharides had no comparable effects. Our study provides the first evidence on the existence of unknown cyanobacterial toxic metabolites that affect in vitro biomarkers of tumor promotion, i.e. inhibition of GJIC and activation of MAPKs.

  20. Prospective study of blood metabolites associated with colorectal cancer risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shu, Xiang; Xiang, Yong-Bing; Rothman, Nathaniel; Yu, Danxia; Li, Hong-Lan; Yang, Gong; Cai, Hui; Ma, Xiao; Lan, Qing; Gao, Yu-Tang; Jia, Wei; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Zheng, Wei

    2018-02-26

    Few prospective studies, and none in Asians, have systematically evaluated the relationship between blood metabolites and colorectal cancer risk. We conducted a nested case-control study to search for risk-associated metabolite biomarkers for colorectal cancer in an Asian population using blood samples collected prior to cancer diagnosis. Conditional logistic regression was performed to assess associations of metabolites with cancer risk. In this study, we included 250 incident cases with colorectal cancer and individually matched controls nested within two prospective Shanghai cohorts. We found 35 metabolites associated with risk of colorectal cancer after adjusting for multiple comparisons. Among them, 12 metabolites were glycerophospholipids including nine associated with reduced risk of colorectal cancer and three with increased risk [odds ratios per standard deviation increase of transformed metabolites: 0.31-1.98; p values: 0.002-1.25 × 10 -10 ]. The other 23 metabolites associated with colorectal cancer risk included nine lipids other than glycerophospholipid, seven aromatic compounds, five organic acids and four other organic compounds. After mutual adjustment, nine metabolites remained statistically significant for colorectal cancer. Together, these independently associated metabolites can separate cancer cases from controls with an area under the curve of 0.76 for colorectal cancer. We have identified that dysregulation of glycerophospholipids may contribute to risk of colorectal cancer. © 2018 UICC.

  1. Effects of vitamin D metabolites on cellular Ca2+ and on Ca transport in primary cultures of bone cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eilam, Y; Szydel, N; Harell, A

    1980-09-01

    Both 1,25-dihydroxycholecalciferol (1,25(OH)2D3) and 24,25-dihydroxycholecalciferol (24,25(OH)2D3) exerted direct effects on Ca2+ transport and accumulation in primary cultures of bone cells. The following changes were recorded. (1) A significant decrease in the amount of intracellular exchangeable Ca2+. (2) A marked increase in the rate constants of efflux from the 'slow'-turnover intracellular Ca pool. (3) A marked increase in the 'initial rate' of Ca influx into the cells. Thus, vitamin D metabolites caused an increase in the turnover of Ca2+ in bone cells and altered the steady-stae level of intracellular exchangeable Ca2+. Whereas the changes in the rate of efflux were abolished in the presence of inhibitors of protein synthesis, the increase in the rate of influx was not sensitive to these inhibitors. It is suggested that the changes in the two fluxes were mediated by different mechanisms and that the changes in influx were due to a direct effect of vitamin D metabolites on the cellular membranes.

  2. MARSI: metabolite analogues for rational strain improvement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cardoso, João G. R.; Zeidan, Ahmad A; Jensen, Kristian

    2018-01-01

    reactions in an organism can be used to predict effects of MAs on cellular phenotypes. Here, we present the Metabolite Analogues for Rational Strain Improvement (MARSI) framework. MARSI provides a rational approach to strain improvement by searching for metabolites as targets instead of genes or reactions...

  3. Constraining Genome-Scale Models to Represent the Bow Tie Structure of Metabolism for 13C Metabolic Flux Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tyler W. H. Backman

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Determination of internal metabolic fluxes is crucial for fundamental and applied biology because they map how carbon and electrons flow through metabolism to enable cell function. 13 C Metabolic Flux Analysis ( 13 C MFA and Two-Scale 13 C Metabolic Flux Analysis (2S- 13 C MFA are two techniques used to determine such fluxes. Both operate on the simplifying approximation that metabolic flux from peripheral metabolism into central “core” carbon metabolism is minimal, and can be omitted when modeling isotopic labeling in core metabolism. The validity of this “two-scale” or “bow tie” approximation is supported both by the ability to accurately model experimental isotopic labeling data, and by experimentally verified metabolic engineering predictions using these methods. However, the boundaries of core metabolism that satisfy this approximation can vary across species, and across cell culture conditions. Here, we present a set of algorithms that (1 systematically calculate flux bounds for any specified “core” of a genome-scale model so as to satisfy the bow tie approximation and (2 automatically identify an updated set of core reactions that can satisfy this approximation more efficiently. First, we leverage linear programming to simultaneously identify the lowest fluxes from peripheral metabolism into core metabolism compatible with the observed growth rate and extracellular metabolite exchange fluxes. Second, we use Simulated Annealing to identify an updated set of core reactions that allow for a minimum of fluxes into core metabolism to satisfy these experimental constraints. Together, these methods accelerate and automate the identification of a biologically reasonable set of core reactions for use with 13 C MFA or 2S- 13 C MFA, as well as provide for a substantially lower set of flux bounds for fluxes into the core as compared with previous methods. We provide an open source Python implementation of these algorithms at https://github.com/JBEI/limitfluxtocore.

  4. Role of oxidative metabolites of cocaine in toxicity and addiction: oxidative stress and electron transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovacic, Peter

    2005-01-01

    Cocaine is one of the principal drugs of abuse. Although impressive advances have been made, unanswered questions remain concerning mechanism of toxicity and addiction. Discussion of action mode usually centers on receptor binding and enzyme inhibition, with limited attention to events at the molecular level. This review provides extensive evidence in support of the hypothesis that oxidative metabolites play important roles comprising oxidative stress (OS), reactive oxygen species (ROS), and electron transfer (ET). The metabolites include norcocaine and norcocaine derivatives: nitroxide radical, N-hydroxy, nitrosonium, plus cocaine iminium and formaldehyde. Observed formation of ROS is rationalized by redox cycling involving several possible ET agents. Three potential ones are present in the form of oxidative metabolites, namely, nitroxide, nitrosonium, and iminium. Most attention has been devoted to the nitroxide-hydroxylamine couple which has been designated by various investigators as the principal source of ROS. The proximate ester substituent is deemed important for intramolecular stabilization of reactive intermediates. Reduction potential of nitroxide is in accord with plausibility of ET in the biological milieu. Toxicity by cocaine, with evidence for participation of OS, is demonstrated for many body components, including liver, central nervous system, cardiovascular system, reproductive system, kidney, mitochondria, urine, and immune system. Other adverse effects associated with ROS comprise teratogenesis and apoptosis. Examples of ROS generated are lipid peroxides and hydroxyl radical. Often observed were depletion of antioxidant defenses, and protection by added antioxidants, such as, thiol, salicylate, and deferoxamine. Considerable evidence supports the contention that oxidative ET metabolites of cocaine are responsible for much of the observed OS. Quite significantly, the pro-oxidant, toxic effects, including generation of superoxide and lipid peroxyl

  5. Metabolite identification through multiple kernel learning on fragmentation trees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Huibin; Dührkop, Kai; Böcker, Sebastian; Rousu, Juho

    2014-06-15

    Metabolite identification from tandem mass spectrometric data is a key task in metabolomics. Various computational methods have been proposed for the identification of metabolites from tandem mass spectra. Fragmentation tree methods explore the space of possible ways in which the metabolite can fragment, and base the metabolite identification on scoring of these fragmentation trees. Machine learning methods have been used to map mass spectra to molecular fingerprints; predicted fingerprints, in turn, can be used to score candidate molecular structures. Here, we combine fragmentation tree computations with kernel-based machine learning to predict molecular fingerprints and identify molecular structures. We introduce a family of kernels capturing the similarity of fragmentation trees, and combine these kernels using recently proposed multiple kernel learning approaches. Experiments on two large reference datasets show that the new methods significantly improve molecular fingerprint prediction accuracy. These improvements result in better metabolite identification, doubling the number of metabolites ranked at the top position of the candidates list. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press.

  6. Flux response of glycolysis and storage metabolism during rapid feast/famine conditions in Penicillium chrysogenum using dynamic (13)C labeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Jonge, Lodewijk; Buijs, Nicolaas A A; Heijnen, Joseph J; van Gulik, Walter M; Abate, Alessandro; Wahl, S Aljoscha

    2014-03-01

    The scale-up of fermentation processes frequently leads to a reduced productivity compared to small-scale screening experiments. Large-scale mixing limitations that lead to gradients in substrate and oxygen availability could influence the microorganism performance. Here, the impact of substrate gradients on a penicillin G producing Penicillium chrysogenum cultivation was analyzed using an intermittent glucose feeding regime. The intermittent feeding led to fluctuations in the extracellular glucose concentration between 400 μM down to 6.5 μM at the end of the cycle. The intracellular metabolite concentrations responded strongly and showed up to 100-fold changes. The intracellular flux changes were estimated on the basis of dynamic (13) C mass isotopomer measurements during three cycles of feast and famine using a novel hybrid modeling approach. The flux estimations indicated a high turnover of internal and external storage metabolites in P. chrysogenum under feast/famine conditions. The synthesis and degradation of storage requires cellular energy (ATP and UTP) in competition with other cellular functions including product formation. Especially, 38% of the incoming glucose was recycled once in storage metabolism. This result indicated that storage turnover is increased under dynamic cultivation conditions and contributes to the observed decrease in productivity compared to reference steady-state conditions. Copyright © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  7. Evaluation of the Effects of S-Allyl-L-cysteine, S-Methyl-L-cysteine, trans-S-1-Propenyl-L-cysteine, and Their N-Acetylated and S-Oxidized Metabolites on Human CYP Activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amano, Hirotaka; Kazamori, Daichi; Itoh, Kenji

    2016-01-01

    Three major organosulfur compounds of aged garlic extract, S-allyl-L-cysteine (SAC), S-methyl-L-cysteine (SMC), and trans-S-1-propenyl-L-cysteine (S1PC), were examined for their effects on the activities of five major isoforms of human CYP enzymes: CYP1A2, 2C9, 2C19, 2D6, and 3A4. The metabolite formation from probe substrates for the CYP isoforms was examined in human liver microsomes in the presence of organosulfur compounds at 0.01-1 mM by using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) analysis. Allicin, a major component of garlic, inhibited CYP1A2 and CYP3A4 activity by 21-45% at 0.03 mM. In contrast, a CYP2C9-catalyzed reaction was enhanced by up to 1.9 times in the presence of allicin at 0.003-0.3 mM. SAC, SMC, and S1PC had no effect on the activities of the five isoforms, except that S1PC inhibited CYP3A4-catalyzed midazolam 1'-hydroxylation by 31% at 1 mM. The N-acetylated metabolites of the three compounds inhibited the activities of several isoforms to a varying degree at 1 mM. N-Acetyl-S-allyl-L-cysteine and N-acetyl-S-methyl-L-cysteine inhibited the reactions catalyzed by CYP2D6 and CYP1A2, by 19 and 26%, respectively, whereas trans-N-acetyl-S-1-propenyl-L-cysteine showed weak to moderate inhibition (19-49%) of CYP1A2, 2C19, 2D6, and 3A4 activities. On the other hand, both the N-acetylated and S-oxidized metabolites of SAC, SMC, and S1PC had little effect on the reactions catalyzed by the five isoforms. These results indicated that SAC, SMC, and S1PC have little potential to cause drug-drug interaction due to CYP inhibition or activation in vivo, as judged by their minimal effects (IC 50 >1 mM) on the activities of five major isoforms of human CYP in vitro.

  8. Do metabolites that are produced during resistance exercise enhance muscle hypertrophy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dankel, Scott J; Mattocks, Kevin T; Jessee, Matthew B; Buckner, Samuel L; Mouser, J Grant; Loenneke, Jeremy P

    2017-11-01

    Many reviews conclude that metabolites play an important role with respect to muscle hypertrophy during resistance exercise, but their actual physiologic contribution remains unknown. Some have suggested that metabolites may work independently of muscle contraction, while others have suggested that metabolites may play a secondary role in their ability to augment muscle activation via inducing fatigue. Interestingly, the studies used as support for an anabolic role of metabolites use protocols that are not actually designed to test the importance of metabolites independent of muscle contraction. While there is some evidence in vitro that metabolites may induce muscle hypertrophy, the only study attempting to answer this question in humans found no added benefit of pooling metabolites within the muscle post-exercise. As load-induced muscle hypertrophy is thought to work via mechanotransduction (as opposed to being metabolically driven), it seems likely that metabolites simply augment muscle activation and cause the mechanotransduction cascade in a larger proportion of muscle fibers, thereby producing greater muscle growth. A sufficient time under tension also appears necessary, as measurable muscle growth is not observed after repeated maximal testing. Based on current evidence, it is our opinion that metabolites produced during resistance exercise do not have anabolic properties per se, but may be anabolic in their ability to augment muscle activation. Future studies are needed to compare protocols which produce similar levels of muscle activation, but differ in the magnitude of metabolites produced, or duration in which the exercised muscles are exposed to metabolites.

  9. Comparative analysis of Hibiscus sabdariffa (roselle) hot and cold extracts in respect to their potential for α-glucosidase inhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasheed, Dalia M; Porzel, Andrea; Frolov, Andrei; El Seedi, Hesham R; Wessjohann, Ludger A; Farag, Mohamed A

    2018-06-01

    Roselle (Hibiscus sabdariffa) is a functional food with potential health benefits, consumed either as hot or cold beverage. To ensure quality control of its various products, accurate measurement of active metabolites is warranted. Herein, we propose a combination of ultra-high performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (UHPLC-MS) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) analytical platforms for the untargeted characterization of metabolites in two roselle cultivars, Aswan and Sudan-1. The analyses revealed 33 metabolites, including sugars, flavonoids, anthocyanins, phenolic and aliphatic organic acids. Their relative contents in cultivars were assessed via principle component analysis (PCA) and orthogonal projection to latent structures analysis (OPLS). Impact of the different extraction methods (decoction, infusion and maceration) was compared by quantitative 1 H NMR spectroscopy, revealing cold maceration to be optimal for preserving anthocyanins, whereas infusion was more suited for recovering organic acids. The metabolite pattern revealed by the different extraction methods was found in good correlation for their ability to inhibit α-glucosidase enzyme. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. LC-MS/MS analysis of uncommon paracetamol metabolites derived through in vitro polymerization and nitration reactions in liquid nitrogen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trettin, Arne; Jordan, Jens; Tsikas, Dimitrios

    2014-09-01

    Paracetamol (acetaminophen, APAP) is a commonly used analgesic drug. Known paracetamol metabolites include the glucuronide, sulfate and mercapturate. N-Acetyl-benzoquinonimine (NAPQI) is considered the toxic intermediate metabolite of paracetamol. In vitro and in vivo studies indicate that paracetamol is also metabolized to additional poorly characterized metabolites. For example, metabolomic studies in urine samples of APAP-treated mice revealed metabolites such as APAP-sulfate-APAP and APAP-S-S-APAP in addition to the classical phase II metabolites. Here, we report on the development and application of LC-MS and LC-MS/MS approaches to study reactions of unlabelled and (2)H-labelled APAP with unlabelled and (15)N-labelled nitrite in aqueous phosphate buffers (pH 7.4) upon their immersion into liquid nitrogen (-196°C). In mechanistic studies, these reactions were also studied in aqueous buffer prepared in (18)O-labelled water. LC-MS and LC-MS/MS analyses were performed on a reverse-phase material (C18) using gradient elution (2mM ammonium acetate/acetonitrile), in positive and negative electrospray mode. We identified a series of APAP metabolites including di-, tri- and tetra-APAP, mono- and di-nitro-APAP and nitric ester of di-APAP. Our study indicates that nitrite induces oxidation, i.e., polymerization and nitration of APAP, when buffered APAP/nitrite solutions are immersed into liquid nitrogen. These reactions are specific for nitrite with respect to nitrate and do not proceed via intermediate formation of NAPQI. Potassium ions and physiological saline but not thiols inhibit nitrite- and shock-freeze-induced reactions of paracetamol. The underlying mechanism likely involves in situ formation of NO2 radicals from nitrite secondary to profound pH reduction (down to pH 1) and disproportionation. Polymeric paracetamol species can be analyzed as pentafluorobenzyl derivatives by LC-MS but not by GC-MS. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Methodological considerations for measuring glucocorticoid metabolites in feathers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berk, Sara A.; McGettrick, Julie R.; Hansen, Warren K.; Breuner, Creagh W.

