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Sample records for inhibiting autoantigen presentation

  1. Epigenetics of Autoantigens: New Opportunities for Therapy of Autoimmune Diseases

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    Marko Radic

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The field of epigenetics requires that traditional divisions between scientific disciplines give way to cross-fertilization of concepts and ideas from different areas of investigation. Such is the case with research in autoimmunity. Recent discoveries of stimuli that induce autoimmunity reveal that epigenetic marks of autoantigens are recognized by autoreactive B and T cell receptors. Thus, insights into the initiation of autoimmunity, its prevention and therapy will arise from understanding the biochemistry, cell biology and microbiology of autoantigen epigenetics. Here, we highlight potential benefits from the inhibition of a histone modifying enzyme and the administration of a phosphorylated, spliceosome-derived peptide, in the treatment of autoimmunity.

  2. Immunogenicity of autoantigens

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    Keller Andreas

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Autoantibodies against self-antigens have been associated not only with autoimmune diseases, but also with cancer and are even found in healthy individuals. The mechanism causing the autoantibody response remains elusive for the majority of the immunogenic antigens. To deepen the understanding of autoantibody responses, we ask whether natural-occurring, autoimmunity-associated and tumor-associated antigens have structural or biological features related to the immune response. To this end, we have carried out the most comprehensive in-silicio study of different groups of autoantigens including large antigen sets identified by our groups combined with publicly available antigen sets. Results We found evidence for an enrichment of genes with a larger exon length increasing the probability of the occurrence of potential immunogenic features such as mutations, SNPs, immunogenic sequence patterns and structural epitopes, or alternative splicing events. While SNPs seem to play a more central role in autoimmunity, somatic mutations seem to be stronger enriched in tumor-associated antigens. In addition, antigens of autoimmune diseases are different from other antigen sets in that they appear preferentially secreted, have frequently an extracellular location, and they are enriched in pathways associated with the immune system. Furthermore, for autoantibodies in general, we found enrichment of sequence-based properties including coiled-coils motifs, ELR motifs, and Zinc finger DNA-binding motifs. Moreover, we found enrichment of proteins binding to proteins or nucleic acids including RNA and enrichment of proteins that are part of ribosome or spliceosome. Both, homologies to proteins of other species and an enrichment of ancient protein domains indicate that immunogenic proteins are evolutionary conserved and that mimicry might play a central role. Conclusions Our results provide evidence that proteins which i are evolutionary conserved

  3. Radiometallating antibodies and autoantigenic peptides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mercer-Smith, J.A.; Lewis, D.; Cole, D.A.; Newmyer, S.L.; Schulte, L.D.; Mixon, P.L.; Schreyer, S.A.; Burns, T.P.; Roberts, J.C.; Figard, S.D.; McCormick, D.J.; Lennon, V.A.; Hayashi, M.; Lavallee, D.K.

    1991-01-01

    We have developed methods to radiolabel large molecules, using porphyrins as bifunctional chelating agents for radiometals. The porphyrins are substituted with an N- benzyl group to activate them for radiometallation under mild reaction conditions. Porphyrins that have one functional group for covalent attachment to other molecules cannot cause crosslinking. We have examined the labeling chemistry for antibodies and have developed methods to label smaller biologically active molecules, such as autoantigenic peptides (fragments of the acetylcholine receptor), which are pertinent to myasthenia gravis research. The methods of covalent attachment of these bifunctional chelating agents to large molecules, the radiometallation chemistry, and biological characterization of the radiolabeled compounds will be discussed

  4. Discovery of native autoantigens via antigen surrogate technology: application to type 1 diabetes.

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    Doran, Todd M; Simanski, Scott; Kodadek, Thomas

    2015-02-20

    A fundamental goal in understanding the mechanisms of autoimmune disease is the characterization of autoantigens that are targeted by autoreactive antibodies and T cells. Unfortunately, the identification of autoantigens is a difficult problem. We have begun to explore a novel route to the discovery of autoantibody/autoantigen pairs that involves comparative screening of combinatorial libraries of unnatural, synthetic molecules for compounds that bind antibodies present at much higher levels in the serum of individuals with a given autoimmune disease than in the serum of control individuals. We have shown that this approach can yield "antigen surrogates" capable of capturing disease-specific autoantibodies from serum. In this report, we demonstrate that the synthetic antigen surrogates can be used to affinity purify the autoantibodies from serum and that these antibodies can then be used to identify their cognate autoantigen in an appropriate tissue lysate. Specifically, we report the discovery of a peptoid able to bind autoantibodies present in about one-third of nonobese diabetic (NOD) mice. The peptoid-binding autoantibodies were highly enriched through peptoid affinity chromatography and employed to probe mouse pancreatic and brain lysates. This resulted in identification of murine GAD65 as the native autoantigen. GAD65 is a known humoral autoantigen in human type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM), but its existence in mice had been controversial. This study demonstrates the potential of this chemical approach for the unbiased identification of autoantigen/autoantibody complexes.

  5. Vitiligo: How do oxidative stress-induced autoantigens trigger autoimmunity?

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    Xie, Heng; Zhou, Fubo; Liu, Ling; Zhu, Guannan; Li, Qiang; Li, Chunying; Gao, Tianwen

    2016-01-01

    Vitiligo is a common depigmentation disorder characterized by a loss of functional melanocytes and melanin from epidermis, in which the autoantigens and subsequent autoimmunity caused by oxidative stress play significant roles according to hypotheses. Various factors lead to reactive oxygen species (ROS) overproduction in the melanocytes of vitiligo: the exogenous and endogenous stimuli that cause ROS production, low levels of enzymatic and non-enzymatic antioxidants, disturbed antioxidant pathways and polymorphisms of ROS-associated genes. These factors synergistically contribute to the accumulation of ROS in melanocytes, finally leading to melanocyte damage and the production of autoantigens through the following ways: apoptosis, accumulation of misfolded peptides and cytokines induced by endoplasmic reticulum stress as well as the sustained unfolded protein response, and an 'eat me' signal for phagocytic cells triggered by calreticulin. Subsequently, autoantigens presentation and dendritic cells maturation occurred mediated by the release of antigen-containing exosomes, adenosine triphosphate and melanosomal autophagy. With the involvement of inducible heat shock protein 70, cellular immunity targeting autoantigens takes the essential place in the destruction of melanocytes, which eventually results in vitiligo. Several treatments, such as narrow band ultraviolet, quercetin and α-melanophore-stimulating hormone, are reported to be able to lower ROS thereby achieving repigmentation in vitiligo. In therapies targeting autoimmunity, restore of regulatory T cells is absorbing attention, in which narrow band ultraviolet also plays a role. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Increased polyamines alter chromatin and stabilize autoantigens in autoimmune diseases

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    Wesley H. Brooks

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Polyamines are small cations with unique combinations of charge and length that give them many putative interactions in cells. Polyamines are essential since they are involved in replication, transcription, translation, and stabilization of macro-molecular complexes. However, polyamine synthesis competes with cellular methylation for S-adenosylmethionine, the methyl donor. Also, polyamine degradation can generate reactive molecules like acrolein. Therefore, polyamine levels are tightly controlled. This control may be compromised in autoimmune diseases since elevated polyamine levels are seen in autoimmune diseases. Here a hypothesis is presented explaining how polyamines can stabilize autoantigens. In addition, the hypothesis explains how polyamines can inappropriately activate enzymes involved in NETosis, a process in which chromatin is modified and extruded from cells as extracellular traps that bind pathogens during an immune response. This polyamine-induced enzymatic activity can lead to an increase in NETosis resulting in release of autoantigenic material and tissue damage.

  7. Identification of human cytochrome P450s as autoantigens.

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    Manns, M P; Johnson, E F

    1991-01-01

    Antimicrosomal antibodies in inflammatory liver diseases all seem to be directed against members of the cytochrome P450 family of proteins. These autoantigens seem to be genetically polymorphic, the autoantibodies are inhibitory, and the autoepitopes are generally conserved among species. Anti-P450 autoantibodies share these characteristics with other autoantibodies, for example, antinuclear antibodies in systemic lupus erythematosus. The identification of P450s as human autoantigens is clinically important. Diagnostic tests will be developed on the basis of cloned antigen, facilitating a better diagnosis of drug-induced and idiopathic autoimmune hepatitis. It is unknown what triggers autoantibody production against cytochrome P450 proteins. Furthermore, their pathogenetic role and thus their involvement in tissue destruction is unclear. In this context LKM1 autoantibodies may serve as a model. Although LKM1 antibodies are inhibitory, all LKM1 antibody-positive patients tested so far are extensive metabolizers for drug metabolism mediated by P450IID6 and express this protein in their livers. Thus, the inhibitory LKM1 autoantibody does not sufficiently penetrate through the intact liver cell membrane to inhibit enzyme function in vivo. Presumably, tissue destruction in autoimmune hepatitis is mediated by liver-infiltrating T lymphocytes. T lymphocytes have been cloned from liver tissue that specifically proliferate in the presence of recombinant cytochrome P450IID6. The construction of overlapping cDNA subclones is also valuable to identify immunodominant B cell as well as relevant T cell epitopes.

  8. Investigations of Caspr2, an autoantigen of encephalitis and neuromyotonia

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    Lancaster, Eric; Huijbers, Maartje GM; Bar, Vered; Boronat, Anna; Wong, Andrew; Martinez-Hernandez, Eugenia; Wilson, Christina; Jacobs, Dina; Lai, Meizan; Walker, Russell W; Graus, Francesc; Bataller, Luis; Illa, Isabel; Markx, Sander; Strauss, Kevin A.; Peles, Elior; Scherer, Steven S; Dalmau, Josep

    2010-01-01

    Objective To report clinical and immunological investigations of contactin-associated protein-like 2 (Caspr2), an autoantigen of encephalitis and peripheral nerve hyperexcitability (PNH) previously attributed to voltage-gated potassium channels (VGKC). Methods Clinical analysis of patients with encephalitis, PNH, or both. Immunoprecipitation and mass spectrometry were used to identify the antigen and to develop an assay with Caspr2-expressing cells. Immunoabsorption with Caspr2 and comparative immunostaining of brain and peripheral nerve of wild-type and Caspr2-null mice were used to assess antibody specificity. Results Using Caspr2-expressing cells, antibodies were identified in 8 patients but not in 140 patients with several types of autoimmune or viral encephalitis, PNH, or mutations of the Caspr2-encoding gene. Patients’ antibodies reacted with brain and peripheral nerve in a pattern that co-localized with Caspr2. This reactivity was abrogated after immunoabsorption with Caspr2 and was absent in tissues from Caspr2-null mice. Of the 8 patients with Caspr2 antibodies, 7 had encephalopathy or seizures, 5 neuropathy or PNH, and 1 isolated PNH. Three patients had also myasthenia gravis, bulbar weakness, or symptoms that initially suggested motor neuron disease. None of the patients had active cancer; 7 responded to immunotherapy and were healthy or only mildly disabled at last follow-up (median 8 months, range 6–84). Interpretation Caspr2 is an autoantigen of encephalitis and PNH previously attributed to VGKC antibodies. The occurrence of other autoantibodies may result in a complex syndrome that at presentation could be mistaken for a motor neuron disorder. Recognition of this disorder is important because it responds to immunotherapy. PMID:21387375

  9. A La autoantigen homologue is required for the internal ribosome entry site mediated translation of giardiavirus.

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    Srinivas Garlapati

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Translation of Giardiavirus (GLV mRNA is initiated at an internal ribosome entry site (IRES in the viral transcript. The IRES localizes to a downstream portion of 5' untranslated region (UTR and a part of the early downstream coding region of the transcript. Recent studies indicated that the IRES does not require a pre-initiation complex to initiate translation but may directly recruit the small ribosome subunit with the help of a number of trans-activating protein factors. A La autoantigen homologue in the viral host Giardia lamblia, GlLa, was proposed as one of the potential trans-activating factors based on its specific binding to GLV-IRES in vitro. In this study, we further elucidated the functional role of GlLa in GLV-IRES mediated translation in Giardia by knocking down GlLa with antisense morpholino oligo, which resulted in a reduction of GLV-IRES activity by 40%. An over-expression of GlLa in Giardia moderately stimulated GLV-IRES activity by 20%. A yeast inhibitory RNA (IRNA, known to bind mammalian and yeast La autoantigen and inhibit Poliovirus and Hepatitis C virus IRES activities in vitro and in vivo, was also found to bind to GlLa protein in vitro and inhibited GLV-IRES function in vivo. The C-terminal domain of La autoantigen interferes with the dimerization of La and inhibits its function. An over-expression of the C-terminal domain (200-348aa of GlLa in Giardia showed a dominant-negative effect on GLV-IRES activity, suggesting a potential inhibition of GlLa dimerization. HA tagged GlLa protein was detected mainly in the cytoplasm of Giardia, thus supporting a primary role of GlLa in translation initiation in Giardiavirus.

  10. Neutrophil Extracellular DNA Traps Induce Autoantigen Production by Airway Epithelial Cells

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    Youngwoo Choi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The hypothesis of autoimmune involvement in asthma has received much recent interest. Autoantibodies, such as anti-cytokeratin (CK 18, anti-CK19, and anti-α-enolase antibodies, react with self-antigens and are found at high levels in the sera of patients with severe asthma (SA. However, the mechanisms underlying autoantibody production in SA have not been fully determined. The present study was conducted to demonstrate that neutrophil extracellular DNA traps (NETs, cytotoxic molecules released from neutrophils, are a key player in the stimulation of airway epithelial cells (AECs to produce autoantigens. This study showed that NETs significantly increased the intracellular expression of tissue transglutaminase (tTG but did not affect that of CK18 in AECs. NETs induced the extracellular release of both tTG and CK18 in a concentration-dependent manner. Moreover, NETs directly degraded intracellular α-enolase into small fragments. However, antibodies against neutrophil elastase (NE or myeloperoxidase (MPO attenuated the effects of NETs on AECs. Furthermore, each NET isolated from healthy controls (HC, nonsevere asthma (NSA, and SA had different characteristics. Taken together, these findings suggest that AECs exposed to NETs may exhibit higher autoantigen production, especially in SA. Therefore, targeting of NETs may represent a new therapy for neutrophilic asthma with a high level of autoantigens.

  11. Tir8/Sigirr prevents murine lupus by suppressing the immunostimulatory effects of lupus autoantigens

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    Lech, Maciej; Kulkarni, Onkar P.; Pfeiffer, Stephanie; Savarese, Emina; Krug, Anne; Garlanda, Cecilia; Mantovani, Alberto; Anders, Hans-Joachim

    2008-01-01

    The Sigirr gene (also known as Tir8) encodes for an orphan receptor of the Toll-like receptor (TLR)/interleukin 1 receptor family that inhibits TLR-mediated pathogen recognition in dendritic cells. Here, we show that Sigirr also inhibits the activation of dendritic cells and B cells upon exposure to RNA and DNA lupus autoantigens. To evaluate the functional role of Sigirr in the pathogenesis of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), we generated Sigirr-deficient C57BL/6-lpr/lpr mice. These mice developed a progressive lymphoproliferative syndrome followed by severe autoimmune lung disease and lupus nephritis within 6 mo of age as compared with the minor abnormalities observed in C57BL/6-lpr/lpr mice. Lack of Sigirr was associated with enhanced activation of dendritic cells and increased expression of multiple proinflammatory and antiapoptotic mediators. In the absence of Sigirr, CD4 T cell numbers were increased and CD4+CD25+ T cell numbers were reduced. Furthermore, lack of Sigirr enhanced the activation and proliferation of B cells, including the production of autoantibodies against multiple nuclear lupus autoantigens. These data identify Sigirr as a novel SLE susceptibility gene in mice. PMID:18644972

  12. Identification of new celiac disease autoantigens using proteomic analysis

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Stulík, J.; Hernychová, L.; Porkertová, S.; Pozler, O.; Tučková, Ludmila; Sánchez, Daniel; Bureš, J.

    2003-01-01

    Roč. 3, - (2003), s. 951-956 ISSN 1615-9853 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA310/00/1373; GA AV ČR IBS5020203 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5020903 Keywords : autoantigens * cells disease Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 5.766, year: 2003

  13. Apoptosis and Redistribution of the Ro Autoantigen in Balb/c Mouse Like in Subacute Cutaneous Lupus Erythematosus

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    Rafael Herrera-Esparza

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available In subacute cutaneous lupus eryhematosus (SCLE the cutaneous antigens constitute the main source of Ro and La autoantigens. The aim of this investigation was to demonstrate if UV light increases the availability of Ro autoantigen in the skin, also the blocking effect of Ac-DEVD-CMK a caspase inhibitor was assessed. For this purpose newborn Balb/c mice were UVB irradiated (5–30 mJ/cm2 equivalent to a moderate to severe sunburn. Animals were injected with monoclonal anti-Ro antibodies from SCLE patients. Apoptosis was also induced by anti-Fas antibody injection. Skin samples were examined by direct immunofluoresence, by TUNEL, and the expression of caspase 3 by RT-PCR. Major findings of present studies were: 1. UVB irradiation and anti-Fas induced apoptosis of keratinocytes. 2. Apoptosis redistribute the Ro antigen on cell surface and is better triggered by Ro antibody. 3. The caspase 3 inhibitor Ac-DEVD-CMK decreases the availability of Ro autoantigen in epidermis and prevents deposition of anti-Ro. In conclusion, the caspase pathway would be blocked to avoid anti-Ro deposition along skin; this finding would be a prospect in the treatment of SCLE patients.

  14. Antibodies against linear epitopes on Goodpasture autoantigen in patients with anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody-associated vasculitis.

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    Jia, Xiao-Yu; Yu, Jun-Tao; Hu, Shui-Yi; Li, Jian-Nan; Wang, Miao; Wang, Chen; Chen, Min; Cui, Zhao; Zhao, Ming-Hui

    2017-09-01

    In a substantial number of patients with crescentic glomerulonephritis, both anti-glomerular basement membrane (GBM) antibodies and anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (ANCA) are detected simultaneously. ANCA is presumed to be the initial event but the mechanism is unknown. In the present study, we investigated the antibodies against linear epitopes on Goodpasture autoantigen in sera from patients with ANCA-associated vasculitis, aiming to reveal the mechanisms of the coexistence of the two kinds of autoantibodies. Thirty-one patients with ANCA-associated vasculitis were enrolled in this study. Twenty-four overlapping linear peptides were synthesized across the whole sequence of Goodpasture autoantigen. Serum antibodies against linear peptides were detected by ELISA and their associations with clinical features were further analyzed. Twenty-five out of the thirty-one (80.6%) sera from patients with ANCA-associated vasculitis possessed antibodies against linear peptides on Goodpasture autoantigen. These antibodies could be detected in 50% of patients with normal renal function (Scr ≤ 133 μmol/L), 70% of patients with moderate renal dysfunction (133 μmol/L  600 μmol/L) (P = 0.032). The highest recognition frequencies were found for peptides P4 (51.6%), P14 (54.8%), and P24 (54.8%), which contained the sequences that constitute the conformational epitopes of E A (P4) and E B (P14) recognized by anti-GBM antibodies. The level of anti-P4 antibodies was positively correlated with the percentage of crescents in glomeruli (r = 0.764, P = 0.027). Patients with anti-P24 antibodies had a significantly higher prevalence of renal dysfunction on diagnosis (88.2 vs. 42.9%, P = 0.018). Antibodies against linear epitopes on Goodpasture autoantigen could be detected in sera of patients with ANCA-associated vasculitis, which might mediate the production of antibodies towards the conformational epitopes on Goodpasture autoantigen, namely, the anti-GBM antibodies.

  15. Osteopontin is a tumor autoantigen in prostate cancer patients

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    TILLI, TATIANA M.; SILVA, ELOÍSIO A.; MATOS, LÍVIA C.; FAGET, DOUGLAS V.; DIAS, BIANCA F.P.; VASCONCELOS, JULIANA S.P.; YOKOSAKI, YASUYUKI; GIMBA, ETEL R.P.

    2011-01-01

    Anti-tumor antibodies act as biomarkers for the early diagnosis of prostate cancer (PCa). Osteopontin (OPN) is overexpressed in PCa cells and contributes to the progression of the disease. This study aimed to evaluate whether OPN evokes a humoral immune response in PCa patients and whether the reactivity levels of anti-OPN antibodies may be used to better differentiate PCa from benign and healthy donor plasma samples. Plasma samples from biopsy-proven PCa patients (29), benign prostate hyperplasia (BPH) (18) and control healthy donors (HD) (30) were tested by immunoblots using the recombinant human OPN. The frequency of anti-OPN antibodies was significantly higher in PCa (66%) plasma samples as compared to BPH (33%) and HD controls (10%). Anti-OPN antibodies were detected in a high proportion of plasma samples from patients with a Gleason score of less than 6 (57%), prostate-specific antigen levels lower than 10 ng/ml (67%) and pT2 organ-confined disease (70%), suggesting that anti-OPN antibodies may be used as an early serum marker for PCa. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first description of OPN as a tumor autoantigen and one of the most reactive individual autoantigens described thus far. These data support the inclusion of OPN in a multiplex of tumor antigens in order to perform antibody profiling in PCa as well as in other malignancies overexpressing OPN. PMID:22870138

  16. Sialylated Autoantigen-Reactive IgG Antibodies Attenuate Disease Development in Autoimmune Mouse Models of Lupus Nephritis and Rheumatoid Arthritis

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    Yannic C. Bartsch

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available Pro- and anti-inflammatory effector functions of IgG antibodies (Abs depend on their subclass and Fc glycosylation pattern. Accumulation of non-galactosylated (agalactosylated; G0 IgG Abs in the serum of rheumatoid arthritis and systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE patients reflects severity of the diseases. In contrast, sialylated IgG Abs are responsible for anti-inflammatory effects of the intravenous immunoglobulin (pooled human serum IgG from healthy donors, administered in high doses (2 g/kg to treat autoimmune patients. However, whether low amounts of sialylated autoantigen-reactive IgG Abs can also inhibit autoimmune diseases is hardly investigated. Here, we explore whether sialylated autoantigen-reactive IgG Abs can inhibit autoimmune pathology in different mouse models. We found that sialylated IgG auto-Abs fail to induce inflammation and lupus nephritis in a B cell receptor (BCR transgenic lupus model, but instead are associated with lower frequencies of pathogenic Th1, Th17 and B cell responses. In accordance, the transfer of small amounts of immune complexes containing sialylated IgG Abs was sufficient to attenuate the development of nephritis. We further showed that administration of sialylated collagen type II (Col II-specific IgG Abs attenuated the disease symptoms in a model of Col II-induced arthritis and reduced pathogenic Th17 cell and autoantigen-specific IgG Ab responses. We conclude that sialylated autoantigen-specific IgG Abs may represent a promising tool for treating pathogenic T and B cell immune responses in autoimmune diseases.

  17. Review of autoantigens in Sjögren’s syndrome: an update

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    Tong L

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Louis Tong,1–4 Vanessa Koh,3 Bernard Yu-Hor Thong5 1Department of Ophthalmology, Yong Loo Lin School of Medicine, National University of Singapore, 2Corneal and External Eye Disease, Singapore National Eye Centre, 3Ocular Surface Research Group, Singapore Eye Research Institute, 4Eye Academic Clinical Program, Duke-NUS Medical School, 5Department of Rheumatology, Allergy and Immunology, Tan Tock Seng Hospital, Singapore Abstract: Primary Sjögren’s syndrome (pSS is an autoimmune disease characterized by inflammation in exocrine glands, resulting in reduced secretion of tears and saliva, manifesting as xerophthalmia and xerostomia, respectively. It is commonly associated with Sjögren’s syndrome type A (Ro and Sjögren’s syndrome type B (La antigens. However, in most patients, the identity of the triggering antigen is not known. Factors such as genetics of histocompatibility, dysregulation of T-cells, B-cells and viral infections have been implicated. Several important studies on autoantigens in pSS have been published since a review in 2012, and the aim of this review is to provide an update on further peer-reviewed original articles in this field. Oxidative damage of Ro60 antigen may explain the epitope spreading during the immune activation in pSS. Immune-mediated destruction of the muscarinic receptor-3-expressing cells has been associated with a reduction in parasympathetic function, which could cause reduced secretory function of exocrine glands. Such a process also activates reactive oxidative species and antioxidants, which are linked to the triggering of inflammatory responses. Elevated levels of kallikrein, yet another antigen present in the lacrimal gland and other tissues, are similarly involved in triggering an autoimmune T-cell response against target glands. Studying additional antigens, the platelet-selectin and vasoactive intestinal peptides, in patients with pSS can help to elucidate the origin and process of

  18. Automated microfluidic assay system for autoantibodies found in autoimmune diseases using a photoimmobilized autoantigen microarray.

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    Matsudaira, Takahiro; Tsuzuki, Saki; Wada, Akira; Suwa, Akira; Kohsaka, Hitoshi; Tomida, Maiko; Ito, Yoshihiro

    2008-01-01

    Autoimmune diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis, multiple sclerosis, and autoimmune diabetes are characterized by the production of autoantibodies that serve as useful diagnostic markers, surrogate markers, and prognostic factors. We devised an in vitro system to detect these clinically pivotal autoantibodies using a photoimmobilized autoantigen microarray. Photoimmobilization was useful for preparing the autoantigen microarray, where autoantigens are covalently immobilized on a plate, because it does not require specific functional groups of the autoantigens and any organic material can be immobilized by a radical reaction induced by photoirradiation. Here, we prepared the microarray using a very convenient method. Aqueous solutions of each autoantigen were mixed with a polymer of poly(ethylene glycol) methacrylate and a photoreactive crosslinker, and the mixtures were microspotted on a plate and dried in air. Finally, the plate was irradiated with an ultraviolet lamp to obtain immobilization. In the assay, patient serum was added to the microarray plate. Antigen-specific IgG adsorbed on the microspotted autoantigen was detected by peroxidase-conjugated anti-IgG antibody. The chemical luminescence intensities of the substrate decomposed by the peroxidase were detected with a sensitive CCD camera. All autoantigens were immobilized stably by this method and used to screen antigen-specific IgG. In addition, the plate was covered with a polydimethylsiloxane sheet containing microchannels and automated measurement was carried out.

  19. Review of autoantigens in Sjögren's syndrome: an update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Louis; Koh, Vanessa; Thong, Bernard Yu-Hor

    2017-01-01

    Primary Sjögren's syndrome (pSS) is an autoimmune disease characterized by inflammation in exocrine glands, resulting in reduced secretion of tears and saliva, manifesting as xerophthalmia and xerostomia, respectively. It is commonly associated with Sjögren's syndrome type A (Ro) and Sjögren's syndrome type B (La) antigens. However, in most patients, the identity of the triggering antigen is not known. Factors such as genetics of histocompatibility, dysregulation of T-cells, B-cells and viral infections have been implicated. Several important studies on autoantigens in pSS have been published since a review in 2012, and the aim of this review is to provide an update on further peer-reviewed original articles in this field. Oxidative damage of Ro60 antigen may explain the epitope spreading during the immune activation in pSS. Immune-mediated destruction of the muscarinic receptor-3-expressing cells has been associated with a reduction in parasympathetic function, which could cause reduced secretory function of exocrine glands. Such a process also activates reactive oxidative species and antioxidants, which are linked to the triggering of inflammatory responses. Elevated levels of kallikrein, yet another antigen present in the lacrimal gland and other tissues, are similarly involved in triggering an autoimmune T-cell response against target glands. Studying additional antigens, the platelet-selectin and vasoactive intestinal peptides, in patients with pSS can help to elucidate the origin and process of autoimmunity, or even lead to potential biomarkers. In conclusion, the understanding of autoantigens has led to exciting major advances in the biology of pSS and may influence diagnosis and management of pSS in future.

  20. 25-hydroxyvitamin D, autoantigenic and total antibody concentrations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorsen, Steffen Ullitz; Pipper, Christian B; Johannesen, Jesper

    2018-01-01

    conducted within this field. OBJECTIVE: Our objective was to investigate if higher 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D) concentrations were inversely associated with β-cell autoantigens glutamic acid decarboxylase (isoform 65) (GADA) and insulinoma associated antigen-2A (IA-2A). Further, we also wanted to examine......BACKGROUND: B cells have recently entered the stage as an important accessory player in type 1 diabetes (T1D) etiopathogenesis. Experimental studies suggest regulatory functions of vitamin D on B cells. However, only a few human studies, with considerable methodological limitations, have been...... the relationship between 25(OH)D and total antibody concentrations. METHODS: We randomly selected 500 patients with newly diagnosed T1D and 500 siblings for 25(OH)D, antibody and genetic analysis from the population-based Danish Registry of Childhood and Adolescent Diabetes. The relative change (RC) in the mean...

  1. Autoantigens targeted in scleroderma patients with vascular disease are enriched in endothelial lineage cells

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    McMahan, Zsuzsanna H.; Cottrell, Tricia R.; Wigley, Fredrick M.; Antiochos, Brendan; Zambidis, Elias T.; Park, Tea Soon; Halushka, Marc K.; Gutierrez-Alamillo, Laura; Cimbro, Raffaello; Rosen, Antony; Casciola-Rosen, Livia

    2016-01-01

    Objective Scleroderma patients with autoantibodies to centromere proteins (CENPs) and/or interferon-inducible protein 16 (IFI16) are at increased risk of severe vascular complications. We set out to define whether these autoantigens are enriched in cells of the vasculature. Methods Successive stages of embryoid bodies (EBs) as well as vascular progenitors were used to evaluate the expression of scleroderma autoantigens IFI16 and CENP by immunoblotting. CD31 was included to mark early blood vessels. IFI16 and CD31 expression were defined in skin paraffin sections from scleroderma patients and from healthy controls. IFI16 expression was determined by flow cytometry in circulating endothelial cells (CECs) and circulating progenitor cells (CPCs). Results Expression of CENP-A, IFI16 and CD31 was enriched in EBs at days 10 and 12 of differentiation, and particularly in cultures enriched in vascular progenitors (IFI16, CD31, CENPs A and-B). This pattern was distinct from that of comparator autoantigens. Immunohistochemical staining of skin paraffin sections showed enrichment of IFI16 in CD31-positive vascular endothelial cells in biopsies from scleroderma patients and normal controls. Flow cytometry analysis revealed IFI16 expression in CPCs, but minimal expression in CECs. Conclusion Expression of scleroderma autoantigens IFI16 and CENPs, which are associated with severe vascular disease, is increased in vascular progenitors and mature endothelial cells. High level, lineage-enriched expression of autoantigens may explain the striking association between clinical phenotypes and the immune targeting of specific autoantigens. PMID:27159521

  2. Pulmonary autoimmunity as a feature of autoimmune polyendocrine syndrome type 1 and identification of KCNRG as a bronchial autoantigen.

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    Alimohammadi, Mohammad; Dubois, Noémie; Sköldberg, Filip; Hallgren, Asa; Tardivel, Isabelle; Hedstrand, Håkan; Haavik, Jan; Husebye, Eystein S; Gustafsson, Jan; Rorsman, Fredrik; Meloni, Antonella; Janson, Christer; Vialettes, Bernard; Kajosaari, Merja; Egner, William; Sargur, Ravishankar; Pontén, Fredrik; Amoura, Zahir; Grimfeld, Alain; De Luca, Filippo; Betterle, Corrado; Perheentupa, Jaakko; Kämpe, Olle; Carel, Jean-Claude

    2009-03-17

    Patients with autoimmune polyendocrine syndrome type 1 (APS-1) suffer from multiple organ-specific autoimmunity with autoantibodies against target tissue-specific autoantigens. Endocrine and nonendocrine organs such as skin, hair follicles, and liver are targeted by the immune system. Despite sporadic observations of pulmonary symptoms among APS-1 patients, an autoimmune mechanism for pulmonary involvement has not been elucidated. We report here on a subset of APS-1 patients with respiratory symptoms. Eight patients with pulmonary involvement were identified. Severe airway obstruction was found in 4 patients, leading to death in 2. Immunoscreening of a cDNA library using serum samples from a patient with APS-1 and obstructive respiratory symptoms identified a putative potassium channel regulator (KCNRG) as a pulmonary autoantigen. Reactivity to recombinant KCNRG was assessed in 110 APS-1 patients by using immunoprecipitation. Autoantibodies to KCNRG were present in 7 of the 8 patients with respiratory symptoms, but in only 1 of 102 APS-1 patients without respiratory symptoms. Expression of KCNRG messenger RNA and protein was found to be predominantly restricted to the epithelial cells of terminal bronchioles. Autoantibodies to KCNRG, a protein mainly expressed in bronchial epithelium, are strongly associated with pulmonary involvement in APS-1. These findings may facilitate the recognition, diagnosis, characterization, and understanding of the pulmonary manifestations of APS-1.

  3. Chloroquine inhibits accessory cell presentation of soluble natural and synthetic protein antigens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buus, S; Werdelin, O

    1984-01-01

    We have studied the in vitro effect of the lysosomotrophic agent, chloroquine, on the presentation of soluble protein antigens by guinea pig accessory cells. Chloroquine inhibited the capacity of antigen-pulsed accessory cells to stimulate proliferation in appropriately primed T cells. The effect...... was time- and dose-dependent. A brief treatment solely of the accessory cells with the drug compromised their ability to stimulate primed T cells in a subsequent culture provided the accessory cells were treated with chloroquine before their exposure to the antigen. These results suggest that chloroquine...... acts on an early event in the antigen handling by accessory cells. Chloroquine is a well known inhibitor of lysosomal proteolysis, and it is likely that its effect on antigen presentation is caused by an inhibition of antigen degradation....

  4. IRF-4-mediated CIITA transcription is blocked by KSHV encoded LANA to inhibit MHC II presentation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiliang Cai

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Peptides presentation to T cells by MHC class II molecules is of importance in initiation of immune response to a pathogen. The level of MHC II expression directly influences T lymphocyte activation and is often targeted by various viruses. Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV encoded LANA is known to evade MHC class I peptide processing, however, the effect of LANA on MHC class II remains unclear. Here, we report that LANA down-regulates MHC II expression and presentation by inhibiting the transcription of MHC II transactivator (CIITA promoter pIII and pIV in a dose-dependent manner. Strikingly, although LANA knockdown efficiently disrupts the inhibition of CIITA transcripts from its pIII and pIV promoter region, the expression of HLA-DQβ but no other MHC II molecules was significantly restored. Moreover, we revealed that the presentation of HLA-DQβ enhanced by LANA knockdown did not help LANA-specific CD4+ T cell recognition of PEL cells, and the inhibition of CIITA by LANA is independent of IL-4 or IFN-γ signaling but dependent on the direct interaction of LANA with IRF-4 (an activator of both the pIII and pIV CIITA promoters. This interaction dramatically blocked the DNA-binding ability of IRF-4 on both pIII and pIV promoters. Thus, our data implies that LANA can evade MHC II presentation and suppress CIITA transcription to provide a unique strategy of KSHV escape from immune surveillance by cytotoxic T cells.

  5. The inhibition mechanisms of quinones and phenols present in wood for the vinyl polymerization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nobashi, Kenzo; Yokota, Tokuo

    1977-01-01

    The inhibitory effects and mechanisms of the quinones and phenols present in wood for the vinyl polymerization initiated with γ-rays and other initiation systems were investigated. The results obtained are summarized as follows; (1) Although phenolic compounds like isotaxiresinol inhibit the γ-ray initiated polymerization of methyl methacrylate (MMA) under the presence of air, they have no inhibitory effects in vacuo. On the other hand, o-benzoquinone and mansonones show strong inhibitory or retarding effects in vacuo. These facts indicate that oxygen may be important for the phenols to inhibit the vinyl polymerization. (2) It is shown qualitatively that there is a relationship between the strength of inhibitory action of quinones and their normal redox potentials. (3) PMMA produced under the presence of o-benzoquinone is found to include the fraction having extremely large chain length based on gel permeation chromatogram. (4) Based on the reaction products of orthoquinones and azobisisobutyronitrile, which was assumed as a model of polymer radicals, the inhibition reaction with polymer chain radical is concluded to take place upon the oxygen atoms of the quinones. (auth.)

  6. Expression of recombinant proteinase 3, the autoantigen in Wegener's granulomatosis, in insect cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van der Geld, YM; Smook, MLF; Huitema, MG; Harmsen, MC; Limburg, PC; Kallenberg, CGM

    2002-01-01

    Proteinase 3 (PR3) is the major autoantigen for anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (ANCA) in patients with Wegener's granulomatosis. Little is known about the major antigenic sites on PR3. To facilitate epitope mapping, PR3 was cloned in insect cells using a baculovirus expression system. Four

  7. Paradoxical effect of pertussis toxin on the delayed hypersensitivity response to autoantigens in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajwahrdhan Yadav

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Pertussis toxin (PTX, an exotoxin of Bordetella pertussis, enhances the development of experimental autoimmune diseases such as experimental autoimmune uveitis (EAU and experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE in rodent models. The mechanisms of the promotion of experimental autoimmune diseases by PTX may be based upon PTX-induced disruption of the blood eye/brain barriers facilitating the infiltration of inflammatory cells, the modulation of inflammatory cell migration and the enhancement of the activation of inflammatory cells. We hypothesized that the facilitation of experimental autoimmunity by PTX suggests that its influence on the in vivo immune response to auto-antigen may differ from its influence on non-self antigens.We have evaluated the effect of PTX on the simultaneous generation of delayed type hypersensitivity (DTH responses and autoimmune responses to uveitogenic interphotoreceptor retinoid binding protein peptide (IRBP161-180, encephalitogenic myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein peptide (MOG35-55 or ovalbumin (OVA. PTX injection of mice immunized to IRBP peptide161-180 led to (i the development of EAU as shown by histopathology of the retina, (ii pro-inflammatory cytokine production by splenocytes in response to IRBP peptide161-180, and (iii symptomatic EAE in mice immunized with encephalitogenic MOG peptide35-55. However, mice that received PTX had a reduced DTH response to IRBP161-180 peptide or MOG peptide35-55 when challenged distal to the site affected by autoreactive T cells. Moreover, footpad challenge with MOG35-55 peptide reduced EAE in mice immunized with MOG peptide. In contrast, the use of PTX when immunizing with OVA protein or an OVA immunogenic peptide did not affect the DTH response to OVA.The results suggest that that the reduced DTH response in mice receiving PTX may be specific for autoantigens and autoantigen-reactive T cells are diverted away from ectopic sites that received the autoantigen and towards

  8. Proactive interference by cues presented without outcomes: Differences in context specificity of latent inhibition and conditioned inhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miguez, Gonzalo; McConnell, Bridget; Polack, Cody W; Miller, Ralph R

    2018-01-08

    This report is part of a larger project examining associative interference as a function of the nature of the interfering and target associations. Lick suppression experiments with rats assessed the effects of context shifts on proactive outcome interference by latent inhibition (LI) and Pavlovian conditioned inhibition (CI) treatments on subsequently trained Pavlovian conditioned excitation treatment. LI and CI were trained in Context A during Phase 1, and then excitation treatment was administered in Context B during Phase 2, followed by tests for conditioned excitation in Contexts A, B, or C. Experiment 1 preliminarily established our LI and CI treatments and resulted in equally retarded acquisition of behavioral control when the target cue was subsequently trained as a conditioned excitor and tested in Context A. However, only CI treatment caused the target to pass a summation test for inhibition. Centrally, Experiment 2 consisted of LI and CI treatments in Context A followed by excitatory training in Context B. Testing found low excitatory control by both LI and CI cues in Context A relative to strong excitatory control in Context B, but CI treatment transferred to Context C more strongly than LI treatment. Experiment 3 determined that LI treatment failed to transfer to Context C even when the number of LI trials was greatly increased. Thus, first-learned LI appears to be relatively context specific, whereas first-learned CI generalizes to a neutral context. These observations add to existing evidence that LI and CI treatments result in different types of learning that diverge sharply in transfer to a novel test context.

  9. Andrographolide presents therapeutic effect on ulcerative colitis through the inhibition of IL-23/IL-17 axis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Qin; Zheng, Peifen; Chen, Xinyu; Zhou, Feng; He, Qiaona; Yang, Yuefeng

    2018-01-01

    Ulcerative colitis (UC) is a chronic and nonspecific intestinal inflammatory disease, which may increase the risk of colon cancer. Andrographolide is a main active component of Andrographis paniculata . The anti-inflammatory ability of andrographolide suggested its potential therapeutic effect against UC. In the present study, elevated serum concentrations of proinflammatory factors, including (TNF)-α, interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6 and IL-23, as well as increased percentages of Th17 cells (IL-17+CD4+ cells) in CD4+ cells were detected in UC patients compared to that in healthy donors. These data suggested that Th17 immune responses may involve in the pathogenesis of UC. Experimental colitis mouse model was then established. The results of hematoxylin and eosin staining demonstrated the therapeutic effect of andrographolide on colitis. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), flow cytometry and western blotting analyses showed that andrographolide could decreased the levels of proinflammatory factors TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6 and IL-17A in the serum and in the colon tissues, reduced the percentages of Th17 cells in CD4+ cells, and suppressed the levels of IL-23, IL-17A, ROR-γt (key transcription factor of Th17 cells) and p-STAT3 in the colon tissues. Further, peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) were isolated from UC patients and treated with various concentrations of andrographolide (0, 10, 20 and 30 μg/ml). Andrographolide also showed inhibitory effects on the levels of proinflammatory factors, the percentages of Th17 cells and the expression of relative proteins. Similar results were obtained in lipopolysaccharide-treated normal PBMCs. These data suggested that andrographolide may inhibit Th17 immune response via STAT3 signaling. In conclusion, we demonstrated that andrographolide inhibited the activity of IL-23/IL-17 axis and down-stream pro-inflammatory factors so as to suppress inflammation response, resulting in the relieving of UC.

  10. 64,000-Mr autoantigen in type I diabetes. Evidence against its surface location on human islets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Colman, P.G.; Campbell, I.L.; Kay, T.W.; Harrison, L.C.

    1987-01-01

    The sera of type I (insulin-dependent) diabetic subjects are reported to contain autoantibodies against a 64,000-Mr protein identified in [ 35 S]methionine biosynthetically labeled pancreatic islet cells. We have attempted to localize this autoantigen to the surface of the beta-cell and to define its properties. Sera from 10 newly diagnosed type I diabetic subjects, including five of the index sera originally used to identify the autoantigen, were shown to specifically precipitate a reduced protein of 67,000 Mr from Triton-solubilized, surface 125 I-labeled cultured adult human islet and rat insulinoma (RINm5F) cells but not from fresh rat spleen cells. Further characterization revealed that this protein was bovine serum albumin (BSA) adsorbed to cells from fetal calf serum (FCS)-supplemented culture medium and precipitated by BSA antibodies present in many diabetic sera. No labeled proteins were specifically precipitated when surface 125 I-labeled and solubilized human islet or RINm5F cells were precleared with anti-BSA immunoglobulins or when cells were first cultured in human serum. In contrast, a 64,000-Mr protein, clearly not BSA, was precipitated by diabetic globulins from human islets but not from RINm5F cells labeled with [ 35 S]methionine. In addition, a protein of the same size as well as proteins of approximately 35,000, 43,000, 140,000, and 200,000 Mr were specifically precipitated by diabetic globulins from freshly isolated human islets solubilized in Triton X-100 and then labeled with 125 I. These findings suggest that the 64,000-Mr antigen is not expressed on the surface of human islet cells, at least in culture, and therefore question its relevance as a target for islet cell surface antibodies in initiating beta-cell damage

  11. PML nuclear body component Sp140 is a novel autoantigen in primary biliary cirrhosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granito, Alessandro; Yang, Wei-Hong; Muratori, Luigi; Lim, Mark J; Nakajima, Ayako; Ferri, Silvia; Pappas, Georgios; Quarneti, Chiara; Bianchi, Francesco B; Bloch, Donald B; Muratori, Paolo

    2010-01-01

    Some patients with primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC) have antinuclear antibodies (ANAs). These ANAs include the "multiple nuclear dots" (MND) staining pattern, targeting promyelocytic leukemia protein (PML) nuclear body (NB) components, such as "speckled 100-kD" protein (Sp100) and PML. A new PML NB protein, designated as Sp140, was identified using serum from a PBC patient. The aim of this study was to analyze the immune response against Sp140 protein in PBC patients. We studied 135 PBC patients and 157 pathological controls with type 1 autoimmune hepatitis, primary sclerosing cholangitis, and systemic lupus erythematosus. We used indirect immunofluorescence and a neuroblastoma cell line expressing Sp140 for detecting anti-Sp140 antibodies, and a commercially available immunoblot for detecting anti-Sp100 and anti-PML antibodies. Anti-Sp140 antibodies were present in 20 (15%) PBC patients but not in control samples, with a higher frequency in antimitochondrial antibody (AMA)-negative cases (53 vs. 9%, P<0.0001). Anti-Sp140 antibodies were found together with anti-Sp100 antibodies in all but one case (19 of 20, 90%) and with anti-PML antibodies in 12 (60%) cases. Anti-Sp140 positivity was not associated with a specific clinical feature of PBC. Our study identifies Sp140 as a new, highly specific autoantigen in PBC for the first time. The very frequent coexistence of anti-Sp140, anti-Sp100 and anti-PML antibodies suggests that the NB is a multiantigenic complex in PBC and enhances the diagnostic significance of these reactivities, which are particularly useful in AMA-negative cases.

  12. Dysregulated homeostasis of target tissues or autoantigens - A novel principle in autoimmunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersen, Frank; Yue, Xiaoyang; Riemekasten, Gabriela; Yu, Xinhua

    2017-06-01

    Monogenic autoimmune disorders provide a powerful tool for our understanding of the principles of autoimmunity due to the obvious impact of a single gene on the disease. So far, approximately 100 single gene defects causing murine monogenic autoimmune disorders have been reported and the functional characterization of these genes will provide significant progress in understanding the nature of autoimmunity. According to their function, genes leading to monogenic autoimmune disorders can be categorized into two groups. An expectable first group contains genes involved in the homeostasis of the immune system, including homeostasis of immune organs and immune cells. Intriguingly, the second group consists of genes functionally involved in the homeostasis of target tissues or autoantigens. According to our novel hypothesis, we propose that autoimmunity represents a consequence of a dysregulated homeostasis of the immune system and/or its targets including autoantigens and target tissues. In this review we refer to both aspects of homeostasis in autoimmunity with a highlight on the role of the homeostasis of target tissues and autoantigens. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Polyphosphate present in DNA preparations from fungal species of Collectotrichum inhibits restriction endonucleases and other enzymes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, R.J.

    1993-01-01

    During the development of a procedure for the isolation of total genomic DNA from filamentous fungi (Rodriguez, R. J., and Yoder, 0. C., Exp. Mycol. 15, 232-242, 1991) a cell fraction was isolated which inhibited the digestion of DNA by restriction enzymes. After elimination of DNA, RNA, proteins, and lipids, the active compound was purified by gel filtration to yield a single fraction capable of complete inhibition of restriction enzyme activity. The inhibitor did not absorb uv light above 220 nm, and was resistant to alkali and acid at 25°C and to temperatures as high as 100°C. More extensive analyses demonstrated that the inhibitor was also capable of inhibiting T4 DNA ligase and TaqI DNA polymerase, but not DNase or RNase. Chemical analyses indicated that the inhibitor was devoid of carbohydrates, proteins, lipids, and nucleic acids but rich in phosphorus. A combination of nuclear magnetic resonance, metachromatic shift of toluidine blue, and gel filtration indicated that the inhibitor was a polyphosphate (polyP) containing approximately 60 phosphate molecules. The mechanism of inhibition appeared to involve complexing of polyP to the enzymatic proteins. All species of Colletotrichum analyzed produced polyP equivalent in chain length and concentration. A modification to the original DNA extraction procedure is described which eliminates polyP and reduces the time necessary to obtain DNA of sufficient purity for restriction enzyme digestion and TaqI polymerase amplification.

  14. Presentations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2007-01-01

    The presented materials consist of presentations of international workshop which held in Warsaw from 4 to 5 October 2007. Main subject of the meeting was progress in manufacturing as well as research program development for neutron detector which is planned to be placed at GANIL laboratory and will be used in nuclear spectroscopy research

  15. Triterpenic Acids Present in Hawthorn Lower Plasma Cholesterol by Inhibiting Intestinal ACAT Activity in Hamsters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuguang Lin

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Hawthorn (Crataegus pinnatifida is an edible fruit used in traditional Chinese medicine to lower plasma lipids. This study explored lipid-lowering compounds and underlying mechanisms of action of hawthorn. Hawthorn powder extracts inhibited acylCoA:cholesterol acyltransferase (ACAT activity in Caco-2 cells. The inhibitory activity was positively associated with triterpenic acid (i.e., oleanolic acid (OA and ursolic acid (UA contents in the extracts. Cholesterol lowering effects of hawthorn and its potential additive effect in combination with plant sterol esters (PSE were further studied in hamsters. Animals were fed a semi-synthetic diet containing 0.08% (w/w cholesterol (control or the same diet supplemented with (i 0.37% hawthorn dichloromethane extract, (ii 0.24% PSE, (iii hawthorn dichloromethane extract (0.37% plus PSE (0.24% or (iv OA/UA mixture (0.01% for 4 weeks. Compared to the control diet, hawthorn, PSE, hawthorn plus PSE and OA/UA significantly lowered plasma non-HDL (VLDL + LDL cholesterol concentrations by 8%, 9%, 21% and 6% and decreased hepatic cholesterol ester content by 9%, 23%, 46% and 22%, respectively. The cholesterol lowering effects of these ingredients were conversely associated with their capacities in increasing fecal neutral sterol excretion. In conclusion, OA and UA are responsible for the cholesterol lowering effect of hawthorn by inhibiting intestinal ACAT activity. In addition, hawthorn and particularly its bioactive compounds (OA and UA enhanced the cholesterol lowering effect of plant sterols.

  16. Regulatory function of a novel population of mouse autoantigen-specific Foxp3 regulatory T cells depends on IFN-gamma, NO, and contact with target cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cyndi Chen

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Both naturally arising Foxp3(+ and antigen-induced Foxp3(- regulatory T cells (Treg play a critical role in regulating immune responses, as well as in preventing autoimmune diseases and graft rejection. It is known that antigen-specific Treg are more potent than polyclonal Treg in suppressing pathogenic immune responses that cause autoimmunity and inflammation. However, difficulty in identifying and isolating a sufficient number of antigen-specific Treg has limited their use in research to elucidate the mechanisms underlying their regulatory function and their potential role in therapy. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Using a novel class II MHC tetramer, we have isolated a population of CD4(+ Foxp3(- T cells specific for the autoantigen glutamic acid decarboxylase p286-300 peptide (NR286 T cells from diabetes-resistant non-obese resistant (NOR mice. These Foxp3(- NR286 T cells functioned as Treg that were able to suppress target T cell proliferation in vitro and inhibit type 1 diabetes in animals. Unexpected results from mechanistic studies in vitro showed that their regulatory function was dependent on not only IFN-gamma and nitric oxide, but also on cell contact with target cells. In addition, separating NR286 Treg from target T cells in transwell assays abolished both production of NO and suppression of target T cells, regardless of whether IFN-gamma was produced in cell cultures. Therefore, production of NO, not IFN-gamma, was cell contact dependent, suggesting that NO may function downstream of IFN-gamma in mediating regulatory function of NR286 Treg. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These studies identified a unique population of autoantigen-specific Foxp3(- Treg that can exert their regulatory function dependent on not only IFN-gamma and NO but also cell contact with target cells.

  17. Presentations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2007-01-01

    The PARIS meeting held in Cracow, Poland from 14 to 15 May 2007. The main subjects discussed during this meeting were the status of international project dedicated to gamma spectroscopy research. The scientific research program includes investigations of giant dipole resonance, probe of hot nuclei induced in heavy reactions, Jacobi shape transitions, isospin mixing and nuclear multifragmentation. The mentioned programme needs Rand D development such as new scintillations materials as lanthanum chlorides and bromides as well as new photo detection sensors as avalanche photodiodes - such subjects are also subjects of discussion. Additionally results of computerized simulations of scintillation detectors properties by means of GEANT- 4 code are presented

  18. Venom-derived peptides inhibiting Kir channels: Past, present, and future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doupnik, Craig A

    2017-12-01

    Inwardly rectifying K + (Kir) channels play a significant role in vertebrate and invertebrate biology by regulating the movement of K + ions involved in membrane transport and excitability. Yet unlike other ion channels including their ancestral K + -selective homologs, there are very few venom toxins known to target and inhibit Kir channels with the potency and selectivity found for the Ca 2+ -activated and voltage-gated K + channel families. It is unclear whether this is simply due to a lack of discovery, or instead a consequence of the evolutionary processes that drive the development of venom components towards their targets based on a collective efficacy to 1) elicit pain for defensive purposes, 2) promote paralysis for prey capture, or 3) facilitate delivery of venom components into the circulation. The past two decades of venom screening has yielded three venom peptides with inhibitory activity towards mammalian Kir channels, including the discovery of tertiapin, a high-affinity pore blocker from the venom of the European honey bee Apis mellifera. Venomics and structure-based computational approaches represent exciting new frontiers for venom peptide development, where re-engineering peptide 'scaffolds' such as tertiapin may aid in the quest to expand the palette of potent and selective Kir channel blockers for future research and potentially new therapeutics. This article is part of the Special Issue entitled 'Venom-derived Peptides as Pharmacological Tools.' Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Presentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo Vicente

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available In the present edition of Significação – Scientific Journal for Audiovisual Culture and in the others to follow something new is brought: the presence of thematic dossiers which are to be organized by invited scholars. The appointed subject for the very first one of them was Radio and the invited scholar, Eduardo Vicente, professor at the Graduate Course in Audiovisual and at the Postgraduate Program in Audiovisual Media and Processes of the School of Communication and Arts of the University of São Paulo (ECA-USP. Entitled Radio Beyond Borders the dossier gathers six articles and the intention of reuniting works on the perspectives of usage of such media as much as on the new possibilities of aesthetical experimenting being build up for it, especially considering the new digital technologies and technological convergences. It also intends to present works with original theoretical approach and original reflections able to reset the way we look at what is today already a centennial media. Having broadened the meaning of “beyond borders”, four foreign authors were invited to join the dossier. This is the first time they are being published in this country and so, in all cases, the articles where either written or translated into Portuguese.The dossier begins with “Radio is dead…Long live to the sound”, which is the transcription of a thought provoking lecture given by Armand Balsebre (Autonomous University of Barcelona – one of the most influential authors in the world on the Radio study field. It addresses the challenges such media is to face so that it can become “a new sound media, in the context of a new soundscape or sound-sphere, for the new listeners”. Andrew Dubber (Birmingham City University regarding the challenges posed by a Digital Era argues for a theoretical approach in radio studies which can consider a Media Ecology. The author understands the form and discourse of radio as a negotiation of affordances and

  20. Immunological cross-reactivity to multiple autoantigens in patients with liver kidney microsomal type 1 autoimmune hepatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choudhuri, K; Gregorio, G V; Mieli-Vergani, G; Vergani, D

    1998-11-01

    We describe two patients with liver kidney microsomal antibody type 1 (LKM1)-positive autoimmune hepatitis (AIH) with associated endocrinopathies. The first patient had insulin-dependent diabetes (IDDM), and the second patient had Addison's disease and hypoparathyroidism, and is also positive for islet cell antibodies, without overt diabetes. To account for the existence of multiple endocrinopathy in these patients, we investigated whether there is sequence similarity between the target of LKM1 antibodies, cytochrome P4502D6 (CYP2D6), and other human proteins, and if so, whether this structural similarity produces a detectable cross-reactive immune response. Our database search identified two proteins, carboxypeptidase H, an autoantigen in insulin-dependent diabetes, and 21-hydroxylase, the major autoantigen in Addison's disease, that share sequence similarity to the second major LKM1 epitope on CYP2D6. We tested the reactivity of sera from these patients to the homologous regions of the three autoantigens using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The cut-off for positivity was established by testing sera from 22 healthy children. To determine the significance of reactivity to the peptide homologues of the three autoantigens, we investigated 16 additional patients with LKM1 AIH and 20 children with chronic hepatitis B virus infection as pathological controls. We found that reactivity to the second major epitope of CYP2D6 is significantly associated with reactivity to the homologous regions of carboxypeptidase H (CPH) and 21-hydroxylase (21-OHase) in patients with LKM1 AIH, and that this simultaneous recognition is cross-reactive. We suggest that a cross-reactive immune response between homologous autoantigens may contribute to the development of multiple endocrinopathies in LKM1 AIH.

  1. Primary structure of the human M2 mitochondrial autoantigen of primary biliary cirrhosis: Dihydrolipoamide acetyltransferase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coppel, R.L.; McNeilage, L.J.; Surh, C.D.; Van De Water, J.; Spithill, T.W.; Whittingham, S.; Gershwin, M.E.

    1988-01-01

    Primary biliary cirrhosis is a chronic, destructive autoimmune liver disease of humans. Patient sera are characterized by a high frequency of autoantibodies to a M r 70,000 mitochondrial antigen a component of the M2 antigen complex. The authors have identified a human cDNA clone encoding the complete amino acid sequence of this autoantigen. The predicted structure has significant similarity with the dihydrolipoamide acetyltransferase of the Escherichia coli pyruvate dehydrogenase multienzyme complex. The human sequence preserves the Glu-Thr-Asp-Lys-Ala motif of the lipoyl-binding site and has two potential binding sites. Expressed fragments of the cDNA react strongly with sera from patients with primary biliary cirrhosis but not with sera from patients with autoimmune chronic active hepatitis or sera from healthy subjects

  2. Re-exposure to beta cell autoantigens in pancreatic allograft recipients with preexisting beta cell autoantibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mujtaba, Muhammad Ahmad; Fridell, Jonathan; Book, Benita; Faiz, Sara; Sharfuddin, Asif; Wiebke, Eric; Rigby, Mark; Taber, Tim

    2015-11-01

    Re-exposure to beta cell autoantigens and its relevance in the presence of donor-specific antibodies (DSA) in pancreatic allograft recipients is not well known. Thirty-three patients requiring a pancreas transplant were enrolled in an IRB approved study. They underwent prospective monitoring for DSA and beta cell autoantibody (BCAA) levels to GAD65, insulinoma-associated antigen 2 (IA-2), insulin (micro-IAA [mIAA]), and islet-specific zinc transporter isoform-8 (ZnT8). Twenty-five (75.7%) had pre-transplant BCAA. Twenty had a single antibody (mIAA n = 15, GAD65 n = 5); five had two or more BCAA (GAD65 + mIAA n = 2, GAD65 + mIAA+IA-2 n = 2, GA65 + mIAA+IA-2 + ZnT8 = 1). No changes in GAD65 (p > 0.29), IA-2 (>0.16), and ZnT8 (p > 0.07) were observed between pre-transplant and post-transplant at 6 or 12 months. A decrease in mIAA from pre- to post-6 months (p BCAA was observed at one yr. Seven (21.0%) developed de novo DSA. The incidence of DSA was 24% in patients with BCAA vs. 25% in patients without BCAA (p = 0.69). Pancreatic allograft function of patients with vs. without BCAA, and with and without BCAA + DSA was comparable until last follow-up (three yr). Re-exposure to beta cell autoantigens by pancreas transplant may not lead to increased levels or development of new BCAA or pancreatic allograft dysfunction. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Are the deficits in navigational abilities present in the Williams syndrome related to deficits in the backward inhibition?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesca eFoti

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Williams syndrome (WS is associated with a distinct profile of relatively proficient skills within the verbal domain compared to the severe impairment of visuo-spatial processing. Abnormalities in executive functions and deficits in planning ability and spatial working memory have been described. However, to date little is known about the influence of executive function deficits on navigational abilities in WS. This study aimed at analyzing in WS individuals a specific executive function, the backward inhibition (BI that allows individuals to flexibly adapt to continuously changing environments. A group of WS individuals and a mental age- and gender-matched group of typically developing (TD children were subjected to three task-switching experiments requiring visuospatial or verbal material to be processed. Results showed that WS individuals exhibited clear BI deficits during visuospatial task-switching paradigms and normal BI effect during verbal task-switching paradigm. Overall, the present results suggest that the BI involvement in updating environment representations during navigation may influence WS navigational abilities.

  4. Design of a Type-1 Diabetes Vaccine Candidate Using Edible Plants Expressing a Major Autoantigen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edoardo Bertini

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Type-1 diabetes (T1D is a metabolic disease involving the autoimmune destruction of insulin-producing pancreatic beta cells. It is often diagnosed by the detection of autoantibodies, typically those recognizing insulin itself or the 65-kDa isoform of glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD65. Oral insulin can be used to induce systemic immunological tolerance and thus prevent or delay the onset of T1D, suggesting that combination treatments with other autoantigens such as GAD65 could be even more successful. GAD65 has induced oral tolerance and prevented T1D in preclinical studies but it is difficult to produce in sufficient quantities for clinical testing. Here we combined edible plant systems, namely spinach (Spinacia oleracea cv Industra and red beet (Beta vulgaris cv Moulin Rouge, with the magnICON® expression system to develop a safe, cost-effective and environmentally sustainable platform for the large-scale production of GAD65. The superior red beet platform was extensively characterized in terms of recombinant protein yields and bioequivalence to wild-type plants, and the product was tested for its ability to resist simulated gastric digestion. Our results indicate that red beet plants are suitable for the production of a candidate oral vaccine based on GAD65 for the future preclinical and clinical testing of T1D immunotherapy approaches.

