WorldWideScience

Sample records for inherent light emissions

  1. Inherently safe light water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ise, Takeharu

    1987-01-01

    Today's large nuclear power reactors of world-wise use have been designed based on the philosophy. It seems that recent less electricity demand rates, higher capital cost and the TMI accident let us acknowledge relative small and simplified nuclear plants with safer features, and that Chernobyl accident in 1983 underlines the needs of intrinsic and passive safety characteristics. In such background, several inherently safe reactor concepts have been presented abroad and domestically. First describing 'Can inherently safe reactors be designed,' then I introduce representative reactor concepts of inherently safe LWRs advocated abroad so far. All of these innovative reactors employ intrinsic and passive features in their design, as follows: (1) PIUS, an acronym for Process Inherent Ultimate Safety, or an integral PWR with passive heat sink and passive shutdown mechanism, advocated by ASEA-ATOM of Sweden. (2) MAP(Minimum Attention Plant), or a self-pressurized, natural circulation integral PWR, promoted by CE Inc. of the U.S. (3) TPS(TRIGA Power System), or a compact PWR with passive heat sink and inherent fuel characteristics of large prompt temperature coefficient, prompted by GA Technologies Inc. of the U.S. (4) PIUS-BWR, or an inherently safe BWR employing passively actuated fluid valves, in competition with PIUS, prompted by ORNL of the U.S. Then, I will describe the domestic trends in Japan and the innovative inherently safe LWRs presented domestically so far. (author)

  2. 40 CFR 88.312-93 - Inherently Low-Emission Vehicle labeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... stroke width not less than 0.5 inches (1.3 centimeters). In addition, the words “INHERENTLY LOW-EMISSION..., the words “CLEAN AIR VEHICLE” must be present in lettering no smaller than 0.8 inches (2.0 centimeters... loan to someone who has not demonstrated eligibility for expanded TCMs available to ILEVs according to...

  3. Integral Inherently Safe Light Water Reactor (I2S-LWR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petrovic, Bojan; Memmott, Matthew; Boy, Guy; Charit, Indrajit; Manera, Annalisa; Downar, Thomas; Lee, John; Muldrow, Lycurgus; Upadhyaya, Belle; Hines, Wesley; Haghighat, Alierza

    2017-01-01

    This final report summarizes results of the multi-year effort performed during the period 2/2013- 12/2016 under the DOE NEUP IRP Project ''Integral Inherently Safe Light Water Reactors (I 2 S-LWR)''. The goal of the project was to develop a concept of a 1 GWe PWR with integral configuration and inherent safety features, at the same time accounting for lessons learned from the Fukushima accident, and keeping in mind the economic viability of the new concept. Essentially (see Figure 1-1) the project aimed to implement attractive safety features, typically found only in SMRs, to a larger power (1 GWe) reactor, to address the preference of some utilities in the US power market for unit power level on the order of 1 GWe.

  4. Passive and inherent safety technologies for light-water nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forsberg, C.W.

    1990-07-01

    Passive/inherent safety implies a technical revolution in our approach to nuclear power safety. This direction is discussed herein for light-water reactors (LWRs) -- the predominant type of power reactor used in the world today. At Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) the approach to the development of passive/inherent safety for LWRs consists of four steps: identify and quantify safety requirements and goals; identify and quantify the technical functional requirements needed for safety; identify, invent, develop, and quantify technical options that meet both of the above requirements; and integrate safety systems into designs of economic and reliable nuclear power plants. Significant progress has been achieved in the first three steps of this program. The last step involves primarily the reactor vendors. These activities, as well as related activities worldwide, are described here. 27 refs., 7 tabs

  5. Light emission mechanism of mixed host organic light-emitting diodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Wook; Lee, Jun Yeob

    2015-03-01

    Light emission mechanism of organic light-emitting diodes with a mixed host emitting layer was studied using an exciplex type mixed host and an exciplex free mixed host. Monitoring of the current density and luminance of the two type mixed host devices revealed that the light emission process of the exciplex type mixed host was dominated by energy transfer, while the light emission of the exciplex free mixed host was controlled by charge trapping. Mixed host composition was also critical to the light emission mechanism, and the contribution of the energy transfer process was maximized at 50:50 mixed host composition. Therefore, it was possible to manage the light emission process of the mixed host devices by managing the mixed host composition.

  6. Integral Inherently Safe Light Water Reactor (I2S-LWR)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petrovic, Bojan [Georgia Inst. of Technology, Atlanta, GA (United States); Memmott, Matthew [Brigham Young Univ., Provo, UT (United States); Boy, Guy [Florida Inst. of Technology, Melbourne, FL (United States); Charit, Indrajit [Univ. of Idaho, Moscow, ID (United States); Manera, Annalisa [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Downar, Thomas [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Lee, John [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Muldrow, Lycurgus [Morehouse College, Atlanta, GA (United States); Upadhyaya, Belle [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Hines, Wesley [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Haghighat, Alierza [Virginia Polytechnic Inst. and State Univ. (Virginia Tech), Blacksburg, VA (United States)

    2017-10-02

    This final report summarizes results of the multi-year effort performed during the period 2/2013- 12/2016 under the DOE NEUP IRP Project “Integral Inherently Safe Light Water Reactors (I2S-LWR)”. The goal of the project was to develop a concept of a 1 GWe PWR with integral configuration and inherent safety features, at the same time accounting for lessons learned from the Fukushima accident, and keeping in mind the economic viability of the new concept. Essentially (see Figure 1-1) the project aimed to implement attractive safety features, typically found only in SMRs, to a larger power (1 GWe) reactor, to address the preference of some utilities in the US power market for unit power level on the order of 1 GWe.

  7. Efficient light emission from inorganic and organic semiconductor hybrid structures by energy-level tuning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlesinger, R; Bianchi, F; Blumstengel, S; Christodoulou, C; Ovsyannikov, R; Kobin, B; Moudgil, K; Barlow, S; Hecht, S; Marder, S R; Henneberger, F; Koch, N

    2015-04-15

    The fundamental limits of inorganic semiconductors for light emitting applications, such as holographic displays, biomedical imaging and ultrafast data processing and communication, might be overcome by hybridization with their organic counterparts, which feature enhanced frequency response and colour range. Innovative hybrid inorganic/organic structures exploit efficient electrical injection and high excitation density of inorganic semiconductors and subsequent energy transfer to the organic semiconductor, provided that the radiative emission yield is high. An inherent obstacle to that end is the unfavourable energy level offset at hybrid inorganic/organic structures, which rather facilitates charge transfer that quenches light emission. Here, we introduce a technologically relevant method to optimize the hybrid structure's energy levels, here comprising ZnO and a tailored ladder-type oligophenylene. The ZnO work function is substantially lowered with an organometallic donor monolayer, aligning the frontier levels of the inorganic and organic semiconductors. This increases the hybrid structure's radiative emission yield sevenfold, validating the relevance of our approach.

  8. Efficient light emission from inorganic and organic semiconductor hybrid structures by energy-level tuning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlesinger, R.; Bianchi, F.; Blumstengel, S.; Christodoulou, C.; Ovsyannikov, R.; Kobin, B.; Moudgil, K.; Barlow, S.; Hecht, S.; Marder, S.R.; Henneberger, F.; Koch, N.

    2015-01-01

    The fundamental limits of inorganic semiconductors for light emitting applications, such as holographic displays, biomedical imaging and ultrafast data processing and communication, might be overcome by hybridization with their organic counterparts, which feature enhanced frequency response and colour range. Innovative hybrid inorganic/organic structures exploit efficient electrical injection and high excitation density of inorganic semiconductors and subsequent energy transfer to the organic semiconductor, provided that the radiative emission yield is high. An inherent obstacle to that end is the unfavourable energy level offset at hybrid inorganic/organic structures, which rather facilitates charge transfer that quenches light emission. Here, we introduce a technologically relevant method to optimize the hybrid structure's energy levels, here comprising ZnO and a tailored ladder-type oligophenylene. The ZnO work function is substantially lowered with an organometallic donor monolayer, aligning the frontier levels of the inorganic and organic semiconductors. This increases the hybrid structure's radiative emission yield sevenfold, validating the relevance of our approach. PMID:25872919

  9. White-Light Emission from Layered Halide Perovskites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Matthew D; Karunadasa, Hemamala I

    2018-03-20

    With nearly 20% of global electricity consumed by lighting, more efficient illumination sources can enable massive energy savings. However, effectively creating the high-quality white light required for indoor illumination remains a challenge. To accurately represent color, the illumination source must provide photons with all the energies visible to our eye. Such a broad emission is difficult to achieve from a single material. In commercial white-light sources, one or more light-emitting diodes, coated by one or more phosphors, yield a combined emission that appears white. However, combining emitters leads to changes in the emission color over time due to the unequal degradation rates of the emitters and efficiency losses due to overlapping absorption and emission energies of the different components. A single material that emits broadband white light (a continuous emission spanning 400-700 nm) would obviate these problems. In 2014, we described broadband white-light emission upon near-UV excitation from three new layered perovskites. To date, nine white-light-emitting perovskites have been reported by us and others, making this a burgeoning field of study. This Account outlines our work on understanding how a bulk material, with no obvious emissive sites, can emit every color of the visible spectrum. Although the initial discoveries were fortuitous, our understanding of the emission mechanism and identification of structural parameters that correlate with the broad emission have now positioned us to design white-light emitters. Layered hybrid halide perovskites feature anionic layers of corner-sharing metal-halide octahedra partitioned by organic cations. The narrow, room-temperature photoluminescence of lead-halide perovskites has been studied for several decades, and attributed to the radiative recombination of free excitons (excited electron-hole pairs). We proposed that the broad white emission we observed primarily stems from exciton self-trapping. Here, the

  10. White light emission from engineered silicon carbide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ou, Haiyan

    Silicon carbide (SiC) is a wide indirect bandgap semiconductor. The light emission efficiency is low in nature. But this material has very unique physical properties like good thermal conductivity, high break down field etc in addition to its abundance. Therefore it is interesting to engineer its...... light emission property so that to take fully potential applications of this material. In this talk, two methods, i.e. doping SiC heavily by donor-acceptor pairs and making SiC porous are introduced to make light emission from SiC. By co-doping SiC with nitrogen and boron heavily, strong yellow emission...... is demonstrated. After optimizing the passivation conditions, strong blue-green emission from porous SiC is demonstrated as well. When combining the yellow emission from co-doped SiC and blue-green from porous SiC, a high color rendering index white light source is achieved....

  11. On-road emissions of light-duty vehicles in europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Martin; Bonnel, Pierre; Hummel, Rudolf; Provenza, Alessio; Manfredi, Urbano

    2011-10-01

    For obtaining type approval in the European Union, light-duty vehicles have to comply with emission limits during standardized laboratory emissions testing. Although emission limits have become more stringent in past decades, light-duty vehicles remain an important source of nitrogen oxides and carbon monoxide emissions in Europe. Furthermore, persisting air quality problems in many urban areas suggest that laboratory emissions testing may not accurately capture the on-road emissions of light-duty vehicles. To address this issue, we conduct the first comprehensive on-road emissions test of light-duty vehicles with state-of-the-art Portable Emission Measurement Systems. We find that nitrogen oxides emissions of gasoline vehicles as well as carbon monoxide and total hydrocarbon emissions of both diesel and gasoline vehicles generally remain below the respective emission limits. By contrast, nitrogen oxides emissions of diesel vehicles (0.93 ± 0.39 grams per kilometer [g/km]), including modern Euro 5 diesel vehicles (0.62 ± 0.19 g/km), exceed emission limits by 320 ± 90%. On-road carbon dioxide emissions surpass laboratory emission levels by 21 ± 9%, suggesting that the current laboratory emissions testing fails to accurately capture the on-road emissions of light-duty vehicles. Our findings provide the empirical foundation for the European Commission to establish a complementary emissions test procedure for light-duty vehicles. This procedure could be implemented together with more stringent Euro 6 emission limits in 2014. The envisaged measures should improve urban air quality and provide incentive for innovation in the automotive industry.

  12. Various light particles emissions accompaning light heavy ion collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Billerey, R.

    1981-01-01

    In this work we have investigated light particles emission accompanying heavy-ion induced reactions. The experiments were performed at the isochronous cyclotron of the I.S.N. de Grenoble and we got in and out of plane correlations between solid state and gazeous detectors. In 14 N (100 MeV) + 27 Al we have chosen, light particles emitted in coincidence with deep inelastic fragments or evaporation residues have been measured. Likewise we observed the correlations between fragments and fragments. The particularities we found between protons and alpha emissions are to be assigned to differences in separation energies, but their relative energies and angular momenta have also a significant part [fr

  13. Measurement of light emission in scintillation vials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duran Ramiro, M. Teresa; Garcia-Torano, Eduardo

    2005-01-01

    The efficiency and energy resolution of liquid scintillation counting (LSC) systems are strongly dependent on the optical characteristics of scintillators, vials, and reflectors. This article presents the results of measurements of the light-emission profile of scintillation vials. Two measurement techniques, autoradiographs and direct measurements with a photomultiplier tube, have been used to obtain light-emission distribution for standard vials of glass, etched glass and polyethylene. Results obtained with both techniques are in good agreement. For the first time, the effect of the meniscus in terms of light contribution has been numerically estimated. These results can help design LSC systems that are more efficient in terms of light collection

  14. Identification and characterization of passive safety system and inherent safety feature building blocks for advanced light-water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forsberg, C.W.

    1989-01-01

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) is investigating passive and inherent safety options for Advanced Light-Water Reactors (ALWRs). A major activity in 1989 includes identification and characterization of passive safety system and inherent safety feature building blocks, both existing and proposed, for ALWRs. Preliminary results of this work are reported herein. This activity is part of a larger effort by the US Department of Energy, reactor vendors, utilities, and others in the United States to develop improved LWRs. The Advanced Boiling Water Reactor (ABWR) program and the Advanced Pressurized Water Reactor (APWR) program have as goals improved, commercially available LWRs in the early 1990s. The Advanced Simplified Boiling Water Reactor (ASBWR) program and the AP-600 program are developing more advanced reactors with increased use of passive safety systems. It is planned that these reactors will become commercially available in the mid 1990s. The ORNL program is an exploratory research program for LWRs beyond the year 2000. Desired long-term goals for such reactors include: (1) use of only passive and inherent safety, (2) foolproof against operator errors, (3) malevolence resistance against internal sabotage and external assault and (4) walkaway safety. The acronym ''PRIME'' [Passive safety, Resilient operation, Inherent safety, Malevolence resistance, and Extended (walkaway) safety] is used to summarize these desired characteristics. Existing passive and inherent safety options are discussed in this document

  15. Blue and white light emission from zinc oxide nanoforests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nafisa Noor

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Blue and white light emission is observed when high voltage stress is applied using micrometer-separated tungsten probes across a nanoforest formed of ZnO nanorods. The optical spectrum of the emitted light consistently shows three fine peaks with very high amplitude in the 465–485 nm (blue range, corresponding to atomic transitions of zinc. Additional peaks with smaller amplitudes in the 330–650 nm range and broad spectrum white light is observed depending on the excitation conditions. The spatial and spectral distribution of the emitted light, with pink–orange regions identifying percolation paths in some cases and high intensity blue and white light with center to edge variations in others, indicate that multiple mechanisms lead to light emission. Under certain conditions, the tungsten probe tips used to make electrical contact with the ZnO structures melt during the excitation, indicating that the local temperature can exceed 3422 °C, which is the melting temperature of tungsten. The distinct and narrow peaks in the optical spectra and the abrupt increase in current at high electric fields suggest that a plasma is formed by application of the electrical bias, giving rise to light emission via atomic transitions in gaseous zinc and oxygen. The broad spectrum, white light emission is possibly due to the free electron transitions in the plasma and blackbody radiation from molten silicon. The white light may also arise from the recombination through multiple defect levels in ZnO or due to the optical excitation from solid ZnO. The electrical measurements performed at different ambient pressures result in light emission with distinguishable differences in the emission properties and I–V curves, which also indicate that the dielectric breakdown of ZnO, sublimation, and plasma formation processes are the underlying mechanisms.

  16. Controlling spontaneous emission of light by photonic crystals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lodahl, Peter

    2005-01-01

    Photonic bandgap crystals were proposed almost two decades ago as a unique tool for controlling propagation and emission of light. Since then the research field of photonic crystals has exploded and many beautiful demonstrations of the use of photonic crystals and fibers for molding light...... propagation have appeared that hold great promises for integrated optics. These major achievements solidly demonstrate the ability to control propagation of light. In contrast, an experimental demonstration of the use of photonic crystals for timing the emission of light has so far lacked. In a recent...... publication in Nature, we have demonstrated experimentally that both the direction and time of spontaneous emission can be controlled, thereby confirming the original proposal by Eli Yablonovich that founded the field of photonic crystals. We believe that this work opens new opportunities for solid...

  17. White light emission of carbon dots by creating different emissive traps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joseph, Julin; Anappara, Aji A.

    2016-01-01

    Here we report a facile and rapid synthetic strategy for white light emitting carbon dots (CDs) by creating inhomogeneity in the surface-moieties by carbonizing ethylene diamine tetra acetic acid (EDTA) and ethylene glycol (EG) which are having different functional groups. The aqueous solution of the as-synthesised nanoparticles exhibits broad-band emission at several excitation wavelengths, with CIE parameters in the white gamut. Furthermore, white light emission is demonstrated through remote-phosphor technology, by capping 365 nm UV chip with PMMA, after dispersing the polymer with CDs. The resulting emission from the white-LED reported colour parameters such as CIE (0.34, 0.38), CRI of 84 and CCT of 5078 K.

  18. White light emission of carbon dots by creating different emissive traps

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joseph, Julin; Anappara, Aji A., E-mail: aji@nitc.ac.in

    2016-10-15

    Here we report a facile and rapid synthetic strategy for white light emitting carbon dots (CDs) by creating inhomogeneity in the surface-moieties by carbonizing ethylene diamine tetra acetic acid (EDTA) and ethylene glycol (EG) which are having different functional groups. The aqueous solution of the as-synthesised nanoparticles exhibits broad-band emission at several excitation wavelengths, with CIE parameters in the white gamut. Furthermore, white light emission is demonstrated through remote-phosphor technology, by capping 365 nm UV chip with PMMA, after dispersing the polymer with CDs. The resulting emission from the white-LED reported colour parameters such as CIE (0.34, 0.38), CRI of 84 and CCT of 5078 K.

  19. Preliminary risk assessment of the Integral Inherently-Safe Light Water Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCarroll, Kellen R.; Lee, John C.; Manera, Annalisa; Memmott, Matthew J.; Ferroni, Paolo

    2017-01-01

    The Integral, Inherently Safe Light Water Reactor (I 2 S-LWR) concept seeks to significantly increase nuclear power plant safety. The project implements a safety-by-design philosophy, eliminating several initiating events and providing novel, passive safety systems at the conceptual phase. Pursuit of unparalleled safety employs an integrated development process linking design with deterministic and probabilistic safety analyses. Unique aspects of the I 2 S-LWR concept and design process present challenges to the probabilistic risk assessment (PRA), particularly regarding overall flexibility, auditability and resolution of results. Useful approaches to initiating events and conditional failures are presented. To exemplify the risk-informed design process using PRA, a trade-off study of two safety system configurations is presented. Although further optimization is required, preliminary results indicate that the I 2 S-LWR can achieve a core damage frequency (CDF) from internal events less than 1.01 × 10 −8 /ry, including reactor vessel ruptures. Containment bypass frequency due to primary heat exchanger rupture is found to be comparable to non-vessel rupture CDF.

  20. Light dependency of VOC emissions from selected Mediterranean plant species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owen, S. M.; Harley, P.; Guenther, A.; Hewitt, C. N.

    The light, temperature and stomatal conductance dependencies of volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions from ten plant species commonly found in the Mediterranean region were studied using a fully controlled leaf cuvette in the laboratory. At standard conditions of temperature and light (30°C and 1000 μmol m -2 s -1 PAR), low emitting species ( Arbutus unedo, Pinus halepensis, Cistus incanus, Cistus salvifolius, Rosmarinus officinalis and Thymus vulgaris) emitted between 0.1 and 5.0 μg (C) (total VOCs) g -1 dw h -1, a medium emitter ( Pinus pinea) emitted between 5 and 10 μg (C) g -1 dw h -1 and high emitters ( Cistus monspeliensis, Lavendula stoechas and Quercus sp.) emitted more than 10 μg (C) g -1 dw h -1. VOC emissions from all of the plant species investigated showed some degree of light dependency, which was distinguishable from temperature dependency. Emissions of all compounds from Quercus sp. were light dependent. Ocimene was one of several monoterpene compounds emitted by P. pinea and was strongly correlated to light. Only a fraction of monoterpene emissions from C. incanus exhibited apparent weak light dependency but emissions from this plant species were strongly correlated to temperature. Data presented here are consistent with past studies, which show that emissions are independent of stomatal conductance. These results may allow more accurate predictions of monoterpene emission fluxes from the Mediterranean region to be made.

  1. Highly efficient white top-emitting organic light-emitting diodes with forward directed light emission

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freitag, Patricia; Reineke, Sebastian; Furno, Mauro; Luessem, Bjoern; Leo, Karl [Institut fuer Angewandte Photophysik, TU Dresden (Germany)

    2010-07-01

    The demand for highly efficient and energy saving illumination has increased considerably during the last decades. Organic light emitting diodes (OLEDs) are promising candidates for future lighting technologies. They offer high efficiency along with excellent color quality, allowing substantially lower power consumption than traditional illuminants. Recently, especially top-emitting devices have attracted high interest due to their compatibility with opaque substrates like metal sheets. In this contribution, we demonstrate top-emitting OLEDs with white emission spectra employing a multilayer hybrid cavity structure with two highly efficient phosphorescent emitter materials for orange-red (Ir(MDQ)2(acac)) and green (Ir(ppy)3) emission as well as the stable fluorescent blue emitter TBPe. To improve the OLED performance and modify the color quality, two different electron blocking layers and anode material combinations are tested. Compared to Lambertian emission, our devices show considerably enhanced forward emission, which is preferred for most lighting applications. Besides broadband emission and angle independent emission maxima, power efficiencies of 13.3 lm/W at 3 V and external quantum efficiencies of 5.3% are achieved. The emission shows excellent CIE coordinates of (0.420,0.407) at approx. 1000 cd/m{sup 2} and color rendering indices up to 77.

  2. [Investigation of emission characteristics for light duty vehicles with a portable emission measurement system].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hai-Kun; Fu, Li-Xin; Zhou, Yu; Lin, Xin; Chen, Ai-Zhong; Ge, Wei-hu; Du, Xuan

    2008-10-01

    Emission from 7 typical light-duty vehicles under actual driving conditions was monitored using a portable emission measurement system to gather data for characterization of the real world vehicle emission in Shenzhen, including the effects of driving modes on vehicle emission, comparison of fuel consumption based emission factors (g x L(-1) with mileage based emission factors (g x km(-1)), and the average emission factors of the monitored vehicles. The acceleration and deceleration modes accounted for 66.7% of total travel time, 80.3% of traveling distance and 74.6%-79.2% of vehicle emission; the acceleration mode contributed more than other driving modes. The fuel based emission factors were less dependent on the driving speed; they may be utilized in building macro-scale vehicle emission inventory with smaller sensitivity to the vehicle driving conditions. The effect of vehicle technology on vehicle emission was significant; the emission factors of CO, HC and NO(x) of carbureted vehicles were 19.9-20.5, 5.6-26.1 and 1.8-2.0 times the more advanced vehicles of Euro II, respectively. Using the ECE + EUDC driving cycle would not produce the desired real-world emission rates of light duty vehicles in a typical Chinese city.

  3. White light emission from fluorescent SiC with porous surface

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lu, Weifang; Ou, Yiyu; Fiordaliso, Elisabetta Maria

    2017-01-01

    We report for the frst time a NUV light to white light conversion in a N-B co-doped 6H-SiC (fuorescent SiC) layer containing a hybrid structure. The surface of fuorescent SiC sample contains porous structures fabricated by anodic oxidation method. After passivation by 20nm thick Al2O3, the photol......We report for the frst time a NUV light to white light conversion in a N-B co-doped 6H-SiC (fuorescent SiC) layer containing a hybrid structure. The surface of fuorescent SiC sample contains porous structures fabricated by anodic oxidation method. After passivation by 20nm thick Al2O3...... the bulk fuorescent SiC layer. A high color rendering index of 81.1 has been achieved. Photoluminescence spectra in porous layers fabricated in both commercial n-type and lab grown N-B co-doped 6H-SiC show two emission peaks centered approximately at 460nm and 530nm. Such bluegreen emission phenomenon can......, the photoluminescence intensity from the porous layer was signifcant enhanced by a factor of more than 12. Using a porous layer of moderate thickness (~10µm), high-quality white light emission was realized by combining the independent emissions of blue-green emission from the porous layer and yellow emission from...

  4. Tailoring the chirality of light emission with spherical Si-based antennas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zambrana-Puyalto, Xavier; Bonod, Nicolas

    2016-05-21

    Chirality of light is of fundamental importance in several enabling technologies with growing applications in life sciences, chemistry and photodetection. Recently, some attention has been focused on chiral quantum emitters. Consequently, optical antennas which are able to tailor the chirality of light emission are needed. Spherical nanoresonators such as colloids are of particular interest to design optical antennas since they can be synthesized at a large scale and they exhibit good optical properties. Here, we show that these colloids can be used to tailor the chirality of a chiral emitter. To this purpose, we derive an analytic formalism to model the interaction between a chiral emitter and a spherical resonator. We then compare the performances of metallic and dielectric spherical antennas to tailor the chirality of light emission. It is seen that, due to their strong electric dipolar response, metallic spherical nanoparticles spoil the chirality of light emission by yielding achiral fields. In contrast, thanks to the combined excitation of electric and magnetic modes, dielectric Si-based particles feature the ability to inhibit or to boost the chirality of light emission. Finally, it is shown that dual modes in dielectric antennas preserve the chirality of light emission.

  5. Dynamic operator actions analysis for inherently safe fast reactors and light water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ho, V.; Apostolakis, G.

    1988-01-01

    A comparative dynamic human actions analysis of inherently safe fast reactors (ISFRs) and light water reactors (LWRs) in terms of systems response and estimated human error rates is presented. Brief overviews of the ISFR and LWR systems are given to illustrate the design differences. Key operator actions required by the ISFR reactor shutdown and decay heat removal systems are identified and are compared with those of the LWR. It is observed that, because of the passive nature of the ISFR safety-related systems, a large time window is available for operator actions during transient events. Furthermore, these actions are fewer in number, are less complex, and have lower error rates and less severe consequences than those of the LWRs. We expect the ISFR operator errors' contribution to risk is smaller (at least in the context of the existing human reliability models) than that of the LWRs. (author)

  6. Effect of a microwave field on the cascade arc light emission

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gerasimov, N.T.; Rosado, R.J.; Schram, D.C.

    1977-01-01

    The effect of a pulsed microwave field on the integral light emission from the argon plasma of a DC atmospheric-pressure cascade arc is investigated experimentally. An intensive light pulse and oscillations of light emission at frequencies of the order of 10 kHz are observed. The shape and amplitude

  7. Light Emission by Nonequilibrium Bodies: Local Kirchhoff Law

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greffet, Jean-Jacques; Bouchon, Patrick; Brucoli, Giovanni; Marquier, François

    2018-04-01

    The goal of this paper is to introduce a local form of Kirchhoff law to model light emission by nonequilibrium bodies. While absorption by a finite-size body is usually described using the absorption cross section, we introduce a local absorption rate per unit volume and also a local thermal emission rate per unit volume. Their equality is a local form of Kirchhoff law. We revisit the derivation of this equality and extend it to situations with subsystems in local thermodynamic equilibrium but not in equilibrium between them, such as hot electrons in a metal or electrons with different Fermi levels in the conduction band and in the valence band of a semiconductor. This form of Kirchhoff law can be used to model (i) thermal emission by nonisothermal finite-size bodies, (ii) thermal emission by bodies with carriers at different temperatures, and (iii) spontaneous emission by semiconductors under optical (photoluminescence) or electrical pumping (electroluminescence). Finally, we show that the reciprocity relation connecting light-emitting diodes and photovoltaic cells derived by Rau is a particular case of the local Kirchhoff law.

  8. Optimization of emission color and efficiency of organic light emitting diodes for lighting applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seidel, Stefan; Krause, Ralf [Department of Materials Science VI, University of Erlangen-Nuernberg (Germany); Siemens AG, CT MM 1, Erlangen (Germany); Kozlowski, Fryderyk; Schmid, Guenter; Hunze, Arvid [Siemens AG, CT MM 1, Erlangen (Germany); Winnacker, Albrecht [Department of Materials Science VI, University of Erlangen-Nuernberg (Germany)

    2008-07-01

    In recent years the performance of organic light emitting diodes (OLEDs) has reached a level where OLED lighting presents an interesting application target. Research activities therefore focus amongst other things on the development of high efficient and stable white light emitting devices. We demonstrate how the color coordinates can be adjusted to achieve a warm white emission spectrum, whereas the OLED stack contains phosphorescent red and green dyes combined with a fluorescent blue one. Detailed results are presented with respect to a variation of layer thicknesses and dopant concentrations of the emission layers. Furthermore the influence of various dye molecules and hence different energy level alignments between host and dopants on color and efficiency will be discussed.

  9. Light absorption by primary particle emissions from a lignite burning plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bond, T.C.; Bussemer, M.; Wehner, B.; Keller, S.; Charlson, R.J.; Heintzenberg, J.

    1999-01-01

    Anthropogenic aerosols from the burning of fossil fuels contribute to climate forcing by both scattering and absorbing solar radiation, and estimates of climate forcing by light-absorbing primary particles have recently been published. While the mass and optical properties of emissions are needed for these studies, the available measurements do not characterize the low-technology burning that is thought to contribute a large fraction of light-absorbing material to the global budget. The authors have measured characteristics of particulate matter (PM) emitted from a small, low-technology lignite-burning plant. The PM emission factor is comparable to those used to calculate emission inventories of light-absorbing particles. However, the fine fraction, the absorbing fraction, and the absorption efficiency of the emissions are substantially below assumptions that have been made in inventories of black carbon emissions and calculations of climate forcing. The measurements suggest that nonblack, light-absorbing particles are emitted from low-technology coal burning. As the burning rate increases, the emitted absorption cross-section decreases, and the wavelength dependence of absorption becomes closer to that of black particles

  10. Real-time black carbon emission factor measurements from light duty vehicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forestieri, Sara D; Collier, Sonya; Kuwayama, Toshihiro; Zhang, Qi; Kleeman, Michael J; Cappa, Christopher D

    2013-11-19

    Eight light-duty gasoline low emission vehicles (LEV I) were tested on a Chassis dynamometer using the California Unified Cycle (UC) at the Haagen-Smit vehicle test facility at the California Air Resources Board in El Monte, CA during September 2011. The UC includes a cold start phase followed by a hot stabilized running phase. In addition, a light-duty gasoline LEV vehicle and ultralow emission vehicle (ULEV), and a light-duty diesel passenger vehicle and gasoline direct injection (GDI) vehicle were tested on a constant velocity driving cycle. A variety of instruments with response times ≥0.1 Hz were used to characterize how the emissions of the major particulate matter components varied for the LEVs during a typical driving cycle. This study focuses primarily on emissions of black carbon (BC). These measurements allowed for the determination of BC emission factors throughout the driving cycle, providing insights into the temporal variability of BC emission factors during different phases of a typical driving cycle.

  11. Efficient light emitting devices based on phosphorescent partially doped emissive layers

    KAUST Repository

    Yang, Xiaohui

    2013-05-29

    We report efficient organic light emitting devices employing an ultrathin phosphor emissive layer. The electroluminescent spectra of these devices can be tuned by introducing a low-energy emitting phosphor layer into the emission zone. Devices with the emissive layer consisting of multiple platinum-complex/spacer layer cells show a peak external quantum efficiency of 18.1%, which is among the best EQE values for platinum-complex based light emitting devices. Devices with an ultrathin phosphor emissive layer show stronger luminance decay with the operating time compared to the counterpart devices having a host-guest emissive layer.

  12. Tunable light emission and similarities with garnet structure of Ce-doped LSCAS glass for white-light devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andrade, L.H.C., E-mail: luishca@uems.br [Grupo de Espectroscopia Optica e Fototermica, Universidade Estadual de Mato Grosso do Sul - UEMS, C.P. 351, Dourados, MS (Brazil); Lima, S.M. [Grupo de Espectroscopia Optica e Fototermica, Universidade Estadual de Mato Grosso do Sul - UEMS, C.P. 351, Dourados, MS (Brazil); Baesso, M.L.; Novatski, A.; Rohling, J.H. [Grupo de Estudos de Fenomenos Fototermicos, Departamento de Fisica, Universidade Estadual de Maringa, Av. Colombo 5790, 87020-900 Maringa, PR (Brazil); Guyot, Y.; Boulon, G. [Laboratoire de Physico-Chimie des Materiaux Luminescents, Universite Claude Bernard Lyon 1, UMR 5620 CNRS, 69622 Villeurbanne (France)

    2012-01-05

    Highlights: > Ce{sup 3+}-doped LSCAS glass exhibits broad, simultaneously blue and yellow emissions under UV excitation. > In this phosphor is possible to continuously tune the emission, covering the entire visible spectrum. > The ability to change the color temperature in accordance to the occasion is a feature of this glass system. - Abstract: In this paper, we report results concerning tunable light emission and color temperature in cerium-doped low-silica-calcium-alumino-silicate (LSCAS) glass for smart white-light devices. Spectroscopic results, analyzed using the CIE 1931 x-y chromatic diagram, show that this glass presents two broad emission bands centered at 475 and 540 nm, whose intensities can be tuned by the excitation wavelength. Moreover, the same emission can be achieved from a color temperature range from 3200 to 10,000 K, with a color-rendering index (CRI) of around 75% obtained by changing the optical path length of the sample. Our new phosphor LSCAS glass, which is a unique system that exhibits tunable yellow emission, combines all qualities for white-light devices.

  13. Electrically driven light emission from an array of Si nanoclusters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mazzitello, K I; Martin, H O; Aldao, C M; Roman, H E

    2004-01-01

    Charge transport and light emission properties of an array of silicon nanoclusters (NCs), sandwiched between a p-type and an n-type doped silicon crystal, are studied theoretically by assuming that electrons and holes enter from the opposite sides of the array in response to an applied electric field. The size of the NCs considered ranges from 16 nm down to 3.6 nm and their spatial distribution is optimized so that light emission, resulting from radiative recombinations, is peaked in the visible red around 1.8 eV. The light emission efficiency is limited by the carrier hopping times and is found to be in the range 2-0.5%, for fields ranging from 100 kV cm -1 to 500 kV cm -1 , respectively

  14. Light Emission by Nonequilibrium Bodies: Local Kirchhoff Law

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-Jacques Greffet

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available The goal of this paper is to introduce a local form of Kirchhoff law to model light emission by nonequilibrium bodies. While absorption by a finite-size body is usually described using the absorption cross section, we introduce a local absorption rate per unit volume and also a local thermal emission rate per unit volume. Their equality is a local form of Kirchhoff law. We revisit the derivation of this equality and extend it to situations with subsystems in local thermodynamic equilibrium but not in equilibrium between them, such as hot electrons in a metal or electrons with different Fermi levels in the conduction band and in the valence band of a semiconductor. This form of Kirchhoff law can be used to model (i thermal emission by nonisothermal finite-size bodies, (ii thermal emission by bodies with carriers at different temperatures, and (iii spontaneous emission by semiconductors under optical (photoluminescence or electrical pumping (electroluminescence. Finally, we show that the reciprocity relation connecting light-emitting diodes and photovoltaic cells derived by Rau is a particular case of the local Kirchhoff law.

  15. Characterization of heat emission of light-curing units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wahbi, Mohammed A; Aalam, F A; Fatiny, F I; Radwan, S A; Eshan, I Y; Al-Samadani, K H

    2012-04-01

    This study was designed to analyze the heat emissions produced by light-curing units (LCUs) of different intensities during their operation. The null hypothesis was that the tested LCUs would show no differences in their temperature rises. FIVE COMMERCIALLY AVAILABLE LCUS WERE TESTED: a "Flipo" plasma arc, "Cromalux 100" quartz-tungsten-halogen, "L.E. Demetron 1" second-generation light-emitting diode (LED), and "Blue Phase C5" and "UltraLume 5" third-generation LED LCUs. The intensity of each LCU was measured with two radiometers. The temperature rise due to illumination was registered with a type-K thermocouple, which was connected to a computer-based data acquisition system. Temperature changes were recorded in continues 10 and 20 s intervals up to 300 s. The Flipo (ARC) light source revealed the highest mean heat emission while the L.E. Demetron 1 LED showing the lowest mean value at 10 and 20 s exposure times. Moreover, Cromalux (QTH) recorded the second highest value for all intervals (12.71, 14.63, 14.60) of heat emission than Blue Phase C5 (LED) (12.25, 13.87, 13.69), interestingly at 20 s illumination for all intervals the highest results (18.15, 19.27, 20.31) were also recorded with Flipo (PAC) LCU, and the lowest (6.71, 5.97, 5.55) with L.E. Demetron 1 LED, while Blue Phase C5 (LED) recorded the second highest value at the 1st and 2nd 20 s intervals (14.12, 11.84, 10.18) of heat emission than Cromalux (QTH) (12.26, 11.43, 10.26). The speed of temperature or heat rise during the 10 and 20 s depends on light intensity of emitted light. However, the QTH LCU was investigated resulted in a higher temperature rise than LED curing units of the same power density. The PAC curing unit induced a significantly higher heat emission and temperature increase in all periods, and data were statistically different than the other tested groups (p < .05). LED (Blue Phase C5) was not statistically significant (p < .05) (at 10 s) than QTH units, also LED (Blue

  16. Full phosphorescent white-light organic light-emitting diodes with improved color stability and efficiency by fine tuning primary emission contributions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Hua

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a novel type of white-light organic light emitting diode (OLED with high color stability was reported, in which the yellow-light emission layer of (4,4′-N,N′-dicarbazolebiphenyl (CBP : tris(2-phenylquinoline-C2,N′iridium(III (Ir(2-phq3 was sandwiched by double blue-light emission layers of 1,1-bis-[(di-4-tolylaminopheny1]cyclohexane (TAPC : bis[4,6-(di-fluorophenyl-pyridinato-N,C2′]picolinate (FIrpic and tris[3-(3-pyridylmesityl]borane (3TPYMB:FIrpic. And, it exhibited the maximum current efficiency of 33.1 cd/A, the turn-on voltage at about 3 V and the maximum luminance in excess of 20000 cd/m2. More important, it realized very stable white-light emission, and its CIE(x, y coordinates only shift from (0.34, 0.37 to (0.33, 0.37 as applied voltage increased from 5 V to 12 V. It is believed that the new scheme in emission layer of white-light OLED can fine tune the contribution of primary emission with applied voltage changed, resulting in high quality white-light OLED.

  17. Full phosphorescent white-light organic light-emitting diodes with improved color stability and efficiency by fine tuning primary emission contributions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hua, Wang, E-mail: wmsu2008@sinano.ac.cn, E-mail: wanghua001@tyut.edu.cn; Du, Xiaogang [Key Laboratory of Interface Science and Engineering in Advanced Materials, Taiyuan University of Technology, Ministry of Education, Taiyuan 030024 (China); Research Center of Advanced Materials Science and Technology, Taiyuan University of Technology, Taiyuan 030024 (China); Su, Wenming, E-mail: wmsu2008@sinano.ac.cn, E-mail: wanghua001@tyut.edu.cn; Zhang, Dongyu [Printable Electronics Research Centre, Suzhou Institute of Nano-Tech and Nano-Bionics, CAS, suzhou 215123 (China); Lin, Wenjing [Key Laboratory of Interface Science and Engineering in Advanced Materials, Taiyuan University of Technology, Ministry of Education, Taiyuan 030024 (China); Research Center of Advanced Materials Science and Technology, Taiyuan University of Technology, Taiyuan 030024 (China); Printable Electronics Research Centre, Suzhou Institute of Nano-Tech and Nano-Bionics, CAS, suzhou 215123 (China)

    2014-02-15

    In this paper, a novel type of white-light organic light emitting diode (OLED) with high color stability was reported, in which the yellow-light emission layer of (4,4{sup ′}-N,N{sup ′}-dicarbazole)biphenyl (CBP) : tris(2-phenylquinoline-C2,N{sup ′})iridium(III) (Ir(2-phq){sub 3}) was sandwiched by double blue-light emission layers of 1,1-bis-[(di-4-tolylamino)pheny1]cyclohexane (TAPC) : bis[4,6-(di-fluorophenyl)-pyridinato-N,C2{sup ′}]picolinate (FIrpic) and tris[3-(3-pyridyl)mesityl]borane (3TPYMB):FIrpic. And, it exhibited the maximum current efficiency of 33.1 cd/A, the turn-on voltage at about 3 V and the maximum luminance in excess of 20000 cd/m{sup 2}. More important, it realized very stable white-light emission, and its CIE(x, y) coordinates only shift from (0.34, 0.37) to (0.33, 0.37) as applied voltage increased from 5 V to 12 V. It is believed that the new scheme in emission layer of white-light OLED can fine tune the contribution of primary emission with applied voltage changed, resulting in high quality white-light OLED.

  18. Full phosphorescent white-light organic light-emitting diodes with improved color stability and efficiency by fine tuning primary emission contributions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hua, Wang; Du, Xiaogang; Su, Wenming; Lin, Wenjing; Zhang, Dongyu

    2014-02-01

    In this paper, a novel type of white-light organic light emitting diode (OLED) with high color stability was reported, in which the yellow-light emission layer of (4,4'-N,N'-dicarbazole)biphenyl (CBP) : tris(2-phenylquinoline-C2,N')iridium(III) (Ir(2-phq)3) was sandwiched by double blue-light emission layers of 1,1-bis-[(di-4-tolylamino)pheny1]cyclohexane (TAPC) : bis[4,6-(di-fluorophenyl)-pyridinato-N,C2']picolinate (FIrpic) and tris[3-(3-pyridyl)mesityl]borane (3TPYMB):FIrpic. And, it exhibited the maximum current efficiency of 33.1 cd/A, the turn-on voltage at about 3 V and the maximum luminance in excess of 20000 cd/m2. More important, it realized very stable white-light emission, and its CIE(x, y) coordinates only shift from (0.34, 0.37) to (0.33, 0.37) as applied voltage increased from 5 V to 12 V. It is believed that the new scheme in emission layer of white-light OLED can fine tune the contribution of primary emission with applied voltage changed, resulting in high quality white-light OLED.

  19. Environmentally Benign Technology for Efficient Warm-White Light Emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Pin-Chun; Lin, Ming-Shiun; Lin, Ching-Fuh

    2014-06-01

    Nowadays efficient down conversion for white light emission is mainly based on rare-earth doped phosphors or cadmium-containing quantum dots. Although they exhibit high luminescence efficiency, the rare-earth mining and cadmium pollution have so far led to extremely high environmental cost, which conflicts the original purpose of pursuing efficient lighting. Here, we explore a new strategy to achieve efficient luminescence conversion based on polymer-decorated nanoparticles. The ZnO and Mn2+ doped ZnS nanoparticles are encapsulated by poly(9,9-di-n- hexylfluorenyl-2,7-diyl). The resultant core-shell nanocomposites then encompass three UV-to-visible luminescence conversion routes for photon emissions at blue, green, and orange colors, respectively. As a result, the color temperature is widely tunable (2100 K ~ 6000 K), so candle light or pure white light can be generated. The quantum yield up to 91% could also be achieved. Such rare-earth-element free nanocomposites give the bright perspectives for energy-saving, healthy, and environmentally benign lighting.

  20. [Real world instantaneous emission simulation for light-duty diesel vehicle].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Cheng; Chen, Chang-Hong; Dai, Pu; Li, Li; Huang, Hai-Ying; Cheng, Zhen; Jia, Ji-Hong

    2008-10-01

    Core architecture and input parameters of CMEM model were introduced to simulation the second by second vehicle emission rate on real world by taking a light-duty diesel car as a case. On-board test data by a portable emission measurement system were then used to validate the simulation results. Test emission factors of CO, THC, NO(x) and CO2 were respectively 0.81, 0.61, 2.09, and 193 g x km(-1), while calculated emission factors were 0.75, 0.47, 2.47, and 212 g x km(-1). The correlation coefficients reached 0.69, 0.69, 0.75, and 0.72. Simulated instantaneous emissions of the light duty diesel vehicle by CMEM model were strongly coherent with the transient driving cycle. By analysis, CO, THC, NO(x), and CO2 emissions would be reduced by 50%, 47%, 45%, and 44% after improving the traffic situation at the intersection. The result indicated that it is necessary and feasible to simulate the instantaneous emissions of mixed vehicle fleet in some typical traffic areas by the micro-scale vehicle emission model.

  1. AMMONIA EMISSIONS FROM THE EPA'S LIGHT DUTY TEST VEHICLE

    Science.gov (United States)

    The paper discusses measurements of ammonia (NH3) emissions from EPA's light duty test vehicle while operated on a dynamometer. The vehicle's (1993 Chevrolet equipped with a three-way catalyst) emissions were measured for three transient (urban driving, highway fuel economy, and ...

  2. Quantitative analysis of directional spontaneous emission spectra from light sources in photonic crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nikolaev, Ivan S.; Lodahl, Peter; Vos, Willem L.

    2005-01-01

    We have performed angle-resolved measurements of spontaneous-emission spectra from laser dyes and quantum dots in opal and inverse opal photonic crystals. Pronounced directional dependencies of the emission spectra are observed: angular ranges of strongly reduced emission adjoin with angular ranges of enhanced emission. It appears that emission from embedded light sources is affected both by the periodicity and by the structural imperfections of the crystals: the photons are Bragg diffracted by lattice planes and scattered by unavoidable structural disorder. Using a model comprising diffuse light transport and photonic band structure, we quantitatively explain the directional emission spectra. This work provides detailed understanding of the transport of spontaneously emitted light in real photonic crystals, which is essential in the interpretation of quantum optics in photonic-band-gap crystals and for applications wherein directional emission and total emission power are controlled

  3. Monoterpene and sesquiterpene emissions from Quercus coccifera exhibit interacting responses to light and temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Staudt

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Light and temperature are known to be the most important environmental factors controlling biogenic volatile organic compound (BVOC emissions from plants, but little is known about their interdependencies especially for BVOCs other than isoprene. We studied light responses at different temperatures and temperature responses at different light levels of foliar BVOC emissions, photosynthesis and chlorophyll fluorescence on Quercus coccifera, an evergreen oak widespread in Mediterranean shrublands. More than 50 BVOCs were detected in the emissions from Q. coccifera leaves most of them being isoprenoids plus a few green leaf volatiles (GLVs. Under standard conditions non-oxygenated monoterpenes (MT-hc accounted for about 90% of the total BVOC release (mean ± SD: 738 ± 378 ng m−2 projected leaf area s−1 or 13.1 ± 6.9 μg g−1 leaf dry weight h−1 and oxygenated monoterpenes (MT-ox and sesquiterpenes (SQTs accounted for the rest in about equal proportions. Except GLVs, emissions of all BVOCs responded positively to light and temperature. The light responses of MT and SQT emissions resembled that of CO2-assimilation and were little influenced by the assay temperature: at high assay temperature, MT-hc emissions saturated at lower light levels than at standard assay temperature and tended even to decrease in the highest light range. The emission responses to temperature showed mostly Arrhenius-type response curves, whose shapes in the high temperature range were clearly affected by the assay light level and were markedly different between isoprenoid classes: at non-saturating light, all isoprenoids showed a similar temperature optimum (~43 °C, but, at higher temperatures, MT-hc emissions decreased faster than MT-ox and SQT emissions. At saturating light, MT-hc emissions peaked around 37 °C and rapidly dropped at higher temperatures, whereas MT-ox and SQT emissions strongly increased between 40 and 50 °C accompanied by a burst of GLVs. In all

  4. Weak light emission of soft tissues induced by heating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spinelli, Antonello E.; Durando, Giovanni; Boschi, Federico

    2018-04-01

    The main goal of this work is to show that soft tissue interaction with high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) or direct heating leads to a weak light emission detectable using a small animal optical imaging system. Our results show that the luminescence signal is detectable after 30 min of heating, resembling the time scale of delayed luminescence. The imaging of a soft tissue after heating it using an HIFU field shows that the luminescence pattern closely matches the shape of the cone typical of the HIFU beam. We conclude that heating a soft tissue using two different sources leads to the emission of a weak luminescence signal from the heated region with a decay half-life of a few minutes (4 to 6 min). The origin of such light emission needs to be further investigated.

  5. Tunneling-Electron-Induced Light Emission from Single Gold Nanoclusters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Arthur; Li, Shaowei; Czap, Gregory; Ho, W

    2016-09-14

    The coupling of tunneling electrons with the tip-nanocluster-substrate junction plasmon was investigated by monitoring light emission in a scanning tunneling microscope (STM). Gold atoms were evaporated onto the ∼5 Å thick Al2O3 thin film grown on the NiAl (110) surface where they formed nanoclusters 3-7 nm wide. Scanning tunneling spectroscopy (STS) of these nanoclusters revealed quantum-confined electronic states. Spatially resolved photon imaging showed localized emission hot spots. Size dependent study and light emission from nanocluster dimers further support the viewpoint that coupling of tunneling electrons to the junction plasmon is the main radiative mechanism. These results showed the potential of the STM to reveal the electronic and optical properties of nanoscale metallic systems in the confined geometry of the tunnel junction.

  6. Isoprenoid emission response to changing light conditions of English oak, European beech and Norway spruce

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Meeningen, Ylva; Schurgers, Guy; Rinnan, Riikka; Holst, Thomas

    2017-09-01

    Light is an important environmental factor controlling biogenic volatile organic compound (BVOC) emissions, but in natural conditions its impact is hard to separate from other influential factors such as temperature. We studied the light response of foliar BVOC emissions, photosynthesis and stomatal conductance on three common European tree species, namely English oak (Quercus robur), European beech (Fagus sylvatica) and two provenances of Norway spruce (Picea abies) in Taastrup, Denmark. Leaf scale measurements were performed on the lowest positioned branches of the tree in July 2015. Light intensity was increased in four steps (0, 500, 1000 and 1500 µmol m-2 s-1), whilst other chamber conditions such as temperature, humidity and CO2 levels were fixed. Whereas the emission rate differed between individuals of the same species, the relative contributions of compounds to the total isoprenoid emission remained similar. Whilst some compounds were species specific, the compounds α-pinene, camphene, 3-carene, limonene and eucalyptol were emitted by all of the measured tree species. Some compounds, like isoprene and sabinene, showed an increasing emission response with increasing light intensity, whereas other compounds, like camphene, had no significant emission response to light for most of the measured trees. English oak and European beech showed high light-dependent emission fractions from isoprene and sabinene, but other emitted compounds were light independent. For the two provenances of Norway spruce, the compounds α-pinene, 3-carene and eucalyptol showed high light-dependent fractions for many of the measured trees. This study highlights differences between compound emissions in their response to a change in light and a possible light independence for certain compounds, which might be valid for a wider range of tree species. This information could be of importance when improving emission models and to further emphasize the discussion regarding light or

  7. Emissions from light and medium goods vehicles in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Kaj

    1996-01-01

    The article analyses atmospheric pollution of light goods vehicles (i.e. freight vehicles lighter than 6 tonnes) and medium goods vehicles (i.e. 6-24 t delivery trucks) in Denmark, and evaluated the scope for emission reductions. Light goods vehicles are very inefficient vehicles, and moreover have...

  8. Fabrication of White Light-emitting Electrochemical Cells with Stable Emission from Exciplexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchida, Soichi; Takizawa, Daisuke; Ikeda, Satoru; Takeuchi, Hironori; Nishimura, Suzushi; Nishide, Hiroyuki; Nishikitani, Yoshinori

    2016-11-15

    The authors present an approach for fabricating stable white light emission from polymer light-emitting electrochemical cells (PLECs) having an active layer which consists of blue-fluorescent poly(9,9-di-n-dodecylfluorenyl-2,7-diyl) (PFD) and π-conjugated triphenylamine molecules. This white light emission originates from exciplexes formed between PFD and amines in electronically excited states. A device containing PFD, 4,4',4''-tris[2-naphthyl(phenyl)amino]triphenylamine (2-TNATA), Poly(ethylene oxide) and K2CF3SO3 showed white light emission with Commission internationale de l'éclairage (CIE) coordinates of (0.33, 0.43) and a Color Rendering Index (CRI) of Ra = 73 at an applied voltage of 3.5 V. Constant voltage measurements showed that the CIE coordinates of (0.27, 0.37), Ra of 67, and the emission color observed immediately after application of a voltage of 5 V were nearly unchanged and stable after 300 sec.

  9. Intrinsic white-light emission from layered hybrid perovskites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dohner, Emma R; Jaffe, Adam; Bradshaw, Liam R; Karunadasa, Hemamala I

    2014-09-24

    We report on the second family of layered perovskite white-light emitters with improved photoluminescence quantum efficiencies (PLQEs). Upon near-ultraviolet excitation, two new Pb-Cl and Pb-Br perovskites emit broadband "cold" and "warm" white light, respectively, with high color rendition. Emission from large, single crystals indicates an origin from the bulk material and not surface defect sites. The Pb-Br perovskite has a PLQE of 9%, which is undiminished after 3 months of continuous irradiation. Our mechanistic studies indicate that the emission has contributions from strong electron-phonon coupling in a deformable lattice and from a distribution of intrinsic trap states. These hybrids provide a tunable platform for combining the facile processability of organic materials with the structural definition of crystalline, inorganic solids.

  10. Light emission from silicon with tin-containing nanocrystals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Søren Roesgaard

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Tin-containing nanocrystals, embedded in silicon, have been fabricated by growing an epitaxial layer of Si1−x−ySnxCy, where x = 1.6 % and y = 0.04 % on a silicon substrate, followed by annealing at various temperatures ranging from 650 ∘C to 900 ∘C. The nanocrystal density and average diameters are determined by scanning transmission-electron microscopy to ≈1017 cm−3 and ≈5 nm, respectively. Photoluminescence spectroscopy demonstrates that the light emission is very pronounced for samples annealed at 725 ∘C, and Rutherford back-scattering spectrometry shows that the nanocrystals are predominantly in the diamond-structured phase at this particular annealing temperature. The origin of the light emission is discussed.

  11. CO2 emissions from Super-light Structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hertz, Kristian Dahl; Bagger, Anne

    2011-01-01

    CO2 emission from the construction of buildings is seldom taken into account because focus is primarily on building operation. New technologies have therefore mainly been developed to reduce the energy consumption connected to operation. Super-light technology is a new structural principle giving...

  12. EMISSION HEIGHT AND TEMPERATURE DISTRIBUTION OF WHITE-LIGHT EMISSION OBSERVED BY HINODE/SOT FROM THE 2012 JANUARY 27 X-CLASS SOLAR FLARE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watanabe, Kyoko; Shimizu, Toshifumi; Masuda, Satoshi; Ichimoto, Kiyoshi; Ohno, Masanori

    2013-01-01

    White-light emissions were observed from an X1.7 class solar flare on 2012 January 27, using three continuum bands (red, green, and blue) of the Solar Optical Telescope on board the Hinode satellite. This event occurred near the solar limb, and so differences in the locations of the various emissions are consistent with differences in heights above the photosphere of the various emission sources. Under this interpretation, our observations are consistent with the white-light emissions occurring at the lowest levels of where the Ca II H emission occurs. Moreover, the centers of the source regions of the red, green, and blue wavelengths of the white-light emissions are significantly displaced from each other, suggesting that those respective emissions are emanating from progressively lower heights in the solar atmosphere. The temperature distribution was also calculated from the white-light data, and we found the lower-layer emission to have a higher temperature. This indicates that high-energy particles penetrated down to near the photosphere, and deposited heat into the ambient lower layers of the atmosphere

  13. Study of photophysical processes in organic light-emitting diodes based on light-emission profile reconstruction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Carvelli, M.

    2012-01-01

    Organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) are emerging as a promising option for energy-efficient, flexible light sources. A key factor that needs to be measured and controlled is the shape of the emission profile, i.e. the spatial distribution of the emitting excitons across the active layer thickness.

  14. Isoprenoid emission response to changing light conditions of English oak, European beech and Norway spruce

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. van Meeningen

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Light is an important environmental factor controlling biogenic volatile organic compound (BVOC emissions, but in natural conditions its impact is hard to separate from other influential factors such as temperature. We studied the light response of foliar BVOC emissions, photosynthesis and stomatal conductance on three common European tree species, namely English oak (Quercus robur, European beech (Fagus sylvatica and two provenances of Norway spruce (Picea abies in Taastrup, Denmark. Leaf scale measurements were performed on the lowest positioned branches of the tree in July 2015. Light intensity was increased in four steps (0, 500, 1000 and 1500 µmol m−2 s−1, whilst other chamber conditions such as temperature, humidity and CO2 levels were fixed. Whereas the emission rate differed between individuals of the same species, the relative contributions of compounds to the total isoprenoid emission remained similar. Whilst some compounds were species specific, the compounds α-pinene, camphene, 3-carene, limonene and eucalyptol were emitted by all of the measured tree species. Some compounds, like isoprene and sabinene, showed an increasing emission response with increasing light intensity, whereas other compounds, like camphene, had no significant emission response to light for most of the measured trees. English oak and European beech showed high light-dependent emission fractions from isoprene and sabinene, but other emitted compounds were light independent. For the two provenances of Norway spruce, the compounds α-pinene, 3-carene and eucalyptol showed high light-dependent fractions for many of the measured trees. This study highlights differences between compound emissions in their response to a change in light and a possible light independence for certain compounds, which might be valid for a wider range of tree species. This information could be of importance when improving emission models and to further emphasize the

  15. Effect of surface contaminants on the light emission spectrum of LiF TLDs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abhold, M.E.

    1987-01-01

    Recent results show the differences between the light emissions spectra from LiF Thermoluminescent Dosimeters (TLDs) for gamma vs. alpha irradiations to be due to contaminants on the surface of the TLD. The light emission spectrum for thermal neutron irradiations was observed to be identical to that for a Cs-137 gamma irradiation in Harshaw TLD-100. Further experiments with surface treatments on TLD-100 indicate trace contaminants introduced by the standard methanol cleansing rinse in reagent grade methanol to have a substantial effect on the light emission spectrum for Am-241 alpha irradiations

  16. Applications of Cherenkov Light Emission for Dosimetry in Radiation Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glaser, Adam Kenneth

    Since its discovery in the 1930's, the Cherenkov effect has been paramount in the development of high-energy physics research. It results in light emission from charged particles traveling faster than the local speed of light in a dielectric medium. The ability of this emitted light to describe a charged particle's trajectory, energy, velocity, and mass has allowed scientists to study subatomic particles, detect neutrinos, and explore the properties of interstellar matter. However, only recently has the phenomenon been considered in the practical context of medical physics and radiation therapy dosimetry, where Cherenkov light is induced by clinical x-ray photon, electron, and proton beams. To investigate the relationship between this phenomenon and dose deposition, a Monte Carlo plug-in was developed within the Geant4 architecture for medically-oriented simulations (GAMOS) to simulate radiation-induced optical emission in biological media. Using this simulation framework, it was determined that Cherenkov light emission may be well suited for radiation dosimetry of clinically used x-ray photon beams. To advance this application, several novel techniques were implemented to realize the maximum potential of the signal, such as time-gating for maximizing the signal to noise ratio (SNR) and Cherenkov-excited fluorescence for generating isotropic light release in water. Proof of concept experiments were conducted in water tanks to demonstrate the feasibility of the proposed method for two-dimensional (2D) projection imaging, three-dimensional (3D) parallel beam tomography, large field of view 3D cone beam tomography, and video-rate dynamic imaging of treatment plans for a number of common radiotherapy applications. The proposed dosimetry method was found to have a number of unique advantages, including but not limited to its non-invasive nature, water-equivalence, speed, high-resolution, ability to provide full 3D data, and potential to yield data in-vivo. Based on

  17. White light emission from Tm3+/Dy3+ co-doped oxyfluoride germanate glasses under UV light excitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lakshminarayana, G.; Yang Hucheng; Qiu Jianrong

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, we report on the absorption and photoluminescence properties of Tm 3+ /Dy 3+ ions co-doped oxyfluoride germanate glasses for white light emission. The X-ray diffraction (XRD) and differential thermal analysis (DTA) profiles of the host glass have been carried out to confirm its structure and thermal stability. From the measured absorption spectra, Judd-Ofelt (J-O) intensity parameters (Ω 2 , Ω 4 and Ω 6 ) have been evaluated for Tm 3+ and Dy 3+ ions. A combination of blue, yellow and red emissions has emerged in these glasses, which allows the observation of bright white light when the glasses are excited by the ultraviolet light. The white light luminescence colour could be changed by varying the excitation wavelength. Also, various colours of luminescence, including white light, can be easily tuned by adjusting the concentrations of Tm 3+ or Dy 3+ ions in the co-doped glasses. Concentration quenching effect was also investigated and possible energy transfer mechanism from Dy 3+ →Tm 3+ ions was explained which is also confirmed by the decay lifetime measurements. - Graphical Abstract: A combination of blue, yellow and red emissions has emerged from Tm 3+ /Dy 3+ co-doped glasses, which allows the observation of bright white light and makes them as excellent candidates applicable in the solid-state multi-colour three-dimensional display.

  18. Visible Light Emission from Atomic Scale Patterns Fabricated by the Scanning Tunneling Microscope

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thirstrup, C.; Sakurai, M.; Stokbro, Kurt

    1999-01-01

    Scanning tunneling microscope (STM) induced light emission from artificial atomic scale structures comprising silicon dangling bonds on hydrogen-terminated Si(001) surfaces has been mapped spatially and analyzed spectroscopically in the visible spectral range. The light emission is based on a novel...

  19. Simulations of emission from microcavity tandem organic light-emitting diodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biswas, Rana; Xu, Chun; Zhao, Weijun; Liu, Rui; Shinar, Ruth; Shinar, Joseph

    2011-01-01

    Microcavity tandem organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) are simulated and compared to experimental results. The simulations are based on two complementary techniques: rigorous finite element solutions of Maxwell's equations and Fourier space scattering matrix solutions. A narrowing and blue shift of the emission spectrum relative to the noncavity single unit OLED is obtained both theoretically and experimentally. In the simulations, a distribution of emitting sources is placed near the interface of the electron transport layer tris(8-hydroxyquinoline) Al (Alq 3 ) and the hole transport layer (N,N'-bis(naphthalen-1-yl)-N,N'-bis(phenyl)benzidine) (α-NPB). Far-field electric field intensities are simulated. The simulated widths of the emission peaks also agree with the experimental results. The simulations of the 2-unit tandem OLEDs shifted the emission to shorter wavelength, in agreement with experimental measurements. The emission spectra's dependence on individual layer thicknesses also agreed well with measurements. Approaches to simulate and improve the light emission intensity from these OLEDs, in particular for white OLEDs, are discussed.

  20. Microcontact printing of self-assembled monolayers to pattern the light-emission of polymeric light-emitting diodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brondijk, J.J.; Li, X.; Akkerman, H.B.; Blom, P.W.M.; Boer, B. de [University of Groningen, Molecular Electronics, Zernike Institute for Advanced Materials, Groningen (Netherlands)

    2009-04-15

    By patterning a self-assembled monolayer (SAM) of thiolated molecules with opposing dipole moments on a gold anode of a polymer light-emitting diode (PLED), the charge injection and, therefore, the light-emission of the device can be controlled with a micrometer-scale resolution. Gold surfaces were modified with SAMs based on alkanethiols and perfluorinated alkanethiols, applied by microcontact printing, and their work functions have been measured. The molecules form a chemisorbed monolayer of only {proportional_to}1.5 nm on the gold surface, thereby locally changing the work function of the metal. Kelvin probe measurements show that the local work function can be tuned from 4.3 to 5.5 eV, which implies that this anode can be used as a hole blocking electrode or as a hole injecting electrode, respectively, in PLEDs based on poly(p-phenylene vinylene) (PPV) derivatives. By microcontact printing of SAMs with opposing dipole moments, the work function was locally modified and the charge injection in the PLED could be controlled down to the micrometer length scale. Consequently, the local light-emission exhibits a high contrast. Microcontact printing of SAMs is a simple and inexpensive method to pattern, with micrometer resolution, the light-emission for low-end applications like static displays. (orig.)

  1. Microcontact printing of self-assembled monolayers to pattern the light-emission of polymeric light-emitting diodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brondijk, J. J.; Li, X.; Akkerman, H. B.; Blom, P. W. M.; de Boer, B.

    2009-04-01

    By patterning a self-assembled monolayer (SAM) of thiolated molecules with opposing dipole moments on a gold anode of a polymer light-emitting diode (PLED), the charge injection and, therefore, the light-emission of the device can be controlled with a micrometer-scale resolution. Gold surfaces were modified with SAMs based on alkanethiols and perfluorinated alkanethiols, applied by microcontact printing, and their work functions have been measured. The molecules form a chemisorbed monolayer of only ˜1.5 nm on the gold surface, thereby locally changing the work function of the metal. Kelvin probe measurements show that the local work function can be tuned from 4.3 to 5.5 eV, which implies that this anode can be used as a hole blocking electrode or as a hole injecting electrode, respectively, in PLEDs based on poly( p-phenylene vinylene) (PPV) derivatives. By microcontact printing of SAMs with opposing dipole moments, the work function was locally modified and the charge injection in the PLED could be controlled down to the micrometer length scale. Consequently, the local light-emission exhibits a high contrast. Microcontact printing of SAMs is a simple and inexpensive method to pattern, with micrometer resolution, the light-emission for low-end applications like static displays.

  2. UV emissions from low energy artificial light sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fenton, Leona; Moseley, Harry

    2014-01-01

    Energy efficient light sources have been introduced across Europe and many other countries world wide. The most common of these is the Compact Fluorescent Lamp (CFL), which has been shown to emit ultraviolet (UV) radiation. Light Emitting Diodes (LEDs) are an alternative technology that has minimal UV emissions. This brief review summarises the different energy efficient light sources available on the market and compares the UV levels and the subsequent effects on the skin of normal individuals and those who suffer from photodermatoses. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. An optimized power conversion system concept of the integral, inherently-safe light water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Memmott, Matthew J.; Wilding, Paul R.; Petrovic, Bojan

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Three power conversion systems (PCS) for the I"2S-LWR are presented. • An optimization analyses was performed to evaluate these PCS alternatives. • The ideal PCS consists of 5 turbines, and obtains an overall efficiency of 35.7%. - Abstract: The integral, inherently safe light water reactor (I"2S-LWR) has been developed to significantly enhance passive safety capabilities while maintaining cost competitiveness relative to the current light water reactor (LWR) fleet. The compact heat exchangers of the I"2S-LWR preclude boiling of the secondary fluid, which decreases the probability of heat exchanger failure, but this requires the addition of a flash drum, which negatively affects the overall plant thermodynamic efficiency. A state of the art Rankine cycle is proposed for the I"2S-LWR to increase the thermodynamic efficiency by utilizing a flash drum with optimized operational parameters. In presenting this option for power conversion in the I"2S-LWR power plant, the key metric used in rating the performance is the overall net thermodynamic efficiency of the cycle. In evaluating the flash-Rankine cycle, three basic industrial concepts are evaluated, one without an intermediate pressure turbine, one with an intermediate turbine and one reheat stream, and one with an intermediate turbine and two reheat streams. For each configuration, a single-path multi-variable optimization is undertaken to maximize the thermal efficiency. The third configuration with an intermediate turbine and 2 reheat streams is the most effective concept, with an optimized efficiency of 35.7%.

  4. Efficient light emitting devices based on phosphorescent partially doped emissive layers

    KAUST Repository

    Yang, Xiaohui; Jabbour, Ghassan E.

    2013-01-01

    We report efficient organic light emitting devices employing an ultrathin phosphor emissive layer. The electroluminescent spectra of these devices can be tuned by introducing a low-energy emitting phosphor layer into the emission zone. Devices

  5. Blackbody emission from light interacting with an effective moving dispersive medium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petev, M; Westerberg, N; Moss, D; Rubino, E; Rimoldi, C; Cacciatori, S L; Belgiorno, F; Faccio, D

    2013-07-26

    Intense laser pulses excite a nonlinear polarization response that may create an effective flowing medium and, under appropriate conditions, a blocking horizon for light. Here, we analyze in detail the interaction of light with such laser-induced flowing media, fully accounting for the medium dispersion properties. An analytical model based on a first Born approximation is found to be in excellent agreement with numerical simulations based on Maxwell's equations and shows that when a blocking horizon is formed, the stimulated medium scatters light with a blackbody emission spectrum. Based on these results, diamond is proposed as a promising candidate medium for future studies of Hawking emission from artificial, dispersive horizons.

  6. Microcontact printing of self-assembled monolayers to pattern the light-emission of polymeric light-emitting diodes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brondijk, J. J.; Li, X.; Akkerman, H. B.; Blom, P. W. M.; de Boer, B.

    By patterning a self-assembled monolayer (SAM) of thiolated molecules with opposing dipole moments on a gold anode of a polymer light-emitting diode (PLED), the charge injection and, therefore, the light-emission of the device can be controlled with a micrometer-scale resolution. Gold surfaces were

  7. Compact All Solid State Oceanic Inherent Optical Property Sensor, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Light propagation in the sea and the consequent remote sensing signals seen by aircraft and spacecraft is fundamentally governed by the inherent optical properties...

