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Sample records for inhibit strongly stimulating

  1. Aloin Inhibits Interleukin (IL)-1β-Stimulated IL-8 Production in KB Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Na, Hee Sam; Song, Yu Ri; Kim, Seyeon; Heo, Jun-Young; Chung, Hae-Young; Chung, Jin

    2016-06-01

    Interleukin (IL)-1β, which is elevated in oral diseases including gingivitis, stimulates epithelial cells to produce IL-8 and perpetuate inflammatory responses. This study investigates stimulatory effects of salivary IL-1β in IL-8 production and determines if aloin inhibits IL-1β-stimulated IL-8 production in epithelial cells. Saliva was collected from volunteers to determine IL-1β and IL-8 levels. Samples from volunteers were divided into two groups: those with low and those with high IL-1β levels. KB cells were stimulated with IL-1β or saliva with or without IL-1 receptor agonist or specific mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) inhibitors. IL-8 production was measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). MAPK protein expression involved in IL-1β-induced IL-8 secretion was detected by Western blot. KB cells were pretreated with aloin, and its effect on IL-1β-induced IL-8 production was examined by ELISA and Western blot analysis. Saliva with high IL-1β strongly stimulated IL-8 production in KB cells, and IL-1 receptor agonist significantly inhibited IL-8 production. Low IL-1β-containing saliva did not increase IL-8 production. IL-1β treatment of KB cells induced activation of MAPK signaling molecules as well as nuclear factor-kappa B. IL-1β-induced IL-8 production was decreased by p38 and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) inhibitor treatment. Aloin pretreatment inhibited IL-1β-induced IL-8 production in a dose-dependent manner and inhibited activation of the p38 and ERK signaling pathway. Finally, aloin pretreatment also inhibited saliva-induced IL-8 production. Results indicated that IL-1β in saliva stimulates epithelial cells to produce IL-8 and that aloin effectively inhibits salivary IL-1β-induced IL-8 production by mitigating the p38 and ERK pathway. Therefore, aloin may be a good candidate for modulating oral inflammatory diseases.

  2. ATF3 inhibits PPARγ-stimulated transactivation in adipocyte cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jang, Min-Kyung; Jung, Myeong Ho, E-mail: jung0603@pusan.ac.kr

    2015-01-02

    Highlights: • ATF3 inhibits PPARγ-stimulated transcriptional activation. • ATF3 interacts with PPARγ. • ATF3 suppresses p300-mediated transcriptional coactivation. • ATF3 decreases the binding of PPARγ and recruitment of p300 to PPRE. - Abstract: Previously, we reported that activating transcription factor 3 (ATF3) downregulates peroxisome proliferator activated receptor (PPARγ) gene expression and inhibits adipocyte differentiation in 3T3-L1 cells. Here, we investigated another role of ATF3 on the regulation of PPARγ activity. ATF3 inhibited PPARγ-stimulated transactivation of PPARγ responsive element (PPRE)-containing reporter or GAL4/PPARγ chimeric reporter. Thus, ATF3 effectively repressed rosiglitazone-stimulated expression of adipocyte fatty acid binding protein (aP2), PPARγ target gene, in 3T3-L1 cells. Coimmunoprecipitation and GST pulldown assay demonstrated that ATF3 interacted with PPARγ. Accordingly, ATF3 prevented PPARγ from binding to PPRE on the aP2 promoter. Furthermore, ATF3 suppressed p300-mediated transcriptional coactivation of PPRE-containing reporter. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assay showed that overexpression of ATF3 blocked both binding of PPARγ and recruitment of p300 to PPRE on aP2 promoter induced by rosiglitazone treatment in 3T3-L1 cells. Taken together, these results suggest that ATF3 interacts with PPARγ and represses PPARγ-mediated transactivation through suppression of p300-stimulated coactivation in 3T3-L1 cells, which may play a role in inhibition of adipocyte differentiation.

  3. Epidermal growth factor (EGF) inhibits stimulated thyroid hormone secretion in the mouse

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahren, B.

    1987-01-01

    It is known that epidermal growth factor (EGF) inhibits iodide uptake in the thyroid follicular cells and lowers plasma levels of thyroid hormones upon infusion into sheep and ewes. In this study, the effects of EGF on basal and stimulated thyroid hormone secretion were investigated in the mouse. Mice were pretreated with 125 I and thyroxine; the subsequent release of 125 I is an estimation of thyroid hormone secretion. It was found that basal radioiodine secretion was not altered by intravenous injection of EGF (5 micrograms/animal). However, the radioiodine secretion stimulated by both TSH (120 microU/animal) and vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP; 5 micrograms/animal) were inhibited by EGF (5 micrograms/animal). At a lower dose level (0.5 microgram/animal), EGF had no influence on stimulated radioiodine secretion. In conclusion, EGF inhibits stimulated thyroid hormone secretion in the mouse

  4. Is transcranial direct current stimulation a potential method for improving response inhibition?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Yong Hyun; Kwon, Jung Won

    2013-04-15

    Inhibitory control of movement in motor learning requires the ability to suppress an inappropriate action, a skill needed to stop a planned or ongoing motor response in response to changes in a variety of environments. This study used a stop-signal task to determine whether transcranial direct-current stimulation over the pre-supplementary motor area alters the reaction time in motor inhibition. Forty healthy subjects were recruited for this study and were randomly assigned to either the transcranial direct-current stimulation condition or a sham-transcranial direct-current stimulation condition. All subjects consecutively performed the stop-signal task before, during, and after the delivery of anodal transcranial direct-current stimulation over the pre-supplementary motor area (pre-transcranial direct-current stimulation phase, transcranial direct-current stimulation phase, and post-transcranial direct-current stimulation phase). Compared to the sham condition, there were significant reductions in the stop-signal processing times during and after transcranial direct-current stimulation, and change times were significantly greater in the transcranial direct-current stimulation condition. There was no significant change in go processing-times during or after transcranial direct-current stimulation in either condition. Anodal transcranial direct-current stimulation was feasibly coupled to an interactive improvement in inhibitory control. This coupling led to a decrease in the stop-signal process time required for the appropriate responses between motor execution and inhibition. However, there was no transcranial direct-current stimulation effect on the no-signal reaction time during the stop-signal task. Transcranial direct-current stimulation can adjust certain behaviors, and it could be a useful clinical intervention for patients who have difficulties with response inhibition.

  5. Histamine stimulates chloride secretion in omeprazole-inhibited frog gastric mucosa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McGreevy, J.; Barton, R.; Housinger, T.

    1986-01-01

    Omeprazole (OME) stops hydrogen ion (H) secretion in the histamine (HIST)-stimulated gastric mucosa while the chloride (Cl) which had accompanied the H continues to be pumped into the lumen. This finding suggests that the Cl pump is independent of the H/K ATP-ase driven H pump. To test this hypothesis, 16 Ussing-chambered frog mucosas were exposed to OME prior to HIST stimulation. If the Cl pump is independent, HIST should stimulate Cl secretion in the OME-inhibited mucosa. A 1 hr control (CON) interval preceded exposure to OME (10 -4 M) in the nutrient solution. Potential difference (PD), short-circuit current (Isc), resistance (R), H flux (J/sup H/) and Cl flux (J/sup Cl/ with 36 Cl) were measured every 15 min. After 1 hr of OME exposure, HIST (10 -5 M) was added to the nutrient solution. The findings demonstrate that HIST stimulates Cl secretion in the OME-inhibited bullfrog gastric mucosa

  6. Inhibiting effects of fructanase on competence-stimulating peptide-dependent quorum sensing system in Streptococcus mutans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Yusuke; Nagasawa, Ryo; Senpuku, Hidenobu

    2017-09-01

    Streptococcus mutans produces glucosyltransferases encoded by the gtfB and gtfC genes, which synthesize insoluble glucan, and both insoluble and soluble glucans by conversion of sucrose, and are known as principal agents to provide strong biofilm formation and demineralization on tooth surfaces. S. mutans possess a Com-dependent quorum sensing (QS) system, which is important for survival in severe conditions. The QS system is stimulated by the interaction between ComD {Receptor to competence-stimulating peptide (CSP)} encoded by the comD and CSP encoded by the comC, and importantly associated with bacteriocin production and genetic competence. Previously, we found enzyme fructanase (FruA) as a new inhibitor for the glucan-dependent biofilm formation. In the present study, inhibiting effects by FruA on glucan-independent biofilm formation of S. mutans UA159, UA159.gtfB - , UA159.gtfC - , and UA159.gtfBC - were observed in sucrose and no sucrose sugars-supplemented conditions using the plate assay. The reduction of UA159.comC - and UA159.comD - biofilm formation were also observed as compared with UA159 in same conditions. These results suggested that inhibitions of glucan-independent and Com-dependent biofilm formation were involved in the inhibiting mechanism by FruA. To more thoroughly investigate effects by FruA on the QS system, we examined on CSP-stimulated and Com-dependent bacteriocin production and genetic transformation. FruA inhibited bacteriocin production in collaboration with CSP and genetic transformation in bacterial cell conditions treated with FruA. Our findings show that FruA has multiple effects that inhibit survival functions of S. mutans, including biofilm formation and CSP-dependent QS responses, indicating its potential use as an agent for prevention of dental caries. Copyright © 2017 Japanese Society of Chemotherapy and The Japanese Association for Infectious Diseases. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Identification of Interferon-Stimulated Gene Proteins That Inhibit Human Parainfluenza Virus Type 3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabbani, M A G; Ribaudo, Michael; Guo, Ju-Tao; Barik, Sailen

    2016-12-15

    A major arm of cellular innate immunity is type I interferon (IFN), represented by IFN-α and IFN-β. Type I IFN transcriptionally induces a large number of cellular genes, collectively known as IFN-stimulated gene (ISG) proteins, which act as antivirals. The IFIT (interferon-induced proteins with tetratricopeptide repeats) family proteins constitute a major subclass of ISG proteins and are characterized by multiple tetratricopeptide repeats (TPRs). In this study, we have interrogated IFIT proteins for the ability to inhibit the growth of human parainfluenza virus type 3 (PIV3), a nonsegmented negative-strand RNA virus of the Paramyxoviridae family and a major cause of respiratory disease in children. We found that IFIT1 significantly inhibited PIV3, whereas IFIT2, IFIT3, and IFIT5 were less effective or not at all. In further screening a set of ISG proteins we discovered that several other such proteins also inhibited PIV3, including IFITM1, IDO (indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase), PKR (protein kinase, RNA activated), and viperin (virus inhibitory protein, endoplasmic reticulum associated, interferon inducible)/Cig5. The antiviral effect of IDO, the enzyme that catalyzes the first step of tryptophan degradation, could be counteracted by tryptophan. These results advance our knowledge of diverse ISG proteins functioning as antivirals and may provide novel approaches against PIV3. The innate immunity of the host, typified by interferon (IFN), is a major antiviral defense. IFN inhibits virus growth by inducing a large number of IFN-stimulated gene (ISG) proteins, several of which have been shown to have specific antiviral functions. Parainfluenza virus type 3 (PIV3) is major pathogen of children, and no reliable vaccine or specific antiviral against it currently exists. In this article, we report several ISG proteins that strongly inhibit PIV3 growth, the use of which may allow a better antiviral regimen targeting PIV3. Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology

  8. Inhibition of Parkinsonian tremor with cutaneous afferent evoked by transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Man-Zhao; Xu, Shao-Qin; Hu, Zi-Xiang; Xu, Fu-Liang; Niu, Chuan-Xin M; Xiao, Qin; Lan, Ning

    2017-07-14

    Recent study suggests that tremor signals are transmitted by way of multi-synaptic corticospinal pathway. Neurophysiological studies have also demonstrated that cutaneous afferents exert potent inhibition to descending motor commands by way of spinal interneurons. We hypothesize in this study that cutaneous afferents could also affect the transmission of tremor signals, thus, inhibit tremor in patients with PD. We tested this hypothesis by activating cutaneous afferents in the dorsal hand skin innervated by superficial radial nerve using transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS). Eight patients with PD having tremor dominant symptom were recruited to participate in this study using a consistent experimental protocol for tremor inhibition. Resting tremor and electromyogram (EMG) of muscles in the upper extremity of these subjects with PD were recorded, while surface stimulation was applied to the dorsal skin of the hand. Fifteen seconds of data were recorded for 5 s prior to, during and post stimulation. Power spectrum densities (PSDs) of tremor and EMG signals were computed for each data segment. The peak values of PSDs in three data segments were compared to detect evidence of tremor inhibition. At stimulation intensity from 1.5 to 1.75 times of radiating sensation threshold, apparent suppressions of tremor at wrist, forearm and upper arm and in the EMGs were observed immediately at the onset of stimulation. After termination of stimulation, tremor and rhythmic EMG bursts reemerged gradually. Statistical analysis of peak spectral amplitudes showed a significant difference in joint tremors and EMGs during and prior to stimulation in all 8 subjects with PD. The average percentage of suppression was 61.56% in tremor across all joints of all subjects, and 47.97% in EMG of all muscles. The suppression appeared to occur mainly in distal joints and muscles. There was a slight, but inconsistent effect on tremor frequency in the 8 patients with PD tested. Our

  9. Nitazoxanide stimulates autophagy and inhibits mTORC1 signaling and intracellular proliferation of Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen K Y Lam

    Full Text Available Tuberculosis, caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection, is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in the world today. M. tuberculosis hijacks the phagosome-lysosome trafficking pathway to escape clearance from infected macrophages. There is increasing evidence that manipulation of autophagy, a regulated catabolic trafficking pathway, can enhance killing of M. tuberculosis. Therefore, pharmacological agents that induce autophagy could be important in combating tuberculosis. We report that the antiprotozoal drug nitazoxanide and its active metabolite tizoxanide strongly stimulate autophagy and inhibit signaling by mTORC1, a major negative regulator of autophagy. Analysis of 16 nitazoxanide analogues reveals similar strict structural requirements for activity in autophagosome induction, EGFP-LC3 processing and mTORC1 inhibition. Nitazoxanide can inhibit M. tuberculosis proliferation in vitro. Here we show that it inhibits M. tuberculosis proliferation more potently in infected human THP-1 cells and peripheral monocytes. We identify the human quinone oxidoreductase NQO1 as a nitazoxanide target and propose, based on experiments with cells expressing NQO1 or not, that NQO1 inhibition is partly responsible for mTORC1 inhibition and enhanced autophagy. The dual action of nitazoxanide on both the bacterium and the host cell response to infection may lead to improved tuberculosis treatment.

  10. Nitazoxanide stimulates autophagy and inhibits mTORC1 signaling and intracellular proliferation of Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, Karen K Y; Zheng, Xingji; Forestieri, Roberto; Balgi, Aruna D; Nodwell, Matt; Vollett, Sarah; Anderson, Hilary J; Andersen, Raymond J; Av-Gay, Yossef; Roberge, Michel

    2012-01-01

    Tuberculosis, caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection, is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in the world today. M. tuberculosis hijacks the phagosome-lysosome trafficking pathway to escape clearance from infected macrophages. There is increasing evidence that manipulation of autophagy, a regulated catabolic trafficking pathway, can enhance killing of M. tuberculosis. Therefore, pharmacological agents that induce autophagy could be important in combating tuberculosis. We report that the antiprotozoal drug nitazoxanide and its active metabolite tizoxanide strongly stimulate autophagy and inhibit signaling by mTORC1, a major negative regulator of autophagy. Analysis of 16 nitazoxanide analogues reveals similar strict structural requirements for activity in autophagosome induction, EGFP-LC3 processing and mTORC1 inhibition. Nitazoxanide can inhibit M. tuberculosis proliferation in vitro. Here we show that it inhibits M. tuberculosis proliferation more potently in infected human THP-1 cells and peripheral monocytes. We identify the human quinone oxidoreductase NQO1 as a nitazoxanide target and propose, based on experiments with cells expressing NQO1 or not, that NQO1 inhibition is partly responsible for mTORC1 inhibition and enhanced autophagy. The dual action of nitazoxanide on both the bacterium and the host cell response to infection may lead to improved tuberculosis treatment.

  11. Sex-specific inhibition and stimulation of worker-reproductive transition in a termite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Qian; Haynes, Kenneth F.; Hampton, Jordan D.; Zhou, Xuguo

    2017-10-01

    In social insects, the postembryonic development of individuals exhibits strong phenotypic plasticity in response to the environment, thus generating the caste system. Different from eusocial Hymenoptera, in which queens dominate reproduction and inhibit worker fertility, the primary reproductive caste in termites (kings and queens) can be replaced by neotenic reproductives derived from functionally sterile individuals. Feedback regulation of nestmate differentiation into reproductives has been suggested, but the sex specificity remains inconclusive. In the eastern subterranean termite, Reticulitermes flavipes, we tested the hypothesis that neotenic reproductives regulate worker-reproductive transition in a sex-specific manner. With this R. flavipes system, we demonstrate a sex-specific regulatory mechanism with both inhibitory and stimulatory functions. Neotenics inhibit workers of the same sex from differentiating into additional reproductives but stimulate workers of the opposite sex to undergo this transition. Furthermore, this process is not affected by the presence of soldiers. Our results highlight the reproductive plasticity of termites in response to social cues and provide insights into the regulation of reproductive division of labor in a hemimetabolous social insect.

  12. Charge-balanced biphasic electrical stimulation inhibits neurite extension of spiral ganglion neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Na; Liang, Qiong; Liu, Yuehong; Lai, Bin; Li, Wen; Wang, Zhengmin; Li, Shufeng

    2016-06-15

    Intracochlear application of exogenous or transgenic neurotrophins, such as neurotrophin-3 (NT-3) and brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), could promote the resprouting of spiral ganglion neuron (SGN) neurites in deafened animals. These resprouting neurites might reduce the gap between cochlear implant electrodes and their targeting SGNs, allowing for an improvement of spatial resolution of electrical stimulation. This study is to investigate the impact of electrical stimulation employed in CI on the extension of resprouting SGN neurites. We established an in vitro model including the devices delivering charge-balanced biphasic electrical stimulation, and spiral ganglion (SG) dissociated culture treated with BDNF and NT-3. After electrical stimulation with varying durations and intensities, we quantified neurite lengths and Schwann cell densities in SG cultures. Stimulations that were greater than 50μA or longer than 8h significantly decreased SG neurite length. Schwann cell density under 100μA electrical stimulation for 48h was significantly lower compared to that in non-stimulated group. These electrical stimulation-induced decreases of neurite extension and Schwann cell density were attenuated by various types of voltage-dependent calcium channel (VDCC) blockers, or completely prevented by their combination, cadmium or calcium-free medium. Our study suggested that charge-balanced biphasic electrical stimulation inhibited the extension of resprouting SGN neurites and decreased Schwann cell density in vitro. Calcium influx through multiple types of VDCCs was involved in the electrical stimulation-induced inhibition. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Wortmannin inhibits both insulin- and contraction-stimulated glucose uptake and transport in rat skeletal muscle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wojtaszewski, Jørgen; Hansen, B F; Ursø, Birgitte

    1996-01-01

    The role of phosphatidylinositol (PI) 3-kinase for insulin- and contraction-stimulated muscle glucose transport was investigated in rat skeletal muscle perfused with a cell-free perfusate. The insulin receptor substrate-1-associated PI 3-kinase activity was increased sixfold upon insulin...... stimulation but was unaffected by contractions. In addition, the insulin-stimulated PI 3-kinase activity and muscle glucose uptake and transport in individual muscles were dose-dependently inhibited by wortmannin with one-half maximal inhibition values of approximately 10 nM and total inhibition at 1 micro......M. This concentration of wortmannin also decreased the contraction-stimulated glucose transport and uptake by approximately 30-70% without confounding effects on contractility or on muscle ATP and phosphocreatine concentrations. At higher concentrations (3 and 10 microM), wortmannin completely blocked the contraction...

  14. Minocycline hydrochloride nanoliposomes inhibit the production of TNF-α in LPS-stimulated macrophages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu D

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available D Liu, P S YangShandong Provincial Key Laboratory of Oral Biomedicine, College of Stomatology, Shandong University, Shandong Province, People's Republic of ChinaBackground: As an adjunctive treatment of chronic periodontitis, it seems that the application of periocline or the other antimicrobials is effective against periodontopathogens. In this study, nanoliposomes were investigated as carriers of minocycline hydrochloride and the inhibition effects of minocycline hydrochloride nanoliposomes on the proliferation and lipopolysaccharide (LPS-stimulated production of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α of macrophages were elucidated.Methods: After stimulation with 10 µg/mL LPS, murine macrophages (ANA-1 were treated with 10, 20, 40, 50 and 70 µg/mL 2% minocycline hydrochloride nanoliposomes, minocycline hydrochloride solution, and periocline for 6, 12, 24, 48 and 60 hours, respectively. A tetrazolium (MTT assay was used to evaluate macrophages cell proliferation rate and the levels of TNF-α mRNA were measured by SYBR Green Real Time PCR.Results: Ten to 70 µg/mL 2% minocycline hydrochloride nanoliposomes, minocycline hydrochloride solution, and periocline showed dose- and time-dependent inhibition of ANA-1 proliferation. Minocycline hydrochloride nanoliposomes showed dose- and ratio-dependent inhibition of LPS-stimulated TNF-α secretion of ANA-1. The inhibition effect of 10 µg/mL minocycline hydrochloride nanoliposomes was significantly better than that of two positive control groups, and equated to that of 60 or 70 µg/mL periocline. The expression of TNF-α mRNA in experimental group continued to reduce linearly with time.Conclusion: All three preparations of minocycline hydrochloride showed dose- and time-dependent inhibition of proliferation of ANA-1. Minocycline hydrochloride nanoliposomes have stronger and longer inhibition effect on LPS-stimulated TNF-α secretion of macrophages cell than minocycline hydrochloride solution and periocline

  15. Haloperidol Abrogates Matrix Metalloproteinase-9 Expression by Inhibition of NF-κB Activation in Stimulated Human Monocytic Cells

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    Yueh-Lun Lee

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Much evidence has indicated that matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs participate in the progression of neuroinflammatory disorders. The present study was undertaken to investigate the inhibitory effect and mechanism of the antipsychotic haloperidol on MMP activation in the stimulated THP-1 monocytic cells. Haloperidol exerted a strong inhibition on tumor necrosis factor- (TNF- α-induced MMP-9 gelatinolysis of THP-1 cells. A concentration-dependent inhibitory effect of haloperidol was observed in TNF-α-induced protein and mRNA expression of MMP-9. On the other hand, haloperidol slightly affected cell viability and tissue inhibition of metalloproteinase-1 levels. It significantly inhibited the degradation of inhibitor-κB-α (IκBα in activated cells. Moreover, it suppressed activated nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB detected by a mobility shift assay, NF-κB reporter gene, and chromatin immunoprecipitation analyses. Consistent with NF-κB inhibition, haloperidol exerted a strong inhibition of lipopolysaccharide- (LPS- induced MMP-9 gelatinolysis but not of transforming growth factor-β1-induced MMP-2. In in vivo studies, administration of haloperidol significantly attenuated LPS-induced intracerebral MMP-9 activation of the brain homogenate and the in situ in C57BL/6 mice. In conclusion, the selective anti-MMP-9 activation of haloperidol could possibly involve the inhibition of the NF-κB signal pathway. Hence, it was found that haloperidol treatment may represent a bystander of anti-MMP actions for its conventional psychotherapy.

  16. Dual Effect of Chrysanthemum indicum Extract to Stimulate Osteoblast Differentiation and Inhibit Osteoclast Formation and Resorption In Vitro

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    Jong Min Baek

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The risk of bone-related diseases increases due to the imbalance between bone resorption and bone formation by osteoclasts and osteoblasts, respectively. The goal in the development of antiosteoporotic treatments is an agent that will improve bone through simultaneous osteoblast stimulation and osteoclast inhibition without undesirable side effects. To achieve this goal, numerous studies have been performed to identify novel approaches using natural oriental herbs to treat bone metabolic diseases. In the present study, we investigated the effect of Chrysanthemum indicum extract (CIE on the differentiation of osteoclastic and osteoblastic cells. CIE inhibited the formation of TRAP-positive mature osteoclasts and of filamentous-actin rings and disrupted the bone-resorbing activity of mature osteoclasts in a dose-dependent manner. CIE strongly inhibited Akt, GSK3β, and IκB phosphorylation in RANKL-stimulated bone marrow macrophages and did not show any effects on MAP kinases, including p38, ERK, and JNK. Interestingly, CIE also enhanced primary osteoblast differentiation via upregulation of the expression of alkaline phosphatase and the level of extracellular calcium concentrations during the early and terminal stages of differentiation, respectively. Our results revealed that CIE could have a potential therapeutic role in bone-related disorders through its dual effects on osteoclast and osteoblast differentiation.

  17. Characteristics of an Organizational Environment Which Stimulate and Inhibit Creativity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alencar, Eunice M. L. Soriano de; Bruno-Faria, Maria de Fatima

    1997-01-01

    Analysis of interviews with 25 Brazilian workers concerning characteristics of a work environment that promote or inhibit creativity identified stimulants (such as organization support, support from bosses, and support from colleagues) and obstacles (such as organization structure, boss characteristics, and personal relationships). (DB)

  18. Inhibition of stimulated Raman scattering due to the excitation of stimulated Brillouin scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yao; Yu, Lu-Le; Weng, Su-Ming; Ren, Chuang; Liu, Chuan-Sheng; Sheng, Zheng-Ming

    2017-09-01

    The nonlinear coupling between stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) and stimulated Brillouin scattering (SBS) of intense laser in underdense plasma is studied theoretically and numerically. Based upon the fluid model, their coupling equations are derived, and a threshold condition of plasma density perturbations due to SBS for the inhibition of SRS is given. Particle-in-cell simulations show that this condition can be achieved easily by SBS in the so-called fluid regime with kLλDDebye length [Kline et al., Phys. Plasmas 13, 055906 (2006)]. SBS can reduce the saturation level of SRS and the temperature of electrons in both homogeneous and inhomogeneous plasma. Numerical simulations also show that this reduced SRS saturation is retained even if the fluid regime condition mentioned above is violated at a later time due to plasma heating.

  19. Strong cellulase inhibition by Mannan polysaccharides in cellulose conversion to sugars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Rajeev; Wyman, Charles E

    2014-07-01

    Cellulase enzymes contribute a major fraction of the total cost for biological conversion of lignocellulosic biomass to fuels and chemicals. Although a several fold reduction in cellulase production costs and enhancement of cellulase activity and stability have been reported in recent years, sugar yields are still lower at low enzyme doses than desired commercially. We recently reported that hemicellulose xylan and its oligomers strongly inhibit cellulase and that supplementation of cellulase with xylanase and β-xylosidase would significantly reduce such inhibition. In this study, mannan polysaccharides and their enzymatically prepared hydrolyzates were discovered to be strongly inhibitory to fungal cellulase in cellulose conversion (>50% drop in % relative conversion), even at a small concentration of 0.1 g/L, and inhibition was much greater than experienced by other known inhibitors such as cellobiose, xylooligomers, and furfural. Furthermore, cellulase inhibition dramatically increased with heteromannan loading and mannan substitution with galactose side units. In general, enzymatically prepared hydrolyzates were less inhibitory than their respective mannan polysaccharides except highly substituted ones. Supplementation of cellulase with commercial accessory enzymes such as xylanase, pectinase, and β-glucosidase was effective in greatly relieving inhibition but only for less substituted heteromannans. However, cellulase supplementation with purified heteromannan specific enzymes relieved inhibition by these more substituted heteromannans as well, suggesting that commercial preparations need to have higher amounts of such activities to realize high sugar yields at the low enzyme protein loadings needed for low cost fuels production. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Evidence of gender differences in the ability to inhibit brain activation elicited by food stimulation

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Gene-Jack; Volkow, Nora D.; Telang, Frank; Jayne, Millard; Ma, Yeming; Pradhan, Kith; Zhu, Wei; Wong, Christopher T.; Thanos, Panayotis K.; Geliebter, Allan; Biegon, Anat; Fowler, Joanna S.

    2009-01-01

    Although impaired inhibitory control is linked to a broad spectrum of health problems, including obesity, the brain mechanism(s) underlying voluntary control of hunger are not well understood. We assessed the brain circuits involved in voluntary inhibition of hunger during food stimulation in 23 fasted men and women using PET and 2-deoxy-2[18F]fluoro-D-glucose (18FDG). In men, but not in women, food stimulation with inhibition significantly decreased activation in amygdala, hippocampus, insul...

  1. Dopamine inhibits maitotoxin-stimulated pituitary 45Ca2+ efflux and prolactin release

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Login, I.S.; Judd, A.M.; MacLeod, R.M.

    1986-01-01

    The authors examined the hypothesis that dopaminergic inhibition of prolactin release is coupled to modulation of cellular calcium flux. Dispersed female rat pituitary cells were prelabeled in 45 Ca 2+ and perifused to determine simultaneously fractional calcium efflux and prolactin release, as stimulated by maitotoxin, a calcium channel activator. The integrated response of each parameter to 5 ng/ml maitotoxin was obtained in individual perifusion columns in the absence or presence of various concentrations of dopamine. Maitotoxin-stimulated calcium efflux was suppressed by dopamine concentrations of 0.01 μM and greater and achieved a maximal effect at ∼0.1 μM, at which calcium efflux was reduced by 50%. Maitotoxin-stimulated prolactin release was inhibited by 0.03 μM dopamine and greater concentrations, and at a concentration of ∼10.0 μM dopamine the effect became maximal at ∼85% suppression. Haloperidol (0.1 μM) blocked the effects of 0.1 μM dopamine on both parameters. Simultaneous suppression of maitotoxin-stimulated calcium efflux and prolactin release by concentrations of dopamine within the nonomolar range suggests that dopamine receptor activation is negatively coupled to modulation of calcium flux in the physiological regulation of prolactin secretion

  2. Dose-dependent platelet stimulation and inhibition induced by anti-PIA1 IgG

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryu, T.; Davis, J.M.; Schwartz, K.A.

    1990-01-01

    The PIA1 antibody produces several clinically distinct and severe thrombocytopenias. Investigations have demonstrated divergent effects on platelet function; prior reports demonstrated inhibition, while a conflicting publication showed platelet activation. We have resolved this conflict using anti-PIA1 IgG produced by a patient with posttransfusion purpura. Relatively low concentrations stimulated platelet aggregation and release of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) whereas high concentrations inhibited platelet function, producing a thrombasthenia-like state. The number of molecules of platelet-associated IgG necessary to initiate aggregation and ATP release (2,086 +/- 556) or produce maximum aggregation (23,420 +/- 3,706) or complete inhibition (63,582 +/- 2654) were measured with a quantitative radiometric assay for bound anti-PIA1. Preincubation of platelets with high concentrations of PIA1 antibody inhibited platelet aggregation with 10 mumol/L adenosine diphosphate and blocked 125I-labeled fibrinogen platelet binding. Platelet activation with nonfibrinogen dependent agonist, 1 U/ml thrombin, was not inhibited by this high concentration of PIA1 IgG. In conclusion, anti-PIAI IgG produces (1) stimulation of platelet aggregation and ATP release that is initiated with 2000 molecules IgG per platelet and is associated with an increase of 125I-fibrinogen binding; (2) conversely, inhibition of platelet aggregation is observed with maximum antibody binding, 63,000 molecules IgG per platelet, and is mediated via a blockade of fibrinogen binding

  3. Pomegranate inhibits neuroinflammation and amyloidogenesis in IL-1β-stimulated SK-N-SH cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velagapudi, Ravikanth; Baco, Gina; Khela, Sunjeet; Okorji, Uchechukwu; Olajide, Olumayokun

    2016-06-01

    Pomegranate fruit, Punica granatum L. (Punicaceae), and its constituents have been shown to inhibit inflammation. In this study, we aimed to assess the effects of freeze-dried pomegranate (PWE) on PGE2 production in IL-1β-stimulated SK-N-SH cells. An enzyme immunoassay (EIA) was used to measure prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) production from supernatants of IL-1β-stimulated SK-N-SH cells. Expression of COX-2, phospho-IκB, and phospho-IKK proteins was evaluated, while NF-κB reporter gene assay was carried out in TNFα-stimulated HEK293 cells to determine the effect of PWE on NF-κB transactivation. Levels of BACE-1 and Aβ in SK-N-SH cells stimulated with IL-1β were measured with an in cell ELISA. PWE (25-200 μg/ml) dose dependently reduced COX-2-dependent PGE2 production in SK-N-SH cells stimulated with IL-1β. Phosphorylation of IκB and IKK was significantly (p pomegranate inhibits inflammation, as well as amyloidogenesis in IL-1β-stimulated SK-N-SH cells. We propose that pomegranate is a potential nutritional strategy in slowing the progression of neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer's disease.

  4. Luteolin Inhibits Angiotensin II-Stimulated VSMC Proliferation and Migration through Downregulation of Akt Phosphorylation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tongda Xu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Luteolin is a naturally occurring flavonoid found in many plants that possesses cardioprotective properties. The purpose of this study was to elucidate the effect of luteolin on vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs proliferation and migration induced by Angiotensin II (Ang II and to investigate the mechanism(s of action of this compound. Rat VSMCs were cultured in vitro, and the proliferation and migration of these cells following Ang II stimulation were monitored. Different doses of luteolin were added to VSMC cultures, and the proliferation and migration rate were observed by MTT and Transwell chamber assays, respectively. In addition, the expressions of p-Akt (308, p-Akt (473, and proliferative cell nuclear antigen (PCNA in VSMCs were monitored by Western blotting. This study demonstrated that luteolin has an inhibitory effect on Ang II-induced VSMC proliferation and migration. Further, the levels of p-Akt (308, p-Akt (473, and PCNA were reduced in VSMCs treated with both Ang II and luteolin compared to VSMCs treated with only Ang II. These findings strongly suggest that luteolin inhibits Ang II-stimulated proliferation and migration of VSMCs, which is partially due to downregulation of the Akt signaling pathway.

  5. [Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS), inhibition processes and attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) - an overview].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoegl, Thomas; Bender, Stephan; Buchmann, Johannes; Kratz, Oliver; Moll, Gunther H; Heinrich, Hartmut

    2014-11-01

    Motor system excitability can be tested by transcranial magnetic stimulation CFMS). In this article, an overview of recent methodological developments and research findings related to attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is provided. Different TMS parameters that reflect the function of interneurons in the motor cortex may represent neurophysiological markers of inhibition in ADHD, particularly the so-called intracortical inhibition. In children with a high level of hyperactivity and impulsivity, intracortical inhibition was comparably low at rest as shortly before the execution of a movement. TMS-evoked potentials can also be measured in the EEG so that investigating processes of excitability is not restricted to motor areas in future studies. The effects of methylphenidate on motor system excitability may be interpreted in the sense of a 'fine-tuning' with these mainly dopaminergic effects also depending on genetic parameters (DAT1 transporter). A differentiated view on the organization of motor control can be achieved by a combined analysis of TMS parameters and event-related potentials. Applying this bimodal approach, strong evidence for a deviant implementation of motor control in children with ADHD and probably compensatory mechanisms (with involvement of the prefrontal cortex) was obtained. These findings, which contribute to a better understanding of hyperactivity/impulsivity, inhibitory processes and motor control in ADHD as well as the mechanisms of medication, underline the relevance of TMS as a neurophysiological method in ADHD research.

  6. A regulator of G Protein signaling, RGS3, inhibits gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH-stimulated luteinizing hormone (LH secretion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Musgrove Lois C

    2001-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Luteinizing hormone secreted by the anterior pituitary gland regulates gonadal function. Luteinizing hormone secretion is regulated both by alterations in gonadotrope responsiveness to hypothalamic gonadotropin releasing hormone and by alterations in gonadotropin releasing hormone secretion. The mechanisms that determine gonadotrope responsiveness are unknown but may involve regulators of G protein signaling (RGSs. These proteins act by antagonizing or abbreviating interaction of Gα proteins with effectors such as phospholipase Cβ. Previously, we reported that gonadotropin releasing hormone-stimulated second messenger inositol trisphosphate production was inhibited when RGS3 and gonadotropin releasing hormone receptor cDNAs were co-transfected into the COS cell line. Here, we present evidence for RGS3 inhibition of gonadotropin releasing hormone-induced luteinizing hormone secretion from cultured rat pituitary cells. Results A truncated version of RGS3 (RGS3T = RGS3 314–519 inhibited gonadotropin releasing hormone-stimulated inositol trisphosphate production more potently than did RSG3 in gonadotropin releasing hormone receptor-bearing COS cells. An RSG3/glutathione-S-transferase fusion protein bound more 35S-Gqα than any other member of the G protein family tested. Adenoviral-mediated RGS3 gene transfer in pituitary gonadotropes inhibited gonadotropin releasing hormone-stimulated luteinizing hormone secretion in a dose-related fashion. Adeno-RGS3 also inhibited gonadotropin releasing hormone stimulated 3H-inositol phosphate accumulation, consistent with a molecular site of action at the Gqα protein. Conclusions RGS3 inhibits gonadotropin releasing hormone-stimulated second messenger production (inositol trisphosphate as well as luteinizing hormone secretion from rat pituitary gonadotropes apparently by binding and suppressing the transduction properties of Gqα protein function. A version of RGS3 that is amino

  7. Cerebellar transcranial static magnetic field stimulation transiently reduces cerebellar brain inhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsugi, Akiyoshi; Okada, Y

    The aim of this study was to investigate whether transcranial static magnetic field stimulation (tSMS) delivered using a compact cylindrical NdFeB magnet over the cerebellum modulates the excitability of the cerebellum and contralateral primary motor cortex, as measured using cerebellar brain inhibition (CBI), motor evoked potentials (MEPs), and resting motor threshold (rMT). These parameters were measured before tSMS or sham stimulation and immediately, 5 minutes and 10 minutes after stimulation. There were no significant changes in CBI, MEPs or rMT over time in the sham stimulation condition, and no changes in MEPs or rMT in the tSMS condition. However, CBI was significantly decreased immediately after tSMS as compared to that before and 5 minutes after tSMS. Our results suggest that tSMS delivered to the cerebellar hemisphere transiently reduces cerebellar inhibitory output but does not affect the excitability of the contralateral motor cortex.

  8. Evidence of gender differences in the ability to inhibit brain activation elicited by food stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Gene-Jack; Volkow, Nora D; Telang, Frank; Jayne, Millard; Ma, Yeming; Pradhan, Kith; Zhu, Wei; Wong, Christopher T; Thanos, Panayotis K; Geliebter, Allan; Biegon, Anat; Fowler, Joanna S

    2009-01-27

    Although impaired inhibitory control is linked to a broad spectrum of health problems, including obesity, the brain mechanism(s) underlying voluntary control of hunger are not well understood. We assessed the brain circuits involved in voluntary inhibition of hunger during food stimulation in 23 fasted men and women using PET and 2-deoxy-2[(18)F]fluoro-D-glucose ((18)FDG). In men, but not in women, food stimulation with inhibition significantly decreased activation in amygdala, hippocampus, insula, orbitofrontal cortex, and striatum, which are regions involved in emotional regulation, conditioning, and motivation. The suppressed activation of the orbitofrontal cortex with inhibition in men was associated with decreases in self-reports of hunger, which corroborates the involvement of this region in processing the conscious awareness of the drive to eat. This finding suggests a mechanism by which cognitive inhibition decreases the desire for food and implicates lower ability to suppress hunger in women as a contributing factor to gender differences in obesity.

  9. Glycosyl glycerides from hydroponic Panax ginseng inhibited NO production in lipopolysaccharide-stimulated RAW264.7 cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Byeong-Ju Cha

    2015-04-01

    Results and conclusion: The glycosyl glycerides were identified to be (2S-1-O-7(Z,10(Z,13(Z-hexadecatrienoyl-3-O-β-d-galactopyranosyl-sn-glycerol (1, (2S-1-O-linolenoyl-3-O-β-d-galactopyranosyl-sn-glycerol (2, (2S-1-O-linolenoyl-2-O-linolenoyl-3-O-β-d-galactopyranosyl-sn-glycerol (3, and 2(S-1-O-linoleoyl-2-O-linoleoyl-3-O-β-d-galactopyranosyl-sn-glycerol (4. Compounds 1 and 2 showed moderate inhibition activity on NO production in LPS-stimulated RAW264.7 cells [half maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50: 63.8 ± 6.4μM and 59.4 ± 6.8μM, respectively] without cytotoxicity at concentrations < 100μM, whereas Compounds 3 and 4 showed good inhibition effect (IC50: 7.7 ± 0.6μM and 8.0 ± 0.9μM, respectively without cytotoxicity at concentrations < 20μM. All isolated compounds showed reduced messenger RNA (mRNA expression of interleukin-1β (IL-1β, IL-6, and tumor necrosis factor-α in LPS-induced macrophage cells with strong inhibition of mRNA activity observed for Compounds 3 and 4.

  10. Reductions in the Cardiac Transient Outward K+ Current Ito Caused by Chronic β-Adrenergic Receptor Stimulation Are Partly Rescued by Inhibition of Nuclear Factor κB.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panama, Brian K; Korogyi, Adam S; Aschar-Sobbi, Roozbeh; Oh, Yena; Gray, Charles B B; Gang, Hongying; Brown, Joan Heller; Kirshenbaum, Lorrie A; Backx, Peter H

    2016-02-19

    The fast transient outward potassium current (Ito,f) plays a critical role in the electrical and contractile properties of the myocardium. Ito,f channels are formed by the co-assembly of the pore-forming α-subunits, Kv4.2 and Kv4.3, together with the accessory β-subunit KChIP2. Reductions of Ito,f are common in the diseased heart, which is also associated with enhanced stimulation of β-adrenergic receptors (β-ARs). We used cultured neonatal rat ventricular myocytes to examine how chronic β-AR stimulation decreases Ito,f. To determine which downstream pathways mediate these Ito,f changes, adenoviral infections were used to inhibit CaMKIIδc, CaMKIIδb, calcineurin, or nuclear factor κB (NF-κB). We observed that chronic β-AR stimulation with isoproterenol (ISO) for 48 h reduced Ito,f along with mRNA expression of all three of its subunits (Kv4.2, Kv4.3, and KChIP2). Inhibiting either CaMKIIδc nor CaMKIIδb did not prevent the ISO-mediated Ito,f reductions, even though CaMKIIδc and CaMKIIδb clearly regulated Ito,f and the mRNA expression of its subunits. Likewise, calcineurin inhibition did not prevent the Ito,f reductions induced by β-AR stimulation despite strongly modulating Ito,f and subunit mRNA expression. In contrast, NF-κB inhibition partly rescued the ISO-mediated Ito,f reductions in association with restoration of KChIP2 mRNA expression. Consistent with these observations, KChIP2 promoter activity was reduced by p65 as well as β-AR stimulation. In conclusion, NF-κB, and not CaMKIIδ or calcineurin, partly mediates the Ito,f reductions induced by chronic β-AR stimulation. Both mRNA and KChIP2 promoter data suggest that the ISO-induced Ito,f reductions are, in part, mediated through reduced KChIP2 transcription caused by NF-κB activation. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  11. The relief of microtherm inhibition for p-fluoronitrobenzene mineralization using electrical stimulation at low temperatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xueqin; Feng, Huajun; Liang, Yuxiang; Zhao, Zhiqing; Long, Yuyang; Fang, Yuan; Wang, Meizhen; Yin, Jun; Shen, Dongsheng

    2015-05-01

    Low temperature aggravates biological treatment of refractory p-fluoronitrobenzene (p-FNB) because of microtherm inhibition of microbial activity. Considering the potential characterization of energy supply for microbial metabolism and spurring microbial activity by electrical stimulation, a bioelectrochemical system (BES) was established to provide sustaining electrical stimulation for p-FNB mineralization at a low temperature. Electrical stimulation facilitated p-FNB treatment and bioelectrochemical reaction rate constants for the removal and defluorination of p-FNB at 10 °C were 0.0931 and 0.0054 h(-1), which were higher than the sums of the rates found using a biological system and an electrocatalytic system by 62.8 and 64.8%, respectively. At a low temperature, microbial activity in terms of dehydrogenase and ATPase was found to be higher with electrical stimulation, being 121.1 and 100.1% more active than that in the biological system. Moreover, stronger antioxidant ability was observed in the BES, which implied a better cold-resistance and relief of microtherm inhibition by electrical stimulation. Bacterial diversity analysis revealed a significant evolution of microbial community by electrical stimulation, and Clostridia was uniquely enriched. One bacterial sequence close to Pseudomonas became uniquely predominant, which appeared to be crucial for excellent p-FNB treatment performance in the BES at a low temperature. Economic evaluation revealed that the energy required to mineralize an extra mole of p-FNB was found to be 247 times higher by heating the system than by application of electrical stimulation. These results indicated that application of electrical stimulation is extremely promising for treating refractory waste at low temperatures.

  12. β-Adrenergic receptor stimulation inhibits proarrhythmic alternans in postinfarction border zone cardiomyocytes: a computational analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomek, Jakub; Rodriguez, Blanca; Bub, Gil; Heijman, Jordi

    2017-08-01

    The border zone (BZ) of the viable myocardium adjacent to an infarct undergoes extensive autonomic and electrical remodeling and is prone to repolarization alternans-induced cardiac arrhythmias. BZ remodeling processes may promote or inhibit Ca 2+ and/or repolarization alternans and may differentially affect ventricular arrhythmogenesis. Here, we used a detailed computational model of the canine ventricular cardiomyocyte to study the determinants of alternans in the BZ and their regulation by β-adrenergic receptor (β-AR) stimulation. The BZ model developed Ca 2+ transient alternans at slower pacing cycle lengths than the control model, suggesting that the BZ may promote spatially heterogeneous alternans formation in an infarcted heart. β-AR stimulation abolished alternans. By evaluating all combinations of downstream β-AR stimulation targets, we identified both direct (via ryanodine receptor channels) and indirect [via sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) Ca 2+ load] modulation of SR Ca 2+ release as critical determinants of Ca 2+ transient alternans. These findings were confirmed in a human ventricular cardiomyocyte model. Cell-to-cell coupling indirectly modulated the likelihood of alternans by affecting the action potential upstroke, reducing the trigger for SR Ca 2+ release in one-dimensional strand simulations. However, β-AR stimulation inhibited alternans in both single and multicellular simulations. Taken together, these data highlight a potential antiarrhythmic role of sympathetic hyperinnervation in the BZ by reducing the likelihood of alternans and provide new insights into the underlying mechanisms controlling Ca 2+ transient and repolarization alternans. NEW & NOTEWORTHY We integrated, for the first time, postmyocardial infarction electrical and autonomic remodeling in a detailed, validated computer model of β-adrenergic stimulation in ventricular cardiomyocytes. Here, we show that β-adrenergic stimulation inhibits alternans and provide novel insights

  13. Long-interval intracortical inhibition as biomarker for epilepsy : a transcranial magnetic stimulation study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bauer, Prisca R.; de Goede, Annika A.; Stern, William M.; Pawley, Adam D.; Chowdhury, Fahmida A.; Helling, Robert M.; Bouet, Romain; Kalitzin, Stiliyan N.; Visser, Gerhard H.; Sisodiya, Sanjay M.; Rothwell, John C.; Richardson, Mark P.; van Putten, Michel J.A.M.; Sander, Josemir W.

    2018-01-01

    Cortical excitability, as measured by transcranial magnetic stimulation combined with electromyography, is a potential biomarker for the diagnosis and follow-up of epilepsy. We report on long-interval intracortical inhibition data measured in four different centres in healthy controls (n = 95),

  14. Vagus nerve stimulation inhibits activation of coagulation and fibrinolysis during endotoxemia in rats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Westerloo, D. J.; Giebelen, I. A. J.; Meijers, J. C. M.; Daalhuisen, J.; de Vos, A. F.; Levi, M. [=Marcel M.; van der Poll, T.

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Sepsis and endotoxemia are associated with concurrent activation of inflammation and the hemostatic mechanism, which both contribute to organ dysfunction and death. Electrical vagus nerve stimulation (VNS) has been found to inhibit tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha release during

  15. Stimulated adiabatic passage in a dissipative ensemble of atoms with strong Rydberg-state interactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petrosyan, David; Molmer, Klaus

    2013-01-01

    We study two-photon excitation of Rydberg states of atoms under stimulated adiabatic passage with delayed laser pulses. We find that the combination of strong interaction between the atoms in Rydberg state and the spontaneous decay of the intermediate exited atomic state leads to the Rydberg exci...... for deterministic creation and, possibly, extraction of Rydberg atoms or ions one at a time. The sympathetic monitoring via decay of ancilla particles may find wider applications for state preparation and probing of interactions in dissipative many-body systems.......We study two-photon excitation of Rydberg states of atoms under stimulated adiabatic passage with delayed laser pulses. We find that the combination of strong interaction between the atoms in Rydberg state and the spontaneous decay of the intermediate exited atomic state leads to the Rydberg...

  16. Thienoquinolins exert diuresis by strongly inhibiting UT-A urea transporters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Huiwen; Wang, Yanhua; Xing, Yongning; Ran, Jianhua; Liu, Ming; Lei, Tianluo; Zhou, Hong; Li, Runtao; Sands, Jeff M.

    2014-01-01

    Urea transporters (UT) play an important role in the urine concentration mechanism by mediating intrarenal urea recycling, suggesting that UT inhibitors could have therapeutic use as a novel class of diuretic. Recently, we found a thienoquinolin UT inhibitor, PU-14, that exhibited diuretic activity. The purpose of this study was to identify more potent UT inhibitors that strongly inhibit UT-A isoforms in the inner medullary collecting duct (IMCD). Efficient thienoquinolin UT inhibitors were identified by structure-activity relationship analysis. Urea transport inhibition activity was assayed in perfused rat terminal IMCDs. Diuretic activity of the compound was determined in rats and mice using metabolic cages. The results show that the compound PU-48 exhibited potent UT-A inhibition activity. The inhibition was 69.5% with an IC50 of 0.32 μM. PU-48 significantly inhibited urea transport in perfused rat terminal IMCDs. PU-48 caused significant diuresis in UT-B null mice, which indicates that UT-A is the target of PU-48. The diuresis caused by PU-48 did not change blood Na+, K+, or Cl− levels or nonurea solute excretion in rats and mice. No toxicity was detected in cells or animals treated with PU-48. The results indicate that thienoquinolin UT inhibitors induce a diuresis by inhibiting UT-A in the IMCD. This suggests that they may have the potential to be developed as a novel class of diuretics with fewer side effects than classical diuretics. PMID:25298523

  17. Theta burst magnetic stimulation over the pre-supplementary motor area improves motor inhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obeso, Ignacio; Wilkinson, Leonora; Teo, James T; Talelli, Penelope; Rothwell, John C; Jahanshahi, Marjan

    Stopping an ongoing motor response or resolving conflict induced by conflicting stimuli are associated with activation of a right-lateralized network of inferior frontal gyrus (IFG), pre-supplementary motor area (pre-SMA) and subthalamic nucleus (STN). However, the roles of the right IFG and pre-SMA in stopping a movement and in conflict resolution remain unclear. We used continuous theta burst stimulation (cTBS) to examine the involvement of the right IFG and pre-SMA in inhibition and conflict resolution using the conditional stop signal task. We measured stop signal reaction time (SSRT, measure of reactive inhibition), response delay effect (RDE, measure of proactive action restraint) and conflict induced slowing (CIS, measure of conflict resolution). Stimulation over the pre-SMA resulted in significantly shorter SSRTs (improved inhibition) compared to sham cTBS. This effect was not observed for CIS, RDE, or any other measures. cTBS over the right IFG had no effect on SSRT, CIS, RDE or on any other measure. The improvement of SSRT with cTBS over the pre-SMA suggests its critical contribution to stopping ongoing movements. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Inhibition of breast cancer resistance protein (ABCG2 in human myeloid dendritic cells induces potent tolerogenic functions during LPS stimulation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun-O Jin

    Full Text Available Breast cancer resistance protein (ABCG2, a member of the ATP-binding cassette transporters has been identified as a major determinant of multidrug resistance (MDR in cancer cells, but ABC transporter inhibition has limited therapeutic value in vivo. In this research, we demonstrated that inhibition of efflux transporters ABCG2 induced the generation of tolerogenic DCs from human peripheral blood myeloid DCs (mDCs. ABCG2 expression was present in mDCs and was further increased by LPS stimulation. Treatment of CD1c+ mDCs with an ABCG2 inhibitor, Ko143, during LPS stimulation caused increased production of IL-10 and decreased production of pro-inflammatory cytokines and decreased expression of CD83 and CD86. Moreover, inhibition of ABCG2 in monocyte-derived DCs (MDDCs abrogated the up-regulation of co-stimulatory molecules and production of pro-inflammatory cytokines in these cells in response to LPS. Furthermore, CD1c+ mDCs stimulated with LPS plus Ko143 inhibited the proliferation of allogeneic and superantigen-specific syngenic CD4+ T cells and promoted expansion of CD25+FOXP3+ regulatory T (Treg cells in an IL-10-dependent fashion. These tolerogenic effects of ABCG2 inhibition could be abolished by ERK inhibition. Thus, we demonstrated that inhibition of ABCG2 in LPS-stimulated mDCs can potently induce tolerogenic potentials in these cells, providing crucial new information that could lead to development of better strategies to combat MDR cancer.

  19. Interleukin-1β inhibits insulin signaling and prevents insulin-stimulated system A amino acid transport in primary human trophoblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aye, Irving L M H; Jansson, Thomas; Powell, Theresa L

    2013-12-05

    Interleukin-1β (IL-1β) promotes insulin resistance in tissues such as liver and skeletal muscle; however the influence of IL-1β on placental insulin signaling is unknown. We recently reported increased IL-1β protein expression in placentas of obese mothers, which could contribute to insulin resistance. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that IL-1β inhibits insulin signaling and prevents insulin-stimulated amino acid transport in cultured primary human trophoblast (PHT) cells. Cultured trophoblasts isolated from term placentas were treated with physiological concentrations of IL-1β (10pg/ml) for 24h. IL-1β increased the phosphorylation of insulin receptor substrate-1 (IRS-1) at Ser307 (inhibitory) and decreased total IRS-1 protein abundance but did not affect insulin receptor β expression. Furthermore, IL-1β inhibited insulin-stimulated phosphorylation of IRS-1 (Tyr612, activation site) and Akt (Thr308) and prevented insulin-stimulated increase in PI3K/p85 and Grb2 protein expression. IL-1β alone stimulated cRaf (Ser338), MEK (Ser221) and Erk1/2 (Thr202/Tyr204) phosphorylation. The inflammatory pathways nuclear factor kappa B and c-Jun N-terminal kinase, which are involved in insulin resistance, were also activated by IL-1β treatment. Moreover, IL-1β inhibited insulin-stimulated System A, but not System L amino acid uptake, indicating functional impairment of insulin signaling. In conclusion, IL-1β inhibited the insulin signaling pathway by inhibiting IRS-1 signaling and prevented insulin-stimulated System A transport, thereby promoting insulin resistance in cultured PHT cells. These findings indicate that conditions which lead to increased systemic maternal or placental IL-1β levels may attenuate the effects of maternal insulin on placental function and consequently fetal growth. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  20. Synchronisation hubs in the visual cortex may arise from strong rhythmic inhibition during gamma oscillations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Folias, Stefanos E; Yu, Shan; Snyder, Abigail; Nikolić, Danko; Rubin, Jonathan E

    2013-09-01

    Neurons in the visual cortex exhibit heterogeneity in feature selectivity and the tendency to generate action potentials synchronously with other nearby neurons. By examining visual responses from cat area 17 we found that, during gamma oscillations, there was a positive correlation between each unit's sharpness of orientation tuning, strength of oscillations, and propensity towards synchronisation with other units. Using a computational model, we demonstrated that heterogeneity in the strength of rhythmic inhibitory inputs can account for the correlations between these three properties. Neurons subject to strong inhibition tend to oscillate strongly in response to both optimal and suboptimal stimuli and synchronise promiscuously with other neurons, even if they have different orientation preferences. Moreover, these strongly inhibited neurons can exhibit sharp orientation selectivity provided that the inhibition they receive is broadly tuned relative to their excitatory inputs. These results predict that the strength and orientation tuning of synaptic inhibition are heterogeneous across area 17 neurons, which could have important implications for these neurons' sensory processing capabilities. Furthermore, although our experimental recordings were conducted in the visual cortex, our model and simulation results can apply more generally to any brain region with analogous neuron types in which heterogeneity in the strength of rhythmic inhibition can arise during gamma oscillations. © 2013 Federation of European Neuroscience Societies and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Inhibition of food stimulated acid secretion by misoprostol, an orally active synthetic E1 analogue prostaglandin.

    OpenAIRE

    Ramage, J K; Denton, A; Williams, J G

    1985-01-01

    The effect of 200 micrograms misoprostol (a synthetic prostaglandin E1 analogue) on food stimulated intragastric acidity has been monitored over a 9 h period in 16 normal volunteers. Misoprostol caused a significant inhibition of intragastric acidity for 2 h post-dosing, but no significant effect was seen thereafter on either basal or food stimulated acidity.

  2. Streptococcus mutans competence-stimulating peptide inhibits Candida albicans hypha formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarosz, Lucja M; Deng, Dong Mei; van der Mei, Henny C; Crielaard, Wim; Krom, Bastiaan P

    2009-11-01

    The oral cavity is colonized by microorganisms growing in biofilms in which interspecies interactions take place. Streptococcus mutans grows in biofilms on enamel surfaces and is considered one of the main etiological agents of human dental caries. Candida albicans is also commonly found in the human oral cavity, where it interacts with S. mutans. C. albicans is a polymorphic fungus, and the yeast-to-hypha transition is involved in virulence and biofilm formation. The aim of this study was to investigate interkingdom communication between C. albicans and S. mutans based on the production of secreted molecules. S. mutans UA159 inhibited C. albicans germ tube (GT) formation in cocultures even when physically separated from C. albicans. Only S. mutans spent medium collected in the early exponential phase (4-h-old cultures) inhibited the GT formation of C. albicans. During this phase, S. mutans UA159 produces a quorum-sensing molecule, competence-stimulating peptide (CSP). The role of CSP in inhibiting GT formation was confirmed by using synthetic CSP and a comC deletion strain of S. mutans UA159, which lacks the ability to produce CSP. Other S. mutans strains and other Streptococcus spp. also inhibited GT formation but to different extents, possibly reflecting differences in CSP amino acid sequences among Streptococcus spp. or differences in CSP accumulation in the media. In conclusion, CSP, an S. mutans quorum-sensing molecule secreted during the early stages of growth, inhibits the C. albicans morphological switch.

  3. Galvanic Tongue Stimulation Inhibits Five Basic Tastes Induced by Aqueous Electrolyte Solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazuma Aoyama

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Galvanic tongue stimulation (GTS modulates taste sensation. However, the effect of GTS is contingent on the electrode polarity in the proximity of the tongue. If an anodal electrode is attached in the proximity of the tongue, an electrical or metallic taste is elicited. On the other hand, if only cathodal electrode is attached in the proximity of the tongue, the salty taste, which is induced by electrolyte materials, is inhibited. The mechanism of this taste inhibition is not adequately understood. In this study, we aim to demonstrate that the inhibition is cause by ions, which elicit taste and which migrate from the taste sensors on the tongue by GTS. We verified the inhibitory effect of GTS on all five basic tastes induced by electrolyte materials. This technology is effective for virtual reality systems and interfaces to support dietary restrictions. Our findings demonstrate that cathodal-GTS inhibits all the five basic tastes. The results also support our hypothesis that the effects of cathodal-GTS are caused by migrating tasting ions in the mouth.

  4. Rupatadine inhibits inflammatory mediator release from human laboratory of allergic diseases 2 cultured mast cells stimulated by platelet-activating factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alevizos, Michail; Karagkouni, Anna; Vasiadi, Magdalini; Sismanopoulos, Nikolaos; Makris, Michael; Kalogeromitros, Dimitrios; Theoharides, Theoharis C

    2013-12-01

    Mast cells are involved in allergy and inflammation by the secretion of multiple mediators, including histamine, cytokines, and platelet-activating factor (PAF), in response to different triggers, including emotional stress. PAF has been associated with allergic inflammation, but there are no clinically available PAF inhibitors. To investigate whether PAF could stimulate human mast cell mediator release and whether rupatadine (RUP), a dual histamine-1 and PAF receptor antagonist, could inhibit the effect of PAF on human mast cells. Laboratory of allergic diseases 2 cultured mast cells were stimulated with PAF (0.001, 0.01, and 0.1 μmol/L) and substance P (1 μmol/L) with or without pretreatment with RUP (2.5 and 25 μmol/L), which was added 10 minutes before stimulation. Release of β-hexosaminidase was measured in supernatant fluid by spectrophotoscopy, and histamine, interleukin-8, and tumor necrosis factor were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. PAF stimulated a statistically significant release of histamine, interleukin-8, and tumor necrosis factor (0.001-0.1 μmol/L) that was comparable to that stimulated by substance P. Pretreatment with RUP (25 μmol/L) for 10 minutes inhibited this effect. In contrast, pretreatment of laboratory of allergic diseases 2 cells with diphenhydramine (25 μmol/L) did not inhibit mediator release, suggesting that the effect of RUP was not due to its antihistaminic effect. PAF stimulates human mast cell release of proinflammatory mediators that is inhibited by RUP. This action endows RUP with additional properties in treating allergic inflammation. Copyright © 2013 American College of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Tumor necrosis factor-alpha inhibits insulin's stimulating effect on glucose uptake and endothelium-dependent vasodilation in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rask-Madsen, Christian; Domínguez, Helena; Ihlemann, Nikolaj

    2003-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Inflammatory mechanisms could be involved in the pathogenesis of both insulin resistance and atherosclerosis. Therefore, we aimed at examining whether the proinflammatory cytokine tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha inhibits insulin-stimulated glucose uptake and insulin....../or TNF-alpha were coinfused. During infusion of insulin alone for 20 minutes, forearm glucose uptake increased by 220+/-44%. This increase was completely inhibited during coinfusion of TNF-alpha (started 10 min before insulin) with a more pronounced inhibition of glucose extraction than of blood flow....... Furthermore, TNF-alpha inhibited the ACh forearm blood flow response (Palpha...

  6. Interactive effects of music and prefrontal cortex stimulation in modulating response inhibition

    OpenAIRE

    Mansouri, Farshad Alizadeh; Acevedo, Nicola; Illipparampil, Rosin; Fehring, Daniel J.; Fitzgerald, Paul B.; Jaberzadeh, Shapour

    2017-01-01

    Influential hypotheses propose that alterations in emotional state influence decision processes and executive control of behavior. Both music and transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) of prefrontal cortex affect emotional state, however interactive effects of music and tDCS on executive functions remain unknown. Learning to inhibit inappropriate responses is an important aspect of executive control which is guided by assessing the decision outcomes such as errors. We found that high-...

  7. Histophilus somni Stimulates Expression of Antiviral Proteins and Inhibits BRSV Replication in Bovine Respiratory Epithelial Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C Lin

    Full Text Available Our previous studies showed that bovine respiratory syncytial virus (BRSV followed by Histophilus somni causes more severe bovine respiratory disease and a more permeable alveolar barrier in vitro than either agent alone. However, microarray analysis revealed the treatment of bovine alveolar type 2 (BAT2 epithelial cells with H. somni concentrated culture supernatant (CCS stimulated up-regulation of four antiviral protein genes as compared with BRSV infection or dual treatment. This suggested that inhibition of viral infection, rather than synergy, may occur if the bacterial infection occurred before the viral infection. Viperin (or radical S-adenosyl methionine domain containing 2--RSAD2 and ISG15 (IFN-stimulated gene 15--ubiquitin-like modifier were most up-regulated. CCS dose and time course for up-regulation of viperin protein levels were determined in treated bovine turbinate (BT upper respiratory cells and BAT2 lower respiratory cells by Western blotting. Treatment of BAT2 cells with H. somni culture supernatant before BRSV infection dramatically reduced viral replication as determined by qRT PCR, supporting the hypothesis that the bacterial infection may inhibit viral infection. Studies of the role of the two known H. somni cytotoxins showed that viperin protein expression was induced by endotoxin (lipooligosaccharide but not by IbpA, which mediates alveolar permeability and H. somni invasion. A naturally occurring IbpA negative asymptomatic carrier strain of H. somni (129Pt does not cause BAT2 cell retraction or permeability of alveolar cell monolayers, so lacks virulence in vitro. To investigate initial steps of pathogenesis, we showed that strain 129Pt attached to BT cells and induced a strong viperin response in vitro. Thus colonization of the bovine upper respiratory tract with an asymptomatic carrier strain lacking virulence may decrease viral infection and the subsequent enhancement of bacterial respiratory infection in vivo.

  8. Bioactive Extract from Moringa oleifera Inhibits the Pro-inflammatory Mediators in Lipopolysaccharide Stimulated Macrophages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fard, Masoumeh Tangestani; Arulselvan, Palanisamy; Karthivashan, Govindarajan; Adam, Siti Khadijah; Fakurazi, Sharida

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Inflammation is a well-known physiological response to protect the body against infection and restore tissue injury. Nevertheless, the chronic inflammation can trigger various inflammatory associated diseases/disorder. Moringa oleifera is a widely grown plant in most tropical countries and it has been recognized traditionally for several medicinal benefits. Objectives: The objective of this study was to investigate the anti-inflammatory properties of M. oleifera extract on lipopolysaccharide (LPS) - stimulated macrophages. Materials and Methods: The anti-inflammatory effect of M. oleifera hydroethanolic bioactive leaves extracts was evaluated by assessing the inhibition of nitric oxide (NO) production during Griess reaction and the expression of pro-inflammatory mediators in macrophages. Results: Interestingly, we found that M. oleifera hydroethanolic bioactive leaves extract significantly inhibited the secretion of NO production and other inflammatory markers such as prostaglandin E2, tumor necrosis factor alpha, interleukin (IL)-6, and IL-1β. Meanwhile, the bioactive extract has induced the production of IL-10 in a dose-dependent manner. In addition, M. oleifera hydroethanolic bioactive leaves extract effectively suppressed the protein expression of inflammatory markers inducible NO synthase, cyclooxygenase-2, and nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B-cells p65 in LPS-induced RAW264.7 macrophages in a dose-dependent manner. Conclusion: These findings support the traditional use of M. oleifera plant as an effective treatment for inflammation associated diseases/disorders. SUMMARY Hydroethanolic extracts of Moringa oleifera effectively inhibit the NO production in LPS induced inflammatory model.M. oleifera crude extracts successfully modulate the production of pro-inflammatory mediators in LPS stimulated macrophages.M. oleifera extracts suppressed the expression of inflammatory mediators in LPS stimulated macrophages. PMID:27013794

  9. Sirtuin inhibition attenuates the production of inflammatory cytokines in lipopolysaccharide-stimulated macrophages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernandes, Cláudia A.; Fievez, Laurence; Neyrinck, Audrey M.; Delzenne, Nathalie M.; Bureau, Fabrice; Vanbever, Rita

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Lipopolysaccharide-stimulated macrophages were treated with cambinol and sirtinol. ► Cambinol and sirtinol decreased lipopolysaccharide-induced cytokines. ► Cambinol decreased NF-κB activity but had no impact on p38 MAPK activation. ► Sirtuins are an interesting target for the treatment of inflammatory diseases. -- Abstract: In several inflammatory conditions such as rheumatoid arthritis or sepsis, the regulatory mechanisms of inflammation are inefficient and the excessive inflammatory response leads to damage to the host. Sirtuins are class III histone deacetylases that modulate the activity of several transcription factors that are implicated in immune responses. In this study, we evaluated the impact of sirtuin inhibition on the activation of lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated J774 macrophages by assessing the production of inflammatory cytokines. The pharmacologic inhibition of sirtuins decreased the production of tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) interleukin 6 (IL-6) and Rantes. The reduction of cytokine production was associated with decreased nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) activity and inhibitor kappa B alpha (IκBα) phosphorylation while no impact was observed on the phosphorylation status of p38 mitogen-activated kinase (p38 MAPK). This work shows that sirtuin pharmacologic inhibitors are a promising tool for the treatment of inflammatory conditions.

  10. Infrared neural stimulation (INS) inhibits electrically evoked neural responses in the deaf white cat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richter, Claus-Peter; Rajguru, Suhrud M.; Robinson, Alan; Young, Hunter K.

    2014-03-01

    Infrared neural stimulation (INS) has been used in the past to evoke neural activity from hearing and partially deaf animals. All the responses were excitatory. In Aplysia californica, Duke and coworkers demonstrated that INS also inhibits neural responses [1], which similar observations were made in the vestibular system [2, 3]. In deaf white cats that have cochleae with largely reduced spiral ganglion neuron counts and a significant degeneration of the organ of Corti, no cochlear compound action potentials could be observed during INS alone. However, the combined electrical and optical stimulation demonstrated inhibitory responses during irradiation with infrared light.

  11. Inhibiting effects of Streptococcus salivarius on competence-stimulating peptide-dependent biofilm formation by Streptococcus mutans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamura, S; Yonezawa, H; Motegi, M; Nakao, R; Yoneda, S; Watanabe, H; Yamazaki, T; Senpuku, H

    2009-04-01

    The effects of Streptococcus salivarius on the competence-stimulating peptide (CSP)-dependent biofilm formation by Streptococcus mutans were investigated. Biofilms were grown on 96-well microtiter plates coated with salivary components in tryptic soy broth without dextrose supplemented with 0.25% sucrose. Biofilm formations were stained using safranin and quantification of stained biofilms was performed by measuring absorbance at 492 nm. S. mutans formed substantial biofilms, whereas biofilms of S. salivarius were formed poorly in the medium conditions used. Furthermore, in combination cultures, S. salivarius strongly inhibited biofilm formation when cultured with S. mutans. This inhibition occurred in the early phase of biofilm formation and was dependent on inactivation of the CSP of S. mutans, which is associated with competence, biofilm formation, and antimicrobial activity of the bacterium, and is induced by expression of the comC gene. Comparisons between the S. mutans clinical strains FSC-3 and FSC-3DeltaglrA in separate dual-species cultures with S. salivarius indicated that the presence of the bacitracin transport ATP-binding protein gene glrA caused susceptibility to inhibition of S. mutans biofilm formation by S. salivarius, and was also associated with the regulation of CSP production by com gene-dependent quorum sensing systems. It is considered that regulation of CSP by glrA in S. mutans and CSP inactivation by S. salivarius are important functions for cell-to-cell communication between biofilm bacteria and oral streptococci such as S. salivarius. Our results provide useful information for understanding the ecosystem of oral streptococcal biofilms, as well as the competition between and coexistence of multiple species in the oral cavity.

  12. Lactoferrin release and interleukin-1, interleukin-6, and tumor necrosis factor production by human polymorphonuclear cells stimulated by various lipopolysaccharides: relationship to growth inhibition of Candida albicans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palma, C; Cassone, A; Serbousek, D; Pearson, C A; Djeu, J Y

    1992-11-01

    Lipopolysaccharides (LPSs) from Escherichia coli, Serratia marcescens, and Salmonella typhimurium, at doses from 1 to 100 ng/ml, strongly enhanced growth inhibition of Candida albicans by human polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN) in vitro. Flow cytometry analysis demonstrated that LPS markedly augmented phagocytosis of Candida cells by increasing the number of yeasts ingested per neutrophil as well as the number of neutrophils capable of ingesting fungal cells. LPS activation caused augmented release of lactoferrin, an iron-binding protein which itself could inhibit the growth of C. albicans in vitro. Antibodies against lactoferrin effectively and specifically reduced the anti-C. albicans activity of both LPS-stimulated and unstimulated PMN. Northern (RNA blot) analysis showed enhanced production of mRNAs for interleukin-1 beta, tumor necrosis factor alpha, and interleukin-6 and in neutrophils within 1 h of stimulation with LPS. The cytokines were also detected in the supernatant of the activated PMN, and their synthesis was prevented by pretreatment of LPS-stimulated PMN with protein synthesis inhibitors, such as emetine and cycloheximide. These inhibitors, however, did not block either lactoferrin release or the anti-Candida activity of LPS-stimulated PMN. These results demonstrate the ability of various bacterial LPSs to augment neutrophil function against C. albicans and suggest that the release of a candidastatic, iron-binding protein, lactoferrin, may contribute to the antifungal effect of PMN. Moreover, the ability to produce cytokines upon stimulation by ubiquitous microbial products such as the endotoxins points to an extraphagocytic, immunomodulatory role of PMN during infection.

  13. The opposing effects of calmodulin, adenosine 5 prime -triphosphate, and pertussis toxin on phorbol ester induced inhibition of atrial natriuretic factor stimulated guanylate cyclase in SK-NEP-1 cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sekiya, M.; Frohlich, E.D.; Cole, F.E. (Alton Ochsner Medical Foundation, New Orleans, LA (USA))

    1991-01-01

    In the present study, we investigated the effects of calmodulin, adenosine 5{prime}-triphosphate (ATP) and pertussis toxin (PT) on phorbol ester (PMA) induced inhibition of ANF-stimulated cyclic GMP formation in cells from the human renal cell line, SK-NEP-1. PMA inhibited ANF-stimulated guanylate cyclase activity in particulate membranes by about 65%. Calmodulin reversed this inhibition in a dose dependent manner. ATP potentiated Mg++ but not Mn++ supported guanylate cyclase activity. In PMA treated membranes, ATP potentiating effects were abolished. PMA also inhibited ANF-stimulated cGMP accumulation, but pretreatment with PT prevented this PMA inhibition. PT did not affect basal or ANF-stimulated cGMP accumulation. In conclusion, these results demonstrated that PMA inhibited ANF stimulation of particulate guanylate cyclase in opposition to the activating effects of calmodulin or ATP in SK-NEP-1 cells. The protein kinase C inhibitory effects appeared to be mediated via a PT-sensitive G protein.

  14. Docosahexaenoic acid inhibits IL-6 expression via PPARγ-mediated expression of catalase in cerulein-stimulated pancreatic acinar cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Eun Ah; Lim, Joo Weon; Kim, Hyeyoung

    2017-07-01

    Cerulein pancreatitis mirrors human acute pancreatitis. In pancreatic acinar cells exposed to cerulein, reactive oxygen species (ROS) mediate inflammatory signaling by Janus kinase (JAK) 2/signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT) 3, and cytokine induction. Docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) acts as an agonist of peroxisome proliferator activated receptor γ (PPARγ), which mediates the expression of some antioxidant enzymes. We hypothesized that DHA may induce PPARγ-target catalase expression and reduce ROS levels, leading to the inhibition of JAK2/STAT3 activation and IL-6 expression in cerulein-stimulated acinar cells. Pancreatic acinar AR42J cells were treated with DHA in the presence or absence of the PPARγ antagonist GW9662, or treated with the PPARγ agonist troglitazone, and then stimulated with cerulein. Expression of IL-6 and catalase, ROS levels, JAK2/STAT3 activation, and nuclear translocation of PPARγ were assessed. DHA suppressed the increase in ROS, JAK2/STAT3 activation, and IL-6 expression induced nuclear translocation of PPARγ and catalase expression in cerulein-stimulated AR42J cells. Troglitazone inhibited the cerulein-induced increase in ROS and IL-6 expression, but induced catalase expression similar to DHA in AR42J cells. GW9662 abolished the inhibitory effect of DHA on cerulein-induced increase in ROS and IL-6 expression in AR42J cells. DHA-induced expression of catalase was suppressed by GW9662 in cerulein-stimulated AR42J cells. Thus, DHA induces PPARγ activation and catalase expression, which inhibits ROS-mediated activation of JAK2/STAT3 and IL-6 expression in cerulein-stimulated pancreatic acinar cells. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  15. Stimulation of the cardiac myocyte Na+-K+ pump due to reversal of its constitutive oxidative inhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chia, Karin K M; Liu, Chia-Chi; Hamilton, Elisha J; Garcia, Alvaro; Fry, Natasha A; Hannam, William; Figtree, Gemma A; Rasmussen, Helge H

    2015-08-15

    Protein kinase C can activate NADPH oxidase and induce glutathionylation of the β1-Na(+)-K(+) pump subunit, inhibiting activity of the catalytic α-subunit. To examine if signaling of nitric oxide-induced soluble guanylyl cyclase (sGC)/cGMP/protein kinase G can cause Na(+)-K(+) pump stimulation by counteracting PKC/NADPH oxidase-dependent inhibition, cardiac myocytes were exposed to ANG II to activate NADPH oxidase and inhibit Na(+)-K(+) pump current (Ip). Coexposure to 3-(5'-hydroxymethyl-2'-furyl)-1-benzylindazole (YC-1) to stimulate sGC prevented the decrease of Ip. Prevention of the decrease was abolished by inhibition of protein phosphatases (PP) 2A but not by inhibition of PP1, and it was reproduced by an activator of PP2A. Consistent with a reciprocal relationship between β1-Na(+)-K(+) pump subunit glutathionylation and pump activity, YC-1 decreased ANG II-induced β1-subunit glutathionylation. The decrease induced by YC-1 was abolished by a PP2A inhibitor. YC-1 decreased phosphorylation of the cytosolic p47(phox) NADPH oxidase subunit and its coimmunoprecipitation with the membranous p22(phox) subunit, and it decreased O2 (·-)-sensitive dihydroethidium fluorescence of myocytes. Addition of recombinant PP2A to myocyte lysate decreased phosphorylation of p47(phox) indicating the subunit could be a substrate for PP2A. The effects of YC-1 to decrease coimmunoprecipitation of p22(phox) and p47(phox) NADPH oxidase subunits and decrease β1-Na(+)-K(+) pump subunit glutathionylation were reproduced by activation of nitric oxide-dependent receptor signaling. We conclude that sGC activation in cardiac myocytes causes a PP2A-dependent decrease in NADPH oxidase activity and a decrease in β1 pump subunit glutathionylation. This could account for pump stimulation with neurohormonal oxidative stress expected in vivo. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  16. Calcitonin causes a sustained inhibition of protein kinase C-stimulated bone resorption in contrast to the transient inhibition of parathyroid hormone-induced bone resorption

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ransjoe, M.; Lerner, U.H.

