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Sample records for ingan-based green leds

  1. Efficiency Drop in Green InGaN /GaN Light Emitting Diodes: The Role of Random Alloy Fluctuations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auf der Maur, Matthias; Pecchia, Alessandro; Penazzi, Gabriele; Rodrigues, Walter; Di Carlo, Aldo

    2016-01-01

    White light emitting diodes (LEDs) based on III-nitride InGaN /GaN quantum wells currently offer the highest overall efficiency for solid state lighting applications. Although current phosphor-converted white LEDs have high electricity-to-light conversion efficiencies, it has been recently pointed out that the full potential of solid state lighting could be exploited only by color mixing approaches without employing phosphor-based wavelength conversion. Such an approach requires direct emitting LEDs of different colors, including, in particular, the green-yellow range of the visible spectrum. This range, however, suffers from a systematic drop in efficiency, known as the "green gap," whose physical origin has not been understood completely so far. In this work, we show by atomistic simulations that a consistent part of the green gap in c -plane InGaN /GaN -based light emitting diodes may be attributed to a decrease in the radiative recombination coefficient with increasing indium content due to random fluctuations of the indium concentration naturally present in any InGaN alloy.

  2. Design analysis of phosphor-free monolithic white light-emitting-diodes with InGaN/ InGaN multiple quantum wells on ternary InGaN substrates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Kee Ooi

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Phosphor-free monolithic white light emitting diodes (LEDs based on InGaN/ InGaN multiple quantum wells (MQWs on ternary InGaN substrates are proposed and analyzed in this study. Simulation studies show that LED devices composed of multi-color-emitting InGaN/ InGaN quantum wells (QWs employing ternary InGaN substrate with engineered active region exhibit stable white color illumination with large output power (∼ 170 mW and high external quantum efficiency (EQE (∼ 50%. The chromaticity coordinate for the investigated monolithic white LED devices are located at (0.30, 0.28 with correlated color temperature (CCT of ∼ 8200 K at J = 50 A/cm2. A reference LED device without any nanostructure engineering exhibits green color emission shows that proper engineered structure is essential to achieve white color illumination. This proof-of-concept study demonstrates that high-efficiency and cost-effective phosphor-free monolithic white LED is feasible by the use of InGaN/ InGaN MQWs on ternary InGaN substrate combined with nanostructure engineering, which would be of great impact for solid state lighting.

  3. Design analysis of phosphor-free monolithic white light-emitting-diodes with InGaN/ InGaN multiple quantum wells on ternary InGaN substrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ooi, Yu Kee, E-mail: Yu.Kee.Ooi@rit.edu; Zhang, Jing, E-mail: Jing.Zhang@rit.edu [Department of Electrical and Microelectronics Engineering, Rochester Institute of Technology, Rochester, New York 14623 (United States)

    2015-05-15

    Phosphor-free monolithic white light emitting diodes (LEDs) based on InGaN/ InGaN multiple quantum wells (MQWs) on ternary InGaN substrates are proposed and analyzed in this study. Simulation studies show that LED devices composed of multi-color-emitting InGaN/ InGaN quantum wells (QWs) employing ternary InGaN substrate with engineered active region exhibit stable white color illumination with large output power (∼ 170 mW) and high external quantum efficiency (EQE) (∼ 50%). The chromaticity coordinate for the investigated monolithic white LED devices are located at (0.30, 0.28) with correlated color temperature (CCT) of ∼ 8200 K at J = 50 A/cm{sup 2}. A reference LED device without any nanostructure engineering exhibits green color emission shows that proper engineered structure is essential to achieve white color illumination. This proof-of-concept study demonstrates that high-efficiency and cost-effective phosphor-free monolithic white LED is feasible by the use of InGaN/ InGaN MQWs on ternary InGaN substrate combined with nanostructure engineering, which would be of great impact for solid state lighting.

  4. Effect of stimulated phase separation on properties of blue, green and monolithic white LEDs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsatsulnikov, A.F.; Lundin, W.V.; Sakharov, A.V.; Zavarin, E.E.; Nikolaev, A.E.; Sizov, V.S. [Ioffe Physical-Technical Institute, Russian Academy of Sciences, Politekhnicheskaya Str. 26, 194021 St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Usov, S.O.; Zakgeim, A.L.; Mizerov, M.N. [Submicron Heterostructures for Microelectronics Research and Engineering Center, Russian Academy of Sciences, Politekhnicheskaya Str. 26, 194021 St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Cherkashin, N.A.; Hytch, M. [CEMES-CNRS, Universite de Toulouse, Toulouse (France)

    2012-03-15

    Different methods of stimulation of phase separation in an InGaN QWs by technological methods and by design of structure were investigated. Effect of admixing of hydrogen during growth interruptions (GIs) after deposition of the InGaN QWs on their structural and optical properties and properties of InGaN-based LEDs was investigated. Effect of growth pressure on the phase separation was investigated and formation of separate InGaN islands at increase in growth pressure was revealed. It was shown that the phase separation is stimulated in composite InAlN/GaN/InGaN heterostructures and formation of well isolated InGaN islands was observed. Effect of the phase separation on the properties of the blue and deep green LEDs was investigated and strong changes in the spectral position and current dependence of the quantum efficiency were revealed. It was shown that formation of the island due to the phase separation allows control position and width of the emission line and maximum in current dependence of the quantum efficiency. Monolithic white LEDs are containing in active region blue and green InGaN QWs grown with applying of the GIs and emitting in spectral range from 440 nm to 560 nm were studied. Monolithic white LEDs having optimal design of active region demonstrate CCT in the range of 9000-12000 K and maximal external quantum efficiency up to 14 lm/W. (copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  5. A Comparison of the recombination efficiency in green-emitting InGaN quantum dots and quantum wells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Il-Kyu; Kwon, Min-Ki; Park, Seong-Ju

    2012-01-01

    A comparative investigation of the recombination efficiency of green-emitting InGaN quantum dots (QDs) and quantum wells (QWs) is reported in this paper. Optical investigations using temperature dependent photoluminescence (PL) results showed that the internal quantum efficiency of InGaN QDs at room temperature was 8.7 times larger than that found for InGaN QWs because they provided dislocation-free recombination sites for the electrical charge carriers. The excitation power-dependent PL and electroluminescence results showed that the effect of the polarization induced electric field on the recombination process of electrical charge carriers in the QDs was negligibly small whereas it was dominant in the QWs. These results indicate that InGaN QDs are more beneficial than QWs in improving the luminescence efficiency of LEDs in the green spectral range.

  6. Semi-polar GaN materials technology for high IQE green LEDs.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koleske, Daniel; Lee, Stephen Roger; Crawford, Mary H; Coltrin, Michael Elliott; Fini, Paul

    2013-06-01

    The goal of this NETL funded program was to improve the IQE in green (and longer wavelength) nitride- based LEDs structures by using semi-polar GaN planar orientations for InGaN multiple quantum well (MQW) growth. These semi-polar orientations have the advantage of significantly reducing the piezoelectric fields that distort the QW band structure and decrease electron-hole overlap. In addition, semipolar surfaces potentially provide a more open surface bonding environment for indium incorporation, thus enabling higher indium concentrations in the InGaN MQW. The goal of the proposed work was to select the optimal semi-polar orientation and explore wafer miscuts around this orientation that produced the highest quantum efficiency LEDs. At the end of this program we had hoped to have MQWs active regions at 540 nm with an IQE of 50% and an EQE of 40%, which would be approximately twice the estimated current state-of-the-art.

  7. InGaN micro-LED-pillar as the building block for high brightness emitters

    KAUST Repository

    Shen, Chao; Cha, Dong Kyu; Ng, Tien Khee; Ooi, Boon S.; Yang, Yang

    2013-01-01

    In summary, we confirmed the improved electrical and optical characteristics, with reduced efficiency droop in InGaN μLED-pillars when these devices were scaled down in size. We demonstrated that strain relief contributed to further improvement in EQE characteristics in small InGaN μLED-pillars (D < 50 μm), apart from the current spreading effect. The μLED-pillar can be deployed as the building block for large effective-area, high brightness emitter. © 2013 IEEE.

  8. Coincident site lattice-matched InGaN on (111) spinel substrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Norman, A. G.; Dippo, P. C.; Moutinho, H. R.; Simon, J.; Ptak, A. J.

    2012-01-01

    Coincident site lattice-matched wurtzite (0001) In 0.31 Ga 0.69 N, emitting in the important green wavelength region, is demonstrated by molecular beam epitaxy on a cubic (111) MgAl 2 O 4 spinel substrate. The coincident site lattice matching condition involves a 30 deg. rotation between the lattice of the InGaN epitaxial layer and the lattice of the spinel. This work describes an alternative approach towards realizing more compositionally homogenous InGaN films with low dislocation density emitting in the ''green gap'' of low efficiency currently observed for semiconductor light emitting diodes (LEDs). This approach could lead to higher efficiency green LEDs presently of great interest for solid-state lighting applications.

  9. Coincident site lattice-matched InGaN on (111) spinel substrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Norman, A. G.; Dippo, P. C.; Moutinho, H. R.; Simon, J.; Ptak, A. J. [National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden, Colorado 80401 (United States)

    2012-04-09

    Coincident site lattice-matched wurtzite (0001) In{sub 0.31}Ga{sub 0.69}N, emitting in the important green wavelength region, is demonstrated by molecular beam epitaxy on a cubic (111) MgAl{sub 2}O{sub 4} spinel substrate. The coincident site lattice matching condition involves a 30 deg. rotation between the lattice of the InGaN epitaxial layer and the lattice of the spinel. This work describes an alternative approach towards realizing more compositionally homogenous InGaN films with low dislocation density emitting in the ''green gap'' of low efficiency currently observed for semiconductor light emitting diodes (LEDs). This approach could lead to higher efficiency green LEDs presently of great interest for solid-state lighting applications.

  10. Analysis of dominant carrier recombination mechanisms depending on injection current in InGaN green light emitting diodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Kyu-Sang; Han, Dong-Pyo; Kim, Hyun-Sung; Shim, Jong-In

    2014-01-01

    Two kinds of green InGaN light emitting diodes (LEDs) have been investigated in order to understand the different slopes in logarithmic light output power-current (L-I) curves. Through the analysis of the carrier rate equation and by considering the carrier density-dependent the injection efficiency into quantum wells, the slopes of the logarithmic L-I curves can be more rigorously understood. The low current level, two as the tunneling current is initially dominant. The high current level beyond the peak of the external quantum efficiency (EQE) diminishes below one as the carrier overflow becomes dominant. In addition, the normalized carrier injection efficiency can be obtained by analyzing the slopes of the logarithmic L-I curves. The carrier injection efficiency decreases after the EQE peak of the InGaN LEDs, determined from the analysis of the slopes of the logarithmic L-I curves

  11. Characterization of failure modes in deep UV and deep green LEDs utilizing advanced semiconductor localization techniques.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tangyunyong, Paiboon; Miller, Mary A.; Cole, Edward Isaac, Jr.

    2012-03-01

    We present the results of a two-year early career LDRD that focused on defect localization in deep green and deep ultraviolet (UV) light-emitting diodes (LEDs). We describe the laser-based techniques (TIVA/LIVA) used to localize the defects and interpret data acquired. We also describe a defect screening method based on a quick electrical measurement to determine whether defects should be present in the LEDs. We then describe the stress conditions that caused the devices to fail and how the TIVA/LIVA techniques were used to monitor the defect signals as the devices degraded and failed. We also describe the correlation between the initial defects and final degraded or failed state of the devices. Finally we show characterization results of the devices in the failed conditions and present preliminary theories as to why the devices failed for both the InGaN (green) and AlGaN (UV) LEDs.

  12. Influence of barrier layer indium on efficiency and wavelength of InGaN multiple quantum well (MQW) with and without semi-bulk InGaN buffer for blue to green regime emission

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alam, Saiful [School of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA (United States); Georgia Tech-CNRS, UMI 2958, Metz (France); CEA-LETI, Minatec Campus, Grenoble (France); Sundaram, Suresh; Li, Xin; El Gmili, Youssef [Georgia Tech-CNRS, UMI 2958, Metz (France); Jamroz, Miryam E.; Robin, Ivan C. [CEA-LETI, Minatec Campus, Grenoble (France); Voss, Paul L.; Ougazzaden, Abdallah [School of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA (United States); Georgia Tech-CNRS, UMI 2958, Metz (France); Salvestrini, Jean-Paul [Georgia Tech-CNRS, UMI 2958, Metz (France); LMOPS, University of Lorraine, EA4423, Metz (France)

    2017-08-15

    The effect of indium (In) in the barrier of InGaN/GaN multiple quantum well (MQW) has been studied for MQWs with and without semi-bulk InGaN buffer. From simulation, the optimum In content in the barrier with 3-5 nm width is 5-7% to get the optimal material quality and internal quantum efficiency (IQE) of ∝65% for 450-480 nm emission range. Simulation shows a reduction of the potential barrier due to band flattening, a more homogeneous distribution of electrons and holes in the active region and subsequently, a more radiative recombination rate with InGaN as barrier layer. Both cathodoluminescence (CL) and photoluminescence (PL) experimental results show a blue-shift of emission wavelength along with an enhancement in the emission intensity when GaN barrier is replaced with InGaN barrier, for a MQW structure both with and without the semi-bulk InGaN buffer. We attribute this blue shift to the reduced polarization mismatch and increased effective bandgap. This InGaN barrier-related improvement in IQE and efficiency droop could be useful for the realization of longer wavelength ''green-gap'' range LEDs where poor IQE and efficiency droop are more prominent due to high indium (In) in the active region. (copyright 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  13. Electrical, spectral and optical performance of yellow-green and amber micro-pixelated InGaN light-emitting diodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Z.; Liu, N. Y.; Tao, Y. B.; Massoubre, D.; Xie, E. Y.; Hu, X. D.; Chen, Z. Z.; Zhang, G. Y.; Pan, Y. B.; Hao, M. S.; Watson, I. M.; Gu, E.; Dawson, M. D.

    2012-01-01

    Micro-pixelated InGaN LED arrays operating at 560 and 600 nm, respectively, are demonstrated for what the authors believe to be the first time. Such devices offer applications in areas including bioinstrumentation, visible light communications and optoelectronic tweezers. The devices reported are based on new epitaxial structures, retaining conventional (0 0 0 1) orientation, but incorporating electron reservoir layers which enhance the efficiency of radiative combination in the active regions. A measured output optical power density up to 8 W cm-2 (4.4 W cm-2) has been achieved from a representative pixel of the yellow-green (amber) LED array, substantially higher than that from conventional broad-area reference LEDs fabricated from the same wafer material. Furthermore, these micro-LEDs can sustain a high current density, up to 4.5 kA cm-2, before thermal rollover. A significant blueshift of the emission wavelength with increasing injection current is observed, however. This blueshift saturates at 45 nm (50 nm) for the yellow-green (amber) LED array, and numerical simulations have been used to gain insight into the responsible mechanisms in this microstructured format of device. In the relatively low-current-density regime (screening of the piezoelectric field by the injected carriers and the band-filling effect, whereas in the high-current regime, it is mainly due to band-filling. Further development of the epitaxial wafer material is expected to improve the current-dependent spectral stability.

  14. Measurement of the indium segregation in InGaN based LEDs with single atom sensitivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jinschek, Joerg; Kisielowski, Christian; Van Dyck, Dirk; Geuens, Philippe

    2003-01-01

    In light emitting diodes (LED) consisting of GaN/InGaN/GaN quantum wells (QWs), the exact indium distribution inside the wells of the active region affects the performance of devices. Indium segregation can take place forming small InGaN clusters of locally varying composition. In the past, we used a local strain analysis from single HRTEM lattice images to determine the In composition inside the InGaN QWs with a resolution of 0.5 nm x 0.3 nm. Truly atomic resolution can be pursued by exploitation of intensity dependencies on the atomic number (Z) of the electron exit-wave (EW). In microscopes with sufficient sensitivity, local variations of amplitude and phase are found to be discrete with sample thickness, which allows for counting the number of atoms in each individual column of ∼0.08 nm diameter. In QW s of ∼17 percent of average indium concentration it is possible to discriminate between pure Ga columns and columns containing 1, 2, 3, or more In atoms because phase changes are discrete and element specific. The preparation of samples with atomically flat surfaces is a limiting factor for the application of the procedure

  15. Site controlled Red-Yellow-Green light emitting InGaN Quantum Discs on nano-tipped GaN rods

    KAUST Repository

    Conroy, Michele Ann; Li, Haoning; Kusch, Gunnar; Zhao, Chao; Ooi, Boon S.; Paul, Edwards; Martin, Robert; Holmes, Justin D.; Parbrook, Peter

    2016-01-01

    We report a method of growing site controlled InGaN multiple quantum discs (QDs) at uniform wafer scale on coalescence free ultra-high density (>80%) nanorod templates by metal organic chemical vapour deposition (MOCVD). The dislocation and coalescence free nature of the GaN space filling nanorod arrays eliminates the well-known emission problems seen in InGaN based visible light sources that these types of crystallographic defects cause. Correlative scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM), energy-dispersive x-ray (EDX) mapping and cathodoluminescence (CL) hyperspectral imaging illustrates the controlled site selection of the red, yellow and green (RYG) emission at these nano tips. This article reveals that the nanorod tips’ broad emission in the RYG visible range is in fact achieved by manipulating the InGaN QD’s confinement dimensions, rather than significantly increasing the In%. This article details the easily controlled method of manipulating the QDs dimensions producing high crystal quality InGaN without complicated growth conditions needed for strain relaxation and alloy compositional changes seen for bulk planar GaN templates.

  16. Site controlled Red-Yellow-Green light emitting InGaN Quantum Discs on nano-tipped GaN rods

    KAUST Repository

    Conroy, Michele Ann

    2016-03-10

    We report a method of growing site controlled InGaN multiple quantum discs (QDs) at uniform wafer scale on coalescence free ultra-high density (>80%) nanorod templates by metal organic chemical vapour deposition (MOCVD). The dislocation and coalescence free nature of the GaN space filling nanorod arrays eliminates the well-known emission problems seen in InGaN based visible light sources that these types of crystallographic defects cause. Correlative scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM), energy-dispersive x-ray (EDX) mapping and cathodoluminescence (CL) hyperspectral imaging illustrates the controlled site selection of the red, yellow and green (RYG) emission at these nano tips. This article reveals that the nanorod tips’ broad emission in the RYG visible range is in fact achieved by manipulating the InGaN QD’s confinement dimensions, rather than significantly increasing the In%. This article details the easily controlled method of manipulating the QDs dimensions producing high crystal quality InGaN without complicated growth conditions needed for strain relaxation and alloy compositional changes seen for bulk planar GaN templates.

  17. InGaN quantum well epilayers morphological evolution under a wide range of MOCVD growth parameter sets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Florescu, D.I.; Ting, S.M.; Merai, V.N.; Parekh, A.; Lee, D.S.; Armour, E.A.; Quinn, W.E. [Veeco TurboDisc Operations, 394 Elizabeth Avenue, Somerset, NJ 08873 (United States)

    2006-06-15

    This study exemplifies the use of TappingMode trademark atomic force microscopy (AFM) surface morphology imaging to investigate and optimise the metalorganic chemical vapour deposition (MOCVD) growth conditions and post-growth stability of thin (<40 Aa) InGaN layers with direct implications to the structural and optical properties of blue (460 nm) and green (520 nm) LEDs. InGaN epilayers less than 40 Aa thick of {proportional_to}20% solid phase indium were produced on thick (3-4 {mu}m) 2{sup ''} GaN templates grown on (0001) c-plane sapphire substrates. The morphological evolution of the InGaN material was studied utilising a DI3100 AFM tool. Surface morphology and its correlation with photoluminescence and X-ray diffraction results are discussed for every set of conditions employed. More specifically, the post-growth ambient exposure and thermal stability of the uncapped InGaN epilayers were investigated. In addition, the initial stage of subsequent GaN growth, which is an essential step towards the manufacture of LED active regions, was examined. Based on the above findings, a flexible MOCVD growth parameter space and improved LED constituent layer sequencing techniques have been established leading to more efficient and stable LED devices. (copyright 2006 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  18. InGaN stress compensation layers in InGaN/GaN blue LEDs with step graded electron injectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheremet, V.; Gheshlaghi, N.; Sözen, M.; Elçi, M.; Sheremet, N.; Aydınlı, A.; Altuntaş, I.; Ding, K.; Avrutin, V.; Özgür, Ü.; Morkoç, H.

    2018-04-01

    We investigate the effect of InGaN stress compensation layer on the properties of light emitting diodes based on InGaN/GaN multiple quantum well (MQW) structures with step-graded electron injectors. Insertion of an InGaN stress compensation layer between n-GaN and the step graded electron injector provides, among others, strain reduction in the MQW region and as a result improves epitaxial quality that can be observed by 15-fold decrease of V-pit density. We observed more uniform distribution of In between quantum wells in MQW region from results of electro- and photoluminescence measurement. These structural improvements lead to increasing of radiant intensity by a factor of 1.7-2.0 and enhancement of LED efficiency by 40%.

  19. Achieving Uniform Carriers Distribution in MBE Grown Compositionally Graded InGaN Multiple-Quantum-Well LEDs

    KAUST Repository

    Mishra, Pawan; Janjua, Bilal; Ng, Tien Khee; Shen, Chao; Salhi, Abdelmajid; Alyamani, Ahmed; El-Desouki, Munir; Ooi, Boon S.

    2015-01-01

    We investigated the design and growth of compositionally-graded InGaN multiple quantum wells (MQW) based light-emitting diode (LED) without an electron-blocking layer (EBL). Numerical investigation showed uniform carrier distribution in the active region, and higher radiative recombination rate for the optimized graded-MQW design, i.e. In0→xGa1→(1-x)N / InxGa(1-x)N / Inx→0Ga(1-x)→1N, as compared to the conventional stepped-MQW-LED. The composition-grading schemes, such as linear, parabolic, and Fermi-function profiles were numerically investigated for comparison. The stepped- and graded-MQW-LED were then grown using plasma assisted molecular beam epitaxy (PAMBE) through surface-stoichiometry optimization based on reflection high-energy electron-diffraction (RHEED) in-situ observations. Stepped- and graded-MQW-LED showed efficiency roll over at 160 A/cm2 and 275 A/cm2, respectively. The extended threshold current density roll-over (droop) in graded-MQW-LED is due to the improvement in carrier uniformity and radiative recombination rate, consistent with the numerical simulation.

  20. Achieving Uniform Carriers Distribution in MBE Grown Compositionally Graded InGaN Multiple-Quantum-Well LEDs

    KAUST Repository

    Mishra, Pawan

    2015-05-06

    We investigated the design and growth of compositionally-graded InGaN multiple quantum wells (MQW) based light-emitting diode (LED) without an electron-blocking layer (EBL). Numerical investigation showed uniform carrier distribution in the active region, and higher radiative recombination rate for the optimized graded-MQW design, i.e. In0→xGa1→(1-x)N / InxGa(1-x)N / Inx→0Ga(1-x)→1N, as compared to the conventional stepped-MQW-LED. The composition-grading schemes, such as linear, parabolic, and Fermi-function profiles were numerically investigated for comparison. The stepped- and graded-MQW-LED were then grown using plasma assisted molecular beam epitaxy (PAMBE) through surface-stoichiometry optimization based on reflection high-energy electron-diffraction (RHEED) in-situ observations. Stepped- and graded-MQW-LED showed efficiency roll over at 160 A/cm2 and 275 A/cm2, respectively. The extended threshold current density roll-over (droop) in graded-MQW-LED is due to the improvement in carrier uniformity and radiative recombination rate, consistent with the numerical simulation.

  1. Internal quantum efficiency and tunable colour temperature in monolithic white InGaN/GaN LED

    Science.gov (United States)

    Titkov, Ilya E.; Yadav, Amit; Zerova, Vera L.; Zulonas, Modestas; Tsatsulnikov, Andrey F.; Lundin, Wsevolod V.; Sakharov, Alexey V.; Rafailov, Edik U.

    2014-03-01

    Internal Quantum Efficiency (IQE) of two-colour monolithic white light emitting diode (LED) was measured by temperature dependant electro-luminescence (TDEL) and analysed with modified rate equation based on ABC model. External, internal and injection efficiencies of blue and green quantum wells were analysed separately. Monolithic white LED contained one green InGaN QW and two blue QWs being separated by GaN barrier. This paper reports also the tunable behaviour of correlated colour temperature (CCT) in pulsed operation mode and effect of self-heating on device performance.

  2. Iodine-stabilized single-frequency green InGaN diode laser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yi-Hsi; Lin, Wei-Chen; Shy, Jow-Tsong; Chui, Hsiang-Chen

    2018-01-01

    A 520-nm InGaN diode laser can emit a milliwatt-level, single-frequency laser beam when the applied current slightly exceeds the lasing threshold. The laser frequency was less sensitive to diode temperature and could be finely tuned by adjusting the applied current. Laser frequency was stabilized onto a hyperfine component in an iodine transition through the saturated absorption spectroscopy. The uncertainty of frequency stabilization was approximately 8×10 -9 at a 10-s integration time. This compact laser system can replace the conventional green diode-pumped solid-state laser and applied as a frequency reference. A single longitudinal mode operational region with diode temperature, current, and output power was investigated.

  3. Fabrication of moth-eye structure on p-GaN layer of GaN-based LEDs for improvement of light extraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hong, Eun-Ju; Byeon, Kyeong-Jae; Park, Hyoungwon; Hwang, Jaeyeon; Lee, Heon; Choi, Kyungwoo; Jung, Gun Young

    2009-01-01

    Moth-eye structures were produced on a p-GaN top cladding layer by UV imprint and inductively coupled plasma (ICP) etch processes in order to improve the light extraction efficiency of GaN-based green light-emitting diodes (LEDs). The height and shape of moth-eye structures were adjusted by controlling the thickness of Cr mask layer and ICP etching time. The transmittance of LED device stacks with moth-eye structure was increased up to 1.5-2.5 times, compared to identical LED sample without moth-eye structure and the intensity of photoluminescence from the InGaN multi-quantum well layer of LED sample with moth-eye structure was 5-7 times higher than that of the LED sample without the moth-eye structure.

  4. Active region dimensionality and quantum efficiencies of InGaN LEDs from temperature dependent photoluminescence transients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Can, Nuri; Okur, Serdal; Monavarian, Morteza; Zhang, Fan; Avrutin, Vitaliy; Morkoç, Hadis; Teke, Ali; Özgür, Ümit

    2015-03-01

    Temperature dependent recombination dynamics in c-plane InGaN light emitting diodes (LEDs) with different well thicknesses, 1.5, 2, and 3 nm, were investigated to determine the active region dimensionality and its effect on the internal quantum efficiencies. It was confirmed for all LEDs that the photoluminescence (PL) transients are governed by radiative recombination at low temperatures while nonradiative recombination dominates at room temperature. At photoexcited carrier densities of 3 - 4.5 x 1016 cm-3 , the room-temperature Shockley-Read-Hall (A) and the bimolecular (B) recombination coefficients (A, B) were deduced to be (9.2x107 s-1, 8.8x10-10 cm3s-1), (8.5x107 s-1, 6.6x10-10 cm3s-1), and (6.5x107 s-1, 1.4x10-10 cm3s-1) for the six period 1.5, 2, and 3 nm well-width LEDs, respectively. From the temperature dependence of the radiative lifetimes, τrad α Tn/2, the dimensionality n of the active region was found to decrease consistently with decreasing well width. The 3 nm wide wells exhibited ~T1.5 dependence, suggesting a three-dimensional nature, whereas the 1.5 nm wells were confirmed to be two-dimensional (~T1) and the 2 nm wells close to being two-dimensional. We demonstrate that a combination of temperature dependent PL and time-resolved PL techniques can be used to evaluate the dimensionality as well as the quantum efficiencies of the LED active regions for a better understanding of the relationship between active-region design and the efficiency limiting processes in InGaN LEDs.

  5. Improvement of quantum efficiency in green light-emitting diodes with pre-TMIn flow treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Ya-Ju; Chen, Yi-Ching; Lu, Tien-Chang

    2011-01-01

    The effects of pre-trimethlyindium (TMIn) flow on the improved electrical characteristics and highly stable temperature properties of InGaN green light-emitting diodes (LEDs) are discussed. For the LED sample with a pre-TMIn flow treatment, the tunnelling of injected carriers associated with threading defects is significantly reduced, which promotes the diffusion-recombination of injected carriers, as well as the overall emission efficiency of the LED. In addition, the pre-TMIn flow treatment evidently reduces the dependence of external quantum efficiency on temperature and efficiency droop of green LEDs. As a result, we conclude that the pre-TMIn flow treatment is a promising scheme for the improvement of output performance of InGaN-based green LEDs.

  6. Progress and prospects of GaN-based LEDs using nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Li-Xia; Yu, Zhi-Guo; Sun, Bo; Zhu, Shi-Chao; An, Ping-Bo; Yang, Chao; Liu, Lei; Wang, Jun-Xi; Li, Jin-Min

    2015-06-01

    Progress with GaN-based light emitting diodes (LEDs) that incorporate nanostructures is reviewed, especially the recent achievements in our research group. Nano-patterned sapphire substrates have been used to grow an AlN template layer for deep-ultraviolet (DUV) LEDs. One efficient surface nano-texturing technology, hemisphere-cones-hybrid nanostructures, was employed to enhance the extraction efficiency of InGaN flip-chip LEDs. Hexagonal nanopyramid GaN-based LEDs have been fabricated and show electrically driven color modification and phosphor-free white light emission because of the linearly increased quantum well width and indium incorporation from the shell to the core. Based on the nanostructures, we have also fabricated surface plasmon-enhanced nanoporous GaN-based green LEDs using AAO membrane as a mask. Benefitting from the strong lateral SP coupling as well as good electrical protection by a passivation layer, the EL intensity of an SP-enhanced nanoporous LED was significantly enhanced by 380%. Furthermore, nanostructures have been used for the growth of GaN LEDs on amorphous substrates, the fabrication of stretchable LEDs, and for increasing the 3-dB modulation bandwidth for visible light communication. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 61334009), the National High Technology Research and Development Program of China (Grant Nos. 2015AA03A101 and 2014BAK02B08), China International Science and Technology Cooperation Program (Grant No. 2014DFG62280), the “Import Outstanding Technical Talent Plan” and “Youth Innovation Promotion Association Program” of the Chinese Academy of Sciences.

  7. Background story of the invention of efficient blue InGaN light emitting diodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakamura, Shuji [University of California, Santa Barbara, CA (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Shuji Nakamura discovered p-type doping in Gallium Nitride (GaN) and developed blue, green, and white InGaN based light emitting diodes (LEDs) and blue laser diodes (LDs). His inventions made possible energy efficient, solid-state lighting systems and enabled the next generation of optical storage. Together with Isamu Akasaki and Hiroshi Amano, he is one of the three recipients of the 2014 Nobel Prize in Physics. In his Nobel lecture, Shuji Nakamura gives an overview of this research and the story of his inventions. (copyright 2015 by WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  8. Origins of efficient green light emission in phase-separated InGaN quantum wells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lai, Y-L; Liu, C-P; Lin, Y-H; Hsueh, T-H; Lin, R-M; Lyu, D-Y; Peng, Z-X; Lin, T-Y

    2006-01-01

    Green-light-emitting InGaN/GaN multiple quantum wells (MQWs) with high luminescent efficiency were grown by metalorganic chemical vapour deposition (MOCVD). The microstructure of the sample was studied by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) and high-resolution x-ray diffraction, while its optical behaviour was analysed in great detail by a variety of photoluminescence methods. Two InGaN-related peaks that were clearly found in the photoluminescence (PL) spectrum are assigned to quasi-quantum dots (516 nm) and the InGaN matrix (450 nm), respectively, due to a strong phase separation observed by HRTEM. Except for the strong indium aggregation regions (511 meV of Stokes shift), slight composition fluctuations were also observed in the InGaN matrix, which were speculated from an 'S-shaped' transition and a Stokes shift of 341 meV. Stronger carrier localization and an internal quantum efficiency of the dot-related emission (21.5%), higher than the InGaN-matrix related emission (7.5%), was demonstrated. Additionally, a shorter lifetime and 'two-component' PL decay were found for the low-indium-content regions (matrix). Thus, the carrier transport process within quantum wells is suggested to drift from the low-In-content matrix to the high-In-content dots, resulting in the enhanced luminescence efficiency of the green light emission

  9. Effects of underlying InGaN/GaN superlattice structures on the structural and optical properties of InGaN LEDs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsai, Chia-Lung, E-mail: cltsai@mail.cgu.edu.tw

    2016-06-15

    This study proposes the use of InGaN/GaN superlattices grown beneath InGaN multiple quantum wells (MQWs) and designed with different well widths to act as an electron emitter layer (EEL). Cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy reveals strong indium segregation in the underlying superlattices with a 5-nm-thick In{sub 0.1}Ga{sub 0.9}N well, thus corrupting the crystalline perfection of the resulting LEDs, and also increasing their leakage current. It was also found that the depth of the localized states increases with the well width of the underlying superlattices. In the proposed LEDs, variation in the biaxial strains of the superlattice EELs with different well widths results in an increase in indium incorporation of InGaN MQWs, thus obtaining a redshifted photoluminescence emission with respect to that of normal LED. Furthermore, the presence of relatively strong carrier localization and the alleviation of electron leakage from the InGaN MQWs results in improved light output performance from the proposed LEDs grown with a narrow In{sub 0.1}Ga{sub 0.9}N well in the underlying superlattices. Although growth in a wide In{sub 0.1}Ga{sub 0.9}N well (~3.5 nm) containing underlying superlattices suffers from poor crystalline quality due to partial strain relaxation, it resulted in improved roll-off behavior in terms of light intensity. This may be due to the improved hot electron cooling capacity mitigating the extent of carrier leakage. - Highlights: • In{sub 0.1}Ga{sub 0.9}N/GaN superlattices are used as an electron emitter layer. • Improved LED performance can be achieved using a narrow In{sub 0.1}Ga{sub 0.9}N well. • A wider well can further reduce carrier leakage despite poor quality is presented.

  10. InGaN directional coupler made with a one-step etching technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Xumin; Yuan, Jialei; Yang, Yongchao; Zhang, Shuai; Shi, Zheng; Li, Xin; Wang, Yongjin

    2017-06-01

    We propose, fabricate and characterize an on-chip integration of light source, InGaN waveguide, directional coupler and photodiode, in which AlGaN layers are used as top and bottom optical claddings to form an InGaN waveguide for guiding the in-plane emitted light from the InGaN/GaN multiple-quantum-well light-emitting diode (MQW-LED). The difference in etch rate caused by different exposure windows leads to an etching depth discrepancy using the one-step etching technique, which forms the InGaN directional coupler with the overlapped underlying slab. Light propagation results directly confirm effective light coupling in the InGaN directional coupler, which is achieved through high-order guided modes. The InGaN waveguide couples the modulated light from the InGaN/GaN MQW-LED and transfers part of light to the coupled waveguide via the InGaN directional coupler. The in-plane InGaN/GaN MQW-photodiode absorbs the guided light by the coupled InGaN waveguide and induces the photocurrent. The on-chip InGaN photonic integration experimentally demonstrates an in-plane light communication with a data transmission of 50 Mbps.

  11. InGaN nanoinclusions in an AlGaN matrix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sizov, V. S.; Tsatsul'nikov, A. F.; Lundin, V. V.

    2008-01-01

    GaN-based structures with InGaN quantum dots in the active region emitting in the near-ultraviolet region are studied. In this study, two types of structures, namely, with InGaN quantum dots in a GaN or AlGaN matrix, are compared. Photoluminescence spectra are obtained for both types of structures in a temperature range of 80-300 K and at various pumping densities, and electroluminescence spectra are obtained for light-emitting (LED) structures with various types of active region. It is shown that the structures with quantum dots in the AlGaN matrix are more stable thermally due to the larger localization energy compared with quantum dots in the GaN matrix. Due to this, the LED structures with quantum dots in an AlGaN matrix are more effective.

  12. Materials challenges for devices based on single, self-assembled InGaN quantum dots

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliver, Rachel A; Jarjour, Anas F; Tahraoui, Abbes; Kappers, Menno J; Taylor, Robert A; Humphreys, Colin J

    2007-01-01

    Builiding on earlier studies of single InGaN quantum dots (QDs), we are considering their potential for use in blue- and green-emitting single photon sources. Envisaging a device based on a resonant cavity light emitting diode, we have studied the effect of growing QDs on an underlying AlN/GaN distributed Bragg reflector, and have shown that enhanced single QD emission may be obtained. Additionally, we have studied the effect of the growth and activation of a p-type cap on an underlying QD layer and have shown that the QDs survive the anneal process

  13. Electroluminescence from a single InGaN quantum dot in the green spectral region up to 150 K

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalden, J; Sebald, K; Gutowski, J; Tessarek, C; Figge, S; Kruse, C; Hommel, D

    2010-01-01

    We present electrically driven luminescence from single InGaN quantum dots embedded into a light emitting diode structure grown by metal-organic vapor-phase epitaxy. Single sharp emission lines in the green spectral region can be identified. Temperature dependent measurements demonstrate thermal stability of the emission of a single quantum dot up to 150 K. These results are an important step towards applications like electrically driven single-photon emitters, which are a basis for applications incorporating plastic optical fibers as well as for modern concepts of free space quantum cryptography.

  14. Power blue and green laser diodes and their applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hager, Thomas; Strauß, Uwe; Eichler, Christoph; Vierheilig, Clemens; Tautz, Sönke; Brüderl, Georg; Stojetz, Bernhard; Wurm, Teresa; Avramescu, Adrian; Somers, André; Ristic, Jelena; Gerhard, Sven; Lell, Alfred; Morgott, Stefan; Mehl, Oliver

    2013-03-01

    InGaN based green laser diodes with output powers up to 50mW are now well established for variety of applications ranging from leveling to special lighting effects and mobile projection of 12lm brightness. In future the highest market potential for visible single mode profile lasers might be laser projection of 20lm. Therefore direct green single-mode laser diodes with higher power are required. We found that self heating was the limiting factor for higher current operation. We present power-current characteristics of improved R and D samples with up to 200mW in cw-operation. An optical output power of 100mW is reached at 215mA, a current level which is suitable for long term operation. Blue InGaN laser diodes are also the ideal source for phosphor based generation of green light sources of high luminance. We present a light engine based on LARP (Laser Activated Remote Phosphor) which can be used in business projectors of several thousand lumens on screen. We discuss the advantages of a laser based systems in comparison with LED light engines. LARP requires highly efficient blue power laser diodes with output power above 1W. Future market penetration of LARP will require lower costs. Therefore we studied new designs for higher powers levels. R and D chips with power-current characteristics up to 4W in continuous wave operation on C-mount at 25°C are presented.

  15. Optoelectronical properties of InGaN quantum well light emitting diodes on semipolar GaN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rass, Jens; Stascheit, Marcus; Ploch, Simon; Wernicke, Tim; Vogt, Patrick; Kneissl, Michael [Technische Universitaet Berlin, Institute of Solid State Physics, Secretariat EW6-1, Hardenbergstrasse 36, 10623 Berlin (Germany)

    2011-07-01

    The performance of GaN-based light emitting diodes (LEDs) is strongly affected by polarization fields along the c-axis of the crystal. Due to the resulting quantum-confined Stark effect the radiative transition rate is reduced and the emission wavelength is blue-shifted when carriers are injected. By growing the structures on semipolar or nonpolar planes the polarization fields can be significantly reduced or even eliminated. In this work, InGaN single quantum well LEDs have been grown by metal-organic vapor phase epitaxy on different semipolar surfaces such as the (10 anti 11) and (20 anti 21) plane. The optoelectronic properties such as the light output power, the emission wavelength and its shift with injection current as well as the operating voltage have been studied. By employing capacitance-voltage- and current-voltage measurements, the size of the depletion region, the build-in potential, the saturation current and the doping concentrations have been determined. LEDs with emission wavelengths ranging from the violet to the blue and green region are presented and their performance characteristics are compared to LEDs grown on the polar c-plane surface.

  16. Polarization-enhanced InGaN/GaN-based hybrid tunnel junction contacts to GaN p-n diodes and InGaN LEDs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mughal, Asad J.; Young, Erin C.; Alhassan, Abdullah I.; Back, Joonho; Nakamura, Shuji; Speck, James S.; DenBaars, Steven P.

    2017-12-01

    Improved turn-on voltages and reduced series resistances were realized by depositing highly Si-doped n-type GaN using molecular beam epitaxy on polarization-enhanced p-type InGaN contact layers grown using metal-organic chemical vapor deposition. We compared the effects of different Si doping concentrations and the addition of p-type InGaN on the forward voltages of p-n diodes and light-emitting diodes, and found that increasing the Si concentrations from 1.9 × 1020 to 4.6 × 1020 cm-3 and including a highly doped p-type InGaN at the junction both contributed to reductions in the depletion width, the series resistance of 4.2 × 10-3-3.4 × 10-3 Ω·cm2, and the turn-on voltages of the diodes.

  17. Polarization-enhanced InGaN/GaN-based hybrid tunnel junction contacts to GaN p–n diodes and InGaN LEDs

    KAUST Repository

    Mughal, Asad J.

    2017-11-27

    Improved turn-on voltages and reduced series resistances were realized by depositing highly Si-doped n-type GaN using molecular beam epitaxy on polarization-enhanced p-type InGaN contact layers grown using metal–organic chemical vapor deposition. We compared the effects of different Si doping concentrations and the addition of p-type InGaN on the forward voltages of p–n diodes and light-emitting diodes, and found that increasing the Si concentrations from 1.9 × 1020 to 4.6 × 1020 cm−3 and including a highly doped p-type InGaN at the junction both contributed to reductions in the depletion width, the series resistance of 4.2 × 10−3–3.4 × 10−3 Ωcenterdotcm2, and the turn-on voltages of the diodes.

  18. Polarization-enhanced InGaN/GaN-based hybrid tunnel junction contacts to GaN p–n diodes and InGaN LEDs

    KAUST Repository

    Mughal, Asad J.; Young, Erin C.; Alhassan, Abdullah I.; Back, Joonho; Nakamura, Shuji; Speck, James S.; DenBaars, Steven P.

    2017-01-01

    Improved turn-on voltages and reduced series resistances were realized by depositing highly Si-doped n-type GaN using molecular beam epitaxy on polarization-enhanced p-type InGaN contact layers grown using metal–organic chemical vapor deposition. We compared the effects of different Si doping concentrations and the addition of p-type InGaN on the forward voltages of p–n diodes and light-emitting diodes, and found that increasing the Si concentrations from 1.9 × 1020 to 4.6 × 1020 cm−3 and including a highly doped p-type InGaN at the junction both contributed to reductions in the depletion width, the series resistance of 4.2 × 10−3–3.4 × 10−3 Ωcenterdotcm2, and the turn-on voltages of the diodes.

  19. The atomic structure of polar and non-polar InGaN quantum wells and the green gap problem

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Humphreys, C.J., E-mail: colin.humphreys@msm.cam.ac.uk [Department of Materials Science and Metallurgy, University of Cambridge, 27 Charles Babbage Road, Cambridge CB3 0FS (United Kingdom); Griffiths, J.T., E-mail: jg641@cam.ac.uk [Department of Materials Science and Metallurgy, University of Cambridge, 27 Charles Babbage Road, Cambridge CB3 0FS (United Kingdom); Tang, F., E-mail: ft274@cam.ac.uk [Department of Materials Science and Metallurgy, University of Cambridge, 27 Charles Babbage Road, Cambridge CB3 0FS (United Kingdom); Oehler, F., E-mail: fabrice.oehler@lpn.cnrs.fr [CNRS/C2N, Paris Sud University, Route de Nozay, 91460 Marcoussis (France); Findlay, S.D., E-mail: scott.findlay@monash.edu [School of Physics and Astronomy, Monash University, Victoria 3800 (Australia); Zheng, C., E-mail: changlin.zheng@monash.edu [Monash Centre for Electron Microscopy, Monash University, Victoria 3800 (Australia); Etheridge, J., E-mail: joanne.etheridge@mcem.monash.edu [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Monash University, Victoria 3800 (Australia); Martin, T.L., E-mail: tomas.martin@materials.ox.ac.uk [Department of Materials, University of Oxford, Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3PH (United Kingdom); Bagot, P.A.J., E-mail: paul.bagot@materials.ox.ac.uk [Department of Materials, University of Oxford, Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3PH (United Kingdom); Moody, M.P., E-mail: michael.moody@materials.ox.ac.uk [Department of Materials, University of Oxford, Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3PH (United Kingdom); Sutherland, D., E-mail: danny.sutherland@manchester.ac.uk [School of Physics and Astronomy, Photon Science Institute, University of Manchester, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Dawson, P., E-mail: philip.dawson@manchester.ac.uk [School of Physics and Astronomy, Photon Science Institute, University of Manchester, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Schulz, S., E-mail: stefan.schulz@tyndall.ie [Tyndall National Institute, Lee Maltings Complex, Dyke Parade, Cork (Ireland); and others

    2017-05-15

    Highlights: • We have studied the atomic structure of polar and non-polar InGaN quantum wells. • The non-polar (11-20) InGaN quantum wells contain indium-rich clusters, unlike the polar (0001) quantum wells. • The electrons and holes in the quantum wells are localised by different mechanisms. - Abstract: We have used high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), aberration-corrected quantitative scanning transmission electron microscopy (Q-STEM), atom probe tomography (APT) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) to study the atomic structure of (0001) polar and (11-20) non-polar InGaN quantum wells (QWs). This paper provides an overview of the results. Polar (0001) InGaN in QWs is a random alloy, with In replacing Ga randomly. The InGaN QWs have atomic height interface steps, resulting in QW width fluctuations. The electrons are localised at the top QW interface by the built-in electric field and the well-width fluctuations, with a localisation energy of typically 20 meV. The holes are localised near the bottom QW interface, by indium fluctuations in the random alloy, with a localisation energy of typically 60 meV. On the other hand, the non-polar (11-20) InGaN QWs contain nanometre-scale indium-rich clusters which we suggest localise the carriers and produce longer wavelength (lower energy) emission than from random alloy non-polar InGaN QWs of the same average composition. The reason for the indium-rich clusters in non-polar (11-20) InGaN QWs is not yet clear, but may be connected to the lower QW growth temperature for the (11-20) InGaN QWs compared to the (0001) polar InGaN QWs.

  20. Luminescent properties of green- or red-emitting Eu2+-doped Sr3Al2O6 for LED

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Jilin; Zhang Xinguo; Shi Jianxin; Gong Menglian

    2011-01-01

    Eu 2+ -doped Sr 3 Al 2 O 6 (Sr 3-x Eu x Al 2 O 6 ) was synthesized by a solid-state reaction under either H 2 and N 2 atmosphere or CO atmosphere. When H 2 was used as the reducing agent, the phosphor exhibited green emission under near UV excitation, while CO was used as the reducing agent, the phosphor mainly showed red emission under blue light excitation. Both emissions belong to the d-f transition of Eu 2+ ion. The relationship between the emission wavelengths and the occupation of Eu 2+ at different crystallographic sites was studied. The preferential substitution of Eu 2+ into different Sr 2+ cites at different reaction periods and the substitution rates under different atmospheres were discussed. Finally, green-emitting and red-emitting LEDs were fabricated by coating the phosphor onto near UV- or blue-emitting InGaN chips. - Highlights: →Sr 3 Al 2 O 6 :Eu 2+ is synthesized by a solid-state reaction under different atmospheres. →Phosphor obtained under H 2 +N 2 atmosphere emits green light under NUV excitation. →Phosphor obtained under CO atmosphere emits red light under blue light excitation. →Different emission wavelengths are due to Eu 2+ in different Sr 2+ sites. →The preferential substitution and the substitution rates of Eu 2+ are discussed.

  1. On the role of diluted magnetic cobalt-doped ZnO electrodes in efficiency improvement of InGaN light emitters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Hong-Ru; Wang, Shih-Yin [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National Chung Hsing University, Taichung 40227, Taiwan (China); Ou, Sin-Liang [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Da-Yeh University, Changhua 51591, Taiwan (China); Wuu, Dong-Sing, E-mail: dsw@dragon.nchu.edu.tw [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National Chung Hsing University, Taichung 40227, Taiwan (China); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Da-Yeh University, Changhua 51591, Taiwan (China); Advanced Optoelectronic Technology Center, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan 70101, Taiwan (China)

    2016-07-11

    The 120-nm-thick cobalt-doped ZnO (Co-doped ZnO, CZO) dilute magnetic films deposited by pulsed laser deposition were employed as the n-electrodes for both lateral-type blue (450 nm) and green (520 nm) InGaN light emitters. In comparison to the conventional blue and green emitters, there were 15.9% and 17.7% enhancements in the output power (@350 mA) after fabricating the CZO n-electrode on the n-GaN layer. Observations on the role of CZO n-electrodes in efficiency improvement of InGaN light emitters were performed. Based on the results of Hall measurements, the carrier mobilities were 176 and 141 cm{sup 2}/V s when the electrons passed through the n-GaN and the patterned-CZO/n-GaN, respectively. By incorporating the CZO n-electrode into the InGaN light emitters, the electrons would be scattered because of the collisions between the magnetic atoms and the electrons as the device is driven, leading to the reduction of the electron mobility. Therefore, the excessively large mobility difference between electron and hole carriers occurred in the conventional InGaN light emitter can be efficiently decreased after preparing the CZO n-electrode on the n-GaN layer, resulting in the increment of carrier recombination rate and the improvement of light output power.

  2. On the role of diluted magnetic cobalt-doped ZnO electrodes in efficiency improvement of InGaN light emitters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Hong-Ru; Wang, Shih-Yin; Ou, Sin-Liang; Wuu, Dong-Sing

    2016-01-01

    The 120-nm-thick cobalt-doped ZnO (Co-doped ZnO, CZO) dilute magnetic films deposited by pulsed laser deposition were employed as the n-electrodes for both lateral-type blue (450 nm) and green (520 nm) InGaN light emitters. In comparison to the conventional blue and green emitters, there were 15.9% and 17.7% enhancements in the output power (@350 mA) after fabricating the CZO n-electrode on the n-GaN layer. Observations on the role of CZO n-electrodes in efficiency improvement of InGaN light emitters were performed. Based on the results of Hall measurements, the carrier mobilities were 176 and 141 cm"2/V s when the electrons passed through the n-GaN and the patterned-CZO/n-GaN, respectively. By incorporating the CZO n-electrode into the InGaN light emitters, the electrons would be scattered because of the collisions between the magnetic atoms and the electrons as the device is driven, leading to the reduction of the electron mobility. Therefore, the excessively large mobility difference between electron and hole carriers occurred in the conventional InGaN light emitter can be efficiently decreased after preparing the CZO n-electrode on the n-GaN layer, resulting in the increment of carrier recombination rate and the improvement of light output power.

  3. High Efficacy Green LEDs by Polarization Controlled MOVPE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wetzel, Christian [Rensselaer Polytechnic Inst., Troy, NY (United States)

    2013-03-31

    Amazing performance in GaInN/GaN based LEDs has become possible by advanced epitaxial growth on a wide variety of substrates over the last decade. An immediate push towards product development and worldwide competition for market share have effectively reduced production cost and generated substantial primary energy savings on a worldwide scale. At all times of the development, this economic pressure forced very fundamental decisions that would shape huge industrial investment. One of those major aspects is the choice of epitaxial growth substrate. The natural questions are to what extend a decision for a certain substrate will limit the ultimate performance and to what extent, the choice of a currently more expensive substrate such as native GaN could overcome any of the remaining performance limitations. Therefore, this project has set out to explore what performance characteristic could be achieved under the utilization of bulk GaN substrate. Our work was guided by the hypotheses that line defects such as threading dislocations in the active region should be avoided and the huge piezoelectric polarization needs to be attenuated – if not turned off – for higher performing LEDs, particularly in the longer wavelength green and deep green portions of the visible spectrum. At their relatively lower performance level, deep green LEDs are a stronger indicator of relative performance improvements and seem particular sensitive to the challenges at hand.

  4. Growth of (20 anti 21)AlGaN, GaN and InGaN by metal organic vapor phase epitaxy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ploch, S.; Wernicke, T.; Rass, J.; Pristovsek, M. [TU Berlin, Institut fuer Festkoerperphysik, Hardenbergstr. 36, 10623 Berlin (Germany); Weyers, M. [Ferdinand-Braun-Institut, Leibniz Institut fuer Hoechstfrequenztechnik, Gustav-Kirchhoff-Str. 4, 12489 Berlin (Germany); Kneissl, M. [TU Berlin, Institut fuer Festkoerperphysik, Hardenbergstr. 36, 10623 Berlin (Germany); Ferdinand-Braun-Institut, Leibniz Institut fuer Hoechstfrequenztechnik, Gustav-Kirchhoff-Str. 4, 12489 Berlin (Germany)

    2012-07-01

    Green InGaN-based laser diodes on (20 anti 21)GaN substrates have recently demonstrated performances exceeding those of conventional (0001) oriented devices. However little is known regarding the growth parameters. We have investigated growth of AlGaN, GaN and InGaN on (20 anti 21)GaN substrates by MOVPE. Smooth GaN layers with a rms roughness <0.5 nm were obtained by low growth temperatures and reactor pressures. The layers exhibit undulations along [10 anti 14] similar to the GaN substrate. AlGaN and InGaN layers exhibit an increased surface roughness. Undulation bunching was observed and attributed to reduced adatom surface mobility due to the binding energy of Al and the low growth temperature for InGaN respectively or strain relaxation. AlGaN and InGaN heterostructures on (20 anti 21)GaN relax by layer tilt accompanied by formation of misfit dislocations, due to shear strain of the unit cell. This relaxation mechanism leads to a reduced critical layer thickness of (20 anti 21)AlGaN layers and InGaN multi quantum wells (MQW) in comparison to (0001). PL spectral broadening of 230 meV of (20 anti 21)InGaN single QWs emitting at 415 nm can be reduced by increased growth temperature or increased number of QWs with reduced thickness.

  5. Improving the Efficiency Enhancement of Photonic Crystal Based InGaN Solar Cell by Using a GaN Cap Layer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. F. Gundogdu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We studied a high indium content (0.8 InGaN based solar cell design where the active InGaN layer is sandwiched between a GaN cap layer and a GaN spacer layer. The incorporation of the sacrificial cap layer allows for the etching of the front surface without removing the active InGaN resulting in a 50% enhancement of the short-circuit current density for a 15 nm-thick InGaN layer.

  6. InGaN quantum well epilayers morphological evolution under a wide range of MOCVD growth parameter sets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Florescu, D.I.; Ting, S.M.; Merai, V.N.; Parekh, A.; Lee, D.S.; Armour, E.A.; Quinn, W.E.

    2006-01-01

    This study exemplifies the use of TappingMode trademark atomic force microscopy (AFM) surface morphology imaging to investigate and optimise the metalorganic chemical vapour deposition (MOCVD) growth conditions and post-growth stability of thin ( '' GaN templates grown on (0001) c-plane sapphire substrates. The morphological evolution of the InGaN material was studied utilising a DI3100 AFM tool. Surface morphology and its correlation with photoluminescence and X-ray diffraction results are discussed for every set of conditions employed. More specifically, the post-growth ambient exposure and thermal stability of the uncapped InGaN epilayers were investigated. In addition, the initial stage of subsequent GaN growth, which is an essential step towards the manufacture of LED active regions, was examined. Based on the above findings, a flexible MOCVD growth parameter space and improved LED constituent layer sequencing techniques have been established leading to more efficient and stable LED devices. (copyright 2006 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  7. An explanation of efficiency droop in InGaN-based light emitting diodes: saturated radiative recombination rate at randomly distributed In-rich active areas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shim, Jong-In; Kim, Hyun-Sung; Shin, Dong-Soo; Yoo, Han-Youl

    2011-01-01

    We present a comprehensive model of the dependence of the internal quantum efficiency (IQE) on both the temperature and the carrier density in InGaN-based blue and green light emitting diodes (LEDs). In our model, carriers are dominantly located and recombine both radiatively and nonradiatively inside randomly distributed In-rich areas of the InGaN quantum wells (QWs). In those areas, the carrier density is very high even at a small current density. We propose that the saturated radiative recombination rate is a primary factor determining the IQE droop of InGaN based LEDs. In typical InGaN-based QWs, it is common for the total carrier recombination rate to be smaller than the carrier injection rate even at a small current density. This is mostly attributable to the saturation of the radiative recombination rate. The saturation of the radiative recombination rate increases carrier density in InGaN QWs, enlarges nonradiative carrier losses, and eventually gives rise to the large IQE droop with increasing current. We show how the radiative recombination rate saturates and the radiative recombination rate has influence on the IQE droop in InGaN-based QW LEDs.

  8. Enhancement of indium incorporation to InGaN MQWs on AlN/GaN periodic multilayers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monavarian, Morteza; Hafiz, Shopan; Das, Saikat; Izyumskaya, Natalia; Özgür, Ümit; Morkoç, Hadis; Avrutin, Vitaliy

    2016-02-01

    The effect of compressive strain in buffer layer on strain relaxation and indium incorporation in InGaN multi-quantum wells (MQWs) is studied for two sets of samples grown side by side on both relaxed GaN layers and strained 10-pairs of AlN/GaN periodic multilayers. The 14-nm AlN layers were utilized in both multilayers, while GaN thickness was 4.5 and 2.5 nm in the first and the second set, respectively. The obtained results for the InGaN active layers on relaxed GaN and AlN/GaN periodic multilayers indicate enhanced indium incorporation for more relaxed InGaN active layers providing a variety of emission colors from purple to green.

  9. InGaN/GaN multilayer quantum dots yellow-green light-emitting diode with optimized GaN barriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Wenbin; Wang, Lai; Wang, Jiaxing; Hao, Zhibiao; Luo, Yi

    2012-11-07

    InGaN/GaN multilayer quantum dot (QD) structure is a potential type of active regions for yellow-green light-emitting diodes (LEDs). The surface morphologies and crystalline quality of GaN barriers are critical to the uniformity of InGaN QD layers. While GaN barriers were grown in multi-QD layers, we used improved growth parameters by increasing the growth temperature and switching the carrier gas from N2 to H2 in the metal organic vapor phase epitaxy. As a result, a 10-layer InGaN/GaN QD LED is demonstrated successfully. The transmission electron microscopy image shows the uniform multilayer InGaN QDs clearly. As the injection current increases from 5 to 50 mA, the electroluminescence peak wavelength shifts from 574 to 537 nm.

  10. Green LED as an Effective Light Source for Curing Acrylate-Based Dental Resins in Combination with Irgacure 784

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katalin Bukovinszky

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Low intensity green light emitting diodes (LED were shown to be an effective light source to induce the photopolymerization of an acrylate-based photocurable dental restorative resin mixture of bisphenol A glycerolate dimethacrylate (BisGMA, triethylene glycol dimethacrylate (TEGDMA, and diurethane dimethacrylate (UDMA, in combination with fluorinated diaryl titanocene (Irgacure 784. Dental matrices were prepared by the LED light source at different intensities. The mechanical properties, such as Vickers microhardness, compressive strength, diametric tensile strength, flexural strength, and E-modulus of the created samples, were investigated. The kinetics of the photopolymerization was followed by Raman spectroscopy and conversion values were determined. It was found that, despite its narrow-emission range centered at a wavelength of 531 nm, the green LED light source is suitable for the preparation of dental matrices with good mechanical properties and high conversion values.