  5. Oral delivery of human biopharmaceuticals, autoantigens and vaccine antigens bioencapsulated in plant cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Kwang-Chul; Verma, Dheeraj; Singh, Nameirakpam D; Herzog, Roland; Daniell, Henry

    2013-06-15

    Among 12billion injections administered annually, unsafe delivery leads to >20million infections and >100million reactions. In an emerging new concept, freeze-dried plant cells (lettuce) expressing vaccine antigens/biopharmaceuticals are protected in the stomach from acids/enzymes but are released to the immune or blood circulatory system when plant cell walls are digested by microbes that colonize the gut. Vaccine antigens bioencapsulated in plant cells upon oral delivery after priming, conferred both mucosal and systemic immunity and protection against bacterial, viral or protozoan pathogens or toxin challenge. Oral delivery of autoantigens was effective against complications of type 1 diabetes and hemophilia, by developing tolerance. Oral delivery of proinsulin or exendin-4 expressed in plant cells regulated blood glucose levels similar to injections. Therefore, this new platform offers a low cost alternative to deliver different therapeutic proteins to combat infectious or inherited diseases by eliminating inactivated pathogens, expensive purification, cold storage/transportation and sterile injections. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Identification of critical residues of linear B cell epitope on Goodpasture autoantigen.

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    Xiao-yu Jia

    Full Text Available The autoantigen of anti-glomerular basement membrane (GBM disease has been identified as the non-collagenous domain 1 of α3 chain of type IV collagen, α3(IVNC1. Our previous study revealed a peptide on α3(IVNC1 as a major linear epitope for B cells and potentially nephrogenic, designated as P14 (α3129-150. This peptide has also been proven to be the epitope of auto-reactive T cells in anti-GBM patients. This study was aimed to further characterize the critical motif of P14.16 patients with anti-GBM disease and positive anti-P14 antibodies were enrolled. A set of truncated and alanine substituted peptides derived from P14 were synthesized. Circulating antibodies against the peptides were detected by enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA.We found that all sera with anti-P14 antibodies reacted with the 13-mer sequence in the C-terminus of P14 (P14c exclusively. The level of antibodies against P14 was highly correlated with the level of antibodies against P14c (r=0.970, P<0.001. P14c was the core immunogenic region and the amino acid sequence (ISLWKGFSFIMFT was highly hydrophobic. Each amino acid residue in P14c was sequentially replaced by alanine. Three residues of glycine142, phenylalanine143, and phenylalanine145 were identified crucial for antibody binding based on the remarkable decline (P<0.001 of antibody reaction after each residue replacement.We defined GFxF (α3142, 143,145 as the critical motif of P14. It may provide some clues for understanding the etiology of anti-GBM disease.

  7. Immunohistochemical analysis of medullary breast carcinoma autoantigens in different histological types of breast carcinomas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kostianets Olga

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background On the past decade a plethora of investigations were directed on identification of molecules involved in breast tumorogenesis, which could represent a powerful tool for monitoring, diagnostics and treatment of this disease. In current study we analyzed six previously identified medullary breast carcinoma autoantigens including LGALS3BP, RAD50, FAM50A, RBPJ, PABPC4, LRRFIP1 with cancer restricted serological profile in different histological types of breast cancer. Methods Semi-quantitative immunohistochemical analysis of 20 tissue samples including medullary breast carcinoma, invasive ductal carcinoma, invasive lobular carcinoma and non-cancerous tissues obtained from patients with fibrocystic disease (each of five was performed using specifically generated polyclonal antibodies. Differences in expression patterns were evaluated considering percent of positively stained cells, insensitivity of staining and subcellular localization in cells of all tissue samples. Results All 6 antigens predominantly expressed in the most cells of all histological types of breast tumors and non-cancerous tissues with slight differences in intensity of staining and subcellular localization. The most significant differences in expression pattern were revealed for RAD50 and LGALS3BP in different histological types of breast cancer and for PABPC4 and FAM50A antigens in immune cells infiltrating breast tumors. Conclusions This pilot study made possible to select 4 antigens LGALS3BP, RAD50, PABPC4, and FAM50A as promising candidates for more comprehensive research as potential molecular markers for breast cancer diagnostics and therapy. Virtual slides The virtual slides’ for this article can be found here: http://www.diagnosticpathology.diagnomx.eu/vs/1860649350796892

  8. Release of Active Peptidyl Arginine Deiminases by Neutrophils Can Explain Production of Extracellular Citrullinated Autoantigens in Rheumatoid Arthritis Synovial Fluid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spengler, Julia; Lugonja, Božo; Jimmy Ytterberg, A.; Zubarev, Roman A.; Creese, Andrew J.; Pearson, Mark J.; Grant, Melissa M.; Milward, Michael; Lundberg, Karin; Buckley, Christopher D.; Filer, Andrew; Raza, Karim; Cooper, Paul R.; Chapple, Iain L.

    2015-01-01

    Objective In the majority of patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), antibodies specifically recognize citrullinated autoantigens that are generated by peptidylarginine deiminases (PADs). Neutrophils express high levels of PAD and accumulate in the synovial fluid (SF) of RA patients during disease flares. This study was undertaken to test the hypothesis that neutrophil cell death, induced by either NETosis (extrusion of genomic DNA–protein complexes known as neutrophil extracellular traps [NETs]) or necrosis, can contribute to production of autoantigens in the inflamed joint. Methods Extracellular DNA was quantified in the SF of patients with RA, patients with osteoarthritis (OA), and patients with psoriatic arthritis (PsA). Release of PAD from neutrophils was investigated by Western blotting, mass spectrometry, immunofluorescence staining, and PAD activity assays. PAD2 and PAD4 protein expression, as well as PAD enzymatic activity, were assessed in the SF of patients with RA and those with OA. Results Extracellular DNA was detected at significantly higher levels in RA SF than in OA SF (P < 0.001) or PsA SF (P < 0.05), and its expression levels correlated with neutrophil concentrations and PAD activity in RA SF. Necrotic neutrophils released less soluble extracellular DNA compared to NETotic cells in vitro (P < 0.05). Higher PAD activity was detected in RA SF than in OA SF (P < 0.05). The citrullinated proteins PAD2 and PAD4 were found attached to NETs and also freely diffused in the supernatant. PAD enzymatic activity was detected in supernatants of neutrophils undergoing either NETosis or necrosis. Conclusion Release of active PAD isoforms into the SF by neutrophil cell death is a plausible explanation for the generation of extracellular autoantigens in RA. PMID:26245941

  9. Aberrant accumulation of the diabetes autoantigen GAD65 in Golgi membranes in conditions of ER stress and autoimmunity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Phelps, Edward A; Cianciaruso, Chiara; Michael, Iacovos P

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic islet beta cells are particularly susceptible to endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, which is implicated in beta cell dysfunction and loss during the pathogenesis of type 1 diabetes (T1D). The peripheral membrane protein GAD65 is an autoantigen in human T1D. GAD65 synthesizes GABA......, an important autocrine and paracrine signaling molecule and a survival factor in islets. We show that ER stress in primary beta cells perturbs the palmitoylation cycle controlling GAD65 endomembrane distribution, resulting in aberrant accumulation of the palmitoylated form in trans-Golgi membranes...... release from stressed and/or damaged beta cells, triggering autoimmunity....

  10. Alkaloids from the Sponge Stylissa carteri Present Prospective Scaffolds for the Inhibition of Human Immunodeficiency Virus 1 (HIV-1)

    KAUST Repository

    O’Rourke, Aubrie

    2016-02-04

    The sponge Stylissa carteri is known to produce a number of secondary metabolites displaying anti-fouling, anti-inflammatory, and anti-cancer activity. However, the anti-viral potential of metabolites produced by S. carteri has not been extensively explored. In this study, an S. carteri extract was HPLC fractionated and a cell based assay was used to evaluate the effects of HPLC fractions on parameters of Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV-1) infection and cell viability. Candidate HIV-1 inhibitory fractions were then analyzed for the presence of potential HIV-1 inhibitory compounds by mass spectrometry, leading to the identification of three previously characterized compounds, i.e., debromohymenialdisine (DBH), hymenialdisine (HD), and oroidin. Commercially available purified versions of these molecules were re-tested to assess their antiviral potential in greater detail. Specifically, DBH and HD exhibit a 30%–40% inhibition of HIV-1 at 3.1 μM and 13 μM, respectively; however, both exhibited cytotoxicity. Conversely, oroidin displayed a 50% inhibition of viral replication at 50 μM with no associated toxicity. Additional experimentation using a biochemical assay revealed that oroidin inhibited the activity of the HIV-1 Reverse Transcriptase up to 90% at 25 μM. Taken together, the chemical search space was narrowed and previously isolated compounds with an unexplored anti-viral potential were found. Our results support exploration of marine natural products for anti-viral drug discovery.

  11. Inhibition of STAT3 Signaling Reduces IgA1 Autoantigen Production in IgA Nephropathy

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    Koshi Yamada

    2017-11-01

    Discussion: Our results revealed that IL-6−induced aberrant activation of STAT3-mediated overproduction of galactose-deficient IgA1. STAT3 signaling pathway may thus represent a new target for disease-specific therapy of IgA nephropathy.

  12. Production of the main celiac disease autoantigen by transient expression in Nicotiana benthamiana

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    Vanesa Soledad Marin Viegas

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Celiac Disease (CD is a gluten sensitive enteropathy that remains widely undiagnosed and implementation of massive screening tests is needed to reduce the long term complications associated to untreated CD. The main CD autoantigen, human tissue transglutaminase (TG2, is a challenge for the different expression systems available since its cross-linking activity affects cellular processes. Plant-based transient expression systems can be an alternative for the production of this protein. In this work, a transient expression system for the production of human TG2 in Nicotiana benthamiana leaves was optimized and reactivity of plant-produced TG2 in CD screening test was evaluated. First, a subcellular targeting strategy was tested. Cytosolic, secretory, endoplasmic reticulum (C-terminal SEKDEL fusion and vacuolar (C-terminal KISIA fusion TG2 versions were transiently expressed in leaves and recombinant protein yields were measured. ER-TG2 and vac-TG2 levels were 9 to 16 fold higher than their cytosolic and secretory counterparts. As second strategy, TG2 variants were co-expressed with a hydrophobic elastin-like polymer (ELP construct encoding for 36 repeats of the pentapeptide VPGXG in which the guest residue X were V and F in ratio 8:1. Protein bodies (PB were induced by the ELP, with a consequent 2 fold-increase in accumulation of both ER-TG2 and vac-TG2. Subsequently, ER-TG2 and vac-TG2 were produced and purified using immobilized metal ion affinity chromatography. Plant purified ER-TG2 and vac-TG2 were recognized by three anti-TG2 monoclonal antibodies that bind different epitopes proving that plant-produced antigen has immunochemical characteristics similar to those of human TG2. Lastly, an ELISA was performed with sera of CD patients and healthy controls. Both vac-TG2 and ER-TG2 were positively recognized by IgA of CD patients while they were not recognized by serum from non-celiac controls. These results confirmed the usefulness of plant

  13. Cycle inhibiting factors (CIFs are a growing family of functional cyclomodulins present in invertebrate and mammal bacterial pathogens.

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    Grégory Jubelin

    Full Text Available The cycle inhibiting factor (Cif produced by enteropathogenic and enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli was the first cyclomodulin to be identified that is injected into host cells via the type III secretion machinery. Cif provokes cytopathic effects characterized by G(1 and G(2 cell cycle arrests, accumulation of the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors (CKIs p21(waf1/cip1 and p27(kip1 and formation of actin stress fibres. The X-ray crystal structure of Cif revealed it to be a divergent member of a superfamily of enzymes including cysteine proteases and acetyltransferases that share a conserved catalytic triad. Here we report the discovery and characterization of four Cif homologs encoded by different pathogenic or symbiotic bacteria isolated from vertebrates or invertebrates. Cif homologs from the enterobacteria Yersinia pseudotuberculosis, Photorhabdus luminescens, Photorhabdus asymbiotica and the beta-proteobacterium Burkholderia pseudomallei all induce cytopathic effects identical to those observed with Cif from pathogenic E. coli. Although these Cif homologs are remarkably divergent in primary sequence, the catalytic triad is strictly conserved and was shown to be crucial for cell cycle arrest, cytoskeleton reorganization and CKIs accumulation. These results reveal that Cif proteins form a growing family of cyclomodulins in bacteria that interact with very distinct hosts including insects, nematodes and humans.

  14. Plant-based vaccines for oral delivery of type 1 diabetes-related autoantigens: Evaluating oral tolerance mechanisms and disease prevention in NOD mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Posgai, Amanda L; Wasserfall, Clive H; Kwon, Kwang-Chul; Daniell, Henry; Schatz, Desmond A; Atkinson, Mark A

    2017-02-13

    Autoantigen-specific immunological tolerance represents a central objective for prevention of type 1 diabetes (T1D). Previous studies demonstrated mucosal antigen administration results in expansion of Foxp3 + and LAP + regulatory T cells (Tregs), suggesting oral delivery of self-antigens might represent an effective means for modulating autoimmune disease. Early preclinical experiments using the non-obese diabetic (NOD) mouse model reported mucosal administration of T1D-related autoantigens [proinsulin or glutamic acid decarboxylase 65 (GAD)] delayed T1D onset, but published data are conflicting regarding dose, treatment duration, requirement for combinatorial agents, and extent of efficacy. Recently, dogma was challenged in a report demonstrating oral insulin does not prevent T1D in NOD mice, possibly due to antigen digestion prior to mucosal immune exposure. We used transplastomic plants expressing proinsulin and GAD to protect the autoantigens from degradation in an oral vaccine and tested the optimal combination, dose, and treatment duration for the prevention of T1D in NOD mice. Our data suggest oral autoantigen therapy alone does not effectively influence disease incidence or result in antigen-specific tolerance assessed by IL-10 measurement and Treg frequency. A more aggressive approach involving tolerogenic cytokine administration and/or lymphocyte depletion prior to oral antigen-specific immunotherapy will likely be required to impart durable therapeutic efficacy.

  15. Melanoma inhibitor of apoptosis protein (ML-IAP) specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes cross-react with an epitope from the auto-antigen SS56

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baek Sørensen, Rikke; Faurschou, Mikkel; Troelsen, Lone

    2009-01-01

    A large proportion of melanoma patients host a spontaneous T-cell response specifically against ML-IAP-derived peptides. In this study, we describe that some ML-IAP-specific cytotoxic T cells isolated from melanoma patients cross react with an epitope from the auto-antigen SS56. SS56 is a recentl...

  16. Mammalian peptidylglycine alpha-amidating monooxygenase (PAM) mRNA expression can be modulated by the La autoantigen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brenet, Fabienne; Dussault, Nadège; Borch, Jonas

    2005-01-01

    Peptidylglycine alpha-amidating monooxygenase (PAM; EC 1.14.17.3) catalyzes the COOH-terminal alpha-amidation of peptidylglycine substrates, yielding amidated products. We have previously reported a putative regulatory RNA binding protein (PAM mRNA-BP) that binds specifically to the 3' untranslated...... region (UTR) of PAM-mRNA. Here, the PAM mRNA-BP was isolated and revealed to be La protein using affinity purification onto a 3' UTR PAM RNA, followed by tandem mass spectrometry identification. We determined that the core binding sequence is approximately 15-nucleotides (nt) long and is located 471 nt...... downstream of the stop codon. Moreover, we identified the La autoantigen as a protein that specifically binds the 3' UTR of PAM mRNA in vivo and in vitro. Furthermore, La protein overexpression caused a nuclear retention of PAM mRNAs and resulted in the down-regulation of endogenous PAM activity. Most...

  17. The orthologue of Sjögren's syndrome nuclear autoantigen 1 (SSNA1 in Trypanosoma brucei is an immunogenic self-assembling molecule.

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    Helen P Price

    Full Text Available Primary Sjögren's Syndrome (PSS is a highly prevalent autoimmune disease, typically manifesting as lymphocytic infiltration of the exocrine glands leading to chronically impaired lacrimal and salivary secretion. Sjögren's Syndrome nuclear autoantigen 1 (SSNA1 or NA14 is a major specific target for autoantibodies in PSS but the precise function and clinical relevance of this protein are largely unknown. Orthologues of the gene are absent from many of the commonly used model organisms but are present in Chlamyodomonas reinhardtii (in which it has been termed DIP13 and most protozoa. We report the functional characterisation of the orthologue of SSNA1 in the kinetoplastid parasite, Trypanosoma brucei. Both TbDIP13 and human SSNA1 are small coiled-coil proteins which are predicted to be remote homologues of the actin-binding protein tropomyosin. We use comparative proteomic methods to identify potential interacting partners of TbDIP13. We also show evidence that TbDIP13 is able to self-assemble into fibril-like structures both in vitro and in vivo, a property which may contribute to its immunogenicity. Endogenous TbDIP13 partially co-localises with acetylated α-tubulin in the insect procyclic stage of the parasite. However, deletion of the DIP13 gene in cultured bloodstream and procyclic stages of T. brucei has little effect on parasite growth or morphology, indicating either a degree of functional redundancy or a function in an alternative stage of the parasite life cycle.

  18. Use of autoantigen-loaded phosphatidylserine-liposomes to arrest autoimmunity in type 1 diabetes.

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    Irma Pujol-Autonell

    Full Text Available The development of new therapies to induce self-tolerance has been an important medical health challenge in type 1 diabetes. An ideal immunotherapy should inhibit the autoimmune attack, avoid systemic side effects and allow β-cell regeneration. Based on the immunomodulatory effects of apoptosis, we hypothesized that apoptotic mimicry can help to restore tolerance lost in autoimmune diabetes.To generate a synthetic antigen-specific immunotherapy based on apoptosis features to specifically reestablish tolerance to β-cells in type 1 diabetes.A central event on the surface of apoptotic cells is the exposure of phosphatidylserine, which provides the main signal for efferocytosis. Therefore, phosphatidylserine-liposomes loaded with insulin peptides were generated to simulate apoptotic cells recognition by antigen presenting cells. The effect of antigen-specific phosphatidylserine-liposomes in the reestablishment of peripheral tolerance was assessed in NOD mice, the spontaneous model of autoimmune diabetes. MHC class II-peptide tetramers were used to analyze the T cell specific response after treatment with phosphatidylserine-liposomes loaded with peptides.We have shown that phosphatidylserine-liposomes loaded with insulin peptides induce tolerogenic dendritic cells and impair autoreactive T cell proliferation. When administered to NOD mice, liposome signal was detected in the pancreas and draining lymph nodes. This immunotherapy arrests the autoimmune aggression, reduces the severity of insulitis and prevents type 1 diabetes by apoptotic mimicry. MHC class II tetramer analysis showed that peptide-loaded phosphatidylserine-liposomes expand antigen-specific CD4+ T cells in vivo. The administration of phosphatidylserine-free liposomes emphasizes the importance of phosphatidylserine in the modulation of antigen-specific CD4+ T cell expansion.We conclude that this innovative immunotherapy based on the use of liposomes constitutes a promising strategy for

  19. Inhibition in movement plan competition: reach trajectories curve away from remembered and task-irrelevant present but not from task-irrelevant past visual stimuli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moehler, Tobias; Fiehler, Katja

    2017-11-01

    The current study investigated the role of automatic encoding and maintenance of remembered, past, and present visual distractors for reach movement planning. The previous research on eye movements showed that saccades curve away from locations actively kept in working memory and also from task-irrelevant perceptually present visual distractors, but not from task-irrelevant past distractors. Curvature away has been associated with an inhibitory mechanism resolving the competition between multiple active movement plans. Here, we examined whether reach movements underlie a similar inhibitory mechanism and thus show systematic modulation of reach trajectories when the location of a previously presented distractor has to be (a) maintained in working memory or (b) ignored, or (c) when the distractor is perceptually present. Participants performed vertical reach movements on a computer monitor from a home to a target location. Distractors appeared laterally and near or far from the target (equidistant from central fixation). We found that reaches curved away from the distractors located close to the target when the distractor location had to be memorized and when it was perceptually present, but not when the past distractor had to be ignored. Our findings suggest that automatically encoding present distractors and actively maintaining the location of past distractors in working memory evoke a similar response competition resolved by inhibition, as has been previously shown for saccadic eye movements.

  20. SP140L, an Evolutionarily Recent Member of the SP100 Family, Is an Autoantigen in Primary Biliary Cirrhosis

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    Mario Saare

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The SP100 family members comprise a set of closely related genes on chromosome 2q37.1. The widely expressed SP100 and the leukocyte-specific proteins SP110 and SP140 have been associated with transcriptional regulation and various human diseases. Here, we have characterized the SP100 family member SP140L. The genome sequence analysis showed the formation of SP140L gene through rearrangements of the two neighboring genes, SP100 and SP140, during the evolution of higher primates. The SP140L expression is interferon-inducible with high transcript levels in B cells and other peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Subcellularly, SP140L colocalizes with SP100 and SP140 in nuclear structures that are devoid of SP110, PML, or p300 proteins. Similarly to SP100 and SP140 protein, we detected serum autoantibodies to SP140L in patients with primary biliary cirrhosis using luciferase immunoprecipitation system and immunoblotting assays. In conclusion, our results show that SP140L is phylogenetically recent member of SP100 proteins and acts as an autoantigen in primary biliary cirrhosis patients.

  1. Autoantigen La promotes efficient RNAi, antiviral response, and transposon silencing by facilitating multiple-turnover RISC catalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ying; Tan, Huiling; Tian, Hui; Liang, Chunyang; Chen, She; Liu, Qinghua

    2011-11-04

    The effector of RNA interference (RNAi) is the RNA-induced silencing complex (RISC). C3PO promotes the activation of RISC by degrading the Argonaute2 (Ago2)-nicked passenger strand of duplex siRNA. Active RISC is a multiple-turnover enzyme that uses the guide strand of siRNA to direct the Ago2-mediated sequence-specific cleavage of complementary mRNA. How this effector step of RNAi is regulated is currently unknown. Here, we used the human Ago2 minimal RISC system to purify Sjögren's syndrome antigen B (SSB)/autoantigen La as an activator of the RISC-mediated mRNA cleavage activity. Our reconstitution studies showed that La could promote multiple-turnover RISC catalysis by facilitating the release of cleaved mRNA from RISC. Moreover, we demonstrated that La was required for efficient RNAi, antiviral defense, and transposon silencing in vivo. Taken together, the findings of C3PO and La reveal a general concept that regulatory factors are required to remove Ago2-cleaved products to assemble or restore active RISC. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. A novel expression platform for the production of diabetes-associated autoantigen human glutamic acid decarboxylase (hGAD65

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    Maxwell Denis

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Human glutamic acid decarboxylase 65 (hGAD65 is a key autoantigen in type 1 diabetes, having much potential as an important marker for the prediction and diagnosis of type 1 diabetes, and for the development of novel antigen-specific therapies for the treatment of type 1 diabetes. However, recombinant production of hGAD65 using conventional bacterial or mammalian cell culture-based expression systems or nuclear transformed plants is limited by low yield and low efficiency. Chloroplast transformation of the unicellular eukaryotic alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii may offer a potential solution. Results A DNA cassette encoding full-length hGAD65, under the control of the C. reinhardtii chloroplast rbcL promoter and 5'- and 3'-UTRs, was constructed and introduced into the chloroplast genome of C. reinhardtii by particle bombardment. Integration of hGAD65 DNA into the algal chloroplast genome was confirmed by PCR. Transcriptional expression of hGAD65 was demonstrated by RT-PCR. Immunoblotting verified the expression and accumulation of the recombinant protein. The antigenicity of algal-derived hGAD65 was demonstrated with its immunoreactivity to diabetic sera by ELISA and by its ability to induce proliferation of spleen cells from NOD mice. Recombinant hGAD65 accumulated in transgenic algae, accounts for approximately 0.25–0.3% of its total soluble protein. Conclusion Our results demonstrate the potential value of C. reinhardtii chloroplasts as a novel platform for rapid mass production of immunologically active hGAD65. This demonstration opens the future possibility for using algal chloroplasts as novel bioreactors for the production of many other biologically active mammalian therapeutic proteins.

  3. Application of indirect immunofluorescent test with an improved HEp-2 substrate tranfected with human Ro60/SSA autoantigens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lv Liangjing; Chen Shunle; Gu Yueying; Shen Nan; Bao Chunde; Wang Yuan; Xue Feng; Ye Peng; Yu Chongzhao

    2006-01-01

    To develop an improved substrate for indirect immunofluorescent test (IIF) to detect anti-Ro/SSA autoantibodies, the human 60-kDa Ro/SSA autoantigens (Ro60) cDNAs were obtained from placental cDNA library using PCR and were cloned into the mammalian expression vectorpEGFP-C1. Then the recombinant plasmids were transfected into HEp-2 cells. We con- firmed the overexpression, localization and antigenicity of fusion proteins in transfected cells by means of fluorescence microscopy, immunoblotting and IIF. HEp-2 and HEp-Ro60 was analyzed by IIF using a panel of 10 precipitinpositive anti-Ro human sera simultaneously. Stable expression of Ro60-GFP (green fluorescent protein) fusion proteins maintained ten more generations. And Ro60-GFP kept the antigenicity of Ro and had its own characteristic immunofluorescent pattern in HEp-Ro60 cells. The transfectants dramatically increased the sensitivity of IIF testing (a mean increase of 6.7-fold in endpoint titer, P<0.01). Eight (8/10) positive an- ti-Ro sera showed characteristic immunofluorescent pattern on HEp-Ro60, including two sera which were antinuclear antibodies (ANA) negative on untransfected HEp-2. IIF-ANA in all healthy sera were negative on HEp-Ro60. As a kind of new substrate of IIF, the Ro60 transfectants can be used to detect anti-Ro antibodies. In addition, transfected HEp-2 cells kept the immunofluorescent property of HEp-2 cells in IIF-ANA tests and could be employed as substrate for the routine IIF-ANA detection. The method improved the sensitivity of IIF-ANA. (authors)

  4. Clinical and serologic parallels to APS-I in patients with thymomas, and autoantigen transcripts in their tumors1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolff, Anette S. B.; Kärner, Jaanika; Owe, Jone F.; Oftedal, Bergithe E.V.; Gilhus, Nils Erik; Erichsen, Martina M.; Kämpe, Olle; Meager, Anthony; Peterson, Pärt; Kisand, Kai; Willcox, Nick; Husebye, Eystein S.

    2014-01-01

    Patients with the autoimmune polyendocrine syndrome type I (APS-I), caused by mutations in the autoimmune regulator (AIRE) gene, and myasthenia gravis (MG) with thymoma, show intriguing but unexplained parallels. They include uncommon manifestations like autoimmune adrenal insufficiency (AI), hypoparathyroidism (HP), and chronic mucocutaneous candidiasis (CMC) plus autoantibodies neutralizing IL-17, IL-22 and type I interferons. Thymopoiesis in the absence of AIRE is implicated in both syndromes. To test whether these parallels extend further, we screened 247 patients with MG and/or thymoma for clinical features and organ-specific autoantibodies characteristic of APS-I patients, and assayed 26 thymoma samples for transcripts for AIRE and 16 peripheral tissue-specific autoantigens (TSAgs) by quantitative PCR. We found APS-I-typical autoantibodies and clinical manifestations, including CMC, AI and asplenia, respectively in 49/121 (40%) and 10/121 (8%) thymoma patients, but clinical features seldom co-occurred with the corresponding autoantibodies. Both were rare in other MG subgroups (N=126). In 38 APS-I patients, by contrast, we observed neither autoantibodies against muscle antigens nor any neuromuscular disorders. Whereas relative transcript levels for AIRE and 7 of 16 TSAgs showed the expected under-expression in thymomas, levels were increased for 4 of the 5 TSAgs most frequently targeted by these patients’ autoAbs. Hence the clinical and serologic parallels to APS-I in patients with thymomas are not explained purely by deficient TSAg transcription in these aberrant AIRE-deficient tumors. We therefore propose additional explanations for the unusual autoimmune biases they provoke. Thymoma patients should be monitored for potentially life-threatening APS-I manifestations such as AI and HP. PMID:25230752

  5. Clinical and serologic parallels to APS-I in patients with thymomas and autoantigen transcripts in their tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolff, Anette S B; Kärner, Jaanika; Owe, Jone F; Oftedal, Bergithe E V; Gilhus, Nils Erik; Erichsen, Martina M; Kämpe, Olle; Meager, Anthony; Peterson, Pärt; Kisand, Kai; Willcox, Nick; Husebye, Eystein S

    2014-10-15

    Patients with the autoimmune polyendocrine syndrome type I (APS-I), caused by mutations in the autoimmune regulator (AIRE) gene, and myasthenia gravis (MG) with thymoma, show intriguing but unexplained parallels. They include uncommon manifestations like autoimmune adrenal insufficiency (AI), hypoparathyroidism, and chronic mucocutaneous candidiasis plus autoantibodies neutralizing IL-17, IL-22, and type I IFNs. Thymopoiesis in the absence of AIRE is implicated in both syndromes. To test whether these parallels extend further, we screened 247 patients with MG, thymoma, or both for clinical features and organ-specific autoantibodies characteristic of APS-I patients, and we assayed 26 thymoma samples for transcripts for AIRE and 16 peripheral tissue-specific autoantigens (TSAgs) by quantitative PCR. We found APS-I-typical autoantibodies and clinical manifestations, including chronic mucocutaneous candidiasis, AI, and asplenia, respectively, in 49 of 121 (40%) and 10 of 121 (8%) thymoma patients, but clinical features seldom occurred together with the corresponding autoantibodies. Both were rare in other MG subgroups (n = 126). In 38 patients with APS-I, by contrast, we observed neither autoantibodies against muscle Ags nor any neuromuscular disorders. Whereas relative transcript levels for AIRE and 7 of 16 TSAgs showed the expected underexpression in thymomas, levels were increased for four of the five TSAgs most frequently targeted by these patients' autoantibodies. Therefore, the clinical and serologic parallels to APS-I in patients with thymomas are not explained purely by deficient TSAg transcription in these aberrant AIRE-deficient tumors. We therefore propose additional explanations for the unusual autoimmune biases they provoke. Thymoma patients should be monitored for potentially life-threatening APS-I manifestations such as AI and hypoparathyroidism. Copyright © 2014 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  6. The F-actin modifier villin regulates insulin granule dynamics and exocytosis downstream of islet cell autoantigen 512

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hassan Mziaut

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Insulin release from pancreatic islet β cells should be tightly controlled to avoid hypoglycemia and insulin resistance. The cortical actin cytoskeleton is a gate for regulated exocytosis of insulin secretory granules (SGs by restricting their mobility and access to the plasma membrane. Prior studies suggest that SGs interact with F-actin through their transmembrane cargo islet cell autoantigen 512 (Ica512 (also known as islet antigen 2/Ptprn. Here we investigated how Ica512 modulates SG trafficking and exocytosis. Methods: Transcriptomic changes in Ica512−/− mouse islets were analyzed. Imaging as well as biophysical and biochemical methods were used to validate if and how the Ica512-regulated gene villin modulates insulin secretion in mouse islets and insulinoma cells. Results: The F-actin modifier villin was consistently downregulated in Ica512−/− mouse islets and in Ica512-depleted insulinoma cells. Villin was enriched at the cell cortex of β cells and dispersed villin−/− islet cells were less round and less deformable. Basal mobility of SGs in villin-depleted cells was enhanced. Moreover, in cells depleted either of villin or Ica512 F-actin cages restraining cortical SGs were enlarged, basal secretion was increased while glucose-stimulated insulin release was blunted. The latter changes were reverted by overexpressing villin in Ica512-depleted cells, but not vice versa. Conclusion: Our findings show that villin controls the size of the F-actin cages restricting SGs and, thus, regulates their dynamics and availability for exocytosis. Evidence that villin acts downstream of Ica512 also indicates that SGs directly influence the remodeling properties of the cortical actin cytoskeleton for tight control of insulin secretion. Keywords: F-actin, Granules, Ica512, Insulin, Secretion, Villin

  7. Immunochemical and autoantigenic properties of the globular domain of basement membrane collagen (type IV).

    Science.gov (United States)

    von der Mark, H; Oberbäumer, I; Timpl, R; Kemler, R; Wick, G

    1985-02-01

    Polyclonal rabbit antibodies raised against the globular domain NC1 of collagen IV from human placenta and a mouse tumor react with conformational antigenic determinants present on the NC1 hexamers and also with the three major subunits obtained after dissociation. The antibodies recognized unique structures within basement membranes and showed a broad tissue reactivity but only limited species cross-reactivity. Using these antibodies, it was possible to detect small amounts of collagen IV antigens from cell cultures and in serum. Monoclonal rat antibodies against mouse NC1 revealed a similar reaction potential. Autoantibodies could be produced in mice against mouse NC1 which react with kidney and lung basement membranes in a pathological manner, mimicking Goodpasture syndrome.

  8. Structural Basis for Recognition and Sequestration of UUUOH 3 ' Temini of Nascent RNA Polymerase III Transcripts by La, a Rheumatic Disease Autoantigen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teplova,M.; Yuan, Y.; Phan, A.; Malinina, L.; Ilin, S.; Teplov, A.; Patel, D.

    2006-01-01

    The nuclear phosphoprotein La was identified as an autoantigen in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus and Sjogren's syndrome. La binds to and protects the UUUOH 3' terminii of nascent RNA polymerase III transcripts from exonuclease digestion. We report the 1.85 Angstroms crystal structure of the N-terminal domain of human La, consisting of La and RRM1 motifs, bound to r(U1-G2-C3-U4-G5-U6-U7-U8-U9OH). The U7-U8-U9OH 3' end, in a splayed-apart orientation, is sequestered within a basic and aromatic amino acid-lined cleft between the La and RRM1 motifs. The specificity-determining U8 residue bridges both motifs, in part through unprecedented targeting of the {beta} sheet edge, rather than the anticipated face, of the RRM1 motif. Our structural observations, supported by mutation studies of both La and RNA components, illustrate the principles behind RNA sequestration by a rheumatic disease autoantigen, whereby the UUUOH 3' ends of nascent RNA transcripts are protected during downstream processing and maturation events.

  9. Epigallocathechin gallate, polyphenol present in green tea, inhibits stem-like characteristics and epithelial-mesenchymal transition in nasopharyngeal cancer cell lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin Chien-Hung

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Previous studies have demonstrated that the consumption of green tea inhibits the growth of various cancers. Most cancers are believed to be initiated from and maintained by a small population of cancer stem-like cells (CSC or tumor-initiating cells (TIC that are responsible for tumor relapse and chemotherapeutic resistance. Although epigallocathechin gallate (EGCG, the most abundant catechin in green tea, has been reported to induce growth inhibition and apoptosis in some cancer cells, its effect on CSC is undefined. In this study, we enriched CSC by the sphere formation, and provided an efficient model for further experiments. Using this method, we examined the effects of EGCG regulating the nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC CSC and attempted to elucidate the possible mechanisms. Methods NPC TW01 and TW06 cell lines were enriched by sphere formation and characterized their phenotypical properties, such as invasion capacity, epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT and gene expression were analyzed by quantitative real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (q-RT-PCR. EGCG-induced growth inhibition in the parental and sphere-derived cells was determined by MTT and bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU assay. EGCG-induced apoptosis was analyzed by flow cytometry with Annexin V and PI staining. The effects of EGCG on sphere-derived cell tumorigenicity, migration and invasion were determined by soft agar assay, wound healing, and cell invasion assay. The alternation of protein expression regulated by EGCG on these sphere-derived cells was assessed by immunofluorescence staining and western blot. Results NPC sphere-derived cells grown in serum-free non-adherent culture showed increased expression of stem cell markers and EMT markers compared to parental cells grown in conventional culture. Although EGCG induced growth inhibition and apoptosis in the parental cells in a dose-dependent manner, it was not as effective against spheres

  10. Luteolin-7-O-Glucoside Present in Lettuce Extracts Inhibits Hepatitis B Surface Antigen Production and Viral Replication by Human Hepatoma Cells in Vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-Xian Cui

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Hepatitis B virus (HBV infection is endemic in Asia and chronic hepatitis B (CHB is a major public health issue worldwide. Current treatment strategies for CHB are not satisfactory as they induce a low rate of hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg loss. Extracts were prepared from lettuce hydroponically cultivated in solutions containing glycine or nitrate as nitrogen sources. The lettuce extracts exerted potent anti-HBV effects in HepG2 cell lines in vitro, including significant HBsAg inhibition, HBV replication and transcription inhibition, without exerting cytotoxic effects. When used in combination interferon-alpha 2b (IFNα-2b or lamivudine (3TC, the lettuce extracts synergistically inhibited HBsAg expression and HBV replication. By using differential metabolomics analysis, Luteolin-7-O-glucoside was identified and confirmed as a functional component of the lettuce extracts and exhibited similar anti-HBV activity as the lettuce extracts in vitro. The inhibition rate on HBsAg was up to 77.4%. Moreover, both the lettuce extracts and luteolin-7-O-glucoside functioned as organic antioxidants and, significantly attenuated HBV-induced intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS accumulation. Luteolin-7-O-glucoside also normalized ROS-induced mitochondrial membrane potential damage, which suggests luteolin-7-O-glucoside inhibits HBsAg and HBV replication via a mechanism involving the mitochondria. Our findings suggest luteolin-7-O-glucoside may have potential value for clinical application in CHB and may enhance HBsAg and HBV clearance when used as a combination therapy.

  11. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells of patients with latent autoimmune diabetes secrete higher levels of pro- & anti-inflammatory cytokines compared to those with type-1 diabetes mellitus following in vitro stimulation with β-cell autoantigens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darshan Badal

    2017-01-01

    Interpretation & conclusions: There are differences in the portfolio of cytokine secretion in diabetic subjects with varying rates of β-cell destruction as LADA subjects secrete higher levels of both pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines on exposure to β-cell autoantigens, thus highlighting another distinguishing feature in the pathophysiology of the two forms of autoimmune diabetes.

  12. Pancreatic beta cells express two autoantigenic forms of glutamic acid decarboxylase, a 65-kDa hydrophilic form and a 64-kDa amphiphilic form which can be both membrane-bound and soluble

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christgau, S; Schierbeck, H; Aanstoot, H J

    1991-01-01

    The 64-kDa pancreatic beta-cell autoantigen, which is a target of autoantibodies associated with early as well as progressive stages of beta-cell destruction, resulting in insulin-dependent diabetes (IDDM) in humans, has been identified as the gamma-aminobutyric acid-synthesizing enzyme glutamic...... acid decarboxylase. We have identified two autoantigenic forms of this protein in rat pancreatic beta-cells, a Mr 65,000 (GAD65) hydrophilic and soluble form of pI 6.9-7.1 and a Mr 64,000 (GAD64) component of pI 6.7. GAD64 is more abundant than GAD65 and has three distinct forms with regard to cellular...

  13. Inhibition of antigen-presenting activity of dendritic cells resulting from UV irradiation of murine skin is restored by in vitro photorepair of cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vink, A.A.; Roza, L.; Moodycliffe, A.M.; Shreedhar, V.

    1997-01-01

    Exposing skin to UVB (280-320 nm) radiation suppresses contact hypersensitivity by a mechanism that involves an alteration in the activity of cutaneous antigen-presenting cells (APC). UV-induced DNA damage appears to be an important molecular trigger for this effect. The specific target cells in the skin that sustain DNA damage relevant to the immunosuppressive effect have yet to be identified. We tested the hypothesis that UV-induced DNA damage in the cutaneous APC was responsible for their impaired ability to present antigen after in vivo UV irradiation. Cutaneous APC were collected from the draining lymph nodes of UVB-irradiated, hapten-sensitized mice and incubated in vitro with liposomes containing a photolyase, which, upon absorption of photoreactivating light, splits UV-induced cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers. Photosome treatment followed by photoreactivating light reduced the number of dimer-containing APC, restored the in vivo antigen-presenting activity of the draining lymph node cells, and blocked the induction of suppressor T cells. Neither Photosomes nor photoreactivating light alone, nor photoreactivating light given before Photosomes, restored APC activity, and Photosomes treatment did not reverse the impairment of APC function when isopsoralen plus UVA (320-400 nm) radiation was used instead of UVB. These controls indicate that the restoration of APC function matched the requirements of Photosome-mediated DNA repair for dimers and post-treatment photoreactivating light. These results provide compelling evidence that it is UV-induced DNA damage in cutaneous APC that leads to reduced immune function

  14. The inhibition of anti-DNA binding to DNA by nucleic acid binding polymers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nancy A Stearns

    Full Text Available Antibodies to DNA (anti-DNA are the serological hallmark of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE and can mediate disease pathogenesis by the formation of immune complexes. Since blocking immune complex formation can attenuate disease manifestations, the effects of nucleic acid binding polymers (NABPs on anti-DNA binding in vitro were investigated. The compounds tested included polyamidoamine dendrimer, 1,4-diaminobutane core, generation 3.0 (PAMAM-G3, hexadimethrine bromide, and a β-cylodextrin-containing polycation. As shown with plasma from patients with SLE, NABPs can inhibit anti-DNA antibody binding in ELISA assays. The inhibition was specific since the NABPs did not affect binding to tetanus toxoid or the Sm protein, another lupus autoantigen. Furthermore, the polymers could displace antibody from preformed complexes. Together, these results indicate that NABPs can inhibit the formation of immune complexes and may represent a new approach to treatment.

  15. Silenced B-Cell Receptor Response To Autoantigen In A Poor-Prognostic Subset Of Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bergh, Ann-Charlotte; Evaldsson, Chamilly; Pedersen, Lone Bredo

    2014-01-01

    Chronic lymphocytic leukemia B cells express auto/xeno antigen-reactive antibodies that bind to self-epitopes and resemble natural IgM antibodies in their repertoire. One of the antigenic structures recognized is oxidation-induced malonedialdehyde that is present on low-density lipoprotein......-cell receptor unresponsiveness to cognate self-antigen on its own in poor-prognostic subset #1 chronic lymphocytic leukemia, indicating that these cells proliferate by other mechanisms that may override B-cell receptor silencing brought about in a context of self-tolerance/anergy. These novel findings have...

  16. A group-specific inhibitor of lysosomal cysteine proteinases selectively inhibits both proteolytic degradation and presentation of the antigen dinitrophenyl-poly-L-lysine by guinea pig accessory cells to T cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buus, S; Werdelin, O

    1986-01-01

    of antigens by guinea pig accessory cells. The proteinase inhibitor benzyloxycarbonyl-phenylalanylalanine-diazomethyl-ketone, which selectively inhibits cysteine proteinases, was used to block this set of enzymes in cultured cells. We demonstrate that the selective inhibition of the cysteine proteinases...

  17. PRESENTED AT NC SOCIETY OF TOXICOLOGY MEETING IN RESEARCH TRIANGLE PARK, NC ON 2/16/2006: PERIPUBERTAL PROCHLORAZ EXPOSURE STRONGLY INHIBITS TESTOSTERONE PRODUCTION, BUT HAS WEAK EFFECTS ON PUBERTY

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prochloraz (PCZ) is an imidazole fungicide that inhibits steroidogenesis and acts as an androgen receptor antagonist. We hypothesized that pubertal exposure to prochloraz would delay preputial separation and development of reproductive organs. Sprague Dawley rats were dosed wit...

  18. Study of microRNAs (miRNAs) that are predicted to target the autoantigens Ro/SSA and La/SSB in primary Sjögren’s Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gourzi, V C; Kapsogeorgou, E K; Kyriakidis, N C; Tzioufas, A G

    2015-01-01

    The elevated tissue expression of Ro/SSA and La/SSB autoantigens appears to be crucial for the generation and perpetuation of autoimmune humoral responses against these autoantigens in Sjögren’s syndrome (SS). The mechanisms that govern their expression are not known. miRNAs, the post-transcriptional regulators of gene expression, might be implicated. We have identified previously the miRNAs let7b, miR16, miR181a, miR200b-3p, miR200b-5p, miR223 and miR483-5p that are predicted to target Ro/SSA [Ro52/tripartite motif-containing protein 21 (TRIM21), Ro60/TROVE domain family, member 2 (TROVE2)] and La/SSB mRNAs. To study possible associations with autoantigen mRNA expression and disease features, their expression was investigated in minor salivary gland (MSG) tissues, peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) and long-term cultured non-neoplastic salivary gland epithelial cells (SGEC) from 29 SS patients (20 of 29 positive for autoantibodies to Ro/SSA and La/SSB) and 24 sicca-complaining controls. The levels of miR16 were up-regulated in MSGs, miR200b-3p in SGECs and miR223 and miR483-5p in PBMCs of SS patients compared to sicca-complaining controls. The MSG levels of let7b, miR16, miR181a, miR223 and miR483-5p were correlated positively with Ro52/TRIM21-mRNA. miR181a and miR200b-3p were correlated negatively with Ro52/TRIM21 and Ro60/TROVE2 mRNAs in SGECs, respectively, whereas let7b, miR200b-5p and miR223 associated with La/SSB-mRNA. In PBMCs, let7b, miR16, miR181a and miR483-5p were correlated with Ro52/TRIM21, whereas let7b, miR16 and miR181a were also associated with La/SSB-mRNA expression. Significantly lower miR200b-5p levels were expressed in SS patients with mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT) lymphoma compared to those without. Our findings indicate that miR16, miR200b-3p, miR223 and miR483-5p are deregulated in SS, but the exact role of this deregulation in disease pathogenesis and autoantigen expression needs to be elucidated. PMID:26201309

  19. Corrosion inhibition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fisher, A O

    1965-12-29

    An acid corrosion-inhibiting composition consists essentially of a sugar, and an alkali metal salt selected from the group consisting of iodides and bromides. The weight ratio of the sugar to the alkali metal salt is between 2:1 and about 20,000:1. Also, a corrosion- inhibited phosphoric acid composition comprising at least about 20 wt% of phosphoric acid and between about 0.1 wt% and about 10 wt% of molasses, and between about 0.0005 wt% and about 1 wt% of potassium iodide. The weight ratio of molasses to iodide is greater than about 2:1. (11 claims)

  20. Delivery presentations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pregnancy - delivery presentation; Labor - delivery presentation; Occiput posterior; Occiput anterior; Brow presentation ... The mother can walk, rock, and try different delivery positions during labor to help encourage the baby ...

  1. Lecture Presentations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2007-01-01

    The Heavy-Ion Collisions in the LHC workshop held in Cracow from 18 to 18 May 2007. The main subject of the workshop was to present the newest results of research provided at CERN LHC collider. Additionally some theoretical models and methods used for presented data analysis were discussed

  2. CATCHY PRESENTATIONS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eriksen, Kaare; Tollestrup, Christian; Ovesen, Nis

    2011-01-01

    An important competence for designers is the ability to communicate and present ideas and proposals for customers, partners, investors and colleagues. The Pecha Kucha principle, developed by Astrid Klein and Mark Dytham, has become a widely used and easy format for the presentation of new concepts...

  3. Workshop presentations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanden, Per-Olof; Edland, Anne; Reiersen, Craig; Mullins, Peter; Ingemarsson, Karl-Fredrik; Bouchard, Andre; Watts, Germaine; Johnstone, John; Hollnagel, Erik; Ramberg, Patric; Reiman, Teemu

    2009-01-01

    An important part of the workshop was a series of invited presentations. The presentations were intended to both provide the participants with an understanding of various organisational approaches and activities as well as to stimulate the exchange of ideas during the small group discussion sessions. The presentation subjects ranged from current organisational regulations and licensee activities to new organisational research and the benefits of viewing organisations from a different perspective. There were more than a dozen invited presentations. The initial set of presentations gave the participants an overview of the background, structure, and aims of the workshop. This included a short presentation on the results from the regulatory responses to the pre-workshop survey. Representatives from four countries (Sweden, Canada, Finland, and the United Kingdom) expanded upon their survey responses with detailed presentations on both regulatory and licensee safety-related organisational activities in their countries. There were also presentations on new research concerning how to evaluate safety critical organisations and on a resilience engineering perspective to safety critical organisations. Below is the list of the presentations, the slides of which being available in Appendix 2: 1 - Workshop Welcome (Per-Olof Sanden); 2 - CSNI Working Group on Human and Organisational Factors (Craig Reiersen); 3 - Regulatory expectations on justification of suitability of licensee organisational structures, resources and competencies (Anne Edland); 4 - Justifying the suitability of licensee organisational structures, resources and competencies (Karl-Fredrik Ingemarsson); 5 - Nuclear Organisational Suitability in Canada (Andre Bouchard); 6 - Designing and Resourcing for Safety and Effectiveness (Germaine Watts); 7 - Organisational Suitability - What do you need and how do you know that you've got it? (Craig Reiersen); 8 - Suitability of Organisations - UK Regulator's View (Peter

  4. CERN presentations

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2011-01-01

    Presentation by CERN (10 minutes each) Rolf Landua - Education and Outreach Salvatore Mele - Open Access Jean-Yves Le Meur - Digital Library in Africa Francois Fluckiger - Open Source/Standards (tbc) Tim Smith - Open Data for Science Tullio Basiglia - tbc

  5. Delivery presentations

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... has entered the pelvis. If the presenting part lies above the ischial spines, the station is reported ... M. is also a founding member of Hi-Ethics and subscribes to the principles of the Health ...

  6. Information Presentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holden, K.L.; Boyer, J.L.; Sandor, A.; Thompson, S.G.; McCann, R.S.; Begault, D.R.; Adelstein, B.D.; Beutter, B.R.; Stone, L.S.

    2009-01-01

    The goal of the Information Presentation Directed Research Project (DRP) is to address design questions related to the presentation of information to the crew. The major areas of work, or subtasks, within this DRP are: 1) Displays, 2) Controls, 3) Electronic Procedures and Fault Management, and 4) Human Performance Modeling. This DRP is a collaborative effort between researchers at Johnson Space Center and Ames Research Center.

  7. Quorum sensing inhibition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Persson, T.; Givskov, Michael Christian; Nielsen, J.

    2005-01-01

    /receptor transcriptional regulator in some clinically relevant Gram-negative bacteria. The present review contains all reported compound types that are currently known to inhibit the QS transcriptional regulator in Gram-negative bacteria. These compounds are sub-divided into two main groups, one comprising structural...

  8. Voting Present

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James Lo

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available During his time as a state senator in Illinois, Barack Obama voted “Present” 129 times, a deliberate act of nonvoting that subsequently became an important campaign issue during the 2008 presidential elections. In this article, I examine the use of Present votes in the Illinois state senate. I find evidence that Present votes can largely be characterized as protest votes used as a legislative tool by the minority party. Incorporating information from Present votes into a Bayesian polytomous item-response model, I find that this information increases the efficiency of ideal point estimates by approximately 35%. There is little evidence of significant moderation by Obama when Present votes are accounted for, though my results suggest that Obama’s voting record may have moderated significantly before his subsequent election to the U.S. Senate. My results also suggest that because legislative nonvoting may occur for a variety of reasons, naive inclusion of nonvoting behavior into vote choice models may lead to biased results.

  9. Lecture Presentations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-01-01

    The Symposium on Physics of Elementary Interactions in the LHC Era held in Warsaw from 21 to 22 April 2008. The main subject of the workshop was to present the progress in CERN LHC collider project. Additionally some satellite activities in field of education, knowledge and technology transfer in the frame of CERN - Poland cooperation were shown

  10. Presentation Technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Froejmark, M.

    1992-10-01

    The report presents a wide, easily understandable description of presentation technique and man-machine communication. General fundamentals for the man-machine interface are illustrated, and the factors that affect the interface are described. A model is presented for describing the operators work situation, based on three different levels in the operators behaviour. The operator reacts routinely in the face of simple, known problems, and reacts in accordance with predetermined plans in the face of more complex, recognizable problems. Deep fundamental knowledge is necessary for truly complex questions. Today's technical status and future development have been studied. In the future, the operator interface will be based on standard software. Functions such as zooming, integration of video pictures, and sound reproduction will become common. Video walls may be expected to come into use in situations in which several persons simultaneously need access to the same information. A summary of the fundamental rules for the design of good picture ergonomics and design requirements for control rooms are included in the report. In conclusion, the report describes a presentation technique within the Distribution Automation and Demand Side Management area and analyses the know-how requirements within Vattenfall. If different systems are integrated, such as geographical information systems and operation monitoring systems, strict demands are made on the expertise of the users for achieving a user-friendly technique which is matched to the needs of the human being. (3 figs.)

  11. Technical presentation

    CERN Document Server

    FI Department

    2008-01-01

    RADIOSPARES, the leading catalogue distributor of components (electronic, electrical, automation, etc.) and industrial supplies will be at CERN on Friday 3 October 2008 (Main Building, Room B, from 9.00 a.m. to 3.00 p.m.) to introduce its new 2008/2009 catalogue. This will be the opportunity for us to present our complete range of products in more detail: 400 000 part numbers available on our web site (Radiospares France, RS International, extended range of components from other manufacturers); our new services: quotations, search for products not included in the catalogue, SBP products (Small Batch Production: packaging in quantities adapted to customers’ requirements); partnership with our focus manufacturers; demonstration of the on-line purchasing tool implemented on our web site in conjunction with CERN. RADIOSPARES will be accompanied by representatives of FLUKE and TYCO ELECTRONICS, who will make presentations, demonstrate materials and answer any technical questio...

  12. Can Arousal Modulate Response Inhibition?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinbach, Noam; Kalanthroff, Eyal; Avnit, Amir; Henik, Avishai

    2015-01-01

    The goal of the present study was to examine if and how arousal can modulate response inhibition. Two competing hypotheses can be drawn from previous literature. One holds that alerting cues that elevate arousal should result in an impulsive response and therefore impair response inhibition. The other suggests that alerting enhances processing of…

  13. Ida-1, the Caenorhabditis elegans orthologue of mammalian diabetes autoantigen IA-2, potentially acts as a common modulator between Parkinson's disease and Diabetes: role of Daf-2/Daf-16 insulin like signalling pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fatima, Soobiya; Haque, Rizwanul; Jadiya, Pooja; Shamsuzzama; Kumar, Lalit; Nazir, Aamir

    2014-01-01

    The lack of cure to age associated Parkinson's disease (PD) has been challenging the efforts of researchers as well as health care providers. Recent evidences suggest that diabetic patients tend to show a higher future risk for PD advocating a strong correlation between PD and Diabetes, thus making it intriguing to decipher common genetic cues behind these ailments. We carried out studies on ida-1, the C. elegans orthologue of mammalian type-1 diabetes auto-antigen IA-2 towards achieving its functional workup vis-à-vis various associated endpoints of PD and Diabetes. Employing transgenic C. elegans strain expressing "human" alpha synuclein (NL5901) under normal and increased glucose concentrations, we studied aggregation of alpha synuclein, content of dopamine, expression of dopamine transporter, content of reactive oxygen species, locomotor activity, nuclear translocation of FOXO transcription factor Daf-16, and quantification of Daf2/Daf-16 mRNA. Our findings indicate that ida-1 affords protection in the studied disease conditions as absence of ida-1 resulted in higher alpha-synuclein aggregation under conditions that mimic the blood glucose levels of diabetic patients. We also observed reduced dopamine content, decreased motility, defective Daf-16 translocation and reduced expression of Daf-2 and Daf-16. Our studies establish important function of ida-1 as a modulator in Daf-2/Daf-16 insulin like signalling pathway thus possibly being a common link between PD and Diabetes.

  14. Crossreactive autoantibodies directed against cutaneous and joint antigens are present in psoriatic arthritis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marzia Dolcino

    Full Text Available Psoriatic arthritis (PsA is a chronic inflammatory disease of unknown origin, characterized by erosions and new bone formation. Diagnosis of PsA is mainly clinical and there are no biomarkers available. Moreover in PsA autoantibodies have not been described so far. Indeed an autoimmune origin has been suggested but never proven. Aim of the study was to investigate the possible presence of autoantibodies typically associated with PsA.We used pooled IgG immunoglobulins derived from 30 patients with PsA to screen a random peptide library in order to identify disease relevant autoantigen peptides.Among the selected peptides, one was recognised by nearly all the patients' sera. The identified peptide (PsA peptide: TNRRGRGSPGAL shows sequence similarities with skin autoantigens, such as fibrillin 3, a constituent of actin microfibrils, desmocollin 3, a constituent of the desmosomes and keratin 78, a component of epithelial cytoskeleton. Interestingly the PsA peptide shares homology with the nebulin-related anchoring protein (N-RAP, a protein localized in the enthesis (point of insertion of a tendon or ligament to the bone, which represents the first affected site during early PsA. Antibodies affinity purified against the PsA peptide recognize fibrillin, desmocollin, keratin and N-RAP. Moreover antibodies directed against the PsA peptide are detectable in 85% of PsA patients. Such antibodies are not present in healthy donors and are present in 13/100 patients with seroposive rheumatoid arthritis (RA. In seronegative RA these antibodies are detectable only in 3/100 patients.Our results indicate that PsA is characterized by the presence of serum autoantibodies crossreacting with an epitope shared by skin and joint antigens.

  15. Anxiety and retrieval inhibition: support for an enhanced inhibition account.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuñez, Mia; Gregory, Josh; Zinbarg, Richard E

    2017-02-01

    Retrieval inhibition of negative associations is important for exposure therapy for anxiety, but the relationship between memory inhibition and anxiety is not well understood-anxiety could either be associated with enhanced or deficient inhibition. The present study tested these two competing hypotheses by measuring retrieval inhibition of negative stimuli by related neutral stimuli. Non-clinically anxious undergraduates completed measures of trait and state anxiety and completed a retrieval induced forgetting task. Adaptive forgetting varied with state anxiety. Low levels of state anxiety were associated with no evidence for retrieval inhibition for either threatening or non-threatening categories. Participants in the middle tertile of state anxiety scores exhibited retrieval inhibition for non-threatening categories but not for threatening categories. Participants in the highest tertile of state anxiety, however, exhibited retrieval inhibition for both threatening and non-threatening categories with the magnitude of retrieval inhibition being greater for threatening than non-threatening categories. The data are in line with the avoidance aspect of the vigilance-avoidance theory of anxiety and inhibition. Implications for cognitive behavioural therapy practices are discussed.

  16. Technical presentation

    CERN Document Server

    FP Department

    2009-01-01

    07 April 2009 Technical presentation by Leuze Electronics: 14.00 – 15.00, Main Building, Room 61-1-017 (Room A) Photoelectric sensors, data identification and transmission systems, image processing systems. We at Leuze Electronics are "the sensor people": we have been specialising in optoelectronic sensors and safety technology for accident prevention for over 40 years. Our dedicated staff are all highly customer oriented. Customers of Leuze Electronics can always rely on one thing – on us! •\tFounded in 1963 •\t740 employees •\t115 MEUR turnover •\t20 subsidiaries •\t3 production facilities in southern Germany Product groups: •\tPhotoelectric sensors •\tIdentification and measurements •\tSafety devices

  17. Mapping of epitopes for autoantibodies to the Type 1 diabetes autoantigen IA-2 by peptide phage display and molecular modelling: Overlap of antibody and T-cell determinants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    A. Dromey, James; Weenink, Sarah M.; Peters, Günther H.J.

    2004-01-01

    IA-2 is a major target of autoimmunity in type 1 diabetes. IA-2 responsive T cells recognize determinants within regions represented by amino acids 787–817 and 841–869 of the molecule. Epitopes for IA-2 autoantibodies are largely conformational and not well defined. In this study, we used peptide......, and aromatic residues and amino acids contributing to the epitope investigated using site-directed mutagenesis. Mutation of each of amino acids Asn858, Glu836, and Trp799 reduced 96/3 Ab binding by >45%. Mutations of these residues also inhibited binding of serum autoantibodies from IA-2 Ab-positive type 1...... phage display and homology modeling to characterize the epitope of a monoclonal IA-2 Ab (96/3) from a human type 1 diabetic patient. This Ab competes for IA-2 binding with Abs from the majority of patients with type 1 diabetes and therefore binds a region close to common autoantibody epitopes. Alignment...

  18. Calcipotriol inhibits the proliferation of hyperproliferative CD29 positive keratinocytes in psoriatic epidermis in the absence of an effect on the function and number of antigen-presenting cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, A.M.; Llado, Minna Fyhn Lykke; Skov, L.

    1998-01-01

    The aim of this study was to elucidate some of the possible mechanisms of action of the vitamin D analogue calcipotriol in vivo. Calcipotriol is finding increasing use in the treatment of psoriasis, but the primary target cell in vivo has not yet been identified. We treated psoriatic patients...... psoriatic and normal skin, calcipotriol treatment did not alter the capacity of epidermal antigen-presenting cells to stimulate the proliferation of autologous T cells, either in the absence or in the presence of exogenous antigen. Epidermal cell suspensions were analysed further by staining...... for infiltrating leucocytes (CD45+) and Langerhans cells (CD1a+). Flow cytometric analysis showed that calcipotriol did not alter the number of CD45+ cells or Langerhans cells in psoriatic skin. These results indicate that calcipotriol does not alter either the number of the function of epidermal antigen...