    1990-01-01

    Calcitonin is a well known inhibitor of osteoclastic bone resortion, both in vivo and in vitro. However, it is also known that calcitonin has only a transient inhibitory effect on bone resorption. The mechanism for this so-called ''escape from inhibition'' phenomenon is not clear. In the present study, the inhibitory effect of calcitonin on phorbol ester-induced bone resorption was examined in cultured neonatal mouse calvaria. Bone resorption was assessed as the release of radioactivity from bones prelabelled in vivo with 45 Ca. Two proteon kinase C-activating phorbol esters, phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate and phorbol-12,13-dibutyrate, both stimulated 45 Ca release in 120-h cultures at a concentration of 10 nmul/l. Calcitonin (30 nmol/l) inhibited phorbol esterstimulated bone resorption without any ''escape from inhibition''. This was in contrast to the transient inhibitory effect of calcitonin on bone resorption stimulated by parathyroid hormone (10 nmol/l), prostaglandin E 2 (2 μmol/l), and bradykinin (1 μmol/l). Our results suggest that activation of protein kinase C produces a sustained inhibitory effect of calcitonin on bone resorption. (author)

  17. ROCK inhibition stimulates SOX9/Smad3-dependent COL2A1 expression in inner meniscus cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furumatsu, Takayuki; Maehara, Ami; Ozaki, Toshifumi

    2016-07-01

    Proper functioning of the meniscus depends on the composition and organization of its fibrocartilaginous extracellular matrix. We previously demonstrated that the avascular inner meniscus has a more chondrocytic phenotype compared with the outer meniscus. Inhibition of the Rho family GTPase ROCK, the major regulator of the actin cytoskeleton, stimulates the chondrogenic transcription factor Sry-type HMG box (SOX) 9-dependent α1(II) collagen (COL2A1) expression in inner meniscus cells. However, the crosstalk between ROCK inhibition, SOX9, and other transcription modulators on COL2A1 upregulation remains unclear in meniscus cells. The aim of this study was to investigate the role of SOX9-related transcriptional complex on COL2A1 expression under the inhibition of ROCK in human meniscus cells. Human inner and outer meniscus cells were prepared from macroscopically intact lateral menisci. Cells were cultured in the presence or absence of ROCK inhibitor (ROCKi, Y27632). Gene expression, collagen synthesis, and nuclear translocation of SOX9 and Smad2/3 were analyzed. Treatment of ROCKi increased the ratio of type I/II collagen double positive cells derived from the inner meniscus. In real-time PCR analyses, expression of SOX9 and COL2A1 genes was stimulated by ROCKi treatment in inner meniscus cells. ROCKi treatment also induced nuclear translocation of SOX9 and phosphorylated Smad2/3 in immunohistological analyses. Complex formation between SOX9 and Smad3 was increased by ROCKi treatment in inner meniscus cells. Chromatin immunoprecipitation analyses revealed that association between SOX9/Smad3 transcriptional complex with the COL2A1 enhancer region was increased by ROCKi treatment. This study demonstrated that ROCK inhibition stimulated SOX9/Smad3-dependent COL2A1 expression through the immediate nuclear translocation of Smad3 in inner meniscus cells. Our results suggest that ROCK inhibition can stimulates type II collagen synthesis through the cooperative activation

  18. Adaptive threshold hunting for the effects of transcranial direct current stimulation on primary motor cortex inhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mooney, Ronan A; Cirillo, John; Byblow, Winston D

    2018-06-01

    Primary motor cortex excitability can be modulated by anodal and cathodal transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS). These neuromodulatory effects may, in part, be dependent on modulation within gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA)-mediated inhibitory networks. GABAergic function can be quantified non-invasively using adaptive threshold hunting paired-pulse transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS). The previous studies have used TMS with posterior-anterior (PA) induced current to assess tDCS effects on inhibition. However, TMS with anterior-posterior (AP) induced current in the brain provides a more robust measure of GABA-mediated inhibition. The aim of the present study was to assess the modulation of corticomotor excitability and inhibition after anodal and cathodal tDCS using TMS with PA- and AP-induced current. In 16 young adults (26 ± 1 years), we investigated the response to anodal, cathodal, and sham tDCS in a repeated-measures double-blinded crossover design. Adaptive threshold hunting paired-pulse TMS with PA- and AP-induced current was used to examine separate interneuronal populations within M1 and their influence on corticomotor excitability and short- and long-interval inhibition (SICI and LICI) for up to 60 min after tDCS. Unexpectedly, cathodal tDCS increased corticomotor excitability assessed with AP (P = 0.047) but not PA stimulation (P = 0.74). SICI AP was reduced after anodal tDCS compared with sham (P = 0.040). Pearson's correlations indicated that SICI AP and LICI AP modulation was associated with corticomotor excitability after anodal (P = 0.027) and cathodal tDCS (P = 0.042). The after-effects of tDCS on corticomotor excitability may depend on the direction of the TMS-induced current used to make assessments, and on modulation within GABA-mediated inhibitory circuits.

  19. Sirtuin inhibition attenuates the production of inflammatory cytokines in lipopolysaccharide-stimulated macrophages

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fernandes, Claudia A. [Universite catholique de Louvain, Louvain Drug Research Institute (LDRI), Pharmaceutics and Drug Delivery Research Group, Brussels B-1200 (Belgium); Fievez, Laurence [University of Liege, GIGA-Research, Laboratory of Cellular and Molecular Immunology, Liege B-4000 (Belgium); Neyrinck, Audrey M.; Delzenne, Nathalie M. [Universite catholique de Louvain, LDRI, Metabolism and Nutrition Research Group, Brussels B-1200 (Belgium); Bureau, Fabrice [University of Liege, GIGA-Research, Laboratory of Cellular and Molecular Immunology, Liege B-4000 (Belgium); Vanbever, Rita, E-mail: rita.vanbever@uclouvain.be [Universite catholique de Louvain, Louvain Drug Research Institute (LDRI), Pharmaceutics and Drug Delivery Research Group, Brussels B-1200 (Belgium)

    2012-04-20

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Lipopolysaccharide-stimulated macrophages were treated with cambinol and sirtinol. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cambinol and sirtinol decreased lipopolysaccharide-induced cytokines. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cambinol decreased NF-{kappa}B activity but had no impact on p38 MAPK activation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Sirtuins are an interesting target for the treatment of inflammatory diseases. -- Abstract: In several inflammatory conditions such as rheumatoid arthritis or sepsis, the regulatory mechanisms of inflammation are inefficient and the excessive inflammatory response leads to damage to the host. Sirtuins are class III histone deacetylases that modulate the activity of several transcription factors that are implicated in immune responses. In this study, we evaluated the impact of sirtuin inhibition on the activation of lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated J774 macrophages by assessing the production of inflammatory cytokines. The pharmacologic inhibition of sirtuins decreased the production of tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-{alpha}) interleukin 6 (IL-6) and Rantes. The reduction of cytokine production was associated with decreased nuclear factor kappa B (NF-{kappa}B) activity and inhibitor kappa B alpha (I{kappa}B{alpha}) phosphorylation while no impact was observed on the phosphorylation status of p38 mitogen-activated kinase (p38 MAPK). This work shows that sirtuin pharmacologic inhibitors are a promising tool for the treatment of inflammatory conditions.

  20. The effects of patterned electrical stimulation combined with voluntary contraction on spinal reciprocal inhibition in healthy individuals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Takahashi, Yoko; Fujiwara, Toshiyuki; Yamaguchi, Tomofumi

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the effects of voluntary contraction (VC) on the modulation of reciprocal inhibition induced by patterned electrical stimulation (PES) in healthy individuals. Twelve healthy volunteers participated in this study. PES was applied to the common peroneal nerve...... a soleus H-reflex conditioning-test paradigm at the time points of before, immediately after, 10 min after, 20 min after, and 30 min after the tasks. PES+VC increased the amount of reciprocal inhibition, with after-effects lasting up to 20 min. PES alone increased reciprocal inhibition and maintained...

  1. Bilateral stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus has differential effects on reactive and proactive inhibition and conflict-induced slowing in Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obeso, Ignacio; Wilkinson, Leonora; Rodríguez-Oroz, Maria-Cruz; Obeso, Jose A; Jahanshahi, Marjan

    2013-05-01

    It has been proposed that the subthalamic nucleus (STN) mediates response inhibition and conflict resolution through the fronto-basal ganglia pathways. Our aim was to compare the effects of deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the STN on reactive and proactive inhibition and conflict resolution in Parkinson's disease using a single task. We used the conditional Stop signal reaction time task that provides the Stop signal reaction time (SSRT) as a measure of reactive inhibition, the response delay effect (RDE) as a measure of proactive inhibition and conflict-induced slowing (CIS) as a measure of conflict resolution. DBS of the STN significantly prolonged SSRT relative to stimulation off. However, while the RDE measure of proactive inhibition was not significantly altered by DBS of the STN, relative to healthy controls, RDE was significantly lower with DBS off but not DBS on. DBS of the STN did not alter the mean CIS but produced a significant differential effect on the slowest and fastest RTs on conflict trials, further prolonging the slowest RTs on the conflict trials relative to DBS off and to controls. These results are the first demonstration, using a single task in the same patient sample, that DBS of the STN produces differential effects on reactive and proactive inhibition and on conflict resolution, suggesting that these effects are likely to be mediated through the impact of STN stimulation on different fronto-basal ganglia pathways: hyperdirect, direct and indirect.

  2. Reinforcement and stimulant medication ameliorate deficient response inhibition in children with Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosch, Keri S.; Fosco, Whitney D.; Pelham, William E.; Waxmonsky, James G.; Bubnik, Michelle G.; Hawk, Larry W.

    2015-01-01

    This study examined the degree to which reinforcement, stimulant medication, and their combination impact response inhibition in children with Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD). Across three studies, participants with ADHD (n=111, 25 girls) and typically-developing (TD) controls (n=33, 6 girls) completed a standard version of the stop signal task (SST) and/or a reinforcement-manipulation SST with performance-contingent points. In two of these studies, these tasks were performed under placebo or 0.3 and 0.6 mg/kg methylphenidate (MPH) conditions. Cross-study comparisons were conducted to test hypotheses regarding the separate and combined effects of reinforcement and methylphenidate on response inhibition among children with ADHD relative to TD controls. Baseline response inhibition was worse among children with ADHD compared to controls. MPH produced dose-related improvements in response inhibition in children with ADHD; compared to non-medicated TD controls, 0.3 mg/kg MPH normalized deficient response inhibition, and 0.6 mg/kg MPH resulted in better inhibition in children with ADHD. Reinforcement improved response inhibition to a greater extent for children with ADHD than for TD children, normalizing response inhibition. The combination of MPH and reinforcement improved response inhibition among children with ADHD compared to reinforcement alone and MPH alone, also resulting in normalization of response inhibition despite repeated task exposure. Deficient response inhibition commonly observed in children with ADHD is significantly improved with MPH and/or reinforcement, normalizing inhibition relative to TD children tested under standard conditions. PMID:25985978

  3. Stimulation of the subthalamic region facilitates the selection and inhibition of motor responses in Parkinson's disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Wildenberg, Wery P. M.; van Boxtel, Geert J. M.; van der Molen, Maurits W.; Bosch, D. Andries; Speelman, Johannes D.; Brunia, Cornelis H. M.

    2006-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to specify the involvement of the basal ganglia in motor response selection and response inhibition. Two samples were studied. The first sample consisted of patients diagnosed with Parkinson's disease (PD) who received deep-brain stimulation (DBS) of the subthalamic

  4. Is transcranial direct current stimulation a potential method for improving response inhibition?☆

    OpenAIRE

    Kwon, Yong Hyun; Kwon, Jung Won

    2013-01-01

    Inhibitory control of movement in motor learning requires the ability to suppress an inappropriate action, a skill needed to stop a planned or ongoing motor response in response to changes in a variety of environments. This study used a stop-signal task to determine whether transcranial direct-current stimulation over the pre-supplementary motor area alters the reaction time in motor inhibition. Forty healthy subjects were recruited for this study and were randomly assigned to either the tran...

  5. Co-culture with human synovium-derived mesenchymal stem cells inhibits inflammatory activity and increases cell proliferation of sodium nitroprusside-stimulated chondrocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryu, Jae-Sung; Jung, Yeon-Hwa; Cho, Mi-Young; Yeo, Jee Eun; Choi, Yun-Jin; Kim, Yong Il; Koh, Yong-Gon

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Co-culture of hSDMSCs with SNP-stimulated chondrocytes improves anti-inflammation. • Co-culture system produces IGF-1. • Co-culture system suppresses inflammatory genes expression. • Co-culture system improves cell proliferation. • Exogenous IGF-1 inhibits inflammatory activity in SNP-stimulated chondrocytes. - Abstract: Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and osteoarthritis (OA) are primarily chronic inflammatory diseases. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have the ability to differentiate into cells of the mesodermal lineage, and to regulate immunomodulatory activity. Specifically, MSCs have been shown to secrete insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1). The purpose of the present study was to examine the inhibitory effects on inflammatory activity from a co-culture of human synovium-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hSDMSCs) and sodium nitroprusside (SNP)-stimulated chondrocytes. First, chondrocytes were treated with SNP to generate an in vitro model of RA or OA. Next, the co-culture of hSDMSCs with SNP-stimulated chondrocytes reduced inflammatory cytokine secretion, inhibited expression of inflammation activity-related genes, generated IGF-1 secretion, and increased the chondrocyte proliferation rate. To evaluate the effect of IGF-1 on inhibition of inflammation, chondrocytes pre-treated with IGF-1 were treated with SNP, and then the production of inflammatory cytokines was analyzed. Treatment with IGF-1 was shown to significantly reduce inflammatory cytokine secretion in SNP-stimulated chondrocytes. Our results suggest that hSDMSCs offer a new strategy to promote cell-based cartilage regeneration in RA or OA

  6. Co-culture with human synovium-derived mesenchymal stem cells inhibits inflammatory activity and increases cell proliferation of sodium nitroprusside-stimulated chondrocytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ryu, Jae-Sung; Jung, Yeon-Hwa; Cho, Mi-Young; Yeo, Jee Eun; Choi, Yun-Jin; Kim, Yong Il; Koh, Yong-Gon, E-mail: yonseranglab@daum.net

    2014-05-16

    Highlights: • Co-culture of hSDMSCs with SNP-stimulated chondrocytes improves anti-inflammation. • Co-culture system produces IGF-1. • Co-culture system suppresses inflammatory genes expression. • Co-culture system improves cell proliferation. • Exogenous IGF-1 inhibits inflammatory activity in SNP-stimulated chondrocytes. - Abstract: Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and osteoarthritis (OA) are primarily chronic inflammatory diseases. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have the ability to differentiate into cells of the mesodermal lineage, and to regulate immunomodulatory activity. Specifically, MSCs have been shown to secrete insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1). The purpose of the present study was to examine the inhibitory effects on inflammatory activity from a co-culture of human synovium-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hSDMSCs) and sodium nitroprusside (SNP)-stimulated chondrocytes. First, chondrocytes were treated with SNP to generate an in vitro model of RA or OA. Next, the co-culture of hSDMSCs with SNP-stimulated chondrocytes reduced inflammatory cytokine secretion, inhibited expression of inflammation activity-related genes, generated IGF-1 secretion, and increased the chondrocyte proliferation rate. To evaluate the effect of IGF-1 on inhibition of inflammation, chondrocytes pre-treated with IGF-1 were treated with SNP, and then the production of inflammatory cytokines was analyzed. Treatment with IGF-1 was shown to significantly reduce inflammatory cytokine secretion in SNP-stimulated chondrocytes. Our results suggest that hSDMSCs offer a new strategy to promote cell-based cartilage regeneration in RA or OA.

  7. Stimulation and inhibition of erythropoiesis in donors and hematopoietic effect in irradiated recipient

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ninkov, V; Piletic, O; Stepanovic, D [Institut za Nuklearne Nauke Boris Kidric, Vinca (Yugoslavia); Belgrade Univ. (Yugoslavia). Inst. of Histology)

    1976-03-01

    Regeneration dynamics in bone marrow and spleen was studied in rats after irradiation of 800 R and transfusion of bone marrow cells from donors treated in different ways. Priority of the microenvironment of the recipient or of the information obtained in cell donors with respect to further hematopoietic cell differentiation was studied in irradiated recipients. Rats irradiated with 800 R were used as recipients in the experiments. The donors of marrow cells were the rats with stimulated or inhibited erythropoiesis. Stimulation of erythropoiesis was induced by bleeding and experimental polycythemia was provoked by packed erythrocytes. According to our results, it can be concluded that the processes of postirradiation hematopoiesis after transplantation of the bone marrow cells depend on the number and proliferative state of both donors and recipient stem cells, and microenvironment, not excluding the information introduced with the donor cell transplant.

  8. Preirradiation of medium induces a subsequent stimulation or inhibition of growth according to the physiological state in Synechococcus lividus in culture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conter, A.

    1987-01-01

    The proliferation of Synechococcus lividus cells grown in preirradiated medium was compared with the proliferation of cells grown in a shielded or freshly prepared medium. Aging of medium in a shielded chamber resulted in a slight inhibiting effect on growth in every phase of the cell cycle which was used. Preirradiation of medium resulted in a stimulation of growth observed on Day 7 in cultures inoculated with cells selected in the deceleration phase and an inhibition of growth in cultures inoculated with exponentially growing cells. Addition of catalase (100 U X ml-1) counteracted the stimulating effect but did not modify the inhibiting effect induced by preirradiated medium. Results demonstrated the indirect effect of low doses of irradiation, implying the presence of hydrogen peroxide in radiostimulation and other radioproducts in the inhibitory effect

  9. Enkephalin inhibition of angiotensin-stimulated release of oxytocin and vasopressin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keil, L. C.; Chee, O.; Rosella-Dampman, L. M.; Emmert, S.; Summy-Long, J. Y.

    1984-01-01

    The effect of intracerebroventricular (ICV) pretreatment with 100 ng/5 microliter leucine(5)-enkephalin (LE) on the increase in plasma oxytocin (OT) and vasopressin (VP) caused by ICV injection of 10, 50, or 100 ng/5 microliter of angiotensin II (AII) is investigated experimentally in conscious adult male Sprague-Dawley rats; the effects of water-deprivation dehydration and lactation/suckling (in female rats) are also studied. An OT radioimmunoassay (RIA) with a sensitivity of 800 fg/ml (described in detail) and the VP RIA technique of Keil and Severs (1977) are employed. Administration of AII or dehydration for 48 or 72 h cause a significant increase in OT and VP without affecting the ratio, while lactation and suckling increase OT only. LE pretreatment inhibits significantly but does not suppress the AII-stimulated OT-VP response.

  10. Inhibition of cAMP-Dependent PKA Activates β2-Adrenergic Receptor Stimulation of Cytosolic Phospholipase A2 via Raf-1/MEK/ERK and IP3-Dependent Ca2+ Signaling in Atrial Myocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pabbidi, M R; Ji, X; Maxwell, J T; Mignery, G A; Samarel, A M; Lipsius, S L

    2016-01-01

    We previously reported in atrial myocytes that inhibition of cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) by laminin (LMN)-integrin signaling activates β2-adrenergic receptor (β2-AR) stimulation of cytosolic phospholipase A2 (cPLA2). The present study sought to determine the signaling mechanisms by which inhibition of PKA activates β2-AR stimulation of cPLA2. We therefore determined the effects of zinterol (0.1 μM; zint-β2-AR) to stimulate ICa,L in atrial myocytes in the absence (+PKA) and presence (-PKA) of the PKA inhibitor (1 μM) KT5720 and compared these results with atrial myocytes attached to laminin (+LMN). Inhibition of Raf-1 (10 μM GW5074), phospholipase C (PLC; 0.5 μM edelfosine), PKC (4 μM chelerythrine) or IP3 receptor (IP3R) signaling (2 μM 2-APB) significantly inhibited zint-β2-AR stimulation of ICa,L in-PKA but not +PKA myocytes. Western blots showed that zint-β2-AR stimulation increased ERK1/2 phosphorylation in-PKA compared to +PKA myocytes. Adenoviral (Adv) expression of dominant negative (dn) -PKCα, dn-Raf-1 or an IP3 affinity trap, each inhibited zint-β2-AR stimulation of ICa,L in + LMN myocytes compared to control +LMN myocytes infected with Adv-βgal. In +LMN myocytes, zint-β2-AR stimulation of ICa,L was enhanced by adenoviral overexpression of wild-type cPLA2 and inhibited by double dn-cPLA2S505A/S515A mutant compared to control +LMN myocytes infected with Adv-βgal. In-PKA myocytes depletion of intracellular Ca2+ stores by 5 μM thapsigargin failed to inhibit zint-β2-AR stimulation of ICa,L via cPLA2. However, disruption of caveolae formation by 10 mM methyl-β-cyclodextrin inhibited zint-β2-AR stimulation of ICa,L in-PKA myocytes significantly more than in +PKA myocytes. We conclude that inhibition of PKA removes inhibition of Raf-1 and thereby allows β2-AR stimulation to act via PKCα/Raf-1/MEK/ERK1/2 and IP3-mediated Ca2+ signaling to stimulate cPLA2 signaling within caveolae. These findings may be relevant to the remodeling of

  11. The strong anti-glioblastoma capacity of the plasma-stimulated lysine-rich medium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yan, Dayun; Keidar, Michael; Nourmohammadi, Niki; Talbot, Annie; Sherman, Jonathan H

    2016-01-01

    Plasma-stimulated medium (PSM) shows a remarkable anti-cancer capacity as strong as the direct cold atmospheric plasma (CAP) treatment of cancer cells. PSM is able to effectively resist the growth of several cancer cell lines. To date, the sole approach to strengthen the anti-cancer capacity of PSM is extending the plasma treatment time. In this study, we demonstrated that the anti-glioblastoma capacity of PSM could be significantly increased by adding 20 mM lysine in Dulbecco’s modified Eagle’s medium (DMEM). This study provides clear evidence that the anti-glioblastoma capacity of PSM could be noticeably enhanced by modifying the composition of medium without increasing the CAP treatment time. (paper)

  12. The transcriptional co-repressor myeloid translocation gene 16 inhibits glycolysis and stimulates mitochondrial respiration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parveen Kumar

    Full Text Available The myeloid translocation gene 16 product MTG16 is found in multiple transcription factor-containing complexes as a regulator of gene expression implicated in development and tumorigenesis. A stable Tet-On system for doxycycline-dependent expression of MTG16 was established in B-lymphoblastoid Raji cells to unravel its molecular functions in transformed cells. A noticeable finding was that expression of certain genes involved in tumor cell metabolism including 6-phosphofructo-2-kinase/fructose-2,6-biphosphatase 3 and 4 (PFKFB3 and PFKFB4, and pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase isoenzyme 1 (PDK1 was rapidly diminished when MTG16 was expressed. Furthermore, hypoxia-stimulated production of PFKFB3, PFKFB4 and PDK1 was inhibited by MTG16 expression. The genes in question encode key regulators of glycolysis and its coupling to mitochondrial metabolism and are commonly found to be overexpressed in transformed cells. The MTG16 Nervy Homology Region 2 (NHR2 oligomerization domain and the NHR3 protein-protein interaction domain were required intact for inhibition of PFKFB3, PFKFB4 and PDK1 expression to occur. Expression of MTG16 reduced glycolytic metabolism while mitochondrial respiration and formation of reactive oxygen species increased. The metabolic changes were paralleled by increased phosphorylation of mitogen-activated protein kinases, reduced levels of amino acids and inhibition of proliferation with a decreased fraction of cells in S-phase. Overall, our findings show that MTG16 can serve as a brake on glycolysis, a stimulator of mitochondrial respiration and an inhibitor of cell proliferation. Hence, elevation of MTG16 might have anti-tumor effect.

  13. Cortical Inhibition in Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder: New Insights from the Electroencephalographic Response to Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruckmann, Sarah; Hauk, Daniela; Roessner, Veit; Resch, Franz; Freitag, Christine M.; Kammer, Thomas; Ziemann, Ulf; Rothenberger, Aribert; Weisbrod, Matthias; Bender, Stephan

    2012-01-01

    Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder is one of the most frequent neuropsychiatric disorders in childhood. Transcranial magnetic stimulation studies based on muscle responses (motor-evoked potentials) suggested that reduced motor inhibition contributes to hyperactivity, a core symptom of the disease. Here we employed the N100 component of the…

  14. Ethanol and Other Short-Chain Alcohols Inhibit NLRP3 Inflammasome Activation through Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase Stimulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoyt, Laura R.; Ather, Jennifer L.; Randall, Matthew J.; DePuccio, Daniel P.; Landry, Christopher C.; Wewers, Mark D.; Gavrilin, Mikhail A.; Poynter, Matthew E.

    2016-01-01

    Immunosuppression is a major complication of alcoholism that contributes to increased rates of opportunistic infections and sepsis in alcoholics. The NLRP3 inflammasome, a multi-protein intracellular pattern recognition receptor complex that facilitates the cleavage and secretion of the pro-inflammatory cytokines IL-1β and IL-18, can be inhibited by ethanol and we sought to better understand the mechanism through which this occurs and whether chemically similar molecules exert comparable effects. We show that ethanol can specifically inhibit activation of the NLRP3 inflammasome, resulting in attenuated IL-1β and caspase-1 cleavage and secretion, as well as diminished ASC speck formation, without affecting potassium efflux, in a mouse macrophage cell line (J774), mouse bone marrow derived dendritic cells, mouse neutrophils, and human PBMCs. The inhibitory effects on the Nlrp3 inflammasome were independent of GABAA receptor activation or NMDA receptor inhibition, but was associated with decreased oxidant production. Ethanol treatment markedly decreased cellular tyrosine phosphorylation, while administration of the tyrosine phosphatase inhibitor sodium orthovanadate prior to ethanol restored tyrosine phosphorylation and IL-1β secretion subsequent to ATP stimulation. Furthermore, sodium orthovanadate-induced phosphorylation of ASC Y144, necessary and sufficient for Nlrp3 inflammasome activation, and secretion of phosphorylated ASC, were inhibited by ethanol. Finally, multiple alcohol-containing organic compounds exerted inhibitory effects on the Nlrp3 inflammasome, whereas 2-methylbutane (isopentane), the analogous alkane of the potent inhibitor isoamyl alcohol (isopentanol), did not. Our results demonstrate that ethanol antagonizes the NLRP3 inflammasome at an apical event in its activation through the stimulation of protein tyrosine phosphatases, an effect shared by other short-chain alcohols. PMID:27421477

  15. Intensity dependent waiting time for strong electron trapping events in speckle stimulated raman scatter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rose, Harvey [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Daughton, W [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Yin, L [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01

    The onset of Stimulated Raman scatter from an intense laser speckle is the simplest experimentally realizable laser-plasma-interaction environment. Despite this data and recent 3D particle simulations, the controlling mechanism at the onset of backscatter in the kinetic regime when strong electron trapping in the daughter Langmuir wave is a dominant nonlinearity is not understood. This paper explores the consequences of assuming that onset is controlled by large thermal fluctuations. A super exponential dependence of mean reflectivity on speckle intensity in the onset regime is predicted.

  16. A Preliminary Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation Study of Cortical Inhibition and Excitability in High-Functioning Autism and Asperger Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enticott, Peter G.; Rinehart, Nicole J.; Tonge, Bruce J.; Bradshaw, John L.; Fitzgerald, Paul B.

    2010-01-01

    Aim: Controversy surrounds the distinction between high-functioning autism (HFA) and Asperger disorder, but motor abnormalities are associated features of both conditions. This study examined motor cortical inhibition and excitability in HFA and Asperger disorder using transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS). Method: Participants were diagnosed by…

  17. Deep brain stimulation effects in dystonia: time course of electrophysiological changes in early treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruge, Diane; Tisch, Stephen; Hariz, Marwan I; Zrinzo, Ludvic; Bhatia, Kailash P; Quinn, Niall P; Jahanshahi, Marjan; Limousin, Patricia; Rothwell, John C

    2011-08-15

    Deep brain stimulation to the internal globus pallidus is an effective treatment for primary dystonia. The optimal clinical effect often occurs only weeks to months after starting stimulation. To better understand the underlying electrophysiological changes in this period, we assessed longitudinally 2 pathophysiological markers of dystonia in patients prior to and in the early treatment period (1, 3, 6 months) after deep brain stimulation surgery. Transcranial magnetic stimulation was used to track changes in short-latency intracortical inhibition, a measure of excitability of GABA(A) -ergic corticocortical connections and long-term potentiation-like synaptic plasticity (as a response to paired associative stimulation). Deep brain stimulation remained on for the duration of the study. Prior to surgery, inhibition was reduced and plasticity increased in patients compared with healthy controls. Following surgery and commencement of deep brain stimulation, short-latency intracortical inhibition increased toward normal levels over the following months with the same monotonic time course as the patients' clinical benefit. In contrast, synaptic plasticity changed rapidly, following a nonmonotonic time course: it was absent early (1 month) after surgery, and then over the following months increased toward levels observed in healthy individuals. We postulate that before surgery preexisting high levels of plasticity form strong memories of dystonic movement patterns. When deep brain stimulation is turned on, it disrupts abnormal basal ganglia signals, resulting in the absent response to paired associative stimulation at 1 month. Clinical benefit is delayed because engrams of abnormal movement persist and take time to normalize. Our observations suggest that plasticity may be a driver of long-term therapeutic effects of deep brain stimulation in dystonia. Copyright © 2011 Movement Disorder Society.

  18. Inhibition of gastrin-stimulated gastric acid secretion by medium-chain triglycerides and long-chain triglycerides in healthy young men.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maas, M.I.M.; Hopman, W.P.M.; Katan, M.B.; Jansen, J.B.M.J.

    1996-01-01

    Long-chain triglycerides inhibit gastric acid secretion, but the effect of medium-chain triglycerides in humans is unknown. We compared the effects of intraduodenally perfused saline, medium-chain and long-chain triglycerides on gastrin-stimulated gastric acid secretion and cholecystokinin release.

  19. [Erythropoiesis and functional characteristics in bone marrow erythroblastic islets during stimulated adn inhibited erythropoiesis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rassokhin, A G; Kruglov, D G; Zakharov, Iu M

    2000-01-01

    When erythropiesis is stimulated (acute blood loss) or inhibited (posttransfusion polycythemia), there are early changes in the cytochemical values of erythroblastic islets (EI): in the levels of acid and neutral glucoconjugates and in the activity of nonspecific esterase. A close correlation has been found between the erythropoiesis in EI and its functional characteristics. It is concluded that central macrophages play the key role in the modulation of EI erythropoiesis. It is suggested that EI macrophages are involved in the provision of bioenergetic and reparative processes in EI.

  20. Inhibition of the mixed leukocyte reaction by alloantisera in man

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jonker, M.; Leeuwen, A. van; Rood, J.J. van

    1977-01-01

    The incidence of MLC(mixed leukocyte culture)-inhibiting antibodies was determined in 42 pregnancy sera. MLC's were carried out between the cells from the serum donor and her husband in the presence of nonimmune AB serum and the test serum. Fifty per cent of the sera reduced the MLC response to less than 40% of the control values. Only four sera had lymphocytotoxic activity. The inhibition was strong against the specific immunizor, less strong against random unrelated cells and weak against cells which were SD(serologically defined)-identical with the serum donor. Absorptions with lymphocytes and platelets were carried out. Lymphocytes removed activity in three of the four sera tested. Platelets removed activity from one serum. It was concluded that both anti-LD(lymphocyte defined) and anti-SD antibodies were able to inhibit the MLR (mixed leukocyte reaction) at the stimulator cell level. (author)

  1. Inhibition of acrolein-stimulated MUC5AC production by fucoidan in human bronchial epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pokharel, Yuba Raj; Yoon, Se Young; Kim, Sang Kyum; Li, Jian-Dong; Kang, Keon Wook

    2008-10-01

    Fucoidan, a marine sulfated polysaccharide has both antithrombotic and anti-inflammatory effects. We determined the effect of fucoidan on MUC5AC expression in a human bronchial epithelial cell line, NCI-H292. Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) analysis showed that fucoidan inhibited MUC5AC expression and protein secretion in cells stimulated with acrolein, a toxic aldehyde present in tobacco smoke. The activation of both nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-kappa B) and activator protein 1 (AP-1) are key steps in the transcriptional activation of MUC5AC. We found that the acrolein-mediated transactivation of MUC5AC was selectively dependent on AP-1 activation and was suppressed by fucoidan. Fucoidan-induced AP-1 inhibition and MUC5AC repression might be associated with fucoidan's protective effects against respiratory diseases.

  2. Ursolic acid isolated from guava leaves inhibits inflammatory mediators and reactive oxygen species in LPS-stimulated macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Min-Hye; Kim, Jin Nam; Han, Sung Nim; Kim, Hye-Kyeong

    2015-06-01

    Psidium guajava (guava) leaves have been frequently used for the treatment of rheumatism, fever, arthritis and other inflammatory conditions. The purpose of this study was to identify major anti-inflammatory compounds from guava leaf extract. The methanol extract and its hexane-, dichloromethane-, ethylacetate-, n-butanol- and water-soluble phases derived from guava leaves were evaluated to determine their inhibitory activity on nitric oxide (NO) production by RAW 264.7 cells stimulated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS). The methanol extract decreased NO production in a dose-dependent manner without cytotoxicity at a concentration range of 0-100 μg/mL. The n-butanol soluble phase was the most potent among the five soluble phases. Four compounds were isolated by reversed-phase HPLC from the n-butanol soluble phase and identified to be avicularin, guaijaverin, leucocyanidin and ursolic acid by their NMR spectra. Among these compounds, ursolic acid inhibited LPS-induced NO production in a dose-dependent manner without cytotoxity at a concentration range of 1-10 µM, but the other three compounds had no effect. Ursolic acid also inhibited LPS-induced prostaglandin E2 production. A western blot analysis showed that ursolic acid decreased the LPS-stimulated inducible nitric oxide synthase and cyclooxygenase protein levels. In addition, ursolic acid suppressed the production of intracellular reactive oxygen species in LPS-stimulated RAW 264.7 cells, as measured by flow cytometry. Taken together, these results identified ursolic acid as a major anti-inflammatory compound in guava leaves.

  3. The role of right prefrontal and medial cortex in response inhibition: interfering with action restraint and action cancellation using transcranial magnetic brain stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dambacher, Franziska; Sack, Alexander T; Lobbestael, Jill; Arntz, Arnoud; Brugmann, Suzanne; Schuhmann, Teresa

    2014-08-01

    The ability of inhibiting impulsive urges is paramount for human behavior. Such successful response inhibition has consistently been associated with activity in pFC. The current study aims to unravel the differential involvement of different areas within right pFC for successful action restraint versus action cancellation. These two conceptually different aspects of action inhibition were measured with a go/no-go task (action restraint) and a stop signal task (action cancellation). Localization of relevant prefrontal activation was based on fMRI data. Significant task-related activation during successful action restraint was localized for each participant individually in right anterior insula (rAI), right superior frontal gyrus, and pre-SMA. Activation during successful action cancellation was localized in rAI, right middle frontal gyrus, and pre-SMA. Subsequently, fMRI-guided continuous thetaburst stimulation was applied to these regions. Results showed that the disruption of neural activity in rAI reduced both the ability to restrain (go/no-go) and cancel (stop signal) responses. In contrast, continuous thetaburst stimulation-induced disruption of the right superior frontal gyrus specifically impaired the ability to restrain from responding (go/no-go), while leaving the ability for action cancellation largely intact. Stimulation applied to right middle frontal gyrus and pre-SMA did not affect inhibitory processing in neither of the two tasks. These findings provide a more comprehensive perspective on the role of pFC in inhibition and cognitive control. The results emphasize the role of inferior frontal regions for global inhibition, whereas superior frontal regions seem to be specifically relevant for successful action restraint.

  4. Ingestion of onion soup high in quercetin inhibits platelet aggregation and essential components of the collagen-stimulated platelet activation pathway in man: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hubbard, Gary P; Wolffram, Siegfried; de Vos, Ric; Bovy, Arnaud; Gibbins, Jonathan M; Lovegrove, Julie A

    2006-09-01

    Epidemiological data suggest that those who consume a diet rich in quercetin-containing foods may have a reduced risk of CVD. Furthermore, in vitro and ex vivo studies have observed the inhibition of collagen-induced platelet activation by quercetin. The aim of the present study was to investigate the possible inhibitory effects of quercetin ingestion from a dietary source on collagen-stimulated platelet aggregation and signalling. A double-blind randomised cross-over pilot study was undertaken. Subjects ingested a soup containing either a high or a low amount of quercetin. Plasma quercetin concentrations and platelet aggregation and signalling were assessed after soup ingestion. The high-quercetin soup contained 69 mg total quercetin compared with the low-quercetin soup containing 5 mg total quercetin. Plasma quercetin concentrations were significantly higher after high-quercetin soup ingestion than after low-quercetin soup ingestion and peaked at 2.59 (sem 0.42) mumol/l. Collagen-stimulated (0.5 mug/ml) platelet aggregation was inhibited after ingestion of the high-quercetin soup in a time-dependent manner. Collagen-stimulated tyrosine phosphorylation of a key component of the collagen-signalling pathway via glycoprotein VI, Syk, was significantly inhibited by ingestion of the high-quercetin soup. The inhibition of Syk tyrosine phosphorylation was correlated with the area under the curve for the high-quercetin plasma profile. In conclusion, the ingestion of quercetin from a dietary source of onion soup could inhibit some aspects of collagen-stimulated platelet aggregation and signalling ex vivo. This further substantiates the epidemiological data suggesting that those who preferentially consume high amounts of quercetin-containing foods have a reduced risk of thrombosis and potential CVD risk.

  5. Transcranial alternating current stimulation at beta frequency: lack of immediate effects on excitation and interhemispheric inhibition of the human motor cortex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viola Rjosk

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Transcranial alternating current stimulation (tACS is a form of noninvasive brain stimulation and is capable of influencing brain oscillations and cortical networks. In humans, the endogenous oscillation frequency in sensorimotor areas peaks at 20 Hz. This beta-band typically occurs during maintenance of tonic motor output and seems to play a role in interhemispheric coordination of movements. Previous studies showed that tACS applied in specific frequency bands over primary motor cortex (M1 or the visual cortex modulates cortical excitability within the stimulated hemisphere. However, the particular impact remains controversial because effects of tACS were shown to be frequency, duration and location specific. Furthermore, the potential of tACS to modulate cortical interhemispheric processing, like interhemispheric inhibition (IHI, remains elusive. Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS is a noninvasive and well-tolerated method of directly activating neurons in superficial areas of the human brain and thereby a useful tool for evaluating the functional state of motor pathways. The aim of the present study was to elucidate the immediate effect of 10 min tACS in the β-frequency band (20 Hz over left M1 on IHI between M1s in 19 young, healthy, right-handed participants. A series of TMS measurements (MEP size, RMT, IHI from left to right M1 and vice versa was performed before and immediately after tACS or sham using a double-blinded, cross-over design. We did not find any significant tACS-induced modulations of intracortical excitation (as assessed by MEP size and RMT and/or interhemispheric inhibition (IHI. These results indicate that 10 min of 20 Hz tACS over left M1 seems incapable of modulating immediate brain activity or inhibition. Further studies are needed to elucidate potential aftereffects of 20 Hz tACS as well as frequency-specific effects of tACS on intracortical excitation and interhemispheric inhibition.

  6. Platelet-Derived Growth Factor-Receptor α Strongly Inhibits Melanoma Growth In Vitro and In Vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Debora Faraone

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Cutaneous melanoma is the most aggressive skin cancer; it is highly metastatic and responds poorly to current therapies. The expression of platelet-derived growth factor receptors (PDGF-Rs is reported to be reduced in metastatic melanoma compared with benign nevi or normal skin; we then hypothesized that PDGF-Rα may control growth of melanoma cells. We show here that melanoma cells overexpressing PDGF-Rα respond to serum with a significantly lower proliferation compared with that of controls. Apoptosis, cell cycle arrest, pRb dephosphorylation, and DNA synthesis inhibition were also observed in cells overexpressing PDGF-Rα. Proliferation was rescued by PDGF-Rα inhibitors, allowing to exclude nonspecific toxic effects and indicating that PDGF-Rα mediates autocrine antiproliferation signals in melanoma cells. Accordingly, PDGF-Rα was found to mediate staurosporine cytotoxicity. A protein array-based analysis of the mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway revealed that melanoma cells overexpressing PDGF-Rα show a strong reduction of c-Jun phosphorylated in serine 63 and of protein phosphatase 2A/Bα and a marked increase of p38γ, mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase 3, and signal regulatory protein α1 protein expression. In a mouse model of primary melanoma growth, infection with the Ad-vector overexpressing PDGF-Rα reached a significant 70% inhibition of primary melanoma growth (P < .001 and a similar inhibition of tumor angiogenesis. All together, these data demonstrate that PDGF-Rα strongly impairs melanoma growth likely through autocrine mechanisms and indicate a novel endogenous mechanism involved in melanoma control.

  7. Intraglomerular inhibition maintains mitral cell response contrast across input frequencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Zuoyi; Puche, Adam C; Shipley, Michael T

    2013-11-01

    Odor signals are transmitted to the olfactory bulb by olfactory nerve (ON) synapses onto mitral/tufted cells (MTCs) and external tufted cells (ETCs); ETCs provide additional feed-forward excitation to MTCs. Both are strongly regulated by intraglomerular inhibition that can last up to 1 s and, when blocked, dramatically increases ON-evoked MC spiking. Intraglomerular inhibition thus limits the magnitude and duration of MC spike responses to sensory input. In vivo, sensory input is repetitive, dictated by sniffing rates from 1 to 8 Hz, potentially summing intraglomerular inhibition. To investigate this, we recorded MTC responses to 1- to 8-Hz ON stimulation in slices. Inhibitory postsynaptic current area (charge) following each ON stimulation was unchanged from 1 to 5 Hz and modestly paired-pulse attenuated at 8 Hz, suggesting there is no summation and only limited decrement at the highest input frequencies. Next, we investigated frequency independence of intraglomerular inhibition on MC spiking. MCs respond to single ON shocks with an initial spike burst followed by reduced spiking decaying to baseline. Upon repetitive ON stimulation peak spiking is identical across input frequencies but the ratio of peak-to-minimum rate before the stimulus (max-min) diminishes from 30:1 at 1 Hz to 15:1 at 8 Hz. When intraglomerular inhibition is selectively blocked, peak spike rate is unchanged but trough spiking increases markedly decreasing max-min firing ratios from 30:1 at 1 Hz to 2:1 at 8 Hz. Together, these results suggest intraglomerular inhibition is relatively frequency independent and can "sharpen" MC responses to input across the range of frequencies. This suggests that glomerular circuits can maintain "contrast" in MC encoding during sniff-sampled inputs.

  8. Computationally Developed Sham Stimulation Protocol for Multichannel Desynchronizing Stimulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magteld Zeitler

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available A characteristic pattern of abnormal brain activity is abnormally strong neuronal synchronization, as found in several brain disorders, such as tinnitus, Parkinson's disease, and epilepsy. As observed in several diseases, different therapeutic interventions may induce a placebo effect that may be strong and hinder reliable clinical evaluations. Hence, to distinguish between specific, neuromodulation-induced effects and unspecific, placebo effects, it is important to mimic the therapeutic procedure as precisely as possibly, thereby providing controls that actually lack specific effects. Coordinated Reset (CR stimulation has been developed to specifically counteract abnormally strong synchronization by desynchronization. CR is a spatio-temporally patterned multichannel stimulation which reduces the extent of coincident neuronal activity and aims at an anti-kindling, i.e., an unlearning of both synaptic connectivity and neuronal synchrony. Apart from acute desynchronizing effects, CR may cause sustained, long-lasting desynchronizing effects, as already demonstrated in pre-clinical and clinical proof of concept studies. In this computational study, we set out to computationally develop a sham stimulation protocol for multichannel desynchronizing stimulation. To this end, we compare acute effects and long-lasting effects of six different spatio-temporally patterned stimulation protocols, including three variants of CR, using a no-stimulation condition as additional control. This is to provide an inventory of different stimulation algorithms with similar fundamental stimulation parameters (e.g., mean stimulation rates but qualitatively different acute and/or long-lasting effects. Stimulation protocols sharing basic parameters, but inducing nevertheless completely different or even no acute effects and/or after-effects, might serve as controls to validate the specific effects of particular desynchronizing protocols such as CR. In particular, based on

  9. Ex-vivo in-vitro inhibition of lipopolysaccharide stimulated tumor necrosis factor-alpha and interleukin-1 beta secretion in human whole blood by extractum urticae dioicae foliorum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obertreis, B; Ruttkowski, T; Teucher, T; Behnke, B; Schmitz, H

    1996-04-01

    An extract of Urtica dioica folium (IDS 23, Rheuma-Hek), monographed positively for adjuvant therapy of rheumatic diseases and with known effects in partial inhibition of prostaglandin and leukotriene synthesis in vitro, was investigated with respect to effects of the extract on the lipopolysaccharide (LPS) stimulated secretion of proinflammatory cytokines in human whole blood of healthy volunteers. In the assay system used, LPS stimulated human whole blood showed a straight increase of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) and interleukin-1 beta (IL-1 beta) secretion reaching maximum concentrations within 24 h following a plateau and slight decrease up to 65 h, respectively. The concentrations of these cytokines was strongly positively correlated with the number of monocytes/macrophages of each volunteer. TNF-alpha and IL-1 beta concentration after LPS stimulation was significantly reduced by simultaneously given IDS 23 in a strictly dose dependent manner. At time 24 h these cytokine concentrations were reduced by 50.8% and 99.7%, respectively, using the highest test IDS 23 assay concentration of 5 mg/ml (p flavonoides such as caffeic malic acid, caffeic acid, chlorogenic acid, quercetin and rutin did not influence LPS stimulated TNF-alpha, IL-1 beta and IL-6 secretion in tested concentrations up to 5 x 10(-5) mol/l. These further findings on the pharmacological mechanism of action of Urticae dioica folia may explain the positive effects of this extract in the treatment of rheumatic diseases.

  10. Adenosine (ADO) released during orthodromic stimulation of the frog sympathetic ganglion inhibits phosphatidylinositol turnover (PI) associated with synaptic transmission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Curnish, R.; Bencherif, M.; Rubio, R.; Berne, R.M.

    1986-01-01

    The authors have previously demonstrated that 3 H-purine release was enhanced during synaptic activation of the prelabelled frog sympathetic ganglion. In addition, during orthodromic stimulation, there is an increased 3 H-inositol release (an index of PI) that occurs during the poststimulation period and not during the period of stimulation. They hypothesized that endogenous ADO inhibits PI turnover during orthodromic stimulation. To test this hypothesis (1) they performed experiments to directly measure ADO release in the extracellular fluid by placing the ganglion in a 5 μl drop of Ringer's and let it come to equilibrium with the interstitial fluid, (2) they destroyed endogenous ADO by suffusing adenosine deaminase (ADA) during the stimulation period. Their results show (1) orthodromic stimulation increases release of ADO into the bathing medium, (2) ADA induced an increase of PI during the stimulation period in contrast to an increase seen only during the poststimulation period when ADA was omitted. They conclude that there is dual control of PI during synaptic activity, a stimulatory effect (cause unknown) and a short lived inhibitory effect that is probably caused by adenosine

  11. Interhemispheric Inhibition Induced by Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation Over Primary Sensory Cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwata, Yasuyuki; Jono, Yasutomo; Mizusawa, Hiroki; Kinoshita, Atsushi; Hiraoka, Koichi

    2016-01-01

    The present study investigated whether the long-interval interhemispheric inhibition (LIHI) is induced by the transcranial magnetic stimulation over the primary sensory area (S1-TMS) without activation of the conditioning side of the primary motor area (M1) contributing to the contralateral motor evoked potential (MEP), whether the S1-TMS-induced LIHI is dependent on the status of the S1 modulated by the tactile input, and whether the pathways mediating the LIHI are different from those mediating the M1-TMS-induced LIHI. In order to give the TMS over the S1 without eliciting the MEP, the intensity of the S1-TMS was adjusted to be the sub-motor-threshold level and the trials with the MEP response elicited by the S1-TMS were discarded online. The LIHI was induced by the S1-TMS given 40 ms before the test TMS in the participants with the attenuation of the tactile perception of the digit stimulation (TPDS) induced by the S1-TMS, indicating that the LIHI is induced by the S1-TMS without activation of the conditioning side of the M1 contributing to the contralateral MEP in the participants in which the pathways mediating the TPDS is sensitive to the S1-TMS. The S1-TMS-induced LIHI was positively correlated with the attenuation of the TPDS induced by the S1-TMS, indicating that the S1-TMS-induced LIHI is dependent on the effect of the S1-TMS on the pathways mediating the TPDS at the S1. In another experiment, the effect of the digit stimulation given before the conditioning TMS on the S1- or M1-TMS-induced LIHI was examined. The digit stimulation produces tactile input to the S1 causing change in the status of the S1. The S1-TMS-induced LIHI was enhanced when the S1-TMS was given in the period in which the tactile afferent volley produced by the digit stimulation just arrived at the S1, while the LIHI induced by above-motor-threshold TMS over the contralateral M1 was not enhanced by the tactile input. Thus, the S1-TMS-induced LIHI is dependent on the status of the S1

  12. A novel PKB/Akt inhibitor, MK-2206, effectively inhibits insulin-stimulated glucose metabolism and protein synthesis in isolated rat skeletal muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Yu-Chiang; Liu, Yang; Jacobs, Roxane; Rider, Mark H

    2012-10-01

    PKB (protein kinase B), also known as Akt, is a key component of insulin signalling. Defects in PKB activation lead to insulin resistance and metabolic disorders, whereas PKB overactivation has been linked to tumour growth. Small-molecule PKB inhibitors have thus been developed for cancer treatment, but also represent useful tools to probe the roles of PKB in insulin action. In the present study, we examined the acute effects of two allosteric PKB inhibitors, MK-2206 and Akti 1/2 (Akti) on PKB signalling in incubated rat soleus muscles. We also assessed the effects of the compounds on insulin-stimulated glucose uptake, glycogen and protein synthesis. MK-2206 dose-dependently inhibited insulin-stimulated PKB phosphorylation, PKBβ activity and phosphorylation of PKB downstream targets (including glycogen synthase kinase-3α/β, proline-rich Akt substrate of 40 kDa and Akt substrate of 160 kDa). Insulin-stimulated glucose uptake, glycogen synthesis and glycogen synthase activity were also decreased by MK-2206 in a dose-dependent manner. Incubation with high doses of MK-2206 (10 μM) inhibited insulin-induced p70 ribosomal protein S6 kinase and 4E-BP1 (eukaryotic initiation factor 4E-binding protein-1) phosphorylation associated with increased eEF2 (eukaryotic elongation factor 2) phosphorylation. In contrast, Akti only modestly inhibited insulin-induced PKB and mTOR (mammalian target of rapamycin) signalling, with little or no effect on glucose uptake and protein synthesis. MK-2206, rather than Akti, would thus be the tool of choice for studying the role of PKB in insulin action in skeletal muscle. The results point to a key role for PKB in mediating insulin-stimulated glucose uptake, glycogen synthesis and protein synthesis in skeletal muscle.

  13. Theta Burst Stimulation of the Cerebellum Modifies the TMS-Evoked N100 Potential, a Marker of GABA Inhibition.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allanah Harrington

    Full Text Available Theta burst stimulation (TBS of the cerebellum, a potential therapy for neurological disease, can modulate corticospinal excitability via the dentato-thalamo-cortical pathway, but it is uncertain whether its effects are mediated via inhibitory or facilitatory networks. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of 30Hz cerebellar TBS on the N100 waveform of the TMS-evoked potential (TEP, a marker of intracortical GABAB-mediated inhibition. 16 healthy participants (aged 18-30 years; 13 right handed and 3 left handed received 30Hz intermittent TBS (iTBS, continuous TBS (cTBS or sham stimulation over the right cerebellum, in three separate sessions. The first 8 participants received TBS at a stimulus intensity of 80% of active motor threshold (AMT, while the remainder received 90% of AMT. Motor evoked potentials (MEP and TEP were recorded before and after each treatment, by stimulating the first dorsal interosseus area of the left motor cortex. Analysis of the 13 right handed participants showed that iTBS at 90% of AMT increased the N100 amplitude compared to sham and cTBS, without significantly altering MEP amplitude. cTBS at 80% of active motor threshold decreased the N100 amplitude and cTBS overall reduced resting MEP amplitude. The study demonstrates effects of 30Hz cerebellar TBS on inhibitory cortical networks that may be useful for treatment of neurological conditions associated with dysfunctional intracortical inhibition.

  14. An examination of the effects of subthalamic nucleus inhibition or μ-opioid receptor stimulation on food-directed motivation in the non-deprived rat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pratt, Wayne E.; Choi, Eugene; Guy, Elizabeth G.

    2012-01-01

    The subthalamic nucleus (STN) serves important functions in regulating movement, cognition, and motivation and is connected with cortical and basal ganglia circuits that process reward and reinforcement. In order to further examine the role of the STN on motivation toward food in non-deprived rats, these experiments studied the effects of pharmacological inhibition or μ-opioid receptor stimulation of the STN on the 2-hr intake of a sweetened fat diet, the amount of work exerted to earn sucrose on a progressive ratio 2 (PR-2) schedule of reinforcement, and performance on a differential reinforcement of low-rate responding (DRL) schedule for sucrose reward. Separate behavioral groups (N = 6–9) were tested following bilateral inhibition of the STN with the GABAA receptor agonist muscimol (at 0–5 ng/0.5 μl/side) or following μ-opioid receptor stimulation with the agonist D-Ala2, N-MePhe4, Gly-ol-enkephalin (DAMGO; at 0, 0.025 or 0.25 μg/0.5 μl/side). Although STN inhibition increased ambulatory behavior during 2-hr feeding sessions, it did not significantly alter intake of the sweetened fat diet. STN inhibition also did not affect the breakpoint for sucrose pellets during a 1-hr PR-2 reinforcement schedule or impact the number of reinforcers earned on a 1-hr DRL-20 sec reinforcement schedule in non-deprived rats. In contrast, STN μ-opioid receptor stimulation significantly increased feeding on the palatable diet and reduced the reinforcers earned on a DRL-20 schedule, although DAMGO microinfusions had no effect on PR-2 performance. These data suggest that STN inhibition does not enhance incentive motivation for food in the absence of food restriction and that STN μ-opioid receptors play an important and unique role in motivational processes. PMID:22391117

  15. Role of diacylglycerol in adrenergic-stimulated sup 86 Rb uptake by proximal tubules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baines, A.D.; Drangova, R.; Ho, P. (Univ. of Toronto, Ontario (Canada))

    1990-05-01

    We used rat proximal tubule fragments purified by Percoll centrifugation to examine the role of diacylglycerol (DAG) in noradrenergic-stimulated Na+ reabsorption. Tubular DAG concentration and ouabain-inhibitable 86Rb uptake increased within 30 s after adding norepinephrine (NE) and remained elevated for at least 5 min. NE (1 microM) increased DAG content 17% and ouabain-inhibitable 86Rb uptake 23%. Cirazoline-stimulated 86Rb uptake was not inhibited by BaCl, quinidine, or bumetanide (1-10 microM) or by the omission of HCO3- or Cl- from the medium, but it was completely inhibited by ouabain and furosemide. Oleoyl-acetyl glycerol, L-alpha-1,2-dioctanoylglycerol, and L-alpha-1,2-dioleoylglycerol (DOG) increased total 86Rb uptake 8-11%. 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA) (5 nM) increased uptake by only 4%. Staurosporine at 5 nM inhibited DOG stimulation completely, whereas 50 nM staurosporine was required to inhibit NE stimulation completely. Sphingosine inhibited DOG stimulation by 66% but did not inhibit NE stimulation. Amiloride (1 mM) completely blocked DOG stimulation. Monensin increased 86Rb uptake 31% and completely blocked the DOG effect but reduced the NE effect by only 26% (P = 0.08). In tubules from salt-loaded rats, NE did not increase DAG concentration, but NE-stimulated 86Rb uptake was reduced by only 23% (P = 0.15). Thus DAG released by NE may stimulate Na+ entry through Na(+)-H+ exchange. NE predominantly stimulates Na(+)-K(+)-adenosinetriphosphatase (ATPase) by activating a protein kinase that is insensitive to DAG and TPA and is inhibited by staurosporine but not by sphingosine. NE may also stimulate K+ efflux through a BaCl-insensitive K+ channel that is inhibited by millimolar furosemide.

  16. Right-sided vagus nerve stimulation inhibits induced spinal cord seizures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tubbs, R Shane; Salter, E George; Killingsworth, Cheryl; Rollins, Dennis L; Smith, William M; Ideker, Raymond E; Wellons, John C; Blount, Jeffrey P; Oakes, W Jerry

    2007-01-01

    We have previously shown that left-sided vagus nerve stimulation results in cessation of induced spinal cord seizures. To test our hypothesis that right-sided vagus nerve stimulation will also abort seizure activity, we have initiated seizures in the spinal cord and then performed right-sided vagus nerve stimulation in an animal model. Four pigs were anesthetized and placed in the lateral position and a small laminectomy performed in the lumbar region. Topical penicillin, a known epileptogenic drug to the cerebral cortex and spinal cord, was next applied to the dorsal surface of the exposed cord. With the exception of the control animal, once seizure activity was discernible via motor convulsion or increased electrical activity, the right vagus nerve previously isolated in the neck was stimulated. Following multiple stimulations of the vagus nerve and with seizure activity confirmed, the cord was transected in the midthoracic region and vagus nerve stimulation performed. Right-sided vagus nerve stimulation resulted in cessation of spinal cord seizure activity in all animals. Transection of the spinal cord superior to the site of seizure induction resulted in the ineffectiveness of vagus nerve stimulation in causing cessation of seizure activity in all study animals. As with left-sided vagus nerve stimulation, right-sided vagus nerve stimulation results in cessation of induced spinal cord seizures. Additionally, the effects of right-sided vagus nerve stimulation on induced spinal cord seizures involve descending spinal pathways. These data may aid in the development of alternative mechanisms for electrical stimulation for patients with medically intractable seizures and add to our knowledge regarding the mechanism for seizure cessation following peripheral nerve stimulation.

  17. Rare sugar D-allose strongly induces thioredoxin-interacting protein and inhibits osteoclast differentiation in Raw264 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Kana; Noguchi, Chisato; Kamitori, Kazuyo; Dong, Youyi; Hirata, Yuko; Hossain, Mohammad A; Tsukamoto, Ikuko; Tokuda, Masaaki; Yamaguchi, Fuminori

    2012-02-01

    Oxidative stress modulates the osteoclast differentiation via redox systems, and thioredoxin 1 (Trx) promotes the osteoclast formation by regulating the activity of transcription factors. The function of Trx is known to be regulated by its binding partner, thioredoxin-interacting protein (TXNIP). We previously reported that the expression of TXNIP gene is strongly induced by a rare sugar D-allose. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that D-allose could inhibit the osteoclast differentiation by regulating the Trx function. We used a murine Raw264 cell line that differentiates to the osteoclast by the receptor activator of nuclear factor-κB ligand (RANKL) treatment. The effect of sugars was evaluated by tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase staining. The expression and localization of TXNIP and Trx protein were examined by Western blotting and immunohistochemisty. The activity of the nuclear factor-κB, nuclear factor of activated T cells, and activator protein 1 transcription factors was measured by the luciferase reporter assay. The addition of D-allose (25 mmol/L) inhibited the osteoclast differentiation down to 9.53% ± 1.27% of a receptor activator of nuclear factor-κB ligand-only treatment. During the osteoclast differentiation, a significant increase of TNXIP was observed by D-allose treatment. The immunohistochemical analysis showed that both Trx and TXNIP existed in the nucleus in preosteoclasts and osteoclasts. Overexpression of TXNIP by plasmid transfection also inhibited the osteoclast formation, indicating the functional importance of TXNIP for the osteoclast differentiation. Transcriptional activity of the activator protein 1, nuclear factor-κB, and nuclear factor of activated T cells, known to be modulated by Trx, were inhibited by D-allose. In conclusion, our data indicate that D-allose is a strong inhibitor of the osteoclast differentiation, and this effect could be caused by TXNIP induction and a resulting inhibition of the Trx function

  18. Ketamine inhibits tumor necrosis factor secretion by RAW264.7 murine macrophages stimulated with antibiotic-exposed strains of community-associated, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aguirre Carlos

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Infections caused by community-associated strains of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA are associated with a marked and prolonged host inflammatory response. In a sepsis simulation model, we tested whether the anesthetic ketamine inhibits the macrophage TNF response to antibiotic-exposed CA-MRSA bacteria via its antagonism of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA receptors. RAW264.7 cells were stimulated for 18 hrs with 105 to 107 CFU/mL inocula of either of two prototypical CA-MRSA isolates, USA300 strain LAC and USA400 strain MW2, in the presence of either vancomycin or daptomycin. One hour before bacterial stimulation, ketamine was added with or without MK-801 (dizocilpine, a chemically unrelated non-competitive NMDA receptor antagonist, APV (D-2-amino-5-phosphono-valerate, a competitive NMDA receptor antagonist, NMDA, or combinations of these agents. Supernatants were collected and assayed for TNF concentration by ELISA. Results RAW264.7 cells exposed to either LAC or MW2 in the presence of daptomycin secreted less TNF than in the presence of vancomycin. The addition of ketamine inhibited macrophage TNF secretion after stimulation with either of the CA-MRSA isolates (LAC, MW2 in the presence of either antibiotic. The NMDA inhibitors, MK-801 and APV, also suppressed macrophage TNF secretion after stimulation with either of the antibiotic-exposed CA-MRSA isolates, and the effect was not additive or synergistic with ketamine. The addition of NMDA substrate augmented TNF secretion in response to the CA-MRSA bacteria, and the addition of APV suppressed the effect of NMDA in a dose-dependent fashion. Conclusions Ketamine inhibits TNF secretion by MRSA-stimulated RAW264.7 macrophages and the mechanism likely involves NMDA receptor antagonism. These findings may have therapeutic significance in MRSA sepsis.

  19. Hippocampal low-frequency stimulation inhibits afterdischarge and increases GABA (A) receptor expression in amygdala-kindled pharmacoresistant epileptic rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Guofeng; Wang, Likun; Hong, Zhen; Ren, Siying; Zhou, Feng

    2017-08-01

    The purpose of the present study was to observe the effects of hippocampal low-frequency stimulation (Hip-LFS) on amygdala afterdischarge and GABA (A) receptor expression in pharmacoresistant epileptic (PRE) rats. A total of 110 healthy adult male Wistar rats were used to generate a model of epilepsy by chronic stimulation of the amygdala. Sixteen PRE rats were selected from 70 amygdala-kindled rats by testing their response to Phenytoin and Phenobarbital, and they were randomly assigned to a pharmacoresistant stimulation group (PRS group, 8 rats) or a pharmacoresistant control group (PRC group, 8 rats). A stimulation electrode was implanted into the hippocampus of all of the rats. Hip-LFS was administered twice per day in the PRS group for two weeks. Simultaneously, amygdala stimulus-induced seizures and afterdischarge were recorded. After the hippocampal stimulation was terminated, the brain tissues were obtained to determine the GABA (A) receptors by a method of immumohistochemistry and a real-time polymerase chain reaction. The stages and duration of the amygdala stimulus-induced epileptic seizures were decreased in the PRS group. The afterdischarge threshold was increased and the duration as well as the afterdischarge frequency was decreased. Simultaneously, the GABA (A) expression was significantly increased in the PRS group. Hip-LFS may inhibit amygdala stimulus-induced epileptic seizures and up-regulate GABA (A) receptor expression in PRE rats. The antiepileptic effects of hippocampal stimulation may be partly achieved by increasing the GABA (A) receptor.

  20. Activation of protein kinase C inhibits synthesis and release of decidual prolactin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harman, I.; Costello, A.; Ganong, B.; Bell, R.M.; Handwerger, S.

    1986-01-01

    Activation of calcium-activated, phospholipid-dependent protein kinase C by diacylglycerol and phorbol esters has been shown to mediate release of hormones in many systems. To determine whether protein kinase C activation is also involved in the regulation of prolactin release from human decidual, the authors have examined the effects of various acylglycerols and phorbol esters on the synthesis and release of prolactin from cultured human decidual cells. sn-1,2-Dioctanolyglycerol (diC 8 ), which is known to stimulate protein kinase C in other systems, inhibited prolactin release in a dose-dependent manner with maximal inhibition of 53.1% at 100 μM. Diolein (100 μM), which also stimulates protein kinase C activity in some systems, inhibited prolactin release by 21.3%. Phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA), phorbol 12,13-didecanoate, and 4β-phorbol 12,13-dibutyrate, which activate protein kinase C in other systems, also inhibited the release of prolactin, which the protein kinase C inactivate 4α-phorbol-12,13-didecanoate was without effect. The inhibition of prolactin release was secondary to a decrease in prolactin synthesis. Although diC 8 and PMA inhibited the synthesis and release of prolactin, these agents had no effect on the synthesis or release of trichloroacetic acid-precipitable [ 35 S]methionine-labeled decidual proteins and did not cause the release of the cytosolic enzymes lactic dehydrogenase and alkaline phosphatase. DiC 8 and PMA stimulates the specific activity of protein kinase C in decidual tissue by 14.6 and 14.0-fold, respectively. The inhibition of the synthesis and release of prolactin by diC 8 and phorbol esters strongly implicates protein kinase C in the regulation of the production and release of prolactin from the decidua

  1. Inhibition of neurotensin-stimulated mast cell secretion and carboxypeptidase A activity by the peptide inhibitor of carboxypeptidase A and neurotensin-receptor antagonist SR 48692.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, L A; Cochrane, D E; Feldberg, R S; Carraway, R E

    1998-06-01

    Neurotensin (NT), a peptide found in brain and several peripheral tissues, is a potent stimulus for mast cell secretion and its actions are blocked by the specific NT receptor antagonist, SR 48692. Subsequent to stimulation, NT is rapidly degraded by mast cell carboxypeptidase A (CPA). In the experiments described here, we tested for the involvement of CPA activity in the activation of mast cell secretion by the peptide, NT. Mast cells were isolated from the peritoneal and pleural cavities of rats, purified over metrizamide gradients and incubated at 37 degrees C in Locke solution or Locke containing the appropriate inhibitors. For some experiments, media derived from mast cells stimulated by compound 48/80 were used as a source of mast cell CPA activity. Treatment of mast cells with the highly specific peptide inhibitor of CPA derived from potato (PCI) inhibited histamine release in response to NT and NT8-13 (the biologically active region of NT). This inhibition required some 20 min to develop and was only partially reversed by a 20-min wash period. PCI (10 microM) did not inhibit histamine release in response to NT1-12, bradykinin, compound 48/80, the calcium ionophore, A23187, or anti-IgE serum. PCI also inhibited mast cell CPA activity. SR 48692, a highly selective antagonist of the brain NT receptor and of NT-stimulated mast cell secretion, also inhibited mast cell CPA activity as well as bovine pancreatic CPA activity in a concentration-dependent manner. It is suggested that the mast cell binding site for NT and the active site for CPA may share similar characteristics. The results are discussed in terms of NT mechanism of action on the mast cell.

  2. Light-stimulated cell expansion in bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) leaves. I. Growth can occur without photosynthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Volkenburgh, E.; Cleland, R. E.

    1990-01-01

    Cell expansion in dicotyledonous leaves is strongly stimulated by bright white light (WL), at least in part as a result of light-induced acidification of the cell walls. It has been proposed that photosynthetic reactions are required for light-stimulated transport processes across plasma membranes of leaf cells, including proton excretion. The involvement of photosynthesis in growth and wall acidification of primary leaves of bean has been tested by inhibiting photosynthesis in two ways: by reducing chlorophyll content of intact plants with tentoxin (TX) and by treating leaf discs with 3-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)-1,1-dimethylurea (DCMU). Exposure to bright WL stimulated growth of intact leaves of TX-treated plants. Discs excised from green as well as from TX-or DCMU-treated leaves also responded by growing faster in WL, as long as exogenous sucrose was supplied to the photosynthetically inhibited tissues. The WL caused acidification of the epidermal surface of intact TX-leaves, but acidification of the incubation medium by mesophyll cells only occurred when photosynthesis was not inhibited. It is concluded that light-stimulated cell enlargement of bean leaves, and the necessary acidification of epidermal cell walls, are mediated by a pigment other than chlorophyll. Light-induced proton excretion by mesophyll cells, on the other hand, may require both a photosynthetic product (or exogenous sugars) and a non-photosynthetic light effect.

  3. GLP-1 receptor stimulation depresses heart rate variability and inhibits neurotransmission to cardiac vagal neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffioen, Kathleen J; Wan, Ruiqian; Okun, Eitan; Wang, Xin; Lovett-Barr, Mary Rachael; Li, Yazhou; Mughal, Mohamed R; Mendelowitz, David; Mattson, Mark P

    2011-01-01

    glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) is an incretin hormone released from the gut in response to food intake. Whereas GLP-1 acts in the periphery to inhibit glucagon secretion and stimulate insulin release, it also acts in the central nervous system to mediate autonomic control of feeding, body temperature, and cardiovascular function. Because of its role as an incretin hormone, GLP-1 receptor analogs are used as a treatment for type 2 diabetes. Central or peripheral administration of GLP-1 increases blood pressure and heart rate, possibly by activating brainstem autonomic nuclei and increasing vagus nerve activity. However, the mechanism(s) by which GLP-1 receptor stimulation affects cardiovascular function are unknown. We used the long-lasting GLP-1 receptor agonist Exendin-4 (Ex-4) to test the hypothesis that GLP-1 signalling modulates central parasympathetic control of heart rate. using a telemetry system, we assessed heart rate in mice during central Ex-4 administration. Heart rate was increased by both acute and chronic central Ex-4 administration. Spectral analysis indicated that the high frequency and low frequency powers of heart rate variability were diminished by Ex-4 treatment. Finally, Ex-4 decreased both excitatory glutamatergic and inhibitory glycinergic neurotransmission to preganglionic parasympathetic cardiac vagal neurons. these data suggest that central GLP-1 receptor stimulation diminishes parasympathetic modulation of the heart thereby increasing heart rate.

  4. Induction of autocrine factor inhibiting cell motility from murine B16-BL6 melanoma cells by alpha-melanocyte stimulating hormone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murata, J; Ayukawa, K; Ogasawara, M; Watanabe, H; Saiki, I

    1999-03-15

    We have previously reported that neuropeptide alpha-melanocyte stimulating hormone (alpha-MSH) successfully inhibited Matrigel invasion and haptotactic migration of B16-BL6 melanoma cells towards both fibronectin and laminin without affecting their growth. In the present study, we investigated the inhibitory mechanism of tumor cell motility by alpha-MSH. Alpha-MSH significantly blocked the autocrine motility factor (AMF)-enhanced cell motility. However, alpha-MSH did neither prevent the secretion of AMF from B16-BL6 cells nor alter the expression level of AMF receptor (gp78). On the other hand, alpha-MSH induced the secretion of the motility inhibitory factor(s) from B16-BL6 cells in a concentration- and time-dependent manner. The induction of the motility inhibitor(s) was proportional to increasing levels of intracellular cAMP induced by alpha-MSH as well as forskolin, and the activity was abolished by an adenylate cyclase inhibitor, 2',5'-dideoxyadenosine (DDA). The motility-inhibiting activity in conditioned medium (CM) from alpha-MSH-treated B16-BL6 cells was found to have a m.w. below 3 kDa after fractionation. This activity was abolished by boiling but insensitive to trypsin. The treatment of tumor cells with cycloheximide reduced the activity in alpha-MSH-stimulated CM. Our results suggest that alpha-MSH inhibited the motility of B16-BL6 cells through induction of autocrine factor(s).

  5. Kaempferol inhibits angiogenic ability by targeting VEGF receptor-2 and downregulating the PI3K/AKT, MEK and ERK pathways in VEGF-stimulated human umbilical vein endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chin, Hsien-Kuo; Horng, Chi-Ting; Liu, Yi-Shan; Lu, Chi-Cheng; Su, Chen-Ying; Chen, Pei-Syuan; Chiu, Hong-Yi; Tsai, Fuu-Jen; Shieh, Po-Chuen; Yang, Jai-Sing

    2018-05-01

    Anti-angiogenesis is one of the most general clinical obstacles in cancer chemotherapy. Kaempferol is a flavonoid phytochemical found in many fruits and vegetables. Our previous study revealed that kaempferol triggered apoptosis in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) by ROS‑mediated p53/ATM/death receptor signaling. However, the anti‑angiogenic potential of kaempferol remains unclear and its underlying mechanism warranted further exploration in VEGF‑stimulated HUVECs. In the present study, kaempferol significantly reduced VEGF‑stimulated HUVEC viability. Kaempferol treatment also inhibited cell migration, invasion, and tube formation in VEGF‑stimulated HUVECs. VEGF receptor‑2 (VEGFR‑2), and its downstream signaling cascades (such as AKT, mTOR and MEK1/2‑ERK1/2) were reduced as determined by western blotting and kinase activity assay in VEGF‑stimulated HUVECs after treatment with kaempferol. The present study revealed that kaempferol may possess angiogenic inhibition through regulation of VEGF/VEGFR‑2 and its downstream signaling cascades (PI3K/AKT, MEK and ERK) in VEGF-stimulated endothelial cells.

  6. A calcium-dependent protein kinase can inhibit a calmodulin-stimulated Ca2+ pump (ACA2) located in the endoplasmic reticulum of Arabidopsis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, I.; Sze, H.; Harper, J. F.; Evans, M. L. (Principal Investigator)

    2000-01-01

    The magnitude and duration of a cytosolic Ca(2+) release can potentially be altered by changing the rate of Ca(2+) efflux. In plant cells, Ca(2+) efflux from the cytoplasm is mediated by H(+)/Ca(2+)-antiporters and two types of Ca(2+)-ATPases. ACA2 was recently identified as a calmodulin-regulated Ca(2+)-pump located in the endoplasmic reticulum. Here, we show that phosphorylation of its N-terminal regulatory domain by a Ca(2+)-dependent protein kinase (CDPK isoform CPK1), inhibits both basal activity ( approximately 10%) and calmodulin stimulation ( approximately 75%), as shown by Ca(2+)-transport assays with recombinant enzyme expressed in yeast. A CDPK phosphorylation site was mapped to Ser(45) near a calmodulin binding site, using a fusion protein containing the N-terminal domain as an in vitro substrate for a recombinant CPK1. In a full-length enzyme, an Ala substitution for Ser(45) (S45/A) completely blocked the observed CDPK inhibition of both basal and calmodulin-stimulated activities. An Asp substitution (S45/D) mimicked phosphoinhibition, indicating that a negative charge at this position is sufficient to account for phosphoinhibition. Interestingly, prior binding of calmodulin blocked phosphorylation. This suggests that, once ACA2 binds calmodulin, its activation state becomes resistant to phosphoinhibition. These results support the hypothesis that ACA2 activity is regulated as the balance between the initial kinetics of calmodulin stimulation and CDPK inhibition, providing an example in plants for a potential point of crosstalk between two different Ca(2+)-signaling pathways.

  7. Iron mediates N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor-dependent stimulation of calcium-induced pathways and hippocampal synaptic plasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz, Pablo; Humeres, Alexis; Elgueta, Claudio; Kirkwood, Alfredo; Hidalgo, Cecilia; Núñez, Marco T

    2011-04-15

    Iron deficiency hinders hippocampus-dependent learning processes and impairs cognitive performance, but current knowledge on the molecular mechanisms underlying the unique role of iron in neuronal function is sparse. Here, we investigated the participation of iron on calcium signal generation and ERK1/2 stimulation induced by the glutamate agonist N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA), and the effects of iron addition/chelation on hippocampal basal synaptic transmission and long-term potentiation (LTP). Addition of NMDA to primary hippocampal cultures elicited persistent calcium signals that required functional NMDA receptors and were independent of calcium influx through L-type calcium channels or α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid receptors; NMDA also promoted ERK1/2 phosphorylation and nuclear translocation. Iron chelation with desferrioxamine or inhibition of ryanodine receptor (RyR)-mediated calcium release with ryanodine-reduced calcium signal duration and prevented NMDA-induced ERK1/2 activation. Iron addition to hippocampal neurons readily increased the intracellular labile iron pool and stimulated reactive oxygen species production; the antioxidant N-acetylcysteine or the hydroxyl radical trapper MCI-186 prevented these responses. Iron addition to primary hippocampal cultures kept in calcium-free medium elicited calcium signals and stimulated ERK1/2 phosphorylation; RyR inhibition abolished these effects. Iron chelation decreased basal synaptic transmission in hippocampal slices, inhibited iron-induced synaptic stimulation, and impaired sustained LTP in hippocampal CA1 neurons induced by strong stimulation. In contrast, iron addition facilitated sustained LTP induction after suboptimal tetanic stimulation. Together, these results suggest that hippocampal neurons require iron to generate RyR-mediated calcium signals after NMDA receptor stimulation, which in turn promotes ERK1/2 activation, an essential step of sustained LTP.

  8. 2-HG Inhibits Necroptosis by Stimulating DNMT1-Dependent Hypermethylation of the RIP3 Promoter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhentao Yang

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available 2-hydroxyglutarate-(2-HG-mediated inhibition of TET2 activity influences DNA hypermethylation in cells harboring mutations of isocitrate dehydrogenases 1 and 2 (IDH1/2. Here, we show that 2-HG also regulates DNA methylation mediated by DNA methyltransferase 1 (DNMT1. DNMT1-dependent hypermethylation of the RIP3 promoter occurred in both IDH1 R132Q knockin mutant mouse embryonic fibroblast (MEFs and 2-HG-treated wild-type (WT MEFs. We found that 2-HG bound to DNMT1 and stimulated its association with the RIP3 promoter, inducing hypermethylation that reduces RIP3 protein and consequently impaired RIP3-dependent necroptosis. In human glioma samples, RIP3 protein levels correlated negatively with IDH1 R132H levels. Furthermore, ectopic expression of RIP3 in transformed IDH1-mutated MEFs inhibited the growth of tumors derived from these cells following transplantation into nude mice. Thus, our research sheds light on a mechanism of 2-HG-induced DNA hypermethylation and suggests that impaired necroptosis contributes to the tumorigenesis driven by IDH1/2 mutations.