  11. Influence of strain on the growth of thick InGaN layers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stellmach, J.; Leyer, M.; Pristovsek, M.; Kneissl, M.

    2008-01-01

    The growth of high quality InGaN alloys is critical for a number of various optoelectronic device applications like LEDs and laser diodes. Nevertheless, the exact growth mechanisms of InGaN with high indium content is still not fully understood. In the present study the growth of thick InGaN layers was systematically investigated. InGaN films with thicknesses between ∝35 nm and ∝200 nm were grown on GaN templates with metal-organic vapour phase epitaxy (MOVPE). The group III partial pressures of 1.1 Pa for TMGa, 0.45 Pa for TMIn and the V/III-ratio of 1600 were kept constant. The growth temperature was varied between 750 C and 800 C. The growth of InGaN layer was characterized by in-situ spectroscopic ellipsometry (SE). Up to temperatures of 790 C structural analysis by XRD showed two strained layers with different indium content. The formation of the layer structure was investigated by varying the growth times at 770 C. In the first 500 s (35 nm) a rough (rms=9 nm) and pseudomorphically strained InGaN layer with low indium content (4%) is formed. Between 500 s and 1000 s this strained layer becomes smoother (rms=3.4 nm). For thicknesses beyond the In content increases (8% at 84 nm) and reaches 11% at 200 nm. We propose that the transition from a first layer with a low indium content to a second layer with an higher indium content is due to a gradual release of strain

  12. Progress in extremely high brightness LED-based light sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoelen, Christoph; Antonis, Piet; de Boer, Dick; Koole, Rolf; Kadijk, Simon; Li, Yun; Vanbroekhoven, Vincent; Van De Voorde, Patrick

    2017-09-01

    Although the maximum brightness of LEDs has been increasing continuously during the past decade, their luminance is still far from what is required for multiple applications that still rely on the high brightness of discharge lamps. In particular for high brightness applications with limited étendue, e.g. front projection, only very modest luminance values in the beam can be achieved with LEDs compared to systems based on discharge lamps or lasers. With dedicated architectures, phosphor-converted green LEDs for projection may achieve luminance values up to 200-300 Mnit. In this paper we report on the progress made in the development of light engines based on an elongated luminescent concentrator pumped by blue LEDs. This concept has recently been introduced to the market as ColorSpark High Lumen Density LED technology. These sources outperform the maximum brightness of LEDs by multiple factors. In LED front projection, green LEDs are the main limiting factor. With our green modules, we now have achieved peak luminance values of 2 Gnit, enabling LED-based projection systems with over 4000 ANSI lm. Extension of this concept to yellow and red light sources is presented. The light source efficiency has been increased considerably, reaching 45-60 lm/W for green under practical application conditions. The module architecture, beam shaping, and performance characteristics are reviewed, as well as system aspects. The performance increase, spectral range extensions, beam-shaping flexibility, and cost reductions realized with the new module architecture enable a breakthrough in LED-based projection systems and in a wide variety of other high brightness applications.

  13. Application of blue-green and ultraviolet micro-LEDs to biological imaging and detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu, H; Zhang, J; Nurmikko, A V; Davitt, K M; Song, Y-K

    2008-01-01

    This paper reviews authors' laboratory's work on the development of nitride-based blue-green and ultraviolet microscale LED devices with particular classes of imaging and spectroscopic applications in cellular level biology. Starting from neuroscience, we illustrate the utility of blue-green micro-LEDs for voltage-sensitive dye imaging of individual neural cells, as well as their ultraviolet counterparts for photostimulation of neurons. Arrays of micro-LEDs are also shown to be useful in projecting spatiotemporal patterns of photoexcitation to study the visual system development in living animals. As another illustration of the utility of the emerging nitride microdevice technology, we demonstrate the application of UV micro-LED arrays in bio-sensing technology as the core of a real-time fluorescence spectroscopy biowarning system. (invited paper)

  14. Digital growth of thick N-polar InGaN films on relaxed InGaN pseudosubstrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lund, Cory; Hestroffer, Karine; Hatui, Nirupam; Nakamura, Shuji; DenBaars, Steven P.; Mishra, Umesh K.; Keller, Stacia

    2017-11-01

    Smooth relaxed N-polar InGaN films were grown by metal-organic CVD (MOCVD) on N-polar InGaN pseudosubstrates (PSs) using a novel digital approach consisting of a constant In precursor flow with the pulsed injection of H2 carrier gas. InGaN layers grown on PSs exhibited an In composition of about 50% higher than those of the layers grown on N-polar GaN templates, assuming the in-plane lattice constant of the relaxed PSs, corresponding to In0.11Ga0.89N. Additionally, the luminescence recorded from InGaN layers grown on PSs at 490 nm was twice as intense as that obtained from the layers deposited on coloaded GaN-on-sapphire templates, which emitted at 430 nm.

  15. Enhancement of Radiative Efficiency with Staggered InGaN Quantum Well Light Emitting Diodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tansu, Nelson; Dierolf, Volkmar; Huang, Gensheng; Penn, Samson; Zhao, Hongping; Liu, Guangyu; Li, Xiaohang; Poplawsky, Jonathan

    2011-07-14

    The technology on the large overlap InGaN QWs developed in this program is currently implemented in commercial technology in enhancing the internal quantum efficiency in major LED industry in US and Asia. The scientific finding from this work supported by the DOE enabled the implementation of this step-like staggered quantum well in the commercial LEDs.

  16. Molecular Beam Epitaxy-Grown InGaN Nanomushrooms and Nanowires for White Light Source Applications

    KAUST Repository

    Gasim, Anwar A.; Bhattacharya, Pallab K.; Cha, Dong Kyu; Ng, Tien Khee; Ooi, Boon S.

    2012-01-01

    We report the observation of coexisting InGaN nanomushrooms and nanowires grown via MBE. Photoluminescence characterization shows that the nanostructures emit yellow and blue light, respectively. The combined emission is promising for white-LEDs.

  17. Emission control of InGaN nanocolumns grown by molecular-beam epitaxy on Si(111) substrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Albert, S.; Bengoechea-Encabo, A.; Sanchez-Garcia, M. A.; Calleja, E.; Lefebvre, P.; Jahn, U.; Trampert, A.

    2011-01-01

    This work studies the effect of the growth temperature on the morphology and emission characteristics of self-assembled InGaN nanocolumns grown by plasma assisted molecular beam epitaxy. Morphology changes are assessed by scanning electron microscopy, while emission is measured by photoluminescence. Within the growth temperature range of 750 to 650 deg. C, an increase in In incorporation for decreasing temperature is observed. This effect allows tailoring the InGaN nanocolumns emission line shape by using temperature gradients during growth. Depending on the gradient rate, span, and sign, broad emission line shapes are obtained, covering the yellow to green range, even yielding white emission.

  18. Investigation of efficiency enhancement in InGaN MQW LED with compositionally step graded GaN/InAlN/GaN multi-layer barrier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prajoon, P.; Anuja Menokey, M.; Charles Pravin, J.; Ajayan, J.; Rajesh, S.; Nirmal, D.

    2018-04-01

    The advantage of InGaN multiple Quantum well (MQW) Light emitting diode (LED) on a SiC substrate with compositionally step graded GaN/InAlN/GaN multi-layer barrier (MLB) is studied. The Internal quantum efficiency, Optical power, current-voltage characteristics, spontaneous emission rate and carrier distribution profile in the active region are investigated using Sentaurus TCAD simulation. An analytical model is also developed to describe the QW carrier injection efficiency, by including carrier leakage mechanisms like carrier overflow, thermionic emission and tunnelling. The enhanced electron confinement, reduced carrier asymmetry, and suppressed carrier overflow in the active region of the MLB MQW LED leads to render a superior performance than the conventional GaN barrier MQW LED. The simulation result also elucidates the efficiency droop behaviour in the MLB MQW LED, it suggests that the efficiency droop effect is remarkably improved when the GaN barrier is replaced with GaN/InAlN/GaN MLB barrier. The analysis shows a dominating behaviour of carrier escape mechanism due to tunnelling. Moreover, the lower lattice mismatching of SiC substrate with GaN epitaxial layer is attributed with good crystal quality and reduced polarization effect, ultimately enhances the optical performance of the LEDs.

  19. Multihydroxy-Anthraquinone Derivatives as Free Radical and Cationic Photoinitiators of Various Photopolymerizations under Green LED.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jing; Hill, NicholasS; Lalevée, Jacques; Fouassier, Jean-Pierre; Zhao, Jiacheng; Graff, Bernadette; Schmidt, Timothy W; Kable, Scott H; Stenzel, Martina H; Coote, Michelle L; Xiao, Pu

    2018-04-20

    Multihydroxy-anthraquinone derivatives [i.e., 1,2,4-trihydroxyanthraquinone (124-THAQ), 1,2,7-trihydroxyanthraquinone (127-THAQ), and 1,2,5,8-tetrahydroxyanthraquinone (1258-THAQ)] can interact with various additives [e.g., iodonium salt, tertiary amine, N-vinylcarbazole, and 2-(4-methoxystyryl)-4,6-bis(trichloromethyl)-1,3,5-triazine] under household green LED irradiation to generate active species (cations and radicals). The relevant photochemical mechanism is investigated using quantum chemistry, fluorescence, cyclic voltammetry, laser flash photolysis, steady state photolysis, and electron spin resonance spin-trapping techniques. Furthermore, the multihydroxy-anthraquinone derivative-based photoinitiating systems are capable of initiating cationic photopolymerization of epoxides or divinyl ethers under green LED, and the relevant photoinitiation ability is consistent with the photochemical reactivity (i.e., 124-THAQ-based photoinitiating system exhibits highest reactivity and photoinitiation ability). More interestingly, multihydroxy-anthraquinone derivative-based photoinitiating systems can initiate free radical crosslinking or controlled (i.e., reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer) photopolymerization of methacrylates under green LED. It reveals that multihydroxy-anthraquinone derivatives can be used as versatile photoinitiators for various types of photopolymerization reactions. © 2018 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. Enabling factors for the improvement of nitride-based LED efficiency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laubsch, Ansgar; Bergbauer, Werner; Sabathil, Matthias; Peter, Matthias; Meyer, Tobias; Bruederl, Georg; Linder, Norbert; Streubel, Klaus; Oberschmid, Raimund; Hahn, Berthold; Wagner, Joachim

    2008-01-01

    Recent progress in the epitaxial growth of LEDs with InGaN/GaN quantum-well heterostructures has led to a significant enhancement of output power. In this talk, we will discuss the mechanisms limiting the devices' internal efficiency and identify enabling factors for further improvements. We compare samples with different Indium content as well as different design of the active layer. Although heteroepitaxial growth of GaN on sapphire generates high defect densities, non-radiative defect-related Shockley-Read-Hall recombination does not seem to substantially limit the efficiency of standard InGaN/GaN LED structures. We rather discuss a supplemental Auger-like non-radiative path for carrier recombination that becomes dominant at quantum-well carrier densities typical for LED operation. Additionally, the piezo-field induced reduced overlap of electron and hole wavefunction in standard c-plane grown InGaN quantum wells reduces the radiative recombination rate

  1. Engineering Strain for Improved III-Nitride Optoelectronic Device Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Den Broeck, Dennis Marnix

    Due to growing environmental and economic concerns, renewable energy generation and high-efficiency lighting are becoming even more important in the scientific community. III-Nitride devices have been essential in production of high-brightness light-emitting diodes (LEDs) and are now entering the photovoltaic (PV) realm as the technology advances. InGaN/GaN multiple quantum well LEDs emitting in the blue/green region have emerged as promising candidates for next-generation lighting technologies. Due to the large lattice mismatch between InN and GaN, large electric fields exist within the quantum well layers and result in low rates of radiative recombination, especially for the green spectral region. This is commonly referred to as the "green gap" and results in poor external quantum efficiencies for light-emitting diodes and laser diodes. In order to mitigate the compressive stress of InGaN QWs, a novel growth technique is developed in order to grown thick, strain-relaxed In yGa1-yN templates for 0.08 structure, "semibulk" InGaN templates were achieved with vastly superior crystal and optical properties than bulk InGaN films. These semibulk InGaN templates were then utilized as new templates for multiple quantum well active layers, effectively reducing the compressive strain in the InGaN wells due to the larger lattice constant of the InGaN template with respect to a GaN template. A zero-stress balance method was used in order to realize a strain-balanced multiple quantum well structure, which again showed improved optical characteristics when compared to fully-strain active regions. The semibulk InGaN template was then implemented into "strain-compensated" LED structures, where light emission was achieved with very little leakage current. Discussion of these strain-compensated devices compared to conventional LEDs is detailed.

  2. Luminescence properties of Eu2+- and Ce3+-doped CaAl2S4 and application in white LEDs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu Ruijin; Wang Jing; Zhang Jianhui; Yuan Haibin; Su Qiang

    2008-01-01

    The Eu 2+ - and Ce 3+ -doped CaAl 2 S 4 phosphors were comparatively synthesized by conventional solid-state reaction and the evacuated sealed quartz ampoule. The X-ray diffraction (XRD) patterns show that the sample with better crystalline quality was prepared by the evacuated sealed quartz ampoule, resulting in the enhancement of the emission intensity of Eu 2+ ion by a factor of 1.7. The intensive green LEDs were also fabricated by combining CaAl 2 S 4 :Eu 2+ with near-ultraviolet InGaN chips (λ em =395 nm). The dependence of as-fabricated green LEDs on forward-bias currents shows that it presents good chromaticity stability and luminance saturation, indicating that CaAl 2 S 4 :Eu 2+ is a promising green-emitting phosphor for a near-UV InGaN-based LED. In addition, the optical properties of CaAl 2 S 4 :Ce 3+ were systematically investigated by means of diffuse reflectance, photoluminescence excitation and emission, concentrating quenching and the decay curve. - Graphical abstract: The Eu 2+ - and Ce 3+ -doped CaAl 2 S 4 phosphors were comparatively synthesized by two methods. The emission intensity of Eu 2+ ion in sample synthesized by the evacuated sealed quartz ampoule method is by a factor of 1.7 as strong as that of Eu 2+ ion in sample prepared by the conventional solid-state reaction method

  3. The optoelectronic chameleon - GaN-based light emitters from the UV to green

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kneissl, Michael [Institut fuer Festkoerperphysik, Technische Universitaet Berlin (Germany)

    2008-07-01

    Group III-nitrides have evolved into one of the most versatile and important semiconductor materials for optoelectronic devices. GaN-based blue, green and white light emitting diodes have already entered many parts of everyday life and violet lasers are expected to be following soon. However, considering the extraordinary electronic properties and the wide spectral range that is accessible through nitride materials, it appears that it we have just touched the tip of the iceberg. We discuss some of the new fields of research for InAlGaN materials and devices and review progress in the development of near and deep ultraviolet light emitting diodes, as well as growth and optical properties of InN and indium rich InGaN alloys for emitter in the blue-green spectral range and beyond.

  4. BInGaN alloys nearly lattice-matched to GaN for high-power high-efficiency visible LEDs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Logan; Kioupakis, Emmanouil

    2017-11-01

    InGaN-based visible light-emitting diodes (LEDs) find commercial applications for solid-state lighting and displays, but lattice mismatch limits the thickness of InGaN quantum wells that can be grown on GaN with high crystalline quality. Since narrower wells operate at a higher carrier density for a given current density, they increase the fraction of carriers lost to Auger recombination and lower the efficiency. The incorporation of boron, a smaller group-III element, into InGaN alloys is a promising method to eliminate the lattice mismatch and realize high-power, high-efficiency visible LEDs with thick active regions. In this work, we apply predictive calculations based on hybrid density functional theory to investigate the thermodynamic, structural, and electronic properties of BInGaN alloys. Our results show that BInGaN alloys with a B:In ratio of 2:3 are better lattice matched to GaN compared to InGaN and, for indium fractions less than 0.2, nearly lattice matched. Deviations from Vegard's law appear as bowing of the in-plane lattice constant with respect to composition. Our thermodynamics calculations demonstrate that the solubility of boron is higher in InGaN than in pure GaN. Varying the Ga mole fraction while keeping the B:In ratio constant enables the adjustment of the (direct) gap in the 1.75-3.39 eV range, which covers the entire visible spectrum. Holes are strongly localized in non-bonded N 2p states caused by local bond planarization near boron atoms. Our results indicate that BInGaN alloys are promising for fabricating nitride heterostructures with thick active regions for high-power, high-efficiency LEDs.

  5. Optimal colour quality of LED clusters based on memory colours.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smet, Kevin; Ryckaert, Wouter R; Pointer, Michael R; Deconinck, Geert; Hanselaer, Peter

    2011-03-28

    The spectral power distributions of tri- and tetrachromatic clusters of Light-Emitting-Diodes, composed of simulated and commercially available LEDs, were optimized with a genetic algorithm to maximize the luminous efficacy of radiation and the colour quality as assessed by the memory colour quality metric developed by the authors. The trade-off of the colour quality as assessed by the memory colour metric and the luminous efficacy of radiation was investigated by calculating the Pareto optimal front using the NSGA-II genetic algorithm. Optimal peak wavelengths and spectral widths of the LEDs were derived, and over half of them were found to be close to Thornton's prime colours. The Pareto optimal fronts of real LED clusters were always found to be smaller than those of the simulated clusters. The effect of binning on designing a real LED cluster was investigated and was found to be quite large. Finally, a real LED cluster of commercially available AlGaInP, InGaN and phosphor white LEDs was optimized to obtain a higher score on memory colour quality scale than its corresponding CIE reference illuminant.

  6. Imaging camera system of OYGBR-phosphor-based white LED lighting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobashi, Katsuya; Taguchi, Tsunemasa

    2005-03-01

    The near-ultraviolet (nUV) white LED approach is analogous to three-color fluorescent lamp technology, which is based on the conversion of nUV radiation to visible light via the photoluminescence process in phosphor materials. The nUV light is not included in the white light generation from nUV-based white LED devices. This technology can thus provide a higher quality of white light than the blue and YAG method. A typical device demonstrates white luminescence with Tc=3,700 K, Ra > 93, K > 40 lm/W and chromaticity (x, y) = (0.39, 0.39), respectively. The orange, yellow, green and blue OYGB) or orange, yellow, red, green and blue (OYRGB) device shows a luminescence spectrum broader than of an RGB white LED and a better color rendering index. Such superior luminous characteristics could be useful for the application of several kinds of endoscope. We have shown the excellent pictures of digestive organs in a stomach of a dog due to the strong green component and high Ra.

  7. Realizing InGaN monolithic solar-photoelectrochemical cells for artificial photosynthesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dahal, R.; Pantha, B. N.; Li, J.; Lin, J. Y.; Jiang, H. X., E-mail: hx.jiang@ttu.edu [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Texas Tech University, Lubbock, Texas 79409 (United States)

    2014-04-07

    InGaN alloys are very promising for solar water splitting because they have direct bandgaps that cover almost the whole solar spectrum. The demonstration of direct solar-to-fuel conversion without external bias with the sunlight being the only energy input would pave the way for realizing photoelectrochemical (PEC) production of hydrogen by using InGaN. A monolithic solar-PEC cell based on InGaN/GaN multiple quantum wells capable to directly generate hydrogen gas under zero bias via solar water splitting is reported. Under the irradiation by a simulated sunlight (1-sun with 100 mW/cm{sup 2}), a 1.5% solar-to-fuel conversion efficiency has been achieved under zero bias, setting a fresh benchmark of employing III-nitrides for artificial photosynthesis. Time dependent hydrogen gas production photocurrent measured over a prolonged period (measured for 7 days) revealed an excellent chemical stability of InGaN in aqueous solution of hydrobromic acid. The results provide insights into the architecture design of using InGaN for artificial photosynthesis to provide usable clean fuel (hydrogen gas) with the sunlight being the only energy input.

  8. Defects of polar, semipolar and nonpolar (In)GaN - a comparison

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schade, Lukas; Schwarz, Ulrich [Department of Microsystems Engeneering, IMTEK, University Freiburg (Germany); Fraunhofer Institute for Applied Solid State Physics (Germany); Wernicke, Tim; Rass, Jens; Ploch, Simon [Institute of Solid State Physics, Technical University Berlin (Germany); Forghani, Kamran [Institute for Optoelectronics, University Ulm (Germany); University of Wisconsin, Madison (United States); Kirste, Lutz [Fraunhofer Institute for Applied Solid State Physics (Germany); Weyers, Markus [Ferdinand-Braun-Institut, Berlin (Germany); Kneissl, Michael [Institute of Solid State Physics, Technical University Berlin (Germany); Ferdinand-Braun-Institut, Berlin (Germany); Scholz, Ferdinand [Institute for Optoelectronics, University Ulm (Germany)

    2013-07-01

    The GaN/InGaN material system is used to realize light emitting diodes from UV-A to the green-yellow spectral region. However, even on quasi bulk GaN substrates threading dislocations (TDs) are present with a density of 10{sup 7} cm{sup -2}. Here, we examine the influence of TDs on the luminescence intensity and transition energy. The impact caused by nonradiative recombination centers and strain fields is analyzed by micro photoluminescence and white light interferometry. We compare TDs in differently oriented GaN layers and InGaN QWs. Three types of burgers vectors are typically observed in GaN: a, c and a+c. When the surface orientation is changed from (0001) c-plane to (10 anti 10) m-plane, their character changes from edge to screw type and vice versa. We studied TDs and V-defects associated to them in polar, semipolar and nonpolar GaN and InGaN QWs. Additionally, we will present the effect of Si doping onto the strain field in (0001) GaN edge dislocations. In undoped GaN, the strain around such a dislocation forms a symmetric dipole. With Si doping, the strain dipole becomes asymmetric.

  9. Investigation of new approaches for InGaN growth with high indium content for CPV application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arif, Muhammad; Salvestrini, Jean Paul, E-mail: salvestr@metz.supelec.fr [CNRS, UMI 2958 Georgia Tech - CNRS, 57070 Metz (France); Université de Lorraine & CentraleSupelec, LMOPS, EA4423, 57070 Metz (France); Sundaram, Suresh; Streque, Jérémy; Gmili, Youssef El [CNRS, UMI 2958 Georgia Tech - CNRS, 57070 Metz (France); Puybaret, Renaud; Voss, Paul L. [Georgia Institute of Technology, UMI 2958 Georgia Tech - CNRS, 57070 Metz (France); Belahsene, Sofiane; Ramdane, Abderahim; Martinez, Anthony; Patriarche, Gilles [CNRS, UPR LPN, Route de Nozay, 91460 Marcoussis (France); Fix, Thomas; Slaoui, Abdelillah [CNRS, ICUBE - Université de Strasbourg (France); Ougazzaden, Abdallah [CNRS, UMI 2958 Georgia Tech - CNRS, 57070 Metz (France); Georgia Institute of Technology, UMI 2958 Georgia Tech - CNRS, 57070 Metz (France)

    2015-09-28

    We propose to use two new approaches that may overcome the issues of phase separation and high dislocation density in InGaN-based PIN solar cells. The first approach consists in the growth of a thick multi-layered InGaN/GaN absorber. The periodical insertion of the thin GaN interlayers should absorb the In excess and relieve compressive strain. The InGaN layers need to be thin enough to remain fully strained and without phase separation. The second approach consists in the growth of InGaN nano-structures for the achievement of high In content thick InGaN layers. It allows the elimination of the preexisting dislocations in the underlying template. It also allows strain relaxation of InGaN layers without any dislocations, leading to higher In incorporation and reduced piezo-electric effect. The two approaches lead to structural, morphological, and luminescence properties that are significantly improved when compared to those of thick InGaN layers. Corresponding full PIN structures have been realized by growing a p-type GaN layer on the top the half PIN structures. External quantum efficiency, electro-luminescence, and photo-current characterizations have been carried out on the different structures and reveal an enhancement of the performances of the InGaN PIN PV cells when the thick InGaN layer is replaced by either InGaN/GaN multi-layered or InGaN nanorod layer.

  10. InGaN pn-junctions grown by PA-MBE: Material characterization and fabrication of nanocolumn electroluminescent devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gherasoiu, I.; Yu, K. M.; Reichertz, L.; Walukiewicz, W.

    2015-09-01

    PN junctions are basic building blocks of many electronic devices and their performance depends on the structural properties of the component layers and on the type and the amount of the doping impurities incorporated. Magnesium is the common p-type dopant for nitride semiconductors while silicon and more recently germanium are the n-dopants of choice. In this paper, therefore we analyze the quantitative limits for Mg and Ge incorporation on GaN and InGaN with high In content. We also discuss the challenges posed by the growth and characterization of InGaN pn-junctions and we discuss the properties of large area, long wavelength nanocolumn LEDs grown on silicon (1 1 1) by PA-MBE.

  11. Nanoselective area growth and characterization of dislocation-free InGaN nanopyramids on AlN buffered Si(111) templates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sundaram, S.; El Gmili, Y. [CNRS, UMI 2958 Georgia Tech-CNRS, 2 Rue Marconi, 57070 Metz (France); Puybaret, R.; Li, X.; Bonanno, P. L.; Voss, P. L.; Ougazzaden, A., E-mail: abdallah.ougazzaden@georgiatech-metz.fr [CNRS, UMI 2958 Georgia Tech-CNRS, 2 Rue Marconi, 57070 Metz (France); School of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, GT Lorraine, 57070 Metz (France); Pantzas, K.; Patriarche, G. [CNRS, UPR LPN, Route de Nozay, 91460 Marcoussis (France); Salvestrini, J. P. [Universite de Lorraine, Centrale Supelec, LMOPS, EA 4423, 2 rue E. Belin, 57070 Metz (France)

    2015-09-14

    We report the metal organic chemical vapor deposition growth of dislocation-free 100 nm thick hexagonal InGaN nanopyramid arrays with up to 33% of indium content by nano-selective area growth on patterned AlN/Si (111) substrates. InGaN grown on SiO{sub 2} patterned templates exhibit high selectivity. Their single crystal structure is confirmed by scanning transmission electron microscope combined with an energy dispersive X-ray analysis, which also reveals the absence of threading dislocations in the InGaN nanopyramids due to elastic strain relaxation mechanisms. Cathodoluminescence measurements on a single InGaN nanopyramid clearly show an improvement of the optical properties when compared to planar InGaN grown under the same conditions. The good structural, morphological, and optical quality of the InGaN nanostructures grown on AlN/Si indicates that the nano-selective area growth technology is attractive for the realization of site-controlled indium-rich InGaN nanostructure-based devices and can also be transferred to other highly mismatched substrates.

  12. Health-friendly high-quality white light using violet-green-red laser and InGaN nanowires-based true yellow nanowires light-emitting diodes

    KAUST Repository

    Janjua, Bilal

    2017-02-16

    White light based on blue laser - YAG: Ce phosphor has the advantage of implementing solid-state lighting and optical wireless communications combined-functionalities in a single lamp. However, the blue light was found to disrupt melatonin production, and therefore the human circadian rhythm in general; while the yellow phosphor is susceptible to degradation by laser irradiation and also lack tunability in color rendering index (CRI). In this investigation, by using a violet laser, which has 50% less impact on circadian response, as compared to blue light, and an InGaN-quantum-disks nanowires-based light-emitting diode (NWs-LED), we address both issues simultaneously. The white light is therefore generated using violet-green-red lasers, in conjunction with a yellow NWs-LED realized using molecular beam epitaxy technique, on titanium-coated silicon substrates. Unlike the conventional quantum-well-based LED, the NWs-LED showed efficiency-droop free behavior up to 9.8 A/cm with peak output power of 400 μW. A low turn-on voltage of ∼2.1 V was attributed to the formation of conducting titanium nitride layer at NWs nucleation site and improved fabrication process in the presence of relatively uniform height distribution. The 3D quantum confinement and the reduced band bending improve carriers-wavefunctions overlap, resulting in an IQE of ∼39 %. By changing the relative intensities of the individual color components, CRI of >85 was achieved with tunable correlated color temperature (CCT), thus covering the desired room lighting conditions. Our architecture provides important considerations in designing smart solid-state lighting while addressing the harmful effect of blue light.

  13. Health-friendly high-quality white light using violet-green-red laser and InGaN nanowires-based true yellow nanowires light-emitting diodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janjua, Bilal; Ng, Tien K.; Zhao, Chao; Anjum, Dalaver H.; Prabaswara, Aditya; Consiglio, Giuseppe Bernardo; Shen, Chao; Ooi, Boon S.

    2017-02-01

    White light based on blue laser - YAG: Ce3+ phosphor has the advantage of implementing solid-state lighting and optical wireless communications combined-functionalities in a single lamp. However, the blue light was found to disrupt melatonin production, and therefore the human circadian rhythm in general; while the yellow phosphor is susceptible to degradation by laser irradiation and also lack tunability in color rendering index (CRI). In this investigation, by using a violet laser, which has 50% less impact on circadian response, as compared to blue light, and an InGaN-quantum-disks nanowires-based light-emitting diode (NWs-LED), we address both issues simultaneously. The white light is therefore generated using violet-green-red lasers, in conjunction with a yellow NWs-LED realized using molecular beam epitaxy technique, on titanium-coated silicon substrates. Unlike the conventional quantum-well-based LED, the NWs-LED showed efficiency-droop free behavior up to 9.8 A/cm2 with peak output power of 400 μW. A low turn-on voltage of 2.1 V was attributed to the formation of conducting titanium nitride layer at NWs nucleation site and improved fabrication process in the presence of relatively uniform height distribution. The 3D quantum confinement and the reduced band bending improve carriers-wavefunctions overlap, resulting in an IQE of 39 %. By changing the relative intensities of the individual color components, CRI of >85 was achieved with tunable correlated color temperature (CCT), thus covering the desired room lighting conditions. Our architecture provides important considerations in designing smart solid-state lighting while addressing the harmful effect of blue light.

  14. Flexible InGaN nanowire membranes for enhanced solar water splitting

    KAUST Repository

    Elafandy, Rami T.

    2018-05-30

    III-Nitride nanowires (NWs) have recently emerged as potential photoelectrodes for efficient solar hydrogen generation. While InGaN NWs epitaxy over silicon is required for high crystalline quality and economic production, it leads to the formation of the notorious silicon nitride insulating interface as well as low electrical conductivity which both impede excess charge carrier dynamics and overall device performance. We tackle this issue by developing, for the first time, a substrate-free InGaN NWs membrane photoanodes, through liftoff and transfer techniques, where excess charge carriers are efficiently extracted from the InGaN NWs through a proper ohmic contact formed with a high electrical conductivity metal stack membrane. As a result, compared to conventional InGaN NWs on silicon, the fabricated free-standing flexible membranes showed a 10-fold increase in the generated photocurrent as well as a 0.8 V cathodic shift in the onset potential. Through electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, accompanied with TEM-based analysis, we further demonstrated the detailed enhancement within excess charge carrier dynamics of the photoanode membranes. This novel configuration in photoelectrodes demonstrates a novel pathway for enhancing the performance of III-nitrides photoelectrodes to accelerate their commercialization for solar water splitting.

  15. Simple models for InGaN alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elfituri, Fathi; Hourahine, Ben

    2012-01-01

    The properties of InGaN alloys are important for many applications in optoelectronics, since their fundamental gap spans the visible range. Calculating properties, particularly for InN, is theoretically challenging, especially to obtain accurate values for the band gap. We have developed a semi-empirical parametrisation of (In,Ga) N using the density functional based tight binding method (DFTB), where the band gaps of InN and GaN have been empirically corrected to experiment. We demonstrate the performance of this method by calculating a range of properties for the two materials, including elastic constants and carrier effective masses. There are several methods to model alloys of these material, one of the simplest being the virtual crystal approximation, which we apply to derive electronic properties over the whole composition range for InGaN. (Copyright copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  16. Optical investigation of microscopic defect distribution in semi-polar (1-101 and 11-22) InGaN light-emitting diodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hafiz, Shopan; Andrade, Nicolas; Monavarian, Morteza; Izyumskaya, Natalia; Das, Saikat; Zhang, Fan; Avrutin, Vitaliy; Morkoç, Hadis; Özgür, Ümit

    2016-02-01

    Near-field scanning optical microscopy was applied to investigate the spatial variations of extended defects and their effects on the optical quality for semi-polar (1-101) and (11-22) InGaN light emitting diodes (LEDs). (1-101) and (11-22) oriented InGaN LEDs emitting at 450-470 nm were grown on patterned Si (001) 7° offcut substrates and m-sapphire substrates by means of nano-epitaxial lateral overgrowth (ELO), respectively. For (1-101) structures, the photoluminescence (PL) at 85 K from the near surface c+ wings was found to be relatively uniform and strong across the sample. However, emission from the c- wings was substantially weaker due to the presence of high density of threading dislocations (TDs) and basal plane stacking faults (BSFs) as revealed from the local PL spectra. In case of (11-22) LED structures, near-field PL intensity correlated with the surface features and the striations along the direction parallel to the c-axis projection exposed facets where the Indium content was higher as deduced from shift in the PL peak energy.

  17. Bridging “green gap” of LEDs: Giant light output enhancement and directional control of LEDs via embedded nano-void photonic crystals

    KAUST Repository

    Tsai, Yu-Lin

    2015-11-23

    Green LEDs do not show the same level of performance as their blue and red cousins, greatly hindering the solid-state lighting development, which is so-called “green gap”. In this work, nano-void photonic crystals (NVPCs) were fabricated to embed within the GaN/InGaN green LEDs by using epitaxial lateral overgrowth (ELO) and nano-sphere lithography techniques. The NVPCs act as an efficient scattering back-reflector to outcouple the guided and downward photons, which not only boosting light extraction efficiency of LEDs with an enhancement of 78% but also collimating the view angle of LEDs from 131.5゜to 114.0゜. This could be because the highly scattering nature of NVPCs which reduce the interference giving rise to Fabry-Perot resonance. Moreover, due to the threading dislocation suppression and strain relief by the NVPCs, the internal quantum efficiency was increased by 25% and droop behavior was reduced from 37.4% to 25.9%. The enhancement of light output power can be achieved as high as 151% at a driving current of 350 mA. Giant light output enhancement and directional control via NVPCs points the way towards a promising avenue of solid-state lighting.

  18. Bridging “green gap” of LEDs: Giant light output enhancement and directional control of LEDs via embedded nano-void photonic crystals

    KAUST Repository

    Tsai, Yu-Lin; Liu, Che-Yu; Krishnan, Chirenjeevi; Lin, Da-Wei; Chu, You-Chen; Chen, Tzu-Pei; Shen, Tien-Lin; Kao, Tsung-Sheng; Charlton, Martin; Yu, Peichen; Lin, Chien-Chung; Kuo, Hao-Chung; He, Jr-Hau

    2015-01-01

    Green LEDs do not show the same level of performance as their blue and red cousins, greatly hindering the solid-state lighting development, which is so-called “green gap”. In this work, nano-void photonic crystals (NVPCs) were fabricated to embed within the GaN/InGaN green LEDs by using epitaxial lateral overgrowth (ELO) and nano-sphere lithography techniques. The NVPCs act as an efficient scattering back-reflector to outcouple the guided and downward photons, which not only boosting light extraction efficiency of LEDs with an enhancement of 78% but also collimating the view angle of LEDs from 131.5゜to 114.0゜. This could be because the highly scattering nature of NVPCs which reduce the interference giving rise to Fabry-Perot resonance. Moreover, due to the threading dislocation suppression and strain relief by the NVPCs, the internal quantum efficiency was increased by 25% and droop behavior was reduced from 37.4% to 25.9%. The enhancement of light output power can be achieved as high as 151% at a driving current of 350 mA. Giant light output enhancement and directional control via NVPCs points the way towards a promising avenue of solid-state lighting.

  19. Ultrafast and band-selective Auger recombination in InGaN quantum wells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, Kristopher W.; Monahan, Nicholas R.; Zhu, X.-Y.; Koleske, Daniel D.; Crawford, Mary H.

    2016-01-01

    In InGaN quantum well based light-emitting diodes, Auger recombination is believed to limit the quantum efficiency at high injection currents. Here, we report the direct observation of carrier loss from Auger recombination on a sub-picosecond timescale in a single InGaN quantum well using time-resolved photoemission. Selective excitations of different valence sub-bands reveal that the Auger rate constant decreases by two orders of magnitude as the effective hole mass decreases, confirming the critical role of momentum conservation.

  20. Synthesis and luminescent features of NaCaPO4:Tb3+ green phosphor for near UV-based LEDs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ratnam, B.V.; Jayasimhadri, M.; Bhaskar Kumar, G.; Jang, Kiwan; Kim, S.S.; Lee, Y.I.; Lim, J.M.; Shin, D.S.; Song, T.K.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► Successfully synthesized orthorhombic phase of NaCaPO 4 (NCP) phosphors ► Structural and Luminescent properties have been investigated. ► In the excitation spectrum, 7 F 6 → 5 G 6 transition at 370 nm exhibit highest intensity. ► CIE coordinates of Tb 3+ : NCP phosphor indicate green light emission in CIE diagram. ► Hence, Tb 3+ doped NaCaPO 4 is suitable for UV based pc-LEDs. -- Abstract: An efficient green emitting Tb 3+ doped NaCaPO 4 (NCP) phosphor was synthesized by using conventional solid-state reaction for solid-state lighting applications. X-ray diffraction (XRD), field emission scanning electron microscope (FE-SEM), FT-IR, emission and excitation properties were extensively investigated for NCP phosphors. X-ray diffraction analysis confirmed the formation of NaCaPO 4 with orthorhombic structure. The excitation spectrum consists of strong 4f–4f transition at around 370 nm, which has higher intensity than the f–d transition. Emission spectra indicated that this phosphor can be efficiently excited by UV light in the range from 250 to 400 nm, and shows strong emission band centered at 547 nm. Analysis of the emission spectra with different Tb 3+ concentrations revealed that the optimum dopant concentration for these NCP phosphors is about 5 mol% of Tb 3+ . Diminishing of 5 D 3 level and increasing of 5 D 4 level emission intensity with the Tb 3+ concentration explained successfully. The emission color was analyzed and confirmed with the help of chromaticity coordinates and color temperature. The excellent luminescent properties of NaCaPO 4 :Tb 3+ phosphor makes it as a potential green phosphor upon near-UV LED excitation

  1. The mechanism of indium-assisted growth of (In)GaN nanorods: eliminating nanorod coalescence by indium-enhanced atomic migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Zhenzhu; Yu, Yuefeng; Han, Jinglei; Wen, Lei; Gao, Fangliang; Zhang, Shuguang; Li, Guoqiang

    2017-11-09

    Both well vertically aligned and uniformly separated (In)GaN nanorods (NRs) were successfully grown on Si(111) substrates by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy. Effects of supplied indium (In) flux on the morphology of (In)GaN NRs were investigated systematically. The scanning electron microscopic analysis and transmission electron microscopic measurements revealed that the presence of In flux can help to inhibit NR coalescence and obtain well-separated (In)GaN NRs. By increasing the supplied In flux, the densities of (In)GaN NRs decreased and the axial growth rates increased. According to the energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry measurements and theoretical calculations, the increase of In content of the NRs enhanced Ga diffusion on the NR sidewalls, which resulted in an increased axial growth rate. A kinetic In-assisted growth model for the well-separated (In)GaN NRs is therefore proposed. The model explains that the presence of In flux not only reduces the density of (In)GaN NRs due to the increase in substrate surface migration of Ga adatoms at nucleation stage but also lead to a remarkable enhancement of axial growth rate at growth stage. Consequently, the NR coalescence was significantly suppressed. The results provide a demonstration of obtaining well-separated (In)GaN NRs and open up further possibility of developing (In)GaN NR-based optoelectronic devices.

  2. InGaN compositional patterning by ultraviolet photoexcitation during NH3-based MOMBE - A pathway to 3D epitaxy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pritchett, D.; Henderson, W.; Billingsley, D.; Doolittle, W.A.

    2008-01-01

    Lateral compositional patterning of InGaN during NH 3 -based MOMBE by digital micromirror patterning of UV photoexcitation is demonstrated. Preferential desorption of In/In-methyl species during InGaN surface exposure to an elliptically focused 5 kW Hg-Xe arc lamp (λ=365 nm) limits the incorporation of indium during growth. Localized photoexcitation results in the preferential In/In-methyl desorption, resulting in indium mole fractions of 0.10 in unexposed regions to as low as 0 in fully exposed regions. The technique demonstrates promise for integration of micromirrors for dynamic and maskless selective epitaxy towards the realization of complex, 3D device structures. (copyright 2008 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  3. High efficiency nitride based phosphores for white LEDs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Li, Yuan Qiang; Hintzen, H.T.J.M.

    2008-01-01

    In this overview paper, novel rare-earth doped silicon nitride based phosphors for white LEDs applications have been demonstrated. The luminescence properties of orange-red-emitting phosphors (M2Si5N8:Eu2+) and green-to-yellow emitting phosphors (MSi2N2O2:Eu2+, M = Ca, Sr, Ba) are discussed in

  4. Fabrication, characterization and applications of flexible vertical InGaN micro-light emitting diode arrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Pengfei; McKendry, Jonathan J D; Gu, Erdan; Chen, Zhizhong; Sun, Yongjian; Zhang, Guoyi; Dawson, Martin D; Liu, Ran

    2016-01-11

    Flexible vertical InGaN micro-light emitting diode (micro-LED) arrays have been fabricated and characterized for potential applications in flexible micro-displays and visible light communication. The LED epitaxial layers were transferred from initial sapphire substrates to flexible AuSn substrates by metal bonding and laser lift off techniques. The current versus voltage characteristics of flexible micro-LEDs degraded after bending the devices, but the electroluminescence spectra show little shift even under a very small bending radius 3 mm. The high thermal conductivity of flexible metal substrates enables high thermal saturation current density and high light output power of the flexible micro-LEDs, benefiting the potential applications in flexible high-brightness micro-displays and high-speed visible light communication. We have achieved ~40 MHz modulation bandwidth and 120 Mbit/s data transmission speed for a typical flexible micro-LED.

  5. InGaN compositional patterning by ultraviolet photoexcitation during NH{sub 3}-based MOMBE - A pathway to 3D epitaxy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pritchett, D.; Henderson, W.; Billingsley, D.; Doolittle, W.A. [School of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, 777 Atlantic Dr., Atlanta, GA 30332 (United States)

    2008-07-01

    Lateral compositional patterning of InGaN during NH{sub 3}-based MOMBE by digital micromirror patterning of UV photoexcitation is demonstrated. Preferential desorption of In/In-methyl species during InGaN surface exposure to an elliptically focused 5 kW Hg-Xe arc lamp ({lambda}=365 nm) limits the incorporation of indium during growth. Localized photoexcitation results in the preferential In/In-methyl desorption, resulting in indium mole fractions of 0.10 in unexposed regions to as low as 0 in fully exposed regions. The technique demonstrates promise for integration of micromirrors for dynamic and maskless selective epitaxy towards the realization of complex, 3D device structures. (copyright 2008 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  6. InGaN High-Temperature Photovoltaic Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starikov, David

    2015-01-01

    This Phase II project developed Indium-Gallium-Nitride (InGaN) photovoltaic cells for high-temperature and high-radiation environments. The project included theoretical and experimental refinement of device structures produced in Phase I as well as modeling and optimization of solar cell device processing. The devices have been tested under concentrated air mass zero (AM0) sunlight, at temperatures from 100 degC to 250 degC, and after exposure to ionizing radiation. The results are expected to further verify that InGaN can be used for high-temperature and high-radiation solar cells. The large commercial solar cell market could benefit from the hybridization of InGaN materials to existing solar cell technology, which would significantly increase cell efficiency without relying on highly toxic compounds. In addition, further development of this technology to even lower bandgap materials for space applications would extend lifetimes of satellite solar cell arrays due to increased radiation hardness. This could be of importance to the Departmentof Defense (DoD) and commercial satellite manufacturers.

  7. Characteristics of InGaN designed for photovoltaic applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trybus, E.; Jani, O.; Burnham, S.; Ferguson, I.; Doolittle, W.A.; Honsberg, C.; Steiner, M.

    2008-01-01

    This work addresses the required properties and device structures for an InGaN solar cell. Homojunction InGaN solar cells with a bandgap greater than 2.0 eV are specifically targeted due to material limitations. These devices are attractive because over half the available power in the solar spectrum is above 2.0 eV. Using high growth rates, InGaN films with indium compositions ranging from 1 to 32% have been grown by Molecular Beam Epitaxy with negligible phase separation according to X-ray diffraction analysis, and better than 190 arc-sec ω-2θ FWHM for ∝0.6 μm thick In 0.32 Ga 0.68 N film. Using measured transmission data, the absorption coefficient of InGaN at 2.4 eV was calculated as α≅2 x 10 5 cm -1 near the band edge. This results in the optimal solar cell thickness of less than a micron and may lead to high open circuit voltage while reducing the constraints on limited minority carrier lifetimes. (copyright 2008 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  8. Characteristics of InGaN designed for photovoltaic applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trybus, E.; Jani, O.; Burnham, S.; Ferguson, I.; Doolittle, W.A. [Georgia Institute of Technology, School of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Atlanta, GA (United States); Honsberg, C. [University of Delaware, Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Newark, DE (United States); Steiner, M. [National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden, CO (United States)

    2008-07-01

    This work addresses the required properties and device structures for an InGaN solar cell. Homojunction InGaN solar cells with a bandgap greater than 2.0 eV are specifically targeted due to material limitations. These devices are attractive because over half the available power in the solar spectrum is above 2.0 eV. Using high growth rates, InGaN films with indium compositions ranging from 1 to 32% have been grown by Molecular Beam Epitaxy with negligible phase separation according to X-ray diffraction analysis, and better than 190 arc-sec {omega}-2{theta} FWHM for {proportional_to}0.6 {mu}m thick In{sub 0.32}Ga{sub 0.68}N film. Using measured transmission data, the absorption coefficient of InGaN at 2.4 eV was calculated as {alpha}{approx_equal}2 x 10{sup 5} cm{sup -1} near the band edge. This results in the optimal solar cell thickness of less than a micron and may lead to high open circuit voltage while reducing the constraints on limited minority carrier lifetimes. (copyright 2008 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  9. Thermal behavior of a quantum dot nanocomposite as a color converting material and its application to white LED

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woo, Ju Yeon; Kim, Kyung Nam; Jeong, Sohee; Han, Chang-Soo, E-mail: cshan@kimm.re.kr [Nano-Mechanical Systems Research division, Korea Institute of Machinery and Materials (KIMM), Daejeon 305343 (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-12-10

    We present a novel nanocomposite, a mixture of a CdSe/CdS/ZnS red quantum dot (QD), an Sr{sub 2}SiO{sub 4}:Eu green phosphor and silicone resin for a color converting material. The temperature rise and the optical characteristics of the nanocomposite due to the addition of the QD have been investigated in terms of QD content ratio and the mixing components. The experimental results suggested that a small addition of QDs generated a large amount of heat during light conversion at the wavelength of QD emission. Considering the temperature rise in a nanocomposite, we applied 0.2 wt% QDs on an InGaN blue LED chip. As a result, we could achieve a white LED device with a high color rendering index of 83.2, a high luminance of 65.86 lm W{sup -1} and a moderate temperature increase of 94 deg. C. The white LED converted by the newly developed QD-phosphor nanocomposite has great potential in future illumination.

  10. Growth mechanism of InGaN nanodots on three-dimensional GaN structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Donghwy; Min, Daehong; Nam, Okhyun [Department of Nano-Optical Engineering, Convergence Center for Advanced Nano-Semiconductor (CANS), Korea Polytechnic University (KPU), Siheung-si, Gyeonggi-do (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-07-15

    In this study, we investigated the growth mechanism of indium gallium nitride (InGaN) nanodots (NDs) and an InGaN layer, which were simultaneously formed on a three-dimensional (3D) gallium nitride (GaN) structure, having (0001) polar, (11-22) semi-polar, and (11-20) nonpolar facets. We observed the difference in the morphological and compositional properties of the InGaN structures. From the high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HR-TEM) images, it can be seen that the InGaN NDs were formed only on the polar and nonpolar facets, whereas an InGaN layer was formed on the semi-polar facet. The indium composition variation in all the InGaN structures was observed using scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) and the energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS). The different growth mechanism can be explained by two reasons: (i) The difference in the diffusivities of indium and gallium adatoms at each facet of 3D GaN structure; and (ii) the difference in the kinetic Wulff plots of polar, semi-polar, and nonpolar GaN planes. (copyright 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  11. Near-infrared InN quantum dots on high-In composition InGaN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soto Rodriguez, Paul E. D.; Gomez, Victor J.; Kumar, Praveen; Calleja, Enrique; Noetzel, Richard [Instituto de Sistemas Optoelectronicos y Microtecnologia (ISOM), Universidad Politecnica de Madrid, Ciudad Universitaria s/n, 28040 Madrid (Spain)

    2013-04-01

    We report the growth of InN quantum dots (QDs) on thick InGaN layers with high In composition (>50%) by molecular beam epitaxy. Optimized growth conditions are identified for the InGaN layers at reduced growth temperature and increased active N flux resulting in minimized phase separation and defect generation. The InN QDs grown on top of the optimized InGaN layer exhibit small size, high density, and photoluminescence up to room temperature. The InN/InGaN QDs reveal excellent potential for intermediate band solar cells with the InGaN and InN QD bandgap energies tuned to the best match of absorption to the solar spectrum.

  12. A novel usage of hydrogen treatment to improve the indium incorporation and internal quantum efficiency of green InGaN/GaN multiple quantum wells simultaneously

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ren, Peng; Zhang, Ning; Xue, Bin; Liu, Zhe; Wang, Junxi; Li, Jinmin

    2016-01-01

    The challenge for improving the internal quantum efficiency (IQE) of InGaN-based light emitting diodes (LED) in the green light range is referred to as the ‘green gap’. However the IQE of InGaN-based LEDs often drops when the emission peak wavelength is adjusted through reducing the growth temperature. Although hydrogen (H 2 ) can improve surface morphology, it reduces the indium incorporation significantly. Here, a novel usage of H 2 treatment on the GaN barrier before the InGaN quantum well is demonstrated to enhance indium incorporation efficiency and improve the IQE simultaneously for the first time. The mechanism behind it is systematically investigated and explained in detail. The possible reason for this phenomenon is the strain relieving function by the undulant GaN barrier surface after H 2 treatment. Test measurements show that applying 0.2 min H 2 treatment on the barrier would reduce defects and enhance indium incorporation, which would improve the localization effect and finally lead to a higher IQE. Although further increasing the treatment time to 0.4 min incorporates more indium atoms, the IQE decreases at the expense of more defects and a larger polarization field than the 0.2 min sample. (paper)

  13. Study on Healing Environment Using Green, Blue and Red LED and Aroma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyaho, Noriharu; Konno, Noriko; Shimada, Takamasa

    In this paper we evaluated the effects of 1/f fluctuation of Green LED light emitted from the specific object by using psychological and physiological experimental tests of spectral electroencephalogram (EEG) topography. In addition, we also verified that the combination of appropriate aroma, blue LED light irradiation and music such as “Mozart: Serenade in Eine Kleine Nacht Musik” has improved mental healing conditions. We confirmed the possibility that the effect of “Healing” would be improved by the above mentioned environments.

  14. Linearly polarized light emission from InGaN/GaN quantum well structure with high indium composition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Hooyoung; Kim, Eun Kyu; Han, Il Ki; Lee, Sung-Ho; Hwang, Sung-Min

    2011-10-01

    We fabricated yellow (575 nm) emitting a-plane InGaN/GaN light emitting diode (LED). Microstructure and stress relaxation of the InGaN well layer were observed from the images of dark field transmission electron microscopy. The LED chip was operated at 3.7 V, 20 mA, and the polarization-free characteristic in nonpolar InGaN layer was confirmed from a small blue-shift of approximaely 1.7 nm with increase of current density. The high photoluminescence (PL) efficiency of 30.4% showed that this non-polar InGaN layer has a potential of application to green-red long wavelength light emitters. The PL polarization ratio at 290 K was 0.25 and the energy difference between two subbands was estimated to be 40.2 meV. The low values of polarization and energy difference were due to the stress relaxation of InGaN well layer.

  15. Study on luminescence and thermal stability of blue-emitting Sr_5(PO_4)_3F: Eu"2"+phosphor for application in InGaN-based LEDs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Jie; Zhang, Zhi-Ming; Wu, Zhan-Chao; Wang, Fang-Fang; Li, Zhen-Jiang

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • A blue phosphor Sr_5(PO_4)_3F: Eu"2"+ was prepared at low temperature of 800 °C. • The broad excitation band of the phosphor matches well with NUV LED chips. • The phosphor shows high color purity and good color stability. • A bright blue-emitting LED was fabricated with this phosphor on an InGaN chip. - Abstract: A series of blue-emitting phosphors Sr_5(PO_4)_3F: Eu"2"+ were synthesized by traditional high temperature solid-state reaction method. The micro-morphology and photoluminescence properties of the phosphors were investigated. The Sr_5(PO_4)_3F: Eu"2"+ phosphors exhibit broad excitation spectra ranging from 250 to 420 nm, and an intense asymmetric blue emission band peaking at 435 nm. Two different Eu"2"+ emission centers in Sr_5(PO_4)_3F: Eu"2"+ phosphors were confirmed via their fluorescence properties. The concentration quenching mechanism, fluorescence lifetime and thermal stability of Sr_5(PO_4)_3F: Eu"2"+ phosphors were studied in detail. The thermal stability can be improved obviously by anion substitution. The CIE chromaticity coordinates of Sr_5(PO_4)_3F: Eu"2"+ phosphors with different Eu"2"+-doped concentrations were calculated. A blue light-emitting diode was fabricated by combination of a 370 nm InGaN chip and the prepared phosphor Sr_5(PO_4)_3F: Eu"2"+. The present work suggests that Sr_5(PO_4)_3F: Eu"2"+ is a potential phosphor applied in InGaN-based LEDs.

  16. Demonstration of 575-Mb/s downlink and 225-Mb/s uplink bi-directional SCM-WDM visible light communication using RGB LED and phosphor-based LED.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yuanquan; Wang, Yiguang; Chi, Nan; Yu, Jianjun; Shang, Huiliang

    2013-01-14

    We propose and experimentally demonstrate a novel full-duplex bi-directional subcarrier multiplexing (SCM)-wavelength division multiplexing (WDM) visible light communication (VLC) system based on commercially available red-green-blue (RGB) light emitting diode (LED) and phosphor-based LED (P-LED) with 575-Mb/s downstream and 225-Mb/s upstream transmission, employing various modulation orders of quadrature amplitude modulation (QAM) orthogonal frequency division multiplexing (OFDM). For the downlink, red and green colors/wavelengths are assigned to carry useful information, while blue chip is just kept lighting to maintain the white color illumination, and for the uplink, the low-cost P-LED is implemented. In this demonstration, pre-equalization and post-equalization are also adopted to compensate the severe frequency response of LEDs. Using this scheme, 4-user downlink and 1-user uplink transmission can be achieved. Furthermore, it can support more users by adjusting the bandwidth of each sub-channel. Bit error rates (BERs) of all links are below pre-forward-error-correction (pre-FEC) threshold of 3.8x 10(-3) after 66-cm free-space delivery. The results show that this scheme has great potential in the practical VLC system.

  17. Simulation study of InGaN intermediate-band solar cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Kuo-Feng; Hung, Chien-Lun; Tsai, Yao-Lung

    2016-01-01

    The performances of single-junction InGaN solar cells with various intermediate bands (IBs) have been simulated using the lifetime model of a 1D simulation program called Analysis of Microelectronic and Photonic Structures (AMPS-1D). It has been observed that the maximum efficiencies of the InGaN solar cells with one, two and three intermediate bands are 47.72%, 55.10% and 58.20%, respectively, which outperform the 25.96% efficiency of the conventional single-junction structure by far. This is primarily attributed to the outstanding capability of the light harvesting from the sub-bandgap absorption. At the optimized bandgap of 2.41 eV, two-IB InGaN solar cells with the IB positions located at 0.95–1.1 eV and 0.3–0.75 eV, respectively, may have an opportunity to realize over 50% efficiency. (paper)

  18. Effects of melatonin and green-wavelength LED light on the physiological stress and immunity of goldfish, Carassius auratus, exposed to high water temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Seo Jin; Kim, Na Na; Choi, Young Jae; Choi, Ji Yong; Choi, Young-Ung; Heo, Youn Seong; Choi, Cheol Young

    2016-10-01

    This study investigated the effects of increasing water temperature (22-30 °C) on the physiological stress response and immunity of goldfish, Carassius auratus, and the ability of green light-emitting diode (LED) irradiation or melatonin injections to mitigate this temperature-induced stress. To evaluate the effects of either green-wavelength LED light or melatonin on stress in goldfish, we measured plasma triiodothyronine (T3), thyroxine (T4), and thyroid hormone receptor (TR) mRNA expression; plasma cortisol and glucose; and immunoglobulin M (IgM) and lysozyme mRNA expression. The thyroid hormone activities, TR mRNA expression, and plasma cortisol and glucose were higher in goldfish exposed to high-temperature water, but were lower after exposure to melatonin or green-wavelength LED light. Lysozyme mRNA expression and plasma IgM activity and protein expression were lower after exposure to high water temperatures and higher after melatonin or green-wavelength LED light treatments. Therefore, high water temperature induced stress and decreased immunity; however, green-wavelength LED light and melatonin treatments mitigated the effects of stress and enhanced immunity. The benefits of melatonin decreased with time, whereas those of green-wavelength LED treatment did not.

  19. Molecular Beam Epitaxy-Grown InGaN Nanowires and Nanomushrooms for Solid State Lighting

    KAUST Repository

    Gasim, Anwar A.

