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Sample records for inhibit cancer growth

  1. Growth Inhibition of Breast Cancer in Rat by AAV Mediated Angiostatin Gene

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Ran; CHEN Hong; REN Chang-shan

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To observe growth inhibition effect of adeno-associated viral vectors (AAV) mediated angiostatin (ANG) gene on implanted breast cancer in rat and its mechanism. Methods: Gene transfer technique was used to transfer AAV-ANG to the tumor. Growth curves were drawn to observe the growth of breast cancer implanted in rat, and immunohistochemical method was used to detect the effects of angiostatin on microvesel density (MVD) of breast cancer implanted in rat. Results: Angiostatin inhibited the growth of breast cancer implanted in rat and decreased the microvessel density of tumor. Conclusion: Expression of an angiostatin transgene can suppress the growth of breast cancer implanted in rat through the inhibition of the growth of microvessels, surggesting that angiostatin gene transfer technique may be effective against breast cancer.

  2. Sulindac Sulfide, but Not Sulindac Sulfone, Inhibits Colorectal Cancer Growth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher S. Williams

    1999-06-01

    Full Text Available Sulindac sulfide, a metabolite of the nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drug (NSAID sulindac sulfoxide, is effective at reducing tumor burden in both familial adenomatous polyposis patients and in animals with colorectal cancer. Another sulindac sulfoxide metabolite, sulindac sulfone, has been reported to have antitumor properties without inhibiting cyclooxygenase activity. Here we report the effect of sulindac sulfone treatment on the growth of colorectal carcinoma cells. We observed that sulindac sulfide or sulfone treatment of HCA-7 cells led to inhibition of prostaglandin E2 production. Both sulindac sulfide and sulfone inhibited HCA-7 and HCT-116 cell growth in vitro. Sulindac sulfone had no effect on the growth of either HCA-7 or HCT-116 xenografts, whereas the sulfide derivative inhibited HCA-7 growth in vivo. Both sulindac sulfide and sulfone inhibited colon carcinoma cell growth and prostaglandin production in vitro, but sulindac sulfone had no effect on the growth of colon cancer cell xenografts in nude mice.

  3. Dicumarol inhibition of NADPH:quinone oxidoreductase induces growth inhibition of pancreatic cancer via a superoxide-mediated mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cullen, Joseph J; Hinkhouse, Marilyn M; Grady, Matthew; Gaut, Andrew W; Liu, Jingru; Zhang, Yu Ping; Weydert, Christine J Darby; Domann, Frederick E; Oberley, Larry W

    2003-09-01

    NADPH:quinone oxidoreductase (NQO(1)), a homodimeric, ubiquitous, flavoprotein, catalyzes the two-electron reduction of quinones to hydroquinones. This reaction prevents the one-electron reduction of quinones by cytochrome P450 reductase and other flavoproteins that would result in oxidative cycling with generation of superoxide (O(2)(.-)). NQO(1) gene regulation may be up-regulated in some tumors to accommodate the needs of rapidly metabolizing cells to regenerate NAD(+). We hypothesized that pancreatic cancer cells would exhibit high levels of this enzyme, and inhibiting it would suppress the malignant phenotype. Reverse transcription-PCR, Western blots, and activity assays demonstrated that NQO(1) was up-regulated in the pancreatic cancer cell lines tested but present in very low amounts in the normal human pancreas. To determine whether inhibition of NQO(1) would alter the malignant phenotype, MIA PaCa-2 pancreatic cancer cells were treated with a selective inhibitor of NQO(1), dicumarol. Dicumarol increased intracellular production of O(2)(.-), as measured by hydroethidine staining, and inhibited cell growth. Both of these effects were blunted with infection of an adenoviral vector containing the cDNA for manganese superoxide dismutase. Dicumarol also inhibited cell growth, plating efficiency, and growth in soft agar. We conclude that inhibition of NQO(1) increases intracellular O(2)(.-) production and inhibits the in vitro malignant phenotype of pancreatic cancer. These mechanisms suggest that altering the intracellular redox environment of pancreatic cancer cells may inhibit growth and delineate a potential strategy directed against pancreatic cancer.

  4. Targeting fibroblast growth factor receptor signaling inhibits prostate cancer progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Shu; Shao, Longjiang; Yu, Wendong; Gavine, Paul; Ittmann, Michael

    2012-07-15

    Extensive correlative studies in human prostate cancer as well as studies in vitro and in mouse models indicate that fibroblast growth factor receptor (FGFR) signaling plays an important role in prostate cancer progression. In this study, we used a probe compound for an FGFR inhibitor, which potently inhibits FGFR-1-3 and significantly inhibits FGFR-4. The purpose of this study is to determine whether targeting FGFR signaling from all four FGFRs will have in vitro activities consistent with inhibition of tumor progression and will inhibit tumor progression in vivo. Effects of AZ8010 on FGFR signaling and invasion were analyzed using immortalized normal prostate epithelial (PNT1a) cells and PNT1a overexpressing FGFR-1 or FGFR-4. The effect of AZ8010 on invasion and proliferation in vitro was also evaluated in prostate cancer cell lines. Finally, the impact of AZ8010 on tumor progression in vivo was evaluated using a VCaP xenograft model. AZ8010 completely inhibits FGFR-1 and significantly inhibits FGFR-4 signaling at 100 nmol/L, which is an achievable in vivo concentration. This results in marked inhibition of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) phosphorylation and invasion in PNT1a cells expressing FGFR-1 and FGFR-4 and all prostate cancer cell lines tested. Treatment in vivo completely inhibited VCaP tumor growth and significantly inhibited angiogenesis and proliferation and increased cell death in treated tumors. This was associated with marked inhibition of ERK phosphorylation in treated tumors. Targeting FGFR signaling is a promising new approach to treating aggressive prostate cancer.

  5. Targeting Insulin-Like Growth Factor 1 Receptor Inhibits Pancreatic Cancer Growth and Metastasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subramani, Ramadevi; Lopez-Valdez, Rebecca; Arumugam, Arunkumar; Nandy, Sushmita; Boopalan, Thiyagarajan; Lakshmanaswamy, Rajkumar

    2014-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is one of the most lethal cancers. Increasing incidence and mortality indicates that there is still much lacking in detection and management of the disease. This is partly due to a lack of specific symptoms during early stages of the disease. Several growth factor receptors have been associated with pancreatic cancer. Here, we have investigated if an RNA interference approach targeted to IGF-IR could be effective and efficient against pancreatic cancer growth and metastasis. For that, we evaluated the effects of IGF-1R inhibition using small interfering RNA (siRNAs) on tumor growth and metastasis in HPAC and PANC-1 pancreatic cancer cell lines. We found that silencing IGF-1R inhibits pancreatic cancer growth and metastasis by blocking key signaling pathways such AKT/PI3K, MAPK, JAK/STAT and EMT. Silencing IGF-1R resulted in an anti-proliferative effect in PANC-1 and HPAC pancreatic cancer cell lines. Matrigel invasion, transwell migration and wound healing assays also revealed a role for IGF-1R in metastatic properties of pancreatic cancer. These results were further confirmed using Western blotting analysis of key intermediates involved in proliferation, epithelial mesenchymal transition, migration, and invasion. In addition, soft agar assays showed that silencing IGF-1R also blocks the colony forming capabilities of pancreatic cancer cells in vitro. Western blots, as well as, flow cytometric analysis revealed the induction of apoptosis in IGF-1R silenced cells. Interestingly, silencing IGF-1R also suppressed the expression of insulin receptor β. All these effects together significantly control pancreatic cancer cell growth and metastasis. To conclude, our results demonstrate the significance of IGF-1R in pancreatic cancer. PMID:24809702

  6. Glyphosate and AMPA inhibit cancer cell growth through inhibiting intracellular glycine synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qingli; Lambrechts, Mark J; Zhang, Qiuyang; Liu, Sen; Ge, Dongxia; Yin, Rutie; Xi, Mingrong; You, Zongbing

    2013-01-01

    Glycine is a nonessential amino acid that is reversibly converted from serine intracellularly by serine hydroxymethyltransferase. Glyphosate and its degradation product, aminomethylphosphonic acid (AMPA), are analogs to glycine, thus they may inhibit serine hydroxymethyltransferase to decrease intracellular glycine synthesis. In this study, we found that glyphosate and AMPA inhibited cell growth in eight human cancer cell lines but not in two immortalized human normal prostatic epithelial cell lines. AMPA arrested C4-2B and PC-3 cancer cells in the G1/G0 phase and inhibited entry into the S phase of the cell cycle. AMPA also promoted apoptosis in C4-2B and PC-3 cancer cell lines. AMPA upregulated p53 and p21 protein levels as well as procaspase 9 protein levels in C4-2B cells, whereas it downregulated cyclin D3 protein levels. AMPA also activated caspase 3 and induced cleavage of poly (adenosine diphosphate [ADP]-ribose) polymerase. This study provides the first evidence that glyphosate and AMPA can inhibit proliferation and promote apoptosis of cancer cells but not normal cells, suggesting that they have potentials to be developed into a new anticancer therapy.

  7. MicroRNA-375 inhibits colorectal cancer growth by targeting PIK3CA

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    Wang, Yihui [Department of Colorectal Surgery, The Third Affiliated Hospital of Harbin Medical University, 150 Haping Road, 150081 Harbin (China); Tang, Qingchao [Cancer Center, The Second Affiliated Hospital of Harbin Medical University, 246 Xuefu Road, 150086 Harbin (China); Li, Mingqi; Jiang, Shixiong [Department of Colorectal Surgery, The Third Affiliated Hospital of Harbin Medical University, 150 Haping Road, 150081 Harbin (China); Wang, Xishan, E-mail: wxshan12081@163.com [Cancer Center, The Second Affiliated Hospital of Harbin Medical University, 246 Xuefu Road, 150086 Harbin (China)

    2014-02-07

    Highlights: • miR-375 is downregulated in colorectal cancer cell lines and tissues. • miR-375 inhibits colorectal cancer cell growth by targeting PIK3CA. • miR-375 inhibits colorectal cancer cell growth in xenograft nude mice model. - Abstract: Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the second most common cause of death from cancer. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) represent a class of small non-coding RNAs that control gene expression by triggering RNA degradation or interfering with translation. Aberrant miRNA expression is involved in human disease including cancer. Herein, we showed that miR-375 was frequently down-regulated in human colorectal cancer cell lines and tissues when compared to normal human colon tissues. PIK3CA was identified as a potential miR-375 target by bioinformatics. Overexpression of miR-375 in SW480 and HCT15 cells reduced PIK3CA protein expression. Subsequently, using reporter constructs, we showed that the PIK3CA untranslated region (3′-UTR) carries the directly binding site of miR-375. Additionally, miR-375 suppressed CRC cell proliferation and colony formation and led to cell cycle arrest. Furthermore, miR-375 overexpression resulted in inhibition of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt signaling pathway. SiRNA-mediated silencing of PIK3CA blocked the inhibitory effect of miR-375 on CRC cell growth. Lastly, we found overexpressed miR-375 effectively repressed tumor growth in xenograft animal experiments. Taken together, we propose that overexpression of miR-375 may provide a selective growth inhibition for CRC cells by targeting PI3K/Akt signaling pathway.

  8. Inhibition of Lung Cancer Growth in Mice by Dietary Mixed Tocopherols

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambert, Joshua D.; Lu, Gang; Lee, Mao-Jung; Hu, Jennifer; Ju, Jihyeung; Yang, Chung S.

    2009-01-01

    Tocopherols are lipophilic antioxidants found in vegetable oils. Here, we examined the growth inhibitory effect of a γ-tocopherol-enriched tocopherol mixture (γTmT) against CL13 murine lung cancer cells grown in culture and as subcutaneous tumors in A/J mice. We found γTmT had no effect after 2 d and weakly inhibited the growth of CL13 in culture after 5 d (28% growth inhibition at 80 µM). Dietary treatment with 0.1% and 0.3% γTmT for 50 d inhibited the growth of CL13 tumors in A/J mice by 53.9 and 80.5%, respectively. Histopathological analysis revealed an increase in tumor necrosis compared to control tumors (80% and 240% increase by 0.1% and 0.3% γTmT, respectively). Dietary treatment with γTmT dose-dependently increased γ- (10.0 – 37.6-fold) and δ-tocopherol (8.9 – 26.7-fold) in the tumors of treated mice compared to controls. Dietary treatment with γTmT also increased plasma γ- (5.4 – 6.7-fold) and δ-tocopherol (5.5 – 7-fold). Whereas others have demonstrated the cancer preventive activity of γTmT against mammary and colon cancer, this is the first report of growth inhibitory activity against lung cancer. Further studies are needed to determine the underlying mechanisms for this anticancer activity, and to determine if such activity occurs in other models of cancer. PMID:19557822

  9. 3-Bromopyruvate inhibits human gastric cancer tumor growth in nude mice via the inhibition of glycolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xian, Shu-Lin; Cao, Wei; Zhang, Xiao-Dong; Lu, Yun-Fei

    2015-02-01

    Tumor cells primarily depend upon glycolysis in order to gain energy. Therefore, the inhibition of glycolysis may inhibit tumor growth. Our previous study demonstrated that 3-bromopyruvate (3-BrPA) inhibited gastric cancer cell proliferation in vitro . However, the ability of 3-BrPA to suppress tumor growth in vivo, and its underlying mechanism, have yet to be elucidated. The aim of the present study was to investigate the inhibitory effect of 3-BrPA in an animal model of gastric cancer. It was identified that 3-BrPA exhibited strong inhibitory effects upon xenograft tumor growth in nude mice. In addition, the antitumor function of 3-BrPA exhibited a dose-effect association, which was similar to that of the chemotherapeutic agent, 5-fluorouracil. Furthermore, 3-BrPA exhibited low toxicity in the blood, liver and kidneys of the nude mice. The present study hypothesized that the inhibitory effect of 3-BrPA is achieved through the inhibition of hexokinase activity, which leads to the downregulation of B-cell lymphoma 2 (Bcl-2) expression, the upregulation of Bcl-2-associated X protein expression and the subsequent activation of caspase-3. These data suggest that 3-BrPA may be a novel therapy for the treatment of gastric cancer.

  10. Prolyl oligopeptidase inhibition-induced growth arrest of human gastric cancer cells

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    Suzuki, Kanayo [Laboratory of Cell Biology, Osaka University of Pharmaceutical Sciences, 4-20-1 Nasahara, Takatsuki, Osaka 569-1094 (Japan); Sakaguchi, Minoru, E-mail: sakaguti@gly.oups.ac.jp [Laboratory of Cell Biology, Osaka University of Pharmaceutical Sciences, 4-20-1 Nasahara, Takatsuki, Osaka 569-1094 (Japan); Tanaka, Satoshi [Laboratory of Cell Biology, Osaka University of Pharmaceutical Sciences, 4-20-1 Nasahara, Takatsuki, Osaka 569-1094 (Japan); Yoshimoto, Tadashi [Department of Life Science, Setsunan University, 17-8 Ikeda-Nakamachi, Neyagawa, Osaka 572-8508 (Japan); Takaoka, Masanori [Laboratory of Cell Biology, Osaka University of Pharmaceutical Sciences, 4-20-1 Nasahara, Takatsuki, Osaka 569-1094 (Japan)

    2014-01-03

    Highlights: •We examined the effects of prolyl oligopeptidase (POP) inhibition on p53 null gastric cancer cell growth. •POP inhibition-induced cell growth suppression was associated with an increase in a quiescent G{sub 0} state. •POP might regulate the exit from and/or reentry into the cell cycle. -- Abstract: Prolyl oligopeptidase (POP) is a serine endopeptidase that hydrolyzes post-proline peptide bonds in peptides that are <30 amino acids in length. We recently reported that POP inhibition suppressed the growth of human neuroblastoma cells. The growth suppression was associated with pronounced G{sub 0}/G{sub 1} cell cycle arrest and increased levels of the CDK inhibitor p27{sup kip1} and the tumor suppressor p53. In this study, we investigated the mechanism of POP inhibition-induced cell growth arrest using a human gastric cancer cell line, KATO III cells, which had a p53 gene deletion. POP specific inhibitors, 3-((4-[2-(E)-styrylphenoxy]butanoyl)-L-4-hydroxyprolyl)-thiazolidine (SUAM-14746) and benzyloxycarbonyl-thioprolyl-thioprolinal, or RNAi-mediated POP knockdown inhibited the growth of KATO III cells irrespective of their p53 status. SUAM-14746-induced growth inhibition was associated with G{sub 0}/G{sub 1} cell cycle phase arrest and increased levels of p27{sup kip1} in the nuclei and the pRb2/p130 protein expression. Moreover, SUAM-14746-mediated cell cycle arrest of KATO III cells was associated with an increase in the quiescent G{sub 0} state, defined by low level staining for the proliferation marker, Ki-67. These results indicate that POP may be a positive regulator of cell cycle progression by regulating the exit from and/or reentry into the cell cycle by KATO III cells.

  11. Glyphosate and AMPA inhibit cancer cell growth through inhibiting intracellular glycine synthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Q

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Qingli Li,1,2 Mark J Lambrechts,1 Qiuyang Zhang,1 Sen Liu,1 Dongxia Ge,1 Rutie Yin,2 Mingrong Xi,2 Zongbing You1 1Departments of Structural and Cellular Biology and Orthopaedic Surgery, Tulane Cancer Center and Louisiana Cancer Research Consortium, Tulane Center for Stem Cell Research and Regenerative Medicine, and Tulane Center for Aging, Tulane University Health Sciences Center, New Orleans, LA, USA; 2Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, West China Second University Hospital, Sichuan University, Chengdu, People’s Republic of China Abstract: Glycine is a nonessential amino acid that is reversibly converted from serine intracellularly by serine hydroxymethyltransferase. Glyphosate and its degradation product, aminomethylphosphonic acid (AMPA, are analogs to glycine, thus they may inhibit serine hydroxymethyltransferase to decrease intracellular glycine synthesis. In this study, we found that glyphosate and AMPA inhibited cell growth in eight human cancer cell lines but not in two immortalized human normal prostatic epithelial cell lines. AMPA arrested C4-2B and PC-3 cancer cells in the G1/G0 phase and inhibited entry into the S phase of the cell cycle. AMPA also promoted apoptosis in C4-2B and PC-3 cancer cell lines. AMPA upregulated p53 and p21 protein levels as well as procaspase 9 protein levels in C4-2B cells, whereas it downregulated cyclin D3 protein levels. AMPA also activated caspase 3 and induced cleavage of poly (adenosine diphosphate [ADP]-ribose polymerase. This study provides the first evidence that glyphosate and AMPA can inhibit proliferation and promote apoptosis of cancer cells but not normal cells, suggesting that they have potentials to be developed into a new anticancer therapy. Keywords: serine hydroxymethyltransferase, prostate cancer, apoptosis

  12. Mullerian Inhibiting Substances (MIS) Augments IFN-gamma Mediated Inhibition of Breast Cancer Cell Growth

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Gupta, Vandana

    2006-01-01

    MIS is a member of the TGF family. The purpose of this study is to test the hypothesis that MIS and IFN-gamma might be more effective in the inhibition of breast cancer cell growth than either agent alone...

  13. Oridonin inhibits breast cancer growth and metastasis through blocking the Notch signaling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shixin Xia

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Oridonin is a diterpenoid isolated from Rabdosia rubescens with potent anticancer activity. The aim of our study is to investigate the role of oridonin to inhibit growth and metastasis of human breast cancer cells. Methods: The effect of oridonin on proliferation was evaluated by MTT assay, cell migration and invasion were evaluated by transwell migration and invasion assays in human breast cancer cells. The inhibitive effect of oridonin in vivo was determined by using xenografted nude mice. In addition, the expression of Notch receptors (Notch 1–4 was detected by western blot. Results: Oridonin inhibited human breast cancer cells in vitro and in vivo. In addition, oridonin significantly induced human breast cancer cells apoptosis. Furthermore, the oridonin treatment not only inhibited cancer cell migration and invasion, but more significantly, decreased the expression of Notch 1-4 protein. Conclusion: Our results suggest that the inhibitive effect of oridonin is likely to be driven by the inhibition of Notch signaling pathway and the resulting increased apoptosis.

  14. Silencing VDAC1 Expression by siRNA Inhibits Cancer Cell Proliferation and Tumor Growth In Vivo

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    Tasleem Arif

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Alterations in cellular metabolism and bioenergetics are vital for cancer cell growth and motility. Here, the role of the mitochondrial protein voltage-dependent anion channel (VDAC1, a master gatekeeper regulating the flux of metabolites and ions between mitochondria and the cytoplasm, in regulating the growth of several cancer cell lines was investigated by silencing VDAC1 expression using small interfering RNA (siRNA. A single siRNA specific to the human VDAC1 sequence at nanomolar concentrations led to some 90% decrease in VDAC1 levels in the lung A549 and H358, prostate PC-3, colon HCT116, glioblastoma U87, liver HepG2, and pancreas Panc-1 cancer cell lines. VDAC1 silencing persisted 144 hours post-transfection and resulted in profound inhibition of cell growth in cancer but not in noncancerous cells, with up to 90% inhibition being observed over 5 days that was prolonged by a second transfection. Cells expressing low VDAC1 levels showed decreased mitochondrial membrane potential and adenoside triphosphate (ATP levels, suggesting limited metabolite exchange between mitochondria and cytosol. Moreover, cells silenced for VDAC1 expression showed decreased migration, even in the presence of the wound healing accelerator basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF. VDAC1-siRNA inhibited cancer cell growth in a Matrigel-based assay in host nude mice. Finally, in a xenograft lung cancer mouse model, chemically modified VDAC1-siRNA not only inhibited tumor growth but also resulted in tumor regression. This study thus shows that VDAC1 silencing by means of RNA interference (RNAi dramatically inhibits cancer cell growth and tumor development by disabling the abnormal metabolic behavior of cancer cells, potentially paving the way for a more effective pipeline of anticancer drugs.

  15. 1-o-acetylbritannilactone (ABL) inhibits angiogenesis and lung cancer cell growth through regulating VEGF-Src-FAK signaling

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    Zhengfu, He; Hu, Zhang; Huiwen, Miao; Zhijun, Li [Department of Thoracic Surgery, Sir Run Run Shaw Hospital of Zhejiang University School of Medicine, Hangzhou (China); Jiaojie, Zhou [Zhejiang University School of Medicine, Hangzhou (China); Xiaoyi, Yan, E-mail: xiaoyiyan163@163.com [Zhejiang University School of Medicine, Hangzhou (China); Xiujun, Cai, E-mail: xiujuncaomaj@163.com [Sir Run Run Shaw Hospital of Zhejiang University School of Medicine, Hangzhou (China)

    2015-08-21

    The search for safe, effective and affordable therapeutics against non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and other lung cancers is important. Here we explored the potential effect of 1-o-acetylbritannilactone (ABL), a novel extract from Inula britannica-F, on angiogenesis and lung cancer cell growth. We demonstrated that ABL dose-dependently inhibited vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-induced proliferation, migration, and capillary structure formation of cultured human umbilical vascular endothelial cells (HUVECs). In vivo, ABL administration suppressed VEGF-induced new vasculature formation in Matrigel plugs. For the mechanism investigations, we found that ABL largely inhibited VEGF-mediated activation of Src kinase and focal adhesion kinase (FAK) in HUVECs. Furthermore, treatment of A549 NSCLC cells with ABL resulted in cell growth inhibition and Src-FAK in-activation. Significantly, administration of a single dose of ABL (12 mg/kg/day) remarkably suppressed growth of A549 xenografts in nude mice. In vivo microvessels formation and Src activation were also significantly inhibited in ABL-treated xenograft tumors. Taken together, our findings suggest that ABL suppresses angiogenesis and lung cancer cell growth possibly via regulating the VEGFR-Src-FAK signaling. - Highlights: • 1-o-acetylbritannilactone (ABL) inhibits VEGF-induced angiogenesis in vivo. • ABL inhibits VEGF-induced HUVEC migration, proliferation, capillary tube formation. • ABL inhibits VEGF-mediated activation of Src and FAK in HUVECs. • ABL inhibits growth and Src-FAK activation in A549 cells. • ABL administration inhibits A549 tumor angiogenesis and growth in nude mice.

  16. Tiamulin inhibits breast cancer growth and pulmonary metastasis by decreasing the activity of CD73.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xu; Pei, Shimin; Wang, Huanan; Jin, Yipeng; Yu, Fang; Zhou, Bin; Zhang, Hong; Zhang, Di; Lin, Degui

    2017-04-11

    Metastasis is the leading cause of death in breast cancer patients. CD73, also known as ecto-5'-nucleotidase, plays a critical role in cancer development including metastasis. The existing researches indicate that overexpression of CD73 promotes growth and metastasis of breast cancer. Therefore, CD73 inhibitor can offer a promising treatment for breast cancer. Here, we determined whether tiamulin, which was found to inhibit CD73, was able to suppress breast cancer development and explored the related mechanisms. We firstly measured the effect of tiamulin hydrogen fumarate (THF) on CD73 using high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Then, we investigated cell proliferation, migration and invasion in MDA-MB-231 human breast cancer cell line and 4 T1 mouse breast cancer cell line treated with THF by migration assay, invasion assay and activity assay. Besides, we examined the effect of THF on syngeneic mammary tumors of mice by immunohistochemistry. Our data demonstrated that THF inhibited CD73 by decreasing the activity instead of the expression of CD73. In vitro, THF inhibited the proliferation, migration and invasion of MDA-MB-231 and 4 T1 cells by suppressing CD73 activity. In vivo, animal experiments showed that THF treatment resulted in significant reduction in syngeneic tumor growth, microvascular density and lung metastasis rate. Our results indicate that THF inhibits growth and metastasis of breast cancer by blocking the activity of CD73, which may offer a promising treatment for breast cancer therapy.

  17. STAT6 Mediates Interleukin-4 Growth Inhibition in Human Breast Cancer Cells

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    Jennifer L. Gooch

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available In addition to acting as a hematopoietic growth factor, interleukin-4 (IL-4 inhibits growth of some transformed cells in vitro and in vivo. In this study, we show that insulin receptor substrate (IRS-1, IRS-2, and signal transducer and activator of transcription 6 (STAT6 are phosphorylated following IL-4 treatment in MCF-7 breast cancer cells. STAT6 DNA binding is enhanced by IL-4 treatment. STAT6 activation occurs even after IRS-1 depletion, suggesting the two pathways are independent. To examine the role of STAT6 in IL-4-mediated growth inhibition and apoptosis, a fulllength STAT6 cDNA was transfected into MCF-7 cells. Transient overexpression of STAT6 resulted in both cytoplasmic and nuclear expression of the protein, increased DNA binding in response to IL-4, and increased transactivation of an IL-4 responsive promoter. In STAT6-transfected cells, basal proliferation was reduced whereas apoptosis was increased. Finally, stable expression of STAT6 resulted in reduced foci formation compared to vector-transfected cells alone. These results suggest STAT6 is required for IL-4mediated growth inhibition and induction of apoptosis in human breast cancer cells.

  18. Aminomethylphosphonic acid inhibits growth and metastasis of human prostate cancer in an orthotopic xenograft mouse model.

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    Parajuli, Keshab Raj; Zhang, Qiuyang; Liu, Sen; You, Zongbing

    2016-03-01

    Aminomethylphosphonic acid (AMPA) has been shown to inhibit prostate cancer cell growth in vitro. The purpose of the present study was to determine if AMPA could inhibit growth and metastasis of prostate cancer in vivo. Human prostate cancer PC-3-LacZ-luciferase cells were implanted into the ventral lateral lobes of the prostate in 39 athymic Nu/Nu nude male mice. Seven days later, mice were randomized into the control group (n = 14, treated intraperitoneally with phosphate buffered saline), low dose group (n = 10, treated intraperitoneally with AMPA at 400 mg/kg body weight/day), and high dose group (n = 15, treated intraperitoneally with AMPA at 800 mg/kg body weight/day). Tumor growth and metastasis were examined every 4-7 days by bioluminescence imaging of live mice. We found that AMPA treatment significantly inhibited growth and metastasis of orthotopic xenograft prostate tumors and prolonged the survival time of the mice. AMPA treatment decreased expression of BIRC2 and activated caspase 3, leading to increased apoptosis in the prostate tumors. AMPA treatment decreased expression of cyclin D1. AMPA treatment also reduced angiogenesis in the prostate tumors. Taken together, these results demonstrate that AMPA can inhibit prostate cancer growth and metastasis, suggesting that AMPA may be developed into a therapeutic agent for the treatment of prostate cancer.

  19. Combination of α-Tomatine and Curcumin Inhibits Growth and Induces Apoptosis in Human Prostate Cancer Cells.

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    Huarong Huang

    Full Text Available α-Tomatine is a glycoalkaloid found in tomatoes and curcumin is a major yellow pigment of turmeric. In the present study, the combined effect of these two compounds on prostate cancer cells was studied. Treatment of different prostate cancer cells with curcumin or α-tomatine alone resulted in growth inhibition and apoptosis in a concentration-dependent manner. Combinations of α-tomatine and curcumin synergistically inhibited the growth and induced apoptosis in prostate cancer PC-3 cells. Effects of the α-tomatine and curcumin combination were associated with synergistic inhibition of NF-κB activity and a potent decrease in the expression of its downstream gene Bcl-2 in the cells. Moreover, strong decreases in the levels of phospho-Akt and phosphor-ERK1/2 were found in PC-3 cells treated with α-tomatine and curcumin in combination. In animal experiment, SCID mice with PC-3 xenograft tumors were treated with α-tomatine and curcumin. Combination of α-tomatine and curcumin more potently inhibited the growth of PC-3 tumors than either agent alone. Results from the present study indicate that α-tomatine in combination with curcumin may be an effective strategy for inhibiting the growth of prostate cancer.

  20. p8 inhibits the growth of human pancreatic cancer cells and its expression is induced through pathways involved in growth inhibition and repressed by factors promoting cell growth

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    Vasseur Sophie

    2003-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background p8 is a stress-induced protein with multiple functions and biochemically related to the architectural factor HMG-I/Y. We analyzed the expression and function of p8 in pancreatic cancer-derived cells. Methods Expression of p8 was silenced in the human pancreatic cancer cell lines Panc-1 and BxPc-3 by infection with a retrovirus expressing p8 RNA in the antisense orientation. Cell growth was measured in control and p8-silenced cells. Influence on p8 expression of the induction of intracellular pathways promoting cellular growth or growth arrest was monitored. Results p8-silenced cells grew more rapidly than control cells transfected with the empty retrovirus. Activation of the Ras→Raf→MEK→ERK and JNK intracellular pathways down-regulated p8 expression. In addition, the MEK1/2 inhibitor U0126 and the JNK inhibitor SP600125 up-regulates expression of p8. Conversely, p38 or TGFβ-1 induced p8 expression whereas the specific p38 inhibitor SB203580 down-regulated p8 expression. Finally, TGFβ-1 induction was in part mediated through p38. Conclusions p8 inhibits the growth of human pancreatic cancer cells. p8 expression is induced through pathways involved in growth inhibition and repressed by factors that promote cell growth. These results suggest that p8 belongs to a pathway regulating the growth of pancreatic cancer cells.

  1. Suppression of progranulin expression inhibits bladder cancer growth and sensitizes cancer cells to cisplatin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buraschi, Simone; Xu, Shi-Qiong; Stefanello, Manuela; Moskalev, Igor; Morcavallo, Alaide; Genua, Marco; Tanimoto, Ryuta; Birbe, Ruth; Peiper, Stephen C; Gomella, Leonard G; Belfiore, Antonino; Black, Peter C; Iozzo, Renato V; Morrione, Andrea

    2016-06-28

    We have recently demonstrated a critical role for progranulin in bladder cancer. Progranulin contributes, as an autocrine growth factor, to the transformed phenotype by modulating Akt-and MAPK-driven motility, invasion and anchorage-independent growth. Progranulin also induces F-actin remodeling by interacting with the F-actin binding protein drebrin. In addition, progranulin is overexpressed in invasive bladder cancer compared to normal tissue controls, suggesting that progranulin might play a key role in driving the transition to the invasive phenotype of urothelial cancer. However, it is not established whether targeting progranulin could have therapeutic effects on bladder cancer. In this study, we stably depleted urothelial cancer cells of endogenous progranulin by shRNA approaches and determined that progranulin depletion severely inhibited the ability of tumorigenic urothelial cancer cells to migrate, invade and grow in anchorage-independency. We further demonstrate that progranulin expression is critical for tumor growth in vivo, in both xenograft and orthotopic tumor models. Notably, progranulin levels correlated with response to cisplatin treatment and were upregulated in bladder tumors. Our data indicate that progranulin may constitute a novel target for therapeutic intervention in bladder tumors. In addition, progranulin may serve as a novel biomarker for bladder cancer.

  2. FXR blocks the growth of liver cancer cells through inhibiting mTOR-s6K pathway

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    Huang, Xiongfei, E-mail: xiongfeihuang@hotmail.com [Department of Pathology and Institute of Oncology, Preclinical School, Fujian Medical University, Fuzhou 350108, Fujian (China); Key Laboratory of Ministry of Education for Gastrointestinal Cancer, Fujian Medical University, Fuzhou 350108, Fujian (China); Zeng, Yeting [Department of Pathology and Institute of Oncology, Preclinical School, Fujian Medical University, Fuzhou 350108, Fujian (China); Wang, Xinrui [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Fujian Medical University, Fuzhou 350108, Fujian (China); Ma, Xiaoxiao [Department of Diabetes Complications and Metabolism, Diabetes & Metabolism Research Institute, Beckman Research Institute, City of Hope, CA 91010 (United States); Li, Qianqian; Li, Ningbo; Su, Hongying [Department of Pathology and Institute of Oncology, Preclinical School, Fujian Medical University, Fuzhou 350108, Fujian (China); Huang, Wendong [Department of Diabetes Complications and Metabolism, Diabetes & Metabolism Research Institute, Beckman Research Institute, City of Hope, CA 91010 (United States)

    2016-05-27

    The nuclear receptor Farnesoid X Receptor (FXR) is likely a tumor suppressor in liver tissue but its molecular mechanism of suppression is not well understood. In this study, the gene expression profile of human liver cancer cells was investigated by microarray. Bioinformatics analysis of these data revealed that FXR might regulate the mTOR/S6K signaling pathway. This was confirmed by altering the expression level of FXR in liver cancer cells. Overexpression of FXR prevented the growth of cells and induced cell cycle arrest, which was enhanced by the mTOR/S6K inhibitor rapamycin. FXR upregulation also intensified the inhibition of cell growth by rapamycin. Downregulation of FXR produced the opposite effect. Finally, we found that ectopic expression of FXR in SK-Hep-1 xenografts inhibits tumor growth and reduces expression of the phosphorylated protein S6K. Taken together, our data provide the first evidence that FXR suppresses proliferation of human liver cancer cells via the inhibition of the mTOR/S6K signaling pathway. FXR expression can be used as a biomarker of personalized mTOR inhibitor treatment assessment for liver cancer patients. -- Highlights: •FXR inhibits the proliferation of liver cancer cells by prolonging G0/G1 phase. •Microarray results indicate that mTOR-S6k signaling is involved in cellular processes in which FXR plays an important role. •FXR blocks the growth of liver cancer cells via the inhibition of the mTOR/S6K signaling pathway in vitro and in vivo.

  3. FXR blocks the growth of liver cancer cells through inhibiting mTOR-s6K pathway

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, Xiongfei; Zeng, Yeting; Wang, Xinrui; Ma, Xiaoxiao; Li, Qianqian; Li, Ningbo; Su, Hongying; Huang, Wendong

    2016-01-01

    The nuclear receptor Farnesoid X Receptor (FXR) is likely a tumor suppressor in liver tissue but its molecular mechanism of suppression is not well understood. In this study, the gene expression profile of human liver cancer cells was investigated by microarray. Bioinformatics analysis of these data revealed that FXR might regulate the mTOR/S6K signaling pathway. This was confirmed by altering the expression level of FXR in liver cancer cells. Overexpression of FXR prevented the growth of cells and induced cell cycle arrest, which was enhanced by the mTOR/S6K inhibitor rapamycin. FXR upregulation also intensified the inhibition of cell growth by rapamycin. Downregulation of FXR produced the opposite effect. Finally, we found that ectopic expression of FXR in SK-Hep-1 xenografts inhibits tumor growth and reduces expression of the phosphorylated protein S6K. Taken together, our data provide the first evidence that FXR suppresses proliferation of human liver cancer cells via the inhibition of the mTOR/S6K signaling pathway. FXR expression can be used as a biomarker of personalized mTOR inhibitor treatment assessment for liver cancer patients. -- Highlights: •FXR inhibits the proliferation of liver cancer cells by prolonging G0/G1 phase. •Microarray results indicate that mTOR-S6k signaling is involved in cellular processes in which FXR plays an important role. •FXR blocks the growth of liver cancer cells via the inhibition of the mTOR/S6K signaling pathway in vitro and in vivo.

  4. Synergistic growth inhibition of cancer cells harboring the RET/PTC1 ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Synergistic growth inhibition of cancer cells harboring the RET/PTC1 oncogene by staurosporine and rotenone involves enhanced cell death. ANTÓNIO PEDRO GONÇALVES, ARNALDO VIDEIRA, VALDEMAR MÁXIMO and PAULA SOARES. J. Biosci. 36(4), September 2011, 639-648, © Indian Academy of Sciences.

  5. Inhibition of Hedgehog signaling antagonizes serous ovarian cancer growth in a primary xenograft model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher K McCann

    Full Text Available Recent evidence links aberrant activation of Hedgehog (Hh signaling with the pathogenesis of several cancers including medulloblastoma, basal cell, small cell lung, pancreatic, prostate and ovarian. This investigation was designed to determine if inhibition of this pathway could inhibit serous ovarian cancer growth.We utilized an in vivo pre-clinical model of serous ovarian cancer to characterize the anti-tumor activity of Hh pathway inhibitors cyclopamine and a clinically applicable derivative, IPI-926. Primary human serous ovarian tumor tissue was used to generate tumor xenografts in mice that were subsequently treated with cyclopamine or IPI-926.Both compounds demonstrated significant anti-tumor activity as single agents. When IPI-926 was used in combination with paclitaxel and carboplatinum (T/C, no synergistic effect was observed, though sustained treatment with IPI-926 after cessation of T/C continued to suppress tumor growth. Hh pathway activity was analyzed by RT-PCR to assess changes in Gli1 transcript levels. A single dose of IPI-926 inhibited mouse stromal Gli1 transcript levels at 24 hours with unchanged human intra-tumor Gli1 levels. Chronic IPI-926 therapy for 21 days, however, inhibited Hh signaling in both mouse stromal and human tumor cells. Expression data from the micro-dissected stroma in human serous ovarian tumors confirmed the presence of Gli1 transcript and a significant association between elevated Gli1 transcript levels and worsened survival.IPI-926 treatment inhibits serous tumor growth suggesting the Hh signaling pathway contributes to the pathogenesis of ovarian cancer and may hold promise as a novel therapeutic target, especially in the maintenance setting.

  6. Paeoniflorin inhibits cell growth and induces cell cycle arrest through inhibition of FoxM1 in colorectal cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yue, Meng; Li, Shiquan; Yan, Guoqiang; Li, Chenyao; Kang, Zhenhua

    2018-01-01

    Paeoniflorin (PF) exhibits tumor suppressive functions in a variety of human cancers. However, the function of PF and molecular mechanism in colorectal cancer are elusive. In the present study, we investigated whether PF could exert its antiproliferative activity, anti-migration, and anti-invasive function in colorectal cancer cells. We found that PF inhibited cell growth and induced apoptosis and blocked cell cycle progression in the G0/G1 phase in colorectal cancer cells. Moreover, we found that PF suppressed cell migration and invasion in colorectal cancer cells. FoxM1 has been reported to play an important oncogenic role in human cancers. We also determine whether PF inhibited the expression of FoxM1, leading to its anti-cancer activity. We found that PF treatment in colorectal cancer cells resulted in down-regulation of FoxM1. The rescue experiments showed that overexpression of FoxM1 abrogated the tumor suppressive function induced by PF treatment. Notably, depletion of FoxM1 promoted the anti-tumor activity of PF in colorectal cancer cells. Therefore, inhibition of FoxM1 could participate in the anti-tumor activity of PF in colorectal cancer cells.

  7. KAEMPFEROL, A FLAVONOID COMPOUND FROM GYNURA MEDICA INDUCED APOPTOSIS AND GROWTH INHIBITION IN MCF-7 BREAST CANCER CELL.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Xiaofang; Zuo, Jiangcheng; Tan, Chao; Xian, Sheng; Luo, Chunhua; Chen, Sai; Yu, Liangfang; Luo, Yucheng

    2016-01-01

    Kaempferol, a natural flavonoid, has been shown to induce cancer cell apoptosis and cell growth inhibition in several tumors. Previously we have conducted a full investigation on the chemical constituents of Gynura medica , kaempferol and its glycosides are the major constituents of G. medica . Here we investigated the growth inhibition and apoptosis induction effect of kaempferol extracted from G. medica . The inhibition effects of kaempferol were evaluated by MTS assay and soft agar colony formation assay. Fluorescence staining and western blotting were be used to study the apoptosis. The structure was identified by 1 H- NMR), 13 C-NMR and ESI-MS analyses. Our results showed that kaempferol's inhibition of MCF-7 breast cancer cell growth may through inducing apoptosis and downregulation of Bcl2 expression. Kaempferol is a promising cancer preventive and therapeutic agent for breast cancer. List of non-standard abbreviations: MTS: 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-5-(3-carboxymethoxyphenyl)-2-(4-sulfophenyl)-2H-tetrazolium, HPLC: High-performance liquid chromatography, NMR: Nuclear Magnetic Resonance, ESI-MS Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectral, PARP: Poly ADP-ribose polymerase.

  8. Quercetin inhibits angiogenesis through thrombospondin-1 upregulation to antagonize human prostate cancer PC-3 cell growth in vitro and in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Feiya; Jiang, Xian; Song, Liming; Wang, Huiping; Mei, Zhu; Xu, Zhiqing; Xing, Nianzeng

    2016-03-01

    The rapid growth, morbidity and mortality of prostate cancer, and the lack of effective treatment have attracted great interests of researchers to find novel cancer therapies aiming to inhibit angiogenesis and tumor growth. Quercetin is a flavonoid compound that widely exists in the nature. Our previous study preliminarily demonstrated that quercetin effectively inhibited human prostate cancer cell xenograft tumor growth by inhibiting angiogenesis. Thrombospondin-1 (TSP-1) is the first reported endogenous anti-angiogenic factor that can inhibit angiogenesis and tumorigenesis. However, the relationship between quercetin inhibiting angiogenesis and TSP-1 upregulation in prostate cancer has not been determined. Thus, we explored the important role of TSP-1 upregulation in reducing angiogenesis and anti-prostate cancer effect of quercetin both in vitro and in vivo for the first time. After the selected doses were used for a certain time, quercetin i) significantly inhibited PC-3 and human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) proliferation, migration and invasion in a dose-dependent manner; ⅱ) effectively inhibited prostate cancer PC-3 cell xenograft tumor growth by 37.5% with 75 mg/kg as compared to vehicle control group, more effective than 25 (22.85%) and 50 mg/kg (29.6%); ⅲ) was well tolerated by BALB/c mice and no obvious toxic reactions were observed; ⅳ) greatly reduced angiogenesis and led to higher TSP-1 protein and mRNA expression both in vitro and in vivo in a dose-dependent manner. Therefore, quercetin could increase TSP-1 expression to inhibit angiogenesis resulting in antagonizing prostate cancer PC-3 cell and xenograft tumor growth. The present study can lay a good basis for the subsequent concrete mechanism study and raise the possibility of applying quercetin to clinical for human prostate cancer in the near future.

  9. Ibrutinib Inhibits ERBB Receptor Tyrosine Kinases and HER2-Amplified Breast Cancer Cell Growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jun; Kinoshita, Taisei; Sukbuntherng, Juthamas; Chang, Betty Y; Elias, Laurence

    2016-12-01

    Ibrutinib is a potent, small-molecule Bruton tyrosine kinase (BTK) inhibitor developed for the treatment of B-cell malignancies. Ibrutinib covalently binds to Cys481 in the ATP-binding domain of BTK. This cysteine residue is conserved among 9 other tyrosine kinases, including HER2 and EGFR, which can be targeted. Screening large panels of cell lines demonstrated that ibrutinib was growth inhibitory against some solid tumor cells, including those inhibited by other HER2/EGFR inhibitors. Among sensitive cell lines, breast cancer lines with HER2 overexpression were most potently inhibited by ibrutinib (ibrutinib coincided with downregulation of phosphorylation on HER2 and EGFR and their downstream targets, AKT and ERK. Irreversible inhibition of HER2 and EGFR in breast cancer cells was established after 30-minute incubation above 100 nmol/L or following 2-hour incubation at lower concentrations. Furthermore, ibrutinib inhibited recombinant HER2 and EGFR activity that was resistant to dialysis and rapid dilution, suggesting an irreversible interaction. The dual activity toward TEC family (BTK and ITK) and ERBB family kinases was unique to ibrutinib, as ERBB inhibitors do not inhibit or covalently bind BTK or ITK. Xenograft studies with HER2 + MDA-MB-453 and BT-474 cells in mice in conjunction with determination of pharmacokinetics demonstrated significant exposure-dependent inhibition of growth and key signaling molecules at levels that are clinically achievable. Ibrutinib's unique dual spectrum of activity against both TEC family and ERBB kinases suggests broader applications of ibrutinib in oncology. Mol Cancer Ther; 15(12); 2835-44. ©2016 AACR. ©2016 American Association for Cancer Research.

  10. RGS16 inhibits breast cancer cell growth by mitigating phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Genqing; Bansal, Geetanjali; Xie, Zhihui; Druey, Kirk M

    2009-08-07

    Aberrant activity of the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) pathway supports growth of many tumors including those of breast, lung, and prostate. Resistance of breast cancer cells to targeted chemotherapies including tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKI) has been linked to persistent PI3K activity, which may in part be due to increased membrane expression of epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptors (HER2 and HER3). Recently we found that proteins of the RGS (regulator of G protein signaling) family suppress PI3K activity downstream of the receptor by sequestering its p85alpha subunit from signaling complexes. Because a substantial percentage of breast tumors have RGS16 mutations and reduced RGS16 protein expression, we investigated the link between regulation of PI3K activity by RGS16 and breast cancer cell growth. RGS16 overexpression in MCF7 breast cancer cells inhibited EGF-induced proliferation and Akt phosphorylation, whereas shRNA-mediated extinction of RGS16 augmented cell growth and resistance to TKI treatment. Exposure to TKI also reduced RGS16 expression in MCF7 and BT474 cell lines. RGS16 bound the amino-terminal SH2 and inter-SH2 domains of p85alpha and inhibited its interaction with the EGF receptor-associated adapter protein Gab1. These results suggest that the loss of RGS16 in some breast tumors enhances PI3K signaling elicited by growth factors and thereby promotes proliferation and TKI evasion downstream of HER activation.

  11. A novel rabbit anti-hepatocyte growth factor monoclonal neutralizing antibody inhibits tumor growth in prostate cancer cells and mouse xenografts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu, Yanlan; Chen, Yicheng; Ding, Guoqing; Wang, Mingchao; Wu, Haiyang; Xu, Liwei; Rui, Xuefang; Zhang, Zhigen

    2015-01-01

    The hepatocyte growth factor and its receptor c-Met are correlated with castration-resistance in prostate cancer. Although HGF has been considered as an attractive target for therapeutic antibodies, the lack of cross-reactivity of monoclonal antibodies with human/mouse HGFs is a major obstacle in preclinical developments. We generated a panel of anti-HGF RabMAbs either blocking HGF/c-Met interaction or inhibiting c-Met phosphorylation. We selected one RabMAb with mouse cross-reactivity and demonstrated that it blocked HGF-stimulated downstream activation in PC-3 and DU145 cells. Anti-HGF RabMAb inhibited not only the growth of PC-3 cells but also HGF-dependent proliferation in HUVECs. We further demonstrated the efficacy and potency of the anti-HGF RabMAb in tumor xenograft mice models. Through these in vitro and in vivo experiments, we explored a novel therapeutic antibody for advanced prostate cancer. - Highlights: • HGF is an attractive target for castration-refractory prostate cancer. • We generated and characterized a panel of anti-HGF rabbit monoclonal antibodies. • More than half of these anti-HGF RabMAbs was cross-reactive with mouse HGF. • Anti-HGF RabMAb blocks HGF-stimulated phosphorylation and cell growth in vitro. • Anti-HGF RabMAb inhibits tumor growth and angiogenesis in xenograft mice

  12. A novel rabbit anti-hepatocyte growth factor monoclonal neutralizing antibody inhibits tumor growth in prostate cancer cells and mouse xenografts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Yanlan; Chen, Yicheng; Ding, Guoqing; Wang, Mingchao; Wu, Haiyang; Xu, Liwei; Rui, Xuefang; Zhang, Zhigen, E-mail: srrshurology@163.com

    2015-08-14

    The hepatocyte growth factor and its receptor c-Met are correlated with castration-resistance in prostate cancer. Although HGF has been considered as an attractive target for therapeutic antibodies, the lack of cross-reactivity of monoclonal antibodies with human/mouse HGFs is a major obstacle in preclinical developments. We generated a panel of anti-HGF RabMAbs either blocking HGF/c-Met interaction or inhibiting c-Met phosphorylation. We selected one RabMAb with mouse cross-reactivity and demonstrated that it blocked HGF-stimulated downstream activation in PC-3 and DU145 cells. Anti-HGF RabMAb inhibited not only the growth of PC-3 cells but also HGF-dependent proliferation in HUVECs. We further demonstrated the efficacy and potency of the anti-HGF RabMAb in tumor xenograft mice models. Through these in vitro and in vivo experiments, we explored a novel therapeutic antibody for advanced prostate cancer. - Highlights: • HGF is an attractive target for castration-refractory prostate cancer. • We generated and characterized a panel of anti-HGF rabbit monoclonal antibodies. • More than half of these anti-HGF RabMAbs was cross-reactive with mouse HGF. • Anti-HGF RabMAb blocks HGF-stimulated phosphorylation and cell growth in vitro. • Anti-HGF RabMAb inhibits tumor growth and angiogenesis in xenograft mice.

  13. Puerariae radix isoflavones and their metabolites inhibit growth and induce apoptosis in breast cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, Y.-J.; Hou, Y.C.; Lin, C.-H.; Hsu, Y.-A.; Sheu, Jim J.C.; Lai, C.-H.; Chen, B.-H.; Lee Chao, Pei-Dawn; Wan Lei; Tsai, F.-J.

    2009-01-01

    Puerariae radix (PR) is a popular natural herb and a traditional food in Asia, which has antithrombotic and anti-allergic properties and stimulates estrogenic activity. In the present study, we investigated the effects of the PR isoflavones puerarin, daidzein, and genistein on the growth of breast cancer cells. Our data revealed that after treatment with PR isoflavones, a dose-dependent inhibition of cell growth occurred in HS578T, MDA-MB-231, and MCF-7 cell lines. Results from cell cycle distribution and apoptosis assays revealed that PR isoflavones induced cell apoptosis through a caspase-3-dependent pathway and mediated cell cycle arrest in the G2/M phase. Furthermore, we observed that the serum metabolites of PR (daidzein sulfates/glucuronides) inhibited proliferation of the breast cancer cells at a 50% cell growth inhibition (GI 50 ) concentration of 2.35 μM. These results indicate that the daidzein constituent of PR can be metabolized to daidzein sulfates or daidzein glucuronides that exhibit anticancer activities. The protein expression levels of the active forms of caspase-9 and Bax in breast cancer cells were significantly increased by treatment with PR metabolites. These metabolites also increased the protein expression levels of p53 and p21. We therefore suggest that PR may act as a chemopreventive and/or chemotherapeutic agent against breast cancer by reducing cell viability and inducing apoptosis.

  14. Ganoderma lucidum suppresses growth of breast cancer cells through the inhibition of Akt/NF-kappaB signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Jiahua; Slivova, Veronika; Harvey, Kevin; Valachovicova, Tatiana; Sliva, Daniel

    2004-01-01

    Ganoderma lucidum (Reishi, Lingzhi) is a popular Asian mushroom that has been used for more than 2 millennia for the general promotion of health and was therefore called the "Mushroom of Immortality." Ganoderma lucidum was also used in traditional Chinese medicine to prevent or treat a variety of diseases, including cancer. We previously demonstrated that Ganoderma lucidum suppresses the invasive behavior of breast cancer cells by inhibiting the transcription factor NF-kappaB. However, the molecular mechanisms responsible for the inhibitory effects of Ganoderma lucidum on the growth of highly invasive and metastatic breast cancer cells has not been fully elucidated. Here, we show that Ganoderma lucidum inhibits proliferation of breast cancer MDA-MB-231 cells by downregulating Akt/NF-kappaB signaling. Ganoderma lucidum suppresses phosphorylation of Akt on Ser473 and downregulates the expression of Akt, which results in the inhibition of NF-kappaB activity in MDA-MB-231 cells. The biological effect of Ganoderma lucidum was demonstrated by cell cycle arrest at G0/G1, which was the result of the downregulation of expression of NF-kappaB-regulated cyclin D1, followed by the inhibition of cdk4. Our results suggest that Ganoderma lucidum inhibits the growth of MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells by modulating Akt/NF-kappaB signaling and could have potential therapeutic use for the treatment of breast cancer.

  15. Pumpkin seed extract: Cell growth inhibition of hyperplastic and cancer cells, independent of steroid hormone receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medjakovic, Svjetlana; Hobiger, Stefanie; Ardjomand-Woelkart, Karin; Bucar, Franz; Jungbauer, Alois

    2016-04-01

    Pumpkin seeds have been known in folk medicine as remedy for kidney, bladder and prostate disorders since centuries. Nevertheless, pumpkin research provides insufficient data to back up traditional beliefs of ethnomedical practice. The bioactivity of a hydro-ethanolic extract of pumpkin seeds from the Styrian pumpkin, Cucurbita pepo L. subsp. pepo var. styriaca, was investigated. As pumpkin seed extracts are standardized to cucurbitin, this compound was also tested. Transactivational activity was evaluated for human androgen receptor, estrogen receptor and progesterone receptor with in vitro yeast assays. Cell viability tests with prostate cancer cells, breast cancer cells, colorectal adenocarcinoma cells and a hyperplastic cell line from benign prostate hyperplasia tissue were performed. As model for non-hyperplastic cells, effects on cell viability were tested with a human dermal fibroblast cell line (HDF-5). No transactivational activity was found for human androgen receptor, estrogen receptor and progesterone receptor, for both, extract and cucurbitin. A cell growth inhibition of ~40-50% was observed for all cell lines, with the exception of HDF-5, which showed with ~20% much lower cell growth inhibition. Given the receptor status of some cell lines, a steroid-hormone receptor independent growth inhibiting effect can be assumed. The cell growth inhibition for fast growing cells together with the cell growth inhibition of prostate-, breast- and colon cancer cells corroborates the ethnomedical use of pumpkin seeds for a treatment of benign prostate hyperplasia. Moreover, due to the lack of androgenic activity, pumpkin seed applications can be regarded as safe for the prostate. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Antiprogestin mifepristone inhibits the growth of cancer cells of reproductive and non-reproductive origin regardless of progesterone receptor expression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tieszen, Chelsea R; Goyeneche, Alicia A; Brandhagen, BreeAnn N; Ortbahn, Casey T; Telleria, Carlos M

    2011-01-01

    Mifepristone (MF) has been largely used in reproductive medicine due to its capacity to modulate the progesterone receptor (PR). The study of MF has been expanded to the field of oncology; yet it remains unclear whether the expression of PR is required for MF to act as an anti-cancer agent. Our laboratory has shown that MF is a potent inhibitor of ovarian cancer cell growth. In this study we questioned whether the growth inhibitory properties of MF observed in ovarian cancer cells would translate to other cancers of reproductive and non-reproductive origin and, importantly, whether its efficacy is related to the expression of cognate PR. Dose-response experiments were conducted with cancer cell lines of the nervous system, breast, prostate, ovary, and bone. Cultures were exposed to vehicle or increasing concentrations of MF for 72 h and analysed for cell number and cell cycle traverse, and hypodiploid DNA content characteristic of apoptotic cell death. For all cell lines, expression of steroid hormone receptors upon treatment with vehicle or cytostatic doses of MF for 24 h was studied by Western blot, whereas the activity of the G1/S regulatory protein Cdk2 in both treatment groups was monitored in vitro by the capacity of Cdk2 to phosphorylate histone H1. MF growth inhibited all cancer cell lines regardless of tissue of origin and hormone responsiveness, and reduced the activity of Cdk2. Cancer cells in which MF induced G1 growth arrest were less susceptible to lethality in the presence of high concentrations of MF, when compared to cancer cells that did not accumulate in G1. While all cancer cell lines were growth inhibited by MF, only the breast cancer MCF-7 cells expressed cognate PR. Antiprogestin MF inhibits the growth of different cancer cell lines with a cytostatic effect at lower concentrations in association with a decline in the activity of the cell cycle regulatory protein Cdk2, and apoptotic lethality at higher doses in association with increased

  17. Antiprogestin mifepristone inhibits the growth of cancer cells of reproductive and non-reproductive origin regardless of progesterone receptor expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ortbahn Casey T

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mifepristone (MF has been largely used in reproductive medicine due to its capacity to modulate the progesterone receptor (PR. The study of MF has been expanded to the field of oncology; yet it remains unclear whether the expression of PR is required for MF to act as an anti-cancer agent. Our laboratory has shown that MF is a potent inhibitor of ovarian cancer cell growth. In this study we questioned whether the growth inhibitory properties of MF observed in ovarian cancer cells would translate to other cancers of reproductive and non-reproductive origin and, importantly, whether its efficacy is related to the expression of cognate PR. Methods Dose-response experiments were conducted with cancer cell lines of the nervous system, breast, prostate, ovary, and bone. Cultures were exposed to vehicle or increasing concentrations of MF for 72 h and analysed for cell number and cell cycle traverse, and hypodiploid DNA content characteristic of apoptotic cell death. For all cell lines, expression of steroid hormone receptors upon treatment with vehicle or cytostatic doses of MF for 24 h was studied by Western blot, whereas the activity of the G1/S regulatory protein Cdk2 in both treatment groups was monitored in vitro by the capacity of Cdk2 to phosphorylate histone H1. Results MF growth inhibited all cancer cell lines regardless of tissue of origin and hormone responsiveness, and reduced the activity of Cdk2. Cancer cells in which MF induced G1 growth arrest were less susceptible to lethality in the presence of high concentrations of MF, when compared to cancer cells that did not accumulate in G1. While all cancer cell lines were growth inhibited by MF, only the breast cancer MCF-7 cells expressed cognate PR. Conclusions Antiprogestin MF inhibits the growth of different cancer cell lines with a cytostatic effect at lower concentrations in association with a decline in the activity of the cell cycle regulatory protein Cdk2, and

  18. Targeting tumor multicellular aggregation through IGPR-1 inhibits colon cancer growth and improves chemotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woolf, N; Pearson, B E; Bondzie, P A; Meyer, R D; Lavaei, M; Belkina, A C; Chitalia, V; Rahimi, N

    2017-09-18

    Adhesion to extracellular matrix (ECM) is crucially important for survival of normal epithelial cells as detachment from ECM triggers specific apoptosis known as anoikis. As tumor cells lose the requirement for anchorage to ECM, they rely on cell-cell adhesion 'multicellular aggregation' for survival. Multicellular aggregation of tumor cells also significantly determines the sensitivity of tumor cells to the cytotoxic effects of chemotherapeutics. In this report, we demonstrate that expression of immunoglobulin containing and proline-rich receptor-1 (IGPR-1) is upregulated in human primary colon cancer. Our study demonstrates that IGPR-1 promotes tumor multicellular aggregation, and interfering with its adhesive function inhibits multicellular aggregation and, increases cell death. IGPR-1 supports colon carcinoma tumor xenograft growth in mouse, and inhibiting its activity by shRNA or blocking antibody inhibits tumor growth. More importantly, IGPR-1 regulates sensitivity of tumor cells to the chemotherapeutic agent, doxorubicin/adriamycin by a mechanism that involves doxorubicin-induced AKT activation and phosphorylation of IGPR-1 at Ser220. Our findings offer novel insight into IGPR-1's role in colorectal tumor growth, tumor chemosensitivity, and as a possible novel anti-cancer target.

  19. Belinostat-induced apoptosis and growth inhibition in pancreatic cancer cells involve activation of TAK1-AMPK signaling axis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Bing; Wang, Xin-bao; Chen, Li-yu; Huang, Ling; Dong, Rui-zen

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: •Belinostat activates AMPK in cultured pancreatic cancer cells. •Activation of AMPK is important for belinostat-induced cytotoxic effects. •ROS and TAK1 are involved in belinostat-induced AMPK activation. •AMPK activation mediates mTOR inhibition by belinostat. -- Abstract: Pancreatic cancer accounts for more than 250,000 deaths worldwide each year. Recent studies have shown that belinostat, a novel pan histone deacetylases inhibitor (HDACi) induces apoptosis and growth inhibition in pancreatic cancer cells. However, the underlying mechanisms are not fully understood. In the current study, we found that AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) activation was required for belinostat-induced apoptosis and anti-proliferation in PANC-1 pancreatic cancer cells. A significant AMPK activation was induced by belinostat in PANC-1 cells. Inhibition of AMPK by RNAi knockdown or dominant negative (DN) mutation significantly inhibited belinostat-induced apoptosis in PANC-1 cells. Reversely, AMPK activator AICAR and A-769662 exerted strong cytotoxicity in PANC-1 cells. Belinostat promoted reactive oxygen species (ROS) production in PANC-1 cells, increased ROS induced transforming growth factor-β-activating kinase 1 (TAK1)/AMPK association to activate AMPK. Meanwhile, anti-oxidants N-Acetyl-Cysteine (NAC) and MnTBAP as well as TAK1 shRNA knockdown suppressed belinostat-induced AMPK activation and PANC-1 cell apoptosis. In conclusion, we propose that belinostat-induced apoptosis and growth inhibition require the activation of ROS-TAK1-AMPK signaling axis in cultured pancreatic cancer cells

  20. Belinostat-induced apoptosis and growth inhibition in pancreatic cancer cells involve activation of TAK1-AMPK signaling axis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Bing, E-mail: wangbin69@yahoo.com; Wang, Xin-bao; Chen, Li-yu; Huang, Ling; Dong, Rui-zen

    2013-07-19

    Highlights: •Belinostat activates AMPK in cultured pancreatic cancer cells. •Activation of AMPK is important for belinostat-induced cytotoxic effects. •ROS and TAK1 are involved in belinostat-induced AMPK activation. •AMPK activation mediates mTOR inhibition by belinostat. -- Abstract: Pancreatic cancer accounts for more than 250,000 deaths worldwide each year. Recent studies have shown that belinostat, a novel pan histone deacetylases inhibitor (HDACi) induces apoptosis and growth inhibition in pancreatic cancer cells. However, the underlying mechanisms are not fully understood. In the current study, we found that AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) activation was required for belinostat-induced apoptosis and anti-proliferation in PANC-1 pancreatic cancer cells. A significant AMPK activation was induced by belinostat in PANC-1 cells. Inhibition of AMPK by RNAi knockdown or dominant negative (DN) mutation significantly inhibited belinostat-induced apoptosis in PANC-1 cells. Reversely, AMPK activator AICAR and A-769662 exerted strong cytotoxicity in PANC-1 cells. Belinostat promoted reactive oxygen species (ROS) production in PANC-1 cells, increased ROS induced transforming growth factor-β-activating kinase 1 (TAK1)/AMPK association to activate AMPK. Meanwhile, anti-oxidants N-Acetyl-Cysteine (NAC) and MnTBAP as well as TAK1 shRNA knockdown suppressed belinostat-induced AMPK activation and PANC-1 cell apoptosis. In conclusion, we propose that belinostat-induced apoptosis and growth inhibition require the activation of ROS-TAK1-AMPK signaling axis in cultured pancreatic cancer cells.

  1. Embelin suppresses growth of human pancreatic cancer xenografts, and pancreatic cancer cells isolated from KrasG12D mice by inhibiting Akt and Sonic hedgehog pathways.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minzhao Huang

    Full Text Available Pancreatic cancer is a deadly disease, and therefore effective treatment and/or prevention strategies are urgently needed. The objectives of this study were to examine the molecular mechanisms by which embelin inhibited human pancreatic cancer cell growth in vitro, and xenografts in Balb C nude mice, and pancreatic cancer cell growth isolated from KrasG12D transgenic mice. XTT assays were performed to measure cell viability. AsPC-1 cells were injected subcutaneously into Balb c nude mice and treated with embelin. Cell proliferation and apoptosis were measured by Ki67 and TUNEL staining, respectively. The expression of Akt, and Sonic Hedgehog (Shh and their target gene products were measured by the immunohistochemistry, and Western blot analysis. The effects of embelin on pancreatic cancer cells isolated from 10-months old KrasG12D mice were also examined. Embelin inhibited cell viability in pancreatic cancer AsPC-1, PANC-1, MIA PaCa-2 and Hs 766T cell lines, and these inhibitory effects were blocked either by constitutively active Akt or Shh protein. Embelin-treated mice showed significant inhibition in tumor growth which was associated with reduced expression of markers of cell proliferation (Ki67, PCNA and Bcl-2 and cell cycle (cyclin D1, CDK2, and CDK6, and induction of apoptosis (activation of caspase-3 and cleavage of PARP, and increased expression of Bax. In addition, embelin inhibited the expression of markers of angiogenesis (COX-2, VEGF, VEGFR, and IL-8, and metastasis (MMP-2 and MMP-9 in tumor tissues. Antitumor activity of embelin was associated with inhibition of Akt and Shh pathways in xenografts, and pancreatic cancer cells isolated from KrasG12D mice. Furthermore, embelin also inhibited epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT by up-regulating E-cadherin and inhibiting the expression of Snail, Slug, and ZEB1. These data suggest that embelin can inhibit pancreatic cancer growth, angiogenesis and metastasis by suppressing Akt and

  2. Kaempferol suppresses bladder cancer tumor growth by inhibiting cell proliferation and inducing apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dang, Qiang; Song, Wenbin; Xu, Defeng; Ma, Yanmin; Li, Feng; Zeng, Jin; Zhu, Guodong; Wang, Xinyang; Chang, Luke S; He, Dalin; Li, Lei

    2015-09-01

    The effects of the flavonoid compound, kaempferol, which is an inhibitor of cancer cell proliferation and an inducer of cell apoptosis have been shown in various cancers, including lung, pancreatic, and ovarian, but its effect has never been studied in bladder cancer. Here, we investigated the effects of kaempferol on bladder cancer using multiple in vitro cell lines and in vivo mice studies. The MTT assay results on various bladder cancer cell lines showed that kaempferol enhanced bladder cancer cell cytotoxicity. In contrast, when analyzed by the flow cytometric analysis, DNA ladder experiment, and TUNEL assay, kaempferol significantly was shown to induce apoptosis and cell cycle arrest. These in vitro results were confirmed in in vivo mice studies using subcutaneous xenografted mouse models. Consistent with the in vitro results, we found that treating mice with kaempferol significant suppression in tumor growth compared to the control group mice. Tumor tissue staining results showed decreased expressions of the growth related markers, yet increased expressions in apoptosis markers in the kaempferol treated group mice tissues compared to the control group mice. In addition, our in vitro and in vivo data showed kaempferol can also inhibit bladder cancer invasion and metastasis. Further mechanism dissection studies showed that significant down-regulation of the c-Met/p38 signaling pathway is responsible for the kaempferol mediated cell proliferation inhibition. All these findings suggest kaempferol might be an effective and novel chemotherapeutic drug to apply for the future therapeutic agent to combat bladder cancer. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Inhibition of BRD4 suppresses tumor growth and enhances iodine uptake in thyroid cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gao, Xuemei; Wu, Xinchao; Zhang, Xiao; Hua, Wenjuan; Zhang, Yajing; Maimaiti, Yusufu; Gao, Zairong; Zhang, Yongxue

    2016-01-01

    Thyroid cancer is a common malignancy of the endocrine system. Although radioiodine "1"3"1I treatment on differentiated thyroid cancer is widely used, many patients still fail to benefit from "1"3"1I therapy. Therefore, exploration of novel targeted therapies to suppress tumor growth and improve radioiodine uptake remains necessary. Bromodomain-containing protein 4 (BRD4) is an important member of the bromodomain and extra terminal domain family that influences transcription of downstream genes by binding to acetylated histones. In the present study, we found that BRD4 was up-regulated in thyroid cancer tissues and cell lines. Inhibition of BRD4 in thyroid cancer cells by JQ1 resulted in cell cycle arrest at G0/G1 phase and enhanced "1"3"1I uptake in vitro and suppressed tumor growth in vivo. Moreover, JQ1 treatment suppressed C-MYC but enhanced NIS expression. We further demonstrated that BRD4 was enriched in the promoter region of C-MYC, which could be markedly blocked by JQ1 treatment. In conclusion, our findings revealed that the aberrant expression of BRD4 in thyroid cancer is possibly involved in tumor progression, and JQ1 is potentially an effective chemotherapeutic agent against human thyroid cancer. - Highlights: • BRD4 is upregulated in thyroid cancer tissues and cell lines. • Inhibition of BRD4 induced cell cycle arrest and enhanced radioiodine uptake in vitro and impaired tumor growth in vivo. • JQ1 suppressed the expression of C-MYC and promoted the expression of NIS and P21. • JQ1 attenuated the recruitment of BRD4 to MYC promoter in thyroid cancer.

  4. Inhibition of BRD4 suppresses tumor growth and enhances iodine uptake in thyroid cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gao, Xuemei [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Union Hospital, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430022, Hubei Province (China); Hubei Province Key Laboratory of Molecular Imaging, Wuhan 430022, Hubei Province (China); Department of Urology, Union Hospital, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430022, Hubei Province (China); Wu, Xinchao [Department of Urology, Union Hospital, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430022, Hubei Province (China); Zhang, Xiao; Hua, Wenjuan; Zhang, Yajing [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Union Hospital, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430022, Hubei Province (China); Hubei Province Key Laboratory of Molecular Imaging, Wuhan 430022, Hubei Province (China); Maimaiti, Yusufu [Department of Thyroid and Breast Surgery, Union Hospital, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430022, Hubei Province (China); Gao, Zairong, E-mail: gaobonn@163.com [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Union Hospital, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430022, Hubei Province (China); Hubei Province Key Laboratory of Molecular Imaging, Wuhan 430022, Hubei Province (China); Zhang, Yongxue [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Union Hospital, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430022, Hubei Province (China); Hubei Province Key Laboratory of Molecular Imaging, Wuhan 430022, Hubei Province (China)

    2016-01-15

    Thyroid cancer is a common malignancy of the endocrine system. Although radioiodine {sup 131}I treatment on differentiated thyroid cancer is widely used, many patients still fail to benefit from {sup 131}I therapy. Therefore, exploration of novel targeted therapies to suppress tumor growth and improve radioiodine uptake remains necessary. Bromodomain-containing protein 4 (BRD4) is an important member of the bromodomain and extra terminal domain family that influences transcription of downstream genes by binding to acetylated histones. In the present study, we found that BRD4 was up-regulated in thyroid cancer tissues and cell lines. Inhibition of BRD4 in thyroid cancer cells by JQ1 resulted in cell cycle arrest at G0/G1 phase and enhanced {sup 131}I uptake in vitro and suppressed tumor growth in vivo. Moreover, JQ1 treatment suppressed C-MYC but enhanced NIS expression. We further demonstrated that BRD4 was enriched in the promoter region of C-MYC, which could be markedly blocked by JQ1 treatment. In conclusion, our findings revealed that the aberrant expression of BRD4 in thyroid cancer is possibly involved in tumor progression, and JQ1 is potentially an effective chemotherapeutic agent against human thyroid cancer. - Highlights: • BRD4 is upregulated in thyroid cancer tissues and cell lines. • Inhibition of BRD4 induced cell cycle arrest and enhanced radioiodine uptake in vitro and impaired tumor growth in vivo. • JQ1 suppressed the expression of C-MYC and promoted the expression of NIS and P21. • JQ1 attenuated the recruitment of BRD4 to MYC promoter in thyroid cancer.

  5. Praziquantel synergistically enhances paclitaxel efficacy to inhibit cancer cell growth.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhen Hua Wu

    Full Text Available The major challenges we are facing in cancer therapy with paclitaxel (PTX are the drug resistance and severe side effects. Massive efforts have been made to overcome these clinical challenges by combining PTX with other drugs. In this study, we reported the first preclinical data that praziquantel (PZQ, an anti-parasite agent, could greatly enhance the anticancer efficacy of PTX in various cancer cell lines, including PTX-resistant cell lines. Based on the combination index value, we demonstrated that PZQ synergistically enhanced PTX-induced cell growth inhibition. The co-treatment of PZQ and PTX also induced significant mitotic arrest and activated the apoptotic cascade. Moreover, PZQ combined with PTX resulted in a more pronounced inhibition of tumor growth compared with either drug alone in a mouse xenograft model. We tried to investigate the possible mechanisms of this synergistic efficacy induced by PZQ and PTX, and we found that the co-treatment of the two drugs could markedly decrease expression of X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis protein (XIAP, an anti-apoptotic protein. Our data further demonstrated that down-regulation of XIAP was required for the synergistic interaction between PZQ and PTX. Together, this study suggested that the combination of PZQ and PTX may represent a novel and effective anticancer strategy for optimizing PTX therapy.

  6. MiR-34a inhibits colon cancer proliferation and metastasis by inhibiting platelet-derived growth factor receptor α.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chunyan; Wang, Yulin; Lu, Shuming; Zhang, Zhuqing; Meng, Hua; Liang, Lina; Zhang, Yan; Song, Bo

    2015-11-01

    The microRNA (miRNA), miR‑34a is significant in colon cancer progression. In the present study, the role of miR‑34a in colon cancer cell proliferation and metastasis was investigated. It was found that the expression of miR‑34a in colon cancer tissues and cell lines was lower when compared with that of normal tissues and cells. Further research demonstrated that miR‑34a inhibited cell proliferation, induced G1 phase arrest, and suppressed metastasis and epithelial mesenchymal transition in colon cancer cells. Bioinformatic prediction indicated that platelet‑derived growth factor receptor α (PDGFRA) was a potential target gene of miR‑34a and a luciferase assay identified that PDGFRA was a novel direct target gene of miR‑34a. In addition, assays of western blot analyses and quantitative reverse‑transcription polymerase chain reaction confirmed that miR‑34a decreased PDGFRA mRNA expression and protein levels in colon cancer cells. Assessment of cellular function indicated that miR‑34a inhibited colon cancer progression via PDGFRA. These findings demonstrate that miR‑34a may act as a negative regulator in colon cancer by targeting PDGFRA.

  7. Exercise-induced muscle-derived cytokines inhibit mammary cancer cell growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hojman, Pernille; Dethlefsen, Christine; Brandt, Claus; Hansen, Jakob; Pedersen, Line; Pedersen, Bente Klarlund

    2011-09-01

    Regular physical activity protects against the development of breast and colon cancer, since it reduces the risk of developing these by 25-30%. During exercise, humoral factors are released from the working muscles for endocrinal signaling to other organs. We hypothesized that these myokines mediate some of the inhibitory effects of exercise on mammary cancer cell proliferation. Serum and muscles were collected from mice after an exercise bout. Incubation with exercise-conditioned serum inhibited MCF-7 cell proliferation by 52% and increased caspase activity by 54%. A similar increase in caspase activity was found after incubation of MCF-7 cells with conditioned media from electrically stimulated myotubes. PCR array analysis (CAPM-0838E; SABiosciences) revealed that seven genes were upregulated in the muscles after exercise, and of these oncostatin M (OSM) proved to inhibit MCF-7 proliferation by 42%, increase caspase activity by 46%, and induce apoptosis. Blocking OSM signaling with anti-OSM antibodies reduced the induction of caspase activity by 51%. To verify that OSM was a myokine, we showed that it was significantly upregulated in serum and in three muscles, tibialis cranialis, gastronemius, and soleus, after an exercise bout. In contrast, OSM expression remained unchanged in subcutaneous and visceral adipose tissue, liver, and spleen (mononuclear cells). We conclude that postexercise serum inhibits mammary cancer cell proliferation and induces apoptosis of these cells. We suggest that one or more myokines secreted from working muscles may be mediating this effect and that OSM is a possible candidate. These findings emphasize that role of physical activity in cancer treatment, showing a direct link between exercise-induced humoral factors and decreased tumor cell growth.

  8. Suppression of SOX18 by siRNA inhibits cell growth and invasion of breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jianxiang; Ma, Yanmei; Wang, Shoujun; Chen, Fu; Gu, Yuanting

    2016-06-01

    Breast cancer is the most common malignancy in women around the world, and its incidence and mortality rates are still rising. An increasing number of studies have reported that SOX18 plays an important role in various cancers. However, the role of SOX18 in breast cancer remains poorly understood. In this study, we aimed to investigate the biological role and potential molecular mechanism of SOX18 in breast cancer. We found that the mRNA and protein expression levels of SOX18 were prevalently and significantly overexpressed in human breast cancer cell lines. Next, we performed loss-of-function experiments by transfection of two breast cancer cell lines, BT-474 and MCF-7, with SOX18 small interfering RNAs (siRNA). Results showed that SOX18 siRNA transfection significantly suppressed mRNA and protein expression of SOX18 in breast cancer cells. Furthermore, knockdown of SOX18 significantly inhibited cell proliferation and invasion, but promoted apoptosis in breast cancer cells. Importantly, several oncogenic proteins, including the Ras homolog gene family member A (RhoA), platelet-derived growth factor B (PDGFB), Insulin-like growth factor 1 receptor (IGF-1R), and matrix metalloproteinase-7 (MMP-7), were markedly decreased by SOX18 siRNA. Taken together, the results of our study suggest that knockdown of SOX18 inhibits breast cancer cell growth and invasion, possibly by downregulating downstream oncogenic proteins, providing novel insights into the development of breast cancer therapy through targeting of SOX18.

