WorldWideScience

Sample records for inhibited cell death

  1. Inhibition of autophagy induced by proteasome inhibition increases cell death in human SHG-44 glioma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Peng-Fei; Zhang, Ji-Zhou; Wang, Xiao-Fei; Meng, Fan-Kai; Li, Wen-Chen; Luan, Yong-Xin; Ling, Feng; Luo, Yi-Nan

    2009-07-01

    The ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS) and lysosome-dependent macroautophagy (autophagy) are two major intracellular pathways for protein degradation. Recent studies suggest that proteasome inhibitors may reduce tumor growth and activate autophagy. Due to the dual roles of autophagy in tumor cell survival and death, the effect of autophagy on the destiny of glioma cells remains unclear. In this study, we sought to investigate whether inhibition of the proteasome can induce autophagy and the effects of autophagy on the fate of human SHG-44 glioma cells. The proteasome inhibitor MG-132 was used to induce autophagy in SHG-44 glioma cells, and the effect of autophagy on the survival of SHG-44 glioma cells was investigated using an autophagy inhibitor 3-MA. Cell viability was measured by MTT assay. Apoptosis and cell cycle were detected by flow cytometry. The expression of autophagy related proteins was determined by Western blot. MG-132 inhibited cell proliferation, induced cell death and cell cycle arrest at G(2)/M phase, and activated autophagy in SHG-44 glioma cells. The expression of autophagy-related Beclin-1 and LC3-I was significantly up-regulated and part of LC3-I was converted into LC3-II. However, when SHG-44 glioma cells were co-treated with MG-132 and 3-MA, the cells became less viable, but cell death and cell numbers at G(2)/M phase increased. Moreover, the accumulation of acidic vesicular organelles was decreased, the expression of Beclin-1 and LC3 was significantly down-regulated and the conversion of LC3-II from LC3-I was also inhibited. Inhibition of the proteasome can induce autophagy in human SHG-44 glioma cells, and inhibition of autophagy increases cell death. This discovery may shed new light on the effect of autophagy on modulating the fate of SHG-44 glioma cells.Acta Pharmacologica Sinica (2009) 30: 1046-1052; doi: 10.1038/aps.2009.71.

  2. Inhibition of thromboxane synthase induces lung cancer cell death via increasing the nuclear p27

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leung, Kin Chung; Hsin, Michael K.Y.; Chan, Joey S.Y.; Yip, Johnson H.Y.; Li, Mingyue; Leung, Billy C.S. [Department of Surgery, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Shatin, New Territories (Hong Kong); Mok, Tony S.K. [Department of Clinical Oncology, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Shatin, New Territories (Hong Kong); Warner, Timothy D. [The William Harvey Research Institute, Queen Mary University of London, London (United Kingdom); Underwood, Malcolm J. [Department of Surgery, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Shatin, New Territories (Hong Kong); Chen, George G., E-mail: gchen@cuhk.edu.hk [Department of Surgery, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Shatin, New Territories (Hong Kong)

    2009-10-15

    The role of thromboxane in lung carcinogenesis is not clearly known, though thromboxane B2 (TXB{sub 2}) level is increased and antagonists of thromboxane receptors or TXA2 can induce apoptosis of lung cancer cells. p27, an atypical tumor suppressor, is normally sequestered in the nucleus. The increased nuclear p27 may result in apoptosis of tumor cells. We hypothesize that the inhibition of thromboxane synthase (TXS) induces the death of lung cancer cells and that such inhibition is associated with the nuclear p27 level. Our experiment showed that the inhibition of TXS significantly induced the death or apoptosis in lung cancer cells. The activity of TXS was increased in lung cancer. The nuclear p27 was remarkably reduced in lung cancer tissues. The inhibition of TXS caused the cell death and apoptosis of lung cancer cells, likely via the elevation of the nuclear p27 since the TXS inhibition promoted the nuclear p27 level and the inhibition of p27 by its siRNA recovered the cell death induced by TXS inhibition. Collectively, lung cancer cells produce high levels of TXB{sub 2} but their nuclear p27 is markedly reduced. The inhibition of TXS results in the p27-related induction of cell death in lung cancer cells.

  3. Inhibition of thromboxane synthase induces lung cancer cell death via increasing the nuclear p27

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leung, Kin Chung; Hsin, Michael K.Y.; Chan, Joey S.Y.; Yip, Johnson H.Y.; Li, Mingyue; Leung, Billy C.S.; Mok, Tony S.K.; Warner, Timothy D.; Underwood, Malcolm J.; Chen, George G.

    2009-01-01

    The role of thromboxane in lung carcinogenesis is not clearly known, though thromboxane B2 (TXB 2 ) level is increased and antagonists of thromboxane receptors or TXA2 can induce apoptosis of lung cancer cells. p27, an atypical tumor suppressor, is normally sequestered in the nucleus. The increased nuclear p27 may result in apoptosis of tumor cells. We hypothesize that the inhibition of thromboxane synthase (TXS) induces the death of lung cancer cells and that such inhibition is associated with the nuclear p27 level. Our experiment showed that the inhibition of TXS significantly induced the death or apoptosis in lung cancer cells. The activity of TXS was increased in lung cancer. The nuclear p27 was remarkably reduced in lung cancer tissues. The inhibition of TXS caused the cell death and apoptosis of lung cancer cells, likely via the elevation of the nuclear p27 since the TXS inhibition promoted the nuclear p27 level and the inhibition of p27 by its siRNA recovered the cell death induced by TXS inhibition. Collectively, lung cancer cells produce high levels of TXB 2 but their nuclear p27 is markedly reduced. The inhibition of TXS results in the p27-related induction of cell death in lung cancer cells.

  4. Fluoxetine Prevents Oligodendrocyte Cell Death by Inhibiting Microglia Activation after Spinal Cord Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jee Y.; Kang, So R.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Oligodendrocyte cell death and axon demyelination after spinal cord injury (SCI) are known to be important secondary injuries contributing to permanent neurological disability. Thus, blocking oligodendrocyte cell death should be considered for therapeutic intervention after SCI. Here, we demonstrated that fluoxetine, an antidepressant drug, alleviates oligodendrocyte cell death by inhibiting microglia activation after SCI. After injury at the T9 level with a Precision Systems and Instrumentation (Lexington, KY) device, fluoxetine (10 mg/kg, intraperitoneal) was administered once a day for the indicated time points. Immunostaining with CD11b (OX-42) antibody and quantification analysis showed that microglia activation was significantly inhibited by fluoxetine at 5 days after injury. Fluoxetine also significantly inhibited activation of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (p38-MAPK) and expression of pro-nerve growth factor (pro-NGF), which is known to mediate oligodendrocyte cell death through the p75 neurotrophin receptor after SCI. In addition, fluoxetine attenuated activation of Ras homolog gene family member A and decreased the level of phosphorylated c-Jun and, ultimately, alleviated caspase-3 activation and significantly reduced cell death of oligodendrocytes at 5 days after SCI. Further, the decrease of myelin basic protein, myelin loss, and axon loss in white matter was also significantly blocked by fluoxetine, as compared to vehicle control. These results suggest that fluoxetine inhibits oligodendrocyte cell death by inhibiting microglia activation and p38-MAPK activation, followed by pro-NGF production after SCI, and provide a potential usage of fluoxetine for a therapeutic agent after acute SCI in humans. PMID:25366938

  5. BAX/BAK–Independent Mitoptosis during Cell Death Induced by Proteasome Inhibition?

    OpenAIRE

    Lomonosova, Elena; Ryerse, Jan; Chinnadurai, G.

    2009-01-01

    Proteasome inhibitors induce rapid death of cancer cells. We show that in epithelial cancer cells, such death is associated with dramatic and simultaneous up-regulation of several BH3-only proteins, including BIK, BIM, MCL-1S, NOXA, and PUMA, as well as p53. Elevated levels of these proteins seem to be the result of direct inhibition of their proteasomal degradation, induction of transcription, and active translation. Subsequent cell death is independent of BAX, and probably BAK, and proceeds...

  6. Murraya koenigii leaf extract inhibits proteasome activity and induces cell death in breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noolu, Bindu; Ajumeera, Rajanna; Chauhan, Anitha; Nagalla, Balakrishna; Manchala, Raghunath; Ismail, Ayesha

    2013-01-09

    Inhibition of the proteolytic activity of 26S proteasome, the protein-degrading machine, is now considered a novel and promising approach for cancer therapy. Interestingly, proteasome inhibitors have been demonstrated to selectively kill cancer cells and also enhance the sensitivity of tumor cells to chemotherapeutic agents. Recently, polyphenols/flavonoids have been reported to inhibit proteasome activity. Murraya koenigii Spreng, a medicinally important herb of Indian origin, has been used for centuries in the Ayurvedic system of medicine. Here we show that Murraya koenigii leaves (curry leaves), a rich source of polyphenols, inhibit the proteolytic activity of the cancer cell proteasome, and cause cell death. Hydro-methanolic extract of curry leaves (CLE) was prepared and its total phenolic content [TPC] determined by, the Folin-Ciocalteau's method. Two human breast carcinoma cell lines: MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 and a normal human lung fibroblast cell line, WI-38 were used for the studies. Cytotoxicity of the CLE was assessed by the MTT assay. We studied the effect of CLE on growth kinetics using colony formation assay. Growth arrest was assessed by cell cycle analysis and apoptosis by Annexin-V binding using flow cytometry. Inhibition of the endogenous 26S proteasome was studied in intact cells and cell extracts using substrates specific to 20S proteasomal enzymes. CLE decreased cell viability and altered the growth kinetics in both the breast cancer cell lines in a dose-dependent manner. It showed a significant arrest of cells in the S phase albeit in cancer cells only. Annexin V binding data suggests that cell death was via the apoptotic pathway in both the cancer cell lines. CLE treatment significantly decreased the activity of the 26S proteasome in the cancer but not normal cells. Our study suggests M. koenigii leaves to be a potent source of proteasome inhibitors that lead to cancer cell death. Therefore, identification of active component(s) from the leaf

  7. Murraya koenigii leaf extract inhibits proteasome activity and induces cell death in breast cancer cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noolu Bindu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Inhibition of the proteolytic activity of 26S proteasome, the protein-degrading machine, is now considered a novel and promising approach for cancer therapy. Interestingly, proteasome inhibitors have been demonstrated to selectively kill cancer cells and also enhance the sensitivity of tumor cells to chemotherapeutic agents. Recently, polyphenols/flavonoids have been reported to inhibit proteasome activity. Murraya koenigii Spreng, a medicinally important herb of Indian origin, has been used for centuries in the Ayurvedic system of medicine. Here we show that Murraya koenigii leaves (curry leaves, a rich source of polyphenols, inhibit the proteolytic activity of the cancer cell proteasome, and cause cell death. Methods Hydro-methanolic extract of curry leaves (CLE was prepared and its total phenolic content [TPC] determined by, the Folin-Ciocalteau’s method. Two human breast carcinoma cell lines: MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 and a normal human lung fibroblast cell line, WI-38 were used for the studies. Cytotoxicity of the CLE was assessed by the MTT assay. We studied the effect of CLE on growth kinetics using colony formation assay. Growth arrest was assessed by cell cycle analysis and apoptosis by Annexin-V binding using flow cytometry. Inhibition of the endogenous 26S proteasome was studied in intact cells and cell extracts using substrates specific to 20S proteasomal enzymes. Results CLE decreased cell viability and altered the growth kinetics in both the breast cancer cell lines in a dose-dependent manner. It showed a significant arrest of cells in the S phase albeit in cancer cells only. Annexin V binding data suggests that cell death was via the apoptotic pathway in both the cancer cell lines. CLE treatment significantly decreased the activity of the 26S proteasome in the cancer but not normal cells. Conclusions Our study suggests M. koenigii leaves to be a potent source of proteasome inhibitors that lead to cancer cell death

  8. The fusarium mycotoxin deoxynivalenol can inhibit plant apoptosis-like programmed cell death.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark Diamond

    Full Text Available The Fusarium genus of fungi is responsible for commercially devastating crop diseases and the contamination of cereals with harmful mycotoxins. Fusarium mycotoxins aid infection, establishment, and spread of the fungus within the host plant. We investigated the effects of the Fusarium mycotoxin deoxynivalenol (DON on the viability of Arabidopsis cells. Although it is known to trigger apoptosis in animal cells, DON treatment at low concentrations surprisingly did not kill these cells. On the contrary, we found that DON inhibited apoptosis-like programmed cell death (PCD in Arabidopsis cells subjected to abiotic stress treatment in a manner independent of mitochondrial cytochrome c release. This suggested that Fusarium may utilise mycotoxins to suppress plant apoptosis-like PCD. To test this, we infected Arabidopsis cells with a wild type and a DON-minus mutant strain of F. graminearum and found that only the DON producing strain could inhibit death induced by heat treatment. These results indicate that mycotoxins may be capable of disarming plant apoptosis-like PCD and thereby suggest a novel way that some fungi can influence plant cell fate.

  9. Huaier Extract Induces Autophagic Cell Death by Inhibiting the mTOR/S6K Pathway in Breast Cancer Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaolong Wang

    Full Text Available Huaier extract is attracting increased attention due to its biological activities, including antitumor, anti-parasite and immunomodulatory effects. Here, we investigated the role of autophagy in Huaier-induced cytotoxicity in MDA-MB-231, MDA-MB-468 and MCF7 breast cancer cells. Huaier treatment inhibited cell viability in all three cell lines and induced various large membranous vacuoles in the cytoplasm. In addition, electron microscopy, MDC staining, accumulated expression of autophagy markers and flow cytometry revealed that Huaier extract triggered autophagy. Inhibition of autophagy attenuated Huaier-induced cell death. Furthermore, Huaier extract inhibited the mammalian target of the rapamycin (mTOR/S6K pathway in breast cancer cells. After implanting MDA-MB-231 cells subcutaneously into the right flank of BALB/c nu/nu mice, Huaier extract induced autophagy and effectively inhibited xenograft tumor growth. This study is the first to show that Huaier-induced cytotoxicity is partially mediated through autophagic cell death in breast cancer cells through suppression of the mTOR/S6K pathway.

  10. Notch inhibition counteracts Paneth cell death in absence of caspase-8.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeon, M K; Kaemmerer, E; Schneider, U; Schiffer, M; Klaus, C; Hennings, J; Clahsen, T; Ackerstaff, T; Niggemann, M; Schippers, A; Longerich, T; Sellge, G; Trautwein, C; Wagner, N; Liedtke, C; Gassler, N

    2018-05-16

    Opposing activities of Notch and Wnt signaling regulate mucosal barrier homeostasis and differentiation of intestinal epithelial cells. Specifically, Wnt activity is essential for differentiation of secretory cells including Wnt3-producing Paneth cells, whereas Notch signaling strongly promotes generation of absorptive cells. Loss of caspase-8 in intestinal epithelium (casp8 ∆int ) is associated with fulminant epithelial necroptosis, severe Paneth cell death, secondary intestinal inflammation, and an increase in Notch activity. Here, we found that pharmacological Notch inhibition with dibenzazepine (DBZ) is able to essentially rescue the loss of Paneth cells, deescalate the inflammatory phenotype, and reduce intestinal permeability in casp8 ∆int mice. The secretory cell metaplasia in DBZ-treated casp8 ∆int animals is proliferative, indicating for Notch activities partially insensitive to gamma-secretase inhibition in a casp8 ∆int background. Our data suggest that casp8 acts in the intestinal Notch network.

  11. Slow and sustained nitric oxide releasing compounds inhibit multipotent vascular stem cell proliferation and differentiation without causing cell death

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Curtis, Brandon M.; Leix, Kyle Alexander; Ji, Yajing; Glaves, Richard Samuel Elliot; Ash, David E.; Mohanty, Dillip K.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Multipotent vascular stem cells (MVSCs) proliferate and differentiate. • Nitric oxide inhibits proliferation of MVSCs. • Nitric oxide inhibits MVSC differentiation to mesenchymal-like stem cells (MSCs). • Smooth muscle cells (SMCs) neither de-differentiate nor proliferate. - Abstract: Atherosclerosis is the leading cause of cerebral and myocardial infarction. It is believed that neointimal growth common in the later stages of atherosclerosis is a result of vascular smooth muscle cell (SMC) de-differentiation in response to endothelial injury. However, the claims of the SMC de-differentiation theory have not been substantiated by monitoring the fate of mature SMCs in response to such injuries. A recent study suggests that atherosclerosis is a consequence of multipotent vascular stem cell (MVSC) differentiation. Nitric oxide (NO) is a well-known mediator against atherosclerosis, in part because of its inhibitory effect on SMC proliferation. Using three different NO-donors, we have investigated the effects of NO on MVSC proliferation. Results indicate that NO inhibits MVSC proliferation in a concentration dependent manner. A slow and sustained delivery of NO proved to inhibit proliferation without causing cell death. On the other hand, larger, single-burst NO concentrations, inhibits proliferation, with concurrent significant cell death. Furthermore, our results indicate that endogenously produced NO inhibits MVSC differentiation to mesenchymal-like stem cells (MSCs) and subsequently to SMC as well

  12. Slow and sustained nitric oxide releasing compounds inhibit multipotent vascular stem cell proliferation and differentiation without causing cell death

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Curtis, Brandon M.; Leix, Kyle Alexander [Department of Chemistry, Central Michigan University, Mount Pleasant, MI 48859 (United States); Ji, Yajing [Department of Biomedical Science and Medicine, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States); Glaves, Richard Samuel Elliot [Department of Biology, Central Michigan University, Mount Pleasant, MI 48859 (United States); Ash, David E. [Department of Chemistry, Central Michigan University, Mount Pleasant, MI 48859 (United States); Mohanty, Dillip K., E-mail: Mohan1dk@cmich.edu [Department of Chemistry, Central Michigan University, Mount Pleasant, MI 48859 (United States)

    2014-07-18

    Highlights: • Multipotent vascular stem cells (MVSCs) proliferate and differentiate. • Nitric oxide inhibits proliferation of MVSCs. • Nitric oxide inhibits MVSC differentiation to mesenchymal-like stem cells (MSCs). • Smooth muscle cells (SMCs) neither de-differentiate nor proliferate. - Abstract: Atherosclerosis is the leading cause of cerebral and myocardial infarction. It is believed that neointimal growth common in the later stages of atherosclerosis is a result of vascular smooth muscle cell (SMC) de-differentiation in response to endothelial injury. However, the claims of the SMC de-differentiation theory have not been substantiated by monitoring the fate of mature SMCs in response to such injuries. A recent study suggests that atherosclerosis is a consequence of multipotent vascular stem cell (MVSC) differentiation. Nitric oxide (NO) is a well-known mediator against atherosclerosis, in part because of its inhibitory effect on SMC proliferation. Using three different NO-donors, we have investigated the effects of NO on MVSC proliferation. Results indicate that NO inhibits MVSC proliferation in a concentration dependent manner. A slow and sustained delivery of NO proved to inhibit proliferation without causing cell death. On the other hand, larger, single-burst NO concentrations, inhibits proliferation, with concurrent significant cell death. Furthermore, our results indicate that endogenously produced NO inhibits MVSC differentiation to mesenchymal-like stem cells (MSCs) and subsequently to SMC as well.

  13. Inhibition of Autophagy Potentiates Atorvastatin-Induced Apoptotic Cell Death in Human Bladder Cancer Cells in Vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Minyong; Jeong, Chang Wook; Ku, Ja Hyeon; Kwak, Cheol; Kim, Hyeon Hoe

    2014-01-01

    Statins are cholesterol reduction agents that exhibit anti-cancer activity in several human cancers. Because autophagy is a crucial survival mechanism for cancer cells under stress conditions, cooperative inhibition of autophagy acts synergistically with other anti-cancer drugs. Thus, this study investigates whether combined treatment of atorvastatin and autophagy inhibitors results in enhancing the cytotoxic effects of atorvastatin, upon human bladder cancer cells, T24 and J82, in vitro. To measure cell viability, we performed the EZ-Cytox cell viability assay. We examined apoptosis by flow cytometry using annexin-V/propidium iodide (PI and western blot using procaspase-3 and poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) antibodies. To examine autophagy activation, we evaluated the co-localization of LC3 and LysoTracker by immunocytochemistry, as well as the expression of LC3 and p62/sequestosome-1 (SQSTM1) by western blot. In addition, we assessed the survival and proliferation of T24 and J82 cells by a clonogenic assay. We found that atorvastatin reduced the cell viability of T24 and J82 cells via apoptotic cell death and induced autophagy activation, shown by the co-localization of LC3 and LysoTracker. Moreover, pharmacologic inhibition of autophagy significantly enhanced atorvastatin-induced apoptosis in T24 and J82 cells. In sum, inhibition of autophagy potentiates atorvastatin-induced apoptotic cell death in human bladder cancer cells in vitro, providing a potential therapeutic approach to treat bladder cancer. PMID:24815071

  14. Plasmodium falciparum metacaspase PfMCA-1 triggers a z-VAD-fmk inhibitable protease to promote cell death.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benoît Meslin

    Full Text Available Activation of proteolytic cell death pathways may circumvent drug resistance in deadly protozoan parasites such as Plasmodium falciparum and Leishmania. To this end, it is important to define the cell death pathway(s in parasites and thus characterize proteases such as metacaspases (MCA, which have been reported to induce cell death in plants and Leishmania parasites. We, therefore, investigated whether the cell death function of MCA is conserved in different protozoan parasite species such as Plasmodium falciparum and Leishmania major, focusing on the substrate specificity and functional role in cell survival as compared to Saccharomyces cerevisae. Our results show that, similarly to Leishmania, Plasmodium MCA exhibits a calcium-dependent, arginine-specific protease activity and its expression in yeast induced growth inhibition as well as an 82% increase in cell death under oxidative stress, a situation encountered by parasites during the host or when exposed to drugs such as artemisins. Furthermore, we show that MCA cell death pathways in both Plasmodium and Leishmania, involve a z-VAD-fmk inhibitable protease. Our data provide evidence that MCA from both Leishmania and Plasmodium falciparum is able to induce cell death in stress conditions, where it specifically activates a downstream enzyme as part of a cell death pathway. This enzymatic activity is also induced by the antimalarial drug chloroquine in erythrocytic stages of Plasmodium falciparum. Interestingly, we found that blocking parasite cell death influences their drug sensitivity, a result which could be used to create therapeutic strategies that by-pass drug resistance mechanisms by acting directly on the innate pathways of protozoan cell death.

  15. Coniferyl aldehyde attenuates radiation enteropathy by inhibiting cell death and promoting endothelial cell function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Ye-Ji; Jung, Myung Gu; Son, Yeonghoon; Jang, Jun-Ho; Lee, Yoon-Jin; Kim, Sung-Ho; Ko, Young-Gyo; Lee, Yun-Sil; Lee, Hae-June

    2015-01-01

    Radiation enteropathy is a common complication in cancer patients. The aim of this study was to investigate whether radiation-induced intestinal injury could be alleviated by coniferyl aldehyde (CA), an HSF1-inducing agent that increases cellular HSP70 expression. We systemically administered CA to mice with radiation enteropathy following abdominal irradiation (IR) to demonstrate the protective effects of CA against radiation-induced gastrointestinal injury. CA clearly alleviated acute radiation-induced intestinal damage, as reflected by the histopathological data and it also attenuated sub-acute enteritis. CA prevented intestinal crypt cell death and protected the microvasculature in the lamina propria during the acute and sub-acute phases of damage. CA induced HSF1 and HSP70 expression in both intestinal epithelial cells and endothelial cells in vitro. Additionally, CA protected against not only the apoptotic cell death of both endothelial and epithelial cells but also the loss of endothelial cell function following IR, indicating that CA has beneficial effects on the intestine. Our results provide novel insight into the effects of CA and suggest its role as a therapeutic candidate for radiation-induced enteropathy due to its ability to promote rapid re-proliferation of the intestinal epithelium by the synergic effects of the inhibition of cell death and the promotion of endothelial cell function.

  16. Barium inhibits arsenic-mediated apoptotic cell death in human squamous cell carcinoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yajima, Ichiro; Uemura, Noriyuki; Nizam, Saika; Khalequzzaman, Md; Thang, Nguyen D; Kumasaka, Mayuko Y; Akhand, Anwarul A; Shekhar, Hossain U; Nakajima, Tamie; Kato, Masashi

    2012-06-01

    Our fieldwork showed more than 1 μM (145.1 μg/L) barium in about 3 μM (210.7 μg/L) arsenic-polluted drinking well water (n = 72) in cancer-prone areas in Bangladesh, while the mean concentrations of nine other elements in the water were less than 3 μg/L. The types of cancer include squamous cell carcinomas (SCC). We hypothesized that barium modulates arsenic-mediated biological effects, and we examined the effect of barium (1 μM) on arsenic (3 μM)-mediated apoptotic cell death of human HSC-5 and A431 SCC cells in vitro. Arsenic promoted SCC apoptosis with increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and JNK1/2 and caspase-3 activation (apoptotic pathway). In contrast, arsenic also inhibited SCC apoptosis with increased NF-κB activity and X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis protein (XIAP) expression level and decreased JNK activity (antiapoptotic pathway). These results suggest that arsenic bidirectionally promotes apoptotic and antiapoptotic pathways in SCC cells. Interestingly, barium in the presence of arsenic increased NF-κB activity and XIAP expression and decreased JNK activity without affecting ROS production, resulting in the inhibition of the arsenic-mediated apoptotic pathway. Since the anticancer effect of arsenic is mainly dependent on cancer apoptosis, barium-mediated inhibition of arsenic-induced apoptosis may promote progression of SCC in patients in Bangladesh who keep drinking barium and arsenic-polluted water after the development of cancer. Thus, we newly showed that barium in the presence of arsenic might inhibit arsenic-mediated cancer apoptosis with the modulation of the balance between arsenic-mediated promotive and suppressive apoptotic pathways.

  17. MK-2206, an AKT Inhibitor, Promotes Caspase-Independent Cell Death and Inhibits Leiomyoma Growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sefton, Elizabeth C.; Qiang, Wenan; Serna, Vanida; Kurita, Takeshi; Wei, Jian-Jun; Chakravarti, Debabrata

    2013-01-01

    Uterine leiomyomas (ULs), benign tumors of the myometrium, are the number one indication for hysterectomies in the United States due to a lack of an effective alternative therapy. ULs show activation of the pro-survival AKT pathway compared with normal myometrium; however, substantial data directly linking AKT to UL cell survival are lacking. We hypothesized that AKT promotes UL cell survival and that it is a viable target for inhibiting UL growth. We used the investigational AKT inhibitor MK-2206, currently in phase II trials, on cultured primary human UL and myometrial cells, immortalized leiomyoma cells, and in leiomyoma grafts grown under the kidney capsule in mice. MK-2206 inhibited AKT and PRAS40 phosphorylation but did not regulate serum- and glucocorticoid-induced kinase and ERK1/2, demonstrating its specificity for AKT. MK-2206 reduced UL cell viability and decreased UL tumor volumes. UL cells exhibited disruption of mitochondrial structures and underwent cell death that was independent of caspases. Additionally, mammalian target of rapamycin and p70S6K phosphorylation were reduced, indicating that mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 signaling was compromised by AKT inhibition in UL cells. MK-2206 also induced autophagy in UL cells. Pretreatment of primary UL cells with 3-methyladenine enhanced MK-2206-mediated UL cell death, whereas knockdown of ATG5 and/or ATG7 did not significantly influence UL cell viability in the presence of MK-2206. Our data provide molecular evidence for the involvement of AKT in UL cell survival and suggest that AKT inhibition by MK-2206 may be a viable option to consider for the treatment of ULs. PMID:24002033

  18. Inhibition by anandamide of 6-hydroxydopamine-induced cell death in PC12 cells.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Mnich, Katarzyna

    2010-01-01

    6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) is a selective neurotoxin that is widely used to investigate cell death and protective strategies in models of Parkinson\\'s disease. Here, we investigated the effects of the endogenous cannabinoid, anandamide, on 6-OHDA-induced toxicity in rat adrenal phaeochromocytoma PC12 cells. Morphological analysis and caspase-3 activity assay revealed that anandamide inhibited 6-OHDA-induced apoptosis. The protection was not affected by antagonists of either cannabinoid receptors (CB(1) or CB(2)) or the vanilloid receptor TRPV1. Anandamide-dependent protection was reduced by pretreatment with LY294002 (inhibitor of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase, PI3K) and unaffected by U0126 (inhibitor of extracellularly-regulated kinase). Interestingly, phosphorylation of c-Jun-NH2-terminal kinase (JNK) in cells exposed to 6-OHDA was strongly reduced by anandamide pre-treatment. Furthermore, 6-OHDA induced c-Jun activation and increased Bim expression, both of which were inhibited by anandamide. Together, these data demonstrate antiapoptotic effects of anandamide and also suggest a role for activation of PI3K and inhibition of JNK signalling in anandamide-mediated protection against 6-OHDA.

  19. Armet, a UPR-upregulated protein, inhibits cell proliferation and ER stress-induced cell death

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Apostolou, Andria; Shen Yuxian; Liang Yan; Luo Jun; Fang Shengyun

    2008-01-01

    The accumulation of misfolded proteins in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) causes ER stress that initiates the unfolded protein response (UPR). UPR activates both adaptive and apoptotic pathways, which contribute differently to disease pathogenesis. To further understand the functional mechanisms of UPR, we identified 12 commonly UPR-upregulated genes by expression microarray analysis. Here, we describe characterization of Armet/MANF, one of the 12 genes whose function was not clear. We demonstrated that the Armet/MANF protein was upregulated by various forms of ER stress in several cell lines as well as by cerebral ischemia of rat. Armet/MANF was localized in the ER and Golgi and was also a secreted protein. Silencing Armet/MANF by siRNA oligos in HeLa cells rendered cells more susceptible to ER stress-induced death, but surprisingly increased cell proliferation and reduced cell size. Overexpression of Armet/MANF inhibited cell proliferation and improved cell viability under glucose-free conditions and tunicamycin treatment. Based on its inhibitory properties for both proliferation and cell death we have demonstrated, Armet is, thus, a novel secreted mediator of the adaptive pathway of UPR

  20. PP2A contributes to endothelial death in high glucose: inhibition by benfotiamine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Y; Kowluru, A; Kern, T S

    2010-12-01

    Endothelial death is critical in diabetic vascular diseases, but regulating factors have been only partially elucidated. Phosphatases play important regulatory roles in cell metabolism, but have not previously been implicated in hyperglycemia-induced cell death. We investigated the role of the phosphatase, type 2A protein phosphatase (PP2A), in hyperglycemia-induced changes in signaling and death in bovine aortic endothelial cells (BAEC). We explored also the influence of benfotiamine on this phosphatase. Activation of PP2A was assessed in BAEC by the extent of methylation and measurement of activity, and the enzyme was inhibited using selective pharmacological (okadaic acid, sodium fostriecin) and molecular (small interfering RNA) approaches. BAECs cultured in 30 mM glucose significantly increased PP2A methylation and activity, and PP2A inhibitors blocked these abnormalities. PP2A activity was increased also in aorta and retina from diabetic rats. NF-κB activity and cell death in BAEC were significantly increased in 30 mM glucose and inhibited by PP2A inhibition. NF-κB played a role in the hyperglycemia-induced death of BAEC, since blocking its translocation with SN50 also inhibited cell death. Inhibition of PP2A blocked the hyperglycemia-induced dephosphorylation of NF-κB and Bad, thus favoring cell survival. Incubation of benfotiamine with BAEC inhibited the high glucose-induced activation of PP2A and NF-κB and cell death, as well as several other metabolic defects, which likewise were inhibited by inhibitors of PP2A. Activation of PP2A contributes to endothelial cell death in high glucose, and beneficial actions of benfotiamine are due, at least in part, to inhibition of PP2A activation.

  1. Mitochondria-targeted vitamin E analogs inhibit breast cancer cell energy metabolism and promote cell death

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheng, Gang; Zielonka, Jacek; McAllister, Donna M; Mackinnon, A Craig Jr; Joseph, Joy; Dwinell, Michael B; Kalyanaraman, Balaraman

    2013-01-01

    Recent research has revealed that targeting mitochondrial bioenergetic metabolism is a promising chemotherapeutic strategy. Key to successful implementation of this chemotherapeutic strategy is the use of new and improved mitochondria-targeted cationic agents that selectively inhibit energy metabolism in breast cancer cells, while exerting little or no long-term cytotoxic effect in normal cells. In this study, we investigated the cytotoxicity and alterations in bioenergetic metabolism induced by mitochondria-targeted vitamin E analog (Mito-chromanol, Mito-ChM) and its acetylated ester analog (Mito-ChMAc). Assays of cell death, colony formation, mitochondrial bioenergetic function, intracellular ATP levels, intracellular and tissue concentrations of tested compounds, and in vivo tumor growth were performed. Both Mito-ChM and Mito-ChMAc selectively depleted intracellular ATP and caused prolonged inhibition of ATP-linked oxygen consumption rate in breast cancer cells, but not in non-cancerous cells. These effects were significantly augmented by inhibition of glycolysis. Mito-ChM and Mito-ChMAc exhibited anti-proliferative effects and cytotoxicity in several breast cancer cells with different genetic background. Furthermore, Mito-ChM selectively accumulated in tumor tissue and inhibited tumor growth in a xenograft model of human breast cancer. We conclude that mitochondria-targeted small molecular weight chromanols exhibit selective anti-proliferative effects and cytotoxicity in multiple breast cancer cells, and that esterification of the hydroxyl group in mito-chromanols is not a critical requirement for its anti-proliferative and cytotoxic effect

  2. Natriuretic peptide receptor A inhibition suppresses gastric cancer development through reactive oxygen species-mediated G2/M cell cycle arrest and cell death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zheng; Wang, Ji-Wei; Wang, Wei-Zhi; Zhi, Xiao-Fei; Zhang, Qun; Li, Bo-Wen; Wang, Lin-Jun; Xie, Kun-Ling; Tao, Jin-Qiu; Tang, Jie; Wei, Song; Zhu, Yi; Xu, Hao; Zhang, Dian-Cai; Yang, Li; Xu, Ze-Kuan

    2016-10-01

    Natriuretic peptide receptor A (NPRA), the major receptor for atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP), has been implicated in tumorigenesis; however, the role of ANP-NPRA signaling in the development of gastric cancer remains unclear. Immunohistochemical analyses indicated that NPRA expression was positively associated with gastric tumor size and cancer stage. NPRA inhibition by shRNA induced G2/M cell cycle arrest, cell death, and autophagy in gastric cancer cells, due to accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Either genetic or pharmacologic inhibition of autophagy led to caspase-dependent cell death. Therefore, autophagy induced by NPRA silencing may represent a cytoprotective mechanism. ROS accumulation activated c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) and AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK). ROS-mediated activation of JNK inhibited cell proliferation by disturbing cell cycle and decreased cell viability. In addition, AMPK activation promoted autophagy in NPRA-downregulated cancer cells. Overall, our results indicate that the inhibition of NPRA suppresses gastric cancer development and targeting NPRA may represent a promising strategy for the treatment of gastric cancer. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Mitochondrial fission proteins regulate programmed cell death in yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fannjiang, Yihru; Cheng, Wen-Chih; Lee, Sarah J; Qi, Bing; Pevsner, Jonathan; McCaffery, J Michael; Hill, R Blake; Basañez, Gorka; Hardwick, J Marie

    2004-11-15

    The possibility that single-cell organisms undergo programmed cell death has been questioned in part because they lack several key components of the mammalian cell death machinery. However, yeast encode a homolog of human Drp1, a mitochondrial fission protein that was shown previously to promote mammalian cell death and the excessive mitochondrial fragmentation characteristic of apoptotic mammalian cells. In support of a primordial origin of programmed cell death involving mitochondria, we found that the Saccharomyces cerevisiae homolog of human Drp1, Dnm1, promotes mitochondrial fragmentation/degradation and cell death following treatment with several death stimuli. Two Dnm1-interacting factors also regulate yeast cell death. The WD40 repeat protein Mdv1/Net2 promotes cell death, consistent with its role in mitochondrial fission. In contrast to its fission function in healthy cells, Fis1 unexpectedly inhibits Dnm1-mediated mitochondrial fission and cysteine protease-dependent cell death in yeast. Furthermore, the ability of yeast Fis1 to inhibit mitochondrial fission and cell death can be functionally replaced by human Bcl-2 and Bcl-xL. Together, these findings indicate that yeast and mammalian cells have a conserved programmed death pathway regulated by a common molecular component, Drp1/Dnm1, that is inhibited by a Bcl-2-like function.

  4. BID links ferroptosis to mitochondrial cell death pathways

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Neitemeier

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Ferroptosis has been defined as an oxidative and iron-dependent pathway of regulated cell death that is distinct from caspase-dependent apoptosis and established pathways of death receptor-mediated regulated necrosis. While emerging evidence linked features of ferroptosis induced e.g. by erastin-mediated inhibition of the Xc- system or inhibition of glutathione peroxidase 4 (Gpx4 to an increasing number of oxidative cell death paradigms in cancer cells, neurons or kidney cells, the biochemical pathways of oxidative cell death remained largely unclear. In particular, the role of mitochondrial damage in paradigms of ferroptosis needs further investigation.In the present study, we find that erastin-induced ferroptosis in neuronal cells was accompanied by BID transactivation to mitochondria, loss of mitochondrial membrane potential, enhanced mitochondrial fragmentation and reduced ATP levels. These hallmarks of mitochondrial demise are also established features of oxytosis, a paradigm of cell death induced by Xc- inhibition by millimolar concentrations of glutamate. Bid knockout using CRISPR/Cas9 approaches preserved mitochondrial integrity and function, and mediated neuroprotective effects against both, ferroptosis and oxytosis. Furthermore, the BID-inhibitor BI-6c9 inhibited erastin-induced ferroptosis, and, in turn, the ferroptosis inhibitors ferrostatin-1 and liproxstatin-1 prevented mitochondrial dysfunction and cell death in the paradigm of oxytosis. These findings show that mitochondrial transactivation of BID links ferroptosis to mitochondrial damage as the final execution step in this paradigm of oxidative cell death. Keywords: Ferroptosis, BID, Mitochondria, CRISPR, Oxytosis, Neuronal death

  5. Stochastic cellular automata model of neurosphere growth: Roles of proliferative potential, contact inhibition, cell death, and phagocytosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sipahi, Rifat; Zupanc, Günther K H

    2018-05-14

    Neural stem and progenitor cells isolated from the central nervous system form, under specific culture conditions, clonal cell clusters known as neurospheres. The neurosphere assay has proven to be a powerful in vitro system to study the behavior of such cells and the development of their progeny. However, the theory of neurosphere growth has remained poorly understood. To overcome this limitation, we have, in the present paper, developed a cellular automata model, with which we examined the effects of proliferative potential, contact inhibition, cell death, and clearance of dead cells on growth rate, final size, and composition of neurospheres. Simulations based on this model indicated that the proliferative potential of the founder cell and its progenitors has a major influence on neurosphere size. On the other hand, contact inhibition of proliferation limits the final size, and reduces the growth rate, of neurospheres. The effect of this inhibition is particularly dramatic when a stem cell becomes encapsulated by differentiated or other non-proliferating cells, thereby suppressing any further mitotic division - despite the existing proliferative potential of the stem cell. Conversely, clearance of dead cells through phagocytosis is predicted to accelerate growth by reducing contact inhibition. A surprising prediction derived from our model is that cell death, while resulting in a decrease in growth rate and final size of neurospheres, increases the degree of differentiation of neurosphere cells. It is likely that the cellular automata model developed as part of the present investigation is applicable to the study of tissue growth in a wide range of systems. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Diglycolic acid inhibits succinate dehydrogenase activity in human proximal tubule cells leading to mitochondrial dysfunction and cell death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landry, Greg M; Dunning, Cody L; Conrad, Taylor; Hitt, Mallory J; McMartin, Kenneth E

    2013-08-29

    Diethylene glycol (DEG) is a solvent used in consumer products allowing the increased risk for consumer exposure. DEG metabolism produces two primary metabolites, 2-hydroxyethoxyacetic acid (2-HEAA) and diglycolic acid (DGA). DGA has been shown to be the toxic metabolite responsible for the proximal tubule cell necrosis seen in DEG poisoning. The mechanism of DGA toxicity in the proximal tubule cell is not yet known. The chemical structure of DGA is very similar to citric acid cycle intermediates. Studies were designed to assess whether its mechanism of toxicity involves disruption of cellular metabolic pathways resulting in mitochondrial dysfunction. First, DGA preferentially inhibited succinate dehydrogenase, including human kidney cell enzyme, but had no effect on other citric acid cycle enzyme activities. DGA produces a cellular ATP depletion that precedes cell death. Human proximal tubule (HPT) cells, pre-treated with increasing DGA concentrations, showed significantly decreased oxygen consumption. DGA did not increase lactate levels, indicating no effect on glycolytic activity. DGA increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) production in HPT cells in a concentration and time dependent manner. These results indicate that DGA produced proximal tubule cell dysfunction by specific inhibition of succinate dehydrogenase and oxygen consumption. Disruption of these processes results in decreased energy production and proximal tubule cell death. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Inhibition of p38 MAPK enhances ABT-737-induced cell death in melanoma cell lines: novel regulation of PUMA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keuling, Angela M; Andrew, Susan E; Tron, Victor A

    2010-06-01

    The mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway is constitutively activated in the majority of melanomas, promoting cell survival, proliferation and migration. In addition, anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 family proteins Mcl-1, Bcl-xL and Bcl-2 are frequently overexpressed, contributing to melanoma's well-documented chemoresistance. Recently, it was reported that the combination of MAPK pathway inhibition by specific MEK inhibitors and Bcl-2 family inhibition by BH3-mimetic ABT-737 synergistically induces apoptotic cell death in melanoma cell lines. Here we provide the first evidence that inhibition of another key MAPK, p38, synergistically induces apoptosis in melanoma cells in combination with ABT-737. We also provide novel mechanistic data demonstrating that inhibition of p38 increases expression of pro-apoptotic Bcl-2 protein PUMA. Furthermore, we demonstrate that PUMA can be cleaved by a caspase-dependent mechanism during apoptosis and identify what appears to be the PUMA cleavage product. Thus, our findings suggest that the combination of ABT-737 and inhibition of p38 is a promising, new treatment strategy that acts through a novel PUMA-dependent mechanism.

  8. Andrographolide Induces Autophagic Cell Death and Inhibits Invasion and Metastasis of Human Osteosarcoma Cells in An Autophagy-Dependent Manner

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying Liu

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Osteosarcoma (OS is the most common primary malignant tumor of bone tissue. Although treatment effectiveness has improved, the OS survival rate has fluctuated in recent years. Andrographolide (AG has been reported to have antitumor activity against a variety of tumors. Our aim was to investigate the effects and potential mechanisms of AG in human osteosarcoma. Methods: Cell viability and morphological changes were assessed by MTT and live/dead assays. Apoptosis was detected using Annexin V-FITC/PI double staining, DAPI, and caspase-3 assays. Autophagy was detected with mRFP-GFP-LC3 adenovirus transfection and western blot. Cell migration and invasion were detected by wound healing assay and Transwell® experiments. Results: AG dose-dependently reduced the viability of osteosarcoma cells. No increase in apoptosis was detected in AG-treated human OS MG-63 and U-2OS cells, and the pan-caspase inhibitor z-VAD did not attenuate AG-induced cell death. However, AG induced autophagy by suppressing PI3K/Akt/mTOR and enhancing JNK signaling pathways. 3-MA and Beclin-1 siRNA could reverse the cytotoxic effects of AG. In addition, AG inhibited the invasion and metastasis of OS, and this effect could be reversed with Beclin-1 siRNA. Conclusion: AG inhibits viability and induces autophagic death in OS cells. AG-induced autophagy inhibits the invasion and metastasis of OS.

  9. BID links ferroptosis to mitochondrial cell death pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neitemeier, Sandra; Jelinek, Anja; Laino, Vincenzo; Hoffmann, Lena; Eisenbach, Ina; Eying, Roman; Ganjam, Goutham K; Dolga, Amalia M; Oppermann, Sina; Culmsee, Carsten

    2017-08-01

    Ferroptosis has been defined as an oxidative and iron-dependent pathway of regulated cell death that is distinct from caspase-dependent apoptosis and established pathways of death receptor-mediated regulated necrosis. While emerging evidence linked features of ferroptosis induced e.g. by erastin-mediated inhibition of the X c - system or inhibition of glutathione peroxidase 4 (Gpx4) to an increasing number of oxidative cell death paradigms in cancer cells, neurons or kidney cells, the biochemical pathways of oxidative cell death remained largely unclear. In particular, the role of mitochondrial damage in paradigms of ferroptosis needs further investigation. In the present study, we find that erastin-induced ferroptosis in neuronal cells was accompanied by BID transactivation to mitochondria, loss of mitochondrial membrane potential, enhanced mitochondrial fragmentation and reduced ATP levels. These hallmarks of mitochondrial demise are also established features of oxytosis, a paradigm of cell death induced by X c - inhibition by millimolar concentrations of glutamate. Bid knockout using CRISPR/Cas9 approaches preserved mitochondrial integrity and function, and mediated neuroprotective effects against both, ferroptosis and oxytosis. Furthermore, the BID-inhibitor BI-6c9 inhibited erastin-induced ferroptosis, and, in turn, the ferroptosis inhibitors ferrostatin-1 and liproxstatin-1 prevented mitochondrial dysfunction and cell death in the paradigm of oxytosis. These findings show that mitochondrial transactivation of BID links ferroptosis to mitochondrial damage as the final execution step in this paradigm of oxidative cell death. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Honokiol, a constituent of Magnolia species, inhibits adrenergic contraction of human prostate strips and induces stromal cell death

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Herrmann

    2014-09-01

    Conclusions: Honokiol inhibits smooth muscle contraction in the human prostate, and induces cell death in cultured stromal cells. Because prostate smooth muscle tone and prostate growth may cause LUTS, it appears possible that honokiol improves voiding symptoms.

  11. Methods for assessing autophagy and autophagic cell death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tasdemir, Ezgi; Galluzzi, Lorenzo; Maiuri, M Chiara; Criollo, Alfredo; Vitale, Ilio; Hangen, Emilie; Modjtahedi, Nazanine; Kroemer, Guido

    2008-01-01

    Autophagic (or type 2) cell death is characterized by the massive accumulation of autophagic vacuoles (autophagosomes) in the cytoplasm of cells that lack signs of apoptosis (type 1 cell death). Here we detail and critically assess a series of methods to promote and inhibit autophagy via pharmacological and genetic manipulations. We also review the techniques currently available to detect autophagy, including transmission electron microscopy, half-life assessments of long-lived proteins, detection of LC3 maturation/aggregation, fluorescence microscopy, and colocalization of mitochondrion- or endoplasmic reticulum-specific markers with lysosomal proteins. Massive autophagic vacuolization may cause cellular stress and represent a frustrated attempt of adaptation. In this case, cell death occurs with (or in spite of) autophagy. When cell death occurs through autophagy, on the contrary, the inhibition of the autophagic process should prevent cellular demise. Accordingly, we describe a strategy for discriminating cell death with autophagy from cell death through autophagy.

  12. GSK-3β Inhibition Attenuates LPS-Induced Death but Aggravates Radiation-Induced Death via Down-Regulation of IL-6

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bailong Li

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Exposure of high dose ionizing radiation is lethal. Signal pathways involved in radiation biology reaction still remain illdefined. Lipopolysaccharides (LPS, the ligands of Toll-like receptor 4(TLR4, could elicit strong immune responses. Glycogen synthase kinase-3β(GSK-3β promotes the production of inflammatory molecules and cell migration. Inhibition of GSK-3β provides protection against inflammation in animal models. The aim of the study was to investigate role of GSK-3β in LPS shock and ionizing radiation. Methods: WT or IL-6-/-mice or cells were pretreated with SB216763, a GSK-3β inhibitor, and survival of the mice was determined. Cell viability was assayed by Cell Counting Kit. Apoptosis was assayed by Annexin V-PI double staining. Serum concentrations of IL-6 and TNF-α were determined by ELISA. Results: SB216763 attenuated LPS induced mice or cell death but aggravated radiation induced mice or cell death. SB216763 reduced IL-6, but not TNF-α levels in vivo. IL-6-/- mice were more resistant to LPS-induced death but less resistant to radiation-induced death than wild type mice. Conclusions: Inhibition of GSK-3β conferred resistance to LPS shock but fostered death induced by ionizing radiation. Inhibition of GSK-3β was effective by reducing IL-6.

  13. cGMP-Phosphodiesterase Inhibition Prevents Hypoxia-Induced Cell Death Activation in Porcine Retinal Explants.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorena Olivares-González

    Full Text Available Retinal hypoxia and oxidative stress are involved in several retinal degenerations including diabetic retinopathy, glaucoma, central retinal artery occlusion, or retinopathy of prematurity. The second messenger cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP has been reported to be protective for neuronal cells under several pathological conditions including ischemia/hypoxia. The purpose of this study was to evaluate whether the accumulation of cGMP through the pharmacological inhibition of phosphodiesterase (PDE with Zaprinast prevented retinal degeneration induced by mild hypoxia in cultures of porcine retina. Exposure to mild hypoxia (5% O2 for 24h reduced cGMP content and induced retinal degeneration by caspase dependent and independent (PARP activation mechanisms. Hypoxia also produced a redox imbalance reducing antioxidant response (superoxide dismutase and catalase activities and increasing superoxide free radical release. Zaprinast reduced mild hypoxia-induced cell death through inhibition of caspase-3 or PARP activation depending on the cell layer. PDE inhibition also ameliorated the effects of mild hypoxia on antioxidant response and the release of superoxide radical in the photoreceptor layer. The use of a PKG inhibitor, KT5823, suggested that cGMP-PKG pathway is involved in cell survival and antioxidant response. The inhibition of PDE, therefore, could be useful for reducing retinal degeneration under hypoxic/ischemic conditions.

  14. Chronic inhibition of glycogen synthase kinase-3 protects against rotenone-induced cell death in human neuron-like cells by increasing BDNF secretion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giménez-Cassina, Alfredo; Lim, Filip; Díaz-Nido, Javier

    2012-12-07

    Mitochondrial dysfunction is a common feature of many neurodegenerative disorders. Likewise, activation of glycogen synthase kinase-3 (GSK-3) has been proposed to play an important role in neurodegeneration. This multifunctional protein kinase is involved in a number of cellular functions and we previously showed that chronic inhibition of GSK-3 protects neuronal cells against mitochondrial dysfunction-elicited cell death, through a mechanism involving increased glucose metabolism and the translocation of hexokinase II (HKII) to mitochondria. Here, we sought to gain deeper insight into the molecular basis of this neuroprotection. We found that chronic inhibition of GSK-3, either genetically or pharmacologically, elicited a marked increase in brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) secretion, which in turn conferred resistance to mitochondrial dysfunction through subcellular re-distribution of HKII. These results define a molecular pathway through which chronic inhibition of GSK-3 may protect neuronal cells from death. Moreover, they highlight the potential benefits of enhanced neurotrophic factor secretion as a therapeutic approach to treat neurodegenerative diseases. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Jaspine B induces nonapoptotic cell death in gastric cancer cells independently of its inhibition of ceramide synthase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cingolani, Francesca; Simbari, Fabio; Abad, Jose Luis; Casasampere, Mireia; Fabrias, Gemma; Futerman, Anthony H; Casas, Josefina

    2017-08-01

    Sphingolipids (SLs) have been extensively investigated in biomedical research due to their role as bioactive molecules in cells. Here, we describe the effect of a SL analog, jaspine B (JB), a cyclic anhydrophytosphingosine found in marine sponges, on the gastric cancer cell line, HGC-27. JB induced alterations in the sphingolipidome, mainly the accumulation of dihydrosphingosine, sphingosine, and their phosphorylated forms due to inhibition of ceramide synthases. Moreover, JB provoked atypical cell death in HGC-27 cells, characterized by the formation of cytoplasmic vacuoles in a time and dose-dependent manner. Vacuoles appeared to originate from macropinocytosis and triggered cytoplasmic disruption. The pan-caspase inhibitor, z-VAD, did not alter either cytotoxicity or vacuole formation, suggesting that JB activates a caspase-independent cell death mechanism. The autophagy inhibitor, wortmannin, did not decrease JB-stimulated LC3-II accumulation. In addition, cell vacuolation induced by JB was characterized by single-membrane vacuoles, which are different from double-membrane autophagosomes. These findings suggest that JB-induced cell vacuolation is not related to autophagy and it is also independent of its action on SL metabolism. Copyright © 2017 by the American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  16. 17-beta estradiol inhibits oxidative stress-induced accumulation of AIF into nucleolus and PARP1-dependent cell death via estrogen receptor alpha.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batnasan, Enkhzaya; Wang, Ruoxi; Wen, Jitao; Ke, Yueshuang; Li, Xiaoxue; Bohio, Ameer Ali; Zeng, Xianlu; Huo, Hongliang; Han, Liping; Boldogh, Istvan; Ba, Xueqing

    2015-01-05

    Oxidative stress-induced DNA damage results in over-activation of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase 1 (PARP1), leading to parthanatos, a newly discovered cell elimination pathway. Inhibition of PARP1-dependent cell death has shown to improve the outcome of diseases, including stroke, heart ischemia, and neurodegenerative diseases. In the present study we aimed to detect whether estrogen plays a protective role in inhibiting parthanatos. We utilized human mammary adenocarcinoma cells (MCF7) that abundantly express the estrogen receptor alpha and beta (ERα and ERβ). Parthanatos was induced by challenging the cells with hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). Microscopic imaging and molecular biological techniques, such as Western blot analysis and RNA interference, were performed. The results showed 17β estradiol (E2) protected MCF7 cells from PARP1-dependent cell death by decreasing protein PARylation, and AIF translocation into nuclei/nucleoli. Down-regulation of ERα expression by siRNA before E2 addition resulted in the failure of the E2-mediated inhibition of H2O2-induced protein PARylation and AIF nucleolar translocation. Together these data suggest that estrogen via its alpha-type receptor inhibits oxidative stress-induced, PARP1-dependent cell death. The present study provided us insight into how to apply hormone therapy in intervention of parthanatos-implicated ischemic and degenerative diseases. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Water-Soluble Coenzyme Q10 Inhibits Nuclear Translocation of Apoptosis Inducing Factor and Cell Death Caused by Mitochondrial Complex I Inhibition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haining Li

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The objectives of the study were to explore the mechanism of rotenone-induced cell damage and to examine the protective effects of water-soluble Coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10 on the toxic effects of rotenone. Murine hippocampal HT22 cells were cultured with mitochondrial complex I inhibitor rotenone. Water-soluble CoQ10 was added to the culture media 3 h prior to the rotenone incubation. Cell viability was determined by alamar blue, reactive oxygen species (ROS production by dihydroethidine (DHE and mitochondrial membrane potential by tetramethyl rhodamine methyl ester (TMRM. Cytochrome c, caspase-9 and apoptosis-inducing factor (AIF were measured using Western blotting after 24 h rotenone incubation. Rotenone caused more than 50% of cell death, increased ROS production, AIF nuclear translocation and reduction in mitochondrial membrane potential, but failed to cause mitochondrial cytochrome c release and caspase-9 activation. Pretreatment with water-soluble CoQ10 enhanced cell viability, decreased ROS production, maintained mitochondrial membrane potential and prevented AIF nuclear translocation. The results suggest that rotenone activates a mitochondria-initiated, caspase-independent cell death pathway. Water-soluble CoQ10 reduces ROS accumulation, prevents the fall of mitochondrial membrane potential, and inhibits AIF translocation and subsequent cell death.

  18. Arctigenin preferentially induces tumor cell death under glucose deprivation by inhibiting cellular energy metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Yuan; Qi, Chunting; Sun, Xiaoxiao; Ma, Xiuquan; Zhang, Haohao; Hu, Lihong; Yuan, Junying; Yu, Qiang

    2012-08-15

    Selectively eradicating cancer cells with minimum adverse effects on normal cells is a major challenge in the development of anticancer therapy. We hypothesize that nutrient-limiting conditions frequently encountered by cancer cells in poorly vascularized solid tumors might provide an opportunity for developing selective therapy. In this study, we investigated the function and molecular mechanisms of a natural compound, arctigenin, in regulating tumor cell growth. We demonstrated that arctigenin selectively promoted glucose-starved A549 tumor cells to undergo necrosis by inhibiting mitochondrial respiration. In doing so, arctigenin elevated cellular level of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and blocked cellular energy metabolism in the glucose-starved tumor cells. We also demonstrated that cellular ROS generation was caused by intracellular ATP depletion and played an essential role in the arctigenin-induced tumor cell death under the glucose-limiting condition. Furthermore, we combined arctigenin with the glucose analogue 2-deoxyglucose (2DG) and examined their effects on tumor cell growth. Interestingly, this combination displayed preferential cell-death inducing activity against tumor cells compared to normal cells. Hence, we propose that the combination of arctigenin and 2DG may represent a promising new cancer therapy with minimal normal tissue toxicity. Crown Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Anti-cancer effect of bee venom toxin and melittin in ovarian cancer cells through induction of death receptors and inhibition of JAK2/STAT3 pathway

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jo, Miran; Park, Mi Hee; Kollipara, Pushpa Saranya; An, Byeong Jun; Song, Ho Sueb; Han, Sang Bae; Kim, Jang Heub; Song, Min Jong; Hong, Jin Tae

    2012-01-01

    We investigated whether bee venom and melittin, a major component of bee venom, inhibit cell growth through enhancement of death receptor expressions in the human ovarian cancer cells, SKOV3 and PA-1. Bee venom (1–5 μg/ml) and melittin (0.5–2 μg/ml) inhibited the growth of SKOV3 and PA-1 ovarian cancer cells by the induction of apoptotic cell death in a dose dependent manner. Consistent with apoptotic cell death, expression of death receptor (DR) 3 and DR6 was increased in both cancer cells, but expression of DR4 was increased only in PA-1 cells. Expression of DR downstream pro-apoptotic proteins including caspase-3, 8, and Bax was concomitantly increased, but the phosphorylation of JAK2 and STAT3 and the expression of Bcl-2 were inhibited by treatment with bee venom and melittin in SKOV3 and PA-1 cells. Expression of cleaved caspase-3 was increased in SKOV3, but cleaved caspase-8 was increased in PA-1 cells. Moreover, deletion of DR3, DR4, and DR6 by small interfering RNA significantly reversed bee venom and melittin-induced cell growth inhibitory effect as well as down regulation of STAT3 by bee venom and melittin in SKOV3 and PA-1 ovarian cancer cell. These results suggest that bee venom and melittin induce apoptotic cell death in ovarian cancer cells through enhancement of DR3, DR4, and DR6 expression and inhibition of STAT3 pathway. -- Highlights: ► Some studies have showed that bee venom and/or melittin have anti-cancer effects. ► We found that bee venom and melittin inhibited cell growth in ovarian cancer cells. ► Bee venom and melittin induce apoptosis in SKOV3 and PA-1.

  20. Pekinenin E Inhibits the Growth of Hepatocellular Carcinoma by Promoting Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress Mediated Cell Death

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lu Fan

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC is a malignant primary liver cancer with poor prognosis. In the present study, we report that pekinenin E (PE, a casbane diterpenoid derived from the roots of Euphorbia pekinensis, has a strong antitumor activity against human HCC cells both in vitro and in vivo. PE suppressed the growth of human HCC cells Hep G2 and SMMC-7721. In addition, PE-mediated endoplasmic reticulum (ER stress caused increasing expressions of C/EBP homologous protein (CHOP, leading to apoptosis in HCC cells both in vitro and in vivo. Inhibition of ER stress with CHOP small interfering RNA or 4-phenyl-butyric acid partially reversed PE-induced cell death. Furthermore, PE induced S cell cycle arrest, which could also be partially reversed by CHOP knockdown. In all, these findings suggest that PE causes ER stress-associated cell death and cell cycle arrest, and it may serve as a potent agent for curing human HCC.

  1. Early death, late death and repair factor in three human tumour cell lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Courdi, A.; Gioanni, J.; Mari, D.; Chauvel, P.

    1997-01-01

    The in vivo colony method used to generate survival curves following exposure to ionizing irradiation allows to score large clones, representing surviving cells, and small colonies, representing late reproductive death. By subtraction, early-dying cells can be estimated. In the three human tumour cell lines examined, we have observed that early cell death is a major mode of action of irradiation. The contribution of early cell death to total mortality increases as the dose increases. Moreover, repair due to dose-splitting and delayed plating in densely-inhibited cells is not observed in early-dying cells. (authors)

  2. Baicalein induces cell death in murine T cell lymphoma via inhibition of thioredoxin system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patwardhan, Raghavendra S; Pal, Debojyoti; Checker, Rahul; Sharma, Deepak; Sandur, Santosh K

    2017-10-01

    We have earlier demonstrated the radioprotective potential of baicalein using murine splenic lymphocytes. Here, we have studied the effect of baicalein on murine T cell lymphoma EL4 cells and investigated the underlying mechanism of action. We observed that baicalein induced a dose dependent cell death in EL4 cells in vitro and significantly reduced the frequency of cancer stem cells. Previously, we have reported that murine and human T cell lymphoma cells have increased oxidative stress tolerance capacity due to active thioredoxin system. Hence, we monitored the effect of baicalein on thioredoxin system in EL4 cells. Docking studies revealed that baicalein could bind to the active site of thioredoxin reductase. Baicalein treatment led to significant reduction in the activity of thioredoxin reductase and nuclear levels of thioredoxin-1 thereby increasing ASK1 levels and caspase-3 activity. Interestingly, CRISPR-Cas9 based knock-out of ASK1 or over-expression of thioredoxin-1 abolished anti-tumor effects of baicalein in EL4 cells. Further, baicalein administration significantly reduced intra-peritoneal tumor burden of EL4 cells in C57BL/6 mice. Thus, our study describes anti-tumor effects of baicalein in EL4 cells via inhibition of thioredoxin system. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Anti-cancer effect of bee venom toxin and melittin in ovarian cancer cells through induction of death receptors and inhibition of JAK2/STAT3 pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jo, Miran; Park, Mi Hee; Kollipara, Pushpa Saranya; An, Byeong Jun; Song, Ho Sueb; Han, Sang Bae; Kim, Jang Heub; Song, Min Jong; Hong, Jin Tae

    2012-01-01

    We investigated whether bee venom and melittin, a major component of bee venom, inhibit cell growth through enhancement of death receptor expressions in the human ovarian cancer cells, SKOV3 and PA-1. Bee venom (1-5 μg/ml) and melittin (0.5-2 μg/ml) inhibited the growth of SKOV3 and PA-1 ovarian cancer cells by the induction of apoptotic cell death in a dose dependent manner. Consistent with apoptotic cell death, expression of death receptor (DR) 3 and DR6 was increased in both cancer cells, but expression of DR4 was increased only in PA-1 cells. Expression of DR downstream pro-apoptotic proteins including caspase-3, 8, and Bax was concomitantly increased, but the phosphorylation of JAK2 and STAT3 and the expression of Bcl-2 were inhibited by treatment with bee venom and melittin in SKOV3 and PA-1 cells. Expression of cleaved caspase-3 was increased in SKOV3, but cleaved caspase-8 was increased in PA-1 cells. Moreover, deletion of DR3, DR4, and DR6 by small interfering RNA significantly reversed bee venom and melittin-induced cell growth inhibitory effect as well as down regulation of STAT3 by bee venom and melittin in SKOV3 and PA-1 ovarian cancer cell. These results suggest that bee venom and melittin induce apoptotic cell death in ovarian cancer cells through enhancement of DR3, DR4, and DR6 expression and inhibition of STAT3 pathway. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Cytoprotective dibenzoylmethane derivatives protect cells from oxidative stress-induced necrotic cell death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hegedűs, Csaba; Lakatos, Petra; Kiss-Szikszai, Attila; Patonay, Tamás; Gergely, Szabolcs; Gregus, Andrea; Bai, Péter; Haskó, György; Szabó, Éva; Virág, László

    2013-06-01

    Screening of a small in-house library of 1863 compounds identified 29 compounds that protected Jurkat cells from hydrogen peroxide-induced cytotoxicity. From the cytoprotective compounds eleven proved to possess antioxidant activity (ABTS radical scavenger effect) and two were found to inhibit poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation (PARylation), a cytotoxic pathway operating in severely injured cells. Four cytoprotective dibenzoylmethane (DBM) derivatives were investigated in more detail as they did not scavenge hydrogen peroxide nor did they inhibit PARylation. These compounds protected cells from necrotic cell death while caspase activation, a parameter of apoptotic cell death was not affected. Hydrogen peroxide activated extracellular signal regulated kinase (ERK1/2) and p38 MAP kinases but not c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK). The cytoprotective DBMs suppressed the activation of Erk1/2 but not that of p38. Cytoprotection was confirmed in another cell type (A549 lung epithelial cells), indicating that the cytoprotective effect is not cell type specific. In conclusion we identified DBM analogs as a novel class of cytoprotective compounds inhibiting ERK1/2 kinase and protecting from necrotic cell death by a mechanism independent of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase inhibition. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Cinnamon extract induces tumor cell death through inhibition of NFκB and AP1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kwon, Ho-Keun; Lee, Sung Haeng; Park, Zee Yong; Im, Sin-Hyeog; Hwang, Ji-Sun; So, Jae-Seon; Lee, Choong-Gu; Sahoo, Anupama; Ryu, Jae-Ha; Jeon, Won Kyung; Ko, Byoung Seob; Im, Chang-Rok

    2010-01-01

    Cinnamomum cassia bark is the outer skin of an evergreen tall tree belonging to the family Lauraceae containing several active components such as essential oils (cinnamic aldehyde and cinnamyl aldehyde), tannin, mucus and carbohydrate. They have various biological functions including anti-oxidant, anti-microbial, anti-inflammation, anti-diabetic and anti-tumor activity. Previously, we have reported that anti-cancer effect of cinnamon extracts is associated with modulation of angiogenesis and effector function of CD8 + T cells. In this study, we further identified that anti-tumor effect of cinnamon extracts is also link with enhanced pro-apoptotic activity by inhibiting the activities NFκB and AP1 in mouse melanoma model. Water soluble cinnamon extract was obtained and quality of cinnamon extract was evaluated by HPLC (High Performance Liquid Chromatography) analysis. In this study, we tested anti-tumor activity and elucidated action mechanism of cinnamon extract using various types of tumor cell lines including lymphoma, melanoma, cervix cancer and colorectal cancer in vitro and in vivo mouse melanoma model. Cinnamon extract strongly inhibited tumor cell proliferation in vitro and induced active cell death of tumor cells by up-regulating pro-apoptotic molecules while inhibiting NFκB and AP1 activity and their target genes such as Bcl-2, BcL-xL and survivin. Oral administration of cinnamon extract in melanoma transplantation model significantly inhibited tumor growth with the same mechanism of action observed in vitro. Our study suggests that anti-tumor effect of cinnamon extracts is directly linked with enhanced pro-apoptotic activity and inhibition of NFκB and AP1 activities and their target genes in vitro and in vivo mouse melanoma model. Hence, further elucidation of active components of cinnamon extract could lead to development of potent anti-tumor agent or complementary and alternative medicine for the treatment of diverse cancers

  6. Bauhinia forficata lectin (BfL) induces cell death and inhibits integrin-mediated adhesion on MCF7 human breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Mariana C C; de Paula, Cláudia A A; Ferreira, Joana G; Paredes-Gamero, Edgar J; Vaz, Angela M S F; Sampaio, Misako U; Correia, Maria Tereza S; Oliva, Maria Luiza V

    2014-07-01

    Plant lectins have attracted great interest in cancer studies due to their antitumor activities. These proteins or glycoproteins specifically and reversibly bind to different types of carbohydrates or glycoproteins. Breast cancer, which presents altered glycosylation of cell surface glycoproteins, is one of the most frequent malignant diseases in women. In this work, we describe the effect of the lectin Bauhinia forficata lectin (BfL), which was purified from B. forficata Link subsp. forficata seeds, on the MCF7 human breast cancer cellular line, investigating the mechanisms involved in its antiproliferative activity. MCF7 cells were treated with BfL. Viability and adhesion alterations were evaluated using flow cytometry and western blotting. BfL inhibited the viability of the MCF7 cell line but was ineffective on MDA-MB-231 and MCF 10A cells. It inhibits MCF7 adhesion on laminin, collagen I and fibronectin, decreases α1, α6 and β1 integrin subunit expression, and increases α5 subunit expression. BfL triggers necrosis and secondary necrosis, with caspase-9 inhibition. It also causes deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) fragmentation, which leads to cell cycle arrest in the G2/M phase and a decrease in the expression of the regulatory proteins pRb and p21. BfL shows selective cytotoxic effect and adhesion inhibition on MCF7 breast cancer cells. Cell death induction and inhibition of cell adhesion may contribute to understanding the action of lectins in breast cancer. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. A Novel Role of Listeria monocytogenes Membrane Vesicles in Inhibition of Autophagy and Cell Death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vdovikova, Svitlana; Luhr, Morten; Szalai, Paula; Nygård Skalman, Lars; Francis, Monika K; Lundmark, Richard; Engedal, Nikolai; Johansson, Jörgen; Wai, Sun N

    2017-01-01

    Bacterial membrane vesicle (MV) production has been mainly studied in Gram-negative species. In this study, we show that Listeria monocytogenes , a Gram-positive pathogen that causes the food-borne illness listeriosis, produces MVs both in vitro and in vivo . We found that a major virulence factor, the pore-forming hemolysin listeriolysin O (LLO), is tightly associated with the MVs, where it resides in an oxidized, inactive state. Previous studies have shown that LLO may induce cell death and autophagy. To monitor possible effects of LLO and MVs on autophagy, we performed assays for LC3 lipidation and LDH sequestration as well as analysis by confocal microscopy of HEK293 cells expressing GFP-LC3. The results revealed that MVs alone did not affect autophagy whereas they effectively abrogated autophagy induced by pure LLO or by another pore-forming toxin from Vibrio cholerae , VCC. Moreover, Listeria monocytogenes MVs significantly decreased Torin1-stimulated macroautophagy. In addition, MVs protected against necrosis of HEK293 cells caused by the lytic action of LLO. We explored the mechanisms of LLO-induced autophagy and cell death and demonstrated that the protective effect of MVs involves an inhibition of LLO-induced pore formation resulting in inhibition of autophagy and the lytic action on eukaryotic cells. Further, we determined that these MVs help bacteria to survive inside eukaryotic cells (mouse embryonic fibroblasts). Taken together, these findings suggest that intracellular release of MVs from L. monocytogenes may represent a bacterial strategy to survive inside host cells, by its control of LLO activity and by avoidance of destruction from the autophagy system during infection.

  8. A Novel Role of Listeria monocytogenes Membrane Vesicles in Inhibition of Autophagy and Cell Death

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Svitlana Vdovikova

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Bacterial membrane vesicle (MV production has been mainly studied in Gram-negative species. In this study, we show that Listeria monocytogenes, a Gram-positive pathogen that causes the food-borne illness listeriosis, produces MVs both in vitro and in vivo. We found that a major virulence factor, the pore-forming hemolysin listeriolysin O (LLO, is tightly associated with the MVs, where it resides in an oxidized, inactive state. Previous studies have shown that LLO may induce cell death and autophagy. To monitor possible effects of LLO and MVs on autophagy, we performed assays for LC3 lipidation and LDH sequestration as well as analysis by confocal microscopy of HEK293 cells expressing GFP-LC3. The results revealed that MVs alone did not affect autophagy whereas they effectively abrogated autophagy induced by pure LLO or by another pore-forming toxin from Vibrio cholerae, VCC. Moreover, Listeria monocytogenes MVs significantly decreased Torin1-stimulated macroautophagy. In addition, MVs protected against necrosis of HEK293 cells caused by the lytic action of LLO. We explored the mechanisms of LLO-induced autophagy and cell death and demonstrated that the protective effect of MVs involves an inhibition of LLO-induced pore formation resulting in inhibition of autophagy and the lytic action on eukaryotic cells. Further, we determined that these MVs help bacteria to survive inside eukaryotic cells (mouse embryonic fibroblasts. Taken together, these findings suggest that intracellular release of MVs from L. monocytogenes may represent a bacterial strategy to survive inside host cells, by its control of LLO activity and by avoidance of destruction from the autophagy system during infection.

  9. Cyanidin-3-glucoside inhibits glutamate-induced Zn2+ signaling and neuronal cell death in cultured rat hippocampal neurons by inhibiting Ca2+-induced mitochondrial depolarization and formation of reactive oxygen species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ji Seon; Perveen, Shazia; Ha, Tae Joung; Kim, Seong Yun; Yoon, Shin Hee

    2015-05-05

    Cyanidin-3-glucoside (C3G), a member of the anthocyanin family, is a potent natural antioxidant. However, effects of C3G on glutamate-induced [Zn(2+)]i increase and neuronal cell death remain unknown. We studied the effects of C3G on glutamate-induced [Zn(2+)]i increase and cell death in cultured rat hippocampal neurons from embryonic day 17 maternal Sprague-Dawley rats using digital imaging methods for Zn(2+), Ca(2+), reactive oxygen species (ROS), mitochondrial membrane potential and a MTT assay for cell survival. Treatment with glutamate (100 µM) for 7 min induces reproducible [Zn(2+)]i increase at 35 min interval in cultured rat hippocampal neurons. The intracellular Zn(2+)-chelator TPEN markedly blocked glutamate-induced [Zn(2+)]i increase, but the extracellular Zn(2+) chelator CaEDTA did not affect glutamate-induced [Zn(2+)]i increase. C3G inhibited the glutamate-induced [Zn(2+)]i response in a concentration-dependent manner (IC50 of 14.1 ± 1.1 µg/ml). C3G also significantly inhibited glutamate-induced [Ca(2+)]i increase. Two antioxidants such as Trolox and DTT significantly inhibited the glutamate-induced [Zn(2+)]i response, but they did not affect the [Ca(2+)]i responses. C3G blocked glutamate-induced formation of ROS. Trolox and DTT also inhibited the formation of ROS. C3G significantly inhibited glutamate-induced mitochondrial depolarization. However, TPEN, Trolox and DTT did not affect the mitochondrial depolarization. C3G, Trolox and DTT attenuated glutamate-induced neuronal cell death in cultured rat hippocampal neurons, respectively. Taken together, all these results suggest that cyanidin-3-glucoside inhibits glutamate-induced [Zn(2+)]i increase through a release of Zn(2+) from intracellular sources in cultured rat hippocampal neurons by inhibiting Ca(2+)-induced mitochondrial depolarization and formation of ROS, which is involved in neuroprotection against glutamate-induced cell death. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. N-acetylcysteine attenuates hexavalent chromium-induced hypersensitivity through inhibition of cell death, ROS-related signaling and cytokine expression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Hsuan Lee

    Full Text Available Chromium hypersensitivity (chromium-induced allergic contact dermatitis is an important issue in occupational skin disease. Hexavalent chromium (Cr (VI can activate the Akt, Nuclear factor κB (NF-κB, and Mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK pathways and induce cell death, via the effects of reactive oxygen species (ROS. Recently, cell death stimuli have been proposed to regulate the release of inflammatory cytokines, such as tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α and interleukin-1 (IL-1. However, the exact effects of ROS on the signaling molecules and cytotoxicity involved in Cr(VI-induced hypersensitivity have not yet been fully demonstrated. N-acetylcysteine (NAC could increase glutathione levels in the skin and act as an antioxidant. In this study, we investigated the effects of NAC on attenuating the Cr(VI-triggered ROS signaling in both normal keratinocyte cells (HaCaT cells and a guinea pig (GP model. The results showed the induction of apoptosis, autophagy and ROS were observed after different concentrations of Cr(VI treatment. HaCaT cells pretreated with NAC exhibited a decrease in apoptosis and autophagy, which could affect cell viability. In addition, Cr (VI activated the Akt, NF-κB and MAPK pathways thereby increasing IL-1α and TNF-α production. However, all of these stimulation phenomena could be inhibited by NAC in both of in vitro and in vivo studies. These novel findings indicate that NAC may prevent the development of chromium hypersensitivity by inhibiting of ROS-induced cell death and cytokine expression.