  8. Spontaneous and light-induced photon emission from intact brains of chick embryos

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张锦珠; 于文斗; 孙彤

    1997-01-01

    Photon emission (PE) and light-induced photon emission(LPE) of intact brains isolated from chick embryos have been measured by using the single photon counting device. Experimental results showed that the intensi-ty level of photon emission was detected to be higher from intact brain than from the medium in which the brain was immerged during measuring, and the emission intensity was related to the developmental stages, the healthy situation of the measured embryos, and the freshness of isolated brains as well. After white light illumination, a short-life de-layed emission from intact brains was observed, and its relaxation behavior followed a hyperbolic rather than an expo-nential law. According to the hypothesis of biophoton emission originating from a delocalized coherent electromagnetic field and Frohlich’s idea of coherent long-range interactions in biological systems, discussions were made on the signifi-cance of photon emission in studying cell communication, biological regulation, living system’

  9. Scanning tunnelling microscope light emission: Finite temperature current noise and over cut-off emission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalathingal, Vijith; Dawson, Paul; Mitra, J

    2017-06-14

    The spectral distribution of light emitted from a scanning tunnelling microscope junction not only bears its intrinsic plasmonic signature but is also imprinted with the characteristics of optical frequency fluc- tuations of the tunnel current. Experimental spectra from gold-gold tunnel junctions are presented that show a strong bias (V b ) dependence, curiously with emission at energies higher than the quantum cut-off (eV b ); a component that decays monotonically with increasing bias. The spectral evolution is explained by developing a theoretical model for the power spectral density of tunnel current fluctuations, incorporating finite temperature contribution through consideration of the quantum transport in the system. Notably, the observed decay of the over cut-off emission is found to be critically associated with, and well explained in terms of the variation in junction conductance with V b . The investigation highlights the scope of plasmon-mediated light emission as a unique probe of high frequency fluctuations in electronic systems that are fundamental to the electrical generation and control of plasmons.

  10. Chamber study of PCB emissions from caulking materials and light ballasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiaoyu; Guo, Zhishi; Krebs, Kenneth A; Stinson, Rayford A; Nardin, Joshua A; Pope, Robert H; Roache, Nancy F

    2015-10-01

    The emissions of polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) congeners from thirteen caulk samples were tested in a micro-chamber system. Twelve samples were from PCB-contaminated buildings and one was prepared in the laboratory. Nineteen light ballasts collected from buildings that represent 13 different models from five manufacturers were tested in 53-L environmental chambers. The rates of PCB congener emissions from caulking materials and light ballasts were determined. Several factors that may have affected the emission rates were evaluated. The experimentally determined emission factors showed that, for a given PCB congener, there is a linear correlation between the emission factor and the concentration of the PCB congener in the source. Furthermore, the test results showed that an excellent log-linear correlation exists between the normalized emission factor and the vapor pressure (coefficient of determination, r(2)⩾0.8846). The PCB congener emissions from ballasts at or near room temperature were relatively low with or without electrical load. However, the PCB congener emission rates increased significantly as the temperature increased. The results of this research provide new data and models for ranking the primary sources of PCBs and supports the development and refinement of exposure assessment models for PCBs. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  11. Inherently safe reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maartensson, Anders

    1992-01-01

    A rethinking of nuclear reactor safety has created proposals for new designs based on inherent and passive safety principles. Diverging interpretations of these concepts can be found. This article reviews the key features of proposed advanced power reactors. An evaluation is made of the degree of inherent safety for four different designs: the AP-600, the PIUS, the MHTGR and the PRISM. The inherent hazards of today's most common reactor principles are used as reference for the evaluation. It is concluded that claims for the new designs being inherently, naturally or passively safe are not substantiated by experience. (author)

  12. Penning plasma based simultaneous light emission source of visible and VUV lights

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vyas, G. L., E-mail: glvyas27@gmail.com [Manipal University Jaipur (India); Prakash, R.; Pal, U. N. [CSIR-Central Electronics and Engineering Research Institute, Microwave Tubes Division (India); Manchanda, R. [Institute for Plasma Research (India); Halder, N. [Manipal University Jaipur (India)

    2016-06-15

    In this paper, a laboratory-based penning plasma discharge source is reported which has been developed in two anode configurations and is able to produce visible and VUV lights simultaneously. The developed source has simultaneous diagnostics facility using Langmuir probe and optical emission spectroscopy. The two anode configurations, namely, double ring and rectangular configurations, have been studied and compared for optimum use of the geometry for efficient light emissions and recording. The plasma is produced using helium gas and admixture of three noble gases including helium, neon, and argon. The source is capable to produce eight spectral lines for pure helium in the VUV range from 20 to 60 nm and total 24 spectral lines covering the wavelength range 20–106 nm for the admixture of gases. The large range of VUV lines is generated from gaseous admixture rather from the sputtered materials. The recorded spectrum shows that the plasma light radiations in both visible and VUV range are larger in double ring configuration than that of the rectangular configurations at the same discharge operating conditions. To clearly understand the difference, the imaging of the discharge using ICCD camera and particle-in-cell simulation using VORPAL have also been carried out. The effect of ion diffusion, metastable collision with the anode wall and the nonlinear effects are correlated to explain the results.

  13. Light-Duty Automotive Technology, Carbon Dioxide Emissions, and Fuel Economy Trends Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The Light-Duty Automotive Technology, Carbon Dioxide Emissions, and Fuel Economy Trends report is the authoritative reference for carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions,...

  14. Light Emission Requires Exposure to the Atmosphere in Ex Vivo Bioluminescence Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yusuke Inoue

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available The identification of organs bearing luciferase activity by in vivo bioluminescence imaging (BLI is often difficult, and ex vivo imaging of excised organs plays a complementary role. This study investigated the importance of exposure to the atmosphere in ex vivo BLI. Mice were inoculated with murine pro-B cell line Ba/F3 transduced with firefly luciferase and p190 BCR-ABL. They were killed following in vivo BLI, and whole-body imaging was done after death and then after intraperitoneal air injection. In addition, the right knee was exposed and imaged before and after the adjacent bones were cut. Extensive light signals were seen on in vivo imaging. The luminescence disappeared after the animal was killed, and air injection restored the light emission from the abdomen only, suggesting a critical role of atmospheric oxygen in luminescence after death. Although no substantial light signal at the right knee was seen before bone cutting, light emission was evident after cutting. In conclusion, in ex vivo BLI, light emission requires exposure to the atmosphere. Bone destruction is required to demonstrate luciferase activity in the bone marrow after death.

  15. Isoprenoid emission response to changing light conditions of English oak, European beech and Norway spruce

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Van Meeningen, Ylva; Schurgers, Guy; Rinnan, Riikka

    2017-01-01

    and stomatal conductance on three common European tree species, namely English oak (Quercus robur), European beech (Fagus sylvatica) and two provenances of Norway spruce (Picea abies) in Taastrup, Denmark. Leaf scale measurements were performed on the lowest positioned branches of the tree in July 2015. Light......, whereas other compounds, like camphene, had no significant emission response to light for most of the measured trees. English oak and European beech showed high light-dependent emission fractions from isoprene and sabinene, but other emitted compounds were light independent. For the two provenances...... be valid for a wider range of tree species. This information could be of importance when improving emission models and to further emphasize the discussion regarding light or temperature dependencies for individual compounds across species. Light is an important environmental factor controlling biogenic...

  16. Light emission from compound eye with conformal fluorescent coating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martín-Palma, Raúl J.; Miller, Amy E.; Pulsifer, Drew P.; Lakhtakia, Akhlesh

    2015-03-01

    Compound eyes of insects are attractive biological systems for engineered biomimicry as artificial sources of light, given their characteristic wide angular field of view. A blowfly eye was coated with a thin conformal fluorescent film, with the aim of achieving wide field-of-view emission. Experimental results showed that the coated eye emitted visible light and that the intensity showed a weaker angular dependence than a fluorescent thin film deposited on a flat surface.

  17. 'Beam-emission spectroscopy' diagnostics also measure edge fast-ion light

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heidbrink, W W; Bortolon, A; McKee, G R; Smith, D R

    2011-01-01

    Beam-emission spectroscopy (BES) diagnostics normally detect fluctuations in the light emitted by an injected neutral beam. Under some circumstances, however, light from fast ions that charge exchange in the high neutral-density region at the edge of the plasma make appreciable contributions to the BES signals. This 'passive' fast-ion D α (FIDA) light appears in BES signals from both the DIII-D tokamak and the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX). One type of passive FIDA light is associated with classical orbits that traverse the edge. Another type is caused by instabilities that expel fast ions from the core; this light can complicate measurement of the instability eigenfunction.

  18. Electroplex emission at PVK/Bphen interface for application in white organic light-emitting diodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wen Liang; Li Fushan; Xie Jiangxing; Wu Chaoxing; Zheng Yong; Chen Dongling; Xu Sheng; Guo Tailiang; Qu Bo; Chen Zhijian; Gong Qihuang

    2011-01-01

    White organic light-emitting diode (WOLED) with a structure of ITO/poly(N-vinylcarbazole) (PVK)/4,7-diphenyl-1, 10-phenanthroline (Bphen)/tris(8-hydroxyquinoline)aluminum (Alq 3 )/LiF/Al has been fabricated via the thermal evaporation technique. The electroluminescence (EL) spectrum of the as-fabricated WOLED covers from 380 to 700 nm of the visible light region with a wide blue emission from PVK and an interesting new red emission. The red emission at 613 nm in EL spectra of the WOLED was attributed to electroplex emission at PVK/Bphen interface since it was not observed in photoluminescence spectra. The WOLED showed a Commission International De l'Eclairage coordinate of (0.31, 0.32), which is very close to the standard white coordinate (0.33, 0.33). - Highlights: → A white organic light-emitting diode was fabricated by vacuum deposition. → A new red emission at 613 nm was observed in the electroluminescence spectra. → Red emission comes from electroplex instead of exciplex at PVK/Bphen interface. → The device has a CIE coordinate of (0.31, 0.32).

  19. Efficient polymer white-light-emitting diodes with a single-emission layer of fluorescent polymer blend

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niu Qiaoli; Xu Yunhua; Jiang Jiaxing; Peng Junbiao; Cao Yong

    2007-01-01

    Efficient polymer white-light-emitting diodes (WPLEDs) have been fabricated with a single layer of fluorescent polymer blend. The device structure consists of ITO/PEDOT/PVK/emissive layer/Ba/Al. The emissive layer is a blend of poly(9,9-dioctylfluorene) (PFO), phenyl-substituted PPV derivative (P-PPV) and a copolymer of 9,9-dioctylfluorene and 4,7-di(4-hexylthien-2-yl)-2,1,3-benzothiadiazole (PFO-DHTBT), which, respectively, emits blue, green and red light. The emission of pure and efficient white light was implemented by tuning the blend weight ratio of PFO: P-PPV: PFO-DHTBT to 96:4:0.4. The maximum current efficiency and luminance are, respectively, 7.6 cd/A at 6.7 V and 11930 cd/m 2 at 11.2 V. The CIE coordinates of white-light emission were stable with the drive voltages

  20. Novel Strategy for Photopatterning Emissive Polymer Brushes for Organic Light Emitting Diode Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Page, Zachariah A; Narupai, Benjaporn; Pester, Christian W; Bou Zerdan, Raghida; Sokolov, Anatoliy; Laitar, David S; Mukhopadhyay, Sukrit; Sprague, Scott; McGrath, Alaina J; Kramer, John W; Trefonas, Peter; Hawker, Craig J

    2017-06-28

    A light-mediated methodology to grow patterned, emissive polymer brushes with micron feature resolution is reported and applied to organic light emitting diode (OLED) displays. Light is used for both initiator functionalization of indium tin oxide and subsequent atom transfer radical polymerization of methacrylate-based fluorescent and phosphorescent iridium monomers. The iridium centers play key roles in photocatalyzing and mediating polymer growth while also emitting light in the final OLED structure. The scope of the presented procedure enables the synthesis of a library of polymers with emissive colors spanning the visible spectrum where the dopant incorporation, position of brush growth, and brush thickness are readily controlled. The chain-ends of the polymer brushes remain intact, affording subsequent chain extension and formation of well-defined diblock architectures. This high level of structure and function control allows for the facile preparation of random ternary copolymers and red-green-blue arrays to yield white emission.

  1. Carbon emissions avoided by electric conservation: the case of lighting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonduelle, A.

    2001-01-01

    Electricity conservation can limit the emissions of carbon dioxide and significantly contribute towards the Kyoto objectives. The detailed prospective modelling of the supply and demand system for electricity in France carried out by INESTENE estimates at 1.86 million tons of equivalent carbon content per year (MtC/y) the sole savings already efficient as regards lighting a value that can rise to 3 MtC/y for the implementation of the technical capacities, i.e. between 10 and 20% of the French effort to respect Kyoto. The use of the supply model ELFIN also highlights the major differences between the economic sectors that request the most electric peak and the other sectors. For example, energy conversation in lights in schools can lead to an emission decrease up to 70% higher than those carried out for a constant base use throughout the year. The study also shows that a method based on a calculation of the average emissions of power plants throughout the year clearly underestimates the gains attributed to energy control. The gains obtained per unit of energy are always higher than 100 gC/kWh, whereas the average carbon content of electricity in France is currently about 20 gC/kWh. Lastly, another significant result of the work concerns the nearly invariable emission gains related to conservation in lighting whether or not there has been a long-term replacement of nuclear energy. These results justify the efforts to control electricity in a 'low electric carbon' country like France. (author)

  2. The emission function of ground-based light sources: State of the art and research challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solano Lamphar, Héctor Antonio

    2018-05-01

    To understand the night sky radiance generated by the light emissions of urbanised areas, different researchers are currently proposing various theoretical approaches. The distribution of the radiant intensity as a function of the zenith angle is one of the most unknown properties on modelling skyglow. This is due to the collective effects of the artificial radiation emitted from the ground-based light sources. The emission function is a key property in characterising the sky brightness under arbitrary conditions, therefore it is required by modellers, environmental engineers, urban planners, light pollution researchers, and experimentalists who study the diffuse light of the night sky. As a matter of course, the emission function considers the public lighting system, which is in fact the main generator of the skyglow. Still, another class of light-emitting devices are gaining importance since their overuse and the urban sprawl of recent years. This paper will address the importance of the emission function in modelling skyglow and the factors involved in its characterization. On this subject, the author's intention is to organise, integrate, and evaluate previously published research in order to state the progress of current research toward clarifying this topic.

  3. Light-particle emission and heavy residues from nucleus-nucleus collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caplar, R.; Hoelbling, S.; Gentner, R.; Lassen, L.; Oberstedt, A.

    1991-01-01

    We have investigated the interrelation between light-particle multiplicities and mass resp. charge distributions of heavy residues from complete and incomplete fusion of heavy ions. We have shown that a simple statistical model provides the possibility of quantitatively correlating heavy-residue distributions and corresponding light-particle multiplicities both at the Coulomb barrier and at higher energies where preequilibrium emission occurs. (author). 8 refs, 4 figs, 1 tab

  4. Capturing triplet emission in white organic light emitting devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, Jai [Faculty of EHSE, School of Engineering and IT, B-purple-12, Charles Darwin University, Darwin, NT 0909 (Australia)

    2011-08-15

    The state-of-the art in the white organic light emitting devices (WOLEDs) is reviewed for further developments with a view to enhance the capture of triplet emission. In particular, applying the new exciton-spin-orbit-photon interaction operator as a perturbation, rates of spontaneous emission are calculated in a few phosphorescent materials and compared with experimental results. For iridium based phosphorescent materials the rates agree quite well with the experimental results. (Copyright copyright 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  5. Nanocrystalline silicon as the light emitting material of a field emission display device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biaggi-Labiosa, A; Sola, F; Resto, O; Fonseca, L F; Gonzalez-BerrIos, A; Jesus, J De; Morell, G

    2008-01-01

    A nanocrystalline Si-based paste was successfully tested as the light emitting material in a field emission display test device that employed a film of carbon nanofibers as the electron source. Stable emission in the 550-850 nm range was obtained at 16 V μm -1 . This relatively low field required for intense cathodoluminescence (CL) from the PSi paste may lead to longer term reliability of both the electron emitting and the light emitting materials, and to lower power consumption. Here we describe the synthesis, characterization, and analyses of the light emitting nanostructured Si paste and the electron emitting C nanofibers used for building the device, including x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and Raman spectroscopy. The corresponding spectra and field emission curves are also shown and discussed

  6. On the efficient warm white-light emission from nano-sized Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cesaria, M., E-mail: maura.cesaria@le.infn.it [Department of Mathematics and Physics “E. De Giorgi”, University of Salento, Lecce (Italy); Collins, J. [Wheaton College, Norton, MA (United States); Di Bartolo, B. [Department of Physics, Boston College, Chestnut Hill, MA (United States)

    2016-01-15

    We consider the reported emission of white light (WL) in the spectral range from 400 to beyond 900 nm induced by monochromatic infrared light (803.5 and 975 nm) continuous wave excitation of nominally un-doped yttrium oxide (Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}) nano-powders. Based on the experimental evidence, such an emission feature is a nano-scale phenomenon, resembles very closely the emission from an incandescent lamp (mimicking the sunlight, i.e., the most comfortable light to human eyes) and exhibits very high efficiency (864 lum/W) and nearly theoretical (i.e., 99) color rendering index. At the fundamental level, the origin of this phenomenon is still unexplained. In this paper we address the fundamental questions raised by the reported occurrence of WL emission from Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanopowders and attempt an interpretation at a more fundamental level. In particular we focus on the multiphoton-absorption and nonexponential decay patterns of the reported WL emission as starting points to formulate models and interpretations of the experimental occurrences still lacking in the literature. Our discussion invokes the electronic dispersion of Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} and nanoscale effects, which is supported by the experimental evidence according to which the observed warm WL emission is a nanoscale phenomenon with properties that only can be explained by nanoscale physics. - Highlights: • Emission of white light from 400 to beyond 900 nm induced by infrared light of un-doped Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} nano-powders. • The emission feature resembles very closely the emission from an incandescent lamp. • The observed emission properties only can be explained by nanoscale physics.

  7. Pre-breakdown light emission phenomena in low-pressure argon between parabolic electrodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wagenaars, E [Department of Applied Physics, Eindhoven University of Technology, PO Box 513, 5600 MB Eindhoven (Netherlands); Perriens, N W B [Department of Applied Physics, Eindhoven University of Technology, PO Box 513, 5600 MB Eindhoven (Netherlands); Brok, W J M [Department of Applied Physics, Eindhoven University of Technology, PO Box 513, 5600 MB Eindhoven (Netherlands); Bowden, M D [Department of Physics and Astronomy, The Open University, Milton Keynes, MK7 6AA (United Kingdom); Veldhuizen, E M van [Department of Applied Physics, Eindhoven University of Technology, PO Box 513, 5600 MB Eindhoven (Netherlands); Kroesen, G M W [Department of Applied Physics, Eindhoven University of Technology, PO Box 513, 5600 MB Eindhoven (Netherlands)

    2006-09-07

    An experimental study on pre-breakdown light emission in low-pressure argon gas was performed. In a pulsed discharge, pre-breakdown phenomena were observed for repetition rates between 100 and 2000 Hz and pulse duration of 100 {mu}s. These phenomena were studied with time-resolved emission imaging using an intensified charge coupled device camera. The origin of the pre-breakdown emission was identified as diffusion of volume charges left over from previous discharges. These charges were accelerated towards the anode in small electron avalanches causing excitation of argon atoms. Different spatial distributions of the pre-breakdown light emission for different times between discharges were measured and the effects of the pre-breakdown phenomena on the main breakdown phase were studied using a double voltage pulse. The observed effects were attributed to the distribution of volume charges, left over from previous discharges, in the discharge gap during the pre-breakdown phase.

  8. Real-time emission factor measurements of isocyanic acid from light duty gasoline vehicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brady, James M; Crisp, Timia A; Collier, Sonya; Kuwayama, Toshihiro; Forestieri, Sara D; Perraud, Véronique; Zhang, Qi; Kleeman, Michael J; Cappa, Christopher D; Bertram, Timothy H

    2014-10-07

    Exposure to gas-phase isocyanic acid (HNCO) has been previously shown to be associated with the development of atherosclerosis, cataracts and rheumatoid arthritis. As such, accurate emission inventories for HNCO are critical for modeling the spatial and temporal distribution of HNCO on a regional and global scale. To date, HNCO emission rates from light duty gasoline vehicles, operated under driving conditions, have not been determined. Here, we present the first measurements of real-time emission factors of isocyanic acid from a fleet of eight light duty gasoline-powered vehicles (LDGVs) tested on a chassis dynamometer using the Unified Driving Cycle (UC) at the California Air Resources Board (CARB) Haagen-Smit test facility, all of which were equipped with three-way catalytic converters. HNCO emissions were observed from all vehicles, in contrast to the idealized laboratory measurements. We report the tested fleet averaged HNCO emission factors, which depend strongly on the phase of the drive cycle; ranging from 0.46 ± 0.13 mg kg fuel(-1) during engine start to 1.70 ± 1.77 mg kg fuel(-1) during hard acceleration after the engine and catalytic converter were warm. The tested eight-car fleet average fuel based HNCO emission factor was 0.91 ± 0.58 mg kg fuel(-1), within the range previously estimated for light duty diesel-powered vehicles (0.21-3.96 mg kg fuel(-1)). Our results suggest that HNCO emissions from LDGVs represent a significant emission source in urban areas that should be accounted for in global and regional models.

  9. Proposed and existing passive and inherent safety-related structures, systems, and components (building blocks) for advanced light-water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forsberg, C.W.; Moses, D.L.; Lewis, E.B.; Gibson, R.; Pearson, R.; Reich, W.J.; Murphy, G.A.; Staunton, R.H.; Kohn, W.E.

    1989-10-01

    A nuclear power plant is composed of many structures, systems, and components (SSCs). Examples include emergency core cooling systems, feedwater systems, and electrical systems. The design of a reactor consists of combining various SSCs (building blocks) into an integrated plant design. A new reactor design is the result of combining old SSCs in new ways or use of new SSCs. This report identifies, describes, and characterizes SSCs with passive and inherent features that can be used to assure safety in light-water reactors. Existing, proposed, and speculative technologies are described. The following approaches were used to identify the technologies: world technical literature searches, world patent searches, and discussions with universities, national laboratories and industrial vendors. 214 refs., 105 figs., 26 tabs

  10. Proposed and existing passive and inherent safety-related structures, systems, and components (building blocks) for advanced light-water reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Forsberg, C.W.; Moses, D.L.; Lewis, E.B.; Gibson, R.; Pearson, R.; Reich, W.J.; Murphy, G.A.; Staunton, R.H.; Kohn, W.E.

    1989-10-01

    A nuclear power plant is composed of many structures, systems, and components (SSCs). Examples include emergency core cooling systems, feedwater systems, and electrical systems. The design of a reactor consists of combining various SSCs (building blocks) into an integrated plant design. A new reactor design is the result of combining old SSCs in new ways or use of new SSCs. This report identifies, describes, and characterizes SSCs with passive and inherent features that can be used to assure safety in light-water reactors. Existing, proposed, and speculative technologies are described. The following approaches were used to identify the technologies: world technical literature searches, world patent searches, and discussions with universities, national laboratories and industrial vendors. 214 refs., 105 figs., 26 tabs.

  11. Type approval and real-world CO_2 and NO_x emissions from EU light commercial vehicles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zacharof, Nikiforos; Tietge, Uwe; Franco, Vicente; Mock, Peter

    2016-01-01

    In the European Union, light duty vehicles (LDVs) are subject to emission targets for carbon dioxide (CO_2) and limits for pollutants such as nitrogen oxides (NO_x). CO_2 emissions are regulated for both passenger vehicles (PV) and light commercial vehicles (LCV), as individual manufacturers are required to reach fleet averages of 130 g/km by 2015 and 175 g/km by 2017, respectively. In the case of PVs, it has been found that there is a significant divergence between real-world and type-approval CO_2 emissions, which has been increasing annually, reaching 40% in 2014. On-road exceedances of regulated NO_x emission limits for diesel passenger cars have also been documented. The current study investigated the LCV characteristics and CO_2 and NO_x emissions in the European Union. A vehicle market analysis found that LCVs comprise 17% of the diesel LDV market and while there were some data for CO_2 emissions, there were hardly any data publicly available for NO_x emissions. Monitoring the divergence in CO_2 emissions revealed that it increased from 14% in 2006 to 33% in 2014, posing an additional annual fuel cost from 120€ in 2006 to 305€ in 2014, while a significant percentage of Euro 5 vehicles exceeded NO_x emission standards. - Highlights: • Light commercial vehicles comprise 17% of diesel light duty vehicle market. • On-road CO_2 emissions were found to be on average 33% higher than compared to type approval measurements. • The annual additional fuel cost due to the on-road and type approval divergence is estimated at 400€. • Data indicates exceedances in on-road NO_x emissions. • Little attention has been given to light commercial vehicles compared to passenger vehicles.

  12. Enhancing Light Emission of ZnO-Nanofilm/Si-Micropillar Heterostructure Arrays by Piezo-Phototronic Effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaoyi; Chen, Mengxiao; Yu, Ruomeng; Zhang, Taiping; Song, Dongsheng; Liang, Renrong; Zhang, Qinglin; Cheng, Shaobo; Dong, Lin; Pan, Anlian; Wang, Zhong Lin; Zhu, Jing; Pan, Caofeng

    2015-06-22

    n-ZnO nanofilm/p-Si micropillar heterostructure light-emitting diode (LED) arrays for white light emissions are achieved and the light emission intensity of LED array is enhanced by 120% under -0.05% compressive strains. These results indicate a promising approach to fabricate Si-based light-emitting components with high performances enhanced by piezo-phototronic effect, with potential applications in touchpad technology, personalized signatures, smart skin, and silicon-based photonic integrated circuits. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. Adjusting White OLEDs with Yellow Light Emission Phosphor Dye and Ultrathin NPB Layer Structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Wang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available High efficiency white organic light emission devices were demonstrated with phosphor material dye bis[2-(4-tertbutylphenylbenzothiazolato-N,C2′]iridium (acetylacetonate and ultrathin layer structure. The ultra thin layer be composed of 4,4′-bis[N-1-naphthyl-N-phenyl-amino]biphenyl (NPB or 4,4′-N,N′-dicarbazole-biphenyl : NPB mixed layer with blue light emission. The emission spectra of devices could be adjusted by different phosphor doping concentrations and ultra thin layer structure. Warm white light emitting device could be obtained with 5 wt% doping concentration and power efficiency of 9.93 lm/W at 5 V. Pure white light with Commission Internationale de l'Eclairage (CIE coordinates of (0.33, 0.30 and external quantum efficiency of 4.49% could be achieved with ultra thin layer device structure and 3 wt% phosphor doped device.

  14. 40 CFR 86.1818-12 - Greenhouse gas emission standards for light-duty vehicles, light-duty trucks, and medium-duty...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 19 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Greenhouse gas emission standards for... Complete Otto-Cycle Heavy-Duty Vehicles § 86.1818-12 Greenhouse gas emission standards for light-duty... group of six greenhouse gases: Carbon dioxide, nitrous oxide, methane, hydrofluorocarbons...

  15. Evaluation of NPP-VIIRS Nighttime Light Data for Mapping Global Fossil Fuel Combustion CO2 Emissions: A Comparison with DMSP-OLS Nighttime Light Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ou, Jinpei; Liu, Xiaoping; Li, Xia; Li, Meifang; Li, Wenkai

    2015-01-01

    Recently, the stable light products and radiance calibrated products from Defense Meteorological Satellite Program's (DMSP) Operational Linescan System (OLS) have been useful for mapping global fossil fuel carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions at fine spatial resolution. However, few studies on this subject were conducted with the new-generation nighttime light data from the Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) sensor on the Suomi National Polar-orbiting Partnership (NPP) Satellite, which has a higher spatial resolution and a wider radiometric detection range than the traditional DMSP-OLS nighttime light data. Therefore, this study performed the first evaluation of the potential of NPP-VIIRS data in estimating the spatial distributions of global CO2 emissions (excluding power plant emissions). Through a disaggregating model, three global emission maps were then derived from population counts and three different types of nighttime lights data (NPP-VIIRS, the stable light data and radiance calibrated data of DMSP-OLS) for a comparative analysis. The results compared with the reference data of land cover in Beijing, Shanghai and Guangzhou show that the emission areas of map from NPP-VIIRS data have higher spatial consistency of the artificial surfaces and exhibit a more reasonable distribution of CO2 emission than those of other two maps from DMSP-OLS data. Besides, in contrast to two maps from DMSP-OLS data, the emission map from NPP-VIIRS data is closer to the Vulcan inventory and exhibits a better agreement with the actual statistical data of CO2 emissions at the level of sub-administrative units of the United States. This study demonstrates that the NPP-VIIRS data can be a powerful tool for studying the spatial distributions of CO2 emissions, as well as the socioeconomic indicators at multiple scales.

  16. Evaluation of NPP-VIIRS Nighttime Light Data for Mapping Global Fossil Fuel Combustion CO2 Emissions: A Comparison with DMSP-OLS Nighttime Light Data.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinpei Ou

    Full Text Available Recently, the stable light products and radiance calibrated products from Defense Meteorological Satellite Program's (DMSP Operational Linescan System (OLS have been useful for mapping global fossil fuel carbon dioxide (CO2 emissions at fine spatial resolution. However, few studies on this subject were conducted with the new-generation nighttime light data from the Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS sensor on the Suomi National Polar-orbiting Partnership (NPP Satellite, which has a higher spatial resolution and a wider radiometric detection range than the traditional DMSP-OLS nighttime light data. Therefore, this study performed the first evaluation of the potential of NPP-VIIRS data in estimating the spatial distributions of global CO2 emissions (excluding power plant emissions. Through a disaggregating model, three global emission maps were then derived from population counts and three different types of nighttime lights data (NPP-VIIRS, the stable light data and radiance calibrated data of DMSP-OLS for a comparative analysis. The results compared with the reference data of land cover in Beijing, Shanghai and Guangzhou show that the emission areas of map from NPP-VIIRS data have higher spatial consistency of the artificial surfaces and exhibit a more reasonable distribution of CO2 emission than those of other two maps from DMSP-OLS data. Besides, in contrast to two maps from DMSP-OLS data, the emission map from NPP-VIIRS data is closer to the Vulcan inventory and exhibits a better agreement with the actual statistical data of CO2 emissions at the level of sub-administrative units of the United States. This study demonstrates that the NPP-VIIRS data can be a powerful tool for studying the spatial distributions of CO2 emissions, as well as the socioeconomic indicators at multiple scales.

  17. Angle-dependent light emission from aligned multiwalled carbon nanotubes under CO2 laser irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Y; Gong, T; Liu, W J; Wei, J Q; Zhang, X F; Wang, K L; Zhong, M L; Wu, D H

    2007-01-01

    This paper reports the light emission from aligned multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) under continuous wave CO 2 laser (λ = 10.6 μm) irradiation. Results indicate that the light emission is dependent on the angle θ between the laser incident direction and the nanotube axis. The relative intensity of the light emission at certain wavelengths shows a Lorentzian feature when θ varies from 0 0 to 90 0 . The Lorentzian fitting curve displays a distinct tendency between shorter (λ 700 nm). A minimum intensity was observed at θ m close to 67 0 under shorter wavelength, whereas a maximum intensity was shown at θ m of about 60 0 at longer wavelength. These results show the anisotropic property of aligned MWNTs

  18. 40 CFR 86.1708-99 - Exhaust emission standards for 1999 and later light-duty vehicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... for Light-Duty Vehicles and Light-Duty Trucks § 86.1708-99 Exhaust emission standards for 1999 and... are incorporated by reference (see § 86.1). (v) Hybrid electric vehicle requirements. Deterioration factors for hybrid electric vehicles shall be based on the emissions and mileage accumulation of the...

  19. 75 FR 7426 - Tier 2 Light-Duty Vehicle and Light-Duty Truck Emission Standards and Gasoline Sulfur Control...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-19

    ... 2060-AI23; 2060-AQ12 Tier 2 Light-Duty Vehicle and Light-Duty Truck Emission Standards and Gasoline.... The rulemaking also required oil refiners to limit the sulfur content of the gasoline they produce. Sulfur in gasoline has a detrimental impact on catalyst performance and the sulfur requirements have...

  20. White-light emission from porous-silicon-aluminium Schottky junctions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Masini, G.; La Monica, S.; Maiello, G.

    1996-01-01

    Porous-silicon-based white-light-emitting devices are presented. The fabrication process on different substrates is described. The peculiarities of technological steps for device fabrication (porous-silicon formation and aluminium treatment) are underlined. Doping profile of the porous layer, current-voltage characteristics, time response, lifetime tests and electroluminescence emission spectrum of the device are presented. A model for electrical behaviour of Al/porous silicon Schottky junction is presented. Electroluminescence spectrum of the presented devices showed strong similarities with white emission from crystalline silicon junctions in the breakdown region

  1. Light emission from organic single crystals operated by electrolyte doping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuki, Keiichiro; Sakanoue, Tomo; Yomogida, Yohei; Hotta, Shu; Takenobu, Taishi

    2018-03-01

    Light-emitting devices based on electrolytes, such as light-emitting electrochemical cells (LECs) and electric double-layer transistors (EDLTs), are solution-processable devices with a very simple structure. Therefore, it is necessary to apply this device structure into highly fluorescent organic materials for future printed applications. However, owing to compatibility problems between electrolytes and organic crystals, electrolyte-based single-crystal light-emitting devices have not yet been demonstrated. Here, we report on light-emitting devices based on organic single crystals and electrolytes. As the fluorescent materials, α,ω-bis(biphenylyl)terthiophene (BP3T) and 5,6,11,12-tetraphenylnaphthacene (rubrene) single crystals were selected. Using ionic liquids as electrolytes, we observed clear light emission from BP3T LECs and rubrene EDLTs.

  2. Broadband white light emission from Ce:AlN ceramics: High thermal conductivity down-converters for LED and laser-driven solid state lighting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. T. Wieg

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available We introduce high thermal conductivity aluminum nitride (AlN as a transparent ceramic host for Ce3+, a well-known active ion dopant. We show that the Ce:AlN ceramics have overlapping photoluminescent (PL emission peaks that cover almost the entire visible range resulting in a white appearance under 375 nm excitation without the need for color mixing. The PL is due to a combination of intrinsic AlN defect complexes and Ce3+ electronic transitions. Importantly, the peak intensities can be tuned by varying the Ce concentration and processing parameters, causing different shades of white light without the need for multiple phosphors or light sources. The Commission Internationale de l’Eclairage coordinates calculated from the measured spectra confirm white light emission. In addition, we demonstrate the viability of laser driven white light emission by coupling the Ce:AlN to a readily available frequency tripled Nd-YAG laser emitting at 355 nm. The high thermal conductivity of these ceramic down-converters holds significant promise for producing higher power white light sources than those available today.

  3. Hydrothermal synthesis and white light emission of cubic ZrO2:Eu3+ nanocrystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meetei, Sanoujam Dhiren; Singh, Shougaijam Dorendrajit

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • White light emitting cubic ZrO 2 :Eu 3+ nanocrystal is synthesized by hydrothermal technique. • Eu 3+ is used to stabilize crystalline phase and to get red counterpart of the white light. • Defect emission and Eu 3+ emission combined to give white light. • The white light emitted from this nanocrystal resembles vertical daylight of the Sun. • Lifetime corresponding to red counterpart of the sample is far longer than conventional white light emitters. -- Abstract: Production of white light has been a promising area of luminescence studies. In this work, white light emitting nanocrystals of cubic zirconia doped with Eu 3+ are synthesized by hydrothermal technique. The dopant Eu 3+ is used to stabilize crystalline phase to cubic and at the same time to get red counterpart of the white light. The synthesis procedure is simple and precursor required no further annealing for crystallization. X-ray diffraction patterns show the crystalline phase of ZrO 2 :Eu 3+ to be cubic and it is confirmed by Fourier Transform Infrared spectroscopy. From transmission electron microscopy images, size of the crystals is found to be ∼5 nm. Photoluminescence emission spectrum of the sample, on monitoring excitation at O 2− –Eu 3+ charge transfer state shows broad peak due to O 2− of the zirconia and that of Eu 3+ emission. Commission Internationale de l’éclairage co-ordinate of this nanocrystal (0.32, 0.34) is closed to that of the ideal white light (0.33, 0.33). Correlated color temperature of the white light (5894 K) is within the range of vertical daylight. Lifetime (1.32 ms) corresponding to 5 D 0 energy level of the Eu 3+ is found to be far longer than conventional red counterparts of white light emitters. It suggests that the ZrO 2 :Eu 3+ nanocrystals synthesized by hydrothermal technique may find applications in simulating the vertical daylight of the Sun

  4. Stability of the Light Output, Oral Cavity Tip Accessibility in Posterior Region and Emission Spectrum of Light-Curing Units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    André, C B; Nima, G; Sebold, M; Giannini, M; Price, R B

    2018-04-09

    This study evaluated the light output from six light-emitting diode dental curing lights after 25 consecutive light exposures without recharging the battery, tip accessibility in the posterior region, and light beam spread from light-curing units. Irradiance, spectral peak, and radiant exposure were measured with the battery fully charged (Bluephase Style, ESPE Cordless, Elipar S10, Demi Ultra, Valo Cordless, and Radii-Cal) and monitored for 25 light exposures (each lasting 10 seconds). The tip diameter was measured to identify the beam size and the ability of the six light-curing units to irradiate all areas of the lower second molar in the standard output setting. Four curing lights delivered a single peak wavelength from 454 to 462 nm, and two (Bluephase Style and Valo Cordless) delivered multiple emission peaks (at 410 and 458 nm and 400, 450, and 460 nm, respectively). The irradiance and radiant exposure always decreased after 25 exposures by 2% to 8%, depending on the light unit; however, only ESPE Cordless, Valo Cordless, and Radii-Cal presented a statistical difference between the first and the last exposure. The tip diameter ranged from 6.77 mm to 9.40 mm. The Radii-Cal delivered the lowest radiant exposure and irradiance. This light was also unable to access all the teeth with the tip parallel to the occlusal surface of the tooth. Not all of the blue-emitting lights deliver the same emission spectra, and some curing lights delivered a lower irradiance (as much as 8% lower) after the 25th exposure.

  5. Particulate emission rates from light-duty vehicles in the South Coast Air Quality Management District

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Durbin, T.D.; Norbeck, J.M.; Smith, M.R.; Truex, T.J.

    1999-01-01

    This paper presents the results of a particulate emission rate study conducted on 129 light-duty gasoline and 19 light-duty diesel vehicles for the Coordinating Research Council's (CRC's) Project E-24-2. Total particulate emission rates for newer gasoline vehicles were low with modest increases with vehicle age and older technology. Average FTP particulate emission rates as a function of model year for gasoline vehicles were found to be 2.5 mg/mi for 1991 and newer models, 14.4 mg/mi for 1986--1990 models, 49.0 mg/mi for 1981--1985 models, and 33.8 mg/mi for 1980 and older models. High gaseous emitters were found to have approximately 5--10 times the particulate emission rates of normal emitters. The diesel vehicles had an average particulate emission rate of 561 mg/mi. It should be noted that the light-duty diesel vehicles were predominantly older, pre-1985 vehicles; the 1985 and newer diesel vehicles had substantially lower particulate emissions, i.e., less than 100 mg/mi. Emission inventory estimates in the South Coast Air Basin based on the fleet emission rates were higher than those obtained using the default values in EMFAC7G, due primarily to the contribution of high emitters

  6. Room-temperature light-emission from Ge quantum dots in photonic crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xia Jinsong [Advanced Research Laboratories, Musashi Institute of Technolgy, 8-15-1 Todoroki, Setagaya-ku, Tokyo 158-0082 (Japan)], E-mail: jxia@sc.musashi-tech.ac.jp; Nemoto, Koudai; Ikegami, Yuta [Advanced Research Laboratories, Musashi Institute of Technolgy, 8-15-1 Todoroki, Setagaya-ku, Tokyo 158-0082 (Japan); Usami, Noritaka [Institute of Materials Research, Tohoku University, 2-2-1 Katahira, Aoba-ku, Sendai Japan (Japan)], E-mail: usa@imr.tohoku.ac.jp; Nakata, Yasushi [Horiba, Ltd., 1-7-8 Higashi-Kanda, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo 101-0031 (Japan)], E-mail: yasushi.nakata@horiba.com; Shiraki, Yasuhiro [Advanced Research Laboratories, Musashi Institute of Technolgy, 8-15-1 Todoroki, Setagaya-ku, Tokyo 158-0082 (Japan)

    2008-11-03

    Multiple layers of Ge self-assembled quantum dots were embedded into two-dimensional silicon photonic crystal microcavities fabricated on silicon-on-insulator substrates. Microphotoluminescence was used to study the light-emission characteristic of the Ge quantum dots in the microcavities. Strong resonant room-temperature light-emission was observed in the telecommunication wavelength region. Significant enhancement of the luminescence from Ge dots was obtained due to the resonance in the cavities. Multiple sharp resonant peaks dominated the spectrum, showing strong optical resonance inside the cavity. By changing the lattice constant of photonic crystal structure, the wavelengths of the resonant peaks are tuned in the wide wavelength range from 1.2 to 1.6 {mu}m.

  7. Pre-breakdown light emission phenomena in low-pressure argon between parabolic electrodes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wagenaars, E.; Perriëns, N.W.B.; Brok, W.J.M.; Bowden, M.D.; Veldhuizen, van E.M.; Kroesen, G.M.W.

    2006-01-01

    An experimental study on pre-breakdown light emission in low-pressure argon gas was performed. In a pulsed discharge, pre-breakdown phenomena were observed for repetition rates between 100 and 2000 Hz and pulse duration of 100 ¿s. These phenomena were studied with time-resolved emission imaging

  8. Membrane potential and microsecond to millisecond delayed light emission after a single excitation flash in isolated chloroplasts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jursinic, P.; Govindjee; Wraight, C.A.

    1978-01-01

    The effect of light-induced and salt-jump induced membrane potential on microsecond and millisecond delayed light emission from chloroplasts, following a single 10 ns flash, have been studied. Microsecond delayed light emission is shown to be independent of the membrane potential contrary to proposals that the activation energy for delayed light emission can be modulated by transmembrane electric fields. This result is discussed in terms of the possible origin of this short-lived emission. Millisecond delayed light after a single excitation flash is enhanced by membrane potential only if a proton gradient is present. By measuring changes in ms delayed light caused by simultaneous injection of KCl and Na-benzoate (which creates a proton gradient) in the presence of valinomycin, the light-induced potential generated across the thylakoid membrane by a single excitation flash was calibrated and found to be 128 +- 10 mV in agreement with the recent measurements of Zickler and Witt, (FEBS Lett. 66, 142-148 (1976)), based on voltage-dependent ionophores. It is concluded that the secondary charges that give rise to ms delayed light, after a single flash, do not fully span the membrane. (author)

  9. Determining the phonon energy of highly oriented pyrolytic graphite by scanning tunneling microscope light emission spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uehara, Yoichi; Michimata, Junichi; Watanabe, Shota; Katano, Satoshi; Inaoka, Takeshi

    2018-03-01

    We have investigated the scanning tunneling microscope (STM) light emission spectra of isolated single Ag nanoparticles lying on highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG). The STM light emission spectra exhibited two types of spectral structures (step-like and periodic). Comparisons of the observed structures and theoretical predictions indicate that the phonon energy of the ZO mode of HOPG [M. Mohr et al., Phys. Rev. B 76, 035439 (2007)] can be determined from the energy difference between the cutoff of STM light emission and the step in the former structure, and from the period of the latter structure. Since the role of the Ag nanoparticles does not depend on the substrate materials, this method will enable the phonon energies of various materials to be measured by STM light emission spectroscopy. The spatial resolution is comparable to the lateral size of the individual Ag nanoparticles (that is, a few nm).

  10. An organic white light-emitting dye: very small molecular architecture displays panchromatic emission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nandhikonda, Premchendar; Heagy, Michael D

    2010-11-14

    The synthesis and photophysical characterization of a new white-light fluorophore is described. The optimization of excitation wavelengths allows the naphthalimide (NI) dyes to display blue, green or white light emission depending on the excitation wavelength.

  11. Proteins involved in biophoton emission and flooding-stress responses in soybean under light and dark conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamal, Abu Hena Mostafa; Komatsu, Setsuko

    2016-02-01

    To know the molecular systems basically flooding conditions in soybean, biophoton emission measurements and proteomic analyses were carried out for flooding-stressed roots under light and dark conditions. Photon emission was analyzed using a photon counter. Gel-free quantitative proteomics were performed to identify significant changes proteins using the nano LC-MS along with SIEVE software. Biophoton emissions were significantly increased in both light and dark conditions after flooding stress, but gradually decreased with continued flooding exposure compared to the control plants. Among the 120 significantly identified proteins in the roots of soybean plants, 73 and 19 proteins were decreased and increased in the light condition, respectively, and 4 and 24 proteins were increased and decreased, respectively, in the dark condition. The proteins were mainly functionally grouped into cell organization, protein degradation/synthesis, and glycolysis. The highly abundant lactate/malate dehydrogenase proteins were decreased in flooding-stressed roots exposed to light, whereas the lysine ketoglutarate reductase/saccharopine dehydrogenase bifunctional enzyme was increased in both light and dark conditions. Notably, however, specific enzyme assays revealed that the activities of these enzymes and biophoton emission were sharply increased after 3 days of flooding stress. This finding suggests that the source of biophoton emission in roots might involve the chemical excitation of electron or proton through enzymatic or non-enzymatic oxidation and reduction reactions. Moreover, the lysine ketoglutarate reductase/saccharopine dehydrogenase bifunctional enzyme may play important roles in responses in flooding stress of soybean under the light condition and as a contributing factor to biophoton emission.

  12. Substrate dependence of TM-polarized light emission characteristics of BAlGaN/AlN quantum wells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Seoung-Hwan; Ahn, Doyeol

    2018-06-01

    To study the substrate dependence of light emission characteristics of transverse-magnetic (TM)-polarized light emitted from BAlGaN/AlN quantum wells (QWs) grown on GaN and AlN substrates were investigated theoretically. It is found that the topmost valence subband for QW structures grown on AlN substrate, is heavy hole state (HH1) while that for QW structures grown on GaN substrate is crystal-field split off light hole state (CL1), irrespective of the boron content. Since TM-polarized light emission is associated with the light hole state, the TM-polarized emission peak of BAlGaN/AlN QW structures grown on GaN substrate is expected to be much larger than that of the QW structure grown on AlN substrate. Also, both QW structures show that the spontaneous emission peak of BAlGaN/AlN QW structures would be improved with the inclusion of the boron. However, it rapidly begins to decrease when the boron content exceeds a critical value.

  13. Light trapping for emission from a photovoltaic cell under normally incident monochromatic illumination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takeda, Yasuhiko, E-mail: takeda@mosk.tytlabs.co.jp; Iizuka, Hideo; Mizuno, Shintaro; Hasegawa, Kazuo; Ichikawa, Tadashi; Ito, Hiroshi; Kajino, Tsutomu [Toyota Central Research and Development Laboratories, Inc., 41-1, Yokomichi, Nagakute, Aichi 480-1192 (Japan); Ichiki, Akihisa; Motohiro, Tomoyoshi [Green Mobility Collaborative Research Center, Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya 464-8601 (Japan)

    2014-09-28

    We have theoretically demonstrated a new light-trapping mechanism to reduce emission from a photovoltaic (PV) cell used for a monochromatic light source, which improves limiting conversion efficiency determined by the detailed balance. A multilayered bandpass filter formed on the surface of a PV cell has been found to prevent the light generated inside by radiative recombination from escaping the cell, resulting in a remarkable decrease of the effective solid angle for the emission. We have clarified a guide to design a suitable configuration of the bandpass filter and achieved significant reduction of the emission. The resultant gain in monochromatic conversion efficiency in the radiative limit due to the optimally designed 18-layerd bandpass filters is as high as 6% under normally incident 1064 nm illumination of 10 mW/cm²~ 1 kW/cm², compared with the efficiency for the perfect anti-reflection treatment to the surface of a conventional solar cell.

  14. Influence of local field on spontaneous light emission by nanoparticles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Keller, Ole; Lozovski, V.; Iezhokin, I.

    2009-01-01

    moment of transition that takes local-field effects into account. The effective dipole moment depends on the particle shape and size. Therefore, dipole radiation depends on those parameters too. The direction patterns of light emission by cubic particles have been calculated. The particles have been......A self-consistent approach based on the local-field concept has been proposed to calculate the direction patterns of light emission by nanoparticles with various shapes. The main idea of the method consists in constructing self-consistent equations for the electromagnetic field at any point...... of the system. The solution of the equations brings about relationships between the local field at an arbitrary point in the system and the external long-wave field via the local-field factor. The latter connects the initial moment of optical dipole transition per system volume unit and the effective dipole...

  15. Comparisons of MOVES Light-duty Gasoline NOx Emission Rates with Real-world Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, D.; Sonntag, D.; Warila, J.

    2017-12-01

    Recent studies have shown differences between air quality model estimates and monitored values for nitrogen oxides. Several studies have suggested that the discrepancy between monitored and modeled values is due to an overestimation of NOx from mobile sources in EPA's emission inventory, particularly for light-duty gasoline vehicles. EPA's MOtor Vehicle Emission Simulator (MOVES) is an emission modeling system that estimates emissions for cars, trucks and other mobile sources at the national, county, and project level for criteria pollutants, greenhouse gases, and air toxics. Studies that directly measure vehicle emissions provide useful data for evaluating MOVES when the measurement conditions are properly accounted for in modeling. In this presentation, we show comparisons of MOVES2014 to thousands of real-world NOx emissions measurements from individual light-duty gasoline vehicles. The comparison studies include in-use vehicle emissions tests conducted on chassis dynamometer tests in support of Denver, Colorado's Vehicle Inspection & Maintenance Program and remote sensing data collected using road-side instruments in multiple locations and calendar years in the United States. In addition, we conduct comparisons of MOVES predictions to fleet-wide emissions measured from tunnels. We also present details on the methodology used to conduct the MOVES model runs in comparing to the independent data.

  16. Fracto-mechanoluminescent light emission of EuD4TEA-PDMS composites subjected to high strain-rate compressive loading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryu, Donghyeon; Castaño, Nicolas; Bhakta, Raj; Kimberley, Jamie

    2017-08-01

    The objective of this study is to understand light emission characteristics of fracto-mechanoluminescent (FML) europium tetrakis(dibenzoylmethide)-triethylammonium (EuD4TEA) crystals under high strain-rate compressive loading. As a sensing material that can play a pivotal role for the self-powered impact sensor technology, it is important to understand transformative light emission characteristics of the FML EuD4TEA crystals under high strain-rate compressive loading. First, EuD4TEA crystals were synthesized and embedded into polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) elastomer to fabricate EuD4TEA-PDMS composite test specimens. Second, the prepared EuD4TEA-PDMS composites were tested using the modified Kolsky bar setup equipped with a high-speed camera. Third, FML light emission was captured to yield 12 bit grayscale video footage, which was processed to quantify the FML light emission. Finally, quantitative parameters were generated by taking into account pixel values and population of pixels of the 12 bit grayscale images to represent FML light intensity. The FML light intensity was correlated with high strain-rate compressive strain and strain rate to understand the FML light emission characteristics under high strain-rate compressive loading that can result from impact occurrences.

  17. Light emission by an oscillator moving through a refracting plate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baryshevskij, V.G.

    1982-01-01

    Optical-frequency light emitted by a fast electron passing through a crystalline plate of a finite thickness is treated. Formulas are presented for the spectral distribution and intensity of the emission at a given frequency and amplitude of the electron oscillations. The formulas correspond to both normal and abnormal Doppler effects. The calculations are carried out for the light observed in the vacuum, with the reflection and refraction at the edges of the plate taken into account

  18. Suppression of Hydrogen Emission in an X-class White-light Solar Flare

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Procházka, Ondrej; Milligan, Ryan O.; Mathioudakis, Mihalis [Astrophysics Research Centre, Queen’s University Belfast, Northern Ireland (United Kingdom); Allred, Joel C. [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Kowalski, Adam F. [Department of Astrophysical and Planetary Sciences, University of Colorado Boulder, 2000 Colorado Avenue, Boulder, CO 80305 (United States); Kotrč, Pavel, E-mail: oprochazka01@qub.ac.uk [Astronomical Institute, The Czech Academy of Sciences, 25165 Ondřejov (Czech Republic)

    2017-03-01

    We present unique NUV observations of a well-observed X-class flare from NOAA 12087 obtained at the Ondřejov Observatory. The flare shows a strong white-light continuum but no detectable emission in the higher Balmer and Lyman lines. Reuven Ramaty High-Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager and Fermi observations indicate an extremely hard X-ray spectrum and γ -ray emission. We use the RADYN radiative hydrodynamic code to perform two types of simulations: one where an energy of 3 × 10{sup 11} erg cm{sup −2} s{sup −1} is deposited by an electron beam with a spectral index of ≈3, and a second where the same energy is applied directly to the photosphere. The combination of observations and simulations allows us to conclude that the white-light emission and the suppression or complete lack of hydrogen emission lines is best explained by a model where the dominant energy deposition layer is located in the lower layers of the solar atmosphere, rather than the chromosphere.

  19. Inherent/passive safety for fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piet, S.J.

    1986-06-01

    The concept of inherent or passive passive safety for fusion energy is explored, defined, and partially quantified. Four levels of safety assurance are defined, which range from true inherent safety to passive safety to protection via active engineered safeguard systems. Fusion has the clear potential for achieving inherent or passive safety, which should be an objective of fusion research and design. Proper material choice might lead to both inherent safety and high mass power density, improving both safety and economics. When inherent safety is accomplished, fusion will be well on the way to achieving its ultimate potential and to be truly different and superior

  20. Emission of high-energy, light particles from intermediate-energy heavy-ion reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ball, J.B.; Auble, R.L.

    1982-01-01

    One of the early surprises in examining reaction products from heavy ion reactions at 10 MeV/nucleon and above was the large yield of light particles emitted and the high energies to which the spectra of these particles extended. The interpretation of the origin of the high energy light ions has evolved from a picture of projectile excitation and subsequent evaporation to one of pre-equilibrium (or nonequilibrium) emission. The time scale for particle emission has thus moved from one that occurs following the initial collision to one that occurs at the very early stages of the collision. Research at ORNL on this phenomenon is reviewed

  1. Engineering light emission of two-dimensional materials in both the weak and strong coupling regimes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brotons-Gisbert, Mauro; Martínez-Pastor, Juan P.; Ballesteros, Guillem C.; Gerardot, Brian D.; Sánchez-Royo, Juan F.

    2018-01-01

    Two-dimensional (2D) materials have promising applications in optoelectronics, photonics, and quantum technologies. However, their intrinsically low light absorption limits their performance, and potential devices must be accurately engineered for optimal operation. Here, we apply a transfer matrix-based source-term method to optimize light absorption and emission in 2D materials and related devices in weak and strong coupling regimes. The implemented analytical model accurately accounts for experimental results reported for representative 2D materials such as graphene and MoS2. The model has been extended to propose structures to optimize light emission by exciton recombination in MoS2 single layers, light extraction from arbitrarily oriented dipole monolayers, and single-photon emission in 2D materials. Also, it has been successfully applied to retrieve exciton-cavity interaction parameters from MoS2 microcavity experiments. The present model appears as a powerful and versatile tool for the design of new optoelectronic devices based on 2D semiconductors such as quantum light sources and polariton lasers.

  2. Study of the Light Emission Process from the Double Chooz Photomultipliers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Calvo, E.; Cerrada, M.; Crespo, J. I.; Gil-Botella, I.; Jimenez, S.; Lopez, M.; Novella, P.; Palomares, C.; Santorelli, R.; Verdugo, A.

    2012-09-13

    In this document we present a study of the light emitted by the base of a Hamamatsu R7081MOD-ASSY photomultiplier (PMT) of the same type used in the Double Chooz experiment. Several characteristic features of the light signal have been found in terms of amplitude, length and pulse shape. Additional investigations on the properties of the epoxy used to cover the photomultiplier base have been carried out. A possible explanation of the light emission process is discussed at the end of the study. (Author) 1 ref.

  3. Engineering photonic and plasmonic light emission enhancement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrence, Nathaniel

    Semiconductor photonic devices are a rapidly maturing technology which currently occupy multi-billion dollar markets in the areas of LED lighting and optical data communication. LEDs currently demonstrate the highest luminous efficiency of any light source for general lighting. Long-haul optical data communication currently forms the backbone of the global communication network. Proper design of light management is required for photonic devices, which can increase the overall efficiency or add new device functionality. In this thesis, novel methods for the control of light propagation and confinement are developed for the use in integrated photonic devices. The first part of this work focuses on the engineering of field confinement within deep subwavelength plasmonic resonators for the enhancement of light-matter interaction. In this section, plasmonic ring nanocavities are shown to form gap plasmon modes confined to the dielectric region between two metal layers. The scattering properties, near-field enhancement and photonic density of states of nanocavity devices are studied using analytic theory and 3D finite difference time domain simulations. Plasmonic ring nanocavities are fabricated and characterized using photoluminescence intensity and decay rate measurements. A 25 times increase in the radiative decay rate of Er:Si02 is demonstrated in nanocavities where light is confined to volumes as small as 0.01( ln )3. The potential to achieve lasing, due to the enhancement of stimulated emission rate in ring nanocavities, is studied as a route to Si-compatible plasmon-enhanced nanolasers. The second part of this work focuses on the manipulation of light generated in planar semiconductor devices using arrays of dielectric nanopillars. In particular, aperiodic arrays of nanopillars are engineered for omnidirectional light extraction enhancement. Arrays of Er:SiNx, nanopillars are fabricated and a ten times increase in light extraction is experimentally demonstrated

  4. Light-absorbing organic carbon from prescribed and laboratory biomass burning and gasoline vehicle emissions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Mingjie; Hays, Michael D; Holder, Amara L

    2017-08-04

    Light-absorbing organic carbon (OC), also termed brown carbon (BrC), from laboratory-based biomass burning (BB) has been studied intensively to understand the contribution of BB to radiative forcing. However, relatively few measurements have been conducted on field-based BB and even fewer measurements have examined BrC from anthropogenic combustion sources like motor vehicle emissions. In this work, the light absorption of methanol-extractable OC from prescribed and laboratory BB and gasoline vehicle emissions was examined using spectrophotometry. The light absorption of methanol extracts showed a strong wavelength dependence for both BB and gasoline vehicle emissions. The mass absorption coefficients at 365 nm (MAC 365 , m 2 g -1 C) - used as a measurement proxy for BrC - were significantly correlated (p burn conditions and fuel types may impact BB BrC characteristics. The average MAC 365 of gasoline vehicle emission samples is 0.62 ± 0.76 m 2  g -1 C, which is similar in magnitude to the BB samples (1.27 ± 0.76 m 2  g -1 C). These results suggest that in addition to BB, gasoline vehicle emissions may also be an important BrC source in urban areas.

  5. How light, temperature, and measurement and growth [CO2] interactively control isoprene emission in hybrid aspen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niinemets, Ülo; Sun, Zhihong

    2015-02-01

    Plant isoprene emissions have been modelled assuming independent controls by light, temperature and atmospheric [CO2]. However, the isoprene emission rate is ultimately controlled by the pool size of its immediate substrate, dimethylallyl diphosphate (DMADP), and isoprene synthase activity, implying that the environmental controls might interact. In addition, acclimation to growth [CO2] can shift the share of the control by DMADP pool size and isoprene synthase activity, and thereby alter the environmental sensitivity. Environmental controls of isoprene emission were studied in hybrid aspen (Populus tremula × Populus tremuloides) saplings acclimated either to ambient [CO2] of 380 μmol mol(-1) or elevated [CO2] of 780 μmol mol(-1). The data demonstrated strong interactive effects of environmental drivers and growth [CO2] on isoprene emissions. Light enhancement of isoprene emission was the greatest at intermediate temperatures and was greater in elevated-[CO2]-grown plants, indicating greater enhancement of the DMADP supply. The optimum temperature for isoprene emission was higher at lower light, suggesting activation of alternative DMADP sinks at higher light. In addition, [CO2] inhibition of isoprene emission was lost at a higher temperature with particularly strong effects in elevated-[CO2]-grown plants. Nevertheless, DMADP pool size was still predicted to more strongly control isoprene emission at higher temperatures in elevated-[CO2]-grown plants. We argue that interactive environmental controls and acclimation to growth [CO2] should be incorporated in future isoprene emission models at the level of DMADP pool size. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Experimental Biology.

  6. Measuring the coherence properties of light emission from laser-plasma interactions. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Batha, S.H.

    1998-01-01

    Several detrimental instabilities can be excited when a high-intensity laser interacts with plasma. The temporal evolution and spectra of the scattered light emitted by many of these instabilities are used to characterize the instabilities and to benchmark theories. It has been difficult to image the emission region with sufficient resolution to make quantitative comparisons with theory. Direct measurement of the emission region would yield information on ponderomotive steepening phenomena, the true emission zone of convective instabilities, and on the saturation of absolute instabilities. The increase in laser intensity caused by the filamentation instability is conjectured to elevate the levels of parametric instabilities found in high-energy laser-plasma interactions. Because the diameter of the filaments is very small (on the order of 10 microm), it is impossible to image the emission sites directly and either to prove or to disprove this conjecture. The research reported here examines an alternate method of measuring the emission region of scattered light from parametric instabilities. This report provides a brief background of coherence theory by defining the relevant parameters in Section 2. A concrete example of the effect that multiple scattering sites would have on the proposed measurement is provided in Section 3. The following section briefly describes experiments that might be able to demonstrate the proposed technique. The conclusion raises the issue of coherence and its effect on the expected angular distribution of scattering light from parametric instabilities

  7. Silicon Mie resonators for highly directional light emission from monolayer MoS2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cihan, Ahmet Fatih; Curto, Alberto G.; Raza, Søren; Kik, Pieter G.; Brongersma, Mark L.

    2018-05-01

    Controlling light emission from quantum emitters has important applications, ranging from solid-state lighting and displays to nanoscale single-photon sources. Optical antennas have emerged as promising tools to achieve such control right at the location of the emitter, without the need for bulky, external optics. Semiconductor nanoantennas are particularly practical for this purpose because simple geometries such as wires and spheres support multiple, degenerate optical resonances. Here, we start by modifying Mie scattering theory developed for plane wave illumination to describe scattering of dipole emission. We then use this theory and experiments to demonstrate several pathways to achieve control over the directionality, polarization state and spectral emission that rely on a coherent coupling of an emitting dipole to optical resonances of a silicon nanowire. A forward-to-backward ratio of 20 was demonstrated for the electric dipole emission at 680 nm from a monolayer MoS2 by optically coupling it to a silicon nanowire.

  8. Spontaneous light emission from fibers in MINOS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Avvakumov, S.; Barrett, W.L.; Belias, T.; Bower, C.; Erwin, A.; Kordosky, M.; Lang, K.; Lee, R.; Liu, J.; Miller, W.; Mualem, L.; Nichol, R.; Nelson, J.; Pearce, G.; Proga, M.; Rebel, B.; Ruddick, K.; Smith, C.; Thomas, J.; Vahle, P.; Webb, R.

    2005-01-01

    We report on the observation and measurements of unexpected background rates in the MINOS Far Detector. The noise level at the Far Detector is significantly greater than that expected from natural radioactivity and intrinsic photomultiplier dark current. We have conducted a series of additional tests which demonstrate that the excess rate is caused by spontaneous light emission in the wavelength-shifting fibers, which are used to read out signals from scintillator strips. This noise due to fibers exhibits an exponential fall off with time with a decay time constant of the order of 100 days

  9. Energy transfer and colour tunability in UV light induced Tm3+/Tb3+/Eu3+: ZnB glasses generating white light emission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naresh, V; Gupta, Kiran; Parthasaradhi Reddy, C; Ham, Byoung S

    2017-03-15

    A promising energy transfer (Tm 3+ →Tb 3+ →Eu 3+ ) approach is brought forward to generate white light emission under ultraviolet (UV) light excitation for solid state lightening. Tm 3+ /Tb 3+ /Eu 3+ ions are combinedly doped in zinc borate glass system in view of understanding energy transfer process resulting in white light emission. Zinc borate (host) glass displayed optical and luminescence properties due to formation of Zn(II) x -[O(-II)] y centres in the ZnB glass matrix. At 360nm (UV) excitation, triply doped Tm 3+ /Tb 3+ /Eu 3+ : ZnB glasses simultaneously shown their characteristic emission bands in blue (454nm: 1 D 2 → 3 F 4 ), green (547nm: 5 D 4 → 7 F 5 ) and red (616nm: 5 D 0 → 7 F 2 ) regions. In triple ions doped glasses, energy transfer dynamics is discussed in terms of Forster-Dexter theory, excitation & emission profiles, lifetime curves and from partial energy level diagram of three ions. The role of Tb 3+ in ET from Tm 3+ →Eu 3+ was discussed using branch model. From emission decay analysis, energy transfer probability (P) and efficiency (η) were evaluated. Colour tunability from blue to white on varying (Tb 3+ , Eu 3+ ) content is demonstrated from Commission Internationale de L'Eclairage (CIE) chromaticity coordinates. Based on chromaticity coordinates, other colour related parameters like correlated colour temperature (CCT) and colour purity are also computed for the studied glass samples. An appropriate blending of such combination of rare earth ions could show better suitability as potential candidates in achieving multi-colour and warm/cold white light emission for white LEDs application in the field of solid state lightening. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Strong white light emission from a processed porous silicon and its photoluminescence mechanism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karacali, T.; Cicek, K.

    2011-01-01

    We have prepared various porous silicon (PS) structures with different surface conditions (any combination of oxidation, carbonization as well as thermal annealing) to increase the intensity of photoluminescence (PL) spectrum in the visible range. Strong white light (similar to day-light) emission was achieved by carrying out thermal annealing at 1100 deg. C after surface modification with 1-decene of anodic oxidized PS structures. Temperature-dependent PL measurements were first performed by gradually increasing the sample temperature from 10 to 300 K inside a cryostat. Then, we analyzed the measured spectrum of all prepared samples. After the analysis, we note that throughout entire measured spectrum, only two main peaks corresponding to blue and green-orange emission lines (which can be interpreted by quantum size effect and/or configuration coordinate model) were seem to be predominant for all temperature range. To further reveal and analysis these peaks, finally, measured data were inputted into the formula of activation energy of thermal excitation. We found that activation energies of blue and green-orange lines were approximately 49.3 and 44.6 meV, respectively. - Highlights: →Light emitting devices based on silicon technology are of great interest in illumination and display applications. → We have achieved strong white light (similar to day-light) emission from porous silicon. → The most important impact of carbonization on porous silicon and post annealing is the enhancement of room temperature luminescence.

  11. Electroplex light emission based on BCP and a novel star-shaped hexafluorenylbenzene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Tao; Yu, Junsheng; Lou, Shuangling; Jiang, Yadong; Zhang, Qing

    2009-05-01

    Organic light emitting diode (OLEDs) are fabricated using a novel star-shaped hexafluorenylbenzene with a simple structure of indium-tin-oxide (ITO)/1,2,3,4,5,6-hexakis(9,9-diethyl-9H-fluoren-2-yl)benzene (HKEthFLYPh):N, N'-bis-(1-naphthyl)-N,N'-diphenyl-(1,1'-biphenyl)-4,4'-diamine (NPB)/2,9-dimenthyl-4,7-diphenyl-1,10-phenanthroline (BCP)/tris(8-hydroxyquinoline) aluminum (Alq3)/Mg:Ag by spin coating method. The electroluminescent properties of the device are characterized. The results show that there is a new peak at 600 nm, which is no appearance in PL spectra. This new emission is proposed to be electroplex that occurred at the solid-state interface between HKEthFLYPh and BCP in addition to the exciton emission from NPB. The Commissions Internationale De L'Eclairage (CIE) coordinates of the device are (x=0.33, y=0.29) at 10 V, which obviously belongs to white light emission.

  12. Constructing carbon offsets: The obstacles to quantifying emission reductions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Millard-Ball, Adam; Ortolano, Leonard

    2010-01-01

    The existing literature generally ascribes the virtual absence of the transport sector from the Clean Development Mechanism (CDM) to the inherent complexity of quantifying emission reductions from mobile sources. We use archival analysis and interviews with CDM decision-makers and experts to identify two additional groups of explanations. First, we show the significance of aspects of the CDM's historical evolution, such as the order in which methodologies were considered and the assignment of expert desk reviewers. Second, we highlight inconsistencies in the treatment of uncertainty across sectors. In contrast to transport methodologies, other sectors are characterized by a narrow focus on sources of measurement uncertainty and a neglect of economic effects ('market leakages'). We do not argue that the rejection of transport methodologies was unjustified, but rather than many of the same problems are inherent in other sectors. Thus, the case of transport sheds light on fundamental problems in quantifying emission reductions under the CDM. We argue that a key theoretical attraction of the CDM-equalization of marginal abatement costs across all sectors-has been difficult to achieve in practice.

  13. Surface magnetism studied by polarized light emission after He+ scattering

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Manske, J; Dirska, M; Lubinski, G; Schleberger, M; Narmann, A; Hoekstra, R

    Surface magnetism is studied by means of an ion beam of low energy (2-15 keV) scattered off the surface under grazing incidence conditions. During the scattering, a small fraction of the ions is neutralized into excited states which decay subsequently by light emission. The circular polarization of

  14. Two-dimensionally grown single-crystal silicon nanosheets with tunable visible-light emissions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sung Wook; Lee, Jaejun; Sung, Ji Ho; Seo, Dong-jae; Kim, Ilsoo; Jo, Moon-Ho; Kwon, Byoung Wook; Choi, Won Kook; Choi, Heon-Jin

    2014-07-22

    Since the discovery of graphene, growth of two-dimensional (2D) nanomaterials has greatly attracted attention. However, spontaneous growth of atomic two-dimensional (2D) materials is limitedly permitted for several layered-structure crystals, such as graphene, MoS2, and h-BN, and otherwise it is notoriously difficult. Here we report the gas-phase 2D growth of silicon (Si), that is cubic in symmetry, via dendritic growth and an interdendritic filling mechanism and to form Si nanosheets (SiNSs) of 1 to 13 nm in thickness. Thin SiNSs show strong thickness-dependent photoluminescence in visible range including red, green, and blue (RGB) emissions with the associated band gap energies ranging from 1.6 to 3.2 eV; these emission energies were greater than those from Si quantum dots (SiQDs) of the similar sizes. We also demonstrated that electrically driven white, as well as blue, emission in a conventional organic light-emitting diode (OLED) geometry with the SiNS assembly as the active emitting layers. Tunable light emissions in visible range in our observations suggest practical implications for novel 2D Si nanophotonics.