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, researchers have begun to use corticosteroid metabolites in feathers (fCORT) as a metric of stress physiology in birds. However, there remain substantial questions about how to measure fCORT most accurately. Notably, small samples contain artificially high amounts of fCORT per millimetre of feather (the small sample artefact). Furthermore, it appears that fCORT is correlated with circulating plasma corticosterone only when levels are artificially elevated by the use of corticosterone implants. Here, we used several approaches to address current methodological issues with the measurement of fCORT. First, we verified that the small sample artefact exists across species and feather types. Second, we attempted to correct for this effect by increasing the amount of methanol relative to the amount of feather during extraction. We consistently detected more fCORT per millimetre or per milligram of feather in small samples than in large samples even when we adjusted methanol:feather concentrations. We also used high-performance liquid chromatography to identify hormone metabolites present in feathers and measured the reactivity of these metabolites against the most commonly used antibody for measuring fCORT. We verified that our antibody is mainly identifying corticosterone (CORT) in feathers, but other metabolites have significant cross-reactivity. Lastly, we measured faecal glucocorticoid metabolites in house sparrows and correlated these measurements with corticosteroid metabolites deposited in concurrently grown feathers; we found no correlation between faecal glucocorticoid metabolites and fCORT. We suggest that researchers should be cautious in their interpretation of fCORT in wild birds and should seek alternative validation methods to examine species-specific relationships between environmental challenges and fCORT. PMID:27335650

  12. Systemic catechol-O-methyl transferase inhibition enables the D1 agonist radiotracer R-[11C]SKF 82957

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palner, Mikael; McCormick, Patrick; Parkes, Jun; Knudsen, Gitte M.; Wilson, Alan A.

    2010-01-01

    Introduction: R-[ 11 C]-SKF 82957 is a high-affinity and potent dopamine D 1 receptor agonist radioligand, which gives rise to a brain-penetrant lipophilic metabolite. In this study, we demonstrate that systemic administration of catechol-O-methyl transferase (COMT) inhibitors blocks this metabolic pathway, facilitating the use of R-[ 11 C]-SKF 82957 to image the high-affinity state of the dopamine D 1 receptor with PET. Methods: R-[ 11 C]SKF 82957 was administered to untreated and COMT inhibitor-treated conscious rats, and the radioactive metabolites present in the brain and plasma were quantified by HPLC. Under optimal conditions, cerebral uptake and dopamine D 1 binding of R-[ 11 C]SKF 82957 were measured ex vivo. In addition, pharmacological challenges with the receptor antagonist SCH 23390, amphetamine, the dopamine reuptake inhibitor RTI-32 and the dopamine hydroxylase inhibitor α-methyl-p-tyrosine were performed to study the specificity and sensitivity of R-[ 11 C]-SKF 82957 dopamine D 1 binding in COMT-inhibited animals. Results: Treatment with the COMT inhibitor tolcapone was associated with a dose-dependent (EC 90 5.3±4.3 mg/kg) reduction in the lipophilic metabolite. Tolcapone treatment (20 mg/kg) also resulted in a significant increase in the striatum/cerebellum ratio of R-[ 11 C]SKF 82957, from 15 (controls) to 24. Treatment with the dopamine D 1 antagonist SCH 23390 reduced the striatal binding to the levels of the cerebellum, demonstrating a high specificity and selectivity of R-[ 11 C]SKF 82957 binding. Conclusions: Pre-treatment with the COMT inhibitor tolcapone inhibits formation of an interfering metabolite of R-[ 11 C]SKF 82957. Under such conditions, R-[ 11 C]SKF 82957 demonstrates high potential as the first agonist radiotracer for imaging the dopamine D 1 receptor by PET.

  13. Development of a Physiologically Based Pharmacokinetic and Pharmacodynamic Model to Determine Dosimetry and Cholinesterase Inhibition for a Binary Mixture of Chlorpyrifos and Diazinon in the Rat

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Timchalk, Chuck; Poet, Torka S.

    2008-05-01

    Physiologically based pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic (PBPK/PD) models have been developed and validated for the organophosphorus (OP) insecticides chlorpyrifos (CPF) and diazinon (DZN). Based on similar pharmacokinetic and mode of action properties it is anticipated that these OPs could interact at a number of important metabolic steps including: CYP450 mediated activation/detoxification, and blood/tissue cholinesterase (ChE) binding/inhibition. We developed a binary PBPK/PD model for CPF, DZN and their metabolites based on previously published models for the individual insecticides. The metabolic interactions (CYP450) between CPF and DZN were evaluated in vitro and suggests that CPF is more substantially metabolized to its oxon metabolite than is DZN. These data are consistent with their observed in vivo relative potency (CPF>DZN). Each insecticide inhibited the other’s in vitro metabolism in a concentration-dependent manner. The PBPK model code used to described the metabolism of CPF and DZN was modified to reflect the type of inhibition kinetics (i.e. competitive vs. non-competitive). The binary model was then evaluated against previously published rodent dosimetry and ChE inhibition data for the mixture. The PBPK/PD model simulations of the acute oral exposure to single- (15 mg/kg) vs. binary-mixtures (15+15 mg/kg) of CFP and DZN at this lower dose resulted in no differences in the predicted pharmacokinetics of either the parent OPs or their respective metabolites; whereas, a binary oral dose of CPF+DZN at 60+60 mg/kg did result in observable changes in the DZN pharmacokinetics. Cmax was more reasonably fit by modifying the absorption parameters. It is anticipated that at low environmentally relevant binary doses, most likely to be encountered in occupational or environmental related exposures, that the pharmacokinetics are expected to be linear, and ChE inhibition dose-additive.

  14. Secondary Metabolites from Higher Fungi: Discovery, Bioactivity, and Bioproduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Jian-Jiang; Xiao, Jian-Hui

    Medicinal higher fungi such as Cordyceps sinensis and Ganoderma lucidum have been used as an alternative medicine remedy to promote health and longevity for people in China and other regions of the world since ancient times. Nowadays there is an increasing public interest in the secondary metabolites of those higher fungi for discovering new drugs or lead compounds. Current research in drug discovery from medicinal higher fungi involves a multifaceted approach combining mycological, biochemical, pharmacological, metabolic, biosynthetic and molecular techniques. In recent years, many new secondary metabolites from higher fungi have been isolated and are more likely to provide lead compounds for new drug discovery, which may include chemopreventive agents possessing the bioactivity of immunomodulatory, anticancer, etc. However, numerous challenges of secondary metabolites from higher fungi are encountered including bioseparation, identification, biosynthetic metabolism, and screening model issues, etc. Commercial production of secondary metabolites from medicinal mushrooms is still limited mainly due to less information about secondary metabolism and its regulation. Strategies for enhancing secondary metabolite production by medicinal mushroom fermentation include two-stage cultivation combining liquid fermentation and static culture, two-stage dissolved oxygen control, etc. Purification of bioactive secondary metabolites, such as ganoderic acids from G. lucidum, is also very important to pharmacological study and future pharmaceutical application. This review outlines typical examples of the discovery, bioactivity, and bioproduction of secondary metabolites of higher fungi origin.

  15. Detecting Beer Intake by Unique Metabolite Patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gürdeniz, Gözde; Jensen, Morten Georg; Meier, Sebastian; Bech, Lene; Lund, Erik; Dragsted, Lars Ove

    2016-12-02

    Evaluation of the health related effects of beer intake is hampered by the lack of accurate tools for assessing intakes (biomarkers). Therefore, we identified plasma and urine metabolites associated with recent beer intake by untargeted metabolomics and established a characteristic metabolite pattern representing raw materials and beer production as a qualitative biomarker of beer intake. In a randomized, crossover, single-blinded meal study (MSt1), 18 participants were given, one at a time, four different test beverages: strong, regular, and nonalcoholic beers and a soft drink. Four participants were assigned to have two additional beers (MSt2). In addition to plasma and urine samples, test beverages, wort, and hops extract were analyzed by UPLC-QTOF. A unique metabolite pattern reflecting beer metabolome, including metabolites derived from beer raw material (i.e., N-methyl tyramine sulfate and the sum of iso-α-acids and tricyclohumols) and the production process (i.e., pyro-glutamyl proline and 2-ethyl malate), was selected to establish a compliance biomarker model for detection of beer intake based on MSt1. The model predicted the MSt2 samples collected before and up to 12 h after beer intake correctly (AUC = 1). A biomarker model including four metabolites representing both beer raw materials and production steps provided a specific and accurate tool for measurement of beer consumption.

  16. Pharmaceutically active secondary metabolites of marine actinobacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manivasagan, Panchanathan; Venkatesan, Jayachandran; Sivakumar, Kannan; Kim, Se-Kwon

    2014-04-01

    Marine actinobacteria are one of the most efficient groups of secondary metabolite producers and are very important from an industrial point of view. Many representatives of the order Actinomycetales are prolific producers of thousands of biologically active secondary metabolites. Actinobacteria from terrestrial sources have been studied and screened since the 1950s, for many important antibiotics, anticancer, antitumor and immunosuppressive agents. However, frequent rediscovery of the same compounds from the terrestrial actinobacteria has made them less attractive for screening programs in the recent years. At the same time, actinobacteria isolated from the marine environment have currently received considerable attention due to the structural diversity and unique biological activities of their secondary metabolites. They are efficient producers of new secondary metabolites that show a range of biological activities including antibacterial, antifungal, anticancer, antitumor, cytotoxic, cytostatic, anti-inflammatory, anti-parasitic, anti-malaria, antiviral, antioxidant, anti-angiogenesis, etc. In this review, an evaluation is made on the current status of research on marine actinobacteria yielding pharmaceutically active secondary metabolites. Bioactive compounds from marine actinobacteria possess distinct chemical structures that may form the basis for synthesis of new drugs that could be used to combat resistant pathogens. With the increasing advancement in science and technology, there would be a greater demand for new bioactive compounds synthesized by actinobacteria from various marine sources in future. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  17. Metabolites in vertebrate Hedgehog signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberg-Larsen, Hanne; Strand, Martin Frank; Krauss, Stefan; Wilson, Steven Ray

    2014-04-11

    The Hedgehog (HH) signaling pathway is critical in embryonic development, stem cell biology, tissue homeostasis, chemoattraction and synapse formation. Irregular HH signaling is associated with a number of disease conditions including congenital disorders and cancer. In particular, deregulation of HH signaling has been linked to skin, brain, lung, colon and pancreatic cancers. Key mediators of the HH signaling pathway are the 12-pass membrane protein Patched (PTC), the 7-pass membrane protein Smoothened (SMO) and the GLI transcription factors. PTC shares homology with the RND family of small-molecule transporters and it has been proposed that it interferes with SMO through metabolites. Although a conclusive picture is lacking, substantial efforts are made to identify and understand natural metabolites/sterols, including cholesterol, vitamin D3, oxysterols and glucocorticoides, that may be affected by, or influence the HH signaling cascade at the level of PTC and SMO. In this review we will elaborate the role of metabolites in HH signaling with a focus on oxysterols, and discuss advancements in modern analytical approaches in the field. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Effects of Ketamine and Ketamine Metabolites on Evoked Striatal Dopamine Release, Dopamine Receptors, and Monoamine Transporters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Can, Adem; Zanos, Panos; Moaddel, Ruin; Kang, Hye Jin; Dossou, Katinia S. S.; Wainer, Irving W.; Cheer, Joseph F.; Frost, Douglas O.; Huang, Xi-Ping

    2016-01-01

    Following administration at subanesthetic doses, (R,S)-ketamine (ketamine) induces rapid and robust relief from symptoms of depression in treatment-refractory depressed patients. Previous studies suggest that ketamine’s antidepressant properties involve enhancement of dopamine (DA) neurotransmission. Ketamine is rapidly metabolized to (2S,6S)- and (2R,6R)-hydroxynorketamine (HNK), which have antidepressant actions independent of N-methyl-d-aspartate glutamate receptor inhibition. These antidepressant actions of (2S,6S;2R,6R)-HNK, or other metabolites, as well as ketamine’s side effects, including abuse potential, may be related to direct effects on components of the dopaminergic (DAergic) system. Here, brain and blood distribution/clearance and pharmacodynamic analyses at DA receptors (D1–D5) and the DA, norepinephrine, and serotonin transporters were assessed for ketamine and its major metabolites (norketamine, dehydronorketamine, and HNKs). Additionally, we measured electrically evoked mesolimbic DA release and decay using fast-scan cyclic voltammetry following acute administration of subanesthetic doses of ketamine (2, 10, and 50 mg/kg, i.p.). Following ketamine injection, ketamine, norketamine, and multiple hydroxynorketamines were detected in the plasma and brain of mice. Dehydronorketamine was detectable in plasma, but concentrations were below detectable limits in the brain. Ketamine did not alter the magnitude or kinetics of evoked DA release in the nucleus accumbens in anesthetized mice. Neither ketamine’s enantiomers nor its metabolites had affinity for DA receptors or the DA, noradrenaline, and serotonin transporters (up to 10 μM). These results suggest that neither the side effects nor antidepressant actions of ketamine or ketamine metabolites are associated with direct effects on mesolimbic DAergic neurotransmission. Previously observed in vivo changes in DAergic neurotransmission following ketamine administration are likely indirect. PMID

  19. Prototype of an intertwined secondary-metabolite supercluster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillipp Wiemann; Chun-Jun. Guo; Jonathan M. Palmer; Relebohile Sekonyela; Clay C.C. Wang; Nancy P. Keller

    2013-01-01

    The hallmark trait of fungal secondary-metabolite gene clusters is well established, consisting of contiguous enzymatic and often regulatory gene(s) devoted to the production of a metabolite of a specific chemical class. Unexpectedly, we have found a deviation from this motif in a subtelomeric region of Aspergillus fumigatus. This region, under the...