  9. Online Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation Protocol for Measuring Cortical Physiology Associated with Response Inhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guthrie, Michael D; Gilbert, Donald L; Huddleston, David A; Pedapati, Ernest V; Horn, Paul S; Mostofsky, Stewart H; Wu, Steve W

    2018-02-08

    We describe the development of a reproducible, child-friendly motor response inhibition task suitable for online Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (TMS) characterization of primary motor cortex (M1) excitability and inhibition. Motor response inhibition prevents unwanted actions and is abnormal in several neuropsychiatric conditions. TMS is a non-invasive technology that can quantify M1 excitability and inhibition using single- and paired-pulse protocols and can be precisely timed to study cortical physiology with high temporal resolution. We modified the original Slater-Hammel (S-H) stop signal task to create a "racecar" version with TMS pulses time-locked to intra-trial events. This task is self-paced, with each trial initiating after a button push to move the racecar towards the 800 ms target. GO trials require a finger-lift to stop the racecar just before this target. Interspersed randomly are STOP trials (25%) during which the dynamically adjusted stop signal prompts subjects to prevent finger-lift. For GO trials, TMS pulses were delivered at 650 ms after trial onset; whereas, for STOP trials, the TMS pulses occurred 150 ms after the stop signal. The timings of the TMS pulses were decided based on electroencephalography (EEG) studies showing event-related changes in these time ranges during stop signal tasks. This task was studied in 3 blocks at two study sites (n=38) and we recorded behavioral performance and event-related motor-evoked potentials (MEP). Regression modelling was used to analyze MEP amplitudes using age as a covariate with multiple independent variables (sex, study site, block, TMS pulse condition [single- vs. paired-pulse], trial condition [GO, successful STOP, failed STOP]). The analysis showed that TMS pulse condition (p<0.0001) and its interaction with trial condition (p=0.009) were significant. Future applications for this online S-H/TMS paradigm include the addition of simultaneous EEG acquisition to measure TMS-evoked EEG potentials. A

  10. Acute stimulation of brain mu opioid receptors inhibits glucose-stimulated insulin secretion via sympathetic innervation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tudurí, Eva; Beiroa, Daniel; Stegbauer, Johannes; Fernø, Johan; López, Miguel; Diéguez, Carlos; Nogueiras, Rubén

    2016-11-01

    Pancreatic insulin-secreting β-cells express opioid receptors, whose activation by opioid peptides modulates hormone secretion. Opioid receptors are also expressed in multiple brain regions including the hypothalamus, where they play a role in feeding behavior and energy homeostasis, but their potential role in central regulation of glucose metabolism is unknown. Here, we investigate whether central opioid receptors participate in the regulation of insulin secretion and glucose homeostasis in vivo. C57BL/6J mice were acutely treated by intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) injection with specific agonists for the three main opioid receptors, kappa (KOR), delta (DOR) and mu (MOR) opioid receptors: activation of KOR and DOR did not alter glucose tolerance, whereas activation of brain MOR with the specific agonist DAMGO blunted glucose-stimulated insulin secretion (GSIS), reduced insulin sensitivity, increased the expression of gluconeogenic genes in the liver and, consequently, impaired glucose tolerance. Pharmacological blockade of α2A-adrenergic receptors prevented DAMGO-induced glucose intolerance and gluconeogenesis. Accordingly, DAMGO failed to inhibit GSIS and to impair glucose tolerance in α2A-adrenoceptor knockout mice, indicating that the effects of central MOR activation on β-cells are mediated via sympathetic innervation. Our results show for the first time a new role of the central opioid system, specifically the MOR, in the regulation of insulin secretion and glucose metabolism. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Inhibition of nitric oxide and inflammatory cytokines in LPS-stimulated murine macrophages by resveratrol, a potent proteasome inhibitor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qureshi Asaf A

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Altered immune function during ageing results in increased production of nitric oxide (NO and other inflammatory mediators. Recently, we have reported that NO production was inhibited by naturally-occurring proteasome inhibitors (quercetin, δ-tocotrienol, and riboflavin in lipopolysaccharide (LPS-stimulated RAW264.7 cells, and thioglycolate-elicited peritoneal macrophages from C57BL/6 mice. In a continuous effort to find more potent, non-toxic, commercially available, naturally-occurring proteasome inhibitors that suppress inflammation, the present study was carried out to describe the inhibition of NF-κB activation and NO, TNF-α, IL-6, IL-1β, and iNOS expression by trans-resveratrol, trans-pterostilbene, morin hydrate, and nicotinic acid in LPS-induced RAW 264.7 cells and thioglycolate-elicited peritoneal macrophages from C57BL/6 and BALB/c mice. Results The present results indicate that resveratrol, pterostilbene, and morin hydrate caused significant inhibition (>70% to 90%; P 40%; P 60%; P 40%; P P  Conclusions The present results clearly demonstrate that resveratrol and pterostilbene are particularly potent proteasome inhibitors that suppress expression of genes, and production of inflammatory products in LPS-stimulated RAW 264.7 cells, and macrophages from C57BL/6 and BALB/c mice. Resveratrol and pterostilbene which are present in grapes, blueberries, and red wine, have been implicated as contributing factors to the lower incidence of cardiovascular disease in the French population, despite their relatively high dietary fat intake. Consequently, it appears likely that the beneficial nutritional effects of resveratrol and pterostilbene are due at least in part, to their ability to inhibit NF-κB activation by the proteasome, thereby suppressing activation of pro-inflammatory cytokines and iNOS genes, resulting in decreased secretion of TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6, and NO levels, in response to inflammatory stimuli

  12. Tangeretin and its metabolite 4'-hydroxytetramethoxyflavone attenuate EGF-stimulated cell cycle progression in hepatocytes; role of inhibition at the level of mTOR/p70S6K.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Z; Surichan, S; Ruparelia, K; Arroo, R; Boarder, M R

    2011-04-01

    The mechanisms by which the dietary compound tangeretin has anticancer effects may include acting as a prodrug, forming an antiproliferative product in cancer cells. Here we show that tangeretin also inhibits cell cycle progression in hepatocytes and investigate the role of its primary metabolite 4'-hydroxy-5,6,7,8-tetramethoxyflavone (4'-OH-TMF) in this effect. We used epidermal growth factor (EGF)-stimulated rat hepatocytes, with [(3)H]-thymidine incorporation into DNA as an index of progression to S-phase of the cell cycle, and Western blots for phospho-proteins involved in the cell signalling cascade. Incubation of tangeretin with microsomes expressing CYP1A, or with hepatocytes, generated a primary product we identified as 4'-OH-TMF. Low micromolar concentrations of tangeretin or 4'-OH-TMF gave a concentration-dependent inhibition of EGF-stimulated progression to S-phase while having little effect on cell viability. To determine whether time for conversion of tangeretin to an active metabolite would enhance the inhibitory effect we used long pre-incubations; this reduced the inhibitory effect, in parallel with a reduction in the concentration of tangeretin. The EGF-stimulation of hepatocyte cell cycle progression requires signalling through Akt/mTOR/p70S6K kinase cascades. The tangeretin metabolite 4'-OH-TMF selectively inhibited S6K phosphorylation in the absence of significant inhibition of upstream Akt activity, suggesting an effect at the level of mTOR. Tangeretin and 4'-OH-TMF both inhibit cell cycle progression in primary hepatocytes. The inhibition of p70S6K phosphorylation by 4'-OH-TMF raises the possibility that inhibition of the mTOR pathway may contribute to the anticancer influence of a flavonoid-rich diet. © 2011 The Authors. British Journal of Pharmacology © 2011 The British Pharmacological Society.

  13. Gliclazide directly inhibits arginine-induced glucagon release

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cejvan, Kenan; Coy, David H; Holst, Jens Juul

    2002-01-01

    Arginine-stimulated insulin and somatostatin release is enhanced by the sulfonylurea gliclazide. In contrast, gliclazide inhibits the glucagon response. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether this inhibition of glucagon release was mediated by a direct suppressive effect of glicl......Arginine-stimulated insulin and somatostatin release is enhanced by the sulfonylurea gliclazide. In contrast, gliclazide inhibits the glucagon response. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether this inhibition of glucagon release was mediated by a direct suppressive effect....... In islet perifusions with DC-41-33, arginine-induced glucagon release was inhibited by 66%. We therefore concluded that gliclazide inhibits glucagon release by a direct action on the pancreatic A cell....

  14. Transcranial magnetic stimulation of dorsolateral prefrontal cortex reduces cocaine use: A pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terraneo, Alberto; Leggio, Lorenzo; Saladini, Marina; Ermani, Mario; Bonci, Antonello; Gallimberti, Luigi

    2016-01-01

    Recent animal studies demonstrate that compulsive cocaine seeking strongly reduces prelimbic frontal cortex activity, while optogenetic stimulation of this brain area significantly inhibits compulsive cocaine seeking, providing a strong rationale for applying brain stimulation to reduce cocaine consumption. Thus, we employed repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS), to test if dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) stimulation might prevent cocaine use in humans. Thirty-two cocaine-addicted patients were randomly assigned to either the experimental group (rTMS) on the left DLPFC, or to a control group (pharmacological agents) during a 29-day study (Stage 1). This was followed by a 63-day follow-up (Stage 2), during which all participants were offered rTMS treatment. Amongst the patients who completed Stage 1, 16 were in the rTMS group (100%) and 13 in the control group (81%). No significant adverse events were noted. During Stage 1, there were a significantly higher number of cocaine-free urine drug tests in the rTMS group compared to control (p=0.004). Craving for cocaine was also significantly lower in the rTMS group compared to the controls (p=0.038). Out of 13 patients who completed Stage 1 in the control group, 10 patients received rTMS treatment during Stage 2 and showed significant improvement with favorable outcomes becoming comparable to those of the rTMS group. The present preliminary findings support the safety of rTMS in cocaine-addicted patients, and suggest its potential therapeutic role for rTMS-driven PFC stimulation in reducing cocaine use, providing a strong rationale for developing larger placebo-controlled studies. Trial name: Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) in cocaine abusers, URL:〈http://www.isrctn.com/ISRCTN15823943?q=&filters=&sort=&offset=8&totalResults=13530&page=1&pageSize=10&searchType=basic-search〉, ISRCTN15823943. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  15. Interleukin 1α inhibits prostaglandin E2 release to suppress pulsatile release of luteinizing hormone but not follicle-stimulating hormone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rettori, V.; McCann, S.M.; Gimeno, M.F.; Karara, A.; Gonzalez, M.C.

    1991-01-01

    Interleukin 1α (IL-1α), a powerful endogenous pyrogen released from monocytes and macrophages by bacterial endotoxin, stimulates corticotropin, prolactin, and somatotropin release and inhibits thyrotropin release by hypothalamic action. The authors injected recombinant human IL-1α into the third cerebral ventricle, to study its effect on the pulsatile release of follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) and luteinizing hormone (LH) in conscious, freely moving, ovariectomized rats. Intraventricular injection of 0.25 pmol of IL-1α caused an almost immediate reduction of plasma LH concentration. To determine the mechanism of the suppression of LH release, mediobasal hypothalamic fragments were incubated in vitro with IL-1α (10 pM) and the release of LH-releasing hormone (LHRH) and prostaglandin E 2 into the medium was measured by RIA in the presence or absence of nonrepinephrine. 1α reduced basal LHRH release and blocked LHRH release induced by nonrepinephrine. In conclusion, IL-1α suppresses LH but not FSH release by an almost complete cessation of pulsatile release of LH in the castrated rat. The mechanism of this effect appears to be by inhibition of prostaglandin E 2 -mediated release of LHRH

  16. Pycnogenol Attenuates the Release of Proinflammatory Cytokines and Expression of Perilipin 2 in Lipopolysaccharide-Stimulated Microglia in Part via Inhibition of NF-κB and AP-1 Activation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bin Fan

    Full Text Available Over activation of microglia results in the production of proinflammatory agents that have been implicated in various brain diseases. Pycnogenol is a patented extract from French maritime pine bark (Pinus pinaster Aiton with strong antioxidant and anti-inflammatory potency. The present study investigated whether pycnogenol may be associated with the production of proinflammatory mediators in lipopolysaccharide-stimulated BV2 (mouse-derived microglia. It was found that pycnogenol treatment was dose-dependently associated with significantly less release of nitricoxide (NO, TNF-α, IL-6 and IL-1β, and lower levels of intercellular adhesion molecule1 (ICAM-1 and perilipin 2 (PLIN2. Furthermore, this effect was replicated in primary brain microglia. Levels of inducible NO synthase mRNA and protein were attenuated, whereas there was no change in the production of the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10. Further evidence indicated that pycnogenol treatment led to the suppression of NF-κB activation through inhibition of p65 translocation into the nucleus and inhibited DNA binding of AP-1, suggesting that these proinflammatory factors are associated with NF-κB and AP-1. We conclude that pycnogenol exerts anti-inflammatory effects through inhibition of the NF-κB and AP-1pathway, and may be useful as a therapeutic agent in the prevention of diseases caused by over activation of microglia.

  17. Ganoderma lucidum ethanol extract inhibits the inflammatory response by suppressing the NF-κB and toll-like receptor pathways in lipopolysaccharide-stimulated BV2 microglial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Hyun-Min; Jang, Kyung-Jun; Han, Min Seok; Jeong, Jin-Woo; Kim, Gi Young; Lee, Jai-Heon; Choi, Yung Hyun

    2013-03-01

    Ganoderma lucidum is a traditional Oriental medicine that has been widely used as a tonic to promote longevity and health in Korea and other Asian countries. Although a great deal of work has been carried out on the therapeutic potential of this mushroom, the pharmacological mechanisms of its anti-inflammatory actions remain unclear. In this study, we evaluated the inhibitory effects of G. lucidum ethanol extract (EGL) on the production of inflammatory mediators and cytokines in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated murine BV2 microglia. We also investigated the effects of EGL on the LPS-induced activation of nuclear factor kappaB (NF-κB) and upregulation of toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) and myeloid differentiation factor 88 (MyD88). Elevated levels of nitric oxide (NO), prostaglandin E(2) (PGE(2)) and pro-inflammatory cytokine production were detected in BV2 microglia following LPS stimulation. We identifed that EGL significantly inhibits the excessive production of NO, PGE(2) and pro-inflammatory cytokines, including interleukin (IL)-1β and tumor necrosis factor-α in a concentration-dependent manner without causing cytotoxicity. In addition, EGL suppressed NF-κB translocation and transcriptional activity by blocking IκB degradation and inhibiting TLR4 and MyD88 expression in LPS-stimulated BV2 cells. Our results indicate that the inhibitory effects of EGL on LPS-stimulated inflammatory responses in BV2 microglia are associated with the suppression of the NF-κB and TLR signaling pathways. Therefore, EGL may be useful in the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases by inhibiting inflammatory mediator responses in activated microglia.

  18. Effect of Electrical Current Stimulation on Pseudomonas Aeruginosa Growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alneami, Auns Q.; Khalil, Eman G.; Mohsien, Rana A.; Albeldawi, Ali F.

    2018-05-01

    The present study evaluates the effect of electrical current with different frequencies stimulation to kill pathogenic Pseudomonas aeruginosa (PA) bacteria in vitro using human safe level of electricity controlled by function generator. A wide range of frequencies has been used from 0.5 Hz-1.2 MHz to stimulate the bacteria at a voltage of 20 p-p volt for different periods of time (5 to 30) minutes. The culture of bacteria used Nickel, Nichrome, or Titanium electrode using agarose in phosphate buffer saline (PBS) and mixed with bacterial stock activated by trypticase soy broth (TSB). The results of frequencies between 0.5-1 KHz show the inhibition zone diameter of 20 mm in average at 30 minutes of stimulation. At frequencies between 3-60 KHz the inhibition zone diameter was only 10mm for 30 minutes of stimulation. While the average of inhibition zone diameter increased to more than 30mm for 30 minutes of stimulation at frequencies between 80-120 KHz. From this study we conclude that at specific frequency (resonance frequency) (frequencies between 0.5-1 KHz) there was relatively large inhibition zone because the inductive reactance effect is equal to the value of capacitive reactance effect (XC = XL). At frequencies over than 60 KHz, maximum inhibition zone noticed because the capacitance impedance becomes negligible (only the small resistivity of the bacterial internal organs).

  19. Inhibition of seed germination by extracts of bitter Hawkesbury watermelon containing cucurbitacin, a feeding stimulant for corn rootworm (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Phyllis A W; Blackburn, Michael

    2003-04-01

    Cucurbitacins are feeding stimulants for corn rootworm used in baits to control the adults of this insect pest. Corn rootworm larvae also feed compulsively on cucurbitacins. Cucurbitacins are reported to be gibberellin antagonists that may preclude their use as seed treatments for these soil-dwelling insects. The crude extract of a bitter Hawkesbury watermelon containing cucurbitacin E-glycoside significantly inhibited germination of watermelon, squash, and tomato seeds. Although the germination of corn seed was not significantly inhibited, root elongation was inhibited by crude extracts, but not by high-performance liquid chromatography-purified cucurbitacin E-glycoside. Therefore, the effects of the major components in the bitter watermelon extract (e.g., sugars) on seed germination and root elongation were determined. Pure sugars (glucose and fructose), at concentrations found in watermelon extract, mimicked the inhibition of seed germination and root elongation seen with the crude bitter Hawkesbury watermelon extract. Removal of these sugars may be necessary to use this extract as a bait for corn rootworm larvae as a seed or root treatment.

  20. Dynamic high pressure induced strong and weak hydrogen bonds enhanced by pre-resonance stimulated Raman scattering in liquid water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shenghan; Fang, Wenhui; Li, Fabing; Gong, Nan; Li, Zhanlong; Li, Zuowei; Sun, Chenglin; Men, Zhiwei

    2017-12-11

    355 nm pulsed laser is employed to excite pre-resonance forward stimulated Raman scattering (FSRS) of liquid water at ambient temperature. Due to the shockwave induced dynamic high pressure, the obtained Raman spectra begin to exhibit double peaks distribution at 3318 and 3373 cm -1 with the input energy of 17 mJ,which correspond with OH stretching vibration with strong and weak hydrogen (H) bonds. With laser energy rising from 17 to 27 mJ, the Stokes line at 3318 cm -1 shifts to 3255 and 3230 cm -1 because of the high pressure being enlarged. When the energy is up to 32 mJ, only 3373 cm -1 peak exists. The strong and weak H bond exhibit quite different energy dependent behaviors.

  1. Tangeretin and its metabolite 4′-hydroxytetramethoxyflavone attenuate EGF-stimulated cell cycle progression in hepatocytes; role of inhibition at the level of mTOR/p70S6K

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Z; Surichan, S; Ruparelia, K; Arroo, R; Boarder, MR

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE The mechanisms by which the dietary compound tangeretin has anticancer effects may include acting as a prodrug, forming an antiproliferative product in cancer cells. Here we show that tangeretin also inhibits cell cycle progression in hepatocytes and investigate the role of its primary metabolite 4′-hydroxy-5,6,7,8-tetramethoxyflavone (4′-OH-TMF) in this effect. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH We used epidermal growth factor (EGF)-stimulated rat hepatocytes, with [3H]-thymidine incorporation into DNA as an index of progression to S-phase of the cell cycle, and Western blots for phospho-proteins involved in the cell signalling cascade. KEY RESULTS Incubation of tangeretin with microsomes expressing CYP1A, or with hepatocytes, generated a primary product we identified as 4′-OH-TMF. Low micromolar concentrations of tangeretin or 4′-OH-TMF gave a concentration-dependent inhibition of EGF-stimulated progression to S-phase while having little effect on cell viability. To determine whether time for conversion of tangeretin to an active metabolite would enhance the inhibitory effect we used long pre-incubations; this reduced the inhibitory effect, in parallel with a reduction in the concentration of tangeretin. The EGF-stimulation of hepatocyte cell cycle progression requires signalling through Akt/mTOR/p70S6K kinase cascades. The tangeretin metabolite 4′-OH-TMF selectively inhibited S6K phosphorylation in the absence of significant inhibition of upstream Akt activity, suggesting an effect at the level of mTOR. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS Tangeretin and 4′-OH-TMF both inhibit cell cycle progression in primary hepatocytes. The inhibition of p70S6K phosphorylation by 4′-OH-TMF raises the possibility that inhibition of the mTOR pathway may contribute to the anticancer influence of a flavonoid-rich diet. PMID:21198542

  2. Multiple blocks of intermittent and continuous theta-burst stimulation applied via transcranial magnetic stimulation differently affect sensory responses in rat barrel cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thimm, Andreas; Funke, Klaus

    2015-02-15

    Theta-burst stimulation (TBS) applied via transcranial magnetic stimulation is able to modulate human cortical excitability. Here we investigated in a rat model how two different forms of TBS, intermittent (iTBS) and continuous (cTBS), affect sensory responses in rat barrel cortex. We found that iTBS but less cTBS promoted late (>18 ms) sensory response components while not affecting the earliest response (8-18 ms). The effect increased with each of the five iTBS blocks applied. cTBS somewhat reduced the early response component after the first block but had a similar effect as iTBS after four to five blocks. We conclude that iTBS primarly modulates the activity of (inhibitory) cortical interneurons while cTBS may first reduce general neuronal excitability with a single block but reverse to iTBS-like effects with application of several blocks. Cortical sensory processing varies with cortical state and the balance of inhibition to excitation. Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) has been shown to modulate human cortical excitability. In a rat model, we recently showed that intermittent theta-burst stimulation (iTBS) applied to the corpus callosum, to activate primarily supragranular cortical pyramidal cells but fewer subcortical neurons, strongly reduced the cortical expression of parvalbumin (PV), indicating reduced activity of fast-spiking interneurons. Here, we used the well-studied rodent barrel cortex system to test how iTBS and continuous TBS (cTBS) modulate sensory responses evoked by either single or double stimuli applied to the principal (PW) and/or adjacent whisker (AW) in urethane-anaesthetized rats. Compared to sham stimulation, iTBS but not cTBS particularly enhanced late (>18 ms) response components of multi-unit spiking and local field potential responses in layer 4 but not the very early response (iTBS diminished the suppression of the second response evoked by paired PW or AW-PW stimulation at 20 ms intervals. The effects

  3. Inhibition of micturition reflex by activation of somatic afferents in posterior femoral cutaneous nerve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tai, Changfeng; Shen, Bing; Mally, Abhijith D; Zhang, Fan; Zhao, Shouguo; Wang, Jicheng; Roppolo, James R; de Groat, William C

    2012-10-01

    This study determined if activation of somatic afferents in posterior femoral cutaneous nerve (PFCN) could modulate the micturition reflex recorded under isovolumetric conditions in α-chloralose anaesthetized cats. PFCN stimulation inhibited reflex bladder activity and significantly (P acid (AA). The optimal frequency for PFCN stimulation-induced bladder inhibition was between 3 and 10 Hz, and a minimal stimulation intensity of half of the threshold for inducing anal twitching was required. Bilateral pudendal nerve transection eliminated PFCN stimulation-induced anal twitching but did not change the stimulation-induced bladder inhibition, excluding the involvement of pudendal afferent or efferent axons in PFCN afferent inhibition.Mechanical or electrical stimulation on the skin surface in the PFCN dermatome also inhibited bladder activity. Prolonged (2 × 30 min) PFCN stimulation induced a post-stimulation inhibition that persists for at least 2 h. This study revealed a new cutaneous-bladder reflex activated by PFCN afferents. Although the mechanisms and physiological functions of this cutaneous-bladder reflex need to be further studied, our data raise the possibility that stimulation of PFCN afferents might be useful clinically for the treatment of overactive bladder symptoms.

  4. Nicotine inhibits collagen synthesis and alkaline phosphatase activity, but stimulates DNA synthesis in osteoblast-like cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramp, W.K.; Lenz, L.G.; Galvin, R.J.

    1991-01-01

    Use of smokeless tobacco is associated with various oral lesions including periodontal damage and alveolar bone loss. This study was performed to test the effects of nicotine on bone-forming cells at concentrations that occur in the saliva of smokeless tobacco users. Confluent cultures of osteoblast-like cells isolated from chick embryo calvariae were incubated for 2 days with nicotine added to the culture medium (25-600 micrograms/ml). Nicotine inhibited alkaline phosphatase in the cell layer and released to the medium, whereas glycolysis (as indexed by lactate production) was unaffected or slightly elevated. The effects on medium and cell layer alkaline phosphatase were concentration dependent with maximal inhibition occurring at 600 micrograms nicotine/ml. Nicotine essentially did not affect the noncollagenous protein content of the cell layer, but did inhibit collagen synthesis (hydroxylation of [ 3 H]proline and collagenase-digestible protein) at 100, 300, and 600 micrograms/ml. Release of [ 3 H]hydroxyproline to the medium was also decreased in a dose-dependent manner, as was the collagenase-digestible protein for both the medium and cell layer. In contrast, DNA synthesis (incorporation of [ 3 H]thymidine) was more than doubled by the alkaloid, whereas total DNA content was slightly inhibited at 600 micrograms/ml, suggesting stimulated cell turnover. Morphologic changes occurred in nicotine-treated cells including rounding up, detachment, and the occurrence of numerous large vacuoles. These results suggest that steps to reduce the salivary concentration of nicotine in smokeless tobacco users might diminish damaging effects of this product on alveolar bone

  5. Colony stimulating factor 1 receptor inhibition delays recurrence of glioblastoma after radiation by altering myeloid cell recruitment and polarization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stafford, Jason H.; Hirai, Takahisa; Deng, Lei; Chernikova, Sophia B.; Urata, Kimiko; West, Brian L.; Brown, J. Martin

    2016-01-01

    Background Glioblastoma (GBM) may initially respond to treatment with ionizing radiation (IR), but the prognosis remains extremely poor because the tumors invariably recur. Using animal models, we previously showed that inhibiting stromal cell–derived factor 1 signaling can prevent or delay GBM recurrence by blocking IR-induced recruitment of myeloid cells, specifically monocytes that give rise to tumor-associated macrophages. The present study was aimed at determining if inhibiting colony stimulating factor 1 (CSF-1) signaling could be used as an alternative strategy to target pro-tumorigenic myeloid cells recruited to irradiated GBM. Methods To inhibit CSF-1 signaling in myeloid cells, we used PLX3397, a small molecule that potently inhibits the tyrosine kinase activity of the CSF-1 receptor (CSF-1R). Combined IR and PLX3397 therapy was compared with IR alone using 2 different human GBM intracranial xenograft models. Results GBM xenografts treated with IR upregulated CSF-1R ligand expression and increased the number of CD11b+ myeloid-derived cells in the tumors. Treatment with PLX3397 both depleted CD11b+ cells and potentiated the response of the intracranial tumors to IR. Median survival was significantly longer for mice receiving combined therapy versus IR alone. Analysis of myeloid cell differentiation markers indicated that CSF-1R inhibition prevented IR-recruited monocyte cells from differentiating into immunosuppressive, pro-angiogenic tumor-associated macrophages. Conclusion CSF-1R inhibition may be a promising strategy to improve GBM response to radiotherapy. PMID:26538619

  6. Inhibition of CSF-1R supports T-cell mediated melanoma therapy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marjolein Sluijter

    Full Text Available Tumor associated macrophages (TAM can promote angiogenesis, invasiveness and immunosuppression. The cytokine CSF-1 (or M-CSF is an important factor of TAM recruitment and differentiation and several pharmacological agents targeting the CSF-1 receptor (CSF-1R have been developed to regulate TAM in solid cancers. We show that the kinase inhibitor PLX3397 strongly dampened the systemic and local accumulation of macrophages driven by B16F10 melanomas, without affecting Gr-1(+ myeloid derived suppressor cells. Removal of intratumoral macrophages was remarkably efficient and a modest, but statistically significant, delay in melanoma outgrowth was observed. Importantly, CSF-1R inhibition strongly enhanced tumor control by immunotherapy using tumor-specific CD8 T cells. Elevated IFNγ production by T cells was observed in mice treated with the combination of PLX3397 and immunotherapy. These results support the combined use of CSF-1R inhibition with CD8 T cell immunotherapy, especially for macrophage-stimulating tumors.

  7. NAD+-dependent HDAC inhibitor stimulates Monascus pigment production but inhibit citrinin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Yan; Zhou, Youxiang; Mao, Zejing; Li, Huihui; Chen, Fusheng; Shao, Yanchun

    2017-08-23

    Monascus species are edible fungi due to the production of food colorant and other beneficial compounds. Hence, it has been an attractive thesis to improve their productivities. Increasing numbers of investigations revealed that regulating the activities of histone deacetylases can significantly perturb secondary metabolites (SM) production at a global level. In this study, dihydrocoumarin (DHC, an inhibitor of the Sirtuin family of NAD + -dependent deacetylases) was used to treat Monascus ruber for evaluating its effects on organism growth and SM production. The results revealed that the variation trends of colonial sizes, biomass and mycotoxin were in a dose-dependent manner. Generally, they decreased with the increased DHC concentrations in the designed range. But the variation trend of pigment was different. Comparison of SM profile, three new peaks occurred to the mycelia extractions from DHC-treated strain corresponding to molecular weights 402, 416 and 444, respectively. These three compounds were identified as Monasfluol B, Monascus azaphilone C and acetyl-monasfluol B (a new Monascus chemical pigment structure). In short, DHC can stimulate M. ruber strain to produce more pigment-like polyketides but inhibition of mycotoxin (citrinin).

  8. Allosteric regulation of the GTP activated and CTP inhibited uracil phosphoribosyltransferase from the thermophilic archaeon Sulfolobus solfataricus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Kaj Frank; Arent, Susan; Larsen, Sine

    2005-01-01

    The upp gene, encoding uracil phosphoribosyltransferase (UPRTase) from the thermoacidophilic archaeon Sulfolobus solfataricus, was cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli. The enzyme was purified to homogeneity. It behaved as a tetramer in solution and showed optimal activity at pH 5.5 when...... assayed at 60 °C. Enzyme activity was strongly stimulated by GTP and inhibited by CTP. GTP caused an approximately 20-fold increase in the turnover number kcat and raised the Km values for 5-phosphoribosyl-1-diphosphate (PRPP) and uracil by two- and >10-fold, respectively. The inhibition by CTP...... was complex as it depended on the presence of the reaction product UMP. Neither CTP nor UMP were strong inhibitors of the enzyme, but when present in combination their inhibition was extremely powerful. Ligand binding analyses showed that GTP and PRPP bind cooperatively to the enzyme and that the inhibitors...

  9. Inhibition of xanthine oxidase reduces oxidative stress and improves skeletal muscle function in response to electrically stimulated isometric contractions in aged mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, Michael J.; Jackson, Janna R.; Hao, Yanlei; Leonard, Stephen S.; Alway, Stephen E.

    2012-01-01

    Oxidative stress is a putative factor responsible for reducing function and increasing apoptotic signaling in skeletal muscle with aging. This study examined the contribution and functional significance of the xanthine oxidase enzyme as a potential source of oxidant production in aged skeletal muscle during repetitive in situ electrically stimulated isometric contractions. Xanthine oxidase activity was inhibited in young adult and aged mice via a subcutaneously placed time release (2.5 mg/day) allopurinol pellet, 7 days prior to the start of in situ electrically stimulated isometric contractions. Gastrocnemius muscles were electrically activated with 20 maximal contractions for three consecutive days. Xanthine oxidase activity was 65% greater in the gastrocnemius muscle of aged mice compared to young mice. Xanthine oxidase activity also increased after in situ electrically stimulated isometric contractions in muscles from both young (33%) and aged (28%) mice, relative to contralateral non-contracted muscles. Allopurinol attenuated the exercise-induced increase in oxidative stress, but it did not affect the elevated basal levels of oxidative stress that was associated with aging. In addition, inhibition of xanthine oxidase activity decreased caspase 3 activity, but it had no effect on other markers of mitochondrial associated apoptosis. Our results show that compared to control conditions, suppression of xanthine oxidase activity by allopurinol reduced xanthine oxidase activity, H2O2 levels, lipid peroxidation and caspase-3 activity, prevented the in situ electrically stimulated isometric contraction-induced loss of glutathione, prevented the increase of catalase and copper-zinc superoxide dismutase activities, and increased maximal isometric force in the plantar flexor muscles of aged mice after repetitive electrically evoked contractions. PMID:21530649

  10. Neutralizing VEGF bioactivity with a soluble chimeric VEGF receptor protein flt (1-3) IGG inhibits testosterone stimulated prostate growth in castrated mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hammarsten, P.; Lissbrant, E.; Lissbrant, I.-F.; Haeggstroem-Rudolfsson, S.; Bergh, A.; Ferrara, N.

    2003-01-01

    Recent studies show that testosterone stimulated growth of the glandular tissue in the ventral prostate in adult castrated rats is preceded by increased epithelial VEGF synthesis, endothelial cell proliferation, vascular growth, and increased blood flow. These observations suggest that testosterone stimulated prostate growth could be angiogenesis dependent, and that VEGF could play a central role in this. To test this hypothesis adult male mice were castrated and after one week treated with testosterone and vehicle, or with testosterone and a soluble chimeric VEGF-receptor flt(1-3)IgG protein. Treatment with testosterone markedly increased endothelial cell proliferation, vascular volume and organ weight in the ventral prostate lobe in the vehicle groups, but these responses were inhibited but not fully prevented by anti-VEGF treatment. The testosterone stimulated increase in epithelial cell proliferation was unaffected by flt(1-3)IgG, but endothelial and epithelial cell apoptosis were increased in the anti-VEGF compared to the vehicle treated group. This study, together with our previous observations, suggest that testosterone stimulates vascular growth in the ventral prostate lobe indirectly by increasing epithelial VEGF synthesis and that this is a necessary component in testosterone stimulated prostate growth

  11. Estrogen inhibits RANKL-stimulated osteoclastic differentiation of human monocytes through estrogen and RANKL-regulated interaction of estrogen receptor-α with BCAR1 and Traf6

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robinson, Lisa J.; Yaroslavskiy, Beatrice B.; Griswold, Reed D.; Zadorozny, Eva V.; Guo, Lida; Tourkova, Irina L.; Blair, Harry C.

    2009-01-01

    The effects of estrogen on osteoclast survival and differentiation were studied using CD14-selected mononuclear osteoclast precursors from peripheral blood. Estradiol at ∼ 1 nM reduced RANKL-dependent osteoclast differentiation by 40-50%. Osteoclast differentiation was suppressed 14 days after addition of RANKL even when estradiol was withdrawn after 18 h. In CD14+ cells apoptosis was rare and was not augmented by RANKL or by 17-β-estradiol. Estrogen receptor-α (ERα) expression was strongly down-regulated by RANKL, whether or not estradiol was present. Mature human osteoclasts thus cannot respond to estrogen via ERα. However, ERα was present in CD14+ osteoclast progenitors, and a scaffolding protein, BCAR1, which binds ERα in the presence of estrogen, was abundant. Immunoprecipitation showed rapid (∼ 5 min) estrogen-dependent formation of ERα-BCAR1 complexes, which were increased by RANKL co-treatment. The RANKL-signaling intermediate Traf6, which regulates NF-κB activity, precipitated with this complex. Reduction of NF-κB nuclear localization occurred within 30 min of RANKL stimulation, and estradiol inhibited the phosphorylation of IκB in response to RANKL. Inhibition by estradiol was abolished by siRNA knockdown of BCAR1. We conclude that estrogen directly, but only partially, curtails human osteoclast formation. This effect requires BCAR1 and involves a non-genomic interaction with ERα.

  12. Estrogen inhibits RANKL-stimulated osteoclastic differentiation of human monocytes through estrogen and RANKL-regulated interaction of estrogen receptor-{alpha} with BCAR1 and Traf6

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robinson, Lisa J., E-mail: robinsonlj@msx.upmc.edu [Department of Pathology, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 15261 (United States); Yaroslavskiy, Beatrice B.; Griswold, Reed D.; Zadorozny, Eva V.; Guo, Lida; Tourkova, Irina L. [Department of Pathology, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 15261 (United States); Blair, Harry C. [Department of Pathology, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 15261 (United States); Veteran' s Affairs Medical Center, Pittsburgh, PA 15243 (United States)

    2009-04-15

    The effects of estrogen on osteoclast survival and differentiation were studied using CD14-selected mononuclear osteoclast precursors from peripheral blood. Estradiol at {approx} 1 nM reduced RANKL-dependent osteoclast differentiation by 40-50%. Osteoclast differentiation was suppressed 14 days after addition of RANKL even when estradiol was withdrawn after 18 h. In CD14+ cells apoptosis was rare and was not augmented by RANKL or by 17-{beta}-estradiol. Estrogen receptor-{alpha} (ER{alpha}) expression was strongly down-regulated by RANKL, whether or not estradiol was present. Mature human osteoclasts thus cannot respond to estrogen via ER{alpha}. However, ER{alpha} was present in CD14+ osteoclast progenitors, and a scaffolding protein, BCAR1, which binds ER{alpha} in the presence of estrogen, was abundant. Immunoprecipitation showed rapid ({approx} 5 min) estrogen-dependent formation of ER{alpha}-BCAR1 complexes, which were increased by RANKL co-treatment. The RANKL-signaling intermediate Traf6, which regulates NF-{kappa}B activity, precipitated with this complex. Reduction of NF-{kappa}B nuclear localization occurred within 30 min of RANKL stimulation, and estradiol inhibited the phosphorylation of I{kappa}B in response to RANKL. Inhibition by estradiol was abolished by siRNA knockdown of BCAR1. We conclude that estrogen directly, but only partially, curtails human osteoclast formation. This effect requires BCAR1 and involves a non-genomic interaction with ER{alpha}.

  13. The Protective Effects of Κ-Opioid Receptor Stimulation in Hypoxic Pulmonary Hypertension Involve Inhibition of Autophagy Through the AMPK-MTOR Pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yaguang Zhou

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: In a previous study, we showed that κ-opioid receptor stimulation with the selective agonist U50,488H ameliorated hypoxic pulmonary hypertension (HPH. However, the roles that pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cell (PASMC proliferation, apoptosis, and autophagy play in κ-opioid receptor-mediated protection against HPH are still unknown. The goal of the present study was to investigate the role of autophagy in U50,488H-induced HPH protection and the underlying mechanisms. Methods: Rats were exposed to 10% oxygen for three weeks to induce HPH. After hypoxia, the mean pulmonary arterial pressure (mPAP and the right ventricular pressure (RVP were measured. Cell viability was monitored using the Cell Counting Kit-8 (CCK-8 assay. Cell apoptosis was detected by flow cytometry and Western blot. Autophagy was assessed by means of the mRFP-GFP-LC3 adenovirus transfection assay and by Western blot. Results: Inhibition of autophagy by the administration of chloroquine prevented the development of HPH in the rat model, as evidenced by significantly reduced mPAP and RVP, as well as decreased autophagy. U50,488H mimicked the effects of chloroquine, and the effects of U50,488H were blocked by nor-BNI, a selective κ-opioid receptor antagonist. In vitro experiments showed that the inhibition of autophagy by chloroquine was associated with decreased proliferation and increased apoptosis of PASMCs. Under hypoxia, U50,488H also significantly inhibited autophagy, reduced proliferation and increased apoptosis of PASMCs. These effects of U50,488H were blocked by nor-BNI. Moreover, exposure to hypoxic conditions significantly increased AMPK phosphorylation and reduced mTOR phosphorylation, and these effects were abrogated by U50,488H. The effects of U50,488H on PASMC autophagy were inhibited by AICAR, a selective AMPK agonist, or by rapamycin, a selective mTOR inhibitor. Conclusion: Our data provide evidence for the first time that κ-opioid receptor

  14. Cerebellar nuclei neurons show only small excitatory responses to optogenetic olivary stimulation in transgenic mice: in vivo and in vitro studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huo eLu

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available To study the olivary input to the cerebellar nuclei (CN we used optogenetic stimulation in transgenic mice expressing channelrhodopsin-2 (ChR2 in olivary neurons. We obtained in vivo extracellular Purkinje cell (PC and CN recordings in anesthetized mice while stimulating the contralateral inferior olive (IO with a blue laser (single pulse, 10 - 50 ms duration. Peri-stimulus histograms were constructed to show the spike rate changes after optical stimulation. Among 29 CN neurons recorded, 15 showed a decrease in spike rate of variable strength and duration, and only 1 showed a transient spiking response. These results suggest that direct olivary input to CN neurons is usually overridden by stronger Purkinje cell inhibition triggered by climbing fiber responses. To further investigate the direct input from the climbing fiber collaterals we also conducted whole cell recordings in brain slices, where we used local stimulation with blue light. Due to the expression of ChR2 in Purkinje cell axons as well as the IO in our transgenic line, strong inhibitory responses could be readily triggered with optical stimulation (13 of 15 neurons. After blocking this inhibition with GABAzine, only in 5 of 13 CN neurons weak excitatory responses were revealed. Therefore our in vitro results support the in vivo findings that the excitatory input to CN neurons from climbing fiber collaterals in adult mice is masked by the inhibition under normal conditions.

  15. Inhibition of colony-stimulating-factor-1 signaling in vivo with the orally bioavailable cFMS kinase inhibitor GW2580.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conway, James G; McDonald, Brad; Parham, Janet; Keith, Barry; Rusnak, David W; Shaw, Eva; Jansen, Marilyn; Lin, Peiyuan; Payne, Alan; Crosby, Renae M; Johnson, Jennifer H; Frick, Lloyd; Lin, Min-Hwa Jasmine; Depee, Scott; Tadepalli, Sarva; Votta, Bart; James, Ian; Fuller, Karen; Chambers, Timothy J; Kull, Frederick C; Chamberlain, Stanley D; Hutchins, Jeff T

    2005-11-01

    Colony-stimulating-factor-1 (CSF-1) signaling through cFMS receptor kinase is increased in several diseases. To help investigate the role of cFMS kinase in disease, we identified GW2580, an orally bioavailable inhibitor of cFMS kinase. GW2580 completely inhibited human cFMS kinase in vitro at 0.06 microM and was inactive against 26 other kinases. GW2580 at 1 microM completely inhibited CSF-1-induced growth of mouse M-NFS-60 myeloid cells and human monocytes and completely inhibited bone degradation in cultures of human osteoclasts, rat calvaria, and rat fetal long bone. In contrast, GW2580 did not affect the growth of mouse NS0 lymphoblastoid cells, human endothelial cells, human fibroblasts, or five human tumor cell lines. GW2580 also did not affect lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced TNF, IL-6, and prostaglandin E2 production in freshly isolated human monocytes and mouse macrophages. After oral administration, GW2580 blocked the ability of exogenous CSF-1 to increase LPS-induced IL-6 production in mice, inhibited the growth of CSF-1-dependent M-NFS-60 tumor cells in the peritoneal cavity, and diminished the accumulation of macrophages in the peritoneal cavity after thioglycolate injection. Unexpectedly, GW2580 inhibited LPS-induced TNF production in mice, in contrast to effects on monocytes and macrophages in vitro. In conclusion, GW2580's selective inhibition of monocyte growth and bone degradation is consistent with cFMS kinase inhibition. The ability of GW2580 to chronically inhibit CSF-1 signaling through cFMS kinase in normal and tumor cells in vivo makes GW2580 a useful tool in assessing the role of cFMS kinase in normal and disease processes.

  16. Prepulse inhibition of auditory change-related cortical responses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inui Koji

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Prepulse inhibition (PPI of the startle response is an important tool to investigate the biology of schizophrenia. PPI is usually observed by use of a startle reflex such as blinking following an intense sound. A similar phenomenon has not been reported for cortical responses. Results In 12 healthy subjects, change-related cortical activity in response to an abrupt increase of sound pressure by 5 dB above the background of 65 dB SPL (test stimulus was measured using magnetoencephalography. The test stimulus evoked a clear cortical response peaking at around 130 ms (Change-N1m. In Experiment 1, effects of the intensity of a prepulse (0.5 ~ 5 dB on the test response were examined using a paired stimulation paradigm. In Experiment 2, effects of the interval between the prepulse and test stimulus were examined using interstimulus intervals (ISIs of 50 ~ 350 ms. When the test stimulus was preceded by the prepulse, the Change-N1m was more strongly inhibited by a stronger prepulse (Experiment 1 and a shorter ISI prepulse (Experiment 2. In addition, the amplitude of the test Change-N1m correlated positively with both the amplitude of the prepulse-evoked response and the degree of inhibition, suggesting that subjects who are more sensitive to the auditory change are more strongly inhibited by the prepulse. Conclusions Since Change-N1m is easy to measure and control, it would be a valuable tool to investigate mechanisms of sensory gating or the biology of certain mental diseases such as schizophrenia.

  17. Stimulation of a Cd-binding protein, and inhibition of the vitamin D-dependent calcium-binding protein, by zinc or cadmium in organ-cultured embryonic chick duodenum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Corradino, R.A.; Fullmer, C.S.

    1980-01-01

    Embryonic chick duodenum maintained in organ culture responds to 1 α,25-dihydroxy vitamin D 3 in the culture medium by de novo synthesis of a specific calcium-binding protein (CaBP). The addition of Cd 2+ (3-5 x 10 -5 M) or Zn 2+ (10 -5 -10 -4 M) to the medium inhibited CaBP, but stimulated biosynthesis of a Cd-binding protein (CdBP). CdBP in duodenal homogenate supernatants was assessed in two ways: first, by its 109 Cd-binding activity ( 109 CdBA) using a competitive ion exchange procedure; and, second, by the extent of [ 35 S]-cystine incorporation into a specific peak or band after gel filtration or analytical polyacrylamide disc gel electrophoresis, respectively. Regardless of whether cadmium- or zinc-stimulated, the 35 S-labeled CdBP - the only protein significantly labeled under the conditions employed - migrated identically upon gel filtration and electrophoresis, and comigrated with purified chick liver Cd-metallothionein. Neither actinomycin D nor α-amanitin, in concentrations sufficient to severely inhibit CaBP, significantly reduced CdBP production. However, cycloheximide did inhibit either Cd 2+ - or Zn 2+ -stimulated CdBP by about 50% at an inhibitor concentration which abolished CaBP. The inhibitor studies, coupled with the observations of extensive incorporation of [ 35 S]cystine into CdBP, suggest that the metals stimulated biosynthesis by a mechanism operating at the translational level. The organ-cultured duodenum seems well suited for studies of the regulation of CdBP biosynthesis especially since it responds predictably to the steroid hormone, 1α,25-dihydroxy vitamin D 3 , in the induction of another specific protein, CaBP, at the transcriptional level. The biosynthesis of CaBP thus may serve as a convenient control in studies of CdBP production under various experimental conditions

  18. Plasmids encoding PKI(1-31), a specific inhibitor of cAMP-stimulated gene expression, inhibit the basal transcriptional activity of some but not all cAMP-regulated DNA response elements in JEG-3 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grove, J R; Deutsch, P J; Price, D J; Habener, J F; Avruch, J

    1989-11-25

    Plasmids that encode a bioactive amino-terminal fragment of the heat-stable inhibitor of the cAMP-dependent protein kinase, PKI(1-31), were employed to characterize the role of this protein kinase in the control of transcriptional activity mediated by three DNA regulatory elements in the JEG-3 human placental cell line. The 5'-flanking sequence of the human collagenase gene contains the heptameric sequence, 5'-TGAGTCA-3', previously identified as a "phorbol ester" response element. Reporter genes containing either the intact 1.2-kilobase 5'-flanking sequence from the human collagenase gene or just the 7-base pair (bp) response element, when coupled to an enhancerless promoter, each exhibit both cAMP and phorbol ester-stimulated expression in JEG-3 cells. Cotransfection of either construct with plasmids encoding PKI(1-31) inhibits cAMP-stimulated but not basal- or phorbol ester-stimulated expression. Pretreatment of cells with phorbol ester for 1 or 2 days abrogates completely the response to rechallenge with phorbol ester but does not alter the basal expression of either construct; cAMP-stimulated expression, while modestly inhibited, remains vigorous. The 5'-flanking sequence of the human chorionic gonadotropin-alpha subunit (HCG alpha) gene has two copies of the sequence, 5'-TGACGTCA-3', contained in directly adjacent identical 18-bp segments, previously identified as a cAMP-response element. Reporter genes containing either the intact 1.5 kilobase of 5'-flanking sequence from the HCG alpha gene, or just the 36-bp tandem repeat cAMP response element, when coupled to an enhancerless promoter, both exhibit a vigorous cAMP stimulation of expression but no response to phorbol ester in JEG-3 cells. Cotransfection with plasmids encoding PKI(1-31) inhibits both basal and cAMP-stimulated expression in a parallel fashion. The 5'-flanking sequence of the human enkephalin gene mediates cAMP-stimulated expression of reporter genes in both JEG-3 and CV-1 cells. Plasmids

  19. Heat shock protein 90 inhibitor enhances apoptosis by inhibiting the AKT pathway in thermal-stimulated SK-MEL-2 human melanoma cell line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Min Kyung; Jeong, Ki-Heon; Choi, Hyeongwon; Ahn, Hye-Jin; Lee, Mu-Hyoung

    2018-02-08

    Heat shock proteins (Hsps) are chaperone proteins, which are upregulated after various stresses. Hsp90 inhibitors have been investigated as adjuvant therapies for the treatment of melanoma. Thermal ablation could be a treatment option for surgically unresectable melanoma or congenital nevomelanocytic nevi, however, there is a limitation such as the possibility of recurrence. We evaluated apoptosis in a melanoma cell line treated with the Hsp90 inhibitor 17-Dimethylaminoethylamino-17-demethoxygeldanamycin (17-DMAG), in hyperthermic conditions. SK-MEL-2 cells were stimulated at 43 °C for 1 h and treated with 0, 0.1 and 1 μM 17-DMAG. We evaluated the cell viability using MTT and apoptosis with HSP 90 inhibitor. We studied the protein expression of AKT, phospho-AKT, ERK, phospho-ERK, MAPK, and phospho-MAPK, caspase 3,7,9, and anti-poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase. 17-DMAG significantly inhibited the proliferation of the SK-MEL-2 cells at 37 °C (0.1 μM: 44.47% and 1 μM: 61.23%) and 43 °C (0.1 μM: 49.21% and 1 μM: 63.60%), suggesting synergism between thermal stimulation and 17-DMAG. 17-DMAG treatment increased the frequency of apoptotic cell populations to 2.17% (0.1 μM) and 3.05% (1 μM) in 37 °C controls, and 4.40% (0.1 μM) and 4.97% (1 μM) in the group stimulated at 43 °C. AKT phosphorylation were activated by thermal stimulation and inhibited by 17-DMAG. Hsp90 inhibitor treatment may be clinically applicable to enhance the apoptosis of melanoma cells in hyperthermic condition. Copyright © 2018 Japanese Society for Investigative Dermatology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Anodal Direct Current Stimulation of the Cerebellum Reduces Cerebellar Brain Inhibition but Does Not Influence Afferent Input from the Hand or Face in Healthy Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doeltgen, Sebastian H; Young, Jessica; Bradnam, Lynley V

    2016-08-01

    The cerebellum controls descending motor commands by outputs to primary motor cortex (M1) and the brainstem in response to sensory feedback. The cerebellum may also modulate afferent input en route to M1 and the brainstem. The objective of this study is to determine if anodal transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) to the cerebellum influences cerebellar brain inhibition (CBI), short afferent inhibition (SAI) and trigeminal reflexes (TRs) in healthy adults. Data from two studies evaluating effects of cerebellar anodal and sham tDCS are presented. The first study used a twin coil transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) protocol to investigate CBI and combined TMS and cutaneous stimulation of the digit to assess SAI. The second study evaluated effects on trigemino-cervical and trigemino-masseter reflexes using peripheral nerve stimulation of the face. Fourteen right-handed healthy adults participated in experiment 1. CBI was observed at baseline and was reduced by anodal cerebellar DCS only (P < 0.01). There was SAI at interstimulus intervals of 25 and 30 ms at baseline (both P < 0.0001), but cerebellar tDCS had no effect. Thirteen right-handed healthy adults participated in experiment 2. Inhibitory reflexes were evoked in the ipsilateral masseter and sternocleidomastoid muscles. There was no effect of cerebellar DCS on either reflex. Anodal DCS reduced CBI but did not change SAI or TRs in healthy adults. These results require confirmation in individuals with neurological impairment.

  1. The effect of stimulation interval on plasticity following repeated blocks of intermittent theta burst stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tse, Nga Yan; Goldsworthy, Mitchell R; Ridding, Michael C; Coxon, James P; Fitzgerald, Paul B; Fornito, Alex; Rogasch, Nigel C

    2018-06-04

    This study assessed the effect of interval duration on the direction and magnitude of changes in cortical excitability and inhibition when applying repeated blocks of intermittent theta burst stimulation (iTBS) over motor cortex. 15 participants received three different iTBS conditions on separate days: single iTBS; repeated iTBS with a 5 minute interval (iTBS-5-iTBS); and with a 15 minute interval (iTBS-15-iTBS). Changes in cortical excitability and short-interval cortical inhibition (SICI) were assessed via motor-evoked potentials (MEPs) before and up to 60 mins following stimulation. iTBS-15-iTBS increased MEP amplitude for up to 60 mins post stimulation, whereas iTBS-5-iTBS decreased MEP amplitude. In contrast, MEP amplitude was not altered by single iTBS. Despite the group level findings, only 53% of individuals showed facilitated MEPs following iTBS-15-iTBS, and only 40% inhibited MEPs following iTBS-5-iTBS. Modulation of SICI did not differ between conditions. These results suggest interval duration between spaced iTBS plays an important role in determining the direction of plasticity on excitatory, but not inhibitory circuits in human motor cortex. While repeated iTBS can increase the magnitude of MEP facilitation/inhibition in some individuals compared to single iTBS, the response to repeated iTBS appears variable between individuals in this small sample.

  2. Wnt6, Wnt10a and Wnt10b inhibit adipogenesis and stimulate osteoblastogenesis through a β-catenin-dependent mechanism

    OpenAIRE

    Cawthorn, William P.; Bree, Adam J.; Yao, Yao; Du, Baowen; Hemati, Nahid; Martinez-Santibañez, Gabriel; MacDougald, Ormond A.

    2011-01-01

    Wnt10b is an established regulator of mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) fate that inhibits adipogenesis and stimulates osteoblastogenesis, thereby impacting bone mass in vivo. However, downstream mechanisms through which Wnt10b exerts these effects are poorly understood. Moreover, whether other endogenous Wnt ligands also modulate MSC fate remains to be fully addressed. In this study, we identify Wnt6 and Wnt10a as additional Wnt family members that, like Wnt10b, are downregulated during developmen...

  3. Gemfibrozil, a Lipid-lowering Drug, Inhibits the Induction of Nitric-oxide Synthase in Human Astrocytes*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pahan, Kalipada; Jana, Malabendu; Liu, Xiaojuan; Taylor, Bradley S.; Wood, Charles; Fischer, Susan M.

    2007-01-01

    Gemfibrozil, a lipid-lowering drug, inhibited cytokine-induced production of NO and the expression of inducible nitric-oxide synthase (iNOS) in human U373MG astroglial cells and primary astrocytes. Similar to gemfibrozil, clofibrate, another fibrate drug, also inhibited the expression of iNOS. Inhibition of human iNOS promoter-driven luciferase activity by gemfibrozil in cytokine-stimulated U373MG astroglial cells suggests that this compound inhibits the transcription of iNOS. Since gemfibrozil is known to activate peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-α (PPAR-α), we investigated the role of PPAR-α in gemfibrozil-mediated inhibition of iNOS. Gemfibrozil induced peroxisome proliferator-responsive element (PPRE)-dependent luciferase activity, which was inhibited by the expression of ΔhPPAR-α, the dominant-negative mutant of human PPAR-α. However, ΔhPPAR-α was unable to abrogate gemfibrozil-mediated inhibition of iNOS suggesting that gemfibrozil inhibits iNOS independent of PPAR-α. The human iNOS promoter contains consensus sequences for the binding of transcription factors, including interferon-γ (IFN-γ) regulatory factor-1 (IRF-1) binding to interferon-stimulated responsive element (ISRE), signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT) binding to γ-activation site (GAS), nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB), activator protein-1 (AP-1), and CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein β (C/EBPβ); therefore, we investigated the effect of gemfibrozil on the activation of these transcription factors. The combination of interleukin (IL)-1β and IFN-γ induced the activation of NF-κB, AP-1, C/EBPβ, and GAS but not that of ISRE, suggesting that IRF-1 may not be involved in cytokine-induced expression of iNOS in human astrocytes. Interestingly, gemfibrozil strongly inhibited the activation of NF-κB, AP-1, and C/EBPβ but not that of GAS in cytokine-stimulated astroglial cells. These results suggest that gemfibrozil inhibits the induction of iNOS probably by

  4. Fisetin inhibits IL-31 production in stimulated human mast cells: Possibilities of fisetin being exploited to treat histamine-independent pruritus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Che, Denis Nchang; Cho, Byoung Ok; Shin, Jae Young; Kang, Hyun Ju; Kim, Young-Soo; Jang, Seon Il

    2018-05-15

    Interleukin-31 (IL-31) is a recently discovered cytokine that is tightly linked to the pathogenesis of pruritus seen in atopic dermatitis. Flavonoids, like fisetin, are naturally occurring molecules with antioxidant, cytoprotective, and anti-inflammatory actions. the present study sought to investigate whether fisetin modulates IL-31 and histamine release in human mast cells (HMC-1). HMC-1 cells were pretreated with fisetin at various doses and stimulated with phorbol-12-myristate 13-acetate and calcium ionophore A23187 (PI) for different time intervals. We evaluated IL-31 production and histamine release and signaling mechanism of the action of fisetin on IL-31 production. We also investigated the effects of fisetin on scratching behaviors in mice. Fisetin decreased PI-stimulated mRNA expression and production of IL-31 in HMC-1 cells. Fisetin inhibited PI-induced phosphorylation of mitogen-activated protein kinases that further suppressed nuclear factor (NF-κB) activation and translocation to the nucleus through the inhibition of IκB-α phosphorylation. Fisetin also prevented mast cell release of histamine in HMC-1 cells. Mice in-vivo studies show that fisetin reduced scratching behaviors in mice. These pharmacological actions of fisetin provide new suggestions that fisetin can be of potential use for the treatment of pruritus that cannot be treated with histamine receptor blockers alone. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Brain sites mediating corticosteroid feedback inhibition of stimulated ACTH secretion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacobson, L.

    1989-01-01

    There is substantial evidence that the brain mediates stress-induced and circadian increases in ACTH secretion and that corticosteroid concentrations which normalize basal plasma ACTH are insufficient to normalize ACTH responses to circadian or stressful stimuli in adrenalectomized rats. To identify brain sites mediating corticosteroid inhibition of stimulated ACTH secretion, two approaches were used. The first compared brain [ 14 C]-2-deoxyglucose uptake in rats with differential ACTH responses to stress. Relative to sham-adrenalectomized (SHAM) rats, adrenalectomized rats replaced with low, constant corticosterone levels via a subcutaneous corticosterone pellet (B-PELLET) exhibited elevated and prolonged ACTH responses to a variety of stimuli. Adrenalectomized rate given a circadian corticosterone rhythm via corticosterone in their drinking water exhibited elevated ACTH levels immediately after stress, but unlike B-PELLET rats, terminated stress induced ACTH secretion normally relative to SHAMS. Therefore, the abnormal ACTH responses to stress in B-PELLET rats were due to the lack of both circadian variations and stress-induced increases in corticosterone. Hypoxia was selected as a standardized stimulus for correlating brain [ 14 C]-2-deoxyglucose uptake with ACTH secretion. In intact rats, increases in plasma ACTH and decreases in arterial PO 2 correlated with the severity of hypoxia at arterial PCO 2 below 60 mm Hg. Hypoxia PELLET vs. SHAM rats. However, in preliminary experiments, although hypoxia increased brain 2-deoxyglucose uptake in most brain regions, plasma ACTH correlated poorly with 2-deoxyglucose uptake at 12% and 10% O 2

  6. PreSMA stimulation changes task-free functional connectivity in the fronto-basal-ganglia that correlates with response inhibition efficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Benjamin; Sandrini, Marco; Wang, Wen-Tung; Smith, Jason F; Sarlls, Joelle E; Awosika, Oluwole; Butman, John A; Horwitz, Barry; Cohen, Leonardo G

    2016-09-01

    Previous work using transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) demonstrated that the right presupplementary motor area (preSMA), a node in the fronto-basal-ganglia network, is critical for response inhibition. However, TMS influences interconnected regions, raising the possibility of a link between the preSMA activity and the functional connectivity within the network. To understand this relationship, we applied single-pulse TMS to the right preSMA during functional magnetic resonance imaging when the subjects were at rest to examine changes in neural activity and functional connectivity within the network in relation to the efficiency of response inhibition evaluated with a stop-signal task. The results showed that preSMA-TMS increased activation in the right inferior-frontal cortex (rIFC) and basal ganglia and modulated their task-free functional connectivity. Both the TMS-induced changes in the basal-ganglia activation and the functional connectivity between rIFC and left striatum, and of the overall network correlated with the efficiency of response inhibition and with the white-matter microstructure along the preSMA-rIFC pathway. These results suggest that the task-free functional and structural connectivity between the rIFCop and basal ganglia are critical to the efficiency of response inhibition. Hum Brain Mapp 37:3236-3249, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Inhibition of hepatic lipogenesis by 2-tetradecylglycidic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCune, S A; Nomura, T; Harris, R A

    1979-10-01

    2-Tetradecylglycidic acid (TDGA), a hypoglycemic agent, has been found to be a very effective inhibitor of de novo fatty acid synthesis by isolated hepatocytes. A comparison was made between the effectiveness of TDGA and 5-(tetradecyloxy)-2-furoic acid (TOFA), a hypolipidemic agent, on the metabolic processes of isolated hepatocytes. These compounds are structurally related and both inhibit fatty acid synthesis; however, they have opposite effects from each other on the oxidation and esterification of fatty acids. TDGA inhibits whereas TOFA stimulates fatty acid oxidation. TDGA stimulates whereas TOFA inhibits fatty acid esterification.

  8. Cardiotonic agent milrinone stimulates resorption in rodent bone organ culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krieger, N S; Stappenbeck, T S; Stern, P H

    1987-01-01

    The cardiotonic agent amrinone inhibits bone resorption in vitro. Milrinone, an amrinone analog, is a more potent cardiotonic agent with lower toxicity. In contrast to amrinone, milrinone stimulated resorption in cultures of neonatal mouse calvaria and fetal rat limb bones. Threshold doses were 0.1 microM in calvaria and 0.1 mM in limb bones; maximal stimulation occurred in calvaria at 0.1 mM. Maximal responses to milrinone and parathyroid hormone were comparable. Milrinone concentrations below 0.1 mM did not affect calvarial cyclic AMP. 0.5 microM indomethacin inhibited milrinone effects in calvaria but usually not in limb bones. 3 nM calcitonin inhibited milrinone-stimulated resorption and there was no escape from this inhibition. Structural homology between milrinone and thyroxine has been reported. We find similarities between milrinone and thyroxine actions on bone, because prostaglandin production was crucial for the effects of both agents in calvaria but not in limb bones, and neither agent exhibited escape from calcitonin inhibition. PMID:3027124

  9. Major role of suckling stimulation for inhibition of estrous behaviors in lactating rabbits: acute and chronic effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Dalmán, Cipatli; González-Mariscal, Gabriela

    2012-01-01

    Lactation in rabbits induces anestrus: sexual receptivity and scent-marking (chinning) are reduced despite the brevity of suckling (one daily nursing bout, lasting around 3 min). The mechanisms underlying this effect are unknown but, as chinning, lordosis, and ambulation in an open field are immediately inhibited by the peripheral stimulation received during mating we hypothesized that, across lactation, suckling stimulation would provoke a similar effect. To test this possibility we provided litters of 1, 3, 5, or 10 pups across lactation days 1-15 and quantified chinning and ambulation frequencies, the lordosis quotient, and milk output. Baseline chinning frequency, determined before the daily nursing bout, was low across lactation days 1-15 in does nursing 3, 5 or 10 pups but it increased steadily across days 1-10 in rabbits suckling one pup. Yet, a single young was sufficient to abolish chinning for about 1h, after which this behavior rose again. Suckling litters of all sizes reduced (but did not abolish) ambulation frequency, both chronically (baseline levels declined across days 1-5) and acutely. Sexual receptivity was significantly reduced on lactation day 15 only in does that had nursed 10 pups. Large litter size promoted a larger milk output and a normal duration of nursing episodes. Results support a major role of suckling stimulation for the suppression of estrous behaviors and ambulation through as yet unidentified mechanisms. Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  10. Cisplatin-mediated radiosensitization of non-small cell lung cancer cells is stimulated by ATM inhibition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toulany, Mahmoud; Mihatsch, Julia; Holler, Marina; Chaachouay, Hassan; Rodemann, H. Peter

    2014-01-01

    Background and purpose: Cisplatin activates ataxia-telangiectasia-mutated (ATM), a protein with roles in DNA repair, cell cycle progression and autophagy. We investigated the radiosensitizing effect of cisplatin with respect to its effect on ATM pathway activation. Material and methods: Non-small cell lung cancer cells (NSCLC) cell lines (A549, H460) and human fibroblast (ATM-deficient AT5, ATM-proficient 1BR3) cells were used. The effects of cisplatin combined with irradiation on ATM pathway activity, clonogenicity, DNA double-strand break (DNA-DSB) repair and cell cycle progression were analyzed with Western blotting, colony formation and γ-H2AX foci assays as well as FACS analysis, respectively. Results: Cisplatin radiosensitized H460 cells, but not A549 cells. Radiosensitization of H460 cells was not due to impaired DNA-DSB repair, increased apoptosis or cell cycle dysregulation. The lack of radiosensitization demonstrated for A549 cells was associated with cisplatin-mediated stimulation of ATM (S1981) and AMPKα (T172) phosphorylation and autophagy. However, in both cell lines inhibition of ATM and autophagy by KU-55933 and chloroquine diphosphate (CQ) respectively resulted in a significant radiosensitization. Combined treatment with the AMPK inhibitor compound-C led to radiosensitization of A549 but not of H460 cells. As compared to the treatment with KU-55933 alone, radiosensitivity of A549 cells was markedly stimulated by the combination of KU-55933 and cisplatin. However, the combination of CQ and cisplatin did not modulate the pattern of radiation sensitivity of A549 or H460 cells. In accordance with the results that cisplatin via stimulation of ATM activity can abrogate its radiosensitizing effect, ATM deficient cells were significantly sensitized to ionizing radiation by cisplatin. Conclusion: The results obtained indicate that ATM targeting can potentiate cisplatin-induced radiosensitization

  11. Against Strong Ethical Parity: Situated Cognition Theses and Transcranial Brain Stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinrichs, Jan-Hendrik

    2017-01-01

    According to a prominent suggestion in the ethics of transcranial neurostimulation the effects of such devices can be treated as ethically on par with established, pre-neurotechnological alterations of the mind. This parity allegedly is supported by situated cognition theories showing how external devices can be part of a cognitive system. This article will evaluate this suggestion. It will reject the claim, that situated cognition theories support ethical parity. It will however point out another reason, why external carriers or modifications of the mental might come to be considered ethically on par with internal carriers. Section "Why Could There Be Ethical Parity between Neural Tissue and External Tools?" presents the ethical parity theses between external and internal carriers of the mind as well as neurotechnological alterations and established alterations. Section "Extended, Embodied, Embedded: Situated Cognition as a Relational Thesis" will elaborate the different situated cognition approaches and their relevance for ethics. It will evaluate, whether transcranial stimulation technologies are plausible candidates for situated cognition theses. Section "On the Ethical Relevance of Situated Cognition Theses" will discuss criteria for evaluating whether a cognitive tool is deeply embedded with a cognitive system and apply these criteria to transcranial brain stimulation technologies. Finally it will discuss the role diverse versions of situated cognition theory can play in the ethics of altering mental states, especially the ethics of transcranial brain stimulation technologies.

  12. Effects of omega-3 fatty acids on progestin stimulation of invasive properties in breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Michael R; King, Rebecca A

    2012-12-01

    Clinical studies have shown that progestins increase breast cancer risk in hormone replacement therapy, while we and others have previously reported that progestins stimulate invasive properties in progesterone receptor (PR)-rich human breast cancer cell lines. Based on others' reports that omega-3 fatty acids inhibit metastatic properties of breast cancer, we have reviewed the literature for possible connections between omega-3 fatty-acid-driven pathways and progestin-stimulated pathways in an attempt to suggest theoretical mechanisms for possible omega-3 fatty acid inhibition of progestin stimulation of breast cancer invasion. We also present some data suggesting that fatty acids regulate progestin stimulation of invasive properties in PR-rich T47D human breast cancer cells, and that an appropriate concentration of the omega-3 fatty acid eicosapentaenoic acid inhibits progestin stimulation of invasive properties. It is hoped that focus on the inter-relationship between pathways by which omega-3 fatty acids inhibit and progestins stimulate breast cancer invasive properties will lead to further in vitro, in vivo, and clinical studies testing the hypothesis that omega-3 fatty acids can inhibit progestin stimulation of invasive properties in breast cancer, and ameliorate harmful effects of progestins which occur in combined progestin-estrogen hormone replacement therapy.

  13. Neomycin inhibits PDGF-induced IP3 formation and DNA synthesis but not PDGF-stimulated uptake of inorganic phosphate in C3H/10T1/2 fibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vassbotn, F S; Langeland, N; Holmsen, H

    1990-09-01

    Porcine PDGF was found to increase [3H]inositol trisphosphate, [3H]thymidine incorporation and 32P-labelling of polyphosphoinositides in C3H/10T1/2 Cl 8 fibroblasts. These responses to PDGF stimulation were all inhibited by 5 mM neomycin, a polycationic aminoglycoside formerly known to inhibit polyphosphoinositide turnover. PDGF also markedly increased the cellular uptake of inorganic [32P]Pi. This response of PDGF was not inhibited by neomycin (5 mM). Thus, neomycin inhibited PDGF-induced IP3 formation, 32P-labelling of polyphosphoinositides and DNA synthesis, but not cellular uptake of inorganic phosphate. These effects of neomycin suggest a bifurcation of the initial part of the PDGF-induced signal transduction, separating at the receptor level or before phospholipase C activation.

  14. Inhibition of Pre-Supplementary Motor Area by Continuous Theta Burst Stimulation Leads to More Cautious Decision-making and More Efficient Sensory Evidence Integration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tosun, Tuğçe; Berkay, Dilara; Sack, Alexander T; Çakmak, Yusuf Ö; Balcı, Fuat

    2017-08-01

    Decisions are made based on the integration of available evidence. The noise in evidence accumulation leads to a particular speed-accuracy tradeoff in decision-making, which can be modulated and optimized by adaptive decision threshold setting. Given the effect of pre-SMA activity on striatal excitability, we hypothesized that the inhibition of pre-SMA would lead to higher decision thresholds and an increased accuracy bias. We used offline continuous theta burst stimulation to assess the effect of transient inhibition of the right pre-SMA on the decision processes in a free-response two-alternative forced-choice task within the drift diffusion model framework. Participants became more cautious and set higher decision thresholds following right pre-SMA inhibition compared with inhibition of the control site (vertex). Increased decision thresholds were accompanied by an accuracy bias with no effects on post-error choice behavior. Participants also exhibited higher drift rates as a result of pre-SMA inhibition compared with the vertex inhibition. These results, in line with the striatal theory of speed-accuracy tradeoff, provide evidence for the functional role of pre-SMA activity in decision threshold modulation. Our results also suggest that pre-SMA might be a part of the brain network associated with the sensory evidence integration.

  15. Chronic treatment with repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation inhibits seizure induction by electroconvulsive shock in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleischmann, A; Hirschmann, S; Dolberg, O T; Dannon, P N; Grunhaus, L

    1999-03-15

    Studies in laboratory animals suggest that repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) and electroconvulsive shock (ECS) increase seizure inhibition acutely. This study was designed to explore whether chronic rTMS would also have seizure inhibition properties. To this purpose we administered rTMS (Magstim Rapid) and sham rTMS twice daily (2.5 T, 4-sec train duration, 20 Hz) to two groups of 10 rats for 16 days. The rTMS coil was a 50-mm figure-8 coil held directly over the rat's head. Raters were blind to experimental groups. On days 11, 17, and 21 (5 days after the last rTMS) ECS was administered with a Siemens convulsator using three electrical charge levels. Variables examined were the presence or absence of seizures and seizure length (measured from the initiation of the tonic contraction until the end of the limb movement). At day 11 rTMS had no effect on seizures, and both rTMS and sham rTMS animals convulsed equally. At day 17, however, rTMS-treated animals convulsed significantly less (both at presence/absence of seizures, and at seizure length) than sham rTMS animals. At day 21 the effects of rTMS had disappeared. These findings suggest that rTMS administered chronically leads to changes in seizure threshold similar to those reported for ECS and ECT; however, these effects were short-lived.

  16. Cognitive stimulation in healthy older adults: a cognitive stimulation program using leisure activities compared to a conventional cognitive stimulation program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimaud, Élisabeth; Taconnat, Laurence; Clarys, David

    2017-06-01

    The aim of this study was to compare two methods of cognitive stimulation for the cognitive functions. The first method used an usual approach, the second used leisure activities in order to assess their benefits on cognitive functions (speed of processing; working memory capacity and executive functions) and psychoaffective measures (memory span and self esteem). 67 participants over 60 years old took part in the experiment. They were divided into three groups: 1 group followed a program of conventional cognitive stimulation, 1 group a program of cognitive stimulation using leisure activities and 1 control group. The different measures have been evaluated before and after the training program. Results show that the cognitive stimulation program using leisure activities is as effective on memory span, updating and memory self-perception as the program using conventional cognitive stimulation, and more effective on self-esteem than the conventional program. There is no difference between the two stimulated groups and the control group on speed of processing. Neither of the two cognitive stimulation programs provides a benefit over shifting and inhibition. These results indicate that it seems to be possible to enhance working memory and to observe far transfer benefits over self-perception (self-esteem and memory self-perception) when using leisure activities as a tool for cognitive stimulation.

  17. Effects of locus coeruleus stimulation on the responses of SI neurons of the rat to controlled natural and electrical stimulation of the skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snow, P J; Andre, P; Pompeiano, O

    1999-02-01

    1. The effects of microstimulation of the locus coeruleus (LC) region on the spontaneous discharge and the response of SI neurons to natural and electrical stimulation of the skin have been investigated in 26 urethane anesthetized Sprague-Dawley rats. In particular, one or two air puffs, 5-10 msec in duration, 1-2 psi, usually separated by an interval of 40 msec, were applied on the hairy skin of the wrist or the forepaw at the presentation rate of 1/sec. For units unresponsive to air puffs, similar presentation of low intensity electrical stimuli (0.2-5.0 V, 0.2-0.4 msec pulses) were applied through two needles inserted on the most effective area of the skin. Both natural and electrical stimulations of the skin were applied under control conditions, as well as 50 msec after a 250 msec train of 0.3 msec pulses at 40 Hz. 20-30 microA applied stereotaxically to the LC complex through a tungsten microelectrode. 2. Not all cortical units exhibited spontaneous discharge. Most of the units, however, which were spontaneously active, were inhibited by electrical stimulation of the LC complex, while the remaining ones were excited. The sites of stimulation, which included either the LC proper or the locus subcoeruleus, were identified following both anatomical and physiological criteria. 3. SI neurons recorded at sites between 400 and 950 microns below the surface of the cortex, thus being most likely granule cells of layers III and IV, responded to cutaneous stimuli with spikes which occurred with a latency of 20-30 msec in response to single air puffs and a latency of 15-20 msec in response to single electrical pulses to the skin. In both instances the response to the second stimulus applied at the interstimulus interval of 40 msec was markedly reduced or abolished due to postexcitatory inhibition following the response to the first stimulus (in-field inhibition). In contrast, units particularly located at or below 1000 microns from the cortical surface, which were of

  18. Gc protein-derived macrophage-activating factor (GcMAF) stimulates cAMP formation in human mononuclear cells and inhibits angiogenesis in chick embryo chorionallantoic membrane assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pacini, Stefania; Morucci, Gabriele; Punzi, Tiziana; Gulisano, Massimo; Ruggiero, Marco

    2011-04-01

    The effects of Gc protein-derived macrophage-activating factor (GcMAF) have been studied in cancer and other conditions where angiogenesis is deregulated. In this study, we demonstrate for the first time that the mitogenic response of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) to GcMAF was associated with 3'-5'-cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) formation. The effect was dose dependent, and maximal stimulation was achieved using 0.1 ng/ml. Heparin inhibited the stimulatory effect of GcMAF on PBMCs. In addition, we demonstrate that GcMAF (1 ng/ml) inhibited prostaglandin E(1)- and human breast cancer cell-stimulated angiogenesis in chick embryo chorionallantoic membrane (CAM) assay. Finally, we tested different GcMAF preparations on CAM, and the assay proved to be a reliable, reproducible and inexpensive method to determine the relative potencies of different preparations and their stability; we observed that storage at room temperature for 15 days decreased GcMAF potency by about 50%. These data could prove useful for upcoming clinical trials on GcMAF.

  19. Sodium arsenite-induced inhibition of cell proliferation is related to inhibition of IL-2 mRNA expression in mouse activated T cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Conde, Patricia; Acosta-Saavedra, Leonor C.; Calderon-Aranda, Emma S. [Centro de Investigacion y de Estudios Avanzados, CINVESTAV, Seccion Toxicologia, P.O. Box 14-740, Mexico, D.F. (Mexico); Goytia-Acevedo, Raquel C. [Universidad Juarez del Estado de Durango, Facultad de Medicina, Gomez Palacio, Durango (Mexico)

    2007-04-15

    A proposed mechanism for the As-induced inhibition of cell proliferation is the inhibition of IL-2 secretion. However, the effects of arsenite on IL-2 mRNA expression or on the ERK pathway in activated-T cells have not yet been described. We examined the effect of arsenite on IL-2 mRNA expression, cell activation and proliferation in PHA-stimulated murine lymphocytes. Arsenite (1 and 10 {mu}M) decreased IL-2 mRNA expression, IL-2 secretion and cell proliferation. Arsenite (10 {mu}M) strongly inhibited ERK-phosphorylation. However, the partial inhibition (50%) of IL-2 mRNA produced by 1 {mu}M, consistent with the effects on IL-2 secretion and cell proliferation, could not be explained by the inhibition of ERK-phosphorylation, which was not affected at this concentration. The inhibition of IL-2 mRNA expression caused by 1 {mu}M could be associated to effects on pathways located downstream or parallel to ERK. Arsenite also decreased early activation (surface CD69{sup +} expression) in both CD4{sup +} and CD8{sup +}, and decreased total CD8{sup +} count without significantly affecting CD4{sup +}, supporting that the cellular immune response mediated by cytotoxic T cells is an arsenic target. Thus, our results suggest that arsenite decreases IL-2 mRNA levels and T-cell activation and proliferation. However, further studies on the effects of arsenite on IL-2 gene transcription and IL-2 mRNA stability are needed. (orig.)