  9. SL-01, an oral derivative of gemcitabine, inhibited human breast cancer growth through induction of apoptosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Yuan-Yuan; Qin, Yi-Zhuo; Wang, Rui-Qi; Li, Wen-Bao; Qu, Xian-Jun

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: •SL-01 is an oral derivative of gemcitabine. •SL-01 possessed activity against human breast cancer growth via apoptotic induction. •SL-01’s activity was more potently than that of gemcitabine. •SL-01 inhibited cancer growth without toxicity to mice. -- Abstract: SL-01 is an oral derivative of gemcitabine that was synthesized by introducing the moiety of 3-(dodecyloxycarbonyl) pyrazine-2-carbonyl at N4-position on cytidine ring of gemcitabine. We aimed to evaluate the efficacy of SL-01 on human breast cancer growth. SL-01 significantly inhibited MCF-7 proliferation as estimated by colorimetric assay. Flow cytometry assay indicated the apoptotic induction and cell cycle arrest in G1 phase. SL-01 modulated the expressions of p-ATM, p53 and p21 and decrease of cyclin D1 in MCF-7 cells. Further experiments were performed in a MCF-7 xenografts mouse model. SL-01 by oral administration strongly inhibited MCF-7 xenografts growth. This effect of SL-01 might arise from its roles in the induction of apoptosis. Immunohistochemistry assay showed the increase of TUNEL staining cells. Western blotting indicated the modulation of apoptotic proteins in SL-01-treated xenografts. During the course of study, there was no evidence of toxicity to mice. In contrast, the decrease of neutrophil cells in peripheral and increase of AST and ALT levels in serum were observed in the gemcitabine-treated mice. Conclusion: SL-01 possessed similar activity against human breast cancer growth with gemcitabine, whereas, with lower toxicity to gemcitabine. SL-01 is a potent oral agent that may supplant the use of gemcitabine

  10. Human Sulfatase 2 inhibits in vivo tumor growth of MDA-MB-231 human breast cancer xenografts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peterson, Sarah M; Concino, Michael F; Liaw, Lucy; Martini, Paolo GV; Iskenderian, Andrea; Cook, Lynette; Romashko, Alla; Tobin, Kristen; Jones, Michael; Norton, Angela; Gómez-Yafal, Alicia; Heartlein, Michael W

    2010-01-01

    Extracellular human sulfatases modulate growth factor signaling by alteration of the heparin/heparan sulfate proteoglycan (HSPG) 6-O-sulfation state. HSPGs bind to numerous growth factor ligands including fibroblast growth factors (FGF), epidermal growth factors (EGF), and vascular endothelial growth factors (VEGF), and are critically important in the context of cancer cell growth, invasion, and metastasis. We hypothesized that sulfatase activity in the tumor microenvironment would regulate tumor growth in vivo. We established a model of stable expression of sulfatases in the human breast cancer cell line MDA-MB-231 and purified recombinant human Sulfatase 2 (rhSulf2) for exogenous administration. In vitro studies were performed to measure effects on breast cancer cell invasion and proliferation, and groups were statistically compared using Student's t-test. The effects of hSulf2 on tumor progression were tested using in vivo xenografts with two methods. First, MDA-MB-231 cells stably expressing hSulf1, hSulf2, or both hSulf1/hSulf2 were grown as xenografts and the resulting tumor growth and vascularization was compared to controls. Secondly, wild type MDA-MB-231 xenografts were treated by short-term intratumoral injection with rhSulf2 or vehicle during tumor growth. Ultrasound analysis was also used to complement caliper measurement to monitor tumor growth. In vivo studies were statistically analyzed using Student's t test. In vitro, stable expression of hSulf2 or administration of rhSulf2 in breast cancer cells decreased cell proliferation and invasion, corresponding to an inhibition of ERK activation. Stable expression of the sulfatases in xenografts significantly suppressed tumor growth, with complete regression of tumors expressing both hSulf1 and hSulf2 and significantly smaller tumor volumes in groups expressing hSulf1 or hSulf2 compared to control xenografts. Despite significant suppression of tumor volume, sulfatases did not affect vascular

  11. Growth inhibition of thyroid follicular cell-derived cancers by the opioid growth factor (OGF) - opioid growth factor receptor (OGFr) axis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McLaughlin, Patricia J; Zagon, Ian S; Park, Sunny S; Conway, Andrea; Donahue, Renee N; Goldenberg, David

    2009-01-01

    Carcinoma of the thyroid gland is an uncommon cancer, but the most frequent malignancy of the endocrine system. Most thyroid cancers are derived from the follicular cell. Follicular carcinoma (FTC) is considered more malignant than papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC), and anaplastic thyroid cancer (ATC) is one of the most lethal human cancers. Opioid Growth Factor (OGF; chemical term - [Met 5 ]-enkephalin) and its receptor, OGFr, form an inhibitory axis regulating cell proliferation. Both the peptide and receptor have been detected in a wide variety of cancers, and OGF is currently used clinically as a biotherapy for some non-thyroid neoplasias. This study addressed the question of whether the OGF-OGFr axis is present and functional in human thyroid follicular cell - derived cancer. Utilizing human ATC (KAT-18), PTC (KTC-1), and FTC (WRO 82-1) cell lines, immunohistochemistry was employed to ascertain the presence and location of OGF and OGFr. The growth characteristics in the presence of OGF or the opioid antagonist naltrexone (NTX), and the specificity of opioid peptides for proliferation of ATC, were established in KAT-18 cells. Dependence on peptide and receptor were investigated using neutralization studies with antibodies and siRNA experiments, respectively. The mechanism of peptide action on DNA synthesis and cell survival was ascertained. The ubiquity of the OGF-OGFr axis in thyroid follicular cell-derived cancer was assessed in KTC-1 (PTC) and WRO 82-1 (FTC) tumor cells. OGF and OGFr were present in KAT-18 cells. Concentrations of 10 -6 M OGF inhibited cell replication up to 30%, whereas NTX increased cell growth up to 35% relative to cultures treated with sterile water. OGF treatment reduced cell number by as much as 38% in KAT-18 ATC in a dose-dependent and receptor-mediated manner. OGF antibodies neutralized the inhibitory effects of OGF, and siRNA knockdown of OGFr negated growth inhibition by OGF. Cell survival was not altered by OGF, but DNA synthesis

  12. Herbal Extract SH003 Suppresses Tumor Growth and Metastasis of MDA-MB-231 Breast Cancer Cells by Inhibiting STAT3-IL-6 Signaling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Youn Kyung Choi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Cancer inflammation promotes cancer progression, resulting in a high risk of cancer. Here, we demonstrate that our new herbal extract, SH003, suppresses both tumor growth and metastasis of MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells via inhibiting STAT3-IL-6 signaling path. Our new herbal formula, SH003, mixed extract from Astragalus membranaceus, Angelica gigas, and Trichosanthes kirilowii Maximowicz, suppressed MDA-MB-231 tumor growth and lung metastasis in vivo and reduced the viability and metastatic abilities of MDA-MB-231 cells in vitro. Furthermore, SH003 inhibited STAT3 activation, which resulted in a reduction of IL-6 production. Therefore, we conclude that SH003 suppresses highly metastatic breast cancer growth and metastasis by inhibiting STAT3-IL-6 signaling path.

  13. Niclosamide inhibits epithelial-mesenchymal transition and tumor growth in lapatinib-resistant human epidermal growth factor receptor 2-positive breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Junjun; Chen, Xiaosong; Ward, Toby; Mao, Yan; Bockhorn, Jessica; Liu, Xiaofei; Wang, Gen; Pegram, Mark; Shen, Kunwei

    2016-02-01

    Acquired resistance to lapatinib, a human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 kinase inhibitor, remains a clinical problem for women with human epidermal growth factor receptor 2-positive advanced breast cancer, as metastasis is commonly observed in these patients. Niclosamide, an anti-helminthic agent, has recently been shown to exhibit cytotoxicity to tumor cells with stem-like characteristics. This study was designed to identify the mechanisms underlying lapatinib resistance and to determine whether niclosamide inhibits lapatinib resistance by reversing epithelial-mesenchymal transition. Here, two human epidermal growth factor receptor 2-positive breast cancer cell lines, SKBR3 and BT474, were exposed to increasing concentrations of lapatinib to establish lapatinib-resistant cultures. Lapatinib-resistant SKBR3 and BT474 cells exhibited up-regulation of the phenotypic epithelial-mesenchymal transition markers Snail, vimentin and α-smooth muscle actin, accompanied by activation of nuclear factor-кB and Src and a concomitant increase in stem cell marker expression (CD44(high)/CD24(low)), compared to naive lapatinib-sensitive SKBR3 and BT474 cells, respectively. Interestingly, niclosamide reversed epithelial-mesenchymal transition, induced apoptosis and inhibited cell growth by perturbing aberrant signaling pathway activation in lapatinib-resistant human epidermal growth factor receptor 2-positive cells. The ability of niclosamide to alleviate stem-like phenotype development and invasion was confirmed. Collectively, our results demonstrate that lapatinib resistance correlates with epithelial-mesenchymal transition and that niclosamide inhibits lapatinib-resistant cell viability and epithelial-mesenchymal transition. These findings suggest a role of niclosamide or derivatives optimized for more favorable bioavailability not only in reversing lapatinib resistance but also in reducing metastatic potential during the treatment of human epidermal growth factor receptor

  14. beta-TrCP inhibition reduces prostate cancer cell growth via upregulation of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Udi Gluschnaider

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Prostate cancer is a common and heterogeneous disease, where androgen receptor (AR signaling plays a pivotal role in development and progression. The initial treatment for advanced prostate cancer is suppression of androgen signaling. Later on, essentially all patients develop an androgen independent stage which does not respond to anti hormonal treatment. Thus, alternative strategies targeting novel molecular mechanisms are required. beta-TrCP is an E3 ligase that targets various substrates essential for many aspects of tumorigenesis.Here we show that beta-TrCP depletion suppresses prostate cancer and identify a relevant growth control mechanism. shRNA targeted against beta-TrCP reduced prostate cancer cell growth and cooperated with androgen ablation in vitro and in vivo. We found that beta-TrCP inhibition leads to upregulation of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR mediating the therapeutic effect. This phenomenon could be ligand independent, as the AhR ligand 2,3,7,8-Tetrachlorodibenzo-p-Dioxin (TCDD did not alter prostate cancer cell growth. We detected high AhR expression and activation in basal cells and atrophic epithelial cells of human cancer bearing prostates. AhR expression and activation is also significantly higher in tumor cells compared to benign glandular epithelium.Together these observations suggest that AhR activation may be a cancer counteracting mechanism in the prostate. We maintain that combining beta-TrCP inhibition with androgen ablation could benefit advanced prostate cancer patients.

  15. KAEMPFEROL, A FLAVONOID COMPOUND FROM GYNURA MEDICA INDUCED APOPTOSIS AND GROWTH INHIBITION IN MCF-7 BREAST CANCER CELL

    OpenAIRE

    Yi, Xiaofang; Zuo, Jiangcheng; Tan, Chao; Xian, Sheng; Luo, Chunhua; Chen, Sai; Yu, Liangfang; Luo, Yucheng

    2016-01-01

    Background: Kaempferol, a natural flavonoid, has been shown to induce cancer cell apoptosis and cell growth inhibition in several tumors. Previously we have conducted a full investigation on the chemical constituents of Gynura medica, kaempferol and its glycosides are the major constituents of G. medica. Here we investigated the growth inhibition and apoptosis induction effect of kaempferol extracted from G. medica. Materials and Methods: The inhibition effects of kaempferol were evaluated by...

  16. A novel peptide sansalvamide analogue inhibits pancreatic cancer cell growth through G0/G1 cell-cycle arrest

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ujiki, Michael B.; Milam, Ben; Ding Xianzhong; Roginsky, Alexandra B.; Salabat, M. Reza; Talamonti, Mark S.; Bell, Richard H.; Gu Wenxin; Silverman, Richard B.; Adrian, Thomas E.

    2006-01-01

    Patients with pancreatic cancer have little hope for cure because no effective therapies are available. Sansalvamide A is a cyclic depsipeptide produced by a marine fungus. We investigated the effect of a novel sansalvamide A analogue on growth, cell-cycle phases, and induction of apoptosis in human pancreatic cancer cells in vitro. The sansalvamide analogue caused marked time- and concentration-dependent inhibition of DNA synthesis and cell proliferation of two human pancreatic cancer cell lines (AsPC-1 and S2-013). The analogue induced G0/G1 phase cell-cycle arrest and morphological changes suggesting induction of apoptosis. Apoptosis was confirmed by annexin V binding. This novel sansalvamide analogue inhibits growth of pancreatic cancer cells through G0/G1 arrest and induces apoptosis. Sansalvamide analogues may be valuable for the treatment of pancreatic cancer

  17. Therapeutic Targeting of AXL Receptor Tyrosine Kinase Inhibits Tumor Growth and Intraperitoneal Metastasis in Ovarian Cancer Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pinar Kanlikilicer

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Despite substantial improvements in the treatment strategies, ovarian cancer is still the most lethal gynecological malignancy. Identification of drug treatable therapeutic targets and their safe and effective targeting is critical to improve patient survival in ovarian cancer. AXL receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK has been proposed to be an important therapeutic target for metastatic and advanced-stage human ovarian cancer. We found that AXL-RTK expression is associated with significantly shorter patient survival based on the The Cancer Genome Atlas patient database. To target AXL-RTK, we developed a chemically modified serum nuclease-stable AXL aptamer (AXL-APTAMER, and we evaluated its in vitro and in vivo antitumor activity using in vitro assays as well as two intraperitoneal animal models. AXL-aptamer treatment inhibited the phosphorylation and the activity of AXL, impaired the migration and invasion ability of ovarian cancer cells, and led to the inhibition of tumor growth and number of intraperitoneal metastatic nodules, which was associated with the inhibition of AXL activity and angiogenesis in tumors. When combined with paclitaxel, in vivo systemic (intravenous [i.v.] administration of AXL-aptamer treatment markedly enhanced the antitumor efficacy of paclitaxel in mice. Taken together, our data indicate that AXL-aptamers successfully target in vivo AXL-RTK and inhibit its AXL activity and tumor growth and progression, representing a promising strategy for the treatment of ovarian cancer.

  18. Co-inhibition of epidermal growth factor receptor and insulin-like growth factor receptor 1 enhances radiosensitivity in human breast cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Ping; Veldwijk, Marlon R; Zhang, Qing; Li, Zhao-bin; Xu, Wen-cai; Fu, Shen

    2013-01-01

    Over-expression of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) or insulin-like growth factor-1 receptor (IGF-1R) have been shown to closely correlate with radioresistance of breast cancer cells. This study aimed to investigate the impact of co-inhibition of EGFR and IGF-1R on the radiosensitivity of two breast cancer cells with different profiles of EGFR and IGF-1R expression. The MCF-7 (EGFR +/−, IGF-1R +++) and MDA-MB-468 (EGFR +++, IGF-1R +++) breast cancer cell lines were used. Radiosensitizing effects were determined by colony formation assay. Apoptosis and cell cycle distribution were measured by flow cytometry. Phospho-Akt and phospho-Erk1/2 were quantified by western blot. In vivo studies were conducted using MDA-MB-468 cells xenografted in nu/nu mice. In MDA-MB-468 cells, the inhibition of IGF-1R upregulated the p-EGFR expression. Either EGFR (AG1478) or IGF-1R inhibitor (AG1024) radiosensitized MDA-MB-468 cells. In MCF-7 cells, radiosensitivity was enhanced by AG1024, but not by AG1478. Synergistical radiosensitizing effect was observed by co-inhibition of EGFR and IGF-1R only in MDA-MB-468 cells with a DMF 10% of 1.90. The co-inhibition plus irradiation significantly induced more apoptosis and arrested the cells at G0/G1 phase in MDA-MB-468 cells. Only co-inhibition of EGFR and IGF-1R synergistically diminished the expression of p-Akt and p-Erk1/2 in MDA-MB-468 cells. In vivo studies further verified the radiosensitizing effects by co-inhibition of both pathways in a MDA-MB-468 xenograft model. Our data suggested that co-inhibition of EGFR and IGF-1R synergistically radiosensitized breast cancer cells with both EGFR and IGF-1R high expression. The approach may have an important therapeutic implication in the treatment of breast cancer patients with high expression of EGFR and IGF-1R

  19. Knockdown of stat3 expression by RNAi inhibits in vitro growth of human ovarian cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao, Shu-Hua; Zhao, Fan; Zheng, Jing-Ying; Gao, Li-Fang; Zhao, Xue-Jian; Cui, Man-Hua

    2011-01-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the suppressive effects of pSilencer2.1-U6-siRNA-stat3 recombinant plasmids on the growth of ovarian cancer in vitro. Three pairs of DNA template (stat3-1, stat3-2, stat3-3) specific for different target sites on stat3 mRNA were synthesized to reconstruct pSilencer2.1-U6-siRNA-stat3s, which were transfected into SKOV3 cells. The expressions of STAT3, BcL-2, cyclin D1 and C-myc in these cells were detected by Western blot and Northern blot. The cell cycle and the growth were determined by flow cytometry (FCM) and MTT assay, respectively. Cell apoptosis was determined by TUNEL staining. Of the three siRNAs, only siRNA targeting stat3-3 markedly suppressed the protein expression of stat3 in SKOV3 cells; MTT assay and FCM showed that transfection of stat3-3 siRNA could significantly suppress the growth of SKOV3 cells and arrest the cell cycle in vitro. TUNEL staining also showed massive apoptosis in SKOV3 cells transfected with stat3-3 siRNA. pSilencer2.1-U6-siRNA-stat3-3 can significantly inhibit the STAT3 expression in human ovarian cancer cells resulting in the inhibition of the cancer growth and the increase of apoptosis of cancer cells

  20. Covalent Targeting of Fibroblast Growth Factor Receptor Inhibits Metastatic Breast Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Wells S; Tan, Li; Smith, Andrew; Gray, Nathanael S; Wendt, Michael K

    2016-09-01

    Therapeutic targeting of late-stage breast cancer is limited by an inadequate understanding of how tumor cell signaling evolves during metastatic progression and by the currently available small molecule inhibitors capable of targeting these processes. Herein, we demonstrate that both β3 integrin and fibroblast growth factor receptor-1 (FGFR1) are part of an epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) program that is required to facilitate metastatic outgrowth in response to fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF2). Mechanistically, β3 integrin physically disrupts an interaction between FGFR1 and E-cadherin, leading to a dramatic redistribution of FGFR1 subcellular localization, enhanced FGF2 signaling and increased three-dimensional (3D) outgrowth of metastatic breast cancer cells. This ability of β3 integrin to drive FGFR signaling requires the enzymatic activity of focal adhesion kinase (FAK). Consistent with these mechanistic data, we demonstrate that FGFR, β3 integrin, and FAK constitute a molecular signature capable of predicting decreased survival of patients with the basal-like subtype of breast cancer. Importantly, covalent targeting of a conserved cysteine in the P-loop of FGFR1-4 with our newly developed small molecule, FIIN-4, more effectively blocks 3D metastatic outgrowth as compared with currently available FGFR inhibitors. In vivo application of FIIN-4 potently inhibited the growth of metastatic, patient-derived breast cancer xenografts and murine-derived metastases growing within the pulmonary microenvironment. Overall, the current studies demonstrate that FGFR1 works in concert with other EMT effector molecules to drive aberrant downstream signaling, and that these events can be effectively targeted using our novel therapeutics for the treatment of the most aggressive forms of breast cancer. Mol Cancer Ther; 15(9); 2096-106. ©2016 AACR. ©2016 American Association for Cancer Research.

  1. PANC-1 pancreatic cancer cell growth inhibited by cucurmosin alone and in combination with an epidermal growth factor receptor-targeted drug.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Congfei; Yang, Aiqin; Zhang, Baoming; Yin, Qiang; Huang, Heguang; Chen, Minghuang; Xie, Jieming

    2014-03-01

    To investigate the inhibition of PANC-1 pancreatic cancer cell growth by cucurmosin (CUS) and its possible mechanism. We observed the inhibition of PANC-1 cell growth by sulforhodamine B and colony-forming experiments in vitro and established nonobese diabetic/severe combined immunodeficiency mouse subcutaneous tumor models in vivo. We used Western blot to analyze protein levels related to apoptosis and epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) signaling pathways after drug intervention, whereas the messenger RNA expression of EGFR was analyzed by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. Sulforhodamine B and colony-forming experiments indicated that CUS inhibited PANC-1 cell proliferation in a dose- and time-dependent manner. A stronger inhibitory effect was observed when CUS was combined with gefitinib. The subcutaneous tumor growth was also inhibited. Western blot showed that all the examined proteins decreased, except for 4E-BP1 and the active fragments of caspase 3 and caspase 9 increased. Epidermal growth factor receptor expression did not change significantly in quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. Cucurmosin can strongly inhibit the growth of PANC-1 cells in vitro and in vivo. Cucurmosin can down-regulate EGFR protein expression, but not at the messenger RNA level. Cucurmosin can also inhibit the ras/raf and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/Akt downstream signaling pathways and enhance the sensitivity of the EGFR-targeted drug gefitinib.

  2. Inhibition of oxidative stress-elicited AKT activation facilitates PPARγ agonist-mediated inhibition of stem cell character and tumor growth of liver cancer cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lanlan Liu

    Full Text Available Emerging evidence suggests that tumor-initiating cells (TICs are the most malignant cell subpopulation in tumors because of their resistance to chemotherapy or radiation treatment. Targeting TICs may be a key innovation for cancer treatment. In this study, we found that PPARγ agonists inhibited the cancer stem cell-like phenotype and attenuated tumor growth of human hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC cells. Reactive oxygen species (ROS initiated by NOX2 upregulation were partially responsible for the inhibitory effects mediated by PPARγ agonists. However, PPARγ agonist-mediated ROS production significantly activated AKT, which in turn promoted TIC survival by limiting ROS generation. Inhibition of AKT, by either pharmacological inhibitors or AKT siRNA, significantly enhanced PPARγ agonist-mediated inhibition of cell proliferation and stem cell-like properties in HCC cells. Importantly, in nude mice inoculated with HCC Huh7 cells, we demonstrated a synergistic inhibitory effect of the PPARγ agonist rosiglitazone and the AKT inhibitor triciribine on tumor growth. In conclusion, we observed a negative feedback loop between oxidative stress and AKT hyperactivation in PPARγ agonist-mediated suppressive effects on HCCs. Combinatory application of an AKT inhibitor and a PPARγ agonist may provide a new strategy for inhibition of stem cell-like properties in HCCs and treatment of liver cancer.

  3. Curcumin induces chemo/radio-sensitization in ovarian cancer cells and curcumin nanoparticles inhibit ovarian cancer cell growth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yallapu Murali M

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chemo/radio-resistance is a major obstacle in treating advanced ovarian cancer. The efficacy of current treatments may be improved by increasing the sensitivity of cancer cells to chemo/radiation therapies. Curcumin is a naturally occurring compound with anti-cancer activity in multiple cancers; however, its chemo/radio-sensitizing potential is not well studied in ovarian cancer. Herein, we demonstrate the effectiveness of a curcumin pre-treatment strategy for chemo/radio-sensitizing cisplatin resistant ovarian cancer cells. To improve the efficacy and specificity of curcumin induced chemo/radio sensitization, we developed a curcumin nanoparticle formulation conjugated with a monoclonal antibody specific for cancer cells. Methods Cisplatin resistant A2780CP ovarian cancer cells were pre-treated with curcumin followed by exposure to cisplatin or radiation and the effect on cell growth was determined by MTS and colony formation assays. The effect of curcumin pre-treatment on the expression of apoptosis related proteins and β-catenin was determined by Western blotting or Flow Cytometry. A luciferase reporter assay was used to determine the effect of curcumin on β-catenin transcription activity. The poly(lactic acid-co-glycolic acid (PLGA nanoparticle formulation of curcumin (Nano-CUR was developed by a modified nano-precipitation method and physico-chemical characterization was performed by transmission electron microscopy and dynamic light scattering methods. Results Curcumin pre-treatment considerably reduced the dose of cisplatin and radiation required to inhibit the growth of cisplatin resistant ovarian cancer cells. During the 6 hr pre-treatment, curcumin down regulated the expression of Bcl-XL and Mcl-1 pro-survival proteins. Curcumin pre-treatment followed by exposure to low doses of cisplatin increased apoptosis as indicated by annexin V staining and cleavage of caspase 9 and PARP. Additionally, curcumin pre

  4. Hispolon inhibits the growth of estrogen receptor positive human breast cancer cells through modulation of estrogen receptor alpha

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jang, Eun Hyang; Jang, Soon Young; Cho, In-Hye; Hong, Darong; Jung, Bom; Park, Min-Ju; Kim, Jong-Ho

    2015-01-01

    Human estrogen receptor α (ERα) is a nuclear transcription factor that is a major therapeutic target in breast cancer. The transcriptional activity of ERα is regulated by certain estrogen-receptor modulators. Hispolon, isolated from Phellinus linteus, a traditional medicinal mushroom called Sanghwang in Korea, has been used to treat various pathologies, such as inflammation, gastroenteric disorders, lymphatic diseases, and cancers. In this latter context, Hispolon has been reported to exhibit therapeutic efficacy against various cancer cells, including melanoma, leukemia, hepatocarcinoma, bladder cancer, and gastric cancer cells. However, ERα regulation by Hispolon has not been reported. In this study, we investigated the effects of Hispolon on the growth of breast cancer cells. We found that Hispolon decreased expression of ERα at both mRNA and the protein levels in MCF7 and T47D human breast cancer cells. Luciferase reporter assays showed that Hispolon decreased the transcriptional activity of ERα. Hispolon treatment also inhibited expression of the ERα target gene pS2. We propose that Hispolon, an anticancer drug extracted from natural sources, inhibits cell growth through modulation of ERα in estrogen-positive breast cancer cells and is a candidate for use in human breast cancer chemotherapy. - Highlights: • Hispolon decreased ERα expression at both mRNA and protein levels. • Hispolon decreased ERα transcriptional activity. • Hispolon treatment inhibited expression of ERα target gene pS2. • Shikonin is a candidate chemotherapeutic target in the treatment of human breast cancer

  5. Hispolon inhibits the growth of estrogen receptor positive human breast cancer cells through modulation of estrogen receptor alpha

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jang, Eun Hyang; Jang, Soon Young; Cho, In-Hye [Department of Pharmacy, Graduate School, Kyung Hee University, 26 Kyungheedae-ro, Dongdaemun-gu, Seoul 130-701 (Korea, Republic of); Hong, Darong [Department of Life and Nanopharmaceutical Science, Graduate School, Kyung Hee University, 26 Kyungheedae-ro, Dongdaemun-gu, Seoul 130-701 (Korea, Republic of); Jung, Bom; Park, Min-Ju [Department of Pharmacy, Graduate School, Kyung Hee University, 26 Kyungheedae-ro, Dongdaemun-gu, Seoul 130-701 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jong-Ho, E-mail: jonghokim@khu.ac.kr [Department of Pharmacy, Graduate School, Kyung Hee University, 26 Kyungheedae-ro, Dongdaemun-gu, Seoul 130-701 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-08-07

    Human estrogen receptor α (ERα) is a nuclear transcription factor that is a major therapeutic target in breast cancer. The transcriptional activity of ERα is regulated by certain estrogen-receptor modulators. Hispolon, isolated from Phellinus linteus, a traditional medicinal mushroom called Sanghwang in Korea, has been used to treat various pathologies, such as inflammation, gastroenteric disorders, lymphatic diseases, and cancers. In this latter context, Hispolon has been reported to exhibit therapeutic efficacy against various cancer cells, including melanoma, leukemia, hepatocarcinoma, bladder cancer, and gastric cancer cells. However, ERα regulation by Hispolon has not been reported. In this study, we investigated the effects of Hispolon on the growth of breast cancer cells. We found that Hispolon decreased expression of ERα at both mRNA and the protein levels in MCF7 and T47D human breast cancer cells. Luciferase reporter assays showed that Hispolon decreased the transcriptional activity of ERα. Hispolon treatment also inhibited expression of the ERα target gene pS2. We propose that Hispolon, an anticancer drug extracted from natural sources, inhibits cell growth through modulation of ERα in estrogen-positive breast cancer cells and is a candidate for use in human breast cancer chemotherapy. - Highlights: • Hispolon decreased ERα expression at both mRNA and protein levels. • Hispolon decreased ERα transcriptional activity. • Hispolon treatment inhibited expression of ERα target gene pS2. • Shikonin is a candidate chemotherapeutic target in the treatment of human breast cancer.

  6. BMP9 inhibits the bone metastasis of breast cancer cells by downregulating CCN2 (connective tissue growth factor, CTGF) expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Wei; Sun, Xiaoxiao; Wang, Ke; Feng, Honglei; Liu, Yuehong; Fei, Chang; Wan, Shaoheng; Wang, Wei; Luo, Jinyong; Shi, Qiong; Tang, Min; Zuo, Guowei; Weng, Yaguang; He, Tongchuan; Zhang, Yan

    2014-03-01

    Bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs), which belong to the transforming growth factor-β superfamily, regulate a wide range of cellular responses including cell proliferation, differentiation, adhesion, migration, and apoptosis. BMP9, the latest BMP to be discovered, is reportedly expressed in a variety of human carcinoma cell lines, but the role of BMP9 in breast cancer has not been fully clarified. In a previous study, BMP9 was found to inhibit the growth, migration, and invasiveness of MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells. In the current study, the effect of BMP9 on the bone metastasis of breast cancer cells was investigated. After absent or low expression of BMP9 was detected in the MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells and breast non-tumor adjacent tissues using Western blot and immunohistochemistry, In our previous study, BMP9 could inhibit the proliferation and invasiveness of breast cancer cells MDA-MB-231 in vitro and in vivo. This paper shows that BMP9 inhibit the bone metastasis of breast cancer cells by activating the BMP/Smad signaling pathway and downregulating connective tissue growth factor (CTGF); however, when CTGF expression was maintained, the inhibitory effect of BMP9 on the MDA-MB-231 cells was abolished. Together, these observations indicate that BMP9 is an important mediator of breast cancer bone metastasis and a potential therapeutic target for treating this deadly disease.

  7. DNA methylation regulates expression of VEGF-C, and S-adenosylmethionine is effective for VEGF-C methylation and for inhibiting cancer growth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Da, M.X. [Department of Surgical Oncology, Gansu Provincial Hospital, Lanzhou (China); Zhang, Y.B. [Department of Surgery, Ningxia Medical University, Yinchuan (China); Yao, J.B. [Department of Surgical Oncology, Gansu Provincial Hospital, Lanzhou (China); Duan, Y.X. [Department of Surgery, Ningxia Medical University, Yinchuan (China)

    2014-09-30

    DNA hypomethylation may activate oncogene transcription, thus promoting carcinogenesis and tumor development. S-adenosylmethionine (SAM) is a methyl donor in numerous methylation reactions and acts as an inhibitor of intracellular demethylase activity, which results in hypermethylation of DNA. The main objectives of this study were to determine whether DNA hypomethylation correlated with vascular endothelial growth factor-C (VEGF-C) expression, and the effect of SAM on VEGF-C methylation and gastric cancer growth inhibition. VEGF-C expression was assayed by Western blotting and RT-qPCR in gastric cancer cells, and by immunohistochemistry in tumor xenografts. VEGF-C methylation was assayed by bisulfite DNA sequencing. The effect of SAM on cell apoptosis was assayed by flow cytometry analyses and its effect on cancer growth was assessed in nude mice. The VEGF-C promoters of MGC-803, BGC-823, and SGC-7901 gastric cancer cells, which normally express VEGF-C, were nearly unmethylated. After SAM treatment, the VEGF-C promoters in these cells were highly methylated and VEGF-C expression was downregulated. SAM also significantly inhibited tumor growth in vitro and in vivo. DNA methylation regulates expression of VEGF-C. SAM can effectively induce VEGF-C methylation, reduce the expression of VEGF-C, and inhibit tumor growth. SAM has potential as a drug therapy to silence oncogenes and block the progression of gastric cancer.

  8. Targeting SPARC by lentivirus-mediated RNA interference inhibits cervical cancer cell growth and metastasis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Jie; Shi, Dehuan; Liu, Xiaoyan; Fang, Shuang; Zhang, Jie; Zhao, Yueran

    2012-01-01

    Secreted protein acidic and rich in cysteine (SPARC), a calcium-binding matricellular glycoprotein, is implicated in the progressions of some cancers. However, no information has been available to date regarding the function of SPARC in cervical cancer cell growth and metastasis. In this study, we isolated and established high invasive subclones and low invasive subclones from human cervical cancer cell lines HeLa and SiHa by the limited dilution method. Real-time q-RT-PCR, Western Blot and ICC were performed to investigate SPARC mRNA and protein expressions in high invasive subclones and low invasive subclones. Then lentivirus vector with SPARC shRNA was constructed and infected the highly invasive subclones. Real-time q-RT-PCR, Western Blot and ICC were also performed to investigate the changes of SPARC expression after viral infection. In functional assays, effects of SPARC knockdown on the biological behaviors of cervical cancer cells were investigated. The mechanisms of SPARC in cervical cancer proliferation, apoptosis and invasion were also researched. SPARC was over-expressed in the highly invasive subclones compared with the low invasive subclones. Knockdown of SPARC significantly suppressed cervical cancer cell proliferation, and induced cell cycle arrest at the G1/G0 phase through the p53/p21 pathway, also caused cell apoptosis accompanied by the decreased ratio of Bcl-2/Bax, and inhibited cell invasion and metastasis accompanied by down-regulated MMP2 and MMP9 expressions and up-regulated E-cadherin expression. SPARC is related to the invasive phenotype of cervical cancer cells. Knockdown of SPARC significantly suppresses cervical cancer cell proliferation, induces cell apoptosis and inhibits cell invasion and metastasis. SPARC as a promoter improves cervical cancer cell growth and metastasis

  9. Targeting SPARC by lentivirus-mediated RNA interference inhibits cervical cancer cell growth and metastasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Jie

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Secreted protein acidic and rich in cysteine (SPARC, a calcium-binding matricellular glycoprotein, is implicated in the progressions of some cancers. However, no information has been available to date regarding the function of SPARC in cervical cancer cell growth and metastasis. Methods In this study, we isolated and established high invasive subclones and low invasive subclones from human cervical cancer cell lines HeLa and SiHa by the limited dilution method. Real-time q-RT-PCR, Western Blot and ICC were performed to investigate SPARC mRNA and protein expressions in high invasive subclones and low invasive subclones. Then lentivirus vector with SPARC shRNA was constructed and infected the highly invasive subclones. Real-time q-RT-PCR, Western Blot and ICC were also performed to investigate the changes of SPARC expression after viral infection. In functional assays, effects of SPARC knockdown on the biological behaviors of cervical cancer cells were investigated. The mechanisms of SPARC in cervical cancer proliferation, apoptosis and invasion were also researched. Results SPARC was over-expressed in the highly invasive subclones compared with the low invasive subclones. Knockdown of SPARC significantly suppressed cervical cancer cell proliferation, and induced cell cycle arrest at the G1/G0 phase through the p53/p21 pathway, also caused cell apoptosis accompanied by the decreased ratio of Bcl-2/Bax, and inhibited cell invasion and metastasis accompanied by down-regulated MMP2 and MMP9 expressions and up-regulated E-cadherin expression. Conclusion SPARC is related to the invasive phenotype of cervical cancer cells. Knockdown of SPARC significantly suppresses cervical cancer cell proliferation, induces cell apoptosis and inhibits cell invasion and metastasis. SPARC as a promoter improves cervical cancer cell growth and metastasis.

  10. Magnolol Inhibits the Growth of Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer via Inhibiting Microtubule Polymerization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jia Shen

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: The tubulin/microtubule system, which is an integral component of the cytoskeleton, plays an essential role in mitosis. Targeting mitotic progression by disturbing microtubule dynamics is a rational strategy for cancer treatment. Methods: Microtubule polymerization assay was performed to examine the effect of Magnolol (a novel natural phenolic compound isolated from Magnolia obovata on cellular microtubule polymerization in human non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC cells. Cell cycle analysis, mitotic index assay, cell proliferation assay, colony formation assay, western blotting analysis of cell cycle regulators, Annexin V-FITC/PI staining, and live/dead viability staining were carried out to investigate the Magnolol’s inhibitory effect on proliferation and viability of NSCLS cells in vitro. Xenograft model of human A549 NSCLC tumor was used to determine the Magnolol’s efficacy in vivo. Results: Magnolol treatment effectively inhibited cell proliferation and colony formation of NSCLC cells. Further study proved that Magnolol induced the mitotic phase arrest and inhibited G2/M progression in a dose-dependent manner, which were mechanistically associated with expression alteration of a series of cell cycle regulators. Furthermore, Magnolol treatment disrupted the cellular microtubule organization via inhibiting the polymerization of microtubule. We also found treatment with NSCLC cells with Magnolol resulted in apoptosis activation through a p53-independent pathway, and autophgy induction via down-regulation of the Akt/mTOR pathway. Finally, Magnolol treatment significantly suppressed the NSCLC tumor growth in mouse xenograft model in vivo. Conclusion: These findings identify Magnolol as a promising candidate with anti-microtubule polymerization activity for NSCLC treatment.

  11. Combination treatment with ionising radiation and gefitinib ('Iressa', ZD1839), an epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) inhibitor, significantly inhibits bladder cancer cell growth in vitro and in vivo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Colquhoun, AJ; Mchugh, LA; Tulchinsky, E.; Kriajevska, M.; Mellon, JK

    2007-01-01

    External beam radiotherapy (EBRT) is the principal bladder-preserving monotherapy for muscle-invasive bladder cancer. Seventy percent of muscle-invasive bladder cancers express epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), which is associated with poor prognosis. Ionising radiation (IR) stimulates EGFR causing activation of cytoprotective signalling cascades and thus may be an underlying cause of radioresistance in bladder tumours. We assessed the ability of IR to activate EGFR in bladder cancer cells and the effect of the anti-EGFR therapy, gefitinib on potential radiation-induced activation. Subsequently we assessed the effect of IR on signalling pathways downstream of EGFR. Finally we assessed the activity of gefitinib as a monotherapy, and in combination with IR, using clonogenic assay in vitro, and a murine model in vivo. IR activated EGFR and gefitinib partially inhibited this activation. Radiation-induced activation of EGFR activated the MAPK and Akt pathways. Gefitinib partially inhibited activation of the MAPK pathway but not the Akt pathway. Treatment with combined gefitinib and IR significantly inhibited bladder cancer cell colony formation more than treatment with gefitinib alone (p=0.001-0.03). J82 xenograft tumours treated with combined gefitinib and IR showed significantly greater growth inhibition than tumours treated with IR alone (p=0.04). Combining gefitinib and IR results in significantly greater inhibition of invasive bladder cancer cell colony formation in vitro and significantly greater tumour growth inhibition in vivo. Given the high frequency of EGFR expression by bladder tumours and the low toxicity of gefitinib there is justification to translate this work into a clinical trial. (author)

  12. A novel human Fab antibody for Trop2 inhibits breast cancer growth in vitro and in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Hong; Zhang, Huiling; Wang, Jun; Lu, Meiping; Zheng, Feng; Wang, Changjun; Tang, Xiaojun; Xu, Ning; Chen, Renjie; Zhang, Dawei; Zhao, Ping; Zhu, Jin; Mao, Yuan; Feng, Zhenqing

    2014-03-01

    Human trophoblastic cell surface antigen 2 (Trop2) has been suggested as an oncogene, which is associated with the different types of tumors. In this study, a human Fab antibody against Trop2 extracellular domain was isolated from phage library by phage display technology, and characterized by ELISA, FACS, fluorescence staining and Western blotting analysis. MTT, apoptosis assay and wound healing assay were employed to evaluate the inhibitory effects of Trop2 Fab on breast cancer cell growth in vitro, while tumor-xenograft model was employed to evaluate the inhibitory effects on breast cancer growth in vivo. The results showed that Trop2 Fab inhibited the proliferation, induced the apoptosis and suspended the migration of MDA-MB-231 cells in a dose dependent manner. The expression caspase-3 was activated, and the expression of Bcl-2 was reduced while that of Bax was elevated in MDA-MB-231 cells by treating with Trop2 Fab. In addition, Trop2 Fab inhibited the growth of breast cancer xenografts and the expression of Bcl-2 was reduced while that of Bax was elevated in xenografts. Trop2 Fab, which was isolated successfully in this research, is a promising therapeutic agent for the treatment of Trop2 expressing breast cancer. © 2013 UICC.

  13. Metformin inhibits the proliferation of human prostate cancer PC-3 cells via the downregulation of insulin-like growth factor 1 receptor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kato, Haruo; Sekine, Yoshitaka; Furuya, Yosuke; Miyazawa, Yoshiyuki; Koike, Hidekazu; Suzuki, Kazuhiro

    2015-01-01

    Metformin is a biguanide drug that is widely used for the treatment of type 2 diabetes. Recent studies have shown that metformin inhibits cancer cell proliferation and tumor growth both in vitro and in vivo. The anti-tumor mechanisms of metformin include activation of the AMP-activated protein kinase/mTOR pathway and direct inhibition of insulin/insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-mediated cellular proliferation. However, the anti-tumor mechanism in prostate cancer remains unclear. Because activation of the IGF-1 receptor (IGF-1R) is required for prostate cell proliferation, IGF-1R inhibitors may be of therapeutic value. Accordingly, we examined the effects of metformin on IGF-1R signaling in prostate cancer cells. Metformin significantly inhibited PC-3 cell proliferation, migration, and invasion. IGF-1R mRNA expression decreased significantly after 48 h of treatment, and IGF-1R protein expression decreased in a similar manner. IGF-1R knockdown by siRNA transfection led to inhibited proliferation, migration and invasion of PC-3 cells. IGF-1 activated both ERK1/2 and Akt, but these effects were attenuated by metformin treatment. In addition, intraperitoneal treatment with metformin significantly reduced tumor growth and IGF-1R mRNA expression in PC-3 xenografts. Our results suggest that metformin is a potent inhibitor of the IGF-1/IGF-1R system and may be beneficial in prostate cancer treatment. - Highlights: • Metformin inhibited PC-3 cell proliferation, migration, and invasion. • Metformin decreased IGF-1R mRNA and protein expressions in PC-3 cells. • Metformin inhibited IGF-1 induced ERK and Akt phosphorylations in PC-3 cells. • Metformin treatment inhibited PC-3 cell growth and IGF-1R expression in vivo. • Metformin may be a potent inhibitor of the IGF-1/IGF-1R signaling

  14. Metformin inhibits the proliferation of human prostate cancer PC-3 cells via the downregulation of insulin-like growth factor 1 receptor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kato, Haruo, E-mail: hal.kato@gunma-u.ac.jp; Sekine, Yoshitaka; Furuya, Yosuke; Miyazawa, Yoshiyuki; Koike, Hidekazu; Suzuki, Kazuhiro

    2015-05-22

    Metformin is a biguanide drug that is widely used for the treatment of type 2 diabetes. Recent studies have shown that metformin inhibits cancer cell proliferation and tumor growth both in vitro and in vivo. The anti-tumor mechanisms of metformin include activation of the AMP-activated protein kinase/mTOR pathway and direct inhibition of insulin/insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-mediated cellular proliferation. However, the anti-tumor mechanism in prostate cancer remains unclear. Because activation of the IGF-1 receptor (IGF-1R) is required for prostate cell proliferation, IGF-1R inhibitors may be of therapeutic value. Accordingly, we examined the effects of metformin on IGF-1R signaling in prostate cancer cells. Metformin significantly inhibited PC-3 cell proliferation, migration, and invasion. IGF-1R mRNA expression decreased significantly after 48 h of treatment, and IGF-1R protein expression decreased in a similar manner. IGF-1R knockdown by siRNA transfection led to inhibited proliferation, migration and invasion of PC-3 cells. IGF-1 activated both ERK1/2 and Akt, but these effects were attenuated by metformin treatment. In addition, intraperitoneal treatment with metformin significantly reduced tumor growth and IGF-1R mRNA expression in PC-3 xenografts. Our results suggest that metformin is a potent inhibitor of the IGF-1/IGF-1R system and may be beneficial in prostate cancer treatment. - Highlights: • Metformin inhibited PC-3 cell proliferation, migration, and invasion. • Metformin decreased IGF-1R mRNA and protein expressions in PC-3 cells. • Metformin inhibited IGF-1 induced ERK and Akt phosphorylations in PC-3 cells. • Metformin treatment inhibited PC-3 cell growth and IGF-1R expression in vivo. • Metformin may be a potent inhibitor of the IGF-1/IGF-1R signaling.

  15. Derricin and derricidin inhibit Wnt/β-catenin signaling and suppress colon cancer cell growth in vitro.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara F Fonseca

    Full Text Available Overactivation of the Wnt/β-catenin pathway in adult tissues has been implicated in many diseases, such as colorectal cancer. Finding chemical substances that can prevent this phenomenon is an emerging problem. Recently, several natural compounds have been described as Wnt/β-catenin inhibitors and might be promising agents for the control of carcinogenesis. Here, we describe two natural substances, derricin and derricidin, belonging to the chalcone subclass, that show potent transcriptional inhibition of the Wnt/β-catenin pathway. Both chalcones are able to affect the cell distribution of β-catenin, and inhibit Wnt-specific reporter activity in HCT116 cells and in Xenopus embryos. Derricin and derricidin also strongly inhibited canonical Wnt activity in vitro, and rescued the Wnt-induced double axis phenotype in Xenopus embryos. As a consequence of Wnt/β-catenin inhibition, derricin and derricidin treatments reduce cell viability and lead to cell cycle arrest in colorectal cancer cell lines. Taken together, our results strongly support these chalcones as novel negative modulators of the Wnt/β-catenin pathway and colon cancer cell growth in vitro.

  16. Maintaining glycogen synthase kinase-3 activity is critical for mTOR kinase inhibitors to inhibit cancer cell growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koo, Junghui; Yue, Ping; Gal, Anthony A; Khuri, Fadlo R; Sun, Shi-Yong

    2014-05-01

    mTOR kinase inhibitors that target both mTORC1 and mTORC2 are being evaluated in cancer clinical trials. Here, we report that glycogen synthase kinase-3 (GSK3) is a critical determinant for the therapeutic response to this class of experimental drugs. Pharmacologic inhibition of GSK3 antagonized their suppressive effects on the growth of cancer cells similarly to genetic attenuation of GSK3. Conversely, expression of a constitutively activated form of GSK3β sensitized cancer cells to mTOR inhibition. Consistent with these findings, higher basal levels of GSK3 activity in a panel of human lung cancer cell lines correlated with more efficacious responses. Mechanistic investigations showed that mTOR kinase inhibitors reduced cyclin D1 levels in a GSK3β-dependent manner, independent of their effects on suppressing mTORC1 signaling and cap binding. Notably, selective inhibition of mTORC2 triggered proteasome-mediated cyclin D1 degradation, suggesting that mTORC2 blockade is responsible for GSK3-dependent reduction of cyclin D1. Silencing expression of the ubiquitin E3 ligase FBX4 rescued this reduction, implicating FBX4 in mediating this effect of mTOR inhibition. Together, our findings define a novel mechanism by which mTORC2 promotes cell growth, with potential implications for understanding the clinical action of mTOR kinase inhibitors. ©2014 AACR.

  17. Gallic acid inhibits gastric cancer cells metastasis and invasive growth via increased expression of RhoB, downregulation of AKT/small GTPase signals and inhibition of NF-κB activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ho, Hsieh-Hsun [Institute of Biochemistry and Biotechnology, Chung Shan Medical University, Taichung 402, Taiwan (China); Chang, Chi-Sen [Department of Medicine, Chung Shan Medical University, Taichung 402, Taiwan (China); Division of Gastroenterology, Taichung Veterans General Hospital, Taichung 402, Taiwan (China); Ho, Wei-Chi [Division of Gastroenterology, Jen-Ai Hospital, Taichung 402, Taiwan (China); Liao, Sheng-You [Institute of Biochemistry and Biotechnology, Chung Shan Medical University, Taichung 402, Taiwan (China); Lin, Wea-Lung [Department of Pathology, School of Medicine, Chung Shan Medical University, Taichung 402, Taiwan (China); Department of Pathology, Chung Shan Medical University Hospital, Taichung 402, Taiwan (China); Wang, Chau-Jong, E-mail: wcj@csmu.edu.tw [Institute of Biochemistry and Biotechnology, Chung Shan Medical University, Taichung 402, Taiwan (China); Department of Medical Research, Chung Shan Medical University Hospital, Taichung 402, Taiwan (China)

    2013-01-01

    Our previous study demonstrated the therapeutic potential of gallic acid (GA) for controlling tumor metastasis through its inhibitory effect on the motility of AGS cells. A noteworthy finding in our previous experiment was increased RhoB expression in GA-treated cells. The aim of this study was to evaluate the role of RhoB expression on the inhibitory effects of GA on AGS cells. By applying the transfection of RhoB siRNA into AGS cells and an animal model, we tested the effect of GA on inhibition of tumor growth and RhoB expression. The results confirmed that RhoB-siRNA transfection induced GA to inhibit AGS cells’ invasive growth involving blocking the AKT/small GTPase signals pathway and inhibition of NF-κB activity. Finally, we evaluated the effect of GA on AGS cell metastasis by colonization of tumor cells in nude mice. It showed GA inhibited tumor cells growth via the expression of RhoB. These data support the inhibitory effect of GA which was shown to inhibit gastric cancer cell metastasis and invasive growth via increased expression of RhoB, downregulation of AKT/small GTPase signals and inhibition of NF-κB activity. Thus, GA might be a potential agent in treating gastric cancer. Highlights: ► GA could downregulate AKT signal via increased expression of RhoB. ► GA inhibits metastasis in vitro in gastric carcinoma. ► GA inhibits tumor growth in nude mice model.

  18. MicroRNA-338 inhibits growth, invasion and metastasis of gastric cancer by targeting NRP1 expression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Peng

    Full Text Available NRP1 as multifunctional non-tyrosine-kinase receptors play critical roles in tumor progression. MicroRNAs (miRNAs are an important class of pervasive genes that are involved in a variety of biological functions, particularly cancer. It remains unclear whether miRNAs can regulate the expression of NRP1. The goal of this study was to identify miRNAs that could inhibit the growth, invasion and metastasis of gastric cancer by targeting NRP1 expression. We found that miR-338 expression was reduced in gastric cancer cell lines and in gastric cancer tissues. Moreover, we found that miR-338 inhibited gastric cancer cell migration, invasion, proliferation and promoted apoptosis by targeting NRP1 expression. As an upstream regulator of NRP1, miR-338 directly targets NRP1. The forced expression of miR-338 inhibited the phosphorylation of Erk1/2, P38 MAPK and Akt; however, the expression of phosphorylated Erk1/2, P38 MAPK and Akt was restored by the overexpression of NRP1. In AGS cells infected with miR-338 or transfected with SiNRP1, the protein levels of fibronectin, vimentin, N-cadherin and SNAIL were decreased, but the expression of E-cadherin was increased. The expression of mesenchymal markers in miR-338-expressing cells was restored to normal levels by the restoration of NRP1 expression. In vivo, miR-338 also decreased tumor growth and suppressed D-MVA by targeting NRP1. Therefore, we conclude that miR-338 acts as a novel tumor suppressor gene in gastric cancer. miR-338 can decrease migratory, invasive, proliferative and apoptotic behaviors, as well as gastric cancer EMT, by attenuating the expression of NRP1.

  19. Downregulation of Akt1 Inhibits Anchorage-Independent Cell Growth and Induces Apoptosis in Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuesong Liu

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available The serine/threonine kinases, Akti/PKBα, Akt2/PKBβ, and Akt3/PKBγ, play a critical role in preventing cancer cells from undergoing apoptosis. However, the function of individual Akt isoforms in the tumorigenicity of cancer cells is still not well defined. In the current study, we used an AM antisense oligonucleotide (AS to specifically downregulate Akti protein in both cancer and normal cells. Our data indicate that AM AS treatment inhibits the ability of MiaPaCa-2, H460, HCT-15, and HT1080 cells to grow in soft agar. The treatment also induces apoptosis in these cancer cells as demonstrated by FRCS analysis and a caspase activity assay. Conversely, Akti AS treatment has little effect on the cell growth and survival of normal human cells including normal human fibroblast (NHF, fibroblast from muscle (FBM, and mammary gland epithelial 184135 cells. In addition, AM AS specifically sensitizes cancer cells to typical chemotherapeutic agents. Thus, Akti is indispensable for maintaining the tumorigenicity of cancer cells. Inhibition of AM may provide a powerful sensitization agent for chemotherapy specifically in cancer cells.

  20. Suppression of Homologous Recombination by insulin-like growth factor-1 inhibition sensitizes cancer cells to PARP inhibitors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amin, Oreekha; Beauchamp, Marie-Claude; Nader, Paul Abou; Laskov, Ido; Iqbal, Sanaa; Philip, Charles-André; Yasmeen, Amber; Gotlieb, Walter H.

    2015-01-01

    Impairment of homologous recombination (HR) is found in close to 50 % of ovarian and breast cancer. Tumors with BRCA1 mutations show increased expression of the Insulin-like growth factor type 1 receptor (IGF-1R). We previously have shown that inhibition of IGF-1R results in growth inhibition and apoptosis of ovarian tumor cells. In the current study, we aimed to investigate the correlation between HR and sensitivity to IGF-1R inhibition. Further, we hypothesized that IGF-1R inhibition might sensitize HR proficient cancers to Poly ADP ribose polymerase (PARP) inhibitors. Using ovarian and breast cancer cellular models with known BRCA1 status, we evaluated their HR functionality by RAD51 foci formation assay. The 50 % lethal concentration (LC50) of Insulin-like growth factor type 1 receptor kinase inhibitor (IGF-1Rki) in these cells was assessed, and western immunoblotting was performed to determine the expression of proteins involved in the IGF-1R pathway. Moreover, IGF-1R inhibitors were added on HR proficient cell lines to assess mRNA and protein expression of RAD51 by qPCR and western blot. Also, we explored the interaction between RAD51 and Insulin receptor substance 1 (IRS-1) by immunoprecipitation. Next, combination effect of IGF-1R and PARP inhibitors was evaluated by clonogenic assay. Cells with mutated/methylated BRCA1 showed an impaired HR function, and had an overactivation of the IGF-1R pathway. These cells were more sensitive to IGF-1R inhibition compared to HR proficient cells. In addition, the IGF-IR inhibitor reduced RAD51 expression at mRNA and protein levels in HR proficient cells, and sensitized these cells to PARP inhibitor. Targeting IGF-1R might lead to improved personalized therapeutic approaches in cancer patients with HR deficiency. Targeting both PARP and IGF-1R might increase the clinical efficacy in HR deficient patients and increase the population of patients who may benefit from PARP inhibitors

  1. Activation of AMPK inhibits cervical cancer cell growth through AKT/FOXO3a/FOXM1 signaling cascade

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    Yung, Mingo Ming Ho; Chan, David Wai; Liu, Vincent Wing Sun; Yao, Kwok-Ming; Ngan, Hextan Yuen-Sheung

    2013-01-01

    Although advanced-stage cervical cancer can benefit from current treatments, approximately 30% patients may fail after definitive treatment eventually. Therefore, exploring alternative molecular therapeutic approaches is imperatively needed for this disease. We have recently shown that activation of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), a metabolic sensor, hampers cervical cancer cell growth through blocking the Wnt/β-catenin signaling activity. Here, we report that activated AMPK (p-AMPK) also inhibits cervical cancer cell growth by counteracting FOXM1 function. Effect of the activation of AMPK on FOXM1 expression was examined by hypoxia and glucose deprivation, as well as pharmacological AMPK activators such as A23187, AICAR and metformin. RT Q-PCR and Western blot analysis were employed to investigate the activities of AMPK, FOXM1 and AKT/FOXO3a signaling. Consistent with our previous findings, the activation of AMPK by either AMPK activators such as AICAR, A23187, metformin, glucose deprivation or hypoxia significantly inhibited the cervical cancer cell growth. Importantly, we found that activated AMPK activity was concomitantly associated with the reduction of both the mRNA and protein levels of FOXM1. Mechanistically, we showed that activated AMPK was able to reduce AKT mediated phosphorylation of p-FOXO3a (Ser253). Interestingly, activated AMPK could not cause any significant changes in FOXM1 in cervical cancer cells in which endogenous FOXO3a levels were knocked down using siRNAs, suggesting that FOXO3a is involved in the suppression of FOXM1. Taken together, our results suggest the activated AMPK impedes cervical cancer cell growth through reducing the expression of FOXM1

  2. Curcumin synergizes with resveratrol to inhibit colon cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majumdar, Adhip P N; Banerjee, Sanjeev; Nautiyal, Jyoti; Patel, Bhaumik B; Patel, Vaishali; Du, Jianhua; Yu, Yingjie; Elliott, Althea A; Levi, Edi; Sarkar, Fazlul H

    2009-01-01

    Development and progression of many malignancies, including colorectal cancer, are associated with activation of multiple signaling pathways. Therefore, inhibition of these signaling pathways with noncytotoxic natural products represents a logical preventive and/or therapeutic approach for colon cancer. Curcumin and resveratrol, both of which inhibit the growth of transformed cells and colon carcinogenesis, were selected to examine whether combining them would be an effective preventive and/or therapeutic strategy for colon cancer. Indeed, the combination of curcumin and resveratrol was found to be more effective in inhibiting growth of p53-positive (wt) and p53-negative colon cancer HCT-116 cells in vitro and in vivo in SCID xenografts of colon cancer HCT-116 (wt) cells than either agent alone. Analysis by Calcusyn software showed synergism between curcumin and resveratrol. The inhibition of tumors in response to curcumin and/or resveratrol was associated with the reduction in proliferation and stimulation of apoptosis accompanied by attenuation of NF-kappaB activity. In vitro studies have further demonstrated that the combinatorial treatment caused a greater inhibition of constitutive activation of EGFR and its family members as well as IGF-1R. Our current data suggest that the combination of curcumin and resveratrol could be an effective preventive/therapeutic strategy for colon cancer.

  3. Resveratrol Reduces Prostate Cancer Growth and Metastasis by Inhibiting the Akt/MicroRNA-21 Pathway

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    Sheth, Sandeep; Jajoo, Sarvesh; Kaur, Tejbeer; Mukherjea, Debashree; Sheehan, Kelly; Rybak, Leonard P.; Ramkumar, Vickram

    2012-01-01

    The consumption of foods containing resveratrol produces significant health benefits. Resveratrol inhibits cancer by reducing cell proliferation and metastasis and by inducing apoptosis. These actions could be explained by its ability to inhibit (ERK-1/2), Akt and suppressing the levels of estrogen and insulin growth factor -1 (IGF-1) receptor. How these processes are manifested into the antitumor actions of resveratrol is not clear. Using microarray studies, we show that resveratrol reduced the expression of various prostate-tumor associated microRNAs (miRs) including miR-21 in androgen-receptor negative and highly aggressive human prostate cancer cells, PC-3M-MM2. This effect of resveratrol was associated with reduced cell viability, migration and invasiveness. Additionally, resveratrol increased the expression of tumor suppressors, PDCD4 and maspin, which are negatively regulated by miR-21. Short interfering (si) RNA against PDCD4 attenuated resveratrol’s effect on prostate cancer cells, and similar effects were observed following over expression of miR-21 with pre-miR-21 oligonucleotides. PC-3M-MM2 cells also exhibited high levels of phospho-Akt (pAkt), which were reduced by both resveratrol and LY294002 (a PI3-kinase inhibitor). MiR-21 expression in these cells appeared to be dependent on Akt, as LY294002 reduced the levels of miR-21 along with a concurrent increase in PDCD4 expression. These in vitro findings were further corroborated in a severe combined immunodeficient (SCID) mouse xenograft model of prostate cancer. Oral administration of resveratrol not only inhibited the tumor growth but also decreased the incidence and number of metastatic lung lesions. These tumor- and metastatic-suppressive effects of resveratrol were associated with reduced miR-21 and pAkt, and elevated PDCD4 levels. Similar anti-tumor effects of resveratrol were observed in DU145 and LNCaP prostate cancer cells which were associated with suppression of Akt and PDCD4, but

  4. Betulinic acid inhibits colon cancer cell and tumor growth and induces proteasome-dependent and -independent downregulation of specificity proteins (Sp transcription factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pathi Satya

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Betulinic acid (BA inhibits growth of several cancer cell lines and tumors and the effects of BA have been attributed to its mitochondriotoxicity and inhibition of multiple pro-oncogenic factors. Previous studies show that BA induces proteasome-dependent degradation of specificity protein (Sp transcription factors Sp1, Sp3 and Sp4 in prostate cancer cells and this study focused on the mechanism of action of BA in colon cancer cells. Methods The effects of BA on colon cancer cell proliferation and apoptosis and tumor growth in vivo were determined using standardized assays. The effects of BA on Sp proteins and Sp-regulated gene products were analyzed by western blots, and real time PCR was used to determine microRNA-27a (miR-27a and ZBTB10 mRNA expression. Results BA inhibited growth and induced apoptosis in RKO and SW480 colon cancer cells and inhibited tumor growth in athymic nude mice bearing RKO cells as xenograft. BA also decreased expression of Sp1, Sp3 and Sp4 transcription factors which are overexpressed in colon cancer cells and decreased levels of several Sp-regulated genes including survivin, vascular endothelial growth factor, p65 sub-unit of NFκB, epidermal growth factor receptor, cyclin D1, and pituitary tumor transforming gene-1. The mechanism of action of BA was dependent on cell context, since BA induced proteasome-dependent and proteasome-independent downregulation of Sp1, Sp3 and Sp4 in SW480 and RKO cells, respectively. In RKO cells, the mechanism of BA-induced repression of Sp1, Sp3 and Sp4 was due to induction of reactive oxygen species (ROS, ROS-mediated repression of microRNA-27a, and induction of the Sp repressor gene ZBTB10. Conclusions These results suggest that the anticancer activity of BA in colon cancer cells is due, in part, to downregulation of Sp1, Sp3 and Sp4 transcription factors; however, the mechanism of this response is cell context-dependent.

  5. Betulinic acid inhibits colon cancer cell and tumor growth and induces proteasome-dependent and -independent downregulation of specificity proteins (Sp) transcription factors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chintharlapalli, Sudhakar; Papineni, Sabitha; Lei, Ping; Pathi, Satya; Safe, Stephen

    2011-01-01

    Betulinic acid (BA) inhibits growth of several cancer cell lines and tumors and the effects of BA have been attributed to its mitochondriotoxicity and inhibition of multiple pro-oncogenic factors. Previous studies show that BA induces proteasome-dependent degradation of specificity protein (Sp) transcription factors Sp1, Sp3 and Sp4 in prostate cancer cells and this study focused on the mechanism of action of BA in colon cancer cells. The effects of BA on colon cancer cell proliferation and apoptosis and tumor growth in vivo were determined using standardized assays. The effects of BA on Sp proteins and Sp-regulated gene products were analyzed by western blots, and real time PCR was used to determine microRNA-27a (miR-27a) and ZBTB10 mRNA expression. BA inhibited growth and induced apoptosis in RKO and SW480 colon cancer cells and inhibited tumor growth in athymic nude mice bearing RKO cells as xenograft. BA also decreased expression of Sp1, Sp3 and Sp4 transcription factors which are overexpressed in colon cancer cells and decreased levels of several Sp-regulated genes including survivin, vascular endothelial growth factor, p65 sub-unit of NFκB, epidermal growth factor receptor, cyclin D1, and pituitary tumor transforming gene-1. The mechanism of action of BA was dependent on cell context, since BA induced proteasome-dependent and proteasome-independent downregulation of Sp1, Sp3 and Sp4 in SW480 and RKO cells, respectively. In RKO cells, the mechanism of BA-induced repression of Sp1, Sp3 and Sp4 was due to induction of reactive oxygen species (ROS), ROS-mediated repression of microRNA-27a, and induction of the Sp repressor gene ZBTB10. These results suggest that the anticancer activity of BA in colon cancer cells is due, in part, to downregulation of Sp1, Sp3 and Sp4 transcription factors; however, the mechanism of this response is cell context-dependent

  6. Manic fringe inhibits tumor growth by suppressing Notch3 degradation in lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Fuming; Amarasinghe, Baru; Dang, Thao P

    2013-01-01

    Notch signaling plays an essential role in development as well as cancer. We have previously shown that Notch3 is important for lung cancer growth and survival. Notch receptors are activated through the interaction with their ligands, resulting in proteolytic cleavage of the receptors. This interaction is modulated by Fringe, a family of fucose-specific β1,3 N-acetylglucosaminyltransferases that modify the extracellular subunit of Notch receptors. Studies in developmental models showed that Fringe enhances Notch's response to Delta ligands at the expense of Jagged ligands. We observed that Manic Fringe expression is down-regulated in lung cancer. Since Jagged1, a known ligand for Notch3, is often over-expressed in lung cancer, we hypothesized that Fringe negatively regulates Notch3 activation. In this study, we show that re-expression of Manic Fringe down-regulates Notch3 target genes HES1 and HeyL and reduces tumor phenotype in vitro and in vivo. The mechanism for this phenomenon appears to be related to modulation of Notch3 protein stability. Proteasome inhibition reverses Manic Fringe-induced protein turnover. Taken together, our data provide the first evidence that Manic Fringe functions as a tumor suppressor in the lung and that the mechanism of its anti-tumor activity is mediated by inhibition of Notch3 activation.

  7. Demethoxycurcumin inhibited human epithelia ovarian cancer cells' growth via up-regulating miR-551a.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Zhenhua; Sha, Xianqun

    2017-03-01

    Curcumin is a natural agent that has ability to dampen tumor cells' growth. However, the natural form of curcumin is prone to degrade and unstable in vitro. Here, we demonstrated that demethoxycurcumin (a curcumin-related demethoxy compound) could inhibit cell proliferation and induce apoptosis of ovarian cancer cells. Moreover, IRS2/PI3K/Akt axis was inactivated in cells treated with demethoxycurcumin. Quantitative real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction demonstrated that miR-551a was down-regulated in ovarian cancer tissues and ovarian cancer cell lines. Over-expression of miR-551a inhibited cell proliferation and induced apoptosis of ovarian cancer cells, whereas down-regulation of miR-551a exerted the opposite function. Luciferase assays confirmed that there was a binding site of miR-551a in IRS2, and we found that miR-551a exerted tumor-suppressive function by targeting IRS2 in ovarian cancer cells. Remarkably, miR-551a was up-regulated in the cells treated with demethoxycurcumin, and demethoxycurcumin suppressed IRS2 by restoration of miR-551a. In conclusion, demethoxycurcumin hindered ovarian cancer cells' malignant progress via up-regulating miR-551a.

  8. CysLT(1)R antagonists inhibit tumor growth in a xenograft model of colon cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savari, Sayeh; Liu, Minghui; Zhang, Yuan; Sime, Wondossen; Sjölander, Anita

    2013-01-01

    The expression of the inflammatory G-protein coupled receptor CysLT1R has been shown to be upregulated in colon cancer patients and associated with poor prognosis. The present study investigated the correlation between CysLT1R and colon cancer development in vivo using CysLT1R antagonists (ZM198,615 or Montelukast) and the nude mouse xenograft model. Two drug administration regimens were established. The first regimen was established to investigate the importance of CysLT1R in tumor initiation. Nude mice were inoculated with 50 µM CysLT1R antagonist-pretreated HCT-116 colon cancer cells and received continued treatment (5 mg/kg/day, intraperitoneally). The second regimen aimed to address the role of CysLT1R in tumor progression. Nude mice were inoculated with non-pretreated HCT-116 cells and did not receive CysLT1R antagonist treatment until recordable tumor appearance. Both regimens resulted in significantly reduced tumor size, attributed to changes in proliferation and apoptosis as determined by reduced Ki-67 levels and increased levels of p21(WAF/Cip1) (Pcolon cancer cell line HCT-116 and CysLT1R antagonists. In addition to significant reductions in cell proliferation, adhesion and colony formation, we observed induction of cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in a dose-dependent manner. The ability of Montelukast to inhibit growth of human colon cancer xenograft was further validated by using two additional colon cancer cell lines, SW-480 and HT-29. Our results demonstrate that CysLT1R antagonists inhibit growth of colon cancer xenografts primarily by reducing proliferation and inducing apoptosis of the tumor cells.

  9. Transcriptional and post-transcriptional upregulation of p27 mediates growth inhibition of isorhapontigenin (ISO) on human bladder cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Guosong; Huang, Chao; Li, Jingxia; Huang, Haishan; Wang, Jingjing; Li, Yawei; Xie, Fei; Jin, Honglei; Zhu, Junlan; Huang, Chuanshu

    2018-03-08

    There are few approved drugs available for the treatment of muscle-invasive bladder cancer (MIBC). Recently, we have demonstrated that isorhapontigenin (ISO), a new derivative isolated from the Chinese herb Gnetum cleistostachyum, effectively induces cell-cycle arrest at the G0/G1 phase and inhibits anchorage-independent cell growth through the miR-137/Sp1/cyclin D1 axis in human MIBC cells. Herein, we found that treatment of bladder cancer (BC) cells with ISO resulted in a significant upregulation of p27, which was also observed in ISO-treated mouse BCs that were induced by N-butyl-N-(4-hydroxybutyl) nitrosamine (BBN). Importantly, knockdown of p27 caused a decline in the ISO-induced G0-G1 growth arrest and reversed ISO suppression of anchorage-independent growth in BC cells. Mechanistic studies revealed that ISO promoted p27 expression at mRNA transcription level through increasing direct binding of forkhead box class O1 (FOXO1) to its promoter, while knockdown of FOXO1 attenuated ISO inhibition of BC cell growth. On the other hand, ISO upregulated the 3'-untranslated region (3'-UTR) activity of p27, which was accompanied by a reduction of miR-182 expression. In line with these observations, ectopic expression of miR-182 significantly blocked p27 3'-UTR activity, whereas mutation of the miR-182-binding site at p27 mRNA 3'-UTR effectively reversed this inhibition. Accordingly, ectopic expression of miR-182 also attenuated ISO upregulation of p27 expression and impaired ISO inhibition of BC cell growth. Our results not only provide novel insight into understanding of the underlying mechanism related to regulation of MIBC cell growth but also identify new roles and mechanisms underlying ISO inhibition of BC cell growth.

  10. Traditional Chinese Medicine CFF-1 induced cell growth inhibition, autophagy, and apoptosis via inhibiting EGFR-related pathways in prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Zhaomeng; Zhu, Qingyi; Yin, Yingying; Kang, Dan; Cao, Runyi; Tian, Qian; Zhang, Yu; Lu, Shan; Liu, Ping

    2018-04-01

    Traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) has a combined therapeutic result in cancer treatment by integrating holistic and local therapeutical effects, by which TCM can enhance the curative effect and reduce the side effect. In this study, we analyzed the effect of CFF-1 (alcohol extract from an anticancer compound Chinese medicine) on prostate cancer (PCa) cell lines and studied in detail the mechanism of cell death induced by CFF-1 in vitro and in vivo. From our data, we found for the first time that CFF-1 obviously arrested cell cycle in G1 phase, decreased cell viability and then increased nuclear rupture in a dose-dependent manner and finally resulted in apoptosis in prostate cancer cells. In molecular level, our data showed that CFF-1 induced inhibition of EGFR auto-phosphorylation and inactivation of EGFR. Disruption of EGFR activity in turn suppressed downstream PI3K/AKT and Raf/Erk signal pathways, resulted in the decrease of p-FOXO1 (Ser256) and regulated the expression of apoptosis-related and cycle-related genes. Moreover, CFF-1 markedly induced cell autophagy through inhibiting PI3K/AKT/mTOR pathway and then up-regulating Beclin-1 and LC-3II and down-regulating phosphorylation of p70S6K. In vivo, CFF-1-treated group exhibited a significant decrease in tumor volume compared with the negative control group in subcutaneous xenograft tumor in nude mice via inhibiting EGFR-related signal pathways. Thus, bio-functions of Chinese medicine CFF-1 in inducing PCa cell growth inhibition, autophagy, and apoptosis suggested that CFF-1 had the clinical potential to treat patients with prostate cancer. © 2018 The Authors. Cancer Medicine published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Metformin enhances tamoxifen-mediated tumor growth inhibition in ER-positive breast carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma, Ji; Zhang, Jian; Liu, Wenchao; Guo, Yan; Chen, Suning; Zhong, Cuiping; Xue, Yan; Zhang, Yuan; Lai, Xiaofeng; Wei, Yifang; Yu, Shentong

    2014-01-01

    Tamoxifen, an endocrine therapy drug used to treat breast cancer, is designed to interrupt estrogen signaling by blocking the estrogen receptor (ER). However, many ER-positive patients are low reactive or resistant to tamoxifen. Metformin is a widely used anti-diabetic drug with noteworthy anti-cancer effects. We investigated whether metformin has the additive effects with tamoxifen in ER-positive breast cancer therapy. The efficacy of metformin alone and in combination with tamoxifen against ER-positive breast cancer was analyzed by cell survival, DNA replication activity, plate colony formation, soft-agar, flow cytometry, immunohistochemistry, and nude mice model assays. The involved signaling pathways were detected by western blot assay. When metformin was combined with tamoxifen, the concentration of tamoxifen required for growth inhibition was substantially reduced. Moreover, metformin enhanced tamoxifen-mediated inhibition of proliferation, DNA replication activity, colony formation, soft-agar colony formation, and induction of apoptosis in ER-positive breast cancer cells. In addition, these tamoxifen-induced effects that were enhanced by metformin may be involved in the bax/bcl-2 apoptotic pathway and the AMPK/mTOR/p70S6 growth pathway. Finally, two-drug combination therapy significantly inhibited tumor growth in vivo. The present work shows that metformin and tamoxifen additively inhibited the growth and augmented the apoptosis of ER-positive breast cancer cells. It provides leads for future research on this drug combination for the treatment of ER-positive breast cancer

  12. Splenectomy inhibits non-small cell lung cancer growth by modulating anti-tumor adaptive and innate immune response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levy, Liran; Mishalian, Inbal; Bayuch, Rachel; Zolotarov, Lida; Michaeli, Janna; Fridlender, Zvi G

    2015-01-01

    It has been shown that inhibitors of the immune system reside in the spleen and inhibit the endogenous antitumor effects of the immune system. We hypothesized that splenectomy would inhibit the growth of relatively large non-small lung cancer (NSCLC) tumors by modulating the systemic inhibition of the immune system, and in particular Myeloid Derived Suppressor Cells (MDSC). The effect of splenectomy was evaluated in several murine lung cancer models. We found that splenectomy reduces tumor growth and the development of lung metastases, but only in advanced tumors. In immune-deficient NOD-SCID mice the effect of splenectomy on tumor growth and metastatic spread disappeared. Splenectomy significantly reduced the presence of MDSC, and especially monocytic-MDSC in the circulation and inside the tumor. Specific reduction of the CCR2+ subset of monocytic MDSC was demonstrated, and the importance of the CCL2-CCR2 axis was further shown by a marked reduction in CCL2 following splenectomy. These changes were followed by changes in the macrophages contents of the tumors to become more antitumorigenic, and by increased activation of CD8+ Cytotoxic T-cells (CTL). By MDSC depletion, and adoptive transfer of MDSCs, we demonstrated that the effect of splenectomy on tumor growth was substantially mediated by MDSC cells. We conclude that the spleen is an important contributor to tumor growth and metastases, and that splenectomy can blunt this effect by depletion of MDSC, changing the amount and characteristics of myeloid cells and enhancing activation of CTL. PMID:26137413

  13. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-β/δ (PPARβ/δ) ligands inhibit growth of UACC903 and MCF7 human cancer cell lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Girroir, Elizabeth E.; Hollingshead, Holly E.; Billin, Andrew N.; Willson, Timothy M.; Robertson, Gavin P.; Sharma, Arun K.; Amin, Shantu; Gonzalez, Frank J.; Peters, Jeffrey M.

    2008-01-01

    The development of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-β/δ (PPARβ/δ) ligands for the treatment of diseases including metabolic syndrome, diabetes and obesity has been hampered due to contradictory findings on their potential safety. For example, while some reports show that ligand activation of PPARβ/δ promotes the induction of terminal differentiation and inhibition of cell growth, other reports suggest that PPARβ/δ ligands potentiate tumorigenesis by increasing cell proliferation. Some of the contradictory findings could be due in part to differences in the ligand examined, the presence or absence of serum in cell cultures, differences in cell lines or differences in the method used to quantify cell growth. For these reasons, this study examined the effect of ligand activation of PPARβ/δ on cell growth of two human cancer cell lines, MCF7 (breast cancer) and UACC903 (melanoma) in the presence or absence of serum using two highly specific PPARβ/δ ligands, GW0742 or GW501516. Culturing cells in the presence of either GW0742 or GW501516 caused upregulation of the known PPARβ/δ target gene angiopoietin-like protein 4 (ANGPTL4). Inhibition of cell growth was observed in both cell lines cultured in the presence of either GW0742 or GW501516, and the presence or absence of serum had little influence on this inhibition. Results from the present studies demonstrate that ligand activation of PPARβ/δ inhibits the growth of both MCF7 and UACC903 cell lines and provide further evidence that PPARβ/δ ligands are not mitogenic in human cancer cell lines

  14. PPARα inhibition modulates multiple reprogrammed metabolic pathways in kidney cancer and attenuates tumor growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abu Aboud, Omran; Donohoe, Dallas; Bultman, Scott; Fitch, Mark; Riiff, Tim; Hellerstein, Marc; Weiss, Robert H

    2015-06-01

    Kidney cancer [renal cell carcinoma (RCC)] is the sixth-most-common cancer in the United States, and its incidence is increasing. The current progression-free survival for patients with advanced RCC rarely extends beyond 1-2 yr due to the development of therapeutic resistance. We previously identified peroxisome proliferator-activating receptor-α (PPARα) as a potential therapeutic target for this disease and showed that a specific PPARα antagonist, GW6471, induced apoptosis and cell cycle arrest at G0/G1 in RCC cell lines associated with attenuation of cell cycle regulatory proteins. We now extend that work and show that PPARα inhibition attenuates components of RCC metabolic reprogramming, capitalizing on the Warburg effect. The specific PPARα inhibitor GW6471, as well as a siRNA specific to PPARα, attenuates the enhanced fatty acid oxidation and oxidative phosphorylation associated with glycolysis inhibition, and PPARα antagonism also blocks the enhanced glycolysis that has been observed in RCC cells; this effect did not occur in normal human kidney epithelial cells. Such cell type-specific inhibition of glycolysis corresponds with changes in protein levels of the oncogene c-Myc and has promising clinical implications. Furthermore, we show that treatment with GW6471 results in RCC tumor growth attenuation in a xenograft mouse model, with minimal obvious toxicity, a finding associated with the expected on-target effects on c-Myc. These studies demonstrate that several pivotal cancer-relevant metabolic pathways are inhibited by PPARα antagonism. Our data support the concept that targeting PPARα, with or without concurrent inhibition of glycolysis, is a potential novel and effective therapeutic approach for RCC that targets metabolic reprogramming in this tumor.