    2012-05-01

    InGaN is a promising semiconductor for solid state lighting thanks to its bandgap which spans the entire visible regime of the electromagnetic spectrum. InGaN is grown heteroepitaxially due to the absence of a native substrate; however, this results in a strained film and a high dislocation density—two effects that have been associated with efficiency droop, which is the disastrous drop in efficiency of a light-emitting diode (LED) as the input current increases. Heteroepitaxially grown nanowires have recently attracted great interest due to their property of eliminating the detrimental effects of the lattice mismatch and the corollary efficiency droop. In this study, InGaN nanowires were grown on a low-cost Si (111) substrate via molecular beam epitaxy. Unique nanostructures, taking the form of mushrooms, have been observed in localized regions on the samples. These nanomushrooms consist of a nanowire body with a wide cap on top. Photoluminescence characterization revealed that the nanowires emit violet-blue, whilst the nanomushrooms emit a broad yellow-orange-red luminescence. The simultaneous emission from the nanowires and nanomushrooms forms white light. Structural characterization of a single nanomushroom via transmission electron microscopy revealed a simultaneous increase in indium and decrease in gallium at the interface between the body and the cap. Furthermore, the cap itself was found to be indium-rich, confirming it as the source of the longer wavelength yellow-orange-red luminescence. It is believed that the nanomushroom cap formed as a consequence of the saturation of growth on the c-plane of the nanowire. It is proposed that the formation of an indium droplet on the tip of the nanowire saturated growth on the c-plane, forcing the indium and gallium adatoms to incorporate on the sidewall m-planes instead, but only at the nanowire tip. This resulted in the formation of a mushroom-like cap on the tip. How and why the indium droplets formed is not

  20. N-type doping of InGaN by high energy particle irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, K.M. [Materials Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley CA, 94720 (United States)

    2009-06-15

    This article reviews our extensive studies of the effects of native defects introduced by high energy particles on the electrical and optical properties of InGaN alloys. We show that the electronic properties of irradiated InGaN can be well described by the amphoteric defect model. Because of the extremely low position of the conduction band edge of InN the formation energy of native donor defects is very low in In-rich InGaN alloys. High energy particle irradiation of InN and In-rich InGaN, will therefore produce donor defects and result in more n-type materials. As the irradiation dose increases, the electron concentration increases until the Fermi energy E{sub F} approaches the Fermi stabilization energy E{sub FS}. At this point both donor and acceptor-type defects are formed at similar rates, and compensate each other, leading to stabilization of E{sub F} and a saturation of the electron concentration. Hence a large increase and then saturation in the Burstein-Moss shift of the optical absorption edge is also observed. Furthermore we also found that mobilities in the irradiated films can be well described by scattering from triply charged defects, providing strong evidence that native defects in InN are triple donors. The excellent agreement between the experimental results and predictions based on the ADM suggests that particle irradiation can be an effective and simple method to control the doping (electron concentration) in In-rich In{sub x}Ga{sub 1-x}N via native point defects. (copyright 2009 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  1. N-type doping of InGaN by high energy particle irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu, K.M.

    2009-01-01

    This article reviews our extensive studies of the effects of native defects introduced by high energy particles on the electrical and optical properties of InGaN alloys. We show that the electronic properties of irradiated InGaN can be well described by the amphoteric defect model. Because of the extremely low position of the conduction band edge of InN the formation energy of native donor defects is very low in In-rich InGaN alloys. High energy particle irradiation of InN and In-rich InGaN, will therefore produce donor defects and result in more n-type materials. As the irradiation dose increases, the electron concentration increases until the Fermi energy E F approaches the Fermi stabilization energy E FS . At this point both donor and acceptor-type defects are formed at similar rates, and compensate each other, leading to stabilization of E F and a saturation of the electron concentration. Hence a large increase and then saturation in the Burstein-Moss shift of the optical absorption edge is also observed. Furthermore we also found that mobilities in the irradiated films can be well described by scattering from triply charged defects, providing strong evidence that native defects in InN are triple donors. The excellent agreement between the experimental results and predictions based on the ADM suggests that particle irradiation can be an effective and simple method to control the doping (electron concentration) in In-rich In x Ga 1-x N via native point defects. (copyright 2009 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  2. Light extraction from GaN-based LED structures on silicon-on-insulator substrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tripathy, S.; Teo, S.L.; Lin, V.K.X.; Chen, M.F. [Institute of Materials Research and Engineering, A*STAR (Agency for Science, Technology, and Research), 117602 (Singapore); Dadgar, A.; Krost, A. [Institut fuer Exerimentelle Physik, Otto-von Guericke Universitaet Magdeburg, Universitaetsplatz 1, 39016 Magdeburg (Germany); AZZURRO Semiconductors AG, Universitaetsplatz 1, 39016 Magdeburg (Germany); Christen, J. [Institut fuer Exerimentelle Physik, Otto-von Guericke Universitaet Magdeburg, Universitaetsplatz 1, 39016 Magdeburg (Germany)

    2010-01-15

    Nano-patterning of GaN-based devices is a promising technology in the development of high output power devices. Recent researches have been focused on the realization of two-dimensional (2D) photonic crystal (PhC) structure to improve light extraction efficiency and to control the direction of emission. In this study, we have demonstrated improved light extraction from green light emitting diode (LED) structures on thin silicon-on-insulator (SOI) substrates using surface nanopatterning. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) is used to probe the size, shape, and etch depth of nano-patterns on the LED surfaces. Different types of nanopatterns were created by e-beam lithography and inductively coupled plasma etching. The LED structures after post processing are studied by photoluminescence (PL) measurements. The GaN nanophotonic structures formed by ICP etching led to more than five-fold increase in the intensity of the green emission. The improved light extraction is due to the combination of SOI substrate reflectivity and photonic structures on top GaN LED surfaces. (copyright 2010 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  3. Crystallographically uniform arrays of ordered (In)GaN nanocolumns

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gačević, Ž., E-mail: gacevic@isom.upm.es; Bengoechea-Encabo, A.; Albert, S.; Calleja, E. [ETSIT-ISOM, Universidad Politécnica de Madrid, Avda. Complutense s/n, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Torres-Pardo, A.; González-Calbet, J. M. [Dept. Química Inorgánica, Universidad Complutense, 28040 Madrid (Spain); CEI Campus Moncloa, UCM-UPM, Madrid (Spain)

    2015-01-21

    In this work, through a comparative study of self-assembled (SA) and selective area grown (SAG) (In)GaN nanocolumn (NC) ensembles, we first give a detailed insight into improved crystallographic uniformity (homogeneity of crystallographic tilts and twists) of the latter ones. The study, performed making use of: reflective high energy electron diffraction, X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy, reveals that unlike their SA counterparts, the ensembles of SAG NCs show single epitaxial relationship to both sapphire(0001) and Si(111) underlying substrates. In the second part of the article, making use of X-ray diffraction, we directly show that the selective area growth leads to improved compositional uniformity of InGaN NC ensembles. This further leads to improved spectral purity of their luminescence, as confirmed by comparative macro-photoluminescence measurements performed on SA and SAG InGaN NC ensembles. An improved crystallographic uniformity of NC ensembles facilitates their integration into optoelectronic devices, whereas their improved compositional uniformity allows for their employment in single-color optoelectronic applications.

  4. Exciton dynamics in near-surface InGaN quantum wells coupled to colloidal nanocrystals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kopylov, Oleksii; Shirazi, Roza; Yvind, Kresten

    2013-01-01

    We study non-radiative energy transfer between InGaN quantum wells and colloidal InP nanocrystals separated by sub-10nm distance. A significant non-radiative energy transfer between the two layers is accompanied by reduced surface recombination in InGaN.......We study non-radiative energy transfer between InGaN quantum wells and colloidal InP nanocrystals separated by sub-10nm distance. A significant non-radiative energy transfer between the two layers is accompanied by reduced surface recombination in InGaN....

  5. Solid State pH Sensor Based on Light Emitting Diodes (LED) As Detector Platform

    OpenAIRE

    Lau, King Tong; Shepherd, R.; Diamond, Danny; Diamond, Dermot

    2006-01-01

    A low-power, high sensitivity, very low-cost light emitting diode (LED)-based device developed for low-cost sensor networks was modified with bromocresol green membrane to work as a solid-state pH sensor. In this approach, a reverse-biased LED functioning as a photodiode is coupled with a second LED configured in conventional emission mode. A simple timer circuit measures how long (in microsecond) it takes for the photocurrent generated on the detector LED to discharge its capacitance from lo...

  6. InGaN/GaN LEDs optical output efficiency enhancement based on AFM surface morphology studies of the constituent layers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Florescu, D.I.; Ramer, J.C.; Merai, V.N.; Parekh, A.; Lu, D.; Lee, D.S.; Armour, E.A. [Veeco TurboDisc Operations, 394 Elizabeth Avenue, Somerset, NJ 08873 (United States)

    2005-05-01

    For GaN-based light emitting diodes (LEDs), the growth mechanism and interface roughness of the n-contact, active region, and p-contact layers are of vital importance for achieving superior optical and electrical characteristics of such devices. Nanoscale range surface morphology is one of the key parameters actively employed to developing high optical efficiency applications. In this study, we illustrate the use of atomic force microscopy to investigate and optimise the surface morphology of (a) sapphire substrates and (b) metalorganic chemical vapour deposition (MOCVD) grown InGaN/GaN LED constituent layers (i.e., n-GaN, InGaN active region, and p-GaN). Several optimal cases are presented and discussed, where based on the surface morphology findings an improved selection of (a) substrates and (b) MOCVD growth parameters was achieved leading to an overall enhancement (over 2 times) of the optical output efficiency of these devices. Applying the principles and observations reported, a thermally robust 465 nm multiple quantum well LED with an unpackaged chip-level power output in the 4.0-5.0 mW range and forward voltage <3.2 V at 20 mA was consistently achieved. (copyright 2005 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  7. Effects of InGaN barriers with low indium content on internal quantum efficiency of blue InGaN multiple quantum wells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lai, Wang; Jia-Xing, Wang; Wei, Zhao; Xiang, Zou; Yi, Luo

    2010-01-01

    Blue In 0.2 Ga 0.8 N multiple quantum wells (MQWs) with In x Ga 1–x N (x = 0.01–0.04) barriers are grown by metal organic vapour phase epitaxy. The internal quantum efficiencies (IQEs) of these MQWs are studied in a way of temperature-dependent photoluminescence spectra. Furthermore, a 2-channel Arrhenius model is used to analyse the nonradiative recombination centres (NRCs). It is found that by adopting the InGaN barrier beneath the lowest well, it is possible to reduce the strain hence the NRCs in InGaN MQWs. By optimizing the thickness and the indium content of the InGaN barriers, the IQEs of InGaN/InGaN MQWs can be increased by about 2.5 times compared with conventional InGaN/GaN MQWs. On the other hand, the incorporation of indium atoms into the intermediate barriers between adjacent wells does not improve IQE obviously. In addition, the indium content of the intermediate barriers should match with that of the lowest barrier to avoid relaxation. (condensed matter: structure, thermal and mechanical properties)

  8. Isoelectronic Ln doping in p-GaN and its effects on InGaN light-emitting diodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, C. S.; Cheong, H. S.; Kang, D. S.; Kim, J. Y.; Hong, C. H.; Suh, E. K.; Lee, H. J.; Cho, H. K.; Adesida, I.

    2004-01-01

    The effects of isoelectronic In doping in a Mg-doped p-GaN layer on device performance of InGaN light-emitting diodes (LED) were investigated. It was found that there was a decrease of Hall resistivity and contact resistivity in p-GaN with In doping, compared to typical Mg-doped p-GaN. Isoelectronic In doping in p-GaN seems to cause a kind of surfactant effect and/or purification effect similar to the In-doped GaN case, which exhibits a decrease of non-radiative recombination centers and an enhancement of carrier concentration. Light output power and operating voltage were improved by applying an In-doped p-GaN contact layer to the LED.

  9. Effects of quantum well growth temperature on the recombination efficiency of InGaN/GaN multiple quantum wells that emit in the green and blue spectral regions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hammersley, S.; Dawson, P. [School of Physics and Astronomy, Photon Science Institute, University of Manchester, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Kappers, M. J.; Massabuau, F. C.-P.; Sahonta, S.-L.; Oliver, R. A.; Humphreys, C. J. [Department of Materials Science and Metallurgy, University of Cambridge, 27 Charles Babbage Road, Cambridge CB3 0FS (United Kingdom)

    2015-09-28

    InGaN-based light emitting diodes and multiple quantum wells designed to emit in the green spectral region exhibit, in general, lower internal quantum efficiencies than their blue-emitting counter parts, a phenomenon referred to as the “green gap.” One of the main differences between green-emitting and blue-emitting samples is that the quantum well growth temperature is lower for structures designed to emit at longer wavelengths, in order to reduce the effects of In desorption. In this paper, we report on the impact of the quantum well growth temperature on the optical properties of InGaN/GaN multiple quantum wells designed to emit at 460 nm and 530 nm. It was found that for both sets of samples increasing the temperature at which the InGaN quantum well was grown, while maintaining the same indium composition, led to an increase in the internal quantum efficiency measured at 300 K. These increases in internal quantum efficiency are shown to be due reductions in the non-radiative recombination rate which we attribute to reductions in point defect incorporation.

  10. Effects of quantum well growth temperature on the recombination efficiency of InGaN/GaN multiple quantum wells that emit in the green and blue spectral regions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hammersley, S.; Dawson, P.; Kappers, M. J.; Massabuau, F. C.-P.; Sahonta, S.-L.; Oliver, R. A.; Humphreys, C. J.

    2015-01-01

    InGaN-based light emitting diodes and multiple quantum wells designed to emit in the green spectral region exhibit, in general, lower internal quantum efficiencies than their blue-emitting counter parts, a phenomenon referred to as the “green gap.” One of the main differences between green-emitting and blue-emitting samples is that the quantum well growth temperature is lower for structures designed to emit at longer wavelengths, in order to reduce the effects of In desorption. In this paper, we report on the impact of the quantum well growth temperature on the optical properties of InGaN/GaN multiple quantum wells designed to emit at 460 nm and 530 nm. It was found that for both sets of samples increasing the temperature at which the InGaN quantum well was grown, while maintaining the same indium composition, led to an increase in the internal quantum efficiency measured at 300 K. These increases in internal quantum efficiency are shown to be due reductions in the non-radiative recombination rate which we attribute to reductions in point defect incorporation

  11. Molecular Beam Epitaxy-Grown InGaN Nanowires and Nanomushrooms for Solid State Lighting

    KAUST Repository

    Gasim, Anwar A.

    2012-01-01

    InGaN is a promising semiconductor for solid state lighting thanks to its bandgap which spans the entire visible regime of the electromagnetic spectrum. InGaN is grown heteroepitaxially due to the absence of a native substrate; however, this results

  12. Luminescence and efficiency optimization of InGaN/GaN core-shell nanowire LEDs by numerical modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Römer, Friedhard; Deppner, Marcus; Andreev, Zhelio; Kölper, Christopher; Sabathil, Matthias; Strassburg, Martin; Ledig, Johannes; Li, Shunfeng; Waag, Andreas; Witzigmann, Bernd

    2012-02-01

    We present a computational study on the anisotropic luminescence and the efficiency of a core-shell type nanowire LED based on GaN with InGaN active quantum wells. The physical simulator used for analyzing this device integrates a multidimensional drift-diffusion transport solver and a k . p Schrödinger problem solver for quantization effects and luminescence. The solution of both problems is coupled to achieve self-consistency. Using this solver we investigate the effect of dimensions, design of quantum wells, and current injection on the efficiency and luminescence of the core-shell nanowire LED. The anisotropy of the luminescence and re-absorption is analyzed with respect to the external efficiency of the LED. From the results we derive strategies for design optimization.

  13. Recombination dynamics and internal quantum efficiency in InGaN

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murotani, Hideaki; Andoh, Hiroya; Tsukamoto, Takehiko; Sugiura, Toko; Yamada, Yoichi; Tabata, Takuya; Honda, Yoshio; Yamaguchi, Masahito; Amano, Hiroshi

    2014-01-01

    Recombination dynamics and internal quantum efficiency (IQE) of green luminescent InGaN nanowires with different crystalline qualities have been studied by means photoluminescence (PL) and time-resolved PL spectroscopy. Temperature- and excitation-power-density-dependent PL spectroscopy enabled to evaluate the IQE as a function of excitation power density. The shape of the efficiency curves at low temperature strongly depended on the magnitude of nonradiative recombination processes. This leads to the misestimation of the IQE in the lower quality nanowire. In addition, the PL decay curves were well described by a double exponential function both at 6 and 300 K. The PL decay time of the faster component was affected by nonradiative recombination processes even at low temperature. This indicated that the radiative recombination lifetime cannot be estimated from the PL decay time in the lower quality nanowire. (copyright 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  14. Electrical efficiency and droop in MQW LEDs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malyutenko, V. K.

    2014-02-01

    It is believed that low power conversion efficiency in commercial MQW LEDs occurs as a result of efficiency droop, current-induced dynamic degradation of the internal quantum efficiency, injection efficiency, and extraction efficiency. Broadly speaking, all these "quenching" mechanisms could be referred to as the optical losses. The vast advances of high-power InGaN and AlGaInP MQW LEDs have been achieved by addressing these losses. In contrast to these studies, in this paper we consider an alternative approach to make high-power LEDs more efficient. We identify current-induced electrical efficiency degradation (EED) as a strong limiting factor of power conversion efficiency. We found that EED is caused by current crowding followed by an increase in current-induced series resistance of a device. By decreasing the current spreading length, EED also causes the optical efficiency to degrade and stands for an important aspect of LED performance. This paper gives scientists the opportunity to look for different attributes of EED.

  15. VLC-based indoor location awareness using LED light and image sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Seok-Ju; Yoo, Jong-Ho; Jung, Sung-Yoon

    2012-11-01

    Recently, indoor LED lighting can be considered for constructing green infra with energy saving and additionally providing LED-IT convergence services such as visible light communication (VLC) based location awareness and navigation services. For example, in case of large complex shopping mall, location awareness to navigate the destination is very important issue. However, the conventional navigation using GPS is not working indoors. Alternative location service based on WLAN has a problem that the position accuracy is low. For example, it is difficult to estimate the height exactly. If the position error of the height is greater than the height between floors, it may cause big problem. Therefore, conventional navigation is inappropriate for indoor navigation. Alternative possible solution for indoor navigation is VLC based location awareness scheme. Because indoor LED infra will be definitely equipped for providing lighting functionality, indoor LED lighting has a possibility to provide relatively high accuracy of position estimation combined with VLC technology. In this paper, we provide a new VLC based positioning system using visible LED lights and image sensors. Our system uses location of image sensor lens and location of reception plane. By using more than two image sensor, we can determine transmitter position less than 1m position error. Through simulation, we verify the validity of the proposed VLC based new positioning system using visible LED light and image sensors.

  16. Growth of GaN-based non- and semipolar heterostructures for high efficiency light emitters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wernicke, Tim

    2010-01-01

    Optoelectronic devices based on GaN and its alloys InGaN and AlGaN are capable of emitting light from the visible to the ultraviolet spectral region. Blue and green lasers have applications in laser projectors, DNA sequencing and spectroscopy. But it is extremely difficult to fabricate green laser diodes. Currently almost all of the light emitting diodes (LEDs) and lasers are grown on GaN crystals that are oriented in the polar (0001) c-plane direction, which provides the most stable growth surface. However the resulting polarization fields on (0001)GaN have detrimental effects on the optical properties of nitride light emitters, e.g. causing significant wavelength shifts and reduced efficiencies in InGaN LEDs. Growth on crystal surfaces with non- and semipolar orientations, e.g. (10 anti 10) m-plane or (11 anti 22), could enable devices with new and improved optical properties. For example, for nonpolar and semipolar LEDs the degree of polarization of the emitted light can be tailored. Furthermore easier to grow devices with green light emission, since the indium incorporation is enhanced for semipolar orientations. In contrast to c-plane GaN there is no polarization field across quantum wells on nonpolar GaN. By reducing the polarization fields an increase in the radiative recombination rate can be expected and would lead to higher LED efficiencies and lower laser thresholds. One of the biggest challenges for the growth of light emitters on non- and semipolar GaN is the choice of a suitable substrate: Heteroepitaxial growth on sapphire or LiAlO 2 allows the deposition of GaN on 2'' diameter wafers and larger. However, these layers show a very high defect density in particular basal plane stacking faults, in comparison to c-plane GaN on sapphire. In order to reduce the defect density we applied successfully epitaxial lateral overgrowth to heteroepitaxial nonpolar a-plane GaN and verified the improvement by spatially and spectrally cathodoluminescence imaging as

  17. Improved InGaN LED System Efficacy and Cost via Droop Reduction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wildeson, Isaac [Lumileds LLC, San Jose, CA (United States)

    2017-11-29

    Efficiency droop is a non-thermal process intrinsic to indium gallium nitride light emitting diodes (LEDs) in which the external quantum efficiency (EQE) decreases with increasing drive current density. Mitigating droop would allow one to reduce the size of LEDs driven at a given current or to drive LEDs of given size at higher current while maintaining high efficiencies. In other words, droop mitigation can lead to significant gains in light output per dollar and/or light output per watt of input power. This project set an EQE improvement goal at high drive current density which was to be attained by improving the LED active region design and growth process following a droop mitigation strategy. The interactions between LED active region design parameters and efficiency droop were studied by modeling and experiments. The crystal defects that tend to form in more complex LED designs intended to mitigate droop were studied with advanced characterization methods that provided insight into the structural and electronic properties of the material. This insight was applied to improve the epitaxy process both in terms of active region design and optimization of growth parameters. The final project goals were achieved on schedule and an epitaxy process leading to LEDs with EQE exceeding the project target was demonstrated.

  18. Proposal of leak path passivation for InGaN solar cells to reduce the leakage current

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Ke, E-mail: ke.wang@chiba-u.jp; Imai, Daichi; Kusakabe, Kazuhide [Center for SMART Green Innovation Research, Chiba University, 1-33, Yayoi-cho, Inage-ku, Chiba 263-8522 (Japan); Yoshikawa, Akihiko, E-mail: yoshi@faculty.chiba-u.jp [Center for SMART Green Innovation Research, Chiba University, 1-33, Yayoi-cho, Inage-ku, Chiba 263-8522 (Japan); Department of Information and Communication Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering, Kogakuin University, Nakano-cho, Hachioji, Tokyo 2665-1 (Japan)

    2016-01-25

    We propose some general ways to passivate the leak paths in InGaN solar cells and report some experimental evidences of its effectiveness. By adopting an AlOx passivation process, the photovoltaic performances of GaN pn-junctions and InGaN solar cells, grown by molecular beam epitaxy, have been significantly improved. The open circuit voltage under 1 sun illumination increases from 1.46 to 2.26 V for a GaN pn junction, and from 0.95 to 1.27 V for an InGaN solar cell, demonstrating evidence of leak path passivation (LPP) by AlOx. The proposed LPP is expected to be a realistic way to exploit the potential of thick and relaxed but defective InGaN for solar cell applications.

  19. Spontaneous formation of InGaN nanowall network directly on Si

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soto Rodriguez, P. E. D.; Kumar, Praveen; Gomez, V. J.; Alvi, N. H.; Calleja, E.; Noetzel, R. [Instituto de Sistemas Optoelectronicos y Microtecnologia (ISOM), Universidad Politecnica de Madrid, Ciudad Universitaria s/n, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Manuel, J. M.; Morales, F. M.; Jimenez, J. J.; Garcia, R. [Dep. Ciencia de los Materiales e IM y QI., F. Ciencias, Universidad de Cadiz, 11510-Puerto Real, Cadiz (Spain)

    2013-04-29

    We present the study on epitaxial growth of an InGaN nanowall network directly on Si by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy. Scanning electron microscopy, high-resolution X-ray diffraction, and transmission electron microscopy together with energy-dispersive X-ray analysis infer the crystalline nature of the InGaN nanowall network, oriented along the C-axis, with In composition ranging from pure GaN to 40%. Room temperature photoluminescence is observed, indicating good optical quality. The nanowall network is highly in-plane electrically conductive.

  20. Light extraction improvement of InGaN light-emitting diodes with large-area highly ordered ITO nanobowls photonic crystal via self-assembled nanosphere lithography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kui Wu

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The InGaN multiple quantum well light-emitting diodes (LEDs with different sizes of indium-tin-oxide (ITO nanobowl photonic crystal (PhC structure has been fabricated using self-assembled monolayer nanosphere lithography. The light output power (LOP of PhC LEDs (at 350 mA has been enhanced by 63.5% and the emission divergence exhibits a 28.8° reduction compared to conventional LEDs without PhC structure. Current-Voltage curves have shown that these PhC structures on ITO layer will not degrade the LED electrical properties. The finite-difference time-domain simulation (FDTD has also been performed for light extraction and emission characteristics, which is consistent with the experimental results.

  1. Mocvd Growth of Group-III Nitrides on Silicon Carbide: From Thin Films to Atomically Thin Layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Balushi, Zakaria Y.

    Group-III nitride semiconductors (AlN, GaN, InN and their alloys) are considered one of the most important class of materials for electronic and optoelectronic devices. This is not limited to the blue light-emitting diode (LED) used for efficient solid-state lighting, but other applications as well, such as solar cells, radar and a variety of high frequency power electronics, which are all prime examples of the technological importance of nitride based wide bandgap semiconductors in our daily lives. The goal of this dissertation work was to explore and establish new growth schemes to improve the structural and optical properties of thick to atomically thin films of group-III nitrides grown by metalorganic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) on SiC substrates for future novel devices. The first research focus of this dissertation was on the growth of indium gallium nitride (InGaN). This wide bandgap semiconductor has attracted much research attention as an active layer in LEDs and recently as an absorber material for solar cells. InGaN has superior material properties for solar cells due to its wavelength absorption tunability that nearly covers the entire solar spectrum. This can be achieved by controlling the indium content in thick grown material. Thick InGaN films are also of interest as strain reducing based layers for deep-green and red light emitters. The growth of thick films of InGaN is, however, hindered by several combined problems. This includes poor incorporation of indium in alloys, high density of structural and morphological defects, as well as challenges associated with the segregation of indium in thick films. Overcoming some of these material challenges is essential in order integrate thick InGaN films into future optoelectronics. Therefore, this dissertation research investigated the growth mechanism of InGaN layers grown in the N-polar direction by MOCVD as a route to improve the structural and optical properties of thick InGaN films. The growth

  2. Comparative study of polar and semipolar (112¯2) InGaN layers grown by metalorganic vapour phase epitaxy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dinh, Duc V.; Zubialevich, V. Z.; Oehler, F.; Kappers, M. J.; Humphreys, C. J.; Alam, S. N.; Parbrook, P. J.; Caliebe, M.; Scholtz, F.

    2014-01-01

    InGaN layers were grown simultaneously on (112 ¯ 2) GaN and (0001) GaN templates by metalorganic vapour phase epitaxy. At higher growth temperature (≥750 °C), the indium content ( ¯ 2) and (0001) InGaN layers was similar. However, for temperatures less than 750 °C, the indium content of the (112 ¯ 2) InGaN layers (15%–26%) were generally lower than those with (0001) orientation (15%–32%). The compositional deviation was attributed to the different strain relaxations between the (112 ¯ 2) and (0001) InGaN layers. Room temperature photoluminescence measurements of the (112 ¯ 2) InGaN layers showed an emission wavelength that shifts gradually from 380 nm to 580 nm with decreasing growth temperature (or increasing indium composition). The peak emission wavelength of the (112 ¯ 2) InGaN layers with an indium content of more than 10% blue-shifted a constant value of ≈(50–60) nm when using higher excitation power densities. This blue-shift was attributed to band filling effects in the layers.

  3. Effects of melatonin injection or green-wavelength LED light on the antioxidant system in goldfish (Carassius auratus) during thermal stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Seo Jin; Choi, Young Jae; Kim, Na Na; Choi, Ji Yong; Kim, Bong-Seok; Choi, Cheol Young

    2016-05-01

    We tested the mitigating effects of melatonin injections or irradiation from green-wavelength light-emitting diodes (LEDs) on goldfish (Carassius auratus) exposed to thermal stress (high water temperature, 30 °C). The effects of the two treatments were assessed by measuring the expression and activity levels of the antioxidant enzymes, superoxide dismutase and catalase, plasma hydrogen peroxide, lipid hydroperoxide, and lysozyme. In addition, a comet assay was conducted to confirm that high water temperature damaged nuclear DNA. The expression and activity of the antioxidant enzymes, plasma hydrogen peroxide, and lipid hydroperoxide were significantly higher after exposure to high temperature and were significantly lower in fish that received melatonin or LED light than in those that received no mitigating treatment. Plasma lysozyme was significantly lower after exposure to high temperature and was significantly higher after exposure to melatonin or LED light. The comet assay revealed that thermal stress caused a great deal of damage to nuclear DNA; however, treatment with melatonin or green-wavelength LED light prevented a significant portion of this damage from occurring. These results indicate that, although high temperatures induce oxidative stress and reduce immune system strength in goldfish, both melatonin and green-wavelength LED light inhibit oxidative stress and boost the immune system. LED treatment increased the antioxidant and immune system activity more significantly than did melatonin treatment. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. High color rendering index of remote-type white LEDs with multi-layered quantum dot-phosphor films and short-wavelength pass dichroic filters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Hee Chang; Oh, Ji Hye; Do, Young Rag

    2014-09-01

    This paper introduces high color rendering index (CRI) white light-emitting diodes (W-LEDs) coated with red emitting (Sr,Ca)AlSiN3:Eu phosphors and yellowish-green emitting AgIn5S8/ZnS (AIS/ZS) quantum dots (QDs) on glass or a short-wavelength pass dichroic filter (SPDF), which transmit blue wavelength regions and reflect yellow wavelength regions. The red emitting (Sr,Ca)AlSiN3:Eu phosphor film is coated on glass and a SPDF using a screen printing method, and then the yellowish-green emitting AIS/ZS QDs are coated on the red phosphor (Sr,Ca)AlSiN3:Eu film-coated glass and SPDF using the electrospray (e-spray) method.To fabricate the red phosphor film, the optimum amount of phosphor is dispersed in a silicon binder to form a red phosphor paste. The AIS/ZS QDs are mixed with dimethylformamide (DMF), toluene, and poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) for the e-spray coating. The substrates are spin-coated with poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene):poly(styrenesulfonate) (PEDOT:PSS) to fabricate a conductive surface. The CRI of the white LEDs is improved through inserting the red phosphor film between the QD layer and the glass substrate. Furthermore, the light intensities of the multi-layered phosphor films are enhanced through changing the glass substrate to the SPDF. The correlated color temperatures (CCTs) vary as a function of the phosphor concentration in the phosphor paste. The optical properties of the yellowish-green AIS/ZS QDs and red (Sr,Ca)AlSiN3:Eu phosphors are characterized using photoluminescence (PL), and the multi-layered QD-phosphor films are measured using electroluminescence (EL) with an InGaN blue LED (λmax = 450 nm) at 60 mA.

  5. Estimation of carrier leakage in InGaN light emitting diodes from photocurrent measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hafiz, Shopan; Zhang, Fan; Monavarian, Morteza; Okur, Serdal; Avrutin, Vitaliy; Morkoç, Hadis; Özgür, Ümit

    2014-02-01

    Carrier transport in double heterostructure (DH) InGaN light emitting diodes (LEDs) was investigated using photocurrent measurements performed under CW HeCd laser (325 nm wavelength) excitation. The effect of electron injector thicknesses was investigated by monitoring the excitation density and applied bias dependent escape of photogenerated carriers from the active region and through energy band structure and carrier transport simulations using Silvaco Atlas. For quad (4x) 3-nm DH LED structures incorporating staircase electron injectors (SEIs), photocurrent increased with SEI thickness due to reduced effective barrier opposing carrier escape from the active region as confirmed by simulations. The carrier leakage percentile at -3V bias and 280 Wcm-2 optical excitation density increased from 24 % to 55 % when In 0.04Ga0.96N + In0.08Ga0.92N SEI thickness was increased from 4 nm + 4 nm to 30 nm + 30 nm. The increased leakage with thicker SEI correlates with increased carrier overflow under forward bias.

  6. Effect of Interface Nanotexture on Light Extraction of InGaN-Based Green Light Emitting Diodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yao-Bo, Pan; Sheng-Li, Qi; Hao, Fang; Guo-Yi, Zhang; Mao-Sheng, Hao

    2010-01-01

    We report the enhancement of the light extraction of InGaN-based green light emitting diodes (LEDs) via the interface nanotexturing. The texture consists of high-density nanocraters on the surface of a sapphire substrate with an in situ etching. The width of nanocraters is about 0.5 μm and the depth is around 0.1 μm. It is demonstrated that the LEDs with interface texture exhibit about a 27% improvement in luminance intensity, compared with standard LEDs. High power InGaN-based green LEDs are obtained by using the interface nanotexture. An optical ray-tracing simulation is performed to investigate the effect of interface nanotexture on light extraction. (cross-disciplinary physics and related areas of science and technology)

  7. Scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy on GaN and InGaN surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krueger, David

    2009-01-01

    Optelectronic devices based on gallium nitride (GaN) and indium gallium nitride (InGaN) are in the focus of research since more than 20 years and still have great potential for optical applications. In the first part of this work non-polar surfaces of GaN are investigated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM) and scanning tunneling microscopy (STM). In SEM and AFM, the (1 anti 100)- and especially the (anti 2110)-plane are quite corrugated. For the first time, the (anti 2110)-plane of GaN is atomically resolved in STM. In the second part InGaN quantum dot layers are investigated by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), scanning tunneling spectroscopy (STS) and STM. The STMmeasurements show the dependency of surface morphology on growth conditions in the metalorganic vapour phase epitaxy (MOVPE). Nucleation, a new MOVPE-strategy, is based on phase separations on surfaces. It is shown that locally varying density of states and bandgaps can be detected by STS, that means bandgap histograms and 2D-bandgap-mapping. (orig.)

  8. Improving the optical performance of InGaN light-emitting diodes by altering light reflection and refraction with triangular air prism arrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Ji Hye; Kim, Hyung Gu; Chandramohan, S; Kim, Hyun Kyu; Kim, Hee Yun; Ryu, Jae Hyoung; Park, Young Jae; Beak, Yun Seon; Lee, Jeong-Sik; Park, Joong Seo; Lysak, Volodymyr V; Hong, Chang-Hee

    2012-01-01

    The effect of triangular air prism (TAP) arrays with different distance-to-width (d/w) ratios on the enhancement of light extraction efficiency (LEE) of InGaN light-emitting diodes (LEDs) is investigated. The TAP arrays embedded at the sapphire/GaN interface act as light reflectors and refractors, and thereby improve the light output power due to the redirection of light into escape cones on both the front and back sides of the LED. Enhancement in radiometric power as high as 117% and far-field angle as low as 129° are realized with a compact arrangement of TAP arrays compared with that of a conventional LED made without TAP arrays under an injection current of 20 mA. © 2012 Optical Society of America

  9. Study of excess carrier dynamics in polar, semi-polar, and non-polar (In,Ga)N epilayers and QWs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aleksiejunas, R. [Institute of Applied Research, Vilnius University, Sauletekio Ave. 9-III, 10222 Vilnius (Lithuania); Laser Research Center, Vilnius University, Sauletekio Ave. 10, 10222 Vilnius (Lithuania); Lubys, L.; Jarasiunas, K. [Institute of Applied Research, Vilnius University, Sauletekio Ave. 9-III, 10222 Vilnius (Lithuania); Vengris, M. [Laser Research Center, Vilnius University, Sauletekio Ave. 10, 10222 Vilnius (Lithuania); Wernicke, T.; Hoffmann, V.; Netzel, C.; Knauer, A.; Weyers, M. [Ferdinand-Braun-Institut, Leibniz-Institut fuer Hoechstfrequenztechnik, Gustav-Kirchhoff-Str. 4, 12498 Berlin (Germany); Kneissl, M. [Ferdinand-Braun-Institut, Leibniz-Institut fuer Hoechstfrequenztechnik, Gustav-Kirchhoff-Str. 4, 12498 Berlin (Germany); Institute of Solid State Physics, Technische Universitaet Berlin, Hardenbergstr. 36, 10623 Berlin (Germany)

    2011-07-15

    We studied carrier recombination and diffusion in GaN/sapphire templates, (In,Ga)N layers, and (In,Ga)N quantum well structures oriented along the polar [0001], semi-polar [11-22], and non-polar [11-20] orientations by means of light induced transient grating, differential transmission, and photoluminescence optical techniques. We show that the lifetime of excess carriers drops by orders of magnitude when changing the orientation from polar to non-polar, both in GaN templates and (In,Ga)N layers. We attribute the shorter lifetime to carrier trapping by extended structural defects that are more abundant in non-polar grown samples. In addition, we observe pronounced carrier localization effects in the semi- and non-polar layers. We show that thick (In,Ga)N layers inherit the properties of the GaN templates. However, the thin quantum well structures show a lower carrier trapping activity. So, a better electrical quality can be assumed as compared to the thick (In,Ga)N layers. (copyright 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  10. Investigation of the radiative efficiency and threshold in InGaN laser diodes under the influence of efficiency droop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryu, Han-Youl

    2012-01-01

    Based on the rate equation model of semiconductor lasers, the radiative efficiency and threshold current density of InGaN-based blue laser diodes (LDs) are theoretically investigated, including the effect of efficiency droop in the InGaN quantum wells. The peak point of the radiative efficiency versus current density relation is used as the parameter of the rate equation analysis. The threshold current density of InGaN blue LDs is found to depend strongly on the maximum radiative efficiency at low current density, implying that improving the maximum efficiency is important to maintain a high radiative efficiency at a large current density and to achieve a low-threshold lasing action under the influence of efficiency droop.

  11. Investigation of a relaxation mechanism specific to InGaN for improved MOVPE growth of nitride solar cell materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pantzas, K.; Abid, M.; Voss, P.L.; Ougazzaden, A.; Patriarche, G.; Orsal, G.; Gautier, S.; Moudakir, T.; Gorge, V.; Djebbour, Z.

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we report on a spontaneous 2D/3D transition observed in InGaN alloys after 60 nm of growth. This transition is responsible for the formation of a stack of distinct InGaN layers. The driving mechanism is shown to be lateral fluctuations of the indium composition, that arise to accommodate the increasing strain energy of the InGaN layer. Three distinct stages of growth have been identified. First, a homogeneous, 2D InGaN layer forms, pseudomorphically strained on the underlying GaN. Then, at around 30 nm large lateral fluctuations of the indium composition are observed and a second pseudomorphic layer, composed of indium-rich and indium-poor clusters, is formed. Finally induces a 2D/3D transition at 60 nm and a 3D InGaN layer is formed. (Copyright copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  12. The Use of Light-Emitting Diodes (LEDs) as Green and Red/Far-Red Light Sources in Plant Physiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, David L.; And Others

    1985-01-01

    The use of green, red, and far-red light-emitting diodes (LEDs) as light sources for plant physiological studies is outlined and evaluated. Indicates that LED lamps have the advantage over conventional light sources in that they are lightweight, low-cost, portable, easily constructed, and do not require color filters. (Author/DH)

  13. Deformation potentials in AlGaN and InGaN alloys and their impact on optical polarization properties of nitride quantum wells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Łepkowski, S. P.; Gorczyca, I.; Stefańska-Skrobas, K.

    2013-01-01

    The deformation potentials acz−D1, act−D2, D3, D4, and D5 are determined for random AlGaN and InGaN alloys using electronic band structure calculations based on the density functional theory. A sublinear composition dependence is obtained for acz−D1 and D3 in AlGaN, and D3 in InGaN, whereas...... superlinear behavior on composition is found foract−D2, D4, and D5 in AlGaN, and act−D2and D5 in InGaN. The optical polarization properties of nitride quantum wells are very well described by the k·p method when the obtained deformation potentials are included. In m-plane AlGaN/AlN and InGaN/GaN quantum wells...

  14. InGaN High Temperature Photovoltaic Cells, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The objectives of this Phase II project are to develop InGaN photovoltaic cells for high temperature and/or high radiation environments to TRL 4 and to define the...

  15. Spatially and spectrally resolved photoluminescence of InGaN MQWs grown on highly Si doped a-plane GaN buffer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thunert, Martin; Wieneke, Matthias; Dempewolf, Anja; Bertram, Frank; Dadgar, Armin; Krost, Alois; Christen, Juergen [Institute of Experimental Physics, Otto-von-Guericke-University Magdeburg (Germany)

    2011-07-01

    A set of InGaN multi quantum well (MQW) samples grown by MOVPE on highly Si doped a-plane GaN on r-plane sapphire templates has been investigated using spatially resolved photoluminescence spectroscopy ({mu}-PL). The Si doping level of nominal about 10{sup 20} cm{sup -3} leads to three dimensionally grown crystallites mostly terminated by m-facets. The MQW thickness has been systematically varied from nominally 2.1 to 4.2 nm, as well as the InGaN growth temperature, which was varied from 760 C to 700 C. The growth of a-plane GaN based devices leads to a non-polar growth direction avoiding the polarization field affected Quantum-Confined-Stark-Effect. Spatially resolved PL studies show for all samples low near band edge (NBE) GaN emission intensity over the whole area under investigation accompanied by highly intense InGaN MQW emission for single crystallites. The MQW luminescence shows a systematic blueshift with increasing InGaN growth temperature due to lower In incorporation as well as a systematic redshift with increasing MQW thickness. Excitation power dependent spectra at 4 K as well as temperature dependent PL spectra will be presented.

  16. BiliLED low cost neonatal phototherapy, from prototype to industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geido, Daniel; Failache, Horacio [Instituto de Fisica de la Facultad de Ingenieria - Universidad de la Republica, Montevideo (Uruguay); Simini, Franco [Nucleo de Ingenieria Biomedica de las Facultades de Medicina e Ingenieria (Uruguay); Hospital de ClInicas. Av Italia S/N. Piso 15 sala 2, 11600 Montevideo (Uruguay)

    2007-11-15

    BiliLED is a phototherapy instrument designed to reduce bilirrubin blood rates in new born babies with jaundice. The light source is centred at 470 nm with a bandwidth of 35 nm and includes a matrix of 196 (14x14) InGaN LEDs. The optical elements are designed to maximize the light intensity useful for treatment, with a small number of LEDs in a compact and low cost unit. The optic array is such that every LED illuminates all the treatment area, which ensures redundancy and, thus, a high reliability not to be found in single-lamp instruments. Thermal dissipation and cost of BiliLED are both an order-of-magnitude smaller than conventional therapy lamps. BiliLED adjusts coetaneous irradiation with a feedback loop to compensate the loss or aging of LEDs achieving a calibrated light source for over a decade of use. A clinical trial in 20 hyperbilirrubinaemia patients shows 16% bilirrubin degradation within 24 hours of treatment, higher than most lamp phototherapy instruments. The steps from prototype to commercial model are described.

  17. BiliLED low cost neonatal phototherapy, from prototype to industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geido, Daniel; Failache, Horacio; Simini, Franco

    2007-11-01

    BiliLED is a phototherapy instrument designed to reduce bilirrubin blood rates in new born babies with jaundice. The light source is centred at 470 nm with a bandwidth of 35 nm and includes a matrix of 196 (14×14) InGaN LEDs. The optical elements are designed to maximize the light intensity useful for treatment, with a small number of LEDs in a compact and low cost unit. The optic array is such that every LED illuminates all the treatment area, which ensures redundancy and, thus, a high reliability not to be found in single-lamp instruments. Thermal dissipation and cost of BiliLED are both an order-of-magnitude smaller than conventional therapy lamps. BiliLED adjusts coetaneous irradiation with a feedback loop to compensate the loss or aging of LEDs achieving a calibrated light source for over a decade of use. A clinical trial in 20 hyperbilirrubinaemia patients shows 16% bilirrubin degradation within 24 hours of treatment, higher than most lamp phototherapy instruments. The steps from prototype to commercial model are described.

  18. BiliLED low cost neonatal phototherapy, from prototype to industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geido, Daniel; Failache, Horacio; Simini, Franco

    2007-01-01

    BiliLED is a phototherapy instrument designed to reduce bilirrubin blood rates in new born babies with jaundice. The light source is centred at 470 nm with a bandwidth of 35 nm and includes a matrix of 196 (14x14) InGaN LEDs. The optical elements are designed to maximize the light intensity useful for treatment, with a small number of LEDs in a compact and low cost unit. The optic array is such that every LED illuminates all the treatment area, which ensures redundancy and, thus, a high reliability not to be found in single-lamp instruments. Thermal dissipation and cost of BiliLED are both an order-of-magnitude smaller than conventional therapy lamps. BiliLED adjusts coetaneous irradiation with a feedback loop to compensate the loss or aging of LEDs achieving a calibrated light source for over a decade of use. A clinical trial in 20 hyperbilirrubinaemia patients shows 16% bilirrubin degradation within 24 hours of treatment, higher than most lamp phototherapy instruments. The steps from prototype to commercial model are described

  19. Health-friendly high-quality white light using violet-green-red laser and InGaN nanowires-based true yellow nanowires light-emitting diodes

    KAUST Repository

    Janjua, Bilal; Ng, Tien Khee; Zhao, Chao; Anjum, Dalaver H.; Prabaswara, Aditya; Consiglio, Giuseppe Bernardo; Shen, Chao; Ooi, Boon S.

    2017-01-01

    , in conjunction with a yellow NWs-LED realized using molecular beam epitaxy technique, on titanium-coated silicon substrates. Unlike the conventional quantum-well-based LED, the NWs-LED showed efficiency-droop free behavior up to 9.8 A/cm with peak output power

  20. Temperature Dependence of Emission Properties of Self-Assembled InGaN Quantum Dots

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao Wan-Ru; Zhang Jiang-Yong; Zhang Bao-Ping; Weng Guo-En; Liang Ming-Ming; Li Zeng-Cheng; Liu Jian-Ping

    2014-01-01

    Emission properties of self-assembled green-emitting InGaN quantum dots (QDs) grown on sapphire substrates by using metal organic chemical vapor deposition are studied by temperature-dependent photoluminescence (PL) measurements. As temperature increases (15–300 K), the PL peak energy shows an anomalous V-shaped (redshift—blueshift) variation instead of an S-shaped (redshift—blueshift—redshift) variation, as observed typically in green-emitting InGaN/GaN multi-quantum wells (MQWs). The PL full width at half maximum (FWHM) also shows a V-shaped (decrease—increase) variation. The temperature dependence of the PL peak energy and FWHM of QDs are well explained by a model similar to MQWs, in which carriers transferring in localized states play an important role, while the confinement energy of localized states in the QDs is significantly larger than that in MQWs. By analyzing the integrated PL intensity, the larger confinement energy of localized states in the QDs is estimated to be 105.9 meV, which is well explained by taking into account the band-gap shrinkage and carrier thermalization with temperature. It is also found that the nonradiative combination centers in QD samples are much less than those in QW samples with the same In content

  1. Influence of InGaN sub-quantum-well on performance of InAlN/GaN/InAlN resonant tunneling diodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Haoran; Yang, Lin'an; Hao, Yue

    2014-01-01

    The resonant tunneling mechanism of the GaN based resonant tunneling diode (RTD) with an InGaN sub-quantum-well has been investigated by means of numerical simulation. At resonant-state, Electrons in the InGaN/InAlN/GaN/InAlN RTD tunnel from the emitter region through the aligned discrete energy levels in the InGaN sub-quantum-well and GaN main-quantum-well into the collector region. The implantation of the InGaN sub-quantum-well alters the dominant transport mechanism, increase the transmission coefficient and give rise to the peak current and peak-to-valley current ratio. We also demonstrate that the most pronounced negative-differential-resistance characteristic can be achieved by choosing appropriately the In composition of In x Ga 1−x N at around x = 0.06

  2. Study on luminescence and thermal stability of blue-emitting Sr{sub 5}(PO{sub 4}){sub 3}F: Eu{sup 2+}phosphor for application in InGaN-based LEDs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Jie; Zhang, Zhi-Ming [State Key Laboratory Base of Eco-chemical Engineering, Laboratory of Inorganic Synthesis and Applied Chemistry, College of Chemistry and Molecular Engineering, Qingdao University of Science and Technology, Qingdao 266042 (China); Wu, Zhan-Chao, E-mail: wuzhan_chao@163.com [State Key Laboratory Base of Eco-chemical Engineering, Laboratory of Inorganic Synthesis and Applied Chemistry, College of Chemistry and Molecular Engineering, Qingdao University of Science and Technology, Qingdao 266042 (China); Wang, Fang-Fang [State Key Laboratory Base of Eco-chemical Engineering, Laboratory of Inorganic Synthesis and Applied Chemistry, College of Chemistry and Molecular Engineering, Qingdao University of Science and Technology, Qingdao 266042 (China); Li, Zhen-Jiang, E-mail: zjli126@126.com [State Key Laboratory Base of Eco-chemical Engineering, College of Sino-German Science and Technology, Qingdao University of Science and Technology, 53 Zhengzhou Road, Qingdao 266042, Shandong (China)

    2017-07-15

    Highlights: • A blue phosphor Sr{sub 5}(PO{sub 4}){sub 3}F: Eu{sup 2+} was prepared at low temperature of 800 °C. • The broad excitation band of the phosphor matches well with NUV LED chips. • The phosphor shows high color purity and good color stability. • A bright blue-emitting LED was fabricated with this phosphor on an InGaN chip. - Abstract: A series of blue-emitting phosphors Sr{sub 5}(PO{sub 4}){sub 3}F: Eu{sup 2+} were synthesized by traditional high temperature solid-state reaction method. The micro-morphology and photoluminescence properties of the phosphors were investigated. The Sr{sub 5}(PO{sub 4}){sub 3}F: Eu{sup 2+} phosphors exhibit broad excitation spectra ranging from 250 to 420 nm, and an intense asymmetric blue emission band peaking at 435 nm. Two different Eu{sup 2+} emission centers in Sr{sub 5}(PO{sub 4}){sub 3}F: Eu{sup 2+} phosphors were confirmed via their fluorescence properties. The concentration quenching mechanism, fluorescence lifetime and thermal stability of Sr{sub 5}(PO{sub 4}){sub 3}F: Eu{sup 2+} phosphors were studied in detail. The thermal stability can be improved obviously by anion substitution. The CIE chromaticity coordinates of Sr{sub 5}(PO{sub 4}){sub 3}F: Eu{sup 2+} phosphors with different Eu{sup 2+}-doped concentrations were calculated. A blue light-emitting diode was fabricated by combination of a 370 nm InGaN chip and the prepared phosphor Sr{sub 5}(PO{sub 4}){sub 3}F: Eu{sup 2+}. The present work suggests that Sr{sub 5}(PO{sub 4}){sub 3}F: Eu{sup 2+} is a potential phosphor applied in InGaN-based LEDs.

  3. Advanced light emitting device structures for optoelectronic applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kovac, J.

    2002-01-01

    Several factors are driving the recent development of light emitting devices (LED,s). The most important ones are brightness, available efficiency, architecture form flexibility, rugged construction and low applied voltages. These are contributing to growth in markets such as traffic lights, automotive brake signals and instrument displays, video displays, traffic signals, decorative signs and the many uses of the new white LED-based products. A new developments are directed to various materials used for high brightness HB-LED,s based on AlGaAs (red), AlInGaP (yellow-green to red) and InGaN (blue, green and white) devices. The development of LED,s depends on epitaxial growth advances, mainly molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) and metalorganic vapor phase epitaxy (MOVPE). As a technology improved, the performace of visible LED,s increased at the rate 10x per decade from less than 0.1 lm/W to the best red and orange LED,s now providing about 100 lm/W. The main engineering challenge is now the extraction or the ability to get all the light out of the chip to where it is needed. This has led to novel changes in the shape of the LED chip and to the replacement of GaAs with transparent GaP substrate throught wafer bonding after the LED has been produced. Most of the focus for nitride devices (InGaN) is to develop improved or new substrate materials to replace sapphire and enable the growth of lower defect density materials. Organic LED,s (OLED,s) have been undergone dramatic improvements in performace in the last five years. Two main technologies for OLED,s have emerged in the last decade, either based on conjaguated polymers, or sublimed films of small molecules. Recent improvements have taken OLED,s to luminous efficiency greater than 20 lm/W. However, in contrast to conventional LED,s, OLED,s share many of the properties associated with other organic substances and polymers. They allow more design flexibility than inorganic LED,s and thus lead to the high

  4. Aging characteristics of blue InGaN micro-light emitting diodes at an extremely high current density of 3.5 kA cm−2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tian, Pengfei; Liu, Ran; Althumali, Ahmad; Gu, Erdan; Watson, Ian M; Dawson, Martin D

    2016-01-01

    The aging characteristics of blue InGaN micro-light emitting diodes (micro-LEDs) with different sizes have been studied at an extremely high current density 3.5 kA cm −2 for emerging micro-LED applications including visible light communication (VLC), micro-LED pumped organic lasers and optogenetics. The light output power of micro-LEDs first increases and then decreases due to the competition of Mg activation in p-GaN layer and defect generation in the active region. The smaller micro-LEDs show less light output power degradation compared with larger micro-LEDs, which is attributed to the lower junction temperature of smaller micro-LEDs. It is found that the high current density without additional junction temperature cannot induce significant micro-LED degradation at room temperature but the combination of the high current density and high junction temperature leads to strong degradation. Furthermore, the cluster LEDs, composed of a micro-LED array, have been developed with both high light output power and less light output degradation for micro-LED applications in solid state lighting and VLC. (paper)

  5. Growth of GaN-based non- and semipolar heterostructures for high efficiency light emitters; Wachstum von nicht- und semipolaren InAIGaN-Heterostrukturen fuer hocheffiziente Lichtemitter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wernicke, Tim

    2010-07-01

    Optoelectronic devices based on GaN and its alloys InGaN and AlGaN are capable of emitting light from the visible to the ultraviolet spectral region. Blue and green lasers have applications in laser projectors, DNA sequencing and spectroscopy. But it is extremely difficult to fabricate green laser diodes. Currently almost all of the light emitting diodes (LEDs) and lasers are grown on GaN crystals that are oriented in the polar (0001) c-plane direction, which provides the most stable growth surface. However the resulting polarization fields on (0001)GaN have detrimental effects on the optical properties of nitride light emitters, e.g. causing significant wavelength shifts and reduced efficiencies in InGaN LEDs. Growth on crystal surfaces with non- and semipolar orientations, e.g. (10 anti 10) m-plane or (11 anti 22), could enable devices with new and improved optical properties. For example, for nonpolar and semipolar LEDs the degree of polarization of the emitted light can be tailored. Furthermore easier to grow devices with green light emission, since the indium incorporation is enhanced for semipolar orientations. In contrast to c-plane GaN there is no polarization field across quantum wells on nonpolar GaN. By reducing the polarization fields an increase in the radiative recombination rate can be expected and would lead to higher LED efficiencies and lower laser thresholds. One of the biggest challenges for the growth of light emitters on non- and semipolar GaN is the choice of a suitable substrate: Heteroepitaxial growth on sapphire or LiAlO{sub 2} allows the deposition of GaN on 2'' diameter wafers and larger. However, these layers show a very high defect density in particular basal plane stacking faults, in comparison to c-plane GaN on sapphire. In order to reduce the defect density we applied successfully epitaxial lateral overgrowth to heteroepitaxial nonpolar a-plane GaN and verified the improvement by spatially and spectrally

  6. Thermoelectric properties of In-rich InGaN and InN/InGaN superlattices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James (Zi-Jian Ju

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The thermoelectric properties of n-type InGaN alloys with high In-content and InN/InGaN thin film superlattices (SL grown by molecular beam epitaxy are investigated. Room-temperature measurements of the thermoelectric properties reveal that an increasing Ga-content in ternary InGaN alloys (0 < x(Ga < 0.2 yields a more than 10-fold reduction in thermal conductivity (κ without deteriorating electrical conductivity (σ, while the Seebeck coefficient (S increases slightly due to a widening band gap compared to binary InN. Employing InN/InGaN SLs (x(Ga = 0.1 with different periods, we demonstrate that confinement effects strongly enhance electron mobility with values as high as ∼820 cm2/V s at an electron density ne of ∼5×1019 cm−3, leading to an exceptionally high σ of ∼5400 (Ωcm−1. Simultaneously, in very short-period SL structures S becomes decoupled from ne, κ is further reduced below the alloy limit (κ < 9 W/m-K, and the power factor increases to 2.5×10−4 W/m-K2 by more than a factor of 5 as compared to In-rich InGaN alloys. These findings demonstrate that quantum confinement in group-III nitride-based superlattices facilitates improvements of thermoelectric properties over bulk-like ternary nitride alloys.

  7. Water Splitting over Epitaxially Grown InGaN Nanowires on-Metallic Titanium/Silicon Template: Reduced Interfacial Transfer Resistance and Improved Stability

    KAUST Repository

    Ebaid, Mohamed

    2018-03-09

    Water splitting using InGaN-based photocatalysts may have a great contribution in future renewable energy production systems. Among the most important parameters to solve are those related to substrate lattice-matching compatibility. Here, we directly grow InGaN nanowires (NWs) on a metallic Ti/Si template, for improving water splitting performance compared to a bare Si substrate. The open circuit potential of the epitaxially grown InGaN NWs on metallic Ti was almost two times that of those grown on Si substrate. The interfacial transfer resistance was also reduced significantly after introducing the metallic Ti interlayer. An applied-bias-photon-to-current conversion efficiency of 2.2% and almost unity Faradic efficiency for hydrogen generation were achieved using this approach. The InGaN NWs grown on Ti showed improved stability of hydrogen generation under continuous operation conditions, when compared to those grown on Si, emphasizing the role of the semiconductor-on-metal approach in enhancing the overall efficiency of water splitting catalysts.

  8. Influence of InGaN sub-quantum-well on performance of InAlN/GaN/InAlN resonant tunneling diodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Haoran; Yang, Lin' an, E-mail: layang@xidian.edu.cn; Hao, Yue [State Key Discipline Laboratory of Wide Bandgap Semiconductor Technology, School of Microelectronics, Xidian University, Xi' an 710071 (China)

    2014-08-21

    The resonant tunneling mechanism of the GaN based resonant tunneling diode (RTD) with an InGaN sub-quantum-well has been investigated by means of numerical simulation. At resonant-state, Electrons in the InGaN/InAlN/GaN/InAlN RTD tunnel from the emitter region through the aligned discrete energy levels in the InGaN sub-quantum-well and GaN main-quantum-well into the collector region. The implantation of the InGaN sub-quantum-well alters the dominant transport mechanism, increase the transmission coefficient and give rise to the peak current and peak-to-valley current ratio. We also demonstrate that the most pronounced negative-differential-resistance characteristic can be achieved by choosing appropriately the In composition of In{sub x}Ga{sub 1−x}N at around x = 0.06.

  9. Visual color matching system based on RGB LED light source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Lei; Huang, Qingmei; Feng, Chen; Li, Wei; Wang, Chaofeng

    2018-01-01

    In order to study the property and performance of LED as RGB primary color light sources on color mixture in visual psychophysical experiments, and to find out the difference between LED light source and traditional light source, a visual color matching experiment system based on LED light sources as RGB primary colors has been built. By simulating traditional experiment of metameric color matching in CIE 1931 RGB color system, it can be used for visual color matching experiments to obtain a set of the spectral tristimulus values which we often call color-matching functions (CMFs). This system consists of three parts: a monochromatic light part using blazed grating, a light mixing part where the summation of 3 LED illuminations are to be visually matched with a monochromatic illumination, and a visual observation part. The three narrow band LEDs used have dominant wavelengths of 640 nm (red), 522 nm (green) and 458 nm (blue) respectively and their intensities can be controlled independently. After the calibration of wavelength and luminance of LED sources with a spectrophotometer, a series of visual color matching experiments have been carried out by 5 observers. The results are compared with those from CIE 1931 RGB color system, and have been used to compute an average locus for the spectral colors in the color triangle, with white at the center. It has been shown that the use of LED is feasible and has the advantages of easy control, good stability and low cost.

  10. Carrier redistribution between different potential sites in semipolar (202¯1) InGaN quantum wells studied by near-field photoluminescence

    KAUST Repository

    Marcinkevičius, S.