  20. Growth inhibition of Chromatium D by L-methionine and its correlation to unusual accumulation of S-adenosyl-L-methionine in the cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sugimoto, Y; Nakatani, K; Shirakashi, T; Ohmori, H; Toraya, T [Kyoto Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Engineering

    1976-07-01

    L-Methionine strongly inhibited the growth of Chromatium D when added at a low concentration to the growth medium containing both sulfide and thiosulfate. S-Adenosyl-L-methionine inhibited the growth, irrespective of the coexistence of sulfide and thiosulfate. Upon addition of L-methionine to the growth media, the presence of both sulfide and thiosulfate in the media stimulated the in vivo conversion of L-methionine to S-adenosyl-L-methionine, and consequently increased the intracellular level of S-adenosyl-L-methionine. From these data, it was strongly suggested that the unusual accumulation of S-adenosyl-L-methionine in the cells of Chromatium D is responsible for the growth inhibition by L-methionine. The level of S-adenosyl-L-methionine synthetase (ATP: L-methionine S-adenosyltransferase, EC2.5.16) was significantly enhanced by adding L-methionine, sulfide and thiosulfate to the growth medium.

  1. Activation of AMPK inhibits cholera toxin stimulated chloride secretion in human and murine intestine.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ailín C Rogers

    Full Text Available Increased intestinal chloride secretion through chloride channels, such as the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR, is one of the major molecular mechanisms underlying enterotoxigenic diarrhea. It has been demonstrated in the past that the intracellular energy sensing kinase, the AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK, can inhibit CFTR opening. We hypothesized that pharmacological activation of AMPK can abrogate the increased chloride flux through CFTR occurring during cholera toxin (CTX mediated diarrhea. Chloride efflux was measured in isolated rat colonic crypts using real-time fluorescence imaging. AICAR and metformin were used to activate AMPK in the presence of the secretagogues CTX or forskolin (FSK. In order to substantiate our findings on the whole tissue level, short-circuit current (SCC was monitored in human and murine colonic mucosa using Ussing chambers. Furthermore, fluid accumulation was measured in excised intestinal loops. CTX and forskolin (FSK significantly increased chloride efflux in isolated colonic crypts. The increase in chloride efflux could be offset by using the AMPK activators AICAR and metformin. In human and mouse mucosal sheets, CTX and FSK increased SCC. AICAR and metformin inhibited the secretagogue induced rise in SCC, thereby confirming the findings made in isolated crypts. Moreover, AICAR decreased CTX stimulated fluid accumulation in excised intestinal segments. The present study suggests that pharmacological activation of AMPK effectively reduces CTX mediated increases in intestinal chloride secretion, which is a key factor for intestinal water accumulation. AMPK activators may therefore represent a supplemental treatment strategy for acute diarrheal illness.

  2. Interactive effects of music and prefrontal cortex stimulation in modulating response inhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansouri, Farshad Alizadeh; Acevedo, Nicola; Illipparampil, Rosin; Fehring, Daniel J; Fitzgerald, Paul B; Jaberzadeh, Shapour

    2017-12-22

    Influential hypotheses propose that alterations in emotional state influence decision processes and executive control of behavior. Both music and transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) of prefrontal cortex affect emotional state, however interactive effects of music and tDCS on executive functions remain unknown. Learning to inhibit inappropriate responses is an important aspect of executive control which is guided by assessing the decision outcomes such as errors. We found that high-tempo music, but not low-tempo music or low-level noise, significantly influenced learning and implementation of inhibitory control. In addition, a brief period of tDCS over prefrontal cortex specifically interacted with high-tempo music and altered its effects on executive functions. Measuring event-related autonomic and arousal response of participants indicated that exposure to task demands and practice led to a decline in arousal response to the decision outcome and high-tempo music enhanced such practice-related processes. However, tDCS specifically moderated the high-tempo music effect on the arousal response to errors and concomitantly restored learning and improvement in executive functions. Here, we show that tDCS and music interactively influence the learning and implementation of inhibitory control. Our findings indicate that alterations in the arousal-emotional response to the decision outcome might underlie these interactive effects.

  3. A novel role of sesamol in inhibiting NF-κB-mediated signaling in platelet activation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chang Chao-Chien

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Platelet activation is relevant to a variety of coronary heart diseases. Our previous studies revealed that sesamol possesses potent antiplatelet activity through increasing cyclic AMP formation. Although platelets are anucleated cells, they also express the transcription factor, NF-κB, that may exert non-genomic functions in platelet activation. Therefore, we further investigated the inhibitory roles of sesamol in NF-κB-mediated platelet function. Methods Platelet aggregation, Fura 2-AM fluorescence, and immunoblotting analysis were used in this study. Results NF-κB signaling events, including IKKβ phosphorylation, IκBα degradation, and p65 phosphorylation, were markedly activated by collagen (1 μg/ml in washed human platelets, and these signaling events were attenuated by sesamol (2.5~25 μM. Furthermore, SQ22536 and ODQ, inhibitors of adenylate cyclase and guanylate cyclase, respectively, strongly reversed the sesamol (25 μM-mediated inhibitory effects of IKKβ phosphorylation, IκBα degradation, and p65 phosphorylation stimulated by collagen. The protein kinase A (PKA inhibitor, H89, also reversed sesamol-mediated inhibition of IκBα degradation. Moreover, BAY11-7082, an NF-κB inhibitor, abolished IκBα degradation, phospholipase C (PLCγ2 phosphorylation, protein kinase C (PKC activation, [Ca2+]i mobilization, and platelet aggregation stimulated by collagen. Preincubation of platelets with the inhibitors, SQ22536 and H89, both strongly reversed sesamol-mediated inhibition of platelet aggregation and [Ca2+]i mobilization. Conclusions Sesamol activates cAMP-PKA signaling, followed by inhibition of the NF-κB-PLC-PKC cascade, thereby leading to inhibition of [Ca2+]i mobilization and platelet aggregation. Because platelet activation is not only linked to hemostasis, but also has a relevant role in inflammation and metastasis, our data demonstrating that inhibition of NF-κB interferes with platelet function may

  4. Eugenol stimulates lactate accumulation yet inhibits volatile fatty acid production and eliminates coliform bacteria in cattle and swine waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varel, V H; Miller, D L

    2004-01-01

    To determine how eugenol affects fermentation parameters and faecal coliforms in cattle and swine waste slurries stored anaerobically. Waste slurries (faeces:urine:water, 50:35:15) were blended with and without additives and aliquoted to triplicate 1-l flasks. Faecal coliforms were eliminated in cattle and swine waste slurries within 1 or 2 days with additions of eugenol at 10.05 mm (0.15%) and 16.75 mm (0.25%). At these concentrations volatile fatty acids (VFA) were reduced ca 70 and 50% in cattle and swine waste, respectively, over 6-8 weeks. Additionally, in cattle waste, eugenol stimulated the accumulation of lactate (>180 mm) when compared with thymol treatment (20 mm lactate). In swine waste, lactate accumulation did not occur without additives; eugenol and thymol stimulated lactate accumulation to concentrations of 22 and 32 mm, respectively. Eugenol added to cattle waste may be more beneficial than thymol because not only does it effectively control faecal coliforms and odour (VFA production), it also stimulates lactate accumulation. This in turn, causes the pH to drop more rapidly, further inhibiting microbial activity and nutrient emissions. Plant essential oils have the potential to solve some of the environmental problems associated with consolidated animal feeding operations. Thymol and eugenol reduce fermentative activity, thus, have the potential to reduce emissions of greenhouse gases and odour, and curtail transmission of pathogens in cattle and swine wastes.

  5. Problems related to stimulated electromagnetic emissions, strong turbulence and ionospheric modification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goodman, S.

    1993-05-01

    Optical pumping of the ionospheric plasma by high-frequency radio waves produces a state of turbulence. Several consequences of the pumping are considered in this thesis. At reflection altitude the plasma is thought to be dominated by parametric instabilities and strong turbulence; these are both encapsulated in the so called Zakharov equations. The Zakharov equations are derived and generalised from kinetic theory. Limits of validity, corrections to the ion sound speed,effective ponderomotive force, nonlinear damping and other generalisation are included. As an example of the difference a kinetic approach makes, the threshold for parametric instabilities is seen to be lowered in a kinetic plasma. Mostly relevant to the upper hybrid layer is the recent discovery in the pumping experiments of stimulated electromagnetic emissions (SEE). In particular one feature of SEE which occurs around the cyclotron harmonics and depends on density striations is investigated. The observed frequency of emission, dependency on striations, time evolution and cutoff frequency below which the feature does not occur, are explained. Two theoretical approaches are taken. The first is a parametric three wave decay instability followed by a nonlinear mixing to produce SEE. Thresholds for the instability are well within experimental capacity. The second, less orthodox, approach, is a finite amplitude model. The finite amplitude model goes beyond the traditional parametric approach by being able to predict radiated power output. Miscellaneous aspects of a turbulent ionosphere are also examined. The dependency of the scattering cross section of a turbulent plasma upon higher order perturbations is considered. In a turbulent plasma, density gradients steeper than characteristic plasma scales may develop. The case of calculating the dielectric permittivity for a linear gradient of arbitrary steepness is considered

  6. Sigma receptor ligand N,N'-di-(ortho-tolyl)guanidine inhibits release of acetylcholine in the guinea pig ileum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cambell, B G; Keana, J F; Weber, E

    1991-11-26

    The inhibition of stimulated contractions of the guinea pig ileum longitudinal muscle/myenteric plexus preparation by sigma receptor ligands has been previously described. In this study, the stimulated release of [3H]acetylcholine from cholinergic nerve terminals in this same preparation was monitored in the presence and absence of sigma receptor ligands. N,N'-Di-(orthotolyl)guanidine (DTG) and other compounds selective for the sigma receptor inhibited stimulated [3H]acetylcholine release. These results suggest that their inhibition of stimulated contractions in this preparation was mediated by inhibition of acetylcholine release.

  7. Transcranial direct current stimulation, implicit alcohol associations and craving

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    den Uijl, T.E.; Gladwin, T.E.; Wiers, R.W.

    2015-01-01

    Previous research has shown that stimulation of the left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) enhances working memory (e.g. in the n-back task), and reduces craving for cigarettes and alcohol. Stimulation of the right inferior frontal gyrus (IFG) improves response inhibition. The underlying

  8. Frontal transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) abolishes list-method directed forgetting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silas, Jonathan; Brandt, Karen R

    2016-03-11

    It is a point of controversy as to whether directed forgetting effects are a result of active inhibition or a change of context initiated by the instruction to forget. In this study we test the causal role of active inhibition in directed forgetting. By applying cathodal transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) over the right prefrontal cortex we suppressed cortical activity commonly associated with inhibitory control. Participants who underwent real brain stimulation before completing the directed forgetting paradigm showed no directed forgetting effects. Conversely, those who underwent sham brain stimulation demonstrated classical directed forgetting effects. We argue that these findings suggest that inhibition is the primary mechanism that results in directed forgetting costs and benefits. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Inhibition of long-term potentiation in the schaffer-CA1 pathway by repetitive high-intensity sound stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunha, A O S; de Oliveira, J A C; Almeida, S S; Garcia-Cairasco, N; Leão, R M

    2015-12-03

    High-intensity sound can induce seizures in susceptible animals. After repeated acoustic stimuli changes in behavioural seizure repertoire and epileptic EEG activity might be seen in recruited limbic and forebrain structures, a phenomenon known as audiogenic kindling. It is postulated that audiogenic kindling can produce synaptic plasticity events leading to the spread of epileptogenic activity to the limbic system. In order to test this hypothesis, we investigated if long-term potentiation (LTP) of hippocampal Schaffer-CA1 synapses and spatial navigation memory are altered by a repeated high-intensity sound stimulation (HISS) protocol, consisting of one-minute 120 dB broadband noise applied twice a day for 10 days, in normal Wistar rats and in audiogenic seizure-prone rats (Wistar Audiogenic Rats - WARs). After HISS all WARs exhibited midbrain seizures and 50% of these animals developed limbic recruitment, while only 26% of Wistar rats presented midbrain seizures and none of them had limbic recruitment. In naïve animals, LTP in hippocampal CA1 neurons was induced by 50- or 100-Hz high-frequency stimulation of Schaffer fibres in slices from both Wistar and WAR animals similarly. Surprisingly, HISS suppressed LTP in CA1 neurons in slices from Wistar rats that did not present any seizure, and inhibited LTP in slices from Wistar rats with only midbrain seizures. However HISS had no effect on LTP in CA1 neurons from slices of WARs. Interestingly HISS did not alter spatial navigation and memory in both strains. These findings show that repeated high-intensity sound stimulation prevent LTP of Schaffer-CA1 synapses from Wistar rats, without affecting spatial memory. This effect was not seen in hippocampi from audiogenic seizure-prone WARs. In WARs the link between auditory stimulation and hippocampal LTP seems to be disrupted which could be relevant for the susceptibility to seizures in this strain. Copyright © 2015 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Effect of iodide on glucose oxidation and 32P incorporation into phospholipids stimulated by different agents in dog thyroid slices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tseng, F.Y.; Rani, C.S.; Field, J.B.

    1989-01-01

    Since iodide (I-) inhibits TSH stimulation of cAMP formation, which mediates most of the effects of the hormone, it has been assumed that this accounts for the inhibitory action of iodide on the thyroid. However, TSH stimulation of 32P incorporation into phospholipids and stimulation of thyroid metabolism by other agonists, such as carbachol, phorbol esters, and ionophore A23187, is not cAMP mediated. The present studies examined the effect of iodide on stimulation of glucose oxidation and 32P incorporation into phospholipids by TSH and other agonists to determine if the inhibition of cAMP formation was responsible for the action of iodide. Preincubation of dog thyroid slices for 1 h with iodide (10(-4) M) inhibited TSH-, (Bu)2cAMP-, carbachol-, methylene blue-, 12-O-tetradecanoyl phorbol-13-acetate-, ionophore A23187-, prostaglandin E1-, and cholera toxin-stimulated glucose oxidation. I- also inhibited the stimulation by TSH, 12-O-tetradecanoyl phorbol-13-acetate, carbachol, and ionophore A23187 of 32P incorporation into phospholipids. The inhibition was similar whether iodide was added 2 h before or simultaneously with the agonist. I- itself sometimes stimulated basal glucose oxidation, but had no effect on basal 32P incorporation into phospholipids. The effects of iodide on basal and agonist-stimulated thyroid metabolism were blocked by methimazole (10(-3) M). When dog thyroid slices were preloaded with 32PO4 or [1-14C]glucose, the iodide inhibition of agonist stimulation disappeared, suggesting that the effect of iodide involves the transport process. In conclusion, I- inhibited stimulation of glucose oxidation and 32P incorporation into phospholipids by all agonists, indicating that the effect is independent of the cAMP system and that iodide autoregulation does not only involve this system. Oxidation and organification of iodide are necessary for the inhibition

  11. Electroacupuncture Confers Antinociceptive Effects via Inhibition of Glutamate Transporter Downregulation in Complete Freund's Adjuvant-Injected Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ha-Neui Kim

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available When we evaluated changes of glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP and two glutamate transporter (GTs by immunohistochemistry, expression of GFAP showed a significant increase in complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA-injected rats; however, this expression was strongly inhibited by electroacupuncture (EA stimulation. Robust downregulation of glutamate-aspartate transporter (GLAST and glutamate transporter-1 (GLT-1 was observed in CFA-injected rats; however, EA stimulation resulted in recovery of this expression. Double-labeling staining showed co-localization of a large proportion of GLAST or GLT-1 with GFAP. Using Western blot, we confirmed protein expression of two GTs, but no differences in the mRNA content of these GTs were observed. Because EA treatment resulted in strong inhibition of CFA-induced proteasome activities, we examined the question of whether thermal sensitivities and GTs expression could be regulated by proteasome inhibitor MG132. CFA-injected rats co-treated with EA and MG132 showed a significantly longer thermal sensitivity, compared with CFA-injected rats with or without MG132. Both EA and MG132 blocked CFA-induced GLAST and GLT-1 downregulation within the spinal cord. These results provide evidence for involvement of GLAST and GLT-1 in response to activation of spinal astrocytes in an EA antinociceptive effect. Antinociceptive effect of EA may be induced via proteasome-mediated regulation of spinal GTs.

  12. Blockade of chloride channels by DIDS stimulates renin release and inhibits contraction of afferent arterioles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, B L; Skøtt, O

    1996-01-01

    or without ethylene glycol-bis(beta-aminoethyl ether)-N,N,N',N'-tetraacetic acid] and DIDS were not additive. In the absence of chloride, basal renin release was suppressed and the stimulatory effect of DIDS was abolished. The DIDS-induced enhancement of renin release was not dependent on bicarbonate....... Norepinephrine (5 x 10(-7)-1 x 10(-6) M) and angiotensin II (1 x 10(-8)-10(-6) M) evoked reversible and dose-dependent contractions of microperfused rabbit afferent arterioles. DIDS (0.5 mM) did not affect the basal diameter of the arterioles but strongly inhibited the response to angiotensin II and attenuated...

  13. Magnolol inhibits migration of vascular smooth muscle cells via cytoskeletal remodeling pathway to attenuate neointima formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karki, Rajendra; Kim, Seong-Bin; Kim, Dong-Wook

    2013-01-01

    Background: Increased proliferation and migration of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) contribute importantly to the formation of both atherosclerotic and restenotic lesions. The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of magnolol on VSMC migration. Methods: The proteolytic activity of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) in tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) stimulated VSMCs was performed by gelatin zymography. VSMC migration was assessed by wound healing and Boyden chamber methods. Collagen induced VSMC adhesion was determined by spectrofluorimeter and stress fibers formation was evaluated by fluorescence microscope. The expression of signaling molecules involved in stress fibers formation was determined by western blot. The phosphorylation of myosin light chain (MLC20) was determined by urea-glycerol polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Immunohistochemistry was performed to determine the expression of β1-integrin and collagen type I in the injured carotid arteries of rats on day 35 after vascular injury. Results: VSMC migration was strongly inhibited by magnolol without affecting MMPs expression. Also, magnolol inhibited β1-integrin expression, FAK phosphorylation and RhoA and Cdc42 activation to inhibit the collagen induced stress fibers formation. Moreover, magnolol inhibited the phosphorylation of MLC20. Our in vivo results showed that magnolol inhibited β1-integrin expression, collagen type I deposition and FAK phosphorylation in injured carotid arteries without affecting MMP-2 activity. Conclusions: Magnolol inhibited VSMC migration via inhibition of cytoskeletal remodeling pathway to attenuate neointima formation. General significance: This study provides a rationale for further evaluation of magnolol for the management of atherosclerosis and restenosis. - Highlights: • Magnolol strongly inhibited migration of VSMCs. • Magnolol inhibited stress fibers formation. • MLC20 phosphorylation was also inhibited by magnolol. • Anti

  14. Magnolol inhibits migration of vascular smooth muscle cells via cytoskeletal remodeling pathway to attenuate neointima formation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karki, Rajendra [Division of Pharmacology and Toxicology, School of Pharmacy, University of Missouri-Kansas City (United States); Department of Oriental Medicine Resources, Mokpo National University (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Seong-Bin [Jeollanamdo Development Institute for Korean Traditional Medicine, Jangheung gun, Jeollanamdo (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Dong-Wook, E-mail: dbkim@mokpo.ac.kr [Department of Oriental Medicine Resources, Mokpo National University (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-12-10

    Background: Increased proliferation and migration of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) contribute importantly to the formation of both atherosclerotic and restenotic lesions. The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of magnolol on VSMC migration. Methods: The proteolytic activity of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) in tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) stimulated VSMCs was performed by gelatin zymography. VSMC migration was assessed by wound healing and Boyden chamber methods. Collagen induced VSMC adhesion was determined by spectrofluorimeter and stress fibers formation was evaluated by fluorescence microscope. The expression of signaling molecules involved in stress fibers formation was determined by western blot. The phosphorylation of myosin light chain (MLC20) was determined by urea-glycerol polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Immunohistochemistry was performed to determine the expression of β1-integrin and collagen type I in the injured carotid arteries of rats on day 35 after vascular injury. Results: VSMC migration was strongly inhibited by magnolol without affecting MMPs expression. Also, magnolol inhibited β1-integrin expression, FAK phosphorylation and RhoA and Cdc42 activation to inhibit the collagen induced stress fibers formation. Moreover, magnolol inhibited the phosphorylation of MLC20. Our in vivo results showed that magnolol inhibited β1-integrin expression, collagen type I deposition and FAK phosphorylation in injured carotid arteries without affecting MMP-2 activity. Conclusions: Magnolol inhibited VSMC migration via inhibition of cytoskeletal remodeling pathway to attenuate neointima formation. General significance: This study provides a rationale for further evaluation of magnolol for the management of atherosclerosis and restenosis. - Highlights: • Magnolol strongly inhibited migration of VSMCs. • Magnolol inhibited stress fibers formation. • MLC20 phosphorylation was also inhibited by magnolol. • Anti

  15. Patterned sensory nerve stimulation enhances the reactivity of spinal Ia inhibitory interneurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubota, Shinji; Hirano, Masato; Morishita, Takuya; Uehara, Kazumasa; Funase, Kozo

    2015-03-25

    Patterned sensory nerve stimulation has been shown to induce plastic changes in the reciprocal Ia inhibitory circuit. However, the mechanisms underlying these changes have not yet been elucidated in detail. The aim of the present study was to determine whether the reactivity of Ia inhibitory interneurons could be altered by patterned sensory nerve stimulation. The degree of reciprocal Ia inhibition, the conditioning effects of transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) on the soleus (SOL) muscle H-reflex, and the ratio of the maximum H-reflex amplitude versus maximum M-wave (H(max)/M(max)) were examined in 10 healthy individuals. Patterned electrical nerve stimulation was applied to the common peroneal nerve every 1 s (100 Hz-5 train) at the motor threshold intensity of tibialis anterior muscle to induce activity changes in the reciprocal Ia inhibitory circuit. Reciprocal Ia inhibition, the TMS-conditioned H-reflex amplitude, and H(max)/M(max) were recorded before, immediately after, and 15 min after the electrical stimulation. The patterned electrical nerve stimulation significantly increased the degree of reciprocal Ia inhibition and decreased the amplitude of the TMS-conditioned H-reflex in the short-latency inhibition phase, which was presumably mediated by Ia inhibitory interneurons. However, it had no effect on H(max)/M(max). Our results indicated that patterned sensory nerve stimulation could modulate the activity of Ia inhibitory interneurons, and this change may have been caused by the synaptic modification of Ia inhibitory interneuron terminals. These results may lead to a clearer understanding of the spinal cord synaptic plasticity produced by repetitive sensory inputs. Copyright © 2015 Wolters Kluwer Health, Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. High density lipoprotein (HDL)-associated sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) inhibits macrophage apoptosis by stimulating STAT3 activity and survivin expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feuerborn, Renata; Becker, Susen; Potì, Francesco; Nagel, Petra; Brodde, Martin; Schmidt, Harmut; Christoffersen, Christina; Ceglarek, Uta; Burkhardt, Ralph; Nofer, Jerzy-Roch

    2017-02-01

    Macrophage apoptosis is critically involved in atherosclerosis. We here examined the effect of anti-atherogenic high density lipoprotein (HDL) and its component sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) on apoptosis in RAW264.7 murine macrophages. Mitochondrial or endoplasmic reticulum-dependent apoptosis was induced by exposure of macrophages to etoposide or thapsigargin/fukoidan, respectively. Cell death induced by these compounds was inhibited by S1P as inferred from reduced annexin V binding, TUNEL staining, and caspase 3, 9 and 12 activities. S1P induced expression of the inhibitor of apoptosis protein (IAP) family proteins cIAP1, cIAP2 and survivin, but only the inhibitor of survivin expression YM155 and not the cIAP1/2 blocker GDC0152 reversed the inhibitory effect of S1P on apoptosis. Moreover, S1P activated signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) and Janus kinase 2 (JAK2) and the stimulatory effect of S1P on survivin expression and inhibitory effects on apoptosis were attenuated by STAT3 or JAK2 inhibitors, S3I-201 or AG490, respectively. The effects of S1P on STAT3 activation, survivin expression and macrophage apoptosis were emulated by HDL, HDL lipids, and apolipoprotein (apo) M-containing HDL, but not by apoA-I or HDL deprived of S1P or apoM. In addition, JTE013 and CAY10444, S1P receptor 2 and 3 antagonists, respectively, compromised the S1P and HDL capacities to stimulate STAT3 activation and survivin expression, and to inhibit apoptosis. HDL-associated S1P inhibits macrophage apoptosis by stimulating STAT3 activity and survivin expression. The suppression of macrophage apoptosis may represent a novel mechanism utilized by HDL to exert its anti-atherogenic effects. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Cardiac effects produced by long-term stimulation of thoracic autonomic ganglia or nerves: implications for interneuronal interactions within the thoracic autonomic nervous system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, C; Watson-Wright, W M; Wilkinson, M; Johnstone, D E; Armour, J A

    1988-03-01

    Electrical stimulation of an acutely decentralized stellate or middle cervical ganglion or cardiopulmonary nerve augments cardiac chronotropism or inotropism; as the stimulation continues there is a gradual reduction of this augmentation following the peak response, i.e., an inhibition of augmentation. The amount of this inhibition was found to be dependent upon the region of the heart investigated and the neural structure stimulated. The cardiac parameters which were augmented the most displayed the greatest inhibition. Maximum augmentation or inhibition occurred, in most instances, when 5-20 Hz stimuli were used. Inhibition of augmentation was overcome when the stimulation frequency was subsequently increased or following the administration of nicotine or tyramine, indicating that the inhibition was not primarily due to the lack of availability of noradrenaline in the nerve terminals of the efferent postganglionic sympathetic neurons. Furthermore, as infusions of isoproterenol or noradrenaline during the period of inhibition could still augment cardiac responses, whereas during the early peak responses they did not, the inhibition of augmentation does not appear to be due primarily to down regulation of cardiac myocyte beta-adrenergic receptors. The inhibition was modified by hexamethonium but not by phentolamine or atropine. Inhibition occurred when all ipsilateral cardiopulmonary nerves connected with acutely decentralized middle cervical and stellate ganglia were stimulated, whereas significant inhibition did not occur when these nerves were stimulated after they had been disconnected from the ipsilateral decentralized ganglia. Taken together these data indicate that the inhibition of cardiac augmentation which occurs during relatively long-term stimulation of intrathoracic sympathetic neural elements is due in large part to nicotinic cholinergic synaptic mechanisms that lie primarily in the major thoracic autonomic ganglia. They also indicate that long

  18. PhCESA3 silencing inhibits elongation and stimulates radial expansion in petunia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Weiyuan; Cai, Yuanping; Hu, Li; Wei, Qian; Chen, Guoju; Bai, Mei; Wu, Hong; Liu, Juanxu; Yu, Yixun

    2017-02-02

    Cellulose synthase catalytic subunits (CESAs) play important roles in plant growth, development and disease resistance. Previous studies have shown an essential role of Arabidopsis thaliana CESA3 in plant growth. However, little is known about the role of CESA3 in species other than A. thaliana. To gain a better understanding of CESA3, the petunia (Petunia hybrida) PhCESA3 gene was isolated, and the role of PhCESA3 in plant growth was analyzed in a wide range of plants. PhCESA3 mRNA was present at varying levels in tissues examined. VIGS-mediated PhCESA3 silencing resulted in dwarfing of plant height, which was consistent with the phenotype of the A. thaliana rsw1 mutant (a temperature-sensitive allele of AtCESA1), the A. thaliana cev1 mutant (the AtCESA3 mild mutant), and the antisense AtCESA3 line. However, PhCESA3 silencing led to swollen stems, pedicels, filaments, styles and epidermal hairs as well as thickened leaves and corollas, which were not observed in the A. thaliana cev1 mutant, the rsw1 mutant and the antisense AtCESA3 line. Further micrographs showed that PhCESA3 silencing reduced the length and increased the width of cells, suggesting that PhCESA3 silencing inhibits elongation and stimulates radial expansion in petunia.

  19. STN-stimulation in Parkinson's disease restores striatal inhibition of thalamocortical projection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Geday, Jacob; Østergaard, Karen; Johnsen, Erik

    2009-01-01

    To test the hypothesis that deep brain stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus (STN) restores the inhibitory output to the striatothalamocortical loop in Parkinson's disease, we obtained functional brain images of blood flow in 10 STN-stimulated patients with Parkinson's disease. Patients were...... in the STN and in the left nucleus lentiformis. Conversely, flow declined in the left supplementary motor area (BA 6), ventrolateral nucleus of the left thalamus, and right cerebellum. Activation of the basal ganglia and deactivation of supplementary motor area and thalamus were both correlated...... with the improvement of motor function. The result is consistent with the explanation that stimulation in resting patients raises output from the STN with activation of the inhibitory basal ganglia output nuclei and subsequent deactivation of the thalamic anteroventral and ventrolateral nuclei and the supplementary...

  20. Anodal transcranial direct current stimulation of right temporoparietal area inhibits self-recognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Payne, Sophie; Tsakiris, Manos

    2017-02-01

    Self-other discrimination is a crucial mechanism for social cognition. Neuroimaging and neurostimulation research has pointed to the involvement of the right temporoparietal region in a variety of self-other discrimination tasks. Although repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation over the right temporoparietal area has been shown to disrupt self-other discrimination in face-recognition tasks, no research has investigated the effect of increasing the cortical excitability in this region on self-other face discrimination. Here we used transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) to investigate changes in self-other discrimination with a video-morphing task in which the participant's face morphed into, or out of, a familiar other's face. The task was performed before and after 20 min of tDCS targeting the right temporoparietal area (anodal, cathodal, or sham stimulation). Differences in task performance following stimulation were taken to indicate a change in self-other discrimination. Following anodal stimulation only, we observed a significant increase in the amount of self-face needed to distinguish between self and other. The findings are discussed in relation to the control of self and other representations and to domain-general theories of social cognition.

  1. Influence of in vitro irradiation upon LIF production by ConA stimulated mononuclear cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sandru, G.; Veraguth, P.

    1981-01-01

    Leukocyte migration inhibitory factor (LIF) activity of culture supernatants of in vitro irradiated Concanavalin A (ConA) stimulated lymphocytes was tested by measuring granulocyte migration from clotted plasma droplets placed in flat bottom microplates. The specificity of inhibition was assured by pretreating the assay supernatants with anti-LIF antibodies which abrogated granulocyte migration inhibition but did not impair guinea pig Peritoneal Exudate Cells (PEC) migration inhibition. In vitro irradiation (150-1200 rads) of MNC cultures either before or after ConA stimulation did not impair lymphokine production and sometimes significantly improved the supernatants' LIF activity as compared with that of unirradiated cultures. The existence of radiosensitive suppressor cells regulating LIF production by ConA stimulated mononuclear cells is suggested

  2. Homologous recombination in mammalian cells: effect of p53 and Bcl-2 proteins, replication inhibition and ionizing radiations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saintigny, Yannick

    1999-01-01

    The control of cell cycle, associated with the mechanisms of replication, DNA repair/recombination allows the cells to maintain their genetic integrity. The p53 protein ensures the control of G1/S transition. Its inactivation would allow to initial replication on damaged matrix and lead to the block of replication forks followed by DNA strand breaks, good substrates for recombination. This work shows that the expression of mutant p53 protein stimulates both spontaneous and radio-induced homologous recombination, independently of the control of cell cycle. Moreover, the use of a set of replication inhibitors show that inhibition of the replication elongation stimulates recombination more strongly than the initiation inhibition. Replication arrest by these inhibitors also significantly increases the number of DNA strand breaks. These results highlighted a point of action of p53 protein on the ultimate stages of the homologous recombination mechanism. Lastly, the expression of Bcl-2 protein inhibits apoptosis and increases survival, but specifically inhibits conservative recombination, after radiation as well as in absence of apoptotic stress. The extinction of this mechanism of DNA repair is associated with an increase of mutagenesis. Taken together, these results allow ta consider the maintenance of the genetic stability as a cellular network involving different pathways. A multiple stages model for tumoral progression can be deduced. (author) [fr

  3. Myelin-induced inhibition in a spiral ganglion organ culture - Approaching a natural environment in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramer, Benedikt; Tropitzsch, Anke; Müller, Marcus; Löwenheim, Hubert

    2017-08-15

    The performance of a cochlear implant depends on the defined interaction between afferent neurons of the spiral ganglion and the inserted electrode. Neurite outgrowth can be induced by neurotrophins such as brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) via tropomyosin kinase receptor B (TrkB). However, neurotrophin signaling through the p75 neurotrophin receptor (p75) inhibits neurite outgrowth in the presence of myelin. Organotypic cultures derived from postnatal (P3-5) mice were used to study myelin-induced inhibition in the cochlear spiral ganglion. Neurite outgrowth was analyzed and quantified utilizing an adapted Sholl analysis. Stimulation of neurite outgrowth was quantified after application of BDNF, the selective TrkB agonist 7,8-dihydroxyflavone (7,8-DHF) and a selective inhibitor of the Rho-associated kinase (Y27632), which inhibits the p75 pathway. Myelin-induced inhibition was assessed by application of myelin-associated glycoprotein (MAG-Fc) to stimulate the inhibitory p75 pathway. Inhibition of neurite outgrowth was achieved by the selective TrkB inhibitor K252a. Stimulation of neurite outgrowth was observed after treatment with BDNF, 7,8 DHF and a combination of BDNF and Y27632. The 7,8-DHF-induced growth effects could be inhibited by K252a. Furthermore, inhibition of neurite outgrowth was observed after supplementation with MAG-Fc. Myelin-induced inhibition could be overcome by 7,8-DHF and the combination of BDNF and Y27632. In this study, myelin-induced inhibition of neurite outgrowth was established in a spiral ganglion model. We reveal that 7,8-DHF is a viable novel compound for the stimulation of neurite outgrowth in a myelin-induced inhibitory environment. The combination of TrkB stimulation and ROCK inhibition can be used to overcome myelin inhibition. Copyright © 2017 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Deep Brain Stimulation of the Internal Globus Pallidus Improves Response Initiation and Proactive Inhibition in Patients With Parkinson’s Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yixin Pan

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Impulse control disorder is not uncommon in patients with Parkinson’s disease (PD who are treated with dopamine replacement therapy and subthalamic deep brain stimulation (DBS. Internal globus pallidus (GPi-DBS is increasingly used, but its role in inhibitory control has rarely been explored. In this study, we evaluated the effect of GPi-DBS on inhibitory control in PD patients.Methods: A stop-signal paradigm was used to test response initiation, proactive inhibition, and reactive inhibition. The subjects enrolled in the experiment were 27 patients with PD, of whom 13 had received only drug treatment and 14 had received bilateral GPi-DBS in addition to conventional medical treatment and 15 healthy individuals.Results: Our results revealed that with GPi-DBS on, patients with PD showed significantly faster responses than the other groups in trials where it was certain that no stop signal would be presented. Proactive inhibition was significantly different in the surgical patients with GPi-DBS on versus when GPi-DBS was off, in surgical patients with GPi-DBS on versus drug-treated patients, and in healthy controls versus drug-treated patients. Correlation analyses revealed that when GPi-DBS was on, there was a statistically significant moderate positive relationship between proactive inhibition and dopaminergic medication.Conclusion: GPi-DBS may lead to an increase in response initiation speed and improve the dysfunctional proactive inhibitory control observed in PD patients. Our results may help us to understand the role of the GPi in cortical-basal ganglia circuits.

  5. The Shewanella algae strain YM8 produces volatiles with strong inhibition activity against Aspergillus pathogens and aflatoxins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andong eGong

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Aflatoxigenic Aspergillus fungi and associated aflatoxins are ubiquitous in the production and storage of food/feed commodities. Controlling these pests is a challenge. In this study, the Shewanella algae strain YM8 was found to produce volatiles that have strong antifungal activity against Aspergillus pathogens. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry profiling revealed 15 volatile organic compounds (VOCs emitted from YM8, of which dimethyl trisulfide was the most abundant. We obtained authentic reference standards for six of the VOCs; these all significantly reduced mycelial growth and conidial germination in Aspergillus; dimethyl trisulfide and 2,4-bis(1,1-dimethylethyl-phenol showed the strongest inhibitory activity. YM8 completely inhibited Aspergillus growth and aflatoxin biosynthesis in maize and peanut samples stored at different water activity levels, and scanning electron microscopy revealed severely damaged conidia and a complete lack of mycelium development and conidiogenesis. YM8 also completely inhibited the growth of eight other agronomically important species of phytopathogenic fungi: A. parasiticus, A. niger, Alternaria alternate, Botrytis cinerea, Fusarium graminearum, Fusarium oxysporum, Monilinia fructicola, and Sclerotinia sclerotiorum. This study demonstrates the susceptibility of Aspergillus and other fungi to VOCs from marine bacteria and indicates a new strategy for effectively controlling these pathogens and the associated mycotoxin production in the field and during storage.

  6. Influence of patterned electrical neuromuscular stimulation on quadriceps activation in individuals with knee joint injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glaviano, Neal R; Langston, William T; Hart, Joseph M; Saliba, Susan

    2014-12-01

    Neuromuscular Electrical Stimulation is a common intervention to address muscle weakness, however presents with many limitations such as fatigue, muscle damage, and patient discomfort that may influence its effectiveness. One novel form of electrical stimulation purported to improve neuromuscular re-education is Patterned Electrical Neuromuscular Stimulation (PENS), which is proposed to mimic muscle-firing patterns of healthy individuals. PENS provides patterned stimulating to the agonist muscle, antagonist muscle and then agonist muscle again in an effort to replicate firing patterns. The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of a single PENS treatment on knee extension torque and quadriceps activation in individuals with quadriceps inhibition. 18 subjects (10 males and 8 females: 24.2±3.4 years, 175.3±11.8cm, 81.8±12.4kg) with a history of knee injury/pain participated in this double-blinded randomized controlled laboratory trial. Participants demonstrated quadriceps inhibition with a central activation ratio of ≤90%. Maximal voluntary isometric contraction of the quadriceps and central activation ratio were measured before and after treatment. The treatment intervention was a 15-minute patterned electrical stimulation applied to the quadriceps and hamstring muscles with a strong motor contraction or a sham group, who received an identical set up as the PENS group, but received a 1mA subsensory stimulation. A 2×2 (group × time) ANCOVA was used to determine differences in maximal voluntary isometric contraction and central activation ratio between groups. The maximal voluntary isometric contraction was selected as a covariate due to baseline differences. There were no differences in change scores between pre- and post-intervention for maximal voluntary isometric contraction: (PENS: 0.09±0.32Nm/kg and Sham 0.15±0.18Nm/kg, p=0.713), or central activation ratio:(PENS: -1.22±6.06 and Sham: 1.48±3.7, p=0.270). A single Patterned Electrical

  7. Double-Cone Coil TMS Stimulation of the Medial Cortex Inhibits Central Pain Habituation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Federico D'Agata

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to investigate whether Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (TMS applied over the medial line of the scalp affects the subjective perception of continuous pain induced by means of electric stimulation. In addition, we wanted to identify the point of stimulation where this effect was maximum.Superficial electrical stimulation was used to induce continuous pain on the dominant hand. At the beginning of the experiment we reached a pain rating of 5 on an 11-point numeric rating scale (NRS; 0 = no pain and 10 = maximum tolerable pain for each subject by setting individually the current intensity. The TMS (five pulses at increasing intensities was applied on 5 equidistant points (one per session over the medial line of the scalp in 13 healthy volunteers using a double-cone coil to stimulate underlying parts of the brain cortex. In every experimental session the painful stimulation lasted 45 minutes, during which pain and distress intensities NRS were recorded continuously. We calculated the effect of adaptation and the immediate effect of the TMS stimulation for all locations. Additionally, an ALE (Activation Likelihood Estimation meta-analysis was performed to compare our results with the neuroimaging literature on subjective pain rating.TMS stimulation temporarily decreased the pain ratings, and pain adaptation was suppressed when applying the TMS over the FCz site on the scalp. No effect was found for distress ratings.The present data suggest that the medial cortex in proximity of the cingulated gyrus has a causal role in adaptation mechanisms and in processing ongoing pain and subjective sensation of pain intensity.

  8. Stimulation of protein synthesis by internalized insulin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, D.S.; Sykes, D.B.

    1991-01-01

    Previous studies showed that microinjected insulin stimulates transcription and translation in Stage 4 Xenopus oocytes by acting at nuclear and cytoplasmic sites. The present report is concerned with the question of whether hormone, internalized from an external medium, can act on those sites to alter cell function. Both intracellular accumulation of undegraded 125I-insulin and insulin-stimulated 35S-methionine incorporation into oocyte protein were measured. Anti-insulin antiserum and purified anti-insulin antibody were microinjected into the cytoplasm of insulin-exposed cells to determine if insulin derived from the medium acted through internal sites. In cells exposed for 2 h to 7 or 70 nM external insulin, methionine incorporation was stimulated, but intracellular hormone accumulation was minimal and microinjected antibody was without effect. In cells exposed for 24 h, methionine incorporation again increased, but now accumulation of undegraded, intracellular hormone was substantial (2.6 and 25.3 fmol with 7 and 70 nM, respectively), and microinjected anti-insulin antibody significantly reduced the insulin-stimulated component of incorporation; basal incorporation was not affected. For cells exposed to 70 nM insulin for 24 h, inhibition of the insulin-stimulated component was maximal at 39%. Thus under those conditions, about 40% of insulin's effects were mediated by the internal sites. Together, the data show that inhibition of insulin-stimulated protein synthesis by microinjected antibody was associated with the intracellular accumulation of insulin. They indicate that when oocytes are exposed to external insulin, hormone eventually gains access to intracellular sites of action and through these stimulates translation. Control of translation appears to be shared between the internal sites and the surface receptor

  9. GABAergic modulation of DC stimulation-induced motor cortex excitability shifts in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nitsche, Michael A; Liebetanz, David; Schlitterlau, Anett; Henschke, Undine; Fricke, Kristina; Frommann, Kai; Lang, Nicolas; Henning, Stefan; Paulus, Walter; Tergau, Frithjof

    2004-05-01

    Weak transcranial DC stimulation (tDCS) of the human motor cortex results in excitability shifts during and after the end of stimulation, which are most probably localized intracortically. Anodal stimulation enhances excitability, whereas cathodal stimulation reduces it. Although the after-effects of tDCS are NMDA receptor-dependent, nothing is known about the involvement of additional receptors. Here we show that pharmacological strengthening of GABAergic inhibition modulates selectively the after-effects elicited by anodal tDCS. Administration of the GABA(A) receptor agonist lorazepam resulted in a delayed, but then enhanced and prolonged anodal tDCS-induced excitability elevation. The initial absence of an excitability enhancement under lorazepam is most probably caused by a loss of the anodal tDCS-generated intracortical diminution of inhibition and enhancement of facilitation, which occurs without pharmacological intervention. The reasons for the late-occurring excitability enhancement remain unclear. Because intracortical inhibition and facilitation are not changed in this phase compared with pre-tDCS values, excitability changes originating from remote cortical or subcortical areas could be involved.

  10. Spinal Cord Excitability and Sprint Performance Are Enhanced by Sensory Stimulation During Cycling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gregory E. P. Pearcey

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Spinal cord excitability, as assessed by modulation of Hoffmann (H- reflexes, is reduced with fatiguing isometric contractions. Furthermore, spinal cord excitability is reduced during non-fatiguing arm and leg cycling. Presynaptic inhibition of Ia terminals is believed to contribute to this suppression of spinal cord excitability. Electrical stimulation to cutaneous nerves reduces Ia presynaptic inhibition, which facilitates spinal cord excitability, and this facilitation is present during arm cycling. Although it has been suggested that reducing presynaptic inhibition may prolong fatiguing contractions, it is unknown whether sensory stimulation can alter the effects of fatiguing exercise on performance or spinal cord excitability. Thus, the aim of this experiment was to determine if sensory stimulation can interfere with fatigue-related suppression of spinal cord excitability, and alter fatigue rates during cycling sprints. Thirteen participants randomly performed three experimental sessions that included: unloaded cycling with sensory stimulation (CONTROL + STIM, sprints with sensory stimulation (SPRINT + STIM and sprints without stimulation (SPRINT. Seven participants also performed a fourth session (CONTROL, which consisted of unloaded cycling. During SPRINT and SPRINT + STIM, participants performed seven, 10 s cycling sprints interleaved with 3 min rest. For CONTROL and CONTROL + STIM, participants performed unloaded cycling for ~30 min. During SPRINT + STIM and CONTROL + STIM, participants received patterned sensory stimulation to nerves of the right foot. H-reflexes and M-waves of the right soleus were evoked by stimulation of the tibial nerve at multiple time points throughout exercise. Sensory stimulation facilitated soleus H-reflexes during unloaded cycling, whereas sprints suppressed soleus H-reflexes. While receiving sensory stimulation, there was less suppression of soleus H-reflexes and slowed reduction in average power output

  11. Spinal Cord Excitability and Sprint Performance Are Enhanced by Sensory Stimulation During Cycling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearcey, Gregory E P; Noble, Steven A; Munro, Bridget; Zehr, E Paul

    2017-01-01

    Spinal cord excitability, as assessed by modulation of Hoffmann (H-) reflexes, is reduced with fatiguing isometric contractions. Furthermore, spinal cord excitability is reduced during non-fatiguing arm and leg cycling. Presynaptic inhibition of Ia terminals is believed to contribute to this suppression of spinal cord excitability. Electrical stimulation to cutaneous nerves reduces Ia presynaptic inhibition, which facilitates spinal cord excitability, and this facilitation is present during arm cycling. Although it has been suggested that reducing presynaptic inhibition may prolong fatiguing contractions, it is unknown whether sensory stimulation can alter the effects of fatiguing exercise on performance or spinal cord excitability. Thus, the aim of this experiment was to determine if sensory stimulation can interfere with fatigue-related suppression of spinal cord excitability, and alter fatigue rates during cycling sprints. Thirteen participants randomly performed three experimental sessions that included: unloaded cycling with sensory stimulation ( CONTROL + STIM ), sprints with sensory stimulation ( SPRINT + STIM ) and sprints without stimulation ( SPRINT ). Seven participants also performed a fourth session ( CONTROL ), which consisted of unloaded cycling. During SPRINT and SPRINT + STIM, participants performed seven, 10 s cycling sprints interleaved with 3 min rest. For CONTROL and CONTROL + STIM , participants performed unloaded cycling for ~30 min. During SPRINT + STIM and CONTROL + STIM , participants received patterned sensory stimulation to nerves of the right foot. H-reflexes and M-waves of the right soleus were evoked by stimulation of the tibial nerve at multiple time points throughout exercise. Sensory stimulation facilitated soleus H-reflexes during unloaded cycling, whereas sprints suppressed soleus H-reflexes. While receiving sensory stimulation, there was less suppression of soleus H-reflexes and slowed reduction in average power output, compared

  12. Corollary discharge inhibition of wind-sensitive cercal giant interneurons in the singing field cricket

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedwig, Berthold

    2014-01-01

    Crickets carry wind-sensitive mechanoreceptors on their cerci, which, in response to the airflow produced by approaching predators, triggers escape reactions via ascending giant interneurons (GIs). Males also activate their cercal system by air currents generated due to the wing movements underlying sound production. Singing males still respond to external wind stimulation, but are not startled by the self-generated airflow. To investigate how the nervous system discriminates sensory responses to self-generated and external airflow, we intracellularly recorded wind-sensitive afferents and ventral GIs of the cercal escape pathway in fictively singing crickets, a situation lacking any self-stimulation. GI spiking was reduced whenever cercal wind stimulation coincided with singing motor activity. The axonal terminals of cercal afferents showed no indication of presynaptic inhibition during singing. In two ventral GIs, however, a corollary discharge inhibition occurred strictly in phase with the singing motor pattern. Paired intracellular recordings revealed that this inhibition was not mediated by the activity of the previously identified corollary discharge interneuron (CDI) that rhythmically inhibits the auditory pathway during singing. Cercal wind stimulation, however, reduced the spike activity of this CDI by postsynaptic inhibition. Our study reveals how precisely timed corollary discharge inhibition of ventral GIs can prevent self-generated airflow from triggering inadvertent escape responses in singing crickets. The results indicate that the responsiveness of the auditory and wind-sensitive pathway is modulated by distinct CDIs in singing crickets and that the corollary discharge inhibition in the auditory pathway can be attenuated by cercal wind stimulation. PMID:25318763

  13. Mechanism of orientation of stimulating currents in magnetic brain stimulation (abstract)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueno, S.; Matsuda, T.

    1991-04-01

    We made a functional map of the human motor cortex related to the hand and foot areas by stimulating the human brain with a focused magnetic pulse. We observed that each functional area in the cortex has an optimum direction for which stimulating currents can produce neural excitation. The present report focuses on the mechanism which is responsible for producing this anisotropic response to brain stimulation. We first obtained a functional map of the brain related to the left ADM (abductor digiti minimi muscles). When the stimulating currents were aligned in the direction from the left to the right hemisphere, clear EMG (electromyographic) responses were obtained only from the left ADM to magnetic stimulation of both hemisphere. When the stimulating currents were aligned in the direction from the right to the left hemisphere, clear EMG signals were obtained only from the right ADM to magnetic stimulation of both hemisphere. The functional maps of the brain were sensitive to changes in the direction of the stimulating currents. To explain the phenomena obtained in the experiments, we developed a model of neural excitation elicited by magnetic stimulation. When eddy currents which are induced by pulsed magnetic fields flow in the direction from soma to the distal part of neural fiber, depolarized area in the distal part are excited, and the membrane excitation propagates along the nerve fiber. In contrast, when the induced currents flow in the direction from the distal part to soma, hyperpolarized parts block or inhibit neural excitation even if the depolarized parts near the soma can be excited. The model explains our observation that the orientation of the induced current vectors reflect both the functional and anatomical organization of the neural fibers in the brain.

  14. Agnus castus extracts inhibit prolactin secretion of rat pituitary cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sliutz, G; Speiser, P; Schultz, A M; Spona, J; Zeillinger, R

    1993-05-01

    In our studies on prolactin inhibition by plant extracts we focused on the effects of extracts of Vitex agnus castus and its preparations on rat pituitary cells under basal and stimulated conditions in primary cell culture. Both extracts from Vitex agnus castus as well as synthetic dopamine agonists (Lisuride) significantly inhibit basal as well as TRH-stimulated prolactin secretion of rat pituitary cells in vitro and as a consequence inhibition of prolactin secretion could be blocked by adding a dopamine receptor blocker. Therefore because of its dopaminergic effect Agnus castus could be considered as an efficient alternative phytotherapeutic drug in the treatment of slight hyperprolactinaemia.

  15. Caffeine Inhibits Fluid Secretion by Interlobular Ducts From Guinea Pig Pancreas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mochimaru, Yuka; Yamamoto, Akiko; Nakakuki, Miyuki; Yamaguchi, Makoto; Taniguchi, Ituka; Ishiguro, Hiroshi

    2017-04-01

    Caffeine is contained in coffee, tea, and numerous beverages and foods. We examined the direct effects of caffeine on the physiological function of pancreatic duct cells by using interlobular duct segments isolated from guinea pig pancreas. The rate of fluid secretion was continuously measured by monitoring the luminal volume of isolated duct segments. Changes in intracellular Ca concentration ([Ca]i) were estimated by microfluorometry in ducts loaded with Fura-2. Both secretin-stimulated and acetylcholine (ACh)-stimulated fluid secretions were substantially and reversibly inhibited by relatively low concentrations of caffeine as low as 0.03 mM relevant to blood levels after ingestion of caffeine-containing beverages. Caffeine inhibited ACh-induced elevation of [Ca]i and secretin-induced fluctuation of [Ca]i. Caffeine abolished thapsigargin-induced intracellular Ca release but did not affect the entry of extracellular Ca. Caffeine (0.05 mM) abolished ethanol (1 mM)-induced fluid hypersecretion in secretin-stimulated pancreatic duct. Low concentrations of caffeine directly inhibit pancreatic ductal fluid secretion stimulated by secretin or ACh and also ethanol-induced fluid hypersecretion. The inhibition by caffeine seems to be mediated by the blockade of intracellular Ca mobilization. Daily intake of caffeine may reduce the volume of pancreatic juice secretion.

  16. Paramecium tetraurelia growth stimulation under low-level chronic irradiation: investigations on a possible mechanism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Croute, F.; Soleilhavoup, J.P.; Vidal, S.; Dupouy, D.; Planel, H.

    1982-01-01

    Experiments were carried out to demonstrate the effects of low-level chronic irradiation on Paramecium tetraurelia proliferation. Biological effects were strongly dependent on the bacterial density of culture medium and more exactly on the catalase content of the medium. Significant growth stimulation was found under 60 Co chronic irradiation at a dose rate of 2 rad/year when paramecia were grown in a medium containing a high bacterial concentration (2.5 x 10 2 cells/m) or supplemented with catalase (300 U/ml). In a medium with a low bacterial density (1 x 10 6 cell/ml) or supplemented with a catalase activity inhibitor, growth simulation was preceded by a transitory inhibiting effect which could be correlated with extracellularly radioproduced H 2 O 2 . H 2 O 2 addition appeared to be able to simulate the biological effects of chronic irradiation. A possible mechanism is discussed.We proposed that the stimulating effects were the result of intracellular enzymatic scavenging of radioproduced H 2 O 2

  17. Anodal transcranial direct current stimulation reduces psychophysically measured surround suppression in the human visual cortex.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel P Spiegel

    Full Text Available Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS is a safe, non-invasive technique for transiently modulating the balance of excitation and inhibition within the human brain. It has been reported that anodal tDCS can reduce both GABA mediated inhibition and GABA concentration within the human motor cortex. As GABA mediated inhibition is thought to be a key modulator of plasticity within the adult brain, these findings have broad implications for the future use of tDCS. It is important, therefore, to establish whether tDCS can exert similar effects within non-motor brain areas. The aim of this study was to assess whether anodal tDCS could reduce inhibitory interactions within the human visual cortex. Psychophysical measures of surround suppression were used as an index of inhibition within V1. Overlay suppression, which is thought to originate within the lateral geniculate nucleus (LGN, was also measured as a control. Anodal stimulation of the occipital poles significantly reduced psychophysical surround suppression, but had no effect on overlay suppression. This effect was specific to anodal stimulation as cathodal stimulation had no effect on either measure. These psychophysical results provide the first evidence for tDCS-induced reductions of intracortical inhibition within the human visual cortex.

  18. Lipoxygenase-mediated pro-radical effect of melatonin via stimulation of arachidonic acid metabolism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radogna, F.; Sestili, P.; Martinelli, C.; Paolillo, M.; Paternoster, L.; Albertini, M.C.; Accorsi, A.; Gualandi, G.; Ghibelli, L.

    2009-01-01

    We have shown that melatonin immediately and transiently stimulates intracellular free radical production on a set of leukocytes, possibly as a consequence of calmodulin binding. We show here that melatonin-induced ROS are produced by lipoxygenase (LOX), since they are prevented by a set of LOX inhibitors, and are accompanied by increase of the 5-LOX product 5-HETE. LOX activation is accompanied by strong liberation of AA; inhibition of Ca 2+ -independent, but not Ca 2+ -dependent, phospholipase A2 (PLA2), prevents both melatonin-induced arachidonic acid and ROS production, whereas LOX inhibition only prevents ROS, indicating that PLA2 is upstream with respect to LOX, as occurs in many signaling pathways. Chlorpromazine, an inhibitor of melatonin-calmodulin interaction, inhibits both ROS and arachidonic acid production, thus possibly placing calmodulin at the origin of a melatonin-induced pro-radical pathway. Interestingly, it is known that Ca 2+ -independent PLA2 binds to calmodulin: our results are compatible with PLA2 being liberated by melatonin from a steady-state calmodulin sequestration, thus initiating an arachidonate signal transduction. These results delineate a novel molecular pathway through which melatonin may participate to the inflammatory response.

  19. Steviol reduces MDCK Cyst formation and growth by inhibiting CFTR channel activity and promoting proteasome-mediated CFTR degradation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chaowalit Yuajit

    Full Text Available Cyst enlargement in polycystic kidney disease (PKD involves cAMP-activated proliferation of cyst-lining epithelial cells and transepithelial fluid secretion into the cyst lumen via cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR chloride channel. This study aimed to investigate an inhibitory effect and detailed mechanisms of steviol and its derivatives on cyst growth using a cyst model in Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK cells. Among 4 steviol-related compounds tested, steviol was found to be the most potent at inhibiting MDCK cyst growth. Steviol inhibition of cyst growth was dose-dependent; steviol (100 microM reversibly inhibited cyst formation and cyst growth by 72.53.6% and 38.2±8.5%, respectively. Steviol at doses up to 200 microM had no effect on MDCK cell viability, proliferation and apoptosis. However, steviol acutely inhibited forskolin-stimulated apical chloride current in MDCK epithelia, measured with the Ussing chamber technique, in a dose-dependent manner. Prolonged treatment (24 h with steviol (100 microM also strongly inhibited forskolin-stimulated apical chloride current, in part by reducing CFTR protein expression in MDCK cells. Interestingly, proteasome inhibitor, MG-132, abolished the effect of steviol on CFTR protein expression. Immunofluorescence studies demonstrated that prolonged treatment (24 h with steviol (100 microM markedly reduced CFTR expression at the plasma membrane. Taken together, the data suggest that steviol retards MDCK cyst progression in two ways: first by directly inhibiting CFTR chloride channel activity and second by reducing CFTR expression, in part, by promoting proteasomal degradation of CFTR. Steviol and related compounds therefore represent drug candidates for treatment of polycystic kidney disease.

  20. Particle trapping in stimulated scattering processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karttunen, S.J.; Heikkinen, J.A.

    1981-01-01

    Particle trapping effects on stimulated Brillouin and Raman scattering are investigated. A time and space dependent model assumes a Maxwellian plasma which is taken to be homogeneous in the interaction region. Ion trapping has a rather weak effect on stimulated Brillouin scattering and large reflectivities are obtained even in strong trapping regime. Stimulated Raman scattering is considerably reduced by electron trapping. Typically 15-20 times larger laser intensities are required to obtain same reflectivity levels than without trapping. (author)

  1. Active glucose transport and proton pumping in tonoplast membrane of Zea mays L. coleoptiles are inhibited by anti-H+-ATPase antibodies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rausch, T.; Butcher, D.N.; Taiz, L.

    1987-01-01

    A tonoplast enriched fraction was obtained from Zea mays L. coleoptiles by isopycnic centrifugation of microsomal membranes in a sucrose step gradient. At the 18/26% interface chloride-stimulated and nitrate-inhibited proton pumping activity coincided with a Mg 2+ -ATP dependent accumulation of 3-O-methyl-D-glucose (OMG) as determined by a membrane filtration technique using 14 C-labeled substrate. OMG transport showed an apparently saturable component with a K/sub m/ of 110 micromolar, and was completely inhibited by 10 micromolar carbonyl cyanide m-chlorophenylhydrazone. Polyclonal antibodies against solubilized native tonoplast H + -ATPase and its 62 and 72 kilodalton subunits were assayed for their ability to inhibit proton pumping and OMG accumulation. Antibodies against both the native enzyme and the putative catalytic subunit strongly inhibited proton pumping and OMG transport whereas antibodies against the 62 kilodalton subunit had only a slight effect on both processes

  2. Hydrocortisone and Vitamin D3 stimulation of 32Psub(i)-phosphate accumulation by organ-cultured chick embryo duodenum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Corradino, R.A.

    1979-01-01

    Either vitamin D 3 (or 1 α,25-(OH) 2 -D 3 ) or hydrocortisone (HC) stimulated phosphate accumulation by organ-cultured embryonic chick duodenum. In combination, these two steroids stimulated phosphate uptake synergistically. Phosphate accumulation appeared to be independent of other vitamin D 3 -stimulated processes: CaBP concentration, cAMP concentration, or alkaline phosphataseactivity. L-phenylalanine, a reported alkaline phosphate inhibitor, when added to the culture medium progressively inhibited either D 3 - or HC-stimulated phosphate uptake subsequent to culture, but did not inhibit the synergistic action under these conditions L-phenylalanine had no consistent effect on alkaline phosphotase activity but unexpectedly, greatly inhibited vitamin D 3 - stimulated CaBP concentration, but only in the absence of HC. Some limited suggestion of an intestinal phosphoprotein sensitve to either vitamin D 3 or HC was observed. (orig.) [de

  3. Transcranial magnetic stimulation and the human brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallett, Mark

    2000-07-01

    Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) is rapidly developing as a powerful, non-invasive tool for studying the human brain. A pulsed magnetic field creates current flow in the brain and can temporarily excite or inhibit specific areas. TMS of motor cortex can produce a muscle twitch or block movement; TMS of occipital cortex can produce visual phosphenes or scotomas. TMS can also alter the functioning of the brain beyond the time of stimulation, offering potential for therapy.

  4. Thapsigargin defines the roles of cellular calcium in secretagogue-stimulated enzyme secretion from pancreatic acini.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metz, D C; Patto, R J; Mrozinski, J E; Jensen, R T; Turner, R J; Gardner, J D

    1992-10-15

    In the present study we used thapsigargin (TG), an inhibitor of microsomal calcium ATPase, to evaluate the roles of free cytoplasmic calcium and intracellular stored calcium in secretagogue-stimulated enzyme secretion from rat pancreatic acini. Using microspectrofluorimetry of fura-2-loaded pancreatic acini, we found that TG caused a sustained increase in free cytoplasmic calcium by mobilizing calcium from inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate-sensitive intracellular stores and by increasing influx of extracellular calcium. TG also caused a small increase in basal amylase secretion, inhibited the stimulation of amylase secretion caused by secretagogues that increase inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate, and potentiated the stimulation of amylase secretion caused by 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate or secretagogues that increase cyclic adenosine 3',5'-monophosphate. Bombesin, which like TG increased free cytoplasmic calcium, also potentiated the stimulation of amylase secretion caused by secretagogues that increase cyclic adenosine 3',5'-monophosphate, but did not inhibit the stimulation of amylase secretion caused by secretagogues that increase inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate. Finally, TG inhibited the sustained phase of cholecystokinin-stimulated amylase secretion and potentiated the time course of vasoactive intestinal peptide-stimulated amylase secretion. The present findings indicate that stimulation of amylase secretion by secretagogues that increase inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate does not depend on increased free cytoplasmic calcium per se. In contrast, TG-induced potentiation of the stimulation of secretagogues that increase cellular cyclic adenosine 3',5'-monophosphate appears to result from increased free cytoplasmic calcium per se.

  5. Perceptual Sensitivity and Response to Strong Stimuli Are Related

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna C. Bolders

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available To shed new light on the long-standing debate about the (independence of sensitivity to weak stimuli and overreactivity to strong stimuli, we examined the relation between these tendencies within the neurobehavioral framework of the Predictive and Reactive Control Systems (PARCS theory (Tops et al., 2010, 2014. Whereas previous studies only considered overreactivity in terms of the individual tendency to experience unpleasant affect (punishment reactivity resulting from strong sensory stimulation, we also took the individual tendency to experience pleasant affect (reward reactivity resulting from strong sensory stimulation into account. According to PARCS theory, these temperamental tendencies overlap in terms of high reactivity toward stimulation, but oppose each other in terms of the response orientation (approach or avoid. PARCS theory predicts that both types of reactivity to strong stimuli relate to sensitivity to weak stimuli, but that these relationships are suppressed due to the opposing relationship between reward and punishment reactivity. We measured punishment and reward reactivity to strong stimuli and sensitivity to weak stimuli using scales from the Adult Temperament Questionnaire (Evans and Rothbart, 2007. Sensitivity was also measured more objectively using the masked auditory threshold. We found that sensitivity to weak stimuli (both self-reported and objectively assessed was positively associated with self-reported punishment and reward reactivity to strong stimuli, but only when these reactivity measures were controlled for each other, implicating a mutual suppression effect. These results are in line with PARCS theory and suggest that sensitivity to weak stimuli and overreactivity are dependent, but this dependency is likely to be obscured if punishment and reward reactivity are not both taken into account.

  6. 18{beta}-Glycyrrhetinic acid inhibits adipogenic differentiation and stimulates lipolysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moon, Myung-Hee; Jeong, Jae-Kyo; Lee, You-Jin; Seol, Jae-Won; Ahn, Dong-Choon; Kim, In-Shik [Center for Healthcare Technology Development, Biosafety Research Institute, College of Veterinary Medicine, Chonbuk National University, Jeonju, Jeonbuk 561-756 (Korea, Republic of); Park, Sang-Youel, E-mail: sypark@chonbuk.ac.kr [Center for Healthcare Technology Development, Biosafety Research Institute, College of Veterinary Medicine, Chonbuk National University, Jeonju, Jeonbuk 561-756 (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-04-20

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer 18{beta}-GA inhibits adipogenic differentiation in 3T3-L1 preadipocytes and stimulates lipolysis in differentiated adipocytes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Anti-adipogenic effect of 18{beta}-GA is caused by down-regulation of PPAR{gamma} and inactivation of Akt signalling. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Lipolytic effect of 18{beta}-GA is mediated by up-regulation of HSL, ATGL and perilipin and activation of HSL. -- Abstract: 18{beta}-Glycyrrhetinic acid (18{beta}-GA) obtained from the herb liquorice has various pharmacological properties including anti-inflammatory and anti-bacterial activities. However, potential biological anti-obesity activities are unclear. In this study, novel biological activities of 18{beta}-GA in the adipogenesis of 3T3-L1 preadipocytes and in lipolysis of differentiated adipocytes were identified. Mouse 3T3-L1 cells were used as an in vitro model of adipogenesis and lipolysis, using a mixture of insulin/dexamethasone/3-isobutyl-1-methylxanthine (IBMX) to induce differentiation. The amount of lipid droplet accumulation was determined by an AdipoRed assay. The expression of several adipogenic transcription factors and enzymes was investigated using real-time reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and Western blotting. 18{beta}-GA dose-dependently (1-40 {mu}M) significantly decreased lipid accumulation in maturing preadipocytes. In 3T3-L1 preadipocytes, 10 {mu}M of 18{beta}-GA down-regulated the transcriptional levels of the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor {gamma}, CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein {alpha} and adiponectin, which are markers of adipogenic differentiation via Akt phosphorylation. Also, in differentiated adipocytes, 18{beta}-GA increased the level of glycerol release and up-regulated the mRNA of hormone-sensitive lipase, adipose TG lipase and perilipin, as well as the phosphorylation of hormone-sensitive lipase at Serine 563. The results indicate that 18{beta

  7. Disparate effects of oxidation on plasma acyltransferase activities: inhibition of cholesterol esterification but stimulation of transesterification of oxidized phospholipids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subbaiah, P V; Liu, M

    1996-05-31

    Oxidation of lipoproteins results in the formation of several polar phospholipids with pro-inflammatory and pro-atherogenic properties. To examine the possible role of lecithin/cholesterol acyltransferase (LCAT) in the metabolism of these oxidized phospholipids, we oxidized whole plasma with either Cu(2+) or a free-radical generator, and determined the various activities of LCAT. Oxidation caused a reduction in plasma phosphatidylcholine (PC), an increase in a short-chain polar PC (SCP-PC), and an inhibition of the transfer of long-chain acyl groups to cholesterol (LCAT activity) or to lyso PC (lysolecithin acyltransferase (LAT) I activity). However, the transfer of short-chain acyl groups from SCP-PC to lyso PCLAT II activity) was stimulated several fold, in direct correlation with the degree of oxidation. LAT II activity was not stimulated by oxidation in LCAT-deficient plasma, showing that it is carried out by LCAT. Oxidized normal plasma exhibited low LCAT activity even in the presence of exogenous proteoliposome substrate, indicating that the depletion of substrate PC was not responsible for the loss of activity. Oxidation of isolated LDL or HDL abolished their ability to support LCAT and LAT I activities of exogenous enzyme, but promoted the LAT II activity. Purified LCAT lost its LCAT and LAT I functions, but not its LAT II function, when oxidized in vitro. These results show that while oxidation of plasma causes a loss of LCAT's ability to transfer long-chain acyl groups, its ability to transfer short-chain acyl groups, from SCP-PC is retained, and even stimulated, suggesting that LCAT may have a physiological role in the metabolism of oxidized PC in plasma.

  8. Adiponectin inhibits insulin function in primary trophoblasts by PPARα-mediated ceramide synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aye, Irving L M H; Gao, Xiaoli; Weintraub, Susan T; Jansson, Thomas; Powell, Theresa L

    2014-04-01

    Maternal adiponectin (ADN) levels are inversely correlated with birth weight, and ADN infusion in pregnant mice down-regulates placental nutrient transporters and decreases fetal growth. In contrast to the insulin-sensitizing effects in adipose tissue and muscle, ADN inhibits insulin signaling in the placenta. However, the molecular mechanisms involved are unknown. We hypothesized that ADN inhibits insulin signaling and insulin-stimulated amino acid transport in primary human trophoblasts by peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-α (PPARα)-mediated ceramide synthesis. Primary human term trophoblast cells were treated with ADN and/or insulin. ADN increased the phosphorylation of p38 MAPK and PPARα. ADN inhibited insulin signaling and insulin-stimulated amino acid transport. This effect was dependent on PPARα, because activation of PPARα with an agonist (GW7647) inhibited insulin signaling and function, whereas PPARα-small interfering RNA reversed the effects of ADN on the insulin response. ADN increased ceramide synthase expression and stimulated ceramide production. C2-ceramide inhibited insulin signaling and function, whereas inhibition of ceramide synthase (with Fumonisin B1) reversed the effects of ADN on insulin signaling and amino acid transport. These findings are consistent with the model that maternal ADN limits fetal growth mediated by activation of placental PPARα and ceramide synthesis, which inhibits placental insulin signaling and amino acid transport, resulting in reduced fetal nutrient availability.

  9. Effects of High-Definition and Conventional tDCS on Response Inhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hogeveen, J; Grafman, J; Aboseria, M; David, A; Bikson, M; Hauner, K K

    2016-01-01

    Response inhibition is a critical executive function, enabling the adaptive control of behavior in a changing environment. The inferior frontal cortex (IFC) is considered to be critical for response inhibition, leading researchers to develop transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) montages attempting to target the IFC and improve inhibitory performance. However, conventional tDCS montages produce diffuse current through the brain, making it difficult to establish causality between stimulation of any one given brain region and resulting behavioral changes. Recently, high-definition tDCS (HD-tDCS) methods have been developed to target brain regions with increased focality relative to conventional tDCS. Remarkably few studies have utilized HD-tDCS to improve cognitive task performance, however, and no study has directly compared the behavioral effects of HD-tDCS to conventional tDCS. In the present study, participants received either HD-tDCS or conventional tDCS to the IFC during performance of a response inhibition task (stop-signal task, SST) or a control task (choice reaction time task, CRT). A third group of participants completed the same behavioral protocols, but received tDCS to a control site (mid-occipital cortex). Post-stimulation improvement in SST performance was analyzed as a function of tDCS group and the task performed during stimulation using both conventional and Bayesian parameter estimation analyses. Bayesian estimation of the effects of HD- and conventional tDCS to IFC relative to control site stimulation demonstrated enhanced response inhibition for both conditions. No improvements were found after control task (CRT) training in any tDCS condition. Results support the use of both HD- and conventional tDCS to the IFC for improving response inhibition, providing empirical evidence that HD-tDCS can be used to facilitate performance on an executive function task. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. 6-Gingerol inhibits ROS and iNOS through the suppression of PKC-α and NF-κB pathways in lipopolysaccharide-stimulated mouse macrophages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Tzung-Yan; Lee, Ko-Chen; Chen, Shih-Yuan; Chang, Hen-Hong

    2009-01-01

    Inflammation is involved in numerous diseases, including chronic inflammatory diseases and the development of cancer. Many plants possess a variety of biological activities, including antifungal, antibacterial and anti-inflammatory activities. However, our understanding of the anti-inflammatory effects of 6-gingerol is very limited. We used lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated macrophages as a model of inflammation to investigate the anti-inflammatory effects of 6-gingerol, which contains phenolic structure. We found that 6-gingerol exhibited an anti-inflammatory effect. 6-Gingerol could decrease inducible nitric oxide synthase and TNF-α expression through suppression of I-κBα phosphorylation, NF-κB nuclear activation and PKC-α translocation, which in turn inhibits Ca 2+ mobilization and disruption of mitochondrial membrane potential in LPS-stimulated macrophages. Here, we demonstrate that 6-gingerol acts as an anti-inflammatory agent by blocking NF-κB and PKC signaling, and may be developed as a useful agent for the chemoprevention of cancer or inflammatory diseases.

  11. Loss of MAPK Pathway Activation in Post-Mitotic Retinal Cells as Mechanism in MEK Inhibition-Related Retinopathy in Cancer Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Dijk, Elon H C; Duits, Danique E M; Versluis, Mieke; Luyten, Gregrorius P M; Bergen, Arthur A B; Kapiteijn, Ellen W; de Lange, Mark J; Boon, Camiel J F; van der Velden, Pieter A

    2016-05-01

    Recently, treatment with MEK inhibitors has been shown to be an effective treatment option for metastatic melanoma. Treatment efficacy is dependent on inhibition of MAPK-related melanoma proliferation. However, targeting of MEK can be accompanied by a time-dependent and reversible serous retinopathy of unknown origin.We analyzed the molecular mechanism by which the MEK inhibitor binimetinib may lead to retinopathy, using neuroretina and cell models of retinal pigment epithelium (RPE).Binimetinib inhibited the MAPK pathway while discontinuation of treatment resulted in reactivation. However, cell proliferation was not inhibited correspondingly during binimetinib treatment of ARPE19 cells. Remarkably, post-mitotic neuroretinal tissue displayed a strong MAPK activation that was lost after binimetinib treatment.We propose that binimetinib-associated retinopathy is correlated with inhibition of the MAPK pathway in multiple retinal components. Retinal cells are able to regain the activation after binimetinib treatment, mimicking the reversibility of the retinopathy. As most retinal cells are nonregenerating, other mechanisms than stimulation of proliferation must be involved.

  12. Lignans from Arctium lappa and their inhibition of LPS-induced nitric oxide production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, So Young; Hong, Seong Su; Han, Xiang Hua; Hwang, Ji Sang; Lee, Dongho; Ro, Jai Seup; Hwang, Bang Yeon

    2007-01-01

    A new butyrolactone sesquilignan, isolappaol C (1), together with four known lignans, lappaol C (2), lappaol D (3), lappaol F (4), and diarctigenin (5), were isolated from the methanolic extract of the seeds from the Arctium lappa plant. The structure of isolappaol C (1) was determined by spectral analysis including 1D- and 2D-NMR. All the isolates were evaluated for their inhibitory effects on the LPS-induced nitric oxide production using murine macrophage RAW264.7 cells. Lappaol F (4) and diarctigenin (5) strongly inhibited NO production in the LPS-stimulated RAW264.7 cells with IC(50) values of 9.5 and 9.6 microM, respectively.

  13. Focal hand dystonia: individualized intervention with repeated application of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimberley, Teresa Jacobson; Borich, Michael R; Schmidt, Rebekah L; Carey, James R; Gillick, Bernadette

    2015-04-01

    To examine for individual factors that may predict response to inhibitory repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) in focal hand dystonia (FHD); to present the method for determining optimal stimulation to increase inhibition in a given patient; and to examine individual responses to prolonged intervention. Single-subject design to determine optimal parameters to increase inhibition for a given subject and to use the selected parameters once per week for 6 weeks, with 1-week follow-up, to determine response. Clinical research laboratory. A volunteer sample of subjects with FHD (N = 2). One participant had transcranial magnetic stimulation responses indicating impaired inhibition, and the other had responses within normative limits. There were 1200 pulses of 1-Hz rTMS delivered using 4 different stimulation sites/intensity combinations: primary motor cortex at 90% or 110% of resting motor threshold (RMT) and dorsal premotor cortex (PMd) at 90% or 110% of RMT. The parameters producing the greatest within-session increase in cortical silent period (CSP) duration were then used as the intervention. Response variables included handwriting pressure and velocity, subjective symptom rating, CSP, and short latency intracortical inhibition and facilitation. The individual with baseline transcranial magnetic stimulation responses indicating impaired inhibition responded favorably to the repeated intervention, with reduced handwriting force, an increase in the CSP, and subjective report of moderate symptom improvement at 1-week follow-up. The individual with normative baseline responses failed to respond to the intervention. In both subjects, 90% of RMT to the PMd produced the greatest lengthening of the CSP and was used as the intervention. An individualized understanding of neurophysiological measures can be an indicator of responsiveness to inhibitory rTMS in focal dystonia, with further work needed to determine likely responders versus nonresponders. Copyright

  14. Stimulation of JNK Phosphorylation by the PTTH in Prothoracic Glands of the Silkworm, Bombyx mori

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    Shi-Hong Gu

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available In this study, phosphorylation of c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK by the prothoracicotropic hormone (PTTH was investigated in prothoracic glands (PGs of the silkworm, Bombyx mori. Results showed that JNK phosphorylation was stimulated by the PTTH in time- and dose-dependent manners. In vitro activation of JNK phosphorylation in PGs by the PTTH was also confirmed in an in vivo experiment, in which a PTTH injection greatly increased JNK phosphorylation in PGs of day-6 last instar larvae. JNK phosphorylation caused by PTTH stimulation was greatly inhibited by U73122, a potent and specific inhibitor of phospholipase C (PLC and an increase in JNK phosphorylation was also detected when PGs were treated with agents (either A23187 or thapsigargin that directly elevated the intracellular Ca2+ concentration, thereby indicating involvement of PLC and Ca2+. Pretreatment with an inhibitor (U0126 of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK/extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK kinase (MEK and an inhibitor (LY294002 of phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K failed to significantly inhibit PTTH-stimulated JNK phosphorylation, indicating that ERK and PI3K were not related to JNK. We further investigated the effect of modulation of the redox state on JNK phosphorylation. In the presence of either an antioxidant (N-acetylcysteine, NAC or diphenylene iodonium (DPI, PTTH-stimulated JNK phosphorylation was blocked. The JNK kinase inhibitor, SP600125, markedly inhibited PTTH-stimulated JNK phosphorylation and ecdysteroid synthesis. The kinase assay of JNK in PGs confirmed its stimulation by PTTH and inhibition by SP600125. Moreover, PTTH treatment did not affect JNK or Jun mRNA expressions. Based on these findings, we concluded that PTTH stimulates JNK phosphorylation in Ca2+- and PLC-dependent manners and that the redox-regulated JNK signaling pathway is involved in PTTH-stimulated ecdysteroid synthesis in B. mori PGs.