  15. Zero- and two-dimensional hybrid carbon phosphors for high colorimetric purity white light-emission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Yamei; Chang, Qing; Xiu, Fei; Chen, Yingying; Liu, Zhengdong; Ban, Chaoyi; Cheng, Shuai; Liu, Juqing; Huang, Wei

    2018-03-01

    Carbon nanomaterials are promising phosphors for white light emission. A facile single-step synthesis method has been developed to prepare zero- and two-dimensional hybrid carbon phosphors for the first time. Zero-dimensional carbon dots (C-dots) emit bright blue luminescence under 365 nm UV light and two-dimensional nanoplates improve the dispersity and film forming ability of C-dots. As a proof-of-concept application, the as-prepared hybrid carbon phosphors emit bright white luminescence in the solid state, and the phosphor-coated blue LEDs exhibit high colorimetric purity white light-emission with a color coordinate of (0.3308, 0.3312), potentially enabling the successful application of white emitting phosphors in the LED field.

  16. White light emission from an exciplex interface with a single emitting layer (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernal, Wilson; Perez-Gutierrez, Enrique; Agular, Andres; Barbosa G, J. Oracio C.; Maldonado, Jose L.; Meneses-Nava, Marco Antonio; Rodriguez Rivera, Mario A.; Rodriguez, Braulio

    2017-02-01

    Efficient solid state lighting devices based in inorganic emissive materials are now available in the market meanwhile for organic emissive materials still a lot of research work is in its way. [1,2] In this work a new organic emissive material based on carbazole, N-(4-Ethynylphenyl) carba-zole-d4 (6-d4), is used as electron-acceptor and commercial PEDOT:PSS as the electron-donor to obtain white emission. Besides the HOMO-LUMO levels of materials the white emission showed dependence on the films thicknesses and applied voltages. In here it is reported that by diminishing the thickness of the PEDOT:PSS layer, from 60 to 35 nm, and by keeping the derivative carbazole layer constant at 100 nm the electro-luminescence (EL) changed from emissive exciton states to the mixture of emissive exciton and exciplex states. [3] For the former thicknesses no white light was obtained meanwhile for the later the EL spectra broadened due to the emission of exciplex states. Under this condition, the best-achieved CIE coordinate was (0.31,0.33) with a driving voltage of 8 V. To lower the driving voltage of the devices a thin film of LiF was added between the derivative of carbazol and cathode but the CIE coordinates changed. The best CIE coordinates for this case were (0.29, 0.34) and (0.32, 0.37) with driving voltage of about 6.5 V. Acknowledgments: CeMie-Sol/27 (Mexico) 207450 References [1] Timothy L Dawson, Society of Dyers and Colourists, Color. Technol., 126, 1-10 (2010), doi: 10.1111/j.1478-4408.2010.00220.x [2] G. M. Farinola, R. Ragni, Journal of Solid State Lighting, 2:9 (2015), doi: 10.1186/s40539-015-0028-7. [3] E. Angioni, et al, J. Mater. Chem. C, 2016, 4, 3851, doi: 10.1039/c6tc00750c.

  17. Tuning Light Emission of a Pressure-Sensitive Silicon/ZnO Nanowires Heterostructure Matrix through Piezo-phototronic Effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Mengxiao; Pan, Caofeng; Zhang, Taiping; Li, Xiaoyi; Liang, Renrong; Wang, Zhong Lin

    2016-06-28

    Based on white light emission at silicon (Si)/ZnO hetrerojunction, a pressure-sensitive Si/ZnO nanowires heterostructure matrix light emitting diode (LED) array is developed. The light emission intensity of a single heterostructure LED is tuned by external strain: when the applied stress keeps increasing, the emission intensity first increases and then decreases with a maximum value at a compressive strain of 0.15-0.2%. This result is attributed to the piezo-phototronic effect, which can efficiently modulate the LED emission intensity by utilizing the strain-induced piezo-polarization charges. It could tune the energy band diagrams at the junction area and regulate the optoelectronic processes such as charge carriers generation, separation, recombination, and transport. This study achieves tuning silicon based devices through piezo-phototronic effect.

  18. A stable Alq3@MOF composite for white-light emission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Wei; He, Wen-Wen; Du, Dong-Ying; Li, Shun-Li; Qin, Jun-Sheng; Su, Zhong-Min; Sun, Chun-Yi; Lan, Ya-Qian

    2016-02-25

    A stable mesoporous blue-emitting MOF NENU-521 was successfully constructed. NENU-521 can serve as a host for encapsulating Alq3 to obtain tunable and efficient white-light emission. The Alq3@NENU-521 composite possesses excellent stability and can be used as a promising white phosphor in WLEDs.

  19. Emission Characteristics of Organic Light-Emitting Diodes and Organic Thin-Films with Planar and Corrugated Structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mao-Kuo Wei

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we review the emission characteristics from organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs and organic molecular thin films with planar and corrugated structures. In a planar thin film structure, light emission from OLEDs was strongly influenced by the interference effect. With suitable design of microcavity structure and layer thicknesses adjustment, optical characteristics can be engineered to achieve high optical intensity, suitable emission wavelength, and broad viewing angles. To increase the extraction efficiency from OLEDs and organic thin-films, corrugated structure with micro- and nano-scale were applied. Microstructures can effectively redirects the waveguiding light in the substrate outside the device. For nanostructures, it is also possible to couple out the organic and plasmonic modes, not only the substrate mode.

  20. White-Light Emission and Structural Distortion in New Corrugated Two-Dimensional Lead Bromide Perovskites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Lingling; Wu, Yilei; Stoumpos, Constantinos C; Wasielewski, Michael R; Kanatzidis, Mercouri G

    2017-03-29

    Hybrid inorganic-organic perovskites are developing rapidly as high performance semiconductors. Recently, two-dimensional (2D) perovskites were found to have white-light, broadband emission in the visible range that was attributed mainly to the role of self-trapped excitons (STEs). Here, we describe three new 2D lead bromide perovskites incorporating a series of bifunctional ammonium dications as templates which also emit white light: (1) α-(DMEN)PbBr 4 (DMEN = 2-(dimethylamino)ethylamine), which adopts a unique corrugated layered structure in space group Pbca with unit cell a = 18.901(4) Å, b = 11.782(2) Å, and c = 23.680(5) Å; (2) (DMAPA)PbBr 4 (DMAPA = 3-(dimethylamino)-1-propylamine), which crystallizes in P2 1 /c with a = 10.717(2) Å, b = 11.735(2) Å, c = 12.127(2) Å, and β = 111.53(3)°; and (3) (DMABA)PbBr 4 (DMABA = 4-dimethylaminobutylamine), which adopts Aba2 with a = 41.685(8) Å, b = 23.962(5) Å, and c = 12.000(2) Å. Photoluminescence (PL) studies show a correlation between the distortion of the "PbBr 6 " octahedron in the 2D layer and the broadening of PL emission, with the most distorted structure having the broadest emission (183 nm full width at half-maximum) and longest lifetime (τ avg = 1.39 ns). The most distorted member α-(DMEN)PbBr 4 exhibits white-light emission with a color rendering index (CRI) of 73 which is similar to a fluorescent light source and correlated color temperature (CCT) of 7863 K, producing "cold" white light.

  1. Light emission and finite-frequency shot noise in molecular junctions: from tunneling to contact

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lu, Jing Tao; Christensen, Rasmus Bjerregaard; Brandbyge, Mads

    2013-01-01

    Scanning tunneling microscope induced light emission from an atomic or molecular junction has been probed from the tunneling to contact regime in recent experiments. There, the measured light emission yields suggest a strong correlation with the high-frequency current/charge fluctuations. We show...... that this is consistent with the established theory in the tunneling regime, by writing the finite-frequency shot noise as a sum of inelastic transitions between different electronic states. Based on this, we develop a practical scheme to perform calculations on realistic structures using nonequilibrium Green's functions...

  2. The effects of emission control strategies on light-absorbing carbon emissions from a modern heavy-duty diesel engine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Michael A; Olson, Michael R; Liu, Z Gerald; Schauer, James J

    2015-06-01

    Control of atmospheric black carbon (BC) and brown carbon (BrC) has been proposed as an important pathway to climate change mitigation, but sources of BC and BrC are still not well understood. In order to better identify the role of modern heavy-duty diesel engines on the production of BC and BrC, emissions from a heavy-duty diesel engine operating with different emission control strategies were examined using a source dilution sampling system. The effect of a diesel oxidation catalyst (DOC) and diesel particulate filter (DPF) on light-absorbing carbon (LAC) was evaluated at three steady-state engine operation modes: idle, 50% speed and load, and 100% speed and load. LAC was measured with four different engine configurations: engine out, DOC out, DPF out, and engine out with an altered combustion calibration. BC and BrC emission rates were measured with the Aethalometer (AE-31). EC and BC emission rates normalized to the mass of CO₂emitted increased with increasing engine speed and load. Emission rates normalized to brake-specific work did not exhibit similar trends with speed and load, but rather the highest emission rate was measured at idle. EC and OC emissions were reduced by 99% when the DOC and DPF architecture was applied. The application of a DPF was equally effective at removing 99% of the BC fraction of PM, proving to be an important control strategy for both LAC and PM. BC emissions were unexpectedly increased across the DOC, seemingly due to a change aerosol optical properties. Removal of exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) flow due to simulated EGR cooler failure caused a large increase in OC and BrC emission rates at idle, but had limited influence during high load operation. LAC emissions proved to be sensitive to the same control strategies effective at controlling the total mass of diesel PM. In the context of black carbon emissions, very small emission rates of brown carbon were measured over a range of control technologies and engine operating

  3. White light emission from organic-inorganic hererostructure devices by using CdSe quantum dots as emitting layer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tang Aiwei; Teng Feng; Gao Yinhao; Li Dan; Zhao Suling; Liang Chunjun; Wang Yongsheng

    2007-01-01

    In this paper, white light emission was obtained from organic-inorganic heterostructure devices by using CdSe quantum dots as emitting layer, in which CdSe quantum dots were synthesized via a colloidal chemical approach by using CdO and Se powder as precursors. Photoluminescence of CdSe quantum dots demonstrated a white emission with a full wavelength at half maximum (FWHM) of about 200 nm under ambient conditions, and the white emission could be observed in both multilayer device ITO/PEDOT:PSS/CdSe/BCP/Alq 3 /Al and single-layer device: ITO/PEDOT:PSS/CdSe/Al. The broad emission was attributed to the inhomogeneous broadening. The CIE coordinates of the multilayer device were x=0.35 and y=0.40. The white-light-emitting diodes with CdSe quantum dots as the emitting layer are potentially useful in lighting applications

  4. An assessment of the real-world driving gaseous emissions from a Euro 6 light-duty diesel vehicle using a portable emissions measurement system (PEMS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luján, José M.; Bermúdez, Vicente; Dolz, Vicente; Monsalve-Serrano, Javier

    2018-02-01

    Recent investigations demonstrated that real-world emissions usually exceed the levels achieved in the laboratory based type approval processes. By means of on-board emissions measurements, it has been shown that nitrogen oxides emitted by diesel engines substantially exceed the limit imposed by the Euro 6 regulation. Thus, with the aim of complementing the worldwide harmonized light vehicles test cycle, the real driving emissions cycle will be introduced after 1 September 2017 to regulate the vehicle emissions in real-world driving situations. This paper presents on-board gaseous emissions measurements from a Euro 6 light-duty diesel vehicle in a real-world driving route using a portable emissions measurement system. The test route characteristics follow the requirements imposed by the RDE regulation. The analysis of the raw emissions results suggests that the greatest amount of nitrogen oxides and nitrogen dioxide are emitted during the urban section of the test route, confirming that lower speeds with more accelerations and decelerations lead to higher nitrogen oxides emissions levels than constant high speeds. Moreover, the comparison of the two calculation methods proposed by the real driving emissions regulation has revealed emissions rates differences ranging from 10% to 45% depending on the pollutant emission and the trip section considered (urban or total). Thus, the nitrogen oxides emissions conformity factor slightly varies from one method to the other.

  5. Tuning the emission of aqueous Cu:ZnSe quantum dots to yellow light window

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Chunlei; Hu, Zhiyang; Xu, Shuhong; Wang, Yanbin; Zhao, Zengxia; Wang, Zhuyuan; Cui, Yiping

    2015-01-01

    Synthesis of internally doped Cu:ZnSe QDs in an aqueous solution still suffers from narrow tunable emissions from the blue to green light window. In this work, we extended the emission window of aqueous Cu:ZnSe QDs to the yellow light window. Our results show that high solution pH, multiple injections of Zn precursors, and nucleation doping strategy are three key factors for preparing yellow emitted Cu:ZnSe QDs. All these factors can depress the reactivity of CuSe nuclei and Zn monomers, promoting ZnSe growth outside CuSe nuclei rather than form ZnSe nuclei separately. With increased ZnSe QD size, the conduction band and nearby trap state energy levels shift to higher energy sites, causing Cu:ZnSe QDs to have a much longer emission. (paper)

  6. Light charged particle emission in heavy-ion reactions – What have ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    coincidence with gamma rays, fission products, evaporation residues have yielded interesting results which bring out the influence of nuclear structure, nuclear mean field and dynamics on the emission of these particles. Keywords. Light charged particles; heavy-ion induced reactions; particle spectra and angular distri-.

  7. Ultraviolet radiation and blue-light emissions from spotlights incorporating tungsten halogen lamps

    CERN Document Server

    MacKinlay, Alistair F; Whillock, M J

    1989-01-01

    This report summarises measurements of the ultraviolet radiation and blue-light emissions from eleven 'desk-top' tungsten halogen (quartz) lamps and one 'floor-standing' tungsten halogen (quartz) lamp available in the UK. Values of occupational hazard weighted and erythemally weighted ultraviolet radiation irradiance and measurements and relevant calculations of blue-light hazards are presented. It is concluded that the safety design of some desk-top tungsten halogen lamps is inadequate to prevent unnecessary exposure of the skin to potentially harmful ultraviolet radiation. It is recommended that all tungsten halogen lamps should have sufficient filtration to reduce their ultraviolet emissions to an acceptably low level. As long as the comfort aversion responses of the eye are respected, direct viewing of the lamps examined should not constitute a retinal hazard.

  8. Ultraviolet radiation and blue-light emissions from spotlights incorporating tungsten halogen lamps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McKinlay, A.F.; Whillock, M.J.; Meulemans, C.C.E.

    1989-07-01

    This report summarises measurements of the ultraviolet radiation and blue-light emissions from eleven 'desk-top' tungsten halogen (quartz) lamps and one 'floor-standing' tungsten halogen (quartz) lamp available in the UK. Values of occupational hazard weighted and erythemally weighted ultraviolet radiation irradiance and measurements and relevant calculations of blue-light hazards are presented. It is concluded that the safety design of some desk-top tungsten halogen lamps is inadequate to prevent unnecessary exposure of the skin to potentially harmful ultraviolet radiation. It is recommended that all tungsten halogen lamps should have sufficient filtration to reduce their ultraviolet emissions to an acceptably low level. As long as the comfort aversion responses of the eye are respected, direct viewing of the lamps examined should not constitute a retinal hazard. (author)

  9. Replacement policy of residential lighting optimized for cost, energy, and greenhouse gas emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Lixi; Keoleian, Gregory A.; Saitou, Kazuhiro

    2017-11-01

    Accounting for 10% of the electricity consumption in the US, artificial lighting represents one of the easiest ways to cut household energy bills and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions by upgrading to energy-efficient technologies such as compact fluorescent lamps (CFL) and light emitting diodes (LED). However, given the high initial cost and rapidly improving trajectory of solid-state lighting today, estimating the right time to switch over to LEDs from a cost, primary energy, and GHG emissions perspective is not a straightforward problem. This is an optimal replacement problem that depends on many determinants, including how often the lamp is used, the state of the initial lamp, and the trajectories of lighting technology and of electricity generation. In this paper, multiple replacement scenarios of a 60 watt-equivalent A19 lamp are analyzed and for each scenario, a few replacement policies are recommended. For example, at an average use of 3 hr day-1 (US average), it may be optimal both economically and energetically to delay the adoption of LEDs until 2020 with the use of CFLs, whereas purchasing LEDs today may be optimal in terms of GHG emissions. In contrast, incandescent and halogen lamps should be replaced immediately. Based on expected LED improvement, upgrading LED lamps before the end of their rated lifetime may provide cost and environmental savings over time by taking advantage of the higher energy efficiency of newer models.

  10. A Versatile and Simple Approach to Generate Light Emission in Semiconductors Mediated by Electric Double Layers

    KAUST Repository

    Pu, Jiang

    2017-04-18

    The light-emitting device is the primary device for current light sources. In principle, conventional light-emitting devices need heterostructures and/or intentional carrier doping to form a p-n junction. This junction formation is, however, very difficult to achieve for most emerging semiconductors, and the fabrication of light-emitting devices is invariably a significant challenge. This study proposes a versatile and simple approach to realize light-emitting devices. This proposed device requires only a semiconducting film with two electrodes that are covered with an electrolyte. This unique structure achieves light emission at a voltage slightly larger than the bandgap energy of materials. This study applies this concept to emerging direct bandgap semiconductors, such as transition metal dichalcogenide monolayers and zinc oxide single crystals. These devices generate obvious light emission and provide sufficient evidence of the formation of a dynamic p-i-n junction or tunneling junction, presenting a versatile technique to develop optoelectronic devices.

  11. Characteristics of black carbon emissions from in-use light-duty passenger vehicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Xuan; Zhang, Shaojun; Wu, Ye; Zhang, K Max; Wu, Xian; Li, Zhenhua; Hao, Jiming

    2017-12-01

    Mitigating black carbon (BC) emissions from various combustion sources has been considered an urgent policy issue to address the challenges of climate change, air pollution and health risks. Vehicles contribute considerably to total anthropogenic BC emissions and urban BC concentrations. Compared with heavy-duty diesel vehicles, there is much larger uncertainty in BC emission factors for light-duty passenger vehicles (LDPVs), in particular for gasoline LDPVs, which warrants further studies. In this study, we employed the dynamometer and the Aethalometer (AE-51) to measure second-by-second BC emissions from eight LDPVs by engine technology and driving cycle. The average BC emission factors under transient cycles (e.g., ECE-15, New European Driving Cycle, NEDC, Worldwide Harmonized Light Vehicles Test Cycle, WLTC) are 3.6-91.5 mg/km, 7.6 mg/km and 0.13-0.58 mg/km, respectively, for diesel (N = 3), gasoline direct injection (GDI) (N = 1) and gasoline port-fuel injection (PFI) engine categories (N = 4). For gasoline PFI LDPVs, the instantaneous emission profiles show a strong association of peak BC emissions with cold-start and high-speed aggressive driving. Such impacts lead to considerable BC emission contributions in cold-start periods (e.g., the first 47 s-94 s) over the entire cycle (e.g., 18-76% of the NEDC and 13-36% of the WLTC) and increased BC emission factors by 80-440% under the WLTC compared to the NEDC. For diesel BC emissions, the size distribution exhibits a typical unimodal pattern with one single peak appearing approximately from 120 to 150 nm, which is largely consistent with previous studies. Nevertheless, the average mass ratios of BC to particle mass (PM) range from 0.38 to 0.54 for three diesel samples, representing substantial impacts from both driving and engine conditions. The significant discrepancy between gasoline BC emission factors obtained from tailpipe exhaust versus ambient conditions suggest that more comparative

  12. Directional Emission from Dielectric Leaky-Wave Nanoantennas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peter, Manuel; Hildebrandt, Andre; Schlickriede, Christian; Gharib, Kimia; Zentgraf, Thomas; Förstner, Jens; Linden, Stefan

    2017-07-01

    An important source of innovation in nanophotonics is the idea to scale down known radio wave technologies to the optical regime. One thoroughly investigated example of this approach are metallic nanoantennas which employ plasmonic resonances to couple localized emitters to selected far-field modes. While metals can be treated as perfect conductors in the microwave regime, their response becomes Drude-like at optical frequencies. Thus, plasmonic nanoantennas are inherently lossy. Moreover, their resonant nature requires precise control of the antenna geometry. A promising way to circumvent these problems is the use of broadband nanoantennas made from low-loss dielectric materials. Here, we report on highly directional emission from active dielectric leaky-wave nanoantennas made of Hafnium dioxide. Colloidal semiconductor quantum dots deposited in the nanoantenna feed gap serve as a local light source. The emission patterns of active nanoantennas with different sizes are measured by Fourier imaging. We find for all antenna sizes a highly directional emission, underlining the broadband operation of our design.

  13. Study of organic light emitting devices (OLEDs) with optimal emission efficiency

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, Jai [School of Engineering and IT, B-purple 12, Faculty of EHS, Charles Darwin University, Darwin, NT 0909 (Australia)

    2010-04-15

    The external emission efficiency of organic light emitting devices (OLEDs) is analysed by studying the rate of spontaneous emission of both singlet and triplet excitons and their corresponding radiative lifetimes. Rates of spontaneous emissions are calculated from the first order perturbation theory using the newly discovered time-dependent spin-orbit-exciton-photon interaction operator as the perturbation operator. It is clearly shown how the new interaction operator is responsible for attracting triplet excitons to a phosphor (heavy metal atom) and then it flips the spins to a singlet configuration. Thus, the spin forbidden transition becomes spin allowed. Calculated rates agree with the experimental results qualitatively. Results are of general interests for OLED studies. (copyright 2010 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  14. Influence of Emission Spectrum and Irradiance on Light Curing of Resin-Based Composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimokawa, Cak; Sullivan, B; Turbino, M L; Soares, C J; Price, R B

    This study examined the influence of different emission spectra (single-peak and broad-spectrum) light-curing units (LCUs) delivering the same radiant exposures at irradiance values of 1200 or 3600 mW/cm 2 on the polymerization and light transmission of four resin-based composites (RBCs). Two prototype LCUs that used the same light tip, but were either a single-peak blue or a broad-spectrum LED, were used to deliver the same radiant exposures to the top surfaces of the RBCs using either standard (1200 mW/cm 2 ) or high irradiance (3600 mW/cm 2 ) settings. The emission spectrum and radiant power from the LCUs were measured with a laboratory-grade integrating sphere coupled to a spectrometer, and the light beam was assessed with a beam profiler camera. Four RBCs (Filtek Supreme Ultra A2, Tetric EvoCeram A2, Tetric EvoCeram T, and TPH Spectra High Viscosity A2) were photoactivated using four different light conditions: single-peak blue/standard irradiance, single-peak blue/high irradiance, broad-spectrum/standard irradiance, and broad-spectrum/high irradiance. The degree of conversion (N=5) and microhardness at the top and bottom of 2.3-mm-diameter by 2.5-mm-thick specimens (N=5) were analyzed with analysis of variance and Tukey tests. The real-time light transmission through the RBCs was also measured. For all light conditions, the 2.3-mm-diameter specimens received a homogeneous irradiance and spectral distribution. Although similar radiant exposures were delivered to the top surfaces of the RBCs, the amount of light energy emitted from the bottom surfaces was different among the four RBCs, and was also greater for the single-peak lights. Very little violet light (wavelengths below 420 nm) reached the bottom of the 2.5-mm-thick specimens. The degree of conversion and microhardness results varied according to the RBC (pspectrum lights, while at the bottom, where little violet light was observed, the results were equal or higher when they were photoactivated with

  15. Wavelength-tuned light emission via modifying the band edge symmetry: Doped SnO2 as an example

    KAUST Repository

    Zhou, Hang

    2014-03-27

    We report the observation of ultraviolet photoluminescence and electroluminescence in indium-doped SnO2 thin films with modified "forbidden" bandgap. With increasing indium concentration in SnO 2, dominant visible light emission evolves into the ultraviolet regime in photoluminescence. Hybrid functional first-principles calculations demonstrate that the complex of indium dopant and oxygen vacancy breaks "forbidden" band gap to form allowed transition states. Furthermore, undoped and 10% indium-doped SnO2 layers are synthesized on p-type GaN substrates to obtain SnO2-based heterojunction light-emitting diodes. A dominant visible emission band is observed in the undoped SnO 2-based heterojunction, whereas strong near-ultraviolet emission peak at 398 nm is observed in the indium-doped SnO2-based heterojunction. Our results demonstrate an unprecedented doping-based approach toward tailoring the symmetry of band edge states and recovering ultraviolet light emission in wide-bandgap oxides. © 2014 American Chemical Society.

  16. PM₂.₅ emissions from light-duty gasoline vehicles in Beijing, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Xianbao; Yao, Zhiliang; Huo, Hong; He, Kebin; Zhang, Yingzhi; Liu, Huan; Ye, Yu

    2014-07-15

    As stricter standards for diesel vehicles are implemented in China, and the use of diesel trucks is forbidden in urban areas, determining the contribution of light-duty gasoline vehicles (LDGVs) to on-road PM2.5 emissions in cities is important. Additionally, in terms of particle number and size, particulates emitted from LDGVs have a greater health impact than particulates emitted from diesel vehicles. In this work, we measured PM2.5 emissions from 20 LDGVs in Beijing, using an improved combined on-board emission measurement system. We compared these measurements with those reported in previous studies, and estimated the contribution of LDGVs to on-road PM2.5 emissions in Beijing. The results show that the PM2.5 emission factors for LDGVs, complying with European Emission Standards Euro-0 through Euro-4 were: 117.4 ± 142, 24.1 ± 20.4, 4.85 ± 7.86, 0.99 ± 1.32, 0.17 ± 0.15 mg/km, respectively. Our results show a significant decline in emissions with improving vehicle technology. However, this trend is not reflected in recent emission inventory studies. The daytime contributions of LDGVs to PM2.5 emissions on highways, arterials, residential roads, and within urban areas of Beijing were 44%, 62%, 57%, and 57%, respectively. The contribution of LDGVs to PM2.5 emissions varied both for different road types and for different times. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. On-board measurements of emissions from light-duty gasoline vehicles in three mega-cities of China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huo, Hong; Yao, Zhiliang; Zhang, Yingzhi; Shen, Xianbao; Zhang, Qiang; Ding, Yan; He, Kebin

    2012-03-01

    This paper is the second in a series of three papers aimed at understanding the emissions of vehicles in China by conducting on-board emission measurements. This paper focuses on light-duty gasoline vehicles. In this study, we measured 57 light-duty gasoline vehicles (LDGVs) in three Chinese mega-cites (Beijing, Guangzhou, and Shenzhen), covering Euro 0 through Euro IV technologies, and generated CO, HC, and NOx emission factors and deterioration rates for each vehicle technology. The results show that the vehicle emission standards have played a significant role in reducing vehicle emission levels in China. The vehicle emission factors are reduced by 47-81%, 53-64%, 46-71%, and 78-82% for each phase from Euro I to Euro IV. Euro 0 vehicles have a considerably high emission level, which is hundreds of times larger than that of Euro IV vehicles. Three old taxis and four other Euro I and Euro II LDGVs are also identified as super emitters with equivalent emission levels to Euro 0 vehicles. Of the measured fleet, 23% super emitters were estimated to contribute 50-80% to total emissions. Besides vehicle emission standards, measures for restricting super emitters are equally important to reduce vehicle emissions. This study is intended to improve the understanding of the vehicle emission levels in China, but some key issues such as emission deterioration rates are yet to be addressed with the presence of a sufficient amount of vehicle emission measurements.

  18. The minimum attention plant inherent safety through LWR simplification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turk, R.S.; Matzie, R.A.

    1987-01-01

    The Minimum Attention Plant (MAP) is a unique small LWR that achieves greater inherent safety, improved operability, and reduced costs through design simplification. The MAP is a self-pressurized, indirect-cycle light water reactor with full natural circulation primary coolant flow and multiple once-through steam generators located within the reactor vessel. A fundamental tenent of the MAP design is its complete reliance on existing LWR technology. This reliance on conventional technology provides an extensive experience base which gives confidence in judging the safety and performance aspects of the design

  19. White light emission from exciplex using tris-(8-hydroxyquinoline)aluminum as chromaticity-tuning layer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feng, Jing; Li, Feng; Gao, Wenbao; Liu, Shiyong; Liu, Yu; Wang, Yue

    2001-01-01

    We demonstrate efficient organic white light-emitting devices (LEDs), using N,N prime-diphenyl-N,N prime-bis(1-naphthyl) - (1,1 prime-biphenyl)-4,4 prime-diamine (NPB) as the hole-transporting layer, 1,6-bis(2-hydroxyphenyl)pyridine boron complex [(dppy)BF] as the emitting layer, tris-(8-hydroxyquinoline)aluminum (Alq) as the electron-transporting and chromaticity-tuning layer. The white light comes from exciplex emission at the solid-state interface between (dppy)BF and NPB in addition to the exciton emission from NPB and (dppy)BF, respectively. The chromaticity of white emission can be tuned by adjusting the thickness of the Alq layer. The white LEDs with an Alq thickness of 15 nm exhibit a maximum luminescence of 2000 cd/m2 and efficiency of 0.58 lm/W, and the Commission Internationale De l'Eclairage coordinates of resulting emission vary from (0.29,0.33) to (0.31,0.35) with increasing forward bias from 10 to 25 V. The region is very close to the equienergy white point (0.33,0.33). [copyright] 2001 American Institute of Physics

  20. Transparent organic light-emitting diodes with balanced white emission by minimizing waveguide and surface plasmonic loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yi-Bo; Ou, Qing-Dong; Li, Yan-Qing; Chen, Jing-De; Zhao, Xin-Dong; Wei, Jian; Xie, Zhong-Zhi; Tang, Jian-Xin

    2017-07-10

    It is challenging in realizing high-performance transparent organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) with symmetrical light emission to both sides. Herein, an efficient transparent OLED with highly balanced white emission to both sides is demonstrated by integrating quasi-periodic nanostructures into the organic emitter and the metal-dielectric composite top electrode, which can simultaneously suppressing waveguide and surface plasmonic loss. The power efficiency and external quantum efficiency are raised to 83.5 lm W -1 and 38.8%, respectively, along with a bi-directional luminance ratio of 1.26. The proposed scheme provides a facile route for extending application scope of transparent OLEDs for future transparent displays and lightings.

  1. Comparison of real-world and certification emission rates for light duty gasoline vehicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Tanzila; Frey, H Christopher

    2018-05-01

    U.S. light duty vehicles are subject to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) emission standards. Emission compliance is determined by certification testing of selected emissions from representative vehicles on standard driving cycles using chassis dynamometers. Test results are also used in many emission inventories. The dynamometer based emission rates are adjusted to provide the certification levels (CL), which must be lower than the standards for compliance. Although standard driving cycles are based on specific observations of real-world driving, they are not necessarily real-world representative. A systematic comparison of the real-world emission rates of U.S. light duty gasoline vehicles (LDGVs) versus CL, and emission standards has not been previously reported. The purpose of this work is to compare regulatory limits (both CLs and emission standards) and the real-world emissions of LDGVs. The sensitivity of the comparisons to cold start emission was assessed. Portable Emission Measurement Systems (PEMS) were used to measure hot stabilized exhaust emissions of 122 LDGVs on a specified 110 mile test route. Cold start emissions were measured with PEMS for a selected vehicle sample of 32 vehicles. Emissions were measured for carbon dioxide (CO 2 ), carbon monoxide (CO), hydrocarbons (HC) and nitrogen oxides (NO x ). For each vehicle, a Vehicle Specific Power (VSP) modal emission rate model was developed. The VSP modal rates were weighted by the standard driving cycles and real-world driving cycles to estimate the respective cycle average emission rates (CAERs). Measured vehicles were matched with certification test vehicles for comparison. For systematic trends in comparison, vehicles were classified into four groups based on the Tier 1 and Tier 2 emission regulation, and the vehicle type such as passenger car and passenger truck. Depending on the cycle-pollutant and the vehicle groups, hot stabilized CAERs are on average either statistically

  2. Measurements of the Spectral Light Emission from Decaying High Pressure Helium Plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stevefelt, J; Johansson, J

    1971-04-15

    The rate of electron density decay has been determined in a helium pulsed discharge plasma at pressures ranging from 100 to 600 Torr, primarily during the early afterglow where the electron density is from 1019 to 2 x 1017/m3. Measurements of the electrical conductivity and the absolute intensity of the light emission were made. The effective recombination rate coefficient was found to increase faster than linearly with gas pressure. The total photon emission rate was significantly lower than the effective recombination rate. Below 400 Torr pressure the afterglow was dominated by He-bands, which were related to the recombination of He{sub 2+} and He{sub 3+} ions. At higher pressures the appearance of intense lines originating from the atomic n = 3 and 23 P states is proposed to result from the He{sub 4+} recombination. Absorption measurements of the atomic metastable concentration gave evidence for recombination directly into the 23 S state. The concentration of molecular metastables was surprisingly low. The light emission had a Techi dependence, with 0 < chi < 0.35 for the intense atomic lines and 0.78 < chi < 1.10 for the molecular bands

  3. Measurements of the Spectral Light Emission from Decaying High Pressure Helium Plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stevefelt, J.; Johansson, J.

    1971-04-01

    The rate of electron density decay has been determined in a helium pulsed discharge plasma at pressures ranging from 100 to 600 Torr, primarily during the early afterglow where the electron density is from 10 19 to 2 x 10 17 /m 3 . Measurements of the electrical conductivity and the absolute intensity of the light emission were made. The effective recombination rate coefficient was found to increase faster than linearly with gas pressure. The total photon emission rate was significantly lower than the effective recombination rate. Below 400 Torr pressure the afterglow was dominated by He-bands, which were related to the recombination of He 2 + and He 3 + ions. At higher pressures the appearance of intense lines originating from the atomic n = 3 and 2 3 P states is proposed to result from the He 4 + recombination. Absorption measurements of the atomic metastable concentration gave evidence for recombination directly into the 2 3 S state. The concentration of molecular metastables was surprisingly low. The light emission had a T e χ dependence, with 0 < χ < 0.35 for the intense atomic lines and 0.78 < χ < 1.10 for the molecular bands

  4. Stimulated light emission in a dielectrically disordered composite porous matrix

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross, E.; Künzner, N.; Diener, J.; Fujii, Minoru; Timoshenko, V. Yu.; Kovalev, D.

    2005-06-01

    We report on a medium exhibiting extremely efficient light scattering properties: a liquid network formed in a porous matrix. Liquid fragments confined in the solid matrix result in a random fluctuation of the dielectric function and act as scattering objects for photons. The optical scattering efficiency is defined by the filling factor of the liquid in the pores and its dielectric constant. The spectral dependence of the scattering length of photons indicates that the phenomenon is governed by a Mie-type scattering mechanism. The degree of the dielectric disorder of the medium, i.e. the level of opacity is tunable by the ambient vapor pressure of the dielectric substance. In the strongest scattering regime the scattering length of photons is found to be in the micrometer range. By incorporation of dye molecules in the voids of the porous layer a system exhibiting optical gain is realized. In the multiple scattering regime the optical path of diffusively propagating photons is enhanced and light amplification through stimulated emission occurs: a strong intensity enhancement of the dye emission accompanied by significant spectral narrowing is observed above the excitation threshold for a layer being in the opalescence state.

  5. Fleet average NOx emission performance of 2004 model year light-duty vehicles, light-duty trucks and medium-duty passenger vehicles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-05-01

    The On-Road Vehicle and Engine Emission Regulations came into effect on January 1, 2004. The regulations introduced more stringent national emission standards for on-road vehicles and engines, and also required that companies submit reports containing information concerning the company's fleets. This report presented a summary of the regulatory requirements relating to nitric oxide (NO x ) fleet average emissions for light-duty vehicles, light-duty trucks, and medium-duty passenger vehicles under the new regulations. The effectiveness of the Canadian fleet average NO x emission program at achieving environmental performance objectives was also evaluated. A summary of the fleet average NO x emission performance of individual companies was presented, as well as the overall Canadian fleet average of the 2004 model year based on data submitted by companies in their end of model year reports. A total of 21 companies submitted reports covering 2004 model year vehicles in 10 test groups, comprising 1,350,719 vehicles of the 2004 model year manufactured or imported for the purpose of sale in Canada. The average NO x value for the entire Canadian LDV/LDT fleet was 0.2016463 grams per mile. The average NO x values for the entire Canadian HLDT/MDPV fleet was 0.321976 grams per mile. It was concluded that the NO x values for both fleets were consistent with the environmental performance objectives of the regulations for the 2004 model year. 9 tabs

  6. Measuring the radial density distribution of light emission around the track of fast ions in nitrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ibach, T.

    1983-01-01

    For analysing the emission and stopping of ionization electrons (σ-electrons) emitted by fast ions passing through a gas, the radial density distribution of the light emission of the (0,0) transition of two optical bands in nitrogen have been measured. The systems selected for the epxeriments are the 2nd positive system (2.PS) at 337.1 nm primarily excited by low-energy electrons of about 20 eV, and the first negative system (1.NS) at 391.4 nm excited by faster electrons and simultaneous ionization. The equipment developed for the experiments records the light emission with a telescope-type optical arrangement including interference filters, allowing high local resolution and dynamics of the measured range. The measurements have been carried out at pressures between 0.133 and 13.3 mbar, using photons of energies ranging from 270 keV to 2.8 MeV, helium 3 beams of 270 keV/u and 500 keV/u, and neon beams of 270 keV/u. Abel's inversion applied to the distance functions allows calculation of the spatial light emission density which is normalized for a gas density of 1 g/cm 3 . The profiles of the two bands indicate that the σ-electron spectrum gets harder in outward direction. Next to the beam the impact density decreases faster with increasing ion energy than the stopping power (increasing interaction range of the σ-electrons). With photon beams, about half of the whole light emission in the 1. NS, and of the ionization, is induced by primary interactions of the ion beam. This proportion decreases at constant energy per nucleon with increasing atomic number of the ions as compared with the σ-electrons. The primary σ-emission gets harder with higher atomic numbers. (orig./HP) [de

  7. Experimental Studies of Light Emission Phenomena in Superconducting RF Cavitites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anthony, P.L.; /SLAC; Delayen, J.R.; /Jefferson Lab; Fryberger, D.; /SLAC; Goree, W.S.; Mammosser, J.; /Jefferson Lab /SNS Project, Oak Ridge; Szalata, Z.M.; II, J.G.Weisend /SLAC

    2009-08-04

    Experimental studies of light emission phenomena in superconducting RF cavities, which we categorize under the general heading of cavity lights, are described. The cavity lights data, which were obtained using a small CCD video camera, were collected in a series of nine experimental runs ranging from {approx} 1/2 to {approx} 2 h in duration. The video data were recorded on a standard VHS tape. As the runs progressed, additional instrumentation was added. For the last three runs a LabVIEW controlled data acquisition system was included. These runs furnish evidence for several, possibly related, light emission phenomena. The most intriguing of these is what appear to be small luminous objects {le} 1.5 mm in size, freely moving about in the vacuum space, generally without wall contact, as verified by reflections of the tracks in the cavity walls. In addition, on a number of occasions, these objects were observed to bounce off of the cavity walls. The wall-bounce aspect of most of these events was clearly confirmed by pre-bounce and post-bounce reflections concurrent with the tracks. In one of the later runs, a mode of behavior was observed that was qualitatively different from anything observed in the earlier runs. Perhaps the most perplexing aspect of this new mode was the observation of as many as seven luminous objects arrayed in what might be described as a macromolecular formation, coherently moving about in the interior of the cavity for extended periods of time, evidently without any wall contact. It is suggested that these mobile luminous objects are without explanation within the realm of established physics. Some remarks about more exotic theoretical possibilities are made, and future plans are discussed.

  8. Light-induced protein nitration and degradation with HONO emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meusel, Hannah; Elshorbany, Yasin; Kuhn, Uwe; Bartels-Rausch, Thorsten; Reinmuth-Selzle, Kathrin; Kampf, Christopher J.; Li, Guo; Wang, Xiaoxiang; Lelieveld, Jos; Pöschl, Ulrich; Hoffmann, Thorsten; Su, Hang; Ammann, Markus; Cheng, Yafang

    2017-10-01

    Proteins can be nitrated by air pollutants (NO2), enhancing their allergenic potential. This work provides insight into protein nitration and subsequent decomposition in the presence of solar radiation. We also investigated light-induced formation of nitrous acid (HONO) from protein surfaces that were nitrated either online with instantaneous gas-phase exposure to NO2 or offline by an efficient nitration agent (tetranitromethane, TNM). Bovine serum albumin (BSA) and ovalbumin (OVA) were used as model substances for proteins. Nitration degrees of about 1 % were derived applying NO2 concentrations of 100 ppb under VIS/UV illuminated conditions, while simultaneous decomposition of (nitrated) proteins was also found during long-term (20 h) irradiation exposure. Measurements of gas exchange on TNM-nitrated proteins revealed that HONO can be formed and released even without contribution of instantaneous heterogeneous NO2 conversion. NO2 exposure was found to increase HONO emissions substantially. In particular, a strong dependence of HONO emissions on light intensity, relative humidity, NO2 concentrations and the applied coating thickness was found. The 20 h long-term studies revealed sustained HONO formation, even when concentrations of the intact (nitrated) proteins were too low to be detected after the gas exchange measurements. A reaction mechanism for the NO2 conversion based on the Langmuir-Hinshelwood kinetics is proposed.

  9. A rapid excitation-emission matrix fluorometer utilizing supercontinuum white light and acousto-optic tunable filters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Wenbo [Imaging Unit, Integrative Oncology Department, BC Cancer Agency Research Center, 675 West 10th Avenue, Vancouver, British Columbia V5Z 1L3 (Canada); Department of Dermatology and Skin Science, University of British Columbia, 835 West 10th Avenue, Vancouver, British Columbia V5Z 4E8 (Canada); Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of British Columbia, KAIS 5500, 2332 Main Mall, Vancouver, British Columbia V6T 1Z4 (Canada); Wu, Zhenguo; Zhao, Jianhua; Lui, Harvey; Zeng, Haishan, E-mail: hzeng@bccrc.ca [Imaging Unit, Integrative Oncology Department, BC Cancer Agency Research Center, 675 West 10th Avenue, Vancouver, British Columbia V5Z 1L3 (Canada); Department of Dermatology and Skin Science, University of British Columbia, 835 West 10th Avenue, Vancouver, British Columbia V5Z 4E8 (Canada)

    2016-06-15

    Scanning speed and coupling efficiency of excitation light to optic fibres are two major technical challenges that limit the potential of fluorescence excitation-emission matrix (EEM) spectrometer for on-line applications and in vivo studies. In this paper, a novel EEM system, utilizing a supercontinuum white light source and acousto-optic tunable filters (AOTFs), was introduced and evaluated. The supercontinuum white light, generated by pumping a nonlinear photonic crystal fiber with an 800 nm femtosecond laser, was efficiently coupled into a bifurcated optic fiber bundle. High speed EEM spectral scanning was achieved using AOTFs both for selecting excitation wavelength and scanning emission spectra. Using calibration lamps (neon and mercury argon), wavelength deviations were determined to vary from 0.18 nm to −0.70 nm within the spectral range of 500–850 nm. Spectral bandwidth for filtered excitation light broadened by twofold compared to that measured with monochromatic light between 650 nm and 750 nm. The EEM spectra for methanol solutions of laser dyes were successfully acquired with this rapid fluorometer using an integration time of 5 s.

  10. A rapid excitation-emission matrix fluorometer utilizing supercontinuum white light and acousto-optic tunable filters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Wenbo; Wu, Zhenguo; Zhao, Jianhua; Lui, Harvey; Zeng, Haishan

    2016-01-01

    Scanning speed and coupling efficiency of excitation light to optic fibres are two major technical challenges that limit the potential of fluorescence excitation-emission matrix (EEM) spectrometer for on-line applications and in vivo studies. In this paper, a novel EEM system, utilizing a supercontinuum white light source and acousto-optic tunable filters (AOTFs), was introduced and evaluated. The supercontinuum white light, generated by pumping a nonlinear photonic crystal fiber with an 800 nm femtosecond laser, was efficiently coupled into a bifurcated optic fiber bundle. High speed EEM spectral scanning was achieved using AOTFs both for selecting excitation wavelength and scanning emission spectra. Using calibration lamps (neon and mercury argon), wavelength deviations were determined to vary from 0.18 nm to −0.70 nm within the spectral range of 500–850 nm. Spectral bandwidth for filtered excitation light broadened by twofold compared to that measured with monochromatic light between 650 nm and 750 nm. The EEM spectra for methanol solutions of laser dyes were successfully acquired with this rapid fluorometer using an integration time of 5 s.

  11. Fabrication, Light Emission, and Magnetism of Silica Nanoparticles Hybridized with AIE Luminogens and Inorganic Nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faisal, Mahtab

    Much research efforts have been devoted in developing new synthetic approaches for fluorescent silica nanoparticles (FSNPs) due to their potential high-technological applications. However, light emissions from most of the FSNPs prepared so far have been rather weak. This is due to the emission quenching caused by the aggregation of fluorophores in the solid state. We have observed a novel phenomenon of aggregation-induced emission (AIE): a series of propeller-shaped molecules such as tetraphenylethene (TPE) and silole are induced to emit efficiently by aggregate formation. Thus, they are ideal fluorophors for the construction of FSNPs and my thesis work focuses on the synthesis of silica nanoparticles containing these luminogens and magnetic nanostructures. Highly emissive FSNPs with core-shell structures are fabricated by surfactant-free sol-gel reactions of tetraphenylethene- (TPE) and silole-functionalized siloxanes followed by the reactions with tetraethoxysilane. The FSNPs are uniformly sized, surface-charged and colloidally stable. The diameters of the FSNPs are tunable in the range of 45--295 nm by changing the reaction conditions. Whereas their TPE and silole precursors are non-emissive, the FSNPs emit strong visible lights, thanks to the novel aggregation-induced emission characteristics of the TPE and silole aggregates in the hybrid nanoparticles. The FSNPs pose no toxicity to living cells and can be utilized to selectively image cytoplasm of HeLa cells. Applying the same tool in the presence of citrate-coated magnetite nanoparticles, uniform magnetic fluorescent silica nanoparticles (MFSNPs) with smooth surfaces are fabricated. These particles exhibit appreciable surface charges and hence good colloidal stability. They are superparamagnetic, exhibiting no hysteresis at room temperature. UV irradiation of a suspension of MFSNPs in ethanol gives strong blue and green emissions. The MFSNPs can selectively stain the cytoplasmic regions of the living cells

  12. White light emission from Er2O3 nano-powder excited by infrared radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabanli, Sevcan; Eryurek, Gonul; Di Bartolo, Baldassare

    2017-07-01

    Phosphors of Er2O3 nano-crystalline powders were synthesized by the thermal decomposition method. The structural properties of the nano-powders were investigated with XRD and HRTEM measurements. The cubic phase with a = 10.540 Å was the only phase observed. The average crystalline sizes and the widths of the grain size distribution curves were determined to be 27.2, 18.7 and 9.7 nm, respectively. The spectroscopic properties of the Er2O3 nano-powder were studied by measuring the luminescence, decay and rise patterns under 808 and 975 nm diode laser excitations. A peculiar effect of the pressure was observed since an optically active ion (Er) is part of the complex and not a dopant. A broad band of the white light emission combined with blue, green and red up-conversion emission bands of Er3+ ions were observed at 0.03 mbar pressure under both excitation wavelengths. Only, an intense broad band white light emission was observed from these nanocrystals at atmospheric pressure. Rising patterns show that the white light intensity reaches its maximum value more rapidly under 975 nm excitation although it decays slower than that of 808 nm excitation. The color quality parameters such as the color coordinate (CRI), correlated color temperature and the color rendering index were found to vary with both the excitation wavelength and the ambient pressure indicating that these nanocrystals could be considered good white light emitting source under the infrared excitations.

  13. Quantum mechanical modeling the emission pattern and polarization of nanoscale light emitting diodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Rulin; Zhang, Yu; Bi, Fuzhen; Frauenheim, Thomas; Chen, GuanHua; Yam, ChiYung

    2016-07-21

    Understanding of the electroluminescence (EL) mechanism in optoelectronic devices is imperative for further optimization of their efficiency and effectiveness. Here, a quantum mechanical approach is formulated for modeling the EL processes in nanoscale light emitting diodes (LED). Based on non-equilibrium Green's function quantum transport equations, interactions with the electromagnetic vacuum environment are included to describe electrically driven light emission in the devices. The presented framework is illustrated by numerical simulations of a silicon nanowire LED device. EL spectra of the nanowire device under different bias voltages are obtained and, more importantly, the radiation pattern and polarization of optical emission can be determined using the current approach. This work is an important step forward towards atomistic quantum mechanical modeling of the electrically induced optical response in nanoscale systems.

  14. Inherently safe characteristics of nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-01-01

    This report is based on a detailed study which was carried out by Colenco (a company of the Motor-Columbus Group) on behalf of the Commission of the European Communities (CEC). It presents a summary of this study and concentrates more on the generic issues involved in the subject of inherent safety in nuclear power plants. It is assumed that the reader is reasonably familiar with the design outline of the systems included in the report. The report examines the role of inherent design features in achieving the safety of nuclear power plants as an alternative to the practice, which is largely followed in current reactors, of achieving safety by the addition of engineered safety features. The report examines current reactor systems to identify the extent to which their characteristics are either already inherently safe or, on the other hand, have inherent characteristics that require protective action to be taken. It then considers the advantages of introducing design changes to improve their inherent safety characteristics. Next, it looks at some new reactor types for which claims of inherent safety are made to see to what extent these claims are justified. The general question is then considered whether adoption of the inherently safe reactors would give advantages (by reducing risk in real terms or by improving the public acceptability of nuclear power) which are sufficient to offset the expected high costs and the technical risks associated with any new technology

  15. Stimulated Light Emission in Dense Fog Confined inside a Porous Glass Matrix

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross, E.; Kovalev, D.; Künzner, N.; Diener, J.; Koch, F.; Fujii, M.

    2002-12-01

    We report on light amplification through stimulated emission in a dielectrically disordered medium. Liquid fragments confined in the solid matrix of porous quartz layers result in a random fluctuation of the dielectric function, and dye molecules embedded in the voids yield optical gain. The level of opacity is tunable by the ambient vapor pressure of the dielectric substance. In the multiple scattering regime, a strong intensity enhancement of the dye emission accompanied by significant spectral narrowing is observed above the threshold for a layer being in the opalescence state.

  16. BaZrO3 perovskite nanoparticles as emissive material for organic/inorganic hybrid light-emitting diodes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tamulevičius, S.; Ivaniuk, K.; Cherpak, V.

    2017-01-01

    In the present work we have demonstrated double-channel emission from organic exciplexes coupled to inorganic nanoparticles. The process is demonstrated by yellow-green emission in light-emitting diodes based on organic exciplexes hybridized with perovskite-type dispersed BaZrO3 nanoparticles...

  17. Inherent/passive safety in fusion power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piet, S.J.; Crocker, J.G.

    1986-01-01

    The concept of inherent or passive safety for fusion energy is explored, defined, and partially quantified. Four levels of safety assurance are defined, which range from true inherent safety to passive safety to protection via active engineered safeguard systems. Fusion has the clear potential for achieving inherent or passive safety, which should be an objective of fusion research and design. Proper material choice might lead to both inherent/passive safety and high mass power density, improving both safety and economics. When inherent or passive safety is accomplished, fusion will be well on the way to achieving its ultimate potential and to be a truly superior energy source for the future

  18. Reduction of particle emissions from light duty vehicles and from taxies; Reduktion af partikelelemissioner fra varebiler og taxier

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nielsen, Johan; Henriques, M.; Weibel, T.G. [TetraPlan A/S (Denmark)

    2006-11-03

    This project, 'Reduction of particle emissions from light duty vehicles and from taxies', analyses different strategies to reduce the particle emission, their effect for particle emissions, and the resulting cost for the society and for the companies. The project describes the EU regulation of emissions, the possibilities of reducing the emissions via special requirements in environmental zones and the Danish taxation of light duty vehicles. Further, the project includes interviews with owners of light duty vehicles and taxies and also with Danish producers of particle filters. The strategies analysed in the scenarios include: 1) Promotion of particle filters; 2) Shift from diesel to gasoline and; 3) Downsizing. The effects for particle emissions and for mortality are described. Further, the costs and benefits for the society and the cost for the companies are evaluated. The effects of the scenarios are analysed, both for initiatives implemented at a national level and for implementation in an environmental zone in the municipality of Copenhagen. The main results are that the socioeconomic benefits in the year 2012 are greater than the costs, if taxis and light duty vehicles have filters installed and if they are driving in the Copenhagen area. For light duty vehicles it is only profitable, if the prices of the filters fall to the price level that is expected in the future in the study. Further, the analysis shows that for light duty vehicles and taxies driving all over the country, the socioeconomic benefits achieved by installing particle filters are too small to cover the costs. The analysis shows that it is also profitable socio-economically to change from diesel to petrol for light duty vehicles and for taxies (except taxies driving nationally). The analysis is based on the producer prices including the general net tax level, while the specific taxes are not included. From the point of view of the companies it is not profitable to change to petrol

  19. A novel orange emissive phosphor SrWO4:Sm3+ for white light-emitting diodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ju Zhenghua; Wei Ruiping; Ma Jingxin; Pang Chaoran; Liu Weisheng

    2010-01-01

    Research highlights: → A novel orange emissive phosphor SrWO 4 :Sm 3+ was firstly reported. → The optics properties of Sm 3+ -doped SrWO 4 phosphor were successfully discussed. → The temperature-dependent luminescence indicates the phosphor exhibits a small thermal-quenching property. → The phosphor is a potential candidate as orange-emitting component for white LED. - Abstract: A novel orange emissive phosphor, Sm 3+ -doped SrWO 4 , was synthesized by high temperature solid-state reaction in air atmosphere. The excitation spectra show that the phosphors can be efficiently excited by ultraviolet and near-ultraviolet light, the optimized concentration is 4 mol%. Three emission peaks locate at 562, 596 and 642 nm, corresponding to CIE chromaticity coordinates of (x = 0.54, y = 0.46), which indicates the orange light emitting. The decay curves are well fitted with triple-exponential decay models. The quantum yield of the Sr 0.96 Sm 0.04 WO 4 phosphor is about 70.65% under excitation of 377 nm. Furthermore, the temperature-dependent luminescence indicates the phosphor exhibits a small thermal-quenching property. So the phosphor is able to be applied to UV-LED chip-based white light-emitting diodes.

  20. Fusion blanket inherent safety assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sze, D.K.; Jung, J.; Cheng, E.T.

    1986-01-01

    Fusion has significant potential safety advantages. There is a strong incentive for designing fusion plants to ensure that inherent safety will be achieved. Accordingly, both the Tokamak Power Systems Studies and MINIMARS have identified inherent safety as a design goal. A necessary condition is for the blanket to maintain its configuration and integrity under all credible accident conditions. A main problem is caused by afterheat removal in an accident condition. In this regard, it is highly desirable to achieve the required level of protection of the plant capital investment and limitation of radioactivity release by systems that rely only on inherent properties of matter (e.g., thermal conductivity, specific heat, etc.) and without the use of active safety equipment. This paper assesses the conditions under which inherent safety is feasible. Three types of accident conditions are evaluated for two blankets. The blankets evaluated are a self cooled vanadium/lithium blanket and a self-cooled vanadium/Flibe blanket. The accident conditions evaluated are: (1) loss-of-flow accident; (2) loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA); and (3) partial loss-of-coolant accident

  1. Slow-light enhancement of spontaneous emission in active photonic crystal waveguides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ek, Sara; Chen, Yaohui; Semenova, Elizaveta

    2012-01-01

    Photonic crystal defect waveguides with embedded active layers containing single or multiple quantum wells or quantum dots have been fabricated. Spontaneous emission spectra are enhanced close to the bandedge, consistently with the enhancement of gain by slow light effects. These are promising...... results for future compact devices for terabit/s communication, such as miniaturised semiconductor optical amplifiers and mode-locked lasers....

  2. Electronic emission produced by light projectiles at intermediate energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bernardi, G.C.

    1989-01-01

    Two aspects of the electronic emission produced by light projectiles of intermediate energies have been studied experimentally. In the first place, measurements of angular distributions in the range from θ = 0 deg -50 deg induced by collisions of 50-200 keV H + incident on He have been realized. It was found that the double differential cross section of electron emission presents a structure focussed in the forward direction and which extends up to relatively large angles. Secondly, the dependence of the double differential cross section on the projectile charge was studied using H + and He 3 2+ projectiles of 50 and 100 keV/amu incident on He. Strong deviations from a constant scaling factor were found for increasing projectile charge. The double differential cross sections and the single differential cross sections as a function of the emission angle, and the ratios of the emissions induced by He 3 2+ and H + at equal incident projectile velocities are compared with the 'Continuum Distorted Wave-Eikonal Initial State' (CDW-EIS) approximation and the 'Classical Trajectory Monte Carlo' (CTMC) method. Both approximations, in which the potential of the projectile exercises a relevant role, reproduce the general aspects of the experimental results. An electron analyzer and the corresponding projectile beam line has been designed and installed; it is characterized by a series of properties which are particularly appropriate for the study of double differential electronic emission in gaseous as well as solid targets. The design permits to assure the conditions to obtain a well localized gaseous target and avoid instrumental distortions of the measured distributions. (Author) [es

  3. Quick and Easy Measurements of the Inherent Optical Property of Water by Laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Izadi, Dina; Hajiesmaeilbaigi, Fereshteh

    2009-01-01

    To generate realistic images of natural waters, one must consider in some detail the interaction of light with the water body. The reflectance and attenuation coefficient of the second harmonic of Nd:YAG laser light through distilled water and a sample of water from the Oman Sea were measured in a solid-state laser laboratory to estimate inherent optical properties of natural waters. These measurements determined the bottom conditions and the impurities of the water. The water's reflectivity varied depending on the angle of incidence, height of the laser from water surface, wavelength of laser light, radiant intensities, and depth of water. In these experiments laser light propagated through the water nonlinearly, and different reflectance showed different bottom slopes. The differences among various water samples were obtained taking into account the exponential equation in attenuation coefficient versus depth graphs.

  4. Multi-year remote-sensing measurements of gasoline light-duty vehicle emissions on a freeway ramp

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sjoedin, A.; Andreasson, K.

    2000-01-01

    On-road optical remote-sensing measurements of gasoline light-duty vehicle (LDV) emissions - CO, HC, NO - were conducted on a freeway ramp in Gothenburg, Sweden, in 1991, 1995 and 1998. Based on almost 30,000 emission measurements, the results show that both catalyst cars and non-catalyst cars emissions deteriorate over time, but also that the emission performance of new TWC-cars has improved significantly in recent years. Furthermore, it was found that fleet age rather than model year determines the rate of emission deterioration for TWC-cars for both CO and NO. The study demonstrates that remote sensing may constitute a powerful tool to evaluate real-world LDV emissions; however, daily field calibration procedures need to be developed in order to assure that the evolution in fleet average emissions can be accurately measured. (author)

  5. Stylized whole-core benchmark of the Integral Inherently Safe Light Water Reactor (I2S-LWR) concept

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hon, Ryan; Kooreman, Gabriel; Rahnema, Farzad; Petrovic, Bojan

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • A stylized benchmark specification of the I2S-LWR core. • A library of cross sections were generated in both 8 and 47 groups. • Monte Carlo solutions generated for the 8 group library using MCNP5. • Cross sections and pin fission densities provided in journal’s repository. - Abstract: The Integral, Inherently Safe Light Water Reactor (I 2 S-LWR) is a pressurized water reactor (PWR) concept under development by a multi-institutional team led by Georgia Tech. The core is similar in size to small 2-loop PWRs while having the power level of current large reactors (∼1000 MWe) but using uranium silicide fuel and advanced stainless steel cladding. A stylized benchmark specification of the I 2 S-LWR core has been developed in order to test whole-core neutronics codes and methods. For simplification the core was split into 57 distinct material regions for cross section generation. Cross sections were generated using the lattice physics code HELIOS version 1.10 in both 8 and 47 groups. Monte Carlo solutions, including eigenvalue and pin fission densities, were generated for the 8 group library using MCNP5. Due to space limitations in this paper, the full cross section library and normalized pin fission density results are provided in the journal’s electronic repository.

  6. Efficient red phosphorescent organic light emitting diodes with double emission layers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ben Khalifa, M; Mazzeo, M; Maiorano, V; Mariano, F; Carallo, S; Melcarne, A; Cingolani, R; Gigli, G

    2008-01-01

    We demonstrate efficient red phosphorescent organic light emitting diodes with a bipolar emission structure (D-EML) formed by two different layers doped with a red phosphorescent dye. Due to its self-balancing character, the recombination zone is shifted far from the emission/carrier-blocking-layer interfaces. This prevents the accumulation of carriers at the interfaces and reduces the triplet-triplet annihilation, resulting in an improved efficiency of the D-EML device compared with the standard single-EML architecture. However, a current efficiency of 8.4 cd A -1 at 10 mA cm -2 is achieved in the D-EML device compared with 3.7 cd A -1 in the single-EML device

  7. Efficient red phosphorescent organic light emitting diodes with double emission layers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ben Khalifa, M; Mazzeo, M; Maiorano, V; Mariano, F; Carallo, S; Melcarne, A; Cingolani, R; Gigli, G [NNL, National Nanotechnology Laboratory of CNR-INFM, Distretto tecnologico ISUFI, Universita del Salento, Italy, Via per Arnesano, Km.5, 73100 Lecce (Italy)], E-mail: mohamed.benkhalifa@unile.it

    2008-08-07

    We demonstrate efficient red phosphorescent organic light emitting diodes with a bipolar emission structure (D-EML) formed by two different layers doped with a red phosphorescent dye. Due to its self-balancing character, the recombination zone is shifted far from the emission/carrier-blocking-layer interfaces. This prevents the accumulation of carriers at the interfaces and reduces the triplet-triplet annihilation, resulting in an improved efficiency of the D-EML device compared with the standard single-EML architecture. However, a current efficiency of 8.4 cd A{sup -1} at 10 mA cm{sup -2} is achieved in the D-EML device compared with 3.7 cd A{sup -1} in the single-EML device.

  8. Emission lines in the hydrogen-deficient variable MV Sagittarii near maximum light

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herbig, G.H.

    1975-01-01

    The H-deficient R CrB type variable MV Sgr near maximum light shows a rich emission spectrum in the 5800--8600 A region. Most of these lines are due to Fe ii, but Si ii, N i, O i, and Hα also are present. Such a spectrum has not been observed in any other R CrB star, but there is some resemblance to v Sgr. The emission lines in MV Sgr probably originate in an extended region of low temperature, which may also be responsible for the infrared excess observed by Feast and Glass

  9. Broadly tunable metal halide perovskites for solid-state light-emission applications

    OpenAIRE

    Adjokatse, Sampson; Fang, Hong-Hua; Loi, Maria Antonietta

    2017-01-01

    The past two years have witnessed heightened interest in metal-halide perovskites as promising optoelectronic materials for solid-state light emitting applications beyond photovoltaics. Metal-halide perovskites are low-cost solution-processable materials with excellent intrinsic properties such as broad tunability of bandgap, defect tolerance, high photoluminescence quantum efficiency and high emission color purity (narrow full-width at half maximum). In this review, the photophysical propert...

  10. Inherent Safety Feature of Hybrid Low Power Research Reactor during Reactivity Induced Accident

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, DongHyun; Yum, Soo Been; Hong, Sung Teak; Lim, In-Cheol [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    Hybrid low power research reactor(H-LPRR) is the new design concept of low power research reactor for critical facility as well as education and training. In the case of typical low power research reactor, the purposes of utilization are the experiments for education of nuclear engineering students, Neutron Activation Analysis(NAA) and radio-isotope production for research purpose. H-LPRR is a light-water cooled and moderated research reactor that uses rod-type LEU UO{sub 2} fuels same as those for commercial power plants. The maximum core thermal power is 70kW and, the core is placed in the bottom of open pool. There are 1 control rod and 2 shutdown rods in the core. It is designed to cool the core by natural convection, retain negative feedback coefficient for entire fuel periods and operate for 20 years without refueling. Inherent safety in H-LPRR is achieved by passive design features such as negative temperature feedback coefficient and core cooling by natural convection during normal and emergency conditions. The purpose of this study is to find out that the inherent safety characteristics of H-LPRR is able to control the power and protect the reactor from the RIA(Reactivity induced accident). RIA analysis was performed to investigate the inherent safety feature of H-LPRR. As a result, it was found that the reactor controls its power without fuel damage in the event and that the reactor remains safe states inherently. Therefore, it is believed that high degree of safety inheres in H-LPRR.

  11. Recent evidence concerning higher NO x emissions from passenger cars and light duty vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carslaw, David C.; Beevers, Sean D.; Tate, James E.; Westmoreland, Emily J.; Williams, Martin L.

    2011-12-01

    Ambient trends in nitrogen oxides (NO x) and nitrogen dioxide (NO 2) for many air pollution monitoring sites in European cities have stabilised in recent years. The lack of a decrease in the concentration of NO x and in particular NO 2 is of concern given European air quality standards are set in law. The lack of decrease in the concentration of NO x and NO 2 is also in clear disagreement with emission inventory estimates and projections. This work undertakes a comprehensive analysis of recent vehicle emissions remote sensing data from seven urban locations across the UK. The large sample size of 84,269 vehicles was carefully cross-referenced to a detailed and comprehensive database of vehicle information. We find that there are significant discrepancies between current UK/European estimates of NO x emissions and those derived from the remote sensing data for several important classes of vehicle. In the case of light duty diesel vehicles it is found that NO x emissions have changed little over 20 years or so over a period when the proportion of directly emitted NO 2 has increased substantially. For diesel cars it is found that absolute emissions of NO x are higher across all legislative classes than suggested by UK and other European emission inventories. Moreover, the analysis shows that more recent technology diesel cars (Euro 3-5) have clear increasing NO x emissions as a function of Vehicle Specific Power, which is absent for older technology vehicles. Under higher engine loads, these newer model diesel cars have a NO x/CO 2 ratio twice that of older model cars, which may be related to the increased use of turbo-charging. Current emissions of NO x from early technology catalyst-equipped petrol cars (Euro 1/2) were also found to be higher than emission inventory estimates - and comparable with NO x emissions from diesel cars. For heavy duty vehicles, it is found that NO x emissions were relatively stable until the introduction of Euro IV technology when

  12. Yellow light emission from Ta2O5:Er, Eu, Ce thin films deposited using a simple co-sputtering method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Miura

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Erbium, europium, and cerium co-doped tantalum oxide (Ta2O5:Er, Eu, Ce thin films were prepared using a simple co-sputtering method, and yellow light emission was observed by the naked eye from a sample annealed at 900 °C for 20 min. The hexagonal Ta2O5 phase is very important, but the hexagonal CeTa7O19 phase should be avoided to obtain strong yellow light emission from Ta2O5:Er, Eu, Ce films. The co-sputtered films can be used as high-refractive-index and yellow-light-emitting materials of autocloned photonic crystals that can be applied to novel light-emission devices, and they will also be used as anti-reflection and down-conversion layers toward high-efficiency silicon solar cells.

  13. Emission enhancement, light extraction and carrier dynamics in InGaAs/GaAs nanowire arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kivisaari, Pyry; Chen, Yang; Anttu, Nicklas

    2018-03-01

    Nanowires (NWs) have the potential for a wide range of new optoelectronic applications. For example, light-emitting diodes that span over the whole visible spectrum are currently being developed from NWs to overcome the well known green gap problem. However, due to their small size, NW devices exhibit special properties that complicate their analysis, characterization, and further development. In this paper, we develop a full optoelectronic simulation tool for NW array light emitters accounting for carrier transport and wave-optical emission enhancement (EE), and we use the model to simulate InGaAs/GaAs NW array light emitters with different geometries and temperatures. Our results show that NW arrays emit light preferentially to certain angles depending on the NW diameter and temperature, encouraging temperature- and angle-resolved measurements of NW array light emission. On the other hand, based on our results both the EE and light extraction efficiency can easily change by at least a factor of two between room temperature and 77 K, complicating the characterization of NW light emitters if conventional methods are used. Finally, simulations accounting for surface recombination emphasize its major effect on the device performance. For example, a surface recombination velocity of 104 cm s-1 reported earlier for bare InGaAs surfaces results in internal quantum efficiencies less than 30% for small-diameter NWs even at the temperature of 30 K. This highlights that core-shell structures or high-quality passivation techniques are eventually needed to achieve efficient NW-based light emitters.

  14. Red, green, blue and white light upconversion emission in Yb3+/Tm3+/Ho3+ co-doped tellurite glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Desirena, H; De la Rosa, E; Meza, O; Salas, P

    2011-01-01

    Several Yb 3+ /Tm 3+ /Ho 3+ co-doped transparent TeO 2 -ZnO-Na 2 O-Yb 2 O 3 -Ho 2 O 3 -Tm 2 O 3 glasses were prepared and luminescence properties were characterized. Simultaneous red, green and blue (RGB) emission were obtained after excitation at 970 nm. Colour emission was tuned from multicolour to white light with colour coordinate (0.32, 0.33) matching very well with the white reference (0.33, 0.33). Changes in colour emission were obtained by varying the intensity ratios between RGB bands that are strongly concentration dependent because of the interaction of co-dopants. The colour tunability, high quality of white light and high intensity of the emitted signal make these transparent glasses excellent candidates for applications in solid-state lighting.