  11. Expression of death receptor 4 induces caspase-independent cell death in MMS-treated yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Mi-Sun; Lee, Sung-Keun; Park, Chang-Shin; Kang, Ju-Hee; Bae, Sung-Ho; Yu, Sung-Lim

    2008-11-14

    DR4, a tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) receptor, is a key element in the extrinsic pathway of TRAIL/TRAIL receptor-related apoptosis that exerts a preferential toxic effect against tumor cells. However, TRAIL and DR4 are expressed in various normal cells, and recent studies indicate that DR4 has a number of non-apoptotic functions. In this study, we evaluated the effects of human DR4 expression in yeast to determine the function of DR4 in normal cells. The expression of DR4 in yeast caused G1 arrest, which resulted in transient growth inhibition. Moreover, treatment of DR4-expressing yeast with a DNA damaging agent, MMS, elicited drastic, and sustained cell growth inhibition accompanied with massive apoptotic cell death. Further analysis revealed that cell death in the presence of DNA damage and DR4 expression was not dependent on the yeast caspase, YCA1. Taken together, these results indicate that DR4 triggers caspase-independent programmed cell death during the response of normal cells to DNA damage.

  12. Zebularine exerts its antiproliferative activity through S phase delay and cell death in human malignant mesothelioma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takemura, Yukitoshi; Satoh, Motohiko; Hatanaka, Kenichi; Kubota, Shunichiro

    2018-04-24

    Malignant mesothelioma is an asbestos-related aggressive tumor and current therapy remains ineffective. Zebularine as a DNA methyltransferase (DNMT) inhibitor has an anti-tumor effect in several human cancer cells. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether zebularine could induce antiproliferative effect in human malignant mesothelioma cells. Zebularine induced cell growth inhibition in a dose-dependent manner. In addition, zebularine dose-dependently decreased expression of DNMT1 in all malignant mesothelioma cells tested. Cell cycle analysis indicated that zebularine induced S phase delay. Zebularine also induced cell death in malignant mesothelioma cells. In contrast, zebularine did not induce cell growth inhibition and cell death in human normal fibroblast cells. These results suggest that zebularine has a potential for the treatment of malignant mesothelioma by inhibiting cell growth and inducing cell death.

  13. Endoplasmic reticulum involvement in yeast cell death

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nicanor Austriaco, O.

    2012-01-01

    Yeast cells undergo programed cell death (PCD) with characteristic markers associated with apoptosis in mammalian cells including chromatin breakage, nuclear fragmentation, reactive oxygen species generation, and metacaspase activation. Though significant research has focused on mitochondrial involvement in this phenomenon, more recent work with both Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Schizosaccharomyces pombe has also implicated the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) in yeast PCD. This minireview provides an overview of ER stress-associated cell death (ER-SAD) in yeast. It begins with a description of ER structure and function in yeast before moving to a discussion of ER-SAD in both mammalian and yeast cells. Three examples of yeast cell death associated with the ER will be highlighted here including inositol starvation, lipid toxicity, and the inhibition of N-glycosylation. It closes by suggesting ways to further examine the involvement of the ER in yeast cell death.

  14. Corosolic Acid Induces Non-Apoptotic Cell Death through Generation of Lipid Reactive Oxygen Species Production in Human Renal Carcinoma Caki Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seon Min Woo

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Corosolic acid is one of the pentacyclic triterpenoids isolated from Lagerstroemia speciose and has been reported to exhibit anti-cancer and anti-proliferative activities in various cancer cells. In the present study, we investigated the molecular mechanisms of corosolic acid in cancer cell death. Corosolic acid induces a decrease of cell viability and an increase of cell cytotoxicity in human renal carcinoma Caki cells. Corosolic acid-induced cell death is not inhibited by apoptosis inhibitor (z-VAD-fmk, a pan-caspase inhibitor, necroptosis inhibitor (necrostatin-1, or ferroptosis inhibitors (ferrostatin-1 and deferoxamine (DFO. Furthermore, corosolic acid significantly induces reactive oxygen species (ROS levels, but antioxidants (N-acetyl-l-cysteine (NAC and trolox do not inhibit corosolic acid-induced cell death. Interestingly, corosolic acid induces lipid oxidation, and α-tocopherol markedly prevents corosolic acid-induced lipid peroxidation and cell death. Anti-chemotherapeutic effects of α-tocopherol are dependent on inhibition of lipid oxidation rather than inhibition of ROS production. In addition, corosolic acid induces non-apoptotic cell death in other renal cancer (ACHN and A498, breast cancer (MDA-MB231, and hepatocellular carcinoma (SK-Hep1 and Huh7 cells, and α-tocopherol markedly inhibits corosolic acid-induced cell death. Therefore, our results suggest that corosolic acid induces non-apoptotic cell death in cancer cells through the increase of lipid peroxidation.

  15. Drosophila Ninjurin A induces nonapoptotic cell death.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah Broderick

    Full Text Available Ninjurins are conserved transmembrane proteins that are upregulated across species in response to injury and stress. Their biological functions are not understood, in part because there have been few in vivo studies of their function. We analyzed the expression and function of one of three Drosophila Ninjurins, NijA. We found that NijA protein is redistributed to the cell surface in larval immune tissues after septic injury and is upregulated by the Toll pathway. We generated a null mutant of NijA, which displayed no detectable phenotype. In ectopic expression studies, NijA induced cell death, as evidenced by cell loss and acridine orange staining. These dying cells did not display hallmarks of apoptotic cells including TUNEL staining and inhibition by p35, indicating that NijA induced nonapoptotic cell death. In cell culture, NijA also induced cell death, which appeared to be cell autonomous. These in vivo studies identify a new role for the Ninjurin family in inducing nonapoptotic cell death.

  16. Induction of cancer cell death by proton beam in tumor hypoxic region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Y. M.; Heo, T. R.; Lee, K. B.; Jang, K. H.; Kim, H. N.; Lee, S. H.; Jeong, M. H.

    2008-04-01

    Proton beam has been applied to treat various tumor patients in clinical studies. However, it is still undefined whether proton radiation can inhibit the blood vessel formation and induce the cell death in vascular endothelial cells in growing organs. The aim of this study are first, to develop an optimal animal model for the observation of blood vessel development with low dose of proton beam and second, to investigate the effect of low dose proton beam on the inhibition of blood vessel formation induced by hypoxic conditions. In this study, flk1-GFP transgenic zebrafish embryos were used to directly visualize and determine the inhibition of blood vessels by low dose (1, 2, 5 Gy) of proton beam with spread out Bragg peak (SOBP). And we observed cell death by acridine orange staining at 96 hours post fertilization (hpf) stage of embryos after proton irradiation. We also compared the effects of proton beam with those of gamma-ray. An antioxidant, N-acetyl cystein (NAC) was used to investigate whether reactive oxygen species (ROS) were involved in the cell deaths induced by proton irradiation. Irradiated flk-1-GFP transgenic embryos with proton beam irradiation (35 MeV, spread out Bragg peak, SOBP) demonstrated a marked inhibition of embryonic growth and an altered fluorescent blood vessel development in the trunk region. When the cells with DNA damage in the irradiated zebrafish were stained with acridine orange, green fluorescent cell death spots were increased in trunk regions compared to non-irradiated control embryos. Proton beam also significantly increased the cell death rate in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC), but pretreatment of N-acetyl cystein (NAC), an antioxidant, recovered the proton-induced cell death rate (p<0.01). Moreover, pretreatment of NAC abrogated the effect of proton beam on the inhibition of trunk vessel development and malformation of trunk truncation. From this study, we found that proton radiation therapy can inhibit the

  17. Proton pump inhibitor-induced tumour cell death by inhibition of a detoxification mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fais, S

    2010-05-01

    This review presents a possible new approach against cancer, as represented by inhibition of proton pumps, a mechanism used by tumour cells to avoid intracellular accumulation of toxic substances. Proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) belong to a family of pro-drugs that are currently used in the treatment of peptic diseases needing acidity to be activated. PPIs target the acidic tumour mass, where they are metabolized, thus blocking proton traffic. Proton pump inhibition triggers a rapid cell death as a result of intracellular acidification, caspase activation and early accumulation of reactive oxygen species into tumour cells. As a whole, the devastating effect of PPIs on tumour cells suggest the triggering of a fatal cell toxification. Many human tumours, including melanoma, osteosarcoma, lymphomas and various adenocarcinomas are responsive to PPIs. This appears highly conceivable, in as much as almost all human tumours are acidic and express high levels of proton pumps. Paradoxically, metastatic tumours appear to be more responsive to PPIs being more acidic than the majority of primary tumours. However, two clinical trials test the effectiveness of PPIs in chemosensitizing melanoma and osteosarcoma patients. Indeed, tumour acidity represents a very potent mechanism of chemoresistance. A majority of cytotoxic agents, being weak bases, are quickly protonated outside and do not enter the cells, thus preventing drugs to reach specific cellular targets. Clinical data will provide the proof of concept on the use of PPIs as a new class of antitumour agent with a very low level of systemic toxicity as compared with standard chemotherapeutic agents.

  18. Melatonin Protects Cultured Tobacco Cells against Lead-Induced Cell Death via Inhibition of Cytochrome c Translocation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agnieszka Kobylińska

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Melatonin was discovered in plants more than two decades ago and, especially in the last decade, it has captured the interests of plant biologists. Beyond its possible participation in photoperiod processes and its role as a direct free radical scavenger as well as an indirect antioxidant, melatonin is also involved in plant defense strategies/reactions. However, the mechanisms that this indoleamine activates to improve plant stress tolerance still require identification and clarification. In the present report, the ability of exogenous melatonin to protect Nicotiana tabacum L. line Bright Yellow 2 (BY-2 suspension cells against the toxic exposure to lead was examined. Studies related to cell proliferation and viability, DNA fragmentation, possible translocation of cytochrome c from mitochondria to cytosol, cell morphology after fluorescence staining and also the in situ accumulation of superoxide radicals measured via the nitro blue tetrazolium reducing test, were conducted. This work establishes a novel finding by correcting the inhibition of release of mitochondrial ctytocrome c in to the cytoplasm with the high accumulation of superoxide radicals. The results show that pretreatment with 200 nm of melatonin protected tobacco cells from DNA damage caused by lead. Melatonin, as an efficacious antioxidant, limited superoxide radical accumulation as well as cytochrome c release thereby, it likely prevents the activation of the cascade of processes leading to cell death. Fluorescence staining with acridine orange and ethidium bromide documented that lead-stressed cells additionally treated with melatonin displayed intact nuclei. The results revealed that melatonin at proper dosage could significantly increase BY-2 cell proliferation and protected them against death. It was proved that melatonin could function as an effective priming agent to promote survival of tobacco cells under harmful lead-induced stress conditions.

  19. Melatonin Protects Cultured Tobacco Cells against Lead-Induced Cell Death via Inhibition of Cytochrome c Translocation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobylińska, Agnieszka; Reiter, Russel J.; Posmyk, Malgorzata M.

    2017-01-01

    Melatonin was discovered in plants more than two decades ago and, especially in the last decade, it has captured the interests of plant biologists. Beyond its possible participation in photoperiod processes and its role as a direct free radical scavenger as well as an indirect antioxidant, melatonin is also involved in plant defense strategies/reactions. However, the mechanisms that this indoleamine activates to improve plant stress tolerance still require identification and clarification. In the present report, the ability of exogenous melatonin to protect Nicotiana tabacum L. line Bright Yellow 2 (BY-2) suspension cells against the toxic exposure to lead was examined. Studies related to cell proliferation and viability, DNA fragmentation, possible translocation of cytochrome c from mitochondria to cytosol, cell morphology after fluorescence staining and also the in situ accumulation of superoxide radicals measured via the nitro blue tetrazolium reducing test, were conducted. This work establishes a novel finding by correcting the inhibition of release of mitochondrial ctytocrome c in to the cytoplasm with the high accumulation of superoxide radicals. The results show that pretreatment with 200 nm of melatonin protected tobacco cells from DNA damage caused by lead. Melatonin, as an efficacious antioxidant, limited superoxide radical accumulation as well as cytochrome c release thereby, it likely prevents the activation of the cascade of processes leading to cell death. Fluorescence staining with acridine orange and ethidium bromide documented that lead-stressed cells additionally treated with melatonin displayed intact nuclei. The results revealed that melatonin at proper dosage could significantly increase BY-2 cell proliferation and protected them against death. It was proved that melatonin could function as an effective priming agent to promote survival of tobacco cells under harmful lead-induced stress conditions. PMID:28959267

  20. Echinacoside induces apoptotic cancer cell death by inhibiting the nucleotide pool sanitizing enzyme MTH1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong L

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Liwei Dong,1 Hongge Wang,1 Jiajing Niu,1 Mingwei Zou,2 Nuoting Wu,1 Debin Yu,1 Ye Wang,1 Zhihua Zou11Key Laboratory for Molecular Enzymology and Engineering of the Ministry of Education, National Engineering Laboratory for AIDS Vaccine, School of Life Sciences, Jilin University, Changchun, Jilin Province, People’s Republic of China; 2Department of Psychology, College of Liberal Arts and Social Sciences, University of Houston, Houston, TX, USA Abstract: Inhibition of the nucleotide pool sanitizing enzyme MTH1 causes extensive oxidative DNA damages and apoptosis in cancer cells and hence may be used as an anticancer strategy. As natural products have been a rich source of medicinal chemicals, in the present study, we used the MTH1-catalyzed enzymatic reaction as a high-throughput in vitro screening assay to search for natural compounds capable of inhibiting MTH1. Echinacoside, a compound derived from the medicinal plants Cistanche and Echinacea, effectively inhibited the catalytic activity of MTH1 in an in vitro assay. Treatment of various human cancer cell lines with Echinacoside resulted in a significant increase in the cellular level of oxidized guanine (8-oxoguanine, while cellular reactive oxygen species level remained unchanged, indicating that Echinacoside also inhibited the activity of cellular MTH1. Consequently, Echinacoside treatment induced an immediate and dramatic increase in DNA damage markers and upregulation of the G1/S-CDK inhibitor p21, which were followed by marked apoptotic cell death and cell cycle arrest in cancer but not in noncancer cells. Taken together, these studies identified a natural compound as an MTH1 inhibitor and suggest that natural products can be an important source of anticancer agents. Keywords: Echinacoside, MTH1, 8-oxoG, DNA damage, apoptosis, cell cycle arrest

  1. Sorafenib-induced defective autophagy promotes cell death by necroptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kharaziha, Pedram; Chioureas, Dimitris; Baltatzis, George; Fonseca, Pedro; Rodriguez, Patricia; Gogvadze, Vladimir; Lennartsson, Lena; Björklund, Ann-Charlotte; Zhivotovsky, Boris; Grandér, Dan; Egevad, Lars; Nilsson, Sten; Panaretakis, Theocharis

    2015-11-10

    Autophagy is one of the main cytoprotective mechanisms that cancer cells deploy to withstand the cytotoxic stress and survive the lethal damage induced by anti-cancer drugs. However, under specific conditions, autophagy may, directly or indirectly, induce cell death. In our study, treatment of the Atg5-deficient DU145 prostate cancer cells, with the multi-tyrosine kinase inhibitor, sorafenib, induces mitochondrial damage, autophagy and cell death. Molecular inhibition of autophagy by silencing ULK1 and Beclin1 rescues DU145 cells from cell death indicating that, in this setting, autophagy promotes cell death. Re-expression of Atg5 restores the lipidation of LC3 and rescues DU145 and MEF atg5-/- cells from sorafenib-induced cell death. Despite the lack of Atg5 expression and LC3 lipidation, DU145 cells form autophagosomes as demonstrated by transmission and immuno-electron microscopy, and the formation of LC3 positive foci. However, the lack of cellular content in the autophagosomes, the accumulation of long-lived proteins, the presence of GFP-RFP-LC3 positive foci and the accumulated p62 protein levels indicate that these autophagosomes may not be fully functional. DU145 cells treated with sorafenib undergo a caspase-independent cell death that is inhibited by the RIPK1 inhibitor, necrostatin-1. Furthermore, treatment with sorafenib induces the interaction of RIPK1 with p62, as demonstrated by immunoprecipitation and a proximity ligation assay. Silencing of p62 decreases the RIPK1 protein levels and renders necrostatin-1 ineffective in blocking sorafenib-induced cell death. In summary, the formation of Atg5-deficient autophagosomes in response to sorafenib promotes the interaction of p62 with RIPK leading to cell death by necroptosis.

  2. DRAM Triggers Lysosomal Membrane Permeabilization and Cell Death in CD4+ T Cells Infected with HIV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laforge, Mireille; Limou, Sophie; Harper, Francis; Casartelli, Nicoletta; Rodrigues, Vasco; Silvestre, Ricardo; Haloui, Houda; Zagury, Jean-Francois; Senik, Anna; Estaquier, Jerome

    2013-01-01

    Productive HIV infection of CD4+ T cells leads to a caspase-independent cell death pathway associated with lysosomal membrane permeabilization (LMP) and cathepsin release, resulting in mitochondrial outer membrane permeabilization (MOMP). Herein, we demonstrate that HIV infection induces damage-regulated autophagy modulator (DRAM) expression in a p53-dependent manner. Knocking down the expression of DRAM and p53 genes with specific siRNAs inhibited autophagy and LMP. However, inhibition of Atg5 and Beclin genes that prevents autophagy had a minor effect on LMP and cell death. The knock down of DRAM gene inhibited cytochrome C release, MOMP and cell death. However, knocking down DRAM, we increased viral infection and production. Our study shows for the first time the involvement of DRAM in host-pathogen interactions, which may represent a mechanism of defense via the elimination of infected cells. PMID:23658518

  3. Moderate extracellular acidification inhibits capsaicin-induced cell death through regulating calcium mobilization, NF-κB translocation and ROS production in synoviocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu, Fen; Yang, Shuang; Zhao, Dan; Zhu, Shuyan; Wang, Yuxiang; Li, Junying

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Moderate extracellular acidification regulates intracellular Ca 2+ mobilization. ► Moderate acidification activates NF-κB nuclear translocation in synoviocytes. ► Moderate acidification depresses the ROS production induced by capsaicin. ► Moderate acidification inhibits capsaicin-caused synoviocyte death. -- Abstract: We previously show the expression of transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) in primary synoviocytes from collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) rats. Capsaicin and lowered extracellular pH from 7.4 to 5.5 induce cell death through TRPV1-mediated Ca 2+ entry and reactive oxygen species (ROS) production. However, under the pathological condition in rheumatoid arthritis, the synovial fluid is acidified to a moderate level (about pH 6.8). In the present study, we examined the effects of pH 6.8 on the TRPV1-mediated cell death. Our finding is different or even opposite from what was observed at pH 5.5. We found that the moderate extracellular acidification (from pH 7.4 to 6.8) inhibited the capsaicin-induced Ca 2+ entry through attenuating the activity of TRPV1. In the mean time, it triggered a phospholipse C (PLC)-related Ca 2+ release from intracellular stores. The nuclear translocation of NF-κB was found at pH 6.8, and this also depends on PLC activation. Moreover, the capsaicin-evoked massive ROS production and cell death were depressed at pH 6.8, both of which are dependent on the activation of PLC and NF-κB. Taken together, these results suggested that the moderate extracellular acidification inhibited the capsaicin-induced synoviocyte death through regulating Ca 2+ mobilization, activating NF-κB nuclear translocation and depressing ROS production.

  4. Moderate extracellular acidification inhibits capsaicin-induced cell death through regulating calcium mobilization, NF-{kappa}B translocation and ROS production in synoviocytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, Fen; Yang, Shuang; Zhao, Dan; Zhu, Shuyan; Wang, Yuxiang [Department of Biophysics, School of Physics and Key Laboratory of Bioactive Materials of Education Ministry, Nankai University, Tianjin 300071 (China); Li, Junying, E-mail: jyli04@nankai.edu.cn [Department of Biophysics, School of Physics and Key Laboratory of Bioactive Materials of Education Ministry, Nankai University, Tianjin 300071 (China)

    2012-07-20

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Moderate extracellular acidification regulates intracellular Ca{sup 2+} mobilization. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Moderate acidification activates NF-{kappa}B nuclear translocation in synoviocytes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Moderate acidification depresses the ROS production induced by capsaicin. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Moderate acidification inhibits capsaicin-caused synoviocyte death. -- Abstract: We previously show the expression of transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) in primary synoviocytes from collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) rats. Capsaicin and lowered extracellular pH from 7.4 to 5.5 induce cell death through TRPV1-mediated Ca{sup 2+} entry and reactive oxygen species (ROS) production. However, under the pathological condition in rheumatoid arthritis, the synovial fluid is acidified to a moderate level (about pH 6.8). In the present study, we examined the effects of pH 6.8 on the TRPV1-mediated cell death. Our finding is different or even opposite from what was observed at pH 5.5. We found that the moderate extracellular acidification (from pH 7.4 to 6.8) inhibited the capsaicin-induced Ca{sup 2+} entry through attenuating the activity of TRPV1. In the mean time, it triggered a phospholipse C (PLC)-related Ca{sup 2+} release from intracellular stores. The nuclear translocation of NF-{kappa}B was found at pH 6.8, and this also depends on PLC activation. Moreover, the capsaicin-evoked massive ROS production and cell death were depressed at pH 6.8, both of which are dependent on the activation of PLC and NF-{kappa}B. Taken together, these results suggested that the moderate extracellular acidification inhibited the capsaicin-induced synoviocyte death through regulating Ca{sup 2+} mobilization, activating NF-{kappa}B nuclear translocation and depressing ROS production.

  5. Oleuropein isolated from Fraxinus rhynchophylla inhibits glutamate-induced neuronal cell death by attenuating mitochondrial dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Mi Hye; Min, Ju-Sik; Lee, Joon Yeop; Chae, Unbin; Yang, Eun-Ju; Song, Kyung-Sik; Lee, Hyun-Shik; Lee, Hong Jun; Lee, Sang-Rae; Lee, Dong-Seok

    2017-04-27

    Glutamate-induced neurotoxicity is related to excessive oxidative stress accumulation and results in the increase of neuronal cell death. In addition, glutamate has been reported to lead to neurodegenerative diseases, including Parkinson's and Alzheimer's diseases.It is well known that Fraxinus rhynchophylla contains a significant level of oleuropein (Ole), which exerts various pharmacological effects. However, the mechanism of neuroprotective effects of Ole is still poorly defined. In this study, we aimed to investigate whether Ole prevents glutamate-induced toxicity in HT-22 hippocampal neuronal cells. The exposure of the glutamate treatment caused neuronal cell death through an alteration of Bax/Bcl-2 expression and translocation of mitochondrial apoptosis-inducing factor (AIF) to the cytoplasm of HT-22 cells. In addition, glutamate induced an increase in dephosphorylation of dynamin-related protein 1 (Drp1), mitochondrial fragmentation, and mitochondrial dysfunction. The pretreatment of Ole decreased Bax expression, increased Bcl-2 expression, and inhibited the translocation of mitochondrial AIF to the cytoplasm. Furthermore, Ole amended a glutamate-induced mitochondrial dynamic imbalance and reduced the number of cells with fragmented mitochondria, regulating the phosphorylation of Drp1 at amino acid residue serine 637. In conclusion, our results show that Ole has a preventive effect against glutamate-induced toxicity in HT-22 hippocampal neuronal cells. Therefore, these data imply that Ole may be an efficient approach for the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases.

  6. Mechanisms underlying 3-bromopyruvate-induced cell death in colon cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yiming; Liu, Zhe; Zou, Xue; Lan, Yadong; Sun, Xiaojin; Wang, Xiu; Zhao, Surong; Jiang, Chenchen; Liu, Hao

    2015-08-01

    3-Bromopyruvate (3BP) is an energy-depleting drug that inhibits Hexokinase II activity by alkylation during glycolysis, thereby suppressing the production of ATP and inducing cell death. As such, 3BP can potentially serve as an anti-tumorigenic agent. Our previous research showed that 3BP can induce apoptosis via AKT /protein Kinase B signaling in breast cancer cells. Here we found that 3BP can also induce colon cancer cell death by necroptosis and apoptosis at the same time and concentration in the SW480 and HT29 cell lines; in the latter, autophagy was also found to be a mechanism of cell death. In HT29 cells, combined treatment with 3BP and the autophagy inhibitor 3-methyladenine (3-MA) exacerbated cell death, while viability in 3BP-treated cells was enhanced by concomitant treatment with the caspase inhibitor benzyloxycarbonyl-Val-Ala-Asp fluoromethylketone (z-VAD-fmk) and the necroptosis inhibitor necrostatin (Nec)-1. Moreover, 3BP inhibited tumor growth in a SW480 xenograft mouse model. These results indicate that 3BP can suppress tumor growth and induce cell death by multiple mechanisms at the same time and concentration in different types of colon cancer cell by depleting cellular energy stores.

  7. Docosahexaenoic Acid Induces Cell Death in Human Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Cells by Repressing mTOR via AMPK Activation and PI3K/Akt Inhibition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nayeong Kim

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The anticancer properties and mechanism of action of omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (ω3-PUFAs have been demonstrated in several cancers; however, the mechanism in lung cancer remains unclear. Here, we show that docosahexaenoic acid (DHA, a ω3-PUFA, induced apoptosis and autophagy in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC cells. DHA-induced cell death was accompanied by AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK activation and inactivated phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K/Akt/mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR signaling. Knocking down AMPK and overexpressing Akt increased mTOR activity and attenuated DHA-induced cell death, suggesting that DHA induces cell death via AMPK- and Akt-regulated mTOR inactivation. This was confirmed in Fat-1 transgenic mice, which produce ω3-PUFAs. Lewis lung cancer (LLC tumor cells implanted into Fat-1 mice showed slower growth, lower phospho-Akt levels, and higher levels of apoptosis and autophagy than cells implanted into wild-type mice. Taken together, these data suggest that DHA-induced apoptosis and autophagy in NSCLC cells are associated with AMPK activation and PI3K/Akt inhibition, which in turn lead to suppression of mTOR; thus ω3-PUFAs may be utilized as potential therapeutic agents for NSCLC treatment.

  8. An antitubulin agent BCFMT inhibits proliferation of cancer cells and induces cell death by inhibiting microtubule dynamics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ankit Rai

    Full Text Available Using cell based screening assay, we identified a novel anti-tubulin agent (Z-5-((5-(4-bromo-3-chlorophenylfuran-2-ylmethylene-2-thioxothiazolidin-4-one (BCFMT that inhibited proliferation of human cervical carcinoma (HeLa (IC(50, 7.2 ± 1.8 µM, human breast adenocarcinoma (MCF-7 (IC(50, 10.0 ± 0.5 µM, highly metastatic breast adenocarcinoma (MDA-MB-231 (IC(50, 6.0 ± 1 µM, cisplatin-resistant human ovarian carcinoma (A2780-cis (IC(50, 5.8 ± 0.3 µM and multi-drug resistant mouse mammary tumor (EMT6/AR1 (IC(50, 6.5 ± 1 µM cells. Using several complimentary strategies, BCFMT was found to inhibit cancer cell proliferation at G2/M phase of the cell cycle apparently by targeting microtubules. In addition, BCFMT strongly suppressed the dynamics of individual microtubules in live MCF-7 cells. At its half maximal proliferation inhibitory concentration (10 µM, BCFMT reduced the rates of growing and shortening phases of microtubules in MCF-7 cells by 37 and 40%, respectively. Further, it increased the time microtubules spent in the pause (neither growing nor shortening detectably state by 135% and reduced the dynamicity (dimer exchange per unit time of microtubules by 70%. In vitro, BCFMT bound to tubulin with a dissociation constant of 8.3 ± 1.8 µM, inhibited tubulin assembly and suppressed GTPase activity of microtubules. BCFMT competitively inhibited the binding of BODIPY FL-vinblastine to tubulin with an inhibitory concentration (K(i of 5.2 ± 1.5 µM suggesting that it binds to tubulin at the vinblastine site. In cultured cells, BCFMT-treatment depolymerized interphase microtubules, perturbed the spindle organization and accumulated checkpoint proteins (BubR1 and Mad2 at the kinetochores. BCFMT-treated MCF-7 cells showed enhanced nuclear accumulation of p53 and its downstream p21, which consequently activated apoptosis in these cells. The results suggested that BCFMT inhibits proliferation of several types of cancer cells including drug

  9. DRAM triggers lysosomal membrane permeabilization and cell death in CD4(+ T cells infected with HIV.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mireille Laforge

    Full Text Available Productive HIV infection of CD4(+ T cells leads to a caspase-independent cell death pathway associated with lysosomal membrane permeabilization (LMP and cathepsin release, resulting in mitochondrial outer membrane permeabilization (MOMP. Herein, we demonstrate that HIV infection induces damage-regulated autophagy modulator (DRAM expression in a p53-dependent manner. Knocking down the expression of DRAM and p53 genes with specific siRNAs inhibited autophagy and LMP. However, inhibition of Atg5 and Beclin genes that prevents autophagy had a minor effect on LMP and cell death. The knock down of DRAM gene inhibited cytochrome C release, MOMP and cell death. However, knocking down DRAM, we increased viral infection and production. Our study shows for the first time the involvement of DRAM in host-pathogen interactions, which may represent a mechanism of defense via the elimination of infected cells.

  10. Blocking CD147 induces cell death in cancer cells through impairment of glycolytic energy metabolism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baba, Miyako; Inoue, Masahiro; Itoh, Kazuyuki; Nishizawa, Yasuko

    2008-01-01

    CD147 is a multifunctional transmembrane protein and promotes cancer progression. We found that the anti-human CD147 mouse monoclonal antibody MEM-M6/1 strongly induces necrosis-like cell death in LoVo, HT-29, WiDr, and SW620 colon cancer cells and A2058 melanoma cells, but not in WI-38 and TIG-113 normal fibroblasts. Silencing or overexpression of CD147 in LoVo cells enhanced or decreased the MEM-M6/1 induced cell death, respectively. CD147 is known to form complex with proton-linked monocarboxylate transporters (MCTs), which is critical for lactate transport and intracellular pH (pHi) homeostasis. In LoVo cells, CD147 and MCT-1 co-localized on the cell surface, and MEM-M6/1 inhibited the association of these molecules. MEM-M6/1 inhibited lactate uptake, lactate release, and reduced pHi. Further, the induction of acidification was parallel to the decrease of the glycolytic flux and intracellular ATP levels. These effects were not found in the normal fibroblasts. As cancer cells depend on glycolysis for their energy production, CD147 inhibition might induce cell death specific to cancer cells

  11. Bifurcate effects of glucose on caspase-independent cell death during hypoxia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aki, Toshihiko; Nara, Akina; Funakoshi, Takeshi; Uemura, Koichi

    2010-01-01

    We investigated the effect of glucose on hypoxic death of rat cardiomyocyte-derived H9c2 cells and found that there is an optimal glucose concentration for protection against hypoxic cell death. Hypoxic cell death in the absence of glucose is accompanied by rapid ATP depletion, release of apoptosis-inducing factor from mitochondria, and nuclear chromatin condensation, all of which are inhibited by glucose in a dose-dependent manner. In contrast, excessive glucose also induces hypoxic cell death that is not accompanied by these events, suggesting a change in the mode of cell death between hypoxic cells with and without glucose supplementation.

  12. Staurosporine induces different cell death forms in cultured rat astrocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simenc, Janez; Lipnik-Stangelj, Metoda

    2012-01-01

    Astroglial cells are frequently involved in malignant transformation. Besides apoptosis, necroptosis, a different form of regulated cell death, seems to be related with glioblastoma genesis, proliferation, angiogenesis and invasion. In the present work we elucidated mechanisms of necroptosis in cultured astrocytes, and compared them with apoptosis, caused by staurosporine. Cultured rat cortical astrocytes were used for a cell death studies. Cell death was induced by different concentrations of staurosporine, and modified by inhibitors of apoptosis (z-vad-fmk) and necroptosis (nec-1). Different forms of a cell death were detected using flow cytometry. We showed that staurosporine, depending on concentration, induces both, apoptosis as well as necroptosis. Treatment with 10 −7 M staurosporine increased apoptosis of astrocytes after the regeneration in a staurosporine free medium. When caspases were inhibited, apoptosis was attenuated, while necroptosis was slightly increased. Treatment with 10 −6 M staurosporine induced necroptosis that occurred after the regeneration of astrocytes in a staurosporine free medium, as well as without regeneration period. Necroptosis was significantly attenuated by nec-1 which inhibits RIP1 kinase. On the other hand, the inhibition of caspases had no effect on necroptosis. Furthermore, staurosporine activated RIP1 kinase increased the production of reactive oxygen species, while an antioxidant BHA significantly attenuated necroptosis. Staurosporine can induce apoptosis and/or necroptosis in cultured astrocytes via different signalling pathways. Distinction between different forms of cell death is crucial in the studies of therapy-induced necroptosis

  13. Apoptotic cell death through inhibition of protein kinase CKII activity by 3,4-dihydroxybenzaldehyde purified from Xanthium strumarium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Bang Hyo; Yoon, Soo-Hyun; Kim, Yun-Sook; Kim, Sang Kook; Moon, Byong Jo; Bae, Young-Seuk

    2008-01-01

    The CKII inhibitory compound was purified from the fruit of Xanthium strumarium by organic solvent extraction and silica gel chromatography. The inhibitory compound was identified as 3,4-dihydroxybenzaldehyde by analysis with FT-IR, FAB-Mass, EI-Mass, (1)H-NMR and (13)C-NMR. 3,4-dihydroxybenzaldehyde inhibited the phosphotransferase activity of CKII with IC(50) of about 783 microM. Steady-state studies revealed that the inhibitor acts as a competitive inhibitor with respect to the substrate ATP. A value of 138.6 microM was obtained for the apparent K(i). Concentration of 300 microM 3,4-dihydroxybenzaldehyde caused 50% growth inhibition of human cancer cell U937. 3,4-dihydroxybenzaldehyde-induced cell death was characterised with the cleavage of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase and procaspase-3. Furthermore, the inhibitor induced the fragmentation of DNA into multiples of 180 bp, indicating that it triggered apoptosis. This induction of apoptosis by 3,4-dihydroxybenzaldehyde was also confirmed by using flow cytometry analysis. Since CKII is involved in cell proliferation and oncogenesis, these results suggest that 3,4-dihydroxybenzaldehyde may function by inhibiting oncogenic disease, at least in part, through the inhibition of CKII activity.

  14. Sensitization of melanoma cells to alkylating agent-induced DNA damage and cell death via orchestrating oxidative stress and IKKβ inhibition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anfernee Kai-Wing Tse

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Nitrosourea represents one of the most active classes of chemotherapeutic alkylating agents for metastatic melanoma. Treatment with nitrosoureas caused severe systemic side effects which hamper its clinical use. Here, we provide pharmacological evidence that reactive oxygen species (ROS induction and IKKβ inhibition cooperatively enhance nitrosourea-induced cytotoxicity in melanoma cells. We identified SC-514 as a ROS-inducing IKKβ inhibitor which enhanced the function of nitrosoureas. Elevated ROS level results in increased DNA crosslink efficiency triggered by nitrosoureas and IKKβ inhibition enhances DNA damage signals and sensitizes nitrosourea-induced cell death. Using xenograft mouse model, we confirm that ROS-inducing IKKβ inhibitor cooperates with nitrosourea to reduce tumor size and malignancy in vivo. Taken together, our results illustrate a new direction in nitrosourea treatment, and reveal that the combination of ROS-inducing IKKβ inhibitors with nitrosoureas can be potentially exploited for melanoma therapy.

  15. HAMLET (human alpha-lactalbumin made lethal to tumor cells) triggers autophagic tumor cell death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aits, Sonja; Gustafsson, Lotta; Hallgren, Oskar; Brest, Patrick; Gustafsson, Mattias; Trulsson, Maria; Mossberg, Ann-Kristin; Simon, Hans-Uwe; Mograbi, Baharia; Svanborg, Catharina

    2009-03-01

    HAMLET, a complex of partially unfolded alpha-lactalbumin and oleic acid, kills a wide range of tumor cells. Here we propose that HAMLET causes macroautophagy in tumor cells and that this contributes to their death. Cell death was accompanied by mitochondrial damage and a reduction in the level of active mTOR and HAMLET triggered extensive cytoplasmic vacuolization and the formation of double-membrane-enclosed vesicles typical of macroautophagy. In addition, HAMLET caused a change from uniform (LC3-I) to granular (LC3-II) staining in LC3-GFP-transfected cells reflecting LC3 translocation during macroautophagy, and this was blocked by the macroautophagy inhibitor 3-methyladenine. HAMLET also caused accumulation of LC3-II detected by Western blot when lysosomal degradation was inhibited suggesting that HAMLET caused an increase in autophagic flux. To determine if macroautophagy contributed to cell death, we used RNA interference against Beclin-1 and Atg5. Suppression of Beclin-1 and Atg5 improved the survival of HAMLET-treated tumor cells and inhibited the increase in granular LC3-GFP staining. The results show that HAMLET triggers macroautophagy in tumor cells and suggest that macroautophagy contributes to HAMLET-induced tumor cell death.

  16. Sorafenib-induced defective autophagy promotes cell death by necroptosis

    OpenAIRE

    Kharaziha, Pedram; Chioureas, Dimitris; Baltatzis, George; Fonseca, Pedro; Rodriguez, Patricia; Gogvadze, Vladimir; Lennartsson, Lena; Bj?rklund, Ann-Charlotte; Zhivotovsky, Boris; Grand?r, Dan; Egevad, Lars; Nilsson, Sten; Panaretakis, Theocharis

    2015-01-01

    Autophagy is one of the main cytoprotective mechanisms that cancer cells deploy to withstand the cytotoxic stress and survive the lethal damage induced by anti-cancer drugs. However, under specific conditions, autophagy may, directly or indirectly, induce cell death. In our study, treatment of the Atg5-deficient DU145 prostate cancer cells, with the multi-tyrosine kinase inhibitor, sorafenib, induces mitochondrial damage, autophagy and cell death. Molecular inhibition of autophagy by silencin...

  17. Neuroprotective effects of corn silk maysin via inhibition of H2O2-induced apoptotic cell death in SK-N-MC cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Doo Jin; Kim, Sun-Lim; Choi, Ji Won; Park, Yong Il

    2014-07-25

    Neuroprotective effects of maysin, which is a flavone glycoside that was isolated from the corn silk (CS, Zea mays L.) of a Korean hybrid corn Kwangpyeongok, against oxidative stress (H2O2)-induced apoptotic cell death of human neuroblastoma SK-N-MC cells were investigated. Maysin cytotoxicity was determined by measuring cell viability using MTT and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) assays. Intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) were measured using a 2,7-dichlorofluorescein diacetate (DCF-DA) assay. Apoptotic cell death was monitored by annexin V-FITC/PI double staining and by a TUNEL assay. Antioxidant enzyme mRNA levels were determined by real-time PCR. The cleavage of poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) was measured by western blotting. Maysin pretreatment reduced the cytotoxic effect of H2O2 on SK-N-MC cells, as shown by the increase in cell viability and by reduced LDH release. Maysin pretreatment also dose-dependently reduced the intracellular ROS level and inhibited PARP cleavage. In addition, DNA damage and H2O2-induced apoptotic cell death were significantly attenuated by maysin pretreatment. Moreover, maysin pretreatment (5-50 μg/ml) for 2h significantly and dose-dependently increased the mRNA levels of antioxidant enzymes (CAT, GPx-1, SOD-1, SOD-2 and HO-1) in H2O2 (200 μM)-insulted cells. These results suggest that CS maysin has neuroprotective effects against oxidative stress (H2O2)-induced apoptotic death of human brain SK-N-MC cells through its antioxidative action. This report is the first regarding neuroprotective health benefits of corn silk maysin by its anti-apoptotic action and by triggering the expression of intracellular antioxidant enzyme systems in SK-N-MC cells. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Group I mGlu receptor stimulation inhibits activation-induced cell death of human T lymphocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiocchetti, Annalisa; Miglio, Gianluca; Mesturini, Riccardo; Varsaldi, Federica; Mocellin, Marco; Orilieri, Elisabetta; Dianzani, Chiara; Fantozzi, Roberto; Dianzani, Umberto; Lombardi, Grazia

    2006-01-01

    The effects of L-glutamate on activation-induced cell death (AICD) of human activated (1 μg ml−1 phytohemagglutinin plus 2 U ml−1 interleukin-2; 8 days) T lymphocytes were studied by measuring anti-CD3 monoclonal antibody (10 μg ml−1; 18 h)-induced cell apoptosis (Annexin V and propidium iodide staining). L-Glutamate (1 × 10−8–1 × 10−4 M) significantly (P⩽0.01) inhibited AICD in a concentration-dependent manner (EC50=6.3 × 10−8 M; maximum inhibition 54.8±6.3% at 1 × 10−6 M). The L-glutamate inhibitory effect was pharmacologically characterized as mediated by group I mGlu receptors, since mGlu receptor agonists reproduced this effect. The EC50 values were: 3.2 × 10−7 M for (1S,3R)-ACPD; 4.5 × 10−8 M for quisqualate; 1.0 × 10−6 M for (S)-3,5-DHPG; 2.0 × 10−5 M for CHPG. Group I mGlu receptor antagonists inhibited the effects of quisqualate 1.0 × 10−6 M. The IC50 values calculated were: 8.7 × 10−5, 4.3 × 10−6 and 6.3 × 10−7 M for AIDA, LY 367385 and MPEP, respectively. L-Glutamate (1 × 10−6 M; 18 h) significantly (P⩽0.05) inhibited FasL expression (40.8±11.3%) (cytofluorimetric analysis), whereas it did not affect Fas signalling. Expression of both mGlu1 and mGlu5 receptor mRNA by T lymphocytes and T-cell lines, as demonstrated by reverse transcriptase–PCR analysis, suggests that L-glutamate-mediated inhibition of AICD was exerted on T cells. These data depict a novel role for L-glutamate in the regulation of the immune response through group I mGlu receptor-mediated mechanisms. PMID:16751798

  19. Sensitization of melanoma cells to alkylating agent-induced DNA damage and cell death via orchestrating oxidative stress and IKKβ inhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tse, Anfernee Kai-Wing; Chen, Ying-Jie; Fu, Xiu-Qiong; Su, Tao; Li, Ting; Guo, Hui; Zhu, Pei-Li; Kwan, Hiu-Yee; Cheng, Brian Chi-Yan; Cao, Hui-Hui; Lee, Sally Kin-Wah; Fong, Wang-Fun; Yu, Zhi-Ling

    2017-04-01

    Nitrosourea represents one of the most active classes of chemotherapeutic alkylating agents for metastatic melanoma. Treatment with nitrosoureas caused severe systemic side effects which hamper its clinical use. Here, we provide pharmacological evidence that reactive oxygen species (ROS) induction and IKKβ inhibition cooperatively enhance nitrosourea-induced cytotoxicity in melanoma cells. We identified SC-514 as a ROS-inducing IKKβ inhibitor which enhanced the function of nitrosoureas. Elevated ROS level results in increased DNA crosslink efficiency triggered by nitrosoureas and IKKβ inhibition enhances DNA damage signals and sensitizes nitrosourea-induced cell death. Using xenograft mouse model, we confirm that ROS-inducing IKKβ inhibitor cooperates with nitrosourea to reduce tumor size and malignancy in vivo. Taken together, our results illustrate a new direction in nitrosourea treatment, and reveal that the combination of ROS-inducing IKKβ inhibitors with nitrosoureas can be potentially exploited for melanoma therapy. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Maitotoxin-induced liver cell death involving loss of cell ATP following influx of calcium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kutty, R.K.; Singh, Y.; Santostasi, G.; Krishna, G.

    1989-01-01

    Maitotoxin, one of the most potent marine toxins known, produced cell death in cultures of rat hepatocytes with a TD50 of 80 pM at 24 hr. The cell death, as indicated by a dose- and time-dependent leakage of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), was also associated with the leakage of [14C]adenine nucleotides from hepatocytes prelabeled with [14C]-adenine. The toxic effect of maitotoxin was completely abolished by the omission of calcium from the culture medium. The cell death induced by maitotoxin increased with increasing concentrations of calcium in the medium. Treatment of hepatocytes with low concentrations of the toxin (less than 0.5 ng/ml) resulted in increases in 45Ca influx into the cells. At higher concentrations of maitotoxin (greater than 1ng/ml), the initial increase in 45Ca influx was followed by the release of the 45Ca from the cells into the medium. Since the 45Ca release paralleled the LDH leakage, the release of calcium was due to cell death. The 45Ca influx, [14C]adenine nucleotide leakage, and LDH leakage were effectively inhibited by verapamil, a calcium channel blocker. Maitotoxin also induced a time- and dose-dependent loss of ATP from hepatocytes, which preceded the [14C]adenine nucleotide and LDH leakage. Thus, it appears that the cell death resulting from maitotoxin treatment is caused by the elevated intracellular calcium, which in turn inhibits mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation causing depletion of cell ATP. Loss of cell ATP may be the causative event in the maitotoxin-induced cell death

  1. Bauhinia variegata candida Fraction Induces Tumor Cell Death by Activation of Caspase-3, RIP, and TNF-R1 and Inhibits Cell Migration and Invasion In Vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. M. Santos

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Metastasis remains the most common cause of death in cancer patients. Inhibition of metalloproteinases (MMPs is an interesting approach to cancer therapy because of their role in the degradation of extracellular matrix (ECM, cell-cell, and cell-ECM interactions, modulating key events in cell migration and invasion. Herein, we show the cytotoxic and antimetastatic effects of the third fraction (FR3 from Bauhinia variegata candida (Bvc stem on human cervical tumor cells (HeLa and human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs. FR3 inhibited MMP-2 and MMP-9 activity, indicated by zymogram. This fraction was cytotoxic to HeLa cells and noncytotoxic to PBMCs and decreased HeLa cell migration and invasion. FR3 is believed to stimulate extrinsic apoptosis together with necroptosis, assessed by western blotting. FR3 inhibited MMP-2 activity in the HeLa supernatant, differently from the control. The atomic mass spectrometry (ESI-MS characterization suggested the presence of glucopyranosides, D-pinitol, fatty acids, and phenolic acid. These findings provide insight suggesting that FR3 contains components with potential tumor-selective cytotoxic action in addition to the action on the migration of tumor cells, which may be due to inhibition of MMPs.

  2. Cell death triggered by alpha-emitting 213Bi-immunoconjugates in HSC45-M2 gastric cancer cells is different from apoptotic cell death

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seidl, Christof; Schroeck, Hedwig; Seidenschwang, Sabine; Beck, Roswitha; Schwaiger, Markus; Senekowitsch-Schmidtke, Reingard; Schmid, Ernst; Abend, Michael; Becker, Karl-Friedrich; Apostolidis, Christos; Nikula, Tuomo K.; Kremmer, Elisabeth

    2005-01-01

    Radioimmunotherapy with α-particle-emitting nuclides, such as 213 Bi, is a promising concept for the elimination of small tumour nodules or single disseminated tumour cells. The aim of this study was to investigate cellular damage and the mode of cell death triggered by 213 Bi-immunoconjugates. Human gastric cancer cells (HSC45-M2) expressing d9-E-cadherin were incubated with different levels of activity of 213 Bi-d9MAb targeting d9-E-cadherin and 213 Bi-d8MAb, which does not bind to d9-E-cadherin. Micronucleated (M) cells, abnormal (A) cells and apoptotic (A) [(MAA)] cells were scored microscopically in the MAA assay following fluorescent staining of nuclei and cytoplasm. Chromosomal aberrations were analysed microscopically following Giemsa staining. The effect of z-VAD-fmk, known to inhibit apoptosis, on the prevention of cell death was investigated following treatment of HSC45-M2 cells with sorbitol as well as 213 Bi-d9MAb. Activation of caspase 3 after incubation of HSC45-M2 cells with both sorbitol and 213 Bi-d9MAb was analysed via Western blotting. Following incubation of HSC45-M2 human gastric cancer cells expressing d9-E-cadherin with 213 Bi-d9MAb the number of cells killed increased proportional to the applied activity concentration. Microscopically visible effects of α-irradiation of HSC45-M2 cells were formation of micronuclei and severe chromosomal aberrations. Preferential induction of these lesions with specific 213 Bi-d9MAb compared with unspecific 213 Bi-d8MAb (not targeting d9-E-cadherin) was not observed if the number of floating, i.e. unbound 213 Bi-immunoconjugates per cell exceeded 2 x 10 4 , most likely due to intense crossfire. In contrast to sorbitol-induced cell death, cell death triggered by 213 Bi-immunoconjugates was independent of caspase 3 activation and could not be inhibited by z-VAD-fmk, known to suppress the apoptotic pathway. 213 Bi-immunoconjugates seem to induce a mode of cell death different from apoptosis in HSC45-M2 cells

  3. Crystalline structure of pulverized dental calculus induces cell death in oral epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziauddin, S M; Yoshimura, A; Montenegro Raudales, J L; Ozaki, Y; Higuchi, K; Ukai, T; Kaneko, T; Miyazaki, T; Latz, E; Hara, Y

    2018-06-01

    Dental calculus is a mineralized deposit attached to the tooth surface. We have shown that cellular uptake of dental calculus triggers nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain-like receptor family pyrin domain-containing 3 (NLRP3) inflammasome activation, leading to the processing of the interleukin-1β precursor into its mature form in mouse and human phagocytes. The activation of the NLRP3 inflammasome also induced a lytic form of programmed cell death, pyroptosis, in these cells. However, the effects of dental calculus on other cell types in periodontal tissue have not been investigated. The aim of this study was to determine whether dental calculus can induce cell death in oral epithelial cells. HSC-2 human oral squamous carcinoma cells, HOMK107 human primary oral epithelial cells and immortalized mouse macrophages were exposed to dental calculus or 1 of its components, hydroxyapatite crystals. For inhibition assays, the cells were exposed to dental calculus in the presence or absence of cytochalasin D (endocytosis inhibitor), z-YVAD-fmk (caspase-1 inhibitor) or glyburide (NLRP3 inflammasome inhibitor). Cytotoxicity was determined by measuring lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release and staining with propidium iodide. Tumor necrosis factor-α production was quantified by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Oral epithelial barrier function was examined by permeability assay. Dental calculus induced cell death in HSC-2 cells, as judged by LDH release and propidium iodide staining. Dental calculus also induced LDH release from HOMK107 cells. Following heat treatment, dental calculus lost its capacity to induce tumor necrosis factor-α in mouse macrophages, but could induce LDH release in HSC-2 cells, indicating a major role of inorganic components in cell death. Hydroxyapatite crystals also induced cell death in both HSC-2 and HOMK107 cells, as judged by LDH release, indicating the capacity of crystal particles to induce cell death. Cell death induced by dental

  4. Transformation-associated changes in sphingolipid metabolism sensitize cells to lysosomal cell death induced by inhibitors of acid sphingomyelinase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Nikolaj H T; Olsen, Ole D; Groth-Pedersen, Line

    2013-01-01

    Lysosomal membrane permeabilization and subsequent cell death may prove useful in cancer treatment, provided that cancer cell lysosomes can be specifically targeted. Here, we identify acid sphingomyelinase (ASM) inhibition as a selective means to destabilize cancer cell lysosomes. Lysosome......-destabilizing experimental anticancer agent siramesine inhibits ASM by interfering with the binding of ASM to its essential lysosomal cofactor, bis(monoacylglycero)phosphate. Like siramesine, several clinically relevant ASM inhibitors trigger cancer-specific lysosomal cell death, reduce tumor growth in vivo, and revert...

  5. Inhibition of the sarco/endoplasmic reticulum (ER) Ca2+-ATPase by thapsigargin analogs induces cell death via ER Ca2+ depletion and the unfolded protein response

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sehgal, Pankaj; Szalai, Paula; Olesen, Claus

    2017-01-01

    Calcium (Ca2+) is a fundamental regulator of cell signaling and function. Thapsigargin (Tg) blocks the sarco/endoplasmic reticulum (ER) Ca2+-ATPase (SERCA), disrupts Ca2+ homeostasis, and causes cell death. However, the exact mechanisms whereby SERCA-inhibition induces cell death are incompletely...... extensive drainage of the ER Ca2+ stores. This Ca2+ depletion was followed by markedly reduced cell proliferation rates and morphological changes that developed over 2–4 days and culminated in cell death. Interestingly, these changes were not accompanied by bulk increases in cytosolic Ca2+ levels. Moreover...... and their detrimental effects on cell viability. Furthermore, caspase activation and cell death were associated with a sustained unfolded protein response (UPR). We conclude that ER Ca2+ drainage and sustained UPR activation are key for initiation of apoptosis at low concentrations of Tg and Tg analogs, whereas high...

  6. Inhibiting c-Jun N-terminal kinase partially attenuates caffeine-dependent cell death without alleviating the caffeine-induced reduction in mitochondrial respiration in C2C12 skeletal myotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Downs, R.M.; Hughes, M.A.; Kinsey, S.T.; Johnson, M.C.; Baumgarner, B.L.

    2016-01-01

    Caffeine is a widely consumed stimulant that has previously been shown to promote cytotoxic stress and even cell death in numerous mammalian cell lines. Thus far there is little information available regarding the toxicity of caffeine in skeletal muscle cells. Our preliminary data revealed that treating C2C12 myotubes with 5 mM caffeine for 6 h increased nuclear fragmentation and reduced basal and maximal oxygen consumption rate (OCR) in skeletal myotubes. The purpose of this study was to further elucidate the pathways by which caffeine increased cell death and reduced mitochondrial respiration. We specifically examined the role of c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), which has previously been shown to simultaneously increase caspase-dependent cell death and reduce mitochondrial respiration in other mammalian cell lines. We found that caffeine promoted a dose-dependent increase in cell death in multinucleated myotubes but did not in mononucleated myoblasts. The addition of 10 μM Z-DEVD-FMK, a specific inhibitor of executioner caspases, completely inhibited caffeine-dependent cell death. Further, the addition of 400 μM dantrolene, a specific ryanodine receptor (RYR) inhibitor, prevented the caffeine-dependent increase in cell death and the reduction in basal and maximal OCR. We also discovered that caffeine treatment significantly increased the phosphorylation of JNK and that the addition of 30 μM SP600125 (JNKi), a specific JNK inhibitor, partially attenuated caffeine-induced cell death without preventing the caffeine-dependent reduction in basal and maximal OCR. Our results suggest that JNK partially mediates the increase in caspase-dependent cell death but does not contribute to reduced mitochondrial respiration in caffeine-treated skeletal muscle cells. We conclude that caffeine increased cell death and reduced mitochondrial respiration in a calcium-dependent manner by activating the RYR and promoting reticular calcium release. - Highlights: • Caffeine

  7. Oxidative stress, mitochondrial permeability transition, and cell death in Cu-exposed trout hepatocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krumschnabel, Gerhard; Manzl, Claudia; Berger, Christian; Hofer, Bettina

    2005-01-01

    We have previously shown that, in trout hepatocytes, exposure to a high dose of copper (Cu) leads to disruption of Ca 2+ homeostasis and elevated formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), with the latter ultimately causing cell death. In the present study, we aimed at identifying, using a lower Cu concentration, the role of mitochondria in this scenario, the potential involvement of the mitochondrial permeability transition (MPT), and the mode of cell death induced by the metal. Incubation with 10 μM Cu resulted in a strong stimulation of ROS formation, and after 2 h of exposure a significant increase of both apoptotic and necrotic cells was seen. Co-incubation of Cu-treated hepatocytes with the iron-chelator deferoxamine significantly inhibited ROS production and completely prevented cell death. The origin of the radicals generated was at least partly mitochondrial, as visualized by confocal laser scanning microscopy. Furthermore, ROS production was diminished by inhibition of mitochondrial respiration, but since this also aggravated the elevation of intracellular Ca 2+ induced by Cu, it did not preserve cell viability. In a sub-population of cells, Cu induced a decrease of mitochondrial membrane potential and occurrence of the MPT. Cyclosporin A, which did not inhibit ROS formation, prevented the onset of the MPT and inhibited apoptotic, but not necrotic, cell death. Cu-induced apoptosis therefore appears to be dependent on induction of the MPT, but the prominent contribution of mitochondria to ROS generation also suggests an important role of mitochondria in necrotic cell death

  8. Thioredoxin reductase deficiency potentiates oxidative stress, mitochondrial dysfunction and cell death in dopaminergic cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pamela Lopert

    Full Text Available Mitochondria are considered major generators of cellular reactive oxygen species (ROS which are implicated in the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative diseases such as Parkinson's disease (PD. We have recently shown that isolated mitochondria consume hydrogen peroxide (H₂O₂ in a substrate- and respiration-dependent manner predominantly via the thioredoxin/peroxiredoxin (Trx/Prx system. The goal of this study was to determine the role of Trx/Prx system in dopaminergic cell death. We asked if pharmacological and lentiviral inhibition of the Trx/Prx system sensitized dopaminergic cells to mitochondrial dysfunction, increased steady-state H₂O₂ levels and death in response to toxicants implicated in PD. Incubation of N27 dopaminergic cells or primary rat mesencephalic cultures with the Trx reductase (TrxR inhibitor auranofin in the presence of sub-toxic concentrations of parkinsonian toxicants paraquat; PQ or 6-hydroxydopamine; 6OHDA (for N27 cells resulted in a synergistic increase in H₂O₂ levels and subsequent cell death. shRNA targeting the mitochondrial thioredoxin reductase (TrxR2 in N27 cells confirmed the effects of pharmacological inhibition. A synergistic decrease in maximal and reserve respiratory capacity was observed in auranofin treated cells and TrxR2 deficient cells following incubation with PQ or 6OHDA. Additionally, TrxR2 deficient cells showed decreased basal mitochondrial oxygen consumption rates. These data demonstrate that inhibition of the mitochondrial Trx/Prx system sensitizes dopaminergic cells to mitochondrial dysfunction, increased steady-state H₂O₂, and cell death. Therefore, in addition to their role in the production of cellular H₂O₂ the mitochondrial Trx/Prx system serve as a major sink for cellular H₂O₂ and its disruption may contribute to dopaminergic pathology associated with PD.

  9. Cell death triggered by alpha-emitting {sup 213}Bi-immunoconjugates in HSC45-M2 gastric cancer cells is different from apoptotic cell death

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seidl, Christof; Schroeck, Hedwig; Seidenschwang, Sabine; Beck, Roswitha; Schwaiger, Markus; Senekowitsch-Schmidtke, Reingard [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Munich (Germany); Schmid, Ernst [National Research Center for Environment and Health, Institute of Radiation Biology, GSF, Neuherberg (Germany); Abend, Michael [German Armed Forces, Institute of Radiobiology, Munich (Germany); Becker, Karl-Friedrich [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Institute of Pathology, Munich (Germany); National Research Center for Environment and Health, Institute of Pathology, GSF, Neuherberg (Germany); National Research Center for Environment and Health, Institute of Molecular Immunology, GSF, Munich (Germany); Apostolidis, Christos; Nikula, Tuomo K. [European Commission, Institute for Transuranium Elements, Karlsruhe (Germany); Kremmer, Elisabeth [National Research Center for Environment and Health, Institute of Molecular Immunology, GSF, Munich (Germany)

    2005-03-01

    Radioimmunotherapy with {alpha}-particle-emitting nuclides, such as{sup 213}Bi, is a promising concept for the elimination of small tumour nodules or single disseminated tumour cells. The aim of this study was to investigate cellular damage and the mode of cell death triggered by {sup 213}Bi-immunoconjugates. Human gastric cancer cells (HSC45-M2) expressing d9-E-cadherin were incubated with different levels of activity of {sup 213}Bi-d9MAb targeting d9-E-cadherin and {sup 213}Bi-d8MAb, which does not bind to d9-E-cadherin. Micronucleated (M) cells, abnormal (A) cells and apoptotic (A) [(MAA)] cells were scored microscopically in the MAA assay following fluorescent staining of nuclei and cytoplasm. Chromosomal aberrations were analysed microscopically following Giemsa staining. The effect of z-VAD-fmk, known to inhibit apoptosis, on the prevention of cell death was investigated following treatment of HSC45-M2 cells with sorbitol as well as {sup 213}Bi-d9MAb. Activation of caspase 3 after incubation of HSC45-M2 cells with both sorbitol and {sup 213}Bi-d9MAb was analysed via Western blotting. Following incubation of HSC45-M2 human gastric cancer cells expressing d9-E-cadherin with {sup 213}Bi-d9MAb the number of cells killed increased proportional to the applied activity concentration. Microscopically visible effects of {alpha}-irradiation of HSC45-M2 cells were formation of micronuclei and severe chromosomal aberrations. Preferential induction of these lesions with specific {sup 213}Bi-d9MAb compared with unspecific {sup 213}Bi-d8MAb (not targeting d9-E-cadherin) was not observed if the number of floating, i.e. unbound {sup 213}Bi-immunoconjugates per cell exceeded 2 x 10{sup 4}, most likely due to intense crossfire. In contrast to sorbitol-induced cell death, cell death triggered by {sup 213}Bi-immunoconjugates was independent of caspase 3 activation and could not be inhibited by z-VAD-fmk, known to suppress the apoptotic pathway. {sup 213}Bi-immunoconjugates seem

  10. MG132, a proteasome inhibitor, induces human pulmonary fibroblast cell death via increasing ROS levels and GSH depletion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Woo Hyun; Kim, Suhn Hee

    2012-04-01

    MG132 as a proteasome inhibitor can induce apoptotic cell death in lung cancer cells. However, little is known about the toxicological cellular effects of MG132 on normal primary lung cells. Here, we investigated the effects of N-acetyl cysteine (NAC) and vitamin C (well known antioxidants) or L-buthionine sulfoximine (BSO; an inhibitor of GSH synthesis) on MG132-treated human pulmonary fibroblast (HPF) cells in relation to cell death, reactive oxygen species (ROS) and glutathione (GSH). MG132 induced growth inhibition and death in HPF cells, accompanied by the loss of mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP; ∆ψm). MG132 increased ROS levels and GSH-depleted cell numbers in HPF cells. Both antioxidants, NAC and vitamin C, prevented growth inhibition, death and MMP (∆ψm) loss in MG132-treated HPF cells and also attenuated ROS levels in these cells. BSO showed a strong increase in ROS levels in MG132-treated HPF cells and slightly enhanced the growth inhibition, cell death, MMP (∆ψm) loss and GSH depletion. In addition, NAC decreased anonymous ubiquitinated protein levels in MG132-treated HPF cells. Furthermore, superoxide dismutase (SOD) 2, catalase (CTX) and GSH peroxidase (GPX) siRNAs enhanced HPF cell death by MG132, which was not correlated with ROS and GSH level changes. In conclusion, MG132 induced the growth inhibition and death of HPF cells, which were accompanied by increasing ROS levels and GSH depletion. Both NAC and vitamin C attenuated HPF cell death by MG132, whereas BSO slightly enhanced the death.

  11. Methanolic extract of white asparagus shoots activates TRAIL apoptotic death pathway in human cancer cells and inhibits colon carcinogenesis in a preclinical model

    Science.gov (United States)

    BOUSSEROUEL, SOUAD; LE GRANDOIS, JULIE; GOSSÉ, FRANCINE; WERNER, DALAL; BARTH, STEPHAN W.; MARCHIONI, ERIC; MARESCAUX, JACQUES; RAUL, FRANCIS

    2013-01-01

    Shoots of white asparagus are a popular vegetable dish, known to be rich in many bioactive phytochemicals reported to possess antioxidant, and anti-inflammatory and antitumor activities. We evaluated the anticancer mechanisms of a methanolic extract of Asparagus officinalis L. shoots (Asp) on human colon carcinoma cells (SW480) and their derived metastatic cells (SW620), and Asp chemopreventive properties were also assessed in a model of colon carcinogenesis. SW480 and SW620 cell proliferation was inhibited by 80% after exposure to Asp (80 μg/ml). We demonstrated that Asp induced cell death through the activation of TRAIL DR4/DR5 death receptors leading to the activation of caspase-8 and caspase-3 and to cell apoptosis. By specific blocking agents of DR4/DR5 receptors we were able to prevent Asp-triggered cell death confirming the key role of DR4/DR5 receptors. We found also that Asp (80 μg/ml) was able to potentiate the effects of the cytokine TRAIL on cell death even in the TRAIL-resistant metastatic SW620 cells. Colon carcinogenesis was initiated in Wistar rats by intraperitoneal injections of azoxymethane (AOM), once a week for two weeks. One week after (post-initiation) rats received daily Asp (0.01%, 14 mg/kg body weight) in drinking water. After 7 weeks of Asp-treatment the colon of rats exhibited a 50% reduction of the number of preneoplastic lesions (aberrant crypt foci). In addition Asp induced inhibition of several pro-inflammatory mediators, in association with an increased expression of host-defense mediators. In the colonic mucosa of Asp-treated rats we also confirmed the pro-apoptotic effects observed in vitro including the activation of the TRAIL death-receptor signaling pathway. Taken together, our data highlight the chemopreventive effects of Asp on colon carcinogenesis and its ability to promote normal cellular homeostasis. PMID:23754197

  12. Curcumin induces autophagic cell death in Spodoptera frugiperda cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veeran, Sethuraman; Shu, Benshui; Cui, Gaofeng; Fu, Shengjiao; Zhong, Guohua

    2017-06-01

    The increasing interest in the role of autophagy (type II cell death) in the regulation of insect toxicology has propelled study of investigating autophagic cell death pathways. Turmeric, the rhizome of the herb Curcuma longa (Mañjaḷ in Tamil, India and Jiānghuáng in Chinese) have been traditionally used for the pest control either alone or combination with other botanical pesticides. However, the mechanisms by which Curcuma longa or curcumin exerts cytotoxicity in pests are not well understood. In this study, we investigated the potency of Curcuma longa (curcumin) as a natural pesticide employing Sf9 insect line. Autophagy induction effect of curcumin on Spodoptera frugiperda (Sf9) cells was investigated using various techniques including cell proliferation assay, morphology analysis with inverted phase contrast microscope and Transmission Electron Microscope (TEM) analysis. Autophagy was evaluated using the fluorescent dye monodansylcadaverine (MDC). Cell death measurement was examined using 3-(4,5-Dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-Diphenyltetrazolium Bromide (MTT) within the concentrations of 5-15μg/mL. Curcumin inhibited the growth of the Sf9 cells and induced autophagic cell death in a time and dose dependent manner. Staining the cells with MDC showed the presence of autophagic vacuoles while increased in a dose and time dependent manner. At the ultrastructural level transmission electron microscopy, cells revealed massive autophagy vacuole accumulation and absence of chromatin condensation. Protein expression levels of ATG8-I and ATG8-II, well-established markers of autophagy related protein were elevated in a time dependent manner after curcumin treatment. The present study proves that curcumin induces autophagic cell death in Sf9 insect cell line and this is the first report of cytotoxic effect of curcumin in insect cells and that will be utilized as natural pesticides in future. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  13. Tumor necrosis factor-α inhibits effects of aryl hydrocarbon receptor ligands on cell death in human lymphocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghatrehsamani, Mahdi; Soleimani, Masoud; Esfahani, Behjat A Moayedi; Shirzad, Hedayatollah; Hakemi, Mazdak G; Mossahebimohammadi, Majid; Eskandari, Nahid; Adib, Minoo

    2015-01-01

    Activation of aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) leads to diverse outcome in various kinds of cells. AhR activation may induce apoptosis or prevent of apoptosis and cell death. Recent studies suggest that apoptosis effects of AhR can be modulated by inflammatory cytokine like tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α). In this study, we try to investigate the possible interaction of TNF-α with the 2, 3, 7, 8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD), a ligand of AhR, on peripheral lymphocytes. Human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) were isolated from peripheral blood by discontinuous density gradient centrifugation on ficoll. Isolated PBMCs were divided into four groups: Control group, TNF-α administered group, TCDD administered group, co-administered group with TCDD and TNF-α. Cells were maintained for a week in lymphocyte culture condition. Then, TNF-α was added to group 2 and 4. Finally, apoptosis and necrosis were analyzed in all samples using flowcytometry. In group 4, the mean percent of necrosis and apoptosis in TCDD treatment groups was significantly larger than other groups; (P 0.05). However, the mean percent of cell death in co-administered group with TCDD and TNF-α was significantly lower than other groups; (P < 0.05). TNF-α could significantly inhibit effects of TCDD on lymphocytes apoptosis. Combination effects of TNF-α and TCDD on lymphocyte increase cell survival.

  14. Cardiac glycosides induce cell death in human cells by inhibiting general protein synthesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Perne

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Cardiac glycosides are Na(+/K(+-pump inhibitors widely used to treat heart failure. They are also highly cytotoxic, and studies have suggested specific anti-tumor activity leading to current clinical trials in cancer patients. However, a definitive demonstration of this putative anti-cancer activity and the underlying molecular mechanism has remained elusive.Using an unbiased transcriptomics approach, we found that cardiac glycosides inhibit general protein synthesis. Protein synthesis inhibition and cytotoxicity were not specific for cancer cells as they were observed in both primary and cancer cell lines. These effects were dependent on the Na(+/K(+-pump as they were rescued by expression of a cardiac glycoside-resistant Na(+/K(+-pump. Unlike human cells, rodent cells are largely resistant to cardiac glycosides in vitro and mice were found to tolerate extremely high levels.The physiological difference between human and mouse explains the previously observed sensitivity of human cancer cells in mouse xenograft experiments. Thus, published mouse xenograft models used to support anti-tumor activity for these drugs require reevaluation. Our finding that cardiac glycosides inhibit protein synthesis provides a mechanism for the cytotoxicity of CGs and raises concerns about ongoing clinical trials to test CGs as anti-cancer agents in humans.

  15. Caspase-independent cell death mediated by apoptosis-inducing factor (AIF) nuclear translocation is involved in ionizing radiation induced HepG2 cell death

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, Hengwen [Department of Radiation, Cancer Center of Guangdong General Hospital (Guangdong Academy of Medical Science), Guangzhou, 510080, Guangdong (China); Yang, Shana; Li, Jianhua [Department of Physiology, Guangzhou Medical University, Guangzhou, 510182, Guangdong (China); Zhang, Yajie [Department of Pathology, Guangzhou Medical University, Guangzhou, 510182, Guangdong (China); Gao, Dongsheng [Department of Oncology, Guangdong Medical College Affiliated Pengpai Memorial Hospital, Hai Feng, 516400, Gungdong (China); Zhao, Shenting, E-mail: zhaoshenting@126.com [Department of Physiology, Guangzhou Medical University, Guangzhou, 510182, Guangdong (China)

    2016-03-25

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the fifth most common cancer in the world. The aim of radiotherapy is to eradicate cancer cells with ionizing radiation. Except for the caspase-dependent mechanism, several lines of evidence demonstrated that caspase-independent mechanism is directly involved in the cell death responding to irradiation. For this reason, defining the contribution of caspase-independent molecular mechanisms represents the main goal in radiotherapy. In this study, we focused on the role of apoptosis-inducing factor (AIF), the caspase-independent molecular, in ionizing radiation induced hepatocellular carcinoma cell line (HepG2) cell death. We found that ionizing radiation has no function on AIF expression in HepG2 cells, but could induce AIF release from the mitochondria and translocate into nuclei. Inhibition of AIF could reduce ionizing radiation induced HepG2 cell death. These studies strongly support a direct relationship between AIF nuclear translocation and radiation induced cell death. What's more, AIF nuclear translocation is caspase-independent manner, but not caspase-dependent manner, in this process. These new findings add a further attractive point of investigation to better define the complex interplay between caspase-independent cell death and radiation therapy. - Highlights: • AIF nuclear translocation is involved in ionizing radiation induced hepatocellular carcinoma cell line HepG2 cell death. • AIF mediated cell death induced by ionizing radiation is caspase-independent. • Caspase-independent pathway is involved in ionzing radiation induced HepG2 cell death.

  16. Caspase-independent cell death mediated by apoptosis-inducing factor (AIF) nuclear translocation is involved in ionizing radiation induced HepG2 cell death

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun, Hengwen; Yang, Shana; Li, Jianhua; Zhang, Yajie; Gao, Dongsheng; Zhao, Shenting

    2016-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the fifth most common cancer in the world. The aim of radiotherapy is to eradicate cancer cells with ionizing radiation. Except for the caspase-dependent mechanism, several lines of evidence demonstrated that caspase-independent mechanism is directly involved in the cell death responding to irradiation. For this reason, defining the contribution of caspase-independent molecular mechanisms represents the main goal in radiotherapy. In this study, we focused on the role of apoptosis-inducing factor (AIF), the caspase-independent molecular, in ionizing radiation induced hepatocellular carcinoma cell line (HepG2) cell death. We found that ionizing radiation has no function on AIF expression in HepG2 cells, but could induce AIF release from the mitochondria and translocate into nuclei. Inhibition of AIF could reduce ionizing radiation induced HepG2 cell death. These studies strongly support a direct relationship between AIF nuclear translocation and radiation induced cell death. What's more, AIF nuclear translocation is caspase-independent manner, but not caspase-dependent manner, in this process. These new findings add a further attractive point of investigation to better define the complex interplay between caspase-independent cell death and radiation therapy. - Highlights: • AIF nuclear translocation is involved in ionizing radiation induced hepatocellular carcinoma cell line HepG2 cell death. • AIF mediated cell death induced by ionizing radiation is caspase-independent. • Caspase-independent pathway is involved in ionzing radiation induced HepG2 cell death.