  15. Kaempferol inhibits gastric cancer tumor growth: An in vitro and in vivo study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Haibin; Bao, Junjie; Wei, Yuzhe; Chen, Yang; Mao, Xiaoguang; Li, Jianguo; Yang, Zhiwei; Xue, Yingwei

    2015-02-01

    Kaempferol, which is one of the general flavonoids, has recently been reported to suppress proliferation, induce cell cycle arrest and promote apoptosis in various human cancer cell lines. In the present study, the effect and mechanism of kaempferol on gastric cancer (GC) was examined. The results showed that kaempferol significantly inhibited the proliferation of MKN28 and SGC7901 cell lines. However, no significant inhibition in the GSE-1 normal gastric epithelial cell line in our experimental dose was detected. Additionally, significant apoptosis and G2/M phase cell cycle arrest were identified following the treatment of kaempferol. More importantly, we observed that kaempferol inhibited the growth of the tumor xenografts although no marked effects on liver, spleen or body weight were induced. The expression levels of G2/M cell cycle‑regulating factors, cyclin B1, Cdk1 and Cdc25C, were significantly reduced. In addition, kaempferol treatment markedly decreased the level of Bcl-2 concomitant with an increase in Bax expression, resulting in the upregulation of cleaved caspase-3 and -9, which promoted PARP cleavage. Kaempferol-treated cells also led to a decrease in p-Akt, p-ERK and COX-2 expression levels. The present study therefore provided evidence that kaempferol may be a therapeutic agent for GC.

  16. D-Glucosamine inhibits proliferation of human cancer cells through inhibition of p70S6K

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oh, Hyun-Ji; Lee, Jason S.; Song, Dae-Kyu; Shin, Dong-Hoon; Jang, Byeong-Churl; Suh, Seong-Il; Park, Jong-Wook; Suh, Min-Ho; Baek, Won-Ki

    2007-01-01

    Although D-glucosamine has been reported as an inhibitor of tumor growth both in vivo and in vitro, the mechanism for the anticancer effect of D-glucosamine is still unclear. Since there are several reports suggesting D-glucosamine inhibits protein synthesis, we examined whether D-glucosamine affects p70S6 K activity, an important signaling molecule involved in protein translation. In the present study, we found D-glucosamine inhibited the activity of p70S6K and the proliferation of DU145 prostate cancer cells and MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells. D-Glucosamine decreased phosphorylation of p70S6K, and its downstream substrates RPS6, and eIF-4B, but not mTOR and 4EBP1 in DU145 cells, suggesting that D-glucosamine induced inhibition of p70S6K is not through the inhibition of mTOR. In addition, D-glucosamine enhanced the growth inhibitory effects of rapamycin, a specific inhibitor of mTOR. These findings suggest that D-glucosamine can inhibit growth of cancer cells through dephosphorylation of p70S6K

  17. Chloroquine and hydroxychloroquine inhibit bladder cancer cell growth by targeting basal autophagy and enhancing apoptosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi-Chia Lin

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Chloroquine (CQ and hydroxychloroquine (HCQ, two antimalarial drugs, are suggested to have potential anticancer properties. in the present study, we investigated the effects of CQ and HCQ on cell growth of bladder cancer with emphasis on autophagy inhibition and apoptosis induction in vitro. The results showed that CQ and HCQ inhibited the proliferation of multiple human bladder cell lines (including RT4, 5637, and T24 in a time- and dose-dependent fashion, especially in advanced bladder cancer cell lines (5637 and T24 compared to immortalized uroepithelial cells (SV-Huc-1 or other reference cancer cell lines (PC3 and MCF-7. We found that 24-hour treatment of CQ or HCQ significantly decreased the clonogenic formation in 5637 and T24 cells compared to SV-Huc-1. As human bladder cancer tumor exhibits high basal level of autophagic activities, we detected the autophagic flux in cells treated with CQ and HCQ, showing an alternation in LC3 flux in CQ- or HCQ-treated cells. Moreover, bladder cancer cells treated with CQ and HCQ underwent apoptosis, resulting in increased caspase 3/7 activities, increased level of cleaved poly(ADP-ribose polymerase (PARP, caspase 3, and DNA fragmentation. Given these results, targeting autophagy with CQ and HCQ represents an effective cancer therapeutic strategy against human bladder cancer.

  18. Chloroquine and hydroxychloroquine inhibit bladder cancer cell growth by targeting basal autophagy and enhancing apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yi-Chia; Lin, Ji-Fan; Wen, Sheng-I; Yang, Shan-Che; Tsai, Te-Fu; Chen, Hung-En; Chou, Kuang-Yu; Hwang, Thomas I-Sheng

    2017-05-01

    Chloroquine (CQ) and hydroxychloroquine (HCQ), two antimalarial drugs, are suggested to have potential anticancer properties. in the present study, we investigated the effects of CQ and HCQ on cell growth of bladder cancer with emphasis on autophagy inhibition and apoptosis induction in vitro. The results showed that CQ and HCQ inhibited the proliferation of multiple human bladder cell lines (including RT4, 5637, and T24) in a time- and dose-dependent fashion, especially in advanced bladder cancer cell lines (5637 and T24) compared to immortalized uroepithelial cells (SV-Huc-1) or other reference cancer cell lines (PC3 and MCF-7). We found that 24-hour treatment of CQ or HCQ significantly decreased the clonogenic formation in 5637 and T24 cells compared to SV-Huc-1. As human bladder cancer tumor exhibits high basal level of autophagic activities, we detected the autophagic flux in cells treated with CQ and HCQ, showing an alternation in LC3 flux in CQ- or HCQ-treated cells. Moreover, bladder cancer cells treated with CQ and HCQ underwent apoptosis, resulting in increased caspase 3/7 activities, increased level of cleaved poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP), caspase 3, and DNA fragmentation. Given these results, targeting autophagy with CQ and HCQ represents an effective cancer therapeutic strategy against human bladder cancer. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Taiwan.

  19. Secreted phosphoprotein 24 kD (Spp24) inhibits growth of human pancreatic cancer cells caused by BMP-2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Chen-Shuang; Tian, Haijun; Zou, Min; Zhao, Ke-Wei; Li, Yawei; Lao, Lifeng; Brochmann, Elsa J.; Duarte, M. Eugenia L.; Daubs, Michael D.; Zhou, Yan-Heng; Murray, Samuel S.; Wang, Jeffrey C.

    2015-01-01

    The emerging role of bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) in the initiation and progression of multiple cancers has drawn great attention in cancer research. In this study, we report that BMP-2 can promote the proliferation of the pancreatic tumor cell line, PANC-1. Secreted phosphoprotein 24 kD (Spp24), a BMP binding protein, did not affect the proliferation of the cells but promoted the apoptosis of the cells in vitro. In a xeneograft tumor model using PANC-1 cells, BMP-2 dramatically promoted tumor growth, while Spp24 not only abolished the effect of BMP-2, but also dramatically induced tumor shrinking when used alone. Activation of Smad1/5/8 participated in this process as demonstrated by immunohistochemical staining of phosphorylated Smad 1/5/8. We conclude that Spp24 can be developed into a therapeutic agent that could be employed in clinical situations where the inhibition of BMPs and related proteins is advantageous. - Highlights: • Spp24 effectively inhibited the in vivo tumor growth of PANC-1. • BMP-2 dramatically promoted tumor growth by promoting PANC-1 proliferation. • Spp24 abolished the tumor growth effect of BMP-2 by promoting PANC-1 apoptosis. • Spp24 may be a candidate as a therapeutic agent of pancreatic cancer.

  20. Secreted phosphoprotein 24 kD (Spp24) inhibits growth of human pancreatic cancer cells caused by BMP-2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Chen-Shuang [Department of Orthodontics, Peking University School and Hospital of Stomatology, Beijing (China); Tian, Haijun, E-mail: haijuntianmd@gmail.com [Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Changzheng Hospital, Second Military Medical University, Shanghai (China); Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, University of California, Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Department of Surgery, Bethune School of Medics, Shijiazhuang (China); Zou, Min [Department of Orthodontics, School and Hospital of Stomatology, Xi' an Jiaotong University, Xi' an (China); Zhao, Ke-Wei [Research Service, VA Greater Los Angeles Healthcare System, North Hills, CA (United States); Li, Yawei; Lao, Lifeng [Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, University of California, Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Brochmann, Elsa J. [Research Service, VA Greater Los Angeles Healthcare System, North Hills, CA (United States); Geriatric Research, Education and Clinical Center, VA Greater Los Angeles Healthcare System, North Hills, CA (United States); Department of Medicine, University of California, Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Duarte, M. Eugenia L. [National Institute of Traumatology and Orthopaedics, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Daubs, Michael D. [Division of Orthopaedic Surgery, Department of Surgery, University of Nevada School of Medicine, Las Vegas, NV (United States); Zhou, Yan-Heng, E-mail: yanhengzhou@vip.163.com [Department of Orthodontics, Peking University School and Hospital of Stomatology, Beijing (China); Murray, Samuel S. [Research Service, VA Greater Los Angeles Healthcare System, North Hills, CA (United States); Geriatric Research, Education and Clinical Center, VA Greater Los Angeles Healthcare System, North Hills, CA (United States); Department of Medicine, University of California, Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Wang, Jeffrey C. [Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    2015-10-16

    The emerging role of bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) in the initiation and progression of multiple cancers has drawn great attention in cancer research. In this study, we report that BMP-2 can promote the proliferation of the pancreatic tumor cell line, PANC-1. Secreted phosphoprotein 24 kD (Spp24), a BMP binding protein, did not affect the proliferation of the cells but promoted the apoptosis of the cells in vitro. In a xeneograft tumor model using PANC-1 cells, BMP-2 dramatically promoted tumor growth, while Spp24 not only abolished the effect of BMP-2, but also dramatically induced tumor shrinking when used alone. Activation of Smad1/5/8 participated in this process as demonstrated by immunohistochemical staining of phosphorylated Smad 1/5/8. We conclude that Spp24 can be developed into a therapeutic agent that could be employed in clinical situations where the inhibition of BMPs and related proteins is advantageous. - Highlights: • Spp24 effectively inhibited the in vivo tumor growth of PANC-1. • BMP-2 dramatically promoted tumor growth by promoting PANC-1 proliferation. • Spp24 abolished the tumor growth effect of BMP-2 by promoting PANC-1 apoptosis. • Spp24 may be a candidate as a therapeutic agent of pancreatic cancer.

  1. Doxorubicin increases the effectiveness of Apo2L/TRAIL for tumor growth inhibition of prostate cancer xenografts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Zawahry, Ahmed; McKillop, John; Voelkel-Johnson, Christina

    2005-01-01

    Prostate cancer is a significant health problem among American men. Treatment strategies for androgen-independent cancer are currently not available. Tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (Apo2L/TRAIL) is a death receptor ligand that can induce apoptosis in a variety of cancer cell lines, including androgen-independent PC3 prostate carcinoma cells. In vitro, TRAIL-mediated apoptosis of prostate cancer cell lines can be enhanced by doxorubicin and correlates with the downregulation of the anti-apoptotic protein c-FLIP. This study evaluated the effects of doxorubicin on c-FLIP expression and tumor growth in combination with Apo2L/TRAIL in a xenograft model. In vitro cytotoxic effects of TRAIL were measured using a MTS-based viability assay. For in vivo studies, PC3 prostate carcinoma cells were grown subcutaneously in athymic nude mice and tumor growth was measured following treatment with doxorubicin and/or Apo2L/TRAIL. c-FLIP expression was determined by western blot analysis. Apoptosis in xenografts was detected using TUNEL. Statistical analysis was performed using the student t-test. In vitro experiments show that PC3 cells are partially susceptible to Apo2L/TRAIL and that susceptibility is enhanced by doxorubicin. In mice, doxorubicin did not significantly affect the growth of PC3 xenografts but reduced c-FLIP expression in tumors. Expression of c-FLIP in mouse heart was decreased only at the high doxorubicin concentration (8 mg/kg). Combination of doxorubicin with Apo2L/TRAIL resulted in more apoptotic cell death and tumor growth inhibition than Apo2L/TRAIL alone. Combination of doxorubicin and Apo2L/TRAIL is more effective in growth inhibition of PC3 xenografts in vivo than either agent alone and could present a novel treatment strategy against hormone-refractory prostate cancer. The intracellular mechanism by which doxorubicin enhances the effect of Apo2L/TRAIL on PC3 xenografts may be by reducing expression of c-FLIP

  2. Metformin-mediated growth inhibition involves suppression of the IGF-I receptor signalling pathway in human pancreatic cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karnevi, Emelie; Said, Katarzyna; Andersson, Roland; Rosendahl, Ann H

    2013-01-01

    Epidemiological studies have shown direct associations between type 2 diabetes and obesity, both conditions associated with hyperglycaemia and hyperinsulinemia, and the risk of pancreatic cancer. Up to 80% of pancreatic cancer patients present with either new-onset type 2 diabetes or impaired glucose tolerance at the time of diagnosis. Recent population studies indicate that the incidence of pancreatic cancer is reduced among diabetics taking metformin. In this study, the effects of exposure of pancreatic cancer cells to high glucose levels on their growth and response to metformin were investigated. The human pancreatic cancer cell lines AsPC-1, BxPC-3, PANC-1 and MIAPaCa-2 were grown in normal (5 mM) or high (25 mM) glucose conditions, with or without metformin. The influence by metformin on proliferation, apoptosis and the AMPK and IGF-IR signalling pathways were evaluated in vitro. Metformin significantly reduced the proliferation of pancreatic cancer cells under normal glucose conditions. Hyperglycaemia however, protected against the metformin-induced growth inhibition. The anti-proliferative actions of metformin were associated with an activation of AMP-activated protein kinase AMPK Thr172 together with an inhibition of the insulin/insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) receptor activation and downstream signalling mediators IRS-1 and phosphorylated Akt. Furthermore, exposure to metformin during normal glucose conditions led to increased apoptosis as measured by poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) cleavage. In contrast, exposure to high glucose levels promoted a more robust IGF-I response and Akt activation which correlated to stimulated AMPK Ser485 phosphorylation and impaired AMPK Thr172 phosphorylation, resulting in reduced anti-proliferative and apoptotic effects by metformin. Our results indicate that metformin has direct anti-tumour activities in pancreatic cancer cells involving AMPK Thr172 activation and suppression of the insulin/IGF signalling pathways

  3. Bithionol inhibits ovarian cancer cell growth In Vitro - studies on mechanism(s) of action

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ayyagari, Vijayalakshmi N; Brard, Laurent

    2014-01-01

    Drug resistance is a cause of ovarian cancer recurrence and low overall survival rates. There is a need for more effective treatment approaches because the development of new drug is expensive and time consuming. Alternatively, the concept of ‘drug repurposing’ is promising. We focused on Bithionol (BT), a clinically approved anti-parasitic drug as an anti-ovarian cancer drug. BT has previously been shown to inhibit solid tumor growth in several preclinical cancer models. A better understanding of the anti-tumor effects and mechanism(s) of action of BT in ovarian cancer cells is essential for further exploring its therapeutic potential against ovarian cancer. The cytotoxic effects of BT against a panel of ovarian cancer cell lines were determined by Presto Blue cell viability assay. Markers of apoptosis such as caspases 3/7, cPARP induction, nuclear condensation and mitochondrial transmembrane depolarization were assessed using microscopic, FACS and immunoblotting methods. Mechanism(s) of action of BT such as cell cycle arrest, reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, autotaxin (ATX) inhibition and effects on MAPK and NF-kB signalling were determined by FACS analysis, immunoblotting and colorimetric methods. BT caused dose dependent cytotoxicity against all ovarian cancer cell lines tested with IC 50 values ranging from 19 μM – 60 μM. Cisplatin-resistant variants of A2780 and IGROV-1 have shown almost similar IC 50 values compared to their sensitive counterparts. Apoptotic cell death was shown by expression of caspases 3/7, cPARP, loss of mitochondrial potential, nuclear condensation, and up-regulation of p38 and reduced expression of pAkt, pNF-κB, pIκBα, XIAP, bcl-2 and bcl-xl. BT treatment resulted in cell cycle arrest at G1/M phase and increased ROS generation. Treatment with ascorbic acid resulted in partial restoration of cell viability. In addition, dose and time dependent inhibition of ATX was observed. BT exhibits cytotoxic effects on various

  4. Enzalutamide inhibits androgen receptor-positive bladder cancer cell growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawahara, Takashi; Ide, Hiroki; Kashiwagi, Eiji; El-Shishtawy, Kareem A; Li, Yi; Reis, Leonardo O; Zheng, Yichun; Miyamoto, Hiroshi

    2016-10-01

    Emerging preclinical evidence suggests that androgen-mediated androgen receptor (AR) signals promote bladder cancer progression. However, little is known about the efficacy of an AR signaling inhibitor, enzalutamide, in the growth of bladder cancer cells. In this study, we compared the effects of enzalutamide and 2 other classic antiandrogens, flutamide and bicalutamide, on androgen-induced bladder cancer cell proliferation, migration, and invasion as well as tumor growth in vivo. Thiazolyl blue cell viability assay, flow cytometry, scratch wound-healing assay, transwell invasion assay, real-time polymerase chain reaction, and reporter gene assay were performed in AR-positive (e.g., UMUC3, TCCSUP, and 647V-AR) and AR-negative (e.g., UMUC3-AR-short hairpin RNA [shRNA], TCCSUP-AR-shRNA, 647V) bladder cancer lines treated with dihydrotestosterone and each AR antagonist. We also used a mouse xenograft model for bladder cancer. Dihydrotestosterone increased bladder cancer cell proliferation, migration, and invasion indicating that endogenous or exogenous AR was functional. Enzalutamide, hydroxyflutamide, and bicalutamide showed similar inhibitory effects, without significant agonist activity, on androgen-mediated cell viability/apoptosis, cell migration, and cell invasion in AR-positive lines. No significant effects of dihydrotestosterone as well as AR antagonists on the growth of AR-negative cells were seen. Correspondingly, in UMUC3 cells, these AR antagonists down-regulated androgen-induced expression of AR, matrix metalloproteinase-2, and interleukin-6. Androgen-enhanced AR-mediated transcriptional activity was also blocked by each AR antagonist exhibiting insignificant agonist activity. In UMUC3 xenograft-bearing mice, oral gavage treatment with each antiandrogen retarded tumor growth, and only enzalutamide demonstrated a statistically significant suppression compared with mock treatment. Our current data support recent observations indicating the involvement of

  5. Arctigenin induced gallbladder cancer senescence through modulating epidermal growth factor receptor pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Mingdi; Cai, Shizhong; Zuo, Bin; Gong, Wei; Tang, Zhaohui; Zhou, Di; Weng, Mingzhe; Qin, Yiyu; Wang, Shouhua; Liu, Jun; Ma, Fei; Quan, Zhiwei

    2017-05-01

    Gallbladder cancer has poor prognosis and limited therapeutic options. Arctigenin, a representative dibenzylbutyrolactone lignan, occurs in a variety of plants. However, the molecular mechanisms involved in the antitumor effect of arctigenin on gallbladder cancer have not been fully elucidated. The expression levels of epidermal growth factor receptor were examined in 100 matched pairs of gallbladder cancer tissues. A positive correlation between high epidermal growth factor receptor expression levels and poor prognosis was observed in gallbladder cancer tissues. Pharmacological inhibition or inhibition via RNA interference of epidermal growth factor receptor induced cellular senescence in gallbladder cancer cells. The antitumor effect of arctigenin on gallbladder cancer cells was primarily achieved by inducing cellular senescence. In gallbladder cancer cells treated with arctigenin, the expression level of epidermal growth factor receptor significantly decreased. The analysis of the activity of the kinases downstream of epidermal growth factor receptor revealed that the RAF-MEK-ERK signaling pathway was significantly inhibited. Furthermore, the cellular senescence induced by arctigenin could be reverted by pcDNA-epidermal growth factor receptor. Arctigenin also potently inhibited the growth of tumor xenografts, which was accompanied by the downregulation of epidermal growth factor receptor and induction of senescence. This study demonstrates arctigenin could induce cellular senescence in gallbladder cancer through the modulation of epidermal growth factor receptor pathway. These data identify epidermal growth factor receptor as a key regulator in arctigenin-induced gallbladder cancer senescence.

  6. Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor in Pancreatic Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliveira-Cunha, Melissa; Newman, William G.; Siriwardena, Ajith K.

    2011-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is the fourth leading cause of cancer related death. The difficulty in detecting pancreatic cancer at an early stage, aggressiveness and the lack of effective therapy all contribute to the high mortality. Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is a transmembrane glycoprotein, which is expressed in normal human tissues. It is a member of the tyrosine kinase family of growth factors receptors and is encoded by proto-oncogenes. Several studies have demonstrated that EGFR is over-expressed in pancreatic cancer. Over-expression correlates with more advanced disease, poor survival and the presence of metastases. Therefore, inhibition of the EGFR signaling pathway is an attractive therapeutic target. Although several combinations of EGFR inhibitors with chemotherapy demonstrate inhibition of tumor-induced angiogenesis, tumor cell apoptosis and regression in xenograft models, these benefits remain to be confirmed. Multimodality treatment incorporating EGFR-inhibition is emerging as a novel strategy in the treatment of pancreatic cancer

  7. CP-31398 inhibits the growth of p53-mutated liver cancer cells in vitro and in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Xing-Xing; Zhang, Yu-Nan; Yan, Jun-Wei; Yan, Jing-Jun; Wu, Qian; Song, Yu-Hu

    2016-01-01

    The tumor suppressor p53 is one of the most frequently mutated genes in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Previous studies demonstrated that CP-31398 restored the native conformation of mutant p53 and trans-activated p53 downstream genes in tumor cells. However, the research on the application of CP-31398 to liver cancer has not been reported. Here, we investigated the effects of CP-31398 on the phenotype of HCC cells carrying p53 mutation. The effects of CP-31398 on the characteristic of p53-mutated HCC cells were evaluated through analyzing cell cycle, cell apoptosis, cell proliferation, and the expression of p53 downstream genes. In tumor xenografts developed by PLC/PRF/5 cells, the inhibition of tumor growth by CP-31398 was analyzed through gross morphology, growth curve, and the expression of p53-related genes. Firstly, we demonstrated that CP-31398 inhibited the growth of p53-mutated liver cancer cells in a dose-dependent and p53-dependent manner. Then, further study showed that CP-31398 re-activated wild-type p53 function in p53-mutated HCC cells, which resulted in inhibitive response of cell proliferation and an induction of cell-cycle arrest and apoptosis. Finally, in vivo data confirmed that CP-31398 blocked the growth of xenografts tumors through transactivation of p53-responsive downstream molecules. Our results demonstrated that CP-31398 induced desired phenotypic change of p53-mutated HCC cells in vitro and in vivo, which revealed that CP-31398 would be developed as a therapeutic candidate for HCC carrying p53 mutation.

  8. Natural product ginsenoside 25-OCH3-PPD inhibits breast cancer growth and metastasis through down-regulating MDM2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wei; Zhang, Xu; Qin, Jiang-Jiang; Voruganti, Sukesh; Nag, Subhasree Ashok; Wang, Ming-Hai; Wang, Hui; Zhang, Ruiwen

    2012-01-01

    Although ginseng and related herbs have a long history of utility for various health benefits, their application in cancer therapy and underlying mechanisms of action are not fully understood. Our recent work has shown that 20(S)-25-methoxyl-dammarane-3β, 12β, 20-triol (25-OCH(3)-PPD), a newly identified ginsenoside from Panax notoginseng, exerts activities against a variety of cancer cells in vitro and in vivo. This study was designed to investigate its anti-breast cancer activity and the underlying mechanisms of action. We observed that 25-OCH(3)-PPD decreased the survival of breast cancer cells by induction of apoptosis and G1 phase arrest and inhibited the growth of breast cancer xenografts in vivo. We further demonstrated that, in a dose- and time-dependent manner, 25-OCH(3)-PPD inhibited MDM2 expression at both transcriptional and post-translational levels in human breast cancer cells with various p53 statuses (wild type and mutant). Moreover, 25-OCH(3)-PPD inhibited in vitro cell migration, reduced the expression of epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) markers, and prevented in vivo metastasis of breast cancer. In summary, 25-OCH(3)-PPD is a potential therapeutic and anti-metastatic agent for human breast cancer through down-regulating MDM2. Further preclinical and clinical development of this agent is warranted.

  9. Lentivirus-mediated knockdown of NLK inhibits small-cell lung cancer growth and metastasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lv MT

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Mutian Lv,1 Yaming Li,1 Xin Tian,2 Shundong Dai,3,4 Jing Sun,5 Guojiang Jin,6 Shenyi Jiang7 1Department of Nuclear Medicine, 2Molecular Oncology Laboratory of Cancer Research Institute, The First Affiliated Hospital of China Medical University, 3Department of Pathology, The First Affiliated Hospital, College of Basic Medical Sciences of China Medical University, 4Department of Pathology, Institute of Pathology and Pathophysiology, 5Department of Immunology and Biotherapy, Liaoning Cancer Hospital and Institute, 6Department of Laboratory Medicine, 7Department of Rheumatology, The First Affiliated Hospital of China Medical University, Shenyang, People’s Republic of China Abstract: Nemo-like kinase (NLK, an evolutionarily conserved serine/threonine kinase, has been recognized as a critical regulator of various cancers. In this study, we investigated the role of NLK in human small-cell lung cancer (SCLC, which is the most aggressive form of lung cancer. NLK expression was evaluated by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction in 20 paired fresh SCLC tissue samples and found to be noticeably elevated in tumor tissues. Lentivirus-mediated RNAi efficiently suppressed NLK expression in NCI-H446 cells, resulting in a significant reduction in cell viability and proliferation in vitro. Moreover, knockdown of NLK led to cell cycle arrest at the S-phase via suppression of Cyclin A, CDK2, and CDC25A, which could contribute to cell growth inhibition. Furthermore, knockdown of NLK decreased the migration of NCI-H446 cells and downregulated matrix metalloproteinase 9. Treatment with NLK short hairpin RNA significantly reduced SCLC tumor growth in vivo. In conclusion, this study suggests that NLK plays an important role in the growth and metastasis of SCLC and may serve as a potential therapeutic target for the treatment of SCLC. Keywords: NLK, SCLC, RNAi, proliferation, migration

  10. Melatonin suppresses thyroid cancer growth and overcomes radioresistance via inhibition of p65 phosphorylation and induction of ROS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhen-Wei Zou

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available Thyroid cancer is the most common endocrine carcinoma with increasing incidence worldwide and anaplastic subtypes are frequently associated with cancer related death. Radioresistance of thyroid cancer often leads to therapy failure and cancer-related death. In this study, we found that melatonin showed potent suppressive roles on NF-κB signaling via inhibition of p65 phosphorylation and generated redox stress in thyroid cancer including the anaplastic subtypes. Our data showed that melatonin significantly decreased cell viability, suppressed cell migration and induced apoptosis in thyroid cancer cell lines in vitro and impaired tumor growth in the subcutaneous mouse model in vivo. By contrast, irradiation of thyroid cancer cells resulted in elevated level of phosphorylated p65, which could be reversed by cotreatment with melatonin. Consequently, melatonin synergized with irradiation to induce cytotoxicity to thyroid cancer, especially in the undifferentiated subgroups. Taken together, our results suggest that melatonin may exert anti-tumor activities against thyroid carcinoma by inhibition of p65 phosphorylation and induction of reactive oxygen species. Radio-sensitization by melatonin may have clinical benefits in thyroid cancer. Keywords: Melatonin, Thyroid cancer, Radioresistance, p65, Reactive oxygen species

  11. Inhibition of insulin-like growth factor-1 receptor signaling enhances growth-inhibitory and proapoptotic effects of gefitinib (Iressa) in human breast cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Camirand, Anne; Zakikhani, Mahvash; Young, Fiona; Pollak, Michael

    2005-01-01

    Gefitinib (Iressa, ZD 1839, AstraZeneca) blocks the tyrosine kinase activity of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and inhibits proliferation of several human cancer cell types including breast cancer. Phase II clinical trials with gefitinib monotherapy showed an objective response of 9 to 19% in non-small-cell lung cancer patients and less than 10% for breast cancer, and phase III results have indicated no benefit of gefitinib in combination with chemotherapy over chemotherapy alone. In order to improve the antineoplastic activity of gefitinib, we investigated the effects of blocking the signalling of the insulin-like growth factor 1 receptor (IGF-1R), a tyrosine kinase with a crucial role in malignancy that is coexpressed with EGFR in most human primary breast carcinomas. AG1024 (an inhibitor of IGF-1R) was used with gefitinib for treatment of MDA468, MDA231, SK-BR-3, and MCF-7 breast cancer lines, which express similar levels of IGF-1R but varying levels of EGFR. Proliferation assays, apoptosis induction studies, and Western blot analyses were conducted with cells treated with AG1024 and gefitinib as single agents and in combination. Gefitinib and AG1024 reduced proliferation in all lines when used as single agents, and when used in combination revealed an additive-to-synergistic effect on cell growth inhibition. Flow cytometry measurements of cells stained with annexin V-propidium iodide and cells stained for caspase-3 activation indicated that adding an IGF-1R-targeting strategy to gefitinib results in higher levels of apoptosis than are achieved with gefitinib alone. Gefitinib either reduced or completely inhibited p42/p44 Erk kinase phosphorylation, depending on the cell line, while Akt phosphorylation was reduced by a combination of the two agents. Overexpression of IGF-1R in SK-BR-3 cells was sufficient to cause a marked enhancement in gefitinib resistance. These results indicate that IGF-1R signaling reduces the antiproliferative effects of

  12. Antibiotic drug tigecycline inhibited cell proliferation and induced autophagy in gastric cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tang, Chunling; Yang, Liqun; Jiang, Xiaolan; Xu, Chuan; Wang, Mei; Wang, Qinrui; Zhou, Zhansong; Xiang, Zhonghuai; Cui, Hongjuan

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Tigecycline inhibited cell growth and proliferation in human gastric cancer cells. • Tigecycline induced autophagy not apoptosis in human gastric cancer cells. • AMPK/mTOR/p70S6K pathway was activated after tigecycline treatment. • Tigecycline inhibited tumor growth in xenograft model of human gastric cancer cells. - Abstract: Tigecycline acts as a glycylcycline class bacteriostatic agent, and actively resists a series of bacteria, specifically drug fast bacteria. However, accumulating evidence showed that tetracycline and their derivatives such as doxycycline and minocycline have anti-cancer properties, which are out of their broader antimicrobial activity. We found that tigecycline dramatically inhibited gastric cancer cell proliferation and provided an evidence that tigecycline induced autophagy but not apoptosis in human gastric cancer cells. Further experiments demonstrated that AMPK pathway was activated accompanied with the suppression of its downstream targets including mTOR and p70S6K, and ultimately induced cell autophagy and inhibited cell growth. So our data suggested that tigecycline might act as a candidate agent for pre-clinical evaluation in treatment of patients suffering from gastric cancer

  13. Antibiotic drug tigecycline inhibited cell proliferation and induced autophagy in gastric cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang, Chunling; Yang, Liqun; Jiang, Xiaolan [State Key Laboratory of Silkworm Genome Biology, Southwest University, Chongqing 400716 (China); Xu, Chuan [Division of Scientific Research and Training, General Hospital of PLA Chengdu Military Area Command, Chengdu, Sichuan 610083 (China); Wang, Mei; Wang, Qinrui [State Key Laboratory of Silkworm Genome Biology, Southwest University, Chongqing 400716 (China); Zhou, Zhansong, E-mail: zhouzhans@sina.com [Institute of Urinary Surgery, Southwest Hospital, Third Military Medical University, Chongqing 400038 (China); Xiang, Zhonghuai [State Key Laboratory of Silkworm Genome Biology, Southwest University, Chongqing 400716 (China); Cui, Hongjuan, E-mail: hcui@swu.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Silkworm Genome Biology, Southwest University, Chongqing 400716 (China)

    2014-03-28

    Highlights: • Tigecycline inhibited cell growth and proliferation in human gastric cancer cells. • Tigecycline induced autophagy not apoptosis in human gastric cancer cells. • AMPK/mTOR/p70S6K pathway was activated after tigecycline treatment. • Tigecycline inhibited tumor growth in xenograft model of human gastric cancer cells. - Abstract: Tigecycline acts as a glycylcycline class bacteriostatic agent, and actively resists a series of bacteria, specifically drug fast bacteria. However, accumulating evidence showed that tetracycline and their derivatives such as doxycycline and minocycline have anti-cancer properties, which are out of their broader antimicrobial activity. We found that tigecycline dramatically inhibited gastric cancer cell proliferation and provided an evidence that tigecycline induced autophagy but not apoptosis in human gastric cancer cells. Further experiments demonstrated that AMPK pathway was activated accompanied with the suppression of its downstream targets including mTOR and p70S6K, and ultimately induced cell autophagy and inhibited cell growth. So our data suggested that tigecycline might act as a candidate agent for pre-clinical evaluation in treatment of patients suffering from gastric cancer.

  14. Inhibition of Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor and Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Receptor Phosphorylation on Tumor-Associated Endothelial Cells Leads to Treatment of Orthotopic Human Colon Cancer in Nude Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takamitsu Sasaki

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of our study was to determine whether the dual inhibition of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR and vascular endothelial growth factor receptor (VEGFR signaling pathways in tumor-associated endothelial cells can inhibit the progressive growth of human colon carcinoma in the cecum of nude mice. SW620CE2 human colon cancer cells growing in culture and orthotopically in the cecum of nude mice expressed a high level of transforming growth factor alpha (TGF-α and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF but were negative for EGFR, human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2, VEGFR. Double immunofluorescence staining revealed that tumorassociated endothelial cells expressed EGFR, VEGFR2, phosphorylated EGFR (pEGFR, phosphorylated VEGFR (pVEGFR. Treatment of mice with either 7H-pyrrolo [2,3-d]-pyrimidine lead scaffold (AEE788; an inhibitor of EGFR and VEGFR tyrosine kinase or CPT-11 as single agents significantly inhibited the growth of cecal tumors (P < .01; this decrease was even more pronounced with AEE788 combined with CPT-11 (P < .001. AEE788 alone or combined with CPT-11 also inhibited the expression of pEGFR and pVEGFR on tumor-associated endothelial cells, significantly decreased vascularization and tumor cell proliferation, increased the level of apoptosis in both tumorassociated endothelial cells and tumor cells. These data demonstrate that targeting EGFR and VEGFR signaling on tumor-associated endothelial cells provides a viable approach for the treatment of colon cancer.

  15. Inhibition of Calcium-Activated Chloride Channel ANO1/TMEM16A Suppresses Tumor Growth and Invasion in Human Lung Cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linghan Jia

    Full Text Available Lung cancer or pulmonary carcinoma is primarily derived from epithelial cells that are thin and line on the alveolar surfaces of the lung for gas exchange. ANO1/TMEM16A, initially identified from airway epithelial cells, is a member of Ca2+-activated Cl- channels (CaCCs that function to regulate epithelial secretion and cell volume for maintenance of ion and tissue homeostasis. ANO1/TMEM16A has recently been shown to be highly expressed in several epithelium originated carcinomas. However, the role of ANO1 in lung cancer remains unknown. In this study, we show that inhibition of calcium-activated chloride channel ANO1/TMEM16A suppresses tumor growth and invasion in human lung cancer. ANO1 is upregulated in different human lung cancer cell lines. Knocking-down ANO1 by small hairpin RNAs inhibited proliferation, migration and invasion of GLC82 and NCI-H520 cancel cells evaluated by CCK-8, would-healing, transwell and 3D soft agar assays. ANO1 protein is overexpressed in 77.3% cases of human lung adenocarcinoma tissues detected by immunohistochemistry. Furthermore, the tumor growth in nude mice implanted with GLC82 cells was significantly suppressed by ANO1 silencing. Taken together, our findings provide evidence that ANO1 overexpression contributes to tumor growth and invasion of lung cancer; and suppressing ANO1 overexpression may have therapeutic potential in lung cancer therapy.

  16. Effect of β,β-Dimethylacrylshikonin on Inhibition of Human Colorectal Cancer Cell Growth in Vitro and in Vivo

    OpenAIRE

    Fan, Yingying; Jin, Shaoju; He, Jun; Shao, Zhenjun; Yan, Jiao; Feng, Ting; Li, Hong

    2012-01-01

    In traditional Chinese medicine, shikonin and its derivatives, has been used in East Asia for several years for the prevention and treatment of several diseases, including cancer. We previously identified that β,β-dimethylacrylshikonin (DA) could inhibit hepatocellular carcinoma growth. In the present study, we investigated the inhibitory effects of DA on human colorectal cancer (CRC) cell line HCT-116 in vitro and in vivo. A viability assay showed th...

  17. 3',5'-Cyclic diguanylic acid (c-di-GMP) inhibits basal and growth factor-stimulated human colon cancer cell proliferation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karaolis, David K.R.; Cheng, Kunrong; Lipsky, Michael; Elnabawi, Ahmed; Catalano, Jennifer; Hyodo, Mamoru; Hayakawa, Yoshihiro; Raufman, Jean-Pierre

    2005-01-01

    The novel cyclic dinucleotide, 3',5'-cyclic diguanylic acid, cGpGp (c-di-GMP), is a naturally occurring small molecule that regulates important signaling mechanisms in prokaryotes. Recently, we showed that c-di-GMP has 'drug-like' properties and that c-di-GMP treatment might be a useful antimicrobial approach to attenuate the virulence and pathogenesis of Staphylococcus aureus and prevent or treat infection. In the present communication, we report that c-di-GMP (≤50 μM) has striking properties regarding inhibition of cancer cell proliferation in vitro. c-di-GMP inhibits both basal and growth factor (acetylcholine and epidermal growth factor)-induced cell proliferation of human colon cancer (H508) cells. Toxicity studies revealed that exposure of normal rat kidney cells and human neuroblastoma cells to c-di-GMP at biologically relevant doses showed no lethal cytotoxicity. Cyclic dinucleotides, such as c-di-GMP, represent an attractive and novel 'drug-platform technology' that can be used not only to develop new antimicrobial agents, but also to develop novel therapeutic agents to prevent or treat cancer

  18. Cathelicidin suppresses colon cancer development by inhibition of cancer associated fibroblasts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng M

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Michelle Cheng,1,* Samantha Ho,1,* Jun Hwan Yoo,1,2,* Deanna Hoang-Yen Tran,1,* Kyriaki Bakirtzi,1 Bowei Su,1 Diana Hoang-Ngoc Tran,1 Yuzu Kubota,1 Ryan Ichikawa,1 Hon Wai Koon1 1Center for Inflammatory Bowel Diseases, Division of Digestive Diseases, David Geffen School of Medicine, University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA, USA; 2Digestive Disease Center, CHA University Bundang Medical Center, Seongnam, Republic of Korea *These authors share co-first authorship Background: Cathelicidin (LL-37 in humans and mCRAMP in mice represents a family of endogenous antimicrobial and anti-inflammatory peptides. Cancer-associated fibroblasts can promote the proliferation of colon cancer cells and growth of colon cancer tumors. Methods: We examined the role of cathelicidin in the development of colon cancer, using subcutaneous human HT-29 colon-cancer-cell-derived tumor model in nude mice and azoxymethane- and dextran sulfate-mediated colon cancer model in C57BL/6 mice. We also determined the indirect antitumoral mechanism of cathelicidin via the inhibition of epithelial–mesenchymal transition (EMT of colon cancer cells and fibroblast-supported colon cancer cell proliferation. Results: Intravenous administration of cathelicidin expressing adeno-associated virus significantly reduced the size of tumors, tumor-derived collagen expression, and tumor-derived fibroblast expression in HT-29-derived subcutaneous tumors in nude mice. Enema administration of the mouse cathelicidin peptide significantly reduced the size and number of colonic tumors in azoxymethane- and dextran sulfate-treated mice without inducing apoptosis in tumors and the adjacent normal colonic tissues. Cathelicidin inhibited the collagen expression and vimentin-positive fibroblast expression in colonic tumors. Cathelicidin did not directly affect HT-29 cell viability, but did significantly reduce tumor growth factor-ß1-induced EMT of colon cancer cells. Media conditioned by the

  19. Clofibric acid, a peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha ligand, inhibits growth of human ovarian cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yokoyama, Yoshihito; Xin, Bing; Shigeto, Tatsuhiko; Umemoto, Mika; Kasai-Sakamoto, Akiko; Futagami, Masayuki; Tsuchida, Shigeki; Al-Mulla, Fahd; Mizunuma, Hideki

    2007-04-01

    Recent reports have shown that peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR)alpha ligands reduce growth of some types of malignant tumors and prevent carcinogenesis. In this study, we investigated the inhibitory effect of clofibric acid (CA), a ligand for PPARalpha on growth of ovarian malignancy, in in vivo and in vitro experiments using OVCAR-3 and DISS cells derived from human ovarian cancer and aimed to elucidate the molecular mechanism of its antitumor effect. CA treatment significantly suppressed the growth of OVCAR-3 tumors xenotransplanted s.c. and significantly prolonged the survival of mice with malignant ascites derived from DISS cells as compared with control. CA also dose-dependently inhibited cell proliferation of cultured cell lines. CA treatment increased the expression of carbonyl reductase (CR), which promotes the conversion of prostaglandin E(2) (PGE(2)) to PGF(2alpha), in implanted OVCAR-3 tumors as well as cultured cells. CA treatment decreased PGE(2) level as well as vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) amount in both of OVCAR-3-tumor and DISS-derived ascites. Reduced microvessel density and induced apoptosis were found in solid OVCAR-3 tumors treated by CA. Transfection of CR expression vector into mouse ovarian cancer cells showed significant reduction of PGE(2) level as well as VEGF expression. These results indicate that CA produces potent antitumor effects against ovarian cancer in conjunction with a reduction of angiogenesis and induction of apoptosis. We conclude that CA could be an effective agent in ovarian cancer and should be tested alone and in combination with other anticancer drugs.

  20. Inhibition of placenta growth factor with TB-403

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Dorte Lisbet; Sengeløv, Lisa

    2012-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: There is clinical evidence that therapies targeting the vascular endothelial growth factor pathway are effective in delaying cancer progression. However, tumors may be either intrinsically resistant or evolve resistance to such therapies. Hence, there is a need for new therapies...... targeting angiogenesis. AREAS COVERED: The data are obtained by searching in the PubMed database. The search terms used included antiangiogenic therapy, TB-403 (RO5323441), placenta growth factor (PlGF) and VEGFR-1 (Flt-1). We review preclinical data concerning the function and inhibition of Pl......GF and summarize data on expression of PlGF in cancer patients. Data from early-phase clinical trials of TB-403 (RO5323441), a monoclonal antibody inhibiting PlGF, are discussed. Future development strategies, therapeutic potentials and limitations of TB-403 are further evaluated. EXPERT OPINION: There are some...

  1. Allosteric inhibition of SHP2 phosphatase inhibits cancers driven by receptor tyrosine kinases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Ying-Nan P.; LaMarche, Matthew J.; Chan, Ho Man; Fekkes, Peter; Garcia-Fortanet, Jorge; Acker, Michael G.; Antonakos, Brandon; Chen, Christine Hiu-Tung; Chen, Zhouliang; Cooke, Vesselina G.; Dobson, Jason R.; Deng, Zhan; Fei, Feng; Firestone, Brant; Fodor, Michelle; Fridrich, Cary; Gao, Hui; Grunenfelder, Denise; Hao, Huai-Xiang; Jacob, Jaison; Ho, Samuel; Hsiao, Kathy; Kang, Zhao B.; Karki, Rajesh; Kato, Mitsunori; Larrow, Jay; La Bonte, Laura R.; Lenoir, Francois; Liu, Gang; Liu, Shumei; Majumdar, Dyuti; Meyer, Matthew J.; Palermo, Mark; Perez, Lawrence; Pu, Minying; Price, Edmund; Quinn, Christopher; Shakya, Subarna; Shultz, Michael D.; Slisz, Joanna; Venkatesan, Kavitha; Wang, Ping; Warmuth, Markus; Williams, Sarah; Yang, Guizhi; Yuan, Jing; Zhang, Ji-Hu; Zhu, Ping; Ramsey, Timothy; Keen, Nicholas J.; Sellers, William R.; Stams, Travis; Fortin , Pascal D. (Novartis)

    2016-06-29

    The non-receptor protein tyrosine phosphatase SHP2, encoded by PTPN11, has an important role in signal transduction downstream of growth factor receptor signalling and was the first reported oncogenic tyrosine phosphatase1. Activating mutations of SHP2 have been associated with developmental pathologies such as Noonan syndrome and are found in multiple cancer types, including leukaemia, lung and breast cancer and neuroblastoma1, 2, 3, 4, 5. SHP2 is ubiquitously expressed and regulates cell survival and proliferation primarily through activation of the RAS–ERK signalling pathway2, 3. It is also a key mediator of the programmed cell death 1 (PD-1) and B- and T-lymphocyte attenuator (BTLA) immune checkpoint pathways6, 7. Reduction of SHP2 activity suppresses tumour cell growth and is a potential target of cancer therapy8, 9. Here we report the discovery of a highly potent (IC50 = 0.071 μM), selective and orally bioavailable small-molecule SHP2 inhibitor, SHP099, that stabilizes SHP2 in an auto-inhibited conformation. SHP099 concurrently binds to the interface of the N-terminal SH2, C-terminal SH2, and protein tyrosine phosphatase domains, thus inhibiting SHP2 activity through an allosteric mechanism. SHP099 suppresses RAS–ERK signalling to inhibit the proliferation of receptor-tyrosine-kinase-driven human cancer cells in vitro and is efficacious in mouse tumour xenograft models. Together, these data demonstrate that pharmacological inhibition of SHP2 is a valid therapeutic approach for the treatment of cancers.

  2. Isoliquiritigenin induces growth inhibition and apoptosis through downregulating arachidonic acid metabolic network and the deactivation of PI3K/Akt in human breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Ying; Zhao, Haixia; Wang, Yuzhong; Zheng, Hao; Yu, Wei; Chai, Hongyan; Zhang, Jing; Falck, John R.; Guo, Austin M.; Yue, Jiang; Peng, Renxiu; Yang, Jing

    2013-01-01

    Arachidonic acid (AA)-derived eicosanoids and its downstream pathways have been demonstrated to play crucial roles in growth control of breast cancer. Here, we demonstrate that isoliquiritigenin, a flavonoid phytoestrogen from licorice, induces growth inhibition and apoptosis through downregulating multiple key enzymes in AA metabolic network and the deactivation of PI3K/Akt in human breast cancer. Isoliquiritigenin diminished cell viability, 5-bromo-2′-deoxyuridine (BrdU) incorporation, and clonogenic ability in both MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231cells, and induced apoptosis as evidenced by an analysis of cytoplasmic histone-associated DNA fragmentation, flow cytometry and hoechst staining. Furthermore, isoliquiritigenin inhibited mRNA expression of multiple forms of AA-metabolizing enzymes, including phospholipase A2 (PLA2), cyclooxygenases (COX)-2 and cytochrome P450 (CYP) 4A, and decreased secretion of their products, including prostaglandin E 2 (PGE 2 ) and 20-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid (20-HETE), without affecting COX-1, 5-lipoxygenase (5-LOX), 5-lipoxygenase activating protein (FLAP), and leukotriene B 4 (LTB 4 ). In addition, it downregulated the levels of phospho-PI3K, phospho-PDK (Ser 241 ), phospho-Akt (Thr 308 ), phospho-Bad (Ser 136 ), and Bcl-x L expression, thereby activating caspase cascades and eventually cleaving poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP). Conversely, the addition of exogenous eicosanoids, including PGE 2 , LTB 4 and a 20-HETE analog (WIT003), and caspase inhibitors, or overexpression of constitutively active Akt reversed isoliquiritigenin-induced apoptosis. Notably, isoliquiritigenin induced growth inhibition and apoptosis of MDA-MB-231 human breast cancer xenografts in nude mice, together with decreased intratumoral levels of eicosanoids and phospho-Akt (Thr 308 ). Collectively, these data suggest that isoliquiritigenin induces growth inhibition and apoptosis through downregulating AA metabolic network and the deactivation of PI3K/Akt in

  3. Components in aqueous Hibiscus rosa-sinensis flower extract inhibit in vitro melanoma cell growth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karina H. Goldberg

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Skin cancer is extremely common, and melanoma causes about 80% of skin cancer deaths. In fact, melanoma kills over 50 thousand people around the world each year, and these numbers are rising. Clearly, standard treatments are not effectively treating melanoma, and alternative therapies are needed to address this problem. Hibiscus tea has been noted to have medicinal properties, including anticancer effects. Extracts from Hibiscus have been shown to inhibit the growth of a variety of cancer cells. In particular, recent studies found that polyphenols extracted from Hibiscus sabdariffa by organic solvents can inhibit melanoma cell growth. However, effects of aqueous extracts from Hibiscus rosa-sinesis flowers, which are commonly used to make traditional medicinal beverages, have not been examined on melanoma cells. Here, we report that aqueous H. rosa-sinesis flower extract contains compounds that inhibit melanoma cell growth in a dose dependent manner at concentrations that did not affect the growth of nontransformed cells. In addition, these extracts contain low molecular weight growth inhibitory compounds below 3 kD in size that combine with larger compounds to more effectively inhibit melanoma cell growth. Future work should identify these compounds, and evaluate their potential to prevent and treat melanoma and other cancers.

  4. Inhibition of glycolysis and growth of colon cancer cells by 3-(3-pyridinyl-1-(4-pyridinyl-2-propen-1-one (3PO in combination with butyrate, 2-deoxy glucose, 3-bromopyruvate or biguanides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lea MA

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Glycolysis shows a positive correlation with growth of human colon cancer cells. PFKFB3 is an important enzyme regulating glycolysis in many tumor cells and presents a target for cancer chemotherapy. We studied the action of an inhibitor of PFKFB3, 3-(3-pyridinyl-1-(4-pyridinyl-2-propen-1-one (3PO, as a single agent and in combination with other molecules that affect glycolysis. Materials and methods: Effects on growth were studied in four human colon cancer cell lines. Glucose metabolism was monitored by uptake from the incubation medium and lactic acid production was judged by acidification of the medium. Induction of alkaline phosphatase served as a marker of differentiation. Results: Growth of colon cancer cells was inhibited by 3PO and butyrate but only butyrate induced activation of alkaline phosphatase. Although metformin and phenformin can increase glucose metabolism, they inhibit colon cancer cell growth and can exert additive inhibitory effects in combination with 3PO. Additive growth inhibitory effects with 3PO were also observed with two compounds that inhibit glycolysis: 2-deoxyglucose and 3-bromopyruvate. Conclusion: 3PO was an inhibitor of growth of colon cancer cells and may be a useful agent in combination with other drugs that inhibit colon cancer cell proliferation.

  5. Methylferulate from Tamarix aucheriana inhibits growth and enhances chemosensitivity of human colorectal cancer cells: possible mechanism of action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abaza, Mohamed Salah I; Afzal, Mohammad; Al-Attiyah, Raja'a J; Guleri, Radhika

    2016-10-01

    Natural products are valuable sources for anticancer agents. In the present study, methylferulate (MF) was identified for the first time from Tamarix aucheriana. Spectral data were used for identification of MF. The potential of MF to control cell growth, cell cycle, apoptosis, generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), cancer cell invasion, nuclear factor kappa B (NFkB) DNA-binding activity and proteasomal activities, as well as the enhancement of chemosensitivity in human colorectal cancer cells, were evaluated. The possible molecular mechanism of MF's therapeutic efficacy was also assessed. Column chromatography and spectral data were used for isolation and identification of MF. MTT, immunofluorescence, flow cytometry, in vitro invasion, fluoremetry, EIA and Real time qPCR were used to measure antiproliferative, chemo-sensitizing effects and other biochemical parameters. MF showed a dose-dependent anti-proliferative effect on colorectal cancer cells (IC 50  = 1.73 - 1.9 mM) with a nonsignificant cytotoxicity toward normal human fibroblast. Colony formation inhibition (P ≤ 0.001, 0.0001) confirmed the growth inhibition by MF. MF arrested cell cycle progression in the S and G2/M phases; induced apoptosis and ROS generation; and inhibited NF-kB DNA-binding activity, proteasomal activities and cell invasion in colorectal cancer cells. MF up-regulated cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors (p19 INK4D , p21 WAF1/CIP1 , p27 KIP1 ), pro-apoptotic gene expression (Bax, Bad, Apaf1, Bid, Bim, Smac) and caspases (caspase 2, 3, 6, 7, 8, 9). Moreover, MF down-regulated cyclin-dependent kinases (Cdk1, Cdk2) and anti-apoptotic gene expression (c-IAP-1, c-IAP-2, Bcl2,FLIP). In addition, MF differentially potentiated the sensitivity of colorectal cancer cells to standard chemotherapeutic drugs. MF showed a multifaceted anti-proliferative and chemosensitizing effects. These results suggest the chemotherapeutic and co-adjuvant potential of MF.

  6. Inhibition of Curcumin on ZAKα Activity Resultant in Apoptosis and Anchorage-Independent Growth in Cancer Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jin-Sun; Wang, Tsu-Shing; Lin, Ming Cheng; Lin, Wei-Wen; Yang, Jaw-Ji

    2017-10-31

    Curcumin, a popular yellow pigment of the dietary spice turmeric, has been reported to inhibit cell growth and to induce apoptosis in a wide variety of cancer cells. Although numerous studies have investigated anticancer effects of curcumin, the precise molecular mechanism of action remains unidentified. Whereas curcumin mediates cell survival and apoptosis through mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) signaling cascades, its impact on the upstream regulation of MAPK is unclear. The leucine-zipper and sterile-α motif kinase alpha (ZAKα), a mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase kinase (MAP3K), activates the c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) and NF-κB pathway. This paper investigated the prospective involvement of ZAKα in curcumin-induced effects on cancer cells. Our results suggest that the antitumor activity of curcumin is mediated via a mechanism involving inhibition of ZAKα activity.

  7. Methylselenol, a selenium metabolite, modulates p53 pathway and inhibits the growth of colon cancer xenografts in Balb/c mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Huawei; Cheng, Wen-Hsing; Johnson, Luann K

    2013-05-01

    It is has been hypothesized that methylselenol is a critical selenium metabolite for anticancer activity in vivo. In this study, we used a protein array which contained 112 different antibodies known to be involved in the p53 pathway to investigate the molecular targets of methylselenol in human HCT116 colon cancer cells. The array analysis indicated that methylselenol exposure changed the expression of 11 protein targets related to the regulation of cell cycle and apoptosis. Subsequently, we confirmed these proteins with the Western blotting approach, and found that methylselenol increased the expression of GADD 153 and p21 but reduced the level of c-Myc, E2F1 and Phos p38 MAP kinase. Similar to our previous report on human HCT116 colon cancer cells, methylselenol also inhibited cell growth and led to an increase in G1 and G2 fractions with a concomitant drop in S-phase in mouse colon cancer MC26 cells. When the MC26 cells were transplanted to their immune-competent Balb/c mice, methylselenol-treated MC26 cells had significantly less tumor growth potential than that of untreated MC26 cells. Taken together, our data suggest that methylselenol modulates the expression of key genes related to cell cycle and apoptosis and inhibits colon cancer cell proliferation and tumor growth. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  8. 3-bromopyruvate and sodium citrate target glycolysis, suppress survivin, and induce mitochondrial-mediated apoptosis in gastric cancer cells and inhibit gastric orthotopic transplantation tumor growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ting-An; Zhang, Xiao-Dong; Guo, Xing-Yu; Xian, Shu-Lin; Lu, Yun-Fei

    2016-03-01

    Glycolysis is the primary method utilized by cancer cells to produce the energy (adenosine triphosphate, ATP) required for cell proliferation. Therefore, inhibition of glycolysis may inhibit tumor growth. We previously found that both 3-bromopyruvate (3-BrPA) and sodium citrate (SCT) can inhibit glycolysis in vitro; however, the underlying inhibitory mechanisms remain unclear. In the present study, we used a human gastric cancer cell line (SGC-7901) and an orthotopic transplantation tumor model in nude mice to explore the specific mechanisms of 3-BrPA and SCT. We found that both 3-BrPA and SCT effectively suppressed cancer cell proliferation, arrested the cell cycle, induced apoptosis, and decreased the production of lactate and ATP. 3-BrPA significantly reduced the glycolytic enzyme hexokinase activity, while SCT selectively inhibited phosphofructokinase-1 activity. Furthermore, 3-BrPA and SCT upregulated the expression of pro-apoptotic proteins (Bax, cytochrome c, and cleaved caspase-3) and downregulated the expression of anti-apoptotic proteins (Bcl-2 and survivin). Finally, our animal model of gastric cancer indicated that intraperitoneal injection of 3-BrPA and SCT suppressed orthotopic transplantation tumor growth and induced tumor apoptosis. Taken together, these results suggest that 3-BrPA and SCT selectively suppress glycolytic enzymes, decrease ATP production, induce mitochondrial-mediated apoptosis, downregulate survivin, and inhibit tumor growth. Moreover, an intraperitoneal injection is an effective form of administration of 3-BrPA and SCT.

  9. Pectic polysaccharide from corn (Zea mays L.) effectively inhibited multi-step mediated cancer cell growth and metastasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayaram, Smitha; Kapoor, Sabeeta; Dharmesh, Shylaja M

    2015-06-25

    Corn pectic polysaccharide (COPP) inhibited galectin-3 mediated hemagglutination at Minimum Inhibitory Concentration (MIC) of 4.08 μg/mL as opposed to citrus pectin (25 μg/mL), a well known galectin-3 inhibitor and lactose (4.16 μg/mL)--sugar specific to galectin-3. COPP effectively (72%) inhibited invasion and metastasis in experimental animals. In vivo results were substantiated by modulation of cancer specific markers such as galectin-3, which is a key molecule for initiation of metastatic cascade, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) that enhances angiogenesis, matrix metalloproteinases 2 and 9 that are required for invasion, NF-κB, a transcription factor for proliferative potency of tumor cells and a phosphoglucoisomerase (PGI), the activity of which favors cancer cell growth. Structural characterization studies indicate the active component (relatively less acidic, 0.05 M ammonium carbonate, 160 kDa fraction) which showed antimetastatic potency in vitro with MIC of 0.09 μg/mL, and ∼ 45 fold increase in the activity when compared to that of COPP. Gas liquid chromatographic analysis indicated the presence of rhamnose (1%), arabinose (20%), xylose (3%), mannose (4%), galactose (54%) and uronic acid (10%) in different proportions. However, correlative data attributed galectin-3 inhibitory activity to enhanced levels of arabinose and galactose. FTIR, HPLC and NMR spectroscopic analysis further highlights that COPP is an arabinogalactan with methyl/ethyl esters. It is therefore suggested that the blockade of galectin-3 mediated lung metastasis appears to be a result of an inhibition of mixed functions induced during metastasis. The data signifies the importance of dietary carbohydrate as cancer-preventive agent. Although pectin digestibility and absorption are issues of concern, promising in vivo data provides evidence for the cancer preventive property of corn. The present study reveals for the first time a new component of corn, i.e.,--corn pectin

  10. Short-hairpin RNA-mediated Heat shock protein 90 gene silencing inhibits human breast cancer cell growth in vitro and in vivo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zuo, Keqiang; Li, Dan; Pulli, Benjamin; Yu, Fei; Cai, Haidong; Yuan, Xueyu; Zhang, Xiaoping; Lv, Zhongwei

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Hsp90 is over-expressed in human breast cancer. ► The shRNA-mediated gene silencing of Hsp90 resulted in inhibition of cell growth. ► Akt and NF-kB were down-regulation after transfection due to Hsp90 silencing. ► The tumor growth ratio was decline due to Hsp90 silencing. ► The PCNA expression was down-regulation due to Hsp90 silencing. -- Abstract: Hsp90 interacts with proteins that mediate signaling pathways involved in the regulation of essential processes such as proliferation, cell cycle control, angiogenesis and apoptosis. Hsp90 inhibition is therefore an attractive strategy for blocking abnormal pathways that are crucial for cancer cell growth. In the present study, the role of Hsp90 in human breast cancer MCF-7 cells was examined by stably silencing Hsp90 gene expression with an Hsp90-silencing vector (Hsp90-shRNA). RT-PCR and Western blot analyses showed that Hsp90-shRNA specifically and markedly down-regulated Hsp90 mRNA and protein expression. NF-kB and Akt protein levels were down-regulated in Hsp90-shRNA transfected cells, indicating that Hsp90 knockout caused a reduction of survival factors and induced apoptosis. Treatment with Hsp90-shRNA significantly increased apoptotic cell death and caused cell cycle arrest in the G1/S phase in MCF-7 cells, as shown by flow cytometry. Silencing of Hsp90 also reduced cell viability, as determined by MTT assay. In vivo experiments showed that MCF-7 cells stably transfected with Hsp90-shRNA grew slowly in nude mice as compared with control groups. In summary, the Hsp90-shRNA specifically silenced the Hsp90 gene, and inhibited MCF-7 cell growth in vitro and in vivo. Possible molecular mechanisms underlying the effects of Hsp90-shRNA include the degradation of Hsp90 breast cancer-related client proteins, the inhibition of survival signals and the upregulation of apoptotic pathways. shRNA-mediated interference may have potential therapeutic utility in human breast cancer.

  11. New symmetrically esterified m-bromobenzyl non-aminobisphosphonates inhibited breast cancer growth and metastases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed Abdelkarim

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Although there was growing evidence in the potential use of Bisphosphonates (BPs in cancer therapy, their strong osseous affinities that contrast their poor soft tissue uptake limited their use. Here, we developed a new strategy to overcome BPs hydrophilicity by masking the phosphonic acid through organic protecting groups and introducing hydrophobic functions in the side chain. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We synthesized non-nitrogen BPs (non N-BPs containing bromobenzyl group (BP7033Br in their side chain that were symmetrically esterified with hydrophobic 4-methoxphenyl (BP7033BrALK and assessed their effects on breast cancer estrogen-responsive cells (T47D, MCF-7 as well as on non responsive ones (SKBR3, MDA-MB-231 and its highly metastatic derived D3H2LN subclone. BP7033Br ALK was more efficient in inhibiting tumor cell proliferation, migration and survival when compared to BP7033Br. Although both compounds inhibited tumor growth without side effects, only BP7033Br ALK abrogated tumor angiogenesis and D3H2LN cells-induced metastases formation. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: Taken together these data suggest the potential therapeutic use of this new class of esterified Bisphosphonates (BPs in the treatment of tumor progression and metastasis without toxic adverse effects.

  12. Inhibition of adipose triglyceride lipase (ATGL) by the putative tumor suppressor G0S2 or a small molecule inhibitor attenuates the growth of cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zagani, Rachid; El-Assaad, Wissal; Gamache, Isabelle; Teodoro, Jose G

    2015-09-29

    The G0/G1 switch gene 2 (G0S2) is methylated and silenced in a wide range of human cancers. The protein encoded by G0S2 is an endogenous inhibitor of lipid catabolism that directly binds adipose triglyceride lipase (ATGL). ATGL is the rate-limiting step in triglyceride metabolism. Although the G0S2 gene is silenced in cancer, the impact of ATGL in the growth and survival of cancer cells has never been addressed. Here we show that ectopic expression of G0S2 in non-small cell lung carcinomas (NSCL) inhibits triglyceride catabolism and results in lower cell growth. Similarly, knockdown of ATGL increased triglyceride levels, attenuated cell growth and promoted apoptosis. Conversely, knockdown of endogenous G0S2 enhanced the growth and invasiveness of cancer cells. G0S2 is strongly induced in acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) cells in response to all trans retinoic acid (ATRA) and we show that inhibition of ATGL in these cells by G0S2 is required for efficacy of ATRA treatment. Our data uncover a novel tumor suppressor mechanism by which G0S2 directly inhibits activity of a key intracellular lipase. Our results suggest that elevated ATGL activity may be a general property of many cancer types and potentially represents a novel target for chemotherapy.

  13. DSGOST inhibits tumor growth by blocking VEGF/VEGFR2-activated angiogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Hyeong Sim; Lee, Kangwook; Kim, Min Kyoung; Lee, Kang Min; Shin, Yong Cheol; Cho, Sung-Gook; Ko, Seong-Gyu

    2016-04-19

    Tumor growth requires a process called angiogenesis, a new blood vessel formation from pre-existing vessels, as newly formed vessels provide tumor cells with oxygen and nutrition. Danggui-Sayuk-Ga-Osuyu-Saenggang-Tang (DSGOST), one of traditional Chinese medicines, has been widely used in treatment of vessel diseases including Raynaud's syndrome in Northeast Asian countries including China, Japan and Korea. Therefore, we hypothesized that DSGOST might inhibit tumor growth by targeting newly formed vessels on the basis of its historical prescription. Here, we demonstrate that DSGOST inhibits tumor growth by inhibiting VEGF-induced angiogenesis. DSGOST inhibited VEGF-induced angiogenic abilities of endothelial cells in vitro and in vivo, which resulted from its inhibition of VEGF/VEGFR2 interaction. Furthermore, DSGOST attenuated pancreatic tumor growth in vivo by reducing angiogenic vessel numbers, while not affecting pancreatic tumor cell viability. Thus, our data conclude that DSGOST inhibits VEGF-induced tumor angiogenesis, suggesting a new indication for DSGOST in treatment of cancer.

  14. Targeting S100P Inhibits Colon Cancer Growth and Metastasis by Lentivirus-Mediated RNA Interference and Proteomic Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Lei; Lai, Yiu-Kay; Zhang, Jinfang; Wang, Hua; Lin, Marie CM; He, Ming-liang; Kung, Hsiang-fu

    2011-01-01

    S100P was recently found to be overexpressed in a variety of cancers and is considered a potential target for cancer therapy, but the functional role or mechanism of action of S100P in colon cancer is not fully understood. In the present study, we knocked down the gene expression of S100P in colon cancer cells using lentivirus-mediated RNA interference. This step resulted in significant inhibition of cancer cell growth, migration and invasion in vitro and tumor growth and liver metastasis in vivo. Moreover, S100P downstream target proteins were identified by proteomic analysis in colon cancer DLD-1 cells with deletion of S100P. Knockdown of S100P led to downregulation of thioredoxin 1 and β-tubulin and upregulation of Rho guanosine diphosphate (GDP) dissociation inhibitor α (RhoGDIA), all potential therapeutic targets in cancer. Taken together, these findings suggest that S100P plays an important role in colon tumorigenesis and metastasis, and the comprehensive and comparative analyses of proteins associated with S100P could contribute to understanding the downstream signal cascade of S100P, leading to tumorigenesis and metastasis. PMID:21327297

  15. The addition of calcitriol or its synthetic analog EB1089 to lapatinib and neratinib treatment inhibits cell growth and promotes apoptosis in breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segovia-Mendoza, Mariana; Díaz, Lorenza; Prado-Garcia, Heriberto; Reginato, Mauricio J; Larrea, Fernando; García-Becerra, Rocío

    2017-01-01

    In breast cancer the use of small molecule inhibitors of tyrosine kinase activity of the ERBB family members improves survival thus represents a valuable therapeutic strategy. The addition of calcitriol, the most active metabolite of vitamin D, or some of its analogs, to conventional anticancer drugs, including tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs), has shown an increased effect on the inhibition of cancer cell growth. In this work, we have evaluated the effects and the mechanism of action of the combination of calcitriol or its analog EB1089 with lapatinib or neratinib on EGFR and/or HER2 positive breast cancer cell lines. Lapatinib, neratinib, calcitriol and EB1089 inhibited breast cancer cell proliferation in a concentration-dependent manner. Addition of calcitriol or EB1089 to TKIs treatment induced more effective inhibiting effect on cell growth and AKT and MAPK phosphorylation than all compounds alone. The combined treatments incremented also the expression of active caspase 3 and induced cell death in two and three-dimensional cell culture and significantly inhibited anchorage-independent colony formation. Our results suggest that the addition of calcitriol or its analog EB1089 to conventional targeted therapies, including lapatinib or neratinib might be of benefit to patients with breast cancer, particularly those with an EGFR and/or HER2 positive phenotype.

  16. Resveratrol induces growth inhibition and apoptosis in metastatic breast cancer cells via de novo ceramide signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scarlatti, Francesca; Sala, Giusy; Somenzi, Giulia; Signorelli, Paola; Sacchi, Nicoletta; Ghidoni, Riccardo

    2003-12-01

    Resveratrol (3,4',5-trans-trihydroxystilbene), a phytoalexin present in grapes and red wine, is emerging as a natural compound with potential anticancer properties. Here we show that resveratrol can induce growth inhibition and apoptosis in MDA-MB-231, a highly invasive and metastatic breast cancer cell line, in concomitance with a dramatic endogenous increase of growth inhibitory/proapoptotic ceramide. We found that accumulation of ceramide derives from both de novo ceramide synthesis and sphingomyelin hydrolysis. More specifically we demonstrated that ceramide accumulation induced by resveratrol can be traced to the activation of serine palmitoyltransferase (SPT), the key enzyme of de novo ceramide biosynthetic pathway, and neutral sphingomyelinase (nSMase), a main enzyme involved in the sphingomyelin/ceramide pathway. However, by using specific inhibitors of SPT, myriocin and L-cycloserine, and nSMase, gluthatione and manumycin, we found that only the SPT inhibitors could counteract the biological effects induced by resveratrol. Thus, resveratrol seems to exert its growth inhibitory/apoptotic effect on the metastatic breast cancer cell line MDA-MB-231 by activating the de novo ceramide synthesis pathway.

  17. Nexrutine Inhibits Cancer Cell Growth as a Consequence of Mitochondrial Damage and Mitophagy

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    Xiang Wu

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Nexrutine is an herbal extract of Phellodendron amurense and has been used as nutrient supplement in China as well as America. Potential protection effect of Nexrutine has been reported. Methods: To investigate the mechanism of Nexrutine, we used the HeLa, U2OS and HCT116 as a model. Based on the acidification of cell culture media, we examined the lactate, mitochondria damage as well as mitophagy status by corresponding assay. Results: Our data suggest that Nexrutine alters the cellular glucose metabolism to promote lactate production. This effect is caused by mitochondrial damage, not an alteration to lactate dehydrogenase activity. As a result of the mitochondrial damage, cell proliferation was inhibited and was associated with an elevation in p21/p27 proteins, which are both important cell cycle inhibitors. As another consequence of the mitochondrial damage, mitophagy was highly activated in Nexrutine-treated cells in a dose-dependent manner. When the autophagy pathway was blocked by siRNAs against BECN1 or ATG7, the growth inhibition caused by Nexrutine was reversed. Conclusion: Our study revealed that autophagy plays an important role in the inhibition of cancer cell proliferation by Nexrutine.

  18. Inhibition of growth and metastasis of human gastric cancer implanted in nude mice by d-limonene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Xiao-Guang; Zhan, Li-Bin; Feng, Bing-An; Qu, Ming-Yang; Yu, Li-Hua; Xie, Ji-Hong

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the effects and mechanism of d-limonene on the growth and metastasis of gastric cancer in vivo. METHODS: Metastatic model simulating human gastric cancer was established by orthotopic implantation of histologically intact human tumor tissue into gastric wall of nude mice. One percent d-limonene was orally administered at dose of 15 ml/kg every other day for seven weeks. Eight weeks after implantation, tumor weight, inhibition rate, apoptotic index (AI), microvessel density (MVD), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), variation of ultrastructure, and the presence of metastasis were evaluated, respectively, after the mice were sacrificed. RESULTS: The tumor weight was significantly reduced in 5-FU group (2.55 ± 0.28 g), d-limonene group (1.49 ± 0.09 g) and combined treatment group (1.48 ± 0.21 g) compared with the control group(2.73 ± 0.23 g, P limonene group, combined treatment group, the inhibition rates were 2.60%, 47.58% and 46.84% and 0, respectively; AI was (3.31 ± 0.33)%, (8.26 ± 1.21)%, (20.99 ± 1.84)% and (19.34 ± 2.19)%, respectively; MVD was (8.64 ± 2.81), (16.77 ± 1.39), (5.32 ± 4.26) and (5.86 ± 2.27), respectively; VEGF expression was (45.77 ± 4.79), (41.34 ± 5.41), (29.71 ± 8.92) and (28.24 ± 8.55), respectively. The incidences of peritoneal metastasis also decreased significantly in 5-FU group(77.8%), d-limonene group (20.0%) and combined group (22.2%) compared with control group (100%) versus 62.5%, 30% and 22.2%) (P limonene group and combined group than that in control group (87.5% vs 55.5%, 20.0% and 22.2% respectively) (P limonene group and combined group was 25.0%, 22.2%, 0, 0, respectively and 12.5%, 11.1% 0, 0, with respect to the metastasis rate to other organs. CONCLUSION: d-limonene has antiangiogenic and proapoptotic effects on gastric cancer, thereby inhibits tumor growth and metastasis. Combination of d-limonene with cytotoxic agents may be more effective. PMID:15237454

  19. Terrestrosin D, a steroidal saponin from Tribulus terrestris L., inhibits growth and angiogenesis of human prostate cancer in vitro and in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Shihu; Fukuhara, Hideo; Chen, Guang; Kawada, Chiaki; Kurabayashi, Atsushi; Furihata, Mutsuo; Inoue, Keiji; Shuin, Taro

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate whether terrestrosin D (TED) inhibits the progression of castration-resistant prostate cancer and consider its mechanism. Cell cycle, mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm) and apoptosis were determined by flow cytometry. Caspase-3 activity and vascular endothelial growth factor secretion were detected by a caspase-3 assay and human vascular endothelial growth factor kit, respectively. A PC-3 xenograft mouse model was used to evaluate the anticancer effect of TED in vivo. In vitro, TED strongly suppressed the growth of prostate cancer cells and endothelial cells in a dose-dependent manner. TED induced cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in PC-3 cells and human umbilical vascular endothelial cells (HUVECs). TED-induced apoptosis did not involve the caspase pathway. TED also decreased ΔΨm in PC-3 cells and HUVECs. In vivo, TED significantly suppressed tumor growth in nude mice bearing PC-3 cells, without any overt toxicity. Immunohistochemical analysis showed TED induced apoptotic cell death and inhibited angiogenesis in xenograft tumor cells. Cell cycle arrest and induction of apoptosis in cancer cells and endothelial cells might be plausible mechanisms of actions for the observed antitumor and antiangiogenic activities of TED. © 2014 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  20. Estrogen receptor-α36 is involved in epigallocatechin-3-gallate induced growth inhibition of ER-negative breast cancer stem/progenitor cells

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    Xiaohua Pan

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG is a type of catechin extracted from green tea, which is reported to have anticancer effects. EGCG is also reported to inhibit the cancer stem/progenitor cells in several estrogen receptor (ER-negative breast cancer cell lines, such as SUM-149, SUM-190 and MDA-MB-231. And all these cancer cells are highly expressed a new variant of ER-α, ER-α36. The aim of our present study is to determine the role of ER-α36 in the growth inhibitory activity of EGCG towards ER-negative breast cancer MDA-MB-231 and MDA-MB-436 cells. We found that EGCG potently inhibited the growth of cancer stem/progenitor cells in MDA-MB-231 and MDA-MB-436 cells, and also reduced the expression of ER-α36 in these cells. However, in ER-α36 knocked-down MDA-MB-231 and MDA-MB-436 cells, no significant inhibitory effects of EGCG on cancer stem/progenitor cells were observed. We also found that down-regulation of ER-α36 expression was in accordance with down-regulation of EGFR, which further verified a loop between ER-α36 and EGFR. Thus, our study indicated ER-α36 is involved in EGCG's inhibitory effects on ER-negative breast cancer stem/progenitor cells, which supports future preclinical and clinical evaluation of EGCG as a therapeutic option for ER-α36 positive breast cancer.

  1. Fluoxetine regulates cell growth inhibition of interferon-α.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yu-Min; Yu, Bu-Chin; Chiu, Wen-Tai; Sun, Hung-Yu; Chien, Yu-Chieh; Su, Hui-Chen; Yen, Shu-Yang; Lai, Hsin-Wen; Bai, Chyi-Huey; Young, Kung-Chia; Tsao, Chiung-Wen

    2016-10-01

    Fluoxetine, a well-known anti-depression agent, may act as a chemosensitizer to assist and promote cancer therapy. However, how fluoxetine regulates cellular signaling to enhance cellular responses against tumor cell growth remains unclear. In the present study, addition of fluoxetine promoted growth inhibition of interferon-alpha (IFN-α) in human bladder carcinoma cells but not in normal uroepithelial cells through lessening the IFN-α-induced apoptosis but switching to cause G1 arrest, and maintaining the IFN-α-mediated reduction in G2/M phase. Activations and signal transducer and transactivator (STAT)-1 and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPAR-α) were involved in this process. Chemical inhibitions of STAT-1 or PPAR-α partially rescued bladder carcinoma cells from IFN-α-mediated growth inhibition via blockades of G1 arrest, cyclin D1 reduction, p53 downregulation and p27 upregulation in the presence of fluoxetine. However, the functions of both proteins were not involved in the control of fluoxetine over apoptosis and maintained the declined G2/M phase of IFN-α. These results indicated that activation of PPAR-α and STAT-1 participated, at least in part, in growth inhibition of IFN-α in the presence of fluoxetine.