  20. [Identification of saponins from Panax notoginseng in metabolites of rats].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Wen-Wen; Zhang, Yin; Qiu, Shou-Bei; Zhu, Fen-Xia; Jia, Xiao-Bin; Tang, Dao-Quan; Chen, Bin

    2017-10-01

    UPLC-QTOF-MS/MS was used to identify metabolites in rat blood, urine and feces after the administration of n-butanol extract derived from steamed notoginseng. The metabolic process of saponins came from steamed notoginseng was analyzed. The metabolites were processed by PeakView software, and identified according to the structural characteristics of prototype compounds and the accurate qualitative and quantitative changes of common metabolic pathways. Four saponins metabolites were identified based on MS/MS information of metabolites, namely ginsenoside Rh₄, Rk₃, Rk₁, Rg₅,and their 15 metabolites were verified. The metabolic pathways of the four ginsenosides in n-butanol extract included glucuronidation, desugar, sulfation, dehydromethylation, and branch loss. The metabolites of main active saponin components derived from steamed Panax notoginseng were analyzed from the perspective of qualitative analysis. And the material basis for the efficacy of steamed notoginseng was further clarified. Copyright© by the Chinese Pharmaceutical Association.

  1. 13C Metabolic Flux Analysis for systematic metabolic engineering of S. cerevisiae for overproduction of fatty acids.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amit Ghosh

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Efficient redirection of microbial metabolism into the abundant production of desired bioproducts remains non-trivial. Here we used flux-based modeling approaches to improve yields of fatty acids in S. cerevisiae. We combined 13C labeling data with comprehensive genome-scale models to shed light onto microbial metabolism and improve metabolic engineering efforts. We concentrated on studying the balance of acetyl-CoA, a precursor metabolite for the biosynthesis of fatty acids. A genome-wide acetyl-CoA balance study showed ATP citrate lyase from Y. lipolytica as a robust source of cytoplasmic acetyl-CoA and malate synthase as a desirable target for down-regulation in terms of acetyl-CoA consumption. These genetic modifications were applied to S. cerevisiae WRY2, a strain that is capable of producing 460 mg L of free fatty acids. With the addition of ATP citrate lyase and down-regulation of malate synthase the engineered strain produced 26 per cent more free fatty acids. Further increases in free fatty acid production of 33 per cent were obtained by knocking out the cytoplasmic glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, which flux analysis had shown was competing for carbon flux upstream with the carbon flux through the acetyl-CoA production pathway in the cytoplasm. In total, the genetic interventions applied in this work increased fatty acid production by 70 per cent.

  2. Vitamin K3 (menadione) redox cycling inhibits cytochrome P450-mediated metabolism and inhibits parathion intoxication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jan, Yi-Hua; Richardson, Jason R; Baker, Angela A; Mishin, Vladimir; Heck, Diane E; Laskin, Debra L; Laskin, Jeffrey D

    2015-10-01

    Parathion, a widely used organophosphate insecticide, is considered a high priority chemical threat. Parathion toxicity is dependent on its metabolism by the cytochrome P450 system to paraoxon (diethyl 4-nitrophenyl phosphate), a cytotoxic metabolite. As an effective inhibitor of cholinesterases, paraoxon causes the accumulation of acetylcholine in synapses and overstimulation of nicotinic and muscarinic cholinergic receptors, leading to characteristic signs of organophosphate poisoning. Inhibition of parathion metabolism to paraoxon represents a potential approach to counter parathion toxicity. Herein, we demonstrate that menadione (methyl-1,4-naphthoquinone, vitamin K3) is a potent inhibitor of cytochrome P450-mediated metabolism of parathion. Menadione is active in redox cycling, a reaction mediated by NADPH-cytochrome P450 reductase that preferentially uses electrons from NADPH at the expense of their supply to the P450s. Using human recombinant CYP 1A2, 2B6, 3A4 and human liver microsomes, menadione was found to inhibit the formation of paraoxon from parathion. Administration of menadione bisulfite (40mg/kg, ip) to rats also reduced parathion-induced inhibition of brain cholinesterase activity, as well as parathion-induced tremors and the progression of other signs and symptoms of parathion poisoning. These data suggest that redox cycling compounds, such as menadione, have the potential to effectively mitigate the toxicity of organophosphorus pesticides including parathion which require cytochrome P450-mediated activation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Inhibition of human anthracycline reductases by emodin — A possible remedy for anthracycline resistance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hintzpeter, Jan, E-mail: hintzpeter@toxi.uni-kiel.de [Institute of Toxicology and Pharmacology for Natural Scientists, University Medical School Schleswig-Holstein, Campus Kiel, Brunswiker Str. 10, 24105 Kiel (Germany); Seliger, Jan Moritz [Institute of Toxicology and Pharmacology for Natural Scientists, University Medical School Schleswig-Holstein, Campus Kiel, Brunswiker Str. 10, 24105 Kiel (Germany); Hofman, Jakub [Department of Biochemical Sciences, Faculty of Pharmacy in Hradec Kralove, Charles University in Prague, Heyrovskeho 1203, 50005 Hradec Kralove (Czech Republic); Martin, Hans-Joerg [Institute of Toxicology and Pharmacology for Natural Scientists, University Medical School Schleswig-Holstein, Campus Kiel, Brunswiker Str. 10, 24105 Kiel (Germany); Wsol, Vladimir [Department of Biochemical Sciences, Faculty of Pharmacy in Hradec Kralove, Charles University in Prague, Heyrovskeho 1203, 50005 Hradec Kralove (Czech Republic); Maser, Edmund [Institute of Toxicology and Pharmacology for Natural Scientists, University Medical School Schleswig-Holstein, Campus Kiel, Brunswiker Str. 10, 24105 Kiel (Germany)

    2016-02-15

    The clinical application of anthracyclines, like daunorubicin and doxorubicin, is limited by two factors: dose-related cardiotoxicity and drug resistance. Both have been linked to reductive metabolism of the parent drug to their metabolites daunorubicinol and doxorubicinol, respectively. These metabolites show significantly less anti-neoplastic properties as their parent drugs and accumulate in cardiac tissue leading to chronic cardiotoxicity. Therefore, we aimed to identify novel and potent natural inhibitors for anthracycline reductases, which enhance the anticancer effect of anthracyclines by preventing the development of anthracycline resistance. Human enzymes responsible for the reductive metabolism of daunorubicin were tested for their sensitivity towards anthrachinones, in particular emodin and anthraflavic acid. Intense inhibition kinetic data for the most effective daunorubicin reductases, including IC{sub 50}- and K{sub i}-values, the mode of inhibition, as well as molecular docking, were compiled. Subsequently, a cytotoxicity profile and the ability of emodin to reverse daunorubicin resistance were determined using multiresistant A549 lung cancer and HepG2 liver cancer cells. Emodin potently inhibited the four main human daunorubicin reductases in vitro. Further, we could demonstrate that emodin is able to synergistically sensitize human cancer cells towards daunorubicin at clinically relevant concentrations. Therefore, emodin may yield the potential to enhance the therapeutic effectiveness of anthracyclines by preventing anthracycline resistance via inhibition of the anthracycline reductases. In symphony with its known pharmacological properties, emodin might be a compound of particular interest in the management of anthracycline chemotherapy efficacy and their adverse effects. - Highlights: • Natural and synthetic compounds were identified as inhibitors for human daunorubicin reductases. • Emodin is a potent inhibitor for human daunorubicin

  4. Investigation of a potential mechanism for the inhibition of SmTGR by Auranofin and its implications for Plasmodium falciparum inhibition

    KAUST Repository

    Caroli, Antonia

    2012-01-01

    Schistosoma mansoni and Plasmodium falciparum are pathogen parasites that spend part of their lives in the blood stream of the human host and are therefore heavily exposed to fluxes of toxic reactive oxygen species (ROS). SmTGR, an essential enzyme of the S. mansoni ROS detoxification machinery, is known to be inhibited by Auranofin although the inhibition mechanism has not been completely clarified. Auranofin also kills P. falciparum, even if its molecular targets are unknown. Here, we used computational and docking techniques to investigate the molecular mechanism of interaction between SmTGR and Auranofin. Furthermore, we took advantage of the homology relationship and of docking studies to assess if PfTR, the SmTGR malaria parasite homologue, can be a putative target for Auranofin. Our findings support a recently hypothesized molecular mechanism of inhibition for SmTGR and suggest that PfTR is indeed a possible and attractive drug target in P. falciparum. © 2011 Elsevier Inc.

  5. NIK and IKKbeta interdependence in NF-kappaB signalling--flux analysis of regulation through metabolites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hong-Bum; Evans, Iona; Smallwood, Rod; Holcombe, Mike; Qwarnstrom, Eva E

    2010-02-01

    Activation of the transcription factor NF-kappaB is central to control of immune and inflammatory responses. Cytokine induced activation through the classical or canonical pathway relies on degradation of the inhibitor, IkappaBalpha and regulation by the IKKbeta kinase. In addition, the NF-kappaB is activated through the NF-kappaB-inducing kinase, NIK. Analysis of the IKK/NIK inter-relationship and its impact on NF-kappaB control, were analysed by mathematical modelling, using matrix formalism and stoichiometrically balanced reactions. The analysis considered a range of bio-reactions and core metabolites and their role in relation to kinase activation and in control of specific steps of the NF-kappaB pathway. The model predicts a growth-rate and time-dependent transfer of the primary kinase activity from IKKbeta to NIK. In addition, it suggests that NIK/IKKbeta interdependence is controlled by intermediates of phosphoribosylpyrophosphate (PRPP) within the glycolysis pathway, and thus, identifies a link between specific metabolic events and kinase activation in inflammatory signal transduction. Subsequent in vitro experiments, carried out to validate the impact of IKK/NIK interdependence, confirmed signal amplification at the level of the NF-kappaB/IkappaBalpha complex control in the presence of both kinases. Further, they demonstrate that the induced potentiation is due to synergistic enhancement of relA-dependent activation. Copyright (c) 2009 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Secondary metabolites from Eremostachys laciniata

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Calis, Ihsan; Güvenc, Aysegül; Armagan, Metin

    2008-01-01

    ), and forsythoside B (18), and five flavone derivatives, luteolin (19), luteolin 7-O-β-D-glucopyranoside (20), luteolin 7-O-(6''-O-β-D-apiofuranosyl)-β-D-glucopyranoside (21), apigenin 7-O-β-D-glucopyranoside (22), and apigenin 7-O-(6''-O-p-coumaroyl)-β-D-glucopyranoside (23). The structures of the metabolites were...... elucidated from spectroscopic (UV, IR, 1D- and 2D-NMR) and ESI-MS evidence, as well as from their specific optical rotation. The presence of these metabolites of three different classes strongly supports the close relationship of the genera Eremostachys and Phlomis....

  7. Cyanobacteria as Cell Factories to Produce Plant Secondary Metabolites

    OpenAIRE

    Xue, Yong; He, Qingfang

    2015-01-01

    Cyanobacteria represent a promising platform for the production of plant secondary metabolites. Their capacity to express plant P450 proteins, which have essential functions in the biosynthesis of many plant secondary metabolites, makes cyanobacteria ideal for this purpose, and their photosynthetic capability allows cyanobacteria to grow with simple nutrient inputs. This review summarizes the advantages of using cyanobacteria to transgenically produce plant secondary metabolites. Some techniq...

  8. An update on organohalogen metabolites produced by basidiomycetes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Field, J.A.; Wijnberg, J.B.P.A.

    2003-01-01

    Basidiomycetes are an ecologically important group of higher fungi known for their widespread capacity to produce organohalogen metabolites. To date, 100 different organohalogen metabolites (mostly chlorinated) have been identified from strains in 70 genera of Basidiomycetes. This manuscript

  9. Metabolome analysis - mass spectrometry and microbial primary metabolites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Højer-Pedersen, Jesper Juul

    2008-01-01

    , and therefore sample preparation is critical for metabolome analysis. The three major steps in sample preparation for metabolite analysis are sampling, extraction and concentration. These three steps were evaluated for the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae with primary focus on analysis of a large number...... of metabolites by one method. The results highlighted that there were discrepancies between different methods. To increase the throughput of cultivation, S. cerevisiae was grown in microtitier plates (MTPs), and the growth was found to be comparable with cultivations in shake flasks. The carbon source was either...... a theoretical metabolome. This showed that in combination with the specificity of MS up to 84% of the metabolites can be identified in a high-accuracy ESI-spectrum. A total of 66 metabolites were systematically analyzed by positive and negative ESI-MS/MS with the aim of initiating a spectral library for ESI...

  10. The Use and Method of Action of Intravenous Lidocaine and Its Metabolite in Headache Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berk, Thomas; Silberstein, Stephen D

    2018-03-14

    Lidocaine, an amide anesthetic, has been used in the treatment of a wide variety of pain disorders for over 75 years. In addition to pain control, lidocaine is an anti-arrhythmic agent and has anti-inflammatory properties. Lidocaine's unique properties, including nonlinear pharmacokinetics, have limited its modern-day use. The purpose of this review is to offer a better understanding of the properties of this unique treatment, which we hope will allow more practitioners to offer this to their patients. An analysis of the history, pharmacokinetics, and relevant uses of lidocaine in headache medicine based on a synthesis of the medical literature and clinical experience. Lidocaine is an amide anesthetic that inhibits voltage gated sodium channels, and lidocaine metabolism occurs exclusively in the liver. One lidocaine metabolite has its own unique properties and may be an active form of the drug. Open label and retrospective studies have investigated the use of lidocaine in many headache disorders, primarily via injection or infusion. Further research into the active metabolite of lidocaine may allow for its use as a novel nonopiate treatment of chronic pain. © 2018 American Headache Society.