  17. Glutathione peroxidase 4 overexpression inhibits ROS-induced cell death in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinowaki, Yuko; Kurata, Morito; Ishibashi, Sachiko; Ikeda, Masumi; Tatsuzawa, Anna; Yamamoto, Masahide; Miura, Osamu; Kitagawa, Masanobu; Yamamoto, Kouhei

    2018-02-20

    Regulation of oxidative stress and redox systems has important roles in carcinogenesis and cancer progression, and for this reason has attracted much attention as a new area of cancer therapeutic targets. Glutathione peroxidase 4 (GPX4), an antioxidant enzyme, has biological important functions such as signaling cell death by suppressing peroxidation of membrane phospholipids. However, few studies exist on the expression and clinical relevance of GPX4 in malignant lymphomas such as diffuse large B-cell lymphoma. In this study, we assessed the expression of GPX4 immunohistochemically. GPX4 was expressed in 35.5% (33/93) cases of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma. The GPX4-positive group had poor overall survival (P = 0.0032) and progression-free survival (P = 0.0004) compared with those of the GPX4-negative group. In a combined analysis of GPX4 and 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine (8-OHdG), an oxidative stress marker, there was a negative correlation between GPX4 and 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine (P = 0.0009). The GPX4-positive and 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine-negative groups had a significantly worse prognosis than the other groups in both overall survival (P = 0.0170) and progression-free survival (P = 0.0005). These results suggest that the overexpression of GPX4 is an independent prognostic predictor in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma. Furthermore, in vitro analysis demonstrated that GPX4-overexpressing cells were resistant to reactive oxygen species-induced cell death (P = 0.0360). Conversely, GPX4-knockdown cells were sensitive to reactive oxygen species-induced cell death (P = 0.0111). From these data, we conclude that GPX4 regulates reactive oxygen species-induced cell death. Our results suggest a novel therapeutic strategy using the mechanism of ferroptosis, as well as a novel prognostic predictor of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma.

  18. Hydroxychavicol, a key ingredient of Piper betle induces bacterial cell death by DNA damage and inhibition of cell division.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Deepti; Narayanamoorthy, Shwetha; Gamre, Sunita; Majumdar, Ananda Guha; Goswami, Manish; Gami, Umesh; Cherian, Susan; Subramanian, Mahesh

    2018-05-20

    Antibiotic resistance is a global problem and there is an urgent need to augment the arsenal against pathogenic bacteria. The emergence of different drug resistant bacteria is threatening human lives to be pushed towards the pre-antibiotic era. Botanical sources remain a vital source of diverse organic molecules that possess antibacterial property as well as augment existing antibacterial molecules. Piper betle, a climber, is widely used in south and south-east Asia whose leaves and nuts are consumed regularly. Hydroxychavicol (HC) isolated from Piper betle has been reported to possess antibacterial activity. It is currently not clear how the antibacterial activity of HC is manifested. In this investigation we show HC generates superoxide in E. coli cells. Antioxidants protected E. coli against HC induced cell death while gshA mutant was more sensitive to HC than wild type. DNA damage repair deficient mutants are hypersensitive to HC and HC induces the expression of DNA damage repair genes that repair oxidative DNA damage. HC treated E. coli cells are inhibited from growth and undergo DNA condensation. In vitro HC binds to DNA and cleaves it in presence of copper. Our data strongly indicates HC mediates bacterial cell death by ROS generation and DNA damage. Damage to iron sulfur proteins in the cells contribute to amplification of oxidative stress initiated by HC. Further HC is active against a number of Gram negative bacteria isolated from patients with a wide range of clinical symptoms and varied antibiotic resistance profiles. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Induction of cell death by chemotherapeutic methylating agents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quiros Barrantes, Steve

    2012-01-01

    The mechanism of cell death induced by O 6 MeG has been investigated and inhibition of homologous recombination as a strategy for sensitization of tumor cells against methylating agents S N 1. Dependence of the cell cycle was determined toxic responses triggered by O''6 MeG and evaluated by proliferation assays if apoptotic cells have originated exclusively from the second post-treatment cycle. Dependence of O''6 MeG was found at DSB formation. The activation of the control points of the cell cycle and induction of apoptosis is generated during the second cell cycle. Additionally, a portion of the cells has been determined that triggers apoptosis in subsequent generations in the second cell cycle. Inhibition of homologous recombination has been a reasonable strategy to increase S N 1 alkylating agent effectiveness. Evidence has been provided in NHEJ dependent inhibition of DNA-PK that not significantly sensitizes the glioblastoma cells against temozolomide [es

  20. Cell death in neural precursor cells and neurons before neurite formation prevents the emergence of abnormal neural structures in the Drosophila optic lobe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hara, Yusuke; Sudo, Tatsuya; Togane, Yu; Akagawa, Hiromi; Tsujimura, Hidenobu

    2018-04-01

    Programmed cell death is a conserved strategy for neural development both in vertebrates and invertebrates and is recognized at various developmental stages in the brain from neurogenesis to adulthood. To understand the development of the central nervous system, it is essential to reveal not only molecular mechanisms but also the role of neural cell death (Pinto-Teixeira et al., 2016). To understand the role of cell death in neural development, we investigated the effect of inhibition of cell death on optic lobe development. Our data demonstrate that, in the optic lobe of Drosophila, cell death occurs in neural precursor cells and neurons before neurite formation and functions to prevent various developmental abnormalities. When neuronal cell death was inhibited by an effector caspase inhibitor, p35, multiple abnormal neuropil structures arose during optic lobe development-e.g., enlarged or fused neuropils, misrouted neurons and abnormal neurite lumps. Inhibition of cell death also induced morphogenetic defects in the lamina and medulla development-e.g., failures in the separation of the lamina and medulla cortices and the medulla rotation. These defects were reproduced in the mutant of an initiator caspase, dronc. If cell death was a mechanism for removing the abnormal neuropil structures, we would also expect to observe them in mutants defective for corpse clearance. However, they were not observed in these mutants. When dead cell-membranes were visualized with Apoliner, they were observed only in cortices and not in neuropils. These results suggest that the cell death occurs before mature neurite formation. Moreover, we found that inhibition of cell death induced ectopic neuroepithelial cells, neuroblasts and ganglion mother cells in late pupal stages, at sites where the outer and inner proliferation centers were located at earlier developmental stages. Caspase-3 activation was observed in the neuroepithelial cells and neuroblasts in the proliferation centers

  1. Insulin receptor substrate-1 prevents autophagy-dependent cell death caused by oxidative stress in mouse NIH/3T3 cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chan Shih-Hung

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Insulin receptor substrate (IRS-1 is associated with tumorigenesis; its levels are elevated in several human cancers. IRS-1 protein binds to several oncogene proteins. Oxidative stress and reactive oxygen species (ROS are involved in the initiation and progression of cancers. Cancer cells produce greater levels of ROS than normal cells do because of increased metabolic stresses. However, excessive production of ROS kills cancer cells. Autophagy usually serves as a survival mechanism in response to stress conditions, but excessive induction of autophagy results in cell death. In addition to inducing necrosis and apoptosis, ROS induces autophagic cell death. ROS inactivates IRS-1 mediated signaling and reduces intracellular IRS-1 concentrations. Thus, there is a complex relationship between IRS-1, ROS, autophagy, and cancer. It is not fully understood how cancer cells grow rapidly and survive in the presence of high ROS levels. Methods and results In this study, we established mouse NIH/3T3 cells that overexpressed IRS-1, so mimicking cancers with increased IRS-1 expression levels; we found that the IRS-1 overexpressing cells grow more rapidly than control cells do. Treatment of cells with glucose oxidase (GO provided a continuous source of ROS; low dosages of GO promoted cell growth, while high doses induced cell death. Evidence for GO induced autophagy includes increased levels of isoform B-II microtubule-associated protein 1 light chain 3 (LC3, aggregation of green fluorescence protein-tagged LC3, and increased numbers of autophagic vacuoles in cells. Overexpression of IRS-1 resulted in inhibition of basal autophagy, and reduced oxidative stress-induced autophagy and cell death. ROS decreased the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR/p70 ribosomal protein S6 kinase signaling, while overexpression of IRS-1 attenuated this inhibition. Knockdown of autophagy-related gene 5 inhibited basal autophagy and diminished oxidative stress

  2. Induction of apoptotic cell death by putrescine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Takao, Koichi; Rickhag, Karl Mattias; Hegardt, Cecilia

    2006-01-01

    that overexpression of a metabolically stable ODC in CHO cells induced a massive cell death unless the cells were grown in the presence of the ODC inhibitor alpha-difluoromethylornithine (DFMO). Cells overexpressing wild-type (unstable) ODC, on the other hand, were not dependent on the presence of DFMO...... for their growth. The induction of cell death was correlated with a dramatic increase in cellular putrescine levels. Analysis using flow cytometry revealed perturbed cell cycle kinetics, with a large accumulation of cells with sub-G1 amounts of DNA, which is a typical sign of apoptosis. Another strong indication...... of apoptosis was the finding that one of the key enzymes in the apoptotic process, caspase-3, was induced when DFMO was omitted from the growth medium. Furthermore, inhibition of the caspase activity significantly reduced the recruitment of cells to the sub-G1 fraction. In conclusion, deregulation of polyamine...

  3. Cylindromatosis mediates neuronal cell death in vitro and in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganjam, Goutham K; Terpolilli, Nicole Angela; Diemert, Sebastian; Eisenbach, Ina; Hoffmann, Lena; Reuther, Christina; Herden, Christiane; Roth, Joachim; Plesnila, Nikolaus; Culmsee, Carsten

    2018-01-19

    The tumor-suppressor cylindromatosis (CYLD) is a deubiquitinating enzyme and key regulator of cell proliferation and inflammation. A genome-wide siRNA screen linked CYLD to receptor interacting protein-1 (RIP1) kinase-mediated necroptosis; however, the exact mechanisms of CYLD-mediated cell death remain unknown. Therefore, we investigated the precise role of CYLD in models of neuronal cell death in vitro and evaluated whether CYLD deletion affects brain injury in vivo. In vitro, downregulation of CYLD increased RIP1 ubiquitination, prevented RIP1/RIP3 complex formation, and protected neuronal cells from oxidative death. Similar protective effects were achieved by siRNA silencing of RIP1 or RIP3 or by pharmacological inhibition of RIP1 with necrostatin-1. In vivo, CYLD knockout mice were protected from trauma-induced brain damage compared to wild-type littermate controls. These findings unravel the mechanisms of CYLD-mediated cell death signaling in damaged neurons in vitro and suggest a cell death-mediating role of CYLD in vivo.

  4. Secretory phospholipase A2-mediated neuronal cell death involves glutamate ionotropic receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kolko, Miriam; de Turco, Elena B; Diemer, Nils Henrik

    2002-01-01

    To define the significance of glutamate ionotropic receptors in sPLA -mediated neuronal cell death we used the NMDA receptor antagonist MK-801 and the AMPA receptor antagonist PNQX. In primary neuronal cell cultures both MK-801 and PNQX inhibited sPLA - and glutamate-induced neuronal death. [ H...

  5. IGF-1 protects against Aβ25-35-induced neuronal cell death via inhibition of PUMA expression and Bax activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Xunyao; Jin, Yan; Chen, Jian; Hong, Yan; Luo, Dingzhen; Yin, Qingqing; Liu, Xueping

    2017-01-10

    Amyloid-β-peptide (Aβ) is considered to be the toxic species in AD and causes cell death in the affected areas of patient's brain. Insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) has been reported to attenuate Aβ toxicity in neuronal cells. However, the molecular mechanisms involved in the neuroprotective function of IGF-1 remain largely unknown. In the present study, we for the first time demonstrated that IGF-1 protects against Aβ-induced neurotoxicity via inhibition of PUMA expression and Bax activation. We found that IGF-1 could activate Akt, which in turn inhibited Aβ-induced FOXO3a nuclear translocation and thus decreased the binding ability of FOXO3a to PUMA promoter, leading to decreased PUMA expression. In addition, IGF-1 inhibited the translocation of Bax to the mitochondria induced by Aβ. Notably, addition of wortmannin, a specific inhibitor of PI3K, significantly abolished the neuroprotective effect of IGF-1, suggesting that IGF-1 exerts its anti-apoptotic effect depend on PI3K activity. Our findings may provide new insights into molecular mechanisms mediated by IGF-1 in cell survival against Aβ-induced apoptosis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Induction of reactive oxygen intermediates-dependent programmed cell death in human malignant ex vivo glioma cells and inhibition of the vascular endothelial growth factor production by taurolidine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodak, Roksana; Kubota, Hisashi; Ishihara, Hideyuki; Eugster, Hans-Pietro; Könü, Dilek; Möhler, Hanns; Yonekawa, Yasuhiro; Frei, Karl

    2005-06-01

    Taurolidine, a derivative of the amino acid taurin, was recently found to display a potent antineoplastic effect both in vitro and in vivo. The authors therefore initiated studies to assess the potential antineoplastic activity of taurolidine in human glioma cell lines and in ex vivo malignant cell cultures. They also studied the mechanisms that induce cell death and the impact of taurolidine on tumor-derived vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) production. Cytotoxicity and clonogenic assays were performed using crystal violet staining. In the cytotoxicity assay 100% of glioma cell lines (eight of eight) and 74% of ex vivo glioma cultures (14 of 19) demonstrated sensitivity to taurolidine, with a mean median effective concentration (EC50) of 51 +/- 28 microg/ml and 56 +/- 23 microg/ml, respectively. Colony formation was inhibited by taurolidine, with a mean EC50 of 7 +/- 3 microg/ml for the cell lines and a mean EC50 of 3.5 +/- 1.7 microg/ml for the ex vivo glioma cultures. On observing this high activity of taurolidine in both assays, the authors decided to evaluate its cell death mechanisms. Fragmentation of DNA, externalization of phosphatidylserine, activation of poly(adenosine diphosphate-ribose) polymerase, loss of the mitochondrial membrane potential followed by a release of apoptosis-inducing factor, and typical apoptotic features were found after taurolidine treatment. Cell death was preceded by the generation of reactive O2 intermediates, which was abrogated by N-acetylcysteine but not by benzyloxycarbonyl-Val-Ala-Asp-fluoromethylketone. Moreover, taurolidine also induced suppression of VEGF production on the protein and messenger RNA level, as shown by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. Given all these findings, taurolidine may be a promising new agent in the treatment of malignant gliomas; it displays a combination of antineoplastic and antiangiogenic activities, inducing tumor cell

  7. Chloroplasts activity and PAP-signaling regulate programmed cell death in Arabidopsis

    KAUST Repository

    Bruggeman, Quentin

    2016-01-09

    Programmed cell death (PCD) is a crucial process both for plant development and responses to biotic and abiotic stress. There is accumulating evidence that chloroplasts may play a central role during plant PCD as for mitochondria in animal cells, but it is still unclear whether they participate in PCD onset, execution, or both. To tackle this question, we have analyzed the contribution of chloroplast function to the cell death phenotype of the myoinositol phosphate synthase1 (mips1) mutant that forms spontaneous lesions in a light-dependent manner. We show that photosynthetically active chloroplasts are required for PCD to occur in mips1, but this process is independent of the redox state of the chloroplast. Systematic genetic analyses with retrograde signaling mutants reveal that 3’-phosphoadenosine 5’-phosphate, a chloroplast retrograde signal that modulates nuclear gene expression in response to stress, can inhibit cell death and compromises plant innate immunity via inhibition of the RNA-processing 5’-3’ exoribonucleases. Our results provide evidence for the role of chloroplast-derived signal and RNA metabolism in the control of cell death and biotic stress response. © 2016 American Society of Plant Biologists. All Rights Reserved.

  8. Characterization of a serine protease-mediated cell death program activated in human leukemia cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Connell, A.R.; Holohan, C.; Torriglia, A.; Lee, B.F.; Stenson-Cox, C.

    2006-01-01

    Tightly controlled proteolysis is a defining feature of apoptosis and caspases are critical in this regard. Significant roles for non-caspase proteases in cell death have been highlighted. Staurosporine causes a rapid induction of apoptosis in virtually all mammalian cell types. Numerous studies demonstrate that staurosporine can activate cell death under caspase-inhibiting circumstances. The aim of this study was to investigate the proteolytic mechanisms responsible for cell death under these conditions. To that end, we show that inhibitors of serine proteases can delay cell death in one such system. Furthermore, through profiling of proteolytic activation, we demonstrate, for the first time, that staurosporine activates a chymotrypsin-like serine protease-dependent cell death in HL-60 cells independently, but in parallel with the caspase controlled systems. Features of the serine protease-mediated system include cell shrinkage and apoptotic morphology, regulation of caspase-3, altered nuclear morphology, generation of an endonuclease and DNA degradation. We also demonstrate a staurosporine-induced activation of a putative 16 kDa chymotrypsin-like protein during apoptosis

  9. Leptin suppresses non-apoptotic cell death in ischemic rat cardiomyocytes by reduction of iPLA2 activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takatani-Nakase, Tomoka; Takahashi, Koichi

    2015-01-01

    Caspase-independent, non-apoptotic cell death is an important therapeutic target in myocardial ischemia. Leptin, an adipose-derived hormone, is known to exhibit cytoprotective effects on the ischemic heart, but the mechanisms are poorly understood. In this research, we found that pretreatment of leptin strongly suppressed ischemic-augmented nuclear shrinkage and non-apoptotic cell death on cardiomyocytes. Leptin was also shown to significantly inhibit the activity of iPLA 2 , which is considered to play crucial roles in non-apoptotic cell death, resulting in effective prevention of ischemia-induced myocyte death. These findings provide the first evidence of a protective mechanism of leptin against ischemia-induced non-apoptotic cardiomyocyte death. - Highlights: • Myocardial ischemia-model induces in caspase-independent, non-apoptotic cell death. • Leptin strongly inhibits ischemic-augmented non-apoptotic cell death. • Leptin reduces iPLA 2 activity, leading to avoidance of non-apoptotic cell death

  10. Triglyceride-induced macrophage cell death is triggered by caspase-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Son, Sin Jee; Rhee, Ki-Jong; Lim, Jaewon; Kim, Tae Ue; Kim, Tack-Joong; Kim, Yoon Suk

    2013-01-01

    Triglyceride (TG) induces macrophage cell death which contributes to the development of atherosclerosis. We confirmed that exogenous TG accumulates in human THP-1 macrophages and causes cell death. TG treated THP-1 macrophages exhibited no change in tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, interleukin (IL)-18, macrophage inflammatory protein (MIP)-1α, and IL-1R1 receptor mRNA expression. However, there was a marked decrease in IL-1β mRNA expression but an increase in IL-1β protein secretion. Decreased expression of IL-1β mRNA and increased secretion of IL-1β protein was not the direct cause of cell death. Until now, TG was assumed to induce necrotic cell death in macrophages. Since caspase-1 is known to be involved in activation and secretion of IL-1β protein and pyroptotic cell death, next we determined whether caspase-1 is associated with TG-induced macrophage cell death. We found an increase in caspase-1 activity in TG-treated THP-1 macrophages and inhibition of caspase-1 activity using a specific inhibitor partially rescued cell death. These results suggest activation of the pyroptotic pathway by TG. This is the first report implicating the activation of caspase-1 and the triggering of the pyroptosis pathway in TG-induced macrophage cell death.

  11. Rip3 knockdown rescues photoreceptor cell death in blind pde6c zebrafish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viringipurampeer, I A; Shan, X; Gregory-Evans, K; Zhang, J P; Mohammadi, Z; Gregory-Evans, C Y

    2014-05-01

    Achromatopsia is a progressive autosomal recessive retinal disease characterized by early loss of cone photoreceptors and later rod photoreceptor loss. In most cases, mutations have been identified in CNGA3, CNGB3, GNAT2, PDE6C or PDE6H genes. Owing to this genetic heterogeneity, mutation-independent therapeutic schemes aimed at preventing cone cell death are very attractive treatment strategies. In pde6c(w59) mutant zebrafish, cone photoreceptors expressed high levels of receptor-interacting protein kinase 1 (RIP1) and receptor-interacting protein kinase 3 (RIP3) kinases, key regulators of necroptotic cell death. In contrast, rod photoreceptor cells were alternatively immunopositive for caspase-3 indicating activation of caspase-dependent apoptosis in these cells. Morpholino gene knockdown of rip3 in pde6c(w59) embryos rescued the dying cone photoreceptors by inhibiting the formation of reactive oxygen species and by inhibiting second-order neuron remodelling in the inner retina. In rip3 morphant larvae, visual function was restored in the cones by upregulation of the rod phosphodiesterase genes (pde6a and pde6b), compensating for the lack of cone pde6c suggesting that cones are able to adapt to their local environment. Furthermore, we demonstrated through pharmacological inhibition of RIP1 and RIP3 activity that cone cell death was also delayed. Collectively, these results demonstrate that the underlying mechanism of cone cell death in the pde6c(w59) mutant retina is through necroptosis, whereas rod photoreceptor bystander death occurs through a caspase-dependent mechanism. This suggests that targeting the RIP kinase signalling pathway could be an effective therapeutic intervention in retinal degeneration patients. As bystander cell death is an important feature of many retinal diseases, combinatorial approaches targeting different cell death pathways may evolve as an important general principle in treatment.

  12. Ultra-violet B (UVB)-induced skin cell death occurs through a cyclophilin D intrinsic signaling pathway

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ji, Chao; Yang, Bo; Yang, Zhi; Tu, Ying; Yang, Yan-li; He, Li; Bi, Zhi-Gang

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► UVB radiated skin keratinocytes show cyclophilin D (Cyp-D) upregulation. ► NAC inhibits UVB induced Cyp-D expression, while H 2 O 2 facilitates it. ► Cyp-D-deficient cells are significantly less susceptible to UVB induced cell death. ► Over-expression of Cyp-D causes spontaneous keratinocytes cell death. -- Abstract: UVB-induced skin cell damage involves the opening of mitochondrial permeability transition pore (mPTP), which leads to both apoptotic and necrotic cell death. Cyclophilin D (Cyp-D) translocation to the inner membrane of mitochondrion acts as a key component to open the mPTP. Our Western-Blot results in primary cultured human skin keratinocytes and in HaCaT cell line demonstrated that UVB radiation and hydrogen peroxide (H 2 O 2 ) induced Cyp-D expression, which was inhibited by anti-oxidant N-acetyl cysteine (NAC). We created a stable Cyp-D deficiency skin keratinocytes by expressing Cyp-D-shRNA through lentiviral infection. Cyp-D-deficient cells were significantly less susceptible than their counterparts to UVB- or H 2 O 2 -induced cell death. Further, cyclosporine A (Cs-A), a Cyp-D inhibitor, inhibited UVB- or H 2 O 2 -induced keratinocytes cell death. Reversely, over-expression of Cyp-D in primary keratinocytes caused spontaneous keratinocytes cell death. These results suggest Cyp-D’s critical role in UVB/oxidative stress-induced skin cell death.

  13. Chikungunya virus–induced autophagy delays caspase-dependent cell death

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joubert, Pierre-Emmanuel; Werneke, Scott W.; de la Calle, Claire; Guivel-Benhassine, Florence; Giodini, Alessandra; Peduto, Lucie; Levine, Beth; Schwartz, Olivier; Lenschow, Deborah J.

    2012-01-01

    Autophagy is an important survival pathway and can participate in the host response to infection. Studying Chikungunya virus (CHIKV), the causative agent of a major epidemic in India, Southeast Asia, and southern Europe, we reveal a novel mechanism by which autophagy limits cell death and mortality after infection. We use biochemical studies and single cell multispectral assays to demonstrate that direct infection triggers both apoptosis and autophagy. CHIKV-induced autophagy is mediated by the independent induction of endoplasmic reticulum and oxidative stress pathways. These cellular responses delay apoptotic cell death by inducing the IRE1α–XBP-1 pathway in conjunction with ROS-mediated mTOR inhibition. Silencing of autophagy genes resulted in enhanced intrinsic and extrinsic apoptosis, favoring viral propagation in cultured cells. Providing in vivo evidence for the relevance of our findings, Atg16LHM mice, which display reduced levels of autophagy, exhibited increased lethality and showed a higher sensitivity to CHIKV-induced apoptosis. Based on kinetic studies and the observation that features of apoptosis and autophagy were mutually exclusive, we conclude that autophagy inhibits caspase-dependent cell death but is ultimately overwhelmed by viral replication. Our study suggests that inducers of autophagy may limit the pathogenesis of acute Chikungunya disease. PMID:22508836

  14. Apoptosis-inducing factor plays a critical role in caspase-independent, pyknotic cell death in hydrogen peroxide-exposed cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Son, Young-Ok; Jang, Yong-Suk; Heo, Jung-Sun; Chung, Wan-Tae; Choi, Ki-Choon; Lee, Jeong-Chae

    2009-06-01

    It has been proposed that continuously generated hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) inhibits typical apoptosis and instead initiates an alternate, apoptosis-inducing factor (AIF)-dependent process. Aside from the role of AIF, however, the detailed morphological characterization of H(2)O(2)-induced cell death is not complete. This study examined the cellular mechanism(s) by which the continuous presence of H(2)O(2) induces cell death. We also further analyzed the precise role of AIF by inhibiting its expression with siRNA. Exposure of cells to H(2)O(2) generated by glucose oxidase caused mitochondrion-mediated, caspase-independent cell death. In addition, H(2)O(2) exposure resulted in cell shrinkage and chromatin condensation without nuclear fragmentation, indicating that H(2)O(2) stimulates a pyknotic cell death. Further analysis of AIF-transfected cells clearly demonstrated that nuclear translocation of AIF is the most important event required for nuclear condensation, phosphatidyl serine translocation, and ultimately cell death in H(2)O(2)-exposed cells. Furthermore, ATP was rapidly and severely depleted in cells exposed to H(2)O(2) generated by glucose oxidase but not by H(2)O(2) added as a bolus. Suppression of the H(2)O(2)-mediated ATP depletion by 3-aminobenzamide led to a significant increase of nuclear fragmentation in glucose oxidase-exposed cells. Collectively, these findings suggest that an acute energy reduction by H(2)O(2) causes caspase-independent and AIF-dependent cell death.

  15. The Phosphodiesterase 4 Inhibitor Roflumilast Protects against Cigarette Smoke Extract-Induced Mitophagy-Dependent Cell Death in Epithelial Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kyung, Sun Young; Kim, Yu Jin; Son, Eun Suk; Jeong, Sung Hwan; Park, Jeong Woong

    2018-04-01

    Recent studies show that mitophagy, the autophagy-dependent turnover of mitochondria, mediates pulmonary epithelial cell death in response to cigarette smoke extract (CSE) exposure and contributes to the development of emphysema in vivo during chronic cigarette smoke (CS) exposure, although the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. In this study, we investigated the role of mitophagy in the regulation of CSE-exposed lung bronchial epithelial cell (Beas-2B) death. We also investigated the role of a phosphodiesterase 4 inhibitor, roflumilast, in CSE-induced mitophagy-dependent cell death. Our results demonstrated that CSE induces mitophagy in Beas-2B cells through mitochondrial dysfunction and increased the expression levels of the mitophagy regulator protein, PTEN-induced putative kinase-1 (PINK1), and the mitochondrial fission protein, dynamin-1-like protein (DRP1). CSE-induced epithelial cell death was significantly increased in Beas-2B cells exposed to CSE but was decreased by small interfering RNA-dependent knockdown of DRP1. Treatment with roflumilast in Beas-2B cells inhibited CSE-induced mitochondrial dysfunction and mitophagy by inhibiting the expression of phospho-DRP1 and -PINK1. Roflumilast protected against cell death and increased cell viability, as determined by the lactate dehydrogenase release test and the MTT assay, respectively, in Beas-2B cells exposed to CSE. These findings suggest that roflumilast plays a protective role in CS-induced mitophagy-dependent cell death. Copyright©2018. The Korean Academy of Tuberculosis and Respiratory Diseases.

  16. Hepatic leukemia factor promotes resistance to cell death: Implications for therapeutics and chronotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waters, Katrina M.; Sontag, Ryan L.; Weber, Thomas J.

    2013-01-01

    Physiological variation related to circadian rhythms and aberrant gene expression patterns are believed to modulate therapeutic efficacy, but the precise molecular determinants remain unclear. Here we examine the regulation of cell death by hepatic leukemia factor (HLF), which is an output regulator of circadian rhythms and is aberrantly expressed in human cancers, using an ectopic expression strategy in JB6 mouse epidermal cells and human keratinocytes. Ectopic HLF expression inhibited cell death in both JB6 cells and human keratinocytes, as induced by serum-starvation, tumor necrosis factor alpha and ionizing radiation. Microarray analysis indicates that HLF regulates a complex multi-gene transcriptional program encompassing upregulation of anti-apoptotic genes, downregulation of pro-apoptotic genes, and many additional changes that are consistent with an anti-death program. Collectively, our results demonstrate that ectopic expression of HLF, an established transcription factor that cycles with circadian rhythms, can recapitulate many features associated with circadian-dependent physiological variation. - Highlights: ► Circadian-dependent physiological variation impacts therapeutic efficacy. ► Hepatic leukemia factor inhibits cell death and is a candidate circadian factor. ► Hepatic leukemia factor anti-death program is conserved in murine and human cells. ► Transcriptomics indicates the anti-death program results from a systems response

  17. Hepatic leukemia factor promotes resistance to cell death: Implications for therapeutics and chronotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Waters, Katrina M. [Computational Biology and Bioinformatics, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA 99354 (United States); Sontag, Ryan L. [Systems Toxicology Groups, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA 99354 (United States); Weber, Thomas J., E-mail: Thomas.Weber@pnl.gov [Systems Toxicology Groups, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA 99354 (United States)

    2013-04-15

    Physiological variation related to circadian rhythms and aberrant gene expression patterns are believed to modulate therapeutic efficacy, but the precise molecular determinants remain unclear. Here we examine the regulation of cell death by hepatic leukemia factor (HLF), which is an output regulator of circadian rhythms and is aberrantly expressed in human cancers, using an ectopic expression strategy in JB6 mouse epidermal cells and human keratinocytes. Ectopic HLF expression inhibited cell death in both JB6 cells and human keratinocytes, as induced by serum-starvation, tumor necrosis factor alpha and ionizing radiation. Microarray analysis indicates that HLF regulates a complex multi-gene transcriptional program encompassing upregulation of anti-apoptotic genes, downregulation of pro-apoptotic genes, and many additional changes that are consistent with an anti-death program. Collectively, our results demonstrate that ectopic expression of HLF, an established transcription factor that cycles with circadian rhythms, can recapitulate many features associated with circadian-dependent physiological variation. - Highlights: ► Circadian-dependent physiological variation impacts therapeutic efficacy. ► Hepatic leukemia factor inhibits cell death and is a candidate circadian factor. ► Hepatic leukemia factor anti-death program is conserved in murine and human cells. ► Transcriptomics indicates the anti-death program results from a systems response.

  18. Effects of epigallocatechin gallate on ultra-violet-induced cell death in PC12 cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, Hideo; Seki, Sakiko; Sakamoto, Naotaka; Nakagawa, Shigeki

    2002-01-01

    We examined the effects of catechin on ultra-violet-induced cell death in PC12 cells. PC12 cells were irradiated by ultra-violet C (254 nm) (UVC). We found that the lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) activities in culture media and lipid peroxide in PC12 cells, which indicate cell death and cell membrane damage, respectively, were increased by UVC irradiation in a time-dependent manner. Cell death was gradually stimulated for 9 hours of cultivation after a UVC irradiation period of 10 or 30 min. Epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG), which is one of the main catechins found in green tea, suppressed the increase in LDH activity in culture medium and also inhibited the formation of lipid peroxide. IκB, a member of the cell death signaling system, was phosphorylated at 1 hour after 10 min of UVC irradiation. Stimulation of phosphorylation of IκB by UVC was suppressed by the addition of EGCG. We concluded that EGCG protects the PC12 cell from cell damage caused by UVC irradiation. (author)

  19. Leptin suppresses non-apoptotic cell death in ischemic rat cardiomyocytes by reduction of iPLA{sub 2} activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takatani-Nakase, Tomoka, E-mail: nakase@mukogawa-u.ac.jp; Takahashi, Koichi, E-mail: koichi@mukogawa-u.ac.jp

    2015-07-17

    Caspase-independent, non-apoptotic cell death is an important therapeutic target in myocardial ischemia. Leptin, an adipose-derived hormone, is known to exhibit cytoprotective effects on the ischemic heart, but the mechanisms are poorly understood. In this research, we found that pretreatment of leptin strongly suppressed ischemic-augmented nuclear shrinkage and non-apoptotic cell death on cardiomyocytes. Leptin was also shown to significantly inhibit the activity of iPLA{sub 2}, which is considered to play crucial roles in non-apoptotic cell death, resulting in effective prevention of ischemia-induced myocyte death. These findings provide the first evidence of a protective mechanism of leptin against ischemia-induced non-apoptotic cardiomyocyte death. - Highlights: • Myocardial ischemia-model induces in caspase-independent, non-apoptotic cell death. • Leptin strongly inhibits ischemic-augmented non-apoptotic cell death. • Leptin reduces iPLA{sub 2} activity, leading to avoidance of non-apoptotic cell death.

  20. Inhibition of neutral sphingomyelinase decreases elevated levels of inducible nitric oxide synthase and apoptotic cell death in ocular hypertensive rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aslan, Mutay, E-mail: mutayaslan@akdeniz.edu.tr [Department of Medical Biochemistry, Akdeniz University Faculty of Medicine, Antalya (Turkey); Basaranlar, Goksun [Department of Biophysics, Akdeniz University Faculty of Medicine, Antalya (Turkey); Unal, Mustafa [Department of Ophthalmology, Akdeniz University Faculty of Medicine, Antalya (Turkey); Ciftcioglu, Akif [Department of Pathology, Akdeniz University Faculty of Medicine, Antalya (Turkey); Derin, Narin [Department of Biophysics, Akdeniz University Faculty of Medicine, Antalya (Turkey); Mutus, Bulent [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of Windsor, Windsor, Ontario (Canada)

    2014-11-01

    Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and excessive nitric oxide production via induction of inducible nitric oxide synthase (NOS2) have been implicated in the pathogenesis of neuronal retinal cell death in ocular hypertension. Neutral sphingomyelinase (N-SMase)/ceramide pathway can regulate NOS2 expression, hence this study determined the role of selective neutral sphingomyelinase (N-SMase) inhibition on retinal NOS2 levels, ER stress, apoptosis and visual evoked potentials (VEPs) in a rat model of elevated intraocular pressure (EIOP). NOS2 expression and retinal protein nitration were significantly greater in EIOP and significantly decreased with N-SMase inhibition. A significant increase was observed in retinal ER stress markers pPERK, CHOP and GRP78 in EIOP, which were not significantly altered by N-SMase inhibition. Retinal TUNEL staining showed increased apoptosis in all EIOP groups; however N-SMase inhibition significantly decreased the percent of apoptotic cells in EIOP. Caspase-3, -8 and -9 activities were significantly increased in EIOP and returned to baseline levels following N-SMase inhibition. Latencies of all VEP components were significantly prolonged in EIOP and shortened following N-SMase inhibition. Data confirm the role of nitrative injury in EIOP and highlight the protective effect of N-SMase inhibition in EIOP via down-regulation of NOS2 levels and nitrative stress. - Highlights: • Inhibition of N-SMase decreases NOS2 levels in ocular hypertension. • Inhibition of N-SMase decreases protein nitration in ocular hypertension. • Inhibition of N-SMase decreases caspase activation in ocular hypertension. • Inhibition of N-SMase decreases apoptosis in ocular hypertension.

  1. Ultra-violet B (UVB)-induced skin cell death occurs through a cyclophilin D intrinsic signaling pathway

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ji, Chao [Department of Dermatology, The First Affiliated Hospital of Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing 210024, Jiangsu (China); Yang, Bo [Department of Dermatology, Huashan Hospital, Fudan University, Shanghai 200040 (China); Yang, Zhi; Tu, Ying [Department of Dermatology, The First Affiliated Hospital of Kunming Medical University, Yunnan Provincial Institute of Dermatology, Kunming 650032, Yunnan (China); Yang, Yan-li [Department of Otorhinolaryngology, The First Affiliated Hospital of Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing 210024, Jiangsu (China); He, Li, E-mail: heli2662@yahoo.com.cn [Department of Otorhinolaryngology, The First Affiliated Hospital of Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing 210024, Jiangsu (China); Bi, Zhi-Gang, E-mail: eltonbibenqhospital@yahoo.com.cn [Department of Dermatology, BenQ Medical Center, Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing 210019, Jiangsu (China)

    2012-09-07

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer UVB radiated skin keratinocytes show cyclophilin D (Cyp-D) upregulation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer NAC inhibits UVB induced Cyp-D expression, while H{sub 2}O{sub 2} facilitates it. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cyp-D-deficient cells are significantly less susceptible to UVB induced cell death. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Over-expression of Cyp-D causes spontaneous keratinocytes cell death. -- Abstract: UVB-induced skin cell damage involves the opening of mitochondrial permeability transition pore (mPTP), which leads to both apoptotic and necrotic cell death. Cyclophilin D (Cyp-D) translocation to the inner membrane of mitochondrion acts as a key component to open the mPTP. Our Western-Blot results in primary cultured human skin keratinocytes and in HaCaT cell line demonstrated that UVB radiation and hydrogen peroxide (H{sub 2}O{sub 2}) induced Cyp-D expression, which was inhibited by anti-oxidant N-acetyl cysteine (NAC). We created a stable Cyp-D deficiency skin keratinocytes by expressing Cyp-D-shRNA through lentiviral infection. Cyp-D-deficient cells were significantly less susceptible than their counterparts to UVB- or H{sub 2}O{sub 2}-induced cell death. Further, cyclosporine A (Cs-A), a Cyp-D inhibitor, inhibited UVB- or H{sub 2}O{sub 2}-induced keratinocytes cell death. Reversely, over-expression of Cyp-D in primary keratinocytes caused spontaneous keratinocytes cell death. These results suggest Cyp-D's critical role in UVB/oxidative stress-induced skin cell death.

  2. The H+/K+ ATPase Inhibitor SCH-28080 Inhibits Insulin Secretion and Induces Cell Death in INS-1E Rat Insulinoma Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Jakab

    2017-10-01

    was unaffected. The L-type ICav blocker nifedipine caused a full inhibition of GSIS at 10 and 20 µM. At 20 µM, SCH-28080 inhibited ICav comparable to 20 µM nifedipine and in addition augmented IKATP recorded at -60 mV and hyperpolarized Vmem by ∼15 mV. Cell viability 2 and 24 h post treatment with SCH-28080 was dose-dependently inhibited with IC50 values of 22.9 µM and 15.3 µM, respectively. At 20 µM the percentages of Annexin-V+, caspase+ and propidium iodide+ cells were significantly increased after 24 and 48 h. Concurrently, the MCV was significantly decreased (apoptotic volume decrease, AVD and the SSC signal was increased. At concentrations >40–50 µM, SCH-28080 became progressively cytotoxic causing a steep increase in necrotic cells already 2 h post treatment and a breakdown of ΔΨm within 4 h under 50 and 100 µM while 10 and 20 µM had no effect on ΔΨm within 24 h. Conclusion: We demonstrate expression of HKα2 in rat INS-1E cells. However, the pump is apparently non-functional under the given conditions. Nonetheless the H+/K+ ATPase blocker SCH-28080 inhibits insulin secretion and induces cell death. Importantly, we show that SCH-28080 inhibits ICav - and activates KATP channels identifying them as novel “off-targets” of the inhibitor, causing hyperpolarization of Vmem and inhibition of insulin secretion.

  3. Vacuolar H+ -ATPase c protects glial cell death induced by sodium nitroprusside under glutathione-depleted condition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byun, Yu Jeong; Lee, Seong-Beom; Lee, Hwa Ok; Son, Min Jeong; Kim, Ho-Shik; Kwon, Oh-Joo; Jeong, Seong-Whan

    2011-08-01

    We examined the role of the c subunit (ATP6L) of vacuolar H(+) -ATPase and its molecular mechanisms in glial cell death induced by sodium nitroprusside (SNP). ATP6L siRNA-transfected cells treated with SNP showed a significant increase in cytotoxicity under glutathione (GSH)-depleted conditions after pretreatment with buthionine sulfoximine, but reduction of ATP6L did not affect the regulation of lysosomal pH in analyses with lysosomal pH-dependent fluorescence probes. Photodegraded SNP and ferrous sulfate induced cytotoxicity with the same pattern as that of SNP, but SNAP and potassium cyanide did not show activity. Pretreatment of the transfected cells with deferoxamine (DFO) reduced ROS production and significantly inhibited the cytotoxicity, which indicates that primarily iron rather than nitric oxide or cyanide from SNP contributes to cell death. Involvement of apoptotic processes in the cells was not shown. Pretreatment with JNK or p38 chemical inhibitor significantly inhibited the cytotoxicity, and we also confirmed that the MAPKs were activated in the cells by immunoblot analysis. Significant increase of LC3-II conversion was observed in the cells, and the conversions were inhibited by cotransfection of the MAPK siRNAs and pretreatment with DFO. Introduction of Atg5 siRNA inhibited the cytotoxicity and inhibited the activation of MAPKs and the conversion of LC3. We finally confirmed autophagic cell death and involvement of MAPKs by observation of autophagic vacuoles via electron microscopy. These data suggest that ATP6L has a protective role against SNP-induced autophagic cell death via inhibition of JNK and p38 in GSH-depleted glial cells. Copyright © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  4. Activation of Cyclin-Dependent Kinase 5 Is a Consequence of Cell Death

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yixia Ye

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (Cdk5 is similar to other Cdks but is activated during cell differentiation and cell death rather than cell division. Since activation of Cdk5 has been reported in many situations leading to cell death, we attempted to determine if it was required for any form of cell death. We found that Cdk5 is activated during apoptotic deaths and that the activation can be detected even when the cells continue to secondary necrosis. This activation can occur in the absence of Bim, calpain, or neutral cathepsins. The kinase is typically activated by p25, derived from p35 by calpain-mediated cleavage, but inhibition of calpain does not affect cell death or the activation of Cdk5. Likewise, RNAi-forced suppression of the synthesis of Cdk5 does not affect the incidence or kinetics of cell death. We conclude that Cdk5 is activated as a consequence of metabolic changes that are common to many forms of cell death. Thus its activation suggests processes during cell death that will be interesting or important to understand, but activation of Cdk5 is not necessary for cells to die.

  5. Melatonin partially protects 661W cells from H2O2-induced death by inhibiting Fas/FasL-caspase-3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Bretaño, Aída; Baba, Kenkichi; Janjua, Uzair; Piano, Ilaria; Gargini, Claudia; Tosini, Gianluca

    2017-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that melatonin (MEL) signaling is involved in the modulation of photoreceptor viability during aging. Recent work by our laboratory suggested that MEL may protect cones by modulating the Fas/FasL-caspase-3 pathway. In this study, we first investigated the presence of MEL receptors (MT 1 and MT 2 ) in 661W cells, then whether MEL can prevent H 2 O 2 -induced cell death, and last, through which pathway MEL confers protection. The mRNA and proteins of the MEL receptors were detected with quantitative PCR (q-PCR) and immunocytochemistry, respectively. To test the protective effect of MEL, 661W cells were treated with H 2 O 2 for 2 h in the presence or absence of MEL, a MEL agonist, and an antagonist. To study the pathways involved in H 2 O 2 -mediated cell death, a Fas/FasL antagonist was used before the exposure to H 2 O 2 . Finally, Fas/FasL and caspase-3 mRNA was analyzed with q-PCR and immunocytochemistry in cells treated with H 2 O 2 and/or MEL. Cell viability was analyzed by using Trypan Blue. Both MEL receptors (MT 1 and MT 2 ) were detected at the mRNA and protein levels in 661W cells. MEL partially prevented H 2 O 2 -mediated cell death (20-25%). This effect was replicated with IIK7 (a melatonin receptor agonist) when used at a concentration of 1 µM. Preincubation with luzindole (a melatonin receptor antagonist) blocked MEL protection. Kp7-6, an antagonist of Fas/FasL, blocked cell death caused by H 2 O 2 similarly to what was observed for MEL. Fas, FasL, and caspase-3 expression was increased in cells treated with H 2 O 2 , and this effect was prevented by MEL. Finally, MEL treatment partially prevented the activation of caspase-3 caused by H 2 O 2 . The results demonstrate that MEL receptors are present and functional in 661W cells. MEL can prevent photoreceptor cell death induced by H 2 O 2 via the inhibition of the proapoptotic pathway Fas/FasL-caspase-3.

  6. Aurora A kinase RNAi and small molecule inhibition of Aurora kinases with VE-465 induce apoptotic death in multiple myeloma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Robert; Naber, Claudia; Steffler, Tara; Checkland, Tamara; Keats, Jonathan; Maxwell, Christopher; Perry, Troy; Chau, Heidi; Belch, Andrew; Pilarski, Linda; Reiman, Tony

    2008-03-01

    The expression of RHAMM and other centrosome-associated genes are known to correlate with the extent of centrosome amplification in multiple myeloma, and with poor prognosis. RHAMM has a significant interaction with TPX2, a protein which regulates the localization and action of Aurora A kinase (AURKA) at the spindle poles. AURKA is known to be a central determinant of centrosome and spindle function and is a target for cancer therapy. Given these observations, we investigated the role of Aurora kinases as therapeutic targets in myeloma. Here we report that AURKA is expressed ubiquitously in myeloma, to varying degrees, in both cell lines and patients' bone marrow plasma cells. siRNA targeting AURKA induces apoptotic cell death in myeloma cell lines. The Aurora kinase inhibitor VE-465 also induces apoptosis and death in myeloma cell lines and primary myeloma plasma cells. The combination of VE-465 and dexamethasone improves cell killing compared with the use of either agent alone, even in cells resistant to the single agents. The phenotype of myeloma cells treated with VE-465 is consistent with published reports on the effects of Aurora kinase inhibition. Aurora kinase inhibitors should be pursued as potential treatments for myeloma.

  7. Mechanism of neem limonoids-induced cell death in cancer: Role of oxidative phosphorylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, Neelu; Kumar, Sandeep; Kumar, Rahul; Srivastava, Pragya; Sun, Leimin; Rapali, Peter; Marlowe, Timothy; Schneider, Andrea; Inigo, Joseph R; O'Malley, Jordan; Londonkar, Ramesh; Gogada, Raghu; Chaudhary, Ajay K; Yadava, Nagendra; Chandra, Dhyan

    2016-01-01

    We have previously reported that neem limonoids (neem) induce multiple cancer cell death pathways. Here we dissect the underlying mechanisms of neem-induced apoptotic cell death in cancer. We observed that neem-induced caspase activation does not require Bax/Bak channel-mediated mitochondrial outer membrane permeabilization, permeability transition pore, and mitochondrial fragmentation. Neem enhanced mitochondrial DNA and mitochondrial biomass. While oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) Complex-I activity was decreased, the activities of other OXPHOS complexes including Complex-II and -IV were unaltered. Increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels were associated with an increase in mitochondrial biomass and apoptosis upon neem exposure. Complex-I deficiency due to the loss of Ndufa1-encoded MWFE protein inhibited neem-induced caspase activation and apoptosis, but cell death induction was enhanced. Complex II-deficiency due to the loss of succinate dehydrogenase complex subunit C (SDHC) robustly decreased caspase activation, apoptosis, and cell death. Additionally, the ablation of Complexes-I, -III, -IV, and -V together did not inhibit caspase activation. Together, we demonstrate that neem limonoids target OXPHOS system to induce cancer cell death, which does not require upregulation or activation of proapoptotic Bcl-2 family proteins. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Oxidative stress activates the TRPM2-Ca2+-CaMKII-ROS signaling loop to induce cell death in cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qian; Huang, Lihong; Yue, Jianbo

    2017-06-01

    High intracellular levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) cause oxidative stress that results in numerous pathologies, including cell death. Transient potential receptor melastatin-2 (TRPM2), a Ca 2+ -permeable cation channel, is mainly activated by intracellular adenosine diphosphate ribose (ADPR) in response to oxidative stress. Here we studied the role and mechanisms of TRPM2-mediated Ca 2+ influx on oxidative stress-induced cell death in cancer cells. We found that oxidative stress activated the TRPM2-Ca 2+ -CaMKII cascade to inhibit early autophagy induction, which ultimately led to cell death in TRPM2 expressing cancer cells. On the other hand, TRPM2 knockdown switched cells from cell death to autophagy for survival in response to oxidative stress. Moreover, we found that oxidative stress activated the TRPM2-CaMKII cascade to further induce intracellular ROS production, which led to mitochondria fragmentation and loss of mitochondrial membrane potential. In summary, our data demonstrated that oxidative stress activates the TRPM2-Ca 2+ -CaMKII-ROS signal loop to inhibit autophagy and induce cell death. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. BH3-mimetics- and cisplatin-induced cell death proceeds through different pathways depending on the availability of death-related cellular components.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vicente Andreu-Fernández

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Owing to their important function in regulating cell death, pharmacological inhibition of Bcl-2 proteins by dubbed BH3-mimetics is a promising strategy for apoptosis induction or sensitization to chemotherapy. However, the role of Apaf-1, the main protein constituent of the apoptosome, in the process has yet not been analyzed. Furthermore as new chemotherapeutics develop, the possible chemotherapy-induced toxicity to rapidly dividing normal cells, especially sensitive differentiated cells, has to be considered. Such undesirable effects would probably be ameliorated by selectively and locally inhibiting apoptosis in defined sensitive cells. METHODOLOGY AND PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFS from Apaf-1 knock out mouse (MEFS KO Apaf-1 and Bax/Bak double KO (MEFS KO Bax/Bak, MEFS from wild-type mouse (MEFS wt and human cervix adenocarcinoma (HeLa cells were used to comparatively investigate the signaling cell death-induced pathways of BH3-mimetics, like ABT737 and GX15-070, with DNA damage-inducing agent cisplatin (cis-diammineplatinum(II dichloride, CDDP. The study was performed in the absence or presence of apoptosis inhibitors namely, caspase inhibitors or apoptosome inhibitors. BH3-mimetic ABT737 required of Apaf-1 to exert its apoptosis-inducing effect. In contrast, BH3-mimetic GX15-070 and DNA damage-inducing CDDP induced cell death in the absence of both Bax/Bak and Apaf-1. GX15-070 induced autophagy-based cell death in all the cell lines analyzed. MEFS wt cells were protected from the cytotoxic effects of ABT737 and CDDP by chemical inhibition of the apoptosome through QM31, but not by using general caspase inhibitors. CONCLUSIONS: BH3-mimetic ABT737 not only requires Bax/Bak to exert its apoptosis-inducing effect, but also Apaf-1, while GX15-070 and CDDP induce different modalities of cell death in the absence of Bax/Bak or Apaf-1. Inclusion of specific Apaf-1 inhibitors in topical and well

  10. The Interaction of CD154 with the α5β1 Integrin Inhibits Fas-Induced T Cell Death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachsais, Meriem; Naddaf, Nadim; Yacoub, Daniel; Salti, Suzanne; Alaaeddine, Nada; Aoudjit, Fawzi; Hassan, Ghada S; Mourad, Walid

    2016-01-01

    CD154, a critical regulator of the immune response, is usually associated with chronic inflammatory, autoimmune diseases as well as malignant disorders. In addition to its classical receptor CD40, CD154 is capable of binding other receptors, members of the integrin family, the αIIbβ3, αMβ2 and α5β1. Given the role attributed to integrins and particularly the β1 integrins in inhibiting apoptotic events in normal as well as malignant T cells, we were highly interested in investigating the role of the CD154/α5β1 interaction in promoting survival of malignant T cells contributing as such to tumor development and/or propagation. To support our hypothesis, we first show that soluble CD154 binds to the T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia cell line, Jurkat E6.1 in a α5β1-dependent manner. Binding of soluble CD154 to α5β1 integrin of Jurkat cells leads to the activation of key survival proteins, including the p38 and ERK1/2 mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs), phosphoinositide 3 kinase (PI-3K), and Akt. Interestingly, soluble CD154 significantly inhibits Fas-mediated apoptosis in T cell leukemia-lymphoma cell lines, Jurkat E6.1 and HUT78 cells, an important hallmark of T cell survival during malignancy progression. These anti-apoptotic effects were mainly mediated by the activation of the PI-3K/Akt pathway but also involved the p38 and the ERK1/2 MAPKs cascades. Our data also demonstrated that the CD154-triggered inhibition of the Fas-mediated cell death response was dependent on a suppression of caspase-8 cleavage, but independent of de novo protein synthesis or alterations in Fas expression on cell surface. Together, our results highlight the impact of the CD154/α5β1 interaction in T cell function/survival and identify novel targets for the treatment of malignant disorders, particularly of T cell origin.

  11. The Interaction of CD154 with the α5β1 Integrin Inhibits Fas-Induced T Cell Death.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meriem Bachsais

    Full Text Available CD154, a critical regulator of the immune response, is usually associated with chronic inflammatory, autoimmune diseases as well as malignant disorders. In addition to its classical receptor CD40, CD154 is capable of binding other receptors, members of the integrin family, the αIIbβ3, αMβ2 and α5β1. Given the role attributed to integrins and particularly the β1 integrins in inhibiting apoptotic events in normal as well as malignant T cells, we were highly interested in investigating the role of the CD154/α5β1 interaction in promoting survival of malignant T cells contributing as such to tumor development and/or propagation. To support our hypothesis, we first show that soluble CD154 binds to the T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia cell line, Jurkat E6.1 in a α5β1-dependent manner. Binding of soluble CD154 to α5β1 integrin of Jurkat cells leads to the activation of key survival proteins, including the p38 and ERK1/2 mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs, phosphoinositide 3 kinase (PI-3K, and Akt. Interestingly, soluble CD154 significantly inhibits Fas-mediated apoptosis in T cell leukemia-lymphoma cell lines, Jurkat E6.1 and HUT78 cells, an important hallmark of T cell survival during malignancy progression. These anti-apoptotic effects were mainly mediated by the activation of the PI-3K/Akt pathway but also involved the p38 and the ERK1/2 MAPKs cascades. Our data also demonstrated that the CD154-triggered inhibition of the Fas-mediated cell death response was dependent on a suppression of caspase-8 cleavage, but independent of de novo protein synthesis or alterations in Fas expression on cell surface. Together, our results highlight the impact of the CD154/α5β1 interaction in T cell function/survival and identify novel targets for the treatment of malignant disorders, particularly of T cell origin.

  12. Bee Venom Protects against Rotenone-Induced Cell Death in NSC34 Motor Neuron Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    So Young Jung

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Rotenone, an inhibitor of mitochondrial complex I of the mitochondrial respiratory chain, is known to elevate mitochondrial reactive oxygen species and induce apoptosis via activation of the caspase-3 pathway. Bee venom (BV extracted from honey bees has been widely used in oriental medicine and contains melittin, apamin, adolapin, mast cell-degranulating peptide, and phospholipase A2. In this study, we tested the effects of BV on neuronal cell death by examining rotenone-induced mitochondrial dysfunction. NSC34 motor neuron cells were pretreated with 2.5 μg/mL BV and stimulated with 10 μM rotenone to induce cell toxicity. We assessed cell death by Western blotting using specific antibodies, such as phospho-ERK1/2, phospho-JNK, and cleaved capase-3 and performed an MTT assay for evaluation of cell death and mitochondria staining. Pretreatment with 2.5 μg/mL BV had a neuroprotective effect against 10 μM rotenone-induced cell death in NSC34 motor neuron cells. Pre-treatment with BV significantly enhanced cell viability and ameliorated mitochondrial impairment in rotenone-treated cellular model. Moreover, BV treatment inhibited the activation of JNK signaling and cleaved caspase-3 related to cell death and increased ERK phosphorylation involved in cell survival in rotenone-treated NSC34 motor neuron cells. Taken together, we suggest that BV treatment can be useful for protection of neurons against oxidative stress or neurotoxin-induced cell death.

  13. Andrographolide Analogue Induces Apoptosis and Autophagy Mediated Cell Death in U937 Cells by Inhibition of PI3K/Akt/mTOR Pathway.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deepak Kumar

    Full Text Available Current chemotherapeutic agents based on apoptosis induction are lacking in desired efficacy. Therefore, there is continuous effort to bring about new dimension in control and gradual eradication of cancer by means of ever evolving therapeutic strategies. Various forms of PCD are being increasingly implicated in anti-cancer therapy and the complex interplay among them is vital for the ultimate fate of proliferating cells. We elaborated and illustrated the underlying mechanism of the most potent Andrographolide analogue (AG-4 mediated action that involved the induction of dual modes of cell death-apoptosis and autophagy in human leukemic U937 cells.AG-4 induced cytotoxicity was associated with redox imbalance and apoptosis which involved mitochondrial depolarisation, altered apoptotic protein expressions, activation of the caspase cascade leading to cell cycle arrest. Incubation with caspase inhibitor Z-VAD-fmk or Bax siRNA decreased cytotoxic efficacy of AG-4 emphasising critical roles of caspase and Bax. In addition, AG-4 induced autophagy as evident from LC3-II accumulation, increased Atg protein expressions and autophagosome formation. Pre-treatment with 3-MA or Atg 5 siRNA suppressed the cytotoxic effect of AG-4 implying the pro-death role of autophagy. Furthermore, incubation with Z-VAD-fmk or Bax siRNA subdued AG-4 induced autophagy and pre-treatment with 3-MA or Atg 5 siRNA curbed AG-4 induced apoptosis-implying that apoptosis and autophagy acted as partners in the context of AG-4 mediated action. AG-4 also inhibited PI3K/Akt/mTOR pathway. Inhibition of mTOR or Akt augmented AG-4 induced apoptosis and autophagy signifying its crucial role in its mechanism of action.Thus, these findings prove the dual ability of AG-4 to induce apoptosis and autophagy which provide a new perspective to it as a potential molecule targeting PCD for future cancer therapeutics.

  14. Ultra-violet B (UVB)-induced skin cell death occurs through a cyclophilin D intrinsic signaling pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Chao; Yang, Bo; Yang, Zhi; Tu, Ying; Yang, Yan-li; He, Li; Bi, Zhi-Gang

    2012-09-07

    UVB-induced skin cell damage involves the opening of mitochondrial permeability transition pore (mPTP), which leads to both apoptotic and necrotic cell death. Cyclophilin D (Cyp-D) translocation to the inner membrane of mitochondrion acts as a key component to open the mPTP. Our Western-Blot results in primary cultured human skin keratinocytes and in HaCaT cell line demonstrated that UVB radiation and hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) induced Cyp-D expression, which was inhibited by anti-oxidant N-acetyl cysteine (NAC). We created a stable Cyp-D deficiency skin keratinocytes by expressing Cyp-D-shRNA through lentiviral infection. Cyp-D-deficient cells were significantly less susceptible than their counterparts to UVB- or H(2)O(2)-induced cell death. Further, cyclosporine A (Cs-A), a Cyp-D inhibitor, inhibited UVB- or H(2)O(2)-induced keratinocytes cell death. Reversely, over-expression of Cyp-D in primary keratinocytes caused spontaneous keratinocytes cell death. These results suggest Cyp-D's critical role in UVB/oxidative stress-induced skin cell death. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. mTOR pathway inhibition prevents neuroinflammation and neuronal death in a mouse model of cerebral palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Isha N; Shperdheja, Jona; Baybis, Marianna; Ferguson, Tanya; Crino, Peter B

    2016-01-01

    Mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway signaling governs cellular responses to hypoxia and inflammation including induction of autophagy and cell survival. Cerebral palsy (CP) is a neurodevelopmental disorder linked to hypoxic and inflammatory brain injury however, a role for mTOR modulation in CP has not been investigated. We hypothesized that mTOR pathway inhibition would diminish inflammation and prevent neuronal death in a mouse model of CP. Mouse pups (P6) were subjected to hypoxia-ischemia and lipopolysaccharide-induced inflammation (HIL), a model of CP causing neuronal injury within the hippocampus, periventricular white matter, and neocortex. mTOR pathway inhibition was achieved with rapamycin (an mTOR inhibitor; 5mg/kg) or PF-4708671 (an inhibitor of the downstream p70S6kinase, S6K, 75 mg/kg) immediately following HIL, and then for 3 subsequent days. Phospho-activation of the mTOR effectors p70S6kinase and ribosomal S6 protein and expression of hypoxia inducible factor 1 (HIF-1α) were assayed. Neuronal cell death was defined with Fluoro-Jade C (FJC) and autophagy was measured using Beclin-1 and LC3II expression. Iba-1 labeled, activated microglia were quantified. Neuronal death, enhanced HIF-1α expression, and numerous Iba-1 labeled, activated microglia were evident at 24 and 48 h following HIL. Basal mTOR signaling, as evidenced by phosphorylated-S6 and -S6K levels, was unchanged by HIL. Rapamycin or PF-4,708,671 treatment significantly reduced mTOR signaling, neuronal death, HIF-1α expression, and microglial activation, coincident with enhanced expression of Beclin-1 and LC3II, markers of autophagy induction. mTOR pathway inhibition prevented neuronal death and diminished neuroinflammation in this model of CP. Persistent mTOR signaling following HIL suggests a failure of autophagy induction, which may contribute to neuronal death in CP. These results suggest that mTOR signaling may be a novel therapeutic target to reduce neuronal cell death in

  16. Anti-proliferative effect of metformin on a feline injection site sarcoma cell line independent of Mtor inhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierro, J; Saba, C; McLean, K; Williams, R; Karpuzoglu, E; Prater, R; Hoover, K; Gogal, R

    2017-10-01

    Metformin is an oral hypoglycemic drug that has been shown to inhibit cancer cell proliferation via up-regulation of AMPK (AMP-activated protein kinase), and possibly inhibition of mTOR (mammalian target of rapamycin). The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of metformin on a feline injection site sarcoma cell line. Cells from a feline injection site sarcoma cell line were treated with metformin at varied concentrations. A dose-dependent decrease in cell viability following metformin treatment was observed, with an IC50 of 8.0mM. Using flow cytometry, the mechanism of cell death was determined to be apoptosis or necrosis. To evaluate the role of mTOR inhibition in metformin-induced cell death, Western blot was performed. No inhibition of mTOR or phosphorylated mTOR was found. Although metformin treatment leads to apoptotic or necrotic cell death in feline injection site sarcoma cells, the mechanism does not appear to be mediated by mTOR inhibition. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Streptococcus sanguinis induces foam cell formation and cell death of macrophages in association with production of reactive oxygen species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okahashi, Nobuo; Okinaga, Toshinori; Sakurai, Atsuo; Terao, Yutaka; Nakata, Masanobu; Nakashima, Keisuke; Shintani, Seikou; Kawabata, Shigetada; Ooshima, Takashi; Nishihara, Tatsuji

    2011-10-01

    Streptococcus sanguinis, a normal inhabitant of the human oral cavity, is a common streptococcal species implicated in infective endocarditis. Herein, we investigated the effects of infection with S. sanguinis on foam cell formation and cell death of macrophages. Infection with S. sanguinis stimulated foam cell formation of THP-1, a human macrophage cell line. At a multiplicity of infection >100, S. sanguinis-induced cell death of the macrophages. Viable bacterial infection was required to trigger cell death because heat-inactivated S. sanguinis did not induce cell death. The production of cytokines interleukin-1β and tumor necrosis factor-α from macrophages was also stimulated during bacterial infection. Inhibition of the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) resulted in reduced cell death, suggesting an association of ROS with cell death. Furthermore, S. sanguinis-induced cell death appeared to be independent of activation of inflammasomes, because cleavage of procaspase-1 was not evident in infected macrophages. © 2011 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by Blackwell Publishing Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. 8-C-(E-phenylethenyl)quercetin from onion/beef soup induces autophagic cell death in colon cancer cells through ERK activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yueliang; Fan, Daming; Zheng, Zong-Ping; Li, Edmund T S; Chen, Feng; Cheng, Ka-Wing; Wang, Mingfu

    2017-02-01

    Quercetin, a flavonoid, widely distributed in edible fruits and vegetables, was reported to effectively inhibit 2-amino-1-methyl-6-phenylimidazo[4, 5-b]pyridine (PhIP) formation in a food model (roast beef patties) with itself being converted into a novel compound 8-C-(E-phenylethenyl)quercetin (8-CEPQ). Here we investigated whether 8-CEPQ could be formed in a real food system, and tested its anticancer activity in human colon cancer cell lines. LC-MS was applied for the determination of 8-CEPQ formation in onion/beef soup. Anticancer activity of 8-CEPQ was evaluated by using cell viability assay and flow cytometry. Results showed that 8-CEPQ suppressed proliferation and caused G 2 phase arrest in colon cancer cells. Based on immunofluorescent staining assay, western blot assay, and RNA knockdown data, we found that 8-CEPQ did not cause apoptotic cell death. Instead, it induced autophagic cell death. Moreover, treatment with 8-CEPQ induced phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK). Inhibition of ERK phosphorylation by the mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase (MEK)/ERK inhibitor U0126 attenuated 8-CEPQ-induced autophagy and reversed 8-CEPQ-mediated cell growth inhibition. Our results demonstrate that 8-CEPQ, a novel quercetin derivative, could be formed in onion/beef soup. 8-CEPQ inhibited colon cancer cell growth by inducing autophagic cell death through ERK activation. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. Docetaxel-induced prostate cancer cell death involves concomitant activation of caspase and lysosomal pathways and is attenuated by LEDGF/p75

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leoh Lai

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hormone-refractory prostate cancer (HRPC is characterized by poor response to chemotherapy and high mortality, particularly among African American men when compared to other racial/ethnic groups. It is generally accepted that docetaxel, the standard of care for chemotherapy of HRPC, primarily exerts tumor cell death by inducing mitotic catastrophe and caspase-dependent apoptosis following inhibition of microtubule depolymerization. However, there is a gap in our knowledge of mechanistic events underlying docetaxel-induced caspase-independent cell death, and the genes that antagonize this process. This knowledge is important for circumventing HRPC chemoresistance and reducing disparities in prostate cancer mortality. Results We investigated mechanistic events associated with docetaxel-induced death in HRPC cell lines using various approaches that distinguish caspase-dependent from caspase-independent cell death. Docetaxel induced both mitotic catastrophe and caspase-dependent apoptosis at various concentrations. However, caspase activity was not essential for docetaxel-induced cytotoxicity since cell death associated with lysosomal membrane permeabilization still occurred in the presence of caspase inhibitors. Partial inhibition of docetaxel-induced cytotoxicity was observed after inhibition of cathepsin B, but not inhibition of cathepsins D and L, suggesting that docetaxel induces caspase-independent, lysosomal cell death. Simultaneous inhibition of caspases and cathepsin B dramatically reduced docetaxel-induced cell death. Ectopic expression of lens epithelium-derived growth factor p75 (LEDGF/p75, a stress survival autoantigen and transcription co-activator, attenuated docetaxel-induced lysosomal destabilization and cell death. Interestingly, LEDGF/p75 overexpression did not protect cells against DTX-induced mitotic catastrophe, and against apoptosis induced by tumor necrosis factor related apoptosis inducing ligand (TRAIL

  20. Recovery from inhibition of transcription in γ-irradiated Euglena cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsushimoto, G.; Kikuchi, T.; Ishida, M.R.

    1982-01-01

    Transcriptional activity was inhibited with low doses of γ-irradiation which did not cause the death of cells, but induced the delay of cell division in the unicellular alga Euglena. The incorporation of [ 14 C]uracil into cells was inhibited to about 50% of non-irradiated cells immediately after 3 krad irradiation. The suppressed transcriptional activity was gradually recovered after irradiation. At about 12 h post-irradiation, the rate of incorporation of [ 14 C]uracil recovered to that of non-irradiated cells. The synthesis of ribosomal RNA was inhibited immediately after 3 krad irradiation, but it recovered within 12 h after irradiation. The synthesis of cytosol ribosomal RNA precursor was more strongly inhibited than that of other cytosol ribosomal RNAs. The synthesis of cytoplasmic organelle ribosomal RNA was also inhibited and recovered after 3 krad irradiation. (Auth.)

  1. Sigma-2 ligands and PARP inhibitors synergistically trigger cell death in breast cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McDonald, Elizabeth S.; Mankoff, Julia; Makvandi, Mehran; Chu, Wenhua; Chu, Yunxiang; Mach, Robert H.; Zeng, Chenbo

    2017-01-01

    The sigma-2 receptor is overexpressed in proliferating cells compared to quiescent cells and has been used as a target for imaging solid tumors by positron emission tomography. Recent work has suggested that the sigma-2 receptor may also be an effective therapeutic target for cancer therapy. Poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) is a family of enzymes involved in DNA damage response. In this study, we looked for potential synergy of cytotoxicity between PARP inhibitors and sigma-2 receptor ligands in breast cancer cell lines. We showed that the PARP inhibitor, YUN3-6, sensitized mouse breast cancer cell line, EMT6, to sigma-2 receptor ligand (SV119, WC-26, and RHM-138) induced cell death determined by cell viability assay and colony forming assay. The PARP inhibitor, olaparib, sensitized tumor cells to a different sigma-2 receptor ligand SW43-induced apoptosis and cell death in human triple negative cell line, MDA-MB-231. Olaparib inhibited PARP activity and cell proliferation, and arrested cells in G2/M phase of the cell cycle in MDA-MB-231 cells. Subsequently cells became sensitized to SW43 induced cell death. In conclusion, the combination of sigma-2 receptor ligands and PARP inhibitors appears to hold promise for synergistically triggering cell death in certain types of breast cancer cells and merits further investigation. - Highlights: • PARPi, YUN3-6 and olaparib, and σ2 ligands, SV119 and SW43, were evaluated. • Mouse and human breast cancer cells, EMT6 and MDA-MB-231 respectively, were used. • YUN3-6 and SV119 synergistically triggered cell death in EMT6 cells. • Olaparib and SW43 additively triggered cell death in MDA-MB-231 cells. • Olaparib arrested cells in G2/M in MDA-MB-231 cells.

  2. Recombinant FIP-gat, a Fungal Immunomodulatory Protein from Ganoderma atrum, Induces Growth Inhibition and Cell Death in Breast Cancer Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Hui; Kong, Ying-Yu; Chen, Xin; Guo, Meng-Yuan; Bai, Xiao-Hui; Lu, Yu-Jia; Li, Wei; Zhou, Xuan-Wei

    2016-04-06

    FIP-gat, an immunomodulatory protein isolated from Ganoderma atrum, is a new member of the FIP family. Little is known, however, about its expressional properties and antitumor activities. It was availably expressed in Escherichia coli with a total yield of 29.75 mg/L. The migration of recombinant FIP-gat (rFIP-gat) on SDS-PAGE corresponded to the predicted molecular mass, and the band was correctly detected by a specific antibody. To characterize the direct effects of rFIP-gat on MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells, MDA-MB-231 cells were treated with different concentrations of rFIP-gat in vitro; the results showed that this protein could reduce cell viability dose-dependently with a median inhibitory concentration (IC50) of 9.96 μg/mL and agglutinate the MDA-MB-231 cells at a concentration as low as 5 μg/mL. Furthermore, FIP-gat at a concentration of 10 μg/mL can induce significant growth inhibition and cell death in MDA-MB-231 cells. Notably, FIP-gat treatment triggers significant cell cycle arrest at the G1/S transition and pronounced increase in apoptotic cell population. Molecular assays based on microarray and real-time PCR further revealed the potential mechanisms encompassing growth arrest, apoptosis, and autophagy underlying the phenotypic effects.

  3. Glucose Metabolism and AMPK Signaling Regulate Dopaminergic Cell Death Induced by Gene (α-Synuclein)-Environment (Paraquat) Interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anandhan, Annadurai; Lei, Shulei; Levytskyy, Roman; Pappa, Aglaia; Panayiotidis, Mihalis I; Cerny, Ronald L; Khalimonchuk, Oleh; Powers, Robert; Franco, Rodrigo

    2017-07-01

    While environmental exposures are not the single cause of Parkinson's disease (PD), their interaction with genetic alterations is thought to contribute to neuronal dopaminergic degeneration. However, the mechanisms involved in dopaminergic cell death induced by gene-environment interactions remain unclear. In this work, we have revealed for the first time the role of central carbon metabolism and metabolic dysfunction in dopaminergic cell death induced by the paraquat (PQ)-α-synuclein interaction. The toxicity of PQ in dopaminergic N27 cells was significantly reduced by glucose deprivation, inhibition of hexokinase with 2-deoxy-D-glucose (2-DG), or equimolar substitution of glucose with galactose, which evidenced the contribution of glucose metabolism to PQ-induced cell death. PQ also stimulated an increase in glucose uptake, and in the levels of glucose transporter type 4 (GLUT4) and Na + -glucose transporters isoform 1 (SGLT1) proteins, but only inhibition of GLUT-like transport with STF-31 or ascorbic acid reduced PQ-induced cell death. Importantly, while autophagy protein 5 (ATG5)/unc-51 like autophagy activating kinase 1 (ULK1)-dependent autophagy protected against PQ toxicity, the inhibitory effect of glucose deprivation on cell death progression was largely independent of autophagy or mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling. PQ selectively induced metabolomic alterations and adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK) activation in the midbrain and striatum of mice chronically treated with PQ. Inhibition of AMPK signaling led to metabolic dysfunction and an enhanced sensitivity of dopaminergic cells to PQ. In addition, activation of AMPK by PQ was prevented by inhibition of the inducible nitric oxide syntase (iNOS) with 1400W, but PQ had no effect on iNOS levels. Overexpression of wild type or A53T mutant α-synuclein stimulated glucose accumulation and PQ toxicity, and this toxic synergism was reduced by inhibition of glucose metabolism

  4. Effects of dimeric PSD-95 inhibition on excitotoxic cell death and outcome after controlled cortical impact in rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sommer, Jens Bak; Bach, Anders; Rytter, Hana Malá

    2017-01-01

    Therapeutic effects of PSD-95 inhibition have been demonstrated in numerous studies of stroke; however only few studies have assessed the effects of PSD-95 inhibitors in traumatic brain injury (TBI). As the pathophysiology of TBI partially overlaps with that of stroke, PSD-95 inhibition may also...... assessed in a water maze at two weeks post-trauma, and at four weeks lesion volumes were estimated. Overall, UCCB01-144 did not protect against NMDA-toxicity in neuronal cultures or experimental TBI in rats. Important factors that should be investigated further in future studies assessing the effects...... be an effective therapeutic strategy in TBI. The objectives of the present study were to assess the effects of a dimeric inhibitor of PSD-95, UCCB01-144, on excitotoxic cell death in vitro and outcome after experimental TBI in rats in vivo. In addition, the pharmacokinetic parameters of UCCB01-144 were...