  2. Andrographolide inhibits hypoxia-inducible factor-1 through phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/AKT pathway and suppresses breast cancer growth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li J

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Jie Li,1 Chao Zhang,1 Hongchuan Jiang,1 Jiao Cheng21Department of General Surgery, 2Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Beijing Chao-Yang Hospital, Beijing, People’s Republic of ChinaAbstract: Hypoxia-inducible factor-1 (HIF-1 is a master regulator of the transcriptional response to hypoxia. HIF-1α is one of the most compelling anticancer targets. Andrographolide (Andro was newly identified to inhibit HIF-1 in T47D cells (a half maximal effective concentration [EC50] of 1.03×10-7 mol/L, by a dual-luciferase reporter assay. It suppressed HIF-1α protein and gene accumulation, which was dependent on the inhibition of upstream phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K/AKT pathway. It also abrogated the expression of HIF-1 target vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF gene and protein. Further, Andro inhibited T47D and MDA-MB-231 cell proliferation and colony formation. In addition, it exhibited significant in vivo efficacy and antitumor potential against the MDA-MB-231 xenograft in nude mice. In conclusion, these results highlighted the potential effects of Andro, which inhibits HIF-1, and hence may be developed as an antitumor agent for breast cancer therapy in future.Keywords: Andrographolide (Andro, HIF-1α, inhibit, breast cancer, hypoxia, PI3k/AKT/mTOR pathway

  3. Survivin inhibitor YM155 suppresses gastric cancer xenograft growth in mice without affecting normal tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Xiao Jiao; Lin, Jia Cheng; Ding, Yan Fei; Zhu, Liming; Ye, Jing; Tu, Shui Ping

    2016-02-09

    Survivin overexpression is associated with poor prognosis of human gastric cancer, and is a target for gastric cancer therapy. YM155 is originally identified as a specific inhibitor of survivin. In this study, we investigated the antitumor effect of YM155 on human gastric cancer. Our results showed that YM155 treatment significantly inhibited cell proliferation, reduced colony formation and induced apoptosis of gastric cancer cells in a dose-dependent manner. Accordingly, YM155 treatment significantly decreased survivin expression without affecting XIAP expression and increased the cleavage of apoptosis-associated proteins caspase 3, 7, 8, 9. YM155 significantly inhibited sphere formation of gastric cancer cells, suppressed expansion and growth of the formed spheres (cancer stem cell-like cells, CSCs) and downregulated the protein levels of β-catenin, c-Myc, Cyclin D1 and CD44 in gastric cancer cells. YM155 infusion at 5 mg/kg/day for 7 days markedly inhibited growth of gastric cancer xenograft in a nude mouse model. Immunohistochemistry staining and Western Blot showed that YM155 treatment inhibited expression of survivin and CD44, induced apoptosis and reduced CD44+ CSCs in xenograft tumor tissues in vivo. No obvious pathological changes were observed in organs (e.g. heart, liver, lung and kidney) in YM155-treated mice. Our results demonstrated that YM155 inhibits cell proliferation, induces cell apoptosis, reduces cancer stem cell expansion, and inhibits xenograft tumor growth in gastric cancer cells. Our results elucidate a new mechanism by which YM155 inhibits gastric cancer growth by inhibition of CSCs. YM155 may be a promising agent for gastric cancer treatment.

  4. A novel muscarinic antagonist R2HBJJ inhibits non-small cell lung cancer cell growth and arrests the cell cycle in G0/G1.

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    Nan Hua

    Full Text Available Lung cancers express the cholinergic autocrine loop, which facilitates the progression of cancer cells. The antagonists of mAChRs have been demonstrated to depress the growth of small cell lung cancers (SCLCs. In this study we intended to investigate the growth inhibitory effect of R2HBJJ, a novel muscarinic antagonist, on non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC cells and the possible mechanisms. The competitive binding assay revealed that R2HBJJ had a high affinity to M3 and M1 AChRs. R2HBJJ presented a strong anticholinergic activity on carbachol-induced contraction of guinea-pig trachea. R2HBJJ markedly suppressed the growth of NSCLC cells, such as H1299, H460 and H157. In H1299 cells, both R2HBJJ and its leading compound R2-PHC displayed significant anti-proliferative activity as M3 receptor antagonist darifenacin. Exogenous replenish of ACh could attenuate R2HBJJ-induced growth inhibition. Silencing M3 receptor or ChAT by specific-siRNAs resulted in a growth inhibition of 55.5% and 37.9% on H1299 cells 96 h post transfection, respectively. Further studies revealed that treatment with R2HBJJ arrested the cell cycle in G0/G1 by down-regulation of cyclin D1-CDK4/6-Rb. Therefore, the current study reveals that NSCLC cells express an autocrine and paracrine cholinergic system which stimulates the growth of NSCLC cells. R2HBJJ, as a novel mAChRs antagonist, can block the local cholinergic loop by antagonizing predominantly M3 receptors and inhibit NSCLC cell growth, which suggest that M3 receptor antagonist might be a potential chemotherapeutic regimen for NSCLC.

  5. Compound K, a Ginsenoside Metabolite, Inhibits Colon Cancer Growth via Multiple Pathways Including p53-p21 Interactions

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    Eugene B. Chang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Compound K (20-O-beta-D-glucopyranosyl-20(S-protopanaxadiol, CK, an intestinal bacterial metabolite of ginseng protopanaxadiol saponins, has been shown to inhibit cell growth in a variety of cancers. However, the mechanisms are not completely understood, especially in colorectal cancer (CRC. A xenograft tumor model was used first to examine the anti-CRC effect of CK in vivo. Then, multiple in vitro assays were applied to investigate the anticancer effects of CK including antiproliferation, apoptosis and cell cycle distribution. In addition, a qPCR array and western blot analysis were executed to screen and validate the molecules and pathways involved. We observed that CK significantly inhibited the growth of HCT-116 tumors in an athymic nude mouse xenograft model. CK significantly inhibited the proliferation of human CRC cell lines HCT-116, SW-480, and HT-29 in a dose- and time-dependent manner. We also observed that CK induced cell apoptosis and arrested the cell cycle in the G1 phase in HCT-116 cells. The processes were related to the upregulation of p53/p21, FoxO3a-p27/p15 and Smad3, and downregulation of cdc25A, CDK4/6 and cyclin D1/3. The major regulated targets of CK were cyclin dependent inhibitors, including p21, p27, and p15. These results indicate that CK inhibits transcriptional activation of multiple tumor-promoting pathways in CRC, suggesting that CK could be an active compound in the prevention or treatment of CRC.

  6. Platelet-camouflaged nanococktail: Simultaneous inhibition of drug-resistant tumor growth and metastasis via a cancer cells and tumor vasculature dual-targeting strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jing, Lijia; Qu, Haijing; Wu, Dongqi; Zhu, Chaojian; Yang, Yongbo; Jin, Xing; Zheng, Jian; Shi, Xiangsheng; Yan, Xiufeng; Wang, Yang

    2018-01-01

    Multidrug resistance (MDR) poses a great challenge to cancer therapy. It is difficult to inhibit the growth of MDR cancer due to its chemoresistance. Furthermore, MDR cancers are more likely to metastasize, causing a high mortality among cancer patients. In this study, a nanomedicine RGD-NPVs@MNPs/DOX was developed by encapsulating melanin nanoparticles (MNPs) and doxorubicin (DOX) inside RGD peptide (c(RGDyC))-modified nanoscale platelet vesicles (RGD-NPVs) to efficiently inhibit the growth and metastasis of drug-resistant tumors via a cancer cells and tumor vasculature dual-targeting strategy. Methods: The in vitro immune evasion potential and the targeting performance of RGD-NPVs@MNPs/DOX were examined using RAW264.7, HUVECs, MDA-MB-231 and MDA-MB-231/ADR cells lines. We also evaluated the pharmacokinetic behavior and the in vivo therapeutic performance of RGD-NPVs@MNPs/DOX using a MDA-MB-231/ADR tumor-bearing nude mouse model. Results: By taking advantage of the self-recognizing property of the platelet membrane and the conjugated RGD peptides, RGD-NPVs@MNPs/DOX was found to evade immune clearance and target the αvβ3 integrin on tumor vasculature and resistant breast tumor cells. Under irradiation with a NIR laser, RGD-NPVs@MNPs/DOX produced a multipronged effect, including reversal of cancer MDR, efficient killing of resistant cells by chemo-photothermal therapy, elimination of tumor vasculature for blocking metastasis, and long-lasting inhibition of the expressions of VEGF, MMP2 and MMP9 within the tumor. Conclusion: This versatile nanomedicine of RGD-NPVs@MNPs/DOX integrating unique biomimetic properties, excellent targeting performance, and comprehensive therapeutic strategies in one formulation might bring opportunities to MDR cancer therapy.

  7. Luteolin inhibits the Nrf2 signaling pathway and tumor growth in vivo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chian, Song; Thapa, Ruby; Chi, Zhexu [Department of Biochemistry and Genetics, School of Medicine, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310058 (China); Wang, Xiu Jun [Department of Pharmacology, School of Medicine, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310058 (China); Tang, Xiuwen, E-mail: xiuwentang@zju.edu.cn [Department of Biochemistry and Genetics, School of Medicine, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310058 (China)

    2014-05-16

    Highlights: • Luteolin inhibits the Nrf2 pathway in mouse liver and in xenografted tumors. • Luteolin markedly inhibits the growth of xenograft tumors. • Luteolin enhances the anti-cancer effect of cisplatin in mice in vivo. • Luteolin could serve as an adjuvant in the chemotherapy of NSCLC. - Abstract: Nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) is over-expressed in many types of tumor, promotes tumor growth, and confers resistance to anticancer therapy. Hence, Nrf2 is regarded as a novel therapeutic target in cancer. Previously, we reported that luteolin is a strong inhibitor of Nrf2 in vitro. Here, we showed that luteolin reduced the constitutive expression of NAD(P)H quinone oxidoreductase 1 in mouse liver in a time- and dose-dependent manner. Further, luteolin inhibited the expression of antioxidant enzymes and glutathione transferases, decreasing the reduced glutathione in the liver of wild-type mice under both constitutive and butylated hydroxyanisole-induced conditions. In contrast, such distinct responses were not detected in Nrf2{sup −/−} mice. In addition, oral administration of luteolin, either alone or combined with intraperitoneal injection of the cytotoxic drug cisplatin, greatly inhibited the growth of xenograft tumors from non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cell line A549 cells grown subcutaneously in athymic nude mice. Cell proliferation, the expression of Nrf2, and antioxidant enzymes were all reduced in tumor xenograft tissues. Furthermore, luteolin enhanced the anti-cancer effect of cisplatin. Together, our findings demonstrated that luteolin inhibits the Nrf2 pathway in vivo and can serve as an adjuvant in the chemotherapy of NSCLC.

  8. Correlation between live attenuated measles viral load and growth inhibition percentage in non-small cell lung cancer cell line

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    Rasha Fadhel Obaid

    2018-03-01

    Conclusion Live attenuated measles virus strain induced cytotoxic effect against human lung cancer cell line (A549 by induction of apoptosis as an important mechanism of anti-tumor activity, in addition, it indicates a correlation between the quantity of MV genomesand percentage of growth inhibition. This relation  has proved that measles virus had anticancer effect.

  9. A novel HDAC inhibitor, CG200745, inhibits pancreatic cancer cell growth and overcomes gemcitabine resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hee Seung; Park, Soo Been; Kim, Sun A; Kwon, Sool Ki; Cha, Hyunju; Lee, Do Young; Ro, Seonggu; Cho, Joong Myung; Song, Si Young

    2017-01-30

    Pancreatic cancer is predominantly lethal, and is primarily treated using gemcitabine, with increasing resistance. Therefore, novel agents that increase tumor sensitivity to gemcitabine are needed. Histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors are emerging therapeutic agents, since HDAC plays an important role in cancer initiation and progression. We evaluated the antitumor effect of a novel HDAC inhibitor, CG200745, combined with gemcitabine/erlotinib on pancreatic cancer cells and gemcitabine-resistant pancreatic cancer cells. Three pancreatic cancer-cell lines were used to evaluate the antitumor effect of CG200745 combined with gemcitabine/erlotinib. CG200745 induced the expression of apoptotic proteins (PARP and caspase-3) and increased the levels of acetylated histone H3. CG200745 with gemcitabine/erlotinib showed significant growth inhibition and synergistic antitumor effects in vitro. In vivo, gemcitabine/erlotinib and CG200745 reduced tumor size up to 50%. CG200745 enhanced the sensitivity of gemcitabine-resistant pancreatic cancer cells to gemcitabine, and decreased the level of ATP-binding cassette-transporter genes, especially multidrug resistance protein 3 (MRP3) and MRP4. The novel HDAC inhibitor, CG200745, with gemcitabine/erlotinib had a synergistic anti-tumor effect on pancreatic cancer cells. CG200745 significantly improved pancreatic cancer sensitivity to gemcitabine, with a prominent antitumor effect on gemcitabine-resistant pancreatic cancer cells. Therefore, improved clinical outcome is expected in the future.

  10. Animal study of rh-endostatin combined with ginsenoside Rg3 on inhibiting growth of breast cancer xenografts

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    Chuan-Ming Tong

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To study the inhibiting effect of rh-endostatin combined with ginsenoside Rg3 on growth of breast cancer xenografts. Methods: C57BL/6 nude mice were selected as research subjects, animal models with breast cancer xenografts were established through subcutaneous injection of breast cancer cells in the neck and randomly divided into A-D groups, and normal saline, rh-endostatin, ginsenoside Rg3 and rh-endostatin combined with ginsenoside Rg3 were injected respectively. Tumor growth, serum angiogenesis factor contents, percentages of cell cycles and expression levels of cell cycle-related molecules in tumor tissue of four groups were compared. Results: 7 d, 14 d and 21 d after treatment, tumor volume as well as serum VEGF and bFGF contents of B group, C group and D group were significantly lower than those of A group, and tumor volume as well as serum VEGF and bFGF contents of D group were significantly lower than those of B group and C group; 21 d after treatment, tumor weight, percentages of S phase and G2/M phase as well as mRNA contents and protein contents of cyclin E and CDC25A in tumor tissue of B group, C group and D group were lower than those of A group, and G0/G1 phase percentages were higher than that of A group; tumor weight, percentages of S phase and G2/M phase as well as mRNA contents and protein contents of cyclin E and CDC25A in tumor tissue of D group were significantly lower than those of B group and C group, and G0/G1 phase percentage was lower than those of B group and C group. Conclusion: rh-endostatin combined with ginsenoside Rg3 can more effectively inhibit growth of breast cancer xenografts, make cell cycle arrest and down-regulate expression of cell cyclerelated molecules.

  11. Suppression of progranulin expression inhibits bladder cancer growth and sensitizes cancer cells to cisplatin

    OpenAIRE

    Buraschi, Simone; Xu, Shi-Qiong; Stefanello, Manuela; Moskalev, Igor; Morcavallo, Alaide; Genua, Marco; Tanimoto, Ryuta; Birbe, Ruth; Peiper, Stephen C.; Gomella, Leonard G.; Belfiore, Antonino; Black, Peter C.; Iozzo, Renato V.; Morrione, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    We have recently demonstrated a critical role for progranulin in bladder cancer. Progranulin contributes, as an autocrine growth factor, to the transformed phenotype by modulating Akt-and MAPK-driven motility, invasion and anchorage-independent growth. Progranulin also induces F-actin remodeling by interacting with the F-actin binding protein drebrin. In addition, progranulin is overexpressed in invasive bladder cancer compared to normal tissue controls, suggesting that progranulin might play...

  12. BET Bromodomain Inhibition Synergizes with PARP Inhibitor in Epithelial Ovarian Cancer

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    Sergey Karakashev

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available PARP inhibition is known to be an effective clinical strategy in BRCA mutant cancers, but PARP inhibition has not been applied to BRCA-proficient tumors. Here, we show the synergy of BET bromodomain inhibition with PARP inhibition in BRCA-proficient ovarian cancers due to mitotic catastrophe. Treatment of BRCA-proficient ovarian cancer cells with the BET inhibitor JQ1 downregulated the G2-M cell-cycle checkpoint regulator WEE1 and the DNA-damage response factor TOPBP1. Combining PARP inhibitor Olaparib with the BET inhibitor, we observed a synergistic increase in DNA damage and checkpoint defects, which allowed cells to enter mitosis despite the accumulation of DNA damage, ultimately causing mitotic catastrophe. Moreover, JQ1 and Olaparib showed synergistic suppression of growth of BRCA-proficient cancer in vivo in a xenograft ovarian cancer mouse model. Our findings indicate that a combination of BET inhibitor and PARP inhibitor represents a potential therapeutic strategy for BRCA-proficient cancers.

  13. Mullerian Inhibiting Substance (MIS) Augments IFN-gamma Mediated Inhibition of Breast Cancer Cell Growth

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Gupta, Vandana

    2004-01-01

    Mullerian Inhibiting Substance (MIS), a member of the TGFB family regulates growth, differentiation, and apoptosis in many cell types In the male embryo, MIS causes regression of the Mullerian duct...

  14. Melatonin and vitamin D3 synergistically down-regulate Akt and MDM2 leading to TGFβ-1-dependent growth inhibition of breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proietti, Sara; Cucina, Alessandra; D'Anselmi, Fabrizio; Dinicola, Simona; Pasqualato, Alessia; Lisi, Elisabetta; Bizzarri, Mariano

    2011-03-01

    Melatonin and vitamin D3 inhibit breast cancer cell growth and induce apoptosis, but they have never been combined as a breast cancer treatment. Therefore, we investigated whether their association could lead to an enhanced anticancer activity. In MCF-7 breast cancer cells, melatonin together with vitamin D3, induced a synergistic proliferative inhibition, with an almost complete cell growth arrest at 144 hr. Cell growth blockade is associated to an activation of the TGFβ-1 pathway, leading to increased TGFβ-1, Smad4 and phosphorylated-Smad3 levels. Concomitantly, melatonin and D3, alone or in combination, caused a significant reduction in Akt phosphorylation and MDM2 values, with a consequent increase of p53/MDM2 ratio. These effects were completely suppressed by adding a monoclonal anti-TGFβ-1 antibody to the culture medium. Taken together, these results indicate that cytostatic effects triggered by melatonin and D3 are likely related to a complex TGFβ-1-dependent mechanism, involving down-regulation of both MDM2 and Akt-phosphorylation. © 2010 The Authors. Journal of Pineal Research © 2010 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  15. The chalcone butein from Rhus verniciflua Stokes inhibits clonogenic growth of human breast cancer cells co-cultured with fibroblasts

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    Tan Jenny

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Butein (3,4,2',4'-tetrahydroxychalone, a plant polyphenol, is a major biologically active component of the stems of Rhus verniciflua Stokes. It has long been used as a food additive in Korea and as an herbal medicine throughout Asia. Recently, butein has been shown to suppress the functions of fibroblasts. Because fibroblasts are believed to play an important role in promoting the growth of breast cancer cells, we investigated the ability of butein to inhibit the clonogenic growth of small numbers of breast cancer cells co-cultured with fibroblasts in vitro. Methods We first measured the clonogenic growth of small numbers of the UACC-812 human breast cancer cell line co-cultured on monolayers of serum-activated, human fibroblasts in the presence of butein (2 μg/mL or various other modulators of fibroblast function (troglitazone-1 μg/mL; GW9662-1 μM; meloxican-1 μM; and 3,4 dehydroproline-10 μg/mL. In a subsequent experiment, we measured the dose-response effect on the clonogenic growth of UACC-812 breast cancer cells by pre-incubating the fibroblasts with varying concentrations of butein (10 μg/ml-1.25 μg/mL. Finally, we measured the clonogenic growth of primary breast cancer cells obtained from 5 clinical specimens with normal fibroblasts and with fibroblasts that had been pre-treated with a fixed dose of butein (2.5 μg/mL. Results Of the five modulators of fibroblast function that we tested, butein was by far the most potent inhibitor of clonogenic growth of UACC-812 breast cancer cells co-cultured with fibroblasts. Pre-treatment of fibroblasts with concentrations of butein as low as 2.5 μg/mL nearly abolished subsequent clonogenic growth of UACC-812 breast cancer cells co-cultured with the fibroblasts. A similar dose of butein had no effect on the clonogenic growth of breast cancer cells cultured in the absence of fibroblasts. Significantly, clonogenic growth of the primary breast cancer cells was also

  16. Effect of crude saponins from Gaultheria trichophylla extract on growth inhibition in human colorectal cancer cells

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    Fiaz Alam

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The genus Gaultheria also comprised of species with reported cytotoxic activities. Current research work was carried out to evaluate G. trichophylla crude extract and respective saponins fraction against human colorectal cancer cell line (Caco-2 based on cell viability assays. Caco-2 cells treated with the crude extract showed significant growth inhibition (p< 0.001 in a dose dependent manner with apparent IC50 value of 200 μg/mL and 100 μg/mL in MTT and NRU assays respectively. The fractioned crude saponins showed an enhanced response and inhibited the growth of Caco-2 by 93.6 and 97.4% in MTT and NRU assays respectively, with compared to actinomycin-D (65%. The DAPI staining of cell treated with crude saponins observed under confocal microscope showed shrunken nuclei with apparent nuclear fragmentation and chromatin condensation indicating apoptosis mode of cell death. The study exhibited that the G. Trichophylla saponins induced apoptosis of Caco-2 cell lines. This study provides new evidences to further explore this plant for the novel targets in anticancer drug development.

  17. Inhibition of cancer cell growth by exposure to a specific time-varying electromagnetic field involves T-type calcium channels.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carly A Buckner

    Full Text Available Electromagnetic field (EMF exposures affect many biological systems. The reproducibility of these effects is related to the intensity, duration, frequency, and pattern of the EMF. We have shown that exposure to a specific time-varying EMF can inhibit the growth of malignant cells. Thomas-EMF is a low-intensity, frequency-modulated (25-6 Hz EMF pattern. Daily, 1 h, exposures to Thomas-EMF inhibited the growth of malignant cell lines including B16-BL6, MDA-MB-231, MCF-7, and HeLa cells but did not affect the growth of non-malignant cells. Thomas-EMF also inhibited B16-BL6 cell proliferation in vivo. B16-BL6 cells implanted in syngeneic C57b mice and exposed daily to Thomas-EMF produced smaller tumours than in sham-treated controls. In vitro studies showed that exposure of malignant cells to Thomas-EMF for > 15 min promoted Ca(2+ influx which could be blocked by inhibitors of voltage-gated T-type Ca(2+ channels. Blocking Ca(2+ uptake also blocked Thomas-EMF-dependent inhibition of cell proliferation. Exposure to Thomas-EMF delayed cell cycle progression and altered cyclin expression consistent with the decrease in cell proliferation. Non-malignant cells did not show any EMF-dependent changes in Ca(2+ influx or cell growth. These data confirm that exposure to a specific EMF pattern can affect cellular processes and that exposure to Thomas-EMF may provide a potential anti-cancer therapy.

  18. Inhibition of cancer cell growth by exposure to a specific time-varying electromagnetic field involves T-type calcium channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckner, Carly A; Buckner, Alison L; Koren, Stan A; Persinger, Michael A; Lafrenie, Robert M

    2015-01-01

    Electromagnetic field (EMF) exposures affect many biological systems. The reproducibility of these effects is related to the intensity, duration, frequency, and pattern of the EMF. We have shown that exposure to a specific time-varying EMF can inhibit the growth of malignant cells. Thomas-EMF is a low-intensity, frequency-modulated (25-6 Hz) EMF pattern. Daily, 1 h, exposures to Thomas-EMF inhibited the growth of malignant cell lines including B16-BL6, MDA-MB-231, MCF-7, and HeLa cells but did not affect the growth of non-malignant cells. Thomas-EMF also inhibited B16-BL6 cell proliferation in vivo. B16-BL6 cells implanted in syngeneic C57b mice and exposed daily to Thomas-EMF produced smaller tumours than in sham-treated controls. In vitro studies showed that exposure of malignant cells to Thomas-EMF for > 15 min promoted Ca(2+) influx which could be blocked by inhibitors of voltage-gated T-type Ca(2+) channels. Blocking Ca(2+) uptake also blocked Thomas-EMF-dependent inhibition of cell proliferation. Exposure to Thomas-EMF delayed cell cycle progression and altered cyclin expression consistent with the decrease in cell proliferation. Non-malignant cells did not show any EMF-dependent changes in Ca(2+) influx or cell growth. These data confirm that exposure to a specific EMF pattern can affect cellular processes and that exposure to Thomas-EMF may provide a potential anti-cancer therapy.

  19. Growth inhibition of human breast cancer cells and down-regulation of ODC1 and ADA genes by Nepeta binaloudensis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akbar Safipour Afshar

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Nepeta binaloudensis Jamzad, Lamiaceae, is a rare medicinal plant endemic to Iran. In spite of many studies about the chemical constituents and antibacterial effects of this species, no report has been provided about its cytotoxic and anticancer activities. In this study we have evaluated the effects of EtOH 70%, hexane and aqueous extracts of N. binaloudensis on the cell proliferation and n-hexane extract on the expression of adenosine deaminase and ornithine decarboxylase 1 genes in breast cancer cell lines (MCF-7, MDA-MB-231 compared to non-cancer line (MCF-10A. The cell lines were subjected to increasing doses of the extracts ranging from 10 to 320 µg/ml. Cell viability was quantified by MTS assay. Expression of adenosine deaminase and ornithine decarboxylase 1 genes was analyzed by real time PCR. N. binaloudensis inhibited the growth of malignant cells in a time and dose-dependent manner. Among extracts of N. binaloudensis, the hexane extract was found to be more toxic compared to other extracts. Results showed a marked decrease in the expression of ornithine decarboxylase 1 and adenosine deaminase genes in cancer cell lines. At 60 µg/ml concentration of N. binaloudensis hexane extract ornithine decarboxylase 1 and adenosine deaminase mRNA expression were reduced 4.9 fold and 3.5 fold in MCF-7 cell line and 3.6 fold and 2.6 fold in MDA-MB-231 cell line compared to control, respectively. The result of our study highlights the potential influences of N. binaloudensis hexane extract on ornithine decarboxylase 1 and adenosine deaminase genes expression in breast cancer cells and its relation to inhibition of cancer cell growth.

  20. Inhibition of Stromal PlGF Suppresses the Growth of Prostate Cancer Xenografts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dietmar Abraham

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The growth and vascularization of prostate cancer is dependent on interactions between cancer cells and supporting stromal cells. The primary stromal cell type found in prostate tumors is the carcinoma-associated fibroblast, which produces placental growth factor (PlGF. PlGF is a member of the vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF family of angiogenic molecules and PlGF mRNA levels increase after androgen deprivation therapy in prostate cancer. In this study, we show that PlGF has a direct dose-dependent proliferative effect on human PC-3 prostate cancer cells in vitro and fibroblast-derived PlGF increases PC-3 proliferation in co-culture. In xenograft tumor models, intratumoral administration of murine PlGF siRNA reduced stromal-derived PlGF expression, reduced tumor burden and decreased the number of Ki-67 positive proliferating cells associated with reduced vascular density. These data show that targeting stromal PlGF expression may represent a therapeutic target for the treatment of prostate cancer.

  1. Stromal Cells Positively and Negatively Modulate the Growth of Cancer Cells: Stimulation via the PGE2-TNFα-IL-6 Pathway and Inhibition via Secreted GAPDH-E-Cadherin Interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawada, Manabu; Inoue, Hiroyuki; Ohba, Shun-ichi; Yoshida, Junjiro; Masuda, Tohru; Yamasaki, Manabu; Usami, Ihomi; Sakamoto, Shuichi; Abe, Hikaru; Watanabe, Takumi; Yamori, Takao; Shibasaki, Masakatsu; Nomoto, Akio

    2015-01-01

    Fibroblast-like stromal cells modulate cancer cells through secreted factors and adhesion, but those factors are not fully understood. Here, we have identified critical stromal factors that modulate cancer growth positively and negatively. Using a cell co-culture system, we found that gastric stromal cells secreted IL-6 as a growth and survival factor for gastric cancer cells. Moreover, gastric cancer cells secreted PGE2 and TNFα that stimulated IL-6 secretion by the stromal cells. Furthermore, we found that stromal cells secreted glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH). Extracellular GAPDH, or its N-terminal domain, inhibited gastric cancer cell growth, a finding confirmed in other cell systems. GAPDH bound to E-cadherin and downregulated the mTOR-p70S6 kinase pathway. These results demonstrate that stromal cells could regulate cancer cell growth through the balance of these secreted factors. We propose that negative regulation of cancer growth using GAPDH could be a new anti-cancer strategy. PMID:25785838

  2. SNX-25a, a novel Hsp90 inhibitor, inhibited human cancer growth more potently than 17-AAG.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shaoxiang; Wang, Xiao; Du, Zhan; Liu, Yuting; Huang, Dane; Zheng, Kai; Liu, Kaisheng; Zhang, Yi; Zhong, Xueyun; Wang, Yifei

    2014-07-18

    17-Allylamino-17-demethoxygeldanamycin (17-AAG), a typical Hsp90 inhibitor derived from geldanamycin (GA), has entered Phase III clinical trials for cancer therapy. However, it has several significant limitations such as poor solubility, limited bioavailability and unacceptable hepatotoxicity. In this study, the anticancer activity and mechanism of SNX-25a, a novel Hsp90 inhibitor, was investigated comparing with that of 17-AAG. We showed that SNX-25a triggered growth inhibition more sensitively than 17-AAG against many human cancer cells, including K562, SW-620, A375, Hep-2, MCF-7, HepG2, HeLa, and A549 cell lines, especially at low concentrations (AAG, SNX-25a was more potent in arresting the cell cycle at G2 phase, and displayed more potent effects on human cancer cell apoptosis and Hsp90 client proteins. It also exhibited a stronger binding affinity to Hsp90 than 17-AAG using molecular docking. Considering the superiority effects on Hsp90 affinity, cell growth, cell cycle, apoptosis, and Hsp90 client proteins, SNX-25a is supposed as a potential anticancer agent that needs to be explored in detail. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Capsaicin Inhibits Multiple Bladder Cancer Cell Phenotypes by Inhibiting Tumor-Associated NADH Oxidase (tNOX and Sirtuin1 (SIRT1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming-Hung Lin

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Bladder cancer is one of the most frequent cancers among males, and its poor survival rate reflects problems with aggressiveness and chemo-resistance. Recent interest has focused on the use of chemopreventatives (nontoxic natural agents that may suppress cancer progression to induce targeted apoptosis for cancer therapy. Capsaicin, which has anti-cancer properties, is one such agent. It is known to preferentially inhibit a tumor-associated NADH oxidase (tNOX that is preferentially expressed in cancer/transformed cells. Here, we set out to elucidate the correlation between tNOX expression and the inhibitory effects of capsaicin in human bladder cancer cells. We showed that capsaicin downregulates tNOX expression and decreases bladder cancer cell growth by enhancing apoptosis. Moreover, capsaicin was found to reduce the expression levels of several proteins involved in cell cycle progression, in association with increases in the cell doubling time and enhanced cell cycle arrest. Capsaicin was also shown to inhibit the activation of ERK, thereby reducing the phosphorylation of paxillin and FAK, which leads to decreased cell migration. Finally, our results indicate that RNA interference-mediated tNOX depletion enhances spontaneous apoptosis, prolongs cell cycle progression, and reduces cell migration and the epithelial-mesenchymal transition. We also observed a downregulation of sirtuin 1 (SIRT1 in these tNOX-knockdown cells, a deacetylase that is important in multiple cellular functions. Taken together, our results indicate that capsaicin inhibits the growth of bladder cancer cells by inhibiting tNOX and SIRT1 and thereby reducing proliferation, attenuating migration, and prolonging cell cycle progression.

  4. PGE2-induced colon cancer growth is mediated by mTORC1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dufour, Marc; Faes, Seraina; Dormond-Meuwly, Anne; Demartines, Nicolas; Dormond, Olivier

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • PGE 2 activates mTORC1 in colon cancer cells. • Inhibition of mTORC1 blocks PGE 2 induced colon cancer cell growth. • mTORC1 is a signaling intermediary in PGE 2 induced colon cancer cell responses. - Abstract: The inflammatory prostaglandin E 2 (PGE 2 ) cytokine plays a key role in the development of colon cancer. Several studies have shown that PGE 2 directly induces the growth of colon cancer cells and furthermore promotes tumor angiogenesis by increasing the production of the vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). The signaling intermediaries implicated in these processes have however not been fully characterized. In this report, we show that the mechanistic target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) plays an important role in PGE 2 -induced colon cancer cell responses. Indeed, stimulation of LS174T cells with PGE 2 increased mTORC1 activity as observed by the augmentation of S6 ribosomal protein phosphorylation, a downstream effector of mTORC1. The PGE 2 EP 4 receptor was responsible for transducing the signal to mTORC1. Moreover, PGE 2 increased colon cancer cell proliferation as well as the growth of colon cancer cell colonies grown in matrigel and blocking mTORC1 by rapamycin or ATP-competitive inhibitors of mTOR abrogated these effects. Similarly, the inhibition of mTORC1 by downregulation of its component raptor using RNA interference blocked PGE 2 -induced LS174T cell growth. Finally, stimulation of LS174T cells with PGE 2 increased VEGF production which was also prevented by mTORC1 inhibition. Taken together, these results show that mTORC1 is an important signaling intermediary in PGE 2 mediated colon cancer cell growth and VEGF production. They further support a role for mTORC1 in inflammation induced tumor growth

  5. Alphavirus replicon particles containing the gene for HER2/neu inhibit breast cancer growth and tumorigenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Xiaoyan; Wang, Jian-Ping; Maughan, Maureen F; Lachman, Lawrence B

    2005-01-01

    Overexpression of the HER2/neu gene in breast cancer is associated with an increased incidence of metastatic disease and with a poor prognosis. Although passive immunotherapy with the humanized monoclonal antibody trastuzumab (Herceptin) has shown some effect, a vaccine capable of inducing T-cell and humoral immunity could be more effective. Virus-like replicon particles (VRP) of Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus containing the gene for HER2/neu (VRP-neu) were tested by an active immunotherapeutic approach in tumor prevention models and in a metastasis prevention model. VRP-neu prevented or significantly inhibited the growth of HER2/neu-expressing murine breast cancer cells injected either into mammary tissue or intravenously. Vaccination with VRP-neu completely prevented tumor formation in and death of MMTV-c-neu transgenic mice, and resulted in high levels of neu-specific CD8 + T lymphocytes and serum IgG. On the basis of these findings, clinical testing of this vaccine in patients with HER2/neu + breast cancer is warranted

  6. Connective tissue growth factor inhibits gastric cancer peritoneal metastasis by blocking integrin α3β1-dependent adhesion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chiung-Nien; Chang, Cheng-Chi; Lai, Hong-Shiee; Jeng, Yung-Ming; Chen, Chia-I; Chang, King-Jeng; Lee, Po-Huang; Lee, Hsinyu

    2015-07-01

    Connective tissue growth factor (CTGF) plays important roles in normal and pathological conditions. The aim of this study was to investigate the role of CTGF in peritoneal metastasis as well as the underlying mechanism in gastric cancer progression. CTGF expression levels for wild-type and stable overexpression clones were determined by Western blotting and quantitative polymerase chain reaction (Q-PCR). Univariate and multivariate analyses, immunohistochemistry, and survival probability analyses were performed on gastric cancer patients. The extracellular matrix components involved in CTGF-regulated adhesion were determined. Recombinant CTGF was added to cells or coinoculated with gastric cancer cells into mice to evaluate its therapeutic potential. CTGF overexpression and treatment with the recombinant protein significantly inhibited cell adhesion. In vivo peritoneal metastasis demonstrated that CTGF-stable transfectants markedly decreased the number and size of tumor nodules in the mesentery. Statistical analysis of gastric cancer patient data showed that patients expressing higher CTGF levels had earlier TNM staging and a higher survival probability after the surgery. Integrin α3β1 was the cell adhesion molecule mediating gastric cancer cell adhesion to laminin, and blocking of integrin α3β1 prevented gastric cancer cell adhesion to recombinant CTGF. Coimmunoprecipitation results indicated that CTGF binds to integrin α3. Coinoculation of recombinant CTGF and gastric cancer cell lines in mice showed effective inhibition of peritoneal dissemination. Our results suggested that gastric cancer peritoneal metastasis is mediated through integrin α3β1 binding to laminin, and CTGF effectively blocks the interaction by binding to integrin α3β1, thus demonstrating the therapeutic potential of recombinant CTGF in gastric cancer patients.

  7. Fungi & Health: can polysaccharides from the fungus inonotus obliquus (CHAGA) inhibit tumor growth?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wold, C. W.; Corthay, A.; Kjeldsen, Christian

    Inonotus obliquus (Chaga) – a white rot fungus found on birch trees in the northern hemisphere –has been used in traditional medicine in Europe and Asia for centuries. Native peoples have made use of Chaga by brewing it as a tea to treat gastro-intestinal problems, to heal wounds and even to treat...... cancer. The last few decades, studies have found Chaga to contain biologically active substances such as polysaccharides, triterpenoids, polyphenols and melanin. In vivo effects such as tumor growth inhibition have been observed in mice receiving various Chaga extracts. The main hypothesis behind...... the tumor inhibiting effect is two-fold: i) fungal polysaccharides may inhibit tumor growth indirectly by activating certain immune cells such as macrophages and ii) triterpenoids and other steroids from Chaga may give a direct cytotoxic effect against cancer cells. While triterpenoids from Chaga have been...

  8. Inhibition of metastasis, angiogenesis, and tumor growth by Chinese herbal cocktail Tien-Hsien Liquid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chia, Jean-San; Du, Jia-Ling; Hsu, Wei-Bin; Sun, Andy; Chiang, Chun-Pin; Wang, Won-Bo

    2010-01-01

    Advanced cancer is a multifactorial disease that demands treatments targeting multiple cellular pathways. Chinese herbal cocktail which contains various phytochemicals may target multiple dys-regulated pathways in cancer cells and thus may provide an alternative/complementary way to treat cancers. Previously we reported that the Chinese herbal cocktail Tien-Hsien Liguid (THL) can specifically induce apoptosis in various cancer cells and have immuno-modulating activity. In this study, we further evaluated the anti-metastatic, anti-angiogenic and anti-tumor activities of THL with a series of in vitro and in vivo experiments. The migration and invasion of cancer cells and endothelial cells was determined by Boyden chamber transwell assays. The effect of THL on pulmonary metastasis was done by injecting CT-26 colon cancer cells intravenously to syngenic mice. The in vitro and in vivo microvessel formation was determined by the tube formation assay and the Matrigel plug assay, respectively. The in vivo anti-tumor effect of THL was determined by a human MDA-MB-231 breast cancer xenograft model. The expression of metalloproteinase (MMP)-2, MMP-9, and urokinase plasminogen activator (uPA) was measured by gelatin zymography. The expression of HIF-1α and the phosphorylation of ERK1/2 were determined by Western blot. THL inhibited the migration and invasion ability of various cancer cells in vitro, decreased the secretion of MMP-2, MMP-9, and uPA and the activity of ERK1/2 in cancer cells, and suppressed pulmonary metastasis of CT-26 cancer cells in syngenic mice. Moreover, THL inhibited the migration, invasion, and tube formation of endothelial cells in vitro, decreased the secretion of MMP-2 and uPA in endothelial cells, and suppressed neovascularization in Matrigel plugs in mice. Besides its inhibitory effect on endothelial cells, THL inhibited hypoxia-induced HIF-1α and vascular endothelial growth factor-A expression in cancer cells. Finally, our results show that THL

  9. Ganoderma tsugae Extract Inhibits Growth of HER2-Overexpressing Cancer Cells via Modulation of HER2/PI3K/Akt Signaling Pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Han-Peng Kuo

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Ganoderma, also known as Lingzhi or Reishi, has been used for medicinal purposes in Asian countries for centuries. It is a medicinal fungus with a variety of biological properties including immunomodulatory and antitumor activities. In this study, we investigated the molecular mechanisms by which Ganoderma tsugae (GT, one of the most common species of Ganoderma, inhibits the proliferation of HER2-overexpressing cancer cells. Here, we show that a quality assured extract of GT (GTE inhibited the growth of HER2-overexpressing cancer cells in vitro and in vivo and enhanced the growth-inhibitory effect of antitumor drugs (e.g., taxol and cisplatin in these cells. We also demonstrate that GTE induced cell cycle arrest by interfering with the HER2/PI3K/Akt signaling pathway. Furthermore, GTE curtailed the expression of the HER2 protein by modulating the transcriptional activity of the HER2 gene and the stability/degradation of the HER2 protein. In conclusion, this study suggests that GTE may be a useful adjuvant therapeutic agent in the treatment of cancer cells that highly express HER2.

  10. Inhibition of prostate cancer growth using doxorubicin assisted by ultrasound-targeted nanobubble destruction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fan X

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Xiaozhou Fan,1,* Luofu Wang,2,* Yanli Guo,1 Xingyu Xiong,1 Lianhua Zhu,1 Kejing Fang1 1Department of Ultrasound, Southwest Hospital, 2Department of Urology, Daping Hospital, Third Military Medical University, Chongqing, People’s Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: Ultrasound (US-targeted microbubble destruction has been widely used as an effective drug-delivery system. However, nanobubbles (NBs have better stability and stronger penetration than microbubbles, and drug delivery assisted by US-targeted NB destruction (UTND still needs to be investigated. Our aim was to investigate the effect of doxorubicin (DOX on the inhibition of prostate cancer growth under UTND. Contrast-enhanced US imaging of transplanted PC3 prostate cancer in mice showed that under a combination of 1 W/cm2 US power and a 100 Hz intermittent pulse with a “5 seconds on, 5 seconds off” mode, NBs with an average size of (485.7±33 nm were effectively destroyed within 15 minutes in the tumor location. PC3 cells and 20 tumor-bearing mice were divided into four groups: a DOX group, a DOX + NB group, a DOX + US group, and a DOX + NB + US group. The cell growth-inhibition rate and DOX concentration of xenografts in the DOX + NB + US group were highest. Based on another control group and these four groups, another 25 tumor-bearing mice were used to observe the treatment effect of nine DOX injections under UTND. The xenografts in the DOX + NB + US group decreased more obviously and had more cellular apoptosis than other groups. Finally, electron microscopy was used to estimate the cavitation effect of NBs under US irradiation in the control group, NB group, US group, and NB + US group. The results of scanning electron microscopy showed that PC3 cells in the DOX + NB + US group had more holes and significantly increased cell-surface folds. Meanwhile, transmission electric microscopy confirmed that more lanthanum nitrate particles entered

  11. CNPY2 inhibits MYLIP-mediated AR protein degradation in prostate cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Saya; Ueno, Akihisa; Ueda, Takashi; Nakagawa, Hideo; Taniguchi, Hidefumi; Kayukawa, Naruhiro; Fujihara-Iwata, Atsuko; Hongo, Fumiya; Okihara, Koji; Ukimura, Osamu

    2018-04-03

    The androgen receptor (AR) is a ligand-dependent transcription factor that promotes prostate cancer (PC) cell growth through control of target gene expression. This report suggests that Canopy FGF signaling regulator 2 (CNPY2) controls AR protein levels in PC cells. We found that AR was ubiquitinated by an E3 ubiquitin ligase, myosin regulatory light chain interacting protein (MYLIP) and then degraded through the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway. CNPY2 decreased the ubiquitination activity of MYLIP by inhibition of interaction between MYLIP and UBE2D1, an E2 ubiquitin ligase. CNPY2 up-regulated gene expression of AR target genes such as KLK3 gene which encodes the prostate specific antigen (PSA) and promoted cell growth of PC cells. The cell growth inhibition by CNPY2 knockdown was rescued by AR overexpression. Furthermore, positive correlation of expression levels between CNPY2 and AR/AR target genes was observed in tissue samples from human prostate cancer patients. Together, these results suggested that CNPY2 promoted cell growth of PC cells by inhibition of AR protein degradation through MYLIP-mediated AR ubiquitination.

  12. Mechanisms of environmental chemicals that enable the cancer hallmark of evasion of growth suppression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nahta, Rita; Al-Mulla, Fahd; Al-Temaimi, Rabeah; Amedei, Amedeo; Andrade-Vieira, Rafaela; Bay, Sarah N; Brown, Dustin G; Calaf, Gloria M; Castellino, Robert C; Cohen-Solal, Karine A; Colacci, Annamaria; Cruickshanks, Nichola; Dent, Paul; Di Fiore, Riccardo; Forte, Stefano; Goldberg, Gary S; Hamid, Roslida A; Krishnan, Harini; Laird, Dale W; Lasfar, Ahmed; Marignani, Paola A; Memeo, Lorenzo; Mondello, Chiara; Naus, Christian C; Ponce-Cusi, Richard; Raju, Jayadev; Roy, Debasish; Roy, Rabindra; Ryan, Elizabeth P; Salem, Hosni K; Scovassi, A Ivana; Singh, Neetu; Vaccari, Monica; Vento, Renza; Vondráček, Jan; Wade, Mark; Woodrick, Jordan; Bisson, William H

    2015-06-01

    As part of the Halifax Project, this review brings attention to the potential effects of environmental chemicals on important molecular and cellular regulators of the cancer hallmark of evading growth suppression. Specifically, we review the mechanisms by which cancer cells escape the growth-inhibitory signals of p53, retinoblastoma protein, transforming growth factor-beta, gap junctions and contact inhibition. We discuss the effects of selected environmental chemicals on these mechanisms of growth inhibition and cross-reference the effects of these chemicals in other classical cancer hallmarks. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  13. Concurrent Autophagy Inhibition Overcomes the Resistance of Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitors in Human Bladder Cancer Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Minyong; Lee, Kyoung-Hwa; Lee, Hye Sun; Jeong, Chang Wook; Kwak, Cheol; Kim, Hyeon Hoe; Ku, Ja Hyeon

    2017-02-04

    Despite the potential therapeutic efficacy of epithelial growth factor receptor (EGFR) inhibitors in the treatment of advanced stage bladder cancer, there currently is no clear evidence to support this hypothesis. In this study, we investigate whether the concurrent treatment of autophagy-blocking agents with EGFR inhibitors exerts synergistic anti-cancer effects in T24 and J82 human bladder cancer cells. Lapatinib and gefitinib were used as EGFR inhibitors, and bafilomycin A1 (BFA1), chloroquine (CQ) and 3-methyladenine (3-MA) were used as the pharmacologic inhibitors of autophagy activities. To assess the proliferative and self-renewal capabilities, the Cell Counting Kit-8 (CCK-8) assay and a clonogenic assay were performed, respectively. To examine apoptotic cell death, flow cytometry using annexin-V/propidium iodide (PI) was used. To measure the autophagy activities, the expression levels of LC3I and II was determined by Western blot analysis. To validate the synergistic effects of autophagy inhibition with EGFR inhibitors, we specifically blocked key autophagy regulatory gene ATG12 by transfection of small interference RNA and examined the phenotypic changes. Of note, lapatinib and gefitinib triggered autophagy activities in T24 and J82 human bladder cancer cells, as indicated by upregulation of LC3II. More importantly, inhibiting autophagy activities with pharmacologic inhibitors (BFA1, CQ or 3-MA) remarkably reduced the cell viabilities and clonal proliferation of T24 and J82 cells, compared to those treated with either of the agents alone. We also obtained similar results of the enhanced anti-cancer effects of EGFR inhibitors by suppressing the expression of ATG12. Notably, the apoptotic assay showed that synergistic anti-cancer effects were induced via the increase of apoptotic cell death. In summary, concomitant inhibition of autophagy activities potentiated the anti-cancer effects of EGFR inhibitors in human bladder cancer cells, indicating a novel

  14. Concurrent Autophagy Inhibition Overcomes the Resistance of Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitors in Human Bladder Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minyong Kang

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Despite the potential therapeutic efficacy of epithelial growth factor receptor (EGFR inhibitors in the treatment of advanced stage bladder cancer, there currently is no clear evidence to support this hypothesis. In this study, we investigate whether the concurrent treatment of autophagy-blocking agents with EGFR inhibitors exerts synergistic anti-cancer effects in T24 and J82 human bladder cancer cells. Lapatinib and gefitinib were used as EGFR inhibitors, and bafilomycin A1 (BFA1, chloroquine (CQ and 3-methyladenine (3-MA were used as the pharmacologic inhibitors of autophagy activities. To assess the proliferative and self-renewal capabilities, the Cell Counting Kit-8 (CCK-8 assay and a clonogenic assay were performed, respectively. To examine apoptotic cell death, flow cytometry using annexin-V/propidium iodide (PI was used. To measure the autophagy activities, the expression levels of LC3I and II was determined by Western blot analysis. To validate the synergistic effects of autophagy inhibition with EGFR inhibitors, we specifically blocked key autophagy regulatory gene ATG12 by transfection of small interference RNA and examined the phenotypic changes. Of note, lapatinib and gefitinib triggered autophagy activities in T24 and J82 human bladder cancer cells, as indicated by upregulation of LC3II. More importantly, inhibiting autophagy activities with pharmacologic inhibitors (BFA1, CQ or 3-MA remarkably reduced the cell viabilities and clonal proliferation of T24 and J82 cells, compared to those treated with either of the agents alone. We also obtained similar results of the enhanced anti-cancer effects of EGFR inhibitors by suppressing the expression of ATG12. Notably, the apoptotic assay showed that synergistic anti-cancer effects were induced via the increase of apoptotic cell death. In summary, concomitant inhibition of autophagy activities potentiated the anti-cancer effects of EGFR inhibitors in human bladder cancer cells, indicating

  15. Regorafenib inhibited gastric cancer cells growth and invasion via CXCR4 activated Wnt pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Xiao-Lin; Xu, Qi; Tang, Lei; Sun, Li; Han, Ting; Wang, Li-Wei; Xiao, Xiu-Ying

    2017-01-01

    Regorafenib is an oral small-molecule multi kinase inhibitor. Recently, several clinical trials have revealed that regorafenib has an anti-tumor activity in gastric cancer. However, only part of patients benefit from regorafenib, and the mechanisms of regorafenib's anti-tumor effect need further demonstrating. In this study, we would assess the potential anti-tumor effects and the underlying mechanisms of regorafenib in gastric cancer cells, and explore novel biomarkers for patients selecting of regorafenib. The anti-tumor effects of regorafenib on gastric cancer cells were analyzed via cell proliferation and invasion. The underlying mechanisms were demonstrated using molecular biology techniques. We found that regorafenib inhibited cell proliferation and invasion at the concentration of 20μmol/L and in a dose dependent manner. The anti-tumor effects of regorafenib related to the decreased expression of CXCR4, and elevated expression and activation of CXCR4 could reverse the inhibition effect of regorafenib on gastric cancer cells. Further studies revealed that regorafenib reduced the transcriptional activity of Wnt/β-Catenin pathway and led to decreased expression of Wnt pathway target genes, while overexpression and activation of CXCR4 could attenuate the inhibition effect of regorafenib on Wnt/β-Catenin pathway. Our findings demonstrated that regorafenib effectively inhibited cell proliferation and invasion of gastric cancer cells via decreasing the expression of CXCR4 and further reducing the transcriptional activity of Wnt/β-Catenin pathway.

  16. Cold atmospheric plasma treatment inhibits growth in colorectal cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Christin; Arndt, Stephanie; Zimmermann, Julia L; Li, Yangfang; Karrer, Sigrid; Bosserhoff, Anja-Katrin

    2018-06-01

    Plasma oncology is a relatively new field of research. Recent developments have indicated that cold atmospheric plasma (CAP) technology is an interesting new therapeutic approach to cancer treatment. In this study, p53 wildtype (LoVo) and human p53 mutated (HT29 and SW480) colorectal cancer cells were treated with the miniFlatPlaSter - a device particularly developed for the treatment of tumor cells - that uses the Surface Micro Discharge (SMD) technology for plasma production in air. The present study analyzed the effects of plasma on colorectal cancer cells in vitro and on normal colon tissue ex vivo. Plasma treatment had strong effects on colon cancer cells, such as inhibition of cell proliferation, induction of cell death, and modulation of p21 expression. In contrast, CAP treatment of murine colon tissue ex vivo for up to 2 min did not show any toxic effect on normal colon cells compared to H2O2 positive control. In summary, these results suggest that the miniFlatPlaSter plasma device is able to kill colorectal cancer cells independent of their p53 mutation status. Thus, this device presents a promising new approach in colon cancer therapy.

  17. Silibinin inhibits accumulation of myeloid-derived suppressor cells and tumor growth of murine breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forghani, Parvin; Khorramizadeh, Mohammad R; Waller, Edmund K

    2014-01-01

    Myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC)s increase in blood and accumulate in the tumor microenvironment of tumor-bearing animals, contributing to immune suppression in cancer. Silibinin, a natural flavonoid from the seeds of milk thistle, has been developed as an anti-inflammatory agent and supportive care agent to reduce the toxicity of cancer chemotherapy. The goals of this study were to evaluate the effect of silibinin on MDSCs in tumor-bearing mice and antitumor activity of silibinin in a mouse model of breast cancer. 4T1 luciferase-transfected mammary carcinoma cells were injected into in the mammary fat pad female BALB/c mice, and female CB17-Prkdc Scid/J mice. Silibinin treatment started on day 4 or day 14 after tumor inoculation continued every other day. Tumor growth was monitored by bioluminescent imaging (BLI) measuring total photon flux. Flow cytometry measured total leukocytes, CD11b + Gr-1 + MDSC, and T cells in the blood and tumors of tumor-bearing mice. The effects of silibinin on 4T1 cell viability in vitro were measured by BLI. Treatment with silibinin increased overall survival in mice harboring tumors derived from the 4T1-luciferase breast cancer cell line, and reduced tumor volumes and numbers of CD11b + Gr-1 + MDSCs in the blood and tumor, and increased the content of T cells in the tumor microenvironment. Silibinin failed to inhibit tumor growth in immunocompromised severe combined immunodeficiency mice, supporting the hypothesis that anticancer effect of silibinin is immune-mediated. The antitumor activity of silibinin requires an intact host immune system and is associated with decreased accumulation of blood and tumor-associated MDSCs

  18. Cantharidin Inhibits the Growth of Triple-Negative Breast Cancer Cells by Suppressing Autophagy and Inducing Apoptosis in Vitro and in Vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong-chang Li

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Cantharidin, a type of terpenoid secreted by the blister beetle Mylabris phalerata (Pallas, has attracted great attention in cancer therapy because of its potential anti-cancer activities. Here, we report the effects on apoptosis and autophagy in human triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC cell lines after treatment with cantharidin and attempt to elucidate the underlying mechanisms. Methods: MDA-MB-231 and MDA-MB-468 cells were treated with cantharidin and cell proliferation was examined using CCK-8 and clone formation assays. The expression of apoptosis- and autophagy-associated proteins was detected by western blotting. Cells were infected with lentivirus carrying the Beclin-1 gene, and MDA-MB-231-beclin1 (MB231-Bec and MDA-MB-468-beclin-1(MB468-Bec cells stably expressing Beclin-1 were established. Autophagic vacuoles in cells were observed with LC3 staining using fluorescence microscopy, and apoptotic cells were detected via flow cytometry. Tumor growth was assessed by subcutaneous inoculation of TNBC cells into BALB/c nude mice. Results: Cantharidin inhibited the proliferation of MDA-MB-231 and MDA-MB-468 cells, and induced cell apoptosis. Cantharidin additionally inhibited the conversion of LC3 I to LC3 II and autophagosome formation by suppressing the expression of Beclin-1. Furthermore, overexpression of Beclin-1 in TNBC cells attenuated the cytotoxicity of cantharidin. In vivo, cantharidin inhibited the growth of MDA-MB-231 and MDA-MB-468 xenografts in nude mice by suppressing autophagy and inducing apoptosis, and Beclin-1 overexpression in TNBC cells reduced the efficacy of cantharidin. Conclusions: Cantharidin inhibits autophagy by suppressing Beclin-1 expression and inducing apoptosis of TNBC cells in vitro and in vivo, thereby representing a potential strategy for the treatment of TNBC.

  19. Docosahexaenoic acid inhibits the growth of hormone-dependent prostate cancer cells by promoting the degradation of the androgen receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Zhimei; Qi, Haixia; Zhang, Ruixue; Zhang, Kun; Shi, Zhemin; Chang, Yanan; Chen, Linfeng; Esmaeili, Mohsen; Baniahmad, Aria; Hong, Wei

    2015-09-01

    Epidemiological and preclinical data have demonstrated the preventative effects of ω-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids, including docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), on prostate cancer. However, there are inconsistencies in these previous studies and the underlying mechanisms remain to be elucidated. In the present study, the androgen receptor (AR), which is a transcription factor involved in cell proliferation and prostate carcinogenesis, was identified as a target of DHA. It was revealed that DHA inhibited hormone‑dependent growth of LNCaP prostate cancer cells. Reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction analysis revealed that treatment with DHA caused no alteration in the transcribed mRNA expression levels of the AR gene. However, immunoblotting revealed that this treatment reduces the protein expression level of the AR. The androgen‑induced genes were subsequently repressed by treatment with DHA. It was demonstrated that DHA exhibits no effect on the translation process of the AR, however, it promotes the proteasome‑mediated degradation of the AR. Therefore, the present study provided a novel mechanism by which DHA exhibits an inhibitory effect on growth of prostate cancer cells.

  20. Selenite Treatment Inhibits LAPC-4 Tumor Growth and Prostate-Specific Antigen Secretion in a Xenograft Model of Human Prostate Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhattacharyya, Rumi S.; Husbeck, Bryan; Feldman, David; Knox, Susan J.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: Selenium compounds have known chemopreventive effects on prostate cancer. However selenite, an inorganic form of selenium, has not been extensively studied as a treatment option for prostate cancer. Our previous studies have demonstrated the inhibition of androgen receptor expression and androgen stimulated prostate-specific antigen (PSA) expression by selenite in human prostate cancer cell lines. In this study, we investigated the in vivo effects of selenite as a therapy to treat mice with established LAPC-4 tumors. Methods and Materials: Male mice harboring androgen-dependent LAPC-4 xenograft tumors were treated with selenite (2 mg/kg intraperitoneally three times per week) or vehicle for 42 days. In addition, androgen-independent LAPC-4 xenograft tumors were generated in female mice over 4 to 6 months. Once established, androgen-independent LAPC-4 tumor fragments were passaged into female mice and were treated with selenite or vehicle for 42 days. Changes in tumor volume and serum PSA levels were assessed. Results: Selenite significantly decreased androgen-dependent LAPC-4 tumor growth in male mice over 42 days (p < 0.001). Relative tumor volume was decreased by 41% in selenite-treated animals compared with vehicle-treated animals. The inhibition of LAPC-4 tumor growth corresponded to a marked decrease in serum PSA levels (p < 0.01). In the androgen-independent LAPC-4 tumors in female mice, selenite treatment decreased tumor volume by 58% after 42 days of treatment (p < 0.001). Conclusions: These results suggest that selenite may have potential as a novel therapeutic agent to treat both androgen-dependent and androgen-independent prostate cancer

  1. The Addition of Manganese Porphyrins during Radiation Inhibits Prostate Cancer Growth and Simultaneously Protects Normal Prostate Tissue from Radiation Damage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arpita Chatterjee

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Radiation therapy is commonly used for prostate cancer treatment; however, normal tissues can be damaged from the reactive oxygen species (ROS produced by radiation. In separate reports, we and others have shown that manganese porphyrins (MnPs, ROS scavengers, protect normal cells from radiation-induced damage but inhibit prostate cancer cell growth. However, there have been no studies demonstrating that MnPs protect normal tissues, while inhibiting tumor growth in the same model. LNCaP or PC3 cells were orthotopically implanted into athymic mice and treated with radiation (2 Gy, for 5 consecutive days in the presence or absence of MnPs. With radiation, MnPs enhanced overall life expectancy and significantly decreased the average tumor volume, as compared to the radiated alone group. MnPs enhanced lipid oxidation in tumor cells but reduced oxidative damage to normal prostate tissue adjacent to the prostate tumor in combination with radiation. Mechanistically, MnPs behave as pro-oxidants or antioxidants depending on the level of oxidative stress inside the treated cell. We found that MnPs act as pro-oxidants in prostate cancer cells, while in normal cells and tissues the MnPs act as antioxidants. For the first time, in the same in vivo model, this study reveals that MnPs enhance the tumoricidal effect of radiation and reduce oxidative damage to normal prostate tissue adjacent to the prostate tumor in the presence of radiation. This study suggests that MnPs are effective radio-protectors for radiation-mediated prostate cancer treatment.

  2. Genistein inhibits proliferation of colon cancer cells by attenuating a negative effect of epidermal growth factor on tumor suppressor FOXO3 activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qi, Wentao; Weber, Christopher R; Wasland, Kaarin; Savkovic, Suzana D

    2011-01-01

    Soy consumption is associated with a lower incidence of colon cancer which is believed to be mediated by one of its of components, genistein. Genistein may inhibit cancer progression by inducing apoptosis or inhibiting proliferation, but mechanisms are not well understood. Epidermal growth factor (EGF)-induced proliferation of colon cancer cells plays an important role in colon cancer progression and is mediated by loss of tumor suppressor FOXO3 activity. The aim of this study was to assess if genistein exerts anti-proliferative properties by attenuating the negative effect of EGF on FOXO3 activity. The effect of genistein on proliferation stimulated by EGF-mediated loss of FOXO3 was examined in human colonic cancer HT-29 cells. EGF-induced FOXO3 phosphorylation and translocation were assessed in the presence of genistein. EGF-mediated loss of FOXO3 interactions with p53 (co-immunoprecipitation) and promoter of p27kip1 (ChIP assay) were examined in presence of genistein in cells with mutated p53 (HT-29) and wild type p53 (HCT116). Silencing of p53 determined activity of FOXO3 when it is bound to p53. Genistein inhibited EGF-induced proliferation, while favoring dephosphorylation and nuclear retention of FOXO3 (active state) in colon cancer cells. Upstream of FOXO3, genistein acts via the PI3K/Akt pathway to inhibit EGF-stimulated FOXO3 phosphorylation (i.e. favors active state). Downstream, EGF-induced disassociation of FOXO3 from mutated tumor suppressor p53, but not wild type p53, is inhibited by genistein favoring FOXO3-p53(mut) interactions with the promoter of the cell cycle inhibitor p27kip1 in colon cancer cells. Thus, the FOXO3-p53(mut) complex leads to elevated p27kip1 expression and promotes cell cycle arrest. These novel anti-proliferative mechanisms of genistein suggest a possible role of combining genistein with other chemoreceptive agents for the treatment of colon cancer

  3. Berberine suppresses tumorigenicity and growth of nasopharyngeal carcinoma cells by inhibiting STAT3 activation induced by tumor associated fibroblasts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsang, Chi Man; Cheung, Yuk Chun; Lui, Vivian Wai-Yan; Yip, Yim Ling; Zhang, Guitao; Lin, Victor Weitao; Cheung, Kenneth Chat-Pan; Feng, Yibin; Tsao, Sai Wah

    2013-01-01

    Cortidis rhizoma (Huanglian) and its major therapeutic component, berberine, have drawn extensive attention in recent years for their anti-cancer properties. Growth inhibitory effects of berberine on multiple types of human cancer cells have been reported. Berberine inhibits invasion, induces cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in human cancer cells. The anti-inflammatory property of berberine, involving inhibition of Signal Transducer and Activator of Transcription 3 (STAT3) activation, has also been documented. In this study, we have examined the effects of berberine on tumorigenicity and growth of nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) cells and their relationship to STAT3 signaling using both in vivo and in vitro models. Berberine effectively inhibited the tumorigenicity and growth of an EBV-positive NPC cell line (C666-1) in athymic nude mice. Inhibition of tumorigenic growth of NPC cells in vivo was correlated with effective inhibition of STAT3 activation in NPC cells inside the tumor xenografts grown in nude mice. In vitro, berberine inhibited both constitutive and IL-6-induced STAT3 activation in NPC cells. Inhibition of STAT3 activation by berberine induced growth inhibition and apoptotic response in NPC cells. Tumor-associated fibroblasts were found to secret IL-6 and the conditioned medium harvested from the fibroblasts also induced STAT3 activation in NPC cells. Furthermore, STAT3 activation by conditioned medium of tumor-associated fibroblasts could be blocked by berberine or antibodies against IL-6 and IL-6R. Our observation that berberine effectively inhibited activation of STAT3 induced by tumor-associated fibroblasts suggests a role of berberine in modulating the effects of tumor stroma on the growth of NPC cells. The effective inhibition of STAT3 activation in NPC cells by berberine supports its potential use in the treatment of NPC

  4. Acetyl-CoA carboxylase rewires cancer metabolism to allow cancer cells to survive inhibition of the Warburg effect by cetuximab.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Jingtao; Hong, Yun; Lu, Yang; Qiu, Songbo; Chaganty, Bharat K R; Zhang, Lun; Wang, Xudong; Li, Qiang; Fan, Zhen

    2017-01-01

    Cetuximab inhibits HIF-1-regulated glycolysis in cancer cells, thereby reversing the Warburg effect and leading to inhibition of cancer cell metabolism. AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is activated after cetuximab treatment, and a sustained AMPK activity is a mechanism contributing to cetuximab resistance. Here, we investigated how acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC), a downstream target of AMPK, rewires cancer metabolism in response to cetuximab treatment. We found that introduction of experimental ACC mutants lacking the AMPK phosphorylation sites (ACC1_S79A and ACC2_S212A) into head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) cells protected HNSCC cells from cetuximab-induced growth inhibition. HNSCC cells with acquired cetuximab resistance contained not only high levels of T172-phosphorylated AMPK and S79-phosphorylated ACC1 but also an increased level of total ACC. These findings were corroborated in tumor specimens of HNSCC patients treated with cetuximab. Cetuximab plus TOFA (an allosteric inhibitor of ACC) achieved remarkable growth inhibition of cetuximab-resistant HNSCC xenografts. Our data suggest a novel paradigm in which cetuximab-mediated activation of AMPK and subsequent phosphorylation and inhibition of ACC is followed by a compensatory increase in total ACC, which rewires cancer metabolism from glycolysis-dependent to lipogenesis-dependent. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. δ-Tocopherol inhibits receptor tyrosine kinase-induced AKT activation in prostate cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hong; Hong, Jungil; Yang, Chung S

    2016-11-01

    The cancer preventive activity of vitamin E is suggested by epidemiological studies and supported by animal studies with vitamin E forms, γ-tocopherol and δ-tocopherol (δ-T). Several recent large-scale cancer prevention trials with high dose of α-tocopherol, however, yielded disappointing results. Whether vitamin E prevents or promotes cancer is a serious concern. A better understanding of the molecular mechanisms of action of the different forms of tocopherols would enhance our understanding of this topic. In this study, we demonstrated that δ-T was the most effective tocopherol form in inhibiting prostate cancer cell growth, by inducing cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. By profiling the effects of δ-T on the cell signaling using the phospho-kinase array, we found that the most inhibited target was the phosphorylation of AKT on T308. Further study on the activation of AKT by EGFR and IGFR revealed that δ-T attenuated the EGF/IGF-induced activation of AKT (via the phosphorylation of AKT on T308 induced by the activation of PIK3). Expression of dominant active PIK3 and AKT in prostate cancer cell line DU145 in which PIK3, AKT, and PTEN are wild type caused the cells to be reflectory to the inhibition of δ-T, supporting that δ-T inhibits the PIK3-mediated activation of AKT. Our data also suggest that δ-T interferes with the EGF-induced EGFR internalization, which leads to the inhibition of the receptor tyrosine kinase-dependent activation of AKT. In summary, our results revealed a novel mechanism of δ-T in inhibiting prostate cancer cell growth, supporting the cancer preventive activity δ-T. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. EGFR‑associated pathways involved in traditional Chinese medicine (TCM)‑1‑induced cell growth inhibition, autophagy and apoptosis in prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Zhaomeng; Zhu, Qingyi; Zhang, Yu; Yin, Yingying; Kang, Dan; Cao, Runyi; Tian, Qian; Lu, Shan; Liu, Ping

    2018-06-01

    Traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) has the synergistic effect of the combination of a single ingredient and a monomer, and systemic and local therapeutic effects in cancer treatment, through which TCM is able to enhance the curative effect and reduce the side effects. The present study analyzed the effect of TCM‑1 (an anti‑cancer TCM) on prostate cancer (PCa) cell lines, and studied in detail the mechanism of cell death induced by TCM‑1 in vitro and in vivo. From the present results, it was identified for the first time, to the best of our knowledge, that TCM‑1 arrested the cell cycle at the G1 phase, decreased cell viability and increased nuclear rupture in a dose‑dependent manner; these effects finally resulted in apoptosis in PCa cells. At the molecular level, the data demonstrated that TCM‑1 competitively acted on epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) with EGF, and suppressed the auto‑phosphorylation and activity of EGFR. Inhibition of EGFR further suppressed the downstream phosphatidylinositol 3‑kinase (PI3K)/RAC‑α serine/threonine‑protein kinase (AKT) and RAF proto‑oncogene serine/threonine‑protein kinase/extracellular signal regulated kinase signaling pathways and resulted in a decrease in the phosphorylated‑forkhead box protein O1 (at Ser256, Thr24 and Ser319) expression level, and induced cell growth inhibition and apoptosis by regulating the expression of apoptosis‑and cell cycle‑associated genes. In addition, TCM‑1 markedly inhibited the PI3K/AKT/serine/threonine‑protein kinase mTOR signaling pathway and induced cell autophagy by downregulating the phosphorylation of p70S6K and upregulating the levels of Beclin‑1 and microtubule‑associated protein light chain‑3II. In vivo, the TCM‑1‑treated group exhibited a significant decrease in tumor volume compared with the negative control group in subcutaneous xenograft nude mice by inhibiting EGFR‑associated signaling pathways. Therefore, the bio‑functions of

  7. ONC201 activates ER stress to inhibit the growth of triple-negative breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Xun; Kho, Dhonghyo; Xu, Jing; Gajan, Ambikai; Wu, Kongming; Wu, Gen Sheng

    2017-03-28

    ONC201 was previously identified as a first-in-class antitumor agent and small-molecule inducer of the TRAIL (tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand) gene that induces apoptosis in cancer cells. ONC201 has a safety profile and is currently in phase II clinical trials for the treatment of various malignancies. In the current study, we examine the effect of ONC201 on triple-negative breast cancer cells (TNBC), a subtype of breast cancer that is sensitive to TRAIL. We find that ONC201 inhibits the growth of TNBC cells including TNBC cells that have developed acquired TRAIL resistance. However, TNBC cells that have developed acquired ONC201 resistance are cross-resistant to TRAIL. Mechanistically, ONC201 triggers an integrated stress response (ISR) involving the activation of the transcription factor ATF4. Knockdown of ATF4 impairs ONC201-induced apoptosis of TNBC cells. Importantly, the activation of ATF4 is compromised in ONC201-resistant TNBC cells. Thus, our results indicate that ONC201 induces an ISR to cause TNBC cell death and suggest that TNBC patients may benefit from ONC201-based therapies.

  8. Critical role of CDK11p58 in human breast cancer growth and angiogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chi, Yayun; Huang, Sheng; Peng, Haojie; Liu, Mengying; Zhao, Jun; Shao, Zhiming; Wu, Jiong

    2015-01-01

    A capillary network is needed in cancer growth and metastasis. Induction of angiogenesis represents one of the major hallmarks of cancer. CDK11 p58 , a Ser/Thr kinase that belongs to the Cell Division Cycle 2-like 1 (CDC2L1) subfamily is associated with cell cycle progression, tumorigenesis, sister chromatid cohesion and apoptotic signaling. However, its role in breast cancer proliferation and angiogenesis remains unclear. Tumorigenicity assays and blood vessel assessment in athymic mice were used to assess the function of CDK11 p58 in tumor proliferation and angiogenesis. CCK-8 assay was used to detect breast cancer cell growth. Immunohistochemistry was used to detect the expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), CD31 and CD34 in CDK11 positive patient breast cancer tissues. Dual-Luciferase array was used to analyze the function of CDK11 p58 in the regulation of VEGF promoter activity. Western blot was used to detect related protein expression levels. CDK11 p58 inhibited breast cancer growth and angiogenesis in breast cancer cells and in nude mice transplanted with tumors. Immunohistochemistry confirmed that CDK11 p58 was negatively associated with angiogenesis-related proteins such as VEGF, CD31 and CD34 in breast cancer patients. Real-time PCR and dual-luciferase assay showed CDK11 p58 inhibited the mRNA levels of VEGF and the promoter activity of VEGF. As CDK11 p58 is a Ser/Thr kinase, the kinase-dead mutant failed to inhibit VEGF mRNA and promoter activity. Western blot analysis showed the same pattern of related protein expression. The data suggested angiogenesis inhibition was dependent on CDK11 p58 kinase activity. This study indicates that CDK11 p58 inhibits the growth and angiogenesis of breast cancer dependent on its kinase activity. The online version of this article (doi:10.1186/s12885-015-1698-7) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users

  9. The Notch ligand delta-like 3 promotes tumor growth and inhibits Notch signaling in lung cancer cells in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deng, San-Ming; Yan, Xian-Chun; Liang, Liang; Wang, Li; Liu, Yuan; Duan, Juan-Li; Yang, Zi-Yan; Chang, Tian-Fang; Ruan, Bai; Zheng, Qi-Jun; Han, Hua

    2017-01-01

    Although it has been suggested that Dll3, one of the Notch ligands, promotes the proliferation and inhibits the apoptosis of cancer cells, the role of Dll3 in cancers remains unclear. In this study, we found that in the murine Lewis lung carcinoma (LLC) cells, the level of Dll3 mRNA changed upon tumor microenvironment (TME) stimulation, namely, decreased under hypoxia or stimulated with tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α. Dll3 was also expressed at higher level in human lung carcinoma tissues than in the para-carcinoma tissues. Overexpression of Dll3 in LLC cells promoted cell proliferation and reduced apoptosis in vitro, and enhanced tumor growth when inoculated in vivo in mice. The Dll3-mediated proliferation could be due to increased Akt phosphorylation in LLC cells, because an Akt inhibitor counteracted Dll3-induced proliferation. Moreover, Dll3 overexpression promoted PI3K/Akt signaling through inhibiting Notch signaling. - Highlights: • The level of Dll3 in Lewis lung carcinoma changed upon tumor microenvironment (TME) stimulation, namely, decreased under hypoxia or stimulated with TNF-α. • The Dll3 was rarely detectable in the para-carcinoma tissues, but positive in 82.1% of NSCLC tissues from 84 patients. • Overexpression of Dll3 in LLC cells promoted tumor growth but did not remarkably alter TME after inoculated in mice. • Overexpression of Dll3 in LLC cells promoted cell proliferation and reduced apoptosis in vitro in an Akt-dependent way. • Dll3 overexpression promoted PI3K/Akt signaling through inhibiting Notch signaling.

  10. Inhibition of transcription factor NF-kappaB signaling proteins IKKbeta and p65 through specific cysteine residues by epoxyquinone A monomer: correlation with its anti-cancer cell growth activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Mei-Chih; Bardhan, Sujata; Pace, Emily A; Rosman, Diana; Beutler, John A; Porco, John A; Gilmore, Thomas D

    2006-02-28

    Transcription factor NF-kappaB is constitutively active in many human chronic inflammatory diseases and cancers. Epoxyquinone A monomer (EqM), a synthetic derivative of the natural product epoxyquinol A, has previously been shown to be a potent inhibitor of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha)-induced activation of NF-kappaB, but the mechanism by which EqM inhibits NF-kappaB activation was not known. In this report, we show that EqM blocks activation of NF-kappaB by inhibiting two molecular targets: IkappaB kinase IKKbeta and NF-kappaB subunit p65. EqM inhibits TNF-alpha-induced IkappaBalpha phosphorylation and degradation by targeting IKKbeta, and an alanine substitution for Cys179 in the activation loop of IKKbeta makes it resistant to EqM-mediated inhibition. EqM also directly inhibits DNA binding by p65, but not p50; moreover, replacement of Cys38 in p65 with Ser abolishes EqM-mediated inhibition of DNA binding. Pretreatment of cells with reducing agent dithiothreitol dose-dependently reduces EqM-mediated inhibition of NF-kappaB, further suggesting that EqM directly modifies the thiol group of Cys residues in protein targets. Modifications of the exocyclic alkene of EqM substantially reduce EqM's ability to inhibit NF-kappaB activation. In the human SUDHL-4 lymphoma cell line, EqM inhibits both proliferation and NF-kappaB DNA binding, and activates caspase-3 activity. EqM also effectively inhibits the growth of human leukemia, kidney, and colon cancer cell lines in the NCI's tumor cell panel. Among six colon cancer cell lines, those with low amounts of constitutive NF-kappaB DNA-binding activity are generally more sensitive to growth inhibition by EqM. Taken together, these results suggest that EqM inhibits growth and induces cell death in tumor cells through a mechanism that involves inhibition of NF-kappaB activity at multiple steps in the signaling pathway.

  11. Bryostatin I inhibits growth and proliferation of pancreatic cancer ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To evaluate the effect of bryostatin I on proliferation of pancreatic cancer cells as well as tumor growth in mice tumor xenograft model. Methods: Activation of NF-κB was evaluated by preparing nuclear material extract using nuclear extract kit (Carlsbad, CA, USA) followed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay ...

  12. Growth suppression of colorectal cancer by plant-derived multiple mAb CO17-1A × BR55 via inhibition of ERK1/2 phosphorylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwak, Dong Hoon; Moussavou, Ghislain; Lee, Ju Hyoung; Heo, Sung Youn; Ko, Kisung; Hwang, Kyung-A; Jekal, Seung-Joo; Choo, Young-Kug

    2014-11-14

    We have generated the transgenic Tabaco plants expressing multiple monoclonal antibody (mAb) CO7-1A × BR55 by cross-pollinating with mAb CO17-1A and mAb BR55. We have demonstrated the anti-cancer effect of plant-derived multiple mAb CO17-1A × BR55. We find that co-treatment of colorectal mAbs (anti-epithelial cellular adhesion molecule (EpCAM), plant-derived monoclonal antibody (mAb(P)) CO17-1A and mAb(P) CO17-1A × BR55) with RAW264.7 cells significantly inhibited the cell growth in SW620 cancer cells. In particular, multi mAb(P) CO17-1A × BR55 significantly and efficiently suppressed the growth of SW620 cancer cells compared to another mAbs. Apoptotic death-positive cells were significantly increased in the mAb(P) CO17-1A × BR55-treated. The mAb(P) CO17-1A × BR55 treatment significantly decreased the expression of B-Cell lymphoma-2 (BCl-2), but the expression of Bcl-2-associated X protein (Bax), and cleaved caspase-3 were markedly increased. In vivo, the mAb(P) CO17-1A × BR55 significantly and efficiently inhibited the growth of colon tumors compared to another mAbs. The apoptotic cell death and inhibition of pro-apoptotic proteins expression were highest by treatment with mAb(P) CO17-1A × BR55. In addition, the mAb(P) CO17-1A × BR55 significantly inhibited the extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1 and 2 (ERK1/2) phosphorylation in cancer cells and tumors. Therefore, this study results suggest that multiple mAb(P) CO17-1A × BR55 has a significant effect on apoptosis-mediated anticancer by suppression of ERK1/2 phosphorylation in colon cancer compared to another mAbs. In light of these results, further clinical investigation should be conducted on mAb(P) CO17-1A × BR55 to determine its possible chemopreventive and/or therapeutic efficacy against human colon cancer.