  19. Content of Diabetes-Associated Autoantibodies against Islet Autoantigens (IA-2A, GADA, IAA and the Level of Different Cytokines in Children and Adolescents on the Pre-Clinical and Early Clinical Stages of Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.V. Popova

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The article provides the data on the immunological mechanisms of type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM on the preclinical and early clinical stages of disease formation on the basis of studying the features of T1DM pathogenesis, monitoring the process of autoimmune destruction of insulin-producing β-cells by determining the content of diabetes-associated auto-antibodies (the incidence and titers dynamics, the study of the characteristics of cytokine secretion on the pre-clinical stage of T1DM development in children and adolescents. Introduction of new approaches to pre-clinical diagnosis of T1DM allowed determine the group of marker-positive children with burdened heredity and predictable risk of disease development. The study involved 450 healthy normoglycemic children and adolescents aged from 7 to 15 years old. It was revealed that 94 (26.7 % of 366 children with burdened hereditary by at least two-fold determination of DAAb had an increased DAAb titer, mainly GADA and IA-2A, the clinical debut of T1DM manifested in 49 (52.1 % of them from 6 months to 12 years (30.9 ± 3.2 months. T1DM developed in the same period in a child, that was 0.8 % of the 272 (73.3 % DAAb-negative children. There was determined a formula of combined incidence and values of simultaneously elevated DAAb titers to islet autoantigens, namely IA-2A + GADA, which are predictor of the duration of T1DM pre-clinical stage and debut occurrence. It has been also established a disturbance of cytokine production (increased level of pro-inflammatory cytokines IL-1α, IL-6 and FNO-α, IL-8 and IL-16 while reduced concentration of IL-4 in blood plasma as a key factor in the T1DM pathogenesis that causes the debut occurrence, and aggressiveness of its course.

  20. B-CELL EPITOPE ON THE U1 SNRNP-C AUTOANTIGEN CONTAINS A SEQUENCE SIMILAR TO THAT OF THE HERPES-SIMPLEX VIRUS PROTEIN

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    MISAKI, Y; YAMAMOTO, K; YANAGI, K; MIURA, H; ICHIJO, H; KATO, T; MATO, T; WELLINGWESTER, S; NISHIOKA, K; ITO, K

    The mechanism of autoantibody production in autoimmune diseases is not well understood. In the present study we performed the B cell epitope mapping of the U1 small nuclear ribonucleoprotein (snRNP)-C, one of the target molecules of anti-nRNP autoantibody to investigate how B cells respond to the

  1. Novel autoantigens immunogenic in COPD patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephan Bernhard

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD is a respiratory inflammatory condition with autoimmune features including IgG autoantibodies. In this study we analyze the complexity of the autoantibody response and reveal the nature of the antigens that are recognized by autoantibodies in COPD patients. Methods An array of 1827 gridded immunogenic peptide clones was established and screened with 17 sera of COPD patients and 60 healthy controls. Protein arrays were evaluated both by visual inspection and a recently developed computer aided image analysis technique. By this computer aided image analysis technique we computed the intensity values for each peptide clone and each serum and calculated the area under the receiver operator characteristics curve (AUC for each clone and the separation COPD sera versus control sera. Results By visual evaluation we detected 381 peptide clones that reacted with autoantibodies of COPD patients including 17 clones that reacted with more than 60% of the COPD sera and seven clones that reacted with more than 90% of the COPD sera. The comparison of COPD sera and controls by the automated image analysis system identified 212 peptide clones with informative AUC values. By in silico sequence analysis we found an enrichment of sequence motives previously associated with immunogenicity. Conclusion The identification of a rather complex humoral immune response in COPD patients supports the idea of COPD as a disease with strong autoimmune features. The identification of novel immunogenic antigens is a first step towards a better understanding of the autoimmune component of COPD.

  2. INHIBITION IN SPEAKING PERFORMANCE

    OpenAIRE

    Humaera, Isna

    2015-01-01

    The most common problem encountered by the learner in the languageacquisition process is learner inhibition. Inhibition refers to a temperamentaltendency to display wariness, fearfulness, or restrain in response tounfamiliar people, objects, and situations. There are some factors that causeinhibition, such as lack of motivation, shyness, self-confidence, self-esteem,and language ego. There are also levels of inhibition, it refers to kinds ofinhibition and caused of inhibition itself. Teacher ...

  3. CD83 Antibody Inhibits Human B Cell Responses to Antigen as well as Dendritic Cell-Mediated CD4 T Cell Responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Kuan Y; Baron, Rebecca; Seldon, Therese A; Jones, Martina L; Rice, Alison M; Munster, David J

    2018-05-15

    Anti-CD83 Ab capable of Ab-dependent cellular cytotoxicity can deplete activated CD83 + human dendritic cells, thereby inhibiting CD4 T cell-mediated acute graft-versus-host disease. As CD83 is also expressed on the surface of activated B lymphocytes, we hypothesized that anti-CD83 would also inhibit B cell responses to stimulation. We found that anti-CD83 inhibited total IgM and IgG production in vitro by allostimulated human PBMC. Also, Ag-specific Ab responses to immunization of SCID mice xenografted with human PBMC were inhibited by anti-CD83 treatment. This inhibition occurred without depletion of all human B cells because anti-CD83 lysed activated CD83 + B cells by Ab-dependent cellular cytotoxicity and spared resting (CD83 - ) B cells. In cultured human PBMC, anti-CD83 inhibited tetanus toxoid-stimulated B cell proliferation and concomitant dendritic cell-mediated CD4 T cell proliferation and expression of IFN-γ and IL-17A, with minimal losses of B cells (80% of B cells but had no effect on CD4 T cell proliferation and cytokine expression. By virtue of the ability of anti-CD83 to selectively deplete activated, but not resting, B cells and dendritic cells, with the latter reducing CD4 T cell responses, anti-CD83 may be clinically useful in autoimmunity and transplantation. Advantages might include inhibited expansion of autoantigen- or alloantigen-specific B cells and CD4 T cells, thus preventing further production of pathogenic Abs and inflammatory cytokines while preserving protective memory and regulatory cells. Copyright © 2018 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  4. Homo economicus belief inhibits trust.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ziqiang Xin

    Full Text Available As a foundational concept in economics, the homo economicus assumption regards humans as rational and self-interested actors. In contrast, trust requires individuals to believe partners' benevolence and unselfishness. Thus, the homo economicus belief may inhibit trust. The present three experiments demonstrated that the direct exposure to homo economicus belief can weaken trust. And economic situations like profit calculation can also activate individuals' homo economicus belief and inhibit their trust. It seems that people's increasing homo economicus belief may serve as one cause of the worldwide decline of trust.

  5. Homo Economicus Belief Inhibits Trust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xin, Ziqiang; Liu, Guofang

    2013-01-01

    As a foundational concept in economics, the homo economicus assumption regards humans as rational and self-interested actors. In contrast, trust requires individuals to believe partners’ benevolence and unselfishness. Thus, the homo economicus belief may inhibit trust. The present three experiments demonstrated that the direct exposure to homo economicus belief can weaken trust. And economic situations like profit calculation can also activate individuals’ homo economicus belief and inhibit their trust. It seems that people’s increasing homo economicus belief may serve as one cause of the worldwide decline of trust. PMID:24146907

  6. A Qualitative Approach to Enzyme Inhibition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waldrop, Grover L.

    2009-01-01

    Most general biochemistry textbooks present enzyme inhibition by showing how the basic Michaelis-Menten parameters K[subscript m] and V[subscript max] are affected mathematically by a particular type of inhibitor. This approach, while mathematically rigorous, does not lend itself to understanding how inhibition patterns are used to determine the…

  7. Autoantibodies from primary biliary cirrhosis patients with anti-p95c antibodies bind to recombinant p97/VCP and inhibit in vitro nuclear envelope assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    MIYACHI, K; HIRANO, Y; HORIGOME, T; MIMORI, T; MIYAKAWA, H; ONOZUKA, Y; SHIBATA, M; HIRAKATA, M; SUWA, A; HOSAKA, H; MATSUSHIMA, S; KOMATSU, T; MATSUSHIMA, H; HANKINS, R W; FRITZLER, M J

    2004-01-01

    We have reported previously that p95c, a novel 95-kDa cytosolic protein, was the target of autoantibodies in sera of patients with autoimmune hepatic diseases. We studied 30 sera that were shown previously to immunoprecipitate a 95 kDa protein from [35S]-methionine-labelled HeLa lysates and had a specific precipitin band in immunodiffusion. Thirteen sera were available to test the ability of p95c antibodies to inhibit nuclear envelope assembly in an in vitro assay in which confocal fluorescence microscopy was also used to identify the stages at which nuclear assembly was inhibited. The percentage inhibition of nuclear envelope assembly of the 13 sera ranged from 7% to 99% and nuclear envelope assembly and the swelling of nucleus was inhibited at several stages. The percentage inhibition of nuclear assembly was correlated with the titre of anti-p95c as determined by immunodiffusion. To confirm the identity of this autoantigen, we used a full-length cDNA of the p97/valosin-containing protein (VCP) to produce a radiolabelled recombinant protein that was then used in an immunoprecipitation (IP) assay. Our study demonstrated that 12 of the 13 (93%) human sera with antibodies to p95c immunoprecipitated recombinant p97/VCP. Because p95c and p97 have similar molecular masses and cell localization, and because the majority of sera bind recombinant p97/VCP and anti-p95c antibodies inhibit nuclear assembly, this is compelling evidence that p95c and p97/VCP are identical. PMID:15147362

  8. Virtual Presenters: Towards Interactive Virtual Presentations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nijholt, Antinus; Cappellini, V.; Hemsley, J.

    2005-01-01

    We discuss having virtual presenters in virtual environments that present information to visitors of these environments. Some current research is surveyed and we will look in particular to our research in the context of a virtual meeting room where a virtual presenter uses speech, gestures, pointing

  9. Should we stop thinking about inhibition? Searching for individual and age differences in inhibition ability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rey-Mermet, Alodie; Gade, Miriam; Oberauer, Klaus

    2018-04-01

    Inhibition is often conceptualized as a unitary construct reflecting the ability to ignore and suppress irrelevant information. At the same time, it has been subdivided into inhibition of prepotent responses (i.e., the ability to stop dominant responses) and resistance to distracter interference (i.e., the ability to ignore distracting information). The present study investigated the unity and diversity of inhibition as a psychometric construct, and tested the hypothesis of an inhibition deficit in older age. We measured inhibition in young and old adults with 11 established laboratory tasks: antisaccade, stop-signal, color Stroop, number Stroop, arrow flanker, letter flanker, Simon, global-local, positive and negative compatibility tasks, and n-2 repetition costs in task switching. In both age groups, the inhibition measures from individual tasks had good reliabilities, but correlated only weakly among each other. Structural equation modeling identified a 2-factor model with factors for inhibition of prepotent responses and resistance to distracter interference. Older adults scored worse in the inhibition of prepotent response, but better in the resistance to distracter interference. However, the model had low explanatory power. Together, these findings call into question inhibition as a psychometric construct and the hypothesis of an inhibition deficit in older age. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2018 APA, all rights reserved).

  10. Inhibition of lactation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Llewellyn-Jones, D

    1975-01-01

    The mechanism and hormonal regulation of lactation is explained and illustrated with a schematic representation. Circulating estrogen above a critical amount seems to be the inhibitory factor controlling lactation during pregnancy. Once delivery occurs, the level of estrogen falls, that of prolactin rises, and lactation begins. Nonsuckling can be used to inhibit lactation. Estrogens can also be used to inhibit lactation more quickly and with less pain. The reported association between estrogens and puerperal thromboembolism cannot be considered conclusive due to defects in the reporting studies. There is no reason not to use estrogens in lactation inhibition except for women over 35 who experienced a surgical delivery. Alternative therapy is available for these women. The recently-developed drug, brom-ergocryptine, may replace other methods of lactation inhibition.

  11. Making your presentation fun: creative presentation techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    KEENEN,MARTHA JANE

    2000-05-18

    What possesses someone to volunteer and go through hoops and red tape to make a presentation at a conference? For that matter, why does anyone ever present anything to anyone? Actually, presentations are a fact of life and there are many reasons for doing a presentation and doing it well. New and existing staff need training and orientation to the way things are done here. Handing all of them a manual and hoping they read it is pretty much a waste of paper. On the other hand, an effective, entertaining and upbeat presentation on the relevant topics is more likely to stick with those people. They will even have a name and face to remember and seek out when they have an issue on or with that topic. This can be a very effective beginning for networking with new peers. The presenter is seen as knowledgeable, as a source of information on company topics and possibly evaluated as a potential mentor or future manager. Project staff and/or peers benefit from clear, concise, presentations of topical knowledge. This is one way that a group working on various aspects of the same project or program can stay in touch and in step with each other. Most importantly, presentations may be the best or only door into the minds (and budgets) of management and customers. These presentations are a wonderful opportunity to address legal and compliance issues, budget, staffing, and services. Here is a chance, maybe the only one, to demonstrate and explain the wonderfulness of a program and the benefit they get by using the services offered most effectively. An interactive presentation on legal and compliance issues can be an effective tool in helping customers and/or management make good risk management decisions.

  12. Maternal celiac disease autoantibodies bind directly to syncytiotrophoblast and inhibit placental tissue transglutaminase activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robinson Nicola J

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Celiac disease (CD occurs in as many as 1 in 80 pregnant women and is associated with poor pregnancy outcome, but it is not known if this is an effect on maternal nutrient absorption or, alternatively, if the placenta is an autoimmune target. The major autoantigen, tissue transglutaminase (tTG, has previously been shown to be present in the maternal-facing syncytiotrophoblast plasma membrane of the placenta. Methods ELISA was used to demonstrate the presence of antibodies to tissue transglutaminase in a panel of CD sera. Immunohistochemistry was used to evaluate the binding of IgA autoantibodies from CD serum to term placenta. In addition, novel direct binding and activity assays were developed to mimic the in vivo exposure of the villous placenta to maternal autoantibody. Results and Discussion CD IgA autoantibodies located to the syncytial surface of the placenta significantly more than IgA antibodies in control sera (P Conclusion These data indicate that direct immune effects in untreated CD women may compromise placental function.

  13. On inhibition of dental erosion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rölla, Gunnar; Jonski, Grazyna; Saxegaard, Erik

    2013-11-01

    To examine the erosion-inhibiting effect of different concentrations of hydrofluoric acid. Thirty-six human molars were individually treated with 10 ml of 0.1 M citric acid for 30 min (Etch 1), acid was collected and stored until analysis. The teeth were randomly divided into six groups and then individually treated with 10 ml of one of six dilutions (from 0.1-1%) of hydrofluoric acid. The teeth were then again treated with citric acid (Etch 2). The individual acid samples from Etch 1 and 2 were analyzed for calcium by flame atomic absorption spectroscopy and difference in calcium loss was calculated. The highest erosion inhibiting effect was obtained in groups with the highest concentrations of hydrofluoric acid, where the pH was lowest, below pKa of 3.17, thus the hydrofluoric acids being mainly in an undissociated state. Diluted hydrofluoric acid is present in aqueous solution of SnF2 and TiF4 (which are known to inhibit dental erosion): SnF2 + 3H2O = Sn(OH)2 + 2HF + H2O and TiF4 + 5H2O = Ti(OH)4 + 4HF + H2O. It is also known that pure, diluted hydrofluoric acid can inhibit dental erosion. Teeth treated with hydrofluoric acid are covered by a layer of CaF2-like mineral. This mineral is acid resistant at pH acid resistant mineral, initiated by tooth enamel treatment with hydrofluoric acid. Hydrofluoric acid is different in having fluoride as a conjugated base, which provides this acid with unique properties.

  14. Inhibition of urinary calculi -- a spectroscopic study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manciu, Felicia; Govani, Jayesh; Durrer, William; Reza, Layra; Pinales, Luis

    2008-10-01

    Although a considerable number of investigations have already been undertaken and many causes such as life habits, metabolic disorders, and genetic factors have been noted as sources that accelerate calculi depositions and aggregations, there are still plenty of unanswered questions regarding efficient inhibition and treatment mechanisms. Thus, in an attempt to acquire more insights, we propose here a detailed scientific study of kidney stone formation and growth inhibition based on a traditional medicine approach with Rotula Aquatica Lour (RAL) herbal extracts. A simplified single diffusion gel growth technique was used for synthesizing the samples for the present study. The unexpected Zn presence in the sample with RAL inhibitor, as revealed by XPS measurements, explains the inhibition process and the dramatic reflectance of the incident light observed in the infrared transmission studies. Raman data demonstrate potential binding of the inhibitor with the oxygen of the kidney stone. Photoluminescence results corroborate to provide additional evidence of Zn-related inhibition.

  15. Exogenously triggered response inhibition in developmental stuttering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eggers, Kurt; De Nil, Luc F; Van den Bergh, Bea R H

    2018-06-01

    The purpose of the present study was to examine relations between children's exogenously triggered response inhibition and stuttering. Participants were 18 children who stutter (CWS; mean age = 9;01 years) and 18 children who not stutter (CWNS; mean age = 9;01 years). Participants were matched on age (±3 months) and gender. Response inhibition was assessed by a stop signal task (Verbruggen, Logan, & Stevens, 2008). Results suggest that CWS, compared to CWNS, perform comparable to CWNS in a task where response control is externally triggered. Our findings seem to indicate that previous questionnaire-based findings (Eggers, De Nil, & Van den Bergh, 2010) of a decreased efficiency of response inhibition cannot be generalized to all types of response inhibition. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Develop your presentation skills

    CERN Document Server

    Theobald, Theo

    2016-01-01

    Going beyond handling nerves and presenting PowerPoint slides, the third edition of "Develop Your Presentation Skills "offers practical advice on developing a captivating presentation, constructing compelling content, and boosting self-confidence. The book includes three new chapters on delivering a "stripped down"presentation, using new media to engage with the audience, and handling being asked to present on short notice."

  17. Enzyme inhibition by iminosugars

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    López, Óscar; Qing, Feng-Ling; Pedersen, Christian Marcus

    2013-01-01

    Imino- and azasugar glycosidase inhibitors display pH dependant inhibition reflecting that both the inhibitor and the enzyme active site have groups that change protonation state with pH. With the enzyme having two acidic groups and the inhibitor one basic group, enzyme-inhibitor complexes...

  18. Cooperation for Better Inhibiting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novoa, Eva Maria; Ribas de Pouplana, Lluís

    2015-06-18

    Cladosporin is an antimalarial drug that acts as an ATP-mimetic to selectively inhibit Plasmodium lysyl-tRNA synthetase. Using multiple crystal structures, Fang et al. (2015) reveal in this issue of Chemistry & Biology the fascinating mechanism responsible for cladosporin selectivity. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Subpart DD Training Presentations

    Science.gov (United States)

    EPA has produced the following training presentation(s) for reporters subject to this subpart. Generally, these presentations explain the rule or show how to use the reporting system e-GGRT to submit annual GHG reports to EPA.

  20. Subpart AA Training Presentations

    Science.gov (United States)

    EPA has produced the following training presentation(s) for reporters subject to this subpart. Generally, these presentations explain how to use the reporting system e-GGRT to submit annual GHG reports to EPA.

  1. Subpart W Training Presentations

    Science.gov (United States)

    EPA has produced the following training presentation(s) for reporters subject to this subpart. Generally, these presentations explain the rule or show how to use the reporting system e-GGRT to submit annual GHG reports to EPA.

  2. Inibição da tripsina de bicho-mineiro do cafeeiro por um fator não-protéico presente em extratos de folhas de mamona Coffee leaf miner trypsin inhibition with castor bean leaf extracts mediated by a non-protein agent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guilherme Duarte Rossi

    2010-04-01

    insects is a control form whose efficacy was verified by different authors. In order to observe the efficiency of castor bean leaf extracts in inhibiting trypsin-like enzymes of the coffee leaf miner, an experiment was carried out with the purpose of observing an "in vitro" inhibition phenomenon. The results of the trypsin inhibition tests with normal and boiled with and without β-mercaptoethanol 0.2% (v/v castor bean leaf extracts and the results of the acetone precipitation process indicated that the inhibitor is a heat-resistant molecule and it is not a protein. This way, the purification process was made by adsorption chromatography with later analysis in mass spectrometer. The reached results indicated that the presence of a trypsin inhibitor of the coffee leaf miner in the castor bean leaf extracts is capable of inhibiting 2.48 + 0.15 UTI, which stands for about 40% of inhibition. Tests performed with bovine trypsin indicated that the castor bean leaf extract have no inhibiting power on this enzyme.

  3. Stuttering Inhibition via Altered Auditory Feedback during Scripted Telephone Conversations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudock, Daniel; Kalinowski, Joseph

    2014-01-01

    Background: Overt stuttering is inhibited by approximately 80% when people who stutter read aloud as they hear an altered form of their speech feedback to them. However, levels of stuttering inhibition vary from 60% to 100% depending on speaking situation and signal presentation. For example, binaural presentations of delayed auditory feedback…

  4. Cognitive Inhibition in Students with and without Dyslexia and Dyscalculia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Li-Chih; Tasi, Hung-Ju; Yang, Hsien-Ming

    2012-01-01

    The present study presents a comparison of the cognitive inhibition abilities of dyslexic, dyscalculic, and control students. The participants were 45 dyslexic students, 45 dyscalculic students, and 45 age-, gender-, and IQ-matched control students. The major evaluation tools included six cognitive inhibition tasks which were restructured during…

  5. Inhibition in the Human Auditory Cortex.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koji Inui

    Full Text Available Despite their indispensable roles in sensory processing, little is known about inhibitory interneurons in humans. Inhibitory postsynaptic potentials cannot be recorded non-invasively, at least in a pure form, in humans. We herein sought to clarify whether prepulse inhibition (PPI in the auditory cortex reflected inhibition via interneurons using magnetoencephalography. An abrupt increase in sound pressure by 10 dB in a continuous sound was used to evoke the test response, and PPI was observed by inserting a weak (5 dB increase for 1 ms prepulse. The time course of the inhibition evaluated by prepulses presented at 10-800 ms before the test stimulus showed at least two temporally distinct inhibitions peaking at approximately 20-60 and 600 ms that presumably reflected IPSPs by fast spiking, parvalbumin-positive cells and somatostatin-positive, Martinotti cells, respectively. In another experiment, we confirmed that the degree of the inhibition depended on the strength of the prepulse, but not on the amplitude of the prepulse-evoked cortical response, indicating that the prepulse-evoked excitatory response and prepulse-evoked inhibition reflected activation in two different pathways. Although many diseases such as schizophrenia may involve deficits in the inhibitory system, we do not have appropriate methods to evaluate them; therefore, the easy and non-invasive method described herein may be clinically useful.

  6. Plastics for corrosion inhibition

    CERN Document Server

    Goldade, Victor A; Makarevich, Anna V; Kestelman, Vladimir N

    2005-01-01

    The development of polymer composites containing inhibitors of metal corrosion is an important endeavour in modern materials science and technology. Corrosion inhibitors can be located in a polymer matrix in the solid, liquid or gaseous phase. This book details the thermodynamic principles for selecting these components, their compatibility and their effectiveness. The various mechanisms of metal protection – barrier, inhibiting and electromechanical – are considered, as are the conflicting requirements placed on the structure of the combined material. Two main classes of inhibited materials (structural and films/coatings) are described in detail. Examples are given of structural plastics used in friction units subjected to mechano-chemical wear and of polymer films/coatings for protecting metal objects against corrosion.

  7. Inhibiting the inevitable

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shashoua, Yvonne

    2006-01-01

    conservation is to ‘buy time’ for the object. Inhibitive conservation of plastics involves the removal or reduction of factors causing or accelerating degradation including light, oxygen, acids, relative humidity and acidic breakdown products. Specific approaches to conservation have been developed......Once plastics objects are registered in museum collections, the institution becomes responsible for their long term preservation, until the end of their useful lifetime. Plastics appear to deteriorate faster than other materials in museum collections and have a useful lifetime between 5 and 25...... years. Preventive or inhibitive conservation involves controlling the environments in which objects are placed during storage and display, with the aim of slowing the major deterioration reactions. Once in progress, degradation of plastics cannot be stopped or reversed, so the aim of preventive...

  8. Distractor inhibition: Evidence from lateralized readiness potentials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pramme, Lisa; Dierolf, Angelika M; Naumann, Ewald; Frings, Christian

    2015-08-01

    The present study investigated distractor inhibition on the level of stimulus representation. In a sequential distractor-to-distractor priming task participants had to respond to target letters flanked by distractor digits. Reaction time and stimulus-locked lateralized readiness potentials (S-LRPs) of probe responses were measured. Distractor-target onset asynchrony was varied. For RTs responses to probe targets were faster in the case of prime-distractor repetition compared to distractor changes indicating distractor inhibition. Benefits in RTs and the latency of S-LRP onsets for distractor repetition were also modulated by distractor-target onset asynchrony. For S-LRPs distractor inhibition was only present with a simultaneous onset of distractors and target. The results confirm previous results indicating inhibitory mechanisms of object-based selective attention on the level of distractor representations. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Rotating Poster Presentations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lagares, Manuel; Reisenleutner, Sandra

    2017-01-01

    Oral presentations are a common practice in foreign language classes, often used to assess students' speaking skills. Usually, the presentations are delivered by students in front of the class, often with PowerPoint slides or Prezi as support. However, frequently the audience does not engage with the presentation and thus, the benefits of this…

  10. Presenting Food Science Effectively

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winter, Carl K.

    2016-01-01

    While the need to present food science information effectively is viewed as a critical competency for food scientists by the Institute of Food Technologists, most food scientists may not receive adequate training in this area. Effective presentations combine both scientific content and delivery mechanisms that demonstrate presenter enthusiasm for…

  11. Innovative presentations for dummies

    CERN Document Server

    Anthony, Ray

    2014-01-01

    Be the speaker they follow with breakthrough innovative presentations Innovative Presentations For Dummies is a practical guide to engaging your audience with superior, creative, and ultra-compelling presentations. Using clear language and a concise style, this book goes way beyond PowerPoint to enable you to reimagine, reinvent, and remake your presentations. Learn how to stimulate, capture, and hold your audience in the palm of your hand with sound, sight, and touch, and get up to speed on the latest presentation design methods that make you a speaker who gets audiences committed and acting

  12. Alarm filtering and presentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bray, M.A.

    1989-01-01

    This paper discusses alarm filtering and presentation in the control room of nuclear and other process control plants. Alarm generation and presentation is widely recognized as a general process control problem. Alarm systems often fail to provide meaningful alarms to operators. Alarm generation and presentation is an area in which computer aiding is feasible and provides clear benefits. Therefore, researchers have developed several computerized alarm filtering and presentation approaches. This paper discusses problems associated with alarm generation and presentation. Approaches to improving the alarm situation and installation issues of alarm system improvements are discussed. The impact of artificial intelligence (AI) technology on alarm system improvements is assessed. (orig.)

  13. Gliclazide directly inhibits arginine-induced glucagon release

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cejvan, Kenan; Coy, David H; Holst, Jens Juul

    2002-01-01

    Arginine-stimulated insulin and somatostatin release is enhanced by the sulfonylurea gliclazide. In contrast, gliclazide inhibits the glucagon response. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether this inhibition of glucagon release was mediated by a direct suppressive effect of glicl......Arginine-stimulated insulin and somatostatin release is enhanced by the sulfonylurea gliclazide. In contrast, gliclazide inhibits the glucagon response. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether this inhibition of glucagon release was mediated by a direct suppressive effect....... In islet perifusions with DC-41-33, arginine-induced glucagon release was inhibited by 66%. We therefore concluded that gliclazide inhibits glucagon release by a direct action on the pancreatic A cell....

  14. Action inhibition in Tourette syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganos, Christos; Kühn, Simone; Kahl, Ursula; Schunke, Odette; Feldheim, Jan; Gerloff, Christian; Roessner, Veit; Bäumer, Tobias; Thomalla, Götz; Haggard, Patrick; Münchau, Alexander

    2014-10-01

    Tourette syndrome is a neuropsychiatric disorder characterized by tics. Tic generation is often linked to dysfunction of inhibitory brain networks. Some previous behavioral studies found deficiencies in inhibitory motor control in Tourette syndrome, but others suggested normal or even better-than-normal performance. Furthermore, neural correlates of action inhibition in these patients are poorly understood. We performed event-related functional magnetic resonance imaging during a stop-signal reaction-time task in 14 uncomplicated adult Tourette patients and 15 healthy controls. In patients, we correlated activations in stop-signal reaction-time task with their individual motor tic frequency. Task performance was similar in both groups. Activation of dorsal premotor cortex was stronger in the StopSuccess than in the Go condition in healthy controls. This pattern was reversed in Tourette patients. A significant positive correlation was present between motor tic frequency and activations in the supplementary motor area during StopSuccess versus Go in patients. Inhibitory brain networks differ between healthy controls and Tourette patients. In the latter the supplementary motor area is probably a key relay of inhibitory processes mediating both suppression of tics and inhibition of voluntary action. © 2014 International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society.

  15. Behavioural present value

    OpenAIRE

    Krzysztof Piasecki

    2013-01-01

    Impact of chosen behavioural factors on imprecision of present value is discussed here. The formal model of behavioural present value is offered as a result of this discussion. Behavioural present value is described here by fuzzy set. These considerations were illustrated by means of extensive numerical case study. Finally there are shown that in proposed model the return rate is given, as a fuzzy probabilistic set.

  16. Conns' syndrome - atypical presentations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumar, K V S Hari; Modi, K D; Jha, Sangeeta; Jha, Ratan

    2009-01-01

    Primary hyperaldosteronism (Conns' syndrome) commonly presents with a combination of clinical features of hypokalemia and hypertension. Atypical presentations like normotension, normokalemia and neurological ailments are described in few cases. We encountered two such cases, the first presenting with acute neurological complaint and second case having insignificant hypertension. Both the patients had a characteristic biochemical and imaging profile consistent with primary hyperaldosteronism and responded to surgical resection of adrenal adenoma. (author)

  17. CERN Electronics Pool presentations

    CERN Multimedia

    2011-01-01

    The CERN Electronics Pool has organised a series of presentations in collaboration with oscilloscope manufacturers. The last one will take place according to the schedule below.   Time will be available at the end of the presentation to discuss your personal needs. The Agilent presentation had to be postponed and will be organised later. -     Lecroy: Thursday, 24 November 2011, in 530-R-030, 14:00 to 16:30.

  18. Presentation skills for nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foulkes, Mark

    2015-02-20

    This article emphasises the importance of effective presentation skills. Such skills allow nurses to share knowledge and expertise and to communicate clearly in a range of workplace scenarios. Nurses are increasingly being asked to present in formal and informal situations, such as conferences, poster presentations, job interviews, case reports and ward-based teaching. This article explores the principles underpinning the development of these skills, discusses the situations in which they could be applied and demonstrates how nurses might improve and develop as presenters.

  19. Illustrating Enzyme Inhibition Using Gibbs Energy Profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bearne, Stephen L.

    2012-01-01

    Gibbs energy profiles have great utility as teaching and learning tools because they present students with a visual representation of the energy changes that occur during enzyme catalysis. Unfortunately, most textbooks divorce discussions of traditional kinetic topics, such as enzyme inhibition, from discussions of these same topics in terms of…

  20. Creating meaningful multimedia presentations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hardman, H.L.; Ossenbruggen, van J.R.

    2006-01-01

    Finding relevant information is one step in the chain of understanding information. Presenting material to a user in a suitable way is a further step. Our research focuses on using semantic annotations of multimedia elements to increase the "presentability" of retrieved information. We investigate

  1. Unusual presentation of sunburn.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Gopalkrishna G; Dave, Dhaval; Byrne, Eileen

    2008-10-01

    We present three cases of sunburn to the head, presenting with oedema of the face in children aged 6, 9 and 13 years. Oedema was predominantly on the forehead and temporal region; a direct effect of gravity was associated with erythema of the scalp. Sunburn healed without any complications.

  2. Presentation to the symposium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goodhead, D.

    1997-01-01

    A novel theory, the Second Event theory, advanced by Chris Busby, suggested that certain man-made radioisotopes could bypass cellular genetic repair mechanisms and cause cancer at very low dose. The present paper, after some introductory comments on the effects of particle tracks on cells, goes on to present the author's own perception of this Second Event theory. (UK)

  3. Conjugando el presente

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Héctor Rojas Herazo

    1968-06-01

    Full Text Available La añoranza suele ser, casi siempre, la línea critica de menor resistencia. El lema de que "todo tiempo pasado fue mejor" tiene un poco la culpa. En cualquier orden del conocimiento el pasado sigue el verdadero presente. Ese presente en que nos gusta respirar y vivir. Nada de compromiso circundante. Nada de inmediatez.

  4. The presentation and treatment

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    tion of single collocations proposals are made for an implicit presentation of complex ... function lexicographers often include items to illustrate the typical use of the ... they have no items explicitly addressed at them to elevate them to treatment.

  5. PRESENT STATUS IN INDIA

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    First page Back Continue Last page Overview Graphics. PRESENT STATUS IN INDIA. FIXED LINES – 36 MILLION. MOBILE CONNECTIONS – 14 MILLION. TELEDENSITY APPROXIMATELY 5. INTERNET CONNECTIONS – 5 MILLION. INTERNET USERS NEARLY – 25 MILLION.

  6. Fostering oral presentation performance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ginkel, van Stan; Gulikers, Judith; Biemans, Harm; Mulder, Martin

    2017-01-01

    Previous research revealed significant differences in the effectiveness of various feedback sources for encouraging students’ oral presentation performance. While former studies emphasised the superiority of teacher feedback, it remains unclear whether the quality of feedback actually differs

  7. Present status of dibaryons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Locher, M.P.

    1981-01-01

    In the present notes the author tries to assess the situation regarding dibaryons in the various channels with baryon number two, emphasizing the problems and discussing in greater detail the most recent developments since the Versailles Conference. One of the motivations for the present search of B=2 states is the possibility of colored subclusters for systems with six quarks which cannot occur for ordinary baryons or mesons. (Auth.)

  8. Presenting New Grammar

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU Cai-ling; WANG Xi

    2015-01-01

    More and more researchers have now agreed upon the necessity of teaching grammar, but it still remains controversial as how to teach the forms, with the central consideration of not to harm the meaning-focused communicative teaching method. In this essay, one of the issues in grammar teaching will be discussed as how to present new grammar to learners, through evaluating and modifying a particular presentation activity in a grammar-teaching textbook.

  9. Silver-Palladium Surfaces Inhibit Biofilm Formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chiang, Wen-Chi; Schroll, Casper; Hilbert, Lisbeth Rischel

    2009-01-01

    Undesired biofilm formation is a major concern in many areas. In the present study, we investigated biofilm-inhibiting properties of a silver-palladium surface that kills bacteria by generating microelectric fields and electrochemical redox processes. For evaluation of the biofilm inhibition...... efficacy and study of the biofilm inhibition mechanism, the silver-sensitive Escherichia coli J53 and the silver-resistant E. coli J53[pMG101] strains were used as model organisms, and batch and flow chamber setups were used as model systems. In the case of the silver-sensitive strain, the silver......-palladium surfaces killed the bacteria and prevented biofilm formation under conditions of low or high bacterial load. In the case of the silver-resistant strain, the silver-palladium surfaces killed surface-associated bacteria and prevented biofilm formation under conditions of low bacterial load, whereas under...

  10. Stellar Presentations (Abstract)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, D.

    2015-12-01

    (Abstract only) The AAVSO is in the process of expanding its education, outreach and speakers bureau program. powerpoint presentations prepared for specific target audiences such as AAVSO members, educators, students, the general public, and Science Olympiad teams, coaches, event supervisors, and state directors will be available online for members to use. The presentations range from specific and general content relating to stellar evolution and variable stars to specific activities for a workshop environment. A presentation—even with a general topic—that works for high school students will not work for educators, Science Olympiad teams, or the general public. Each audience is unique and requires a different approach. The current environment necessitates presentations that are captivating for a younger generation that is embedded in a highly visual and sound-bite world of social media, twitter and U-Tube, and mobile devices. For educators, presentations and workshops for themselves and their students must support the Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS), the Common Core Content Standards, and the Science Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM) initiative. Current best practices for developing relevant and engaging powerpoint presentations to deliver information to a variety of targeted audiences will be presented along with several examples.

  11. Trichilia monadelpha Bark Extracts Inhibit Carrageenan-Induced ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The present study was undertaken to evaluate the anti-inflammatory properties of aqueous (TWE), alcoholic (TAE) and petroleum ether extract (TPEE) of T. ... The reference anti-inflammatory drugs (diclofenac and dexamethasone) inhibited the chick-carrageenan-induced footpad oedema, with maximal inhibitions of ...

  12. Milk: Past and Present

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulajić, S.; Đorđević, J.; Ledina, T.; Šarčević, D.; Baltić, M. Ž.

    2017-09-01

    Although milk/dairy consumption is part of many cultures and is recommended in most dietary guidelines around the world, its contribution to overall diet quality remains a matter of controversy, leading to a highly polarized debate within the scientific community, media and public sector. The present article, at first, describes the evolutionary roots of milk consumption, then reviews the milk-derived bioactive peptides as health-promoting components. The third part of the article, in general, presents the associations between milk nutrients, disease prevention, and health promotion.

  13. Book Presentation | 27 February

    CERN Multimedia

    The CERN Library

    2013-01-01

    "A caccia del bosone di Higgs. Magneti, governi, scienziati e particelle nell'impresa scientifica del secolo" by Luciano Maiani and Romeo Bassoli, published by Mondadori. On Wednesday 27 February Luciano Maiani will present the book "A caccia del bosone di Higgs. Magneti, governi, scienziati e particelle nell'impresa scientifica del secolo". More information here. The presentation will take place in the Council Chamber at 16.00 and will be followed by a debate and book signing. The book will be on sale. You are cordially invited.

  14. Renewable Electricity Futures (Presentation)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mai, T.

    2012-08-01

    This presentation library summarizes findings of NREL's Renewable Electricity Futures study, published in June 2012. RE Futures investigated the challenges and impacts of achieving very high renewable electricity generation levels in the contiguous United States by 2050. It was presented at the 2012 RE AMP Annual Meeting. RE-AMP is an active network of 144 nonprofits and foundations across eight Midwestern states working on climate change and energy policy with the goal of reducing global warming pollution economy-wide 80% by 2050.

  15. Hera presentation generator (Poster)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Frasincar, F.; Houben, G.J.P.M.; Barna, P.; Ellis, A.; Hagino, T.

    2005-01-01

    Semantic Web Information Systems (SWIS) are Web Information Systems that use Semantic Web technologies. Hera is a model-driven design methodology for SWIS. In Hera, models are represented in RDFS and model instances in RDF. The Hera Presentation Generator (HPG) is an integrated development

  16. Creating Meaningful Multimedia Presentations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L. Hardman (Lynda); J.R. van Ossenbruggen (Jacco)

    2006-01-01

    textabstractFinding relevant information is one step in the chain of understanding information. Presenting material to a user in a suitable way is a further step. Our research focuses on using semantic annotations of multimedia elements to increase the ”presentability” of

  17. AECL present and future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foster, J.S.

    The history and present activities of the Crown corporation AECL are described. AECL owns limited interests in nuclear power plants and a Manitoba transmission system. AECL is the world's foremost producer of heavy water, and exports CANDU type reactors and radiation processing equipment. AECL backs up the Canadian nuclear power program wherever there is no conflict with private enterprise. (E.C.B.)

  18. Econophysics: Past and present

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Area Leão Pereira, Eder Johnson; da Silva, Marcus Fernandes; Pereira, H. B. B.

    2017-05-01

    This paper provides a brief historical review of the relationship between economics and physics, beginning with Adam Smith being influenced by Isaac Newton's ideas up to the present day including the new econophysics discipline and some of the tools applied to the economy. Thus, this work is expected to motivate new researchers who are interested in this new discipline.

  19. Present State Examination

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Kamilla; Bertelsen, Aksel

    Present State Examination (PSE) 5. udgave er en revideret version af speciallæge i psykiatri Aksel Bertelsens oprindelige materiale. Aksel Bertelsen er ophavsmand til PSE og til den danske udgave af ICD-10. Revisionen omfatter et forbedret layout, en modernisering af sproget, tilføjelse af...

  20. Presentation of CEA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graf, J.J.

    1976-01-01

    The organization of the CEA, its missions and means are presented. Its activities in the field of light water reactors, fast neutron reactors and PWR reactors of small and medium power for electricity and/or heat generation are emphasized [fr

  1. Going beyond methodological presentism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Garbi

    2017-01-01

    Denmark is an example of a country where the idea of historical ethnic homogeneity stands strong. This article challenges this historical presentism: the scholarly and societal tendency to understand social phenomena within a limited contemporary framework, neglecting possible effects and similar...

  2. Analyzing in the present

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Revsbæk, Line; Tanggaard, Lene

    2015-01-01

    The article presents a notion of “analyzing in the present” as a source of inspiration in analyzing qualitative research materials. The term emerged from extensive listening to interview recordings during everyday commuting to university campus. Paying attention to the way different parts of vari...

  3. Presentation on ecoenergetic assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fournelle, C.

    1998-01-01

    The development of a tool to assess the quality of indoor air for buildings in the residential and commercial sector was presented. The computer software program was designed to allow a building operator to set an optimal target to reflect the greatest economies in energy consumption. Air quality was assessed in terms of carbon dioxide, volatile organic compounds, and other common indoor pollutants

  4. Keynote presentation : SAR systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Halsema, D. van; Otten, M.P.G.; Maas, A.P.M.; Bolt, R.J.; Anitori, L.

    2011-01-01

    Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) systems are becoming increasingly important sensors in as well the military environment as in the civilian market. In this keynote presentation an overview will be given over more than 2 decades of SAR system∼ and SAR application development at TNO in the Netherlands.

  5. Agriculture Oral Presentations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-01-01

    This publication contains 23 papers related to the use of nuclear techniques in plant breeding in Turkey, effect of gamma irradiations on growing various plants, mutations and soil chemistry, etc., presented at 4. International Congress of Nuclear Agriculture and Animal Science in Bursa, Turkey, 25-27 Sep 1996. A separate abstract was prepared for each paper

  6. Imagined futures, present lives

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dalsgaard, Anne Line; Wildermuth, Norbert

    2006-01-01

    is discussed centrally in this attempt to contribute to an empirically grounded understanding of the role that media play for youth in their striving to ‘find a place in life'. In the empirical context presented in the article, imaginations, expanded and circulated by a globalized media circuit...

  7. Presentation of 2004 earnings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-03-01

    This presentation offers financial information on the AREVA Group earnings for the year 2004. With manufacturing facilities in over 40 countries and a sales network in over 100, Areva offers customers technological solutions for nuclear power generation and electricity transmission and distribution. The Group also provides interconnect systems to the telecommunications, computer and automotive markets. (A.L.B.)

  8. Inhibition of polyphenoloxidase by sulfite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sayavedra-Soto, L.A.; Montgomery, M.W.

    1986-01-01

    When polyphenoloxidase (PPO) was exposed to sulfite prior to substrate addition, inhibition was irreversible. Trials to regenerate PPO activity, using extensive dialysis, column chromatography, and addition of copper salts were not successful. Increased concentrations of sulfite and pH levels less than 5 enhanced the inhibition of PPO by sulfite. At pH 4, concentrations greater than 0.04 mg/mL completely inhibited 1000 units of PPO activity almost instantaneously. This suggested that the HSO 3 - molecule was the main component in the sulfite system inhibiting PPO. Column chromatography, extensive dialysis, and gel electrophoresis did not demonstrate 35 SO 2 bound to purified pear PPO protein. Formation of extra protein bands of sulfite inhibited purified pear PPO fractions on gel electrophoresis was demonstrated. This and other evidence suggested that the major mode of direct irreversible inhibition of PPO was modification of the protein structure, with retention of its molecular unity

  9. Summary of the presentations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-01-01

    This part summarizes the content of the six following presentations: 1. IAEA requirements/guidance for the decommissioning safety case (Mike Bell, IAEA); 2. Safety case in an EIA context (Patrick O'SULLIVAN, The Netherlands); 3. Plant configuration and the D and D licensing process (Eugenio GIL LOPEZ and Pedro CARBONERAS, Spain); 4. Accident assessment (Ivo TRIPPUTI, Italy; Ingmar LUND, Sweden); 5. Balancing radiological and industrial risk in the safety case (Pascal DEBOODT, Belgium); 6. The safety case for safe store and dormancy periods (Paul WOOLLAM, UK). Following the six presentations, the WPDD members discussed the safety case in an open discussion led by the Topical Session Chair, Frances Taylor. The discussion was wide-ranging, and topics varied from the standards that apply to releases to the environment during safe store, to decommissioning parallels with other major processing industries and facilities (such as oil rigs). Frances Taylor steered the discussion toward addressing the questions that the WPDD Core Group had proposed for the topical session. The Chair, the Rapporteur, and some members of the group sensed that the presentations had covered such an wide variety of issues, and that the content of the presentations themselves differed so greatly, that it would be difficult to distill a position paper from the information gathered, as had been the mandate from the Core Group. In addition, the meaning of the term 'Safety Case' differed greatly among participants in the topical session. Some took the term to mean the analysis and document that the implementor provides to the regulator, describing how operations will be performed safely. Others considered the term to mean the overall safety and risk conditions inherent in a nuclear facility during operations or decommissioning. With the differences in presentations and with the meaning of the terminology remaining unclear, the WPDD participants did not reach consensus conclusions on December 5, 2001

  10. Inhibition of proliferation and migration of stricture fibroblasts by epithelial cell-conditioned media

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nilima Nath

    2015-01-01

    Conclusion: These results demonstrate the ability of ECCM to inhibit the proliferation and migration of stricture fibroblasts and present it as an effective adjunct in urethroplasty, which may influence stricture wound healing and inhibit the recurrence of stricture.

  11. [Metachromatic Leukodystrophy. Case Presentation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espejo, Lina María; de la Espriella, Ricardo; Hernández, José Fernando

    Metachromatic leukodystrophy (MLD) is a rare demyelinating disease (prevalence 1:40 000), also called arylsulfatase A deficiency (ARS-A), which may present with neurological and psychiatric symptoms. Clinical assessment may be difficult, due to unspecific signs and symptoms. A case is presented of a 16 year-old female patient seen in psychiatry due to behavioural changes, psychosis, and with impaired overall performance. She was initially diagnosed with schizophrenia, but the Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) scan and laboratory tests lead to the diagnosis of MLD. Copyright © 2016 Asociación Colombiana de Psiquiatría. Publicado por Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  12. Sirenomelia: A Rare Presentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srinivas, S; Kumar, Shiva; Reddy, Surweshwar; Prasad, Hari; Irfan, G M

    2012-01-01

    We are presenting two cases of Sirenomelia (Mermaid Syndrome), which is an extreme example of the caudal regression syndrome. It invariably presents with lower limb fusion, sacral and pelvic bony anomalies, absent external genitalia, imperforate anus, and renal agenesis or dysgenesis. There are approximately 300 cases reported in the literature, 15% of which are associated with twinning, most often monozygotic. The syndrome of caudal regression is thought to be the result of injury to the caudal mesoderm early in gestation. One of our cases survived for 12 days after birth. This new born had an unusually high anorectal anomaly in which the colon was ending at the level of mid transverse colon, fused lower limbs and genital anomalies. Ultrasound of the abdomen revealed horseshoe kidney. Colostomy was performed on day 2 of life. The second case encountered was a stillborn baby on whom an autopsy was performed. PMID:26023366

  13. Sirenomelia: a rare presentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, K Ramesh; Srinivas, S; Kumar, Shiva; Reddy, Surweshwar; Prasad, Hari; Irfan, G M

    2012-01-01

    We are presenting two cases of Sirenomelia (Mermaid Syndrome), which is an extreme example of the caudal regression syndrome. It invariably presents with lower limb fusion, sacral and pelvic bony anomalies, absent external genitalia, imperforate anus, and renal agenesis or dysgenesis. There are approximately 300 cases reported in the literature, 15% of which are associated with twinning, most often monozygotic. The syndrome of caudal regression is thought to be the result of injury to the caudal mesoderm early in gestation. One of our cases survived for 12 days after birth. This new born had an unusually high anorectal anomaly in which the colon was ending at the level of mid transverse colon, fused lower limbs and genital anomalies. Ultrasound of the abdomen revealed horseshoe kidney. Colostomy was performed on day 2 of life. The second case encountered was a stillborn baby on whom an autopsy was performed.

  14. Organising and presenting information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kankanady, Raghavendra; Wells, Marilyn

    2013-01-01

    Information management can be a daunting process for clinicians, health care providers and policy makers within the health care industry. This chapter discusses the importance of information classification and information architecture in the information economy and specific challenges faced within the health care industry. The healthcare sector has industry specific requirements for information management, standards and specifications for information presentation. Classification of information based on information criticality and the value in the health care industry is discussed in this paper. Presentation of information with reference to eHealth standards and specifications for healthcare information systems and their key requirements are also discussed, as are information architecture for eHealth implementation in Australia. This chapter also touches on information management and clinical governance since the importance of information governance is discussed by various researchers and how this is becoming of value to healthcare information management.

  15. Atypical Presentations of Tularemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odegaard, Karah; Boersma, Beth; Keegan, James

    2017-05-01

    Francisella tularensis is a gram-negative coccobacillus that causes a condition commonly referred to as tularemia. There has been a dramatic increase in tularemia cases reported in South Dakota, many of which were challenging to diagnose due to atypical clinical manifestations. We describe an interesting case of pneumonic tularemia and summarize six similar cases, several of which presented with lung nodules suggestive of malignancy. According to the literature, this is only the third outbreak of pneumonic tularemia reported in the U.S. We believe it is important for clinicians to be aware of the increased incidence of tularemia in the area and to be vigilant in the diagnosis and management of these atypically presenting cases. Copyright© South Dakota State Medical Association.

  16. Presentation = Speech + Slides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Derik Badman

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Back in October, Aaron Schmidt posted “HOWTO give a good presentation” to his blog walking paper. His second bullet point of “thoughts” on good presentations is: Please don’t fill your slides with words. Find some relevant and pretty pictures to support what you’re saying. You can use the pictures to remind yourself what you’re going [...

  17. Equol inhibits growth, induces atresia, and inhibits steroidogenesis of mouse antral follicles in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahalingam, Sharada; Gao, Liying; Gonnering, Marni; Helferich, William; Flaws, Jodi A.

    2016-01-01

    Equol is a non-steroidal estrogen metabolite produced by microbial conversion of daidzein, a major soy isoflavone, in the gut of some humans and many animal species. Isoflavones and their metabolites can affect endogenous estradiol production, action, and metabolism, potentially influencing ovarian follicle function. However, no studies have examined the effects of equol on intact ovarian antral follicles, which are responsible for sex steroid synthesis and further development into ovulatory follicles. Thus, the present study tested the hypothesis that equol inhibits antral follicle growth, increases follicle atresia, and inhibits steroidogenesis in the adult mouse ovary. To test this hypothesis, antral follicles isolated from adult CD-1 mice were cultured with vehicle control (dimethyl sulfoxide; DMSO) or equol (600 nM, 6 μM, 36 μM, and 100 μM) for 48 and 96 h. Every 24 h, follicle diameters were measured to monitor growth. At 48 and 96 h, the culture medium was subjected to measurement of hormone levels, and the cultured follicles were subjected to gene expression analysis. Additionally, follicles were histologically evaluated for signs of atresia after 96 h of culture. The results indicate that equol (100 μM) inhibited follicle growth, altered the mRNA levels of bcl2-associated X protein and B cell leukemia/lymphoma 2, and induced follicle atresia. Further, equol decreased the levels of estradiol, testosterone, androstenedione, and progesterone, and it decreased mRNA levels of cholesterol side-chain cleavage, steroid 17-α-hydroxalase, and aromatase. Collectively, these data indicate that equol inhibits growth, increases atresia, and inhibits steroidogenesis of cultured mouse antral follicles. - Highlights: • Equol exposure inhibits antral follicle growth. • Equol exposure increases follicle atresia. • Equol exposure inhibits sex steroid hormone levels. • Equol exposure inhibits mRNA levels of certain steroidogenic enzymes.

  18. Equol inhibits growth, induces atresia, and inhibits steroidogenesis of mouse antral follicles in vitro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mahalingam, Sharada, E-mail: mahalin2@illinois.edu [Department of Comparative Biosciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Illinois, 2001 S. Lincoln Ave, Urbana, IL 61802 (United States); Gao, Liying, E-mail: lgao@uiuc.edu [Department of Comparative Biosciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Illinois, 2001 S. Lincoln Ave, Urbana, IL 61802 (United States); Gonnering, Marni, E-mail: mgonne2@illinois.edu [Department of Comparative Biosciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Illinois, 2001 S. Lincoln Ave, Urbana, IL 61802 (United States); Helferich, William, E-mail: helferic@illinois.edu [Department of Food Science and Human Nutrition, University of Illinois, 905 S. Goodwin, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States); Flaws, Jodi A., E-mail: jflaws@illinois.edu [Department of Comparative Biosciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Illinois, 2001 S. Lincoln Ave, Urbana, IL 61802 (United States)

    2016-03-15

    Equol is a non-steroidal estrogen metabolite produced by microbial conversion of daidzein, a major soy isoflavone, in the gut of some humans and many animal species. Isoflavones and their metabolites can affect endogenous estradiol production, action, and metabolism, potentially influencing ovarian follicle function. However, no studies have examined the effects of equol on intact ovarian antral follicles, which are responsible for sex steroid synthesis and further development into ovulatory follicles. Thus, the present study tested the hypothesis that equol inhibits antral follicle growth, increases follicle atresia, and inhibits steroidogenesis in the adult mouse ovary. To test this hypothesis, antral follicles isolated from adult CD-1 mice were cultured with vehicle control (dimethyl sulfoxide; DMSO) or equol (600 nM, 6 μM, 36 μM, and 100 μM) for 48 and 96 h. Every 24 h, follicle diameters were measured to monitor growth. At 48 and 96 h, the culture medium was subjected to measurement of hormone levels, and the cultured follicles were subjected to gene expression analysis. Additionally, follicles were histologically evaluated for signs of atresia after 96 h of culture. The results indicate that equol (100 μM) inhibited follicle growth, altered the mRNA levels of bcl2-associated X protein and B cell leukemia/lymphoma 2, and induced follicle atresia. Further, equol decreased the levels of estradiol, testosterone, androstenedione, and progesterone, and it decreased mRNA levels of cholesterol side-chain cleavage, steroid 17-α-hydroxalase, and aromatase. Collectively, these data indicate that equol inhibits growth, increases atresia, and inhibits steroidogenesis of cultured mouse antral follicles. - Highlights: • Equol exposure inhibits antral follicle growth. • Equol exposure increases follicle atresia. • Equol exposure inhibits sex steroid hormone levels. • Equol exposure inhibits mRNA levels of certain steroidogenic enzymes.

  19. Proactive modulation of long-interval intracortical inhibition during response inhibition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowie, Matthew J.; MacDonald, Hayley J.; Cirillo, John

    2016-01-01

    Daily activities often require sudden cancellation of preplanned movement, termed response inhibition. When only a subcomponent of a whole response must be suppressed (required here on Partial trials), the ensuing component is markedly delayed. The neural mechanisms underlying partial response inhibition remain unclear. We hypothesized that Partial trials would be associated with nonselective corticomotor suppression and that GABAB receptor-mediated inhibition within primary motor cortex might be responsible for the nonselective corticomotor suppression contributing to Partial trial response delays. Sixteen right-handed participants performed a bimanual anticipatory response inhibition task while single- and paired-pulse transcranial magnetic stimulation was delivered to elicit motor evoked potentials in the left first dorsal interosseous muscle. Lift times, amplitude of motor evoked potentials, and long-interval intracortical inhibition were examined across the different trial types (Go, Stop-Left, Stop-Right, Stop-Both). Go trials produced a tight distribution of lift times around the target, whereas those during Partial trials (Stop-Left and Stop-Right) were substantially delayed. The modulation of motor evoked potential amplitude during Stop-Right trials reflected anticipation, suppression, and subsequent reinitiation of movement. Importantly, suppression was present across all Stop trial types, indicative of a “default” nonselective inhibitory process. Compared with blocks containing only Go trials, inhibition increased when Stop trials were introduced but did not differ between trial types. The amount of inhibition was positively correlated with lift times during Stop-Right trials. Tonic levels of inhibition appear to be proactively modulated by task context and influence the speed at which unimanual responses occur after a nonselective “brake” is applied. PMID:27281744

  20. EPMA present and future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Love, G.

    2002-01-01

    In electron probe microanalysis the objective has always been to gain the maximum information from a sample. To this end efforts have been directed at increasing detection efficiency, reducing the size of the excitation volume, analysing more difficult specimens and improving the accuracy of quantitative measurements whilst, at the same time, attempting to minimize the complexity of the analysis. The present paper comments on the progress that has been made in this areas, focuses on the latest hardware and software developments taking place and looks forward to how these may impact on the technique of EPMA. (author)

  1. Sarcoidosis Presenting Addison's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Kentaro; Kagami, Shin-Ichiro; Kawashima, Hirotoshi; Kashiwakuma, Daisuke; Suzuki, Yoshio; Iwamoto, Itsuo

    2016-01-01

    We herein describe a second Japanese case of sarcoidosis presenting Addison's disease. A 52-year-old man was diagnosed with sarcoidosis based on clinical and laboratory findings, including bilateral hilar lymphadenopathy and elevated levels of serum angiotensin-converting enzyme and lysozyme, as well as the presence of noncaseating epithelioid granulomas. The patient also exhibited general fatigue, pigmentation, weight loss, hypotension and hyponatremia, suggestive of chronic adrenocortical insufficiency. An endocrine examination confirmed primary adrenocortical insufficiency. This case suggests the direct involvement of sarcoid granuloma in the adrenal glands.

  2. Radwaste - Multimedia presentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-01-01

    Radioactivity is a part of the Nature since the creation of the Earth. We have learned how to use radioactivity in medicine, power industry, and in other areas of life. Similarly as in other activities, waste is generated. We offer you basic information about radioactivity and radioactive waste (radwaste) in four films: Radioactivity, Source of radwaste, Management of radwaste. In the glossary are video presentations: Container (Castor) for radioactive waste; Deep underground repository; Transport vehicle; WWER type reactor. Encyclopedic part of the program contains detailed theoretical and practical information about use of radioactivity and radioactive waste. You will find the explanation in the part Glossary. (authors)

  3. Presenting Newtonian gravitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Counihan, Martin

    2007-01-01

    The basic principles of the Newtonian theory of gravitation are presented in a way which students may find more logically coherent, mathematically accessible and physically interesting than other approaches. After giving relatively simple derivations of the circular hodograph and the elliptical orbit from the inverse-square law, the concept of gravitational energy is developed from vector calculus. It is argued that the energy density of a gravitational field may reasonably be regarded as -g 2 /8πG, and that the inverse-square law may be replaced by a Schwarzschild-like force law without the need to invoke non-Euclidean geometry

  4. Presentation to the symposium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Busby, C.

    1997-01-01

    This paper proposes that there is a major error in the present perception of cancer risk from exposure to low level radiation from internal man-made fission products like strontium-90. The author's Second Event theory is discussed which advances the basis that fission products are different in radiation risk terms. Since the scientific community has been so ready to dismiss this idea out of hand, the author also explores scientific culture and scientific revolutions. The evidence that the idea is broadly right is surveyed and finally some studies that could be undertaken to prove or disprove the author's contention are outlined. (UK)

  5. Radiation myelopathy (case presentation)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sangheli, M.; Lisnic, V.; Plesca, S.; Odainic, O.; Chetrari, L.

    2009-01-01

    The radiotherapy is one of the most widely spread and commonly used method in treating tumors of different localization. A detailed analysis of benefits and possible side effects along with evaluation of the risk factors allows preventing one of the most difficult complication, and namely the radiation myelopathy. The delayed form of such a disease is distinguished by a pronounced unfavorable prognosis. The presented case provoked the discussion of difficulties in performing differential diagnosis, as well as the importance of determining the localization of vulnerable tissues as regards the target organ exposed to radiotherapy. (authors)

  6. DOE financial assurance presentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huck, R.

    1990-01-01

    The presentation topic is California's approach to license application review in meeting financial assurances for the proposed Ward Valley site. The purpose of the presentation is to provide information on specific financial assurance provisions contained in 10 CFR Part 61 and how California intends to satisfy those requirements. Also, as rate setter, California intends to demonstrate how it will assure allowable costs to the rate base though a financial prudency review. The key provisions of financial assurance are: 10 CFR Section 61.61 - This provision requires an applicant to demonstrate its ability to finance licensed activities; 10 CFR Section 61.62 - This provision requires an applicant to provide assurance that sufficient funds will be available for site closure and stabilization; and 10 CFR Section 61.63 - This provision requires an applicant to provide 'a copy of a binding arrangement, such as a lease, between the applicant and the disposal site owner, so that sufficient funds will be available to cover the costs of the institutional control period.' To assist California in its determination of financial assurance compliance to be demonstrated by the applicant for Part 61 requirements, is NUREG guidance document 1199 'Standard Format and Content of a License Application for a Low-Level Radioactive Waste (LLRW) Disposal Facility.' The detailed financial assurance provisions of NUREG 1199 are then embodied in NUREG 1200, 'Standard Review Plant for the Review of a License Application for a LLRW Disposal Facility.'