    2014-09-15

    © 2014 AIP Publishing LLC. Scanning near-field photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopy at different excitation powers was applied to study nanoscale properties of carrier localization and recombination in semipolar (202¯1) InGaN quantum wells (QWs) emitting in violet, blue, and green-yellow spectral regions. With increased excitation power, an untypical PL peak energy shift to lower energies was observed. The shift was attributed to carrier density dependent carrier redistribution between nm-scale sites of different potentials. Near-field PL scans showed that in (202¯1) QWs the in-plane carrier diffusion is modest, and the recombination properties are uniform, which is advantageous for photonic applications.

  11. Dependence of InGaN solar cell performance on polarization-induced electric field and carrier lifetime

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Jing; Zhao De-Gang; Jiang De-Sheng; Liu Zong-Shun; Chen Ping; Li Liang; Wu Liang-Liang; Le Ling-Cong; Li Xiao-Jing; He Xiao-Guang; Yang Hui; Wang Hui; Zhu Jian-Jun; Zhang Shu-Ming; Zhang Bao-Shun

    2013-01-01

    The effects of Mg-induced net acceptor doping concentration and carrier lifetime on the performance of a p—i—n InGaN solar cell are investigated. It is found that the electric field induced by spontaneous and piezoelectric polarization in the i-region could be totally shielded when the Mg-induced net acceptor doping concentration is sufficiently high. The polarization-induced potential barriers are reduced and the short circuit current density is remarkably increased from 0.21 mA/cm 2 to 0.95 mA/cm 2 by elevating the Mg doping concentration. The carrier lifetime determined by defect density of i-InGaN also plays an important role in determining the photovoltaic properties of solar cell. The short circuit current density severely degrades, and the performance of InGaN solar cell becomes more sensitive to the polarization when carrier lifetime is lower than the transit time. This study demonstrates that the crystal quality of InGaN absorption layer is one of the most important challenges in realizing high efficiency InGaN solar cells. (interdisciplinary physics and related areas of science and technology)

  12. Theoretical analysis of the influence of defect parameters on photovoltaic performances of composition graded InGaN solar cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gorge, V.; Migan-Dubois, A.; Djebbour, Z.; Pantzas, K.; Gautier, S.; Moudakir, T.; Suresh, S.; Ougazzaden, A.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► We have modeled a p–i–n InGaN-based solar cell with gradual bandgap layers. ► InGaN defects have been modeled by two band tails and one localized energy level. ► Energetic position and band tail widths have a low effect on device efficiency. ► The localized defect FWHM has a significant impact on performance. ► The efficiency drops radically when the defect density is higher than the P-doping. - Abstract: In this paper, we have used simulations to evaluate the impact of the distribution of electrically active defects on the photovoltaic performances of InGaN-based solar cell. The simulations were carried out using Silvaco's ATLAS software. We have modeled a P-GaN/Grad-InGaN/i-In 0.53 Ga 0.47 N/Grad-InGaN/N-ZnO where Grad-InGaN corresponds to an InGaN layer with a graded composition. This layer is inserted to eliminate the band discontinuities at the interface between InGaN and the GaN and ZnO layers. The defects were modeled through the introduction of band tails and a Gaussian distribution of defects in i-InGaN material. We have evaluated the influence of band tail widths as well as the parameters of the Gaussian distribution (i.e. defect density, mean position and standard deviation) on the short-circuit current, the open-circuit voltage and the fill-factor (efficiency) of the solar cell. These results have allowed us to identify key structural parameters useful for the optimization of InGaN solar cells, as well as to give realistic estimates of the performances of such cells.

  13. Theoretical analysis of the influence of defect parameters on photovoltaic performances of composition graded InGaN solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gorge, V.; Migan-Dubois, A. [LGEP, UMR 8507, CNRS, SUPELEC, UPMC, Universite Paris-Sud 11, 11 rue Joliot-Curie, Plateau de Moulon, 91192 Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex (France); Djebbour, Z., E-mail: zakaria.djebbour@uvsq.fr [LGEP, UMR 8507, CNRS, SUPELEC, UPMC, Universite Paris-Sud 11, 11 rue Joliot-Curie, Plateau de Moulon, 91192 Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex (France); Department of Physics and Engineering Science, University of Versailles UVSQ, 45 Av. Des Etats Unis, 78035 Versailles (France); Pantzas, K. [Georgia Institute of Technology, GT-Lorraine, 2 rue Marconi, 57 070 Metz (France); UMI 2958 Georgia Tech, CNRS, 2 rue Marconi, 57 070 Metz (France); Gautier, S. [UMI 2958 Georgia Tech, CNRS, 2 rue Marconi, 57 070 Metz (France); LMOPS, UMR 7132, CNRS, University of Metz, Supelec, 2 rue E. Belin, 57 070 Metz (France); Moudakir, T.; Suresh, S. [UMI 2958 Georgia Tech, CNRS, 2 rue Marconi, 57 070 Metz (France); Ougazzaden, A. [Georgia Institute of Technology, GT-Lorraine, 2 rue Marconi, 57 070 Metz (France); UMI 2958 Georgia Tech, CNRS, 2 rue Marconi, 57 070 Metz (France)

    2013-02-01

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We have modeled a p-i-n InGaN-based solar cell with gradual bandgap layers. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer InGaN defects have been modeled by two band tails and one localized energy level. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Energetic position and band tail widths have a low effect on device efficiency. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The localized defect FWHM has a significant impact on performance. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The efficiency drops radically when the defect density is higher than the P-doping. - Abstract: In this paper, we have used simulations to evaluate the impact of the distribution of electrically active defects on the photovoltaic performances of InGaN-based solar cell. The simulations were carried out using Silvaco's ATLAS software. We have modeled a P-GaN/Grad-InGaN/i-In{sub 0.53}Ga{sub 0.47}N/Grad-InGaN/N-ZnO where Grad-InGaN corresponds to an InGaN layer with a graded composition. This layer is inserted to eliminate the band discontinuities at the interface between InGaN and the GaN and ZnO layers. The defects were modeled through the introduction of band tails and a Gaussian distribution of defects in i-InGaN material. We have evaluated the influence of band tail widths as well as the parameters of the Gaussian distribution (i.e. defect density, mean position and standard deviation) on the short-circuit current, the open-circuit voltage and the fill-factor (efficiency) of the solar cell. These results have allowed us to identify key structural parameters useful for the optimization of InGaN solar cells, as well as to give realistic estimates of the performances of such cells.

  14. MOVPE growth and characterization of (In,Ga)N quantum structures for laser diodes emitting at 440 nm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoffmann, Veit

    2011-04-18

    The presented work describes the metal organic vapor phase epitaxy and characterization of nitride-based quantum structures which are used in laser heterostructures emitting in the wavelength range between 400 nm and 440 nm. Aiming at current injection and optically pumped laser structures with low threshold current or respectively threshold power densities, the device properties were correlated with the material properties of the indium gallium nitride (InGaN) active region. Furthermore, the influence of the active region and waveguide heterostructure layout on the material gain as well as the modal gain was investigated. In order to understand the InGaN growth process and the formation of structural imperfections, 15 nm-100 nm thick InGaN single layers were deposited on gallium nitride (GaN) on sapphire substrates and analyzed subsequently. It turned out that the spiral pattern of the growth edges around screw dislocations, threading from the substrate to the growth surface, and the formation of additional V-shaped surface defects are the main cause for the deterioration of the crystal perfection of the InGaN. As a result of the transition from a layer-by-layer to a 3D growth regime stable facets with preferred indium incorporation are formed that increase the lateral variation of the indium mole fraction in the layer. The higher indium incorporation at the facets is explained by dynamical elasticity theory and proven by the growth and characterization of InGaN layers on differently oriented GaN. The material properties of the InGaN quantum wells were correlated with laser device properties using 400 nm laser structures: In the case of thin quantum wells the 3D growth results in a lateral variation of the band gap due to variations of the indium mole fraction and the well width. Systematical investigations of laser structures with different band gap fluctuations show an increase of the threshold power density as the lateral variation of the band gap increases. It

  15. Beyond conventional c-plane GaN-based light emitting diodes: A systematic exploration of LEDs on semi-polar orientations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monavarian, Morteza

    Despite enormous efforts and investments, the efficiency of InGaN-based green and yellow-green light emitters remains relatively low, and that limits progress in developing full color display, laser diodes, and bright light sources for general lighting. The low efficiency of light emitting devices in the green-to-yellow spectral range, also known as the "Green Gap", is considered a global concern in the LED industry. The polar c-plane orientation of GaN, which is the mainstay in the LED industry, suffers from polarization-induced separation of electrons and hole wavefunctions (also known as the "quantum confined Stark effect") and low indium incorporation efficiency that are the two main factors that contribute to the Green Gap phenomenon. One possible approach that holds promise for a new generation of green and yellow light emitting devices with higher efficiency is the deployment of nonpolar and semi-polar crystallographic orientations of GaN to eliminate or mitigate polarization fields. In theory, the use of other GaN planes for light emitters could also enhance the efficiency of indium incorporation compared to c-plane. In this thesis, I present a systematic exploration of the suitable GaN orientation for future lighting technologies. First, in order to lay the groundwork for further studies, it is important to discuss the analysis of processes limiting LED efficiency and some novel designs of active regions to overcome these limitations. Afterwards, the choice of nonpolar orientations as an alternative is discussed. For nonpolar orientation, the (1100)-oriented (mo-plane) structures on patterned Si (112) and freestanding m-GaN are studied. The semi-polar orientations having substantially reduced polarization field are found to be more promising for light-emitting diodes (LEDs) owing to high indium incorporation efficiency predicted by theoretical studies. Thus, the semi-polar orientations are given close attention as alternatives for future LED technology

  16. Non-polar InGaN quantum dot emission with crystal-axis oriented linear polarization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reid, Benjamin P. L., E-mail: benjamin.reid@physics.ox.ac.uk; Chan, Christopher C. S.; Taylor, Robert A. [Clarendon Laboratory, Department of Physics, University of Oxford, Oxford OX1 3PU (United Kingdom); Kocher, Claudius [Department of Physics, University of Konstanz, Konstanz 78457 (Germany); Zhu, Tongtong; Oehler, Fabrice; Oliver, Rachel A. [Department of Materials Science and Metallurgy, University of Cambridge, 27 Charles Babbage Road, Cambridge CB3 0FS (United Kingdom)

    2015-04-27

    Polarization sensitive photoluminescence is performed on single non-polar InGaN quantum dots. The studied InGaN quantum dots are found to have linearly polarized emission with a common polarization direction defined by the [0001] crystal axis. Around half of ∼40 studied dots have a polarization degree of 1. For those lines with a polarization degree less than 1, we can resolve fine structure splittings between −800 μeV and +800 μeV, with no clear correlation between fine structure splitting and emission energy.

  17. Led spectral and power characteristics under hybrid PWM/AM dimming strategy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beczkowski, Szymon; Munk-Nielsen, Stig

    2010-01-01

    In order to dim LEDs the pulse width modulation (PWM) or amplitude modulation (AM) dimming scheme is typically used. Previous studies show that these dimming schemes can have opposite effects on diodes peak wavelength shift. An experimental study was conducted to test the behavior of InGaN diodes...... and phosphor-converted white diodes under hybrid PWM/AM modulation. Feed forward control schemes that provide stable peak wavelength position during dimming and the ability to compensate the thermally induced color shifts and the decrease of the luminous flux are investigated....

  18. Theoretical Modeling of Intensity Noise in InGaN Semiconductor Lasers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moustafa Ahmed

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper introduces modeling and simulation of the noise properties of the blue-violet InGaN laser diodes. The noise is described in terms of the spectral properties of the relative intensity noise (RIN. We examine the validity of the present noise modeling by comparing the simulated results with the experimental measurements available in literature. We also compare the obtained noise results with those of AlGaAs lasers. Also, we examine the influence of gain suppression on the quantum RIN. In addition, we examine the changes in the RIN level when describing the gain suppression by the case of inhomogeneous spectral broadening. The results show that RIN of the InGaN laser is nearly 9 dB higher than that of the AlGaAs laser.

  19. Solid State pH Sensor Based on Light Emitting Diodes (LED) As Detector Platform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, King Tong; Shepherd, R.; Diamond, Danny; Diamond, Dermot

    2006-01-01

    A low-power, high sensitivity, very low-cost light emitting diode (LED)-based device developed for low-cost sensor networks was modified with bromocresol green membrane to work as a solid-state pH sensor. In this approach, a reverse-biased LED functioning as a photodiode is coupled with a second LED configured in conventional emission mode. A simple timer circuit measures how long (in microsecond) it takes for the photocurrent generated on the detector LED to discharge its capacitance from logic 1 (+5 V) to logic 0 (+1.7 V). The entire instrument provides an inherently digital output of light intensity measurements for a few cents. A light dependent resistor (LDR) modified with similar sensor membrane was also used as a comparison method. Both the LED sensor and the LDR sensor responded to various pH buffer solutions in a similar way to obtain sigmoidal curves expected of the dye. The pKa value obtained for the sensors was found to agree with the literature value.

  20. Spectrally-resolved internal quantum efficiency and carrier dynamics of semipolar (10\\bar{1}1) core-shell triangular nanostripe GaN/InGaN LEDs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okur, Serdal; Rishinaramangalam, Ashwin K.; Mishkat-Ul-Masabih, Saadat; Nami, Mohsen; Liu, Sheng; Brener, Igal; Brueck, Steven R. J.; Feezell, Daniel F.

    2018-06-01

    We investigate the spectrally resolved internal quantum efficiency (IQE) and carrier dynamics in semipolar (10\\bar{1}1) core–shell triangular nanostripe light-emitting diodes (TLEDs) using temperature-dependent photoluminescence (TDPL) and time-resolved photoluminescence (TRPL) at various excitation energy densities. Using electroluminescence, photoluminescence, and cathodoluminescence measurements, we verify the origins of the broad emission spectra from the nanostructures and confirm that localized regions of high-indium-content InGaN exist along the apex of the nanostructures. Spectrally resolved IQE measurements are then performed, with the spectra integrated from 400–450 nm and 450–500 nm to obtain the IQE of the QWs mainly near the sidewalls and apex of the TLEDs, respectively. TDPL and TRPL are used to decouple the radiative and non-radiative carrier lifetimes for different regions of the emission spectra. We observe that the IQE is higher for the spectral region between 450 nm and 500 nm compared to the IQE between 400 and 450 nm. This result is in contrast to the typical observation that the IQE of planar GaN-based LEDs is lower for longer wavelengths (i.e., higher indium contents). We also observe a longer non-radiative recombination lifetime for the longer wavelength portion of the spectrum. Several explanations are proposed for the improved IQE and longer non-radiative lifetime observed near the apex of the nanostructures. The results show that nanostructures may be leveraged to design more efficient green LEDs, potentially addressing a long-standing challenge in GaN-based materials.

  1. Flexible InGaN nanowire membranes for enhanced solar water splitting

    KAUST Repository

    Elafandy, Rami T.; Elafandy, Rami T.; Min, Jung-Wook; Zhao, Chao; Ng, Tien Khee; Ooi, Boon S.

    2018-01-01

    III-Nitride nanowires (NWs) have recently emerged as potential photoelectrodes for efficient solar hydrogen generation. While InGaN NWs epitaxy over silicon is required for high crystalline quality and economic production, it leads to the formation

  2. Investigation of self-organized quantum dots in InGaN alloys for photovoltaic devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yuan, Jinshe; Wang, Mingyue [Chongqing Normal Univ. (China). Dept. of Physics

    2008-07-01

    The self-organized quantum dots in InGaN alloys grown by metal organic chemical vapor deposition for photovoltaic devices were investigated using photoluminescence spectra, x-ray diffraction and atomic force microscopy measurements. The AFM view of the alloy shows the island-like microstructure appearing to be composed of granular-crystalline in nanometer scale. By analysis of the PL, it has been found that the narrow 493nm emission peak with 490nm and 487nm shoulder peaks was originated from InGaN self-organized quantum dots, which provide a candidate for realizing high efficiencies photovoltaic devices. (orig.)

  3. Design and fabrication of adjustable red-green-blue LED light arrays for plant research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenitz J Dustin

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although specific light attributes, such as color and fluence rate, influence plant growth and development, researchers generally cannot control the fine spectral conditions of artificial plant-growth environments. Plant growth chambers are typically outfitted with fluorescent and/or incandescent fixtures that provide a general spectrum that is accommodating to the human eye and not necessarily supportive to plant development. Many studies over the last several decades, primarily in Arabidopsis thaliana, have clearly shown that variation in light quantity, quality and photoperiod can be manipulated to affect growth and control developmental transitions. Light emitting diodes (LEDs has been used for decades to test plant responses to narrow-bandwidth light. LEDs are particularly well suited for plant growth chambers, as they have an extraordinary life (about 100,000 hours, require little maintenance, and use negligible energy. These factors render LED-based light strategies particularly appropriate for space-biology as well as terrestrial applications. However, there is a need for a versatile and inexpensive LED array platform where individual wavebands can be specifically tuned to produce a series of light combinations consisting of various quantities and qualities of individual wavelengths. Two plans are presented in this report. Results In this technical report we describe the practical construction of tunable red-green-blue LED arrays to support research in plant growth and development. Two light fixture designs and corresponding circuitry are presented. The first is well suited for a laboratory environment for use in a finite area with small plants, such as Arabidopsis. The second is expandable and appropriate for growth chambers. The application of these arrays to early plant developmental studies has been validated with assays of hypocotyl growth inhibition/promotion and phototropic curvature in Arabidopsis seedlings

  4. Improved photoluminescence properties of a new green SrB2O4:Tb3+ phosphor by charge compensation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Zhan-Chao; Wang, Ping; Liu, Jie; Li, Chao; Zhou, Wen-Hui; Kuang, Shao-Ping

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► New green-emitting SrB 2 O 4 :Tb 3+ phosphor was synthesized by solid-state reaction. ► Li + , Na + , and K + can all increase luminescent intensity of SrB 2 O 4 :Tb 3+ . ► Na + is the optimal charge compensator among Li + , Na + and K + . ► SrB 2 O 4 :Tb 3+ is a promising green phosphor for fabricating WLED. -- Abstract: A new green-emitting SrB 2 O 4 :Tb 3+ phosphor was synthesized by solid-state reaction. X-ray powder diffraction (XRD) analysis confirmed all the samples with orthorhombic formation of SrB 2 O 4 . The excitation spectra indicate the phosphor can be effectively excited by near ultraviolet (NUV) light, making it attractive as conversion phosphor for LED applications. The phosphor exhibits a bright green emission with the highest photoluminescence (PL) intensity at 544 nm excited by 378 nm light. The critical quenching concentration of Tb 3+ in SrB 2 O 4 :Tb 3+ is about 10 mol%. The effects of charge compensators (Li + , Na + , and K + ) on photoluminescence of SrB 2 O 4 :Tb 3+ were also studied. The results show that the emission intensity can be improved by all the three charge compensators and Na + is the optimal one for SrB 2 O 4 :Tb 3+ . All properties show that the phosphor is a promising green phosphor pumped by NUV InGaN chip for fabricating white light-emitting diodes (WLEDs).

  5. Photoreceptor spectral sensitivity of the compound eyes of black soldier fly (Hermetia illucens) informing the design of LED-based illumination to enhance indoor reproduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oonincx, D G A B; Volk, N; Diehl, J J E; van Loon, J J A; Belušič, G

    2016-12-01

    Mating in the black soldier fly (BSF) is a visually mediated behaviour that under natural conditions occurs in full sunlight. Artificial light conditions promoting mating by BSF were designed based on the spectral characteristics of the compound eye retina. Electrophysiological measurements revealed that BSF ommatidia contained UV-, blue- and green-sensitive photoreceptor cells, allowing trichromatic vision. An illumination system for indoor breeding based on UV, blue and green LEDs was designed and its efficiency was compared with illumination by fluorescent tubes which have been successfully used to sustain a BSF colony for five years. Illumination by LEDs and the fluorescent tubes yielded equal numbers of egg clutches, however, the LED illumination resulted in significantly more larvae. The possibilities to optimize the current LED illumination system to better approximate the skylight illuminant and potentially optimize the larval yield are discussed. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. The possible ocular hazards of LED dental illumination applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stamatacos, Catherine; Harrison, Janet L

    2013-01-01

    The use of high-intensity illumination via Light-Emitting Diode (LED) headlamps is gaining in popularity with dentists and student dentists. Practitioners are using LED headlamps together with magnifying loupes, overhead LED illumination and fiber-optic dental handpieces for long periods of time. Although most manufacturers of these LED illuminators advertise that their devices emit "white" light, these still consist of two spectral bands--the blue spectral band, with its peak at 445 nm, and the green with its peak at 555 nm. While manufacturers suggest that their devices emit "white" light, spectral components of LED lights from different companies are significantly different. Dental headlamp manufacturers strive to create a white LED, and they advertise that this type of light emitted from their product offers bright white-light illumination. However, the manufacturing of a white LED light is done through selection of a white LED-type based on the peak blue strength in combination with the green peak strength and thus creating a beam-forming optic, which determines the beam quality. Some LED illuminators have a strong blue-light component versus the green-light component. Blue-light is highly energized and is close in the color spectrum to ultraviolet-light. The hazards of retinal damage with the use of high-intensity blue-lights has been well-documented. There is limited research regarding the possible ocular hazards of usage of high-intensity illuminating LED devices. Furthermore, the authors have found little research, standards, or guidelines examining the possible safety issues regarding the unique dental practice setting consisting of the combined use of LED illumination systems. Another unexamined component is the effect of high-intensity light reflective glare and magnification back to the practitioner's eyes due to the use of water during dental procedures. Based on the result of Dr. Janet Harrison's observations of beginning dental students in a

  7. Green Capital: Student Capital student-led evaluation

    OpenAIRE

    Runkle, Q.; Haines, T.; Piper, K.; Leach, S.

    2016-01-01

    To assess and evaluate the impact of the Green Capital: Student Capital project, the partnership (the University of the West of England, the University of Bristol, the Students’ Union at UWE, and Bristol Students’ Union) worked with NUS to train a team of students from both universities to lead an evaluation process. There were two key aims for the evaluation: \\ud \\ud • To verify the quantitative outputs of the Green Capital: Student Capital project; \\ud • And to make a qualitative assessment...

  8. Mesa-height Dependent Quantum Efficiency Characteristics of InGaN Micro-LEDs

    KAUST Repository

    Shen, Chao; Kang, Chun Hong; Ng, Tien Khee; Ooi, Boon S.

    2013-01-01

    The mechanisms of mesa-height dependent efficiency and efficiency droop of blue InGaN/GaN micro-LED is presented. Device with a large etch-depth (> 1.3 µm) shows significant strain relief with aggravated current crowding.

  9. Indium clustering in a-plane InGaN quantum wells as evidenced by atom probe tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tang, Fengzai; Zhu, Tongtong; Oehler, Fabrice; Fu, Wai Yuen; Griffiths, James T.; Massabuau, Fabien C.-P.; Kappers, Menno J.; Oliver, Rachel A.; Martin, Tomas L.; Bagot, Paul A. J.; Moody, Michael P.

    2015-01-01

    Atom probe tomography (APT) has been used to characterize the distribution of In atoms within non-polar a-plane InGaN quantum wells (QWs) grown on a GaN pseudo-substrate produced using epitaxial lateral overgrowth. Application of the focused ion beam microscope enabled APT needles to be prepared from the low defect density regions of the grown sample. A complementary analysis was also undertaken on QWs having comparable In contents grown on polar c-plane sample pseudo-substrates. Both frequency distribution and modified nearest neighbor analyses indicate a statistically non-randomized In distribution in the a-plane QWs, but a random distribution in the c-plane QWs. This work not only provides insights into the structure of non-polar a-plane QWs but also shows that APT is capable of detecting as-grown nanoscale clustering in InGaN and thus validates the reliability of earlier APT analyses of the In distribution in c-plane InGaN QWs which show no such clustering

  10. Indium clustering in a-plane InGaN quantum wells as evidenced by atom probe tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang, Fengzai; Zhu, Tongtong; Oehler, Fabrice; Fu, Wai Yuen; Griffiths, James T.; Massabuau, Fabien C.-P.; Kappers, Menno J.; Oliver, Rachel A., E-mail: rao28@cam.ac.uk [Department of Materials Science and Metallurgy, University of Cambridge, 27 Charles Babbage Road, Cambridge CB3 0FS (United Kingdom); Martin, Tomas L.; Bagot, Paul A. J.; Moody, Michael P., E-mail: michael.moody@materials.ox.ac.uk [Department of Materials, University of Oxford, Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3PH (United Kingdom)

    2015-02-16

    Atom probe tomography (APT) has been used to characterize the distribution of In atoms within non-polar a-plane InGaN quantum wells (QWs) grown on a GaN pseudo-substrate produced using epitaxial lateral overgrowth. Application of the focused ion beam microscope enabled APT needles to be prepared from the low defect density regions of the grown sample. A complementary analysis was also undertaken on QWs having comparable In contents grown on polar c-plane sample pseudo-substrates. Both frequency distribution and modified nearest neighbor analyses indicate a statistically non-randomized In distribution in the a-plane QWs, but a random distribution in the c-plane QWs. This work not only provides insights into the structure of non-polar a-plane QWs but also shows that APT is capable of detecting as-grown nanoscale clustering in InGaN and thus validates the reliability of earlier APT analyses of the In distribution in c-plane InGaN QWs which show no such clustering.

  11. Design of the control system for full-color LED display based on MSP430 MCU

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xue; Xu, Hui-juan; Qin, Ling-ling; Zheng, Long-jiang

    2013-08-01

    The LED display incorporate the micro electronic technique, computer technology and information processing as a whole, it becomes the most preponderant of a new generation of display media with the advantages of bright in color, high dynamic range, high brightness and long operating life, etc. The LED display has been widely used in the bank, securities trading, highway signs, airport and advertising, etc. According to the display color, the LED display screen is divided into monochrome screen, double color display and full color display. With the diversification of the LED display's color and the ceaseless rise of the display demands, the LED display's drive circuit and control technology also get the corresponding progress and development. The earliest monochrome screen just displaying Chinese characters, simple character or digital, so the requirements of the controller are relatively low. With the widely used of the double color LED display, the performance of its controller will also increase. In recent years, the full color LED display with three primary colors of red, green, blue and grayscale display effect has been highly attention with its rich and colorful display effect. Every true color pixel includes three son pixels of red, green, blue, using the space colour mixture to realize the multicolor. The dynamic scanning control system of LED full-color display is designed based on MSP430 microcontroller technology of the low power consumption. The gray control technology of this system used the new method of pulse width modulation (PWM) and 19 games show principle are combining. This method in meet 256 level grayscale display conditions, improves the efficiency of the LED light device, and enhances the administrative levels feels of the image. Drive circuit used 1/8 scanning constant current drive mode, and make full use of the single chip microcomputer I/O mouth resources to complete the control. The system supports text, pictures display of 256 grayscale

  12. Effects of Green - Emitting Phosphor (La,Ce,TbPO_4:Ce:Tb on Luminous Flux and Color Quality of White LED Lamps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nguyen Thi Phuong Thao

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we present and analyze the influence of (La,Ce,TbPO_4:Ce:Tb green phosphor (LaTb toward the performance of the multi-chip white LED (MCW-LEDs lamps including color uniformity, lumen output, Color Rendering Index (CRI, and Color Quality Scale (CQS. By mixing the LaTb green phosphor and the YAG:Ce yellow phosphor compounding under condition of 7000 K MCW-LEDs, this new approach can produce a huge meaningful change in lumen output and the angular color distribution of MCW-LEDs. We also study the interaction between the concentration and size of the LaTb particles with output flux, color uniformity, CRI, and CQS. The obtained results demonstrate that the higher lumen output, the higher color uniformity enhancement could be attained by adding the LaTb particles with a size range around 6-8 µm and the concentration around 1.5% in phosphor layer. Meanwhile, the decrease of the color rendering value (CRI and the Color Quality Scale (CQS tend to be stable and insignificant. In other words, the obtained results provide a prospective method which plays an important role in the development of MCW-LED manufacturing technology.

  13. Efficiency droop in nonpolar InGaN quantum wells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schade, Lukas; Schwarz, Ulrich [Fraunhofer Institut fuer Angewandte Festkoerperphysik (IAF), Freiburg im Breisgau (Germany); Institut fuer Mikrosystemtechnik (IMTEK), Universitaet Freiburg, Freiburg im Breisgau (Germany); Wernicke, Tim; Rass, Jens; Ploch, Simon [Institut fuer Festkoerperphysik, Technische Universitaet Berlin (Germany); Weyers, Markus [Ferdinand-Braun-Institut (FBH), Berlin (Germany); Kneissl, Michael [Institut fuer Festkoerperphysik, Technische Universitaet Berlin (Germany); Ferdinand-Braun-Institut (FBH), Berlin (Germany)

    2012-07-01

    InGaN quantum wells (QWs) exhibit a decline of the internal efficiency at high charge carrier excitation. This has been observed for polar as well as for semipolar and nonpolar oriented QWs. Polar stands for the (0001) growth direction with strong piezoelectric fields. Due to the vanishing fields, the orthogonal growth directions (a or m) are called nonpolar, while all directions between are merged as semipolar orientations. In contrast to the polar and many semipolar QWs, nonpolar InGaN QWs provide a special property: optical polarization of the radiative transitions, which is a result of the anisotropic strain within pseudomorphic grown nonpolar QWs. Using this property, the broadened effective emission can be resolved into two fundamental transitions. They are spectrally separated by a defined energy which corresponds to the energy distance of the valence subbands. We studied nonpolar InGaN/InGaN Multi-QWs grown on low defect density GaN substrates with a setup for confocal microscopy. To reach high excitation densities of charge carriers, we use either a combination of an UV laser and highly focusing objectives or an electric pulse generator. The emission is spectrally analysed and compared to established models.

  14. Significant performance enhancement of InGaN/GaN nanorod LEDs with multi-layer graphene transparent electrodes by alumina surface passivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latzel, M; Büttner, P; Sarau, G; Höflich, K; Heilmann, M; Chen, W; Wen, X; Conibeer, G; Christiansen, S H

    2017-02-03

    Nanotextured surfaces provide an ideal platform for efficiently capturing and emitting light. However, the increased surface area in combination with surface defects induced by nanostructuring e.g. using reactive ion etching (RIE) negatively affects the device's active region and, thus, drastically decreases device performance. In this work, the influence of structural defects and surface states on the optical and electrical performance of InGaN/GaN nanorod (NR) light emitting diodes (LEDs) fabricated by top-down RIE of c-plane GaN with InGaN quantum wells was investigated. After proper surface treatment a significantly improved device performance could be shown. Therefore, wet chemical removal of damaged material in KOH solution followed by atomic layer deposition of only 10 [Formula: see text] alumina as wide bandgap oxide for passivation were successfully applied. Raman spectroscopy revealed that the initially compressively strained InGaN/GaN LED layer stack turned into a virtually completely relaxed GaN and partially relaxed InGaN combination after RIE etching of NRs. Time-correlated single photon counting provides evidence that both treatments-chemical etching and alumina deposition-reduce the number of pathways for non-radiative recombination. Steady-state photoluminescence revealed that the luminescent performance of the NR LEDs is increased by about 50% after KOH and 80% after additional alumina passivation. Finally, complete NR LED devices with a suspended graphene contact were fabricated, for which the effectiveness of the alumina passivation was successfully demonstrated by electroluminescence measurements.

  15. Heterostructures for Increased Quantum Efficiency in Nitride LEDs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davis, Robert F. [Carnegie Mellon Univ., Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

    2010-09-30

    Task 1. Development of an advanced LED simulator useful for the design of efficient nitride-based devices. Simulator will contain graphical interface software that can be used to specify the device structure, the material parameters, the operating conditions and the desired output results. Task 2. Theoretical and experimental investigations regarding the influence on the microstructure, defect concentration, mechanical stress and strain and IQE of controlled changes in the chemistry and process route of deposition of the buffer layer underlying the active region of nitride-based blue- and greenemitting LEDs. Task 3. Theoretical and experimental investigations regarding the influence on the physical properties including polarization and IQE of controlled changes in the geometry, chemistry, defect density, and microstructure of components in the active region of nitride-based blue- and green-emitting LEDs. Task 4. Theoretical and experimental investigations regarding the influence on IQE of novel heterostructure designs to funnel carriers into the active region for enhanced recombination efficiency and elimination of diffusion beyond this region. Task 5. Theoretical and experimental investigations regarding the influence of enhanced p-type doping on the chemical, electrical, and microstructural characteristics of the acceptor-doped layers, the hole injection levels at Ohmic contacts, the specific contact resistivity and the IQE of nitride-based blue- and green-emitting LEDs. Development and optical and electrical characterization of reflective Ohmic contacts to n- and p-type GaN films.

  16. Investigation of the current collapse induced in InGaN back barrier AlGaN/GaN high electron mobility transistors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wan Xiaojia; Wang Xiaoliang; Xiao Hongling; Feng Chun; Jiang Lijuan; Qu Shenqi; Wang Zhanguo; Hou Xun

    2013-01-01

    Current collapses were studied, which were observed in AlGaN/GaN high electron mobility transistors (HEMTs) with and without InGaN back barrier (BB) as a result of short-term bias stress. More serious drain current collapses were observed in InGaN BB AlGaN/GaN HEMTs compared with the traditional HEMTs. The results indicate that the defects and surface states induced by the InGaN BB layer may enhance the current collapse. The surface states may be the primary mechanism of the origination of current collapse in AlGaN/GaN HEMTs for short-term direct current stress. (semiconductor devices)

  17. Evaluation of a LED-based flatbed document scanner for radiochromic film dosimetry in transmission mode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lárraga-Gutiérrez, José Manuel; García-Garduño, Olivia Amanda; Treviño-Palacios, Carlos; Herrera-González, José Alfredo

    2018-03-01

    Flatbed scanners are the most frequently used reading instrument for radiochromic film dosimetry because its low cost, high spatial resolution, among other advantages. These scanners use a fluorescent lamp and a CCD array as light source and detector, respectively. Recently, manufacturers of flatbed scanners replaced the fluorescent lamp by light emission diodes (LED) as a light source. The goal of this work is to evaluate the performance of a commercial flatbed scanner with LED based source light for radiochromic film dosimetry. Film read out consistency, response uniformity, film-scanner sensitivity, long term stability and total dose uncertainty was evaluated. In overall, the performance of the LED flatbed scanner is comparable to that of a cold cathode fluorescent lamp (CCFL). There are important spectral differences between LED and CCFL lamps that results in a higher sensitivity of the LED scanner in the green channel. Total dose uncertainty, film response reproducibility and long-term stability of LED scanner are slightly better than those of the CCFL. However, the LED based scanner has a strong non-uniform response, up to 9%, that must be adequately corrected for radiotherapy dosimetry QA. The differences in light emission spectra between LED and CCFL lamps and its potential impact on film-scanner sensitivity suggest that the design of a dedicated flat-bed scanner with LEDs may improve sensitivity and dose uncertainty in radiochromic film dosimetry. Copyright © 2018 Associazione Italiana di Fisica Medica. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. ZnO thin films and nanostructures for emerging optoelectronic applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, D. J.; Teherani, F. H.; Sandana, V. E.; Razeghi, M.

    2010-02-01

    ZnO-based thin films and nanostructures grown by PLD for various emerging optoelectronic applications. AZO thin films are currently displacing ITO for many TCO applications due to recent improvements in attainable AZO conductivity combined with processing, cost and toxicity advantages. Advances in the channel mobilities and Id on/off ratios in ZnO-based TTFTs have opened up the potential for use as a replacement for a-Si in AM-OLED and AM-LCD screens. Angular-dependent specular reflection measurements of self-forming, moth-eye-like, nanostructure arrays grown by PLD were seen to have green gap in InGaN-based LEDs was combated by substituting low Ts PLD n-ZnO for MOCVD n-GaN in inverted hybrid heterojunctions. This approach maintained the integrity of the InGaN MQWs and gave LEDs with green emission at just over 510 nm. Hybrid n-ZnO/p-GaN heterojunctions were also seen to have the potential for UV (375 nm) EL, characteristic of ZnO NBE emission. This suggests that there was significant hole injection into the ZnO and that such LEDs could profit from the relatively high exciton binding energy of ZnO.

  19. Efficiency enhancement of InGaN amber MQWs using nanopillar structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ou, Yiyu; Iida, Daisuke; Liu, Jin

    2018-01-01

    We have investigated the use of nanopillar structures on high indium content InGaN amber multiple quantum well (MQW) samples to enhance the emission efficiency. A significant emission enhancement was observed which can be attributed to the enhancement of internal quantum efficiency and light extr...

  20. Development of LEDs-based microplate reader for bioanalytical assay measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alaruri, Sami D; Katzlinger, Michael; Schinwald, Bernhard; Kronberger, Georg; Atzler, Joseph

    2013-01-01

    The optical design for an LEDs-based microplate reader that can perform fluorescence intensity (top and bottom), absorbance, luminescence and time-resolved fluorescence measurements is described. The microplate reader is the first microplate reader in the marketplace that incorporates LEDs as excitation light sources. Absorbance measurements over the 0–3.5 optical density range for caffeine solution are presented. Additionally, fluorescence intensity readings collected at 535 and 625 nm from a green and a red RediPlate TM are reported. Furthermore, fluorescence decay lifetime measurements obtained for Eu (europium) and Sm (samarium) standard solutions using 370 nm excitation are presented. The microplate reader detection limits for the fluorescence intensity top, fluorescence intensity bottom, fluorescence polarization and time-resolved fluorescence modes are 1.5 fmol 100 µL −1 fluorescein (384-well plate), 25 fmol 100 µL −1 fluorescein (384-well plate), 5 mP at 10 nM fluorescein (black 384-well plate) and 30 amol 100 µL −1 europium solution (white 384-well plate), respectively. (paper)

  1. Development of LEDs-based microplate reader for bioanalytical assay measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alaruri, Sami D.; Katzlinger, Michael; Schinwald, Bernhard; Kronberger, Georg; Atzler, Joseph

    2013-10-01

    The optical design for an LEDs-based microplate reader that can perform fluorescence intensity (top and bottom), absorbance, luminescence and time-resolved fluorescence measurements is described. The microplate reader is the first microplate reader in the marketplace that incorporates LEDs as excitation light sources. Absorbance measurements over the 0-3.5 optical density range for caffeine solution are presented. Additionally, fluorescence intensity readings collected at 535 and 625 nm from a green and a red RediPlateTM are reported. Furthermore, fluorescence decay lifetime measurements obtained for Eu (europium) and Sm (samarium) standard solutions using 370 nm excitation are presented. The microplate reader detection limits for the fluorescence intensity top, fluorescence intensity bottom, fluorescence polarization and time-resolved fluorescence modes are 1.5 fmol 100 µL-1 fluorescein (384-well plate), 25 fmol 100 µL-1 fluorescein (384-well plate), 5 mP at 10 nM fluorescein (black 384-well plate) and 30 amol 100 µL-1 europium solution (white 384-well plate), respectively.

  2. Long-term stable stacked CsPbBr3 quantum dot films for highly efficient white light generation in LEDs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Young Hyun; Yoo, Jin Sun; Kang, Bong Kyun; Choi, Seung Hee; Ji, Eun Kyung; Jung, Hyun Suk; Yoon, Dae Ho

    2016-12-01

    We report highly efficient ethyl cellulose with CsPbBr 3 perovskite QD films for white light generation in LED application. Ethyl cellulose with CsPbBr 3 quantum dots is applied with Sr 2 Si 5 N 8  : Eu 2+ red phosphor on an InGaN blue chip, achieving a highly efficient luminous efficacy of 67.93 lm W -1 under 20 mA current.

  3. Photoelectrochemical water splitting and hydrogen generation by a spontaneously formed InGaN nanowall network

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alvi, N. H., E-mail: nhalvi@isom.upm.es, E-mail: r.noetzel@isom.upm.es; Soto Rodriguez, P. E. D.; Kumar, Praveen; Gómez, V. J.; Aseev, P.; Nötzel, R., E-mail: nhalvi@isom.upm.es, E-mail: r.noetzel@isom.upm.es [ISOM Institute for Systems Based on Optoelectronics and Microtechnology, ETSI Telecomunicación, Universidad Politécnica de Madrid, Ciudad Universitaria s/n, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Alvi, A. H. [Department of Physics, Government College University, Faisalabad (Pakistan); Alvi, M. A. [Department of Chemistry, Government College University, Faisalabad (Pakistan); Willander, M. [Department of Science and Technology (ITN), Campus Norrköping, Linköping University, 60174 Norrköping (Sweden)

    2014-06-02

    We investigate photoelectrochemical water splitting by a spontaneously formed In-rich InGaN nanowall network, combining the material of choice with the advantages of surface texturing for light harvesting by light scattering. The current density for the InGaN-nanowalls-photoelectrode at zero voltage versus the Ag/AgCl reference electrode is 3.4 mA cm{sup −2} with an incident-photon-to-current-conversion efficiency (IPCE) of 16% under 350 nm laser illumination with 0.075 W·cm{sup −2} power density. In comparison, the current density for a planar InGaN-layer-photoelectrode is 2 mA cm{sup −2} with IPCE of 9% at zero voltage versus the Ag/AgCl reference electrode. The H{sub 2} generation rates at zero externally applied voltage versus the Pt counter electrode per illuminated area are 2.8 and 1.61 μmol·h{sup −1}·cm{sup −2} for the InGaN nanowalls and InGaN layer, respectively, revealing ∼57% enhancement for the nanowalls.

  4. Atomic layer epitaxy of ZnO for applications in molecular beam epitaxy growth of GaN and InGaN

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Godlewski, M.; Szczerbakow, A.; Ivanov, V. Yu.; Barski, A.; Goldys, E.M.

    2000-01-01

    We report the successful atomic layer epitaxy growth of thin ZnO films and their use for GaN and InGaN epitaxy. The properties of ZnO epilayers, obtained by four different procedures, are analysed, as well as of GaN and InGaN films grown on ZnO-coated Si and GaAs by MBE. (author)

  5. In-clustering effects in InAlN and InGaN revealed by high pressure studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gorczyca, I.; Suski, T.; Kaminska, A.

    2010-01-01

    results are compared with the results of photoluminescence measurements performed at high hydrostatic pressures on InAlN and InGaN quasi-bulk epilayers. We discuss the modification of the uppermost valence band due to formation of In clusters which, together with the related lattice relaxations, may......Electronic band structure calculations of InAlN and InGaN under pressure are presented for two different arrangements of the In atoms, uniform and clustered. The band gap pressure coefficients exhibit strong bowing, and the effect is especially large when indium atoms are clustered. The theoretical...

  6. Enhancement of coherent acoustic phonons in InGaN multiple quantum wells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hafiz, Shopan D.; Zhang, Fan; Monavarian, Morteza; Avrutin, Vitaliy; Morkoç, Hadis; Özgür, Ümit

    2015-03-01

    Enhancement of coherent zone folded longitudinal acoustic phonon (ZFLAP) oscillations at terahertz frequencies was demonstrated in InGaN multiple quantum wells (MQWs) by using wavelength degenerate time resolved differential transmission spectroscopy. Screening of the piezoelectric field in InGaN MQWs by photogenerated carriers upon femtosecond pulse excitation gave rise to terahertz ZFLAPs, which were monitored at the Brillouin zone center in the transmission geometry. MQWs composed of 10 pairs InxGa1-xN wells and In0.03Ga0.97N barriers provided coherent phonon frequencies of 0.69-0.80 THz depending on the period of MQWs. Dependences of ZFLAP amplitude on excitation density and wavelength were also investigated. Possibility of achieving phonon cavity, incorporating a MQW placed between two AlN/GaN phonon mirrors designed to exhibit large acoustic gaps at the zone center, was also explored.

  7. Confinement factor, near and far field patterns in InGaN MQW laser diodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martín, J.; Sánchez, M.

    2005-07-01

    In this work the influence of the QW number in the active region on spectral characteristics in InGaN multi quamtun well lasers is analyzed. A comparison between the abrupt index step structure (Step) and a graded-index structure (GRIN) is done. The effect of the introduction of a p-AlxGa1-xN electron blocking layer, placed above the last InGaN barrier in the Step structure is also analyzed. Calculations of the confinement factor, near and far field patterns were carried out. We found that with the adequate aluminum content in this layer, the confinement factor, near and far field patterns are improved, and values similar to those obtained with GRIN structure can be reached.

  8. Optical properties of InGaN thin films in the entire composition range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazazis, S. A.; Papadomanolaki, E.; Androulidaki, M.; Kayambaki, M.; Iliopoulos, E.

    2018-03-01

    The optical properties of thick InGaN epilayers, with compositions spanning the entire ternary range, are studied in detail. High structural quality, single phase InxGa1-xN (0001) films were grown heteroepitaxially by radio-frequency plasma assisted molecular-beam epitaxy on freestanding GaN substrates. Their emission characteristics were investigated by low temperature photoluminescence spectroscopy, whereas variable angle spectroscopic ellipsometry was applied to determine the complex dielectric function of the films, in the 0.55-4.0 eV photon range. Photoluminescence lines were intense and narrow, in the range of 100 meV for Ga-rich InGaN films (x 0.6). The composition dependence of the strain-free emission energy was expressed by a bowing parameter of b = 2.70 ± 0.12 eV. The films' optical dielectric function dispersion was obtained by the analysis of the ellipsometric data employing a Kramers-Kronig consistent parameterized optical model. The refractive index dispersion was obtained for alloys in the entire composition range, and the corresponding values at the band edge show a parabolic dependence on the InN mole fraction expressed by a bowing parameter of b = 0.81 ± 0.04. The bowing parameter describing the fundamental energy bandgap was deduced to be equal to 1.66 ± 0.07 eV, consistent with the ab initio calculations for statistically random (non-clustered) InGaN alloys.

  9. Impact of surface morphology on the properties of light emission in InGaN epilayers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kristijonas Uždavinys, Tomas; Marcinkevičius, Saulius; Mensi, Mounir; Lahourcade, Lise; Carlin, Jean-François; Martin, Denis; Butté, Raphaël; Grandjean, Nicolas

    2018-05-01

    Scanning near-field optical microscopy was used to study the influence of the surface morphology on the properties of light emission and alloy composition in InGaN epitaxial layers grown on GaN substrates. A strong correlation between the maps of the photoluminescence (PL) peak energy and the gradient of the surface morphology was observed. This correlation demonstrates that the In incorporation strongly depends on the geometry of the monolayer step edges that form during growth in the step-flow mode. The spatial distribution of nonradiative recombination centers — evaluated from PL intensity maps — was found to strongly anticorrelate with the local content of In atoms in the InGaN alloy.

  10. A comparison of the optical properties of InGaN/GaN multiple quantum well structures grown with and without Si-doped InGaN prelayers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davies, M. J.; Hammersley, S.; Dawson, P.; Massabuau, F. C.-P.; Oliver, R. A.; Kappers, M. J.; Humphreys, C. J.

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we report on a detailed spectroscopic study of the optical properties of InGaN/GaN multiple quantum well structures, both with and without a Si-doped InGaN prelayer. In photoluminescence and photoluminescence excitation spectroscopy, a 2nd emission band, occurring at a higher energy, was identified in the spectrum of the multiple quantum well structure containing the InGaN prelayer, originating from the first quantum well in the stack. Band structure calculations revealed that a reduction in the resultant electric field occurred in the quantum well immediately adjacent to the InGaN prelayer, therefore leading to a reduction in the strength of the quantum confined Stark effect in this quantum well. The partial suppression of the quantum confined Stark effect in this quantum well led to a modified (higher) emission energy and increased radiative recombination rate. Therefore, we ascribed the origin of the high energy emission band to recombination from the 1st quantum well in the structure. Study of the temperature dependent recombination dynamics of both samples showed that the decay time measured across the spectrum was strongly influenced by the 1st quantum well in the stack (in the sample containing the prelayer) leading to a shorter average room temperature lifetime in this sample. The room temperature internal quantum efficiency of the prelayer containing sample was found to be higher than the reference sample (36% compared to 25%) which was thus attributed to the faster radiative recombination rate of the 1st quantum well providing a recombination pathway that is more competitive with non-radiative recombination processes

  11. A comparison of the optical properties of InGaN/GaN multiple quantum well structures grown with and without Si-doped InGaN prelayers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davies, M. J., E-mail: Matthew.Davies-2@Manchester.ac.uk; Hammersley, S.; Dawson, P. [School of Physics and Astronomy, Photon Science Institute, University of Manchester, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Massabuau, F. C.-P.; Oliver, R. A.; Kappers, M. J.; Humphreys, C. J. [Department of Material Science and Metallurgy, 27 Charles Babbage Road, University of Cambridge, Cambridge CB3 0FS (United Kingdom)

    2016-02-07

    In this paper, we report on a detailed spectroscopic study of the optical properties of InGaN/GaN multiple quantum well structures, both with and without a Si-doped InGaN prelayer. In photoluminescence and photoluminescence excitation spectroscopy, a 2nd emission band, occurring at a higher energy, was identified in the spectrum of the multiple quantum well structure containing the InGaN prelayer, originating from the first quantum well in the stack. Band structure calculations revealed that a reduction in the resultant electric field occurred in the quantum well immediately adjacent to the InGaN prelayer, therefore leading to a reduction in the strength of the quantum confined Stark effect in this quantum well. The partial suppression of the quantum confined Stark effect in this quantum well led to a modified (higher) emission energy and increased radiative recombination rate. Therefore, we ascribed the origin of the high energy emission band to recombination from the 1st quantum well in the structure. Study of the temperature dependent recombination dynamics of both samples showed that the decay time measured across the spectrum was strongly influenced by the 1st quantum well in the stack (in the sample containing the prelayer) leading to a shorter average room temperature lifetime in this sample. The room temperature internal quantum efficiency of the prelayer containing sample was found to be higher than the reference sample (36% compared to 25%) which was thus attributed to the faster radiative recombination rate of the 1st quantum well providing a recombination pathway that is more competitive with non-radiative recombination processes.

  12. Understanding and optimization of InN and high indium containing InGaN alloys by metal organic chemical vapor deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tuna, Oecal

    2013-07-18

    revealed a similar trend in regard to the change of the V/III ratio. However, a huge difference with the carrier concentrations obtained by Hall and optical techniques is found. For the samples grown at a V/III ratio of 111k, a carrier concentration estimated by optical techniques is in the range of 9.0 x 10{sup 17} cm{sup -3} compared to 6.0 x 10{sup 18} cm{sup -3} found by Hall measurement. The huge difference in carrier concentrations obtained by the optical and Hall measurements is caused by parallel conductivity. The surface accumulation layer on InN and defects at the interface between InN/GaN dominates the Hall measurement results. Following InN, In{sub x}Ga{sub 1-x}N layers with various In content ranging from 40% to 85% are grown and investigated. A new approach is proposed in order to enhance the In incorporation in InGaN layer, based on growing InGaN directly on thin InN interlayer on the GaN templates. With this method In incorporation is enhanced by In segregation from thin InN interlayers to In{sub x}Ga{sub 1-x}N layers. As a result of this approach, an additional 11% increase of In content in InGaN is achieved. For instance, while without the InN interlayer, the In content is about 74%, it increased to 85% when the InN interlayer is grown. Band bending and the related surface electron accumulation on the surface of InxGa1-xN are investigated. A decrease in surface electron accumulation is observed with increasing Ga content, and the transition from an accumulation to a depletion layer is observed at X{sub In}=20. Finally, synthesis and a systematic study of structural, optical and electrical properties of Mg-doped InxGa1-xN layers are studied. At a low annealing temperature of 750 C, p-type conductivity is achieved for InGaN with 18% In. It is demonstrated that p-type InGaN layers with about 18% In can be grown with an acceptor concentration of 3.5 x 10{sup 18} cm{sup -3}. Temperature dependent PL revealed an activation energy of Mg in In{sub 0.18}Ga{sub 0

  13. Understanding and optimization of InN and high indium containing InGaN alloys by metal organic chemical vapor deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tuna, Oecal

    2013-01-01

    similar trend in regard to the change of the V/III ratio. However, a huge difference with the carrier concentrations obtained by Hall and optical techniques is found. For the samples grown at a V/III ratio of 111k, a carrier concentration estimated by optical techniques is in the range of 9.0 x 10 17 cm -3 compared to 6.0 x 10 18 cm -3 found by Hall measurement. The huge difference in carrier concentrations obtained by the optical and Hall measurements is caused by parallel conductivity. The surface accumulation layer on InN and defects at the interface between InN/GaN dominates the Hall measurement results. Following InN, In x Ga 1-x N layers with various In content ranging from 40% to 85% are grown and investigated. A new approach is proposed in order to enhance the In incorporation in InGaN layer, based on growing InGaN directly on thin InN interlayer on the GaN templates. With this method In incorporation is enhanced by In segregation from thin InN interlayers to In x Ga 1-x N layers. As a result of this approach, an additional 11% increase of In content in InGaN is achieved. For instance, while without the InN interlayer, the In content is about 74%, it increased to 85% when the InN interlayer is grown. Band bending and the related surface electron accumulation on the surface of InxGa1-xN are investigated. A decrease in surface electron accumulation is observed with increasing Ga content, and the transition from an accumulation to a depletion layer is observed at X In =20. Finally, synthesis and a systematic study of structural, optical and electrical properties of Mg-doped InxGa1-xN layers are studied. At a low annealing temperature of 750 C, p-type conductivity is achieved for InGaN with 18% In. It is demonstrated that p-type InGaN layers with about 18% In can be grown with an acceptor concentration of 3.5 x 10 18 cm -3 . Temperature dependent PL revealed an activation energy of Mg in In 0.18 Ga 0.82 N:Mg is about 80 meV, which is much lower that the activation

  14. MBE-growth, characterization and properties of InN and InGaN

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nanishi, Y.; Saito, Y.; Yamaguchi, T.; Hori, M.; Matsuda, F.; Araki, T.; Suzuki, A.; Miyajima, T.

    2003-01-01

    Recent developments on RF-MBE growth of InN and InGaN and their structural and property characterizations are reviewed. For successful growth of high quality InN, (1) nitridation of the sapphire substrates, (2) two-step growth, (3) precise control of V/III ratio and (4) selection of optimum growth temperature are found to be essential. Characterization using XRD, TEM, EXAFS and Raman scattering have clearly demonstrated that InN films have ideal hexagonal wurtzite structure. It is also found that the film has N-polarity. Studies on optimum growth condition dependence on substrate polarity using C and Si face SiC substrates and Ga and N face free-standing GaN substrates are also demonstrated. The result explains why high-quality InN grown by RF-MBE has N-polarity. PL and CL studies on these well-characterized high-quality InN have shown luminescence peaks at approximately 0.75 eV at 77 K. These values, however, change slightly depending on measurement temperatures and probably on the residual carrier concentrations. InGaN with full compositional range are also successfully grown on sapphire substrates and band gap energies of these alloys are also studied using PL and CL. Based on these results, true band gap energies of InN are discussed. This paper also includes latest study on single crystalline InN growth on Si (111) substrates. (copyright 2003 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  15. MBE-growth, characterization and properties of InN and InGaN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nanishi, Y.; Saito, Y.; Yamaguchi, T.; Hori, M.; Matsuda, F.; Araki, T. [Dept. of Photonics, Ritsumeikan Univ., 1-1-1 Noji-higashi, Kusatsu (Japan); Suzuki, A. [Res. Org. of Sci. and Eng., Ritsumeikan Univ., 1-1-1 Noji-higashi, Kusatsu (Japan); Miyajima, T. [Sony Corp. Core Technology and Network Company, 4-14-1 Asahi, Atsugi, Kanagawa 243-0014 (Japan)

    2003-11-01

    Recent developments on RF-MBE growth of InN and InGaN and their structural and property characterizations are reviewed. For successful growth of high quality InN, (1) nitridation of the sapphire substrates, (2) two-step growth, (3) precise control of V/III ratio and (4) selection of optimum growth temperature are found to be essential. Characterization using XRD, TEM, EXAFS and Raman scattering have clearly demonstrated that InN films have ideal hexagonal wurtzite structure. It is also found that the film has N-polarity. Studies on optimum growth condition dependence on substrate polarity using C and Si face SiC substrates and Ga and N face free-standing GaN substrates are also demonstrated. The result explains why high-quality InN grown by RF-MBE has N-polarity. PL and CL studies on these well-characterized high-quality InN have shown luminescence peaks at approximately 0.75 eV at 77 K. These values, however, change slightly depending on measurement temperatures and probably on the residual carrier concentrations. InGaN with full compositional range are also successfully grown on sapphire substrates and band gap energies of these alloys are also studied using PL and CL. Based on these results, true band gap energies of InN are discussed. This paper also includes latest study on single crystalline InN growth on Si (111) substrates. (copyright 2003 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  16. Development of Laser LEDs Based a Programmable Optical Sensor for Detection of Environmental Pollutants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amit K. Sharma

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The laser LED based optical sensor and its multifunctional operation for detection of environmental pollutants are described. The work will provide the instructions to design of circuitry for optical sensor instrument with a program based on a microcontroller (8902051-24PI, and to allow this program to communicate via RS-232 with computer. An algorithm is outlined by which the sensor instrument can use three laser LEDs (blue, Green and red to quantify the composition of pollutant. The operation of measurement through optical sensor has been applied to the study of detection and rate of reaction of pollutant i.e. methyl parathion and the produced informative data were also correlated with UV-vis spectrophotometry for the validation of results. The purpose of designed optical sensor is that the sophisticated analytical techniques show costly impact, time taking process, high consumable solvents and not suit for field application purpose which focuses the merits of the optical sensor.

  17. Epitaxial growth of In-rich InGaN on yttria-stabilized zirconia and its application to metal–insulator–semiconductor field-effect transistors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kobayashi, Atsushi; Lye, Khe Shin; Ueno, Kohei [Institute of Industrial Science, The University of Tokyo, Tokyo 153-8505 (Japan); Ohta, Jitsuo [Institute of Industrial Science, The University of Tokyo, Tokyo 153-8505 (Japan); PRESTO, Japan Science and Technology Agency, Saitama 332-0012 (Japan); Fujioka, Hiroshi, E-mail: hfujioka@iis.u-tokyo.ac.jp [Institute of Industrial Science, The University of Tokyo, Tokyo 153-8505 (Japan); ACCEL, Japan Science and Technology Agency, Tokyo 102-0076 (Japan)

    2016-08-28

    We grew In-rich In{sub x}Ga{sub 1-x}N films on yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) substrates at low temperatures by pulsed sputtering deposition. It was found that single-crystal In{sub x}Ga{sub 1-x}N (0.63 ≤ x ≤ 0.82) films can be prepared without significant compositional fluctuations at growth temperatures below 500 °C. It was also found that the electrical properties of InGaN are strongly dependent on In composition, growth temperature, and film polarity. N-channel operation of the metal–insulator–semiconductor field-effect transistor (MISFET) with an ultrathin InGaN channel on the YSZ substrates was successfully demonstrated. These results indicate that an InGaN-based MISFET is a promising device for next-generation high-speed electronics.