  13. Aromatic hydrocarbon receptor inhibits lysophosphatidic acid-induced vascular endothelial growth factor-A expression in PC-3 prostate cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Pei-Yi; Lin, Yueh-Chien; Lan, Shun-Yan; Huang, Yuan-Li; Lee, Hsinyu

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: •LPA-induced VEGF-A expression was regulated by HIF-1α and ARNT. •PI3K mediated LPA-induced VEGF-A expression. •AHR signaling inhibited LPA-induced VEGF-A expression in PC-3 cells. -- Abstract: Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) is a lipid growth factor with multiple biological functions and has been shown to stimulate cancer cell secretion of vascular endothelial growth factor-A (VEGF-A) and trigger angiogenesis. Hypoxia-inducible factor-1 (HIF-1), a heterodimer consisting of HIF-1α and HIF-1β (also known as aromatic hydrocarbon receptor nuclear translocator (ARNT)) subunits, is an important regulator of angiogenesis in prostate cancer (PC) through the enhancement of VEGF-A expression. In this study, we first confirmed the ability of LPA to induce VEGF-A expression in PC-3 cells and then validated that LPA-induced VEGF-A expression was regulated by HIF-1α and ARNT through phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase activation. Aromatic hydrocarbon receptor (AHR), a receptor for dioxin-like compounds, functions as a transcription factor through dimerization with ARNT and was found to inhibit prostate carcinogenesis and vanadate-induced VEGF-A production. Since ARNT is a common dimerization partner of AHR and HIF-1α, we hypothesized that AHR might suppress LPA-induced VEGF-A expression in PC-3 cells by competing with HIF-1α for ARNT. Here we demonstrated that overexpression and ligand activation of AHR inhibited HIF-1-mediated VEGF-A induction by LPA treatment of PC-3 cells. In conclusion, our results suggested that AHR activation may inhibit LPA-induced VEGF-A expression in PC-3 cells by attenuating HIF-1α signaling, and subsequently, suppressing angiogenesis and metastasis of PC. These results suggested that AHR presents a potential therapeutic target for the prevention of PC metastasis

  14. Inhibition of metastasis, angiogenesis, and tumor growth by Chinese herbal cocktail Tien-Hsien Liquid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sun Andy

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Advanced cancer is a multifactorial disease that demands treatments targeting multiple cellular pathways. Chinese herbal cocktail which contains various phytochemicals may target multiple dys-regulated pathways in cancer cells and thus may provide an alternative/complementary way to treat cancers. Previously we reported that the Chinese herbal cocktail Tien-Hsien Liguid (THL can specifically induce apoptosis in various cancer cells and have immuno-modulating activity. In this study, we further evaluated the anti-metastatic, anti-angiogenic and anti-tumor activities of THL with a series of in vitro and in vivo experiments. Methods The migration and invasion of cancer cells and endothelial cells was determined by Boyden chamber transwell assays. The effect of THL on pulmonary metastasis was done by injecting CT-26 colon cancer cells intravenously to syngenic mice. The in vitro and in vivo microvessel formation was determined by the tube formation assay and the Matrigel plug assay, respectively. The in vivo anti-tumor effect of THL was determined by a human MDA-MB-231 breast cancer xenograft model. The expression of metalloproteinase (MMP-2, MMP-9, and urokinase plasminogen activator (uPA was measured by gelatin zymography. The expression of HIF-1α and the phosphorylation of ERK1/2 were determined by Western blot. Results THL inhibited the migration and invasion ability of various cancer cells in vitro, decreased the secretion of MMP-2, MMP-9, and uPA and the activity of ERK1/2 in cancer cells, and suppressed pulmonary metastasis of CT-26 cancer cells in syngenic mice. Moreover, THL inhibited the migration, invasion, and tube formation of endothelial cells in vitro, decreased the secretion of MMP-2 and uPA in endothelial cells, and suppressed neovascularization in Matrigel plugs in mice. Besides its inhibitory effect on endothelial cells, THL inhibited hypoxia-induced HIF-1α and vascular endothelial growth factor-A expression

  15. Eugenol and its synthetic analogues inhibit cell growth of human cancer cells (Part I)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carrasco A, H.; Cardona, W.; Espinoza C, L.; Gallardo, C.; Catalan M, K.; Cardile, V.; Lombardo, L.; Cuellar F, M.; Russo, A.

    2008-01-01

    Eugenol (4-allyl-2-methoxyphenol) (1) has been reported to possess antioxidant and anticancer properties. In an attempt to enhance intrinsic activity of this natural compound, some derivatives were synthesized. Eugenol was extracted from cloves oil and further, the eugenol analogues (2-6) were obtained through acetylation and nitration reactions. Eugenol (1) and its analogues (2-6) were examined by in vitro model of cancer using two human cancer cell lines: DU-145 (androgeninsensitive prostate cancer cells) and KB (oral squamous carcinoma cells). Cell viability, by tetrazolium salts assay, was measured. Lactic dehydrogenase (LDH) release was also investigated to evaluate the presence of cell toxicity as a result of cell disruption, subsequent to membrane rupture. In the examined cancer cells, all compounds showed cell-growth inhibition activity. The obtained results demonstrate that the compounds 5-allyl-3-nitrobenzene-1,2-diol (3) and 4-allyl- 2-methoxy-5-nitrophenyl acetate (5) were significantly (p 50 values in DU-145 cells of 19.02 x 10 -6 and 21.5 x 10 -6 mol L -1 , respectively, and in KB cells of 18.11 x 10 -6 and 21.26 x 10 -6 mol L -1 , respectively, suggesting that the presence of nitro and hydroxyl groups could be important in the activity of these compounds. In addition, our results seem to indicate that apoptotic cell demise appears to be induced in KB and DU-145 cells. In fact, in our experimental conditions, no statistically significant increase in LDH release was observed in cancer cells treated with eugenol and its analogues. (author)

  16. Tafazzin (TAZ promotes the tumorigenicity of cervical cancer cells and inhibits apoptosis.

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    Mei Chen

    Full Text Available Tafazzin (TAZ is often aberrantly expressed in some cancers, including rectal cancer and thyroid neoplasms. However, the function of TAZ in cervical cancer cells remains unknown. This study aims to explore the expression and function of TAZ in cervical cancer cells. Here, we determined the expression of TAZ protein in normal cervical tissue (NC, n = 27, high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions (HSIL, n = 26 and squamous cervical carcinoma (SCC, n = 41 by immunohistochemistry, the expression of TAZ protein gradually increased from NC to HSIL to SCC. TAZ was overexpressed or down-regulated in cervical cancer cells by stably transfecting a TAZ-expressing plasmid or a shRNA plasmid targeting TAZ. In vitro, the cell growth curves and MTT assays showed that TAZ may promote the growth and viability of cervical cancer cells. In vivo, xenografts experiment showed that TAZ may increase tumor-forming ability. The percentage of apoptosis cells analyzed by FACS and TUNEL assays consistently showed that TAZ inhibits apoptosis in cervical cancer cells. Furthermore, the Cleaved Caspase 9 and Cleaved Caspase 3 were down-regulated by TAZ in cervical cancer cells. Taken together, this study demonstrated that TAZ is overexpressed in cervical cancer and may promote tumorigenicity of cervical cancer cells and inhibit apoptosis.

  17. Sulindac metabolites inhibit epidermal growth factor receptor activation and expression

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    Ahnen Dennis

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Regular use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs is associated with a decreased mortality from colorectal cancer (CRC. NSAIDs induce apoptotic cell death in colon cancer cells in vitro and inhibit growth of neoplastic colonic mucosa in vivo however, the biochemical mechanisms required for these growth inhibitory effects are not well defined. We previously reported that metabolites of the NSAID sulindac downregulate extracellular-signal regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2 signaling and that this effect is both necessary and sufficient for the apoptotic effects of these drugs. The goal of this project was to specifically test the hypothesis that sulindac metabolites block activation and/or expression of the epidermal growth factor (EGF receptor (EGFR. Methods HT29 human colon cancer cells were treated with EGF, alone, or in the presence of sulindac sulfide or sulindac sulfone. Cells lysates were assayed by immunoblotting for phosphorylated EGFR (pEGFR, pY1068, total EGFR, phosphorylated ERK1/2 (pERK1/2, total ERK1/2, activated caspase-3, and α-tubulin. Results EGF treatment rapidly induced phosphorylation of both EGFR and ERK1/2 in HT29 colon cancer cells. Pretreatment with sulindac metabolites for 24 h blocked EGF-induced phosphorylation of both EGFR and ERK1/2 and decreased total EGFR protein expression. Under basal conditions, downregulation of pEGFR and total EGFR was detected as early as 12 h following sulindac sulfide treatment and persisted through at least 48 h. Sulindac sulfone induced downregulation of pEGFR and total EGFR was detected as early as 1 h and 24 h, respectively, following drug treatment, and persisted through at least 72 h. EGFR downregulation by sulindac metabolites was observed in three different CRC cell lines, occurred prior to the observed downregulation of pERK1/2 and induction of apoptosis by these drugs, and was not dependent of caspase activation. Conclusion These results suggest that

  18. Prostacyclin Inhibits Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Growth by a Frizzled 9-Dependent Pathway That Is Blocked by Secreted Frizzled-Related Protein 1

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    Meredith A. Tennis

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available The goal of this study was to assess the ability of iloprost, an orally active prostacyclin analog, to inhibit transformed growth of human non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC and to define the mechanism of iloprost's tumor suppressive effects. In a panel of NSCLC cell lines, the ability of iloprost to inhibit transformed cell growth was not correlated with the expression of the cell surface receptor for prostacyclin, but instead was correlated with the presence of Frizzled 9 (Fzd 9 and the activation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ (PPARγ. Silencing of Fzd 9 blocked PPARγ activation by iloprost, and expression of Fzd 9 in cells lacking the protein resulted in iloprost's activation of PPARγ and inhibition of transformed growth. Interestingly, soluble Frizzled-related protein-1, a well-known inhibitor of Wnt/Fzd signaling, also blocked the effects of iloprost and Fzd 9. Moreover, mice treated with iloprost had reduced lung tumors and increased Fzd 9 expression. These studies define a novel paradigm, linking the eicosanoid pathway and Wnt signaling. In addition, these data also suggest that prostacyclin analogs may represent a new class of therapeutic agents in the treatment of NSCLC where the restoration of noncanonical Wnt signaling maybe important for the inhibition of transformed cell growth.

  19. Ultrasound-mediated interferon β gene transfection inhibits growth of malignant melanoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamaguchi, Kazuki; Feril, Loreto B.; Tachibana, Katsuro; Takahashi, Akira; Matsuo, Miki; Endo, Hitomi; Harada, Yoshimi; Nakayama, Juichiro

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → Successful ultrasound-mediated transfection of melanoma (C32) cells with IFN-β genes both in vitro and in vivo. → Ultrasound-mediated IFN-β transfection inhibited proliferation of melanoma cells in vitro. → Ultrasound-mediated IFN-β transfection inhibited melanoma tumor growth in vivo. -- Abstract: We investigated the effects of ultrasound-mediated transfection (sonotransfection) of interferon β (IFN-β) gene on melanoma (C32) both in vitro and in vivo. C32 cells were sonotransfected with IFN-β in vitro. Subcutaneous C32 tumors in mice were sonicated weekly immediately after intra-tumor injection with IFN-β genes mixed with microbubbles. Successful sonotransfection with IFN-β gene in vitro was confirmed by ELISA, which resulted in C32 growth inhibition. In vivo, the growth ratio of tumors transfected with IFN-β gene was significantly lower than the other experimental groups. These results may lead to a new method of treatment against melanoma and other hard-to-treat cancers.

  20. Fisetin inhibits liver cancer growth in a mouse model: Relation to dopamine receptor.

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    Liu, Xiang-Feng; Long, Hai-Jiao; Miao, Xiong-Ying; Liu, Guo-Li; Yao, Hong-Liang

    2017-07-01

    Fisetin (3,3',4',7-tetrahydroxyflavone), a natural abundant flavonoid, is produced in different vegetables and fruits. Fisetin has been reported to relate to various positive biological effects, including anti-proliferative, anticancer, anti-oxidative and neuroprotective effects. Dopamine receptors (DRs) belonging to G protein‑coupled receptor family, are known as the target of ~50% of all modern medicinal drugs. DRs consist of various proteins, functioning as transduction of intracellular signals for extracellular stimuli. We found that fisetin performed as DR2 agonist to suppress liver cancer cells proliferation, migration and invasion. Caspase-3 signaling was activated to induce apoptosis for fisetin administration. Furthermore, TGF‑β1 was also inhibited in fisetin-treated liver cancer cells, reducing epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT). Additionally, fisetin downregulated VEGFR1, p-ERK1/2, p38 and pJNK, ameliorating liver cancer progression. In vivo, the orthotopically implanted tumors from mice were inhibited by fisetin adminisatration accompanied by prolonged survival rate and higher levels of dopamine. Together, the results indicated a novel therapeutic strategy to suppress liver cancer progression associated with DR2 regulation, indicating that dopamine might be of importance in liver cancer progression.

  1. Paeoniflorin inhibits the growth of bladder carcinoma via deactivation of STAT3

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    Yang Jianhui

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available Bladder cancer (BCa is one of the most common urinary cancers. The present study aims to investigate whether Paeoniflorin (Pae can exert inhibitory effects on BCa. The results showed that Pae inhibited proliferation of human BCa cell lines in a concentration- and time-dependent manner. Pae and cisplatin (Cis synergistically inhibited the growth of tumours in RT4-bearing mice. Pae treatment neutralized the body loss induced by Cis. Moreover, Pae induced apoptosis in RT4 cells and increased the activities of caspase3, caspase8 and caspase9. Western blotting and immunohistochemical analysis revealed that the phosphorylated signal transducer and activator of transcription-3 (p-STAT3 level were decreased in Pae-treated RT4 cells and Pae-treated tumour-bearing mice. Furthermore, STAT3 transcriptional target B-cell lymphoma-2 was decreased in Pae-treated RT4 cells. Interestingly, Pae prevented translocation of STAT3 to the nucleus in RT4 cells. Collectively, Pae inhibits the growth of BCa, at least in part, via a STAT3 pathway.

  2. Effect of β,β-Dimethylacrylshikonin on Inhibition of Human Colorectal Cancer Cell Growth in Vitro and in Vivo

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    Ting Feng

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available In traditional Chinese medicine, shikonin and its derivatives, has been used in East Asia for several years for the prevention and treatment of several diseases, including cancer. We previously identified that β,β-dimethylacrylshikonin (DA could inhibit hepatocellular carcinoma growth. In the present study, we investigated the inhibitory effects of DA on human colorectal cancer (CRC cell line HCT-116 in vitro and in vivo. A viability assay showed that DA could inhibit tumor cell growth in a time- and dose-dependent manner. Flow cytometry showed that DA blocks the cell cycle at G0/G1 phase. Western blotting results demonstrated that the induction of apoptosis by DA correlated with the induction of pro-apoptotic proteins Bax, and Bid, and a decrease in the expression of anti-apoptotic proteins Bcl-2 and Bcl-xl. Furthermore, treatment of HCT-116 bearing nude mice with DA significantly retarded the growth of xenografts. Consistent with the results in vitro, the DA-mediated suppression of HCT-116 xenografts correlated with Bax and Bcl-2. Taken together, these results suggest that DA could be a novel and promising approach to the treatment of CRC.

  3. PPARγ inhibits ovarian cancer cells proliferation through upregulation of miR-125b

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    Luo, Shuang, E-mail: luoshuangsch@163.com [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Suining Central Hospital, Suining (China); Wang, Jidong [Department of Gynecology and Obsterics, Jinan Central Hospital, Jinan (China); Ma, Ying [Department of Otorhinolaryngolgy, Suining Central Hospital, Suining (China); Yao, Zhenwei [Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics, The First Affiliated Hospital of Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing (China); Pan, Hongjuan [Department of Gynecology and Obsterics, Zhongshan Hospital, Wuhan (China)

    2015-06-26

    miR-125b has essential roles in coordinating tumor proliferation, angiogenesis, invasiveness, metastasis and chemotherapy recurrence. In ovarian cancer miR-125b has been shown to be downregulated and acts as a tumor suppressor by targeting proto-oncogene BCL3. PPARγ, a multiple functional transcription factor, has been reported to have anti-tumor effects through inhibition of proliferation and induction of differentiation and apoptosis by targeting the tumor related genes. However, it is unclear whether miR-125b is regulated by PPARγ in ovarian cancer. In this study, we demonstrated that the miR-125b downregulated in ovarian cancer tissues and cell lines. Ligands-activated PPARγ suppressed proliferation of ovarian cancer cells and this PPARγ-induced growth inhibition is mediated by the upregulation of miR-125b. PPARγ promoted the expression of miR-125b by directly binding to the responsive element in miR-125b gene promoter region. Thus, our results suggest that PPARγ can induce growth suppression of ovarian cancer by upregulating miR-125b which inhibition of proto-oncogene BCL3. These findings will extend our understanding of the function of PPARγ in tumorigenesis and miR-125b may be a therapeutic intervention of ovarian cancer. - Highlights: • miR-125b is down-regulated in ovarian cancer tissues and cells. • PPARγ upregulates miR-125b and downregulates its target gene BCL3 expression. • Silence of miR-125b attenuates PPARγ-mediated growth suppression of ovarian cancer cells. • PPARγ promotes the transcription of miR-125b via binding to PPARE in miR-125b gene promoter region.

  4. [Gefitineb inhibits the growth and induces the apoptosis of mouse I-10 Leydig testicular cancer cells in vitro].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Jie; Tong, Xu-hui; Zhang, Xin-yu; Gao, Qin; Li, Bei-bei; Wu, Xiao-xiang

    2015-09-01

    To observe the inhibitory effect of gefitineb on the proliferation and its inducing effect on the apoptosis of mouse I-10 Leydig testicular cancer cells in vitro. We treated I-10 Leydig testicular cancer cells of mice with gefitineb at 0, 1.25, 2.5, 5, 10, 20, and 40 µmol/L. Then we determined the inhibitory effect of gefitineb on the growth of the cells by MTT, detected their early and late apoptosis by Annexin V-FITC/propidium iodide double staining and Hoechst 33258 nuclear staining, respectively, and observed the expressions of apoptosis-related proteins Bcl-2, Bax and caspase 3/9 by Western blot. Compared with the blank control group, gefitineb significantly inhibited the proliferation of the I-10 cells at 10 and 20 µmol/L (P testicular cancer cells of mice and induce their apoptosis via the mitochondria-mediated apoptosis signaling pathway.

  5. Opioid and nicotine receptors affect growth regulation of human lung cancer cell lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maneckjee, R.; Minna, J.D.

    1990-01-01

    Using specific radioactively-labeled ligands, the authors find that lung cancer cell lines of diverse histologic types express multiple, high-affinity membrane receptors for μ, δ, and κ opioid agonists and for nicotine and α-bungarotoxin. These receptors are biologically active because cAMP levels decreased in lung cancer cells after opioid and nicotine application. Nicotine at concentrations found in the blood of smokers had no effect on in vitro lung cancer cell growth, whereas μ, δ, and κ opioid agonists at low concentrations inhibited lung cancer growth in vitro. They also found that lung cancer cells expressed various combinations of immunoreactive opioid peptides (β-endorphin, enkephalin, or dynorphin), suggesting the participation of opioids in a negative autocrine loop or tumor-suppressing system. Due to the almost universal exposure of patients with lung cancer to nicotine, they tested whether nicotine affected the response of lung cancer cell growth to opioids and found that nicotine at concentrations of 100-200 nM partially or totally reversed opioid-induced growth inhibition in 9/14 lung cancer cell lines. These in vitro results for lung cancer cells suggest that opioids could function as part of a tumor suppressor system and that nicotine can function to circumvent this system in the pathogenesis of lung cancer

  6. Opioid and nicotine receptors affect growth regulation of human lung cancer cell lines

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    Maneckjee, R.; Minna, J.D. (National Cancer Institute-Navy Medical Oncology Branch, Bethesda, MD (USA) Uniformed Services Univ. of the Health Sciences, Bethesda, MD (USA))

    1990-05-01

    Using specific radioactively-labeled ligands, the authors find that lung cancer cell lines of diverse histologic types express multiple, high-affinity membrane receptors for {mu}, {delta}, and {kappa} opioid agonists and for nicotine and {alpha}-bungarotoxin. These receptors are biologically active because cAMP levels decreased in lung cancer cells after opioid and nicotine application. Nicotine at concentrations found in the blood of smokers had no effect on in vitro lung cancer cell growth, whereas {mu}, {delta}, and {kappa} opioid agonists at low concentrations inhibited lung cancer growth in vitro. They also found that lung cancer cells expressed various combinations of immunoreactive opioid peptides ({beta}-endorphin, enkephalin, or dynorphin), suggesting the participation of opioids in a negative autocrine loop or tumor-suppressing system. Due to the almost universal exposure of patients with lung cancer to nicotine, they tested whether nicotine affected the response of lung cancer cell growth to opioids and found that nicotine at concentrations of 100-200 nM partially or totally reversed opioid-induced growth inhibition in 9/14 lung cancer cell lines. These in vitro results for lung cancer cells suggest that opioids could function as part of a tumor suppressor system and that nicotine can function to circumvent this system in the pathogenesis of lung cancer.

  7. Synergistic Effects of Natural Medicinal Plant Extracts on Growth Inhibition of Carcinoma (KB) Cells under Oxidative Stress

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jeong Hee; Ju, Eun Mi; Kim, Jin Kyu

    2000-01-01

    Medicinal plants with synergistic effects on growth inhibition of cancer cells under oxidative stress were screened in this study. Methanol extracts from 51 natural medicinal plants, which were reported to have anticancer effect on hepatoma, stomach cancer or colon cancers which are frequently found in Korean, were prepared and screened for their synergistic activity on growth inhibition of cancer cells under chemically-induced oxidative stress by using MTT assay. Twenty seven samples showed synergistic activity on the growth inhibition in various extent under chemically-induced oxidative stress. Among those samples, eleven samples, such as Melia azedarach, Agastache rugosa, Catalpa ovata, Prunus persica, Sinomenium acutum, Pulsatilla koreana, Oldenlandia diffiusa, Anthriscus sylvestris, Schizandra chinensis, Gleditsia sinensis, Cridium officinale, showed decrease in IC 50 values more than 50%, other 16 samples showed decrease in IC 50 values between 50-25%, compared with the value acquired when medicinal plant sample was used alone. Among those 11 samples, extract of Catalpa ovata showed the highest activity. IC 50 values were decrease to 61% and 28% when carcinoma cells were treated with Catalpa ovata extract in combination of 75 and 100 μM of hydrogen peroxide, respectively

  8. TLR4 has a TP53-dependent dual role in regulating breast cancer cell growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haricharan, Svasti; Brown, Powel

    2015-06-23

    Breast cancer is a leading cause of cancer-related death, and it is important to understand pathways that drive the disease to devise effective therapeutic strategies. Our results show that Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) drives breast cancer cell growth differentially based on the presence of TP53, a tumor suppressor. TP53 is mutationally inactivated in most types of cancer and is mutated in 30-50% of diagnosed breast tumors. We demonstrate that TLR4 activation inhibits growth of TP53 wild-type cells, but promotes growth of TP53 mutant breast cancer cells by regulating proliferation. This differential effect is mediated by changes in tumor cell cytokine secretion. Whereas TLR4 activation in TP53 mutant breast cancer cells increases secretion of progrowth cytokines, TLR4 activation in TP53 wild-type breast cancer cells increases type I IFN (IFN-γ) secretion, which is both necessary and sufficient for mediating TLR4-induced growth inhibition. This study identifies a novel dichotomous role for TLR4 as a growth regulator and a modulator of tumor microenvironment in breast tumors. These results have translational relevance, demonstrating that TP53 mutant breast tumor growth can be suppressed by pharmacologic TLR4 inhibition, whereas TLR4 inhibitors may in fact promote growth of TP53 wild-type tumors. Furthermore, using data generated by The Cancer Genome Atlas consortium, we demonstrate that the effect of TP53 mutational status on TLR4 activity may extend to ovarian, colon, and lung cancers, among others, suggesting that the viability of TLR4 as a therapeutic target depends on TP53 status in many different tumor types.

  9. Metformin combined with aspirin significantly inhibit pancreatic cancer cell growth in vitro and in vivo by suppressing anti-apoptotic proteins Mcl-1 and Bcl-2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yue, Wen; Zheng, Xi; Lin, Yong; Yang, Chung S.; Xu, Qing; Carpizo, Darren; Huang, Huarong; DiPaola, Robert S.; Tan, Xiang-Lin

    2015-01-01

    Metformin and aspirin have been studied extensively as cancer preventive or therapeutic agents. However, the effects of their combination on pancreatic cancer cells have not been investigated. Herein, we evaluated the effects of metformin and aspirin, alone or in combination, on cell viability, migration, and apoptosis as well as the molecular changes in mTOR, STAT3 and apoptotic signaling pathways in PANC-1 and BxPC3 cells. Metformin and aspirin, at relatively low concentrations, demonstrated synergistically inhibitory effects on cell viability. Compared to the untreated control or individual drug, the combination of metformin and aspirin significantly inhibited cell migration and colony formation of both PANC-1 and BxPC-3 cells. Metformin combined with aspirin significantly inhibited the phosphorylation of mTOR and STAT3, and induced apoptosis as measured by caspase-3 and PARP cleavage. Remarkably, metformin combined with aspirin significantly downregulated the anti-apoptotic proteins Mcl-1 and Bcl-2, and upregulated the pro-apoptotic proteins Bim and Puma, as well as interrupted their interactions. The downregulation of Mcl-1 and Bcl-2 was independent of AMPK or STAT3 pathway but partially through mTOR signaling and proteasome degradation. In a PANC-1 xenograft mouse model, we demonstrated that the combination of metformin and aspirin significantly inhibited tumor growth and downregulated the protein expression of Mcl-1 and Bcl-2 in tumors. Taken together, the combination of metformin and aspirin significantly inhibited pancreatic cancer cell growth in vitro and in vivo by regulating the pro- and anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 family members, supporting the continued investigation of this two drug combination as chemopreventive or chemotherapeutic agents for pancreatic cancer. PMID:26056043

  10. N-ω-chloroacetyl-l-ornithine, a new competitive inhibitor of ornithine decarboxylase, induces selective growth inhibition and cytotoxicity on human cancer cells versus normal cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medina-Enríquez, Miriam Marlene; Alcántara-Farfán, Verónica; Aguilar-Faisal, Leopoldo; Trujillo-Ferrara, José Guadalupe; Rodríguez-Páez, Lorena; Vargas-Ramírez, Alba Laura

    2015-06-01

    Many cancer cells have high expression of ornithine decarboxylase (ODC) and there is a concerted effort to seek new inhibitors of this enzyme. The aim of the study was to initially characterize the inhibition properties, then to evaluate the cytotoxicity/antiproliferative cell based activity of N-ω-chloroacetyl-l-ornithine (NCAO) on three human cancer cell lines. Results showed NCAO to be a reversible competitive ODC inhibitor (Ki = 59 µM) with cytotoxic and antiproliferative effects, which were concentration- and time-dependent. The EC50,72h of NCAO was 15.8, 17.5 and 10.1 µM for HeLa, MCF-7 and HepG2 cells, respectively. NCAO at 500 µM completely inhibited growth of all cancer cells at 48 h treatment, with almost no effect on normal cells. Putrescine reversed NCAO effects on MCF-7 and HeLa cells, indicating that this antiproliferative activity is due to ODC inhibition.

  11. SH003 suppresses breast cancer growth by accumulating p62 in autolysosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Youn Kyung; Cho, Sung-Gook; Choi, Yu-Jeong; Yun, Yee Jin; Lee, Kang Min; Lee, Kangwook; Yoo, Hye-Hyun; Shin, Yong Cheol; Ko, Seong-Gyu

    2017-10-24

    Drug markets revisits herbal medicines, as historical usages address their therapeutic efficacies with less adverse effects. Moreover, herbal medicines save both cost and time in development. SH003, a modified version of traditional herbal medicine extracted from Astragalus membranaceus (Am), Angelica gigas (Ag), and Trichosanthes Kirilowii Maximowicz (Tk) with 1:1:1 ratio (w/w) has been revealed to inhibit tumor growth and metastasis on highly metastatic breast cancer cells, both in vivo and in vitro with no toxicity. Meanwhile, autophagy is imperative for maintenance cellular homeostasis, thereby playing critical roles in cancer progression. Inhibition of autophagy by pharmacological agents induces apoptotic cell death in cancer cells, resulting in cancer treatment. In this study, we demonstrate that SH003-induced autophagy via inhibiting STAT3 and mTOR results in an induction of lysosomal p62/SQSTM1 accumulation-mediated reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation and attenuates tumor growth. SH003 induced autophagosome and autolysosome formation by inhibiting activation of STAT3- and mTOR-mediated signaling pathways. However, SH003 blocked autophagy-mediated p62/SQSTM1 degradation through reducing of lysosomal proteases, Cathepsins, resulting in accumulation of p62/SQSTM1 in the lysosome. The accumulation of p62/SQSTM1 caused the increase of ROS, which resulted in the induction of apoptotic cell death. Therefore, we conclude that SH003 suppresses breast cancer growth by inducing autophagy. In addition, SH003-induced p62/SQSTM1 could function as an important mediator for ROS generation-dependent cell death suggesting that SH003 may be useful for treating breast cancer.

  12. PGE{sub 2}-induced colon cancer growth is mediated by mTORC1

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    Dufour, Marc, E-mail: Marc.dufour@chuv.ch; Faes, Seraina, E-mail: Seraina.faes@chuv.ch; Dormond-Meuwly, Anne, E-mail: Anne.meuwly-Dormond@chuv.ch; Demartines, Nicolas, E-mail: Demartines@chuv.ch; Dormond, Olivier, E-mail: Olivier.dormond@chuv.ch

    2014-09-05

    Highlights: • PGE{sub 2} activates mTORC1 in colon cancer cells. • Inhibition of mTORC1 blocks PGE{sub 2} induced colon cancer cell growth. • mTORC1 is a signaling intermediary in PGE{sub 2} induced colon cancer cell responses. - Abstract: The inflammatory prostaglandin E{sub 2} (PGE{sub 2}) cytokine plays a key role in the development of colon cancer. Several studies have shown that PGE{sub 2} directly induces the growth of colon cancer cells and furthermore promotes tumor angiogenesis by increasing the production of the vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). The signaling intermediaries implicated in these processes have however not been fully characterized. In this report, we show that the mechanistic target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) plays an important role in PGE{sub 2}-induced colon cancer cell responses. Indeed, stimulation of LS174T cells with PGE{sub 2} increased mTORC1 activity as observed by the augmentation of S6 ribosomal protein phosphorylation, a downstream effector of mTORC1. The PGE{sub 2} EP{sub 4} receptor was responsible for transducing the signal to mTORC1. Moreover, PGE{sub 2} increased colon cancer cell proliferation as well as the growth of colon cancer cell colonies grown in matrigel and blocking mTORC1 by rapamycin or ATP-competitive inhibitors of mTOR abrogated these effects. Similarly, the inhibition of mTORC1 by downregulation of its component raptor using RNA interference blocked PGE{sub 2}-induced LS174T cell growth. Finally, stimulation of LS174T cells with PGE{sub 2} increased VEGF production which was also prevented by mTORC1 inhibition. Taken together, these results show that mTORC1 is an important signaling intermediary in PGE{sub 2} mediated colon cancer cell growth and VEGF production. They further support a role for mTORC1 in inflammation induced tumor growth.

  13. L-carnitine is an endogenous HDAC inhibitor selectively inhibiting cancer cell growth in vivo and in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Hongbiao; Liu, Ningning; Guo, Haiping; Liao, Siyan; Li, Xiaofen; Yang, Changshan; Liu, Shouting; Song, Wenbin; Liu, Chunjiao; Guan, Lixia; Li, Bing; Xu, Li; Zhang, Change; Wang, Xuejun; Dou, Q Ping; Liu, Jinbao

    2012-01-01

    L-carnitine (LC) is generally believed to transport long-chain acyl groups from fatty acids into the mitochondrial matrix for ATP generation via the citric acid cycle. Based on Warburg's theory that most cancer cells mainly depend on glycolysis for ATP generation, we hypothesize that, LC treatment would lead to disturbance of cellular metabolism and cytotoxicity in cancer cells. In this study, Human hepatoma HepG2, SMMC-7721 cell lines, primary cultured thymocytes and mice bearing HepG2 tumor were used. ATP content was detected by HPLC assay. Cell cycle, cell death and cell viability were assayed by flow cytometry and MTS respectively. Gene, mRNA expression and protein level were detected by gene microarray, Real-time PCR and Western blot respectively. HDAC activities and histone acetylation were detected both in test tube and in cultured cells. A molecular docking study was carried out with CDOCKER protocol of Discovery Studio 2.0 to predict the molecular interaction between L-carnitine and HDAC. Here we found that (1) LC treatment selectively inhibited cancer cell growth in vivo and in vitro; (2) LC treatment selectively induces the expression of p21(cip1) gene, mRNA and protein in cancer cells but not p27(kip1); (4) LC increases histone acetylation and induces accumulation of acetylated histones both in normal thymocytes and cancer cells; (5) LC directly inhibits HDAC I/II activities via binding to the active sites of HDAC and induces histone acetylation and lysine-acetylation accumulation in vitro; (6) LC treatment induces accumulation of acetylated histones in chromatin associated with the p21(cip1) gene but not p27(kip1) detected by ChIP assay. These data support that LC, besides transporting acyl group, works as an endogenous HDAC inhibitor in the cell, which would be of physiological and pathological importance.

  14. Eugenol and its synthetic analogues inhibit cell growth of human cancer cells (Part I)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carrasco A, H.; Cardona, W. [Universidad Andres Bello, Vina del Mar (Chile). Dept. de Ciencias Quimicas]. E-mail: hcarrasco@unab.cl; Espinoza C, L.; Gallardo, C.; Catalan M, K. [Universidad Tecnica Federico Santa Maria, Valparaiso (Chile). Dept. de Quimica; Cardile, V.; Lombardo, L. [University of Catania (Italy). Dept. of Physiological Sciences; Cuellar F, M. [Universidad de Valparaiso (Chile). Facultad de Farmacia; Russo, A. [University of Catania (Italy). Dept. of Biological Chemistry, Medical Chemistry and Molecular Biology

    2008-07-01

    Eugenol (4-allyl-2-methoxyphenol) (1) has been reported to possess antioxidant and anticancer properties. In an attempt to enhance intrinsic activity of this natural compound, some derivatives were synthesized. Eugenol was extracted from cloves oil and further, the eugenol analogues (2-6) were obtained through acetylation and nitration reactions. Eugenol (1) and its analogues (2-6) were examined by in vitro model of cancer using two human cancer cell lines: DU-145 (androgeninsensitive prostate cancer cells) and KB (oral squamous carcinoma cells). Cell viability, by tetrazolium salts assay, was measured. Lactic dehydrogenase (LDH) release was also investigated to evaluate the presence of cell toxicity as a result of cell disruption, subsequent to membrane rupture. In the examined cancer cells, all compounds showed cell-growth inhibition activity. The obtained results demonstrate that the compounds 5-allyl-3-nitrobenzene-1,2-diol (3) and 4-allyl- 2-methoxy-5-nitrophenyl acetate (5) were significantly (p < 0,001) more active than eugenol, with IC{sub 50} values in DU-145 cells of 19.02 x 10{sup -6} and 21.5 x 10{sup -6} mol L{sup -1}, respectively, and in KB cells of 18.11 x 10{sup -6} and 21.26 x 10{sup -6} mol L{sup -1}, respectively, suggesting that the presence of nitro and hydroxyl groups could be important in the activity of these compounds. In addition, our results seem to indicate that apoptotic cell demise appears to be induced in KB and DU-145 cells. In fact, in our experimental conditions, no statistically significant increase in LDH release was observed in cancer cells treated with eugenol and its analogues. (author)

  15. Inhibition of Mammary Cancer Progression in Fetal Alcohol Exposed Rats by β-Endorphin Neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Changqing; Franklin, Tina; Sarkar, Dipak K

    2016-01-01

    Fetal alcohol exposure (FAE) increases the susceptibility to carcinogen-induced mammary cancer progression in rodent models. FAE also decreases β-endorphin (β-EP) level and causes hyperstress response, which leads to inhibition of immune function against cancer. Previous studies have shown that injection of nanosphere-attached dibutyryl cyclic adenosine monophosphate (dbcAMP) into the third ventricle increases the number of β-EP neurons in the hypothalamus. In this study, we assessed the therapeutic potential of stress regulation using methods to increase hypothalamic levels of β-EP, a neuropeptide that inhibits stress axis activity, in treatment of carcinogen-induced mammary cancer in fetal alcohol exposed rats. Fetal alcohol exposed and control Sprague Dawley rats were given a dose of N-Nitroso-N-methylurea (MNU) at postnatal day 50 to induce mammary cancer growth. Upon detection of mammary tumors, the animals were either transplanted with β-EP neurons or injected with dbcAMP-delivering nanospheres into the hypothalamus to increase β-EP peptide production. Spleen cytokines were detected using reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction assays. Metastasis study was done by injecting mammary cancer cells MADB106 into jugular vein of β-EP-activated or control fetal alcohol exposed animals. Both transplantation of β-EP neurons and injection of dbcAMP-delivering nanospheres inhibited MNU-induced mammary cancer growth in control rats, and reversed the effect of FAE on the susceptibility to mammary cancer. Similar to the previously reported immune-enhancing and stress-suppressive effects of β-EP transplantation, injection of dbcAMP-delivering nanospheres increased the levels of interferon-γ and granzyme B and decreased the levels of epinephrine and norepinephrine in fetal alcohol exposed rats. Mammary cancer cell metastasis study also showed that FAE increased incidence of lung tumor retention, while β-EP transplantation inhibited lung tumor growth in

  16. Positive regulation of prostate cancer cell growth by lipid droplet forming and processing enzymes DGAT1 and ABHD5.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitra, Ranjana; Le, Thuc T; Gorjala, Priyatham; Goodman, Oscar B

    2017-09-06

    Neoplastic cells proliferate rapidly and obtain requisite building blocks by reprogramming metabolic pathways that favor growth. Previously, we observed that prostate cancer cells uptake and store lipids in the form of lipid droplets, providing building blocks for membrane synthesis, to facilitate proliferation and growth. Mechanisms of lipid uptake, lipid droplet dynamics and their contribution to cancer growth have yet to be defined. This work is focused on elucidating the prostate cancer-specific modifications in lipid storage pathways so that these modified gene products can be identified and therapeutically targeted. To identify genes that promote lipid droplet formation and storage, the expression profiles of candidate genes were assessed and compared between peripheral blood mononuclear cells and prostate cancer cells. Subsequently, differentially expressed genes were inhibited and growth assays performed to elucidate their role in the growth of the cancer cells. Cell cycle, apoptosis and autophagy assays were performed to ascertain the mechanism of growth inhibition. Our results indicate that DGAT1, ABHD5, ACAT1 and ATGL are overexpressed in prostate cancer cells compared to PBMCs and of these overexpressed genes, DGAT1 and ABHD5 aid in the growth of the prostate cancer cells. Blocking the expression of both DGAT1 and ABHD5 results in inhibition of growth, cell cycle block and cell death. DGAT1 siRNA treatment inhibits lipid droplet formation and leads to autophagy where as ABHD5 siRNA treatment promotes accumulation of lipid droplets and leads to apoptosis. Both the siRNA treatments reduce AMPK phosphorylation, a key regulator of lipid metabolism. While DGAT1 siRNA reduces phosphorylation of ACC, the rate limiting enzyme in de novo fat synthesis and triggers phosphorylation of raptor and ULK-1 inducing autophagy and cell death, ABHD5 siRNA decreases P70S6 phosphorylation, leading to PARP cleavage, apoptosis and cell death. Interestingly, DGAT-1 is involved

  17. Knockdown of long non-coding RNA MAP3K20 antisense RNA 1 inhibits gastric cancer growth through epigenetically regulating miR-375.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quan, Yongsheng; Zhang, Yan; Lin, Wei; Shen, Zhaohua; Wu, Shuai; Zhu, Changxin; Wang, Xiaoyan

    2018-03-04

    Emerging evidence has demonstrated that long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) play a critical role in tumorigenesis of gastric cancer. LncRNA MAP3K20 antisense RNA 1 (MLK7-AS1) has been identified as one of gastric cancer-specific lncRNAs. However, its precise role in gastric cancer remains unknown. In this study, we found that lncRNA MLK7-AS1 was significantly increased in gastric cancer tissues compared with in adjacent tissues. Gastric cancer patients with high MLK7-AS1 expression had a shorter survival and poorer prognosis. By loss-function assay, we demonstrated that knockdown of MLK7-AS1 inhibited cell proliferation and induced apoptosis in HGC27and MKN-45 cells. Furthermore, we identified miR-375 as a target of MLK7-AS1. MLK7-AS1 interacted with Dnmt1 and recruited it to miR-375 promotor, hyper-methylating miR-375 promotor and repressing miR-375 expression. Taken together, our findings demonstrate that knockdown of MLK7-AS1 by siRNA inhibits gastric cancer growth by epigenetically regulating miR-375. Thus, MLK7-AS1 may be a useful prognostic marker and therapeutic target for gastric cancer patients. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. CLIC4 Moves Into Nucleus to Stabilize Anti-Growth Signal | Center for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    In cancer, the delicate balance of signaling pathways that control cell growth and function is disrupted. One signaling pathway commonly altered in cancer is the TGF-beta pathway. TGF-beta significantly inhibits growth of normal cells, particularly epithelial cells. Many cancer cells have developed ways to bypass one or more steps of this pathway in order to achieve

  19. Nanoparticles of Selaginella doederleinii leaf extract inhibit human lung cancer cells A549

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syaefudin; Juniarti, A.; Rosiyana, L.; Setyani, A.; Khodijah, S.

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study is to evaluate cytotoxicity effect of nanoparticles of Selaginella doederleinii (S. doederleinii) leaves extract. S. doederleinii was extracted by maceration method using 70%(v/v) ethanol as solvent. Phytochemical content was analyzed qualitatively by using Harborne and Thin Layer Chromatography (TLC) methods. Nanoparticle extract was prepared by ionic gelation using chitosan as encapsulant agent. Anticancer activity was performed by using 3-(4, 5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2, 5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay. The results showed that S. doederleinii contains of flavonoids. Nanoparticle of S. doederleinii leaves extract greatly inhibited A549 cells growth (cancer cells), with IC50 of 3% or 1020 μg/ml. These nanoparticles extract also inhibited the growth of Chang cells (normal cells), with IC50 of 4% or 1442 μg/ml. The effective concentration of nanoparticles extract which inhibits cancer cells without harming the normal cells is 0.5% or 167 μg/ml. Further studies are needed to obtain the concentration of nanoparticles extract which can selectively suppress cancer cells.

  20. Inhibition of fibroblast growth factor receptor 3-dependent lung adenocarcinoma with a human monoclonal antibody

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongjun Yin

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Activating mutations in fibroblast growth factor receptor 3 (FGFR3 have been identified in multiple types of human cancer and in congenital birth defects. In human lung cancer, fibroblast growth factor 9 (FGF9, a high-affinity ligand for FGFR3, is overexpressed in 10% of primary resected non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC specimens. Furthermore, in a mouse model where FGF9 can be induced in lung epithelial cells, epithelial proliferation and ensuing tumorigenesis is dependent on FGFR3. To develop new customized therapies for cancers that are dependent on FGFR3 activation, we have used this mouse model to evaluate a human monoclonal antibody (D11 with specificity for the extracellular ligand-binding domain of FGFR3, that recognizes both human and mouse forms of the receptor. Here, we show that D11 effectively inhibits signaling through FGFR3 in vitro, inhibits the growth of FGFR3-dependent FGF9-induced lung adenocarcinoma in mice, and reduces tumor-associated morbidity. Given the potency of FGF9 in this mouse model and the absolute requirement for signaling through FGFR3, this study validates the D11 antibody as a potentially useful and effective reagent for treating human cancers or other pathologies that are dependent on activation of FGFR3.

  1. A novel long noncoding RNA AK001796 acts as an oncogene and is involved in cell growth inhibition by resveratrol in lung cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Qiaoyuan [Institute for Chemical Carcinogenesis, State Key Laboratory of Respiratory Diseases, Guangzhou Medical University, Guangzhou 510182 (China); Xu, Enwu [Department of Thoracic Surgery, General Hospital of Guangzhou Military Command of Chinese People' s Liberation Army, Guangzhou 510010 (China); Dai, Jiabin; Liu, Binbin; Han, Zhiyuan; Wu, Jianjun; Zhang, Shaozhu; Peng, Baoying [Institute for Chemical Carcinogenesis, State Key Laboratory of Respiratory Diseases, Guangzhou Medical University, Guangzhou 510182 (China); Zhang, Yajie [Department of Pathology, Guangzhou Medical University, Guangzhou 510182 (China); Jiang, Yiguo, E-mail: jiangyiguo@vip.163.com [Institute for Chemical Carcinogenesis, State Key Laboratory of Respiratory Diseases, Guangzhou Medical University, Guangzhou 510182 (China)

    2015-06-01

    Lung cancer is the most common form of cancer throughout the world. The specific targeting of long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) by resveratrol opened a new avenue for cancer chemoprevention. In this study, we found that 21 lncRNAs were upregulated and 19 lncRNAs were downregulated in lung cancer A549 cells with 25 μmol/L resveratrol treatment determined by microarray analysis. AK001796, the lncRNA with the most clearly altered expression, was overexpressed in lung cancer tissues and cell lines, but its expression was downregulated in resveratrol-treated lung cancer cells. By monitoring cell proliferation and growth in vitro and tumor growth in vivo, we observed a significant reduction in cell viability in lung cancer cells and a slow growth in the tumorigenesis following AK001796 knockdown. We also found that AK001796 knockdown caused a cell-cycle arrest, with significant increases in the percentage of cells in G{sub 0}/G{sub 1} in lung cancer cells. By using cell cycle pathway-specific PCR arrays, we detected changes in a number of cell cycle-related genes related to lncRNA AK001796 knockdown. We further investigated whether AK001796 participated in the anticancer effect of resveratrol and the results showed that reduced lncRNA AK001796 level potentially impaired the inhibitory effect of resveratrol on cell proliferation. To our knowledge, this is the first study to report the changes in an lncRNA expression profile induced by resveratrol in lung cancer. - Highlights: • LncRNA AK001796 played an oncogenic role in lung carcinogenesis. • LncRNA AK001796 was downregulated in resveratrol-treated lung cancer cells. • LncRNA AK001796 was involved in the inhibition of cell growth by resveratrol.

  2. A novel long noncoding RNA AK001796 acts as an oncogene and is involved in cell growth inhibition by resveratrol in lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Qiaoyuan; Xu, Enwu; Dai, Jiabin; Liu, Binbin; Han, Zhiyuan; Wu, Jianjun; Zhang, Shaozhu; Peng, Baoying; Zhang, Yajie; Jiang, Yiguo

    2015-01-01

    Lung cancer is the most common form of cancer throughout the world. The specific targeting of long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) by resveratrol opened a new avenue for cancer chemoprevention. In this study, we found that 21 lncRNAs were upregulated and 19 lncRNAs were downregulated in lung cancer A549 cells with 25 μmol/L resveratrol treatment determined by microarray analysis. AK001796, the lncRNA with the most clearly altered expression, was overexpressed in lung cancer tissues and cell lines, but its expression was downregulated in resveratrol-treated lung cancer cells. By monitoring cell proliferation and growth in vitro and tumor growth in vivo, we observed a significant reduction in cell viability in lung cancer cells and a slow growth in the tumorigenesis following AK001796 knockdown. We also found that AK001796 knockdown caused a cell-cycle arrest, with significant increases in the percentage of cells in G 0 /G 1 in lung cancer cells. By using cell cycle pathway-specific PCR arrays, we detected changes in a number of cell cycle-related genes related to lncRNA AK001796 knockdown. We further investigated whether AK001796 participated in the anticancer effect of resveratrol and the results showed that reduced lncRNA AK001796 level potentially impaired the inhibitory effect of resveratrol on cell proliferation. To our knowledge, this is the first study to report the changes in an lncRNA expression profile induced by resveratrol in lung cancer. - Highlights: • LncRNA AK001796 played an oncogenic role in lung carcinogenesis. • LncRNA AK001796 was downregulated in resveratrol-treated lung cancer cells. • LncRNA AK001796 was involved in the inhibition of cell growth by resveratrol

  3. mTOR Inhibition Induces EGFR Feedback Activation in Association with Its Resistance to Human Pancreatic Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feng Wei

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR is dysregulated in diverse cancers and contributes to tumor progression and drug resistance. The first generation of mTOR inhibitors have failed to show clinical efficiency in treating pancreatic cancers due in part to the feedback relief of the insulin-like growth factor-1 receptor (IGF-1R-AKT signaling pathway. The second generation of mTOR inhibitors, such as AZD8055, could inhibit AKT activation upon mTOR complex 2 (mTORC2 inhibition. However, whether this generation of mTOR inhibitors can obtain satisfactory activities in pancreatic cancer therapy remains unclear. In this study, we found AZD8055 did not show great improvement compared with everolimus, AZD8055 induced a temporal inhibition of AKT kinase activities and AKT was then rephosphorylated. Additionally, we found that AZD8055-induced transient AKT inhibition increased the expression and activation of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR by releasing its transcriptional factors Fork-head box O 1/3a (FoxO1/3a, which might contribute to cell resistance to AZD8055. The in vitro and in vivo experiments further indicated the combination of AZD8055 and erlotinib synergistically inhibited the mTORC1/C2 signaling pathway, EGFR/AKT feedback activation, and cell growth, as well as suppressed the progression of pancreatic cancer in a xenograft model. This study provides a rationale and strategy for overcoming AZD8055 resistance by a combined treatment with the EGFR inhibitor erlotinib in pancreatic cancer therapy.

  4. Anti-cancer effect of bee venom toxin and melittin in ovarian cancer cells through induction of death receptors and inhibition of JAK2/STAT3 pathway

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jo, Miran; Park, Mi Hee; Kollipara, Pushpa Saranya; An, Byeong Jun; Song, Ho Sueb; Han, Sang Bae; Kim, Jang Heub; Song, Min Jong; Hong, Jin Tae

    2012-01-01

    We investigated whether bee venom and melittin, a major component of bee venom, inhibit cell growth through enhancement of death receptor expressions in the human ovarian cancer cells, SKOV3 and PA-1. Bee venom (1–5 μg/ml) and melittin (0.5–2 μg/ml) inhibited the growth of SKOV3 and PA-1 ovarian cancer cells by the induction of apoptotic cell death in a dose dependent manner. Consistent with apoptotic cell death, expression of death receptor (DR) 3 and DR6 was increased in both cancer cells, but expression of DR4 was increased only in PA-1 cells. Expression of DR downstream pro-apoptotic proteins including caspase-3, 8, and Bax was concomitantly increased, but the phosphorylation of JAK2 and STAT3 and the expression of Bcl-2 were inhibited by treatment with bee venom and melittin in SKOV3 and PA-1 cells. Expression of cleaved caspase-3 was increased in SKOV3, but cleaved caspase-8 was increased in PA-1 cells. Moreover, deletion of DR3, DR4, and DR6 by small interfering RNA significantly reversed bee venom and melittin-induced cell growth inhibitory effect as well as down regulation of STAT3 by bee venom and melittin in SKOV3 and PA-1 ovarian cancer cell. These results suggest that bee venom and melittin induce apoptotic cell death in ovarian cancer cells through enhancement of DR3, DR4, and DR6 expression and inhibition of STAT3 pathway. -- Highlights: ► Some studies have showed that bee venom and/or melittin have anti-cancer effects. ► We found that bee venom and melittin inhibited cell growth in ovarian cancer cells. ► Bee venom and melittin induce apoptosis in SKOV3 and PA-1.

  5. Protein-bound polysaccharide from Phellinus linteus inhibits tumor growth, invasion, and angiogenesis and alters Wnt/β-catenin in SW480 human colon cancer cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Park Hae-Duck

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Polysaccharides extracted from the Phellinus linteus (PL mushroom are known to possess anti-tumor effects. However, the molecular mechanisms responsible for the anti-tumor properties of PL remain to be explored. Experiments were carried out to unravel the anticancer effects of PL. Methods The anti-cancer effects of PL were examined in SW480 colon cancer cells by evaluating cell proliferation, invasion and matrix metallo-proteinase (MMP activity. The anti-angiogenic effects of PL were examined by assessing human umbilical vein endothelial cell (HUVEC proliferation and capillary tube formation. The in vivo effect of PL was evaluated in an athymic nude mouse SW480 tumor engraft model. Results PL (125-1000 μg/mL significantly inhibited cell proliferation and decreased β-catenin expression in SW480 cells. Expression of cyclin D1, one of the downstream-regulated genes of β-catenin, and T-cell factor/lymphocyte enhancer binding factor (TCF/LEF transcription activity were also significantly reduced by PL treatment. PL inhibited in vitro invasion and motility as well as the activity of MMP-9. In addition, PL treatment inhibited HUVEC proliferation and capillary tube formation. Tumor growth of SW480 cells implanted into nude mice was significantly decreased as a consequence of PL treatment, and tumor tissues from treated animals showed an increase in the apoptotic index and a decrease in β-catenin expression. Moreover, the proliferation index and microvessel density were significantly decreased. Conclusions These data suggest that PL suppresses tumor growth, invasion, and angiogenesis through the inhibition of Wnt/β-catenin signaling in certain colon cancer cells.

  6. Diclofenac inhibits tumor growth in a murine model of pancreatic cancer by modulation of VEGF levels and arginase activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayorek, Nina; Naftali-Shani, Nili; Grunewald, Myriam

    2010-09-15

    Diclofenac is one of the oldest anti-inflammatory drugs in use. In addition to its inhibition of cyclooxygenases (COX), diclofenac potently inhibits phospholipase A(2) (PLA(2)), thus yielding a broad anti-inflammatory effect. Since inflammation is an important factor in the development of pancreatic tumors we explored the potential of diclofenac to inhibit tumor growth in mice inoculated with PANCO2 cells orthotopically. We found that diclofenac treatment (30 mg/kg/bw for 11 days) of mice inoculated with PANC02 cells, reduced the tumor weight by 60%, correlating with increased apoptosis of tumor cells. Since this effect was not observed in vitro on cultured PANCO2 cells, we theorized that diclofenac beneficial treatment involved other mediators present in vivo. Indeed, diclofenac drastically decreased tumor vascularization by downregulating VEGF in the tumor and in abdominal cavity fluid. Furthermore, diclofenac directly inhibited vascular sprouting ex vivo. Surprisingly, in contrast to other COX-2 inhibitors, diclofenac increased arginase activity/arginase 1 protein content in tumor stroma cells, peritoneal macrophages and white blood cells by 2.4, 4.8 and 2 fold, respectively. We propose that the subsequent arginine depletion and decrease in NO levels, both in serum and peritoneal cavity, adds to tumor growth inhibition by malnourishment and poor vasculature development. In conclusion, diclofenac shows pronounced antitumoral properties in pancreatic cancer model that can contribute to further treatment development. The ability of diclofenac to induce arginase activity in tumor stroma, peritoneal macrophages and white blood cells provides a tool to study a controversial issue of pro-and antitumoral effects of arginine depletion.

  7. PPARγ induces growth inhibition and apoptosis through upregulation of insulin-like growth factor-binding protein-3 in gastric cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, S.Y. [Department of Pediatrics, Chonbuk National University Hospital, Jeonju (Korea, Republic of); Biomedical Research Institute, School of Medicine, Chonbuk National University Hospital, Jeonju (Korea, Republic of); Kim, M.S.; Lee, M.K. [Department of Pediatrics, Chonbuk National University Hospital, Jeonju (Korea, Republic of); Kim, J.S.; Yi, H.K. [Department of Biochemistry, School of Dentistry, Chonbuk National University, Jeonju (Korea, Republic of); Nam, S.Y. [Department of Alternative Therapy, Jeonju University, Jeonju (Korea, Republic of); Lee, D.Y.; Hwang, P.H. [Department of Pediatrics, Chonbuk National University Hospital, Jeonju (Korea, Republic of); Biomedical Research Institute, School of Medicine, Chonbuk National University Hospital, Jeonju (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-01-13

    Peroxisome proliferator activator receptor-gamma (PPARγ) is a ligand-activated transcriptional factor involved in the carcinogenesis of various cancers. Insulin-like growth factor-binding protein-3 (IGFBP-3) is a tumor suppressor gene that has anti-apoptotic activity. The purpose of this study was to investigate the anticancer mechanism of PPARγ with respect to IGFBP-3. PPARγ was overexpressed in SNU-668 gastric cancer cells using an adenovirus gene transfer system. The cells in which PPARγ was overexpressed exhibited growth inhibition, induction of apoptosis, and a significant increase in IGFBP-3 expression. We investigated the underlying molecular mechanisms of PPARγ in SNU-668 cells using an IGFBP-3 promoter/luciferase reporter system. Luciferase activity was increased up to 15-fold in PPARγ transfected cells, suggesting that PPARγ may directly interact with IGFBP-3 promoter to induce its expression. Deletion analysis of the IGFBP-3 promoter showed that luciferase activity was markedly reduced in cells without putative p53-binding sites (-Δ1755, -Δ1795). This suggests that the critical PPARγ-response region is located within the p53-binding region of the IGFBP-3 promoter. We further demonstrated an increase in PPARγ-induced luciferase activity even in cells treated with siRNA to silence p53 expression. Taken together, these data suggest that PPARγ exhibits its anticancer effect by increasing IGFBP-3 expression, and that IGFBP-3 is a significant tumor suppressor.

  8. Inhibition of connective tissue growth factor (CTGF/CCN2) in gallbladder cancer cells leads to decreased growth in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Patricia; Leal, Pamela; Ili, Carmen; Brebi, Priscilla; Alvarez, Hector; Roa, Juan C

    2013-06-01

    Gallbladder cancer (GBC) is an aggressive neoplasm associated with late diagnosis, unsatisfactory treatment and poor prognosis. Previous work showed that connective tissue growth factor (CTGF) expression is increased in this malignancy. This matricellular protein plays an important role in various cellular processes and its involvement in the tumorigenesis of several human cancers has been demonstrated. However, the precise function of CTGF expression in cancer cells is yet to be determined. The aim of this study was to evaluate the CTGF expression in gallbladder cancer cell lines, and its effect on cell viability, colony formation and in vitro cell migration. CTGF expression was evaluated in seven GBC cell lines by Western blot assay. Endogenous CTGF expression was downregulated by lentiviral shRNA directed against CTGF mRNA in G-415 cells, and the effects on cell viability, anchorage-independent growth and migration was assessed by comparing them to scrambled vector-transfected cells. Knockdown of CTGF resulted in significant reduction in cell viability, colony formation and anchorage-independent growth (P cancer may confer a growth advantage for neoplastic cells. © 2013 The Authors. International Journal of Experimental Pathology © 2013 International Journal of Experimental Pathology.

  9. Combination of Vorinostat and caspase-8 inhibition exhibits high anti-tumoral activity on endometrial cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergadà, Laura; Sorolla, Annabel; Yeramian, Andree; Eritja, Nuria; Mirantes, Cristina; Matias-Guiu, Xavier; Dolcet, Xavier

    2013-08-01

    Histone deacetylase inhibitors such as Vorinostat display anti-neoplastic activity against a variety of solid tumors. Here, we have investigated the anti-tumoral activity of Vorinostat on endometrial cancer cells. We have found that Vorinostat caused cell growth arrest, loss of clonogenic growth and apoptosis of endometrial cancer cells. Vorinostat-induced the activation of caspase-8 and -9, the initiators caspases of the extrinsic and the intrinsic apoptotic pathways, respectively. Next, we investigated the role of the extrinsic pathway in apoptosis triggered by Vorinostat. We found that Vorinostat caused a dramatic decrease of FLIP mRNA and protein levels. However, overexpression of the long from of FLIP did not block Vorinostat-induced apoptosis. To further investigate the role of extrinsic apoptotic pathway in Vorinostat-induced apoptosis, we performed an shRNA-mediated knock-down of caspase-8. Surprisingly, downregulation of caspase-8 alone caused a marked decrease in clonogenic ability and reduced the growth of endometrial cancer xenografts in vivo, revealing that targeting caspase-8 may be an attractive target for anticancer therapy on endometrial tumors. Furthermore, combination of caspase-8 inhibition and Vorinostat treatment caused an enhancement of apoptotic cell death and a further decrease of clonogenic growth of endometrial cancer cells. More importantly, combination of Vorinostat and caspase-8 inhibition caused a nearly complete inhibition of tumor xenograft growth. Finally, we demonstrate that cell death triggered by Vorinostat alone or in combination with caspase-8 shRNAs was inhibited by the anti-apoptotic protein Bcl-XL. Our results suggest that combinatory therapies using Vorinostat treatment and caspase-8 inhibition can be an effective treatment for endometrial carcinomas. Copyright © 2013 Federation of European Biochemical Societies. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Plant lectin can target receptors containing sialic acid, exemplified by podoplanin, to inhibit transformed cell growth and migration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jhon Alberto Ochoa-Alvarez

    Full Text Available Cancer is a leading cause of death of men and women worldwide. Tumor cell motility contributes to metastatic invasion that causes the vast majority of cancer deaths. Extracellular receptors modified by α2,3-sialic acids that promote this motility can serve as ideal chemotherapeutic targets. For example, the extracellular domain of the mucin receptor podoplanin (PDPN is highly O-glycosylated with α2,3-sialic acid linked to galactose. PDPN is activated by endogenous ligands to induce tumor cell motility and metastasis. Dietary lectins that target proteins containing α2,3-sialic acid inhibit tumor cell growth. However, anti-cancer lectins that have been examined thus far target receptors that have not been identified. We report here that a lectin from the seeds of Maackia amurensis (MASL with affinity for O-linked carbohydrate chains containing sialic acid targets PDPN to inhibit transformed cell growth and motility at nanomolar concentrations. Interestingly, the biological activity of this lectin survives gastrointestinal proteolysis and enters the cardiovascular system to inhibit melanoma cell growth, migration, and tumorigenesis. These studies demonstrate how lectins may be used to help develop dietary agents that target specific receptors to combat malignant cell growth.

  11. beta 1 integrin inhibition dramatically enhances radiotherapy efficacy in human breast cancer xenografts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Catherine C.; Park, Catherine C.; Zhang, Hui J.; Yao, Evelyn S.; Park, Chong J.; Bissell, Mina J.

    2008-01-01

    β1 integrin signaling has been shown to mediate cellular resistance to apoptosis after exposure to ionizing radiation (IR). Other signaling molecules that increase resistance include Akt, which promotes cell survival downstream of β1 integrin signaling. We showed previously that β1 integrin inhibitory antibodies, AIIB2, enhance apoptosis and decrease growth in human breast cancer cells in 3 dimensional laminin-rich extracellular matrix (3D lrECM) cultures and in vivo. Here we asked whether AIIB2 could synergize with IR to modify Akt-mediated IR resistance. We used 3D lrECM cultures to test the optimal combination of AIIB2 with IR treatment of two breast cancer cell lines, MCF-7 and HMT3522-T4-2, as well as T4-2 myr-Akt breast cancer colonies or HMT3522-S-1, which form normal organotypic structures in 3D lrECM. Colonies were assayed for apoptosis and β1 integrin/Akt signaling pathways were evaluated using western blot. In addition, mice bearing MCF-7 xenografts were used to validate the findings in 3D lrECM. We report that AIIB2 increased apoptosis optimally post-IR by down regulating Akt in breast cancer colonies in 3D lrECM. In vivo, addition of AIIB2 after IR significantly enhanced tumor growth inhibition and apoptosis compared to either treatment alone. Remarkably, the degree of tumor growth inhibition using AIIB2 plus 2 Gy radiation was similar to that of 8 Gy alone. We showed previously that AIIB2 had no discernible toxicity in mice; here, its addition allowed for a significant reduction in the IR dose that was necessary to achieve comparable growth inhibition and apoptosis in breast cancer xenografts in vivo

  12. beta 1 integrin inhibition dramatically enhances radiotherapy efficacy in human breast cancer xenografts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Catherine C.; Park, Catherine C.; Zhang, Hui J.; Yao, Evelyn S.; Park, Chong J.; Bissell, Mina J.

    2008-06-02

    {beta}1 integrin signaling has been shown to mediate cellular resistance to apoptosis after exposure to ionizing radiation (IR). Other signaling molecules that increase resistance include Akt, which promotes cell survival downstream of {beta}1 integrin signaling. We showed previously that {beta}1 integrin inhibitory antibodies, AIIB2, enhance apoptosis and decrease growth in human breast cancer cells in 3 dimensional laminin-rich extracellular matrix (3D lrECM) cultures and in vivo. Here we asked whether AIIB2 could synergize with IR to modify Akt-mediated IR resistance. We used 3D lrECM cultures to test the optimal combination of AIIB2 with IR treatment of two breast cancer cell lines, MCF-7 and HMT3522-T4-2, as well as T4-2 myr-Akt breast cancer colonies or HMT3522-S-1, which form normal organotypic structures in 3D lrECM. Colonies were assayed for apoptosis and {beta}1 integrin/Akt signaling pathways were evaluated using western blot. In addition, mice bearing MCF-7 xenografts were used to validate the findings in 3D lrECM. We report that AIIB2 increased apoptosis optimally post-IR by down regulating Akt in breast cancer colonies in 3D lrECM. In vivo, addition of AIIB2 after IR significantly enhanced tumor growth inhibition and apoptosis compared to either treatment alone. Remarkably, the degree of tumor growth inhibition using AIIB2 plus 2 Gy radiation was similar to that of 8 Gy alone. We showed previously that AIIB2 had no discernible toxicity in mice; here, its addition allowed for a significant reduction in the IR dose that was necessary to achieve comparable growth inhibition and apoptosis in breast cancer xenografts in vivo.

  13. Increased oxidative stress mediates the antitumor effect of PARP inhibition in ovarian cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong Hou

    2018-07-01

    Full Text Available PARP inhibitors have been widely tested in clinical trials, especially for the treatment of breast cancer and ovarian cancer, and were shown to be highly successful. Because PARP primarily functions in sensing and repairing DNA strand breaks, the therapeutic effect of PARP inhibition is generally believed to be attributed to impaired DNA repair. We here report that oxidative stress is also increased by PARP inhibition and mediates the antitumor effect. We showed that PARP1 is highly expressed in specimens of high grade serous ovarian carcinoma and its activity is required for unperturbed proliferation of ovarian cancer cells. Inhibition or depletion of PARP leads to not only an increase in DNA damage, but also an elevation in the levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS. Importantly, antioxidant N-acetylcysteine (NAC significantly attenuated the induction of DNA damage and the perturbation of proliferation by PARP inhibition or depletion. We further showed that NADPH oxidases 1 and 4 were significantly upregulated by PARP inhibition and were partially responsible for the induction of oxidative stress. Depletion of NOX1 and NOX4 partially rescued the growth inhibition of PARP1-deficient tumor xenografts. Our findings suggest that in addition to compromising the repair of DNA damage, PARP inhibition or depletion may exert extra antitumor effect by elevating oxidative stress in ovarian cancer cells. Keywords: PARP1, Oxidative stress, NADPH oxidases, Ovarian cancer

  14. Simvastatin inhibits the proliferation of human prostate cancer PC-3 cells via down-regulation of the insulin-like growth factor 1 receptor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sekine, Yoshitaka; Furuya, Yosuke; Nishii, Masahiro; Koike, Hidekazu; Matsui, Hiroshi; Suzuki, Kazuhiro

    2008-01-01

    Recently, statins have been being studied for their proapoptic and antimetastatic effects. However, the exact mechanisms of their anticancer action are still unclear. Dolichyl phosphate is a nonsterol isoprenoid derivative in the mevalonate pathway that affects the expression of the Insulin-like growth factor 1 receptor (IGF-1R). IGF-1R activation is required for prostate cell proliferation; therefore, IGF-1R inhibitory agents may be of preventive and/or therapeutic value. In this study, the effects of simvastatin on IGF-1R signaling in prostate cancer PC-3 cells were examined. Simvastatin suppressed proliferation and induced apoptosis of PC-3, and the expression of IGF-1R was suppressed by simvastatin. Knockdown of IGF-1R by siRNA led to inhibition of proliferation of PC-3. Simvastatin also inhibited IGF-1-induced activation of both ERK and Akt signaling and IGF-1-induced PC-3 cell proliferation. Our results suggest statins are potent inhibitors of the IGF-1/IGF-1R system in prostate cancer cells and may be beneficial in prostate cancer treatment

  15. Murraya koenigii leaf extract inhibits proteasome activity and induces cell death in breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noolu, Bindu; Ajumeera, Rajanna; Chauhan, Anitha; Nagalla, Balakrishna; Manchala, Raghunath; Ismail, Ayesha

    2013-01-09

    Inhibition of the proteolytic activity of 26S proteasome, the protein-degrading machine, is now considered a novel and promising approach for cancer therapy. Interestingly, proteasome inhibitors have been demonstrated to selectively kill cancer cells and also enhance the sensitivity of tumor cells to chemotherapeutic agents. Recently, polyphenols/flavonoids have been reported to inhibit proteasome activity. Murraya koenigii Spreng, a medicinally important herb of Indian origin, has been used for centuries in the Ayurvedic system of medicine. Here we show that Murraya koenigii leaves (curry leaves), a rich source of polyphenols, inhibit the proteolytic activity of the cancer cell proteasome, and cause cell death. Hydro-methanolic extract of curry leaves (CLE) was prepared and its total phenolic content [TPC] determined by, the Folin-Ciocalteau's method. Two human breast carcinoma cell lines: MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 and a normal human lung fibroblast cell line, WI-38 were used for the studies. Cytotoxicity of the CLE was assessed by the MTT assay. We studied the effect of CLE on growth kinetics using colony formation assay. Growth arrest was assessed by cell cycle analysis and apoptosis by Annexin-V binding using flow cytometry. Inhibition of the endogenous 26S proteasome was studied in intact cells and cell extracts using substrates specific to 20S proteasomal enzymes. CLE decreased cell viability and altered the growth kinetics in both the breast cancer cell lines in a dose-dependent manner. It showed a significant arrest of cells in the S phase albeit in cancer cells only. Annexin V binding data suggests that cell death was via the apoptotic pathway in both the cancer cell lines. CLE treatment significantly decreased the activity of the 26S proteasome in the cancer but not normal cells. Our study suggests M. koenigii leaves to be a potent source of proteasome inhibitors that lead to cancer cell death. Therefore, identification of active component(s) from the leaf

  16. Acetoacetate reduces growth and ATP concentration in cancer cell lines which over-express uncoupling protein 2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Quadros Edward V

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recent evidence suggests that several human cancers are capable of uncoupling of mitochondrial ATP generation in the presence of intact tricarboxylic acid (TCA enzymes. The goal of the current study was to test the hypothesis that ketone bodies can inhibit cell growth in aggressive cancers and that expression of uncoupling protein 2 is a contributing factor. The proposed mechanism involves inhibition of glycolytic ATP production via a Randle-like cycle while increased uncoupling renders cancers unable to produce compensatory ATP from respiration. Methods Seven aggressive human cancer cell lines, and three control fibroblast lines were grown in vitro in either 10 mM glucose medium (GM, or in glucose plus 10 mM acetoacetate [G+AcA]. The cells were assayed for cell growth, ATP production and expression of UCP2. Results There was a high correlation of cell growth with ATP concentration (r = 0.948 in a continuum across all cell lines. Controls demonstrated normal cell growth and ATP with the lowest density of mitochondrial UCP2 staining while all cancer lines demonstrated proportionally inhibited growth and ATP, and over-expression of UCP2 (p Conclusion Seven human cancer cell lines grown in glucose plus acetoacetate medium showed tightly coupled reduction of growth and ATP concentration. The findings were not observed in control fibroblasts. The observed over-expression of UCP2 in cancer lines, but not in controls, provides a plausible molecular mechanism by which acetoacetate spares normal cells but suppresses growth in cancer lines. The results bear on the hypothesized potential for ketogenic diets as therapeutic strategies.

  17. Targeting cyclin B1 inhibits proliferation and sensitizes breast cancer cells to taxol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Androic, Ilija; Krämer, Andrea; Yan, Ruilan; Rödel, Franz; Gätje, Regine; Kaufmann, Manfred; Strebhardt, Klaus; Yuan, Juping

    2008-01-01

    Cyclin B1, the regulatory subunit of cyclin-dependent kinase 1 (Cdk1), is essential for the transition from G2 phase to mitosis. Cyclin B1 is very often found to be overexpressed in primary breast and cervical cancer cells as well as in cancer cell lines. Its expression is correlated with the malignancy of gynecological cancers. In order to explore cyclin B1 as a potential target for gynecological cancer therapy, we studied the effect of small interfering RNA (siRNA) on different gynecological cancer cell lines by monitoring their proliferation rate, cell cycle profile, protein expression and activity, apoptosis induction and colony formation. Tumor formation in vivo was examined using mouse xenograft models. Downregulation of cyclin B1 inhibited proliferation of several breast and cervical cancer cell lines including MCF-7, BT-474, SK-BR-3, MDA-MB-231 and HeLa. After combining cyclin B1 siRNA with taxol, we observed an increased apoptotic rate accompanied by an enhanced antiproliferative effect in breast cancer cells. Furthermore, control HeLa cells were progressively growing, whereas the tumor growth of HeLa cells pre-treated with cyclin B1 siRNA was strongly inhibited in nude mice, indicating that cyclin B1 is indispensable for tumor growth in vivo. Our data support the notion of cyclin B1 being essential for survival and proliferation of gynecological cancer cells. Concordantly, knockdown of cyclin B1 inhibits proliferation in vitro as well as in vivo. Moreover, targeting cyclin B1 sensitizes breast cancer cells to taxol, suggesting that specific cyclin B1 targeting is an attractive strategy for the combination with conventionally used agents in gynecological cancer therapy

  18. Prostate Cancer Cell Growth: Stimulatory Role of Neurotensin and Mechanism of Inhibition by Flavonoids as Related to Protein Kinase C

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    cell lines (NCI-N417, NCI-H345, NCI-N592) were found to convert exogenous NT into the fragments NT1 –8 and NT9–13, reflecting the presence of...secrete NT. However, exogenous NT was degraded primarily to NT1 –11, consistent with the presence of neutral endopeptidase 3.4.24.11 in these cells . This...TITLE: Prostate Cancer Cell Growth: Stimulatory Role of Neurotensin and Mechanism of Inhibition by Flavonoids as Related to Protein Kinase C

  19. MicroRNA 128a increases intracellular ROS level by targeting Bmi-1 and inhibits medulloblastoma cancer cell growth by promoting senescence.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sujatha Venkataraman

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: MicroRNAs (miRNAs are a class of short non-coding RNAs that regulate cell homeostasis by inhibiting translation or degrading mRNA of target genes, and thereby can act as tumor suppressor genes or oncogenes. The role of microRNAs in medulloblastoma has only recently been addressed. We hypothesized that microRNAs differentially expressed during normal CNS development might be abnormally regulated in medulloblastoma and are functionally important for medulloblastoma cell growth. METHODOLOGY AND PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We examined the expression of microRNAs in medulloblastoma and then investigated the functional role of one specific one, miR-128a, in regulating medulloblastoma cell growth. We found that many microRNAs associated with normal neuronal differentiation are significantly down regulated in medulloblastoma. One of these, miR-128a, inhibits growth of medulloblastoma cells by targeting the Bmi-1 oncogene. In addition, miR-128a alters the intracellular redox state of the tumor cells and promotes cellular senescence. CONCLUSIONS AND SIGNIFICANCE: Here we report the novel regulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS by microRNA 128a via the specific inhibition of the Bmi-1 oncogene. We demonstrate that miR-128a has growth suppressive activity in medulloblastoma and that this activity is partially mediated by targeting Bmi-1. This data has implications for the modulation of redox states in cancer stem cells, which are thought to be resistant to therapy due to their low ROS states.

  20. Platycodin D inhibits tumor growth by antiangiogenic activity via blocking VEGFR2-mediated signaling pathway

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luan, Xin; Gao, Yun-Ge; Guan, Ying-Yun; Xu, Jian-Rong; Lu, Qin [Department of Pharmacology, Institute of Medical Sciences, Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine (SJTU-SM), Shanghai 200025 (China); Zhao, Mei [Department of Pharmacy, Shanghai Institute of Health Sciences and Health School Attached to SJTU-SM, 279 Zhouzhu Road, Shanghai 201318 (China); Liu, Ya-Rong; Liu, Hai-Jun [Department of Pharmacology, Institute of Medical Sciences, Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine (SJTU-SM), Shanghai 200025 (China); Fang, Chao, E-mail: fangchao100@hotmail.com [Department of Pharmacology, Institute of Medical Sciences, Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine (SJTU-SM), Shanghai 200025 (China); Chen, Hong-Zhuan, E-mail: hongzhuan_chen@hotmail.com [Department of Pharmacology, Institute of Medical Sciences, Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine (SJTU-SM), Shanghai 200025 (China)

    2014-11-15

    Platycodin D (PD) is an active component mainly isolated from the root of Platycodon grandiflorum. Recent studies proved that PD exhibited inhibitory effect on proliferation, migration, invasion and xenograft growth of diverse cancer cell lines. However, whether PD is suppressive for angiogenesis, an important hallmark in cancer development, remains unknown. Here, we found that PD could dose-dependently inhibit human umbilical vein endothelial cell (HUVEC) proliferation, motility, migration and tube formation. PD also significantly inhibited angiogenesis in the chick embryo chorioallantoic membrane (CAM). Moreover, the antiangiogenic activity of PD contributed to its in vivo anticancer potency shown in the decreased microvessel density and delayed growth of HCT-15 xenograft in mice with no overt toxicity. Western blot analysis indicated that PD inhibited the phosphorylation of VEGFR2 and its downstream protein kinase including PLCγ1, JAK2, FAK, Src, and Akt in endothelial cells. Molecular docking simulation showed that PD formed hydrogen bonds and hydrophobic interactions within the ATP binding pocket of VEGFR2 kinase domain. The present study firstly revealed the high antiangiogenic activity and the underlying molecular basis of PD, suggesting that PD may be a potential antiangiogenic agent for angiogenesis-related diseases. - Highlights: • Platycodin D inhibits HUVEC proliferation, motility, migration and tube formation. • Platycodin D inhibits the angiogenesis in chick embryo chorioallantoic membrane. • Platycodin D suppresses the angiogenesis and growth of HCT-15 xenograft in mice. • Platycodin D inhibits the phosphorylation of VEGFR2 and downstream kinases in HUVEC.