  5. Nuclear DAMP complex-mediated RAGE-dependent macrophage cell death

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Ruochan [Department of Surgery, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 15213 (United States); Department of Infectious Diseases and State Key Lab of Viral Hepatitis, Xiangya Hospital, Central South University, Changsha, Hunan 410008 (China); Fu, Sha; Fan, Xue-Gong [Department of Infectious Diseases and State Key Lab of Viral Hepatitis, Xiangya Hospital, Central South University, Changsha, Hunan 410008 (China); Lotze, Michael T.; Zeh, Herbert J. [Department of Surgery, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 15213 (United States); Tang, Daolin, E-mail: tangd2@upmc.edu [Department of Surgery, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 15213 (United States); Kang, Rui, E-mail: kangr@upmc.edu [Department of Surgery, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 15213 (United States)

    2015-03-13

    High mobility group box 1 (HMGB1), histone, and DNA are essential nuclear components involved in the regulation of chromosome structure and function. In addition to their nuclear function, these molecules act as damage-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs) alone or together when released extracellularly. The synergistic effect of these nuclear DNA-HMGB1-histone complexes as DAMP complexes (nDCs) on immune cells remains largely unexplored. Here, we demonstrate that nDCs limit survival of macrophages (e.g., RAW264.7 and peritoneal macrophages) but not cancer cells (e.g., HCT116, HepG2 and Hepa1-6). nDCs promote production of inflammatory tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα) release, triggering reactive oxygen species-dependent apoptosis and necrosis. Moreover, the receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE), but not toll-like receptor (TLR)-4 and TLR-2, was required for Akt-dependent TNFα release and subsequent cell death following treatment with nDCs. Genetic depletion of RAGE by RNAi, antioxidant N-Acetyl-L-cysteine, and TNFα neutralizing antibody significantly attenuated nDC-induced cell death. These findings provide evidence supporting novel signaling mechanisms linking nDCs and inflammation in macrophage cell death. - Highlights: • Nuclear DAMP complexes (nDCs) selectively induce cell death in macrophages, but not cancer cells. • TNFα-mediated oxidative stress is required for nDC-induced death. • RAGE-mediated Akt activation is required for nDC-induced TNFα release. • Blocking RAGE and TNFα inhibits nDC-induced macrophage cell death.

  6. Propofol prevents autophagic cell death following oxygen and glucose deprivation in PC12 cells and cerebral ischemia-reperfusion injury in rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Derong Cui

    Full Text Available Propofol exerts protective effects on neuronal cells, in part through the inhibition of programmed cell death. Autophagic cell death is a type of programmed cell death that plays elusive roles in controlling neuronal damage and metabolic homeostasis. We therefore studied whether propofol could attenuate the formation of autophagosomes, and if so, whether the inhibition of autophagic cell death mediates the neuroprotective effects observed with propofol.The cell model was established by depriving the cells of oxygen and glucose (OGD for 6 hours, and the rat model of ischemia was introduced by a transient two-vessel occlusion for 10 minutes. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM revealed that the formation of autophagosomes and autolysosomes in both neuronal PC12 cells and pyramidal rat hippocampal neurons after respective OGD and ischemia/reperfusion (I/R insults. A western blot analysis revealed that the autophagy-related proteins, such as microtubule-associated protein 1 light chain 3 (LC3-II, Beclin-1 and class III PI3K, were also increased accordingly, but cytoprotective Bcl-2 protein was decreased. The negative effects of OGD and I/R, including the formation of autophagosomes and autolysosomes, the increase in LC3-II, Beclin-1 and class III PI3K expression and the decline in Bcl-2 production were all inhibited by propofol and specific inhibitors of autophagy, such as 3-methyladenine (3-MA, LY294002 and Bafilomycin A1 (Baf,. Furthermore, in vitro OGD cultures and in vivo I/R rats showed an increase in cell survival following the administration of propofol, as assessed by an MTT assay or histochemical analyses.Our data suggest that propofol can markedly attenuate autophagic processes via the decreased expression of autophagy-related proteins in vitro and in vivo. This inhibition improves cell survival, which provides a novel explanation for the pleiotropic effects of propofol that benefit the nervous system.

  7. The natural product peiminine represses colorectal carcinoma tumor growth by inducing autophagic cell death

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lyu, Qing; Tou, Fangfang; Su, Hong; Wu, Xiaoyong; Chen, Xinyi; Zheng, Zhi

    2015-01-01

    Autophagy is evolutionarily conservative in eukaryotic cells that engulf cellular long-lived proteins and organelles, and it degrades the contents through fusion with lysosomes, via which the cell acquires recycled building blocks for the synthesis of new molecules. In this study, we revealed that peiminine induces cell death and enhances autophagic flux in colorectal carcinoma HCT-116 cells. We determined that peiminine enhances the autophagic flux by repressing the phosphorylation of mTOR through inhibiting upstream signals. Knocking down ATG5 greatly reduced the peiminine-induced cell death in wild-type HCT-116 cells, while treating Bax/Bak-deficient cells with peiminine resulted in significant cell death. In summary, our discoveries demonstrated that peiminine represses colorectal carcinoma cell proliferation and cell growth by inducing autophagic cell death. - Highlights: • Peiminine induces autophagy and upregulates autophagic flux. • Peiminine represses colorectal carcinoma tumor growth. • Peiminine induces autophagic cell death. • Peiminine represses mTOR phosphorylation by influencing PI3K/Akt and AMPK pathway

  8. The natural product peiminine represses colorectal carcinoma tumor growth by inducing autophagic cell death

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lyu, Qing [School of Life Sciences, Tsinghua University, Beijing, 100084 (China); Key Lab in Healthy Science and Technology, Division of Life Science, Graduate School at Shenzhen, Tsinghua University, Shenzhen, 518055 (China); Tou, Fangfang [Jiangxi Provincial Key Lab of Oncology Translation Medicine, Jiangxi Cancer Hospital, Nanchang, 330029 (China); Su, Hong; Wu, Xiaoyong [First Affiliated Hospital, Guiyang College of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Guiyang, 550002 (China); Chen, Xinyi [Department of Hematology and Oncology, Beijing University of Chinese Medicine, Beijing, 100029 (China); Zheng, Zhi, E-mail: zheng_sheva@hotmail.com [Jiangxi Provincial Key Lab of Oncology Translation Medicine, Jiangxi Cancer Hospital, Nanchang, 330029 (China)

    2015-06-19

    Autophagy is evolutionarily conservative in eukaryotic cells that engulf cellular long-lived proteins and organelles, and it degrades the contents through fusion with lysosomes, via which the cell acquires recycled building blocks for the synthesis of new molecules. In this study, we revealed that peiminine induces cell death and enhances autophagic flux in colorectal carcinoma HCT-116 cells. We determined that peiminine enhances the autophagic flux by repressing the phosphorylation of mTOR through inhibiting upstream signals. Knocking down ATG5 greatly reduced the peiminine-induced cell death in wild-type HCT-116 cells, while treating Bax/Bak-deficient cells with peiminine resulted in significant cell death. In summary, our discoveries demonstrated that peiminine represses colorectal carcinoma cell proliferation and cell growth by inducing autophagic cell death. - Highlights: • Peiminine induces autophagy and upregulates autophagic flux. • Peiminine represses colorectal carcinoma tumor growth. • Peiminine induces autophagic cell death. • Peiminine represses mTOR phosphorylation by influencing PI3K/Akt and AMPK pathway.

  9. Inhibition of apoptic cell death induced by Pseudomonas syringae pv. Tabaci and mycotoxin fumonisin B1

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Iakimova, E.T.; Batchvorova, R.; Kapchina, V.; Popov, T.; Atanassov, A.; Woltering, E.J.

    2004-01-01

    The impact of programmed cell death (PCD) inhibitors on lesion formation and biochemical events in transgenic (ttr line) and non-transgenic (Nevrokop 1164) tobacco infected with Pseudomonas syringae pv. tabaci was tested. Programmed cell death in tomato cell culture was induced by Fumonisin B1 (FUM)

  10. Methyl Vitamin B12 but not methylfolate rescues a motor neuron-like cell line from homocysteine-mediated cell death

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hemendinger, Richelle A.; Armstrong, Edward J.; Brooks, Benjamin Rix

    2011-01-01

    Homocysteine is an excitatory amino acid implicated in multiple diseases including amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Information on the toxicity of homocysteine in motor neurons is limited and few studies have examined how this toxicity can be modulated. In NSC-34D cells (a hybrid cell line derived from motor neuron-neuroblastoma), homocysteine induces apoptotic cell death in the millimolar range with a TC 50 (toxic concentration at which 50% of maximal cell death is achieved) of 2.2 mM, confirmed by activation of caspase 3/7. Induction of apoptosis was independent of short-term reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation. Methyl Vitamin B12 (MeCbl) and methyl tetrahydrofolate (MTHF), used clinically to treat elevated homocysteine levels, were tested for their ability to reverse homocysteine-mediated motor neuron cell death. MeCbl in the micromolar range was able to provide neuroprotection (2 h pretreatment prior to homocysteine) and neurorescue (simultaneous exposure with homocysteine) against millimolar homocysteine with an IC 50 (concentration at which 50% of maximal cell death is inhibited) of 0.6 μM and 0.4 μM, respectively. In contrast, MTHF (up to 10 μM) had no effect on homocysteine-mediated cell death. MeCbl inhibited caspase 3/7 activation by homocysteine in a time- and dose-dependent manner, whereas MTHF had no effect. We conclude that MeCbl is effective against homocysteine-induced cell death in motor neurons in a ROS-independent manner, via a reduction in caspase activation and apoptosis. MeCbl decreases Hcy induced motor neuron death in vitro in a hybrid cell line derived from motor neuron-neuroblastoma and may play a role in the treatment of late stage ALS where HCy levels are increased in animal models of ALS.

  11. Blockage of NOX2/MAPK/NF-κB Pathway Protects Photoreceptors against Glucose Deprivation-Induced Cell Death

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bin Fan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute energy failure is one of the critical factors contributing to the pathogenic mechanisms of retinal ischemia. Our previous study demonstrated that glucose deprivation can lead to a caspase-dependent cell death of photoreceptors. The aim of this study was to decipher the upstream signal pathway in glucose deprivation- (GD- induced cell death. We mimicked acute energy failure by using glucose deprivation in photoreceptor cells (661W cells. GD-induced oxidative stress was evaluated by measuring ROS with the DCFH-DA assay and HO-1 expression by Western blot analysis. The activation of NOX2/MAPK/NF-κB signal was assessed by Western blot and immunohistochemical assays. The roles of these signals in GD-induced cell death were measured by using their specific inhibitors. Inhibition of Rac-1 and NOX2 suppressed GD-induced oxidative stress and protected photoreceptors against GD-induced cell death. NOX2 was an upstream signal in the caspase-dependent cell death cascade, yet the downstream MAPK pathways were activated and blocking MAPK signals rescued 661W cells from GD-induced death. In addition, GD caused the activation of NF-κB signal and inhibiting NF-κB significantly protected 661W cells. These observations may provide insights for treating retinal ischemic diseases and protecting retinal neurons from ischemia-induced cell death.

  12. Therapeutic approaches to preventing cell death in Huntington disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaplan, Anna; Stockwell, Brent R

    2012-12-01

    Neurodegenerative diseases affect the lives of millions of patients and their families. Due to the complexity of these diseases and our limited understanding of their pathogenesis, the design of therapeutic agents that can effectively treat these diseases has been challenging. Huntington disease (HD) is one of several neurological disorders with few therapeutic options. HD, like numerous other neurodegenerative diseases, involves extensive neuronal cell loss. One potential strategy to combat HD and other neurodegenerative disorders is to intervene in the execution of neuronal cell death. Inhibiting neuronal cell death pathways may slow the development of neurodegeneration. However, discovering small molecule inhibitors of neuronal cell death remains a significant challenge. Here, we review candidate therapeutic targets controlling cell death mechanisms that have been the focus of research in HD, as well as an emerging strategy that has been applied to developing small molecule inhibitors-fragment-based drug discovery (FBDD). FBDD has been successfully used in both industry and academia to identify selective and potent small molecule inhibitors, with a focus on challenging proteins that are not amenable to traditional high-throughput screening approaches. FBDD has been used to generate potent leads, pre-clinical candidates, and has led to the development of an FDA approved drug. This approach can be valuable for identifying modulators of cell-death-regulating proteins; such compounds may prove to be the key to halting the progression of HD and other neurodegenerative disorders. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Trypanosoma cruzi response to sterol biosynthesis inhibitors: morphophysiological alterations leading to cell death.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael Luis Kessler

    Full Text Available The protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi displays similarities to fungi in terms of its sterol lipid biosynthesis, as ergosterol and other 24-alkylated sterols are its principal endogenous sterols. The sterol pathway is thus a potential drug target for the treatment of Chagas disease. We describe here a comparative study of the growth inhibition, ultrastructural and physiological changes leading to the death of T. cruzi cells following treatment with the sterol biosynthesis inhibitors (SBIs ketoconazole and lovastatin. We first calculated the drug concentration inhibiting epimastigote growth by 50% (EC(50/72 h or killing all cells within 24 hours (EC(100/24 h. Incubation with inhibitors at the EC(50/72 h resulted in interesting morphological changes: intense proliferation of the inner mitochondrial membrane, which was corroborated by flow cytometry and confocal microscopy of the parasites stained with rhodamine 123, and strong swelling of the reservosomes, which was confirmed by acridine orange staining. These changes to the mitochondria and reservosomes may reflect the involvement of these organelles in ergosterol biosynthesis or the progressive autophagic process culminating in cell lysis after 6 to 7 days of treatment with SBIs at the EC(50/72 h. By contrast, treatment with SBIs at the EC(100/24 h resulted in rapid cell death with a necrotic phenotype: time-dependent cytosolic calcium overload, mitochondrial depolarization and reservosome membrane permeabilization (RMP, culminating in cell lysis after a few hours of drug exposure. We provide the first demonstration that RMP constitutes the "point of no return" in the cell death cascade, and propose a model for the necrotic cell death of T. cruzi. Thus, SBIs trigger cell death by different mechanisms, depending on the dose used, in T. cruzi. These findings shed new light on ergosterol biosynthesis and the mechanisms of programmed cell death in this ancient protozoan parasite.

  14. Terminalia Chebula provides protection against dual modes of necroptotic and apoptotic cell death upon death receptor ligation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yoonjung; Byun, Hee Sun; Seok, Jeong Ho; Park, Kyeong Ah; Won, Minho; Seo, Wonhyoung; Lee, So-Ra; Kang, Kidong; Sohn, Kyung-Cheol; Lee, Ill Young; Kim, Hyeong-Geug; Son, Chang Gue; Shen, Han-Ming; Hur, Gang Min

    2016-04-27

    Death receptor (DR) ligation elicits two different modes of cell death (necroptosis and apoptosis) depending on the cellular context. By screening a plant extract library from cells undergoing necroptosis or apoptosis, we identified a water extract of Terminalia chebula (WETC) as a novel and potent dual inhibitor of DR-mediated cell death. Investigation of the underlying mechanisms of its anti-necroptotic and anti-apoptotic action revealed that WETC or its constituents (e.g., gallic acid) protected against tumor necrosis factor-induced necroptosis via the suppression of TNF-induced ROS without affecting the upstream signaling events. Surprisingly, WETC also provided protection against DR-mediated apoptosis by inhibition of the caspase cascade. Furthermore, it activated the autophagy pathway via suppression of mTOR. Of the WETC constituents, punicalagin and geraniin appeared to possess the most potent anti-apoptotic and autophagy activation effect. Importantly, blockage of autophagy with pharmacological inhibitors or genetic silencing of Atg5 selectively abolished the anti-apoptotic function of WETC. These results suggest that WETC protects against dual modes of cell death upon DR ligation. Therefore, WETC might serve as a potential treatment for diseases characterized by aberrantly sensitized apoptotic or non-apoptotic signaling cascades.

  15. An Ursolic Acid Derived Small Molecule Triggers Cancer Cell Death through Hyperstimulation of Macropinocytosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Lin; Li, Bin; Su, Xiaohui; Chen, Ge; Li, Yaqin; Yu, Linqian; Li, Li; Wei, Wanguo

    2017-08-10

    Macropinocytosis is a transient endocytosis that internalizes extracellular fluid and particles into vacuoles. Recent studies suggest that hyperstimulation of macropinocytosis can induce a novel nonapoptotic cell death, methuosis. In this report, we describe the identification of an ursolic acid derived small molecule (compound 17), which induces cancer cell death through hyperstimulation of macropinocytosis. 17 causes the accumulation of vacuoles derived from macropinosomes based on transmission electron microscopy, time-lapse microscopy, and labeling with extracellular fluid phase tracers. The vacuoles induced by 17 separate from other cytoplasmic compartments but acquire some characteristics of late endosomes and lysosomes. Inhibiting hyperstimulation of macropinocytosis with the specific inhibitor amiloride blocks cell death, implicating that 17 leads to cell death via macropinocytosis, which is coincident with methuosis. Our results uncovered a novel cell death pathway involved in the activity of 17, which may provide a basis for further development of natural-product-derived scaffolds for drugs that trigger cancer cell death by methuosis.

  16. Free cholesterol accumulation impairs antioxidant activities and aggravates apoptotic cell death in menadione-induced oxidative injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Waisin; Xu, Mingjing; Li, Yue; Gu, Yong; Chen, Jianping; Wong, Derek; Fung, Peter C W; Shen, Jiangang

    2011-10-01

    Although the relationship between hypercholesterolemia and oxidative stress has been extensively investigated, direct evidence regarding to the roles of cholesterol accumulation in the generations of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and apoptotic cell death under oxidative stress is lack. In this study, we investigated productions of superoxide anions (O(2)(-)) and nitric oxide (NO), and apoptotic cell death in wild type Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells and cholesterol accumulated CHO cells genetically and chemically. Oxidative stress was induced by menadione challenge. The results revealed that abundance of free cholesterol (FC) promoted menadione-induced O(2)(-) and NO productions. FC accumulation down-regulated eNOS expression but up-regulated NADPH oxidases, and inhibited the activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase. Treatment of menadione increased the expressions of iNOS and qp91 phox, enhanced the activities of SOD and catalase in the wild-type CHO cells but inhibited the activity of glutathione peroxidase in the cholesterol accumulated CHO cells. Moreover, FC abundance promoted apoptotic cell death in these cells. Taken together, those results suggest that free cholesterol accumulation aggravates menadione-induced oxidative stress and exacerbates apoptotic cell death. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Synergism between arsenite and proteasome inhibitor MG132 over cell death in myeloid leukaemic cells U937 and the induction of low levels of intracellular superoxide anion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lombardo, Tomás; Cavaliere, Victoria; Costantino, Susana N.; Kornblihtt, Laura; Alvarez, Elida M.; Blanco, Guillermo A.

    2012-01-01

    Increased oxygen species production has often been cited as a mechanism determining synergism on cell death and growth inhibition effects of arsenic-combined drugs. However the net effect of drug combination may not be easily anticipated solely from available knowledge of drug-induced death mechanisms. We evaluated the combined effect of sodium arsenite with the proteasome inhibitor MG132, and the anti-leukaemic agent CAPE, on growth-inhibition and cell death effect in acute myeloid leukaemic cells U937 and Burkitt's lymphoma-derived Raji cells, by the Chou–Talalay method. In addition we explored the association of cytotoxic effect of drugs with changes in intracellular superoxide anion (O 2 − ) levels. Our results showed that combined arsenite + MG132 produced low levels of O 2 − at 6 h and 24 h after exposure and were synergic on cell death induction in U937 cells over the whole dose range, although the combination was antagonistic on growth inhibition effect. Exposure to a constant non-cytotoxic dose of 80 μM hydrogen peroxide together with arsenite + MG132 changed synergism on cell death to antagonism at all effect levels while increasing O 2 − levels. Arsenite + hydrogen peroxide also resulted in antagonism with increased O 2 − levels in U937 cells. In Raji cells, arsenite + MG132 also produced low levels of O 2 − at 6 h and 24 h but resulted in antagonism on cell death and growth inhibition. By contrast, the combination arsenite + CAPE showed high levels of O 2 − production at 6 h and 24 h post exposure but resulted in antagonism over cell death and growth inhibition effects in U937 and Raji cells. We conclude that synergism between arsenite and MG132 in U937 cells is negatively associated to O 2 − levels at early time points after exposure. -- Highlights: ► Arsenic combined cytotoxic and anti-proliferative effects by Chou–Talalay method. ► Cytotoxic effect associated with superoxide levels as assessed by flow cytometry. ► Synergism

  18. Akebia saponin PA induces autophagic and apoptotic cell death in AGS human gastric cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Mei-Ying; Lee, Dong Hwa; Joo, Eun Ji; Son, Kun Ho; Kim, Yeong Shik

    2013-09-01

    In this study, we investigated the anticancer mechanism of akebia saponin PA (AS), a natural product isolated from Dipsacus asperoides in human gastric cancer cell lines. It was shown that AS-induced cell death is caused by autophagy and apoptosis in AGS cells. The apoptosis-inducing effect of AS was characterized by annexin V/propidium (PI) staining, increase of sub-G1 phase and caspase-3 activation, while the autophagy-inducing effect was indicated by the formation of cytoplasmic vacuoles and microtubule-associated protein 1 light chain-3 II (LC3-II) conversion. The autophagy inhibitor bafilomycin A1 (BaF1) decreased AS-induced cell death and caspase-3 activation, but caspase-3 inhibitor Ac-DEVD-CHO did not affect LC3-II accumulation or AS-induced cell viability, suggesting that AS induces autophagic cell death and autophagy contributes to caspase-3-dependent apoptosis. Furthermore, AS activated p38/c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), which could be inhibited by BaF1, and caspase-3 activation was attenuated by both SB202190 and SP600125, indicating that AS-induced autophagy promotes mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs)-mediated apoptosis. Taken together, these results demonstrate that AS induces autophagic and apoptotic cell death and autophagy plays the main role in akebia saponin PA-induced cell death. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Checkpoint Inhibition: Programmed Cell Death 1 and Programmed Cell Death 1 Ligand Inhibitors in Hodgkin Lymphoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villasboas, Jose Caetano; Ansell, Stephen

    2016-01-01

    Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) is a lymphoid malignancy characterized by a reactive immune infiltrate surrounding relatively few malignant cells. In this scenario, active immune evasion seems to play a central role in allowing tumor progression. Immune checkpoint inhibitor pathways are normal mechanisms of T-cell regulation that suppress immune effector function following an antigenic challenge. Hodgkin lymphoma cells are able to escape immune surveillance by co-opting these mechanisms. The programmed cell death 1 (PD-1) pathway in particular is exploited in HL as the malignant Hodgkin and Reed-Sternberg cells express on their surface cognate ligands (PD-L1/L2) for the PD-1 receptor and thereby dampen the T-cell-mediated antitumoral response. Monoclonal antibodies that interact with and disrupt the PD-1:PD-L1/L2 axis have now been developed and tested in early-phase clinical trials in patients with advanced HL with encouraging results. The remarkable clinical activity of PD-1 inhibitors in HL highlights the importance of immune checkpoint pathways as therapeutic targets in HL. In this review, we discuss the rationale for targeting PD-1 and PD-L1 in the treatment of HL. We will evaluate the published clinical data on the different agents and highlight the safety profile of this class of agents. We discuss the available evidence on the use of biomarkers as predictors of response to checkpoint blockade and summarize the areas under active investigation in the use of PD-1/PD-L1 inhibitors for the treatment of HL.

  20. Sodium valproate, a histone deacetylase inhibitor, modulates the vascular endothelial growth inhibitor-mediated cell death in human osteosarcoma and vascular endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamanegi, Koji; Kawabe, Mutsuki; Futani, Hiroyuki; Nishiura, Hiroshi; Yamada, Naoko; Kato-Kogoe, Nahoko; Kishimoto, Hiromitsu; Yoshiya, Shinichi; Nakasho, Keiji

    2015-05-01

    The level of vascular endothelial growth inhibitor (VEGI) has been reported to be negatively associated with neovascularization in malignant tumors. The soluble form of VEGI is a potent anti-angiogenic factor due to its effects in inhibiting endothelial cell proliferation. This inhibition is mediated by death receptor 3 (DR3), which contains a death domain in its cytoplasmic tail capable of inducing apoptosis that can be subsequently blocked by decoy receptor 3 (DcR3). We investigated the effects of sodium valproate (VPA) and trichostatin A (TSA), histone deacetylase inhibitors, on the expression of VEGI and its related receptors in human osteosarcoma (OS) cell lines and human microvascular endothelial (HMVE) cells. Consequently, treatment with VPA and TSA increased the VEGI and DR3 expression levels without inducing DcR3 production in the OS cell lines. In contrast, the effect on the HMVE cells was limited, with no evidence of growth inhibition or an increase in the DR3 and DcR3 expression. However, VPA-induced soluble VEGI in the OS cell culture medium markedly inhibited the vascular tube formation of HMVE cells, while VEGI overexpression resulted in enhanced OS cell death. Taken together, the HDAC inhibitor has anti-angiogenesis and antitumor activities that mediate soluble VEGI/DR3-induced apoptosis via both autocrine and paracrine pathways. This study indicates that the HDAC inhibitor may be exploited as a therapeutic strategy modulating the soluble VEGI/DR3 pathway in osteosarcoma patients.

  1. Ezrin dephosphorylation/downregulation contributes to ursolic acid-mediated cell death in human leukemia cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, G; Zhou, T; Liu, L; Chen, J; Zhao, Z; Peng, Y; Li, P; Gao, N

    2013-01-01

    Ezrin links the actin filaments with the cell membrane and has a functional role in the apoptotic process. It appears clear that ezrin is directly associated with Fas, leading to activation of caspase cascade and cell death. However, the exact role of ezrin in ursolic acid (UA)-induced apoptosis remains unclear. In this study, we show for the first time that UA induces apoptosis in both transformed and primary leukemia cells through dephosphorylation/downregulation of ezrin, association and polarized colocalization of Fas and ezrin, as well as formation of death-inducing signaling complex. These events are dependent on Rho-ROCK1 signaling pathway. Knockdown of ezrin enhanced cell death mediated by UA, whereas overexpression of ezrin attenuated UA-induced apoptosis. Our in vivo study also showed that UA-mediated inhibition of tumor growth of mouse leukemia xenograft model is in association with the dephosphorylation/downregulation of ezrin. Such findings suggest that the cytoskeletal protein ezrin may represent an attractive target for UA-mediated lethality in human leukemia cells

  2. Caffeic acid, morin hydrate and quercetin partially attenuate sulfur mustard-induced cell death by inhibiting the lipoxygenase pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Shin; Jeong, Kwang-Joon; Cho, Sung Kweon; Park, Joo-Won; Park, Woo-Jae

    2016-11-01

    Sulfur mustard (SM) is an alkylating agent, which has been used as in chemical warfare in a number of conflicts. As the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), and adducts in DNA and proteins have been suggested as the mechanism underlying SM‑induced cytotoxicity, the present study screened several antioxidant candidates, including tannic acid, deferoxamine mesylate, trolox, vitamin C, ellagic acid and caffeic acid (CA) to assess their potential as therapeutic agents for SM‑induced cell death. Among several antioxidants, CA partially alleviated SM‑induced cell death in a dose‑dependent manner. Although CA treatment decreased the phosphorylation of p38 mitogen‑activated protein (MAP) kinase and p53, p38 MAP kinase inhibition by SB203580 did not affect SM‑induced cell death. As CA has also been reported as a 15‑lipoxygenase (15‑LOX) inhibitor, the role of 15‑LOX in SM‑induced cytotoxicity was also examined. Similar to the results observed with CA, treatment with PD146176, a specific 15‑LOX inhibitor, decreased SM‑induced cytotoxicity, accompanied by decreases in the production of tumor necrosis factor‑α and 15‑hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid. Furthermore, the present study investigated the protective effects of two natural 15‑LOX inhibitors, morin hydrate and quercetin, in SM‑induced cytotoxicity. As expected, these inhibitors had similar protective effects against SM‑induced cytotoxicity. These antioxidants also reduced the generation of ROS and nitrate/nitrite. Therefore, the results of the present study indicated that the natural products, CA, quercetin and morin hydrate, offer potential as adjuvant therapeutic agents for SM‑induced toxicity, not only by reducing inflammation mediated by the p38 and LOX signaling pathways, but also by decreasing the generation of ROS and nitrate/nitrite.

  3. Molecular mechanisms of cell death: recommendations of the Nomenclature Committee on Cell Death 2018

    OpenAIRE

    Galluzzi, L; Vitale, I; Aaronson, Sa; Abrams, Jm; Adam, D; Agostinis, P; Alnemri, Es; Altucci, L; Amelio, I; Andrews, Dw; Annicchiarico-Petruzzelli, M; Antonov, Av; Arama, E; Baehrecke, Eh; Barlev, Na

    2018-01-01

    Over the past decade, the Nomenclature Committee on Cell Death (NCCD) has formulated guidelines for the definition and interpretation of cell death from morphological, biochemical, and functional perspectives. Since the field continues to expand and novel mechanisms that orchestrate multiple cell death pathways are unveiled, we propose an updated classification of cell death subroutines focusing on mechanistic and essential (as opposed to correlative and dispensable) aspects of the process. A...

  4. Annonaceous acetogenin mimic AA005 induces cancer cell death via apoptosis inducing factor through a caspase-3-independent mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Bing; Wang, Tong-Dan; Shen, Shao-Ming; Yu, Yun; Mao, Chan; Yao, Zhu-Jun; Wang, Li-Shun

    2015-03-18

    Annonaceous acetogenins are a family of natural products with antitumor activities. Annonaceous acetogenin mimic AA005 reportedly inhibits mammalian mitochondrial NADH-ubiquinone reductase (Complex I) and induces gastric cancer cell death. However, the mechanisms underlying its cell-death-inducing activity are unclear. We used SW620 colorectal adenocarcinoma cells to study AA005 cytotoxic activity. Cell deaths were determined by Trypan blue assay and flow cytometry, and related proteins were characterized by western blot. Immunofluorescence and subcellular fractionation were used to evaluate AIF nuclear translocation. Reactive oxygen species were assessed by using redox-sensitive dye DCFDA. AA005 induces a unique type of cell death in colorectal adenocarcinoma cells, characterized by lack of caspase-3 activation or apoptotic body formation, sensitivity to poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase inhibitor Olaparib (AZD2281) but not pan-caspase inhibitor Z-VAD.fmk, and dependence on apoptosis-inducing factor (AIF). AA005 treatment also reduced expression of mitochondrial Complex I components, and leads to accumulation of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) at the early stage. Blocking ROS formation significantly suppresses AA005-induced cell death in SW620 cells. Moreover, blocking activation of RIP-1 by necroptosis inhibitor necrotatin-1 inhibits AIF translocation and partially suppresses AA005-induced cell death in SW620 cells demonstrating that RIP-1 protein may be essential for cell death. AA005 may trigger the cell death via mediated by AIF through caspase-3 independent pathway. Our work provided new mechanisms for AA005-induced cancer cell death and novel clues for cancer treatment via AIF dependent cell death.

  5. MG132 as a proteasome inhibitor induces cell growth inhibition and cell death in A549 lung cancer cells via influencing reactive oxygen species and GSH level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Yong Hwan; Park, Woo Hyun

    2010-07-01

    Carbobenzoxy-Leu-Leu-leucinal (MG132) as a proteasome inhibitor has been shown to induce apoptotic cell death through formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). In the present study, we evaluated the effects of MG132 on the growth of A549 lung cancer cells in relation to cell growth, ROS and glutathione (GSH) levels. Treatment with MG132 inhibited the growth of A549 cells with an IC(50) of approximately 20 microM at 24 hours. DNA flow cytometric analysis indicated that 0.5 approximately 30 microM MG132 induced a G1 phase arrest of the cell cycle in A549 cells. Treatment with 10 or 30 microM MG132 also induced apoptosis, as evidenced by sub-G1 cells and annexin V staining cells. This was accompanied by the loss of mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP; Delta psi m). The intracellular ROS levels including O(2) (*-) were strongly increased in 10 or 30 microM MG132-treated A549 cells but were down-regulated in 0.1, 0.5 or 1 microM MG132-treated cells. Furthermore, 10 or 30 microM MG132 increased mitochondrial O(2) (*- ) level but 0.1, 0.5 or 1 microM MG132 decreased that. In addition, 10 or 30 microM MG132 induced GSH depletion in A549 cells. In conclusion, MG132 inhibited the growth of human A549 cells via inducing the cell cycle arrest as well as triggering apoptosis, which was in part correlated with the changes of ROS and GSH levels. Our present data provide important information on the anti-growth mechanisms of MG132 in A549 lung cancer cells in relation to ROS and GSH.

  6. Mechanisms of palmitate-induced cell death in human osteoblasts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunaratnam, Krishanthi; Vidal, Christopher; Boadle, Ross; Thekkedam, Chris; Duque, Gustavo

    2013-01-01

    Summary Lipotoxicity is an overload of lipids in non-adipose tissues that affects function and induces cell death. Lipotoxicity has been demonstrated in bone cells in vitro using osteoblasts and adipocytes in coculture. In this condition, lipotoxicity was induced by high levels of saturated fatty acids (mostly palmitate) secreted by cultured adipocytes acting in a paracrine manner. In the present study, we aimed to identify the underlying mechanisms of lipotoxicity in human osteoblasts. Palmitate induced autophagy in cultured osteoblasts, which was preceded by the activation of autophagosomes that surround palmitate droplets. Palmitate also induced apoptosis though the activation of the Fas/Jun kinase (JNK) apoptotic pathway. In addition, osteoblasts could be protected from lipotoxicity by inhibiting autophagy with the phosphoinositide kinase inhibitor 3-methyladenine or by inhibiting apoptosis with the JNK inhibitor SP600125. In summary, we have identified two major molecular mechanisms of lipotoxicity in osteoblasts and in doing so we have identified a new potential therapeutic approach to prevent osteoblast dysfunction and death, which are common features of age-related bone loss and osteoporosis. PMID:24285710

  7. PEP-1-SIRT2 inhibits inflammatory response and oxidative stress-induced cell death via expression of antioxidant enzymes in murine macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Mi Jin; Kim, Dae Won; Park, Jung Hwan; Kim, Sang Jin; Lee, Chi Hern; Yong, Ji In; Ryu, Eun Ji; Cho, Su Bin; Yeo, Hyeon Ji; Hyeon, Jiye; Cho, Sung-Woo; Kim, Duk-Soo; Son, Ora; Park, Jinseu; Han, Kyu Hyung; Cho, Yoon Shin; Eum, Won Sik; Choi, Soo Young

    2013-10-01

    Sirtuin 2 (SIRT2), a member of the sirtuin family of proteins, plays an important role in cell survival. However, the biological function of SIRT2 protein is unclear with respect to inflammation and oxidative stress. In this study, we examined the protective effects of SIRT2 on inflammation and oxidative stress-induced cell damage using a cell permeative PEP-1-SIRT2 protein. Purified PEP-1-SIRT2 was transduced into RAW 264.7 cells in a time- and dose-dependent manner and protected against lipopolysaccharide- and hydrogen peroxide (H₂O₂)-induced cell death and cytotoxicity. Also, transduced PEP-1-SIRT2 significantly inhibited the expression of cytokines as well as the activation of NF-κB and mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs). In addition, PEP-1-SIRT2 decreased cellular levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and of cleaved caspase-3, whereas it elevated the expression of antioxidant enzymes such as MnSOD, catalase, and glutathione peroxidase. Furthermore, topical application of PEP-1-SIRT2 to 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol 13-acetate-treated mouse ears markedly inhibited expression levels of COX-2 and proinflammatory cytokines as well as the activation of NF-κB and MAPKs. These results demonstrate that PEP-1-SIRT2 inhibits inflammation and oxidative stress by reducing the levels of expression of cytokines and ROS, suggesting that PEP-1-SIRT2 may be a potential therapeutic agent for various disorders related to ROS, including skin inflammation. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Destabilization of Akt Promotes the Death of Myeloma Cell Lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanan Zhang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Constitutive activation of Akt is believed to be an oncogenic signal in multiple myeloma and is associated with poor patient prognosis and resistance to available treatment. The stability of Akt proteins is regulated by phosphorylating the highly conserved turn motif (TM of these proteins and the chaperone protein HSP90. In this study we investigate the antitumor effects of inhibiting mTORC2 plus HSP90 in myeloma cell lines. We show that chronic exposure of cells to rapamycin can inhibit mTORC2 pathway, and AKT will be destabilized by administration of the HSP90 inhibitor 17-allylamino-geldanamycin (17-AAG. Finally, we show that the rapamycin synergizes with 17-AAG and inhibits myeloma cells growth and promotes cell death to a greater extent than either drug alone. Our studies provide a clinical rationale of use mTOR inhibitors and chaperone protein inhibitors in combination regimens for the treatment of human blood cancers.

  9. Cancer Cell Growth Inhibitory Effect of Bee Venom via Increase of Death Receptor 3 Expression and Inactivation of NF-kappa B in NSCLC Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyung Eun Choi

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Our previous findings have demonstrated that bee venom (BV has anti-cancer activity in several cancer cells. However, the effects of BV on lung cancer cell growth have not been reported. Cell viability was determined with trypan blue uptake, soft agar formation as well as DAPI and TUNEL assay. Cell death related protein expression was determined with Western blotting. An EMSA was used for nuclear factor kappaB (NF-κB activity assay. BV (1–5 μg/mL inhibited growth of lung cancer cells by induction of apoptosis in a dose dependent manner in lung cancer cell lines A549 and NCI-H460. Consistent with apoptotic cell death, expression of DR3 and DR6 was significantly increased. However, deletion of DRs by small interfering RNA significantly reversed BV induced cell growth inhibitory effects. Expression of pro-apoptotic proteins (caspase-3 and Bax was concomitantly increased, but the NF-κB activity and expression of Bcl-2 were inhibited. A combination treatment of tumor necrosis factor (TNF-like weak inducer of apoptosis, TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand, docetaxel and cisplatin, with BV synergistically inhibited both A549 and NCI-H460 lung cancer cell growth with further down regulation of NF-κB activity. These results show that BV induces apoptotic cell death in lung cancer cells through the enhancement of DR3 expression and inhibition of NF-κB pathway.

  10. Chemical chaperones reduce ionizing radiation-induced endoplasmic reticulum stress and cell death in IEC-6 cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Eun Sang; Lee, Hae-June; Lee, Yoon-Jin [Division of Radiation Effects, Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul 139-706 (Korea, Republic of); Jeong, Jae-Hoon [Division of Radiotherapy, Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul 139-706 (Korea, Republic of); Kang, Seongman [Division of Life Sciences, Korea University, Seoul 136-701 (Korea, Republic of); Lim, Young-Bin, E-mail: yblim@kirams.re.kr [Division of Radiation Effects, Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul 139-706 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-07-25

    Highlights: • UPR activation precedes caspase activation in irradiated IEC-6 cells. • Chemical ER stress inducers radiosensitize IEC-6 cells. • siRNAs that targeted ER stress responses ameliorate IR-induced cell death. • Chemical chaperons prevent cell death in irradiated IEC-6 cells. - Abstract: Radiotherapy, which is one of the most effective approaches to the treatment of various cancers, plays an important role in malignant cell eradication in the pelvic area and abdomen. However, it also generates some degree of intestinal injury. Apoptosis in the intestinal epithelium is the primary pathological factor that initiates radiation-induced intestinal injury, but the mechanism by which ionizing radiation (IR) induces apoptosis in the intestinal epithelium is not clearly understood. Recently, IR has been shown to induce endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, thereby activating the unfolded protein response (UPR) signaling pathway in intestinal epithelial cells. However, the consequences of the IR-induced activation of the UPR signaling pathway on radiosensitivity in intestinal epithelial cells remain to be determined. In this study, we investigated the role of ER stress responses in IR-induced intestinal epithelial cell death. We show that chemical ER stress inducers, such as tunicamycin or thapsigargin, enhanced IR-induced caspase 3 activation and DNA fragmentation in intestinal epithelial cells. Knockdown of Xbp1 or Atf6 with small interfering RNA inhibited IR-induced caspase 3 activation. Treatment with chemical chaperones prevented ER stress and subsequent apoptosis in IR-exposed intestinal epithelial cells. Our results suggest a pro-apoptotic role of ER stress in IR-exposed intestinal epithelial cells. Furthermore, inhibiting ER stress may be an effective strategy to prevent IR-induced intestinal injury.

  11. Apoptosis and tumor cell death in response to HAMLET (human alpha-lactalbumin made lethal to tumor cells).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallgren, Oskar; Aits, Sonja; Brest, Patrick; Gustafsson, Lotta; Mossberg, Ann-Kristin; Wullt, Björn; Svanborg, Catharina

    2008-01-01

    HAMLET (human alpha-lactalbumin made lethal to tumor cells) is a molecular complex derived from human milk that kills tumor cells by a process resembling programmed cell death. The complex consists of partially unfolded alpha-lactalbumin and oleic acid, and both the protein and the fatty acid are required for cell death. HAMLET has broad antitumor activity in vitro, and its therapeutic effect has been confirmed in vivo in a human glioblastoma rat xenograft model, in patients with skin papillomas and in patients with bladder cancer. The mechanisms of tumor cell death remain unclear, however. Immediately after the encounter with tumor cells, HAMLET invades the cells and causes mitochondrial membrane depolarization, cytochrome c release, phosphatidyl serine exposure, and a low caspase response. A fraction of the cells undergoes morphological changes characteristic of apoptosis, but caspase inhibition does not rescue the cells and Bcl-2 overexpression or altered p53 status does not influence the sensitivity of tumor cells to HAMLET. HAMLET also creates a state of unfolded protein overload and activates 20S proteasomes, which contributes to cell death. In parallel, HAMLET translocates to tumor cell nuclei, where high-affinity interactions with histones cause chromatin disruption, loss of transcription, and nuclear condensation. The dying cells also show morphological changes compatible with macroautophagy, and recent studies indicate that macroautophagy is involved in the cell death response to HAMLET. The results suggest that HAMLET, like a hydra with many heads, may interact with several crucial cellular organelles, thereby activating several forms of cell death, in parallel. This complexity might underlie the rapid death response of tumor cells and the broad antitumor activity of HAMLET.

  12. Collagen gel protects L929 cells from TNFα-induced death by activating NF-κB.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hong-Ju; Li, Meng-Qi; Liu, Wei-Wei; Hayashi, Toshihiko; Fujisaki, Hitomi; Hattori, Shunji; Tashiro, Shin-Ichi; Onodera, Satoshi; Ikejima, Takashi

    2017-09-01

    Type I collagen is one of the most abundant components of extracellular matrix. We previously illustrated that murine fibrosarcoma L929 cells grew well on type I collagen gel and escaped from TNFα-induced cell death. In this study, we investigated the mechanism underlying the protective effect of collagen gel. We used western blot, confocal microscopy, MTT assay and flow cytometry by introducing fluorescence staining to determine the expression levels of nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB), inhibitory ratio and autophagy. L929 cells on collagen gel showed higher expression of NF-κB in the nucleus. Inhibition of NF-κB with pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate hydrochloride (PDTC) or knockdown by NF-κB-siRNA canceled the protective effect of collagen gel on L929 cells from TNFα-induced death, suggesting for the role of NF-κB in the protection from cell death. We found a new aspect of the effect of PDTC on L929 cells cultured on collagen gel. PDTC alone without TNFα induced apoptosis in the L929 cells cultured on collagen gel but not the cells on plastic dish. The apoptosis induction of the L929 cells cultured on collagen gel with PDTC was repressed by inhibiting autophagy with chloroquine, an autophagy inhibitor, suggesting that autophagy contributes to the death induced by the treatment with PDTC. Possible underlying mechanism of this finding is discussed. NF-κB played an important role in protecting the L929 cells cultured on collagen gel from TNFα-induced death.

  13. Resveratrol enhances ultraviolet B-induced cell death through nuclear factor-κB pathway in human epidermoid carcinoma A431 cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roy, Preeti; Kalra, Neetu; Nigam, Nidhi; George, Jasmine; Ray, Ratan Singh; Hans, Rajendra K.; Prasad, Sahdeo; Shukla, Yogeshwer

    2009-01-01

    Resveratrol has been reported to suppress cancer progression in several in vivo and in vitro models, whereas ultraviolet B (UVB), a major risk for skin cancer, is known to induce cell death in cancerous cells. Here, we investigated whether resveratrol can sensitize A431 human epidermoid carcinoma cells to UVB-induced cell death. We examined the combined effect of UVB (30 mJ/cm 2 ) and resveratrol (60 μM) on A431 cells. Exposure of A431 carcinoma cells to UVB radiation or resveratrol can inhibit cell proliferation and induce apoptosis. However, the combination of resveratrol and UVB exposure was associated with increased proliferation inhibition of A431 cells compared with either agent alone. Furthermore, results showed that resveratrol and UVB treatment of A431 cells disrupted the nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-κB) pathway by blocking phosphorylation of serine 536 and inactivating NF-κB and subsequent degradation of IκBα, which regulates the expression of survivin. Resveratrol and UVB treatment also decreased the phosphorylation of tyrosine 701 of the important transcription factor signal transducer activator of transcription (STAT1), which in turn inhibited translocation of phospho-STAT1 to the nucleus. Moreover, resveratrol/UVB also inhibited the metastatic protein LIMK1, which reduced the motility of A431 cells. In conclusion, our study demonstrates that the combination of resveratrol and UVB act synergistically against skin cancer cells. Thus, resveratrol is a potential chemotherapeutic agent against skin carcinogenesis.

  14. Resveratrol enhances ultraviolet B-induced cell death through nuclear factor-{kappa}B pathway in human epidermoid carcinoma A431 cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roy, Preeti; Kalra, Neetu; Nigam, Nidhi; George, Jasmine [Proteomics Laboratory, Indian Institute of Toxicology Research (CSIR), P.O. Box 80, M.G. Marg, Lucknow 226 001 (India); Ray, Ratan Singh; Hans, Rajendra K. [Photobiology Laboratory, Indian Institute of Toxicology Research (CSIR), P.O. Box 80, M.G. Marg, Lucknow 226 001 (India); Prasad, Sahdeo [Proteomics Laboratory, Indian Institute of Toxicology Research (CSIR), P.O. Box 80, M.G. Marg, Lucknow 226 001 (India); Shukla, Yogeshwer, E-mail: yogeshwer_shukla@hotmail.com [Proteomics Laboratory, Indian Institute of Toxicology Research (CSIR), P.O. Box 80, M.G. Marg, Lucknow 226 001 (India)

    2009-06-26

    Resveratrol has been reported to suppress cancer progression in several in vivo and in vitro models, whereas ultraviolet B (UVB), a major risk for skin cancer, is known to induce cell death in cancerous cells. Here, we investigated whether resveratrol can sensitize A431 human epidermoid carcinoma cells to UVB-induced cell death. We examined the combined effect of UVB (30 mJ/cm{sup 2}) and resveratrol (60 {mu}M) on A431 cells. Exposure of A431 carcinoma cells to UVB radiation or resveratrol can inhibit cell proliferation and induce apoptosis. However, the combination of resveratrol and UVB exposure was associated with increased proliferation inhibition of A431 cells compared with either agent alone. Furthermore, results showed that resveratrol and UVB treatment of A431 cells disrupted the nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-{kappa}B) pathway by blocking phosphorylation of serine 536 and inactivating NF-{kappa}B and subsequent degradation of I{kappa}B{alpha}, which regulates the expression of survivin. Resveratrol and UVB treatment also decreased the phosphorylation of tyrosine 701 of the important transcription factor signal transducer activator of transcription (STAT1), which in turn inhibited translocation of phospho-STAT1 to the nucleus. Moreover, resveratrol/UVB also inhibited the metastatic protein LIMK1, which reduced the motility of A431 cells. In conclusion, our study demonstrates that the combination of resveratrol and UVB act synergistically against skin cancer cells. Thus, resveratrol is a potential chemotherapeutic agent against skin carcinogenesis.

  15. Attenuation of oxidative neuronal cell death by coffee phenolic phytochemicals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, Eun Sun; Jang, Young Jin; Hwang, Mun Kyung; Kang, Nam Joo; Lee, Ki Won; Lee, Hyong Joo

    2009-01-01

    Neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer's disease (AD) are strongly associated with oxidative stress, which is induced by reactive oxygen species (ROS) including hydrogen peroxide (H 2 O 2 ). Recent studies suggest that moderate coffee consumption may reduce the risk of neurodegenerative diseases such as AD, but the molecular mechanisms underlying this effect remain to be clarified. In this study, we investigated the protective effects of chlorogenic acid (5-O-caffeoylquinic acid; CGA), a major phenolic phytochemical found in instant decaffeinated coffee (IDC), and IDC against oxidative PC12 neuronal cell death. IDC (1 and 5 μg/ml) or CGA (1 and 5 μM) attenuated H 2 O 2 -induced PC12 cell death. H 2 O 2 -induced nuclear condensation and DNA fragmentation were strongly inhibited by pretreatment with IDC or CGA. Pretreatment with IDC or CGA also inhibited the H 2 O 2 -induced cleavage of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP), and downregulation of Bcl-X L and caspase-3. The accumulation of intracellular ROS in H 2 O 2 -treated PC12 cells was dose-dependently diminished by IDC or CGA. The activation of c-Jun N-terminal protein kinase (JNK) and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) by H 2 O 2 in PC12 cells was also inhibited by IDC or CGA. Collectively, these results indicate that IDC and CGA protect PC12 cells from H 2 O 2 -induced apoptosis by blocking the accumulation of intracellular ROS and the activation of MAPKs

  16. Synergism between arsenite and proteasome inhibitor MG132 over cell death in myeloid leukaemic cells U937 and the induction of low levels of intracellular superoxide anion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lombardo, Tomás [Laboratorio de Immunotoxicologia (LaITO), IDEHU-CONICET, Hospital de Clínicas, José de San Martín, Universidad de Buenos Aires (UBA), Buenos Aires (Argentina); Cavaliere, Victoria; Costantino, Susana N. [Laboratorio de Inmunología Tumoral (LIT), IDEHU-CONICET, Facultad de Farmacia y Bioquímica, UBA, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Kornblihtt, Laura [Servicio de Hematología, Hospital de Clínicas, José de San Martín (UBA), Buenos Aires (Argentina); Alvarez, Elida M. [Laboratorio de Inmunología Tumoral (LIT), IDEHU-CONICET, Facultad de Farmacia y Bioquímica, UBA, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Blanco, Guillermo A., E-mail: gblanco@ffyb.uba.ar [Laboratorio de Immunotoxicologia (LaITO), IDEHU-CONICET, Hospital de Clínicas, José de San Martín, Universidad de Buenos Aires (UBA), Buenos Aires (Argentina)

    2012-02-01

    Increased oxygen species production has often been cited as a mechanism determining synergism on cell death and growth inhibition effects of arsenic-combined drugs. However the net effect of drug combination may not be easily anticipated solely from available knowledge of drug-induced death mechanisms. We evaluated the combined effect of sodium arsenite with the proteasome inhibitor MG132, and the anti-leukaemic agent CAPE, on growth-inhibition and cell death effect in acute myeloid leukaemic cells U937 and Burkitt's lymphoma-derived Raji cells, by the Chou–Talalay method. In addition we explored the association of cytotoxic effect of drugs with changes in intracellular superoxide anion (O{sub 2}{sup −}) levels. Our results showed that combined arsenite + MG132 produced low levels of O{sub 2}{sup −} at 6 h and 24 h after exposure and were synergic on cell death induction in U937 cells over the whole dose range, although the combination was antagonistic on growth inhibition effect. Exposure to a constant non-cytotoxic dose of 80 μM hydrogen peroxide together with arsenite + MG132 changed synergism on cell death to antagonism at all effect levels while increasing O{sub 2}{sup −} levels. Arsenite + hydrogen peroxide also resulted in antagonism with increased O{sub 2}{sup −} levels in U937 cells. In Raji cells, arsenite + MG132 also produced low levels of O{sub 2}{sup −} at 6 h and 24 h but resulted in antagonism on cell death and growth inhibition. By contrast, the combination arsenite + CAPE showed high levels of O{sub 2}{sup −} production at 6 h and 24 h post exposure but resulted in antagonism over cell death and growth inhibition effects in U937 and Raji cells. We conclude that synergism between arsenite and MG132 in U937 cells is negatively associated to O{sub 2}{sup −} levels at early time points after exposure. -- Highlights: ► Arsenic combined cytotoxic and anti-proliferative effects by Chou–Talalay method. ► Cytotoxic effect

  17. Apoptotic Cell Death Induced by Resveratrol Is Partially Mediated by the Autophagy Pathway in Human Ovarian Cancer Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fangfang Lang

    Full Text Available Resveratrol (trans-3,4,5'-trihydroxystilbene is an active compound in food, such as red grapes, peanuts, and berries. Resveratrol exhibits an anticancer effect on various human cancer cells. However, the mechanism of resveratrol-induced anti-cancer effect at the molecular level remains to be elucidated. In this study, the mechanism underlying the anti-cancer effect of resveratrol in human ovarian cancer cells (OVCAR-3 and Caov-3 was investigated using various molecular biology techniques, such as flow cytometry, western blotting, and RNA interference, with a major focus on the potential role of autophagy in resveratrol-induced apoptotic cell death. We demonstrated that resveratrol induced reactive oxygen species (ROS generation, which triggers autophagy and subsequent apoptotic cell death. Resveratrol induced ATG5 expression and promoted LC3 cleavage. The apoptotic cell death induced by resveratrol was attenuated by both pharmacological and genetic inhibition of autophagy. The autophagy inhibitor chloroquine, which functions at the late stage of autophagy, significantly reduced resveratrol-induced cell death and caspase 3 activity in human ovarian cancer cells. We also demonstrated that targeting ATG5 by siRNA also suppressed resveratrol-induced apoptotic cell death. Thus, we concluded that a common pathway between autophagy and apoptosis exists in resveratrol-induced cell death in OVCAR-3 human ovarian cancer cells.

  18. Cell Death in C. elegans Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malin, Jennifer Zuckerman; Shaham, Shai

    2015-01-01

    Cell death is a common and important feature of animal development, and cell death defects underlie many human disease states. The nematode Caenorhabditis elegans has proven fertile ground for uncovering molecular and cellular processes controlling programmed cell death. A core pathway consisting of the conserved proteins EGL-1/BH3-only, CED-9/BCL2, CED-4/APAF1, and CED-3/caspase promotes most cell death in the nematode, and a conserved set of proteins ensures the engulfment and degradation of dying cells. Multiple regulatory pathways control cell death onset in C. elegans, and many reveal similarities with tumor formation pathways in mammals, supporting the idea that cell death plays key roles in malignant progression. Nonetheless, a number of observations suggest that our understanding of developmental cell death in C. elegans is incomplete. The interaction between dying and engulfing cells seems to be more complex than originally appreciated, and it appears that key aspects of cell death initiation are not fully understood. It has also become apparent that the conserved apoptotic pathway is dispensable for the demise of the C. elegans linker cell, leading to the discovery of a previously unexplored gene program promoting cell death. Here, we review studies that formed the foundation of cell death research in C. elegans and describe new observations that expand, and in some cases remodel, this edifice. We raise the possibility that, in some cells, more than one death program may be needed to ensure cell death fidelity. © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Cell death in Tetrahymena thermophila: new observations on culture conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen, S T; Sørensen, H; Beyer, N H; Kristiansen, K; Rasmussen, L; Rasmussen, M I

    2001-01-01

    We previously suggested that the cell fate of the protozoan ciliate, Tetrahymena thermophila, effectively relates to a quorum-sensing mechanism where cell-released factors support cell survival and proliferation. The cells have to be present above a critical initial density in a chemically defined nutrient medium in order to release a sufficient level of these factors to allow a new colony to flourish. At a relatively high rate of metabolism and/or macromolecular synthesis and below this critical density, cells began to die abruptly within 30 min of inoculation, and this death took the form of an explosive disintegration lasting less than 50 milliseconds. The cells died at any location in the culture, and the frequency of cell death was always lower in well-filled vials than those with medium/air interface. Cell death was inhibited by the addition of Actinomycin D or through modifications of the culture conditions either by reducing the oxygen tension or by decreasing the temperature of the growth medium. In addition, plastic caps in well-filled vials release substances, which promote cell survival. The fate of low-density cultures is related to certain 'physical' conditions, in addition to the availability of oxygen within closed culture systems. Copyright 2001 Academic Press.

  20. Annonaceous acetogenin mimic AA005 induces cancer cell death via apoptosis inducing factor through a caspase-3-independent mechanism

    OpenAIRE

    Han, Bing; Wang, Tong-Dan; Shen, Shao-Ming; Yu, Yun; Mao, Chan; Yao, Zhu-Jun; Wang, Li-Shun

    2015-01-01

    Background Annonaceous acetogenins are a family of natural products with antitumor activities. Annonaceous acetogenin mimic AA005 reportedly inhibits mammalian mitochondrial NADH-ubiquinone reductase (Complex I) and induces gastric cancer cell death. However, the mechanisms underlying its cell-death-inducing activity are unclear. Methods We used SW620 colorectal adenocarcinoma cells to study AA005 cytotoxic activity. Cell deaths were determined by Trypan blue assay and flow cytometry, and rel...

  1. Myeloid-derived suppressor activity is mediated by monocytic lineages maintained by continuous inhibition of extrinsic and intrinsic death pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haverkamp, Jessica M; Smith, Amber M; Weinlich, Ricardo; Dillon, Christopher P; Qualls, Joseph E; Neale, Geoffrey; Koss, Brian; Kim, Young; Bronte, Vincenzo; Herold, Marco J; Green, Douglas R; Opferman, Joseph T; Murray, Peter J

    2014-12-18

    Nonresolving inflammation expands a heterogeneous population of myeloid suppressor cells capable of inhibiting T cell function. This heterogeneity has confounded the functional dissection of individual myeloid subpopulations and presents an obstacle for antitumor immunity and immunotherapy. Using genetic manipulation of cell death pathways, we found the monocytic suppressor-cell subset, but not the granulocytic subset, requires continuous c-FLIP expression to prevent caspase-8-dependent, RIPK3-independent cell death. Development of the granulocyte subset requires MCL-1-mediated control of the intrinsic mitochondrial death pathway. Monocytic suppressors tolerate the absence of MCL-1 provided cytokines increase expression of the MCL-1-related protein A1. Monocytic suppressors mediate T cell suppression, whereas their granulocytic counterparts lack suppressive function. The loss of the granulocytic subset via conditional MCL-1 deletion did not alter tumor incidence implicating the monocytic compartment as the functionally immunosuppressive subset in vivo. Thus, death pathway modulation defines the development, survival, and function of myeloid suppressor cells. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Chemoprotective effect of insulin-like growth factor I against acetaminophen-induced cell death in Chang liver cells via ERK1/2 activation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hwang, Hye-Jung; Kwon, Mi-Jin; Nam, Taek-Jeong

    2007-01-01

    The insulin-like growth factor (IGF) system and type-I IGF receptor (IGF-IR) signaling are involved in protecting against chemotherapeutic drug-induced cell death in human hepatoma cells. Acetaminophen (AAP) hepatotoxicity is the leading cause of liver failure, and the prevention of AAP-induced cell death has been the focus of many studies. We determined whether IGF-I could protect against AAP-induced cell death in Chang liver cells and investigated the protective mechanism. Based on the results of MTS assays, LDH release assays, Hoechst 33342 cell staining, and DNA fragmentation experiments, AAP induced cell death in a dose-dependent manner. According to Western blot analysis, treatment with AAP increased the level of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) fragments in cells compared with that in control cells; however, caspase-3, a critical signaling molecule in apoptosis, was not activated after AAP overdose. Moreover, combined treatment with AAP and IGF-I inhibited PARP cleavage, which was consistent with the ability of IGF-I to restore the level of glutathione (GSH) and cell viability in GSH and MTS assays, respectively. We investigated whether the protective effect of IGF-I against AAP cytotoxicity is related to the extracellular signal-related kinase ERK1/2, which is generally activated by mitogenic and proliferative stimuli such as growth factors. Compared with AAP treatment alone, IGF-I and AAP co-treatment increased ERK1/2 phosphorylation but inhibited PARP cleavage. Thus ERK1/2 activation is instrumental in the protective effect of IGF-I against AAP-induced cell death in Chang liver cells

  3. Pharmacologic inhibition of S1P attenuates ATF6 expression, causes ER stress and contributes to apoptotic cell death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebeau, Paul; Byun, Jae Hyun; Yousof, Tamana; Austin, Richard C

    2018-04-22

    Mammalian cells express unique transcription factors embedded in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membrane, such as the sterol regulatory element-binding proteins (SREBPs), that promote de novo lipogenesis. Upon their release from the ER, the SREBPs require proteolytic activation in the Golgi by site-1-protease (S1P). As such, inhibition of S1P, using compounds such as PF-429242 (PF), reduces cholesterol synthesis and may represent a new strategy for the management of dyslipidemia. In addition to the SREBPs, the unfolded protein response (UPR) transducer, known as the activating transcription factor 6 (ATF6), is another ER membrane-bound transcription factor that requires S1P-mediated activation. ATF6 regulates ER protein folding capacity by promoting the expression of ER chaperones such as the 78-kDa glucose-regulated protein (GRP78). ER-resident chaperones like GRP78 prevent and/or resolve ER polypeptide accumulation and subsequent ER stress-induced UPR activation by folding nascent polypeptides. Here we report that pharmacological inhibition of S1P reduced the expression of ATF6 and GRP78 and induced the activation of UPR transducers inositol-requiring enzyme-1α (IRE1α) and protein kinase RNA-like ER kinase (PERK). As a consequence, S1P inhibition also increased the susceptibility of cells to ER stress-induced cell death. Our findings suggest that S1P plays a crucial role in the regulation of ER folding capacity and also identifies a compensatory cross-talk between UPR transducers in order to maintain adequate ER chaperone expression and activity. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  4. Effects of intracellular iron overload on cell death and identification of potent cell death inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Shenglin; Yu, Xiaonan; Ding, Haoxuan; Han, Jianan; Feng, Jie

    2018-06-11

    Iron overload causes many diseases, while the underlying etiologies of these diseases are unclear. Cell death processes including apoptosis, necroptosis, cyclophilin D-(CypD)-dependent necrosis and a recently described additional form of regulated cell death called ferroptosis, are dependent on iron or iron-dependent reactive oxygen species (ROS). However, whether the accumulation of intracellular iron itself induces ferroptosis or other forms of cell death is largely elusive. In present study, we study the role of intracellular iron overload itself-induced cell death mechanisms by using ferric ammonium citrate (FAC) and a membrane-permeable Ferric 8-hydroxyquinoline complex (Fe-8HQ) respectively. We show that FAC-induced intracellular iron overload causes ferroptosis. We also identify 3-phosphoinositide-dependent kinase 1 (PDK1) inhibitor GSK2334470 as a potent ferroptosis inhibitor. Whereas, Fe-8HQ-induced intracellular iron overload causes unregulated necrosis, but partially activates PARP-1 dependent parthanatos. Interestingly, we identify many phenolic compounds as potent inhibitors of Fe-8HQ-induced cell death. In conclusion, intracellular iron overload-induced cell death form might be dependent on the intracellular iron accumulation rate, newly identified cell death inhibitors in our study that target ferroptosis and unregulated oxidative cell death represent potential therapeutic strategies against iron overload related diseases. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Withaferin A Inhibits STAT3 and Induces Tumor Cell Death in Neuroblastoma and Multiple Myeloma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisette P. Yco

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3 is an oncogenic transcription factor that has been implicated in many human cancers and has emerged as an ideal target for cancer therapy. Withaferin A (WFA is a natural product with promising antiproliferative properties through its association with a number of molecular targets including STAT3. However, the effect of WFA in pediatric neuroblastoma (NB and its interaction with STAT3 have not been reported. In this study, we found that WFA effectively induces dose-dependent cell death in high-risk and drug-resistant NB as well as multiple myeloma (MM tumor cells, prevented interleukin-6 (IL-6–mediated and persistently activated STAT3 phosphorylation at Y705, and blocked the transcriptional activity of STAT3. We further provide computational models that show that WFA binds STAT3 near the Y705 phosphotyrosine residue of the STAT3 Src homology 2 (SH2 domain, suggesting that WFA prevents STAT3 dimer formation similar to BP-1-102, a well-established STAT3 inhibitor. Our findings propose that the antitumor activity of WFA is mediated at least in part through inhibition of STAT3 and provide a rationale for further drug development and clinical use in NB and MM.

  6. Cancer-selective death of human breast cancer cells by leelamine is mediated by bax and bak activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sehrawat, Anuradha; Kim, Su-Hyeong; Hahm, Eun-Ryeong; Arlotti, Julie A; Eiseman, Julie; Shiva, Sruti S; Rigatti, Lora H; Singh, Shivendra V

    2017-02-01

    The present study is the first to report inhibition of breast cancer cell growth in vitro and in vivo and suppression of self-renewal of breast cancer stem cells (bCSC) by a pine bark component (leelamine). Except for a few recent publications in melanoma, anticancer pharmacology of this interesting phytochemical is largely elusive. Leelamine (LLM) dose-dependently inhibited viability of MDA-MB-231 (triple-negative), MCF-7 (estrogen receptor-positive), and SUM159 (triple-negative) human breast cancer cells in association with apoptotic cell death induction. To the contrary, a normal mammary epithelial cell line derived from fibrocystic breast disease and spontaneously immortalized (MCF-10A) was fully resistant to LLM-mediated cell growth inhibition and apoptosis induction. LLM also inhibited self-renewal of breast cancer stem cells. Apoptosis induction by LLM in breast cancer cells was accompanied by a modest increase in reactive oxygen species production, which was not due to inhibition of mitochondrial electron transport chain complexes. Nevertheless, ectopic expression of manganese superoxide dismutase conferred partial protection against LLM-induced cell death but only at a lower yet pharmacologically relevant concentration. Exposure of breast cancer cells to LLM resulted in (a) induction and/or activation of multidomain proapoptotic proteins Bax and Bak, (b) caspase-9 activation, and (c) cytosolic release of cytochrome c. Bax and Bak deficiency in immortalized fibroblasts conferred significant protection against cell death by LLM. Intraperitoneal administration of LLM (7.5 mg/kg; 5 times/wk) suppressed the growth of orthotopic SUM159 xenografts in mice without any toxicity. In conclusion, the present study provides critical preclinical data to warrant further investigation of LLM. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Activation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ (PPARγ) induces cell death through MAPK-dependent mechanism in osteoblastic cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Sung Hun; Yoo, Chong Il; Kim, Hui Taek; Park, Ji Yeon; Kwon, Chae Hwa; Keun Kim, Yong

    2006-01-01

    The present study was undertaken to determine the role of the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) subfamilies in cell death induced by PPARγ agonists in osteoblastic cells. Ciglitazone and troglitazone, PPARγ agonists, resulted in a concentration- and time-dependent cell death, which was largely attributed to apoptosis. But a PPARα agonist ciprofibrate did not affect the cell death. Ciglitazone caused reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation and ciglitazone-induced cell death was prevented by antioxidants, suggesting an important role of ROS generation in the ciglitazone-induced cell death. ROS generation and cell death induced by ciglitazone were inhibited by the PPARγ antagonist GW9662. Ciglitazone treatment caused activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) and p38. Activation of ERK was dependent on epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and that of p38 was independent. Ciglitazone-induced cell death was significantly prevented by PD98059, an inhibitor of ERK upstream kinase MEK1/2, and SB203580, a p38 inhibitor. Ciglitazone treatment increased Bax expression and caused a loss of mitochondrial membrane potential, and its effect was prevented by N-acetylcysteine, PD98059, and SB203580. Ciglitazone induced caspase activation, which was prevented by PD98059 and SB203580. The general caspase inhibitor z-DEVD-FMK and the specific inhibitor of caspases-3 DEVD-CHO exerted the protective effect against the ciglitazone-induced cell death. The EGFR inhibitors AG1478 and suramin protected against the ciglitazone-induced cell death. Taken together, these findings suggest that the MAPK signaling pathways play an active role in mediating the ciglitazone-induced cell death of osteoblasts and function upstream of a mitochondria-dependent mechanism. These data may provide a novel insight into potential therapeutic strategies for treatment of osteoporosis

  8. Calcium regulates cell death in cancer: Roles of the mitochondria and mitochondria-associated membranes (MAMs).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danese, Alberto; Patergnani, Simone; Bonora, Massimo; Wieckowski, Mariusz R; Previati, Maurizio; Giorgi, Carlotta; Pinton, Paolo

    2017-08-01

    Until 1972, the term 'apoptosis' was used to differentiate the programmed cell death that naturally occurs in organismal development from the acute tissue death referred to as necrosis. Many studies on cell death and programmed cell death have been published and most are, at least to some degree, related to cancer. Some key proteins and molecular pathways implicated in cell death have been analyzed, whereas others are still being actively researched; therefore, an increasing number of cellular compartments and organelles are being implicated in cell death and cancer. Here, we discuss the mitochondria and subdomains of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) that interact with mitochondria, the mitochondria-associated membranes (MAMs), which have been identified as critical hubs in the regulation of cell death and tumor growth. MAMs-dependent calcium (Ca 2+ ) release from the ER allows selective Ca 2+ uptake by the mitochondria. The perturbation of Ca 2+ homeostasis in cancer cells is correlated with sustained cell proliferation and the inhibition of cell death through the modulation of Ca 2+ signaling. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Mitochondria in Cancer, edited by Giuseppe Gasparre, Rodrigue Rossignol and Pierre Sonveaux. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Simultaneous activation of mitophagy and autophagy by staurosporine protects against dopaminergic neuronal cell death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ha, Ji-Young; Kim, Ji-Soo; Kim, Seo-Eun; Son, Jin H

    2014-02-21

    Abnormal autophagy is frequently observed during dopaminergic neurodegeneration in Parkinson's disease (PD). However, it is not yet firmly established whether active autophagy is beneficial or pathogenic with respect to dopaminergic cell loss. Staurosporine, a common inducer of apoptosis, is often used in mechanistic studies of dopaminergic cell death. Here we report that staurosporine activates both autophagy and mitophagy simultaneously during dopaminergic neuronal cell death, and evaluate the physiological significance of these processes during cell death. First, staurosporine treatment resulted in induction of autophagy in more than 75% of apoptotic cells. Pharmacological inhibition of autophagy by bafilomycin A1 decreased significantly cell viability. In addition, staurosporine treatment resulted in activation of the PINK1-Parkin mitophagy pathway, of which deficit underlies some familial cases of PD, in the dopaminergic neuronal cell line, SN4741. The genetic blockade of this pathway by PINK1 null mutation also dramatically increased staurosporine-induced cell death. Taken together, our data suggest that staurosporine induces both mitophagy and autophagy, and that these pathways exert a significant neuroprotective effect, rather than a contribution to autophagic cell death. This model system may therefore be useful for elucidating the mechanisms underlying crosstalk between autophagy, mitophagy, and cell death in dopaminergic neurons. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. The Inhibition of microRNA-128 on IGF-1-Activating mTOR Signaling Involves in Temozolomide-Induced Glioma Cell Apoptotic Death.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peng-Hsu Chen

    Full Text Available Temozolomide (TMZ, an alkylating agent of the imidazotetrazine series, is a first-line chemotherapeutic drug used in the clinical therapy of glioblastoma multiforme, the most common and high-grade primary glioma in adults. Micro (miRNAs, which are small noncoding RNAs, post-transcriptionally regulate gene expressions and are involved in gliomagenesis. However, no studies have reported relationships between TMZ and miRNA gene regulation. We investigated TMZ-mediated miRNA profiles and its molecular mechanisms underlying the induction of glioma cell death. By performing miRNA microarray and bioinformatics analyses, we observed that expression of 248 miRNAs was altered, including five significantly upregulated and 17 significantly downregulated miRNAs, in TMZ-treated U87MG cells. miR-128 expression levels were lower in different glioma cells and strongly associated with poor survival. TMZ treatment significantly upregulated miR-128 expression. TMZ significantly enhanced miR-128-1 promoter activity and transcriptionally regulated miR-128 levels through c-Jun N-terminal kinase 2/c-Jun pathways. The overexpression and knockdown of miR-128 expression significantly affected TMZ-mediated cell viability and apoptosis-related protein expression. Furthermore, the overexpression of miR-128 alone enhanced apoptotic death of glioma cells through caspase-3/9 activation, poly(ADP ribose polymerase degradation, reactive oxygen species generation, mitochondrial membrane potential loss, and non-protective autophagy formation. Finally, we identified that key members in mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR signaling including mTOR, rapamycin-insensitive companion of mTOR, insulin-like growth factor 1, and PIK3R1, but not PDK1, were direct target genes of miR-128. TMZ inhibited mTOR signaling through miR-128 regulation. These results indicate that miR-128-inhibited mTOR signaling is involved in TMZ-mediated cytotoxicity. Our findings may provide a better understanding

  11. Synergistic growth inhibition of cancer cells harboring the RET/PTC1 ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Synergistic growth inhibition of cancer cells harboring the RET/PTC1 oncogene by staurosporine and rotenone involves enhanced cell death. ANTÓNIO PEDRO GONÇALVES, ARNALDO VIDEIRA, VALDEMAR MÁXIMO and PAULA SOARES. J. Biosci. 36(4), September 2011, 639-648, © Indian Academy of Sciences.

  12. Combined treatment with cotylenin A and phenethyl isothiocyanate induces strong antitumor activity mainly through the induction of ferroptotic cell death in human pancreatic cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasukabe, Takashi; Honma, Yoshio; Okabe-Kado, Junko; Higuchi, Yusuke; Kato, Nobuo; Kumakura, Shunichi

    2016-08-01

    The treatment of pancreatic cancer, one of the most aggressive gastrointestinal tract malignancies, with current chemotherapeutic drugs has had limited success due to its chemoresistance and poor prognosis. Therefore, the development of new drugs or effective combination therapies is urgently needed. Cotylenin A (CN-A) (a plant growth regulator) is a potent inducer of differentiation in myeloid leukemia cells and exhibits potent antitumor activities in several cancer cell lines. In the present study, we demonstrated that CN-A and phenethyl isothiocyanate (PEITC), an inducer of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and a dietary anticarcinogenic compound, synergistically inhibited the proliferation of MIAPaCa-2, PANC-1 and gemcitabine-resistant PANC-1 cells. A combined treatment with CN-A and PEITC also effectively inhibited the anchorage-independent growth of these cancer cells. The combined treatment with CN-A and PEITC strongly induced cell death within 1 day at concentrations at which CN-A or PEITC alone did not affect cell viability. A combined treatment with synthetic CN-A derivatives (ISIR-005 and ISIR-042) or fusicoccin J (CN-A-related natural product) and PEITC did not have synergistic effects on cell death. The combined treatment with CN-A and PEITC synergistically induced the generation of ROS. Antioxidants (N-acetylcysteine and trolox), ferroptosis inhibitors (ferrostatin-1 and liproxstatin), and the lysosomal iron chelator deferoxamine canceled the synergistic cell death. Apoptosis inhibitors (Z-VAD-FMK and Q-VD-OPH) and the necrosis inhibitor necrostatin-1s did not inhibit synergistic cell death. Autophagy inhibitors (3-metyladenine and chloroquine) partially prevented cell death. These results show that synergistic cell death induced by the combined treatment with CN-A and PEITC is mainly due to the induction of ferroptosis. Therefore, the combination of CN-A and PEITC has potential as a novel therapeutic strategy against pancreatic cancer.