  15. Laser and Plasma Parameters for Laser Pulse Amplification by Stimulated Brillouin Backscattering in the Strong Coupling Regime

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gangolf, Thomas; Blecher, Marius; Bolanos, Simon; Lancia, Livia; Marques, Jean-Raphael; Cerchez, Mirela; Prasad, Rajendra; Aurand, Bastian; Loiseau, Pascal; Fuchs, Julien; Willi, Oswald

    2017-10-01

    In the ongoing quest for novel techniques to obtain ever higher laser powers, plasma amplification has drawn much attention, benefiting from the fact that a plasma can sustain much higher energy densities than a solid state amplifier. As a plasma process, Stimulated Brillouin Backscattering in the strong coupling regime (sc-SBS) can be used to transfer energy from one laser pulse (pump) to another (seed), by a nonlinear ion oscillation forced by the pump laser. Here, we report on experimental results on amplification by sc-SBS using the ARCTURUS Ti:Sapphire multi-beam laser system at the University of Duesseldorf, Germany. Counter-propagating in a supersonic Hydrogen gas jet target, an ultrashort seed pulse with a pulse duration between 30 and 160 fs and an energy between 1 and 12 mJ was amplified by a high-energy pump pulse (1.7 ps, 700 mJ). For some of the measurements, the gas was pre-ionized with a separate laser pulse (780 fs, 460 mJ). Preliminary analysis shows that the amplification was larger for the longer seed pulses, consistent with theoretical predictions.

  16. Effect of inhibition of microsomal Ca(2+)-ATPase on cytoplasmic calcium and enzyme secretion in pancreatic acini.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metz, D C; Pradhan, T K; Mrozinski, J E; Jensen, R T; Turner, R J; Patto, R J; Gardner, J D

    1994-01-13

    We used thapsigargin (TG), 2,5-di-tert-butyl-1,4-benzohydroquinone (BHQ) and cyclopiazonic acid (CPA), each of which inhibits microsomal Ca(2+)-ATPase, to evaluate the effects of this inhibition on cytoplasmic free calcium ([Ca2+]i) and secretagogue-stimulated enzyme secretion in rat pancreatic acini. Using single-cell microspectrofluorimetry of fura-2-loaded acini we found that all three agents caused a sustained increase in [Ca2+]i by mobilizing calcium from inositol-(1,4,5)-trisphosphate-sensitive intracellular calcium stores and by promoting influx of extracellular calcium. Concentrations of all three agents that increased [Ca2+]i potentiated the stimulation of enzyme secretion caused by secretagogues that activate adenylate cyclase but inhibited the stimulation of enzyme secretion caused by secretagogues that activate phospholipase C. With BHQ, potentiation of adenylate cyclase-mediated enzyme secretion occurred immediately whereas inhibition of phospholipase C-mediated enzyme secretion occurred only after several min of incubation. In addition, the effects of BHQ and CPA on both [Ca2+]i and secretagogue-stimulated enzyme secretion were reversed completely by washing whereas the actions of TG could not be reversed by washing. Concentrations of BHQ in excess of those that caused maximal changes in [Ca2+]i inhibited all modes of stimulated enzyme secretion by a mechanism that was apparently unrelated to changes in [Ca2+]i. Finally, in contrast to the findings with TG and BHQ, CPA inhibited bombesin-stimulated enzyme secretion over a range of concentrations that was at least 10-fold lower than the range of concentrations over which CPA potentiated VIP-stimulated enzyme secretion.

  17. Slow oscillating transcranial direct current stimulation during non-rapid eye movement sleep improves behavioral inhibition in attention-deficit/ hyperactivity disorder

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    Manuel Tobias Munz

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Behavioral inhibition, which is a later-developing executive function (EF and anatomically located in prefrontal areas, is impaired in attention-deficit and hyperactivity disorder (ADHD. While optimal EFs have been shown to depend on efficient sleep in healthy subjects, the impact of sleep problems, frequently reported in ADHD, remains elusive. Findings of macroscopic sleep changes in ADHD are inconsistent, but there is emerging evidence for distinct microscopic changes with a focus on prefrontal cortical regions and non-rapid eye movement (non-REM slow-wave sleep. Recently, slow oscillations (SO during non-REM sleep were found to be less functional and, as such, may be involved in sleep-dependent memory impairments in ADHD. Objective: By augmenting slow-wave power through bilateral, slow oscillating transcranial direct current stimulation (so-tDCS, frequency = 0.75 Hz during non-REM sleep, we aimed to improve daytime behavioral inhibition in children with ADHD. Methods: 14 boys (10-14 yrs diagnosed with ADHD were included. In a randomized, double-blind, cross-over design, patients received so-tDCS either in the first or in the second experimental sleep night. Inhibition control was assessed with a visuomotor go/no-go task. Intrinsic alertness was assessed with a simple stimulus response task. To control for visuomotor performance, motor memory was assessed with a finger sequence tapping task. Results: SO-power was enhanced during early non-REM sleep, accompanied by slowed reaction times and decreased standard deviations of reaction times, in the go/no-go task after so-tDCS. In contrast, intrinsic alertness and motor memory performance were not improved by so-tDCS. Conclusion: Since behavioral inhibition but not intrinsic alertness or motor memory was improved by so-tDCS, our results suggest that lateral prefrontal slow oscillations during sleep might play a specific role for executive functioning in ADHD.

  18. Epac is required for exogenous and endogenous stimulation of adenosine A2B receptor for inhibition of angiotensin II-induced collagen synthesis and myofibroblast differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phosri, Sarawuth; Bunrukchai, Kwanchai; Parichatikanond, Warisara; Sato, Vilasinee H; Mangmool, Supachoke

    2018-01-10

    Angiotensin II (Ang II) plays an important role on the pathogenesis of cardiac fibrosis. Prolong and overstimulation of angiotensin II type 1 receptor with Ang II-induced collagen synthesis and myofibroblast differentiation in cardiac fibroblasts, leading to cardiac fibrosis. Although adenosine and its analogues are known to have cardioprotective effects, the mechanistic by which adenosine A 2 receptors (A 2 Rs) inhibit Ang II-induced cardiac fibrosis is not clearly understood. In the present study, we examined the effects of exogenous adenosine and endogenous adenosine on Ang II-induced collagen and myofibroblast differentiation determined by α-smooth muscle action (α-SMA) overexpression and their underlying signal transduction. Elevation of endogenous adenosine levels resulted in the inhibition of Ang II-induced collagen type I and III and α-SMA synthesis in cardiac fibroblasts. Moreover, treatment with exogenous adenosine which selectively stimulated A 2 Rs also suppressed Ang II-induced collagen synthesis and α-SMA production. These antifibrotic effects of both endogenous and exogenous adenosines are mediated through the A 2B receptor (A 2B R) subtype. Stimulation of A 2B R exhibited antifibrotic effects via the cAMP-dependent and Epac-dependent pathways. Our results provide new mechanistic insights regarding the role for cAMP and Epac on A 2B R-mediated antifibrotic effects. Thus, A 2B R is one of the potential therapeutic targets against cardiac fibrosis.

  19. Andrographolide inhibits nuclear factor-κB activation through JNK-Akt-p65 signaling cascade in tumor necrosis factor-α-stimulated vascular smooth muscle cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yu-Ying; Hsu, Ming-Jen; Hsieh, Cheng-Ying; Lee, Lin-Wen; Chen, Zhih-Cherng; Sheu, Joen-Rong

    2014-01-01

    Critical vascular inflammation leads to vascular dysfunction and cardiovascular diseases, including abdominal aortic aneurysms, hypertension, and atherosclerosis. Andrographolide is the most active and critical constituent isolated from the leaves of Andrographis paniculata, a herbal medicine widely used for treating anti-inflammation in Asia. In this study, we investigated the mechanisms of the inhibitory effects of andrographolide in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) exposed to a proinflammatory stimulus, tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α). Treating TNF-α-stimulated VSMCs with andrographolide suppressed the expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase in a concentration-dependent manner. A reduction in TNF-α-induced c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), Akt, and p65 phosphorylation was observed in andrographolide-treated VSMCs. However, andrographolide affected neither IκBα degradation nor p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase or extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 phosphorylation under these conditions. Both treatment with LY294002, a phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/Akt inhibitor, and treatment with SP600125, a JNK inhibitor, markedly reversed the andrographolide-mediated inhibition of p65 phosphorylation. In addition, LY294002 and SP600125 both diminished Akt phosphorylation, whereas LY294002 had no effects on JNK phosphorylation. These results collectively suggest that therapeutic interventions using andrographolide can benefit the treatment of vascular inflammatory diseases, and andrographolide-mediated inhibition of NF-κB activity in TNF-α-stimulated VSMCs occurs through the JNK-Akt-p65 signaling cascade, an IκBα-independent mechanism.

  20. Andrographolide Inhibits Nuclear Factor-κB Activation through JNK-Akt-p65 Signaling Cascade in Tumor Necrosis Factor-α-Stimulated Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Ying Chen

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Critical vascular inflammation leads to vascular dysfunction and cardiovascular diseases, including abdominal aortic aneurysms, hypertension, and atherosclerosis. Andrographolide is the most active and critical constituent isolated from the leaves of Andrographis paniculata, a herbal medicine widely used for treating anti-inflammation in Asia. In this study, we investigated the mechanisms of the inhibitory effects of andrographolide in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs exposed to a proinflammatory stimulus, tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α. Treating TNF-α-stimulated VSMCs with andrographolide suppressed the expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase in a concentration-dependent manner. A reduction in TNF-α-induced c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK, Akt, and p65 phosphorylation was observed in andrographolide-treated VSMCs. However, andrographolide affected neither IκBα degradation nor p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase or extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 phosphorylation under these conditions. Both treatment with LY294002, a phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/Akt inhibitor, and treatment with SP600125, a JNK inhibitor, markedly reversed the andrographolide-mediated inhibition of p65 phosphorylation. In addition, LY294002 and SP600125 both diminished Akt phosphorylation, whereas LY294002 had no effects on JNK phosphorylation. These results collectively suggest that therapeutic interventions using andrographolide can benefit the treatment of vascular inflammatory diseases, and andrographolide-mediated inhibition of NF-κB activity in TNF-α-stimulated VSMCs occurs through the JNK-Akt-p65 signaling cascade, an IκBα-independent mechanism.

  1. The effects of transcranial direct current stimulation on short-interval intracortical inhibition and intracortical facilitation: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biabani, Mana; Aminitehrani, Maryam; Zoghi, Maryam; Farrell, Michael; Egan, Gary; Jaberzadeh, Shapour

    2018-01-26

    Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) is increasingly being used to affect the neurological conditions with deficient intracortical synaptic activities (i.e. Parkinson's disease and epilepsy). In addition, it is suggested that the lasting effects of tDCS on corticospinal excitability (CSE) have intracortical origin. This systematic review and meta-analysis aimed to examine whether tDCS has any effect on intracortical circuits. Eleven electronic databases were searched for the studies investigating intracortical changes induced by anodal (a) and cathodal (c) tDCS, in healthy individuals, using two paired-pulse transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) paradigms: short-interval intracortical inhibition (SICI) and intracortical facilitation (ICF). Additionally, motor-evoked potential (MEP) size alterations, assessed by single-pulse TMS, were extracted from these studies to investigate the probable intracortical origin of tDCS effects on CSE. The methodological quality of included studies was examined using Physiotherapy Evidence Database (PEDro) and Downs and Black's (D&B) assessment tools. Thirteen research papers, including 24 experiments, were included in this study scoring good and medium quality in PEDro and D&B scales, respectively. Immediately following anodal tDCS (a-tDCS) applications, we found significant decreases in SICI, but increases in ICF and MEP size. However, ICF and MEP size significantly decreased, and SICI increased immediately following cathodal tDCS (c-tDCS). The results of this systematic review and meta-analysis reveal that a-tDCS changes intracortical activities (SICI and ICF) toward facilitation, whereas c-tDCS alters them toward inhibition. It can also be concluded that increases and decreases in CSE after tDCS application are associated with corresponding changes in intracortical activities. The results suggest that tDCS can be clinically useful to modulate intracortical circuits.

  2. Rapid-rate paired associative stimulation over the primary somatosensory cortex.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philemon Tsang

    Full Text Available Rapid-rate paired associative stimulation (rPAS involves repeat pairing of peripheral nerve stimulation and Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS pulses at a 5 Hz frequency. RPAS over primary motor cortex (M1 operates with spike-timing dependent plasticity such that increases in corticospinal excitability occur when the nerve and TMS pulse temporally coincide in cortex. The present study investigates the effects of rPAS over primary somatosensory cortex (SI which has not been performed to date. In a series of experiments, rPAS was delivered over SI and M1 at varying timing intervals between the nerve and TMS pulse based on the latency of the N20 somatosensory evoked potential (SEP component within each participant (intervals for SI-rPAS: N20, N20-2.5 ms, N20 + 2.5 ms, intervals for M1-rPAS: N20, N20+5 ms. Changes in SI physiology were measured via SEPs (N20, P25, N20-P25 and SEP paired-pulse inhibition, and changes in M1 physiology were measured with motor evoked potentials and short-latency afferent inhibition. Measures were obtained before rPAS and at 5, 25 and 45 minutes following stimulation. Results indicate that paired-pulse inhibition and short-latency afferent inhibition were reduced only when the SI-rPAS nerve-TMS timing interval was set to N20-2.5 ms. SI-rPAS over SI also led to remote effects on motor physiology over a wider range of nerve-TMS intervals (N20-2.5 ms - N20+2.5 ms during which motor evoked potentials were increased. M1-rPAS increased motor evoked potentials and reduced short-latency afferent inhibition as previously reported. These data provide evidence that, similar to M1, rPAS over SI is spike-timing dependent and is capable of exerting changes in SI and M1 physiology.

  3. Inhibition of Pain and Pain-Related Brain Activity by Heterotopic Noxious Counter-Stimulation and Selective Attention in Chronic Non-Specific Low Back Pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ladouceur, Alexandra; Rustamov, Nabi; Dubois, Jean-Daniel; Tessier, Jessica; Lehmann, Alexandre; Descarreaux, Martin; Rainville, Pierre; Piché, Mathieu

    2017-10-10

    The aim of the present study was to assess inhibition of pain and somatosensory-evoked potentials (SEPs) by heterotopic noxious counter-stimulation (HNCS) and by selective attention in patients with chronic non-specific LBP. Seventeen patients and age/sex-matched controls were recruited (10 men, 7 women; mean age ± SD: 43.3 ± 10.4 and 42.7 ± 11.1, respectively). On average, patients with LBP reported pain duration of 7.6 ± 6.5 years, light to moderate disability (19.3 ± 5.7/100) and low clinical pain intensity (21.8 ± 1.5/100), while pain catastrophizing, state and trait anxiety and depressive symptoms were not significantly different between groups (all p's >0.05). HNCS and selective attention had differential inhibitory effects on pain and SEP, but no difference was observed between groups. Across both groups, HNCS decreased pain (p = 0.06) as well as the N100 and the N150 components of SEP (p's selective attention only decreased pain (p attention was directed toward the HNCS stimulus (pselective attention. Importantly, this experiment was carefully designed to control for non-specific effects associated with the repetition of the test stimulus and the effect of an innocuous counter-stimulation. It remains to be determined if these results hold for patients with severe LBP and psychological symptoms or whether symptom severity may be associated with pain inhibition deficits. Copyright © 2017 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Transient inhibition and long-term facilitation of locomotion by phasic optogenetic activation of serotonin neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Correia, Patrícia A; Lottem, Eran; Banerjee, Dhruba; Machado, Ana S; Carey, Megan R; Mainen, Zachary F

    2017-01-01

    Serotonin (5-HT) is associated with mood and motivation but the function of endogenous 5-HT remains controversial. Here, we studied the impact of phasic optogenetic activation of 5-HT neurons in mice over time scales from seconds to weeks. We found that activating dorsal raphe nucleus (DRN) 5-HT neurons induced a strong suppression of spontaneous locomotor behavior in the open field with rapid kinetics (onset ≤1 s). Inhibition of locomotion was independent of measures of anxiety or motor impairment and could be overcome by strong motivational drive. Repetitive place-contingent pairing of activation caused neither place preference nor aversion. However, repeated 15 min daily stimulation caused a persistent increase in spontaneous locomotion to emerge over three weeks. These results show that 5-HT transients have strong and opposing short and long-term effects on motor behavior that appear to arise from effects on the underlying factors that motivate actions. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.20975.001 PMID:28193320

  5. Brief Report: Blockade of TANK-Binding Kinase 1/IKKɛ Inhibits Mutant Stimulator of Interferon Genes (STING)-Mediated Inflammatory Responses in Human Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frémond, Marie-Louise; Uggenti, Carolina; Van Eyck, Lien; Melki, Isabelle; Bondet, Vincent; Kitabayashi, Naoki; Hertel, Christina; Hayday, Adrian; Neven, Bénédicte; Rose, Yoann; Duffy, Darragh; Crow, Yanick J; Rodero, Mathieu P

    2017-07-01

    Gain-of-function mutations in TMEM173, encoding the stimulator of interferon (IFN) genes (STING) protein, underlie a novel type I interferonopathy that is minimally responsive to conventional immunosuppressive therapies and associated with high frequency of childhood morbidity and mortality. STING gain-of-function causes constitutive oversecretion of IFN. This study was undertaken to determine the effects of a TANK-binding kinase 1 (TBK-1)/IKKɛ inhibitor (BX795) on secretion and signaling of IFN in primary peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from patients with mutations in STING. PBMCs from 4 patients with STING-associated disease were treated with BX795. The effect of BX795 on IFN pathways was assessed by Western blotting and an IFNβ reporter assay, as well as by quantification of IFNα in cell lysates, staining for STAT-1 phosphorylation, and measurement of IFN-stimulated gene (ISG) messenger RNA (mRNA) expression. Treatment of PBMCs with BX795 inhibited the phosphorylation of IFN regulatory factor 3 and IFNβ promoter activity induced in HEK 293T cells by cyclic GMP-AMP or by genetic activation of STING. In vitro exposure to BX795 inhibited IFNα production in PBMCs of patients with STING-associated disease without affecting cell survival. In addition, BX795 decreased STAT-1 phosphorylation and ISG mRNA expression independent of IFNα blockade. These findings demonstrate the effect of BX795 on reducing type I IFN production and IFN signaling in cells from patients with gain-of-function mutations in STING. A combined inhibition of TBK-1 and IKKɛ therefore holds potential for the treatment of patients carrying STING mutations, and may also be relevant in other type I interferonopathies. © 2017, American College of Rheumatology.

  6. Partially non-linear stimulation intensity-dependent effects of direct current stimulation on motor cortex excitability in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batsikadze, G; Moliadze, V; Paulus, W; Kuo, M-F; Nitsche, M A

    2013-04-01

    Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) of the human motor cortex at an intensity of 1 mA with an electrode size of 35 cm(2) has been shown to induce shifts of cortical excitability during and after stimulation. These shifts are polarity-specific with cathodal tDCS resulting in a decrease and anodal stimulation in an increase of cortical excitability. In clinical and cognitive studies, stronger stimulation intensities are used frequently, but their physiological effects on cortical excitability have not yet been explored. Therefore, here we aimed to explore the effects of 2 mA tDCS on cortical excitability. We applied 2 mA anodal or cathodal tDCS for 20 min on the left primary motor cortex of 14 healthy subjects. Cathodal tDCS at 1 mA and sham tDCS for 20 min was administered as control session in nine and eight healthy subjects, respectively. Motor cortical excitability was monitored by transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS)-elicited motor-evoked potentials (MEPs) from the right first dorsal interosseous muscle. Global corticospinal excitability was explored via single TMS pulse-elicited MEP amplitudes, and motor thresholds. Intracortical effects of stimulation were obtained by cortical silent period (CSP), short latency intracortical inhibition (SICI) and facilitation (ICF), and I wave facilitation. The above-mentioned protocols were recorded both before and immediately after tDCS in randomized order. Additionally, single-pulse MEPs, motor thresholds, SICI and ICF were recorded every 30 min up to 2 h after stimulation end, evening of the same day, next morning, next noon and next evening. Anodal as well as cathodal tDCS at 2 mA resulted in a significant increase of MEP amplitudes, whereas 1 mA cathodal tDCS decreased corticospinal excitability. A significant shift of SICI and ICF towards excitability enhancement after both 2 mA cathodal and anodal tDCS was observed. At 1 mA, cathodal tDCS reduced single-pulse TMS-elicited MEP amplitudes and shifted SICI

  7. Brain Stimulation and the Role of the Right Hemisphere in Aphasia Recovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turkeltaub, Peter E

    2015-11-01

    Aphasia is a common consequence of left hemisphere stroke and causes a disabling loss of language and communication ability. Current treatments for aphasia are inadequate, leaving a majority of aphasia sufferers with ongoing communication difficulties for the rest of their lives. In the past decade, two forms of noninvasive brain stimulation, repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation and transcranial direct current stimulation, have emerged as promising new treatments for aphasia. The most common brain stimulation protocols attempt to inhibit the intact right hemisphere based on the hypothesis that maladaptive activity in the right hemisphere limits language recovery in the left. There is now sufficient evidence to demonstrate that this approach, at least for repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation, improves specific language abilities in aphasia. However, the biological mechanisms that produce these behavioral improvements remain poorly understood. Taken in the context of the larger neurobiological literature on aphasia recovery, the role of the right hemisphere in aphasia recovery remains unclear. Additional research is needed to understand biological mechanisms of recovery, in order to optimize brain stimulation treatments for aphasia. This article summarizes the current evidence on noninvasive brain stimulation methods for aphasia and the neuroscientific considerations surrounding treatments using right hemisphere inhibition. Suggestions are provided for further investigation and for clinicians whose patients ask about brain stimulation treatments for aphasia.

  8. CTRP6 inhibits fibrogenesis in TGF-β1-stimulated human dermal fibroblasts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fan, Rong-hui, E-mail: fan_ronghuixa@163.com [Department of Burn and Plastic Surgery, Shaanxi Provincial People’s Hospital, Xi’an 710068 (China); Zhu, Xiu-mei; Sun, Yao-wen [Department of Burn and Plastic Surgery, Shaanxi Provincial People’s Hospital, Xi’an 710068 (China); Peng, Hui-zi [Department of Cosmetology Plastic Surgery, The First Affiliated Hospital of Xi’an Jiaotong University, Xi’an, Shaanxi 710061 (China); Wu, Hang-li; Gao, Wen-jie [Department of Burn and Plastic Surgery, Shaanxi Provincial People’s Hospital, Xi’an 710068 (China)

    2016-07-08

    Skin fibrosis is characterized by excessive proliferation of fibroblasts and overproduction of extracellular matrix (ECM). C1q/tumor necrosis factor-related protein 6 (CTRP6), a member of CTRPs, has been involved in the development of cardiac fibrosis. However, the function and detailed regulatory mechanism of CTRP6 in skin fibrosis remain unclear. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of CTRP6 on the activation of human dermal fibroblasts. Our results showed that CTRP6 was lowly expressed in scar tissues and transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1)-treated dermal fibroblasts. CTRP6 overexpression significantly inhibited the proliferation of dermal fibroblasts, as well as suppressed the expression of ECM in TGF-β1-treated dermal fibroblasts. Furthermore, CTRP6 overexpression markedly inhibited TGF-β1-induced phosphorylation of Smad3 in dermal fibroblasts. In conclusion, the data reported here demonstrate that CTRP6 is able to inhibit the proliferation and ECM expression in human dermal fibroblasts through suppressing the TGF-β1/Smad3 signaling pathway. These findings suggest that CTRP6 may be a potential therapeutic target for the prevention of skin fibrosis. -- Highlights: •CTRP6 expression was decreased in scar tissues and TGF-β1-treated dermal fibroblasts. •CTRP6 inhibits TGF-β1-induced the proliferation of dermal fibroblasts. •CTRP6 inhibits expression of collagen type I and α-SMA. •CTRP6 inhibits the activation of TGF-β1/Smad3 signaling pathway in dermal fibroblasts.

  9. CTRP6 inhibits fibrogenesis in TGF-β1-stimulated human dermal fibroblasts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fan, Rong-hui; Zhu, Xiu-mei; Sun, Yao-wen; Peng, Hui-zi; Wu, Hang-li; Gao, Wen-jie

    2016-01-01

    Skin fibrosis is characterized by excessive proliferation of fibroblasts and overproduction of extracellular matrix (ECM). C1q/tumor necrosis factor-related protein 6 (CTRP6), a member of CTRPs, has been involved in the development of cardiac fibrosis. However, the function and detailed regulatory mechanism of CTRP6 in skin fibrosis remain unclear. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of CTRP6 on the activation of human dermal fibroblasts. Our results showed that CTRP6 was lowly expressed in scar tissues and transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1)-treated dermal fibroblasts. CTRP6 overexpression significantly inhibited the proliferation of dermal fibroblasts, as well as suppressed the expression of ECM in TGF-β1-treated dermal fibroblasts. Furthermore, CTRP6 overexpression markedly inhibited TGF-β1-induced phosphorylation of Smad3 in dermal fibroblasts. In conclusion, the data reported here demonstrate that CTRP6 is able to inhibit the proliferation and ECM expression in human dermal fibroblasts through suppressing the TGF-β1/Smad3 signaling pathway. These findings suggest that CTRP6 may be a potential therapeutic target for the prevention of skin fibrosis. -- Highlights: •CTRP6 expression was decreased in scar tissues and TGF-β1-treated dermal fibroblasts. •CTRP6 inhibits TGF-β1-induced the proliferation of dermal fibroblasts. •CTRP6 inhibits expression of collagen type I and α-SMA. •CTRP6 inhibits the activation of TGF-β1/Smad3 signaling pathway in dermal fibroblasts.

  10. IL-12 Inhibits Lipopolysaccharide Stimulated Osteoclastogenesis in Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masako Yoshimatsu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Lipopolysaccharide (LPS is related to osteoclastogenesis in osteolytic diseases. Interleukin- (IL- 12 is an inflammatory cytokine that plays a critical role in host defense. In this study, we investigated the effects of IL-12 on LPS-induced osteoclastogenesis. LPS was administered with or without IL-12 into the supracalvariae of mice, and alterations in the calvarial suture were evaluated histochemically. The number of osteoclasts in the calvarial suture and the mRNA level of tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP, an osteoclast marker, were lower in mice administered LPS with IL-12 than in mice administered LPS alone. The serum level of tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase 5b (TRACP 5b, a bone resorption marker, was also lower in mice administered LPS with IL-12 than in mice administered LPS alone. These results revealed that IL-12 might inhibit LPS-induced osteoclastogenesis and bone resorption. In TdT-mediated dUTP-biotin nick end-labeling (TUNEL assays, apoptotic changes in cells were recognized in the calvarial suture in mice administered LPS with IL-12. Furthermore, the mRNA levels of both Fas and FasL were increased in mice administered LPS with IL-12. Taken together, the findings demonstrate that LPS-induced osteoclastogenesis is inhibited by IL-12 and that this might arise through apoptotic changes in osteoclastogenesis-related cells induced by Fas/FasL interactions.

  11. Alpha 1-adrenergic stimulation of phosphatidylinositol turnover and respiration of brown fat cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohell, N.; Wallace, M.; Fain, J.N.

    1984-01-01

    The alpha-adrenergic agonist phenylephrine (in the presence of the beta-adrenergic antagonist alprenolol) stimulated respiration and incorporation of [ 3 H]glycerol and [ 32 P] P/sub i/ into phosphatidylinositol of hamster brown fat cells in a concentration-dependent manner. Both responses were preferentially inhibited by prazosin as compared with yohimbine, indicating alpha 1 specificity. Uniquely, prazosin inhibition of phenylephrine-stimulated phosphatidylinositol metabolism had two components, since 30% of the response was inhibited by less than 1 nM prazosin, 10 nM gave no further inhibition, and 100 nM prazosin completely inhibited the response. The phosphatidylinositol response was still present in Ca 2 +-free buffer, although reduced in magnitude. The concentration relationships of the effects of agonists and antagonists were compared with those of previous results of [ 3 H]prazosin binding and with phenylephrine potency to compete for binding. On the basis of these comparisons, it is suggested that the highly prazosin-sensitive part of the phosphatidylinositol response may be closely associated with receptor occupation

  12. Pharmacological Inhibition of O-GlcNAcase Enhances Autophagy in Brain through an mTOR-Independent Pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Yanping; Shan, Xiaoyang; Safarpour, Farzaneh; Erro Go, Nancy; Li, Nancy; Shan, Alice; Huang, Mina C; Deen, Matthew; Holicek, Viktor; Ashmus, Roger; Madden, Zarina; Gorski, Sharon; Silverman, Michael A; Vocadlo, David J

    2018-03-05

    The glycosylation of nucleocytoplasmic proteins with O-linked N-acetylglucosamine residues (O-GlcNAc) is conserved among metazoans and is particularly abundant within brain. O-GlcNAc is involved in diverse cellular processes ranging from the regulation of gene expression to stress response. Moreover, O-GlcNAc is implicated in various diseases including cancers, diabetes, cardiac dysfunction, and neurodegenerative diseases. Pharmacological inhibition of O-GlcNAcase (OGA), the sole enzyme that removes O-GlcNAc, reproducibly slows neurodegeneration in various Alzheimer's disease (AD) mouse models manifesting either tau or amyloid pathology. These data have stimulated interest in the possibility of using OGA-selective inhibitors as pharmaceuticals to alter the progression of AD. The mechanisms mediating the neuroprotective effects of OGA inhibitors, however, remain poorly understood. Here we show, using a range of methods in neuroblastoma N2a cells, in primary rat neurons, and in mouse brain, that selective OGA inhibitors stimulate autophagy through an mTOR-independent pathway without obvious toxicity. Additionally, OGA inhibition significantly decreased the levels of toxic protein species associated with AD pathogenesis in the JNPL3 tauopathy mouse model as well as the 3×Tg-AD mouse model. These results strongly suggest that OGA inhibitors act within brain through a mechanism involving enhancement of autophagy, which aids the brain in combatting the accumulation of toxic protein species. Our study supports OGA inhibition being a feasible therapeutic strategy for hindering the progression of AD and other neurodegenerative diseases. Moreover, these data suggest more targeted strategies to stimulate autophagy in an mTOR-independent manner may be found within the O-GlcNAc pathway. These findings should aid the advancement of OGA inhibitors within the clinic.

  13. Transcranial alternating current stimulation (tACS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea eAntal

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Transcranial alternating current stimulation (tACS seems likely to open a new era of the field of noninvasive electrical stimulation of the human brain by directly interfering with cortical rhythms. It is expected to synchronize (by one single resonance frequency or desynchronize (e.g. by the application of several frequencies cortical oscillations. If applied long enough it may cause neuroplastic effects. In the theta range it may improve cognition when applied in phase. Alpha rhythms could improve motor performance, whereas beta intrusion may deteriorate them. TACS with both alpha and beta frequencies has a high likelihood to induce retinal phosphenes. Gamma intrusion can possibly interfere with attention. Stimulation in the ripple range induces intensity dependent inhibition or excitation in the motor cortex most likely by entrainment of neuronal networks, whereas stimulation in the low kHz range induces excitation by neuronal membrane interference. TACS in the 200 kHz range may have a potential in oncology.

  14. Total glucosides of paeony inhibits lipopolysaccharide-induced proliferation, migration and invasion in androgen insensitive prostate cancer cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhi-Hui Zhang

    Full Text Available Previous studies demonstrated that inflammatory microenvironment promoted prostate cancer progression. This study investigated whether total glucosides of paeony (TGP, the active constituents extracted from the root of Paeonia Lactiflora Pall, suppressed lipopolysaccharide (LPS-stimulated proliferation, migration and invasion in androgen insensitive prostate cancer cells. PC-3 cells were incubated with LPS (2.0 μg/mL in the absence or presence of TGP (312.5 μg /mL. As expected, cells at S phase and nuclear CyclinD1, the markers of cell proliferation, were increased in LPS-stimulated PC-3 cells. Migration activity, as determined by wound-healing assay and transwell migration assay, and invasion activity, as determined by transwell invasion assay, were elevated in LPS-stimulated PC-3 cells. Interestingly, TGP suppressed LPS-stimulated PC-3 cells proliferation. Moreover, TGP inhibited LPS-stimulated migration and invasion of PC-3 cells. Additional experiment showed that TGP inhibited activation of nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK/p38 in LPS-stimulated PC-3 cells. Correspondingly, TGP attenuated upregulation of interleukin (IL-6 and IL-8 in LPS-stimulated PC-3 cells. In addition, TGP inhibited nuclear translocation of signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3 in LPS-stimulated PC-3 cells. These results suggest that TGP inhibits inflammation-associated STAT3 activation and proliferation, migration and invasion in androgen insensitive prostate cancer cells.

  15. [gammadelta T cells stimulated by zoledronate kill osteosarcoma cells].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Hui; Xu, Qiang; Yang, Chao; Cao, Zhen-Guo; Li, Zhao-Xu; Ye, Zhao-Ming

    2010-12-01

    To investigate the cytotoxicity of human γδT cells from PBMCs stimulated by zoledronate against osteosarcoma cell line HOS in vitro and in vivo and evaluate the relavent pathways. The peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs)of healthy donors were stimulated by single dose zoledronate and cultured in the present of IL-2 for two weeks, analysising the percentage of γδT cells on a FACSCalibur cytometer.Study the cytotoxicity of γδT cells against the osteosarcoma line HOS using LDH release assay kit. Pre-treatment of γδT cells with anti-human γδTCR antibody, anti-human NKG2D antibody and concanamycin A to bolck the relavent pathways for evaluating the mechenisms of its cytotoxicity. In vivo, BALB/c mice were inoculated subcutaneously osteosarcoma cell HOS for developing hypodermal tumors. And they were randomized into two groups: unteated group, γδT cell therapy group. Tumor volume and weight of the two groups were compared. After two weeks of culture, γδT cells from zoledronate-stimulated PBMCs could reach (95±3)%. When the E:T as 6:1, 12:1, 25:1, 50:1, the percentage of osteosarcoma cell HOS killed by γδT cells was 26.8%, 31.5%, 37.8%, 40.9%, respectively.When anti-huma γδTCR antibody, anti-human NKG2D antibody and concanamycin A blocked the relavent pathways, the percentage was 32.3%, 4.7%, 16.7% ( E:T as 25:1), respectively. In vivo, the tumor inhibition rate of the group of γδT cell therapy was 42.78%. γδT cells derived from PBMCs stimulated by zoledronate can acquired pure γδT cells. And they show strong cytoxicity against osteosarcoma cell line HOS in vitro and in vivo.

  16. Tyrosine phosphorylation of Jak2 in the JH2 domain inhibits cytokine signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feener, Edward P; Rosario, Felicia; Dunn, Sarah L; Stancheva, Zlatina; Myers, Martin G

    2004-06-01

    Jak family tyrosine kinases mediate signaling by cytokine receptors to regulate diverse biological processes. Although Jak2 and other Jak kinase family members are phosphorylated on numerous sites during cytokine signaling, the identity and function of most of these sites remains unknown. Using tandem mass spectroscopic analysis of activated Jak2 protein from intact cells, we identified Tyr(221) and Tyr(570) as novel sites of Jak2 phosphorylation. Phosphorylation of both sites was stimulated by cytokine treatment of cultured cells, and this stimulation required Jak2 kinase activity. While we observed no gross alteration of signaling upon mutation of Tyr(221), Tyr(570) lies within the inhibitory JH2 domain of Jak2, and mutation of this site (Jak2(Y570F)) results in constitutive Jak2-dependent signaling in the absence of cytokine stimulation and enhances and prolongs Jak2 activation during cytokine stimulation. Mutation of Tyr(570) does not alter the ability of SOCS3 to bind or inhibit Jak2, however. Thus, the phosphorylation of Tyr(570) in vivo inhibits Jak2-dependent signaling independently of SOCS3-mediated inhibition. This Tyr(570)-dependent mechanism of Jak2 inhibition likely represents an important mechanism by which cytokine function is regulated.

  17. Transcutaneous Electrical Nerve Stimulation (TENS) reduces pain, fatigue, and hyperalgesia while restoring central inhibition in primary fibromyalgia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dailey, Dana L; Rakel, Barbara A; Vance, Carol GT; Liebano, Richard E; Anand, Amrit S; Bush, Heather M; Lee, Kyoung S; Lee, Jennifer E; Sluka, Kathleen A

    2014-01-01

    Because TENS works by reducing central excitability and activating central inhibition pathways, we tested the hypothesis that TENS would reduce pain and fatigue and improve function and hyperalgesia in people with fibromyalgia who have enhanced central excitability and reduced inhibition. The current study used a double-blinded randomized, placebo controlled cross-over design to test effects of a single treatment of TENS in people with fibromyalgia. Three treatments were assessed in random order: active TENS, placebo TENS, no TENS. The following measures were assessed before and after each TENS treatment: pain and fatigue at rest and movement, pressure pain thresholds (PPTs), 6 minute walk test (6MWT), range of motion (ROM), five time sit to stand test (FTSTS), and single leg stance (SLS). Conditioned pain modulation (CPM) was completed at end of testing. There was a significant decrease in pain and fatigue with movement for active TENS compared to placebo and no TENS. PPTs increased at site of TENS (spine) and outside site of TENS (leg) when compared to placebo TENS or no TENS. During Active TENS CPM was significantly stronger compared to placebo TENS and no TENS. No changes in functional tasks were observed with TENS. Thus, the current study suggests TENS has short-term efficacy in relieving symptoms of fibromyalgia while the stimulator is active. Future clinical trials should examine the effects of repeated daily delivery of TENS, similar to how TENS is used clinically, on pain, fatigue, function and quality of life in individuals with fibromyalgia. PMID:23900134

  18. Depolarization-stimulated 42K+ efflux in rat aorta is calcium- and cellular volume-dependent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magliola, L.; Jones, A.W.

    1987-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the factors controlling membrane permeability to potassium of smooth muscle cells from rat aorta stimulated by depolarization. The increase 42 K+ efflux (change in the rate constant) induced by depolarization (application of high concentrations of potassium chloride) was inhibited significantly by the calcium antagonists diltiazem and nisoldipine. Parallel inhibitory effects on contraction were observed. Diltiazem also inhibited potassium-stimulated 36 Cl- efflux. The addition of 25-150 mM KCl to normal physiologic solution stimulated 42 K+ efflux in a concentration-dependent manner. Diltiazem suppressed potassium-stimulated 42 K+ efflux approximately 90% at 25 mM KCl and approximately 40% at 150 mM KCl. The ability of nisoldipine to inhibit 42 K+ efflux also diminished as the potassium chloride concentration was elevated. The component of efflux that was resistant to calcium antagonists probably resulted from a decrease in the electrochemical gradient for potassium. Cellular water did not change during potassium addition. Substitution of 80 and 150 mM KCl for sodium chloride produced cellular swelling and enhanced potassium-stimulated 42 K+ efflux compared with potassium chloride addition. The addition of sucrose to prevent cellular swelling reduced efflux response to potassium substitution toward that of potassium addition. A hypoosmolar physiologic solution produced an increase in the 42 K+ efflux and a contracture that were both prevented by the addition of sucrose. We concluded that the depolarization-mediated 42 K+ efflux has three components: one is calcium dependent; a second is dependent on cellular volume; and a third is resistant to inhibition by calcium antagonists

  19. α-Iso-cubebene exerts neuroprotective effects in amyloid beta stimulated microglia activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Sun Young; Park, Se Jin; Park, Nan Jeong; Joo, Woo Hong; Lee, Sang-Joon; Choi, Young-Whan

    2013-10-25

    Schisandra chinensis is commonly used for food and as a traditional remedy for the treatment of neuronal disorders. However, it is unclear which component of S. chinensis is responsible for its neuropharmacological effects. To answer this question, we isolated α-iso-cubebene, a dibenzocyclooctadiene lignin, from S. chinensis and determined if it has any anti-neuroinflammatory and neuroprotective properties against amyloid β-induced neuroinflammation in microglia. Microglia that are stimulated by amyloid β increased their production of pro-inflammatory cytokines and chemokines, prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), nitric oxide (NO) and reactive oxygen species (ROS) and the enzymatic activity of matrix metalloproteinase 9 (MMP-9). We found this was all inhibited by α-iso-cubebene. Consistent with these results, α-iso-cubebene inhibited the expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), cyclooxygenase 2 (COX-2) and MMP-9 in amyloid β-stimulated microglia. Subsequent mechanistic studies revealed that α-iso-cubebene inhibited the phosphorylation and degradation of IκB-α, the phosphorylation and transactivity of NF-κB, and the phosphorylation of MAPK in amyloid β-stimulated microglia. These results suggest that α-iso-cubebene impairs the amyloid β-induced neuroinflammatory response of microglia by inhibiting the NF-κB and MAPK signaling pathways. Importantly, α-iso-cubebene can provide critical neuroprotection for primary cortical neurons against amyloid β-stimulated microglia-mediated neurotoxicity. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report showing that α-iso-cubebene can provide neuroprotection against, and influence neuroinflammation triggered by, amyloid β activation of microglia. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Attention to Intentions--How to Stimulate Strong Intentions to Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dam, M.; Janssen, F. J. J. M.; van Driel, J. H.

    2018-01-01

    The implementation of educational reforms requires behavioral changes from the teachers involved. Theories on successful behavioral change prescribe the following conditions: teachers need to possess the necessary knowledge and skills, form strong positive intentions to perform the new behavior, and have a supporting environment for change.…

  1. Shifting from constant-voltage to constant-current in Parkinson's disease patients with chronic stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amami, P; Mascia, M M; Franzini, A; Saba, F; Albanese, A

    2017-08-01

    The study aimed to evaluate safety and efficacy of shifting stimulation settings from constant-voltage (CV) to constant-current (CC) programming in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) and chronic subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation (STN DBS). Twenty PD patients with chronic STN DBS set in CV programming were shifted to CC and followed for 3 months; the other stimulation settings and the medication regimen remained unchanged. Side effects, motor, non-motor, executive functions, and impedance were assessed at baseline and during follow-up. No adverse events were observed at time of shifting or during CC stimulation. Motor and non-motor measures remained unchanged at follow-up despite impedance decreased. Compared to baseline, inhibition processes improved at follow-up. The shifting strategy was well tolerated and the clinical outcome was maintained with no need to adjust stimulation settings or medications notwithstanding a decrease of impedance. Improvement of inhibition processes is a finding which needed further investigation.

  2. The Effects of Kaempferol-Inhibited Autophagy on Osteoclast Formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Chang-Ju; Shin, Sang-Hun; Kim, Bok-Joo; Kim, Chul-Hoon; Kim, Jung-Han; Kang, Hae-Mi; Park, Bong-Soo; Kim, In-Ryoung

    2018-01-02

    Kaempferol, a flavonoid compound, is derived from the rhizome of Kaempferia galanga L ., which is used in traditional medicine in Asia. Autophagy has pleiotropic functions that are involved in cell growth, survival, nutrient supply under starvation, defense against pathogens, and antigen presentation. There are many studies dealing with the inhibitory effects of natural flavonoids in bone resorption. However, no studies have explained the relationship between the autophagic and inhibitory processes of osteoclastogenesis by natural flavonoids. The present study was undertaken to investigate the inhibitory effects of osteoclastogenesis through the autophagy inhibition process stimulated by kaempferol in murin macrophage (RAW 264.7) cells. The cytotoxic effect of Kaempferol was investigated by MTT assay. The osteoclast differentiation and autophagic process were confirmed via tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP) staining, pit formation assay, western blot, and real-time PCR. Kaempferol controlled the expression of autophagy-related factors and in particular, it strongly inhibited the expression of p62/SQSTM1. In the western blot and real time-PCR analysis, when autophagy was suppressed with the application of 3-Methyladenine (3-MA) only, osteoclast and apoptosis related factors were not significantly affected. However, we found that after cells were treated with kaempferol, these factors inhibited autophagy and activated apoptosis. Therefore, we presume that kaempferol-inhibited autophagy activated apoptosis by degradation of p62/SQSTM1. Further study of the p62/SQSTM1 gene as a target in the autophagy mechanism, may help to delineate the potential role of kaempferol in the treatment of bone metabolism disorders.

  3. Modulation of motor cortex excitability by paired peripheral and transcranial magnetic stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumru, Hatice; Albu, Sergiu; Rothwell, John; Leon, Daniel; Flores, Cecilia; Opisso, Eloy; Tormos, Josep Maria; Valls-Sole, Josep

    2017-10-01

    Repetitive application of peripheral electrical stimuli paired with transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) of M1 cortex at low frequency, known as paired associative stimulation (PAS), is an effective method to induce motor cortex plasticity in humans. Here we investigated the effects of repetitive peripheral magnetic stimulation (rPMS) combined with low frequency rTMS ('magnetic-PAS') on intracortical and corticospinal excitability and whether those changes were widespread or circumscribed to the cortical area controlling the stimulated muscle. Eleven healthy subjects underwent three 10min stimulation sessions: 10HzrPMS alone, applied in trains of 5 stimuli every 10s (60 trains) on the extensor carpi radialis (ECR) muscle; rTMS alone at an intensity 120% of ECR threshold, applied over motor cortex of ECR and at a frequency of 0.1Hz (60 stimuli) and magnetic PAS, i.e., paired rPMS and rTMS. We recorded motor evoked potentials (MEPs) from ECR and first dorsal interosseous (FDI) muscles. We measured resting motor threshold, motor evoked potentials (MEP) amplitude at 120% of RMT, short intracortical inhibition (SICI) at interstimulus interval (ISI) of 2ms and intracortical facilitation (ICF) at an ISI of 15ms before and immediately after each intervention. Magnetic-PAS , but not rTMS or rPMS applied separately, increased MEP amplitude and reduced short intracortical inhibition in ECR but not in FDI muscle. Magnetic-PAS can increase corticospinal excitability and reduce intracortical inhibition. The effects may be specific for the area of cortical representation of the stimulated muscle. Application of magnetic-PAS might be relevant for motor rehabilitation. Copyright © 2017 International Federation of Clinical Neurophysiology. All rights reserved.

  4. Design, synthesis, and structure-activity relationship study of halogen containing 2-benzylidene-1-indanone derivatives for inhibition of LPS-stimulated ROS production in RAW 264.7 macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrestha, Aarajana; Jin Oh, Hye; Kim, Mi Jin; Pun, Nirmala Tilija; Magar, Til Bahadur Thapa; Bist, Ganesh; Choi, Hongseok; Park, Pil-Hoon; Lee, Eung-Seok

    2017-06-16

    As a continuous effort to discover new potential anti-inflammatory agents, we systematically designed and synthesized sixty-one 2-benzylidene-1-indanone derivatives with structural modification of chalcone, and evaluated their inhibitory activity on LPS-stimulated ROS production in RAW 264.7 macrophages. Systematic structure-activity relationship study revealed that hydroxyl group in C-5, C-6, or C-7 position of indanone moiety, and ortho-, meta-, or para-fluorine, trifluoromethyl, trifluoromethoxy, and bromine functionalities in phenyl ring are important for inhibition of ROS production in LPS-stimulated RAW 264.7 macrophages. Among all the tested compounds, 6-hydroxy-2-(2-(trifluoromethoxy) benzylidene)-2,3-dihydro-1H-inden-1-one (compound 44) showed the strongest inhibitory activity of ROS production. Further studies on the mode of action revealed that compound 44 potently suppressed LPS-stimulated ROS production via modulation of NADPH oxidase. The findings of this work could be useful to design 2-benzylidene-indanone based lead compounds as novel anti-inflammatory agents. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  5. cAMP Stimulates Transepithelial Short-Circuit Current and Fluid Transport Across Porcine Ciliary Epithelium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Angela King-Wah; Civan, Mortimer M; To, Chi-Ho; Do, Chi-Wai

    2016-12-01

    To investigate the effects of cAMP on transepithelial electrical parameters and fluid transport across porcine ciliary epithelium. Transepithelial electrical parameters were determined by mounting freshly isolated porcine ciliary epithelium in a modified Ussing chamber. Similarly, fluid movement across intact ciliary body was measured with a custom-made fluid flow chamber. Addition of 1, 10, and 100 μM 8-Br-cAMP (cAMP) to the aqueous side (nonpigmented ciliary epithelium, NPE) induced a sustained increase in short-circuit current (Isc). Addition of niflumic acid (NFA) to the aqueous surface effectively blocked the cAMP-induced Isc stimulation. The administration of cAMP to the stromal side (pigmented ciliary epithelium, PE) triggered a significant stimulation of Isc only at 100 μM. No additive effect was observed with bilateral application of cAMP. Likewise, forskolin caused a significant stimulation of Isc when applied to the aqueous side. Concomitantly, cAMP and forskolin increased fluid transport across porcine ciliary epithelium, and this stimulation was effectively inhibited by aqueous NFA. Depleting Cl- in the bathing solution abolished the baseline Isc and inhibited the subsequent stimulation by cAMP. Pretreatment with protein kinase A (PKA) blockers (H89/KT5720) significantly inhibited the cAMP- and forskolin-induced Isc responses. Our results suggest that cAMP triggers a sustained stimulation of Cl- and fluid transport across porcine ciliary epithelium; Cl- channels in the NPE cells are potentially a cellular site for this PKA-sensitive cAMP-mediated response.

  6. Transcranial direct-current stimulation as treatment in epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gschwind, Markus; Seeck, Margitta

    2016-12-01

    Neuromodulation (NM) is a complementary therapy for patients with drug-resistant epilepsy. Vagal nerve stimulation and deep brain stimulation of the anterior thalamus are established techniques and have shown their efficacy in lowering seizure frequency, but they are invasive and rarely render patients seizure-free. Non-invasive NM techniques are therefore increasingly investigated in a clinical context. Areas covered: Current knowledge about transcranial direct-current stimulation (tDCS) and other non-invasive NM in patients with epilepsy, based on the available animal and clinical studies from PubMed search. Expert commentary: tDCS modulates neuronal membrane potentials, and consequently alters cortical excitability. Cathodal stimulation leads to cortical inhibition, which is of particular importance in epilepsy treatment. The antiepileptic efficacy is promising but still lacks systematic studies. The beneficial effect, seen in ~20%, outlasts the duration of stimulation, indicating neuronal plasticity and is therefore of great interest to obtain long-term effects.

  7. Stimulation of Escherichia coli DNA photoreactivating enzyme activity by adenosine 5'-triphosphate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koka, P.

    1984-01-01

    A purification procedure consisting of Biorex-70, single-stranded DNA-agarose, and ultraviolet (UV) light irradiated DNA-cellulose chromatography has been adopted for the Escherichia coli photoreactivating enzyme, to obtain enzyme preparations that are free of extraneous nucleic acid or nucleotides. The purification yields high specific activities (75 000 pmol h -1 mg -1 ) with a 50% recovery. Enzyme preparations have also been obtained from UV-irradiated DNA-cellulose by exposure to visible light. These enzyme preparations contain oligoribonucleotides, up to 26 nucleotides in length in relation to DNA size markers, but these are not essential for enzymatic activity. When the enzyme is preincubated with exogenous ATP a 10-fold stimulation in the enzyme activity has been observed. It has been determined by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and high-voltage diethylaminoethyl paper electrophoresis that the light-released enzyme samples from a preincubated and washed mixture of the enzyme, [γ- 32 P]ATP, and UV-irradiated DNA-cellulose contained exogenous [γ- 32 P], which eluted with the enzyme-containing fractions when subjected to Bio-Gel P-30 chromatography. GTP caused a slight enhancement of the enzyme activity while ADP strongly inhibited photoreactivation, at the same concentration and conditions. Higher (X5) concentrations of ADP and adenosine 5'-(β, γ-methylenetriphosphate) totally inhibited the enzyme activity. Dialysis of a photoreactivating enzyme preparation against a buffer solution containing 1 mM ATP caused a 9-fold stimulation of the enzyme activity. In addition, there is an apparent hydrolysis of ATP during photoreactivation as measured by the release of 32 P from [γ- 32 P]ATP

  8. TLR2-dependent inhibition of macrophage responses to IFN-gamma is mediated by distinct, gene-specific mechanisms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah A Benson

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Mycobacterium tuberculosis uses multiple mechanisms to avoid elimination by the immune system. We have previously shown that M. tuberculosis can inhibit selected macrophage responses to IFN-gamma through TLR2-dependent and -independent mechanisms. To specifically address the role of TLR2 signaling in mediating this inhibition, we stimulated macrophages with the specific TLR2/1 ligand Pam(3CSK(4 and assayed responses to IFN-gamma. Pam(3CSK(4 stimulation prior to IFN-gamma inhibited transcription of the unrelated IFN-gamma-inducible genes, CIITA and CXCL11. Surface expression of MHC class II and secretion of CXCL11 were greatly reduced as well, indicating that the reduction in transcripts had downstream effects. Inhibition of both genes required new protein synthesis. Using chromatin immunoprecipitation, we found that TLR2 stimulation inhibited IFN-gamma-induced RNA polymerase II binding to the CIITA and CXCL11 promoters. Furthermore, TATA binding protein was unable to bind the TATA box of the CXCL11 promoter, suggesting that assembly of transcriptional machinery was disrupted. However, TLR2 stimulation affected chromatin modifications differently at each of the inhibited promoters. Histone H3 and H4 acetylation was reduced at the CIITA promoter but unaffected at the CXCL11 promoter. In addition, NF-kappaB signaling was required for inhibition of CXCL11 transcription, but not for inhibition of CIITA. Taken together, these results indicate that TLR2-dependent inhibition of IFN-gamma-induced gene expression is mediated by distinct, gene-specific mechanisms that disrupt binding of the transcriptional machinery to the promoters.

  9. Neomysin inhibits Ca2+-stimulated phosphatidylinositol hydrolysis and protects cultured rat cardiomyocytes from Ca2+-dependent cell injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Babson, J.R.; Dougherty, J.M.

    1991-01-01

    Exposure of cultured rat cardiomyocytes to ionomycin and extracellular Ca 2+ leads to a rapid, sustained increase in intracellular free Ca 2+ as monitored by Ca 2+ -dependent phosphorylase a activation and to a subsequent loss of cardiomyocyte viability as determined by lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) leakage. The intracellular free Ca 2+ increase coincided with a rapid hydrolysis of phosphatidylinositol that preceded cell death. Phosphatidylinositol hydrolysis was monitored by the release of radiolabeled phosphoinositides from cardiomyocytes prelabeled with [2- 3 H]-myo-inositol. Neomycin, a known inhibitor of phospholipase C, inhibited the phosphatidylinositol hydrolysis and markedly reduced the extent of cell injury. Inhibitors of other Ca 2+ -activated processes, including intracellular proteases and phospholipase A 2 , had no effect on ionomycin-mediated cell injury. These data suggest that ionomycin-induced Ca 2+ -dependent cell injury in cultured cardiomyocytes may be due in part to the stimulation of phosphatidylinositol hydrolysis, presumably catalyzed by a Ca 2+ -dependent phospholipase C

  10. Geomagnetic and strong static magnetic field effects on growth and chlorophyll a fluorescence in Lemna minor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jan, Luka; Fefer, Dušan; Košmelj, Katarina; Gaberščik, Alenka; Jerman, Igor

    2015-04-01

    The geomagnetic field (GMF) varies over Earth's surface and changes over time, but it is generally not considered as a factor that could influence plant growth. The effects of reduced and enhanced GMFs and a strong static magnetic field on growth and chlorophyll a (Chl a) fluorescence of Lemna minor plants were investigated under controlled conditions. A standard 7 day test was conducted in extreme geomagnetic environments of 4 µT and 100 µT as well as in a strong static magnetic field environment of 150 mT. Specific growth rates as well as slow and fast Chl a fluorescence kinetics were measured after 7 days incubation. The results, compared to those of controls, showed that the reduced GMF significantly stimulated growth rate of the total frond area in the magnetically treated plants. However, the enhanced GMF pointed towards inhibition of growth rate in exposed plants in comparison to control, but the difference was not statistically significant. This trend was not observed in the case of treatments with strong static magnetic fields. Our measurements suggest that the efficiency of photosystem II is not affected by variations in GMF. In contrast, the strong static magnetic field seems to have the potential to increase initial Chl a fluorescence and energy dissipation in Lemna minor plants. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Proactive modulation of long-interval intracortical inhibition during response inhibition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowie, Matthew J.; MacDonald, Hayley J.; Cirillo, John

    2016-01-01

    Daily activities often require sudden cancellation of preplanned movement, termed response inhibition. When only a subcomponent of a whole response must be suppressed (required here on Partial trials), the ensuing component is markedly delayed. The neural mechanisms underlying partial response inhibition remain unclear. We hypothesized that Partial trials would be associated with nonselective corticomotor suppression and that GABAB receptor-mediated inhibition within primary motor cortex might be responsible for the nonselective corticomotor suppression contributing to Partial trial response delays. Sixteen right-handed participants performed a bimanual anticipatory response inhibition task while single- and paired-pulse transcranial magnetic stimulation was delivered to elicit motor evoked potentials in the left first dorsal interosseous muscle. Lift times, amplitude of motor evoked potentials, and long-interval intracortical inhibition were examined across the different trial types (Go, Stop-Left, Stop-Right, Stop-Both). Go trials produced a tight distribution of lift times around the target, whereas those during Partial trials (Stop-Left and Stop-Right) were substantially delayed. The modulation of motor evoked potential amplitude during Stop-Right trials reflected anticipation, suppression, and subsequent reinitiation of movement. Importantly, suppression was present across all Stop trial types, indicative of a “default” nonselective inhibitory process. Compared with blocks containing only Go trials, inhibition increased when Stop trials were introduced but did not differ between trial types. The amount of inhibition was positively correlated with lift times during Stop-Right trials. Tonic levels of inhibition appear to be proactively modulated by task context and influence the speed at which unimanual responses occur after a nonselective “brake” is applied. PMID:27281744

  12. Negative BOLD signal changes in ipsilateral primary somatosensory cortex are associated with perfusion decreases and behavioral evidence for functional inhibition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schäfer, Katharina; Blankenburg, Felix; Kupers, Ron

    2012-01-01

    that the negative BOLD signal is associated with functional inhibition. Electrical stimulation of the median nerve at 7Hz evoked robust negative BOLD signals in the primary somatosensory cortex (SI) ipsilateral to stimulation, and positive BOLD signals in contralateral SI. The negative BOLD signal in ipsilateral SI......) at the ipsilateral finger during concomitant stimulation of the contralateral median nerve increased significantly, suggesting augmented functional inhibition. Since the CPT in the ipsilateral hallux did not significantly change in response to median nerve stimulation, it is more likely that the CPT......-increase for the finger is due to functional inhibition (Kastrup et al., 2008) than to changes in selective attention. In conclusion, our data provide evidence that stimulus-induced reductions in relative rCBF may underlie the negative BOLD signal, which in turn may reflect increments in functional inhibition....

  13. Regulation of myosin light chain kinase during insulin-stimulated glucose uptake in 3T3-L1 adipocytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shelly Woody

    Full Text Available Myosin II (MyoII is required for insulin-responsive glucose transporter 4 (GLUT4-mediated glucose uptake in 3T3-L1 adipocytes. Our previous studies have shown that insulin signaling stimulates phosphorylation of the regulatory light chain (RLC of MyoIIA via myosin light chain kinase (MLCK. The experiments described here delineate upstream regulators of MLCK during insulin-stimulated glucose uptake. Since 3T3-L1 adipocytes express two MyoII isoforms, we wanted to determine which isoform was required for insulin-stimulated glucose uptake. Using a siRNA approach, we demonstrate that a 60% decrease in MyoIIA protein expression resulted in a 40% inhibition of insulin-stimulated glucose uptake. We also show that insulin signaling stimulates the phosphorylation of MLCK. We further show that MLCK can be activated by calcium as well as signaling pathways. We demonstrate that adipocytes treated with the calcium chelating agent, 1,2-b (iso-aminophenoxy ethane-N,N,N',N'-tetra acetic acid, (BAPTA (in the presence of insulin impaired the insulin-induced phosphorylation of MLCK by 52% and the RLC of MyoIIA by 45% as well as impairing the recruitment of MyoIIA to the plasma membrane when compared to cells treated with insulin alone. We further show that the calcium ionophore, A23187 alone stimulated the phosphorylation of MLCK and the RLC associated with MyoIIA to the same extent as insulin. To identify signaling pathways that might regulate MLCK, we examined ERK and CaMKII. Inhibition of ERK2 impaired phosphorylation of MLCK and insulin-stimulated glucose uptake. In contrast, while inhibition of CaMKII did inhibit phosphorylation of the RLC associated with MyoIIA, inhibition of CAMKIIδ did not impair MLCK phosphorylation or translocation to the plasma membrane or glucose uptake. Collectively, our results are the first to delineate a role for calcium and ERK in the activation of MLCK and thus MyoIIA during insulin-stimulated glucose uptake in 3T3-L1 adipocytes.

  14. Inhibition of insulin-stimulated hydrogen peroxide production prevents stimulation of sodium transport in A6 cell monolayers.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Markadieu, N.Y.G.; Crutzen, R.; Boom, A.; Erneux, C.; Beauwens, R.

    2009-01-01

    Insulin-stimulated sodium transport across A6 cell (derived from amphibian distal nephron) monolayers involves the activation of a phosphatidylinositol (PI) 3-kinase. We previously demonstrated that exogenous addition of H2O2 to the incubation medium of A6 cell monolayers provokes an increase in PI

  15. Deficient inhibition in alcohol-dependence: let's consider the role of the motor system!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quoilin, Caroline; Wilhelm, Emmanuelle; Maurage, Pierre; de Timary, Philippe; Duque, Julie

    2018-04-26

    Impaired inhibitory control contributes to the development, maintenance, and relapse of alcohol-dependence, but the neural correlates of this deficit are still unclear. Because inhibitory control has been labeled as an executive function, most studies have focused on prefrontal areas, overlooking the contribution of more "primary" structures, such as the motor system. Yet, appropriate neural inhibition of the motor output pathway has emerged as a central aspect of healthy behavior. Here, we tested the hypothesis that this motor inhibition is altered in alcohol-dependence. Neural inhibitory measures of motor activity were obtained in 20 detoxified alcohol-dependent (AD) patients and 20 matched healthy subjects, using a standard transcranial magnetic stimulation procedure whereby motor-evoked potentials (MEPs) are elicited in a choice reaction time task. Moreover, behavioral inhibition and trait impulsivity were evaluated in all participants. Finally, the relapse status of patients was assessed 1 year after the experiment. As expected, AD patients displayed poorer behavioral inhibition and higher trait impulsivity than controls. More importantly, the MEP data revealed a considerable shortage of neural motor inhibition in AD patients. Interestingly, this neural defect was strongest in the patients who ended up relapsing during the year following the experiment. Our data suggest a strong motor component in the neural correlates of altered inhibitory control in AD patients. They also highlight an intriguing relationship with relapse and the perspective of a new biomarker to follow strategies aiming at reducing relapse in AD patients.

  16. Effects of methyl gallate and gallic acid on the production of inflammatory mediators interleukin-6 and interleukin-8 by oral epithelial cells stimulated with Fusobacterium nucleatum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Mi-Sun; Jang, Hee-Sook; Oh, Jong-Suk; Yang, Kyu-Ho; Choi, Nam-Ki; Lim, Hoi-Soon; Kim, Seon-Mi

    2009-12-01

    Interactions between periodontal bacteria and human oral epithelial cells can lead to the activation and expression of a variety of inflammatory mediators in epithelial cells. Fusobacterium nucleatum is a filamentous human pathogen that is strongly associated with periodontal diseases. This study examined the effects of methyl gallate (MG) and gallic acid (GA) on the production of inflammatory mediators, interleukin (IL)-6 and IL-8, by oral epithelial cells stimulated by F. nucleatum. In a real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, live F. nucleatum induced high levels of gene expression and protein release of IL-6 and IL-8. The effects of MG and GA were examined by treating KB oral epithelial cells with MG and GA and stimulating them with F. nucleatum. MG and GA inhibited significantly the increases in the IL-6 and IL-8 gene and protein levels in a dose-dependent manner. These Compounds also inhibited the growth of F. nucleatum. No visible effects of MG and GA on the adhesion and invasion of KB cells by F. nucleatum were observed. In conclusion, both MG and GA inhibit IL-6 and IL-8 production from F. nucleatum-activated KB cells.

  17. Glucocorticoids Inhibit Basal and Hormone-Induced Serotonin Synthesis in Pancreatic Beta Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moina Hasni Ebou

    Full Text Available Diabetes is a major complication of chronic Glucocorticoids (GCs treatment. GCs induce insulin resistance and also inhibit insulin secretion from pancreatic beta cells. Yet, a full understanding of this negative regulation remains to be deciphered. In the present study, we investigated whether GCs could inhibit serotonin synthesis in beta cell since this neurotransmitter has been shown to be involved in the regulation of insulin secretion. To this aim, serotonin synthesis was evaluated in vitro after treatment with GCs of either islets from CD1 mice or MIN6 cells, a beta-cell line. We also explored the effect of GCs on the stimulation of serotonin synthesis by several hormones such as prolactin and GLP 1. We finally studied this regulation in islet in two in vivo models: mice treated with GCs and with liraglutide, a GLP1 analog, and mice deleted for the glucocorticoid receptor in the pancreas. We showed in isolated islets and MIN6 cells that GCs decreased expression and activity of the two key enzymes of serotonin synthesis, Tryptophan Hydroxylase 1 (Tph1 and 2 (Tph2, leading to reduced serotonin contents. GCs also blocked the induction of serotonin synthesis by prolactin or by a previously unknown serotonin activator, the GLP-1 analog exendin-4. In vivo, activation of the Glucagon-like-Peptide-1 receptor with liraglutide during 4 weeks increased islet serotonin contents and GCs treatment prevented this increase. Finally, islets from mice deleted for the GR in the pancreas displayed an increased expression of Tph1 and Tph2 and a strong increased serotonin content per islet. In conclusion, our results demonstrate an original inhibition of serotonin synthesis by GCs, both in basal condition and after stimulation by prolactin or activators of the GLP-1 receptor. This regulation may contribute to the deleterious effects of GCs on beta cells.

  18. Naloxone inhibits superoxide but not enzyme release by human neutrophils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simpkins, C.; Alailima, S.; Tate, E.

    1986-01-01

    The release of toxic oxygen metabolites and enzymes by phagocytic cells is thought to play a role in the multisystemic tissue injury of sepsis. Naloxone protects septic animals. We have found that at concentrations administered to animals (10 -7 to 10 -4 M), naloxone inhibited (p 2 - ) by human neutrophils (HN), stimulated with N-formyl methionyl leucyl phenylalanine (FMLP). Naloxone had no effect on cell viability. Maximum inhibition was 65% of the total O 2 - released (13.1 nMoles/8 min/320,000 cells). FMLP-stimulated release of beta-glucoronidase or lysozyme was not altered by naloxone. Naloxone had no effect on the binding of 3 H FMLP to HN. Using 3 H naloxone and various concentrations of unlabeled naloxone higher affinity (K/sub D/ = 12nM) and lower affinity (K/sub D/ = 4.7 x 10 -5 ) binding sites were detected. The K/sub D/ of the low affinity site corresponded to the ED 50 for naloxone inhibition of O 2 - (1 x 10 -5 M). Binding to this low affinity site was decreased by (+) naloxone, beta-endorphin and N acetyl beta-endorphin, but not by leu-enkephalin, thyrotropin releasing factor, prostaglandin D 2 or E 2 . Conclusions: (1) naloxone inhibits FMLP-stimulated O 2 but not enzyme release, (2) this inhibition is not due to alteration of FMLP receptor binding, (3) naloxone may act via a low affinity binding site which is ligand specific, and (4) a higher affinity receptor is present on HN

  19. Acupuncture-like stimulation at auricular point Heart evokes cardiovascular inhibition via activating the cardiac-related neurons in the nucleus tractus solitarius.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Xin Yan; Li, Yan Hua; Liu, Kun; Rong, Pei Jing; Ben, Hui; Li, Liang; Zhu, Bing; Zhang, Shi Ping

    2011-06-23

    Fifty-eight male Sprague-Dawley rats used in the present study to investigate the role of baroreceptor sensitive neurons of the nucleus tractus solitarius (NTS) in the regulation of cardiovascular inhibition during acupuncture at the auricular point Heart, single unit recording was made in anesthetized Sprague-Dawley rats. A neuron was considered to be excited or inhibited by acupuncture stimulation if it displayed 15% more or less spikes s(-1), respectively. NTS neurons were classified into cardiac-related (CR) neurons and non-cardiac-related neurons based on whether their rhythmic discharges were synchronized with the R-waves and responding to sodium nitroprusside (NP; 20 μg/kg, i.v.) administration. Manual acupuncture was applied at the auricular point Heart and somatic acupuncture points ST36 and PC6. Acupuncture at auricular point Heart showed a more significant inhibitory effect on arterial pressure (-22.1±2.4mm Hg; Pheart rate (-12.7±1.7 bpm; PHeart also increased the level of response of CR neurons in the NTS (93.8%±26.0% increase in discharge rate; Pneurons evoked by auricular acupuncture, but had no effect on the same responses evoked by somatic acupuncture. Inactivation of the NTS with local anesthetics also decreased the cardiovascular inhibitory responses evoked by auricular acupuncture. Our results show that acupuncture at the auricular point Heart regulates cardiovascular function by activating baroreceptor sensitive neurons in the NTS in a similar manner as the baroreceptor reflex in cardiovascular inhibition. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. The effect of synthetic inducers of systemic resistance in inhibiting grey mold development on geranium and poinsettia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jolanta Floryszak-Wieczorek

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Several chemical activators of resistance were tested to evaluate their efficiency in restricting development caused by Botryotinia fuckeliana (Botrytis cinerea on geranium and poinsettia leaves. The used signal pathway inducers of salicylic acid, such as DL-â-aminobutyric acid (BABA, g-aminobutyric acid (GABA and benzothiadiazole (BTH, at the applied rates markedly inhibited the development of grey mould in the both plant species. The mentioned inducers showed no toxic or restricting effect on the fungus growth and development under in vitro conditions. Only methyl jasmonate (Me-JA, a potential activator of independent signal transduction pathway, at the applied quantities (O,1-1,0 mg·ml-1, noticeably enhanced the disease spot development probably through stimulation of ethylene synthesis in plant. Me-JA added to medium with B.cinerea showed a strong antifungal action, whereas ethylene significantly stimulated mycelium growth in the in vitro cultures.

  1. ß-Adrenergic Stimulation Increases RyR2 Activity via Intracellular Ca2+ and Mg2+ Regulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jiao; Imtiaz, Mohammad S.; Beard, Nicole A.; Dulhunty, Angela F.; Thorne, Rick; vanHelden, Dirk F.; Laver, Derek R.

    2013-01-01

    Here we investigate how ß-adrenergic stimulation of the heart alters regulation of ryanodine receptors (RyRs) by intracellular Ca2+ and Mg2+ and the role of these changes in SR Ca2+ release. RyRs were isolated from rat hearts, perfused in a Langendorff apparatus for 5 min and subject to 1 min perfusion with 1 µM isoproterenol or without (control) and snap frozen in liquid N2 to capture their phosphorylation state. Western Blots show that RyR2 phosphorylation was increased by isoproterenol, confirming that RyR2 were subject to normal ß-adrenergic signaling. Under basal conditions, S2808 and S2814 had phosphorylation levels of 69% and 15%, respectively. These levels were increased to 83% and 60%, respectively, after 60 s of ß-adrenergic stimulation consistent with other reports that ß-adrenergic stimulation of the heart can phosphorylate RyRs at specific residues including S2808 and S2814 causing an increase in RyR activity. At cytoplasmic [Ca2+] adrenergic stimulation increased luminal Ca2+ activation of single RyR channels, decreased luminal Mg2+ inhibition and decreased inhibition of RyRs by mM cytoplasmic Mg2+. At cytoplasmic [Ca2+] >1 µM, ß-adrenergic stimulation only decreased cytoplasmic Mg2+ and Ca2+ inhibition of RyRs. The Ka and maximum levels of cytoplasmic Ca2+ activation site were not affected by ß-adrenergic stimulation. Our RyR2 gating model was fitted to the single channel data. It predicted that in diastole, ß-adrenergic stimulation is mediated by 1) increasing the activating potency of Ca2+ binding to the luminal Ca2+ site and decreasing its affinity for luminal Mg2+ and 2) decreasing affinity of the low-affinity Ca2+/Mg2+ cytoplasmic inhibition site. However in systole, ß-adrenergic stimulation is mediated mainly by the latter. PMID:23533585

  2. 1-Oleoyl-2-acetylglycerol stimulates 5-lipoxygenase activity via a putative (phospho)lipid binding site within the N-terminal C2-like domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hörnig, Christina; Albert, Dana; Fischer, Lutz; Hörnig, Michael; Rådmark, Olof; Steinhilber, Dieter; Werz, Oliver

    2005-07-22

    5-Lipoxygenase (5-LO) catalysis is positively regulated by Ca2+ ions and phospholipids that both act via the N-terminal C2-like domain of 5-LO. Previously, we have shown that 1-oleoyl-2-acetylglycerol (OAG) functions as an agonist for human polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNL) in stimulating 5-LO product formation. Here we have demonstrated that OAG directly stimulates 5-LO catalysis in vitro. In the absence of Ca2+ (chelated using EDTA), OAG strongly and concentration-dependently stimulated crude 5-LO in 100,000 x g supernatants as well as purified 5-LO enzyme from PMNL. Also, the monoglyceride 1-O-oleyl-rac-glycerol and 1,2-dioctanoyl-sn-glycerol were effective, whereas various phospholipids did not stimulate 5-LO. However, in the presence of Ca2+, OAG caused no stimulation of 5-LO. Also, phospholipids or cellular membranes abolished the effects of OAG. As found previously for Ca2+, OAG renders 5-LO activity resistant against inhibition by glutathione peroxidase activity, and this effect of OAG is reversed by phospholipids. Intriguingly, a 5-LO mutant lacking tryptophan residues (Trp-13, -75, and -102) important for the binding of the 5-LO C2-like domain to phospholipids was not stimulated by OAG. We conclude that OAG directly stimulates 5-LO by acting at a phospholipid binding site located within the C2-like domain.

  3. Histamine H3 receptor activation selectively inhibits dopamine D1 receptor-dependent [3H]GABA release from depolarization-stimulated slices of rat substantia nigra pars reticulata

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aceves, J.; Young, J.M.; Arias-Montano, J.A.; Floran, B.; Garcia, M.

    1997-01-01

    The release of [ 3 H]GABA from slices of rat substantia nigra pars reticulata induced by increasing extracellular K + from 6 to 15 mM in the presence of 10 μM sulpiride was inhibited by 73±3% by 1 μM SCH 23390, consistent with a large component of release dependent upon D 1 receptor activation. The histamine H 3 receptor-selective agonist immepip (1 μM) and the non-selective agonist histamine (100 μM) inhibited [ 3 H]GABA release by 78±2 and 80±2%, respectively. The inhibition by both agonists was reversed by the H 3 receptor antagonist thioperamide (1 μM). However, in the presence of 1 μM SCH 23390 depolarization-induced release of [ 3 H]GABA was not significantly decreased by 1 μM immepip. In rats depleted of dopamine by pretreatment with reserpine, immepip no longer inhibited control release of [ 3 H]GABA, but in the presence of 1 μM SKF 38393, which produced a 7±1-fold stimulation of release, immepip reduced the release to a level not statistically different from that in the presence of immepip alone. Immepip (1 μM) also inhibited the depolarization-induced release of [ 3 H]dopamine from substantia nigra pars reticulata slices, by 38±3%.The evidence is consistent with the proposition that activation of histamine H 3 receptors leads to the selective inhibition of the component of depolarization-induced [ 3 H]GABA release in substantia nigra pars reticulata slices which is dependent upon D 1 receptor activation. This appears to be largely an action at the terminals of the striatonigral GABA projection neurons, which may be enhanced by a partial inhibition of dendritic [ 3 H]dopamine release. (Copyright (c) 1997 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam. All rights reserved.)

  4. Induced photoassociation in the field of a strong electomagnetic wave

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zaretskij, D.F.; Lomonosov, V.V.; Lyul'ka, V.A.