  1. Platycodin D inhibits tumor growth by antiangiogenic activity via blocking VEGFR2-mediated signaling pathway

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luan, Xin; Gao, Yun-Ge; Guan, Ying-Yun; Xu, Jian-Rong; Lu, Qin; Zhao, Mei; Liu, Ya-Rong; Liu, Hai-Jun; Fang, Chao; Chen, Hong-Zhuan

    2014-01-01

    Platycodin D (PD) is an active component mainly isolated from the root of Platycodon grandiflorum. Recent studies proved that PD exhibited inhibitory effect on proliferation, migration, invasion and xenograft growth of diverse cancer cell lines. However, whether PD is suppressive for angiogenesis, an important hallmark in cancer development, remains unknown. Here, we found that PD could dose-dependently inhibit human umbilical vein endothelial cell (HUVEC) proliferation, motility, migration and tube formation. PD also significantly inhibited angiogenesis in the chick embryo chorioallantoic membrane (CAM). Moreover, the antiangiogenic activity of PD contributed to its in vivo anticancer potency shown in the decreased microvessel density and delayed growth of HCT-15 xenograft in mice with no overt toxicity. Western blot analysis indicated that PD inhibited the phosphorylation of VEGFR2 and its downstream protein kinase including PLCγ1, JAK2, FAK, Src, and Akt in endothelial cells. Molecular docking simulation showed that PD formed hydrogen bonds and hydrophobic interactions within the ATP binding pocket of VEGFR2 kinase domain. The present study firstly revealed the high antiangiogenic activity and the underlying molecular basis of PD, suggesting that PD may be a potential antiangiogenic agent for angiogenesis-related diseases. - Highlights: • Platycodin D inhibits HUVEC proliferation, motility, migration and tube formation. • Platycodin D inhibits the angiogenesis in chick embryo chorioallantoic membrane. • Platycodin D suppresses the angiogenesis and growth of HCT-15 xenograft in mice. • Platycodin D inhibits the phosphorylation of VEGFR2 and downstream kinases in HUVEC

  2. YAP Inhibition by Resveratrol via Activation of AMPK Enhances the Sensitivity of Pancreatic Cancer Cells to Gemcitabine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhengdong Jiang

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Resveratrol, a natural polyphenol present in most plants, inhibits the growth of numerous cancers both in vitro and in vivo. Aberrant expression of YAP has been reported to activate multiple growth-regulatory pathways and confer anti-apoptotic abilities to many cancer cells. However, the role of resveratrol in YES-activated protein (YAP expression and that of YAP in pancreatic cancer cells’ response to gemcitabine resistance remain elusive. In this study, we found that resveratrol suppressed the proliferation and cloning ability and induced the apoptosis of pancreatic cancer cells. These multiple biological effects might result from the activation of AMP-activation protein kinase (AMPK (Thr172 and, thus, the induction of YAP cytoplasmic retention, Ser127 phosphorylation, and the inhibition of YAP transcriptional activity by resveratrol. YAP silencing by siRNA or resveratrol enhanced the sensitivity of gemcitabine in pancreatic cancer cells. Taken together, these findings demonstrate that resveratrol could increase the sensitivity of pancreatic cancer cells to gemcitabine by inhibiting YAP expression. More importantly, our work reveals that resveratrol is a potential anticancer agent for the treatment of pancreatic cancer, and YAP may serve as a promising target for sensitizing pancreatic cancer cells to chemotherapy.

  3. Inhibition of type I insulin-like growth factor receptor signaling attenuates the development of breast cancer brain metastasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saldana, Sandra M; Lee, Heng-Huan; Lowery, Frank J; Khotskaya, Yekaterina B; Xia, Weiya; Zhang, Chenyu; Chang, Shih-Shin; Chou, Chao-Kai; Steeg, Patricia S; Yu, Dihua; Hung, Mien-Chie

    2013-01-01

    Brain metastasis is a common cause of mortality in cancer patients, yet potential therapeutic targets remain largely unknown. The type I insulin-like growth factor receptor (IGF-IR) is known to play a role in the progression of breast cancer and is currently being investigated in the clinical setting for various types of cancer. The present study demonstrates that IGF-IR is constitutively autophosphorylated in brain-seeking breast cancer sublines. Knockdown of IGF-IR results in a decrease of phospho-AKT and phospho-p70s6k, as well as decreased migration and invasion of MDA-MB-231Br brain-seeking cells. In addition, transient ablation of IGFBP3, which is overexpressed in brain-seeking cells, blocks IGF-IR activation. Using an in vivo experimental brain metastasis model, we show that IGF-IR knockdown brain-seeking cells have reduced potential to establish brain metastases. Finally, we demonstrate that the malignancy of brain-seeking cells is attenuated by pharmacological inhibition with picropodophyllin, an IGF-IR-specific tyrosine kinase inhibitor. Together, our data suggest that the IGF-IR is an important mediator of brain metastasis and its ablation delays the onset of brain metastases in our model system.

  4. Dietary agent, benzyl isothiocyanate inhibits signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 phosphorylation and collaborates with sulforaphane in the growth suppression of PANC-1 cancer cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deangelis Stephanie

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The Signal Transducer and Activator of Transcription (STAT proteins comprise a family of latent transcription factors with diverse functions. STAT3 has well established roles in cell proliferation, growth and survival, and its persistent activation has been detected with high frequency in many human cancers. As constitutive activation of STAT3 appears to be vital for the continued survival of these cancerous cells, it has emerged as an attractive target for chemotherapeutics. We examined whether the inhibitory activities of bioactive compounds from cruciferous vegetables, such as Benzyl isothiocyanate (BITC and sulforaphane, extended to STAT3 activation in PANC-1 human pancreatic cancer cells. BITC and sulforaphane were both capable of inhibiting cell viability and inducing apoptosis in PANC-1. Sulforaphane had minimal effect on the direct inhibition of STAT3 tyrosine phosphorylation, however, suggesting its inhibitory activities are most likely STAT3-independent. Conversely, BITC was shown to inhibit the tyrosine phosphorylation of STAT3, but not the phosphorylation of ERK1/2, MAPK and p70S6 kinase. These results suggest that STAT3 may be one of the targets of BITC-mediated inhibition of cell viability in PANC-1 cancer cells. In addition, we show that BITC can prevent the induction of STAT3 activation by Interleukin-6 in MDA-MB-453 breast cancer cells. Furthermore, combinations of BITC and sulforaphane inhibited cell viability and STAT3 phosphorylation more dramatically than either agent alone. These findings suggest that the combination of the dietary agents BITC and sulforaphane has potent inhibitory activity in pancreatic cancer cells and that they may have translational potential as chemopreventative or therapeutic agents.

  5. A novel mouse monoclonal antibody targeting ErbB2 suppresses breast cancer growth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kawa, Seiji [Division of Oncology, Institute of Medical Science, University of Tokyo, Shirokanedai 4-6-1, Minato-ku, Tokyo 108-8639 (Japan); Matsushita, Hirohisa; Ohbayashi, Hirokazu [Department of Research and Development, Nichirei Biosciences Inc., Tokyo 104-8402 (Japan); Semba, Kentaro [Department of Life Science and Medical Bio-Science, School of Science and Engineering, Waseda University, Tokyo 169-8555 (Japan); Yamamoto, Tadashi, E-mail: tyamamot@ims.u-tokyo.ac.jp [Division of Oncology, Institute of Medical Science, University of Tokyo, Shirokanedai 4-6-1, Minato-ku, Tokyo 108-8639 (Japan)

    2009-07-03

    Overexpression of ErbB2 in breast cancer is associated with increased recurrence and worse prognosis. Accumulating evidences suggest that molecular targeted therapy is a promising anticancer strategy. In this study, we produced a novel anti-ErbB2 monoclonal antibody, 6G10, that recognized an epitope distinct from the trastuzumab binding site. 6G10 induced aggregation of BT474 breast cancer cells and inhibited proliferation of various breast cancer cell lines including BT474. A growth inhibition assay showed that 6G10 had EC{sub 50} values comparable to trastuzumab, indicating that the drugs have a similar level of potency. Furthermore, intraperitoneal administration of 6G10 completely inhibited the growth of xenografted tumors derived from BT474 and SK-BR-3 cells. These data suggested that 6G10 has great therapeutic potential and could be administered to patients alternatively, or synergistically, with trastuzumab.

  6. Mitochondria-targeted vitamin E analogs inhibit breast cancer cell energy metabolism and promote cell death

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheng, Gang; Zielonka, Jacek; McAllister, Donna M; Mackinnon, A Craig Jr; Joseph, Joy; Dwinell, Michael B; Kalyanaraman, Balaraman

    2013-01-01

    Recent research has revealed that targeting mitochondrial bioenergetic metabolism is a promising chemotherapeutic strategy. Key to successful implementation of this chemotherapeutic strategy is the use of new and improved mitochondria-targeted cationic agents that selectively inhibit energy metabolism in breast cancer cells, while exerting little or no long-term cytotoxic effect in normal cells. In this study, we investigated the cytotoxicity and alterations in bioenergetic metabolism induced by mitochondria-targeted vitamin E analog (Mito-chromanol, Mito-ChM) and its acetylated ester analog (Mito-ChMAc). Assays of cell death, colony formation, mitochondrial bioenergetic function, intracellular ATP levels, intracellular and tissue concentrations of tested compounds, and in vivo tumor growth were performed. Both Mito-ChM and Mito-ChMAc selectively depleted intracellular ATP and caused prolonged inhibition of ATP-linked oxygen consumption rate in breast cancer cells, but not in non-cancerous cells. These effects were significantly augmented by inhibition of glycolysis. Mito-ChM and Mito-ChMAc exhibited anti-proliferative effects and cytotoxicity in several breast cancer cells with different genetic background. Furthermore, Mito-ChM selectively accumulated in tumor tissue and inhibited tumor growth in a xenograft model of human breast cancer. We conclude that mitochondria-targeted small molecular weight chromanols exhibit selective anti-proliferative effects and cytotoxicity in multiple breast cancer cells, and that esterification of the hydroxyl group in mito-chromanols is not a critical requirement for its anti-proliferative and cytotoxic effect

  7. FBXW7 Acts as an Independent Prognostic Marker and Inhibits Tumor Growth in Human Osteosarcoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhanchun Li

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available F-box and WD repeat domain-containing 7 (FBXW7 is a potent tumor suppressor in human cancers including breast cancer, colorectal cancer, gastric cancer and hepatocellular carcinoma. In this study, we found that the expressions of FBXW7 protein and mRNA levels in osteosarcoma (OS cases were significantly lower than those in normal bone tissues. Clinical analysis indicated that FBXW7 was expressed at lower levels in OS patients with advanced clinical stage, high T classification and poor histological differentiation. Furthermore, we demonstrated that high expression of FBXW7 was correlated with a better 5-year survival of OS patients. Multivariate Cox regression analysis indicated that FBXW7 was an independent prognostic marker in OS. Our in vitro studies showed that FBXW7 overexpression inhibited cell cycle transition and cell proliferation, and promoted apoptosis in both U2OS and MG-63 cells. In a nude mouse xenograft model, FBXW7 overexpression slowed down tumor growth by inducing apoptosis and growth arrest. Mechanistically, FBXW7 inversely regulated oncoprotein c-Myc and cyclin E levels in both U2OS and MG-63 cells. Together these findings suggest that FBXW7 may serve as a prognostic biomarker and inhibit tumor progression by inducing apoptosis and growth arrest in OS.

  8. Fascaplysin Exerts Anti-Cancer Effects through the Downregulation of Survivin and HIF-1α and Inhibition of VEGFR2 and TRKA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taek-In Oh

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Fascaplysin has been reported to exert anti-cancer effects by inhibiting cyclin-dependent kinase 4 (CDK4; however, the precise mode of action by which fascaplysin suppresses tumor growth is not clear. Here, we found that fascaplysin has stronger anti-cancer effects than other CDK4 inhibitors, including PD0332991 and LY2835219, on lung cancer cells that are wild-type or null for retinoblastoma (RB, indicating that unknown target molecules might be involved in the inhibition of tumor growth by fascaplysin. Fascaplysin treatment significantly decreased tumor angiogenesis and increased cleaved-caspase-3 in xenografted tumor tissues. In addition, survivin and HIF-1α were downregulated in vitro and in vivo by suppressing 4EBP1-p70S6K1 axis-mediated de novo protein synthesis. Kinase screening assays and drug-protein docking simulation studies demonstrated that fascaplysin strongly inhibited vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 (VEGFR2 and tropomyosin-related kinase A (TRKA via DFG-out non-competitive inhibition. Overall, these results suggest that fascaplysin inhibits TRKA and VEGFR2 and downregulates survivin and HIF-1α, resulting in suppression of tumor growth. Fascaplysin, therefore, represents a potential therapeutic approach for the treatment of multiple types of solid cancer.

  9. Diclofenac inhibits tumor growth in a murine model of pancreatic cancer by modulation of VEGF levels and arginase activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nina Mayorek

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Diclofenac is one of the oldest anti-inflammatory drugs in use. In addition to its inhibition of cyclooxygenases (COX, diclofenac potently inhibits phospholipase A(2 (PLA(2, thus yielding a broad anti-inflammatory effect. Since inflammation is an important factor in the development of pancreatic tumors we explored the potential of diclofenac to inhibit tumor growth in mice inoculated with PANCO2 cells orthotopically. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We found that diclofenac treatment (30 mg/kg/bw for 11 days of mice inoculated with PANC02 cells, reduced the tumor weight by 60%, correlating with increased apoptosis of tumor cells. Since this effect was not observed in vitro on cultured PANCO2 cells, we theorized that diclofenac beneficial treatment involved other mediators present in vivo. Indeed, diclofenac drastically decreased tumor vascularization by downregulating VEGF in the tumor and in abdominal cavity fluid. Furthermore, diclofenac directly inhibited vascular sprouting ex vivo. Surprisingly, in contrast to other COX-2 inhibitors, diclofenac increased arginase activity/arginase 1 protein content in tumor stroma cells, peritoneal macrophages and white blood cells by 2.4, 4.8 and 2 fold, respectively. We propose that the subsequent arginine depletion and decrease in NO levels, both in serum and peritoneal cavity, adds to tumor growth inhibition by malnourishment and poor vasculature development. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: In conclusion, diclofenac shows pronounced antitumoral properties in pancreatic cancer model that can contribute to further treatment development. The ability of diclofenac to induce arginase activity in tumor stroma, peritoneal macrophages and white blood cells provides a tool to study a controversial issue of pro-and antitumoral effects of arginine depletion.

  10. 5-Geranyloxy-7-methoxycoumarin inhibits colon cancer (SW480) cells growth by inducing apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patil, Jaiprakash R; Jayaprakasha, Guddadarangavvanahally K; Kim, Jinhee; Murthy, Kotamballi N Chidambara; Chetti, Mahadev B; Nam, Sang-Yong; Patil, Bhimanagouda S

    2013-03-01

    For the first time, three coumarins were isolated from the hexane extract of limes (Citrus aurantifolia) and purified by flash chromatography. The structures were identified by NMR (1D, 2D) and mass spectral analyses as 5-geranyloxy-7-methoxycoumarin, limettin, and isopimpinellin. These compounds inhibited human colon cancer (SW-480) cell proliferation, with 5-geranyloxy-7-methoxycoumarin showing the highest inhibition activity (67 %) at 25 µM. Suppression of SW480 cell proliferation by 5-geranyloxy-7-methoxycoumarin was associated with induction of apoptosis, as evidenced by annexin V staining and DNA fragmentation. In addition, 5-geranyloxy-7-methoxycoumarin arrested cells at the G0/G1 phase, and induction of apoptosis was demonstrated through the activation of tumour suppressor gene p53, caspase8/3, regulation of Bcl2, and inhibition of p38 MAPK phosphorylation. These findings suggest that 5-geranyloxy-7-methoxycoumarin has potential as a cancer preventive agent. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  11. Breviscapine suppresses the growth of non-small cell lung cancer

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Breviscapine (BVP) has previously been shown to inhibit the proliferation of hepatocellular carcinoma cells.However, little is known about the effects of BVP on non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) growth. Here, we aimedto study the effects of BVP on human NSCLC growth. We employed A549, NCL-H460 and A549 cells ...

  12. Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor-γ Inhibits Transformed Growth of Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Cells through Selective Suppression of Snail

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rashmi Choudhary

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Work from our laboratory and others has demonstrated that activation of the nuclear receptor peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ (PPARγ inhibits transformed growth of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC cell lines in vitro and in vivo. We have demonstrated that activation of PPARγ promotes epithelial differentiation of NSCLC by increasing expression of E-cadherin, as well as inhibiting expression of COX-2 and nuclear factor-κB. The Snail family of transcription factors, which includes Snail (Snail1, Slug (Snail2, and ZEB1, is an important regulator of epithelial-mesenchymal transition, as well as cell survival. The goal of this study was to determine whether the biological responses to rosiglitazone, a member of the thiazolidinedione family of PPARγ activators, are mediated through the regulation of Snail family members. Our results indicate that, in two independent NSCLC cell lines, rosiglitazone specifically decreased expression of Snail, with no significant effect on either Slug or ZEB1. Suppression of Snail using short hairpin RNA silencing mimicked the effects of PPARγ activation, in inhibiting anchorage-independent growth, promoting acinar formation in three-dimensional culture, and inhibiting invasiveness. This was associated with the increased expression of E-cadherin and decreased expression of COX-2 and matrix metaloproteinases. Conversely, overexpression of Snail blocked the biological responses to rosiglitazone, increasing anchorage-independent growth, invasiveness, and promoting epithelial-mesenchymal transition. The suppression of Snail expression by rosiglitazone seemed to be independent of GSK-3 signaling but was rather mediated through suppression of extracellular signal-regulated kinase activity. These findings suggest that selective regulation of Snail may be critical in mediating the antitumorigenic effects of PPARγ activators.

  13. Inhibition of Estrogen-induced Growth of Breast Cancer by Targeting Mitochondrial Oxidants

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Roy, Deodutta; Felty, Quentin; Kunkle, Brian

    2008-01-01

    ...) Anchorage-independent cell growth, and (c) tumor spheroid formation using new 3D HuBiogel bioassay whether estrogen induced conversion of normal cells to transformed cells is inhibited by treatment with antioxidants, over expression of MnSOD...

  14. The bifunctional autophagic flux by 2-deoxyglucose to control survival or growth of prostate cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeon, Jeong Yong; Kim, Seung Won; Park, Ki Cheong; Yun, Mijin

    2015-01-01

    Recent reports using metabolism regulating drugs showed that nutrient deprivation was an efficient tool to suppress cancer progression. In addition, autophagy control is emerging to prevent cancer cell survival. Autophagy breaks down the unnecessary cytoplasmic components into anabolic units and energy sources, which are the most important sources for making the ATP that maintains homeostasis in cancer cell growth and survival. Therefore, the glucose analog 2-deoxyglucose (2DG) has been used as an anticancer reagent due to its inhibition of glycolysis. Prostate cancer cells (PC3) were treated with 2DG for 6 h or 48 h to analyze the changing of cell cycle and autophagic flux. Rapamycin and LC3B overexpressing vectors were administered to PC3 cells for autophagy induction and chloroquine and shBeclin1 plasmid were used to inhibit autophagy in PC3 cells to analyze PC3 cells growth and survival. The samples for western blotting were prepared in each culture condition to confirm the expression level of autophagy related and regulating proteins. We demonstrated that 2DG inhibits PC3 cells growth and had discriminating effects on autophagy regulation based on the different time period of 2DG treatment to control cell survival. Short-term treatment of 2DG induced autophagic flux, which increased microtubule associated protein 1 light chain 3B (LC3B) conversion rates and reduced p62 levels. However, 2DG induced autophagic flux is remarkably reduced over an extended time period of 2DG treatment for 48 h despite autophagy inducing internal signaling being maintained. The relationship between cell growth and autophagy was proved. Increased autophagic flux by rapamycin or LC3B overexpression powerfully reduced cell growth, while autophagy inhibition with shBeclin1 plasmid or chloroquine had no significant effect on regulating cell growth. Given these results, maintaining increased autophagic flux was more effective at inhibiting cancer cell progression than inhibition of

  15. Pulsatilla saponin A, an active molecule from Pulsatilla chinensis, induces cancer cell death and inhibits tumor growth in mouse xenograft models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Qiang; Chen, Weichang; Jiao, Yang; Hou, Jianquan; Wu, Qingyu; Liu, Yanli; Qi, Xiaofei

    2014-05-15

    Many natural compounds possess antitumor growth activities. Pulsatilla chinensis is an herb used in traditional Chinese medicine to treat infectious diseases. More recently, extracts from P chinensis have been shown to contain antitumor activities. In this study, we isolated Pulsatilla saponin A as an active compound from P chinensis extracts and tested its anticancer activity in vitro and in vivo. In cell culture, Pulsatilla saponin A significantly inhibited the growth of human hepatocellular carcinoma SMCC-7721 cells and pancreatic BXPC3 and SW1990 cancer cells. Similar inhibitory activities were observed when the compound was tested in mouse xenograft tumor models using human hepatocellular carcinoma Bel-7402 and pancreatic cancer SW1990 cells. In Comet assay and flow cytometric analysis of cell cycle distribution and annexin V expression, DNA damage, G2 arrest, and apoptosis were identified in Pulsatilla saponin A-treated cancer cells. Based on the results of Western blotting, p53 and cyclin B protein levels were higher, whereas Bcl-2 protein levels were lower in Pulsatilla saponin A-treated cancer cells than in vehicle-treated cells. Pulsatilla saponin A may exert its antitumor effect by inducing DNA damage and causing G2 arrest and apoptosis in cancer cells. Pulsatilla saponin A and its derivatives may be developed as a new class of anticancer agents. Crown Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Efficient inhibition of murine breast cancer growth and metastasis by gene transferred mouse survivin Thr34→Ala mutant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen li-Juan

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Metastasis in breast cancer is a vital concern in treatment because most women with primary breast cancer have micrometastases to distant sites at diagnosis. As a member of the inhibitor of apoptosis protein (IAP family, survivin has been proposed as an attractive target for new anticancer interventions. In this study, we investigated the role of the plasmid encoding the phosphorylation-defective mouse survivin threonine 34→alanine mutant (Msurvivin T34A plasmid in suppressing both murine primary breast carcinomas and pulmonary metastases. Methods In vitro study, induction of apoptosis by Msurvivin T34A plasmid complexed with cationic liposome (DOTAP/Chol was examined by PI staining fluorescence microscopy and flow cytometric analysis. The anti-tumor and anti-metastases activity of Msurvivin T34A plasmid complexed with cationic liposome (DOTAP/Chol was evaluated in female BALB/c mice bearing 4T1 s.c. tumors. Mice were treated twice weekly with i.v. administration of Msurvivin T34A plasmid complexed with cationic liposome (DOTAP/Chol, PORF-9 null plasmid complexed with cationic liposome (DOTAP/Chol, 0.9% NaCl solution for 4 weeks. Tumor volume was observed. After sacrificed, tumor net weight was measured and Lung metastatic nodules of each group were counted. Assessment of apoptotic cells by TUNEL assay was conducted in tumor tissue. Microvessel density within tumor tissue was determined by CD31 immunohistochemistry. Alginate-encapsulated tumor cells test was conducted to evaluate the effect on angiogenesis. By experiment of cytotoxicity T lymphocytes, we test whether Msurvivin T34A plasmid complexed with cationic liposome (DOTAP/Chol can induce specific cell immune response. Results Administration of Msurvivin T34A plasmid complexed with cationic liposome (DOTAP/Chol resulted in significant inhibition in the growth and metastases of 4T1 tumor model. These anti-tumor and anti-metastases responses were associated with

  17. Platelet-Derived Growth Factor-Receptor α Strongly Inhibits Melanoma Growth In Vitro and In Vivo

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    Debora Faraone

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Cutaneous melanoma is the most aggressive skin cancer; it is highly metastatic and responds poorly to current therapies. The expression of platelet-derived growth factor receptors (PDGF-Rs is reported to be reduced in metastatic melanoma compared with benign nevi or normal skin; we then hypothesized that PDGF-Rα may control growth of melanoma cells. We show here that melanoma cells overexpressing PDGF-Rα respond to serum with a significantly lower proliferation compared with that of controls. Apoptosis, cell cycle arrest, pRb dephosphorylation, and DNA synthesis inhibition were also observed in cells overexpressing PDGF-Rα. Proliferation was rescued by PDGF-Rα inhibitors, allowing to exclude nonspecific toxic effects and indicating that PDGF-Rα mediates autocrine antiproliferation signals in melanoma cells. Accordingly, PDGF-Rα was found to mediate staurosporine cytotoxicity. A protein array-based analysis of the mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway revealed that melanoma cells overexpressing PDGF-Rα show a strong reduction of c-Jun phosphorylated in serine 63 and of protein phosphatase 2A/Bα and a marked increase of p38γ, mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase 3, and signal regulatory protein α1 protein expression. In a mouse model of primary melanoma growth, infection with the Ad-vector overexpressing PDGF-Rα reached a significant 70% inhibition of primary melanoma growth (P < .001 and a similar inhibition of tumor angiogenesis. All together, these data demonstrate that PDGF-Rα strongly impairs melanoma growth likely through autocrine mechanisms and indicate a novel endogenous mechanism involved in melanoma control.

  18. RKIP Inhibits Local Breast Cancer Invasion by Antagonizing the Transcriptional Activation of MMP13.

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    Ila Datar

    Full Text Available Raf Kinase Inhibitory Protein or RKIP was initially identified as a Raf-1 binding protein using the yeast 2-hybrid screen. RKIP inhibits the activation phosphorylation of MEK by Raf-1 by competitively inhibiting the binding of MEK to Raf-1 and thus exerting an inhibitory effect on the Raf-MEK-Erk pathway. RKIP has been identified as a metastasis suppressor gene. Expression of RKIP is low in cancer metastases. Although primary tumor growth remains unaffected, re- expression of RKIP inhibits cancer metastasis. Mechanistically, RKIP constrains metastasis by inhibiting angiogenesis, local invasion, intravasation, and colonization. The molecular mechanism of how RKIP inhibits these individual steps remains undefined. In our present study, using an unbiased PCR based screening and by analyzing DNA microarray expression datasets we observe that the expression of multiple metalloproteases (MMPs including MMP1, MMP3, MMP10 and MMP13 are negatively correlated with RKIP expression in breast cancer cell lines and clinical samples. Since expression of MMPs by cancer cells is important for cancer metastasis, we hypothesize that RKIP may mediate suppression of breast cancer metastasis by inhibiting multiple MMPs. We show that the expression signature of RKIP and MMPs is better at predicting high metastatic risk than the individual gene. Using a combination of loss- and gain-of-function approaches, we find that MMP13 is the cause of RKIP-mediated inhibition of local cancer invasion. Interestingly expression of MMP13 alone is not sufficient to reverse the inhibition of breast cancer cell metastasis to the lung due to the expression of RKIP. We find that RKIP negatively regulates MMP13 through the Erk2 signaling pathway and the repression of MMP13 by RKIP is transcription factor AP-1 independent. Together, our findings indicate that RKIP inhibits cancer cell invasion, in part, via MMP13 inhibition. These data also implicate RKIP in the regulation of MMP

  19. Dioscin inhibits colon tumor growth and tumor angiogenesis through regulating VEGFR2 and AKT/MAPK signaling pathways

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    Tong, Qingyi [Regenerative Medicine Research Center, State Key Laboratory of Biotherapy and Cancer Center, West China Hospital, Sichuan University, Chengdu, Sichuan 610041 (China); Qing, Yong, E-mail: qingyongxy@yahoo.co.jp [Department of Pharmacology, West China School of Pharmacy, Sichuan University, Chengdu, Sichuan 610041 (China); Wu, Yang [State Key Laboratory of Biotherapy and Cancer Center, West China Hospital, Sichuan University, Chengdu, Sichuan 610041 (China); Hu, Xiaojuan; Jiang, Lei [Department of Pharmacology, West China School of Pharmacy, Sichuan University, Chengdu, Sichuan 610041 (China); Wu, Xiaohua, E-mail: wuxh@scu.edu.cn [Regenerative Medicine Research Center, State Key Laboratory of Biotherapy and Cancer Center, West China Hospital, Sichuan University, Chengdu, Sichuan 610041 (China)

    2014-12-01

    Dioscin has shown cytotoxicity against cancer cells, but its in vivo effects and the mechanisms have not elucidated yet. The purpose of the current study was to assess the antitumor effects and the molecular mechanisms of dioscin. We showed that dioscin could inhibit tumor growth in vivo and has no toxicity at the test condition. The growth suppression was accompanied by obvious blood vessel decrease within solid tumors. We also found dioscin treatment inhibited the proliferation of cancer and endothelial cell lines, and most sensitive to primary cultured human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). What's more, analysis of HUVECs migration, invasion, and tube formation exhibited that dioscin has significantly inhibitive effects to these actions. Further analysis of blood vessel formation in the matrigel plugs indicated that dioscin could inhibit VEGF-induced blood vessel formation in vivo. We also identified that dioscin could suppress the downstream protein kinases of VEGFR2, including Src, FAK, AKT and Erk1/2, accompanied by the increase of phosphorylated P38MAPK. The results potently suggest that dioscin may be a potential anticancer drug, which efficiently inhibits angiogenesis induced by VEGFR2 signaling pathway as well as AKT/MAPK pathways. - Highlights: • Dioscin inhibits tumor growth in vivo and does not exhibit any toxicity. • Dioscin inhibits angiogenesis within solid tumors. • Dioscin inhibits the proliferation, migration, invasion, and tube formation of HUVECs. • Dioscin inhibits VEGF–induced blood vessel formation in vivo. • Dioscin inhibits VEGFR2 signaling pathway as well as AKT/MAPK pathway.

  20. Targeting cyclin B1 inhibits proliferation and sensitizes breast cancer cells to taxol

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    Strebhardt Klaus

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cyclin B1, the regulatory subunit of cyclin-dependent kinase 1 (Cdk1, is essential for the transition from G2 phase to mitosis. Cyclin B1 is very often found to be overexpressed in primary breast and cervical cancer cells as well as in cancer cell lines. Its expression is correlated with the malignancy of gynecological cancers. Methods In order to explore cyclin B1 as a potential target for gynecological cancer therapy, we studied the effect of small interfering RNA (siRNA on different gynecological cancer cell lines by monitoring their proliferation rate, cell cycle profile, protein expression and activity, apoptosis induction and colony formation. Tumor formation in vivo was examined using mouse xenograft models. Results Downregulation of cyclin B1 inhibited proliferation of several breast and cervical cancer cell lines including MCF-7, BT-474, SK-BR-3, MDA-MB-231 and HeLa. After combining cyclin B1 siRNA with taxol, we observed an increased apoptotic rate accompanied by an enhanced antiproliferative effect in breast cancer cells. Furthermore, control HeLa cells were progressively growing, whereas the tumor growth of HeLa cells pre-treated with cyclin B1 siRNA was strongly inhibited in nude mice, indicating that cyclin B1 is indispensable for tumor growth in vivo. Conclusion Our data support the notion of cyclin B1 being essential for survival and proliferation of gynecological cancer cells. Concordantly, knockdown of cyclin B1 inhibits proliferation in vitro as well as in vivo. Moreover, targeting cyclin B1 sensitizes breast cancer cells to taxol, suggesting that specific cyclin B1 targeting is an attractive strategy for the combination with conventionally used agents in gynecological cancer therapy.

  1. Quercetin suppresses insulin receptor signaling through inhibition of the insulin ligand–receptor binding and therefore impairs cancer cell proliferation

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    Wang, Feng [Department of Gastroenterology, The Tenth People’s Hospital of Shanghai, Tongji University, Shanghai 200072 (China); Department of Nanomedicine, Houston Methodist Research Institute, Houston, TX 77030 (United States); Yang, Yong, E-mail: yyang@houstonmethodist.org [Department of Nanomedicine, Houston Methodist Research Institute, Houston, TX 77030 (United States); Department of Medicine, Weill Cornell Medical College, New York, NY 10065 (United States)

    2014-10-03

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Quercetin inhibits insulin ligand–receptor interactions. • Quercetin reduces downstream insulin receptor signaling. • Quercetin blocks insulin induced glucose uptake. • Quercetin suppresses insulin stimulated cancer cell proliferation and tumor growth. - Abstract: Although the flavonoid quercetin is known to inhibit activation of insulin receptor signaling, the inhibitory mechanism is largely unknown. In this study, we demonstrate that quercetin suppresses insulin induced dimerization of the insulin receptor (IR) through interfering with ligand–receptor interactions, which reduces the phosphorylation of IR and Akt. This inhibitory effect further inhibits insulin stimulated glucose uptake due to decreased cell membrane translocation of glucose transporter 4 (GLUT4), resulting in impaired cancer cell proliferation. The effect of quercetin in inhibiting tumor growth was also evident in an in vivo model, indicating a potential future application for quercetin in the treatment of cancers.

  2. Quercetin suppresses insulin receptor signaling through inhibition of the insulin ligand–receptor binding and therefore impairs cancer cell proliferation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Feng; Yang, Yong

    2014-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Quercetin inhibits insulin ligand–receptor interactions. • Quercetin reduces downstream insulin receptor signaling. • Quercetin blocks insulin induced glucose uptake. • Quercetin suppresses insulin stimulated cancer cell proliferation and tumor growth. - Abstract: Although the flavonoid quercetin is known to inhibit activation of insulin receptor signaling, the inhibitory mechanism is largely unknown. In this study, we demonstrate that quercetin suppresses insulin induced dimerization of the insulin receptor (IR) through interfering with ligand–receptor interactions, which reduces the phosphorylation of IR and Akt. This inhibitory effect further inhibits insulin stimulated glucose uptake due to decreased cell membrane translocation of glucose transporter 4 (GLUT4), resulting in impaired cancer cell proliferation. The effect of quercetin in inhibiting tumor growth was also evident in an in vivo model, indicating a potential future application for quercetin in the treatment of cancers

  3. Cyclooxygenase-2 inhibition blocks M2 macrophage differentiation and suppresses metastasis in murine breast cancer model.

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    Yi-Rang Na

    Full Text Available Tumor cells are often associated with abundant macrophages that resemble the alternatively activated M2 subset. Tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs inhibit anti-tumor immune responses and promote metastasis. Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2 inhibition is known to prevent breast cancer metastasis. This study hypothesized that COX-2 inhibition affects TAM characteristics potentially relevant to tumor cell metastasis. We found that the specific COX-2 inhibitor, etodolac, inhibited human M2 macrophage differentiation, as determined by decreased CD14 and CD163 expressions and increased TNFα production. Several key metastasis-related mediators, such as vascular endothelial growth factor-A, vascular endothelial growth factor-C, and matrix metalloproteinase-9, were inhibited in the presence of etodolac as compared to untreated M2 macrophages. Murine bone marrow derived M2 macrophages also showed enhanced surface MHCII IA/IE and CD80, CD86 expressions together with enhanced TNFα expressions with etodolac treatment during differentiation. Using a BALB/c breast cancer model, we found that etodolac significantly reduced lung metastasis, possibly due to macrophages expressing increased IA/IE and TNFα, but decreased M2 macrophage-related genes expressions (Ym1, TGFβ. In conclusion, COX-2 inhibition caused loss of the M2 macrophage characteristics of TAMs and may assist prevention of breast cancer metastasis.

  4. TOFA suppresses ovarian cancer cell growth in vitro and in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shu; Qiu, Lihua; Wu, Buchu; Shen, Haoran; Zhu, Jing; Zhou, Liang; Gu, Liying; Di, Wen

    2013-08-01

    A characteristic feature of cancer cells is the activation of de novo fatty acid synthesis. Acetyl‑CoA carboxylase (ACC) is a key enzyme in fatty acid synthesis, accelerating the reaction that carboxylates cytosolic acetyl‑CoA to form malonyl‑CoA. ACC is highly expressed in several types of human cancer and is important in breast and prostate cancer cell growth. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of 5‑tetradecyloxy‑2‑furoic acid (TOFA), an allosteric inhibitor of ACC, on the proliferation and cell cycle progression of the ovarian cancer cell lines COC1 and COC1/DDP. TOFA was found to be cytotoxic to COC1 and COC1/DDP cells with a 50% inhibitory concentration (IC50) of ~26.1 and 11.6 µg/ml, respectively. TOFA inhibited the proliferation of the cancer cells examined in a time‑ and dose‑dependent manner, arrested the cells in the G0/G1 cell cycle phase and induced apoptosis. The expression of the cell cycle regulating proteins cyclin D1 and cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) 4, as well as the expression of the apoptosis‑related proteins caspase‑3 and Bcl‑2, were detected by western blot analysis. Cyclin D1, CDK4 and Bcl‑2 protein expression was inhibited by TOFA, while caspase‑3 was cleaved and activated. To the best of our knowledge, the present study demonstrated for the first time that TOFA inhibits COC1/DDP cell growth in ovarian tumor mouse xenografts. By inhibiting ACC, TOFA may be a promising small molecule agent for ovarian cancer therapy.

  5. Hedgehog Pathway Inhibition Radiosensitizes Non-Small Cell Lung Cancers

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    Zeng, Jing; Aziz, Khaled; Chettiar, Sivarajan T. [Department of Radiation Oncology and Molecular Radiation Sciences, The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Aftab, Blake T. [Department of Medical Oncology, The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Armour, Michael; Gajula, Rajendra; Gandhi, Nishant; Salih, Tarek; Herman, Joseph M.; Wong, John [Department of Radiation Oncology and Molecular Radiation Sciences, The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Rudin, Charles M. [Department of Medical Oncology, The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Tran, Phuoc T. [Department of Radiation Oncology and Molecular Radiation Sciences, The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Department of Medical Oncology, The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Hales, Russell K., E-mail: rhales1@jhmi.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology and Molecular Radiation Sciences, The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland (United States)

    2013-05-01

    Purpose: Despite improvements in chemoradiation, local control remains a major clinical problem in locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer. The Hedgehog pathway has been implicated in tumor recurrence by promoting survival of tumorigenic precursors and through effects on tumor-associated stroma. Whether Hedgehog inhibition can affect radiation efficacy in vivo has not been reported. Methods and Materials: We evaluated the effects of a targeted Hedgehog inhibitor (HhAntag) and radiation on clonogenic survival of human non-small cell lung cancer lines in vitro. Using an A549 cell line xenograft model, we examined tumor growth, proliferation, apoptosis, and gene expression changes after concomitant HhAntag and radiation. In a transgenic mouse model of Kras{sup G12D}-induced and Twist1-induced lung adenocarcinoma, we assessed tumor response to radiation and HhAntag by serial micro-computed tomography (CT) scanning. Results: In 4 human lung cancer lines in vitro, HhAntag showed little or no effect on radiosensitivity. By contrast, in both the human tumor xenograft and murine inducible transgenic models, HhAntag enhanced radiation efficacy and delayed tumor growth. By use of the human xenograft model to differentiate tumor and stromal effects, mouse stromal cells, but not human tumor cells, showed significant and consistent downregulation of Hedgehog pathway gene expression. This was associated with increased tumor cell apoptosis. Conclusions: Targeted Hedgehog pathway inhibition can increase in vivo radiation efficacy in lung cancer preclinical models. This effect is associated with pathway suppression in tumor-associated stroma. These data support clinical testing of Hedgehog inhibitors as a component of multimodality therapy for locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer.

  6. Indomethacin Inhibits Cancer Cell Migration via Attenuation of Cellular Calcium Mobilization

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    Ke-Li Tsai

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs were shown to reduce the risk of colorectal cancer recurrence and are widely used to modulate inflammatory responses. Indomethacin is an NSAID. Herein, we reported that indomethacin can suppress cancer cell migration through its influence on the focal complexes formation. Furthermore, endothelial growth factor (EGF-mediated Ca2+ influx was attenuated by indomethacin in a dose dependent manner. Our results identified a new mechanism of action for indomethacin: inhibition of calcium influx that is a key determinant of cancer cell migration.

  7. Inhibition of growth of experimental prostate cancer with sustained delivery systems (microcapsules and microgranules) of the luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone antagonist SB-75.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korkut, E; Bokser, L; Comaru-Schally, A M; Groot, K; Schally, A V

    1991-02-01

    Inhibitory effects of the sustained delivery systems (microcapsules and microgranules) of a potent antagonist of luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone N-Ac-[3-(2-naphthyl)-D-alanine1, 4-chloro-D-phenylalanine2, 3-(3-pyridyl)-D-alanine3, D-citrulline6, D-alanine10]LH-RH (SB-75) on the growth of experimental prostate cancers were investigated. In the first experiment, three doses of a microcapsule preparation releasing 23.8, 47.6, and 71.4 micrograms of antagonist SB-75 per day were compared with microcapsules of agonist [D-Trp6]LH-RH liberating 25 micrograms/day in rats bearing Dunning R3327H transplantable prostate carcinoma. During 8 weeks of treatment, tumor growth was decreased by [D-Trp6]LH-RH and all three doses of SB-75 as compared to untreated controls. The highest dose of SB-75 (71.4 micrograms/day) caused a greater inhibition of prostate cancer growth than [D-Trp6]LH-RH as based on measurement of tumor volume and percentage change in tumor volume. Doses of 23.8 and 47.6 micrograms of SB-75 per day induced a partial and submaximal decrease, respectively, in tumor weight and volume. Tumor doubling time was the longest (50 days) with the high dose of SB-75 vs. 15 days for controls. The body weights were unchanged. The weights of testes, seminal vesicles, and ventral prostate were greatly reduced in all three groups that received SB-75, and testosterone levels were decreased to nondetectable values in the case of the two higher doses of SB-75. LH levels were also diminished. Similar results were obtained in the second experiment, in which the animals were treated for a period of 8 weeks with microgranules of SB-75. Therapy with microgranules of SB-75 significantly decreased tumor growth as measured by the final tumor volume, the percentage change from the initial tumor volume, and the reduction in tumor weight. The results indicate that antagonist SB-75, released from sustained delivery systems, can produce a state of chemical castration and effectively

  8. Salinomycin inhibits metastatic colorectal cancer growth and interferes with Wnt/β-catenin signaling in CD133+ human colorectal cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klose, Johannes; Eissele, Jana; Volz, Claudia; Schmitt, Steffen; Ritter, Alina; Ying, Shen; Schmidt, Thomas; Heger, Ulrike; Schneider, Martin; Ulrich, Alexis

    2016-01-01

    The polyether antibiotic Salinomycin (Sal) is regarded as an inhibitor of cancer stem cells. Its effectiveness on human colorectal cancer (CRC) cells in vitro has been demonstrated before. The aim of this study was to establish a murine model to investigate the effectiveness of Sal in vivo. Furthermore, we investigated the impact of Sal on Wnt/β-catenin signaling in human CD133 + CRC cells. The two murine CRC cell lines MC38 and CT26 were used to analyze the impact of Sal on tumor cell proliferation, viability, migration, cell cycle progression and cell death in vitro. For in vivo studies, CT26 cells were injected into syngeneic BALB/c mice to initiate (i) subcutaneous, (ii) orthotopic, or (iii) metastatic CRC growth. Sal was administered daily, 5-Fluoruracil served as a control. For mechanistic studies, the CD133 + and CD133 - subpopulations of human CRC cells were separated by flow cytometry and separately exposed to increasing concentrations of Sal. The impact on Wnt/β-catenin signaling was determined by Western blotting and quantitative PCR. Sal markedly impaired tumor cell viability, proliferation and migration, and induced necrotic cell death in vitro. CRC growth in vivo was likewise inhibited upon Sal treatment. Interference with Wnt signaling and reduced expression of the Wnt target genes Fibronectin and Lgr5 indicates a novel molecular mechanism, mediating anti-tumoral effects of Sal in CRC. Sal effectively impairs CRC growth in vivo. Furthermore, Sal acts as an inhibitor of Wnt/β-catenin signaling. Thus, Salinomycin represents a promising candidate for clinical CRC treatment. The online version of this article (doi:10.1186/s12885-016-2879-8) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users

  9. Resveratrol, a Red Wine Polyphenol, Suppresses Pancreatic Cancer by Inhibiting Leukotriene A4 Hydrolase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oi, Naomi; Jeong, Chul-Ho; Nadas, Janos; Cho, Yong-Yeon; Pugliese, Angelo; Bode, Ann M.; Dong, Zigang

    2016-01-01

    The anticancer effects of red wine have attracted considerable attention. Resveratrol (3,5,4′-trihydroxy-trans-stilbene) is a well-known polyphenolic compound of red wine with cancer chemopreventive activity. However, the basis for this activity is unclear. We studied leukotriene A4 hydrolase (LTA4H) as a relevant target in pancreatic cancer. LTA4H knockdown limited the formation of leukotriene B4 (LTB4), the enzymatic product of LTA4H, and suppressed anchorage-independent growth of pancreatic cancer cells. An in silico shape similarity algorithm predicted that LTA4H might be a potential target of resveratrol. In support of this idea, we found that resveratrol directly bound to LTA4H in vitro and in cells and suppressed proliferation and anchorage-independent growth of pancreatic cancer by inhibiting LTB4 production and expression of the LTB4 receptor 1 (BLT1). Notably, resveratrol exerted relatively stronger inhibitory effects than bestatin, an established inhibitor of LTA4H activity, and the inhibitory effects of resveratrol were reduced in cells where LTA4H was suppressed by shRNA-mediated knockdown. Importantly, resveratrol inhibited tumor formation in a xenograft mouse model of human pancreatic cancer by inhibiting LTA4H activity. Our findings identify LTA4H as a functionally important target for mediating the anticancer properties of resveratrol. PMID:20952510

  10. Downregulation of connective tissue growth factor inhibits the growth and invasion of gastric cancer cells and attenuates peritoneal dissemination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Cheng-Gang; Lv, Ling; Liu, Fu-Rong; Wang, Zhen-Ning; Liu, Fu-Nan; Li, Yan-Shu; Wang, Chun-Yu; Zhang, Hong-Yan; Sun, Zhe; Xu, Hui-Mian

    2011-09-28

    Connective tissue growth factor (CTGF) has been shown to be implicated in tumor development and progression. However, the role of CTGF in gastric cancer remains largely unknown. In this study, we showed that CTGF was highly expressed in gastric cancer tissues compared with matched normal gastric tissues. The CTGF expression in tumor tissue was associated with histologic grade, lymph node metastasis and peritoneal dissemination (P cancer cells and decreased cyclin D1 expression. Moreover, knockdown of CTGF expression also markedly reduced the migration and invasion of gastric cancer cells and decreased the expression of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2 and MMP-9. Animal studies revealed that nude mice injected with the CTGF knockdown stable cell lines featured a smaller number of peritoneal seeding nodules than the control cell lines. These data suggest that CTGF plays an important role in cell growth and invasion in human gastric cancer and it appears to be a potential prognostic marker for patients with gastric cancer.

  11. Instability of the Null Steady State: The Fundamental Problem of Inhibiting Malignant Cell Growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varfolomeev, S. D.; Lukovenkov, A. V.

    2018-07-01

    Mathematical modeling of the process of inhibiting malignant growth by common chemotherapeutic agents and biological therapeutics is used to investigate the effect kinetic parameters of the model have on the outcome of treatment. It is shown that the ultimate suppression of growth, i.e., the formation of a stable steady-state with no cancer cells, cannot be attained if only the means of classical chemotherapy are used.

  12. Murraya koenigii leaf extract inhibits proteasome activity and induces cell death in breast cancer cells

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    Noolu Bindu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Inhibition of the proteolytic activity of 26S proteasome, the protein-degrading machine, is now considered a novel and promising approach for cancer therapy. Interestingly, proteasome inhibitors have been demonstrated to selectively kill cancer cells and also enhance the sensitivity of tumor cells to chemotherapeutic agents. Recently, polyphenols/flavonoids have been reported to inhibit proteasome activity. Murraya koenigii Spreng, a medicinally important herb of Indian origin, has been used for centuries in the Ayurvedic system of medicine. Here we show that Murraya koenigii leaves (curry leaves, a rich source of polyphenols, inhibit the proteolytic activity of the cancer cell proteasome, and cause cell death. Methods Hydro-methanolic extract of curry leaves (CLE was prepared and its total phenolic content [TPC] determined by, the Folin-Ciocalteau’s method. Two human breast carcinoma cell lines: MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 and a normal human lung fibroblast cell line, WI-38 were used for the studies. Cytotoxicity of the CLE was assessed by the MTT assay. We studied the effect of CLE on growth kinetics using colony formation assay. Growth arrest was assessed by cell cycle analysis and apoptosis by Annexin-V binding using flow cytometry. Inhibition of the endogenous 26S proteasome was studied in intact cells and cell extracts using substrates specific to 20S proteasomal enzymes. Results CLE decreased cell viability and altered the growth kinetics in both the breast cancer cell lines in a dose-dependent manner. It showed a significant arrest of cells in the S phase albeit in cancer cells only. Annexin V binding data suggests that cell death was via the apoptotic pathway in both the cancer cell lines. CLE treatment significantly decreased the activity of the 26S proteasome in the cancer but not normal cells. Conclusions Our study suggests M. koenigii leaves to be a potent source of proteasome inhibitors that lead to cancer cell death

  13. In vivo immunotherapy of lung cancer using cross-species reactive vascular endothelial growth factor nanobodies

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    vFatemeh Kazemi-Lomedasht v

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective(s: Lung cancer is the main leading cause of cancer death worldwide. Angiogenesis is the main step in proliferation and spreading of tumor cells. Targeting vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF is an effective approach for inhibition of cancer angiogenesis. Nanobodies (NBs are a novel class of antibodies derived from the camel. Unique characteristics of Nbs like their small size and good penetration to tumor tissues makes them promising tools in drug development.  Development of NBs targeting both human and mouse VEGF is required for understanding their in vivo functions.  Therefore, development of cross-species reactive anti-VEGF Nbs for immunotherapy of lung cancer was the main aim of the current study. Materials and Methods: Here we developed NBs from Camelus dromedarius library with high specificity and binding affinity to both human and mouse VEGF. In vitro and In vivo function of developed NB was evaluated on human endothelial cells and lung epithelial tumor cells (TC-1. Results: A nanobody showed the highest affinity to human and mouse VEGF and potently inhibited VEGF in the ELISA experiment. Anti-VEGF NBs significantly inhibited in vitro human endothelial cell migration through blockade of VEGF (P=0.045. Anti-VEGF NBs also significantly inhibited in vivo TC-1 growth in a dose-dependent manner (P=0.001 and resulted in higher survival rate in the nanobody treated group Conclusion: These findings demonstrate the potential of anti-VEGF NBsin tumor growth inhibition and are promising as novel cancer therapeutic candidate.

  14. Down-regulation of LRP1B in colon cancer promoted the growth and migration of cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhiqiang; Sun, Peng; Gao, Chun; Chen, Ji; Li, Jun; Chen, Zhonghao; Xu, Ming; Shao, Jun; Zhang, Yunpeng; Xie, Jiang

    2017-08-01

    Aberrant activation of beta-catenin/TCF signaling is one of the hallmarks of colon cancer. It is of great interest to study the mechanism for the regulation of beta-catenin/TCF signaling. In this study, it was found that LRP1B was down-regulated in colon cancer tissues and inhibited the growth, migration and metastasis of colon cancer cells. The molecular mechanism study revealed that LRP1B interacted with DVL2, inhibited the interaction between DVL2 and Axin, and negatively regulated beta-catenin/TCF signaling. Taken together, our study demonstrated the suppressive roles of LRP1B in the progression of colon cancer, implicating that restoring the function of LRP1B would be a promising strategy for the treatment of colon cancer. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  15. miR-449 overexpression inhibits papillary thyroid carcinoma cell growth by targeting RET kinase-β-catenin signaling pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zongyu; Huang, Xin; Xu, Jinkai; Su, Qinghua; Zhao, Jun; Ma, Jiancang

    2016-10-01

    Papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC) is the most common thyroid cancer and represent approximately 80% of all thyroid cancers. The present study is aimed to investigate the role of microRNA (miR)-449 in the progression of PTC. Our results revealed that miR-449 was underexpressed in the collected PTC specimens compared with non-cancerous PTC tissues. Overexpression of miR-449 induced a cell cycle arrest at G0/G1 phase and inhibited PTC cell growth in vitro. Further studies revealed that RET proto-oncogene (RET) is a novel miR-449 target, due to miR-449 bound directly to its 3'-untranslated region and miR-449 mimic reduced the protein expression of RET. Similar to the effects of miR-449 overexpression, RET downregulation inhibited cell growth, whereas RET overexpression reversed the inhibitive effect of miR-449 mimic. Furthermore, miR-449 overexpression inhibited the nuclear translocation of β-catenin and reduced the expression of several downstream genes, including c-Myc, cyclin D1, T cell-specific transcription factor (TCF) and lymphoid enhancer-binding factor 1 (LEF-1), and inactivated the β-catenin pathway in TPC-1 cells. Moreover, overexpression of β-catenin prevented miR-449-reduced cell cycle arrest and cell viability. In xenograft animal experiments, miR-449 overexpression effectively suppressed the tumor growth of PTC. Taken together, our research indicated that miR-449 functions as an anti-oncogene by targeting RET, and that miR-449 overexpression inhibited the growth of PTC by inactivating the β-catenin pathway. Thus, miR-449 may serve as a potential therapeutic strategy for the treatment of PTC.

  16. Inhibition of growth of human breast cancer cells in culture by neutron capture using liposomes containing 10B.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanagië, H; Kobayashi, H; Takeda, Y; Yoshizaki, I; Nonaka, Y; Naka, S; Nojiri, A; Shinnkawa, H; Furuya, Y; Niwa, H; Ariki, K; Yasuhara, H; Eriguchi, M

    2002-03-01

    Cell destruction in boron neutron capture therapy is effected by nuclear reaction between 10B and thermal neutrons with the release of alpha-particles (4He) and lithium-7 ions (7Li). 4He kills cells within 10 microm of the site of 4He generation, therefore it is theoretically possible to destroy tumour cells without affecting adjacent healthy tissue, given selective delivery of compounds containing 10B. Liposomes wore prepared by vortex dispersion of solutions containing 10B compounds with dried lipid films and the effects of those compounds on human breast cancer cells in culture were examined after thermal neutral irradiation. [3H]-TdR incorporation by MRKnu/nu-1 cells treated with 10B-containing liposomes showed 40% suppression compared with liposomes without 10B, at 2 x 1012 n/cm2 thermal neutron fluence. Inhibition of tumour cell growth with liposomes prepared with 100 mm 10B-compound was as significant as with those made with 500 ppm 10B solution. The concentration of 10B in liposomes was 76.5 +/- 3.4 microg/mL. Boronated liposomes can thus deliver sufficient 10B atoms to this line of breast cancer cells in culture to effect cytotoxicity and suppression of growth after thermal neutron irradiation.

  17. 1082-39, an analogue of sorafenib, inhibited human cancer cell growth more potently than sorafenib.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Jia-Hui; Zhao, Cui-Rong; Song, Zhi-Yu; Wang, Rui-Qi; Qin, Yi-Zhuo; Li, Wen-Bao; Qu, Xian-Jun

    2014-04-01

    1082-39, an analogue of sorafenib, is a derivative of indazole diarylurea. We evaluated the activity of 1082-39 against human cancer cell growth. Its effects and mechanisms of action were then compared with those of sorafenib. The experiments were performed in human melanoma M21 cells. Cell viability was estimated by using the colorimetric assay. Annexin V-FITC/PI staining assay was used to recognize the apoptotic cells. Further analysis of the mitochondria membrane potential (MMP) was performed by the JC-1 fluorescence probe staining. The levels of apoptotic proteins and kinases related to cancer proliferation were determined by western blotting assay. 1082-39 possessed the activity against cancer cell proliferation with time- and dose-dependent manner. 1082-39 induced M21 cell to apoptosis, showing the increase of annexin V-FITC/PI staining cells, the MMP collapse and releasing cytochrome c from mitochondria. Western blotting analysis showed the activation of the mitochondria-mediated intrinsic pathway, showing the increase of cleaved caspase-9, cleaved caspase-3 and cleaved PARP. Statistical analysis suggested that 1082-39 possessed greater activities than sorafenib in the inhibition of M21 proliferation and induction of apoptosis. These effects of 1082-39 might arise from its activity of regulation the PI3K/Akt and Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathways. 1082-39 is a promising candidate compound which could develop as a potent anticancer agent. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  18. Apigenin inhibits HGF-promoted invasive growth and metastasis involving blocking PI3K/Akt pathway and β4 integrin function in MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, W.-J.; Chen, W.-K.; Wang, C.-J.; Lin, W.-L.; Tseng, T.-H.

    2008-01-01

    Hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) and its receptor, Met, known to control invasive growth program have recently been shown to play crucial roles in the survival of breast cancer patients. The diet-derived flavonoids have been reported to possess anti-invasion properties; however, knowledge on the pharmacological and molecular mechanisms in suppressing HGF/Met-mediated tumor invasion and metastasis is poorly understood. In our preliminary study, we use HGF as an invasive inducer to investigate the effect of flavonoids including apigenin, naringenin, genistein and kaempferol on HGF-dependent invasive growth of MDA-MB-231 human breast cancer cells. Results show that apigenin presents the most potent anti-migration and anti-invasion properties by Boyden chamber assay. Furthermore, apigenin represses the HGF-induced cell motility and scattering and inhibits the HGF-promoted cell migration and invasion in a dose-dependent manner. The effect of apigenin on HGF-induced signaling activation involving invasive growth was evaluated by immunoblotting analysis, it shows that apigenin blocks the HGF-induced Akt phosphorylation but not Met, ERK, and JNK phosphorylation. In addition to MDA-MB-231 cells, apigenin exhibits inhibitory effect on HGF-induced Akt phosphorylation in hepatoma SK-Hep1 cells and lung carcinoma A549 cells. By indirect immunofluorescence microscopy assay, apigenin inhibits the HGF-induced clustering of β4 integrin at actin-rich adhesive site and lamellipodia through PI3K-dependent manner. Treatment of apigenin inhibited HGF-stimulated integrin β4 function including cell-matrix adhesion and cell-endothelial cells adhesion in MDA-MB-231 cells. By Akt-siRNA transfection analysis, it confirmed that apigenin inhibited HGF-promoted invasive growth involving blocking PI3K/Akt pathway. Finally, we evaluated the effect of apigenin on HGF-promoted metastasis by lung colonization of tumor cells in nude mice and organ metastasis of tumor cells in chick embryo. By

  19. Honokiol inhibits sphere formation and xenograft growth of oral cancer side population cells accompanied with JAK/STAT signaling pathway suppression and apoptosis induction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, Jhy-Shrian; Yao, Chih-Jung; Chuang, Shuang-En; Yeh, Chi-Tai; Lee, Liang-Ming; Chen, Ruei-Ming; Chao, Wan-Ju; Whang-Peng, Jacqueline; Lai, Gi-Ming

    2016-01-01

    Eliminating cancer stem cells (CSCs) has been suggested for prevention of tumor recurrence and metastasis. Honokiol, an active compound of Magnolia officinalis, had been proposed to be a potential candidate drug for cancer treatment. We explored its effects on the elimination of oral CSCs both in vitro and in vivo. By using the Hoechst side population (SP) technique, CSCs-like SP cells were isolated from human oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) cell lines, SAS and OECM-1. Effects of honokiol on the apoptosis and signaling pathways of SP-derived spheres were examined by Annexin V/Propidium iodide staining and Western blotting, respectively. The in vivo effectiveness was examined by xenograft mouse model and immunohistochemical tissue staining. The SP cells possessed higher stemness marker expression (ABCG2, Ep-CAM, Oct-4 and Nestin), clonogenicity, sphere formation capacity as well as tumorigenicity when compared to the parental cells. Treatment of these SP-derived spheres with honokiol resulted in apoptosis induction via Bax/Bcl-2 and caspase-3-dependent pathway. This apoptosis induction was associated with marked suppression of JAK2/STAT3, Akt and Erk signaling pathways in honokiol-treated SAS spheres. Consistent with its effect on JAK2/STAT3 suppression, honokiol also markedly inhibited IL-6-mediated migration of SAS cells. Accordingly, honokiol dose-dependently inhibited the growth of SAS SP xenograft and markedly reduced the immunohistochemical staining of PCNA and endothelial marker CD31 in the xenograft tumor. Honokiol suppressed the sphere formation and xenograft growth of oral CSC-like cells in association with apoptosis induction and inhibition of survival/proliferation signaling pathways as well as angiogenesis. These results suggest its potential as an integrative medicine for combating oral cancer through targeting on CSCs. The online version of this article (doi:10.1186/s12885-016-2265-6) contains supplementary material, which is available to

  20. Emodin enhances the chemosensitivity of endometrial cancer by inhibiting ROS-mediated Cisplatin-resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Ning; Zhang, Hong; Su, Shan; Ding, Yumei; Yu, Xiaohui; Tang, Yujie; Wang, Qingfang; Liu, Peishu

    2017-12-18

    Background Endometrial cancer is a common cause of death in gynecological malignancies. Cisplatin is a clinically chemotherapeutic agent. However, drug-resistance is the primary cause of treatment failure. Objective Emodin is commonly used clinically to increase the sensitivity of chemotherapeutic agents, yet whether Emodin promotes the role of Cisplatin in the treatment of endometrial cancer has not been studied. Method CCK-8 kit was utilized to determine the growth of two endometrial cancer cell lines, Ishikawa and HEC-IB. The apoptosis level of Ishikawa and HEC-IB cells was detected by Annexin V / propidium iodide double-staining assay. ROS level was detected by DCFH-DA and NADPH oxidase expression. Expressions of drug-resistant genes were examined by real-time PCR and Western blotting. Results Emodin combined with Cisplatin reduced cell growth and increased the apoptosis of endometrial cancer cells. Co-treatment of Emodin and Cisplatin increased chemosensitivity by inhibiting the expression of drug-resistant genes through reducing the ROS levels in endometrial cancer cells. In an endometrial cancer xenograft murine model, the tumor size was reduced and animal survival time was increased by co-treatment of Emodin and Cisplatin. Conclusion This study demonstrates that Emodin enhances the chemosensitivity of Cisplatin on endometrial cancer by inhibiting ROS-mediated expression of drug-resistance genes. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  1. The c-Met Inhibitor MSC2156119J Effectively Inhibits Tumor Growth in Liver Cancer Models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bladt, Friedhelm, E-mail: Friedhelm.Bladt@merckgroup.com; Friese-Hamim, Manja; Ihling, Christian; Wilm, Claudia; Blaukat, Andree [EMD Serono, and Merck Serono Research and Development, Merck KGaA, Darmstadt 64293 (Germany)

    2014-08-19

    The mesenchymal-epithelial transition factor (c-Met) is a receptor tyrosine kinase with hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) as its only high-affinity ligand. Aberrant activation of c-Met is associated with many human malignancies, including hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). We investigated the in vivo antitumor and antimetastatic efficacy of the c-Met inhibitor MSC2156119J (EMD 1214063) in patient-derived tumor explants. BALB/c nude mice were inoculated with MHCC97H cells or with tumor fragments of 10 patient-derived primary liver cancer explants selected according to c-Met/HGF expression levels. MSC2156119J (10, 30, and 100 mg/kg) and sorafenib (50 mg/kg) were administered orally as single-agent treatment or in combination, with vehicle as control. Tumor response, metastases formation, and alpha fetoprotein (AFP) levels were measured. MSC2156119J inhibited tumor growth and induced complete regression in mice bearing subcutaneous and orthotopic MHCC97H tumors. AFP levels were undetectable after 5 weeks of MSC2156119J treatment, and the number of metastatic lung foci was reduced. Primary liver explant models with strong c-Met/HGF activation showed increased responsiveness to MSC2156119J, with MSC2156119J showing similar or superior activity to sorafenib. Tumors characterized by low c-Met expression were less sensitive to MSC2156119J. MSC2156119J was better tolerated than sorafenib, and combination therapy did not improve efficacy. These findings indicate that selective c-Met/HGF inhibition with MSC2156119J is associated with marked regression of c-Met high-expressing tumors, supporting its clinical development as an antitumor treatment for HCC patients with active c-Met signaling.

  2. Shizukaol D, a Dimeric Sesquiterpene Isolated from Chloranthus serratus, Represses the Growth of Human Liver Cancer Cells by Modulating Wnt Signalling Pathway.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisha Tang

    Full Text Available Natural products have become sources of developing new drugs for the treatment of cancer. To seek candidate compounds that inhibit the growth of liver cancer, components of Chloranthus serratus were tested. Here, we report that shizukaol D, a dimeric sesquiterpene from Chloranthus serratus, exerted a growth inhibition effect on liver cancer cells in a dose- and time-dependent manner. We demonstrated that shizukaol D induced cells to undergo apoptosis. More importantly, shizukaol D attenuated Wnt signalling and reduced the expression of endogenous Wnt target genes, which resulted in decreased expression of β-catenin. Collectively, this study demonstrated that shizukaol D inhibited the growth of liver cancer cells by modulating Wnt pathway.

  3. δ-Tocotrienol, a natural form of vitamin E, inhibits pancreatic cancer stem-like cells and prevents pancreatic cancer metastasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Husain, Kazim; Centeno, Barbara A; Coppola, Domenico; Trevino, Jose; Sebti, Said M; Malafa, Mokenge P

    2017-05-09

    The growth, metastasis, and chemotherapy resistance of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is characterized by the activation and growth of tumor-initiating cells in distant organs that have stem-like properties. Thus, inhibiting growth of these cells may prevent PDAC growth and metastases. We have demonstrated that δ-tocotrienol, a natural form of vitamin E (VEDT), is bioactive against cancer, delays progression, and prevents metastases in transgenic mouse models of PDAC. In this report, we provide the first evidence that VEDT selectively inhibits PDAC stem-like cells. VEDT inhibited the viability, survival, self-renewal, and expression of Oct4 and Sox2 transcription factors in 3 models of PDAC stem-like cells. In addition, VEDT inhibited the migration, invasion, and several biomarkers of epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition and angiogenesis in PDAC cells and tumors. These processes are critical for tumor metastases. Furthermore, in the L3.6pl orthotopic model of PDAC metastases, VEDT significantly inhibited growth and metastases of these cells. Finally, in an orthotopic xenograft model of human PDAC stem-like cells, we showed that VEDT significantly retarded the growth and metastases of gemcitabine-resistant PDAC human stem-like cells. Because VEDT has been shown to be safe and to reach bioactive levels in humans, this work supports investigating VEDT for chemoprevention of PDAC metastases.

  4. Ursodeoxycholic acid inhibits the proliferation of colon cancer cells by regulating oxidative stress and cancer stem-like cell growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, EuiJoo

    2017-01-01

    Introduction The regulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) exists as a therapeutic target for cancer treatments. Previous studies have shown that ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA) suppresses the proliferation of colon cancer cells. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of UDCA upon the proliferation of colon cancer cells as a direct result of the regulation of ROS. Method Colon cancer cell lines (HT29 and HCT116) were treated with UDCA. The total number of cells and the number of dead cells were determined using cell counters. A fluorescein isothiocyanate-bromodeoxyuridine flow kit was used to analyze cell cycle variations. Upon exposure to UDCA, the protein levels of p27, p21, CDK2, CDK4 and CDK6 were determined using western blotting, and qRT-PCR was used to determine levels of mRNA. We preformed dichlorofluorescindiacetate (DCF-DA) staining to detect alteration of intracellular ROS using fluorescence activated cell sorting (FACS). Colon cancer stem-like cell lines were generated by tumorsphere culture and treated with UDCA for seven days. The total number of tumorspheres was determined using microscopy. Results We found that UDCA reduced the total number of colon cancer cells, but did not increase the number of dead cells. UDCA inhibited the G1/S and G2/M transition phases in colon cancer cells. UDCA induced expression of cell cycle inhibitors such as p27 and p21. However, it was determined that UDCA suppressed levels of CDK2, CDK4, and CDK6. UDCA regulated intracellular ROS generation in colon cancer cells, and induced activation of Erk1/2. Finally, UDCA inhibited formation of colon cancer stem-like cells. Conclusion Our results indicate that UDCA suppresses proliferation through regulation of oxidative stress in colon cancer cells, as well as colon cancer stem-like cells. PMID:28708871

  5. Acute inhibition of myostatin-family proteins preserves skeletal muscle in mouse models of cancer cachexia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benny Klimek, Margaret E.; Aydogdu, Tufan [Department of Cell Biology and Anatomy, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Miami, FL (United States); Link, Majik J.; Pons, Marianne [Molecular Oncology Program, Division of Surgical Oncology, DeWitt Daughtry Family Department of Surgery, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Miami, FL (United States); Koniaris, Leonidas G. [Department of Cell Biology and Anatomy, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Miami, FL (United States); Molecular Oncology Program, Division of Surgical Oncology, DeWitt Daughtry Family Department of Surgery, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Miami, FL (United States); Molecular Oncology and Experimental Therapeutics Program, Sylvester Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Miami, FL (United States); Zimmers, Teresa A., E-mail: tzimmers@med.miami.edu [Department of Cell Biology and Anatomy, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Miami, FL (United States); Molecular Oncology Program, Division of Surgical Oncology, DeWitt Daughtry Family Department of Surgery, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Miami, FL (United States); Molecular Oncology and Experimental Therapeutics Program, Sylvester Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Miami, FL (United States)

    2010-01-15

    Cachexia, progressive loss of fat and muscle mass despite adequate nutrition, is a devastating complication of cancer associated with poor quality of life and increased mortality. Myostatin is a potent tonic muscle growth inhibitor. We tested how myostatin inhibition might influence cancer cachexia using genetic and pharmacological approaches. First, hypermuscular myostatin null mice were injected with Lewis lung carcinoma or B16F10 melanoma cells. Myostatin null mice were more sensitive to tumor-induced cachexia, losing more absolute mass and proportionately more muscle mass than wild-type mice. Because myostatin null mice lack expression from development, however, we also sought to manipulate myostatin acutely. The histone deacetylase inhibitor Trichostatin A has been shown to increase muscle mass in normal and dystrophic mice by inducing the myostatin inhibitor, follistatin. Although Trichostatin A administration induced muscle growth in normal mice, it failed to preserve muscle in colon-26 cancer cachexia. Finally we sought to inhibit myostatin and related ligands by administration of the Activin receptor extracellular domain/Fc fusion protein, ACVR2B-Fc. Systemic administration of ACVR2B-Fc potently inhibited muscle wasting and protected adipose stores in both colon-26 and Lewis lung carcinoma cachexia, without affecting tumor growth. Enhanced cachexia in myostatin knockouts indicates that host-derived myostatin is not the sole mediator of muscle wasting in cancer. More importantly, skeletal muscle preservation with ACVR2B-Fc establishes that targeting myostatin-family ligands using ACVR2B-Fc or related molecules is an important and potent therapeutic avenue in cancer cachexia.

  6. Acute inhibition of myostatin-family proteins preserves skeletal muscle in mouse models of cancer cachexia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benny Klimek, Margaret E.; Aydogdu, Tufan; Link, Majik J.; Pons, Marianne; Koniaris, Leonidas G.; Zimmers, Teresa A.

    2010-01-01

    Cachexia, progressive loss of fat and muscle mass despite adequate nutrition, is a devastating complication of cancer associated with poor quality of life and increased mortality. Myostatin is a potent tonic muscle growth inhibitor. We tested how myostatin inhibition might influence cancer cachexia using genetic and pharmacological approaches. First, hypermuscular myostatin null mice were injected with Lewis lung carcinoma or B16F10 melanoma cells. Myostatin null mice were more sensitive to tumor-induced cachexia, losing more absolute mass and proportionately more muscle mass than wild-type mice. Because myostatin null mice lack expression from development, however, we also sought to manipulate myostatin acutely. The histone deacetylase inhibitor Trichostatin A has been shown to increase muscle mass in normal and dystrophic mice by inducing the myostatin inhibitor, follistatin. Although Trichostatin A administration induced muscle growth in normal mice, it failed to preserve muscle in colon-26 cancer cachexia. Finally we sought to inhibit myostatin and related ligands by administration of the Activin receptor extracellular domain/Fc fusion protein, ACVR2B-Fc. Systemic administration of ACVR2B-Fc potently inhibited muscle wasting and protected adipose stores in both colon-26 and Lewis lung carcinoma cachexia, without affecting tumor growth. Enhanced cachexia in myostatin knockouts indicates that host-derived myostatin is not the sole mediator of muscle wasting in cancer. More importantly, skeletal muscle preservation with ACVR2B-Fc establishes that targeting myostatin-family ligands using ACVR2B-Fc or related molecules is an important and potent therapeutic avenue in cancer cachexia.

  7. Consumption of lycopene inhibits the growth and progression of colon cancer in a mouse xenograft model

    Science.gov (United States)

    A previous study indicated that lycopene could significantly inhibit the proliferation of human colon cancer cells in vitro. However, the in vivo anticancer effects of lycopene against colon cancer have not been demonstrated yet. Therefore, this study investigated whether consumption of lycopene cou...

  8. Mefloquine effectively targets gastric cancer cells through phosphatase-dependent inhibition of PI3K/Akt/mTOR signaling pathway

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Yanwei [Department of General Surgery, Shiyan Taihe Hospital, Hubei University of Medicine, Shiyan, Hubei Province (China); Chen, Sen [Department of Academic Affairs, Hubei University of Medicine, Shiyan, Hubei Province (China); Xue, Rui [Department of Anesthesiology, Renmin Hospital, Hubei University of Medicine, Shiyan, Hubei Province (China); Zhao, Juan [Department of Oncology, Xiangyang Central Hospital, Shiyan, Hubei Province (China); Di, Maojun, E-mail: maoojun_di@163.com [Department of General Surgery, Shiyan Taihe Hospital, Hubei University of Medicine, Shiyan, Hubei Province (China)

    2016-02-05

    Deregulation of PI3K/Akt/mTOR pathway has been recently identified to play a crucial role in the progress of human gastric cancer. In this study, we show that mefloquine, a FDA-approved anti-malarial drug, effectively targets human gastric cancer cells. Mefloquine potently inhibits proliferation and induces apoptosis of a panel of human gastric cancer cell lines, with EC{sub 50} ∼0.5–0.7 μM. In two independent gastric cancer xenograft mouse models, mefloquine significantly inhibits growth of both tumors. The combination of mefloquine with paclitaxel enhances the activity of either drug alone in in vitro and in vivo. In addition, mefloquine potently decreased phosphorylation of PI3K, Akt, mTOR and rS6. Overexpression of constitutively active Akt significantly restored mefloquine-mediated inhibition of mTOR phosphorylation and growth, and induction of apoptosis, suggesting that mefloquine acts on gastric cancer cells via suppressing PI3K/Akt/mTOR pathway. We further show that mefloquine-mediated inhibition of Akt/mTOR singaling is phosphatase-dependent as pretreatment with calyculin A does-dependently reversed mefloquine-mediated inhibition of Akt/mTOR phosphorylation. Since mefloquine is already available for clinic use, these results suggest that it is a useful addition to the treatment armamentarium for gastric cancer. - Highlights: • Mefloquine targets a panel of gastric cancer cell lines in vitro and in vivo. • Combination of mefloquine and paclitaxel is synergistic. • Mefloquine acts on gastric cancer via inhibition of PI3K/Akt/mTOR pathway. • Mefloquine can be repurposed for gastric cancer treatment.

  9. Nrf2 but not autophagy inhibition is associated with the survival of wild-type epidermal growth factor receptor non-small cell lung cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou, Yan; Li, Yuan; Ni, Hong-Min; Ding, Wen-Xing; Zhong, Hua

    2016-01-01

    Non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is one of the most common malignancies in the world. Icotinib and Gefitinib are two epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) that have been used to treat NSCLC. While it is well known that mutations of EGFR can affect the sensitivity of NSCLC to the EGFR-TKI, other mechanisms may also be adopted by lung cancer cells to develop resistance to EGFR-TKI treatment. Cancer cells can use multiple adaptive mechanisms such as activation of autophagy and Nrf2 to protect against various stresses and chemotherapeutic drugs. Whether autophagy or Nrf2 activation contributes to the resistance of NSCLC to EGFR-TKI treatment in wild-type EGFR NSCLC cells remains elusive. In the present study, we confirmed that Icotinib and Gefitinib induced apoptosis in EGFR mutant HCC827 but not in EGFR wild-type A549 NSCLC cells. Icotinib and Gefitinib did not induce autophagic flux or inhibit mTOR in A549 cells. Moreover, suppression of autophagy by chloroquine, a lysosomal inhibitor, did not affect Icotinib- or Gefitinib-induced cell death in A549 cells. In contrast, Brusatol, an Nrf2 inhibitor, significantly suppressed the cell survival of A549 cells. However, Brusatol did not further sensitize A549 cells to EGFR TKI-induced cell death. Results from this study suggest that inhibition of Nrf2 can decrease cell vitality of EGFR wild-type A549 cells independent of autophagy. - Highlights: • Cancer cells use adaptive mechanisms against chemotherapy. • Autophagy is not essential for the drug resistance of lung cancer A549 cells. • Inhibition of Nrf2 decreases cell survival of lung cancer A549 cells.

  10. Nrf2 but not autophagy inhibition is associated with the survival of wild-type epidermal growth factor receptor non-small cell lung cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Yan [Department of Pulmonary, Shanghai Chest Hospital, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200030 (China); Department of Pharmacology, Toxicology and Therapeutics, The University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, KS 66160 (United States); Li, Yuan; Ni, Hong-Min; Ding, Wen-Xing [Department of Pharmacology, Toxicology and Therapeutics, The University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, KS 66160 (United States); Zhong, Hua, E-mail: eddiedong8@hotmail.com [Department of Pulmonary, Shanghai Chest Hospital, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200030 (China)

    2016-11-01

    Non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is one of the most common malignancies in the world. Icotinib and Gefitinib are two epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) that have been used to treat NSCLC. While it is well known that mutations of EGFR can affect the sensitivity of NSCLC to the EGFR-TKI, other mechanisms may also be adopted by lung cancer cells to develop resistance to EGFR-TKI treatment. Cancer cells can use multiple adaptive mechanisms such as activation of autophagy and Nrf2 to protect against various stresses and chemotherapeutic drugs. Whether autophagy or Nrf2 activation contributes to the resistance of NSCLC to EGFR-TKI treatment in wild-type EGFR NSCLC cells remains elusive. In the present study, we confirmed that Icotinib and Gefitinib induced apoptosis in EGFR mutant HCC827 but not in EGFR wild-type A549 NSCLC cells. Icotinib and Gefitinib did not induce autophagic flux or inhibit mTOR in A549 cells. Moreover, suppression of autophagy by chloroquine, a lysosomal inhibitor, did not affect Icotinib- or Gefitinib-induced cell death in A549 cells. In contrast, Brusatol, an Nrf2 inhibitor, significantly suppressed the cell survival of A549 cells. However, Brusatol did not further sensitize A549 cells to EGFR TKI-induced cell death. Results from this study suggest that inhibition of Nrf2 can decrease cell vitality of EGFR wild-type A549 cells independent of autophagy. - Highlights: • Cancer cells use adaptive mechanisms against chemotherapy. • Autophagy is not essential for the drug resistance of lung cancer A549 cells. • Inhibition of Nrf2 decreases cell survival of lung cancer A549 cells.