  13. NETs: The missing link between cell death and systemic autoimmune diseases?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felipe eAndrade

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available For almost 20 years, apoptosis and secondary necrosis have been considered the major source of autoantigens and endogenous adjuvants in the pathogenic model of systemic autoimmune diseases. This focus is justified in part because initial evidence in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE guided investigators toward the study of apoptosis, but also because other forms of cell death were unknown. To date, it is known that many other forms of cell death occur, and that they vary in their capacity to stimulate as well as inhibit the immune system. Among these, NETosis (an antimicrobial form of death in neutrophils in which nuclear material is extruded from the cell forming extracellular traps, is gaining major interest as a process that may trigger some of the immune features found in SLE, granulomatosis with polyangiitis (formerly Wegener’s granulomatosis and Felty’s syndrome. Although there have been volumes of very compelling studies published on the role of cell death in autoimmunity, no unifying theory has been adopted nor have any successful therapeutics been developed based on this important pathway. The recent inclusion of NETosis into the pathogenic model of autoimmune diseases certainly adds novel insights into this paradigm, but also reveals a previously unappreciated level of complexity and raises many new questions. This review discusses the role of cell death in systemic autoimmune diseases with a focus on apoptosis and NETosis, highlights the current short comings in our understanding of the vast complexity of cell death, and considers the potential shift in the cell death paradigm in autoimmunity. Understanding this complexity is critical in order to develop tools to clearly define the death pathways that are active in systemic autoimmune diseases, identify drivers of disease propagation, and develop novel therapeutics.

  14. Apoptosis-like yeast cell death in response to DNA damage and replication defects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burhans, William C.; Weinberger, Martin; Marchetti, Maria A.; Ramachandran, Lakshmi; D' Urso, Gennaro; Huberman, Joel A

    2003-11-27

    In budding (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) and fission (Schizosaccharomyces pombe) yeast and other unicellular organisms, DNA damage and other stimuli can induce cell death resembling apoptosis in metazoans, including the activation of a recently discovered caspase-like molecule in budding yeast. Induction of apoptotic-like cell death in yeasts requires homologues of cell cycle checkpoint proteins that are often required for apoptosis in metazoan cells. Here, we summarize these findings and our unpublished results which show that an important component of metazoan apoptosis recently detected in budding yeast - reactive oxygen species (ROS) - can also be detected in fission yeast undergoing an apoptotic-like cell death. ROS were detected in fission and budding yeast cells bearing conditional mutations in genes encoding DNA replication initiation proteins and in fission yeast cells with mutations that deregulate cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs). These mutations may cause DNA damage by permitting entry of cells into S phase with a reduced number of replication forks and/or passage through mitosis with incompletely replicated chromosomes. This may be relevant to the frequent requirement for elevated CDK activity in mammalian apoptosis, and to the recent discovery that the initiation protein Cdc6 is destroyed during apoptosis in mammals and in budding yeast cells exposed to lethal levels of DNA damage. Our data indicate that connections between apoptosis-like cell death and DNA replication or CDK activity are complex. Some apoptosis-like pathways require checkpoint proteins, others are inhibited by them, and others are independent of them. This complexity resembles that of apoptotic pathways in mammalian cells, which are frequently deregulated in cancer. The greater genetic tractability of yeasts should help to delineate these complex pathways and their relationships to cancer and to the effects of apoptosis-inducing drugs that inhibit DNA replication.

  15. Apoptosis-like yeast cell death in response to DNA damage and replication defects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burhans, William C.; Weinberger, Martin; Marchetti, Maria A.; Ramachandran, Lakshmi; D'Urso, Gennaro; Huberman, Joel A.

    2003-01-01

    In budding (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) and fission (Schizosaccharomyces pombe) yeast and other unicellular organisms, DNA damage and other stimuli can induce cell death resembling apoptosis in metazoans, including the activation of a recently discovered caspase-like molecule in budding yeast. Induction of apoptotic-like cell death in yeasts requires homologues of cell cycle checkpoint proteins that are often required for apoptosis in metazoan cells. Here, we summarize these findings and our unpublished results which show that an important component of metazoan apoptosis recently detected in budding yeast - reactive oxygen species (ROS) - can also be detected in fission yeast undergoing an apoptotic-like cell death. ROS were detected in fission and budding yeast cells bearing conditional mutations in genes encoding DNA replication initiation proteins and in fission yeast cells with mutations that deregulate cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs). These mutations may cause DNA damage by permitting entry of cells into S phase with a reduced number of replication forks and/or passage through mitosis with incompletely replicated chromosomes. This may be relevant to the frequent requirement for elevated CDK activity in mammalian apoptosis, and to the recent discovery that the initiation protein Cdc6 is destroyed during apoptosis in mammals and in budding yeast cells exposed to lethal levels of DNA damage. Our data indicate that connections between apoptosis-like cell death and DNA replication or CDK activity are complex. Some apoptosis-like pathways require checkpoint proteins, others are inhibited by them, and others are independent of them. This complexity resembles that of apoptotic pathways in mammalian cells, which are frequently deregulated in cancer. The greater genetic tractability of yeasts should help to delineate these complex pathways and their relationships to cancer and to the effects of apoptosis-inducing drugs that inhibit DNA replication

  16. Calpain Determines the Propensity of Adult Hippocampal Neural Stem Cells to Autophagic Cell Death Following Insulin Withdrawal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Kyung Min; Park, Hyunhee; Jung, Seonghee; Ha, Shinwon; Yoo, Seung-Jun; Woo, Hanwoong; Lee, Hyang Ju; Kim, Seong Who; Kim, Eun-Kyoung; Moon, Cheil; Yu, Seong-Woon

    2015-10-01

    Programmed cell death (PCD) has significant effects on the function of neural stem cells (NSCs) during brain development and degeneration. We have previously reported that adult rat hippocampal neural stem (HCN) cells underwent autophagic cell death (ACD) rather than apoptosis following insulin withdrawal despite their intact apoptotic capabilities. Here, we report a switch in the mode of cell death in HCN cells with calpain as a critical determinant. In HCN cells, calpain 1 expression was barely detectable while calpain 2 was predominant. Inhibition of calpain in insulin-deprived HCN cells further augmented ACD. In contrast, expression of calpain 1 switched ACD to apoptosis. The proteasome inhibitor lactacystin blocked calpain 2 degradation and elevated the intracellular Ca(2+) concentration. In combination, these effects potentiated calpain activity and converted the mode of cell death to apoptosis. Our results indicate that low calpain activity, due to absence of calpain 1 and degradation of calpain 2, results in a preference for ACD over apoptosis in insulin-deprived HCN cells. On the other hand, conditions leading to high calpain activity completely switch the mode of cell death to apoptosis. This is the first report on the PCD mode switching mechanism in NSCs. The dynamic change in calpain activity through the proteasome-mediated modulation of the calpain and intracellular Ca(2+) levels may be the critical contributor to the demise of NSCs. Our findings provide a novel insight into the complex mechanisms interconnecting autophagy and apoptosis and their roles in the regulation of NSC death. © 2015 AlphaMed Press.

  17. miR-203 inhibits cell proliferation and promotes cisplatin induced cell death in tongue squamous cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Jiong; Lin, Yao [Guangdong Provincial Key Laboratory of Stomatology, Department of Orthodontics, Guanghua School of Stomatology, Hospital of Stomatology, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou, 510055 (China); Fan, Li [Department of Pharmaceutical Analysis, School of Pharmacy, The Fourth Military Medical University, Xi' an, Shaanxi, 710032 (China); Guangdong Provincial Key Laboratory of Stomatology, Guangzhou, 510055 (China); Kuang, Wei [Department of Stomatology, Guangzhou General Hospital of Guangzhou Military Command, 111 Liuhua Road, Guangzhou, 510010 (China); Zheng, Liwei [State Key Laboratory of Oral Diseases, Sichuan University, Wuhou District, Chengdu, 610041 (China); Wu, Jiahua [Guangdong Provincial Key Laboratory of Stomatology, Department of Orthodontics, Guanghua School of Stomatology, Hospital of Stomatology, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou, 510055 (China); Shang, Peng [Patient-specific Orthopedic Technology Research Center in GuangDong Research Centre for Neural Engineering, 1068 Xueyuan Boulevard, University Town of Shenzhen, Xili, Nanshan, Shenzhen, 518055 (China); Wang, Qiaofeng [Department of Pharmaceutical Chemistry, School of Pharmacy, The Fourth Military Medical University, Xi' an, Shanxi, 710032 (China); Tan, Jiali, E-mail: jasminenov@163.com [Guangdong Provincial Key Laboratory of Stomatology, Department of Orthodontics, Guanghua School of Stomatology, Hospital of Stomatology, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou, 510055 (China)

    2016-04-29

    Oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) is one of the most common types of the head and neck cancer. Chemo resistance of OSCC has been identified as a substantial therapeutic hurdle. In this study, we analyzed the role of miR-203 in the OSCC and its effects on cisplatin-induced cell death in an OSCC cell line, Tca8113. There was a significant decrease of miR-203 expression in OSCC samples, compared with the adjacent normal, non-cancerous tissue. After 3 days cisplatin treatment, the survived Tca8113 cells had a lower expression of miR-203 than that in the untreated control group. In contrast, PIK3CA showed an inverse expression in cancer and cisplatin survived Tca8113 cells. Transfection of Tca8113 cells with miR-203 mimics greatly reduced PIK3CA expression and Akt activation. Furthermore, miR-203 repressed PIK3CA expression through targeting the 3′UTR. Restoration of miR-203 not only suppressed cell proliferation, but also sensitized cells to cisplatin induced cell apoptosis. This effect was absent in cells that were simultaneously treated with PIK3CA RNAi. In summary, these findings suggest miR-203 plays an important role in cisplatin resistance in OSCC, and furthermore delivery of miR-203 analogs may serve as an adjuvant therapy for OSCC. - Highlights: • Much lower miR-203 expression in cisplatin resistant Tca8113 cells is discovered. • Delivery of miR-203 can sensitize the Tca8113 cells to cisplatin induced cell death. • MiR-203 can downregulate PIK3CA through the 3′UTR. • The effects of miR-203 on cisplatin sensitivity is mainly through PIK3CA pathway.

  18. Programmed cell death

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-12-31

    The purpose of this conference to provide a multidisciplinary forum for exchange of state-of-the-art information on the role programmed cell death plays in normal development and homeostasis of many organisms. This volume contains abstracts of papers in the following areas: invertebrate development; immunology/neurology; bcl-2 family; biochemistry; programmed cell death in viruses; oncogenesis; vertebrate development; and diseases.

  19. Triptolide induces lysosomal-mediated programmed cell death in MCF-7 breast cancer cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Owa C

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Chie Owa, Michael E Messina Jr, Reginald HalabyDepartment of Biology, Montclair State University, Montclair, NJ, USABackground: Breast cancer is a major cause of death; in fact, it is the most common type, in order of the number of global deaths, of cancer in women worldwide. This research seeks to investigate how triptolide, an extract from the Chinese herb Tripterygium wilfordii Hook F, induces apoptosis in MCF-7 human breast cancer cells. Accumulating evidence suggests a role for lysosomal proteases in the activation of apoptosis. However, there is also some controversy regarding the direct participation of lysosomal proteases in activation of key apoptosis-related caspases and release of mitochondrial cytochrome c. In the present study, we demonstrate that triptolide induces an atypical, lysosomal-mediated apoptotic cell death in MCF-7 cells because they lack caspase-3.Methods: MCF-7 cell death was characterized via cellular morphology, chromatin condensation, 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide colorimetric cell growth inhibition assay and the expression levels of proapoptotic proteins. Acridine orange and LysoTracker® staining were performed to visualize lysosomes. Lysosomal enzymatic activity was monitored using an acid phosphatase assay and western blotting of cathepsin B protein levels in the cytosolic fraction, which showed increased enzymatic activity in drug-treated cells.Results: These experiments suggest that triptolide-treated MCF-7 cells undergo atypical apoptosis and that, during the early stages, lysosomal enzymes leak into the cytosol, indicating lysosomal membrane permeability.Conclusion: Our results suggest that further studies are warranted to investigate triptolide's potential as an anticancer therapeutic agent.Keywords: triptolide, MCF-7 breast cancer cells, apoptosis, lysosomes, lysosomal membrane permeabilization (LMP

  20. Minocycline attenuates both OGD-induced HMGB1 release and HMGB1-induced cell death in ischemic neuronal injury in PC12 cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kikuchi, Kiyoshi [Division of Laboratory and Vascular Medicine, Field of Cardiovascular and Respiratory Disorders, Department of Advanced Therapeutics, Kagoshima University Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, 8-35-1 Sakuragaoka, Kagoshima 890-8520 (Japan); Department of Neurosurgery, Omuta City General Hospital, 2-19-1 Takarazaka, Omuta-City, Fukuoka 836-8567 (Japan); Kawahara, Ko-ichi; Biswas, Kamal Krishna; Ito, Takashi [Division of Laboratory and Vascular Medicine, Field of Cardiovascular and Respiratory Disorders, Department of Advanced Therapeutics, Kagoshima University Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, 8-35-1 Sakuragaoka, Kagoshima 890-8520 (Japan); Tancharoen, Salunya [Department of Pharmacology, Faculty of Dentistry, Mahidol University, 6 Yothe Rd., Rajthevee Bangkok 10400 (Thailand); Morimoto, Yoko [Department of Periodontology, Kagoshima University Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, 8-35-1 Sakuragaoka, Kagoshima 890-8544 (Japan); Matsuda, Fumiyo [Division of Physical Therapy, School of Health Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, Kagoshima University, 8-35-1 Sakuragaoka, Kagoshima 890-8560 (Japan); Oyama, Yoko; Takenouchi, Kazunori [Division of Laboratory and Vascular Medicine, Field of Cardiovascular and Respiratory Disorders, Department of Advanced Therapeutics, Kagoshima University Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, 8-35-1 Sakuragaoka, Kagoshima 890-8520 (Japan); Miura, Naoki [Laboratory of Veterinary Diagnostic Imaging, Department of Veterinary Medicine, Faculty of Agriculture, Kagoshima University, 1-21-24 Korimoto, Kagoshima 890-0065 (Japan); Arimura, Noboru; Nawa, Yuko; Meng, Xiaojie; Shrestha, Binita; Arimura, Shinichiro [Division of Laboratory and Vascular Medicine, Field of Cardiovascular and Respiratory Disorders, Department of Advanced Therapeutics, Kagoshima University Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, 8-35-1 Sakuragaoka, Kagoshima 890-8520 (Japan); and others

    2009-07-24

    High mobility group box-1 (HMGB1), a non-histone DNA-binding protein, is massively released into the extracellular space from neuronal cells after ischemic insult and exacerbates brain tissue damage in rats. Minocycline is a semisynthetic second-generation tetracycline antibiotic which has recently been shown to be a promising neuroprotective agent. In this study, we found that minocycline inhibited HMGB1 release in oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD)-treated PC12 cells and triggered the activation of p38mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERK1/2). The ERK kinase (MEK)1/2 inhibitor U-0126 and p38MAPK inhibitor SB203580 blocked HMGB1 release in response to OGD. Furthermore, HMGB1 triggered cell death in a dose-dependent fashion. Minocycline significantly rescued HMGB1-induced cell death in a dose-dependent manner. In light of recent observations as well as the good safety profile of minocycline in humans, we propose that minocycline might play a potent neuroprotective role through the inhibition of HMGB1-induced neuronal cell death in cerebral infarction.

  1. Minocycline attenuates both OGD-induced HMGB1 release and HMGB1-induced cell death in ischemic neuronal injury in PC12 cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kikuchi, Kiyoshi; Kawahara, Ko-ichi; Biswas, Kamal Krishna; Ito, Takashi; Tancharoen, Salunya; Morimoto, Yoko; Matsuda, Fumiyo; Oyama, Yoko; Takenouchi, Kazunori; Miura, Naoki; Arimura, Noboru; Nawa, Yuko; Meng, Xiaojie; Shrestha, Binita; Arimura, Shinichiro

    2009-01-01

    High mobility group box-1 (HMGB1), a non-histone DNA-binding protein, is massively released into the extracellular space from neuronal cells after ischemic insult and exacerbates brain tissue damage in rats. Minocycline is a semisynthetic second-generation tetracycline antibiotic which has recently been shown to be a promising neuroprotective agent. In this study, we found that minocycline inhibited HMGB1 release in oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD)-treated PC12 cells and triggered the activation of p38mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERK1/2). The ERK kinase (MEK)1/2 inhibitor U-0126 and p38MAPK inhibitor SB203580 blocked HMGB1 release in response to OGD. Furthermore, HMGB1 triggered cell death in a dose-dependent fashion. Minocycline significantly rescued HMGB1-induced cell death in a dose-dependent manner. In light of recent observations as well as the good safety profile of minocycline in humans, we propose that minocycline might play a potent neuroprotective role through the inhibition of HMGB1-induced neuronal cell death in cerebral infarction.

  2. Silicon does not mitigate cell death in cultured tobacco BY-2 cells subjected to salinity without ethylene emission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Xiaolei; Wang, Huahua; Hu, Yanfeng; Mao, Lina; Sun, Lili; Dong, Tian; Nan, Wenbin; Bi, Yurong

    2015-02-01

    Silicon induces cell death when ethylene is suppressed in cultured tobacco BY-2 cells. There is a crosstalk between Si and ethylene signaling. Silicon (Si) is beneficial for plant growth. It alleviates both biotic and abiotic stresses in plants. How Si works in plants is still mysterious. This study investigates the mechanism of Si-induced cell death in tobacco BY-2 cell cultures when ethylene is suppressed. Results showed that K2SiO3 alleviated the damage of NaCl stress. Si treatment rapidly increased ethylene emission and the expression of ethylene biosynthesis genes. Treatments with Si + Ag and Si + aminooxyacetic acid (AOA, ethylene biosynthesis inhibitor) reduced the cell growth and increased cell damage. The treatment with Si + Ag induced hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) generation and ultimately cell death. Some nucleus of BY-2 cells treated with Si + Ag appeared TUNEL positive. The inhibition of H2O2 and nitric oxide (NO) production reduced the cell death rate induced by Si + Ag treatment. Si eliminated the up-regulation of alternative pathway by Ag. These data suggest that ethylene plays an important role in Si function in plants. Without ethylene, Si not only failed to enhance plant resistance, but also elevated H2O2 generation and further induced cell death in tobacco BY-2 cells.

  3. Attenuation of oxidative neuronal cell death by coffee phenolic phytochemicals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Eun Sun; Jang, Young Jin [Department of Agricultural Biotechnology and Research Institute for Agriculture and Life Sciences, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-921 (Korea, Republic of); Hwang, Mun Kyung; Kang, Nam Joo [Department of Agricultural Biotechnology and Research Institute for Agriculture and Life Sciences, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-921 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Bioscience and Biotechnology, Konkuk University, 1 Hwayang-dong, Gwangjin-gu, Seoul 143-701 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Ki Won [Department of Bioscience and Biotechnology, Konkuk University, 1 Hwayang-dong, Gwangjin-gu, Seoul 143-701 (Korea, Republic of)], E-mail: kiwon@konkuk.ac.kr; Lee, Hyong Joo [Department of Agricultural Biotechnology and Research Institute for Agriculture and Life Sciences, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-921 (Korea, Republic of)], E-mail: leehyjo@snu.ac.kr

    2009-02-10

    Neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer's disease (AD) are strongly associated with oxidative stress, which is induced by reactive oxygen species (ROS) including hydrogen peroxide (H{sub 2}O{sub 2}). Recent studies suggest that moderate coffee consumption may reduce the risk of neurodegenerative diseases such as AD, but the molecular mechanisms underlying this effect remain to be clarified. In this study, we investigated the protective effects of chlorogenic acid (5-O-caffeoylquinic acid; CGA), a major phenolic phytochemical found in instant decaffeinated coffee (IDC), and IDC against oxidative PC12 neuronal cell death. IDC (1 and 5 {mu}g/ml) or CGA (1 and 5 {mu}M) attenuated H{sub 2}O{sub 2}-induced PC12 cell death. H{sub 2}O{sub 2}-induced nuclear condensation and DNA fragmentation were strongly inhibited by pretreatment with IDC or CGA. Pretreatment with IDC or CGA also inhibited the H{sub 2}O{sub 2}-induced cleavage of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP), and downregulation of Bcl-X{sub L} and caspase-3. The accumulation of intracellular ROS in H{sub 2}O{sub 2}-treated PC12 cells was dose-dependently diminished by IDC or CGA. The activation of c-Jun N-terminal protein kinase (JNK) and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) by H{sub 2}O{sub 2} in PC12 cells was also inhibited by IDC or CGA. Collectively, these results indicate that IDC and CGA protect PC12 cells from H{sub 2}O{sub 2}-induced apoptosis by blocking the accumulation of intracellular ROS and the activation of MAPKs.

  4. Arctigenin inhibits the activation of the mTOR pathway, resulting in autophagic cell death and decreased ER expression in ER-positive human breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maxwell, Thressi; Lee, Kyu Shik; Kim, Soyoung; Nam, Kyung-Soo

    2018-04-01

    Arctigenin, a member of the Asteraceae family, is a biologically active lignan that is consumed worldwide due to its several health benefits. However, its use may pose a problem for patients with estrogen receptor (ER)α-positive breast cancer, since studies have shown that arctigenin is a phytoestrogen that exerts a proliferative effect by binding to the ER. Thus, in this study, we examined the effect of arctigenin on ERα-positive MCF-7 human breast cancer cells to determine whether the consumption of arctigenin is safe for patients with breast cancer. First, we found that arctigenin inhibited the viability of the MCF-7 cells, and colony formation assay confirmed that this effect was cytotoxic rather than cytostatic. The cytotoxic effects were not mediated by cell cycle arrest, apoptosis, or necroptosis, despite DNA damage, as indicated by poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) cleavage and phosphorylated H2A.X. An increase in lipidated LC3, a marker of autophagosome formation, was observed, indicating that autophagy was induced by arctigenin, which was found to be triggered by the inhibition of the mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway. We then examined the effects of arctigenin on ERα expression and determined whether it affects the sensitivity of the cells to tamoxifen, as tamoxifen is commonly used against hormone-responsive cancers and is known to act via the ERα. We found that treatment with arctigenin effectively downregulated ERα expression, which was found to be a consequence of the inhibition of the mTOR pathway. However, treatment with arctigenin in combination with tamoxifen did not affect the sensitivity of the cells to tamoxifen, but instead, exerted a synergistic effect. On the whole, our data indicate that the phytoestrogen, arctigenin, mainly targeted the mTOR pathway in ERα-positive MCF-7 human breast cancer cells, leading to autophagy-induced cell death and the downregulation of ERα expression. Furthermore, the synergistic effects

  5. Methylglyoxal-bis(guanylhydrazone), a polyamine analogue, sensitized γ-radiation-induced cell death in HL-60 leukemia cells Sensitizing effect of MGBG on γ-radiation-induced cell death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jin Sik; Lee, Jin; Chung, Hai Won; Choi, Han; Paik, Sang Gi; Kim, In Gyu

    2006-09-01

    Methylglyoxal-bis(guanylhydrazone) (MGBG), a polyamine analogue, has been known to inhibit the biosynthesis of polyamines, which are important in cell proliferation. We showed that MGBG treatment significantly affected γ-radiation-induced cell cycle transition (G(1)/G(0)→S→G(2)/M) and thus γ-radiation-induced cell death. As determined by micronuclei and comet assay, we showed that it sensitized the cytotoxic effect induced by γ-radiation. One of the reasons is that polyamine depletion by MGBG treatment did not effectively protect against the chemical (OH) or physical damage to DNA caused by γ-radiation. Through in vitro experiment, we confirmed that DNA strand breaks induced by γ-radiation was prevented more effectively in the presence of polyamines (spermine and spermidine) than in the absence of polyamines. MGBG also blocks the cell cycle transition caused by γ-radiation (G(2) arrest), which helps protect cells by allowing time for DNA repair before entry into mitosis or apoptosis, via the down regulation of cyclin D1, which mediates the transition from G(1) to S phase of cell cycle, and ataxia telangiectasia mutated, which is involved in the DNA sensing, repair and cell cycle check point. Therefore, the abrogation of G(2) arrest sensitizes cells to the effect of γ-radiation. As a result, γ-radiation-induced cell death increased by about 2.5-3.0-fold in cells treated with MGBG. However, exogenous spermidine supplement partially relieved this γ-radiation-induced cytotoxicity and cell death. These findings suggest a potentially therapeutic strategy for increasing the cytotoxic efficacy of γ-radiation.

  6. Lycopene protects human SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells against hydrogen peroxide-induced death via inhibition of oxidative stress and mitochondria-associated apoptotic pathways

    Science.gov (United States)

    FENG, CHUNSHENG; LUO, TIANFEI; ZHANG, SHUYAN; LIU, KAI; ZHANG, YANHONG; LUO, YINAN; GE, PENGFEI

    2016-01-01

    Oxidative stress, which is characterized by excessive production of reactive oxygen species (ROS), is a common pathway that results in neuronal injury or death due to various types of pathological stress. Although lycopene has been identified as a potent antioxidant, its effect on hydrogen peroxide (H2O2)-induced neuronal damage remains unclear. In the present study, pretreatment with lycopene was observed to protect SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells against H2O2-induced death via inhibition of apoptosis resulting from activation of caspase-3 and translocation of apoptosis inducing factor (AIF) to the nucleus. Furthermore, the over-produced ROS, as well as the reduced activities of anti-oxidative enzymes, superoxide dismutase and catalase, were demonstrated to be alleviated by lycopene. Additionally, lycopene counteracted H2O2-induced mitochondrial dysfunction, which was evidenced by suppression of mitochondrial permeability transition pore opening, attenuation of the decline of the mitochondrial membrane potential, and inhibition of the increase of Bax and decrease of Bcl-2 levels within the mitochondria. The release of cytochrome c and AIF from the mitochondria was also reduced. These results indicate that lycopene is a potent neuroprotectant against apoptosis, oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction, and could be administered to prevent neuronal injury or death. PMID:27035331

  7. Tetrandrine, an Activator of Autophagy, Induces Autophagic Cell Death via PKC-α Inhibition and mTOR-Dependent Mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vincent Kam Wai Wong

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Emerging evidence suggests the therapeutic role of autophagic modulators in cancer therapy. This study aims to identify novel traditional Chinese medicinal herbs as potential anti-tumor agents through autophagic induction, which finally lead to autophagy mediated-cell death in apoptosis-resistant cancer cells. Using bioactivity-guided purification, we identified tetrandrine (Tet from herbal plant, Radix stephaniae tetrandrae, as an inducer of autophagy. Across a number of cancer cell lines, we found that breast cancer cells treated with tetrandrine show an increase autophagic flux and formation of autophagosomes. In addition, tetrandrine induces cell death in a panel of apoptosis-resistant cell lines that are deficient for caspase 3, caspase 7, caspase 3 and 7, or Bax-Bak respectively. We also showed that tetrandrine-induced cell death is independent of necrotic cell death. Mechanistically, tetrandrine induces autophagy that depends on mTOR inactivation. Furthermore, tetrandrine induces autophagy in a calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase kinase-β (CaMKK-β, 5′ AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK independent manner. Finally, by kinase profiling against 300 WT kinases and computational molecular docking analysis, we showed that tetrandrine is a novel PKC-α inhibitor, which lead to autophagic induction through PKC-α inactivation. This study provides detailed insights into the novel cytotoxic mechanism of an anti-tumor compound originated from the herbal plant, which may be useful in promoting autophagy mediated- cell death in cancer cell that is resistant to apoptosis.

  8. Fas/Fas ligand regulation mediates cell death in human Ewing's sarcoma cells treated with melatonin

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Santos, G; Martin, V; Rodríguez-Blanco, J; Herrera, F; Casado-Zapico, S; Sánchez-Sánchez, A M; Antolín, I; Rodríguez, C

    2012-01-01

    Background: Despite recent advances in cancer therapy, the 5-year survival rate for Ewing's sarcoma is still very low, and new therapeutic approaches are necessary. It was found previously that melatonin induces cell death in the Ewing's sarcoma cell line, SK-N-MC, by activating the extrinsic apoptotic pathway. Methods: Melatonin actions were analysed by metabolic viability/survival cell assays, flow cytometry, quantitative PCR for mRNA expression, western blot for protein activation/expression and electrophoretic mobility shift assay for transcription factor activation. Results: Melatonin increases the expression of Fas and its ligand Fas L, this increase being responsible for cell death induced by the indolamine. Melatonin also produces a transient increase in intracellular oxidants and activation of the redox-regulated transcription factor Nuclear factor-kappaB. Inhibition of such activation prevents cell death and Fas/Fas L upregulation. Cytotoxic effect and Fas/Fas L regulation occur in all Ewing's cell lines studied, and do not occur in the other tumour cell lines studied where melatonin does not induce cell death. Conclusion: Our data offers new insights in the study of alternative therapeutic strategies in the treatment of Ewing's sarcoma. Further attention deserves to be given to the differences in the cellular biology of sensitive tumours that could explain the cytotoxic effect of melatonin and the increase in the level of free radicals caused by this molecule, in particular cancer types. PMID:22382690

  9. XIAP antagonist embelin inhibited proliferation of cholangiocarcinoma cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cody J Wehrkamp

    Full Text Available Cholangiocarcinoma cells are dependent on antiapoptotic signaling for survival and resistance to death stimuli. Recent mechanistic studies have revealed that increased cellular expression of the E3 ubiquitin-protein ligase X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis (XIAP impairs TRAIL- and chemotherapy-induced cytotoxicity, promoting survival of cholangiocarcinoma cells. This study was undertaken to determine if pharmacologic antagonism of XIAP protein was sufficient to sensitize cholangiocarcinoma cells to cell death. We employed malignant cholangiocarcinoma cell lines and used embelin to antagonize XIAP protein. Embelin treatment resulted in decreased XIAP protein levels by 8 hours of treatment with maximal effect at 16 hours in KMCH and Mz-ChA-1 cells. Assessment of nuclear morphology demonstrated a concentration-dependent increase in nuclear staining. Interestingly, embelin induced nuclear morphology changes as a single agent, independent of the addition of TNF-related apoptosis inducing ligand (TRAIL. However, caspase activity assays revealed that increasing embelin concentrations resulted in slight inhibition of caspase activity, not activation. In addition, the use of a pan-caspase inhibitor did not prevent nuclear morphology changes. Finally, embelin treatment of cholangiocarcinoma cells did not induce DNA fragmentation or PARP cleavage. Apoptosis does not appear to contribute to the effects of embelin on cholangiocarcinoma cells. Instead, embelin caused inhibition of cell proliferation and cell cycle analysis indicated that embelin increased the number of cells in S and G2/M phase. Our results demonstrate that embelin decreased proliferation in cholangiocarcinoma cell lines. Embelin treatment resulted in decreased XIAP protein expression, but did not induce or enhance apoptosis. Thus, in cholangiocarcinoma cells the mechanism of action of embelin may not be dependent on apoptosis.

  10. Paraptosis cell death induction by the thiamine analog benfotiamine in leukemia cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naomi Sugimori

    Full Text Available Benfotiamine is a synthetic thiamine analogue that stimulates transketolase, a cellular enzyme essential for glucose metabolism. Currently, benfotiamine is used to treat diabetic neuropathy. We recently reported that oral benfotiamine induced a temporary but remarkable recovery from acute myeloid leukemia in an elderly patient who was ineligible for standard chemotherapy due to dementia and renal failure. In the present study we present evidences that benfotiamine possess antitumor activity against leukemia cells. In a panel of nine myeloid leukemia cell lines benfotiamine impaired the viability of HL-60, NB4, K562 and KG1 cells and also inhibited the growing of primary leukemic blasts. The antitumor activity of benfotiamine is not mediated by apoptosis, necrosis or autophagy, but rather occurs though paraptosis cell death induction. Mechanistic studies revealed that benfotiamine inhibited the activity of constitutively active ERK1/2 and concomitantly increased the phosphorylation of JNK1/2 kinase in leukemic cells. In addition, benfotiamine induced the down regulation of the cell cycle regulator CDK3 which resulted in G1 cell cycle arrest in the sensitive leukemic cells. Moreover, combination index studies showed that benfotiamine enhanced the antiproliferative activities of cytarabine against leukemia cells. These findings suggest that benfotiamine has antitumor therapeutic potential.

  11. Paraptosis cell death induction by the thiamine analog benfotiamine in leukemia cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugimori, Naomi; Espinoza, J Luis; Trung, Ly Quoc; Takami, Akiyoshi; Kondo, Yukio; An, Dao Thi; Sasaki, Motoko; Wakayama, Tomohiko; Nakao, Shinji

    2015-01-01

    Benfotiamine is a synthetic thiamine analogue that stimulates transketolase, a cellular enzyme essential for glucose metabolism. Currently, benfotiamine is used to treat diabetic neuropathy. We recently reported that oral benfotiamine induced a temporary but remarkable recovery from acute myeloid leukemia in an elderly patient who was ineligible for standard chemotherapy due to dementia and renal failure. In the present study we present evidences that benfotiamine possess antitumor activity against leukemia cells. In a panel of nine myeloid leukemia cell lines benfotiamine impaired the viability of HL-60, NB4, K562 and KG1 cells and also inhibited the growing of primary leukemic blasts. The antitumor activity of benfotiamine is not mediated by apoptosis, necrosis or autophagy, but rather occurs though paraptosis cell death induction. Mechanistic studies revealed that benfotiamine inhibited the activity of constitutively active ERK1/2 and concomitantly increased the phosphorylation of JNK1/2 kinase in leukemic cells. In addition, benfotiamine induced the down regulation of the cell cycle regulator CDK3 which resulted in G1 cell cycle arrest in the sensitive leukemic cells. Moreover, combination index studies showed that benfotiamine enhanced the antiproliferative activities of cytarabine against leukemia cells. These findings suggest that benfotiamine has antitumor therapeutic potential.

  12. Exosomal lipids impact notch signaling and induce death of human pancreatic tumoral SOJ-6 cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sadia Beloribi

    Full Text Available Exosomes are of increasing interest as alternative mode of cell-to-cell communication. We previously reported that exosomes secreted by human SOJ-6 pancreatic tumor cells induce (glycoprotein ligand-independent cell death and inhibit Notch-1 pathway, this latter being particularly active during carcinogenesis and in cancer stem cells. Therefore, we asked whether exosomal lipids were key-elements for cell death and hypothesized that cholesterol-rich membrane microdomains were privileged sites of exosome interactions with tumor cells. To address these questions and based on the lipid composition of exosomes from SOJ-6 cells (Ristorcelli et al. (2008 FASEB J. 22; 3358-3369 enriched in cholesterol and sphingomyelin (lipids forming liquid-ordered phase, Lo and depleted in phospholipids (lipids forming liquid-disordered phase, Ld, we designed Synthetic Exosome-Like Nanoparticles (SELN with ratios Lo/Ld from 3.0 to 6.0 framing that of SOJ-6 cell exosomes. SELN decreased tumor cell survival, the higher the Lo/Ld ratio, the lower the cell survival. This decreased survival was due to activation of cell death with inhibition of Notch pathway. FRET analyses indicated fusions/exchanges of SELN with cell membranes. Fluorescent SELN co-localized with the ganglioside GM1 then with Rab5A, markers of lipid microdomains and of early endosomes, respectively. These interactions occurred at lipid microdomains of plasma and/or endosome membranes where the Notch-1 pathway matures. We thus demonstrated a major role for lipids in interactions between SELN and tumor cells, and in the ensued cell death. To our knowledge this is the first report on such effects of lipidic nanoparticles on tumor cell behavior. This may have implications in tumor progression.

  13. Sensitization of vascular smooth muscle cell to TNF-α-mediated death in the presence of palmitate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rho, Mun-Chual; Ah Lee, Kyeong; Mi Kim, Sun; Sik Lee, Chang; Jeong Jang, Min; Kook Kim, Young; Sun Lee, Hyun; Hyun Choi, Yung; Yong Rhim, Byung; Kim, Koanhoi

    2007-01-01

    Saturated free fatty acids (FFAs), including palmitate, can activate the intrinsic death pathway in cells. However, the relationship between FFAs and receptor-mediated death pathway is still unknown. In this study, we have investigated whether FFAs are able to trigger receptor-mediated death. In addition, to clarify the mechanisms responsible for the activation, we examined the biochemical changes in dying vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) and the effects of various molecules to the receptor-mediated VSMC death. Tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α-mediated VSMC death occurred in the presence of sub-cytotoxic concentration of palmitate as determined by assessing viability and DNA degradation, while the cytokine did not influence VSMC viability in the presence of oleate. The VSMC death was inhibited by the gene transfer of a dominant-negative Fas-associated death domain-containing protein and the baculovirus p35, but not by the bcl-xL or the c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) binding domain of JNK-interacting protein-1, in tests utilizing recombinant adenoviruses. The VSMC death was also inhibited by a neutralizing anti-TNF receptor 1 antibody, the caspase inhibitor z-VAD, and the cathepsin B inhibitor CA074, a finding indicative of the role of both caspases and cathepsin B in this process. Consistent with this finding, caspase-3 activation and an increase in cytosolic cathepsin B activity were detected in the dying VSMC. Palmitate inhibited an increase of TNF-α-mediated nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) activity, the survival pathway activated by the cytokine, by hindering the translocation of the NF-κB subunit of p65 from the cytosol into the nucleus. The gene transfer of inhibitor of NF-κB predisposed VSMC to palmitate-induced cell death. To the best of our knowledge, this study is the first report to demonstrate the activation of TNF-α-mediated cell death in the presence of palmitate. The current study proposes that FFAs would take part in deleterious vascular

  14. Inhibition of ERK1/2 or AKT Activity Equally Enhances Radiation Sensitization in B16F10 Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalal, Bhuvanesh Sukhlal; Fathima, Faraz; Pai, Vinitha Ramanath; Sanjeev, Ganesh; Krishna, Chilakapati Murali; Upadhya, Dinesh

    2018-01-01

    Background The aim of the study was to evaluate the radiation sensitizing ability of ERK1/2, PI3K-AKT and JNK inhibitors in highly radiation resistant and metastatic B16F10 cells which carry wild-type Ras and Braf. Methods Mouse melanoma cell line B16F10 was exposed to 1.0, 2.0 and 3.0 Gy of electron beam radiation. Phosphorylated ERK1/2, AKT and JNK levels were estimated by ELISA. Cells were exposed to 2.0 and 3.0 Gy of radiation with or without prior pharmacological inhibition of ERK1/2, AKT as well as JNK pathways. Cell death induced by radiation as well as upon inhibition of these pathways was measured by TUNEL assay using flow cytometry. Results Exposure of B16F10 cells to 1.0, 2.0 and 3.0 Gy of electron beam irradiation triggered an increase in all the three phosphorylated proteins compared to sham-treated and control groups. B16F10 cells pre-treated with either ERK1/2 or AKT inhibitors equally enhanced radiation-induced cell death at 2.0 as well as 3.0 Gy (P < 0.001), while inhibition of JNK pathway increased radiation-induced cell death to a lesser extent. Interestingly combined inhibition of ERK1/2 or AKT pathways did not show additional cell death compared to individual ERK1/2 or AKT inhibition. This indicates that ERK1/2 or AKT mediates radiation resistance through common downstream molecules in B16F10 cells. Conclusions Even without activating mutations in Ras or Braf genes, ERK1/2 and AKT play a critical role in B16F10 cell survival upon radiation exposure and possibly act through common downstream effector/s. PMID:29581812

  15. Molecular mechanisms of cell death: recommendations of the Nomenclature Committee on Cell Death 2018

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Galluzzi, Lorenzo; Vitale, Ilio; Aaronson, Stuart A.; Abrams, John M.; Adam, Dieter; Agostinis, Patrizia; Alnemri, Emad S.; Altucci, Lucia; Amelio, Ivano; Andrews, David W.; Annicchiarico-Petruzzelli, Margherita; Antonov, Alexey V.; Arama, Eli; Baehrecke, Eric H.; Barlev, Nickolai A.; Bazan, Nicolas G.; Bernassola, Francesca; Bertrand, Mathieu J. M.; Bianchi, Katiuscia; Blagosklonny, Mikhail V.; Blomgren, Klas; Borner, Christoph; Boya, Patricia; Brenner, Catherine; Campanella, Michelangelo; Candi, Eleonora; Carmona-Gutierrez, Didac; Cecconi, Francesco; Chan, Francis K.-M.; Chandel, Navdeep S.; Cheng, Emily H.; Chipuk, Jerry E.; Cidlowski, John A.; Ciechanover, Aaron; Cohen, Gerald M.; Conrad, Marcus; Cubillos-Ruiz, Juan R.; Czabotar, Peter E.; D'Angiolella, Vincenzo; Dawson, Ted M.; Dawson, Valina L.; de Laurenzi, Vincenzo; de Maria, Ruggero; Debatin, Klaus-Michael; DeBerardinis, Ralph J.; Deshmukh, Mohanish; Di Daniele, Nicola; Di Virgilio, Francesco; Dixit, Vishva M.; Dixon, Scott J.; Duckett, Colin S.; Dynlacht, Brian D.; El-Deiry, Wafik S.; Elrod, John W.; Fimia, Gian Maria; Fulda, Simone; García-Sáez, Ana J.; Garg, Abhishek D.; Garrido, Carmen; Gavathiotis, Evripidis; Golstein, Pierre; Gottlieb, Eyal; Green, Douglas R.; Greene, Lloyd A.; Gronemeyer, Hinrich; Gross, Atan; Hajnoczky, Gyorgy; Hardwick, J. Marie; Harris, Isaac S.; Hengartner, Michael O.; Hetz, Claudio; Ichijo, Hidenori; Jäättelä, Marja; Joseph, Bertrand; Jost, Philipp J.; Juin, Philippe P.; Kaiser, William J.; Karin, Michael; Kaufmann, Thomas; Kepp, Oliver; Kimchi, Adi; Kitsis, Richard N.; Klionsky, Daniel J.; Knight, Richard A.; Kumar, Sharad; Lee, Sam W.; Lemasters, John J.; Levine, Beth; Linkermann, Andreas; Lipton, Stuart A.; Lockshin, Richard A.; López-Otín, Carlos; Lowe, Scott W.; Luedde, Tom; Lugli, Enrico; MacFarlane, Marion; Madeo, Frank; Malewicz, Michal; Malorni, Walter; Manic, Gwenola; Marine, Jean-Christophe; Martin, Seamus J.; Martinou, Jean-Claude; Medema, Jan Paul; Mehlen, Patrick; Meier, Pascal; Melino, Sonia; Miao, Edward A.; Molkentin, Jeffery D.; Moll, Ute M.; Muñoz-Pinedo, Cristina; Nagata, Shigekazu; Nuñez, Gabriel; Oberst, Andrew; Oren, Moshe; Overholtzer, Michael; Pagano, Michele; Panaretakis, Theocharis; Pasparakis, Manolis; Penninger, Josef M.; Pereira, David M.; Pervaiz, Shazib; Peter, Marcus E.; Piacentini, Mauro; Pinton, Paolo; Prehn, Jochen H. M.; Puthalakath, Hamsa; Rabinovich, Gabriel A.; Rehm, Markus; Rizzuto, Rosario; Rodrigues, Cecilia M. P.; Rubinsztein, David C.; Rudel, Thomas; Ryan, Kevin M.; Sayan, Emre; Scorrano, Luca; Shao, Feng; Shi, Yufang; Silke, John; Simon, Hans-Uwe; Sistigu, Antonella; Stockwell, Brent R.; Strasser, Andreas; Szabadkai, Gyorgy; Tait, Stephen W. G.; Tang, Daolin; Tavernarakis, Nektarios; Thorburn, Andrew; Tsujimoto, Yoshihide; Turk, Boris; Vanden Berghe, Tom; Vandenabeele, Peter; Vander Heiden, Matthew G.; Villunger, Andreas; Virgin, Herbert W.; Vousden, Karen H.; Vucic, Domagoj; Wagner, Erwin F.; Walczak, Henning; Wallach, David; Wang, Ying; Wells, James A.; Wood, Will; Yuan, Junying; Zakeri, Zahra; Zhivotovsky, Boris; Zitvogel, Laurence; Melino, Gerry; Kroemer, Guido

    2018-01-01

    Over the past decade, the Nomenclature Committee on Cell Death (NCCD) has formulated guidelines for the definition and interpretation of cell death from morphological, biochemical, and functional perspectives. Since the field continues to expand and novel mechanisms that orchestrate multiple cell

  16. Nonthermal-plasma-mediated animal cell death

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Wanil; Woo, Kyung-Chul; Kim, Gyoo-Cheon; Kim, Kyong-Tai

    2011-01-01

    Animal cell death comprising necrosis and apoptosis occurred in a well-regulated manner upon specific stimuli. The physiological meanings and detailed molecular mechanisms of cell death have been continuously investigated over several decades. Necrotic cell death has typical morphological changes, such as cell swelling and cell lysis followed by DNA degradation, whereas apoptosis shows blebbing formation and regular DNA fragmentation. Cell death is usually adopted to terminate cancer cells in vivo. The current strategies against tumour are based on the induction of cell death by adopting various methods, including radiotherapy and chemotherapeutics. Among these, radiotherapy is the most frequently used treatment method, but it still has obvious limitations. Recent studies have suggested that the use of nonthermal air plasma can be a prominent method for inducing cancer cell death. Plasma-irradiated cells showed the loss of genomic integrity, mitochondrial dysfunction, plasma membrane damage, etc. Tumour elimination with plasma irradiation is an emerging concept in cancer therapy and can be accelerated by targeting certain tumour-specific proteins with gold nanoparticles. Here, some recent developments are described so that the mechanisms related to plasma-mediated cell death and its perspectives in cancer treatment can be understood.

  17. Nonthermal-plasma-mediated animal cell death

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Wanil; Woo, Kyung-Chul; Kim, Kyong-Tai [Department of Life Science, Division of Molecular and Life Science, Pohang University of Science and Technology, San 31, Hyoja Dong, Pohang 790-784 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Gyoo-Cheon, E-mail: ktk@postech.ac.kr [Department of Oral Anatomy and Cell Biology, School of Dentistry, Pusan National University, Yangsan 626-810 (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-01-12

    Animal cell death comprising necrosis and apoptosis occurred in a well-regulated manner upon specific stimuli. The physiological meanings and detailed molecular mechanisms of cell death have been continuously investigated over several decades. Necrotic cell death has typical morphological changes, such as cell swelling and cell lysis followed by DNA degradation, whereas apoptosis shows blebbing formation and regular DNA fragmentation. Cell death is usually adopted to terminate cancer cells in vivo. The current strategies against tumour are based on the induction of cell death by adopting various methods, including radiotherapy and chemotherapeutics. Among these, radiotherapy is the most frequently used treatment method, but it still has obvious limitations. Recent studies have suggested that the use of nonthermal air plasma can be a prominent method for inducing cancer cell death. Plasma-irradiated cells showed the loss of genomic integrity, mitochondrial dysfunction, plasma membrane damage, etc. Tumour elimination with plasma irradiation is an emerging concept in cancer therapy and can be accelerated by targeting certain tumour-specific proteins with gold nanoparticles. Here, some recent developments are described so that the mechanisms related to plasma-mediated cell death and its perspectives in cancer treatment can be understood. (topical review)

  18. Nonthermal-plasma-mediated animal cell death

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Wanil; Woo, Kyung-Chul; Kim, Kyong-Tai; Kim, Gyoo-Cheon

    2011-01-01

    Animal cell death comprising necrosis and apoptosis occurred in a well-regulated manner upon specific stimuli. The physiological meanings and detailed molecular mechanisms of cell death have been continuously investigated over several decades. Necrotic cell death has typical morphological changes, such as cell swelling and cell lysis followed by DNA degradation, whereas apoptosis shows blebbing formation and regular DNA fragmentation. Cell death is usually adopted to terminate cancer cells in vivo. The current strategies against tumour are based on the induction of cell death by adopting various methods, including radiotherapy and chemotherapeutics. Among these, radiotherapy is the most frequently used treatment method, but it still has obvious limitations. Recent studies have suggested that the use of nonthermal air plasma can be a prominent method for inducing cancer cell death. Plasma-irradiated cells showed the loss of genomic integrity, mitochondrial dysfunction, plasma membrane damage, etc. Tumour elimination with plasma irradiation is an emerging concept in cancer therapy and can be accelerated by targeting certain tumour-specific proteins with gold nanoparticles. Here, some recent developments are described so that the mechanisms related to plasma-mediated cell death and its perspectives in cancer treatment can be understood. (topical review)

  19. Gigantol Inhibits Epithelial to Mesenchymal Process in Human Lung Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thitita Unahabhokha

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Lung cancer remains a leading public health problem as evidenced by its increasing death rate. The main cause of death in lung cancer patients is cancer metastasis. The metastatic behavior of lung cancer cells becomes enhanced when cancer cells undergo epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT. Gigantol, a bibenzyl compound extracted from the Thai orchid, Dendrobium draconis, has been shown to have promising therapeutic potential against cancer cells, which leads to the hypothesis that gigantol may be able to inhibit the fundamental EMT process in cancer cells. This study has demonstrated for the first time that gigantol possesses the ability to suppress EMT in non-small cell lung cancer H460 cells. Western blot analysis has revealed that gigantol attenuates the activity of ATP-dependent tyrosine kinase (AKT, thereby inhibiting the expression of the major EMT transcription factor, Slug, by both decreasing its transcription and increasing its degradation. The inhibitory effects of gigantol on EMT result in a decrease in the level of migration in H460 lung cancer cells. The results of this study emphasize the potential of gigantol for further development against lung cancer metastasis.

  20. Mis-specified cells die by an active gene-directed process, and inhibition of this death results in cell fate transformation in Drosophila

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werz, Christian; Lee, Tom V.; Lee, Peter L.; Lackey, Melinda; Bolduc, Clare; Stein, David S.; Bergmann, Andreas

    2009-01-01

    Summary Incorrectly specified or mis-specified cells often undergo cell death or are transformed to adopt a different cell fate during development. The underlying cause for this distinction is largely unknown. In many developmental mutants in Drosophila, large numbers of mis-specified cells die synchronously, providing a convenient model for analysis of this phenomenon. The maternal mutant bicoid is particularly useful model with which to address this issue because its mutant phenotype is a combination of both transformation of tissue (acron to telson) and cell death in the presumptive head and thorax regions. We show that a subset of these mis-specified cells die through an active gene-directed process involving transcriptional upregulation of the cell death inducer hid. Upregulation of hid also occurs in oskar mutants and other segmentation mutants. In hid bicoid double mutants, mis-specified cells in the presumptive head and thorax survive and continue to develop, but they are transformed to adopt a different cell fate. We provide evidence that the terminal torso signaling pathway protects the mis-specified telson tissue in bicoid mutants from hid-induced cell death, whereas mis-specified cells in the head and thorax die, presumably because equivalent survival signals are lacking. These data support a model whereby mis-specification can be tolerated if a survival pathway is provided, resulting in cellular transformation. PMID:16280349

  1. Activation of aryl hydrocarbon receptor reduces carbendazim-induced cell death

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wei, Kuo-Liang; Chen, Fei-Yun; Lin, Chih-Yi; Gao, Guan-Lun; Kao, Wen-Ya; Yeh, Chi-Hui; Chen, Chang-Rong; Huang, Hao-Chun; Tsai, Wei-Ren; Jong, Koa-Jen; Li, Wan-Jung; Su, Jyan-Gwo Joseph

    2016-01-01

    Carbendazim inhibits microtubule assembly, thus blocking mitosis and inhibiting cancer cell proliferation. Accordingly, carbendazim is being explored as an anticancer drug. Data show that carbendazim increased mRNA and protein expressions and promoter activity of CYP1A1. In addition, carbendazim activated transcriptional activity of the aryl hydrocarbon response element, and induced nuclear translocation of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR), a sign the AhR is activated. Carbendazim-induced CYP1A1 expression was blocked by AhR antagonists, and was abolished in AhR signal-deficient cells. Results demonstrated that carbendazim activated the AhR, thereby stimulating CYP1A1 expression. In order to understand whether AhR-induced metabolic enzymes turn carbendazim into less-toxic metabolites, Hoechst 33342 staining to reveal carbendazim-induced nuclear changes and flow cytometry to reveal the subG 0 /G 1 population were applied to monitor carbendazim-induced cell apoptosis. Carbendazim induced less apoptosis in Hepa-1c1c7 cells than in AhR signal-deficient Hepa-1c1c7 mutant cells. Pretreatment with β-NF, an AhR agonist that highly induces CYP1A1 expression, decreased carbendazim-induced cell death. In addition, the lower the level of AhR was, the lower the vitality present in carbendazim-treated cells, including hepatoma cells and their derivatives with AhR RNA interference, also embryonic kidney cells, bladder carcinoma cells, and AhR signal-deficient Hepa-1c1c7 cells. In summary, carbendazim is an AhR agonist. The toxicity of carbendazim was lower in cells with the AhR signal. This report provides clues indicating that carbendazim is more potent at inducing cell death in tissues without than in those with the AhR signal, an important reference for applying carbendazim in cancer chemotherapy. - Highlights: • Carbendazim induced transcriptional activity of the aryl hydrocarbon response element. • Carbendazim induced nuclear translocation of the aryl hydrocarbon

  2. Activation of aryl hydrocarbon receptor reduces carbendazim-induced cell death

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wei, Kuo-Liang [Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Department of Internal Medicine, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Chiayi 61363, Taiwan, ROC (China); College of Medicine, Chang Gung University, Taoyuan 33302, Taiwan, ROC (China); Chen, Fei-Yun; Lin, Chih-Yi [Department of Biochemical Science and Technology, National Chiayi University, Chiayi 60004, Taiwan, ROC (China); Gao, Guan-Lun [Department of Biochemical Science and Technology, National Chiayi University, Chiayi 60004, Taiwan, ROC (China); Department of Biological Resources, National Chiayi University, Chiayi, 60004, Taiwan, ROC (China); Kao, Wen-Ya [Department of Biochemical Science and Technology, National Chiayi University, Chiayi 60004, Taiwan, ROC (China); Yeh, Chi-Hui [Department of Environmental Engineering, College of Engineering, Da-Yeh University, Dacun, Changhua 51591, Taiwan, ROC (China); Chen, Chang-Rong [Department of Biochemical Science and Technology, National Chiayi University, Chiayi 60004, Taiwan, ROC (China); Huang, Hao-Chun [Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Department of Internal Medicine, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Chiayi 61363, Taiwan, ROC (China); Tsai, Wei-Ren [Division of Applied Toxicology, Taiwan Agricultural Chemicals and Toxic Substances Research Institute, Council of Agriculture, Executive Yuan, Taichung 41358, Taiwan, ROC (China); Jong, Koa-Jen [Department of Biological Resources, National Chiayi University, Chiayi, 60004, Taiwan, ROC (China); Li, Wan-Jung [Department of Biochemical Science and Technology, National Chiayi University, Chiayi 60004, Taiwan, ROC (China); Su, Jyan-Gwo Joseph, E-mail: jgjsu@mail.ncyu.edu.tw [Department of Biochemical Science and Technology, National Chiayi University, Chiayi 60004, Taiwan, ROC (China)

    2016-09-01

    Carbendazim inhibits microtubule assembly, thus blocking mitosis and inhibiting cancer cell proliferation. Accordingly, carbendazim is being explored as an anticancer drug. Data show that carbendazim increased mRNA and protein expressions and promoter activity of CYP1A1. In addition, carbendazim activated transcriptional activity of the aryl hydrocarbon response element, and induced nuclear translocation of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR), a sign the AhR is activated. Carbendazim-induced CYP1A1 expression was blocked by AhR antagonists, and was abolished in AhR signal-deficient cells. Results demonstrated that carbendazim activated the AhR, thereby stimulating CYP1A1 expression. In order to understand whether AhR-induced metabolic enzymes turn carbendazim into less-toxic metabolites, Hoechst 33342 staining to reveal carbendazim-induced nuclear changes and flow cytometry to reveal the subG{sub 0}/G{sub 1} population were applied to monitor carbendazim-induced cell apoptosis. Carbendazim induced less apoptosis in Hepa-1c1c7 cells than in AhR signal-deficient Hepa-1c1c7 mutant cells. Pretreatment with β-NF, an AhR agonist that highly induces CYP1A1 expression, decreased carbendazim-induced cell death. In addition, the lower the level of AhR was, the lower the vitality present in carbendazim-treated cells, including hepatoma cells and their derivatives with AhR RNA interference, also embryonic kidney cells, bladder carcinoma cells, and AhR signal-deficient Hepa-1c1c7 cells. In summary, carbendazim is an AhR agonist. The toxicity of carbendazim was lower in cells with the AhR signal. This report provides clues indicating that carbendazim is more potent at inducing cell death in tissues without than in those with the AhR signal, an important reference for applying carbendazim in cancer chemotherapy. - Highlights: • Carbendazim induced transcriptional activity of the aryl hydrocarbon response element. • Carbendazim induced nuclear translocation of the aryl

  3. The TrkAIII oncoprotein inhibits mitochondrial free radical ROS-induced death of SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells by augmenting SOD2 expression and activity at the mitochondria, within the context of a tumour stem cell-like phenotype.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pierdomenico Ruggeri

    Full Text Available The developmental and stress-regulated alternative TrkAIII splice variant of the NGF receptor TrkA is expressed by advanced stage human neuroblastomas (NBs, correlates with worse outcome in high TrkA expressing unfavourable tumours and exhibits oncogenic activity in NB models. In the present study, we report that constitutive TrkAIII expression in human SH-SY5Y NB cells inhibits Rotenone, Paraquat and LY83583-induced mitochondrial free radical reactive oxygen species (ROS-mediated death by stimulating SOD2 expression, increasing mitochondrial SOD2 activity and attenuating mitochondrial free radical ROS production, in association with increased mitochondrial capacity to produce H2O2, within the context of a more tumour stem cell-like phenotype. This effect can be reversed by the specific TrkA tyrosine kinase inhibitor GW441756, by the multi-kinase TrkA inhibitors K252a, CEP-701 and Gö6976, which inhibit SOD2 expression, and by siRNA knockdown of SOD2 expression, which restores the sensitivity of TrkAIII expressing SH-SY5Y cells to Rotenone, Paraquat and LY83583-induced mitochondrial free radical ROS production and ROS-mediated death. The data implicate the novel TrkAIII/SOD2 axis in promoting NB resistance to mitochondrial free radical-mediated death and staminality, and suggest that the combined use of TrkAIII and/or SOD2 inhibitors together with agents that induce mitochondrial free radical ROS-mediated death could provide a therapeutic advantage that may also target the stem cell niche in high TrkA expressing unfavourable NB.

  4. Effect of dicycloplatin, a novel platinum chemotherapeutical drug, on inhibiting cell growth and inducing cell apoptosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guang-quan Li

    Full Text Available Dicycloplatin, a new supramolecular platinum-based antitumor drug, has been approved by the State Food and Administration (SFDA of China. In this study, we investigated the anticancer activity of dicycloplatin in cancer cells and signaling pathways involved in dicycloplatin-induced apoptosis. Dicycloplatin inhibited the proliferation of cancer cells and increased the percentage of apoptosis in a concentration-dependent manner. Besides, some apoptosis related events were observed after treatment with dicycloplatin, including increase of reactive oxygen species (ROS, collapse of mitochondrial membrane potential (Δψm, release of cytochrome c from the mitochondria to the cytosol, upregulation of p53, which were accompanied by activation of caspase-9, caspase-3, caspase-8, and poly (ADP-ribose polymerase cleavage in a concentration-dependent manner. The role of apoptosis in dicycloplatin-mediated cell death was further confirmed by the concomitant treatment with caspase-8 or caspase-9 inhibitors, which inhibited apoptosis and PARP cleavage. Intracellular glutathione (GSH was also found to inhibit the cytotoxic effect of dicycloplatin. In conclusion, these findings suggest that dicycloplatin induces apoptosis through ROS stress-mediated death receptor pathway and mitochondrial pathway which is similar to carboplatin.

  5. Protection against RAGE-mediated neuronal cell death by sRAGE-secreting human mesenchymal stem cells in 5xFAD transgenic mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Son, Myeongjoo; Oh, Seyeon; Park, Hyunjin; Ahn, Hyosang; Choi, Junwon; Kim, Hyungho; Lee, Hye Sun; Lee, Sojung; Park, Hye-Jeong; Kim, Seung U; Lee, Bonghee; Byun, Kyunghee

    2017-11-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD), which is the most commonly encountered neurodegenerative disease, causes synaptic dysfunction and neuronal loss due to various pathological processes that include tau abnormality and amyloid beta (Aβ) accumulation. Aβ stimulates the secretion and the synthesis of Receptor for Advanced Glycation End products (RAGE) ligand by activating microglial cells, and has been reported to cause neuronal cell death in Aβ 1-42 treated rats and in mice with neurotoxin-induced Parkinson's disease. The soluble form of RAGE (sRAGE) is known to reduce inflammation, and to decrease microglial cell activation and Aβ deposition, and thus, it protects from neuronal cell death in AD. However, sRAGE protein has too a short half-life for therapeutic purposes. We developed sRAGE-secreting umbilical cord derived mesenchymal stem cells (sRAGE-MSCs) to enhance the inhibitory effects of sRAGE on Aβ deposition and to reduce the secretion and synthesis of RAGE ligands in 5xFAD mice. In addition, these cells improved the viability of injected MSCs, and enhanced the protective effects of sRAGE by inhibiting the binding of RAGE and RAGE ligands in 5xFAD mice. These findings suggest sRAGE protein from sRAGE-MSCs has better protection against neuronal cell death than sRAGE protein or single MSC treatment by inhibiting the RAGE cell death cascade and RAGE-induce inflammation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Alternative Cell Death Pathways and Cell Metabolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simone Fulda

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available While necroptosis has for long been viewed as an accidental mode of cell death triggered by physical or chemical damage, it has become clear over the last years that necroptosis can also represent a programmed form of cell death in mammalian cells. Key discoveries in the field of cell death research, including the identification of critical components of the necroptotic machinery, led to a revised concept of cell death signaling programs. Several regulatory check and balances are in place in order to ensure that necroptosis is tightly controlled according to environmental cues and cellular needs. This network of regulatory mechanisms includes metabolic pathways, especially those linked to mitochondrial signaling events. A better understanding of these signal transduction mechanisms will likely contribute to open new avenues to exploit our knowledge on the regulation of necroptosis signaling for therapeutic application in the treatment of human diseases.

  7. Benzyl isothiocyanate alters the gene expression with cell cycle regulation and cell death in human brain glioblastoma GBM 8401 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Nou-Ying; Chueh, Fu-Shin; Yu, Chien-Chih; Liao, Ching-Lung; Lin, Jen-Jyh; Hsia, Te-Chun; Wu, King-Chuen; Liu, Hsin-Chung; Lu, Kung-Wen; Chung, Jing-Gung

    2016-04-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is a highly malignant devastating brain tumor in adults. Benzyl isothiocyanate (BITC) is one of the isothiocyanates that have been shown to induce human cancer cell apoptosis and cell cycle arrest. Herein, the effect of BITC on cell viability and apoptotic cell death and the genetic levels of human brain glioblastoma GBM 8401 cells in vitro were investigated. We found that BITC induced cell morphological changes, decreased cell viability and the induction of cell apoptosis in GBM 8401 cells was time-dependent. cDNA microarray was used to examine the effects of BITC on GBM 8401 cells and we found that numerous genes associated with cell death and cell cycle regulation in GBM 8401 cells were altered after BITC treatment. The results show that expression of 317 genes was upregulated, and two genes were associated with DNA damage, the DNA-damage-inducible transcript 3 (DDIT3) was increased 3.66-fold and the growth arrest and DNA-damage-inducible α (GADD45A) was increased 2.34-fold. We also found that expression of 182 genes was downregulated and two genes were associated with receptor for cell responses to stimuli, the EGF containing fibulin-like extracellular matrix protein 1 (EFEMP1) was inhibited 2.01-fold and the TNF receptor-associated protein 1 (TRAP1) was inhibited 2.08-fold. BITC inhibited seven mitochondria ribosomal genes, the mitochondrial ribosomal protein; tumor protein D52 (MRPS28) was inhibited 2.06-fold, the mitochondria ribosomal protein S2 (MRPS2) decreased 2.07-fold, the mitochondria ribosomal protein L23 (MRPL23) decreased 2.08-fold, the mitochondria ribosomal protein S2 (MRPS2) decreased 2.07-fold, the mitochondria ribosomal protein S12 (MRPS12) decreased 2.08-fold, the mitochondria ribosomal protein L12 (MRPL12) decreased 2.25-fold and the mitochondria ribosomal protein S34 (MRPS34) was decreased 2.30-fold in GBM 8401 cells. These changes of gene expression can provide the effects of BITC on the genetic level and are

  8. Molecular Mechanisms by Which a Fucus vesiculosus Extract Mediates Cell Cycle Inhibition and Cell Death in Pancreatic Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ulf Geisen

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Pancreatic cancer is one of the most aggressive cancer entities, with an extremely poor 5-year survival rate. Therefore, novel therapeutic agents with specific modes of action are urgently needed. Marine organisms represent a promising source to identify new pharmacologically active substances. Secondary metabolites derived from marine algae are of particular interest. The present work describes cellular and molecular mechanisms induced by an HPLC-fractionated, hydrophilic extract derived from the Baltic brown seaweed Fucus vesiculosus (Fv1. Treatment with Fv1 resulted in a strong inhibition of viability in various pancreatic cancer cell lines. This extract inhibited the cell cycle of proliferating cells due to the up-regulation of cell cycle inhibitors, shown on the mRNA (microarray data and protein level. As a result, cells were dying in a caspase-independent manner. Experiments with non-dividing cells showed that proliferation is a prerequisite for the effectiveness of Fv1. Importantly, Fv1 showed low cytotoxic activity against non-malignant resting T cells and terminally differentiated cells like erythrocytes. Interestingly, accelerated killing effects were observed in combination with inhibitors of autophagy. Our in vitro data suggest that Fv1 may represent a promising new agent that deserves further development towards clinical application.

  9. Exogenous NAD(+) decreases oxidative stress and protects H2O2-treated RPE cells against necrotic death through the up-regulation of autophagy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Ying; Zhao, Ke-Ke; Tong, Yao; Zhou, Ya-Li; Wang, Yi-Xiao; Zhao, Pei-Quan; Wang, Zhao-Yang

    2016-05-31

    Increased oxidative stress, which can lead to the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) cell death by inducing ATP depletion and DNA repair, is believed to be a prominent pathology in age-related macular degeneration (AMD). In the present study, we showed that and 0.1 mM nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD(+)) administration significantly blocked RPE cell death induced by 300 μM H2O2. Further investigation showed that H2O2 resulted in increased intracellular ROS level, activation of PARP-1 and subsequently necrotic death of RPE cells. Exogenous NAD(+) administration significantly decreased intracellular and intranuclear ROS levels in H2O2-treated RPE cells. In addition, NAD(+) administration to H2O2-treated RPE cells inhibited the activation of PARP-1 and protected the RPE cells against necrotic death. Moreover, exogenous NAD(+) administration up-regulated autophagy in the H2O2-treated RPE cells. Inhibition of autophagy by LY294002 blocked the decrease of intracellular and intranuclear ROS level. Besides, inhibition of autophagy by LY294002 abolished the protection of exogenous NAD(+) against H2O2-induced cell necrotic death. Taken together, our findings indicate that that exogenous NAD(+) administration suppresses H2O2-induced oxidative stress and protects RPE cells against PARP-1 mediated necrotic death through the up-regulation of autophagy. The results suggest that exogenous NAD(+) administration might be potential value for the treatment of AMD.

  10. Exogenous NAD+ decreases oxidative stress and protects H2O2-treated RPE cells against necrotic death through the up-regulation of autophagy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Ying; Zhao, Ke-ke; Tong, Yao; Zhou, Ya-li; Wang, Yi-xiao; Zhao, Pei-quan; Wang, Zhao-yang

    2016-01-01

    Increased oxidative stress, which can lead to the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) cell death by inducing ATP depletion and DNA repair, is believed to be a prominent pathology in age-related macular degeneration (AMD). In the present study, we showed that and 0.1 mM nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD+) administration significantly blocked RPE cell death induced by 300 μM H2O2. Further investigation showed that H2O2 resulted in increased intracellular ROS level, activation of PARP-1 and subsequently necrotic death of RPE cells. Exogenous NAD+ administration significantly decreased intracellular and intranuclear ROS levels in H2O2-treated RPE cells. In addition, NAD+ administration to H2O2-treated RPE cells inhibited the activation of PARP-1 and protected the RPE cells against necrotic death. Moreover, exogenous NAD+ administration up-regulated autophagy in the H2O2-treated RPE cells. Inhibition of autophagy by LY294002 blocked the decrease of intracellular and intranuclear ROS level. Besides, inhibition of autophagy by LY294002 abolished the protection of exogenous NAD+ against H2O2-induced cell necrotic death. Taken together, our findings indicate that that exogenous NAD+ administration suppresses H2O2-induced oxidative stress and protects RPE cells against PARP-1 mediated necrotic death through the up-regulation of autophagy. The results suggest that exogenous NAD+ administration might be potential value for the treatment of AMD. PMID:27240523

  11. ERK1/2 signalling protects against apoptosis following endoplasmic reticulum stress but cannot provide long-term protection against BAX/BAK-independent cell death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darling, Nicola J; Balmanno, Kathryn; Cook, Simon J

    2017-01-01

    Disruption of protein folding in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) causes ER stress. Activation of the unfolded protein response (UPR) acts to restore protein homeostasis or, if ER stress is severe or persistent, drive apoptosis, which is thought to proceed through the cell intrinsic, mitochondrial pathway. Indeed, cells that lack the key executioner proteins BAX and BAK are protected from ER stress-induced apoptosis. Here we show that chronic ER stress causes the progressive inhibition of the extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK1/2) signalling pathway. This is causally related to ER stress since reactivation of ERK1/2 can protect cells from ER stress-induced apoptosis whilst ERK1/2 pathway inhibition sensitises cells to ER stress. Furthermore, cancer cell lines harbouring constitutively active BRAFV600E are addicted to ERK1/2 signalling for protection against ER stress-induced cell death. ERK1/2 signalling normally represses the pro-death proteins BIM, BMF and PUMA and it has been proposed that ER stress induces BIM-dependent cell death. We found no evidence that ER stress increased the expression of these proteins; furthermore, BIM was not required for ER stress-induced death. Rather, ER stress caused the PERK-dependent inhibition of cap-dependent mRNA translation and the progressive loss of pro-survival proteins including BCL2, BCLXL and MCL1. Despite these observations, neither ERK1/2 activation nor loss of BAX/BAK could confer long-term clonogenic survival to cells exposed to ER stress. Thus, ER stress induces cell death by at least two biochemically and genetically distinct pathways: a classical BAX/BAK-dependent apoptotic response that can be inhibited by ERK1/2 signalling and an alternative ERK1/2- and BAX/BAK-independent cell death pathway.

  12. ERK1/2 signalling protects against apoptosis following endoplasmic reticulum stress but cannot provide long-term protection against BAX/BAK-independent cell death.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicola J Darling

    Full Text Available Disruption of protein folding in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER causes ER stress. Activation of the unfolded protein response (UPR acts to restore protein homeostasis or, if ER stress is severe or persistent, drive apoptosis, which is thought to proceed through the cell intrinsic, mitochondrial pathway. Indeed, cells that lack the key executioner proteins BAX and BAK are protected from ER stress-induced apoptosis. Here we show that chronic ER stress causes the progressive inhibition of the extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK1/2 signalling pathway. This is causally related to ER stress since reactivation of ERK1/2 can protect cells from ER stress-induced apoptosis whilst ERK1/2 pathway inhibition sensitises cells to ER stress. Furthermore, cancer cell lines harbouring constitutively active BRAFV600E are addicted to ERK1/2 signalling for protection against ER stress-induced cell death. ERK1/2 signalling normally represses the pro-death proteins BIM, BMF and PUMA and it has been proposed that ER stress induces BIM-dependent cell death. We found no evidence that ER stress increased the expression of these proteins; furthermore, BIM was not required for ER stress-induced death. Rather, ER stress caused the PERK-dependent inhibition of cap-dependent mRNA translation and the progressive loss of pro-survival proteins including BCL2, BCLXL and MCL1. Despite these observations, neither ERK1/2 activation nor loss of BAX/BAK could confer long-term clonogenic survival to cells exposed to ER stress. Thus, ER stress induces cell death by at least two biochemically and genetically distinct pathways: a classical BAX/BAK-dependent apoptotic response that can be inhibited by ERK1/2 signalling and an alternative ERK1/2- and BAX/BAK-independent cell death pathway.

  13. Glutathione in Cancer Cell Death

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ortega, Angel L. [Department of Physiology, Faculty of Medicine and Odontology, University of Valencia, 17 Av. Blasco Ibanez, 46010 Valencia (Spain); Mena, Salvador [Green Molecular SL, Pol. Ind. La Coma-Parc Cientific, 46190 Paterna, Valencia (Spain); Estrela, Jose M., E-mail: jose.m.estrela@uv.es [Department of Physiology, Faculty of Medicine and Odontology, University of Valencia, 17 Av. Blasco Ibanez, 46010 Valencia (Spain)

    2011-03-11

    Glutathione (L-γ-glutamyl-L-cysteinyl-glycine; GSH) in cancer cells is particularly relevant in the regulation of carcinogenic mechanisms; sensitivity against cytotoxic drugs, ionizing radiations, and some cytokines; DNA synthesis; and cell proliferation and death. The intracellular thiol redox state (controlled by GSH) is one of the endogenous effectors involved in regulating the mitochondrial permeability transition pore complex and, in consequence, thiol oxidation can be a causal factor in the mitochondrion-based mechanism that leads to cell death. Nevertheless GSH depletion is a common feature not only of apoptosis but also of other types of cell death. Indeed rates of GSH synthesis and fluxes regulate its levels in cellular compartments, and potentially influence switches among different mechanisms of death. How changes in gene expression, post-translational modifications of proteins, and signaling cascades are implicated will be discussed. Furthermore, this review will finally analyze whether GSH depletion may facilitate cancer cell death under in vivo conditions, and how this can be applied to cancer therapy.