  11. Genealogy profiling through strain improvement by using metabolic network analysis: metabolic flux genealogy of several generations of lysine-producing corynebacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wittmann, Christoph; Heinzle, Elmar

    2002-12-01

    A comprehensive approach of metabolite balancing, (13)C tracer studies, gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry, and isotopomer modeling was applied for comparative metabolic network analysis of a genealogy of five successive generations of lysine-producing Corynebacterium glutamicum. The five strains examined (C. glutamicum ATCC 13032, 13287, 21253, 21526, and 21543) were previously obtained by random mutagenesis and selection. Throughout the genealogy, the lysine yield in batch cultures increased markedly from 1.2 to 24.9% relative to the glucose uptake flux. Strain optimization was accompanied by significant changes in intracellular flux distributions. The relative pentose phosphate pathway (PPP) flux successively increased, clearly corresponding to the product yield. Moreover, the anaplerotic net flux increased almost twofold as a consequence of concerted regulation of C(3) carboxylation and C(4) decarboxylation fluxes to cover the increased demand for lysine formation; thus, the overall increase was a consequence of concerted regulation of C(3) carboxylation and C(4) decarboxylation fluxes. The relative flux through isocitrate dehydrogenase dropped from 82.7% in the wild type to 59.9% in the lysine-producing mutants. In contrast to the NADPH demand, which increased from 109 to 172% due to the increasing lysine yield, the overall NADPH supply remained constant between 185 and 196%, resulting in a decrease in the apparent NADPH excess through strain optimization. Extrapolated to industrial lysine producers, the NADPH supply might become a limiting factor. The relative contributions of PPP and the tricarboxylic acid cycle to NADPH generation changed markedly, indicating that C. glutamicum is able to maintain a constant supply of NADPH under completely different flux conditions. Statistical analysis by a Monte Carlo approach revealed high precision for the estimated fluxes, underlining the

  12. New secondary metabolites of phenylbutyrate in humans and rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasumov, Takhar; Brunengraber, Laura L; Comte, Blandine; Puchowicz, Michelle A; Jobbins, Kathryn; Thomas, Katherine; David, France; Kinman, Renee; Wehrli, Suzanne; Dahms, William; Kerr, Douglas; Nissim, Itzhak; Brunengraber, Henri

    2004-01-01

    Phenylbutyrate is used to treat inborn errors of ureagenesis, malignancies, cystic fibrosis, and thalassemia. High-dose phenylbutyrate therapy results in toxicity, the mechanism of which is unexplained. The known metabolites of phenylbutyrate are phenylacetate, phenylacetylglutamine, and phenylbutyrylglutamine. These are excreted in urine, accounting for a variable fraction of the dose. We identified new metabolites of phenylbutyrate in urine of normal humans and in perfused rat livers. These metabolites result from interference between the metabolism of phenylbutyrate and that of carbohydrates and lipids. The new metabolites fall into two categories, glucuronides and phenylbutyrate beta-oxidation side products. Two questions are raised by these data. First, is the nitrogen-excreting potential of phenylbutyrate diminished by ingestion of carbohydrates or lipids? Second, does competition between the metabolism of phenylbutyrate, carbohydrates, and lipids alter the profile of phenylbutyrate metabolites? Finally, we synthesized glycerol esters of phenylbutyrate. These are partially bioavailable in rats and could be used to administer large doses of phenylbutyrate in a sodium-free, noncaustic form.

  13. Novel urinary metabolite of d-delta-tocopherol in rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chiku, S.; Hamamura, K.; Nakamura, T.

    1984-01-01

    A novel metabolite of d-delta-tocopherol was isolated from the urine of rats given d-3,4-[ 3 H 2 ]-delta-tocopherol intravenously. The metabolite was collected from the urine of rats given d-delta-tocopherol in the same manner as that of the labeled compound. It was found that the metabolites consisted of sulfate conjugates. The portion of the major metabolite released with sulfatase was determined to be 2,8-dimethyl-2-(2'-carboxyethyl)-6-chromanol by infrared spectra, nuclear magnetic resonance spectra, and mass spectra. The proposed structure was confirmed by comparing the analytical results with those of a synthetically derived compound. As a result of the structural elucidation of this novel metabolite, a pathway for the biological transformation of delta-tocopherol is proposed which is different from that of alpha-tocopherol. A characteristic feature of the pathway is the absence of any opening of the chroman ring throughout the sequence

  14. Circulating prostacyclin metabolites in the dog

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taylor, B.M.; Shebuski, R.J.; Sun, F.F.

    1983-01-01

    The present study was designed to determine the concentration of prostacyclin (PGI2) metabolites in the blood of the dog. After a bolus i.v. dose of [11 beta- 3 H]PGI2 (5 micrograms/kg) into each of five dogs, blood samples were withdrawn at 0.33, 0.67, 1, 3, 5, 20, 30, 60 and 120 min postdrug administration. Plasma samples were extracted and the radioactive components were analyzed by two-dimensional thin-layer chromatography with autoradiofluorography and radio-high-performance liquid chromatography. The compounds were identified by comparing their mobility with synthetic standards; only parallel responses observed in both tests constituted positive identification. Seven metabolites were identified by these two techniques: 6-keto-prostaglandin (PG)F1 alpha; 6-keto-PGE1; 2,3-dinor-6-keto-PGF 1 alpha; 2,3-dinor-13,14-dihydro-6,15-diketo-20-carboxyl PGF 1 alpha; and 2,3,18,19-tetranor-13,14-dihydro-6,15-diketo-20-carboxyl PGF 1 alpha. Several additional compounds, both polar and nonpolar in nature, which did not co-chromatograph with any of our standards were also detected. Early samples consisted predominantly of 6-keto-PGF 1 alpha and other 20-carbon metabolites. By 30 min, the predominant metabolites were the 16- and 18-carbon dicarboxylic acids. By 60 min, 85% of the radioactivity was associated with two unidentified polar compounds. The evidence suggests that 6-keto-PGF 1 alpha probably reflects only the transient levels of freshly entering PGI2 in the circulation, whereas levels of the most polar metabolites (e.g., dihydro-diketo-carboxyl tetranor-PGF 2 alpha) may be a better measure of the overall PGI2 presence due to its longer half-life in circulation

  15. Liquid jet impingement cooling with diamond substrates for extremely high heat flux applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lienhard V, J.H.

    1993-01-01

    The combination of impinging jets and diamond substrates may provide an effective solution to a class of extremely high heat flux problems in which very localized heat loads must be removed. Some potential applications include the cooling of high-heat-load components in synchrotron x-ray, fusion, and semiconductor laser systems. Impinging liquid jets are a very effective vehicle for removing high heat fluxes. The liquid supply arrangement is relatively simple, and low thermal resistances can be routinely achieved. A jet's cooling ability is a strong function of the size of the cooled area relative to the jet diameter. For relatively large area targets, the critical heat fluxes can approach 20 W/mm 2 . In this situation, burnout usually originates at the outer edge of the cooled region as increasing heat flux inhibits the liquid supply. Limitations from liquid supply are minimized when heating is restricted to the jet stagnation zone. The high stagnation pressure and high velocity gradients appear to suppress critical flux phenomena, and fluxes of up to 400 W/mm 2 have been reached without evidence of burnout. Instead, the restrictions on heat flux are closely related to properties of the cooled target. Target properties become an issue owing to the large temperatures and large temperature gradients that accompany heat fluxes over 100 W/mm 2 . These conditions necessitate a target with both high thermal conductivity to prevent excessive temperatures and good mechanical properties to prevent mechanical failures. Recent developments in synthetic diamond technology present a possible solution to some of the solid-side constraints on heat flux. Polycrystalline diamond foils can now be produced by chemical vapor deposition in reasonable quantity and at reasonable cost. Synthetic single crystal diamonds as large as 1 cm 2 are also available

  16. Effect of agitation rate on the production of antifungal metabolites by Streptomyces hygroscopicus in a lab-scale bioreactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mitrović Ivana Ž.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The application of antifungal compounds produced by microorganisms in the control of plant diseases caused by phytopathogenic fungi is a promising alternative to synthetic pesticides. Among phytopathogenic fungi, Alternaria alternata and Fusarium avenaceum are significant pathogens responsible for the storage rot of apple fruits. During storage, transport and marketing A. alternata and F. avenaceum can cause significant losses of apple fruits and their control is of great importance for the producers and consumers. In the present study, the effects of agitation rate on the production of antifungal methabolite( s by Streptomyces hygroscopicus in a 3-L lab-scale bioreactor (Biostat® Aplus, Sartorius AG, Germany against two isolates of A. alternata and two isolates of F. avenaceum were investigated. The cultivation of S. hygroscopicus was carried out at 27°C with agitation rates of 100 rpm and 200 rpm during 7 days. The aim was to analyze the bioprocess parameters of biofungicide production in a medium containing glycerol as a carbon source, and examine the effect of agitation rate on the production of antifungal metabolite(s. The in vitro antifungal activity of the produced metabolites against fungi from the genera Alternaria and Fusarium grown on potato dextrose agar medium was determined every 24 h using wells technique. In the experiments conducted in the bioreactor at different stirring speeds, it was found that the maximum production of antifungal metabolites occurred after 96 hours of cultivation. A higher consumption of nutrients and a larger inhibition zone diameter was registered in the experiment with an agitation rate of 200 rpm. [Project of the Serbian Ministry of Education, Science and Technological Development, Grant no. TR-31002

  17. Flux Balance Analysis Inspired Bioprocess Upgrading for Lycopene Production by a Metabolically Engineered Strain of Yarrowia lipolytica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Komi Nambou

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Genome-scale metabolic models embody a significant advantage of systems biology since their applications as metabolic flux simulation models enable predictions for the production of industrially-interesting metabolites. The biotechnological production of lycopene from Yarrowia lipolytica is an emerging scope that has not been fully scrutinized, especially for what concerns cultivation conditions of newly generated engineered strains. In this study, by combining flux balance analysis (FBA and Plackett-Burman design, we screened chemicals for lycopene production from a metabolically engineered strain of Y. lipolytica. Lycopene concentrations of 126 and 242 mg/L were achieved correspondingly from the FBA-independent and the FBA-assisted designed media in fed-batch cultivation mode. Transcriptional studies revealed upregulations of heterologous genes in media designed according to FBA, thus implying the efficiency of model predictions. Our study will potentially support upgraded lycopene and other terpenoids production from existing or prospect bioengineered strains of Y. lipolytica and/or closely related yeast species.

  18. Characterization of differential cocaine metabolism in mouse and rat through metabolomics-guided metabolite profiling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Dan; Shi, Xiaolei; Wang, Lei; Gosnell, Blake A; Chen, Chi

    2013-01-01

    Rodent animal models have been widely used for studying neurologic and toxicological events associated with cocaine abuse. It is known that the mouse is more susceptible to cocaine-induced hepatotoxicity (CIH) than the rat. However, the causes behind this species-dependent sensitivity to cocaine have not been elucidated. In this study, cocaine metabolism in the mouse and rat was characterized through LC-MS-based metabolomic analysis of urine samples and were further compared through calculating the relative abundance of individual cocaine metabolites. The results showed that the levels of benzoylecgonine, a major cocaine metabolite from ester hydrolysis, were comparable in the urine from the mice and rats treated with the same dose of cocaine. However, the levels of the cocaine metabolites from oxidative metabolism, such as N-hydroxybenzoylnorecgonine and hydroxybenzoylecgonine, differed dramatically between the two species, indicating species-dependent cocaine metabolism. Subsequent structural analysis through accurate mass analysis and LC-MS/MS fragmentation revealed that N-oxidation reactions, including N-demethylation and N-hydroxylation, are preferred metabolic routes in the mouse, while extensive aryl hydroxylation reactions occur in the rat. Through stable isotope tracing and in vitro enzyme reactions, a mouse-specific α-glucoside of N-hydroxybenzoylnorecgonine and a group of aryl hydroxy glucuronides high in the rat were identified and structurally elucidated. The differences in the in vivo oxidative metabolism of cocaine between the two rodent species were confirmed by the in vitro microsomal incubations. Chemical inhibition of P450 enzymes further revealed that different P450-mediated oxidative reactions in the ecgonine and benzoic acid moieties of cocaine contribute to the species-dependent biotransformation of cocaine.

  19. Pharmacokinetics of ifosfamide and some metabolites in children

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kaijser, G. P.; de Kraker, J.; Bult, A.; Underberg, W. J.; Beijnen, J. H.

    1998-01-01

    The pharmacokinetics of ifosfamide and some metabolites in children was investigated. The patients received various doses of ifosfamide, mostly by continuous infusion, over several days. The penetration of ifosfamide and its metabolites into the cerebrospinal fluid was also studied in four cases.

  20. Biogenic synthesis of silver nanoparticle by using secondary metabolites from Pseudomonas aeruginosa DM1 and its anti-algal effect on Chlorella vulgaris and Chlorella pyrenoidosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumari, Rima; Barsainya, Manjari; Singh, Devendra Pratap

    2017-02-01

    Biogenic synthesis of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) using extracellular metabolites from the bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa DM1 offers an eco-friendly and sustainable way of metal nanoparticle synthesis. The present work highlights the biotransformation of silver nitrate solution into AgNP, mediated by extracellular secondary metabolite pyoverdine, a siderophore produced by P. aeruginosa. The bioreduction of silver ions into AgNPs by using pyoverdine was recorded in terms of Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) analysis and color change in the reaction mixture (AgNO 3 + pyoverdine) from pale yellow to dark brown with absorption maxima at 415 nm. The results of X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis of AgNPs showed its crystalline face-centered cubic structure. The scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) pictures of AgNPs showed spherical morphology of AgNP in the range of 45-100 nm, with tendency of agglomerations. The energy-dispersive X-ray (EDX) analysis of particles provided strong signal of elemental silver with few minor peaks of other impurities. The present approach offers a unique in vitro method of metal nanoparticle synthesis by exogenously produced bacterial secondary metabolites, where direct contact between the toxic metal and biological resource material can be avoided. The biologically synthesized AgNPs are found to have anti-algal effects against two species of Chlorella (Chlorella vulgaris and Chlorella pyenoidosa), as indicated by zone of growth inhibition on algal culture plates. Further results exhibit concentration-dependent progressive inhibition of chlorophyll content in the algal cells by AgNPs, confirming the algicidal effect of AgNPs.

  1. Novel pyrazine metabolites found in polymyxin biosynthesis by Paenibacillus polymyxa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beck, Hans Christian; Hansen, Anne M; Lauritsen, Frants R

    2003-01-01

    A complex mixture of methyl-branched alkyl-substituted pyrazines was found in the growth medium of the polymyxin-producing bacterium Paenibacillus polymyxa, and of these, seven are new natural compounds. A total of 19 pyrazine metabolites were identified. The dominant metabolite was 2,5-diisoprop......A complex mixture of methyl-branched alkyl-substituted pyrazines was found in the growth medium of the polymyxin-producing bacterium Paenibacillus polymyxa, and of these, seven are new natural compounds. A total of 19 pyrazine metabolites were identified. The dominant metabolite was 2...