  15. Estimation of light duty vehicle emissions in Islamabad and climate co-benefits of improved emission standards implementation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Izhar Hussain; Zeeshan, Muhammad

    2016-02-01

    Light Duty Vehicles (LDVs) hold a major share in Islamabad's vehicle fleet and their contribution towards air pollution has not been analyzed previously. Emissions for the base year (2014) and two optimistic 'what-if' scenarios were estimated by using the International Vehicle Emissions (IVE) model. Considering the recent implementation of Euro II as emission standard in Pakistan, scenario 1 assumed entire LDV fleet meeting at least Euro II standards while scenario 2 assumed all LDVs meeting Euro IV standards except motorcycles which would be meeting Euro III emission standards. Higher average age for all vehicles and lower share of Euro compliant vehicles was found in the base case. Low engine stress mode (lower speeds with frequent decelerations) was observed for all vehicles especially on arterials and residential roads. Highest overall emissions (59%) were observed on arterials, followed by residential roads (24%) and highways (17%) with higher emissions observed during morning (8-10 am) and evening (4-6 pm) rush hours. Composite emission factors were also calculated. Results reveal that 1094, 147, 11.1, 0.2 and 0.4 kt of CO2, CO, NOx, SO2 and PM10 respectively were emitted in 2014 by LDVs. Compared with the base year, scenario 1 showed a reduction of 9%, 69%, 73%, 13% and 31%, while scenario 2 exhibited a reduction of 5%, 92%, 90%, 92% and 81% for CO2, CO, NOx, SO2 and PM10 respectively. As compared to the base year, a 20 year CO2-equivalent Global Warming Potential (GWP) reduced by 55% and 64% under scenario 1 and 2 respectively, while a 100 year GWP reduced by 40% and 44% under scenario 1 and 2 respectively. Our results demonstrated significant co-benefits that could be achieved in emission reduction and air quality improvement in the city by vehicle technology implementation.

  16. In-situ TEM study on structural change and light emission of a multiwall carbon nanotube during Joule heating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishikawa, K.; Asaka, K.; Nakahara, H.; Saito, Y.

    2018-01-01

    Structure changes of a multiwall carbon nanotube (MWNT) during Joule heating were studied with simultaneous measurement of light emission spectra. The outer shells of the MWNT peeled off one by one because of excessive heating. All the peeled outer shells finally disappeared and inner shells whose tips were closed emerged, i.e., a new MWNT was formed. Each diameter of the shells comprising the MWNT decreased compared with those before the fracture. Light emission spectra during Joule heating of an MWNT were composed of both the blackbody radiation and characteristic peaks. The peaks in the light emission spectra shifted to higher energies in accordance with shrinkage of the inner shells. The energies of the peaks in the spectra corresponded to energy gaps between van Hove singularities calculated from the diameters of the shells, indicating that the peaks in the spectra are attributed to the interband electron transition in the MWNT.

  17. Ca²⁺ signal contributing to the synthesis and emission of monoterpenes regulated by light intensity in Lilium 'siberia'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Zenghui; Li, Tianjiao; Zheng, Jian; Yang, Kai; He, Xiangfeng; Leng, Pingsheng

    2015-06-01

    The floral scent is an important part of plant volatile compounds, and is influenced by environmental factors. The emission of monoterpenes of Lilium 'siberia' is regulated by light intensity, but the mechanism is large unknown. In this study, the expression of Li-mTPS, a monoterpene synthase gene in the tepals of Lilium 'siberia', and net Ca(2+) flux were investigated after exposure to different levels of light intensity (0, 100, 300, 600, 1000, and 1500 μmol m(-2) s(-1)). Moreover the effect of LaCl3 and ethylene glycol-bis-(2-aminoethylether)-N,N,N',N'-tetraacetic acid (EGTA) on the Li-mTPS expression, monoterpene emission, and net Ca(2+) flux were examined at 600 μmol m(-2) s(-1). The results showed that along with the enhancement of light intensity, the expression level of Li-mTPS increased gradually, and the net Ca(2+) influx was also enhanced showing a similar pattern. It was found that LaCl3 and EGTA effectively inhibited the increase in expression of Li-mTPS and the net Ca(2+) influx induced by light treatment. Moreover, the release amounts of monoterpenes decreased significantly after treatment with LaCl3 and EGTA. So it can be concluded that Ca(2+) signal contributed to the biosynthesis and emission of monoterpenes regulated by light intensity in Lilium 'siberia' tepals. The increased light intensity firstly triggered the Ca(2+) influx to cytoplasm, and then the gene expression of monoterpene synthases downstream was activated to regulate the biosynthesis and emission of monoterpenes. But in the signaling pathway other mechanisms were thought to be involved in the emission of monoterpenes regulated by light intensity, which need to be investigated in future research. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  18. Broadband sensitized white light emission of g-C_3N_4/Y_2MoO_6:Eu"3"+ composite phosphor under near ultraviolet excitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han, Bing; Xue, Yongfei; Li, Pengju; Zhang, Jingtao; Zhang, Jie; Shi, Hengzhen

    2015-01-01

    The g-C_3N_4/Y_2MoO_6:Eu"3"+ composite phosphors were synthesized and characterized by X-ray diffraction, Fourier transform-infrared spectroscopy, ultraviolet visible diffuse reflection spectra, photoluminescence spectra and luminescence decay curves. Under the excitation of 360 nm near ultraviolet light, these composite phosphors show tunable emission from blue to red region, in which white light emission can be obtained in term of appropriate quality proportion of Y_2MoO_6:Eu"3"+ relative to g-C_3N_4/Y_2MoO_6:Eu"3"+. In addition, the emission color can be also dependent on the excitation wavelength in g-C_3N_4/Y_2MoO_6:Eu"3"+ composite phosphor. - Graphical abstract: Under the excitation of 360 nm near ultraviolet light, the g-C_3N_4/Y_2MoO_6:Eu"3"+ composite phosphors show tunable emission from blue to red region, in which white light emission can be obtained. - Highlights: • The g-C3N4/Y2MoO6:Eu"3"+ composite phosphors were synthesized and characterized. • White light emission was realized in the g-C3N4/Y2MoO6:Eu"3"+ composites under UV excitation. • A novel idea to realize the broadband sensitized white light emission in phosphors was provided.

  19. Laboratory and field measurements of enantiomeric monoterpene emissions as a function of chemotype, light and temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, W.; Staudt, M.; Bourgeois, I.; Williams, J.

    2014-03-01

    Plants emit significant amounts of monoterpenes into the earth's atmosphere, where they react rapidly to form a multitude of gas phase species and particles. Many monoterpenes exist in mirror-image forms or enantiomers. In this study the enantiomeric monoterpene profile for several representative plants (Quercus ilex L., Rosmarinus officinalis L., and Pinus halepensis Mill.) was investigated as a function of chemotype, light and temperature both in the laboratory and in the field. Analysis of enantiomeric monoterpenes from 19 Quercus ilex individuals from Southern France and Spain revealed four regiospecific chemotypes (genetically fixed emission patterns). In agreement with previous work, only Quercus ilex emissions increased strongly with light. However, for all three plant species no consistent enantiomeric variation was observed as a function of light, and the enantiomeric ratio of α-pinene was found to vary by less than 20% from 100 and 1000 μmol m-2 s-1 PAR (photosynthetically active radiation). The rate of monoterpene emission increased with temperature from all three plant species, but little variation in the enantiomeric distribution of α-pinene was observed with temperature. There was more enantiomeric variability between individuals of the same species than could be induced by either light or temperature. Field measurements of α-pinene enantiomer mixing ratios in the air, taken at a Quercus ilex forest in Southern France, and several other previously reported field enantiomeric ratio diel cycle profiles are compared. All show smoothly varying diel cycles (some positive and some negative) even over changing wind directions. This is surprising in comparison with variations of enantiomeric emission patterns shown by individuals of the same species.

  20. Light particle and gamma ray emission measurements in heavy-ion reactions. Progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petitt, G.A.

    1982-01-01

    The development of a position-sensitive neutron detector and a data acquisition system at HHIRF for studying light particle emission in heavy ion reactions is described. Results are presented and discussed for the reactions 12 C + 158 Gd, 13 C + 157 Gd, and 20 Ne + 150 Nd

  1. Operation: Inherent Resolve

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cramer-Larsen, Lars

    2015-01-01

    Kapitlet giver læseren indsigt i den internationale koalitions engagement mod IS igennem Operaton Inherent Resolve; herunder koalitionens strategi i forhold til IS strategi, ligesom det belyser kampagnens legalitet og folkeretlige grundlag, ligesom det giver et bud på overvejelser om kampagnens...

  2. First approach to exhaust emissions characterization of light vehicles in Montevideo, Uruguay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Angelo, Mauro; González, Alice Elizabeth; Rezzano Tizze, Nicolás

    2018-03-15

    According to Act No. 17283 of November 28th, 2000, air quality protection is a general concern in Uruguay. Road transport is the main emitter of nitrogen oxides (NO x ), as the National Inventory of Air Emissions 2006 stated. Actually, it is responsible for the emissions of 59.8% of NO x and 28% of carbon monoxide (CO). The number of households owning a car in Uruguay increased from 29% in 2005 to 39% in 2013, enhancing the importance of characterizing the vehicular emissions of the national fleet. In this paper, a first approach for this characterization is presented. It was carried out on a sample of 11 light vehicles currently in use in Montevideo city, Uruguay. On-road emissions measurements of nitrogen monoxide (NO), carbon monoxide (CO) and carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) were carried out for calculating the emission factors. The fitness of the set of calculated emission factors values to different probability distributions was tested. When possible, the 95% confidence intervals were obtained for the mean emission factors (CO: 2.0g/km±0.3g/km; NO: 0.05g/km±0.01g/km). This procedure was useful to obtaining accurate confidence intervals from a relatively small sample size. Finally, the link between atmospheric emissions and some other parameters of the tested vehicles was studied using a multivariate statistical tool, highlighting the strong increase in carbon monoxide emissions observed for low vehicles speeds and fuel efficiencies. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Time- and space-resolved light emission and spectroscopic research of the flashover plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gleizer, J. Z.; Krasik, Ya. E. [Physics Department, Technion, Haifa 32000 (Israel); Leopold, J. [Department of Applied Physics, Rafael Laboratories, Box 2250, Haifa 31021 (Israel)

    2015-02-21

    The results of an experimental study of the evolution of surface flashover across the surface of an insulator in vacuum subject to a high-voltage pulse and the parameters of the flashover plasma are reported. For the system studied, flashover is always initiated at the cathode triple junctions. Using time-resolved framing photography of the plasma light emission the velocity of the light emission propagation along the surface of the insulator was found to be ∼2.5·10{sup 8} cm/s. Spectroscopic measurements show that the flashover is characterized by a plasma density of 2–4 × 10{sup 14} cm{sup −3} and neutral and electron temperatures of 2–4 eV and 1–3 eV, respectively, corresponding to a plasma conductivity of ∼0.2 Ω{sup −1} cm{sup −1} and a discharge current density of up to ∼10 kA/cm{sup 2}.

  4. Light vehicle energy efficiency programs and their impact on Brazilian CO2 emissions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wills, William; La Rovere, Emilio Lebre

    2010-01-01

    This paper analyses the impact of an energy efficiency program for light vehicles in Brazil on emissions of carbon dioxide (CO 2 ), the main greenhouse gas in the atmosphere. Several energy efficiency programs for light vehicles around the world are reviewed. The cases of Japan and Europe were selected for presentation here given their status as current and future world leaders in the control of passenger vehicle fuel consumption. The launching of the National Climate Change Plan and the pressure on the Brazilian car industry due to the world financial crisis make it a good time for the Brazilian government to implement such a program, and its various benefits are highlighted in this study. Three scenarios are established for Brazil covering the 2000-2030 period: the first with no efficiency goals, the second with the Japanese goals applied with a 10 years delay, and the third, with the Japanese goals applied with no delay. The consequences of a vehicular efficiency program and its middle and long-term effects on the consumption of energy and the CO 2 emissions are quantified and discussed. The simulation results indicate that efficiency goals may make an important contribution to reducing vehicular emissions and fuel consumption in Brazil, compared to a baseline scenario.

  5. [The spectrogram characteristics of organic blue-emissive light-emitting excitated YAG : Ce phosphor].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xi, Jian-Fei; Zhang, Fang-Hui; Mu, Qiang; Zhang, Mai-Li

    2011-09-01

    It is demonstrated that the panchromatic luminescence devices with organic blue-emissive light-emitting was fabricated. This technique used down conversion, which was already popular in inorganic power LEDs to obtain white light emission. A blue OLED device with a configuration of ITO/2T-NATA (30 nm)/AND : TBPe (50 Wt%, 40 nm)/Alq3 (100 nm)/LiF(1 nm)/Al(100 nm) was prepared via vacuum deposition process, and then coated with YAG : Ce phosphor layers of different thicknesses to obtain a controllable and uniform shape while the CIE coordinates were fine tuned. This development not only decreased steps of technics and degree of difficulty, but also applied the mature technology of phosphor. The results showed that steady spectrogram was obtained in the devices with phosphor, with a best performance of a maximum luminance of 13 840 cd x m(-2) which was about 2 times of that of the devices without phosphor; a maximum current efficiency of 17.3 cd x A(-1) was increased more two times more than the devices without phosphor. The emission spectrum could be adjusted by varying the concentration and thickness of the phosphor layers. Absoulte spectrogram of devices was in direct proportion with different driving current corresponding.

  6. Observations and models of emissions of volatile terpenoid compounds from needles of ponderosa pine trees growing in situ: control by light, temperature and stomatal conductance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harley, Peter; Eller, Allyson; Guenther, Alex; Monson, Russell K

    2014-09-01

    Terpenoid emissions from ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa subsp. scopulorum) were measured in Colorado, USA over two growing seasons to evaluate the role of incident light, needle temperature, and stomatal conductance in controlling emissions of 2-methyl-3-buten-2-ol (MBO) and several monoterpenes. MBO was the dominant daylight terpenoid emission, comprising on average 87% of the total flux, and diurnal variations were largely determined by light and temperature. During daytime, oxygenated monoterpenes (especially linalool) comprised up to 75% of the total monoterpenoid flux from needles. A significant fraction of monoterpenoid emissions was dependent on light and 13CO2 labeling studies confirmed de novo production. Thus, modeling of monoterpenoid emissions required a hybrid model in which a significant fraction of emissions was dependent on both light and temperature, while the remainder was dependent on temperature alone. Experiments in which stomata were forced to close using abscisic acid demonstrated that MBO and a large fraction of the monoterpene flux, presumably linalool, could be limited at the scale of seconds to minutes by stomatal conductance. Using a previously published model of terpenoid emissions, which explicitly accounts for the physicochemical properties of emitted compounds, we were able to simulate these observed stomatal effects, whether induced experimentally or arising under naturally fluctuation conditions of temperature and light. This study shows unequivocally that, under naturally occurring field conditions, de novo light-dependent monoterpenes comprise a significant fraction of emissions in ponderosa pine. Differences between the monoterpene composition of ambient air and needle emissions imply a significant non-needle emission source enriched in Δ-3-carene.

  7. Observations and models of emissions of volatile terpenoid compounds from needles of ponderosa pine trees growing in situ: control by light, temperature and stomatal conductance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harley, Peter; Eller, Allyson; Guenther, Alex; Monson, Russell K.

    2014-07-12

    Terpenoid emissions from ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa subsp. scopulorum) were measured in Colorado, USA over two growing seasons to evaluate the role of incident light, needle temperature and stomatal conductance in controlling emissions of 2-methyl-3-buten-2-ol (MBO) and several monoterpenes. MBO was the dominant daylight terpenoid emission, comprising on average 87% of the total flux, and diurnal variations were largely determined by light and temperature. During daytime, oxygenated monoterpenes (especially linalool) comprised up to 75% of the total monoterpenoid flux from needles. A significant fraction of monoterpenoid emissions was light dependent and 13CO2 labeling studies confirmed de novo production. Thus, modeling of monoterpenoid emissions required a hybrid model in which a significant fraction of emissions was dependent on both light and temperature, while the remainder was dependent on temperature alone. Experiments in which stomata were forced to close using abscisic acid demonstrated that MBO and a large fraction of the monoterpene flux, presumably linalool, could be limited at the scale of seconds to minutes by stomatal conductance. Using a previously published model of terpenoid emissions which explicitly accounts for the physico-chemical properties of emitted compounds, we are able to simulate these observed stomatal effects, whether induced through experimentation or arising under naturally fluctuation conditions of temperature and light. This study shows unequivocally that, under naturally occurring field conditions, de novo light dependent monoterpenes can comprise a large fraction of emissions. Differences between the monoterpene composition of ambient air and needle emissions imply a significant non-needle emission source enriched in Δ-3-carene.

  8. White top-emitting organic light-emitting diodes using one-emissive layer of the DCJTB doped DPVBi layer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, M.S.; Jeong, C.H.; Lim, J.T. [Department of Advanced Materials Science and Engineering, Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon, Gyonggi-Do, 440-746 (Korea, Republic of); Yeom, G.Y. [Department of Advanced Materials Science and Engineering, Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon, Gyonggi-Do, 440-746 (Korea, Republic of); The National Program for Tera-level Devices, Hawolgok-dong, Sungbuk-gu, Seoul, 136-791 (Korea, Republic of)], E-mail: gyyeom@skku.edu

    2008-04-01

    White top-emitting organic light-emitting diodes (TEOLEDs) composed of one doped emissive layer which emits two-wavelength light though the radiative recombination were fabricated. As the emissive layer, 4,4-bis(2,2-diphenylethen-1-yl)biphenyl (DPVBi) was used as the host material and 4-(dicyanomethylene)-2-tert-butyl-6-(1,1,7,7-tetramethyljulolidyl-9-enyl) -4H-pyran (DCJTB) was added as the dopant material. By optimizing the DCJTB concentration (1.2%) and the thickness of the DPVBi layer (30 nm), the intensity ratio of the two wavelengths could be adjusted for balanced white light emission. By using the device composed of glass/Ag (100 nm)/ITO (90 nm)/2-TNATA (60 nm)/NPB (15 nm)/DPVBi:DCJTB (1.2%, 30 nm)/Alq{sub 3} (20 nm)/Li (1.0 nm)/Al (2.0 nm)/Ag (20 nm)/ITO (63 nm)/SiO{sub 2} (42 nm), the Commission Internationale d'Eclairage (CIE) chromaticity coordinate of (0.32, 0.34) close to the ideal white color CIE coordinate could be obtained at 100 cd/m{sup 2}.

  9. Light Converting Inorganic Phosphors for White Light-Emitting Diodes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chiao-Wen Yeh

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available White light-emitting diodes (WLEDs have matched the emission efficiency of florescent lights and will rapidly spread as light source for homes and offices in the next 5 to 10 years. WLEDs provide a light element having a semiconductor light emitting layer (blue or near-ultraviolet (nUV LEDs and photoluminescence phosphors. These solid-state LED lamps, rather than organic light emitting diode (OLED or polymer light-emitting diode (PLED, have a number of advantages over conventional incandescent bulbs and halogen lamps, such as high efficiency to convert electrical energy into light, reliability and long operating lifetime. To meet with the further requirement of high color rendering index, warm light with low color temperature, high thermal stability and higher energy efficiency for WLEDs, new phosphors that can absorb excitation energy from blue or nUV LEDs and generate visible emissions efficiently are desired. The criteria of choosing the best phosphors, for blue (450-480 nm and nUV (380-400 nm LEDs, strongly depends on the absorption and emission of the phosphors. Moreover, the balance of light between the emission from blue-nUV LEDs and the emissions from phosphors (such as yellow from Y3Al5O12:Ce3+ is important to obtain white light with proper color rendering index and color temperature. Here, we will review the status of phosphors for LEDs and prospect the future development.

  10. Light Converting Inorganic Phosphors for White Light-Emitting Diodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Lei; Lin, Chun-Che; Yeh, Chiao-Wen; Liu, Ru-Shi

    2010-01-01

    White light-emitting diodes (WLEDs) have matched the emission efficiency of florescent lights and will rapidly spread as light source for homes and offices in the next 5 to 10 years. WLEDs provide a light element having a semiconductor light emitting layer (blue or near-ultraviolet (nUV) LEDs) and photoluminescence phosphors. These solid-state LED lamps, rather than organic light emitting diode (OLED) or polymer light-emitting diode (PLED), have a number of advantages over conventional incandescent bulbs and halogen lamps, such as high efficiency to convert electrical energy into light, reliability and long operating lifetime. To meet with the further requirement of high color rendering index, warm light with low color temperature, high thermal stability and higher energy efficiency for WLEDs, new phosphors that can absorb excitation energy from blue or nUV LEDs and generate visible emissions efficiently are desired. The criteria of choosing the best phosphors, for blue (450−480 nm) and nUV (380−400 nm) LEDs, strongly depends on the absorption and emission of the phosphors. Moreover, the balance of light between the emission from blue-nUV LEDs and the emissions from phosphors (such as yellow from Y3Al5O12:Ce3+) is important to obtain white light with proper color rendering index and color temperature. Here, we will review the status of phosphors for LEDs and prospect the future development.

  11. Non-classical light emission from single conjugated polymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollars, Christopher; Lane, Stephen; Huser, Thomas

    2002-03-01

    Photon-antibunching from single, isolated molecules of collapsed-chain poly[2-methoxy,5-(2’-ethyl-hexyloxy)-p-phenylene-vinylene] (MEH-PPV) has been observed using confocal microscopy techniques. Efficient inter-segment energy transfer in collapsed-chain conjugated polymers leads to emission from an average of only 2-3 active sites on a polymer chain that is composed of hundreds of quasi-chromophores. These few centers consist of the segments with the lowest excitation energy and are supplied by the efficient light-harvesting and energy transfer of the surrounding higher-energy segments. This effect depends on the conformation of the polymer molecules, which is controlled by solvent polarity. These results provide new insight into the controversial photophysics of conjugated polymers and their application in optoelectronic devices.

  12. Color improvement of white-light through Mn-enhancing yellow-green emission of SrSi2O2N2:Eu phosphor for white light emitting diodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fei Qinni; Liu Yanhua; Gu Tiecheng; Wang Dajian

    2011-01-01

    Photoluminescence (PL) enhancement of SrSi 2 O 2 N 2 :Eu and the resultant color improvement of white-light were investigated via co-doping Mn with Eu. We observed that a unique absorption of host lattice of SrSi 2 O 2 N 2 and its visible band emission peaked at around ∼550 nm for SrSi 2 O 2 N 2 :Mn 2+ in the wavelength range of 450-600 nm. This highly eye-sensitive ∼550 nm-peaked band emission of SrSi 2 O 2 N 2 doped with Mn 2+ happens to overlap the 535 nm-peaked band emission of SrSi 2 O 2 N 2 doped with Eu 2+ , resulting in an intensified photoluminescence in a maximum by 355%. By combining this as-prepared Mn intensified SrSi 2 O 2 N 2 :Eu phosphor with blue InGaN chip, the quality of white-light was improved to 93.3% for color rendering index and 3584 K for correlated color temperature. - Research highlights: Photoluminescence enhancement and resultant color improvement of SrSi 2 O 2 N 2 : Eu can be adjusted via co-doping Mn with Eu. The band emission peaked at ∼550 for Mn2+ overlaps that at ∼535 nm for Eu 2+ . A white-light with 93.3% for CRI and 3584 K for CCT is achieved.

  13. The influence on intrinsic light emission of calcium tungstate and molybdate powders by multivalence Pr codoping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu, Fang; Xiao, Zhisong; Yan, Lu; Zhang, Feng; Huang, Anping

    2010-01-01

    For trivalent praseodymium (Pr 3+ ) and quadrivalent praseodymium (Pr 4+ ) codoped CaMO 4 (M = W, Mo) powders, the luminescence propriety of matrix is obviously influenced by carrier concentration. The light emission intensity of CaWO 4 matrix decreases exponentially with increasing of Pr concentration because oxygen-deficient (WO 3 .V O ) obtains an electron supplied by Pr 3+ (5d). However, the light emission intensity of CaMoO 4 is enhanced by Pr codoping because the quasi-free electrons increase the probability of radiative combination. The difference of photoluminescence properties in the two materials are attributed to the bonding character of M and O in the CaMO 4 structure. (orig.)

  14. Efficient organic light-emitting devices with platinum-complex emissive layer

    KAUST Repository

    Yang, Xiaohui

    2011-01-18

    We report efficient organic light-emitting devices having a platinum-complex emissive layer with the peak external quantum efficiency of 17.5% and power efficiency of 45 lm W−1. Variation in the device performance with platinum-complex layer thickness can be attributed to the interplay between carrier recombination and intermolecular interactions in the layer. Efficient white devices using double platinum-complex layers show the external quantum efficiency of 10%, the Commission Internationale d’Énclairage coordinates of (0.42, 0.41), and color rendering index of 84 at 1000 cd m−2.

  15. Efficient organic light-emitting devices with platinum-complex emissive layer

    KAUST Repository

    Yang, Xiaohui; Wu, Fang-Iy; Haverinen, Hanna; Li, Jian; Cheng, Chien-Hong; Jabbour, Ghassan E.

    2011-01-01

    We report efficient organic light-emitting devices having a platinum-complex emissive layer with the peak external quantum efficiency of 17.5% and power efficiency of 45 lm W−1. Variation in the device performance with platinum-complex layer thickness can be attributed to the interplay between carrier recombination and intermolecular interactions in the layer. Efficient white devices using double platinum-complex layers show the external quantum efficiency of 10%, the Commission Internationale d’Énclairage coordinates of (0.42, 0.41), and color rendering index of 84 at 1000 cd m−2.

  16. CORRELATION OF HARD X-RAY AND WHITE LIGHT EMISSION IN SOLAR FLARES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuhar, Matej; Krucker, Säm; Battaglia, Marina; Kleint, Lucia; Casadei, Diego [University of Applied Sciences and Arts Northwestern Switzerland, Bahnhofstrasse 6, 5210 Windisch (Switzerland); Oliveros, Juan Carlos Martinez; Hudson, Hugh S. [Space Sciences Laboratory, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720-7450 (United States)

    2016-01-01

    A statistical study of the correlation between hard X-ray and white light emission in solar flares is performed in order to search for a link between flare-accelerated electrons and white light formation. We analyze 43 flares spanning GOES classes M and X using observations from the Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager and Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager. We calculate X-ray fluxes at 30 keV and white light fluxes at 6173 Å summed over the hard X-ray flare ribbons with an integration time of 45 s around the peak hard-X ray time. We find a good correlation between hard X-ray fluxes and excess white light fluxes, with a highest correlation coefficient of 0.68 for photons with energy of 30 keV. Assuming the thick target model, a similar correlation is found between the deposited power by flare-accelerated electrons and the white light fluxes. The correlation coefficient is found to be largest for energy deposition by electrons above ∼50 keV. At higher electron energies the correlation decreases gradually while a rapid decrease is seen if the energy provided by low-energy electrons is added. This suggests that flare-accelerated electrons of energy ∼50 keV are the main source for white light production.

  17. Lattice-matched double dip-shaped BAlGaN/AlN quantum well structures for ultraviolet light emission devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Seoung-Hwan; Ahn, Doyeol

    2018-05-01

    Ultraviolet light emission characteristics of lattice-matched BxAlyGa1-x-y N/AlN quantum well (QW) structures with double AlGaN delta layers were investigated theoretically. In contrast to conventional single dip-shaped QW structure where the reduction effect of the spatial separation between electron and hole wave functions is negligible, proposed double dip-shaped QW shows significant enhancement of the ultraviolet light emission intensity from a BAlGaN/AlN QW structure due to the reduced spatial separation between electron and hole wave functions. The emission peak of the double dip-shaped QW structure is expected to be about three times larger than that of the conventional rectangular AlGaN/AlN QW structure.

  18. Transparent organic light-emitting diodes with different bi-directional emission colors using color-conversion capping layers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jonghee, E-mail: jonghee.lee@etri.re.kr [OLED Research Center, Electronics and Telecommunications Research Institute (ETRI), Daejeon 305-700 (Korea, Republic of); Institut für Angewandte Photophysik, Technische Universität Dresden, George-Bähr-Straße 1, 01062 Dresden (Germany); Koh, Tae-Wook [Department of Electrical Engineering, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (KAIST), Daejeon 305-701 (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Hyunsu [OLED Research Center, Electronics and Telecommunications Research Institute (ETRI), Daejeon 305-700 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Electrical Engineering, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (KAIST), Daejeon 305-701 (Korea, Republic of); Schwab, Tobias [Institut für Angewandte Photophysik, Technische Universität Dresden, George-Bähr-Straße 1, 01062 Dresden (Germany); Lee, Jae-Hyun [Department School of Global Convergence Studies, Hanbat National University, San 16-1, Duckmyoung-dong, Daejeon 305-719 (Korea, Republic of); Hofmann, Simone [Institut für Angewandte Photophysik, Technische Universität Dresden, George-Bähr-Straße 1, 01062 Dresden (Germany); Lee, Jeong-Ik [OLED Research Center, Electronics and Telecommunications Research Institute (ETRI), Daejeon 305-700 (Korea, Republic of); Yoo, Seunghyup [Department of Electrical Engineering, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (KAIST), Daejeon 305-701 (Korea, Republic of); and others

    2015-06-15

    We report a study on transparent organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) with different bi-directional emission colors, enabled by color-conversion organic capping layers. Starting from a transparent blue OLED with an uncapped Ag top electrode exhibiting an average transmittance of 33.9%, a 4-(dicyanomethylene)-2-methyl-6-(4-dimethylaminostyryl)-4H-pyran (DCM)-doped tris-(8-hydroxy-quinolinato)-aluminum (Alq3) capping layer is applied to achieve color-conversion from blue to orange-red on the top side while maintaining almost unchanged device transmittance. This color-conversion capping layer does not only change the color of the top side emission, but also enhances the overall device efficiency due to the optical interaction of the capping layer with the primary blue transparent OLED. Top white emission from the transparent bi-directional OLED exhibits a correlated color temperature around 6000–7000 K, with excellent color stability as evidenced by an extremely small variation in color coordinate of Δ(x,y)=(0.002, 0.002) in the forward luminance range of 100–1000 cd m{sup −2}. At the same time, the blue emission color of bottom side is not influenced by the color conversion capping layer, which finally results in different emission colors of the two opposite sides of our transparent OLEDs. - Highlights: • We report transparent organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) with different bi-directional emission colors. • Transparent blue OLED with color-conversion organic capping layers (CCL) shows orange top side emission. • Top white emission exhibits a CCT around 7000 K, with excellent color stability on a driving voltage.

  19. Transparent organic light-emitting diodes with different bi-directional emission colors using color-conversion capping layers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jonghee; Koh, Tae-Wook; Cho, Hyunsu; Schwab, Tobias; Lee, Jae-Hyun; Hofmann, Simone; Lee, Jeong-Ik; Yoo, Seunghyup

    2015-01-01

    We report a study on transparent organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) with different bi-directional emission colors, enabled by color-conversion organic capping layers. Starting from a transparent blue OLED with an uncapped Ag top electrode exhibiting an average transmittance of 33.9%, a 4-(dicyanomethylene)-2-methyl-6-(4-dimethylaminostyryl)-4H-pyran (DCM)-doped tris-(8-hydroxy-quinolinato)-aluminum (Alq3) capping layer is applied to achieve color-conversion from blue to orange-red on the top side while maintaining almost unchanged device transmittance. This color-conversion capping layer does not only change the color of the top side emission, but also enhances the overall device efficiency due to the optical interaction of the capping layer with the primary blue transparent OLED. Top white emission from the transparent bi-directional OLED exhibits a correlated color temperature around 6000–7000 K, with excellent color stability as evidenced by an extremely small variation in color coordinate of Δ(x,y)=(0.002, 0.002) in the forward luminance range of 100–1000 cd m −2 . At the same time, the blue emission color of bottom side is not influenced by the color conversion capping layer, which finally results in different emission colors of the two opposite sides of our transparent OLEDs. - Highlights: • We report transparent organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) with different bi-directional emission colors. • Transparent blue OLED with color-conversion organic capping layers (CCL) shows orange top side emission. • Top white emission exhibits a CCT around 7000 K, with excellent color stability on a driving voltage

  20. The determination of light elements in heavy matrix using proton induced X-ray emission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levenets, V.V.; Omel'nik, A.P.; Shchur, A.A.; Chernov, A.E.; Usikov, N.P.; Zats, A.V.

    2007-01-01

    In this report the possibility of determination of light impurities in heavy matrixes is studied using proton induced X-Ray emission. The wide-band X-ray emission filter made from pyrolytic graphite was used in spectrometric scheme of experiment. The results of studying of filter features in energy range of X-ray emission from 4 to 12 keV were presented. The possibilities were examined of application of pyrolytic graphite filter to modify the X-rays spectrum for determination of iron, using characteristic emission of K-series, and hafnium, using L-series, in substances on base of zirconium (glasses, alloys etc.). It was shown, that the using of similar filter allows to reach the significant improving of metrological characteristics of analysis of mentioned impurities: the limits of detection of iron and hafnium were lowered single-order of magnitude. (authors)

  1. Prospects for inherently safe reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barkenbus, J.N.

    1988-01-01

    Public fears over nuclear safety have led some within the nuclear community to investigate the possibility of producing inherently safe nuclear reactors; that is, reactors that are transparently incapable of producing a core melt. While several promising designs of such reactors have been produced, support for large-scale research and development efforts has not been forthcoming. The prospects for commercialization of inherently safe reactors, therefore, are problematic; possible events such as further nuclear reactor accidents and superpower summits, could alter the present situation significantly. (author)

  2. ZnO nanopowder induced light scattering for improved visualization of emission sites in carbon nanotube films and arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meško, Marcel; Ou, Qiongrong; Matsuda, Takafumi; Ishikawa, Tomokazu; Veis, Martin; Antoš, Roman; Ogino, Akihisa; Nagatsu, Masaaki

    2009-06-01

    We report on ZnO nanopowder induced light scattering for improved visualization of emission sites in carbon nanotube films and arrays. We observed a significant reduction of the internal multiple light scattering phenomena, which are characteristic for ZnO micropowders. The microsized grains of the commercially available ZnO:Zn (P 15) were reduced to the nanometre scale by pulsed laser ablation at an oxygen ambient pressure of 10 kPa. Our investigations show no crystalline change and no shift of the broad green emission peak at 500 nm for the ZnO nanopowder. For the application in field emission displays, we demonstrate the possibility of achieving cathodoluminescence with a fine pitch size of 100 µm of the patterned pixels without requiring additional electron beam focusing and without a black matrix. Moreover, the presented results show the feasibility of employing ZnO nanopowder as a detection material for the phosphorus screen method, which is able to localize emission sites of carbon nanotube films and arrays with an accuracy comparable to scanning anode field emission microscopy.

  3. ZnO nanopowder induced light scattering for improved visualization of emission sites in carbon nanotube films and arrays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mesko, Marcel; Ou Qiongrong; Matsuda, Takafumi; Ishikawa, Tomokazu; Ogino, Akihisa; Nagatsu, Masaaki; Veis, Martin; Antos, Roman

    2009-01-01

    We report on ZnO nanopowder induced light scattering for improved visualization of emission sites in carbon nanotube films and arrays. We observed a significant reduction of the internal multiple light scattering phenomena, which are characteristic for ZnO micropowders. The microsized grains of the commercially available ZnO:Zn (P 15) were reduced to the nanometre scale by pulsed laser ablation at an oxygen ambient pressure of 10 kPa. Our investigations show no crystalline change and no shift of the broad green emission peak at 500 nm for the ZnO nanopowder. For the application in field emission displays, we demonstrate the possibility of achieving cathodoluminescence with a fine pitch size of 100 μm of the patterned pixels without requiring additional electron beam focusing and without a black matrix. Moreover, the presented results show the feasibility of employing ZnO nanopowder as a detection material for the phosphorus screen method, which is able to localize emission sites of carbon nanotube films and arrays with an accuracy comparable to scanning anode field emission microscopy.

  4. Strongly transverse-electric-polarized emission from deep ultraviolet AlGaN quantum well light emitting diodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reich, Christoph, E-mail: Christoph.Reich@tu-berlin.de; Guttmann, Martin; Wernicke, Tim; Mehnke, Frank; Kuhn, Christian [Institut für Festkörperphysik, Technische Universität Berlin, Hardenbergstr. 36, Berlin 10623 (Germany); Feneberg, Martin; Goldhahn, Rüdiger [Institut für Experimentelle Physik, Otto-von-Guericke-Universität, Universitätsplatz 2, Magdeburg 39106 (Germany); Rass, Jens; Kneissl, Michael [Institut für Festkörperphysik, Technische Universität Berlin, Hardenbergstr. 36, Berlin 10623 (Germany); Ferdinand-Braun-Institut, Leibniz-Institut für Höchstfrequenztechnik, Gustav-Kirchhoff-Str. 4, Berlin 12489 (Germany); Lapeyrade, Mickael; Einfeldt, Sven; Knauer, Arne; Kueller, Viola; Weyers, Markus [Ferdinand-Braun-Institut, Leibniz-Institut für Höchstfrequenztechnik, Gustav-Kirchhoff-Str. 4, Berlin 12489 (Germany)

    2015-10-05

    The optical polarization of emission from ultraviolet (UV) light emitting diodes (LEDs) based on (0001)-oriented Al{sub x}Ga{sub 1−x}N multiple quantum wells (MQWs) has been studied by simulations and electroluminescence measurements. With increasing aluminum mole fraction in the quantum well x, the in-plane intensity of transverse-electric (TE) polarized light decreases relative to that of the transverse-magnetic polarized light, attributed to a reordering of the valence bands in Al{sub x}Ga{sub 1−x}N. Using k ⋅ p theoretical model calculations, the AlGaN MQW active region design has been optimized, yielding increased TE polarization and thus higher extraction efficiency for bottom-emitting LEDs in the deep UV spectral range. Using (i) narrow quantum wells, (ii) barriers with high aluminum mole fractions, and (iii) compressive growth on patterned aluminum nitride sapphire templates, strongly TE-polarized emission was observed at wavelengths as short as 239 nm.

  5. Strong blue and white photoluminescence emission of BaZrO{sub 3} undoped and lanthanide doped phosphor for light emitting diodes application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Romero, V.H. [Centro de Investigaciones en Optica, A. P. 1-948, Leon Gto., 37160 (Mexico); De la Rosa, E., E-mail: elder@cio.mx [Centro de Investigaciones en Optica, A. P. 1-948, Leon Gto., 37160 (Mexico); Salas, P. [Centro de Fisica Aplicada y Tecnologia Avanzada, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, A.P. 1-1010, Queretaro, Qro. 76000 (Mexico); Velazquez-Salazar, J.J. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, The University of Texas at San Antonio One UTSA Circle, San Antonio TX 78249 (United States)

    2012-12-15

    In this paper, we report the obtained strong broadband blue photoluminescence (PL) emission centered at 427 nm for undoped BaZrO{sub 3} observed after 266 nm excitation of submicron crystals prepared by hydrothermal/calcinations method. This emission is enhanced with the introduction of Tm{sup 3+} ions and is stronger than the characteristic PL blue emission of such lanthanide. The proposed mechanism of relaxation for host lattice emission is based on the presence of oxygen vacancies produced during the synthesis process and the charge compensation due to the difference in the electron valence between dopant and substituted ion in the host. Brilliant white light emission with a color coordinate of (x=0.29, y=0.32) was observed by combining the blue PL emission from the host with the green and red PL emission from Tb{sup 3+} and Eu{sup 3+} ions, respectively. The color coordinate can be tuned by changing the ratio between blue, green and red band by changing the concentration of lanthanides. - Graphical abstract: Strong blue emission from undoped BaZrO{sub 3} phosphor and white light emission by doping with Tb{sup 3+} (green) and Eu{sup 3+} (red) after 266 nm excitation. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Blue emission from BaZrO{sub 3} phosphor. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Blue emission enhanced with Tm{sup 3+}. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer White light from BaZrO{sup 3+} phosphor.

  6. Spontaneous light emission in complex nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanco, L. A.; García de Abajo, F. J.

    2004-05-01

    The spontaneous emission of an excited atom surrounded by different materials is studied in the framework of a semiclassical approach, where the transition dipole moment acts as the source of the emission field. The emission in the presence of semiinfinite media, metallic nanorings, spheres, gratings, and other complex geometries is investigated. Strong emission enhancement effects are obtained in some of these geometries associated to the excitation of plasmons (e.g., in nanorings or spheres). Furthermore, the emission is shown to take place only along narrow angular distributions when the atom is located inside a low-index dielectric and near its planar surface, or when metallic nanogratings are employed at certain resonant wave lengths. In particular, axially symmetric gratings made of real silver metal are considered, and both emission rate enhancement and focused far-field emission are achieved simultaneously when the grating is decorated with further nanostructures.

  7. High-Power and High-Efficiency 1.3- µm Superluminescent Diode With Flat-Top and Ultrawide Emission Bandwidth

    KAUST Repository

    Khan, Mohammed Zahed Mustafa; Alhashim, Hala H.; Ng, Tien Khee; Ooi, Boon S.

    2015-01-01

    We report on a flat-top and ultrawide emission bandwidth of 125 nm from InGaAsP/InP multiple quantum-well (MQW) superluminescent diode with antireflection coated and tilted ridge-waveguide device configuration. A total output power in excess of 70 mW with an average power spectral density of 0.56 mW/nm and spectral ripple ≤ 1.2 ± 0.5 dB is measured from the device. Wall-plug efficiency and output power as high as 14% and 80 mW, respectively, is demonstrated from this batch of devices. We attribute the broad emission to the inherent inhomogeneity of the electron-heavy-hole (e-hh) and electron-light-hole (e-lh) recombination of the ground state and the first excited state of the MQWs and their simultaneous emission.

  8. High-Power and High-Efficiency 1.3- µm Superluminescent Diode With Flat-Top and Ultrawide Emission Bandwidth

    KAUST Repository

    Khan, Mohammed Zahed Mustafa

    2015-02-01

    We report on a flat-top and ultrawide emission bandwidth of 125 nm from InGaAsP/InP multiple quantum-well (MQW) superluminescent diode with antireflection coated and tilted ridge-waveguide device configuration. A total output power in excess of 70 mW with an average power spectral density of 0.56 mW/nm and spectral ripple ≤ 1.2 ± 0.5 dB is measured from the device. Wall-plug efficiency and output power as high as 14% and 80 mW, respectively, is demonstrated from this batch of devices. We attribute the broad emission to the inherent inhomogeneity of the electron-heavy-hole (e-hh) and electron-light-hole (e-lh) recombination of the ground state and the first excited state of the MQWs and their simultaneous emission.

  9. Hot electron light emission in gallium arsenide/aluminium(x) gallium(1-x) arsenic heterostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teke, Ali

    In this thesis we have demonstrated the operation of a novel tunable wavelength surface light emitting device. The device is based on a p-GaAs, and n-Ga1- xAlxAs heterojunction containing an inversion layer on the p- side, and GaAs quantum wells on the n- side, and, is referred to as HELLISH-2 (Hot Electron Light Emitting and Lasing in Semiconductor Heterostructure-Type 2). The devices utilise hot electron longitudinal transport and, therefore, light emission is independent of the polarity of the applied voltage. The wavelength of the emitted light can be tuned with the applied bias from GaAs band-to-band transition in the inversion layer to e1-hh1 transition in the quantum wells. In this work tunable means that the device can be operated at either single or multiple wavelength emission. The operation of the device requires only two diffused in point contacts. In this project four HELLISH-2 samples coded as ES1, ES2, ES6 and QT919 have been studied. First three samples were grown by MBE and the last one was grown by MOVPE techniques. ES1 was designed for single and double wavelength operation. ES2 was a control sample used to compare our results with previous work on HELLISH-2 and ES6 was designed for single, double and triple wavelength operation. Theoretical modelling of the device operation was carried out and compared with the experimental results. HELLISH-2 structure was optimised for low threshold and high efficiency operation as based on our model calculations. The last sample QT919 has been designed as an optimised device for single and double wavelength operation like ES1. HELLISH-2 has a number of advantages over the conventional light emitters, resulting in some possible applications, such as light logic gates and wavelength division multiplexing in optoelectronic.

  10. Cold Temperature Effects on Speciated VOC Emissions from Modern GDI Light-Duty Vehicles 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    In this study, speciated VOC emissions were characterized from three modern GDI light-duty vehicles. The vehicles were tested on a chassis dynamometer housed in a climate-controlled chamber at two temperatures (20 and 72 °F) using the EPA Federal Test Procedure (FTP) and a portio...

  11. Spectrally-balanced chromatic approach-lighting system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chase, W. D.

    1977-01-01

    Approach lighting system employing combinations of red and blue lights reduces problem of color-based optical illusions. System exploits inherent chromatic aberration of eye to create three-dimensional effect, giving pilot visual clues of position.

  12. Light vehicle energy efficiency programs and their impact on Brazilian CO{sub 2} emissions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wills, William; La Rovere, Emilio Lebre [Centro de Estudos Integrados sobre Meio Ambiente e Mudancas Climaticas, Centro Clima/COPPE/UFRJ, Centro de Tecnologia, Bloco I2000, sala 208, Cidade Universitaria, Ilha do Fundao, CEP: 21941-972 Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2010-11-15

    This paper analyses the impact of an energy efficiency program for light vehicles in Brazil on emissions of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}), the main greenhouse gas in the atmosphere. Several energy efficiency programs for light vehicles around the world are reviewed. The cases of Japan and Europe were selected for presentation here given their status as current and future world leaders in the control of passenger vehicle fuel consumption. The launching of the National Climate Change Plan and the pressure on the Brazilian car industry due to the world financial crisis make it a good time for the Brazilian government to implement such a program, and its various benefits are highlighted in this study. Three scenarios are established for Brazil covering the 2000-2030 period: the first with no efficiency goals, the second with the Japanese goals applied with a 10 years delay, and the third, with the Japanese goals applied with no delay. The consequences of a vehicular efficiency program and its middle and long-term effects on the consumption of energy and the CO{sub 2} emissions are quantified and discussed. The simulation results indicate that efficiency goals may make an important contribution to reducing vehicular emissions and fuel consumption in Brazil, compared to a baseline scenario. (author)

  13. Light-duty vehicle greenhouse gas emission standards and corporate average fuel economy standards : final rule

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-07

    Final Rule to establish a National Program consisting of new standards for light-duty vehicles that will reduce greenhouse gas emissions and improve fuel economy. This joint : Final Rule is consistent with the National Fuel Efficiency Policy announce...

  14. Formation of Long-Lived Color Centers for Broadband Visible Light Emission in Low-Dimensional Layered Perovskites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Booker, Edward P; Thomas, Tudor H; Quarti, Claudio; Stanton, Michael R; Dashwood, Cameron D; Gillett, Alexander J; Richter, Johannes M; Pearson, Andrew J; Davis, Nathaniel J L K; Sirringhaus, Henning; Price, Michael B; Greenham, Neil C; Beljonne, David; Dutton, Siân E; Deschler, Felix

    2017-12-27

    We investigate the origin of the broadband visible emission in layered hybrid lead-halide perovskites and its connection with structural and photophysical properties. We study ⟨001⟩ oriented thin films of hexylammonium (HA) lead iodide, (C 6 H 16 N) 2 PbI 4 , and dodecylammonium (DA) lead iodide, (C 12 H 28 N) 2 PbI 4 , by combining first-principles simulations with time-resolved photoluminescence, steady-state absorption and X-ray diffraction measurements on cooling from 300 to 4 K. Ultrafast transient absorption and photoluminescence measurements are used to track the formation and recombination of emissive states. In addition to the excitonic photoluminescence near the absorption edge, we find a red-shifted, broadband (full-width at half-maximum of about 0.4 eV), emission band below 200 K, similar to emission from ⟨110⟩ oriented bromide 2D perovskites at room temperature. The lifetime of this sub-band-gap emission exceeds that of the excitonic transition by orders of magnitude. We use X-ray diffraction measurements to study the changes in crystal lattice with temperature. We report changes in the octahedral tilt and lattice spacing in both materials, together with a phase change around 200 K in DA 2 PbI 4 . DFT simulations of the HA 2 PbI 4 crystal structure indicate that the low-energy emission is due to interstitial iodide and related Frenkel defects. Our results demonstrate that white-light emission is not limited to ⟨110⟩ oriented bromide 2D perovskites but a general property of this class of system, and highlight the importance of defect control for the formation of low-energy emissive sites, which can provide a pathway to design tailored white-light emitters.

  15. Suppressed speckle contrast of blue light emission out of white lamp with phosphors excited by blue laser diodes for high-brightness lighting applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinoshita, Junichi; Ikeda, Yoshihisa; Takeda, Yuji; Ueno, Misaki; Kawasaki, Yoji; Matsuba, Yoshiaki; Heike, Atsushi

    2012-11-01

    The speckle contrast of blue light emission out of high-brightness white lamps using phosphors excited by InGaN/GaN blue laser diodes is evaluated as a measure of coherence. As a result, speckle contrast of as low as 1.7%, the same level as a blue light emitting diode, is obtained. This implies that the original blue laser light can be converted into incoherent light through lamp structures without any dynamic mechanisms. This unique speckle-free performance is considered to be realized by multiple scattering inside the lamp structure, the multi-longitudinal mode operation of the blue laser diodes, and the use of multiple laser diodes. Such almost-incoherent white lamps can be applied for general lighting without any nuisance of speckle noise and should be categorized as lamps rather than lasers in terms of laser safety regulation.

  16. Light emission probing quantum shot noise and charge fluctuations at a biased molecular junction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schneider, N.L.; Lu, Jing Tao; Brandbyge, M.

    2012-01-01

    The emission of plasmonic light from a single C60 molecule on Cu(111) is probed in a scanning tunneling microscope from the weak-coupling, tunneling range to strong coupling of the molecule to the electrodes at contact. At positive sample voltage the photon yield decreases owing to shot...

  17. The azimuthally anisotropic emission of unstable light nuclear in the heavy ion collisions at intermediate energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    He Zhiyong; Jin Genming; Li Zuyu; Duan Limin; Dai Guangxi; Zhang Baoguo; Wu Heyu; Wen Wanxin; Qi Yujin; Luo Qingzheng

    1996-01-01

    The unstable light nuclei emitted in the interaction of 40 Ar on 197 Au have been detected at energy of 25 MeV/u by using particle-particle correlation measurement at small relative angle. Their in-plane and out-of-plane emission were measured for three bins of experimentally estimated impact parameter. The enhanced in-plane emission for mid-rapidity unstable nuclei is observed. This enhanced in-plane emission becomes stronger with increasing of impact parameter, but changes small with the mass of unstable nuclei. The in-plane enhancement decreases slightly with the energy of excited state of unstable nuclei. For projectile-like unstable nuclei, the in-plane emission dominates as expected

  18. Organic light-emitting diodes with a spacer enhanced exciplex emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Fei; Chen, Rui; Sun, Handong; Wei Sun, Xiao

    2014-04-01

    By introducing a spacer molecule into the blended exciplex emissive layer, the performance of the bulk heterojunction exciplex organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) was improved dramatically; the maximum luminous efficiency was enhanced by about 22% from 7.9 cd/A to 9.7 cd/A, and the luminous efficiency drop was reduced by 28% at 400 mA/cm2. Besides the suppressed annihilation of exciton, the time-resolved photoluminescence measurements indicated that the spacer enhanced the delayed fluorescence through increasing the backward intersystem crossing rate from the triplet to singlet exciplex state. This method is useful for developing high performance exciplex OLEDs.

  19. Light emitting diode excitation emission matrix fluorescence spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hart, Sean J; JiJi, Renée D

    2002-12-01

    An excitation emission matrix (EEM) fluorescence instrument has been developed using a linear array of light emitting diodes (LED). The wavelengths covered extend from the upper UV through the visible spectrum: 370-640 nm. Using an LED array to excite fluorescence emission at multiple excitation wavelengths is a low-cost alternative to an expensive high power lamp and imaging spectrograph. The LED-EEM system is a departure from other EEM spectroscopy systems in that LEDs often have broad excitation ranges which may overlap with neighboring channels. The LED array can be considered a hybrid between a spectroscopic and sensor system, as the broad LED excitation range produces a partially selective optical measurement. The instrument has been tested and characterized using fluorescent dyes: limits of detection (LOD) for 9,10-bis(phenylethynyl)-anthracene and rhodamine B were in the mid parts-per-trillion range; detection limits for the other compounds were in the low parts-per-billion range (LED-EEMs were analyzed using parallel factor analysis (PARAFAC), which allowed the mathematical resolution of the individual contributions of the mono- and dianion fluorescein tautomers a priori. Correct identification and quantitation of six fluorescent dyes in two to six component mixtures (concentrations between 12.5 and 500 ppb) has been achieved with root mean squared errors of prediction (RMSEP) of less than 4.0 ppb for all components.

  20. Controlled light emission from white organic light-emitting devices with a single blue-emitting host and multiple fluorescent dopants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chin, Byung Doo; Kim, Jai Kyeong; Park, O Ok

    2007-01-01

    In this work, we fabricated white organic light-emitting devices (WOLEDs) containing a layered light-emitting region composed of a single blue-emitting host and different fluorescent dopant materials. The effects of varying the dye-doping ratio and emitting layer thickness on the efficiency, lifetime, spectral voltage-dependence and white balance were investigated for devices with a blue/orange stacked layer structure. Addition of a blue host layer doped with a green-emitting dopant, to give a blue/green/orange emitter, resulted in a broadband white spectrum without the need for a charge-blocking interlayer. The composition of blue, green and orange dopants in the host and the thickness of each emitting layer were optimized, resulting in a device efficiency of 9-11 cd A -1 even at a high brightness of 10 000 cd m -2 (achieved at a bias voltage of less than 9 V) with an emission spectrum suitable for lighting applications

  1. Reduction in global warming due to fuel economy improvements and emissions control of criteria pollutants: New US light-duty vehicles (1968--1991)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pitstick, M.E.; Santini, D.J. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Chauhan, H. [Delaware Univ., Newark, DE (United States). Dept. of Civil Engineering

    1992-08-01

    This paper explores the impact of US emission controls and fuel economy improvements on the global warming potential (GWP) of new light-duty vehicles. Fuel economy improvements have reduced the GWP of both passenger cars and light-duty trucks by lowering the per mile emissions of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}). Further GWP reductions have been achieved by emission standards for criteria pollutants: carbon monoxide (CO), hydrocarbons (HC), and nitrogen oxides (NO{sub x}). The GWP of a criteria pollutant was calculated by multiplying the emission rate by a relative global warming factor to obtain a CO{sub 2} equivalent emission rate. Both CO{sub 2} and criteria pollutant emission rates per vehicle have decreased substantially for new light-duty vehicles over the period from 1968 to 1991. Over that period, the GWP from CO{sub 2} was reduced by almost 50% in new vehicles by improving fuel economy. In that same time period, the GWP from criteria pollutants from new vehicles was reduced with emission controls by from 80% to 90% depending on the global warming time frame of interest. Consequently, total reductions in the GWP of new passenger cars and light-duty trucks have been on the order of 55 to 75 percent compared to precontrol (before 1968) new vehicles. However, the reduction in GWP caused by emission control of criteria pollutants has been larger than the reduction caused by improved fuel economy (i.e., reduced CO{sub 2}). The contribution of criteria pollutants to the GWP of precontrol new vehicles was substantial, but their contribution has been reduced significantly due to US emission controls. As a result, the contribution of criteria pollutants to global warming is now much less than the contribution of CO{sub 2} from fuel consumption.

  2. Reduction in global warming due to fuel economy improvements and emissions control of criteria pollutants: New US light-duty vehicles (1968--1991)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pitstick, M.E.; Santini, D.J. (Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)); Chauhan, H. (Delaware Univ., Newark, DE (United States). Dept. of Civil Engineering)

    1992-01-01

    This paper explores the impact of US emission controls and fuel economy improvements on the global warming potential (GWP) of new light-duty vehicles. Fuel economy improvements have reduced the GWP of both passenger cars and light-duty trucks by lowering the per mile emissions of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}). Further GWP reductions have been achieved by emission standards for criteria pollutants: carbon monoxide (CO), hydrocarbons (HC), and nitrogen oxides (NO{sub x}). The GWP of a criteria pollutant was calculated by multiplying the emission rate by a relative global warming factor to obtain a CO{sub 2} equivalent emission rate. Both CO{sub 2} and criteria pollutant emission rates per vehicle have decreased substantially for new light-duty vehicles over the period from 1968 to 1991. Over that period, the GWP from CO{sub 2} was reduced by almost 50% in new vehicles by improving fuel economy. In that same time period, the GWP from criteria pollutants from new vehicles was reduced with emission controls by from 80% to 90% depending on the global warming time frame of interest. Consequently, total reductions in the GWP of new passenger cars and light-duty trucks have been on the order of 55 to 75 percent compared to precontrol (before 1968) new vehicles. However, the reduction in GWP caused by emission control of criteria pollutants has been larger than the reduction caused by improved fuel economy (i.e., reduced CO{sub 2}). The contribution of criteria pollutants to the GWP of precontrol new vehicles was substantial, but their contribution has been reduced significantly due to US emission controls. As a result, the contribution of criteria pollutants to global warming is now much less than the contribution of CO{sub 2} from fuel consumption.

  3. Reduction in global warming due to fuel economy improvements and emissions control of criteria pollutants: New US light-duty vehicles (1968--1991)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pitstick, M.E.; Santini, D.J.; Chauhan, H.

    1992-01-01

    This paper explores the impact of US emission controls and fuel economy improvements on the global warming potential (GWP) of new light-duty vehicles. Fuel economy improvements have reduced the GWP of both passenger cars and light-duty trucks by lowering the per mile emissions of carbon dioxide (CO 2 ). Further GWP reductions have been achieved by emission standards for criteria pollutants: carbon monoxide (CO), hydrocarbons (HC), and nitrogen oxides (NO x ). The GWP of a criteria pollutant was calculated by multiplying the emission rate by a relative global warming factor to obtain a CO 2 equivalent emission rate. Both CO 2 and criteria pollutant emission rates per vehicle have decreased substantially for new light-duty vehicles over the period from 1968 to 1991. Over that period, the GWP from CO 2 was reduced by almost 50% in new vehicles by improving fuel economy. In that same time period, the GWP from criteria pollutants from new vehicles was reduced with emission controls by from 80% to 90% depending on the global warming time frame of interest. Consequently, total reductions in the GWP of new passenger cars and light-duty trucks have been on the order of 55 to 75 percent compared to precontrol (before 1968) new vehicles. However, the reduction in GWP caused by emission control of criteria pollutants has been larger than the reduction caused by improved fuel economy (i.e., reduced CO 2 ). The contribution of criteria pollutants to the GWP of precontrol new vehicles was substantial, but their contribution has been reduced significantly due to US emission controls. As a result, the contribution of criteria pollutants to global warming is now much less than the contribution of CO 2 from fuel consumption

  4. Enhancing light emission in flexible AC electroluminescent devices by tetrapod-like zinc oxide whiskers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Li; Liu, Nishuang; Wang, Siliang; Zhang, Hui; Zhao, Wanqiu; Yang, Zhichun; Wang, Yumei; Su, Jun; Li, Luying; Long, Fei; Zou, Zhengguang; Gao, Yihua

    2016-10-03

    Flexible alternating current electroluminescent devices (ACEL) are more and more popular and widely used in liquid-crystal display back-lighting, large-scale architectural and decorative lighting due to their uniform light emission, low power consumption and high resolution. However, presently how to acquire high brightness under a certain voltage are confronted with challenges. Here, we demonstrate an electroluminescence (EL) enhancing strategy that tetrapod-like ZnO whiskers (T-ZnOw) are added into the bottom electrode of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) instead of phosphor layer in flexible ACEL devices emitting blue, green and orange lights, and the brightness is greatly enhanced due to the coupling between the T-ZnOw and ZnS phosphor dispersed in the flexible polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) layer. This strategy provides a new routine for the development of high performance, flexible and large-area ACEL devices.

  5. Project Profile: Hydrogen Fuel Cell Mobile Lighting Tower (HFCML)

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLaughlin, Russell

    2013-01-01

    NASA is committed to finding innovative solutions that improve the operational performance of ground support equipment while providing environment and cost benefits, as well. Through the Hydrogen Fuel Cell Mobile Lighting Tower (HFCML) project, NASA gained operational exposure to a novel application of high efficiency technologies. Traditionally, outdoor lighting and auxiliary power at security gates, launch viewing sites, fallback areas, outage support, and special events is provided by diesel generators with metal halide lights. Diesel generators inherently contribute to C02, NOx, particulate emissions, and are very noisy. In 2010, engineers from NASA's Technology Evaluation for Environmental Risk Mitigation Principal Center (TEERM) introduced KSC operations to a novel technology for outdoor lighting needs. Developed by a team led by Sandia National Laboratory (SNL), the technology pairs a 5kW hydrogen fuel cell with robust high efficiency plasma lights in a towable trailer. Increased efficiency, in both the fuel cell power source and lighting load, yields longer run times between fueling operations while providing greater auxiliary power. Because of the unit's quiet operation and no exhaust fumes, it is capable of being used indoors and in emergency situations, and meets the needs of all other operational roles for metal halide/diesel generators. The only discharge is some water and warm air. Environmental benefits include elimination of diesel particulate emissions and estimated 73% greenhouse gas emissions savings when the hydrogen source is natural gas (per GREET model). As the technology matures the costs could become competitive for the fuel cell units which are approximately 5 times diesel units. Initial operational . concerns included the hydrogen storage tanks and valves, lightning safety/grounding, and required operating and refueling procedures. TEERM facilitated technical information exchange (design drawings, technical standards, and operations

  6. Light-Dependent Aerobic Methane Oxidation Reduces Methane Emissions from Seasonally Stratified Lakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oswald, Kirsten; Milucka, Jana; Brand, Andreas; Littmann, Sten; Wehrli, Bernhard; Kuypers, Marcel M. M.; Schubert, Carsten J.

    2015-01-01

    Lakes are a natural source of methane to the atmosphere and contribute significantly to total emissions compared to the oceans. Controls on methane emissions from lake surfaces, particularly biotic processes within anoxic hypolimnia, are only partially understood. Here we investigated biological methane oxidation in the water column of the seasonally stratified Lake Rotsee. A zone of methane oxidation extending from the oxic/anoxic interface into anoxic waters was identified by chemical profiling of oxygen, methane and δ13C of methane. Incubation experiments with 13C-methane yielded highest oxidation rates within the oxycline, and comparable rates were measured in anoxic waters. Despite predominantly anoxic conditions within the zone of methane oxidation, known groups of anaerobic methanotrophic archaea were conspicuously absent. Instead, aerobic gammaproteobacterial methanotrophs were identified as the active methane oxidizers. In addition, continuous oxidation and maximum rates always occurred under light conditions. These findings, along with the detection of chlorophyll a, suggest that aerobic methane oxidation is tightly coupled to light-dependent photosynthetic oxygen production both at the oxycline and in the anoxic bottom layer. It is likely that this interaction between oxygenic phototrophs and aerobic methanotrophs represents a widespread mechanism by which methane is oxidized in lake water, thus diminishing its release into the atmosphere. PMID:26193458

  7. Approaches to achieving inherently safe fusion power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piet, S.J.

    1986-01-01

    Achieving inherently safe fusion facilities and conceptual designs is a challenge to the fusion community. Success should provide fusion with important competitive advantages versus other energy technologies. Inherent safety should mean a facility designed with passive safety features such that the public is protected from any acute fatalities under all credible accidental circumstances. A key aspect to inherent safety is demonstrability - the ability to prove that a deign is as safe as claimed. Three complementary approaches to achieving inherent safety are examined: toxin inventory reduction, energy source reduction and design fault tolerance. Four levels of assurance are defined, associated with uncertainty in the words ''credible' and ''demonstrable.'' Sound reasons exist for believing that inherent safety puts a modest upper bound on all accident consequences; it should be considered a part of the collection of safety and environmental issues, which also include lower consequence accidents, waste management, and effluent control

  8. Excitation light source dependence of emission in Sn2+-Ce3+ codoped ZnO-P2O5 glasses

    OpenAIRE

    Masai, Hirokazu; Hino, Yusuke; Yanagida, Takayuki; Fujimoto, Yutaka; Fukuda, Kentaro; Yoko, Toshinobu

    2013-01-01

    Correlation between excitation light source and the emission property of Sn^{2+}-Ce^{3+} co-doped zinc phosphate glasses is examined. Although photoluminescence (PL) peaks of both Sn^{2+}and Ce^{3+} shifted with increasing amount of Ce^{3+}, there was little energy resonance between Sn^{2+} and Ce^{3+} emission centers. On the other hand, radioluminescence (RL) spectra excited by X-ray was independent of the Ce concentration, indicating that emission was mainly observed from Sn^{2+} emission ...

  9. White organic light emitting devices with hybrid emissive layers combining phosphorescence and fluorescence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lei Gangtie; Chen Xiaolan; Wang Lei; Zhu Meixiang; Zhu Weiguo [Key Lab of Environmental-friendly Chemistry and Application of Ministry of Education, College of Chemistry, Xiangtan University, Xiangtan 411105 (China); Wang Liduo; Qiu Yong [Key Lab of Organic-Optoelectronics and Molecular Sciences of Ministry of Education, Department of Chemistry, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China)], E-mail: lgt@xtu.edu.cn

    2008-05-21

    We fabricated a white organic light-emitting diode (WOLED) by hybrid emissive layers which combined phosphorescence with fluorescence. In this device, the thin layer of 4-(dicyanomethylene)-2-(t-butyl)-6-(1, 1, 7, 7-tetramethyljulolidyl-9-enyl)-4H-pyran played the role of undoped red emissive layer which was inserted between two blue phosphorescence emissive layers. The blue phosphorescent dye was bis[(4, 6-difluorophenyl)-pyridinato-N, C{sup 2}] (picolinato) Ir(III), which was doped in the host material, N, N'-dicarbazolyl-1, 4-dimethene-benzene. The WOLED showed stable Commission Internationale de L'Eclairage coordinates and a high efficency of 9.6 cd A{sup -1} when the current density was 1.8 A m{sup -2}. The maximum luminance of the device achieved was 17 400 cd m{sup -2} when the current density was 3000 A m{sup -2}.

  10. Efficient white organic light emission by single emitting layer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ko, Young Wook; Chung, Choong-Heui; Lee, Jin Ho; Kim, Yong-Hae; Sohn, Choong-Yong; Kim, Bong-Chul; Hwang, Chi-Sun; Song, Yoon-Ho; Lim, Jongtae; Ahn, Young-Joo; Kang, Gi-Wook; Lee, Namheon; Lee, Changhee

    2003-02-24

    Stable organic white light-emitting diodes are successfully fabricated by a single organic white emitting layer, which is Bis (2-methyl-8-quinolinato) (triphenylsiloxy) aluminum (III) (SAlq) doped red fluorescent dye of 4-(dicyanomethylene)-2-tert-butyl-6(1,1,7,7-tetramethyljulolidyl-9-enyl)- 4H-pyran (DCJTB). The incomplete energy transfer from blue-emitting SAlq to red-emitting DCJTB enables to obtain a stable white balanced light-emission by the DCJTB doping concentration of 0.5%. A device with the structure of ITO/TPD (50 nm)/SAlq:DCJTB (30 nm, 0.5%)/Alq{sub 3} (20 nm)/LiF (0.5 nm)/Al (110 nm) shows maximum luminance of 20 400 cd/m{sup 2} at 810 mA/cm{sup 2}, external quantum efficiency of 2% at 200 cd/m{sup 2} ({approx}3 mA/cm{sup 2}), power efficiency of 2.3 lm/W at 67 cd/m{sup 2} ({approx}1 mA/cm{sup 2}), and a Commission Internationale de l'Eclairage chromaticity coordinates of (0.34, 0.39) at 1.8 mA/cm{sup 2} to (0.31, 0.38) at 36 mA/cm{sup 2}.

  11. Nonlinearity-tailored fiber laser technology for low-noise, ultra-wideband tunable femtosecond light generation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Xiaomin; Lægsgaard, Jesper; Iegorov, Roman

    2017-01-01

    supercontinuum, taking advantage of a simpler fiber technology: a fixed-wavelength pump laser pulse is converted into a spectrally very broadband output, from which the required resulting wavelength is then optically filtered. Unfortunately, this process is associated with an inherently poor noise figure, which...... often precludes many realistic applications of such supercontinuum sources. Here, we show that by adding only one passive optical element—a tapered photonic crystal fiber—to a fixed-wavelength femtosecond laser, one can in a very simple manner resonantly convert the laser emission wavelength......The emission wavelength of a laser is physically predetermined by the gain medium used.Consequently,arbitrary wavelength generation is a fundamental challenge in the science of light. Present solutions include optical parametric generation, requiring complex optical setups and spectrally sliced...

  12. New insights into the parametrization of temperature and light responses of mono - and sesquiterpene emissions from Aleppo pine and rosemary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staudt, M.; Bourgeois, I.; Al Halabi, R.; Song, W.; Williams, J.

    2017-03-01

    Phytogenic emission of large volatile organic compounds (VOCs) such as monoterpenes (MTs) and sesquiterpenes (SQTs) are key precursors to the formation and growth of atmospheric particles. However, controlled environment studies to elucidate emission responses to temperature and light are still sparse. In this study, the volatile contents and emission responses of Aleppo pine and Rosemary have been investigated. These two common Mediterranean species store semivolatiles inside (resin ducts) and outside (trichomes) their foliage tissues respectively. Both species emitted mainly MTs with basal emission rates of around 5 (Rosemary) and 10 (pine) μg g-1 h-1 and SQTs about one order of magnitude lower. In Aleppo pine, two volatile sources could be clearly distinguished: 1) de-novo synthesized emission of (E)-β-ocimene and linalool, which accounted for about 70% of the total VOC release, were not found in foliar VOC extracts and expressed light dependency (LD) and temperature responses typical for enzyme driven emissions; and 2) storage-derived emissions of various MTs and SQTs whose emissions increased exponentially with temperature, showed no light dependency and were all present in leaf extracts. In Rosemary, all emitted MTs and SQTs including many oxygenated compounds, showed responses typical for stored volatiles and were all found in leaf extracts. The emissions of individual volatiles or volatile classes could be well described with the commonly applied empirical algorithms developed for LD or non LD emissions. However, the shapes of the temperature responses, and hence the deduced coefficient values, were significantly different between oxygenated and non-oxygenated compounds. They also differed between the storage-derived emissions of the two plant species, for individual VOCs or VOC classes. We address the possible reasons for this variation in temperature responses and argue that they are mostly due to molecular interactions along the species specific leaf

  13. Laser based imaging of time depending microscopic scenes with strong light emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahlweg, Cornelius; Wilhelm, Eugen; Rothe, Hendrik

    2011-10-01

    Investigating volume scatterometry methods based on short range LIDAR devices for non-static objects we achieved interesting results aside the intended micro-LIDAR: the high speed camera recording of the illuminated scene of an exploding wire -intended for Doppler LIDAR tests - delivered a very effective method of observing details of objects with extremely strong light emission. As a side effect a schlieren movie is gathered without any special effort. The fact that microscopic features of short time processes with high emission and material flow might be imaged without endangering valuable equipment makes this technique at least as interesting as the intended one. So we decided to present our results - including latest video and photo material - instead of a more theoretical paper on our progress concerning the primary goal.