  14. Ganglioside GD2 in reception and transduction of cell death signal in tumor cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doronin, Igor I; Vishnyakova, Polina A; Kholodenko, Irina V; Ponomarev, Eugene D; Ryazantsev, Dmitry Y; Molotkovskaya, Irina M; Kholodenko, Roman V

    2014-01-01

    Ganglioside GD2 is expressed on plasma membranes of various types of malignant cells. One of the most promising approaches for cancer immunotherapy is the treatment with monoclonal antibodies recognizing tumor-associated markers such as ganglioside GD2. It is considered that major mechanisms of anticancer activity of anti-GD2 antibodies are complement-dependent cytotoxicity and/or antibody-mediated cellular cytotoxicity. At the same time, several studies suggested that anti-GD2 antibodies are capable of direct induction of cell death of number of tumor cell lines, but it has not been investigated in details. In this study we investigated the functional role of ganglioside GD2 in the induction of cell death of multiple tumor cell lines by using GD2-specific monoclonal antibodies. Expression of GD2 on different tumor cell lines was analyzed by flow cytometry using anti-GD2 antibodies. By using HPTLC followed by densitometric analysis we measured the amount of ganglioside GD2 in total ganglioside fractions isolated from tumor cell lines. An MTT assay was performed to assess viability of GD2-positive and -negative tumor cell lines treated with anti-GD2 mAbs. Cross-reactivity of anti-GD2 mAbs with other gangliosides or other surface molecules was investigated by ELISA and flow cytometry. Inhibition of GD2 expression was achieved by using of inhibitor for ganglioside synthesis PDMP and/or siRNA for GM2/GD2 and GD3 synthases. Anti-GD2 mAbs effectively induced non-classical cell death that combined features of both apoptosis and necrosis in GD2-positive tumor cells and did not affect GD2-negative tumors. Anti-GD2 mAbs directly induced cell death, which included alteration of mitochondrial membrane potential, induction of apoptotic volume decrease and cell membrane permeability. This cytotoxic effect was mediated exclusively by specific binding of anti-GD2 antibodies with ganglioside GD2 but not with other molecules. Moreover, the level of GD2 expression correlated with

  15. Inducing death in tumor cells: roles of the inhibitor of apoptosis proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finlay, Darren; Teriete, Peter; Vamos, Mitchell; Cosford, Nicholas D P; Vuori, Kristiina

    2017-01-01

    The heterogeneous group of diseases collectively termed cancer results not just from aberrant cellular proliferation but also from a lack of accompanying homeostatic cell death. Indeed, cancer cells regularly acquire resistance to programmed cell death, or apoptosis, which not only supports cancer progression but also leads to resistance to therapeutic agents. Thus, various approaches have been undertaken in order to induce apoptosis in tumor cells for therapeutic purposes. Here, we will focus our discussion on agents that directly affect the apoptotic machinery itself rather than on drugs that induce apoptosis in tumor cells indirectly, such as by DNA damage or kinase dependency inhibition. As the roles of the Bcl-2 family have been extensively studied and reviewed recently, we will focus in this review specifically on the inhibitor of apoptosis protein (IAP) family. IAPs are a disparate group of proteins that all contain a baculovirus IAP repeat domain, which is important for the inhibition of apoptosis in some, but not all, family members. We describe each of the family members with respect to their structural and functional similarities and differences and their respective roles in cancer. Finally, we also review the current state of IAPs as targets for anti-cancer therapeutics and discuss the current clinical state of IAP antagonists.

  16. Thromboxane synthase suppression induces lung cancer cell apoptosis via inhibiting NF-κB

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leung, Kin Chung; Li, Ming-Yue; Leung, Billy C.S.; Hsin, Michael K.Y.; Mok, Tony S.K.; Underwood, Malcolm J.; Chen, George G.

    2010-01-01

    Accumulating evidence shows that the inhibition of thromboxane synthase (TXS) induced apoptosis in cancer cells. TXS inhibitor 1-Benzylimidzole (1-BI) can trigger apoptosis in lung cancer cells but the mechanism is not fully defined. In this study, lung cancer cells were treated with 1-BI. In this study, the level of reactive oxygen species (ROS) was measured and NF-κB activity was determined in human lung cancer cells. The roles of ROS and NF-κB in 1-BI-mediated cell death were analyzed. The results showed that 1-BI induced ROS generation but decreased the activity of NF-κB by reducing phosphorylated IκBα (p-IκBα) and inhibiting the translocation of p65 into the nucleus. In contrast to 1-BI, antioxidant N-acetyl cysteine (NAC) stimulated cell proliferation and significantly protected the cells from 1-BI-mediated cell death by neutralizing ROS. Collectively, apoptosis induced by 1-BI is associated with the over-production of ROS and the reduction of NF-κB. Antioxidants can significantly block the inhibitory effect of 1-BI.

  17. HAMLET triggers apoptosis but tumor cell death is independent of caspases, Bcl-2 and p53.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallgren, O; Gustafsson, L; Irjala, H; Selivanova, G; Orrenius, S; Svanborg, C

    2006-02-01

    HAMLET (Human alpha-lactalbumin Made Lethal to Tumor cells) triggers selective tumor cell death in vitro and limits tumor progression in vivo. Dying cells show features of apoptosis but it is not clear if the apoptotic response explains tumor cell death. This study examined the contribution of apoptosis to cell death in response to HAMLET. Apoptotic changes like caspase activation, phosphatidyl serine externalization, chromatin condensation were detected in HAMLET-treated tumor cells, but caspase inhibition or Bcl-2 over-expression did not prolong cell survival and the caspase response was Bcl-2 independent. HAMLET translocates to the nuclei and binds directly to chromatin, but the death response was unrelated to the p53 status of the tumor cells. p53 deletions or gain of function mutations did not influence the HAMLET sensitivity of tumor cells. Chromatin condensation was partly caspase dependent, but apoptosis-like marginalization of chromatin was also observed. The results show that tumor cell death in response to HAMLET is independent of caspases, p53 and Bcl-2 even though HAMLET activates an apoptotic response. The use of other cell death pathways allows HAMLET to successfully circumvent fundamental anti-apoptotic strategies that are present in many tumor cells.

  18. Prodigiosin activates endoplasmic reticulum stress cell death pathway in human breast carcinoma cell lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pan, Mu-Yun; Shen, Yuh-Chiang; Lu, Chien-Hsing; Yang, Shu-Yi; Ho, Tsing-Fen; Peng, Yu-Ta; Chang, Chia-Che

    2012-01-01

    Prodigiosin is a bacterial tripyrrole pigment with potent cytotoxicity against diverse human cancer cell lines. Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress is initiated by accumulation of unfolded or misfolded proteins in the ER lumen and may induce cell death when irremediable. In this study, the role of ER stress in prodigiosin-induced cytotoxicity was elucidated for the first time. Comparable to the ER stress inducer thapsigargin, prodigiosin up-regulated signature ER stress markers GRP78 and CHOP in addition to activating the IRE1, PERK and ATF6 branches of the unfolded protein response (UPR) in multiple human breast carcinoma cell lines, confirming prodigiosin as an ER stress inducer. Prodigiosin transcriptionally up-regulated CHOP, as evidenced by its promoting effect on the CHOP promoter activity. Of note, knockdown of CHOP effectively lowered prodigiosin's capacity to evoke PARP cleavage, reduce cell viability and suppress colony formation, highlighting an essential role of CHOP in prodigiosin-induced cytotoxic ER stress response. In addition, prodigiosin down-regulated BCL2 in a CHOP-dependent manner. Importantly, restoration of BCL2 expression blocked prodigiosin-induced PARP cleavage and greatly enhanced the survival of prodigiosin-treated cells, suggesting that CHOP-dependent BCL2 suppression mediates prodigiosin-elicited cell death. Moreover, pharmacological inhibition of JNK by SP600125 or dominant-negative blockade of PERK-mediated eIF2α phosphorylation impaired prodigiosin-induced CHOP up-regulation and PARP cleavage. Collectively, these results identified ER stress-mediated cell death as a mode-of-action of prodigiosin's tumoricidal effect. Mechanistically, prodigiosin engages the IRE1–JNK and PERK–eIF2α branches of the UPR signaling to up-regulate CHOP, which in turn mediates BCL2 suppression to induce cell death. Highlights: ► Prodigiosin is a bacterial tripyrrole pigment with potent anticancer effect. ► Prodigiosin is herein identified as an

  19. Prodigiosin activates endoplasmic reticulum stress cell death pathway in human breast carcinoma cell lines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pan, Mu-Yun [Institute of Biomedical Sciences, National Chung Hsing University, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Shen, Yuh-Chiang [Institute of Biomedical Sciences, National Chung Hsing University, Taichung, Taiwan (China); National Research Institute of Chinese Medicine, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Lu, Chien-Hsing [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Taichung Veterans General Hospital, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, National Yang-Ming University School of Medicine, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Yang, Shu-Yi [Institute of Biomedical Sciences, National Chung Hsing University, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Ho, Tsing-Fen [Department of Medical Laboratory Science and Biotechnology, Central Taiwan University of Science and Technology, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Peng, Yu-Ta [Institute of Biomedical Sciences, National Chung Hsing University, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Chang, Chia-Che, E-mail: chia_che@dragon.nchu.edu.tw [Institute of Biomedical Sciences, National Chung Hsing University, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Agricultural Biotechnology Center, National Chung Hsing University, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Graduate Institute of Basic Medical Science, China Medical University, Taichung, Taiwan (China)

    2012-12-15

    Prodigiosin is a bacterial tripyrrole pigment with potent cytotoxicity against diverse human cancer cell lines. Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress is initiated by accumulation of unfolded or misfolded proteins in the ER lumen and may induce cell death when irremediable. In this study, the role of ER stress in prodigiosin-induced cytotoxicity was elucidated for the first time. Comparable to the ER stress inducer thapsigargin, prodigiosin up-regulated signature ER stress markers GRP78 and CHOP in addition to activating the IRE1, PERK and ATF6 branches of the unfolded protein response (UPR) in multiple human breast carcinoma cell lines, confirming prodigiosin as an ER stress inducer. Prodigiosin transcriptionally up-regulated CHOP, as evidenced by its promoting effect on the CHOP promoter activity. Of note, knockdown of CHOP effectively lowered prodigiosin's capacity to evoke PARP cleavage, reduce cell viability and suppress colony formation, highlighting an essential role of CHOP in prodigiosin-induced cytotoxic ER stress response. In addition, prodigiosin down-regulated BCL2 in a CHOP-dependent manner. Importantly, restoration of BCL2 expression blocked prodigiosin-induced PARP cleavage and greatly enhanced the survival of prodigiosin-treated cells, suggesting that CHOP-dependent BCL2 suppression mediates prodigiosin-elicited cell death. Moreover, pharmacological inhibition of JNK by SP600125 or dominant-negative blockade of PERK-mediated eIF2α phosphorylation impaired prodigiosin-induced CHOP up-regulation and PARP cleavage. Collectively, these results identified ER stress-mediated cell death as a mode-of-action of prodigiosin's tumoricidal effect. Mechanistically, prodigiosin engages the IRE1–JNK and PERK–eIF2α branches of the UPR signaling to up-regulate CHOP, which in turn mediates BCL2 suppression to induce cell death. Highlights: ► Prodigiosin is a bacterial tripyrrole pigment with potent anticancer effect. ► Prodigiosin is herein identified

  20. Inhibition of autophagy induced by TSA sensitizes colon cancer cell to radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Gang; Wang, Yan; Pang, Xueli; Zhang, Bo

    2014-02-01

    Radiotherapy is one of the main treatments for clinical cancer therapy. However, its application was limited due to lack of radiosensitivity in some cancers. Trichostatin A (TSA) is a classic histone deacetylases inhibitor (HDACi) that specifically inhibits the biochemical functions of HDAC and is demonstrated to be an active anticancer drug. However, whether it could sensitize colon cancer to radiation is not clear. Our results showed that TSA enhanced the radiosensitivity of colon cancer cells as determined by CCK-8 and clonogenic survival assay. Moreover, apoptotic cell death induced by radiation was enhanced by TSA treatment. Additionally, TSA also induced autophagic response in colon cancer cells, while autophagy inhibition led to cell apoptosis and enhanced the radiosensitivity of colon cancer cells. Our data suggested that inhibition of cytoprotective autophagy sensitizes cancer cell to radiation, which might be further investigated for clinical cancer radiotherapy.

  1. Titanium dioxide induces apoptotic cell death through reactive oxygen species-mediated Fas upregulation and Bax activation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoon TH

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Ki-Chun Yoo1, Chang-Hwan Yoon1, Dongwook Kwon2, Kyung-Hwan Hyun1, Soo Jung Woo1, Rae-Kwon Kim1, Eun-Jung Lim1, Yongjoon Suh1, Min-Jung Kim1, Tae Hyun Yoon2, Su-Jae Lee11Laboratory of Molecular Biochemistry, 2Laboratory of Nanoscale Characterization and Environmental Chemistry, Department of Chemistry, Hanyang University, Seoul, Republic of KoreaBackground: Titanium dioxide (TiO2 has been widely used in many areas, including biomedicine, cosmetics, and environmental engineering. Recently, it has become evident that some TiO2 particles have a considerable cytotoxic effect in normal human cells. However, the molecular basis for the cytotoxicity of TiO2 has yet to be defined.Methods and results: In this study, we demonstrated that combined treatment with TiO2 nanoparticles sized less than 100 nm and ultraviolet A irradiation induces apoptotic cell death through reactive oxygen species-dependent upregulation of Fas and conformational activation of Bax in normal human cells. Treatment with P25 TiO2 nanoparticles with a hydrodynamic size distribution centered around 70 nm (TiO2P25–70 together with ultraviolet A irradiation-induced caspase-dependent apoptotic cell death, accompanied by transcriptional upregulation of the death receptor, Fas, and conformational activation of Bax. In line with these results, knockdown of either Fas or Bax with specific siRNA significantly inhibited TiO2-induced apoptotic cell death. Moreover, inhibition of reactive oxygen species with an antioxidant, N-acetyl-L-cysteine, clearly suppressed upregulation of Fas, conformational activation of Bax, and subsequent apoptotic cell death in response to combination treatment using TiO2P25–70 and ultraviolet A irradiation.Conclusion: These results indicate that sub-100 nm sized TiO2 treatment under ultraviolet A irradiation induces apoptotic cell death through reactive oxygen species-mediated upregulation of the death receptor, Fas, and activation of the preapoptotic protein

  2. PARP-1 cleavage fragments: signatures of cell-death proteases in neurodegeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Jonathan S

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The normal function of poly (ADP-ribose polymerase-1 (PARP-1 is the routine repair of DNA damage by adding poly (ADP ribose polymers in response to a variety of cellular stresses. Recently, it has become widely appreciated that PARP-1 also participates in diverse physiological and pathological functions from cell survival to several forms of cell death and has been implicated in gene transcription, immune responses, inflammation, learning, memory, synaptic functions, angiogenesis and aging. In the CNS, PARP inhibition attenuates injury in pathologies like cerebral ischemia, trauma and excitotoxicity demonstrating a central role of PARP-1 in these pathologies. PARP-1 is also a preferred substrate for several 'suicidal' proteases and the proteolytic action of suicidal proteases (caspases, calpains, cathepsins, granzymes and matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs on PARP-1 produces several specific proteolytic cleavage fragments with different molecular weights. These PARP-1 signature fragments are recognized biomarkers for specific patterns of protease activity in unique cell death programs. This review focuses on specific suicidal proteases active towards PARP-1 to generate signature PARP-1 fragments that can identify key proteases and particular forms of cell death involved in pathophysiology. The roles played by some of the PARP-1 fragments and their associated binding partners in the control of different forms of cell death are also discussed.

  3. Polycation-mediated integrated cell death processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Parhamifar, Ladan; Andersen, Helene; Wu, Linping

    2014-01-01

    standard. PEIs are highly efficient transfectants, but depending on their architecture and size they induce cytotoxicity through different modes of cell death pathways. Here, we briefly review dynamic and integrated cell death processes and pathways, and discuss considerations in cell death assay design...

  4. The cell on the edge of life and death: Crosstalk between autophagy and apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasprowska-Liśkiewicz, Daniela

    2017-09-21

    Recently, the crosstalk between autophagy and apoptosis has attracted broader attention. Basal autophagy serves to maintain cell homeostasis, while the upregulation of this process is an element of stress response that enables the cell to survive under adverse conditions. Autophagy may also determine the fate of the cell through its interactions with cell death pathways. The protein networks that control the initiation and the execution phase of these two processes are highly interconnected. Several scenarios for the crosstalk between autophagy and apoptosis exist. In most cases, the activation of autophagy represents an attempt of the cell to cope with stress, and protects the cell from apoptosis or delays its initiation. Generally, the simultaneous activation of pro-survival and pro-death pathways is prevented by the mutual inhibitory crosstalk between autophagy and apoptosis. But in some circumstances, autophagy or the proteins of the core autophagic machinery may promote cellular demise through excessive self-digestion (so-called "autophagic cell death") or by stimulating the activation of other cell death pathways. It is controversial whether cells actually die via autophagy, which is why the term "autophagic cell death" has been under intense debate lately. This review summarizes the recent findings on the multilevel crosstalk between autophagy and apoptosis in aspects of common regulators, mutual inhibition of these processes, the stimulation of apoptosis by autophagy or autophagic proteins and finally the role of autophagy as a death-execution mechanism.

  5. Bar represses dPax2 and decapentaplegic to regulate cell fate and morphogenetic cell death in Drosophila eye.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jongkyun Kang

    Full Text Available The coordinated regulation of cell fate and cell survival is crucial for normal pattern formation in developing organisms. In Drosophila compound eye development, crystalline arrays of hexagonal ommatidia are established by precise assembly of diverse cell types, including the photoreceptor cells, cone cells and interommatidial (IOM pigment cells. The molecular basis for controlling the number of cone and IOM pigment cells during ommatidial pattern formation is not well understood. Here we present evidence that BarH1 and BarH2 homeobox genes are essential for eye patterning by inhibiting excess cone cell differentiation and promoting programmed death of IOM cells. Specifically, we show that loss of Bar from the undifferentiated retinal precursor cells leads to ectopic expression of Prospero and dPax2, two transcription factors essential for cone cell specification, resulting in excess cone cell differentiation. We also show that loss of Bar causes ectopic expression of the TGFβ homolog Decapentaplegic (Dpp posterior to the morphogenetic furrow in the larval eye imaginal disc. The ectopic Dpp expression is not responsible for the formation of excess cone cells in Bar loss-of-function mutant eyes. Instead, it causes reduction in IOM cell death in the pupal stage by antagonizing the function of pro-apoptotic gene reaper. Taken together, this study suggests a novel regulatory mechanism in the control of developmental cell death in which the repression of Dpp by Bar in larval eye disc is essential for IOM cell death in pupal retina.

  6. BMPR2 inhibition induced apoptosis and autophagy via destabilization of XIAP in human chondrosarcoma cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiao, G; Guo, W; Ren, T; Lu, Q; Sun, Y; Liang, W; Ren, C; Yang, K; Sun, K

    2014-01-01

    Bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) are multifunctional proteins, and their receptors (BMPRs) have crucial roles in the process of signaling. However, their function in cancer is somewhat inconsistent. It has been demonstrated that more prevalent expression of bone morphogenetic protein receptor 2 (BMPR2) has been detected in dedifferentiated chondrosarcomas than conventional chondrosarcomas. Here, we find that BMPR2 inhibition induces apoptosis and autophagy of chondrosarcoma. We found that BMPR2 expression was correlated with the clinicopathological features of chondrosarcomas, and could predict the treatment outcome. Knockdown of BMPR2 by small interfering RNA results in growth inhibition in chondrosarcoma cells. Silencing BMPR2 promoted G2/M cell cycle arrest, induced chondrosarcoma cell apoptosis through caspase-3-dependent pathway via repression of X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis protein (XIAP) and induced autophagy of chondrosarcoma cells via XIAP-Mdm2-p53 pathway. Inhibition of autophagy induced by BMPR2 small interfering RNA (siBMPR2) sensitized chondrosarcoma cells to siBMPR2-induced apoptotic cell death, suggesting that autophagy has a protective role for chondrosarcoma cells in context of siBMPR2-induced apoptotic cell death. In vivo tumorigenicity assay in mice indicated that inhibition of BMPR2 reduced tumor growth. Taken together, our results suggest that BMPR2 has a significant role in the tumorigenesis of chondrosarcoma, and could be an important prognostic marker for chondrosarcoma. BMPR2 inhibition could eventually provide a promising therapy for chondrosarcoma treatment. PMID:25501832

  7. Cyclic AMP induces apoptosis in multiple myeloma cells and inhibits tumor development in a mouse myeloma model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Follin-Arbelet, Virginie; Hofgaard, Peter O; Hauglin, Harald; Naderi, Soheil; Sundan, Anders; Blomhoff, Rune; Bogen, Bjarne; Blomhoff, Heidi K

    2011-01-01

    Multiple myeloma is an incurable disease requiring the development of effective therapies which can be used clinically. We have elucidated the potential for manipulating the cAMP signaling pathway as a target for inhibiting the growth of multiple myeloma cells. As a model system, we primarily used the murine multiple myeloma cell line MOPC315 which can be grown both in vivo and in vitro. Human multiple myeloma cell lines U266, INA-6 and the B-cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia cell line Reh were used only for in vitro studies. Cell death was assessed by flow cytometry and western blot analysis after treatment with cAMP elevating agents (forskolin, prostaglandin E2 and rolipram) and cAMP analogs. We followed tumor growth in vivo after forskolin treatment by imaging DsRed-labelled MOPC315 cells transplanted subcutaneously in BALB/c nude mice. In contrast to the effect on Reh cells, 50 μM forskolin more than tripled the death of MOPC315 cells after 24 h in vitro. Forskolin induced cell death to a similar extent in the human myeloma cell lines U266 and INA-6. cAMP-mediated cell death had all the typical hallmarks of apoptosis, including changes in the mitochondrial membrane potential and cleavage of caspase 3, caspase 9 and PARP. Forskolin also inhibited the growth of multiple myeloma cells in a mouse model in vivo. Elevation of intracellular levels of cAMP kills multiple myeloma cells in vitro and inhibits development of multiple myeloma in vivo. This strongly suggests that compounds activating the cAMP signaling pathway may be useful in the field of multiple myeloma

  8. Gene expression analysis of cell death induction by Taurolidine in different malignant cell lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chromik, Ansgar M; Weyhe, Dirk; Mittelkötter, Ulrich; Uhl, Waldemar; Hahn, Stephan A; Daigeler, Adrien; Flier, Annegret; Bulut, Daniel; May, Christina; Harati, Kamran; Roschinsky, Jan; Sülberg, Dominique

    2010-01-01

    The anti-infective agent Taurolidine (TRD) has been shown to have cell death inducing properties, but the mechanism of its action is largely unknown. The aim of this study was to identify potential common target genes modulated at the transcriptional level following TRD treatment in tumour cell lines originating from different cancer types. Five different malignant cell lines (HT29, Chang Liver, HT1080, AsPC-1 and BxPC-3) were incubated with TRD (100 μM, 250 μM and 1000 μM). Proliferation after 8 h and cell viability after 24 h were analyzed by BrdU assay and FACS analysis, respectively. Gene expression analyses were carried out using the Agilent -microarray platform to indentify genes which displayed conjoint regulation following the addition of TRD in all cell lines. Candidate genes were subjected to Ingenuity Pathways Analysis and selected genes were validated by qRT-PCR and Western Blot. TRD 250 μM caused a significant inhibition of proliferation as well as apoptotic cell death in all cell lines. Among cell death associated genes with the strongest regulation in gene expression, we identified pro-apoptotic transcription factors (EGR1, ATF3) as well as genes involved in the ER stress response (PPP1R15A), in ubiquitination (TRAF6) and mitochondrial apoptotic pathways (PMAIP1). This is the first conjoint analysis of potential target genes of TRD which was performed simultaneously in different malignant cell lines. The results indicate that TRD might be involved in different signal transduction pathways leading to apoptosis

  9. Ursodeoxycholic Acid Induces Death Receptor-mediated Apoptosis in Prostate Cancer Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Won Sup; Jung, Ji Hyun; Panchanathan, Radha; Yun, Jeong Won; Kim, Dong Hoon; Kim, Hye Jung; Kim, Gon Sup; Ryu, Chung Ho; Shin, Sung Chul; Hong, Soon Chan; Choi, Yung Hyun; Jung, Jin-Myung

    2017-01-01

    Background Bile acids have anti-cancer properties in a certain types of cancers. We determined anticancer activity and its underlying molecular mechanism of ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA) in human DU145 prostate cancer cells. Methods Cell viability was measured with an MTT assay. UDCA-induced apoptosis was determined with flow cytometric analysis. The expression levels of apoptosis-related signaling proteins were examined with Western blotting. Results UDCA treatment significantly inhibited cell growth of DU145 in a dose-dependent manner. It induced cellular shrinkage and cytoplasmic blebs and accumulated the cells with sub-G1 DNA contents. Moreover, UDCA activated caspase 8, suggesting that UDCA-induced apoptosis is associated with extrinsic pathway. Consistent to this finding, UDCA increased the expressions of tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) receptor, death receptor 4 (DR4) and death receptor 5 (DR5), and TRAIL augmented the UDCA-induced cell death in DU145 cells. In addition, UDCA also increased the expressions of Bax and cytochrome c and decreased the expression of Bcl-xL in DU145 cells. This finding suggests that UDCA-induced apoptosis may be involved in intrinsic pathway. Conclusions UDCA induces apoptosis via extrinsic pathway as well as intrinsic pathway in DU145 prostate cancer cells. UDCA may be a promising anti-cancer agent against prostate cancer. PMID:28382282

  10. Type I collagen gel protects murine fibrosarcoma L929 cells from TNFα-induced cell death

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Hong-Ju; He, Wen-Qi; Chen, Ling; Liu, Wei-Wei; Xu, Qian; Xia, Ming-Yu; Hayashi, Toshihiko; Fujisaki, Hitomi; Hattori, Shunji; Tashiro, Shin-ichi; Onodera, Satoshi; Ikejima, Takashi

    2015-01-01

    Murine fibrosarcoma L929 cells have been used to test efficacy of proinflammatory cytokine TNFα. In the present study, we reported on protective effect of type I collagen gel used as L929 cell culture. L929 cell grew and proliferated well on collagen gel. However, the L929 cells exhibited cobblestone-like morphology which was much different from the spread fusiform shape when cultured on conventional cell dishes as well as the cells tended to aggregate. On conventional cell culture dishes, the cells treated with TNFα became round in shape and eventually died in a necroptotic manner. The cells cultured on collagen gel, however, were completely unaffected. TNFα treatment was reported to induce autophagy in L929 cells on the plastic dish, and therefore we investigated the effect of collagen gel on induction of autophagy. The results indicated that autophagy induced by TNFα treatment was much reduced when the cells were cultured on collagen gel. In conclusion, type I collagen gel protected L929 cell from TNFα-induced cell death. - Highlights: • Collagen gel culture changed the morphology of L929 cells. • L929 cell cultured on collagen gel were resistant to TNFα-induced cell death. • Collagen gel culture inhibited TNFα-induced autophagy in L929 cells

  11. Type I collagen gel protects murine fibrosarcoma L929 cells from TNFα-induced cell death

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Hong-Ju; He, Wen-Qi; Chen, Ling; Liu, Wei-Wei; Xu, Qian; Xia, Ming-Yu; Hayashi, Toshihiko [China-Japan Research Institute of Medical and Pharmaceutical Sciences, Shenyang Pharmaceutical University, Shenyang 110016 (China); Fujisaki, Hitomi; Hattori, Shunji [Nippi Research Institute of Biomatrix, Toride, Ibaraki 302-0017 (Japan); Tashiro, Shin-ichi [Institute for Clinical and Biomedical Sciences, Kyoto 603-8072 (Japan); Onodera, Satoshi [Department of Clinical and Pharmaceutical Sciences, Showa Pharmaceutical University, Tokyo 194-8543 (Japan); Ikejima, Takashi, E-mail: ikejimat@vip.sina.com [China-Japan Research Institute of Medical and Pharmaceutical Sciences, Shenyang Pharmaceutical University, Shenyang 110016 (China)

    2015-02-20

    Murine fibrosarcoma L929 cells have been used to test efficacy of proinflammatory cytokine TNFα. In the present study, we reported on protective effect of type I collagen gel used as L929 cell culture. L929 cell grew and proliferated well on collagen gel. However, the L929 cells exhibited cobblestone-like morphology which was much different from the spread fusiform shape when cultured on conventional cell dishes as well as the cells tended to aggregate. On conventional cell culture dishes, the cells treated with TNFα became round in shape and eventually died in a necroptotic manner. The cells cultured on collagen gel, however, were completely unaffected. TNFα treatment was reported to induce autophagy in L929 cells on the plastic dish, and therefore we investigated the effect of collagen gel on induction of autophagy. The results indicated that autophagy induced by TNFα treatment was much reduced when the cells were cultured on collagen gel. In conclusion, type I collagen gel protected L929 cell from TNFα-induced cell death. - Highlights: • Collagen gel culture changed the morphology of L929 cells. • L929 cell cultured on collagen gel were resistant to TNFα-induced cell death. • Collagen gel culture inhibited TNFα-induced autophagy in L929 cells.

  12. Ursodeoxycholic acid suppresses mitochondria-dependent programmed cell death induced by sodium nitroprusside in SH-SY5Y cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chun, Hong Sung; Low, Walter C.

    2012-01-01

    Although ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA) and its highly water-soluble formula (Yoo's solution; YS) have been shown to prevent neuronal damage, the effects of UDCA or YS against Parkinson's disease (PD)-related dopaminergic cell death has not been studied. This study investigated the protective effects of UDCA and YS on sodium nitroprusside (SNP)-induced cytotoxicity in human dopaminergic SH-SY5Y cells. Both UDCA (50–200 μM) and YS (100–200 μM) dose-dependently prevented SNP (1 mM)-induced cell death. Results showed that both UDCA and YS effectively attenuated the production of total reactive oxygen species (ROS), peroxynitrite (ONOO − ) and nitric oxide (NO), and markedly inhibited the mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) loss and intracellular reduced glutathione (GSH) depletion. SNP-induced programmed cell death events, such as nuclear fragmentation, caspase-3/7 and -9 activation, Bcl-2/Bax ratio decrease, and cytochrome c release, were significantly attenuated by both UDCA and YS. Furthermore, selective inhibitor of phosphatidylinositiol-3-kinase (PI3K), LY294002, and Akt/PKB inhibitor, triciribine, reversed the preventive effects of UDCA on the SNP-induced cytotoxicity and Bax translocation. These results suggest that UDCA can protect SH-SY5Y cells under programmed cell death process by regulating PI3K-Akt/PKB pathways.

  13. Critical role of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 in modulating the mode of cell death caused by continuous oxidative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Son, Young-Ok; Kook, Sung-Ho; Jang, Yong-Suk; Shi, Xianglin; Lee, Jeong-Chae

    2009-11-01

    Continuously generated hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) inhibits typical apoptosis and instead initiates a caspase-independent, apoptosis-inducing factor (AIF)-mediated pyknotic cell death. This may be related to H(2)O(2)-mediated DNA damage and subsequent ATP depletion, although the exact mechanisms by which the mode of cell death is decided after H(2)O(2) exposure are still unclear. Accumulated evidence and our previous data led us to hypothesize that continuously generated H(2)O(2), not an H(2)O(2) bolus, induces severe DNA damage, signaling poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP-1) activation, ATP depletion, and eventually caspase-independent cell death. Results from the present study support that H(2)O(2) generated continuously by glucose oxidase causes excessive DNA damage and PARP-1 activation. Blockage of PARP-1 by a siRNA transfection or by pharmacological inhibitor resulted in the significant inhibition of ATP depletion, loss of mitochondrial membrane potential, nuclear translocation of AIF and endonuclease G, and eventually conversion to caspase-dependent apoptosis. Overall, the current study demonstrates the different roles of PARP-1 inhibition in modulation of cell death according to the method of H(2)O(2) exposure, that is, continuous generation versus a direct addition. (c) 2009 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  14. Role of mitochondria-associated hexokinase II in cancer cell death induced by 3-Bromopyruvate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhao; Zhang, Hui; Lu, Weiqin; Huang, Peng

    2009-01-01

    Summary It has long been observed that cancer cells rely more on glycolysis to generate ATP and actively use certain glycolytic metabolic intermediates for biosynthesis. Hexokinase II (HKII) is a key glycolytic enzyme that plays a role in the regulation of the mitochondria-initiated apoptotic cell death. As a potent inhibitor of hexokinase, 3-bromopyruvate (3-BrPA) is known to inhibit cancer cell energy metabolism and trigger cell death, supposedly through depletion of cellular ATP. The current study showed that 3-BrPA caused a covalent modification of HKII protein and directly triggered its dissociation from mitochondria, leading to a specific release of apoptosis-inducing factor (AIF) from the mitochondria to cytosol and eventual cell death. Co-immunoprecipitation revealed a physical interaction between HKII and AIF. Using a competitive peptide of HKII, we showed that the dissociation of hexokinase II from mitochondria alone could cause apoptotic cell death, especially in the mitochondria-deficient ρ0 cells that highly express HKII. Interestingly, the dissociation of HKII itself did no directly affect the mitochondrial membrane potential, ROS generation, and oxidative phosphorylation. Our study suggests that the physical association between HKII and AIF is important for the normal localization of AIF in the mitochondria, and disruption of this protein complex by 3-BrPA leads to their release from the mitochondria and eventual cell death. PMID:19285479

  15. Protective Effects of Curcumin on Manganese-Induced BV-2 Microglial Cell Death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Euteum; Chun, Hong Sung

    2017-08-01

    Curcumin, a bioactive component in tumeric, has been shown to exert antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, anticarcinogenic, hepatoprotective, and neuroprotective effects, but the effects of curcumin against manganese (Mn)-mediated neurotoxicity have not been studied. This study examined the protective effects of curcumin on Mn-induced cytotoxicity in BV-2 microglial cells. Curcumin (0.1-10 µM) dose-dependently prevented Mn (250 µM)-induced cell death. Mn-induced mitochondria-related apoptotic characteristics, such as caspase-3 and -9 activation, cytochrome c release, Bax increase, and Bcl-2 decrease, were significantly suppressed by curcumin. In addition, curcumin significantly increased intracellular glutathione (GSH) and moderately potentiated superoxide dismutase (SOD), both which were diminished by Mn treatment. Curcumin pretreatment effectively suppressed Mn-induced upregulation of malondialdehyde (MDA), total reactive oxygen species (ROS). Moreover, curcumin markedly inhibited the Mn-induced mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) loss. Furthermore, curcumin was able to induce heme oxygenase (HO)-1 expression. Curcumin-mediated inhibition of ROS, down-regulation of caspases, restoration of MMP, and recovery of cell viability were partially reversed by HO-1 inhibitor (SnPP). These results suggest the first evidence that curcumin can prevent Mn-induced microglial cell death through the induction of HO-1 and regulation of oxidative stress, mitochondrial dysfunction, and apoptotic events.

  16. Melatonin pre-treatment mitigates SHSY-5Y cells against oxaliplatin induced mitochondrial stress and apoptotic cell death

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choudhury, Arnab; Kar, Sudeshna; Tabassum, Heena

    2017-01-01

    Oxaliplatin (Oxa) treatment to SH-SY5Y human neuroblastoma cells has been shown by previous studies to induce oxidative stress, which in turn modulates intracellular signaling cascades resulting in cell death. While this phenomenon of Oxa-induced neurotoxicity is known, the underlying mechanisms involved in this cell death cascade must be clarified. Moreover, there is still little known regarding the roles of neuronal mitochondria and cytosolic compartments in mediating Oxa-induced neurotoxicity. With a better grasp of the mechanisms driving neurotoxicity in Oxa-treated SH-SY5Y cells, we can then identify certain pathways to target in protecting against neurotoxic cell damage. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to determine whether one such agent, melatonin (Mel), could confer protection against Oxa-induced neurotoxicity in SH-SY5Y cells. Results from the present study found Oxa to significantly reduce SH-SY5Y cell viability in a dose-dependent manner. Alternatively, we found Mel pre-treatment to SH-SY5Y cells to attenuate Oxa-induced toxicity, resulting in a markedly increased cell viability. Mel exerted its protective effects by regulating reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and reducing superoxide radicals inside Oxa-exposed. In addition, we observed pre-treatment with Mel to rescue Oxa-treated cells by protecting mitochondria. As Oxa-treatment alone decreases mitochondrial membrane potential (Δψm), resulting in an altered Bcl-2/Bax ratio and release of sequestered cytochrome c, so Mel was shown to inhibit these pathways. Mel was also found to inhibit proteolytic activation of caspase 3, inactivation of Poly (ADP Ribose) polymerase, and DNA damage, thereby allowing SH-SY5Y cells to resist apoptotic cell death. Collectively, our results suggest a role for melatonin in reducing Oxa induced neurotoxicity. Further studies exploring melatonin’s protective effects may prove successful in eliciting pathways to further alter the neurotoxic pathways of

  17. Melatonin pre-treatment mitigates SHSY-5Y cells against oxaliplatin induced mitochondrial stress and apoptotic cell death.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Waseem

    Full Text Available Oxaliplatin (Oxa treatment to SH-SY5Y human neuroblastoma cells has been shown by previous studies to induce oxidative stress, which in turn modulates intracellular signaling cascades resulting in cell death. While this phenomenon of Oxa-induced neurotoxicity is known, the underlying mechanisms involved in this cell death cascade must be clarified. Moreover, there is still little known regarding the roles of neuronal mitochondria and cytosolic compartments in mediating Oxa-induced neurotoxicity. With a better grasp of the mechanisms driving neurotoxicity in Oxa-treated SH-SY5Y cells, we can then identify certain pathways to target in protecting against neurotoxic cell damage. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to determine whether one such agent, melatonin (Mel, could confer protection against Oxa-induced neurotoxicity in SH-SY5Y cells. Results from the present study found Oxa to significantly reduce SH-SY5Y cell viability in a dose-dependent manner. Alternatively, we found Mel pre-treatment to SH-SY5Y cells to attenuate Oxa-induced toxicity, resulting in a markedly increased cell viability. Mel exerted its protective effects by regulating reactive oxygen species (ROS production and reducing superoxide radicals inside Oxa-exposed. In addition, we observed pre-treatment with Mel to rescue Oxa-treated cells by protecting mitochondria. As Oxa-treatment alone decreases mitochondrial membrane potential (Δψm, resulting in an altered Bcl-2/Bax ratio and release of sequestered cytochrome c, so Mel was shown to inhibit these pathways. Mel was also found to inhibit proteolytic activation of caspase 3, inactivation of Poly (ADP Ribose polymerase, and DNA damage, thereby allowing SH-SY5Y cells to resist apoptotic cell death. Collectively, our results suggest a role for melatonin in reducing Oxa induced neurotoxicity. Further studies exploring melatonin's protective effects may prove successful in eliciting pathways to further alter the neurotoxic

  18. Efavirenz and 8-hydroxyefavirenz induce cell death via a JNK- and BimEL-dependent mechanism in primary human hepatocytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bumpus, Namandje N., E-mail: nbumpus1@jhmi.edu

    2011-12-15

    Chronic use of efavirenz (EFV) has been linked to incidences of hepatotoxicity in patients receiving EFV to treat HIV-1. While recent studies have demonstrated that EFV stimulates hepatic cell death a role for the metabolites of efavirenz in this process has yet to be examined. In the present study, incubation of primary human hepatocytes with synthetic 8-hydroxyEFV (8-OHEFV), which is the primary metabolite of EFV, resulted in cell death, caspase-3 activation and reactive oxygen species formation. The metabolite exerted these effects at earlier time points and using lower concentrations than were required for the parent compound. In addition, pharmacological inhibition of cytochrome P450-dependent metabolism of EFV using 1-aminobenzotriazole markedly decreased reactive oxygen species formation and cell death. Treatment of primary human hepatocytes with EFV and 8-OHEFV also stimulated phosphorylation of c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) as well as phosphorylation of the JNK substrate c-Jun. Further, the mRNA and protein expression of an isoform of Bim (Bcl-2 interacting mediator of cell death) denoted as BimEL, which is proapoptotic and has been shown to be modulated by JNK, was increased. Inhibition of JNK using SP600125 prevented the EFV- and 8-OHEFV-mediated cell death. Silencing of Bim using siRNA transfected into hepatocytes also prevented cell death resulting from 8-OHEFV-treatment. These data suggest that the oxidative metabolite 8-OHEFV is a more potent inducer of hepatic cell death than the parent compound EFV. Further, activation of the JNK signaling pathway and BimEL mRNA expression appear to be required for EFV- and 8-OHEFV-mediated hepatocyte death. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer 8-Hydroxyefavirenz is a more potent stimulator of cell death than efavirenz. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Efavirenz and 8-hydroxyefavirenz increase JNK activity and BimEL mRNA expression. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer JNK and Bim are required for efavirenz- and 8

  19. Blockade of maitotoxin-induced oncotic cell death reveals zeiosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schilling William P

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Maitotoxin (MTX initiates cell death by sequentially activating 1 Ca2+ influx via non-selective cation channels, 2 uptake of vital dyes via formation of large pores, and 3 release of lactate dehydrogenase, an indication of cell lysis. MTX also causes formation of membrane blebs, which dramatically dilate during the cytolysis phase. To determine the role of phospholipase C (PLC in the cell death cascade, U73122, a specific inhibitor of PLC, and U73343, an inactive analog, were examined on MTX-induced responses in bovine aortic endothelial cells. Results Addition of either U73122 or U73343, prior to MTX, produced a concentration-dependent inhibition of the cell death cascade (IC50 ≈ 1.9 and 0.66 μM, respectively suggesting that the effect of these agents was independent of PLC. Addition of U73343 shortly after MTX, prevented or attenuated the effects of the toxin, but addition at later times had little or no effect. Time-lapse videomicroscopy showed that U73343 dramatically altered the blebbing profile of MTX-treated cells. Specifically, U73343 blocked bleb dilation and converted the initial blebbing event into "zeiosis", a type of membrane blebbing commonly associated with apoptosis. Cells challenged with MTX and rescued by subsequent addition of U73343, showed enhanced caspase-3 activity 48 hr after the initial insult, consistent with activation of the apoptotic program. Conclusions Within minutes of MTX addition, endothelial cells die by oncosis. Rescue by addition of U73343 shortly after MTX showed that a small percentage of cells are destined to die by oncosis, but that a larger percentage survive; cells that survive the initial insult exhibit zeiosis and may ultimately die by apoptotic mechanisms.

  20. Programmed Death-1 Inhibition in Cancer With a Focus on Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer: Rationale, Nursing Implications, and Patient Management Strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-01

    Programmed death-1 (PD-1) immune checkpoint inhibitors are novel immuno-oncology agents. Unlike chemotherapy or targeted agents, which inhibit tumor cell proliferation or induce tumor cell death, immune checkpoint inhibitors are designed to stimulate a patient's own immune system to eliminate tumors. As a result of their mechanism of action, PD-1 pathway inhibitors are associated with adverse events (AEs) with immunologic etiologies, termed immune-mediated AEs (imAEs). These include skin and gastrointestinal AEs, and endocrine, hepatic, renal, and respiratory AEs, including pneumonitis. Most imAEs can be effectively managed with treatment interruption/discontinuation and/or steroids or other immunosuppressive agents. A specialist consult may be required in some cases, and endocrine imAEs may require permanent hormone replacement therapy. This article provides an overview of PD-1 inhibitors, including the potential mechanism of action, key clinical trial data, and strategies for managing patients who may receive PD-1 inhibitors for the treatment of non-small cell lung cancer. Information in the article comes from PubMed literature searches and the author's experience with these agents in clinical trials. Oncology clinicians must thoroughly assess baseline functioning and symptoms and be vigilant for imAEs, which require prompt diagnosis and management. A good understanding of the clinical profile of PD-1 pathway inhibitors is instrumental in helping clinicians manage patients receiving these new therapies.

  1. Radiosensitization of colorectal carcinoma cell lines by histone deacetylase inhibition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flatmark, Kjersti; Nome, Ragnhild V; Folkvord, Sigurd; Bratland, Åse; Rasmussen, Heidi; Ellefsen, Mali Strand; Fodstad, Øystein; Ree, Anne Hansen

    2006-01-01

    The tumor response to preoperative radiotherapy of locally advanced rectal cancer varies greatly, warranting the use of experimental models to assay the efficacy of molecular targeting agents in rectal cancer radiosensitization. Histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors, agents that cause hyperacetylation of histone proteins and thereby remodeling of chromatin structure, may override cell cycle checkpoint responses to DNA damage and amplify radiation-induced tumor cell death. Human colorectal carcinoma cell lines were exposed to ionizing radiation and HDAC inhibitors, and cell cycle profiles and regulatory factors, as well as clonogenicity, were analyzed. In addition to G 2 /M phase arrest following irradiation, the cell lines displayed cell cycle responses typical for either intact or defective p53 function (the presence or absence, respectively, of radiation-induced expression of the cell cycle inhibitor p21 and subsequent accumulation of G 1 phase cells). In contrast, histone acetylation was associated with complete depletion of the G 1 population of cells with functional p53 but accumulation of both G 1 and G 2 /M populations of cells with defective p53. The cellular phenotypes upon HDAC inhibition were consistent with the observed repression of Polo-like kinase-1, a regulatory G 2 /M phase kinase. Following pre-treatment with HDAC inhibitors currently undergoing clinical investigation, the inhibitory effect of ionizing radiation on clonogenicity was significantly amplified. In these experimental models, HDAC inhibition sensitized the tumor cells to ionizing radiation, which is in accordance with the concept of increased probability of tumor cell death when chromatin structure is modified

  2. Sulfated lentinan induced mitochondrial dysfunction leads to programmed cell death of tobacco BY-2 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jie; Wang, Yaofeng; Shen, Lili; Qian, Yumei; Yang, Jinguang; Wang, Fenglong

    2017-04-01

    Sulphated lentinan (sLTN) is known to act as a resistance inducer by causing programmed cell death (PCD) in tobacco suspension cells. However, the underlying mechanism of this effect is largely unknown. Using tobacco BY-2 cell model, morphological and biochemical studies revealed that mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and mitochondrial dysfunction contribute to sLNT induced PCD. Cell viability, and HO/PI fluorescence imaging and TUNEL assays confirmed a typical cell death process caused by sLNT. Acetylsalicylic acid (an ROS scavenger), diphenylene iodonium (an inhibitor of NADPH oxidases) and protonophore carbonyl cyanide p-trifluoromethoxyphenyl hydrazone (a protonophore and an uncoupler of mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation) inhibited sLNT-induced H 2 O 2 generation and cell death, suggesting that ROS generation linked, at least partly, to a mitochondrial dysfunction and caspase-like activation. This conclusion was further confirmed by double-stained cells with the mitochondria-specific marker MitoTracker RedCMXRos and the ROS probe H 2 DCFDA. Moreover, the sLNT-induced PCD of BY-2 cells required cellular metabolism as up-regulation of the AOX family gene transcripts and induction of the SA biosynthesis, the TCA cycle, and miETC related genes were observed. It is concluded that mitochondria play an essential role in the signaling pathway of sLNT-induced ROS generation, which possibly provided new insight into the sLNT-mediated antiviral response, including PCD. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  3. Targeting of Survivin Pathways by YM155 Inhibits Cell Death and Invasion in Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wei; Liu, Yuan; Li, Yu Feng; Yue, Yun; Yang, Xinghua; Peng, Lin

    2016-01-01

    Specific overexpression in cancer cells and evidence of oncogenic functions make Survivin an attractive target in cancer therapy. The small molecule compound YM155 has been described as the first "Survivin suppressant" but molecular mechanisms involved in its biological activity and its clinical potential remain obscure. Survivin protein plays critical roles in oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC), suggesting that YM155 would be extremely valuable for OSCC. In this study, we tested our hypothesis whether YM155 could be an effective inhibitor of cell growth, invasion and angiogenesis in oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) cells. SCC9 and SCC25 were treated with different concentration of YM155 for indicated time. Using MTT assay and flow cytometry analysis to detect cell growth and apoptosis; Using transwell and Wound healing assay to detect migration and invasion; Using reverse transcription-PCR, Western blotting and electrophoretic mobility shift assay for measuring gene and protein expression, and DNA binding activity of NF-x03BA;B. YM155 inhibited survivin-rich expressed SCC9 cell growth in a dose- and time dependent manner. This was accompanied by increased apoptosis and concomitant attenuation of NF-x03BA;B and downregulation of NF-x03BA;B downstream genes MMP-9, resulting in the inhibition of SCC9 cell migration and invasion in vitro and caused antitumor activity and anti metastasis in vivo. YM155 treatment did not affect cell growth, apoptosis and invasion of surviving-poor expressed SCC25 cells in vitro. YM155 is a potent inhibitor of progression of SCC9 cells, which could be due to attenuation of survivin signaling processes. Our findings provide evidence showing that YM155 could act as a small molecule survivin inhibitor on survivin-rich expressed SCC9 cells in culture as well as when grown as tumor in a xenograft model. We also suggest that survivin could be further developed as a potential therapeutic agent for the treatment of survivin-rich expressed

  4. Quercetogetin protects against cigarette smoke extract-induced apoptosis in epithelial cells by inhibiting mitophagy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Son, Eun Suk; Kim, Se-Hee; Ryter, Stefan W; Yeo, Eui-Ju; Kyung, Sun Young; Kim, Yu Jin; Jeong, Sung Hwan; Lee, Chang Soo; Park, Jeong-Woong

    2018-04-01

    Recent studies demonstrate that the autophagy-dependent turnover of mitochondria (mitophagy) mediates pulmonary epithelial cell death in response to cigarette smoke extract (CSE) exposure, and contributes to emphysema development in vivo during chronic cigarette smoke (CS)-exposure, although the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. Here, we investigated the role of mitophagy in regulating apoptosis in CSE-exposed human lung bronchial epithelial cells. Furthermore, we investigated the potential of the polymethoxylated flavone antioxidant quercetogetin (QUE) to inhibit CSE-induced mitophagy-dependent apoptosis. Our results demonstrate that CSE induces mitophagy in epithelial cells via mitochondrial dysfunction, and causes increased expression levels of the mitophagy-regulator protein PTEN-induced putative kinase-1 (PINK1) and the mitochondrial fission protein dynamin-1-like protein (DRP-1). CSE induced epithelial cell death and increased the expression of the apoptosis-related proteins cleaved caspase-3, -8 and -9. Caspase-3 activity was significantly increased in Beas-2B cells exposed to CSE, and decreased by siRNA-dependent knockdown of DRP-1. Treatment of epithelial cells with QUE inhibited CSE-induced mitochondrial dysfunction and mitophagy by inhibiting phospho (p)-DRP-1 and PINK1 expression. QUE suppressed mitophagy-dependent apoptosis by inhibiting the expression of cleaved caspase-3, -8 and -9 and downregulating caspase activity in human bronchial epithelial cells. These findings suggest that QUE may serve as a potential therapeutic in CS-induced pulmonary diseases. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Mouse embryonic stem cells undergo charontosis, a novel programmed cell death pathway dependent upon cathepsins, p53, and EndoG, in response to etoposide treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tichy, Elisia D; Stephan, Zachary A; Osterburg, Andrew; Noel, Greg; Stambrook, Peter J

    2013-05-01

    Embryonic stem cells (ESCs) are hypersensitive to many DNA damaging agents and can rapidly undergo cell death or cell differentiation following exposure. Treatment of mouse ESCs (mESCs) with etoposide (ETO), a topoisomerase II poison, followed by a recovery period resulted in massive cell death with characteristics of a programmed cell death pathway (PCD). While cell death was both caspase- and necroptosis-independent, it was partially dependent on the activity of lysosomal proteases. A role for autophagy in the cell death process was eliminated, suggesting that ETO induces a novel PCD pathway in mESCs. Inhibition of p53 either as a transcription factor by pifithrin α or in its mitochondrial role by pifithrin μ significantly reduced ESC death levels. Finally, EndoG was newly identified as a protease participating in the DNA fragmentation observed during ETO-induced PCD. We coined the term charontosis after Charon, the ferryman of the dead in Greek mythology, to refer to the PCD signaling events induced by ETO in mESCs. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Mitochondrial control of cell death induced by hyperosmotic stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Criollo, Alfredo; Galluzzi, Lorenzo; Maiuri, M Chiara; Tasdemir, Ezgi; Lavandero, Sergio; Kroemer, Guido

    2007-01-01

    HeLa and HCT116 cells respond differentially to sorbitol, an osmolyte able to induce hypertonic stress. In these models, sorbitol promoted the phenotypic manifestations of early apoptosis followed by complete loss of viability in a time-, dose-, and cell type-specific fashion, by eliciting distinct yet partially overlapping molecular pathways. In HCT116 but not in HeLa cells, sorbitol caused the mitochondrial release of the caspase-independent death effector AIF, whereas in both cell lines cytochrome c was retained in mitochondria. Despite cytochrome c retention, HeLa cells exhibited the progressive activation of caspase-3, presumably due to the prior activation of caspase-8. Accordingly, caspase inhibition prevented sorbitol-induced killing in HeLa, but only partially in HCT116 cells. Both the knock-out of Bax in HCT116 cells and the knock-down of Bax in A549 cells by RNA interference reduced the AIF release and/or the mitochondrial alterations. While the knock-down of Bcl-2/Bcl-X(L) sensitized to sorbitol-induced killing, overexpression of a Bcl-2 variant that specifically localizes to mitochondria (but not of the wild-type nor of a endoplasmic reticulum-targeted form) strongly inhibited sorbitol effects. Thus, hyperosmotic stress kills cells by triggering different molecular pathways, which converge at mitochondria where pro- and anti-apoptotic members of the Bcl-2 family exert their control.

  7. Autophagy protects against neural cell death induced by piperidine alkaloids present in Prosopis juliflora (Mesquite).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Victor D A; Cuevas, Carlos; Muñoz, Patricia; Villa, Monica; Ahumada-Castro, Ulises; Huenchuguala, Sandro; Santos, Cleonice C Dos; Araujo, Fillipe M DE; Ferreira, Rafael S; Silva, Vanessa B DA; Silva, Juliana H C E; Soares, Érica N; Velozo, Eudes S; Segura-Aguilar, Juan; Costa, Silvia L

    2017-01-01

    Prosopis juliflora is a shrub that has been used to feed animals and humans. However, a synergistic action of piperidine alkaloids has been suggested to be responsible for neurotoxic damage observed in animals. We investigated the involvement of programmed cell death (PCD) and autophagy on the mechanism of cell death induced by a total extract (TAE) of alkaloids and fraction (F32) from P. juliflora leaves composed majoritary of juliprosopine in a model of neuron/glial cell co-culture. We saw that TAE (30 µg/mL) and F32 (7.5 µg/mL) induced reduction in ATP levels and changes in mitochondrial membrane potential at 12 h exposure. Moreover, TAE and F32 induced caspase-9 activation, nuclear condensation and neuronal death at 16 h exposure. After 4 h, they induced autophagy characterized by decreases of P62 protein level, increase of LC3II expression and increase in number of GFP-LC3 cells. Interestingly, we demonstrated that inhibition of autophagy by bafilomycin and vinblastine increased the cell death induced by TAE and autophagy induced by serum deprivation and rapamycin reduced cell death induced by F32 at 24 h. These results indicate that the mechanism neural cell death induced by these alkaloids involves PCD via caspase-9 activation and autophagy, which seems to be an important protective mechanism.

  8. Autophagy protects against neural cell death induced by piperidine alkaloids present in Prosopis juliflora (Mesquite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    VICTOR D.A. SILVA

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Prosopis juliflora is a shrub that has been used to feed animals and humans. However, a synergistic action of piperidine alkaloids has been suggested to be responsible for neurotoxic damage observed in animals. We investigated the involvement of programmed cell death (PCD and autophagy on the mechanism of cell death induced by a total extract (TAE of alkaloids and fraction (F32 from P. juliflora leaves composed majoritary of juliprosopine in a model of neuron/glial cell co-culture. We saw that TAE (30 µg/mL and F32 (7.5 µg/mL induced reduction in ATP levels and changes in mitochondrial membrane potential at 12 h exposure. Moreover, TAE and F32 induced caspase-9 activation, nuclear condensation and neuronal death at 16 h exposure. After 4 h, they induced autophagy characterized by decreases of P62 protein level, increase of LC3II expression and increase in number of GFP-LC3 cells. Interestingly, we demonstrated that inhibition of autophagy by bafilomycin and vinblastine increased the cell death induced by TAE and autophagy induced by serum deprivation and rapamycin reduced cell death induced by F32 at 24 h. These results indicate that the mechanism neural cell death induced by these alkaloids involves PCD via caspase-9 activation and autophagy, which seems to be an important protective mechanism.

  9. Caspases in retinal ganglion cell death and axon regeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Chloe N; Berry, Martin; Logan, Ann; Blanch, Richard J; Ahmed, Zubair

    2017-01-01

    Retinal ganglion cells (RGC) are terminally differentiated CNS neurons that possess limited endogenous regenerative capacity after injury and thus RGC death causes permanent visual loss. RGC die by caspase-dependent mechanisms, including apoptosis, during development, after ocular injury and in progressive degenerative diseases of the eye and optic nerve, such as glaucoma, anterior ischemic optic neuropathy, diabetic retinopathy and multiple sclerosis. Inhibition of caspases through genetic or pharmacological approaches can arrest the apoptotic cascade and protect a proportion of RGC. Novel findings have also highlighted a pyroptotic role of inflammatory caspases in RGC death. In this review, we discuss the molecular signalling mechanisms of apoptotic and inflammatory caspase responses in RGC specifically, their involvement in RGC degeneration and explore their potential as therapeutic targets. PMID:29675270

  10. Heat-modified citrus pectin induces apoptosis-like cell death and autophagy in HepG2 and A549 cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leclere, Lionel; Fransolet, Maude; Cote, Francois; Cambier, Pierre; Arnould, Thierry; Van Cutsem, Pierre; Michiels, Carine

    2015-01-01

    Cancer is still one of the leading causes of death worldwide, and finding new treatments remains a major challenge. Previous studies showed that modified forms of pectin, a complex polysaccharide present in the primary plant cell wall, possess anticancer properties. Nevertheless, the mechanism of action of modified pectin and the pathways involved are unclear. Here, we show that citrus pectin modified by heat treatment induced cell death in HepG2 and A549 cells. The induced cell death differs from classical apoptosis because no DNA cleavage was observed. In addition, Z-VAD-fmk, a pan-caspase inhibitor, did not influence the observed cell death in HepG2 cells but appeared to be partly protective in A549 cells, indicating that heat-modified citrus pectin might induce caspase-independent cell death. An increase in the abundance of the phosphatidylethanolamine-conjugated Light Chain 3 (LC3) protein and a decrease in p62 protein abundance were observed in both cell types when incubated in the presence of heat-modified citrus pectin. These results indicate the activation of autophagy. To our knowledge, this is the first time that autophagy has been revealed in cells incubated in the presence of a modified form of pectin. This autophagy activation appears to be protective, at least for A549 cells, because its inhibition with 3-methyladenine increased the observed modified pectin-induced cytotoxicity. This study confirms the potential of modified pectin to improve chemotherapeutic cancer treatments.

  11. Heat-modified citrus pectin induces apoptosis-like cell death and autophagy in HepG2 and A549 cancer cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lionel Leclere

    Full Text Available Cancer is still one of the leading causes of death worldwide, and finding new treatments remains a major challenge. Previous studies showed that modified forms of pectin, a complex polysaccharide present in the primary plant cell wall, possess anticancer properties. Nevertheless, the mechanism of action of modified pectin and the pathways involved are unclear. Here, we show that citrus pectin modified by heat treatment induced cell death in HepG2 and A549 cells. The induced cell death differs from classical apoptosis because no DNA cleavage was observed. In addition, Z-VAD-fmk, a pan-caspase inhibitor, did not influence the observed cell death in HepG2 cells but appeared to be partly protective in A549 cells, indicating that heat-modified citrus pectin might induce caspase-independent cell death. An increase in the abundance of the phosphatidylethanolamine-conjugated Light Chain 3 (LC3 protein and a decrease in p62 protein abundance were observed in both cell types when incubated in the presence of heat-modified citrus pectin. These results indicate the activation of autophagy. To our knowledge, this is the first time that autophagy has been revealed in cells incubated in the presence of a modified form of pectin. This autophagy activation appears to be protective, at least for A549 cells, because its inhibition with 3-methyladenine increased the observed modified pectin-induced cytotoxicity. This study confirms the potential of modified pectin to improve chemotherapeutic cancer treatments.

  12. Combined effects of starvation and butyrate on autophagy-dependent gingival epithelial cell death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, M; Murofushi, T; Tsuda, H; Mikami, Y; Zhao, N; Ochiai, K; Kurita-Ochiai, T; Yamamoto, M; Otsuka, K; Suzuki, N

    2017-06-01

    induced LC3B production and the induction was attenuated by AMPK inhibition. LC3B knockdown, in turn, significantly decreased butyrate-induced cell death. Therefore, AMPK-dependent LC3B induction apparently plays an important role in butyrate-induced cell death. There was a lack of correspondence between the levels of AMPK activation and LC3B induction; this may reflect the histone deacetylase-inhibitory capacity of butyrate on histone proteins. Taken together, starvation and butyrate exposure promote autophagy via AMPK signaling, while the histone deacetylase-inhibitory effects of butyrate alter chromatin to transcriptionally active state, resulting in strong LC3B induction and subsequent cell death. These findings may help improve the understanding of the cellular processes underlying periodontal disease initiation. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. 1-L-MT, an IDO inhibitor, prevented colitis-associated cancer by inducing CDC20 inhibition-mediated mitotic death of colon cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiuting; Zhou, Wei; Zhang, Xin; Ding, Yang; Du, Qianming; Hu, Rong

    2018-04-01

    Indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase 1 (IDO1), known as IDO, catabolizes tryptophan through kynurenine pathway, whose activity is correlated with impaired clinical outcome of colorectal cancer. Here we showed that 1-L-MT, a canonical IDO inhibitor, suppressed proliferation of human colorectal cancer cells through inducing mitotic death. Our results showed that inhibition of IDO decreased the transcription of CDC20, which resulted in G2/M cycle arrest of HCT-116 and HT-29. Furthermore, 1-L-MT induced mitochondria injuries and caused apoptotic cancer cells. Importantly, 1-L-MT protected mice from azoxymethane (AOM)/dextran sodium sulfate (DSS)-induced colon carcinogenesis, with reduced mortality, tumor number and size. What is more, IDO1-/- mice exhibited fewer tumor burdens and reduced proliferation in the neoplastic epithelium, while, 1-L-MT did not exhibit any further protective effects on IDO-/- mice, confirming the critical role of IDO and the protective effect of 1-L-MT-mediated IDO inhibition in CRC. Furthermore, 1-L-MT also alleviated CRC in Rag1-/- mice, demonstrating the modulatory effects of IDO independent of its role in modulating adaptive immunity. Taken together, our findings validated that the anti-proliferation effect of 1-L-MT in vitro and the prevention of CRC in vivo were through IDO-induced cell cycle disaster of colon cancer cells. Our results identified 1-L-MT as a promising candidate for the chemoprevention of CRC. © 2018 UICC.

  14. Characterization of the programmed cell death induced by metabolic products of Alternaria alternata in tobacco BY-2 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Dan-Dan; Jia, Yu-Jiao; Gao, Hui-Yuan; Zhang, Li-Tao; Zhang, Zi-Shan; Xue, Zhong-Cai; Meng, Qing-Wei

    2011-02-01

    Alternaria alternata has received considerable attention in current literature and most of the studies are focused on its pathogenic effects on plant chloroplasts, but little is known about the characteristics of programmed cell death (PCD) induced by metabolic products (MP) of A. alternata, the effects of the MP on mitochondrial respiration and its relation to PCD. The purpose of this study was to explore the mechanism of MP-induced PCD in non-green tobacco BY-2 cells and to explore the role of mitochondrial inhibitory processes in the PCD of tobacco BY-2 cells. MP treatment led to significant cell death that was proven to be PCD by the concurrent cytoplasm shrinkage, chromatin condensation and DNA laddering observed in the cells. Moreover, MP treatment resulted in the overproduction of reactive oxygen species (ROS), rapid ATP depletion and a respiratory decline in the tobacco BY-2 cells. It was concluded that the direct inhibition of the mitochondrial electron transport chain (ETC), alternative pathway (AOX) capacity and catalase (CAT) activity by the MP might be the main contributors to the MP-induced ROS burst observed in tobacco BY-2 cells. The addition of adenosine together with the MP significantly inhibited ATP depletion without preventing PCD; however, when the cells were treated with the MP plus CAT, ROS overproduction was blocked and PCD did not occur. The data presented here demonstrate that the ROS burst played an important role in MP-induced PCD in the tobacco BY-2 cells.

  15. 3-Bromopyruvate induces rapid human prostate cancer cell death by affecting cell energy metabolism, GSH pool and the glyoxalase system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valenti, Daniela; Vacca, Rosa A; de Bari, Lidia

    2015-12-01

    3-bromopyruvate (3-BP) is an anti-tumour drug effective on hepatocellular carcinoma and other tumour cell types, which affects both glycolytic and mitochondrial targets, depleting cellular ATP pool. Here we tested 3-BP on human prostate cancer cells showing, differently from other tumour types, efficient ATP production and functional mitochondrial metabolism. We found that 3-BP rapidly induced cultured androgen-insensitive (PC-3) and androgen-responsive (LNCaP) prostate cancer cell death at low concentrations (IC(50) values of 50 and 70 μM, respectively) with a multimodal mechanism of action. In particular, 3-BP-treated PC-3 cells showed a selective, strong reduction of glyceraldeide 3-phosphate dehydrogenase activity, due to the direct interaction of the drug with the enzyme. Moreover, 3-BP strongly impaired both glutamate/malate- and succinate-dependent mitochondrial respiration, membrane potential generation and ATP synthesis, concomitant with the inhibition of respiratory chain complex I, II and ATP synthase activities. The drastic reduction of cellular ATP levels and depletion of GSH pool, associated with significant increase in cell oxidative stress, were found after 3-BP treatment of PC-3 cells. Interestingly, the activity of both glyoxalase I and II, devoted to the elimination of the cytotoxic methylglyoxal, was strongly inhibited by 3-BP. Both N-acetylcysteine and aminoguanidine, GSH precursor and methylglyoxal scavenger, respectively, prevented 3-BP-induced PC-3 cell death, showing that impaired cell antioxidant and detoxifying capacities are crucial events leading to cell death. The provided information on the multi-target cytotoxic action of 3-BP, finally leading to PC-3 cell necrosis, might be useful for future development of 3-BP as a therapeutic option for prostate cancer treatment.

  16. Eclalbasaponin II induces autophagic and apoptotic cell death in human ovarian cancer cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoon Jin Cho

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Triterpenoids echinocystic acid and its glycosides, isolated from several Eclipta prostrata, have been reported to possess various biological activities such as anti-inflammatory, anti-bacterial, and anti-diabetic activity. However, the cytotoxicity of the triterpenoids in human cancer cells and their molecular mechanism of action are poorly understood. In the present study, we found that eclalbasaponin II with one glucose moiety has potent cytotoxicity in three ovarian cancer cells and two endometrial cancer cells compared to an aglycone echinocystic acid and eclalbasaponin I with two glucose moiety. Eclalbasaponin II treatment dose-dependently increased sub G1 population. Annexin V staining revealed that eclalbasaponin II induced apoptosis in SKOV3 and A2780 ovarian cancer cells. In addition, eclalbasaponin II-induced cell death was associated with characteristics of autophagy; an increase in acidic vesicular organelle content and elevation of the levels of LC3-II. Interestingly, autophagy inhibitor BaF1 suppressed the eclalbasaponin II-induced apoptosis. Moreover, eclalbasaponin II activated JNK and p38 signaling and inhibited the mTOR signaling. We further demonstrated that pre-treatment with a JNK and p38 inhibitor and mTOR activator attenuated the eclalbasaponin II-induced autophagy. This suggests that eclalbasaponin II induces apoptotic and autophagic cell death through the regulation of JNK, p38, and mTOR signaling in human ovarian cancer cells.

  17. Increased expression of interleukin-1β in triglyceride-induced macrophage cell death is mediated by p38 MAP kinase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sung, Ho Joong; Son, Sin Jee; Yang, Seung-ju; Rhee, Ki-Jong; Kim, Yoon Suk

    2012-07-01

    Triglycerides (TG) are implicated in the development of atherosclerosis through formation of foam cells and induction of macrophage cell death. In this study, we report that addition of exogenous TG induced cell death in phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate-differentiated THP-1 human macrophages. TG treatment induced a dramatic decrease in interleukin-1β (IL-1β) mRNA expression in a dose- and time-dependent manner. The expression of granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor and platelet endothelial cell adhesion molecule remained unchanged. To identify signaling pathways involved in TG-induced downregulation of IL-1β, we added p38 MAPK, protein kinase C (PKC) or c-Raf1 specific inhibitors. We found that inhibition of p38 MAPK alleviated the TG-induced downregulation of IL-1β, whereas inhibition of PKC and c-Raf1 had no effect. This is the first report showing decreased IL-1β expression during TG-induced cell death in a human macrophage line. Our results suggest that downregulation of IL-1β expression by TG-treated macrophages may play a role during atherogenesis.

  18. MAPK inhibitors, particularly the JNK inhibitor, increase cell death effects in H2O2-treated lung cancer cells via increased superoxide anion and glutathione depletion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Woo Hyun

    2018-02-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS), especially hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), induce apoptosis in cancer cells by regulating mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling pathways. The present study investigated the effects of MAPK inhibitors on cell growth and death as well as changes in ROS and glutathione (GSH) levels in H2O2-treated Calu-6 and A549 lung cancer cells. H2O2 inhibited growth and induced death of Calu-6 and A549 lung cancer cells. All MAPK inhibitors appeared to enhance growth inhibition in H2O2-treated Calu-6 and A549 lung cancer cells and increased the percentage of Annexin V-FITC-positive cells in these cancer cells. Among the MAPK inhibitors, a JNK inhibitor significantly augmented the loss of mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP; ΔΨm) in H2O2-treated Calu-6 and A549 lung cancer cells. Intracellular ROS levels were significantly increased in the H2O2-treated cells at 1 and 24 h. Only the JNK inhibitor increased ROS levels in the H2O2-treated cells at 1 h and all MAPK inhibitors raised superoxide anion levels in these cells at 24 h. In addition, H2O2 induced GSH depletion in Calu-6 and A549 cells and the JNK inhibitor significantly enhanced GSH depletion in H2O2‑treated cells. Each of the MAPK inhibitors altered ROS and GSH levels differently in the Calu-6 and A549 control cells. In conclusion, H2O2 induced growth inhibition and death in lung cancer cells through oxidative stress and depletion of GSH. The enhanced effect of MAPK inhibitors, especially the JNK inhibitor, on cell death in H2O2-treated lung cancer cells was correlated with increased O2•- levels and GSH depletion.

  19. Inhibition of fatty acid metabolism reduces human myeloma cells proliferation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Manuel Tirado-Vélez

    Full Text Available Multiple myeloma is a haematological malignancy characterized by the clonal proliferation of plasma cells. It has been proposed that targeting cancer cell metabolism would provide a new selective anticancer therapeutic strategy. In this work, we tested the hypothesis that inhibition of β-oxidation and de novo fatty acid synthesis would reduce cell proliferation in human myeloma cells. We evaluated the effect of etomoxir and orlistat on fatty acid metabolism, glucose metabolism, cell cycle distribution, proliferation, cell death and expression of G1/S phase regulatory proteins in myeloma cells. Etomoxir and orlistat inhibited β-oxidation and de novo fatty acid synthesis respectively in myeloma cells, without altering significantly glucose metabolism. These effects were associated with reduced cell viability and cell cycle arrest in G0/G1. Specifically, etomoxir and orlistat reduced by 40-70% myeloma cells proliferation. The combination of etomoxir and orlistat resulted in an additive inhibitory effect on cell proliferation. Orlistat induced apoptosis and sensitized RPMI-8226 cells to apoptosis induction by bortezomib, whereas apoptosis was not altered by etomoxir. Finally, the inhibitory effect of both drugs on cell proliferation was associated with reduced p21 protein levels and phosphorylation levels of retinoblastoma protein. In conclusion, inhibition of fatty acid metabolism represents a potential therapeutic approach to treat human multiple myeloma.

  20. Plasmalogens rescue neuronal cell death through an activation of AKT and ERK survival signaling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md Shamim Hossain

    Full Text Available Neuronal cells are susceptible to many stresses, which will cause the apoptosis and neurodegenerative diseases. The precise molecular mechanism behind the neuronal protection against these apoptotic stimuli is necessary for drug discovery. In the present study, we have found that plasmalogens (Pls, which are glycerophospholipids containing vinyl ether linkage at sn-1 position, can protect the neuronal cell death upon serum deprivation. Interestingly, caspse-9, but not caspase-8 and caspase-12, was cleaved upon the serum starvation in Neuro-2A cells. Pls treatments effectively reduced the activation of caspase-9. Furthermore, cellular signaling experiments showed that Pls enhanced phosphorylation of the phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K-dependent serine/threonine-specific protein kinase AKT and extracellular-signal-regulated kinases ERK1/2. PI3K/AKT inhibitor LY294002 and MAPK/ERK kinase (MEK inhibitor U0126 treatments study clearly indicated that Pls-mediated cell survival was dependent on the activation of these kinases. In addition, Pls also inhibited primary mouse hippocampal neuronal cell death induced by nutrient deprivation, which was associated with the inhibition of caspase-9 and caspase-3 cleavages. It was reported that Pls content decreased in the brain of the Alzheimer's patients, which indicated that the reduction of Pls content could endanger neurons. The present findings, taken together, suggest that Pls have an anti-apoptotic action in the brain. Further studies on precise mechanisms of Pls-mediated protection against cell death may lead us to establish a novel therapeutic approach to cure neurodegenerative disorders.