  7. Rett syndrome: EEG presentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, R; Langill, L; Wong, P K; Ho, H H

    1988-11-01

    Rett syndrome, a degenerative neurological disorder of girls, has a classical presentation and typical EEG findings. The electroencephalograms (EEGs) of 7 girls whose records have been followed from the onset of symptoms to the age of 5 or more are presented. These findings are tabulated with the Clinical Staging System of Hagberg and Witt-Engerström (1986). The records show a progressive deterioration in background rhythms in waking and sleep. The abnormalities of the background activity may only become evident at 4-5 years of age or during stage 2--the Rapid Destructive Stage. The marked contrast between waking and sleep background may not occur until stage 3--the Pseudostationary Stage. In essence EEG changes appear to lag behind clinical symptomatology by 1-3 years. An unexpected, but frequent, abnormality was central spikes seen in 5 of 7 girls. They appeared to be age related and could be evoked by tactile stimulation in 2 patients. We hypothesize that the prominent 'hand washing' mannerism may be self-stimulating and related to the appearance of central spike discharges.

  8. Bad (Re)Presentations

    CERN Multimedia

    Computer Security Team

    2013-01-01

    This time, we would like to address copyright violations (again) - but with a twist. While previous articles focussed on “Music, videos and the risk for CERN” or on software licences, the focus is now on using photos, music and images “found” on the Web for presentations, publications and web pages…   Just recently, a video produced for CERN and published on YouTube and Facebook used background music from a contemporary popular artist. However, the people responsible failed to obtain the appropriate permission to actually use that music. They thought that having bought it on iTunes was sufficient. But it was not: “buying” means you have the right to listen, but not the right for further distribution or re-publication. As a result, the videos were pulled from YouTube and Facebook. Similarly, how many of us integrate graphics and images “found” on the Web into our presentations?  How many of us...

  9. The present situation of irradiation services

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hironiwa, Takayuki

    2014-01-01

    The present state of food irradiation in Japan is presented from a point of view of a trustee for irradiation business. Radiation sprout inhibition of potatoes, only approved by Government, and spice treatment, now being applied for, are explained. Existing establishments capable of entrusting irradiation services as business in Japan are outlined including Co-60 gamma ray and X-ray irradiation and electron beam irradiation. Principles of irradiation-induced physical and chemical effects in irradiated materials specifically organic polymers and brief explanation of facilities together with safety devices are also explained. (S. Ohno)

  10. Film Presentation: Die Urknallmaschine

    CERN Multimedia

    Carolyn Lee

    2010-01-01

    Die Urknallmaschine, an Austrian film by Gerd Baldauf, narrated by Norbert Frischauf (Alpha Österreich - ORF, 2009).  In CERN’s gigantic complex particles are accelerated to almost the speed of light, brought to collision and made to divide into even smaller particles. Public opinion of CERN’s research is also divided. Sceptics fear that black holes may be created. Might the goal to study the origin of the world lead to its destruction? The Austrian researcher Norbert Frischauf worked at CERN for many years. With his guidance it is possible to explore the world’s largest research centre, get a glimpse of the fascinating work the scientists do there and take a crash course in particle physics. Die Urknallmaschine will be presented on Friday, 25 June from 13:00 to 14:00 in the Main Auditorium. Language: German

  11. Abdominal pregnancy - Case presentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohiltea, R; Radoi, V; Tufan, C; Horhoianu, I A; Bohiltea, C

    2015-01-01

    Abdominal pregnancy, a rare diagnosis, belongs to the ectopic pregnancy group, the leading cause of pregnancy related exitus. The positive diagnosis is very difficult to establish most often in an acute setting, leading to a staggering percent of feto-maternal morbidity and mortality. We present the case of 26-weeks-old abdominal pregnancy with partial feto-placental detachment in a patient, after hysteroscopy and in vitro fertilization, which until the acute symptoms that led to emergency laparotomy went unrecognized. The patient recovered completely and satisfactorily after surgery and, due to the high risk of uterine rupture with regard to a second pregnancy, opted for a surrogate mother. Abdominal pregnancy can be regarded as a difficult to establish diagnosis, with a greater chance in case of increased awareness. It is compulsory to be well informed in order not to be surprised by the diagnosis and to apply the correct treatment immediately as the morbidity and mortality rate is elevated.

  12. Trichinosis - case presentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajko Saletinger

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Trichinosis is a widespread zoonosis acquired by ingestion of undercooked meat infected with the larvae of Trichinella parasites. The disease has variable clinical manifestations ranging from asymptomatic to fatal. Majority of infections is caused by Trichinella spiralis, although there are some cases caused by other species. The dramatic decline of trichinosis reflects changes in industrial practices and increased public awareness. The majority of human cases are now associated with wild game meat and noncommercial pork. The case of previously healthy, young man with trichinosis is presented. The disease was determined with serologic testing and cured with albendazole. The source of infection has not been determined.Conclusions: In patients with fever, mialgias and eosinophilia infection with tissue nematodes should always be taken in consideration. In those who have recently consumed raw or undercooked pork and wild game meat we should think about trichinosis. The disease is rare in Slovenia.

  13. Imagined futures, present lives

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dalsgaard, Anne Line; Wildermuth, Norbert

    2006-01-01

    The article is focused thematically on the uses and meanings of media for (some) young people in Recife, a million-inhabitant city in the northeast of Brazil. The article brings together the perspective of Anne Line Dalsgaard, a long-term anthropological field researcher who is familiar with the ......The article is focused thematically on the uses and meanings of media for (some) young people in Recife, a million-inhabitant city in the northeast of Brazil. The article brings together the perspective of Anne Line Dalsgaard, a long-term anthropological field researcher who is familiar...... is discussed centrally in this attempt to contribute to an empirically grounded understanding of the role that media play for youth in their striving to ‘find a place in life'. In the empirical context presented in the article, imaginations, expanded and circulated by a globalized media circuit...

  14. Presenting practice financial information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webster, Lee Ann H

    2007-01-01

    Medical practice leadership teams, often consisting primarily of physicians with limited financial backgrounds, must make important business decisions and continuously monitor practice operations. In order to competently perform this duty, they need financial reports that are relevant and easy to understand. This article explores financial reporting and decision-making in a physician practice. It discusses reports and tools, such as ratios, graphs, and comparisons, that practices typically include in their reports. Because profitability and cash flow are often the most important financial considerations for physician practices, reports should generally focus on the impact of various activities and potential decisions upon these concerns. This article also provides communication tips for both those presenting practice financial information and those making the decisions. By communicating effectively, these leaders can best use financial information to improve decision-making and maximize financial performance.

  15. Modeling intentional inhibition of actions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thilakarathne, D.J.; Treur, J.

    2015-01-01

    Inspired by cognitive and neurological literature on action ownership and action awareness, in this paper a computational cognitive model for intentional inhibition (i.e.; the capacity to voluntarily suspend or inhibit an action) is introduced. The interplay between (positive) potential selection of

  16. Neural Synchrony during Response Production and Inhibition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Viktor; Anokhin, Andrey P.

    2012-01-01

    Inhibition of irrelevant information (conflict monitoring) and/or of prepotent actions is an essential component of adaptive self-organized behavior. Neural dynamics underlying these functions has been studied in humans using event-related brain potentials (ERPs) elicited in Go/NoGo tasks that require a speeded motor response to the Go stimuli and withholding a prepotent response when a NoGo stimulus is presented. However, averaged ERP waveforms provide only limited information about the neuronal mechanisms underlying stimulus processing, motor preparation, and response production or inhibition. In this study, we examine the cortical representation of conflict monitoring and response inhibition using time-frequency analysis of electroencephalographic (EEG) recordings during continuous performance Go/NoGo task in 50 young adult females. We hypothesized that response inhibition would be associated with a transient boost in both temporal and spatial synchronization of prefrontal cortical activity, consistent with the role of the anterior cingulate and lateral prefrontal cortices in cognitive control. Overall, phase synchronization across trials measured by Phase Locking Index and phase synchronization between electrode sites measured by Phase Coherence were the highest in the Go and NoGo conditions, intermediate in the Warning condition, and the lowest under Neutral condition. The NoGo condition was characterized by significantly higher fronto-central synchronization in the 300–600 ms window, whereas in the Go condition, delta- and theta-band synchronization was higher in centro-parietal regions in the first 300 ms after the stimulus onset. The present findings suggest that response production and inhibition is supported by dynamic functional networks characterized by distinct patterns of temporal and spatial synchronization of brain oscillations. PMID:22745691

  17. Neural synchrony during response production and inhibition.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viktor Müller

    Full Text Available Inhibition of irrelevant information (conflict monitoring and/or of prepotent actions is an essential component of adaptive self-organized behavior. Neural dynamics underlying these functions has been studied in humans using event-related brain potentials (ERPs elicited in Go/NoGo tasks that require a speeded motor response to the Go stimuli and withholding a prepotent response when a NoGo stimulus is presented. However, averaged ERP waveforms provide only limited information about the neuronal mechanisms underlying stimulus processing, motor preparation, and response production or inhibition. In this study, we examine the cortical representation of conflict monitoring and response inhibition using time-frequency analysis of electroencephalographic (EEG recordings during continuous performance Go/NoGo task in 50 young adult females. We hypothesized that response inhibition would be associated with a transient boost in both temporal and spatial synchronization of prefrontal cortical activity, consistent with the role of the anterior cingulate and lateral prefrontal cortices in cognitive control. Overall, phase synchronization across trials measured by Phase Locking Index and phase synchronization between electrode sites measured by Phase Coherence were the highest in the Go and NoGo conditions, intermediate in the Warning condition, and the lowest under Neutral condition. The NoGo condition was characterized by significantly higher fronto-central synchronization in the 300-600 ms window, whereas in the Go condition, delta- and theta-band synchronization was higher in centro-parietal regions in the first 300 ms after the stimulus onset. The present findings suggest that response production and inhibition is supported by dynamic functional networks characterized by distinct patterns of temporal and spatial synchronization of brain oscillations.

  18. Presentation of Canada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hedley, Dianne E.

    1997-01-01

    In contingency of a nuclear emergency event, requiring application of intervention measures on a federal scale, Canada has of a plan ensuring the compatibility of the plans of different provinces and serving as interface between federal and provincial authorities. Exclusive of a nuclear attack against North America, by nuclear emergency it is understood an accident resulting in radionuclide release. This is called the Plan of federal intervention in case of nuclear emergency. 'Sante Canada' is the federal authority responsible for intervention in case of nuclear emergency and it has the task of preparing and coordinating the actions on a federal scale.Should the plan be set in action and if the emergency has repercussions upon the agricultural sector, the sustaining organism will be 'Agriculture and agroalimentaire Canada' which in case of emergency acts through the channels of the National System of intervention in the agro-alimentary sector (SNIUA). The paper presents the objectives, the principles of organization and operation, the responsibilities and the plans which SNIUA has in its charge to implement in case of emergency

  19. STS-69 postflight presentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    1995-10-01

    A postflight conference of the STS-69 mission is presented. The flightcrew ('The Dog Team') consisted of Cmdr. David Walker, Pilot Kenneth Cockrell, Payload Cmdr. James Voss, and Mission Specialists James Newman and Michael Gernhardt. The mission's primary objective was the deployment and retrieval of the SPARTAN-201 satellite, which investigated the interaction between the Sun and it's solar wind. Other secondary experiments and shuttle payloads included the Wake Shield Facility (WSF), which grew several layers of semiconductor films, the International Extreme Ultraviolet Hitchhiker (IEH-1), the Capillary Pumped Loop-2/Gas Bridge Assembly (CAPL-2/GBA), several Get Away Specials (GAS) experiments, the Electrolysis Performance Improvement Concept Study (EPICS), the Thermal Energy Storage (TES-2) experiment, the Commercial Generic Bioprocessing Apparatus-7 (CGBA-7), the National Institutes of Health-Cells 4 (NIH-C4) experiment, and the Biological Research in Canister-6 (BRIC-6) experiment. Earth views consisted of Saudi Arabia water wells, uncommon vortices over Oman, the Amazon River, the Bahamas, Somalia, a sunset over the Earth's horizon, and two hurricanes, Luis and Marilyn.

  20. Present energy status

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Desprairies, P

    1988-04-01

    This paper reviews the past and present situation of the World Oil Market and assumes future trends and possible future evolution. Low oil prices between 1950 and 1973 have contributed to an exceptional growth of oil demand during more than 20 years which was more and more supplied by OPEC. The oil shocks of 1973 and 1979 have dramatically changed this situation. Some of the most important changes have been the emergence of non-OPEC new oil producers, the growth of substitute energies, especially natural gas and nuclear power, on the supply side; and substantial decrease of energy consumption in many industrialized countries which has greatly reduced oil demand to OPEC on the demand side. Today this situation seems somewhat stabilized (after the reversal of world oil prices in 1986) and OPEC is producing around 18 million b/day as against a producing capacity of about 30 million b/day. It is generally considered that in coming years oil prices will remain relatively low (or occasionally even become lower than today) due to excess oil production capacity and relative abundance of other types of energy. However, many experts think that these trends can be reversed when oil supply will more and more concentrate again in the Middle East; but it is hard to say if this will begin in 1995, 2000, 2010.

  1. The laryngocele; case presentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriel V. Berteșteanu

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Laryngocele is a rare pathology, but because of their clinical evolution and the symptoms they generate, they should always be considered as a differential diagnosis when investigating neck masses. A laryngocele is basically a herniation of the mucosa of the laryngeal ventricle (Morgagni's ventricle arising usually from the saccular region. This herniation may remain confined to the larynx - in which case the laryngocele is internal- or expand through the thyro-hyoid membrane into the structures of the neck - thus being called an external laryngocele. Usually the laryngocele has both an internal and external component thus being a mixed laryngocele. Diagnosis of laryngoceles still relies heavily on clinical signs such as tympanism, easily depressible neck mass, indirect laryngoscopy, but is now simplified by imagistic investigations (ultrasound, CT and MRI. However, the treatment of this condition is exclusively surgical and consists of total excision of the laryngocele, as well as proper identification of the point of origin from the saccule and also the final suture of the breach in order to prevent recurrence. Investigation of possible causes of obstruction of the laryngeal ventricle should always be performed (because of the possibility of an underlying malignancy as well as a follow-up protocol of the patient, given the risk of relapse. We present a recently diagnosed case of a 32 year old man with mixed laryngocele, which we have operated in our clinic.

  2. [Antibiotics: present and future].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bérdy, János

    2013-04-14

    The author discuss the up to date interpretation of the concept of antibiotics and antibiotic research, as well as the present role of various natural, semisynthetic and synthetic antibiotic compounds in various areas of the human therapy. The origin and the total number of all antibiotics and applied antibiotics in the practice, as well as the bioactive microbial metabolites (antibiotics) in other therapeutical, non-antibiotic fields (including agriculture) are also reviewed. The author discusses main problems, such as increasing (poly)resistance, virulence of pathogens and the non-scientific factors (such as a decline of research efforts and their sociological, economic, financial and regulatory reasons). A short summary of the history of Hungarian antibiotic research is also provided. The author briefly discusses the prospects in the future and the general advantages of the natural products over synthetic compounds. It is concluded that new approaches for the investigation of the unlimited possibilities of the living world are necessary. The discovery of new types or simply neglected (micro)organisms and their biosynthetic capabilities, the introduction of new biotechnological and genetic methods (genomics, metagenom, genome mining) are absolutely required in the future.

  3. IKONOS: future and present

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaap, Niek

    2003-04-01

    The IKONOS satellite has been operational since January 2000 and was the first commercial satellite collecting imagery with 1 meter resolution. The current life expectancy of the satellite is 10 years. Since the launch, Space Imaging Inc. (the owner of the satellite) supplied IKONOS imagery to users in many vertical markets, such as: agriculture, defense, oil & gas and telecommunications. This oral presentation will give comprehensive information about IKONOS and the future: * Block II, the successor of IKONOS. Space Imaging expects to launch in 2004 a new high-resolution satellite, ensuring both continuity and (for some years) a tandem operation with IKONOS, greatly improving the availability of imagery. * Space Imaging affiliates. IKONOS imagery collected, processed and sold by regional affiliates. These regional affiliates are strategically located around the world, like Japan Space Imaging (Tokyo), Space Imaging Middle East (Dubai) and Space Imaging Eurasia (Ankara, Turkey). * Technical briefing IKONOS. IKONOS (compared to other commercial high-resolution satellites) has superior collection capabilities. Due to, the higher orbit altitude, local reception of the imagery, bi-directional scanning and the high agility of the satellite, is the IKONOS satellite capable to collect the imagery relative quickly.

  4. Presentation of Pydio

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2014-01-01

    **Pydio is an open-source platform for file sharing and synchronisation.** It is wildly used by enterprises and organizations worldwide, including major universities. Pydio comes with a rich web-based interface, native clients for both iOS and Android mobile devices, and lately a new sync client for desktop platforms. Pydio v6 is of great useability and introduces many new features that makes it the ultimate sharing machine. Its architecture makes it a perfect fit for either easily deploying an on-premise dropbox solution, or building more complicated solutions where the box feature is integrated as OEM. Storage-agnostic, Pydio is a simple layer that can be deployed on top of any storage backend, thus providing scalability and high-availability out-of-the-box. Charles du Jeu is the lead developer of the solution and will briefly present its feature and how it can fit for research and engineering purpose. See https://pyd.io/ for more information.

  5. Theobromine inhibits sensory nerve activation and cough.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usmani, Omar S; Belvisi, Maria G; Patel, Hema J; Crispino, Natascia; Birrell, Mark A; Korbonits, Márta; Korbonits, Dezso; Barnes, Peter J

    2005-02-01

    Cough is a common and protective reflex, but persistent coughing is debilitating and impairs quality of life. Antitussive treatment using opioids is limited by unacceptable side effects, and there is a great need for more effective remedies. The present study demonstrates that theobromine, a methylxanthine derivative present in cocoa, effectively inhibits citric acid-induced cough in guinea-pigs in vivo. Furthermore, in a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study in man, theobromine suppresses capsaicin-induced cough with no adverse effects. We also demonstrate that theobromine directly inhibits capsaicin-induced sensory nerve depolarization of guinea-pig and human vagus nerve suggestive of an inhibitory effect on afferent nerve activation. These data indicate the actions of theobromine appear to be peripherally mediated. We conclude theobromine is a novel and promising treatment, which may form the basis for a new class of antitussive drugs.

  6. THE UPSIDE OF PRESENTISM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lynn Fendler

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available El presentismo es visto generalmente como un mal necesario en historiografía. Este artículo explora lo positivo de esta inevitabilidad. Aplicando un enfoque filosófico al análisis discursivo en la tradición de la nueva historia cultural, se distingue -de una parte-¿ entre un uso estratégico del presentismo, y -de otra- un enfoque racionalista en historia. El artículo concluye considerando algunas implicaciones políticas en historiografía de las explicaciones racionalistas y de las explicaciones estratégicamente presentistas. Los modos de comprensión racionalistas inscriben las expectativas del pasado en las visiones del futuro; asignando al historiador el papel de profeta; y perpetuando nociones de agentes ahistóricos. En contraste, las historias estratégicamente presentistas incorporan una orientación que deliberadamente emplea las lentes y perspectivas del presente en orden a tener en cuenta supuestos y perspectivas actuales. Cuando las asunciones son examinadas en relación a las perspectivas presentistas, dichos presupuestos sueltan su rienda en el pensamiento. Dado que el presentismo es inevitable, no debe ser desestimado por completo, sino que debe ser una cuestión sondeada y examinada críticamente. Con dicho foco, el presentismo estratégico en la historiografía debe posibilitar una reflexión sobre los límites de lo que es posible pensar.

  7. Texts of presentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Magnin, G.; Vidolov, K.; Dufour-Fallot, B.; Dewarrat, Th.; Rose, T.; Favatier, A.; Gazeley, D.; Pujol, T.; Worner, D.; Van de Wel, E.; Revaz, J.M.; Clerfayt, G.; Creedy, A.; Moisan, F.; Geissler, M.; Isbell, P.; Macaluso, M.; Litzka, V.; Gillis, W.; Jarvis, I.; Gorg, M.; Bebie, B.

    2004-07-01

    Implementing a sustainable local energy policy involves a long term reflection on the general interest, energy efficiency, distributed generation and environmental protection. Providing services on a market involves looking for activities that are profitable, if possible in the 'short-term'. The aim of this conference is to analyse the possibility of reconciling these apparently contradictory requirements and how this can be achieved. This conference brings together the best specialists from European municipalities as well as important partners for local authorities (energy agencies, service companies, institutions, etc.) in order to discuss the public-private partnerships concerning the various functions that municipalities may perform in the energy field as consumers and customers, planners and organizers of urban space and rousers as regards inhabitants and economic players of their areas. This document contains the summaries of the following presentations: 1 - Performance contracting: Bulgarian municipalities use private capital for energy efficiency improvement (K. VIDOLOV, Varna (BG)), Contracting experiences in Swiss municipalities: consistent energy policy thanks to the Energy-city label (B. DUFOUR-FALLOT and T. DEWARRAT (CH)), Experience of contracting in the domestic sector (T. ROSE (GB)); 2 - Public procurement: Multicolor electricity (A. FAVATIER (CH)), Tendering for new green electricity capacity (D. GAZELEY (GB)), The Barcelona solar thermal ordinance (T. PUJOL (ES)); 3 - Urban planning and schemes: Influencing energy issues through urban planning (D. WOERNER (DE)), Tendering for the supply of energy infrastructure (E. VAN DE WEL (NL)), Concessions and public utility warranty (J.M. REVAZ (CH)); 4 - Certificate schemes: the market of green certificates in Wallonia region in a liberalized power market (G. CLERFAYT (BE)), The Carbon Neutral{sup R} project: a voluntary certification scheme with opportunity for implementation in other European

  8. Crystallography: past and present

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodeau, J.-L.; Guinebretiere, R.

    2007-12-01

    structure (chemical order, anisotropy, charge transfer, magnetic order) versus an external parameter like temperature, pressure, magnetic or electric field. Modern crystallography is also extended to the study of very small crystals, powders, ill-ordered or non-crystallized materials. Thus presently, crystallography is concerned with any solid that “scatters” an incident beam. Nevertheless, as quoted by A. Guinier, “the problems facing crystallographers have only changed, ... new ones have appeared which require reflection and imagination, ... and which in turn may still bring much joy to all those who like crystallography” [4]. Such developments open up crystallography to modern materials like artificial ones and nanostructures with low- and/or multi-scaled-periodicities and/or extremely small “crystal size” and to materials of the “real world”, with mixtures of phases and/or amorphous contribution and/or defects, a common characteristic of ancient materials analysed in patrimonial research. In our contribution we will show by selected examples that these improvements were allowed (i) by the use of powerful sources, apparatus and detectors which allow micro-diffraction, in-situ diffraction, spectroscopy, resonant scattering, inelastic scattering, coherent scattering, (ii) by the development of methods like diffraction anomalous fine structure (DAFS), pair distribution function (PDF), simulated annealing, single object reconstruction, (iii) by combination of scattering and spectroscopy and by combination of scattering and microscopy. Such combination of different approaches is very efficient and, as said by H. Curien at the IUCr Bordeaux Congress in 1990, “in crystallography, there is a constant alternation between the crystal space and its associated reciprocal space, ... the alternation between experiment and model building is another feature of crystallography activity ..., the crystallographer relies both on his computer and on his diffractometer

  9. Isolation and characterization of cDNA encoding the 80-kDa subunit protein of the human autoantigen Ku (p70/p80) recognized by autoantibodies from patients with scleroderma-polymyositis overlap syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mimori, Tsuneyo; Ohosone, Yasuo; Hama, Nobuaki; Suwa, Akira; Akizuki, Masashi; Homma, Mitsuo; Griffith, A.J.; Hardin, J.A.

    1990-01-01

    Anti-Ku (p70/p80) autoantibodies in patients with scleroderma-polymyositis overlap syndrome recognize a 70-kDa/80-kDa protein heterodimer which binds to terminal regions of double-stranded DNA. In the present study, the authors isolated full-length cDNAs that encode the 80-kDa Ku subunit. Initial screening of a human spleen cDNA library with anti-Ku antibodies yielded a cDNA of 1.0 kilobase (kb) (termed K71) encoding a portion of the 80-kDa Ku polypeptide (identification based on immunological criteria). In RNA blots, this cDNA hybridized with two mRNAs of 3.4 and 2.6 kb. In vitro transcription and translation experiments produced an immunoprecipitable polypeptide which comigrated with the 80-kDa Ku subunit. The Ku80-6 cDNA proved to be 3304 nucleotides in length, with an additional poly(A) tail, closely approximating the size of the larger mRNA. It contains a single long open reading frame encoding 732 amino acids. The putative polypeptide has a high content of acidic amino acids and a region with periodic repeat of leucine in every seventh position which may form the leucine zipper structure. In genomic DNA blots, probes derived from the opposite ends of cDNA Ku80-6 hybridized with several nonoverlapping restriction fragments from human leukocyte DNA, indicating that the gene encoding the 80-kDa Ku polypeptide is divided into several exons by intervening sequences

  10. Inhibition Efficiency in Highly Proficient Bilinguals and Simultaneous Interpreters: Evidence from Language Switching and Stroop Tasks

    OpenAIRE

    Aparicio, X.; Heidlmayr, K.; Isel, F.

    2017-01-01

    The present behavioral study aimed to examine the impact of language control expertise on two domain-general control processes, i.e. active inhibition of competing representations and overcoming of inhibition. We compared how Simultaneous Interpreters (SI) and Highly Proficient Bilinguals—two groups assumed to differ in language control capacity—performed executive tasks involving specific inhibition processes. In Experiment 1 (language decision task), both active and overcoming of inhibition...

  11. Selective inhibition of distracting input.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noonan, MaryAnn P; Crittenden, Ben M; Jensen, Ole; Stokes, Mark G

    2017-10-16

    We review a series of studies exploring distractor suppression. It is often assumed that preparatory distractor suppression is controlled via top-down mechanisms of attention akin to those that prepare brain areas for target enhancement. Here, we consider two alternative mechanisms: secondary inhibition and expectation suppression within a predictive coding framework. We draw on behavioural studies, evidence from neuroimaging and some animal studies. We conclude that there is very limited evidence for selective top-down control of preparatory inhibition. By contrast, we argue that distractor suppression often relies secondary inhibition of non-target items (relatively non-selective inhibition) and on statistical regularities of the environment, learned through direct experience. Crown Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Participation of L3T4 in T cell activation in the absence of class II major histocompatibility complex antigens. Inhibition by anti-L3T4 antibodies is a function both of epitope density and mode of presentation of anti-receptor antibody

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Owens, T; Fazekas de St Groth, B

    1987-01-01

    two monoclonal antibodies, KJ16-133.18 and F23.1, that recognize a determinant encoded by the T cell receptor V beta 8 gene family. These antibodies were used to select two clones of T cells with surface phenotype Thy-1.2+, L3T4+, Lyt-2-, KJ16-133.18+, F23.1+, IA-, IE-. One of these clones (E9.D4......The recognition of many class II major histocompatibility complex (MHC)-associated antigens by T cells requires the participation of the L3T4 molecule. It has been proposed that this molecule acts to stabilize low affinity binding to antigen in association with MHC and thereby increases the avidity...... of T cell/antigen interactions. By using antibodies against the T cell antigen receptor (TCR) to activate T cells, thereby circumventing the requirement for antigen presenting cells and MHC-associated antigen, we have been able to study the function of L3T4 in the absence of class II MHC. We have used...

  13. present

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    as medium of instruction enhances concept formation, especially in science subjects as ... The study, on which this paper is based, was conducted to evaluate Malawi's ... corrected in the wake of information flowing from the evaluation phase (Kaplan .... concerning the background information and suggested activities (Thodi,.

  14. PRESENTATION

    OpenAIRE

    Editors, The

    2017-01-01

    To plan and to implement academic projects remain a systematic challenge for the team and the collaborators of the Electronic Journal. Each study published is an opportunity to strengthen the proposed goals and to add more value to the community involved and interested.

  15. Presentations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2007-01-01

    The aim of the Exploratory Workshop is to encourage informal discussion and the exchange of expertise between scientists using random matrix theory in various areas of research ranging from fundamental physics: string theory, gravity, quantum chaos, information theory, complexity theory, combinatorics to applied research: biophysics, econophysics, quantitative finance and telecommunication. Such a discussion would be a first step towards creating a common European environment for researchers using this powerful theory

  16. [Concepts of inhibition in psychiatry].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auroux, Y; Bourrat, M M; Brun, J P

    1978-01-01

    Following a historical approach, the authors first describe the original development of the concept of inhibition in neurophysiology and then analyze the subsequent adaptations made in psychiatry around such concept including those of: -- Pavlov, Hull, Watson and the behaviorists, -- Freud and the Freudian School, -- clinicians and psychopharmacologists. The concept of inhibition has thus various meanings in psychiatry. Although some unity is achieved on the semiological level, this aspect cannot explain the extent of the process.

  17. Inhibition of MMPs by alcohols

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tezvergil-Mutluay, Arzu; Agee, Kelli A.; Hoshika, Tomohiro; Uchiyama, Toshikazu; Tjäderhane, Leo; Breschi, Lorenzo; Mazzoni, Annalisa; Thompson, Jeremy M.; McCracken, Courtney E.; Looney, Stephen W.; Tay, Franklin R.; Pashley, David H.

    2011-01-01

    Objectives While screening the activity of potential inhibitors of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), due to the limited water solubility of some of the compounds, they had to be solubilized in ethanol. When ethanol solvent controls were run, they were found to partially inhibit MMPs. Thus, the purpose of this study was to compare the MMP-inhibitory activity of a series of alcohols. Methods The possible inhibitory activity of a series of alcohols was measured against soluble rhMMP-9 and insoluble matrix-bound endogenous MMPs of dentin in completely demineralized dentin. Increasing concentrations (0.17, 0.86, 1.71 and 4.28 moles/L) of a homologous series of alcohols (i.e. methanol, ethanol, propanols, butanols, pentanols, hexanols, the ethanol ester of methacrylic acid, heptanols and octanol) were compared to ethanediol, and propanediol by regression analysis to calculate the molar concentration required to inhibit MMPs by 50% (i.e. the IC50). Results Using two different MMP models, alcohols were shown to inhibit rhMMP-9 and the endogenous proteases of dentin matrix in a dose-dependent manner. The degree of MMP inhibition by alcohols increased with chain length up to 4 methylene groups. Based on the molar concentration required to inhibit rhMMP-9 fifty percent, 2-hydroxyethylmethacrylate (HEMA), 3-hexanol, 3-heptanol and 1-octanol gave the strongest inhibition. Significance The results indicate that alcohols with 4 methylene groups inhibit MMPs more effectively than methanol or ethanol. MMP inhibition was inversely related to the Hoy's solubility parameter for hydrogen bonding forces of the alcohols (i.e. to their hydrophilicity). PMID:21676453

  18. The contribution of forward masking to saccadic inhibition of return.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souto, David; Born, Sabine; Kerzel, Dirk

    2018-03-08

    Inhibition of return is the name typically given to the prolonged latency of motor responses directed to a previously cued target location. There is intense debate about the origins of this effect and its function, but most take for granted (despite lack of evidence) that it depends little on forward masking. Therefore, we re-examined the role of forward masking in inhibition of return. Forward masking was indexed by slower saccadic reaction times (SRTs) when the target orientation repeated the cue orientation at the same location. We confirmed effects of orientation repetition in the absence of an attentional bias when cues were presented on both sides of fixation (bilateral presentation). The effect of orientation repetition was reduced with high target contrast, consistent with a low-level origin such as contrast gain control in early visual areas. When presenting cues on only one side of fixation (unilateral presentation), we obtained inhibition of return with longer cue-target intervals and facilitation with targets presented shortly after the cue. The effect of orientation repetition was reduced when facilitation was observed, but was as strong as with bilateral cues when inhibition of return was observed. Therefore, forward masking may contribute to the inhibition of return effect by delaying reaction times to repeated features at the same location, but is not a principal cause of inhibition of return; in agreement with previous views. The saccadic inhibition of return effect is a reaction-time cost when responding to a pre-cued location. Additional object updating costs are typically invoked to explain reaction-time costs observed when cue and target have the same shape. Yet, lower-level, forward masking of the target by the cue can not be ruled out. Importantly, we show an effect of orientation repetition that is consistent with low-level forward masking rather than object updating costs and that does not interact with inhibition of return.

  19. Inhibition of PTEN and activation of Akt by menadione

    OpenAIRE

    Yoshikawa, Kyoko; Nigorikawa, Kiyomi; Tsukamoto, Mariko; Tamura, Namiko; Hazeki, Kaoru; Hazeki, Osamu

    2007-01-01

    Menadione (vitamin K3) has been shown to activate Erk in several cell lines. This effect has been shown to be due to the activation of EGF receptors (EGFR) as a result of inhibition of some protein tyrosine phosphatases. In the present study, we examined the effects of menadione on Akt in Chinese hamster ovary cells. The phosphorylation of Akt by menadione was not inhibited by AG1478, an inhibitor of EGFR. Menadione inhibited the lipid phosphatase activity of PTEN in a cell-free system. In an...

  20. Methanol Extract of Myelophycus caespitosus Inhibits the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Methanol Extract of Myelophycus caespitosus Inhibits the Inflammatory Response in Lipopolysaccharidestimulated BV2 Microglial Cells by Downregulating NF-kB via Inhibition of the Akt Signaling Pathway.

  1. 3-Bromopyruvate inhibits human gastric cancer tumor growth in nude mice via the inhibition of glycolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xian, Shu-Lin; Cao, Wei; Zhang, Xiao-Dong; Lu, Yun-Fei

    2015-02-01

    Tumor cells primarily depend upon glycolysis in order to gain energy. Therefore, the inhibition of glycolysis may inhibit tumor growth. Our previous study demonstrated that 3-bromopyruvate (3-BrPA) inhibited gastric cancer cell proliferation in vitro . However, the ability of 3-BrPA to suppress tumor growth in vivo, and its underlying mechanism, have yet to be elucidated. The aim of the present study was to investigate the inhibitory effect of 3-BrPA in an animal model of gastric cancer. It was identified that 3-BrPA exhibited strong inhibitory effects upon xenograft tumor growth in nude mice. In addition, the antitumor function of 3-BrPA exhibited a dose-effect association, which was similar to that of the chemotherapeutic agent, 5-fluorouracil. Furthermore, 3-BrPA exhibited low toxicity in the blood, liver and kidneys of the nude mice. The present study hypothesized that the inhibitory effect of 3-BrPA is achieved through the inhibition of hexokinase activity, which leads to the downregulation of B-cell lymphoma 2 (Bcl-2) expression, the upregulation of Bcl-2-associated X protein expression and the subsequent activation of caspase-3. These data suggest that 3-BrPA may be a novel therapy for the treatment of gastric cancer.

  2. Ketoconazole inhibits the cellular uptake of anandamide via inhibition of FAAH at pharmacologically relevant concentrations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emmelie Björklund

    Full Text Available The antifungal compound ketoconazole has, in addition to its ability to interfere with fungal ergosterol synthesis, effects upon other enzymes including human CYP3A4, CYP17, lipoxygenase and thromboxane synthetase. In the present study, we have investigated whether ketoconazole affects the cellular uptake and hydrolysis of the endogenous cannabinoid receptor ligand anandamide (AEA.The effects of ketoconazole upon endocannabinoid uptake were investigated using HepG2, CaCo2, PC-3 and C6 cell lines. Fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH activity was measured in HepG2 cell lysates and in intact C6 cells. Ketoconazole inhibited the uptake of AEA by HepG2 cells and CaCo2 cells with IC50 values of 17 and 18 µM, respectively. In contrast, it had modest effects upon AEA uptake in PC-3 cells, which have a low expression of FAAH. In cell-free HepG2 lysates, ketoconazole inhibited FAAH activity with an IC50 value (for the inhibitable component of 34 µM.The present study indicates that ketoconazole can inhibit the cellular uptake of AEA at pharmacologically relevant concentrations, primarily due to its effects upon FAAH. Ketoconazole may be useful as a template for the design of dual-action FAAH/CYP17 inhibitors as a novel strategy for the treatment of prostate cancer.

  3. Targeting inflammation with autoantigen-specific T cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Guichelaar, T.

    2008-01-01

    Chronic autoimmune diseases are driven by cells that respond to tissue components of the body. Inflammation in diseases like rheumatoid arthritis, diabetes or multiple sclerosis, can be suppressed by drug therapy. However, the broad range of immunosuppressive action of these drugs often does not

  4. Chemotherapy synergizes with radioimmunotherapy targeting La autoantigen in tumors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fares Al-Ejeh

    Full Text Available To date, inefficient delivery of therapeutic doses of radionuclides to solid tumors limits the clinical utility of radioimmunotherapy. We aim to test the therapeutic utility of Yttrium-90 ((90Y-radio-conjugates of a monoclonal antibody, which we showed previously to bind specifically to the abundant intracellular La ribonucleoprotein revealed in dead tumor cells after DNA-damaging treatment.Immunoconjugates of the DAB4 clone of the La-specific monoclonal antibody, APOMAB, were prepared using the metal chelator, 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7,10-tetraacetic acid (DOTA, and then radiolabeled with (90Y. Mice bearing established subcutaneous tumors were treated with (90Y-DOTA-DAB4 alone or after chemotherapy. Non-radiosensitizing cyclophosphamide/etoposide chemotherapy was used for the syngeneic EL4 lymphoma model. Radiosensitizing cisplatin/gemcitabine chemotherapy was used for the syngeneic Lewis Lung carcinoma (LL2 model, and for the xenograft models of LNCaP prostatic carcinoma and Panc-1 pancreatic carcinoma. We demonstrate the safety, specificity, and efficacy of (90Y-DOTA-DAB4-radioimmunotherapy alone or combined with chemotherapy. EL4 lymphoma-bearing mice either were cured at higher doses of radioimmunotherapy alone or lower doses of radioimmunotherapy in synergy with chemotherapy. Radioimmunotherapy alone was less effective in chemo- and radio-resistant carcinoma models. However, radioimmunotherapy synergized with radiosensitizing chemotherapy to retard significantly tumor regrowth and so prolong the survival of mice bearing LL2, LNCaP, or Panc-1 subcutaneous tumor implants.We report proof-of-concept data supporting a unique form of radioimmunotherapy, which delivers bystander killing to viable cancer cells after targeting the universal cancer antigen, La, created by DNA-damaging treatment in neighboring dead cancer cells. Subsequently we propose that DAB4-targeted ionizing radiation induces additional cycles of tumor cell death, which further augments DAB4 binding to produce a tumor-lethal 'genotoxic chain reaction'. Clinically, this approach may be useful as consolidation treatment after a drug-induced cell death among (small-volume metastatic deposits, the commonest cause of cancer death. This article is part II of a two-part series providing proof-of-concept for the diagnostic and therapeutic use of the DAB4 clone of the La-specific monoclonal antibody, APOMAB.

  5. Lactate dehydrogenase activity is inhibited by methylmalonate in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saad, Laura O; Mirandola, Sandra R; Maciel, Evelise N; Castilho, Roger F

    2006-04-01

    Methylmalonic acidemia (MMAemia) is an inherited metabolic disorder of branched amino acid and odd-chain fatty acid metabolism, involving a defect in the conversion of methylmalonyl-coenzyme A to succinyl-coenzyme A. Systemic and neurological manifestations in this disease are thought to be associated with the accumulation of methylmalonate (MMA) in tissues and biological fluids with consequent impairment of energy metabolism and oxidative stress. In the present work we studied the effect of MMA and two other inhibitors of mitochondrial respiratory chain complex II (malonate and 3-nitropropionate) on the activity of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) in tissue homogenates from adult rats. MMA potently inhibited LDH-catalyzed conversion of lactate to pyruvate in liver and brain homogenates as well as in a purified bovine heart LDH preparation. LDH was about one order of magnitude less sensitive to inhibition by MMA when catalyzing the conversion of pyruvate to lactate. Kinetic studies on the inhibition of brain LDH indicated that MMA inhibits this enzyme competitively with lactate as a substrate (K (i)=3.02+/-0.59 mM). Malonate and 3-nitropropionate also strongly inhibited LDH-catalyzed conversion of lactate to pyruvate in brain homogenates, while no inhibition was observed by succinate or propionate, when present in concentrations of up to 25 mM. We propose that inhibition of the lactate/pyruvate conversion by MMA contributes to lactate accumulation in blood, metabolic acidemia and inhibition of gluconeogenesis observed in patients with MMAemia. Moreover, the inhibition of LDH in the central nervous system may also impair the lactate shuttle between astrocytes and neurons, compromising neuronal energy metabolism.

  6. Imitation inhibition in children with Tourette syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandt, Valerie Cathérine; Moczydlowski, Agnes; Jonas, Melanie; Boelmans, Kai; Bäumer, Tobias; Brass, Marcel; Münchau, Alexander

    2017-08-12

    Echopraxia, that is, the open and automatic imitation of other peoples' actions, is common in patients with Gilles de la Tourette syndrome, autism spectrum disorder, and also those with frontal lobe lesions. While systematic reaction time tasks have confirmed increased automatic imitation in the latter two groups, adult patients with Tourette syndrome appear to compensate for automatic imitation tendencies by an overall slowing in response times. However, whether children with Tourette syndrome are already able to inhibit automatic imitation tendencies has not been investigated. Fifteen children with Tourette syndrome and 15 healthy children (aged 7-12 years) performed an imitation inhibition paradigm. Participants were asked to respond to an auditory cue by lifting their index finger or their little finger. Participants were simultaneously presented with either compatible or incompatible visual stimuli. Overall responses in children with Tourette syndrome were slower than in healthy children. Although responses were faster in compatible than in incompatible trials in both groups, this 'interference effect' was smaller in children with Tourette syndrome. Children with Tourette syndrome have a smaller interference effect than healthy children, indicating an enhanced ability to behaviourally control automatic imitation tendencies at the cost of reacting slower. The results suggest that children with Tourette syndrome already employ different or additional inhibition strategies compared to healthy children. © 2017 The British Psychological Society.

  7. Extinction Generates Outcome-Specific Conditioned Inhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laurent, Vincent; Chieng, Billy; Balleine, Bernard W

    2016-12-05

    Extinction involves altering a previously established predictive relationship between a cue and its outcome by repeatedly presenting that cue alone. Although it is widely accepted that extinction generates some form of inhibitory learning [1-4], direct evidence for this claim has been lacking, and the nature of the associative changes induced by extinction have, therefore, remained a matter of debate [5-8]. In the current experiments, we used a novel behavioral approach that we recently developed and that provides a direct measure of conditioned inhibition [9] to compare the influence of extinguished and non-extinguished cues on choice between goal-directed actions. Using this approach, we provide direct evidence that extinction generates outcome-specific conditioned inhibition. Furthermore, we demonstrate that this inhibitory learning is controlled by the infralimbic cortex (IL); inactivation of the IL using M4 DREADDs abolished outcome-specific inhibition and rendered the cue excitatory. Importantly, we found that context modulated this inhibition. Outside its extinction context, the cue was excitatory and functioned as a specific predictor of its previously associated outcome, biasing choice toward actions earning the same outcome. In its extinction context, however, the cue acted as a specific inhibitor and biased choice toward actions earning different outcomes. Context modulation of these excitatory and inhibitory memories was mediated by the dorsal hippocampus (HPC), suggesting that the HPC and IL act in concert to control the influence of conditioned inhibitors on choice. These findings demonstrate for the first time that extinction turns a cue into a net inhibitor that can influence choice via counterfactual action-outcome associations. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Caffeine Inhibits Acetylcholinesterase, But Not Butyrylcholinesterase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petr Dobes

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Caffeine is an alkaloid with a stimulant effect in the body. It can interfere in transmissions based on acetylcholine, epinephrine, norepinephrine, serotonin, dopamine and glutamate. Clinical studies indicate that it can be involved in the slowing of Alzheimer disease pathology and some other effects. The effects are not well understood. In the present work, we focused on the question whether caffeine can inhibit acetylcholinesterase (AChE and/or, butyrylcholinesterase (BChE, the two enzymes participating in cholinergic neurotransmission. A standard Ellman test with human AChE and BChE was done for altering concentrations of caffeine. The test was supported by an in silico examination as well. Donepezil and tacrine were used as standards. In compliance with Dixon’s plot, caffeine was proved to be a non-competitive inhibitor of AChE and BChE. However, inhibition of BChE was quite weak, as the inhibition constant, Ki, was 13.9 ± 7.4 mol/L. Inhibition of AChE was more relevant, as Ki was found to be 175 ± 9 µmol/L. The predicted free energy of binding was −6.7 kcal/mol. The proposed binding orientation of caffeine can interact with Trp86, and it can be stabilize by Tyr337 in comparison to the smaller Ala328 in the case of human BChE; thus, it can explain the lower binding affinity of caffeine for BChE with reference to AChE. The biological relevance of the findings is discussed.

  9. Laser-induced immune modulation inhibits tumor growth in vivo (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ottaviani, Giulia; Martinelli, Valentina; Rupel, Katia; Caronni, Nicoletta; Naseem, Asma; Zandonà, Lorenzo; Perinetti, Giuseppe; Gobbo, Margherita; Di Lenarda, Roberto; Bussani, Rossana; Benvenuti, Federica; Giacca, Mauro; Biasotto, Matteo; Zacchigna, Serena

    2017-02-01

    Photobiomodulation stands as a recommended therapy for oral mucositis induced by oncological therapies. However, its mechanisms of action and, more importantly, its safety in cancer patients, are still unclear. We assessed cancer cell metabolism and proliferation in vitro and in vivo after exposure to different laser protocols. We exploited both ectopic melanoma and a more physiological oral carcinogenesis mouse model, followed by molecular, histological and immunohistochemical characterization. Laser irradiation resulted in a slightly increase in cell metabolism and proliferation in vitro, albeit each protocol exerted a difference response. Of notice, in vivo laser light reduced tumour growth and invasiveness, indicating e beneficial effect on tumor microenvironment. Laser-treated tumors were surrounded and infiltrated by immune cells, mainly lymphocytes and dendritic cells, paralleled by an enhanced secretion of type I interferons. In contrast, the number of pro-angiogenic macrophages was reduced in response to laser irradiation, with consequent normalization of the tumor vasculature. Based on these finding we have also started exploring the effect of photobiomodulation on lymphocyte response in an experimental model of vaccination. Preliminary data indicate that laser light induced antigen-specific CD8+ and CD4+ T cell responses. In conclusion, our data point toward photobiomodulation as an effective strategy to boost the immune response in vivo, with relevant, therapeutic activities in both cancer and vaccination experimental models. These results support the safe use of laser light on cancer patients and open the way to innovative therapeutic opportunities.

  10. Endogenous inhibition of somatic pain is impaired in girls with irritable bowel syndrome compared with healthy girls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Endogenous pain inhibition is often deficient in adults with chronic pain conditions including irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). It is unclear whether deficiencies in pain inhibition are present in young children with IBS. The present study compared endogenous pain inhibition, somatic pain threshold, ...

  11. Inhibition of Retinoblastoma Protein Inactivation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-11-01

    CONTRACT NUMBER Inhibition of Retinoblastoma Protein Inactivation 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-14-1-0329 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) Seth M...confirmed 108 compounds as giving a dose-response curve with at least 30% inhibition at 10 µM. The flowchart of hit progression is shown on the...Cancer Research Program under Award No. W81XWH-14-1-0329 to S.M.R. Opinions, interpretations, conclusions, and recommendations are those of the author

  12. Dicumarol inhibition of NADPH:quinone oxidoreductase induces growth inhibition of pancreatic cancer via a superoxide-mediated mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cullen, Joseph J; Hinkhouse, Marilyn M; Grady, Matthew; Gaut, Andrew W; Liu, Jingru; Zhang, Yu Ping; Weydert, Christine J Darby; Domann, Frederick E; Oberley, Larry W

    2003-09-01

    NADPH:quinone oxidoreductase (NQO(1)), a homodimeric, ubiquitous, flavoprotein, catalyzes the two-electron reduction of quinones to hydroquinones. This reaction prevents the one-electron reduction of quinones by cytochrome P450 reductase and other flavoproteins that would result in oxidative cycling with generation of superoxide (O(2)(.-)). NQO(1) gene regulation may be up-regulated in some tumors to accommodate the needs of rapidly metabolizing cells to regenerate NAD(+). We hypothesized that pancreatic cancer cells would exhibit high levels of this enzyme, and inhibiting it would suppress the malignant phenotype. Reverse transcription-PCR, Western blots, and activity assays demonstrated that NQO(1) was up-regulated in the pancreatic cancer cell lines tested but present in very low amounts in the normal human pancreas. To determine whether inhibition of NQO(1) would alter the malignant phenotype, MIA PaCa-2 pancreatic cancer cells were treated with a selective inhibitor of NQO(1), dicumarol. Dicumarol increased intracellular production of O(2)(.-), as measured by hydroethidine staining, and inhibited cell growth. Both of these effects were blunted with infection of an adenoviral vector containing the cDNA for manganese superoxide dismutase. Dicumarol also inhibited cell growth, plating efficiency, and growth in soft agar. We conclude that inhibition of NQO(1) increases intracellular O(2)(.-) production and inhibits the in vitro malignant phenotype of pancreatic cancer. These mechanisms suggest that altering the intracellular redox environment of pancreatic cancer cells may inhibit growth and delineate a potential strategy directed against pancreatic cancer.

  13. Sex differences in emotional contexts modulation on response inhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos-Loyo, Julieta; Angulo-Chavira, Armando; Llamas-Alonso, Luis A; González-Garrido, Andrés A

    2016-10-01

    The aim of the present study was to explore sex differences in the effects that emotional contexts exert on the temporal course of response inhibition using event-related potentials (ERP). Participants performed a Go-NoGo response inhibition task under 3 context conditions: with 1) neutral background stimuli, and 2) pleasant, and 3) unpleasant emotional contexts. No sex differences were found in relation to accuracy. Women showed higher N2NoGo amplitudes than men in both emotional contexts; whereas during inhibition men tended to show higher P3NoGo amplitudes than women in the unpleasant context. Both groups experienced a relevant effect of the presence of the unpleasant context during inhibition processing, as shown by the enhancement of the N2NoGo amplitudes in frontal regions compared to results from the neutral and pleasant conditions. In addition, women showed differences between the pleasant and unpleasant contexts, with the latter inducing higher amplitude values. Only in men did inhibition accuracy correlate with higher N2NoGo and lower P3NoGo amplitudes in the emotional context conditions. These findings suggest that when an inhibition task is performed in an emotionally-neutral background context no sex differences are observed in either accuracy or ERP components. However, when the emotional context was introduced -especially the unpleasant one- some gender differences did become evident. The higher N2NoGo amplitude at the presence of the unpleasant context may reflect an effect on attention and conflict monitoring. In addition, results suggest that during earlier processing stages, women invested more resources to process inhibition than men. Furthermore, men who invested more neural resources during earlier stages showed better response inhibition than those who did it during later processing stages, more closely-related to cognitive and motor inhibition processes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Noninvasive optical inhibition with a red-shifted microbial rhodopsin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chuong, Amy S; Miri, Mitra L; Busskamp, Volker

    2014-01-01

    Optogenetic inhibition of the electrical activity of neurons enables the causal assessment of their contributions to brain functions. Red light penetrates deeper into tissue than other visible wavelengths. We present a red-shifted cruxhalorhodopsin, Jaws, derived from Haloarcula (Halobacterium......) salinarum (strain Shark) and engineered to result in red light-induced photocurrents three times those of earlier silencers. Jaws exhibits robust inhibition of sensory-evoked neural activity in the cortex and results in strong light responses when used in retinas of retinitis pigmentosa model mice. We also...... demonstrate that Jaws can noninvasively mediate transcranial optical inhibition of neurons deep in the brains of awake mice. The noninvasive optogenetic inhibition opened up by Jaws enables a variety of important neuroscience experiments and offers a powerful general-use chloride pump for basic and applied...

  15. Is forgetting caused by inhibition?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Raaijmakers, J.G.W.; Jakab, E.

    2013-01-01

    A well-known finding in memory research is the forgetting effect that occurs because of practicing some Item A on the recall of a related Item B. The traditional explanation for such interference effects is based on the notion of competition. According to the inhibition theory of forgetting,

  16. Testing of Biologically Inhibiting Surface

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bill Madsen, Thomas; Larsen, Erup

    2003-01-01

    The main purpose of this course is to examine a newly developed biologically inhibiting material with regards to galvanic corrosion and electrochemical properties. More in detail, the concern was how the material would react when exposed to cleaning agents, here under CIP cleaning (Cleaning...

  17. Metformin and Its Sulfenamide Prodrugs Inhibit Human Cholinesterase Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magdalena Markowicz-Piasecka

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The results of epidemiological and pathophysiological studies suggest that type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM may predispose to Alzheimer’s disease (AD. The two conditions present similar glucose levels, insulin resistance, and biochemical etiologies such as inflammation and oxidative stress. The diabetic state also contributes to increased acetylcholinesterase (AChE activity, which is one of the factors leading to neurodegeneration in AD. The aim of this study was to assess in vitro the effects of metformin, phenformin, and metformin sulfenamide prodrugs on the activity of human AChE and butyrylcholinesterase (BuChE and establish the type of inhibition. Metformin inhibited 50% of the AChE activity at micromolar concentrations (2.35 μmol/mL, mixed type of inhibition and seemed to be selective towards AChE since it presented low anti-BuChE activity. The tested metformin prodrugs inhibited cholinesterases (ChE at nanomolar range and thus were more active than metformin or phenformin. The cyclohexyl sulfenamide prodrug demonstrated the highest activity towards both AChE (IC50 = 890 nmol/mL, noncompetitive inhibition and BuChE (IC50 = 28 nmol/mL, mixed type inhibition, while the octyl sulfenamide prodrug did not present anti-AChE activity, but exhibited mixed inhibition towards BuChE (IC50 = 184 nmol/mL. Therefore, these two bulkier prodrugs were concluded to be the most selective compounds for BuChE over AChE. In conclusion, it was demonstrated that biguanides present a novel class of inhibitors for AChE and BuChE and encourages further studies of these compounds for developing both selective and nonselective inhibitors of ChEs in the future.

  18. Bioassays for the determination of nitrification inhibition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grunditz, Camilla

    1999-07-01

    Requirements for nitrogen reduction in wastewater treatment plants were introduced in Sweden in the early 1990's. This was a governmental move to reduce the nitrogen discharges to the Baltic and Kattegat in order to prevent eutrophication. The nitrification process in wastewater treatment plants is performed by nitrifying bacteria. These are susceptible to inhibition and it is of great importance that the influent water does not contain toxic compounds. Therefore, there is a need for assays for the determination of nitrification inhibition. This thesis describes the development and applications of such bioassays. Pure cultures of Nitrosomonas sp. and Nitrobacter sp. were isolated from activated sludge of a wastewater treatment plant. These cultures were used as test organisms in the development of bioassays for nitrification inhibition measurements. The assays are based on two different principles; cell suspensions of the bacteria, performed in test tubes, and mediated amperometric biosensors with the bacteria immobilised. Ammonia oxidation and nitrite oxidation are studied separately without interference from other organisms, which makes it easier to interpret the results. The cell suspension assays were applied to samples of industrial and municipal wastewater. The Nitrosomonas and Nitrobacter assays showed to have different inhibition patterns. A large percentage of the Swedish municipal wastewater treatment plants were found to receive inhibitory influent water, but the inhibition level was generally low. Compared to an assay based on activated sludge, the screening method, the pure culture assays found more samples of influent water strongly inhibitory or stimulating. The highest correlation was found between the screening method and the Nitrosomonas assay. The Nitrobacter assay was found to be the most sensitive method. Assessment of toxicity of a number of chemical substances was studied using the biosensors, together with the cell suspension assays

  19. Tips for Good Electronic Presentations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strasser, Dennis

    1996-01-01

    Describes library uses of presentation graphics software and offers tips for creating electronic presentations. Tips include: audience retention; visual aid options; software package options; presentation planning; presentation showing; and use of text, colors, and graphics. Sidebars note common presentation errors and popular presentation…

  20. Asparaginase-Induced Hypertriglyceridemia Presenting as Pseudohyponatremia during Leukemia Treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Hinson, Ashley; Newbern, Dorothee; Linardic, Corinne M.

    2014-01-01

    Asparaginase is a chemotherapeutic agent used to induce disease remission in children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). We describe the cases of two females with ALL who developed pseudohyponatremia as a presentation of hypertriglyceridemia following asparaginase treatment. Nine similar published cases of asparaginase-induced hypertriglyceridemia and its complications are also discussed. Possible mechanisms of action include inhibition of lipoprotein lipase, decreased hepatic synthesis...

  1. Inhibiting cancer cell hallmark features through nuclear export inhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Qingxiang; Chen, Xueqin; Zhou, Qiao; Burstein, Ezra; Yang, Shengyong; Jia, Da

    2016-01-01

    Treating cancer through inhibition of nuclear export is one of the best examples of basic research translation into clinical application. Nuclear export factor chromosomal region maintenance 1 (CRM1; Xpo1 and exportin-1) controls cellular localization and function of numerous proteins that are critical for the development of many cancer hallmarks. The diverse actions of CRM1 are likely to explain the broad ranging anti-cancer potency of CRM1 inhibitors observed in pre-clinical studies and/or clinical trials (phase I-III) on both advanced-stage solid and hematological tumors. In this review, we compare and contrast the mechanisms of action of different CRM1 inhibitors, and discuss the potential benefit of unexplored non-covalent CRM1 inhibitors. This emerging field has uncovered that nuclear export inhibition is well poised as an attractive target towards low-toxicity broad-spectrum potent anti-cancer therapy.

  2. Radon adsorption on present activated charcoals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kazankin, Yu.N.; Trofimov, A.M.; Mikhajlova, L.K.

    1978-01-01

    Radon adsorption from helium and air has been studied on modern activated carbons of SKT-1, SKT-2a, SKT-3, SKT-2b, SKT-6, PAU-1 within the temperature range from 100 to 80 deg. It has been shown that PAU-1 carbon has the highest activity with respect to radon in the temperature range studied. With decreasing temperature the adsorption coefficients increase sharply. It has been found that for the case of radon adsorption from helium the logarythm of the Henry coefficient linearly depends on the inverse value of absolute temperature. Adsorption of radon from air is inhibited and the above-cited relationship is deviated from linear. The results of calculating differential heats of radon and air adsorption as well as coefficients of radon and air separation on carbons are presented

  3. Response inhibition under alcohol: effects of cognitive and motivational conflict.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fillmore, M T; Vogel-Sprott, M

    2000-03-01

    This experiment tested the effect of cognitive and motivational conflict on response inhibition under alcohol. Fifty-six male social drinkers were randomly assigned to one of eight groups (n = 8). Four pairs of groups received 0.62 g/kg of alcohol, or a placebo, and each pair performed a go/stop choice reaction time task under one of four conflict conditions. One condition (C) produced cognitive conflict by presenting "go" and "stop" signals in the task. Another condition (IR) added motivational conflict by administering an equal monetary reward for inhibiting responses to stop-signals, and for responding to go-signals. The remaining two conditions resolved the motivational conflict by administering the monetary reward only for inhibitions (I), or only for responses (R). Compared with placebo, alcohol reduced inhibitions (i.e., impaired inhibitory control) under cognitive conflict (C; p = .041) and under motivational conflict (IR; p = .012). No significant effect of alcohol on inhibitions was observed in conditions where conflict was resolved (i.e., I and R). The study shows that alcohol can reduce the ability to inhibit a response. However, impaired inhibitory control is not an inevitable outcome of the drug action, because it can be counteracted by the consequences of behavior in the situation.

  4. Inhibition of PTEN and activation of Akt by menadione.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshikawa, Kyoko; Nigorikawa, Kiyomi; Tsukamoto, Mariko; Tamura, Namiko; Hazeki, Kaoru; Hazeki, Osamu

    2007-04-01

    Menadione (vitamin K(3)) has been shown to activate Erk in several cell lines. This effect has been shown to be due to the activation of EGF receptors (EGFR) as a result of inhibition of some protein tyrosine phosphatases. In the present study, we examined the effects of menadione on Akt in Chinese hamster ovary cells. The phosphorylation of Akt by menadione was not inhibited by AG1478, an inhibitor of EGFR. Menadione inhibited the lipid phosphatase activity of PTEN in a cell-free system. In an intact cell system, menadione inhibited the effect of transfected PTEN on Akt. Thus, one mechanism of its action was considered the accelerated activation of Akt through inhibition of PTEN. This was not the sole mechanism responsible for the EGFR-independent activation of Akt, because menadione attenuated the rate of Akt dephosphorylation even in PTEN-null PC3 cells. The decelerated inactivation of Akt, probably through inhibition of some tyrosine phosphatases, was considered another mechanism of its action.

  5. Punch up your podium presentations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Tim J; Hollier, Amelie

    2017-08-01

    The goal of most presentations is to engage audience participants. Effective presenters go beyond content expertise to connect with audiences through various techniques, formats, and presentation styles. Mayer's theory of multimedia learning, neurocognitive factors, and the assertion-evidence approach are essential elements that presenters can use if they have not had formal training in creating presentations. Tips are offered on how to connect with the audience and how to avoid known pitfalls. ©2017 American Association of Nurse Practitioners.