  18. Influences of point defects on electrical and optical properties of InGaN light-emitting diodes at cryogenic temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tu, Yi; Ruan, Yujiao; Zhu, Lihong; Tu, Qingzhen; Wang, Hongwei; Chen, Jie; Lu, Yijun; Gao, Yulin; Shih, Tien-Mo; Chen, Zhong; Lin, Yue

    2018-04-01

    We investigate the cryogenic external quantum efficiency (EQE) for some InGaN light-emitting diodes with different indium contents. We observe a monotonic decrease in EQE with the increasing forward current before the "U-turn" point, beyond which the thermal effect increases the EQE. We discover positive dependences among the droop rate (χ), differential electrical resistance (Rd), and indium content. Also, χ and Rd of individual green samples shift correspondingly during the aging test, when the Mg ions are activated at high injection density and diffuse into the active region. Considering the fact that both In and Mg ions would introduce point defects (PDs), we proposed a model that reveals the mechanism of interplay between PDs and carriers. PDs serve as both energy traps and non-radiative recombination centers. They attract and confine carriers, leading to an increase in Rd and a decrease in EQE.

  19. Optical Control of Internal Electric Fields in Band Gap-Graded InGaN Nanowires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erhard, N.; Sarwar, A. T. M. Golam; Yang, F.; McComb, D. W.; Myers, R. C.; Holleitner, A. W.

    2015-01-01

    InGaN nanowires are suitable building blocks for many future optoelectronic devices. We show that a linear grading of the indium content along the nanowire axis from GaN to InN introduces an internal electric field evoking a photocurrent. Consistent with quantitative band structure simulations we observe a sign change in the measured photocurrent as a function of photon flux. This negative differential photocurrent opens the path to a new type of nanowire-based photodetector. We demonstrate that the photocurrent response of the nanowires is as fast as 1.5 ps.

  20. Issues associated with the metalorganic chemical vapor deposition of ScGaN and YGaN alloys.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koleske, Daniel David; Knapp, James Arthur; Lee, Stephen Roger; Crawford, Mary Hagerott; Creighton, James Randall; Cross, Karen Charlene; Thaler, Gerald

    2009-07-01

    The most energy efficient solid state white light source will likely be a combination of individually efficient red, green, and blue LED. For any multi-color approach to be successful the efficiency of deep green LEDs must be significantly improved. While traditional approaches to improve InGaN materials have yielded incremental success, we proposed a novel approach using group IIIA and IIIB nitride semiconductors to produce efficient green and high wavelength LEDs. To obtain longer wavelength LEDs in the nitrides, we attempted to combine scandium (Sc) and yttrium (Y) with gallium (Ga) to produce ScGaN and YGaN for the quantum well (QW) active regions. Based on linear extrapolation of the proposed bandgaps of ScN (2.15 eV), YN (0.8 eV) and GaN (3.4 eV), we expected that LEDs could be fabricated from the UV (410 nm) to the IR (1600 nm), and therefore cover all visible wavelengths. The growth of these novel alloys potentially provided several advantages over the more traditional InGaN QW regions including: higher growth temperatures more compatible with GaN growth, closer lattice matching to GaN, and reduced phase separation than is commonly observed in InGaN growth. One drawback to using ScGaN and YGaN films as the active regions in LEDs is that little research has been conducted on their growth, specifically, are there metalorganic precursors that are suitable for growth, are the bandgaps direct or indirect, can the materials be grown directly on GaN with a minimal defect formation, as well as other issues related to growth. The major impediment to the growth of ScGaN and YGaN alloys was the low volatility of metalorganic precursors. Despite this impediment some progress was made in incorporation of Sc and Y into GaN which is detailed in this report. Primarily, we were able to incorporate up to 5 x 10{sup 18} cm{sup -3} Y atoms into a GaN film, which are far below the alloy concentrations needed to evaluate the YGaN optical properties. After a no-cost extension was

  1. Growth of monolithic full-color GaN-based LED with intermediate carrier blocking layers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El-Ghoroury, Hussein S.; Yeh, Milton; Chen, J. C., E-mail: jc.chen@ostendo.com; Li, X.; Chuang, Chih-Li [EPI Lab, Ostendo Technologies, Inc., 679 Brea Canyon Rd, Walnut, CA 91789 (United States)

    2016-07-15

    Specially designed intermediate carrier blocking layers (ICBLs) in multi-active regions of III-nitride LEDs were shown to be effective in controlling the carrier injection distribution across the active regions. In principle, the majority of carriers, both holes and electrons, can be guided into targeted quantum wells and recombine to generate light of specific wavelengths at controlled current-densities. Accordingly we proposed and demonstrated a novel monolithic InGaN-based LED to achieve three primary colors of light from one device at selected current densities. This LED structure, which has three different sets of quantum wells separated with ICBLs for three primary red-green-blue (RGB) colors, was grown by metal-organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD). Results show that this LED can emit light ranging from 460 to 650 nm to cover the entire visible spectrum. The emission wavelength starts at 650 nm and then decreases to 460 nm or lower as the injection current increases. In addition to three primary colors, many other colors can be obtained by color mixing techniques. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first demonstration of monolithic full-color LED grown by a simple growth technique without using re-growth process.

  2. Growth of monolithic full-color GaN-based LED with intermediate carrier blocking layers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Ghoroury, Hussein S.; Yeh, Milton; Chen, J. C.; Li, X.; Chuang, Chih-Li

    2016-01-01

    Specially designed intermediate carrier blocking layers (ICBLs) in multi-active regions of III-nitride LEDs were shown to be effective in controlling the carrier injection distribution across the active regions. In principle, the majority of carriers, both holes and electrons, can be guided into targeted quantum wells and recombine to generate light of specific wavelengths at controlled current-densities. Accordingly we proposed and demonstrated a novel monolithic InGaN-based LED to achieve three primary colors of light from one device at selected current densities. This LED structure, which has three different sets of quantum wells separated with ICBLs for three primary red-green-blue (RGB) colors, was grown by metal-organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD). Results show that this LED can emit light ranging from 460 to 650 nm to cover the entire visible spectrum. The emission wavelength starts at 650 nm and then decreases to 460 nm or lower as the injection current increases. In addition to three primary colors, many other colors can be obtained by color mixing techniques. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first demonstration of monolithic full-color LED grown by a simple growth technique without using re-growth process.

  3. EDITORIAL: LED light sources (light for the future) LED light sources (light for the future)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grandjean, N.

    2010-09-01

    Generating white light from electricity with maximum efficacy has been a long quest since the first incandescent lamp was invented by Edison at the end of the 19th century. Nowadays, semiconductors are making reality the holy grail of converting electrons into photons with 100% efficiency and with colours that can be mixed for white light illumination. The revolution in solid-state lighting (SSL) dates to 1994 when Nakamura reported the first high-brightness blue LED based on GaN semiconductors. Then, white light was produced by simply combining a blue dye with a yellow phosphor. After more than a decade of intensive research the performance of white LEDs is quite impressive, beating by far the luminous efficacy of compact fluorescent lamps. We are likely close to replacing our current lighting devices by SSL lamps. However, there are still technological and fabrication cost issues that could delay large market penetration of white LEDs. Interestingly, SSL may create novel ways of using light that could potentially limit electricity saving. Whatever the impact of SSL, it will be significant on our daily life. The purpose of this special cluster issue is to produce a snapshot of the current situation of SSL from different viewing angles. In an introductory paper, Tsao and co-workers from Sandia National Laboratories, present an energy-economics perspective of SSL considering societal changes and SSL technology evolution. In a second article, Narukawa et al working at Nichia Corporation—the pioneer and still the leading company in SSL—describe the state of the art of current research products. They demonstrate record performance with white LEDs exhibiting luminous efficacy of 183 lm W-1 at high-current injection. Then, a series of topical papers discuss in detail various aspects of the physics and technology of white LEDs Carrier localization in InGaN quantum wells has been considered the key to white LEDs' success despite the huge density of defects. A

  4. Understanding and controlling chromaticity shift in LED devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davis, Lynn; Mills, Karmann; Lamvik, Michael; Perkins, Curtis; Bobashev, Georgiy; Young, Joseph; Yaga, Robert; Johnson, Cortina

    2017-05-30

    Chromaticity shift in light-emitting diode (LED) devices arises from multiple mechanisms, and at least five different chromaticity shift modes (CSMs) have been identified to date. This paper focuses on the impacts of irreversible phosphor degradation as a cause of chromaticity shifts in LED devices. The nitride phosphors used to produce warm white LEDs are especially vulnerable to degradation due to thermal and chemical effects such as reactions with oxygen and water. As a result, LED devices utilizing these phosphors were found to undergo either a green shift or, less commonly, a red shift depending on the phosphor mix in the LED devices. These types of chromaticity shifts are classified as CSM-2 (green shift) and CSM-5 (red shift). This paper provides an overview of the kinetic processes responsible for green and red chromaticity shifts along with examples from accelerated stress testing of 6” downlights. Both CSMs appear to proceed through analogous mechanisms that are initiated at the surface of the phosphor. A green shift is produced by the surface oxidation of the nitride phosphor that changes the emission profile to lower wavelengths. As the surface oxidation reaction proceeds, reactant limitations slow the rate and bulk oxidation processes become more prevalent. We found that a red chromaticity shift arises from quenching of the green phosphor, also possibly due to surface reactions of oxygen, which shift the emission chromaticity in the red direction. In conclusion, we discuss the implications of these findings on projecting chromaticity.

  5. High-luminosity blue and blue-green gallium nitride light-emitting diodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morkoç, H; Mohammad, S N

    1995-01-06

    Compact and efficient sources of blue light for full color display applications and lighting eluded and tantalized researchers for many years. Semiconductor light sources are attractive owing to their reliability and amenability to mass manufacture. However, large band gaps are required to achieve blue color. A class of compound semiconductors formed by metal nitrides, GaN and its allied compounds AIGaN and InGaN, exhibits properties well suited for not only blue and blue-green emitters, but also for ultraviolet emitters and detectors. What thwarted engineers and scientists from fabricating useful devices from these materials in the past was the poor quality of material and lack of p-type doping. Both of these obstacles have recently been overcome to the point where highluminosity blue and blue-green light-emitting diodes are now available in the marketplace.

  6. Control of surface adatom kinetics for the growth of high-indium content InGaN throughout the miscibility gap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moseley, Michael; Lowder, Jonathan; Billingsley, Daniel; Doolittle, W. Alan

    2010-11-01

    The surface kinetics of InGaN alloys grown via metal-modulated epitaxy (MME) are explored in combination with transient reflection high-energy electron diffraction intensities. A method for monitoring and controlling indium segregation in situ is demonstrated. It is found that indium segregation is more accurately associated with the quantity of excess adsorbed metal, rather than the metal-rich growth regime in general. A modified form of MME is developed in which the excess metal dose is managed via shuttered growth, and high-quality InGaN films throughout the miscibility gap are grown.

  7. Control of surface adatom kinetics for the growth of high-indium content InGaN throughout the miscibility gap

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moseley, Michael; Lowder, Jonathan; Billingsley, Daniel; Doolittle, W. Alan

    2010-01-01

    The surface kinetics of InGaN alloys grown via metal-modulated epitaxy (MME) are explored in combination with transient reflection high-energy electron diffraction intensities. A method for monitoring and controlling indium segregation in situ is demonstrated. It is found that indium segregation is more accurately associated with the quantity of excess adsorbed metal, rather than the metal-rich growth regime in general. A modified form of MME is developed in which the excess metal dose is managed via shuttered growth, and high-quality InGaN films throughout the miscibility gap are grown.

  8. Comparative studies of efficiency droop in polar and non-polar InGaN quantum wells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davies, M. J.; Dawson, P.; Hammersley, S.; Zhu, T.; Kappers, M. J.; Humphreys, C. J.; Oliver, R. A.

    2016-01-01

    We report on a comparative study of efficiency droop in polar and non-polar InGaN quantum well structures at T = 10 K. To ensure that the experiments were carried out with identical carrier densities for any particular excitation power density, we used laser pulses of duration ∼100 fs at a repetition rate of 400 kHz. For both types of structures, efficiency droop was observed to occur for carrier densities of above 7 × 10 11  cm −2  pulse −1 per quantum well; also both structures exhibited similar spectral broadening in the droop regime. These results show that efficiency droop is intrinsic in InGaN quantum wells, whether polar or non-polar, and is a function, specifically, of carrier density.

  9. InGaN nanocolumn growth self-induced by in-situ annealing and ion irradiation during growth process with molecular beam epitaxy method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Junjun; Cai, Qing; Zhang, Baohua; Ge, Mei; Chen, Dunjun; Zheng, Jianguo; Zhi, Ting; Tao, Zhikuo; Chen, Jiangwei; Wang, Lianhui; Zhang, Rong; Zheng, Youdou

    2017-11-01

    Incubation and shape transition are considered as two essential processes for nucleating of self-assembly InGaN nanocolumns (NCs) in traditional way. We propose a new approach for nuclei forming directly by in-situ annealing and ion irradiating the InGaN template during growing process. The nanoislands, considered as the nuclei of NCs, were formed by a combinational effect of thermal and ion etching (TIE), which made the gaps of the V-pits deeper and wider. On account of the decomposition of InGaN during TIE process, more nitride-rich amorphous alloys would intent to accumulate in the corroded V-pits. The amorphous alloys played a key role to promote the following growth from 2D regime into Volmer-Weber growth regime so that the NC morphology took place, rather than a compact film. As growth continued, the subsequently epitaxial InGaN alloys on the annealed NC nuclei were suffered in biaxial compressive stress for losing part of indium content from the NC nuclei during the TIE process. Strain relaxation, accompanied by thread dislocations, came up and made the lattice planes misoriented, which prevented the NCs from coalescence into a compact film at later period of growing.

  10. III-Nitride Micro and Nano Structures for Solid State Lightning

    KAUST Repository

    Ben Slimane, Ahmed

    2014-08-01

    Visible light emitting diodes (LEDs) are widely used in daily consumer electronics systems, such as general lighting, displays, communication, sensing, and also biomedical applications. To mitigate the ever increasing technology demand, there are tremendous on-going efforts in improving material properties and micro-fabrication techniques. In general, visible LEDs are environmentally friendly, robust and reliable light emitters with small device footprint, and are capable of delivering high luminous efficacy. Typically, LEDs rely on group-III-nitride materials to generate visible light. One of the techniques to generate white light is to coat blue LEDs with yellow phosphor, or ultraviolet (UV) LEDs with red-green-blue (RGB) phosphor. Other scheme relies on combination of RGB LEDs, where high brightness green and blue LEDs are generally grown on robust sapphire substrate. But the current challenges in high threading dislocation density of III-Nitride materials on sapphire or hetero-substrate, phosphor degradation, and bulk-LED mechanical design constraints imposed by the supporting substrate wafer motivate further scientific investigations into strain-engineering, novel reliable phosphor-semiconductor, color-tuning techniques, and transferrable III-nitride vertical LEDs. The current research presents a significant step towards the utilization of annealed porous GaN as a template for subsequent growth of fully relaxed GaN-based epitaxy materials. In our study, we observed significant compressive strain relaxation of 0.41 ± 0.04 GPa in annealed porous GaN fabricated using UV-assisted electroless etching. Moreover the use of GaN nanoparticles with large wavelength tunability and 10 µm InGaN microstructures with different indium composition ushers a new way of making reliable phosphor for white light generation. We also investigate the epitaxial lift-off of InGaN LED structures by selectively etching unintentionally doped GaN sacrificial buffer layer. High Ga

  11. Stacking faults and phase changes in Mg-doped InGaN grown on Si

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liliental-Weber, Zuzanna; Yu, Kin M.; Reichertz, Lothar A.; Ager, Joel W.; Walukiewicz, Wladek; Schaff, William J.; Hawkridge, Michael E.

    2009-01-01

    We report evidence for the role of Mg in the formation of basal stacking faults and a phase transition in In x Ga 1-x N layers doped with Mg grown by molecular beam epitaxy on Si(111) substrates with AlN buffer layers. Several samples with varying In content between x∝0.1 and x∝0.3 are examined by transmission electron microscopy and other techniques. High densities of basal stacking faults are observed in the central region of the InGaN layer away from the substrate or layer surface, but at varying depths within this region. Selected area diffraction patterns show that while the InGaN layer is initially in the wurtzite phase (and of good quality) AlN buffer layer, there is a change to the zinc blende phase in the upper part of the InGaN layer. SIMS measurements show that the Mg concentration drops from a maximum to a steady concentration coinciding with the presence of the basal stacking faults. There is little change in In or Ga concentrations in the same area. High-resolution electron microscopy from the area of the stacking faults confirms that the change to the cubic phase is abrupt across one such fault. These results indicate that Mg plays a role in the formation of stacking faults and the phase change observed in In x Ga 1-x N alloys. We also consider the role of In in the formation of these defects. (copyright 2009 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  12. Nanoimprinted polymer lasers with threshold below 100 W/cm2 using mixed-order distributed feedback resonators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yue; Tsiminis, Georgios; Kanibolotsky, Alexander L; Skabara, Peter J; Samuel, Ifor D W; Turnbull, Graham A

    2013-06-17

    Organic semiconductor lasers were fabricated by UV-nanoimprint lithography with thresholds as low as 57 W/cm(2) under 4 ns pulsed operation. The nanoimprinted lasers employed mixed-order distributed feedback resonators, with second-order gratings surrounded by first-order gratings, combined with a light-emitting conjugated polymer. They were pumped by InGaN LEDs to produce green-emitting lasers, with thresholds of 208 W/cm(2) (102 nJ/pulse). These hybrid lasers incorporate a scalable UV-nanoimprint lithography process, compatible with high-performance LEDs, therefore we have demonstrated a coherent, compact, low-cost light source.

  13. Simulataneous Formation of InGaN Nanostructures with Varying Shapes for White Light Source Applications

    KAUST Repository

    Gasim, Anwar A.; Bhattacharya, Pallab K.; Cha, Dong Kyu; Ng, Tien Khee; Ooi, Boon S.

    2012-01-01

    Varying shapes of InGaN nanostructures were simultaneously formed on silicon epitaxially. The nanowires and nanomushrooms emit violet-blue light, and broad yellow-orange-red luminescence, respectively. The combination of which is promising for white light emission.

  14. Effects of Mg Doping on the Performance of InGaN Films Made by Reactive Sputtering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, Dong-Hau; Li, Cheng-Che; Tuan, Thi Tran Anh; Yen, Wei-Chun

    2015-01-01

    Mg-doped InGaN (Mg-InGaN) films have been deposited directly on Si (100) substrates by radio-frequency reactive sputtering technique with single cermet targets in an Ar/N2 atmosphere. The cermet targets with a constant 5% indium content were made by hot pressing the mixture of metallic In, Ga, and Mg powders and ceramic GaN powder. The Mg-InGaN films had a wurtzite structure with a preferential () growth plane. The SEM images showed that Mg-InGaN films were smooth, continuous, free from cracks and holes, and composed of nanometer-sized grains. As the Mg dopant content in Mg-InGaN increased to 7.7 at.%, the film was directly transformed into p-type conduction without a post-annealing process. It had high hole concentration of 5.53 × 1018 cm-3 and electrical mobility of 15.7 ± 4.2 cm2 V-1 s-1. The over-doping of Mg in InGaN degraded the electrical properties. The bandgap of Mg-InGaN films decreased from 2.92 eV to 2.84 eV, as the Mg content increased from 7.7% to 18.2%. The constructed p-type Mg-InGaN/ n-type GaN diode was used to confirm the realization of the p-type InGaN by sputtering technique.

  15. PENGEMBANGAN LAMPU LED DENGAN TEKNOLOGI PHOTOVOLTAIC (LED-PV SEBAGAI ALAT BANTU PENGUMPUL IKAN PADA PERIKANAN BAGAN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mochamad Arief Sofijanto

    2015-03-01

    fishes attracted to LED lights (positive phototaxis of the set bagan. The statistical analysis showed that the siginificant difference in the colour of the LED lamps by the difference of the number of catches the. Based on the calculation of the Least Significant Different (LSD, the blue LED lamps and followed by yellow, green, white and red.

  16. Comparative studies of efficiency droop in polar and non-polar InGaN quantum wells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davies, M. J.; Dawson, P.; Hammersley, S. [School of Physics and Astronomy, Photon Science Institute, University of Manchester, M13 9PL Manchester (United Kingdom); Zhu, T.; Kappers, M. J.; Humphreys, C. J.; Oliver, R. A. [Department of Material Science and Metallurgy, 27 Charles Babbage Road, University of Cambridge, Cambridge CB3 0FS (United Kingdom)

    2016-06-20

    We report on a comparative study of efficiency droop in polar and non-polar InGaN quantum well structures at T = 10 K. To ensure that the experiments were carried out with identical carrier densities for any particular excitation power density, we used laser pulses of duration ∼100 fs at a repetition rate of 400 kHz. For both types of structures, efficiency droop was observed to occur for carrier densities of above 7 × 10{sup 11 }cm{sup −2 }pulse{sup −1} per quantum well; also both structures exhibited similar spectral broadening in the droop regime. These results show that efficiency droop is intrinsic in InGaN quantum wells, whether polar or non-polar, and is a function, specifically, of carrier density.

  17. A Descriptive Study towards Green Computing Practice Application for Data Centers in IT Based Industries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anthony Jnr. Bokolo

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The progressive upsurge in demand for processing and computing power has led to a subsequent upsurge in data center carbon emissions, cost incurred, unethical waste management, depletion of natural resources and high energy utilization. This raises the issue of the sustainability attainment in data centers of Information Technology (IT based industries. Green computing practice can be applied to facilitate sustainability attainment as IT based industries utilizes data centers to provide services to staffs, practitioners and end users. But it is a known fact that enterprise servers utilize huge quantity of energy and incur other expenditures in cooling operations and it is difficult to address the needs of accuracy and efficiency in data centers while yet encouraging a greener application practice alongside cost reduction. Thus this research study focus on the practice application of Green computing in data centers which houses servers and as such presents the Green computing life cycle strategies and best practices to be practiced for better management in data centers in IT based industries. Data was collected through questionnaire from 133 respondents in industries that currently operate their in-house data centers. The analysed data was used to verify the Green computing life cycle strategies presented in this study. Findings from the data shows that each of the life cycles strategies is significant in assisting IT based industries apply Green computing practices in their data centers. This study would be of interest to knowledge and data management practitioners as well as environmental manager and academicians in deploying Green data centers in their organizations.

  18. Preliminary investigations of piezoelectric based LED luminary

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Dennis; Andersen, Michael A. E.; Meyer, Kaspar Sinding

    2011-01-01

    , modulation schemes, LEDs and LED driving conditions are analyzed. A prototype radial mode PT optimized for ZVS (Zero Voltage Switching) is designed. FEM (Final Element Method) and measurements validates the PT design. A prototype PT based AC/DC converter operating from european mains is proposed......This paper presents a preliminary study of PT (Piezoelectric Transformer) based SMPS’s (Switch Mode Power Supplies) for LED luminary. The unique properties of PTs (efficiency, power density and EMI) make them highly suitable for this application. Power stage topologies, rectifiers circuits...

  19. Non-Destructive Quality Evaluation of Pepper (Capsicum annuum L. Seeds Using LED-Induced Hyperspectral Reflectance Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Changyeun Mo

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we developed a viability evaluation method for pepper (Capsicum annuum L. seeds based on hyperspectral reflectance imaging. The reflectance spectra of pepper seeds in the 400–700 nm range are collected from hyperspectral reflectance images obtained using blue, green, and red LED illumination. A partial least squares–discriminant analysis (PLS-DA model is developed to classify viable and non-viable seeds. Four spectral ranges generated with four types of LEDs (blue, green, red, and RGB, which were pretreated using various methods, are investigated to develop the classification models. The optimal PLS-DA model based on the standard normal variate for RGB LED illumination (400–700 nm yields discrimination accuracies of 96.7% and 99.4% for viable seeds and nonviable seeds, respectively. The use of images based on the PLS-DA model with the first-order derivative of a 31.5-nm gap for red LED illumination (600–700 nm yields 100% discrimination accuracy for both viable and nonviable seeds. The results indicate that a hyperspectral imaging technique based on LED light can be potentially applied to high-quality pepper seed sorting.

  20. Real-Time Pricing Strategy Based on the Stability of Smart Grid for Green Internet of Things

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huwei Chen

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The ever increasing demand of energy efficiency and the strong awareness of environment have led to the enhanced interests in green Internet of things (IoTs. How to efficiently deliver power, especially, with the smart grid based on the stability of network becomes a challenge for green IoTs. Therefore, in this paper we present a novel real-time pricing strategy based on the network stability in the green IoTs enabled smart grid. Firstly, the outage is analyzed by considering the imbalance of power supply and demand as well as the load uncertainty. Secondly, the problem of power supply with multiple-retailers is formulated as a Stackelberg game, where the optimal price can be obtained with the maximal profit for retailers and users. Thirdly, the stability of price is analyzed under the constraints. In addition, simulation results show the efficiency of the proposed strategy.

  1. Relationships between junction temperature, electroluminescence spectrum and ageing of light-emitting diodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaskuri, Anna; Kärhä, Petri; Baumgartner, Hans; Kantamaa, Olli; Pulli, Tomi; Poikonen, Tuomas; Ikonen, Erkki

    2018-04-01

    We have developed spectral models describing the electroluminescence spectra of AlGaInP and InGaN light-emitting diodes (LEDs) consisting of the Maxwell-Boltzmann distribution and the effective joint density of states. One spectrum at a known temperature for one LED specimen is needed for calibrating the model parameters of each LED type. Then, the model can be used for determining the junction temperature optically from the spectral measurement, because the junction temperature is one of the free parameters. We validated the models using, in total, 53 spectra of three red AlGaInP LED specimens and 72 spectra of three blue InGaN LED specimens measured at various current levels and temperatures between 303 K and 398 K. For all the spectra of red LEDs, the standard deviation between the modelled and measured junction temperatures was only 2.4 K. InGaN LEDs have a more complex effective joint density of states. For the blue LEDs, the corresponding standard deviation was 11.2 K, but it decreased to 3.5 K when each LED specimen was calibrated separately. The method of determining junction temperature was further tested on white InGaN LEDs with luminophore coating and LED lamps. The average standard deviation was 8 K for white InGaN LED types. We have six years of ageing data available for a set of LED lamps and we estimated the junction temperatures of these lamps with respect to their ageing times. It was found that the LEDs operating at higher junction temperatures were frequently more damaged.

  2. Secondary ions mass spectroscopy measurements of dopant impurities in highly stressed InGaN laser diodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marona, L.; Suski, T.; Perlin, P.; Czernecki, R.; Leszczynski, M.; Bockowski, M.; Jakiela, R.; Najda, S. P.

    2011-01-01

    We performed a systematic secondary ions mass spectroscopy (SIMS) study of dopant impurities in life-time stressed InGaN laser devices in order to investigate the main degradation mechanism that is observed in nitride laser diodes. A continuous wave (cw) current density of 3 kA/cm 2 was applied to InGaN laser diodes over an extended period of time and we observed the characteristic square root degradation of optical power. We compared the SIMS profiles of Mg, H, and Si impurities in the aged devices and observe that the impurities are remarkably stable over 10 000 h of cw operation. Nor is there any SIMS evidence of p-contact metals penetrating into the semiconductor material. Thus our SIMS results are contrary to what one would expect for impurity diffusion causing the observed square root degradation characteristic.

  3. A green-LED driven source of hydrated electrons characterized from microseconds to hours and applied to cross couplings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naumann, Robert; Goez, Martin

    2018-03-12

    We present a novel photoredox catalytic system that delivers synthetically useable concentrations of hydrated electrons when illuminated with a green light-emitting diode (LED). The catalyst is a ruthenium complex protected by an anionic micelle, and the urate dianion serves as sacrificial donor confined to the aqueous bulk. Through its chemical properties, that donor not only suppresses charge recombination that would limit the electron yield but also enables this system to perform cross couplings via hydrated electrons, for which we report the first examples. We have investigated the kinetics of all the steps involving the electron and its direct precursor in a comparative study by using laser flash photolysis and by monitoring product formation during LED photolysis. Despite the differences in timescales, each approach on its own already gives a complete picture of the reaction over a temporal range ten orders of magnitude wide. Noticeable discrepancies between the kinetic parameters obtained with the two complementary techniques can be rationalized with the slow secondary chemistry of the system; they reveal that the product-based method provides a more accurate description because it responds also to the changes of the system composition during a synthesis; hence, they demonstrate that in complex systems the timescale of the experimental observation should be matched to that of the actual application. © 2018 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. Calcium impurity as a source of non-radiative recombination in (In,Ga)N layers grown by molecular beam epitaxy

    KAUST Repository

    Young, E. C.; Grandjean, N.; Mates, T. E.; Speck, J. S.

    2016-01-01

    Ca as an unintentional impurity has been investigated in III-nitride layers grown by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE). It is found that Ca originates from the substrate surface, even if careful cleaning and rinsing procedures are applied. The initial Ca surface coverage is ∼1012 cm−2, which is consistent with previous reports on GaAs and silicon wafers. At the onset of growth, the Ca species segregates at the growth front while incorporating at low levels. The incorporation rate is strongly temperature dependent. It is about 0.03% at 820 °C and increases by two orders of magnitude when the temperature is reduced to 600 °C, which is the typical growth temperature for InGaN alloy. Consequently, [Ca] is as high as 1018 cm−3 in InGaN/GaN quantum well structures. Such a huge concentration might be detrimental for the efficiency of light emitting diodes (LEDs) if one considers that Ca is potentially a source of Shockley-Read-Hall (SRH) defects. We thus developed a specific growth strategy to reduce [Ca] in the MBE grown LEDs, which consisted of burying Ca in a low temperature InGaN/GaN superlattice (SL) before the growth of the active region. Finally, two LED samples with and without an SL were fabricated. An increase in the output power by one order of magnitude was achieved when Ca was reduced in the LED active region, providing evidence for the role of Ca in the SRH recombination.

  5. Calcium impurity as a source of non-radiative recombination in (In,Ga)N layers grown by molecular beam epitaxy

    KAUST Repository

    Young, E. C.

    2016-11-23

    Ca as an unintentional impurity has been investigated in III-nitride layers grown by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE). It is found that Ca originates from the substrate surface, even if careful cleaning and rinsing procedures are applied. The initial Ca surface coverage is ∼1012 cm−2, which is consistent with previous reports on GaAs and silicon wafers. At the onset of growth, the Ca species segregates at the growth front while incorporating at low levels. The incorporation rate is strongly temperature dependent. It is about 0.03% at 820 °C and increases by two orders of magnitude when the temperature is reduced to 600 °C, which is the typical growth temperature for InGaN alloy. Consequently, [Ca] is as high as 1018 cm−3 in InGaN/GaN quantum well structures. Such a huge concentration might be detrimental for the efficiency of light emitting diodes (LEDs) if one considers that Ca is potentially a source of Shockley-Read-Hall (SRH) defects. We thus developed a specific growth strategy to reduce [Ca] in the MBE grown LEDs, which consisted of burying Ca in a low temperature InGaN/GaN superlattice (SL) before the growth of the active region. Finally, two LED samples with and without an SL were fabricated. An increase in the output power by one order of magnitude was achieved when Ca was reduced in the LED active region, providing evidence for the role of Ca in the SRH recombination.

  6. Scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy on GaN and InGaN surfaces; Rastertunnelmikroskopie und -spektroskopie an GaN- und InGaN-Oberflaechen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krueger, David

    2009-12-02

    Optelectronic devices based on gallium nitride (GaN) and indium gallium nitride (InGaN) are in the focus of research since more than 20 years and still have great potential for optical applications. In the first part of this work non-polar surfaces of GaN are investigated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM) and scanning tunneling microscopy (STM). In SEM and AFM, the (1 anti 100)- and especially the (anti 2110)-plane are quite corrugated. For the first time, the (anti 2110)-plane of GaN is atomically resolved in STM. In the second part InGaN quantum dot layers are investigated by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), scanning tunneling spectroscopy (STS) and STM. The STMmeasurements show the dependency of surface morphology on growth conditions in the metalorganic vapour phase epitaxy (MOVPE). Nucleation, a new MOVPE-strategy, is based on phase separations on surfaces. It is shown that locally varying density of states and bandgaps can be detected by STS, that means bandgap histograms and 2D-bandgap-mapping. (orig.)

  7. Goniometric characterization of LED based greenhouse lighting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorseth, Anders; Lindén, Johannes; Corell, Dennis Dan

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes a demonstration of goniospectroradiometry for characterizations of new light emitting diode (LED) based luminaries for enhanced photosynthesis in greenhouses. It highlights the differences between measurement of the traditional high pressure sodium (HPS) luminaries and the LED...

  8. LED Virtual Simulation based on Web3D

    OpenAIRE

    Lilan Liu; Liu Han; Zhiqi Lin; Manping Li; Tao Yu

    2014-01-01

    Regarding to the high price and low market popularity of current LED indoor lighting products, a LED indoor lighting platform is proposed based on Web3D technology. The internet virtual reality technology is integrated and applied into the LED collaborative e-commerce website with Virtools. According to the characteristics of the LED indoor lighting products, this paper introduced the method to build encapsulated model and three characteristics of LED lighting: geometrical, optical and behavi...

  9. Observations of Rabi oscillations in a non-polar InGaN quantum dot

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reid, Benjamin P. L., E-mail: benjamin.reid@physics.ox.ac.uk; Chan, Christopher C. S.; Taylor, Robert A. [Department of Physics, University of Oxford, Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3PU (United Kingdom); Kocher, Claudius [Department of Physics, University of Oxford, Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3PU (United Kingdom); Konstanz University, Konstanz (Germany); Zhu, Tongtong; Oehler, Fabrice; Emery, Robert; Oliver, Rachel A. [Department of Materials Science and Metallurgy, 27 Charles Babbage Road, Cambridge CB3 0FS (United Kingdom)

    2014-06-30

    Experimental observation of Rabi rotations between an exciton excited state and the crystal ground state in a single non-polar InGaN quantum dot is presented. The exciton excited state energy is determined by photoluminescence excitation spectroscopy using two-photon excitation from a pulsed laser. The population of the exciton excited state is seen to undergo power dependent damped Rabi oscillations.

  10. Observations of Rabi oscillations in a non-polar InGaN quantum dot

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reid, Benjamin P. L.; Chan, Christopher C. S.; Taylor, Robert A.; Kocher, Claudius; Zhu, Tongtong; Oehler, Fabrice; Emery, Robert; Oliver, Rachel A.

    2014-01-01

    Experimental observation of Rabi rotations between an exciton excited state and the crystal ground state in a single non-polar InGaN quantum dot is presented. The exciton excited state energy is determined by photoluminescence excitation spectroscopy using two-photon excitation from a pulsed laser. The population of the exciton excited state is seen to undergo power dependent damped Rabi oscillations.

  11. Investigation of localization effect in GaN-rich InGaN alloys and ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. The temperature-dependent PL properties of GaN-rich InxGa1−xN alloys is investigated and S-shaped temperature dependence is observed in all InGaN samples. It is found that the origin of localization effect in samples. A and B are different from that in sample C. For samples A and B, In content fluctuations ...

  12. ZnO nanorod based low turn-on voltage LEDs with wide electroluminescence spectra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jha, S.K.; Kutsay, O.; Bello, I.; Lee, S.T.

    2013-01-01

    Light emitting diodes (LEDs) based on arrays of n-type ZnO Nanorods were fabricated on p-GaN films using a hydrothermal method. The LEDs emit mainly in blue and UV range of the light. Their current–Voltage (I–V) characteristics typically show a low leakage current (7.2 μA) and a high rectification ratio (3 5 5). Devices operate at a low turn-on voltage of ∼4.5 V. Photoluminescence (PL) and electroluminescence (EL) measurements suggest low density of ZnO defects; however, in some aspects density of interfacial defects still might be considerable in the studied devices. The PL emission is deconvoluted to three peaks that are located at wavelengths of 361, 381, and 397 nm, while the wide EL spectra are deconvoluted to five peaks appearing at 368, 385, 427, 474, and 515 nm. Near-band-edge (NBE) emission of p-GaN and n-ZnO was observed in both the PL and EL spectra. Deconvoluted EL spectra consist of a very wide green band with the peak at 515 nm and extending up to 650 nm (red), and a rarely reported EL emission at 474 nm. Origin of these emissions is discussed, herein. The electrical characteristics together with EL characteristics indicate potential to develop and study p-GaN/n-ZnO nanorod LEDs for white emitting applications. - Highlights: ► A low turn-on voltage (4–4.5 V) and low threshold (5 V) electroluminescence from ZnO/GaN heterostructure. ► A wide spectrum EL emission (360–700 nm) suitable for white LED application. ► EL spectra consist of a rarely reported emission band with peak at 474 nm. ► Low-temperature and solution based fabrication, which is scalable and of low cost.

  13. Polarisation of the spontaneous emission from nonpolar and semipolar InGaN quantum wells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schade, Lukas; Schwarz, Ulrich [Department of Microsystems Engineering, University of Freiburg (IMTEK) (Germany); Fraunhofer Institute for Applied Solid State Physics (IAF) (Germany); Ploch, Simon; Wernicke, Tim [Institute of Solid State Physics, Technical University Berlin (Germany); Knauer, Arne; Hoffmann, Veit; Weyers, Markus [Ferdinand-Braun-Institute (FBH) (Germany); Kneissl, Michael [Institute of Solid State Physics, Technical University Berlin (Germany); Ferdinand-Braun-Institute (FBH) (Germany)

    2011-07-01

    Spontaneously emitted light stemming from semipolar and nonpolar InGaN quantum wells is polarized. This property is a consequence of the broken in-plane symmetry of non c-plane wurtzite quantum wells. We studied the polarized photoluminescence of semipolar and nonpolar InGaN/InGaN multi quantum wells grown on low defect density GaN substrates with a setup for confocal microscopy. For excitation of charge carriers we use a 375 nm diode laser. The photoluminescence is collected with an objective of small NA, to avoid polarisation scrambling, and analyzed with a broadband polarizer and a spectrometer. The experimental results are compared to k.p band structure calculations for semipolar and nonpolar InGaN quantum wells. These simulations provide the polarisation degree of the confined states of the valence band and their energetic splitting. Next, from the thermal occupation the polarized spectra are calculated. The comparison with experimental results allows the determination of the valence subband splitting. Our experiments show a splitting of the two topmost valence subbands in nonpolar direction which is larger than predicted.

  14. Green perovskite light emitting diodes based on the ITO/Al2O3/CsPbBr3 heterojunction structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhuang, Shiwei; Ma, Xue; Hu, Daqiang; Dong, Xin; Zhang, Yuantao; Zhang, Baolin

    2018-03-01

    Perovskite light emitting diodes (PeLEDs) now emerge as a promising new optoelectronic application field for these amazing semiconductors. For the purpose of investigating the device structures and light emission mechanisms of PeLEDs, we have fabricated green PeLEDs based on the ITO/Al2O3/CsPbBr3 heterojunction structure. The emission layer inorganic perovskite CsPbBr3 film with small grain sizes (∼28.9 nm) was prepared using a two-step method. The device exhibits a typical rectification behavior with turn-on voltage of ∼6 V. The EL emission band is narrow with the FWHM of ∼25 nm. The peak EQE of the device was ∼0.09%. The working mechanism of the device is also discussed. The result of the present work provides a feasible innovation idea of PeLEDs fabrication and great potentials for the development of perovskite based LEDs.

  15. Design and Simulation of InGaN p-n Junction Solar Cell

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Mesrane

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The tunability of the InGaN band gap energy over a wide range provides a good spectral match to sunlight, making it a suitable material for photovoltaic solar cells. The main objective of this work is to design and simulate the optimal InGaN single-junction solar cell. For more accurate results and best configuration, the optical properties and the physical models such as the Fermi-Dirac statistics, Auger and Shockley-Read-Hall recombination, and the doping and temperature-dependent mobility model were taken into account in simulations. The single-junction In0.622Ga0.378N (Eg = 1.39 eV solar cell is the optimal structure found. It exhibits, under normalized conditions (AM1.5G, 0.1 W/cm2, and 300 K, the following electrical parameters: Jsc=32.6791 mA/cm2, Voc=0.94091 volts, FF = 86.2343%, and η=26.5056%. It was noticed that the minority carrier lifetime and the surface recombination velocity have an important effect on the solar cell performance. Furthermore, the investigation results show that the In0.622Ga0.378N solar cell efficiency was inversely proportional with the temperature.

  16. The analysis of colour uniformity for a volumetric display based on a rotating LED array

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Jiang; Liu, Xu; Yan, Caijie; Xia, XinXing; Li, Haifeng

    2011-01-01

    There is a colour nonuniformity zone existing in three-dimensional (3D) volumetric displays which is based on the rotating colour light-emitting diode (LED) array. We analyse the reason for the colour nonuniformity zone by measuring the light intensity distribution and chromaticity coordinates of the LED in the volumetric display. Two boundaries of the colour nonuniformity zone are calculated. We measure the colour uniformities for a single cuboid of 3*3*4 voxels to display red, green, blue and white colour in different horizontal viewing angles, and for 64 cuboids distributed in the whole cylindrical image space with a fixed viewpoint. To evaluate the colour uniformity of a 3D image, we propose three evaluation indices of colour uniformity: the average of colour difference, the maximum colour difference and the variance of colour difference. The measurement results show that the character of colour uniformity is different for the 3D volumetric display and the two-dimensional display

  17. Effect of LED irradiation on the ripening and nutritional quality of postharvest banana fruit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Jen-Yi; Xu, Fengying; Zhou, Weibiao

    2018-04-24

    With the ability to tailor wavelengths necessary to the photosynthetically active radiation spectrum of plant pigments, light-emitting diodes (LEDs) offer vast possibilities in horticultural lighting. The influence of LED light irradiation on major postharvest features of banana was investigated. Mature green bananas were treated daily with selected blue (464-474 nm), green (515-525 nm) and red (617-627 nm) LED lights for 8 days, and compared with non-illuminated control. The positive effect of LED lighting on the acceleration of ripening in bananas was greatest for blue, followed by red and green. Under the irradiation of LED lights, faster peel de-greening and flesh softening, and increased ethylene production and respiration rate in bananas were observed during storage. Furthermore, the accumulations of ascorbic acid, total phenols, and total sugars in banana fruit were enhanced by LED light exposure. LED light treatment can induce the ripening of bananas and improve their quality and nutrition potential. These findings might provide new chemical-free strategies to shorten the time to ripen banana after harvest by using LED light source. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  18. High-power LEDs for plant cultivation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamulaitis, Gintautas; Duchovskis, Pavelas; Bliznikas, Zenius; Breive, Kestutis; Ulinskaite, Raimonda; Brazaityte, Ausra; Novickovas, Algirdas; Zukauskas, Arturas; Shur, Michael S.

    2004-10-01

    We report on high-power solid-state lighting facility for cultivation of greenhouse vegetables and on the results of the study of control of photosynthetic activity and growth morphology of radish and lettuce imposed by variation of the spectral composition of illumination. Experimental lighting modules (useful area of 0.22 m2) were designed based on 4 types of high-power light-emitting diodes (LEDs) with emission peaked in red at the wavelengths of 660 nm and 640 nm (predominantly absorbed by chlorophyll a and b for photosynthesis, respectively), in blue at 455 nm (phototropic function), and in far-red at 735 nm (important for photomorphology). Morphological characteristics, chlorophyll and phytohormone concentrations in radish and lettuce grown in phytotron chambers under lighting with different spectral composition of the LED-based illuminator and under illumination by high pressure sodium lamps with an equivalent photosynthetic photon flux density were compared. A well-balanced solid-state lighting was found to enhance production of green mass and to ensure healthy morphogenesis of plants compared to those grown using conventional lighting. We observed that the plant morphology and concentrations of morphologically active phytohormones is strongly affected by the spectral composition of light in the red region. Commercial application of the LED-based illumination for large-scale plant cultivation is discussed. This technology is favorable from the point of view of energy consumption, controllable growth, and food safety but is hindered by high cost of the LEDs. Large scale manufacturing of high-power red AlInGaP-based LEDs emitting at 650 nm and a further decrease of the photon price for the LEDs emitting in the vicinity of the absorption peak of chlorophylls have to be achieved to promote horticulture applications.

  19. Hydride vapor phase epitaxy growth of GaN, InGaN, ScN, and ScAIN

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bohnen, T.

    2010-01-01

    Chemical vapor deposition (CVD); hydride vapor phase epitaxy (HVPE); gallium nitride (GaN); indium gallium nitride (InGaN); scandium nitride (ScN); scandium aluminum nitride (ScAlN); semiconductors; thin films; nanowires; III nitrides; crystal growth - We studied the HVPE growth of different III

  20. Construction of Tungsten Halogen, Pulsed LED, and Combined Tungsten Halogen-LED Solar Simulators for Solar Cell I-V Characterization and Electrical Parameters Determination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anon Namin

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available I-V characterization of solar cells is generally done under natural sunlight or solar simulators operating in either a continuous mode or a pulse mode. Simulators are classified on three features of irradiance, namely, spectral match with respect to air mass 1.5, spatial uniformity, and temporal stability. Commercial solar simulators use Xenon lamps and halogen lamps, whereas LED-based solar simulators are being developed. In this work, we build and test seven simulators for solar cell characterization, namely, one tungsten halogen simulator, four monochromatic (red, green, blue, and white LED simulators, one multicolor LED simulator, and one tungsten halogen-blue LED simulator. The seven simulators provide testing at nonstandard test condition. High irradiance from simulators is obtained by employing elevated supply voltage to tungsten halogen lamps and high pulsing voltages to LEDs. This new approach leads to higher irradiance not previously obtained from tungsten halogen lamps and LEDs. From I-V curves, electrical parameters of solar cell are made and corrected based on methods recommended in the IEC 60891 Standards. Corrected values obtained from non-STC measurements are in good agreement with those obtained from Class AAA solar simulator.

  1. Synthesis and luminescence properties of Ce{sup 3+}-doped Y{sub 3}Al{sub 3.5}Ga{sub 1.5}O{sub 12} green phosphor for white LEDs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qiang, Yaochun [Fujian Key Laboratory of Advanced Materials, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, College of Materials, Xiamen University, Xiamen 361005 (China); Yu, Yuxi, E-mail: yu_heart@xmu.edu.cn [Fujian Key Laboratory of Advanced Materials, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, College of Materials, Xiamen University, Xiamen 361005 (China); Chen, Guolong [Fujian Engineering Research Center for Solid-state Lighting, Department of Electronic Science, Xiamen University, Xiamen 361005 (China); Fang, Jiyu [Advanced Materials Processing and Analysis Center, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Central Florida, Orlando, FL 32816 (United States)

    2016-04-15

    A series of Ce{sup 3+}-doped Y{sub 3}Al{sub 3.5}Ga{sub 1.5}O{sub 12} green phosphors were successfully synthesized by a solid-state reaction method. The microstructure, morphology, luminescence spectra, luminescence quantum yield (QY) and thermal stability of the phosphor were investigated. The critical concentration of Ce{sup 3+} ions in Y{sub 3−m}Al{sub 3.5}Ga{sub 1.5}O{sub 12}:mCe{sup 3+} is m=0.06. The QY of Y{sub 2.94}Al{sub 3.5}Ga{sub 1.5}O{sub 12}:0.06Ce{sup 3+} phosphor is as high as 94% under excitation at 450 nm and its luminescence intensity at 150 °C still maintains 90% of that measured at 25 °C, which are just a little worse than those of commercial Lu{sub 3}Al{sub 5}O{sub 12}:Ce{sup 3+} green phosphor but much better than those of commercial (Sr,Ba){sub 2}SiO{sub 4}:Eu{sup 2+} green phosphor. A white LED lamp was fabricated by employing Y{sub 2.94}Al{sub 3.5}Ga{sub 1.5}O{sub 12}:0.06Ce{sup 3+} as a green phosphor and commercial (Ca,Sr)AlSiN{sub 3}:Eu{sup 2+} as a red phosphor (628 nm), its Ra value, correlated color temperature (CCT), CIE1931 chromaticity coordinates and luminous efficiency is 84, 3081 K, (x=0.4369, y=0.4142) and 102 lm/W, respectively. The experimental results demonstrate that Y{sub 2.94}Al{sub 3.5}Ga{sub 1.5}O{sub 12}:0.06Ce{sup 3+} is a promising green phosphor not only can be used for high color rendering index white LEDs but also for high-power white LEDs.

  2. Packaging technology of LEDs for LCD backlights

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fan Manning; Liang Meng; Wang Guohong

    2009-01-01

    We design a package patterned with red and green emitting phosphors excited by a blue LED to emit tri-basic mixing color. For high backlight display quality, we compare several phosphors. According to our measurements, green phosphors 0752G, 0753G and red phosphor 0763R are preferred for producing a good backlight source. Compared to RGB-LED backlight units, this frame typically benefits the lighting uniformity, and can simplify the structures. It also provides higher color render and better CCT than the traditional package method of a yellow phosphor with a blue chip. However, its light efficiency needs to be further improved for the use of backlights for LCDs.

  3. A new approach to correlate transport processes and optical efficiency in GaN-based LEDs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pavesi, M; Manfredi, M; Rossi, F; Salviati, G; Meneghini, M; Zanoni, E

    2009-01-01

    Carrier injection and non-radiative processes are determinants of the optical efficiency of InGaN/GaN LEDs. Among transport mechanisms, tunnelling is crucial for device functioning, but other contributions can be decisive on a varying bias. It is not easy to identify the weights and roles of these terms by a simple current-voltage characterization, so it needs a careful investigation by means of complementary experimental techniques. The correlation between luminescence and microscopic transport processes in InGaN/GaN LEDs has been investigated by means of a set of techniques: electroluminescence, cathodoluminescence, current-voltage dc measurements and thermal admittance spectroscopy. Green and blue LEDs, designed with a multi-quantum-well injector layer and an optically active single-quantum-well, have been tested. They showed distinctive current and temperature dependences of the optical efficiency, with a better performance at room temperature observed for green devices. This was discussed in terms of the carrier injection efficiency controlled by electrically active traps. The comparative analysis of the optical and electrical experimental data comes in handy as a methodological approach to correlate the emission properties with the carrier injection mechanisms and to improve the functionality in a large number of quantum well heterostructures for lighting applications.

  4. Calcium as a nonradiative recombination center in InGaN

    KAUST Repository

    Shen, Jimmy-Xuan

    2017-01-13

    Calcium can be unintentionally incorporated during the growth of semiconductor devices. Using hybrid functional first-principles calculations, we assess the role of Ca impurities in GaN. Ca substituted on the cation site acts as a deep acceptor with a level ~1 eV above the GaN valence-band maximum. We find that for Ca concentrations of 1017 cm−3, the Shockley–Read–Hall recombination coefficient, A, of InGaN exceeds 106 s−1 for band gaps less than 2.5 eV. A values of this magnitude can lead to significant reductions in the efficiency of light-emitting diodes.

  5. Calcium as a nonradiative recombination center in InGaN

    KAUST Repository

    Shen, Jimmy-Xuan; Wickramaratne, Darshana; Dreyer, Cyrus E.; Alkauskas, Audrius; Young, Erin; Speck, James S.; Van de Walle, Chris G.

    2017-01-01

    Calcium can be unintentionally incorporated during the growth of semiconductor devices. Using hybrid functional first-principles calculations, we assess the role of Ca impurities in GaN. Ca substituted on the cation site acts as a deep acceptor with a level ~1 eV above the GaN valence-band maximum. We find that for Ca concentrations of 1017 cm−3, the Shockley–Read–Hall recombination coefficient, A, of InGaN exceeds 106 s−1 for band gaps less than 2.5 eV. A values of this magnitude can lead to significant reductions in the efficiency of light-emitting diodes.

  6. Green synthetic strategy of BCNO nanostructure and phosphor-based light – Emitting diodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Yue [The Quartermaster Research Institute of General Logistics Department, Beijing 100010 (China); Yuan, Bo [Chemical Defense Institute of China, Beijing 100010 (China); Zhang, Dongjiu [Key Laboratory of Space Launching Site Reliability Technology, Hainan 570100 (China); Ma, Tian; Huang, Xiancong [The Quartermaster Research Institute of General Logistics Department, Beijing 100010 (China); Chu, Zengyong [College of Science, National University of Defense Technology, Changsha 410073 (China); Lai, Kan [The Quartermaster Research Institute of General Logistics Department, Beijing 100010 (China)

    2016-11-15

    BCNO phosphor has been paid much attention due to their unique physical, electronic and optical properties. Here we have successfully obtained BCNO nano-particle phosphor by microwave treating from boric acid, urea, and glucose at low temperatures and in short reaction time. Glucose decomposed into graphene quantum dots (GQDs), which facilitated the formation of hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN). Through our method, GQDs domains were uniformly incorporated into h-BN, leading to the formation of BCNO and decrease of bandgap. BCNO demonstrated excellent performance in light emitting diodes (LEDs) with green and blue light. We envision that this BCNO phosphor will enable the next generation blue and green LED devices due to the easiness of large scale fabrication at an economic cost.

  7. Green synthetic strategy of BCNO nanostructure and phosphor-based light – Emitting diodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Yue; Yuan, Bo; Zhang, Dongjiu; Ma, Tian; Huang, Xiancong; Chu, Zengyong; Lai, Kan

    2016-01-01

    BCNO phosphor has been paid much attention due to their unique physical, electronic and optical properties. Here we have successfully obtained BCNO nano-particle phosphor by microwave treating from boric acid, urea, and glucose at low temperatures and in short reaction time. Glucose decomposed into graphene quantum dots (GQDs), which facilitated the formation of hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN). Through our method, GQDs domains were uniformly incorporated into h-BN, leading to the formation of BCNO and decrease of bandgap. BCNO demonstrated excellent performance in light emitting diodes (LEDs) with green and blue light. We envision that this BCNO phosphor will enable the next generation blue and green LED devices due to the easiness of large scale fabrication at an economic cost.

  8. High Power UV LED Industrial Curing Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karlicek, Robert, F., Jr; Sargent, Robert

    2012-05-14

    UV curing is a green technology that is largely underutilized because UV radiation sources like Hg Lamps are unreliable and difficult to use. High Power UV LEDs are now efficient enough to replace Hg Lamps, and offer significantly improved performance relative to Hg Lamps. In this study, a modular, scalable high power UV LED curing system was designed and tested, performing well in industrial coating evaluations. In order to achieve mechanical form factors similar to commercial Hg Lamp systems, a new patent pending design was employed enabling high irradiance at long working distances. While high power UV LEDs are currently only available at longer UVA wavelengths, rapid progress on UVC LEDs and the development of new formulations designed specifically for use with UV LED sources will converge to drive more rapid adoption of UV curing technology. An assessment of the environmental impact of replacing Hg Lamp systems with UV LED systems was performed. Since UV curing is used in only a small portion of the industrial printing, painting and coating markets, the ease of use of UV LED systems should increase the use of UV curing technology. Even a small penetration of the significant number of industrial applications still using oven curing and drying will lead to significant reductions in energy consumption and reductions in the emission of green house gases and solvent emissions.

  9. Luminescence and ultrafast phenomena in InGaN multiple quantum wells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Viswanath, Annamraju Kasi; Lee, J.I.; Kim, S.T.; Yang, G.M.; Lee, H.J.; Kim, Dongho

    2007-01-01

    High quality In 0.13 Ga 0.87 N/GaN multiple quantum wells (MQWs) on (0001) sapphire substrate were fabricated by MOCVD method. The quantum well thickness is as thin as 10 A, and the barrier thickness is 50 A. We have investigated these ultrathin MQWs by continuous wave (cw) and time-resolved spectroscopy in the picosecond time scales in a wide temperature range from 10 to 290 K. In the luminescence spectrum at 10 K, we observed a broad peak at 3.134 eV which was attributed to the quantum wells emission of InGaN. The full width at half maximum of this peak was 129 meV at 10 K and the broadening at low temperatures which was mostly inhomogeneous was thought to be due to compositional fluctuations and interfacial disorder in the alloy. We also observed an intense and narrow peak at 3.471 eV due to the GaN barrier. The temperature dependence of the luminescence was studied and the peak positions and the intensities of the different peaks were obtained. The activation energy of the InGaN quantum well emission peak was estimated as 69 meV. From the measurements of luminescence intensities and lifetimes at various temperatures, radiative and non-radiative recombination lifetimes were deduced. The results were explained by considering only the localization of the excitons due to potential fluctuations

  10. Green City Branding in Perspective d

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gulsrud, Natalie Marie

    2014-01-01

    their competitive advantage as an increasingly global economy has led to fierce competition between cities at a national and international level. Cities are actively competing for talent, innovation, and creativity to boost their economies. One way cities achieve a competitive image is through green place branding......From Sydney, Australia’s “Sustainable Sydney 2030” campaign, to Vancouver, Canada’s “Greenest City 2020” vision, green city brands have become a global tool for municipal leaders to promise a better quality of life, promote sustainable development, and increase their competitive advantage. In Asia......, various green city schemes and rankings exist. They include Siemen’s Asian Green City Index, assessed by The Economist Intelligence Unit, based on a city’s environmental performance in a wide range of categories (Economist Intelligence Unit 2011). These green city brands provide a vision of health...

  11. PLACE-BASED GREEN BUILDING: INTEGRATING LOCAL ENVIRONMENTAL AND PLANNING ANALYSIS INTO GREEN BUILDING GUIDELINES

    Science.gov (United States)

    This project will develop a model for place-based green building guidelines based on an analysis of local environmental, social, and land use conditions. The ultimate goal of this project is to develop a methodology and model for placing green buildings within their local cont...

  12. Conduction-driven cooling of LED-based automotive LED lighting systems for abating local hot spots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saati, Ferina; Arik, Mehmet

    2018-02-01

    Light-emitting diode (LED)-based automotive lighting systems pose unique challenges, such as dual-side packaging (front side for LEDs and back side for driver electronics circuit), size, harsh ambient, and cooling. Packaging for automotive lighting applications combining the advanced printed circuit board (PCB) technology with a multifunctional LED-based board is investigated with a focus on the effect of thermal conduction-based cooling for hot spot abatement. A baseline study with a flame retardant 4 technology, commonly known as FR4 PCB, is first compared with a metal-core PCB technology, both experimentally and computationally. The double-sided advanced PCB that houses both electronics and LEDs is then investigated computationally and experimentally compared with the baseline FR4 PCB. Computational models are first developed with a commercial computational fluid dynamics software and are followed by an advanced PCB technology based on embedded heat pipes, which is computationally and experimentally studied. Then, attention is turned to studying different heat pipe orientations and heat pipe placements on the board. Results show that conventional FR4-based light engines experience local hot spots (ΔT>50°C) while advanced PCB technology based on heat pipes and thermal spreaders eliminates these local hot spots (ΔT<10°C), leading to a higher lumen extraction with improved reliability. Finally, possible design options are presented with embedded heat pipe structures that further improve the PCB performance.