  1. Induction of cytosine arabinoside-resistant human myeloid leukemia cell death through autophagy regulation by hydroxychloroquine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yundeok; Eom, Ju-In; Jeung, Hoi-Kyung; Jang, Ji Eun; Kim, Jin Seok; Cheong, June-Won; Kim, Young Sam; Min, Yoo Hong

    2015-07-01

    We investigated the effects of the autophagy inhibitor hydroxychloroquine (HCQ) on cell death of cytosine arabinoside (Ara-C)-resistant human acute myeloid leukemia (AML) cells. Ara-C-sensitive (U937, AML-2) and Ara-C-resistant (U937/AR, AML-2/AR) human AML cell lines were used to evaluate HCQ-regulated cytotoxicity, autophagy, and apoptosis as well as effects on cell death-related signaling pathways. We found that HCQ-induced dose- and time-dependent cell death in Ara-C-resistant cells compared to Ara-C-sensitive cell lines. The extent of cell death and features of HCQ-induced autophagic markers including increase in microtubule-associated protein light chain 3 (LC3) I conversion to LC3-II, beclin-1, ATG5, as well as green fluorescent protein-LC3 positive puncta and autophagosome were remarkably greater in U937/AR cells. Also, p62/SQSTM1 was increased in response to HCQ. p62/SQSTM1 protein interacts with both LC3-II and ubiquitin protein and is degraded in autophagosomes. Therefore, a reduction of p62/SQSTM1 indicates increased autophagic degradation, whereas an increase of p62/SQSTM1 by HCQ indicates inhibited autophagic degradation. Knock down of p62/SQSTM1 using siRNA were prevented the HCQ-induced LC3-II protein level as well as significantly reduced the HCQ-induced cell death in U937/AR cells. Also, apoptotic cell death and caspase activation in U937/AR cells were increased by HCQ, provided evidence that HCQ-induced autophagy blockade. Taken together, our data show that HCQ-induced apoptotic cell death in Ara-C-resistant AML cells through autophagy regulation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  2. Modelling radiation-induced cell death and tumour re-oxygenation: local versus global and instant versus delayed cell death

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gago-Arias, Araceli; Espinoza, Ignacio; Sánchez-Nieto, Beatriz; Aguiar, Pablo; Pardo-Montero, Juan

    2016-01-01

    The resistance of hypoxic cells to radiation, due to the oxygen dependence of radiosensitivity, is well known and must be taken into account to accurately calculate the radiation induced cell death. A proper modelling of the response of tumours to radiation requires deriving the distribution of oxygen at a microscopic scale. This usually involves solving the reaction-diffusion equation in tumour voxels using a vascularization distribution model. Moreover, re-oxygenation arises during the course of radiotherapy, one reason being the increase of available oxygen caused by cell killing, which can turn hypoxic tumours into oxic. In this work we study the effect of cell death kinetics in tumour oxygenation modelling, analysing how it affects the timing of re-oxygenation, surviving fraction and tumour control. Two models of cell death are compared, an instantaneous cell killing, mimicking early apoptosis, and a delayed cell death scenario in which cells can die shortly after being damaged, as well as long after irradiation. For each of these scenarios, the decrease in oxygen consumption due to cell death can be computed globally (macroscopic voxel average) or locally (microscopic). A re-oxygenation model already used in the literature, the so called full re-oxygenation, is also considered. The impact of cell death kinetics and re-oxygenation on tumour responses is illustrated for two radiotherapy fractionation schemes: a conventional schedule, and a hypofractionated treatment. The results show large differences in the doses needed to achieve 50% tumour control for the investigated cell death models. Moreover, the models affect the tumour responses differently depending on the treatment schedule. This corroborates the complex nature of re-oxygenation, showing the need to take into account the kinetics of cell death in radiation response models. (paper)

  3. A set of nutrient limitations trigger yeast cell death in a nitrogen-dependent manner during wine alcoholic fermentation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camille Duc

    Full Text Available Yeast cell death can occur during wine alcoholic fermentation. It is generally considered to result from ethanol stress that impacts membrane integrity. This cell death mainly occurs when grape musts processing reduces lipid availability, resulting in weaker membrane resistance to ethanol. However the mechanisms underlying cell death in these conditions remain unclear. We examined cell death occurrence considering yeast cells ability to elicit an appropriate response to a given nutrient limitation and thus survive starvation. We show here that a set of micronutrients (oleic acid, ergosterol, pantothenic acid and nicotinic acid in low, growth-restricting concentrations trigger cell death in alcoholic fermentation when nitrogen level is high. We provide evidence that nitrogen signaling is involved in cell death and that either SCH9 deletion or Tor inhibition prevent cell death in several types of micronutrient limitation. Under such limitations, yeast cells fail to acquire any stress resistance and are unable to store glycogen. Unexpectedly, transcriptome analyses did not reveal any major changes in stress genes expression, suggesting that post-transcriptional events critical for stress response were not triggered by micronutrient starvation. Our data point to the fact that yeast cell death results from yeast inability to trigger an appropriate stress response under some conditions of nutrient limitations most likely not encountered by yeast in the wild. Our conclusions provide a novel frame for considering both cell death and the management of nutrients during alcoholic fermentation.

  4. [Methuosis: a novel type of cell death].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Hongbing; Liu, Jinkun; Fan, Qin; Li, Xin

    2013-12-01

    Cell death is a major physiological or pathological phenomenon in life activities. The classic forms of cell death include apoptosis, necrosis, and autophagy. Recently, a novel type of cell death has been observed and termed as methuosis, in which excessive stimuli can induce cytoplasmic uptake and accumulation of small bubbles that gradually merge into giant vacuoles, eventually leading to decreased cellular metabolic activity, cell membrane rupture and cell death. In this article, we describe the nomenclature, morphological characteristics and underlying mechanisms of methuosis, compare methuosis with autophagy, oncosis and paraptosis, and review the related researches.

  5. Morphological classification of plant cell deaths.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Doorn, W G; Beers, E P; Dangl, J L; Franklin-Tong, V E; Gallois, P; Hara-Nishimura, I; Jones, A M; Kawai-Yamada, M; Lam, E; Mundy, J; Mur, L A J; Petersen, M; Smertenko, A; Taliansky, M; Van Breusegem, F; Wolpert, T; Woltering, E; Zhivotovsky, B; Bozhkov, P V

    2011-08-01

    Programmed cell death (PCD) is an integral part of plant development and of responses to abiotic stress or pathogens. Although the morphology of plant PCD is, in some cases, well characterised and molecular mechanisms controlling plant PCD are beginning to emerge, there is still confusion about the classification of PCD in plants. Here we suggest a classification based on morphological criteria. According to this classification, the use of the term 'apoptosis' is not justified in plants, but at least two classes of PCD can be distinguished: vacuolar cell death and necrosis. During vacuolar cell death, the cell contents are removed by a combination of autophagy-like process and release of hydrolases from collapsed lytic vacuoles. Necrosis is characterised by early rupture of the plasma membrane, shrinkage of the protoplast and absence of vacuolar cell death features. Vacuolar cell death is common during tissue and organ formation and elimination, whereas necrosis is typically found under abiotic stress. Some examples of plant PCD cannot be ascribed to either major class and are therefore classified as separate modalities. These are PCD associated with the hypersensitive response to biotrophic pathogens, which can express features of both necrosis and vacuolar cell death, PCD in starchy cereal endosperm and during self-incompatibility. The present classification is not static, but will be subject to further revision, especially when specific biochemical pathways are better defined.

  6. Semicarbazone EGA Inhibits Uptake of Diphtheria Toxin into Human Cells and Protects Cells from Intoxication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonie Schnell

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Diphtheria toxin is a single-chain protein toxin that invades human cells by receptor-mediated endocytosis. In acidic endosomes, its translocation domain inserts into endosomal membranes and facilitates the transport of the catalytic domain (DTA from endosomal lumen into the host cell cytosol. Here, DTA ADP-ribosylates elongation factor 2 inhibits protein synthesis and leads to cell death. The compound 4-bromobenzaldehyde N-(2,6-dimethylphenylsemicarbazone (EGA has been previously shown to protect cells from various bacterial protein toxins which deliver their enzymatic subunits from acidic endosomes to the cytosol, including Bacillus anthracis lethal toxin and the binary clostridial actin ADP-ribosylating toxins C2, iota and Clostridium difficile binary toxin (CDT. Here, we demonstrate that EGA also protects human cells from diphtheria toxin by inhibiting the pH-dependent translocation of DTA across cell membranes. The results suggest that EGA might serve for treatment and/or prevention of the severe disease diphtheria.

  7. The novel anthraquinone derivative IMP1338 induces death of human cancer cells by p53-independent S and G2/M cell cycle arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Hyun Kyung; Ryu, Hwani; Son, A-Rang; Seo, Bitna; Hwang, Sang-Gu; Song, Jie-Young; Ahn, Jiyeon

    2016-04-01

    To identify novel small molecules that induce selective cancer cell death, we screened a chemical library containing 1040 compounds in HT29 colon cancer and CCD18-Co normal colon cells, using a phenotypic cell-based viability assay system with the Cell Counting Kit-8 (CCK-8). We discovered a novel anthraquinone derivative, N-(4-[{(9,10-dioxo-9,10-dihydro-1-anthracenyl)sulfonyl}amino]phenyl)-N-methylacetamide (IMP1338), which was cytotoxic against the human colon cancer cells tested. The MTT cell viability assay showed that treatment with IMP1338 selectively inhibited HCT116, HCT116 p53(-/-), HT29, and A549 cancer cell proliferation compared to that of Beas2B normal epithelial cells. To elucidate the cellular mechanism underlying the cytotoxicity of IMP1338, we examined the effect of IMP1338 on the cell cycle distribution and death of cancer cells. IMP1338 treatment significantly arrested the cell cycle at S and G2/M phases by DNA damage and led to apoptotic cell death, which was determined using FACS analysis with Annexin V/PI double staining. Furthermore, IMP1338 increased caspase-3 cleavage in wild-type p53, p53 knockout HCT116, and HT29 cells as determined using immunoblotting. In addition, IMP1338 markedly induced the phosphorylation of histone H2AX and Chk1 in both cell lines while the combination of 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) and radiation inhibited the viability of HCT116, HCT116 p53(-/-), and HT29 cells compared to 5-FU or radiation alone. Our findings indicated that IMP1338 induced p53-independent cell death through S and G2/M phase arrest as well as DNA damage. These results provide a basis for future investigations assessing the promising anticancer properties of IMP1338. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  8. Corn silk maysin induces apoptotic cell death in PC-3 prostate cancer cells via mitochondria-dependent pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jisun; Lee, Seul; Kim, Sun-Lim; Choi, Ji Won; Seo, Jeong Yeon; Choi, Doo Jin; Park, Yong Il

    2014-12-05

    Despite recent advances in prostate cancer diagnostics and therapeutics, the overall survival rate still remains low. This study was aimed to assess potential anti-cancer activity of maysin, a major flavonoid of corn silk (CS, Zea mays L.), in androgen-independent human prostate cancer cells (PC-3). Maysin was isolated from CS of Kwangpyeongok, a Korean hybrid corn, via methanol extraction and preparative C18 reverse phase column chromatography. Maysin cytotoxicity was determined by either monitoring cell viability in various cancer cell lines by MTT assay or morphological changes. Apoptotic cell death was assessed by annexin V-FITC/PI double staining, depolarization of mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP), expression levels of Bcl-2 and pro-caspase-3 and by terminal transferase mediated dUTP-fluorescein nick end labeling (TUNEL) staining. Underlying mechanism in maysin-induced apoptosis of PC-3 cells was explored by evaluating its effects on Akt and ERK pathway. Maysin dose-dependently reduced the PC-3 cell viability, with an 87% reduction at 200 μg/ml. Maysin treatment significantly induced apoptotic cell death, DNA fragmentation, depolarization of MMP, and reduction in Bcl-2 and pro-caspase-3 expression levels. Maysin also significantly attenuated phosphorylation of Akt and ERK. A combined treatment with maysin and other known anti-cancer agents, including 5-FU, etoposide, cisplatin, or camptothecin, synergistically enhanced PC-3 cell death. These results suggested for the first time that maysin inhibits the PC-3 cancer cell growth via stimulation of mitochondria-dependent apoptotic cell death and may have a strong therapeutic potential for the treatment of either chemo-resistant or androgen-independent human prostate cancer. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Autophagic cell death: Loch Ness monster or endangered species?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Han-Ming; Codogno, Patrice

    2011-05-01

    The concept of autophagic cell death was first established based on observations of increased autophagic markers in dying cells. The major limitation of such a morphology-based definition of autophagic cell death is that it fails to establish the functional role of autophagy in the cell death process, and thus contributes to the confusion in the literature regarding the role of autophagy in cell death and cell survival. Here we propose to define autophagic cell death as a modality of non-apoptotic or necrotic programmed cell death in which autophagy serves as a cell death mechanism, upon meeting the following set of criteria: (i) cell death occurs without the involvement of apoptosis; (ii) there is an increase of autophagic flux, and not just an increase of the autophagic markers, in the dying cells; and (iii) suppression of autophagy via both pharmacological inhibitors and genetic approaches is able to rescue or prevent cell death. In light of this new definition, we will discuss some of the common problems and difficulties in the study of autophagic cell death and also revisit some well-reported cases of autophagic cell death, aiming to achieve a better understanding of whether autophagy is a real killer, an accomplice or just an innocent bystander in the course of cell death. At present, the physiological relevance of autophagic cell death is mainly observed in lower eukaryotes and invertebrates such as Dictyostelium discoideum and Drosophila melanogaster. We believe that such a clear definition of autophagic cell death will help us study and understand the physiological or pathological relevance of autophagic cell death in mammals.

  10. N-methylhemeanthidine chloride, a novel Amaryllidaceae alkaloid, inhibits pancreatic cancer cell proliferation via down-regulating AKT activation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guo, Guoli; Yao, Guangmin; Zhan, Guanqun; Hu, Yufeng [Hubei Key Laboratory of Natural Medicinal Chemistry and Resource Evaluation, School of Pharmacy, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan, Hubei PR China (China); Yue, Ming [Hubei Key Laboratory of Drug Target Research and Pharmacodynamic Evaluation, School of Basic Medicine, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan, Hubei (China); Cheng, Ling; Liu, Yaping; Ye, Qi [Hubei Key Laboratory of Natural Medicinal Chemistry and Resource Evaluation, School of Pharmacy, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan, Hubei PR China (China); Qing, Guoliang [Hubei Key Laboratory of Drug Target Research and Pharmacodynamic Evaluation, School of Basic Medicine, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan, Hubei (China); Zhang, Yonghui, E-mail: zhangyh@mails.tjmu.edu.cn [Hubei Key Laboratory of Natural Medicinal Chemistry and Resource Evaluation, School of Pharmacy, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan, Hubei PR China (China); Liu, Hudan, E-mail: hudanliu@hust.edu.cn [Hubei Key Laboratory of Natural Medicinal Chemistry and Resource Evaluation, School of Pharmacy, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan, Hubei PR China (China)

    2014-11-01

    We previously reported the isolation of a novel Amaryllidaceae alkaloid, N-methylhemeanthidine chloride (NMHC), from Zephyranthes candida, which exhibits potent cytotoxicity in a spectrum of tumor cells. However, the mechanism of action remains unclear. Using multiple cell lines derived from human pancreatic cancer, one of the most mortal and refractory human malignancies, we further studied the NMHC-mediated cytotoxicity and found that it induced drastic cytotoxicity in pancreatic cancer cells whereas an insignificant effect on a noncancerous cell line. The NMHC-mediated growth inhibition was more severe than the first-line chemotherapeutic agent gemcitabine, leading to cell cycle arrest, apoptotic death and decreased glycolysis. NMHC exerted its function through down-regulating AKT activation, and the ectopic expression of activated AKT rescued the growth inhibition. Consistently, NMHC injections in a pancreatic cancer xenograft model manifested the anti-tumor effect in vivo. Engrafted tumor cells underwent AKT attenuation and apoptotic death upon treatments. As such, we here demonstrate the AKT inhibition may be one of the mechanisms by which NMHC decreases tumor cell survival rate in vitro and in vivo. Our data thereby suggest that NMHC holds great promise as a potent chemotherapeutic agent against pancreatic cancer and sheds new light on obtaining such agents from natural products toward therapeutic purposes. - Highlights: • N-methylhemeanthidine chloride (NMHC) is a novel Amaryllidaceae alkaloid. • NMHC exhibits potent anti-neoplastic activity. • NMHC leads to cell cycle arrest, apoptotic death and decreased metabolism. • NMHC down-regulates the AKT signaling pathway.

  11. Senescent cells re-engineered to express soluble programmed death receptor-1 for inhibiting programmed death receptor-1/programmed death ligand-1 as a vaccination approach against breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zehong; Hu, Kang; Feng, Lieting; Su, Ruxiong; Lai, Nan; Yang, Zike; Kang, Shijun

    2018-06-01

    Various types of vaccines have been proposed as approaches for prevention or delay of the onset of cancer by boosting the endogenous immune system. We previously developed a senescent-cell-based vaccine, induced by radiation and veliparib, as a preventive and therapeutic tool against triple-negative breast cancer. However, the programmed death receptor-1/programmed death ligand-1 (PD-1/PD-L1) pathway was found to play an important role in vaccine failure. Hence, we further developed soluble programmed death receptor-1 (sPD1)-expressing senescent cells to overcome PD-L1/PD-1-mediated immune suppression while vaccinating to promote dendritic cell (DC) maturity, thereby amplifying T-cell activation. In the present study, sPD1-expressing senescent cells showed a particularly active status characterized by growth arrest and modified immunostimulatory cytokine secretion in vitro. As expected, sPD1-expressing senescent tumor cell vaccine (STCV/sPD-1) treatment attracted more mature DC and fewer exhausted-PD1 + T cells in vivo. During the course of the vaccine studies, we observed greater safety and efficacy for STCV/sPD-1 than for control treatments. STCV/sPD-1 pre-injections provided complete protection from 4T1 tumor challenge in mice. Additionally, the in vivo therapeutic study of mice with s.c. 4T1 tumor showed that STCV/sPD-1 vaccination delayed tumorigenesis and suppressed tumor progression at early stages. These results showed that STCV/sPD-1 effectively induced a strong antitumor immune response against cancer and suggested that it might be a potential strategy for TNBC prevention. © 2018 The Authors. Cancer Science published by John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd on behalf of Japanese Cancer Association.

  12. Porcine circovirus-2 capsid protein induces cell death in PK15 cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walia, Rupali; Dardari, Rkia, E-mail: rdardari@ucalgary.ca; Chaiyakul, Mark; Czub, Markus

    2014-11-15

    Studies have shown that Porcine circovirus (PCV)-2 induces apoptosis in PK15 cells. Here we report that cell death is induced in PCV2b-infected PK15 cells that express Capsid (Cap) protein and this effect is enhanced in interferon gamma (IFN-γ)-treated cells. We further show that transient PCV2a and 2b-Cap protein expression induces cell death in PK15 cells at rate similar to PCV2 infection, regardless of Cap protein localization. These data suggest that Cap protein may have the capacity to trigger different signaling pathways involved in cell death. Although further investigation is needed to gain deeper insights into the nature of the pathways involved in Cap-induced cell death, this study provides evidence that PCV2-induced cell death in kidney epithelial PK15 cells can be mapped to the Cap protein and establishes the need for future research regarding the role of Cap-induced cell death in PCV2 pathogenesis. - Highlights: • IFN-γ enhances PCV2 replication that leads to cell death in PK15 cells. • IFN-γ enhances nuclear localization of the PCV2 Capsid protein. • Transient PCV2a and 2b-Capsid protein expression induces cell death. • Cell death is not dictated by specific Capsid protein sub-localization.

  13. Radiation-induced cell death in embryogenic cells of coniferous plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watanabe, Yoshito; Homma-Takeda, Shino; Yukawa, Masae; Nishimura, Yoshikazu; Sasamoto, Hamako; Takahagi, Masahiko

    2004-01-01

    Reproductive processes are particularly radiosensitive in plant development, which was clearly illustrated in reduction of seed formation in native coniferous plants around Chernobyl after the nuclear accident. For the purpose to investigate the effects of ionizing radiation on embryonic formation in coniferous plants, we used an embryo-derived embryogenic cell culture of a Japanese native coniferous plant, Japanese cedar (Cryplomeria japonica). The embryogenic cells were so radiosensitive that most of the cells died by X-ray irradiation of 5 Gy. This indicated that the embryogenic cells are as radiosensitive as some mammalian cells including lymphocytes. We considered that this type of radiosensitive cell death in the embryogenic cells should be responsible for reproductive damages of coniferous plants by low dose of ionizing radiation. The cell death of the embryogenic cells was characteristic of nuclear DNA fragmentation, which is typically observed in radiation-induced programmed cell death, i.e. apoptosis, in mammalian cells. On the other hand, cell death with nuclear DNA fragmentation did not develop by X-ray irradiation in vegetative cells including meristematic cells of Japanese cedar. This suggests that an apoptosis-like programmed cell death should develop cell-specifically in embryogenic cells by ionizing radiation. The abortion of embryogenic cells may work to prevent transmission of radiation-induced genetic damages to the descendants. (author)

  14. Overexpression of p65 attenuates celecoxib-induced cell death in MDA-MB-231 human breast cancer cell line

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Ling

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Celecoxib is a selective cyclooxygenase (COX-2 inhibitor that has been reported to reduce the risk of breast cancer. In our previous study, celecoxib induced apoptosis and caused cell cycle arrest at the G0/G1 phase in the breast cancer cell line MDA-MB-231, and its effects were mediated by downregulation of NF-κB signaling. The NF-κB p65/RelA subunit may play a role in cell death through the activation of anti-apoptotic target genes including the inhibitor of apoptosis (IAP and Bcl-2 families, and inhibition of protein kinase B/Akt. The aim of the present study was to investigate p65 as the potential target of celecoxib treatment and determine whether p65 overexpression can override the inhibitory effect of celecoxib on NF-κB activity and affect cell survival. Methods The effects of p65 overexpression on celecoxib-inhibited NF-κB transcriptional activity were examined by western blotting, electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA and luciferase reporter gene assay. Cell viability and cell death were evaluated by the 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl-2,5-diphenyltetrazoliumbromide (MTT assay, and the levels of cleaved poly(ADP-ribose polymerase (PARP and caspase. Anti-apoptotic NF-κB target genes and cell cycle regulators were examined by western blotting to screen for the expression of target genes under direct regulation by p65. Results Overexpression of p65 increased NF-κB transcriptional activity and interfered with celecoxib-mediated apoptosis as assessed by MTT assay and caspase-3, caspase-9, and PARP expressions. Exogenously overexpressed p65 upregulated NF-κB-responsive genes, including anti-apoptotic genes such as survivin and XIAP, and the cell cycle regulatory gene cyclin D1. However, p65 overexpression did not affect celecoxib-induced p-Akt inactivation, suggesting that celecoxib might have separate molecular mechanisms for regulating Akt signaling independently of its inhibition of NF-κB transcriptional

  15. DISTINCT FUNCTIONS OF JNK AND C-JUN IN OXIDANT-INDUCED HEPATOCYTE DEATH

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amir, Muhammad; Liu, Kun; Zhao, Enpeng; Czaja, Mark J.

    2013-01-01

    Overactivation of c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK)/c-Jun signaling is a central mechanism of hepatocyte injury and death including that from oxidative stress. However, the functions of JNK and c-Jun are still unclear, and this pathway also inhibits hepatocyte death. Previous studies of menadione-induced oxidant stress demonstrated that toxicity resulted from sustained JNK/c-Jun activation as death was blocked by the c-Jun dominant negative TAM67. To further delineate the function of JNK/c-Jun signaling in hepatocyte injury from oxidant stress, the effects of direct JNK inhibition on menadione-induced death were examined. In contrast to the inhibitory effect of TAM67, pharmacological JNK inhibition by SP600125 sensitized the rat hepatocyte cell line RALA255-10G to death from menadione. SP600125 similarly sensitized mouse primary hepatocytes to menadione toxicity. Death from SP600125/menadione was c-Jun dependent as it was blocked by TAM67, but independent of c-Jun phosphorylation. Death occurred by apoptosis and necrosis and activation of the mitochondrial death pathway. Short hairpin RNA knockdowns of total JNK or JNK2 sensitized to death from menadione, whereas a jnk1 knockdown was protective. Jnk2 null mouse primary hepatocytes were also sensitized to menadione death. JNK inhibition magnified decreases in cellular ATP content and β-oxidation induced by menadione. This effect mediated cell death as chemical inhibition of β-oxidation also sensitized cells to death from menadione, and supplementation with the β-oxidation substrate oleate blocked death. Components of the JNK/c-Jun signaling pathway have opposing functions in hepatocyte oxidant stress with JNK2 mediating resistance to cell death and c-Jun promoting death. PMID:22644775

  16. UV irradiation/cold shock-mediated apoptosis is switched to bubbling cell death at low temperatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Szu-Jung; Lin, Pei-Wen; Lin, Hsin-Ping; Huang, Shenq-Shyang; Lai, Feng-Jie; Sheu, Hamm-Ming; Hsu, Li-Jin; Chang, Nan-Shan

    2015-04-10

    When COS7 fibroblasts and other cells were exposed to UVC irradiation and cold shock at 4°C for 5 min, rapid upregulation and nuclear accumulation of NOS2, p53, WWOX, and TRAF2 occurred in 10-30 min. By time-lapse microscopy, an enlarging gas bubble containing nitric oxide (NO) was formed in the nucleus in each cell that finally popped out to cause "bubbling death". Bubbling occurred effectively at 4 and 22°C, whereas DNA fragmentation was markedly blocked at 4°C. When temperature was increased to 37°C, bubbling was retarded and DNA fragmentation occurred in 1 hr, suggesting that bubbling death is switched to apoptosis with increasing temperatures. Bubbling occurred prior to nuclear uptake of propidium iodide and DAPI stains. Arginine analog Nω-LAME inhibited NO synthase NOS2 and significantly suppressed the bubbling death. Unlike apoptosis, there were no caspase activation and flip-over of membrane phosphatidylserine (PS) during bubbling death. Bubbling death was significantly retarded in Wwox knockout MEF cells, as well as in cells overexpressing TRAF2 and dominant-negative p53. Together, UV/cold shock induces bubbling death at 4°C and the event is switched to apoptosis at 37°C. Presumably, proapoptotic WWOX and p53 block the protective TRAF2 to execute the bubbling death.

  17. Alpha-tocopheryl succinate inhibits autophagic survival of prostate cancer cells induced by vitamin K3 and ascorbate to trigger cell death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomasetti, Marco; Nocchi, Linda; Neuzil, Jiri; Goodwin, Jacob; Nguyen, Maria; Dong, Lanfeng; Manzella, Nicola; Staffolani, Sara; Milanese, Claudio; Garrone, Beatrice; Alleva, Renata; Borghi, Battista; Santarelli, Lory; Guerrieri, Roberto

    2012-01-01

    The redox-silent vitamin E analog α-tocopheryl succinate (α-TOS) was found to synergistically cooperate with vitamin K3 (VK3) plus ascorbic acid (AA) in the induction of cancer cell-selective apoptosis via a caspase-independent pathway. Here we investigated the molecular mechanism(s) underlying cell death induced in prostate cancer cells by α-TOS, VK3 and AA, and the potential use of targeted drug combination in the treatment of prostate cancer. The generation of ROS, cellular response to oxidative stress, and autophagy were investigated in PC3 prostate cancer cells by using drugs at sub-toxic doses. We evaluated whether PARP1-mediated apoptosis-inducing factor (AIF) release plays a role in apoptosis induced by the combination of the agents. Next, the effect of the combination of α-TOS, VK3 and AA on tumor growth was examined in nude mice. VK3 plus AA induced early ROS formation associated with induction of autophagy in response to oxidative stress, which was reduced by α-TOS, preventing the formation of autophagosomes. α-TOS induced mitochondrial destabilization leading to the release of AIF. Translocation of AIF from mitochondria to the nucleus, a result of the combinatorial treatment, was mediated by PARP1 activation. The inhibition of AIF as well as of PARP1 efficiently attenuated apoptosis triggered by the drug combination. Using a mouse model of prostate cancer, the combination of α-TOS, VK3 and AA was more efficient in tumor suppression than when the drugs were given separately, without deleterious side effects. α-TOS, a mitochondria-targeting apoptotic agent, switches at sub-apoptotic doses from autophagy-dependent survival of cancer cells to their demise by promoting the induction of apoptosis. Given the grim prognosis for cancer patients, this finding is of potential clinical relevance.

  18. Alpha-tocopheryl succinate inhibits autophagic survival of prostate cancer cells induced by vitamin K3 and ascorbate to trigger cell death.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Tomasetti

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The redox-silent vitamin E analog α-tocopheryl succinate (α-TOS was found to synergistically cooperate with vitamin K3 (VK3 plus ascorbic acid (AA in the induction of cancer cell-selective apoptosis via a caspase-independent pathway. Here we investigated the molecular mechanism(s underlying cell death induced in prostate cancer cells by α-TOS, VK3 and AA, and the potential use of targeted drug combination in the treatment of prostate cancer. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The generation of ROS, cellular response to oxidative stress, and autophagy were investigated in PC3 prostate cancer cells by using drugs at sub-toxic doses. We evaluated whether PARP1-mediated apoptosis-inducing factor (AIF release plays a role in apoptosis induced by the combination of the agents. Next, the effect of the combination of α-TOS, VK3 and AA on tumor growth was examined in nude mice. VK3 plus AA induced early ROS formation associated with induction of autophagy in response to oxidative stress, which was reduced by α-TOS, preventing the formation of autophagosomes. α-TOS induced mitochondrial destabilization leading to the release of AIF. Translocation of AIF from mitochondria to the nucleus, a result of the combinatorial treatment, was mediated by PARP1 activation. The inhibition of AIF as well as of PARP1 efficiently attenuated apoptosis triggered by the drug combination. Using a mouse model of prostate cancer, the combination of α-TOS, VK3 and AA was more efficient in tumor suppression than when the drugs were given separately, without deleterious side effects. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: α-TOS, a mitochondria-targeting apoptotic agent, switches at sub-apoptotic doses from autophagy-dependent survival of cancer cells to their demise by promoting the induction of apoptosis. Given the grim prognosis for cancer patients, this finding is of potential clinical relevance.

  19. Valproic acid inhibits neural progenitor cell death by activation of NF-κB signaling pathway and up-regulation of Bcl-XL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Han Seol

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background At the beginning of neurogenesis, massive brain cell death occurs and more than 50% of cells are eliminated by apoptosis along with neuronal differentiation. However, few studies were conducted so far regarding the regulation of neural progenitor cells (NPCs death during development. Because of the physiological role of cell death during development, aberration of normal apoptotic cell death is detrimental to normal organogenesis. Apoptosis occurs in not only neuron but also in NPCs and neuroblast. When growth and survival signals such as EGF or LIF are removed, apoptosis is activated as well as the induction of differentiation. To investigate the regulation of cell death during developmental stage, it is essential to investigate the regulation of apoptosis of NPCs. Methods Neural progenitor cells were cultured from E14 embryonic brains of Sprague-Dawley rats. For in vivo VPA animal model, pregnant rats were treated with VPA (400 mg/kg S.C. diluted with normal saline at E12. To analyze the cell death, we performed PI staining and PARP and caspase-3 cleavage assay. Expression level of proteins was investigated by Western blot and immunocytochemical assays. The level of mRNA expression was investigated by RT-PCR. Interaction of Bcl-XL gene promoter and NF-κB p65 was investigated by ChIP assay. Results In this study, FACS analysis, PI staining and PARP and caspase-3 cleavage assay showed that VPA protects cultured NPCs from cell death after growth factor withdrawal both in basal and staurosporine- or hydrogen peroxide-stimulated conditions. The protective effect of prenatally injected VPA was also observed in E16 embryonic brain. Treatment of VPA decreased the level of IκBα and increased the nuclear translocation of NF-κB, which subsequently enhanced expression of anti-apoptotic protein Bcl-XL. Conclusion To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report to indicate the reduced death of NPCs by VPA at developmentally

  20. Non-Canonical Cell Death Induced by p53

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atul Ranjan

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Programmed cell death is a vital biological process for multicellular organisms to maintain cellular homeostasis, which is regulated in a complex manner. Over the past several years, apart from apoptosis, which is the principal mechanism of caspase-dependent cell death, research on non-apoptotic forms of programmed cell death has gained momentum. p53 is a well characterized tumor suppressor that controls cell proliferation and apoptosis and has also been linked to non-apoptotic, non-canonical cell death mechanisms. p53 impacts these non-canonical forms of cell death through transcriptional regulation of its downstream targets, as well as direct interactions with key players involved in these mechanisms, in a cell type- or tissue context-dependent manner. In this review article, we summarize and discuss the involvement of p53 in several non-canonical modes of cell death, including caspase-independent apoptosis (CIA, ferroptosis, necroptosis, autophagic cell death, mitotic catastrophe, paraptosis, and pyroptosis, as well as its role in efferocytosis which is the process of clearing dead or dying cells.

  1. A paraptosis-like cell death induced by δ-tocotrienol in human colon carcinoma SW620 cells is associated with the suppression of the Wnt signaling pathway

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Jing-Shu; Li, Da-Ming; He, Ning; Liu, Ying-Hua; Wang, Chun-Hua; Jiang, Shu-Qing; Chen, Bing-Qing; Liu, Jia-Ren

    2011-01-01

    Tocotrienol is considered a beneficial effect agent on inhibition of tumor development. In this study, we focused on the effects of δ-tocotrienol and its possible mechanism on induction of death in human colon cancer SW620 cells. δ-Tocotrienol inhibited proliferation of SW620 cell in a dose-dependent manner. Our findings showed that δ-tocotrienol effectively induced paraptosis-like death in SW620 cells, correlated with the vacuolation that may be from welling and fusion of mitochondria and/or the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) as well as caspase-3 nonactivated. However, there were no changes in apoptosis based on flow cytometry analysis. Of being noted, δ-tocotrienol reduced the expression of β-catenin and wnt-1 proteins by about 50% at the highest dose (20 μmol/L). δ-Tocotrienol also decreased cyclin D1, c-jun and MMP-7 protein levels in SW620 cells. Altogether, these data indicate that δ-tocotrienol induces paraptosis-like cell death, which is associated with the suppression of the Wnt signaling pathway. Thus, our findings may provide a novel application in treatment of human colon carcinoma.

  2. In Situ Gelation-Induced Death of Cancer Cells Based on Proteinosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yuting; Song, Jianmin; Wang, Lei; Xue, Xuting; Liu, Xiaoman; Xie, Hui; Huang, Xin

    2017-08-14

    Hydrogels are an excellent type of material that can be utilized as a platform for cell culture. However, when a bulky hydrogel forms on the inside of cancer cells, the result would be different. In this study, we demonstrate a method for in situ gelation inside cancer cells that can efficiently induce cell death. Glutathione-responsive proteinosomes with good biocompatibility were prepared as carriers for sodium alginate to be endocytosed by cancer cells, where the chelation between sodium alginate and free calcium ions in the culture medium occurs during the diffusion process. The uptake of the hydrogel-loaded proteinosomes into the cancer cells, and then the triggered release of hydrogel with concomitant aggregation, was well-confirmed by monitoring the change of the Young's modulus of the cells based on AFM force measurements. Accordingly, when a large amount of hydrogel formed in cells, the cell viability would be inhibited by ∼90% by MTT assay at a concentration of 5.0 μM of hydrogel-loaded proteinosomes after 48 h incubation, which clearly proves the feasibility of the demonstrated method for killing cancer cells. Although more details regarding the mechanism of cell death should be conducted in the near future, such a demonstrated method of in situ gelation inside cells provides another choice for killing cancer cells.

  3. Treatment with a JNK inhibitor increases, whereas treatment with a p38 inhibitor decreases, H2O2-induced calf pulmonary arterial endothelial cell death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Woo Hyun

    2017-08-01

    Oxidative stress induces apoptosis in endothelial cells (ECs). Reactive oxygen species (ROS) promote cell death by regulating the activity of various mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) in ECs. The present study investigated the effects of MAPK inhibitors on cell survival and glutathione (GSH) levels upon H 2 O 2 treatment in calf pulmonary artery ECs (CPAECs). H 2 O 2 treatment inhibited the growth and induced the death of CPAECs, as well as causing GSH depletion and the loss of mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP). While treatment with the MEK or JNK inhibitor impaired the growth of H 2 O 2 -treated CPAECs, treatment with the p38 inhibitor attenuated this inhibition of growth. Additionally, JNK inhibitor treatment increased the proportion of sub-G 1 phase cells in H 2 O 2 -treated CPAECs and further decreased the MMP. However, treatment with a p38 inhibitor reversed the effects of H 2 O 2 treatment on cell growth and the MMP. Similarly, JNK inhibitor treatment further increased, whereas p38 inhibitor treatment decreased, the proportion of GSH-depleted cells in H 2 O 2 -treated CPAECs. Each of the MAPK inhibitors affected cell survival, and ROS or GSH levels differently in H 2 O 2 -untreated, control CPAECs. The data suggest that the exposure of CPAECs to H 2 O 2 caused the cell growth inhibition and cell death through GSH depletion. Furthermore, JNK inhibitor treatment further enhanced, whereas p38 inhibitors attenuated, these effects. Thus, the results of the present study suggest a specific protective role for the p38 inhibitor, and not the JNK inhibitor, against H 2 O 2 -induced cell growth inhibition and cell death.

  4. A unifying mechanism for cancer cell death through ion channel activation by HAMLET.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Storm, Petter; Klausen, Thomas Kjaer; Trulsson, Maria; Ho C S, James; Dosnon, Marion; Westergren, Tomas; Chao, Yinxia; Rydström, Anna; Yang, Henry; Pedersen, Stine Falsig; Svanborg, Catharina

    2013-01-01

    Ion channels and ion fluxes control many aspects of tissue homeostasis. During oncogenic transformation, critical ion channel functions may be perturbed but conserved tumor specific ion fluxes remain to be defined. Here we used the tumoricidal protein-lipid complex HAMLET as a probe to identify ion fluxes involved in tumor cell death. We show that HAMLET activates a non-selective cation current, which reached a magnitude of 2.74±0.88 nA within 1.43±0.13 min from HAMLET application. Rapid ion fluxes were essential for HAMLET-induced carcinoma cell death as inhibitors (amiloride, BaCl2), preventing the changes in free cellular Na(+) and K(+) concentrations also prevented essential steps accompanying carcinoma cell death, including changes in morphology, uptake, global transcription, and MAP kinase activation. Through global transcriptional analysis and phosphorylation arrays, a strong ion flux dependent p38 MAPK response was detected and inhibition of p38 signaling delayed HAMLET-induced death. Healthy, differentiated cells were resistant to HAMLET challenge, which was accompanied by innate immunity rather than p38-activation. The results suggest, for the first time, a unifying mechanism for the initiation of HAMLET's broad and rapid lethal effect on tumor cells. These findings are particularly significant in view of HAMLET's documented therapeutic efficacy in human studies and animal models. The results also suggest that HAMLET offers a two-tiered therapeutic approach, killing cancer cells while stimulating an innate immune response in surrounding healthy tissues.

  5. PCM1 Depletion Inhibits Glioblastoma Cell Ciliogenesis and Increases Cell Death and Sensitivity to Temozolomide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lan B. Hoang-Minh

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available A better understanding of the molecules implicated in the growth and survival of glioblastoma (GBM cells and their response to temozolomide (TMZ, the standard-of-care chemotherapeutic agent, is necessary for the development of new therapies that would improve the outcome of current GBM treatments. In this study, we characterize the role of pericentriolar material 1 (PCM1, a component of centriolar satellites surrounding centrosomes, in GBM cell proliferation and sensitivity to genotoxic agents such as TMZ. We show that PCM1 is expressed around centrioles and ciliary basal bodies in patient GBM biopsies and derived cell lines and that its localization is dynamic throughout the cell cycle. To test whether PCM1 mediates GBM cell proliferation and/or response to TMZ, we used CRISPR/Cas9 genome editing to generate primary GBM cell lines depleted of PCM1. These PCM1-depleted cells displayed reduced AZI1 satellite protein localization and significantly decreased proliferation, which was attributable to increased apoptotic cell death. Furthermore, PCM1-depleted lines were more sensitive to TMZ toxicity than control lines. The increase in TMZ sensitivity may be partly due to the reduced ability of PCM1-depleted cells to form primary cilia, as depletion of KIF3A also ablated GBM cells' ciliogenesis and increased their sensitivity to TMZ while preserving PCM1 localization. In addition, the co-depletion of KIF3A and PCM1 did not have any additive effect on TMZ sensitivity. Together, our data suggest that PCM1 plays multiple roles in GBM pathogenesis and that associated pathways could be targeted to augment current or future anti-GBM therapies.

  6. Protection against inflammatory β-cell damage by lysine deacetylase inhibition and microRNA expression?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vestergaard, Anna Lindeløv; Pallesen, Emil Marek Heymans; Novotny, Guy Wayne

    Background and aims: Pro-inflammatory cytokines contribute to pancreatic β-cell apoptosis in type 1 and 2 diabetes mellitus. The detrimental effects resulting from cytokine-induced signaling in the β cell can be reduced by inhibition of class I classical lysine deacetylases (KDACi), especially HDAC...... of oxidative stress proteins responsible for β-cell death. The aim of the study is to identify novel and specific therapeutic targets for β-cell protection by mapping the miR profile of β cells rescued from inflammatory assault by inhibition of lysine deacetylation, thereby identifying miR that repress....... The perspective of this study is to develop novel anti-diabetic drugs targeting HDAC1 and/or associated miR....

  7. Involvment of cytosolic and mitochondrial GSK-3beta in mitochondrial dysfunction and neuronal cell death of MPTP/MPP-treated neurons.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agnès Petit-Paitel

    Full Text Available Aberrant mitochondrial function appears to play a central role in dopaminergic neuronal loss in Parkinson's disease (PD. 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium iodide (MPP(+, the active metabolite of N-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP, is a selective inhibitor of mitochondrial complex I and is widely used in rodent and cell models to elicit neurochemical alterations associated with PD. Recent findings suggest that Glycogen Synthase Kinase-3beta (GSK-3beta, a critical activator of neuronal apoptosis, is involved in the dopaminergic cell death. In this study, the role of GSK-3beta in modulating MPP(+-induced mitochondrial dysfunction and neuronal death was examined in vivo, and in two neuronal cell models namely primary cultured and immortalized neurons. In both cell models, MPTP/MPP(+ treatment caused cell death associated with time- and concentration-dependent activation of GSK-3beta, evidenced by the increased level of the active form of the kinase, i.e. GSK-3beta phosphorylated at tyrosine 216 residue. Using immunocytochemistry and subcellular fractionation techniques, we showed that GSK-3beta partially localized within mitochondria in both neuronal cell models. Moreover, MPP(+ treatment induced a significant decrease of the specific phospho-Tyr216-GSK-3beta labeling in mitochondria concomitantly with an increase into the cytosol. Using two distinct fluorescent probes, we showed that MPP(+ induced cell death through the depolarization of mitochondrial membrane potential. Inhibition of GSK-3beta activity using well-characterized inhibitors, LiCl and kenpaullone, and RNA interference, prevented MPP(+-induced cell death by blocking mitochondrial membrane potential changes and subsequent caspase-9 and -3 activation. These results indicate that GSK-3beta is a critical mediator of MPTP/MPP(+-induced neurotoxicity through its ability to regulate mitochondrial functions. Inhibition of GSK-3beta activity might provide protection against

  8. 1-Nitropyrene (1-NP) induces apoptosis and apparently a non-apoptotic programmed cell death (paraptosis) in Hepa1c1c7 cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asare, Nana; Landvik, Nina E.; Lagadic-Gossmann, Dominique; Rissel, Mary; Tekpli, Xavier; Ask, Kjetil; Lag, Marit; Holme, Jorn A.

    2008-01-01

    Mechanistic studies of nitro-PAHs (polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons) of interest might help elucidate which chemical characteristics are most important in eliciting toxic effects. 1-Nitropyrene (1-NP) is the predominant nitrated PAH emitted in diesel exhaust. 1-NP-exposed Hepa1c1c7 cells exhibited marked changes in cellular morphology, decreased proliferation and different forms of cell death. A dramatic increase in cytoplasmic vacuolization was observed already after 6 h of exposure and the cells started to round up at 12 h. The rate of cell proliferation was markedly reduced at 24 h and apoptotic as well as propidium iodide (PI)-positive cells appeared. Electron microscopic examination revealed that the vacuolization was partly due to mitochondria swelling. The caspase inhibitor Z-VAD-FMK inhibited only the apoptotic cell death and Nec-1 (an inhibitor of necroptosis) exhibited no inhibitory effects on either cell death or vacuolization. In contrast, cycloheximide markedly reduced both the number of apoptotic and PI-positive cells as well as the cytoplasmic vacuolization, suggesting that 1-NP induced paraptotic cell death. All the MAPKs; ERK1/2, p38 and JNK, appear to be involved in the death process since marked activation was observed upon 1-NP exposure, and their inhibitors partly reduced the induced cell death. The ERK1/2 inhibitor PD 98057 completely blocked the induced vacuolization, whereas the other MAPKs inhibitors only had minor effects on this process. These findings suggest that 1-NP may cause apoptosis and paraptosis. In contrast, the corresponding amine (1-aminopyrene) elicited only minor apoptotic and necrotic cell death, and cells with characteristics typical of paraptosis were absent

  9. TNF-α activates death pathway in human aorta smooth muscle cell in the presence of 7-ketocholesterol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Hyun Sun; Chang, Jong Sun; Baek, Jin Ah; Chung, Mi Yeon; Lee, Han Cheol; Rhim, Byung Yong; Sok, Dai Eun; Rho, Mun-Chual; Kim, Young Kook; Kim, Koanhoi

    2005-01-01

    This study was undertaken to investigate whether a physiologically compatible concentration of 7-ketocholesterol had any effect on human vascular smooth muscle cells (HVSMCs). We found that 7-ketocholesterol changed the viability of human aorta smooth muscle cells (HAoSMC) not by cytotoxicity but by activation of tumor necrosis factor-α receptor (TNFR)-mediated death. Whereas TNF-α did not affect the viability in the presence of 7α-hydroxycholesterol or cholesterol, the cytokine induced HAoSMC death in the presence of 7-ketocholesterol as detected by morphology, viability, and fragmentation of chromosomal DNA. The HAoSMC death was inhibited by a neutralizing anti-TNF receptor 1 (TNFR1) antibody and by the caspase inhibitors of z-VAD and z-DEVD. Activations of caspase-8 and -3 were detected from dying HAoSMCs. 7-Ketocholesterol inhibited translocation of the nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) subunits of p65 and p50 from the cytosol into the nucleus, increase of NF-κB activity, and expression of caspase-8 homolog Fas ligand interleukin-1-converting enzyme inhibitory protein by TNF-α. We also found that X-chromosome-linked inhibitor of apoptosis protein was degraded in dying HAoSMC. The present study proposes that 7-ketocholesterol would contribute to the disappearance of HVSMC in the atherosclerotic lesions by enhancing receptor-mediated death. This is the first report demonstrating induction of TNF-α-mediated death by oxysterol in cells

  10. Differential Reponses of Hematopoietic Stem and Progenitor Cells to mTOR Inhibition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aimin Yang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Abnormal activation of the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR signaling pathway has been observed in a variety of human cancers. Therefore, targeting of the mTOR pathway is an attractive strategy for cancer treatment and several mTOR inhibitors, including AZD8055 (AZD, a novel dual mTORC1/2 inhibitor, are currently in clinical trials. Although bone marrow (BM suppression is one of the primary side effects of anticancer drugs, it is not known if pharmacological inhibition of dual mTORC1/2 affects BM hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs function and plasticity. Here we report that dual inhibition of mTORC1/2 by AZD or its analogue (KU-63794 depletes mouse BM Lin−Sca-1+c-Kit+ cells in cultures via the induction of apoptotic cell death. Subsequent colony-forming unit (CFU assays revealed that inhibition of mTORC1/2 suppresses the clonogenic function of hematopoietic progenitor cells (HPCs in a dose-dependent manner. Surprisingly, we found that dual inhibition of mTORC1/2 markedly inhibits the growth of day-14 cobblestone area-forming cells (CAFCs but enhances the generation of day-35 CAFCs. Given the fact that day-14 and day-35 CAFCs are functional surrogates of HPCs and hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs, respectively, these results suggest that dual inhibition of mTORC1/2 may have distinct effects on HPCs versus HSCs.

  11. Morphological classification of plant cell deaths

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Doorn, W.G.; Beers, E.P.; Dangl, J.L.

    2011-01-01

    , which can express features of both necrosis and vacuolar cell death, PCD in starchy cereal endosperm and during self-incompatibility. The present classification is not static, but will be subject to further revision, especially when specific biochemical pathways are better defined....... the classification of PCD in plants. Here we suggest a classification based on morphological criteria. According to this classification, the use of the term 'apoptosis' is not justified in plants, but at least two classes of PCD can be distinguished: vacuolar cell death and necrosis. During vacuolar cell death...

  12. Live-cell visualization of gasdermin D-driven pyroptotic cell death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rathkey, Joseph K; Benson, Bryan L; Chirieleison, Steven M; Yang, Jie; Xiao, Tsan S; Dubyak, George R; Huang, Alex Y; Abbott, Derek W

    2017-09-01

    Pyroptosis is a form of cell death important in defenses against pathogens that can also result in a potent and sometimes pathological inflammatory response. During pyroptosis, GSDMD (gasdermin D), the pore-forming effector protein, is cleaved, forms oligomers, and inserts into the membranes of the cell, resulting in rapid cell death. However, the potent cell death induction caused by GSDMD has complicated our ability to understand the biology of this protein. Studies aimed at visualizing GSDMD have relied on expression of GSDMD fragments in epithelial cell lines that naturally lack GSDMD expression and also lack the proteases necessary to cleave GSDMD. In this work, we performed mutagenesis and molecular modeling to strategically place tags and fluorescent proteins within GSDMD that support native pyroptosis and facilitate live-cell imaging of pyroptotic cell death. Here, we demonstrate that these fusion proteins are cleaved by caspases-1 and -11 at Asp-276. Mutations that disrupted the predicted p30-p20 autoinhibitory interface resulted in GSDMD aggregation, supporting the oligomerizing activity of these mutations. Furthermore, we show that these novel GSDMD fusions execute inflammasome-dependent pyroptotic cell death in response to multiple stimuli and allow for visualization of the morphological changes associated with pyroptotic cell death in real time. This work therefore provides new tools that not only expand the molecular understanding of pyroptosis but also enable its direct visualization. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  13. Silibinin induces apoptosis via calpain-dependent AIF nuclear translocation in U87MG human glioma cell death

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim Yong K

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Silibinin, a natural polyphenolic flavonoid, has been reported to induce cell death in various cancer cell types. However, the molecular mechanism is not clearly defined. Our previous study showed that silibinin induces glioma cell death and its effect was effectively prevented by calpain inhibitor. The present study was therefore undertaken to examine the role of calpain in the silibinin-induced glioma cell death. Methods U87MG cells were grown on well tissue culture plates and cell viability was measured by MTT assay. ROS generation and △ψm were estimated using the fluorescence dyes. PKC activation and Bax expression were measured by Western blot analysis. AIF nuclear translocation was determined by Western blot and immunocytochemistry. Results Silibinin induced activation of calpain, which was blocked by EGTA and the calpain inhibitor Z-Leu-Leu-CHO. Silibinin caused ROS generation and its effect was inhibited by calpain inhibitor, the general PKC inhibitor GF 109203X, the specific PKCδ inhibitor rottlerin, and catalase. Silibinin-induce cell death was blocked by calpain inhibitor and PKC inhibitors. Silibinin-induced PKCδ activation and disruption of △ψm were prevented by the calpain inhibitor. Silibinin induced AIF nuclear translocation and its effect was prevented by calpain inhibitor. Transfection of vector expressing microRNA of AIF prevented the silibinin-induced cell death. Conclusions Silibinin induces apoptotic cell death through a calpain-dependent mechanism involving PKC, ROS, and AIF nuclear translocation in U87MG human glioma cells.

  14. Autonomous rexinoid death signaling is suppressed by converging signaling pathways in immature leukemia cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benoit, G R; Flexor, M; Besançon, F; Altucci, L; Rossin, A; Hillion, J; Balajthy, Z; Legres, L; Ségal-Bendirdjian, E; Gronemeyer, H; Lanotte, M

    2001-07-01

    On their own, retinoid X receptor (RXR)-selective ligands (rexinoids) are silent in retinoic acid receptor (RAR)-RXR heterodimers, and no selective rexinoid program has been described as yet in cellular systems. We report here on the rexinoid signaling capacity that triggers apoptosis of immature promyelocytic NB4 cells as a default pathway in the absence of survival factors. Rexinoid-induced apoptosis displays all features of bona fide programmed cell death and is inhibited by RXR, but not RAR antagonists. Several types of survival signals block rexinoid-induced apoptosis. RARalpha agonists switch the cellular response toward differentiation and induce the expression of antiapoptosis factors. Activation of the protein kinase A pathway in the presence of rexinoid agonists induces maturation and blocks immature cell apoptosis. Addition of nonretinoid serum factors also blocks cell death but does not induce cell differentiation. Rexinoid-induced apoptosis is linked to neither the presence nor stability of the promyelocytic leukemia-RARalpha fusion protein and operates also in non-acute promyelocytic leukemia cells. Together our results support a model according to which rexinoids activate in certain leukemia cells a default death pathway onto which several other signaling paradigms converge. This pathway is entirely distinct from that triggered by RAR agonists, which control cell maturation and postmaturation apoptosis.

  15. Acrolein-Induced Oxidative Stress and Cell Death Exhibiting Features of Apoptosis in the Yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae Deficient in SOD1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwolek-Mirek, Magdalena; Zadrąg-Tęcza, Renata; Bednarska, Sabina; Bartosz, Grzegorz

    2015-04-01

    The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is a useful eukaryotic model to study the toxicity of acrolein, an important environmental toxin and endogenous product of lipid peroxidation. The study was aimed at elucidation of the cytotoxic effect of acrolein on the yeast deficient in SOD1, Cu, Zn-superoxide dismutase which is hypersensitive to aldehydes. Acrolein generated within the cell from its precursor allyl alcohol caused growth arrest and cell death of the yeast cells. The growth inhibition involved an increase in production of reactive oxygen species and high level of protein carbonylation. DNA condensation and fragmentation, exposition of phosphatidylserine at the cell surface as well as decreased dynamic of actin microfilaments and mitochondria disintegration point to the induction of apoptotic-type cell death besides necrotic cell death.

  16. Oxidative Stress Facilitates IFN-γ-Induced Mimic Extracellular Trap Cell Death in A549 Lung Epithelial Cancer Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Chiou-Feng; Chen, Chia-Ling; Chien, Shun-Yi; Tseng, Po-Chun; Wang, Yu-Chih; Tsai, Tsung-Ting

    2016-01-01

    We previously demonstrated that IFN-γ induces an autophagy-regulated mimic extracellular trap cell death (ETosis) in A549 human lung cancer cells. Regarding reactive oxygen species (ROS) are involved in ETosis, this study investigated the role of oxidative stress. After IFN-γ stimulation, a necrosis-like cell death mimic ETosis occurred accompanied by the inhibition of cell growth, aberrant nuclear staining, and nucleosome release. ROS were generated in a time-dependent manner with an increase in NADPH oxidase component protein expression. STAT1-mediated IFN regulatory factor-1 activation was essential for upregulating ROS production. By genetically silencing p47phox, IFN-γ-induced ROS and mimic ETosis were significantly attenuated. This mechanistic study indicated that ROS may mediate DNA damage followed by histone H3 citrullination. Furthermore, ROS promoted IFN-γ-induced mimic ETosis in cooperation with autophagy. These findings further demonstrate that ROS regulates IFN-γ-induced mimic ETosis in lung epithelial malignancy.

  17. Atractylenolide-I Protects Human SH-SY5Y Cells from 1-Methyl-4-Phenylpyridinium-Induced Apoptotic Cell Death

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandeep Vasant More

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Oxidative stress and apoptosis are the major mechanisms that induce dopaminergic cell death. Our study investigates the protective effects of atractylenolide-I (ATR-I on 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium (MPP+-induced cytotoxicity in human dopaminergic SH-SY5Y cells, as well as its underlying mechanism. Our experimental data indicates that ATR-I significantly inhibits the loss of cell viability induced by MPP+ in SH-SY5Y cells. To further unravel the mechanism, we examined the effect of ATR-I on MPP+-induced apoptotic cell death characterized by an increase in the Bax/Bcl-2 mRNA ratio, the release of cytochrome-c, and the activation of caspase-3 leading to elevated levels of cleaved poly(ADP-ribose polymerase (PARP resulting in SH-SY5Y cell death. Our results demonstrated that ATR-I decreases the level of pro-apoptotic proteins induced by MPP+ and also restored Bax/Bcl-2 mRNA levels, which are critical for inducing apoptosis. In addition, ATR-I demonstrated a significant increase in the protein expression of heme-oxygenase in MPP+-treated SH-SY5Y cells. These results suggest that the pharmacological effect of ATR-I may be, at least in part, caused by the reduction in pro-apoptotic signals and also by induction of anti-oxidant protein.

  18. Mechanism of artemisinin phytotoxicity action: induction of reactive oxygen species and cell death in lettuce seedlings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Zhi-Qiang; Wang, Dan-Dan; Ding, Lan; Cui, Hai-Yan; Jin, Hui; Yang, Xiao-Yan; Yang, Jian-She; Qin, Bo

    2015-03-01

    Artemisinin has been recognized as an allelochemical that inhibits growth of several plant species. However, its mode of action is not well clarified. In this study, the mechanism of artemisinin phytotoxicity on lettuce seedlings was investigated. Root and shoot elongation of lettuce seedlings were inhibited by artemisinin in a concentration-dependent manner. The compound effectively arrested cell division and caused loss of cell viability in root tips of lettuce. Overproduction of reactive oxygen species (ROS) was induced by artemisinin. Lipid peroxidation, proline overproduction and reduction of chlorophyll content in lettuce seedlings were found after treatments. These results suggested that artemisinin could induce ROS overproduction, which caused membrane lipids peroxidation and cell death, and impacted mitosis and physiological processes, resulting in growth inhibition of receptor plants. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  19. Carbamoylating activity associated with the activation of the antitumor agent laromustine inhibits angiogenesis by inducing ASK1-dependent endothelial cell death.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weidong Ji

    Full Text Available The anticancer agent 1,2-bis(methylsulfonyl-1-(2-chloroethyl-2-[(methylaminocarbonyl]hydrazine (laromustine, upon decomposition in situ, yields methyl isocyanate and the chloroethylating species 1,2-bis(methylsulfonyl-1-(2-chloroethylhydrazine (90CE. 90CE has been shown to kill tumor cells via a proposed mechanism that involves interstrand DNA cross-linking. However, the role of methyl isocyanate in the antineoplastic function of laromustine has not been delineated. Herein, we show that 1,2-bis(methylsulfonyl-1-[(methylaminocarbonyl]hydrazine (101MDCE, an analog of laromustine that generates only methyl isocyanate, activates ASK1-JNK/p38 signaling in endothelial cells (EC. We have previously shown that ASK1 forms a complex with reduced thioredoxin (Trx1 in resting EC, and that the Cys residues in ASK1 and Trx1 are critical for their interaction. 101MDCE dissociated ASK1 from Trx1, but not from the phosphoserine-binding inhibitor 14-3-3, in whole cells and in cell lysates, consistent with the known ability of methyl isocyanate to carbamoylate free thiol groups of proteins. 101MDCE had no effect on the kinase activity of purified ASK1, JNK, or the catalytic activity of Trx1. However, 101MDCE, but not 90CE, significantly decreased the activity of Trx reductase-1 (TrxR1. We conclude that methyl isocyanate induces dissociation of ASK1 from Trx1 either directly by carbamoylating the critical Cys groups in the ASK1-Trx1 complex or indirectly by inhibiting TrxR1. Furthermore, 101MDCE (but not 90CE induced EC death through a non-apoptotic (necroptotic pathway leading to inhibition of angiogenesis in vitro. Our study has identified methyl isocyanates may contribute to the anticancer activity in part by interfering with tumor angiogenesis.

  20. Prolactin protects retinal pigment epithelium by inhibiting sirtuin 2-dependent cell death

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo Meléndez García

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The identification of pathways necessary for retinal pigment epithelium (RPE function is fundamental to uncover therapies for blindness. Prolactin (PRL receptors are expressed in the retina, but nothing is known about the role of PRL in RPE. Using the adult RPE 19 (ARPE-19 human cell line and mouse RPE, we identified the presence of PRL receptors and demonstrated that PRL is necessary for RPE cell survival via anti-apoptotic and antioxidant actions. PRL promotes the antioxidant capacity of ARPE-19 cells by reducing glutathione. It also blocks the hydrogen peroxide-induced increase in deacetylase sirtuin 2 (SIRT2 expression, which inhibits the TRPM2-mediated intracellular Ca2+ rise associated with reduced survival under oxidant conditions. RPE from PRL receptor-null (prlr−/− mice showed increased levels of oxidative stress, Sirt2 expression and apoptosis, effects that were exacerbated in animals with advancing age. These observations identify PRL as a regulator of RPE homeostasis.

  1. Intracellular Hyper-Acidification Potentiated by Hydrogen Sulfide Mediates Invasive and Therapy Resistant Cancer Cell Death

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zheng-Wei Lee

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Slow and continuous release of H2S by GYY4137 has previously been demonstrated to kill cancer cells by increasing glycolysis and impairing anion exchanger and sodium/proton exchanger activity. This action is specific for cancer cells. The resulting lactate overproduction and defective pH homeostasis bring about intracellular acidification-induced cancer cell death. The present study investigated the potency of H2S released by GYY4137 against invasive and radio- as well as chemo-resistant cancers, known to be glycolytically active. We characterized and utilized cancer cell line pairs of various organ origins, based on their aggressive behaviors, and assessed their response to GYY4137. We compared glycolytic activity, via lactate production, and intracellular pH of each cancer cell line pair after exposure to H2S. Invasive and therapy resistant cancers, collectively termed aggressive cancers, are receptive to H2S-mediated cytotoxicity, albeit at a higher concentration of GYY4137 donor. While lactate production was enhanced, intracellular pH of aggressive cancers was only modestly decreased. Inherently, the magnitude of intracellular pH decrease is a key determinant for cancer cell sensitivity to H2S. We demonstrated the utility of coupling GYY4137 with either simvastatin, known to inhibit monocarboxylate transporter 4 (MCT4, or metformin, to further boost glycolysis, in bringing about cell death for aggressive cancers. Simvastatin inhibiting lactate extrusion thence contained excess lactate induced by GYY4137 within intracellular compartment. In contrast, the combined exposure to both GYY4137 and metformin overwhelms cancer cells with lactate over-production exceeding its expulsion rate. Together, GYY4137 and simvastatin or metformin synergize to induce intracellular hyper-acidification-mediated cancer cell death.

  2. Methadone induces CAD degradation and AIF-mediated necrotic-like cell death in neuroblastoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez-Alvarez, Sergio; Iglesias-Guimarais, Victoria; Solesio, María E; Melero-Fernandez de Mera, Raquel María; Yuste, Víctor J; Galindo, María F; Jordán, Joaquín

    2011-04-01

    Methadone (d,l-methadone hydrochloride) is a full-opioid agonist, originally developed as a substitution for heroin or other opiates abusers. Nowadays methadone is also being applied as long-lasting analgesics in cancer, and it is proposed as a promising agent for leukemia therapy. Previously, we have demonstrated that high concentrations of methadone (0.5mM) induced necrotic-like cell death in SH-SY5Y cells. The pathway involved is caspase-independent but involves impairment of mitochondrial ATP synthesis and mitochondrial cytochrome c release. However, the downstream mitochondrial pathways remained unclear. Here, we studied the participation of apoptosis inducing factor (AIF) in methadone-induced cell death. Methadone resulted in a translocation of AIF from mitochondria to the nucleus. Translocation was inhibited by cyclosporine A, but not by lack of Bax protein. Therefore the effect seems mediated by the formation of the mitochondrial transition pore, but is apparently independent of Bax. Furthermore, methadone-treated SH-SY5Y nuclei show characteristics that are typical for stage I nuclear condensation. Methadone did not induce degradation of DNA into oligonucleosomal fragments or into high molecular weight DNA fragments. Absence of DNA fragmentation coincided with a considerable decrease in the levels of the caspase-actived endonuclase DNase and its chaperone-inhibitor ICAD. In conclusion, our results provide mechanistic insights into the molecular mechanisms that underlie methadone-induced cell death. This knowledge may prove useful to develop novel strategies to prevent toxic side-effects of methadone thereby sustaining its use as therapeutical agent against tumors. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Hypothesis: holiday sudden cardiac death: food and alcohol inhibition of SULT1A enzymes as a precipitant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eagle, Ken

    2012-10-01

    Sudden cardiac death is a significant health issue, causing millions of deaths worldwide annually. Studies have found that the likelihood of such death is higher in winter. Further studies identified that the highest likelihood occurs on Christmas Day and New Years Day, but not the interim period. Thanksgiving, Independence Day and the Islamic holiday Eid Al-Fitr also show significant increases in the rate of cardiac events or death. A number of mechanisms have been proposed, but none have satisfactorily explained the evidence. This article reviews the data supporting the existence of a holiday cardiac death phenomenon, the involvement of catecholamines and the normal modes of human catecholamine deactivation. Further evidence is reviewed that supports a hypothesized mechanism whereby critical SULT1A catecholamine deactivation enzymes can in some patients be inhibited by naturally-occurring phenols and polyphenols in foods and alcohols. If deactivation is inhibited by holiday consumption excesses, holiday stress or excitement could lead to a buildup of catecholamines that can cause fatal arrhythmias. Awareness of this mechanism could reduce deaths, both through doctor/patient education leading to a moderation in consumption and through the potential identification of patients with a predisposition to SULT1A inhibition. This hypothesis also raises parallels between sudden cardiac death in adults and Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS). The possible involvement of SULT1A inhibition in SIDS is discussed. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  4. Hypothesis Holiday sudden cardiac death: food and alcohol inhibition of SULT1A enzymes as a precipitant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eagle, Ken

    2012-01-01

    Sudden cardiac death is a significant health issue, causing millions of deaths worldwide annually. Studies have found that the likelihood of such death is higher in winter. Further studies identified that the highest likelihood occurs on Christmas Day and New Years Day, but not the interim period. Thanksgiving, Independence Day and the Islamic holiday Eid Al-Fitr also show significant increases in the rate of cardiac events or death. A number of mechanisms have been proposed, but none have satisfactorily explained the evidence. This article reviews the data supporting the existence of a holiday cardiac death phenomenon, the involvement of catecholamines and the normal modes of human catecholamine deactivation. Further evidence is reviewed that supports a hypothesized mechanism whereby critical SULT1A catecholamine deactivation enzymes can in some patients be inhibited by naturally-occurring phenols and polyphenols in foods and alcohols. If deactivation is inhibited by holiday consumption excesses, holiday stress or excitement could lead to a buildup of catecholamines that can cause fatal arrhythmias. Awareness of this mechanism could reduce deaths, both through doctor/patient education leading to a moderation in consumption and through the potential identification of patients with a predisposition to SULT1A inhibition. This hypothesis also raises parallels between sudden cardiac death in adults and Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS). The possible involvement of SULT1A inhibition in SIDS is discussed. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:22678655

  5. Can deaths in police cells be prevented? Experience from Norway and death rates in other countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aasebø, Willy; Orskaug, Gunnar; Erikssen, Jan

    2016-01-01

    To describe the changes in death rates and causes of deaths in Norwegian police cells during the last 2 decades. To review reports on death rates in police cells that have been published in medical journals and elsewhere, and discuss the difficulties of comparing death rates between countries. Data on deaths in Norwegian police cells were collected retrospectively in 2002 and 2012 for two time periods: 1993-2001 (period 1) and 2003-2012 (period 2). Several databases were searched to find reports on deaths in police cells from as many countries as possible. The death rates in Norwegian police cells reduced significantly from 0.83 deaths per year per million inhabitants (DYM) in period 1 to 0.22 DYM in period 2 (p police cells reduced by about 75% over a period of approximately 10 years. This is probably mainly due to individuals with severe alcohol intoxication no longer being placed in police cells. However, there remain large methodology difficulties in comparing deaths rates between countries. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd and Faculty of Forensic and Legal Medicine. All rights reserved.

  6. Levels of p21WAF1/CIP1 do not affect radiation-induced cell death in human breast epithelial cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Harold E.; Han, Sue J.; Waid, David; Lee, Yong J.; Kim, Hyeong-Reh Choi

    1997-01-01

    Purpose/Objective: Loss of the wild-type p53 activity and/or overexpression of the proto-oncogene bcl-2 are frequently detected in breast cancer and suggested to be related to resistance to chemotherapy and radiation therapy. The long-term goals of this study are to identify the downstream signaling molecules for anti-proliferative and apoptotic activities of p53 and to investigate the interaction of bcl-2 with p53 in human breast epithelial cells. We previously showed that overexpression of bcl-2 downregulates radiation-induced expression of p21 WAF1/CIP1 , a p53 downstream molecule that functions to inhibit cyclin dependent kinases, and suppresses radiation-induced apoptosis in human breast epithelial cell line (MCF10A). In this study, we investigated the role of p21 WAF1/CIP1 in radiation-induced cell death in MCF10A cells. Materials and Methods: To determine whether downregulation of p21 WAF1/CIP1 is required for anti-apoptotic activity of bcl-2, and to investigate the roles of p21 WAF1/CIP1 in cell death following irradiation, we transfected p21 WAF1/CIP1 expression vector into bcl-2 overexpressing MCF10A cells. The effects of p21 WAF1/CIP1 overexpression on cell growth, radiation-induced apoptosis and clonogenic cell survival were analyzed. Results: Overexpression of p21 WAF1/CIP1 resulted in marked growth inhibition, but no effect on dose-dependent radiation-induced cell lethality as determined by clonogenic survival assay. Radiation-induced apoptosis was not detected in bcl-2 overexpressing MCF10A cells independent of levels of p21 WAF1/CIP1 expression. Conclusion: This study suggests that bcl-2 downregulation of p21 WAF1/CIP1 is independent of anti-apoptotic activity of bcl-2 and that levels of p21 WAF1/CIP1 do not affect radiation-induced cell death in human breast epithelial cells

  7. Trifluoperazine-Induced Suicidal Erythrocyte Death and S-Nitrosylation Inhibition, Reversed by the Nitric Oxide Donor Sodium Nitroprusside

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehrdad Ghashghaeinia

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Background and Purpose: The high potency antipsychotic drug trifluoperazine (10-[3-(4-methyl-1-piperazinyl-propyl]-2-(trifluoromethyl-(10H-phenothiazine dihydrochloride; TFP may either counteract or promote suicidal cell death or apoptosis. Similar to apoptosis, erythrocytes may enter eryptosis, characterized by phosphatidylserine exposure at the cell surface and cell shrinkage. Eryptosis can be stimulated by an increase in cytoplasmic Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i and inhibited by nitric oxide (NO. We explored whether TFP treatment of erythrocytes induces phosphatidylserine exposure, cell shrinkage, and calcium influx, whether it impairs S-nitrosylation and whether these effects are inhibited by NO. Methods: Phosphatidylserine exposure at the cell surface was estimated from annexin-V-binding, cell volume from forward scatter, [Ca2+]i from Fluo3-fluorescence, and protein nitrosylation from fluorescence switch of the Bodipy-TMR/Sypro Ruby signal. Results: Exposure of human erythrocytes to TFP significantly enhanced the percentage of annexin-V-binding cells, raised [Ca2+]i, and decreased S-nitrosylation. The effect of TFP on annexin-V-binding was not affected by removal of extracellular Ca2+ alone, but was significantly inhibited by pre-treatment with sodium nitroprusside (SNP, an effect significantly augmented by additional removal of extracellular Ca2+. A 3 hours treatment with 0.1 µM Ca2+ ionophore ionomycin triggered annexin-V-binding and cell shrinkage, effects fully reversed by removal of extracellular Ca2+. Conclusions: TFP induces eryptosis and decreases protein S-nitrosylation, effects blunted by nitroprusside. The effect of nitroprusside is attenuated in the presence of extracellular Ca2+.

  8. Inhibition of cell proliferation and migration by oxidative stress from ascorbate-driven juglone redox cycling in human bladder-derived T24 cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kviecinski, M.R., E-mail: mrkviecinski@hotmail.com [Laboratorio de Bioquimica Experimental, Departamento de Bioquimica, Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina, Florianopolis (Brazil); Pedrosa, R.C., E-mail: rozangelapedrosa@gmail.com [Laboratorio de Bioquimica Experimental, Departamento de Bioquimica, Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina, Florianopolis (Brazil); Felipe, K.B., E-mail: kakabettega@yahoo.com.br [Laboratorio de Bioquimica Experimental, Departamento de Bioquimica, Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina, Florianopolis (Brazil); Farias, M.S., E-mail: mirellesfarias@hotmail.com [Laboratorio de Bioquimica Experimental, Departamento de Bioquimica, Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina, Florianopolis (Brazil); Glorieux, C., E-mail: christophe.glorieux@uclouvain.be [Toxicology and Cancer Biology Research Group, Louvain Drug Research Institute, Universite Catholique de Louvain, 73 Avenue E. Mounier, GTOX 7309, 1200 Brussels (Belgium); Valenzuela, M., E-mail: mavalenzuela@med.uchile.cl [Toxicology and Cancer Biology Research Group, Louvain Drug Research Institute, Universite Catholique de Louvain, 73 Avenue E. Mounier, GTOX 7309, 1200 Brussels (Belgium); Sid, B., E-mail: brice.sid@uclouvain.be [Toxicology and Cancer Biology Research Group, Louvain Drug Research Institute, Universite Catholique de Louvain, 73 Avenue E. Mounier, GTOX 7309, 1200 Brussels (Belgium); and others

    2012-05-04

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The cytotoxicity of juglone is markedly increased by ascorbate. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer T24 cell death by oxidative stress is necrosis-like. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Redox cycling by juglone/ascorbate inhibits cell proliferation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cellular migration is impaired by juglone/ascorbate. -- Abstract: The effects of juglone on T24 cells were assessed in the presence and absence of ascorbate. The EC{sub 50} value for juglone at 24 h decreased from 28.5 {mu}M to 6.3 {mu}M in the presence of ascorbate. In juglone-treated cells, ascorbate increased ROS formation (4-fold) and depleted GSH (65%). N-acetylcysteine or catalase restricted the juglone/ascorbate-mediated effects, highlighting the role of oxidative stress in juglone cytotoxicity. Juglone alone or associated with ascorbate did not cause caspase-3 activation or PARP cleavage, suggesting necrosis-like cell death. DNA damage and the mild ER stress caused by juglone were both enhanced by ascorbate. In cells treated with juglone (1-5 {mu}M), a concentration-dependent decrease in cell proliferation was observed. Ascorbate did not impair cell proliferation but its association with juglone led to a clonogenic death state. The motility of ascorbate-treated cells was not affected. Juglone slightly restricted motility, but cells lost their ability to migrate most noticeably when treated with juglone plus ascorbate. We postulate that juglone kills cells by a necrosis-like mechanism inhibiting cell proliferation and the motility of T24 cells. These effects are enhanced in the presence of ascorbate.