  6. Put Power into Your Presentations: Using Presentation Software Effectively

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safransky, Robert J.; Burmeister, Marsha L.

    2009-01-01

    Microsoft PowerPoint, Apple Keynote, and OpenOffice Impress are relatively common tools in the classroom and in the boardroom these days. What makes presentation software so popular? As the Chinese proverb declares, a picture is worth a thousand words. People like visual presentations. Presentation software can make even a dull subject come to…

  7. Entanglement and inhibited quantum evolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toschek, P E; Balzer, Chr; Hannemann, Th; Wunderlich, Ch; Neuhauser, W

    2003-01-01

    The evolution of a quantum system is impeded by the system's state being observed. A test on an ensemble neither proves the causal nexus nor discloses the nature of the inhibition. Two recent experiments that make use of sequential optical or microwave-optical double resonance on an individual trapped ion disprove a dynamical effect of back action by meter or environment. They rather indicate the ionic states involved in the evolution being entangled with the potentially recorded bivalued scattered-light signal

  8. Allosteric Inhibition of Factor XIIIa. Non-Saccharide Glycosaminoglycan Mimetics, but Not Glycosaminoglycans, Exhibit Promising Inhibition Profile.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rami A Al-Horani

    Full Text Available Factor XIIIa (FXIIIa is a transglutaminase that catalyzes the last step in the coagulation process. Orthostery is the only approach that has been exploited to design FXIIIa inhibitors. Yet, allosteric inhibition of FXIIIa is a paradigm that may offer a key advantage of controlled inhibition over orthosteric inhibition. Such an approach is likely to lead to novel FXIIIa inhibitors that do not carry bleeding risks. We reasoned that targeting a collection of basic amino acid residues distant from FXIIIa's active site by using sulfated glycosaminoglycans (GAGs or non-saccharide GAG mimetics (NSGMs would lead to the discovery of the first allosteric FXIIIa inhibitors. We tested a library of 22 variably sulfated GAGs and NSGMs against human FXIIIa to discover promising hits. Interestingly, although some GAGs bound to FXIIIa better than NSGMs, no GAG displayed any inhibition. An undecasulfated quercetin analog was found to inhibit FXIIIa with reasonable potency (efficacy of 98%. Michaelis-Menten kinetic studies revealed an allosteric mechanism of inhibition. Fluorescence studies confirmed close correspondence between binding affinity and inhibition potency, as expected for an allosteric process. The inhibitor was reversible and at least 9-fold- and 26-fold selective over two GAG-binding proteins factor Xa (efficacy of 71% and thrombin, respectively, and at least 27-fold selective over a cysteine protease papain. The inhibitor also inhibited the FXIIIa-mediated polymerization of fibrin in vitro. Overall, our work presents the proof-of-principle that FXIIIa can be allosterically modulated by sulfated non-saccharide agents much smaller than GAGs, which should enable the design of selective and safe anticoagulants.

  9. The Inhibition of the Components from Shengmai Injection towards UDP-Glucuronosyltransferase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li-Peng Jiang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The mechanism of shengmai injection- (SMI- related drug-drug interaction remains unclear. Evaluation of the inhibition potential of SMI’s ingredients towards UDP-glucuronosyltransferases (UGTs activity will provide a new insight to understand SMI-related drug-drug interaction. In vitro incubation system to model UGT reaction was used. Recombinant UGT isoforms-catalyzed 4-methylumbelliferone (4-MU glucuronidation and UGT1A4-catalyzed trifluoperazine (TFP glucuronidation reactions were employed to phenotype the inhibition profile of maidong’s components towards the activity of UGT isoforms. Different inhibition potential of maidong’s components towards various UGT isoforms was observed. Based on the inhibition kinetic investigation results, ophiopogonin D (OD noncompetitively inhibited UGT1A6 and competitively inhibited UGT1A8, ophiopogonin D′ (OD′ noncompetitively inhibited UGT1A6 and UGT1A10, and ruscorectal (RU exhibited competitive inhibition towards UGT1A4. The inhibition kinetic parameters were calculated to be 20.6, 40.1, 5.3, 9.0, and 0.02 μM, respectively. In combination with our previous results obtained for the inhibition of UGT isoforms by ginsenosides and wuweizi components, the important SMI ingredients exhibiting strong inhibition towards UGT isoforms were highlighted. All the results obtained in the present study provide a new insight to understand SMI-related drug-drug interaction.

  10. Present market for nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marzo, M.A.S.

    1987-01-01

    The present market for nuclear energy is present since nuclear production and electric power generation to the utilization of radioisotopes in medicine and biology. Some data about the main world suppliers to this market are shown. (E.G.) [pt

  11. Integral Presentations of Catalan Numbers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dana-Picard, Thierry

    2010-01-01

    We compute in three different ways the same definite parametric integral. By-products are the derivation of a combinatorial identity and two integral presentations of Catalan numbers. One of them leads to a presentation using the [gamma] function.

  12. Inhibition Performance in Children with Math Disabilities

    OpenAIRE

    Winegar, Kathryn Lileth

    2013-01-01

    This study examined the inhibition deficit hypothesis in children with math disabilities (MD). Children with and without MD were compared on two inhibition tasks that included the random generation of numbers and letters. The results addressed three hypotheses. Weak support was found for the first hypothesis which stated difficulties related to inhibition are significantly related to math performance. I found partial support for this hypothesis in that inhibition was related to math problem s...

  13. An Atypical Presentation on Insulinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-06-16

    PUBLICATIONS/ PRESENTATIONS 1. TO: CLINICAL RESEARCH 2. FROM: (Author’s Name, Rank, Grade, Office Symbol) 3. GME/GHSE STUDENT: 4. PROTOCOL NUMBER: Kluesner...PROCESSING OF PROFESSIONAL MEDICAL RESEARCH/TECHNICAL PUBLICATIONS/ PRESENTATIONS 1st ENDORSEMENT (59 MDW/SGVU Use Only) TO: Clinical Research Division 24...CAPT JOSEPH KLUESNER FROM: 59 MDW/SGYU SUBJECT: Professional Presentation Approval 1. Your paper, entitled An Atypical Presentation of Insulinoma

  14. Turning Scientific Presentations into Stories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aruffo, Christopher

    2015-01-01

    To increase students' confidence in giving scientific presentations, students were shown how to present scientific findings as a narrative story. Students who were preparing to give a scientific talk attended a workshop in which they were encouraged to experience the similarities between telling a personal anecdote and presenting scientific data.…

  15. Kaempferol inhibits thrombosis and platelet activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Jun-Hui; Park, Se-Eun; Kim, Sung-Jun; Kim, Seung

    2015-08-01

    The objectives of the present study were to investigate whether kaempferol affects pro-coagulant proteinase activity, fibrin clot formation, blood clot and thrombin (or collagen/epinephrine)-stimulated platelet activation, thrombosis, and coagulation in ICR (Imprinting Control Region) mice and SD (Sprague-Dawley) rats. Kaempferol significantly inhibited the enzymatic activities of thrombin and FXa by 68 ± 1.6% and 52 ± 2.4%, respectively. Kaempferol also inhibited fibrin polymer formation in turbidity. Microscopic analysis was performed using a fluorescent conjugate. Kaempferol completely attenuated phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) 1/2, p38, c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) 1/2, and phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K)/PKB (AKT) in thrombin-stimulated platelets and delayed aggregation time (clotting) by 34.6% in an assay of collagen/epinephrine-stimulated platelet activation. Moreover, kaempferol protected against thrombosis development in 3 animal models, including collagen/epinephrine- and thrombin-induced acute thromboembolism models and an FeCl3-induced carotid arterial thrombus model. The ex vivo anticoagulant effect of kaempferol was further confirmed in ICR mice. This study demonstrated that kaempferol may be clinically useful due to its ability to reduce or prevent thrombotic challenge. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. and Société Française de Biochimie et Biologie Moléculaire (SFBBM). All rights reserved.

  16. Dressed to Present: Ratings of Classroom Presentations Vary with Attire

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurung, Regan A. R.; Kempen, Laura; Klemm, Kayla; Senn, Rebecca; Wysocki, Rosie

    2014-01-01

    This study investigates the effects of formality of dress on ratings of classroom presentations. Participants (N = 65, 66% women) from a Midwestern university in the United States rated three female students giving a presentation designed for a health psychology class in one of four outfits: casual, party, business casual, or business formal.…

  17. Isolated Torticollis May Present as an Atypical Presentation of Meningitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roger Chirurgi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Bacterial meningitis is a life-threatening medical emergency that requires urgent diagnosis and treatment. Diagnosis is infrequently missed if the patient presents with the classic symptoms of fever, headache, rash, nuchal rigidity, or Kernig or Brudzinski sign. However, it may be less obvious in neonates, elderly, or immunocompromised patients. Meningitis which presents as isolated torticollis, without any other signs or symptoms, is exceedingly rare. Objective. To identify an abnormal presentation of meningitis in an adult immunocompromised patient. Case Report. We present a case of an adult diabetic male who presented multiple times to the ED with complaint of isolated torticollis, who ultimately was diagnosed with bacterial meningitis. Conclusion. We propose that in the absence of sufficient explanation for acute painful torticollis in an immunocompromised adult patient, further evaluation, possibly including a lumbar puncture may be warranted.

  18. The neural markers of an imminent failure of response inhibition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bengson, Jesse J.; Mangun, George R.; Mazaheri, Ali

    2012-01-01

    In his novel Ulysses, James Joyce wrote that mistakes are the "...portals of discovery". The present study investigated the pre-stimulus oscillatory EEG signatures of selective attention and motor preparation that predicted failures of overt response inhibition. We employed a trial-by-trial spatial

  19. Catalytic Deoxygenation of Fatty Acids: Elucidation of the Inhibition Process

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hollak, S.A.W.; Jong, de K.P.; Es, van D.S.

    2014-01-01

    Catalytic deoxygenation of unsaturated fatty acids in the absence of H2 is known to suffer from significant catalyst inhibition. Thus far, no conclusive results have been reported on the cause of deactivation. Here we show that CC double bonds present in the feed or the products dramatically reduce

  20. In vitro screening of soil bacteria for inhibiting phytopathogenic fungi ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    At present, the greatest interest resides with the development and application of specific biocontrol agent for the control of diseases on plant and this form the focus of this work. Several soil bacteria were evaluated in vitro for their effectiveness on the basis of their ability to suppress fungi in plate inhibition assays. 51 strains ...

  1. Specific CDK4/6 inhibition in breast cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Polk, Anne; Kolmos, Ida Lykke; Kümler, Iben

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Loss of cell cycle control is a hallmark of cancer, and aberrations in the cyclin-dependent kinase-retinoblastoma (CDK-Rb) pathway are common in breast cancer (BC). Consequently, inhibition of this pathway is an attractive therapeutic strategy. The present review addresses efficacy...

  2. Entanglement and inhibited quantum evolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toschek, P E; Balzer, Chr; Hannemann, Th; Wunderlich, Ch; Neuhauser, W [Universitaet Hamburg, Institut fuer Laser-Physik, Jungiusstrasse 9, D-20355 Hamburg (Germany)

    2003-03-14

    The evolution of a quantum system is impeded by the system's state being observed. A test on an ensemble neither proves the causal nexus nor discloses the nature of the inhibition. Two recent experiments that make use of sequential optical or microwave-optical double resonance on an individual trapped ion disprove a dynamical effect of back action by meter or environment. They rather indicate the ionic states involved in the evolution being entangled with the potentially recorded bivalued scattered-light signal.

  3. Discussion paper (presented during meeting)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allemand, R.

    1975-01-01

    A method of particle localization for gas chambers (backgammon game method) is presented. The cathode is geometrically cut in such a way that it is possible to establish a simple relation between the signal amplitude on the different parts of the cathode and the position of the nuclear event. The results obtained in the case of x-ray detectors are presented. The application of this method to the localization of neutrons is presently studied [fr

  4. Unusual presentation of Klinefelter syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Chanchal; Sahana, Pranab Kumar; Sengupta, Nilanjan; Roy, Mukut; Dasgupta, Ranen

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Klinefelter syndrome usually presents in the puberty and adulthood with its characteristic features. We report a boy who had Klinefelter syndrome with hypospadias and hydrocele. Case Note: Six and half year old boy had complaints of genitourinary problem in the form of hypospadias, small phallus and hydrocele. Karyotyping showed 47,XXY. Conclusion: This case illustrates that Klinefelter syndrome was presented in the infancy with hypospadias and hydrocele which are very uncommon presentation of the disease PMID:24910838

  5. Behavioral inhibition and obsessive-compulsive disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coles, Meredith E; Schofield, Casey A; Pietrefesa, Ashley S

    2006-01-01

    Behavioral inhibition is frequently cited as a vulnerability factor for development of anxiety. However, few studies have examined the unique relationship between behavioral inhibition and obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). Therefore, the current study addressed the relationship between behavioral inhibition and OCD in a number of ways. In a large unselected student sample, frequency of current OC symptoms was significantly correlated with retrospective self-reports of total levels of childhood behavioral inhibition. In addition, frequency of current OC symptoms was also significantly correlated with both social and nonsocial components of behavioral inhibition. Further, there was evidence for a unique relationship between behavioral inhibition and OC symptoms beyond the relationship of behavioral inhibition and social anxiety. In addition, results showed that reports of childhood levels of behavioral inhibition significantly predicted levels of OCD symptoms in adulthood. Finally, preliminary evidence suggested that behavioral inhibition may be more strongly associated with some types of OC symptoms than others, and that overprotective parenting may moderate the impact of behavioral inhibition on OC symptoms. The current findings suggest the utility of additional research examining the role of behavioral inhibition in the etiology of OCD.

  6. Intermittency inhibited by transport: An exactly solvable model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanette, Damián H.

    1994-04-01

    Transport is incorporated in a discrete-time stochastic model of a system undergoing autocatalytic reactions of the type A-->2A and A-->0, whose population field is known to exhibit spatiotemporal intermittency. The temporal evolution is exactly solved, and it is shown that if the transport process is strong enough, intermittency is inhibited. This inhibition is nonuniform, in the sense that, as transport is strengthened, low-order population moments are affected before the high-order ones. Numerical simulations are presented to support the analytical results.

  7. Self-regulation, ego depletion, and inhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumeister, Roy F

    2014-12-01

    Inhibition is a major form of self-regulation. As such, it depends on self-awareness and comparing oneself to standards and is also susceptible to fluctuations in willpower resources. Ego depletion is the state of reduced willpower caused by prior exertion of self-control. Ego depletion undermines inhibition both because restraints are weaker and because urges are felt more intensely than usual. Conscious inhibition of desires is a pervasive feature of everyday life and may be a requirement of life in civilized, cultural society, and in that sense it goes to the evolved core of human nature. Intentional inhibition not only restrains antisocial impulses but can also facilitate optimal performance, such as during test taking. Self-regulation and ego depletion- may also affect less intentional forms of inhibition, even chronic tendencies to inhibit. Broadly stated, inhibition is necessary for human social life and nearly all societies encourage and enforce it. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Retinoblastoma: a most unusual presentation

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dr. C. Pedro-Egbe

    Although leukocoria and strabismus are the most common presenting signs of retinoblastoma, a retrospective study by Abramson et al. identified 32 distinct presenting signs of retinoblastoma.6-8. A few other studies have also noted some distinct characteristics exhibited by children whose conditions were diagnosed in the ...

  9. Present status of processing method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kosako, Kazuaki [Sumitomo Atomic Energy Industries Ltd., Tokyo (Japan)

    1998-11-01

    Present status of processing method for a high-energy nuclear data file was examined. The NJOY94 code is the only one available to the processing. In Japan, present processing used NJOY94 is orienting toward the production of traditional cross section library, because a high-energy transport code using a high-energy cross section library is indistinct. (author)

  10. Uncommon presentation of neuro- cysticercosis

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Uncommon presentation of neuro- cysticercosis. Neurocysticercosis (NCC) is a common parasitic infection of the central nervous system caused by the pork tapeworm Taenia solium. The clinical presentation of NCC in children includes generalised and partial seizures with or without features of raised intracranial pressure.

  11. Presentation Skills Workshops for Nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinn, S.; Kenyon, M.

    2002-01-01

    Workshops were held to prepare nurses (n=87) to present results of professional activities. One year after the course, 20 had made oral and 30 written presentations. The workshops increased their confidence and were considered practical, informal, and nonthreatening. (Contains 31 references.) (SK)

  12. Castleman's disease, an unusual presentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shital Munde

    2015-01-01

    The present report describes a 30-year-old serving male who presented with pain abdomen and on and off episodes ofmelena, found to have peripancreatic lymphadenopathy on CECT abdomen. Ultrasound guided FN AC was done in private hospital revealed reactive lymphadenopathy. Excision biopsy was done in our institute and a diagnosis of Castleman's disease was made.

  13. Multiphasic presentation of Rasmussen's encephalitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Avbersek, A.; Miserocchi, A.; McEvoy, A.W.; Patel, A.V.; Aronica, E.; Blumcke, I.; Jacques, T.S.; Acheson, J.; Thom, M.; Sisodiya, S.M.

    2015-01-01

    Rasmussen's encephalitis is a rare, chronic inflammatory disorder of unknown cause, characterised by drug-resistant focal epilepsy that may rarely present in adolescence or adulthood. We present a case of Rasmussen's encephalitis with prominent recurrent fluctuation in symptoms and well-documented

  14. Graphene: corrosion-inhibiting coating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasai, Dhiraj; Tuberquia, Juan Carlos; Harl, Robert R; Jennings, G Kane; Rogers, Bridget R; Bolotin, Kirill I

    2012-02-28

    We report the use of atomically thin layers of graphene as a protective coating that inhibits corrosion of underlying metals. Here, we employ electrochemical methods to study the corrosion inhibition of copper and nickel by either growing graphene on these metals, or by mechanically transferring multilayer graphene onto them. Cyclic voltammetry measurements reveal that the graphene coating effectively suppresses metal oxidation and oxygen reduction. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy measurements suggest that while graphene itself is not damaged, the metal under it is corroded at cracks in the graphene film. Finally, we use Tafel analysis to quantify the corrosion rates of samples with and without graphene coatings. These results indicate that copper films coated with graphene grown via chemical vapor deposition are corroded 7 times slower in an aerated Na(2)SO(4) solution as compared to the corrosion rate of bare copper. Tafel analysis reveals that nickel with a multilayer graphene film grown on it corrodes 20 times slower while nickel surfaces coated with four layers of mechanically transferred graphene corrode 4 times slower than bare nickel. These findings establish graphene as the thinnest known corrosion-protecting coating.

  15. A novel approach to inhibit bone resorption

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Panwar, Preety; Søe, Kent; Guido, Rafael VC

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Cathepsin K (CatK) is a major drug target for the treatment of osteoporosis. Potent active site-directed inhibitors have been developed and showed variable success in clinical trials. These inhibitors block the entire activity of CatK and thus may interfere with other...... pathways. The present study investigates the antiresorptive effect of an exosite inhibitor that selectively inhibits only the therapeutically relevant collagenase activity of CatK. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH: Human osteoclasts and fibroblasts were used to analyse the effect of the exosite inhibitor, ortho......-dihydrotanshinone (DHT1), and the active site inhibitor, odanacatib (ODN), on bone resorption and TGF-ß1 degradation. Cell cultures, Western blot, light and scanning electron microscopy as well as energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, molecular modelling and enzymatic assays were used to evaluate the inhibitors. KEY...

  16. Creating an effective poster presentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taggart, H M; Arslanian, C

    2000-01-01

    One way to build knowledge in nursing is to share research findings or clinical program outcomes. The dissemination of these findings is often a difficult final step in a project that has taken months or years to complete. One method of sharing findings in a relaxed and informal setting is a poster presentation. This method is an effective form for presenting findings using an interactive approach. The milieu of a poster presentation enables the presenters to interact and dialogue with colleagues. Guidelines for size and format require that the poster is clear and informative. Application of design helps to create visually appealing posters. This article summarizes elements of designing and conducting a poster presentation.

  17. Do motivational incentives reduce the inhibition deficit in ADHD?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shanahan, Michelle A; Pennington, Bruce F; Willcutt, Erik W

    2008-01-01

    The primary goal of this study was to test three competing theories of ADHD: the inhibition theory, the motivational theory, and a dual deficit theory. Previous studies have produced conflicting findings about the effects of incentives on executive processes in ADHD. In the present study of 25 children with ADHD and 30 typically developing controls, motivation was manipulated within the Stop Task. Stop signal reaction time was examined, as well as reaction time, its variability, and the number of errors in the primary choice reaction time task. Overall, the pattern of results supported the inhibition theory over the motivational or dual deficit hypotheses, as main effects of group were found for most key variables (ADHD group was worse), whereas the group by reward interaction predicted by the motivational and dual deficit accounts was not found. Hence, as predicted by the inhibition theory, children with ADHD performed worse than controls irrespective of incentives.

  18. Spice phenolics inhibit human PMNL 5-lipoxygenase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasad, N Satya; Raghavendra, R; Lokesh, B R; Naidu, K Akhilender

    2004-06-01

    A wide variety of phenolic compounds and flavonoids present in spices possess potent antioxidant, antimutagenic and anticarcinogenic activities. We examined whether 5-lipoxygenase (5-LO), the key enzyme involved in biosynthesis of leukotrienes is a possible target for the spices. Effect of aqueous extracts of turmeric, cloves, pepper, chili, cinnamon, onion and also their respective active principles viz., curcumin, eugenol, piperine, capsaicin, cinnamaldehyde, quercetin, and allyl sulfide were tested on human PMNL 5-LO activity by spectrophotomeric and HPLC methods. The formation of 5-LO product 5-HETE was significantly inhibited in a concentration-dependent manner with IC(50) values of 0.122-1.44 mg for aqueous extracts of spices and 25-83 microM for active principles, respectively. The order of inhibitory activity was of quercetin>eugenol>curcumin>cinnamaldehyde>piperine>capsaicin>allyl sulfide. Quercetin, eugenol and curcumin with one or more phenolic ring and methoxy groups in their structure showed high inhibitory effect, while the non-phenolic spice principle allyl sulfide showed least inhibitory effect on 5-LO. The inhibitory effect of quercetin, curcumin and eugenol was similar to that of synthetic 5-LO inhibitors-phenidone and NDGA. Moreover, the inhibitory potency of aqueous extracts of spice correlated with the active principles of their respective spices. The synergistic or antagonistic effect of mixtures of spice active principles and spice extracts were investigated and all the combinations of spice active principles/extracts exerted synergistic effect in inhibiting 5-LO activity. These findings clearly suggest that phenolic compounds present in spices might have physiological role in modulating 5-LO pathway.

  19. Cartilage proteoglycans inhibit fibronectin-mediated adhesion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rich, A. M.; Pearlstein, E.; Weissmann, G.; Hoffstein, S. T.

    1981-09-01

    Normal tissues and organs show, on histological examination, a pattern of cellular and acellular zones that is characteristic and unique for each organ or tissue. This pattern is maintained in health but is sometimes destroyed by disease. For example, in mobile joints, the articular surfaces consist of relatively acellular hyaline cartilage, and the joint space is enclosed by a capsule of loose connective tissue with a lining of fibroblasts and macrophages. In the normal joint these cells are confined to the synovial lining and the articular surface remains acellular. In in vitro culture, macrophages and their precursor monocytes are very adhesive, and fibroblasts can migrate and overgrow surfaces such as collagen or plastic used for tissue culture. The fibroblasts adhere to collagen by means of fibronectin, which they synthesize and secrete1. Because the collagen of cartilage is capable of binding serum fibronectin2 and fibronectin is present in cartilage during its development3, these cells should, in theory, slowly migrate from the synovial lining to the articular surface. It is their absence from the articular cartilage in normal circumstances, and then presence in such pathological states as rheumatoid arthritis, that is striking. We therefore set out to determine whether a component of cartilage could prevent fibroblast adherence in a defined adhesion assay. As normal cartilage is composed of 50% proteoglycans and 50% collagen by dry weight4, we tested the possibility that the proteoglycans in cartilage inhibit fibroblast adhesion to collagen. We present here evidence that fibroblast spreading and adhesion to collagenous substrates is inhibited by cartilage proteoglycans.

  20. Atypical presentations of Wolframs syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Saran

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Wolfram syndrome is a rare hereditary or sporadic neurodegenerative disorder also known as DIDMOAD. The classically described presentation is of insulin-dependent diabetes, followed by optic atrophy, central diabetes insipidus, and sensory neural deafness. Also included are less well-described presentations of Wolframs syndrome. We here present three cases of atypical presentation of this syndrome. Case 1: A 15-year-old boy with insulin-dependent diabetes was presented for evaluation of depressive symptoms associated with suicidal tendency. Neuropsychiatric manifestations are described with Wolframs syndrome, and wolframin gene, in recessive inheritance, is associated with psychiatric illnesses without other manifestations of Wolframs syndrome. Case 2: A 17-year-old diabetic boy on insulin with good control of blood sugar presented for evaluation of delayed puberty. Central hypogonadism and other anterior pituitary hormone dysfunctions are the less publicized hormone dysfunctions in Wolframs syndrome. Case 3: A 23-year-old female who was on insulin for diabetes for the past 14 years, got admitted for evaluation of sudden loss of vision. This patient had developed a vitreous hemorrhage and, on evaluation, was found to have optic atrophy, sensory neural hearing loss, and diabetes insipidus, and presented differently from the gradual loss of vision described in Wolframs syndrome. Conclusion: Wolframs syndrome being a multisystem degenerative disorder can have myriad other manifestations than the classically described features. Neuropsychiatric manifestations, depression with suicidal risk, central hypogonadism, and secondary adrenal insufficiency are among the less well-described manifestations of this syndrome.

  1. Di(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate inhibits antral follicle growth, induces atresia, and inhibits steroid hormone production in cultured mouse antral follicles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hannon, Patrick R., E-mail: phannon2@illinois.edu; Brannick, Katherine E., E-mail: kbran@illinois.edu; Wang, Wei, E-mail: Wei.Wang2@covance.com; Gupta, Rupesh K., E-mail: drrupesh@yahoo.com; Flaws, Jodi A., E-mail: jflaws@illinois.edu

    2015-04-01

    Di(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP) is a ubiquitous environmental toxicant found in consumer products that causes ovarian toxicity. Antral follicles are the functional ovarian units and must undergo growth, survival from atresia, and proper regulation of steroidogenesis to ovulate and produce hormones. Previous studies have determined that DEHP inhibits antral follicle growth and decreases estradiol levels in vitro; however, the mechanism by which DEHP elicits these effects is unknown. The present study tested the hypothesis that DEHP directly alters regulators of the cell cycle, apoptosis, and steroidogenesis to inhibit antral follicle functionality. Antral follicles from adult CD-1 mice were cultured with vehicle control or DEHP (1–100 μg/ml) for 24–96 h to establish the temporal effects of DEHP on the follicle. Following 24–96 h of culture, antral follicles were subjected to gene expression analysis, and media were subjected to measurements of hormone levels. DEHP increased the mRNA levels of cyclin D2, cyclin dependent kinase 4, cyclin E1, cyclin A2, and cyclin B1 and decreased the levels of cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor 1A prior to growth inhibition. Additionally, DEHP increased the mRNA levels of BCL2-associated agonist of cell death, BCL2-associated X protein, BCL2-related ovarian killer protein, B-cell leukemia/lymphoma 2, and Bcl2-like 10, leading to an increase in atresia. Further, DEHP decreased the levels of progesterone, androstenedione, and testosterone prior to the decrease in estradiol levels, with decreased mRNA levels of side-chain cleavage, 17α-hydroxylase-17,20-desmolase, 17β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase, and aromatase. Collectively, DEHP directly alters antral follicle functionality by inhibiting growth, inducing atresia, and inhibiting steroidogenesis. - Highlights: • DEHP inhibits antral follicle growth by dysregulating cell cycle regulators. • DEHP induces antral follicle atresia by dysregulating apoptosis regulators. • DEHP

  2. Di(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate inhibits antral follicle growth, induces atresia, and inhibits steroid hormone production in cultured mouse antral follicles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hannon, Patrick R.; Brannick, Katherine E.; Wang, Wei; Gupta, Rupesh K.; Flaws, Jodi A.

    2015-01-01

    Di(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP) is a ubiquitous environmental toxicant found in consumer products that causes ovarian toxicity. Antral follicles are the functional ovarian units and must undergo growth, survival from atresia, and proper regulation of steroidogenesis to ovulate and produce hormones. Previous studies have determined that DEHP inhibits antral follicle growth and decreases estradiol levels in vitro; however, the mechanism by which DEHP elicits these effects is unknown. The present study tested the hypothesis that DEHP directly alters regulators of the cell cycle, apoptosis, and steroidogenesis to inhibit antral follicle functionality. Antral follicles from adult CD-1 mice were cultured with vehicle control or DEHP (1–100 μg/ml) for 24–96 h to establish the temporal effects of DEHP on the follicle. Following 24–96 h of culture, antral follicles were subjected to gene expression analysis, and media were subjected to measurements of hormone levels. DEHP increased the mRNA levels of cyclin D2, cyclin dependent kinase 4, cyclin E1, cyclin A2, and cyclin B1 and decreased the levels of cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor 1A prior to growth inhibition. Additionally, DEHP increased the mRNA levels of BCL2-associated agonist of cell death, BCL2-associated X protein, BCL2-related ovarian killer protein, B-cell leukemia/lymphoma 2, and Bcl2-like 10, leading to an increase in atresia. Further, DEHP decreased the levels of progesterone, androstenedione, and testosterone prior to the decrease in estradiol levels, with decreased mRNA levels of side-chain cleavage, 17α-hydroxylase-17,20-desmolase, 17β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase, and aromatase. Collectively, DEHP directly alters antral follicle functionality by inhibiting growth, inducing atresia, and inhibiting steroidogenesis. - Highlights: • DEHP inhibits antral follicle growth by dysregulating cell cycle regulators. • DEHP induces antral follicle atresia by dysregulating apoptosis regulators. • DEHP

  3. An unusual presentation of sporotrichosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S S Vaishampayan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Sporotrichosis can mimic a few diseases. Sporotrichosis presenting as a hypoaesthetic plaque or plaque suggestive of leprosy has not been mentioned in literature. Herein we present a case of a 26 years old man who presented with hypoesthetic plaque on left ankle and was clinically diagnosed to have borderline tuberculoid leprosy who later developed few nodules in linear fashion on left leg, which ruptured to form non healing ulcers. Culture from ulcer grew Sporothrix schenckii. Patient was successfully treated with oral potassium iodide.

  4. Rhabdomyosarcoma presenting as acute leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morandi, S; Manna, A; Sabattini, E; Porcellini, A

    1996-08-01

    We describe a case of a very unusual presentation of rhabdomyosarcoma. An 18-year-old woman presented with symptoms and signs compatible with acute leukemia. The bone marrow picture showed diffuse involvement sustained by undifferentiated blasts that turned out to be of striated muscle origin by immunochemistry. While it is well known that rhabdomyosarcoma may metastasize to the bone marrow, extensive marrow involvement with leukemic spread as a unique clinical manifestation is extremely rare. Our observation further confirms the need to consider rhabdomyosarcoma among the possible differential diagnoses in patients who present with a leukemic picture and atypical blasts lacking all hematopoietic markers.

  5. PDE1A inhibition elicits cGMP-dependent relaxation of rat mesenteric arteries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Khammy, Makhala Michell; Dalsgaard, Thomas; Larsen, Peter Hjorringgaard

    2017-01-01

    (EC50 = 32 nM). Inhibition of NOS with L-NAME, soluble GC with ODQ, or PKG with Rp-8-Br-PET-cGMP all attenuated PDE1 inhibition-induced relaxation, whereas PKA inhibition with H89 had no effect. CONCLUSION AND IMPLICATIONS: Pde1a was the dominant PDE1 isoform present in VSMC and relaxation mediated...... by PDE1A-inhibition was predominantly driven by enhanced cGMP signalling. These results imply that isoform-selective PDE1 inhibitors are powerful investigative tools allowing examination of physiological and pathological roles of PDE1 isoforms....

  6. Neural signature of behavioural inhibition in women with bulimia nervosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skunde, Mandy; Walther, Stephan; Simon, Joe J; Wu, Mudan; Bendszus, Martin; Herzog, Wolfgang; Friederich, Hans-Christoph

    2016-08-01

    Impaired inhibitory control is considered a behavioural phenotype in patients with bulimia nervosa. However, the underlying neural correlates of impaired general and food-specific behavioural inhibition are largely unknown. Therefore, we investigated brain activation during the performance of behavioural inhibition to general and food-related stimuli in adults with bulimia nervosa. Women with bulimia and healthy control women underwent event-related fMRI while performing a general and a food-specific no-go task. We included 28 women with bulimia nervosa and 29 healthy control women in our study. On a neuronal level, we observed significant group differences in response to general no-go stimuli in women with bulimia nervosa with high symptom severity; compared with healthy controls, the patients showed reduced activation in the right sensorimotor area (postcentral gyrus, precentral gyrus) and right dorsal striatum (caudate nucleus, putamen). The present results are limited to adult women with bulimia nervosa. Furthermore, it remains unclear whether impaired behavioural inhibition in patients with this disorder are a cause or consequence of chronic illness. Our findings suggest that diminished frontostriatal brain activation in patients with bulimia nervosa contribute to the severity of binge eating symptoms. Gaining further insight into the neural mechanisms of behavioural inhibition problems in individuals with this disorder may inform brain-directed treatment approaches and the development of response inhibition training approaches to improve inhibitory control in patients with bulimia nervosa. The present study does not support greater behavioural and neural impairments to food-specific behavioural inhibition in these patients.

  7. Neural signature of behavioural inhibition in women with bulimia nervosa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skunde, Mandy; Walther, Stephan; Simon, Joe J.; Wu, Mudan; Bendszus, Martin; Herzog, Wolfgang; Friederich, Hans-Christoph

    2016-01-01

    Background Impaired inhibitory control is considered a behavioural phenotype in patients with bulimia nervosa. However, the underlying neural correlates of impaired general and food-specific behavioural inhibition are largely unknown. Therefore, we investigated brain activation during the performance of behavioural inhibition to general and food-related stimuli in adults with bulimia nervosa. Methods Women with bulimia and healthy control women underwent event-related fMRI while performing a general and a food-specific no-go task. Results We included 28 women with bulimia nervosa and 29 healthy control women in our study. On a neuronal level, we observed significant group differences in response to general no-go stimuli in women with bulimia nervosa with high symptom severity; compared with healthy controls, the patients showed reduced activation in the right sensorimotor area (postcentral gyrus, precentral gyrus) and right dorsal striatum (caudate nucleus, putamen). Limitations The present results are limited to adult women with bulimia nervosa. Furthermore, it remains unclear whether impaired behavioural inhibition in patients with this disorder are a cause or consequence of chronic illness. Conclusion Our findings suggest that diminished frontostriatal brain activation in patients with bulimia nervosa contribute to the severity of binge eating symptoms. Gaining further insight into the neural mechanisms of behavioural inhibition problems in individuals with this disorder may inform brain-directed treatment approaches and the development of response inhibition training approaches to improve inhibitory control in patients with bulimia nervosa. The present study does not support greater behavioural and neural impairments to food-specific behavioural inhibition in these patients. PMID:27575858

  8. Nesfatin-1 inhibits ovarian epithelial carcinoma cell proliferation in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu, Yang; Pang, Xiaoyan; Dong, Mei; Wen, Fang; Zhang, Yi

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: •Nesfatin-1 inhibits the proliferation and growth of HO-8910 cells by G1 phase arrest. •Nesfatin-1 enhances HO-8910 cell apoptosis. •Nesfatin-1 inhibits HO-8910 cell proliferation via mTOR and RhoA/ROCK signaling pathway. •The first report of nesfatin-1-mediated proliferation in ovarian epithelial carcinoma. -- Abstract: Nesfatin-1, an 82-amino-acid peptide derived from a 396-amino-acid precursor protein nucleobindin 2 (NUCB2), was originally identified in hypothalamic nuclei involved in the regulation of food intake. It was recently reported that nesfatin-1 is a novel depot specific adipokine preferentially produced by subcutaneous tissue, with obesity- and food deprivation-regulated expression. Although a relation between ovarian cancer mortality and obesity has been previously established, a role of nesfatin-1 in ovarian epithelial carcinoma remains unknown. The aim of the present study is to examine the effect of nesfatin-1 on ovary carcinoma cells proliferation. We found that nesfatin-1 inhibits the proliferation and growth of HO-8910 cells by G1 phase arrest, this inhibition could be abolished by nesfatin-1 neutralizing antibody. Nesfatin-1 enhances HO-8910 cell apoptosis, activation of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) and RhoA/ROCK signaling pathway block the effects of nesfatin-1-induced apoptosis, therefore reverses the inhibition of HO-8910 cell proliferation by nesfatin-1. In conclusion, the present study demonstrated that nesfatin-1 can inhibit the proliferation in human ovarian epithelial carcinoma cell line HO-8910 cells through inducing apoptosis via mTOR and RhoA/ROCK signaling pathway. This study provides a novel regulatory signaling pathway of nesfatin-1-regulated ovarian epithelial carcinoma growth and may contribute to ovarian cancer prevention and therapy, especially in obese patients

  9. Nesfatin-1 inhibits ovarian epithelial carcinoma cell proliferation in vitro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Yang; Pang, Xiaoyan; Dong, Mei; Wen, Fang, E-mail: wenfang64@hotmail.com; Zhang, Yi, E-mail: syzi960@yahoo.com

    2013-11-01

    Highlights: •Nesfatin-1 inhibits the proliferation and growth of HO-8910 cells by G1 phase arrest. •Nesfatin-1 enhances HO-8910 cell apoptosis. •Nesfatin-1 inhibits HO-8910 cell proliferation via mTOR and RhoA/ROCK signaling pathway. •The first report of nesfatin-1-mediated proliferation in ovarian epithelial carcinoma. -- Abstract: Nesfatin-1, an 82-amino-acid peptide derived from a 396-amino-acid precursor protein nucleobindin 2 (NUCB2), was originally identified in hypothalamic nuclei involved in the regulation of food intake. It was recently reported that nesfatin-1 is a novel depot specific adipokine preferentially produced by subcutaneous tissue, with obesity- and food deprivation-regulated expression. Although a relation between ovarian cancer mortality and obesity has been previously established, a role of nesfatin-1 in ovarian epithelial carcinoma remains unknown. The aim of the present study is to examine the effect of nesfatin-1 on ovary carcinoma cells proliferation. We found that nesfatin-1 inhibits the proliferation and growth of HO-8910 cells by G1 phase arrest, this inhibition could be abolished by nesfatin-1 neutralizing antibody. Nesfatin-1 enhances HO-8910 cell apoptosis, activation of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) and RhoA/ROCK signaling pathway block the effects of nesfatin-1-induced apoptosis, therefore reverses the inhibition of HO-8910 cell proliferation by nesfatin-1. In conclusion, the present study demonstrated that nesfatin-1 can inhibit the proliferation in human ovarian epithelial carcinoma cell line HO-8910 cells through inducing apoptosis via mTOR and RhoA/ROCK signaling pathway. This study provides a novel regulatory signaling pathway of nesfatin-1-regulated ovarian epithelial carcinoma growth and may contribute to ovarian cancer prevention and therapy, especially in obese patients.

  10. Clinical presentation of thyroid cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samuel, A.M.; Shah, D.H.

    1999-01-01

    The clinical manifestation of thyroid cancer (TC) as seen at the Nuclear Medicine Department, where the patients investigated prior to diagnosis of disease are clinically suspected to harbor malignancy and mostly referred for scintigraphic investigations are presented

  11. Hyperthyroidism: an unusual case presentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scripture, D L

    1998-02-01

    Hyperthyroidism is the most common disorder of the thyroid. Patients typically present with complaints consistent with a hypermetabolic state, including nervousness, weight loss, heat intolerance, palpitations, irritability, and tremor. This case report reviews a 34-year-old woman who presented with unilateral upper extremity weakness, weight gain, and an episode of atrial fibrillation, the latter coinciding with a 36-hour lack of sleep and excess alcohol and caffeine intake. Although an extensive neurologic evaluation failed to identify any abnormality, the patient's laboratory analysis revealed elevations in thyroxine (T4) and triiodothyronine (T3) levels with unsuppressed thyroid-stimulating hormone levels. Subsequent treatment with the antithyroid drug methimazole (Tapazole) provided complete relief of symptoms. This case report illustrates how health care providers can be diverted to pursue a neurologic etiology when muscle weakness presents as a unilateral symptom. Plausible alternative causes for muscle weakness and other symptoms are presented.

  12. Thyrotoxic crisis presenting with jaundice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wickramasinghe, R D S S; Luke, W A N V; Sebastiampillai, B S; Gunathilake, M P M L; Premaratna, R

    2016-06-23

    Thyrotoxic crisis is a medical emergency requiring early diagnosis and urgent management, which can be challenging due to its diverse clinical presentations. While common presentations include fever, sweating, palpitations, tremors and confusion, presence of jaundice is rare. We report a 35-year-old male who presented with jaundice due to cholestasis along with other features of thyrotoxic crisis due to Graves' disease. He had a good clinical recovery with resolution of cholestasis following treatment for thyrotoxic crisis. Jaundice can be a rare manifestation of thyrotoxic crisis, and should be considered in the differential diagnosis when other clinical features of thyrotoxic crisis are present. However secondary causes of jaundice should be looked into and excluded.

  13. Presentation at FTP: A review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sheffield, J.

    1987-01-01

    This series of vugraphs presents some information concerning ORNL's involvement in the fusion energy research program. Recent and future experiments are named, and a rough estimate of funding is given

  14. Extradural lipomatosis presenting with paraplegia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deogaonkar M

    1995-07-01

    Full Text Available An unusual case with spinal extradural lipomatosis in a non-obese and otherwise healthy man is reported. The patient presented with a history of weakness of legs which progressed to paraplegia over a 40 day period.

  15. A centralized audio presentation manager

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Papp, A.L. III; Blattner, M.M.

    1994-05-16

    The centralized audio presentation manager addresses the problems which occur when multiple programs running simultaneously attempt to use the audio output of a computer system. Time dependence of sound means that certain auditory messages must be scheduled simultaneously, which can lead to perceptual problems due to psychoacoustic phenomena. Furthermore, the combination of speech and nonspeech audio is examined; each presents its own problems of perceptibility in an acoustic environment composed of multiple auditory streams. The centralized audio presentation manager receives abstract parameterized message requests from the currently running programs, and attempts to create and present a sonic representation in the most perceptible manner through the use of a theoretically and empirically designed rule set.

  16. Hypertension presenting early in pregnancy

    OpenAIRE

    Melvin, Audrey; Kinsley, Brendan

    2015-01-01

    Key Clinical Message Paraganglioma in pregnancy is an exceedingly rare and potentially life?threatening diagnosis. It is important that the clinicians consider secondary causes when women present with hypertension in early pregnancy.

  17. HYDROGEOLOGIC CASE STUDIES (DENVER PRESENTATION)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hydrogeology is the foundation of subsurface site characterization for evaluations of monitored natural attenuation (MNA). Three case studies are presented. Examples of the potentially detrimental effects of drilling additives on ground-water samples from monitoring wells are d...

  18. QCD machines - present and future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Christ, N.H.

    1991-01-01

    The present status of the currently working and nearly working dedicated QCD machines is reviewed and proposals for future machines are discussed with particular emphasis on the QCD Teraflop Project in the US. (orig.)

  19. Reversal of androgen inhibition of estrogen-activated sexual behavior by cholinergic agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dohanich, G P; Cada, D A

    1989-12-01

    Androgens have been found to inhibit lordosis activated by estrogen treatment of ovariectomized female rats. In the present experiments, dihydrotestosterone propionate (200 micrograms for 3 days) inhibited the incidence of lordosis in ovariectomized females treated with estradiol benzoate (1 microgram for 3 days). This inhibition of lordosis was reversed 15 min after bilateral intraventricular infusion of physostigmine (10 micrograms/cannula), an acetylcholinesterase inhibitor, or carbachol (0.5 microgram/cannula), a cholinergic receptor agonist. This reversal of inhibition appears to be mediated by cholinergic muscarinic receptors since pretreatment with scopolamine (4 mg/kg, ip), a muscarinic receptor blocker, prevented the reversal of androgen inhibition by physostigmine. These results indicate that androgens may inhibit estrogen-activated lordosis through interference with central cholinergic muscarinic mechanisms.

  20. Application of magnetic tools designed by Ecopetrol to inhibit paraffin in the production systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Medina Z, Carlos; Pelaez U, Carlos; Buendia I, Hernando; Pena C, Alvaro

    1995-01-01

    The present article narrates the experiences and the results obtained with these tools in 3 representative historical cases of a group of 16, using a technique of magnetic inhibition of paraffin which has been proven with great success in diverse parts of the world, making of this a non expensive inhibition method and of continuous treatment

  1. Unusual presentation of cutaneous leiomyoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sapnashree Bhaskar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Herein, we report a case of leiomyoma cutis because of its rarity and unusual presentation. The case presented with a solitary leiomyoma lesion which was painless. However, the adjacent normal appearing area was tender. A biopsy of the lesion as well as of a portion of the adjacent normal appearing area was taken, which confirmed the diagnosis of cutaneous leiomyoma. This may suggest the dormant nature of the disease which has not yet become apparent.

  2. ECRIS 2010 - Proceedings and Presentations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2012-01-01

    The workshop focussed on the latest developments in performance, modeling and applications of ECR ion sources along with the associated physics and technologies, including plasma physics, beam optics, beam diagnostics, magnet technology.... The presentations were organized around 8 topics: 1) status of ECRIS operation, 2) new developments, 3) ion beams and low energy beam transport (LEBT), 4) pulsed operation, 5) applications, and 6) plasma and beam investigations. Most papers are accompanied with the slides of their presentation

  3. AN UNUSUAL PRESENTATION OF DIC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manish

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Placenta Praevia is a common obstetric problem which presents with antepartum H aemorrhage and is treated by the obstetrician. It is very rare to see a patient with placenta praevia treated in medical ward for post - partum H aemorrhage due to disseminated intravascular coagulation defect with the added complication of acute kidney injury, P ost - partum H ypertension and PRES (posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome, hence the presentation

  4. Present and future superconducting cyclotrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nolen, J.A. Jr.

    1987-01-01

    This paper begins with a brief review of the status of present superconducting (SC) cyclotron projects, including the two which are currently operating and the six which are under construction. The next section summarizes the main features shared by five of these machines, while the third section presents recent developments and new concepts introduced in the other three ''second generation'' SC cyclotrons. Projects in early stages of development are discussed in the fourth section

  5. Peripartum Cardiomyopathy Presenting as Bradycardia

    OpenAIRE

    Codsi, Elisabeth; Rose, Carl H.; Tweet, Marysia S.; Hayes, Sharonne N.; Best, Patricia J. M.; Blauwet, Lori A.

    2017-01-01

    Peripartum cardiomyopathy (PPCM) is a disease that typically affects young otherwise healthy women. As PPCM is associated with significant mortality, timely diagnosis is necessary to ensure appropriate care. To our knowledge, this represents the first reported case of PPCM presenting as symptomatic bradycardia. We describe the patient’s clinical presentation and relevant findings and review the potential etiology and ramifications of bradycardia in patients with PPCM.

  6. D-Glucosamine inhibits proliferation of human cancer cells through inhibition of p70S6K

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oh, Hyun-Ji; Lee, Jason S.; Song, Dae-Kyu; Shin, Dong-Hoon; Jang, Byeong-Churl; Suh, Seong-Il; Park, Jong-Wook; Suh, Min-Ho; Baek, Won-Ki

    2007-01-01

    Although D-glucosamine has been reported as an inhibitor of tumor growth both in vivo and in vitro, the mechanism for the anticancer effect of D-glucosamine is still unclear. Since there are several reports suggesting D-glucosamine inhibits protein synthesis, we examined whether D-glucosamine affects p70S6 K activity, an important signaling molecule involved in protein translation. In the present study, we found D-glucosamine inhibited the activity of p70S6K and the proliferation of DU145 prostate cancer cells and MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells. D-Glucosamine decreased phosphorylation of p70S6K, and its downstream substrates RPS6, and eIF-4B, but not mTOR and 4EBP1 in DU145 cells, suggesting that D-glucosamine induced inhibition of p70S6K is not through the inhibition of mTOR. In addition, D-glucosamine enhanced the growth inhibitory effects of rapamycin, a specific inhibitor of mTOR. These findings suggest that D-glucosamine can inhibit growth of cancer cells through dephosphorylation of p70S6K

  7. Presentation of the ASTRAL software; Presentation du logiciel ASTRAL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2011-07-01

    This report presents the ASTRAL software (ASTRAL means technical assistance in post-accidental radioprotection) which is aimed to be used as an aid-to-decision tool in the case of an important release of radionuclides in the environment by assessing radionuclide concentration in different environments and food products, determining the potential exposure to irradiation of concerned populations, foreseeing the evolution of the situation, and proposing different scenarios for the management of contaminated areas. The report describes the software general operation, presents the calculation module (main functionalities, concentration index calculation, dose calculation or radiological impact calculation, how countermeasures are taken into account), the data bases (contextual data, data for radio-ecological calculations and for radiological calculations), the software ergonomics (general principles, result selection and display, result printing and input data). Its briefly evokes the development quality assurance, and describes the software implementation architecture

  8. Carbapenems: Past, Present, and Future ▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papp-Wallace, Krisztina M.; Endimiani, Andrea; Taracila, Magdalena A.; Bonomo, Robert A.

    2011-01-01

    In this review, we summarize the current “state of the art” of carbapenem antibiotics and their role in our antimicrobial armamentarium. Among the β-lactams currently available, carbapenems are unique because they are relatively resistant to hydrolysis by most β-lactamases, in some cases act as “slow substrates” or inhibitors of β-lactamases, and still target penicillin binding proteins. This “value-added feature” of inhibiting β-lactamases serves as a major rationale for expansion of this class of β-lactams. We describe the initial discovery and development of the carbapenem family of β-lactams. Of the early carbapenems evaluated, thienamycin demonstrated the greatest antimicrobial activity and became the parent compound for all subsequent carbapenems. To date, more than 80 compounds with mostly improved antimicrobial properties, compared to those of thienamycin, are described in the literature. We also highlight important features of the carbapenems that are presently in clinical use: imipenem-cilastatin, meropenem, ertapenem, doripenem, panipenem-betamipron, and biapenem. In closing, we emphasize some major challenges and urge the medicinal chemist to continue development of these versatile and potent compounds, as they have served us well for more than 3 decades. PMID:21859938

  9. Dexmedetomidine overdosage: An unusual presentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soumya S Nath

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a case of dexmedetomidine toxicity in a 3-year-old child. The case report describes the features and outlines the treatment strategy adopted. The child presented with bradypnoea, bradycardia, hypotension, deep hypnosis and miosis. He was successfully managed with oxygen, saline boluses and adrenaline infusion. He became haemodynamically stable with adrenaline infusion. He started responding to painful stimuli in 3 h and became oriented in 7 h. Dexmedetomidine, a selective α2 adrenoceptor agonist, is claimed to have a wide safety margin. This case report highlights the fact that dexmedetomidine administered in a toxic dose may be life-threatening may present with miosis and adrenaline infusion may be a useful supportive treatment.

  10. Neonatal hemophilia: a rare presentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nuno Ferreira

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Hemophilia A is a X-linked hereditary condition that lead to decreased factor VIII activity, occurs mainly in males. Decreased factor VIII activity leads to increased risk of bleeding events. During neonatal period, diagnosis is made after post-partum bleeding complication or unexpected bleeding after medical procedures. Subgaleal hemorrhage during neonatal period is a rare, severe extracranial bleeding with high mortality and usually related to traumatic labor or coagulation disorders. Subgaleal hemorrhage complications result from massive bleeding. We present a neonate with unremarkable family history and uneventful pregnancy with a vaginal delivery with no instrumentation, presenting with severe subgaleal bleeding at 52 hours of life. Aggressive support measures were implemented and bleeding managed. The unexpected bleeding lead to a coagulation study and the diagnosis of severe hemophilia A. There were no known sequelae. This case shows a rare hemophilia presentation reflecting the importance of coagulation studies when faced with unexplained severe bleeding.

  11. Andrographolide inhibits multiple myeloma cells by inhibiting the TLR4/NF-κB signaling pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Hui; Wang, Jianrong

    2016-02-01

    Andrographolide is an active component from the extract of Andrographis paniculata [(Burm.f) Nees], a medicinal plant from the Acanthaceae family. Pharmacological studies have revealed that andrographolide possesses anti-bacterial, anti-inflammatory, anti-viral, immune regulatory and hepatoprotective properties, and is efficacious in the treatment of cardiovascular diseases, while exhibiting low toxicity and low cost. The present study aimed to determine the inhibitory effects of andrographolide on the growth of multiple myeloma (MM) cells and its possible impact on the Toll-like receptor (TLR)4/nuclear factor (NF)-κB signaling pathway. Cell proliferation was detected using an MTT assay, cellular apoptosis was measured using flow cytometry, and caspase-9/3 activation were assessed using colorimetric assay kits. Furthermore, TLR4 and NF-κB protein expression was determined by western blot analysis. The results revealed that andrographolide reduced the proliferation, while increasing cellular apoptosis and caspase-9/3 activation of MM cells, in addition to downregulating the expression of TLR4 and NF-κB protein. Of note, TLR4- or NF-κB-targeting small-interfering (si)RNA enhanced the andrographolide-induced inhibition of cell proliferation and induction of apoptosis of MM cells. The results of the present study therefore suggested that andrographolide inhibited multiple myeloma cells via the TLR4/NF-κB signaling pathway.

  12. Graphical presentation of participants' results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1991-01-01

    The results obtained by 19 participating dosimetry systems are presented in this section. Section 3 of the preceding report, ''Evaluation of the Results of the First IAEA Coordinated Research Program on Intercomparison for Individual Monitoring'', explains the format and conventions used for the graphical presentation. The system number appearing in the upper left hand corner of each page can be used to correlate the dosimeter design information found in Table 2 of the preceding report with the results. However, care should be used in drawing inferences from this correlation, since system performance depends on a number of factors other than detector selection and design characteristics. (orig.)

  13. Technical presentation: Next Generation Oscilloscopes

    CERN Multimedia

    PH Department

    2011-01-01

      Rohde & Schwarz "Next Generation Oscilloscopes" - Introduction and Presentation Agenda: Wednesday 23 March  -  09:30 to 11:30 (open end) Bldg. 13-2-005 Language: English 09.30 Presentation "Next Generation Oscilloscopes" from Rohde & Schwarz RTO / RTM in theory and practice Gerard Walker 10.15 Technical design details from R&D Dr. Markus Freidhof 10.45 Scope and Probe Roadmap (confidential) Guido Schulze 11.00 Open Discussion Feedback, first impression, wishes, needs and requirements from CERN All 11.30 Expert Talks, Hands on All Mr. Dr. Markus Freidhof, Head of R&D Oscilloscopes, Rohde & Schwarz, Germany; Mr. Guido Schulze, ...

  14. STIR: Assessing and Training Response Inhibition Abilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-07-30

    Learning to stop responding to alcohol cues reduces alcohol intake via reduced affective associations rather than increased response inhibition. Addiction ...requires an abstract application of the core learning principle1,2, and viable examples are often hard to find and/or assess. If exposure to non...inhibition training that expands upon previous successful “near transfer” response inhibition training efforts—such as treating alcohol addictions by

  15. Inhibition of cortiocosteroidogenesis by delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warner, W; Harris, L S; Carchman, R A

    1977-12-01

    ACTH, cholera toxin, cyclic AMP but not pregnenolone-induced steroidogenesis in Y-1 functional mouse adrenal tumor cells was significantly inhibited by delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol, cannabidiol, and cannabinol. The inhibition of steroidogenesis could not be correlated with a general depression in cell function or viability. The data suggest that cannabinoids inhibit corticosteroidogenesis at a site between the synthesis of cAMP and of pregnenolone.

  16. DOE Collegiate Wind Competition (Presentation)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, J.

    2014-02-01

    This presentation for the January Stakeholder Engagement and Outreach webinar outlines the expanded need for workers in the wind industry and provides an overview of the DOE Wind Competition (to be held in May 2014) and the guiding principles of the competition.

  17. Press book presentation progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-07-01

    This document presents four french sites of the ANDRA concerning the radioactive waste disposal. The concerned site are the underground research laboratory of Meuse/Haute-Marne, the Aube Center, the TFA Center and the Manche Center. For each sites, data and information on the geophysics, the capacity, the management or the research programs are analysed. (A.L.B.)

  18. Rose breeding: past, present, prospects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vries, de D.P.; Dubois, L.A.M.

    1996-01-01

    In this review the PAST, PRESENT and PROSPECT will be considered as three separate periods in the history of the breeding and development of rose cultivars. The recurring theme is the genetic variation. This theme was chosen because there is justified doubt as to sufficient genetic variation

  19. Understanding Algorithms in Different Presentations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Csernoch, Mária; Biró, Piroska; Abari, Kálmán; Máth, János

    2015-01-01

    Within the framework of the Testing Algorithmic and Application Skills project we tested first year students of Informatics at the beginning of their tertiary education. We were focusing on the students' level of understanding in different programming environments. In the present paper we provide the results from the University of Debrecen, the…

  20. Experiments in Multimodal Information Presentation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Hooijdonk, Charlotte; Bosma, W.E.; Krahmer, Emiel; Maes, Alfons; Theune, Mariet; van den Bosch, Antal; Bouma, Gosse

    In this chapter we describe three experiments investigating multimodal information presentation in the context of a medical QA system. In Experiment 1, we wanted to know how non-experts design (multimodal) answers to medical questions, distinguishing between what questions and how questions. In

  1. Clinical Presentations of Acute Leukemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shahab, F.; Raziq, F.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To document the clinical presentation and epidemiology of various types of acute leukemia with their respective referral source at a tertiary level centre in Peshawar. Study Design: An observational study. Place and Duration of Study: Department of Pathology, Hayatabad Medical Complex (HMC), Peshawar, from January 2011 to May 2012. Methodology: A total of 618 bone marrow biopsy reports were reviewed. All biopsy reports labeled as acute leukemia were reviewed for age, gender, address, referring unit, diagnosis on bone marrow examination, presenting complaints, duration of illness and findings of clinical examination. Results: Ninety-two patients were diagnosed as suffering from acute leukemias (15%). ALL was most prevalent (46%), followed by AML (38%) and undifferentiated acute leukemia (16%). Males were affected more compared to females (60% vs. 40%). ALL and AML were predominant in pediatric (64%) and adults (77%) patients respectively. Patients from Afghanistan accounted for 33% of all cases followed by Peshawar (14%). Fever (77%), pallor (33%) and bleeding disorders (23%) were the main presenting complaints. Enlargement of liver, spleen and lymph nodes together was associated with ALL compared with AML (p = 0.004). Conclusion: ALL-L1 and AML-M4 were the most common sub-types. Fever, pallor and bleeding disorders were the main presenting complaints. Enlargement of liver, spleen and lymph nodes was more frequently associated with ALL compared to AML. (author)

  2. Reninoma presenting as cardiac syncope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tak, Shahid I; Wani, Mohd Lateef; Khan, Khursheed A; Alai, Mohd Sultan; Shera, Altaf Hussain; Ahangar, Abdul G; Khan, Yasir Bashir; Nayeem-ul-Hassan; Irshad, Ifat

    2011-01-01

    Reninoma, a renin-secreting tumor of the juxta-glomerular cells of the kidney, is a rare but surgically treatable cause of secondary hypertension in children. We report a case of reninoma presenting as cardiac syncope with long QTc on electrocardiogram due to hypokalemia. PMID:21677812

  3. Unusual Presentation of Maydl's Hernia

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Nikhil NBA, Natarajan K, Mohanty A, et al. An. Unusual Case of Maydl's Hernia. Int J Cur Res Rev. 2013;5(6):22-5. 11. Ganesaratnam M. Maydl's hernia: Report of a Series of Seven Cases and Review of Literature. Brit J Surg. 1985;72:737-8. 12. Weledji EP, Mokake M, Ngowe MN. A Rare. Presentation of Maydl's Hernia.

  4. Secondary syphilis presenting as vertigo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bari, A.U.; Mehmood, T.; Khan, B.; Malik, N.; Malik, K.Z.; Sukhera, A.M.

    2006-01-01

    Syphilis is a chronic, systemic and sexually transmitted infectious disease affecting most of the organs in the body. A young African man presented with vertigo, unsteadiness of gait and a skin rash suggestive of secondary syphilis. Diagnosis was confirmed on serology and was treated with two shots of long-acting penicillin, following which his symptoms settled. (author)

  5. Energy consumption: Past, present, future

    Science.gov (United States)

    1973-01-01

    The energy consumption history of the United States and the changes which could occur in consumption characteristics in the next 50 years are presented. The various sources of energy are analyzed to show the limitations involved in development and utilization as a function of time available. Several scenarios were prepared to show the consumption and supply of energy under varying conditions.