  2. Design of a flux buffer based on the flux shuttle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gershenson, M.

    1991-01-01

    This paper discusses the design considerations for a flux buffer based on the flux-shuttle concept. Particular attention is given to the issues of flux popping, stability of operation and saturation levels for a large input. Modulation techniques used in order to minimize 1/f noise, in addition to offsets are also analyzed. Advantages over conventional approaches using a SQUID for a flux buffer are discussed. Results of computer simulations are presented

  3. Assessing the associations of blood metabolites with osteoporosis: a Mendelian randomization study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Li; Wen, Yan; Zhang, Lei; Xu, Peng; Liang, Xiao; Du, Yanan; Li, Ping; He, Awen; Fan, QianRui; Hao, Jingcan; Wang, Wenyu; Guo, Xiong; Shen, Hui; Tian, Qing; Zhang, Feng; Deng, Hong-Wen

    2018-03-01

    Osteoporosis is a metabolic bone disease. The impact of blood metabolites on the development of osteoporosis remains elusive now. To explore the relationship between blood metabolites and osteoporosis. We used 2,286 unrelated Caucasian subjects as discovery samples and 3,143 unrelated Caucasian subjects from the Framingham heart study (FHS) as replication samples. Bone mineral density (BMD) were measured using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry. Genome-wide SNP genotyping was performed using Affymetrix Human SNP Array 6.0 (for discovery samples) and Affymetrix SNP 500K and 50K array (for FHS replication samples). The SNP sets significantly associated with blood metabolites were obtained from a published whole-genome sequencing study. For each subject, the genetic risk score (GRS) of metabolite was calculated from the genotype data of metabolite associated SNP sets. Pearson correlation analysis was conducted to evaluate the potential impact of blood metabolites on the variations bone phenotypes. 10,000 permutations were conducted to calculate the empirical P value and false discovery rate (FDR). 481 blood metabolites were analyzed in this study. We identified multiple blood metabolites associated with hip BMD, such as 1,5-anhydroglucitol(1,5-AG) (Pdiscovery metabolites on the variations of BMD, and identified several candidate blood metabolites for osteoporosis.

  4. Metabolites of alectinib in human: their identification and pharmacological activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mika Sato-Nakai

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Two metabolites (M4 and M1b in plasma and four metabolites (M4, M6, M1a and M1b in faeces were detected through the human ADME study following a single oral administration of [14C]alectinib, a small-molecule anaplastic lymphoma kinase inhibitor, to healthy subjects. In the present study, M1a and M1b, which chemical structures had not been identified prior to the human ADME study, were identified as isomers of a carboxylate metabolite oxidatively cleaved at the morpholine ring. In faeces, M4 and M1b were the main metabolites, which shows that the biotransformation to M4 and M1b represents two main metabolic pathways for alectinib. In plasma, M4 was a major metabolite and M1b was a minor metabolite. The contribution to in vivo pharmacological activity of these circulating metabolites was assessed from their in vitro pharmacological activity and plasma protein binding. M4 had a similar cancer cell growth inhibitory activity and plasma protein binding to that of alectinib, suggesting its contribution to the antitumor activity of alectinib, whereas the pharmacological activity of M1b was insignificant.

  5. Metabolite Profiling of Candidatus Liberibacter Infection in Hamlin Sweet Oranges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Wei-Lun; Wang, Yu

    2018-04-18

    Huanglongbing (HLB), also known as citrus greening disease, caused by Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus (CLas), is considered the most serious citrus disease in the world. CLas infection has been shown to greatly affect metabolite profiles in citrus fruits. However, because of uneven distribution of CLas throughout the tree and a minimum bacterial titer requirement for polymerase chain reaction (PCR) detection, the infected trees may test false negative. To prevent this, metabolites of healthy Hamlin oranges (CLas-) obtained from the citrus undercover protection systems (CUPS) were investigated. Comparison of the metabolite profile of juice obtained from CLas- and CLas+ (asymptomatic and symptomatic) trees revealed significant differences in both volatile and nonvolatile metabolites. However, no consistent pattern could be observed in alcohols, esters, sesquiterpenes, sugars, flavanones, and limonoids as compared to previous studies. These results suggest that CLas may affect metabolite profiles of citrus fruits earlier than detecting infection by PCR. Citric acid, nobiletin, malic acid, and phenylalanine were identified as the metabolic biomarkers associated with the progression of HLB. Thus, the differential metabolites found in this study may serve as the biomarkers of HLB in its early stage, and the metabolite signature of CLas infection may provide useful information for developing a potential treatment strategy.

  6. Metabolic Flux Distribution during Defatting of Steatotic Human Hepatoma (HepG2 Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriel Yarmush

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Methods that rapidly decrease fat in steatotic hepatocytes may be helpful to recover severely fatty livers for transplantation. Defatting kinetics are highly dependent upon the extracellular medium composition; however, the pathways involved are poorly understood. Steatosis was induced in human hepatoma cells (HepG2 by exposure to high levels of free fatty acids, followed by defatting using plain medium containing no fatty acids, or medium supplemented with a cocktail of defatting agents previously described before. We measured the levels of 28 extracellular metabolites and intracellular triglyceride, and fed the data into a steady-state mass balance model to estimate strictly intracellular fluxes. We found that during defatting, triglyceride content decreased, while beta-oxidation, the tricarboxylic acid cycle, and the urea cycle increased. These fluxes were augmented by defatting agents, and even more so by hyperoxic conditions. In all defatting conditions, the rate of extracellular glucose uptake/release was very small compared to the internal supply from glycogenolysis, and glycolysis remained highly active. Thus, in steatotic HepG2 cells, glycolysis and fatty acid oxidation may co-exist. Together, these pathways generate reducing equivalents that are supplied to mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation.

  7. Metabolite Profiles of Lactic Acid Bacteria in Grass Silage▿

    OpenAIRE

    Broberg, Anders; Jacobsson, Karin; Ström, Katrin; Schnürer, Johan

    2007-01-01

    The metabolite production of lactic acid bacteria (LAB) on silage was investigated. The aim was to compare the production of antifungal metabolites in silage with the production in liquid cultures previously studied in our laboratory. The following metabolites were found to be present at elevated concentrations in silos inoculated with LAB strains: 3-hydroxydecanoic acid, 2-hydroxy-4-methylpentanoic acid, benzoic acid, catechol, hydrocinnamic acid, salicylic acid, 3-phenyllactic acid, 4-hydro...

  8. Aspergillus flavus secondary metabolites: more than just aflatoxins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aspergillus flavus is best known for producing the family of potent carcinogenic secondary metabolites known as aflatoxins. However, this opportunistic plant and animal pathogen also produces numerous other secondary metabolites, many of which have also been shown to be toxic. While about forty of t...

  9. Biomass hydrolysis inhibition at high hydrogen partial pressure in solid-state anaerobic digestion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cazier, E A; Trably, E; Steyer, J P; Escudie, R

    2015-08-01

    In solid-state anaerobic digestion, so-called ss-AD, biogas production is inhibited at high total solids contents. Such inhibition is likely caused by a slow diffusion of dissolved reaction intermediates that locally accumulate. In this study, we investigated the effect of H2 and CO2 partial pressure on ss-AD. Partial pressure of H2 and/or CO2 was artificially fixed, from 0 to 1 557mbars for H2 and from 0 to 427mbars for CO2. High partial pressure of H2 showed a significant effect on methanogenesis, while CO2 had no impact. At high [Formula: see text] , the overall substrate degradation decreased with no accumulation of metabolites from acidogenic bacteria, indicating that the hydrolytic activity was specifically impacted. Interestingly, such inhibition did not occur when CO2 was added with H2. This result suggests that CO2 gas transfer is probably a key factor in ss-AD from biomass. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Direct detection of glucuronide metabolites of lidocaine in sheep urine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doran, Gregory S; Smith, Alistair K; Rothwell, Jim T; Edwards, Scott H

    2018-02-15

    The anaesthetic lidocaine is metabolised quickly to produce a series of metabolites, including several hydroxylated metabolites, which are further metabolised by addition of a glucuronic acid moiety. Analysis of these glucuronide metabolites in urine is performed indirectly by cleaving the glucuronic acid group using β-glucuronidase. However, direct analysis of intact glucuronide conjugates is a more straightforward approach as it negates the need for long hydrolysis incubations, and minimises the oxidation of sensitive hydrolysis products, while also distinguishing between the two forms of hydroxylated metabolites. A method was developed to identify three intact glucuronides of lidocaine in sheep urine using LC-MS/MS, which was further confirmed by the synthesis of glucuronide derivatives of 3OH-MEGX and 4OH-LIDO. Direct analysis of urine allowed the detection of the glucuronide metabolites of hydroxylidocaine (OH-LIDO), hydroxyl-monoethylglycinexylidide (OH-MEGX), and hydroxy-2,6-xylidine (OH-XYL). Analysis of urine before and after β-glucuronidase digestion showed that the efficiency of hydrolysis of these glucuronide metabolites may be underestimated in some studies. Analysis of urine in the current study from three different sheep with similar glucuronide metabolite concentrations resulted in different hydrolysis efficiencies, which may have been a result of different levels of substrate binding by matrix components, preventing enzyme cleavage. The use of direct analysis of intact glucuronides has the benefit of being less influenced by these matrix effects, while also allowing analysis of unstable metabolites like 4OH-XYL, which rapidly oxidises after hydrolysis. Additionally, direct analysis is less expensive and less time consuming, while providing more information about the status of hydroxylated metabolites in urine. Crown Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. CONTROL OF POSTHARVEST TOMATO ROT BY SPORE SUSPENSION AND ANTIFUNGAL METABOLITES OF TRICHODERMA HARZIANUM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Momein H. El-Katatny

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Rot of cherry tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum fruits caused by several fungal pathogens is a detrimental disease leading to substantial yield loses worldwide. Alternaria isolates were the most common fungal species isolated from healthy or rotten fruits. Trichoderma harzianum spore suspension and culture filtrate were tested for their antagonistic activity on controlling tomato fruit rot. T. harzianum isolates suppressed or interfered with the growth of different postharvest tomato fungal pathogens albeit at different degrees. Their culture filtrate inhibited pathogen spore germination possibly due to the released extracellular diffusible metabolite(s. Besides, aberrant morphology of conidia was observed with deformation of hyphal tips. Furthermore, the resulting mycelia appeared desiccated with coagulated protoplasm leading to complete collapse of protoplasm in presence of T. harzianum culture filtrate. Application of T. harzianum spores to tomato fruits decreased disease severity significantly with the most profound effect at higher spore concentrations (108 cells per ml. Similarly, culture filtrate of T. harzianum prevented pathogen spore germination on the surface of tomato fruits leading to decreased incidence of rot symptoms at high culture filtrate concentrations. This work provides strong evidence that T. harzianum is a competent antagonist and its spore suspension and culture filtrate can be used efficiently to control postharvest tomato rot.

  12. Magnetic-flux pump

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hildebrandt, A. F.; Elleman, D. D.; Whitmore, F. C. (Inventor)

    1966-01-01

    A magnetic flux pump is described for increasing the intensity of a magnetic field by transferring flux from one location to the magnetic field. The device includes a pair of communicating cavities formed in a block of superconducting material, and a piston for displacing the trapped magnetic flux into the secondary cavity producing a field having an intense flux density.

  13. Inhibition of UDP-Glucuronosyltransferase (UGT) Isoforms by Arctiin and Arctigenin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hui; Zhao, Zhenying; Wang, Tao; Wang, Yijia; Cui, Xiao; Zhang, Huijuan; Fang, Zhong-Ze

    2016-07-01

    Arctiin is the major pharmacological ingredient of Fructus Arctii, and arctigenin is the metabolite of arctiin formed via the catalysis of human intestinal bacteria. The present study aims to investigate the inhibition profile of arctiin and arctigenin on important phase II drug-metabolizing enzymes UDP-glucuronosyltransferases (UGTs), indicating the possible herb-drug interaction. In vitro screening experiment showed that 100 μM of arctiin and arctigenin inhibited the activity of UGT1A3, 1A9, 2B7, and 2B15. Homology modeling-based in silico docking of arctiin and arctigenin into the activity cavity of UGT2B15 showed that hydrogen bonds and hydrophobic interactions contributed to the strong binding free energy of arctiin (-8.14 kcal/mol) and arctigenin (-8.43 kcal/mol) with UGT2B15. Inhibition kinetics study showed that arctiin and arctigenin exerted competitive and noncompetitive inhibition toward UGT2B15, respectively. The inhibition kinetic parameters (Ki ) were calculated to be 16.0 and 76.7 μM for the inhibition of UGT2B15 by arctiin and arctigenin, respectively. Based on the plasma concentration of arctiin and arctigenin after administration of 100 mg/kg of arctiin, the [I]/Ki values were calculated to be 0.3 and 0.007 for arctiin and arctigenin, respectively. Based on the inhibition evaluation standard ([I]/Ki   1, high possibility), arctiin might induce drug-drug interaction with medium possibility. Based on these results, clinical monitoring the utilization of Fructus Arctii is very important and necessary. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  14. CYP2C19*17 increases clopidogrel-mediated platelet inhibition but does not alter the pharmacokinetics of the active metabolite of clopidogrel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Rasmus Steen; Nielsen, Flemming; Stage, Tore Bjerregaard

    2014-01-01

    *1/*1, 11 CYP2C19*1/*17 and nine CYP2C19*17/*17). In Phase A, the pharmacokinetics of the derivatized active metabolite of clopidogrel (CAMD) and platelet function were determined after administration of a single oral dose of 600 mg clopidogrel (Plavix; Sanofi-Avensis, Horsholm, Denmark). In Phase B...

  15. Transport properties of valsartan, sacubitril and its active metabolite (LBQ657) as determinants of disposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanna, Imad; Alexander, Natalya; Crouthamel, Matthew H; Davis, John; Natrillo, Adrienne; Tran, Phi; Vapurcuyan, Arpine; Zhu, Bing

    2018-03-01

    1. The potential for drug-drug interactions of LCZ696 (a novel, crystalline complex comprising sacubitril and valsartan) was investigated in vitro. 2. Sacubitril was shown to be a highly permeable P-glycoprotein (P-gp) substrate and was hydrolyzed to the active anionic metabolite LBQ657 by human carboxylesterase 1 (CES1b and 1c). The multidrug resistance-associated protein 2 (MRP2) was shown to be capable of LBQ657 and valsartan transport that contributes to the elimination of either compound. 3. LBQ657 and valsartan were transported by OAT1, OAT3, OATP1B1 and OATP1B3, whereas no OAT- or OATP-mediated sacubitril transport was observed. 4. The contribution of OATP1B3 to valsartan transport (73%) was appreciably higher than that by OATP1B1 (27%), Alternatively, OATP1B1 contribution to the hepatic uptake of LBQ657 (∼70%) was higher than that by OATP1B3 (∼30%). 5. None of the compounds inhibited OCT1/OCT2, MATE1/MATE2-K, P-gp, or BCRP. Sacubitril and LBQ657 inhibited OAT3 but not OAT1, and valsartan inhibited the activity of both OAT1 and OAT3. Sacubitril and valsartan inhibited OATP1B1 and OATP1B3, whereas LBQ657 weakly inhibited OATP1B1 but not OATP1B3. 6. Drug interactions due to the inhibition of transporters are unlikely due to the redundancy of the available transport pathways (LBQ657: OATP1B1/OAT1/3 and valsartan: OATP1B3/OAT1/3) and the low therapeutic concentration of the LCZ696 analytes.