  9. WEE1 inhibition sensitizes osteosarcoma to radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    PosthumaDeBoer, Jantine; Würdinger, Thomas; Graat, Harm CA; Beusechem, Victor W van; Helder, Marco N; Royen, Barend J van; Kaspers, Gertjan JL

    2011-01-01

    The use of radiotherapy in osteosarcoma (OS) is controversial due to its radioresistance. OS patients currently treated with radiotherapy generally are inoperable, have painful skeletal metastases, refuse surgery or have undergone an intralesional resection of the primary tumor. After irradiation-induced DNA damage, OS cells sustain a prolonged G 2 cell cycle checkpoint arrest allowing DNA repair and evasion of cell death. Inhibition of WEE1 kinase leads to abrogation of the G 2 arrest and could sensitize OS cells to irradiation induced cell death. WEE1 expression in OS was investigated by gene-expression data analysis and immunohistochemistry of tumor samples. WEE1 expression in OS cell lines and human osteoblasts was investigated by Western blot. The effect of WEE1 inhibition on the radiosensitivity of OS cells was assessed by cell viability and caspase activation analyses after combination treatment. The presence of DNA damage was visualized using immunofluorescence microscopy. Cell cycle effects were investigated by flow cytometry and WEE1 kinase regulation was analyzed by Western blot. WEE1 expression is found in the majority of tested OS tissue samples. Small molecule drug PD0166285 inhibits WEE1 kinase activity. In the presence of WEE1-inhibitor, irradiated cells fail to repair their damaged DNA, and show higher levels of caspase activation. The inhibition of WEE1 effectively abrogates the irradiation-induced G 2 arrest in OS cells, forcing the cells into premature, catastrophic mitosis, thus enhancing cell death after irradiation treatment. We show that PD0166285, a small molecule WEE1 kinase inhibitor, can abrogate the G 2 checkpoint in OS cells, pushing them into mitotic catastrophe and thus sensitizing OS cells to irradiation-induced cell death. This suggests that WEE1 inhibition may be a promising strategy to enhance the radiotherapy effect in patients with OS

  10. Lysosomal cell death at a glance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aits, Sonja; Jaattela, Marja

    2013-01-01

    Lysosomes serve as the cellular recycling centre and are filled with numerous hydrolases that can degrade most cellular macromolecules. Lysosomal membrane permeabilization and the consequent leakage of the lysosomal content into the cytosol leads to so-called "lysosomal cell death". This form...... of cell death is mainly carried out by the lysosomal cathepsin proteases and can have necrotic, apoptotic or apoptosis-like features depending on the extent of the leakage and the cellular context. This article summarizes our current knowledge on lysosomal cell death with an emphasis on the upstream...... mechanisms that lead to lysosomal membrane permeabilization....

  11. Chloroquine, an Endocytosis Blocking Agent, Inhibits Zika Virus Infection in Different Cell Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delvecchio, Rodrigo; Higa, Luiza M; Pezzuto, Paula; Valadão, Ana Luiza; Garcez, Patrícia P; Monteiro, Fábio L; Loiola, Erick C; Dias, André A; Silva, Fábio J M; Aliota, Matthew T; Caine, Elizabeth A; Osorio, Jorge E; Bellio, Maria; O'Connor, David H; Rehen, Stevens; de Aguiar, Renato Santana; Savarino, Andrea; Campanati, Loraine; Tanuri, Amilcar

    2016-11-29

    Zika virus (ZIKV) infection in utero might lead to microcephaly and other congenital defects. Since no specific therapy is available thus far, there is an urgent need for the discovery of agents capable of inhibiting its viral replication and deleterious effects. Chloroquine is widely used as an antimalarial drug, anti-inflammatory agent, and it also shows antiviral activity against several viruses. Here we show that chloroquine exhibits antiviral activity against ZIKV in Vero cells, human brain microvascular endothelial cells, human neural stem cells, and mouse neurospheres. We demonstrate that chloroquine reduces the number of ZIKV-infected cells in vitro, and inhibits virus production and cell death promoted by ZIKV infection without cytotoxic effects. In addition, chloroquine treatment partially reveres morphological changes induced by ZIKV infection in mouse neurospheres.

  12. Chloroquine, an Endocytosis Blocking Agent, Inhibits Zika Virus Infection in Different Cell Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo Delvecchio

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Zika virus (ZIKV infection in utero might lead to microcephaly and other congenital defects. Since no specific therapy is available thus far, there is an urgent need for the discovery of agents capable of inhibiting its viral replication and deleterious effects. Chloroquine is widely used as an antimalarial drug, anti-inflammatory agent, and it also shows antiviral activity against several viruses. Here we show that chloroquine exhibits antiviral activity against ZIKV in Vero cells, human brain microvascular endothelial cells, human neural stem cells, and mouse neurospheres. We demonstrate that chloroquine reduces the number of ZIKV-infected cells in vitro, and inhibits virus production and cell death promoted by ZIKV infection without cytotoxic effects. In addition, chloroquine treatment partially reveres morphological changes induced by ZIKV infection in mouse neurospheres.

  13. Chloroquine, an Endocytosis Blocking Agent, Inhibits Zika Virus Infection in Different Cell Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delvecchio, Rodrigo; Higa, Luiza M.; Pezzuto, Paula; Valadão, Ana Luiza; Garcez, Patrícia P.; Monteiro, Fábio L.; Loiola, Erick C.; Dias, André A.; Silva, Fábio J. M.; Aliota, Matthew T.; Caine, Elizabeth A.; Osorio, Jorge E.; Bellio, Maria; O’Connor, David H.; Rehen, Stevens; de Aguiar, Renato Santana; Savarino, Andrea; Campanati, Loraine; Tanuri, Amilcar

    2016-01-01

    Zika virus (ZIKV) infection in utero might lead to microcephaly and other congenital defects. Since no specific therapy is available thus far, there is an urgent need for the discovery of agents capable of inhibiting its viral replication and deleterious effects. Chloroquine is widely used as an antimalarial drug, anti-inflammatory agent, and it also shows antiviral activity against several viruses. Here we show that chloroquine exhibits antiviral activity against ZIKV in Vero cells, human brain microvascular endothelial cells, human neural stem cells, and mouse neurospheres. We demonstrate that chloroquine reduces the number of ZIKV-infected cells in vitro, and inhibits virus production and cell death promoted by ZIKV infection without cytotoxic effects. In addition, chloroquine treatment partially reveres morphological changes induced by ZIKV infection in mouse neurospheres. PMID:27916837

  14. Understanding cell cycle and cell death regulation provides novel weapons against human diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiman, K G; Zhivotovsky, B

    2017-05-01

    Cell division, cell differentiation and cell death are the three principal physiological processes that regulate tissue homoeostasis in multicellular organisms. The growth and survival of cells as well as the integrity of the genome are regulated by a complex network of pathways, in which cell cycle checkpoints, DNA repair and programmed cell death have critical roles. Disruption of genomic integrity and impaired regulation of cell death may both lead to uncontrolled cell growth. Compromised cell death can also favour genomic instability. It is becoming increasingly clear that dysregulation of cell cycle and cell death processes plays an important role in the development of major disorders such as cancer, cardiovascular disease, infection, inflammation and neurodegenerative diseases. Research achievements in these fields have led to the development of novel approaches for treatment of various conditions associated with abnormalities in the regulation of cell cycle progression or cell death. A better understanding of how cellular life-and-death processes are regulated is essential for this development. To highlight these important advances, the Third Nobel Conference entitled 'The Cell Cycle and Cell Death in Disease' was organized at Karolinska Institutet in 2016. In this review we will summarize current understanding of cell cycle progression and cell death and discuss some of the recent advances in therapeutic applications in pathological conditions such as cancer, neurological disorders and inflammation. © 2017 The Association for the Publication of the Journal of Internal Medicine.

  15. FK866-induced NAMPT inhibition activates AMPK and downregulates mTOR signaling in hepatocarcinoma cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schuster, Susanne, E-mail: Susanne.Schuster@medizin.uni-leipzig.de [Center for Pediatric Research Leipzig, University Hospital for Children and Adolescents, Faculty of Medicine, University of Leipzig, Liebigstr. 21, 04103 Leipzig (Germany); Penke, Melanie; Gorski, Theresa [Center for Pediatric Research Leipzig, University Hospital for Children and Adolescents, Faculty of Medicine, University of Leipzig, Liebigstr. 21, 04103 Leipzig (Germany); Gebhardt, Rolf [Institute of Biochemistry, Faculty of Medicine, University of Leipzig, Johannisallee 30, 04103 Leipzig (Germany); Weiss, Thomas S. [Children' s University Hospital, University of Regensburg, Franz-Josef-Strauss-Allee 11, 93053 Regensburg (Germany); Kiess, Wieland; Garten, Antje [Center for Pediatric Research Leipzig, University Hospital for Children and Adolescents, Faculty of Medicine, University of Leipzig, Liebigstr. 21, 04103 Leipzig (Germany)

    2015-03-06

    Background: Nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase (NAMPT) is the key enzyme of the NAD salvage pathway starting from nicotinamide. Cancer cells have an increased demand for NAD due to their high proliferation and DNA repair rate. Consequently, NAMPT is considered as a putative target for anti-cancer therapies. There is evidence that AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) and mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) become dysregulated during the development of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Here, we investigated the effects of NAMPT inhibition by its specific inhibitor FK866 on the viability of hepatocarcinoma cells and analyzed the effects of FK866 on the nutrient sensor AMPK and mTOR complex1 (mTORC1) signaling. Results: FK866 markedly decreased NAMPT activity and NAD content in hepatocarcinoma cells (Huh7 cells, Hep3B cells) and led to delayed ATP reduction which was associated with increased cell death. These effects could be abrogated by administration of nicotinamide mononucleotide (NMN), the enzyme product of NAMPT. Our results demonstrated a dysregulation of the AMPK/mTOR pathway in hepatocarcinoma cells compared to non-cancerous hepatocytes with a higher expression of mTOR and a lower AMPKα activation in hepatocarcinoma cells. We found that NAMPT inhibition by FK866 significantly activated AMPKα and inhibited the activation of mTOR and its downstream targets p70S6 kinase and 4E-BP1 in hepatocarcinoma cells. Non-cancerous hepatocytes were less sensitive to FK866 and did not show changes in AMPK/mTOR signaling after FK866 treatment. Conclusion: Taken together, these findings reveal an important role of the NAMPT-mediated NAD salvage pathway in the energy homeostasis of hepatocarcinoma cells and suggest NAMPT inhibition as a potential treatment option for HCC. - Highlights: • FK866 increases cell death in p53-deficient hepatocarcinoma cells. • AMPK/mTOR signaling is dysregulated in hepatocarcinoma cells. • FK866-induced NAMPT inhibition activates AMPK

  16. FK866-induced NAMPT inhibition activates AMPK and downregulates mTOR signaling in hepatocarcinoma cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schuster, Susanne; Penke, Melanie; Gorski, Theresa; Gebhardt, Rolf; Weiss, Thomas S.; Kiess, Wieland; Garten, Antje

    2015-01-01

    Background: Nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase (NAMPT) is the key enzyme of the NAD salvage pathway starting from nicotinamide. Cancer cells have an increased demand for NAD due to their high proliferation and DNA repair rate. Consequently, NAMPT is considered as a putative target for anti-cancer therapies. There is evidence that AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) and mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) become dysregulated during the development of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Here, we investigated the effects of NAMPT inhibition by its specific inhibitor FK866 on the viability of hepatocarcinoma cells and analyzed the effects of FK866 on the nutrient sensor AMPK and mTOR complex1 (mTORC1) signaling. Results: FK866 markedly decreased NAMPT activity and NAD content in hepatocarcinoma cells (Huh7 cells, Hep3B cells) and led to delayed ATP reduction which was associated with increased cell death. These effects could be abrogated by administration of nicotinamide mononucleotide (NMN), the enzyme product of NAMPT. Our results demonstrated a dysregulation of the AMPK/mTOR pathway in hepatocarcinoma cells compared to non-cancerous hepatocytes with a higher expression of mTOR and a lower AMPKα activation in hepatocarcinoma cells. We found that NAMPT inhibition by FK866 significantly activated AMPKα and inhibited the activation of mTOR and its downstream targets p70S6 kinase and 4E-BP1 in hepatocarcinoma cells. Non-cancerous hepatocytes were less sensitive to FK866 and did not show changes in AMPK/mTOR signaling after FK866 treatment. Conclusion: Taken together, these findings reveal an important role of the NAMPT-mediated NAD salvage pathway in the energy homeostasis of hepatocarcinoma cells and suggest NAMPT inhibition as a potential treatment option for HCC. - Highlights: • FK866 increases cell death in p53-deficient hepatocarcinoma cells. • AMPK/mTOR signaling is dysregulated in hepatocarcinoma cells. • FK866-induced NAMPT inhibition activates AMPK

  17. (+)-Grandifloracin, an antiausterity agent, induces autophagic PANC-1 pancreatic cancer cell death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueda, Jun-ya; Athikomkulchai, Sirivan; Miyatake, Ryuta; Saiki, Ikuo; Esumi, Hiroyasu; Awale, Suresh

    2014-01-01

    Human pancreatic tumors are known to be highly resistant to nutrient starvation, and this prolongs their survival in the hypovascular (austere) tumor microenvironment. Agents that retard this tolerance to nutrient starvation represent a novel antiausterity strategy in anticancer drug discovery. (+)-Grandifloracin (GF), isolated from Uvaria dac, has shown preferential toxicity to PANC-1 human pancreatic cancer cells under nutrient starvation, with a PC50 value of 14.5 μM. However, the underlying mechanism is not clear. In this study, GF was found to preferentially induce PANC-1 cell death in a nutrient-deprived medium via hyperactivation of autophagy, as evidenced by a dramatic upregulation of microtubule-associated protein 1 light chain 3. No change was observed in expression of the caspase-3 and Bcl-2 apoptosis marker proteins. GF was also found to strongly inhibit the activation of Akt, a key regulator of cancer cell survival and proliferation. Because pancreatic tumors are highly resistant to current therapies that induce apoptosis, the alternative cell death mechanism exhibited by GF provides a novel therapeutic insight into antiausterity drug candidates.

  18. Antitumor agent 25-epi Ritterostatin GN1N induces endoplasmic reticulum stress and autophagy mediated cell death in melanoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riaz Ahmed, Kausar Begam; Kanduluru, Ananda Kumar; Feng, Li; Fuchs, Philip L; Huang, Peng

    2017-05-01

    Metastatic melanoma is the most aggressive of all skin cancers and is associated with poor prognosis owing to lack of effective treatments. 25-epi Ritterostatin GN1N is a novel antitumor agent with yet undefined mechanisms of action. We sought to delineate the antitumor mechanisms of 25-epi Ritterostatin GN1N in melanoma cells to determine the potential of this compound as a treatment for melanoma. Activation of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress protein glucose-regulated protein 78 (GRP78) has been associated with increased melanoma progression, oncogenic signaling, drug resistance, and suppression of cell death. We found that 25-epi Ritterostatin GN1N induced cell death in melanoma cells at nanomolar concentrations, and this cell death was characterized by inhibition of GRP78 expression, increased expression of the ER stress marker CHOP, loss of mitochondrial membrane potential, and lipidation of the autophagy marker protein LC3B. Importantly, normal melanocytes exhibited limited sensitivity to 25-epi Ritterostatin GN1N. Subsequent in vivo results demonstrated that 25-epi Ritterostatin GN1N reduced melanoma growth in mouse tumor xenografts and did not affect body weight, suggesting minimal toxicity. In summary, our findings indicate that 25-epi Ritterostatin GN1N causes ER stress and massive autophagy, leading to collapse of mitochondrial membrane potential and cell death in melanoma cells, with minimal effects in normal melanocytes. Thus, 25-epi Ritterostatin GN1N is a promising anticancer agent that warrants further investigation.

  19. Exploiting cannabinoid-induced cytotoxic autophagy to drive melanoma cell death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, Jane L; Hill, David S; McKee, Christopher S; Hernandez-Tiedra, Sonia; Lorente, Mar; Lopez-Valero, Israel; Eleni Anagnostou, Maria; Babatunde, Fiyinfoluwa; Corazzari, Marco; Redfern, Christopher P F; Velasco, Guillermo; Lovat, Penny E

    2015-06-01

    Although the global incidence of cutaneous melanoma is increasing, survival rates for patients with metastatic disease remain viability, and activation of apoptosis, whereas cotreatment with chloroquine or knockdown of Atg7, but not Beclin-1 or Ambra1, prevented THC-induced autophagy and cell death in vitro. Administration of Sativex-like (a laboratory preparation comprising equal amounts of THC and cannabidiol (CBD)) to mice bearing BRAF wild-type melanoma xenografts substantially inhibited melanoma viability, proliferation, and tumor growth paralleled by an increase in autophagy and apoptosis compared with standard single-agent temozolomide. Collectively, our findings suggest that THC activates noncanonical autophagy-mediated apoptosis of melanoma cells, suggesting that cytotoxic autophagy induction with Sativex warrants clinical evaluation for metastatic disease.

  20. Plant lectin can target receptors containing sialic acid, exemplified by podoplanin, to inhibit transformed cell growth and migration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jhon Alberto Ochoa-Alvarez

    Full Text Available Cancer is a leading cause of death of men and women worldwide. Tumor cell motility contributes to metastatic invasion that causes the vast majority of cancer deaths. Extracellular receptors modified by α2,3-sialic acids that promote this motility can serve as ideal chemotherapeutic targets. For example, the extracellular domain of the mucin receptor podoplanin (PDPN is highly O-glycosylated with α2,3-sialic acid linked to galactose. PDPN is activated by endogenous ligands to induce tumor cell motility and metastasis. Dietary lectins that target proteins containing α2,3-sialic acid inhibit tumor cell growth. However, anti-cancer lectins that have been examined thus far target receptors that have not been identified. We report here that a lectin from the seeds of Maackia amurensis (MASL with affinity for O-linked carbohydrate chains containing sialic acid targets PDPN to inhibit transformed cell growth and motility at nanomolar concentrations. Interestingly, the biological activity of this lectin survives gastrointestinal proteolysis and enters the cardiovascular system to inhibit melanoma cell growth, migration, and tumorigenesis. These studies demonstrate how lectins may be used to help develop dietary agents that target specific receptors to combat malignant cell growth.

  1. Glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase aggregation inhibitor peptide: A potential therapeutic strategy against oxidative stress-induced cell death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itakura, Masanori; Nakajima, Hidemitsu; Semi, Yuko; Higashida, Shusaku; Azuma, Yasu-Taka; Takeuchi, Tadayoshi

    2015-11-13

    The glycolytic enzyme glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) has multiple functions, including mediating oxidative stress-induced neuronal cell death. This process is associated with disulfide-bonded GAPDH aggregation. Some reports suggest a link between GAPDH and the pathogenesis of several oxidative stress-related diseases. However, the pathological significance of GAPDH aggregation in disease pathogenesis remains unclear due to the lack of an effective GAPDH aggregation inhibitor. In this study, we identified a GAPDH aggregation inhibitor (GAI) peptide and evaluated its biological profile. The decapeptide GAI specifically inhibited GAPDH aggregation in a concentration-dependent manner. Additionally, the GAI peptide did not affect GAPDH glycolytic activity or cell viability. The GAI peptide also exerted a protective effect against oxidative stress-induced cell death in SH-SY5Y cells. This peptide could potentially serve as a tool to investigate GAPDH aggregation-related neurodegenerative and neuropsychiatric disorders and as a possible therapy for diseases associated with oxidative stress-induced cell death. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Novel oxindole derivatives prevent oxidative stress-induced cell death in mouse hippocampal HT22 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirata, Yoko; Yamada, Chika; Ito, Yuki; Yamamoto, Shotaro; Nagase, Haruna; Oh-Hashi, Kentaro; Kiuchi, Kazutoshi; Suzuki, Hiromi; Sawada, Makoto; Furuta, Kyoji

    2018-03-15

    The current medical and surgical therapies for neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's disease and Parkinson's disease offer symptomatic relief but do not provide a cure. Thus, small synthetic compounds that protect neuronal cells from degeneration are critically needed to prevent and treat these. Oxidative stress has been implicated in various pathophysiological conditions, including neurodegenerative diseases. In a search for neuroprotective agents against oxidative stress using the murine hippocampal HT22 cell line, we found a novel oxindole compound, GIF-0726-r, which prevented oxidative stress-induced cell death, including glutamate-induced oxytosis and erastin-induced ferroptosis. This compound also exerted a protective effect on tunicamycin-induced ER stress to a lesser extent but had no effect on campthothecin-, etoposide- or staurosporine-induced apoptosis. In addition, GIF-0726-r was also found to be effective after the occurrence of oxidative stress. GIF-0726-r was capable of inhibiting reactive oxygen species accumulation and Ca 2+ influx, a presumed executor in cell death, and was capable of activating the antioxidant response element, which is a cis-acting regulatory element in promoter regions of several genes encoding phase II detoxification enzymes and antioxidant proteins. These results suggest that GIF-0726-r is a low-molecular-weight compound that prevents neuronal cell death through attenuation of oxidative stress. Among the more than 200 derivatives of the GIF-0726-r synthesized, we identified the 11 most potent activators of the antioxidant response element and characterized their neuroprotective activity in HT22 cells. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Cytoprotective effects of fisetin against hypoxia-induced cell death in PC12 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Pei-Yi; Ho, Yi-Ru; Wu, Ming-Jiuan; Huang, Shun-Ping; Chen, Po-Kong; Tai, Mi-Hsueh; Ho, Chi-Tang; Yen, Jui-Hung

    2015-01-01

    Fisetin (3,7,3',4'-tetrahydroxyflavone), a flavonol compound of flavonoids, exhibits a broad spectrum of biological activities including anti-oxidant, anti-inflammatory, anti-cancer and neuroprotective effects. The aim of this study is to investigate the cytoprotective effect of fisetin and the underlying molecular mechanism against hypoxia-induced cell death in PC12 cells. The results of this study showed that fisetin significantly restored the cell viability of PC12 cells under both cobalt chloride (CoCl₂)- and low oxygen-induced hypoxic conditions. Treatment with fisetin successfully reduced the CoCl₂-mediated reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, which was accompanied by an increase in the cell viability of PC12 cells. Furthermore, we found that treatment of PC12 cells with fisetin markedly upregulated hypoxia-inducible factor 1α (HIF-1α), its nuclear accumulation and the hypoxia-response element (HRE)-driven transcriptional activation. The fisetin-mediated cytoprotection during CoCl₂ exposure was significantly attenuated through the administration of HIF-1α siRNA. Moreover, we demonstrated that MAPK/ERK kinase 1/2 (MEK1/2), p38 MAPK and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3 K) inhibitors significantly blocked the increase in cell survival that was induced by fisetin treatment under hypoxic conditions. Consistently, increased phosphorylation of ERK, p38 and Akt proteins was observed in PC12 cells treated with fisetin. However, the fisetin-induced HRE-driven transcription was not affected by inhibition of these kinase signaling pathways. Current results reveal for the first time that fisetin promotes cell survival and protects against hypoxia-induced cell death through ROS scavenging and the activation of HIF1α-, MAPK/ERK-, p38 MAPK- and PI3 K/Akt-dependent signaling pathways in PC12 cells.

  4. Autophagy protein p62/SQSTM1 is involved in HAMLET-induced cell death by modulating apotosis in U87MG cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Y-B; Gong, J-L; Xing, T-Y; Zheng, S-P; Ding, W

    2013-03-21

    HAMLET is a complex of oleic acids and decalcified α-lactalbumin that was discovered to selectively kill tumor cells both in vitro and in vivo. Autophagy is an important cellular process involved in drug-induced cell death of glioma cells. We treated U87MG human glioma cells with HAMLET and found that the cell viability was significantly decreased and accompanied with the activation of autophagy. Interestingly, we observed an increase in p62/SQSTM1, an important substrate of autophagosome enzymes, at the protein level upon HAMLET treatment for short periods. To better understand the functionality of autophagy and p62/SQSTM1 in HAMLET-induced cell death, we modulated the level of autophagy or p62/SQSTM1 with biochemical or genetic methods. The results showed that inhibition of autophagy aggravated HAMLET-induced cell death, whereas activation of authophagy attenuated this process. Meanwhile, we found that overexpression of wild-type p62/SQSTM1 was able to activate caspase-8, and then promote HAMLET-induced apoptosis, whereas knockdown of p62/SQSTM1 manifested the opposite effect. We further demonstrated that the function of p62/SQSTM1 following HAMLET treatment required its C-terminus UBA domain. Our results indicated that in addition to being a marker of autophagy activation in HAMLET-treated glioma cells, p62/SQSTM1 could also function as an important mediator for the activation of caspase-8-dependent cell death.

  5. DNA fragmentation and cell death mediated by T cell antigen receptor/CD3 complex on a leukemia T cell line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, S; Maecker, H T; Levy, R

    1989-10-01

    An anti-T cell receptor (TcR) monoclonal antibody (mAb), LC4, directed against a human leukemic T cell line, SUP-T13, caused DNA fragmentation ("apoptosis") and cell death upon binding to this cell line. Cross-linking of receptor molecules was necessary for this effect since F(ab')2, but not Fab', fragments of LC4 could induce cell death. Five anti-CD3 mAb tested also caused apoptosis, but only when they were presented on a solid phase. Interestingly, soluble anti-CD3 mAb induced calcium flux and had an additive effect on the calcium flux and interleukin 2 receptor expression induced by LC4, but these anti-CD3 mAb reversed the growth inhibition and apoptosis caused by LC4. The calcium ionophore A23187, but not the protein kinase C activator phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA), also induced apoptosis, suggesting that protein kinase C activation alone does not cause apoptosis, although PMA is growth inhibitory. These results suggest that two distinct biological phenomena can accompany stimulation of the TcR/CD3 complex. In both cases, calcium flux and interleukin 2 receptor expression is induced, but only in one case is apoptosis and cell death seen. The signal initiating apoptosis can be selectively prevented by binding CD3 portion of the receptor in this cell line. This difference in signals mediated by the TcR/CD3 complex may be important in explaining the process of thymic selection, as well as in choosing anti-TcR mAb for therapeutic use.

  6. The control and execution of programmed cell death

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Begum, R.; Pathak, N.; Hasnain, S.E.; Sah, N.K.; Athar, M.

    1999-01-01

    Apoptosis or programmed cell death is a highly conserved genetically controlled response of metazoan cells to commit suicide. Non apoptotic programmed cell death seems to operate in single celled eukaryotes implying that evolution of PCD has preceded the evolution of multicellularity. PCD plays a crucial role in the regulation of cellular and tissue homeostasis and any aberrations in apoptosis leads to several diseases including cancer, neurodegenerative disorders and AIDS. The mechanisms by which apoptosis is controlled are varied. In some cells, members of bcl-2 family or p53 are crucial for regulating the apoptosis programme, whereas in other cells Fas ligand is more important. bcl-2 family members have a prime role in the regulation of cell death at all stages including development, whereas cell death during development is independent of p53. bcl-2 family members being localized on the outer mitochondrial membrane, control the mitochondrial homeostasis and cytochrome c redistribution and thereby regulate the cell death process. p53 promotes DNA damage mediated cell death after growth arrest and failed DNA repair. Caspases play a key role in the execution of cell death by mediating highly specific cleavages of crucial cellular proteins collectively manifesting the apoptotic phenotype. Protein inhibitors like crm A, p35 and IAPs could prevent/control apoptosis induced by a broad array of cell death stimuli by several mechanisms specially interfering in caspase activation or caspase activity. Among endonucleases, caspase activated DNase (CAD) plays a crucial role in DNA fragmentation, a biochemical hallmark of apoptosis. As regulation of cell death seems to be as complex as regulation of cell proliferation, multiple kinase mediated regulatory mechanisms might control the apoptotic process. Thus, in spite of intensive research over the past few years, the field of apoptosis still remains fertile to unravel among others, the molecular mechanisms of cytochrome c

  7. The control and execution of programmed cell death

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Begum, R.; Pathak, N.; Hasnain, S.E.; Sah, N.K. [National Inst. of Immunology, New Delhi (India). Eukaryotic Gene Expression Lab.; Taneja, T.K.; Mohan, M. [National Inst. of Immunology, New Delhi (India). Eukaryotic Gene Expression Lab.]|[Dept. of Medical Elementology and Toxicology, New Delhi (India); Athar, M. [Dept. of Medical Elementology and Toxicology, New Delhi (India)

    1999-07-01

    Apoptosis or programmed cell death is a highly conserved genetically controlled response of metazoan cells to commit suicide. Non apoptotic programmed cell death seems to operate in single celled eukaryotes implying that evolution of PCD has preceded the evolution of multicellularity. PCD plays a crucial role in the regulation of cellular and tissue homeostasis and any aberrations in apoptosis leads to several diseases including cancer, neurodegenerative disorders and AIDS. The mechanisms by which apoptosis is controlled are varied. In some cells, members of bcl-2 family or p53 are crucial for regulating the apoptosis programme, whereas in other cells Fas ligand is more important. bcl-2 family members have a prime role in the regulation of cell death at all stages including development, whereas cell death during development is independent of p53. bcl-2 family members being localized on the outer mitochondrial membrane, control the mitochondrial homeostasis and cytochrome c redistribution and thereby regulate the cell death process. p53 promotes DNA damage mediated cell death after growth arrest and failed DNA repair. Caspases play a key role in the execution of cell death by mediating highly specific cleavages of crucial cellular proteins collectivley manifesting the apoptotic phenotype. Protein inhibitors like crm A, p35 and IAPs could prevent/control apoptosis induced by a broad array of cell death stimuli by several mechanisms specially interfering in caspase activation or caspase activity. Among endonucleases, caspase activated DNase (CAD) plays a crucial role in DNA fragmentation, a biochemical hallmark of apoptosis. As regulation of cell death seems to be as complex as regulation of cell proliferation, multiple kinase mediated regulatory mechanisms might control the apoptotic process. Thus, in spite of intensive research over the past few years, the field of apoptosis still remains fertile to unravel among others, the molecular mechanisms of cytochrome c

  8. Salinomycin induces cell death and differentiation in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma stem cells despite activation of epithelial-mesenchymal transition and Akt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuo, Selena Z; Blair, Katherine J; Rahimy, Elham; Kiang, Alan; Abhold, Eric; Fan, Jian-Bing; Wang-Rodriguez, Jessica; Altuna, Xabier; Ongkeko, Weg M

    2012-01-01

    Cancer stem cells (CSC) are believed to play a crucial role in cancer recurrence due to their resistance to conventional chemotherapy and capacity for self-renewal. Recent studies have reported that salinomycin, a livestock antibiotic, selectively targets breast cancer stem cells 100-fold more effectively than paclitaxel. In our study we sought to determine the effects of salinomycin on head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) stem cells. MTS and TUNEL assays were used to study cell proliferation and apoptosis as a function of salinomycin exposure in JLO-1, a putative HNSCC stem cell culture. MTS and trypan blue dye exclusion assays were performed to investigate potential drug interactions between salinomycin and cisplatin or paclitaxel. Stem cell-like phenotype was measured by mRNA expression of stem cell markers, sphere-forming capacity, and matrigel invasion assays. Immunoblotting was also used to determine expression of epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) markers and Akt phosphorylation. Arrays by Illumina, Inc. were used to profile microRNA expression as a function of salinomycin dose. In putative HNSCC stem cells, salinomycin was found to significantly inhibit cell viability, induce a 71.5% increase in levels of apoptosis, elevate the Bax/Bcl-2 ratio, and work synergistically with cisplatin and paclitaxel in inducing cell death. It was observed that salinomycin significantly inhibited sphere forming-capability and repressed the expression of CD44 and BMI-1 by 3.2-fold and 6.2-fold, respectively. Furthermore, salinomycin reduced invasion of HNSCC stem cells by 2.1 fold. Contrary to expectations, salinomycin induced the expression of EMT markers Snail, vimentin, and Zeb-1, decreased expression of E-cadherin, and also induced phosphorylation of Akt and its downstream targets GSK3-β and mTOR. These results demonstrate that in HNSCC cancer stem cells, salinomycin can cause cell death and decrease stem cell properties despite activation of both EMT and

  9. Mitochondrial fission proteins regulate programmed cell death in yeast

    OpenAIRE

    Fannjiang, Yihru; Cheng, Wen-Chih; Lee, Sarah J.; Qi, Bing; Pevsner, Jonathan; McCaffery, J. Michael; Hill, R. Blake; Basañez, Gorka; Hardwick, J. Marie

    2004-01-01

    The possibility that single-cell organisms undergo programmed cell death has been questioned in part because they lack several key components of the mammalian cell death machinery. However, yeast encode a homolog of human Drp1, a mitochondrial fission protein that was shown previously to promote mammalian cell death and the excessive mitochondrial fragmentation characteristic of apoptotic mammalian cells. In support of a primordial origin of programmed cell death involving mitochondria, we fo...

  10. Retinal Cell Death Caused by Sodium Iodate Involves Multiple Caspase-Dependent and Caspase-Independent Cell-Death Pathways

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jasmin Balmer

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Herein, we have investigated retinal cell-death pathways in response to the retina toxin sodium iodate (NaIO3 both in vivo and in vitro. C57/BL6 mice were treated with a single intravenous injection of NaIO3 (35 mg/kg. Morphological changes in the retina post NaIO3 injection in comparison to untreated controls were assessed using electron microscopy. Cell death was determined by TdT-mediated dUTP-biotin nick end labeling (TUNEL staining. The activation of caspases and calpain was measured using immunohistochemistry. Additionally, cytotoxicity and apoptosis in retinal pigment epithelial (RPE cells, primary retinal cells, and the cone photoreceptor (PRC cell line 661W were assessed in vitro after NaIO3 treatment using the ApoToxGlo™ assay. The 7-AAD/Annexin-V staining was performed and necrostatin (Nec-1 was administered to the NaIO3-treated cells to confirm the results. In vivo, degenerating RPE cells displayed a rounded shape and retracted microvilli, whereas PRCs featured apoptotic nuclei. Caspase and calpain activity was significantly upregulated in retinal sections and protein samples from NaIO3-treated animals. In vitro, NaIO3 induced necrosis in RPE cells and apoptosis in PRCs. Furthermore, Nec-1 significantly decreased NaIO3-induced RPE cell death, but had no rescue effect on treated PRCs. In summary, several different cell-death pathways are activated in retinal cells as a result of NaIO3.

  11. Combination of aspartic acid and glutamic acid inhibits tumor cell proliferation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaguchi, Yoshie; Yamamoto, Katsunori; Sato, Yoshinori; Inoue, Shinjiro; Morinaga, Tetsuo; Hirano, Eiichi

    2016-01-01

    Placental extract contains several biologically active compounds, and pharmacological induction of placental extract has therapeutic effects, such as improving liver function in patients with hepatitis or cirrhosis. Here, we searched for novel molecules with an anti-tumor activity in placental extracts. Active molecules were separated by chromatographic analysis, and their antiproliferative activities were determined by a colorimetric assay. We identified aspartic acid and glutamic acid to possess the antiproliferative activity against human hepatoma cells. Furthermore, we showed that the combination of aspartic acid and glutamic acid exhibited enhanced antiproliferative activity, and inhibited Akt phosphorylation. We also examined in vivo tumor inhibition activity using the rabbit VX2 liver tumor model. The treatment mixture (emulsion of the amino acids with Lipiodol) administered by hepatic artery injection inhibited tumor cell growth of the rabbit VX2 liver. These results suggest that the combination of aspartic acid and glutamic acid may be useful for induction of tumor cell death, and has the potential for clinical use as a cancer therapeutic agent.

  12. Cell death induced by hydroxyapatite on L929 fibroblast cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inayat-Hussain, S H; Rajab, N F; Roslie, H; Hussin, A A; Ali, A M; Annuar, B O

    2004-05-01

    Biomaterials intended for end-use application as bone-graft substitutes have to undergo safety evaluation. In this study, we investigated the in vitro cytotoxic effects especially to determine the mode of death of two hydroxyapatite compounds (HA2, HA3) which were synthesized locally. The methods used for cytotoxicity was the standard MTT assay whereas AO/PI staining was performed to determine the mode of cell death in HA treated L929 fibroblasts. Our results demonstrated that both HA2 and HA3 were not significantly cytotoxic as more than 75% cells after 72 hours treatment were viable. Furthermore, we found that the major mode of cell death in HA treated cells was apoptosis. In conclusion, our results demonstrated that these hydroxyapatite compounds are not cytotoxic where the mode of death was primarily via apoptosis.

  13. Death Receptor-Induced Apoptosis Signalling Regulation by Ezrin Is Cell Type Dependent and Occurs in a DISC-Independent Manner in Colon Cancer Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iessi, Elisabetta; Zischler, Luciana; Etringer, Aurélie; Bergeret, Marion; Morlé, Aymeric; Jacquemin, Guillaume; Morizot, Alexandre; Shirley, Sarah; Lalaoui, Najoua; Elifio-Esposito, Selene L.; Fais, Stefano; Garrido, Carmen; Solary, Eric; Micheau, Olivier

    2015-01-01

    Ezrin belongs to the ERM (ezrin-radixin-moesin) protein family and has been demonstrated to regulate early steps of Fas receptor signalling in lymphoid cells, but its contribution to TRAIL-induced cell death regulation in adherent cancer cells remains unknown. In this study we report that regulation of FasL and TRAIL-induced cell death by ezrin is cell type dependant. Ezrin is a positive regulator of apoptosis in T-lymphoma cell line Jurkat, but a negative regulator in colon cancer cells. Using ezrin phosphorylation or actin-binding mutants, we provide evidence that negative regulation of death receptor-induced apoptosis by ezrin occurs in a cytoskeleton- and DISC-independent manner, in colon cancer cells. Remarkably, inhibition of apoptosis induced by these ligands was found to be tightly associated with regulation of ezrin phosphorylation on serine 66, the tumor suppressor gene WWOX and activation of PKA. Deficiency in WWOX expression in the liver cancer SK-HEP1 or the pancreatic Mia PaCa-2 cell lines as well as WWOX silencing or modulation of PKA activation by pharmacological regulators, in the colon cancer cell line SW480, abrogated regulation of TRAIL signalling by ezrin. Altogether our results show that death receptor pro-apoptotic signalling regulation by ezrin can occur downstream of the DISC in colon cancer cells. PMID:26010871

  14. Death Receptor-Induced Apoptosis Signalling Regulation by Ezrin Is Cell Type Dependent and Occurs in a DISC-Independent Manner in Colon Cancer Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisabetta Iessi

    Full Text Available Ezrin belongs to the ERM (ezrin-radixin-moesin protein family and has been demonstrated to regulate early steps of Fas receptor signalling in lymphoid cells, but its contribution to TRAIL-induced cell death regulation in adherent cancer cells remains unknown. In this study we report that regulation of FasL and TRAIL-induced cell death by ezrin is cell type dependant. Ezrin is a positive regulator of apoptosis in T-lymphoma cell line Jurkat, but a negative regulator in colon cancer cells. Using ezrin phosphorylation or actin-binding mutants, we provide evidence that negative regulation of death receptor-induced apoptosis by ezrin occurs in a cytoskeleton- and DISC-independent manner, in colon cancer cells. Remarkably, inhibition of apoptosis induced by these ligands was found to be tightly associated with regulation of ezrin phosphorylation on serine 66, the tumor suppressor gene WWOX and activation of PKA. Deficiency in WWOX expression in the liver cancer SK-HEP1 or the pancreatic Mia PaCa-2 cell lines as well as WWOX silencing or modulation of PKA activation by pharmacological regulators, in the colon cancer cell line SW480, abrogated regulation of TRAIL signalling by ezrin. Altogether our results show that death receptor pro-apoptotic signalling regulation by ezrin can occur downstream of the DISC in colon cancer cells.

  15. Novel histone deacetylase inhibitor CG200745 induces clonogenic cell death by modulating acetylation of p53 in cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Eun-Taex; Park, Moon-Taek; Choi, Bo-Hwa; Ro, Seonggu; Choi, Eun-Kyung; Jeong, Seong-Yun; Park, Heon Joo

    2012-04-01

    Histone deacetylase (HDAC) plays an important role in cancer onset and progression. Therefore, inhibition of HDAC offers potential as an effective cancer treatment regimen. CG200745, (E)-N(1)-(3-(dimethylamino)propyl)-N(8)-hydroxy-2-((naphthalene-1-loxy)methyl)oct-2-enediamide, is a novel HDAC inhibitor presently undergoing a phase I clinical trial. Enhancement of p53 acetylation by HDAC inhibitors induces cell cycle arrest, differentiation, and apoptosis in cancer cells. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the role of p53 acetylation in the cancer cell death caused by CG200745. CG200745-induced clonogenic cell death was 2-fold greater in RKO cells expressing wild-type p53 than in p53-deficient RC10.1 cells. CG200745 treatment was also cytotoxic to PC-3 human prostate cancer cells, which express wild-type p53. CG200745 increased acetylation of p53 lysine residues K320, K373, and K382. CG200745 induced the accumulation of p53, promoted p53-dependent transactivation, and enhanced the expression of MDM2 and p21(Waf1/Cip1) proteins, which are encoded by p53 target genes. An examination of CG200745 effects on p53 acetylation using cells transfected with various p53 mutants showed that cells expressing p53 K382R mutants were significantly resistant to CG200745-induced clonogenic cell death compared with wild-type p53 cells. Moreover, p53 transactivation in response to CG200745 was suppressed in all cells carrying mutant forms of p53, especially K382R. Taken together, these results suggest that acetylation of p53 at K382 plays an important role in CG200745-induced p53 transactivation and clonogenic cell death.

  16. Significance of apoptotic cell death after γ-irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, H.G.; Kim, I.H.; Ha, S.W.; Park, C.I.

    2003-01-01

    Full text: The objectives of this study are to investigate the significance of apoptotic death compared to total cell death after γ-ray irradiation in human Hand N cancer cell lines and to find out correlation between apoptosis and radiation sensitivity. Materials and Method: Head and neck cancer cell lines (PCI-1, PCI-13, and SNU-1066), leukemia cell line (CCRF-CEM), and fibroblast cell line (LM217) as a normal control were used for this study. Cells were irradiated using Cs-137 animal experiment irradiator. Total cell death was measured by clonogenic assay. Annexin-V staining was used to detect the fraction of apoptotic death. The resulting data was analyzed with two parameters, apoptotic index (AI) and apoptotic fraction(AF). AI is ratio of apoptotic cells to total cells, and AF is ration of apoptotic cell death to mutant frequencytion ex(Number of apoptotic cells) / (Number of total cells counted) AF = {(AI) / (1-survival fraction)} x 100 (%) Results. Surviving fraction at 2 Gy (SF2) were 0.741, 0.544, 0.313, 0.302, and 0.100 for PCI-1, PCI-13, SNU-1066, CCRF-CEM, and LM217 cell lines, respectively. Apoptosis was detected in all cell lines. Apoptotic index reached peak value at 72 hours after irradiation in head and neck cancer cell lines, and that was at 24 hours in CCRF-CEM and LM217. Total cell death increased exponentially with increasing radiation dose from 0 Gy to 8 Gy, but the change was minimal in apoptotic index (Fig. 1.). Apoptotic fractions at 2 Gy were 46%, 48%, 46%, 24%, and 19% and at 6 Gy were 20%, 33%, 35%, 17%, and 20% for PCI-1, PCI-13, SNU-1066, CCRF-CEM, and LM217, respectively. The radioresistant cell lines showed more higher apoptotic fraction at 2 Gy (Table 1.), but there was not such correlation at 6 Gy. Conclusion: All cell lines used in this study showed apoptosis after irradiation, but time course of apoptosis was different from that of leukemia cell line and normal fibroblast cell line. Reproductive cell death was more important

  17. mTOR inhibition sensitizes ONC201-induced anti-colorectal cancer cell activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Zhe-Zhu; Wang, Wei; Fang, Di-Long; Jin, Yong-Jun

    2016-09-30

    We here tested the anti-colorectal cancer (CRC) activity by a first-in-class small molecule TRAIL inducer ONC201. The potential effect of mTOR on ONC201's actions was also examined. ONC201 induced moderate cytotoxicity against CRC cell lines (HT-29, HCT-116 and DLD-1) and primary human CRC cells. Significantly, AZD-8055, a mTOR kinase inhibitor, sensitized ONC201-induced cytotoxicity in CRC cells. Meanwhile, ONC201-induced TRAIL/death receptor-5 (DR-5) expression, caspase-8 activation and CRC cell apoptosis were also potentiated with AZD-8055 co-treatment. Reversely, TRAIL sequestering antibody RIK-2 or the caspase-8 specific inhibitor z-IETD-fmk attenuated AZD-8055 plus ONC201-induced CRC cell death. Further, mTOR kinase-dead mutation (Asp-2338-Ala) or shRNA knockdown significantly sensitized ONC201's activity in CRC cells, leading to profound cell death and apoptosis. On the other hand, expression of a constitutively-active S6K1 (T389E) attenuated ONC201-induced CRC cell apoptosis. For the mechanism study, we showed that ONC201 blocked Akt, but only slightly inhibited mTOR in CRC cells. Co-treatment with AZD-8055 also concurrently blocked mTOR activation. These results suggest that mTOR could be a primary resistance factor of ONC201 in CRC cells. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Anticancer Effect of Ginger Extract against Pancreatic Cancer Cells Mainly through Reactive Oxygen Species-Mediated Autotic Cell Death

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akimoto, Miho; Iizuka, Mari; Kanematsu, Rie; Yoshida, Masato; Takenaga, Keizo

    2015-01-01

    The extract of ginger (Zingiber officinale Roscoe) and its major pungent components, [6]-shogaol and [6]-gingerol, have been shown to have an anti-proliferative effect on several tumor cell lines. However, the anticancer activity of the ginger extract in pancreatic cancer is poorly understood. Here, we demonstrate that the ethanol-extracted materials of ginger suppressed cell cycle progression and consequently induced the death of human pancreatic cancer cell lines, including Panc-1 cells. The underlying mechanism entailed autosis, a recently characterized form of cell death, but not apoptosis or necroptosis. The extract markedly increased the LC3-II/LC3-I ratio, decreased SQSTM1/p62 protein, and enhanced vacuolization of the cytoplasm in Panc-1 cells. It activated AMPK, a positive regulator of autophagy, and inhibited mTOR, a negative autophagic regulator. The autophagy inhibitors 3-methyladenine and chloroquine partially prevented cell death. Morphologically, however, focal membrane rupture, nuclear shrinkage, focal swelling of the perinuclear space and electron dense mitochondria, which are unique morphological features of autosis, were observed. The extract enhanced reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, and the antioxidant N-acetylcystein attenuated cell death. Our study revealed that daily intraperitoneal administration of the extract significantly prolonged survival (P = 0.0069) in a peritoneal dissemination model and suppressed tumor growth in an orthotopic model of pancreatic cancer (P < 0.01) without serious adverse effects. Although [6]-shogaol but not [6]-gingerol showed similar effects, chromatographic analyses suggested the presence of other constituent(s) as active substances. Together, these results show that ginger extract has potent anticancer activity against pancreatic cancer cells by inducing ROS-mediated autosis and warrants further investigation in order to develop an efficacious candidate drug. PMID:25961833

  19. Anticancer Effect of Ginger Extract against Pancreatic Cancer Cells Mainly through Reactive Oxygen Species-Mediated Autotic Cell Death.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miho Akimoto

    Full Text Available The extract of ginger (Zingiber officinale Roscoe and its major pungent components, [6]-shogaol and [6]-gingerol, have been shown to have an anti-proliferative effect on several tumor cell lines. However, the anticancer activity of the ginger extract in pancreatic cancer is poorly understood. Here, we demonstrate that the ethanol-extracted materials of ginger suppressed cell cycle progression and consequently induced the death of human pancreatic cancer cell lines, including Panc-1 cells. The underlying mechanism entailed autosis, a recently characterized form of cell death, but not apoptosis or necroptosis. The extract markedly increased the LC3-II/LC3-I ratio, decreased SQSTM1/p62 protein, and enhanced vacuolization of the cytoplasm in Panc-1 cells. It activated AMPK, a positive regulator of autophagy, and inhibited mTOR, a negative autophagic regulator. The autophagy inhibitors 3-methyladenine and chloroquine partially prevented cell death. Morphologically, however, focal membrane rupture, nuclear shrinkage, focal swelling of the perinuclear space and electron dense mitochondria, which are unique morphological features of autosis, were observed. The extract enhanced reactive oxygen species (ROS generation, and the antioxidant N-acetylcystein attenuated cell death. Our study revealed that daily intraperitoneal administration of the extract significantly prolonged survival (P = 0.0069 in a peritoneal dissemination model and suppressed tumor growth in an orthotopic model of pancreatic cancer (P < 0.01 without serious adverse effects. Although [6]-shogaol but not [6]-gingerol showed similar effects, chromatographic analyses suggested the presence of other constituent(s as active substances. Together, these results show that ginger extract has potent anticancer activity against pancreatic cancer cells by inducing ROS-mediated autosis and warrants further investigation in order to develop an efficacious candidate drug.

  20. Non-Cell Autonomous Influence of the Astrocyte System xc − on Hypoglycaemic Neuronal Cell Death

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicole A Jackman

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Despite longstanding evidence that hypoglycaemic neuronal injury is mediated by glutamate excitotoxicity, the cellular and molecular mechanisms involved remain incompletely defined. Here, we demonstrate that the excitotoxic neuronal death that follows GD (glucose deprivation is initiated by glutamate extruded from astrocytes via system xc −– – an amino acid transporter that imports L-cystine and exports L-glutamate. Specifically, we find that depriving mixed cortical cell cultures of glucose for up to 8 h injures neurons, but not astrocytes. Neuronal death is prevented by ionotropic glutamate receptor antagonism and is partially sensitive to tetanus toxin. Removal of amino acids during the deprivation period prevents – whereas addition of L-cystine restores – GD-induced neuronal death, implicating the cystine/glutamate antiporter, system xc−–. Indeed, drugs known to inhibit system xc −– ameliorate GD-induced neuronal death. Further, a dramatic reduction in neuronal death is observed in chimaeric cultures consisting of neurons derived from WT (wild-type mice plated on top of astrocytes derived from sut mice, which harbour a naturally occurring null mutation in the gene (Slc7a11 that encodes the substrate-specific light chain of system xc −– (xCT. Finally, enhancement of astrocytic system xc −– expression and function via IL-1β (interleukin-1β exposure potentiates hypoglycaemic neuronal death, the process of which is prevented by removal of L-cystine and/or addition of system xc −– inhibitors. Thus, under the conditions of GD, our studies demonstrate that astrocytes, via system xc −–, have a direct, non-cell autonomous effect on cortical neuron survival.

  1. SphK1 inhibitor II (SKI-II) inhibits acute myelogenous leukemia cell growth in vitro and in vivo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Li; Weng, Wei; Sun, Zhi-Xin; Fu, Xian-Jie; Ma, Jun; Zhuang, Wen-Fang

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies have identified sphingosine kinase 1 (SphK1) as a potential drug target for treatment of acute myeloid leukemia (AML). In the current study, we investigated the potential anti-leukemic activity of a novel and specific SphK1 inhibitor, SKI-II. We demonstrated that SKI-II inhibited growth and survival of human AML cell lines (HL-60 and U937 cells). SKI-II was more efficient than two known SphK1 inhibitors SK1-I and FTY720 in inhibiting AML cells. Meanwhile, it induced dramatic apoptosis in above AML cells, and the cytotoxicity by SKI-II was almost reversed by the general caspase inhibitor z-VAD-fmk. SKI-II treatment inhibited SphK1 activation, and concomitantly increased level of sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) precursor ceramide in AML cells. Conversely, exogenously-added S1P protected against SKI-II-induced cytotoxicity, while cell permeable short-chain ceramide (C6) aggravated SKI-II's lethality against AML cells. Notably, SKI-II induced potent apoptotic death in primary human AML cells, but was generally safe to the human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) isolated from healthy donors. In vivo, SKI-II administration suppressed growth of U937 leukemic xenograft tumors in severe combined immunodeficient (SCID) mice. These results suggest that SKI-II might be further investigated as a promising anti-AML agent. - Highlights: • SKI-II inhibits proliferation and survival of primary and transformed AML cells. • SKI-II induces apoptotic death of AML cells, but is safe to normal PBMCs. • SKI-II is more efficient than two known SphK1 inhibitors in inhibiting AML cells. • SKI-II inhibits SphK1 activity, while increasing ceramide production in AML cells. • SKI-II dose-dependently inhibits U937 xenograft growth in SCID mice

  2. SphK1 inhibitor II (SKI-II) inhibits acute myelogenous leukemia cell growth in vitro and in vivo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Li; Weng, Wei; Sun, Zhi-Xin; Fu, Xian-Jie; Ma, Jun, E-mail: majuntongrensh1@126.com; Zhuang, Wen-Fang, E-mail: wenfangzhuangmd@163.com

    2015-05-15

    Previous studies have identified sphingosine kinase 1 (SphK1) as a potential drug target for treatment of acute myeloid leukemia (AML). In the current study, we investigated the potential anti-leukemic activity of a novel and specific SphK1 inhibitor, SKI-II. We demonstrated that SKI-II inhibited growth and survival of human AML cell lines (HL-60 and U937 cells). SKI-II was more efficient than two known SphK1 inhibitors SK1-I and FTY720 in inhibiting AML cells. Meanwhile, it induced dramatic apoptosis in above AML cells, and the cytotoxicity by SKI-II was almost reversed by the general caspase inhibitor z-VAD-fmk. SKI-II treatment inhibited SphK1 activation, and concomitantly increased level of sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) precursor ceramide in AML cells. Conversely, exogenously-added S1P protected against SKI-II-induced cytotoxicity, while cell permeable short-chain ceramide (C6) aggravated SKI-II's lethality against AML cells. Notably, SKI-II induced potent apoptotic death in primary human AML cells, but was generally safe to the human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) isolated from healthy donors. In vivo, SKI-II administration suppressed growth of U937 leukemic xenograft tumors in severe combined immunodeficient (SCID) mice. These results suggest that SKI-II might be further investigated as a promising anti-AML agent. - Highlights: • SKI-II inhibits proliferation and survival of primary and transformed AML cells. • SKI-II induces apoptotic death of AML cells, but is safe to normal PBMCs. • SKI-II is more efficient than two known SphK1 inhibitors in inhibiting AML cells. • SKI-II inhibits SphK1 activity, while increasing ceramide production in AML cells. • SKI-II dose-dependently inhibits U937 xenograft growth in SCID mice.

  3. Edaravone protects osteoblastic cells from dexamethasone through inhibiting oxidative stress and mPTP opening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Wen-xiao; Zheng, Hai-ya; Lan, Jun

    2015-11-01

    Existing evidences have emphasized an important role of oxidative stress in dexamethasone (Dex)-induced osteoblastic cell damages. Here, we investigated the possible anti-Dex activity of edaravone in osteoblastic cells, and studied the underlying mechanisms. We showed that edaravone dose-dependently attenuated Dex-induced death and apoptosis of established human or murine osteoblastic cells. Further, Dex-mediated damages to primary murine osteoblasts were also alleviated by edaravone. In osteoblastic cells/osteoblasts, Dex induced significant oxidative stresses, tested by increased levels of reactive oxygen species and lipid peroxidation, which were remarkably inhibited by edaravone. Meanwhile, edaravone repressed Dex-induced mitochondrial permeability transition pore (mPTP) opening, or mitochondrial membrane potential reduction, in osteoblastic cells/osteoblasts. Significantly, edaravone-induced osteoblast-protective activity against Dex was alleviated with mPTP inhibition through cyclosporin A or cyclophilin-D siRNA. Together, we demonstrate that edaravone protects osteoblasts from Dex-induced damages probably through inhibiting oxidative stresses and following mPTP opening.

  4. TSA-induced cell death in prostate cancer cell lines is caspase-2 dependent and involves the PIDDosome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taghiyev, Agshin F; Guseva, Natalya V; Glover, Rebecca A; Rokhlin, Oskar W; Cohen, Michael B

    2006-09-01

    The histone deacetylase inhibitor Trichostatin A (TSA) has previously been found to induce caspase activity in the human prostate cancer cell lines DU145 and LNCaP. TSA treatment resulted in the release of cytochrome c and Smac/DIABLO from mitochondria in DU145, and activation of caspase-9 in both cell lines. We concluded that TSA mediated its effect via the mitochondrial pathway. The aim of the current study was to determine how TSA initiated the caspase cascade. The results revealed that caspase-2 plays an important role in TSA-induced apoptosis. Inhibition of caspase-2 by siRNA or expression of caspase-2dn substantially decreased caspase activity after TSA treatment in both cell lines, siRNA caspase-2 also inhibited TSA-induced cell death. Caspase-2 acts upstream of caspase-8 and -9 and mediates mitochondrial cytochrome c release. Coimmunoprecipitation experiments show that caspase-2 formed protein complexes with RADD/RAIDD and PIDD. Together, these data indicate that caspase-2 initiates caspase cascade after TSA treatment and involves the formation of the PIDDosome.

  5. Rewiring of an Epithelial Differentiation Factor, miR-203, to Inhibit Human Squamous Cell Carcinoma Metastasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathan Benaich

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Summary: Metastatic colonization of distant organs underpins the majority of human-cancer-related deaths, including deaths from head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC. We report that miR-203, a miRNA that triggers differentiation in multilayered epithelia, inhibits multiple postextravasation events during HNSCC lung metastasis. Inducible reactivation of miR-203 in already established lung metastases reduces the overall metastatic burden. Using an integrated approach, we reveal that miR-203 inhibits metastasis independently of its effects on differentiation. In vivo genetic reconstitution experiments show that miR-203 inhibits lung metastasis by suppressing the prometastatic activities of three factors involved in cytoskeletal dynamics (LASP1, extracellular matrix remodeling (SPARC, and cell metabolism (NUAK1. Expression of miR-203 and its downstream effectors correlates with HNSCC overall survival outcomes, indicating the therapeutic potential of targeting this signaling axis. : Benaich et al. have identified miR-203, a microRNA that triggers differentiation in multilayered epithelia, as an inhibitor of lung metastasis in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC cells. They show that miR-203 inhibits metastasis independently of its effects on differentiation. Rather, miR-203 suppresses the prometastatic activities of three factors involved in cytoskeletal dynamics (LASP1, extracellular matrix remodeling (SPARC, and cell metabolism (NUAK1. Expression of miR-203 and its downstream effectors correlates with survival in HNSCC patients.

  6. PARP activity and inhibition in fetal and adult oligodendrocyte precursor cells: Effect on cell survival and differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldassarro, Vito A; Marchesini, Alessandra; Giardino, Luciana; Calzà, Laura

    2017-07-01

    Poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) family members are ubiquitously expressed and play a key role in cellular processes, including DNA repair and cell death/survival balance. Accordingly, PARP inhibition is an emerging pharmacological strategy for cancer and neurodegenerative diseases. Consistent evidences support the critical involvement of PARP family members in cell differentiation and phenotype maturation. In this study we used an oligodendrocyte precursor cells (OPCs) enriched system derived from fetal and adult brain to investigate the role of PARP in OPCs proliferation, survival, and differentiation. The PARP inhibitors PJ34, TIQ-A and Olaparib were used as pharmacological tools. The main results of the study are: (i) PARP mRNA expression and PARP activity are much higher in fetal than in adult-derived OPCs; (ii) the culture treatment with PARP inhibitors is cytotoxic for OPCs derived from fetal, but not from adult, brain; (iii) PARP inhibition reduces cell number, according to the inhibitory potency of the compounds; (iv) PARP inhibition effect on fetal OPCs is a slow process; (v) PARP inhibition impairs OPCs maturation into myelinating OL in fetal, but not in adult cultures, according to the inhibitory potency of the compounds. These results have implications for PARP-inhibition therapies for diseases and lesions of the central nervous system, in particular for neonatal hypoxic/ischemic encephalopathy. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Molecular control of brain size: Regulators of neural stem cell life, death and beyond

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joseph, Bertrand; Hermanson, Ola

    2010-01-01

    The proper development of the brain and other organs depends on multiple parameters, including strictly controlled expansion of specific progenitor pools. The regulation of such expansion events includes enzymatic activities that govern the correct number of specific cells to be generated via an orchestrated control of cell proliferation, cell cycle exit, differentiation, cell death etc. Certain proteins in turn exert direct control of these enzymatic activities and thus progenitor pool expansion and organ size. The members of the Cip/Kip family (p21Cip1/p27Kip1/p57Kip2) are well-known regulators of cell cycle exit that interact with and inhibit the activity of cyclin-CDK complexes, whereas members of the p53/p63/p73 family are traditionally associated with regulation of cell death. It has however become clear that the roles for these proteins are not as clear-cut as initially thought. In this review, we discuss the roles for proteins of the Cip/Kip and p53/p63/p73 families in the regulation of cell cycle control, differentiation, and death of neural stem cells. We suggest that these proteins act as molecular interfaces, or 'pilots', to assure the correct assembly of protein complexes with enzymatic activities at the right place at the right time, thereby regulating essential decisions in multiple cellular events.

  8. Molecular control of brain size: Regulators of neural stem cell life, death and beyond

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joseph, Bertrand [Department of Oncology-Pathology, Cancer Centrum Karolinska (CCK), Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm (Sweden); Hermanson, Ola, E-mail: ola.hermanson@ki.se [Linnaeus Center in Developmental Biology for Regenerative Medicine (DBRM), Department of Neuroscience, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2010-05-01

    The proper development of the brain and other organs depends on multiple parameters, including strictly controlled expansion of specific progenitor pools. The regulation of such expansion events includes enzymatic activities that govern the correct number of specific cells to be generated via an orchestrated control of cell proliferation, cell cycle exit, differentiation, cell death etc. Certain proteins in turn exert direct control of these enzymatic activities and thus progenitor pool expansion and organ size. The members of the Cip/Kip family (p21Cip1/p27Kip1/p57Kip2) are well-known regulators of cell cycle exit that interact with and inhibit the activity of cyclin-CDK complexes, whereas members of the p53/p63/p73 family are traditionally associated with regulation of cell death. It has however become clear that the roles for these proteins are not as clear-cut as initially thought. In this review, we discuss the roles for proteins of the Cip/Kip and p53/p63/p73 families in the regulation of cell cycle control, differentiation, and death of neural stem cells. We suggest that these proteins act as molecular interfaces, or 'pilots', to assure the correct assembly of protein complexes with enzymatic activities at the right place at the right time, thereby regulating essential decisions in multiple cellular events.

  9. The slow cell death response when screening chemotherapeutic agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blois, Joseph; Smith, Adam; Josephson, Lee

    2011-09-01

    To examine the correlation between cell death and a common surrogate of death used in screening assays, we compared cell death responses to those obtained with the sulforhodamine B (SRB) cell protein-based "cytotoxicity" assay. With the SRB assay, the Hill equation was used to obtain an IC50 and final cell mass, or cell mass present at infinite agent concentrations, with eight adherent cell lines and four agents (32 agent/cell combinations). Cells were treated with high agent concentrations (well above the SRB IC50) and the death response determined as the time-dependent decrease in cells failing to bind both annexin V and vital fluorochromes by flow cytometry. Death kinetics were categorized as fast (5/32) (similar to the reference nonadherent Jurkat line), slow (17/32), or none (10/32), despite positive responses in the SRB assay in all cases. With slow cell death, a single exposure to a chemotherapeutic agent caused a slow, progressive increase in dead (necrotic) and dying (apoptotic) cells for at least 72 h. Cell death (defined by annexin and/or fluorochrome binding) did not correlate with the standard SRB "cytotoxicity" assay. With the slow cell death response, a single exposure to an agent caused a slow conversion from vital to apoptotic and necrotic cells over at least 72 h (the longest time point examined). Here, increasing the time of exposure to agent concentrations modestly above the SRB IC50 provides a method of maximizing cell kill. If tumors respond similarly, sustained low doses of chemotherapeutic agents, rather than a log-kill, maximum tolerated dose strategy may be an optimal strategy of maximizing tumor cell death.

  10. Ionizing radiation-induced cell death

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szumiel, I.

    1994-01-01

    Selected aspects of radiation-induced cell death, connected with signal transduction pathways are reviewed. Cell death is defined as insufficiency of the cellular signal transducing system to maintain the cell's physiological functions. The insufficiency may be due to impaired signal reception and/or transduction, lack or erroneous transcription activation, and eventual cellular ''misexpression'' of the signal. The molecular basis of this insufficiency would be damage to genomic (but also other cellular) structures and closing of specific signalling pathways or opening of others (like those leading to apoptosis). I describe experimental data that suggest an important role of RAS/NFI and p53/p105 Rb proteins in cell cycle control-coupled responses to DNA damage. (Author)

  11. Violacein induces death of resistant leukaemia cells via kinome reprogramming, endoplasmic reticulum stress and Golgi apparatus collapse.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karla C S Queiroz

    Full Text Available It is now generally recognised that different modes of programmed cell death (PCD are intimately linked to the cancerous process. However, the mechanism of PCD involved in cancer chemoprevention is much less clear and may be different between types of chemopreventive agents and tumour cell types involved. Therefore, from a pharmacological view, it is crucial during the earlier steps of drug development to define the cellular specificity of the candidate as well as its capacity to bypass dysfunctional tumoral signalling pathways providing insensitivity to death stimuli. Studying the cytotoxic effects of violacein, an antibiotic dihydro-indolone synthesised by an Amazon river Chromobacterium, we observed that death induced in CD34(+/c-Kit(+/P-glycoprotein(+/MRP1(+ TF1 leukaemia progenitor cells is not mediated by apoptosis and/or autophagy, since biomarkers of both types of cell death were not significantly affected by this compound. To clarify the working mechanism of violacein, we performed kinome profiling using peptide arrays to yield comprehensive descriptions of cellular kinase activities. Pro-death activity of violacein is actually carried out by inhibition of calpain and DAPK1 and activation of PKA, AKT and PDK, followed by structural changes caused by endoplasmic reticulum stress and Golgi apparatus collapse, leading to cellular demise. Our results demonstrate that violacein induces kinome reprogramming, overcoming death signaling dysfunctions of intrinsically resistant human leukaemia cells.

  12. The dual mTORC1 and mTORC2 inhibitor AZD8055 inhibits head and neck squamous cell carcinoma cell growth in vivo and in vitro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Qiang; Song, Xin-mao; Ji, Yang-yang; Jiang, Hui; Xu, Lin-gen, E-mail: drlingenxu@126.com

    2013-11-01

    Highlights: •AZD8055 induces significant cytotoxic effects in cultured HNSCC cells. •AZD8055 blocks mTORC1 and mTORC2 activation in cultured HNSCC cells. •JNK activation is required for AZD8055-induced HNSCC cell death. •AZD8055 inhibits Hep-2 cell growth in vivo, and was more efficient than rapamycin. -- Abstract: The serine/threonine kinase mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) promotes cell survival and proliferation, and is constitutively activated in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). Thus mTOR is an important target for drug development in this disease. Here we tested the anti-tumor ability of AZD8055, the novel mTOR inhibitor, in HNSCC cells. AZD8055 induced dramatic cell death of HNSCC lines (Hep-2 and SCC-9) through autophagy. AZD8055 blocked both mTOR complex (mTORC) 1 and mTORC2 activation without affecting Erk in cultured HNSCC cells. Meanwhile, AZD8055 induced significant c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) activation, which was also required for cancer cell death. JNK inhibition by its inhibitors (SP 600125 and JNK-IN-8), or by RNA interference (RNAi) alleviated AZD8055-induced cell death. Finally, AZD8055 markedly increased the survival of Hep-2 transplanted mice through a significant reduction of tumor growth, without apparent toxicity, and its anti-tumor ability was more potent than rapamycin. Meanwhile, AZD8055 administration activated JNK while blocking mTORC1/2 in Hep-2 tumor engrafts. Our current results strongly suggest that AZD8055 may be further investigated for HNSCC treatment in clinical trials.

  13. TRAIL enhances paracetamol-induced liver sinusoidal endothelial cell death in a Bim- and Bid-dependent manner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badmann, A; Langsch, S; Keogh, A; Brunner, T; Kaufmann, T; Corazza, N

    2012-01-01

    Paracetamol (acetaminophen, APAP) is a universally used analgesic and antipyretic agent. Considered safe at therapeutic doses, overdoses cause acute liver damage characterized by centrilobular hepatic necrosis. One of the major clinical problems of paracetamol-induced liver disease is the development of hemorrhagic alterations. Although hepatocytes represent the main target of the cytotoxic effect of paracetamol overdose, perturbations within the endothelium involving morphological changes of liver sinusoidal endothelial cells (LSECs) have also been described in paracetamol-induced liver disease. Recently, we have shown that paracetamol-induced liver damage is synergistically enhanced by the TRAIL signaling pathway. As LSECs are constantly exposed to activated immune cells expressing death ligands, including TRAIL, we investigated the effect of TRAIL on paracetamol-induced LSEC death. We here demonstrate for the first time that TRAIL strongly enhances paracetamol-mediated LSEC death with typical features of apoptosis. Inhibition of caspases using specific inhibitors resulted in a strong reduction of cell death. TRAIL appears to enhance paracetamol-induced LSEC death via the activation of the pro-apoptotic BH3-only proteins Bid and Bim, which initiate the mitochondrial apoptotic pathway. Taken together this study shows that the liver endothelial layer, mainly LSECs, represent a direct target of the cytotoxic effect of paracetamol and that activation of TRAIL receptor synergistically enhances paracetamol-induced LSEC death via the mitochondrial apoptotic pathway. TRAIL-mediated acceleration of paracetamol-induced cell death may thus contribute to the pathogenesis of paracetamol-induced liver damage. PMID:23254290

  14. Induction of Cell Death through Alteration of Oxidants and Antioxidants in Epithelial Cells Exposed to High Energy Protons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramesh, Govindarajan; Wu, Honglu

    2012-01-01

    Radiation affects several cellular and molecular processes including double strand breakage, modifications of sugar moieties and bases. In outer space, protons are the primary radiation source which poses a range of potential health risks to astronauts. On the other hand, the use of proton radiation for tumor radiation therapy is increasing as it largely spares healthy tissues while killing tumor tissues. Although radiation related research has been conducted extensively, the molecular toxicology and cellular mechanisms affected by proton radiation remain poorly understood. Therefore, in the present study, we irradiated rat epithelial cells (LE) with different doses of protons and investigated their effects on cell proliferation and cell death. Our data showed an inhibition of cell proliferation in proton irradiated cells with a significant dose dependent activation and repression of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and antioxidants, glutathione and superoxide dismutase respectively as compared to control cells. In addition, apoptotic related genes such as caspase-3 and -8 activities were induced in a dose dependent manner with corresponding increased levels of DNA fragmentation in proton irradiated cells than control cells. Together, our results show that proton radiation alters oxidant and antioxidant levels in the cells to activate apoptotic pathway for cell death.

  15. Autophagy plays an important role in Sunitinib-mediated cell death in H9c2 cardiac muscle cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao Yuqin; Xue Tao; Yang Xiaochun; Zhu Hong; Ding Xiaofei; Lou Liming; Lu Wei; Yang Bo; He Qiaojun

    2010-01-01

    Sunitinib, which is a multitargeted tyrosine-kinase inhibitor, exhibits antiangiogenic and antitumor activity, and extends survival of patients with metastatic renal-cell carcinoma (mRCC) and gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST). This molecule has also been reported to be associated with cardiotoxicity at a high frequency, but the mechanism is still unknown. In the present study, we observed that Sunitinib showed high anti-proliferative effect on H9c2 cardiac muscle cells measured by PI staining and the MTT assay. But apoptotic markers (PARP cleavage, caspase 3 cleavage and chromatin condensation) were uniformly negative in H9c2 cells after Sunitinib treatment for 48 h, indicating that another cell death pathway may be involved in Sunitinib-induced cardiotoxicity. Here we found Sunitinib dramatically increased autophagic flux in H9c2 cells. Acidic vesicle fluorescence and high expression of LC3-II in H9c2 cells identified autophagy as a Sunitinib-induced process that might be associated with cytotoxicity. Furthermore, knocking down Beclin 1 by RNA-interference to block autophagy in H9c2 cells revealed that the death rate was decreased when treated with Sunitinib in comparison to control cells. These results confirmed that autophagy plays an important role in Sunitinib-mediated H9c2 cells cytotoxicity. Taken together, the data presented here strongly suggest that autophagy is associated with Sunitinib-induced cardiotoxicity, and that inhibition of autophagy constitutes a viable strategy for reducing Sunitinib-induced cardiomyocyte death thereby alleviating Sunitinib cardiotoxicity.

  16. Seizure-like activity leads to the release of BAD from 14-3-3 protein and cell death in hippocampal neurons in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meller, R; Schindler, C K; Chu, X P; Xiong, Z G; Cameron, J A; Simon, R P; Henshall, D C

    2003-05-01

    Seizure-induced neuronal death may involve engagement of the BCL-2 family of apoptosis-regulating proteins. In the present study we examined the activation of proapoptotic BAD in cultured hippocampal neurons following seizures induced by removal of chronic glutamatergic transmission blockade. Kynurenic acid withdrawal elicited an increase in seizure-like electrical activity, which was inhibited by blockers of AMPA (CNQX) and NMDA (MK801 and AP5) receptor function. However, only NMDA receptor antagonists inhibited calcium entry as assessed by fura-2, and cell death of hippocampal neurons. Seizures increased proteolysis of caspase-3 and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labelling (TUNEL) of cells. Seizure-like activity induced dephosphorylation of BAD and the disruption of its constitutive interaction with 14-3-3 proteins. In turn, BAD dimerized with antiapoptotic BCL-Xl after seizures. However, the absence of neuroprotective effects of pathway intervention suggests that BAD may perform a reinforcement rather than instigator role in cell death following seizures in vitro.

  17. Cell death in Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Webb, J.S.; Thompson, L.S.; James, S.

    2003-01-01

    Bacteria growing in biofilms often develop multicellular, three-dimensional structures known as microcolonies. Complex differentiation within biofilms of Pseudomonas aeruginosa occurs, leading to the creation of voids inside microcolonies and to the dispersal of cells from within these voids....... However, key developmental processes regulating these events are poorly understood. A normal component of multicellular development is cell death. Here we report that a repeatable pattern of cell death and lysis occurs in biofilms of P. aeruginosa during the normal course of development. Cell death...... occurred with temporal and spatial organization within biofilms, inside microcolonies, when the biofilms were allowed to develop in continuous-culture flow cells. A subpopulation of viable cells was always observed in these regions. During the onset of biofilm killing and during biofilm development...

  18. The anti-cell death FNK protein protects cells from death induced by freezing and thawing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sudo, Kentaro; Asoh, Sadamitsu; Ohsawa, Ikuroh; Ozaki, Daiya; Yamagata, Kumi; Ito, Hiromoto; Ohta, Shigeo