  6. Learning through Dramatic Story Presentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tindall, Evie

    2012-01-01

    The use of story with dramatic presentation approaches produces an engaging and powerful instructional choice for today's adult ESL educators. Two engaging and timed-tested approaches are Reader's Theater and Tableau Vivant. Both provide English language learners with content tailored to their abilities in addition to numerable opportunities to…

  7. Police, managerialization and presentational strategies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Terpstra, J.; Trommel, W.A.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose - The managerialization of the police may be seen as an effort to restore the legitimacy of the police. This paper aims to show that the managerialist strategy presently occurring within police forces creates new pitfalls and unintended consequences. Design/methodology/approach - The paper

  8. Viewfoils for environmental capabilities presentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    This document contains information about the environmental applications of aerial surveys. It discusses the accuracy, dependability, history, advantages, and sensitivity of aerial surveys. Also included, are a brief overview of in-situ gamma spectroscopy and samples of aerial surveys. This document contains entirely of an outline and viewfoils for the presentation

  9. Present Day Philosophies of Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ediger, Marlow

    2006-01-01

    Presently, there are competing philosophies of education which need comparison. Two philosophies will be compared which are at opposite ends of the continuum. They are distinctly different. And yet, both schools of thought have their disciples. Each of the two will be discussed in terms of its essential features and then there will be selected…

  10. MAMMARY TUBERCULOSIS PRESENTING AS CARCINOMA

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    She was otherwise well wizh no symptoms referable to other systems. On examination .... cardiac failure. The other ... but chronic oedema of the right arm of moderate degree was present. .... a tuberculous ulcer on the dorsum of the hand, followed ... venous system may also lead to haematogenous dissemination, producing ...

  11. The Present State of Behaviorism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mowrer, O. Hobart

    1976-01-01

    Assesses the present status of behaviorism by dividing this study into an evaluation of Behaviorism 1, based explicitly on Pavlov's conception of conditioned-response learning, and Behaviorism 11, single-handedly launched and almost completely dominanted by Professor B. F. Skinner. (Author/RK)

  12. Petroleum - its present and future

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    SenGupta, R.; Qasim, S.Z.

    World's "published proved" reserve of oil by the end of 1984 was known to be of the order of 95,000 million tonnes. Of this, 57% lies buried in the middle eastern countries. At the present rate of growth in consumption and production of oil...

  13. Reactor enclosure. BRC meeting presentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fisch, J.W.

    1975-01-01

    The latest status of key components of the Reactor Enclosure System of the Clinch River Breeder Reactor Plant is described. Areas where there have been notable design changes or significant design detail maturity in the six months since the last BRC presentation are highlighted. (auth)

  14. Slide Composition for Electronic Presentations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larson, Ronald B.

    2004-01-01

    Instructors who use computer-generated graphics in their lectures have many options to consider when developing their presentations. Experts give different advice on which typefaces, background and letter colors, and background imagery improve communications. This study attempted to resolve these controversies by examining how short-term recall of…

  15. Hypervideos and interactive multimedia presentations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    B. Meixner (Britta)

    2017-01-01

    textabstractHypervideos and interactive multimedia presentations allow the creation of fully interactive and enriched video. It is possible to organize video scenes in a nonlinear way. Additional information can be added to the video ranging from short descriptions to images and more videos.

  16. Unusual presentation of gallbladder perforation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Jayasinghe

    2016-01-01

    Conclusions: Percutaneous abscesses arising from the gallbladder are a rare but potentially serious consequence of acute cholecystitis, and may present in a wide variety of locations. Therefore it is imperative to conduct a full body inspection in the septic patient, even when a source has been identified.

  17. Neutrino astronomy: Present and future

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. I briefly review the present and future status of the burgeoning field of neu- ... near future build upon previous results. ... novel radio and acoustic techniques utilized by, for example, experiments such as. GLUE ... Left: Schematic of νµ-induced muon track in detector. Right: .... an eye toward the galactic center).

  18. BVDV: past, present, and future

    Science.gov (United States)

    The term bovine viral diarrhea (BVD) has come to refer to a collection of diverse clinical presentations that include respiratory, enteric and reproductive diseases accompanied by immunosuppression. BVD may be caused by one of three different species of bovine pestivirus, bovine viral diarrhea viru...

  19. Clustering semantics for hypermedia presentation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alberink, M.J.; Rutledge, L.W.; Hardman, H.L.; Veenstra, M.J.A.

    2004-01-01

    Semantic annotations of media repositories make relationships among the stored media and relevant concepts explicit. However, these relationships and the media they join are not directly presentable as hypermedia. Previous work shows how clustering over the annotations in the repositories can

  20. Summary of presentations and discussions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takeuchi, Mitsuo

    2008-01-01

    In December 2007, the Forum on Stakeholder Confidence discussed its theme entitled 'Link between research, development and demonstration (RD and D) and stakeholder confidence'. It was remarked that regulators need a technical demonstration to aid in evaluating the safety case. Local stakeholders appreciate the opportunity to visualise technological arrangements. In both cases, demonstration adds to confidence in the feasibility of solutions. Some believe there is an important role for analogues in communication with stakeholders, if handled with integrity. To explore and benchmark current practices, it was decided to hold a topical session at the 9. regular meeting of the FSC on 4 June 2008 regarding the use of analogues for confidence building. The session opened with an introductory presentation by the session rapporteur. This incorporated input provided for the purpose by FSC members in cooperation with their country's representative to the NEA RWMC 'Integration Group on the Safety Case'. Three speakers then presented the various uses of analogues by implementers, regulators and scientists to build their own confidence; a fourth speaker dealt with the experience of using natural analogues in public information. The presentations addressed the use of analogues in the field of geological disposal of high-level waste (HLW) and long-lived intermediate level (ILW-LL) radioactive waste. Then the FSC participants split into two working groups for discussion. The outcome of these discussions was reported in plenary on 6 June 2008 and it was agreed to publish proceedings of the session. The present summary, prepared by the session rapporteur with input from the NEA Secretariat, captures the main points heard in the course of the event. It combines data from the formal presentations and remarks made in discussion. The latter represent viewpoints expressed by a group whose primary focus is not natural analogues but rather stakeholder interests. The summary and viewpoints

  1. Pulmonary hyalinizing granuloma presenting with dysphagia: a rare presentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Fazal; Hamid, Arsalan; Fatima, Benish; Hashmi, Shiraz; Fatimi, Saulat

    2017-01-01

    A 25-year-old man presented with a 2-month history of dysphagia and past history of pulmonary and intestinal tuberculosis. A barium swallow showed a point of constriction 42 mm above the gastroesophageal junction. Computed tomography revealed large opacities in bilateral lung fields, encroaching more on the esophagus. The lesion progressively compressed the esophagus as it moved inferiorly. A right posterolateral thoracotomy was performed for sub-anatomical resection of the mass. A biopsy revealed homogenous whirling hyalinized collagen fibers, highly suggestive of pulmonary hyalinizing granuloma, with no evidence of malignancy. Pulmonary hyalinizing granuloma should be considered in the differential diagnosis of longstanding dysphagia.

  2. Inhibition of apparent photosynthesis by nitrogen oxides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hill, A C; Bennett, J H

    1970-01-01

    The nitrogen oxides (NO/sub 2/ and NO) inhibited apparent photosynthesis of oats and alfalfa at concentrations below those required to cause visible injury. There appeared to be a threshold concentration of about 0.6 ppm for each pollutant. An additive effect in depressing apparent photosynthesis occurred when the plants were exposed to a mixture of NO and NO/sub 2/. Although NO produced a more rapid effect on the plants, lower concentrations of NO/sub 2/ were required to cause a given inhibition after 2 hour of exposure. Inhibition by nitric oxide was more closely related to its partial pressure than was inhibition by NO/sub 2/.

  3. An unusual presentation of presentation of a branchial cleft cyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vemula, Rahul; Greco, Gregory

    2012-05-01

    Branchial cleft cysts are congenital anomalies that arise from the aberrant embryological development of the branchial apparatus. The location of a branchial cleft cyst is determined by which branchial cleft failed to obliterate during embryological development, with the second branchial cleft cyst being the most commonly recognized lesion. Although the most common location for branchial cleft cysts is between the external auditory canal and the level of the clavicle, the literature does describe unusual locations. We present a case a 15-year-old boy who had an enlarging lesion on his back that had been present since birth. A presumptive radiologic diagnosis of lymphangioma circumscriptum was made. Upon excision of the lesion and pathologic examination, it was determined to be a branchial cleft cyst. The patient had an uneventful postoperative course, and no recurrence was noted after a 2-year follow-up. Our clinical report demonstrates a lesion on the posterior thorax that proved to be a branchial cleft cyst and should always be part of the differential diagnosis for soft tissue masses of the thorax.

  4. Presentation of the ASTRAL software

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-01-01

    This report presents the ASTRAL software (ASTRAL means technical assistance in post-accidental radioprotection) which is aimed to be used as an aid-to-decision tool in the case of an important release of radionuclides in the environment by assessing radionuclide concentration in different environments and food products, determining the potential exposure to irradiation of concerned populations, foreseeing the evolution of the situation, and proposing different scenarios for the management of contaminated areas. The report describes the software general operation, presents the calculation module (main functionalities, concentration index calculation, dose calculation or radiological impact calculation, how countermeasures are taken into account), the data bases (contextual data, data for radio-ecological calculations and for radiological calculations), the software ergonomics (general principles, result selection and display, result printing and input data). Its briefly evokes the development quality assurance, and describes the software implementation architecture

  5. Presentation of economic evaluation results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaikledkaew, Usa

    2014-05-01

    The first HTA guidelines for Thailand included a chapter outlining a set of guidelines on how best to report the findings of health economic evaluations, based on a review of best practice and existing guidelines on the presentation of economic evaluation results from around the world. In this second edition of HTA guidelines for Thailand, the recommendations build on the first edition by using a case study to illustrate how the guidelines can be applied in a real research context. The guidelines propose that all reporting include ten key elements: defining the scope of the study, selection of comparator(s), defining the type of economic evaluation, measurement of costs, measurement of clinical effects, handling time in economic evaluation studies, handling uncertainty and sensitivity analysis, presentation of the results, discussion of the results, and disclosure of funding and authors conflict of interest.

  6. RTNS-II: present status

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heikkinen, D.W.; Logan, C.M.

    1980-10-01

    The present status of the RTNS-II facility is described and typical operating parameters are given. A brief discussion is given of the methods used in production of the TiT 2 targets as well as their performance and tritium handling at RTNS-II. The various types of non-interactive beam diagnostics presently in use at the neutron sources are outlined. The on-line computer system which provides a time history of an irradiation and records target performance is described. Examples are listed of several representative experimental programs which have been carried out thus far at RTNS-II. These include both active and passive experiments. Finally, several of the major improvements to the facility made since the beginning of the experimental program are given

  7. Presentation of TVO's visitor's centre

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aemmaelae, V.M.

    1993-01-01

    There are four nuclear power plant units in Finland, two of which are PWR's owned by Imatran Voima Oy. The two BWR units are located at Olkiluoto and owned by Teollisuuden Voima Oy. This presentation tells about TVO's concept of informing the visitors at Olkiluoto. At the site there are located, in addition to the two nuclear power plant units, the intermediate storage for spent fuel, the repository for low and medium-active waste as well as the training centre. At the Olkiluoto Visitor's Centre all the activities of the company are presented using varied audio-visual aids. The centre has several exhibits and there are also different installations to show how the plant works. (author)

  8. Amebiasis Presenting as Pleuropulmonary Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Kubitschek, Kenneth R.; Peters, Jay; Nickeson, David; Musher, Daniel M.

    1985-01-01

    Seven patients with amebic liver abscess presenting as pleuropulmonary disease were admitted to hospital initially because of pulmonary symptoms and were found to have amebic liver disease. Three categories of pleuropulmonary involvement included reactive inflammation of the pleura or lung, rupture of a hepatic abscess into the pleural space and rupture of a hepatic abscess into the bronchial airways. The preferred medical treatment is with metronidazole, but rupture of hepatic amebic abscess...

  9. Computer training, present and future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, G. A.

    1972-01-01

    The products of educational firms today lead toward a multimedia approach to the education and training of commercial programmers and systems analysts. Computer-assisted instruction or CAI is a relatively new medium to augment the other media. The government use of computers is discussed together with the importance of computer pretests. Pretests can aid in determining a person's ability to absorb a particular instructional level. The material presented in a number of computer courses is listed.

  10. Sarcoidosis presenting as penile mass

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hüseyin Semiz

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Sarcoidosis is an inflammatory disease with unknown cause characterized by noncaseating granuloma formations. It may present with bilateral hilar lymphadenopathy, skin lesions, eye, and musculoskeletal system involvement. Rare involvement of the genital organs (prostate, testis, epididymis has also been reported. However, penile involvement is observed quite rare. In this paper, we report a patient with penile mass who was diagnosed with sarcoidosis on the basis of the laboratory, radiological, and pathological investigations.

  11. Carcinoma caecum - a rare presentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ali, T.; Mudasser, S.; Mudsser, S.; Sarwar, M.

    2010-01-01

    Caecal and right sided colonic cancers mostly present with fatigue, weakness and iron deficiency anemia. Such tumours rarely perforate posteriorly and involve the retroperitoneum. We report a case of an old Omani lady who came with insidious sign and symptoms of perforated caecum leading to retroperitoneal collection and necrotizing fasciitis of abdominal wall due to carcinoma of caecum. She underwent surgery but despite active intervention, she died because of septicemic shock. (author)

  12. Water plants past and present

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Riis, Tenna

    2006-01-01

    How has the condition of the environment developed during the last 100 years? This is an important question because the conditions of the past infl uence those of the present, and knowledge about this development makes it possible to evaluate the causes of changes in species richness, species com...... composition and environmental quality. Here we compare old and contemporary studies of the Danish stream fl ora....

  13. Burning mouth syndrome: Present perspective

    OpenAIRE

    Ramesh Parajuli

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Burning mouth syndrome is characterized by chronic oral pain or burning sensation affecting the oral mucosa in the absence of obvious visible mucosal lesions. Patient presenting with the burning mouth sensation or pain is frequently encountered in clinical practice which poses a challenge to the treating clinician. Its exact etiology remains unknown which probably has multifactorial origin. It often affects middle or old age women and it may be accompanied by xerostomia and alte...

  14. Present status of CP violation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ng, J.N.

    1989-06-01

    A review of the status of CP violation in kaons is given. Status of our knowledge of quark mixing angles in the standard six quark model is presented. The role Β d o - Βd o transition plays in this study is examined. A comparison of the estimates of CP violation effects from models beyond the standard one is given. Other experiments that have the capability of testing different CP violation models are also discussed. (Author) 35 refs., 6 figs., tab

  15. Nocardial mycetoma: Diverse clinical presentations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharma Nand

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Nocardia spp are gram-positive, aerobic, acid-fast bacteria which exist as saprophytes in nature. Invasive disseminated infections are particularly common in immunocompromised or debilitated hosts. Superficial infections with Nocardia spp occur as a result of local trauma and contamination of the wound. Clinically, it presents as acute infection (abscesses or cellulitis, mycetoma, or sporotrichoid infection. Differential diagnosis includes eumycetoma, chromomycosis, blastomycosis, coccidioidomycosis, sporotrichosis, tuberculosis, botryomycosis, syphilis, yaws, and neoplasia. Its diagnosis is confirmed by demonstrating the causative organism in exudates (as granules, tissue specimens, or cultures. Early diagnosis will obviate need for drastic surgical measures as early institution of chemotherapy is effective in most patients. However, its diagnosis is often delayed due to diverse clinical presentations and for want of clinical suspicion, particularly in non-endemic areas. This paper presents 4 clinical forms of this not so uncommon disease, emphasizing the importance of high index of clinical suspicion, especially in non-endemic regions; and the significance of repeated examination of exudates for Nocardia granules for an early diagnosis.

  16. Industry Presentation to Regulatory Workshop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Treasure, Mark

    2012-01-01

    Mr. Mark Treasure from EDF NGL gave a presentation on industry perspectives on safety culture oversight. Mr. Treasure is the Nuclear Inspection and Oversight Manager within the Safety and Regulation Division. The presentation started with an explanation of the role of the nuclear inspection and oversight group (internal regulator), and their current approach to internal oversight of safety culture. A key element of the current internal regulatory oversight program is Management and Leadership Assessments. These are carried out by a team including management peers from other plants to enhance credibility. Findings can be linked to safety performance, and typically identify issues in areas such as accountability arrangements and strategic focus of the leadership team. Safety indicators have also been introduced to show trends in safety management and safety performance for each EDF UK nuclear power plant. A periodic nuclear safety culture survey is also carried out to identify focus areas and progress. The presentation included discussion on views of the role of the nuclear regulator. Important aspects were identified as: - Supporting the internal regulator by seeking to understand before taking enforcement action, maintaining an open dialogue and recognising that this area is complex and that there is rarely a 'silver bullet' solution. - Communication: being visible and actively discussing safety improvement, and use of language which emphasises nuclear safety rather than legal compliance. - Positive reinforcement to recognise efforts and encourage further improvement

  17. XPL the Extensible Presentation Language

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Santangelo

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The last decade has witnessed a growing interest in the development of web interfaces enabling both multiple ways to access contents and, at the same time, fruition by multiple modalities of interaction (point-and-click, contents reading, voice commands, gestures, etc.. In this paper we describe a framework aimed at streamlining the design process of multi-channel, multimodal interfaces enabling full reuse of software components. This framework is called the eXtensible Presentation architecture and Language (XPL, a presentation language based on design pattern paradigm that keeps separated the presentation layer from the underlying programming logic. The language supplies a methodology to expedite multimodal interface development and to reduce the effort to implement interfaces for multiple access devices, by means of using the same code. This paper describes a methodology approach based on Visual Design Pattern (ViDP and Verbal Design Pattern (VeDP, offering examples of multimodal and multichannel interfaces created with the XPL Editor.

  18. Quantum technology past, present, future: quantum energetics (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Sang H.

    2017-04-01

    Since the development of quantum physics in the early part of the 1900s, this field of study has made remarkable contributions to our civilization. Some of these advances include lasers, light-emitting diodes (LED), sensors, spectroscopy, quantum dots, quantum gravity and quantum entanglements. In 1998, the NASA Langley Research Center established a quantum technology committee to monitor the progress in this area and initiated research to determine the potential of quantum technology for future NASA missions. The areas of interest in quantum technology at NASA included fundamental quantum-optics materials associated with quantum dots and quantum wells, device-oriented photonic crystals, smart optics, quantum conductors, quantum information and computing, teleportation theorem, and quantum energetics. A brief review of the work performed, the progress made in advancing these technologies, and the potential NASA applications of quantum technology will be presented.

  19. Gain control through divisive inhibition prevents abrupt transition to chaos in a neural mass model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papasavvas, Christoforos A.; Wang, Yujiang; Trevelyan, Andrew J.; Kaiser, Marcus

    2016-01-01

    Experimental results suggest that there are two distinct mechanisms of inhibition in cortical neuronal networks: subtractive and divisive inhibition. They modulate the input-output function of their target neurons either by increasing the input that is needed to reach maximum output or by reducing the gain and the value of maximum output itself, respectively. However, the role of these mechanisms on the dynamics of the network is poorly understood. We introduce a novel population model and numerically investigate the influence of divisive inhibition on network dynamics. Specifically, we focus on the transitions from a state of regular oscillations to a state of chaotic dynamics via period-doubling bifurcations. The model with divisive inhibition exhibits a universal transition rate to chaos (Feigenbaum behavior). In contrast, in an equivalent model without divisive inhibition, transition rates to chaos are not bounded by the universal constant (non-Feigenbaum behavior). This non-Feigenbaum behavior, when only subtractive inhibition is present, is linked to the interaction of bifurcation curves in the parameter space. Indeed, searching the parameter space showed that such interactions are impossible when divisive inhibition is included. Therefore, divisive inhibition prevents non-Feigenbaum behavior and, consequently, any abrupt transition to chaos. The results suggest that the divisive inhibition in neuronal networks could play a crucial role in keeping the states of order and chaos well separated and in preventing the onset of pathological neural dynamics. PMID:26465514

  20. Gain control through divisive inhibition prevents abrupt transition to chaos in a neural mass model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papasavvas, Christoforos A; Wang, Yujiang; Trevelyan, Andrew J; Kaiser, Marcus

    2015-09-01

    Experimental results suggest that there are two distinct mechanisms of inhibition in cortical neuronal networks: subtractive and divisive inhibition. They modulate the input-output function of their target neurons either by increasing the input that is needed to reach maximum output or by reducing the gain and the value of maximum output itself, respectively. However, the role of these mechanisms on the dynamics of the network is poorly understood. We introduce a novel population model and numerically investigate the influence of divisive inhibition on network dynamics. Specifically, we focus on the transitions from a state of regular oscillations to a state of chaotic dynamics via period-doubling bifurcations. The model with divisive inhibition exhibits a universal transition rate to chaos (Feigenbaum behavior). In contrast, in an equivalent model without divisive inhibition, transition rates to chaos are not bounded by the universal constant (non-Feigenbaum behavior). This non-Feigenbaum behavior, when only subtractive inhibition is present, is linked to the interaction of bifurcation curves in the parameter space. Indeed, searching the parameter space showed that such interactions are impossible when divisive inhibition is included. Therefore, divisive inhibition prevents non-Feigenbaum behavior and, consequently, any abrupt transition to chaos. The results suggest that the divisive inhibition in neuronal networks could play a crucial role in keeping the states of order and chaos well separated and in preventing the onset of pathological neural dynamics.

  1. Evidence inhibition responds reactively to the salience of distracting information during focused attention.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalie Wyatt

    Full Text Available Along with target amplification, distractor inhibition is regarded as a major contributor to selective attention. Some theories suggest that the strength of inhibitory processing is proportional to the salience of the distractor (i.e., inhibition reacts to the distractor intensity. Other theories suggest that the strength of inhibitory processing does not depend on the salience of the distractor (i.e., inhibition does not react to the distractor intensity. The present study aimed to elucidate the relationship between the intensity of a distractor and its subsequent inhibition during focused attention. A flanker task with a variable distractor-target stimulus-onset asynchrony (SOA was used to measure both distractor interference and distractor inhibition. We manipulated the intensity of the distractor in two separate ways, by varying its distance from the target (Experiment 1 and by varying its brightness (Experiment 2. The results indicate that more intense distractors were associated with both increased interference and stronger distractor inhibition. The latter outcome provides novel support for the reactive inhibition hypothesis, which posits that inhibition reacts to the strength of distractor input, such that more salient distractors elicit stronger inhibition.

  2. Differences between endogenous and exogenous emotion inhibition in the human brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kühn, Simone; Haggard, Patrick; Brass, Marcel

    2014-05-01

    The regulation of emotions is an integral part of our mental health. It has only recently been investigated using brain imaging techniques. In most studies, participants are instructed by a cue to inhibit a specific emotional reaction. The aim of the present study was to investigate the alternative situation where a person decides to inhibit an emotion as an act of endogenous self-control. Healthy participants viewed highly arousing pictures with negative valence. In the endogenous condition, participants could freely choose on each trial to inhibit or feel the emotions elicited by the picture. In an exogenous condition, a visual cue instructed them to either feel or inhibit the emotion elicited by the picture. Participants' subjective ratings of intensity of experienced emotion showed an interaction effect between source of control (endogenous/exogenous) and feel/inhibit based on a stronger modulation between feel and inhibition for the endogenous compared to the exogenous condition. Endogenous inhibition of emotions was associated with dorso-medial prefrontal cortex activation, whereas exogenous inhibition was found associated with lateral prefrontal cortex activation. Thus, the brain regions for both endogenous and exogenous inhibition of emotion are highly similar to those for inhibition of motor actions in Brass and Haggard (J Neurosci 27:9141-9145, 2007), Kühn et al. (Hum Brain Mapp 30:2834-2843, 2009). Functional connectivity analyses showed that dorsofrontomedial cortex exerts greater control onto pre-supplementary motor area during endogenous inhibition compared to endogenous feel. This functional dissociation between an endogenous, fronto-medial and an exogenous, fronto-lateral inhibition centre has important implications for our understanding of emotion regulation in health and psychopathology.

  3. Lycopene Inhibits Propagation of Chlamydia Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naylia A. Zigangirova

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Chlamydiaceae is a family of obligate intracellular pathogenic bacteria with similar developmental cycles and cell biology responsible for a wide range of diseases in different hosts including genital and eye inflammatory diseases, arthritis, and inflammatory diseases of the respiratory and cardiovascular systems. In the present paper, we report that lycopene, one of the main dietary carotenoids, which is present in tomato and some other fruits, has a strong inhibitory effect on C. trachomatis and C. pneumoniae infections in alveolar macrophages. This finding was documented by both immunofluorescence analysis and electron microscopy. It was noted that lycopene treatment inhibited intracellular phase of the chlamydial developmental cycle and resulted in a significant loss of infectious progeny. The antichlamydial effect of lycopene was also confirmed in a clinical setting. There was a significant reduction of IgG antibodies against C. pneumoniae in the serum of volunteers treated for a month with oral ingestion of 7 mg of lycopene. Additional studies are needed to further explore the antichlamydial activity of lycopene and its possible effect on C. pneumoniae in relation to antichlamydial activity of lycopene to mechanisms of atherosclerosis.

  4. Clofilium inhibits Slick and Slack potassium channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Los Angeles Tejada, Maria; Stolpe, Kathleen; Meinild, Anne-Kristine; Klaerke, Dan A

    2012-01-01

    Slick and Slack high-conductance potassium channels have been recently discovered, and are found in the central nervous system and in the heart. Both channels are activated by Na(+) and Cl(-), and Slick channels are also inhibited by adenosine triphospate (ATP). An important role of setting the resting membrane potential and controlling the basal excitability of neurons has been suggested for these channels. In addition, no specific blockers for these channels are known up to the present. With the purpose of studying the pharmacological characteristics of Slick and Slack channels, the effects of exposure to the antiarrhythmic compound clofilium were evaluated. Clofilium was able to modulate the activity of Slick and Slack channels effectively, with a stronger effect on Slack than Slick channels. In order to evaluate the pharmacological behavior of Slick and Slack channels further, 38 commonly used potassium channel blockers were tested. Screening of these compounds did not reveal any modulators of Slick and Slack channels, except for clofilium. The present study provides a first approach towards elucidating the pharmacological characteristics of Slick and Slack channels and could be the basis for future studies aimed at developing potent and specific blockers and activators for these channels.

  5. Diabetic Myonecrosis: An Atypical Presentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Hernán Martínez

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Diabetic myonecrosis is a frequently unrecognized complication of longstanding and poorly controlled diabetes mellitus. The clinical presentation is swelling, pain, and tenderness of the involved muscle, most commonly the thigh muscles. Management consists of conservative measures including analgesia and rest. Short-term prognosis is good, but long-term prognosis is poor with most patients dying within 5 years. Failure to properly identify this condition will expose the patient to aggressive measures that could result in increased morbidity. To our knowledge this is the first case reported in which there was involvement of multiple muscle groups including upper and lower limbs.

  6. Variable retinal presentations in nanophthalmos

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, A.; Zafar, S.N.

    2009-01-01

    Nanophthalmos is an uncommon developmental ocular disorder characterized by a small eye with short axial length, high hyperopia and high lens/eye volume ratio due to arrested development of the globe in all directions. Different types of fundus changes can rarely occur with nanophthalmos. We describe five cases of nanophthalmos, each of them presenting with a different fundus appearance. Our case series highlights variability of pigmentary changes from retinal flecks to bone spicules and bull's eye maculopathy, which are rare in the combinations described here. (author)

  7. Present art of reactivity determination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaneko, Yoshihiko; Nakano, Masafumi; Matsuura, Shojiro

    1977-01-01

    Experimental techniques for reactivity determination of a reactor have been one of the long standing subjects in reactor physics. Recently, such a requirement was proposed by the reactor designers and operators that the values of reactivity should be measured more accurately. This is because importance is emphasized for the role of reactivity to the performance of reactor safety, economics and operability. Motivated by the requirement, some remarkable progresses are being made for the improvement of the experimental techniques. Then, the present review summarizes the research activities on this subject, identifies several reactor physics problems to be overcome, and makes mention of the future targets. (auth.)

  8. Addison's disease presenting with perimyocarditis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baranski Lamback, Elisa; Morandi, Grazia; Rapti, Eleni; Christov, Georgi; Brogan, Paul A; Hindmarsh, Peter

    2018-01-26

    Polyglandular autoimmune syndrome (PGA) and eosinophilic granulomatosis with polyangiitis (EGPA) do not seem to represent a coincidental association. A case of a 15-year-old boy is reported who presented with severe systemic inflammation, perimyocarditis and cardiogenic shock, in whom EGPA was initially suspected and later diagnosed with autoimmune adrenalitis with PGA. The severity of the systemic inflammation and perimyocarditis suggests a more widespread autoimmune-mediated process. Autoimmune adrenal insufficiency should be considered in all cases of pericarditis and perimyocarditis, especially when the severity of clinical manifestations exceeds the expected for the severity of the cardiac findings, as timely identification and prompt treatment may be life-saving.

  9. Metastatic liposarcoma present in mediastinum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vazquez Gonzalez, Jose Manuel; Danta Fundora, Debora; Collado Otero, Juan Carlos; Paredes Lopez, Dagmar I

    2009-01-01

    Authors present the case of a woman aged 59 operated on in three occasions due to the presence of neck nodules. Biopsy from two of them informs that be about a pleomorphous liposarcoma. After 6 years she came to consultation by a picture of high retrosternal pain and slight dyspnea. Thorax tomography shows a solid mass in anterior mediastinum. We made exeresis of a 10 cm diameter soft solid mass. Pathological Anatomy Service reported on relapse of a pleomorphous liposarcoma. In general, the postoperative course was satisfactory. Literature reviewed shows that the surgical treatment is the more used procedure in these cases. (author)

  10. Presentation at Innoventure Annual Competition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2010-03-31

    This report documents the components of the workshop presented at the recent annual competition for the Innoventure program. The goal of the workshop was to focus on the delivery of science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) concepts in a hands-on experiential learning format to increase interest in national security careers at NNSA, most of which are in the STEM fields. This work is a part of the National Security Preparedness Project (NSPP), being performed under a Department of Energy (DOE)/National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) grant.

  11. Vitality of optical vortices (Presentation)

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Roux, FS

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available stream_source_info Roux3_2014.pdf.txt stream_content_type text/plain stream_size 3018 Content-Encoding UTF-8 stream_name Roux3_2014.pdf.txt Content-Type text/plain; charset=UTF-8 Title Vitality of optical vortices F Stef... Roux Presented at Complex Light and Optical Force VIII SPIE Photonics West 2014 Moscone Center, San Francisco, California USA 5 February 2014 CSIR National Laser Centre, Pretoria, South Africa – p. 1/11 Speckle Amplitude Phase – p. 2/11 Vortex...

  12. Cartography past, present and future

    CERN Document Server

    Rhind, DW

    2013-01-01

    Making maps dates back at least four thousand years and it is widely recognised that many maps are of great historical value and present a skilled method of summarising the real world on a sheet of paper. Less well known is the judgement involved in the selection and simplification of features, the complex transformation of space and the exacting standards which are needed in cartography. This book is primarily a tribute to Professor F.J. Ormeling, former President and Secretary/Treasurer of the ICA and gives a wide ranging review of the current status of cartography, how this status was atta

  13. Inhibition of photosynthesis by carbon monoxide and suspension of the carbon monoxide inhibition by light

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gewitz, H S; Voelker, W

    1963-08-01

    The experimental subject was the autotroph Chlorella pyrenoidosa. It was found that growth conditions determine whether the alga is inhibited by carbon monoxide or not. Respiration and photosynthesis are inhibited by carbon monoxide if the cells have grown rapidly under high light intensities. The inhibition of respiration and photosynthesis found in such cells is completely reversible. The inhibition depends not only on carbon monoxide pressure, but also on the oxygen pressure prevailing at the same time. 5 references, 1 figure, 3 tables.

  14. STS-95 Post Flight Presentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-01-01

    The STS-95 flight crew, Cmdr. Curtis L. Brown, Pilot Steven W. Lindsey, Mission Specialists Scott E. Parazynski, Stephen K. Robinson, and Pedro Duque, and Payload Specialists Chiaki Mukai and John H. Glenn present a video mission over-view of their space flight. Images include prelaunch activities such as eating the traditional breakfast, crew suit-up, and the ride out to the launch pad. Also, included are various panoramic views of the shuttle on the pad. The crew can be seen being readied in the "whiteroom" for their mission. After the closing of the hatch and arm retraction, launch activities are shown including countdown, engine ignition, launch, and the separation of the Solid Rocket Boosters. The primary objectives, which include the conducting of a variety of science experiments in the pressurized SPACEHAB module, the deployment and retrieval of the Spartan free-flyer payload, and operations with the HST Orbiting Systems Test (HOST) and the International Extreme Ultraviolet Hitchhiker (IEH) payloads are discussed in both the video and still photo presentation.

  15. OROPHARYNGEAL TUBERCULOSIS: AN UNUSUAL PRESENTATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M H Dadgarnia

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available "nTuberculosis (TB still represents a major public health problem worldwide. The primary form of disease is most often localized to the lung. In a minority of patients, progressive pulmonary disease spreads to other organ systems through self inoculation via infected sputum, blood and lymphatic system, establishing the secondary form of tuberculosis. We present a patient that was referred to us with complaint of ulcerative mouth lesions from 3 months ago. In physical examination multiple erythematous and irregularly ulcerative lesions affecting soft palate area, uvula and anterior tonsillar pillar was noted bilaterally. Punch biopsy was done from several points that revealed chronic granulomatous inflammation. Ziehl-Nielsen staining of cultured specimen demonstrated acid-fast bacilli. Chest X-ray showed apical pulmonary involvement, suggesting tuberculosis infection. Patient was treated with anti-tuberculosis 4 drugs regimen. In the one year follow-up period after complete treatment; patient didn't have any evidence of disease. Oral and oropharyngeal TB lesions are uncommon, it is estimated that only 0.05-5% of total TB cases may present with oral manifestations, but should be an important consideration in the differential diagnosis of lesions that appear in the oral cavity and oropharynx. The secondary form is more frequent and involves mainly the tongue but involvement of pharynx is quite rare condition. Although tuberculosis of oropharynx is relatively rare, with the increasing incidence of tuberculosis, it must be considered in the differential diagnosis of atypical ulcerative lesions of the mouth and oropharynx.

  16. Early presentation of primary glioblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faguer, R; Tanguy, J-Y; Rousseau, A; Clavreul, A; Menei, P

    2014-08-01

    Clinical and neuroimaging findings of glioblastomas (GBM) at an early stage have rarely been described and those tumors are most probably under-diagnosed. Furthermore, their genetic alterations, to our knowledge, have never been previously reported. We report the clinical as well as neuroimaging findings of four early cases of patients with GBM. In our series, early stage GBM occurred at a mean age of 57 years. All patients had seizures as their first symptom. In all early stages, MRI showed a hyperintense signal on T2-weighted sequences and an enhancement on GdE-T1WI sequences. A hyperintense signal on diffusion sequences with a low ADC value was also found. These early observed occurrences of GBM developed rapidly and presented the MRI characteristics of classic GBM within a few weeks. The GBM size was multiplied by 32 in one month. Immunohistochemical analysis indicated the de novo nature of these tumors, i.e. absence of mutant IDH1 R132H protein expression, which is a diagnostic marker of low-grade diffuse glioma and secondary GBM. A better knowledge of early GBM presentation would allow a more suitable management of the patients and may improve their prognosis. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  17. Teratology - past, present and future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ujházy, Eduard; Mach, Mojmír; Navarová, Jana; Brucknerová, Ingrid; Dubovický, Michal

    2012-12-01

    Teratology is the science that studies the causes, mechanisms, and patterns of abnormal development. The authors present an updated overview of the most important milestones and stages of the development of modern teratology. Development of knowledge and society led to the recognition that causes of congenital developmental disorders (CDDs) might be caused by various mechanical effects, foetal diseases, and retarded or arrested development of the embryo and foetus. Based on the analysis of the historical development of hypotheses and theories representing a decisive contribution to this field, we present a survey of the six Wilson's fundamental principles of teratology. The aim of observing these principles is to get insight into developmental relations and to understand mechanisms of action on the level of cell populations (elementary morphogenetic processes), tissues and organs. It is important to realise that any negative intervention into the normal course of these processes, either on genetic or non-genetic basis, inevitably leads to a sequence of subsequent changes resulting in CDDs. Moreover, the classical toxicologic monotonic dose-response paradigm recently has been challenged by the so-called "low dose-hypothesis", particularly in the case of endocrine active substances. These include some pesticides, dioxins, polychlorobiphenyls (PCBs), and bisphenol A. Despite modern approaches of molecular biology and genetics, along with top diagnostic techniques, we are still not able to identify the actual cause in more than 65 to 70% of all congenital defects classified as having an unknown etiology. Today CDDs include any birth defect, either morphological, biochemical, or behavioural.

  18. Cutaneous sporotrichosis: Unusual clinical presentations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahajan Vikram

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Three unusual clinical forms of sporotrichosis described in this paper will be a primer for the clinicians for an early diagnosis and treatment, especially in its unusual presentations. Case 1, a 52-year-old man, developed sporotrichosis over pre-existing facial nodulo-ulcerative basal cell carcinoma of seven-year duration, due to its contamination perhaps from topical herbal pastes and lymphocutaneous sporotrichosis over right hand/forearm from facial lesion/herbal paste. Case 2, a 25-year-old woman, presented with disseminated systemic-cutaneous, osteoarticular and possibly pleural (effusion sporotrichosis. There was no laboratory evidence of tuberculosis and treatment with anti-tuberculosis drugs (ATT did not benefit. Both these cases were diagnosed by histopathology/culture of S. schenckii from tissue specimens. Case 3, a 20-year-old girl, had multiple intensely pruritic, nodular lesions over/around left knee of two-year duration. She was diagnosed clinically as a case of prurigo nodularis and histologically as cutaneous tuberculosis, albeit, other laboratory investigations and treatment with ATT did not support the diagnosis. All the three patients responded well to saturated solution of potassium iodide (SSKI therapy. A high clinical suspicion is important in early diagnosis and treatment to prevent chronicity and morbidity in these patients. SSKI is fairly safe and effective when itraconazole is not affordable/ available.

  19. Presentation Extensions of the SOAP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carnright, Robert; Stodden, David; Coggi, John

    2009-01-01

    A set of extensions of the Satellite Orbit Analysis Program (SOAP) enables simultaneous and/or sequential presentation of information from multiple sources. SOAP is used in the aerospace community as a means of collaborative visualization and analysis of data on planned spacecraft missions. The following definitions of terms also describe the display modalities of SOAP as now extended: In SOAP terminology, View signifies an animated three-dimensional (3D) scene, two-dimensional still image, plot of numerical data, or any other visible display derived from a computational simulation or other data source; a) "Viewport" signifies a rectangular portion of a computer-display window containing a view; b) "Palette" signifies a collection of one or more viewports configured for simultaneous (split-screen) display in the same window; c) "Slide" signifies a palette with a beginning and ending time and an animation time step; and d) "Presentation" signifies a prescribed sequence of slides. For example, multiple 3D views from different locations can be crafted for simultaneous display and combined with numerical plots and other representations of data for both qualitative and quantitative analysis. The resulting sets of views can be temporally sequenced to convey visual impressions of a sequence of events for a planned mission.

  20. Bilirubin present in diverse angiosperms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pirone, Cary; Johnson, Jodie V; Quirke, J Martin E; Priestap, Horacio A; Lee, David

    2010-01-01

    Bilirubin is an orange-yellow tetrapyrrole produced from the breakdown of heme by mammals and some other vertebrates. Plants, algae and cyanobacteria synthesize molecules similar to bilirubin, including the protein-bound bilins and phytochromobilin which harvest or sense light. Recently, we discovered bilirubin in the arils of Strelitzia nicolai, the White Bird of Paradise Tree, which was the first example of this molecule in a higher plant. Subsequently, we identified bilirubin in both the arils and the flowers of Strelitzia reginae, the Bird of Paradise Flower. In the arils of both species, bilirubin is present as the primary pigment, and thus functions to produce colour. Previously, no tetrapyrroles were known to generate display colour in plants. We were therefore interested in determining whether bilirubin is broadly distributed in the plant kingdom and whether it contributes to colour in other species. In this paper, we use HPLC/UV and HPLC/UV/electrospray ionization-tandem mass spectrometry (HPLC/UV/ESI-MS/MS) to search for bilirubin in 10 species across diverse angiosperm lineages. Bilirubin was present in eight species from the orders Zingiberales, Arecales and Myrtales, but only contributed to colour in species within the Strelitziaceae. The wide distribution of bilirubin in angiosperms indicates the need to re-assess some metabolic details of an important and universal biosynthetic pathway in plants, and further explore its evolutionary history and function. Although colour production was limited to the Strelitziaceae in this study, further sampling may indicate otherwise.

  1. Anaphylactic reactions presenting with hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solmazgul, Emrullah; Kutlu, Ali; Dogru, Salim; Ozalper, Veysel; Cetindagli, Ibrahim; Sezer, Ogun; Salmanoglu, Musa; Kilic, Erol; Karabacak, Ercan; Ozturk, Sami

    2016-01-01

    Although a few case reports about hypertensive anaphylaxis (HA) are available in the present literature, there is no study about the prevalence of HA. In this study, we review our cases with anaphylaxis presenting with hypertension and ascertain its prevalence. The documents of the patients who had anaphylactic reactions after the procedures performed for the diagnosis and treatment of allergic diseases in GATA Haydarpasa Clinic of Allergy and Immunology between January 2010 and December 2014 were retrospectively reviewed. Within the study period, 324 patients had undergone 4332 procedures in which 62 of them had developed anaphylaxis. During the procedures, the rate of anaphylaxis was found to be 1.43 %. The rate of HA among the anaphylaxis patients was 12.9 % (8 of 62 patients). During treatments, 2 patients received adrenaline injections without any adverse reaction. HA may be seen at a considerable rate during an anaphylactic reaction. Anaphylaxis and hypertension can be recovered by adrenaline injection when required. According to the best of our knowledge, this study is the first original study about the prevalence of HA in English-language medical literature.

  2. 7-Piperazinethylchrysin inhibits melanoma cell proliferation by ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In B16F10 and A375 cells, treatment with PEC caused the inhibition ... Conclusion: PEC inhibited melanoma cell proliferation, apparently by blocking the cell cycle at G0/G1 .... all statistical analyses. .... Financial support from the Department of.

  3. Inhibition: Mental Control Process or Mental Resource?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Im-Bolter, Nancie; Johnson, Janice; Ling, Daphne; Pascual-Leone, Juan

    2015-01-01

    The current study tested 2 models of inhibition in 45 children with language impairment and 45 children with normally developing language; children were aged 7 to 12 years. Of interest was whether a model of inhibition as a mental-control process (i.e., executive function) or as a mental resource would more accurately reflect the relations among…

  4. The pharmacology of visuospatial attention and inhibition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Logemann, H.N.A.

    2013-01-01

    Attention and inhibition are of vital importance in everyday functioning. Problems of attention and inhibition are central to disorders such as Attention Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD). Both bias and disengagement key components of visuospatial attention. Bias refers to neuronal signals that

  5. Inhibition of human pancreatic and biliary output but not intestinal motility by physiological intraileal lipid loads

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Keller, Jutta; Holst, Jens Juul; Layer, Peter

    2005-01-01

    Lipid perfusion into the distal ileal lumen at supraphysiological loads inhibits pancreatic exocrine secretion and gastrointestinal motility in humans. In the present study, we sought to determine the effects of physiological postprandial intraileal lipid concentrations on endogenously stimulated...

  6. Uncommon presentation of pulmonary aspergilloma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baradkar V

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Cases of pulmonary aspergilloma without any predisposing factors are rarely reported. Clinical presentation varies from case to case. Here, we report a case of pulmonary aspergilloma in a 60-year-old male patient who was admitted to the Intensive Respiratory Care Unit with spontaneous pneumothorax. The patient had a history of dyspnea on exertion since 9 months and mild haemoptysis since the last 6 months. A computerised tomographic scan of the lungs showed a lesion in the left main bronchus along with obstructive emphysema of the right lung, moderate pneumothorax and mediastinal emphysema. Bronchoscopy was performed and the biopsy samples were processed for histopathological examination and culture on Sabouraud′s dextrose agar, which yielded growth of Aspergillus flavus. Repeat sputum samples also yielded the growth of A. flavus . The patient responded to intravenous liposomaamphotericin B and intercostal drainage.

  7. Site selection: Past and present

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tilford, N.R.

    1994-01-01

    Site selection has been going on since the earliest times. The process has evolved through the Industrial Revolution to the present period of exploding population and environmental awareness. Now the work must be done both with increasing sophistication and greater transparency. Modern techniques for site selection have been developed during the last two decades or so, utilizing a teachable body of knowledge and a growing literature. Many firms and individuals have contributed to this growing field. The driving force has been the need for such a process in siting and licensing of critical facilities such as nuclear power plants. A list of crucial, documented steps for identifying social impacts and acceptability are provided. A recent innovation is the self-selection method developed by government. The Superconducting Supercollider serves as an example of this approach. Geological or geologically dependent factors often dominate the process. The role as engineering and environmental geoscientists is to provide responsible leadership, consultation, and communication to the effort

  8. Neurocysticercosis presenting as pseudobulbar palsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arinaganahalli Subbanna Praveen Kumar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Neurocysticercosis (NCC is the most common helminthic infestation of the central nervous system (CNS and a leading cause of acquired epilepsy worldwide. The common manifestations of NCC are seizures and headache. The NCC as a cause of pseudobulbar palsy is very unusual and not reported yet in the literature. A pseudobulbar palsy can occur in any disorder that causes bilateral corticobulbar disease. The common etiologies of pseudobulbar palsy are vascular, demyelinative, or motor neuron disease. We report a 38-year-old female patient who presented with partial seizures and pseudobulbar palsy. The MRI brain showed multiple small cysts with scolex in both the cerebral hemispheres and a giant intraparenchymal cyst. Our patient responded well to standard treatment of neurocysticercosis and antiepileptics.

  9. Present challenges in hadrontherapy techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amaldi, U.; Braccini, S.

    2011-07-01

    Hadrontherapy is a high-precision technique in cancer radiation therapy, which allows obtaining a superior conformal treatment with respect to photons used in conventional radiation therapy. To reach this ambitious goal without reducing the patient throughput needed in a hospital-based environment, the physical and radiobiological properties of charged hadrons, protons and carbon ions in particular, have to be exploited at best, making use of the most modern technologies issued from research in nuclear and particle physics. In the present days, we are assisting to a continuous technological challenge, leading to the conception and to the development of innovative methods and instruments. In this paper, the most relevant challenges in dose delivery systems, gantries, imaging, quality assurance and particle accelerators are reviewed.

  10. Ebolavirus Evolution: Past and Present.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de La Vega, Marc-Antoine; Stein, Derek; Kobinger, Gary P

    2015-01-01

    The past year has marked the most devastating Ebola outbreak the world has ever witnessed, with over 28,000 cases and over 11,000 deaths. Ebola virus (EBOV) has now been around for almost 50 years. In this review, we discuss past and present outbreaks of EBOV and how those variants evolved over time. We explore and discuss selective pressures that drive the evolution of different Ebola variants, and how they may modify the efficacy of therapeutic treatments and vaccines currently being developed. Finally, given the unprecedented size and spread of the outbreak, as well as the extended period of replication in human hosts, specific attention is given to the 2014-2015 West African outbreak variant (Makona).

  11. Ebolavirus Evolution: Past and Present.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marc-Antoine de La Vega

    Full Text Available The past year has marked the most devastating Ebola outbreak the world has ever witnessed, with over 28,000 cases and over 11,000 deaths. Ebola virus (EBOV has now been around for almost 50 years. In this review, we discuss past and present outbreaks of EBOV and how those variants evolved over time. We explore and discuss selective pressures that drive the evolution of different Ebola variants, and how they may modify the efficacy of therapeutic treatments and vaccines currently being developed. Finally, given the unprecedented size and spread of the outbreak, as well as the extended period of replication in human hosts, specific attention is given to the 2014-2015 West African outbreak variant (Makona.

  12. Tritium practices past and present

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gede, V.P.; Gildea, P.D.

    1980-01-01

    History of the production and use of tritium, as well as handling techniques, are reviewed. Handling techniques first used at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory made use of glass vacuum systems and relatively crude ion chambers for monitoring airborne activity. The first use of inert atmosphere glove boxes demonstrated that uptake through the skin could be a serious personnel exposure problem. Growing environmental concerns in the early 1970's resulted in the implementation by the Atomic Energy Commission of a new criteria to limit atmospheric tritium releases to levels as low as practicable. An important result of the new criteria was the development of containment and recovery systems to capture tritium rather than vent it to the atmosphere. The Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, Tritium Research Laboratory containment and decontamination systems are presented as a typical example of this technology. The application of computers to control systems is expected to provide the greatest potential for change in future tritium handling practices

  13. Speaker's presentations. Energy supply security

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pierret, Ch.

    2000-01-01

    This document is a collection of most of the papers used by the speakers of the European Seminar on Energy Supply Security organised in Paris (at the French Ministry of Economy, Finance and Industry) on 24 November 2000 by the General Direction of Energy and Raw Materials, in co-operation with the European Commission and the French Planning Office. About 250 attendees were present, including a lot of high level Civil Servants from the 15 European State members, and their questions have allowed to create a rich debate. It took place five days before the publication, on 29 November 2000, by the European Commission, of the Green Paper 'Towards a European Strategy for the Security of Energy Supply'. This French initiative, which took place within the framework of the European Presidency of the European Union, during the second half-year 2000. will bring a first impetus to the brainstorming launched by the Commission. (author)

  14. Different presentations of pulmonary criptococosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Londono Palacio, Natalia; Ojeda Paulina; Ortiz, Guillermo; Alwers Rolf C; Munive, Abraham Ali

    1998-01-01

    We presented 4 cases studies of criptococosis, all of them with pulmonary compromise, diagnosed at Hospital Santa Clara in a period of 5 years. It's important to note that none of the patients were HIV positive. In the first case studied the cellular immune compromise has, a multifactorial origin: rheumatoid arthritis and the administration of corticoids. In the second case studied, SLE can explain its origin. In the third case studied, because of the short hospital stay, the investigation with respect to the etiology of the immune-compromise was limited. In the fourth case studied, because of a low CD4 count Elisa immunoassay for HIV was repeated without its confirmation. Spontaneous recuperation was obtained, being free of infection for a period of five years

  15. Director general presentation to personnel

    CERN Multimedia

    2016-01-01

    Dear Colleagues, Many important discussions are scheduled for the upcoming Council Week (13-17 June) on topics including the Medium-Term Plan, the Pension Fund and other matters of great relevance to us.   I would therefore like to share the main outcome of the week with you and I invite you to join me and the Directors in the Main Auditorium at 10 a.m. on Thursday 23 June. The meeting will last about one hour and a webcast will also be available. Best regards, Fabiola Gianotti DG presentation to personnel Thursday 23 June at 10 am Main Auditorium Retransmission in Council Chamber, IT Auditorium, Kjell Jonhsen Auditorium, Prevessin 864-1-C02 Webcast on cern.ch/webcast More information on the event page.

  16. Atypical presentations of celiac disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Balasa Adriana Luminita

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available In this study we evaluated the association of celiac disease in 81 children with autoimmune disease and genetic syndromes over a two years periods (January 2014 to July 2016 in Pediatric Clinic in Constanta. Because the extraintestinal symptoms are an atypical presentation of celiac disease we determined in these children the presence of celiac disease antibodies: Anti-tissue Transglutaminase Antibody IgA and IgA total serum level as a screening method followeds in selective cases by Anti-tissue Transglutaminase Antibody IgG, anti-endomysial antibodies, deamidated gliadin antibodies IgA and IgG and intestinal biopsia. In our study 8 patients had been diagnosed with celiac disease with extraintestinal symptoms, of which 4 with type 1 diabetes, 1 patient with ataxia, 2 patients with dermatitis herpetiformis and 1 patient with Down syndrome that associate also autoimmune thyroiditis, alopecia areata, enamel hypoplasia.

  17. Oropharyngeal styloids: An unusual presentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lathadevi Hassan Thotappa

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The close proximity of the styloid process to many of the vital neurovascular structures in the neck makes it clinically significant. The styloid process is said to be elongated if it is longer than 3.0 cm in length. Anatomical variations are very common and clinical symptoms arising from such variations have to be recognized. Elongated styloid processes may cause chronic throat pain along with foreign body sensation, dysphagia, vague facial pain, and otalgia. Surgical excision of an elongated styloid is considered as a satisfactory treatment for such cases. Here, we present a unique case of bilaterally elongated styloids that could be visualized just by depressing the tongue, when they appeared like the tusks of an elephant in the oropharyngeal region.

  18. Splenic abscess: a rare presentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohit Bhatia

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Splenic abscess is a rare clinical entity with an incidence of 0.2-0.7% in autopsy-based studies. When untreated, splenic abscess is associated with nearly 100% mortality; in treated patients, the mortality rate is 16.6% during the first 90 days. It mostly occurs in patients with neoplasia, immunodeficiency, trauma, diabetes or splenic infarct. The incidence of splenic abscess is thought to be growing because of the increase in the number of immunocompromised patients who are particularly at risk for this disease and also because of the widespread use of diagnostic modalities. However, the optimal treatment for this remains unclear. We present a case of a 42-year-old man diagnosed with multiloculated splenic abscess and was subjected to splenectomy.

  19. Safeguards instrumentation: past, present, future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Higinbotham, W.A.

    1982-01-01

    Instruments are essential for accounting, for surveillance and for protection of nuclear materials. The development and application of such instrumentation is reviewed, with special attention to international safeguards applications. Active and passive nondestructive assay techniques are some 25 years of age. The important advances have been in learning how to use them effectively for specific applications, accompanied by major advances in radiation detectors, electronics, and, more recently, in mini-computers. The progress in seals has been disappointingly slow. Surveillance cameras have been widely used for many applications other than safeguards. The revolution in TV technology will have important implications. More sophisticated containment/surveillance equipment is being developed but has yet to be exploited. On the basis of this history, some expectations for instrumentation in the near future are presented

  20. Cavernous hemangioma presenting marked hyperostosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobata, Hitoshi; Miyake, Hiroji; Kitamura, Junji; Kajikawa, Hiroshi; Ohta, Tomio

    1988-01-01

    The authors report here a case of hemangioma of the left parietal bone which presented headache and papilledema. This patient is a 37-year-old female who had, prior to admission, complained of increasing headache for one year and blurred vision for three months. She had no history of head injury. Local physical examinations revealed a slight bulging in her left parietal region which was insensitive to palpation and not adherent to the overlying scalp. Neurological examinations revealed bilateral papilledema and an incongruous bitemporal upper quadrant defect in the visual field. All the other neurological and laboratory data were normal. A plain skull roentogenogram showed a 9 x 9 cm osteolytic and characteristic honeycomb lesion in the parietal region. Systemic bone survey revealed a similar lesion in the right tibia which was not histologically examined. A marked accumulation of isotopes was detected on the bone scintigrams at both lesions. Selective external carotid angiograms demonstrated a tumor stain fed by the superficial temporal, occipital, and middle meningial arteries. CT scans of the brain and skull clearly showed a local thickening of and structural changes in the skull bone and also a mass effect on the brain and lateral ventricle. The lesioned bone was removed en bloc and replaced by an artificial bone. It was highly vascular, but not adherent to the overlying dura. The post-operative course was uneventful, and the headache and papilledema disappeared. Hemangioma of the skull presenting marked hyperostosis, as reported above, seems to be rare. In addition, in this case, skeletal angioma without any clinical manifestation was detected. Clinical and radiological pictures of the hemangioma of the skull and other bones were briefly discussed. (author)

  1. Inhibition of ethylene production by cobaltous ion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lau, O.L; Yang, S.F.

    1976-01-01

    The effect of Co 2+ on ethylene production by mung bean (Phaseolus aureus Roxb.) and by apple tissues was studied. Co 2+ , depending on concentrations applied, effectively inhibited ethylene production by both tissues. It also strongly inhibited the ethylene production induced by IAA, kinetin, IAA plus kinetin, Ca 2+ , kinetin plus Ca 2+ , or Cu 2+ treatments in mung bean hypocotyl segments. While Co 2+ greatly inhibited ethylene production, it had little effect on the respiration of apple tissue, indicating that Co 2+ does not exert its inhibitory effect as a general metabolic inhibitor. Ni 2+ , which belongs to the same group as Co 2+ in the periodic table, also markedly curtailed both the basal and the induced ethylene production by apple and mung bean hypocotyl tissues. In a system in which kinetin and Ca 2+ were applied together, kinetin greatly enhanced Ca 2+ uptake, thus enhancing ethylene production. Co 2+ , however, slightly inhibited the uptake of Ca 2+ but appreciably inhibited ethylene production, either in the presence or in the absence of kinetin. Tracer experiments using apple tissue indicated that Co 2+ strongly inhibited the in vivo conversion of L-[U-- 14 C]methionine to 14 C-ethylene. These data suggested that Co 2+ inhibited ethylene production by inhibiting the conversion of methionine to ethylene, a common step which is required for ethylene formation by higher plants. Co 2+ is known to promote elongation, leaf expansion, and hook opening in excised plant parts in response to applied auxins or cytokinins.Since ethylene is known to inhibit those growth phenomena, it is suggested that Co 2+ exerts its promotive effect, at least in part, by inhibiting ethylene formation

  2. Fluoxetine regulates cell growth inhibition of interferon-α.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yu-Min; Yu, Bu-Chin; Chiu, Wen-Tai; Sun, Hung-Yu; Chien, Yu-Chieh; Su, Hui-Chen; Yen, Shu-Yang; Lai, Hsin-Wen; Bai, Chyi-Huey; Young, Kung-Chia; Tsao, Chiung-Wen

    2016-10-01

    Fluoxetine, a well-known anti-depression agent, may act as a chemosensitizer to assist and promote cancer therapy. However, how fluoxetine regulates cellular signaling to enhance cellular responses against tumor cell growth remains unclear. In the present study, addition of fluoxetine promoted growth inhibition of interferon-alpha (IFN-α) in human bladder carcinoma cells but not in normal uroepithelial cells through lessening the IFN-α-induced apoptosis but switching to cause G1 arrest, and maintaining the IFN-α-mediated reduction in G2/M phase. Activations and signal transducer and transactivator (STAT)-1 and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPAR-α) were involved in this process. Chemical inhibitions of STAT-1 or PPAR-α partially rescued bladder carcinoma cells from IFN-α-mediated growth inhibition via blockades of G1 arrest, cyclin D1 reduction, p53 downregulation and p27 upregulation in the presence of fluoxetine. However, the functions of both proteins were not involved in the control of fluoxetine over apoptosis and maintained the declined G2/M phase of IFN-α. These results indicated that activation of PPAR-α and STAT-1 participated, at least in part, in growth inhibition of IFN-α in the presence of fluoxetine.

  3. Retrieval-Induced Inhibition in Short-Term Memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Min-Suk; Choi, Joongrul

    2015-07-01

    We used a visual illusion called motion repulsion as a model system for investigating competition between two mental representations. Subjects were asked to remember two random-dot-motion displays presented in sequence and then to report the motion directions for each. Remembered motion directions were shifted away from the actual motion directions, an effect similar to the motion repulsion observed during perception. More important, the item retrieved second showed greater repulsion than the item retrieved first. This suggests that earlier retrieval exerted greater inhibition on the other item being held in short-term memory. This retrieval-induced motion repulsion could be explained neither by reduced cognitive resources for maintaining short-term memory nor by continued inhibition between short-term memory representations. These results indicate that retrieval of memory representations inhibits other representations in short-term memory. We discuss mechanisms of retrieval-induced inhibition and their implications for the structure of memory. © The Author(s) 2015.

  4. Neural mechanisms of impaired fear inhibition in posttraumatic stress disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tanja eJovanovic

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD can develop in some individuals who are exposed to an event that causes extreme fear, horror, or helplessness (APA, 1994. PTSD is a complex and heterogeneous disorder, which is often co-morbid with depression, substance abuse, and anxiety disorders such as panic or social phobia. Given this complexity, progress in the field can be greatly enhanced by focusing on phenotypes that are more proximal to the neurobiology of the disorder. Such neurobiological intermediate phenotypes can provide investigative tools to increase our understanding of the roots of the disorder and develop better prevention or intervention programs. In the present paper, we argue that the inhibition of fear responses is an intermediate phenotype that is related to both the neurocircuitry associated with the disorder, and is linked to its clinical symptoms. An advantage of focusing on fear inhibition is that the neurobiology of fear has been well investigated in animal models providing the necessary groundwork in understanding alterations. Furthermore, because many paradigms can be tested across species, fear inhibition is an ideal translational tool. Here we review both the behavioral tests and measures of fear inhibition and the related neurocircuitry in neuroimaging studies with both healthy and clinical samples.