  16. Metabolite characterization in serum samples from normal healthy ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Metabolite characterization in serum samples from normal healthy human subjects by 1H and 13C NMR spectroscopy. D Misra, U Bajpai. Abstract. One and two dimensional NMR spectroscopy has been employed to characterize the various metabolites of serum control healthy samples. Two dimensional heteronuclear ...

  17. UV-guided isolation of fungal metabolites by HSCCC

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dalsgaard, P.W.; Nielsen, K.F.; Larsen, Thomas Ostenfeld

    2005-01-01

    Analytical standardised reversed phase liquid chromatography (RPLC) data can be helpful in finding a suitable solvent combination for isolation of fungal metabolites by high-speed counter current chromatography. Analysis of the distribution coefficient (K-D) of fungal metabolites in a series...... peptides from a crude fungal extract....

  18. Effect of metabolites produced by Trichoderma species against ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Metabolites released from Trichoderma viride, T. polysporum, T. hamatum and T. aureoviride were tested in culture medium against Ceratocystis paradoxa, which causes black seed rot in oil palm sprouted seeds. The Trichoderma metabolites had similar fungistatic effects on the growth of C. paradoxa except those from T.

  19. Methodology for and the determination of the major constituents and metabolites of the Amazonian botanical medicine ayahuasca in human urine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McIlhenny, Ethan H; Riba, Jordi; Barbanoj, Manel J; Strassman, Rick; Barker, Steven A

    2011-09-01

    Ayahuasca, also known as caapi or yage among various South American groups, holds a highly esteemed and millennia-old position in these cultures' medical and religious pharmacopeia. There is now an increasing interest in the potential for modern medical applications of ayahuasca, as well as concerns regarding its increasing potential for abuse. Toxicological and clinical research to address these issues will require information regarding its metabolism and clearance. Thus, a rapid, sensitive and specific method for characterization and quantitation of the major constituents and of the metabolites of ayahuasca in urine is needed. The present research provides a protocol for conducting such analyses. The characteristics of the method, conducted by sample dilution and using HPLC-electrospray ionization (ESI)-selected reaction monitoring (SRM)-tandem mass spectrometry, are presented. The application of the analytical protocol to urine samples collected from three individuals that were administered ayahuasca has also been demonstrated. The data show that the major metabolite of the hallucinogenic component of ayahuasca, N,N-dimethyltryptamine (DMT), is the corresponding N-oxide, the first time this metabolite has been described in in vivo studies in humans. Further, very little DMT was detected in urine, despite the inhibition of monoamine oxidase afforded by the presence of the harmala alkaloids in ayahuasca. The major harmala alkaloid excreted was tetrahydroharmine. Other excretion products and metabolites were also identified and quantified. The method described would be suitable for use in further toxicological and clinical research on ayahuasca. Copyright © 2010 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  20. Enhanced photo(geno)toxicity of demethylated chlorpromazine metabolites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palumbo, Fabrizio [Instituto de Tecnología Química UPV-CSIC/Departamento de Química, Universitat Politècnica de València, Camino de Vera s/n, 46022 Valencia (Spain); Garcia-Lainez, Guillermo [Instituto de Investigación Sanitaria (IIS) La Fe, Hospital Universitari i Politècnic La Fe, Avenida de Fernando Abril Martorell 106, 46026 Valencia (Spain); Limones-Herrero, Daniel [Instituto de Tecnología Química UPV-CSIC/Departamento de Química, Universitat Politècnica de València, Camino de Vera s/n, 46022 Valencia (Spain); Coloma, M. Dolores; Escobar, Javier [Instituto de Investigación Sanitaria (IIS) La Fe, Hospital Universitari i Politècnic La Fe, Avenida de Fernando Abril Martorell 106, 46026 Valencia (Spain); Jiménez, M. Consuelo [Instituto de Tecnología Química UPV-CSIC/Departamento de Química, Universitat Politècnica de València, Camino de Vera s/n, 46022 Valencia (Spain); Miranda, Miguel A., E-mail: mmiranda@qim.upv.es [Instituto de Tecnología Química UPV-CSIC/Departamento de Química, Universitat Politècnica de València, Camino de Vera s/n, 46022 Valencia (Spain); and others

    2016-12-15

    Chlorpromazine (CPZ) is an anti-psychotic drug widely used to treat disorders such as schizophrenia or manic-depression. Unfortunately, CPZ exhibits undesirable side effects such as phototoxic and photoallergic reactions in humans. In general, the influence of drug metabolism on this type of reactions has not been previously considered in photosafety testing. Thus, the present work aims to investigate the possible photo(geno)toxic potential of drug metabolites, using CPZ as an established reference compound. In this case, the metabolites selected for the study are demethylchlorpromazine (DMCPZ), didemethylchlorpromazine (DDMCPZ) and chlorpromazine sulfoxide (CPZSO). The demethylated CPZ metabolites DMCPZ and DDMCPZ maintain identical chromophore to the parent drug. In this work, it has been found that the nature of the aminoalkyl side chain modulates the hydrophobicity and the photochemical properties (for instance, the excited state lifetimes), but it does not change the photoreactivity pattern, which is characterized by reductive photodehalogenation, triggered by homolytic carbon-chlorine bond cleavage with formation of highly reactive aryl radical intermediates. Accordingly, these metabolites are phototoxic to cells, as revealed by the 3T3 NRU assay; their photo-irritation factors are even higher than that of CPZ. The same trend is observed in photogenotoxicity studies, both with isolated and with cellular DNA, where DMCPZ and DDMCPZ are more active than CPZ itself. In summary, side-chain demethylation of CPZ, as a consequence of Phase I biotransformation, does not result a photodetoxification. Instead, it leads to metabolites that exhibit in an even enhanced photo(geno)toxicity. - Highlights: • Demethylated CPZ metabolites are phototoxic to cells, as revealed by the NRU assay. • Single cell electrophoresis (Comet Assay) confirms the photodamage to cellular DNA. • DNA single strand breaks formation is observed on agarose gel electrophoresis.

  1. Enhanced photo(geno)toxicity of demethylated chlorpromazine metabolites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palumbo, Fabrizio; Garcia-Lainez, Guillermo; Limones-Herrero, Daniel; Coloma, M. Dolores; Escobar, Javier; Jiménez, M. Consuelo; Miranda, Miguel A.

    2016-01-01

    Chlorpromazine (CPZ) is an anti-psychotic drug widely used to treat disorders such as schizophrenia or manic-depression. Unfortunately, CPZ exhibits undesirable side effects such as phototoxic and photoallergic reactions in humans. In general, the influence of drug metabolism on this type of reactions has not been previously considered in photosafety testing. Thus, the present work aims to investigate the possible photo(geno)toxic potential of drug metabolites, using CPZ as an established reference compound. In this case, the metabolites selected for the study are demethylchlorpromazine (DMCPZ), didemethylchlorpromazine (DDMCPZ) and chlorpromazine sulfoxide (CPZSO). The demethylated CPZ metabolites DMCPZ and DDMCPZ maintain identical chromophore to the parent drug. In this work, it has been found that the nature of the aminoalkyl side chain modulates the hydrophobicity and the photochemical properties (for instance, the excited state lifetimes), but it does not change the photoreactivity pattern, which is characterized by reductive photodehalogenation, triggered by homolytic carbon-chlorine bond cleavage with formation of highly reactive aryl radical intermediates. Accordingly, these metabolites are phototoxic to cells, as revealed by the 3T3 NRU assay; their photo-irritation factors are even higher than that of CPZ. The same trend is observed in photogenotoxicity studies, both with isolated and with cellular DNA, where DMCPZ and DDMCPZ are more active than CPZ itself. In summary, side-chain demethylation of CPZ, as a consequence of Phase I biotransformation, does not result a photodetoxification. Instead, it leads to metabolites that exhibit in an even enhanced photo(geno)toxicity. - Highlights: • Demethylated CPZ metabolites are phototoxic to cells, as revealed by the NRU assay. • Single cell electrophoresis (Comet Assay) confirms the photodamage to cellular DNA. • DNA single strand breaks formation is observed on agarose gel electrophoresis.

  2. Reparation and Immunomodulating Properties of Bacillus sp. Metabolites from Permafrost.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalenova, L F; Melnikov, V P; Besedin, I M; Bazhin, A S; Gabdulin, M A; Kolyvanova, S S

    2017-09-01

    An ointment containing metabolites of Bacillus sp. microorganisms isolated from permafrost samples was applied onto the skin wound of BALB/c mice. Metabolites isolated during culturing of Bacillus sp. at 37°C produced a potent therapeutic effect and promoted wound epithelialization by 30% in comparison with the control (ointment base) and by 20% in comparison with Solcoseryl. Treatment with Bacillus sp. metabolites stimulated predominantly humoral immunity, reduced the time of wound contraction and the volume of scar tissue, and promoted complete hair recovery. These metabolites can be considered as modulators of the wound process with predominance of regeneration mechanisms.

  3. Soluble epoxide hydrolase contamination of specific catalase preparations inhibits epoxyeicosatrienoic acid vasodilation of rat renal arterioles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, Lauren; Harder, Adam; Isbell, Marilyn; Imig, John D.; Gutterman, David D.; Falck, J. R.; Campbell, William B.

    2011-01-01

    Cytochrome P-450 metabolites of arachidonic acid, the epoxyeicosatrienoic acids (EETs) and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), are important signaling molecules in the kidney. In renal arteries, EETs cause vasodilation whereas H2O2 causes vasoconstriction. To determine the physiological contribution of H2O2, catalase is used to inactivate H2O2. However, the consequence of catalase action on EET vascular activity has not been determined. In rat renal afferent arterioles, 14,15-EET caused concentration-related dilations that were inhibited by Sigma bovine liver (SBL) catalase (1,000 U/ml) but not Calbiochem bovine liver (CBL) catalase (1,000 U/ml). SBL catalase inhibition was reversed by the soluble epoxide hydrolase (sEH) inhibitor tAUCB (1 μM). In 14,15-EET incubations, SBL catalase caused a concentration-related increase in a polar metabolite. Using mass spectrometry, the metabolite was identified as 14,15-dihydroxyeicosatrienoic acid (14,15-DHET), the inactive sEH metabolite. 14,15-EET hydrolysis was not altered by the catalase inhibitor 3-amino-1,2,4-triazole (3-ATZ; 10–50 mM), but was abolished by the sEH inhibitor BIRD-0826 (1–10 μM). SBL catalase EET hydrolysis showed a regioisomer preference with greatest hydrolysis of 14,15-EET followed by 11,12-, 8,9- and 5,6-EET (Vmax = 0.54 ± 0.07, 0.23 ± 0.06, 0.18 ± 0.01 and 0.08 ± 0.02 ng DHET·U catalase−1·min−1, respectively). Of five different catalase preparations assayed, EET hydrolysis was observed with two Sigma liver catalases. These preparations had low specific catalase activity and positive sEH expression. Mass spectrometric analysis of the SBL catalase identified peptide fragments matching bovine sEH. Collectively, these data indicate that catalase does not affect EET-mediated dilation of renal arterioles. However, some commercial catalase preparations are contaminated with sEH, and these contaminated preparations diminish the biological activity of H2O2 and EETs. PMID:21753077

  4. Communication: On the calculation of time-dependent electron flux within the Born-Oppenheimer approximation: A flux-flux reflection principle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albert, Julian; Hader, Kilian; Engel, Volker

    2017-12-01

    It is commonly assumed that the time-dependent electron flux calculated within the Born-Oppenheimer (BO) approximation vanishes. This is not necessarily true if the flux is directly determined from the continuity equation obeyed by the electron density. This finding is illustrated for a one-dimensional model of coupled electronic-nuclear dynamics. There, the BO flux is in perfect agreement with the one calculated from a solution of the time-dependent Schrödinger equation for the coupled motion. A reflection principle is derived where the nuclear BO flux is mapped onto the electronic flux.

  5. Extracellular Metabolites from Industrial Microalgae and Their Biotechnological Potential

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lu Liu

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Industrial microalgae, as a big family of promising producers of renewable biomass feedstock, have been commercially exploited for functional food, living feed and feed additives, high-value chemicals in nutraceuticals, cosmeceuticals, and chemical reagents. Recently, microalgae have also been considered as a group that might play an important role in biofuel development and environmental protection. Almost all current products of industrial microalgae are derived from their biomass; however, large amounts of spent cell-free media are available from mass cultivation that is mostly unexploited. In this contribution we discuss that these media, which may contain a remarkable diversity of bioactive substances are worthy to be recovered for further use. Obviously, the extracellular metabolites from industrial microalgae have long been neglected in the development of production methods for valuable metabolites. With the advances in the last ten years, more and more structures and properties from extracellular metabolites have been identified, and the potential utilization over wide fields is attracting attention. Some of these extracellular metabolites can be potentially used as drugs, antioxidants, growth regulators or metal chelators. The purpose of this review is to provide an overview of the known extracellular metabolites from industrial microalgae which might be of commercial interest. The attention mainly focuses on the reports of extracellular bioactive metabolites and their potential application in biotechnology.

  6. Metabolites from inhalation of aerosolized S-8 synthetic jet fuel in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tremblay, Raphael T; Martin, Sheppard A; Fisher, Jeffrey W

    2011-01-01

    Alternative fuels are being considered for civilian and military uses. One of these is S-8, a replacement jet fuel synthesized using the Fischer-Tropsch process, which contains no aromatic compounds and is mainly composed of straight and branched alkanes. Metabolites of S-8 fuel in laboratory animals have not been identified. The goal of this study was to identify metabolic products from exposure to aerosolized S-8 and a designed straight-chain alkane/polyaromatic mixture (decane, undecane, dodecane, tridecane, tetradecane, pentadecane, naphthalene, and 2-methylnaphthalene) in male Fischer 344 rats. Collected blood and tissue samples were analyzed for 70 straight and branched alcohols and ketones ranging from 7 to 15 carbons. No fuel metabolites were observed in the blood, lungs, brain, and fat following S-8 exposure. Metabolites were detected in the liver, urine, and feces. Most of the metabolites were 2- and 3-position alcohols and ketones of prominent hydrocarbons with very few 1- or 4-position metabolites. Following exposure to the alkane mixture, metabolites were observed in the blood, liver, and lungs. Interestingly, heavy metabolites (3-tridecanone, 2-tridecanol, and 2-tetradecanol) were observed only in the lung tissues possibly indicating that metabolism occurred in the lungs. With the exception of these heavy metabolites, the metabolic profiles observed in this study are consistent with previous studies reporting on the metabolism of individual alkanes. Further work is needed to determine the potential metabolic interactions of parent, primary, and secondary metabolites and identify more polar metabolites. Some metabolites may have potential use as biomarkers of exposure to fuels.