    1979-01-01

    The quantum-mechanical problem of the stimulated transition of a system in the field of a strong electromagnetic wave from the continuous spectrum to a bound state possessing a finite lifetime is considered. The expressions obtained are employed to calculate stimulated production of mesic atoms and mesic molecules (ddμ). It is demonstrated that in an external electromagnetic field the probability for production of this type may considerably increase

  5. Stimulation of accumbal GABAA receptors inhibits delta2-, but not delta1-, opioid receptor-mediated dopamine efflux in the nucleus accumbens of freely moving rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aono, Yuri; Kiguchi, Yuri; Watanabe, Yuriko; Waddington, John L; Saigusa, Tadashi

    2017-11-15

    The nucleus accumbens contains delta-opioid receptors that may reduce inhibitory neurotransmission. Reduction in GABA A receptor-mediated inhibition of accumbal dopamine release due to delta-opioid receptor activation should be suppressed by stimulating accumbal GABA A receptors. As delta-opioid receptors are divided into delta2- and delta1-opioid receptors, we analysed the effects of the GABA A receptor agonist muscimol on delta2- and delta1-opioid receptor-mediated accumbal dopamine efflux in freely moving rats using in vivo microdialysis. Drugs were administered intracerebrally through the dialysis probe. Doses of compounds indicate total amount administered (mol) during 25-50min infusions. The delta2-opioid receptor agonist deltorphin II (25.0nmol)- and delta1-opioid receptor agonist DPDPE (5.0nmol)-induced increases in dopamine efflux were inhibited by the delta2-opioid receptor antagonist naltriben (1.5nmol) and the delta1-opioid receptor antagonist BNTX (150.0pmol), respectively. Muscimol (250.0pmol) inhibited deltorphin II (25.0nmol)-induced dopamine efflux. The GABA A receptor antagonist bicuculline (50.0pmol), which failed to affect deltorphin II (25.0nmol)-induced dopamine efflux, counteracted the inhibitory effect of muscimol on deltorphin II-induced dopamine efflux. Neither muscimol (250.0pmol) nor bicuculline (50.0 and 500.0pmol) altered DPDPE (5.0nmol)-induced dopamine efflux. The present results show that reduction in accumbal GABA A receptor-mediated inhibition of dopaminergic activity is necessary to produce delta2-opioid receptor-induced increase in accumbal dopamine efflux. This study indicates that activation of delta2- but not delta1-opioid receptors on the cell bodies and/or terminals of accumbal GABAergic interneurons inhibits GABA release and, accordingly, decreases GABA A receptor-mediated inhibition of dopaminergic terminals, resulting in enhanced accumbal dopamine efflux. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Strigolactones Stimulate Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Fungi by Activating Mitochondria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Besserer, Arnaud; Puech-Pagès, Virginie; Kiefer, Patrick; Gomez-Roldan, Victoria; Jauneau, Alain; Roy, Sébastien; Portais, Jean-Charles; Roux, Christophe; Bécard, Guillaume

    2006-01-01

    The association of arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi with plant roots is the oldest and ecologically most important symbiotic relationship between higher plants and microorganisms, yet the mechanism by which these fungi detect the presence of a plant host is poorly understood. Previous studies have shown that roots secrete a branching factor (BF) that strongly stimulates branching of hyphae during germination of the spores of AM fungi. In the BF of Lotus, a strigolactone was found to be the active molecule. Strigolactones are known as germination stimulants of the parasitic plants Striga and Orobanche. In this paper, we show that the BF of a monocotyledonous plant, Sorghum, also contains a strigolactone. Strigolactones strongly and rapidly stimulated cell proliferation of the AM fungus Gigaspora rosea at concentrations as low as 10 −13 M. This effect was not found with other sesquiterperne lactones known as germination stimulants of parasitic weeds. Within 1 h of treatment, the density of mitochondria in the fungal cells increased, and their shape and movement changed dramatically. Strigolactones stimulated spore germination of two other phylogenetically distant AM fungi, Glomus intraradices and Gl. claroideum. This was also associated with a rapid increase of mitochondrial density and respiration as shown with Gl. intraradices. We conclude that strigolactones are important rhizospheric plant signals involved in stimulating both the pre-symbiotic growth of AM fungi and the germination of parasitic plants. PMID:16787107

  7. Strigolactones stimulate arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi by activating mitochondria.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arnaud Besserer

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available The association of arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM fungi with plant roots is the oldest and ecologically most important symbiotic relationship between higher plants and microorganisms, yet the mechanism by which these fungi detect the presence of a plant host is poorly understood. Previous studies have shown that roots secrete a branching factor (BF that strongly stimulates branching of hyphae during germination of the spores of AM fungi. In the BF of Lotus, a strigolactone was found to be the active molecule. Strigolactones are known as germination stimulants of the parasitic plants Striga and Orobanche. In this paper, we show that the BF of a monocotyledonous plant, Sorghum, also contains a strigolactone. Strigolactones strongly and rapidly stimulated cell proliferation of the AM fungus Gigaspora rosea at concentrations as low as 10(-13 M. This effect was not found with other sesquiterperne lactones known as germination stimulants of parasitic weeds. Within 1 h of treatment, the density of mitochondria in the fungal cells increased, and their shape and movement changed dramatically. Strigolactones stimulated spore germination of two other phylogenetically distant AM fungi, Glomus intraradices and Gl. claroideum. This was also associated with a rapid increase of mitochondrial density and respiration as shown with Gl. intraradices. We conclude that strigolactones are important rhizospheric plant signals involved in stimulating both the pre-symbiotic growth of AM fungi and the germination of parasitic plants.

  8. Stimulating thought: a functional MRI study of transcranial direct current stimulation in schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orlov, Natasza D; O'Daly, Owen; Tracy, Derek K; Daniju, Yusuf; Hodsoll, John; Valdearenas, Lorena; Rothwell, John; Shergill, Sukhi S

    2017-09-01

    Individuals with schizophrenia typically suffer a range of cognitive deficits, including prominent deficits in working memory and executive function. These difficulties are strongly predictive of functional outcomes, but there is a paucity of effective therapeutic interventions targeting these deficits. Transcranial direct current stimulation is a novel neuromodulatory technique with emerging evidence of potential pro-cognitive effects; however, there is limited understanding of its mechanism. This was a double-blind randomized sham controlled pilot study of transcranial direct current stimulation on a working memory (n-back) and executive function (Stroop) task in 28 individuals with schizophrenia using functional magnetic resonance imaging. Study participants received 30 min of real or sham transcranial direct current stimulation applied to the left frontal cortex. The 'real' and 'sham' groups did not differ in online working memory task performance, but the transcranial direct current stimulation group demonstrated significant improvement in performance at 24 h post-transcranial direct current stimulation. Transcranial direct current stimulation was associated with increased activation in the medial frontal cortex beneath the anode; showing a positive correlation with consolidated working memory performance 24 h post-stimulation. There was reduced activation in the left cerebellum in the transcranial direct current stimulation group, with no change in the middle frontal gyrus or parietal cortices. Improved performance on the executive function task was associated with reduced activity in the anterior cingulate cortex. Transcranial direct current stimulation modulated functional activation in local task-related regions, and in more distal nodes in the network. Transcranial direct current stimulation offers a potential novel approach to altering frontal cortical activity and exerting pro-cognitive effects in schizophrenia. © The Author (2017). Published by Oxford

  9. Evidence for the involvement of a labile protein in stimulation of adrenal steroidogenesis under conditions not inhibitory to protein synthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krueger, R.J.; Orme-Johnson, N.R.

    1988-01-01

    Evidence is presented to support the hypothesis that synthesis of a labile protein is required for stimulation of steroidogenesis in rat adrenocortical cells. Amino acids L-canavanine and L-S-aminoethylcysteine, at concentrations as high as 5 mM, each inhibited steroidogenesis to a much greater extent than they inhibited protein synthesis. S-Aminoethylcysteine caused a 50% decrease in the stimulated rate of corticosterone production under conditions where incorporation of [35S]methionine into protein was unchanged. Both amino acids block stimulation of steroid synthesis at a step subsequent to the formation of cAMP and before the synthesis of progesterone. The onset of this effect, after the addition of the amino acids, on corticosterone production is quite rapid. These results provide support, that is not dependent on inhibition of protein synthesis, for the hypothesis that a labile protein mediates stimulation of steroidogenesis. Reversal of canavanine and S-aminoethylcysteine inhibition of steroidogenesis by arginine and lysine, respectively, suggests that the inhibitors are functioning as amino acid analogs. S-Aminoethylcysteine inhibits the incorporation of [3H]lysine into protein as well as inhibits steroidogenesis; further, [3H]S-aminoethylcysteine is incorporated into protein that is nonstimulatory. These results suggest that lysine residues play an essential role in the function of the labile protein or that the labile protein contains a large number of lysine residues

  10. Contribution of α-adrenoceptor stimulation by phenylephrine to basal nitric oxide production in the isolated mouse aorta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Langen, Johanna T H; Van Hove, Cor E; Schrijvers, Dorien M; Martinet, Wim; De Meyer, Guido R Y; Fransen, Paul; Bult, Hidde

    2013-04-01

    In the mouse aorta, contractions evoked by the α(1)-adrenoceptor agonist phenylephrine are strongly suppressed by the continuous production of nitric oxide (NO). We investigated whether phenylephrine itself stimulated NO production by activating endothelial α(2)-adrenoceptors. On a prostaglandin F(2α) contraction, the α(2)-adrenoceptor agonist 5-bromo-N-(4,5-dihydro-1H-imidazol-2-yl)-6-quinoxalinamine (UK14304) induced 29.3 ± 7.4% relaxation, which was inhibited by 0.1 μM 2-[(4,5-Dihydro-1H-imidazol-2-yl)methyl]-2,3-dihydro-1-methyl-1H-isoindole (BRL44408) with a pKB' corresponding to α(2)-antagonism. In the presence of NO synthase blockers, UK14304 elicited small contractions above 1 μM that were inhibited by 0.1 μM prazosin, but not influenced by 0.1 μM rauwolscine. At 3 μM or higher concentrations, phenylephrine caused only modest relaxation (up to 7.4 ± 2.3%) of segments constricted with prostaglandin F(2α) in the presence of prazosin, which was abolished with 0.1 μM BRL44408. Furthermore, BRL44408 did not increase contractions induced with 1 μM phenylephrine. These results confirm that α(1)- but not α(2)-adrenoceptors are expressed on aortic smooth muscle cells, whereas endothelial cells only express α(2)-adrenoceptors. Moreover, phenylephrine exerted a very modest relaxing effect through nonspecific stimulation of α(2)-adrenoceptors, but only at concentrations higher than 1 μM. It is concluded that the high basal output of NO in the isolated mouse aorta is not due to stimulation of α-adrenoceptors.

  11. Excavatolide B Attenuates Rheumatoid Arthritis through the Inhibition of Osteoclastogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yen-You; Jean, Yen-Hsuan; Lee, Hsin-Pai; Lin, Sung-Chun; Pan, Chieh-Yu; Chen, Wu-Fu; Wu, Shu-Fen; Su, Jui-Hsin; Tsui, Kuan-Hao; Sheu, Jyh-Horng; Sung, Ping-Jyun; Wen, Zhi-Hong

    2017-01-06

    Osteoclasts are multinucleated giant cells of macrophage/monocyte lineage, and cell differentiation with the upregulation of osteoclast-related proteins is believed to play a major role in the destruction of the joints in the course of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Pro-inflammatory cytokines, such as interleukin-17A (IL-17A) and macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF), can be overexpressed in RA and lead to osteoclastogenesis. In a previous study, we found that cultured-type soft coral-derived excavatolide B (Exc-B) exhibited anti-inflammatory properties. In the present study, we thus aimed to evaluate the anti-arthritic activity of Exc-B in in vitro and in vivo models. The results demonstrated that Exc-B inhibits LPS-induced multinucleated cell and actin ring formation, as well as TRAP, MMP-9, and cathepsin K expression. Additionally, Exc-B significantly attenuated the characteristics of RA in adjuvant (AIA) and type II collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) in rats. Moreover, Exc-B improved histopathological features, and reduced the number of TRAP-positive multinucleated cells in the in vivo AIA and CIA models. Immunohistochemical analysis showed that Exc-B attenuated the protein expression of cathepsin K, MMP-2, MMP-9, CD11b, and NFATc1 in ankle tissues of AIA and CIA rats. Level of interleukin-17A and macrophage colony-stimulating factor were also decreased by Exc-B. These findings strongly suggest that Exc-B could be of potential use as a therapeutic agent by inhibiting osteoclast differentiation in arthritis. Moreover, this study also illustrates the use of the anti-inflammatory marine compound, Exc-B, as a potential therapeutic strategy for RA.

  12. Excavatolide B Attenuates Rheumatoid Arthritis through the Inhibition of Osteoclastogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yen-You Lin

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Osteoclasts are multinucleated giant cells of macrophage/monocyte lineage, and cell differentiation with the upregulation of osteoclast-related proteins is believed to play a major role in the destruction of the joints in the course of rheumatoid arthritis (RA. Pro-inflammatory cytokines, such as interleukin-17A (IL-17A and macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF, can be overexpressed in RA and lead to osteoclastogenesis. In a previous study, we found that cultured-type soft coral-derived excavatolide B (Exc-B exhibited anti-inflammatory properties. In the present study, we thus aimed to evaluate the anti-arthritic activity of Exc-B in in vitro and in vivo models. The results demonstrated that Exc-B inhibits LPS-induced multinucleated cell and actin ring formation, as well as TRAP, MMP-9, and cathepsin K expression. Additionally, Exc-B significantly attenuated the characteristics of RA in adjuvant (AIA and type II collagen-induced arthritis (CIA in rats. Moreover, Exc-B improved histopathological features, and reduced the number of TRAP-positive multinucleated cells in the in vivo AIA and CIA models. Immunohistochemical analysis showed that Exc-B attenuated the protein expression of cathepsin K, MMP-2, MMP-9, CD11b, and NFATc1 in ankle tissues of AIA and CIA rats. Level of interleukin-17A and macrophage colony-stimulating factor were also decreased by Exc-B. These findings strongly suggest that Exc-B could be of potential use as a therapeutic agent by inhibiting osteoclast differentiation in arthritis. Moreover, this study also illustrates the use of the anti-inflammatory marine compound, Exc-B, as a potential therapeutic strategy for RA.

  13. Effects of cyclophosphamide on in vitro human lymphocyte culture and mitogenic stimulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharma, B.S.

    1983-01-01

    Cyclophosphamide (CY) has been reported to be inactive in vitro under certain conditions. In the present study, CY was tested for its ability to inhibit human lymphocyte proliferation and to modulate lymphocyte response to mitogens in vitro. The inhibition of or the increase in 3 H-thymidine incorporation in mitogen-stimulated and unstimulated lymphocytes by CY was used as a measure of CY activity in vitro. The results demonstrate that lymphocytes from 10 different persons had a mean decrease of 74% in 3 H-thymidine incorporation in the presence of CY (P less than 0.005). The effect was maximal at a concentration of 160 micrograms/ml. A mean inhibition of 35 and 55% was caused by 10 and 40 micrograms/ml concentrations of CY, respectively. CY also was able to reduce the number of viable cells during 5 days in culture and had a profound effect on mitogen stimulation of lymphocytes. In all cases, CY modulated the stimulation of lymphocytes by phytohemagglutinin (PHA), concanavalin A (Con A), and pokeweed mitogen (PWM) either by augmenting or suppressing the responses. At low concentrations (10 micrograms/ml) it augmented mitogenic stimulation by 46 to 281%. At higher concentrations (20 to 160 micrograms/ml), CY had a suppressive effect with a maximum suppression of 99%. The CY-induced immunomodulation is perhaps caused by its action on the regulatory T cells. When tested in vitro, CY had inhibitory activity on T cells

  14. Cyclooxygenase-2 Inhibition Enhances Proliferation of NKT Cells Derived from Patients with Laryngeal Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klatka, Janusz; Grywalska, Ewelina; Hymos, Anna; Guz, Małgorzata; Polberg, Krzysztof; Roliński, Jacek; Stepulak, Andrzej

    2017-08-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze whether inhibition of cyclooxygenase-2 by celecoxib and the subsequent enhancement in the proliferation of natural killer T (NKT) cells could play a role in dendritic cell (DC)-based laryngeal cancer (LC) immunotherapy. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells were obtained from 48 male patients diagnosed with LC and 30 control patients without cancer disease. Neoplastic cell lysate preparations were made from cancer tissues obtained after surgery and used for in vitro DCs generation. NKT cells proliferation assay was performed based on 3 H-thymidine incorporation assay. An increased proliferation of NKT cells was obtained from control patients compared to NKT cells obtained from LC patients regardless of the type of stimulation or treatment. In the patient group diagnosed with LC, COX-2 inhibition resulted in a significantly enhanced proliferation of NKT cells when stimulated with autologous DCs than NKT cells stimulated with DCs without COX-2 inhibition. These correlations were not present in the control group. Higher proliferation rate of NKT cells was also observed in non-metastatic and highly differentiated LC, which was independent of the type of stimulation or treatment. COX-2 inhibition could be regarded as immunotherapy-enhancing tool in patients with LC. Copyright© 2017, International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. George J. Delinasios), All rights reserved.

  15. Hesperidin, A Popular Antioxidant Inhibits Melanogenesis via Erk1/2 Mediated MITF Degradation

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    Heun Joo Lee

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Regulation of melanogenesis has been the focus of treatment for hyperpigmentary skin disorders. Although hesperidin is one of the most well-known, naturally occurring flavonoids with antioxidant and anti-inflammatory effect, its anti-melanogenic effect is not known. The present study aims to determine the anti-melanogenic effect of hespiridin as well as its underlying molecular mechanisms. Melanin contents were measured in normal human melanocytes and B16F10 melanoma cells. Protein and mRNA levels of tyrosinase, microphthalmia-associated transcription factor (MITF, tyrosinase related protein-1 (TRP-1 and TRP-2 were determined. Melanogenesis-regulating signals were examined. In results, hesperidin strongly inhibited melanin synthesis and tyrosinase activity. Hesperidin decreased tyrosinase, TRP-1, and TRP-2 protein expression but increased phospho-extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (p-Erk1/2 expression. Specific inhibitor of Erk1/2 or proteasome inhibitor reversed the inhibition of melanogenesis induced by hesperidin. Taken together, hesperidin, a popular antioxidant, stimulated Erk1/2 phosphorylation which subsequently degraded MITF which resulted in suppression of melanogenic enzymes and melanin synthesis.

  16. Prospects for strong interaction physics at ISABELLE. [Seven papers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sidhu, D P; Trueman, T L

    1977-01-01

    Seven papers are presented resulting from a conference intended to stimulate thinking about how ISABELLE could be used for studying strong interactions. A separate abstract was prepared for each paper for inclusion in DOE Energy Research Abstracts (ERA). (PMA)

  17. Lactadherin inhibits secretory phospholipase A2 activity on pre-apoptotic leukemia cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steffen Nyegaard

    Full Text Available Secretory phospholipase A2 (sPLA2 is a critical component of insect and snake venoms and is secreted by mammalian leukocytes during inflammation. Elevated secretory PLA2 concentrations are associated with autoimmune diseases and septic shock. Many sPLA2's do not bind to plasma membranes of quiescent cells but bind and digest phospholipids on the membranes of stimulated or apoptotic cells. The capacity of these phospholipases to digest membranes of stimulated or apoptotic cells correlates to the exposure of phosphatidylserine. In the present study, the ability of the phosphatidyl-L-serine-binding protein, lactadherin to inhibit phospholipase enzyme activity has been assessed. Inhibition of human secretory phospholipase A2-V on phospholipid vesicles exceeded 90%, whereas inhibition of Naja mossambica sPLA2 plateaued at 50-60%. Lactadherin inhibited 45% of activity of Naja mossambica sPLA2 and >70% of human secretory phospholipase A2-V on the membranes of human NB4 leukemia cells treated with calcium ionophore A23187. The data indicate that lactadherin may decrease inflammation by inhibiting sPLA2.

  18. Naloxone inhibits superoxide but not enzyme release by human neutrophils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simpkins, C.; Alailima, S.; Tate, E.

    1986-03-01

    The release of toxic oxygen metabolites and enzymes by phagocytic cells is thought to play a role in the multisystemic tissue injury of sepsis. Naloxone protects septic animals. We have found that at concentrations administered to animals (10/sup -7/ to 10/sup -4/M), naloxone inhibited (p < .001) the release of superoxide (O/sub 2//sup -/) by human neutrophils (HN), stimulated with N-formyl methionyl leucyl phenylalanine (FMLP). Naloxone had no effect on cell viability. Maximum inhibition was 65% of the total O/sub 2//sup -/ released (13.1 nMoles/8 min/320,000 cells). FMLP-stimulated release of beta-glucoronidase or lysozyme was not altered by naloxone. Naloxone had no effect on the binding of /sup 3/H FMLP to HN. Using /sup 3/H naloxone and various concentrations of unlabeled naloxone higher affinity (K/sub D/ = 12nM) and lower affinity (K/sub D/ = 4.7 x 10/sup -5/) binding sites were detected. The K/sub D/ of the low affinity site corresponded to the ED/sub 50/ for naloxone inhibition of O/sub 2//sup -/ (1 x 10/sup -5/M). Binding to this low affinity site was decreased by (+) naloxone, beta-endorphin and N acetyl beta-endorphin, but not by leu-enkephalin, thyrotropin releasing factor, prostaglandin D/sub 2/ or E/sub 2/. Conclusions: (1) naloxone inhibits FMLP-stimulated O/sub 2/ but not enzyme release, (2) this inhibition is not due to alteration of FMLP receptor binding, (3) naloxone may act via a low affinity binding site which is ligand specific, and (4) a higher affinity receptor is present on HN.

  19. Facilitate insight by non-invasive brain stimulation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard P Chi

    Full Text Available Our experiences can blind us. Once we have learned to solve problems by one method, we often have difficulties in generating solutions involving a different kind of insight. Yet there is evidence that people with brain lesions are sometimes more resistant to this so-called mental set effect. This inspired us to investigate whether the mental set effect can be reduced by non-invasive brain stimulation. 60 healthy right-handed participants were asked to take an insight problem solving task while receiving transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS to the anterior temporal lobes (ATL. Only 20% of participants solved an insight problem with sham stimulation (control, whereas 3 times as many participants did so (p = 0.011 with cathodal stimulation (decreased excitability of the left ATL together with anodal stimulation (increased excitability of the right ATL. We found hemispheric differences in that a stimulation montage involving the opposite polarities did not facilitate performance. Our findings are consistent with the theory that inhibition to the left ATL can lead to a cognitive style that is less influenced by mental templates and that the right ATL may be associated with insight or novel meaning. Further studies including neurophysiological imaging are needed to elucidate the specific mechanisms leading to the enhancement.

  20. Autocrine effect of Zn²⁺ on the glucose-stimulated insulin secretion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slepchenko, Kira G; Daniels, Nigel A; Guo, Aili; Li, Yang V

    2015-09-01

    It is well known that zinc (Zn(2+)) is required for the process of insulin biosynthesis and the maturation of insulin secretory granules in pancreatic beta (β)-cells, and that changes in Zn(2+) levels in the pancreas have been found to be associated with diabetes. Glucose-stimulation causes a rapid co-secretion of Zn(2+) and insulin with similar kinetics. However, we do not know whether Zn(2+) regulates insulin availability and secretion. Here we investigated the effect of Zn(2+) on glucose-stimulated insulin secretion (GSIS) in isolated mouse pancreatic islets. Whereas Zn(2+) alone (control) had no effect on the basal secretion of insulin, it significantly inhibited GSIS. The application of CaEDTA, by removing the secreted Zn(2+) from the extracellular milieu of the islets, resulted in significantly increased GSIS, suggesting an overall inhibitory role of secreted Zn(2+) on GSIS. The inhibitory action of Zn(2+) was mostly mediated through the activities of KATP/Ca(2+) channels. Furthermore, during brief paired-pulse glucose-stimulated Zn(2+) secretion (GSZS), Zn(2+) secretion following the second pulse was significantly attenuated, probably by the secreted endogenous Zn(2+) after the first pulse. Such an inhibition on Zn(2+) secretion following the second pulse was completely reversed by Zn(2+) chelation, suggesting a negative feedback mechanism, in which the initial glucose-stimulated Zn(2+) release inhibits subsequent Zn(2+) secretion, subsequently inhibiting insulin co-secretion as well. Taken together, these data suggest a negative feedback mechanism on GSZS and GSIS by Zn(2+) secreted from β-cells, and the co-secreted Zn(2+) may act as an autocrine inhibitory modulator.

  1. Activated AMPK inhibits PPAR-{alpha} and PPAR-{gamma} transcriptional activity in hepatoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sozio, Margaret S; Lu, Changyue; Zeng, Yan; Liangpunsakul, Suthat; Crabb, David W

    2011-10-01

    AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-α (PPAR-α) are critical regulators of short-term and long-term fatty acid oxidation, respectively. We examined whether the activities of these molecules were coordinately regulated. H4IIEC3 cells were transfected with PPAR-α and PPAR-γ expression plasmids and a peroxisome-proliferator-response element (PPRE) luciferase reporter plasmid. The cells were treated with PPAR agonists (WY-14,643 and rosiglitazone), AMPK activators 5-aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide riboside (AICAR) and metformin, and the AMPK inhibitor compound C. Both AICAR and metformin decreased basal and WY-14,643-stimulated PPAR-α activity; compound C increased agonist-stimulated reporter activity and partially reversed the effect of the AMPK activators. Similar effects on PPAR-γ were seen, with both AICAR and metformin inhibiting PPRE reporter activity. Compound C increased basal PPAR-γ activity and rosiglitazone-stimulated activity. In contrast, retinoic acid receptor-α (RAR-α), another nuclear receptor that dimerizes with retinoid X receptor (RXR), was largely unaffected by the AMPK activators. Compound C modestly increased AM580 (an RAR agonist)-stimulated activity. The AMPK activators did not affect PPAR-α binding to DNA, and there was no consistent correlation between effects of the AMPK activators and inhibitor on PPAR and the nuclear localization of AMPK-α subunits. Expression of either a constitutively active or dominant negative AMPK-α inhibited basal and WY-14,643-stimulated PPAR-α activity and basal and rosiglitazone-stimulated PPAR-γ activity. We concluded that the AMPK activators AICAR and metformin inhibited transcriptional activities of PPAR-α and PPAR-γ, whereas inhibition of AMPK with compound C activated both PPARs. The effects of AMPK do not appear to be mediated through effects on RXR or on PPAR/RXR binding to DNA. These effects are independent of kinase activity and instead appear to

  2. Human brain activity associated with painful mechanical stimulation to muscle and bone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maeda, Lynn; Ono, Mayu; Koyama, Tetsuo; Oshiro, Yoshitetsu; Sumitani, Masahiko; Mashimo, Takashi; Shibata, Masahiko

    2011-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to elucidate the central processing of painful mechanical stimulation to muscle and bone by measuring blood oxygen level-dependent signal changes using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). Twelve healthy volunteers were enrolled. Mechanical pressure on muscle and bone were applied at the right lower leg by an algometer. Intensities were adjusted to cause weak and strong pain sensation at either target site in preliminary testing. Brain activation in response to mechanical nociceptive stimulation targeting muscle and bone were measured by fMRI and analyzed. Painful mechanical stimulation targeting muscle and bone activated the common areas including bilateral insula, anterior cingulate cortex, posterior cingulate cortex, secondary somatosensory cortex (S2), inferior parietal lobe, and basal ganglia. The contralateral S2 was more activated by strong stimulation than by weak stimulation. Some areas in the basal ganglia (bilateral putamen and caudate nucleus) were more activated by muscle stimulation than by bone stimulation. The putamen and caudate nucleus may have a more significant role in brain processing of muscle pain compared with bone pain.

  3. Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) accelerates cutaneous wound healing and inhibits pro-inflammatory cytokines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gürgen, Seren Gülşen; Sayın, Oya; Cetin, Ferihan; Tuç Yücel, Ayşe

    2014-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) and other common treatment methods used in the process of wound healing in terms of the expression levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines. In the study, 24 female and 24 male adult Wistar-Albino rats were divided into five groups: (1) the non-wounded group having no incision wounds, (2) the control group having incision wounds, (3) the TENS (2 Hz, 15 min) group, (4) the physiological saline (PS) group and (5) the povidone iodine (PI) group. In the skin sections, interleukin-1 beta (IL-1β), interleukin-6 (IL-6), and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) were assessed with enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and immunohistochemical methods. In the non-wounded group, the expression of IL-1β, IL-6, and TNF-α signaling molecules was weaker in the whole tissue; however, in the control group, significant inflammatory response occurred, and strong cytokine expression was observed in the dermis, granulation tissue, hair follicles, and sebaceous glands (P TENS group, the decrease in TNF-α, IL-1β, and IL-6 immunoreaction in the skin was significant compared to the other forms of treatment (P TENS group suggest that TENS shortened the healing process by inhibating the inflammation phase.

  4. Human trophoblast-derived hydrogen sulfide stimulates placental artery endothelial cell angiogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Dong-Bao; Feng, Lin; Hodges, Jennifer K; Lechuga, Thomas J; Zhang, Honghai

    2017-09-01

    Endogenous hydrogen sulfide (H2S), mainly synthesized by cystathionine β-synthase (CBS) and cystathionine γ-lyase (CTH), has been implicated in regulating placental angiogenesis; however, the underlying mechanisms are unknown. This study was to test a hypothesis that trophoblasts synthesize H2S to promote placental angiogenesis. Human choriocarcinoma-derived BeWo cells expressed both CBS and CTH proteins, while the first trimester villous trophoblast-originated HTR-8/SVneo cells expressed CTH protein only. The H2S producing ability of BeWo cells was significantly inhibited by either inhibitors of CBS (carboxymethyl hydroxylamine hemihydrochloride, CHH) or CTH (β-cyano-L-alanine, BCA) and that in HTR-8/SVneo cells was inhibited by CHH only. H2S donors stimulated cell proliferation, migration, and tube formation in ovine placental artery endothelial cells (oFPAECs) as effectively as vascular endothelial growth factor. Co-culture with BeWo and HTR-8/SVneo cells stimulated oFPAEC migration, which was inhibited by CHH or BCA in BeWo but CHH only in HTR-8/SVneo cells. Primary human villous trophoblasts (HVT) were more potent than trophoblast cell lines in stimulating oFPAEC migration that was inhibited by CHH and CHH/BCA combination in accordance with its H2S synthesizing activity linked to CBS and CTH expression patterns. H2S donors activated endothelial nitric oxide synthase (NOS3), v-AKT murine thymoma viral oncogene homolog 1 (AKT1), and extracellular signal-activated kinase 1/2 (mitogen-activated protein kinase 3/1, MAPK3/1) in oFPAECs. H2S donor-induced NOS3 activation was blocked by AKT1 but not MAPK3/1 inhibition. In keeping with our previous studies showing a crucial role of AKT1, MAPK3/1, and NOS3/NO in placental angiogenesis, these data show that trophoblast-derived endogenous H2S stimulates placental angiogenesis, involving activation of AKT1, NOS3/NO, and MAPK3/1. © The Authors 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Society for the Study

  5. Protein synthesis inhibitors attenuate water flow in vasopressin-stimulated toad urinary bladder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoch, B.S.; Ast, M.B.; Fusco, M.J.; Jacoby, M.; Levine, S.D.

    1988-01-01

    Vasopressin stimulates the introduction of aggregated particles, which may represent pathways for water flow, into the luminal membrane of toad urinary bladder. It is not known whether water transport pathways are degraded on removal from membrane or whether they are recycled. The authors examined the effect of the protein synthesis inhibitors cycloheximide and puromycin using repeated 30-min cycles of vasopressin followed by washout of vasopressin, all in the presence of an osmotic gradient, a protocol that maximizes aggregate turnover. High dose cycloheximide inhibited flow immediately. Low dose cycloheximide did not affect initial flow. In the absence of vasopressin, inhibition did not develop. Despite the inhibition of flow in vasopressin-treated tissues, the cAMP-dependent protein kinase ratio was elevated in cycloheximide-treated tissues, suggesting modulation at a distal site in the stimulatory cascade. [ 14 C]urea permeability was not inhibited by cycloheximide. Puromycin also inhibited water flow by the fourth challenge with vasopressin. The data suggest that protein synthesis inhibitors attenuate flow at a site that is distal to cAMP-dependent protein kinase. However, the reversal of inhibition in MIX-treated tissues suggests that the water pathway can be fully manifested given suitable stimulation. They conclude that either large stores of the transport system are available or that the transport system is extensively recycled on retrieval from the membrane

  6. Formyl Met-Leu-Phe-Stimulated FPR1 Phosphorylation in Plate-Adherent Human Neutrophils: Enhanced Proteolysis but Lack of Inhibition by Platelet-Activating Factor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Algirdas J. Jesaitis

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available N-formyl-Met-Leu-Phe (fMLF is a model PAMP/DAMP driving human PMN to sites of injury/infection utilizing the GPCR, FPR1. We examined a microtiter plate format for measurement of FPR1 phosphorylation in adherent PMN at high densities and found that a new phosphosensitive FPR1 fragment, 25K-FPR1, accumulates in SDS-PAGE extracts. 25K-FPR1 is fully inhibited by diisopropylfluorophosphate PMN pretreatment but is not physiologic, as its formation failed to be significantly perturbed by ATP depletion, time and temperature of adherence, or adherence mechanism. 25K-FPR1 was minimized by extracting fMLF-exposed PMN in lithium dodecylsulfate at 4°C prior to reduction/alkylation. After exposure of adherent PMN to a 5 log range of PAF before or after fMLF, unlike in suspension PMN, no inhibition of fMLF-induced FPR1 phosphorylation was observed. However, PAF induced the release of 40% of PMN lactate dehydrogenase, implying significant cell lysis. We infer that PAF-induced inhibition of fMLF-dependent FPR1 phosphorylation observed in suspension PMN does not occur in the unlysed adherent PMN. We speculate that although the conditions of the assay may induce PAF-stimulated necrosis, the cell densities on the plates may approach levels observed in inflamed tissues and provide for an explanation of PAF’s divergent effects on FPR1 phosphorylation as well as PMN function.

  7. Augmented brain function by coordinated reset stimulation with slowly varying sequences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magteld eZeitler

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Several brain disorders are characterized by abnormally strong neuronal synchrony. Coordinated Reset (CR stimulation was developed to selectively counteract abnormal neuronal synchrony by desynchronization. For this, phase resetting stimuli are delivered to different subpopulations in a timely coordinated way. In neural networks with spike timing-dependent plasticity CR stimulation may eventually lead to an anti-kindling, i.e. an unlearning of abnormal synaptic connectivity and abnormal synchrony. The spatiotemporal sequence by which all stimulation sites are stimulated exactly once is called the stimulation site sequence, or briefly sequence. So far, in simulations, pre-clinical and clinical applications CR was applied either with fixed sequences or rapidly varying sequences (RVS. In this computational study we show that appropriate repetition of the sequence with occasional random switching to the next sequence may significantly improve the anti-kindling effect of CR. To this end, a sequence is applied many times before randomly switching to the next sequence. This new method is called SVS CR stimulation, i.e. CR with slowly varying sequences. In a neuronal network with strong short-range excitatory and weak long-range inhibitory dynamic couplings SVS CR stimulation turns out to be superior to CR stimulation with fixed sequences or RVS.

  8. Augmented brain function by coordinated reset stimulation with slowly varying sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeitler, Magteld; Tass, Peter A

    2015-01-01

    Several brain disorders are characterized by abnormally strong neuronal synchrony. Coordinated Reset (CR) stimulation was developed to selectively counteract abnormal neuronal synchrony by desynchronization. For this, phase resetting stimuli are delivered to different subpopulations in a timely coordinated way. In neural networks with spike timing-dependent plasticity CR stimulation may eventually lead to an anti-kindling, i.e., an unlearning of abnormal synaptic connectivity and abnormal synchrony. The spatiotemporal sequence by which all stimulation sites are stimulated exactly once is called the stimulation site sequence, or briefly sequence. So far, in simulations, pre-clinical and clinical applications CR was applied either with fixed sequences or rapidly varying sequences (RVS). In this computational study we show that appropriate repetition of the sequence with occasional random switching to the next sequence may significantly improve the anti-kindling effect of CR. To this end, a sequence is applied many times before randomly switching to the next sequence. This new method is called SVS CR stimulation, i.e., CR with slowly varying sequences. In a neuronal network with strong short-range excitatory and weak long-range inhibitory dynamic couplings SVS CR stimulation turns out to be superior to CR stimulation with fixed sequences or RVS.

  9. Cardiotonic agent milrinone stimulates resorption in rodent bone organ culture.

    OpenAIRE

    Krieger, N S; Stappenbeck, T S; Stern, P H

    1987-01-01

    The cardiotonic agent amrinone inhibits bone resorption in vitro. Milrinone, an amrinone analog, is a more potent cardiotonic agent with lower toxicity. In contrast to amrinone, milrinone stimulated resorption in cultures of neonatal mouse calvaria and fetal rat limb bones. Threshold doses were 0.1 microM in calvaria and 0.1 mM in limb bones; maximal stimulation occurred in calvaria at 0.1 mM. Maximal responses to milrinone and parathyroid hormone were comparable. Milrinone concentrations bel...

  10. Protein tyrosine phosphatase-1B (PTP1B) helps regulate EGF-induced stimulation of S-phase entry in human corneal endothelial cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishino, Yutaka; Zhu, Cheng; Harris, Deshea L.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose Human corneal endothelial cells (HCEC), particularly from older donors, only proliferate weakly in response to EGF. The protein tyrosine phosphatase, PTP1B, is known to negatively regulate EGF-induced signaling in several cell types by dephosphorylating the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR). The current studies were conducted to determine whether PTP1B plays a role in regulating cell cycle entry in HCEC in response to EGF stimulation. Methods Donor corneas were obtained from the National Disease Research Interchange and accepted for study based on established exclusion criteria. PTP1B was localized in the endothelium of ex vivo corneas and in cultured cells by immunocytochemistry. Western blot analysis verified PTP1B protein expression in HCEC and then compared the relative expression of EGFR and PTP1B in HCEC from young (60 years old). The effect of inhibiting the activity of PTP1B on S-phase entry was tested by comparing time-dependent BrdU incorporation in subconfluent HCEC incubated in the presence or absence of the PTP1B inhibitor, CinnGEL 2Me, before EGF stimulation. Results PTP1B was localized in a punctate pattern mainly within the cytoplasm of HCEC in ex vivo corneas and cultured cells. Western blots revealed the presence of three PTP1B-positive bands in HCEC and the control. Further western blot analysis showed no significant age-related difference in expression of EGFR (p=0.444>0.05); however, PTP1B expression was significantly higher in HCEC from older donors (p=0.024<0.05). Pre-incubation of HCEC with the PTP1B inhibitor significantly increased (p=0.019<0.05) the number of BrdU positive cells by 48 h after EGF stimulation. Conclusions Both immunolocalization and western blot studies confirmed that PTP1B is expressed in HCEC. Staining patterns strongly suggest that at least a subset of PTP1B is localized to the cytoplasm and most likely to the endoplasmic reticulum, the known site of EGFR/PTP1B interaction following EGF stimulation. PTP1B

  11. Kaempferol inhibits thrombosis and platelet activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Jun-Hui; Park, Se-Eun; Kim, Sung-Jun; Kim, Seung

    2015-08-01

    The objectives of the present study were to investigate whether kaempferol affects pro-coagulant proteinase activity, fibrin clot formation, blood clot and thrombin (or collagen/epinephrine)-stimulated platelet activation, thrombosis, and coagulation in ICR (Imprinting Control Region) mice and SD (Sprague-Dawley) rats. Kaempferol significantly inhibited the enzymatic activities of thrombin and FXa by 68 ± 1.6% and 52 ± 2.4%, respectively. Kaempferol also inhibited fibrin polymer formation in turbidity. Microscopic analysis was performed using a fluorescent conjugate. Kaempferol completely attenuated phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) 1/2, p38, c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) 1/2, and phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K)/PKB (AKT) in thrombin-stimulated platelets and delayed aggregation time (clotting) by 34.6% in an assay of collagen/epinephrine-stimulated platelet activation. Moreover, kaempferol protected against thrombosis development in 3 animal models, including collagen/epinephrine- and thrombin-induced acute thromboembolism models and an FeCl3-induced carotid arterial thrombus model. The ex vivo anticoagulant effect of kaempferol was further confirmed in ICR mice. This study demonstrated that kaempferol may be clinically useful due to its ability to reduce or prevent thrombotic challenge. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. and Société Française de Biochimie et Biologie Moléculaire (SFBBM). All rights reserved.

  12. Optimal number of stimulation contacts for coordinated reset neuromodulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lysyansky, Borys; Popovych, Oleksandr V.; Tass, Peter A.

    2013-01-01

    In this computational study we investigate coordinated reset (CR) neuromodulation designed for an effective control of synchronization by multi-site stimulation of neuronal target populations. This method was suggested to effectively counteract pathological neuronal synchrony characteristic for several neurological disorders. We study how many stimulation sites are required for optimal CR-induced desynchronization. We found that a moderate increase of the number of stimulation sites may significantly prolong the post-stimulation desynchronized transient after the stimulation is completely switched off. This can, in turn, reduce the amount of the administered stimulation current for the intermittent ON–OFF CR stimulation protocol, where time intervals with stimulation ON are recurrently followed by time intervals with stimulation OFF. In addition, we found that the optimal number of stimulation sites essentially depends on how strongly the administered current decays within the neuronal tissue with increasing distance from the stimulation site. In particular, for a broad spatial stimulation profile, i.e., for a weak spatial decay rate of the stimulation current, CR stimulation can optimally be delivered via a small number of stimulation sites. Our findings may contribute to an optimization of therapeutic applications of CR neuromodulation. PMID:23885239

  13. Hyposmotic stimulation-induced nitric oxide production in outer hair cells of the guinea pig cochlea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeda-Nakazawa, Hiroko; Harada, Narinobu; Shen, Jing; Kubo, Nobuo; Zenner, Hans-Peter; Yamashita, Toshio

    2007-08-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) production during hyposmotic stimulation in outer hair cells (OHCs) of the guinea pig cochlea was investigated using the NO sensitive dye DAF-2. Simultaneous measurement of the cell length and NO production showed rapid hyposmotic-induced cell swelling to precede NO production in OHCs. Hyposmotic stimulation failed to induce NO production in the Ca2+-free solution. L-NG-nitroarginine methyl ester (L-NAME), a non-specific NO synthase inhibitor and gadolinium, a stretch-activated channel blocker inhibited the hyposmotic stimulation-induced NO production whereas suramin, a P2 receptor antagonist did not. S-nitroso-N-acetylpenicillamine (SNAP), a NO donor inhibited the hyposmotic stimulation-induced increase in the intracellular Ca2+ concentrations ([Ca2+]i) while L-NAME enhanced it. 1H-[1,2,4]oxadiazole[4,3a]quinoxalin-1-one, an inhibitor of guanylate cyclase and KT5823, an inhibitor of cGMP-dependent protein kinase (PKG) mimicked effects of L-NAME on the Ca2+ response. Transient receptor potential vanilloid 4 (TRPV4), an osmo- and mechanosensitive channel was expressed in the OHCs by means of immunohistochemistry. 4alpha-phorbol 12,13-didecanoate, a TRPV4 synthetic activator, induced NO production in OHCs. These results suggest that hyposmotic stimulation can induce NO production by the [Ca2+]i increase, which is presumably mediated by the activation of TRPV4 in OHCs. NO conversely inhibits the Ca2+ response via the NO-cGMP-PKG pathway by a feedback mechanism.

  14. Conditioned Media from Human Umbilical Cord Blood-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells Inhibits Melanogenesis by Promoting Proteasomal Degradation of MITF.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eun Sung Kim

    Full Text Available Human umbilical cord blood-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hUCB-MSCs secrete various beneficial molecules, which have anti-apoptotic activity and cell proliferation. However, the effect of hUCB-MSCs in melanogenesis is largely unclear. In this study, we show that conditioned media (CM derived from hUCB-MSCs inhibit melanogenesis by regulating microphthalmia-associated transcription factor (MITF expression via the ERK signalling pathway. Treatment of hUCB-MSC-CM strongly inhibited the alpha-melanocyte stimulating hormone-induced hyperpigmentation in melanoma cells as well as melanocytes. Treatment of hUCB-MSC-CM induced ERK1/2 activation in melanocytes. In addition, inhibition of ERK1/2 suppressed the anti-pigmentation activity of the hUCB-MSC-CM in melanocytes and in vitro artificial skin models. We also found that the expression of MITF was appreciably diminished while expression of phosphorylated MITF, which leads to its proteasomal degradation, was increased in cells treated with hUCB-MSC-CM. These results suggested that hUCB-MSC-CM significantly suppresses melanin synthesis via MITF degradation by the ERK pathway activation.

  15. Short-Term Dosage Regimen for Stimulation-Induced Long-Lasting Desynchronization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thanos Manos

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we computationally generate hypotheses for dose-finding studies in the context of desynchronizing neuromodulation techniques. Abnormally strong neuronal synchronization is a hallmark of several brain disorders. Coordinated Reset (CR stimulation is a spatio-temporally patterned stimulation technique that specifically aims at disrupting abnormal neuronal synchrony. In networks with spike-timing-dependent plasticity CR stimulation may ultimately cause an anti-kindling, i.e., an unlearning of abnormal synaptic connectivity and neuronal synchrony. This long-lasting desynchronization was theoretically predicted and verified in several pre-clinical and clinical studies. We have shown that CR stimulation with rapidly varying sequences (RVS robustly induces an anti-kindling at low intensities e.g., if the CR stimulation frequency (i.e., stimulus pattern repetition rate is in the range of the frequency of the neuronal oscillation. In contrast, CR stimulation with slowly varying sequences (SVS turned out to induce an anti-kindling more strongly, but less robustly with respect to variations of the CR stimulation frequency. Motivated by clinical constraints and inspired by the spacing principle of learning theory, in this computational study we propose a short-term dosage regimen that enables a robust anti-kindling effect of both RVS and SVS CR stimulation, also for those parameter values where RVS and SVS CR stimulation previously turned out to be ineffective. Intriguingly, for the vast majority of parameter values tested, spaced multishot CR stimulation with demand-controlled variation of stimulation frequency and intensity caused a robust and pronounced anti-kindling. In contrast, spaced CR stimulation with fixed stimulation parameters as well as singleshot CR stimulation of equal integral duration failed to improve the stimulation outcome. In the model network under consideration, our short-term dosage regimen enables to robustly induce

  16. Short-Term Dosage Regimen for Stimulation-Induced Long-Lasting Desynchronization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manos, Thanos; Zeitler, Magteld; Tass, Peter A

    2018-01-01

    In this paper, we computationally generate hypotheses for dose-finding studies in the context of desynchronizing neuromodulation techniques. Abnormally strong neuronal synchronization is a hallmark of several brain disorders. Coordinated Reset (CR) stimulation is a spatio-temporally patterned stimulation technique that specifically aims at disrupting abnormal neuronal synchrony. In networks with spike-timing-dependent plasticity CR stimulation may ultimately cause an anti-kindling, i.e., an unlearning of abnormal synaptic connectivity and neuronal synchrony. This long-lasting desynchronization was theoretically predicted and verified in several pre-clinical and clinical studies. We have shown that CR stimulation with rapidly varying sequences (RVS) robustly induces an anti-kindling at low intensities e.g., if the CR stimulation frequency (i.e., stimulus pattern repetition rate) is in the range of the frequency of the neuronal oscillation. In contrast, CR stimulation with slowly varying sequences (SVS) turned out to induce an anti-kindling more strongly, but less robustly with respect to variations of the CR stimulation frequency. Motivated by clinical constraints and inspired by the spacing principle of learning theory, in this computational study we propose a short-term dosage regimen that enables a robust anti-kindling effect of both RVS and SVS CR stimulation, also for those parameter values where RVS and SVS CR stimulation previously turned out to be ineffective. Intriguingly, for the vast majority of parameter values tested, spaced multishot CR stimulation with demand-controlled variation of stimulation frequency and intensity caused a robust and pronounced anti-kindling. In contrast, spaced CR stimulation with fixed stimulation parameters as well as singleshot CR stimulation of equal integral duration failed to improve the stimulation outcome. In the model network under consideration, our short-term dosage regimen enables to robustly induce long

  17. ADAMTS1 inhibits lymphangiogenesis by attenuating phosphorylation of the lymphatic endothelial cell-specific VEGF receptor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Inagaki, Junko; Takahashi, Katsuyuki; Ogawa, Hiroko; Asano, Keiichi; Faruk Hatipoglu, Omer; Zeynel Cilek, Mehmet; Obika, Masanari; Ohtsuki, Takashi [Department of Molecular Biology and Biochemistry, Okayama University Graduate School of Medicine, Dentistry and Pharmaceutical Sciences, Okayama (Japan); Hofmann, Matthias [Department of Dermatology, Venereology and Allergology, Goethe University, Frankfurt (Germany); Kusachi, Shozo [Department of Medical Technology, Okayama University Graduate School of Health Sciences, Okayama (Japan); Ninomiya, Yoshifumi [Department of Molecular Biology and Biochemistry, Okayama University Graduate School of Medicine, Dentistry and Pharmaceutical Sciences, Okayama (Japan); Hirohata, Satoshi, E-mail: hirohas@cc.okayama-u.ac.jp [Department of Molecular Biology and Biochemistry, Okayama University Graduate School of Medicine, Dentistry and Pharmaceutical Sciences, Okayama (Japan); International Center, Okayama University, Okayama (Japan)

    2014-05-01

    Angiogenesis and lymphangiogenesis play roles in malignant tumor progression, dissemination, and metastasis. ADAMTS1, a member of the matrix metalloproteinase family, is known to inhibit angiogenesis. Recombinant ADAMTS1 was shown to strongly inhibit angiogenesis. We investigated whether ADAMTS1 inhibited lymphangiogenesis in the present study. We examined cell proliferation and cell migration in normal human dermal lymphatic microvascular endothelial cells (HMVEC-dLy) transduced with or without adenoviral human ADAMTS1 gene therapy. We then examined the VEGFC/VEGFR3 signal transduction pathway in ADAMTS1-transduced HMVEC-dLy. Cell proliferation and tube formation in Matrigel were significantly lower with transduced ADAMTS1 than with control (non-transduced HMVEC-dLy). The phosphorylation of VEGFR3 was also attenuated by ADAMTS1 gene therapy in HMVEC-dLy. Immunoprecipitation assays revealed that ADAMTS1 formed a complex with VEGFC. Our results demonstrated that ADAMTS1 inhibited lymphangiogenesis in vitro. The data highlight the new function of ADAMTS1 in the regulation of lymphangiogenesis and the therapeutic potential of ADAMTS1 in cancer therapy. - Highlights: • ADAMTS1 significantly inhibited tube formation and cell proliferation in HMVEC-dLy. • Reduced lymph endothelial cell migration in ADAMTS1 transduced co-culture systems. • VEGFC-stimulated phosphorylation of VEGFR3 is attenuated by ADAMTS1. • Reduced phosphorylation of Akt and ERK1/2 in ADAMTS1 treated HMVEC-dLy. • ADAMTS1 binds directly to VEGFC.

  18. ADAMTS1 inhibits lymphangiogenesis by attenuating phosphorylation of the lymphatic endothelial cell-specific VEGF receptor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inagaki, Junko; Takahashi, Katsuyuki; Ogawa, Hiroko; Asano, Keiichi; Faruk Hatipoglu, Omer; Zeynel Cilek, Mehmet; Obika, Masanari; Ohtsuki, Takashi; Hofmann, Matthias; Kusachi, Shozo; Ninomiya, Yoshifumi; Hirohata, Satoshi

    2014-01-01

    Angiogenesis and lymphangiogenesis play roles in malignant tumor progression, dissemination, and metastasis. ADAMTS1, a member of the matrix metalloproteinase family, is known to inhibit angiogenesis. Recombinant ADAMTS1 was shown to strongly inhibit angiogenesis. We investigated whether ADAMTS1 inhibited lymphangiogenesis in the present study. We examined cell proliferation and cell migration in normal human dermal lymphatic microvascular endothelial cells (HMVEC-dLy) transduced with or without adenoviral human ADAMTS1 gene therapy. We then examined the VEGFC/VEGFR3 signal transduction pathway in ADAMTS1-transduced HMVEC-dLy. Cell proliferation and tube formation in Matrigel were significantly lower with transduced ADAMTS1 than with control (non-transduced HMVEC-dLy). The phosphorylation of VEGFR3 was also attenuated by ADAMTS1 gene therapy in HMVEC-dLy. Immunoprecipitation assays revealed that ADAMTS1 formed a complex with VEGFC. Our results demonstrated that ADAMTS1 inhibited lymphangiogenesis in vitro. The data highlight the new function of ADAMTS1 in the regulation of lymphangiogenesis and the therapeutic potential of ADAMTS1 in cancer therapy. - Highlights: • ADAMTS1 significantly inhibited tube formation and cell proliferation in HMVEC-dLy. • Reduced lymph endothelial cell migration in ADAMTS1 transduced co-culture systems. • VEGFC-stimulated phosphorylation of VEGFR3 is attenuated by ADAMTS1. • Reduced phosphorylation of Akt and ERK1/2 in ADAMTS1 treated HMVEC-dLy. • ADAMTS1 binds directly to VEGFC

  19. Stimulated Raman scattering and ion dynamics: the role of Langmuir wave non-linearities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonnaud, G.; Pesme, D.

    1987-01-01

    The saturation of the Stimulated Raman Scattering (SRS) is studied by means of wave-coupling numerical simulations. A new code (CHEOPS) has been designed in order to model these couplings, in real 1-D space, with aperiodic boundary conditions. Each wave can be represented either by a complete amplitude or by an envelope amplitude only. The choice of the wave set to be coupled allows to investigate separately some mechanisms relevant in long time SRS evolution. The various mechanisms which may inhibit SRS growth are reviewed and the SRS saturation scenarios are exhibited in an homogeneous density plasma slab. The ion dependent mechanisms appear to be the most efficient ones to saturate SRS. Their importance is strongly bound to the electron temperature and to the ion fluctuation level at time when SRS has already grown many e-foldings

  20. Stimulated secondary emission from semiconductor microcavities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, John Erland; Mizeikis, V.; Langbein, Wolfgang Werner

    2001-01-01

    We find strong influence of final-state stimulation on the time-resolved light emission dynamics from semiconductor microcavities after pulsed excitation allowing angle-resonant polariton-polariton scattering on the lower-polariton branch. The polariton dynamics can be controlled by injection...

  1. Luteolin, a flavonoid, inhibits AP-1 activation by basophils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirano, Toru; Higa, Shinji; Arimitsu, Junsuke; Naka, Tetsuji; Ogata, Atsushi; Shima, Yoshihito; Fujimoto, Minoru; Yamadori, Tomoki; Ohkawara, Tomoharu; Kuwabara, Yusuke; Kawai, Mari; Matsuda, Hisashi; Yoshikawa, Masayuki; Maezaki, Naoyoshi; Tanaka, Tetsuaki; Kawase, Ichiro; Tanaka, Toshio

    2006-01-01

    Flavonoids including luteolin, apigenin, and fisetin are inhibitors of IL-4 synthesis and CD40 ligand expression by basophils. This study was done to search for compounds with greater inhibitory activity of IL-4 expression and to clarify the molecular mechanisms through which flavonoids inhibit their expression. Of the 37 flavonoids and related compounds examined, ayanin, luteolin, and apigenin were the strongest inhibitors of IL-4 production by purified basophils in response to anti-IgE antibody plus IL-3. Luteolin did not suppress Syk or Lyn phosphorylation in basophils, nor did suppress p54/46 SAPK/JNK, p38 MAPK, and p44/42 MAPK activation by a basophilic cell line, KU812 cells, stimulated with A23187 and PMA. However, luteolin did inhibit phosphorylation of c-Jun and DNA binding activity of AP-1 in nuclear lysates from stimulated KU812 cells. These results provide a fundamental structure of flavonoids for IL-4 inhibition and demonstrate a novel action of flavonoids that suppresses the activation of AP-1

  2. Mifepristone inhibits extracellular matrix formation in uterine leiomyoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Amrita; Malik, Minnie; Britten, Joy; Cox, Jeris; Catherino, William H

    2016-04-01

    To characterize the efficacy of mifepristone treatment on extracellular matrix (ECM) production in leiomyomas. Laboratory study. University research laboratory. None. Treatment of human immortalized two-dimensional (2D) and three-dimensional (3D) leiomyoma and myometrial cells with mifepristone and the progestin promegestone (R5020). Expression of COL1A1, fibronectin, versican variant V0, and dermatopontin in treated leiomyoma cells by Western blot analysis and confirmatory immunohistochemistry staining of treated 3D cultures. Treatment with progestin stimulated production of COL1A1, fibronectin, versican, and dermatopontin. Mifepristone treatment inhibited protein production of these genes, most notably with versican expression. Combination treatment with both the agonist and antagonist further inhibited protein expression of these genes. Immunohistochemistry performed on 3D cultures demonstrated generalized inhibition of ECM protein concentration. Our study demonstrated that the progesterone agonist R5020 directly stimulated extracellular matrix components COL1A1, fibronectin, versican, and dermatopontin production in human leiomyoma cells. Progesterone antagonist mifepristone decreased protein production of these genes to levels comparable with untreated leiomyoma cells. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  3. Effect of stimulation intensity and botulinum toxin isoform on rat bladder strip contractions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Christopher P; Boone, Timothy B; de Groat, William C; Chancellor, Michael B; Somogyi, George T

    2003-07-15

    The present experiments compared the inhibitory effects of botulinum toxin A (BoNT-A) and botulinum toxin D (BoNT-D) on neurally evoked contractions of rat bladder strips. We examined the effect of fatigue (trains of 100 shocks at 20Hz every 20s for 10min) followed by non-fatigue stimulation (trains of 100 shocks at 20Hz every 100s for 20min) on the onset of effect and potency of the two toxins. For non-fatigue experiments, strips were untreated (n=4); or incubated with 1.36nM BoNT-A (n=4). During fatigue experiments, strips were untreated (n=5); or treated with either 1.36nM BoNT-A (n=6) or 0.8nM BoNT-D (n=6). In non-fatigue experiments, BoNT-A produced significant decreases in contractile area after 1h of stimulation compared to untreated strips (PD bladder strips, were statistically significant (PD-treated strips, as a significant reduction (PD) and untreated bladder strips responded similarly to atropine, suggesting that the effects of BoNT result from inhibition of both acetylcholine and ATP release. Our results demonstrate that BoNT-D may be a more effective agent to inhibit transmitter release from autonomic nerves of the rat lower urinary tract. Moreover, in our hands, non-fatigue stimulation is as effective as fatigue stimulation in inhibiting bladder strip contractions.

  4. Scaling Up Cortical Control Inhibits Pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jahrane Dale

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Summary: Acute pain evokes protective neural and behavioral responses. Chronic pain, however, disrupts normal nociceptive processing. The prefrontal cortex (PFC is known to exert top-down regulation of sensory inputs; unfortunately, how individual PFC neurons respond to an acute pain signal is not well characterized. We found that neurons in the prelimbic region of the PFC increased firing rates of the neurons after noxious stimulations in free-moving rats. Chronic pain, however, suppressed both basal spontaneous and pain-evoked firing rates. Furthermore, we identified a linear correlation between basal and evoked firing rates of PFC neurons, whereby a decrease in basal firing leads to a nearly 2-fold reduction in pain-evoked response in chronic pain states. In contrast, enhancing basal PFC activity with low-frequency optogenetic stimulation scaled up prefrontal outputs to inhibit pain. These results demonstrate a cortical gain control system for nociceptive regulation and establish scaling up prefrontal outputs as an effective neuromodulation strategy to inhibit pain. : Dale et al. find that acute pain increases activity levels in the prefrontal cortex. Chronic pain reduces both basal spontaneous and pain-evoked activity in this region, whereas neurostimulation to restore basal activities can in turn enhance nociception-evoked prefrontal activities to inhibit pain. Keywords: chronic pain, neuromodulation, prefrontal cortex, PFC, cortical gain control

  5. Optimal number of stimulation contacts for coordinated reset neuromodulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Borys eLysyansky

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available In this computational study we investigatecoordinated reset (CR neuromodulation designed for an effective controlof synchronization by multi-site stimulation of neuronal target populations. This method was suggested to effectively counteract pathological neuronal synchronycharacteristic for several neurological disorders. We studyhow many stimulation sites are required for optimal CR-induced desynchronization. We found that a moderate increase of the number of stimulation sitesmay significantly prolong the post-stimulation desynchronized transientafter the stimulation is completely switched off. This can, in turn,reduce the amount of the administered stimulation current for theintermittent ON-OFF CR stimulation protocol, where time intervalswith stimulation ON are recurrently followed by time intervals withstimulation OFF. In addition, we found that the optimal number ofstimulation sites essentially depends on how strongly the administeredcurrent decays within the neuronal tissue with increasing distancefrom the stimulation site. In particular, for a broad spatial stimulationprofile, i.e., for a weak spatial decay rate of the stimulation current,CR stimulation can optimally be delivered via a small number of stimulationsites. Our findings may contribute to an optimization of therapeutic applications of CR neuromodulation.

  6. Abscisic Acid Stimulates Elongation of Excised Pea Root Tips

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaither, Douglas H.; Lutz, Donald H.; Forrence, Leonard E.

    1975-01-01

    Excised Pisum sativum L. root tips were incubated in a pH 5.2 sucrose medium containing abscisic acid. Elongation growth was inhibited by 100 μm abscisic acid. However, decreasing the abscisic acid concentration caused stimulation of elongation, the maximum response (25% to 30%) occurring at 1 μm abscisic acid. Prior to two hours, stimulation of elongation by 1 μm abscisic acid was not detectable. Increased elongation did not occur in abscisic acid-treated root tips of Lens culinaris L., Phaseolus vulgaris L., or Zea mays L. PMID:16659198

  7. Measuring Feedforward Inhibition and Its Impact on Local Circuit Function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hull, Court

    2017-05-01

    This protocol describes a series of approaches to measure feedforward inhibition in acute brain slices from the cerebellar cortex. Using whole-cell voltage and current clamp recordings from Purkinje cells in conjunction with electrical stimulation of the parallel fibers, these methods demonstrate how to measure the relationship between excitation and inhibition in a feedforward circuit. This protocol also describes how to measure the impact of feedforward inhibition on Purkinje cell excitability, with an emphasis on spike timing. © 2017 Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press.

  8. PERIPUBERTAL PROCHLORAZ EXPOSURE STRONGLY INHIBITS TESTOSTERONE PRODUCTION, BUT HAS WEAK EFFECTS ON PUBERTY

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prochloraz (PCZ) is an imidazole fungicide that inhibits steroidogenesis and acts as an androgen receptor antagonist. We hypothesized that pubertal exposure to prochloraz would delay preputial separation and development of reproductive organs. Sprague Dawley rats were dosed wit...

  9. Cutting edge: Antimalarial drugs inhibit IFN-β production through blockade of cyclic GMP-AMP synthase-DNA interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Jie; Woodward, Joshua J; Sasaki, Tomikazu; Minie, Mark; Elkon, Keith B

    2015-05-01

    Type I IFN is strongly implicated in the pathogenesis of systemic autoimmune diseases, such as lupus, and rare monogenic IFNopathies, including Aicardi-Goutières syndrome. Recently, a new DNA-activated pathway involving the enzyme cyclic GMP-AMP synthase (cGAS) was described and potentially linked to Aicardi-Goutières syndrome. To identify drugs that could potentially inhibit cGAS activity, we performed in silico screening of drug libraries. By computational analysis, we identified several antimalarial drugs (AMDs) that were predicted to interact with the cGAS/dsDNA complex. Our studies validated that several AMDs were effective inhibitors of IFN-β production and that they functioned by inhibiting dsDNA stimulation of cGAS. Because AMDs have been widely used in human diseases and have an excellent safety profile, our findings suggest new therapeutic strategies for the treatment of severe debilitating diseases associated with type I IFNs due to cGAS activation. Copyright © 2015 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  10. Andrographolide Inhibits Inflammatory Cytokines Secretion in LPS-Stimulated RAW264.7 Cells through Suppression of NF-κB/MAPK Signaling Pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yu; He, Shengnan; Tang, Jishun; Ding, Nana; Chu, Xiaoyan; Cheng, Lianping; Ding, Xuedong; Liang, Ting; Feng, Shibin; Rahman, Sajid Ur; Wang, Xichun; Wu, Jinjie

    2017-01-01

    Andrographolide, the main active component extracted from Andrographis paniculata (Burm.f.) Wall. ex Nees, exerts anti-inflammatory effects; however, the principal molecular mechanisms remain unclear. The objective of this study was to investigate the molecular mechanisms of Andrographolide in modifying lipopolysaccharide- (LPS-) induced signaling pathway in RAW264.7 cells. An in vitro model of inflammation was induced by LPS in mouse RAW264.7 cells in the presence of Andrographolide. The concentration and expression levels of proinflammatory cytokines were determined by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR), respectively. The nuclear level of NF- κ B was measured by an electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA). The expression levels of NF- κ B, p38, ERK, and JNK were determined by western blot. Andrographolide dose-dependently inhibited the release and mRNA expression of TNF- α , IL-6, and IL-1 β in LPS-stimulated RAW264.7 cells. The nuclear level of p65 protein was decreased in Andrographolide treatment group. Western blot analysis showed that Andrographolide suppressed LPS-induced NF- κ B activation and the phosphorylation of IkBa, ERK1/2, JNK, and p38. These results suggest that Andrographolide exerts an anti-inflammatory effect by inhibiting the activation of NF- κ B/MAPK signaling pathway and the induction of proinflammatory cytokines.

  11. Andrographolide Inhibits Inflammatory Cytokines Secretion in LPS-Stimulated RAW264.7 Cells through Suppression of NF-κB/MAPK Signaling Pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Li

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Andrographolide, the main active component extracted from Andrographis paniculata (Burm.f. Wall. ex Nees, exerts anti-inflammatory effects; however, the principal molecular mechanisms remain unclear. The objective of this study was to investigate the molecular mechanisms of Andrographolide in modifying lipopolysaccharide- (LPS- induced signaling pathway in RAW264.7 cells. An in vitro model of inflammation was induced by LPS in mouse RAW264.7 cells in the presence of Andrographolide. The concentration and expression levels of proinflammatory cytokines were determined by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA and quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR, respectively. The nuclear level of NF-κB was measured by an electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA. The expression levels of NF-κB, p38, ERK, and JNK were determined by western blot. Andrographolide dose-dependently inhibited the release and mRNA expression of TNF-α, IL-6, and IL-1β in LPS-stimulated RAW264.7 cells. The nuclear level of p65 protein was decreased in Andrographolide treatment group. Western blot analysis showed that Andrographolide suppressed LPS-induced NF-κB activation and the phosphorylation of IkBa, ERK1/2, JNK, and p38. These results suggest that Andrographolide exerts an anti-inflammatory effect by inhibiting the activation of NF-κB/MAPK signaling pathway and the induction of proinflammatory cytokines.

  12. Cortical stimulation evokes abnormal responses in the dopamine-depleted rat basal ganglia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kita, Hitoshi; Kita, Takako

    2011-07-13

    The motor cortex (MC) sends massive projections to the basal ganglia. Motor disabilities in patients and animal models of Parkinson's disease (PD) may be caused by dopamine (DA)-depleted basal ganglia that abnormally process the information originating from MC. To study how DA depletion alters signal transfer in the basal ganglia, MC stimulation-induced (MC-induced) unitary responses were recorded from the basal ganglia of control and 6-hydroxydopamine-treated hemi-parkinsonian rats anesthetized with isoflurane. This report describes new findings about how DA depletion alters MC-induced responses. MC stimulation evokes an excitation in normally quiescent striatal (Str) neurons projecting to the globus pallidus external segment (GPe). After DA-depletion, the spontaneous firing of Str-GPe neurons increases, and MC stimulation evokes a shorter latency excitation followed by a long-lasting inhibition that was invisible under normal conditions. The increased firing activity and the newly exposed long inhibition generate tonic inhibition and a disfacilitation in GPe. The disfacilitation in GPe is then amplified in basal ganglia circuitry and generates a powerful long inhibition in the basal ganglia output nucleus, the globus pallidus internal segment. Intra-Str injections of a behaviorally effective dose of DA precursor l-3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine effectively reversed these changes. These newly observed mechanisms also support the generation of pauses and burst activity commonly observed in the basal ganglia of parkinsonian subjects. These results suggest that the generation of abnormal response sequences in the basal ganglia contributes to the development of motor disabilities in PD and that intra-Str DA supplements effectively suppress abnormal signal transfer.

  13. Effect of experimental diabetes on cholinergic, purinergic and peptidergic motor responses of the isolated rat bladder to electrical field stimulation or capsaicin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benkó, Rita; Lázár, Zsófia; Pórszász, Róbert; Somogyi, George T; Barthó, Loránd

    2003-09-30

    An attempt has been made to pharmacologically isolate cholinergic, P(2) purinoceptor-mediated and peptidergic (capsaicin-sensitive, tachykinin-mediated) contraction of the guanethidine-treated rat bladder detrusor preparation, in vitro. The effect of experimental diabetes was assessed on these types of contraction. Responses were evoked by electrical field stimulation (single shocks or 1 Hz for 30 s or 10 Hz for 40 s). Single shocks and 1-Hz stimulation were applied in the presence of (a). atropine (1 microM) or (b). P(2) purinoceptor antagonists (50 microM pyridoxalphosphate-6-azophenyl-2',4'-disulfonic acid) [PPADS] plus 100 microM suramin. Long-term electrical field stimulation (10 Hz for 40 s) (c). was applied with both atropine and the P(2) purinoceptor antagonists present in the organ bath. The effects of capsaicin (d). and ATP (e). were also studied. Three groups of experimental animals were used: streptozotocin-treated (50 mg.kg(-1) i.p., 8 weeks before the experiment), parallel solvent-treated and untreated rats. (a). Responses to electrical field stimulation in the presence of atropine were reduced by half by PPADS plus suramin, but were resistant to capsaicin tachyphylaxis. They were enhanced in preparations taken from diabetic rats. (b). Contractions to electrical field stimulation in the presence of PPADS plus suramin were reduced by 2/3 by atropine, but were left unchanged by capsaicin or diabetes. (c). Contractions to long-term stimulation had a quick and a sustained phase. Especially the latter was inhibited by capsaicin tachypyhlaxis; it was also strongly reduced in preparations taken from diabetic rats. (d). Contractions to capsaicin (30 nM and 1 microM) were resistant to tetrodotoxin, strongly reduced by a combination of tachykinin NK(1) and NK(2) receptor antagonists, and slightly reduced in preparations from diabetic animals. Capsaicin (1 microM) had no acute inhibitory action on cholinergic or purinergic responses, nor did it cause relaxation

  14. Effects of sphingosine and sphingosine analogues on the free radical production by stimulated neutrophils: ESR and chemiluminescence studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Mouithys-Mickalad

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available Sphingolipids inhibit the activation of the neutrophil (PMN NADPH oxidase by protein kinase C pathway. By electron spin resonance spectroscopy (ESR and chemiluminescence (CL, we studied the effects of sphingosine (SPN and ceramide analogues on phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA, 5 × 10-7M stimulated PMN (6 × 106 cells. By ESR with spin trapping (100 mM DMPO: 5,5-dimethyl-1-pyrroline-Noxide, we showed that SPN (5 to 8 × 10-6M, C2-ceramide (N-acetyl SPN and C6-ceramide (N-hexanoyl SPN at the final concentration of 2 × 10-5 and 2 × 10-4M inhibit the production of free radicals by stimulated PMN. The ESR spectrum of stimulated PMN was that of DMPO-superoxide anion spin adduct. Inhibition by 5 × 10-6M SPN was equivalent to that of 30 U/ml SOD. SPN (5 to 8 × 10-6M has no effect on in vitro systems generating superoxide anion (xanthine 50 mM/xanthine oxidase 110 mU/ml or hydroxyl radical (Fenton reaction: 88 mM H2O2, 0.01 mM Fe2+ and 0.01 mM EDTA. SPN and N-acetyl SPN also inhibited the CL of PMA stimulated PMN in a dose dependent manner (from 2 × 10-6 to 10-5M, but N-hexanoyl SPN was less active (from 2 × 10-5 to 2 × 10-4M. These effects were compared with those of known PMN inhibitors, superoxide dismutase, catalase and azide. SPN was a better inhibitor compared with these agents. The complete inhibition by SPN of ESR signal and CL of stimulated PMN confirms that this compound or one of its metabolites act at the level of NADPH-oxidase, the key enzyme responsible for production of oxygen-derived free radicals.

  15. Human lactoferrin stimulates skin keratinocyte function and wound re-epithelialization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, L; Wu, J J; Ma, Q; Cui, T; Andreopoulos, F M; Gil, J; Valdes, J; Davis, S C; Li, J

    2010-07-01

    Human lactoferrin (hLF), a member of the transferrin family, is known for its antimicrobial and anti-inflammatory effects. Recent studies on various nonskin cell lines indicate that hLF may have a stimulatory effect on cell proliferation. To study the potential role of hLF in wound re-epithelialization. The effects of hLF on cell growth, migration, attachment and survival were assessed, with a rice-derived recombinant hLF (holo-rhLF), using proliferation analysis, scratch migration assay, calcein-AM/propidium iodide staining and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick-end labelling (TUNEL) method, respectively. The mechanisms of hLF on cell proliferation and migration were explored using specific pathway inhibitors. The involvement of lactoferrin receptor low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 1 (LRP1) was examined with RNA interference technique. An in vivo swine second-degree burn wound model was also used to assess wound re-epithelialization. Studies revealed that holo-rhLF significantly stimulated keratinocyte proliferation which could be blocked by mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) kinase 1 inhibitor. Holo-rhLF also showed strong promoting effects on keratinocyte migration, which could be blocked by either inhibition of the MAPK, Src and Rho/ROCK pathways, or downregulation of the LRP1 receptor. With cells under starving or 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate exposure, the addition of holo-rhLF was found greatly to increase cell viability and inhibit cell apoptosis. Additionally, holo-rhLF significantly increased the rate of wound re-epithelialization in swine second-degree burn wounds. Our studies demonstrate the direct effects of holo-rhLF on wound re-epithelialization including the enhancement of keratinocyte proliferation and migration as well as the protection of cells from apoptosis. The data strongly indicate its potential therapeutic applications in wound healing.

  16. β-Glucan from Lentinus edodes inhibits nitric oxide and tumor necrosis factor-α production and phosphorylation of mitogen-activated protein kinases in lipopolysaccharide-stimulated murine RAW 264.7 macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xiaojuan; Yasuda, Michiko; Nakamura-Tsuruta, Sachiko; Mizuno, Masashi; Ashida, Hitoshi

    2012-01-06

    Lentinan (LNT), a β-glucan from the fruiting bodies of Lentinus edodes, is well known to have immunomodulatory activity. NO and TNF-α are associated with many inflammatory diseases. In this study, we investigated the effects of LNT extracted by sonication (LNT-S) on the NO and TNF-α production in LPS-stimulated murine RAW 264.7 macrophages. The results suggested that treatment with LNT-S not only resulted in the striking inhibition of TNF-α and NO production in LPS-activated macrophage RAW 264.7 cells, but also the protein expression of inducible NOS (iNOS) and the gene expression of iNOS mRNA and TNF-α mRNA. It is surprising that LNT-S enhanced LPS-induced NF-κB p65 nuclear translocation and NF-κB luciferase activity, but severely inhibited the phosphorylation of JNK1/2 and ERK1/2. The neutralizing antibodies of anti-Dectin-1 and anti-TLR2 hardly affected the inhibition of NO production. All of these results suggested that the suppression of LPS-induced NO and TNF-α production was at least partially attributable to the inhibition of JNK1/2 and ERK1/2 activation. This work discovered a promising molecule to control the diseases associated with overproduction of NO and TNF-α.

  17. Potassium humate inhibits complement activation and the production of inflammatory cytokines in vitro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    van Rensburg, C.E.J.; Naude, P.J. [University of Pretoria, Pretoria (South Africa)

    2009-08-15

    The effects of brown coal derived potassium humate on lymphocyte proliferation, cytokine production and complement activation were investigated in vitro. Potassium humate increased lymphocyte proliferation of phytohaemaglutinin A (PHA) and pokeweed mitogen (PWM) stimulated mononuclear lymphocytes (MNL) in vitro from concentrations of 20 to 80 {mu} g/ml, in a dose dependant manner. On the other hand potassium humate, at 40 {mu} g/ml, significantly inhibited the release of TNF-alpha, IL-1 beta, IL-6 and IL-10 by PHA stimulated MNL. Regarding complement activation it was found that potassium humate inhibits the activation of both the alternative and classical pathways without affecting the stability of the red blood cell membranes. These results indicate that the anti-inflammatory potential of potassium humate could be partially due to the inhibition of pro-inflammatory cytokines responsible for the initiation of these reactions as well as inhibition of complement activation. The increased lymphocyte proliferation observed, might be due to increased IL-2 production as previously been documented.

  18. Alpha 2-adrenergic receptor stimulation of phospholipase A2 and of adenylate cyclase in transfected Chinese hamster ovary cells is mediated by different mechanisms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, S.B.; Halenda, S.P.; Bylund, D.B.

    1991-01-01

    The effect of alpha 2-adrenergic receptor activation on adenylate cyclase activity in Chinese hamster ovary cells stably transfected with the alpha 2A-adrenergic receptor gene is biphasic. At lower concentrations of epinephrine forskolin-stimulated cyclic AMP production is inhibited, but at higher concentrations the inhibition is reversed. Both of these effects are blocked by the alpha 2 antagonist yohimbine but not by the alpha 1 antagonist prazosin. Pretreatment with pertussis toxin attenuates inhibition at lower concentrations of epinephrine and greatly potentiates forskolin-stimulated cyclic AMP production at higher concentrations of epinephrine. alpha 2-Adrenergic receptor stimulation also causes arachidonic acid mobilization, presumably via phospholipase A2. This effect is blocked by yohimbine, quinacrine, removal of extracellular Ca2+, and pretreatment with pertussis toxin. Quinacrine and removal of extracellular Ca2+, in contrast, have no effect on the enhanced forskolin-stimulated cyclic AMP production. Thus, it appears that the alpha 2-adrenergic receptor in these cells can simultaneously activate distinct signal transduction systems; inhibition of adenylate cyclase and stimulation of phospholipase A2, both via G1, and potentiation of cyclic AMP production by a different (pertussis toxin-insensitive) mechanism

  19. Alpha 2-adrenergic receptor stimulation of phospholipase A2 and of adenylate cyclase in transfected Chinese hamster ovary cells is mediated by different mechanisms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, S.B.; Halenda, S.P.; Bylund, D.B. (Univ. of Missouri-Columbia (USA))

    1991-02-01

    The effect of alpha 2-adrenergic receptor activation on adenylate cyclase activity in Chinese hamster ovary cells stably transfected with the alpha 2A-adrenergic receptor gene is biphasic. At lower concentrations of epinephrine forskolin-stimulated cyclic AMP production is inhibited, but at higher concentrations the inhibition is reversed. Both of these effects are blocked by the alpha 2 antagonist yohimbine but not by the alpha 1 antagonist prazosin. Pretreatment with pertussis toxin attenuates inhibition at lower concentrations of epinephrine and greatly potentiates forskolin-stimulated cyclic AMP production at higher concentrations of epinephrine. alpha 2-Adrenergic receptor stimulation also causes arachidonic acid mobilization, presumably via phospholipase A2. This effect is blocked by yohimbine, quinacrine, removal of extracellular Ca2+, and pretreatment with pertussis toxin. Quinacrine and removal of extracellular Ca2+, in contrast, have no effect on the enhanced forskolin-stimulated cyclic AMP production. Thus, it appears that the alpha 2-adrenergic receptor in these cells can simultaneously activate distinct signal transduction systems; inhibition of adenylate cyclase and stimulation of phospholipase A2, both via G1, and potentiation of cyclic AMP production by a different (pertussis toxin-insensitive) mechanism.