  5. Gas hydrate inhibition by perturbation of liquid water structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sa, Jeong-Hoon; Kwak, Gye-Hoon; Han, Kunwoo; Ahn, Docheon; Lee, Kun-Hong

    2015-06-01

    Natural gas hydrates are icy crystalline materials that contain hydrocarbons, which are the primary energy source for this civilization. The abundance of naturally occurring gas hydrates leads to a growing interest in exploitation. Despite their potential as energy resources and in industrial applications, there is insufficient understanding of hydrate kinetics, which hinders the utilization of these invaluable resources. Perturbation of liquid water structure by solutes has been proposed to be a key process in hydrate inhibition, but this hypothesis remains unproven. Here, we report the direct observation of the perturbation of the liquid water structure induced by amino acids using polarized Raman spectroscopy, and its influence on gas hydrate nucleation and growth kinetics. Amino acids with hydrophilic and/or electrically charged side chains disrupted the water structure and thus provided effective hydrate inhibition. The strong correlation between the extent of perturbation by amino acids and their inhibition performance constitutes convincing evidence for the perturbation inhibition mechanism. The present findings bring the practical applications of gas hydrates significantly closer, and provide a new perspective on the freezing and melting phenomena of naturally occurring gas hydrates.

  6. Thrombomodulin inhibits the activation of eosinophils and mast cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roeen, Ziaurahman; Toda, Masaaki; D'Alessandro-Gabazza, Corina N; Onishi, Masahiro; Kobayashi, Tetsu; Yasuma, Taro; Urawa, Masahito; Taguchi, Osamu; Gabazza, Esteban C

    2015-01-01

    Eosinophils and mast cells play critical roles in the pathogenesis of bronchial asthma. Activation of both cells leads to the release of pro-inflammatory mediators in the airway of asthmatic patients. Recently, we have shown that inhaled thrombomodulin inhibits allergic bronchial asthma in a mouse model. In the present study, we hypothesize that thrombomodulin can inhibit the activation of eosinophils and mast cells. The effect of thrombomodulin on the activation and release of inflammatory mediators from eosinophils and mast cells was evaluated. Thrombomodulin inhibited the eotaxin-induced chemotaxis, upregulation of CD11b and degranulation of eosinophils. Treatment with thrombomodulin also significantly suppressed the degranulation and synthesis of inflammatory cytokines and chemokines in eosinophils and mast cells. Mice treated with a low-dose of inhaled thrombomodulin have decreased number of eosinophils and activated mast cells and Th2 cytokines in the lungs compared to untreated mice. The results of this study suggest that thrombomodulin may modulate allergic responses by inhibiting the activation of both eosinophils and mast cells. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Factors facilitating and inhibiting value stream mapping processes at hospital units in three Nordic countries - a Nordic multicenter study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Winkel, Jørgen; Birgisdóttir, Birna Dröfn; Dudas, Kerstin

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to present observations that may indicate facilitating and inhibiting factors for the VSM process.......The aim of this paper is to present observations that may indicate facilitating and inhibiting factors for the VSM process....

  8. Lysophospholipase inhibition by organophosphorus toxicants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quistad, Gary B.; Casida, John E.

    2004-01-01

    Lysophospholipases (LysoPLAs) are a large family of enzymes for removing lysophospholipids from cell membranes. Potent inhibitors are needed to define the importance of LysoPLAs as targets for toxicants and potential therapeutics. This study considers organophosphorus (OP) inhibitors with emphasis on mouse brain total LysoPLA activity relative to the mipafox-sensitive neuropathy target esterase (NTE)-LysoPLA recently established as 17% of the total activity and important in the action of OP delayed toxicants. The most potent inhibitors of total LysoPLA in mouse brain are isopropyl dodecylphosphonofluoridate (also for LysoPLA of Vibrio bacteria), ethyl octylphosphonofluoridate (EOPF), and two alkyl-benzodioxaphosphorin 2-oxides (BDPOs)[(S)-octyl and dodecyl] (IC50 2-8 nM). OP inhibitors acting in vitro and in vivo differentiate a more sensitive portion but not a distinct NTE-LysoPLA compared with total LysoPLA activity. For 10 active inhibitors, NTE-LysoPLA is 17-fold more sensitive than total LysoPLA, but structure-activity comparisons give a good correlation (r 2 = 0.94) of IC50 values, suggesting active site structural similarity or identity. In mice 4 h after intraperitoneal treatment with discriminating doses, EOPF, tribufos (a plant defoliant), and dodecanesulfonyl fluoride inhibit 41-57% of the total brain LysoPLA and 85-99% of the NTE-LysoPLA activity. Total LysoPLA as well as NTE-LysoPLA is decreased in activity in Nte +/- -haploinsufficient mice compared to their Nte +/+ littermates. The lysolecithin level of spinal cord but not brain is elevated significantly following EOPF treatment (3 mg/kg), thereby focusing attention on localized rather than general alterations in lysophospholipid metabolism in OP-induced hyperactivity and toxicity

  9. Application of various water soluble polymers in gas hydrate inhibition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kamal, Muhammad Shahzad; Hussein, Ibnelwaleed A.; Sultan, Abdullah S.

    2016-01-01

    . This review presents the various types of water soluble polymers used for hydrate inhibition, including conventional and novel polymeric inhibitors along with their limitations. The review covers the relevant properties of vinyl lactam, amide, dendrimeric, fluorinated, and natural biodegradable polymers....... The factors affecting the performance of these polymers and the structure-property relationships are reviewed. A comprehensive review of the techniques used to evaluate the performance of the polymeric inhibitors is given. This review also addresses recent developments, current and future challenges...

  10. Ginger extract inhibits LPS induced macrophage activation and function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruch David

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Macrophages play a dual role in host defence. They act as the first line of defence by mounting an inflammatory response to antigen exposure and also act as antigen presenting cells and initiate the adaptive immune response. They are also the primary infiltrating cells at the site of inflammation. Inhibition of macrophage activation is one of the possible approaches towards modulating inflammation. Both conventional and alternative approaches are being studied in this regard. Ginger, an herbal product with broad anti inflammatory actions, is used as an alternative medicine in a number of inflammatory conditions like rheumatic disorders. In the present study we examined the effect of ginger extract on macrophage activation in the presence of LPS stimulation. Methods Murine peritoneal macrophages were stimulated by LPS in presence or absence of ginger extract and production of proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines were observed. We also studied the effect of ginger extract on the LPS induced expression of MHC II, B7.1, B7.2 and CD40 molecules. We also studied the antigen presenting function of ginger extract treated macrophages by primary mixed lymphocyte reaction. Results We observed that ginger extract inhibited IL-12, TNF-α, IL-1β (pro inflammatory cytokines and RANTES, MCP-1 (pro inflammatory chemokines production in LPS stimulated macrophages. Ginger extract also down regulated the expression of B7.1, B7.2 and MHC class II molecules. In addition ginger extract negatively affected the antigen presenting function of macrophages and we observed a significant reduction in T cell proliferation in response to allostimulation, when ginger extract treated macrophages were used as APCs. A significant decrease in IFN-γ and IL-2 production by T cells in response to allostimulation was also observed. Conclusion In conclusion ginger extract inhibits macrophage activation and APC function and indirectly inhibits T cell activation.

  11. INHIBITION OF CORROSION OF ZINC IN (HNO3 + HCl) ACID ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2015-05-01

    May 1, 2015 ... corrosion inhibitor for zinc in phosphoric acid. Vashi et al.[8-9] studied the corrosion inhibition of zinc in (HNO3 + H2SO4) and (HNO3 + H3PO4) binary acid mixture by aniline. In the present work, the role of aniline as inhibitor for corrosion of zinc in (HNO3 + HCl) binary acid mixture has been reported. 2.

  12. Amebiasis Presenting as Pleuropulmonary Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubitschek, Kenneth R.; Peters, Jay; Nickeson, David; Musher, Daniel M.

    1985-01-01

    Seven patients with amebic liver abscess presenting as pleuropulmonary disease were admitted to hospital initially because of pulmonary symptoms and were found to have amebic liver disease. Three categories of pleuropulmonary involvement included reactive inflammation of the pleura or lung, rupture of a hepatic abscess into the pleural space and rupture of a hepatic abscess into the bronchial airways. The preferred medical treatment is with metronidazole, but rupture of hepatic amebic abscess into the pleural space requires drainage in addition to medical therapy. In contrast, rupture into the bronchus may provide spontaneous drainage so that only medical therapy is needed. Recovery from amebiasis in all three categories is generally complete. Morbidity and mortality increase with failure to correctly identify amebic infection of the liver as the underlying cause. Because, in new cases, no findings specifically suggest that pleuropulmonary disease is a complication of hepatic amebic abscess, this possibility needs to be considered, especially in persons who are at risk of having been infected with amebae. ImagesFigure 1.Figure 2. PMID:4013249

  13. Surface Disinfections: Present and Future

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matteo Saccucci

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The propagation of antibiotic resistance increases the chances of major infections for patients during hospitalization and the spread of health related diseases. Therefore finding new and effective solutions to prevent the proliferation of pathogenic microorganisms is critical, in order to protect hospital environment, such as the surfaces of biomedical devices. Modern nanotechnology has proven to be an effective countermeasure to tackle the threat of infections. On this note, recent scientific breakthroughs have demonstrated that antimicrobial nanomaterials are effective in preventing pathogens from developing resistance. Despite the ability to destroy a great deal of bacteria and control the outbreak of infections, nanomaterials present many other advantages. Moreover, it is unlikely for nanomaterials to develop resistance due to their multiple and simultaneous bactericidal mechanisms. In recent years, science has explored more complex antimicrobial coatings and nanomaterials based on graphene have shown great potential in antibacterial treatment. The purpose of this article is to deepen the discussion on the threat of infections related to surface disinfection and to assess the state of the art and potential solutions, with specific focus on disinfection procedures using nanomaterials.

  14. Database Systems - Present and Future

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The database systems have nowadays an increasingly important role in the knowledge-based society, in which computers have penetrated all fields of activity and the Internet tends to develop worldwide. In the current informatics context, the development of the applications with databases is the work of the specialists. Using databases, reach a database from various applications, and also some of related concepts, have become accessible to all categories of IT users. This paper aims to summarize the curricular area regarding the fundamental database systems issues, which are necessary in order to train specialists in economic informatics higher education. The database systems integrate and interfere with several informatics technologies and therefore are more difficult to understand and use. Thus, students should know already a set of minimum, mandatory concepts and their practical implementation: computer systems, programming techniques, programming languages, data structures. The article also presents the actual trends in the evolution of the database systems, in the context of economic informatics.

  15. STS-70 Post Flight Presentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Glen (Editor)

    1995-01-01

    In this post-flight overview, the flight crew of the STS-70 mission, Tom Henricks (Cmdr.), Kevin Kregel (Pilot), Major Nancy Currie (MS), Dr. Mary Ellen Weber (MS), and Dr. Don Thomas (MS), discuss their mission and accompanying experiments. Pre-flight, launch, and orbital footage is followed by the in-orbit deployment of the Tracking and Data Relay Satellite (TDRS) and a discussion of the following spaceborne experiments: a microgravity bioreactor experiment to grow 3D body-like tissue; pregnant rat muscular changes in microgravity; embryonic development in microgravity; Shuttle Amateur Radio Experiment (SAREX); terrain surface imagery using the HERCULES camera; and a range of other physiological tests, including an eye and vision test. Views of Earth include: tropical storm Chantal; the Nile River and Red Sea; lightning over Brazil. A three planet view (Earth, Mars, and Venus) was taken right before sunrise. The end footage shows shuttle pre-landing checkout, entry, and landing, along with a slide presentation of the flight.

  16. A cool present for LEIR

    CERN Multimedia

    2005-01-01

    LEIR (Low Energy Ion Ring), which will supply lead ions to the LHC experiments, has taken delivery of one of its key components, its electron cooling system. From left to right, Gérard Tranquille, Virginia Prieto and Roland Sautier, in charge of the electron cooling system for LEIR at CERN, and Christian Lacroix, in charge of installation for the LEIR machine. On 16 December, the day before CERN's annual closure, the LEIR teams received a rather impressive Christmas present. The "parcel" from Russia, measuring 7 metres in length and 4 metres in height, weighed no less than 20 tonnes! The component will, in fact, be one of the key elements of the future LEIR, namely its electron cooling system. LEIR is one of the links in the injector chain that will supply lead ions to the LHC experiments, in particular ALICE (see Bulletin No. 28/2004 of 5 July 2004), within the framework of the I-LHC Project. The electron cooling system is designed to reduce and standardise transverse ion velocity. This focuses the bea...

  17. Present status of Tokamak research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Basu, Jayanta

    1991-01-01

    The scenario of thermonuclear fusion research is presented, and the tokamak which is the most promising candidate as a fusion reactor is introduced. A brief survey is given of the most noteworthy tokamaks in the global context, and fusion programmes relating to Next Step devices are outlined. Supplementary heating of tokamak plasma by different methods is briefly reviewed; the latest achievements in heating to fusion temperatures are also reported. The progress towards the high value of the fusion product necessary for ignition is described. The improvement in plasma confinement brought about especially by the H-mode, is discussed. The latest situation in pushing up Β for increasing the efficiency of a tokamak is elucidated. Mention is made of the different types of wall treatment of the tokamak vessel for impurity control, which has led to a significant improvement in tokamak performance. Different methods of current drive for steady state tokamak operation are reviewed, and the issue of current drive efficiency is addressed. A short resume is given of the various diagnostic methods which are employed on a routine basis in the major tokamak centres. A few diagnostics recently developed or proposed in the context of the advanced tokamaks as well as the Next Step devices are indicated. The important role of the interplay between theory, experiment and simulation is noted, and the areas of investigation requiring concerted effort for further progress in tokamak research are identified. (author). 17 refs

  18. Presentation of suspected pediatric uveitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saeed, Muhammad Usman; Raza, Syed Hamid; Goyal, Sudeshna; Cleary, Gavin; Newman, William David; Chandna, Arvind

    2014-01-01

    Presentation of suspected pediatric uveitis: Pediatric uveitis is usually managed in specialized ophthalmic centers in the UK. Meaningful data acquisition in these clinics may be helpful in clinical governance, and healthcare planning in a specialty that is gradually changing due to changes in treatment choices. Retrospective analysis of prospectively acquired data in the Liverpool pediatric uveitis database was performed. Analysis of our data, based on 147 patients, with a mean age of 10 years, indicated a female to male ratio of 2:1. 99% of patients were Caucasian. Our data indicates 86% of all patients attending the uveitis clinic were diagnosed with juvenile idiopathic arthritis, followed by intermediate uveitis 5% and idiopathic uveitis 4%. 46% of patients required treatment. Systemic treatment included methotrexate (34%), prednisolone (14%), etanercept (6%), ciclosporin (6%), mycophenolate (3%), and infliximab (1%). Severe visual loss (defined by counting fingers or below vision) was seen in 10 eyes despite appropriately treated chronic uveitis. Our data shows uveitis-related ocular morbidity in a predominantly pediatric Caucasian population. Patients with severe and chronic uveitis may experience significant uveitis-related complications and subsequent visual loss despite aggressive treatment.

  19. UNSCEAR: present and future activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holm, Lars-Erik

    2000-01-01

    United Nations Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation (UNSCEAR) was established in 1955. The Committee reviews the exposure of the world population to all sources of radiation under normal circumstances as well as after accidents, and is also the prime international scientific body reviewing and assessing the health risks of exposure to ionizing radiation. Its estimates have been and are still being used by major international bodies including the ICRP, IAEA, and WHO. UNSCEAR's publications form the scientific basis on which international and national agencies develop appropriate radiation protection standards for workers, patients and the general public. UNSCEAR reports yearly to the General Assembly and submits regularly comprehensive reports with detailed scientific annexes on the sources and biological effects of ionizing radiation. In 1995, UNSCEAR began a new program of review of the sources, exposure and biological effects of ionizing radiation. A comprehensive report with scientific annexes will be published in the year 2000. The report will include exposures from natural and man-made radiation sources, occupational and medical radiation exposures, and dose assessment methodologies. The biological effects will cover epidemiological evaluation of radiation-induced cancer, DNA repair and mutagenesis, hereditary effects, combined effects of radiation and other agents, as well as models, mechanisms and uncertainties of biological effects at low radiation doses. An assessment of exposures and effects of the Chernobyl accidents is also made. A brief overview is presented here of the range of subjects considered by the Committee. (author)

  20. Exoplanets: Past, Present, and Future

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chien-Hsiu Lee

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Our understanding of extra-solar planet systems is highly driven by advances in observations in the past decade. Thanks to high precision spectrographs, we are able to reveal unseen companions to stars with the radial velocity method. High precision photometry from the space, especially with the Kepler mission, enables us to detect planets when they transit their stars and dim the stellar light by merely one percent or smaller. Ultra wide-field, high cadence, continuous monitoring of the Galactic bulge from different sites around the southern hemisphere provides us the opportunity to observe microlensing effects caused by planetary systems from the solar neighborhood, all the way to the Milky Way center. The exquisite AO imaging from ground-based large telescopes, coupled with high-contrast coronagraph, captured the photons directly emitted by planets around other stars. In this article, I present a concise review of the extra-solar planet discoveries, discussing the strengths and weaknesses of the major planetary detection methods, providing an overview of our current understanding of planetary formation and evolution given the tremendous observations delivered by various methods, as well as on-going and planned observation endeavors to provide a clear picture of extra-solar planetary systems.

  1. Presentation of the results 97

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-01-01

    Gaz de France (GDF) presents in a press kit the main results achieved in 1997. The European community has formulated a project of definition of rules concerning the natural gas market. Minima values for annual consumptions have been defined and the consumption and use of natural gas in EC countries is described. The financial results of GDF in 1997 are compared with previous years. Net sales grew by nearly 1 billion french francs to reach 55 billion. Overall sales were down by 4% but the share of natural gas in french energy consumption increased and sales to industrial users went up in particular due to new cogeneration plants installed in 1996. A comparison of gas prices in Europe is given for the years 1985 to 1998. The efforts of GDF to offer increased quality of services concerning in particular safety aspects as checking programs and installation of new safeguard appliances are described. The efforts of GDF to increase the energy market share of natural gas resulted in the development of new products like cogeneration, air conditioning and fuels for automotive needs. (C.B.)

  2. Nuclear Fuels: Present and Future

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donald R. Olander

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available The important new developments in nuclear fuels and their problems are reviewed and compared with the status of present light-water reactor fuels. The limitations of these fuels and the reactors they power are reviewed with respect to important recent concerns, namely provision of outlet coolant temperatures high enough for use in H2 production, destruction of plutonium to eliminate proliferation concerns, and burning of the minor actinides to reduce the waste repository heat load and long-term radiation hazard. In addition to current oxide-based fuel-rod designs, the hydride fuel with liquid metal thermal bonding of the fuel-cladding gap is covered. Finally, two of the most promising Generation IV reactor concepts, the Very High Temperature Reactor and the Sodium Fast Reactor, and the accompanying reprocessing technologies, aqueous-based UREX and pyrometallurgical, are summarized. In all of the topics covered, the thermodynamics involved in the material's behavior under irradiation and in the reprocessing schemes are emphasized.

  3. [ISRAEL NEONATOLOGY: PRESENT AND FUTURE].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dollberg, Shaul

    2016-01-01

    The practice of neonatology in Israel debuted in the 1970s as local enterprises by individual hospitals that needed to provide sick and preterm newly born infants with up-to-date and effective care. Descriptions of research and advances in humane and gentle treatment during neonatal care for preterm infants and their families, as well as prevention of neonatal infections, follow-up of preterm infants and care of full-term infants are presented in this issue. The Israel National Very Low Birth Weight (VLBW) Infant database provides an excellent source of knowledge, which has led to multiple scientific publications. Recent international comparisons of the outcome of preterm VLBW infants, made possible by this unique database in Israel, has provided the neonatal community and the Ministry of Health with insights as to the differences in prognosis between Israel and other countries, especially among extremely low birth weight infants. At the border of viability, mortality in Israelis significantly higher than that reported in other countries and proactive steps undertaken to examine these differences and prompt correctional action should be pursued. The Israel Ministry of Health started positive initiatives and should ensure that their steps are implemented at the preterm infant's bedside.

  4. Source rock hydrocarbons. Present status

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vially, R.; Maisonnier, G.; Rouaud, T.

    2013-01-01

    This report first presents the characteristics of conventional oil and gas system, and the classification of liquid and gaseous non conventional hydrocarbons, with the peculiar case of coal-bed methane. The authors then describe how source rock hydrocarbons are produced: production of shale oils and gases (horizontal drilling, hydraulic fracturing, exploitation) and of coal-bed methane and coal mine methane. In the next part, they address and discuss the environmental impact of source rock hydrocarbon production: installation footprint, water resource management, drilling fluids, fracturing fluids composition, toxicity and recycling, air pollution, induced seismicity, pollutions from other exploitation and production activities. They propose an overview of the exploitation and production of source rock gas, coal-bed gas and other non conventional gases in the world. They describe the current development and discuss their economic impacts: world oil context and trends in the USA, in Canada and other countries, impacts on the North American market, on the world oil industry, on refining industries, on the world oil balance. They analyse the economic impacts of non conventional gases: development potential, stakes for the world gas trade, consequence for gas prices, development opportunities for oil companies and for the transport sector, impact on CO 2 emissions, macro-economic impact in the case of the USA

  5. Radiation epidemiology: Past and present

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boice, J.D. Jr.

    1997-01-01

    Major advancements in radiation epidemiology have occurred during the last several years in studies of atomic bomb survivors, patients given medical radiation, and radiation workers, including underground miners. Risks associated with the Chernobyl accident, indoor radon and childhood exposure to I-131 have yet to be elucidated. Situations in the former Soviet Union around Chelyabinsk, a nuclear installation in the southern Urals, and in the Altai, which received radioactive fallout from weapons testing at Semipalatinsk, Kazakhstan, have the potential to provide information on the effects of chronic radiation exposure. Since Roentgen's discovery of x-rays just 100 years ago, a tremendous amount of knowledge has been accumulated about human health effects following irradiation. The 1994 UNSCEAR report contains the latest compilation and synthesis of radiation epidemiology. This overview will cover epidemiology from a radiation perspective. The different types of study methodologies will be described, followed by a kaleidoscope coverage of past and present studies; ending with some remaining questions in radiation epidemiology. This should set the stage for future chapters, and stimulate thinking about implications of the new data on radiation cancer risks

  6. Extraskeletal presentation of Ewing's Sarcoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangual, Danny; Bisbal-Matos, Luis A; Jiménez-Lee, Ricardo; Vélez, Román; Noy, Miguel

    2018-03-01

    The case of a 27-year-old Hispanic female who presented with an occipito-parietal tumor after suffering trauma to the area. A physical examination revealed no tenderness to palpation and with evidence of healing ulcerations. The biopsy was consistent with a synovial sarcoma. A wide excision of the mass (15cm x 14cm x 6cm) followed by a pericranial flap was performed. A follow-up CT showed recurrence involving the parietal sagittal sinus. After a second biopsy the mass was determined to be a small-cell sarcoma, consistent with Ewing's sarcoma. Chemotherapy included 8 cycles of doxorubicin, vincristine, and cyclophosphamide, with alternating cycles of etoposide and ifosfamide. A year later, a second wide excision of the mass was performed, followed by bilaminate skin substitute and skin graft placement for reconstruction of the soft-tissue defect. After chemotherapy, a follow-up PET scan showed no signs of re-uptake in any soft tissue or skeletal structures. After 2 years, the patient remains in complete remission.

  7. Clinical presentation of primary hypothyroidism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmed, B.; Hussain, T.; Memon, A. R.; Solangi, G. A.

    2001-01-01

    Objective: To determine the clinical preparation of primary hypothyroidism at the time of diagnosis. Design: It was an observational and prospective study. Place and Duration of Study: Civil Hospital, Karachi from 1st January 1997 to 31st December 1997. Subjects and Methods: Forty-eight consecutive cases of primary hypothyroidism were included. A detailed history with special emphasis on symptoms and signs was conducted and the findings observed were noted in previously made proforma. Results: Primary hypothyroidism was found to be 5 times more common in female patients, with male to female ratio 1:5, majority of cases (33.33%) were between 41 to 50 years of age. The common symptoms at the time of presentation were tiredness (95.8%), weakness (91.6%), weight gain (85.4%), hoarseness of voice (83.3%), cold intolerance (77.0%) and constipation (75.0%) in patients. Physical signs observed were delayed relaxation of ankle jerk (93.7%), periorbital edema (83.3%), thick tongue (62.5%), goiter (50.0%), dry and coarse skin (47.9%) in patients. Serum, TSH, T4 and T3 were performed in all cases through immunoradiometric technique. Serum TSH was markedly elevated, with normal to reduced T4 and T3 levels in all cases. Conclusion: Primary hypothyroidism was found more common in female than male of the age group 41-50 years. Weakness, tiredness, hoarseness of voice and constipation were the common symptoms noted. The diagnosis is almost certain on clinical grounds if the patient happens to have delayed relaxation of ankle jerks and periorbital puffiness. (author)

  8. Regulation of spatial selectivity by crossover inhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cafaro, Jon; Rieke, Fred

    2013-04-10

    Signals throughout the nervous system diverge into parallel excitatory and inhibitory pathways that later converge on downstream neurons to control their spike output. Converging excitatory and inhibitory synaptic inputs can exhibit a variety of temporal relationships. A common motif is feedforward inhibition, in which an increase (decrease) in excitatory input precedes a corresponding increase (decrease) in inhibitory input. The delay of inhibitory input relative to excitatory input originates from an extra synapse in the circuit shaping inhibitory input. Another common motif is push-pull or "crossover" inhibition, in which increases (decreases) in excitatory input occur together with decreases (increases) in inhibitory input. Primate On midget ganglion cells receive primarily feedforward inhibition and On parasol cells receive primarily crossover inhibition; this difference provides an opportunity to study how each motif shapes the light responses of cell types that play a key role in visual perception. For full-field stimuli, feedforward inhibition abbreviated and attenuated responses of On midget cells, while crossover inhibition, though plentiful, had surprisingly little impact on the responses of On parasol cells. Spatially structured stimuli, however, could cause excitatory and inhibitory inputs to On parasol cells to increase together, adopting a temporal relation very much like that for feedforward inhibition. In this case, inhibitory inputs substantially abbreviated a cell's spike output. Thus inhibitory input shapes the temporal stimulus selectivity of both midget and parasol ganglion cells, but its impact on responses of parasol cells depends strongly on the spatial structure of the light inputs.

  9. Fear inhibition in high trait anxiety.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Merel Kindt

    Full Text Available Trait anxiety is recognized as an individual risk factor for the development of anxiety disorders but the neurobiological mechanisms remain unknown. Here we test whether trait anxiety is associated with impaired fear inhibition utilizing the AX+/BX- conditional discrimination procedure that allows for the independent evaluation of startle fear potentiation and inhibition of fear. Sixty undergraduate students participated in the study--High Trait Anxious: n = 28 and Low Trait Anxious: n = 32. We replicated earlier findings that a transfer of conditioned inhibition for startle responses requires contingency awareness. However, contrary to the fear inhibition hypothesis, our data suggest that high trait anxious individuals show a normal fear inhibition of conditioned startle responding. Only at the cognitive level the high trait anxious individuals showed evidence for impaired inhibitory learning of the threat cue. Together with other findings where impaired fear inhibition was only observed in those PTSD patients who were either high on hyperarousal symptoms or with current anxiety symptoms, we question whether impaired fear inhibition is a biomarker for the development of anxiety disorders.

  10. Corrosion Inhibition of Carbon Steel in HCl Solution by Some Plant Extracts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ambrish Singh

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The strict environmental legislations and increasing ecological awareness among scientists have led to the development of “green” alternatives to mitigate corrosion. In the present work, literature on green corrosion inhibitors has been reviewed, and the salient features of our work on green corrosion inhibitors have been highlighted. Among the studied leaves, extract Andrographis paniculata showed better inhibition performance (98% than the other leaves extract. Strychnos nuxvomica showed better inhibition (98% than the other seed extracts. Moringa oleifera is reflected as a good corrosion inhibitor of mild steel in 1 M HCl with 98% inhibition efficiency among the studied fruits extract. Bacopa monnieri showed its maximum inhibition performance to be 95% at 600 ppm among the investigated stem extracts. All the reported plant extracts were found to inhibit the corrosion of mild steel in acid media.

  11. Past and present Aral Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dukhovniy, Viktor; Stulina, Galina; Eshchanov, Odylbek

    2013-04-01

    The tragedy of disappearing of Aral Sea is well known to the World. Before and after collapse of Soviet Union, a huge quantity of scientific and popular editions described with grief the situation around the Aral Sea. After the NIS states became independent, World Bank, UNDP, UNEP in proper competition with each other had provided some assessment of the situation through presentation of some small and medium grants, but after 2000, the local population remained alone with own problems. Although on the eyes of the present generation a unique transformation of great water body into deserts took place, the global scientific community did not find forces and financing for real and detail investigation of the processes accompanying the Sea shrinking and land formation. We should acknowledge and give big respect to NATO, later to German Government that through GTZ (now GIZ) - German International Collaboration Agency - and GFZ (Potzdam) paid attention to this area of environment crisis and organized scientific and protective design in the so-called Priaralie - the territory around the drying Sea and delta of the two rivers - Amudarya and Syrdarya. Thank to this assistance, the local specialists in collaboration with limited a number of foreign scientists (N.Aladin, P.Zavialov, Joop de Schutter, Hans Wilps, Hedi Oberhansli) organized significant works for detail socioeconomic, ecological and hydrological assessment situation in Priaralie and on the Aral sea coast. On this base, Ministry of Agriculture and Water resources of Uzbekistan and State Committee of Water resources of Kazakhstan developed a plan of rehabilitation of Amudarya and Syrdarya deltas and started implementation of these projects. If Kazakh water authority moved ahead in wetland restoration faster, a forestation of delta and drying bed of Aral Sea got big success in Uzbek territory. 244 thousands hectares of saxsaul and tamarix were planted for protection of the Priaralie. By request of GTZ SIC, ICWC

  12. Como responder ao momento presente?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Filomena Molder

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available http://dx.doi.org/10.5007/1984-784X.2013v13n19p13 Foi com esta pergunta — já um efeito de um primeiro encontro entre Irene Pimentel e eu própria — que decidimos desafiar colegas, estudantes e funci­onários da nossa Faculdade, FCSH (Faculdade de Ciências Sociais e Huma­nas, de outras Faculdades da Universidade Nova de Lisboa, de outras Uni­versidades e todos os interessados em con­siderar e discutir em comum aquilo que se passava em Portugal e que no anúncio da Jornada de 6 de De­zembro de 2012 se descrevia como um “processo de desmantela­mento social, económico e cultural sem precedentes — pese embora tantas compara­ções, baseadas na premissa da ‘eterna repetição’ — e cujas consequências não param de exceder as previsões dos responsáveis por esse desmantelamento”. Acedendo com todo o empenho e gratidão ao convite que me foi dirigido por Humberto Brito para fazer uma resenha da Jornada a publicar no primeiro número de Forma de Vida (saúdo a revista e o título, decidi-me, no entanto, a pôr de lado a resenha, que sob a forma de “Editorial” será em breve publi­cada no blogue Responder ao Momento Presente, entre­tanto criado, conjuntamente com os textos escritos pelos nossos convidados, com as parti­cipações de pessoas que corresponderam ao nosso apelo e ainda com contri­bui­ções que se alargaram para lá da Jornada; a que se juntará uma gravação em video, também disponível no Youtube.   Texto publicado originalmente em Forma de Vida, Lisboa, n.1, fev. 2013. Agrade­cemos à autora por permitir a republicação neste número do Boletim. [N.E.

  13. Aluminum Chloride Pretreatment of Elastin Inhibits Elastolysis by Matrix Metalloproteinases and Leads to Inhibition of Elastin-Oriented Calcification

    OpenAIRE

    Bailey, Michael; Xiao, Hui; Ogle, Matthew; Vyavahare, Naren

    2001-01-01

    Calcification of elastin occurs in many pathological cardiovascular diseases including atherosclerosis. We have previously shown that purified elastin when subdermally implanted in rats undergoes severe calcification and aluminum chloride (AlCl3) pretreatment of elastin inhibits calcification. In the present study we investigated whether matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) binding to elastin and elastin degradation is prevented by AlCl3 pretreatment. Subdermal implantation of AlCl3-pretreated elas...

  14. RKIP Inhibits Local Breast Cancer Invasion by Antagonizing the Transcriptional Activation of MMP13.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ila Datar

    Full Text Available Raf Kinase Inhibitory Protein or RKIP was initially identified as a Raf-1 binding protein using the yeast 2-hybrid screen. RKIP inhibits the activation phosphorylation of MEK by Raf-1 by competitively inhibiting the binding of MEK to Raf-1 and thus exerting an inhibitory effect on the Raf-MEK-Erk pathway. RKIP has been identified as a metastasis suppressor gene. Expression of RKIP is low in cancer metastases. Although primary tumor growth remains unaffected, re- expression of RKIP inhibits cancer metastasis. Mechanistically, RKIP constrains metastasis by inhibiting angiogenesis, local invasion, intravasation, and colonization. The molecular mechanism of how RKIP inhibits these individual steps remains undefined. In our present study, using an unbiased PCR based screening and by analyzing DNA microarray expression datasets we observe that the expression of multiple metalloproteases (MMPs including MMP1, MMP3, MMP10 and MMP13 are negatively correlated with RKIP expression in breast cancer cell lines and clinical samples. Since expression of MMPs by cancer cells is important for cancer metastasis, we hypothesize that RKIP may mediate suppression of breast cancer metastasis by inhibiting multiple MMPs. We show that the expression signature of RKIP and MMPs is better at predicting high metastatic risk than the individual gene. Using a combination of loss- and gain-of-function approaches, we find that MMP13 is the cause of RKIP-mediated inhibition of local cancer invasion. Interestingly expression of MMP13 alone is not sufficient to reverse the inhibition of breast cancer cell metastasis to the lung due to the expression of RKIP. We find that RKIP negatively regulates MMP13 through the Erk2 signaling pathway and the repression of MMP13 by RKIP is transcription factor AP-1 independent. Together, our findings indicate that RKIP inhibits cancer cell invasion, in part, via MMP13 inhibition. These data also implicate RKIP in the regulation of MMP

  15. High outgroup entitativity can inhibit intergroup retribution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newheiser, Anna-Kaisa; Dovidio, John F

    2015-06-01

    Understanding the psychological processes that are involved in the perpetuation and escalation of intergroup conflict remains an important goal for intergroup relations research. In the present research, we examined perceived outgroup entitativity as a potential determinant of intergroup hostility. In intergroup conflict situations, high-entitative outgroups are perceived as particularly deserving of retribution; however, high-entitative outgroups are also perceived as efficacious and capable of retaliating successfully, suggesting that people may inhibit hostility against high-entitative (vs. low-entitative) outgroups that are in a position to retaliate. We tested this prediction in two studies. In Study 1, we manipulated intergroup provocation and outgroup entitativity, and found that higher negative mood predicted greater aggression against a low-entitative provoker outgroup, but failed to predict aggression against a high-entitative provoker outgroup that was plausibly in a position to retaliate. In Study 2, we held provocation constant while manipulating outgroup entitativity and the possibility of retaliation by the outgroup, and found that people acted in a retributive manner against a high-entitative provoker outgroup only when the outgroup was not in a position to retaliate. Implications for intergroup conflict are discussed. © 2014 The British Psychological Society.

  16. Linking algal growth inhibition to chemical activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Stine N.; Mayer, Philipp

    Unitless chemical activity, expressing the energetic level of a compound relative to its energetic level in pure liquid [0-1], has proven useful to quantify the effective exposure to hydrophobic organic compounds through both aerial and aqueous media. Several studies have linked toxicity to chemi......Unitless chemical activity, expressing the energetic level of a compound relative to its energetic level in pure liquid [0-1], has proven useful to quantify the effective exposure to hydrophobic organic compounds through both aerial and aqueous media. Several studies have linked toxicity...... to chemical activity, as opposed to e.g. the total concentration. Baseline toxicity (narcosis) for neutral hydrophobic organic compounds has been shown to initiate in the narrow chemical activity range of 0.01 to 0.1. This presentation focuses on linking algal growth inhibition to chemical activity......-polar liquids were applied to challenge the chemical activity range for baseline toxicity. For each compound, the effective activity (Ea50) was estimated as the ratio of the effective concentration (EC50) and water solubility. Of these ratios, 90% were within the expected chemical activity range of 0.01 to 0...

  17. Draft Workshop Summary and Presentations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Houssin, Didier; ); Tam, Cecilia; ); Cameron, Ron; ); Paillere, Henri; ); Lisann, Beth; Ehlert, Andreas; Kaufer, Barry; Decobert, Veronique; Beutier, Didier; Crepin, Anne; Aurela, Jorma; Baritaud, Manuel; ); Rooke, Oliver; Blundell, Neil; ); Shropshire, David; Noren, Bjarne; Blundell, Neil; ); Dujardin, Thierry; )

    2014-01-01

    the electricity market reform in the UK); Session 4: Nuclear regulation and safety (Regulation for new build and new comer countries and Fukushima Safety Action Plan; WANO's contribution to strengthen nuclear safety worldwide; Strengthening Good Practice within Nuclear Safety post Fukushima-Daiichi); Session 5: Key Message for the Road-map update (Outline current status of nuclear technology development and need for additional R and D to address increased safety requirements; Provide an updated vision for nuclear energy's role in a low carbon energy system; Identify barriers and actions needed to accelerate the development and deployment of nuclear technologies to meet the Road-map vision; Identify and share lessons learned and best practices in nuclear regulation, front and back end fuel cycle practices, construction and financing. This document brings together the available presentations (slides) given at this workshop: 1 - Road-map overview and role of nuclear in IEA scenarios (Cecilia Tam, IEA); 2 - The Direction Of The 2014 Nuclear Road-map (Ron Cameron, OECD/NEA); 3 - Technology development needs for nuclear energy, 1.a: Reactor technology (Henri Paillere, OECD/NEA); 4 - IEA/NEA Nuclear Technology Road-map Update (Beth Lisann, US-DoE); 5 - Update of the Nuclear Energy Technology Road-map - Nuclear Decommissioning (Andreas Ehlert, E-On); 6 - Overcoming barriers to nuclear build - other than financing (Veronique Decobert, Westinghouse); 7 - Development of the supply chain: relying on local industrial involvement (Didier Beutier, Areva); 8 - Training and capacity development needs (Jorma Aurela, Finnish Ministry of Employment and the Economy); 9 - Key conditions for successful Nuclear new build financing (Anne Crepin, Areva); 10 - Regulation for New Build and Newcomers, IAEA Nuclear Safety Action Plan (David Shropshire, IAEA); 11 - WANO's contribution to strengthen nuclear safety worldwide (Bjarne Noren, WANO); 12 - Strengthening Good Practice within Nuclear Safety

  18. Autophagy contributes to gefitinib-induced glioma cell growth inhibition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Cheng-Yi [Department of Surgery, Fong-Yuan Hospital, Taichung 420, Taiwan (China); Graduate Institute of Pharmaceutical Science and Technology, Central Taiwan University of Science and Technology, Taichung 406, Taiwan (China); Kuan, Yu-Hsiang [Department of Pharmacology, School of Medicine, Chung Shan Medical University, Taichung 402, Taiwan (China); Department of Pharmacy, Chung Shan Medical University Hospital, Taichung 402, Taiwan (China); Ou, Yen-Chuan; Li, Jian-Ri [Division of Urology, Taichung Veterans General Hospital, Taichung 407, Taiwan (China); Wu, Chih-Cheng [Department of Anesthesiology, Taichung Veterans General Hospital, Taichung 407, Taiwan (China); Department of Financial and Computational Mathematics, Providence University, Taichung 433, Taiwan (China); Pan, Pin-Ho [Department of Pediatrics, Tungs’ Taichung MetroHarbor Hospital, Taichung 435, Taiwan (China); Chen, Wen-Ying [Department of Veterinary Medicine, National Chung Hsing University, Taichung 402, Taiwan (China); Huang, Hsuan-Yi [Department of Surgery, Fong-Yuan Hospital, Taichung 420, Taiwan (China); Chen, Chun-Jung, E-mail: cjchen@vghtc.gov.tw [Department of Medical Research, Taichung Veterans General Hospital, Taichung 407, Taiwan (China); Institute of Biomedical Sciences, National Chung Hsing University, Taichung 402, Taiwan (China); Rong Hsing Research Center for Translational Medicine, National Chung Hsing University, Taichung 402, Taiwan (China); Center for General Education, Tunghai University, Taichung 407, Taiwan (China); Department of Nursing, HungKuang University, Taichung 433, Taiwan (China)

    2014-09-10

    Epidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitors, including gefitinib, have been evaluated in patients with malignant gliomas. However, the molecular mechanisms involved in gefitinib-mediated anticancer effects against glioma are incompletely understood. In the present study, the cytostatic potential of gefitinib was demonstrated by the inhibition of glioma cell growth, long-term clonogenic survival, and xenograft tumor growth. The cytostatic consequences were accompanied by autophagy, as evidenced by monodansylcadaverine staining of acidic vesicle formation, conversion of microtubule-associated protein-1 light chain 3-II (LC3-II), degradation of p62, punctate pattern of GFP-LC3, and conversion of GFP-LC3 to cleaved-GFP. Autophagy inhibitor 3-methyladenosine and chloroquine and genetic silencing of LC3 or Beclin 1 attenuated gefitinib-induced growth inhibition. Gefitinib-induced autophagy was not accompanied by the disruption of the Akt/mammalian target of rapamycin signaling. Instead, the activation of liver kinase-B1/AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) signaling correlated well with the induction of autophagy and growth inhibition caused by gefitinib. Silencing of AMPK suppressed gefitinib-induced autophagy and growth inhibition. The crucial role of AMPK activation in inducing glioma autophagy and growth inhibition was further supported by the actions of AMP mimetic AICAR. Gefitinib was shown to be capable of reducing the proliferation of glioma cells, presumably by autophagic mechanisms involving AMPK activation. - Highlights: • Gefitinib causes cytotoxic and cytostatic effect on glioma. • Gefitinib induces autophagy. • Gefitinib causes cytostatic effect through autophagy. • Gefitinib induces autophagy involving AMPK.

  19. Selenium inhibits the phytotoxicity of mercury in garlic (Allium sativum)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao, Jiating; Gao, Yuxi; Li, Yu-Feng; Hu, Yi; Peng, Xiaomin; Dong, Yuanxing; Li, Bai; Chen, Chunying; Chai, Zhifang

    2013-01-01

    To investigate the influence of selenium on mercury phytotoxicity, the levels of selenium and mercury were analyzed with inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) in garlic tissues upon exposure to different dosages of inorganic mercury (Hg 2+ ) and selenite (SeO 3 2− ) or selenate (SeO 4 2− ). The distributions of selenium and mercury were examined with micro-synchrotron radiation X-ray fluorescence (μ-SRXRF), and the mercury speciation was investigated with micro-X-ray absorption near edge structure (μ-XANES). The results show that Se at higher exposure levels (>1 mg/L of SeO 3 2− or SeO 4 2− ) would significantly inhibit the absorption and transportation of Hg when Hg 2+ levels are higher than 1 mg/L in culture media. SeO 3 2− and SeO 4 2− were found to be equally effective in reducing Hg accumulation in garlic. The inhibition of Hg uptake by Se correlates well with the influence of Se on Hg phytotoxicity as indicated by the growth inhibition factor. Elemental imaging using μ-SRXRF also shows that Se could inhibit the accumulation and translocation of Hg in garlic. μ-XANES analysis shows that Hg is mainly present in the forms of Hg–S bonding as Hg(GSH) 2 and Hg(Met) 2 . Se exposure elicited decrease of Hg–S bonding in the form of Hg(GSH) 2 , together with Se-mediated alteration of Hg absorption, transportation and accumulation, may account for attenuated Hg phytotoxicity by Se in garlic. -- Highlights: ► Hg phytotoxicity can be mitigated by Se supplement in garlic growth. ► Se can inhibit the accumulation and transportation of Hg in garlic tissues. ► Localization and speciation of Hg in garlic can be modified by Se

  20. Autophagy contributes to gefitinib-induced glioma cell growth inhibition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, Cheng-Yi; Kuan, Yu-Hsiang; Ou, Yen-Chuan; Li, Jian-Ri; Wu, Chih-Cheng; Pan, Pin-Ho; Chen, Wen-Ying; Huang, Hsuan-Yi; Chen, Chun-Jung

    2014-01-01

    Epidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitors, including gefitinib, have been evaluated in patients with malignant gliomas. However, the molecular mechanisms involved in gefitinib-mediated anticancer effects against glioma are incompletely understood. In the present study, the cytostatic potential of gefitinib was demonstrated by the inhibition of glioma cell growth, long-term clonogenic survival, and xenograft tumor growth. The cytostatic consequences were accompanied by autophagy, as evidenced by monodansylcadaverine staining of acidic vesicle formation, conversion of microtubule-associated protein-1 light chain 3-II (LC3-II), degradation of p62, punctate pattern of GFP-LC3, and conversion of GFP-LC3 to cleaved-GFP. Autophagy inhibitor 3-methyladenosine and chloroquine and genetic silencing of LC3 or Beclin 1 attenuated gefitinib-induced growth inhibition. Gefitinib-induced autophagy was not accompanied by the disruption of the Akt/mammalian target of rapamycin signaling. Instead, the activation of liver kinase-B1/AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) signaling correlated well with the induction of autophagy and growth inhibition caused by gefitinib. Silencing of AMPK suppressed gefitinib-induced autophagy and growth inhibition. The crucial role of AMPK activation in inducing glioma autophagy and growth inhibition was further supported by the actions of AMP mimetic AICAR. Gefitinib was shown to be capable of reducing the proliferation of glioma cells, presumably by autophagic mechanisms involving AMPK activation. - Highlights: • Gefitinib causes cytotoxic and cytostatic effect on glioma. • Gefitinib induces autophagy. • Gefitinib causes cytostatic effect through autophagy. • Gefitinib induces autophagy involving AMPK

  1. Role of tonic inhibition in associative reward conditioning in Lymnaea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vincenzo Marra

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Changes in the strength of excitatory synaptic connections are known to underlie associative memory formation in the molluscan nervous system but less is known about the role of synaptic inhibition. Tonic or maintained synaptic inhibition has an important function in controlling the Lymnaea feeding system and is known to suppress feeding in the absence of food or in satiated animals. Tonic inhibition to the feeding network is provided by the N3t interneuron that has inhibitory monosynaptic connection with the central pattern generator interneuron, the N1M. Here we asked whether a reduction in the level of tonic inhibition provided by the N3t cell could play a role in reward conditioning? Semi-intact preparations made from hungry snails were conditioned using a previously-developed one-trail chemical conditioning paradigm. We recorded electrical activity in a feeding motoneuron, the B3, at various time-points after conditioning. This allowed us to measure the frequency of spike activity in the N3t interneuron and monitor fictive feeding patterns that generate the rhythmic movements involved in food ingestion. We show that there is a reduction in N3t spiking at 1, 2, 3 and 4 hours after conditioning but not at 10 minutes and 30 minutes and the reduction in N3t firing inversely correlates with an increase in the conditioned fictive feeding response. Computer simulation of N3t-N1M interactions suggests that changes in N3t firing are sufficient to explain the increase in the fictive feeding activity produced by conditioning. A network model is presented that summarizes evidence suggesting that reward conditioning in Lymnaea is due to the combined effects of reduced tonic inhibition and enhanced excitatory synaptic connections between the CS pathway and feeding command neurons.

  2. Simple model of inhibition of chain-branching combustion processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babushok, Valeri I.; Gubernov, Vladimir V.; Minaev, Sergei S.; Miroshnichenko, Taisia P.

    2017-11-01

    A simple kinetic model has been suggested to describe the inhibition and extinction of flame propagation in reaction systems with chain-branching reactions typical for hydrocarbon systems. The model is based on the generalised model of the combustion process with chain-branching reaction combined with the one-stage reaction describing the thermal mode of flame propagation with the addition of inhibition reaction steps. Inhibitor addition suppresses the radical overshoot in flame and leads to the change of reaction mode from the chain-branching reaction to a thermal mode of flame propagation. With the increase of inhibitor the transition of chain-branching mode of reaction to the reaction with straight-chains (non-branching chain reaction) is observed. The inhibition part of the model includes a block of three reactions to describe the influence of the inhibitor. The heat losses are incorporated into the model via Newton cooling. The flame extinction is the result of the decreased heat release of inhibited reaction processes and the suppression of radical overshoot with the further decrease of the reaction rate due to the temperature decrease and mixture dilution. A comparison of the results of modelling laminar premixed methane/air flames inhibited by potassium bicarbonate (gas phase model, detailed kinetic model) with the results obtained using the suggested simple model is presented. The calculations with the detailed kinetic model demonstrate the following modes of combustion process: (1) flame propagation with chain-branching reaction (with radical overshoot, inhibitor addition decreases the radical overshoot down to the equilibrium level); (2) saturation of chemical influence of inhibitor, and (3) transition to thermal mode of flame propagation (non-branching chain mode of reaction). The suggested simple kinetic model qualitatively reproduces the modes of flame propagation with the addition of the inhibitor observed using detailed kinetic models.

  3. Naloxone inhibits superoxide but not enzyme release by human neutrophils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simpkins, C.; Alailima, S.; Tate, E.

    1986-03-01

    The release of toxic oxygen metabolites and enzymes by phagocytic cells is thought to play a role in the multisystemic tissue injury of sepsis. Naloxone protects septic animals. We have found that at concentrations administered to animals (10/sup -7/ to 10/sup -4/M), naloxone inhibited (p < .001) the release of superoxide (O/sub 2//sup -/) by human neutrophils (HN), stimulated with N-formyl methionyl leucyl phenylalanine (FMLP). Naloxone had no effect on cell viability. Maximum inhibition was 65% of the total O/sub 2//sup -/ released (13.1 nMoles/8 min/320,000 cells). FMLP-stimulated release of beta-glucoronidase or lysozyme was not altered by naloxone. Naloxone had no effect on the binding of /sup 3/H FMLP to HN. Using /sup 3/H naloxone and various concentrations of unlabeled naloxone higher affinity (K/sub D/ = 12nM) and lower affinity (K/sub D/ = 4.7 x 10/sup -5/) binding sites were detected. The K/sub D/ of the low affinity site corresponded to the ED/sub 50/ for naloxone inhibition of O/sub 2//sup -/ (1 x 10/sup -5/M). Binding to this low affinity site was decreased by (+) naloxone, beta-endorphin and N acetyl beta-endorphin, but not by leu-enkephalin, thyrotropin releasing factor, prostaglandin D/sub 2/ or E/sub 2/. Conclusions: (1) naloxone inhibits FMLP-stimulated O/sub 2/ but not enzyme release, (2) this inhibition is not due to alteration of FMLP receptor binding, (3) naloxone may act via a low affinity binding site which is ligand specific, and (4) a higher affinity receptor is present on HN.

  4. Naloxone inhibits superoxide but not enzyme release by human neutrophils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simpkins, C.; Alailima, S.; Tate, E.

    1986-01-01

    The release of toxic oxygen metabolites and enzymes by phagocytic cells is thought to play a role in the multisystemic tissue injury of sepsis. Naloxone protects septic animals. We have found that at concentrations administered to animals (10 -7 to 10 -4 M), naloxone inhibited (p 2 - ) by human neutrophils (HN), stimulated with N-formyl methionyl leucyl phenylalanine (FMLP). Naloxone had no effect on cell viability. Maximum inhibition was 65% of the total O 2 - released (13.1 nMoles/8 min/320,000 cells). FMLP-stimulated release of beta-glucoronidase or lysozyme was not altered by naloxone. Naloxone had no effect on the binding of 3 H FMLP to HN. Using 3 H naloxone and various concentrations of unlabeled naloxone higher affinity (K/sub D/ = 12nM) and lower affinity (K/sub D/ = 4.7 x 10 -5 ) binding sites were detected. The K/sub D/ of the low affinity site corresponded to the ED 50 for naloxone inhibition of O 2 - (1 x 10 -5 M). Binding to this low affinity site was decreased by (+) naloxone, beta-endorphin and N acetyl beta-endorphin, but not by leu-enkephalin, thyrotropin releasing factor, prostaglandin D 2 or E 2 . Conclusions: (1) naloxone inhibits FMLP-stimulated O 2 but not enzyme release, (2) this inhibition is not due to alteration of FMLP receptor binding, (3) naloxone may act via a low affinity binding site which is ligand specific, and (4) a higher affinity receptor is present on HN

  5. Enantioselective inhibition of carprofen towards UDP-glucuronosyltransferase (UGT) 2B7.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Zhong-Ze; Wang, Haina; Cao, Yun-Feng; Sun, Dong-Xue; Wang, Li-Xuan; Hong, Mo; Huang, Ting; Chen, Jian-Xing; Zeng, Jia

    2015-03-01

    UDP-glucuronosyltransferases (UGTs)-catalyzed glucuronidation conjugation reaction plays an important role in the elimination of many important clinical drugs and endogenous substances. The present study aims to investigate the enantioselective inhibition of carprofen towards UGT isoforms. In vitro a recombinant UGT isoforms-catalyzed 4-methylumbelliferone (4-MU) glucuronidation incubation mixture was used to screen the inhibition potential of (R)-carprofen and (S)-carprofen towards multiple UGT isoforms. The results showed that (S)-carprofen exhibited stronger inhibition potential than (R)-carprofen towards UGT2B7. However, no significant difference was observed for the inhibition of (R)-carprofen and (S)-carprofen towards other UGT isoforms. Furthermore, the inhibition kinetic behavior was compared for the inhibition of (S)-carprofen and (R)-carprofen towards UGT2B7. A Lineweaver-Burk plot showed that both (S)-carprofen and (R)-carprofen exhibited competitive inhibition towards UGT2B7-catalyzed 4-MU glucuronidation. The inhibition kinetic parameter (Ki ) was calculated to be 7.0 μM and 31.1 μM for (S)-carprofen and (R)-carprofen, respectively. Based on the standard for drug-drug interaction, the threshold for (S)-carprofen and (R)-carprofen to induce a drug-drug interaction is 0.7 μM and 3.1 μM, respectively. In conclusion, enantioselective inhibition of carprofen towards UDP-glucuronosyltransferase (UGT) 2B7 was demonstrated in the present study. Using the in vitro inhibition kinetic parameter, the concentration threshold of (S)-carprofen and (R)-carprofen to possibly induce the drug-drug interaction was obtained. Therefore, clinical monitoring of the plasma concentration of (S)-carprofen is more important than (R)-carprofen to avoid a possible drug-drug interaction between carprofen and the drugs mainly undergoing UGT2B7-catalyzed metabolism. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Ultraviolet light-induced suppression of antigen presentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spellman, C.W.; Tomasi, T.B.

    1983-01-01

    Ultraviolet (UV) light irradiation of animals results in the development of specific T suppressor cells that inhibit antitumor immune responses. It is thought that suppression may arise as a consequence of altered antigen presentation by UV-irradiated epidermal cells. This hypothesis is based on evidence demonstrating that specific lymphoid tissues from UV-irradiated hosts exhibit impaired antigen-presenting function and that animals cannot be contact sensitized when antigens are applied to a UV-irradiated skin site. Langerhans cells of the skin are likely candidates as targets of UV-induced defects in antigen presentation as they bear Fc and C3b receptors, express Ia antigens, are of bone marrow origin, and are capable of presenting antigen in vitro. We speculate on the possible clinical usefulness of UV-induced tolerance to specific antigens such as those encountered in monoclonal antibody therapy and tissue transplantation

  7. Improving response inhibition systems in frontotemporal dementia with citalopram.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Laura E; Rittman, Timothy; Regenthal, Ralf; Robbins, Trevor W; Rowe, James B

    2015-07-01

    Disinhibition is a cardinal feature of the behavioural variant of frontotemporal dementia, presenting as impulsive and impetuous behaviours that are often difficult to manage. The options for symptomatic treatments are limited, but a potential target for therapy is the restoration of serotonergic function, which is both deficient in behavioural variant frontotemporal dementia and closely associated with inhibitory control. Based on preclinical studies and psychopharmacological interventions in other disorders, we predicted that inhibition would be associated with the right inferior frontal gyrus and dependent on serotonin. Using magnetoencephalography and electroencephalography of a Go-NoGo paradigm, we investigated the neural basis of behavioural disinhibition in behavioural variant frontotemporal dementia and the effect of selective serotonin reuptake inhibition on the neural systems for response inhibition. In a randomized double-blinded placebo-controlled crossover design study, 12 patients received either a single 30 mg dose of citalopram or placebo. Twenty age-matched healthy controls underwent the same magnetoencephalography/electroencephalography protocol on one session without citalopram, providing normative data for this task. In the control group, successful NoGo trials evoked two established indices of successful response inhibition: the NoGo-N2 and NoGo-P3. Both of these components were significantly attenuated by behavioural variant frontotemporal dementia. Cortical sources associated with successful inhibition in control subjects were identified in the right inferior frontal gyrus and anterior temporal lobe, which have been strongly associated with behavioural inhibition in imaging and lesion studies. These sources were impaired by behavioural variant frontotemporal dementia. Critically, citalopram enhanced the NoGo-P3 signal in patients, relative to placebo treatment, and increased the evoked response in the right inferior frontal gyrus. Voxel

  8. Chirality Influence of Zaltoprofen Towards UDP-Glucuronosyltransferases (UGTs) Inhibition Potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Lin; Hu, Cuimin; Wang, Haina; Liu, Yongzhe; Liu, Xin; Zhang, Yan-Yan; Li, Wei; Wang, Li-Xuan; Cao, Yun-Feng; Fang, Zhong-Ze

    2015-06-01

    Zaltoprofen (ZLT) is a nonsteroidal antiinflammation drug, and has been clinically employed to treat rheumatoid arthritis, osteoarthritis, and other chronic inflammatory pain conditions. The present study aims to investigate the chirality influence of zaltoprofen towards the inhibition potential towards UDP-glucuronosyltransferases (UGTs) isoforms. In vitro a recombinant UGT isoforms-catalyzed 4-methylumbelliferone (4-MU) glucuronidation incubation system was employed to investigate the inhibition of (R)-zaltoprofen and (S)-zaltoprofen towards UGT isoforms. The inhibition difference capability was observed for the inhibition of (R)-zaltoprofen and (S)-zaltoprofen towards UGT1A8 and UGT2B7, but not for other tested UGT isoforms. (R)-zaltoprofen exhibited noncompetitive inhibition towards UGT1A8 and competitive inhibition towards UGT2B7. The inhibition kinetic parameters were calculated to be 35.3 μM and 19.2 μM for UGT1A8 and UGT2B7. (R)-zaltoprofen and (S)-zaltoprofen exhibited a different inhibition type towards UGT1A7. Based on the reported maximum plasma concentration of (R)-zaltoprofen in vivo, a high drug-drug interaction between (R)-zaltoprofen and the drugs mainly undergoing UGT1A7, UGT1A8, and UGT2B7-catalyzed glucuronidation was indicated. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Prevalence of behavioral inhibition among preschool aged children in Tehran, Iran.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alipasha Meysamie

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available One of the identified risk factors for anxiety disorders in adolescence and adulthood is inhibited behaviors in childhood. The present study sought to examine the relationship between behavioral inhibition with some of the internal (personal and external (family environment factors in a sample of preschool children in kindergartens. In a cross sectional study in 2009, data was collected trough a structured questionnaire completed by parents and teachers in day-care centers. A total of 1403 children were assessed. Analysis was performed through complex sample analysis. The results showed that 7.4% (CI95%= 6.1%-9.1% of children according to parents' and 8.1% (CI95%= 6%- 10.7% according to teachers' evaluation classified as behaviorally inhibited. The higher levels of behavioral inhibition were shown by girls, first children, single parent families and older children. Birth year before 2004, birth rank, living in a single parent family and maternal level of education were independent predictors for behavioral inhibition in logistic regression modeling. There is relatively high prevalence of inhibited behaviors among Iranian children. Further examination of diagnosed children with behavioral inhibition by experienced psychiatrists is needed. Also establishing consultation centers for behaviorally inhibited children and instructing their parents and teachers are recommended.

  10. Inhibition of phospholipase A2 from human plasma by sodium bisulfite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wiggins, C.W.; Franson, R.C.