  7. Development of a Knowledgebase (MetRxn) of Metabolites, Reactions and Atom Mappings to Accelerate Discovery and Redesign

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maranas, Costas D. [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States)

    2017-12-11

    With advances in DNA sequencing and genome annotation techniques, the breadth of metabolic knowledge across all kingdoms of life is increasing. The construction of genome-scale models (GSMs) facilitates this distillation of knowledge by systematically accounting for reaction stoichiometry and directionality, gene to protein to reaction relationships, reaction localization among cellular organelles, metabolite transport costs and routes, transcriptional regulation, and biomass composition. Genome-scale reconstructions available now span across all kingdoms of life, from microbes to whole-plant models, and have become indispensable for driving informed metabolic designs and interventions. A key barrier to the pace of this development is our inability to utilize metabolite/reaction information from databases such as BRENDA [1], KEGG [2], MetaCyc [3], etc. due to incompatibilities of representation, duplications, and errors. Duplicate entries constitute a major impediment, where the same metabolite is found with multiple names across databases and models, which significantly slows downs the collating of information from multiple data sources. This can also lead to serious modeling errors such as charge/mass imbalances [4,5] which can thwart model predictive abilities such as identifying synthetic lethal gene pairs and quantifying metabolic flows. Hence, we created the MetRxn database [6] that takes the next step in integrating data from multiple sources and formats to automatically create a standardized knowledgebase. We subsequently deployed this resource to bring about new paradigms in genome-scale metabolic model reconstruction, metabolic flux elucidation through MFA, modeling of microbial communities, and pathway prospecting. This research has enabled the PI’s group to continue building upon research milestones and reach new ones (see list of MetRxn-related publications below).

  8. An Interspecies Signaling System Mediated by Fusaric Acid Has Parallel Effects on Antifungal Metabolite Production by Pseudomonas protegens Strain Pf-5 and Antibiosis of Fusarium spp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quecine, Maria Carolina; Kidarsa, Teresa A.; Goebel, Neal C.; Shaffer, Brenda T.; Henkels, Marcella D.; Zabriskie, T. Mark

    2015-01-01

    Pseudomonas protegens strain Pf-5 is a rhizosphere bacterium that suppresses soilborne plant diseases and produces at least seven different secondary metabolites with antifungal properties. We derived mutants of Pf-5 with single and multiple mutations in biosynthesis genes for seven antifungal metabolites: 2,4-diacetylphoroglucinol (DAPG), pyrrolnitrin, pyoluteorin, hydrogen cyanide, rhizoxin, orfamide A, and toxoflavin. These mutants were tested for inhibition of the pathogens Fusarium verticillioides and Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. pisi. Rhizoxin, pyrrolnitrin, and DAPG were found to be primarily responsible for fungal antagonism by Pf-5. Previously, other workers showed that the mycotoxin fusaric acid, which is produced by many Fusarium species, including F. verticillioides, inhibited the production of DAPG by Pseudomonas spp. In this study, amendment of culture media with fusaric acid decreased DAPG production, increased pyoluteorin production, and had no consistent influence on pyrrolnitrin or orfamide A production by Pf-5. Fusaric acid also altered the transcription of biosynthetic genes, indicating that the mycotoxin influenced antibiotic production by Pf-5 at the transcriptional level. Addition of fusaric acid to the culture medium reduced antibiosis of F. verticillioides by Pf-5 and derivative strains that produce DAPG but had no effect on antibiosis by Pf-5 derivatives that suppressed F. verticillioides due to pyrrolnitrin or rhizoxin production. Our results demonstrated the importance of three compounds, rhizoxin, pyrrolnitrin, and DAPG, in suppression of Fusarium spp. by Pf-5 and confirmed that an interspecies signaling system mediated by fusaric acid had parallel effects on antifungal metabolite production and antibiosis by the bacterial biological control organism. PMID:26655755

  9. Heme-dependent Metabolite Switching Regulates H2S Synthesis in Response to Endoplasmic Reticulum (ER) Stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kabil, Omer; Yadav, Vinita; Banerjee, Ruma

    2016-08-05

    Substrate ambiguity and relaxed reaction specificity underlie the diversity of reactions catalyzed by the transsulfuration pathway enzymes, cystathionine β-synthase (CBS) and γ-cystathionase (CSE). These enzymes either commit sulfur metabolism to cysteine synthesis from homocysteine or utilize cysteine and/or homocysteine for synthesis of H2S, a signaling molecule. We demonstrate that a kinetically controlled heme-dependent metabolite switch in CBS regulates these competing reactions where by cystathionine, the product of CBS, inhibits H2S synthesis by the second enzyme, CSE. Under endoplasmic reticulum stress conditions, induction of CSE and up-regulation of the CBS inhibitor, CO, a product of heme oxygenase-1, flip the operating preference of CSE from cystathionine to cysteine, transiently stimulating H2S production. In contrast, genetic deficiency of CBS leads to chronic stimulation of H2S production. This metabolite switch from cystathionine to cysteine and/or homocysteine renders H2S synthesis by CSE responsive to the known modulators of CBS: S-adenosylmethionine, NO, and CO. Used acutely, it regulates H2S synthesis; used chronically, it might contribute to disease pathology. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  10. Protective Effects of Dihydrocaffeic Acid, a Coffee Component Metabolite, on a Focal Cerebral Ischemia Rat Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyungjin Lee

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available We recently reported the protective effects of chlorogenic acid (CGA in a transient middle cerebral artery occlusion (tMCAo rat model. The current study further investigated the protective effects of the metabolites of CGA and dihydrocaffeic acid (DHCA was selected for further study after screening using the same tMCAo rat model. In the current study, tMCAo rats (2 h of MCAo followed by 22 h of reperfusion were injected with various doses of DHCA at 0 and 2 h after onset of ischemia. We assessed brain damage, functional deficits, brain edema, and blood-brain barrier damage at 24 h after ischemia. For investigating the mechanism, in vitro zymography and western blotting analysis were performed to determine the expression and activation of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP-2 and -9. DHCA (3, 10, and 30 mg/kg, i.p. dose-dependently reduced brain infarct volume, behavioral deficits, brain water content, and Evans Blue (EB leakage. DHCA inhibited expression and activation of MMP-2 and MMP-9. Therefore, DHCA might be one of the important metabolites of CGA and of natural products, including coffee, with protective effects on ischemia-induced neuronal damage and brain edema.

  11. Hepatic Disposition of Gemfibrozil and Its Major Metabolite Gemfibrozil 1-O-β-Glucuronide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimoto, Emi; Li, Rui; Scialis, Renato J; Lai, Yurong; Varma, Manthena V S

    2015-11-02

    Gemfibrozil (GEM), which decreases serum triglycerides and low density lipoprotein, perpetrates drug-drug interactions (DDIs) with several drugs. These DDIs are primarily attributed to the inhibition of drug transporters and metabolic enzymes, particularly cytochrome P450 (CYP) 2C8 by the major circulating metabolite gemfibrozil 1-O-β-glucuronide (GG). Here, we characterized the transporter-mediated hepatic disposition of GEM and GG using sandwich-cultured human hepatocytes (SCHH) and transporter-transfect systems. Significant active uptake was noted in SCHH for the metabolite. GG, but not GEM, showed substrate affinity to organic anion transporting polypeptide (OATP) 1B1, 1B3, and 2B1. In SCHH, glucuronidation was characterized affinity constants (Km) of 7.9 and 61.4 μM, and biliary excretion of GG was observed. Furthermore, GG showed active basolateral efflux from preloaded SCHH and ATP-dependent uptake into membrane vesicles overexpressing multidrug resistance-associated protein (MRP) 2, MRP3, and MRP4. A mathematical model was developed to estimate hepatic uptake and efflux kinetics of GEM and GG based on SCHH studies. Collectively, the hepatic transporters play a key role in the disposition and thus determine the local concentrations of GEM and more so for GG, which is the predominant inhibitory species against CYP2C8 and OATP1B1.

  12. Penicillinolide A: A New Anti-Inflammatory Metabolite from the Marine Fungus Penicillium sp. SF-5292

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyuncheol Oh

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available In the course of studies on bioactive metabolites from marine fungi, a new 10-membered lactone, named penicillinolide A (1 was isolated from the organic extract of Penicillium sp. SF-5292 as a potential anti-inflammatory compound. The structure of penicillinolide A (1 was mainly determined by analysis of NMR and MS data and Mosher’s method. Penicillinolide A (1 inhibited the production of NO and PGE2 due to inhibition of the expression of iNOS and COX-2. Penicillinolide A (1 also reduced TNF-α, IL-1β and IL-6 production, and these anti-inflammatory effects were shown to be correlated with the suppression of the phosphorylation and degradation of IκB-α, NF-κB nuclear translocation, and NF-κB DNA binding activity. In addition, using inhibitor tin protoporphyrin (SnPP, a competitive inhibitor of HO activity, it was verified that the inhibitory effects of compound 1 on the production of pro-inflammatory mediators and NF-κB DNA binding activity were partially associated with HO-1 expression through Nrf2 nuclear translocation.

  13. Penicillinolide A: a new anti-inflammatory metabolite from the marine fungus Penicillium sp. SF-5292.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Dong-Sung; Ko, Wonmin; Quang, Tran Hong; Kim, Kyoung-Su; Sohn, Jae Hak; Jang, Jae-Hyuk; Ahn, Jong Seog; Kim, Youn-Chul; Oh, Hyuncheol

    2013-11-12

    In the course of studies on bioactive metabolites from marine fungi, a new 10-membered lactone, named penicillinolide A (1) was isolated from the organic extract of Penicillium sp. SF-5292 as a potential anti-inflammatory compound. The structure of penicillinolide A (1) was mainly determined by analysis of NMR and MS data and Mosher's method. Penicillinolide A (1) inhibited the production of NO and PGE2 due to inhibition of the expression of iNOS and COX-2. Penicillinolide A (1) also reduced TNF-α, IL-1β and IL-6 production, and these anti-inflammatory effects were shown to be correlated with the suppression of the phosphorylation and degradation of IκB-α, NF-κB nuclear translocation, and NF-κB DNA binding activity. In addition, using inhibitor tin protoporphyrin (SnPP), a competitive inhibitor of HO activity, it was verified that the inhibitory effects of compound 1 on the production of pro-inflammatory mediators and NF-κB DNA binding activity were partially associated with HO-1 expression through Nrf2 nuclear translocation.

  14. Penicillinolide A: A New Anti-Inflammatory Metabolite from the Marine Fungus Penicillium sp. SF-5292

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Dong-Sung; Ko, Wonmin; Quang, Tran Hong; Kim, Kyoung-Su; Sohn, Jae Hak; Jang, Jae-Hyuk; Ahn, Jong Seog; Kim, Youn-Chul; Oh, Hyuncheol

    2013-01-01

    In the course of studies on bioactive metabolites from marine fungi, a new 10-membered lactone, named penicillinolide A (1) was isolated from the organic extract of Penicillium sp. SF-5292 as a potential anti-inflammatory compound. The structure of penicillinolide A (1) was mainly determined by analysis of NMR and MS data and Mosher’s method. Penicillinolide A (1) inhibited the production of NO and PGE2 due to inhibition of the expression of iNOS and COX-2. Penicillinolide A (1) also reduced TNF-α, IL-1β and IL-6 production, and these anti-inflammatory effects were shown to be correlated with the suppression of the phosphorylation and degradation of IκB-α, NF-κB nuclear translocation, and NF-κB DNA binding activity. In addition, using inhibitor tin protoporphyrin (SnPP), a competitive inhibitor of HO activity, it was verified that the inhibitory effects of compound 1 on the production of pro-inflammatory mediators and NF-κB DNA binding activity were partially associated with HO-1 expression through Nrf2 nuclear translocation. PMID:24225730

  15. Metabolite production by species of Stemphylium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Kresten Jon Kromphardt; Rossman, Amy; Andersen, Birgitte

    2018-01-01

    metabolites were found to be important for distinguishing species, while some unknown metabolites were also found to have important roles in distinguishing species of Stemphylium. This study is the first of its kind to investigate the chemical potential of Stemphylium across the whole genus.......Morphology and phylogeny has been used to distinguish members of the plant pathogenic fungal genus Stemphylium. A third method for distinguishing species is by chemotaxonomy. The main goal of the present study was to investigate the chemical potential of Stemphylium via HPLC-UV-MS analysis, while...

  16. Baicalin and its metabolites suppresses gluconeogenesis through activation of AMPK or AKT in insulin resistant HepG-2 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Tao; Jiang, Hongmei; Cao, Shijie; Chen, Qian; Cui, Mingyuan; Wang, Zhijie; Li, Dandan; Zhou, Jing; Wang, Tao; Qiu, Feng; Kang, Ning

    2017-12-01

    Scutellaria baicalensis Georgi (S. baicalensis), as a traditional Chinese herbal medicine, is an important component of several famous Chinese medicinal formulas for treating patients with diabetes mellitus. Baicalin (BG), a main bioactive component of S. baicalensis, has been reported to have antidiabetic effects. However, pharmacokinetic studies have indicated that BG has poor oral bioavailability. Therefore, it is hard to explain the pharmacological effects of BG in vivo. Interestingly, several reports show that BG is extensively metabolized in rats and humans. Therefore, we speculate that the BG metabolites might be responsible for the pharmacological effects. In this study, BG and its three metabolites (M1-M3) were examined their effects on glucose consumption in insulin resistant HepG-2 cells with a commercial glucose assay kit. Real-time PCR and western blot assay were used to confirm genes and proteins of interest, respectively. The results demonstrate that BG and its metabolites (except for M3) enhanced the glucose consumption which might be associated with inhibiting the expression of the key gluconeogenic genes, including glucose-6-phosphatase (G6Pase), phosphoenolypyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK) and glucose transporter 2 (GLUT2). Further study found that BG and M1 could suppress hepatic gluconeogenesis via activation of the AMPK pathway, while M2 could suppress hepatic gluconeogenesis via activation of the PI3K/AKT signaling pathway. Taken together, our findings suggest that both BG and its metabolites have antihyperglycemic activities, and might be the active forms of oral doses of BG in vivo. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  17. Alkaloids from the Sponge Stylissa carteri Present Prospective Scaffolds for the Inhibition of Human Immunodeficiency Virus 1 (HIV-1)

    KAUST Repository

    O’Rourke, Aubrie

    2016-02-04

    The sponge Stylissa carteri is known to produce a number of secondary metabolites displaying anti-fouling, anti-inflammatory, and anti-cancer activity. However, the anti-viral potential of metabolites produced by S. carteri has not been extensively explored. In this study, an S. carteri extract was HPLC fractionated and a cell based assay was used to evaluate the effects of HPLC fractions on parameters of Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV-1) infection and cell viability. Candidate HIV-1 inhibitory fractions were then analyzed for the presence of potential HIV-1 inhibitory compounds by mass spectrometry, leading to the identification of three previously characterized compounds, i.e., debromohymenialdisine (DBH), hymenialdisine (HD), and oroidin. Commercially available purified versions of these molecules were re-tested to assess their antiviral potential in greater detail. Specifically, DBH and HD exhibit a 30%–40% inhibition of HIV-1 at 3.1 μM and 13 μM, respectively; however, both exhibited cytotoxicity. Conversely, oroidin displayed a 50% inhibition of viral replication at 50 μM with no associated toxicity. Additional experimentation using a biochemical assay revealed that oroidin inhibited the activity of the HIV-1 Reverse Transcriptase up to 90% at 25 μM. Taken together, the chemical search space was narrowed and previously isolated compounds with an unexplored anti-viral potential were found. Our results support exploration of marine natural products for anti-viral drug discovery.