  13. Temperature-dependent fine structure splitting in InGaN quantum dots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Tong; Puchtler, Tim J.; Zhu, Tongtong; Jarman, John C.; Kocher, Claudius C.; Oliver, Rachel A.; Taylor, Robert A.

    2017-07-01

    We report the experimental observation of temperature-dependent fine structure splitting in semiconductor quantum dots using a non-polar (11-20) a-plane InGaN system, up to the on-chip Peltier cooling threshold of 200 K. At 5 K, a statistical average splitting of 443 ± 132 μeV has been found based on 81 quantum dots. The degree of fine structure splitting stays relatively constant for temperatures less than 100 K and only increases above that temperature. At 200 K, we find that the fine structure splitting ranges between 2 and 12 meV, which is an order of magnitude higher than that at low temperatures. Our investigations also show that phonon interactions at high temperatures might have a correlation with the degree of exchange interactions. The large fine structure splitting at 200 K makes it easier to isolate the individual components of the polarized emission spectrally, increasing the effective degree of polarization for potential on-chip applications of polarized single-photon sources.

  14. Topical Review: Development of overgrown semi-polar GaN for high efficiency green/yellow emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, T.

    2016-09-01

    The most successful example of large lattice-mismatched epitaxial growth of semiconductors is the growth of III-nitrides on sapphire, leading to the award of the Nobel Prize in 2014 and great success in developing InGaN-based blue emitters. However, the majority of achievements in the field of III-nitride optoelectronics are mainly limited to polar GaN grown on c-plane (0001) sapphire. This polar orientation poses a number of fundamental issues, such as reduced quantum efficiency, efficiency droop, green and yellow gap in wavelength coverage, etc. To date, it is still a great challenge to develop longer wavelength devices such as green and yellow emitters. One clear way forward would be to grow III-nitride device structures along a semi-/non-polar direction, in particular, a semi-polar orientation, which potentially leads to both enhanced indium incorporation into GaN and reduced quantum confined Stark effects. This review presents recent progress on developing semi-polar GaN overgrowth technologies on sapphire or Si substrates, the two kinds of major substrates which are cost-effective and thus industry-compatible, and also demonstrates the latest achievements on electrically injected InGaN emitters with long emission wavelengths up to and including amber on overgrown semi-polar GaN. Finally, this review presents a summary and outlook on further developments for semi-polar GaN based optoelectronics.

  15. Optimum LED wavelength for underwater optical wireless communication at turbid water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenkrantz, Etai; Arnon, Shlomi

    2014-10-01

    Underwater optical wireless communication is an emerging technology, which can provide high data rate. High data rate communication is required for applications such as underwater imaging, networks of sensors and swarms of underwater vehicles. These applications pursue an affordable light source, which can be obtained by light emitting diodes (LED). LEDs offer solutions characterized by low cost, high efficiency, reliability and compactness based on off-the-shelf components such as blue and green light emitting diodes. In this paper we present our recent theoretical and experimental results in this field.

  16. Safety assessment of green tea based beverages and dried green tea extracts as nutritional supplements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dekant, Wolfgang; Fujii, Kenkichi; Shibata, Eiichiro; Morita, Osamu; Shimotoyodome, Akira

    2017-08-05

    The safety of green tea infusions and green tea extract (GTE)-based products is reviewed regarding catechins. Epigallocatechin 3-gallate (EGCG), the major catechin present in green tea, is suspected of being responsible for liver toxicity reported in humans consuming food supplements. Intake of EGCG with green tea infusions and GTE-based beverages is up to about 450mg EGCG/person/day in Europe and higher in Asia. Consumption of green tea is not associated with liver damage in humans, and green tea infusion and GTE-based beverages are considered safe in the range of historical uses. In animal studies, EGCG's potency for liver effects is highly dependent on conditions of administration. Use of NOAELs from bolus administration to derive a tolerable upper intake level applying the margin of safety concept results in acceptable EGCG-doses lower than those from one cup of green tea. NOAELs from toxicity studies applying EGCG with diet/split of the daily dose are a better point of departure for risk characterization. In clinical intervention studies, liver effects were not observed after intakes below 600mg EGCG/person/day. Thus, a tolerable upper intake level of 300mg EGCG/person/day is proposed for food supplements; this gives a twofold safety margin to clinical studies that did not report liver effects and a margin of safety of 100 to the NOAELs in animal studies with dietary administration of green tea catechins. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Vision communications based on LED array and imaging sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Jong-Ho; Jung, Sung-Yoon

    2012-11-01

    In this paper, we propose a brand new communication concept, called as "vision communication" based on LED array and image sensor. This system consists of LED array as a transmitter and digital device which include image sensor such as CCD and CMOS as receiver. In order to transmit data, the proposed communication scheme simultaneously uses the digital image processing and optical wireless communication scheme. Therefore, the cognitive communication scheme is possible with the help of recognition techniques used in vision system. By increasing data rate, our scheme can use LED array consisting of several multi-spectral LEDs. Because arranged each LED can emit multi-spectral optical signal such as visible, infrared and ultraviolet light, the increase of data rate is possible similar to WDM and MIMO skills used in traditional optical and wireless communications. In addition, this multi-spectral capability also makes it possible to avoid the optical noises in communication environment. In our vision communication scheme, the data packet is composed of Sync. data and information data. Sync. data is used to detect the transmitter area and calibrate the distorted image snapshots obtained by image sensor. By making the optical rate of LED array be same with the frame rate (frames per second) of image sensor, we can decode the information data included in each image snapshot based on image processing and optical wireless communication techniques. Through experiment based on practical test bed system, we confirm the feasibility of the proposed vision communications based on LED array and image sensor.

  18. Steps towards a GaN nanowire based light emitting diode and its integration with Si-MOS technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Limbach, Friederich

    2012-06-22

    This work is concerned with the realization and investigation of a light emitting diode (LED) structure within single GaN nanowires (NWs) and its integration with Si technology. To this end first a general understanding of the GaN NW growth is given. This is followed by investigations of the influence which doping species, such as Mg and Si, have on the growth of the NWs. The experience gathered in these studies set the basis for the synthesis of nominal p-i-n and n-i-p junctions in GaN NWs. Investigations of these structures resulted in the technologically important insight, that p-type doping with Mg is achieved best if it is done in the later NW growth stage. This implies that it is beneficial for a NW LED to place the p-type segment on the NW top. Another important component of an LED is the active zone where electron-hole recombination takes place. In the case of planar GaN LEDs, this is usually achieved by alloying Ga and In to form InGaN. In order to be able to control the growth under a variety of conditions, we investigate the growth of InGaN in the form of extended segments on top of GaN NWs, as well as multi quantum wells (MQWs) in GaN NWs. All the knowledge gained during these preliminary studies is harnessed to reach the overall goal: The realization of a GaN NW LED. Such structures are fabricated, investigated and processed into working LEDs. Finally, a report on the efforts of integrating III-nitride NW LEDs and Si based metaloxide-semiconductor field effect transistor (MOSFET) technology is given. This demonstrates the feasibility of the monolithic integration of both devices on the same wafer at the same time.

  19. Imaging Localized Energy States in Silicon-doped InGaN Nanowires Using 4D Electron Microscopy

    KAUST Repository

    Bose, Riya; Adhikari, Aniruddha; Burlakov, Victor M; Liu, Guangyu; Haque, Mohammed; Priante, Davide; Hedhili, Mohamed N.; Wehbe, Nimer; Zhao, Chao; Yang, Haoze; Ng, Tien Khee; Goriely, Alain; Bakr, Osman; Wu, Tao; Ooi, Boon S.; Mohammed, Omar F.

    2018-01-01

    Introducing dopants into InGaN NWs is known to significantly improve their device performances through a variety of mechanisms. However, to further optimize device operation under the influence of large specific surfaces, a thorough knowledge of ultrafast dynamical processes at the surface and interface of these NWs is imperative. Here, we describe the development of four-dimensional scanning ultrafast electron microscopy (4D S-UEM) as an extremely surface-sensitive method to directly visualize in space and time the enormous impact of silicon doping on the surface-carrier dynamics of InGaN NWs. Two time regime dynamics are identified for the first time in a 4D S-UEM experiment: an early time behavior (within 200 picoseconds) associated with the deferred evolution of secondary electrons due to the presence of localized trap states that decrease the electron escape rate and a longer timescale behavior (several ns) marked by accelerated charge carrier recombination. The results are further corroborated by conductivity studies carried out in dark and under illumination.

  20. Imaging Localized Energy States in Silicon-doped InGaN Nanowires Using 4D Electron Microscopy

    KAUST Repository

    Bose, Riya

    2018-01-23

    Introducing dopants into InGaN NWs is known to significantly improve their device performances through a variety of mechanisms. However, to further optimize device operation under the influence of large specific surfaces, a thorough knowledge of ultrafast dynamical processes at the surface and interface of these NWs is imperative. Here, we describe the development of four-dimensional scanning ultrafast electron microscopy (4D S-UEM) as an extremely surface-sensitive method to directly visualize in space and time the enormous impact of silicon doping on the surface-carrier dynamics of InGaN NWs. Two time regime dynamics are identified for the first time in a 4D S-UEM experiment: an early time behavior (within 200 picoseconds) associated with the deferred evolution of secondary electrons due to the presence of localized trap states that decrease the electron escape rate and a longer timescale behavior (several ns) marked by accelerated charge carrier recombination. The results are further corroborated by conductivity studies carried out in dark and under illumination.

  1. Color adjustable LED driver design based on PWM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Yiying; Yu, Caideng; Que, Longcheng; Zhou, Yun; Lv, Jian

    2012-10-01

    Light-emitting diode (LED) is a liquid cold source light source that rapidly develops in recent years. The merits of high brightness efficiency, long duration, high credibility and no pollution make it satisfy our demands for consumption and natural life, and gradually replace the traditional lamp-house-incandescent light and fluorescent light. However, because of the high cost and unstable drive circuit, the application range is restricted. To popularize the applications of the LED, we focus on improving the LED driver circuit to change this phenomenon. Basing on the traditional LED drive circuit, we adopt pre-setup constant current model and introduce pulse width modulation (PWM) control method to realize adjustable 256 level-grays display. In this paper, basing on human visual characteristics and the traditional PWM control method, we propose a new PWM control timing clock to alter the duty cycle of PWM signal to realize the simple gamma correction. Consequently, the brightness can accord with our visual characteristics.

  2. LED-based UV source for monitoring spectroradiometer properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sildoja, Meelis-Mait; Nevas, Saulius; Kouremeti, Natalia; Gröbner, Julian; Pape, Sven; Pendsa, Stefan; Sperfeld, Peter; Kemus, Fabian

    2018-06-01

    A compact and stable UV monitoring source based on state-of-the-art commercially available ultraviolet light emitting diodes (UV-LEDs) has been developed. It is designed to trace the radiometric stability—both responsivity and wavelength scale—of array spectroradiometers measuring direct solar irradiance in the wavelength range between 300 nm and 400 nm. The spectral irradiance stability of the UV-LED-based light source observed in the laboratory after seasoning (burning-in) the individual LEDs was better than 0.3% over a 12 h period of continuous operation. The integral irradiance measurements of the source over a period of several months, where the UV-LED source was not operated continuously between the measurements, showed stability within 0.3%. In-field measurements of the source with an array spectroradiometer indicated the stability of the source to be within the standard uncertainty of the spectroradiometer calibration, which was within 1% to 2%.

  3. Annealing effect on the electrical and optical properties of Au/n-ZnO NWs Schottky diodes white LEDs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soomro, M. Y.; Hussain, I.; Bano, N.; Nur, O.; Willander, M.

    2013-10-01

    We report the post-growth heat treatment effect on the electrical and the optical properties of hydrothermally grown zinc oxide (ZnO) nanowires (NWs) Schottky white light emitting diodes (LEDs). It was found that there is a changed in the electroluminescence (EL) spectrum when post growth annealing process was performed at 600 °C under nitrogen, oxygen and argon ambients. The EL spectrum for LEDs based on the as grown NWs show three bands red, green and blue centered at 724, 518 and 450 nm respectively. All devices based on ZnO NWs annealed in oxygen (O2), nitrogen (N2) and argon (Ar) ambient show blue shift in the violet and the red emissions whereas a red shift is observed in the green emission compared to the as grown NWs based device. The color rendering index (CRI) and the correlated color temperature (CCT) of all LEDs were calculated to be in the range 78-91 and 2753-5122 K, respectively. These results indicate that light from the LEDs can be tuned from cold white light to warm white light by post growth annealing.

  4. "Light-box" accelerated growth of poinsettias: LED-only illumination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weerasuriya, Charitha; Detez, Stewart; Hock Ng, Soon; Hughes, Andrew; Callaway, Michael; Harrison, Iain; Katkus, Tomas; Juodkazis, Saulius

    2018-01-01

    For the current commercialized agricultural industry which requires a reduced product lead time to customer and supply all year round, an artificial light emitting diodes (LEDs)-based illumination has high potential due to high efficiency of electrical-to-light conversion. The main advantage of the deployed Red Green Blue Amber LED lighting system is colour mixing capability, which means ability to generate all the colours in the spectrum by using three or four primary colours LEDs. The accelerated plant growth was carried out in a "light-box" which was made to generate an artificial day/night cycle by moving the colour mixing ratio along the colour temperature curve of the chromaticity diagram. The control group of plants form the same initial batch was grown on the same shelf in a greenhouse at the same conditions with addition of artificial illumination by incandescent lamps for few hours. Costs and efficiency projections of LED lamps for horticultural applications is discussed together with required capital investment. The total cost of the "light-box" including LED lamps and electronics was 850 AUD.

  5. Effect of Led Lighting Colors for Laying Japanese Quails

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    KC Nunes

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Time of exposure and light intensity rearing house may affect the performance and egg quality of laying quails. This research aimed at evaluating the live performance, egg quality, biometry of the reproductive system, and the gastrointestinal tract of Japanese quails (Coturnix coturnix japonica exposed to artificial light-emitting diodes (LED of different colors in comparison with fluorescent lamps. A total of 240 Japanese quails were distributed in completely randomized experimental design with four treatments (fluorescent lamp, and green, red, or blue LED lamps with six replicates of 10 birds each. Average egg weight and eggshell thickness were different (p0.05. The oviduct of 64-d-old hens exposed to green LED lighting was shorter (p<0.05 than those exposed to the fluorescent lamp. Red LED can be used to replace the fluorescent lamps, as they promote the same live performance, egg quality, and morphological development of the reproductive tract of laying Japanese quails.

  6. Meeting the challenges of developing LED-based projection displays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geißler, Enrico

    2006-04-01

    The main challenge in developing a LED-based projection system is to meet the brightness requirements of the market. Therefore a balanced combination of optical, electrical and thermal parameters must be reached to achieve these performance and cost targets. This paper describes the system design methodology for a digital micromirror display (DMD) based optical engine using LEDs as the light source, starting at the basic physical and geometrical parameters of the DMD and other optical elements through characterization of the LEDs to optimizing the system performance by determining optimal driving conditions. LEDs have a luminous flux density which is just at the threshold of acceptance in projection systems and thus only a fully optimized optical system with a matched set of LEDs can be used. This work resulted in two projection engines, one for a compact pocket projector and the other for a rear projection television, both of which are currently in commercialization.

  7. Solution processable inverted structure ZnO-organic hybrid heterojuction white LEDs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bano, N.; Hussain, I.; Soomro, M. Y.; EL-Naggar, A. M.; Albassam, A. A.

    2018-05-01

    Improving luminance efficiency and colour purity are the most important challenges for zinc oxide (ZnO)-organic hybrid heterojunction light emitting diodes (LEDs), affecting their large area applications. If ZnO-organic hybrid heterojunction white LEDs are fabricated by a hydrothermal method, it is difficult to obtain pure and stable blue emission from PFO due to the presence of an undesirable green emission. In this paper, we present an inverted-structure ZnO-organic hybrid heterojunction LED to avoid green emission from PFO, which mainly originates during device processing. With this configuration, each ZnO nanorod (NR) forms a discrete p-n junction; therefore, large-area white LEDs can be designed without compromising the junction area. The configuration used for this novel structure is glass/ZnO NRs/PFO/PEDOT:PSS/L-ITO, which enables the development of efficient, large-area and low-cost hybrid heterojunction LEDs. Inverted-structure ZnO-organic hybrid heterojunction white LEDs offer several improvements in terms of brightness, size, colour, external quantum efficiency and a wider applicability as compared to normal architecture LEDs.

  8. A review of drug delivery systems based on nanotechnology and green chemistry: green nanomedicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jahangirian, Hossein; Lemraski, Ensieh Ghasemian; Webster, Thomas J; Rafiee-Moghaddam, Roshanak; Abdollahi, Yadollah

    2017-01-01

    This review discusses the impact of green and environmentally safe chemistry on the field of nanotechnology-driven drug delivery in a new field termed "green nanomedicine". Studies have shown that among many examples of green nanotechnology-driven drug delivery systems, those receiving the greatest amount of attention include nanometal particles, polymers, and biological materials. Furthermore, green nanodrug delivery systems based on environmentally safe chemical reactions or using natural biomaterials (such as plant extracts and microorganisms) are now producing innovative materials revolutionizing the field. In this review, the use of green chemistry design, synthesis, and application principles and eco-friendly synthesis techniques with low side effects are discussed. The review ends with a description of key future efforts that must ensue for this field to continue to grow.

  9. High-resistive layers obtained through periodic growth and in situ annealing of InGaN by metalorganic chemical vapor deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Shuo; Ma, Ping, E-mail: maping@semi.ac.cn; Liu, Boting; Wu, Dongxue; Li, Jinmin [Research and Development Center for Solid State Lighting, Institute of Semiconductors, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100083 (China); Huang, Yuliang [Beijing Engineering Research Center for the 3rd Generation Semiconductor Materials and Application, Beijing 100083 (China); Wang, Junxi [State Key Laboratory of Solid State Lighting, Beijing 100083 (China)

    2016-06-15

    High-resistive layers were obtained by periodic growth and in situ annealing of InGaN. The effect of the annealing temperature of InGaN on the indium content and the material sheet resistive was investigated. The indium content decreased as the increase of in situ annealing temperature. Additionally, the material sheet resistance increased with the increase of the in situ annealing temperature for the annealed samples and reached 2 × 10{sup 10}Ω/sq in the light and 2 × 10{sup 11}Ω/sq in the dark when the in situ annealing temperature reached 970{sup ∘}C. The acquirement of high-resistive layers is attributed to the generation of indium vacancy-related defects. Introducing indium vacancy-related defects to compensate background carriers can be an effective method to grow high-resistance material.

  10. High-resistive layers obtained through periodic growth and in situ annealing of InGaN by metalorganic chemical vapor deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Shuo; Ma, Ping; Liu, Boting; Wu, Dongxue; Li, Jinmin; Huang, Yuliang; Wang, Junxi

    2016-01-01

    High-resistive layers were obtained by periodic growth and in situ annealing of InGaN. The effect of the annealing temperature of InGaN on the indium content and the material sheet resistive was investigated. The indium content decreased as the increase of in situ annealing temperature. Additionally, the material sheet resistance increased with the increase of the in situ annealing temperature for the annealed samples and reached 2 × 10"1"0Ω/sq in the light and 2 × 10"1"1Ω/sq in the dark when the in situ annealing temperature reached 970"∘C. The acquirement of high-resistive layers is attributed to the generation of indium vacancy-related defects. Introducing indium vacancy-related defects to compensate background carriers can be an effective method to grow high-resistance material.

  11. Efficiency enhancement of InGaN amber MQWs using nanopillar structures

    KAUST Repository

    Ou, Yiyu

    2017-09-09

    We have investigated the use of nanopillar structures on high indium content InGaN amber multiple quantum well (MQW) samples to enhance the emission efficiency. A significant emission enhancement was observed which can be attributed to the enhancement of internal quantum efficiency and light extraction efficiency. The size-dependent strain relaxation effect was characterized by photoluminescence, Raman spectroscopy and time-resolved photoluminescence measurements. In addition, the light extraction efficiency of different MQW samples was studied by finite-different time-domain simulations. Compared to the as-grown sample, the nanopillar amber MQW sample with a diameter of 300 nm has demonstrated an emission enhancement by a factor of 23.8.

  12. Efficiency enhancement of InGaN amber MQWs using nanopillar structures

    KAUST Repository

    Ou, Yiyu; Iida, Daisuke; Liu, Jin; Wu, Kaiyu; Ohkawa, Kazuhiro; Boisen, Anja; Petersen, Paul Michael; Ou, Haiyan

    2017-01-01

    We have investigated the use of nanopillar structures on high indium content InGaN amber multiple quantum well (MQW) samples to enhance the emission efficiency. A significant emission enhancement was observed which can be attributed to the enhancement of internal quantum efficiency and light extraction efficiency. The size-dependent strain relaxation effect was characterized by photoluminescence, Raman spectroscopy and time-resolved photoluminescence measurements. In addition, the light extraction efficiency of different MQW samples was studied by finite-different time-domain simulations. Compared to the as-grown sample, the nanopillar amber MQW sample with a diameter of 300 nm has demonstrated an emission enhancement by a factor of 23.8.

  13. Synthesis, characteristics and luminescent properties of a new Tb(III) ternary complex applied in near UV-based LED

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Naiqun; Li, Liping; Yang, Yamin; Zhang, Aiqin; Jia, Husheng; Liu, Xuguang; Xu, Bingshe

    2015-11-01

    A novel Tb(III) ternary complex, Tb(p-BBA)3UA, was synthesized with 4-benzoylbenzoic acid (p-BBA) as primary ligand and undecylenic acid (UA) as reactive ligand. Tb(III) complex exhibits high thermal stability and wide and strong excitation bands from 310 nm to 400 nm when monitored at 543 nm, which matches well with the 365 nm UV chip. The complex displays Tb(III) characteristic peaks at 488, 543, 584 and 619 nm under the excitation of 365 nm UV-light. The intramolecular energy transfer process was also discussed. Meanwhile, the complex has longer fluorescence lifetime (1.317 ms) and higher quantum yield (44.8%). When used in LED with 365 nm UV chip (power efficiency is 17.3 lm/W), the complex still maintained its qualified luminescent performance. All the results indicate that Tb(p-BBA)3UA can be applied as a green component for fabrication of near UV-based white LED.

  14. Impact of band structure and transition matrix elements on polarization properties of the photoluminescence of semipolar and nonpolar InGaN quantum wells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schade, L.; Schwarz, U.T. [Department of Microsystems Engineering, University of Freiburg, Georges-Koehler-Allee 103, 79108 Freiburg (Germany); Fraunhofer Institute for Applied Solid State Physics (IAF), Tullastrasse 72, 79108 Freiburg (Germany); Wernicke, T. [Institute of Solid State Physics, Technical University, Hardenbergstrasse 36, 10623 Berlin (Germany); Weyers, M. [Ferdinand-Braun-Institut fuer Hoechstfrequenztechnik, Gustav-Kirchhoff-Strasse 4, 12489 Berlin (Germany); Kneissl, M. [Institute of Solid State Physics, Technical University, Hardenbergstrasse 36, 10623 Berlin (Germany); Ferdinand-Braun-Institut fuer Hoechstfrequenztechnik, Gustav-Kirchhoff-Strasse 4, 12489 Berlin (Germany)

    2011-03-15

    Partial or full linear polarization is characteristic for the spontaneous emission of light from semipolar and nonpolar InGaN quantum wells. This property is an implication of the crystalline anisotropy as a basic property of the wurtzite structure. The influence of this anisotropy on the band structure and the transition matrix elements was calculated by a k.p-method for arbitrary quantum well orientations with respect to the c-axis; results are shown here in detail. Optical polarization is a direct consequence of a broken symmetry, mainly affecting the transition matrix elements from the conduction to the valence bands. Furthermore, the strain of the InGaN quantum well strongly depends on the crystal orientation of the substrate, resulting in a valence band mixing. The composition of the eigenfunctions has emerged to be most important for the polarization dependence of strained semipolar and nonpolar InGaN QW. The matrix elements, in combination with the thermal occupation of the bands, determine the polarization of the spontaneously emitted light. Our photoluminescence measurements of nonpolar QW match well with this model. However, in contrast to calculations with standard band parameters, the two topmost subbands show a larger separation in the emitted energy. (Copyright copyright 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  15. Colorimetry and efficiency of white LEDs: Spectral width dependence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taylor, Elaine; Edwards, Paul R.; Martin, Robert W. [Department of Physics, SUPA, Strathclyde University, Glasgow (United Kingdom)

    2012-03-15

    The potential colour rendering capability and efficiency of white LEDs constructed by a combination of individual red, green and blue (RGB) LEDs are analysed. The conventional measurement of colour rendering quality, the colour rendering index (CRI), is used as well as a recently proposed colour quality scale (CQS), designed to overcome some of the limitations of CRI when narrow-band emitters are being studied. The colour rendering performance is maximised by variation of the peak emission wavelength and relative intensity of the component LEDs, with the constraint that the spectral widths follow those measured in actual devices. The highest CRI achieved is 89.5, corresponding to a CQS value of 79, colour temperature of 3800 K and a luminous efficacy of radiation (LER) of 365 lm/W. By allowing the spectral width of the green LED to vary the CRI can be raised to 90.9, giving values of 82.5 and 370 lm/W for the CQS and LER, respectively. The significance of these values are discussed in terms of optimising the possible performance of RGB LEDs. (Copyright copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  16. Color optimization of conjugated-polymer/InGaN hybrid white light emitting diodes by incomplete energy transfer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, Chi-Jung; Lai, Chun-Feng; Madhusudhana Reddy, P.; Chen, Yung-Lin; Chiou, Wei-Yung; Chang, Shinn-Jen

    2015-01-01

    By using the wavelength conversion method, white light emitting diodes (WLEDs) were produced by applying mixtures of polysiloxane and fluorescent polymers on InGaN based light emitting diodes. UV curable organic–inorganic hybrid materials with high refractive index (1.561), compromised optical, thermal and mechanical properties was used as encapsulants. Red light emitting fluorescent FABD polymer (with 9,9-dioctylfluorene (F), anthracene (A) and 2,1,3-benzothiadiazole (B), and 4,7-bis(2-thienyl)-2,1,3-benzothiadiazole (D) repeating units) and green light emitting fluorescent FAB polymer were used as wavelength converters. The encapsulant/fluorescent polymer mixture and InGaN produce the white light by incomplete energy transfer mechanism. WLEDs with high color rendering index (CRI, about 93), and tunable correlated color temperature (CCT) properties can be produced by controlling the composition and chemical structures of encapsulating polymer and fluorescent polymer in hybrid materials, offering cool-white and neutral-white LEDs. - Highlights: • Highly efficient white light-emitting diodes (WLEDs) were produced. • Conjugated-polymer/InGaN hybrid WLEDs by incomplete energy transfer mechanism. • WLEDs with high color-rendering index and tunable correlated color temperature. • Polysiloxane encapsulant with superior optical, mechanical and thermal properties

  17. Enhanced Ce{sup 3+} photoluminescence by Li{sup +} co-doping in CaO phosphor and its use in blue-pumped white LEDs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hao, Zhendong, E-mail: haozd@ciomp.ac.cn; Zhang, Xia; Luo, Yongshi; Zhang, Ligong; Zhao, Haifeng; Zhang, Jiahua, E-mail: zhangjh@ciomp.ac.cn

    2013-08-15

    In this paper, we demonstrate a method to improve the photoluminescence of CaO: Ce{sup 3+} phosphor and delineate its first use in blue-pumped white LEDs. The results show that the yellow emission of Ce{sup 3+} is enhanced by a factor of 1.88 by adding Li{sup +} into CaO host at 474 nm blue light excitation. On analyzing the diffuse reflection spectra and fluorescence decay curves, we reveal that the photoluminescence enhancement is originated from the rise of absorbance to the excitation photons but not from the improvement of the luminescent efficiency. Li{sup +}-improved CaO: Ce{sup 3+} exhibits more red component when it is compared with the commercial Y{sub 3}Al{sub 5}O{sub 12}: Ce{sup 3+} (YAG: Ce{sup 3+}) phosphor, indicating its potential application for high color rendering white LEDs. Thus, a white LED is fabricated by combining blue InGaN LED chip with CaO: Ce{sup 3+}, Li{sup +} phosphor and a warm white light with high color rendering index (R{sub a}) of 80, low correlated color temperature (T{sub c}) of 4524 K, and sufficient luminous efficiency of 50 lm W{sup −1} is obtained. -- Highlights: • The photoluminescence of Ce{sup 3+} in CaO host was enhanced by Li{sup +} co-doping. • A CaO: Ce{sup 3+}, Li{sup +} based white LED was fabricated for the first time. • An efficient warm white light was obtained. • CaO: Ce{sup 3+}, Li{sup +} is expected to be used as a yellow phosphor for blue-pumped white LEDs.

  18. Design of an Oximeter Based on LED-LED Configuration and FPGA Technology

    OpenAIRE

    Stojanovic, Radovan; Karadaglic, Dejan

    2013-01-01

    A fully digital photoplethysmographic (PPG) sensor and actuator has been developed. The sensing circuit uses one Light Emitting Diode (LED) for emitting light into human tissue and one LED for detecting the reflectance light from human tissue. A Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA) is used to control the LEDs and determine the PPG and Blood Oxygen Saturation (SpO2). The configurations with two LEDs and four LEDs are developed for measuring PPG signal and Blood Oxygen Saturation (SpO2). N-LEDs...

  19. LED-based high-speed visible light communications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chi, Nan; Shi, Meng; Zhao, Yiheng; Wang, Fumin; Shi, Jianyang; Zhou, Yingjun; Lu, Xingyu; Qiao, Liang

    2018-01-01

    We are seeing a growing use of light emitting diodes (LEDs) in a range of applications including lighting, TV and backlight board screen, display etc. In comparison with the traditional incandescent and fluorescent light bulbs, LEDs offer long life-space, much higher energy efficiency, high performance cost ratio and above all very fast switching capability. LED based Visible Light Communications (VLC) is an emerging field of optical communications that focuses on the part of the electromagnetic spectrum that humans can see. Depending on the transmission distance, we can divide the whole optical network into two categories, long haul and short haul. Visible light communication can be a promising candidate for short haul applications. In this paper, we outline the configuration of VLC, its unique benefits, and describe the state of the art research contributions consisting of advanced modulation formats including adaptive bit loading OFDM, carrierless amplitude and phase (CAP), pulse amplitude modulation (PAM) and single carrier Nyquist, linear equalization and nonlinear distortion mitigation based on machine learning, quasi-balanced coding and phase-shifted Manchester coding. These enabling technologies can support VLC up to 10Gb/s class free space transmission.

  20. Materials and Designs for High-Efficacy LED Light Engines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ibbetson, James [Cree, Inc., Durham, NC (United States); Gresback, Ryan [Cree, Inc., Durham, NC (United States)

    2017-09-28

    Cree, Inc. conducted a narrow-band downconverter (NBD) materials development and implementation program which will lead to warm-white LED light engines with enhanced efficacy via improved spectral efficiency with respect to the human eye response. New red (600-630nm) NBD materials could result in as much as a 20% improvement in warm-white efficacy at high color quality relative to conventional phosphor-based light sources. Key program innovations included: high quantum yield; narrow peak width; minimized component-level losses due to “cross-talk” and light scattering among red and yellow-green downconverters; and improved reliability to reach parity with conventional phosphors. NBD-enabled downconversion efficiency gains relative to conventional phosphors yielded an end-of-project LED light engine efficacy of >160 lm/W at room temperature and 35 A/cm2, with a correlated color temperature (CCT) of ~3500K and >90 CRI (Color Rending Index). NBD-LED light engines exhibited equivalent luminous flux and color point maintenance at >1,000 hrs. of highly accelerated reliability testing as conventional phosphor LEDs. A demonstration luminaire utilizing an NBD-based LED light engine had a steady-state system efficacy of >150 lm/W at ~3500K and >90 CRI, which exceeded the 2014 DOE R&D Plan luminaire milestone for FY17 of >150 lm/W at just 80 CRI.

  1. Luminescence properties and energy transfer of site-sensitive Ca(6-x-y)Mg(x-z)(PO(4))(4):Eu(y)(2+),Mn(z)(2+) phosphors and their application to near-UV LED-based white LEDs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Ki Hyuk; Im, Won Bin; Jang, Ho Seong; Yoo, Hyoung Sun; Jeon, Duk Young

    2009-12-21

    On the basis of the structural information that the host material has excellent charge stabilization, blue-emitting Ca(6-x-y)Mg(x)(PO(4))(4):Eu(y)(2+) (CMP:Eu(2+)) phosphors were synthesized and systematically optimized, and their photoluminescence (PL) properties were evaluated. Depending upon the amount of Mg added, the emission efficiency of the phosphors could be enhanced. The substitution of Eu(2+) affected their maximum wavelength (lambda(max)) and thermal stability because the substitution site of Eu(2+) could be varied. To obtain single-phase two-color-emitting phosphors, we incorporated Mn(2+) into CMP:Eu(2+) phosphors. Weak red emission resulting from the forbidden transition of Mn(2+) could be enhanced by the energy transfer from Eu(2+) to Mn(2+) that occurs because of the spectral overlap between the photoluminescence excitation (PLE) spectrum of Mn(2+) and the PL spectrum of Eu(2+). The energy transfer process was confirmed by the luminescence spectra, energy transfer efficiency, and decay curve of the phosphors. Finally, the optimized Ca(6-x-y)Mg(x-z)(PO(4))(4):Eu(y)(2+),Mn(z)(2+) (CMP:Eu(2+),Mn(2+)) phosphors were applied with green emitting Ca(2)MgSi(2)O(7):Eu(2+) (CMS:Eu(2+)) phosphors to ultraviolet (UV) light emitting diode (LED)-pumped white LEDs. The CMS:Eu(2+)-mixed CMP:Eu(2+), Mn(2+)-based white LEDs showed an excellent color rendering index (CRI) of 98 because of the broader emission band and more stable color coordinates than those of commercial Y(3)Al(5)O(12):Ce(3+) (YAG:Ce(3+))-based white LEDs under a forward bias current of 20 mA. The fabricated white LEDs showed very bright natural white light that had the color coordinate of (0.3288, 0.3401), and thus CMP:Eu(2+),Mn(2+) could be regarded as a good candidate for UV LED-based white LEDs.

  2. Carrier redistribution between different potential sites in semipolar (202¯1) InGaN quantum wells studied by near-field photoluminescence

    KAUST Repository

    Marcinkevičius, S.; Gelžinytė, K.; Zhao, Y.; Nakamura, S.; DenBaars, S. P.; Speck, J. S.

    2014-01-01

    © 2014 AIP Publishing LLC. Scanning near-field photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopy at different excitation powers was applied to study nanoscale properties of carrier localization and recombination in semipolar (202¯1) InGaN quantum wells (QWs

  3. The LED monitoring system of the PHOENICS experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Urban, D.

    1991-07-01

    The PHOENICS experiment at ELSA uses a LED monitoring system to control pulse height and time measurement with scintillation counters. A green LED is mounted at the light guide of each of the 304 involved photomultiplier tubes. The LEDs are driven by fast voltage pulses of 5 ns FWHM width and about 20 V amplitude. Simulation of single events is possible by computer controlled switching of individual LEDs. In order to correct for the temperature dependence of the LED intensity an automatic temperature recording system was coupled to the computer. This monitor system allows to control the pulse height and time measurement with an accuracy of about 2% and 100 ps respectively. (orig.) [de

  4. Forward Conduction Mode Controlled Piezoelectric Transformer-Based PFC LED Drive

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roedgaard, M. S.; Weirich, M.; Andersen, M. A. E.

    2013-01-01

    Light-emitting diode (LED) illumination is getting more and more common; as LED's performance is rising, the price is falling and is getting competitive. Some of the challenges of ac mains supplied illumination are the requirement of power factor correction (PFC) and the competitiveness of a low...... priced market. In this paper, a new forward conduction mode (FCM) control method for piezoelectric transformer (PT)-based power converters is proposed. A PT-based LED drive facilitating passive PFC is developed, utilizing and validating the FCM control method. The drive utilizes an inductorless half...... LED drive has been developed, supplied from 230-V 50-Hz ac mains, achieving a power factor of 0.96....

  5. Nanometer-scale, quantitative composition mappings of InGaN layers from a combination of scanning transmission electron microscopy and energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pantzas, K; Voss, P L; Ougazzaden, A; Patriarche, G; Largeau, L; Mauguin, O; Troadec, D; Gautier, S; Moudakir, T; Suresh, S

    2012-01-01

    Using elastic scattering theory we show that a small set of energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (EDX) measurements is sufficient to experimentally evaluate the scattering function of electrons in high-angle annular dark field scanning transmission microscopy (HAADF-STEM). We then demonstrate how to use this function to transform qualitative HAADF-STEM images of InGaN layers into precise, quantitative chemical maps of the indium composition. The maps obtained in this way combine the resolution of HAADF-STEM and the chemical precision of EDX. We illustrate the potential of such chemical maps by using them to investigate nanometer-scale fluctuations in the indium composition and their impact on the growth of epitaxial InGaN layers. (paper)

  6. A synthetic method of solar spectrum based on LED

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ji-qiang; Su, Shi; Zhang, Guo-yu; Zhang, Jian

    2017-10-01

    A synthetic method of solar spectrum which based on the spectral characteristics of the solar spectrum and LED, and the principle of arbitrary spectral synthesis was studied by using 14 kinds of LED with different central wavelengths.The LED and solar spectrum data were selected by Origin Software firstly, then calculated the total number of LED for each center band by the transformation relation between brightness and illumination and Least Squares Curve Fit in Matlab.Finally, the spectrum curve of AM1.5 standard solar spectrum was obtained. The results met the technical indexes of the solar spectrum matching with ±20% and the solar constant with >0.5.

  7. Efficiency enhancement of InGaN amber MQWs using nanopillar structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ou Yiyu

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available We have investigated the use of nanopillar structures on high indium content InGaN amber multiple quantum well (MQW samples to enhance the emission efficiency. A significant emission enhancement was observed which can be attributed to the enhancement of internal quantum efficiency and light extraction efficiency. The size-dependent strain relaxation effect was characterized by photoluminescence, Raman spectroscopy and time-resolved photoluminescence measurements. In addition, the light extraction efficiency of different MQW samples was studied by finite-different time-domain simulations. Compared to the as-grown sample, the nanopillar amber MQW sample with a diameter of 300 nm has demonstrated an emission enhancement by a factor of 23.8.

  8. Ultrapure Green Light-Emitting Diodes Using Two-Dimensional Formamidinium Perovskites: Achieving Recommendation 2020 Color Coordinates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Sudhir; Jagielski, Jakub; Kallikounis, Nikolaos; Kim, Young-Hoon; Wolf, Christoph; Jenny, Florian; Tian, Tian; Hofer, Corinne J; Chiu, Yu-Cheng; Stark, Wendelin J; Lee, Tae-Woo; Shih, Chih-Jen

    2017-09-13

    Pure green light-emitting diodes (LEDs) are essential for realizing an ultrawide color gamut in next-generation displays, as is defined by the recommendation (Rec.) 2020 standard. However, because the human eye is more sensitive to the green spectral region, it is not yet possible to achieve an ultrapure green electroluminescence (EL) with a sufficiently narrow bandwidth that covers >95% of the Rec. 2020 standard in the CIE 1931 color space. Here, we demonstrate efficient, ultrapure green EL based on the colloidal two-dimensional (2D) formamidinium lead bromide (FAPbBr 3 ) hybrid perovskites. Through the dielectric quantum well (DQW) engineering, the quantum-confined 2D FAPbBr 3 perovskites exhibit a high exciton binding energy of 162 meV, resulting in a high photoluminescence quantum yield (PLQY) of ∼92% in the spin-coated films. Our optimized LED devices show a maximum current efficiency (η CE ) of 13.02 cd A -1 and the CIE 1931 color coordinates of (0.168, 0.773). The color gamut covers 97% and 99% of the Rec. 2020 standard in the CIE 1931 and the CIE 1976 color space, respectively, representing the "greenest" LEDs ever reported. Moreover, the device shows only a ∼10% roll-off in η CE (11.3 cd A -1 ) at 1000 cd m -2 . We further demonstrate large-area (3 cm 2 ) and ultraflexible (bending radius of 2 mm) LEDs based on 2D perovskites.

  9. Design of an Oximeter Based on LED-LED Configuration and FPGA Technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radovan Stojanovic

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A fully digital photoplethysmographic (PPG sensor and actuator has been developed. The sensing circuit uses one Light Emitting Diode (LED for emitting light into human tissue and one LED for detecting the reflectance light from human tissue. A Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA is used to control the LEDs and determine the PPG and Blood Oxygen Saturation (SpO2. The configurations with two LEDs and four LEDs are developed for measuring PPG signal and Blood Oxygen Saturation (SpO2. N-LEDs configuration is proposed for multichannel SpO2 measurements. The approach resulted in better spectral sensitivity, increased and adjustable resolution, reduced noise, small size, low cost and low power consumption.

  10. Design of an oximeter based on LED-LED configuration and FPGA technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stojanovic, Radovan; Karadaglic, Dejan

    2013-01-04

    A fully digital photoplethysmographic (PPG) sensor and actuator has been developed. The sensing circuit uses one Light Emitting Diode (LED) for emitting light into human tissue and one LED for detecting the reflectance light from human tissue. A Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA) is used to control the LEDs and determine the PPG and Blood Oxygen Saturation (S(p)O(2)). The configurations with two LEDs and four LEDs are developed for measuring PPG signal and Blood Oxygen Saturation (S(p)O(2)). N-LEDs configuration is proposed for multichannel S(p)O(2) measurements. The approach resulted in better spectral sensitivity, increased and adjustable resolution, reduced noise, small size, low cost and low power consumption.

  11. The use of light-emitting diodes (LED in commercial layer production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R Borille

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Artificial lighting is one of the most powerful management tools available to commercial layer producers. Artificial light allows anticipating or delaying the beginning of lay, improving egg production, and optimizing feed efficiency. This study aimed at comparing the performance of commercial layers submitted to lighting using different LED colors or conventional incandescent lamps. The study was carried out in a layer house divided in isolated environments in order to prevent any influenced from the neighboring treatments. In total, 360 Isa Brown layers, with an initial age of 56 weeks, were used. The following light sources were used: blue LED, yellow LED, green LED, red LED, white LED, and 40W incandescent light. Birds in all treatment were submitted to a 17-h continuous lighting program, and were fed a corn and soybean meal-based diet. A completely randomized experimental design with subplots was applied, with 24 treatments (six light sources and four periods of three replicates. Egg production (% was significantly different (p0.05 by light source. It was concluded that the replacement of incandescent light bulbs by white and red LEDs does not cause any negative effect on the egg production of commercial layers.

  12. Light emission ranging from blue to red from a series of Iguana/GaN single quantum wells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, R.W. [Department of Physics, University of Strathclyde, Glasgow (United Kingdom)]. E-mail: r.w.martin@strath.ac.uk; Edwards, P.R.; Pecharroman-Gallego, R.; O' Donnell, K.P. [Department of Physics, University of Strathclyde, Glasgow (United Kingdom); Liu, C.; Deatcher, C.J.; Watson, I.M. [Institute of Photonics, University of Strathclyde, Glasgow (United Kingdom)

    2002-04-07

    In this paper, we describe the growth and characterization of InGaN single quantum wells with emission peaks in the blue, green, amber and red spectral regions, grown by metal-organic vapour phase epitaxy. Starting from the growth of a blue-emitting (peak {approx}430 nm) InGaN quantum well at 860 deg. C the InGaN growth temperature was progressively reduced. The photoluminescence peak wavelength, measured at low temperature, shifts through the green and orange spectral regions and reaches 670 nm for an InGaN growth temperature of 760 deg. C. This corresponds to an energy lower than the currently accepted band-gap of the binary compound, InN. Spectral characteristics of the luminescence peaks will be discussed, including an analysis of the phonon-assisted contribution. Low energy secondary ion mass spectrometry analysis provides information on the indium content and thickness of the 'blue' and 'red' quantum wells. The results are combined to discuss the origin of the 'sub-band-gap' luminescence in terms of the combined influence of InN-GaN segregation and the effect of intense piezoelectric fields. (author)

  13. Light emission ranging from blue to red from a series of Iguana/GaN single quantum wells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, R.W.; Edwards, P.R.; Pecharroman-Gallego, R.; O'Donnell, K.P.; Liu, C.; Deatcher, C.J.; Watson, I.M.

    2002-01-01

    In this paper, we describe the growth and characterization of InGaN single quantum wells with emission peaks in the blue, green, amber and red spectral regions, grown by metal-organic vapour phase epitaxy. Starting from the growth of a blue-emitting (peak ∼430 nm) InGaN quantum well at 860 deg. C the InGaN growth temperature was progressively reduced. The photoluminescence peak wavelength, measured at low temperature, shifts through the green and orange spectral regions and reaches 670 nm for an InGaN growth temperature of 760 deg. C. This corresponds to an energy lower than the currently accepted band-gap of the binary compound, InN. Spectral characteristics of the luminescence peaks will be discussed, including an analysis of the phonon-assisted contribution. Low energy secondary ion mass spectrometry analysis provides information on the indium content and thickness of the 'blue' and 'red' quantum wells. The results are combined to discuss the origin of the 'sub-band-gap' luminescence in terms of the combined influence of InN-GaN segregation and the effect of intense piezoelectric fields. (author)

  14. Non-destructive quality evaluation of pepper (Capsicum annuum L.) seeds using LED-induced hyperspectral reflectance imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    In this study, we develop a viability evaluation method for pepper (Capsicum annuum L.) seed based on hyperspectral reflectance imaging. The reflectance spectra of pepper seeds in the 400–700 nm range are collected from hyperspectral reflectance images obtained using blue, green, and red LED illumin...

  15. Room-temperature epitaxial growth of high-quality m-plane InGaN films on ZnO substrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shimomoto, Kazuma; Ueno, Kohei [Institute of Industrial Science, University of Tokyo (Japan); Kobayashi, Atsushi [Institute of Industrial Science, University of Tokyo (Japan); Kanagawa Academy of Science and Technology (KAST), Takatsu-ku, Kawasaki (Japan); Department of Applied Chemistry, University of Tokyo (Japan); Ohta, Jitsuo [Institute of Industrial Science, University of Tokyo (Japan); Kanagawa Academy of Science and Technology (KAST), Takatsu-ku, Kawasaki (Japan); Oshima, Masaharu [Department of Applied Chemistry, University of Tokyo (Japan); Core Research for Evolutional Science and Technology, Japan Science and Technology Corporation (JST-CREST), Tokyo (Japan); Fujioka, Hiroshi [Institute of Industrial Science, University of Tokyo (Japan); Kanagawa Academy of Science and Technology (KAST), Takatsu-ku, Kawasaki (Japan); Core Research for Evolutional Science and Technology, Japan Science and Technology Corporation (JST-CREST), Tokyo (Japan); Amanai, Hidetaka; Nagao, Satoru; Horie, Hideyoshi [Mitsubishi Chemical Group, Science and Technology Research Center, Higashi-Mamiana, Ushiku-shi, Ibaraki (Japan)

    2009-05-15

    The authors have grown high-quality m -plane In{sub 0.36}Ga{sub 0.64}N (1 anti 100) films on ZnO (1 anti 100) substrates at room temperature (RT) by pulsed laser deposition (PLD) and have investigated their structural properties. m-plane InGaN films grown on ZnO substrates at RT possess atomically flat surfaces with stepped and terraced structures, indicating that the film growth proceeds in a two-dimensional mode. X-ray diffraction measurements have revealed that the m-plane InGaN films grow without phase separation reactions at RT. The full-width at half-maximum values of the 1 anti 100 X-ray rocking curves of films with X-ray incident azimuths perpendicular to the c- and a-axis are 88 arcsec and 78 arcsec, respectively. Reciprocal space-mapping has revealed that a 50 nm thick m-plane In{sub 0.36}Ga{sub 0.64}N film grows coherently on the ZnO substrate, which can probably explain the low defect density that is observed in the film. (copyright 2009 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  16. Room-temperature epitaxial growth of high-quality m-plane InGaN films on ZnO substrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimomoto, Kazuma; Ueno, Kohei; Kobayashi, Atsushi; Ohta, Jitsuo; Oshima, Masaharu; Fujioka, Hiroshi; Amanai, Hidetaka; Nagao, Satoru; Horie, Hideyoshi

    2009-01-01

    The authors have grown high-quality m -plane In 0.36 Ga 0.64 N (1 anti 100) films on ZnO (1 anti 100) substrates at room temperature (RT) by pulsed laser deposition (PLD) and have investigated their structural properties. m-plane InGaN films grown on ZnO substrates at RT possess atomically flat surfaces with stepped and terraced structures, indicating that the film growth proceeds in a two-dimensional mode. X-ray diffraction measurements have revealed that the m-plane InGaN films grow without phase separation reactions at RT. The full-width at half-maximum values of the 1 anti 100 X-ray rocking curves of films with X-ray incident azimuths perpendicular to the c- and a-axis are 88 arcsec and 78 arcsec, respectively. Reciprocal space-mapping has revealed that a 50 nm thick m-plane In 0.36 Ga 0.64 N film grows coherently on the ZnO substrate, which can probably explain the low defect density that is observed in the film. (copyright 2009 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  17. The relation between photoluminescence properties and gas pressure with [0001] InGaN single quantum well systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsutsumi, Toshiaki [Department of Nanosystem Sciences, Yokohama City University, Yokohama 236-0027 (Japan); Alfieri, Giovanni; Kawakami, Yoichi [Department of Electronic Science and Engineering, Kyoto University, Kyotodaigaku-katsura, Nishikyo, Kyoto 615-8510 (Japan); Micheletto, Ruggero, E-mail: ruggero@yokohama-cu.ac.jp [Department of Nanosystem Sciences, Yokohama City University, Yokohama 236-0027 (Japan)

    2017-01-15

    Highlights: • Photoluminescence of InGaN device is variable, there is no clear explanation for this. • We perform an ad-hoc absorption procedure, found that gases on the surface reduce emission. • We found that variability is related to the pressure of the gas in which the sample is immersed. • We point out the role of oxygen as major player in the reduction of photoluminescence. • A model is proposed and explains successfully the dynamical optical processes observed. - Abstract: We show for the first time that photoluminescence of InGaN single quantum wells (SQW) devices is related to the gas pressure in which the sample is immersed, also we give a model of the phenomena to suggest a possible cause. Our model shows a direct relation between experimental behavior and molecular coverage dynamics. This strongly suggests that the driving force of photoluminescence decrease is oxygen covering the surface of the device with a time dynamics that depends on the gas pressure. This aims to contribute to the understanding of the physical mechanism of the so-called optical memory effect and blinking phenomenon observed in these devices.

  18. Metal-organic chemical vapor deposition of high quality, high indium composition N-polar InGaN layers for tunnel devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lund, Cory; Romanczyk, Brian; Catalano, Massimo; Wang, Qingxiao; Li, Wenjun; DiGiovanni, Domenic; Kim, Moon J.; Fay, Patrick; Nakamura, Shuji; DenBaars, Steven P.; Mishra, Umesh K.; Keller, Stacia

    2017-05-01

    In this study, the growth of high quality N-polar InGaN films by metalorganic chemical vapor deposition is presented with a focus on growth process optimization for high indium compositions and the structural and tunneling properties of such films. Uniform InGaN/GaN multiple quantum well stacks with indium compositions up to 0.46 were grown with local compositional analysis performed by energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy within a scanning transmission electron microscope. Bright room-temperature photoluminescence up to 600 nm was observed for films with indium compositions up to 0.35. To study the tunneling behavior of the InGaN layers, N-polar GaN/In0.35Ga0.65N/GaN tunnel diodes were fabricated which reached a maximum current density of 1.7 kA/cm2 at 5 V reverse bias. Temperature-dependent measurements are presented and confirm tunneling behavior under reverse bias.

  19. Electron mobility of two-dimensional electron gas in InGaN heterostructures: Effects of alloy disorder and random dipole scatterings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoshino, Tomoki; Mori, Nobuya

    2018-04-01

    InGaN has a smaller electron effective mass and is expected to be used as a channel material for high-electron-mobility transistors. However, it is an alloy semiconductor with a random distribution of atoms, which introduces additional scattering mechanisms: alloy disorder and random dipole scatterings. In this work, we calculate the electron mobility in InGaN- and GaN-channel high-electron-mobility transistors (HEMTs) while taking into account acoustic deformation potential, polar optical phonon, alloy disorder, and random dipole scatterings. For InGaN-channel HEMTs, we find that not only alloy disorder but also random dipole scattering has a strong impact on the electron mobility and it significantly decreases as the In mole fraction of the channel increases. Our calculation also shows that the channel thickness w dependence of the mobility is rather weak when w > 1 nm for In0.1Ga0.9N-channel HEMTs.

  20. A Simulation-Based LED Design Project in Photonics Instruction Based on Industry-University Collaboration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, S. -H.; Chen, M. -L.; Kuo, Y. -K.; Shen, Y. -C.

    2011-01-01

    In response to the growing industrial demand for light-emitting diode (LED) design professionals, based on industry-university collaboration in Taiwan, this paper develops a novel instructional approach: a simulation-based learning course with peer assessment to develop students' professional skills in LED design as required by industry as well as…

  1. Spin relaxation in InGaN quantum disks in GaN nanowires

    KAUST Repository

    Banerjee, Animesh; Dog,; Heo, Junseok; Manchon, Aurelien; Guo, Wei; Bhattacharya, Pallab K.

    2011-01-01

    The spin relaxation time of photoinduced conduction electrons has been measured in InGaN quantum disks in GaN nanowires as a function of temperature and In composition in the disks. The relaxation times are of the order of ∼100 ps at 300 K and are weakly dependent on temperature. Theoretical considerations show that the Elliott-Yafet scattering mechanism is essentially absent in these materials and the results are interpreted in terms of the D'yakonov-Perel' relaxation mechanism in the presence of Rashba spin-orbit coupling of the wurtzite structure. The calculated spin relaxation times are in good agreement with the measured values. © 2011 American Chemical Society.

  2. Spin relaxation in InGaN quantum disks in GaN nanowires

    KAUST Repository

    Banerjee, Animesh

    2011-12-14

    The spin relaxation time of photoinduced conduction electrons has been measured in InGaN quantum disks in GaN nanowires as a function of temperature and In composition in the disks. The relaxation times are of the order of ∼100 ps at 300 K and are weakly dependent on temperature. Theoretical considerations show that the Elliott-Yafet scattering mechanism is essentially absent in these materials and the results are interpreted in terms of the D\\'yakonov-Perel\\' relaxation mechanism in the presence of Rashba spin-orbit coupling of the wurtzite structure. The calculated spin relaxation times are in good agreement with the measured values. © 2011 American Chemical Society.

  3. Implementation Opportunities of Green Accounting for Activity-Based Costing (ABC in Romania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sorinel Capusneanu

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available This article refers to implementation opportunities of green accounting for the Activity- Based Costing method. It shows why we choose Activity-Based Costing method and what must be done in this way. Green accounting observes the specific principles of the Activity-Based Costing method. It also represents the advantages and disadvantages of the green accounting into an enterprise in case of Activity-Based Costing implementation. The paper describes the stages we must follow in case of implementation of green accounting alongside Activity-Based Costing method into an enterprise.

  4. Hole transport in c-plane InGaN-based green laser diodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheng, Yang; Liu, Jianping, E-mail: jpliu2010@sinano.ac.cn; Tian, Aiqin; Zhang, Feng; Feng, Meixin; Hu, Weiwei; Zhang, Shuming; Ikeda, Masao; Li, Deyao; Zhang, Liqun; Yang, Hui [Key Lab of Nanodevices and Applications, Suzhou Institute of Nano-Tech and Nano-Bionics, Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS), Suzhou 215123 (China); School of Nano Technology and Nano Bionics, University of Science and Technology of China, Suzhou 215123 (China)

    2016-08-29

    Hole transport in c-plane InGaN-based green laser diodes (LDs) has been investigated by both simulations and experiments. It is found that holes can overflow from the green double quantum wells (DQWs) at high current density, which reduces carrier injection efficiency of c-plane InGaN-based green LDs. A heavily silicon-doped layer right below the green DQWs can effectively suppress hole overflow from the green DQWs.

  5. Fuzzy Axiomatic Design approach based green supplier selection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kannan, Devika; Govindan, Kannan; Rajendran, Sivakumar

    2015-01-01

    proposes a multi-criteria decision-making (MCDM) approach called Fuzzy Axiomatic Design (FAD) to select the best green supplier for Singapore-based plastic manufacturing company. At first, the environmental criteria was developed along with the traditional criteria based on the literature review......Abstract Green Supply Chain Management (GSCM) is a developing concept recently utilized by manufacturing firms of all sizes. All industries, small or large, seek improvements in the purchasing of raw materials, manufacturing, allocation, transportation efficiency, in curbing storage time, importing...... responsible in addition to being efficiently managed. A significant way to implement responsible GSCM is to reconsider, in innovative ways, the purchase and supply cycle, and a preliminary step would be to ensure that the supplier of goods successfully incorporates green criteria. Therefore, this paper...

  6. Feasibility of LED-Assisted CMOS Camera: Contrast Estimation for Laser Tattoo Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ngot Thi Pham

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Understanding the residual tattoo ink in skin after laser treatment is often critical for achieving good clinical outcomes. The current study aims to investigate the feasibility of a light-emitting diode (LED-assisted CMOS camera to estimate the relative variations in tattoo contrast after the laser treatment. Asian mice were tattooed using two color inks (black and red. The LED illumination was a separate process from the laser tattoo treatment. Images of the ink tattoos in skin were acquired under the irradiation of three different LED colors (red, green, and blue for pre- and post-treatment. The degree of contrast variation due to the treatment was calculated and compared with the residual tattoo distribution in the skin. The black tattoo demonstrated that the contrast consistently decreased after the laser treatment for all LED colors. However, the red tattoo showed that the red LED yielded an insignificant contrast whereas the green and blue LEDs induced a 30% (p < 0.001 and 26% (p < 0.01 contrast reduction between the treatment conditions, respectively. The proposed LED-assisted CMOS camera can estimate the relative variations in the image contrast before and after the laser tattoo treatment.

  7. University of Nevada Las Vegas LED Display Engineering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2010-08-31

    The primary objective of this part of the project is to develop and implement a method that compensates for the inefficiency of the green LED. The proposed engineering solution which will be the backbone of this project will be to use RGBW combination in every pixel to save energy. Two different RGBW geometrical pixel configurations will be implemented and compared against traditional LED configurations. These configurations will be analyzed for energy efficiency while keeping the quality of the display the same. Cost of the addition of white LEDs to displays along with energy cost savings will be presented and analyzed.

  8. Warm white LEDs lighting over Ra=95 and its applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobashi, Katsuya; Taguchi, Tsunemasa

    2007-02-01

    We have for the first time developed warm white LEDs lighting using a combination of near ultraviolet LED and three-band (red, green and blue) white phosphors. This LED has the average color-rendering index Ra=96. Moreover, special color-rendering index R9 (red) and R15 (face color of Japanese) are estimated to be 95 and 97, respectively. We will describe the results of evaluation on the medical lighting applications such as operation, treatment and endoscope experiments, application to the LED fashions and application to the Japanese antique art (ink painting) lighting.