  14. Dynamics of the cavity radiation of a correlated emission laser initially seeded with a thermal light

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tesfa, Sintayehu, E-mail: sint_tesfa@yahoo.com [Max Planck Institute for the Physics of Complex Systems, Noethnitzer Street 38, 01187 Dresden (Germany); Physics Department, Dilla University, PO Box 419, Dilla (Ethiopia)

    2011-10-15

    A detailed analysis of the time evolution of the two-mode squeezing, entanglement and intensity of the cavity radiation of a two-photon correlated emission laser initially seeded with a thermal light is presented. The dependences of the degree of two-mode squeezing and entanglement on the intensity of the thermal light and time are found to have a more or less similar nature, although the actual values differ, especially in the early stages of the process and when the atoms are initially prepared with nearly 50:50 probability to be in the upper and lower energy levels. Seeding the cavity degrades the nonclassical features significantly, particularly in the vicinity of t=0. It is also shown that the mean photon number in a wider time span has a dip when mode b is seeded but a peak when mode a is seeded. Moreover, it turns out that the effect of the seed light on the nonclassical features and intensity of the cavity radiation decreases significantly with time, an outcome essentially attributed to the pertinent emission-absorption mechanism. This can be taken as an encouraging aspect in the practical utilization of this model as a source of a bright entangled light.

  15. Integrated Plastic Substrates for OLED Lighting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gaynor, Whitney

    2015-08-01

    manufacturing methods that can produce thousands of feet of material without defects. We have evaluated the materials and manufacturing costs of these films at scale and find that they meet the current and future cost targets for bringing down the cost of OLED lighting while enabling future roll-to-roll manufacturing of the complete device. And finally, we have demonstrated that the inherent light-scattering properties of our films enhance white OLED emission efficiency from 20% to 50% depending on the metric. This work has shown that these substrates can be created, manufactured, and will perform as needed to enable flexible OLED lighting to enter the marketplace.

  16. Effects of cold temperature and ethanol content on VOC emissions from light-duty gasoline vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emissions of speciated volatile organic compounds (VOCs), including mobile source air toxics (MSATs), were measured in vehicle exhaust from three light-duty spark ignition vehicles operating on summer and winter grade gasoline (E0) and ethanol blended (E10 and E85) fuels. Vehicle...

  17. Origins of efficient green light emission in phase-separated InGaN quantum wells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lai, Y-L; Liu, C-P; Lin, Y-H; Hsueh, T-H; Lin, R-M; Lyu, D-Y; Peng, Z-X; Lin, T-Y

    2006-01-01

    Green-light-emitting InGaN/GaN multiple quantum wells (MQWs) with high luminescent efficiency were grown by metalorganic chemical vapour deposition (MOCVD). The microstructure of the sample was studied by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) and high-resolution x-ray diffraction, while its optical behaviour was analysed in great detail by a variety of photoluminescence methods. Two InGaN-related peaks that were clearly found in the photoluminescence (PL) spectrum are assigned to quasi-quantum dots (516 nm) and the InGaN matrix (450 nm), respectively, due to a strong phase separation observed by HRTEM. Except for the strong indium aggregation regions (511 meV of Stokes shift), slight composition fluctuations were also observed in the InGaN matrix, which were speculated from an 'S-shaped' transition and a Stokes shift of 341 meV. Stronger carrier localization and an internal quantum efficiency of the dot-related emission (21.5%), higher than the InGaN-matrix related emission (7.5%), was demonstrated. Additionally, a shorter lifetime and 'two-component' PL decay were found for the low-indium-content regions (matrix). Thus, the carrier transport process within quantum wells is suggested to drift from the low-In-content matrix to the high-In-content dots, resulting in the enhanced luminescence efficiency of the green light emission

  18. Design of Slow and Fast Light Photonic Crystal Waveguides for Single-photon Emission Using a Bloch Mode Expansion Technique

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    de Lasson, Jakob Rosenkrantz; Rigal, B.; Kapon, E.

    We design slow and fast light photonic crystal waveguides for single-photon emission using a Bloch mode expansion and scattering matrix technique. We propose slow light designs that increase the group index-waveguide mode volume ratio for larger Purcell enhancement, and address efficient slow-to-...

  19. Enhanced emission of non-compound light particles in the reaction plane

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsang, M.B.

    1984-01-01

    In an experiment performed at the K500 cyclotron at Michigan State University, light particles in coincidence with two fission fragments for 14 N induced reactions on 197 Au at 420 MeV incident energy have been measured. The fission fragments were detected with two large area position sensitive parallel plate avalanche detectors. Light particle telescopes consisting of silicon-ΔE and Nal-E detectors were placed both in and out of the plane defined by the centers of the two fission detectors and the beam axis. The momentum transferred to the composite system was determined by measuring the folding angle between the two outgoing fission fragments. Unlike observations with more fissile targets, however, transfer and inelastic reactions characterized by small linear momentum transfers contribute negligibly to the fission cross section for reactions on the 197 Au target. For events which lead to fission, the most probable linear momentum transfer corresponded to about 85% of the beam momentum. This is similar to the most probable momentum transfer observed for fusion-like reactions on 238 U at the same beam energy. Much of the missing momentum is carried away by non-equilibrium light particle emission

  20. Vowel Inherent Spectral Change

    CERN Document Server

    Assmann, Peter

    2013-01-01

    It has been traditional in phonetic research to characterize monophthongs using a set of static formant frequencies, i.e., formant frequencies taken from a single time-point in the vowel or averaged over the time-course of the vowel. However, over the last twenty years a growing body of research has demonstrated that, at least for a number of dialects of North American English, vowels which are traditionally described as monophthongs often have substantial spectral change. Vowel Inherent Spectral Change has been observed in speakers’ productions, and has also been found to have a substantial effect on listeners’ perception. In terms of acoustics, the traditional categorical distinction between monophthongs and diphthongs can be replaced by a gradient description of dynamic spectral patterns. This book includes chapters addressing various aspects of vowel inherent spectral change (VISC), including theoretical and experimental studies of the perceptually relevant aspects of VISC, the relationship between ar...

  1. How to prevent greenhouse gas emissions in electrical installations: lighting energy savings and solar energy approaches

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yavuz, C.; Aksoy, C. [Sakarya University, Faculty of Engineering, Electrical and Electronics Engineering Department, Serdivan (Turkey)

    2012-07-01

    Day by day greenhouse gas emissions increase dramatically. A passive adaptive method of lighting energy savings, daylight responsive systems are considered one of the best solutions for energy efficiency, saving and prevent CO{sub 2} emissions. Results of an annual experiment which was held in Sakarya University proves the necessity of daylight responsive systems with a 41% energy saving and 942.5 kg of prevented CO{sub 2} emissions Thinking this prevention is realized just only in a 36 m{sup 2} room with the use of 8 luminaries spreading such systems to nationwide, a major amount of greenhouse gas emissions would be prohibited. On the other hand energy saving is not the only way to reduce CO{sub 2} emissions. Again in Sakarya University a project has started to investigate the possibility of illumination of a complete building by using solar energy. This paper evaluates these mentioned systems both in energy efficiency, greenhouse gas emissions prevention and economic point of views. (author)

  2. On-board emission measurement of high-loaded light-duty vehicles in Algeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boughedaoui, Ménouèr; Kerbachi, Rabah; Joumard, Robert

    2008-01-01

    A sample of eight private gasoline and diesel conventional light-duty vehicles (LDVs) in use with various ages, carrying a load of 460 kg, were tested on a representative trip in the traffic flow of the city of Blida to obtain emission factors representing the actual use conditions of Algerian LDVs. The gas sampling system (mini-constant volume sampling) as well as the analyzers are carried on-board the vehicle. Around 55 tests were conducted during 3 months covering more than 480 km under various real driving conditions. The mean speed downtown is about 16.1 km/hr with a rather low acceleration, an average of 0.60 m/sec2. For each test, kinematics are recorded as well as the analysis of the four emitted pollutants carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide, oxides of nitrogen, and total hydrocarbons. Emission factors were evaluated according to speed for each category of gasoline and diesel engines. The influence of some parameters such as cold/hot start, age of vehicle and its state of maintenance are discussed. Results are compared with the European database ARTEMIS for comparable vehicles. These measurements contribute to the development of unit emission of the vehicles used in Algeria, which are necessary for the calculation of emission inventory of pollutants and greenhouse gases from the road transportation sector. The unit emissions constitute a tool of decisionmaking aid regarding the conception of new regulations of vehicle control and inspection in Algeria and even in similar developing countries.

  3. Oxygenated palm biodiesel: Ignition, combustion and emissions quantification in a light-duty diesel engine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chong, Cheng Tung; Ng, Jo-Han; Ahmad, Solehin; Rajoo, Srithar

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Diesel engine test using palm biodiesel and diesel at varying speed and load. • Palm biodiesel shows better performance at late stage of cycle evolution. • Oxygen in palm biodiesel fuel improves local combustion at late stage of combustion. • Emissions of NO are lower at low and medium operating speed for palm biodiesel. • Formulation of trend guide for performance and emissions characteristics for light-duty diesel engines. - Abstract: This paper presents an investigation of oxygenated neat palm biodiesel in a direct injection single cylinder diesel engine in terms of ignition, combustion and emissions characteristics. Conventional non-oxygenated diesel fuel is compared as baseline. The engine testing is performed between the operating speed of 2000–3000 rpm and load of up to 3 bar of brake mean effective pressure. From it, a total of 50 experiment cases are tested to form a comprehensive operational speed-load contour map for ignition and combustion; while various engine-out emissions such as NO, CO, UHCs and CO 2 are compared based on fuel type-speed combinations. The ignition and combustion evolution contour maps quantify the absolute ignition delay period and elucidate the difference between that of palm biodiesel and fossil diesel. Although diesel has shorter ignition delay period by up to 0.6 CAD at 3000 rpm and burns more rapidly at the start of combustion, combustion of palm biodiesel accelerates during the mid-combustion phase and overtakes diesel in the cumulative heat release rates (HRR) prior to the 90% cumulative HRR. This can be attributed to the oxygen contained in palm biodiesel assisting in localized regions of combustion. In terms of performance, the oxygenated nature of palm biodiesel provided mixed performances with improved thermal efficiency and increased brake specific fuel consumption, due to the improved combustion and lower calorific values, respectively. Emission measurements show that NO for palm biodiesel is

  4. Effect of the polymer emission on the electroluminescence characteristics of n-ZnO nanorods/p-polymer hybrid light emitting diode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaman, S.; Zainelabdin, A.; Amin, G.; Nur, O.; Willander, M.

    2011-09-01

    Hybrid light emitting diodes (LEDs) based on zinc oxide (ZnO) nanorods and polymers (single and blended) were fabricated and characterized. The ZnO nanorods were grown by the chemical bath deposition method at 50°C. Three different LEDs, with blue emitting, orange-red emitting or their blended polymer together with ZnO nanorods, were fabricated and studied. The current-voltage characteristics show good diode behavior with an ideality factor in the range of 2.1 to 2.27 for all three devices. The electroluminescence spectrum (EL) of the blended device has an emission range from 450 nm to 750 nm, due to the intermixing of the blue emission generated by poly(9,9-dioctylfluorene) denoted as PFO with orange-red emission produced by poly(2-methoxy-5(20-ethyl-hexyloxy)-1,4-phenylenevinylene) 1,4-phenylenevinylene) symbolized as MEH PPV combined with the deep-band emission (DBE) of the ZnO nanorods, i.e. it covers the whole visible region and is manifested as white light. The CIE color coordinates showed bluish, orange-red and white emission from the PFO, MEH PPV and blended LEDs with ZnO nanorods, respectively. These results indicate that the choice of the polymer with proper concentration is critical to the emitted color in ZnO nanorods/p-organic polymer LEDs and careful design should be considered to obtain intrinsic white light sources.

  5. Modeling real-world fuel consumption and carbon dioxide emissions with high resolution for light-duty passenger vehicles in a traffic populated city

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Shaojun; Wu, Ye; Un, Puikei; Fu, Lixin; Hao, Jiming

    2016-01-01

    Modeling fuel consumption of light-duty passenger vehicles has created substantial concerns due to the uncertainty from real-world operating conditions. Macao is world-renowned for its tourism industry and high population density. An empirical model is developed to estimate real-world fuel consumption and carbon dioxide emissions for gasoline-powered light-duty passenger vehicles in Macao by considering local fleet configuration and operating conditions. Thanks to increasingly stringent fuel consumption limits in vehicle manufacturing countries, estimated type-approval fuel consumption for light-duty passenger vehicles in Macao by model year was reduced from 7.4 L/100 km in 1995 to 5.9 L/100 km in 2012, although a significant upsizing trend has considerably offset potential energy-saving benefit. However, lower driving speed and the air-conditioning usage tend to raise fleet-average fuel consumption and carbon dioxide emission factors, which are estimated to be 10.1 L/100 km and 240 g/km in 2010. Fleet-total fuel consumption and carbon dioxide emissions are modeled through registered vehicle population-based and link-level traffic demand approaches and the results satisfactorily coincide with the historical record of fuel sales in Macao. Temporal and spatial variations in fuel consumption and carbon dioxide emissions from light-duty passenger vehicles further highlight the importance of effective traffic management in congested areas of Macao. - Highlights: • A fuel consumption model is developed for Macao's light-duty passenger cars. • Increased vehicle size partially offset energy benefit from tightened fuel consumption standard. • Lower speed and use of air-conditioning greatly increase fuel use of Macao light-duty passenger cars. • A high resolution inventory of fuel use and carbon dioxide emissions is built with link-level traffic data. • Policy suggestions are provided to mitigate fuel use in a traffic populated city.

  6. White light emission and effect of annealing on the Ho3+–Yb3+ codoped BaCa2Al8O15 phosphor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumari, Astha; Rai, Vineet Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Graphical abstract: The upconversion emission spectra of the Ho 3+ /Yb 3+ doped/codoped BaCa 2 Al 8 O 15 phosphors with different doping concentrations of Ho 3+ /Yb 3+ ions along with UC emission spectrum of the white light emitting phosphor annealed at 800 °C. - Highlights: • BaCa 2 Al 8 O 15 phosphors codoped with Ho 3+ –Yb 3+ have been prepared by combustion method. • Phosphor annealed at 800 °C, illuminate an intense white light upon NIR excitation. • The sample annealed at higher temperatures emits in the pure green region. • The colour emitted persists in the white region even at high pump power density. • Developed phosphor is suitable for making upconverters and WLEDs. - Abstract: The BaCa 2 Al 8 O 15 (BCAO) phosphors codoped with suitable Ho 3+ –Yb 3+ dopant concentration prepared by combustion method illuminate an intense white light upon near infrared diode laser excitation. The structural analysis of the phosphors and the detection of impurity contents have been performed by using the X-Ray Diffraction, FESEM and FTIR analysis. The purity of white light emitted from the sample has been confirmed by the CIE chromaticity diagram. Also, the white light emitted from the sample persists with the variation of pump power density. The phosphors emit upconversion (UC) emission bands in the blue, green and red region (three primary colours required for white light emission) along with one more band in the near infrared region of the electromagnetic spectrum. On annealing the white light emitting sample at higher temperatures, the sample starts to emit green colour and also the intensity of green and red UC emission bands get enhanced largely.

  7. Inherent Anticipation in the Pharmaceutical and Biotechnology Industries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldman, Michael; Evans, Georgia; Zappia, Andrew

    2015-04-15

    Pharmaceutical and biotech research often involves discovering new properties of, or new methods to use, existing compositions. The doctrine of inherent anticipation, however, prevents the issuance and/or validity of a patent for discoveries deemed to have been implicitly disclosed in the prior art. This can be a barrier to patent rights in these technologies. Inherent anticipation therefore creates uncertainty for patent protection in the pharmaceutical and biotech sciences. Despite this uncertainty, Federal Circuit jurisprudence provides guidance on the boundaries of the inherent anticipation doctrine. In view of the case law, certain strategies may be employed to protect inventions that may potentially be viewed as inherent in the prior art. Copyright © 2015 Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press; all rights reserved.

  8. The effect of electric field strength on electroplex emission at the interface of NPB/PBD organic light-emitting diodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, De-Wei; Xu, Zheng; Zhang, Fu-Jun; Song, Shu-Fang; Zhao, Su-Ling; Wang, Yong; Yuan, Guang-Cai; Zhang, Yan-Fei; Xu, Hong-Hua

    2007-02-01

    Organic light-emitting diode (OLED) based on two kinds of blue emission materials N, N'-bis(1-naphthyl)- N, N'-diphenyl-l,l'-diphenyl-4,4'-diamine (NPB) and 2-(4-biphenylyl)-5(4- tert-butyl-phenyl)-1,3,4-oxadiazole (PBD) was fabricated. There is only one emission peak in photoluminescence (PL) spectrum which originates from NPB exciton emission. And the electroluminescence (EL) emission peaks have an apparent red-shift with the increase of driving voltage. The red-shift emission from exciplex emission could be ruled out. Thus, by the method of Gaussian fitting it should be ascribed to the overlap of exciton emission and electroplex emission which occurs at the interface between NPB and PBD. The formation of the electroplex emission under high electric field is analyzed.

  9. Inherently safe high temperature gas-cooled reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamada, Masao; Hayakawa, Hitoshi

    1987-01-01

    It is recognized in general that High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactors have remarkable characteristics in inherent safety and it is well known that credits of the time margin have been admitted for accident evaluation in the licensing of the currently operating prototype HTGRs (300 MWe class). Recently, more inherently safe HTGRs are being developed in various countries and drawing attention on their possibility for urban siting. The inherent safety characteristics of these HTRs differ each other depending on their design philosophy and on the features of the components/structures which constitute the plant. At first, the specific features/characteristics of the elemental components/structures of the HTRs are explained one by one and then the overall safety features/characteristics of these HTR plants are explained in connection with their design philosophy and combination of the elemental features. Taking the KWU/Interatom Modular Reactor System as an example, the particular design philosophy and safety characteristics of the inherently safe HTR are explained with a result of preliminary evaluation on the possibility of siting close to densely populated area. (author)

  10. Can the inherence heuristic explain vitalistic reasoning?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bastian, Brock

    2014-10-01

    Inherence is an important component of psychological essentialism. By drawing on vitalism as a way in which to explain this link, however, the authors appear to conflate causal explanations based on fixed features with those based on general causal forces. The disjuncture between these two types of explanatory principles highlights potential new avenues for the inherence heuristic.

  11. Non-doped white organic light-emitting diodes based on aggregation-induced emission

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen Shuming; Kwok, Hoi Sing [Center for Display Research, Department of Electronic and Computer Engineering, Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, Clear Water Bay, Kowloon (Hong Kong); Zhao Zujin; Tang, Ben Zhong, E-mail: eekwok@ust.h [Department of Chemistry, Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, Clear Water Bay, Kowloon (Hong Kong)

    2010-03-10

    Non-doped white organic light-emitting diodes (WOLEDs) based on newly synthesized bluish-green light-emitting material 1,3,6,8-tetrakis [4-(1,2,2-triphenylvinyl)phenyl]pyrene (TTPEPy) and red light-emitting material 4-(4-(1,2,2-triphenylvinyl)phenyl)-7-(5-(4-(1,2,2-triphenylvinyl) phenyl)thiophen-2-yl)benzo[c][1,2,5]thiadiazole (BTPETTD) have been demonstrated. A maximum efficiency of 7.4 cd A{sup -1}, 4 lm W{sup -1} and brightness of 18 000 cd m{sup -2} have been achieved by employing 3 nm thick 4, 4'-bis [N-(1-naphthyl-1-)-N-phenyl-amino]- biphenyl (NPB) as an electron-blocking layer. The WOLEDs exhibit a high colour rendering index of 90 and moderate colour stability with 1931 Commision International de L'Eclairage coordinates changing from (0.41, 0.41) to (0.38, 0.40) over a wide range of driving voltages. Moreover, the non-doped WOLEDs enjoy a reduced efficiency roll-off due to their nature of aggregation-induced emission.

  12. Non-doped white organic light-emitting diodes based on aggregation-induced emission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Shuming; Kwok, Hoi Sing; Zhao Zujin; Tang, Ben Zhong

    2010-01-01

    Non-doped white organic light-emitting diodes (WOLEDs) based on newly synthesized bluish-green light-emitting material 1,3,6,8-tetrakis [4-(1,2,2-triphenylvinyl)phenyl]pyrene (TTPEPy) and red light-emitting material 4-(4-(1,2,2-triphenylvinyl)phenyl)-7-(5-(4-(1,2,2-triphenylvinyl) phenyl)thiophen-2-yl)benzo[c][1,2,5]thiadiazole (BTPETTD) have been demonstrated. A maximum efficiency of 7.4 cd A -1 , 4 lm W -1 and brightness of 18 000 cd m -2 have been achieved by employing 3 nm thick 4, 4'-bis [N-(1-naphthyl-1-)-N-phenyl-amino]- biphenyl (NPB) as an electron-blocking layer. The WOLEDs exhibit a high colour rendering index of 90 and moderate colour stability with 1931 Commision International de L'Eclairage coordinates changing from (0.41, 0.41) to (0.38, 0.40) over a wide range of driving voltages. Moreover, the non-doped WOLEDs enjoy a reduced efficiency roll-off due to their nature of aggregation-induced emission.

  13. Utilization of solvothermally grown InP/ZnS quantum dots as wavelength converters for fabrication of white light-emitting diodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Eun-Pyo; Yang, Heesun

    2013-09-01

    This work reports on a simple solvothermal synthesis of InP/ZnS core/shell quantum dots (QDs) using a much safer and cheaper phosphorus precursor of tris(dimethylamino)phosphine than the most popularly chosen tris(trimethylsilyl)phosphine. The band gap of InP QDs is facilely controlled by varying the solvothermal core growth time (4 vs. 6 h) with a fixed temperature of 150 degrees C, and the successive solvothermal ZnS shelling at 220 degrees C for 6 h results in green- and yellow-emtting InP/ZnS QD with emission quantum yield of 41-42%. The broad size distribution of as-synthesized InP/ZnS QDs, which appears to be inherent in the current solvothermal approach, is improved by a size-selective sorting procedure, and the emission properties of the resulting size-sorted QD fractions are investigated. To produce white emission for general lighting source, a blue light-emitting diode (LED) is combined with non-size-soroted green or yellow QDs as wavelength converters. Furthermore, the QD-LED that includes a blend of green and yellow QDs is fabricated to generate a white lighting source with an enhanced color rendering performance, and its electroluminescent properties are characterized in detail.

  14. Color-tunable and stable-efficiency white organic light-emitting diode fabricated with fluorescent-phosphorescent emission layers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Su-Hua; Shih, Po-Jen; Wu, Wen-Jie; Huang, Yi-Hua

    2013-01-01

    White organic light emitting diodes (OLEDs) were fabricated for color-tunable lighting applications. Fluorescent and phosphorescent hybrid emission layers (EMLs) were used to enhance the luminance and stability of the devices, which have blue-EML/CBP interlayer/green-EML/phosphorescent-sensitized-EML/red-EML structures. The influence of the composition and structure of the EMLs on the electroluminescence properties of the devices were investigated from the viewpoint of their emission spectra. The possible exciton harvesting, diffusion, transport, and annihilation processes occurring in the EMLs were also evaluated. A maximum luminance intensity of 7400 cd/m 2 and a highly stable current efficiency of 3.2 cd/A were obtained. Good color tunability was achieved for the white OLEDs; the chromatic coordinates linearly shifted from pure white (0.300, 0.398) to cold white (0.261, 0.367) when the applied voltage was varied from 10 to 14 V. -- Highlights: • Exciton harvesting, diffusion, transport, and annihilation processes were evaluated. • The electroluminescence properties were investigated from the viewpoint of the emission spectra. • Good color tunability and stable-efficiency were achieved for the white OLEDs

  15. Optimization of light quality from color mixing light-emitting diode systems for general lighting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorseth, Anders

    2012-03-01

    Given the problem of metamerisms inherent in color mixing in light-emitting diode (LED) systems with more than three distinct colors, a method for optimizing the spectral output of multicolor LED system with regards to standardized light quality parameters has been developed. The composite spectral power distribution from the LEDs are simulated using spectral radiometric measurements of single commercially available LEDs for varying input power, to account for the efficiency droop and other non-linear effects in electrical power vs. light output. The method uses electrical input powers as input parameters in a randomized steepest decent optimization. The resulting spectral power distributions are evaluated with regard to the light quality using the standard characteristics: CIE color rendering index, correlated color temperature and chromaticity distance. The results indicate Pareto optimal boundaries for each system, mapping the capabilities of the simulated lighting systems with regard to the light quality characteristics.

  16. Development of physiotherapy inherent requirement statements - an Australian experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bialocerkowski, Andrea; Johnson, Amanda; Allan, Trevor; Phillips, Kirrilee

    2013-04-16

    The United Nations Convention on the Rights of People with Disabilities promotes equal rights of people with a disability in all aspects of their life including their education. In Australia, Disability Discrimination legislation underpins this Convention. It mandates that higher education providers must demonstrate that no discrimination has occurred and all reasonable accommodations have been considered and implemented, to facilitate access and inclusion for a student with a disability. The first step to meeting legislative requirements is to provide students with information on the inherent requirements of a course. This paper describes the steps which were taken to develop inherent requirement statements for a 4-year entry-level physiotherapy program at one Australian university. Inherent requirement statements were developed using an existing framework, which was endorsed and mandated by the University. Items which described inherencies were extracted from Australian physiotherapy professional standards and statutory regulatory requirements, and units contained in the physiotherapy program. Data were integrated into the 8 prescribed domains: ethical behaviour, behavioural stability, legal, communication, cognition, sensory abilities, strength and mobility, and sustainable performance. Statements for each domain were developed using a 5-level framework (introductory statement, description of the inherent requirement, justification for inherency, characteristics of reasonable adjustments and exemplars) and reviewed by a University Review Panel. Refinement of statements continued until no further changes were required. Fifteen physiotherapy inherent requirement statements were developed. The eight domains identified in the existing framework, developed for Nursing, were relevant to the study of physiotherapy. The inherent requirement statements developed in this study provide a transparent, defensible position on the current requirements of physiotherapy study at

  17. Silicon nanocrystal-based photonic crystal slabs with broadband and efficient directional light emission

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Ondič, Lukáš; Varga, Marián; Pelant, Ivan; Valenta, J.; Kromka, Alexander; Elliman, R. G.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 7, č. 1 (2017), s. 1-8, č. článku 5763. ISSN 2045-2322 R&D Projects: GA ČR GJ16-09692Y; GA MŠk(CZ) LD15003 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : photonic crystal slab * silicon nanocrystals * light emission Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism OBOR OECD: Condensed matter physics (including formerly solid state physics, supercond.) Impact factor: 4.259, year: 2016

  18. White emission from nano-structured top-emitting organic light-emitting diodes based on a blue emitting layer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hyun, Woo Jin; Park, Jung Jin; Park, O Ok; Im, Sang Hyuk; Chin, Byung Doo

    2013-01-01

    We demonstrated that white emission can be obtained from nano-structured top-emitting organic light-emitting diodes (TEOLEDs) based on a blue emitting layer (EML). The nano-structured TEOLEDs were fabricated on nano-patterned substrates, in which both optical micro-cavity and scattering effects occur simultaneously. Due to the combination of these two effects, the electroluminescence spectra of the nano-structured device with a blue EML exhibited not only blue but also yellow colours, which corresponded to the intrinsic emission of the EML and the resonant emission of the micro-cavity effect. Consequently, it was possible to produce white emission from nano-structured TEOLEDs without employing a multimode micro-cavity. The intrinsic emission wavelength can be varied by altering the dopant used for the EML. Furthermore, the emissive characteristics turned out to be strongly dependent on the nano-pattern sizes of the nano-structured devices. (paper)

  19. Carbon dioxide emission trends in cars and light trucks: A comparative analysis of emissions and methodologies for Florida's counties (2000 and 2008)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garren, S.J.; Pinjari, A.R.; Brinkmann, R.

    2011-01-01

    This paper investigates methodologies to quantify CO 2 emissions from cars and light trucks in Florida. The most widely used methodology to calculate greenhouse gas emissions in the transportation sector at the local level uses a harmonic average (HA) methodology based on nationally averaged fuel economies that assume 55% city and 45% highway VMTs. This paper presents a local condition (LC) methodology that accounts for county-level variations in city and highway VMTs, as opposed to assumed uniform driving conditions. Both HA and LC methodologies were used to estimate and compare absolute and per capita CO 2 emissions both statewide and counties for 2000 and 2008. From 2000 to 2008, statewide absolute and per capita CO 2 emissions increased similarly using HA and LC methodologies; however, the percent change varied considerably among counties. Statewide CO 2 emissions calculated from HA and LC methodologies differed by only -0.2% (2000) and 1.7% (2008); however, the differences in the county-level emissions ranged from -8.0% to 14.9% (2000) and from -5.6% to 17.0% (2008). While either the HA or the LC methodology yields a similar result statewide, significant variation exists at the county level, warranting the need to consider local driving conditions when estimating county-level emissions. - Highlights: → The paper evaluates GHG emission methods for on-road passenger vehicles in Florida. → The paper compares methods that assume the harmonic average with actual VMTs driven. → The paper analyzes statewide GHG emissions aggregated by county for 2000 and 2008. → The paper improves on methods that balance bottom-up with top-down GHG emissions.

  20. Solid State pH Sensor Based on Light Emitting Diodes (LED) As Detector Platform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, King Tong; Shepherd, R.; Diamond, Danny; Diamond, Dermot

    2006-01-01

    A low-power, high sensitivity, very low-cost light emitting diode (LED)-based device developed for low-cost sensor networks was modified with bromocresol green membrane to work as a solid-state pH sensor. In this approach, a reverse-biased LED functioning as a photodiode is coupled with a second LED configured in conventional emission mode. A simple timer circuit measures how long (in microsecond) it takes for the photocurrent generated on the detector LED to discharge its capacitance from logic 1 (+5 V) to logic 0 (+1.7 V). The entire instrument provides an inherently digital output of light intensity measurements for a few cents. A light dependent resistor (LDR) modified with similar sensor membrane was also used as a comparison method. Both the LED sensor and the LDR sensor responded to various pH buffer solutions in a similar way to obtain sigmoidal curves expected of the dye. The pKa value obtained for the sensors was found to agree with the literature value.

  1. Geolocation by light

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lisovski, Simeon; Hewson, Chris M.; Klaassen, Raymond H. G.

    2012-01-01

    1. Geolocation by light allows for tracking animal movements, based on measurements of light intensity over time by a data-logging device (‘geolocator’). Recent developments of ultra-light devices (.... However, an inherent problem of geolocators is that any factor or process that changes the natural light intensity pattern also affects the positions calculated from these light patterns. Although the most important factors have been identified, estimation of their effect on the accuracy and precision...... of positions estimated has been lacking but is very important for the analyses and interpretation of geolocator data. 2. The ‘threshold method’ is mainly used to derive positions by defining sunrise and sunset times from the light intensity pattern for each recorded day. This method requires calibration...

  2. Effects of the ZnO layer on the structure and white light emission properties of a ZnS:Mn/GaN nanocomposite system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Cai-Feng; Hu, Bo

    2017-10-01

    ZnO films were inserted between the ZnS:Mn films and GaN substrates by pulsed laser deposition (PLD). The structure, morphology, and optical properties of the ZnS:Mn/ZnO/GaN nanocomposite systems have been investigated. X-ray diffraction results show that there are three diffraction peaks located at 28.4°, 34.4°, and 34.1°, which correspond to the β-ZnS(111), ZnO(002), and GaN(002) planes, respectively. Due to the insertion of ZnO films, the diffraction peak intensity of ZnS:Mn in ZnS:Mn/ZnO/GaN is stronger than that of ZnS:Mn in ZnS:Mn/GaN, and the full width at half-maximum is smaller. Though the transmittance of ZnS:Mn/ZnO films is slightly lower than that of ZnS:Mn films, the transmittance is still higher than 80%. Compared with ZnS:Mn/GaN, an ultraviolet (UV) emission at 387 nm (originated from the near-band emission of ZnO) and a green light emission at about 520 nm appeared in the photoluminescence (PL) spectra of ZnS:Mn/ZnO/GaN, in addition to the blue emission at 435 nm and the orange-red emission at 580 nm. The emission at 520 nm may be related to the deep-level emission from ZnO and the interface of ZnS:Mn/ZnO. The PL spectrum of ZnS:Mn/ZnO/GaN covers the visible region from the blue light to the red light (400-700 nm), and its color coordinate and color temperature are (0.3103,0.3063) and 6869 K, respectively, presenting strong white light emission.

  3. Defect controlled tuning of the ratio of ultraviolet to visible light emission in TiO2 thin films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mondal, S.; Basak, D.

    2016-01-01

    The photoluminescence (PL) of sol–gel TiO 2 thin film has been found to be largely dependent on the post-deposition processing such as annealing at 500 °C in air, vacuum and ultraviolet (UV) light curing at room temperature. A detailed analysis of room temperature PL spectra shows that the UV/VIS PL peak intensity ratio is maximum for the film which has been annealed at 500 °C in air. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy confirms the presence of Ti 3+ type of point defects. The visible emission is deconvoluted to green and orange emissions. Analyses of the present experimental results indicate that V O and/or Ti 3+ causes the green emission and OH and/or excess O 2 adsorption on TiO 2 surface probably causes the orange emission. The time correlated single photon counting spectroscopy data of the UV PL indicates higher number defects in vacuum annealed and UV cured films as compared to the air annealed film. Correlation of the results altogether allows us to conclude that the surface defects those causing the visible emission are smaller in number in the air annealed film. The present results may be useful for tuning the relative PL intensities of UV, green and orange emissions. - Highlights: • Sol–gel TiO 2 films were treated both in air, vacuum at 500 °C and under UV light (room temperature). • UV/VIS PL intensity ratio is maximum for air annealed and minimum for UV cured films. • Both green and orange emission predominantly controls the visible emission of TiO 2 . • The visible emission exhibit a clear correlation with Ti 3+  defects on the surface.

  4. Super RLuc8: A novel engineered Renilla luciferase with a red-shifted spectrum and stable light emission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahnama, Somaieh; Saffar, Behnaz; Kahrani, Zahra Fanaei; Nazari, Mahboobeh; Emamzadeh, Rahman

    2017-01-01

    Renilla luciferase is a bioluminescent enzyme which is broadly used as a reporter protein in molecular biosensors. In this study, a novel luciferase with desired light emission wavelength and thermostability is reported. The results indicated that the new luciferase, namely super RLuc8, had a red-shifted spectrum and showed stable light emission. Super RLuc8 showed a 10-fold (p-value=0.0084) increase in the thermostability at 37°C after 20min incubation, in comparison to the native enzyme. The optimum temperature of the mutant increased from 30 to 37°C. Molecular dynamics simulation analysis indicated that the increased thermostability was most probably caused by a better structural compactness and more local rigidity in the regions out of the emitter site. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Methanol emissions from maize: Ontogenetic dependence to varying light conditions and guttation as an additional factor constraining the flux

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mozaffar, A.; Schoon, N.; Digrado, A.; Bachy, A.; Delaplace, P.; du Jardin, P.; Fauconnier, M.-L.; Aubinet, M.; Heinesch, B.; Amelynck, C.

    2017-03-01

    Because of its high abundance and long lifetime compared to other volatile organic compounds in the atmosphere, methanol (CH3OH) plays an important role in atmospheric chemistry. Even though agricultural crops are believed to be a large source of methanol, emission inventories from those crop ecosystems are still scarce and little information is available concerning the driving mechanisms for methanol production and emission at different developmental stages of the plants/leaves. This study focuses on methanol emissions from Zea mays L. (maize), which is vastly cultivated throughout the world. Flux measurements have been performed on young plants, almost fully grown leaves and fully grown leaves, enclosed in dynamic flow-through enclosures in a temperature and light-controlled environmental chamber. Strong differences in the response of methanol emissions to variations in PPFD (Photosynthetic Photon Flux Density) were noticed between the young plants, almost fully grown and fully grown leaves. Moreover, young maize plants showed strong emission peaks following light/dark transitions, for which guttation can be put forward as a hypothetical pathway. Young plants' average daily methanol fluxes exceeded by a factor of 17 those of almost fully grown and fully grown leaves when expressed per leaf area. Absolute flux values were found to be smaller than those reported in the literature, but in fair agreement with recent ecosystem scale flux measurements above a maize field of the same variety as used in this study. The flux measurements in the current study were used to evaluate the dynamic biogenic volatile organic compound (BVOC) emission model of Niinemets and Reichstein. The modelled and measured fluxes from almost fully grown leaves were found to agree best when a temperature and light dependent methanol production function was applied. However, this production function turned out not to be suitable for modelling the observed emissions from the young plants

  6. Pressure-enhanced light emission and its structural origin in Er:GdVO 4

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong, Fang; Yue, Binbin; Cheng, Zhenxiang; Shen, Hui; Yang, Ke; Hong, Xinguo; Chen, Bin; Mao, Ho-Kwang

    2017-01-09

    Rare earth phosphors have been widely studied because of their sharp emission lines and excellent optical performance. However, photoluminescence (PL) tuning by crystal field in Er3+ embedded phosphors has always been a challenge. Here, we demonstrate that pressure can help to enhance the red and green light emission simultaneously in Er:GdVO4. Synchrotron X-ray diffraction investigations revealed that a structural phase transition was responsible for the enhancement. Our work brightens the future prospects for applications of Er3+-based PL materials in various fields, such as high power lasers and (bio) medical imaging.

  7. Biogenic Volatile Organic Compound (BVOC) emissions from agricultural crop species: is guttation a possible source for methanol emissions following light/dark transition ?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mozaffar, Ahsan; Amelynck, Crist; Bachy, Aurélie; Digrado, Anthony; Delaplace, Pierre; du Jardin, Patrick; Fauconnier, Marie-Laure; Schoon, Niels; Aubinet, Marc; Heinesch, Bernard

    2015-04-01

    In the framework of the CROSTVOC (CROp STress VOC) project, the exchange of biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs) between two important agricultural crop species, maize and winter wheat, and the atmosphere has recently been measured during an entire growing season by using the eddy covariance technique. Because of the co-variation of BVOC emission drivers in field conditions, laboratory studies were initiated in an environmental chamber in order to disentangle the responses of the emissions to variations of the individual environmental parameters (such as PPFD and temperature) and to diverse abiotic stress factors. Young plants were enclosed in transparent all-Teflon dynamic enclosures (cuvettes) through which BVOC-free and RH-controlled air was sent. BVOC enriched air was subsequently sampled from the plant cuvettes and an empty cuvette (background) and analyzed for BVOCs in a high sensitivity Proton Transfer Reaction Mass Spectrometer (hs-PTR-MS) and for CO2 in a LI-7000 non-dispersive IR gas analyzer. Emissions were monitored at constant temperature (25 °C) and at a stepwise varying PPFD pattern (0-650 µmol m-2 s-1). For maize plants, sudden light/dark transitions at the end of the photoperiod were accompanied by prompt and considerable increases in methanol (m/z 33) and water vapor (m/z 39) emissions. Moreover, guttation droplets appeared on the sides and the tips of the leaves within a few minutes after light/dark transition. Therefore the assumption has been raised that methanol is also coming out with guttation fluid from the leaves. Consequently, guttation fluid was collected from young maize and wheat plants, injected in an empty enclosure and sampled by PTR-MS. Methanol and a large number of other compounds were observed from guttation fluid. Recent studies have shown that guttation from agricultural crops frequently occurs in field conditions. Further research is required to find out the source strength of methanol emissions by this guttation

  8. Optimal control of quantum systems: Origins of inherent robustness to control field fluctuations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rabitz, Herschel

    2002-01-01

    The impact of control field fluctuations on the optimal manipulation of quantum dynamics phenomena is investigated. The quantum system is driven by an optimal control field, with the physical focus on the evolving expectation value of an observable operator. A relationship is shown to exist between the system dynamics and the control field fluctuations, wherein the process of seeking optimal performance assures an inherent degree of system robustness to such fluctuations. The presence of significant field fluctuations breaks down the evolution of the observable expectation value into a sequence of partially coherent robust steps. Robustness occurs because the optimization process reduces sensitivity to noise-driven quantum system fluctuations by taking advantage of the observable expectation value being bilinear in the evolution operator and its adjoint. The consequences of this inherent robustness are discussed in the light of recent experiments and numerical simulations on the optimal control of quantum phenomena. The analysis in this paper bodes well for the future success of closed-loop quantum optimal control experiments, even in the presence of reasonable levels of field fluctuations

  9. CO_2 emissions reduction of Chinese light manufacturing industries: A novel RAM-based global Malmquist–Luenberger productivity index

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Emrouznejad, Ali; Yang, Guo-liang

    2016-01-01

    Climate change has become one of the most challenging issues facing the world. Chinese government has realized the importance of energy conservation and prevention of the climate changes for sustainable development of China's economy and set targets for CO_2 emissions reduction in China. In China industry contributes 84.2% of the total CO_2 emissions, especially manufacturing industries. Data envelopment analysis (DEA) and Malmquist productivity (MP) index are the widely used mathematical techniques to address the relative efficiency and productivity of a group of homogenous decision making units, e.g. industries or countries. However, in many real applications, especially those related to energy efficiency, there are often undesirable outputs, e.g. the pollutions, waste and CO_2 emissions, which are produced inevitably with desirable outputs in the production. This paper introduces a novel Malmquist–Luenberger productivity (MLP) index based on directional distance function (DDF) to address the issue of productivity evolution of DMUs in the presence of undesirable outputs. The new RAM (Range-adjusted measure)-based global MLP index has been applied to evaluate CO_2 emissions reduction in Chinese light manufacturing industries. Recommendations for policy makers have been discussed. - Highlights: •CO_2 emissions reduction in Chinese light manufacturing industries are measured. •A novel RAM based Malmquist–Luenberger productivity index has been developed. •Recommendation to policy makers for reducing CO_2 reduction in China are given.

  10. Cost-competitive, inherently safe LFMBR pool plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McDonald, J.S.; Brunings, J.E.; Chang, Y.I.; Hren, R.R.; Seidensticker, R.W.

    1984-01-01

    The Cost-Competitive, Inherently Safe LMFBR Pool Plant design was prepared in GFY 1983 under a DOE-sponsored program. This plant design was developed as a joint effort by Rockwell International and the Argonne National Laboratory with major contributions from the Bechtel Group, Inc.; Combustion engineering, Inc.; the Chicago Bridge and Iron Company; and the General Electric Company. Using current LMFBR technology, many innovative features were developed and incorporated into the design to meet the ultimate objectives of the Breeder Program, i.e., energy costs competitive with LWRs and inherent safety features to maintain the plant in a safe condition following assumed accidents without requiring operator action. This paper provides a description of the principal features that were incorporated into the design to achieve low cost and inherent safety

  11. Detection of Time Lags between Quasar Continuum Emission Bands Based On Pan-STARRS Light Curves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiang, Yan-Fei [Kavli Institute for Theoretical Physics, University of California, Santa Barbara, CA 93106 (United States); Green, Paul J.; Pancoast, Anna; MacLeod, Chelsea L. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Greene, Jenny E. [Department of Astrophysical Sciences, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States); Morganson, Eric; Shen, Yue [Department of Astronomy, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States); Anderson, Scott F.; Ruan, John J. [Department of Astronomy, University of Washington, Box 351580, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States); Brandt, W. N.; Grier, C. J. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Rix, H.-W. [Max Planck Institute for Astronomy, Königstuhl 17, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Protopapas, Pavlos [Institute for Applied Computational Science, John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Scott, Caroline [Astrophysics, Imperial College London, Blackett Laboratory, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Burgett, W. S.; Hodapp, K. W.; Huber, M. E.; Kaiser, N.; Kudritzki, R. P.; Magnier, E. A. [Institute for Astronomy, University of Hawaii, 2680 Woodlawn Drive, Honolulu HI 96822 (United States); and others

    2017-02-20

    We study the time lags between the continuum emission of quasars at different wavelengths, based on more than four years of multi-band ( g , r , i , z ) light curves in the Pan-STARRS Medium Deep Fields. As photons from different bands emerge from different radial ranges in the accretion disk, the lags constrain the sizes of the accretion disks. We select 240 quasars with redshifts of z ≈ 1 or z ≈ 0.3 that are relatively emission-line free. The light curves are sampled from day to month timescales, which makes it possible to detect lags on the scale of the light crossing time of the accretion disks. With the code JAVELIN , we detect typical lags of several days in the rest frame between the g band and the riz bands. The detected lags are ∼2–3 times larger than the light crossing time estimated from the standard thin disk model, consistent with the recently measured lag in NGC 5548 and microlensing measurements of quasars. The lags in our sample are found to increase with increasing luminosity. Furthermore, the increase in lags going from g − r to g − i and then to g − z is slower than predicted in the thin disk model, particularly for high-luminosity quasars. The radial temperature profile in the disk must be different from what is assumed. We also find evidence that the lags decrease with increasing line ratios between ultraviolet Fe ii lines and Mg ii, which may point to changes in the accretion disk structure at higher metallicity.

  12. Engineering Designed Proteins for Light Capture, Energy Transfer, and Emissive Sensing In Vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mancini, Joshua A.

    Proteins that are used for photosynthetic light harvesting and biological signaling are critical to life. These types of proteins act as scaffolds that hold small, sometimes metal-containing organic molecules in precise locations for light absorption and successive use. For signaling proteins, this energy can be used to induce a photoisomerization of the small molecule that can turn on or off a signaling cascade that controls the physiology of an organism. Alternatively, photosynthetic light-harvesting proteins funnel this energy in a directional manner towards a charge separating catalytic component that can change this light energy into chemical energy. The protein environment also serves to tune the photophysical properties of the small molecules. This is seen extensively with the linear tetrapyrroles that are used in both photosynthetic and signaling proteins. Many efforts have been made to harness these natural proteins for societal use, including improving photophysical properties and interfacing capabilities with manmade catalytic components. Several methods of achieving improvement have entailed structurally guided mutation and directed evolution. However, these methods all have their limitations due to the inherent complexity and fragility of the natural proteins. This work presents an alternative more robust method to natural proteins. My thesis states: that man-made proteins, known as maquettes, employing basic rules of protein folding, can be designed to become light harvesting and signaling proteins that can be assembled fully in vivo providing an alternative, robust, and versatile platform for meeting the diverse array of societal "green chemistry" and biomedical needs. This in vivo assembly is carried out by interacting with cyanobacterial protein and pigment machinery, both as stand-alone units and as protein fusions with natural antenna complexes. Additionally, this work offers insight for fast and tight binding of circular and linear tetrapyrroles

  13. Metal oxide core shell nanostructures as building blocks for efficient light emission (SISGR)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Jane P [Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Dorman, James [Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Cheung, Cyrus [Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    2016-01-12

    The objective of this research is to synthesize core-shell nano-structured metal oxide materials and investigate their structural, electronic and optical properties to understand the microscopic pathways governing the energy conversion process, thereby controlling and improving their efficiency. Specifically, the goal is to use a single metal oxide core-shell nanostructure and a single excitation source to generate photons with long emission lifetime over the entire visible spectrum and when controlled at the right ratio, generating white light. In order to achieve this goal, we need to control the energy transfer between light emitting elements, which dictates the control of their interatomic spacing and spatial distribution. We developed an economical wet chemical process to form the nanostructured core and to control the thickness and composition of the shell layers. With the help from using DOE funded synchrotron radiation facility, we delineated the growth mechanism of the nano-structured core and the shell layers, thereby enhancing our understanding of structure-property relation in these materials. Using the upconversion luminescence and the lifetime measurements as effective feedback to materials sysnthes is and integration, we demonstrated improved luminescence lifetimes of the core-shell nano-structures and quantified the optimal core-multi-shell structure with optimum shell thickness and composition. We developed a rare-earths co-doped LaPO4 core-multishell structure in order to produce a single white light source. It was decided that the mutli-shell method would produce the largest increase in luminescence efficiency while limiting any energy transfer that may occur between the dopant ions. All samples resulted in emission spectra within the accepted range of white light generation based on the converted CIE color coordinates. The white light obtained varied between warm and cool white depending on the layering architecture, allowing for the

  14. Characterization of in-use light-duty gasoline vehicle emissions by remote sensing in Beijing: impact of recent control measures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yu; Fu, Lixin; Cheng, Linglin

    2007-09-01

    China's national government and Beijing city authorities have adopted additional control measures to reduce the negative impact of vehicle emissions on Beijing's air quality. An evaluation of the effectiveness of these measures may provide guidance for future vehicle emission control strategy development. In-use emissions from light-duty gasoline vehicles (LDGVs) were investigated at five sites in Beijing with remote sensing instrumentation. Distance-based mass emission factors were derived with fuel consumption modeled on real world data. The results show that the recently implemented aggressive control strategies are significantly reducing the emissions of on-road vehicles. Older vehicles are contributing substantially to the total fleet emissions. An earlier program to retrofit pre-Euro cars with three-way catalysts produced little emission reduction. The impact of model year and driving conditions on the average mass emission factors indicates that the durability of vehicles emission controls may be inadequate in Beijing.

  15. Green leaf volatiles and oxygenated metabolite emission bursts from mesquite branches following light-dark transitions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jardine, K; Barron-Gafford, G A; Norman, J P; Abrell, L; Monson, R K; Meyers, K T; Pavao-Zuckerman, M; Dontsova, K; Kleist, E; Werner, C; Huxman, T E

    2012-09-01

    Green leaf volatiles (GLVs) are a diverse group of fatty acid-derived compounds emitted by all plants and are involved in a wide variety of developmental and stress-related biological functions. Recently, GLV emission bursts from leaves were reported following light-dark transitions and hypothesized to be related to the stress response while acetaldehyde bursts were hypothesized to be due to the 'pyruvate overflow' mechanism. In this study, branch emissions of GLVs and a group of oxygenated metabolites (acetaldehyde, ethanol, acetic acid, and acetone) derived from the pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH) bypass pathway were quantified from mesquite plants following light-dark transitions using a coupled GC-MS, PTR-MS, and photosynthesis system. Within the first minute after darkening following a light period, large emission bursts of both C(5) and C(6) GLVs dominated by (Z)-3-hexen-1-yl acetate together with the PDH bypass metabolites are reported for the first time. We found that branches exposed to CO(2)-free air lacked significant GLV and PDH bypass bursts while O(2)-free atmospheres eliminated the GLV burst but stimulated the PDH bypass burst. A positive relationship was observed between photosynthetic activity prior to darkening and the magnitude of the GLV and PDH bursts. Photosynthesis under (13)CO(2) resulted in bursts with extensive labeling of acetaldehyde, ethanol, and the acetate but not the C(6)-alcohol moiety of (Z)-3-hexen-1-yl acetate. Our observations are consistent with (1) the "pyruvate overflow" mechanism with a fast turnover time (3 h) responsible for the C(6) alcohol moiety of (Z)-3-hexen-1-yl acetate via the 13-lipoxygenase pathway. We conclude that our non-invasive method may provide a new valuable in vivo tool for studies of acetyl-CoA and fatty acid metabolism in plants at a variety of spatial scales.

  16. ELECTROMAGNETIC EMISSION FROM LONG-LIVED BINARY NEUTRON STAR MERGER REMNANTS. II. LIGHT CURVES AND SPECTRA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Siegel, Daniel M. [Max Planck Institute for Gravitational Physics (Albert Einstein Institute), Am Mühlenberg 1, D-14476 Potsdam-Golm (Germany); Ciolfi, Riccardo, E-mail: daniel.siegel@aei.mpg.de, E-mail: riccardo.ciolfi@unitn.it [Physics Department, University of Trento, Via Sommarive 14, I-38123 Trento (Italy)

    2016-03-01

    Recent observations indicate that in a large fraction of binary neutron star (BNS) mergers a long-lived neutron star (NS) may be formed rather than a black hole. Unambiguous electromagnetic (EM) signatures of such a scenario would strongly impact our knowledge on how short gamma-ray bursts (SGRBs) and their afterglow radiation are generated. Furthermore, such EM signals would have profound implications for multimessenger astronomy with joint EM and gravitational-wave (GW) observations of BNS mergers, which will soon become reality thanks to the ground-based advanced LIGO/Virgo GW detector network. Here we explore such EM signatures based on the model presented in a companion paper, which provides a self-consistent evolution of the post-merger system and its EM emission up to ∼10{sup 7} s. Light curves and spectra are computed for a wide range of post-merger physical properties. We present X-ray afterglow light curves corresponding to the “standard” and the “time-reversal” scenario for SGRBs (prompt emission associated with the merger or with the collapse of the long-lived NS). The light curve morphologies include single and two-plateau features with timescales and luminosities that are in good agreement with Swift observations. Furthermore, we compute the X-ray signal that should precede the SGRB in the time-reversal scenario, the detection of which would represent smoking-gun evidence for this scenario. Finally, we find a bright, highly isotropic EM transient peaking in the X-ray band at ∼10{sup 2}–10{sup 4} s after the BNS merger with luminosities of L{sub X} ∼ 10{sup 46}–10{sup 48} erg s{sup −1}. This signal represents a very promising EM counterpart to the GW emission from BNS mergers.

  17. Light output from six battery operated dental curing lights

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shimokawa, Carlos Alberto Kenji, E-mail: carlos.shimokawa@usp.br [University of São Paulo, School of Dentistry, Restorative Dentistry, Avenida Professor Lineu Prestes, 2227, 05508-000, São Paulo, São Paulo (Brazil); Dalhousie University, Faculty of Dentistry, Dental Clinical Sciences, 5981 University Avenue, B3H 4R2, Halifax, Nova Scotia (Canada); Turbino, Míriam Lacalle, E-mail: miturbin@usp.br [University of São Paulo, School of Dentistry, Restorative Dentistry, Avenida Professor Lineu Prestes, 2227, 05508-000, São Paulo, São Paulo (Brazil); Harlow, Jessie Eudora, E-mail: jessie.harlow@dal.ca [Dalhousie University, Faculty of Dentistry, Dental Clinical Sciences, 5981 University Avenue, B3H 4R2, Halifax, Nova Scotia (Canada); Price, Hannah Louise, E-mail: hannlprice@gmail.com [Dalhousie University, Faculty of Dentistry, Dental Clinical Sciences, 5981 University Avenue, B3H 4R2, Halifax, Nova Scotia (Canada); Price, Richard Bengt, E-mail: richard.price@dal.ca [Dalhousie University, School of Biomedical Engineering and Faculty of Dentistry, 5981 University Avenue, B3H 4R2, Halifax, Nova Scotia (Canada)

    2016-12-01

    Light Curing Units (LCUs) are used daily in almost every dental office to photocure resins, but because the light is so bright, the user is unable to tell visually if there are any differences between different LCUs. This study evaluated the light output from six dental LCUs: Elipar Deep Cure-S (3M ESPE), Bluephase G2 (Ivoclar Vivadent), Translux 2Wave (Heraeus Kulzer), Optilight Prime (Gnatus), Slim Blast (First Medica) and Led.B (Guilin Woodpecker) with a fully charged battery, after 50, and again after 100, 20 second light exposures. For each situation, the radiant power was measured 10 times with a laboratory-grade power meter. Then, the emission spectrum was measured using a fiber-optic spectrometer followed by an analysis of the light beam profile. It was found there were significant differences in the LCU power and the irradiance values between the LCUs (p < 0.01). The Optilight Prime and Slim Blast LCUs showed a significant reduction in light output after a 50 and 100 exposures, while Bluephase G2 exhibited a significant reduction only after 100 exposures (p < 0.01). The Bluephase G2 and Translux 2 Wave delivered an emission spectrum that had two distinct wavelength emission peaks. Only the Elipar Deep Cure-S and Bluephase G2 LCUs displayed homogeneous light beam profiles, the other LCUs exhibited highly non-homogeneous light beam profiles. It was concluded that contemporary LCUs could have very different light output characteristics. Both manufacturers and researchers should provide more information about the light output from LCUs. - Highlights: • The six LCUs delivered significantly different light output characteristics. • The use of a single irradiance value does not adequately describe the light output from a curing light. • Small differences in the tip area, or how it is defined, will have a large effect on the calculated irradiance. • In some cases there were large portions of the light tip that emitted less than 400 mW/cm². • The radiant

  18. Light output from six battery operated dental curing lights

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimokawa, Carlos Alberto Kenji; Turbino, Míriam Lacalle; Harlow, Jessie Eudora; Price, Hannah Louise; Price, Richard Bengt

    2016-01-01

    Light Curing Units (LCUs) are used daily in almost every dental office to photocure resins, but because the light is so bright, the user is unable to tell visually if there are any differences between different LCUs. This study evaluated the light output from six dental LCUs: Elipar Deep Cure-S (3M ESPE), Bluephase G2 (Ivoclar Vivadent), Translux 2Wave (Heraeus Kulzer), Optilight Prime (Gnatus), Slim Blast (First Medica) and Led.B (Guilin Woodpecker) with a fully charged battery, after 50, and again after 100, 20 second light exposures. For each situation, the radiant power was measured 10 times with a laboratory-grade power meter. Then, the emission spectrum was measured using a fiber-optic spectrometer followed by an analysis of the light beam profile. It was found there were significant differences in the LCU power and the irradiance values between the LCUs (p < 0.01). The Optilight Prime and Slim Blast LCUs showed a significant reduction in light output after a 50 and 100 exposures, while Bluephase G2 exhibited a significant reduction only after 100 exposures (p < 0.01). The Bluephase G2 and Translux 2 Wave delivered an emission spectrum that had two distinct wavelength emission peaks. Only the Elipar Deep Cure-S and Bluephase G2 LCUs displayed homogeneous light beam profiles, the other LCUs exhibited highly non-homogeneous light beam profiles. It was concluded that contemporary LCUs could have very different light output characteristics. Both manufacturers and researchers should provide more information about the light output from LCUs. - Highlights: • The six LCUs delivered significantly different light output characteristics. • The use of a single irradiance value does not adequately describe the light output from a curing light. • Small differences in the tip area, or how it is defined, will have a large effect on the calculated irradiance. • In some cases there were large portions of the light tip that emitted less than 400 mW/cm². • The radiant

  19. Dissertation: Precompound Emission of Energetic Light Fragments in Spallation Reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kerby, Leslie Marie [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-08-04

    Emission of light fragments (LF) from nuclear reactions is an open question. Different reaction mechanisms contribute to their production; the relative roles of each, and how they change with incident energy, mass number of the target, and the type and emission energy of the fragments is not completely understood. None of the available models are able to accurately predict emission of LF from arbitrary reactions. However, the ability to describe production of LF (especially at energies ≳ 30 MeV) from many reactions is important for different applications, such as cosmic-ray-induced Single Event Upsets (SEUs), radiation protection, and cancer therapy with proton and heavy-ion beams, to name just a few. The Cascade-Exciton Model (CEM) version 03.03 and the Los Alamos version of the Quark-Gluon String Model (LAQGSM) version 03.03 event generators in Monte Carlo N-Particle Transport Code version 6 (MCNP6) describe quite well the spectra of fragments with sizes up to ⁴He across a broad range of target masses and incident energies (up to ~ 5 GeV for CEM and up to ~ 1 TeV/A for LAQGSM). However, they do not predict the high energy tails of LF spectra heavier than ⁴He well. Most LF with energies above several tens of MeV are emitted during the precompound stage of a reaction. The current versions of the CEM and LAQGSM event generators do not account for precompound emission of LF larger than ⁴He. The aim of our work is to extend the precompound model in them to include such processes, leading to an increase of predictive power of LF-production in MCNP6. This entails upgrading the Modified Exciton Model currently used at the preequilibrium stage in CEM and LAQGSM. It also includes expansion and examination of the coalescence and Fermi break-up models used in the precompound stages of spallation reactions within CEM and LAQGSM. Extending our models to include emission of fragments heavier than ⁴He at the precompound stage has indeed provided results that have much

  20. Comprehensive Study of Solar Cell Structure Defects by Means of Noise and Light Emission Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Macku

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper discusses the issue of silicon solar cells localized defects from metrological and physical points of view. Structure imperfections represent the real problem because of solar cells long-term degradation and conversion efficiency decreasing. To this aim we pay our attention to research relating to the defect light emission and correlation with rectangular microplasma fluctuation. A sensitive CCD camera has been used for mapping of surface photon emission. The operation point of the samples has been set to reverse bias mode, and different electric field intensity was applied. We managed to get interesting information using a combination of optical investigation and electrical noise measurement in time and spectral domain. It will be revealed that a direct correlation between noise and photon emission exists and the results related to several defect spots are presented in detail in this paper.

  1. Pressure dependence of emission intensity of rare-gas excimer light produced by silent discharge; Teikiatsu ryoiki ni okeru musei hoden reiki ki gas excimer hikari shutsuryoku no atsuryoku izonsei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshida, Y.; Tanaka, M.; Yukimura, K. [Doshisha University, Kyoto (Japan)

    1996-09-20

    To establish the pressure dependence of silent discharge excited rare gas excimer light emission, a vacua ultraviolet light was subjected to spectroscopic analysis at a pressure lower than 20kPa. Researches are under way to apply the discharge excited rare gas excimer lamp as a vacuum ultraviolet light source for the development of new materials and for the conservation of environments. When the pressure is as low as 1.8kPa or 4.4kPa, the emission has peaks at wavelengths centering on 147nm and 149nm, both of which are the resonance lines of the xenon atom. Excimer generation becomes prominent as the pressure increases, with the second continuum of light growing dominant at 35kPa to weaken relatively the resonance lines and the first continuum of light. In the first continuum, emission increases only at a suppressed rate, as compared with emission in the second continuum, due for instance to a collision caused relaxation process in which excimers are lost. In the case of xenon in the vicinity of 10-11kPa, the first continuum of light and the second continuum of light are approximately equal in emission intensity, producing a vacuum ultraviolet light source with a bandwidth relatively large for a single gas spectrum. 14 refs., 11 figs.

  2. Wavelength-tuned light emission via modifying the band edge symmetry: Doped SnO2 as an example

    KAUST Repository

    Zhou, Hang; Deng, Rui; Li, Yongfeng; Yao, Bin; Ding, Zhanhui; Wang, Qingxiao; Han, Yu; Wu, Tao; Liu, Lei

    2014-01-01

    at 398 nm is observed in the indium-doped SnO2-based heterojunction. Our results demonstrate an unprecedented doping-based approach toward tailoring the symmetry of band edge states and recovering ultraviolet light emission in wide-bandgap oxides. © 2014

  3. InGaAs quantum dots grown by molecular beam epitaxy for light emission on Si substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bru-Chevallier, C; El Akra, A; Pelloux-Gervais, D; Dumont, H; Canut, B; Chauvin, N; Regreny, P; Gendry, M; Patriarche, G; Jancu, J M; Even, J; Noe, P; Calvo, V; Salem, B

    2011-10-01

    The aim of this study is to achieve homogeneous, high density and dislocation free InGaAs quantum dots grown by molecular beam epitaxy for light emission on silicon substrates. This work is part of a project which aims at overcoming the severe limitation suffered by silicon regarding its optoelectronic applications, especially efficient light emission device. For this study, one of the key points is to overcome the expected type II InGaAs/Si interface by inserting the InGaAs quantum dots inside a thin silicon quantum well in SiO2 fabricated on a SOI substrate. Confinement effects of the Si/SiO2 quantum well are expected to heighten the indirect silicon bandgap and then give rise to a type I interface with the InGaAs quantum dots. Band structure and optical properties are modeled within the tight binding approximation: direct energy bandgap is demonstrated in SiO2/Si/InAs/Si/SiO2 heterostructures for very thin Si layers and absorption coefficient is calculated. Thinned SOI substrates are successfully prepared using successive etching process resulting in a 2 nm-thick Si layer on top of silica. Another key point to get light emission from InGaAs quantum dots is to avoid any dislocations or defects in the quantum dots. We investigate the quantum dot size distribution, density and structural quality at different V/III beam equivalent pressure ratios, different growth temperatures and as a function of the amount of deposited material. This study was performed for InGaAs quantum dots grown on Si(001) substrates. The capping of InGaAs quantum dots by a silicon epilayer is performed in order to get efficient photoluminescence emission from quantum dots. Scanning transmission electronic microscopy images are used to study the structural quality of the quantum dots. Dislocation free In50Ga50As QDs are successfully obtained on a (001) silicon substrate. The analysis of QDs capped with silicon by Rutherford Backscattering Spectrometry in a channeling geometry is also presented.

  4. Measurement of the radial density distribution of the light emissions near the trajectory of fast ions in nitrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ibach, T.

    1983-11-01

    For the analysis of the emission and deceleration mechanisms of ionisation-electrons (delta-electrons) during the passage of fast ions through gases, the radial density distribution of the light emission has been measured, which is related with the (0,0)-transitions of two optical bands in nitrogen. These measurements have been made using a small aperture limited ion beam. The first band under study is the 2. positive system at 337.1 nm excited mainly by low energy electrons around 20 eV, and the second band is the 1. negative system at 391.4 nm excited by fast electrons with simultaneous ionisation. For these measurements an experimental setup has been developed with a telescope-like optical system and interference filters to detect the emitted light with a high spacial resolution (4x10 -4 of profile width) and a high dynamic range (10 6 ). The experiments have been performed using proton beams of different energies between 270 keV and 2.8 MeV, He-3 beams with 270 keV/u and 500 keV/u and a Ne beam with 270 keV/u with gas pressures in the range between 0.133 to 13.3 mbar. Based on the method of Abel inversion the spacial light emission density is deduced from the experimental distance functions and normalized to a gas density of 1 g/cm 3 . The results show that approximately half of the total light emission in the 1. negative system and the ionisation is caused by the primary interaction of the ion beam. For the same energy per nucleon this contribution decreases relative to the contribution of the delta-electrons with increasing atomic number. In addition the delta-radiation becomes harder with increasing atomic number. Good agreement is obtained by comparison with the results of other authors, which are based on probe techniques and Monte-Carlo-calculations. (orig./HP) [de

  5. Variability in operation-based NO(x) emission factors with different test routes, and its effects on the real-driving emissions of light diesel vehicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Taewoo; Park, Junhong; Kwon, Sangil; Lee, Jongtae; Kim, Jeongsoo

    2013-09-01

    The objective of this study is to quantify the differences in NO(x) emissions between standard and non-standard driving and vehicle operating conditions, and to estimate by how much NO(x) emissions exceed the legislative emission limits under typical Korean road traffic conditions. Twelve Euro 3-5 light-duty diesel vehicles (LDDVs) manufactured in Korea were driven on a chassis dynamometer over the standard New European Driving Cycle (NEDC) and a representative Korean on-road driving cycle (KDC). NO(x) emissions, average speeds and accelerations were calculated for each 1-km trip segment, so called averaging windows. The results suggest that the NO(x) emissions of the tested vehicles are more susceptible to variations in the driving cycles than to those in the operating conditions. Even under comparable operating conditions, the NO(x) control capabilities of vehicles differ from each other, i.e., NO(x) control is weaker for the KDC than for the NEDC. The NO(x) emissions over the KDC for given vehicle operating conditions exceed those over the NEDC by more than a factor of 8. Consequently, on-road NO(x) emission factors are estimated here to exceed the Euro 5 emission limit by up to a factor of 8, 4 and 3 for typical Korean urban, rural, and motorway road traffic conditions, respectively. Our findings support the development of technical regulations for supplementary real-world emission tests for emission certification and the corresponding research actions taken by automotive industries. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Concept of an inherently-safe high temperature gas-cooled reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohashi, Hirofumi; Sato, Hiroyuki; Tachibana, Yukio; Kunitomi, Kazuhiko; Ogawa, Masuro

    2012-01-01

    As the challenge to ensure no harmful release of radioactive materials at the accidents by deterministic approach instead to satisfy acceptance criteria or safety goal for risk by probabilistic approach, new concept of advanced reactor, an inherently-safe high temperature gas-cooled reactor, is proposed based on the experience of the operation of the actual High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor (HTGR) in Japan, High Temperature Engineering Test Reactor (HTTR), and the design of the commercial plant (GTHTR300), utilizing the inherent safety features of the HTGR (i.e., safety features based on physical phenomena). The safety design philosophy of the inherently-safe HTGR for the safety analysis of the radiological consequences is determined as the confinement of radioactive materials is assured by only inherent safety features without engineered safety features, AC power or prompt actions by plant personnel if the design extension conditions occur. Inherent safety features to prevent the loss or degradation of the confinement function are identified. It is proposed not to apply the probabilistic approach for the evaluation of the radiological consequences of the accidents in the safety analysis because no inherent safety features fail for the mitigation of the consequences of the accidents. Consequently, there are no event sequences to harmful release of radioactive materials if the design extension conditions occur in the inherently-safe HTGR concept. The concept and future R and D items for the inherently-safe HTGR are described in this paper.