    1987-01-01

    The anti-oxidant sodium bisulfite has been shown to inhibit acid active(lysosomal), non-Ca ++ -dependent phospholipase A 2 (PLA 2 ), and to interact reversibly with unsaturated fatty acids, altering their chromatographic mobility. The authors examined the effect of bisulfite on neutral active, Ca ++ -dependent PLA 2 from human plasma. Using [1- 14 C]oleate-labelled autoclaved E. coli as substrate, PLA 2 activity was inhibited in a dose-dependent manner by bisulfite. Maximal inhibition occurred at 100μM bisulfite. Preincubation of plasma for 0-30 minutes with bisulfite resulted in a time-dependent increase in PLA 2 inhibition. Preincubation of substrate with bisulfite had no such effect. When the plasma PLA 2 was purified 25-fold by SP-Sephadex chromatography it was no longer inhibited by bisulfite. The SP-Sephadex wash through fraction, which contained greater than 95% of the applied protein but not PLA 2 activity, did not inhibit the purified enzyme. When incubated with bisulfite however, the SP-wash through fraction produced dose-dependent inhibition of the purified enzyme. These results indicate that sodium bisulfite inhibits human plasma PLA 2 , in vitro, indirectly by interaction with a factor(s) present in plasma and suggests that anti-oxidants may similarly influence expression of extracellular PLA 2 in vivo

  11. Structure–inhibition relationship of ginsenosides towards UDP-glucuronosyltransferases (UGTs)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fang, Zhong-Ze; Cao, Yun-Feng; Hu, Cui-Min; Hong, Mo; Sun, Xiao-Yu; Ge, Guang-Bo; Liu, Yong; Zhang, Yan-Yan; Yang, Ling; Sun, Hong-Zhi

    2013-01-01

    The wide utilization of ginseng provides the high risk of herb–drug interaction (HDI) with many clinical drugs. The inhibition of ginsenosides towards drug-metabolizing enzymes (DMEs) has been regarded as an important reason for herb–drug interaction (HDI). Compared with the deep studies on the ginsenosides' inhibition towards cytochrome P450 (CYP), the inhibition of ginsenosides towards the important phase II enzymes UDP-glucuronosyltransferases (UGTs) remains to be unclear. The present study aims to evaluate the inhibition behavior of ginsenosides towards important UGT isoforms located in the liver and intestine using in vitro methods. The recombinant UGT isoform-catalyzed 4-methylumbelliferone (4-MU) glucuronidation reaction was employed as in vitro probe reaction. The results showed that structure-dependent inhibition existed for the inhibition of ginsenosides towards UGT isoforms. To clarify the possibility of in vivo herb–drug interaction induced by this kind of inhibition, the ginsenoside Rg 3 was selected as an example, and the inhibition kinetic type and parameters (K i ) were determined. Rg 3 competitively inhibited UGT1A7, 2B7 and 2B15-catalyzed 4-MU glucuronidation reaction, and exerted noncompetitive inhibition towards UGT1A8-catalyzed 4-MU glucuronidation. The inhibition parameters (K i values) were calculated to be 22.6, 7.9, 1.9, and 2.0 μM for UGT1A7, 1A8, 2B7 and 2B15. Using human maximum plasma concentration of Rg 3 (400 ng/ml (0.5 μM)) after intramuscular injection of 60 mg Rg 3 , the area under the plasma concentration-time curve (AUC) was extrapolated to increase by 2.2%, 6.3%, 26.3%, and 25% for the co-administered drugs completely undergoing the metabolism catalyzed by UGT1A7, 1A8, 2B7 and 2B15, respectively. All these results indicated that the ginsenosides' inhibition towards UGT isoforms might be an important reason for ginseng–drug interaction. - Highlights: ► Structure-dependent inhibition of ginsenoside towards UDP

  12. Structure–inhibition relationship of ginsenosides towards UDP-glucuronosyltransferases (UGTs)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fang, Zhong-Ze [The First Affiliated Hospital of Liaoning Medical University, Jinzhou 121001 (China); Joint Center for Translational Medicine, Dalian Institute of Chemical Physics Chinese Academy of Sciences and The first Affiliated Hospital of Liaoning Medical University, No.457, Zhongshan Road, Dalian 116023 (China); Laboratory of Metabolism, Center for Cancer Research, National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, MD 20892 (United States); Cao, Yun-Feng [Key Laboratory of Contraceptives and Devices Research(NPFPC),Shanghai Engineer and Technology Research Center of Reproductive Health Drug and Devices, Shanghai Institute of Planned Parenthood Research, Shanghai 200032 (China); Joint Center for Translational Medicine, Dalian Institute of Chemical Physics Chinese Academy of Sciences and The first Affiliated Hospital of Liaoning Medical University, No.457, Zhongshan Road, Dalian 116023 (China); Hu, Cui-Min [Laboratory of Metabolism, Center for Cancer Research, National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, MD 20892 (United States); Hong, Mo; Sun, Xiao-Yu [Joint Center for Translational Medicine, Dalian Institute of Chemical Physics Chinese Academy of Sciences and The first Affiliated Hospital of Liaoning Medical University, No.457, Zhongshan Road, Dalian 116023 (China); Ge, Guang-Bo; Liu, Yong; Zhang, Yan-Yan; Yang, Ling [Laboratory of Pharmaceutical Resource Discovery, Dalian Institute of Chemical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 116023 Dalian (China); Sun, Hong-Zhi, E-mail: zzfang228@gmail.com [The First Affiliated Hospital of Liaoning Medical University, Jinzhou 121001 (China)

    2013-03-01

    The wide utilization of ginseng provides the high risk of herb–drug interaction (HDI) with many clinical drugs. The inhibition of ginsenosides towards drug-metabolizing enzymes (DMEs) has been regarded as an important reason for herb–drug interaction (HDI). Compared with the deep studies on the ginsenosides' inhibition towards cytochrome P450 (CYP), the inhibition of ginsenosides towards the important phase II enzymes UDP-glucuronosyltransferases (UGTs) remains to be unclear. The present study aims to evaluate the inhibition behavior of ginsenosides towards important UGT isoforms located in the liver and intestine using in vitro methods. The recombinant UGT isoform-catalyzed 4-methylumbelliferone (4-MU) glucuronidation reaction was employed as in vitro probe reaction. The results showed that structure-dependent inhibition existed for the inhibition of ginsenosides towards UGT isoforms. To clarify the possibility of in vivo herb–drug interaction induced by this kind of inhibition, the ginsenoside Rg{sub 3} was selected as an example, and the inhibition kinetic type and parameters (K{sub i}) were determined. Rg{sub 3} competitively inhibited UGT1A7, 2B7 and 2B15-catalyzed 4-MU glucuronidation reaction, and exerted noncompetitive inhibition towards UGT1A8-catalyzed 4-MU glucuronidation. The inhibition parameters (K{sub i} values) were calculated to be 22.6, 7.9, 1.9, and 2.0 μM for UGT1A7, 1A8, 2B7 and 2B15. Using human maximum plasma concentration of Rg{sub 3} (400 ng/ml (0.5 μM)) after intramuscular injection of 60 mg Rg{sub 3}, the area under the plasma concentration-time curve (AUC) was extrapolated to increase by 2.2%, 6.3%, 26.3%, and 25% for the co-administered drugs completely undergoing the metabolism catalyzed by UGT1A7, 1A8, 2B7 and 2B15, respectively. All these results indicated that the ginsenosides' inhibition towards UGT isoforms might be an important reason for ginseng–drug interaction. - Highlights: ► Structure

  13. Hypnotic suggestibility, cognitive inhibition, and dissociation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dienes, Zoltán; Brown, Elizabeth; Hutton, Sam; Kirsch, Irving; Mazzoni, Giuliana; Wright, Daniel B

    2009-12-01

    We examined two potential correlates of hypnotic suggestibility: dissociation and cognitive inhibition. Dissociation is the foundation of two of the major theories of hypnosis and other theories commonly postulate that hypnotic responding is a result of attentional abilities (including inhibition). Participants were administered the Waterloo-Stanford Group Scale of Hypnotic Susceptibility, Form C. Under the guise of an unrelated study, 180 of these participants also completed: a version of the Dissociative Experiences Scale that is normally distributed in non-clinical populations; a latent inhibition task, a spatial negative priming task, and a memory task designed to measure negative priming. The data ruled out even moderate correlations between hypnotic suggestibility and all the measures of dissociation and cognitive inhibition overall, though they also indicated gender differences. The results are a challenge for existing theories of hypnosis.

  14. Corrosion inhibition by lithium zinc phosphate pigment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alibakhshi, E.; Ghasemi, E.; Mahdavian, M.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: •Synthesis of lithium zinc phosphate (LZP) by chemical co-precipitation method. •Corrosion inhibition activity of pigments compare with zinc phosphate (ZP). •LZP showed superior corrosion inhibition effect in EIS measurements. •Evaluation of adhesion strength and dispersion stability. -- Abstract: Lithium zinc phosphate (LZP) has been synthesized through a co-precipitation process and characterized by XRD and IR spectroscopy. The inhibitive performances of this pigment for corrosion of mild steel have been discussed in comparison with the zinc phosphate (ZP) in the pigment extract solution by means of EIS and in the epoxy coating by means of salt spray. The EIS and salt spray results revealed the superior corrosion inhibitive effect of LZP compared to ZP. Moreover, adhesion strength and dispersion stability of the pigmented epoxy coating showed the advantage of LZP compared to ZP

  15. Human milk glycoconjugates that inhibit pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newburg, D S

    1999-02-01

    Breast-fed infants have lower incidence of diarrhea, respiratory disease, and otitis media. The protection by human milk has long been attributed to the presence of secretory IgA. However, human milk contains large numbers and amounts of complex carbohydrates, including glycoproteins, glycolipids, glycosaminoglycans, mucins, and especially oligosaccharides. The oligosaccharides comprise the third most abundant solid constituent of human milk, and contain a myriad of structures. Complex carbohydrate moieties of glycoconjugates and oligosaccharides are synthesized by the many glycosyltransferases in the mammary gland; those with homology to cell surface glycoconjugate pathogen receptors may inhibit pathogen binding, thereby protecting the nursing infant. Several examples are reviewed: A fucosyloligosaccharide inhibits the diarrheagenic effect of stable toxin of Escherichia coli. A different fucosyloligosaccharide inhibits infection by Campylobacter jejuni. Binding of Streptococcus pneumoniae and of enteropathogenic E. coli to their respective receptors is inhibited by human milk oligosaccharides. The 46-kD glycoprotein, lactadherin, inhibits rotavirus binding and infectivity. Low levels of lactadherin in human milk are associated with a higher incidence of symptomatic rotavirus in breast-fed infants. A mannosylated glycopeptide inhibits binding by enterohemorrhagic E. coli. A glycosaminoglycan inhibits binding of gp120 to CD4, the first step in HIV infection. Human milk mucin inhibits binding by S-fimbriated E. coli. The ganglioside, GM1, reduces diarrhea production by cholera toxin and labile toxin of E. coli. The neutral glycosphingolipid, Gb3, binds to Shigatoxin. Thus, many complex carbohydrates of human milk may be novel antipathogenic agents, and the milk glycoconjugates and oligosaccharides may be a major source of protection for breastfeeding infants.

  16. Asparaginase-Induced Hypertriglyceridemia Presenting as Pseudohyponatremia during Leukemia Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashley Hinson

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Asparaginase is a chemotherapeutic agent used to induce disease remission in children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL. We describe the cases of two females with ALL who developed pseudohyponatremia as a presentation of hypertriglyceridemia following asparaginase treatment. Nine similar published cases of asparaginase-induced hypertriglyceridemia and its complications are also discussed. Possible mechanisms of action include inhibition of lipoprotein lipase, decreased hepatic synthesis of lipoprotein, and increased synthesis of VLDL. Effects of asparaginase-induced hypertriglyceridemia range from asymptomatic to transaminasemia, pancreatitis, and life-threatening thrombosis or hyperviscosity syndrome. All cases of hypertriglyceridemia described resolved following cessation of asparaginase treatment ± further treatments.

  17. Doubled dosage of sofosbuviris expected for inhibiting Zika virus infection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Somsri Wiwanitkit; Viroj Wiwanitkit

    2017-01-01

    Sofosbuvir is a new antiviral drug that has been recommended for management of hepatitis C virus (HCV) for a few years. New researches support that sofosbuvir might be useful for the management of Zika virus infection. Based on the pharmacological activity, inhibiting the HCV RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp or NS5 protein), sofosbuvir is proposed for its effectiveness against Zika virus infection. Here, the authors used a mathematical modelling theoretical approach to predict the expected dosage of sofosbuvir for inhibiting Zika virus infection. Based on the modeling study, if sofosbuvir is assigned for management of Zika virus infection, doubled dosage of the present dosage for hepatitis C management is recommended.

  18. Lactate dehydrogenase inhibition: exploring possible applications beyond cancer treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Stefano, Giuseppina; Manerba, Marcella; Di Ianni, Lorenza; Fiume, Luigi

    2016-04-01

    Lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) inhibition is considered a worthwhile attempt in the development of innovative anticancer strategies. Unfortunately, in spite of the involvement of several research institutions and pharma-companies, the discovery of LDH inhibitors with drug-like properties seems a hardly resolvable challenge. While awaiting new advancements, in the present review we will examine other pathologic conditions characterized by increased glycolysis and LDH activity, which could potentially benefit from LDH inhibition. The rationale for targeting LDH activity in these contexts is the same justifying the LDH-based approach in anticancer therapy: because of the enzyme position at the end of glycolytic pathway, LDH inhibitors are not expected to hinder glucose metabolism of normal cells. Moreover, we will summarize the latest contributions in the discovery of enzyme inhibitors and try to glance over the reasons underlying the complexity of this research.

  19. The inhibition of repair in UV irradiated human cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Collins, A.R.S.; Schor, S.L.; Johnson, R.T.

    1977-01-01

    Three different assay procedures are used to determine the effects of hydroxyurea on excision repair in UV-irradiated HeLa cells. At the cytological level, incubation of UV-irradiated metaphase cells with hydroxyurea caused chromosome decondensation. Using a modified alkaline sucrose gradient sedimentation technique involving minimal lysis before centrifugation, a marked retardation was found in the sedimentation of DNA from UV-irradiated cells incubated for a short period with hydroxyurea. The effect of hydroxyurea on the incorporation of [ 3 H]thymidine by UV-irradiated G1 cells was found to depend on the concentration of thymidine present in the medium. The results point to an inhibition of repair DNA synthesis by hydroxyurea (or deoxyadenosine), at the level of the supply of DNA precursors, i.e. in the same way that these agents inhibit semiconservative DNA synthesis. In the presence of these inhibitors, single-strand gaps accumulate in the DNA

  20. Relational integration, inhibition, and analogical reasoning in older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viskontas, Indre V; Morrison, Robert G; Holyoak, Keith J; Hummel, John E; Knowlton, Barbara J

    2004-12-01

    The difficulty of reasoning tasks depends on their relational complexity, which increases with the number of relations that must be considered simultaneously to make an inference, and on the number of irrelevant items that must be inhibited. The authors examined the ability of younger and older adults to integrate multiple relations and inhibit irrelevant stimuli. Young adults performed well at all but the highest level of relational complexity, whereas older adults performed poorly even at a medium level of relational complexity, especially when irrelevant information was presented. Simulations based on a neurocomputational model of analogical reasoning, Learning and Inference with Schemas and Analogies (LISA), suggest that the observed decline in reasoning performance may be explained by a decline in attention and inhibitory functions in older adults. copyright (c) 2004 APA, all rights reserved.

  1. Irregular activity arises as a natural consequence of synaptic inhibition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Terman, D.; Rubin, J. E.; Diekman, C. O.

    2013-01-01

    Irregular neuronal activity is observed in a variety of brain regions and states. This work illustrates a novel mechanism by which irregular activity naturally emerges in two-cell neuronal networks featuring coupling by synaptic inhibition. We introduce a one-dimensional map that captures the irregular activity occurring in our simulations of conductance-based differential equations and mathematically analyze the instability of fixed points corresponding to synchronous and antiphase spiking for this map. We find that the irregular solutions that arise exhibit expansion, contraction, and folding in phase space, as expected in chaotic dynamics. Our analysis shows that these features are produced from the interplay of synaptic inhibition with sodium, potassium, and leak currents in a conductance-based framework and provides precise conditions on parameters that ensure that irregular activity will occur. In particular, the temporal details of spiking dynamics must be present for a model to exhibit this irregularity mechanism and must be considered analytically to capture these effects

  2. Irregular activity arises as a natural consequence of synaptic inhibition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Terman, D., E-mail: terman@math.ohio-state.edu [Department of Mathematics, The Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 43210 (United States); Rubin, J. E., E-mail: jonrubin@pitt.edu [Department of Mathematics, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15260 (United States); Diekman, C. O., E-mail: diekman@njit.edu [Department of Mathematical Sciences, New Jersey Institute of Technology, Newark, New Jersey 07102 (United States)

    2013-12-15

    Irregular neuronal activity is observed in a variety of brain regions and states. This work illustrates a novel mechanism by which irregular activity naturally emerges in two-cell neuronal networks featuring coupling by synaptic inhibition. We introduce a one-dimensional map that captures the irregular activity occurring in our simulations of conductance-based differential equations and mathematically analyze the instability of fixed points corresponding to synchronous and antiphase spiking for this map. We find that the irregular solutions that arise exhibit expansion, contraction, and folding in phase space, as expected in chaotic dynamics. Our analysis shows that these features are produced from the interplay of synaptic inhibition with sodium, potassium, and leak currents in a conductance-based framework and provides precise conditions on parameters that ensure that irregular activity will occur. In particular, the temporal details of spiking dynamics must be present for a model to exhibit this irregularity mechanism and must be considered analytically to capture these effects.

  3. Cortical organization of inhibition-related functions and modulation by psychopathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warren, Stacie L; Crocker, Laura D; Spielberg, Jeffery M; Engels, Anna S; Banich, Marie T; Sutton, Bradley P; Miller, Gregory A; Heller, Wendy

    2013-01-01

    Individual differences in inhibition-related functions have been implicated as risk factors for a broad range of psychopathology, including anxiety and depression. Delineating neural mechanisms of distinct inhibition-related functions may clarify their role in the development and maintenance of psychopathology. The present study tested the hypothesis that activity in common and distinct brain regions would be associated with an ecologically sensitive, self-report measure of inhibition and a laboratory performance measure of prepotent response inhibition. Results indicated that sub-regions of DLPFC distinguished measures of inhibition, whereas left inferior frontal gyrus and bilateral inferior parietal cortex were associated with both types of inhibition. Additionally, co-occurring anxiety and depression modulated neural activity in select brain regions associated with response inhibition. Results imply that specific combinations of anxiety and depression dimensions are associated with failure to implement top-down attentional control as reflected in inefficient recruitment of posterior DLPFC and increased activation in regions associated with threat (MTG) and worry (BA10). Present findings elucidate possible neural mechanisms of interference that could help explain executive control deficits in psychopathology.

  4. Cortical organization of inhibition-related functions and modulation by psychopathology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stacie L. Warren

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Individual differences in inhibition-related functions have been implicated as risk factors for a broad range of psychopathology, including anxiety and depression. Delineating neural mechanisms of distinct inhibition-related functions may clarify their role in the development and maintenance of psychopathology. The present study tested the hypothesis that activity in common and distinct brain regions would be associated with an ecologically sensitive, self-report measure of inhibition and a laboratory performance measure of prepotent response inhibition. Results indicated that sub-regions of DLPFC distinguished measures of inhibition, whereas left inferior frontal gyrus and bilateral inferior parietal cortex were associated with both types of inhibition. Additionally, co-occurring anxiety and depression modulated neural activity in select brain regions associated with response inhibition. Results imply that specific combinations of anxiety and depression dimensions are associated with failure to implement top-down attentional control as reflected in inefficient recruitment of posterior DLPFC and increased activation in regions associated with threat (MTG and worry (BA10. Present findings elucidate possible neural mechanisms of interference that could help explain executive control deficits in psychopathology.

  5. Emotion potentiates response activation and inhibition in masked priming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bocanegra, Bruno R; Zeelenberg, René

    2012-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that emotion can have 2-fold effects on perception. At the object-level, emotional stimuli benefit from a stimulus-specific boost in visual attention at the relative expense of competing stimuli. At the visual feature-level, recent findings indicate that emotion may inhibit the processing of small visual details and facilitate the processing of coarse visual features. In the present study, we investigated whether emotion can boost the activation and inhibition of automatic motor responses that are generated prior to overt perception. To investigate this, we tested whether an emotional cue affects covert motor responses in a masked priming task. We used a masked priming paradigm in which participants responded to target arrows that were preceded by invisible congruent or incongruent prime arrows. In the standard paradigm, participants react faster, and commit fewer errors responding to the directionality of target arrows, when they are preceded by congruent vs. incongruent masked prime arrows (positive congruency effect, PCE). However, as prime-target SOAs increase, this effect reverses (negative congruency effect, NCE). These findings have been explained as evidence for an initial activation and a subsequent inhibition of a partial response elicited by the masked prime arrow. Our results show that the presentation of fearful face cues, compared to neutral face cues, increased the size of both the PCE and NCE, despite the fact that the primes were invisible. This is the first demonstration that emotion prepares an individual's visuomotor system for automatic activation and inhibition of motor responses in the absence of visual awareness.

  6. The Effects of Kaempferol-Inhibited Autophagy on Osteoclast Formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Chang-Ju; Shin, Sang-Hun; Kim, Bok-Joo; Kim, Chul-Hoon; Kim, Jung-Han; Kang, Hae-Mi; Park, Bong-Soo; Kim, In-Ryoung

    2018-01-02

    Kaempferol, a flavonoid compound, is derived from the rhizome of Kaempferia galanga L ., which is used in traditional medicine in Asia. Autophagy has pleiotropic functions that are involved in cell growth, survival, nutrient supply under starvation, defense against pathogens, and antigen presentation. There are many studies dealing with the inhibitory effects of natural flavonoids in bone resorption. However, no studies have explained the relationship between the autophagic and inhibitory processes of osteoclastogenesis by natural flavonoids. The present study was undertaken to investigate the inhibitory effects of osteoclastogenesis through the autophagy inhibition process stimulated by kaempferol in murin macrophage (RAW 264.7) cells. The cytotoxic effect of Kaempferol was investigated by MTT assay. The osteoclast differentiation and autophagic process were confirmed via tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP) staining, pit formation assay, western blot, and real-time PCR. Kaempferol controlled the expression of autophagy-related factors and in particular, it strongly inhibited the expression of p62/SQSTM1. In the western blot and real time-PCR analysis, when autophagy was suppressed with the application of 3-Methyladenine (3-MA) only, osteoclast and apoptosis related factors were not significantly affected. However, we found that after cells were treated with kaempferol, these factors inhibited autophagy and activated apoptosis. Therefore, we presume that kaempferol-inhibited autophagy activated apoptosis by degradation of p62/SQSTM1. Further study of the p62/SQSTM1 gene as a target in the autophagy mechanism, may help to delineate the potential role of kaempferol in the treatment of bone metabolism disorders.

  7. Isolated tumoral pyruvate dehydrogenase can synthesize acetoin which inhibits pyruvate oxidation as well as other aldehydes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baggetto, L G; Lehninger, A L

    1987-05-29

    Oxidation of 1 mM pyruvate by Ehrlich and AS30-D tumor mitochondria is inhibited by acetoin, an unusual and important metabolite of pyruvate utilization by cancer cells, by acetaldehyde, methylglyoxal and excess pyruvate. The respiratory inhibition is reversed by other substrates added to pyruvate and also by 0.5 mM ATP. Kinetic properties of pyruvate dehydrogenase complex isolated from these tumor mitochondria have been studied. This complex appears to be able to synthesize acetoin from acetaldehyde plus pyruvate and is competitively inhibited by acetoin. The role of a new regulatory pattern for tumoral pyruvate dehydrogenase is presented.

  8. Characterization of acetylcholinesterase-inhibition by itopride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwanaga, Y; Kimura, T; Miyashita, N; Morikawa, K; Nagata, O; Itoh, Z; Kondo, Y

    1994-11-01

    Itopride is a gastroprokinetic benzamide derivative. This agent inhibited both electric eel acetylcholinesterase (AChE) and horse serum butyrylcholinesterase (BuChE). The IC50 of itopride with AChE (2.04 +/- 0.27 microM) was, however, 100-fold less than that with BuChE, whereas in the case of neostigmine with AChE (11.3 +/- 3.4 nM), it was 10-fold less. The recovery of AChE activity inhibited by 10(-7) M neostigmine was partial, but that inhibited by up to 3 x 10(-5) M itopride was complete when the reaction mixture was subjected to ultrafiltration. Double reciprocal plots of the experimental data showed that both Km and Vmax were affected by itopride, suggesting that the inhibition is a "mixed" type, although primarily being an uncompetitive one. The inhibitory effect of itopride on cholinesterase (ChE) activity in guinea pig gastrointestine was much weaker than that on pure AChE. However, in the presence of a low dose of diisopropyl fluorophosphate, just enough to inhibit BuChE but not AChE, the IC50s of itopride against ChE activities were found to be about 0.5 microM. In conclusion, itopride exerts reversible and a "mixed" type of inhibition preferably against AChE. The IC50 of itopride for electric eel and guinea pig gastrointestinal AChE inhibition was 200 times and 50 times as large as that of neostigmine, respectively.

  9. Ethylene not responsible for inhibition of conidium germination by soils volatiles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schippers, B.; Boerwinkel, D.J.; Konings, H.

    1978-01-01

    Volatile factors inhibiting the germination of Botrytis cinerea and Cochlibolus sativus conidia on membrane filters were emanated from six alkaline and two acid soils of different organic content and origin. Addition of lime or chitin increased the inhibitory action. Evidence is presented that ethylene is not involved either directly or indirectly in the inhibition of conidium germination above the different soils tested. 16 references, 4 figures, 2 tables.

  10. GABA, not glycine, mediates inhibition of latent respiratory motor pathways after spinal cord injury

    OpenAIRE

    Zimmer, M. Beth; Goshgarian, Harry G.

    2006-01-01

    Previous work has shown that latent respiratory motor pathways known as crossed phrenic pathways are inhibited via a spinal inhibitory process; however, the underlying mechanisms remain unknown. The present study investigated whether spinal GABA-A and/or glycine receptors are involved in the inhibition of the crossed phrenic pathways after a C2 spinal cord hemisection injury. Under ketamine/xylazine anesthesia, adult, female, Sprague Dawley rats were hemisected at the C2 spinal cord level. Fo...

  11. Inhibition of α-Amylases by Condensed and Hydrolysable Tannins: Focus on Kinetics and Hypoglycemic Actions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camila Gabriel Kato

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study was to compare the in vitro inhibitory effects on the salivary and pancreatic α-amylases and the in vivo hypoglycemic actions of the hydrolysable tannin from Chinese natural gall and the condensed tannin from Acacia mearnsii. The human salivary α-amylase was more strongly inhibited by the hydrolysable than by the condensed tannin, with the concentrations for 50% inhibition (IC50 being 47.0 and 285.4 μM, respectively. The inhibitory capacities of both tannins on the pancreatic α-amylase were also different, with IC50 values being 141.1 μM for the hydrolysable tannin and 248.1 μM for the condensed tannin. The kinetics of the inhibition presented complex patterns in that for both inhibitors more than one molecule can bind simultaneously to either the free enzyme of the substrate-complexed enzyme (parabolic mixed inhibition. Both tannins were able to inhibit the intestinal starch absorption. Inhibition by the hydrolysable tannin was concentration-dependent, with 53% inhibition at the dose of 58.8 μmol/kg and 88% inhibition at the dose of 294 μmol/kg. For the condensed tannin, inhibition was not substantially different for doses between 124.4 μmol/kg (49% and 620 μmol/kg (57%. It can be concluded that both tannins, but especially the hydrolysable one, could be useful in controlling the postprandial glycemic levels in diabetes.

  12. The Mechanistic Basis for Noncompetitive Ibogaine Inhibition of Serotonin and Dopamine Transporters*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulling, Simon; Schicker, Klaus; Zhang, Yuan-Wei; Steinkellner, Thomas; Stockner, Thomas; Gruber, Christian W.; Boehm, Stefan; Freissmuth, Michael; Rudnick, Gary; Sitte, Harald H.; Sandtner, Walter

    2012-01-01

    Ibogaine, a hallucinogenic alkaloid proposed as a treatment for opiate withdrawal, has been shown to inhibit serotonin transporter (SERT) noncompetitively, in contrast to all other known inhibitors, which are competitive with substrate. Ibogaine binding to SERT increases accessibility in the permeation pathway connecting the substrate-binding site with the cytoplasm. Because of the structural similarity between ibogaine and serotonin, it had been suggested that ibogaine binds to the substrate site of SERT. The results presented here show that ibogaine binds to a distinct site, accessible from the cell exterior, to inhibit both serotonin transport and serotonin-induced ionic currents. Ibogaine noncompetitively inhibited transport by both SERT and the homologous dopamine transporter (DAT). Ibogaine blocked substrate-induced currents also in DAT and increased accessibility of the DAT cytoplasmic permeation pathway. When present on the cell exterior, ibogaine inhibited SERT substrate-induced currents, but not when it was introduced into the cytoplasm through the patch electrode. Similar to noncompetitive transport inhibition, the current block was not reversed by increasing substrate concentration. The kinetics of inhibitor binding and dissociation, as determined by their effect on SERT currents, indicated that ibogaine does not inhibit by forming a long-lived complex with SERT, but rather binds directly to the transporter in an inward-open conformation. A kinetic model for transport describing the noncompetitive action of ibogaine and the competitive action of cocaine accounts well for the results of the present study. PMID:22451652

  13. The mechanistic basis for noncompetitive ibogaine inhibition of serotonin and dopamine transporters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulling, Simon; Schicker, Klaus; Zhang, Yuan-Wei; Steinkellner, Thomas; Stockner, Thomas; Gruber, Christian W; Boehm, Stefan; Freissmuth, Michael; Rudnick, Gary; Sitte, Harald H; Sandtner, Walter

    2012-05-25

    Ibogaine, a hallucinogenic alkaloid proposed as a treatment for opiate withdrawal, has been shown to inhibit serotonin transporter (SERT) noncompetitively, in contrast to all other known inhibitors, which are competitive with substrate. Ibogaine binding to SERT increases accessibility in the permeation pathway connecting the substrate-binding site with the cytoplasm. Because of the structural similarity between ibogaine and serotonin, it had been suggested that ibogaine binds to the substrate site of SERT. The results presented here show that ibogaine binds to a distinct site, accessible from the cell exterior, to inhibit both serotonin transport and serotonin-induced ionic currents. Ibogaine noncompetitively inhibited transport by both SERT and the homologous dopamine transporter (DAT). Ibogaine blocked substrate-induced currents also in DAT and increased accessibility of the DAT cytoplasmic permeation pathway. When present on the cell exterior, ibogaine inhibited SERT substrate-induced currents, but not when it was introduced into the cytoplasm through the patch electrode. Similar to noncompetitive transport inhibition, the current block was not reversed by increasing substrate concentration. The kinetics of inhibitor binding and dissociation, as determined by their effect on SERT currents, indicated that ibogaine does not inhibit by forming a long-lived complex with SERT, but rather binds directly to the transporter in an inward-open conformation. A kinetic model for transport describing the noncompetitive action of ibogaine and the competitive action of cocaine accounts well for the results of the present study.

  14. A cell-based fluorescent assay to detect the activity of AB toxins that inhibit protein synthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    AB-type protein toxins, produced by numerous bacterial pathogens and some plants, elicit a cytotoxic effect involving the inhibition of protein synthesis. To develop an improved method to detect the inhibition of protein synthesis by AB-type toxins, the present study characterized a Vero cell line t...

  15. Aspartate inhibits Staphylococcus aureus biofilm formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Hang; Wang, Mengyue; Yu, Junping; Wei, Hongping

    2015-04-01

    Biofilm formation renders Staphylococcus aureus highly resistant to conventional antibiotics and host defenses. Four D-amino acids (D-Leu, D-Met, D-Trp and D-Tyr) have been reported to be able to inhibit biofilm formation and disassemble established S. aureus biofilms. We report here for the first time that both D- and L-isoforms of aspartate (Asp) inhibited S. aureus biofilm formation on tissue culture plates. Similar biofilm inhibition effects were also observed against other staphylococcal strains, including S. saprophyticus, S. equorum, S. chromogenes and S. haemolyticus. It was found that Asp at high concentrations (>10 mM) inhibited the growth of planktonic N315 cells, but at subinhibitory concentrations decreased the cellular metabolic activity without influencing cell growth. The decreased cellular metabolic activity might be the reason for the production of less protein and DNA in the matrix of the biofilms formed in the presence of Asp. However, varied inhibition efficacies of Asp were observed for biofilms formed by clinical staphylococcal isolates. There might be mechanisms other than decreasing the metabolic activity, e.g. the biofilm phenotypes, affecting biofilm formation in the presence of Asp. © FEMS 2015. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  16. Simvastatin inhibits Candida albicans biofilm in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Geoffrey; Vellucci, Vincent F; Kyc, Stephanie; Hostetter, Margaret K

    2009-12-01

    By inhibiting the conversion of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl CoA (HMG-CoA) to mevalonate, statins impair cholesterol metabolism in humans. We reasoned that statins might similarly interfere with the biosynthesis of ergosterol, the major sterol of the yeast cell membrane. As assessed by spectrophotometric and microscopic analysis, significant inhibition of biofilm production was noted after 16-h incubation with 1, 2.5, and 5 muM simvastatin, concentrations that did not affect growth, adhesion, or hyphal formation by C. albicans in vitro. Higher concentrations (10, 20, and 25 muM simvastatin) inhibited biofilm by >90% but also impaired growth. Addition of exogenous ergosterol (90 muM) overcame the effects of 1 and 2.5 muM simvastatin, suggesting that at least one mechanism of inhibition is interference with ergosterol biosynthesis. Clinical isolates from blood, skin, and mucosal surfaces produced biofilms; biofilms from bloodstream isolates were similarly inhibited by simvastatin. In the absence of fungicidal activity, simvastatin's interruption of a critical step in an essential metabolic pathway, highly conserved from yeast to man, has unexpected effects on biofilm production by a eukaryotic pathogen.

  17. Terbinafine inhibits gap junctional intercellular communication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Ju Yeun; Yoon, Sei Mee; Choi, Eun Ju; Lee, Jinu

    2016-01-01

    Terbinafine is an antifungal agent that selectively inhibits fungal sterol synthesis by blocking squalene epoxidase. We evaluated the effect of terbinafine on gap junctional intercellular communication (GJIC). Fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP) and I-YFP GJIC assays revealed that terbinafine inhibits GJIC in a reversible and dose-dependent manner in FRT-Cx43 and LN215 cells. Treatment with terbinafine did not affect Cx43 phosphorylation status or intracellular Ca 2+ concentration, well-known action mechanisms of various GJIC blockers. While a structurally related chemical, naftifine, attenuated GJIC, epigallocatechin gallate, another potent squalene epoxidase inhibitor with a different structure, did not. These results suggest that terbinafine inhibits GJIC with a so far unknown mechanism of action. - Highlights: • In vitro pharmacological studies were performed on FRT-Cx43 and LN215 cells. • Terbinafine inhibits gap junctional intercellular communication in both cell lines. • The inhibitory effect of terbinafine is reversible and dose-dependent. • Treatment of terbinafine does not alter Cx43 phosphorylation or cytosolic Ca 2+ concentration. • Inhibition of squalene epoxidase is not involved in this new effect of terbinafine.

  18. Terbinafine inhibits gap junctional intercellular communication

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Ju Yeun, E-mail: whitewndus@naver.com [College of Pharmacy, Yonsei Institute of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Yonsei University, 85 Songdogwahak-ro, Yeonsu-gu, Incheon 21983 (Korea, Republic of); Yoon, Sei Mee, E-mail: sei_mee@naver.com [College of Pharmacy, Yonsei Institute of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Yonsei University, 85 Songdogwahak-ro, Yeonsu-gu, Incheon 21983 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Integrated OMICS for Biomedical Sciences, Yonsei University, 50 Yonsei-ro, Seodaemun-gu, Seoul 120-749 (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Eun Ju, E-mail: yureas@naver.com [College of Pharmacy, Yonsei Institute of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Yonsei University, 85 Songdogwahak-ro, Yeonsu-gu, Incheon 21983 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jinu, E-mail: jinulee@yonsei.ac.kr [College of Pharmacy, Yonsei Institute of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Yonsei University, 85 Songdogwahak-ro, Yeonsu-gu, Incheon 21983 (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-09-15

    Terbinafine is an antifungal agent that selectively inhibits fungal sterol synthesis by blocking squalene epoxidase. We evaluated the effect of terbinafine on gap junctional intercellular communication (GJIC). Fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP) and I-YFP GJIC assays revealed that terbinafine inhibits GJIC in a reversible and dose-dependent manner in FRT-Cx43 and LN215 cells. Treatment with terbinafine did not affect Cx43 phosphorylation status or intracellular Ca{sup 2+} concentration, well-known action mechanisms of various GJIC blockers. While a structurally related chemical, naftifine, attenuated GJIC, epigallocatechin gallate, another potent squalene epoxidase inhibitor with a different structure, did not. These results suggest that terbinafine inhibits GJIC with a so far unknown mechanism of action. - Highlights: • In vitro pharmacological studies were performed on FRT-Cx43 and LN215 cells. • Terbinafine inhibits gap junctional intercellular communication in both cell lines. • The inhibitory effect of terbinafine is reversible and dose-dependent. • Treatment of terbinafine does not alter Cx43 phosphorylation or cytosolic Ca{sup 2+} concentration. • Inhibition of squalene epoxidase is not involved in this new effect of terbinafine.

  19. The neural markers of an imminent failure of response inhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bengson, Jesse J; Mangun, George R; Mazaheri, Ali

    2012-01-16

    In his novel Ulysses, James Joyce wrote that mistakes are the "…portals of discovery". The present study investigated the pre-stimulus oscillatory EEG signatures of selective attention and motor preparation that predicted failures of overt response inhibition. We employed a trial-by-trial spatial cueing task using a go/no-go response paradigm with bilateral target stimuli. Subjects were required to covertly attend to the spatial location cued on each trial and respond to most of the number targets (go trials) at that location while withholding responses for one designated number (no-go trials). We analyzed the post-cue/pre-target spectral patterns comparing no-go trials in which a response occurred in error (False Alarms, FA) with trials in which participants correctly withheld a response (Correct Rejections, CR). We found that cue-induced occipital alpha (8-12 Hz) lateralization and inter-frequency anti-correlations between the motor beta (18-24 Hz) and pre-frontal theta (3-5 Hz) bands each independently predicted subsequent failures of response inhibition. Based on these findings, we infer that independent perceptual and motor mechanisms operate in parallel to contribute to failures of response inhibition. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Kaffir lime leaves extract inhibits biofilm formation by Streptococcus mutans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kooltheat, Nateelak; Kamuthachad, Ludthawun; Anthapanya, Methinee; Samakchan, Natthapon; Sranujit, Rungnapa Pankla; Potup, Pachuen; Ferrante, Antonio; Usuwanthim, Kanchana

    2016-04-01

    Although kaffir lime has been reported to exhibit antioxidant and antileukemic activity, little is known about the antimicrobial effect of kaffir lime extract. Because Streptococcus mutans has been known to cause biofilm formation, it has been considered the most important causative pathogen of dental caries. Thus, the effective control of its effects on the oral biofilm is the key to the prevention of dental caries. The aims of the present study were to investigate the effect of kaffir lime leaves extract on biofilm formation and its antibacterial activity on S. mutans. We examined the effect of kaffir lime leaves extract on growth and biofilm formation of S. mutans. For the investigation we used a kaffir lime extract with high phenolic content. The minimum inhibitory concentration of the extract was determined by broth microdilution assay. The inhibitory effect of the test substances on biofilm formation was also investigated by biofilm formation assay and qRT-PCR of biofilm formation-associated genes. Kaffir lime leaves extract inhibits the growth of S. mutans, corresponding to the activity of an antibiotic, ampicillin. Formation of biofilm by S. mutans was also inhibited by the extract. These results were confirmed by the down-regulation of genes associated with the biofilm formation. The findings highlight the ability of kaffir lime leaves extract to inhibit S. mutans activity, which may be beneficial in the prevention of biofilm formation on dental surface, reducing dental plaque and decreasing the chance of dental carries. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Memory, verbal fluency, and response inhibition in normal aging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaurav Thapliyal

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The concepts of aging-related cognitive changes have appeared to be a major challenge in the society. In this context, the present study was planned to find out the functioning of aging population on different neurocognitive measures. Aims: The aim of the study was to find out the neurocognitive functioning, namely memory, verbal fluency, and response inhibition of normal aging population. Materials and Methods: Following purposive sampling technique, a total of 50 healthy subjects (30 males and 20 females in the age range of 60-70 years were recruited from Jaipur city of Rajasthan. Mini-mental state Examination, PGI memory scale, animal names test, and Stroop test were administered. Results: The findings reveal dysfunction in almost all the domains of memory, namely mental balance, attention and concentration, delayed recall, verbal retention for dissimilar pairs, visual retention and recognition, immediate recall, verbal retention for similar pairs, and visual retention. In domain of verbal fluency, all subjects gave low responses on the animal names test. In domain of response inhibition, all the subjects took less time in color test as compared to color word test on the Stroop task. Conclusions: Findings suggest that there are dysfunction in the area of memory, verbal fluency, and response inhibition in persons aged 60-70 years. However, recent and remote memory were found to be intact.

  2. Clonal cell populations unresponsive to radiosensitization induced by telomerase inhibition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ju, Yeun-Jin; Shin, Hyun-Jin; Park, Jeong-Eun; Juhn, Kyoung-Mi; Woo, Seon Rang; Kim, Hee-Young; Han, Young-Hoon; Hwang, Sang-Gu; Hong, Sung-Hee; Kang, Chang-Mo; Yoo, Young-Do; Park, Won-Bong; Cho, Myung-Haing; Park, Gil Hong; Lee, Kee-Ho

    2010-01-01

    Research highlights: → In our present manuscript, we have clearly showed an interesting but problematic obstacle of a radiosensitization strategy based on telomerase inhibition by showing that: Clonal population unresponsive to this radiosensitization occasionally arise. → The telomere length of unsensitized clones was reduced, as was that of most sensitized clones. → The unsensitized clones did not show chromosome end fusion which was noted in all sensitized clones. → P53 status is not associated with the occurrence of unsensitized clone. → Telomere end capping in unsensitized clone is operative even under telomerase deficiency. -- Abstract: A combination of a radiotherapeutic regimen with telomerase inhibition is valuable when tumor cells are to be sensitized to radiation. Here, we describe cell clones unresponsive to radiosensitization after telomere shortening. After extensive division of individual transformed clones of mTERC -/- cells, about 22% of clones were unresponsive to radiosensitization even though telomerase action was inhibited. The telomere lengths of unsensitized mTERC -/- clones were reduced, as were those of most sensitized clones. However, the unsensitized clones did not exhibit chromosomal end-to-end fusion to the extent noted in all sensitized clones. Thus, a defense mechanism preventing telomere erosion is operative even when telomeres become shorter under conditions of telomerase deficiency, and results in unresponsiveness to the radiosensitization generally mediated by telomere shortening.

  3. Viologen-Phosphorus Dendrimers Inhibit α-Synuclein Fibrillation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milowska, Katarzyna; Grochowina, Justyna; Katir, Nadia; El Kadib, Abdelkrim; Majoral, Jean-Pierre; Bryszewska, Maria; Gabryelak, Teresa

    2013-03-04

    Inhibition of α-synuclein (ASN) fibril formation is a potential therapeutic strategy in Parkinson's disease and other synucleinopathies. The aim of this study was to examine the role of viologen-phosphorus dendrimers in the α-synuclein fibrillation process and to assess the structural changes in α-synuclein under the influence of dendrimers. ASN interactions with phosphonate and pegylated surface-reactive viologen-phosphorus dendrimers were examined by measuring the zeta potential, which allowed determining the number of dendrimer molecules that bind to the ASN molecule. The fibrillation kinetics and the structural changes were examined using ThT fluorescence and CD spectroscopy. Depending on the concentration of the used dendrimer and the nature of the reactive groups located on the surface, ASN fibrillation kinetics can be significantly reduced, and even, in the specific case of phosphonate dendrimers, the fibrillation can be totally inhibited at low concentrations. The presented results indicate that viologen-phosphorus dendrimers are able to inhibit ASN fibril formation and may be used as fibrillar regulating agents in neurodegenerative disorders.

  4. Obesity, Cardiovascular Fitness, and Inhibition Function: An Electrophysiological Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tai-Fen Song

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the present study was to examine how obesity and cardiovascular fitness are associated with the inhibition aspect of executive function from behavioral and electrophysiological perspectives. One hundred college students, aged 18 to 25 years, were categorized into four groups of equal size on the basis of body mass index and cardiovascular fitness: a normal-weight and high-fitness (NH group, an obese-weight and high-fitness (OH group, a normal-weight and low-fitness (NL group, and an obese-weight and low-fitness (OL group. Behavioral measures of response time and number of errors, as well as event-related potential (ERP measures of P3 and N1, were assessed during the Stroop Task. The results revealed that, in general, the NH group exhibited shorter response times and larger P3 amplitudes relative to the OH, NL, and OL groups, wherein the OL group exhibited the longest response time in the incongruent condition. No group differences in N1 indices were also revealed. These findings suggest that the status of being both normal weight and having high cardiovascular fitness is associated with better behavioral and later stages of electrophysiological indices of inhibition. However, these benefits in inhibition function would be lost in an individual who is obese or has low cardiovascular fitness, reflecting the importance keeping both normal weight and having high cardiovascular fitness.

  5. Mycotoxicogenic fungal inhibition by innovative cheese cover with aromatic plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moro, Armando; Librán, Celia M; Berruga, M Isabel; Zalacain, Amaya; Carmona, Manuel

    2013-03-30

    The use of aromatic plants and their extracts with antimicrobial properties may be compromised in the case of cheese, as some type of fungal starter is needed during its production. Penicillium verrucosum is considered a common cheese spoiler. The aim of this study was to evaluate the innovative use of certain aromatic plants as natural cheese covers in order to prevent mycotoxicogenic fungal growth (P. verrucosum). A collection of 12 essential oils (EOs) was obtained from various aromatic plants by solvent-free microwave extraction technology, and volatile characterisation of the EOs was carried out by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. The most effective EOs against P. verrucosum were obtained from Anethum graveolens, Hyssopus officinalis and Chamaemelum nobile, yielding 50% inhibition of fungal growth at concentration values lower than 0.02 µL mL⁻¹. All EOs showed high volatile heterogeneity, with α-phellandrene, pinocamphone, isopinocamphone, α-pinene, camphene, 1,8-cineole, carvacrol and trans-anethole being found to be statistically significant in the antifungal model. The use of these aromatic plants as natural covers on cheese can satisfactorily inhibit the growth of some mycotoxicogenic fungal spoilers. Among the volatile compounds present, α- and β-phellandrene were confirmed as the most relevant in the inhibition. © 2012 Society of Chemical Industry.

  6. The effects of bilateral presentations on lateralized lexical decision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandino, Leonardo; Iacoboni, Marco; Zaidel, Eran

    2007-06-01

    We investigated how lateralized lexical decision is affected by the presence of distractors in the visual hemifield contralateral to the target. The study had three goals: first, to determine how the presence of a distractor (either a word or a pseudoword) affects visual field differences in the processing of the target; second, to identify the stage of the process in which the distractor is affecting the decision about the target; and third, to determine whether the interaction between the lexicality of the target and the lexicality of the distractor ("lexical redundancy effect") is due to facilitation or inhibition of lexical processing. Unilateral and bilateral trials were presented in separate blocks. Target stimuli were always underlined. Regarding our first goal, we found that bilateral presentations (a) increased the effect of visual hemifield of presentation (right visual field advantage) for words by slowing down the processing of word targets presented to the left visual field, and (b) produced an interaction between visual hemifield of presentation (VF) and target lexicality (TLex), which implies the use of different strategies by the two hemispheres in lexical processing. For our second goal of determining the processing stage that is affected by the distractor, we introduced a third condition in which targets were always accompanied by "perceptual" distractors consisting of sequences of the letter "x" (e.g., xxxx). Performance on these trials indicated that most of the interaction occurs during lexical access (after basic perceptual analysis but before response programming). Finally, a comparison between performance patterns on the trials containing perceptual and lexical distractors indicated that the lexical redundancy effect is mainly due to inhibition of word processing by pseudoword distractors.

  7. Inhibition of ethylene production by putrescine alleviates aluminium-induced root inhibition in wheat plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Yan; Jin, Chongwei; Sun, Chengliang; Wang, Jinghong; Ye, Yiquan; Zhou, Weiwei; Lu, Lingli; Lin, Xianyong

    2016-01-08

    Inhibition of root elongation is one of the most distinct symptoms of aluminium (Al) toxicity. Although putrescine (Put) has been identified as an important signaling molecule involved in Al tolerance, it is yet unknown how Put mitigates Al-induced root inhibition. Here, the possible mechanism was investigated by using two wheat genotypes differing in Al resistance: Al-tolerant Xi Aimai-1 and Al-sensitive Yangmai-5. Aluminium caused more root inhibition in Yangmai-5 and increased ethylene production at the root apices compared to Xi Aimai-1, whereas the effects were significantly reversed by ethylene biosynthesis inhibitors. The simultaneous exposure of wheat seedlings to Al and ethylene donor, ethephon, or ethylene biosynthesis precursor, 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid (ACC), increased ethylene production and aggravated root inhibition, which was more pronounced in Xi Aimai-1. In contrast, Put treatment decreased ethylene production and alleviated Al-induced root inhibition in both genotypes, and the effects were more conspicuous in Yangmai-5. Furthermore, our results indicated that Al-induced ethylene production was mediated by ACC synthase (ACS) and ACC oxidase, and that Put decreased ethylene production by inhibiting ACS. Altogether, these findings indicate that ethylene is involved in Al-induced root inhibition and this process could be alleviated by Put through inhibiting ACS activity.

  8. Mode of Action of the Natural Insecticide, Decaleside Involves Sodium Pump Inhibition.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yallappa Rajashekar

    Full Text Available Decalesides are a new class of natural insecticides which are toxic to insects by contact via the tarsal gustatory chemosensilla. The symptoms of their toxicity to insects and the rapid knockdown effect suggest neurotoxic action, but the precise mode of action and the molecular targets for decaleside action are not known. We have presented experimental evidence for the involvement of sodium pump inhibition in the insecticidal action of decaleside in the cockroach and housefly. The knockdown effect of decaleside is concomitant with the in vivo inhibition of Na+, K+ -ATPase in the head and thorax. The lack of insecticidal action by experimental ablation of tarsi or blocking the tarsal sites with paraffin correlated with lack of inhibition of Na+- K+ ATPase in vivo. Maltotriose, a trisaccharide, partially rescued the toxic action of decaleside as well as inhibition of the enzyme, suggesting the possible involvement of gustatory sugar receptors. In vitro studies with crude insect enzyme preparation and purified porcine Na+, K+ -ATPase showed that decaleside competitively inhibited the enzyme involving the ATP binding site. Our study shows that the insecticidal action of decaleside via the tarsal gustatory sites is causally linked to the inhibition of sodium pump which represents a unique mode of action. The precise target(s for decaleside in the tarsal chemosensilla and the pathway linked to inhibition of sodium pump and the insecticidal action remain to be understood.

  9. Mode of Action of the Natural Insecticide, Decaleside Involves Sodium Pump Inhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajashekar, Yallappa; Shivanandappa, Thimmappa

    2017-01-01

    Decalesides are a new class of natural insecticides which are toxic to insects by contact via the tarsal gustatory chemosensilla. The symptoms of their toxicity to insects and the rapid knockdown effect suggest neurotoxic action, but the precise mode of action and the molecular targets for decaleside action are not known. We have presented experimental evidence for the involvement of sodium pump inhibition in the insecticidal action of decaleside in the cockroach and housefly. The knockdown effect of decaleside is concomitant with the in vivo inhibition of Na+, K+ -ATPase in the head and thorax. The lack of insecticidal action by experimental ablation of tarsi or blocking the tarsal sites with paraffin correlated with lack of inhibition of Na+- K+ ATPase in vivo. Maltotriose, a trisaccharide, partially rescued the toxic action of decaleside as well as inhibition of the enzyme, suggesting the possible involvement of gustatory sugar receptors. In vitro studies with crude insect enzyme preparation and purified porcine Na+, K+ -ATPase showed that decaleside competitively inhibited the enzyme involving the ATP binding site. Our study shows that the insecticidal action of decaleside via the tarsal gustatory sites is causally linked to the inhibition of sodium pump which represents a unique mode of action. The precise target(s) for decaleside in the tarsal chemosensilla and the pathway linked to inhibition of sodium pump and the insecticidal action remain to be understood.

  10. Inhibition effect of fatty amides with secondary compound on carbon steel corrosion in hydrodynamic condition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibrahim, I. M.; Jai, J.; Daud, M.; Hashim, Md A.

    2018-03-01

    The inhibition effect demonstrates an increase in the inhibition performance in presence of a secondary compound in the inhibited solution. This study introduces fatty amides as corrosion inhibitor and oxygen scavenger, namely, sodium sulphite as a secondary compound. The main objective is to determine the synergistic inhibition effect of a system by using fatty amides together with sodium sulphite in hydrodynamic condition. The synergistic inhibition of fatty amides and sodium sulphite on corrosion of carbon steel in 3.5 wt% sodium chloride solution had been studied using linear polarization resistance method and scanning electron microscope (SEM) with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX). Electrochemical measurement was carried out using rotating cylinder electrode at different flow regimes (static, laminar, transition and turbulent). Linear polarization resistance experiments showed the changes in polarization resistance when the rotation speed increased. It found that, by addition of fatty amides together with sodium sulphite in test solution, the inhibition efficiency increased when rotation speed increased. The results collected from LPR experiment correlated with results from SEM-EDX. The results showed inhibition efficiency of system was enhanced when fatty amides and oxygen scavengers were present together.

  11. Inhibition of melanogenesis by Xanthium strumarium L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hailan; Min, Young Sil; Park, Kyoung-Chan; Kim, Dong-Seok

    2012-01-01

    Xanthium strumarium L. (Asteraceae) is traditionally used in Korea to treat skin diseases. In this study, we investigated the effects of a X. strumarium stem extract on melanin synthesis. It inhibited melanin synthesis in a concentration-dependent manner, but it did not directly inhibit tyrosinase, the rate-limiting melanogenic enzyme, and instead downregulated microphthalmia-associated transcription factor (MITF) and tyrosinase expression. MITF, the master regulator of pigmentation, is a target of the Wnt signaling pathway, which includes glycogen synthase kinase 3β (GSK3β) and β-catenin. Hence, the influence of X. strumarium stem extract on GSK3β and β-catenin was further investigated. X. strumarium induced GSK3β phosphorylation (inactivation), but the level of β-catenin did not change. Moreover, a specific GSK3β inhibitor restored X. strumarium-induced melanin reduction. Hence, we suggest that X. strumarium inhibits melanin synthesis through downregulation of tyrosinase via GSK3β phosphorylation.

  12. Mapuche Herbal Medicine Inhibits Blood Platelet Aggregation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susan Skanderup Falkenberg

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available 12 plant species traditionally used by the Mapuche people in Chile to treat wounds and inflammations have been evaluated for their direct blood platelet inhibition. Seven of the 12 tested plant species showed platelet inhibitory effect in sheep blood, and four of these were also able to inhibit the ADP- (5.0 μM and collagen- (2.0 μg/mL induced aggregations in human blood. These four species in respective extracts (in brackets were Blechnum chilense (MeOH, Luma apiculata (H2O, Amomyrtus luma (DCM : MeOH 1 : 1 and Cestrum parqui (DCM : MeOH 1 : 1. The platelet aggregating inhibitory effects of A. luma (DCM : MeOH 1 : 1, and L. apiculata (H2O were substantial and confirmed by inhibition of platelet surface activation markers.

  13. Terbinafine inhibits gap junctional intercellular communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ju Yeun; Yoon, Sei Mee; Choi, Eun Ju; Lee, Jinu

    2016-09-15

    Terbinafine is an antifungal agent that selectively inhibits fungal sterol synthesis by blocking squalene epoxidase. We evaluated the effect of terbinafine on gap junctional intercellular communication (GJIC). Fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP) and I-YFP GJIC assays revealed that terbinafine inhibits GJIC in a reversible and dose-dependent manner in FRT-Cx43 and LN215 cells. Treatment with terbinafine did not affect Cx43 phosphorylation status or intracellular Ca(2+) concentration, well-known action mechanisms of various GJIC blockers. While a structurally related chemical, naftifine, attenuated GJIC, epigallocatechin gallate, another potent squalene epoxidase inhibitor with a different structure, did not. These results suggest that terbinafine inhibits GJIC with a so far unknown mechanism of action. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Inhibition of aluminum corrosion using Opuntia extract

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Etre, A.Y.

    2003-01-01

    The inhibitive action of the mucilage extracted from the modified stems of prickly pears, toward acid corrosion of aluminum, is tested using weight loss, thermometry, hydrogen evolution and polarization techniques. It was found that the extract acts as a good corrosion inhibitor for aluminum corrosion in 2.0 M HCl solution. The inhibition action of the extract was discussed in view of Langmuir adsorption isotherm. It was found that the adsorption of the extract on aluminum surface is a spontaneous process. The inhibition efficiency (IE) increases as the extract concentration is increased. The effect of temperature on the IE was studied. It was found that the presence of extract increases the activation energy of the corrosion reaction. Moreover, the thermodynamic parameters of the adsorption process were calculated. It was found also that the Opuntia extract provides a good protection to aluminum against pitting corrosion in chloride ion containing solutions

  15. Mapuche herbal medicine inhibits blood platelet aggregation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falkenberg, Susan Skanderup; Tarnow, Inge; Guzman, Alfonso; Mølgaard, Per; Simonsen, Henrik Toft

    2012-01-01

    12 plant species traditionally used by the Mapuche people in Chile to treat wounds and inflammations have been evaluated for their direct blood platelet inhibition. Seven of the 12 tested plant species showed platelet inhibitory effect in sheep blood, and four of these were also able to inhibit the ADP- (5.0 μM) and collagen- (2.0 μg/mL) induced aggregations in human blood. These four species in respective extracts (in brackets) were Blechnum chilense (MeOH), Luma apiculata (H(2)O), Amomyrtus luma (DCM : MeOH 1 : 1) and Cestrum parqui (DCM : MeOH 1 : 1). The platelet aggregating inhibitory effects of A. luma (DCM : MeOH 1 : 1), and L. apiculata (H(2)O) were substantial and confirmed by inhibition of platelet surface activation markers.

  16. A metalloproteinase karilysin present in the majority of Tannerella forsythia isolates inhibits all pathways of the complement system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jusko, Monika; Potempa, Jan; Karim, Abdulkarim Y

    2012-01-01

    Tannerella forsythia is a poorly studied pathogen despite being one of the main causes of periodontitis, which is an inflammatory disease of the supporting structures of the teeth. We found that despite being recognized by all complement pathways, T. forsythia is resistant to killing by human....... forsythia obtained from patients with periodontitis. Taken together, the newly characterized karilysin appears to be an important virulence factor of T. forsythia and might have several important implications for immune evasion....

  17. Alkaloids from the Sponge Stylissa carteri Present Prospective Scaffolds for the Inhibition of Human Immunodeficiency Virus 1 (HIV-1)

    KAUST Repository

    O’ Rourke, Aubrie; Kremb, Stephan; Bader, Theresa; Helfer, Markus; Schmitt-Kopplin, Philippe; Gerwick, William; Brack-Werner, Ruth; Voolstra, Christian R.

    2016-01-01

    The sponge Stylissa carteri is known to produce a number of secondary metabolites displaying anti-fouling, anti-inflammatory, and anti-cancer activity. However, the anti-viral potential of metabolites produced by S. carteri has not been extensively

  18. Paeoniflorin inhibits cell growth and induces cell cycle arrest through inhibition of FoxM1 in colorectal cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yue, Meng; Li, Shiquan; Yan, Guoqiang; Li, Chenyao; Kang, Zhenhua

    2018-01-01

    Paeoniflorin (PF) exhibits tumor suppressive functions in a variety of human cancers. However, the function of PF and molecular mechanism in colorectal cancer are elusive. In the present study, we investigated whether PF could exert its antiproliferative activity, anti-migration, and anti-invasive function in colorectal cancer cells. We found that PF inhibited cell growth and induced apoptosis and blocked cell cycle progression in the G0/G1 phase in colorectal cancer cells. Moreover, we found that PF suppressed cell migration and invasion in colorectal cancer cells. FoxM1 has been reported to play an important oncogenic role in human cancers. We also determine whether PF inhibited the expression of FoxM1, leading to its anti-cancer activity. We found that PF treatment in colorectal cancer cells resulted in down-regulation of FoxM1. The rescue experiments showed that overexpression of FoxM1 abrogated the tumor suppressive function induced by PF treatment. Notably, depletion of FoxM1 promoted the anti-tumor activity of PF in colorectal cancer cells. Therefore, inhibition of FoxM1 could participate in the anti-tumor activity of PF in colorectal cancer cells.

  19. Inhibition of intestinal disaccharidase activity by pentoses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Halschou-Jensen, Kia

    on carbohydrate- ingesting enzymes activity in vitro and possible effects on human postprandial blood response. In paper 1 the effects of sugar beet polyphenols from molasses and the potential inhibition of sucrase activity in vitro, was investigated. Two different polyphenol-rich fractions from chromatographic...... separation of molasses from sugar beets and pure ferulic acid were tested. We found no effects of the two fractions of molasses. The pure ferulic acid indicated an inhibition of sucrase in vitr. Both in vitro and in vivo studies have investigated the effects of L-arabinose and D-xylose on carbohydrate...

  20. Sprout inhibition in roots, tubers and bulbs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luna C, P.C.

    1992-05-01

    The treatment with ionizing radiations to low dose impedes that appear sprouts in the tubers (potatoes); bulbs (onion and garlic) and in roots like the ginger and the yucca. The purpose is to inhibit the germination during the process of manipulation and storage, and this way to avoid the lost ones post crop of these products. The radiation dose required to inhibit the germination goes to depend of: the development conditions, the differences of variety, of the storage state of the bulbs and the conditions of cured and storage. (Author)