  9. Occupancy-based illumination control of LED lighting systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Caicedo Fernandez, D.R.; Pandharipande, A.; Leus, G.

    2011-01-01

    Light emitting diode (LED)-based systems are considered to be the future of lighting. We consider the problem of energy-efficient illumination control of such systems. Energy-efficient system design is based on two aspects: localised information on occupancy and optimisation of dimming levels of the

  10. Effects of the number of wells on the performance of green InGaN/GaN LEDs with V-shape pits grown on Si substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Qingfeng; Zhang, Jianli; Mo, Chunlan; Wang, Xiaolan; Quan, Zhijue; Wu, Xiaoming; Pan, Shuan; Wang, Guangxu; Liu, Junlin; Jiang, Fengyi

    2018-02-01

    The effect of the number of wells on quantum efficiency and forward voltage of vertical green InGaN/GaN multiple quantum wells (MQWs) light-emitting diodes (LEDs) grown on Si substrate has been experimentally investigated. We have prepared three LED samples with 3, 5 and 7 wells. Electroluminescence measurement shows that the LED with 5 wells has the highest external quantum efficiency (EQE) and the lowest forward voltage. It is observed that V-shaped pits grow up in size and density with an increase in quantum well number by means of scan electron microscope. Due to more hole injection via V-shaped pits, a larger area ratio of pits as a result of more number of wells would bring a lower forward voltage and a higher EQE. However, besides the increasing series resistance would bring a higher forward voltage, the interface of MQWs would become rougher and deteriorate the emission efficiency when increasing the wells number.

  11. Tunable blue-green color emitting phosphors Sr{sub 3}YNa(PO{sub 4}){sub 3}F:Eu{sup 2+}, Tb{sup 3+} based on energy transfer for near-UV white LEDs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jin, Yahong, E-mail: yhjin@gdut.edu.cn; Lv, Yang; Hu, Yihua, E-mail: huyh@gdut.edu.cn; Chen, Li; Ju, Guifang; Mu, Zhongfei

    2017-05-15

    A series of Eu{sup 2+} and Tb{sup 3+} doped Sr{sub 3}YNa(PO{sub 4}){sub 3}F phosphors have been synthesized via a high temperature solid state reaction method. Eu{sup 2+} activated Sr{sub 3}YNa(PO{sub 4}){sub 3}F phosphors can be efficiently excited by light in the range of 220–420 nm, which matches well with the commercial n-UV LEDs, and show intense blue emission centered at 456 nm. The optimal doping concentration of Eu{sup 2+} is determined to be 1 mol%. The concentration quenching mechanism of Eu{sup 2+} in SYNPF host is mainly attributed to the dipole-dipole interaction. Energy transfer from Eu{sup 2+} to Tb{sup 3+} is observed when Eu{sup 2+} and Tb{sup 3+} are co-doped into Sr{sub 3}YNa(PO{sub 4}){sub 3}F host. Under excitation of 380 nm, the emission color can be varied from blue to green along with the increase of Tb{sup 3+} doping concentration. Based on decay curves, the energy transfer from the Eu{sup 2+} to Tb{sup 3+} ions is demonstrated to be a dipole–dipole mechanism. According to thermal quenching study by yoyo experiments of heating-cooling, Sr{sub 3}YNa(PO{sub 4}){sub 3}F:Eu{sup 2+}, Tb{sup 3+} shows good thermal stability. The thermal quenching mechanism is also discussed. The results indicate that as-prepared samples might be of potential application in w-LEDs.

  12. Is South Korea’s Green Job Policy Sustainable?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yeon-Mi Jung

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available South Korea’s green job policy was implemented in February 2008 as a part of low-carbon green growth policy, but has been discontinued at the present. The country’s actual energy and environmental consumption has continuously increased, and South Korean society has grown increasingly distant from sustainable development. The study constructs a theoretical framework centering on sustainable development and analyzes the process and contents of South Korea’s green job policy. We suggest four findings: First, in terms of ideology, the nation’s green job policy was based on green growth. Implemented as a strategy typical of developing countries, South Korea’s green growth was pursued as weak ecological modernization, relatively stressing economic growth and excluding citizens’ participation. Second, in terms of governance, the nation’s green job policy was led by the central government, thus nearly completely destroying existing legal and institutional infrastructures related to sustainable development. Third, South Korea’s green job policy was defined on the basis of a growth orientation and concentrated on the Four Major Rivers Restoration Project and the NPP project, both of which betrayed considerable problems from the perspective of sustainable development. Fourth, green jobs were created in traditional environmental protection and pollution reduction and therefore limited.

  13. Photoluminescence characteristics of low indium composition InGaN thin films grown on sapphire by metalorganic chemical vapor deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feng, Z.C.; Liu, W.; Chua, S.J.; Yu, J.W.; Yang, C.C.; Yang, T.R.; Zhao, J.

    2006-01-01

    The wavelength shifts in the photoluminescence (PL) from low indium composition (∼ 3%) InGaN epitaxial thin films, grown on sapphire substrates by metalorganic chemical vapour deposition, has been studied by a combination of experiment and theory. As temperature increases from 6 K, the PL peak energy red-shifts very slightly first, then blue-shifts to reach a maximum at near 100 K, and red-shifts again till room temperature. This unique PL behaviour, indicating the existence of the phase separation, is interpreted qualitatively from the spatial variation of band structure due to the In-compositional fluctuation. Theoretical calculation, based upon a model involving the band-tail states in the radiative recombination, explains the experimental data successfully

  14. Secrecy Dimming Capacity in Multi-LED PAM-Based Visible Light Communications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Byung Wook Kim

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Recently, mobile cloud computing (MCC has gained a lot of interest for researchers building the next-generation mobile applications. Because unauthorized access may cause serious problems, security and privacy with MCC have become significant issues. This paper addresses the secrecy dimming capacity of secure transmission in MCC over visible light communication (VLC channels. By obtaining the entropy-maximizing symbol probability of multiple light emitting diode- (LED- based pulse amplitude modulation (PAM, mathematical analysis of the secrecy dimming capacity of VLC was derived. Simulation results show that the secure transmission ability of multi-LED-based VLC is determined according to the number of activated LEDs and target dimming level. This can be a guideline for practical VLC-based mobile network designers intending to secure wireless transmission and to decide on the number of activated LEDs at target dimming level to operate.

  15. Application of Surface Plasmonics for Semiconductor Light-Emitting Diodes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fadil, Ahmed

    This thesis addresses the lack of an efficient semiconductor light source at green emission colours. Considering InGaN based quantum-well (QW) light-emitters and light-emitting diodes (LEDs), various ways of applying surface plasmonics and nano-patterning to improve the efficiency, are investigated....... By placing metallic thin films or nanoparticles (NPs) in the near-field of QW light-emitters, it is possible to improve their internal quantum efficiency (IQE) through the Purcell enhancement effect. It has been a general understanding that in order to achieve surface plasmon (SP) coupling with QWs......-QW coupling does not necessarily lead to emission enhancement. The findings of this work show that the scattering and absorption properties of NPs play a crucial role in determining whether the implementation will improve or degrade the optical performance. By applying these principles, a novel design...

  16. The Development of LED-Based Dental Light Using a Multiplanar Reflector Design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chi-Chang Hsieh

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A multiplanar reflector was designed to enhance the application efficiency of light-emitting diode (LED light sources that can be employed as LED-based dental lights. This study used a high-power LED developed by Nichia, that is, a single LED capable of providing a total luminous flux of 120 lm, as the primarily light source to design and develop an LED-based dental light. This LED complies with the international standards and regulations stipulated in ISO 9680:2007. The light spots produced by the prototype were rectangular, with a length of 200 mm and a width of 100 mm. These light spots achieved maximum illumination of 12,000 lux. The use of LEDs can reduce energy consumption from 50 W to 3 W, providing an energy saving of more than 90%.

  17. A review of drug delivery systems based on nanotechnology and green chemistry: green nanomedicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jahangirian H

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Hossein Jahangirian,1 Ensieh Ghasemian Lemraski,2 Thomas J Webster,1 Roshanak Rafiee-Moghaddam,3 Yadollah Abdollahi4 1Department of Chemical Engineering, Northeastern University, Boston, MA, USA; 2Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Ilam University, Ilam, Iran; 3School of Chemical Sciences and Food Technology, Faculty of Science and Technology, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, Selangor, 4Department of Electrical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, University of Malaysia, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia Abstract: This review discusses the impact of green and environmentally safe chemistry on the field of nanotechnology-driven drug delivery in a new field termed “green nanomedicine”. Studies have shown that among many examples of green nanotechnology-driven drug delivery systems, those receiving the greatest amount of attention include nanometal particles, polymers, and biological materials. Furthermore, green nanodrug delivery systems based on environmentally safe chemical reactions or using natural biomaterials (such as plant extracts and microorganisms are now producing innovative materials revolutionizing the field. In this review, the use of green chemistry design, synthesis, and application principles and eco-friendly synthesis techniques with low side effects are discussed. The review ends with a description of key future efforts that must ensue for this field to continue to grow. Keywords: green chemistry, cancer, drug delivery, nanoparticle

  18. SILAR-Based Application of Various Nanopillars on GaN-Based LED to Enhance Light-Extraction Efficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. C. Shei

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We reported the various nanopillars on GaN-based LED to enhance light-extraction efficiency prepared by successive ionic layer adsorption and reaction method (SILAR. Indium tin oxide (ITO with thickness of 1 μm as transparent contact layer was grown to improve the electrical characteristics of the LEDs, including series resistance and operating voltage. SILAR-deposition ZnO nanoparticles on SiO2 were used as etching nanomasks. Multiple nanopillars were simultaneously formed on overall surfaces of ITO p- and n-GaN by ICP etching. The proposed GaN-based LEDs with nanopillars increase light output power by 7%–20.3% (at 20 mA over that of regular GaN-based LEDs. The difference in light output power can be attributed to differences in materials and shapes of nanopillars, resulting in a reduction in Fresnel reflection by the roughened surface of GaN-based LEDs.

  19. The study of LED light source illumination conditions for ideal algae cultivation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Chun-Chin; Huang, Chien-Fu; Chen, Cin-Fu; Yue, Cheng-Feng

    2017-02-01

    Utilizing LED light source modules with 3 different RGB colors, the illumination effect of different wavelengths had been investigated on the growth curve of the same kind of micro algae. It was found that the best micro algae culturing status came out with long wavelength light such as red light (650 670 nm). Based on the same condition for a period of 3 weeks , the grown micro algae population density ratio represented by Optical Density (O.D.) ratio is 1?0.4?0.7 corresponding to growth with Red, Green, Blue light sources, respectively. Mixing 3 types and 2 types of LEDs with different parameters, the grown micro algae population densities were compared in terms of O.D. Interestingly enough, different light sources resulted in significant discoloration on micro algae growth, appearing yellow, brown, green, etc. Our experiments results showed such discoloration effect is reversible. Based on the same lighting condition, micro algae growth can be also affected by incubator size, nutrition supply, and temperature variation. In recent years, micro algae related technologies have been international wise a hot topic of energy and environmental protection for research and development institutes, and big energy companies among those developed countries. There will be an economically prosperous future. From this study of LED lighting to ideal algae cultivation, it was found that such built system would be capable of optimizing artificial cultivation system, leading to economic benefits for its continuous development. Since global warming causing weather change, accompanying with reducing energy sources and agriculture growth shortage are all threatening human being survival.

  20. Recent developments in white light emitting diodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lohe, P. P.; Nandanwar, D. V.; Belsare, P. D.; Moharil, S. V.

    2018-05-01

    In the recent years solid state lighting based on LEDs has revolutionized lighting technology. LEDs have many advantages over the conventional lighting based on fluorescent and incandescent lamps such as mercury free, high conversion efficiency of electrical energy into light, long lifetime reliability and ability to use with many types of devices. LEDs have emerged as a new potentially revolutionary technology that could save up to half of energy used for lighting applications. White LEDs would be the most important light source in the future, so much so that this aspect had been highlighted by the Nobel committee during the award of 2014 Nobel Prize for Physics. Recent advancement in the fabrication of GaN chip capable of emitting in blue and near UV region paved way for fabrication of white LED lamps. Mainly there are two approaches used for preparing white emitting solid state lamp. In the first approach blue light (λ=450 nm) emitted from the InGaN LED chip is partially absorbed by the YAG:Ce3+ phosphor coated on it and re-emitted as yellow fluorescence. A white light can be generated by the combination of blue + yellow emission bands. These lamps are already available. But they are suffering from major drawback that their Colour Rendering Index (CRI) is low. In the second approach, white LEDs are made by coating near ultraviolet emitting (360 to 410nm) LED with a mixture of high efficiency red, green and blue emitting phosphors, analogous to the fluorescent lamp. This method yields lamps with better color rendition. Addition of a yellow emitting phosphor improves CRI further. However conversion efficiency is compromised to some extent. Further the cost of near UV emitting chip is very high compared to blue emitting chips. Thus cost and light output wise, near UV chips are much inferior to blue chips. Recently some rare earth activated oxynitrides, silicates, fluorides have emerged as an important family of luminescent materials for white LED application

  1. InN/GaN short-period superlattices as ordered InGaN ternary alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kusakabe, Kazuhide; Imai, Daichi; Wang, Ke; Yoshikawa, Akihiko

    2016-01-01

    Coherent (InN) 1 /(GaN) n short-period superlattices (SPSs) were successfully grown through dynamic atomic layer epitaxy (D-ALEp) mode by RF-plasma molecular beam epitaxy (MBE), where GaN layer thicknesses n were thinned down to 4 monolayer (ML). After this achievement, we demonstrated quasi-ternary InGaN behavior in their photoluminescence (PL) spectra for the first time. It was found interestingly that GaN layer thickness of n = 4 ML was the criterion both for structural control and continuum-band formation. Although highly lattice-mismatched InN/GaN interfaces easily introduce relaxation in (InN) 1 /(GaN) 4 SPSs during growth depending on the dynamic surface stoichiometry condition, this problem was overcome by precise control/removal of fluid-like residual In/Ga metals on the growth front with in-situ monitoring method. The (InN) 1 /(GaN) n SPSs with n ≥ 7 ML showed a constant PL peak energy around 3.2 eV at 12 K, reflecting discrete electron/hole wavefunctions. On the other hand, the (InN) 1 /(GaN) 4 SPSs indicated the red-shifted PL peak at 2.93 eV at 12 K, which was attributed to the continuum-band state with increasing in the overlap of electrons/hole wavefunctions. This result is concluded that the (InN) 1 /(GaN) 4 SPSs can be considered as ordered InGaN alloys. (copyright 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  2. Efficient conceptual design for LED-based pixel light vehicle headlamps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Held, Marcel Philipp; Lachmayer, Roland

    2017-12-01

    High-resolution vehicle headlamps represent a future-oriented technology that can be used to increase traffic safety and driving comfort. As a further development to the current Matrix Beam headlamps, LED-based pixel light systems enable ideal lighting functions (e.g. projection of navigation information onto the road) to be activated in any given driving scenario. Moreover, compared to other light-modulating elements such as DMDs and LCDs, instantaneous LED on-off toggling provides a decisive advantage in efficiency. To generate highly individualized light distributions for automotive applications, a number of approaches using an LED array may be pursued. One approach is to vary the LED density in the array so as to output the desired light distribution. Another notable approach makes use of an equidistant arrangement of the individual LEDs together with distortion optics to formulate the desired light distribution. The optical system adjusts the light distribution in a manner that improves resolution and increases luminous intensity of the desired area. An efficient setup for pixel generation calls for one lens per LED. Taking into consideration the limited space requirements of the system, this implies that the luminous flux, efficiency and resolution image parameters are primarily controlled by the lens dimensions. In this paper a concept for an equidistant LED array arrangement utilizing distortion optics is presented. The paper is divided into two parts. The first part discusses the influence of lens geometry on the system efficiency whereas the second part investigates the correlation between resolution and luminous flux based on the lens dimensions.

  3. Evaluation of growth, cell size and biomass of Isochrysis aff. galbana (T-ISO with two LED regimes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel Victor Cordoba-Matson

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available In contrast to crops, there are fewer studies using LED-based light with green microalgae and none cultivating the microalga Isochrysis aff. galbana (T-ISO even though of its importance in marine aquaculture. The objective was to evaluate of white and red LEDs as an alternative source of light to cultivate I. aff. galbana (T-ISO. In order to carry this out white and red LEDs were used with a laboratory built Erlenmeyer-type photobioreactor to determine productivity, cell number and size and biomass composition. Results were compared with standard fluorescent lights of the same light intensity. The culture system consisted of 3 flasks for applying red LEDs and three for white LEDs and 3 control group flasks illuminated with the normal fluorescent lighting at the similar light intensity of ~60 mM m–2 s–1. It was found that the population cell density did not significantly increase with either red LEDs or white LEDs (p > 0.05, if at all. Standard fluorescent lighting (control group showed significant increases in population cell number (p < 0.05. Through microscopic observation cell size was found to be smaller for white LEDS and even smaller for red LEDs compared to fluorescent lighting. Biochemical composition of proteins, carbohydrates and lipids was similar for all light regimes. The authors suggest that the unexpected non-growth I. aff. galbana (T-ISO, a haptophyte microalga, with white and red LEDs is possibly due to fact that to initiate cell growth this microalgae requires other wavelengths (possibly green besides red and blue, to allow other pigments, probably fucoxanthin, to capture light

  4. A self-calibrating led-based solar test platform

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krebs, Frederik C; Sylvester-Hvid, Kristian O.; Jørgensen, Mikkel

    2011-01-01

    A compact platform for testing solar cells is presented. The light source comprises a multi-wavelength high-power LED (light emitting diode) array allowing the homogenous illumination of small laboratory solar cell devices (substrate size 50 × 25 mm) within the 390–940 nm wavelength range......, it is possible to perform all the commonly employed measurements on the solar cell at very high speed without moving the sample. In particular, the LED-based illumination system provides an alternative to light-biased incident photon-to-current efficiency measurement to be performed which we demonstrate. Both...

  5. The characterization of an economic and portable LED-based photoacoustic imaging system to facilitate molecular imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Hariri

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Photoacoustic imaging (PAI is a non-invasive, high-resolution hybrid imaging modality that combines optical excitation and ultrasound detection. PAI can image endogenous chromophores (melanin, hemoglobin, etc. and exogenous contrast agents in different medical applications. However, most current equipment uses sophisticated and complicated OPO lasers with tuning and stability features inconsistent with broad clinical deployment. As the number of applications of PAI in medicine increases, there is an urgent need to make the imaging equipment more compact, portable, and affordable. Here, portable light emitting diode – based photoacoustic imaging (PLED-PAI was introduced and characterized in terms of system specifications, light source characterizations, photoacoustic spatial/temporal resolution, and penetration. The system uses two LED arrays attached to the sides of a conventional ultrasound transducer. The LED pulse repetition rate is tunable between 1 K Hz, 2 K Hz, 3 K Hz, and 4 K Hz. The axial resolution was 0.268 mm, and the lateral resolution was between 0.55 and 0.59 mm. The system could detect optical absorber (pencil lead at a depth of 3.2 cm and the detection limits of indocyanine green (ICG and methylene blue (MB were 9 μM and 0.78 mM. In vivo imaging of labeled human mesenchymal stem cells was achieved to confirm compatibility with small animal imaging. The characterization we report here may have value to other groups evaluating commercially available photoacoustic imaging equipment. Keywords: Portable photoacoustic imaging, LED, Optoacoustic imaging, Molecular imaging

  6. Light Emitting Diode (LED) circular traffic signal lifetime management system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-01

    The objective of this research is to build lifetime curves for red, yellow, and green LED circular traffic signals through 20,000-hr. accelerated stress testing of samples operating under Louisianas environmental conditions.

  7. Phototaxis of Propsilocerus akamusi (Diptera: Chironomidae) From a Shallow Eutrophic Lake in Response to Led Lamps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirabayashi, Kimio; Nagai, Yoshinari; Mushya, Tetsuya; Higashino, Makoto; Taniguchi, Yoshio

    2017-06-01

    A study on the attraction of adult Propsilocerus akamusi midges to different-colored light traps was carried out from October 21 to November 15, 2013. The 6 colored lights used in light-emitting diode (LED) lamps were white, green, red, blue, amber, and ultraviolet (UV). The UV lamp attracted the most P. akamusi, followed by green, white, blue, amber, and red. A white pulsed LED light attracted only half the number of midges as did a continuous-emission white LED light. The result indicated that manipulation of light color, considering that the red LED light and/or pulsed LED light are not as attractive as the other colors, may be appropriate for the development of an overall integrated strategy to control nuisance P. akamusi in the Lake Suwa area.

  8. Daylight integrated illumination control of LED systems based on enhanced presence sensing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pandharipande, A.; Caicedo Fernandez, D.R.

    2011-01-01

    Light emitting diodes (LEDs) are considered to become the dominant source of illumination in the future, offering long life times, energy efficiency and flexible tunability. The flexibility of adapting LED parameters offers multiple degrees of freedom in designing LED based lighting systems. In this

  9. Optically pumped quantum-dot Cd(Zn)Se/ZnSe laser and microchip converter for yellow-green spectral region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lutsenko, E V; Voinilovich, A G; Rzheutskii, N V; Pavlovskii, V N; Yablonskii, G P; Sorokin, S V; Gronin, S V; Sedova, I V; Kop' ev, Petr S; Ivanov, Sergei V; Alanzi, M; Hamidalddin, A; Alyamani, A

    2013-05-31

    The room temperature laser generation in the yellow-green ({lambda} = 558.5-566.7 nm) spectral range has been demonstrated under optical pumping by a pulsed nitrogen laser of Cd(Zn)Se/ZnSe quantum dot heterostructures. The maximum achieved laser wavelength was as high as {lambda} = 566.7 nm at a laser cavity length of 945 {mu}m. High values of both the output pulsed power (up to 50 W) and the external differential quantum efficiency ({approx}60%) were obtained at a cavity length of 435 {mu}m. Both a high quality of the laser heterostructure and a low lasing threshold ({approx}2 kW cm{sup -2}) make it possible to use a pulsed InGaN laser diode as a pump source. A laser microchip converter based on this heterostructure has demonstrated a maximum output pulse power of {approx}90 mW at {lambda} = 560 nm. The microchip converter was placed in a standard TO-18 (5.6 mm in diameter) laser diode package. (semiconductor lasers. physics and technology)

  10. Projecting LED product life based on application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narendran, Nadarajah; Liu, Yi-wei; Mou, Xi; Thotagamuwa, Dinusha R.; Eshwarage, Oshadhi V. Madihe

    2016-09-01

    LED products have started to displace traditional light sources in many lighting applications. One of the commonly claimed benefits for LED lighting products is their long useful lifetime in applications. Today there are many replacement lamp products using LEDs in the marketplace. Typically, lifetime claims of these replacement lamps are in the 25,000-hour range. According to current industry practice, the time for the LED light output to reach the 70% value is estimated according to IESNA LM-80 and TM-21 procedures and the resulting value is reported as the whole system life. LED products generally experience different thermal environments and switching (on-off cycling) patterns when used in applications. Current industry test methods often do not produce accurate lifetime estimates for LED systems because only one component of the system, namely the LED, is tested under a continuous-on burning condition without switching on and off, and because they estimate for only one failure type, lumen depreciation. The objective of the study presented in this manuscript was to develop a test method that could help predict LED system life in any application by testing the whole LED system, including on-off power cycling with sufficient dwell time, and considering both failure types, catastrophic and parametric. The study results showed for the LED A-lamps tested in this study, both failure types, catastrophic and parametric, exist. The on-off cycling encourages catastrophic failure, and maximum operating temperature influences the lumen depreciation rate and parametric failure time. It was also clear that LED system life is negatively affected by on-off switching, contrary to commonly held belief. In addition, the study results showed that most of the LED systems failed catastrophically much ahead of the LED light output reaching the 70% value. This emphasizes the fact that life testing of LED systems must consider catastrophic failure in addition to lumen depreciation, and

  11. Energy-Saving Tunnel Illumination System Based on LED's Intelligent Control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo Shanshan; Wu Lan; Gu Hanting; Jiang Shuixiu

    2011-01-01

    At present there is a lot of electric energy wastage in tunnel illumination, whose design is based on the maximum brightness outside and the maximum vehicle speed all year round. LED's energy consumption is low, and the control of its brightness is simple and effective. It can be quickly adjusted between 0-100% of its maximum brightness, and will not affect the service life. Therefore, using LED as tunnel's illumination source, we can achieve a good energy saving effect. According to real-time data acquisition of vehicle speed, traffic flow and brightness outside the tunnel, the auto real-time control of tunnel illumination can be achieved. And the system regulated the LED luminance by means of combination of LED power module and intelligent control module. The tunnel information was detected by inspection equipments, which included luminometer, vehicle detector, and received by RTU(Remote Terminal Unit), then synchronously transmitted to PC. After data processing, RTU emitted the dimming signal to the LED driver to adjust the brightness of LED. Despite the relatively high cost of high-power LED lights, the enormous energy-saving effect and the well-behaved controllability is beyond compare to other lighting devices.

  12. Continuous light-emitting Diode (LED) lighting for improving food quality

    OpenAIRE

    Lu, C; Bian, Z

    2016-01-01

    Lighting-emitting diodes (LEDs) have shown great potential for plant growth and development, with higher luminous efficiency and positive impact compared with other artificial lighting. The combined effects of red/blue or/and green, and white LED light on plant growth and physiology, including chlorophyll fluorescence, nitrate content and phytochemical concentration before harvest, were investigated. The results showed that continuous light (CL)\\ud exposure at pre-harvest can effectively redu...

  13. Molecular dynamics studies of InGaN growth on nonpolar (11 2 \\xAF0 ) GaN surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, K.; Gruber, J.; Zhou, X. W.; Jones, R. E.; Lee, S. R.; Tucker, G. J.

    2018-01-01

    We have performed direct molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of heteroepitaxial vapor deposition of I nxG a1 -xN films on nonpolar (11 2 ¯0 ) wurtzite-GaN surfaces to investigate strain relaxation by misfit-dislocation formation. The simulated growth is conducted on an atypically large scale by sequentially injecting nearly a million individual vapor-phase atoms towards a fixed GaN substrate. We apply time-and-position-dependent boundary constraints to affect the appropriate environments for the vapor phase, the near-surface solid phase, and the bulklike regions of the growing layer. The simulations employ a newly optimized Stillinger-Weber In-Ga-N system interatomic potential wherein multiple binary and ternary structures are included in the underlying density-functional theory and experimental training sets to improve the treatment of the In-Ga-N related interactions. To examine the effect of growth conditions, we study a matrix of 63 different MD-growth simulations spanning seven I nxG a1 -xN -alloy compositions ranging from x =0.0 to x =0.8 and nine growth temperatures above half the simulated melt temperature. We found a composition dependent temperature range where all kinetically trapped defects were eliminated, leaving only quasiequilibrium misfit and threading dislocations present in the simulated films. Based on the MD results obtained in this temperature range, we observe the formation of interfacial misfit and threading dislocation arrays with morphologies strikingly close to those seen in experiments. In addition, we compare the MD-observed thickness-dependent onset of misfit-dislocation formation to continuum-elasticity-theory models of the critical thickness and find reasonably good agreement. Finally, we use the three-dimensional atomistic details uniquely available in the MD-growth histories to directly observe the nucleation of dislocations at surface pits in the evolving free surface.

  14. Illumination sensing in LED lighting systems based on frequency-division multiplexing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yang, Hongming; Bergmans, J.W.M.; Schenk, T.C.W.

    2009-01-01

    Recently, light emitting diode (LED) based illumination systems have attracted considerable research interest. Such systems normally consist of a large number of LEDs. In order to facilitate the control of such high-complexity system, a novel signal processing application, namely illumination

  15. System Reliability for LED-Based Products

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davis, J Lynn; Mills, Karmann; Lamvik, Michael; Yaga, Robert; Shepherd, Sarah D; Bittle, James; Baldasaro, Nick; Solano, Eric; Bobashev, Georgiy; Johnson, Cortina; Evans, Amy

    2014-04-07

    Results from accelerated life tests (ALT) on mass-produced commercially available 6” downlights are reported along with results from commercial LEDs. The luminaires capture many of the design features found in modern luminaires. In general, a systems perspective is required to understand the reliability of these devices since LED failure is rare. In contrast, components such as drivers, lenses, and reflector are more likely to impact luminaire reliability than LEDs.

  16. Evaluation of enamel by scanning electron microscopy green LED associated to hydrogen peroxide 35% for dental bleaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monteiro, Juliana S. C.; de Oliveira, Susana C. P. S.; Zanin, Fátima A. A.; Santos, Gustavo M. P.; Sampaio, Fernando J. P.; Gomes Júnior, Rafael Araújo; Gesteira, Maria F. M.; Vannier-Santos, Marcos A.; Pinheiro, Antônio Luiz B.

    2014-02-01

    Dental bleaching is a frequently requested procedure in clinical dental practice. The literature is contradictory regarding the effects of bleaching agents on both morphology and demineralization of enamel after bleaching. The aim of this study was to analyze by SEM the effect of 35% neutral hydrogen peroxide cured by green LED. Buccal surfaces of 15 pre-molars were sectioned and marked with a central groove to allow experimental and control groups on the same specimen. For SEM, 75 electron micrographs were evaluated by tree observers at 43X, 220X and 1000X. Quantitative analysis for the determination of the surface elemental composition of the samples through X-ray microanalysis by SEM was also performed. The protocol tested neither showed significant changes in mineral composition of the samples nor to dental enamel structure when compared to controls. SEM analysis allowed inferring that there were marked morphological differences between the enamel samples highlighting the need for the use of the same tooth in comparative morphological studies. The tested protocol did not cause morphological damage the enamel surface when compared to their respective controls.

  17. Generation of solar spectrum by using LEDs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Pengzhi; Yang, Hua; Pei, Yanrong; Li, Jing; Xue, Bin; Wang, Junxi; Li, Jinmin

    2016-09-01

    Light emitting diode (LED) has been recognized as an applicable light source for indoor and outdoor lighting, city beautifying, landscape facilities, and municipal engineering etc. Conventional LED has superior characteristics such as long life time, low power consumption, high contrast, and wide viewing angle. Recently, LED with high color-rendering index and special spectral characteristics has received more and more attention. This paper is intended to report a solar spectrum simulated by multichip LED light source. The typical solar spectrum of 5500k released by CIE was simulated as a reference. Four types of LEDs with different spectral power distributions would be used in the LED light source, which included a 430nm LED, a 480nm LED, a 500nm LED and a white LED. In order to obtain better simulation results, the white LED was achieved by a 450nm LED chip with the mixture of phosphor. The phosphor combination was prepared by mixing green phosphor, yellow phosphor and red phosphor in a certain proportion. The multichip LED light source could provide a high fidelity spectral match with the typical solar spectrum of 5500k by adjusting injection current to each device. The luminous flux, CIE chromaticity coordinate x, y, CCT, and Ra were 104.7 lm, 0.3337, 0.3681, 5460K, and 88.6, respectively. Because of high color-rendering index and highly match to the solar spectrum, the multichip LED light source is a competitive candidate for applications where special spectral is required, such as colorimetric measurements, visual inspection, gemstone identification and agriculture.

  18. Microscopic investigations of the optical and structural properties of nonpolar InGaN MQWs on a-plane GaN ELOG structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schwarz, Torsten; Bastek, Barbara; Hempel, Thomas; Veit, Peter; Christen, Juergen [Institute of Experimental Physics, Otto-von-Guericke-University Magdeburg (Germany); Wernicke, Tim; Weyers, Markus [Ferdinand-Braun-Institut fuer Hoechstfrequenztechnik, Berlin (Germany); Kneissl, Michael [Ferdinand-Braun-Institut fuer Hoechstfrequenztechnik, Berlin (Germany); Institute of Solid State Physics, Technical University Berlin (Germany)

    2010-07-01

    We present the optical and structural properties of InGaN MQWs which were grown by MOVPE on fully coalesced lateral epitaxially overgrown (ELOG) a-plane GaN on r-plane sapphire substrate and stripe masks orientated in the [0110] direction. Photoluminescence (PL) measurements exhibit a strong emission from the InGaN MQW at 3.109 eV at 4 K dominating the GaN (D{sup 0},X) emission at 3.488 eV by two orders of magnitude. The emission from basal plane stacking faults (BSF) was even more suppressed. Transmission electron microscopy showed a drastic reduction of the BSF in the lateral overgrown area (I) compared to the area of coherent growth (II). {mu}-PL and highly spatially resolved cathodoluminescence (CL) measurements revealed an intensity increase of the MQW emission by a factor of two for the defect reduced region (I) compared to the defective region (II). Also a blue shift by 20 meV of the MQW peak emission wavelength in the area (I) in comparison with defective area (II) was observed.

  19. Bright infrared LEDs based on colloidal quantum-dots

    KAUST Repository

    Sun, Liangfeng; Choi, Joshua J.; Stachnik, David; Bartnik, Adam C.; Hyun, Byung-Ryool; Malliaras, George G.; Hanrath, Tobias; Wise, Frank W.

    2013-01-01

    Record-brightness infrared LEDs based on colloidal quantum-dots have been achieved through control of the spacing between adjacent quantum-dots. By tuning the size of quantum-dots, the emission wavelengths can be tuned between 900nm and 1650nm. © 2013 Materials Research Society.

  20. LED-Based High-Voltage Lines Warning System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eldar MUSA

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available LED-based system, running with the current of high-voltage lines and converting the current flowing through the line into the light by using a toroid transformer, has been developed. The transformer’s primary winding is constituted by the high voltage power line. Toroidal core consists of two equal parts and the secondary windings are evenly placed on these two parts. The system is mounted on the high-voltage lines as a clamp. The secondary winding ends are connected in series by the connector on the clamp. LEDs are supplied by the voltage at the ends of secondary. Current flowing through highvoltage transmission lines is converted to voltage by the toroidal transformer and the light emitting LEDs are supplied with this voltage. The theory of the conversion of the current flowing through the line into the light is given. The system, running with the current of the line and converting the current into the light, has been developed. System has many application areas such as warning high voltage lines (warning winches to not hinder the high-voltage lines when working under the lines, warning planes to not touch the high-voltage lines, remote measurement of high-voltage line currents, and local illumination of the line area

  1. Flat-panel video resolution LED display system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wareberg, P. G.; Kennedy, D. I.

    The system consists of a 128 x 128 element X-Y addressable LED array fabricated from green-emitting gallium phosphide. The LED array is interfaced with a 128 x 128 matrix TV camera. Associated electronics provides for seven levels of grey scale above zero with a grey scale ratio of square root of 2. Picture elements are on 0.008 inch centers resulting in a resolution of 125 lines-per-inch and a display area of approximately 1 sq. in. The LED array concept lends itself to modular construction, permitting assembly of a flat panel screen of any desired size from 1 x 1 inch building blocks without loss of resolution. A wide range of prospective aerospace applications exist extending from helmet-mounted systems involving small dedicated arrays to multimode cockpit displays constructed as modular screens. High-resolution LED arrays are already used as CRT replacements in military film-marking reconnaissance applications.

  2. GaN-based micro-LED arrays on flexible substrates for optical cochlear implants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goßler, Christian; Bierbrauer, Colin; Moser, Rüdiger; Kunzer, Michael; Holc, Katarzyna; Pletschen, Wilfried; Köhler, Klaus; Wagner, Joachim; Schwarz, Ulrich T; Schwaerzle, Michael; Ruther, Patrick; Paul, Oliver; Neef, Jakob; Keppeler, Daniel; Hoch, Gerhard; Moser, Tobias

    2014-01-01

    Currently available cochlear implants are based on electrical stimulation of the spiral ganglion neurons. Optical stimulation with arrays of micro-sized light-emitting diodes (µLEDs) promises to increase the number of distinguishable frequencies. Here, the development of a flexible GaN-based micro-LED array as an optical cochlear implant is reported for application in a mouse model. The fabrication of 15 µm thin and highly flexible devices is enabled by a laser-based layer transfer process of the GaN-LEDs from sapphire to a polyimide-on-silicon carrier wafer. The fabricated 50 × 50 µm 2 LEDs are contacted via conducting paths on both p- and n-sides of the LEDs. Up to three separate channels could be addressed. The probes, composed of a linear array of the said µLEDs bonded to the flexible polyimide substrate, are peeled off the carrier wafer and attached to flexible printed circuit boards. Probes with four µLEDs and a width of 230 µm are successfully implanted in the mouse cochlea both in vitro and in vivo. The LEDs emit 60 µW at 1 mA after peel-off, corresponding to a radiant emittance of 6 mW mm −2 . (paper)

  3. InGaN/GaN Nanowire LEDs and Lasers

    KAUST Repository

    Zhao, Chao

    2016-01-01

    The large specific surface, and the associated high density of surface states was found to limit the light output power and quantum efficiency of nanowire-array devices, despite their potential for addressing the “green-gap” and efficiency-droop issues. The phonon and carrier confinement in nanowires also led to junction heating, and reduced heat dissipation. In this paper, we will present our studies on effective surface states passivation in InGaN/GaN quantum-disks (Qdisks)-in-nanowire light-emitting diodes (LEDs) and lasers grown on silicon (Si), as well as our recent work on nanowires LEDs grown on bulk-metal, a non-conventional substrate.

  4. Downstream-based Scheduling for Energy Conservation in Green EPONs

    KAUST Repository

    Chen, Shen

    2012-05-01

    Maximizing the optical network unit’s (ONU) sleep time is an effective approach for achieving maximum energy conservation in green Ethernet passive optical networks (EPONs). While overlapping downstream and upstream ONU transmissions can maximize the ONU sleep time, it jeopardizes the quality of service (QoS) performance of the network, especially for downstream traffic in case the overlapping is based on the upstream time slot. In this paper, we study the downstream traffic performance in green EPONs under the limited service discipline and the upstream-based overlapped time window. Specifically, we first derive the expected mean packet delay, and then present a closed-form expression of the ONU sleep time, setting identical upstream/downstream transmission cycle times based on a maximum downstream traffic delay re-quirement. With the proposed system model, we present a novel downstream bandwidth allocation scheme for energy conservation in green EPONs. Simulation results verify the proposed model and highlight the advantages of our scheme over conventional approaches.

  5. Fluorescein isothiocyanate and rhodamine B dye encapsulated mesoporous SiO2 for applications of blue LED excited white LED

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Sourav; Manam, J.

    2018-05-01

    In this work, the fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) and rhodamine B (RhB) dyes were encapsulated in mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSNp). The MSNp-FITC-RhB nanohybrids phosphor showed a dichromatic PL emission at green region and orange region when excited at 460 nm. A Forster Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET) was observed from FITC to RhB. The materials were further characterized by XRD, FTIR, TEM, and temperature dependent photoluminescence. The CIE coordinates were tuned from greenish yellow to the orange region and quantum yield was reached 52.04% based on FRET. So by combining the MSNp-FITC-RhB nanohybrids phosphor with the blue LED chip, the white light emission with flexible Color Correlated Temperature and improved Color Rendering Index can be obtained.

  6. 130 LPW 1000 Lm Warm White LED for Illumination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soer, Wouter [Philips Lumileds Lighting Company LLC, San Jose, CA (United States)

    2012-12-21

    An illumination-grade warm-white LED, having correlated color temperature (CCT) between 2700 and 3500 K and capable of producing 1000 lm output at over 130 lm/W at room temperature, has been developed in this program. The high-power warm-white LED is an ideal source for use in indoor and outdoor lighting applications. Over the two year period, we have made the following accomplishments: • Developed a low-cost high-power white LED package and commercialized a series of products with CCT ranging from 2700 to 5700 K under the product name LUXEON M; • Demonstrated a record efficacy of 124.8 lm/W at a flux of 1023 lm, CCT of 3435 K and color rendering index (CRI) over 80 at room temperature in the productized package; • Demonstrated a record efficacy of 133.1 lm/W at a flux of 1015 lm, CCT of 3475 K and CRI over 80 at room temperature in an R&D package. The new high-power LED package is a die-on-ceramic surface mountable LED package. It has four 2 mm2 InGaN pump dice, flip-chip attached to a ceramic submount in a 2x2 array configuration. The submount design utilizes a design approach that combines a high-thermal- conductivity ceramic core for die attach and a low-cost and low-thermal-conductivity ceramic frame for mechanical support and as optical lens carrier. The LED package has a thermal resistance of less than 1.25 K/W. The white LED fabrication also adopts a new batch level (instead of die-by-die) phosphor deposition process with precision layer thickness and composition control, which provides not only tight color control, but also low cost. The efficacy performance goal was achieved through the progress in following key areas: (1) high-efficiency royal blue pump LED development through active region design and epitaxial growth quality improvement (funded by internal programs); (2) improvement in extraction efficiency from the LED package through improvement of InGaN-die-level and package-level optical extraction efficiency; and (3) improvement in phosphor

  7. Combining surface plasmonic and light extraction enhancement on InGaN quantum-well light-emitters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fadil, Ahmed; Ou, Yiyu; Iida, Daisuke

    2016-01-01

    and internal quantum efficiency enhancement for InGaN/GaN quantum-well light-emitters. By fabricating dielectric nano-rod pattern on the GaN surface, an optical coating that improves the light extraction is obtained, and furthermore has a low refractive index which blue-shifts the plasmonic resonance of Ag NPs......Surface plasmon coupling with light-emitters and surface nano-patterning have widely been used separately to improve low efficiency InGaN light-emitting diodes. We demonstrate a method where dielectric nano-patterning and Ag nanoparticles (NPs) are combined to provide both light extraction...

  8. Green Clustering Implementation Based on DPS-MOPSO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Lu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A green clustering implementation is proposed to be as the first method in the framework of an energy-efficient strategy for centralized enterprise high-density WLANs. Traditionally, to maintain the network coverage, all of the APs within the WLAN have to be powered on. Nevertheless, the new algorithm can power off a large proportion of APs while the coverage is maintained as the always-on counterpart. The proposed algorithm is composed of two parallel and concurrent procedures, which are the faster procedure based on K-means and the more accurate procedure based on Dynamic Population Size Multiple Objective Particle Swarm Optimization (DPS-MOPSO. To implement green clustering efficiently and accurately, dynamic population size and mutational operators are introduced as complements for the classical MOPSO. In addition to the function of AP selection, the new green clustering algorithm has another new function as the reference and guidance for AP deployment. This paper also presents simulations in scenarios modeled with ray-tracing method and FDTD technique, and the results show that about 67% up to 90% of energy consumption can be saved while the original network coverage is maintained during periods when few users are online or when the traffic load is low.

  9. Contribution Index Based on Green Building Certification Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuting Sun

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Green Building Certification Systems (GBCS are carried out in many countries due to the rising awareness of the importance of sustainability in the building industry. The intention should have motivated participants to construct and operate buildings sustainably, however, there is not yet a method developed to investigate the motivation of the participants. Based on the GBCS, this paper proposes the contribution index as a standard global method to analyze the performance of participants in the green building industry. Three contribution indices, namely Frequency Contribution Index (FCI, Intensity Contribution Index (ICI and Comprehensive Contribution Index (CCI that concern each different category of participant, have been formulated. Three further analyses based on the index were undertaken to investigate some features of the industry. A case study of Singapore was conducted to show how the contribution index could be used to extract industry patterns and trends and assess the participants’ performance in the green building industry. Interviews with experts provide some suggested applications and support for the findings.

  10. Spectral optimization simulation of white light based on the photopic eye-sensitivity curve

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dai, Qi; Hao, Luoxi; Lin, Yi; Cui, Zhe

    2016-01-01

    Spectral optimization simulation of white light is studied to boost maximum attainable luminous efficacy of radiation at high color-rendering index (CRI) and various color temperatures. The photopic eye-sensitivity curve V(λ) is utilized as the dominant portion of white light spectra. Emission spectra of a blue InGaN light-emitting diode (LED) and a red AlInGaP LED are added to the spectrum of V(λ) to match white color coordinates. It is demonstrated that at the condition of color temperature from 2500 K to 6500 K and CRI above 90, such white sources can achieve spectral efficacy of 330–390 lm/W, which is higher than the previously reported theoretical maximum values. We show that this eye-sensitivity-based approach also has advantages on component energy conversion efficiency compared with previously reported optimization solutions

  11. Spectral optimization simulation of white light based on the photopic eye-sensitivity curve

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dai, Qi, E-mail: qidai@tongji.edu.cn [College of Architecture and Urban Planning, Tongji University, 1239 Siping Road, Shanghai 200092 (China); Institute for Advanced Study, Tongji University, 1239 Siping Road, Shanghai 200092 (China); Key Laboratory of Ecology and Energy-saving Study of Dense Habitat (Tongji University), Ministry of Education, 1239 Siping Road, Shanghai 200092 (China); Hao, Luoxi; Lin, Yi; Cui, Zhe [College of Architecture and Urban Planning, Tongji University, 1239 Siping Road, Shanghai 200092 (China); Key Laboratory of Ecology and Energy-saving Study of Dense Habitat (Tongji University), Ministry of Education, 1239 Siping Road, Shanghai 200092 (China)

    2016-02-07

    Spectral optimization simulation of white light is studied to boost maximum attainable luminous efficacy of radiation at high color-rendering index (CRI) and various color temperatures. The photopic eye-sensitivity curve V(λ) is utilized as the dominant portion of white light spectra. Emission spectra of a blue InGaN light-emitting diode (LED) and a red AlInGaP LED are added to the spectrum of V(λ) to match white color coordinates. It is demonstrated that at the condition of color temperature from 2500 K to 6500 K and CRI above 90, such white sources can achieve spectral efficacy of 330–390 lm/W, which is higher than the previously reported theoretical maximum values. We show that this eye-sensitivity-based approach also has advantages on component energy conversion efficiency compared with previously reported optimization solutions.

  12. Diameter-dependent photoluminescence properties of strong phase-separated dual-wavelength InGaN/GaN nanopillar LEDs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Qiang, E-mail: qwang365@163.com [School of Science, Qilu University of Technology, Jinan, 250353 (China); School of Microelectronics, Shandong University, Jinan, 250100 (China); Ji, Ziwu, E-mail: jiziwu@sdu.edu.cn [School of Microelectronics, Shandong University, Jinan, 250100 (China); Zhou, Yufan; Wang, Xuelin [School of Physics, Shandong University, Jinan, 250100 (China); Liu, Baoli [Beijing National Laboratory for Condensed Matter Physics, Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, 100190 (China); Xu, Xiangang [Key Laboratory of Functional Crystal Materials and Device (Ministry of Education), Shandong University, Jinan, 250100 (China); Gao, Xingguo; Leng, Jiancai [School of Science, Qilu University of Technology, Jinan, 250353 (China)

    2017-07-15

    Highlights: • Nanopillar LED with smaller diameter shows a larger strain relaxation in the MQWs. • Nanopillar induced blue shift of green peak is smaller than that of blue peak. • Nanopillar induced blue shift of green/blue peak at 300 K is smaller than at 4 K. • PL intensity decreases with reducing nanopillar diameter with same pillar density. - Abstract: In this paper, strong phase-separated blue/green dual-wavelength InGaN/GaN nanopillar (NP) light emitting diodes (LEDs) with the same NP density and various NP diameters were fabricated using focused ion beam etching. Micro-Raman spectroscopy was used to show the effect of NP diameter on the strain relaxation in the multi-quantum-wells (MQWs). The effect of NP diameter on optical behaviors of the strong phase-separated dual-wavelength InGaN/GaN NP LEDs was investigated for the first time by using micro-photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopy. The blue shifts of PL peak energies of the NP LEDs showed that the NP LED with a smaller diameter exhibited a larger strain relaxation in the MQWs, as confirmed by micro-Raman results. And the blue shift of green emission was smaller than that of blue emission. The total integrated PL intensities from the NP arrays were enhanced compared to the as-grown sample due to the increased recombination rate and light extraction efficiency. The enhancement factor decreased with decreasing the NP diameter in our experiments, which indicated that the loss of active volume was gradually dominant for the luminous efficiency of NP LEDs compared to the increased recombination rate and light extraction efficiency.

  13. Building Envelope Thermal Performance Assessment Using Visual Programming and BIM, based on ETTV requirement of Green Mark and GreenRE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taki Eddine Seghier

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Accomplishment of green building design requirements and the achievement of the targeted credit points under a specific green rating system are known to be a task that is very challenging. Building Information Modeling (BIM design process and tools have already made considerable advancements in green building design and performance analysis. However, Green building design process is still lack of tools and workflows that can provide real-time feedback of building sustainability and rating during the design stage. In this paper, a new workflow of green building design assessment and rating is proposed based on the integration of Visual Programing Language (VPL and BIM. Thus, the aim of this study is to develop a BIM-VPL based tool for building envelope design and assessment support. The focus performance metric in this research is building Envelope Thermal Transfer Value (ETTV which is an Energy Efficiency (EE prerequisite requirement (up to 15 credits in both Green Mark and GreenRE rating systems. The development of the tool begins first by creating a generic integration framework between BIM-VPL functionalities and ETTV requirements. Then, data is extracted from the BIM 3D model and managed using Revit, Excel and Dynamo for visual scripting. A sample project consisting of a hypothetical residential building is run and its envelope ETTV performance and rating score are obtained for the validation of the tool. This tool will support project team in building envelope design and assessment by allowing them to select the most appropriate façade configuration according to its performance efficiency and the green rating. Furthermore, this tool serves as proof of concept that building sustainability rating and compliance checking can be automatically processed through customized workflows developed based on BIM and VPL technologies.

  14. Implementation and Test of a LED-Based Lamp for a Lighthouse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luca Mercatelli

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A novel sustainable source was developed for an existing Italian lighthouse, exploiting the light emitting diode (LED technology and the norms evolution. The research work started with the optical design of the device, while this work concerns the realization, installation, and test of the new LED lamp. The lamp recombines multiple separated LEDs, realizing a quasipunctual localized source. After installation in the lighthouse, specific photometric tests verified that the proposed power-saving source satisfied the illumination requirements of the marine signaling norms. The advantages of the LED-based lamp are reduced energy consumption, enhanced efficiency, longer life, decreased faults, slower aging, and lower maintenance costs. The obtained LED signalling device is more durable and reliable. In the future the application of these power-saving long-life sources could be extended to other maritime signaling devices or to other traffic signs.

  15. The Evolution of Urban Green Areas in Romania during 2002-2013

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iulian Adrian Şorcaru

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The small size of green areas in Romanian urban settlements remains a problem of current urbanization, having a negative impact on the healthy lifestyle of the population. Nowadays, the green areas from most of the Romanian cities are under the WHO standard of 50 m2/inhabitant, under the E.U. standard of 26 m2/inhabitant, and also under the national standard (94 urban settlements-29.4% have less than 10 m2/inhabitant of green area in 2013. Furthermore, the evolution of green areas after 2002, shows that almost a quarter of Romanian urban settlements (24.5% recorded significant declines, some towns having less than one square meter per inhabitant. This study presents a detailed analysis of Romanian urban green areas, their evolution over the period 2002-2013, based on the latest data provided by INS (National Institute of Statistics, identifying in the same time the causes and effects that led to the current situation. Mapping the results and identifying regional disparities, along with proposing measures to increase urban green areas are also objectives achieved in this study.

  16. White LED with High Package Extraction Efficiency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yi Zheng; Stough, Matthew

    2008-01-01

    The goal of this project is to develop a high efficiency phosphor converting (white) Light Emitting Diode (pcLED) 1-Watt package through an increase in package extraction efficiency. A transparent/translucent monolithic phosphor is proposed to replace the powdered phosphor to reduce the scattering caused by phosphor particles. Additionally, a multi-layer thin film selectively reflecting filter is proposed between blue LED die and phosphor layer to recover inward yellow emission. At the end of the project we expect to recycle approximately 50% of the unrecovered backward light in current package construction, and develop a pcLED device with 80 lm/W e using our technology improvements and commercially available chip/package source. The success of the project will benefit luminous efficacy of white LEDs by increasing package extraction efficiency. In most phosphor-converting white LEDs, the white color is obtained by combining a blue LED die (or chip) with a powdered phosphor layer. The phosphor partially absorbs the blue light from the LED die and converts it into a broad green-yellow emission. The mixture of the transmitted blue light and green-yellow light emerging gives white light. There are two major drawbacks for current pcLEDs in terms of package extraction efficiency. The first is light scattering caused by phosphor particles. When the blue photons from the chip strike the phosphor particles, some blue light will be scattered by phosphor particles. Converted yellow emission photons are also scattered. A portion of scattered light is in the backward direction toward the die. The amount of this backward light varies and depends in part on the particle size of phosphors. The other drawback is that yellow emission from phosphor powders is isotropic. Although some backward light can be recovered by the reflector in current LED packages, there is still a portion of backward light that will be absorbed inside the package and further converted to heat. Heat generated

  17. Performance of GaN-Based LEDs with Nanopatterned Indium Tin Oxide Electrode

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhanxu Chen

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The indium tin oxide (ITO has been widely applied in light emitting diodes (LEDs as the transparent current spreading layer. In this work, the performance of GaN-based blue light LEDs with nanopatterned ITO electrode is investigated. Periodic nanopillar ITO arrays are fabricated by inductive coupled plasma etching with the mask of polystyrene nanosphere. The light extraction efficiency (LEE of LEDs can be improved by nanopatterned ITO ohmic contacts. The light output intensity of the fabricated LEDs with nanopatterned ITO electrode is 17% higher than that of the conventional LEDs at an injection current of 100 mA. Three-dimensional finite difference time domain simulation matches well with the experimental result. This method may serve as a practical approach to improving the LEE of the LEDs.

  18. Thermal management for LED applications

    CERN Document Server

    Poppe, András

    2014-01-01

    Thermal Management for LED Applications provides state-of-the-art information on recent developments in thermal management as it relates to LEDs and LED-based systems and their applications. Coverage begins with an overview of the basics of thermal management including thermal design for LEDs, thermal characterization and testing of LEDs, and issues related to failure mechanisms and reliability and performance in harsh environments. Advances and recent developments in thermal management round out the book with discussions on advances in TIMs (thermal interface materials) for LED applications, advances in forced convection cooling of LEDs, and advances in heat sinks for LED assemblies. This book also: Presents a comprehensive overview of the basics of thermal management as it relates to LEDs and LED-based systems Discusses both design and thermal management considerations when manufacturing LEDs and LED-based systems Covers reliability and performance of LEDs in harsh environments Has a hands-on applications a...

  19. A filter bank approach for LED illumintaion sensing based on frequency division multiplexing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yang, Hongming; Bergmans, J.W.M.; Schenk, T.C.W.

    2009-01-01

    In this work, we consider illumination sensing in a light emitting diode (LED) based illumination system that normally consists of a large number of LEDs. Illumination sensing is used in order to facilitate the control of such system whose complexity, due to the large number of LEDs, can be quite

  20. Structural Control of InP/ZnS Core/Shell Quantum Dots Enables High-quality White LEDs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganesh Kumar, Baskaran; Sadeghi, Sadra; Melikov, Rustamzhon; Mohammadi Aria, Mohammed; Bahmani Jalali, Houman; Ow-Yang, Cleva; Nizamoglu, Sedat

    2018-05-30

    Herein, we demonstrate that the structural and optical control of InP-based quantum dots can lead to high-performance LEDs. Zinc sulphide (ZnS) shells passivate the InP quantum dot core and increase the quantum yield in green-emitting quantum dots by 13-fold and red-emitting quantum dots by 8-fold. The optimised quantum dots are integrated in the liquid-state to eliminate aggregation induced emission quenching and we fabricated white LEDs with warm, neutral, and cool white appearance by the down-conversion mechanism. The quantum dot-functionalized white LEDs achieve luminous efficiency up to 14.7 lm/W and colour-rendering index up to 80. The structural and optical control of InP/ZnS core/shell quantum dots enable 23-fold enhancement in luminous efficiency of white LEDs compared to ones containing only QDs of InP core. © 2018 IOP Publishing Ltd.

  1. Structural, optical and Carrier dynamics of self-assembled InGaN nanocolumns on Si(111)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Praveen; Devi, Pooja; Soto Rodriguez, P. E. D.; Jain, Rishabh; Jaggi, Neena; Sinha, R. K.; Kumar, Mahesh

    2018-05-01

    We investigated the morphological, structural, optical, electrical and carrier relaxation dynamic changes on the self-assembled grown InGaN nanocolumns (NCs) directly on p-Si(111) substrate at two different substrate temperature, namely 580 °C (A) and 500 °C (B). The emission wavelength of comparably low temperature (LT) grown NCs was red-shifted from 3.2eV to 2.4eV. First observations on the charge carrier dynamics of these directly grown NCs show comparable broad excited state absorption (ESA) for LT gown NCs, which manifest bi-exponential decay due to the radiative defects generated during the coalescence of these NCs.

  2. [Identification of green tea brand based on hyperspectra imaging technology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hai-Liang; Liu, Xiao-Li; Zhu, Feng-Le; He, Yong

    2014-05-01

    Hyperspectral imaging technology was developed to identify different brand famous green tea based on PCA information and image information fusion. First 512 spectral images of six brands of famous green tea in the 380 approximately 1 023 nm wavelength range were collected and principal component analysis (PCA) was performed with the goal of selecting two characteristic bands (545 and 611 nm) that could potentially be used for classification system. Then, 12 gray level co-occurrence matrix (GLCM) features (i. e., mean, covariance, homogeneity, energy, contrast, correlation, entropy, inverse gap, contrast, difference from the second-order and autocorrelation) based on the statistical moment were extracted from each characteristic band image. Finally, integration of the 12 texture features and three PCA spectral characteristics for each green tea sample were extracted as the input of LS-SVM. Experimental results showed that discriminating rate was 100% in the prediction set. The receiver operating characteristic curve (ROC) assessment methods were used to evaluate the LS-SVM classification algorithm. Overall results sufficiently demonstrate that hyperspectral imaging technology can be used to perform classification of green tea.

  3. The characterization of an economic and portable LED-based photoacoustic imaging system to facilitate molecular imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hariri, Ali; Lemaster, Jeanne; Wang, Junxin; Jeevarathinam, AnanthaKrishnan S; Chao, Daniel L; Jokerst, Jesse V

    2018-03-01

    Photoacoustic imaging (PAI) is a non-invasive, high-resolution hybrid imaging modality that combines optical excitation and ultrasound detection. PAI can image endogenous chromophores (melanin, hemoglobin, etc.) and exogenous contrast agents in different medical applications. However, most current equipment uses sophisticated and complicated OPO lasers with tuning and stability features inconsistent with broad clinical deployment. As the number of applications of PAI in medicine increases, there is an urgent need to make the imaging equipment more compact, portable, and affordable. Here, portable light emitting diode - based photoacoustic imaging (PLED-PAI) was introduced and characterized in terms of system specifications, light source characterizations, photoacoustic spatial/temporal resolution, and penetration. The system uses two LED arrays attached to the sides of a conventional ultrasound transducer. The LED pulse repetition rate is tunable between 1 K Hz, 2 K Hz, 3 K Hz, and 4 K Hz. The axial resolution was 0.268 mm, and the lateral resolution was between 0.55 and 0.59 mm. The system could detect optical absorber (pencil lead) at a depth of 3.2 cm and the detection limits of indocyanine green (ICG) and methylene blue (MB) were 9 μM and 0.78 mM. In vivo imaging of labeled human mesenchymal stem cells was achieved to confirm compatibility with small animal imaging. The characterization we report here may have value to other groups evaluating commercially available photoacoustic imaging equipment.