  7. White emission from organic light-emitting diodes with a super-thin BCP layer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hao Jingang; Deng Zhenbo; Yang Shengyi

    2007-01-01

    We report a method to achieve white emission from organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) in which a super-thin (3 nm) hole blocking layer, 2,9-dimethyl-4,7-diphenyl-1,10-phenanthroline (BCP), was inserted between electron-transport layer 8-hydroxyquinoline aluminum (Alq 3 ) and 4-(dicyanomethylene)-2-t-butyl-6(1,1,7,7-tetramethyljulolidyl-9-enyl) -4H-pyran (DCJTB) doped poly-vinlycarbazole (PVK) layer. The BCP layer can not only confine exciton in the emitting layer but also control energy transfer proportion from PVK to Alq 3 and then from Alq 3 to DCJTB through BCP layer. In this way, pure white emission with CIE coordinate of (0.32, 0.32) was obtained and it was voltage independent. The brightness reached 270 cd/m 2 at 18 V with an efficiency of 0.166 cd/A

  8. Control of a White Organic Light Emitting Diode emission parameters using a single doped RGB active layer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pereira, D. [Departamento de Ciência dos Materiais e i3N – Instituto de Nanoestruturas, Nanomodelação e Nanofabricação, Faculdade de Ciências e Tecnologia, Universidade Nova de Lisboa, Campus da Caparica, 2829-516 Caparica (Portugal); Pinto, A.; Califórnia, A.; Gomes, J. [CeNTI – Centro de Nanotecnologia, Materiais Técnicos, Funcionais e Inteligentes, Rua Fernando Mesquita 2785, 4760-034 Vila Nova de Famalicão (Portugal); Pereira, L., E-mail: luiz@ua.pt [Departmento de Física e i3N – Instituto de Nanoestruturas, Nanomodelação e Nanofabricação, Universidade de Aveiro, 3810-193 Aveiro (Portugal)

    2016-09-15

    Highlights: • A simple WOLED for Solid State Lighting is proposed with high color stability. • Energy transfer and electroluminescence dynamics of a single RGB layer for WOLEDs. • White shade modulation and stability over large emitting areas and applied voltages. - Abstract: Solid State Lighting technologies based on Organic Light Emitting Diodes, became an interesting focus due to their unique properties. The use of a unique RGB active layer for white emission, although simple in theory, shows difficulty to stabilize both CIE coordinates and color modulation. In this work, a WOLED using a simple RGB layer, was developed achieving a high color stability and shade modulation. The RGB matrix comprises a blue host material NPB, doped with two guests, a green (Coumarin 153) and a red (DCM1) in low concentrations. The RGB layer carrier dynamics allows for the white emission in low device complexity and high stability. This was also shown independent of the white shade, obtained through small changes in the red dopant resulting in devices ranging from warm to cool white i.e. an easy color tuning. A detailed analysis of the opto-electrical behavior is made.

  9. Control of a White Organic Light Emitting Diode emission parameters using a single doped RGB active layer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pereira, D.; Pinto, A.; Califórnia, A.; Gomes, J.; Pereira, L.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • A simple WOLED for Solid State Lighting is proposed with high color stability. • Energy transfer and electroluminescence dynamics of a single RGB layer for WOLEDs. • White shade modulation and stability over large emitting areas and applied voltages. - Abstract: Solid State Lighting technologies based on Organic Light Emitting Diodes, became an interesting focus due to their unique properties. The use of a unique RGB active layer for white emission, although simple in theory, shows difficulty to stabilize both CIE coordinates and color modulation. In this work, a WOLED using a simple RGB layer, was developed achieving a high color stability and shade modulation. The RGB matrix comprises a blue host material NPB, doped with two guests, a green (Coumarin 153) and a red (DCM1) in low concentrations. The RGB layer carrier dynamics allows for the white emission in low device complexity and high stability. This was also shown independent of the white shade, obtained through small changes in the red dopant resulting in devices ranging from warm to cool white i.e. an easy color tuning. A detailed analysis of the opto-electrical behavior is made.

  10. Licensing issues for inherently safe fast reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kastenberg, W.E.; Lee, S.; Okrent, D.

    1986-01-01

    There has been considerable interest recently in a new generation of liquid metal reactor (LMR) concepts in the US. Some significant changes in regulatory philosophy will be required if the anticipated cost advantages of inherently safe designs are to be achieved. The defense in depth philosophy will need to be significantly re-evaluated in the context of inherently safe reactors. It is the purpose of this paper to begin such a re-evaluation of this regulatory philosophy

  11. Implications of inherent safe nuclear power system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, Yo-Taik

    1987-01-01

    The safety of present day nuclear power reactors and research reactors depends on a combination of design features of passive and active systems, and the alert judgement of their operators. A few inherently safe designs of nuclear reactors for power plants are currently under development. In these designs, the passive systems are emphasized, and the active systems are minimized. Also efforts are made to eliminate the potential for human failures that initiate the series of accidents. If a major system fails in these designs, the core is flooded automatically with coolants that flow by gravity, not by mechanical pumps or electromagnetic actuators. Depending on the choice of the coolants--water, liquid metal and helium gas--there are three principal types of inherently safe reactors. In this paper, these inherently safe reactor designs are reviewed and their implications are discussed. Further, future perspectives of their acceptance by nuclear industries are discussed. (author)

  12. Autocorrelation analysis of plasma plume light emissions in deep penetration laser welding of steel

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mrňa, Libor; Šarbort, Martin; Řeřucha, Šimon; Jedlička, Petr

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 29, č. 1 (2017), s. 1-10, č. článku 012009. ISSN 1042-346X R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LO1212; GA MŠk ED0017/01/01 Institutional support: RVO:68081731 Keywords : laser welding * plasma plume * light emissions * autocorrelation analysis * weld depth Subject RIV: BH - Optics, Masers, Lasers OBOR OECD: Optics (including laser optics and quantum optics) Impact factor: 1.492, year: 2016

  13. A modal approach to light emission and propagation in coupled cavity waveguide systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gregersen, Niels; Kristensen, P. T.; de Lasson, Jakob Rosenkrantz

    2016-01-01

    We theoretically investigate systems of optical cavities coupled to waveguides,which necessitates the introduction of non-trivial radiation conditions and normalization procedures. In return, the approach provides simple and accurate modeling of Green functions,Purcell factors and perturbation...... corrections, as well as an alternative approach to the so-calledcoupled mode theory. In combination, these results may form part of the foundations for highly efficient, yet physically transparent models of light emission and propagation in both classical and quantum integrated photonic circuits....

  14. Barium light source method and apparatus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curry, John J. (Inventor); MacDonagh-Dumler, Jeffrey (Inventor); Anderson, Heidi M. (Inventor); Lawler, James E. (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    Visible light emission is obtained from a plasma containing elemental barium including neutral barium atoms and barium ion species. Neutral barium provides a strong green light emission in the center of the visible spectrum with a highly efficient conversion of electrical energy into visible light. By the selective excitation of barium ionic species, emission of visible light at longer and shorter wavelengths can be obtained simultaneously with the green emission from neutral barium, effectively providing light that is visually perceived as white. A discharge vessel contains the elemental barium and a buffer gas fill therein, and a discharge inducer is utilized to induce a desired discharge temperature and barium vapor pressure therein to produce from the barium vapor a visible light emission. The discharge can be induced utilizing a glow discharge between electrodes in the discharge vessel as well as by inductively or capacitively coupling RF energy into the plasma within the discharge vessel.

  15. One-dimensional organic lead halide perovskites with efficient bluish white-light emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Zhao; Zhou, Chenkun; Tian, Yu; Shu, Yu; Messier, Joshua; Wang, Jamie C.; van de Burgt, Lambertus J.; Kountouriotis, Konstantinos; Xin, Yan; Holt, Ethan; Schanze, Kirk; Clark, Ronald; Siegrist, Theo; Ma, Biwu

    2017-01-01

    Organic-inorganic hybrid metal halide perovskites, an emerging class of solution processable photoactive materials, welcome a new member with a one-dimensional structure. Herein we report the synthesis, crystal structure and photophysical properties of one-dimensional organic lead bromide perovskites, C4N2H14PbBr4, in which the edge sharing octahedral lead bromide chains [PbBr4 2-]∞ are surrounded by the organic cations C4N2H14 2+ to form the bulk assembly of core-shell quantum wires. This unique one-dimensional structure enables strong quantum confinement with the formation of self-trapped excited states that give efficient bluish white-light emissions with photoluminescence quantum efficiencies of approximately 20% for the bulk single crystals and 12% for the microscale crystals. This work verifies once again that one-dimensional systems are favourable for exciton self-trapping to produce highly efficient below-gap broadband luminescence, and opens up a new route towards superior light emitters based on bulk quantum materials.

  16. Influence of heterojunction interface on exciplex emission from organic light-emitting diodes under electric fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Shengyi; Zhang, Xiulong; Lou, Zhidong; Hou, Yanbing [Beijing Jiaotong University, Key Laboratory of Luminescence and Optical Information, Ministry of Education, Institute of Optoelectronic Technology, Beijing (China)

    2008-03-15

    In this paper, electroluminescence from organic light-emitting diodes based on 2-(4'-biphenyl)-5-(4{sup ''}-tert-butylphenyl)-1,3,4-oxadiazole (PBD) and N,N'-diphenyl-N,N'-bis(3-methylphenyl)-(1,1'-biphenyl)-4,4'-diamine (TPD) is reported. Based on the exciplex emission from the TPD/PBD interface under high electric fields, the influence of the TPD/PBD interface on exciplex emission was investigated by increasing the number of TPD/PBD interfaces while keeping both the total thickness of the TPD layer and the PBD layer constant in the multiple quantum-wells (MQW) device ITO/TPD/[PBD/TPD]{sub n}/PBD/Al (n is the well number that was varied from 0 to 3). Our experimental data shows that exciplex emission can be enhanced by suitably increasing the well number of this kind of MQW-like device. (orig.)

  17. Synthesis and Characterization of Pure Copper Nanostructures Using Wood Inherent Architecture as a Natural Template

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Youming; Wang, Kaili; Tan, Yi; Wang, Qingchun; Li, Jianzhang; Mark, Hughes; Zhang, Shifeng

    2018-04-01

    The inherent sophisticated structure of wood inspires researchers to use it as a natural template for synthesizing functional nanoparticles. In this study, pure copper nanoparticles were synthesized using poplar wood as a natural inexpensive and renewable template. The crystal structure and morphologies of the copper nanoparticles were characterized by X-ray diffraction and field emission scanning electron microscopy. The optical properties, antibacterial properties, and stability of the hybrid wood materials were also tested. Due to the hierarchical and anisotropic structure and electron-rich components of wood, pure copper nanoparticles with high stability were synthesized with fcc structure and uniform sizes and then assembled into corncob-like copper deposits along the wood cell lumina. The products of nanoparticles depended strongly on the initial OH- concentration. With an increase in OH- concentration, Cu2O gradually decreased and Cu remained. Due to the restrictions inherent in wood structure, the derived Cu nanoparticles showed similar grain size in spite of increased Cu2+ concentration. This combination of Cu nanostructures and wood exhibited remarkable optical and antibacterial properties.

  18. Broadband sensitized white light emission of g-C{sub 3}N{sub 4}/Y{sub 2}MoO{sub 6}:Eu{sup 3+} composite phosphor under near ultraviolet excitation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Bing, E-mail: hanbing@zzuli.edu.cn [School of Material and Chemical Engineering, Zhengzhou University of Light Industry, Zhengzhou 450002 (China); Xue, Yongfei; Li, Pengju [School of Material and Chemical Engineering, Zhengzhou University of Light Industry, Zhengzhou 450002 (China); Zhang, Jingtao [School of Food and Bioengineering, Zhengzhou University of Light Industry, Zhengzhou 450002 (China); Zhang, Jie [School of Material and Chemical Engineering, Zhengzhou University of Light Industry, Zhengzhou 450002 (China); Shi, Hengzhen, E-mail: shihz@zzuli.edu.cn [School of Material and Chemical Engineering, Zhengzhou University of Light Industry, Zhengzhou 450002 (China)

    2015-12-15

    The g-C{sub 3}N{sub 4}/Y{sub 2}MoO{sub 6}:Eu{sup 3+} composite phosphors were synthesized and characterized by X-ray diffraction, Fourier transform-infrared spectroscopy, ultraviolet visible diffuse reflection spectra, photoluminescence spectra and luminescence decay curves. Under the excitation of 360 nm near ultraviolet light, these composite phosphors show tunable emission from blue to red region, in which white light emission can be obtained in term of appropriate quality proportion of Y{sub 2}MoO{sub 6}:Eu{sup 3+} relative to g-C{sub 3}N{sub 4}/Y{sub 2}MoO{sub 6}:Eu{sup 3+}. In addition, the emission color can be also dependent on the excitation wavelength in g-C{sub 3}N{sub 4}/Y{sub 2}MoO{sub 6}:Eu{sup 3+} composite phosphor. - Graphical abstract: Under the excitation of 360 nm near ultraviolet light, the g-C{sub 3}N{sub 4}/Y{sub 2}MoO{sub 6}:Eu{sup 3+} composite phosphors show tunable emission from blue to red region, in which white light emission can be obtained. - Highlights: • The g-C3N4/Y2MoO6:Eu{sup 3+} composite phosphors were synthesized and characterized. • White light emission was realized in the g-C3N4/Y2MoO6:Eu{sup 3+} composites under UV excitation. • A novel idea to realize the broadband sensitized white light emission in phosphors was provided.

  19. Technology which led to the westinghouse inherently safe liquid metal reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmidt, J.E.; Coffield, R.D.; Doncals, R.A.; Kalinowski, J.E.; Markley, R.A.

    1985-01-01

    The Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) and the Clinch River Breeder Reactor programs resulted in an understanding of liquid metal reactor behavior that is being used to design inherent safety capability into liquid metal reactors. Technological advances give the same beneficial operating characteristics of conventional liquid metal reactors, however, the addition of inherently safe design features precludes the initiation of hypothetical core disruptive accidents. These innovative features permit inherent safety capability to be demonstrated with more than adequate margins. Also, the variety of inherent safety features provides the designers with options in selecting inherent design features for a specific reactor application

  20. Bio ethanol use in light vehicles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nogueira, Luiz Augusto Horta; Leal, Manoel Regis Lima Verde

    2012-07-01

    This chapter approaches vehicles emissions and air quality, Unite States context, Brazilian context, bio ethanol impact on engine emissions, bioethanol and engine technologies for emission control, bioethanol impact on engine emissions, flex-fuel vehicles, impact of bioethanol use in light vehicles, evolution perspectives for light vehicles: energy issues, and hybrid vehicles.

  1. Inherent-opening-controlled pattern formation in carbon nanotube arrays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang Xiao; Zhou, Jijie J; Sansom, Elijah; Gharib, Morteza; Haur, Sow Chorng

    2007-01-01

    We have introduced inherent openings into densely packed carbon nanotube arrays to study self-organized pattern formation when the arrays undergo a wetting-dewetting treatment from nanotube tips. These inherent openings, made of circular or elongated hollows in nanotube mats, serve as dewetting centres, from where liquid recedes from. As the dewetting centres initiate dry zones and the dry zones expand, surrounding nanotubes are pulled away from the dewetting centres by liquid surface tension. Among short nanotubes, the self-organized patterns are consistent with the shape of the inherent openings, i.e. slender openings lead to elongated trench-like structures, and circular holes result in relatively round nest-like arrangements. Nanotubes in a relatively high mat are more connected, like in an elastic body, than those in a short mat. Small cracks often initialize themselves in a relatively high mat, along two or more adjacent round openings; each of the cracks evolves into a trench as liquid dries up. Self-organized pattern control with inherent openings needs to initiate the dewetting process above the nanotube tips. If there is no liquid on top, inherent openings barely enlarge themselves after the wetting-dewetting treatment

  2. Switching of chirality by light

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Feringa, B.L.; Schoevaars, A.M; Jager, W.F.; de Lange, B.; Huck, N.P.M.

    1996-01-01

    Optically active photoresponsive molecules are described by which control of chirality is achieved by light. These chiroptical molecular switches are based on inherently dissymmetric overcrowded alkenes and the synthesis, resolution and dynamic stereochemical properties are discussed. Introduction

  3. SUPERLUMINOUS SUPERNOVAE POWERED BY MAGNETARS: LATE-TIME LIGHT CURVES AND HARD EMISSION LEAKAGE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, S. Q.; Wang, L. J.; Dai, Z. G.; Wu, X. F.

    2015-01-01

    Recently, research performed by two groups has revealed that the magnetar spin-down energy injection model with full energy trapping can explain the early-time light curves of SN 2010gx, SN 2013dg, LSQ12dlf, SSS120810, and CSS121015 but fails to fit the late-time light curves of these superluminous supernovae (SLSNe). These results imply that the original magnetar-powered model is challenged in explaining these SLSNe. Our paper aims to simultaneously explain both the early- and late-time data/upper limits by considering the leakage of hard emissions. We incorporate quantitatively the leakage effect into the original magnetar-powered model and derive a new semianalytical equation. Comparing the light curves reproduced by our revised magnetar-powered model with the observed data and/or upper limits of these five SLSNe, we found that the late-time light curves reproduced by our semianalytical equation are in good agreement with the late-time observed data and/or upper limits of SN 2010gx, CSS121015, SN 2013dg, and LSQ12dlf and the late-time excess of SSS120810, indicating that the magnetar-powered model might be responsible for these SLSNe and that the gamma-ray and X-ray leakages are unavoidable when the hard photons were down-Comptonized to softer photons. To determine the details of the leakage effect and unveil the nature of SLSNe, more high-quality bolometric light curves and spectra of SLSNe are required

  4. Development of Hot Exhaust Emission Factors for Iranian-Made Euro-2 Certified Light-Duty Vehicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banitalebi, Ehsan; Hosseini, Vahid

    2016-01-05

    Emission factors (EFs) are fundamental, necessary data for air pollution research and scenario implementation. With the vision of generating national EFs of the Iranian transportation system, a portable emission measurement system (PEMS) was used to develop the basic EFs for a statistically significant sample of Iranian gasoline-fueled privately owned light duty vehicles (LDVs) operated in Tehran. A smaller sample size of the same fleet was examined by chassis dynamometer (CD) bag emission measurement tests to quantify the systematic differences between the PEMS and CD methods. The selected fleet was tested over four different routes of uphill highways, flat highways, uphill urban streets, and flat urban streets. Real driving emissions (RDEs) and fuel consumption (FC) rates were calculated by weighted averaging of the results from each route. The activity of the fleet over each route type was assumed as a weighting factor. The activity data were obtained from a Tehran traffic model. The RDEs of the selected fleet were considerably higher than the certified emission levels of all vehicles. Differences between Tehran real driving cycles and the New European Driving Cycle (NEDC) was attributed to the lower loading of NEDC. A table of EFs based on RDEs was developed for the sample fleet.

  5. Measurement of inherent optical properties in the Arabian Sea

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Suresh, T.; Desa, E.; Kurian, J.; Mascarenhas, A.A.M.Q.

    Inherent optical properties, absorption and began attenuation were measured in situ using a reflective tube absorption meter at nint wavelength, 412, 440, 488, 510, 555, 630, 650, 676 and 715 nm, in the Arabian Sea during March. Since inherent...

  6. Top-Emission Organic Light Emitting Diode Fabrication Using High Dissipation Graphite Substrate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Sheng Tsai

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This study uses a synthetic graphite fiber as the heat dissipation substrate for top-emission organic light emitting diode (TEOLED to reduce the impact from joule heat. UV glue (YCD91 was spin coated onto the substrate as the insulation layer. The TEOLED structure is (glass; copper; graphite substrate/YCD91 glue/Al/Au/EHI608/TAPC/Alq3/LiF/Al/Ag. The proposed graphite fiber substrate presents better luminous performance compared with glass and copper substrate devices with luminance of 3055 cd/m2 and current efficiency of 6.11 cd/A at 50 mA/cm2. When lighting period of different substrates TEOLED, the substrate case back temperature was observed using different lighting periods. A glass substrate element operating from 5 to 25 seconds at 3000 cd/m2 luminance produced a temperature rate of 1.207°C/sec. Under 4000 cd/m2 luminance the copper and graphite substrate temperature rates were 0.125°C/sec and 0.088°C/sec. Graphite component lifetime was determined to be 1.875 times higher than the glass components and 1.125 times higher than that of copper.

  7. White emission from organic light-emitting diodes with a super-thin BCP layer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hao Jingang [Key Laboratory of Luminescence and Optical Information, Ministry of Education, Institute of Optoelectronic Technology, Beijing Jiaotong University, Beijing 100044 (China); Deng Zhenbo [Key Laboratory of Luminescence and Optical Information, Ministry of Education, Institute of Optoelectronic Technology, Beijing Jiaotong University, Beijing 100044 (China)]. E-mail: zbdeng@center.njtu.edu.cn; Yang Shengyi [Key Laboratory of Luminescence and Optical Information, Ministry of Education, Institute of Optoelectronic Technology, Beijing Jiaotong University, Beijing 100044 (China)

    2007-01-15

    We report a method to achieve white emission from organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) in which a super-thin (3 nm) hole blocking layer, 2,9-dimethyl-4,7-diphenyl-1,10-phenanthroline (BCP), was inserted between electron-transport layer 8-hydroxyquinoline aluminum (Alq{sub 3}) and 4-(dicyanomethylene)-2-t-butyl-6(1,1,7,7-tetramethyljulolidyl-9-enyl) -4H-pyran (DCJTB) doped poly-vinlycarbazole (PVK) layer. The BCP layer can not only confine exciton in the emitting layer but also control energy transfer proportion from PVK to Alq{sub 3} and then from Alq{sub 3} to DCJTB through BCP layer. In this way, pure white emission with CIE coordinate of (0.32, 0.32) was obtained and it was voltage independent. The brightness reached 270 cd/m{sup 2} at 18 V with an efficiency of 0.166 cd/A.

  8. Phosphorescent Molecularly Doped Light-Emitting Diodes with Blended Polymer Host and Wide Emission Spectra

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Wang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Stable green light emission and high efficiency organic devices with three polymer layers were fabricated using bis[2-(4′-tert-butylphenyl-1-phenyl-1H-benzoimidazole-N,C2′] iridium(III (acetylacetonate doped in blended host materials. The 1 wt% doping concentration showed maximum luminance of 7841 cd/cm2 at 25.6 V and maximum current efficiency of 9.95 cd/A at 17.2 V. The electroluminescence spectra of devices indicated two main peaks at 522 nm and 554 nm coming from phosphor dye and a full width at half maximum (FWHM of 116 nm. The characteristics of using blended host, doping iridium complex, emission spectrum, and power efficiency of organic devices were investigated.

  9. Support for the revision of regulation on CO2 emissions from light commercial vehicles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smokers, R.; Fraga, F.; Verbeek, M.; Willems, F.; Massink, R.; Spreen, J. [TNO, Delft (Netherlands); Norris, J.; Martinez, C. [AEA Technology plc, London (United Kingdom); Kampman, B.; Brinke, L.; Van Essen, H. [CE Delft, Delft (Netherlands); Schilling, S.; Gruhlke, A.; Sander, K. [Institut fuer Oekologie und Politik Oekopol, Hamburg (Netherlands); Breemersch, T.; De Ceuster, G.; Vanherle, K.; Heyndrickx, C. [Transport and Mobility Leuven TML, Leuven (Belgium); Wrigley, S.; O' Brien, S.; Johnson, A. [Ricardo UK, Shoreham-by-Sea, West Sussex (United Kingdom); Buttigieg, D.; Sima, L.; Pagnac, J.; Dhaene, G. [IHS Global Insight, Nijmegen (Netherlands)

    2012-04-15

    Road vehicles make a major contribution to transport sector CO2 emissions and the European Union has several policies in place to reduce their emissions. One of these is the regulation to reduce the CO2 emissions of light commercial vehicles (LCVs or vans), Regulation (EU) 510/2011, often referred to as the vans regulation. This contains a number of review clauses, which require the European Commission to carry out an impact assessment on the 2020 target of 147 gCO2/km, and to assess a number of further issues. The ensuing study addresses a wide range of topics relating to this regulation, and includes the development of cost curves for different LCV segments, the evaluation of different utility parameters, a comparison with the effort needed to reduce the CO2 emissions of passenger cars, an assessment of the impact of electric vehicle penetration and calculation of the effects on the total cost of ownership and the societal abatement costs associated with the 2020 target. CE Delft contributed to this study by developing scenarios for the market uptake of electric vehicles in this vehicle segment, and by providing support to the Commission regarding the economic aspects of the Impact Analysis.

  10. Metasurface integrated high energy efficient and high linearly polarized InGaN/GaN light emitting diode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Miao; Xu, Fuyang; Lin, Yu; Cao, Bing; Chen, Linghua; Wang, Chinhua; Wang, Jianfeng; Xu, Ke

    2017-07-06

    We proposed and demonstrated an integrated high energy efficient and high linearly polarized InGaN/GaN green LED grown on (0001) oriented sapphire with combined metasurface polarizing converter and polarizer system. It is different from those conventional polarized light emissions generated with plasmonic metallic grating in which at least 50% high energy loss occurs inherently due to high reflection of the transverse electric (TE) component of an electric field. A reflecting metasurface, with a two dimensional elliptic metal cylinder array (EMCA) that functions as a half-wave plate, was integrated at the bottom of a LED such that the back-reflected TE component, that is otherwise lost by a dielectric/metal bi-layered wire grids (DMBiWG) polarizer on the top emitting surface of the LED, can be converted to desired transverse magnetic (TM) polarized emission after reflecting from the metasurface. This significantly enhances the polarized light emission efficiency. Experimental results show that extraction efficiency of the polarized emission can be increased by 40% on average in a wide angle of ±60° compared to that with the naked bottom of sapphire substrate, or 20% compared to reflecting Al film on the bottom of a sapphire substrate. An extinction ratio (ER) of average value 20 dB within an angle of ±60° can be simultaneously obtained directly from an InGaN/GaN LED. Our results show the possibility of simultaneously achieving a high degree of polarization and high polarization extraction efficiency at the integrated device level. This advances the field of GaN LED toward energy efficiency, multi-functional applications in illumination, display, medicine, and light manipulation.

  11. The inherently-safe power reactor DYONISOS (Dynamic Nuclear Inherently-Safe Reactor Operating with Spheres)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taube, M.; Lanfranchi, M.; Weissenfluh, Th. von; Ligou, J.; Yadigaroglu, G.; Taube, P.

    1986-01-01

    A philosophy of inherent safety is formulated and an inherently-safe thermal power reactor is presented. Solid fuel in the form of spheres a few centimetres in diameter is suspended under the hydro-dynamic pressure of molten lead coolant in vertical channels within the graphite moderator. Loss of main pump pressure, or a loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA), results in immediate removal of the fuel to rigid sieves below the core, with consequent subcriticality. Residual and decay heat are carried away by thermal conduction through the coolant or, in the case of a LOCA, by a combination of radiation and natural convection of cover gas or incoming air from the fuel to the reactor vessel and convection of air between the vessel and steel containment wall. All decay heat removal systems are passive, though actively initiated external spray cooling of the containment can be used to reduce wall temperature. This, however, is only necessary in the case of a LOCA and after a period of 24 h. (author)

  12. Development of physiotherapy inherent requirement statements – an Australian experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background The United Nations Convention on the Rights of People with Disabilities promotes equal rights of people with a disability in all aspects of their life including their education. In Australia, Disability Discrimination legislation underpins this Convention. It mandates that higher education providers must demonstrate that no discrimination has occurred and all reasonable accommodations have been considered and implemented, to facilitate access and inclusion for a student with a disability. The first step to meeting legislative requirements is to provide students with information on the inherent requirements of a course. This paper describes the steps which were taken to develop inherent requirement statements for a 4-year entry-level physiotherapy program at one Australian university. Case presentation Inherent requirement statements were developed using an existing framework, which was endorsed and mandated by the University. Items which described inherencies were extracted from Australian physiotherapy professional standards and statutory regulatory requirements, and units contained in the physiotherapy program. Data were integrated into the 8 prescribed domains: ethical behaviour, behavioural stability, legal, communication, cognition, sensory abilities, strength and mobility, and sustainable performance. Statements for each domain were developed using a 5-level framework (introductory statement, description of the inherent requirement, justification for inherency, characteristics of reasonable adjustments and exemplars) and reviewed by a University Review Panel. Refinement of statements continued until no further changes were required. Fifteen physiotherapy inherent requirement statements were developed. The eight domains identified in the existing framework, developed for Nursing, were relevant to the study of physiotherapy. Conclusions The inherent requirement statements developed in this study provide a transparent, defensible position on the

  13. A wireless acoustic emission sensor remotely powered by light

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zahedi, F; Huang, H

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, wireless sensing of acoustic emission (AE) signals using a battery-free sensor node remotely powered by light is presented. The wireless sensor consists of a piezoelectric wafer active sensor (PWAS) for AE signal acquisition and a wireless transponder that performs signal conditioning, frequency conversion, and wireless transmission. For signal conditioning, a voltage follower that consumes less than 2 mW was introduced to buffer the high impedance of the PWAS from the low impedance of the wireless transponder. A photocell-based energy harvester with a stable voltage output was developed to power the voltage follower so that the wireless AE sensor can operate without an external power source. The principle of operation of the battery-free wireless AE sensor node and the sensor interrogation system is described, followed by a detailed description of the hardware implementation. The voltage follower and the wireless channel were characterized by ultrasound pitch–catch and pencil lead break experiments. (paper)

  14. AC-driven organic light emission devices with carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeon, So-Yeon; Yu, SeGi

    2017-02-01

    We have investigated alternating current (AC)-driven organic light-emitting devices (OLEDs), with carbon nanotubes (CNTs) incorporated within the emission layer. With CNT incorporation, the brightness of the OLEDs was substantially improved, and the turn-on voltage was reduced by at least a factor of five. Furthermore, the current levels of the CNT-incorporated OLEDs were lower than that of the reference device. A roughly 70% decrease in the current level was obtained for a CNT concentration of 0.03 wt%. This was accomplished by keeping the concentration of CNTs low and the length of CNTs short, which helped to suppress the percolation networking of CNTs within the emitting layer. Strong local electric fields near the end-tips of CNTs and micro-capacitors formed by dispersed CNTs might have caused this high brightness and these low currents. CNT incorporation in the emitting layer can improve the characteristics of AC-driven OLEDs, which are considered to be one of the candidates for flat panel displays and lightning devices.

  15. AC-driven Organic Light Emission Devices with Carbon Nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeon, So-Yeon [Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon (Korea, Republic of); Yu, SeGi [Hankuk University of Foreign Studies, Yongin (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-02-15

    We have investigated alternating current (AC)-driven organic light-emitting devices (OLEDs), with carbon nanotubes (CNTs) incorporated within the emission layer. With CNT incorporation, the brightness of the OLEDs was substantially improved, and the turn-on voltage was reduced by at least a factor of five. Furthermore, the current levels of the CNT-incorporated OLEDs were lower than that of the reference device. A roughly 70% decrease in the current level was obtained for a CNT concentration of 0.03 wt%. This was accomplished by keeping the concentration of CNTs low and the length of CNTs short, which helped to suppress the percolation networking of CNTs within the emitting layer. Strong local electric fields near the end-tips of CNTs and micro-capacitors formed by dispersed CNTs might have caused this high brightness and these low currents. CNT incorporation in the emitting layer can improve the characteristics of AC-driven OLEDs, which are considered to be one of the candidates for flat panel displays and lightning devices.

  16. Multi-objective optimization of a cascade refrigeration system: Exergetic, economic, environmental, and inherent safety analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eini, Saeed; Shahhosseini, Hamidreza; Delgarm, Navid; Lee, Moonyong; Bahadori, Alireza

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • A multi-objective optimization is performed for a cascade refrigeration cycle. • The optimization problem considers inherently safe design as well as 3E analysis. • As a measure of inherent safety level a quantitative risk analysis is utilized. • A CO 2 /NH 3 cascade refrigeration system is compared with a CO 2 /C 3 H 8 system. - Abstract: Inherently safer design is the new approach to maximize the overall safety of a process plant. This approach suggests some risk reduction strategies to be implemented in the early stages of design. In this paper a multi-objective optimization was performed considering economic, exergetic, and environmental aspects besides evaluation of the inherent safety level of a cascade refrigeration system. The capital costs, the processing costs, and the social cost due to CO 2 emission were considered to be included in the economic objective function. Exergetic efficiency of the plant was considered as the second objective function. As a measure of inherent safety level, Quantitative Risk Assessment (QRA) was performed to calculate total risk level of the cascade as the third objective function. Two cases (ammonia and propane) were considered to be compared as the refrigerant of the high temperature circuit. The achieved optimum solutions from the multi–objective optimization process were given as Pareto frontier. The ultimate optimal solution from available solutions on the Pareto optimal curve was selected using Decision-Makings approaches. NSGA-II algorithm was used to obtain Pareto optimal frontiers. Also, three decision-making approaches (TOPSIS, LINMAP, and Shannon’s entropy methods) were utilized to select the final optimum point. Considering continuous material release from the major equipment in the plant, flash and jet fire scenarios were considered for the CO 2 /C 3 H 8 cycle and toxic hazards were considered for the CO 2 /NH 3 cycle. The results showed no significant differences between CO 2 /NH 3 and

  17. Organic light emitting diode with light extracting electrode

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhandari, Abhinav; Buhay, Harry

    2017-04-18

    An organic light emitting diode (10) includes a substrate (20), a first electrode (12), an emissive active stack (14), and a second electrode (18). At least one of the first and second electrodes (12, 18) is a light extracting electrode (26) having a metallic layer (28). The metallic layer (28) includes light scattering features (29) on and/or in the metallic layer (28). The light extracting features (29) increase light extraction from the organic light emitting diode (10).

  18. Light in complex dielectrics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schuurmans, F.J.P.

    1999-01-01

    In this thesis the properties of light in complex dielectrics are described, with the two general topics of "modification of spontaneous emission" and "Anderson localization of light". The first part focuses on the spontaneous emission rate of an excited atom in a dielectric host with variable

  19. Red light emission from ZnO:Eu"3"+|CuSCN hetero-junction under cathodic polarization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sirimanne, P.M.; Minoura, H.

    2015-01-01

    Eu"3"+ ions were bonded to ZnO ceramic via organic ligand. Surface bonded Eu"3"+ ions were exhibited specific luminescence bands due to electron transitions between f–f intra-configurationally transitions. Further enhancement of luminescence bands was observed by attaching selected oligomers to Eu"3"+ ions. A hetero-junction was prepared by depositing copper-thiocyanate on Eu"3"+ ions bonded ZnO ceramic. Red light emission was observed from surface bonded Eu"3"+ ions in ZnO:Eu"3"+|CuSCN hetero-junction under reverse bias. - Highlights: • Europium doped ZnO ceramic exhibits photo-luminescence. • Semiconductor hetro-junction was prepared. • ZnO:Eu"3"+|CuSCN hetero-junction emits red light under reverse bias.

  20. Fabrication and characterization of high quality n-ZnO/p-GaN heterojunction light emission diodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zheng Hao; Mei, Z.X.; Zeng, Z.Q.; Liu, Y.Z.; Guo, L.W.; Jia, J.F.; Xue, Q.K.; Zhang, Z.; Du, X.L.

    2011-01-01

    High quality single crystalline n-type ZnO film was grown on p-type GaN substrate using molecular beam epitaxy. Transmission electron microscopy reveals a sharp ZnO/GaN interface. Light-emitting diode was fabricated from this heterostructure, and a turn-on voltage of ∼ 3.4 V was demonstrated. We found that the emission peak shifts from violet (430 nm) to near-ultraviolet (375 nm) when the driving current increases from 0.38 mA to 3.08 mA. This intriguing phenomenon can be understood by charged carrier's radical recombination occurring at both sides of the device, and the current enhancement of ZnO emission efficiency.

  1. Evaluation of emission factors for light-duty gasoline vehicles based on chassis dynamometer and tunnel studies in Shanghai, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Cheng; Tao, Shikang; Lou, Shengrong; Hu, Qingyao; Wang, Hongli; Wang, Qian; Li, Li; Wang, Hongyu; Liu, Jian'gang; Quan, Yifeng; Zhou, Lanlan

    2017-11-01

    CO, THC, NOx, and PM emission factors of 51 light-duty gasoline vehicles (LDGVs) spanning the emission standards from Euro 2 to Euro 5 were measured by a chassis dynamometer. High frequencies of high-emitting vehicles were observed in Euro 2 and Euro 3 LDGV fleet. 56% and 33% of high-emitting vehicles contributed 81%-92% and 82%-85% of the emissions in Euro 2 and Euro 3 test fleet, respectively. Malfunctions of catalytic convertors after high strength use are the main cause of the high emissions. Continuous monitoring of a gasoline vehicle dominated tunnel in Shanghai, China was conducted to evaluate the average emission factors of vehicles in real-world. The results indicated that the emission factors of LDGVs were considerably underestimated in EI guidebook in China. The overlook of high-emitting vehicles in older vehicle fleet is the main reason for this underestimation. Enhancing the supervision of high emission vehicles and strengthening the compliance tests of in-use vehicles are essential measures to control the emissions of in-use gasoline vehicles at the present stage in China.

  2. High-efficiency green phosphorescent organic light-emitting diodes with double-emission layer and thick N-doped electron transport layer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nobuki, Shunichiro, E-mail: shunichiro.nobuki.nb@hitachi.com [Hitachi Research Laboratory, Hitachi Ltd., 7-1-1 Omika-cho, Hitachi-city, Ibaraki 319-1292 (Japan); Wakana, Hironori; Ishihara, Shingo [Hitachi Research Laboratory, Hitachi Ltd., 7-1-1 Omika-cho, Hitachi-city, Ibaraki 319-1292 (Japan); Mikami, Akiyoshi [Dept. of Electrical Engineering, Kanazawa Institute of Technology, 7-1 Ohgigaoka, Nonoichimachi, Ishikawa 921-8501 (Japan)

    2014-03-03

    We have developed green phosphorescent organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) with high external quantum efficiency of 59.7% and power efficiency of 243 lm/W at 2.73 V at 0.053 mA/cm{sup 2}. A double emission layer and a thick n-doped electron transport layer were adopted to improve the exciton recombination factor. A high refractive index hemispherical lens was attached to a high refractive index substrate for extracting light trapped inside the substrate and the multiple-layers of OLEDs to air. Additionally, we analyzed an energy loss mechanism to clarify room for the improvement of our OLEDs including the charge balance factor. - Highlights: • We developed high efficiency green phosphorescent organic light-emitting diode (OLED). • Our OLED had external quantum efficiency of 59.7% and power efficiency of 243 lm/W. • A double emission layer and thick n-doped electron transport layer were adopted. • High refractive index media (hemispherical lens and substrate) were also used. • We analyzed an energy loss mechanism to clarify the charge balance factor of our OLED.

  3. Tailpipe emissions and engine performance of a light-duty diesel engine operating on petro- and bio-diesel fuel blends.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-06-01

    This report summarizes the experimental apparatus developed in the Transportation Air Quality Laboratory (TAQ Lab) at the University of Vermont to compare light-duty diesel engine performance and exhaust emissions when operating on petroleum diesel (...

  4. The representation of inherent properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasada, Sandeep

    2014-10-01

    Research on the representation of generic knowledge suggests that inherent properties can have either a principled or a causal connection to a kind. The type of connection determines whether the outcome of the storytelling process will include intuitions of inevitability and a normative dimension and whether it will ground causal explanations.

  5. Synthesis of new N-heteroaromatic attached tetraphenylethene based luminogens having aggregation induced emission and their applications in organic light emitting diodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Odabas, Serhat [Department of Chemistry, Middle East Technical University, 06800 Ankara (Turkey); The Scientific and Technological Research Council of Turkey (TUBITAK), Marmara Research Center, Institute of Chemical Technology, P.K. 21, 41470 Gebze, Kocaeli (Turkey); Tekin, Emine [The Scientific and Technological Research Council of Turkey (TUBITAK), Marmara Research Center, Material Institute, P.K. 21, 41470 Gebze, Kocaeli (Turkey); Turksoy, Figen, E-mail: figen.turksoy@tubitak.gov.tr [The Scientific and Technological Research Council of Turkey (TUBITAK), Marmara Research Center, Institute of Chemical Technology, P.K. 21, 41470 Gebze, Kocaeli (Turkey); Tanyeli, Cihangir, E-mail: tanyeli@metu.edu.tr [Department of Chemistry, Middle East Technical University, 06800 Ankara (Turkey)

    2016-08-15

    Aggregation induced emission is an auxiliary property that can eliminate the aggregation caused quenching effect. It is a common undesired emission characteristic of most bulky aromatic molecules. Tetraphenylethene, with its unique features, is the most commonly studied molecule having aggregation induced emission property. In this work four N heteroaromatic attached tetraphenylethene derivatives were synthesized via inexpensive C–N bond formation reactions. The synthesized luminogens showed good thermal properties, having high Td values between 366 °C and 505 °C. All four tetraphenylethene derivatives exhibited excellent aggregation induced emission properties and there was an up to 200-fold increase in their fluorescence intensities. According to the time-resolved emission decay experimental analyses, all four luminogens showed two relaxation pathways in a THF – water mixture (10–90%). Non-doped turquoise and light green OLED devices using the synthesized luminogens as a light emitting layer exhibited a maximum brightness up to 2600 cd/m{sup 2}, a maximum current efficiency up to 3.6 cd/A, turn-on voltages between 7.0 and 10.0 V, and external quantum efficiencies up to 1.5%. - Highlights: • A series of N-heterocyclic attached tetraphenylethene cored luminogens are synthesized and characterized. • Excellent thermal and aggregation induced emission properties are observed. • OLEDs are fabricated using synthesized luminogens as non-doped emitting layers.

  6. Light Converting Inorganic Phosphors for White Light-Emitting Diodes

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Lei; Lin, Chun-Che; Yeh, Chiao-Wen; Liu, Ru-Shi

    2010-01-01

    White light-emitting diodes (WLEDs) have matched the emission efficiency of florescent lights and will rapidly spread as light source for homes and offices in the next 5 to 10 years. WLEDs provide a light element having a semiconductor light emitting layer (blue or near-ultraviolet (nUV) LEDs) and photoluminescence phosphors. These solid-state LED lamps, rather than organic light emitting diode (OLED) or polymer light-emitting diode (PLED), have a number of advantages over conventional incand...

  7. Caracterização das emissões de aldeídos de veículos do ciclo diesel Emission of aldehydes from light duty diesel vehicles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rui de Abrantes

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Caracterizar as emissões de acetaldeído e formaldeído, substâncias nocivas para a saúde das pessoas e cujas emissões dos veículos a diesel ainda não estão regulamentadas. MÉTODOS: Testes padronizados foram realizados em quatro veículos leves comerciais do ciclo diesel, testados num dinamômetro de chassis, usando o procedimento de teste FTP-75. Os poluentes foram analisados por cromatografia líquida de alta eficiência. RESULTADOS: Os resultados mostraram que a emissão de acetaldeído variou de 5,9 a 45,4 mg/km e a de formaldeído variou de 16,5 a 115,2 mg/km. A emissão média para a soma dos aldeídos foi de 58,7 mg/km, variando de 22,5 mg/km a 160 mg/km. A proporção entre os dois se manteve constante, próximo de 74% de formaldeído e 26% de acetaldeído. CONCLUSÕES: A emissão de aldeídos provenientes de veículos movidos a diesel foi significativa quando comparada com as emissões reais dos veículos de ignição por centelha ou com o limite previsto para os veículos do ciclo Otto na legislação brasileira. O estabelecimento de limites de emissão para essas substâncias para veículos a diesel mostra-se importante, considerando o crescimento da frota de veículos a diesel, a toxicidade desses compostos e sua participação como precursores nas reações de formação de gás ozônio na baixa troposfera.OBJECTIVE: To characterize acetaldehyde and formaldehyde emissions, which are harmful gases to human health and not yet regulated for diesel engines. METHODS: Standardized tests were performed in four diesel light duty commercial vehicles, using a frame dynamometer and test procedure FTP-75. The pollutants were analyzed by high performance liquid chromatography. RESULTS: Results have shown acetaldehyde emission ranged from 5.9 to 45.4 mg/km, and formaldehyde emission from 16.5 to 115.2 mg/km. The average emission for aldehyde sum was 58.7 mg/km, ranging from 22.4 to 160.6 mg/km. The proportion between the two

  8. Evaluation of solid particle number and black carbon for very low particulate matter emissions standards in light-duty vehicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, M-C Oliver; Shields, J Erin

    2017-06-01

    To reliably measure at the low particulate matter (PM) levels needed to meet California's Low Emission Vehicle (LEV III) 3- and 1-mg/mile particulate matter (PM) standards, various approaches other than gravimetric measurement have been suggested for testing purposes. In this work, a feasibility study of solid particle number (SPN, d50 = 23 nm) and black carbon (BC) as alternatives to gravimetric PM mass was conducted, based on the relationship of these two metrics to gravimetric PM mass, as well as the variability of each of these metrics. More than 150 Federal Test Procedure (FTP-75) or Supplemental Federal Test Procedure (US06) tests were conducted on 46 light-duty vehicles, including port-fuel-injected and direct-injected gasoline vehicles, as well as several light-duty diesel vehicles equipped with diesel particle filters (LDD/DPF). For FTP tests, emission variability of gravimetric PM mass was found to be slightly less than that of either SPN or BC, whereas the opposite was observed for US06 tests. Emission variability of PM mass for LDD/DPF was higher than that of both SPN and BC, primarily because of higher PM mass measurement uncertainties (background and precision) near or below 0.1 mg/mile. While strong correlations were observed from both SPN and BC to PM mass, the slopes are dependent on engine technologies and driving cycles, and the proportionality between the metrics can vary over the course of the test. Replacement of the LEV III PM mass emission standard with one other measurement metric may imperil the effectiveness of emission reduction, as a correlation-based relationship may evolve over future technologies for meeting stringent greenhouse standards. Solid particle number and black carbon were suggested in place of PM mass for the California LEV III 1-mg/mile FTP standard. Their equivalence, proportionality, and emission variability in comparison to PM mass, based on a large light-duty vehicle fleet examined, are dependent on engine

  9. Improvement of Lighting Uniformity and Phosphor Life in Field Emission Lamps Using Carbon Nanocoils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kun-Ju Chung

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The lighting performances and phosphor degradation in field emission lamps (FELs with two different kinds of cathode materials—multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs and carbon nanocoils (CNCs—were compared. The MWCNTs and CNCs were selectively synthesized on 304 stainless steel wire substrates dip-coated with nanosized Pd catalysts by controlling the growth temperature in thermal chemical vapor deposition, and the film uniformity can be optimized by adjusting the growth time. FELs were successfully fabricated by assembling these cathode filaments with a glass bulb-type anode. The FEL with the CNC cathode showed much higher lighting uniformity and light-spot density and a lower current at the same voltage than that with the MWCNT cathode filament, and its best luminous efficiency was as high as 75 lm/W at 8 kV. We also found that, for P22, the phosphor degradation can be effectively suppressed by replacing MWCNTs with CNCs in the cathode, due to the much larger total bright spot area and hence much lower current density loading on the anode.

  10. An inherently safe power reactor module

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salerno, L.N.

    1985-01-01

    General Electric's long participation in liquid metal reactor technology has led to a Power Reactor Inherently Safe Module (PRISM) concept supported by DOE contract DE-AC06-85NE37937. The reactor module is sized to maximize inherent safety features. The small size allows factory fabrication, reducing field construction and field QA/QC labor, and allows safety to be demonstrated in full scale, to support a pre-licensed standard commercial product. The module is small enough to be placed underground, and can be combined with steam and electrical generating equipment to provide a complete electrical power producing plant in the range of 400-1200 MWe. Initial assessments are that the concept has the potential to be economically competitive with existing methods of power production used by the utility industry

  11. Collinear light scattering using electromagnetically induced transparency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harris, S.E.; Sokolov, A.V.; Walker, D.R.; Yavuz, D.D.; Yin, G.Y.

    2001-01-01

    The paper describes two types of nonlinear optical processes which are based on electromagnetically induced transparency. These are: (1) Collinear generation of FM-like Raman sidebands and (2) a type of pondermotive light scattering which is inherent to the interaction of slow light with cold atoms. Connections to other areas of EIT-based nonlinear optics are also described

  12. Assessing Rates of Global Warming Emissions from Port- Fuel Injection and Gasoline Direct Injection Engines in Light-Duty Passenger Vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Short, D.; , D., Vi; Durbin, T.; Karavalakis, G.; Asa-Awuku, A. A.

    2013-12-01

    Passenger vehicles are known emitters of climate warming pollutants. CO2 from automobile emissions are an anthropogenic greenhouse gas (GHG) and a large contributor to global warming. Worldwide, CO2 emissions from passenger vehicles are responsible for 11% of the total CO2 emissions inventory. Black Carbon (BC), another common vehicular emission, may be the second largest contributor to global warming (after CO2). Currently, 52% of BC emissions in the U.S are from the transportation sector, with ~10% originating from passenger vehicles. The share of pollutants from passenger gasoline vehicles is becoming larger due to the reduction of BC from diesel vehicles. Currently, the majority of gasoline passenger vehicles in the United States have port- fuel injection (PFI) engines. Gasoline direct injection (GDI) engines have increased fuel economy compared to the PFI engine. GDI vehicles are predicted to dominate the U.S. passenger vehicle market in the coming years. The method of gasoline injection into the combustion chamber is the primary difference between these two technologies, which can significantly impact primary emissions from light-duty vehicles (LDV). Our study will measure LDV climate warming emissions and assess the impact on climate due to the change in U.S vehicle technologies. Vehicles were tested on a light- duty chassis dynamometer for emissions of CO2, methane (CH4), and BC. These emissions were measured on F3ederal and California transient test cycles and at steady-state speeds. Vehicles used a gasoline blend of 10% by volume ethanol (E10). E10 fuel is now found in 95% of gasoline stations in the U.S. Data is presented from one GDI and one PFI vehicle. The 2012 Kia Optima utilizes GDI technology and has a large market share of the total GDI vehicles produced in the U.S. In addition, The 2012 Toyota Camry, equipped with a PFI engine, was the most popular vehicle model sold in the U.S. in 2012. Methane emissions were ~50% lower for the GDI technology

  13. Probing Millisecond Pulsar Emission Geometry Using Light Curves From the Fermi Large Area Telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venter, Christo; Harding, Alice; Guillemot, L.

    2009-01-01

    An interesting new high-energy pulsar sub-population is emerging following early discoveries of gamma-ray millisecond pulsars (MSPs) by the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT). We present results from 3D emission modeling, including the Special Relativistic effects of aberration and time-of-flight delays and also rotational sweepback of 13-field lines, in the geometric context of polar cap (PC), slot gap (SG), outer gap (OG), and two-pole caustic (TPC) pulsar models. In contrast to the general belief that these very old, rapidly-rotating neutron stars (NSs) should have largely pair-starved magnetospheres due to the absence of significant pair production, we find that most of the light curves are best fit by SG and OG models, which indicates the presence of narrow accelerating gaps limited by robust pair production -- even in these pulsars with very low spin-down luminosities. The gamma-ray pulse shapes and relative phase lags with respect to the radio pulses point to high-altitude emission being dominant for all geometries. We also find exclusive differentiation of the current gamma-ray MSP population into two MSP sub-classes: light curve shapes and lags across wavebands impose either pair-starved PC (PSPC) or SG / OG-type geometries. In the first case, the radio pulse has a small lag with respect to the single gamma-ray pulse, while the (first) gamma-ray peak usually trails the radio by a large phase offset in the latter case. Finally, we find that the flux correction factor as a function of magnetic inclination and observer angles is typically of order unity for all models. Our calculation of light curves and flux correction factor f(_, _, P) for the case of MSPs is therefore complementary to the "ATLAS paper" of Watters et al. for younger pulsars.

  14. Development of quantitative goals for inherent safety feature design and licensing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kastenberg, W.E.; Apostolakis, G.; Dhir, V.K.; Okrent, D.

    1987-01-01

    There is now considerable interest in the development of advanced fast reactors whose major focus is inherent safety. The achievement of inherent safety can be viewed from several aspects. In the Integral Fast Reactor Concept the approach is to utilize the intrinsic characteristics of pool-type liquid metal fast breeder reactors (LMFBRs) and the properties of metal fuels to integrate a high degree of inherent safety into the design. The PRISM and SAFR concepts focus on other inherent safety features. The reactors discussed above represent a radical departure from existing LWR designs as well as previous LMFBR designs (e.g., CRBRP) which are based, for the most part, on the General Design Criteria found in 10CFR50 Appendix. In view of these parallel developments (advanced reactors exploiting inherent safety and the use of quantitative goals to augment licensing), there appears to be a need to perform research on the development of methods for designing, assessing, and licensing inherent safety features in advanced reactors. The objectives of such research are outlined

  15. Chemical light emission and formation of C=O radicals accompanying thermal deterioration of irradiated pure EPR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ito, Masayuki

    1991-01-01

    The Institute of Electrical Engineers of Japan proposed the method of successively applying radiation and heat as the environmental test method for the electric wires and cables for nuclear power stations. In this study, the method of applying radiation first and heat next was examined. In the case of trying to give by the successive application the deterioration equivalent to that by the simultaneous application of radiation and heat, it becomes an important problem whether the activation energy of thermal deterioration changes due to irradiation or not. In this study, the samples were irradiated and subsequently exposed to heat, and the chemical light emission arose at that time which reflects the oxidizing reaction was measured. Besides, the concentration of C=O radicals which were accumulated as the result of the oxidizing reaction was measured, and the temperature dependence of the constant of the concentration increase rate was examined. The experiment on chemical light emission and on the formation of C=O radicals and the results are reported. It was clarified that the concentraiton of C=O radicals formed by irradiation and heat treatment thereafter can be represented as the functions of dose and heat treatment temperature. (K.I.)

  16. Red:far-red light conditions affect the emission of volatile organic compounds from barley (Hordeum vulgare), leading to altered biomass allocation in neighbouring plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kegge, Wouter; Ninkovic, Velemir; Glinwood, Robert; Welschen, Rob A. M.; Voesenek, Laurentius A. C. J.; Pierik, Ronald

    2015-01-01

    Background and Aims Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) play various roles in plant–plant interactions, and constitutively produced VOCs might act as a cue to sense neighbouring plants. Previous studies have shown that VOCs emitted from the barley (Hordeum vulgare) cultivar ‘Alva’ cause changes in biomass allocation in plants of the cultivar ‘Kara’. Other studies have shown that shading and the low red:far-red (R:FR) conditions that prevail at high plant densities can reduce the quantity and alter the composition of the VOCs emitted by Arabidopsis thaliana, but whether this affects plant–plant signalling remains unknown. This study therefore examines the effects of far-red light enrichment on VOC emissions and plant–plant signalling between ‘Alva’ and ‘Kara’. Methods The proximity of neighbouring plants was mimicked by supplemental far-red light treatment of VOC emitter plants of barley grown in growth chambers. Volatiles emitted by ‘Alva’ under control and far-red light-enriched conditions were analysed using gas chromatography–mass spectrometry (GC-MS). ‘Kara’ plants were exposed to the VOC blend emitted by the ‘Alva’ plants that were subjected to either of the light treatments. Dry matter partitioning, leaf area, stem and total root length were determined for ‘Kara’ plants exposed to ‘Alva’ VOCs, and also for ‘Alva’ plants exposed to either control or far-red-enriched light treatments. Key Results Total VOC emissions by ‘Alva’ were reduced under low R:FR conditions compared with control light conditions, although individual volatile compounds were found to be either suppressed, induced or not affected by R:FR. The altered composition of the VOC blend emitted by ‘Alva’ plants exposed to low R:FR was found to affect carbon allocation in receiver plants of ‘Kara’. Conclusions The results indicate that changes in R:FR light conditions influence the emissions of VOCs in barley, and that these altered emissions

  17. Red:far-red light conditions affect the emission of volatile organic compounds from barley (Hordeum vulgare), leading to altered biomass allocation in neighbouring plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kegge, Wouter; Ninkovic, Velemir; Glinwood, Robert; Welschen, Rob A M; Voesenek, Laurentius A C J; Pierik, Ronald

    2015-05-01

    Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) play various roles in plant-plant interactions, and constitutively produced VOCs might act as a cue to sense neighbouring plants. Previous studies have shown that VOCs emitted from the barley (Hordeum vulgare) cultivar 'Alva' cause changes in biomass allocation in plants of the cultivar 'Kara'. Other studies have shown that shading and the low red:far-red (R:FR) conditions that prevail at high plant densities can reduce the quantity and alter the composition of the VOCs emitted by Arabidopsis thaliana, but whether this affects plant-plant signalling remains unknown. This study therefore examines the effects of far-red light enrichment on VOC emissions and plant-plant signalling between 'Alva' and 'Kara'. The proximity of neighbouring plants was mimicked by supplemental far-red light treatment of VOC emitter plants of barley grown in growth chambers. Volatiles emitted by 'Alva' under control and far-red light-enriched conditions were analysed using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). 'Kara' plants were exposed to the VOC blend emitted by the 'Alva' plants that were subjected to either of the light treatments. Dry matter partitioning, leaf area, stem and total root length were determined for 'Kara' plants exposed to 'Alva' VOCs, and also for 'Alva' plants exposed to either control or far-red-enriched light treatments. Total VOC emissions by 'Alva' were reduced under low R:FR conditions compared with control light conditions, although individual volatile compounds were found to be either suppressed, induced or not affected by R:FR. The altered composition of the VOC blend emitted by 'Alva' plants exposed to low R:FR was found to affect carbon allocation in receiver plants of 'Kara'. The results indicate that changes in R:FR light conditions influence the emissions of VOCs in barley, and that these altered emissions affect VOC-mediated plant-plant interactions. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on

  18. Inherent safety features in balance-of-plant layout

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wattelet, P.L.; Green, K.J.

    1992-01-01

    Future nuclear units must be more economical to construct and operate, and, at the same time, clearly incorporate advances in safety over the current generation of light water reactors. To achieve these goals, the root causes of safety issues must be addressed. In this way, global, cost-effective solutions can be implemented. With simple, direct design approaches, the licensing risk is minimized and configuration control is enhanced. With proper planning in the early stages of plant design, postulated accidents and events can often be mitigated by passive features inherent in the basic structure and layout, eliminating expensive added protective structures and components often found in current designs. Korea Electric Power Corporation's Yonggwang (YGN) Units 3 and 4, shown in an artist's rendering in Figure 1, are now under construction in Korea. Engineering is more than 85% complete, and Unit 3 construction is more than 50% complete. Significant steps toward design simplification and safety enhancement have been made by addressing safety concerns very early in the design effort. The tools used to achieve this were improved symmetry and separation, isolation of potential hazards, and an improved design process

  19. Informing patients of risks inherent in treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffith, Richard; Tengnah, Cassam

    2009-11-01

    Consent to treatment lies at the heart of autonomous decision making by patients who are entitled to make a free choice about whether to accept or refuse treatment. To help patients arrive at their decision district nurses must ensure that they give sufficient information about the nature and risks inherent in the treatment to allow an informed choice to be made. This article considers how much information regarding risks needs to be disclosed. It discusses how the law requires a different level of disclosure for patients who ask no questions about risks, those who make general enquiries about risks and those who ask specific questions about the risks inherent in treatment.

  20. Potential to reduce emissions of sulphur dioxide through reducing sulphur levels in heavy and light fuel oils - a discussion paper

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tushingham, M.; Bellamy, J.

    2001-01-01

    Background information on the sulphur levels in light fuel oil (used in residential heating) and heavy fuel oil (used as industrial fuel oil) is provided. In addition to the description of sulphur levels in light and heavy fuel oils, the report also provides a summary of regulatory limits in Canada and elsewhere, and a description of the emission benefits of decreasing sulphur in fuels. 4 refs., 10 tabs., 12 figs

  1. Does the inherence heuristic take us to psychological essentialism?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marmodoro, Anna; Murphy, Robin A; Baker, A G

    2014-10-01

    We argue that the claim that essence-based causal explanations emerge, hydra-like, from an inherence heuristic is incomplete. No plausible mechanism for the transition from concrete properties, or cues, to essences is provided. Moreover, the fundamental shotgun and storytelling mechanisms of the inherence heuristic are not clearly enough specified to distinguish them, developmentally, from associative or causal networks.

  2. [Multiplayer white organic light-emitting diodes with different order and thickness of emission layers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Wei; Lu, Fu-Han; Cao, Jin; Zhu, Wen-Qing; Jiang, Xue-Yin; Zhang, Zhi-Lin; Xu, Shao-Hong

    2008-02-01

    In multilayer OLED devices, the order and thickness of the emission layers have great effect on their spectrum. Based on the three basic colours of red, blue and green, a series of white organic light-emitting diodes(WOLEDS)with the structure of ITO/CuPc(12 nm)/NPB(50 nm)/EML/LiF(1 nm)/Al(100 nm) and a variety of emission layer's orders and thicknesses were fabricated. The blue emission material: 2-t-butyl-9,10-di-(2-naphthyl)anthracene (TBADN) doped with p-bis(p-N, N-diphenyl-amono-styryl)benzene(DSA-Ph), the green emission material: tris-[8-hydroxyquinoline]aluminum(Alq3) doped with C545, and the red emission material: tris-[8-hydroxyquinoline]aluminum( Alq3) doped with 4-(dicyanomethylene)-2-t-butyl-6-(1, 1, 7, 7-tetramethyljulolidyl-9-enyl)-4H-pyran (DCJTB) were used. By adjusting the order and thickness of each emission layer in the RBG structure, we got a white OLED with current efficiency of 5.60 cd x A(-1) and Commission Internationale De L'Eclairage (CIE) coordinates of (0. 34, 0.34) at 200 mA x cm(-2). Its maximum luminance reached 20 700 cd x m(-2) at current density of 400 mA x cm(-2). The results were analyzed on the basis of the theory of excitons' generation and diffusion. According to the theory, an equation was set up which relates EL spectra to the luminance efficiency, the thickness of each layer and the exciton diffusion length. In addition, in RBG structure with different thickness of red layer, the ratio of th e spectral intensity of red to that of blue was calculated. It was found that the experimental results are in agreement with the theoretical values.

  3. Light emitting device having peripheral emissive region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forrest, Stephen R

    2013-05-28

    Light emitting devices are provided that include one or more OLEDs disposed only on a peripheral region of the substrate. An OLED may be disposed only on a peripheral region of a substantially transparent substrate and configured to emit light into the substrate. Another surface of the substrate may be roughened or include other features to outcouple light from the substrate. The edges of the substrate may be beveled and/or reflective. The area of the OLED(s) may be relatively small compared to the substrate surface area through which light is emitted from the device. One or more OLEDs also or alternatively may be disposed on an edge of the substrate about perpendicular to the surface of the substrate through which light is emitted, such that they emit light into the substrate. A mode expanding region may be included between each such OLED and the substrate.

  4. White light emission and effect of annealing on the Ho{sup 3+}–Yb{sup 3+} codoped BaCa{sub 2}Al{sub 8}O{sub 15} phosphor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumari, Astha; Rai, Vineet Kumar, E-mail: vineetkrrai@yahoo.co.in

    2015-12-15

    Graphical abstract: The upconversion emission spectra of the Ho{sup 3+}/Yb{sup 3+} doped/codoped BaCa{sub 2}Al{sub 8}O{sub 15} phosphors with different doping concentrations of Ho{sup 3+}/Yb{sup 3+} ions along with UC emission spectrum of the white light emitting phosphor annealed at 800 °C. - Highlights: • BaCa{sub 2}Al{sub 8}O{sub 15} phosphors codoped with Ho{sup 3+}–Yb{sup 3+} have been prepared by combustion method. • Phosphor annealed at 800 °C, illuminate an intense white light upon NIR excitation. • The sample annealed at higher temperatures emits in the pure green region. • The colour emitted persists in the white region even at high pump power density. • Developed phosphor is suitable for making upconverters and WLEDs. - Abstract: The BaCa{sub 2}Al{sub 8}O{sub 15} (BCAO) phosphors codoped with suitable Ho{sup 3+}–Yb{sup 3+} dopant concentration prepared by combustion method illuminate an intense white light upon near infrared diode laser excitation. The structural analysis of the phosphors and the detection of impurity contents have been performed by using the X-Ray Diffraction, FESEM and FTIR analysis. The purity of white light emitted from the sample has been confirmed by the CIE chromaticity diagram. Also, the white light emitted from the sample persists with the variation of pump power density. The phosphors emit upconversion (UC) emission bands in the blue, green and red region (three primary colours required for white light emission) along with one more band in the near infrared region of the electromagnetic spectrum. On annealing the white light emitting sample at higher temperatures, the sample starts to emit green colour and also the intensity of green and red UC emission bands get enhanced largely.

  5. Three-peak standard white organic light-emitting devices for solid-state lighting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Kunping; Wei, Bin

    2014-12-01

    Standard white organic light-emitting device (OLED) lighting provides a warm and comfortable atmosphere and shows mild effect on melatonin suppression. A high-efficiency red OLED employing phosphorescent dopant has been investigated. The device generates saturated red emission with Commission Internationale de l'Eclairage (CIE) coordinates of (0.66, 0.34), characterized by a low driving voltage of 3.5 V and high external quantum efficiency of 20.1% at 130 cd m-2. In addition, we have demonstrated a two-peak cold white OLED by combining with a pure blue emitter with the electroluminescent emission of 464 nm, 6, 12-bis{[N-(3,4-dimethylpheyl)-N-(2,4,5-trimethylphenyl)]} chrysene (BmPAC). It was found that the man-made lighting device capable of yielding a relatively stable color emission within the luminance range of 1000-5000 cd m-2. And the chromaticity coordinates, varying from (0.25, 0.21) to (0.23, 0.21). Furthermore, an ultrathin layer of green-light-emitting tris (2-phenylpyridinato)iridium(Ⅲ) Ir(ppy)3 in the host material was introduced to the emissive region for compensating light. By appropriately controlling the layer thickness, the white light OLED achieved good performance of 1280 cd m-2 at 5.0 V and 5150 cd m-2 at 7.0 V, respectively. The CIE coordinates of the emitted light are quite stable at current densities from 759 cd m-2 to 5150 cd m-2, ranging from (0.34, 0.37) to (0.33, 0.33).

  6. Enhanced light emission efficiency and current stability by morphology control and thermal annealing of organic light emitting diode devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caria, S [Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche (CNR), Istituto per lo Studio dei Materiali Nanostrutturati (ISMN), Via P Gobetti 101, 40129 Bologna (Italy); Como, E Da [Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche (CNR), Istituto per lo Studio dei Materiali Nanostrutturati (ISMN), Via P Gobetti 101, 40129 Bologna (Italy); Murgia, M [Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche (CNR), Istituto per lo Studio dei Materiali Nanostrutturati (ISMN), Via P Gobetti 101, 40129 Bologna (Italy); Zamboni, R [Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche (CNR), Istituto per lo Studio dei Materiali Nanostrutturati (ISMN), Via P Gobetti 101, 40129 Bologna (Italy); Melpignano, P [Centro Ricerche Plast-Optica (CRP), via Jacopo Linussio 1, 33020 Amaro (UD) (Italy); Biondo, V [Centro Ricerche Plast-Optica (CRP), via Jacopo Linussio 1, 33020 Amaro (UD) (Italy)

    2006-08-23

    The electro-optical behaviour of organic light emitting diode devices (OLEDs) is greatly influenced by the morphology of the films. A major parameter is due to the important role that the morphology of the active organic thin films plays in the phenomena that lead to light emission. For vacuum-grown OLEDs, the morphology of the specific thin films can be varied by modification of the deposition conditions. We have assessed the method (ultrahigh-vacuum organic molecular beam deposition) and conditions (variation of the deposition rate) for electro-emission (EL) optimization in a standard {alpha}-NPB (N,N'-bis-(1-naphthyl)-N,N' diphenyl-1,1' biphenyl-4-4' diamine)/Alq3 (tris-(8-hydroxyquinoline) aluminium) vacuum-grown OLED device. The best EL performances have been obtained for OLEDs made in ultrahigh vacuum with the Alq3 layer deposited with a differential deposition rate ranging from 1.0 to 0.3Angsts{sup -1}. The results are consistent with a model of different Alq3 morphologies, allowing efficient charge injection at the metal/organic interface, and of the minimization of grain boundaries at the electron-hole recombination interface, allowing efficient radiative excitonic decay. At the same time, with the objective of controlling and stabilizing the morphology changes and stabilizing the charge transport over a long OLED operating time, we have studied the effect of thermal annealing processing in the standard current behaviour of OLEDs. The large current fluctuations typically observed for standard vacuum-grown OLEDs have been smeared out and kept constant over a long operating time by the given thermal annealing conditions. The results are interpreted in terms of the stabilization of intrinsic polymorphism of the organic film's structure induced by thermal energy and leading the morphology to a lowest-energetic configuration.

  7. On the theory of frequency-shifted secondary emission of light-harvesting molecular systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morozov, V.A.

    2001-01-01

    The expressions are obtained for the intensity of the frequency-shifted secondary emission of a chromophore playing the role of a reaction center in the simplest model three-chromophore molecular 'light-harvesting' antenna, which is constructed and oriented in space so that the incident photons coherently excite two of its chromophore pigments. The quantum-field formalism was used, which takes into account the generalized (quantum-electrodynamic) dipole-dipole, as well as radiative and nonradiative dissipative interactions between pigments and the reaction center of the antenna. The special features of the excitation spectrum of the Raman scattering line and the frequency-shifted fluorescence spectrum of the reaction center of the molecular antenna under study are discussed. A comparison of the expressions obtained for the excitation and fluorescence spectra and with the corresponding expressions obtained for a bichromophore molecular system, which differs from a three-chromophore antenna by the absence of one of the pigments, revealed the properties of the mechanism of action of light-harvesting molecular antennas that have not been found earlier. In particular, it is shown that 'the light-harvesting' caused by the collective dissipative interactions of pigments with the reaction center of the antenna can substantially exceed a sum of contributions from separate pigments

  8. Tunable white light emission from hafnium oxide films co-doped with trivalent terbium and europium ions deposited by Pyrosol technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guzman-Olguin, J.C.; Montes, E.; Guzman-Mendoza, J. [Centro de Investigacion en Ciencia Aplicada y Tecnologia Avanzada del Instituto Politecnico Nacional, Unidad Legaria (Mexico); Baez-Rodriguez, A.; Zamora-Peredo, L. [Centro de Investigacion en Micro y Nanotecnologia, Universidad Veracruzana, Boca del Rio, Ver (Mexico); Garcia-Hipolito, M.; Alvarez-Fregoso, O. [Instituto de Investigaciones en Materiales, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Circuito Exterior, Ciudad Universitaria, Coyoacan (Mexico); Martinez-Merlin, I.; Falcony, C. [Centro de Investigacion y de Estudios Avanzados del Instituto Politecnico Nacional (Mexico)

    2017-10-15

    In this paper, the photo and cathodoluminescent properties of HfO{sub 2} films optically activated with different atomic concentrations of Tb{sup 3+} and Eu{sup 3+} ions, deposited by the Pyrosol technique, are reported. These films were deposited at temperatures from 400 to 600 C, using chlorides as raw materials. The surface morphologies of all deposited films were rough and dense. X-ray diffraction analysis showed that the films deposited at 600 C were polycrystalline exhibiting the HfO{sub 2} monoclinic phase. The tuning by the means of the excitation wavelength generates photoluminescence spectra, for co-doped films, in several emissions from blue to yellow (including white light) due to the characteristic electronic transitions of Tb{sup 3+} (green), Eu{sup 3+}(red) ions and the violet-blue emission associated to the host lattice (HfO{sub 2}). According to the chromaticity diagram, the best white light is reached for the sample S2 excited with 382 nm (x = 0.3343, y = 0.3406). The cathodoluminescence emission spectra for co-doped films showed emissions from green to red (including yellow, orange and other intermediate emissions). The averaged quantum efficiency values of the sample labeled as S2 resulted between 47 and 78% depending on the excitation wavelength. In addition, XPS, TEM, SEM and decay times were performed to characterize these films. (copyright 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  9. Beamed neutron emission driven by laser accelerated light ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kar, S.; Green, A.; Ahmed, H.; Alejo, A.; Robinson, A. P. L.; Cerchez, M.; Clarke, R.; Doria, D.; Dorkings, S.; Fernandez, J.; Mirfayzi, S. R.; McKenna, P.; Naughton, K.; Neely, D.; Norreys, P.; Peth, C.; Powell, H.; Ruiz, J. A.; Swain, J.; Willi, O.; Borghesi, M.