  11. Downregulation of connective tissue growth factor inhibits the growth and invasion of gastric cancer cells and attenuates peritoneal dissemination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Hong-Yan

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Connective tissue growth factor (CTGF has been shown to be implicated in tumor development and progression. However, the role of CTGF in gastric cancer remains largely unknown. Results In this study, we showed that CTGF was highly expressed in gastric cancer tissues compared with matched normal gastric tissues. The CTGF expression in tumor tissue was associated with histologic grade, lymph node metastasis and peritoneal dissemination (P 1 expression. Moreover, knockdown of CTGF expression also markedly reduced the migration and invasion of gastric cancer cells and decreased the expression of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP-2 and MMP-9. Animal studies revealed that nude mice injected with the CTGF knockdown stable cell lines featured a smaller number of peritoneal seeding nodules than the control cell lines. Conclusions These data suggest that CTGF plays an important role in cell growth and invasion in human gastric cancer and it appears to be a potential prognostic marker for patients with gastric cancer.

  12. Natural killer cells inhibit oxaliplatin-resistant colorectal cancer by repressing WBSCR22 via upregulating microRNA-146b-5p.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Haiyan; Su, Wuyun; Kang, Qingmei; Xing, Ze; Lin, Xue; Wu, Zhongjun

    2018-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells have exhibited promising efficacy in inhibiting cancer growth. We aimed to explorer the effect of NK cells on oxaliplatin-resistant colorectal cancer and the underlying molecular mechanism. Oxaliplatin-resistant colorectal cancer cell lines were co-cultured with NK cells to evaluate the effect on viability, proliferation, migration and invasion in vitro . Oxaliplatin-resistant colorectal cancer cells were also co-injected with NK cells into mice to establish xenograft tumor model, to assess the in vivo effect of NK cells on tumorigenesis of the oxaliplatin-resistant colorectal cancer cells. Expression of WBSCR22 gene was assessed in the oxaliplatin-resistant colorectal cancer cells following NK cell treatment to elucidate the mechanism. NK cell treatment significantly reduces growth of oxaliplatin-resistant colorectal cancer cells both in vitro and in vivo , as well as reduced WBSCR22 expression. MicroRNAs potentially targeting WBSCR22 were analyzed, and microRNA-146b-5p was found to be significantly upregulated following NK cell treatment. MicroRNA-146b-5p directly targeted WBSCR22 mRNA 3'-UTR to inhibit its expression, which was required for NK cell-induced inhibition of oxaliplatin-resistant colorectal cancer cell lines. NK cells inhibit oxaliplatin-resistant colorectal cancer by repressing WBSCR22 via upregulating microRNA-146b-5p, both of which could serve as candidates for targeted therapy against oxaliplatin-resistant colorectal cancer.

  13. Sphingosine kinase-1 is central to androgen-regulated prostate cancer growth and survival.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Audrey Dayon

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Sphingosine kinase-1 (SphK1 is an oncogenic lipid kinase notably involved in response to anticancer therapies in prostate cancer. Androgens regulate prostate cancer cell proliferation, and androgen deprivation therapy is the standard of care in the management of patients with advanced disease. Here, we explored the role of SphK1 in the regulation of androgen-dependent prostate cancer cell growth and survival. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Short-term androgen removal induced a rapid and transient SphK1 inhibition associated with a reduced cell growth in vitro and in vivo, an event that was not observed in the hormono-insensitive PC-3 cells. Supporting the critical role of SphK1 inhibition in the rapid effect of androgen depletion, its overexpression could impair the cell growth decrease. Similarly, the addition of dihydrotestosterone (DHT to androgen-deprived LNCaP cells re-established cell proliferation, through an androgen receptor/PI3K/Akt dependent stimulation of SphK1, and inhibition of SphK1 could markedly impede the effects of DHT. Conversely, long-term removal of androgen support in LNCaP and C4-2B cells resulted in a progressive increase in SphK1 expression and activity throughout the progression to androgen-independence state, which was characterized by the acquisition of a neuroendocrine (NE-like cell phenotype. Importantly, inhibition of the PI3K/Akt pathway--by negatively impacting SphK1 activity--could prevent NE differentiation in both cell models, an event that could be mimicked by SphK1 inhibitors. Fascinatingly, the reversability of the NE phenotype by exposure to normal medium was linked with a pronounced inhibition of SphK1 activity. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We report the first evidence that androgen deprivation induces a differential effect on SphK1 activity in hormone-sensitive prostate cancer cell models. These results also suggest that SphK1 activation upon chronic androgen deprivation may serve as a

  14. Alpha cyano-4-hydroxy-3-methoxycinnamic acid inhibits proliferation and induces apoptosis in human breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamdan, Lamia; Arrar, Zoheir; Al Muataz, Yacoub; Suleiman, Lutfi; Négrier, Claude; Mulengi, Joseph Kajima; Boukerche, Habib

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated the underlying mechanism of 4-hydroxy-3-methoxycinnamic acid (ACCA), on the growth of breast cancer cells and normal immortal epithelial cells, and compared their cytotoxic effects responses. Treatment of breast cancer cells (MCF-7, T47D, and MDA-231) with ACCA resulted in dose- and time-dependent decrease of cell proliferation, viability in colony formation assay, and programmed cell death (apoptosis) with minimal effects on non-tumoral cells. The ability of ACCA to suppress growth in cancer cells not expressing or containing defects in p53 gene indicates a lack of involvement of this critical tumor suppressor element in mediating ACCA-induced growth inhibition. Induction of apoptosis correlated with an increase in Bax protein, an established inducer of programmed cell death, and the ratio of Bax to Bcl-2, an established inhibitor of apoptosis. We also documented the ability of ACCA to inhibit the migration and invasion of MDA-231 cells with ACCA in vitro. Additionally, tumor growth of MDA-231 breast cancer cells in vivo was dramatically affected with ACCA. On the basis of its selective anticancer inhibitory activity on tumor cells, ACCA may represent a promising therapeutic drug that should be further evaluated as a chemotherapeutic agent for human breast cancer.

  15. Alpha cyano-4-hydroxy-3-methoxycinnamic acid inhibits proliferation and induces apoptosis in human breast cancer cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lamia Hamdan

    Full Text Available This study investigated the underlying mechanism of 4-hydroxy-3-methoxycinnamic acid (ACCA, on the growth of breast cancer cells and normal immortal epithelial cells, and compared their cytotoxic effects responses. Treatment of breast cancer cells (MCF-7, T47D, and MDA-231 with ACCA resulted in dose- and time-dependent decrease of cell proliferation, viability in colony formation assay, and programmed cell death (apoptosis with minimal effects on non-tumoral cells. The ability of ACCA to suppress growth in cancer cells not expressing or containing defects in p53 gene indicates a lack of involvement of this critical tumor suppressor element in mediating ACCA-induced growth inhibition. Induction of apoptosis correlated with an increase in Bax protein, an established inducer of programmed cell death, and the ratio of Bax to Bcl-2, an established inhibitor of apoptosis. We also documented the ability of ACCA to inhibit the migration and invasion of MDA-231 cells with ACCA in vitro. Additionally, tumor growth of MDA-231 breast cancer cells in vivo was dramatically affected with ACCA. On the basis of its selective anticancer inhibitory activity on tumor cells, ACCA may represent a promising therapeutic drug that should be further evaluated as a chemotherapeutic agent for human breast cancer.

  16. Parafibromin inhibits cancer cell growth and causes G1 phase arrest

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Chun; Kong Dong; Tan, M.-H.; Pappas, Donald L.; Wang, P.-F.; Chen, Jindong; Farber, Leslie; Zhang Nian; Koo, H.-M.; Weinreich, Michael; Williams, Bart O.; Teh, B.T.

    2006-01-01

    The HRPT2 (hereditary hyperparathyroidism type 2) tumor suppressor gene encodes a ubiquitously expressed 531 amino acid protein termed parafibromin. Inactivation of parafibromin predisposes one to the development of HPT-JT syndrome. To date, the role of parafibromin in tumorigenesis is largely unknown. Here, we report that parafibromin is a nuclear protein that possesses anti-proliferative properties. We show that overexpression of parafibromin inhibits colony formation and cellular proliferation, and induces cell cycle arrest in the G1 phase. Moreover, HPT-JT syndrome-derived mutations in HRPT2 behave in a dominant-negative manner by abolishing the ability of parafibromin to suppress cell proliferation. These findings suggest that parafibromin has a critical role in cell growth, and mutations in HRPT2 can directly inhibit this role

  17. The small-molecule IAP antagonist AT406 inhibits pancreatic cancer cells in vitro and in vivo

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    Jiang, Yongsheng; Meng, Qinghua [Department of General Surgery, Jinan Central Hospital of Shandong University, Jinan (China); Chen, Bo [Department of Biliary and Pancreatic Surgery, East Hospital Affiliated to Tongji University in Shanghai, Shanghai (China); Shen, Haiyu; Yan, Bing [Department of General Surgery, Jinan Central Hospital of Shandong University, Jinan (China); Sun, Baoyou, E-mail: sunbaoyou_sdu@yeah.net [Department of General Surgery, Shandong Provincial Hospital Affiliated to Shandong University, No.9677 Jing-Shi Road, Jinan 250014 (China)

    2016-09-09

    In the present study, we tested the anti-pancreatic cancer activity by AT406, a small-molecule antagonist of IAP (inhibitor of apoptosis proteins). In established (Panc-1 and Mia-PaCa-2 lines) and primary human pancreatic cancer cells, treatment of AT406 significantly inhibited cell survival and proliferation. Yet, same AT406 treatment was non-cytotoxic to pancreatic epithelial HPDE6c7 cells. AT406 increased caspase-3/-9 activity and provoked apoptosis in the pancreatic cancer cells. Reversely, AT406′ cytotoxicity in these cells was largely attenuated with pre-treatment of caspase inhibitors. AT406 treatment caused degradation of IAP family proteins (cIAP1 and XIAP) and release of cytochrome C, leaving Bcl-2 unaffected in pancreatic cancer cells. Bcl-2 inhibition (by ABT-737) or shRNA knockdown dramatically sensitized Panc-1 cells to AT406. In vivo, oral administration of AT406 at well-tolerated doses downregulated IAPs (cIAP1/XIAP) and inhibited Panc-1 xenograft tumor growth in severe combined immunodeficient (SCID) nude mice. Together, our preclinical results suggest that AT406 could be further evaluated as a promising anti-pancreatic cancer agent. - Highlights: • AT406 is cytotoxic to established/primary human pancreatic cancer cells. • AT406 provokes caspase-dependent apoptosis in pancreatic cancer cells. • AT406 causes degradation of key IAPs and promotes cytochrome C release. • Bcl-2 inhibition or knockdown dramatically sensitizes Panc-1 cells to AT406. • Oral administration of AT406 inhibits Panc-1 tumor growth in SCID nude mice.

  18. The small-molecule IAP antagonist AT406 inhibits pancreatic cancer cells in vitro and in vivo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang, Yongsheng; Meng, Qinghua; Chen, Bo; Shen, Haiyu; Yan, Bing; Sun, Baoyou

    2016-01-01

    In the present study, we tested the anti-pancreatic cancer activity by AT406, a small-molecule antagonist of IAP (inhibitor of apoptosis proteins). In established (Panc-1 and Mia-PaCa-2 lines) and primary human pancreatic cancer cells, treatment of AT406 significantly inhibited cell survival and proliferation. Yet, same AT406 treatment was non-cytotoxic to pancreatic epithelial HPDE6c7 cells. AT406 increased caspase-3/-9 activity and provoked apoptosis in the pancreatic cancer cells. Reversely, AT406′ cytotoxicity in these cells was largely attenuated with pre-treatment of caspase inhibitors. AT406 treatment caused degradation of IAP family proteins (cIAP1 and XIAP) and release of cytochrome C, leaving Bcl-2 unaffected in pancreatic cancer cells. Bcl-2 inhibition (by ABT-737) or shRNA knockdown dramatically sensitized Panc-1 cells to AT406. In vivo, oral administration of AT406 at well-tolerated doses downregulated IAPs (cIAP1/XIAP) and inhibited Panc-1 xenograft tumor growth in severe combined immunodeficient (SCID) nude mice. Together, our preclinical results suggest that AT406 could be further evaluated as a promising anti-pancreatic cancer agent. - Highlights: • AT406 is cytotoxic to established/primary human pancreatic cancer cells. • AT406 provokes caspase-dependent apoptosis in pancreatic cancer cells. • AT406 causes degradation of key IAPs and promotes cytochrome C release. • Bcl-2 inhibition or knockdown dramatically sensitizes Panc-1 cells to AT406. • Oral administration of AT406 inhibits Panc-1 tumor growth in SCID nude mice.

  19. microRNA-328 inhibits cervical cancer cell proliferation and tumorigenesis by targeting TCF7L2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Xuan; Xia, Ying

    2016-01-01

    microRNAs (miRNAs) play a vital role in tumor development and progression. In this study, we aimed to determine the expression and biological roles of miR-328 in cervical cancer and identify its direct target gene. Our data showed that miR-328 was significantly downregulated in human cervical cancer tissues and cells. Re-expression of miR-328 inhibited cervical cancer cell proliferation and colony formation in vitro and suppressed the growth of xenograft tumors in vivo. Bioinformatic analysis predicted TCF7L2 (an essential effector of canonical Wnt signaling) as a target gene of miR-328, which was confirmed by luciferase reporter assays. Enforced expression of miR-328 led to a decline in the expression of endogenous TCF7L2 in cervical cancer cells. In cervical cancer tissues, TCF7L2 protein levels were negatively correlated with miR-328 expression levels (r = −0.462, P = 0.017). Small interfering RNA-mediated knockdown of TCF7L2 significantly impaired the proliferation and colony formation of cervical cancer cells. Ectopic expression of a miRNA-resistant form of TCF7L2 significantly reversed the growth suppressive effects of miR-328 on cervical cancer cells, which was accompanied by induction of cyclin D1 expression. Taken together, our results provide first evidence for the growth suppressive activity of miR-328 in cervical cancer, which is largely ascribed to downregulation of TCF7L2. Restoration of miR-328 may have therapeutic potential in cervical cancer. -- Highlights: •miR-328 inhibits cervical cancer cell growth and tumorigenesis. •TCF7L2 is a direct target gene of miR-328 in cervical cancer. •Knockdown of TCF7L2 impairs the proliferation and colony formation of cervical cancer cells.

  20. microRNA-328 inhibits cervical cancer cell proliferation and tumorigenesis by targeting TCF7L2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Xuan [Department of Gynaecology, Qilu Hospital, Shandong University, Jinan (China); Department of Gynaecology, Yantai Yuhuangding Hospital, Qingdao University School of Medicine, Yantai (China); Xia, Ying, E-mail: YingXia2006@qq.com [Department of Gynecology, Huadong Hospital, Fudan University, Shanghai, 200040 (China)

    2016-06-24

    microRNAs (miRNAs) play a vital role in tumor development and progression. In this study, we aimed to determine the expression and biological roles of miR-328 in cervical cancer and identify its direct target gene. Our data showed that miR-328 was significantly downregulated in human cervical cancer tissues and cells. Re-expression of miR-328 inhibited cervical cancer cell proliferation and colony formation in vitro and suppressed the growth of xenograft tumors in vivo. Bioinformatic analysis predicted TCF7L2 (an essential effector of canonical Wnt signaling) as a target gene of miR-328, which was confirmed by luciferase reporter assays. Enforced expression of miR-328 led to a decline in the expression of endogenous TCF7L2 in cervical cancer cells. In cervical cancer tissues, TCF7L2 protein levels were negatively correlated with miR-328 expression levels (r = −0.462, P = 0.017). Small interfering RNA-mediated knockdown of TCF7L2 significantly impaired the proliferation and colony formation of cervical cancer cells. Ectopic expression of a miRNA-resistant form of TCF7L2 significantly reversed the growth suppressive effects of miR-328 on cervical cancer cells, which was accompanied by induction of cyclin D1 expression. Taken together, our results provide first evidence for the growth suppressive activity of miR-328 in cervical cancer, which is largely ascribed to downregulation of TCF7L2. Restoration of miR-328 may have therapeutic potential in cervical cancer. -- Highlights: •miR-328 inhibits cervical cancer cell growth and tumorigenesis. •TCF7L2 is a direct target gene of miR-328 in cervical cancer. •Knockdown of TCF7L2 impairs the proliferation and colony formation of cervical cancer cells.

  1. Curcumin Inhibits Tumor Growth and Angiogenesis in an Orthotopic Mouse Model of Human Pancreatic Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabrina Bimonte

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Pancreatic cancer is a malignant neoplasm originating from transformed cells arising in tissues forming the pancreas. The best chemotherapeutic agent used to treat pancreatic cancer is the gemcitabine. However, gemcitabine treatment is associated with many side effects. Thus novel strategies involving less toxic agents for treatment of pancreatic cancer are necessary. Curcumin is one such agent that inhibits the proliferation and angiogenesis of a wide variety of tumor cells, through the modulation of many cell signalling pathways. In this study, we investigated whether curcumin plays antitumor effects in MIA PaCa-2 cells. In vitro studies showed that curcumin inhibits the proliferation and enhances apoptosis of MIA PaCa-2 cells. To test whether the antitumor activity of curcumin is also observed in vivo, we generated an orthotopic mouse model of pancreatic cancer by injection of MIA PaCa-2 cells in nude mice. We placed mice on diet containing curcumin at 0.6% for 6 weeks. In these treated mice tumors were smaller with respect to controls and showed a downregulation of the transcription nuclear factor NF-κB and NF-κB-regulated gene products. Overall, our data indicate that curcumin has a great potential in treatment of human pancreatic cancer through the modulation of NF-κB pathway.

  2. Down-regulation of connective tissue growth factor by inhibition of transforming growth factor beta blocks the tumor-stroma cross-talk and tumor progression in hepatocellular carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzocca, Antonio; Fransvea, Emilia; Dituri, Francesco; Lupo, Luigi; Antonaci, Salvatore; Giannelli, Gianluigi

    2010-02-01

    Tumor-stroma interactions in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) are of key importance to tumor progression. In this study, we show that HCC invasive cells produce high levels of connective tissue growth factor (CTGF) and generate tumors with a high stromal component in a xenograft model. A transforming growth factor beta (TGF-beta) receptor inhibitor, LY2109761, inhibited the synthesis and release of CTGF, as well as reducing the stromal component of the tumors. In addition, the TGF-beta-dependent down-regulation of CTGF diminished tumor growth, intravasation, and metastatic dissemination of HCC cells by inhibiting cancer-associated fibroblast proliferation. By contrast, noninvasive HCC cells were found to produce low levels of CTGF. Upon TGF-beta1 stimulation, noninvasive HCC cells form tumors with a high stromal content and CTGF expression, which is inhibited by treatment with LY2109761. In addition, the acquired intravasation and metastatic spread of noninvasive HCC cells after TGF-beta1 stimulation was blocked by LY2109761. LY2109761 interrupts the cross-talk between cancer cells and cancer-associated fibroblasts, leading to a significant reduction of HCC growth and dissemination. Interestingly, patients with high CTGF expression had poor prognosis, suggesting that treatment aimed at reducing TGF-beta-dependent CTGF expression may offer clinical benefits. Taken together, our preclinical results indicate that LY2109761 targets the cross-talk between HCC and the stroma and provide a rationale for future clinical trials.

  3. Growth Factor Inhibiting PKC Sensor in E-coli Environment Using Classification Technique and ANN Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. K. BASAK

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Protein kinease C plays an important role in angiogenesis and apoptosis in cancer. During the phase of angiogenesis the growth factor is up regulated where as during apoptosis the growth factor is down regulated. For down regulation of growth factor the pH environment of intra-cellular fluid has a specific range in the alkaline medium. Protein kinease C along with E-coli through interaction of Selenometabolite is able to maintain that alkaline environment for the apoptosis of the cancer cell with inhibition of the growth factor related to antioxidant/oxidant ratio. The present paper through implementation of Artificial Neural Network and Decision Tree has focused on metastasis linked with Capacitance Relaxation phenomena and down regulation of growth factor (VGEF. In this paper a distributed neural network has been applied to a data mining problem for classification of cancer stages inorder to have proper diagnosis of patient with PKC sensor. The Network was trained off line using 270 patterns each of 6 inputs. Using the weight obtained during training, fresh patterns were tested for accuracy in diagnosis linked with the stages of cancer.

  4. Anandamide inhibits adhesion and migration of breast cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grimaldi, Claudia; Pisanti, Simona; Laezza, Chiara; Malfitano, Anna Maria; Santoro, Antonietta; Vitale, Mario; Caruso, Maria Gabriella; Notarnicola, Maria; Iacuzzo, Irma; Portella, Giuseppe; Di Marzo, Vincenzo; Bifulco, Maurizio

    2006-01-01

    The endocannabinoid system regulates cell proliferation in human breast cancer cells. We reasoned that stimulation of cannabinoid CB 1 receptors could induce a non-invasive phenotype in breast mtastatic cells. In a model of metastatic spreading in vivo, the metabolically stable anandamide analogue, 2-methyl-2'-F-anandamide (Met-F-AEA), significantly reduced the number and dimension of metastatic nodes, this effect being antagonized by the selective CB 1 antagonist SR141716A. In MDA-MB-231 cells, a highly invasive human breast cancer cell line, and in TSA-E1 cells, a murine breast cancer cell line, Met-F-AEA inhibited adhesion and migration on type IV collagen in vitro without modifying integrin expression: both these effects were antagonized by SR141716A. In order to understand the molecular mechanism involved in these processes, we analyzed the phosphorylation of FAK and Src, two tyrosine kinases involved in migration and adhesion. In Met-F-AEA-treated cells, we observed a decreased tyrosine phosphorylation of both FAK and Src, this effect being attenuated by SR141716A. We propose that CB 1 receptor agonists inhibit tumor cell invasion and metastasis by modulating FAK phosphorylation, and that CB 1 receptor activation might represent a novel therapeutic strategy to slow down the growth of breast carcinoma and to inhibit its metastatic diffusion in vivo

  5. Targeting receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE) expression induces apoptosis and inhibits prostate tumor growth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elangovan, Indira; Thirugnanam, Sivasakthivel; Chen, Aoshuang; Zheng, Guoxing; Bosland, Maarten C.; Kajdacsy-Balla, André; Gnanasekar, Munirathinam

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Targeting RAGE by RNAi induces apoptosis in prostate cancer cells. ► Silencing RAGE expression abrogates rHMGB1 mediated cell proliferation. ► Down regulation of RAGE by RNAi inhibits PSA secretion of prostate cancer cells. ► Knock down of RAGE abrogates prostate tumor growth in vivo. ► Disruption of RAGE expression in prostate tumor activates death receptors. -- Abstract: Expression of receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE) plays a key role in the progression of prostate cancer. However, the therapeutic potential of targeting RAGE expression in prostate cancer is not yet evaluated. Therefore in this study, we have investigated the effects of silencing the expression of RAGE by RNAi approach both in vitro and in vivo. The results of this study showed that down regulation of RAGE expression by RNAi inhibited the cell proliferation of androgen-dependent (LNCaP) and androgen-independent (DU-145) prostate cancer cells. Furthermore, targeting RAGE expression resulted in apoptotic elimination of these prostate cancer cells by activation of caspase-8 and caspase-3 death signaling. Of note, the levels of prostate specific antigen (PSA) were also reduced in LNCaP cells transfected with RAGE RNAi constructs. Importantly, the RAGE RNAi constructs when administered in nude mice bearing prostate tumors, inhibited the tumor growth by targeting the expression of RAGE, and its physiological ligand, HMGB1 and by up regulating death receptors DR4 and DR5 expression. Collectively, the results of this study for the first time show that targeting RAGE by RNAi may be a promising alternative therapeutic strategy for treating prostate cancer.

  6. Restoration of microRNA‑218 increases cellular chemosensitivity to cervical cancer by inhibiting cell‑cycle progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Ruofan; Qiu, Haifeng; Du, Guiqiang; Wang, Yuan; Yu, Jinjin; Mao, Caiping

    2014-12-01

    We previously reported frequent loss of microRNA‑218 (miR‑218) in human cervical cancer, which was associated with tumor progression and poor prognosis. In this study, we investigated whether restoration of the miR‑218 level is a valid strategy for the treatment of cervical cancer. The expression of miR‑218 in cervical cancer samples and cell lines was quantified by reverse transcription TaqMan quantitative (RT‑q)PCR. Overexpression of miR‑218 was achieved by both transient and stable transfection, using a miR‑218 mimic and a miR‑218‑expressing plasmid, respectively. Alterations in cellular proliferation and cell‑cycle progression were measured by the MTT assay and flow cytometry analysis. Nude mice bearing SiHa xenografts were used to investigate the functions of miR‑218 and carboplatin on tumor growth and weight. The expression of cycle‑related proteins was detected by western blotting and immunohistochemical staining. In vitro, miR‑218 significantly inhibited cellular growth in all four cell lines tested (P=0.021 for CaSki, P=0.009 for HeLa, P=0.016 for SiHa, and P=0.029 for C33A). Overexpression of miR‑218 induced G1 phase arrest and reduced expression of cyclin D1 and CDK4. In vivo, restoration of miR‑218 notably inhibited tumor growth and decreased tumor weight. In primary cultured samples, tumors with high levels of miR‑218 were more sensitive to carboplatin (R2=0.3319, P=0.0026); consistently, miR‑218 overexpression suppressed tumor growth, induced cell‑cycle arrest, and reduced the cyclin D1 level. Based on these and previous results, we conclude that restoration of the miR‑218 level inhibits the growth of cervical cancer cells both in vitro and in vivo; furthermore, overexpression of miR‑218 sensitizes cervical cancer cells to carboplatin. Our findings suggest a novel therapy for cervical cancer based on miR‑218, especially in patients with reduced levels of miR‑218.

  7. Methyl Sartortuoate Inhibits Colon Cancer Cell Growth by Inducing Apoptosis and G2/M-Phase Arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lan, Qiusheng; Li, Shoufeng; Lai, Wei; Xu, Heyang; Zhang, Yang; Zeng, Yujie; Lan, Wenjian; Chu, Zhonghua

    2015-08-17

    The potential anti-neoplastic activity of terpenoids is of continued interest. In this study, we investigate whether methyl sartortuoate, a terpenoid isolated from soft coral, induced cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in a human colon cancer cell line. Culture studies found that methyl sartortuoate inhibited colon cancer cell (LoVo and RKO) growth and caused apoptotic death in a concentration- and time-dependent manner, by activation of caspase-8, caspase-9, caspase-3, p53 and Bax, and inactivation of B-cell lymphoma 2 (Bcl-2) apoptosis regulating proteins. Methyl sartortuoate treatment led to reduced expression of cdc2 and up-regulated p21 and p53, suggesting that Methyl sartortuoate induced G2-M arrest through modulation of p53/p21/cdc2 pathways. Methyl sartortuoate also up-regulated phospho-JNK and phospho-p38 expression levels. This resulted in cell cycle arrest at the G2-M phase and apoptosis in LoVo and RKO cells. Treatment with the JNK inhibitor SP600125 and the p38 MAPK inhibitor SB203580 prevented methyl sartortuoate-induced apoptosis in LoVo cells. Moreover, methyl sartortuoate also prevented neoplasm growth in NOD-SCID nude mice inoculated with LoVo cells. Taken together, these findings suggest that methyl sartortuoate is capable of leading to activation of caspase-8, -9, -3, increasing p53 and Bax/Bcl-2 ratio apoptosis through MAPK-dependent apoptosis and results in G2-M phase arrest in LoVo and RKO cells. Thus, methyl sartortuoate may be a promising anticancer candidate.

  8. Fentanyl inhibits proliferation and invasion of colorectal cancer via β-catenin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiu-Lai; Chen, Min-Li; Zhou, Sheng-Li

    2015-01-01

    Background and aim: Fentanyl is widely used for relieving pain and narcotizing in cancer patients. However, there are few published reports regarding the effects of fentanyl on tumor control and treatment. Here we investigated the effects of fentanyl on tumor growth and cell invasion in the human colorectal carcinoma (HCT116) cells. Methods: Nude mice xenografts of HCT116 cells were established to assess the inhibition effect on tumor growth by fentanyl. MTT and Transwell were employed to determine the cell survival rate and cell invasion, respectively. MicroRNAs and mRNAs expression were quantified by real-time PCR. β-catenin and matrix metalloproteinases (MMP-2 and MMP-9) expression were assayed by western blotting. β-Catenin-specific small interfering RNA (Si-β-catenin) and miR-182 mimics were transfected in cells to investigate the mechanism underlying the effects of fentanyl on the colorectal tumor and HCT116 cells. Results: Treatment with fentanyl inhibited the tumor growth and HCT116 cells invasion. Fentanyl also downregulated the expression of β-catenin and miR-182 in both xenograft tumors and HCT116 cells, and decreased the protein level of MMP-9 in HCT116 cells. Downregulation of β-Catenin resulted in the decrease of miR-182 expression in colorectal cells. In addition, the overexpression of miR-182 reversed the effect of fentanyl on MMP-9 expression and cell invasion of HCT116 cells. Conclusions: The current study demonstrated that the inhibition of tumor growth and cell invasion in colorectal cancer by fentanyl is probably due to downregulation of miR-182 and MMP-9 expression by β-catenin. PMID:25755709

  9. Inhibition of human MCF-7 breast cancer cells and HT-29 colon cancer cells by rice-produced recombinant human insulin-like growth binding protein-3 (rhIGFBP-3.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stanley C K Cheung

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Insulin-like growth factor binding protein-3 (IGFBP-3 is a multifunctional molecule which is closely related to cell growth, apoptosis, angiogenesis, metabolism and senescence. It combines with insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I to form a complex (IGF-I/IGFBP-3 that can treat growth hormone insensitivity syndrome (GHIS and reduce insulin requirement in patients with diabetes. IGFBP-3 alone has been shown to have anti-proliferation effect on numerous cancer cells. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We reported here an expression method to produce functional recombinant human IGFBP-3 (rhIGFBP-3 in transgenic rice grains. Protein sorting sequences, signal peptide and endoplasmic reticulum retention tetrapeptide (KDEL were included in constructs for enhancing rhIGFBP-3 expression. Western blot analysis showed that only the constructs with signal peptide were successfully expressed in transgenic rice grains. Both rhIGFBP-3 proteins, with or without KDEL sorting sequence inhibited the growth of MCF-7 human breast cancer cells (65.76 ± 1.72% vs 45.00 ± 0.86%, p < 0.05; 50.84 ± 1.97% vs 45.00 ± 0.86%, p < 0.01 respectively and HT-29 colon cancer cells (65.14 ± 3.84% vs 18.01 ± 13.81%, p < 0.05 and 54.7 ± 9.44% vs 18.01 ± 13.81%, p < 0.05 respectively when compared with wild type rice. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: These findings demonstrated the feasibility of producing biological active rhIGFBP-3 in rice using a transgenic approach, which will definitely encourage more research on the therapeutic use of hIGFBP-3 in future.

  10. Pseudomonas aeruginosa inhibits the growth of Cryptococcus species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rella, Antonella; Yang, Mo Wei; Gruber, Jordon; Montagna, Maria Teresa; Luberto, Chiara; Zhang, Yong-Mei; Del Poeta, Maurizio

    2012-06-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a ubiquitous and opportunistic bacterium that inhibits the growth of different microorganisms, including Gram-positive bacteria and fungi such as Candida spp. and Aspergillus fumigatus. In this study, we investigated the interaction between P. aeruginosa and Cryptococcus spp. We found that P. aeruginosa PA14 and, to a lesser extent, PAO1 significantly inhibited the growth of Cryptococcus spp. The inhibition of growth was observed on solid medium by the visualization of a zone of inhibition of yeast growth and in liquid culture by viable cell counting. Interestingly, such inhibition was only observed when P. aeruginosa and Cryptococcus were co-cultured. Minimal inhibition was observed when cell-cell contact was prevented using a separation membrane, suggesting that cell contact is required for inhibition. Using mutant strains of Pseudomonas quinoline signaling, we showed that P. aeruginosa inhibited the growth of Cryptococcus spp. by producing antifungal molecules pyocyanin, a redox-active phenazine, and 2-heptyl-3,4-dihydroxyquinoline (PQS), an extracellular quorum-sensing signal. Because both P. aeruginosa and Cryptococcus neoformans are commonly found in lung infections of immunocompromised patients, this study may have important implication for the interaction of these microbes in both an ecological and a clinical point of view.

  11. Inhibition of DNA2 nuclease as a therapeutic strategy targeting replication stress in cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, S; Peng, X; Daley, J; Yang, L; Shen, J; Nguyen, N; Bae, G; Niu, H; Peng, Y; Hsieh, H-J; Wang, L; Rao, C; Stephan, C C; Sung, P; Ira, G; Peng, G

    2017-04-17

    Replication stress is a characteristic feature of cancer cells, which is resulted from sustained proliferative signaling induced by activation of oncogenes or loss of tumor suppressors. In cancer cells, oncogene-induced replication stress manifests as replication-associated lesions, predominantly double-strand DNA breaks (DSBs). An essential mechanism utilized by cells to repair replication-associated DSBs is homologous recombination (HR). In order to overcome replication stress and survive, cancer cells often require enhanced HR repair capacity. Therefore, the key link between HR repair and cellular tolerance to replication-associated DSBs provides us with a mechanistic rationale for exploiting synthetic lethality between HR repair inhibition and replication stress. DNA2 nuclease is an evolutionarily conserved essential enzyme in replication and HR repair. Here we demonstrate that DNA2 is overexpressed in pancreatic cancers, one of the deadliest and more aggressive forms of human cancers, where mutations in the KRAS are present in 90-95% of cases. In addition, depletion of DNA2 significantly reduces pancreatic cancer cell survival and xenograft tumor growth, suggesting the therapeutic potential of DNA2 inhibition. Finally, we develop a robust high-throughput biochemistry assay to screen for inhibitors of the DNA2 nuclease activity. The top inhibitors were shown to be efficacious against both yeast Dna2 and human DNA2. Treatment of cancer cells with DNA2 inhibitors recapitulates phenotypes observed upon DNA2 depletion, including decreased DNA double strand break end resection and attenuation of HR repair. Similar to genetic ablation of DNA2, chemical inhibition of DNA2 selectively attenuates the growth of various cancer cells with oncogene-induced replication stress. Taken together, our findings open a new avenue to develop a new class of anticancer drugs by targeting druggable nuclease DNA2. We propose DNA2 inhibition as new strategy in cancer therapy by targeting

  12. Anti-cancer effect of bee venom toxin and melittin in ovarian cancer cells through induction of death receptors and inhibition of JAK2/STAT3 pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jo, Miran; Park, Mi Hee; Kollipara, Pushpa Saranya; An, Byeong Jun; Song, Ho Sueb; Han, Sang Bae; Kim, Jang Heub; Song, Min Jong; Hong, Jin Tae

    2012-01-01

    We investigated whether bee venom and melittin, a major component of bee venom, inhibit cell growth through enhancement of death receptor expressions in the human ovarian cancer cells, SKOV3 and PA-1. Bee venom (1-5 μg/ml) and melittin (0.5-2 μg/ml) inhibited the growth of SKOV3 and PA-1 ovarian cancer cells by the induction of apoptotic cell death in a dose dependent manner. Consistent with apoptotic cell death, expression of death receptor (DR) 3 and DR6 was increased in both cancer cells, but expression of DR4 was increased only in PA-1 cells. Expression of DR downstream pro-apoptotic proteins including caspase-3, 8, and Bax was concomitantly increased, but the phosphorylation of JAK2 and STAT3 and the expression of Bcl-2 were inhibited by treatment with bee venom and melittin in SKOV3 and PA-1 cells. Expression of cleaved caspase-3 was increased in SKOV3, but cleaved caspase-8 was increased in PA-1 cells. Moreover, deletion of DR3, DR4, and DR6 by small interfering RNA significantly reversed bee venom and melittin-induced cell growth inhibitory effect as well as down regulation of STAT3 by bee venom and melittin in SKOV3 and PA-1 ovarian cancer cell. These results suggest that bee venom and melittin induce apoptotic cell death in ovarian cancer cells through enhancement of DR3, DR4, and DR6 expression and inhibition of STAT3 pathway. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Restoration of tumor suppressor miR-34 inhibits human p53-mutant gastric cancer tumorspheres

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ji, Qing; Hao, Xinbao; Meng, Yang; Zhang, Min; DeSano, Jeffrey; Fan, Daiming; Xu, Liang

    2008-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs), some of which function as oncogenes or tumor suppressor genes, are involved in carcinogenesis via regulating cell proliferation and/or cell death. MicroRNA miR-34 was recently found to be a direct target of p53, functioning downstream of the p53 pathway as a tumor suppressor. miR-34 targets Notch, HMGA2, and Bcl-2, genes involved in the self-renewal and survival of cancer stem cells. The role of miR-34 in gastric cancer has not been reported previously. In this study, we examined the effects of miR-34 restoration on p53-mutant human gastric cancer cells and potential target gene expression. Human gastric cancer cells were transfected with miR-34 mimics or infected with the lentiviral miR-34-MIF expression system, and validated by miR-34 reporter assay using Bcl-2 3'UTR reporter. Potential target gene expression was assessed by Western blot for proteins, and by quantitative real-time RT-PCR for mRNAs. The effects of miR-34 restoration were assessed by cell growth assay, cell cycle analysis, caspase-3 activation, and cytotoxicity assay, as well as by tumorsphere formation and growth. Human gastric cancer Kato III cells with miR-34 restoration reduced the expression of target genes Bcl-2, Notch, and HMGA2. Bcl-2 3'UTR reporter assay showed that the transfected miR-34s were functional and confirmed that Bcl-2 is a direct target of miR-34. Restoration of miR-34 chemosensitized Kato III cells with a high level of Bcl-2, but not MKN-45 cells with a low level of Bcl-2. miR-34 impaired cell growth, accumulated the cells in G1 phase, increased caspase-3 activation, and, more significantly, inhibited tumorsphere formation and growth. Our results demonstrate that in p53-deficient human gastric cancer cells, restoration of functional miR-34 inhibits cell growth and induces chemosensitization and apoptosis, indicating that miR-34 may restore p53 function. Restoration of miR-34 inhibits tumorsphere formation and growth, which is reported to be

  14. Epigallocatechin-3-gallate inhibits stem-like inflammatory breast cancer cells.

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    Nora D Mineva

    Full Text Available Inflammatory Breast Cancer (IBC is a highly aggressive form of cancer characterized by high rates of proliferation, lymphangiogenesis and metastasis, and an overall poor survival. As regular green tea consumption has been associated with improved prognosis of breast cancer patients, including decreased risk of recurrence, here the effects of the green tea polyphenol epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG were tested on two IBC lines: SUM-149 and SUM-190. EGCG decreased expression of genes that promote proliferation, migration, invasion, and survival. Consistently, growth, invasive properties, and survival of IBC cells were reduced by EGCG treatment. EGCG also reduced lymphangiogenesis-promoting genes, in particular VEGF-D. Conditioned media from EGCG-treated IBC cells displayed decreased VEGF-D secretion and reduced ability to promote lymphangiogenesis in vitro as measured by hTERT-HDLEC lymphatic endothelial cell migration and tube formation. Tumorsphere formation by SUM-149 cells was robustly inhibited by EGCG, suggesting effects on self-renewal ability. Stem-like SUM-149 cells with high aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH activity, previously implicated in poor patient prognosis, were isolated. EGCG treatment reduced growth and induced apoptosis of the stem-like SUM-149 cells in culture. In an orthotopic mouse model, EGCG decreased growth of pre-existing tumors derived from ALDH-positive stem-like SUM-149 cells and their expression of VEGF-D, which correlated with a significant decrease in peritumoral lymphatic vessel density. Thus, EGCG inhibits the overall aggressive IBC phenotype. Reduction of the stem-like cell compartment by EGCG may explain the decreased risk of breast cancer recurrence among green tea drinkers. Recent clinical trials demonstrate the efficacy of green tea polyphenol extracts in treatment of prostate cancer and lymphocytic leukemia with low toxicity. Given the poor prognosis of IBC patients, our findings suggest further exploration

  15. Growth inhibition of human pancreatic cancer cells by lipofection mediated IGF-1R antisense oligodeoxynucletides in combination with ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pan Yaozhen; Sun Chengyi; Wang Yuzhi

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To study the growth inhibition of human pancreatic cancer cells (PC-3) by lipofection-mediated and ionizing radiation improving transfection of IGF-1R antisense oligodeoxynucletides (ASON) in vitro. Methods: Colonigenicity of PC-3 cells in vitro after 60 Co γ-radiation was observed for ascertaining their radiosensitivity and optimal radiation dose was selected according to the radiation sensitivity. PC-3 cells were transfected by two ways: 1) by lipofection-mediated IGF-1R ASON combined with ionizing radiation. 2) by lipo-ASON alone without ionizing radiation. Cell growth was assessed by MTT method. The expression of IGF-1R at mRNA level was examined by RT-PCR. Flow cytometry was used to demonstrate apoptotic changes in lipo-ASON-treated cells. Results: The inhibitory efficiency of lipo-ASON combined with ionizing radiation was higher than that without ionizing radiation (P < 0.05). The apoptotic efficiency and the decreased level of IGF-1R at mRNA were significantly improved (P < 0.05). Conclusion: Lipofection-mediated and ionizing radiation-promoted transfection of IGF-1R antisense oligodeoxynucletides (ASON) significantly decreases IGF-1R at mRNA level and induces apoptosis of human pancreatic cancer cells in vitro

  16. RAF Suppression Synergizes with MEK Inhibition in KRAS Mutant Cancer Cells

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    Simona Lamba

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available KRAS is the most frequently mutated oncogene in human cancer, yet no therapies are available to treat KRAS mutant cancers. We used two independent reverse genetic approaches to identify components of the RAS-signaling pathways required for growth of KRAS mutant tumors. Small interfering RNA (siRNA screening of 37 KRAS mutant colorectal cancer cell lines showed that RAF1 suppression was synthetic lethal with MEK inhibition. An unbiased kinome short hairpin RNA (shRNA-based screen confirmed this synthetic lethal interaction in colorectal as well as in lung cancer cells bearing KRAS mutations. Compounds targeting RAF kinases can reverse resistance to the MEK inhibitor selumetinib. MEK inhibition induces RAS activation and BRAF-RAF1 dimerization and sustains MEK-ERK signaling, which is responsible for intrinsic resistance to selumetinib. Prolonged dual blockade of RAF and MEK leads to persistent ERK suppression and efficiently induces apoptosis. Our data underlie the relevance of developing combinatorial regimens of drugs targeting the RAF-MEK pathway in KRAS mutant tumors.

  17. MCT1 modulates cancer cell pyruvate export and growth of tumors that co-express MCT1 and MCT4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Candice Sun; Graham, Nicholas A.; Gu, Wen; Camacho, Carolina Espindola; Mah, Vei; Maresh, Erin L.; Alavi, Mohammed; Bagryanova, Lora; Krotee, Pascal A. L.; Gardner, Brian K.; Behbahan, Iman Saramipoor; Horvath, Steve; Chia, David; Mellinghoff, Ingo K.; Hurvitz, Sara A.; Dubinett, Steven M.; Critchlow, Susan E.; Kurdistani, Siavash K.; Goodglick, Lee; Braas, Daniel; Graeber, Thomas G.; Christofk, Heather R.

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY Monocarboxylate Transporter 1 (MCT1) inhibition is thought to block tumor growth through disruption of lactate transport and glycolysis. Here we show MCT1 inhibition impairs proliferation of glycolytic breast cancer cells co-expressing MCT1 and MCT4 via disruption of pyruvate rather than lactate export. MCT1 expression is elevated in glycolytic breast tumors, and high MCT1 expression predicts poor prognosis in breast and lung cancer patients. Acute MCT1 inhibition reduces pyruvate export but does not consistently alter lactate transport or glycolytic flux in breast cancer cells that co-express MCT1 and MCT4. Despite the lack of glycolysis impairment, MCT1 loss-of-function decreases breast cancer cell proliferation and blocks growth of mammary fat pad xenograft tumors. Our data suggest MCT1 expression is elevated in glycolytic cancers to promote pyruvate export, which when inhibited enhances oxidative metabolism and reduces proliferation. This study presents an alternative molecular consequence of MCT1 inhibitors further supporting their use as anti-cancer therapeutics. PMID:26876179

  18. Inhibitory effect of snake venom toxin on NF-κB activity prevents human cervical cancer cell growth via increase of death receptor 3 and 5 expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hye Lim; Park, Mi Hee; Hong, Ji Eun; Kim, Dae Hwan; Kim, Ji Young; Seo, Hyen Ok; Han, Sang-Bae; Yoon, Joo Hee; Lee, Won Hyoung; Song, Ho Sueb; Lee, Ji In; Lee, Ung Soo; Song, Min Jong; Hong, Jin Tae

    2016-02-01

    We previously found that snake venom toxin inhibits nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) activity in several cancer cells. NF-κB is implicated in cancer cell growth and chemoresistance. In our present study, we investigated whether snake venom toxin (SVT) inhibits NF-κB, thereby preventing human cervical cancer cell growth (Ca Ski and C33A). SVT (0-12 μg/ml) inhibited the growth of cervical cancer cells by the induction of apoptotic cell death. These inhibitory effects were associated with the inhibition of NF-κB activity. However, SVT dose dependently increased the expression of death receptors (DRs): DR3, DR5 and DR downstream pro-apoptotic proteins. Exploration of NF-κB inhibitor (Phenylarsine oxide, 0.1 μM) synergistically further increased SVT-induced DR3 and DR5 expressions accompanied with further inhibition of cancer cells growth. Moreover, deletion of DR3 and DR5 by small interfering RNA significantly abolished SVT-induced cell growth inhibitory effects, as well as NF-κB inactivation. Using TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand resistance cancer cells (A549 and MCF-7), we also found that SVT enhanced the susceptibility of chemoresistance of these cancer cells through down-regulation of NF-κB, but up-regulation of DR3 and DR5. In vivo study also showed that SVT (0.5 and 1 mg/kg) inhibited tumor growth accompanied with inactivation of NF-κB. Thus, our present study indicates that SVT could be applicable as an anticancer agent for cervical cancer, or as an adjuvant agent for chemoresistant cancer cells.

  19. Anti-metastatic and anti-tumor growth effects of Origanum majorana on highly metastatic human breast cancer cells: inhibition of NFκB signaling and reduction of nitric oxide production.

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    Yusra Al Dhaheri

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: We have recently reported that Origanummajorana exhibits anticancer activity by promoting cell cycle arrest and apoptosis of the metastatic MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cell line. Here, we extended our study by investigating the effect of O. majorana on the migration, invasion and tumor growth of these cells. RESULTS: We demonstrate that non-cytotoxic concentrations of O. majorana significantly inhibited the migration and invasion of the MDA-MB-231 cells as shown by wound-healing and matrigel invasion assays. We also show that O. majorana induce homotypic aggregation of MDA-MB-231 associated with an upregulation of E-cadherin protein and promoter activity. Furthermore, we show that O. majorana decrease the adhesion of MDA-MB-231 to HUVECs and inhibits transendothelial migration of MDA-MB-231 through TNF-α-activated HUVECs. Gelatin zymography assay shows that O. majorana suppresses the activities of matrix metalloproteinase-2 and -9 (MMP-2 and MMP-9. ELISA, RT-PCR and Western blot results revealed that O. majorana decreases the expression of MMP-2, MMP-9, urokinase plasminogen activator receptor (uPAR, ICAM-1 and VEGF. Further investigation revealed that O. majorana suppresses the phosphorylation of IκB, downregulates the nuclear level of NFκB and reduces Nitric Oxide (NO production in MDA-MB-231 cells. Most importantly, by using chick embryo tumor growth assay, we also show that O. majorana promotes inhibition of tumor growth and metastasis in vivo. CONCLUSION: Our findings identify Origanummajorana as a promising chemopreventive and therapeutic candidate that modulate breast cancer growth and metastasis.

  20. Chitosan-coated doxorubicin nano-particles drug delivery system inhibits cell growth of liver cancer via p53/PRC1 pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Bai-Liang; Zheng, Ru; Ruan, Xiao-Jiao; Zheng, Zhi-Hai; Cai, Hua-Jie

    2018-01-01

    Nano-particles have been widely used in target-specific drug delivery system and showed advantages in cancers treatment. This study aims to evaluate the effect of chitosan coated doxorubicin nano-particles drug delivery system in liver cancer. The chitosan nano-particles were prepared by using the ionic gelation method. The characterizations of the nano-particles were determined by transmission electron microscopy. The cytotoxicity was detected by MTT assay, and the endocytosis, cell apoptosis and cell cycle were examined by flow cytometry. The protein level was analyzed with western blot. The dual luciferase reporter assay was performed to assess the interaction between p53 and the promoter of PRC1, and chromatin immune-precipitation was used to verify the binding between them. The FA-CS-DOX nano-particles were irregular and spherical particles around 30-40 nm, with uniform size and no adhesion. No significant difference was noted in doxorubicin release rate between CS-DOX and FA-CS-DOX. FA-CS-DOX nano-particles showed stronger cytotoxicity than CS-DOX. FA-CS-DOX nano-particles promoted the apoptosis and arrested cell cycle at G2/M phase, and they up-regulated p53. FA-CS-DOX nano-particles inhibited cell survival through p53/PRC1 pathway. Chitosan-coated doxorubicin nano-particles drug delivery system inhibits cell growth of liver cancer by promoting apoptosis and arresting cell cycle at G2/M phase through p53/PRC1 pathway. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Periplocin from Cortex periplocae inhibits cell growth and down-regulates survivin and c-myc expression in colon cancer in vitro and in vivo via beta-catenin/TCF signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Lianmei; Shan, Baoen; Du, Yanyan; Wang, Mingxia; Liu, Lihua; Ren, Feng-Zhi

    2010-08-01

    Cancer of the colon and rectum is the third most commonly diagnosed cancer and accounts for approximately 10% of all cancer-related deaths. Although surgical resection or radiotherapy are potentially curative for localized disease, advanced colon cancer is currently associated with poor prognosis. Therefore, the development of a new and effective chemotherapeutic agent is required to target critical pathways to induce responsiveness of colon cancer cells to death signals. Dysregulation of the beta-catenin/TCF pathway plays a central role in early activities of colorectal carcinogenesis. In this study, human colon cancer SW480 cells were used to investigate the effect of CPP (periplocin from Cortex periplocae) on the modulation of the beta-catenin/TCF signaling pathway. Our research results showed that CPP caused a dose- and time-dependent inhibition of cell growth as assessed by MTT assay and an induction in apoptosis as measured by flow cytometry and transmission electron microscopy. Furthermore, the CPP- treated cells were characterized by a decreased expression of beta-catenin protein in the total cell lysates and cytosolic and nuclear extracts. This expression alleviates the binding activity of T-cell factor (Tcf) complexes to its specific DNA-binding sites. Thus, the protein expression of the downstream elements survivin and c-myc was down-regulated. To determine the precise inhibitory mechanisms involved, further in-depth in vivo studies of CPP are warranted. In conclusion, our data suggest that CPP wields a multi-prong strategy to target the beta-catenin/Tcf signaling pathway, leading to the induction of apoptosis and inhibition of growth of colon cancer cells in vitro and in vivo. Therefore, CPP may become a potential agent against colon cancer.

  2. Survivin inhibits anti-growth effect of p53 activated by aurora B

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jung, Ji-Eun; Kim, Tae-Kyung; Lee, Joong-Seob; Oh, Se-Yeong; Kwak, Sungwook; Jin, Xun; Sohn, Jin-Young; Song, Min-Keun; Sohn, Young-Woo; Lee, Soo-Yeon; Pian, Xumin; Lee, Jang-Bo; Chung, Yong Gu; Choi, Young Ki; You, Seungkwon; Kim, Hyunggee

    2005-01-01

    Genomic instability and apoptosis evasion are hallmarks of cancer, but the molecular mechanisms governing these processes remain elusive. Here, we found that survivin, a member of the apoptosis-inhibiting gene family, and aurora B kinase, a chromosomal passenger protein, were co-overexpressed in the various glioblastoma cell lines and tumors. Notably, exogenous introduction of the aurora B in human BJ cells was shown to decrease cell growth and increase the senescence-associated β-galactosidase activity by activation of p53 tumor suppressor. However, aurora B overexpression failed to inhibit cell proliferation in BJ and U87MG cells transduced with dominant-negative p53 as well as in p53 -/- mouse astrocytes. Aurora B was shown to increase centrosome amplification in the p53 -/- astrocytes. Survivin was shown to induce anchorage-independent growth and inhibit anti-proliferation and drug-sensitive apoptosis caused by aurora B. Overexpression of both survivin and aurora B further accelerated the proliferation of BJ cells. Taken together, the present study indicates that survivin should accelerate tumorigenesis by inhibiting the anti-proliferative effect of p53 tumor suppressor that is activated by aurora B in normal and glioblastoma cells containing intact p53

  3. Effect of Sterols Isolated from Myrtillocactus geometrizans on Growth Inhibition of Colon and Breast Cancer Cells

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    Mario Augusto Bolaños-Carrillo

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To explore the effect of peniocerol and macdougallin on HCT-15 and MCF-7 cells proliferation, cell cycle, apoptosis, and PARP cleavage. Methods. HCT-15 and MCF-7 cells were treated with various concentrations of peniocerol and macdougallin (10–80 μM during 24 or 48 h. Crystal Violet Assay was used to evaluate the inhibition effect. Cell cycle regulation was examined by a propidium iodide method. Cell apoptosis was detected through both Annexin–V FLUOS/PI double-labeled cytometry assays and Western blot was applied to assess PARP cleavage. Results. Peniocerol and macdougallin induced growth inhibition and apoptosis in vitro in a time- and dose-dependent manner. Moreover, peniocerol and macdougallin induced arrest of cell cycle-dependent manner and increased the proportion of cells in G0/G1 phase. PARP cleavage in HCT-15 and MCF-7 cells was induced by treatment with peniocerol and macdougallin after 36 hours. Conclusions. Our results showed that the mechanism of cytotoxicity displayed by peniocerol and macdougallin is related to cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in both cell lines. This is a significant observation because it helps to understand the way some oxysterols isolated from Myrtillocactus geometrizans develop their biological activities against cancer cells.

  4. Camptothecin disrupts androgen receptor signaling and suppresses prostate cancer cell growth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Shicheng; Yuan, Yiming; Okumura, Yutaka; Shinkai, Norihiro; Yamauchi, Hitoshi

    2010-01-01

    The androgen receptor (AR) is the main therapeutic target for treatment of metastatic prostate cancers. The present study demonstrates that the topoisomerase I inhibitor camptothecin selectively inhibits androgen-responsive growth of prostate cancer cells. Camptothecin strikingly inhibited mutated and wild-type AR protein expression in LNCaP and PC-3/AR cells. This inhibition coincided with decreased androgen-mediated AR phosphorylation at Ser 81 and reduced androgen-mediated AR transcriptional activity in a dose-dependent manner. Additionally, camptothecin disrupted the association between AR and heat shock protein 90 and impeded binding of the synthetic androgen [ 3 H]R1881 to AR in LNCaP cells. Camptothecin also blocked androgen-induced AR nuclear translocation, leading to downregulation of the AR target gene PSA. In addition to decreasing the intracellular and secreted prostate-specific antigen (PSA) levels, camptothecin markedly inhibited androgen-stimulated PSA promoter activity. Collectively, our data reveal that camptothecin not only serves as a traditional genotoxic agent but, by virtue of its ability to target and disrupt AR, may also be a novel candidate for the treatment of prostate cancer.

  5. The diabetes medication Canagliflozin reduces cancer cell proliferation by inhibiting mitochondrial complex-I supported respiration

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    Linda A. Villani

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The sodium-glucose transporter 2 (SGLT2 inhibitors Canagliflozin and Dapagliflozin are recently approved medications for type 2 diabetes. Recent studies indicate that SGLT2 inhibitors may inhibit the growth of some cancer cells but the mechanism(s remain unclear. Methods: Cellular proliferation and clonogenic survival were used to assess the sensitivity of prostate and lung cancer cell growth to the SGLT2 inhibitors. Oxygen consumption, extracellular acidification rate, cellular ATP, glucose uptake, lipogenesis, and phosphorylation of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK, acetyl-CoA carboxylase, and the p70S6 kinase were assessed. Overexpression of a protein that maintains complex-I supported mitochondrial respiration (NDI1 was used to establish the importance of this pathway for mediating the anti-proliferative effects of Canagliflozin. Results: Clinically achievable concentrations of Canagliflozin, but not Dapagliflozin, inhibit cellular proliferation and clonogenic survival of prostate and lung cancer cells alone and in combination with ionizing radiation and the chemotherapy Docetaxel. Canagliflozin reduced glucose uptake, mitochondrial complex-I supported respiration, ATP, and lipogenesis while increasing the activating phosphorylation of AMPK. The overexpression of NDI1 blocked the anti-proliferative effects of Canagliflozin indicating reductions in mitochondrial respiration are critical for anti-proliferative actions. Conclusion: These data indicate that like the biguanide metformin, Canagliflozin not only lowers blood glucose but also inhibits complex-I supported respiration and cellular proliferation in prostate and lung cancer cells. These observations support the initiation of studies evaluating the clinical efficacy of Canagliflozin on limiting tumorigenesis in pre-clinical animal models as well epidemiological studies on cancer incidence relative to other glucose lowering therapies in clinical populations. Keywords: AMP

  6. Epigenetic repression of regulator of G-protein signaling 2 promotes androgen-independent prostate cancer cell growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolff, Dennis W; Xie, Yan; Deng, Caishu; Gatalica, Zoran; Yang, Mingjie; Wang, Bo; Wang, Jincheng; Lin, Ming-Fong; Abel, Peter W; Tu, Yaping

    2012-04-01

    G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR)-stimulated androgen-independent activation of androgen receptor (AR) contributes to acquisition of a hormone-refractory phenotype by prostate cancer. We previously reported that regulator of G-protein signaling (RGS) 2, an inhibitor of GPCRs, inhibits androgen-independent AR activation (Cao et al., Oncogene 2006;25:3719-34). Here, we show reduced RGS2 protein expression in human prostate cancer specimens compared to adjacent normal or hyperplastic tissue. Methylation-specific PCR analysis and bisulfite sequencing indicated that methylation of the CpG island in the RGS2 gene promoter correlated with RGS2 downregulation in prostate cancer. In vitro methylation of this promoter suppressed reporter gene expression in transient transfection studies, whereas reversal of this promoter methylation with 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine (5-Aza-dC) induced RGS2 reexpression in androgen-independent prostate cancer cells and inhibited their growth under androgen-deficient conditions. Interestingly, the inhibitory effect of 5-Aza-dC was significantly reduced by an RGS2-targeted short hairpin RNA, indicating that reexpressed RGS2 contributed to this growth inhibition. Restoration of RGS2 levels by ectopic expression in androgen-independent prostate cancer cells suppressed growth of xenografts in castrated mice. Thus, RGS2 promoter hypermethylation represses its expression and unmasks a latent pathway for AR transactivation in prostate cancer cells. Targeting this reversible process may provide a new strategy for suppressing prostate cancer progression by reestablishing its androgen sensitivity. Copyright © 2011 UICC.

  7. Phospho-aspirin (MDC-22) inhibits breast cancer in preclinical animal models: an effect mediated by EGFR inhibition, p53 acetylation and oxidative stress

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, Liqun; Wong, Chi C; Mackenzie, Gerardo G; Sun, Yu; Cheng, Ka Wing; Vrankova, Kvetoslava; Alston, Ninche; Ouyang, Nengtai; Rigas, Basil

    2014-01-01

    The anticancer properties of aspirin are restricted by its gastrointestinal toxicity and its limited efficacy. Therefore, we synthesized phospho-aspirin (PA-2; MDC-22), a novel derivative of aspirin, and evaluated its chemotherapeutic and chemopreventive efficacy in preclinical models of triple negative breast cancer (TNBC). Efficacy of PA-2 was evaluated in human breast cancer cells in vitro, and in orthotopic and subcutaneous TNBC xenografts in nude mice. Mechanistic studies were also carried out to elucidate the mechanism of action of PA-2. PA-2 inhibited the growth of TNBC cells in vitro more potently than aspirin. Treatment of established subcutaneous TNBC xenografts (MDA-MB-231 and BT-20) with PA-2 induced a strong growth inhibitory effect, resulting in tumor stasis (79% and 90% inhibition, respectively). PA-2, but not aspirin, significantly prevented the development of orthotopic MDA-MB-231 xenografts (62% inhibition). Mechanistically, PA-2: 1) inhibited the activation of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and suppressed its downstream signaling cascades, including PI3K/AKT/mTOR and STAT3; 2) induced acetylation of p53 at multiple lysine residues and enhanced its DNA binding activity, leading to cell cycle arrest; and 3) induced oxidative stress by suppressing the thioredoxin system, consequently inhibiting the activation of the redox sensitive transcription factor NF-κB. These molecular alterations were observed in vitro and in vivo, demonstrating their relevance to the anticancer effect of PA-2. Our findings demonstrate that PA-2 possesses potent chemotherapeutic efficacy against TNBC, and is also effective in its chemoprevention, warranting further evaluation as an anticancer agent

  8. Smad7 induces tumorigenicity by blocking TGF-beta-induced growth inhibition and apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halder, Sunil K; Beauchamp, R Daniel; Datta, Pran K

    2005-07-01

    Smad proteins play a key role in the intracellular signaling of the transforming growth factor beta (TGF-beta) superfamily of extracellular polypeptides that initiate signaling to regulate a wide variety of biological processes. The inhibitory Smad, Smad7, has been shown to function as intracellular antagonists of TGF-beta family signaling and is upregulated in several cancers. To determine the effect of Smad7-mediated blockade of TGF-beta signaling, we have stably expressed Smad7 in a TGF-beta-sensitive, well-differentiated, and non-tumorigenic cell line, FET, that was derived from human colon adenocarcinoma. Smad7 inhibits TGF-beta-induced transcriptional responses by blocking complex formation between Smad 2/3 and Smad4. While Smad7 has no effect on TGF-beta-induced activation of p38 MAPK and ERK, it blocks the phosphorylation of Akt by TGF-beta and enhances TGF-beta-induced phosphorylation of c-Jun. FET cells expressing Smad7 show anchorage-independent growth and enhance tumorigenicity in athymic nude mice. Smad7 blocks TGF-beta-induced growth inhibition by preventing TGF-beta-induced G1 arrest. Smad7 inhibits TGF-beta-mediated downregulation of c-Myc, CDK4, and Cyclin D1, and suppresses the expression of p21(Cip1). As a result, Smad7 inhibits TGF-beta-mediated downregulation of Rb phosphorylation. Furthermore, Smad7 inhibits the apoptosis of these cells. Together, Smad7 may increase the tumorigenicity of FET cells by blocking TGF-beta-induced growth inhibition and by inhibiting apoptosis. Thus, this study provides a mechanism by which a portion of human colorectal tumors may become refractory to tumor-suppressive actions of TGF-beta that might result in increased tumorigenicity.

  9. Curcumin Inhibits Growth of Human NCI-H292 Lung Squamous Cell Carcinoma Cells by Increasing FOXA2 Expression

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    Lingling Tang

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Lung squamous cell carcinoma (LSCC is a common histological lung cancer subtype, but unlike lung adenocarcinoma, limited therapeutic options are available for treatment. Curcumin, a natural compound, may have anticancer effects in various cancer cells, but how it may be used to treat LSCC has not been well studied. Here, we applied curcumin to a human NCI-H292 LSCC cell line to test anticancer effects and explored underlying potential mechanisms of action. Curcumin treatment inhibited NCI-H292 cell growth and increased FOXA2 expression in a time-dependent manner. FOXA2 expression was decreased in LSCC tissues compared with adjacent normal tissues and knockdown of FOXA2 increased NCI-H292 cells proliferation. Inhibition of cell proliferation by curcumin was attenuated by FOXA2 knockdown. Moreover inhibition of STAT3 pathways by curcumin increased FOXA2 expression in NCI-H292 cells whereas a STAT3 activator (IL-6 significantly inhibited curcumin-induced FOXA2 expression. Also, SOCS1 and SOCS3, negative regulators of STAT3 activity, were upregulated by curcumin treatment. Thus, curcumin inhibited human NCI-H292 cells growth by increasing FOXA2 expression via regulation of STAT3 signaling pathways.

  10. Vector-based RNA interference against vascular endothelial growth factor-A significantly limits vascularization and growth of prostate cancer in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wannenes, Francesca; Ciafré, Silvia Anna; Niola, Francesco; Frajese, Gaetano; Farace, Maria Giulia

    2005-12-01

    RNA interference technology is emerging as a very potent tool to obtain a cellular knockdown of a desired gene. In this work we used vector-based RNA interference to inhibit vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) expression in prostate cancer in vitro and in vivo. We demonstrated that transduction with a plasmid carrying a small interfering RNA targeting all isoforms of VEGF, dramatically impairs the expression of this growth factor in the human prostate cancer cell line PC3. As a consequence, PC3 cells loose their ability to induce one of the fundamental steps of angiogenesis, namely the formation of a tube-like network in vitro. Most importantly, our "therapeutic" vector is able to impair tumor growth rate and vascularization in vivo. We show that a single injection of naked plasmid in developing neoplastic mass significantly decreases microvessel density in an androgen-refractory prostate xenograft and is able to sustain a long-term slowing down of tumor growth. In conclusion, our results confirm the basic role of VEGF in the angiogenic development of prostate carcinoma, and suggest that the use of our vector-based RNA interference approach to inhibit angiogenesis could be an effective tool in view of future gene therapy applications for prostate cancer.

  11. Arsenic trioxide inhibits cell proliferation and human papillomavirus oncogene expression in cervical cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Hongtao; Gao, Peng; Zheng, Jie

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • As 2 O 3 inhibits growth of cervical cancer cells and expression of HPV oncogenes in these cells. • HPV-negative cervical cancer cells are more sensitive to As 2 O 3 than HPV-positive cervical cancer cells. • HPV-18 positive cervical cancer cells are more sensitive to As 2 O 3 than HPV-16 positive cancer cells. • Down-regulation of HPV oncogenes by As 2 O 3 is partially due to the diminished AP-1 binding. - Abstract: Arsenic trioxide (As 2 O 3 ) has shown therapeutic effects in some leukemias and solid cancers. However, the molecular mechanisms of its anticancer efficacy have not been clearly elucidated, particularly in solid cancers. Our previous data showed that As 2 O 3 induced apoptosis of human papillomavirus (HPV) 16 DNA-immortalized human cervical epithelial cells and cervical cancer cells and inhibited the expression of HPV oncogenes in these cells. In the present study, we systemically examined the effects of As 2 O 3 on five human cervical cancer cell lines and explored the possible molecular mechanisms. MTT assay showed that HPV-negative C33A cells were more sensitive to growth inhibition induced by As 2 O 3 than HPV-positive cervical cancer cells, and HPV 18-positive HeLa and C4-I cells were more sensitive to As 2 O 3 than HPV 16-positive CaSki and SiHa cells. After As 2 O 3 treatment, both mRNA and protein levels of HPV E6 and E7 obviously decreased in all HPV positive cell lines. In contrast, p53 and Rb protein levels increased in all tested cell lines. Transcription factor AP-1 protein expression decreased significantly in HeLa, CaSki and C33A cells with ELISA method. These results suggest that As 2 O 3 is a potential anticancer drug for cervical cancer

  12. Arsenic trioxide inhibits cell proliferation and human papillomavirus oncogene expression in cervical cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Hongtao [Department of Pathology, School of Medicine, Southeast University, Nanjing 210009 (China); Gao, Peng [Department of Internal Medicine, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA 52242 (United States); Zheng, Jie, E-mail: jiezheng54@126.com [Department of Pathology, School of Medicine, Southeast University, Nanjing 210009 (China)

    2014-09-05

    Highlights: • As{sub 2}O{sub 3} inhibits growth of cervical cancer cells and expression of HPV oncogenes in these cells. • HPV-negative cervical cancer cells are more sensitive to As{sub 2}O{sub 3} than HPV-positive cervical cancer cells. • HPV-18 positive cervical cancer cells are more sensitive to As{sub 2}O{sub 3} than HPV-16 positive cancer cells. • Down-regulation of HPV oncogenes by As{sub 2}O{sub 3} is partially due to the diminished AP-1 binding. - Abstract: Arsenic trioxide (As{sub 2}O{sub 3}) has shown therapeutic effects in some leukemias and solid cancers. However, the molecular mechanisms of its anticancer efficacy have not been clearly elucidated, particularly in solid cancers. Our previous data showed that As{sub 2}O{sub 3} induced apoptosis of human papillomavirus (HPV) 16 DNA-immortalized human cervical epithelial cells and cervical cancer cells and inhibited the expression of HPV oncogenes in these cells. In the present study, we systemically examined the effects of As{sub 2}O{sub 3} on five human cervical cancer cell lines and explored the possible molecular mechanisms. MTT assay showed that HPV-negative C33A cells were more sensitive to growth inhibition induced by As{sub 2}O{sub 3} than HPV-positive cervical cancer cells, and HPV 18-positive HeLa and C4-I cells were more sensitive to As{sub 2}O{sub 3} than HPV 16-positive CaSki and SiHa cells. After As{sub 2}O{sub 3} treatment, both mRNA and protein levels of HPV E6 and E7 obviously decreased in all HPV positive cell lines. In contrast, p53 and Rb protein levels increased in all tested cell lines. Transcription factor AP-1 protein expression decreased significantly in HeLa, CaSki and C33A cells with ELISA method. These results suggest that As{sub 2}O{sub 3} is a potential anticancer drug for cervical cancer.

  13. Inhibiting cancer cell hallmark features through nuclear export inhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Qingxiang; Chen, Xueqin; Zhou, Qiao; Burstein, Ezra; Yang, Shengyong; Jia, Da

    2016-01-01

    Treating cancer through inhibition of nuclear export is one of the best examples of basic research translation into clinical application. Nuclear export factor chromosomal region maintenance 1 (CRM1; Xpo1 and exportin-1) controls cellular localization and function of numerous proteins that are critical for the development of many cancer hallmarks. The diverse actions of CRM1 are likely to explain the broad ranging anti-cancer potency of CRM1 inhibitors observed in pre-clinical studies and/or clinical trials (phase I-III) on both advanced-stage solid and hematological tumors. In this review, we compare and contrast the mechanisms of action of different CRM1 inhibitors, and discuss the potential benefit of unexplored non-covalent CRM1 inhibitors. This emerging field has uncovered that nuclear export inhibition is well poised as an attractive target towards low-toxicity broad-spectrum potent anti-cancer therapy.

  14. Hydroxychavicol, a betel leaf component, inhibits prostate cancer through ROS-driven DNA damage and apoptosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gundala, Sushma Reddy; Yang, Chunhua [Department of Biology, Georgia State University, Atlanta, GA 30303 (United States); Mukkavilli, Rao [Advinus Therapeutics, Karnataka (India); Paranjpe, Rutugandha; Brahmbhatt, Meera; Pannu, Vaishali; Cheng, Alice [Department of Biology, Georgia State University, Atlanta, GA 30303 (United States); Reid, Michelle D. [Department of Pathology, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA (United States); Aneja, Ritu, E-mail: raneja@gsu.edu [Department of Biology, Georgia State University, Atlanta, GA 30303 (United States)

    2014-10-01

    Dietary phytochemicals are excellent ROS-modulating agents and have been shown to effectively enhance ROS levels beyond toxic threshold in cancer cells to ensure their selective killing while leaving normal cells unscathed. Here we demonstrate that hydroxychavicol (HC), extracted and purified from Piper betel leaves, significantly inhibits growth and proliferation via ROS generation in human prostate cancer, PC-3 cells. HC perturbed cell-cycle kinetics and progression, reduced clonogenicity and mediated cytotoxicity by ROS-induced DNA damage leading to activation of several pro-apoptotic molecules. In addition, HC treatment elicited a novel autophagic response as evidenced by the appearance of acidic vesicular organelles and increased expression of autophagic markers, LC3-IIb and beclin-1. Interestingly, quenching of ROS with tiron, an antioxidant, offered significant protection against HC-induced inhibition of cell growth and down regulation of caspase-3, suggesting the crucial role of ROS in mediating cell death. The collapse of mitochondrial transmembrane potential by HC further revealed the link between ROS generation and induction of caspase-mediated apoptosis in PC-3 cells. Our data showed remarkable inhibition of prostate tumor xenografts by ∼ 72% upon daily oral administration of 150 mg/kg bw HC by quantitative tumor volume measurements and non-invasive real-time bioluminescent imaging. HC was well-tolerated at this dosing level without any observable toxicity. This is the first report to demonstrate the anti-prostate cancer efficacy of HC in vitro and in vivo, which is perhaps attributable to its selective prooxidant activity to eliminate cancer cells thus providing compelling grounds for future preclinical studies to validate its potential usefulness for prostate cancer management. - Highlights: • HC perturbs cell-cycle progression by induction of reactive oxygen species (ROS). • HC mediated cytotoxicity by ROS-induced DNA damage leading to

  15. Hydroxychavicol, a betel leaf component, inhibits prostate cancer through ROS-driven DNA damage and apoptosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gundala, Sushma Reddy; Yang, Chunhua; Mukkavilli, Rao; Paranjpe, Rutugandha; Brahmbhatt, Meera; Pannu, Vaishali; Cheng, Alice; Reid, Michelle D.; Aneja, Ritu

    2014-01-01

    Dietary phytochemicals are excellent ROS-modulating agents and have been shown to effectively enhance ROS levels beyond toxic threshold in cancer cells to ensure their selective killing while leaving normal cells unscathed. Here we demonstrate that hydroxychavicol (HC), extracted and purified from Piper betel leaves, significantly inhibits growth and proliferation via ROS generation in human prostate cancer, PC-3 cells. HC perturbed cell-cycle kinetics and progression, reduced clonogenicity and mediated cytotoxicity by ROS-induced DNA damage leading to activation of several pro-apoptotic molecules. In addition, HC treatment elicited a novel autophagic response as evidenced by the appearance of acidic vesicular organelles and increased expression of autophagic markers, LC3-IIb and beclin-1. Interestingly, quenching of ROS with tiron, an antioxidant, offered significant protection against HC-induced inhibition of cell growth and down regulation of caspase-3, suggesting the crucial role of ROS in mediating cell death. The collapse of mitochondrial transmembrane potential by HC further revealed the link between ROS generation and induction of caspase-mediated apoptosis in PC-3 cells. Our data showed remarkable inhibition of prostate tumor xenografts by ∼ 72% upon daily oral administration of 150 mg/kg bw HC by quantitative tumor volume measurements and non-invasive real-time bioluminescent imaging. HC was well-tolerated at this dosing level without any observable toxicity. This is the first report to demonstrate the anti-prostate cancer efficacy of HC in vitro and in vivo, which is perhaps attributable to its selective prooxidant activity to eliminate cancer cells thus providing compelling grounds for future preclinical studies to validate its potential usefulness for prostate cancer management. - Highlights: • HC perturbs cell-cycle progression by induction of reactive oxygen species (ROS). • HC mediated cytotoxicity by ROS-induced DNA damage leading to

  16. Centchroman regulates breast cancer angiogenesis via inhibition of HIF-1α/VEGFR2 signalling axis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dewangan, Jayant; Kaushik, Shweta; Rath, Srikanta Kumar; Balapure, Anil K

    2018-01-15

    Angiogenesis is a recognized hallmark of cancer which promotes cancer cell progression and metastasis. Inhibition of angiogenesis to attenuate cancer growth is becoming desirable strategy for breast cancer management. The present study is aimed to investigate the antiangiogenic efficacy of a novel selective estrogen receptor modulator Centchroman (CC) on human breast cancer cells. Effect of CC on cell viability was evaluated using Sulforhodamine B assay. Endothelial cell proliferation, wound healing, Boyden chamber cell invasion, tube formation and chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) assays were performed to assess the effect of CC on migration, invasion and angiogenesis. Apoptosis, reactive oxygen species generation, caspase-3/7 and intracellular calcium ion level were measured through flow cytometry. Expression levels of HIF-1α, VEGF, VEGFR2, AKT and ERK were assessed by western blot analysis. CC selectively induces apoptosis in human breast cancer cells without affecting non-tumorigenic breast epithelial cells MCF-10A. Moreover, it inhibits migratory, invasive and mammosphere forming potential of breast cancer. Furthermore, CC also inhibited VEGF-induced migration, invasion and tube formation of HUVECs in vitro. CC effectively inhibited neovasculature formation in chicken CAM. Western blot analysis demonstrated that CC inhibited expression of HIF-1α and its downstream target VEGF. Interestingly, CC also suppressed VEGFR2 phosphorylation and consequently attenuated AKT and ERK phosphorylation. Our findings suggest that CC downregulates VEGF-induced angiogenesis by modulating HIF-1α/VEGFR2 pathway and recommend it (CC) as a potential therapeutic drug for breast cancer treatment. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Isorhapontigenin (ISO) Inhibits Invasive Bladder Cancer Formation In Vivo and Human Bladder Cancer Invasion In Vitro by Targeting STAT1/FOXO1 Axis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Guosong; Wu, Amy D; Huang, Chao; Gu, Jiayan; Zhang, Liping; Huang, Haishan; Liao, Xin; Li, Jingxia; Zhang, Dongyun; Zeng, Xingruo; Jin, Honglei; Huang, Haojie; Huang, Chuanshu

    2016-07-01

    Although our most recent studies have identified Isorhapontigenin (ISO), a novel derivative of stilbene that isolated from a Chinese herb Gnetum cleistostachyum, for its inhibition of human bladder cancer growth, nothing is known whether ISO possesses an inhibitory effect on bladder cancer invasion. Thus, we addressed this important question in current study and discovered that ISO treatment could inhibit mouse-invasive bladder cancer development following bladder carcinogen N-butyl-N-(4-hydroxybutyl) nitrosamine (BBN) exposure in vivo We also found that ISO suppressed human bladder cancer cell invasion accompanied by upregulation of the forkhead box class O 1 (FOXO1) mRNA transcription in vitro Accordingly, FOXO1 was profoundly downregulated in human bladder cancer tissues and was negatively correlated with bladder cancer invasion. Forced expression of FOXO1 specifically suppressed high-grade human bladder cancer cell invasion, whereas knockdown of FOXO1 promoted noninvasive bladder cancer cells becoming invasive bladder cancer cells. Moreover, knockout of FOXO1 significantly increased bladder cancer cell invasion and abolished the ISO inhibition of invasion in human bladder cancer cells. Further studies showed that the inhibition of Signal transducer and activator of transcription 1 (STAT1) phosphorylation at Tyr701 was crucial for ISO upregulation of FOXO1 transcription. Furthermore, this study revealed that metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2) was a FOXO1 downstream effector, which was also supported by data obtained from mouse model of ISO inhibition BBN-induced mouse-invasive bladder cancer formation. These findings not only provide a novel insight into the understanding of mechanism of bladder cancer's propensity to invasion, but also identify a new role and mechanisms underlying the natural compound ISO that specifically suppresses such bladder cancer invasion through targeting the STAT1-FOXO1-MMP-2 axis. Cancer Prev Res; 9(7); 567-80. ©2016 AACR. ©2016 American

  18. Inhibition of human lung cancer cell proliferation and survival by wine

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Compounds of plant origin and food components have attracted scientific attention for use as agents for cancer prevention and treatment. Wine contains polyphenols that were shown to have anti-cancer and other health benefits. The survival pathways of Akt and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (Erk), and the tumor suppressor p53 are key modulators of cancer cell growth and survival. In this study, we examined the effects of wine on proliferation and survival of human Non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cells and its effects on signaling events. Methods Human NSCLC adenocarcinoma A549 and H1299 cells were used. Cell proliferation was assessed by thymidine incorporation. Clonogenic assays were used to assess cell survival. Immunoblotting was used to examine total and phosphorylated levels of Akt, Erk and p53. Results In A549 cells red wine inhibited cell proliferation and reduced clonogenic survival at doses as low as 0.02%. Red wine significantly reduced basal and EGF-stimulated Akt and Erk phosphorylation while it increased the levels of total and phosphorylated p53 (Ser15). Control experiments indicated that the anti-proliferative effects of wine were not mediated by the associated contents of ethanol or the polyphenol resveratrol and were independent of glucose transport into cancer cells. White wine also inhibited clonogenic survival, albeit at a higher doses (0.5-2%), and reduced Akt phosphorylation. The effects of both red and white wine on Akt phosphorylation were also verified in H1299 cells. Conclusions Red wine inhibits proliferation of lung cancer cells and blocks clonogenic survival at low concentrations. This is associated with inhibition of basal and EGF-stimulated Akt and Erk signals and enhancement of total and phosphorylated levels of p53. White wine mediates similar effects albeit at higher concentrations. Our data suggest that wine may have considerable anti-tumour and chemoprevention properties in lung cancer and deserves further

  19. Picropodophyllin inhibits the growth of Ewing's sarcoma cells through the insulin‑like growth factor‑1 receptor/Akt signaling pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yong-Tao; Wang, Bao-Jun; Miao, Sheng-Wu; Gao, Jian-Jun

    2015-11-01

    Ewing's sarcoma (ES) is the second most common type of pediatric bone tumor, and is associated with a poor prognosis. Picropodophyllin (PPP), a novel selective inhibitor of insulin‑like growth factor‑1 receptor (IGF‑1R), is able to strongly inhibit various types of cancers. However, the effect of IGF‑1R on ES remains unclear. Following treatment with various concentrations of PPP for various times, cell viability was determined using an MTT assay. In addition, cell proliferation and apoptosis was investigated separately by bromodeoxyuridine staining and flow cytometry, respectively. The PPP‑associated signaling pathway was also investigated. The results of the present study suggested that PPP inhibited cell proliferation and viability of A673 and SK‑ES‑1 human Ewing's sarcoma cells in a dose- and time‑dependent manner. In addition, cell apoptosis rates were increased following treatment with PPP. Further investigation of the underlying mechanism revealed that PPP inhibited Akt phosphorylation. Fumonisin B1, an Akt‑specific activator, reversed the inhibitory effects of PPP on cell growth. Furthermore, the results suggested that PPP decreased the expression levels of IGF‑1R, a common activator of Akt signaling. PPP inhibited the growth of human Ewing's sarcoma cells by targeting the IGF‑1R/Akt signaling pathway. Therefore, PPP may prove useful in the development of an effective strategy for the treatment of Ewing's sarcoma.