  18. Characterization of branchial transepithelial calcium fluxes in freshwater trout, Salmo gairdneri

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perry, S.F.; Flik, G.

    1988-01-01

    Experiments were performed to determine whether gill transepithelial calcium fluxes in the freshwater trout (Salmo gairdneri) are passive or require active transport and to characterize the mechanism involved. A comparison of the in vivo unidirectional flux ratios with the flux ratios calculated according to the transepithelial electrochemical gradients revealed that calcium uptake from the water requires active transport of Ca 2+ . The inhibition of calcium uptake by external lanthanum, the specific deposition of lanthanum on the apical surface of chloride cells, and the favorable electrochemical gradient for calcium across the apical membrane suggest that the initial step in branchial calcium uptake is the passive entry of calcium into the cytosol of chloride cells through apical channels that are permeable to calcium. The study of gill basolateral plasma membrane vesicles demonstrated the existence of a high-affinity calmodulin-dependent calcium-transporting system. This system actively transports calcium from the cytosol of chloride cells into the plasma against a sizeable electrochemical gradient, thereby completing the transepithelial uptake of calcium. Calcium efflux occurs passively through paracellular pathways between chloride cells and adjacent pavement cells or between neighboring pavement cells

  19. Identification of Unique Metabolites of the Designer Opioid Furanyl Fentanyl.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goggin, Melissa M; Nguyen, An; Janis, Gregory C

    2017-06-01

    The illicit drug market has seen an increase in designer opioids, including fentanyl and methadone analogs, and other structurally unrelated opioid agonists. The designer opioid, furanyl fentanyl, is one of many fentanyl analogs clandestinely synthesized for recreational use and contributing to the fentanyl and opioid crisis. A method has been developed and validated for the analysis of furanyl fentanyl and furanyl norfentanyl in urine specimens from pain management programs. Approximately 10% of samples from a set of 500 presumptive heroin-positive urine specimens were found to contain furanyl fentanyl, with an average concentration of 33.8 ng/mL, and ranging from 0.26 to 390 ng/mL. Little to no furanyl norfentanyl was observed; therefore, the furanyl fentanyl specimens were further analyzed by untargeted high-resolution mass spectrometry to identify other metabolites. Multiple metabolites, including a dihydrodiol metabolite, 4-anilino-N-phenethyl-piperidine (4-ANPP) and a sulfate metabolite were identified. The aim of the presented study was to identify the major metabolite(s) of furanyl fentanyl and estimate their concentrations for the purpose of toxicological monitoring. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  20. β-Cypermethrin and its metabolite 3-phenoxybenzoic acid exhibit immunotoxicity in murine macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xia; He, Bingnan; Kong, Baida; Wei, Lai; Wang, Rong; Zhou, Chenqian; Shao, Yiyan; Lin, Jiajia; Jin, Yuanxiang; Fu, Zhengwei

    2017-12-01

    β-Cypermethrin (β-CYP), one of most important pyrethroids, is widely used to control insects, and has been detected in organisms, including human. Pyrethroids have been shown to pose neurotoxicity, hepatotoxicity, endocrine disruption and reproductive risks in mammals. However, research in immunotoxicity of pyrethroids, especially their metabolites, is limited. A common metabolite of pyrethroids is 3-phenoxybenzoic acid (3-PBA) in mammals. Thus, in this study, we evaluated the immunotoxicity of β-CYP and 3-PBA in mouse macrophages, RAW 264.7 cells. MTT assays showed that both β-CYP and 3-PBA reduced cell viability in a concentration- and time-dependent manner. Flow cytometry with Annexin-V/PI staining demonstrated that both β-CYP and 3-PBA induced RAW 264.7 cell apoptosis. Furthermore, our results also showed that N-acetylcysteine partially blocked β-CYP- and 3-PBA-induced cytotoxicity and apoptosis. Intrinsic apoptotic pathway was stimulated by both β-CYP and 3-PBA exposure. In addition, we found that β-CYP and 3-PBA inhibited mRNA levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines with or without LPS stimulation. Phagocytosis assay showed that both β-CYP and 3-PBA inhibited phagocytic ability of macrophages. Moreover, it was also found that both β-CYP and 3-PBA increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels in RAW 264.7 cells. Accordingly, both β-CYP and 3-PBA were found to regulate the mRNA levels of oxidative stress-related genes in RAW 264.7 cells. Taken together, the results obtained in this study demonstrated that β-CYP and 3-PBA may have immunotoxic effect on macrophages and that elevated ROS may underlie the mechanism. The present study will help to understand the health risks caused by β-CYP and other pyrethroids. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Institute of Biochemistry and Cell Biology, Shanghai Institutes for Biological Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e

  1. Loss of metabolites from monkey striatum during PET with FDOPA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cumming, P; Munk, O L; Doudet, D

    2001-01-01

    diffusion of [(18)F]fluorodopamine metabolites from brain. Consequently, time-radioactivity recordings of striatum are progressively influenced by metabolite loss. In linear analyses, the net blood-brain clearance of FDOPA (K(D)(i), ml g(-1) min(-1)) can be corrected for this loss by the elimination rate...... constant k(Lin)(cl) (min(-1)). Similarly, the DOPA decarboxylation rate constant (k(D)(3), min(-1)) calculated by compartmental analysis can also be corrected for metabolite loss by the elimination rate constant k(DA)(9) (min(-1)). To compare the two methods, we calculated the two elimination rate...... of the estimate was substantially improved upon correction for metabolite loss. The rate constants for metabolite loss were higher in MPTP-lesioned monkey striatum than in normal striatum. The high correlation between individual estimates of k(Lin)(cl) and k(DA)(9) suggests that both rate constants reveal loss...

  2. Transformation products and human metabolites of triclocarban and tricllosan in sewage sludge across the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pycke, Benny F.G.; Roll, Isaac B.; Brownawell, Bruce J.; Kinney, Chad A.; Furlong, Edward T.; Kolpin, Dana W.; Halden, Rolf U.

    2014-01-01

    Removal of triclocarban (TCC) and triclosan (TCS) from wastewater is a function of adsorption, abiotic degradation, and microbial mineralization or transformation, reactions that are not currently controlled or optimized in the pollution control infrastructure of standard wastewater treatment. Here, we report on the levels of eight transformation products, human metabolites, and manufacturing byproducts of TCC and TCS in raw and treated sewage sludge. Two sample sets were studied: samples collected once from 14 wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) representing nine states, and multiple samples collected from one WWTP monitored for 12 months. Time-course analysis of significant mass fluxes (α = 0.01) indicate that transformation of TCC (dechlorination) and TCS (methylation) occurred during sewage conveyance and treatment. Strong linear correlations were found between TCC and the human metabolite 2′-hydroxy-TCC (r = 0.84), and between the TCC-dechlorination products dichlorocarbanilide (DCC) and monochlorocarbanilide (r = 0.99). Mass ratios of DCC-to-TCC and of methyl-triclosan (MeTCS)-to-TCS, serving as indicators of transformation activity, revealed that transformation was widespread under different treatment regimes across the WWTPs sampled, though the degree of transformation varied significantly among study sites (α = 0.01). The analysis of sludge sampled before and after different unit operation steps (i.e., anaerobic digestion, sludge heat treatment, and sludge drying) yielded insights into the extent and location of TCC and TCS transformation. Results showed anaerobic digestion to be important for MeTCS transformation (37–74%), whereas its contribution to partial TCC dechlorination was limited (0.4–2.1%). This longitudinal and nationwide survey is the first to report the occurrence of transformation products, human metabolites, and manufacturing byproducts of TCC and TCS in sewage sludge.

  3. Antioxidant potential of lichen species and their secondary metabolites. A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Moriano, Carlos; Gómez-Serranillos, María Pilar; Crespo, Ana

    2016-01-01

    Pharmacological interest of lichens lies in their capacity to produce bioactive secondary metabolites, being most of them phenolic compounds with reactive hydroxyl groups that confer antioxidant potential through various mechanisms. Increasing incidence and impact of oxidative stress-related diseases (i.e., neurodegenerative disorders) has encouraged the search of new pharmacological strategies to face them. Lichens appear to be a promising source of phenolic compounds in the discovery of natural products exerting antioxidant activity. The present review thoroughly discusses the available knowledge on antioxidant properties of lichens, including both in vitro and in vivo studies and the parameters assessed so far on lichen constituents. Literature survey was performed by using as main databases PubMed, Google Scholar, Scopus, Science Direct, and Recent Literature on Lichens. We reviewed 98 highlighted research articles without date restriction. Current report collects data related to antioxidant activities of more than 75 lichen species (from 18 botanical families) and 65 isolated metabolites. Much information comes from in vitro investigations, such as chemical assays evaluating radical scavenging properties, lipid peroxidation inhibition, and reducing power of lichen species and compounds; similarly, research on cellular substrates and animal models generally measures antioxidant enzymes levels and other antioxidant markers, such as glutathione levels or tissue peroxidation. Since consistent evidence demonstrated the contribution of oxidative stress on the development and progression of several human diseases, reviewed data suggest that some lichen compounds are worthy of further investigation and better understanding of their antioxidant and neuroprotective potentials.

  4. Environmental controls of daytime leaf carbon exchange: Implications for estimates of ecosystem fluxes in a deciduous forest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heskel, M.; Tang, J.

    2017-12-01

    Leaf-level photosynthesis and respiration are sensitive to short- and long-term changed in temperature, and how these processes respond to phenological and seasonal transitions and daily temperature variation dictate how carbon is first assimilated and released in terrestrial ecosystems. We examined the short-term temperature response of daytime leaf carbon exchange at Harvard Forest across growing season, with the specific objective to quantify the light inhibition of dark respiration and photorespiration in leaves and use this to better inform daytime carbon assimilation and efflux estimates at the canopy scale. Dark and light respiration increased with measurement temperature and varied seasonally in a proportional manner, with the level of inhibition remaining relatively constant through the growing season. Higher rates of mitochondrial respiration and photorespiration at warmer temperatures drove a lower carbon use efficiency. Using temperature, light, and canopy leaf area index values to drive models, we estimate partitioned ecosystem fluxes and re-calculate gross primary production under multiple scenarios that include and exclude the impact of light inhibition, thermal acclimation, and seasonal variation in physiology. Quantifying the contribution of these `small fluxes' to ecosystem carbon exchange in forests provides a nuanced approach for integrating physiology into regional model estimates derived from eddy covariance and remote-sensing methods.

  5. Comparative in vitro inhibition of urinary tract pathogens by single- and multi-strain probiotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, C M C; Gibson, G R; Todd, S; Rowland, I

    2013-09-01

    Multi-species probiotic preparations have been suggested as having a wide spectrum of application, although few studies have compared their efficacy with that of individual component strains at equal concentrations. We therefore tested the ability of 4 single probiotics and 4 probiotic mixtures to inhibit the urinary tract pathogens Escherichia coli NCTC 9001 and Enterococcus faecalis NCTC 00775. We used an agar spot test to test the ability of viable cells to inhibit pathogens, while a broth inhibition assay was used to assess inhibition by cell-free probiotic supernatants in both pH-neutralised and non-neutralised forms. In the agar spot test, all probiotic treatments showed inhibition, L. acidophilus was the most inhibitory single strain against E. faecalis, L. fermentum the most inhibitory against E. coli. A commercially available mixture of 14 strains (Bio-Kult(®)) was the most effective mixture, against E. faecalis, the 3-lactobacillus mixture the most inhibitory against E. coli. Mixtures were not significantly more inhibitory than single strains. In the broth inhibition assays, all probiotic supernatants inhibited both pathogens when pH was not controlled, with only 2 treatments causing inhibition at a neutral pH. Both viable cells of probiotics and supernatants of probiotic cultures were able to inhibit growth of two urinary tract pathogens. Probiotic mixtures prevented the growth of urinary tract pathogens but were not significantly more inhibitory than single strains. Probiotics appear to produce metabolites that are inhibitory towards urinary tract pathogens. Probiotics display potential to reduce the incidence of urinary tract infections via inhibition of colonisation.

  6. Flux flow and flux creep in thick films of YBCO. [Y-Ba-Cu-O

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rickets, J.; Vinen, W.F.; Abell, J.S.; Shields, T.C. (Superconductivity Research Group, Univ. of Birmingham (United Kingdom))

    1991-12-01

    The results are described of new experiments designed to study flux creep and flux flow along a single flux percolation path in thick films of YBCO. The flux flow regime is studied by a four-point resistive technique using pulsed currents, and the flux creep regime by observing the rate at which flux enters a superconducting loop in parallel with the resistance that is associated with the flux percolation path. (orig.).

  7. Identification of Volatile Secondary Metabolites from an Endophytic Microfungus Aspergillus Nomius KUB105

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lateef Adebola Azeez; Lateef Adebola Azeez; Sepiah Muid; Bolhassan Mohamad Hasnul

    2016-01-01

    Microfungi are a highly diverse group of micro-organisms and important components of the ecosystem with great potential for diverse metabolite production. During a survey of microfungi on leaves in a National Park in Sarawak, an uncommon endophytic microfungus Aspergillus nomius was encountered. The metabolite production of this microfungus was investigated by growing it in a liquid basal medium for 2 weeks. Gas Chromatography - Mass Spectrometry (GC-MS) and Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) profiling of the secondary metabolites produced by this microfungus in the liquid medium revealed the presence of 46 different secondary metabolites. The metabolites include saturated hydrocarbons, alkyl halides, alcohols and an unsaturated hydrocarbon. Majority of the metabolites produced were saturated hydrocarbons. Tetracosane, Icosane and 10-Methylicosane were the most abundant metabolites identified while heptadecane and 2,4-dimethylundecane were the least abundant respectively. This study is the first GC-MS and FTIR report of secondary metabolites from A. nomius. The results from this study confirm the ability of microfungi to produce diverse metabolites, including saturated hydrocarbons. (author)

  8. MCT1 and MCT4 expression and lactate flux activity increase during white and brown adipogenesis and impact adipocyte metabolism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Charlotte; Nielsen, Mette D.; Andersen, Elise S.

    2017-01-01

    RNA and protein levels of the l