    2016-05-01

    Highly anisotropic, beam-like neutron emission with peak flux of the order of 109 n/sr was obtained from light nuclei reactions in a pitcher-catcher scenario, by employing MeV ions driven by a sub-petawatt laser. The spatial profile of the neutron beam, fully captured for the first time by employing a CR39 nuclear track detector, shows a FWHM divergence angle of ˜ 70^\\circ , with a peak flux nearly an order of magnitude higher than the isotropic component elsewhere. The observed beamed flux of neutrons is highly favourable for a wide range of applications, and indeed for further transport and moderation to thermal energies. A systematic study employing various combinations of pitcher-catcher materials indicates the dominant reactions being d(p, n+p)1H and d(d,n)3He. Albeit insufficient cross-section data are available for modelling, the observed anisotropy in the neutrons’ spatial and spectral profiles is most likely related to the directionality and high energy of the projectile ions.

  10. A real-life example of choosing an inherently safer process option

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Study, Karen

    2007-01-01

    While choosing an inherently safer alternative may seem straightforward, sometimes what seems to be the most obvious alternative may not provide the best risk reduction. The process designer must maintain a broad perspective to be able to recognize all potential hazards when evaluating design options. All aspects of operation such as start-up, shut-down, utility failure, as well as normal operation should be considered. Choosing the inherently safer option is best accomplished early in the option selection phase of a project; however, recycle back to the option selection phase may be needed if an option is not thoroughly evaluated early in the process. In this paper, a project to supply ammonia to a catalytic reactor will be reviewed. During the course of the project, an 'inherently safer' alternative was selected and later discarded due to issues uncovered during the detail design phase. The final option chosen will be compared to (1) the original design and (2) the initial 'inherently safer' alternative. The final option was inherently safer than both the original design and the initial 'inherently safer' alternative even though the design team initially believed that it would not be

  11. Synthesis of Colloidal Nanocrystal Heterostructures for High-Efficiency Light Emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Yifei

    -LEDs. Secondly, CdS/CdSe/ZnS QDQWs were synthesized and their luminescence was tuned in an effort to realize efficient blue light emission from CdSe nanocrystals. CdSe QWs with a well width of 1.05 nm emitted at 467 nm with a spectral full-width-at-half-maximum of ~30 nm. With a 3-monolayer ZnS cladding layer which also acts as a passivating and strain-compensating layer, the QDQWs acquired a ~35% PL quantum yield (QY). Blue and green EL was obtained from QDQW-LEDs with 3-4.5 monolayers (MLs) QWs. It was found that as the well width and peak wavelength decreased, the overall EL was increasingly dominated by defect state emission, suggesting the device performance is mainly limited by poor charge injection into the QDQWs.

  12. Life cycle carbon emissions inventory of brick masonry and light steel framing houses in Brasilia: proposal of design guidelines for low-carbon social housing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucas Rosse Caldas

    Full Text Available Abstract This study evaluated the CO2eq emissions during the life cycle of two social housing projects in the city of Brasilia. A house of ceramic brick masonry was compared to a light steel framing one. The life cycle carbon emissions assessment (LCCO2A with a cradle-to-grave approach was used. The relation between the thermal performance of the wall systems and CO2eq emissions in the operational phase of the houses were evaluated using the DesignBuilder software. In addition, six scenarios composed of three CO2eq emission factors from the Brazilian electrical grid and two schedules of occupation of houses (full and part time were evaluated. The brick masonry house presented less CO2eq emissions than the light steel framing one. For both houses, the operational phase was the most significant regarding the total CO2eq emissions (50% to 70%, followed by the construction (20% to 30%, maintenance (11% to 20% and end-of-life (lower than 1% phases. The results also showed the importance of considering different CO2eq emission factors for the Brazilian context in the operational phase. Finally, based on the results obtained, design guidelines for low carbon social housing were proposed.

  13. A tunable lighting system integrated by inorganic and transparent organic light-emitting diodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jing-jing; Zhang, Tao; Jin, Ya-fang; Liu, Shi-shen; Yuan, Shi-dong; Cui, Zhao; Zhang, Li; Wang, Wei-hui

    2014-05-01

    A tunable surface-emitting integrated lighting system is constructed using a combination of inorganic light-emitting diodes (LEDs) and transparent organic LEDs (OLEDs). An RB two-color LED is used to supply red and blue light emission, and a green organic LED is used to supply green light emission. Currents of the LED and OLED are tuned to produce a white color, showing different Commission Internationale d'Eclairage (CIE) chromaticity coordinates and correlated color temperatures with a wide adjustable range. Such an integration can compensate for the lack of the LED's luminance uniformity and the transparent OLED's luminance intensity.

  14. Visible light emission from porous silicon carbide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ou, Haiyan; Lu, Weifang

    2017-01-01

    Light-emitting silicon carbide is emerging as an environment-friendly wavelength converter in the application of light-emitting diode based white light source for two main reasons. Firstly, SiC has very good thermal conductivity and therefore a good substrate for GaN growth in addition to the small...

  15. Selective area epitaxy of monolithic white-light InGaN/GaN quantum well microstripes with dual color emission

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Yuejing; Tong, Yuying; Yang, Guofeng, E-mail: gfyang@jiangnan.edu.cn; Yao, Chujun; Sun, Rui; Cai, Lesheng; Xu, Guiting; Wang, Jin; Zhang, Qing; Ye, Xuanchao; Wu, Mengting; Wen, Zhiqin [School of Science, Jiangnan University, Wuxi 214122 (China)

    2015-09-15

    Monolithic color synthesis is demonstrated using InGaN/GaN multiple quantum wells (QWs) grown on GaN microstripes formed by selective area epitaxy on SiO{sub 2} mask patterns. The striped microfacet structure is composed of (0001) and (11-22) planes, attributed to favorable surface polarity and surface energy. InGaN/GaN QWs on different microfacets contain spatially inhomogeneous compositions owing to the diffusion of adatoms among the facets. This unique property allows the microfacet QWs to emit blue light from the (11-22) plane and yellow light from the top (0001) plane, the mixing of which leads to the perception of white light emission.

  16. Selective area epitaxy of monolithic white-light InGaN/GaN quantum well microstripes with dual color emission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Yuejing; Tong, Yuying; Yang, Guofeng; Yao, Chujun; Sun, Rui; Cai, Lesheng; Xu, Guiting; Wang, Jin; Zhang, Qing; Ye, Xuanchao; Wu, Mengting; Wen, Zhiqin

    2015-01-01

    Monolithic color synthesis is demonstrated using InGaN/GaN multiple quantum wells (QWs) grown on GaN microstripes formed by selective area epitaxy on SiO 2 mask patterns. The striped microfacet structure is composed of (0001) and (11-22) planes, attributed to favorable surface polarity and surface energy. InGaN/GaN QWs on different microfacets contain spatially inhomogeneous compositions owing to the diffusion of adatoms among the facets. This unique property allows the microfacet QWs to emit blue light from the (11-22) plane and yellow light from the top (0001) plane, the mixing of which leads to the perception of white light emission

  17. Optimization of the implosion phase on TC-I by light emission analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aramaki, E.A.; Porto, P.; Berni, L.; Honda, R.Y.; Ueda, M.; Doi, I.; Machid, M.

    1988-01-01

    The best operation condition on the field-reversed theta-pinch TC-I at UNICAMP is studied by analysis of the helium-plasma light emission and electromagnetic signals observed during the preionization and implosion phase of FRC plasma. The TC-I device can be operated with a crowbar switch on the preionization and main capacitor banks, in order to fix the number of oscillations as well as the time interval between the end of the preionization and the main discharge phase. A detailed study of the plasma implosion has been carried out by changing the above parameters and also the working gas pressure by using photodiode, a visible spectrometer, magnetic probes, a Faraday cup and a streak camera [pt

  18. Optimization of the implosion phase of TC-I by light emission analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aramaki, E.A.; Porto, P.; Berni, L.; Honda, R.Y.; Ueda, M.; Doi, I.; Machida, M.

    1989-01-01

    The best operation condition on the field-reversed theta-pinch TC-I at UNICAMP is studied by analysis of the helium-plasma light emission and electromagnetic signals observed during the preionization and implosion phase of FRC plasma. The TC-I device can be operated with a crowbar switch on the preionization and main capacitor banks, in order to fix the number of oscillations as well as the time interval between the end of the preionization and the main discharge phase. A detailed study of the plasma implosion has been carried out by changing the above parameters and also the working gas pressure by using a photodiode, a visible spectrometer, magnetic probes, a Faraday cup and a streak camera. (orig.)

  19. Mechanism of giant enhancement of light emission from Au/CdSe nanocomposites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hsieh, Y-P; Liang, C-T; Chen, Y-F; Lai, C-W; Chou, P-T

    2007-01-01

    Based on the enhanced electron-hole recombination rate generated by surface plasmon (SP) waves of Au nanoparticles (NPs) and electrons transferred from CdSe quantum dots (QDs) to Au NPs, we propose a mechanism to elucidate the luminescent behavior in Au and CdSe nanocomposites. With our proposed model, the enhancement of the spectrally integrated PL intensity can be manipulated by up to a factor of ∼33, the largest value ever reported. Our study can be used to clarify the ambiguity in controlling the light emission enhancement and quenching of semiconductor nanocrystals coupled with the SP waves of metal NPs. It should be very useful for the creation of highly efficient solid-state emitters

  20. Characterization of Inherent Particles and Mechanism of Thermal Stress Induced Particle Formation in HSV-2 Viral Vaccine Candidate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Lillian; Kirkitadze, Marina; Bhandal, Kamaljit; Roque, Cristopher; Yang, Eric; Carpick, Bruce; Rahman, Nausheen

    2017-11-10

    Vaccine formulations may contain visible and/or subvisible particles, which can vary in both size and morphology. Extrinsic particles, which are particles not part of the product such as foreign contaminants, are generally considered undesirable and should be eliminated or controlled in injectable products. However, biological products, in particular vaccines, may also contain particles that are inherent to the product. Here we focus on the characterization of visible and subvisible particles in a live, replication-deficient viral vaccine candidate against HSV genital herpes in an early developmental stage. HSV-2 viral vaccine was characterized using a panel of analytical methods, including Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE), Western blot, liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS), light microscopy, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), micro-flow imaging (MFI), dynamic light scattering (DLS), right angle light scattering (RALS), and intrinsic fluorescence. Particles in HSV-2 vaccine typically ranged from hundreds of nanometers to hundreds of micrometers in size and were determined to be inherent to the product. The infectious titer did not correlate with any trend in subvisible particle concentration and size distribution as shown by DLS, MFI, and TEM under stressed conditions. This suggested that particle changes in the submicron range were related to HSV-2 virion structure and had direct impact on biological activity. It was also observed that subvisible and visible particles could induce aggregation in the viral product. The temperature induced aggregation was observed by RALS, intrinsic fluorescence, and DLS. The increase of subvisible particle size with temperature could be fitted to a two-step thermokinetic model. Visible and subvisible particles were found to be inherent to the HSV-2 viral vaccine product. The mechanism of protein aggregation was discussed and a two

  1. Colour tuneable light-emitting transistor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feldmeier, Eva J.; Melzer, Christian; Seggern, Heinz von [Electronic Materials Department, Institute of Materials Science, Technische Universitaet Darmstadt (Germany)

    2010-07-01

    In recent years the interest in ambipolar organic light-emitting field-effect transistors has increased steadily as the devices combine switching behaviour of transistors with light emission. Usually, small molecules and polymers with a band gap in the visible spectral range serve as semiconducting materials. Mandatory remain balanced injection and transport properties for both charge carrier types to provide full control of the spatial position of the recombination zone of electrons and holes in the transistor channel via the applied voltages. As will be presented here, the spatial control of the recombination zone opens new possibilities towards light-emitting devices with colour tuneable emission. In our contribution an organic light-emitting field-effect transistors is presented whose emission colour can be changed by the applied voltages. The organic top-contact field-effect transistor is based on a parallel layer stack of acenes serving as organic transport and emission layers. The transistor displays ambipolar characteristics with a narrow recombination zone within the transistor channel. During operation the recombination zone can be moved by a proper change in the drain and gate bias from one organic semiconductor layer to another one inducing a change in the emission colour. In the presented example the emission maxima can be switched from 530 nm to 580 nm.

  2. Inherently safe technologies-chemical and nuclear

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weinberg, A.M.

    1984-01-01

    Probabilistic risk assessments show an inverse relationship between the likelihood and the consequences of nuclear and chemical plant accidents, but the Bhopal accident has change public complacency about the safety of chemical plants to such an extent that public confidence is now at the same low level as with nuclear plants. The nuclear industry's response was to strengthen its institutions and improve its technologies, but the public may not be convinced. One solution is to develop reactors which do not depend upon the active intervention of humans of electromechanical devices to deal with emergencies, but which have physical properties that limit the possible temperature and power of a reactor. The Process Inherent Ultimately Safe and the modular High-Temperature Gas-Cooled reactors are two possibilities. the chemical industry needs to develop its own inherently safe design precepts that incorporate smallness, safe processes, and hardening against sabotage. 5 references

  3. Photonic crystal light source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleming, James G [Albuquerque, NM; Lin, Shawn-Yu [Albuquerque, NM; Bur, James A [Corrales, NM

    2004-07-27

    A light source is provided by a photonic crystal having an enhanced photonic density-of-states over a band of frequencies and wherein at least one of the dielectric materials of the photonic crystal has a complex dielectric constant, thereby producing enhanced light emission at the band of frequencies when the photonic crystal is heated. The dielectric material can be a metal, such as tungsten. The spectral properties of the light source can be easily tuned by modification of the photonic crystal structure and materials. The photonic crystal light source can be heated electrically or other heating means. The light source can further include additional photonic crystals that exhibit enhanced light emission at a different band of frequencies to provide for color mixing. The photonic crystal light source may have applications in optical telecommunications, information displays, energy conversion, sensors, and other optical applications.

  4. The Inherent Visible Light Signature of an Intense Underwater Ultraviolet Light Source Due to Combined Raman and Fluorescence Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-01-01

    Humans cannot see ultraviolet light. The blue-sensitive cones in the retina would respond weakly to ultraviolet wavelengths if exposed to them, but...545, 1992. 3. C. S. Yentsch, and D. A. Phinney, " Autofluorescence and Raman scattering in the marine underwater environment," Ocean Optics X, SPIE

  5. Diagnostics of pre-breakdown light emission in a helium coplanar barrier discharge: the presence of neutral bremsstrahlung

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navrátil, Zdeněk; Morávek, Tomáš; Ráheľ, Jozef; Čech, Jan; Lalinský, Ondřej; Trunec, David

    2017-05-01

    Weak light emission (˜10-3 of active discharge signal; average count rate ˜ 1 photon s-1 nm-1) associated with surface charge relaxation during the dark phase of a helium diffuse coplanar barrier discharge was studied by optical emission spectroscopy, using a technique of phase-resolved single photon counting. The optical emission spectra of the dark phase contained luminescent bands of the dielectrics used (Al2O3, AlN) and spectral lines from the gas constituents (OH*, {{{N}}}2* , {{{N}}}2+* , He*, He{}2* , O*). During the charge relaxation event, a broad continuum appeared in the optical emission spectra, consisting of bremsstrahlung radiation and amplified luminescence of the dielectric barrier. The analysis presented suggests that the bremsstrahlung radiation originated from slow electrons colliding with neutral helium atoms. The fitting procedure we developed reproduced well the observed shape of the continuum. Moreover, it provided a method for the determination of electric field strength in the discharge during this particular phase. The electric field reached 1 kV cm-1 during the charge relaxation event.

  6. Detecção de emissão espontânea de luz em ensaios de colimetria aplicados ao monitoramento de efluentes sanitários Spontaneous light emission in coliforms test applied to wastewater monitoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samuel Ricardo dos Santos

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available No presente trabalho avaliou-se o potencial do emprego da técnica biofotônica ao monitoramento da qualidade microbiológica de efluentes sanitários, por meio da detecção de emissão ultrafraca de luz em testes envolvendo bactéria do grupo coliforme. Foram acompanhados os padrões de emissão de luz em câmara escura com o uso de efluente doméstico, antes e após tratamento, incubados em meio nutritivo à base de lactose e lauril triptose. O controle foi efetuado com o uso de cepa de Escherichia coli (ATCC 25.922, tendo seu crescimento sido monitorado por emissão de luz em câmara escura com fotomultiplicador acoplado. Os dados demonstraram que o monitoramento microbiológico pode ser efetuado por meio técnica biofotônica, podendo ser aplicado, com respostas rápidas, ao monitoramento microbiológico de efluentes, por meio de testes envolvendo coliformes.The spontaneous light emission of living systems emerge as a promising methodology that applied to microbiological in monitoring water can lead to short-term analysis. The present study evaluated the potential of biophoton measurements applied to wastewater monitoring by using ultraweak light emission in coliform tests. The procedure is based on photon-counting measurements inside a dark-chamber, of wastewater samples, before and after treatment, inoculated in nutrient presence/absence medium (lactose and lauryl triptose broth. Strain of Escherichia coli (ATCC 25,922 was used in control tests by monitoring the light emission inside a dark-chamber with an acoplade photomultiplier. The data showed that microbiological monitoring can be done by photon-counting in real-time applied to microbiological wastewater monitoring using coliform test.

  7. Long-term implications of alternative light-duty vehicle technologies for global greenhouse gas emissions and primary energy demands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kyle, Page; Kim, Son H.

    2011-01-01

    This study assesses global light-duty vehicle (LDV) transport in the upcoming century, and the implications of vehicle technology advancement and fuel-switching on greenhouse gas emissions and primary energy demands. Five different vehicle technology scenarios are analyzed with and without a CO 2 emissions mitigation policy using the GCAM integrated assessment model: a reference internal combustion engine vehicle scenario, an advanced internal combustion engine vehicle scenario, and three alternative fuel vehicle scenarios in which all LDVs are switched to natural gas, electricity, or hydrogen by 2050. The emissions mitigation policy is a global CO 2 emissions price pathway that achieves 450 ppmv CO 2 at the end of the century with reference vehicle technologies. The scenarios demonstrate considerable emissions mitigation potential from LDV technology; with and without emissions pricing, global CO 2 concentrations in 2095 are reduced about 10 ppmv by advanced ICEV technologies and natural gas vehicles, and 25 ppmv by electric or hydrogen vehicles. All technological advances in vehicles are important for reducing the oil demands of LDV transport and their corresponding CO 2 emissions. Among advanced and alternative vehicle technologies, electricity- and hydrogen-powered vehicles are especially valuable for reducing whole-system emissions and total primary energy. - Highlights: → Alternative-fuel LDVs reduce whole-system CO 2 emissions, even without carbon pricing. → Alternative-fuel LDVs enhance the CO 2 mitigation capacity of the transportation sector. → Electric and hydrogen vehicles reduce whole-system primary energy supporting LDV transport.

  8. High-efficiency white organic light-emitting devices with a non-doped yellow phosphorescent emissive layer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao Juan; Yu Junsheng, E-mail: jsyu@uestc.edu.cn; Hu Xiao; Hou Menghan; Jiang Yadong

    2012-03-30

    Highly efficient phosphorescent white organic light-emitting devices (PHWOLEDs) with a simple structure of ITO/TAPC (40 nm)/mCP:FIrpic (20 nm, x wt.%)/bis[2-(4-tertbutylphenyl)benzothiazolato-N,C{sup 2} Prime ] iridium (acetylacetonate) (tbt){sub 2}Ir(acac) (y nm)/Bphen (30 nm)/Mg:Ag (200 nm) have been developed, by inserting a thin layer of non-doped yellow phosphorescent (tbt){sub 2}Ir(acac) between doped blue emitting layer (EML) and electron transporting layer. By changing the doping concentration of the blue EML and the thickness of the non-doped yellow EML, a PHWOLED comprised of higher blue doping concentration and thinner yellow EML achieves a high current efficiency of 31.7 cd/A and Commission Internationale de l'Eclairage coordinates of (0.33, 0.41) at a luminance of 3000 cd/m{sup 2} could be observed. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We introduce a simplified architecture for phosphorescent white organic light-emitting device. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The key concept of device fabrication is combination of doped blue emissive layer (EML) with non-doped ultra-thin yellow EML. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Doping concentration of the blue EML and thickness of the yellow EML are sequentially adjusted. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer High device performance is achieved due to improved charge carrier balance as well as two parallel emission mechanisms in the EMLs.

  9. Time-resolved light emission of a, c, and r-cut sapphires shock-compressed to 65 GPa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Q. C.; Zhou, X. M.

    2018-04-01

    To investigate light emission and dynamic deformation behaviors, sapphire (single crystal Al2O3) samples with three crystallographic orientations (a, c, and r-cut) were shock-compressed by the planar impact method, with final stress ranges from 47 to 65 GPa. Emission radiance and velocity versus time profiles were simultaneously measured with a fast pyrometer and a Doppler pin system in each experiment. Wave profile results show anisotropic elastic-plastic transitions, which confirm the literature observations. Under final shock stress of about 52 GPa, lower emission intensity is observed in the r-cut sample, in agreement with the previous report in the literature. When final shock stress increases to 57 GPa and 65 GPa, spectral radiance histories of the r-cut show two stages of distinct features. In the first stage, the emission intensity of r-cut is lower than those of the other two, which agrees with the previous report in the literature. In the second stage, spectral radiance of r-cut increases with time at much higher rate and it finally peaks over those of the a and c-cut. These observations (conversion of intensified emission in the r-cut) may indicate activation of a second slip system and formation of shear bands which are discussed with the resolved shear stress calculations for the slip systems in each of the three cuts under shock compression.

  10. Light extraction enhancement from organic light-emitting diodes with randomly scattered surface fixture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Dong-Ying; Shi, Xiao-Bo; Gao, Chun-Hong; Cai, Shi-Duan; Jin, Yue; Liao, Liang-Sheng, E-mail: lsliao@suda.edu.cn

    2014-09-30

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • A combination of scattering layer and roughened substrate is used for light extraction from OLEDs. • The scattering layer is readily achieved by spin-coating the TiO{sub 2} sol. • The enhancement relying scattering depends on the size of TiO{sub 2} nano particles. • With the light extraction techniques the uniform emission is achieved. - Abstract: A combination of a scattering medium layer and a roughened substrate was proposed to enhance the light extraction efficiency of organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs). Comparing with a reference OLED without any scattering layer, 65% improvement in the forward emission has been achieved with a scattering layer formed on an intentionally roughened external substrate surface of the OLED by spin-coating a sol–gel fabricated matrix containing well dispersed titania (TiO{sub 2}) particles. Such a combination method not only demonstrated efficient extraction of the light trapped in the glass substrate but also achieved homogenous emission from the OLED panel. The proposed technique, convenient and inexpensive, is believed to be suitable for the large area OLED production in lighting applications.

  11. [Study on Hexagonal Super-Lattice Pattern with Light Spot and Dim Spot in Dielectric Barrier Discharge by Optical Emission Spectra].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ying; Dong, Li-fang; Niu, Xue-jiao; Zhang, Chao

    2016-02-01

    The hexagonal super-lattice pattern composed of the light spot and the dim spot is firstly observed and investigated in the discharge of gas mixture of air and argon by using the dielectric barrier discharge device with double water electrodes. It is found that the dim spot is located at the center of its surrounding three light spots by observing the discharge image. Obviously, the brightness of the light spot and the dim spot are different, which indicates that the plasma states of the light spot and the dim spot may be different. The optical emission spectrum method is used to further study the several plasma parameters of the light spot and the dim spot in different argon content. The emission spectra of the N₂ second positive band (C³IIu --> B³IIg) are measured, from which the molecule vibration temperatures of the light spot and the dim spot are calculated. Based on the relative intensity ratio of the line at 391.4 nm and the N₂ line at 394.1 nm, the average electron energies of the light spot and the dim spot are investigated. The broadening of spectral line 696.57 nm (2P₂-1S₅) is used to study the electron densities of the light spot and the dim spot. The experiment shows that the molecule vibration temperature, average electron energy and the electron density of the dim spot are higher than those of the light spot in the same argon content. The molecule vibration temperature and electron density of the light spot and dim spot increase with the argon content increasing from 70% to 95%, while average electron energies of the light spot and dim spot decrease gradually. The short-exposure image recorded by a high speed video camera shows that the dim spot results from the surface discharges (SDs). The surface discharge induced by the volume discharge (VD) has the decisive effect on the formation of the dim spot. The experiment above plays an important role in studying the formation mechanism of the hexagonal super-lattice pattern with light spot and

  12. Pulsar Emission Geometry and Accelerating Field Strength

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeCesar, Megan E.; Harding, Alice K.; Miller, M. Coleman; Kalapotharakos, Constantinos; Parent, Damien

    2012-01-01

    The high-quality Fermi LAT observations of gamma-ray pulsars have opened a new window to understanding the generation mechanisms of high-energy emission from these systems, The high statistics allow for careful modeling of the light curve features as well as for phase resolved spectral modeling. We modeled the LAT light curves of the Vela and CTA I pulsars with simulated high-energy light curves generated from geometrical representations of the outer gap and slot gap emission models. within the vacuum retarded dipole and force-free fields. A Markov Chain Monte Carlo maximum likelihood method was used to explore the phase space of the magnetic inclination angle, viewing angle. maximum emission radius, and gap width. We also used the measured spectral cutoff energies to estimate the accelerating parallel electric field dependence on radius. under the assumptions that the high-energy emission is dominated by curvature radiation and the geometry (radius of emission and minimum radius of curvature of the magnetic field lines) is determined by the best fitting light curves for each model. We find that light curves from the vacuum field more closely match the observed light curves and multiwavelength constraints, and that the calculated parallel electric field can place additional constraints on the emission geometry

  13. The effects of biodiesels on semivolatile and nonvolatile particulate matter emissions from a light-duty diesel engine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Yuan; Li, Shao-Meng; Liggio, John; Hayden, Katherine; Han, Yuemei; Stroud, Craig; Chan, Tak; Poitras, Marie-Josée

    2017-11-01

    Semivolatile organic compounds (SVOCs) represent a dominant category of secondary organic aerosol precursors that are increasingly included in air quality models. In the present study, an experimental system was developed and applied to a light-duty diesel engine to determine the emission factors of particulate SVOCs (pSVOCs) and nonvolatile particulate matter (PM) components at dilution ratios representative of ambient conditions. The engine was tested under three steady-state operation modes, using ultra-low-sulfur diesel (ULSD), three types of pure biodiesels and their blends with ULSD. For ULSD, the contribution of pSVOCs to total particulate organic matter (POM) mass in the engine exhaust ranged between 21 and 85%. Evaporation of pSVOCs from the diesel particles during dilution led to decreases in the hydrogen to carbon ratio of POM and the PM number emission factor of the particles. Substituting biodiesels for ULSD could increase pSVOCs emissions but brought on large reductions in black carbon (BC) emissions. Among the biodiesels tested, tallow/used cooking oil (UCO) biodiesel showed advantages over soybean and canola biodiesels in terms of both pSVOCs and nonvolatile PM emissions. It is noteworthy that PM properties, such as particle size and BC mass fraction, differed substantially between emissions from conventional diesel and biodiesels. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Synthesis and up-conversion white light emission of RE{sup 3+}-doped lutetium oxide nanocubes as a single compound

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu Shanshan [School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Southwest University, Chongqing 400715 (China); Yang Jun, E-mail: jyang@swu.edu.cn [School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Southwest University, Chongqing 400715 (China); Li Chunxia [State Key Laboratory of Rare Earth Resource Utilization, Changchun Institute of Applied Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Changchun 130022 (China); Lin Jun, E-mail: jlin@ciac.jl.cn [State Key Laboratory of Rare Earth Resource Utilization, Changchun Institute of Applied Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Changchun 130022 (China)

    2012-04-16

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Uniform and dispersive cubic precursor can be synthesized by sample hydrothermal process. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Hydrothermal precursor could transform to Lu{sub 2}O{sub 3}:RE{sup 3+} with its original cubic morphology. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nearly equal intensities of blue, green, and red emissions under single 980 nm laser. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Lu{sub 2}O{sub 3}:RE{sup 3+} show bright white light emission, clearly visible to the naked eyes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Chromaticity coordinate is very close to the standard equal energy white light illuminate. - Abstract: Uniform and dispersive Lu{sub 2}O{sub 3}:Yb{sup 3+}/Er{sup 3+}/Tm{sup 3+} nanocubes have been successfully synthesized by hydrothermal process with subsequent calcination at 900 Degree-Sign C. The as-formed RE{sup 3+}-doped lutetium oxide precursor via the hydrothermal process, as a template, could transform to RE{sup 3+}-doped Lu{sub 2}O{sub 3} with their original cubic morphology and slight shrinkage in the size after post-annealing process. The formation mechanism for the lutetium oxide precursor cubes has been proposed. Under single wavelength diode laser excitation of 980 nm, the as-obtained Lu{sub 2}O{sub 3}:3%Yb{sup 3+}/0.5%Er{sup 3+}/0.3%Tm{sup 3+} nanocubes show nearly equal intensities of blue (Tm{sup 3+}: {sup 1}G{sub 4} {yields} {sup 3}H{sub 6}), green (Er{sup 3+}: ({sup 2}H{sub 11/2}, {sup 4}S{sub 3/2}) {yields} {sup 4}I{sub 15/2}), and red (Er{sup 3+}: {sup 4}F{sub 9/2} {yields} {sup 4}I{sub 15/2}) emissions, which produces bright white light emission, clearly visible to the naked eyes. The main pathways to populate the upper emitting states come from the energy-transfer processes from Yb{sup 3+} to Tm{sup 3+}/Er{sup 3+}, respectively. The chromaticity coordinate of the Lu{sub 2}O{sub 3}:3%Yb{sup 3+}/0.5%Er{sup 3+}/0.3%Tm{sup 3+} sample is calculated to be about x = 0.3403 and y = 0.3169, which falls exactly within the

  15. 75 FR 62739 - 2017 and Later Model Year Light Duty Vehicle GHG Emissions and CAFE Standards; Notice of Intent

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-13

    ... Model Year Light Duty Vehicle GHG Emissions and CAFE Standards; Notice of Intent AGENCIES: Environmental... fuel economy (CAFE) standards in accordance with the Energy Policy and Conservation Act (EPCA), as... FR 49454, 49460 (September 28, 2009). The NHTSA CAFE standards are only based on technologies that...

  16. The efficiency challenge of nitride light-emitting diodes for lighting

    KAUST Repository

    Weisbuch, Claude

    2015-03-13

    © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim. We discuss the challenges of light-emitting diodes in view of their application to solid-state lighting. The requirement is to at least displace the quite efficient fluorescent, sodium, and high intensity discharge lamps used today in the main energy consuming lighting sectors, industrial, commercial and outdoors, with more efficient and better light quality lamps. We show that both from the point of view of cost of ownership and carbon emissions reduction, the relevant metric is efficiency, more than the cost of lumens. Then, progress from present performance requires identification of the loss mechanisms in light emission from LEDs, and solutions competing with mainstream c-plane LEDS grown on sapphire need to be on par with these. Special attention is devoted to a discussion of the efficiency droop mechanisms, and of a recent direct measurement of Auger generated electrons which appear to be responsible for droop.

  17. Posttest analysis of the FFTF inherent safety tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Padilla, A. Jr.; Claybrook, S.W.

    1987-01-01

    Inherent safety tests were performed during 1986 in the 400-MW (thermal) Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) reactor to demonstrate the effectiveness of an inherent shutdown device called the gas expansion module (GEM). The GEM device provided a strong negative reactivity feedback during loss-of-flow conditions by increasing the neutron leakage as a result of an expanding gas bubble. The best-estimate pretest calculations for these tests were performed using the IANUS plant analysis code (Westinghouse Electric Corporation proprietary code) and the MELT/SIEX3 core analysis code. These two codes were also used to perform the required operational safety analyses for the FFTF reactor and plant. Although it was intended to also use the SASSYS systems (core and plant) analysis code, the calibration of the SASSYS code for FFTF core and plant analysis was not completed in time to perform pretest analyses. The purpose of this paper is to present the results of the posttest analysis of the 1986 FFTF inherent safety tests using the SASSYS code

  18. Study of the out-of-plane emission of protons and light fragments in symmetric heavy-ion collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brill, D.; Beckerle, P.; Bormann, C.; Schwab, E.; Shin, Y.; Stock, R.; Stroebele, H.; Baltes, P.; Muentz, C.; Oeschler, H.; Sturm, C.; Wagner, A.; Barth, R.; Cieslak, M.; Debowski, M.; Grosse, E.; Koczon, P.; Mang, M.; Miskowiec, D.; Schicker, R.; Senger, P.; Kohlmeyer, B.; Puehlhofer, F.; Speer, J.; Voelkel, K.; Walus, W.

    1996-01-01

    Midrapidity protons from 209 Bi+ 209 Bi collisions were measured with the Kaon Spectrometer at SIS at incident energies of E Lab /A=400, 700 and 1000 MeV. Additionally, light fragments were analysed at 400 MeV. We have investigated the azimuthal emission pattern of the particles relative to the reaction plane as function of transverse momentum, bombarding energy and impact parameter. We observe an enhanced emission of particles perpendicular to the reaction plane at all bombarding energies. The ratio of the number of particles emitted out-of-plane/in-plane increases strongly with the particles transverse momentum. The anisotropy decreases with increasing beam energy. Composite particles show a much stronger effect than protons. (orig.)

  19. Red Emission of SrAl2O4:Mn4+ Phosphor for Warm White Light-Emitting Diodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chi, N. T. K.; Tuan, N. T.; Lien, N. T. K.; Nguyen, D. H.

    2018-05-01

    In this work, SrAl2O4:Mn4+ phosphor is prepared by co-precipitation. The phase structure, morphology, composition and luminescent performance of the phosphor are investigated in detail with x-ray diffraction, field emission scanning electron microscopy, steady-state photoluminescence (PL) spectra, and temperature-dependent PL measurements. The phosphor shows a strong red emission peak at ˜ 690 nm, which is due to the transition between electronic levels and the electric dipole transition 2Eg to 4A2g of Mn4+ ions located at the sites with D3d local symmetry. The sample doped with 0.04 mol.% Mn4+ exhibits intense red emission with high thermal stability and appropriate International Commission on Illumination (CIE) coordinates (x = 0.6959, y = 0.2737). It is also found that the phosphor absorption in an extended band from 250 nm to 500 nm has three peaks at 320 nm, 405 nm, and 470 nm, which match well with the emission band of ultraviolet (UV) lighting emission diode (LED) or blue LED chips. These results demonstrate that SrAl2O4:Mn4+ phosphor can play the role of activator in narrow red-emitting phosphor, which is potentially useful in UV (˜ 320 nm) or blue (˜ 460 nm) LED.

  20. Emission tunability and local environment in europium-doped OH{sup −}-free calcium aluminosilicate glasses for artificial lighting applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farias, Aline M.; Sandrini, Marcelo; Viana, José Renato M.; Baesso, Mauro L.; Bento, Antônio C.; Rohling, Jurandir H. [Departamento de Física, Universidade Estadual de Maringá, Av Colombo, 5790, 87020-900, Maringá, PR (Brazil); Guyot, Yannick [Laboratoire de Physico–Chimie des Matériaux Luminescents, Université de Lyon, Université Claude Bernard Lyon 1, Villeurbanne, UMR 5620 CNRS 69622 (France); De Ligny, Dominique [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Erlangen Nürnberg, Martens str. 5, 91058, Erlangen (Germany); Nunes, Luiz Antônio O. [Instituto de Física de São Carlos, Universidade de São Paulo, Av. Trabalhador São-Carlense400, 13566-590, São Carlos, SP (Brazil); Gandra, Flávio G. [Instituto de Física Gleb Wataghin, Universidade Estadual de Campinas, 13083-859, Campinas, SP (Brazil); Sampaio, Juraci A. [Lab Ciências Físicas, Universidade Estadual Norte Fluminense, 28013-602, Campos Dos Goytacazes, RJ (Brazil); Lima, Sandro M.; Andrade, Luis Humberto C. [Grupo de Espectroscopia Óptica e Fototérmica, Universidade Estadual de Mato Grosso do Sul-UEMS, Dourados, MS, C. P. 351, CEP 79804-970 (Brazil); and others

    2015-04-15

    The relationship between emission tunability and the local environment of europium ions in OH{sup −}-free calcium aluminosilicate glasses was investigated, focusing on the development of devices for artificial lighting. Significant conversion of Eu{sup 3+} to Eu{sup 2+} was obtained by means of melting the glasses under a vacuum atmosphere and controlling the silica content, resulting in broad, intense, and tunable luminescence ranging from blue to red. Electron spin resonance and X-ray absorption near edge structure measurements enabled correlation of the luminescence behavior of the material with the Eu{sup 2+}/Eu{sup 3+} concentration ratio and changes in the surrounding ions' crystal field. The coordinates of the CIE 1931 chromaticity diagram were calculated from the spectra, and the contour maps showed that the light emitted from Eu{sup 2+} presented broad bands and enhanced color tuning, ranging from reddish-orange to blue. The results showed that these Eu doped glasses can be used for tunable white lighting by combining matrix composition and the adjustment of the pumping wavelength. - Highlights: • Eu{sup 2+}-doped OH{sup −} free calcium aluminosilicate glass as a new source for white lighting. • Correlation between emission tunability and local environment of europium ions. • Significant reduction of Eu{sup 3+} to Eu{sup 2+} by melting the glasses under vacuum atmosphere. • Broad, intense and tunable luminescence ranging from blue to red.

  1. Light vehicle regulated and unregulated emissions from different biodiesels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karavalakis, George; Stournas, Stamoulis; Bakeas, Evangelos

    2009-01-01

    In this study, the regulated and unregulated emissions profile and fuel consumption of an automotive diesel and biodiesel blends, prepared from two different biodiesels, were investigated. The biodiesels were a rapeseed methyl ester (RME) and a palm-based methyl ester (PME). The tests were performed on a chassis dynamometer with constant volume sampling (CVS) over the New European Driving Cycle (NEDC) and the non-legislated Athens Driving Cycle (ADC), using a Euro 2 compliant passenger vehicle. The objectives were to evaluate the impact of biodiesel chemical structure on the emissions, as well as the influence of the applied driving cycle on the formation of exhaust emissions and fuel consumption. The results showed that NOx emissions were influenced by certain biodiesel properties, such as those of cetane number and iodine number. NOx emissions followed a decreasing trend over both cycles, where the most beneficial reduction was obtained with the application of the more saturated biodiesel. PM emissions were decreased with the palm-based biodiesel blends over both cycles, with the exception of the 20% blend which was higher compared to diesel fuel. PME blends led to increases in PM emissions over the ADC. The majority of the biodiesel blends showed a tendency for lower CO and HC emissions. The differences in CO2 emissions were not statistically significant. Fuel consumption presented an increase with both biodiesels. Total PAH and nitro-PAH emission levels were decreased with the use of biodiesel independently of the source material. Lower molecular weight PAHs were predominant in both gaseous and particulate phases. Both biodiesels had a negative impact on certain carbonyl emissions. Formaldehyde and acetaldehyde were the dominant aldehydes emitted from both fuels.

  2. Effect of Gasoline Properties on Exhaust Emissions from Tier 2 Light-Duty Vehicles -- Final Report: Phase 3; July 28, 2008 - July 27, 2013

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whitney, K.

    2014-05-01

    This report covers work the Southwest Research Institute (SwRI) Office of Automotive Engineering has conducted for the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), and the Coordinating Research Council (CRC) in support of the Energy Policy Act of 2005 (EPAct). Section 1506 of EPAct requires EPA to produce an updated fuel effects model representing the 2007 light - duty gasoline fleet, including determination of the emissions impacts of increased renewable fuel use. This report covers the exhaust emissions testing of 15 light-duty vehicles with 27 E0 through E20 test fuels, and 4 light-duty flexible fuel vehicles (FFVs) on an E85 fuel, as part of the EPAct Gasoline Light-Duty Exhaust Fuel Effects Test Program. This program will also be referred to as the EPAct/V2/E-89 Program based on the designations used for it by the EPA, NREL, and CRC, respectively. It is expected that this report will be an attachment or a chapter in the overall EPAct/V2/E-89 Program report prepared by EPA and NREL.

  3. Electrical manipulation of the light emission of single CdSe/CdS nanorods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mueller, J.

    2005-01-01

    In the center of the present thesis lies the study and manipulation of the light emission of novel rod-shaped cadmium-selenide/cadmium-sulfide (CdSe/CdS) nanocrystals. These nanocrystals consist of a spherical CdSe nucleus, on which a CdS nanorod is grown monocrystallinely. By this grow spatially asymmetric semiconductor nanorods with an aspect ratio between 1.6 and 4.0. By the measurement of the radiation rate in this thesis it could be shown that the electron is delocalized over the whole nanorod, while the hole is localized in the CdSe nucleus. Therefore by the length of the cadmium-sulfide rod the wave-function overlap can be directly manipulated. The wave functions and by this the emission energies can be beside the geometry especially also controlled by external fields. Because the magnitude of the so-called ''Stark effect in quantum-bounded structures'' increases with the spatial extension of the nanostructure, in the nanorods an in comparison with spherical nanocrystals distinctly increased field effect could be observed. Experiments on single CdSe/CdS nanorods exhibit however not only a shift of the emission energy by the 50-fold of the line width, but simultaneously a field-induced decreasement of the emission intensity by one order of magnitude. The experimental results can be excellently compared with a theoretical model. For this the effective-mass model was supplemented by the Coulomb interaction and extended by a finite-element method for asymmetric geometries. By this it is possible to predict both the radiation rate, the Stark shift of the emission energy, and the intensity modulation by electric fields qualitatively and quantitatively and to describe the Stark effect in colloidal nanocrystal by a quantum-mechanical model. The emission characteristics is not only influenced by external fields, but also by fluctuations of local fields, which arise by diffunding surface charges. These local field changes induce also a Stark shift and lead to a time

  4. Comments on the Joint Proposed Rulemaking to Establish Light-Duty Vehicle Greenhouse Gas Emission Standards and Corporate Average Fuel Economy Standards

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wenzel, Tom [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2009-10-27

    Tom Wenzel of Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory comments on the joint rulemaking to establish greenhouse gas emission and fuel economy standards for light-duty vehicle, specifically on the relationship between vehicle weight and vehicle safety.

  5. The inherent politics of quality in public park management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindholst, Andrej Christian; Konijnendijk, Cecil Cornelis; Fors, Hanna

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we highlight and illustrate the inherent politics embedded in “quality” as a concept for managing public parks. Reflecting more generic quality concepts, contemporary quality models in park management include concepts for both operational, strategic and stakeholder management as well...... managing the park organisation itself. However, quality concepts and their application through various management models include as well as exclude the access, values and worldviews of particular interests. In this way, any particular quality concept and model embeds its own politics by inherent...... allocations of ‘who gets what, when and how’. We illustrate the inherent politics by providing a case study of a widely adopted quality model for operational management that has been adopted and implemented in Denmark as part of new public management reforms. In perspective, other quality concepts and models...

  6. Inherent work suit buoyancy distribution: effects on lifejacket self-righting performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barwood, Martin J; Long, Geoffrey M; Lunt, Heather; Tipton, Michael J

    2014-09-01

    Accidental immersion in cold water is an occupational risk. Work suits and life jackets (LJ) should work effectively in combination to keep the airway clear of the water (freeboard) and enable self-righting. We hypothesized that inherent buoyancy, in the suit or LJ, would be beneficial for enabling freeboard, but its distribution may influence LJ self-righting. Six participants consented to complete nine immersions. Suits and LJ tested were: flotation suit (FLOAT; 85 N inherent buoyancy); oilskins 1 (OS-1) and 2 (OS-2), both with no inherent buoyancy; LJs (inherent buoyancy/buoyancy after inflation/total buoyancy), LJ-1 50/150/200 N, LJ-2 0/290/290 N, LJ-3 80/190/270 N. Once dressed, the subject entered an immersion pool where uninflated freeboard, self-righting performance, and inflated freeboard were measured. Data were compared using Friedman's test to the 0.05 alpha level. All suits and LJs enabled uninflated and inflated freeboard, but differences were seen between the suits and LJs. Self-righting was achieved on 43 of 54 occasions, irrespective of suit or LJ. On all occasions that self-righting was not achieved, this occurred in an LJ that included inherent buoyancy (11/54 occasions). Of these 11 failures, 8 occurred (73% of occasions) when the FLOAT suit was being worn. LJs that included inherent buoyancy, that are certified as effective on their own, worked less effectively from the perspective of self-righting in combination with a work suit that also included inherent buoyancy. Equipment that is approved for use in the workplace should be tested in combination to ensure adequate performance in an emergency scenario.

  7. Investigation of black and brown carbon multiple-wavelength-dependent light absorption from biomass and fossil fuel combustion source emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michael R. Olson; Mercedes Victoria Garcia; Michael A. Robinson; Paul Van Rooy; Mark A. Dietenberger; Michael Bergin; James Jay Schauer

    2015-01-01

    Quantification of the black carbon (BC) and brown carbon (BrC) components of source emissions is critical to understanding the impact combustion aerosols have on atmospheric light absorption. Multiple-wavelength absorption was measured from fuels including wood, agricultural biomass, coals, plant matter, and petroleum distillates in controlled combustion settings....

  8. In situ observation of modulated light emission of fiber fuse synchronized with void train over hetero-core splice point.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shin-ichi Todoroki

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Fiber fuse is a process of optical fiber destruction under the action of laser radiation, found 20 years ago. Once initiated, opical discharge runs along the fiber core region to the light source and leaves periodic voids whose shape looks like a bullet pointing the direction of laser beam. The relation between damage pattern and propagation mode of optical discharge is still unclear even after the first in situ observation three years ago. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Fiber fuse propagation over hetero-core splice point (Corning SMF-28e and HI 1060 was observed in situ. Sequential photographs obtained at intervals of 2.78 micros recorded a periodic emission at the tail of an optical discharge pumped by 1070 nm and 9 W light. The signal stopped when the discharge ran over the splice point. The corresponding damage pattern left in the fiber core region included a segment free of periodicity. CONCLUSIONS: The spatial modulation pattern of the light emission agreed with the void train formed over the hetero-core splice point. Some segments included a bullet-shaped void pointing in the opposite direction to the laser beam propagation although the sequential photographs did not reveal any directional change in the optical discharge propagation.

  9. On-road assessment of light duty vehicles in Delhi city: Emission factors of CO, CO2 and NOX

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaiprakash; Habib, Gazala

    2018-02-01

    This study presents the technology based emission factors of gaseous pollutants (CO, CO2, and NOX) measured during on-road operation of nine passenger cars of diesel, gasoline, and compressed natural gas (CNG). The emissions from two 3-wheelers, and three 2-wheelers were measured by putting the vehicles on jacks and operating them according to Modified Indian Driving Cycle (MIDC) at no load condition. The emission factors observed in the present work were significantly higher than values reported from dynamometer study by Automotive Research Association of India (ARAI). Low CO (0.34 ± 0.08 g km-1) and high NOX (1.0 ± 0.4 g km-1) emission factors were observed for diesel passenger cars, oppositely high CO (2.2 ± 2.6 g km-1) and low NOX (1.0 ± 1.6 g km-1) emission factors were seen for gasoline powered cars. The after-treatment technology in diesel vehicles was effective in CO reduction. While the use of turbocharger in diesel vehicles to generate high combustion temperature and pressure produces more NOx, probably which may not be effectively controlled by after-treatment device. The after-treatment devices in gasoline powered Post-2010, Post-2005 vehicles can be acclaimed for reduced CO emissions compared to Post-2000 vehicles. This work presents a limited data set of emission factors from on-road operations of light duty vehicles, this limitation can be improved by further measurements of emissions from similar vehicles.

  10. Modulation of the electroluminescence emission from ZnO/Si NCs/p-Si light-emitting devices via pulsed excitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Vidrier, J.; Gutsch, S.; Blázquez, O.; Hiller, D.; Laube, J.; Kaur, R.; Hernández, S.; Garrido, B.; Zacharias, M.

    2017-05-01

    In this work, the electroluminescence (EL) emission of zinc oxide (ZnO)/Si nanocrystals (NCs)-based light-emitting devices was studied under pulsed electrical excitation. Both Si NCs and deep-level ZnO defects were found to contribute to the observed EL. Symmetric square voltage pulses (50-μs period) were found to notably enhance EL emission by about one order of magnitude. In addition, the control of the pulse parameters (accumulation and inversion times) was found to modify the emission lineshape, long inversion times (i.e., short accumulation times) suppressing ZnO defects contribution. The EL results were discussed in terms of the recombination dynamics taking place within the ZnO/Si NCs heterostructure, suggesting the excitation mechanism of the luminescent centers via a combination of electron impact, bipolar injection, and sequential carrier injection within their respective conduction regimes.

  11. Light propagation and emission in scattering media. Application to imaging of complex media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pierrat, Romain

    2007-01-01

    In this manuscript, we raise different aspects of the propagation and emission of electromagnetic waves in a scattering medium. In the first part, we show that the Radiative Transfer Equation (rte) is a very good tool to study light propagation in a complex medium. Thanks to this formalism, we study the evolution of the spatial coherence of the beam inside the medium, which is seen as a signature of the different transport regimes of photons (single scattering, multiple scattering, diffusive regime). Next, we derive rigorously the diffusion approximation by using a modal approach of the rte. In particular, we obtain that the diffusion coefficient is independent of the level of absorption in the dynamic regime while it depends on absorption in the case of the steady-state regime. Finally, we study the temporal fluctuations of the scattered intensity and show that the use of the rte allows to go beyond the diffusive regime described by the diffusing-waves spectroscopy theory (dws). Comparisons between numerical computations and experiments are realized in reflexion to underline the fundamental role of the anisotropy of the scattering, which is not described by the standard theory. The second part is dedicated to the study of light emission in complex media. First, we study the amplification of scattered light in a gain system called random laser and show that it exists a laser threshold in the incoherent feedback regime. This threshold is quantified by using a modal approach of the rte. Thanks to this formalism, we highlight the limitations of the diffusion approximation in such a system. Next, we study the modification of the fluorescent decay rate of a single molecule embedded in a complex medium. We derive a model allowing the replacement of the scattering medium by an homogeneous equivalent medium taking into account the multiple scattering and the interactions between scatterers. This model is validated by comparison with the value of the decay rate of the

  12. Compact fluorescent lighting in Wisconsin: elevated atmospheric emission and landfill deposition post-EISA implementation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arendt, John D; Katers, John F

    2013-07-01

    The majority of states in the USA, including Wisconsin, have been affected by elevated air, soil and waterborne mercury levels. Health risks associated with mercury increase from the consumption of larger fish species, such as Walleye or Pike, which bio-accumulate mercury in muscle tissue. Federal legislation with the 2011 Mercury and Air Toxics Standards and the Wisconsin legislation on mercury, 2009 Wisconsin Act 44, continue to aim at lowering allowable levels of mercury emissions. Meanwhile, mercury-containing compact fluorescent lights (CFL) sales continue to grow as businesses and consumers move away from energy intensive incandescent light bulbs. An exchange in pollution media is occurring as airborne mercury emissions from coal-burning power plants, the largest anthropogenic source of mercury, are being reduced by lower energy demand and standards, while more universal solid waste containing mercury is generated each time a CFL is disposed. The treatment of CFLs as a 'universal waste' by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) led to the banning of non-household fluorescent bulbs from most municipal solid waste. Although the EPA encourages recycling of bulbs, industry currently recycles fluorescent lamps and CFLs at a rate of only 29%. Monitoring programs at the federal and state level have had only marginal success with industrial and business CFL recycling. The consumer recycling rate is even lower at only 2%. A projected increase in residential CFL use in Wisconsin owing to the ramifications of the Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007 will lead to elevated atmospheric mercury and landfill deposition in Wisconsin.

  13. Visible light emission from porous silicon carbide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ou, Haiyan; Lu, Weifang

    2017-01-01

    Light-emitting silicon carbide is emerging as an environment-friendly wavelength converter in the application of light-emitting diode based white light source for two main reasons. Firstly, SiC has very good thermal conductivity and therefore a good substrate for GaN growth in addition to the small...... lattice mismatch. Secondly, SiC material is abundant, containing no rear-earth element material as commercial phosphor. In this paper, fabrication of porous SiC is introduced, and their morphology and photoluminescence are characterized. Additionally, the carrier lifetime of the porous SiC is measured...... by time-resolved photoluminescence. The ultrashort lifetime in the order of ~70ps indicates porous SiC is very promising for the application in the ultrafast visible light communications....

  14. Rear surface light emission measurements from laser-produced shock waves in clear and Al-coated polystyrene targets

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLean, E. A.; Deniz, A. V.; Schmitt, A. J.; Stamper, J. A.; Obenschain, S. P.; Lehecka, T.; Mostovych, A. N.; Seely, J.

    1999-08-01

    The Nike KrF laser, with its very uniform focal distributions, has been used at intensities near 10 14 W/cm 2 to launch shock waves in polystyrene targets. The rear surface visible light emission differed between clear polystyrene (CH) targets and targets with a thin (125 nm) Al coating on the rear side. The uncoated CH targets showed a relatively slowly rising emission followed by a sudden fall when the shock emerges, while the Al-coated targets showed a rapid rise in emission when the shock emerges followed by a slower fall, allowing an unambiguous determination of the time the shock arrived at the rear surface. A half-aluminized target allowed us to observe this difference in a single shot. The brightness temperature of both the aluminized targets and the non-aluminized targets was slightly below but close to rear surface temperature predictions of a hydrodynamic code. A discussion of preheat effects is given.

  15. Warm-White-Light-Emitting Diode Based on a Dye-Loaded Metal-Organic Framework for Fast White-Light Communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhiye; Wang, Zi; Lin, Bangjiang; Hu, XueFu; Wei, YunFeng; Zhang, Cankun; An, Bing; Wang, Cheng; Lin, Wenbin

    2017-10-11

    A dye@metal-organic framework (MOF) hybrid was used as a fluorophore in a white-light-emitting diode (WLED) for fast visible-light communication (VLC). The white light was generated from a combination of blue emission of the 9,10-dibenzoate anthracene (DBA) linkers and yellow emission of the encapsulated Rhodamine B molecules. The MOF structure not only prevents dye molecules from aggregation-induced quenching but also efficiently transfers energy to the dye for dual emission. This light-emitting material shows emission lifetimes of 1.8 and 5.3 ns for the blue and yellow components, respectively, which are significantly shorter than the 200 ns lifetime of Y 3 Al 5 O 12 :Ce 3+ in commercial WLEDs. The MOF-WLED device exhibited a modulating frequency of 3.6 MHz for VLC, six times that of commercial WLEDs.

  16. Ultrathin nondoped emissive layers for efficient and simple monochrome and white organic light-emitting diodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yongbiao; Chen, Jiangshan; Ma, Dongge

    2013-02-01

    In this paper, highly efficient and simple monochrome blue, green, orange, and red organic light emitting diodes (OLEDs) based on ultrathin nondoped emissive layers (EMLs) have been reported. The ultrathin nondoped EML was constructed by introducing a 0.1 nm thin layer of pure phosphorescent dyes between a hole transporting layer and an electron transporting layer. The maximum external quantum efficiencies (EQEs) reached 17.1%, 20.9%, 17.3%, and 19.2% for blue, green, orange, and red monochrome OLEDs, respectively, indicating the universality of the ultrathin nondoped EML for most phosphorescent dyes. On the basis of this, simple white OLED structures are also demonstrated. The demonstrated complementary blue/orange, three primary blue/green/red, and four color blue/green/orange/red white OLEDs show high efficiency and good white emission, indicating the advantage of ultrathin nondoped EMLs on constructing simple and efficient white OLEDs.

  17. Inherent Reward and Risk (Part I): Towards a Universal Paradigm for Investment Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Liang Zou

    2000-01-01

    In this paper, a new paradigm is developed for analyzinginvestment strategies and pricing financial assets. This paradigmassumes that any investment strategy has its own “inherent reward”and “inherent risk” that can be judged with common sense. Ijustify axiomatically the existence and uniqueness (ratio scale)of inherent reward (U) and inherent risk (D) that could beregarded as universal measures of reward and risk for any giveninvestment strategy. Incorporating the notion of “inherentefficien...

  18. Towards a comprehensive city emission function (CCEF)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kocifaj, Miroslav

    2018-01-01

    The comprehensive city emission function (CCEF) is developed for a heterogeneous light-emitting or blocking urban environments, embracing any combination of input parameters that characterize linear dimensions in the system (size and distances between buildings or luminaires), properties of light-emitting elements (such as luminous building façades and street lighting), ground reflectance and total uplight-fraction, all of these defined for an arbitrarily sized 2D area. The analytical formula obtained is not restricted to a single model class as it can capture any specific light-emission feature for wide range of cities. The CCEF method is numerically fast in contrast to what can be expected of other probabilistic approaches that rely on repeated random sampling. Hence the present solution has great potential in light-pollution modeling and can be included in larger numerical models. Our theoretical findings promise great progress in light-pollution modeling as this is the first time an analytical solution to city emission function (CEF) has been developed that depends on statistical mean size and height of city buildings, inter-building separation, prevailing heights of light fixtures, lighting density, and other factors such as e.g. luminaire light output and light distribution, including the amount of uplight, and representative city size. The model is validated for sensitivity and specificity pertinent to combinations of input parameters in order to test its behavior under various conditions, including those that can occur in complex urban environments. It is demonstrated that the solution model succeeds in reproducing a light emission peak at some elevated zenith angles and is consistent with reduced rather than enhanced emission in directions nearly parallel to the ground.

  19. Summary of advanced LMR [Liquid Metal Reactor] evaluations: PRISM [Power Reactor Inherently Safe Module] and SAFR [Sodium Advanced Fast Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Tuyle, G.J.; Slovik, G.C.; Chan, B.C.; Kennett, R.J.; Cheng, H.S.; Kroeger, P.G.

    1989-10-01

    In support of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) has performed independent analyses of two advanced Liquid Metal Reactor (LMR) concepts. The designs, sponsored by the US Department of Energy (DOE), the Power Reactor Inherently Safe Module (PRISM) [Berglund, 1987] and the Sodium Advanced Fast Reactor (SAFR) [Baumeister, 1987], were developed primarily by General Electric (GE) and Rockwell International (RI), respectively. Technical support was provided to DOE, RI, and GE, by the Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), particularly with respect to the characteristics of the metal fuels. There are several examples in both PRISM and SAFR where inherent or passive systems provide for a safe response to off-normal conditions. This is in contrast to the engineered safety systems utilized on current US Light Water Reactor (LWR) designs. One important design inherency in the LMRs is the ''inherent shutdown'', which refers to the tendency of the reactor to transition to a much lower power level whenever temperatures rise significantly. This type of behavior was demonstrated in a series of unscrammed tests at EBR-II [NED, 1986]. The second key design feature is the passive air cooling of the vessel to remove decay heat. These systems, designated RVACS in PRISM and RACS in SAFR, always operate and are believed to be able to prevent core damage in the event that no other means of heat removal is available. 27 refs., 78 figs., 3 tabs

  20. Process Inherent Ultimate Safety (PIUS) reactor evaluation study: Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-02-01

    This report presents the results of an independent study by United Engineers and Constructors (UNITED) of the SECURE-P Process Inherent Ultimate Safety (PIUS) Reactor Concept which is presently under development by the Swedish light water reactor vendor ASEA-ATOM of Vasteras, Sweden. This study was performed to investigate whether there is any realistic basis for believing that the PIUS reactor could be a viable competitor in the US energy market in the future. Assessments were limited to the technical, economic and licensing aspects of PIUS. Socio-political issues, while certainly important in answering this question, are so broad and elusive that it was considered that addressing them with the limited perspective of one small group from one company would be of questionable value and likely be misleading. Socio-political issues aside, the key issue is economics. For this reason, the specific objectives of this study were to determine if the estimated PIUS plant cost will be competitive in the US market and to identify and evaluate the technical and licensing risks that might make PIUS uneconomical or otherwise unacceptable

  1. Study of the emission of a light particle charged during the fission of 235U by thermal neutron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carles, Claude

    1969-01-01

    In a first part, this research thesis discusses the existing theories of the mechanism of emission of light particles charged of tri-partition (tri-partition is defined as an event involving two big fragments of masses comparable with those obtained in binary fission, and a charged light particle). Then, the author presents and reports an experiment performed by suing nuclear emulsions. Another type of experiment is then presented which allows the measurement of masses and energies of tri-partition fragments. The author then presents theoretical calculations which have been performed in order to find again some characteristics of tri-partition. These calculations are mainly based on Coulomb repulsion between various fragments

  2. Tunable light emission by exciplex state formation between hybrid halide perovskite and core/shell quantum dots: Implications in advanced LEDs and photovoltaics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez, Rafael S; de la Fuente, Mauricio Solis; Suarez, Isaac; Muñoz-Matutano, Guillermo; Martinez-Pastor, Juan P; Mora-Sero, Ivan

    2016-01-01

    We report the first observation of exciplex state electroluminescence due to carrier injection between the hybrid lead halide perovskite (MAPbI3-xClx) and quantum dots (core/shell PbS/CdS). Single layers of perovskite (PS) and quantum dots (QDs) have been produced by solution processing methods, and their photoluminescent properties are compared to those of bilayer samples in both PS/QD and QD/PS configurations. Exciplex emission at lower energies than the band gap of both PS and QD has been detected. The exciplex emission wavelength of this mixed system can be simply tuned by controlling the QD size. Light-emitting diodes (LEDs) have been fabricated using those configurations, which provide light emission with considerably low turn-on potential. The "color" of the LED can also be tuned by controlling the applied bias. The presence of the exciplex state PS and QDs opens up a broad range of possibilities with important implications not only in tunable LEDs but also in the preparation of intermediate band gap photovoltaic devices with the potentiality of surpassing the Shockley-Queisser limit.

  3. Microwave-assisted aqueous synthesis of transition metal ions doped ZnSe/ZnS core/shell quantum dots with tunable white-light emission

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Jie [Laboratory of Advanced Materials, Fudan University, Shanghai 200438 (China); Chen, Qiuhang; Zhang, Wanlu; Mei, Shiliang; He, Liangjie; Zhu, Jiatao [Engineering Research Center of Advanced Lighting Technology, Ministry of Education, Institute for Electric Light Sources, Fudan University, Shanghai 200433 (China); Chen, Guoping [School of Information Science and Technology, Fudan University, Shanghai 200433 (China); Guo, Ruiqian, E-mail: rqguo@fudan.edu.cn [Engineering Research Center of Advanced Lighting Technology, Ministry of Education, Institute for Electric Light Sources, Fudan University, Shanghai 200433 (China)

    2015-10-01

    Highlights: • ZnSe-based QDs were formed via a microwave-assisted aqueous approach. • The stabilizer, ZnS coats and UV irradiation played a role in the PL enhancement. • Tunable white-light-emitting Mn:ZnSe QDs and Cu,Mn:ZnSe/ZnS QDs were synthesized. • The formation mechanism of Cu,Mn:ZnSe QDs was clarified. • The corresponding CIE color coordinates of different PL spectra were obtained. - Abstract: Synthesis of bright white-light emitting Mn and Cu co-doped ZnSe/ZnS core/shell quantum dots (QDs) (Cu,Mn:ZnSe/ZnS) was reported. Water-soluble ZnSe-based QDs with Mn and Cu doping were prepared using a versatile hot-injection method in aqueous solution with a microwave-assisted approach. Influence of the Se/S ratio, stabilizer, refluxing time and the concentration of Cu/Mn dopant ions on the particle size and photoluminescence (PL) were investigated. The as-prepared QDs in the different stages of growth were characterized by X-ray powder diffractometer (XRD), high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), UV–visible (UV–vis) spectrophotometer, and fluorescence spectrophotometer. It is found that these ZnSe-based QDs synthesized under mild conditions exhibit emission in the range of 390–585 nm. The PL quantum yield (QY) of the as-prepared water-soluble ZnSe QDs can be up to 24.3% after the UV-irradiation treatment. The band-gap emission of ZnSe is effectively restrained through Mn and Cu doping. The refluxing time influences the doping of not only Mn, but also Cu, which leads to the best refluxing time of Mn:ZnSe and the red-shift of the emission of Cu:ZnSe d-dots. Co-doping induced white-light emission (WLE) from Cu,Mn:ZnSe/ZnS core/shell QDs were obtained, which can offer the opportunity for future-generation white-light emitting diodes (LEDs)

  4. Emissions of CO2, CO, NOx, HC, PM, HFC-134a, N2O and CH4 from the global light duty vehicle fleet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timothy J. Wallington

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Vehicles emit carbon dioxide (CO2, carbon monoxide (CO, nitrogen oxides (NOx, hydrocarbons (HC, particulate matter (PM, hydrofluorocarbon 134a (HFC-134a, methane (CH4, and nitrous oxide (N2O. An understanding of these emissions is needed in discussions of climate change and local air pollution issues. To facilitate such discussions an overview of past, present, and likely future emissions from light duty vehicles is presented. Emission control technologies have reduced the emissions of CO, VOCs, PM, HFC-134a, CH4, and N2O from modern vehicles to very low levels.

  5. Strong visible-light emission of ZnS nanocrystals embedded in sol-gel silica xerogel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Ping; Lue, M.-K.; Song, C.-F.; Zhou, G.-J.; Ai, Z.-P.; Xu Dong; Yuan, D.-R.; Cheng, X.-F.

    2003-01-01

    ZnS nanoparticles embedded in novel porous phosphor silica xerogel have been synthesized by sol-gel processing. Their fluorescence properties have been evaluated and compared with those of the Na + -doped and un-doped silica xerogels. Stable and strong visible-light emission of the doped samples has been observed. The relative fluorescence intensities of the samples doped with ZnS nanoparticles (S 2- ions have been obtained by the water solution of NaS) are the highest among all of the doped samples. Its relative fluorescence intensity is about 7.5 times of that of the un-doped silica xerogel and about 300 times of that of pure ZnS nanoparticles. The emission wavelength of the ZnS-doped and Na + -doped samples is the same as that of the un-doped silica xerogel and ZnS nanoparticles (λ em =440-450 nm). This high efficiency luminescence of the doped silica xerogels has been assigned to the luminescence centers of ZnS nanoparticles and Na + in the porous phosphorescence silica xerogel

  6. Deterministic control of the emission from light sources in 1D nanoporous photonic crystals (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galisteo-López, Juan F.

    2017-02-01

    Controlling the emission of a light source demands acting on its local photonic environment via the local density of states (LDOS). Approaches to exert such control on large scale samples, commonly relying on self-assembly methods, usually lack from a precise positioning of the emitter within the material. Alternatively expensive and time consuming techniques can be used to produce samples of small dimensions where a deterministic control on emitter position can be achieved. In this work we present a full solution process approach to fabricate photonic architectures containing nano-emitters which position can be controlled with nanometer precision over squared milimiter regions. By a combination of spin and dip coating we fabricate one-dimensional (1D) nanoporous photonic crystals, which potential in different fields such as photovoltaics or sensing has been previously reported, containing monolayers of luminescent polymeric nanospheres. We demonstrate how, by modifying the position of the emitters within the photonic crystal, their emission properties (photoluminescence intensity and angular distribution) can be deterministically modified. Further, the nano-emitters can be used as a probe to study the LDOS distribution within these systems with a spatial resolution of 25 nm (provided by the probe size) carrying out macroscopic measurements over squared milimiter regions. Routes to enhance light-matter interaction in this kind of systems by combining them with metallic surfaces are finally discussed.

  7. Acceptor thickness effect of exciplex and electroplex emission at heterojunction interface in organic light-emitting diodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wei; Yu, Junsheng; Yuan, Kai; Jiang, Yadong; Zhang, Qing; Cao, Kangli

    2010-10-01

    Organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) consisted of a novel fluorene derivative of 5,6-bis(9,9-dihexyl-9H-fluoren-2-yl)- 2,3-diisocyano-2,3-dihydropyrazine (BDHFLCNPy) and a hole transporting material of N,N'-Di-[(1-naphthalenyl)- N,N'-diphenyl](1,1'-biphenyl)-4,4'-diamine (NPB) were fabricated, and electroluminescence (EL) spectrum of devices were investigated. It was found that light emission around 650 nm observed in devices came from exciplex generated at heterojunction interface by NPB molecules worked as electron donor and BDHFLCNPy molecules worked as electron acceptor. Moreover, a shoulder peak around 500 nm ascribed to BDHFLCNPy exciton was observed. To systemically study the effect of heterojunction structure in exciplex formation, OLEDs with different thickness of acceptor were fabricated. The results illustrated that a shoulder peak around 600 nm occurred in EL when acceptor thickness increases, and BDHFLCNPy exciton emitting strength is relatively altered. The emission band around 600 nm is due to electroplex. The L-V-J properties of OLEDs show that device with the thinnest acceptor layer has the highest luminance and current density. On the contrary, OLEDs with thicker acceptor layer have higher luminance efficiency. The different recombination mechanism of exciton, exciplex and electroplex in heterojunction were studied. Furthermore, the acceptor thickness effect of exciplex and electroplex generating mechanism and energy transferring mechanism between them was also discussed.