  20. Fibroblast growth factor receptor mediates fibroblast-dependent growth in EMMPRIN-depleted head and neck cancer tumor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhiyong; Hartman, Yolanda E; Warram, Jason M; Knowles, Joseph A; Sweeny, Larissa; Zhou, Tong; Rosenthal, Eben L

    2011-08-01

    Head and neck squamous cell carcinoma tumors (HNSCC) contain a dense fibrous stroma which is known to promote tumor growth, although the mechanism of stroma-mediated growth remains unclear. As dysplastic mucosal epithelium progresses to cancer, there is incremental overexpression of extracellular matrix metalloprotease inducer (EMMPRIN) which is associated with tumor growth and metastasis. Here, we present evidence that gain of EMMPRIN expression allows tumor growth to be less dependent on fibroblasts by modulating fibroblast growth factor receptor-2 (FGFR2) signaling. We show that silencing EMMPRIN in FaDu and SCC-5 HNSCC cell lines inhibits cell growth, but when EMMPRIN-silenced tumor cells were cocultured with fibroblasts or inoculated with fibroblasts into severe combined immunodeficient mice, the growth inhibition by silencing EMMPRIN was blunted by the presence of fibroblasts. Coculture experiments showed fibroblast-dependent tumor cell growth occurred via a paracrine signaling. Analysis of tumor gene expression revealed expression of FGFR2 was inversely related to EMMPRIN expression. To determine the role of FGFR2 signaling in EMMPRIN-silenced tumor cells, ligands and inhibitors of FGFR2 were assessed. Both FGF1 and FGF2 enhanced tumor growth in EMMPRIN-silenced cells compared with control vector-transfected cells, whereas inhibition of FGFR2 with blocking antibody or with a synthetic inhibitor (PD173074) inhibited tumor cell growth in fibroblast coculture, suggesting the importance of FGFR2 signaling in fibroblast-mediated tumor growth. Analysis of xenografted tumors revealed that EMMPRIN-silenced tumors had a larger stromal compartment compared with control. Taken together, these results suggest that EMMPRIN acquired during tumor progression promotes fibroblast-independent tumor growth.

  1. Fibroblast growth factor receptor mediates fibroblast-dependent growth in EMMPRIN depleted head and neck cancer tumor cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhiyong; Hartman, Yolanda E.; Warram, Jason M.; Knowles, Joseph A.; Sweeny, Larrisa; Zhou, Tong; Rosenthal, Eben L.

    2011-01-01

    Head and neck squamous cell carcinoma tumors (HNSCC) contain a dense fibrous stroma which is known to promote tumor growth, although the mechanism of stroma mediated growth remains unclear. As dysplastic mucosal epithelium progresses to cancer there is incremental overexpression of extracellular matrix metalloprotease inducer (EMMPRIN) which is associated with tumor growth and metastasis. Here we present evidence that gain of EMMPRIN expression allows tumor growth to be less dependent on fibroblasts by modulating fibroblast growth factor receptor-2 (FGFR2) signaling. We show that silencing EMMPRIN in FaDu and SCC-5 HNSCC cell lines inhibits cell growth, but when EMMPRIN-silenced tumor cells were co-cultured with fibroblasts or inoculated with fibroblasts into SCID mice, the growth inhibition by silencing EMMPRIN was blunted by the presence of fibroblasts. Co-culture experiments demonstrated fibroblast-dependent tumor cell growth occurred via a paracrine signaling. Analysis of tumor gene expression revealed expression of FGFR2 was inversely related to EMMPRIN expression. To determine the role of FGFR2 signaling in EMMPRIN silenced tumor cells, ligands and inhibitors of FGFR2 were assessed. Both FGF1 and FGF2 enhanced tumor growth in EMMPRIN silenced cells compared to control vector transfected cells, while inhibition of FGFR2 with blocking antibody or with a synthetic inhibitor (PD173074) inhibited tumor cell growth in fibroblast co-culture, suggesting the importance of FGFR2 signaling in fibroblast mediated tumor growth. Analysis of xenografted tumors revealed EMMPRIN silenced tumors had a larger stromal compartment compared to control. Taken together, these results suggest that EMMPRIN acquired during tumor progression promotes fibroblast independent tumor growth. PMID:21665938

  2. Glycogen synthase kinase-3 inhibitors suppress the AR-V7-mediated transcription and selectively inhibit cell growth in AR-V7-positive prostate cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakata, Daisuke; Koyama, Ryokichi; Nakayama, Kazuhide; Kitazawa, Satoshi; Watanabe, Tatsuya; Hara, Takahito

    2017-06-01

    Recent evidence suggests that androgen receptor (AR) splice variants, including AR-V7, play a pivotal role in resistance to androgen blockade in prostate cancer treatment. The development of new therapeutic agents that can suppress the transcriptional activities of AR splice variants has been anticipated as the next generation treatment of castration-resistant prostate cancer. High-throughput screening of AR-V7 signaling inhibitors was performed using an AR-V7 reporter system. The effects of a glycogen synthase kinase-3 (GSK3) inhibitor, LY-2090314, on endogenous AR-V7 signaling were evaluated in an AR-V7-positive cell line, JDCaP-hr, by quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. The relationship between AR-V7 signaling and β-catenin signaling was assessed using RNA interference. The effect of LY-2090314 on cell growth in various prostate cancer cell lines was also evaluated. We identified GSK3 inhibitors as transcriptional suppressors of AR-V7 using a high-throughput screen with an AR-V7 reporter system. LY-2090314 suppressed the reporter activity and endogenous AR-V7 activity in JDCaP-hr cells. Because silencing of β-catenin partly rescued the suppression, it was evident that the suppression was mediated, at least partially, via the activation of β-catenin signaling. AR-V7 signaling and β-catenin signaling reciprocally regulate each other in JDCaP-hr cells, and therefore, GSK3 inhibition can repress AR-V7 transcriptional activity by accumulating intracellular β-catenin. Notably, LY-2090314 selectively inhibited the growth of AR-V7-positive prostate cancer cells in vitro. Our findings demonstrate the potential of GSK3 inhibitors in treating advanced prostate cancer driven by AR splice variants. In vivo evaluation of AR splice variant-positive prostate cancer models will help illustrate the overall significance of GSK3 inhibitors in treating prostate cancer. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. HOXB13 promotes androgen independent growth of LNCaP prostate cancer cells by the activation of E2F signaling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Choi Chan

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Androgen signaling plays a critical role in the development of prostate cancer and its progression. However, androgen-independent prostate cancer cells emerge after hormone ablation therapy, resulting in significant clinical problems. We have previously demonstrated that the HOXB13 homeodomain protein functions as a prostate cancer cell growth suppressor by inhibiting androgen-mediated signals. However, the role of the HOXB13 in androgen-independent growth of prostate cancer cells remains unexplained. Results In this report, we first demonstrated that HOXB13 was highly overexpressed in hormone-refractory tumors compared to tumors without prostate-specific antigen after initial treatment. Functionally, in an androgen-free environment minimal induction of HOXB13 in LNCaP prostate cancer cells, to the level of the normal prostate, markedly promoted cell proliferation while suppression inhibited cell proliferation. The HOXB13-mediated cell growth promotion in the absence of androgen, appears to be mainly accomplished through the activation of RB-E2F signaling by inhibiting the expression of the p21waf tumor suppressor. Indeed, forced expression of HOXB13 dramatically decreased expression of p21waf; this inhibition largely affected HOXB13-mediated promotion of E2F signaling. Conclusions Taken together, the results of this study demonstrated the presence of a novel pathway that helps understand androgen-independent survival of prostate cancer cells. These findings suggest that upregulation of HOXB13 is associated with an additive growth advantage of prostate cancer cells in the absence of or low androgen concentrations, by the regulation of p21-mediated E2F signaling.

  4. Olive phenolics as c-Met inhibitors: (--Oleocanthal attenuates cell proliferation, invasiveness, and tumor growth in breast cancer models.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed R Akl

    Full Text Available Dysregulation of the Hepatocyte growth factor (HGF/c-Met signaling axis upregulates diverse tumor cell functions, including cell proliferation, survival, scattering and motility, epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT, angiogenesis, invasion, and metastasis. (--Oleocanthal is a naturally occurring secoiridoid from extra-virgin olive oil, which showed antiproliferative and antimigratory activity against different cancer cell lines. The aim of this study was to characterize the intracellular mechanisms involved in mediating the anticancer effects of (--oleocanthal treatment and the potential involvement of c-Met receptor signaling components in breast cancer. Results showed that (--oleocanthal inhibits the growth of human breast cancer cell lines MDA-MB-231, MCF-7 and BT-474 while similar treatment doses were found to have no effect on normal human MCF10A cell growth. In addition, (--oleocanthal treatment caused a dose-dependent inhibition of HGF-induced cell migration, invasion and G1/S cell cycle progression in breast cancer cell lines. Moreover, (--oleocanthal treatment effects were found to be mediated via inhibition of HGF-induced c-Met activation and its downstream mitogenic signaling pathways. This growth inhibitory effect is associated with blockade of EMT and reduction in cellular motility. Further results from in vivo studies showed that (--oleocanthal treatment suppressed tumor cell growth in an orthotopic model of breast cancer in athymic nude mice. Collectively, the findings of this study suggest that (--oleocanthal is a promising dietary supplement lead with potential for therapeutic use to control malignancies with aberrant c-Met activity.

  5. Cross-linked hyaluronic acid gel inhibits metastasis and growth of gastric and hepatic cancer cells: in vitro and in vivo studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lan, Ting; Pang, Ji; Wu, Yan; Zhu, Miaolin; Yao, Xiaoyuan; Wu, Min; Qian, Hai; Zhang, Zhenyu; Gao, Jizong; Chen, Yongchang

    2016-01-01

    Cross-linked hyaluronic acid gel (CHAG) has been used to prevent postoperative adhesion of abdominal tumorectomy. However, its effect on tumor cells is still unknown. This paper was designed to investigate the effect of CHAG on metastasis and growth of tumor cells. Migration and invasion assays, Western blotting, pull down assay, siRNA interference, and nude mice implantation tumor model were applied in this study. The results of in vitro experiments with gastric cancer cell line AGS and hepatic cancer cell line HepG2 showed that CHAG inhibited the migration and invasion activities, the MAPK and PI3K/Akt mediated signaling, the activation of small G proteins Rac1 and RhoA, and the expression of MMPs and PCNA initiated by EGF, through blocking the activation of EGFR. CHAG also had inhibitory effect on activation of other membrane receptors, including integrin and VEGFR. When the expression of hyaluronic acid receptors (CD44 or RHAMM) was interfered, the above inhibitory effects of CHAG still existed. In vivo experimental results showed that CHAG suppressed colonization, growth and metastasis of gastric cancer cell line SGC-7901 in peritoneal cavity of nude mice. In conclusion, CHAG had inhibitory effect on tumor cells, through covering cell surface and blocking the interaction between extracellular stimulative factors and their receptors. PMID:27589842

  6. Long-term exposure to hypoxia inhibits tumor progression of lung cancer in rats and mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu, Lunyin; Hales, Charles A

    2011-01-01

    Hypoxia has been identified as a major negative factor for tumor progression in clinical observations and in animal studies. However, the precise role of hypoxia in tumor progression has not been fully explained. In this study, we extensively investigated the effect of long-term exposure to hypoxia on tumor progression in vivo. Rats bearing transplanted tumors consisting of A549 human lung cancer cells (lung cancer tumor) were exposed to hypoxia for different durations and different levels of oxygen. The tumor growth and metastasis were evaluated. We also treated A549 lung cancer cells (A549 cells) with chronic hypoxia and then implanted the hypoxia-pretreated cancer cells into mice. The effect of exposure to hypoxia on metastasis of Lewis lung carcinoma in mice was also investigated. We found that long-term exposure to hypoxia a) significantly inhibited lung cancer tumor growth in xenograft and orthotopic models in rats, b) significantly reduced lymphatic metastasis of the lung cancer in rats and decreased lung metastasis of Lewis lung carcinoma in mice, c) reduced lung cancer cell proliferation and cell cycle progression in vitro, d) decreased growth of the tumors from hypoxia-pretreated A549 cells, e) decreased Na + -K + ATPase α1 expression in hypoxic lung cancer tumors, and f) increased expression of hypoxia inducible factors (HIF1α and HIF2α) but decreased microvessel density in the lung cancer tumors. In contrast to lung cancer, the growth of tumor from HCT116 human colon cancer cells (colon cancer tumor) was a) significantly enhanced in the same hypoxia conditions, accompanied by b) no significant change in expression of Na + -K + ATPase α1, c) increased HIF1α expression (no HIF2α was detected) and d) increased microvessel density in the tumor tissues. This study demonstrated that long-term exposure to hypoxia repressed tumor progression of the lung cancer from A549 cells and that decreased expression of Na + -K + ATPase was involved in hypoxic

  7. Ganodermanontriol (GDNT) exerts its effect on growth and invasiveness of breast cancer cells through the down-regulation of CDC20 and uPA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang, Jiahua; Jedinak, Andrej; Sliva, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: ► Ganodermanontriol (GDNT), a Ganoderma mushroom alcohol, inhibits growth of breast cancer cells. ► CDC20 is over-expressed in tumors but not in the tumor surrounding tissue in breast cancer patients. ► GDNT inhibits expression of CDC20 in breast cancer cells. ► GDNT inhibits cell adhesion, cell migration and cell invasion of breast cancer cells. ► GDNT inhibits secretion of uPA and down-regulates expression of uPAR in breast cancer cells. -- Abstract: Ganoderma lucidum is a medicinal mushroom that has been recognized by Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM). Although some of the direct anticancer activities are attributed to the presence of triterpenes—ganoderic and lucidenic acids—the activity of other compounds remains elusive. Here we show that ganodermanontriol (GDNT), a Ganoderma alcohol, specifically suppressed proliferation (anchorage-dependent growth) and colony formation (anchorage-independent growth) of highly invasive human breast cancer cells MDA-MB-231. GDNT suppressed expression of the cell cycle regulatory protein CDC20, which is over-expressed in precancerous and breast cancer cells compared to normal mammary epithelial cells. Moreover, we found that CDC20 is over-expressed in tumors when compared to the tissue surrounding the tumor in specimens from breast cancer patients. GDNT also inhibited invasive behavior (cell adhesion, cell migration, and cell invasion) through the suppression of secretion of urokinase-plasminogen activator (uPA) and inhibited expression of uPA receptor. In conclusion, mushroom GDNT is a natural agent that has potential as a therapy for invasive breast cancers.

  8. Ganodermanontriol (GDNT) exerts its effect on growth and invasiveness of breast cancer cells through the down-regulation of CDC20 and uPA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiang, Jiahua; Jedinak, Andrej [Cancer Research Laboratory, Methodist Research Institute, Indiana University Health, Indianapolis, IN (United States); Sliva, Daniel, E-mail: dsliva@iuhealth.org [Cancer Research Laboratory, Methodist Research Institute, Indiana University Health, Indianapolis, IN (United States); Department of Medicine, School of Medicine, Indiana University, Indianapolis, IN (United States); Indiana University Simon Cancer Center, School of Medicine, Indiana University, Indianapolis, IN (United States)

    2011-11-18

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Ganodermanontriol (GDNT), a Ganoderma mushroom alcohol, inhibits growth of breast cancer cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer CDC20 is over-expressed in tumors but not in the tumor surrounding tissue in breast cancer patients. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer GDNT inhibits expression of CDC20 in breast cancer cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer GDNT inhibits cell adhesion, cell migration and cell invasion of breast cancer cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer GDNT inhibits secretion of uPA and down-regulates expression of uPAR in breast cancer cells. -- Abstract: Ganoderma lucidum is a medicinal mushroom that has been recognized by Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM). Although some of the direct anticancer activities are attributed to the presence of triterpenes-ganoderic and lucidenic acids-the activity of other compounds remains elusive. Here we show that ganodermanontriol (GDNT), a Ganoderma alcohol, specifically suppressed proliferation (anchorage-dependent growth) and colony formation (anchorage-independent growth) of highly invasive human breast cancer cells MDA-MB-231. GDNT suppressed expression of the cell cycle regulatory protein CDC20, which is over-expressed in precancerous and breast cancer cells compared to normal mammary epithelial cells. Moreover, we found that CDC20 is over-expressed in tumors when compared to the tissue surrounding the tumor in specimens from breast cancer patients. GDNT also inhibited invasive behavior (cell adhesion, cell migration, and cell invasion) through the suppression of secretion of urokinase-plasminogen activator (uPA) and inhibited expression of uPA receptor. In conclusion, mushroom GDNT is a natural agent that has potential as a therapy for invasive breast cancers.

  9. Inhibition of tumor metastasis by a growth factor receptor bound protein 2 Src homology 2 domain-binding antagonist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giubellino, Alessio; Gao, Yang; Lee, Sunmin; Lee, Min-Jung; Vasselli, James R; Medepalli, Sampath; Trepel, Jane B; Burke, Terrence R; Bottaro, Donald P

    2007-07-01

    Metastasis, the primary cause of death in most forms of cancer, is a multistep process whereby cells from the primary tumor spread systemically and colonize distant new sites. Blocking critical steps in this process could potentially inhibit tumor metastasis and dramatically improve cancer survival rates; however, our understanding of metastasis at the molecular level is still rudimentary. Growth factor receptor binding protein 2 (Grb2) is a widely expressed adapter protein with roles in epithelial cell growth and morphogenesis, as well as angiogenesis, making it a logical target for anticancer drug development. We have previously shown that a potent antagonist of Grb2 Src homology-2 domain-binding, C90, blocks growth factor-driven cell motility in vitro and angiogenesis in vivo. We now report that C90 inhibits metastasis in vivo in two aggressive tumor models, without affecting primary tumor growth rate. These results support the potential efficacy of this compound in reducing the metastatic spread of primary solid tumors and establish a critical role for Grb2 Src homology-2 domain-mediated interactions in this process.

  10. TLR4 has a TP53-dependent dual role in regulating breast cancer cell growth

    OpenAIRE

    Haricharan, Svasti; Brown, Powel

    2015-01-01

    This study fundamentally alters our understanding of how TLR4 drives breast cancer. Although TLR4 was previously considered a tumor promoter, we demonstrate a complex, TP53-dependent role for TLR4 in regulating tumor growth. TP53 is a tumor suppressor commonly inactivated across cancer types. In TP53 wild-type cancer cells, TLR4 activation causes secretion of IFN-γ into the microenvironment, resulting in induction of p21 and inhibition of cell growth. Conversely, TLR4 activation in TP53 mutan...

  11. FOXD3 suppresses tumor growth and angiogenesis in non-small cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yan, Jun-Hai; Zhao, Chun-Liu; Ding, Lan-Bao; Zhou, Xi

    2015-01-01

    The transcription factor forkhead box D3 (FOXD3), widely studied as a transcriptional repressor in embryogenesis, participates in the carcinogenesis of many cancers. However, the expression pattern and role of FOXD3 in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) have not been well characterized. We report that FOXD3 is significantly downregulated in NSCLC cell lines and clinical tissues. FOXD3 overexpression significantly inhibits cell growth and results in G1 cell cycle arrest in NSCLC A549 and H1299 cells. In a xenograft tumor model, FOXD3 overexpression inhibits tumor growth and angiogenesis. Remarkably, expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) was reduced in FOXD3 overexpression models both in vitro and in vivo. These findings suggest that FOXD3 plays a potential tumor suppressor role in NSCLC progression and represents a promising clinical prognostic marker and therapeutic target for this disease. - Highlights: • FOXD3 is downregulated in NSCLC cell lines and tissues. • FOXD3 overexpression inhibited cell proliferation in NSCLC cells. • FOXD3 overexpression led to decreased angiogenesis in NSCLC cells in vitro and in vivo.

  12. FOXD3 suppresses tumor growth and angiogenesis in non-small cell lung cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yan, Jun-Hai; Zhao, Chun-Liu [Department of Respiratory Medicine, Luwan Branch of Ruijin Hospital, Shanghai Jiaotong University School of Medicine, Shanghai 20020 (China); Ding, Lan-Bao [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Shanghai 10th People' s Hospital, Tongji University School of Medicine, Shanghai 200072 (China); Zhou, Xi, E-mail: modelmap@139.com [Department of Respiratory Medicine, Luwan Branch of Ruijin Hospital, Shanghai Jiaotong University School of Medicine, Shanghai 20020 (China)

    2015-10-09

    The transcription factor forkhead box D3 (FOXD3), widely studied as a transcriptional repressor in embryogenesis, participates in the carcinogenesis of many cancers. However, the expression pattern and role of FOXD3 in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) have not been well characterized. We report that FOXD3 is significantly downregulated in NSCLC cell lines and clinical tissues. FOXD3 overexpression significantly inhibits cell growth and results in G1 cell cycle arrest in NSCLC A549 and H1299 cells. In a xenograft tumor model, FOXD3 overexpression inhibits tumor growth and angiogenesis. Remarkably, expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) was reduced in FOXD3 overexpression models both in vitro and in vivo. These findings suggest that FOXD3 plays a potential tumor suppressor role in NSCLC progression and represents a promising clinical prognostic marker and therapeutic target for this disease. - Highlights: • FOXD3 is downregulated in NSCLC cell lines and tissues. • FOXD3 overexpression inhibited cell proliferation in NSCLC cells. • FOXD3 overexpression led to decreased angiogenesis in NSCLC cells in vitro and in vivo.

  13. Fisetin inhibits the growth and migration in the A549 human lung cancer cell line via the ERK1/2 pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Junjian; Huang, Shaoxiang

    2018-03-01

    Lung cancer is the most prevalent malignant tumor type in the developed world and the discovery of novel anti-tumor drugs is a research hotspot. Fisetin, a naturally occurring flavonoid, has been reported to have anti-cancer effects in multiple tumor types. The present study found that fisetin inhibited the growth and migration of non-small cell lung cancer in vitro . MTT, wound-healing, cell-matrix adhesion and Transwell assays were performed and demonstrated that fisetin suppressed proliferation, migration, adhesion and invasion, respectively. Flow cytometric analysis indicated that fisetin induced apoptosis in the A549 cell line by decreasing the expression of c-myc, cyclin-D1, cyclooxygenase-2, B cell lymphoma-2, CXC chemokine receptor type 4, cluster of differentiation 44 and metalloproteinase-2/9, increasing the expression of cyclin dependent kinase inhibitor (CDKN) 1A/B, CDKN2D and E-cadherin and increasing the activity of caspase-3/9 via targeting the extracellular signal-regulated kinase signaling pathway. The results provided comprehensive evidence for the anti-tumor effects of fisetin in non-small cell lung cancer in vitro , which may provide a novel approach for clinical treatment.

  14. Inhibition of SLC1A5 sensitizes colorectal cancer to cetuximab.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Huanrong; Wu, Zhenzhen; Peng, Jianjun; Li, Yang; Huang, Hongxiang; Liao, Yi; Zhou, Minyu; Sun, Li; Huang, Na; Shi, Min; Bin, Jianping; Liao, Yulin; Rao, Jinjun; Wang, Lin; Liao, Wangjun

    2018-06-15

    Cetuximab resistance is a key barrier in treating metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC). Targeting of metabolic resources import could resensitize drug-resistant cancer cells to anticancer treatments. Here we showed that the expression of the glutamine transporter solute carrier 1 family member 5 (SLC1A5) in clinical CRC samples of patients resisted to cetuximab was significantly higher than in those of patients responded to cetuximab. Inhibition of SLC1A5 by shRNA-mediated gene silencing or pharmacological inhibitor significantly suppressed the growth of CRC. Moreover, inhibition of SLC1A5 significantly enhanced the inhibitory efficacy of cetuximab on CRC proliferation both in vitro and in vivo. Mechanistically, SLC1A5 inhibition facilitated EGFR degradation through the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway, and decreased the expression of nuclear EGFR, both of which might have contribution to the improved response to cetuximab. This study provides the metabolic molecule SLC1A5 as a potential therapeutic target to increase the efficacy of cetuximab on CRC. © 2018 UICC.

  15. Linear ubiquitin chain induces apoptosis and inhibits tumor growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Zhoushuai; Jiang, Wandong; Wang, Guifen; Sun, Ying; Xiao, Wei

    2018-01-01

    Ubiquitination of proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) plays an important role in DNA damage response. Ectopic expression of PCNA fused at either terminus with ubiquitin (Ub) lacking two C-terminal glycine residues induces translesion DNA synthesis which resembles synthesis mediated by PCNA monoubiquitination. PCNA fused with Ub containing the C-terminal Gly residues at the C-terminus can be further polyubiquitinated in a Gly-dependent manner, which inhibits cell proliferation and induces ATR-dependent replication checkpoint. In this study, we surprisingly found that PCNA fused to a head-to-tail linear Ub chain induces apoptosis in a Ub chain length-dependent manner. Further investigation revealed that the apoptotic effect is actually induced by the linear Ub chain independently from PCNA, as the Ub chain fused to GFP or an epitope tag still efficiently induces apoptosis. It is revealed that the artificial linear Ub chain differs from endogenously encoded linear Ub chains in that its Ubs contain a Ub-G76S substitution, making the Ub chain resistant to cleavage by deubiquitination enzymes. We demonstrated in this study that ectopic expression of the artificial Ub chain alone in cultured human cancer cells is sufficient to inhibit tumor growth in a xenograft mouse model, making the linear Ub chain a putative anti-cancer agent.

  16. Nanobiopolymer for direct targeting and inhibition of EGFR expression in triple negative breast cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satoshi Inoue

    Full Text Available Treatment options for triple negative breast cancer (TNBC are generally limited to cytotoxic chemotherapy. Recently, anti-epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR therapy has been introduced for TNBC patients. We engineered a novel nanobioconjugate based on a poly(β-L-malic acid (PMLA nanoplatform for TNBC treatment. The nanobioconjugate carries anti-tumor nucleosome-specific monoclonal antibody (mAb 2C5 to target breast cancer cells, anti-mouse transferrin receptor (TfR antibody for drug delivery through the host endothelial system, and Morpholino antisense oligonucleotide (AON to inhibit EGFR synthesis. The nanobioconjugates variants were: (1 P (BioPolymer with AON, 2C5 and anti-TfR for tumor endothelial and cancer cell targeting, and EGFR suppression (P/AON/2C5/TfR, and (2 P with AON and 2C5 (P/AON/2C5. Controls included (3 P with 2C5 but without AON (P/2C5, (4 PBS, and (5 P with PEG and leucine ester (LOEt for endosomal escape (P/mPEG/LOEt. Drugs were injected intravenously to MDA-MB-468 TNBC bearing mice. Tissue accumulation of injected nanobioconjugates labeled with Alexa Fluor 680 was examined by Xenogen IVIS 200 (live imaging and confocal microscopy of tissue sections. Levels of EGFR, phosphorylated and total Akt in tumor samples were detected by western blotting. In vitro western blot showed that the leading nanobioconjugate P/AON/2C5/TfR inhibited EGFR synthesis significantly better than naked AON. In vivo imaging revealed that 2C5 increased drug-tumor accumulation. Significant tumor growth inhibition was observed in mice treated with the lead nanobioconjugate (1 [P = 0.03 vs. controls; P<0.05 vs. nanobioconjugate variant (2]. Lead nanobioconjugate (1 also showed stronger inhibition of EGFR expression and Akt phosphorylation than other treatments. Treatment of TNBC with the new nanobioconjugate results in tumor growth arrest by inhibiting EGFR and its downstream signaling intermediate, phosphorylated Akt. The nanobioconjugate

  17. Danshen extract circumvents drug resistance and represses cell growth in human oral cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Cheng-Yu; Hsieh, Cheng-Chih; Lin, Chih-Kung; Lin, Chun-Shu; Peng, Bo; Lin, Gu-Jiun; Sytwu, Huey-Kang; Chang, Wen-Liang; Chen, Yuan-Wu

    2017-12-29

    Danshen is a common traditional Chinese medicine used to treat neoplastic and chronic inflammatory diseases in China. However, the effects of Danshen on human oral cancer cells remain relatively unknown. This study investigated the antiproliferative effects of a Danshen extract on human oral cancer SAS, SCC25, OEC-M1, and KB drug-resistant cell lines and elucidated the possible underlying mechanism. We investigated the anticancer potential of the Danshen extract in human oral cancer cell lines and an in vivo oral cancer xenograft mouse model. The expression of apoptosis-related molecules was evaluated through Western blotting, and the concentration of in vivo apoptotic markers was measured using immunohistochemical staining. The antitumor effects of 5-fluorouracil and the Danshen extract were compared. Cell proliferation assays revealed that the Danshen extract strongly inhibited oral cancer cell proliferation. Cell morphology studies revealed that the Danshen extract inhibited the growth of SAS, SCC25, and OEC-M1 cells by inducing apoptosis. The Flow cytometric analysis indicated that the Danshen extract induced cell cycle G0/G1 arrest. Immunoblotting analysis for the expression of active caspase-3 and X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis protein indicated that Danshen extract-induced apoptosis in human oral cancer SAS cells was mediated through the caspase pathway. Moreover, the Danshen extract significantly inhibited growth in the SAS xenograft mouse model. Furthermore, the Danshen extract circumvented drug resistance in KB drug-resistant oral cancer cells. The study results suggest that the Danshen extract could be a potential anticancer agent in oral cancer treatment.

  18. A bi-paratopic anti-EGFR nanobody efficiently inhibits solid tumour growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roovers, Rob C.; Vosjan, Maria J.W.D.; Laeremans, Toon; el Khoulati, Rachid; de Bruin, Renée C.G.; Ferguson, Kathryn M.; Verkleij, Arie J.; van Dongen, Guus A.M.S.; van Bergen en Henegouwen, Paul M. P.

    2014-01-01

    The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) has been shown to be a valid cancer target for antibody-based therapy. At present, several anti-EGFR monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) have been successfully used, among which cetuximab and matuzumab. X-ray crystallography data show that these antibodies bind to different epitopes on the ecto-domain of EGFR, providing a rationale for the combined use of these two antibody specificities. We have previously reported on the successful isolation of antagonistic anti-EGFR nanobodies. In the present study, we aimed to improve on these molecules by combining nanobodies with specificities similar to both cetuximab and matuzumab into a single bi-paratopic molecule. Carefully designed phage nanobody selections resulted in two sets of nanobodies that specifically blocked the binding of either matuzumab or of cetuximab to EGFR and that did not compete for each others binding. A combination of nanobodies from both epitope groups into the bi-paratopic nanobody CONAN-1 was shown to block EGFR activation more efficiently than monovalent or bivalent (monospecific) nanobodies. In addition, this bi-paratopic nanobody potently inhibited EGF-dependent cell proliferation. Importantly, in an in vivo model of athymic mice bearing A431 xenografts, CONAN-1 inhibited tumour outgrowth with an almost similar potency as the whole mAb cetuximab, despite the fact that CONAN-1 is devoid of an Fc portion that could mediate immune effector functions. Compared to therapy using bivalent, mono-specific nanobodies, CONAN-1 was clearly more potent in tumour growth inhibition. These results show that the rational design of bi-paratopic nanobody-based anti-cancer therapeutics may yield potent lead molecules for further development. PMID:21520037

  19. Acetylshikonin Inhibits Human Pancreatic PANC-1 Cancer Cell Proliferation by Suppressing the NF-κB Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Seok-Cheol; Choi, Bu Young

    2015-09-01

    Acetylshikonin, a natural naphthoquinone derivative compound, has been used for treatment of inflammation and cancer. In the present study, we have investigated whether acetylshikonin could regulate the NF-κB signaling pathway, thereby leading to suppression of tumorigenesis. We observed that acetylshikonin significantly reduced proliferation of several cancer cell lines, including human pancreatic PANC-1 cancer cells. In addition, acetylshikonin inhibited phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) or tumor necrosis-α (TNF-α)-induced NF-κB reporter activity. Proteome cytokine array and real-time RT-PCR results illustrated that acetylshikonin inhibition of PMA-induced production of cytokines was mediated at the transcriptional level and it was associated with suppression of NF-κB activity and matrix metalloprotenases. Finally, we observed that an exposure of acetylshikonin significantly inhibited the anchorage-independent growth of PANC-1 cells. Together, our results indicate that acetylshikonin could serve as a promising therapeutic agent for future treatment of pancreatic cancer.

  20. Arctigenin inhibits prostate tumor cell growth in vitro and in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Piwen; Solorzano, Walter; Diaz, Tanya; Magyar, Clara E.; Henning, Susanne M.; Vadgama, Jaydutt V.

    2017-01-01

    The low bioavailability of most phytochemicals limits their translation to humans. We investigated whether arctigenin, a novel anti-inflammatory lignan from the seeds of Arctium lappa, has favorable bioavailability/potency against prostate cancer. The anticarcinogenic activity of arctigenin was investigated both in vitro using the androgen-sensitive LNCaP and LAPC-4 human prostate cancer cells and pre-malignant WPE1-NA22 cells, and in vivo using xenograft mouse models. Arctigenin at lower doses (< 2μM) significantly inhibited the proliferation of LNCaP and LAPC-4 cells by 30-50% at 48h compared to control, and inhibited WPE1-NA22 cells by 75%, while did not affect normal prostate epithelial cells. Male severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) mice were implanted subcutaneously with LAPC-4 cells for in vivo studies. In one experiment, the intervention started one week after tumor implantation. Mice received arctigenin at 50mg/kg (LD) or 100mg/kg (HD) b.w. daily or vehicle control by oral gavage. After 6 weeks, tumor growth was inhibited by 50% (LD) and 70% (HD) compared to control. A stronger tumor inhibitory effect was observed in a second experiment where arctigenin intervention started two weeks prior to tumor implantation. Arc was detectable in blood and tumors in Arc groups, with a mean value up to 2.0 μM in blood, and 8.3 nmol/g tissue in tumors. Tumor levels of proliferation marker Ki67, total and nuclear androgen receptor, and growth factors including VEGF, EGF, and FGF-β were significantly decreased by Arc, along with an increase in apoptosis marker of Bax/Bcl-2 ratio. Genes responsive to arctigenin were identified including TIMP3 and ZNF185, and microRNAs including miR-126-5p, and miR-21-5p. This study provides the first in vivo evidence of the strong anticancer activity of arctigenin in prostate cancer. The effective dose of arctigenin in vitro is physiologically achievable in vivo, which provides a high promise in its translation to human application

  1. Growth inhibition induced by antiprogestins RU-38486, ORG-31710, and CDB-2914 in ovarian cancer cells involves inhibition of cyclin dependent kinase 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goyeneche, Alicia A; Seidel, Erin E; Telleria, Carlos M

    2012-06-01

    Antiprogestins have been largely utilized in reproductive medicine, yet their repositioning for oncologic use is rapidly emerging. In this study we investigated the molecular mediators of the anti-ovarian cancer activity of the structurally related antiprogestins RU-38486, ORG-31710 and CDB-2914. We studied the responses of wt p53 OV2008 and p53 null SK-OV-3 cells to varying doses of RU-38486, ORG-31710 and CDB-2914. The steroids inhibited the growth of both cell lines with a potency of RU-38486 > ORG-31710 > CDB-2914, and were cytostatic at lower doses but lethal at higher concentrations. Antiprogestin-induced lethality associated with morphological features of apoptosis, hypodiploid DNA content, DNA fragmentation, and cleavage of executer caspase substrate PARP. Cell death ensued despite RU-38486 caused transient up-regulation of anti-apoptotic Bcl-2, ORG-31710 induced transient up-regulation of inhibitor of apoptosis XIAP, and CDB-2914 up-regulated both XIAP and Bcl-2. The antiprogestins induced accumulation of Cdk inhibitors p21(cip1) and p27(kip1) and increased association of p21(cip1) and p27(kip1) with Cdk-2. They also promoted nuclear localization of p21(cip1) and p27(kip1), reduced the nuclear abundances of Cdk-2 and cyclin E, and blocked the activity of Cdk-2 in both nucleus and cytoplasm. The cytotoxic potency of the antiprogestins correlated with the magnitude of the inhibition of Cdk-2 activity, ranging from G1 cell cycle arrest towards cell death. Our results suggest that, as a consequence of their cytostatic and lethal effects, antiprogestin steroids of well-known contraceptive properties emerge as attractive new agents to be repositioned for ovarian cancer therapeutics.

  2. Long Non-Coding RNA MEG3 Inhibits Cell Proliferation and Induces Apoptosis in Prostate Cancer

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    Gang Luo

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs play important roles in diverse biological processes, such as cell growth, apoptosis and migration. Although downregulation of lncRNA maternally expressed gene 3 (MEG3 has been identified in several cancers, little is known about its role in prostate cancer progression. The aim of this study was to detect MEG3 expression in clinical prostate cancer tissues, investigate its biological functions in the development of prostate cancer and the underlying mechanism. Methods: MEG3 expression levels were detected by qRT-PCR in both tumor tissues and adjacent non-tumor tissues from 21 prostate cancer patients. The effects of MEG3 on PC3 and DU145 cells were assessed by MTT assay, colony formation assay, western blot and flow cytometry. Transfected PC3 cells were transplanted into nude mice, and the tumor growth curves were determined. Results: MEG3 decreased significantly in prostate cancer tissues relative to adjacent normal tissues. MEG3 inhibited intrinsic cell survival pathway in vitro and in vivo by reducing the protein expression of Bcl-2, enhancing Bax and activating caspase 3. We further demonstrated that MEG3 inhibited the expression of cell cycle regulatory protein Cyclin D1 and induced cell cycle arrest in G0/G1 phase. Conclusions: Our study presents an important role of MEG3 in the molecular etiology of prostate cancer and implicates the potential application of MEG3 in prostate cancer therapy.

  3. Arctigenin Inhibits Liver Cancer Tumorigenesis by Inhibiting Gankyrin Expression via C/EBPα and PPARα

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Ying; Tan, Yu-jun; Lu, Zhan-zhao; Li, Bing-bing; Sun, Cheng-hong; Li, Tao; Zhao, Li-li; Liu, Zhong; Zhang, Gui-min; Yao, Jing-chun; Li, Jie

    2018-01-01

    growth. In conclusion, our results suggested that arctigenin could inhibit liver cancer growth by directly recruiting C/EBPα to the gankyrin promoter. PPARα subsequently bound to C/EBPα, and both had a negative regulatory effect on gankyrin expression. This study has identified a new mechanism of action of arctigenin against liver cancer growth. PMID:29636686

  4. Arctigenin Inhibits Liver Cancer Tumorigenesis by Inhibiting Gankyrin Expression via C/EBPα and PPARα

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying Sun

    2018-03-01

    effect on HCC growth. In conclusion, our results suggested that arctigenin could inhibit liver cancer growth by directly recruiting C/EBPα to the gankyrin promoter. PPARα subsequently bound to C/EBPα, and both had a negative regulatory effect on gankyrin expression. This study has identified a new mechanism of action of arctigenin against liver cancer growth.

  5. Arctigenin Inhibits Liver Cancer Tumorigenesis by Inhibiting Gankyrin Expression via C/EBPα and PPARα.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Ying; Tan, Yu-Jun; Lu, Zhan-Zhao; Li, Bing-Bing; Sun, Cheng-Hong; Li, Tao; Zhao, Li-Li; Liu, Zhong; Zhang, Gui-Min; Yao, Jing-Chun; Li, Jie

    2018-01-01

    growth. In conclusion, our results suggested that arctigenin could inhibit liver cancer growth by directly recruiting C/EBPα to the gankyrin promoter. PPARα subsequently bound to C/EBPα, and both had a negative regulatory effect on gankyrin expression. This study has identified a new mechanism of action of arctigenin against liver cancer growth.

  6. A novel small molecule inhibits STAT3 phosphorylation and DNA binding activity and exhibits potent growth suppressive activity in human cancer cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin Li

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Targeting Signal Transducer and Activator of Transcription 3 (STAT3 signaling is an attractive therapeutic approach for most types of human cancers with constitutively activated STAT3. A novel small molecular STAT3 inhibitor, FLLL32 was specifically designed from dietary agent, curcumin to inhibit constitutive STAT3 signaling in multiple myeloma, glioblastoma, liver cancer, and colorectal cancer cells. Results FLLL32 was found to be a potent inhibitor of STAT3 phosphorylation, STAT3 DNA binding activity, and the expression of STAT3 downstream target genes in vitro, leading to the inhibition of cell proliferation as well as the induction of Caspase-3 and PARP cleavages in human multiple myeloma, glioblastoma, liver cancer, and colorectal cancer cell lines. However, FLLL32 exhibited little inhibition on some tyrosine kinases containing SH2 or both SH2 and SH3 domains, and other protein and lipid kinases using a kinase profile assay. FLLL32 was also more potent than four previously reported JAK2 and STAT3 inhibitors as well as curcumin to inhibit cell viability in these cancer cells. Furthermore, FLLL32 selectively inhibited the induction of STAT3 phosphorylation by Interleukin-6 but not STAT1 phosphorylation by IFN-γ. Conclusion Our findings indicate that FLLL32 exhibits potent inhibitory activity to STAT3 and has potential for targeting multiple myeloma, glioblastoma, liver cancer, and colorectal cancer cells expressing constitutive STAT3 signaling.

  7. Jasmonic Acid Enhances Al-Induced Root Growth Inhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zhong-Bao; He, Chunmei; Ma, Yanqi; Herde, Marco; Ding, Zhaojun

    2017-02-01

    Phytohormones such as ethylene and auxin are involved in the regulation of the aluminum (Al)-induced root growth inhibition. Although jasmonate (JA) has been reported to play a crucial role in the regulation of root growth and development in response to environmental stresses through interplay with ethylene and auxin, its role in the regulation of root growth response to Al stress is not yet known. In an attempt to elucidate the role of JA, we found that exogenous application of JA enhanced the Al-induced root growth inhibition. Furthermore, phenotype analysis with mutants defective in either JA biosynthesis or signaling suggests that JA is involved in the regulation of Al-induced root growth inhibition. The expression of the JA receptor CORONATINE INSENSITIVE1 (COI1) and the key JA signaling regulator MYC2 was up-regulated in response to Al stress in the root tips. This process together with COI1-mediated Al-induced root growth inhibition under Al stress was controlled by ethylene but not auxin. Transcriptomic analysis revealed that many responsive genes under Al stress were regulated by JA signaling. The differential responsive of microtubule organization-related genes between the wild-type and coi1-2 mutant is consistent with the changed depolymerization of cortical microtubules in coi1 under Al stress. In addition, ALMT-mediated malate exudation and thus Al exclusion from roots in response to Al stress was also regulated by COI1-mediated JA signaling. Together, this study suggests that root growth inhibition is regulated by COI1-mediated JA signaling independent from auxin signaling and provides novel insights into the phytohormone-mediated root growth inhibition in response to Al stress. © 2017 American Society of Plant Biologists. All Rights Reserved.

  8. Signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 activation is associated with bladder cancer cell growth and survival

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsieh Fu-Chuan

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Constitutive activation of signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (Stat3 signaling pathway plays an important role in several human cancers. Activation of Stat3 is dependent on the phosphorylation at the tyrosine residue 705 by upstream kinases and subsequent nuclear translocation after dimerization. It remains unclear whether oncogenic Stat3 signaling pathway is involved in the oncogenesis of bladder cancer. Results We found that elevated Stat3 phosphorylation in 19 of 100 (19% bladder cancer tissues as well as bladder cancer cell lines, WH, UMUC-3 and 253J. To explore whether Stat3 activation is associated with cell growth and survival of bladder cancer, we targeted the Stat3 signaling pathway in bladder cancer cells using an adenovirus-mediated dominant-negative Stat3 (Y705F and a small molecule compound, STA-21. Both prohibited cell growth and induction of apoptosis in these bladder cancer cell lines but not in normal bladder smooth muscle cell (BdSMC. The survival inhibition might be mediated through apoptotic caspase 3, 8 and 9 pathways. Moreover, down-regulation of anti-apoptotic genes (Bcl-2, Bcl-xL and survivin and a cell cycle regulating gene (cyclin D1 was associated with the cell growth inhibition and apoptosis. Conclusion These results indicated that activation of Stat3 is crucial for bladder cancer cell growth and survival. Therefore, interference of Stat3 signaling pathway emerges as a potential therapeutic approach for bladder cancer.

  9. Breast cancer stem-like cells are inhibited by a non-toxic aryl hydrocarbon receptor agonist.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gérald J Prud'homme

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Cancer stem cells (CSCs have increased resistance to cancer chemotherapy. They can be enriched as drug-surviving CSCs (D-CSCs by growth with chemotherapeutic drugs, and/or by sorting of cells expressing CSC markers such as aldehyde dehydrogenase-1 (ALDH. CSCs form colonies in agar, mammospheres in low-adherence cultures, and tumors following xenotransplantation in Scid mice. We hypothesized that tranilast, a non-toxic orally active drug with anti-cancer activities, would inhibit breast CSCs.We examined breast cancer cell lines or D-CSCs generated by growth of these cells with mitoxantrone. Tranilast inhibited colony formation, mammosphere formation and stem cell marker expression. Mitoxantrone-selected cells were enriched for CSCs expressing stem cell markers ALDH, c-kit, Oct-4, and ABCG2, and efficient at forming mammospheres. Tranilast markedly inhibited mammosphere formation by D-CSCs and dissociated formed mammospheres, at pharmacologically relevant concentrations. It was effective against D-CSCs of both HER-2+ and triple-negative cell lines. Tranilast was also effective in vivo, since it prevented lung metastasis in mice injected i.v. with triple-negative (MDA-MB-231 mitoxantrone-selected cells. The molecular targets of tranilast in cancer have been unknown, but here we demonstrate it is an aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR agonist and this plays a key role. AHR is a transcription factor activated by 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and other ligands. Tranilast induced translocation of the AHR to the nucleus and stimulated CYP1A1 expression (a marker of AHR activation. It inhibited binding of the AHR to CDK4, which has been linked to cell-cycle arrest. D-CSCs expressed higher levels of the AHR than other cells. Knockdown of the AHR with siRNA, or blockade with an AHR antagonist, entirely abrogated the anti-proliferative and anti-mammosphere activity of tranilast. Thus, the anti-cancer effects of

  10. Silencing of BAG3 inhibits the epithelial-mesenchymal transition in human cervical cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Fei; Wang, Geng; Ma, Zhifang; Ma, Yuebing; Wang, Yingying

    2017-11-10

    Bcl2-associated athanogene 3 (BAG3) has been reported to be involved in aggressive progression of many tumors. In the present study, we examined the expression of BAG3 in human cervical cancer (CC) tissues and investigated the role of BAG3 in SiHa and HeLa cell growth, migration, and invasion. Here, we found that most of CC tissues highly expressed the protein and mRNA of BAG3, while their expression was obviously lower in paired normal tissues (all pBAG3 expression was associated with FIGO stage and metastasis (all pBAG3 siRNAs inhibited SiHa and HeLa cell growth, invasion and migration. Mechanically, BAG3 siRNAs inhibited the expression of EMT-regulating markers, involving MMP2, Slug and N-cadherin, and increased the expression of E-cadherin. In a xenograft nude model, BAG3 siRNAs inhibited tumor growth and the expression of EMT biomarkers. In conclusion, BAG3 is involved in the EMT process, including cell growth, invasion and migration in the development of CC. Thus, BAG3 target might be recommended as a novel therapeutic approach.

  11. Polydatin inhibits cell proliferation and induces apoptosis in laryngeal cancer and HeLa cells via suppression of the PDGF/AKT signaling pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Haixia; Shi, Baoyuan; Li, Yanyun; Yin, Fengfang

    2017-07-01

    Polydatin (PD), a stilbene compound extracted from Polygonum cuspidatum, is suggested to possess anti-cancer activities, including inhibition of cell proliferation, cell cycle arrest, and induction of apoptosis. The platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF)/AKT signaling pathway plays complex roles in tumor suppression. However, the effect of PD on the PDGF/AKT signaling pathway in laryngeal cancer and HeLa cells has not been explored. MTT assay and flow cytometry showed that PD inhibited cell proliferation and induced apoptosis in Hep-2 and AMC-HN-8 cells. Western blot analysis indicated that PD inhibited the expression levels of PDGF-B and phosphorylated AKT (p-AKT) in both cells. Treatment of PDGF-B siRNA or PDGFR inhibitor found that after the PDGF signaling was inactivated, p-AKT expression was significantly decreased in Hep-2 cells. Tumor xenograft experiment in nude mice indicated PD significantly inhibited the growth of Hep-2 cells in vivo. In conclusion, PD inhibited cell proliferation and induced apoptosis in laryngeal cancer and HeLa cells via inactivation of the PDGF/AKT signaling pathway. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Olive oil compounds inhibit vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-2 phosphorylation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lamy, Sylvie; Ouanouki, Amira; Béliveau, Richard; Desrosiers, Richard R.

    2014-01-01

    Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) triggers crucial signaling processes that regulate tumor angiogenesis and, therefore, represents an attractive target for the development of novel anticancer therapeutics. Several epidemiological studies have confirmed that abundant consumption of foods from plant origin is associated with reduced risk of developing cancers. In the Mediterranean basin, the consumption of extra virgin olive oil is an important constituent of the diet. Compared to other vegetable oils, the presence of several phenolic antioxidants in olive oil is believed to prevent the occurrence of a variety of pathological processes, such as cancer. While the strong antioxidant potential of these molecules is well characterized, their antiangiogenic activities remain unknown. The aim of this study is to investigate whether tyrosol (Tyr), hydroxytyrosol (HT), taxifolin (Tax), oleuropein (OL) and oleic acid (OA), five compounds contained in extra virgin olive oil, can affect in vitro angiogenesis. We found that HT, Tax and OA were the most potent angiogenesis inhibitors through their inhibitory effect on specific autophosphorylation sites of VEGFR-2 (Tyr951, Tyr1059, Tyr1175 and Tyr1214) leading to the inhibition of endothelial cell (EC) signaling. Inhibition of VEGFR-2 by these olive oil compounds significantly reduced VEGF-induced EC proliferation and migration as well as their morphogenic differentiation into capillary-like tubular structures in Matrigel. Our study demonstrates that HT, Tax and OA are novel and potent inhibitors of the VEGFR-2 signaling pathway. These findings emphasize the chemopreventive properties of olive oil and highlight the importance of nutrition in cancer prevention. - Highlights: • We investigated five compounds contained in extra virgin olive oil on angiogenesis. • Hydroxytyrosol, taxifolin and oleic acid are the best angiogenesis inhibitors. • Olive oil compounds affect endothelial cell functions essential for

  13. Olive oil compounds inhibit vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-2 phosphorylation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lamy, Sylvie, E-mail: lamy.sylvie@uqam.ca; Ouanouki, Amira; Béliveau, Richard; Desrosiers, Richard R.

    2014-03-10

    Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) triggers crucial signaling processes that regulate tumor angiogenesis and, therefore, represents an attractive target for the development of novel anticancer therapeutics. Several epidemiological studies have confirmed that abundant consumption of foods from plant origin is associated with reduced risk of developing cancers. In the Mediterranean basin, the consumption of extra virgin olive oil is an important constituent of the diet. Compared to other vegetable oils, the presence of several phenolic antioxidants in olive oil is believed to prevent the occurrence of a variety of pathological processes, such as cancer. While the strong antioxidant potential of these molecules is well characterized, their antiangiogenic activities remain unknown. The aim of this study is to investigate whether tyrosol (Tyr), hydroxytyrosol (HT), taxifolin (Tax), oleuropein (OL) and oleic acid (OA), five compounds contained in extra virgin olive oil, can affect in vitro angiogenesis. We found that HT, Tax and OA were the most potent angiogenesis inhibitors through their inhibitory effect on specific autophosphorylation sites of VEGFR-2 (Tyr951, Tyr1059, Tyr1175 and Tyr1214) leading to the inhibition of endothelial cell (EC) signaling. Inhibition of VEGFR-2 by these olive oil compounds significantly reduced VEGF-induced EC proliferation and migration as well as their morphogenic differentiation into capillary-like tubular structures in Matrigel. Our study demonstrates that HT, Tax and OA are novel and potent inhibitors of the VEGFR-2 signaling pathway. These findings emphasize the chemopreventive properties of olive oil and highlight the importance of nutrition in cancer prevention. - Highlights: • We investigated five compounds contained in extra virgin olive oil on angiogenesis. • Hydroxytyrosol, taxifolin and oleic acid are the best angiogenesis inhibitors. • Olive oil compounds affect endothelial cell functions essential for

  14. Piper betle leaf extract enhances the cytotoxicity effect of 5-fluorouracil in inhibiting the growth of HT29 and HCT116 colon cancer cells*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Pek Leng; Rajab, Nor Fadilah; Then, Sue Mian; Mohd Yusof, Yasmin Anum; Wan Ngah, Wan Zurinah; Pin, Kar Yong; Looi, Mee Lee

    2014-01-01

    Objective: The combination effect of Piper betle (PB) and 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) in enhancing the cytotoxic potential of 5-FU in inhibiting the growth of colon cancer cells was investigated. Methods: HT29 and HCT116 cells were subjected to 5-FU or PB treatment. 5-FU and PB were then combined and their effects on both cell lines were observed after 24 h of treatment. PB-5-FU interaction was elucidated by isobologram analysis. Apoptosis features of the treated cells were revealed by annexin V/PI stain. High-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) was performed to exclude any possible chemical interaction between the compounds. Results: In the presence of PB extract, the cytotoxicity of 5-FU was observed at a lower dose (IC50 12.5 μmol/L) and a shorter time (24 h) in both cell lines. Both cell lines treated with 5-FU or PB alone induced a greater apoptosis effect compared with the combination treatment. Isobologram analysis indicated that PB and 5-FU interacted synergistically and antagonistically in inhibiting the growth of HT29 and HCT116 cells, respectively. Conclusions: In the presence of PB, a lower dosage of 5-FU is required to achieve the maximum drug effect in inhibiting the growth of HT29 cells. However, PB did not significantly reduce 5-FU dosage in HCT116 cells. Our result showed that this interaction may not solely contribute to the apoptosis pathway. PMID:25091987

  15. Piper betle leaf extract enhances the cytotoxicity effect of 5-fluorouracil in inhibiting the growth of HT29 and HCT116 colon cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Pek Leng; Rajab, Nor Fadilah; Then, Sue Mian; Mohd Yusof, Yasmin Anum; Wan Ngah, Wan Zurinah; Pin, Kar Yong; Looi, Mee Lee

    2014-08-01

    The combination effect of Piper betle (PB) and 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) in enhancing the cytotoxic potential of 5-FU in inhibiting the growth of colon cancer cells was investigated. HT29 and HCT116 cells were subjected to 5-FU or PB treatment. 5-FU and PB were then combined and their effects on both cell lines were observed after 24 h of treatment. PB-5-FU interaction was elucidated by isobologram analysis. Apoptosis features of the treated cells were revealed by annexin V/PI stain. High-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) was performed to exclude any possible chemical interaction between the compounds. In the presence of PB extract, the cytotoxicity of 5-FU was observed at a lower dose (IC50 12.5 µmol/L) and a shorter time (24 h) in both cell lines. Both cell lines treated with 5-FU or PB alone induced a greater apoptosis effect compared with the combination treatment. Isobologram analysis indicated that PB and 5-FU interacted synergistically and antagonistically in inhibiting the growth of HT29 and HCT116 cells, respectively. In the presence of PB, a lower dosage of 5-FU is required to achieve the maximum drug effect in inhibiting the growth of HT29 cells. However, PB did not significantly reduce 5-FU dosage in HCT116 cells. Our result showed that this interaction may not solely contribute to the apoptosis pathway.

  16. Suppression of the epidermal growth factor receptor inhibits epithelial-mesenchymal transition in human pancreatic cancer PANC-1 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Zhi-Gang; Wei, Jun-Min; Qin, Chang-Fu; Hao, Kun; Tian, Xiao-Dong; Xie, Kun; Xie, Xue-Hai; Yang, Yin-Mo

    2012-05-01

    Aberrant expression of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) has been detected in pancreatic cancer; however, the mechanisms of EGFR in inducing pancreatic cancer development have not been adequately elucidated. The objective of this study was to determine the role of EGFR in mediating epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) in pancreatic cancer cells. Pancreatic cancer cell line PANC-1 was transfected with small interfering RNA of EGFR by use of a lentiviral expression vector to establish an EGFR-knockdown cell line (si-PANC-1). PANC-1 cells transfected with lentiviral vector expressing negative control sequence were used as negative control (NC-PANC-1). Scratch assay and transwell study were used to analyze cell migration and invasion. Real-time PCR and Western blotting were used to detect the expression of EMT markers E-cadherin, N-cadherin, vimentin, and fibronectin and transcription factors snail, slug, twist1, and sip1 in PANC-1, NC-PANC-1, and si-PANC-1 cells. Immunofluorescent staining with these antibodies and confocal microscopy were used to observe their cellular location and morphologic changes. After RNA interference of EGFR, the migration and invasion ability of si-PANC-1 cells decreased significantly. The expression of epithelial phenotype marker E-cadherin increased and the expression of mesenchymal phenotype markers N-cadherin, vimentin, and fibronectin decreased, indicating reversion of EMT. We also observed intracellular translocation of E-cadherin. Expression of transcription factors snail and slug in si-PANC-1 cells decreased significantly. Suppression of EGFR expression can significantly inhibit EMT of pancreatic cancer PANC-1 cells. The mechanism may be related with the down-regulation of the expression of transcription factors snail and slug.

  17. HET0016, a selective inhibitor of 20-HETE synthesis, decreases pro-angiogenic factors and inhibits growth of triple negative breast cancer in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thaiz Ferraz Borin

    Full Text Available A selective inhibitor of 20-HETE synthesis, HET0016, has been reported to inhibit angiogenesis. 20-HETE has been known as a second mitogenic messenger of angiogenesis inducing growth factors. HET0016 effects were analyzed on MDA-MB-231 derived breast cancer in mouse and in vitro cell line. MDA-MB-231 tumor cells were implanted in animals' right flank and randomly assigned to early (1 and 2, starting treatments on day 0, or delayed groups (3 and 4 on day 8 after implantation of tumor. Animals received HET0016 (10 mg/kg treatment via intraperitoneal injection for 5 days/week for either 3 or 4 weeks. Control group received vehicle treatment. Tumor sizes were measured on days 7, 14, 21, and 28 and the animals were euthanized on day 22 and 29. Proteins were extracted from the whole tumor and from cells treated with 10 µM HET0016 for 4 and 24 hrs. Protein array kits of 20 different cytokines/factors were used. ELISA was performed to observe the HIF-1α and MMP-2 protein expression. Other markers were confirmed by IHC. HET0016 significantly inhibited tumor growth in all treatment groups at all-time points compared to control (p<0.05. Tumor growth was completely inhibited on three of ten animals on early treatment group. Treatment groups showed significantly lower expression of pro-angiogenic factors compared to control at 21 days; however, there was no significant difference in HIF-1α expression after treatments. Similar results were found in vitro at 24 hrs of HET0016 treatment. After 28 days, significant increase of angiogenin, angiopoietin-1/2, EGF-R and IGF-1 pro-angiogenic factors were found (p<0.05 compared to control, as well as an higher intensity of all factors were found when compared to that of 21 day's data, suggesting a treatment resistance. HET0016 inhibited tumor growth by reducing expression of different set of pro-angiogenic factors; however, a resistance to treatment seemed to happen after 21 days.

  18. Anthelminthic drug niclosamide sensitizes the responsiveness of cervical cancer cells to paclitaxel via oxidative stress-mediated mTOR inhibition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Liping; Wang, Li; Shen, Haibin; Lin, Hui; Li, Dan

    2017-01-01

    Drug repurposing represents an alternative therapeutic strategy to cancer treatment. The potent anti-cancer activities of a FDA-approved anthelminthic drug niclosamide have been demonstrated in various cancers. However, whether niclosamide is active against cervical cancer is unknown. In this study, we investigated the effects of niclosamide alone and its combination with paclitaxel in cervical cancer in vitro and in vivo. We found that niclosamide significantly inhibited proliferation and induced apoptosis of a panel of cervical cancer cell lines, regardless of their cellular origin and genetic pattern. Niclosamide also inhibited tumor growth in cervical cancer xenograft mouse model. Importantly, niclosamide significantly enhanced the responsiveness of cervical cancer cell to paclitaxel. We further found that niclosamide induced mitochondrial dysfunctions via inhibiting mitochondrial respiration, complex I activity and ATP generation, which led to oxidative stress. ROS scavenge agent N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC) completely reversed the effects of niclosamide in increasing cellular ROS, inhibiting proliferation and inducing apoptosis, suggesting that oxidative stress induction is the mechanism of action of niclosamide in cervical cancer cells. In addition, niclosamide significantly inhibited mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling pathway in cervical cancer cells and its inhibitory effect on mTOR is modulated by oxidative stress. Our work suggests that niclosamide is a useful addition to the treatment armamentarium for cervical cancer and induction of oxidative stress may be a potential therapeutic strategy in cervical cancer. - Highlights: • Niclosamide is active against cervical cancer cells in vitro and in vivo. • Niclosamide sensitizes cervical cancer cell response to paclitaxel. • Niclosamide induces mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative damage. • Niclosamide inhibits mTOR signaling in an oxidative stress-dependent manner.

  19. Bioactivity-guided identification and cell signaling technology to delineate the lactate dehydrogenase A inhibition effects of Spatholobus suberectus on breast cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhiyu Wang

    Full Text Available Aerobic glycolysis is an important feature of cancer cells. In recent years, lactate dehydrogenase A (LDH-A is emerging as a novel therapeutic target for cancer treatment. Seeking LDH-A inhibitors from natural resources has been paid much attention for drug discovery. Spatholobus suberectus (SS is a common herbal medicine used in China for treating blood-stasis related diseases such as cancer. This study aims to explore the potential medicinal application of SS for LDH-A inhibition on breast cancer and to determine its bioactive compounds. We found that SS manifested apoptosis-inducing, cell cycle arresting and anti-LDH-A activities in both estrogen-dependent human MCF-7 cells and estrogen-independent MDA-MB-231 cell. Oral herbal extracts (1 g/kg/d administration attenuated tumor growth and LDH-A expression in both breast cancer xenografts. Bioactivity-guided fractionation finally identified epigallocatechin as a key compound in SS inhibiting LDH-A activity. Further studies revealed that LDH-A plays a critical role in mediating the apoptosis-induction effects of epigallocatechin. The inhibited LDH-A activities by epigallocatechin is attributed to disassociation of Hsp90 from HIF-1α and subsequent accelerated HIF-1α proteasome degradation. In vivo study also demonstrated that epigallocatechin could significantly inhibit breast cancer growth, HIF-1α/LDH-A expression and trigger apoptosis without bringing toxic effects. The preclinical study thus suggests that the potential medicinal application of SS for inhibiting cancer LDH-A activity and the possibility to consider epigallocatechin as a lead compound to develop LDH-A inhibitors. Future studies of SS for chemoprevention or chemosensitization against breast cancer are thus warranted.

  20. Inhibition of glucose turnover by 3-bromopyruvate counteracts pancreatic cancer stem cell features and sensitizes cells to gemcitabine

    OpenAIRE

    Isayev, Orkhan; Rausch, Vanessa; Bauer, Nathalie; Liu, Li; Fan, Pei; Zhang, Yiyao; Gladkich, Jury; Nwaeburu, Clifford C.; Mattern, Jürgen; Mollenhauer, Martin; Rückert, Felix; Zach, Sebastian; Haberkorn, Uwe; Gross, Wolfgang; Schönsiegel, Frank

    2014-01-01

    According to the cancer stem cell (CSC) hypothesis, the aggressive growth and early metastasis of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDA) is due to the activity of CSCs, which are not targeted by current therapies. Otto Warburg suggested that the growth of cancer cells is driven by a high glucose metabolism. Here, we investigated whether glycolysis inhibition targets CSCs and thus may enhance therapeutic efficacy. Four established and 3 primary PDA cell lines, non-malignant cells, and 3 patien...

  1. Andrographolide Suppress Tumor Growth by Inhibiting TLR4/NF-κB Signaling Activation in Insulinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qian-Qian; Ding, Yi; Lei, Yan; Qi, Cui-Ling; He, Xiao-Dong; Lan, Tian; Li, Jiang-Chao; Gong, Ping; Yang, Xuesong; Geng, Jian-Guo; Wang, Li-Jing

    2014-01-01

    Insulinomas are rare tumors, and approximately 10% of insulinomas are malignant. Accumulating evidence has implicated that we still lack effective therapy to treat the patients who are diagnosed with rare malignant insulinoma. Previous studies have reported that Andrographolide (Andro) could inhibit cell cycle progression, reduce cell invasion and induce cell apoptosis in many common cancer cells. However, the effects of andro are cell type-dependent. So we emplored the β-TC-6 cells and the RIP1-Tag2 transgenic mouse model of endogenously growing insulinoma model to elucidate the possible anti-cancer effect of Andro on insulinoma, an uncommon type of malignant cancers in this study. Our experiments revealed that Andro significantly inhibited tumor growth at both the early-stage and the advanced-stage of insulinoma through targeting the TLR4/NF-κB signaling pathway. This work initially provides the evidence that the TLR4/NF-κB signaling pathway might be vital as a potential therapeutic target, and also indispensable in Andro-mediated anti-cancer effect in insulinoma. PMID:24719558

  2. A novel oncolytic adenovirus targeting Wnt signaling effectively inhibits cancer-stem like cell growth via metastasis, apoptosis and autophagy in HCC models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jian; Lai, Weijie; Li, Qiang; Yu, Yang; Jin, Jin; Guo, Wan; Zhou, Xiumei; Liu, Xinyuan; Wang, Yigang

    2017-09-16

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs), which are highly differentiated and self-renewing, play an important role in the occurrence, therapeutic resistant and metastasis of hepatacellular carcinoma (HCC). Oncolytic adenoviruses have targeted killing effect on tumor cells, and are invoked as candidate drugs for cancer treatment. We designed a dual-regulated oncolytic adenovirus Ad.wnt-E1A(△24bp)-TSLC1 that targets Wnt and Rb signaling pathways respectively, and carries the tumor suppressor gene, TSLC1. Previous studies have demonstrated that oncolytic adenovirus mediated TSLC1can target liver cancer and exhibit significant cytotoxicity. However, whether Ad.wnt-E1A(△24bp)-TSLC1 can effectively eliminate liver CSCs remains to be explored. We first used the spheroid culture to enrich the liver CSCs-like cells, and detected the self-renewal capacity, differentiation, drug resistance and tumorigenicity. The results showed that Ad-wnt-E1A(△24bp)-TSLC1 could effectively lead to autophagic death. In addition, recombinant adenovirus effectively induced the apoptosis, inhibit metastasis of hepatic CSCs-like cells in vivo. Further animal experiments indicated that Ad-wnt-E1A(△24bp)-TSLC1could effectively inhibit the growth of transplanted tumor of hepatic CSCs and prolong the survival time of mice. Therefore, the novel oncolytic adenovirus Ad.wnt-E1A(△24bp)-TSLC1 has potential application as a therapeutic target for HCC stem cells. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Silencing of the hTERT gene by shRNA inhibits colon cancer SW480 cell growth in vitro and in vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ai-Qun Liu

    Full Text Available Human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT is the key enzyme responsible for synthesizing and maintaining the telomeres on the ends of chromosomes, and it is essential for cell proliferation. This has made hTERT a focus of oncology research and an attractive target for anticancer drug development. In this study, we designed a small interfering RNA (siRNA targeting the catalytic subunit of hTERT and tested its effects on the growth of telomerase-positive human colon carcinoma SW480 cells in vitro, as well as on the tumorigenicity of these cells in nude mice. Transient and stable transfection of hTERT siRNA into colon cancer SW480 cells suppressed hTERT expression, reduced telomerase activity and inhibited cell growth and proliferation. Knocking down hTERT expression in SW480 tumors xenografted into nude mice significantly slowed tumor growth and promoted tumor cell apoptosis. Our results suggest that hTERT is involved in carcinogenesis of human colon carcinoma, and they highlight the therapeutic potential of a hTERT knock-down approach.

  4. Inhibition of Cell Survival by Curcumin Is Associated with Downregulation of Cell Division Cycle 20 (Cdc20) in Pancreatic Cancer Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yu; Xue, Ying-Bo; Li, Hang; Qiu, Dong; Wang, Zhi-Wei; Tan, Shi-Sheng

    2017-02-04

    Pancreatic cancer is one of the most aggressive human tumors in the United States. Curcumin, a polyphenol derived from the Curcuma longa plant, has been reported to exert its antitumor activity in pancreatic cancer. However, the molecular mechanisms of curcumin-mediated tumor suppressive function have not been fully elucidated. In the current study, we explore whether curcumin exhibits its anti-cancer function through inhibition of oncoprotein cell division cycle 20 (Cdc20) in pancreatic cancer cells. We found that curcumin inhibited cell growth, enhanced apoptosis, induced cell cycle arrest and retarded cell invasion in pancreatic cancer cells. Moreover, we observed that curcumin significantly inhibited the expression of Cdc20 in pancreatic cancer cells. Furthermore, our results demonstrated that overexpression of Cdc20 enhanced cell proliferation and invasion, and abrogated the cytotoxic effects induced by curcumin in pancreatic cancer cells. Consistently, downregulation of Cdc20 promoted curcumin-mediated anti-tumor activity. Therefore, our findings indicated that inhibition of Cdc20 by curcumin could be useful for the treatment of pancreatic cancer patients.

  5. The Antidiabetic Drug Metformin Inhibits the Proliferation of Bladder Cancer Cells in Vitro and in Vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tao Zhang

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Recent studies suggest that metformin, a widely used antidiabetic agent, may reduce cancer risk and improve prognosis of certain malignancies. However, the mechanisms for the anti-cancer effects of metformin remain uncertain. In this study, we investigated the effects of metformin on human bladder cancer cells and the underlying mechanisms. Metformin significantly inhibited the proliferation and colony formation of 5637 and T24 cells in vitro; specifically, metformin induced an apparent cell cycle arrest in G0/G1 phases, accompanied by a strong decrease of cyclin D1, cyclin-dependent kinase 4 (CDK4, E2F1 and an increase of p21waf-1. Further experiments revealed that metformin activated AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK and suppressed mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR, the central regulator of protein synthesis and cell growth. Moreover, daily treatment of metformin led to a substantial inhibition of tumor growth in a xenograft model with concomitant decrease in the expression of proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA, cyclin D1 and p-mTOR. The in vitro and in vivo results demonstrate that metformin efficiently suppresses the proliferation of bladder cancer cells and suggest that metformin may be a potential therapeutic agent for the treatment of bladder cancer.

  6. 3-Bromopyruvate and sodium citrate induce apoptosis in human gastric cancer cell line MGC-803 by inhibiting glycolysis and promoting mitochondria-regulated apoptosis pathway

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guo, Xingyu; Zhang, Xiaodong; Wang, Tingan, E-mail: moonsonlife@yahoo.com; Xian, Shulin; Lu, Yunfei, E-mail: doctorlife@126.com

    2016-06-17

    Cancer cells are mainly dependent on glycolysis to generate adenosine triphosphate (ATP) and intermediates required for cell growth and proliferation. Thus, inhibition of glycolysis might be of therapeutic value in antitumor treatment. Our previously studies had found that both 3-bromopyruvate (BP) and sodium citrate (SCT) can inhibit tumor growth and proliferation in vitro and in vivo. However, the mechanism involved in the BP and SCT mediated antitumor activity is not entirely clear. In this work, it is demonstrated that BP inhibits the enzyme hexokinase (HK) activity and SCT suppresses the phosphofructokinase (PFK) activity respectively, both the two agents decrease viability, ATP generation and lactate content in the human gastric cancer cell line MGC-803. These effects are directly correlated with blockage of glycolysis. Furthermore, BP and SCT can induce the characteristic manifestations of mitochondria-regulated apoptosis, such as down-regulation of anti-apoptosis proteins Bcl-2 and Survivin, up-regulation of pro-apoptosis protein Bax, activation of caspase-3, as well as leakage of cytochrome c (Cyt-c). In summary, our results provided evidences that BP and SCT inhibit the MGC-803 cells growth and proliferation might be correlated with inhibiting glycolysis and promoting mitochondria-regulated apoptosis. -- Highlights: •Blockage of glycolysis might be a novel way to anticancer. •Both 3-bromopyruvate and sodium citrate could inhibit glycolysis and regulate mitochondrial pathway in cancer cells. •Both 3-bromopyruvate and sodium citrate would be the novel agents on treatment of gastric cancer.

  7. 3-Bromopyruvate and sodium citrate induce apoptosis in human gastric cancer cell line MGC-803 by inhibiting glycolysis and promoting mitochondria-regulated apoptosis pathway

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo, Xingyu; Zhang, Xiaodong; Wang, Tingan; Xian, Shulin; Lu, Yunfei

    2016-01-01

    Cancer cells are mainly dependent on glycolysis to generate adenosine triphosphate (ATP) and intermediates required for cell growth and proliferation. Thus, inhibition of glycolysis might be of therapeutic value in antitumor treatment. Our previously studies had found that both 3-bromopyruvate (BP) and sodium citrate (SCT) can inhibit tumor growth and proliferation in vitro and in vivo. However, the mechanism involved in the BP and SCT mediated antitumor activity is not entirely clear. In this work, it is demonstrated that BP inhibits the enzyme hexokinase (HK) activity and SCT suppresses the phosphofructokinase (PFK) activity respectively, both the two agents decrease viability, ATP generation and lactate content in the human gastric cancer cell line MGC-803. These effects are directly correlated with blockage of glycolysis. Furthermore, BP and SCT can induce the characteristic manifestations of mitochondria-regulated apoptosis, such as down-regulation of anti-apoptosis proteins Bcl-2 and Survivin, up-regulation of pro-apoptosis protein Bax, activation of caspase-3, as well as leakage of cytochrome c (Cyt-c). In summary, our results provided evidences that BP and SCT inhibit the MGC-803 cells growth and proliferation might be correlated with inhibiting glycolysis and promoting mitochondria-regulated apoptosis. -- Highlights: •Blockage of glycolysis might be a novel way to anticancer. •Both 3-bromopyruvate and sodium citrate could inhibit glycolysis an