  20. The autophagoproteasome a novel cell clearing organelle in baseline and stimulated conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paola Lenzi

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Protein clearing pathways named autophagy (ATG and ubiquitin proteasome (UP control homeostasis within eukaryotic cells, while their dysfunction produces neurodegeneration. These pathways are viewed as distinct biochemical cascades occurring within specific cytosolic compartments owing pathway-specific enzymatic activity.Recent data strongly challenged the concept of two morphologically distinct and functionally segregated compartments. In fact, preliminary evidence suggests the convergence of these pathways to form a novel organelle named autophagoproteasome. This is characterized in the present study by using a cell line where, mTOR activity is upregulated and autophagy is suppressed. This was reversed dose-dependently by administering the mTOR inhibitor rapamycin. Thus, we could study autophagoproteasomes when autophagy was either suppressed or stimulated. The occurrence of autophagoproteasome was shown also in non-human cell lines. Ultrastructural morphometry, based on the stochiometric binding of immunogold particles allowed the quantitative evaluation of ATG and UP component within autophagoproteasomes. The number of autophagoproteasomes increases following mTOR inhibition. Similarly, mTOR inhibition produces overexpression of both LC3 and P20S particles. This is confirmed by the fact that the ratio of free vs autophagosome-bound LC3 is similar to that measured for P20S, both in baseline conditions and following mTOR inhibition. Remarkably, within autophagoproteasomes there is a slight prevalence of ATG compared with UP components for low rapamycin doses, whereas for higher rapamycin doses UP increases more than ATG. While LC3 is widely present within cytosol, UP is strongly polarized within autophagoproteasomes. These fine details were evident at electron microscopy but could not be deciphered by using confocal microscopy. Despite its morphological novelty autophagoproteasomes appear the natural site where clearing pathways (once believed

  1. The Autophagoproteasome a Novel Cell Clearing Organelle in Baseline and Stimulated Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenzi, Paola; Lazzeri, Gloria; Biagioni, Francesca; Busceti, Carla L; Gambardella, Stefano; Salvetti, Alessandra; Fornai, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    Protein clearing pathways named autophagy (ATG) and ubiquitin proteasome (UP) control homeostasis within eukaryotic cells, while their dysfunction produces neurodegeneration. These pathways are viewed as distinct biochemical cascades occurring within specific cytosolic compartments owing pathway-specific enzymatic activity. Recent data strongly challenged the concept of two morphologically distinct and functionally segregated compartments. In fact, preliminary evidence suggests the convergence of these pathways to form a novel organelle named autophagoproteasome. This is characterized in the present study by using a cell line where, mTOR activity is upregulated and autophagy is suppressed. This was reversed dose-dependently by administering the mTOR inhibitor rapamycin. Thus, we could study autophagoproteasomes when autophagy was either suppressed or stimulated. The occurrence of autophagoproteasome was shown also in non-human cell lines. Ultrastructural morphometry, based on the stochiometric binding of immunogold particles allowed the quantitative evaluation of ATG and UP component within autophagoproteasomes. The number of autophagoproteasomes increases following mTOR inhibition. Similarly, mTOR inhibition produces overexpression of both LC3 and P20S particles. This is confirmed by the fact that the ratio of free vs. autophagosome-bound LC3 is similar to that measured for P20S, both in baseline conditions and following mTOR inhibition. Remarkably, within autophagoproteasomes there is a slight prevalence of ATG compared with UP components for low rapamycin doses, whereas for higher rapamycin doses UP increases more than ATG. While LC3 is widely present within cytosol, UP is strongly polarized within autophagoproteasomes. These fine details were evident at electron microscopy but could not be deciphered by using confocal microscopy. Despite its morphological novelty autophagoproteasomes appear in the natural site where clearing pathways (once believed to be

  2. Improvement of language functions in a chronic non-fluent post-stroke aphasic patient following bilateral sequential theta burst magnetic stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vuksanović, Jasmina; Jelić, Milan B; Milanović, Sladjan D; Kačar, Katarina; Konstantinović, Ljubica; Filipović, Saša R

    2015-01-01

    In chronic non-fluent aphasia patients, inhibition of the intact right hemisphere (RH), by transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) or similar methods, can induce improvement in language functions. The supposed mechanism behind this improvement is a release of preserved left hemisphere (LH) language networks from RH transcallosal inhibition. Direct stimulation of the damaged LH can sometimes bring similar results too. Therefore, we developed a novel treatment approach that combined direct LH (Broca's area (BA)) stimulation, by intermittent theta burst stimulation (TBS), with homologue RH area's inhibition, by continuous TBS. We present the results of application of 15 daily sessions of the described treatment approach in a right-handed patient with chronic post-stroke non-fluent aphasia. The intervention appeared to improve several language functions, but most notably propositional speech, semantic fluency, short-term verbal memory, and verbal learning. Bilateral TBS modulation of activation of the language-related areas of both hemispheres seems to be a feasible and promising way to induce recovery in chronic aphasic patients. Due to potentially cumulative physiological effects of bilateral stimulation, the improvements may be even greater than following unilateral interventions.

  3. Inhibition of presynaptic activity by zinc released from mossy fiber terminals during tetanic stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minami, Akira; Sakurada, Naomi; Fuke, Sayuri; Kikuchi, Kazuya; Nagano, Tetsuo; Oku, Naoto; Takeda, Atsushi

    2006-01-01

    Zinc exists in high densities in the giant boutons of hippocampal mossy fibers. On the basis of the evidence that zinc decreases extracellular glutamate concentration in the hippocampus, the presynaptic action of zinc released from mossy fibers during high-frequency (tetanic) stimulation was examined using hippocampal slices. The increase in zinc-specific fluorescent signals was observed in both extracellular and intracellular compartments in the mossy fiber terminals during the delivery of tetanic stimuli (100 Hz, 1 sec) to the dentate granule cell layer, suggesting that zinc released from mossy fibers is immediately retaken up by mossy fibers. When mossy fiber terminals were preferentially double-stained with zinc and calcium indicators and tetanic stimuli (100 Hz, 1 sec) were delivered to the dentate granule cell layer, the increase in calcium orange signal during the stimulation was enhanced in mossy fiber terminals by addition of CaEDTA, a membrane-impermeable zinc chelator, and was suppressed by addition of zinc. The decrease in FM4-64 signal (vesicular exocytosis) during tetanic stimulation (10 Hz, 180 sec), which induced mossy fiber long-term potentiation, was also enhanced in mossy fiber terminals by addition of CaEDTA and was suppressed by addition of zinc. The present study demonstrates that zinc released from mossy fibers may be a negative-feedback factor against presynaptic activity during tetanic stimulation.

  4. Undecylenic Acid Inhibits Morphogenesis of Candida albicans

    OpenAIRE

    McLain, Nealoo; Ascanio, Rhoda; Baker, Carol; Strohaver, Robert A.; Dolan, Joseph W.

    2000-01-01

    Resilient liners are frequently used to treat denture stomatitis, a condition often associated with Candida albicans infections. Of 10 liners tested, 2 were found to inhibit the switch from the yeast form to hyphae and a third was found to stimulate this switch. The inhibitor was determined to be undecylenic acid.

  5. Undecylenic acid inhibits morphogenesis of Candida albicans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLain, N; Ascanio, R; Baker, C; Strohaver, R A; Dolan, J W

    2000-10-01

    Resilient liners are frequently used to treat denture stomatitis, a condition often associated with Candida albicans infections. Of 10 liners tested, 2 were found to inhibit the switch from the yeast form to hyphae and a third was found to stimulate this switch. The inhibitor was determined to be undecylenic acid.

  6. Stroke rehabilitation using noninvasive cortical stimulation: aphasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mylius, Veit; Zouari, Hela G; Ayache, Samar S; Farhat, Wassim H; Lefaucheur, Jean-Pascal

    2012-08-01

    Poststroke aphasia results from the lesion of cortical areas involved in the motor production of speech (Broca's aphasia) or in the semantic aspects of language comprehension (Wernicke's aphasia). Such lesions produce an important reorganization of speech/language-specific brain networks due to an imbalance between cortical facilitation and inhibition. In fact, functional recovery is associated with changes in the excitability of the damaged neural structures and their connections. Two main mechanisms are involved in poststroke aphasia recovery: the recruitment of perilesional regions of the left hemisphere in case of small lesion and the acquisition of language processing ability in homotopic areas of the nondominant right hemisphere when left hemispheric language abilities are permanently lost. There is some evidence that noninvasive cortical stimulation, especially when combined with language therapy or other therapeutic approaches, can promote aphasia recovery. Cortical stimulation was mainly used to either increase perilesional excitability or reduce contralesional activity based on the concept of reciprocal inhibition and maladaptive plasticity. However, recent studies also showed some positive effects of the reinforcement of neural activities in the contralateral right hemisphere, based on the potential compensatory role of the nondominant hemisphere in stroke recovery.

  7. Inhibition of the primary motor cortex and the upgoing thumb sign

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonia Nucera

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: The upgoing thumb sign has been frequently observed in patients with minor strokes and transient ischemic attacks as an indicator of brain involvement. We assessed the effect of primary motor cortex (M1 inhibition in the development of the upgoing thumb sign. Methods: Used repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (rTMS, 1Hz frequency for 15min, 1s ISI, 900 pulses at 60% of resting motor threshold to inhibit the right or left primary motor cortex of 10 healthy individuals. Participants were examined before and after rTMS by a neurologist who was blind to the site of motor cortex inhibition. Results: 10 neurological intact participants (5 women/5 men were recruited for this study. 2 cases were excluded due to pre-existing possible thumb signs. After the inhibition of the primary motor cortex, in 6 subjects out of 8, we observed a thumb sign contralateral to the site of primary motor cortex inhibition. In one subject an ipsilateral thumbs sign was noted. In another case, we did not find an upgoing thumb sign. Conclusion: The upgoing thumb sign is a subtle neurological finding that may be related to the primary motor cortex or corticospinal pathways involvements. Keywords: Corticospinal tract, Upper motor neuron lesions, Primary motor cortex, Transcranial magnetic stimulation

  8. No Effects of Bilateral tDCS over Inferior Frontal Gyrus on Response Inhibition and Aggression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Franziska Dambacher

    Full Text Available Response inhibition is defined as the capacity to adequately withdraw pre-planned responses. It has been shown that individuals with deficits in inhibiting pre-planned responses tend to display more aggressive behaviour. The prefrontal cortex is involved in both, response inhibition and aggression. While response inhibition is mostly associated with predominantly right prefrontal activity, the neural components underlying aggression seem to be left-lateralized. These differences in hemispheric dominance are conceptualized in cortical asymmetry theories on motivational direction, which assign avoidance motivation (relevant to inhibit responses to the right and approach motivation (relevant for aggressive actions to the left prefrontal cortex. The current study aimed to directly address the inverse relationship between response inhibition and aggression by assessing them within one experiment. Sixty-nine healthy participants underwent bilateral transcranial Direct Current Stimulation (tDCS to the inferior frontal cortex. In one group we induced right-hemispheric fronto-cortical dominance by means of a combined right prefrontal anodal and left prefrontal cathodal tDCS montage. In a second group we induced left-hemispheric fronto-cortical dominance by means of a combined left prefrontal anodal and right prefrontal cathodal tDCS montage. A control group received sham stimulation. Response inhibition was assessed with a go/no-go task (GNGT and aggression with the Taylor Aggression Paradigm (TAP. We revealed that participants with poorer performance in the GNGT displayed more aggression during the TAP. No effects of bilateral prefrontal tDCS on either response inhibition or aggression were observed. This is at odds with previous brain stimulation studies applying unilateral protocols. Our results failed to provide evidence in support of the prefrontal cortical asymmetry model in the domain of response inhibition and aggression. The absence of t

  9. Irreversible inhibition of RANK expression as a possible mechanism for IL-3 inhibition of RANKL-induced osteoclastogenesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khapli, Shruti M.; Tomar, Geetanjali B.; Barhanpurkar, Amruta P.; Gupta, Navita; Yogesha, S.D.; Pote, Satish T. [National Center for Cell Science, University of Pune Campus, Pune 411 007 (India); Wani, Mohan R., E-mail: mohanwani@nccs.res.in [National Center for Cell Science, University of Pune Campus, Pune 411 007 (India)

    2010-09-03

    Research highlights: {yields} IL-3 inhibits receptor activator of NF-{kappa}B ligand (RANKL)-induced osteoclastogenesis. {yields} IL-3 inhibits RANKL-induced JNK activation. {yields} IL-3 down-regulates expression of c-Fos and NFATc1 transcription factors. {yields} IL-3 down-regulates RANK expression posttranscriptionally and irreversibly. {yields} IL-3 inhibits in vivo RANK expression. -- Abstract: IL-3, a cytokine secreted by activated T lymphocytes, stimulates the proliferation, differentiation and survival of pluripotent hematopoietic stem cells. In this study, we investigated the mechanism of inhibitory action of IL-3 on osteoclast differentiation. We show here that IL-3 significantly inhibits receptor activator of NF-{kappa}B (RANK) ligand (RANKL)-induced activation of c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK). IL-3 down-regulates expression of c-Fos and nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFATc1) transcription factors. In addition, IL-3 down-regulates RANK expression posttranscriptionally in both purified osteoclast precursors and whole bone marrow cells. Furthermore, the inhibitory effect of IL-3 on RANK expression was irreversible. Interestingly, IL-3 inhibits in vivo RANK expression in mice. Thus, we provide the first evidence that IL-3 irreversibly inhibits RANK expression that results in inhibition of important signaling molecules induced by RANKL.

  10. Irreversible inhibition of RANK expression as a possible mechanism for IL-3 inhibition of RANKL-induced osteoclastogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khapli, Shruti M.; Tomar, Geetanjali B.; Barhanpurkar, Amruta P.; Gupta, Navita; Yogesha, S.D.; Pote, Satish T.; Wani, Mohan R.

    2010-01-01

    Research highlights: → IL-3 inhibits receptor activator of NF-κB ligand (RANKL)-induced osteoclastogenesis. → IL-3 inhibits RANKL-induced JNK activation. → IL-3 down-regulates expression of c-Fos and NFATc1 transcription factors. → IL-3 down-regulates RANK expression posttranscriptionally and irreversibly. → IL-3 inhibits in vivo RANK expression. -- Abstract: IL-3, a cytokine secreted by activated T lymphocytes, stimulates the proliferation, differentiation and survival of pluripotent hematopoietic stem cells. In this study, we investigated the mechanism of inhibitory action of IL-3 on osteoclast differentiation. We show here that IL-3 significantly inhibits receptor activator of NF-κB (RANK) ligand (RANKL)-induced activation of c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK). IL-3 down-regulates expression of c-Fos and nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFATc1) transcription factors. In addition, IL-3 down-regulates RANK expression posttranscriptionally in both purified osteoclast precursors and whole bone marrow cells. Furthermore, the inhibitory effect of IL-3 on RANK expression was irreversible. Interestingly, IL-3 inhibits in vivo RANK expression in mice. Thus, we provide the first evidence that IL-3 irreversibly inhibits RANK expression that results in inhibition of important signaling molecules induced by RANKL.

  11. Bioassays for the determination of nitrification inhibition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grunditz, Camilla

    1999-07-01

    Requirements for nitrogen reduction in wastewater treatment plants were introduced in Sweden in the early 1990's. This was a governmental move to reduce the nitrogen discharges to the Baltic and Kattegat in order to prevent eutrophication. The nitrification process in wastewater treatment plants is performed by nitrifying bacteria. These are susceptible to inhibition and it is of great importance that the influent water does not contain toxic compounds. Therefore, there is a need for assays for the determination of nitrification inhibition. This thesis describes the development and applications of such bioassays. Pure cultures of Nitrosomonas sp. and Nitrobacter sp. were isolated from activated sludge of a wastewater treatment plant. These cultures were used as test organisms in the development of bioassays for nitrification inhibition measurements. The assays are based on two different principles; cell suspensions of the bacteria, performed in test tubes, and mediated amperometric biosensors with the bacteria immobilised. Ammonia oxidation and nitrite oxidation are studied separately without interference from other organisms, which makes it easier to interpret the results. The cell suspension assays were applied to samples of industrial and municipal wastewater. The Nitrosomonas and Nitrobacter assays showed to have different inhibition patterns. A large percentage of the Swedish municipal wastewater treatment plants were found to receive inhibitory influent water, but the inhibition level was generally low. Compared to an assay based on activated sludge, the screening method, the pure culture assays found more samples of influent water strongly inhibitory or stimulating. The highest correlation was found between the screening method and the Nitrosomonas assay. The Nitrobacter assay was found to be the most sensitive method. Assessment of toxicity of a number of chemical substances was studied using the biosensors, together with the cell suspension assays

  12. Microwave induced stimulation of 32Pi incorporation into phosphoinositides of rat brain synaptosomes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gandhi, C.R.; Ross, D.H.

    1989-01-01

    Exposure of synaptosomes to microwave radiation at a power density of 10 mW/sq cm or more produced stimulation of the 32 Pi-incorporation into phosphoinositides. The extent of 32 Pi incorporation was found to be much more pronounced in phosphatidylinositol-4-phosphate (PIP), and phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphosphate (PIP 2 ) as compared to phosphatidylinositol (PI) and phosphatidic acid (PA). Other lipids were also found to incorporate 32 Pi but no significant changes in their labeling were seen after exposure to microwave radiation. Inclusion of 10 mM lithium in the medium reduced the basal labeling of PIP 2 , PIP and PI and increased PA labeling. Li + also inhibited the microwave stimulated PIP 2 , PIP and PI labeling but had no effect on PA labeling. Calcium inophore, A 23187 , inhibited the basal and microwave stimulated 32 Pi labeling of PIP and PIP 2 , stimulated basal labeling of PA and PI and had no effect on microwave stimulated PA and PI labeling. Calcium chelator, EGTA, on the other hand, had no effect on basal labeling of PA and PI, stimulated basal PIP and PIP 2 labeling but did not alter microwave stimulated labeling of these lipids. Exposure of synaptosomes to microwave radiation did not alter the chemical concentration of phosphoinositides indicating that the turnover of these lipids was altered. These results suggest that low frequency microwave radiation alter the metabolism of inositol phospholipids by enhancing their turnover and thus may affect the transmembrane signalling in the nerve endings. (orig.)

  13. N-acetyl lysyltyrosylcysteine amide inhibits myeloperoxidase, a novel tripeptide inhibitor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hao; Jing, Xigang; Shi, Yang; Xu, Hao; Du, Jianhai; Guan, Tongju; Weihrauch, Dorothee; Jones, Deron W; Wang, Weiling; Gourlay, David; Oldham, Keith T; Hillery, Cheryl A; Pritchard, Kirkwood A

    2013-11-01

    Myeloperoxidase (MPO) plays important roles in disease by increasing oxidative and nitrosative stress and oxidizing lipoproteins. Here we report N-acetyl lysyltyrosylcysteine amide (KYC) is an effective inhibitor of MPO activity. We show KYC inhibits MPO-mediated hypochlorous acid (HOCl) formation and nitration/oxidation of LDL. Disulfide is the major product of MPO-mediated KYC oxidation. KYC (≤4,000 μM) does not induce cytotoxicity in bovine aortic endothelial cells (BAECs). KYC inhibits HOCl generation by phorbol myristate acetate (PMA)-stimulated neutrophils and human promyelocytic leukemia (HL-60) cells but not superoxide generation by PMA-stimulated HL-60 cells. KYC inhibits MPO-mediated HOCl formation in BAEC culture and protects BAECs from MPO-induced injury. KYC inhibits MPO-mediated lipid peroxidation of LDL whereas tyrosine (Tyr) and tryptophan (Trp) enhance oxidation. KYC is unique as its isomers do not inhibit MPO activity, or are much less effective. Ultraviolet-visible spectral studies indicate KYC binds to the active site of MPO and reacts with compounds I and II. Docking studies show the Tyr of KYC rests just above the heme of MPO. Interestingly, KYC increases MPO-dependent H₂O₂ consumption. These data indicate KYC is a novel and specific inhibitor of MPO activity that is nontoxic to endothelial cell cultures. Accordingly, KYC may be useful for treating MPO-mediated vascular disease.

  14. Estrogens stimulate serotonin neurons to inhibit binge-like eating in mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binge eating afflicts approximately 5% of US adults, though effective treatments are limited. Here, we showed that estrogen replacement substantially suppresses binge-like eating behavior in ovariectomized female mice. Estrogen-dependent inhibition of binge-like eating was blocked in female mice spe...

  15. Functional lateralization of temporoparietal junction - imitation inhibition, visual perspective-taking and theory of mind.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santiesteban, Idalmis; Banissy, Michael J; Catmur, Caroline; Bird, Geoffrey

    2015-10-01

    Although neuroimaging studies have consistently identified the temporoparietal junction (TPJ) as a key brain region involved in social cognition, the literature is far from consistent with respect to lateralization of function. For example, during theory-of-mind tasks bilateral TPJ activation is found in some studies but only right hemisphere activation in others. Visual perspective-taking and imitation inhibition, which have been argued to recruit the same socio-cognitive processes as theory of mind, are associated with unilateral activation of either left TPJ (perspective taking) or right TPJ (imitation inhibition). The present study investigated the functional lateralization of TPJ involvement in the above three socio-cognitive abilities using transcranial direct current stimulation. Three groups of healthy adults received anodal stimulation over right TPJ, left TPJ or the occipital cortex prior to performing three tasks (imitation inhibition, visual perspective-taking and theory of mind). In contrast to the extant neuroimaging literature, our results suggest bilateral TPJ involvement in imitation inhibition and visual perspective-taking, while no effect of anodal stimulation was observed on theory of mind. The discrepancy between these findings and those obtained using neuroimaging highlight the efficacy of neurostimulation as a complementary methodological tool in cognitive neuroscience. © 2015 Federation of European Neuroscience Societies and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Postvagotomy acid secretion and mucosal blood flow during beta-adrenoceptor stimulation and universal chemical sympathectomy in dogs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hovendal, C P

    1983-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to examine the effect of beta-adrenoceptor stimulation, alpha blockade, and elimination of the adrenergic nerve function on mucosal blood flow and acid secretion in parietal-cell-vagotomized (PCV) gastric fistula dogs. Isoprenaline inhibited pentagastrin-stimulate......The aim of the present study was to examine the effect of beta-adrenoceptor stimulation, alpha blockade, and elimination of the adrenergic nerve function on mucosal blood flow and acid secretion in parietal-cell-vagotomized (PCV) gastric fistula dogs. Isoprenaline inhibited pentagastrin...... to chemical sympathectomy with 6-hydroxy-dopamine, a false neurotransmitter that selectively destroys the adrenergic nerve terminals. Chemical sympathectomy increased the pentagastrin-stimulated gastric acid secretion and stabilized the mucosal blood flow at the level before vagotomy, but with an increased...... ratio between blood flow and acid secretion. One may conclude that the sympathetic nerve system influences gastric function after vagotomy....

  17. The safety of transcranial magnetic stimulation with deep brain stimulation instruments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimojima, Yoshio; Morita, Hiroshi; Nishikawa, Noriko; Kodaira, Minori; Hashimoto, Takao; Ikeda, Shu-Ichi

    2010-02-01

    Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) has been employed in patients with an implanted deep brain stimulation (DBS) device. We investigated the safety of TMS using simulation models with an implanted DBS device. The DBS lead was inserted into plastic phantoms filled with dilute gelatin showing impedance similar to that of human brain. TMS was performed with three different types of magnetic coil. During TMS (1) electrode movement, (2) temperature change around the lead, and (3) TMS-induced current in various situations were observed. The amplitude and area of each evoked current were measured to calculate charge density of the evoked current. There was no movement or temperature increase during 0.2 Hz repetitive TMS with 100% stimulus intensity for 1 h. The size of evoked current linearly increased with TMS intensity. The maximum charge density exceeded the safety limit of 30 muC/cm(2)/phase during stimulation above the loops of the lead with intensity over 50% using a figure-eight coil. Strong TMS on the looped DBS leads should not be administered to avoid electrical tissue injury. Subcutaneous lead position should be paid enough attention for forthcoming situations during surgery. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Inhibition of Nitric Oxide and Prostaglandin E 2 Expression by ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Inhibition of Nitric Oxide and Prostaglandin E 2 Expression by Methanol Extract of Polyopes affinis in Lipopolysaccharide-stimulated BV2 Microglial Cells through Suppression of Akt-dependent NF-kB Activity and MAPK Pathway.

  19. Atomic and free electrons in a strong light field

    CERN Document Server

    Fedorov, Mikhail V

    1997-01-01

    This book presents and describes a series of unusual and striking strong-field phenomena concerning atoms and free electrons. Some of these phenomena are: multiphoton stimulated bremsstrahlung, free-electron lasers, wave-packet physics, above-threshold ionization, and strong-field stabilization in Rydberg atoms. The theoretical foundations and causes of the phenomena are described in detail, with all the approximations and derivations discussed. All the known and relevant experiments are described too, and their results are compared with those of the existing theoretical models.An extensive ge

  20. Ginger extract inhibits LPS induced macrophage activation and function

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    Bruch David

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Macrophages play a dual role in host defence. They act as the first line of defence by mounting an inflammatory response to antigen exposure and also act as antigen presenting cells and initiate the adaptive immune response. They are also the primary infiltrating cells at the site of inflammation. Inhibition of macrophage activation is one of the possible approaches towards modulating inflammation. Both conventional and alternative approaches are being studied in this regard. Ginger, an herbal product with broad anti inflammatory actions, is used as an alternative medicine in a number of inflammatory conditions like rheumatic disorders. In the present study we examined the effect of ginger extract on macrophage activation in the presence of LPS stimulation. Methods Murine peritoneal macrophages were stimulated by LPS in presence or absence of ginger extract and production of proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines were observed. We also studied the effect of ginger extract on the LPS induced expression of MHC II, B7.1, B7.2 and CD40 molecules. We also studied the antigen presenting function of ginger extract treated macrophages by primary mixed lymphocyte reaction. Results We observed that ginger extract inhibited IL-12, TNF-α, IL-1β (pro inflammatory cytokines and RANTES, MCP-1 (pro inflammatory chemokines production in LPS stimulated macrophages. Ginger extract also down regulated the expression of B7.1, B7.2 and MHC class II molecules. In addition ginger extract negatively affected the antigen presenting function of macrophages and we observed a significant reduction in T cell proliferation in response to allostimulation, when ginger extract treated macrophages were used as APCs. A significant decrease in IFN-γ and IL-2 production by T cells in response to allostimulation was also observed. Conclusion In conclusion ginger extract inhibits macrophage activation and APC function and indirectly inhibits T cell activation.

  1. Plasma rich in growth factors (PRGF-Endoret) stimulates proliferation and migration of primary keratocytes and conjunctival fibroblasts and inhibits and reverts TGF-beta1-Induced myodifferentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anitua, Eduardo; Sanchez, Mikel; Merayo-Lloves, Jesus; De la Fuente, Maria; Muruzabal, Francisco; Orive, Gorka

    2011-08-01

    Plasma rich in growth factors (PRGF-Endoret) technology is an autologous platelet-enriched plasma obtained from patient's own blood, which after activation with calcium chloride allows the release of a pool of biologically active proteins that influence and promote a range of biological processes including cell recruitment, and growth and differentiation. Because ocular surface wound healing is mediated by different growth factors, we decided to explore the potential of PRGF-Endoret technology in stimulating the biological processes related with fibroblast-induced tissue repair. Furthermore, the anti-fibrotic properties of this technology were also studied. Blood from healthy donors was collected, centrifuged and, whole plasma column (WP) and the plasma fraction with the highest platelet concentration (F3) were drawn off, avoiding the buffy coat. Primary human cells including keratocytes and conjunctival fibroblasts were used to perform the "in vitro" investigations. The potential of PRGF-Endoret in promoting wound healing was evaluated by means of a proliferation and migration assays. Fibroblast cells were induced to myofibroblast differentiation after the treatment with 2.5 ng/mL of TGF-β1. The capability of WP and F3 to prevent and inhibit TGF-β1-induced differentiation was evaluated. Results show that this autologous approach significantly enhances proliferation and migration of both keratocytes and conjunctival fibroblasts. In addition, plasma rich in growth factors prevents and inhibits TGF-β1-induced myofibroblast differentiation. No differences were found between WP and F3 plasma fractions. These results suggest that PRGF-Endoret could reduce scarring while stimulating wound healing in ocular surface. F3 or whole plasma column show similar biological effects in keratocytes and conjunctival fibroblast cells.

  2. Modulation of itch by conditioning itch and pain stimulation in healthy humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Hjalte Holm; van Laarhoven, Antoinette I. M.; Elberling, Jesper

    2017-01-01

    Little is known about endogenous descending control of itch. In chronic pain, descending pain inhibition is reduced as signified by lowered conditioned pain modulation (CPM). There are indications that patients with chronic itch may also exhibit reduced endogenous descending inhibition of itch......-evoked itch, while the test stimuli were electrical stimulation paradigms designed to evoke itch or pain. Pain was significantly reduced (CPM-effect) by the conditioning pain stimulus (p

  3. Air-Stimulated ATP Release from Keratinocytes Occurs through Connexin Hemichannels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barr, Travis P.; Albrecht, Phillip J.; Hou, Quanzhi; Mongin, Alexander A.; Strichartz, Gary R.; Rice, Frank L.

    2013-01-01

    Cutaneous ATP release plays an important role in both epidermal stratification and chronic pain, but little is known about ATP release mechanisms in keratinocytes that comprise the epidermis. In this study, we analyzed ATP release from cultured human neonatal keratinocytes briefly exposed to air, a process previously demonstrated to trigger ATP release from these cells. We show that exposing keratinocytes to air by removing media for 15 seconds causes a robust, long-lasting ATP release. This air-stimulated ATP release was increased in calcium differentiated cultures which showed a corresponding increase in connexin 43 mRNA, a major component of keratinocyte hemichannels. The known connexin hemichannel inhibitors 1-octanol and carbenoxolone both significantly reduced air-stimulated ATP release, as did two drugs traditionally used as ABC transporter inhibitors (glibenclamide and verapamil). These same 4 inhibitors also prevented an increase in the uptake of a connexin permeable dye induced by air exposure, confirming that connexin hemichannels are open during air-stimulated ATP release. In contrast, activity of the MDR1 ABC transporter was reduced by air exposure and the drugs that inhibited air-stimulated ATP release had differential effects on this transporter. These results indicate that air exposure elicits non-vesicular release of ATP from keratinocytes through connexin hemichannels and that drugs used to target connexin hemichannels and ABC transporters may cross-inhibit. Connexins represent a novel, peripheral target for the treatment of chronic pain and dermatological disease. PMID:23457608

  4. Electrochemical activation and inhibition of neuromuscular systems through modulation of ion concentrations with ion-selective membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Yong-Ak; Melik, Rohat; Rabie, Amr N.; Ibrahim, Ahmed M. S.; Moses, David; Tan, Ara; Han, Jongyoon; Lin, Samuel J.

    2011-12-01

    Conventional functional electrical stimulation aims to restore functional motor activity of patients with disabilities resulting from spinal cord injury or neurological disorders. However, intervention with functional electrical stimulation in neurological diseases lacks an effective implantable method that suppresses unwanted nerve signals. We have developed an electrochemical method to activate and inhibit a nerve by electrically modulating ion concentrations in situ along the nerve. Using ion-selective membranes to achieve different excitability states of the nerve, we observe either a reduction of the electrical threshold for stimulation by up to approximately 40%, or voluntary, reversible inhibition of nerve signal propagation. This low-threshold electrochemical stimulation method is applicable in current implantable neuroprosthetic devices, whereas the on-demand nerve-blocking mechanism could offer effective clinical intervention in disease states caused by uncontrolled nerve activation, such as epilepsy and chronic pain syndromes.

  5. Nicotine can skew the characterization of the macrophage type-1 (MΦ1) phenotype differentiated with granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor to the MΦ2 phenotype

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yanagita, Manabu; Kobayashi, Ryohei; Murakami, Shinya

    2009-01-01

    Macrophages (MΦs) exhibit functional heterogeneity and plasticity in the local microenvironment. Recently, it was reported that MΦs can be divided into proinflammatory MΦs (MΦ1) and anti-inflammatory MΦs (MΦ2) based on their polarized functional properties. Here, we report that nicotine, the major ingredient of cigarette smoke, can modulate the characteristics of MΦ1. Granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor-driven MΦ1 with nicotine (Ni-MΦ1) showed the phenotypic characteristics of MΦ2. Like MΦ2, Ni-MΦ1 exhibited antigen-uptake activities. Ni-MΦ1 suppressed IL-12, but maintained IL-10 and produced high amounts of MCP-1 upon lipopolysaccharide stimulation compared with MΦ1. Moreover, we observed strong proliferative responses of T cells to lipopolysaccharide-stimulated MΦ1, whereas Ni-MΦ1 reduced T cell proliferation and inhibited IFN-γ production by T cells. These results suggest that nicotine can change the functional characteristics of MΦ and skew the MΦ1 phenotype to MΦ2. We propose that nicotine is a potent regulator that modulates immune responses in microenvironments.

  6. Rhizoma coptidis Inhibits LPS-Induced MCP-1/CCL2 Production in Murine Macrophages via an AP-1 and NFB-Dependent Pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew Remppis

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. The Chinese extract Rhizoma coptidis is well known for its anti-inflammatory, antioxidative, antiviral, and antimicrobial activity. The exact mechanisms of action are not fully understood. Methods. We examined the effect of the extract and its main compound, berberine, on LPS-induced inflammatory activity in a murine macrophage cell line. RAW 264.7 cells were stimulated with LPS and incubated with either Rhizoma coptidis extract or berberine. Activation of AP-1 and NFB was analyzed in nuclear extracts, secretion of MCP-1/CCL2 was measured in supernatants. Results. Incubation with Rhizoma coptidis and berberine strongly inhibited LPS-induced monocyte chemoattractant protein (MCP-1 production in RAW cells. Activation of the transcription factors AP-1 and NFB was inhibited by Rhizoma coptidis in a dose- and time-dependent fashion. Conclusions. Rhizoma coptidis extract inhibits LPS-induced MCP-1/CCL2 production in vitro via an AP-1 and NFB-dependent pathway. Anti-inflammatory action of the extract is mediated mainly by its alkaloid compound berberine.

  7. Stimulation of mitochondrial respiration induced by laser irradiation in the presence of rhodamine dyes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krasnikov, B.F.; Zorov, D.B.

    1996-01-01

    The effect of micromolar concentration of rhodamine 123 (methylrhodamine) and ethyl and amyl esters of unsubstituted rhodamine on oxygen consumption by rat liver mitochondria was studied under irradiation by an argon laser (488 and 514 nm). Irradiation of mitochondria in the presence of rhodamine stimulates their respiration. Light-induced stimulation of respiration is not inhibited by free radical scavenger ionol and by inhibitor of the permeability transition pore cyclosporine A. Stimulation of respiration by moderate doses of radiation is reversed in the dark. Increase in radiation dose resulted in only partial reversal of stimulated respiration in the dark. Rhodamine efficacy in stimulation of mitochondrial respiration depends on its structure (amyl > ethyl > methylrhodamine). 22 refs.; 4 figs

  8. Luteolin, a flavonoid, inhibits CD40 ligand expression by activated human basophils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirano, Toru; Arimitsu, Junsuke; Higa, Shinji; Naka, Tetsuji; Ogata, Atsushi; Shima, Yoshihito; Fujimoto, Minoru; Yamadori, Tomoki; Ohkawara, Tomoharu; Kuwabara, Yusuke; Kawai, Mari; Kawase, Ichiro; Tanaka, Toshio

    2006-01-01

    We have previously shown that flavonoids such as luteolin, apigenin and fisetin inhibit interleukin 4 and interleukin 13 production. In this study, we investigated whether luteolin can suppress CD40 ligand expression by basophils. A human basophilic cell line, KU812, was stimulated with A23187 and phorbol myristate acetate (PMA) with or without various concentrations of luteolin or other flavonoids for 12 h, and CD40 ligand expression was analyzed by FACS. The effect of luteolin on CD40 ligand mRNA expression was studied by semiquantitative reverse transcription PCR analysis. In addition, CD40 ligand expression was also measured in purified basophils that had been stimulated for 12 h with A23187 plus PMA with or without various concentrations of luteolin. CD40 ligand expression by KU812 cells was enhanced noticeably in response to A23187 and even more strikingly augmented by A23187 plus PMA. The expression was significantly suppressed by 10 or 30 microM of luteolin, whereas myricetin failed to inhibit. Reverse transcription PCR analyses demonstrated that luteolin inhibited CD40 ligand mRNA expression by stimulated KU812 cells. Of the six flavonoids examined, luteolin, apigenin, fisetin and quercetin at 30 microM showed a significant inhibitory effect on CD40 ligand expression. The incubation of purified basophils with A23187 plus PMA significantly enhanced CD40 ligand expression, and the presence of luteolin again had an inhibitory effect. Luteolin inhibits CD40 ligand expression by activated basophils.

  9. Fast inhibition of glutamate-activated currents by caffeine.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholas P Vyleta

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Caffeine stimulates calcium-induced calcium release (CICR in many cell types. In neurons, caffeine stimulates CICR presynaptically and thus modulates neurotransmitter release. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Using the whole-cell patch-clamp technique we found that caffeine (20 mM reversibly increased the frequency and decreased the amplitude of miniature excitatory postsynaptic currents (mEPSCs in neocortical neurons. The increase in mEPSC frequency is consistent with a presynaptic mechanism. Caffeine also reduced exogenously applied glutamate-activated currents, confirming a separate postsynaptic action. This inhibition developed in tens of milliseconds, consistent with block of channel currents. Caffeine (20 mM did not reduce currents activated by exogenous NMDA, indicating that caffeine block is specific to non-NMDA type glutamate receptors. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Caffeine-induced inhibition of mEPSC amplitude occurs through postsynaptic block of non-NMDA type ionotropic glutamate receptors. Caffeine thus has both pre and postsynaptic sites of action at excitatory synapses.

  10. Fisetin, a flavonol, inhibits TH2-type cytokine production by activated human basophils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higa, Shinji; Hirano, Toru; Kotani, Mayumi; Matsumoto, Motonobu; Fujita, Akihito; Suemura, Masaki; Kawase, Ichiro; Tanaka, Toshio

    2003-06-01

    Activation of mast cells and basophils through allergen stimulation releases chemical mediators and synthesizes cytokines. Among these cytokines, IL-4, IL-13, and IL-5 have major roles in allergic inflammation. We sought to determine the potency of flavonoids (astragalin, fisetin, kaempferol, myricetin, quercetin, and rutin) for the inhibition of cytokine expression and synthesis by human basophils. The inhibitory effect of flavonoids on cytokine expression by stimulated KU812 cells, a human basophilic cell line, and freshly purified peripheral blood basophils was measured by means of semiquantitative RT-PCR and ELISA assays. The effects of flavonoids on transcriptional activation of the nuclear factor of activated T cells were assessed by means of electrophoretic mobility shift assays. Fisetin suppressed the induction of IL-4, IL-13, and IL-5 mRNA expression by A23187-stimulated KU812 cells and basophils in response to cross-linkage of the IgE receptor. Fisetin reduced IL-4, IL-13, and IL-5 synthesis (inhibitory concentration of 50% [IC(50)] = 19.4, 17.7, and 17.4 micromol/L, respectively) but not IL-6 and IL-8 production by KU812 cells. In addition, fisetin inhibited IL-4 and IL-13 synthesis by anti-IgE antibody-stimulated human basophils (IC(50) = 5.1 and 6.2 micromol/L, respectively) and IL-4 synthesis by allergen-stimulated basophils from allergic patients (IC(50) = 4.8 micromol/L). Among the flavonoids examined, kaempferol and quercetin showed substantial inhibitory activities in cytokine expression but less so than those of fisetin. Fisetin inhibited nuclear localization of nuclear factor of activated T cells c2 by A23187-stimulated KU812 cells. These results provide evidence of a novel activity of the flavonoid fisetin that suppresses the expression of T(H)2-type cytokines (IL-4, IL-13, and IL-5) by basophils.

  11. Anti-Inflammatory Effect of Myristicin on RAW 264.7 Macrophages Stimulated with Polyinosinic-Polycytidylic Acid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wansu Park

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Myristicin (1-allyl-5-methoxy-3,4-methylenedioxybenzene is an active aromatic compound found in nutmeg (the seed of Myristica fragrans, carrot, basil, cinnamon, and parsley. Myristicin has been known to have anti-cholinergic, antibacterial, and hepatoprotective effects, however, the effects of myristicin on virus-stimulated macrophages are not fully reported. In this study, the anti-inflammatory effect of myristicin on double-stranded RNA (dsRNA-stimulated macrophages was examined. Myristicin did not reduce the cell viability of RAW 264.7 mouse macrophages at concentrations of up to 50 µM. Myristicin significantly inhibited the production of calcium, nitric oxide (NO, interleukin (IL-6, IL-10, interferon inducible protein-10, monocyte chemotactic protein (MCP-1, MCP-3, granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor, macrophage inflammatory protein (MIP-1α, MIP-1β, and leukemia inhibitory factor in dsRNA [polyinosinic-polycytidylic acid]-induced RAW 264.7 cells (P < 0.05. In conclusion, myristicin has anti-inflammatory properties related with its inhibition of NO, cytokines, chemokines, and growth factors in dsRNA-stimulated macrophages via the calcium pathway.

  12. Challenges associated with nerve conduction block using kilohertz electrical stimulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Yogi A.; Butera, Robert J.

    2018-06-01

    Neuromodulation therapies, which electrically stimulate parts of the nervous system, have traditionally attempted to activate neurons or axons to restore function or alleviate disease symptoms. In stark contrast to this approach is inhibiting neural activity to relieve disease symptoms and/or restore homeostasis. One potential approach is kilohertz electrical stimulation (KES) of peripheral nerves—which enables a rapid, reversible, and localized block of conduction. This review highlights the existing scientific and clinical utility of KES and discusses the technical and physiological challenges that must be addressed for successful translation of KES nerve conduction block therapies.

  13. Non-Invasive Brain Stimulation to Enhance Post-Stroke Recovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubis, Nathalie

    2016-01-01

    Brain plasticity after stroke remains poorly understood. Patients may improve spontaneously within the first 3 months and then more slowly in the coming year. The first day, decreased edema and reperfusion of the ischemic penumbra may possibly account for these phenomena, but the improvement during the next weeks suggests plasticity phenomena and cortical reorganization of the brain ischemic areas and of more remote areas. Indeed, the injured ischemic motor cortex has a reduced cortical excitability at the acute phase and a suspension of the topographic representation of affected muscles, whereas the contralateral motor cortex has an increased excitability and an enlarged somatomotor representation; furthermore, contralateral cortex exerts a transcallosal interhemispheric inhibition on the ischemic cortex. This results from the imbalance of the physiological reciprocal interhemispheric inhibition of each hemisphere on the other, contributing to worsening of neurological deficit. Cortical excitability is measurable through transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) and prognosis has been established according to the presence of motor evoked potentials (MEP) at the acute phase of stroke, which is predictive of better recovery. Conversely, the lack of response to early stimulation is associated with a poor functional outcome. Non-invasive stimulation techniques such as repetitive TMS (rTMS) or transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) have the potential to modulate brain cortical excitability with long lasting effects. In the setting of cerebrovascular disease, around 1000 stroke subjects have been included in placebo-controlled trials so far, most often with an objective of promoting motor recovery of the upper limb. High frequency repetitive stimulation (>3 Hz) rTMS, aiming to increase excitability of the ischemic cortex, or low frequency repetitive stimulation (≤1 Hz), aiming to reduce excitability of the contralateral homonymous cortex, or combined therapies

  14. Non invasive brain stimulation to enhance post-stroke recovery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathalie Kubis

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Brain plasticity after stroke remains poorly understood. Patients may improve spontaneously within the first 3 months and then more slowly in the coming year. The first days, decreased edema and reperfusion of the ischemic penumbra may possibly account for these phenomena, but the improvement during the next weeks suggests plasticity phenomena and cortical reorganization of the brain ischemic areas and of more remote areas. Indeed, the injured ischemic motor cortex has a reduced cortical excitability at the acute phase and a suspension of the topographic representation of affected muscles, whereas the contralateral motor cortex has an increased excitability and an enlarged somatomotor representation; furthermore, contralateral cortex exerts a transcallosal interhemispheric inhibition on the ischemic cortex. This results from the imbalance of the physiological reciprocal interhemispheric inhibition of each hemisphere on the other, contributing to worsening of neurological deficit. Cortical excitability is measurable through transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS and prognosis has been established according to the presence of motor evoked potentials (MEP at the acute phase of stroke, which is predictive of better recovery. Conversely, the lack of response to early stimulation is associated with a poor functional outcome. Non-invasive stimulation techniques such as repetitive TMS (rTMS or transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS have the potential to modulate brain cortical excitability with long lasting effects. In the setting of cerebrovascular disease, around 1000 stroke subjects have been included in placebo-controlled trials so far, most often with an objective of promoting motor recovery of the upper limb. High frequency repetitive stimulation (> 3 Hz rTMS, aiming to increase excitability of the ischemic cortex, or low frequency repetitive stimulation (≤ 1 Hz, aiming to reduce excitability of the contralateral homonymous cortex, or

  15. [27- Hydroxycholesterol reverses estradiol induced inhibition of platelet aggregation in postmenopausal women].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocha, Gladys; Sierralta, Walter; Valladares, Luis

    2016-11-01

    The decline of estrogen levels increases cardiovascular risk in women. Platelets express estrogen receptors and 17β-estradiol- (E2) can produce a protective effect on thrombus formation. The hydroxylation of cholesterol generates several sterols and 27-hydroxycholesterol (27HC) predominates in circulation. To evaluate the effect of 27HC as an endogenous antagonist of the anti-aggregating properties of E2 in platelets of postmenopausal women. Platelet function of postmenopausal women was evaluated ex-vivo. Platelets pre-incubated with 27HC in the presence or absence of E2, were stimulated with collagen. Aggregation was evaluated using turbidimetry using a Chrono-log aggregometer. Collagen-stimulated platelet aggregation was significantly inhibited by E2. The inhibitory effect of E2 on collagen-stimulated platelet aggregation was significantly reversed in the presence of 27HC. The suppressive effect of E2 on platelet aggregation is inhibited by 27HC, which could contribute to increase cardiovascular risk in postmenopausal women.

  16. Boosting the LTP-like plasticity effect of intermittent theta-burst stimulation using gamma transcranial alternating current stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerra, Andrea; Suppa, Antonio; Bologna, Matteo; D'Onofrio, Valentina; Bianchini, Edoardo; Brown, Peter; Di Lazzaro, Vincenzo; Berardelli, Alfredo

    2018-03-24

    Transcranial Alternating Current Stimulation (tACS) consists in delivering electric current to the brain using an oscillatory pattern that may entrain the rhythmic activity of cortical neurons. When delivered at gamma frequency, tACS modulates motor performance and GABA-A-ergic interneuron activity. Since interneuronal discharges play a crucial role in brain plasticity phenomena, here we co-stimulated the primary motor cortex (M1) in healthy subjects by means of tACS during intermittent theta-burst stimulation (iTBS), a transcranial magnetic stimulation paradigm known to induce long-term potentiation (LTP)-like plasticity. We measured and compared motor evoked potentials before and after gamma, beta and sham tACS-iTBS. While we delivered gamma-tACS, we also measured short-interval intracortical inhibition (SICI) to detect any changes in GABA-A-ergic neurotransmission. Gamma, but not beta and sham tACS, significantly boosted and prolonged the iTBS-induced after-effects. Interestingly, the extent of the gamma tACS-iTBS after-effects correlated directly with SICI changes. Overall, our findings point to a link between gamma oscillations, interneuronal GABA-A-ergic activity and LTP-like plasticity in the human M1. Gamma tACS-iTBS co-stimulation might represent a new strategy to enhance and prolong responses to plasticity-inducing protocols, thereby lending itself to future applications in the neurorehabilitation setting. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Kaempferol stimulates gene expression of low-density lipoprotein receptor through activation of Sp1 in cultured hepatocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ochiai, Ayasa; Miyata, Shingo; Iwase, Masamori; Shimizu, Makoto; Inoue, Jun; Sato, Ryuichiro

    2016-01-01

    A high level of plasma low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol is considered a risk factor for atherosclerosis. Because the hepatic LDL receptor (LDLR) is essential for clearing plasma LDL cholesterol, activation of LDLR is a promising therapeutic target for patients with atherosclerotic disease. Here we demonstrated how the flavonoid kaempferol stimulated the gene expression and activity of LDLR in HepG2 cells. The kaempferol-mediated stimulation of LDLR gene expression was completely inhibited by knockdown of Sp1 gene expression. Treatment of HepG2 cells with kaempferol stimulated the recruitment of Sp1 to the promoter region of the LDLR gene, as well as the phosphorylation of Sp1 on Thr-453 and Thr-739. Moreover, these kaempferol-mediated processes were inhibited in the presence of U0126, an ERK pathway inhibitor. These results suggest that kaempferol may increase the activity of Sp1 through stimulation of Sp1 phosphorylation by ERK1/2 and subsequent induction of LDLR expression and activity. PMID:27109240

  18. Facing emotions in narcolepsy with cataplexy: haemodynamic and behavioural responses during emotional stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Zambotti, Massimiliano; Pizza, Fabio; Covassin, Naima; Vandi, Stefano; Cellini, Nicola; Stegagno, Luciano; Plazzi, Giuseppe

    2014-08-01

    Narcolepsy with cataplexy is a complex sleep disorder that affects the modulation of emotions: cataplexy, the key symptom of narcolepsy, is indeed strongly linked with emotions that usually trigger the episodes. Our study aimed to investigate haemodynamic and behavioural responses during emotional stimulation in narco-cataplexy. Twelve adult drug-naive narcoleptic patients (five males; age: 33.3 ± 9.4 years) and 12 healthy controls (five males; age: 30.9 ± 9.5 years) were exposed to emotional stimuli (pleasant, unpleasant and neutral pictures). Heart rate, arterial blood pressure and mean cerebral blood flow velocity of the middle cerebral arteries were continuously recorded using photoplethysmography and Doppler ultrasound. Ratings of valence and arousal and coping strategies were scored by the Self-Assessment Manikin and by questionnaires, respectively. Narcoleptic patients' haemodynamic responses to pictures overlapped with the data obtained from controls: decrease of heart rate and increase of mean cerebral blood flow velocity regardless of pictures' content, increase of systolic blood pressure during the pleasant condition, and relative reduction of heart rate during pleasant and unpleasant conditions. However, when compared with controls, narcoleptic patients reported lower arousal scores during the pleasant and neutral stimulation, and lower valence scores during the pleasant condition, respectively, and also a lower score at the 'focus on and venting of emotions' dimensions of coping. Our results suggested that adult narcoleptic patients, compared with healthy controls, inhibited their emotion-expressive behaviour to emotional stimulation, and that may be related to the development of adaptive cognitive strategies to face emotions avoiding cataplexy. © 2014 European Sleep Research Society.

  19. Stimulation of Na+ -K+ -pump currents by epithelial nicotinic receptors in rat colon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bader, Sandra; Lottig, Lena; Diener, Martin

    2017-05-01

    Acetylcholine-induced epithelial Cl - secretion is generally thought to be mediated by epithelial muscarinic receptors and nicotinic receptors on secretomotor neurons. However, recent data have shown expression of nicotinic receptors by intestinal epithelium and the stimulation of Cl - secretion by nicotine, in the presence of the neurotoxin, tetrodotoxin. Here, we aimed to identify the transporters activated by epithelial nicotinic receptors and to clarify their role in cholinergic regulation of intestinal ion transport. Ussing chamber experiments were performed, using rat distal colon with intact epithelia. Epithelia were basolaterally depolarized to measure currents across the apical membrane. Apically permeabilized tissue was also used to measure currents across the basolateral membrane in the presence of tetrodotoxin. Nicotine had no effect on currents through Cl - channels in the apical membrane or on currents through K + channels in the apical or the basolateral membrane. Instead, nicotine stimulated the Na + -K + -pump as indicated by Na + -dependency and sensitivity of the nicotine-induced current across the basolateral membrane to cardiac steroids. Effects of nicotine were inhibited by nicotinic receptor antagonists such as hexamethonium and mimicked by dimethyl-4-phenylpiperazinium, a chemically different nicotinic agonist. Simultaneous stimulation of epithelial muscarinic and nicotinic receptors led to a strong potentiation of transepithelial Cl - secretion. These results suggest a novel concept for the cholinergic regulation of transepithelial ion transport by costimulation of muscarinic and nicotinic epithelial receptors and a unique role of nicotinic receptors controlling the activity of the Na + -K + -ATPase. © 2017 The British Pharmacological Society.

  20. FLAX OIL FROM TRANSGENIC LINUM USITATISSIMUM SELECTIVELY INHIBITS IN VITRO PROLIFERATION OF HUMAN CANCER CELL LINES.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gebarowski, Tomasz; Gebczak, Katarzyna; Wiatrak, Benita; Kulma, Anna; Pelc, Katarzyna; Czuj, Tadeusz; Szopa, Jan; Gasiorowski, Kazimierz

    2017-03-01

    Emulsions made of oils from transgenic flaxseeds significantly decreased in vitro proliferation of six tested human cancer cell lines in 48-h cultures, as assessed with the standard sulforhodamine assay. However, the emulsions also increased proliferation rate of normal human dermal fibroblasts and, to a lower extend, of keratinocytes. Both inhibition of in vitro proliferation of human cancer cell lines and stimulation of proliferation of normal dermal fibroblasts and keratinocytes were especially strong with the emulsion type B and with emulsion type M. Oils from seeds of transgenic flax type B and M should be considered as valuable adjunct to standard cytostatic therapy of human cancers and also could be applied to improve the treatment of skin lesions in wound healing.

  1. Microwave induced stimulation of /sup 32/Pi incorporation into phosphoinositides of rat brain synaptosomes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gandhi, C.R.; Ross, D.H.

    1989-07-01

    Exposure of synaptosomes to microwave radiation at a power density of 10 mW/sq cm or more produced stimulation of the /sup 32/Pi-incorporation into phosphoinositides. The extent of /sup 32/Pi incorporation was found to be much more pronounced in phosphatidylinositol-4-phosphate (PIP), and phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphosphate (PIP/sub 2/) as compared to phosphatidylinositol (PI) and phosphatidic acid (PA). Other lipids were also found to incorporate /sup 32/Pi but no significant changes in their labeling were seen after exposure to microwave radiation. Inclusion of 10 mM lithium in the medium reduced the basal labeling of PIP/sub 2/, PIP and PI and increased PA labeling. Li/sup +/ also inhibited the microwave stimulated PIP/sub 2/, PIP and PI labeling but had no effect on PA labeling. Calcium inophore, A/sub 23187/, inhibited the basal and microwave stimulated /sup 32/Pi labeling of PIP and PIP/sub 2/, stimulated basal labeling of PA and PI and had no effect on microwave stimulated PA and PI labeling. Calcium chelator, EGTA, on the other hand, had no effect on basal labeling of PA and PI, stimulated basal PIP and PIP/sub 2/ labeling but did not alter microwave stimulated labeling of these lipids. Exposure of synaptosomes to microwave radiation did not alter the chemical concentration of phosphoinositides indicating that the turnover of these lipids was altered. These results suggest that low frequency microwave radiation alter the metabolism of inositol phospholipids by enhancing their turnover and thus may affect the transmembrane signalling in the nerve endings.

  2. Inhibition of ethylene production by cobaltous ion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lau, O.L; Yang, S.F.

    1976-01-01

    The effect of Co 2+ on ethylene production by mung bean (Phaseolus aureus Roxb.) and by apple tissues was studied. Co 2+ , depending on concentrations applied, effectively inhibited ethylene production by both tissues. It also strongly inhibited the ethylene production induced by IAA, kinetin, IAA plus kinetin, Ca 2+ , kinetin plus Ca 2+ , or Cu 2+ treatments in mung bean hypocotyl segments. While Co 2+ greatly inhibited ethylene production, it had little effect on the respiration of apple tissue, indicating that Co 2+ does not exert its inhibitory effect as a general metabolic inhibitor. Ni 2+ , which belongs to the same group as Co 2+ in the periodic table, also markedly curtailed both the basal and the induced ethylene production by apple and mung bean hypocotyl tissues. In a system in which kinetin and Ca 2+ were applied together, kinetin greatly enhanced Ca 2+ uptake, thus enhancing ethylene production. Co 2+ , however, slightly inhibited the uptake of Ca 2+ but appreciably inhibited ethylene production, either in the presence or in the absence of kinetin. Tracer experiments using apple tissue indicated that Co 2+ strongly inhibited the in vivo conversion of L-[U-- 14 C]methionine to 14 C-ethylene. These data suggested that Co 2+ inhibited ethylene production by inhibiting the conversion of methionine to ethylene, a common step which is required for ethylene formation by higher plants. Co 2+ is known to promote elongation, leaf expansion, and hook opening in excised plant parts in response to applied auxins or cytokinins.Since ethylene is known to inhibit those growth phenomena, it is suggested that Co 2+ exerts its promotive effect, at least in part, by inhibiting ethylene formation

  3. Excitatory and inhibitory effects of prolactin release activated by nerve stimulation in rat anterior pituitary

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gao Li-Zhi

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A series of studies showed the presence of substantial amount of nerve fibers and their close relationship with the anterior pituitary gland cells. Our previous studies have suggested that aside from the classical theory of humoral regulation, the rat anterior pituitary has direct neural regulation on adrenocorticotropic hormone release. In rat anterior pituitary, typical synapses are found on every type of the hormone-secreting cells, many on lactotrophs. The present study was aimed at investigating the physiological significance of this synaptic relationship on prolactin release. Methods The anterior pituitary of rat was sliced and stimulated with electrical field in a self-designed perfusion chamber. The perfusate was continuously collected in aliquots and measured by radioimmunoassay for prolactin levels. After statistic analysis, differences of prolactin concentrations within and between groups were outlined. Results The results showed that stimulation at frequency of 2 Hz caused a quick enhancement of prolactin release, when stimulated at 10 Hz, prolactin release was found to be inhibited which came slower and lasted longer. The effect of nerve stimulation on prolactin release is diphasic and frequency dependent. Conclusions The present in vitro study offers the first physiological evidence that stimulation of nerve fibers can affect prolactin release in rat anterior pituitary. Low frequency stimulation enhances prolactin release and high frequency mainly inhibits it.

  4. Peripheral afferent mechanisms underlying acupuncture inhibition of cocaine behavioral effects in rats.

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    Seol Ah Kim

    Full Text Available Administration of cocaine increases locomotor activity by enhancing dopamine transmission. To explore the peripheral mechanisms underlying acupuncture treatment for drug addiction, we developed a novel mechanical acupuncture instrument (MAI for objective mechanical stimulation. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether acupuncture inhibition of cocaine-induced locomotor activity is mediated through specific peripheral nerves, the afferents from superficial or deep tissues, or specific groups of nerve fibers. Mechanical stimulation of acupuncture point HT7 with MAI suppressed cocaine-induced locomotor activity in a stimulus time-dependent manner, which was blocked by severing the ulnar nerve or by local anesthesia. Suppression of cocaine-induced locomotor activity was elicited after HT7 stimulation at frequencies of either 50 (for Meissner corpuscles or 200 (for Pacinian corpuscles Hz and was not affected by block of C/Aδ-fibers in the ulnar nerve with resiniferatoxin, nor generated by direct stimulation of C/Aδ-fiber afferents with capsaicin. These findings suggest that HT7 inhibition of cocaine-induced locomotor activity is mediated by A-fiber activation of ulnar nerve that originates in superficial and deep tissue.

  5. Global inhibition of reactive oxygen species (ROS inhibits paclitaxel-induced painful peripheral neuropathy.

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    Mehmet Fidanboylu

    Full Text Available Paclitaxel (Taxol® is a widely used chemotherapeutic agent that has a major dose limiting side-effect of painful peripheral neuropathy. Currently there is no effective therapy for the prevention or treatment of chemotherapy-induced painful peripheral neuropathies. Evidence for mitochondrial dysfunction during paclitaxel-induced pain was previously indicated with the presence of swollen and vacuolated neuronal mitochondria. As mitochondria are a major source of reactive oxygen species (ROS, the aim of this study was to examine whether pharmacological inhibition of ROS could reverse established paclitaxel-induced pain or prevent the development of paclitaxel-induced pain. Using a rat model of paclitaxel-induced pain (intraperitoneal 2 mg/kg paclitaxel on days 0, 2, 4 & 6, the effects of a non-specific ROS scavenger, N-tert-Butyl-α-phenylnitrone (PBN and a superoxide selective scavenger, 4-hydroxy-2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine-1-oxyl (TEMPOL were compared. Systemic 100 mg/kg PBN administration markedly inhibited established paclitaxel-induced mechanical hypersensitivity to von Frey 8 g and 15 g stimulation and cold hypersensitivity to plantar acetone application. Daily systemic administration of 50 mg/kg PBN (days -1 to 13 completely prevented mechanical hypersensitivity to von Frey 4 g and 8 g stimulation and significantly attenuated mechanical hypersensitivity to von Frey 15 g. Systemic 100 mg/kg TEMPOL had no effect on established paclitaxel-induced mechanical or cold hypersensitivity. High dose (250 mg/kg systemic TEMPOL significantly inhibited mechanical hypersensitivity to von Frey 8 g & 15 g, but to a lesser extent than PBN. Daily systemic administration of 100 mg/kg TEMPOL (day -1 to 12 did not affect the development of paclitaxel-induced mechanical hypersensitivity. These data suggest that ROS play a causal role in the development and maintenance of paclitaxel-induced pain, but such effects cannot be attributed to superoxide radicals

  6. Rhizoma Coptidis Inhibits LPS-Induced MCP-1/CCL2 Production in Murine Macrophages via an AP-1 and NFκB-Dependent Pathway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Remppis, Andrew; Bea, Florian; Greten, Henry Johannes; Buttler, Annette; Wang, Hongjie; Zhou, Qianxing; Preusch, Michael R.; Enk, Ronny; Ehehalt, Robert; Katus, Hugo; Blessing, Erwin

    2010-01-01

    Introduction. The Chinese extract Rhizoma coptidis is well known for its anti-inflammatory, antioxidative, antiviral, and antimicrobial activity. The exact mechanisms of action are not fully understood. Methods. We examined the effect of the extract and its main compound, berberine, on LPS-induced inflammatory activity in a murine macrophage cell line. RAW 264.7 cells were stimulated with LPS and incubated with either Rhizoma coptidis extract or berberine. Activation of AP-1 and NFκB was analyzed in nuclear extracts, secretion of MCP-1/CCL2 was measured in supernatants. Results. Incubation with Rhizoma coptidis and berberine strongly inhibited LPS-induced monocyte chemoattractant protein (MCP)-1 production in RAW cells. Activation of the transcription factors AP-1 and NFκB was inhibited by Rhizoma coptidis in a dose- and time-dependent fashion. Conclusions. Rhizoma coptidis extract inhibits LPS-induced MCP-1/CCL2 production in vitro via an AP-1 and NFκB-dependent pathway. Anti-inflammatory action of the extract is mediated mainly by its alkaloid compound berberine. PMID:20652055

  7. The analgesic agent tapentadol inhibits calcitonin gene-related peptide release from isolated rat brainstem via a serotonergic mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greco, Maria Cristina; Navarra, Pierluigi; Tringali, Giuseppe

    2016-01-15

    In this study we tested the hypothesis that tapentadol inhibits GGRP release from the rat brainstem through a mechanism mediated by the inhibition of NA reuptake; as a second alternative hypothesis, we investigated whether tapentadol inhibits GGRP release via the inhibition of 5-HT reuptake. Rat brainstems were explanted and incubated in short-term experiments. CGRP released in the incubation medium was taken as a marker of CGRP release from the central terminals of trigeminal neurons within the brainstem. CGRP levels were measured by radioimmunoassay under basal conditions or in the presence of tapentadol; NA, 5-HT, clonidine, yohimbine and ondansetron were used as pharmacological tools to investigate the action mechanism of tapentadol. The α2-antagonist yohimbine failed to counteract the effects of tapentadol. Moreover, neither NA nor the α2-agonist clonidine per se inhibited K(+)-stimulated CGRP release, thereby indicating that the effects of tapentadol are nor mediated through the block of NA reuptake. Further experiments showed that 5-HT and tramadol, which inhibits both NA and 5-HT reuptake, significantly reduced K(+)-stimulated CGRP release. Moreover, the 5-HT3 antagonist ondansetron was able to counteract the effects of tapentadol in this system. This study provided pharmacological evidence that tapentadol inhibits stimulated CGRP release from the rat brainstem in vitro through a mechanism involving an increase in 5-HT levels in the system and the subsequent activation of 5-HT3 receptors. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Inhibition of nitric oxide synthase expression in activated microglia and peroxynitrite scavenging activity by Opuntia ficus indica var. saboten.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ming Hong; Kim, Jae Yeon; Yoon, Jeong Hoon; Lim, Hyo Jin; Kim, Tae Hee; Jin, Changbae; Kwak, Wie-Jong; Han, Chang-Kyun; Ryu, Jae-Ha

    2006-09-01

    Activated microglia by neuronal injury or inflammatory stimulation overproduce nitric oxide (NO) by inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and reactive oxygen species (ROS) such as superoxide anion, resulting in neurodegenerative diseases. The toxic peroxynitrite (ONOO-), the reaction product of NO and superoxide anion further contributes to oxidative neurotoxicity. A butanol fraction obtained from 50% ethanol extracts of Opuntia ficus indica var. saboten (Cactaceae) stem (SK OFB901) and its hydrolysis product (SK OFB901H) inhibited the production of NO in LPS-activated microglia in a dose dependent manner (IC50 15.9, 4.2 microg/mL, respectively). They also suppressed the expression of protein and mRNA of iNOS in LPS-activated microglial cells at higher than 30 microg/mL as observed by western blot analysis and RT-PCR experiment. They also inhibited the degradation of I-kappaB-alpha in activated microglia. Moreover, they showed strong activity of peroxynitrite scavenging in a cell free bioassay system. These results imply that Opuntia ficus indica may have neuroprotective activity through the inhibition of NO production by activated microglial cells and peroxynitrite scavenging activity. Copyright (c) 2006 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  9. Atriopeptin II stimulates chloride secretion in the isolated operculum epithelium of Fundulus heteroclitus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zadunaisky, J.A.; Scheide, J.I.

    1986-01-01

    Whole killifish efflux of 36 Cl was increased more than 2x with the addition of 1.4 x 10 -7 M atriopeptin (ANF) to the seawater bath. Atriopeptin II (10 -7 M) added serosally to the isolated Fundulus heteroclitus opercular epithelium resulted in a consistent stimulation of the short-circuit current, from 129.5 +/- 12.3 to 153.5 +/- 13.4 μA/cm 2 . Tissue resistance was decreased 10% from 114.9 +/- 14.2 to 103.9 +/- 11.8 Omega x cm 2 indicating a change in chloride conductance. The effect of ANF was maximal at 10 -7 M and mucosal addition of ANF was ineffective in stimulating the opercular current. The ANF current stimulation did not interfere with the isoproterenol (10 -6 M) response but ANF did not stimulate the current if added after isoproterenol. Serosal addition of propranolol (10 -5 M), sufficient to inhibit 10 -6 M isoproterenol, had no effect on the ANF response. The serosal addition of 10 -6 M tetrodotoxin or 10 -4 M diltiazem did not inhibit the ANF response. The stimulatory effect observed by ANF did not involve the isoproterenol receptor or nerve activation; however, it was a distinct stimulatory response on the isolated opercular epithelium

  10. Stretch-stimulated glucose transport in skeletal muscle is regulated by Rac1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sylow, Lykke; Møller, Lisbeth L V; Kleinert, Maximilian; Richter, Erik A; Jensen, Thomas E

    2015-02-01

    Rac1 regulates stretch-stimulated (i.e. mechanical stress) glucose transport in muscle. Actin depolymerization decreases stretch-induced glucose transport in skeletal muscle. Rac1 is a required part of the mechanical stress-component of the contraction-stimulus to glucose transport in skeletal muscle. An alternative to the canonical insulin signalling pathway for glucose transport is muscle contraction/exercise. Mechanical stress is an integrated part of the muscle contraction/relaxation cycle, and passive stretch stimulates muscle glucose transport. However, the signalling mechanism regulating stretch-stimulated glucose transport is not well understood. We recently reported that the actin cytoskeleton regulating GTPase, Rac1, was activated in mouse muscle in response to stretching. Rac1 is a regulator of contraction- and insulin-stimulated glucose transport, however, its role in stretch-stimulated glucose transport and signalling is unknown. We therefore investigated whether stretch-induced glucose transport in skeletal muscle required Rac1 and the actin cytoskeleton. We used muscle-specific inducible Rac1 knockout mice as well as pharmacological inhibitors of Rac1 and the actin cytoskeleton in isolated soleus and extensor digitorum longus muscles. In addition, the role of Rac1 in contraction-stimulated glucose transport during conditions without mechanical load on the muscles was evaluated in loosely hanging muscles and muscles in which cross-bridge formation was blocked by the myosin ATPase inhibitors BTS and Blebbistatin. Knockout as well as pharmacological inhibition of Rac1 reduced stretch-stimulated glucose transport by 30-50% in soleus and extensor digitorum longus muscle. The actin depolymerizing agent latrunculin B similarly decreased glucose transport in response to stretching by 40-50%. Rac1 inhibition reduced contraction-stimulated glucose transport by 30-40% in tension developing muscle but did not affect contraction-stimulated glucose transport in

  11. Physiological markers of motor inhibition during human behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duque, Julie; Greenhouse, Ian; Labruna, Ludovica; Ivry, Richard B.

    2017-01-01

    Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) studies in humans have shown that many behaviors engage processes that suppress excitability within the corticospinal tract. Inhibition of the motor output pathway has been extensively studied in the context of action stopping, where a planned movement needs to be abruptly aborted. Recent TMS work has also revealed markers of motor inhibition during the preparation of movement. Here, we review the evidence for motor inhibition during action stopping and action preparation, focusing on studies that have used TMS to monitor changes in the excitability of the corticospinal pathway. We discuss how these physiological results have motivated theoretical models of how the brain selects actions, regulates movement initiation and execution, and switches from one state to another. PMID:28341235

  12. Inhibition of GLO1 in Glioblastoma Multiforme Increases DNA-AGEs, Stimulates RAGE Expression, and Inhibits Brain Tumor Growth in Orthotopic Mouse Models

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    Rahul Jandial

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Cancers that exhibit the Warburg effect may elevate expression of glyoxylase 1 (GLO1 to detoxify the toxic glycolytic byproduct methylglyoxal (MG and inhibit the formation of pro-apoptotic advanced glycation endproducts (AGEs. Inhibition of GLO1 in cancers that up-regulate glycolysis has been proposed as a therapeutic targeting strategy, but this approach has not been evaluated for glioblastoma multiforme (GBM, the most aggressive and difficult to treat malignancy of the brain. Elevated GLO1 expression in GBM was established in patient tumors and cell lines using bioinformatics tools and biochemical approaches. GLO1 inhibition in GBM cell lines and in an orthotopic xenograft GBM mouse model was examined using both small molecule and short hairpin RNA (shRNA approaches. Inhibition of GLO1 with S-(p-bromobenzyl glutathione dicyclopentyl ester (p-BrBzGSH(Cp2 increased levels of the DNA-AGE N2-1-(carboxyethyl-2′-deoxyguanosine (CEdG, a surrogate biomarker for nuclear MG exposure; substantially elevated expression of the immunoglobulin-like receptor for AGEs (RAGE; and induced apoptosis in GBM cell lines. Targeting GLO1 with shRNA similarly increased CEdG levels and RAGE expression, and was cytotoxic to glioma cells. Mice bearing orthotopic GBM xenografts treated systemically with p-BrBzGSH(Cp2 exhibited tumor regression without significant off-target effects suggesting that GLO1 inhibition may have value in the therapeutic management of these drug-resistant tumors.

  13. Inhibition of GLO1 in Glioblastoma Multiforme Increases DNA-AGEs, Stimulates RAGE Expression, and Inhibits Brain Tumor Growth in Orthotopic Mouse Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jandial, Rahul; Neman, Josh; Lim, Punnajit P; Tamae, Daniel; Kowolik, Claudia M; Wuenschell, Gerald E; Shuck, Sarah C; Ciminera, Alexandra K; De Jesus, Luis R; Ouyang, Ching; Chen, Mike Y; Termini, John

    2018-01-30

    Cancers that exhibit the Warburg effect may elevate expression of glyoxylase 1 (GLO1) to detoxify the toxic glycolytic byproduct methylglyoxal (MG) and inhibit the formation of pro-apoptotic advanced glycation endproducts (AGEs). Inhibition of GLO1 in cancers that up-regulate glycolysis has been proposed as a therapeutic targeting strategy, but this approach has not been evaluated for glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), the most aggressive and difficult to treat malignancy of the brain. Elevated GLO1 expression in GBM was established in patient tumors and cell lines using bioinformatics tools and biochemical approaches. GLO1 inhibition in GBM cell lines and in an orthotopic xenograft GBM mouse model was examined using both small molecule and short hairpin RNA (shRNA) approaches. Inhibition of GLO1 with S -( p -bromobenzyl) glutathione dicyclopentyl ester ( p- BrBzGSH(Cp)₂) increased levels of the DNA-AGE N ²-1-(carboxyethyl)-2'-deoxyguanosine (CEdG), a surrogate biomarker for nuclear MG exposure; substantially elevated expression of the immunoglobulin-like receptor for AGEs (RAGE); and induced apoptosis in GBM cell lines. Targeting GLO1 with shRNA similarly increased CEdG levels and RAGE expression, and was cytotoxic to glioma cells. Mice bearing orthotopic GBM xenografts treated systemically with p -BrBzGSH(Cp)₂ exhibited tumor regression without significant off-target effects suggesting that GLO1 inhibition may have value in the therapeutic management of these drug-resistant tumors.

  14. Modulation of long-latency afferent inhibition by the amplitude of sensory afferent volley.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turco, Claudia V; El-Sayes, Jenin; Fassett, Hunter J; Chen, Robert; Nelson, Aimee J

    2017-07-01

    Long-latency afferent inhibition (LAI) is the inhibition of the transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) motor-evoked potentials (MEP) by the sensory afferent volley following electrical stimulation of a peripheral nerve. It is unknown how the activation of sensory afferent fibers relates to the magnitude of LAI. This study investigated the relationship between LAI and the sensory nerve action potentials (SNAP) from the median nerve (MN) and the digital nerves (DN) of the second digit. LAI was obtained by delivering nerve stimulation 200 ms before a TMS pulse delivered over the motor cortex. Experiment 1 assessed the magnitude of LAI following stimulation of the contralateral MN or DN using nerve stimulus intensities relative to the maximum SNAP (SNAP max ) of that nerve and two TMS intensities (0.5- and 1-mV MEP). Results indicate that MN LAI is maximal at ~50% SNAP max , when presumably all sensory afferents are recruited for TMS of 0.5-mV MEP. For DN, LAI appears at ~50% SNAP max and does not increase with further recruitment of sensory afferents. Experiment 2 investigated the magnitude of LAI following ipsilateral nerve stimulation at intensities relative to SNAP max Results show minimal LAI evoked by ipsilateral MN and no LAI following ipsilateral DN stimulation. Implications for future studies investigating LAI include adjusting nerve stimulation to 50% SNAP max to obtain maximal LAI. Additionally, MN LAI can be used as a marker for neurological disease or injury by using a nerve stimulation intensity that can evoke a depth of LAI capable of increasing or decreasing. NEW & NOTEWORTHY This is the first investigation of the relationship between long-latency afferent inhibition (LAI) and the sensory afferent volley. Differences exist between median and digital nerve LAI. For the median nerve, LAI increases until all sensory fibers are presumably recruited. In contrast, digital nerve LAI does not increase with the recruitment of additional sensory fibers but

  15. LPS inhibits caspase 3-dependent apoptosis in RAW264.7 macrophages induced by the AMPK activator AICAR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Russe, Otto Quintus; Möser, Christine V.; Kynast, Katharina L.; King, Tanya S.; Olbrich, Katrin; Grösch, Sabine; Geisslinger, Gerd; Niederberger, Ellen

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • AMPK-activation induces caspase 3-dependent apoptosis in macrophages. • Apoptosis is associated with decreased mTOR and increased p21 levels. • All effects can be significantly inhibited by the TLR4 agonist lipopolysaccharide. - Abstract: AMP-activated kinase is a cellular energy sensor which is activated in stages of increased ATP consumption. Its activation has been associated with a number of beneficial effects such as decreasing inflammatory processes and the disease progress of diabetes and obesity, respectively. Furthermore, AMPK activation has been linked with induction of cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in cancer and vascular cells, indicating that it might have a therapeutic impact for the treatment of cancer and atherosclerosis. However, the impact of AMPK on the proliferation of macrophages, which also play a key role in the formation of atherosclerotic plaques and in inflammatory processes, has not been focused so far. We have assessed the influence of AICAR- and metformin-induced AMPK activation on cell viability of macrophages with and without inflammatory stimulation, respectively. In cells without inflammatory stimulation, we found a strong induction of caspase 3-dependent apoptosis associated with decreased mTOR levels and increased expression of p21. Interestingly, these effects could be inhibited by co-stimulation with bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) but not by other proinflammatory cytokines suggesting that AICAR induces apoptosis via AMPK in a TLR4-pathway dependent manner. In conclusion, our results revealed that AMPK activation is not only associated with positive effects but might also contribute to risk factors by disturbing important features of macrophages. The fact that LPS is able to restore AMPK-associated apoptosis might indicate an important role of TLR4 agonists in preventing unfavorable cell death of immune cells

  16. LPS inhibits caspase 3-dependent apoptosis in RAW264.7 macrophages induced by the AMPK activator AICAR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Russe, Otto Quintus, E-mail: quintus@russe.eu; Möser, Christine V., E-mail: chmoeser@hotmail.com; Kynast, Katharina L., E-mail: katharina.kynast@googlemail.com; King, Tanya S., E-mail: tanya.sarah.king@googlemail.com; Olbrich, Katrin, E-mail: Katrin.olbrich@gmx.net; Grösch, Sabine, E-mail: groesch@em.uni-frankfurt.de; Geisslinger, Gerd, E-mail: geisslinger@em.uni-frankfurt.de; Niederberger, Ellen, E-mail: e.niederberger@em.uni-frankfurt.de

    2014-05-09

    Highlights: • AMPK-activation induces caspase 3-dependent apoptosis in macrophages. • Apoptosis is associated with decreased mTOR and increased p21 levels. • All effects can be significantly inhibited by the TLR4 agonist lipopolysaccharide. - Abstract: AMP-activated kinase is a cellular energy sensor which is activated in stages of increased ATP consumption. Its activation has been associated with a number of beneficial effects such as decreasing inflammatory processes and the disease progress of diabetes and obesity, respectively. Furthermore, AMPK activation has been linked with induction of cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in cancer and vascular cells, indicating that it might have a therapeutic impact for the treatment of cancer and atherosclerosis. However, the impact of AMPK on the proliferation of macrophages, which also play a key role in the formation of atherosclerotic plaques and in inflammatory processes, has not been focused so far. We have assessed the influence of AICAR- and metformin-induced AMPK activation on cell viability of macrophages with and without inflammatory stimulation, respectively. In cells without inflammatory stimulation, we found a strong induction of caspase 3-dependent apoptosis associated with decreased mTOR levels and increased expression of p21. Interestingly, these effects could be inhibited by co-stimulation with bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) but not by other proinflammatory cytokines suggesting that AICAR induces apoptosis via AMPK in a TLR4-pathway dependent manner. In conclusion, our results revealed that AMPK activation is not only associated with positive effects but might also contribute to risk factors by disturbing important features of macrophages. The fact that LPS is able to restore AMPK-associated apoptosis might indicate an important role of TLR4 agonists in preventing unfavorable cell death of immune cells.