  8. Stable angular emission spectra in white organic light-emitting diodes using graphene/PEDOT:PSS composite electrode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Hyunsu; Lee, Hyunkoo; Lee, Jonghee; Sung, Woo Jin; Kwon, Byoung-Hwa; Joo, Chul-Woong; Shin, Jin-Wook; Han, Jun-Han; Moon, Jaehyun; Lee, Jeong-Ik; Cho, Seungmin; Cho, Nam Sung

    2017-05-01

    In this work, we suggest a graphene/ poly (3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) polystyrene sulfonate (PEDOT:PSS) composite as a transparent electrode for stabilizing white emission of organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs). Graphene/PEDOT:PSS composite electrodes have increased reflectance when compared to graphene itself, but their reflectance is still lower than that of ITO itself. Changes in the reflectance of the composite electrode have the advantage of suppressing the angular spectral distortion of white emission OLEDs and achieving an efficiency of 16.6% for white OLEDs, comparable to that achieved by graphene-only electrodes. By controlling the OLED structure to compensate for the two-beam interference effect, the CIE color coordinate change (Δxy) of OLEDs based on graphene/PEDOT:PSS composite electrodes is 0.018, less than that based on graphene-only electrode, i.e.,0.027.

  9. High-efficiency red-light emission from polyfluorenes grafted with cyclometalated iridium complexes and charge transport moiety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiwen; Liao, Jin-Long; Liang, Yongmin; Ahmed, M O; Tseng, Hao-En; Chen, Show-An

    2003-01-22

    We report a new route for the design of electroluminescent polymers by grafting high-efficiency phosphorescent organometallic complexes as dopants and charge transport moieties onto alky side chains of fully conjugated polymers for polymer light-emitting diodes (PLED) with single layer/single polymers. The polymer system studied involves polyfluorene (PF) as the base conjugated polymer, carbazole (Cz) as the charge transport moiety and a source for green emission by forming an electroplex with the PF main chain, and cyclometalated iridium (Ir) complexes as the phosphorescent dopant. Energy transfer from the green Ir complex or an electroplex formed between the fluorene main chain and side-chain carbazole moieties, in addition to that from the PF main chain, to the red Ir complex can significantly enhance the device performance, and a red light-emitting device with the high efficiency 2.8 cd/A at 7 V and 65 cd/m2, comparable to that of the same Ir complex-based OLED, and a broad-band light-emitting device containing blue, green, and red peaks (2.16 cd/A at 9 V) are obtained.

  10. Controlling the emission and propagation of light with nano-plasmonic metamaterials and metasurfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ni, Xingjie

    Metamaterials---artificially structured materials with engineered electromagnetic properties---have enabled unprecedented flexibility in manipulating electromagnetic waves and producing new functionalities. Metasurfaces are subwavelength thin metamaterial layers to introduce unusual properties do not exist in nature. They can play a fundamental role in generating synthetic scattering diagrams of macroscopic objects. Optical metamaterials and metasurfaces have enabled unprecedented flexibility in manipulating light waves and producing new functionalities. We have studied various topics in this field, from designs to potential applications. We experimentally demonstrated the world's first optical metasurface which is capable of precisely manipulating light in arbitrary ways over a broad range of near-infrared light, which could make possible of many optical innovations such as more powerful microscopes, telecommunications and computers. We proposed the first hyperbolic metasurface, which consist of a highly anisotropic material layer and an isotropic material layer can support Dyakonov surface waves that have hyperbolic dispersion. This type of metasurfaces support a broadband singularity in the photonic density of states, which opens up another possibility to engineer the spontaneous emission efficiency. We also developed a set of parallel simulation tools which can handle a variety of problems in nanophotonics and plasmonics. Especially, we established an on-line research environment for the research community with six tools, which deliver a cloud computing service with no demand for either any powerful computational hardware or any additional software installations and cover a range of tasks including the design and simulation of complex transformation optics devices and optical metamaterials.

  11. Analytical estimation of emission zone mean position and width in organic light-emitting diodes from emission pattern image-source interference fringes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Epstein, Ariel; Tessler, Nir; Einziger, Pinchas D.; Roberts, Matthew

    2014-01-01

    We present an analytical method for evaluating the first and second moments of the effective exciton spatial distribution in organic light-emitting diodes (OLED) from measured emission patterns. Specifically, the suggested algorithm estimates the emission zone mean position and width, respectively, from two distinct features of the pattern produced by interference between the emission sources and their images (induced by the reflective cathode): the angles in which interference extrema are observed, and the prominence of interference fringes. The relations between these parameters are derived rigorously for a general OLED structure, indicating that extrema angles are related to the mean position of the radiating excitons via Bragg's condition, and the spatial broadening is related to the attenuation of the image-source interference prominence due to an averaging effect. The method is applied successfully both on simulated emission patterns and on experimental data, exhibiting a very good agreement with the results obtained by numerical techniques. We investigate the method performance in detail, showing that it is capable of producing accurate estimations for a wide range of source-cathode separation distances, provided that the measured spectral interval is large enough; guidelines for achieving reliable evaluations are deduced from these results as well. As opposed to numerical fitting tools employed to perform similar tasks to date, our approximate method explicitly utilizes physical intuition and requires far less computational effort (no fitting is involved). Hence, applications that do not require highly resolved estimations, e.g., preliminary design and production-line verification, can benefit substantially from the analytical algorithm, when applicable. This introduces a novel set of efficient tools for OLED engineering, highly important in the view of the crucial role the exciton distribution plays in determining the device performance.

  12. Analytical estimation of emission zone mean position and width in organic light-emitting diodes from emission pattern image-source interference fringes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Epstein, Ariel, E-mail: ariel.epstein@utoronto.ca; Tessler, Nir, E-mail: nir@ee.technion.ac.il; Einziger, Pinchas D. [Department of Electrical Engineering, Technion-Israel Institute of Technology, Haifa 32000 (Israel); Roberts, Matthew, E-mail: mroberts@cdtltd.co.uk [Cambridge Display Technology Ltd, Building 2020, Cambourne Business Park, Cambourne, Cambridgeshire CB23 6DW (United Kingdom)

    2014-06-14

    We present an analytical method for evaluating the first and second moments of the effective exciton spatial distribution in organic light-emitting diodes (OLED) from measured emission patterns. Specifically, the suggested algorithm estimates the emission zone mean position and width, respectively, from two distinct features of the pattern produced by interference between the emission sources and their images (induced by the reflective cathode): the angles in which interference extrema are observed, and the prominence of interference fringes. The relations between these parameters are derived rigorously for a general OLED structure, indicating that extrema angles are related to the mean position of the radiating excitons via Bragg's condition, and the spatial broadening is related to the attenuation of the image-source interference prominence due to an averaging effect. The method is applied successfully both on simulated emission patterns and on experimental data, exhibiting a very good agreement with the results obtained by numerical techniques. We investigate the method performance in detail, showing that it is capable of producing accurate estimations for a wide range of source-cathode separation distances, provided that the measured spectral interval is large enough; guidelines for achieving reliable evaluations are deduced from these results as well. As opposed to numerical fitting tools employed to perform similar tasks to date, our approximate method explicitly utilizes physical intuition and requires far less computational effort (no fitting is involved). Hence, applications that do not require highly resolved estimations, e.g., preliminary design and production-line verification, can benefit substantially from the analytical algorithm, when applicable. This introduces a novel set of efficient tools for OLED engineering, highly important in the view of the crucial role the exciton distribution plays in determining the device performance.

  13. Laser induced white lighting of tungsten filament

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strek, W.; Tomala, R.; Lukaszewicz, M.

    2018-04-01

    The sustained bright white light emission of thin tungsten filament was induced under irradiation with focused beam of CW infrared laser diode. The broadband emission centered at 600 nm has demonstrated the threshold behavior on excitation power. Its intensity increased non-linearly with excitation power. The emission occurred only from the spot of focused beam of excitation laser diode. The white lighting was accompanied by efficient photocurrent flow and photoelectron emission which both increased non-linearly with laser irradiation power.

  14. Impulse transfer and light particles emission during the reaction α + 232Th at 70 MeV/u

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nguyen, M.S.

    1988-02-01

    We have measured during the reaction 4 He + 232 Th at 70 MeV/u the angular correlation of heavy fragments of fission, the inclusive energy spectra of light particles (p, d, t, 3 He and α) and triple coincidence between two fission fragments and a light ejectile. Energy spectra show an evaporation component at low energy, a component of projectile fragmentation at energy equivalent to beam velocity and an intermediate component attributed to pre-equilibrium emission. The analysis of the correlation between linear momentum transfer to the fissioning nucleus and the characteristics of the ejectile in coincidence shows a phenomenon of incomplete massive transfer. We run an Intra-Nuclear Cascade (INC) computation to reproduce ejectile energy spectra, but the agreement with experiment was very bad. We conclude to the impossibility to apply INC computation at intermediate energy of 70 MeV/u. We also applied Distorted Wave Born Approximation (DWBA) for direct transfer reaction extended to continuum states: but the agreement with experiment was again deceiving. Finally, we used an analysis by moving sources for which we propose a model of generalized fragmentation giving a continuous representation of the emission source phenomenon from low energy up to high energy [fr

  15. Highly pure yellow light emission of perovskite CsPb(BrxI1-x)3 quantum dots and their application for yellow light-emitting diodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Yuandan; Gong, Jinhui; Zhu, Yiyuan; Feng, Xingcan; Peng, Hong; Wang, Wei; He, Haiyang; Liu, Hu; Wang, Li

    2018-06-01

    High-quality all-inorganic perovskite CsPb(BrxI1-x)3 quantum dots (QDs) with quantum yield of 50% were systematically studied as yellow light convertor for light emitting diodes (LEDs). A novel heat insulation structure was designed for the QD-converted yellow LEDs. In this structure, a silicone layer was set on top of the GaN LED chip to prevent directly heating of the QDs by the LED chip. Then the CsPb(BrxI1-x)3 QDs were filled in the bowl-shaped silicone layer after ultrasonic dispersion treatment. Finally, an Al2O3 passivation layer was grown on the QDs layer by Atomic Layer Disposition at 40 °C. When x = 0.55, highly pure yellow LEDs with an emission peak at ∼570 nm and a full width at half maximum of 25 nm were achieved. The chromaticity coordinates of the QD-converted yellow LEDs (0.4920 ± 0.0017, 0.4988 ± 0.0053) showed almost no variation under driving current from 5 mA to 150 mA. During an operation period of 60 min, the emission wavelength of the yellow LEDs showed no distinct shift. Moreover, the luminous efficiency of the QD-converted yellow LEDs achieved 13.51 l m/W at 6 mA. These results demonstrated that CsPb(BrxI1-x)3 QDs and the heat insulation structure are promising candidate for high purity yellow LEDs.

  16. Emissions credits from natural gas vehicles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, J.F.; Kodjak, D.

    1997-01-01

    Dedicated natural gas vehicles (NGVs) often are capable of testing to lower than federally required engine certification standards. NGVs often meet inherently low emission vehicle (ILEV) and ultra low emission vehicle (ULEV) standards. Over the useful life of the vehicle, a significant amount of mobile source emission reduction credits (MSERCs) can be generated. This paper will discuss key elements of establishing a workable methodology to quantify the emissions benefits generated through the purchase and use of heavy-duty natural gas vehicles instead of heavy-duty diesel vehicles. The paper will focus on a public fleet of transit buses owned by the Massachusetts Bay Transit Agency, the Massachusetts Port Authority, and a private fleet of waste haulers. Public fleets may generate emission credits as a key compliance option to offset emission shortfalls from changes to the Employee Commute Options (ECO) program, the Inspection and Maintenance program, and facilitate annual surface transportation conformity. Private fleets may generate emission credits for open market trading to area and stationary sources seeking to buy credits from mobile sources, where allowed by EPA and state policy

  17. Solution-processable red-emission organic materials containing triphenylamine and benzothiodiazole units: synthesis and applications in organic light-emitting diodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yi; Zhou, Yi; He, Qingguo; He, Chang; Yang, Chunhe; Bai, Fenglian; Li, Yongfang

    2009-06-04

    Three solution-processable red-emissive organic materials with a hole-transporting unit triphenylamine (TPA) as the core part and a D-pi-A bipolar structure as the branch part, TPA-BT (single-branched molecule), b-TPA-BT (bibranched molecule), and t-TPA-BT (tribranched molecule), were synthesized by the Heck coupling reaction. Herein, for the D-pi-A push-pull structure, we use TPA as the electron donor, benzothiodiazole (BT) as the electron acceptor, and the vinylene bond as the pi-bridge connecting the TPA and BT units. The compounds exhibit good solubility in common organic solvents, benefited from the three-dimensional spatial configuration of TPA units and the branch structure of the molecules. TPA-BT, b-TPA-BT, and t-TPA-BT show excellent photoluminescent properties with maximum emission peaks at ca. 630 nm. High-performance red-emission organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) were fabricated with the active layer spin coated from a solution of these compounds. The OLED based on TPA-BT displayed a low turn-on voltage of 2.0 V, a maximum luminance of 12192 cd/m2, and a maximum current efficiency of 1.66 cd/A, which is among the highest values for the solution-processed red-emission OLEDs. In addition, high-performance white-light-emitting diodes (WLEDs) with maximum luminance around 4400 cd/m2 and maximum current efficiencies above 4.5 cd/A were realized by separately doping the three TPA-BT-containing molecules as red emitter and poly(6,6'-bi-(9,9'-dihexylfluorene)- co-(9,9'-dihexylfluorene-3-thiophene-5'-yl)) as green emitter into blue poly(9,9-dioctylfluorene-2,7-diyl) host material with suitable weight ratios.

  18. Light absorption of biomass burning and vehicle emission-sourced carbonaceous aerosols of the Tibetan Plateau.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Zhaofu; Kang, Shichang; Li, Chaoliu; Yan, Fangping; Chen, Pengfei; Gao, Shaopeng; Wang, Zhiyong; Zhang, Yulan; Sillanpää, Mika

    2017-06-01

    Carbonaceous aerosols over the Tibetan Plateau originate primarily from biomass burning and vehicle emissions (BB and VEs, respectively). The light absorption characteristics of these carbonaceous aerosols are closely correlated with the burning conditions and represent key factors that influence climate forcing. In this study, the light absorption characteristics of elemental carbon (EC) and water-soluble organic carbon (WSOC) in PM 2.5 (fine particulate matter smaller than 2.5 μm) generated from BB and VEs were investigated over the Tibetan Plateau (TP). The results showed that the organic carbon (OC)/EC ratios from BB- and VE-sourced PM 2.5 were 17.62 ± 10.19 and 1.19 ± 0.36, respectively. These values were higher than the ratios in other regions, which was primarily because of the diminished amount of oxygen over the TP. The mass absorption cross section of EC (MAC EC ) at 632 nm for the BB-sourced PM 2.5 (6.10 ± 1.21 m 2 .g -1 ) was lower than that of the VE-sourced PM 2.5 (8.10 ± 0.98 m 2 .g -1 ), indicating that the EC content of the BB-sourced PM 2.5 was overestimated because of the high OC/EC ratio. The respective absorption per mass (α/ρ) values at 365 nm for the VE- and BB-sourced PM 2.5 were 0.71 ± 0.17 m 2 .g -1 and 0.91 ± 0.18 m 2 .g -1 . The α/ρ value of the VEs was loaded between that of gasoline and diesel emissions, indicating that the VE-sourced PM 2.5 originated from both types of emissions. Because OC and WSOC accounts for most of the carbonaceous aerosols at remote area of the TP, the radiative forcing contributed by the WSOC should be high, and requires further investigation.

  19. Constraints on light WIMP candidates from the isotropic diffuse gamma-ray emission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arina, Chiara; Tytgat, Michel H.G.

    2011-01-01

    Motivated by the measurements reported by direct detection experiments, most notably DAMA, CDMS-II, CoGeNT and Xenon10/100, we study further the constraints that might be set on some light dark matter candidates, M DM ∼ few GeV, using the Fermi-LAT data on the isotropic gamma-ray diffuse emission. In particular, we consider a Dirac fermion singlet interacting through a new Z' gauge boson, and a scalar singlet S interacting through the Higgs portal. Both candidates are WIMP (Weakly Interacting Massive Particles), i.e. they have an annihilation cross-section in the pbarn range. Also they may both have a spin-independent elastic cross section on nucleons in the range required by direct detection experiments. Although being generic WIMP candidates, because they have different interactions with Standard Model particles, their phenomenology regarding the isotropic diffuse gamma-ray emission is quite distinct. In the case of the scalar singlet, the one-to-one correspondence between its annihilation cross-section and its spin-independent elastic scattering cross-section permits to express the constraints from the Fermi-LAT data in the direct detection exclusion plot, σ n 0 −M DM . Depending on the astrophysics, we argue that it is possible to exclude the singlet scalar dark matter candidate at 95% confidence level. The constraints on the Dirac singlet interacting through a Z' are comparatively weaker

  20. Light-Emitting Pickles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vollmer, M.; Mollmann, K-P.

    2015-01-01

    We present experiments giving new insights into the classical light-emitting pickle experiment. In particular, measurements of the spectra and temperatures, as well as high-speed recordings, reveal that light emission is connected to the polarity of the electrodes and the presence of hydrogen.

  1. Tuning the light emission of novel donor-acceptor phenoxazine dye-based materials towards the red spectral range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damaceanu, Mariana-Dana; Constantin, Catalin-Paul

    2018-04-01

    A novel red fluorescent push-pull system able to generate an intramolecular charge-transfer (ICT) complex was synthesized. The novel dye (R-POX) combines some structural features which are rarely encountered in the design of other push-pull systems: hexyl-substituted phenoxazine as donor moiety, divinylketone as π-linker, and p-fluorobenzene as electron acceptor group. The relationship between the structural motif, photo-physical and electrochemical properties by UV-Vis absorption, photoluminescence and cyclic voltammetry was thoroughly investigated both as red dopant in poly(methylmethacrylate) (PMMA) or polyimide (PI) matrix, and non-doped host emitter. The molecular rigid cores of the synthesized dye formed supramolecular rod-like structures in condensed phase with a strong impact on the emissive centers. The aggregation was totally suppressed when the dye was used as dopant in an amorphous polymeric matrix, such as PMMA or PI. Electrochemical measurements revealed the dye ability for both hole and electron injection and transport. The fluorescence emission was found to be highly sensitive to solvent polarity, rendering blue-green, yellow, orange and red light emission in different organic solvents. The absolute fluorescence quantum yield reached 39.57% in solution, and dropped to 1.2% in solid state and to 14.01% when the dye was used as dopant in PMMA matrix. According to the available CIE 1931 standard, R-POX emitted pure and saturated red light of single wavelength with chromaticity coordinates very close to those of National Television System Committee (NTSC) standard red colour. The R-POX photo-optical features were compared to those of the commercial red emitter 6, 13-diphenylpentacene.

  2. Life cycle air emissions impacts and ownership costs of light-duty vehicles using natural gas as a primary energy source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luk, Jason M; Saville, Bradley A; MacLean, Heather L

    2015-04-21

    This paper aims to comprehensively distinguish among the merits of different vehicles using a common primary energy source. In this study, we consider compressed natural gas (CNG) use directly in conventional vehicles (CV) and hybrid electric vehicles (HEV), and natural gas-derived electricity (NG-e) use in plug-in battery electric vehicles (BEV). This study evaluates the incremental life cycle air emissions (climate change and human health) impacts and life cycle ownership costs of non-plug-in (CV and HEV) and plug-in light-duty vehicles. Replacing a gasoline CV with a CNG CV, or a CNG CV with a CNG HEV, can provide life cycle air emissions impact benefits without increasing ownership costs; however, the NG-e BEV will likely increase costs (90% confidence interval: $1000 to $31 000 incremental cost per vehicle lifetime). Furthermore, eliminating HEV tailpipe emissions via plug-in vehicles has an insignificant incremental benefit, due to high uncertainties, with emissions cost benefits between -$1000 and $2000. Vehicle criteria air contaminants are a relatively minor contributor to life cycle air emissions impacts because of strict vehicle emissions standards. Therefore, policies should focus on adoption of plug-in vehicles in nonattainment regions, because CNG vehicles are likely more cost-effective at providing overall life cycle air emissions impact benefits.

  3. Photoluminescence light-up detection of zinc ion and imaging in living cells based on the aggregation induced emission enhancement of glutathione-capped copper nanoclusters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Liyun; Hu, Yuefang; Zhang, Liangliang; Huang, Yong; Zhao, Shulin

    2017-08-15

    In this work, we prepared glutathione (GSH)-capped copper nanoclusters (Cu NCs) with red emission by simply adjusting the pH of GSH/Cu 2+ mixture at room temperature. A photoluminescence light-up method for detecting Zn 2+ was then developed based on the aggregation induced emission enhancement of GSH-capped Cu NCs. Zn 2+ could trigger the aggregation of Cu NCs, inducing the enhancement of luminescence and the increase of absolute quantum yield from 1.3% to 6.2%. GSH-capped Cu NCs and the formed aggregates were characterized, and the possible mechanism was also discussed. The prepared GSH-capped Cu NCs exhibited a fast response towards Zn 2+ and a wider detection range from 4.68 to 2240μM. The detection limit (1.17μM) is much lower than that of the World Health Organization permitted in drinking water. Furthermore, taking advantages of the low cytotoxicity, large Stokes shift, red emission and light-up detection mode, we explored the use of the prepared GSH-capped Cu NCs in the imaging of Zn 2+ in living cells. The developed luminescence light-up nanoprobe may hold the potentials for Zn 2+ -related drinking water safety and biological applications. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Emission properties of biomimetic composites for dentistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P.V. Seredin

    Full Text Available Biocomposites based on carbonate-substituted hydroxyapatite synthesized from the biological source of calcium (Goloshchapov et al., 2013 and organic primer on the basis of amino acids found in the enamel tubules of teeth, namely, arginine, histidine, lysine and hyaluronic acid were obtained and studied in this work. Incorporation of organic primer into biocomposite formulation allowed us to obtain the emission characteristics (luminescence that were identical to those inherent to the native tissues of the human tooth (enamel and dentine. Keywords: Biocomposites, IR-spectroscopy, Optical and emission properties, Hydroxyapatite, Human tooth tissues

  5. Selective scanning tunneling microscope light emission from rutile phase of VO2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakai, Joe; Kuwahara, Masashi; Hotsuki, Masaki; Katano, Satoshi; Uehara, Yoichi

    2016-09-28

    We observed scanning tunneling microscope light emission (STM-LE) induced by a tunneling current at the gap between an Ag tip and a VO2 thin film, in parallel to scanning tunneling spectroscopy (STS) profiles. The 34 nm thick VO2 film grown on a rutile TiO2 (0 0 1) substrate consisted of both rutile (R)- and monoclinic (M)-structure phases of a few 10 nm-sized domains at room temperature. We found that STM-LE with a certain photon energy of 2.0 eV occurs selectively from R-phase domains of VO2, while no STM-LE was observed from M-phase. The mechanism of STM-LE from R-phase VO2 was determined to be an interband transition process rather than inverse photoemission or inelastic tunneling processes.

  6. Light particle emission as a probe of reaction mechanism and nuclear excitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guerreau, D.

    1989-01-01

    The central part of these lectures will be dealing with the problem of energy dissipation. A good understanding of the mechanisms for the dissipation requires to study both peripheral and central collisions or, in other words, to look at the impact paramenter dependence. This should also provide valuable information on the time scale. In order to probe the reaction mechanism and nuclear excitation, one of the most powerful tool is unquestionably the observation of light particle emission, including neutrons and charged particles. Several examples will be discussed related to peripheral collisions (the fate of transfer reactions, the excitation energy generation, the production of projectile-like fragments) as well as inner collisions for which extensive studies have demonstrated the strength of intermediate energy heavy ions for the production of very hot nuclei and detailed study of their decay properties

  7. Green light emitting curcumin dye in organic solvents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mubeen, Mohammad; Deshmukh, Abhay D.; Dhoble, S. J.

    2018-05-01

    In this modern world, the demand for the white light emission has increased because of its wide applications in various display and lighting devices, sensors etc. This white light can be produced by mixing red, green and blue lights. Thus this green light can be produced from the plant extract i.e., Turmeric. Curcumin is the essential element present in turmeric to generate the green light. The Photoluminescence (PL) emission is observed at 540 nm at 380nm excitation. This method of generating green light is very simple, cost effective and efficient when compared to other methods.

  8. Exhaust gas emissions from various automotive fuels for light-duty vehicles. Effects on health, environment and energy utilization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahlvik, P.; Brandberg, Aa.

    1999-12-01

    The main aim of the investigation has been to assess the effects on health and environment from various alternative fuels for light-duty vehicles. Effects that can be identified and quantified, such as acidification, ozone formation, cancer risk and climate change, have been of primary interest but other effects, such as respiratory diseases, have also been investigated. Data have been collected through literature surveys for subsequent calculation of the mentioned effects in different time-frames. Corrections have been used to take into consideration the influence of climate, ageing and driving pattern. Emissions generated in fuel production have also been accounted for. The most significant and important differences between the fuels have been found for effects as ozone formation cancer risk and particulate emissions. Alternative fuels, such as methanol and methane (natural gas and biogas), significantly decrease the ozone formation in comparison to petrol, while ethanol, methanol and methane are advantageous concerning cancer risk. The particulate emissions are considerably higher for diesel engines fuelled by diesel oil and RME in comparison to the other fuels. In the future, the importance of acid emissions in the fuel production will increase since the NO x and SO x emissions will decrease from the vehicles. The emissions of climate gases could be significantly reduced by using non-fossil fuels but the efficiency of the drive train is also of importance. The technical development potential for further emission reductions is considerable for all fuels but the advantage for the best fuel options will remain in the future

  9. White polymer light-emitting electrochemical cells using emission from exciplexes with long intermolecular distances formed between polyfluorene and π-conjugated amine molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishikitani, Y.; Takeuchi, H.; Nishide, H.; Uchida, S.; Yazaki, S.; Nishimura, S.

    2015-12-01

    The authors present white polymer light-emitting electrochemical cells (PLECs) fabricated with polymer blend films of poly(9,9-di-n-dodecylfluorenyl-2,7-diyl) (PFD) and π-conjugated triphenylamine molecules. The PLECs have bulk heterojunction structures composed of van der Waals interfaces between the PFD segments and the amine molecules. White-light electroluminescence (EL) can be achieved via light-mixing of the blue exciton emission from PFD and long-wavelength exciplex emission from excited complexes consisting of PFD segments (acceptors (As)) and the amine molecules (donors (Ds)). Precise control of the distances between the PFD and the amine molecules, affected through proper choice of the concentrations of PFD, amine molecules, and polymeric solid electrolytes, is critical to realizing white emission. White PLECs can be fabricated with PFD and amine molecules whose highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO) levels range from -5.3 eV to -5.0 eV. Meanwhile, PLECs fabricated with amine molecules whose HOMO levels are lower than -5.6 eV cannot produce exciplex emission. The distances between the PFD and amine molecules of the exciplexes appear to be larger than 0.4 nm. These experimental data are explained by perturbation theory using the charge-transfer state ( A - D + ), the locally excited state ( A * D ), which is assumed to be the locally excited acceptor state in which there is no interaction with the donor molecule; and the energy gap between the HOMO levels of the PFD and the amine molecules. Color-stable white PLECs were fabricated using 4,4',4″-tris[N-(2-naphthyl)-N-phenylamino]-triphenylamine, which has a HOMO level of -5.2 eV, as the amine molecule, and the color stability of the device is a function of the fact that PFD forms exciplexes with these molecules.

  10. Impact of reduced mass of light commercial vehicles on fuel consumption, CO2 emissions, air quality, and socio-economic costs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cecchel, S; Chindamo, D; Turrini, E; Carnevale, C; Cornacchia, G; Gadola, M; Panvini, A; Volta, M; Ferrario, D; Golimbioschi, R

    2018-02-01

    This study presents a modelling system to evaluate the impact of weight reduction in light commercial vehicles with diesel engines on air quality and greenhouse gas emissions. The PROPS model assesses the emissions of one vehicle in the aforementioned category and its corresponding reduced-weight version. The results serve as an input to the RIAT+ tool, an air quality integrated assessment modelling system. This paper applies the tools in a case study in the Lombardy region (Italy) and discusses the input data pre-processing, the PROPS-RIAT+ modelling system runs, and the results. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Implications of diesel emissions control failures to emission factors and road transport NOx evolution

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ntziachristos, L.; Papadimitriou, G.; Ligterink, N.; Hausberger, S.

    2016-01-01

    Diesel NOx emissions have been at the forefront of research and regulation scrutiny as a result of failures of late vehicle technologies to deliver on-road emissions reductions. The current study aims at identifying the actual emissions levels of late light duty vehicle technologies, including Euro

  12. Students' Perception of Live Lectures' Inherent Disadvantages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrovic, Juraj; Pale, Predrag

    2015-01-01

    This paper aims to provide insight into various properties of live lectures from the perspective of sophomore engineering students. In an anonymous online survey conducted at the Faculty of Electrical Engineering and Computing, University of Zagreb, we investigated students' opinions regarding lecture attendance, inherent disadvantages of live…

  13. Energy efficient solid state lighting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dam-Hansen, C.; Petersen, Poul Michael

    2012-11-15

    Even though vast improvements have been made on efficiency and light quality, SSL is still in its infancy. One of the barriers for a market introduction is the price, which still is around 5 times higher than traditional lighting technologies. In order to fulfil the potential of SSL, further research and development needs to increase the light extraction from semiconductor materials, provide better and cheaper production and packaging, and advanced optical systems for optimized light distribution and new thermal solutions for SSL lamps and luminaires. Nanotechnology and applied research at DTU Fotonik in close collaboration with industry are essential parts in the development of new enhanced LED optical systems and LEDs with higher light extraction efficiency. Photonic crystals can help to efficiently extract light from LEDs and to form a desired emission profile. Future directions are devoted to the next generation of LEDs, in which the spontaneous emission is photon enhanced. One realization of this idea is using LEDs with a layer of nanocrystals, which are coupled to the quantum well of the LED. Such R and D work is ongoing all over the world and DOE roadmaps foresee luminous efficiencies by 2020 that are close to 250 lm/W for both cold and warm white light from LEDs, and prices in the order of one dollar per kilolumen. Such figures will drastically reduce the energy consumption worldwide for lighting, and hence a marked reduction in carbon emissions. (Author)

  14. Time-of-flight Measurement Of Hole-tunneling Properties And Emission Color Control In Organic Light-emitting Diodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurata, K.; Kashiwabara, K.; Nakajima, K.; Mizoguchi, Y.; Ohtani, N.

    2011-12-01

    Hole transport properties of organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) with a thin hole-blocking layer (HBL) were evaluated by time-of-flight measurement. Electroluminescence (EL) spectra of OLEDs with various HBL thicknesses were also evaluated. The results clearly show that the time-resolved photocurrent response and the emission color strongly depend on HBL thickness. This can be attributed to hole-tunneling through the thin HBL. We successfully fabricated a white OLED by controlling the thickness of HBL.

  15. Tailoring the Energy Landscape in Quasi-2D Halide Perovskites Enables Efficient Green-Light Emission

    KAUST Repository

    Quan, Li Na; Zhao, Yongbiao; Garcí a de Arquer, F. Pelayo; Sabatini, Randy; Walters, Grant; Voznyy, Oleksandr; Comin, Riccardo; Li, Yiying; Fan, James Z.; Tan, Hairen; Pan, Jun; Yuan, Mingjian; Bakr, Osman; Lu, Zhenghong; Kim, Dong Ha; Sargent, Edward H.

    2017-01-01

    Organo-metal halide perovskites are a promising platform for optoelectronic applications in view of their excellent charge-transport and bandgap tunability. However, their low photoluminescence quantum efficiencies, especially in low-excitation regimes, limit their efficiency for light emission. Consequently, perovskite light-emitting devices are operated under high injection, a regime under which the materials have so far been unstable. Here we show that, by concentrating photoexcited states into a small subpopulation of radiative domains, one can achieve a high quantum yield, even at low excitation intensities. We tailor the composition of quasi-2D perovskites to direct the energy transfer into the lowest-bandgap minority phase and to do so faster than it is lost to nonradiative centers. The new material exhibits 60% photoluminescence quantum yield at excitation intensities as low as 1.8 mW/cm2, yielding a ratio of quantum yield to excitation intensity of 0.3 cm2/mW; this represents a decrease of 2 orders of magnitude in the excitation power required to reach high efficiency compared with the best prior reports. Using this strategy, we report light-emitting diodes with external quantum efficiencies of 7.4% and a high luminescence of 8400 cd/m2.

  16. Tailoring the Energy Landscape in Quasi-2D Halide Perovskites Enables Efficient Green-Light Emission

    KAUST Repository

    Quan, Li Na

    2017-05-10

    Organo-metal halide perovskites are a promising platform for optoelectronic applications in view of their excellent charge-transport and bandgap tunability. However, their low photoluminescence quantum efficiencies, especially in low-excitation regimes, limit their efficiency for light emission. Consequently, perovskite light-emitting devices are operated under high injection, a regime under which the materials have so far been unstable. Here we show that, by concentrating photoexcited states into a small subpopulation of radiative domains, one can achieve a high quantum yield, even at low excitation intensities. We tailor the composition of quasi-2D perovskites to direct the energy transfer into the lowest-bandgap minority phase and to do so faster than it is lost to nonradiative centers. The new material exhibits 60% photoluminescence quantum yield at excitation intensities as low as 1.8 mW/cm2, yielding a ratio of quantum yield to excitation intensity of 0.3 cm2/mW; this represents a decrease of 2 orders of magnitude in the excitation power required to reach high efficiency compared with the best prior reports. Using this strategy, we report light-emitting diodes with external quantum efficiencies of 7.4% and a high luminescence of 8400 cd/m2.

  17. First-principles dynamics treatment of light emission in collisions between alkali-metal atom and noble-gas atom collisions at 10keV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pacheco, Alexander B.; Reyes, Andrés; Micha, David A.

    2006-12-01

    Collision-induced light emission during the interaction of an alkali-metal atom and a noble-gas atom is treated within a first-principles, or direct, dynamics approach that calculates a time-dependent electric dipole for the whole system, and spectral emission cross sections from its Fourier transform. These cross sections are very sensitive to excited diatomic potentials and a source of information on their shape. The coupling between electronic transitions and nuclear motions is treated with atomic pseudopotentials and an electronic density matrix coupled to trajectories for the nuclei. A recently implemented pseudopotential parametrization scheme is used here for the ground and excited states of the LiHe system, and to calculate state-to-state dipole moments. To verify the accuracy of our new parameters, we recalculate the integral cross sections for the LiHe system in the keV energy regime and obtain agreement with other results from theory and experiment. We further present results for the emission spectrum from 10keV Li(2s)+He collisions, and compare them to experimental values available in the region of light emitted at 300-900nm .

  18. Tunable light emission by exciplex state formation between hybrid halide perovskite and core/shell quantum dots: Implications in advanced LEDs and photovoltaics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez, Rafael S.; de la Fuente, Mauricio Solis; Suarez, Isaac; Muñoz-Matutano, Guillermo; Martinez-Pastor, Juan P.; Mora-Sero, Ivan

    2016-01-01

    We report the first observation of exciplex state electroluminescence due to carrier injection between the hybrid lead halide perovskite (MAPbI3–xClx) and quantum dots (core/shell PbS/CdS). Single layers of perovskite (PS) and quantum dots (QDs) have been produced by solution processing methods, and their photoluminescent properties are compared to those of bilayer samples in both PS/QD and QD/PS configurations. Exciplex emission at lower energies than the band gap of both PS and QD has been detected. The exciplex emission wavelength of this mixed system can be simply tuned by controlling the QD size. Light-emitting diodes (LEDs) have been fabricated using those configurations, which provide light emission with considerably low turn-on potential. The “color” of the LED can also be tuned by controlling the applied bias. The presence of the exciplex state PS and QDs opens up a broad range of possibilities with important implications not only in tunable LEDs but also in the preparation of intermediate band gap photovoltaic devices with the potentiality of surpassing the Shockley-Queisser limit. PMID:26844299

  19. High resolution Cerenkov light imaging of induced positron distribution in proton therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamamoto, Seiichi, E-mail: s-yama@met.nagoya-u.ac.jp; Fujii, Kento; Morishita, Yuki; Okumura, Satoshi; Komori, Masataka [Radiological and Medical Laboratory Sciences, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, Aichi 461-8673 (Japan); Toshito, Toshiyuki [Department of Proton Therapy Physics, Nagoya Proton Therapy Center, Nagoya City West Medical Center, Aichi 462-8508 (Japan)

    2014-11-01

    Purpose: In proton therapy, imaging of the positron distribution produced by fragmentation during or soon after proton irradiation is a useful method to monitor the proton range. Although positron emission tomography (PET) is typically used for this imaging, its spatial resolution is limited. Cerenkov light imaging is a new molecular imaging technology that detects the visible photons that are produced from high-speed electrons using a high sensitivity optical camera. Because its inherent spatial resolution is much higher than PET, the authors can measure more precise information of the proton-induced positron distribution with Cerenkov light imaging technology. For this purpose, they conducted Cerenkov light imaging of induced positron distribution in proton therapy. Methods: First, the authors evaluated the spatial resolution of our Cerenkov light imaging system with a {sup 22}Na point source for the actual imaging setup. Then the transparent acrylic phantoms (100 × 100 × 100 mm{sup 3}) were irradiated with two different proton energies using a spot scanning proton therapy system. Cerenkov light imaging of each phantom was conducted using a high sensitivity electron multiplied charge coupled device (EM-CCD) camera. Results: The Cerenkov light’s spatial resolution for the setup was 0.76 ± 0.6 mm FWHM. They obtained high resolution Cerenkov light images of the positron distributions in the phantoms for two different proton energies and made fused images of the reference images and the Cerenkov light images. The depths of the positron distribution in the phantoms from the Cerenkov light images were almost identical to the simulation results. The decay curves derived from the region-of-interests (ROIs) set on the Cerenkov light images revealed that Cerenkov light images can be used for estimating the half-life of the radionuclide components of positrons. Conclusions: High resolution Cerenkov light imaging of proton-induced positron distribution was possible. The

  20. High resolution Cerenkov light imaging of induced positron distribution in proton therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamamoto, Seiichi; Fujii, Kento; Morishita, Yuki; Okumura, Satoshi; Komori, Masataka; Toshito, Toshiyuki

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: In proton therapy, imaging of the positron distribution produced by fragmentation during or soon after proton irradiation is a useful method to monitor the proton range. Although positron emission tomography (PET) is typically used for this imaging, its spatial resolution is limited. Cerenkov light imaging is a new molecular imaging technology that detects the visible photons that are produced from high-speed electrons using a high sensitivity optical camera. Because its inherent spatial resolution is much higher than PET, the authors can measure more precise information of the proton-induced positron distribution with Cerenkov light imaging technology. For this purpose, they conducted Cerenkov light imaging of induced positron distribution in proton therapy. Methods: First, the authors evaluated the spatial resolution of our Cerenkov light imaging system with a 22 Na point source for the actual imaging setup. Then the transparent acrylic phantoms (100 × 100 × 100 mm 3 ) were irradiated with two different proton energies using a spot scanning proton therapy system. Cerenkov light imaging of each phantom was conducted using a high sensitivity electron multiplied charge coupled device (EM-CCD) camera. Results: The Cerenkov light’s spatial resolution for the setup was 0.76 ± 0.6 mm FWHM. They obtained high resolution Cerenkov light images of the positron distributions in the phantoms for two different proton energies and made fused images of the reference images and the Cerenkov light images. The depths of the positron distribution in the phantoms from the Cerenkov light images were almost identical to the simulation results. The decay curves derived from the region-of-interests (ROIs) set on the Cerenkov light images revealed that Cerenkov light images can be used for estimating the half-life of the radionuclide components of positrons. Conclusions: High resolution Cerenkov light imaging of proton-induced positron distribution was possible. The authors

  1. Effect of refraction index and light sharing on detector element identification for 2D detector modules in Positron Emission Tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tornai, M.P.; Hoffman, E.J.; Cherry, S.R.

    1994-01-01

    Relationships among indices of refraction (n) of scintillation detectors, light sharing among discrete detector elements and accuracy of detector element identification in Positron Emission Tomography (PET) 2-D detector arrays were examined with theory and experiment. Mismatches between the index of refraction of scintillators and the glass of photomultipliers (PMT) were seen to lead to nonlinear relationships between crystal position and ratio (positioning) signals derived from PMTs. Insight is provided into the empirically derived use of light sharing among elements of the crystals in PET 2-D array detectors to compensate for this nonlinear response. ((orig.))

  2. Survey on neutron pre-emission at the fusion of 11 Li halo nuclei with light targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petrascu, M.

    1999-01-01

    The neutron halo nuclei characterized by very large matter radii, small separation energy and small internal momentum of the valence neutrons, were discovered by Tanihata and co-workers. Until now, the halo nuclei were investigated mostly by elastic, inelastic scattering and breakup processes. It was recently predicted, that due to the very large dimension of 11 Li, one may expect, that in a fusion experiment on a light target, the valence neutrons will not be absorbed together with the 9 Li core, but will be emitted in the early stage of the reaction process. The first experiment aiming to check this expectation, was performed at the RIKEN-RIPS facility. In the experimental setup, the MUSIC chamber, achieved in the frame of IFIN-HH - RIKEN cooperation, played an important role. The obtained results confirm the prediction, indicating to a novel pre-emission effect (near 40 %, for one or two neutrons). The pre-emission of neutron pairs was investigated by time-position coincidences. It is considered that the pre-emission of neutron pairs is responsible for the experimentally observed strong neutron focusing effect. An experiment aiming to a large number of n-n coincidences, based on a new neutron array detector built in the frame of IFIN-HH - RIKEN cooperation, is in preparation. A model for the pre-emission probabilities calculations has been also worked out. Good agreement with the experimental data has been obtained. (author)

  3. NOx Emissions from Diesel Passenger Cars Worsen with Age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yuche; Borken-Kleefeld, Jens

    2016-04-05

    Commonly, the NOx emissions rates of diesel vehicles have been assumed to remain stable over the vehicle's lifetime. However, there have been hardly any representative long-term emission measurements. Here we present real-driving emissions of diesel cars and light commercial vehicles sampled on-road over 15 years in Zurich/Switzerland. Results suggest deterioration of NOx unit emissions for Euro 2 and Euro 3 diesel technologies, while Euro 1 and Euro 4 technologies seem to be stable. We can exclude a significant influence of high-emitting vehicles. NOx emissions from all cars and light commercial vehicles in European emission inventories increase by 5-10% accounting for the observed deterioration, depending on the country and its share of diesel cars. We suggest monitoring the stability of emission controls particularly for high-mileage light commercial as well as heavy-duty vehicles.

  4. Observation and analysis of water inherent optical properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Deyong; Li, Yunmei; Le, Chengfeng; Huang, Changchun

    2008-03-01

    Inherent optical property is an important part of water optical properties, and is the foundation of water color analytical model establishment. Through quantity filter technology (QFT) and backscattering meter BB9 (WETlabs Inc), absorption coefficients of CDOM, total suspended minerals and backscattering coefficients of total suspended minerals had been observed in Meiliang Bay of Taihu lake at summer and winter respectively. After analyzing the spectral characteristics of absorption and backscattering coefficients, the differences between two seasons had been illustrated adequately, and the reasons for the phenomena, which are related to the changes of water quality coefficient, had also been explained. So water environment states can be reflected by inherent optical properties. In addition, the relationship models between backscattering coefficients and suspended particle concentrations had been established, which can support coefficients for analytical models.

  5. Sol–gel synthesis and photoluminescence studies on colour tuneable Dy3+/Tm3+ co-doped NaGd(WO4)2 phosphor for white light emission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Durairajan, A.; Balaji, D.; Rasu, K. Kavi; Moorthy Babu, S.; Hayakawa, Y.; Valente, M.A.

    2015-01-01

    A series of Dy 3+ /Tm 3+ ion co-doped NaGd(WO 4 ) 2 (NGW) phosphors were synthesised by a sol–gel method at low temperature for white light emission. The structural and luminescence properties of the synthesised phosphors were studied by powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), Raman and photoluminescence techniques. In Dy 3+ /Tm 3+ :NGW phosphors, the dopant ions substituted Gd 3+ ions that are located in S 4 sites of NGW host lattice. In NGW host, under UV excitation the Dy 3+ ions have shown strong yellow ( 4 F 9/2 → 6 H 13/2 ) and comparatively weak blue ( 4 F 9/2 → 6 H 15/2 ) emission transitions at 575 and 488 nm, respectively. Due to deficient blue colour the overall emission falls in yellow region. Hence, Tm 3+ ions having strong blue emission at 455 nm corresponding to the transition 1 D 2 → 3 F 4 were co-activated along with Dy 3+ ions in NGW matrix. By changing the doping concentrations of Tm 3+ and Dy 3+ ions in NGW, white light emission was tuned by 353 nm excitation wavelength. Their corresponding colour co-ordinates were calculated and found to be very close to the white colour chromaticity co-ordinates (0.333, 0.333). - Highlights: • Dy 3+ and Dy 3+ /Tm 3+ :NGW phosphors were synthesised by sol–gel methods. • The excitation spectrum confirmed the strong absorption in near-UV region. • The emission spectrum shows the yellow and white emission to doped and co-doped phosphors respectively. • The CIE co-ordinate conforms close to daylight emission

  6. Influence of emissive layer thickness on electrical characteristics of polyfluorene copolymer based polymer light emitting diodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Das, D; Gopikrishna, P; Singh, A; Dey, A; Iyer, P K

    2016-01-01

    Polymer light emitting diodes (PLEDs) with a device configuration of ITO/PEDOT:PSS/PFONPN01 [Poly [2,7-(9,9’-dioctylfluorene)-co-N-phenyl-1,8-naphthalimide (99:01)]/LiF/Al have been fabricated by varying the emissive layer (EML) thickness (40/65/80/130 nm) and the influence of EML thickness on the electrical characteristics of PLED has been studied. PLED can be modelled as a simple combination of resistors and capacitors. The impedance spectroscopy analysis showed that the devices with different EML thickness had different values of parallel resistance (R P ) and the parallel capacitance (C P ). The impedance of the devices is found to increase with increasing EML thickness resulting in an increase in the driving voltage. The device with an emissive layer thickness of 80nm, spin coated from a solution of concentration 15 mg/mL is found to give the best device performance with a maximum brightness value of 5226 cd/m 2 . (paper)

  7. Inherent reward & risk (Part I): Towards a universal paradigm for investment analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zou, L.

    2000-01-01

    In this paper, a new paradigm is developed for analyzinginvestment strategies and pricing financial assets. This paradigmassumes that any investment strategy has its own "inherent reward"and "inherent risk" that can be judged with common sense. Ijustify axiomatically the existence and uniqueness

  8. Probabilities of inherent shutdown of unprotected events in innovative liquid metal reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mueller, C.J.; Wade, D.C.

    1988-01-01

    The uncertainty in predicting the effectiveness of inherent shutdown in innovative liquid metal cooled reactors with metallic fuel results from three broad contributing areas of uncertainty: (1) the inability to exactly predict the frequency of ATWS events with potential to challenge the safety systems and require inherent shutdown; (2) the approximation of representing all such events by a selected set of ''generic scenarios''; and (3) the inability to exactly calculate the core response to the selected generic scenarios. This paper discusses the work being done to address each of these contributing areas, identifies the design and research approaches being used at Argonne National Laboratory to reducing the key contributions to uncertainties in inherent shutdown, and presents results. The conditional probabilities (given ATWS initiation) of achieving temperatures capable of defeating inherent shutdown are shown to range from /approximately/0.1% to negligible for current designs

  9. Ordeals of Chernobyl and the rejustification of the inherently safe reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu, Y.

    1989-01-01

    This paper presents the necessity of developing inherently safe economic reactors (ISERs). Two characteristics which define inherent safety are discussed on the basis of various applications of such a principle in practice. Different design concepts of ISERs are then evaluated and their possible role in the future nuclear program of PRC discussed. A three-stage development strategy of ISERs in PRC is proposed

  10. General-relativistic pulsar magnetospheric emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pétri, J.

    2018-06-01

    Most current pulsar emission models assume photon production and emission within the magnetosphere. Low-frequency radiation is preferentially produced in the vicinity of the polar caps, whereas the high-energy tail is shifted to regions closer but still inside the light cylinder. We conducted a systematic study of the merit of several popular radiation sites like the polar cap, the outer gap, and the slot gap. We computed sky maps emanating from each emission site according to a prescribed distribution function for the emitting particles made of an electron/positron mixture. Calculations are performed using a three-dimensional integration of the plasma emissivity in the vacuum electromagnetic field of a rotating and centred general-relativistic dipole. We compare Newtonian electromagnetic fields to their general-relativistic counterpart. In the latter case, light bending is also taken into account. As a typical example, light curves and sky maps are plotted for several power-law indices of the particle distribution function. The detailed pulse profiles strongly depend on the underlying assumption about the fluid motion subject to strong electromagnetic fields. This electromagnetic topology enforces the photon propagation direction directly, or indirectly, from aberration effects. We also discuss the implication of a net stellar electric charge on to sky maps. Taking into account, the electric field strongly affects the light curves originating close to the light cylinder, where the electric field strength becomes comparable to the magnetic field strength.

  11. Plasmonics for solid-state lighting : enhanced excitation and directional emission of highly efficient light sources

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lozano, G.; Louwers, Davy J.; Rodriguez, S.R.K.; Murai, S.; Jansen, O.T.A.; Verschuuren, M.A.; Gomez Rivas, J.

    2013-01-01

    Light sources based on reliable and energy-efficient light-emitting diodes (LEDs) are instrumental in the development of solid-state lighting (SSL). Most research efforts in SSL have focused on improving both the intrinsic quantum efficiency (QE) and the stability of light emitters. For this reason,

  12. Safety assessment in plant layout design using indexing approach: Implementing inherent safety perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tugnoli, Alessandro; Khan, Faisal; Amyotte, Paul; Cozzani, Valerio

    2008-01-01

    Layout planning plays a key role in the inherent safety performance of process plants since this design feature controls the possibility of accidental chain-events and the magnitude of possible consequences. A lack of suitable methods to promote the effective implementation of inherent safety in layout design calls for the development of new techniques and methods. In the present paper, a safety assessment approach suitable for layout design in the critical early phase is proposed. The concept of inherent safety is implemented within this safety assessment; the approach is based on an integrated assessment of inherent safety guideword applicability within the constraints typically present in layout design. Application of these guidewords is evaluated along with unit hazards and control devices to quantitatively map the safety performance of different layout options. Moreover, the economic aspects related to safety and inherent safety are evaluated by the method. Specific sub-indices are developed within the integrated safety assessment system to analyze and quantify the hazard related to domino effects. The proposed approach is quick in application, auditable and shares a common framework applicable in other phases of the design lifecycle (e.g. process design). The present work is divided in two parts: Part 1 (current paper) presents the application of inherent safety guidelines in layout design and the index method for safety assessment; Part 2 (accompanying paper) describes the domino hazard sub-index and demonstrates the proposed approach with a case study, thus evidencing the introduction of inherent safety features in layout design

  13. Long range stress correlations in the inherent structures of liquids at rest

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chowdhury, Sadrul; Abraham, Sneha; Hudson, Toby; Harrowell, Peter [School of Chemistry, University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia)

    2016-03-28

    Simulation studies of the atomic shear stress in the local potential energy minima (inherent structures) are reported for binary liquid mixtures in 2D and 3D. These inherent structure stresses are fundamental to slow stress relaxation and high viscosity in supercooled liquids. We find that the atomic shear stress in the inherent structures (IS’s) of both liquids at rest exhibits slowly decaying anisotropic correlations. We show that the stress correlations contribute significantly to the variance of the total shear stress of the IS configurations and consider the origins of the anisotropy and spatial extent of the stress correlations.

  14. Influence of stray light for divertor spectroscopy in ITER

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kajita, Shin; Veshchev, Evgeny; Lisgo, Steve; Barnsley, Robin; Morgan, Philip; Walsh, Michael; Ogawa, Hiroaki; Sugie, Tatsuo; Itami, Kiyoshi

    2015-01-01

    The influence of stray light in the divertor spectroscopy system in ITER is quantitatively investigated using a ray tracing simulation. Simulation results show that the stray light is negligible at positions in the divertor where the plasma emission is strong. However, it is also shown that the stray light can be significantly greater than the real signal if the plasma intensity is low. Deuterium and beryllium emissions are used for the assessment; for beryllium cases in particular, since the emission profile may be non-uniform in the divertor region, the influence of stray light can be non-negligible at some positions, e.g., above the divertor dome

  15. Toxic release consequence analysis tool (TORCAT) for inherently safer design plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shariff, Azmi Mohd; Zaini, Dzulkarnain

    2010-01-01

    Many major accidents due to toxic release in the past have caused many fatalities such as the tragedy of MIC release in Bhopal, India (1984). One of the approaches is to use inherently safer design technique that utilizes inherent safety principle to eliminate or minimize accidents rather than to control the hazard. This technique is best implemented in preliminary design stage where the consequence of toxic release can be evaluated and necessary design improvements can be implemented to eliminate or minimize the accidents to as low as reasonably practicable (ALARP) without resorting to costly protective system. However, currently there is no commercial tool available that has such capability. This paper reports on the preliminary findings on the development of a prototype tool for consequence analysis and design improvement via inherent safety principle by utilizing an integrated process design simulator with toxic release consequence analysis model. The consequence analysis based on the worst-case scenarios during process flowsheeting stage were conducted as case studies. The preliminary finding shows that toxic release consequences analysis tool (TORCAT) has capability to eliminate or minimize the potential toxic release accidents by adopting the inherent safety principle early in preliminary design stage.

  16. LightSavers : accelerating advanced outdoor lighting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Purcell, B.; Pickering, M.

    2010-01-15

    This paper provided an update to the Toronto Atmospheric Fund (TAF) LightSavers program. The program was designed to accelerate market transformation for light emitting diode (LED) and advanced lighting management systems in outdoor lighting applications. It is expected that the program will result in significant electricity savings and emissions reductions within the Greater Toronto Area (GTA) and other Ontario municipalities. The first phase of the program established advanced outdoor lighting pilot programs in parking lots, garages, and pathway lighting applications that were guided by a common monitoring protocol to ensure useful and reliable assessment of the pilot programs. The TAF has since developed a strategy to strengthen public understanding and support for the use of advanced lighting, and continues to address policy issues that may impact the future of LED lighting programs. The TAF has also activated an electronic newsletter, delivered public workshops, and has been represented at several conferences. A working partnership has been established with Toronto Hydro Energy Services. Five pilot sites have been installed and have begun to provide monitoring data. Details of the pilot programs were provided. 16 figs.

  17. OSCILLATING LIGHT WALL ABOVE A SUNSPOT LIGHT BRIDGE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Shuhong; Zhang, Jun; Jiang, Fayu [Key Laboratory of Solar Activity, National Astronomical Observatories, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100012 (China); Xiang, Yongyuan, E-mail: shuhongyang@nao.cas.cn [Fuxian Solar Observatory, Yunnan Observatories, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Kunming 650011 (China)

    2015-05-10

    With the high tempo-spatial Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph 1330 Å images, we find that many bright structures are rooted in the light bridge of NOAA 12192, forming a light wall. The light wall is brighter than the surrounding areas, and the wall top is much brighter than the wall body. The New Vacuum Solar Telescope Hα and the Solar Dynamics Observatory 171 and 131 Å images are also used to study the light-wall properties. In 1330, 171, and 131 Å, the top of the wall has a higher emission, while in the Hα line, the wall-top emission is very low. The wall body corresponds to bright areas in 1330 Å and dark areas in the other lines. The top of the light wall moves upward and downward successively, performing oscillations in height. The deprojected mean height, amplitude, oscillation velocity, and the dominant period are determined to be 3.6 Mm, 0.9 Mm, 15.4 km s{sup −1}, and 3.9 minutes, respectively. We interpret the oscillations of the light wall as the leakage of p-modes from below the photosphere. The constant brightness enhancement of the wall top implies the existence of some kind of atmospheric heating, e.g., via the persistent small-scale reconnection or the magneto-acoustic waves. In another series of 1330 Å images, we find that the wall top in the upward motion phase is significantly brighter than in the downward phase. This kind of oscillation may be powered by the energy released due to intermittent impulsive magnetic reconnection.

  18. Enhanced polymer light-emitting diode property using fluorescent conducting polymer-reduced graphene oxide nanocomposite as active emissive layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Jyoti Prakash; Saha, Uttam; Jaiswal, Rimpa; Anand, Raghubir Singh; Srivastava, Anurag; Goswami, Thako Hari

    2014-11-01

    The present article reports the polymer light-emitting diode property of the nanocomposite comprising poly 9,9-dioctyl fluorene- alt-bithiophene and reduced graphene oxide used as an emissive layer. Two times repetition of Hummers oxidation and hydrazine hydrate reduction method produce reduced graphene oxide (term as rGO2) with more uniform distribution in size and thickness. In addition, this uniquely synthesized rGO2 induces favorable shift in balance of electron and hole recombination zone toward the center of emissive layer owing to increase in in-plane crystallite size and high localize aromatic confinement. Five times increase in maximum device efficiency (Cd/A) and three times increase in maximum brightness (Cd/m2) are achieved with the LED device using nanocomposite as emissive layer compared to neat polymer. Also, the fabricated device requires relatively low turn-on voltage (4 V) because of low energy barrier between PEDOT work function (-5.0 eV) and HOMO levels of bi-thiophene copolymer -5.67 eV) and nanocomposite (-5.66 eV).

  19. Simulating Supernova Light Curves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Even, Wesley Paul [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Dolence, Joshua C. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-05-05

    This report discusses supernova light simulations. A brief review of supernovae, basics of supernova light curves, simulation tools used at LANL, and supernova results are included. Further, it happens that many of the same methods used to generate simulated supernova light curves can also be used to model the emission from fireballs generated by explosions in the earth’s atmosphere.

  20. Simulating Supernova Light Curves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Even, Wesley Paul; Dolence, Joshua C.

    2016-01-01

    This report discusses supernova light simulations. A brief review of supernovae, basics of supernova light curves, simulation tools used at LANL, and supernova results are included. Further, it happens that many of the same methods used to generate simulated supernova light curves can also be used to model the emission from fireballs generated by explosions in the earth's atmosphere.

  1. Progress on PRISM, an inherently safe, economic, and testable advanced liquid metal reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tippets, F.E.; Salerno, L.N.; Boardman, C.E.; Kwant, W.; Murata, R.E.; Snyder, C.R.

    1987-01-01

    This paper reports progress on the design of PRISM (Power Reactor Inherently Safe Module) under the DOE-sponsored innovative reactor program now in its third year at General Electric. The purpose of this program is to develop a design for an inherently safe, reliable, and marketable liquid metal fast reactor power plant. The PRISM design approach includes the following key elements: Compact sodium-cooled pool-type reactor modules that are sized to enable factory fabrication, economical shipment to inland as well as water-side sites, and economical full-scale prototype testing for design certification; Nuclear safety-related envelope limited to the reactor modules and their service systems; Inherent, passive shutdown heat removal for loss-of-cooling events; Inherent, passive reactivity shutdown for failure-to-scram events

  2. Development of real-world driving cycles and estimation of emission factors for in-use light-duty gasoline vehicles in urban areas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwa, Mei-Yin; Yu, Tai-Yi

    2014-07-01

    This investigation adopts vehicle tracking manner to establish real-world driving patterns and estimates emission factors with dynamometers with 23 traffic-driving variables for 384 in-use light-duty passenger vehicles during non-rush hour. Adequate numbers of driving variables were decided with factor analysis and cluster analysis. The dynamometer tests were performed on FTP75 cycle and five local driving cycles derived from real-world speed profiles. Results presented that local driving cycles and FTP75 cycle were completely different in driving characteristic parameters of typical driving cycles and emission factors. The highest values of emission factor ratios of local driving cycle and FTP75 cycle for CO, NMHC, NO x , CH4, and CO2 were 1.38, 1.65, 1.58, 1.39, and 1.14, respectively.

  3. Modulating emission intensity of GaN-based green light emitting diodes on c-plane sapphire

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Du, Chunhua; Ma, Ziguang; Zhou, Junming; Lu, Taiping; Jiang, Yang; Jia, Haiqiang; Liu, Wuming; Chen, Hong

    2014-01-01

    The asymmetric dual-wavelength (green/blue) coupled InGaN/GaN multiple quantum wells were proposed to modulate the green emission intensity. Electroluminescent measurements demonstrate the conspicuous increment of the green light intensity by decreasing the coupled barrier thickness. This was partly attributed to capture of more carriers when holes tunnel across the thinner barrier from the blue quantum wells, as a hole reservoir, to the green quantum wells. While lower effective barrier height of the blue quantum wells benefits improved hole transportation from p-GaN to the active region. Efficiency droop of the green quantum wells was partially alleviated due to the enhanced injection efficiency of holes

  4. White emission via electroplex emission from two blue materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Junming; Song, Dandan; Zhao, Suling; Zhang, Fujun; Xu, Zheng; Song, Jinglu; Lu, Lifang; Liu, Xiaodong; Wang, Yongsheng

    2010-03-01

    Influences of electric fields on the emission from organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) based on poly (N-vinylcarbazole) (PVK); 2, 9-dimethyl-4, 7-diphenyl-1, 10-phenanthroline (BCP); and tris (8-hydroxyquinoline) aluminum (Alq3) were studied. There are three emission peaks at 420 nm, 520 nm, and 620 nm of the device ITO/PEDOT: PSS/PVK/BCP/LiF/Al under different driving voltages. The emissions at 420 nm and 520 nm should be from the exciton emission of PVK and Alq3, respectively. The last emission at 620 nm could be attributed to electroplex emission at the interface between the PVK and BCP layers. A high intensity white emission via electroplex formation was obtained with Commission International d'Eclairage (CIE) coordinates (0.33, 0.34) at 15 V, which is very close to the equienergy white point (0.33, 0.33).

  5. Direction-division multiplexed holographic free-electron-driven light sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, Brendan P.; MacDonald, Kevin F.; Zheludev, Nikolay I.

    2018-01-01

    We report on a free-electron-driven light source with a controllable direction of emission. The source comprises a microscopic array of plasmonic surface-relief holographic domains, each tailored to direct electron-induced light emission at a selected wavelength into a collimated beam in a prescribed direction. The direction-division multiplexed source is tested by driving it with the 30 kV electron beam of a scanning electron microscope: light emission, at a wavelength of 800 nm in the present case, is switched among different output angles by micron-scale repositioning of the electron injection point among domains. Such sources, with directional switching/tuning possible at picosecond timescales, may be applied to field-emission and surface-conduction electron-emission display technologies, optical multiplexing, and charged-particle-beam position metrology.

  6. Pulsar Emission: Is It All Relative?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harding, Alice K.

    2004-01-01

    Thirty-five years after the discovery of pulsars, we still do not understand the fundamentals of their pulsed emission at any wavelength. The fact that even detailed pulse profiles cannot identlfy the origin of the emission in a magnetosphere that extends fiom the neutron star surface to plasma moving at relativistic speeds near the light cylinder compounds the problem. I will discuss the role of special and general relativistic effects on pulsar emission, fiom inertial frame-dragging near the stellar surface to aberration, time-of-flight and retardation of the magnetic field near the light cylinder. Understanding how these effects determine what we observe at different wavelengths is critical to unraveling the emission physics.

  7. White top emitting OLED with angle independent emission characteristic

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomschke, Michael; Freitag, Patricia; Schwartz, Gregor; Nitsche, Robert; Walzer, Karsten; Leo, Karl [Technische Universitaet Dresden, Institut fuer Angewandte Photophysik, Georg-Baehr-Strasse 1, 01062 Dresden (Germany)

    2008-07-01

    The general device structure of a top emitting organic light emitting diode (OLED) consists of several organic layers sandwiched in between two metal contacts, with the top one being semitransparent for light outcoupling reasons. Due to the high reflectivity of the electrodes, strong microcavity effects occur which lead to a preferred emission of light of a certain wavelength with main outcoupling in forward direction. This creates rather narrow emission bands, accompanied by strong spectral shifts upon viewing angle variation. By using an organic capping layer on top of the semitransparent metal contact, this unwanted effect can be reduced. This is important especially for white light emission for the use of OLEDs in future lighting applications. Our optical simulations show that the strong angular dependence of the emission color almost vanishes. To verify the simulations we study white top emitting OLEDs based on an approach which are adapted to the top emitting case.

  8. Study of proton and 2 protons emission from light neutron deficient nuclei around A=20

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zerguerras, T.

    2001-09-01

    Proton and two proton emission from light neutron deficient nuclei around A=20 have been studied. A radioactive beam of 18 Ne, 17 F and 20 Mg, produced at the Grand Accelerateur National d'Ions Lourds by fragmentation of a 24 Mg primary beam at 95 MeV/A, bombarded a 9 Be target to form unbound states. Proton(s) and nuclei from the decay were detected respectively in the MUST array and the SPEG spectrometer. From energy and angle measurements, the invariant mass of the decaying nucleus could be reconstructed. Double coincidence events between a proton and 17 F, 16 O, 15 O, 14 O and 18 Ne were registered to obtain excitation energy spectra of 18 Ne, 17 F, 16 F, 15 F et 19 Na. Generally, the masses measures are in agreement with previous experiments. In the case of 18 Ne, excitation energy and angular distributions agree well with the predictions of a break up model calculation. From 17 Ne proton coincidences, a first experimental measurement of the ground state mass excess of 18 Na has been obtained and yields 24,19(0,15)MeV. Two proton emission from 17 Ne and 18 Ne excited states and the 19 Mg ground state was studied through triple coincidences between two proton and 15 O, 16 O and 17 Ne respectively. In the first case, the proton-proton relative angle distribution in the center of mass has been compared with model calculation. Sequential emission from excited states of 17 Ne, above the proton emission threshold, through 16 F is dominant but a 2 He decay channel could not be excluded. No 2 He emission from the 1.288 MeV 17 Ne state, or from the 6.15 MeV 18 Ne state has been observed. Only one coincidence event between 17 Ne and two proton was registered, the value of the one neutron stripping reaction cross section of 20 Mg being much lower than predicted. (author)

  9. Seeds of Brassicaceae weeds have an inherent or inducible response to the germination stimulant karrikinolide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Rowena L; Stevens, Jason C; Griffiths, Erin M; Adamek, Markus; Gorecki, Marta J; Powles, Stephen B; Merritt, David J

    2011-10-01

    Karrikinolide (KAR(1)) is a smoke-derived chemical that can trigger seeds to germinate. A potential application for KAR(1) is for synchronizing the germination of weed seeds, thereby enhancing the efficiency of weed control efforts. Yet not all species germinate readily with KAR(1), and it is not known whether seemingly non-responsive species can be induced to respond. Here a major agronomic weed family, the Brassicaceae, is used to test the hypothesis that a stimulatory response to KAR(1) may be present in physiologically dormant seeds but may not be expressed under all circumstances. Seeds of eight Brassicaceae weed species (Brassica tournefortii, Raphanus raphanistrum, Sisymbrium orientale, S. erysimoides, Rapistrum rugosum, Lepidium africanum, Heliophila pusilla and Carrichtera annua) were tested for their response to 1 µm KAR(1) when freshly collected and following simulated and natural dormancy alleviation, which included wet-dry cycling, dry after-ripening, cold and warm stratification and a 2 year seed burial trial. Seven of the eight Brassicaceae species tested were stimulated to germinate with KAR(1) when the seeds were fresh, and the remaining species became responsive to KAR(1) following wet-dry cycling and dry after-ripening. Light influenced the germination response of seeds to KAR(1), with the majority of species germinating better in darkness. Germination with and without KAR(1) fluctuated seasonally throughout the seed burial trial. KAR(1) responses are more complex than simply stating whether a species is responsive or non-responsive; light and temperature conditions, dormancy state and seed lot all influence the sensitivity of seeds to KAR(1), and a response to KAR(1) can be induced. Three response types for generalizing KAR(1) responses are proposed, namely inherent, inducible and undetected. Given that responses to KAR(1) were either inherent or inducible in all 15 seed lots included in this study, the Brassicaceae may be an ideal target for

  10. Memory accessibility shapes explanation: Testing key claims of the inherence heuristic account.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussak, Larisa J; Cimpian, Andrei

    2018-01-01

    People understand the world by constructing explanations for what they observe. It is thus important to identify the cognitive processes underlying these judgments. According to a recent proposal, everyday explanations are often constructed heuristically: Because people need to generate explanations on a moment-by-moment basis, they cannot perform an exhaustive search through the space of possible reasons, but may instead use the information that is most easily accessible in memory (Cimpian & Salomon 2014a, b). In the present research, we tested two key claims of this proposal that have so far not been investigated. First, we tested whether-as previously hypothesized-the information about an entity that is most accessible in memory tends to consist of inherent or intrinsic facts about that entity, rather than extrinsic (contextual, historical, etc.) facts about it (Studies 1 and 2). Second, we tested the implications of this difference in the memory accessibility of inherent versus extrinsic facts for the process of generating explanations: Does the fact that inherent facts are more accessible than relevant extrinsic facts give rise to an inherence bias in the content of the explanations generated (Studies 3 and 4)? The findings supported the proposal that everyday explanations are generated in part via a heuristic process that relies on easily accessible-and often inherent-information from memory.

  11. Is the inherent potential of maize roots efficient for soil phosphorus acquisition?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Deng

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