  17. Behavioral inhibition and obsessive-compulsive disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coles, Meredith E; Schofield, Casey A; Pietrefesa, Ashley S

    2006-01-01

    Behavioral inhibition is frequently cited as a vulnerability factor for development of anxiety. However, few studies have examined the unique relationship between behavioral inhibition and obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). Therefore, the current study addressed the relationship between behavioral inhibition and OCD in a number of ways. In a large unselected student sample, frequency of current OC symptoms was significantly correlated with retrospective self-reports of total levels of childhood behavioral inhibition. In addition, frequency of current OC symptoms was also significantly correlated with both social and nonsocial components of behavioral inhibition. Further, there was evidence for a unique relationship between behavioral inhibition and OC symptoms beyond the relationship of behavioral inhibition and social anxiety. In addition, results showed that reports of childhood levels of behavioral inhibition significantly predicted levels of OCD symptoms in adulthood. Finally, preliminary evidence suggested that behavioral inhibition may be more strongly associated with some types of OC symptoms than others, and that overprotective parenting may moderate the impact of behavioral inhibition on OC symptoms. The current findings suggest the utility of additional research examining the role of behavioral inhibition in the etiology of OCD.

  18. Transcranial magnetic stimulation reveals cortical hyperexcitability in episodic cluster headache.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cosentino, Guiseppe; Brighina, Filippo; Brancato, Sara; Valentino, Francesca; Indovino, Serena; Fierro, Brigida

    2015-01-01

    Evidence shows involvement of the cerebral cortex in the pathophysiology of cluster headache (CH). Here we investigated cortical excitability in episodic CH patients by using transcranial magnetic stimulation. In 25 patients with episodic CH and 13 healthy subjects we evaluated the motor cortical response to single-pulse (ie, motor threshold, input-output curves, cortical silent period) and paired-pulse (ie, intracortical facilitation, short intracortical inhibition) transcranial magnetic stimulation in both hemispheres. Thirteen patients were evaluated outside bout and the remaining 12 patients inside bout. Our results showed increased slope of the input-output curves after stimulation of both hemispheres in patients outside bout and in the hemisphere contralateral to the headache side in patients inside bout. Increased intracortical facilitation was observed in the hemisphere ipsilateral to the headache side in patients evaluated both outside and inside bout; reduced short intracortical inhibition was observed in patients inside bout ipsilateral to the side of pain. In conclusion, we provide evidence of increased cortical excitability in episodic CH both outside and inside bout, especially in the hemisphere ipsilateral to the side of headache attacks. Our results suggest that an abnormal regulation of cortical excitability could be involved in the pathophysiology of CH. We investigated cortical excitability in episodic cluster headache by using transcranial magnetic stimulation, providing evidence of cortical hyperexcitability in patients both inside and outside bout. We suggest that an abnormal state of cortical excitability could be involved in the pathophysiology of the disease. Copyright © 2015 American Pain Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Corrosion of conductive polypyrrole: Effects of environmental factors, electrochemical stimulation, and doping anions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qi Kai; Qiu Yubing; Chen Zhenyu; Guo Xingpeng

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Corrosive galvanic cells form on PPy film with the electrochemical reduction of O 2. ► Suitable electrochemical stimulation can inhibit the PPy’s corrosion. ► PPy film doped with larger sized anions has better corrosion resistance performance. - Abstract: The effects of environmental factors, electrochemical stimulation, and doping anions on the corrosion behaviour of conductive polypyrrole (PPy) films in alkaline aqueous media were studied with cyclic voltammetry, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. High concentrations of electrolyte, low dissolved oxygen and low temperatures enhance the stability of PPy. Polarising PPy at a negative potential inhibits its corrosion obviously. PPy doped with large counter anions shows better corrosion resistance than PPy doped with small counter ions. The possible mechanism involved in PPy corrosion process is discussed.

  20. Ribosomal Protein S6 Kinase (RSK-2 as a central effector molecule in RON receptor tyrosine kinase mediated epithelial to mesenchymal transition induced by macrophage-stimulating protein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Rui-Wen

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT occurs during cancer cell invasion and malignant metastasis. Features of EMT include spindle-like cell morphology, loss of epithelial cellular markers and gain of mesenchymal phenotype. Activation of the RON receptor tyrosine kinase by macrophage-stimulating protein (MSP has been implicated in cellular EMT program; however, the major signaling determinant(s responsible for MSP-induced EMT is unknown. Results The study presented here demonstrates that RSK2, a downstream signaling protein of the Ras-Erk1/2 pathway, is the principal molecule that links MSP-activated RON signaling to complete EMT. Using MDCK cells expressing RON as a model, a spindle-shape based screen was conducted, which identifies RSK2 among various intracellular proteins as a potential signaling molecule responsible for MSP-induced EMT. MSP stimulation dissociated RSK2 with Erk1/2 and promoted RSK2 nuclear translocation. MSP strongly induced RSK2 phosphorylation in a dose-dependent manner. These effects relied on RON and Erk1/2 phosphorylation, which is significantly potentiated by transforming growth factor (TGF-β1, an EMT-inducing cytokine. Specific RSK inhibitor SL0101 completely prevented MSP-induced RSK phosphorylation, which results in inhibition of MSP-induced spindle-like morphology and suppression of cell migration associated with EMT. In HT-29 cancer cells that barely express RSK2, forced RSK2 expression results in EMT-like phenotype upon MSP stimulation. Moreover, specific siRNA-mediated silencing of RSK2 but not RSK1 in L3.6pl pancreatic cancer cells significantly inhibited MSP-induced EMT-like phenotype and cell migration. Conclusions MSP-induced RSK2 activation is a critical determinant linking RON signaling to cellular EMT program. Inhibition of RSK2 activity may provide a therapeutic opportunity for blocking RON-mediated cancer cell migration and subsequent invasion.

  1. HER2-Targeted Polyinosine/Polycytosine Therapy Inhibits Tumor Growth and Modulates the Tumor Immune Microenvironment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zigler, Maya; Shir, Alexei; Joubran, Salim; Sagalov, Anna; Klein, Shoshana; Edinger, Nufar; Lau, Jeffrey; Yu, Shang-Fan; Mizraji, Gabriel; Globerson Levin, Anat; Sliwkowski, Mark X; Levitzki, Alexander

    2016-08-01

    The development of targeted therapies that affect multiple signaling pathways and stimulate antitumor immunity is greatly needed. About 20% of patients with breast cancer overexpress HER2. Small molecules and antibodies targeting HER2 convey some survival benefits; however, patients with advanced disease succumb to the disease under these treatment regimens, possibly because HER2 is not completely necessary for the survival of the targeted cancer cells. In the present study, we show that a polyinosine/polycytosine (pIC) HER2-homing chemical vector induced the demise of HER2-overexpressing breast cancer cells, including trastuzumab-resistant cells. Targeting pIC to the tumor evoked a number of cell-killing mechanisms, as well as strong bystander effects. These bystander mechanisms included type I IFN induction, immune cell recruitment, and activation. The HER2-targeted pIC strongly inhibited the growth of HER2-overexpressing tumors in immunocompetent mice. The data presented here could open additional avenues in the treatment of HER2-positive breast cancer. Cancer Immunol Res; 4(8); 688-97. ©2016 AACR. ©2016 American Association for Cancer Research.

  2. Acute anal stretch inhibits NMDA-dependent pelvic-urethra reflex potentiation via spinal GABAergic inhibition in anesthetized rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Sung-Lang; Huang, Yu-Hui; Kao, Yu-Lin; Chen, Gin-Den; Cheng, Chen-Li; Peng, Hsien-Yu; Liao, Jiuan-Miaw; Huang, Pei-Chen; Tsai, Shih-Jei; Lin, Tzer-Bin

    2008-10-01

    The impact of acute anal stretch on the pelvic-urethra reflex potentiation was examined in urethane-anesthetized rats by recording the external urethra sphincter electromyogram activity evoked by the pelvic afferent stimulation. Test stimulation (1 stimulation/30 s) evoked a baseline reflex activity with a single action potential that was abolished by gallamine (5 mg/kg iv). On the other hand, the repetitive stimulation (1 stimulation/1 s) induced spinal reflex potentiation (SRP) that was attenuated by intrathecal 6-cyano-7-nitroquinoxaline-2,4-dione (a glutamatergic alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazoleproprionat receptor antagonist, 100 microM, 10 microl) and d-2-amino-5-phosphonovalerate [a glutamatergic N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) antagonist, 100 microM, 10 microl]. Acute anal stretch using a mosquito clamp with a distance of 4 mm exhibited no effect, whereas distances of 8 mm attenuated and 12 mm abolished the repetitive stimulation-induced SRP. Intrathecal NMDA (100 microM, 10 microl) reversed the abolition on SRP caused by anal stretch. On the other hand, pretreated bicuculline [gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) A receptor antagonist, 100 microM, 10 microl] but not hydroxysaclofen (GABAB receptor antagonist) counteracted the abolition on the repetitive stimulation-induced SRP caused by the anal stretch. All of the results suggested that anal stretch may be used as an adjunct to assist voiding dysfunction in patients with overactive urethra sphincter and that GABAergic neurotransmission is important in the neural mechanisms underlying external urethra sphincter activity inhibited by anal stretch.

  3. Dietary obacunone supplementation stimulates muscle hypertrophy, and suppresses hyperglycemia and obesity through the TGR5 and PPARγ pathway

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Horiba, Taro, E-mail: thoriba@mail.kikkoman.co.jp [Research and Development Division, Kikkoman Corporation, Chiba (Japan); Katsukawa, Masahiro [Research and Development Division, Kikkoman Corporation, Chiba (Japan); Mita, Moeko; Sato, Ryuichiro [Department of Applied Biological Chemistry, Graduate School of Agricultural and Life Science, The University of Tokyo, Tokyo (Japan)

    2015-08-07

    Obacunone is a limonoid that is predominantly found in Citrus. Although various biological activities of limonoids have been reported, little is known about the beneficial effects of obacunone on metabolic disorders. In the present study, we examined the effects of dietary obacunone supplementation on obese KKAy mice, to clarify the function of obacunone in metabolic regulation. Mice were pair-fed a normal diet either alone or supplemented with 0.1% w/w obacunone for 28 days. Compared with the control, obacunone-fed mice had lower glycosylated hemoglobin, blood glucose, and white adipose tissue weight, although there was no significant difference in body weight. Obacunone treatment also significantly increased the weight of the gastrocnemius and quadriceps muscles. Reporter gene assays revealed that obacunone stimulated the transcriptional activity of the bile acids-specific G protein-coupled receptor, TGR5, in a dose-dependent manner. In addition, obacunone inhibited adipocyte differentiation in 3T3-L1 cells and antagonized ligand-stimulated peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ) transcriptional activity. These results suggest that obacunone stimulates muscle hypertrophy and prevents obesity and hyperglycemia, and that these beneficial effects are likely to be mediated through the activation of TGR5 and inhibition of PPARγ transcriptional activity. - Highlights: • Citrus limonoid obacunone prevents hyperglycemia in obese, diabetic KKAy mice. • Obacunone reduces fat content and stimulates muscle hypertrophy in KKAy mice. • Obacunone stimulates TGR5 transcriptional activities. • Obacunone antagonizes PPARγ and inhibits lipid accumulation in adipocytes.

  4. Dietary obacunone supplementation stimulates muscle hypertrophy, and suppresses hyperglycemia and obesity through the TGR5 and PPARγ pathway

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horiba, Taro; Katsukawa, Masahiro; Mita, Moeko; Sato, Ryuichiro

    2015-01-01

    Obacunone is a limonoid that is predominantly found in Citrus. Although various biological activities of limonoids have been reported, little is known about the beneficial effects of obacunone on metabolic disorders. In the present study, we examined the effects of dietary obacunone supplementation on obese KKAy mice, to clarify the function of obacunone in metabolic regulation. Mice were pair-fed a normal diet either alone or supplemented with 0.1% w/w obacunone for 28 days. Compared with the control, obacunone-fed mice had lower glycosylated hemoglobin, blood glucose, and white adipose tissue weight, although there was no significant difference in body weight. Obacunone treatment also significantly increased the weight of the gastrocnemius and quadriceps muscles. Reporter gene assays revealed that obacunone stimulated the transcriptional activity of the bile acids-specific G protein-coupled receptor, TGR5, in a dose-dependent manner. In addition, obacunone inhibited adipocyte differentiation in 3T3-L1 cells and antagonized ligand-stimulated peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ) transcriptional activity. These results suggest that obacunone stimulates muscle hypertrophy and prevents obesity and hyperglycemia, and that these beneficial effects are likely to be mediated through the activation of TGR5 and inhibition of PPARγ transcriptional activity. - Highlights: • Citrus limonoid obacunone prevents hyperglycemia in obese, diabetic KKAy mice. • Obacunone reduces fat content and stimulates muscle hypertrophy in KKAy mice. • Obacunone stimulates TGR5 transcriptional activities. • Obacunone antagonizes PPARγ and inhibits lipid accumulation in adipocytes

  5. Critical role of the FERM domain in Pyk2 stimulated glioma cell migration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lipinski, Christopher A.; Tran, Nhan L.; Dooley, Andrea; Pang, Yuan-Ping; Rohl, Carole; Kloss, Jean; Yang, Zhongbo; McDonough, Wendy; Craig, David; Berens, Michael E.; Loftus, Joseph C.

    2006-01-01

    The strong tendency of malignant glioma cells to invade locally into surrounding normal brain precludes effective surgical resection, reduces the efficacy of radiotherapy, and is associated with increased resistance to chemotherapy regimens. We report that the N-terminal FERM domain of Pyk2 regulates its promigratory function. A 3-dimensional model of the Pyk2 FERM domain was generated and mutagenesis studies identified residues essential for Pyk2 promigratory function. Model-based targeted mutations within the FERM domain decreased Pyk2 phosphorylation and reduced the capacity of Pyk2 to stimulate glioma cell migration but did not significantly alter the intracellular distribution of Pyk2. Expression of autonomous Pyk2 FERM domain fragments containing analogous mutations exhibited reduced capacity to inhibit glioma cell migration and Pyk2 phosphorylation relative to expression of an autonomous wild type FERM domain fragment. These results indicate that the FERM domain plays an important role in regulating the functional competency of Pyk2 as a promigratory factor in glioma

  6. Protein thiophosphorylation associated with secretory inhibition in permeabilized chromaffin cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brooks, J.C.; Brooks, M.

    1985-01-01

    Permeabilized cells treated with the adenosine triphosphate analog, ( 35 S)adenosine-5'-0-3(3-thiotriphosphate) ((γ- 35 S)ATP), showed thiophosphorylation of a small number of cellular proteins. A 54 kilodalton (kDa) protein was heavily thiophosphorylated in unstimulated control cells and a 43 kilodalton protein was more heavily thiophosphorylated in calcium stimulated cells. Intact cells incorporated 35 S into a series of higher molecular weight proteins. Stimulation of prelabelled, permeabilized cells resulted in a loss of 35 S from the cells over a 20 min period. Treatment of permeabilized cells with ATPγS inhibited secretion and 35 S incorporation into the cells. Pretreatment with ATPγS resulted in subsequent inhibition of both secretion and the ability of the cells to incorporate 35 S from (γ- 35 S)ATP. These results indicate that the sites normally available for phosphorylation were inactivated by thiophosphorylation and were unavailable to participate in the secretory process. The inhibition of secretion associated with thiophosphorylation of these proteins suggests that they may play a role in the control of secretion by chromaffin cells. 15 references, 1 figure, 3 tables

  7. Central inhibition of initiation of swallowing by systemic administration of diazepam and baclofen in anaesthetized rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsujimura, Takanori; Sakai, Shogo; Suzuki, Taku; Ujihara, Izumi; Tsuji, Kojun; Magara, Jin; Canning, Brendan J; Inoue, Makoto

    2017-05-01

    Dysphagia is caused not only by neurological and/or structural damage but also by medication. We hypothesized memantine, dextromethorphan, diazepam, and baclofen, all commonly used drugs with central sites of action, may regulate swallowing function. Swallows were evoked by upper airway (UA)/pharyngeal distension, punctate mechanical stimulation using a von Frey filament, capsaicin or distilled water (DW) applied topically to the vocal folds, and electrical stimulation of a superior laryngeal nerve (SLN) in anesthetized rats and were documented by recording electromyographic activation of the suprahyoid and thyrohyoid muscles and by visualizing laryngeal elevation. The effects of intraperitoneal or topical administration of each drug on swallowing function were studied. Systemic administration of diazepam and baclofen, but not memantine or dextromethorphan, inhibited swallowing evoked by mechanical, chemical, and electrical stimulation. Both benzodiazepines and GABA A receptor antagonists diminished the inhibitory effects of diazepam, whereas a GABA B receptor antagonist diminished the effects of baclofen. Topically applied diazepam or baclofen had no effect on swallowing. These data indicate that diazepam and baclofen act centrally to inhibit swallowing in anesthetized rats. NEW & NOTEWORTHY Systemic administration of diazepam and baclofen, but not memantine or dextromethorphan, inhibited swallowing evoked by mechanical, chemical, and electrical stimulation. Both benzodiazepines and GABA A receptor antagonists diminished the inhibitory effects of diazepam, whereas a GABA B receptor antagonist diminished the effects of baclofen. Topical applied diazepam or baclofen was without effect on swallowing. Diazepam and baclofen act centrally to inhibit swallowing in anesthetized rats. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  8. Treatment of renal anemia: Erythropoiesis stimulating agents and beyond

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick Biggar

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Anemia, complicating the course of chronic kidney disease, is a significant parameter, whether interpreted as subjective impairment or an objective prognostic marker. Renal anemia is predominantly due to relative erythropoietin (EPO deficiency. EPO inhibits apoptosis of erythrocyte precursors. Studies using EPO substitution have shown that increasing hemoglobin (Hb levels up to 10-11 g/dL is associated with clinical improvement. However, it has not been unequivocally proven that further intensification of erythropoiesis stimulating agent (ESA therapy actually leads to a comprehensive benefit for the patient, especially as ESAs are potentially associated with increased cerebro-cardiovascular events. Recently, new developments offer interesting options not only via stimulating erythropoeisis but also by employing additional mechanisms. The inhibition of activin, a member of the transforming growth factor superfamily, has the potential to correct anemia by stimulating liberation of mature erythrocyte forms and also to mitigate disturbed mineral and bone metabolism as well. Hypoxia-inducible factor prolyl hydroxylase inhibitors also show pleiotropic effects, which are at the focus of present research and have the potential of reducing mortality. However, conventional ESAs offer an extensive body of safety evidence, against which the newer substances should be measured. Carbamylated EPO is devoid of Hb augmenting effects whilst exerting promising tissue protective properties. Additionally, the role of hepcidin antagonists is discussed. An innovative new hemodialysis blood tube system, reducing blood contact with air, conveys a totally different and innocuous option to improve renal anemia by reducing mechanical hemolysis.

  9. Mechanically stimulated bone cells secrete paracrine factors that regulate osteoprogenitor recruitment, proliferation, and differentiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brady, Robert T.; O'Brien, Fergal J.; Hoey, David A.

    2015-01-01

    Bone formation requires the recruitment, proliferation and osteogenic differentiation of mesenchymal progenitors. A potent stimulus driving this process is mechanical loading, yet the signalling mechanisms underpinning this are incompletely understood. The objective of this study was to investigate the role of the mechanically-stimulated osteocyte and osteoblast secretome in coordinating progenitor contributions to bone formation. Initially osteocytes (MLO-Y4) and osteoblasts (MC3T3) were mechanically stimulated for 24hrs and secreted factors within the conditioned media were collected and used to evaluate mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) and osteoblast recruitment, proliferation and osteogenesis. Paracrine factors secreted by mechanically stimulated osteocytes significantly enhanced MSC migration, proliferation and osteogenesis and furthermore significantly increased osteoblast migration and proliferation when compared to factors secreted by statically cultured osteocytes. Secondly, paracrine factors secreted by mechanically stimulated osteoblasts significantly enhanced MSC migration but surprisingly, in contrast to the osteocyte secretome, inhibited MSC proliferation when compared to factors secreted by statically cultured osteoblasts. A similar trend was observed in osteoblasts. This study provides new information on mechanically driven signalling mechanisms in bone and highlights a contrasting secretome between cells at different stages in the bone lineage, furthering our understanding of loading-induced bone formation and indirect biophysical regulation of osteoprogenitors. - Highlights: • Physically stimulated osteocytes secrete factors that regulate osteoprogenitors. • These factors enhance recruitment, proliferation and osteogenic differentiation. • Physically stimulated osteoblasts secrete factors that also regulate progenitors. • These factors enhance recruitment but inhibit proliferation of osteoprogenitors. • This study highlights a contrasting

  10. Mechanically stimulated bone cells secrete paracrine factors that regulate osteoprogenitor recruitment, proliferation, and differentiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brady, Robert T. [Tissue Engineering Research Group, Dept. of Anatomy, Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland (Ireland); Trinity Centre for Bioengineering, School of Engineering, Trinity College Dublin (Ireland); Advanced Materials and BioEngineering Research Centre (AMBER), Trinity College Dublin & Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland (Ireland); Dept. of Mechanical, Aeronautical and Biomedical Engineering, University of Limerick (Ireland); O' Brien, Fergal J. [Tissue Engineering Research Group, Dept. of Anatomy, Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland (Ireland); Trinity Centre for Bioengineering, School of Engineering, Trinity College Dublin (Ireland); Advanced Materials and BioEngineering Research Centre (AMBER), Trinity College Dublin & Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland (Ireland); Hoey, David A., E-mail: david.hoey@ul.ie [Trinity Centre for Bioengineering, School of Engineering, Trinity College Dublin (Ireland); Dept. of Mechanical, Aeronautical and Biomedical Engineering, University of Limerick (Ireland); The Centre for Applied Biomedical Engineering Research, University of Limerick (Ireland); Materials & Surface Science Institute, University of Limerick (Ireland)

    2015-03-27

    Bone formation requires the recruitment, proliferation and osteogenic differentiation of mesenchymal progenitors. A potent stimulus driving this process is mechanical loading, yet the signalling mechanisms underpinning this are incompletely understood. The objective of this study was to investigate the role of the mechanically-stimulated osteocyte and osteoblast secretome in coordinating progenitor contributions to bone formation. Initially osteocytes (MLO-Y4) and osteoblasts (MC3T3) were mechanically stimulated for 24hrs and secreted factors within the conditioned media were collected and used to evaluate mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) and osteoblast recruitment, proliferation and osteogenesis. Paracrine factors secreted by mechanically stimulated osteocytes significantly enhanced MSC migration, proliferation and osteogenesis and furthermore significantly increased osteoblast migration and proliferation when compared to factors secreted by statically cultured osteocytes. Secondly, paracrine factors secreted by mechanically stimulated osteoblasts significantly enhanced MSC migration but surprisingly, in contrast to the osteocyte secretome, inhibited MSC proliferation when compared to factors secreted by statically cultured osteoblasts. A similar trend was observed in osteoblasts. This study provides new information on mechanically driven signalling mechanisms in bone and highlights a contrasting secretome between cells at different stages in the bone lineage, furthering our understanding of loading-induced bone formation and indirect biophysical regulation of osteoprogenitors. - Highlights: • Physically stimulated osteocytes secrete factors that regulate osteoprogenitors. • These factors enhance recruitment, proliferation and osteogenic differentiation. • Physically stimulated osteoblasts secrete factors that also regulate progenitors. • These factors enhance recruitment but inhibit proliferation of osteoprogenitors. • This study highlights a contrasting

  11. Differential regulation of TNF-α and IL-1β production from endotoxin stimulated human monocytes by phosphodiesterase inhibitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. L. Molnar-Kimber

    1992-01-01

    Full Text Available The effect of selective PDE-I (vinpocetine, PDE-III (milrinone, CI-930, PDE-IV (rolipram, nitroquazone, and PDE-V (zaprinast isozyme inhibitors on TNF-α and IL-1β production from LPS stimulated human monocytes was investigated. The PDE-IV inhibitors caused a concentration dependent inhibition of TNF-α production, but only partially inhibited IL-1β at high concentrations. High concentrations of the PDE-III inhibitors weakly inhibited TNF-α, but had no effect on IL-1β production. PDE-V inhibition was associated with an augmentation of cytokine secretion. Studies with combinations of PDE isozyme inhibitors indicated that PDE-III and PDE-V inhibitors modulate rolipram's suppression of TNF production in an additive manner. These data confirm that TNF-α and IL-1β production from LPS stimulated human monocytes are differentially regulated, and suggest that PDE-IV inhibitors have the potential to suppress TNF levels in man.

  12. N-acetyl lysyltyrosylcysteine amide inhibits myeloperoxidase, a novel tripeptide inhibitor1[S

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hao; Jing, Xigang; Shi, Yang; Xu, Hao; Du, Jianhai; Guan, Tongju; Weihrauch, Dorothee; Jones, Deron W.; Wang, Weiling; Gourlay, David; Oldham, Keith T.; Hillery, Cheryl A.; Pritchard, Kirkwood A.

    2013-01-01

    Myeloperoxidase (MPO) plays important roles in disease by increasing oxidative and nitrosative stress and oxidizing lipoproteins. Here we report N-acetyl lysyltyrosylcysteine amide (KYC) is an effective inhibitor of MPO activity. We show KYC inhibits MPO-mediated hypochlorous acid (HOCl) formation and nitration/oxidation of LDL. Disulfide is the major product of MPO-mediated KYC oxidation. KYC (⩽4,000 μM) does not induce cytotoxicity in bovine aortic endothelial cells (BAECs). KYC inhibits HOCl generation by phorbol myristate acetate (PMA)-stimulated neutrophils and human promyelocytic leukemia (HL-60) cells but not superoxide generation by PMA-stimulated HL-60 cells. KYC inhibits MPO-mediated HOCl formation in BAEC culture and protects BAECs from MPO-induced injury. KYC inhibits MPO-mediated lipid peroxidation of LDL whereas tyrosine (Tyr) and tryptophan (Trp) enhance oxidation. KYC is unique as its isomers do not inhibit MPO activity, or are much less effective. Ultraviolet-visible spectral studies indicate KYC binds to the active site of MPO and reacts with compounds I and II. Docking studies show the Tyr of KYC rests just above the heme of MPO. Interestingly, KYC increases MPO-dependent H2O2 consumption. These data indicate KYC is a novel and specific inhibitor of MPO activity that is nontoxic to endothelial cell cultures. Accordingly, KYC may be useful for treating MPO-mediated vascular disease. PMID:23883583

  13. Aspirin Inhibits Platelet-Derived Sphingosine-1-Phosphate Induced Endothelial Cell Migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polzin, Amin; Knoop, Betül; Böhm, Andreas; Dannenberg, Lisa; Zurek, Mark; Zeus, Tobias; Kelm, Malte; Levkau, Bodo; Rauch, Bernhard H

    2018-01-01

    Aspirin plays a crucial role in the prevention of cardiovascular diseases. We previously described that aspirin has effects beyond inhibition of platelet aggregation, as it inhibited thrombin-mediated release of sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) from human platelets. S1P is a bioactive lipid with important functions on inflammation and apoptosis. In endothelial cells (EC), S1P is a key regulator of cell migration. In this study, we aimed to analyze the effects of aspirin on platelet-induced EC migration. Human umbilical EC migration was measured by Boyden chamber assay. EC migration was induced by platelet supernatants of thrombin receptor-activating peptide-1 (AP1) stimulated platelets. To investigate the S1P receptor subtype that promotes EC migration, specific inhibitors of S1P receptor subtypes were applied. S1P induced EC migration in a concentration-dependent manner. EC migration induced by AP1-stimulated platelet supernatants was reduced by aspirin. S1P1 receptor inhibition almost completely abolished EC migration induced by activated platelets. The inhibition of S1P2 or S1P3 receptor had no effect. Aspirin inhibits EC migration induced by activated platelets that is in part due to S1P and mediated by the endothelial S1P1 receptor. The clinical significance of this novel mechanism of aspirin action has to be investigated in future studies. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  14. Regulation of intracellular calcium in resting and stimulated rat basophilic leukemia cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohr, F.C.

    1988-01-01

    Intracellular calcium regulation was studied in a cell line of mast cells, the rat basophilic leukemia (RBL) cells with the purpose of determining (1) The properties of the plasma membrane calcium permeability pathway and (2) The role of intracellular calcium stores. The first set of experiments showed that depolarization did not induce calcium entry or secretion in resting cells and did inhibit antigen-stimulated calcium uptake and secretion. In the second set of experiments the ionic basis of antigen-induced depolarization was studied using the fluorescent potential-sensitive probe bis-oxonol. The properties of the calcium entry pathway were more consistent with a calcium channel than a calcium transport mechanism such as Na:Ca exchange. The third set of experiments examined the effects of the proton ionophore carbonyl cyanide m-chlorophenylhydrazone (CCCP) on RBL cells. CCCP inhibited antigen-stimulated 45 Ca uptake and secretion by depolarizing the plasma membrane

  15. Limonene inhibits methamphetamine-induced locomotor activity via regulation of 5-HT neuronal function and dopamine release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yun, Jaesuk

    2014-05-15

    Methamphetamine is a psychomotor stimulant that produces hyperlocomotion in rodents. Limonene (a cyclic terpene from citrus essential oils) has been reported to induce sedative effects. In this study, we demonstrated that limonene administration significantly inhibited serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT)-induced head twitch response in mice. In rats, pretreatment with limonene decreased hyperlocomotion induced by methamphetamine injection. In addition, limonene reversed the increase in dopamine levels in the nucleus accumbens of rats given methamphetamine. These results suggest that limonene may inhibit stimulant-induced behavioral changes via regulating dopamine levels and 5-HT receptor function. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  16. Inhibition of insulin-dependent glucose uptake by trivalent arsenicals: possible mechanism of arsenic-induced diabetes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walton, Felecia S.; Harmon, Anne W.; Paul, David S.; Drobna, Zuzana; Patel, Yashomati M.; Styblo, Miroslav

    2004-01-01

    Chronic exposures to inorganic arsenic (iAs) have been associated with increased incidence of noninsulin (type-2)-dependent diabetes mellitus. Although mechanisms by which iAs induces diabetes have not been identified, the clinical symptoms of the disease indicate that iAs or its metabolites interfere with insulin-stimulated signal transduction pathway or with critical steps in glucose metabolism. We have examined effects of iAs and methylated arsenicals that contain trivalent or pentavalent arsenic on glucose uptake by 3T3-L1 adipocytes. Treatment with inorganic and methylated pentavalent arsenicals (up to 1 mM) had little or no effect on either basal or insulin-stimulated glucose uptake. In contrast, trivalent arsenicals, arsenite (iAs III ), methylarsine oxide (MAs III O), and iododimethylarsine (DMAs III O) inhibited insulin-stimulated glucose uptake in a concentration-dependent manner. Subtoxic concentrations of iAs III (20 μM), MAs III O (1 μM), or DMAs III I (2 μM) decreased insulin-stimulated glucose uptake by 35-45%. Basal glucose uptake was significantly inhibited only by cytotoxic concentrations of iAs III or MAs III O. Examination of the components of the insulin-stimulated signal transduction pathway showed that all trivalent arsenicals suppressed expression and possibly phosphorylation of protein kinase B (PKB/Akt). The concentration of an insulin-responsive glucose transporter (GLUT4) was significantly lower in the membrane region of 3T3-L1 adipocytes treated with trivalent arsenicals as compared with untreated cells. These results suggest that trivalent arsenicals inhibit insulin-stimulated glucose uptake by interfering with the PKB/Akt-dependent mobilization of GLUT4 transporters in adipocytes. This mechanism may be, in part, responsible for the development of type-2 diabetes in individuals chronically exposed to iAs

  17. Fungal bioremediation of olive mill wastewater: using a multi-step approach to model inhibition or stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bevilacqua, Antonio; Cibelli, Francesca; Raimondo, Maria Luisa; Carlucci, Antonia; Lops, Francesco; Sinigaglia, Milena; Corbo, Maria Rosaria

    2017-01-01

    Olive mill wastewaters (OMWWs) possess a strong environmental impact; the use of fungi as tools for bioremediation could be a promising method. Twenty-nine fungi were grown on minimal media supplemented with five different kinds of OMWWs (5-15%). Radial growth was assessed for 21 days and the data were modelled through the Dantigny-logistic like function to estimate τ, i.e. the time to attain half of the maximum diameter. Growth on potato dextrose agar and water agar (WA, minimal medium without supplementation) was used as reference. The differences in τ between PDA/WA and minimal media with OMWWs were modelled through a multi-factorial ANOVA, using the concentration of OMWW, the kind of wastes and fungi as categorical predictors. Finally, a principal component analysis was run to group and divide resistant and sensitive fungi. Some fungi experienced a positive Δτ, thus suggesting an inhibition by OMWW, whereas other isolates were enhanced. Some isolates (for example Aspergillus ochraceus) showed a promising trend and could be possible candidates for a validation on a real scale. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry.

  18. Baculovirus IE2 Stimulates the Expression of Heat Shock Proteins in Insect and Mammalian Cells to Facilitate Its Proper Functioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tung, Hsuan; Wei, Sung-Chan; Lo, Huei-Ru; Chao, Yu-Chan

    2016-01-01

    Baculoviruses have gained popularity as pest control agents and for protein production in insect systems. These viruses are also becoming popular for gene expression, tissue engineering and gene therapy in mammalian systems. Baculovirus infection triggers a heat shock response, and this response is crucial for its successful infection of host insect cells. However, the viral protein(s) or factor(s) that trigger this response are not yet clear. Previously, we revealed that IE2-an early gene product of the baculovirus-could form unique nuclear bodies for the strong trans-activation of various promoters in mammalian cells. Here, we purified IE2 nuclear bodies from Vero E6 cells and investigated the associated proteins by using mass spectrometry. Heat shock proteins (HSPs) were found to be one of the major IE2-associated proteins. Our experiments show that HSPs are greatly induced by IE2 and are crucial for the trans-activation function of IE2. Interestingly, blocking both heat shock protein expression and the proteasome pathway preserved the IE2 protein and its nuclear body structure, and revived its function. These observations reveal that HSPs do not function directly to assist the formation of the nuclear body structure, but may rather protect IE2 from proteasome degradation. Aside from functional studies in mammalian cells, we also show that HSPs were stimulated and required to determine IE2 protein levels, in insect cells infected with baculovirus. Upon inhibiting the expression of heat shock proteins, baculovirus IE2 was substantially suppressed, resulting in a significantly suppressed viral titer. Thus, we demonstrate a unique feature in that IE2 can function in both insect and non-host mammalian cells to stimulate HSPs, which may be associated with IE2 stabilization and lead to the protection of the its strong gene activation function in mammalian cells. On the other hand, during viral infection in insect cells, IE2 could also strongly stimulate HSPs and

  19. Clinical Evaluation of the Self-Injurious Behavior Inhibiting System (SIBIS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linscheid, Thomas R.; And Others

    1990-01-01

    The Self-Injurious Behavior Inhibiting System (in which mild and brief contingent electric stimulation is delivered) was evaluated with five cases involving severe mental retardation and previously unmanageable self-injurious behavior. Findings indicated almost complete elimination of the self-injurious behavior with followup suggesting continuing…

  20. Long-lasting desynchronization in rat hippocampal slice induced by coordinated reset stimulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tass, P. A.; Barnikol, U. B.; Silchenko, A. N.; Hauptmann, C.; Speckmann, E.-J.

    2009-01-01

    In computational models it has been shown that appropriate stimulation protocols may reshape the connectivity pattern of neural or oscillator networks with synaptic plasticity in a way that the network learns or unlearns strong synchronization. The underlying mechanism is that a network is shifted from one attractor to another, so that long-lasting stimulation effects are caused which persist after the cessation of stimulation. Here we study long-lasting effects of multisite electrical stimulation in a rat hippocampal slice rendered epileptic by magnesium withdrawal. We show that desynchronizing coordinated reset stimulation causes a long-lasting desynchronization between hippocampal neuronal populations together with a widespread decrease in the amplitude of the epileptiform activity. In contrast, periodic stimulation induces a long-lasting increase in both synchronization and amplitude.

  1. Chloroquine inhibits accessory cell presentation of soluble natural and synthetic protein antigens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buus, S; Werdelin, O

    1984-01-01

    We have studied the in vitro effect of the lysosomotrophic agent, chloroquine, on the presentation of soluble protein antigens by guinea pig accessory cells. Chloroquine inhibited the capacity of antigen-pulsed accessory cells to stimulate proliferation in appropriately primed T cells. The effect...... was time- and dose-dependent. A brief treatment solely of the accessory cells with the drug compromised their ability to stimulate primed T cells in a subsequent culture provided the accessory cells were treated with chloroquine before their exposure to the antigen. These results suggest that chloroquine...... acts on an early event in the antigen handling by accessory cells. Chloroquine is a well known inhibitor of lysosomal proteolysis, and it is likely that its effect on antigen presentation is caused by an inhibition of antigen degradation....

  2. Probenecid inhibits α-adrenergic receptor-mediated vasoconstriction in the human leg vasculature

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nyberg, Michael Permin; Piil, Peter Bergmann; Kiehn, Oliver Thistrup

    2018-01-01

    to α1- and α2-adrenergic receptor stimulation in the human forearm and leg vasculature of young healthy male subjects (23±3 years). By use of immunolabeling and confocal microscopy, Panx1 channels were found to be expressed in vascular smooth muscle cells of arterioles in human leg skeletal muscle....... Probenecid treatment increased (Padrenergic receptor stimulation) by ≈15%, whereas the response to the α1-agonist phenylephrine was unchanged. Inhibition...

  3. Pulmonary surfactant and its components inhibit secretion of phosphatidylcholine from cultured rat alveolar type II cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dobbs, L.G.; Wright, J.R.; Hawgood, S.; Gonzalez, R.; Venstrom, K.; Nellenbogen, J.

    1987-01-01

    Pulmonary surfactant is synthesized and secreted by alveolar type II cells. Radioactive phosphatidylcholine has been used as a marker for surfactant secretion. The authors report findings that suggest that surfactant inhibits secretion of 3 H-labeled phosphatidylcholine by cultured rat type II cells. The lipid components and the surfactant protein group of M/sub r/ 26,000-36,000 (SP 26-36) inhibit secretion to different extents. Surfactant lipids do not completely inhibit release; in concentrations of 100 μg/ml, lipids inhibit stimulated secretion by 40%. SP 26-36 inhibits release with an EC 50 of 0.1 μg/ml. At concentrations of 1.0 μg/ml, SP 26-36 inhibits basal secretion and reduces to basal levels secretion stimulated by terbutaline, phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate, and the ionophore A23187. The inhibitory effect of SP 26-36 can be blocked by washing type II cells after adding SP 26-36, by heating the proteins to 100 0 C for 10 min, by adding antiserum specific to SP 26-36, or by incubating cells in the presence of 0.2 mM EGTA. SP 26-36 isolated from canine and human sources also inhibits phosphatidylcholine release from rat type II cells. Neither type I collagen nor serum apolipoprotein A-1 inhibits secretion. These findings are compatible with the hypothesis that surfactant secretion is under feedback regulatory control

  4. Inhibition of translation in liver polyribosomes by a new substituted thiopseudourea with antitumour action

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Cadavid, Néstor F.; Quijada, Flor Herrera

    1974-01-01

    A new thiopseudourea, S-(10-undecen-1-yl)isothiouronium iodide (compound AHR-1911), was tested for antitumour action and shown to inhibit considerably the growth of the Walker carcinoma in rats. The mechanism of its effect on protein and nucleic acid synthesis was then studied with systems in vitro from rat liver. In incubations of liver slices, 1.4mm-compound AHR-1911 decreased by 96% the incorporation of [14C]leucine into microsomal proteins, and mitochondrial protein synthesis measured in the presence of cycloheximide was decreased by 44%. At lower doses, translation, as well as the incorporation of [3H]uridine into RNA, was also considerably impaired, compound AHR-1911 being the most active of all the thiopseudoureas tested whereas undecylenic acid and thiourea by themselves showed practically no inhibition. Protein synthesis by cytoplasmic ribosomes (microsomes and C-polyribosomes) was inhibited by compound AHR-1911 at different concentrations (72% at 0.42mm), and again the other related compounds were much less effective, with the exception of one antileukaemic thiopseudourea. The same occurred with the poly(U)-stimulated incorporation of phenylalanine. The puromycin reaction with pulse-labelled C-ribosomes was strongly inhibited, particularly when preincubation with compound AHR-1911 preceded the addition of puromycin, with no release of nascent chains by the thiopseudourea alone. In the presence of GTP and pH5 fraction, to induce translocation and transform all the ribosomes to the donor state, the percentage inhibition remained the same. The ribosomes incubated with the drug are aggregated, as shown by the polyribosome profile, but, when excess of inhibitor was removed, the activity in protein synthesis and the puromycin reaction was restored, indicating that the inhibition is not due to the polyribosomal aggregation. These results suggest that the effect on translation with both 55S and 80S ribosomes is derived from inhibition of chain elongation at the

  5. Inhibition of murine splenic B lymphocyte activation following oral exposure to 7,12-dimethylbenz(a)anthracene (DMBA)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davis, D.P.; Burchiel, S.W.; Montano, R.M.; Seamer, L.C.

    1991-01-01

    Previous results from this laboratory have demonstrated that oral exposure of B6C3F1 mice to DMBA inhibited mitogen-stimulated lymphocyte activation in cells recovered from several lymphoid organs. These studies showed that both LPS and PHA-stimulated lymphocyte proliferation and PHA-induced Ca +2 mobilization were significantly inhibited by DMBA exposure, supporting the hypothesis that DMBA inhibits early events associated with lymphocyte activation. The purpose of the current studies was to test this hypothesis directly for B cell activation. B6C3F1 mice were treated with 0, 1.0, or 10 mg/kg/day doses of DMBA for 14 days (total cumulative doses of 0, 14, or 140 mg/kg). B lymphocyte populations were then selected on the flow cytometer by direct positive staining of spleen cells with phycoerythrin-labeled anti-Ly5 (B lymphocyte marker) antibodies. Ca +2 mobilization studies were performed using affinity-purified goat anti-mouse IgD antibodies as the stimulant and Indo-1 as the intracellular Ca +2 indicator. Cell proliferation studies were also performed using 3 H-thymidine and insoluble anti-IgD antibodies. Anti-IgD stimulated Ca +2 mobilization was significantly reduced at the 140 mg/kg dose of DMBA. A statistically significant decrease in anti-IgD stimulated B lymphocyte proliferation at the 14 mg/kg and 140 mg/kg doses of DMBA was found. These results suggest that B lymphocytes may be important targets for DMBA-mediated immunosuppression

  6. Atomic and Free Electrons in a Strong Light Field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fedorov, Mikhail V.

    1998-02-01

    This book presents and describes a series of unusual and striking strong-field phenomena concerning atoms and free electrons. Some of these phenomena are: multiphoton stimulated Bremsstrahlung, free-electron lasers, ave-packet physics, above-threshold ionization, and strong-field stabilization in Rydberg atoms. The theoretical foundations and causes of the phenomena are described in detail, with all the approximations and derivations discussed. All the known and relevant experiments are described oo, and their results are compared with those of the existing theoretical models. An extensive general theoretical introduction gives a good basis for subsequent parts of the book and is an independent and self-sufficient description of the most efficient theoretical methods of the strong-field and multiphoton physics. This book can serve as a textbook for graduate students

  7. Stimulation of cannabinoid receptor 2 (CB2 suppresses microglial activation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernandez Francisco

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Activated microglial cells have been implicated in a number of neurodegenerative disorders, including Alzheimer's disease (AD, multiple sclerosis (MS, and HIV dementia. It is well known that inflammatory mediators such as nitric oxide (NO, cytokines, and chemokines play an important role in microglial cell-associated neuron cell damage. Our previous studies have shown that CD40 signaling is involved in pathological activation of microglial cells. Many data reveal that cannabinoids mediate suppression of inflammation in vitro and in vivo through stimulation of cannabinoid receptor 2 (CB2. Methods In this study, we investigated the effects of a cannabinoid agonist on CD40 expression and function by cultured microglial cells activated by IFN-γ using RT-PCR, Western immunoblotting, flow cytometry, and anti-CB2 small interfering RNA (siRNA analyses. Furthermore, we examined if the stimulation of CB2 could modulate the capacity of microglial cells to phagocytise Aβ1–42 peptide using a phagocytosis assay. Results We found that the selective stimulation of cannabinoid receptor CB2 by JWH-015 suppressed IFN-γ-induced CD40 expression. In addition, this CB2 agonist markedly inhibited IFN-γ-induced phosphorylation of JAK/STAT1. Further, this stimulation was also able to suppress microglial TNF-α and nitric oxide production induced either by IFN-γ or Aβ peptide challenge in the presence of CD40 ligation. Finally, we showed that CB2 activation by JWH-015 markedly attenuated CD40-mediated inhibition of microglial phagocytosis of Aβ1–42 peptide. Taken together, these results provide mechanistic insight into beneficial effects provided by cannabinoid receptor CB2 modulation in neurodegenerative diseases, particularly AD.

  8. Rac1 and AMPK Account for the Majority of Muscle Glucose Uptake Stimulated by Ex Vivo Contraction but Not In Vivo Exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sylow, Lykke; Møller, Lisbeth L V; Kleinert, Maximilian; D'Hulst, Gommaar; De Groote, Estelle; Schjerling, Peter; Steinberg, Gregory R; Jensen, Thomas E; Richter, Erik A

    2017-06-01

    Exercise bypasses insulin resistance to increase glucose uptake in skeletal muscle and therefore represents an important alternative to stimulate glucose uptake in insulin-resistant muscle. Both Rac1 and AMPK have been shown to partly regulate contraction-stimulated muscle glucose uptake, but whether those two signaling pathways jointly account for the entire signal to glucose transport is unknown. We therefore studied the ability of contraction and exercise to stimulate glucose transport in isolated muscles with AMPK loss of function combined with either pharmacological inhibition or genetic deletion of Rac1.Muscle-specific knockout (mKO) of Rac1, a kinase-dead α2 AMPK (α2KD), and double knockout (KO) of β1 and β2 AMPK subunits (β1β2 KO) each partially decreased contraction-stimulated glucose transport in mouse soleus and extensor digitorum longus (EDL) muscle. Interestingly, when pharmacological Rac1 inhibition was combined with either AMPK β1β2 KO or α2KD, contraction-stimulated glucose transport was almost completely inhibited. Importantly, α2KD+Rac1 mKO double-transgenic mice also displayed severely impaired contraction-stimulated glucose transport, whereas exercise-stimulated glucose uptake in vivo was only partially reduced by Rac1 mKO with no additive effect of α2KD. It is concluded that Rac1 and AMPK together account for almost the entire ex vivo contraction response in muscle glucose transport, whereas only Rac1, but not α2 AMPK, regulates muscle glucose uptake during submaximal exercise in vivo. © 2017 by the American Diabetes Association.

  9. Platelet-poor plasma stimulates the proliferation but inhibits the differentiation of rat osteoblastic cells in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamdan, Ahmad Abdel-Salam; Loty, Sabine; Isaac, Juliane; Bouchard, Philippe; Berdal, Ariane; Sautier, Jean-Michel

    2009-06-01

    Recent studies have shown that the use of platelet preparations in bone and implant surgery might stimulate bone formation. However, the biological mechanisms are not well understood. Moreover, few studies have attempted to evaluate the effect of platelet-poor plasma (PPP), which is a product of the platelet-rich plasma preparation process. Thus, this study investigated the behavior of osteoblasts isolated from fetal rat calvaria cultivated in the presence of homologous PPP. PPP was obtained by centrifugation of the rat mother's blood and used in replacement of fetal calf serum, which is classically used in primary culture procedures. Proliferation was measured by an MTT assay at 24, 48, and 72 h. Real-time PCR was performed to study the expression of Runx2, Dlx5, and osteocalcin (OC) on days 0 (4 h), 1, 3, 7, and 12. Alkaline phosphatase (ALP) biochemical activity was evaluated on days 0 (4 h), 1, 3, 7, and 12. Observations by phase-contrast microscopy showed that osteoblasts were able to differentiate until the mineralization of the matrix in the presence of PPP. PPP enhanced the proliferation significantly compared with the control group (Pexpressed by cells in the experimental group at lower levels compared with the control group. Biochemical assay of ALP showed a lower activity in the experimental group compared with the control group (P<0.001). These results suggest that, in the presence of homologous PPP, rat osteoblastic cells are able to maintain their phenotype, with a higher rate of proliferation. However, PPP seems to inhibit osteoblastic differentiation.

  10. KCl stimulation increases norepinephrine transporter function in PC12 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandela, Prashant; Ordway, Gregory A

    2006-09-01

    The norepinephrine transporter (NET) plays a pivotal role in terminating noradrenergic signaling and conserving norepinephrine (NE) through the process of re-uptake. Recent evidence suggests a close association between NE release and regulation of NET function. The present study evaluated the relationship between release and uptake, and the cellular mechanisms that govern these processes. KCl stimulation of PC12 cells robustly increased [3H]NE uptake via the NET and simultaneously increased [3H]NE release. KCl-stimulated increases in uptake and release were dependent on Ca2+. Treatment of cells with phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate (PMA) or okadaic acid decreased [3H]NE uptake but did not block KCl-stimulated increases in [3H]NE uptake. In contrast, PMA increased [3H]NE release and augmented KCl-stimulated release, while okadaic acid had no effects on release. Inhibition of Ca2+-activated signaling cascades with KN93 (a Ca2+ calmodulin-dependent kinase inhibitor), or ML7 and ML9 (myosin light chain kinase inhibitors), reduced [3H]NE uptake and blocked KCl-stimulated increases in uptake. In contrast, KN93, ML7 and ML9 had no effect on KCl-stimulated [3H]NE release. KCl-stimulated increases in [3H]NE uptake were independent of transporter trafficking to the plasma membrane. While increases in both NE release and uptake mediated by KCl stimulation require Ca2+, different intracellular mechanisms mediate these two events.

  11. Resveratrol inhibits PDGF receptor mitogenic signaling in mesangial cells: role of PTP1B

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkatesan, Balachandar; Ghosh-Choudhury, Nandini; Das, Falguni; Mahimainathan, Lenin; Kamat, Amrita; Kasinath, Balakuntalam S.; Abboud, Hanna E.; Choudhury, Goutam Ghosh

    2008-01-01

    Mesangioproliferative glomerulonephritis is associated with overactive PDGF receptor signal transduction. We show that the phytoalexin resveratrol dose dependently inhibits PDGF-induced DNA synthesis in mesangial cells with an IC50 of 10 μM without inducing apoptosis. Remarkably, the increased SIRT1 deacetylase activity induced by resveratrol was not necessary for this inhibitory effect. Resveratrol significantly blocked PDGF-stimulated c-Src and Akt kinase activation, resulting in reduced cyclin D1 expression and attenuated pRb phosphorylation and cyclin-dependent kinase-2 (CDK2) activity. Furthermore, resveratrol inhibited PDGFR phosphorylation at the PI 3 kinase and Grb-2 binding sites tyrosine-751 and tyrosine-716, respectively. This deficiency in PDGFR phosphorylation resulted in significant inhibition of PI 3 kinase and Erk1/2 MAPK activity. Interestingly, resveratrol increased the activity of protein tyrosine phosphatase PTP1B, which dephosphorylates PDGF-stimulated phosphorylation at tyrosine-751 and tyrosine-716 on PDGFR with concomitant reduction in Akt and Erk1/2 kinase activity. PTP1B significantly inhibited PDGF-induced DNA synthesis without inducing apoptosis. These results for the first time provide evidence that the stilbene resveratrol targets PTP1B to inhibit PDGFR mitogenic signaling.—Venkatesan, B., Ghosh-Choudhury, N., Das, F., Mahimainathan, L., Kamat, A., Kasinath, B. S., Abboud, H. E., Choudhury, G. G. Resveratrol inhibits PDGF receptor mitogenic signaling in mesangial cells: role of PTP1B. PMID:18567737

  12. Inhibition of osteoclast differentiation by overexpression of NDRG2 in monocytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Kyeongah; Nam, Sorim; Kim, Bomi; Lim, Ji Hyun; Yang, Young; Lee, Myeong-Sok; Lim, Jong-Seok, E-mail: jslim@sookmyung.ac.kr

    2015-12-25

    N-Myc downstream-regulated gene 2 (NDRG2), a member of the NDRG family of differentiation-related genes, has been characterized as a regulator of dendritic cell differentiation from monocytes, CD34{sup +} progenitor cells, and myelomonocytic leukemic cells. In this study, we show that NDRG2 overexpression inhibits the differentiation of U937 cells into osteoclasts in response to stimulation with a combination of macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF) and soluble receptor activator of NF-κB ligand (RANKL). U937 cells stably expressing NDRG2 are unable to differentiate into multinucleated osteoclast-like cells and display reduced tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP) activity and resorption pit formation. Furthermore, NDRG2 expression significantly suppresses the expression of genes that are crucial for the proliferation, survival, differentiation, and function of osteoclasts, including c-Fos, Atp6v0d2, RANK, and OSCAR. The activation of ERK1/2 and p38 is also inhibited by NDRG2 expression during osteoclastogenesis, and the inhibition of osteoclastogenesis by NDRG2 correlates with the down-regulation of the expression of the transcription factor PU.1. Taken together, our results suggest that the expression of NDRG2 potentially inhibits osteoclast differentiation and plays a role in modulating the signal transduction pathway responsible for osteoclastogenesis. - Highlights: • The expression of NDRG2 significantly impairs osteoclast differentiation. • PU.1 and p38 MAPK inhibitions by NDRG2 are critical for the inhibition of osteoclastogenesis. • Knockdown of NDRG2 rescues the ability of monocytes to differentiate into osteoclasts. • NDRG2 expression in BM and primary macrophages also impairs osteoclast differentiation. • This study implies the potential of NDRG2 expression in the inhibition of osteoclastogenesis.

  13. Evidence that the cortical motor command for the initiation of dynamic plantarflexion consists of excitation followed by inhibition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Taube, Wolfgang; Lundbye-Jensen, Jesper; Schubert, Martin

    2011-01-01

    by conditioning the soleus H-reflex with different interstimulus intervals by cervicomedullary stimulation (CMS-conditioning) and transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) of M1 (M1-conditioning). This technique provides a precise time course of facilitation and inhibition. CMS- and M1-conditioning produced......At the onset of dynamic movements excitation of the motor cortex (M1) is spatially restricted to areas representing the involved muscles whereas adjacent areas are inhibited. The current study elucidates whether the cortical motor command for dynamic contractions is also restricted to a certain...... population of cortical neurons responsible for the fast corticospinal projections. Therefore, corticospinal transmission was assessed with high temporal resolution during dynamic contractions after both, magnetic stimulation over M1 and the brainstem. The high temporal resolution could be obtained...

  14. Sucrose nonfermenting AMPK-related kinase (SNARK) mediates contraction-stimulated glucose transport in mouse skeletal muscle

    OpenAIRE

    Koh, Ho-Jin; Toyoda, Taro; Fujii, Nobuharu; Jung, Michelle M.; Rathod, Amee; Middelbeek, R. Jan-Willem; Lessard, Sarah J.; Treebak, Jonas T.; Tsuchihara, Katsuya; Esumi, Hiroyasu; Richter, Erik A.; Wojtaszewski, Jørgen F. P.; Hirshman, Michael F.; Goodyear, Laurie J.

    2010-01-01

    The signaling mechanisms that mediate the important effects of contraction to increase glucose transport in skeletal muscle are not well understood, but are known to occur through an insulin-independent mechanism. Muscle-specific knockout of LKB1, an upstream kinase for AMPK and AMPK-related protein kinases, significantly inhibited contraction-stimulated glucose transport. This finding, in conjunction with previous studies of ablated AMPKα2 activity showing no effect on contraction-stimulated...

  15. Lactoferrin release and interleukin-1, interleukin-6, and tumor necrosis factor production by human polymorphonuclear cells stimulated by various lipopolysaccharides: relationship to growth inhibition of Candida albicans.

    OpenAIRE

    Palma, C; Cassone, A; Serbousek, D; Pearson, C A; Djeu, J Y

    1992-01-01

    Lipopolysaccharides (LPSs) from Escherichia coli, Serratia marcescens, and Salmonella typhimurium, at doses from 1 to 100 ng/ml, strongly enhanced growth inhibition of Candida albicans by human polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN) in vitro. Flow cytometry analysis demonstrated that LPS markedly augmented phagocytosis of Candida cells by increasing the number of yeasts ingested per neutrophil as well as the number of neutrophils capable of ingesting fungal cells. LPS activation caused augmented ...

  16. Picomolar-affinity binding and inhibition of adenylate cyclase activity by melatonin in Syrian hamster hypothalamus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niles, L.P.; Hashemi, F.

    1990-01-01

    1. The effect of melatonin on forskolin-stimulated adenylate cyclase activity was measured in homogenates of Syrian hamster hypothalamus. In addition, the saturation binding characteristics of the melatonin receptor ligand, [ 125 I]iodomelatonin, was examined using an incubation temperature (30 degree C) similar to that used in enzyme assays. 2. At concentrations ranging from 10 pM to 1 nM, melatonin caused a significant decrease in stimulated adenylate cyclase activity with a maximum inhibition of approximately 22%. 3. Binding experiments utilizing [ 125 I]iodomelatonin in a range of approximately 5-80 pM indicated a single class of high-affinity sites: Kd = 55 +/- 9 pM, Bmax = 1.1 +/- 0.3 fmol/mg protein. 4. The ability of picomolar concentrations of melatonin to inhibit forskolin-stimulated adenylate cyclase activity suggests that this affect is mediated by picomolar-affinity receptor binding sites for this hormone in the hypothalamus

  17. Oxygen sensitivity of potassium- and angiotensin II-stimulated aldosterone release by bovine adrenal cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brickner, R C; Raff, H

    1991-04-01

    Angiotensin II (AII) and extracellular K+, acting through different intracellular mechanisms, stimulate aldosterone release in a synergistic fashion. We have previously shown that decreases in oxygen (O2) within the physiological range inhibit AII, cyclic AMP (cAMP) and ACTH-stimulated aldosterone release. The present experiment evaluated the effect of various concentrations of O2 on K+-stimulated aldosterone release in the presence and absence of AII. Dispersed bovine adrenal glomerulosa cells were incubated with different concentrations of K+ (0.9-5.4 mmol/l) without and with AII (10 nmol/l) under different concentrations of O2 (0, 5 or 50%); 21% O2 (pO2 = 19.9 +/- 0.5 kPa,n = 9) was used as reference control for comparison. In all cases, increases in K+ stimulated aldosterone release, an effect augmented by AII. Under 0% O2 (pO2 = 8.1 +/- 0.3 kPa, n = 3) and 5% O2 (pO2 = 12.8 +/- 0.5 kPa, n = 3), aldosterone release stimulated by K+ or K+/AII was significantly inhibited compared with that under 21% O2. Conversely, under 50% O2 (pO2 = 36.3 +/- 2.5 kPa, n = 3), aldosterone release stimulated by K+ or K+/AII was significantly augmented. Cortisol secretion was not significantly affected by 5% or 50% O2 but was significantly decreased under 0% O2. The effect of O2 on K+/AII stimulation of aldosterone release, as well as previous experiments with cAMP, progesterone and ACTH, suggest a final common post-receptor oxygen-sensitive component of the aldosterone synthetic pathway. It is suggested that one or more enzymes in the aldosterone synthetic pathway is/are exquisitely sensitive to small changes in O2 within the physiological range.

  18. Lithium ions induce prestalk-associated gene expression and inhibit prespore gene expression in Dictyostelium discoideum

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peters, Dorien J.M.; Lookeren Campagne, Michiel M. van; Haastert, Peter J.M. van; Spek, Wouter; Schaap, Pauline

    1989-01-01

    We investigated the effect of Li+ on two types of cyclic AMP-regulated gene expression and on basal and cyclic AMP-stimulated inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (Ins(1,4,5)P3) levels. Li+ effectively inhibits cyclic AMP-induced prespore gene expression, half-maximal inhibition occurring at about 2mM-LiCl.

  19. Response inhibition signals and miscoding of direction in dorsomedial striatum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel W Bryden

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The ability to inhibit action is critical for everyday behavior and is affected by a variety of disorders. Behavioral control and response inhibition is thought to depend on a neural circuit that includes the dorsal striatum, yet the neural signals that lead to response inhibition and its failure are unclear. To address this issue, we recorded from neurons in rat dorsomedial striatum (mDS in a novel task in which rats responded to a spatial cue that signaled that reward would be delivered either to the left or to the right. On 80% of trials rats were instructed to respond in the direction cued by the light (GO. On 20% of trials a second light illuminated instructing the rat to refrain from making the cued movement and move in the opposite direction (STOP. Many neurons in mDS encoded direction, firing more or less strongly for GO movements made ipsilateral or contralateral to the recording electrode. Neurons that fired more strongly for contralateral GO responses were more active when rats were faster, showed reduced activity on STOP trials, and miscoded direction on errors, suggesting that when these neurons were overly active, response inhibition failed. Neurons that decreased firing for contralateral movement were excited during trials in which the rat was required to stop the ipsilateral movement. For these neurons activity was reduced when errors were made and was negatively correlated with movement time suggesting that when these neurons were less active on STOP trials, response inhibition failed. Finally, the activity of a significant number of neurons represented a global inhibitory signal, firing more strongly during response inhibition regardless of response direction. Breakdown by cell type suggests that putative medium spiny neurons tended to fire more strongly under STOP trials, whereas putative interneurons exhibited both activity patterns. 

  20. Reduced short interval cortical inhibition correlates with atomoxetine response in children with attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Tina H; Wu, Steve W; Welge, Jeffrey A; Dixon, Stephan G; Shahana, Nasrin; Huddleston, David A; Sarvis, Adam R; Sallee, Floyd R; Gilbert, Donald L

    2014-12-01

    Clinical trials in children with attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) show variability in behavioral responses to the selective norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor atomoxetine. The objective of this study was to determine whether transcranial magnetic stimulation-evoked short interval cortical inhibition might be a biomarker predicting, or correlating with, clinical atomoxetine response. At baseline and after 4 weeks of atomoxetine treatment in 7- to 12-year-old children with ADHD, transcranial magnetic stimulation short interval cortical inhibition was measured, blinded to clinical improvement. Primary analysis was by multivariate analysis of covariance. Baseline short interval cortical inhibition did not predict clinical responses. However, paradoxically, after 4 weeks of atomoxetine, mean short interval cortical inhibition was reduced 31.9% in responders and increased 6.1% in nonresponders (analysis of covariance t 41 = 2.88; P = .0063). Percentage reductions in short interval cortical inhibition correlated with reductions in the ADHD Rating Scale (r = 0.50; P = .0005). In children ages 7 to 12 years with ADHD treated with atomoxetine, improvements in clinical symptoms are correlated with reductions in motor cortex short interval cortical inhibition. © The Author(s) 2014.

  1. Exercise-induced muscle-derived cytokines inhibit mammary cancer cell growth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hojman, Pernille; Dethlefsen, Christine; Brandt, Claus

    2011-01-01

    in caspase activity was found after incubation of MCF-7 cells with conditioned media from electrically stimulated myotubes. PCR array analysis (CAPM-0838E; SABiosciences) revealed that seven genes were upregulated in the muscles after exercise, and of these oncostatin M (OSM) proved to inhibit MCF-7...

  2. Effects of Methylphenidate and Atomoxetine on Cortical Inhibition in ADHD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Gordon Millichap

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available The effects of methylphenidate (MPH, a psychostimulant, and atomoxetine (ATX, a selective norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor, on short interval-cortical inhibition (SICI were measured in motor cortex with transcranial magnetic stimulation, in a study at Cincinnati Children’s Medical Center, OH, and other centers.

  3. Hemispheric asymmetry and somatotopy of afferent inhibition in healthy humans.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Helmich, R.C.G.; Baumer, T.; Siebner, H.R.; Bloem, B.R.; Munchau, A.

    2005-01-01

    A conditioning electrical stimulus to a digital nerve can inhibit the motor-evoked potentials (MEPs) in adjacent hand muscles elicited by transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) to the contralateral primary motor cortex (M1) when given 25-50 ms before the TMS pulse. This is referred to as

  4. Calcium and osmotic stimulation in renin release from isolated rat glomeruli

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skøtt, O

    1986-01-01

    of the RR rate preceding the stimulus. Removal of calcium stimulated the RR by 10 times (n = 5, p less than 0.001) and a subsequent decrease in osmolality of 20 mOsm/kg stimulated the RR proportionally to that observed in the series containing 2 mM calcium. A decrease in osmolality was able to stimulate RR......The effects of changes in osmolality and calcium concentration on renin release (RR) from isolated superfused rat glomeruli were studied. The undisturbed RR followed a first order fall with a half-time of about 100 min (n = 45). Changes in the osmolality between 270 and 350 mOsm/kg resulted in dose......-dependent changes in the RR rates. Hypoosmotic treatment stimulated the RR transiently, whereas hyperosmotic treatment produced a sustained inhibition. The dose-response relationship was log-linear between 270 and 320 mOsm/kg. A decrease in osmolality of 20 mOsm/kg gave proportional increases in RR irrespectively...

  5. The effect of diet on tumor necrosis factor stimulation of hepatic lipogenesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feingold, K.R.; Soued, M.; Serio, M.K.; Adi, S.; Moser, A.H.; Grunfeld, C. (Univ. of California, San Francisco (USA))

    1990-06-01

    In this study, we determined the effects of tumor necrosis factor (TNF) on serum lipid levels and hepatic lipid synthesis in animals whose diets and feeding conditions were varied to induce changes in baseline serum lipid levels and/or rates of hepatic lipid synthesis. In animals studied at both the nadir and peak of the diurnal cycle of hepatic lipid synthesis, TNF acutely increases serum triglyceride levels, stimulates hepatic fatty acid synthesis, and increases the quantity of newly synthesized fatty acids found in the serum. Similarly, in animals ingesting either high-sucrose or cholesterol-enriched diets, TNF induces the characteristic rapid increase in serum triglyceride levels, hepatic fatty acid synthesis, and quantity of labeled fatty acids in the serum. In animals fed a diet high in triglycerides, using either corn oil or lard, TNF stimulates hepatic fatty acid synthesis and increases the quantity of newly synthesized fatty acids in the serum, but serum triglyceride levels do not change. However, TNF inhibits gastric emptying, which results in a marked decrease in fat absorption in TNF-treated animals. It is likely that a decrease in the dietary contribution to serum triglyceride levels during high-triglyceride feeding counterbalances the increased hepatic contribution induced by TNF treatment. In animals fasted before TNF administration there was no acute change in either serum lipid levels, hepatic fatty acid synthesis, or the quantity of labeled fatty acids in the serum. Thus, TNF stimulates hepatic fatty acid synthesis and increases serum triglyceride levels under many diverse dietary conditions, suggesting that there is a strong linkage between the immune system and lipid metabolism that is independent of most dietary manipulations and may be of fundamental importance in the body's response to infection.

  6. The effect of diet on tumor necrosis factor stimulation of hepatic lipogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feingold, K.R.; Soued, M.; Serio, M.K.; Adi, S.; Moser, A.H.; Grunfeld, C.

    1990-01-01

    In this study, we determined the effects of tumor necrosis factor (TNF) on serum lipid levels and hepatic lipid synthesis in animals whose diets and feeding conditions were varied to induce changes in baseline serum lipid levels and/or rates of hepatic lipid synthesis. In animals studied at both the nadir and peak of the diurnal cycle of hepatic lipid synthesis, TNF acutely increases serum triglyceride levels, stimulates hepatic fatty acid synthesis, and increases the quantity of newly synthesized fatty acids found in the serum. Similarly, in animals ingesting either high-sucrose or cholesterol-enriched diets, TNF induces the characteristic rapid increase in serum triglyceride levels, hepatic fatty acid synthesis, and quantity of labeled fatty acids in the serum. In animals fed a diet high in triglycerides, using either corn oil or lard, TNF stimulates hepatic fatty acid synthesis and increases the quantity of newly synthesized fatty acids in the serum, but serum triglyceride levels do not change. However, TNF inhibits gastric emptying, which results in a marked decrease in fat absorption in TNF-treated animals. It is likely that a decrease in the dietary contribution to serum triglyceride levels during high-triglyceride feeding counterbalances the increased hepatic contribution induced by TNF treatment. In animals fasted before TNF administration there was no acute change in either serum lipid levels, hepatic fatty acid synthesis, or the quantity of labeled fatty acids in the serum. Thus, TNF stimulates hepatic fatty acid synthesis and increases serum triglyceride levels under many diverse dietary conditions, suggesting that there is a strong linkage between the immune system and lipid metabolism that is independent of most dietary manipulations and may be of fundamental importance in the body's response to infection

  7. NADPH oxidase 4 mediates insulin-stimulated HIF-1α and VEGF expression, and angiogenesis in vitro.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dan Meng

    Full Text Available Acute intensive insulin therapy causes a transient worsening of diabetic retinopathy in type 1 diabetes patients and is related to VEGF expression. Reactive oxygen species (ROS have been shown to be involved in HIF-1α and VEGF expression induced by insulin, but the role of specific ROS sources has not been fully elucidated. In this study we examined the role of NADPH oxidase subunit 4 (Nox4 in insulin-stimulated HIF-1α and VEGF expression, and angiogenic responses in human microvascular endothelial cells (HMVECs. Here we demonstrate that knockdown of Nox4 by siRNA reduced insulin-stimulated ROS generation, the tyrosine phosphorylation of IR-β and IRS-1, but did not change the serine phosphorylation of IRS-1. Nox4 gene silencing had a much greater inhibitory effect on insulin-induced AKT activation than ERK1/2 activation, whereas it had little effect on the expression of the phosphatases such as MKP-1 and SHIP. Inhibition of Nox4 expression inhibited the transcriptional activity of VEGF through HIF-1. Overexpression of wild-type Nox4 was sufficient to increase VEGF transcriptional activity, and further enhanced insulin-stimulated the activation of VEGF. Downregulation of Nox4 expression decreased insulin-stimulated mRNA and protein expression of HIF-1α, but did not change the rate of HIF-1α degradation. Inhibition of Nox4 impaired insulin-stimulated VEGF expression, cell migration, cell proliferation, and tube formation in HMVECs. Our data indicate that Nox4-derived ROS are essential for HIF-1α-dependent VEGF expression, and angiogenesis in vitro induced by insulin. Nox4 may be an attractive therapeutic target for diabetic retinopathy caused by intensive insulin treatment.

  8. Anti-inflammatory effects of ursodeoxycholic acid by lipopolysaccharide-stimulated inflammatory responses in RAW 264.7 macrophages.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wan-Kyu Ko

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to investigate the anti-inflammatory effects of Ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA in lipopolysaccharide (LPS-stimulated RAW 264.7 macrophages.We induced an inflammatory process in RAW 264.7 macrophages using LPS. The anti-inflammatory effects of UDCA on LPS-stimulated RAW 264.7 macrophages were analyzed using nitric oxide (NO. Pro-inflammatory and anti-inflammatory cytokines were analyzed by quantitative real time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA. The phosphorylations of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK, c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK, and p38 in mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK signaling pathways and nuclear factor kappa-light polypeptide gene enhancer in B-cells inhibitor, alpha (IκBα signaling pathways were evaluated by western blot assays.UDCA decreased the LPS-stimulated release of the inflammatory mediator NO. UDCA also decreased the pro-inflammatory cytokines tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α, interleukin 1-α (IL-1α, interleukin 1-β (IL-1β, and interleukin 6 (IL-6 in mRNA and protein levels. In addition, UDCA increased an anti-inflammatory cytokine interleukin 10 (IL-10 in the LPS-stimulated RAW 264.7 macrophages. UDCA inhibited the expression of inflammatory transcription factor nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB in LPS-stimulated RAW 264.7 macrophages. Furthermore, UDCA suppressed the phosphorylation of ERK, JNK, and p38 signals related to inflammatory pathways. In addition, the phosphorylation of IκBα, the inhibitor of NF-κB, also inhibited by UDCA.UDCA inhibits the pro-inflammatory responses by LPS in RAW 264.7 macrophages. UDCA also suppresses the phosphorylation by LPS on ERK, JNK, and p38 in MAPKs and NF-κB pathway. These results suggest that UDCA can serve as a useful anti-inflammatory drug.

  9. Anti-Inflammatory Action of an Antimicrobial Model Peptide That Suppresses the TRIF-Dependent Signaling Pathway via Inhibition of Toll-Like Receptor 4 Endocytosis in Lipopolysaccharide-Stimulated Macrophages.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Do-Wan Shim

    Full Text Available Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs, also called host defense peptides, particularly those with amphipathic helical structures, are emerging as target molecules for therapeutic development due to their immunomodulatory properties. Although the antimicrobial activity of AMPs is known to be exerted primarily by permeation of the bacterial membrane, the mechanism underlying its anti-inflammatory activity remains to be elucidated. We report potent anti-inflammatory activity of WALK11.3, an antimicrobial model peptide with an amphipathic helical conformation, in lipopolysaccharide (LPS-stimulated RAW264.7 cells. This peptide inhibited the expression of inflammatory mediators, including nitric oxide, COX-2, IL-1β, IL-6, INF-β, and TNF-α. Although WALK11.3 did not exert a major effect on all downstream signaling in the MyD88-dependent pathway, toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4- mediated pro-inflammatory signals were markedly attenuated in the TRIF-dependent pathway due to inhibition of the phosphorylation of STAT1 by attenuation of IRF3 phosphorylation. WALK11.3 specifically inhibited the endocytosis of TLR4, which is essential for triggering TRIF-mediated signaling in macrophage cells. Hence, we suggest that specific interference with TLR4 endocytosis could be one of the major modes of the anti-inflammatory action of AMPs. Our designed WALK11 peptides, which possess both antimicrobial and anti-inflammatory activities, may be promising molecules for the development of therapies for infectious inflammation.

  10. Quercetin suppresses insulin receptor signaling through inhibition of the insulin ligand–receptor binding and therefore impairs cancer cell proliferation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Feng [Department of Gastroenterology, The Tenth People’s Hospital of Shanghai, Tongji University, Shanghai 200072 (China); Department of Nanomedicine, Houston Methodist Research Institute, Houston, TX 77030 (United States); Yang, Yong, E-mail: yyang@houstonmethodist.org [Department of Nanomedicine, Houston Methodist Research Institute, Houston, TX 77030 (United States); Department of Medicine, Weill Cornell Medical College, New York, NY 10065 (United States)

    2014-10-03

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Quercetin inhibits insulin ligand–receptor interactions. • Quercetin reduces downstream insulin receptor signaling. • Quercetin blocks insulin induced glucose uptake. • Quercetin suppresses insulin stimulated cancer cell proliferation and tumor growth. - Abstract: Although the flavonoid quercetin is known to inhibit activation of insulin receptor signaling, the inhibitory mechanism is largely unknown. In this study, we demonstrate that quercetin suppresses insulin induced dimerization of the insulin receptor (IR) through interfering with ligand–receptor interactions, which reduces the phosphorylation of IR and Akt. This inhibitory effect further inhibits insulin stimulated glucose uptake due to decreased cell membrane translocation of glucose transporter 4 (GLUT4), resulting in impaired cancer cell proliferation. The effect of quercetin in inhibiting tumor growth was also evident in an in vivo model, indicating a potential future application for quercetin in the treatment of cancers.

  11. Quercetin suppresses insulin receptor signaling through inhibition of the insulin ligand–receptor binding and therefore impairs cancer cell proliferation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Feng; Yang, Yong

    2014-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Quercetin inhibits insulin ligand–receptor interactions. • Quercetin reduces downstream insulin receptor signaling. • Quercetin blocks insulin induced glucose uptake. • Quercetin suppresses insulin stimulated cancer cell proliferation and tumor growth. - Abstract: Although the flavonoid quercetin is known to inhibit activation of insulin receptor signaling, the inhibitory mechanism is largely unknown. In this study, we demonstrate that quercetin suppresses insulin induced dimerization of the insulin receptor (IR) through interfering with ligand–receptor interactions, which reduces the phosphorylation of IR and Akt. This inhibitory effect further inhibits insulin stimulated glucose uptake due to decreased cell membrane translocation of glucose transporter 4 (GLUT4), resulting in impaired cancer cell proliferation. The effect of quercetin in inhibiting tumor growth was also evident in an in vivo model, indicating a potential future application for quercetin in the treatment of cancers

  12. Herbicidal and Plant-growth Stimulating Effects of Phenolic Compounds Isolated from Lichens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marize Terezinha Lopes Pereira Peres

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The depsides atranorin (7 and diffractaic acid (1, the depsidones hypostictic (2 protocetraric (3, salazinic (4 acids, the xanthone secalonic acid (5, and usnic acid (6 were evaluated for their phytotoxic potentials against the target species Allium cepa cv. Baia periforme (onion, Monocotyledoneae. The bioassays, carried out under laboratory conditions, revealed that diffractaic (1 and hypostictic (2 acids stimulated plant growth; secalonic acid (5 stimulated seed germination and radicle growth, while reducing coleoptile length. Usnic acid (6 promoted seed germination and stronger inhibition of radicle and coleoptile growth. Protocetraric (3 and salazinic (4 acids and atranorin (7 exhibited a herbicidal effect, inhibiting seed germination and reducing radicle and coleoptile growth—features that suggest their utility as natural herbicides. These results invite further investigation to elucidate the mode of action of these compounds and to synthesize them for field experiments. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.17807/orbital.v7i3.756 

  13. Causes of variation in botulinal inhibition in perishable canned cured meat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tompkin, R B; Christiansen, L N; Shaparis, A B

    1978-05-01

    Final internal processing temperatures within the range of 63 to 74 degrees C did not alter the degree of botulinal inhibition in inoculated perishable canned comminuted cured pork abused at 27 degree