  4. LED; Zum Thema LED

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2010-07-01

    This collection of articles on the subject of light emitting diodes (LED) provides technical information on LED technology, examines latest developments and provides examples of LED use in practice. An 'ABC' of LED technology is presented and fifteen common LED mistakes are noted. The chances and risks of LED use are discussed as is the retrofitting of lighting installations with LEDs. The use of LEDs in street lighting is examined. The journal also includes interviews with architects and a lighting designer. Practical examples of the use of LEDs include the refurbished parliamentary library in Berne, their use in the bird sanctuary headquarters in Sempach, Switzerland, as well as LED use in sales outlets. Also, the use of LED lighting in a spa gazebo in Lucerne is examined.

  5. A new LED lamp for the collection of nocturnal Lepidoptera and a spectral comparison of light-trapping lamps

    OpenAIRE

    Brehm, Gunnar

    2017-01-01

    Most nocturnal Lepidoptera can be attracted to artificial light sources, particularly to those that emit a high proportion of ultraviolet radiation. Here, I describe a newly developed LED lamp set for the use in the field that is lightweight, handy, robust, and energy efficient. The emitted electromagnetic spectrum corresponds to the peak sensitivity in most Lepidoptera eye receptors (ultraviolet, blue and green). Power LEDs with peaks at 368 nm (ultraviolet), 450 nm (blue), 530 nm (green), a...

  6. Development of a LED based standard for luminous flux

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sardinha, André; Ázara, Ivo; Torres, Miguel; Menegotto, Thiago; Grieneisen, Hans Peter; Borghi, Giovanna; Couceiro, Iakyra; Zim, Alexandre; Muller, Filipe

    2018-03-01

    Incandescent lamps, simple artifacts with radiation spectrum very similar to a black-body emitter, are traditional standards in photometry. Nowadays LEDs are broadly used in lighting, with great variety of spectra, and it is convenient to use standards for photometry with spectral distribution similar to that of the measured artifact. Research and development of such standards occur in several National Metrology Institutes. In Brazil, Inmetro is working on a practical solution for providing a LED based standard to be used for luminous flux measurements in the field of general lighting. This paper shows the measurements made for the developing of a prototype, that in sequence will be characterized in photometric quantities.

  7. Ab initio-based bulk and surface thermodynamics of InGaN alloys. Investigating the effects of strain and surface polarity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duff, Andrew I.; Lymperakis, Liverios; Neugebauer, Joerg [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Eisenforschung, Duesseldorf (Germany)

    2015-05-15

    The growth of high In content InGaN with sufficiently high crystal quality is challenging due to the differences in the GaN and InN thermodynamics. The surprisingly different thermodynamics is due to a complex competition between strain and chemistry and mediated by the different indium and gallium atomic radii as well as their different bonding enthalpies with nitrogen. In the present work, we investigate bulk and surface thermodynamics of molecular beam epitaxial (MBE) growth of In{sub x}Ga{sub 1-x}N for the technologically relevant (0001) and (000 anti 1) growth planes by means of density functional theory calculations. Our calculations confirm that coherent growth fully suppresses phase separation through spinodal decomposition. However, the biaxial strain is found to have a marginal effect on the critical temperatures for In{sub x}Ga{sub 1-x}N decomposition. Furthermore, the thermal stability of excess indium is found to be remarkably higher on N-polar surfaces than on the Ga-polar surfaces. (copyright 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  8. LED and Semiconductor Photo-effects on Living Things

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujiyasu, Hiroshi; Ishigaki, Takemitsu; Fujiyasu, Kentarou; Ujihara, Shirou; Watanabe, Naoharu; Sunayama, Shunji; Ikoma, Shuuji

    We have studied LED irradiation effects on plants and animals in the visible to UV region of light from GaN LEDs. The results are as follows. Blue light considers to be effective for pearl cultivation or for attraction of small fishes living in near the surface of sea such as Pompano or Sardine, white light radiation is effective for cultivation of botanical plankton for shells. Other experiments of UV light irradiation attracting effect on baby sea turtle and the germination UV effect of mushroom, green light weight enhance effect on baby pigs, light vernalization effect of vegitable and Ge far infrared therapic effect on human body are also given.

  9. LED-FISH: Fluorescence microscopy based on light emitting diodes for the molecular analysis of Her-2/neu oncogene amplification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vollmer Ekkehard

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Light emitting diodes (LED, which are available as small monochromatic light sources with characteristic features such as maximum illumination power combined with minimum energy consumption and extremely long lifespan have already proved as a highly potential low-cost alternative for specific diagnostic applications in clinical medicine such as tuberculosis fluorescence microscopy. Likewise, the most reliable evaluation of Her-2/neu (c-erbB2 gene amplification, which has been established in the last few years for routine diagnosis in clinical pathology as determinant towards Herceptin-based treatment of patients with breast cancer, is based on fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH and corresponding high priced fluorescence equipment. In order to test the possibility to utilize the advantages of low-cost LED technology on FISH analysis of c-erbB2 gene expression for routine diagnostic purposes, the applicability of a standard bright field Carl Zeiss Axiostar Plus microscope equipped with a Fraen AFTER* LED Fluorescence Microscope Kit for the detection of Her-2/neu gene signals was compared to an advanced Nikon Eclipse 80i fluorescence microscope in combination with a conventional 100W mercury vapor lamp. Both microscopes were fitted with the same Quicam FAST CCD digital camera to unequivocally compare the quality of the captured images. C-erbB2 gene expression was analyzed in 30 different human tissue samples of primary invasive breast cancer, following formalin fixation and subsequent paraffin-embedding. The Her2/neu gene signals (green were identifiable in the tumor cells in all cases and images of equal quality were captured under almost identical conditions by 480 nm (blue LED module equipped standard Axiostar microscope as compared to conventional fluorescence microscopy. In this first attempt, these monochromatic LED elements proved in principle to be suitable for the detection of Her-2/neu gene expression by FISH. Thus, our own

  10. Economising subsidies for green housing features: A stated preference approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yung Yau

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available In light of the enormous amounts of energy and resources consumed by housing development and operations, many governments have started recognising the urgent need to promote green or eco-friendly housing with the aim of achieving sustainable development. Apart from regulations, governments can offer incentives to developers to provide green features in their developments by offering subsidies in various forms. However, such subsidisation is often uneconomical. In theory, market forces can lead to green housing provision without any government intervention if the market players are willing to pay extra for the green features of housing. Against this background, this article presents the findings of a study that compared potential homebuyers’ willingness to pay (WTP for various green housing features based on findings from a structured questionnaire survey in Macau. The housing attributes under investigation included uses of green materials (e.g., sustainable forest products and construction methods (e.g., prefabrication, energy-efficient technologies (e.g., LED lighting and water-saving devices (e.g., grey-water recycling systems. Results indicate that the respondents’ WTP was mainly motivated by economic incentives. Green housing attributes that can offer direct financial benefits corresponded to greater WTP. The policy implications of the research findings then follow.

  11. 340nm UV LED excitation in time-resolved fluorescence system for europium-based immunoassays detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodenko, Olga; Fodgaard, Henrik; Tidemand-Lichtenberg, Peter; Pedersen, Christian

    2017-02-01

    In immunoassay analyzers for in-vitro diagnostics, Xenon flash lamps have been widely used as excitation light sources. Recent advancements in UV LED technology and its advantages over the flash lamps such as smaller footprint, better wall-plug efficiency, narrow emission spectrum, and no significant afterglow, have made them attractive light sources for gated detection systems. In this paper, we report on the implementation of a 340 nm UV LED based time-resolved fluorescence system based on europium chelate as a fluorescent marker. The system performance was tested with the immunoassay based on the cardiac marker, TnI. The same signal-to-noise ratio as for the flash lamp based system was obtained, operating the LED below specified maximum current. The background counts of the system and its main contributors were measured and analyzed. The background of the system of the LED based unit was improved by 39% compared to that of the Xenon flash lamp based unit, due to the LEDs narrower emission spectrum and longer pulse width. Key parameters of the LED system are discussed to further optimize the signal-to-noise ratio and signal-to-background, and hence the sensitivity of the instrument.

  12. Review and perspective on the composition and safety of green tea extracts

    Science.gov (United States)

    The growing body of evidence regarding the putative health benefits of green tea (Camellia sinensis), including reduced risk of cancer and cardiovascular disease, has led to an increase in the consumption of brewed green tea and the formulation of green tea extracts (GTE) into a variety of food and ...

  13. Radiative transitions in InGaN quantum-well structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shapiro, Noad Asaf [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2002-01-01

    InGaN based light emitting devices demonstrate excellent luminescence properties and have great potential in lighting applications. Though these devices are already being produced on an industrial scale, the nature of their radiative transition is still not well understood. In particular, the role of the huge (>1MV/cm), built-in electric field in these transitions is still under debate. The luminescence characteristics of InGaN quantum well structures were investigated as a function of excitation power, temperature, and biaxial strain, with an intent of discerning the effects of the electric field and inhomogeneous indium distribution in the QW on the radiative transition. It was found that the luminescence energy did not scale only with the indium concentration but that the QW thickness must also be taken into account. The thickness affects the transition energy due to quantum confinement and carrier separation across a potential drop in the QW. The luminescence peak width was shown to increase with increased indium fraction, due to increased indium inhomogeneity. The carrier lifetime increased exponentially with QW thickness and luminescence wavelength, due to increased carrier separation. Measuring the luminescence energy and carrier lifetime as a function of excitation density showed that the electric field can be screened by strong excitation and, as a consequence, the carrier separation reduced. The temperature dependence of the luminescence showed evidence for bandtails in the density of states, a phenomenon that has been previously related to transition in indium-rich nano-clusters, yet could be accounted for by fluctuations in other parameters that affect the transition energy. Room temperature luminescence efficiency was shown to weakly decrease with increased QW thickness. The application of biaxial strain resulted in either a redshift or blueshift of the luminescence, depending on the sample. The direction and magnitude of the shift in luminescence

  14. Customers’ Intention to Use Green Products: the Impact of Green Brand Dimensions and Green Perceived Value

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Doszhanov Aibek

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to identify the relationships between green brand dimension (green brand awareness, green brand image, and green brand trust, green perceived value and customer’s intention to use green products. Data was collected through structured survey questionnaire from 384 customers of three hypermarkets in Kuala-Lumpur. Data was analyzed based on multiple regression analysis. The results indicate that there are significant relationships between green brand awareness, green brand trust, green perceived value, and customer’s intention to use green products. However, green brand image was not found to have significant relationship with customer’s intention to use green products. The discussion presented suggestions for marketers and researchers interested in green branding.

  15. Nitride-based Quantum-Confined Structures for Ultraviolet-Visible Optical Devices on Silicon Substrates

    KAUST Repository

    Janjua, Bilal

    2017-04-01

    III–V nitride quantum-confined structures embedded in nanowires (NWs), also known as quantum-disks-in-nanowires (Qdisks-in-NWs), have recently emerged as a new class of nanoscale materials exhibiting outstanding properties for optoelectronic devices and systems. It is promising for circumventing the technology limitation of existing planar epitaxy devices, which are bounded by the lattice-, crystal-structure-, and thermal- matching conditions. This work presents significant advances in the growth of good quality GaN, InGaN and AlGaN Qdisks-in-NWs based on careful optimization of the growth parameters, coupled with a meticulous layer structure and active region design. The NWs were grown, catalyst-free, using plasma assisted molecular beam epitaxy (PAMBE) on silicon (Si) substrates. A 2-step growth scheme was developed to achieve high areal density, dislocation free and vertically aligned NWs on Ti/Si substrates. Numerical modeling of the NWs structures, using the nextnano3 software, showed reduced polarization fields, and, in the presence of Qdisks, exhibited improved quantum-confinement; thus contributing to high carrier radiative-recombination rates. As a result, based on the growth and device structure optimization, the technologically challenging orange and yellow NWs light emitting devices (LEDs) targeting the ‘green-yellow’ gap were demonstrated on scalable, foundry compatible, and low-cost Ti coated Si substrates. The NWs work was also extended to LEDs emitting in the ultraviolet (UV) range with niche applications in environmental cleaning, UV-curing, medicine, and lighting. In this work, we used a Ti (100 nm) interlayer and Qdisks to achieve good quality AlGaN based UV-A (320 - 400 nm) device. To address the issue of UV-absorbing polymer, used in the planarization process, we developed a pendeo-epitaxy technique, for achieving an ultra-thin coalescence of the top p-GaN contact layer, for a self-planarized Qdisks-in-NWs UV-B (280 – 320 nm) LED grown

  16. Exciton localization in (11-22)-oriented semi-polar InGaN multiple quantum wells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monavarian, Morteza; Rosales, Daniel; Gil, Bernard; Izyumskaya, Natalia; Das, Saikat; Özgür, Ümit; Morkoç, Hadis; Avrutin, Vitaliy

    2016-02-01

    Excitonic recombination dynamics in (11-22) -oriented semipolar In0.2Ga0.8N/In0.06Ga0.94N multiquantum wells (MQWs) grown on GaN/m-sapphire templates have been investigated by temperature-dependent time-resolved photoluminescence (TRPL). The radiative and nonradiative recombination contributions to the PL intensity at different temperatures were evaluated by analysing temperature dependences of PL peak intensity and decay times. The obtained data indicate the existence of exciton localization with a localization energy of Eloc(15K) =7meV and delocalization temperature of Tdeloc = 200K in the semipolar InGaN MQWs. Presence of such exciton localization in semipolar (11-22) -oriented structures could lead to improvement of excitonic emission and internal quantum efficiency.

  17. The Influence of Legitimacy on a Proactive Green Orientation and Green Performance: A Study Based on Transitional Economy Scenarios in China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baoshan Ge

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available With environmental pollution, climate change and resource scarcity being serious global issues, green entrepreneurship is increasingly seen as an approach to simultaneously address economic performance, environmental impact and social responsibility. As green entrepreneurship needs to consider both venture performance and social responsibility, it will be subject to legitimacy constraints at the system level. Whether these legitimacy constraints are favorable to green enterprise is not yet clear from current research. Especially for transition economies, the problem of whether proactive green enterprises facing legitimacy constraints under institutional uncertainty can achieve green performance requires further study. Thus, a theoretical model to determine the relationship between green proactiveness orientation (GPO, green performance, legitimacy, and transitional economics was proposed. Based on the data from 235 new Chinese green firms, the empirical results suggest that green startups launch with a green proactiveness orientation, which enables them to acquire a green performance advantage over their competitors. Improvements in green performance is also shown to be driven by the pressure from institutional legitimacy. Better green performance can be easily achieved if green startups have a higher level of legitimacy. However, against the background of transitional economies, the increase in institutional uncertainty will damage the promotion of political legitimacy and make the enterprises that are subject to political legitimacy constraints lose their green performance. Currently, political legitimacy is no longer an impetus. However, the increase in institutional uncertainty will strengthen the promotion of commercial legitimacy and cause green-oriented startups to pursue more commercial interests. Thus, to a certain extent, it will lead to market uncertainty. The conclusion of this study not only provides guidance for startups in

  18. Simulation for light extraction in light emitting diode using finite domain time difference method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hong, Jun Hee; Park, Si Hyun

    2008-01-01

    InGaN based LEDs are indispensable to traffic light, full color displays, back lights in liquid crystals, and general lighting. The demand for high efficiency LEDs is on the increase. Recently we have reported the improvement of the light extraction efficiency of InGaN based LED. In this paper we show suitable a three dimensional (3 D)FDTD simulation method for LED simulation and we apply our FDTD simulation to our PNS LED structures, comparing the simulation results with the experimental results. For real FDTD simulation, we first must consider the spatial and temporal grid size. In order to obtain an accurate result, the spatial grid size must be so small that the feature of the field can be resolved. We computed the field power at each time at the surface 0.3mm away from the surface between GaN and air and integrate over surface. The calculations were conducted for the PNS LEDs employing the different height of SiO_2 columns, that is, h=160nm, h=350nm, h=550nm, h=750nm, and h=950nm. Simulation results according to different height is shown in Fig. 1(a,b). All simulation curves follow rough trend that it increases with column height and reaches the maximum at about 600nm height and then decreases with height. And this is a consistent with the trend from our experiments. Our FDTD simulation gives a possibility for design of LED structures of high extraction efficiency

  19. 340 nm pulsed UV LED system for europium-based time-resolved fluorescence detection of immunoassays

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rodenko, Olga; Fodgaard, Henrik; Tidemand-Lichtenberg, Peter

    2016-01-01

    We report on the design, development and investigation of an optical system based on UV light emitting diode (LED) excitation at 340 nm for time-resolved fluorescence detection of immunoassays. The system was tested to measure cardiac marker Troponin I with a concentration of 200 ng....../L in immunoassay. The signal-to-noise ratio was comparable to state-of-the-art Xenon flash lamp based unit with equal excitation energy and without overdriving the LED. We performed a comparative study of the flash lamp and the LED based system and discussed temporal, spatial, and spectral features of the LED...... excitation for time-resolved fluorimetry. Optimization of the suggested key parameters of the LED promises significant increase of the signal-to-noise ratio and hence of the sensitivity of immunoassay systems....

  20. 340 nm pulsed UV LED system for europium-based time-resolved fluorescence detection of immunoassays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodenko, Olga; Fodgaard, Henrik; Tidemand-Lichtenberg, Peter; Petersen, Paul Michael; Pedersen, Christian

    2016-09-19

    We report on the design, development and investigation of an optical system based on UV light emitting diode (LED) excitation at 340 nm for time-resolved fluorescence detection of immunoassays. The system was tested to measure cardiac marker Troponin I with a concentration of 200 ng/L in immunoassay. The signal-to-noise ratio was comparable to state-of-the-art Xenon flash lamp based unit with equal excitation energy and without overdriving the LED. We performed a comparative study of the flash lamp and the LED based system and discussed temporal, spatial, and spectral features of the LED excitation for time-resolved fluorimetry. Optimization of the suggested key parameters of the LED promises significant increase of the signal-to-noise ratio and hence of the sensitivity of immunoassay systems.

  1. Spectral properties of polarized light from semipolar grown InGaN quantum wells at low temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schade, L.; Schwarz, U.T. [Fraunhofer Institute for Applied Solid State Physics IAF, Freiburg (Germany); Department of Microsystems Engineering (IMTEK), University of Freiburg (Germany); Wernicke, T.; Ploch, S. [Institute of Solid State Physics, TU Berlin (Germany); Weyers, M. [Ferdinand-Braun-Institut, Leibniz-Institut fuer Hoechstfrequenztechnik, Berlin (Germany); Kneissl, M. [Institute of Solid State Physics, TU Berlin (Germany); Ferdinand-Braun-Institut, Leibniz-Institut fuer Hoechstfrequenztechnik, Berlin (Germany)

    2012-03-15

    The polarization dependent photoluminescence at low temperatures of strained semipolar and nonpolar InGaN quantum wells was studied as a function of the emission wavelength. We found for semipolar QWs that the maximum of the spectral resolved optical polarization is either red- or blue-shifted with respect to the maximum of the emission. In contrast, the nonpolar emission exhibits no clear maximum. We assign all effects to an inhomogeneous broadening of the emission caused by indium fluctuations and explain this behavior here in the light of the optical polarization switching. (copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  2. Low temperature p-type doping of (Al)GaN layers using ammonia molecular beam epitaxy for InGaN laser diodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malinverni, M.; Lamy, J.-M.; Martin, D.; Feltin, E.; Dorsaz, J.; Castiglia, A.; Rossetti, M.; Duelk, M.; Vélez, C.; Grandjean, N.

    2014-12-01

    We demonstrate state-of-the-art p-type (Al)GaN layers deposited at low temperature (740 °C) by ammonia molecular beam epitaxy (NH3-MBE) to be used as top cladding of laser diodes (LDs) with the aim of further reducing the thermal budget on the InGaN quantum well active region. Typical p-type GaN resistivities and contact resistances are 0.4 Ω cm and 5 × 10-4 Ω cm2, respectively. As a test bed, we fabricated a hybrid laser structure emitting at 400 nm combining n-type AlGaN cladding and InGaN active region grown by metal-organic vapor phase epitaxy, with the p-doped waveguide and cladding layers grown by NH3-MBE. Single-mode ridge-waveguide LD exhibits a threshold voltage as low as 4.3 V for an 800 × 2 μm2 ridge dimension and a threshold current density of ˜5 kA cm-2 in continuous wave operation. The series resistance of the device is 6 Ω and the resistivity is 1.5 Ω cm, confirming thereby the excellent electrical properties of p-type Al0.06Ga0.94N:Mg despite the low growth temperature.

  3. Observation of weak carrier localization in green emitting InGaN/GaN multi-quantum well structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mohanta, Antaryami; Wang, Shiang-Fu; Jang, Der-Jun, E-mail: djjang@mail.nsysu.edu.tw [Department of Physics, National Sun Yat-sen University, Kaohsiung 80424, Taiwan (China); Young, Tai-Fa [Department of Mechanical and Electromechanical Engineering, National Sun Yat-sen University, Kaohsiung 80424, Taiwan (China); Yeh, Ping-Hung; Ling, Dah-Chin [Department of Physics, Tamkang University, Tamsui Dist., New Taipei City 25137, Taiwan (China); Lee, Meng-En [Department of Physics, National Kaohsiung Normal University, Kaohsiung 80264, Taiwan (China)

    2015-04-14

    Green emitting InGaN/GaN multi-quantum well samples were investigated using transmission electron microscopy, photoluminescence (PL), and time-resolved photoluminescence (TRPL) spectroscopy. Weak carrier localization with characteristic energy of ∼12 meV due to an inhomogeneous distribution of In in the InGaN quantum (QW) layer is observed. The temperature dependence of the PL peak energy exhibits S-shape phenomenon and is comparatively discussed within the framework of the Varshni's empirical formula. The full width at half maximum of the PL emission band shows an increasing-decreasing-increasing behavior with increasing temperature arising from the localized states caused by potential fluctuations. The radiative life time, τ{sub r}, extracted from the TRPL profile shows ∼T{sup 3/2} dependence on temperature above 200 K, which confirms the absence of the effect of carrier localization at room temperature.

  4. Green and Bio-Based Solvents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calvo-Flores, Francisco G; Monteagudo-Arrebola, María José; Dobado, José A; Isac-García, Joaquín

    2018-04-24

    Chemical reactions and many of the procedures of separation and purification employed in industry, research or chemistry teaching utilize solvents massively. In the last decades, with the birth of Green Chemistry, concerns about the employment of solvents and the effects on human health, as well as its environmental impacts and its dependence on non-renewable raw materials for manufacturing most of them, has drawn the attention of the scientific community. In this work, we review the concept of green solvent and the properties and characteristics to be considered green. Additionally, we discuss the different possible routes to prepare many solvents from biomass, as an alternative way to those methods currently applied in the petrochemical industry.

  5. DC Grids for Smart LED-Based Lighting: The EDISON Solution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steffen Thielemans

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper highlights the benefits and possible drawbacks of a DC-based lighting infrastructure for powering Light Emitting Diode (LED-lamps. It also evaluates the efforts needed for integrating the so called smart lighting and other sensor/actuator based control systems, and compares existing and emerging solutions. It reviews and discusses published work in this field with special focus on the intelligent DC-based infrastructure named EDISON that is primarily dedicated to lighting, but is applicable to building automation in general. The EDISON “PowerLAN” consists of a DC-based infrastructure that offers telecommunication abilities and can be applied to lighting retrofitting scenarios for buildings. Its infrastructure allows simple and efficient powering of DC-oriented devices like LED lamps, sensors and microcontrollers, while offering a wired communication channel. This paper motivates the design choices for organizing DC lighting grids and their associated communication possibilities. It also shows how the EDISON based smart lighting solution is evolving today to include new communication technologies and to further integrate other parts of building management solutions through the OneM2M (Machine to Machine service bus.

  6. Different shades of green on small islands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teresa Tiago

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Many small islands exist as tourism destinations worldwide. In the 1990s, the growth of environmental consciousness led some small islands to question their mass tourism offers and to refocus on more sustainable propositions. However, it remains unclear whether hospitality firms see these sustainability related efforts as drivers of success and whether tourists value this dimension when choosing or recommending a destination. This study chose a small island destination to address these questions using data covering firm and tourism perceptions of green products. The results show that tourists tend to value green efforts with different intensities, corresponding to three segments: Light Green, Green, and Super Green. These findings should help hotels adjust their communication strategies and develop new services. Further, destination marketing organizations can devise a consistent destination strategy, integrating all stakeholders by including their most valued concepts.

  7. 340nm UV LED excitation in time-resolved fluorescence system for europium-based immunoassays detection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rodenko, Olga; Fodgaard, Henrik; Tidemand-Lichtenberg, Peter

    2017-01-01

    In immunoassay analyzers for in-vitro diagnostics, Xenon flash lamps have been widely used as excitation light sources. Recent advancements in UV LED technology and its advantages over the flash lamps such as smaller footprint, better wall-plug efficiency, narrow emission spectrum......, and no significant afterglow, have made them attractive light sources for gated detection systems. In this paper, we report on the implementation of a 340 nm UV LED based time-resolved fluorescence system based on europium chelate as a fluorescent marker. The system performance was tested with the immunoassay based...... on the cardiac marker, TnI. The same signal-to-noise ratio as for the flash lamp based system was obtained, operating the LED below specified maximum current. The background counts of the system and its main contributors were measured and analyzed. The background of the system of the LED based unit was improved...

  8. Reverse leakage current characteristics of InGaN/GaN multiple quantum well ultraviolet/blue/green light-emitting diodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Shengjun; Lv, Jiajiang; Wu, Yini; Zhang, Yuan; Zheng, Chenju; Liu, Sheng

    2018-05-01

    We investigated the reverse leakage current characteristics of InGaN/GaN multiple quantum well (MQW) near-ultraviolet (NUV)/blue/green light-emitting diodes (LEDs). Experimental results showed that the NUV LED has the smallest reverse leakage current whereas the green LED has the largest. The reason is that the number of defects increases with increasing nominal indium content in InGaN/GaN MQWs. The mechanism of the reverse leakage current was analyzed by temperature-dependent current–voltage measurement and capacitance–voltage measurement. The reverse leakage currents of NUV/blue/green LEDs show similar conduction mechanisms: at low temperatures, the reverse leakage current of these LEDs is attributed to variable-range hopping (VRH) conduction; at high temperatures, the reverse leakage current of these LEDs is attributed to nearest-neighbor hopping (NNH) conduction, which is enhanced by the Poole–Frenkel effect.

  9. The research of automatic speed control algorithm based on Green CBTC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Ying; Xiong, Hui; Wang, Xiaoliang; Wu, Youyou; Zhang, Chuanqi

    2017-06-01

    Automatic speed control algorithm is one of the core technologies of train operation control system. It’s a typical multi-objective optimization control algorithm, which achieve the train speed control for timing, comfort, energy-saving and precise parking. At present, the train speed automatic control technology is widely used in metro and inter-city railways. It has been found that the automatic speed control technology can effectively reduce the driver’s intensity, and improve the operation quality. However, the current used algorithm is poor at energy-saving, even not as good as manual driving. In order to solve the problem of energy-saving, this paper proposes an automatic speed control algorithm based on Green CBTC system. Based on the Green CBTC system, the algorithm can adjust the operation status of the train to improve the efficient using rate of regenerative braking feedback energy while ensuring the timing, comfort and precise parking targets. Due to the reason, the energy-using of Green CBTC system is lower than traditional CBTC system. The simulation results show that the algorithm based on Green CBTC system can effectively reduce the energy-using due to the improvement of the using rate of regenerative braking feedback energy.

  10. Using Pre-TMIn Treatment to Improve the Optical Properties of Green Light Emitting Diodes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bing Xu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We investigated the effects of pre-TMIn treatment on the optical properties of green light emitting diodes (LEDs. Although pre-TMIn treatment did not affect the epitaxial structure of quantum wells, it significantly improved the quality of the surface morphology relative to that of the untreated sample. Indium cluster can be seen by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HR-TEM, which is the explanation for the red-shift of photoluminescence (PL. Time-resolved photoluminescence measurements indicated that the sample prepared with pre-TMIn treatment had a shorter radiative decay time. As a result, the light output power of the treated green LED was higher than that of the conventional untreated one. Thus, pre-TMIn treatment appears to be a simple and efficient means of improving the performance of green LEDs.

  11. High Output LED-Based Profile Lighting Fixture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Török, Lajos; Beczkowski, Szymon; Munk-Nielsen, Stig

    2011-01-01

    Recent developments in power light emitting diode (LED) industry have made LEDs suitable for being efficiently used in high intensity lighting fixtures instead of the commonly used high intensity discharge (HID) lamps. A high output LEDbased profile-light fixture is presented in this paper...

  12. Role of quantum-confined stark effect on bias dependent photoluminescence of N-polar GaN/InGaN multi-quantum disk amber light emitting diodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tangi, Malleswararao; Mishra, Pawan; Janjua, Bilal; Prabaswara, Aditya; Zhao, Chao; Priante, Davide; Min, Jung-Wook; Ng, Tien Khee; Ooi, Boon S.

    2018-03-01

    We study the impact of quantum-confined stark effect (QCSE) on bias dependent micro-photoluminescence emission of the quantum disk (Q-disk) based nanowires light emitting diodes (NWs-LED) exhibiting the amber colored emission. The NWs are found to be nitrogen polar (N-polar) verified using KOH wet chemical etching and valence band spectrum analysis of high-resolution X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The crystal structure and quality of the NWs were investigated by high-angle annular dark field - scanning transmission electron microscopy. The LEDs were fabricated to acquire the bias dependent micro-photoluminescence spectra. We observe a redshift and a blueshift of the μPL peak in the forward and reverse bias conditions, respectively, with reference to zero bias, which is in contrast to the metal-polar InGaN well-based LEDs in the literature. Such opposite shifts of μPL peak emission observed for N-polar NWs-LEDs, in our study, are due to the change in the direction of the internal piezoelectric field. The quenching of PL intensity, under the reverse bias conditions, is ascribed to the reduction of electron-hole overlap. Furthermore, the blueshift of μPL emission with increasing excitation power reveals the suppression of QCSE resulting from the photo-generated carriers. Thereby, our study confirms the presence of QCSE for NWs-LEDs from both bias and power dependent μPL measurements. Thus, this study serves to understand the QCSE in N-polar InGaN Q-disk NWs-LEDs and other related wide-bandgap nitride nanowires, in general.

  13. Role of quantum-confined stark effect on bias dependent photoluminescence of N-polar GaN/InGaN multi-quantum disk amber light emitting diodes

    KAUST Repository

    Tangi, Malleswararao

    2018-03-09

    We study the impact of quantum-confined stark effect (QCSE) on bias dependent micro-photoluminescence emission of the quantum disk (Q-disk) based nanowires light emitting diodes (NWs-LED) exhibiting the amber colored emission. The NWs are found to be nitrogen polar (N-polar) verified using KOH wet chemical etching and valence band spectrum analysis of high-resolution X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The crystal structure and quality of the NWs were investigated by high-angle annular dark field - scanning transmission electron microscopy. The LEDs were fabricated to acquire the bias dependent micro-photoluminescence spectra. We observe a redshift and a blueshift of the μPL peak in the forward and reverse bias conditions, respectively, with reference to zero bias, which is in contrast to the metal-polar InGaN well-based LEDs in the literature. Such opposite shifts of μPL peak emission observed for N-polar NWs-LEDs, in our study, are due to the change in the direction of the internal piezoelectric field. The quenching of PL intensity, under the reverse bias conditions, is ascribed to the reduction of electron-hole overlap. Furthermore, the blueshift of μPL emission with increasing excitation power reveals the suppression of QCSE resulting from the photo-generated carriers. Thereby, our study confirms the presence of QCSE for NWs-LEDs from both bias and power dependent μPL measurements. Thus, this study serves to understand the QCSE in N-polar InGaN Q-disk NWs-LEDs and other related wide-bandgap nitride nanowires, in general.

  14. Green energy and large commercial users

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Capage, Adam

    2000-01-01

    The difficulties faced in selling green energy to large commercial users are reviewed in this article. Four steps are identified in helping energy service suppliers (ESP) focus on opportunities for maximising revenue, namely, targeting the best prospects, identifying the right contact person, appealing to the primary contact, and helping contacts to make the sale internally. Companies with environmentally conscious customers and well defined environmental policies and led by those that promote environmental stewardship are recognised as commercial customers most likely to sign a deal for green energy

  15. Growth and properties of blue/green InGaN/GaN MQWs on Si(111) substrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Kang Jea; Oh, Tae Su; Kim, Tae Ki; Yang, Gye Mo; Lim, Kee Young

    2005-01-01

    InGaN/GaN multiple quantum wells (MQWs) were grown on highly tensile-strained GaN films on Si(111) substrate by metalorganic chemical vapor deposition. Due to the large difference of lattice constant and thermal expansion coefficient between GaN and Si, GaN growth on Si(111) substrate usually leads to an initially high dislocation density and cracks. We demonstrate low dislocation-density and crack-free GaN films grown on Si(111) substrate by introducing an AlN/GaN strain-compensation layer and Si x N y dislocation masking layer. Blue/green-emitting InGaN/GaN MQW heterostructures have been successfully grown on Si(111) substrates. Two sets of InGaN/GaN MQWs with different In solid composition and number of pairs grown between 820 .deg. C and 900 .deg. C were studied by high-resolution X-ray diffraction and photoluminescence spectroscopy. The emission wavelengths of InGaN MQW structures were significantly dependent on growth temperature.

  16. Color-filter-free spatial visible light communication using RGB-LED and mobile-phone camera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shih-Hao; Chow, Chi-Wai

    2014-12-15

    A novel color-filter-free visible-light communication (VLC) system using red-green-blue (RGB) light emitting diode (LED) and mobile-phone camera is proposed and demonstrated for the first time. A feature matching method, which is based on the scale-invariant feature transform (SIFT) algorithm for the received grayscale image is used instead of the chromatic information decoding method. The proposed method is simple and saves the computation complexity. The signal processing is based on the grayscale image computation; hence neither color-filter nor chromatic channel information is required. A proof-of-concept experiment is performed and high performance channel recognition is achieved.

  17. Structure dependent luminescence characterization of green-yellow emitting Sr{sub 2}SiO{sub 4}:Eu{sup 2+} phosphors for near UV LEDs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, J.K. [University of California, San Diego, Materials Science and Engineering Program, La Jolla, CA 92093 (United States); Hannah, M.E.; Piquette, A. [Central Research, OSRAM SYLVANIA, 71 Cherry Hill Drive Beverly, MA 01915 (United States); Hirata, G.A. [Centro de Nanociencias y Nanotecnolgia, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Km. 107 Carretera Tijuana-Ensenada Apdo, Ensenada, MX CP 22860 (Mexico); Talbot, J.B. [University of California, San Diego, Materials Science and Engineering Program, La Jolla, CA 92093 (United States); Mishra, K.C. [Central Research, OSRAM SYLVANIA, 71 Cherry Hill Drive Beverly, MA 01915 (United States); McKittrick, J., E-mail: jmckittrick@ucsd.edu [University of California, San Diego, Materials Science and Engineering Program, La Jolla, CA 92093 (United States)

    2012-01-15

    This paper reports on the luminescence properties of mixtures of {alpha}- and {beta}-(Sr{sub 0.97}Eu{sub 0.03}){sub 2}SiO{sub 4} phosphors. These phosphors were prepared by 3 different synthesis techniques: a modified sol-gel/Pechini method, a co-precipitation method and a combustion method. The structural and optical properties of these phosphors were compared to those of solid state synthesized powders. The emission spectra consist of a weak broad blue band centered near 460 nm and a strong broad green-yellow band centered between 543 and 573 nm depending on the crystal structure. The green-yellow emission peak blue-shifts as the amount of {beta} phase increases and the photoluminescence emission intensity and quantum efficiency of the mixed phase powders is greater than those of predominant {alpha}-phase powders when excited between 370 and 410 nm. Thus, (Sr{sub 1-x}Eu{sub x}){sub 2}SiO{sub 4} with larger proportion of the {beta} phase are more promising candidates than single {alpha}-phase powders for use as a green-yellow emitting phosphor for near UV LED applications. Finally the phosphors prepared by the sol-gel/Pechini method, which have larger amount of {beta} phase, have a higher emission intensity and quantum efficiency than those prepared by co-precipitation or combustion synthesis. - Highlights: > Mixtures of {alpha}- and {beta}-Sr{sub 2}SiO{sub 4}:Eu{sup 2+} phosphors were prepared by 3 different synthesis methods. > Emission peak blue-shifts as the amount of {beta} phase increases. > Emission intensity and QE of the {alpha}+{beta} powders are greater than those of single {alpha} phase. > Phosphors prepared by sol-gel/Pechini have the highest emission intensity and QE.

  18. Green colorants based on energetic azole borates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glück, Johann; Klapötke, Thomas M; Rusan, Magdalena; Stierstorfer, Jörg

    2014-11-24

    The investigation of green-burning boron-based compounds as colorants in pyrotechnic formulations as alternative for barium nitrate, which is a hazard to health and to the environment, is reported. Metal-free and nitrogen-rich dihydrobis(5-aminotetrazolyl)borate salts and dihydrobis(1,3,4-triazolyl)borate salts have been synthesized and characterized by NMR spectroscopy, elemental analysis, mass spectrometry, and vibrational spectroscopy. Their thermal and energetic properties have been determined as well. Several pyrotechnic compositions using selected azolyl borate salts as green colorants were investigated. Formulations with ammonium dinitramide and ammonium nitrate as oxidizers and boron and magnesium as fuels were tested. The burn time, dominant wavelength, spectral purity, luminous intensity, and luminous efficiency as well as the thermal and energetic properties of these compositions were measured. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. Design and radiation tests on a LED based emergency evacuation directional lighting

    CERN Document Server

    Trikoupis, Nikolaos

    2017-01-01

    A LED (Light Emitting Diode) based directional lighting system has been designed to indicate the best evacuation direction for applications like the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) tunnel. The design includes constraints for redundancy required by safety systems and for components selection by radiation effects. Most of the literature for radiation effects on LEDs concern digital communications systems, although some recent reports do exist for visible spectrum power LEDs and the reduction in light output versus dose is coherent with the results presented in this paper. Prototype lighting units were irradiated in CERN’s CHARM facility up to a Total Integrated Dose (TID) of 870 Gy and no failures were observed. This paper describes the basic design, presents field tests and the effects of radiation on the LEDs luminance.

  20. LED Technology for Dental Applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Argyraki, Aikaterini; Ou, Yiyu; Soerensen, L. H.

    LEDs have a large potential in many dental and oral applications. Areas such as photo polymerization, fluorescence imaging, photodynamic therapy, and photoactivated disinfection are important future candidates for LED based diagnostics and treatment in dentistry.......LEDs have a large potential in many dental and oral applications. Areas such as photo polymerization, fluorescence imaging, photodynamic therapy, and photoactivated disinfection are important future candidates for LED based diagnostics and treatment in dentistry....

  1. Barrier reduction via implementation of InGaN interlayer in wafer-bonded current aperture vertical electron transistors consisting of InGaAs channel and N-polar GaN drain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jeonghee; Laurent, Matthew A.; Li, Haoran; Lal, Shalini; Mishra, Umesh K.

    2015-01-01

    This letter reports the influence of the added InGaN interlayer on reducing the inherent interfacial barrier and hence improving the electrical characteristics of wafer-bonded current aperture vertical electron transistors consisting of an InGaAs channel and N-polar GaN drain. The current-voltage characteristics of the transistors show that the implementation of N-polar InGaN interlayer effectively reduces the barrier to electron transport across the wafer-bonded interface most likely due to its polarization induced downward band bending, which increases the electron tunneling probability. Fully functional wafer-bonded transistors with nearly 600 mA/mm of drain current at V GS  = 0 V and L go  = 2 μm have been achieved, and thus demonstrate the feasibility of using wafer-bonded heterostructures for applications that require active carrier transport through both materials

  2. Reducing Threshold of Multi Quantum Wells InGaN Laser Diode by Using InGaN/GaN Waveguide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdullah, Rafid A.; Ibrahim, Kamarulazizi

    2010-07-01

    ISE TCAD (Integrated System Engineering Technology Computer Aided Design) software simulation program has been utilized to help study the effect of using InGaN/GaN as a waveguide instead of conventional GaN waveguide for multi quantum wells violet InGaN laser diode (LD). Simulation results indicate that the threshold of the LD has been reduced by using InGaN/GaN waveguide where InGaN/GaN waveguide increases the optical confinement factor which leads to increase the confinement carriers at the active region of the LD.

  3. Modeling of the Interminiband Absorption Coefficient in InGaN Quantum Dot Superlattices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanni Giannoccaro

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a model to estimate minibands and theinterminiband absorption coefficient for a wurtzite (WZ indium gallium nitride (InGaN self-assembled quantum dot superlattice (QDSL is developed. It considers a simplified cuboid shape for quantum dots (QDs. The semi-analytical investigation starts from evaluation through the three-dimensional (3D finite element method (FEM simulations of crystal mechanical deformation derived from heterostructure lattice mismatch under spontaneous and piezoelectric polarization effects. From these results, mean values in QDs and barrier regions of charge carriers’ electric potentials and effective masses for the conduction band (CB and three valence sub-bands for each direction are evaluated. For the minibands’ investigation, the single-particle time-independent Schrödinger equation in effective mass approximation is decoupled in three directions and resolved using the one-dimensional (1D Kronig–Penney model. The built-in electric field is also considered along the polar axis direction, obtaining Wannier–Stark ladders. Then, theinterminiband absorption coefficient in thermal equilibrium for transverse electric (TE and magnetic (TM incident light polarization is calculated using Fermi’s golden rule implementation based on a numerical integration into the first Brillouin zone. For more detailed results, an absorption coefficient component related to superlattice free excitons is also introduced. Finally, some simulation results, observations and comments are given.

  4. Continuous-flux MOVPE growth of position-controlled N-face GaN nanorods and embedded InGaN quantum wells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bergbauer, W; Strassburg, M; Koelper, Ch; Linder, N; Roder, C; Laehnemann, J; Trampert, A; Fuendling, S; Li, S F; Wehmann, H-H; Waag, A

    2010-01-01

    We demonstrate the fabrication of N-face GaN nanorods by metal organic vapour phase epitaxy (MOVPE), using continuous-flux conditions. This is in contrast to other approaches reported so far, which have been based on growth modes far off the conventional growth regimes. For position control of nanorods an SiO 2 masking layer with a dense hole pattern on a c-plane sapphire substrate was used. Nanorods with InGaN/GaN heterostructures have been grown catalyst-free. High growth rates up to 25 μm h -1 were observed and a well-adjusted carrier gas mixture between hydrogen and nitrogen enabled homogeneous nanorod diameters down to 220 nm with aspect ratios of approximately 8:1. The structural quality and defect progression within nanorods were determined by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Different emission energies for InGaN quantum wells (QWs) could be assigned to different side facets by room temperature cathodoluminescence (CL) measurements.

  5. Continuous-flux MOVPE growth of position-controlled N-face GaN nanorods and embedded InGaN quantum wells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bergbauer, W; Strassburg, M; Koelper, Ch; Linder, N [Osram Opto Semiconductors GmbH, Leibnizstrasse 4, D-93055 Regensburg (Germany); Roder, C; Laehnemann, J; Trampert, A [Paul-Drude-Institut fuer Festkoerperelektronik, Hausvogteiplatz 5-7, D-10117 Berlin (Germany); Fuendling, S; Li, S F; Wehmann, H-H; Waag, A, E-mail: werner.bergbauer@osram-os.com [Institut fuer Halbleitertechnik, TU Braunschweig, Hans-Sommer-Strasse 66, D-38106 Braunschweig (Germany)

    2010-07-30

    We demonstrate the fabrication of N-face GaN nanorods by metal organic vapour phase epitaxy (MOVPE), using continuous-flux conditions. This is in contrast to other approaches reported so far, which have been based on growth modes far off the conventional growth regimes. For position control of nanorods an SiO{sub 2} masking layer with a dense hole pattern on a c-plane sapphire substrate was used. Nanorods with InGaN/GaN heterostructures have been grown catalyst-free. High growth rates up to 25 {mu}m h{sup -1} were observed and a well-adjusted carrier gas mixture between hydrogen and nitrogen enabled homogeneous nanorod diameters down to 220 nm with aspect ratios of approximately 8:1. The structural quality and defect progression within nanorods were determined by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Different emission energies for InGaN quantum wells (QWs) could be assigned to different side facets by room temperature cathodoluminescence (CL) measurements.

  6. Continuous-flux MOVPE growth of position-controlled N-face GaN nanorods and embedded InGaN quantum wells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergbauer, W.; Strassburg, M.; Kölper, Ch; Linder, N.; Roder, C.; Lähnemann, J.; Trampert, A.; Fündling, S.; Li, S. F.; Wehmann, H.-H.; Waag, A.

    2010-07-01

    We demonstrate the fabrication of N-face GaN nanorods by metal organic vapour phase epitaxy (MOVPE), using continuous-flux conditions. This is in contrast to other approaches reported so far, which have been based on growth modes far off the conventional growth regimes. For position control of nanorods an SiO2 masking layer with a dense hole pattern on a c-plane sapphire substrate was used. Nanorods with InGaN/GaN heterostructures have been grown catalyst-free. High growth rates up to 25 µm h - 1 were observed and a well-adjusted carrier gas mixture between hydrogen and nitrogen enabled homogeneous nanorod diameters down to 220 nm with aspect ratios of approximately 8:1. The structural quality and defect progression within nanorods were determined by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Different emission energies for InGaN quantum wells (QWs) could be assigned to different side facets by room temperature cathodoluminescence (CL) measurements.

  7. Towards green loyalty: the influences of green perceived risk, green image, green trust and green satisfaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chrisjatmiko, K.

    2018-01-01

    The paper aims to present a comprehensive framework for the influences of green perceived risk, green image, green trust and green satisfaction to green loyalty. The paper also seeks to account explicitly for the differences in green perceived risk, green image, green trust, green satisfaction and green loyalty found among green products customers. Data were obtained from 155 green products customers. Structural equation modeling was used in order to test the proposed hypotheses. The findings show that green image, green trust and green satisfaction has positive effects to green loyalty. But green perceived risk has negative effects to green image, green trust and green satisfaction. However, green perceived risk, green image, green trust and green satisfaction also seems to be a good device to gain green products customers from competitors. The contributions of the paper are, firstly, a more complete framework of the influences of green perceived risk, green image, green trust and green satisfaction to green loyalty analyses simultaneously. Secondly, the study allows a direct comparison of the difference in green perceived risk, green image, green trust, green satisfaction and green loyalty between green products customers.

  8. Green maritime transportation: Market based measures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Psaraftis, Harilaos N.

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this chapter is to introduce the concept of Market Based Measures (MBMs) to reduce Green House Gas (GHG) emissions from ships, and review several distinct MBM proposals that have been under consideration by the International Maritime Organization (IMO). The chapter discusses the me...... the mechanisms used by MBMs, and explores how the concept of the Marginal Abatement Cost (MAC) can be linked to MBMs. It also attempts to discuss the pros and cons of the submitted proposals....

  9. Oblique-angle sputtered AlN nanocolumnar layer as a buffer layer in GaN-based LED

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Lung-Chien; Tien, Ching-Ho; Liao, Wei-Chian; Luo, Yi-Min

    2011-01-01

    This work presents an aluminum nitride (AlN) nanocolumnar layer sputtered at various oblique angles and its application as a buffer layer for GaN-based light-emitting diodes (LEDs) that are fabricated on sapphire substrates. The OA-AlN nanocolumnar layer has a diameter of about 30-60 nm. The GaN-based LED structure is perpendicularly extended from the OA-AlN nanocolumnar layer. Then, the nanocolumnar structure is merged into p-GaN layer to form a mesa structure with a diameter of about 200-600 nm on the surface of the GaN-based LED. Moreover, optical characteristics of the LED were studied using photoluminescence, along with the blue-shifts observed as well. - Research highlights: → An AlN nanocolumnar buffer layer prepared by oblique-angle (OA) deposition. → GaN-based LED structures were grown on a sapphire substrate with an AlN nanocolumnar buffer layer. → The OA-AlN nanocolumnar layer has a diameter of about 30-60 nm.

  10. Low temperature p-type doping of (Al)GaN layers using ammonia molecular beam epitaxy for InGaN laser diodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malinverni, M., E-mail: marco.malinverni@epfl.ch; Lamy, J.-M.; Martin, D.; Grandjean, N. [ICMP, École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL), CH-1015 Lausanne (Switzerland); Feltin, E.; Dorsaz, J. [NOVAGAN AG, CH-1015 Lausanne (Switzerland); Castiglia, A.; Rossetti, M.; Duelk, M.; Vélez, C. [EXALOS AG, CH-8952 Schlieren (Switzerland)

    2014-12-15

    We demonstrate state-of-the-art p-type (Al)GaN layers deposited at low temperature (740 °C) by ammonia molecular beam epitaxy (NH{sub 3}-MBE) to be used as top cladding of laser diodes (LDs) with the aim of further reducing the thermal budget on the InGaN quantum well active region. Typical p-type GaN resistivities and contact resistances are 0.4 Ω cm and 5 × 10{sup −4} Ω cm{sup 2}, respectively. As a test bed, we fabricated a hybrid laser structure emitting at 400 nm combining n-type AlGaN cladding and InGaN active region grown by metal-organic vapor phase epitaxy, with the p-doped waveguide and cladding layers grown by NH{sub 3}-MBE. Single-mode ridge-waveguide LD exhibits a threshold voltage as low as 4.3 V for an 800 × 2 μm{sup 2} ridge dimension and a threshold current density of ∼5 kA cm{sup −2} in continuous wave operation. The series resistance of the device is 6 Ω and the resistivity is 1.5 Ω cm, confirming thereby the excellent electrical properties of p-type Al{sub 0.06}Ga{sub 0.94}N:Mg despite the low growth temperature.

  11. Health risks occurring when color is percepted under led lighting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.A. Kaptsov

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with problems of color perception under LED lighting. We revealed that inadequate perception of a signal color by a driver led to greater risks of transport accidents. We reviewed both Jung-Helmholtz three-color hypothesis and a modern one based on fiber-optical approach to functioning of "Mueller cells and cones" system. We made an attempt to explain a number of effects related to visibility curves and time delays when defining color of light signals. Our research on assessing influence exerted by LED lighting on functional state and working capacity of railway workers during which we applied occupational selection techniques revealed negative changes. We proved there was a decrease in functional resistance to color sense between red and green signals as well as longer response time for complicated sight-motor reaction and significant decrease in readiness to emergency actions (resistance to monotony in examined individuals. The article also contains data on time peculiarities which are characteristic for defining signals color in relation to red signal (650 nm. We showed that when red color LEDs with wave length much shorter than 650 nm were used in signaling devices it caused risks of inadequate color detection, longer reaction to inhibiting signals, and greater possibility of transport accidents and negative events in everyday life. These peculiarities should be taken into account when designing traffic lights and other signaling devices which provide transport safety. We also proved that signaling traffic lights for transport systems should be designed allowing for physiology of color perception by a human visual analyzer; application of LEDs with wave length shorter than 650 nm should be absolutely excluded

  12. Linearly polarized photoluminescence of InGaN quantum disks embedded in GaN nanorods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Youngsin; Chan, Christopher C S; Nuttall, Luke; Puchtler, Tim J; Taylor, Robert A; Kim, Nammee; Jo, Yongcheol; Im, Hyunsik

    2018-05-25

    We have investigated the emission from InGaN/GaN quantum disks grown on the tip of GaN nanorods. The emission at 3.21 eV from the InGaN quantum disk doesn't show a Stark shift, and it is linearly polarized when excited perpendicular to the growth direction. The degree of linear polarization is about 39.3% due to the anisotropy of the nanostructures. In order to characterize a single nanostructure, the quantum disks were dispersed on a SiO 2 substrate patterned with a metal reference grid. By rotating the excitation polarization angle from parallel to perpendicular relative to the nanorods, the variation of overall PL for the 3.21 eV peak was recorded and it clearly showed the degree of linear polarization (DLP) of 51.5%.

  13. Precise Temperature Mapping of GaN-Based LEDs by Quantitative Infrared Micro-Thermography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geon Hee Kim

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available A method of measuring the precise temperature distribution of GaN-based light-emitting diodes (LEDs by quantitative infrared micro-thermography is reported. To reduce the calibration error, the same measuring conditions were used for both calibration and thermal imaging; calibration was conducted on a highly emissive black-painted area on a dummy sapphire wafer loaded near the LED wafer on a thermoelectric cooler mount. We used infrared thermal radiation images of the black-painted area on the dummy wafer and an unbiased LED wafer at two different temperatures to determine the factors that degrade the accuracy of temperature measurement, i.e., the non-uniform response of the instrument, superimposed offset radiation, reflected radiation, and emissivity map of the LED surface. By correcting these factors from the measured infrared thermal radiation images of biased LEDs, we determined a precise absolute temperature image. Consequently, we could observe from where the local self-heat emerges and how it distributes on the emitting area of the LEDs. The experimental results demonstrated that highly localized self-heating and a remarkable temperature gradient, which are detrimental to LED performance and reliability, arise near the p-contact edge of the LED surface at high injection levels owing to the current crowding effect.

  14. A time-dependent Green's function-based model for stream ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DRINIE

    2003-07-03

    Jul 3, 2003 ... applications, this Green's function has found use primarily in linear heat transfer and flow ... based on the mathematical description of the flow with the nonlinear .... i∂/∂x + j∂/∂y is the two-dimensional gradient operator,.

  15. Optimization design of LED heat dissipation structure based on strip fins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Lingyun; Wan, Wenbin; Chen, Qingguang; Rao, Huanle; Xu, Ping

    2018-03-01

    To solve the heat dissipation problem of LED, a radiator structure based on strip fins is designed and the method to optimize the structure parameters of strip fins is proposed in this paper. The combination of RBF neural networks and particle swarm optimization (PSO) algorithm is used for modeling and optimization respectively. During the experiment, the 150 datasets of LED junction temperature when structure parameters of number of strip fins, length, width and height of the fins have different values are obtained by ANSYS software. Then RBF neural network is applied to build the non-linear regression model and the parameters optimization of structure based on particle swarm optimization algorithm is performed with this model. The experimental results show that the lowest LED junction temperature reaches 43.88 degrees when the number of hidden layer nodes in RBF neural network is 10, the two learning factors in particle swarm optimization algorithm are 0.5, 0.5 respectively, the inertia factor is 1 and the maximum number of iterations is 100, and now the number of fins is 64, the distribution structure is 8*8, and the length, width and height of fins are 4.3mm, 4.48mm and 55.3mm respectively. To compare the modeling and optimization results, LED junction temperature at the optimized structure parameters was simulated and the result is 43.592°C which approximately equals to the optimal result. Compared with the ordinary plate-fin-type radiator structure whose temperature is 56.38°C, the structure greatly enhances heat dissipation performance of the structure.

  16. Enhanced light extraction from GaN-based LEDs with a bottom-up assembled photonic crystal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gong Haibo; Hao Xiaopeng; Wu Yongzhong; Cao Bingqiang; Xia Wei; Xu Xiangang

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → Polystyrene (PS) microspheres were employed as a template. → A noninvasive photonic crystal was fabricated on the surface of GaN-based LED. → Periodic arrangement of bowl-like holes served as a photonic crystal with gradually changed fill factors. → The electroluminescence intensity of LED with a photonic crystal was significantly enhanced. - Abstract: Photonic crystal (PhC) structure is an efficient tool for light extraction from light-emitting diodes (LEDs). The fabrication of a large area PhC structure on the light output surface of LEDs often involves sophisticated equipments such as nanoimprint lithography machine. In this study a monolayer of polystyrene (PS) microspheres was employed as a template to fabricate a noninvasive photonic crystal of indium tin oxide (ITO) on the surface of GaN-based LED. PS spheres can help to form periodic arrangement of bowl-like holes, a photonic crystal with gradually changed fill factors. Importantly, the electroluminescence intensity of LED with a photonic crystal was significantly enhanced by 1.5 times compared to that of the conventional one under various forward injection currents.

  17. Enhanced light extraction from GaN-based LEDs with a bottom-up assembled photonic crystal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gong Haibo [State Key Lab of Crystal Materials, Shandong University, Jinan, 250100 (China); School of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Jinan, Jinan, 250022 (China); Hao Xiaopeng, E-mail: xphao@sdu.edu.cn [State Key Lab of Crystal Materials, Shandong University, Jinan, 250100 (China); Wu Yongzhong [State Key Lab of Crystal Materials, Shandong University, Jinan, 250100 (China); Cao Bingqiang [School of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Jinan, Jinan, 250022 (China); Xia Wei [Shandong Huaguang Optoelectronics Company, Ltd., Jinan, 250101 (China); Xu Xiangang [State Key Lab of Crystal Materials, Shandong University, Jinan, 250100 (China); Shandong Huaguang Optoelectronics Company, Ltd., Jinan, 250101 (China)

    2011-08-15

    Highlights: > Polystyrene (PS) microspheres were employed as a template. > A noninvasive photonic crystal was fabricated on the surface of GaN-based LED. > Periodic arrangement of bowl-like holes served as a photonic crystal with gradually changed fill factors. > The electroluminescence intensity of LED with a photonic crystal was significantly enhanced. - Abstract: Photonic crystal (PhC) structure is an efficient tool for light extraction from light-emitting diodes (LEDs). The fabrication of a large area PhC structure on the light output surface of LEDs often involves sophisticated equipments such as nanoimprint lithography machine. In this study a monolayer of polystyrene (PS) microspheres was employed as a template to fabricate a noninvasive photonic crystal of indium tin oxide (ITO) on the surface of GaN-based LED. PS spheres can help to form periodic arrangement of bowl-like holes, a photonic crystal with gradually changed fill factors. Importantly, the electroluminescence intensity of LED with a photonic crystal was significantly enhanced by 1.5 times compared to that of the conventional one under various forward injection currents.

  18. 高显色指数LED合成白光光源的研究%Study on LEDs Synthesized High Color Rendering Index White Light Source

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    胡奕彬; 庄其仁; 刘士伟; 赖传杜

    2016-01-01

    针对目前白光发光二极管(LED)照明灯具显色性不高的问题,基于测色法研究了LED合成白光显色指数的计算模型,根据参与合成的LED光源光谱及其数量,软件编程计算得出合成光源的色温、显色指数等参数.采用优化的遍历范围,将实验测量得到的冷、暖白光及单色LED的光谱导入程序进行模拟计算,得到不同色温下合成光源的显色指数最大值以及所对应的各种LED配比数量.结果表明,暖白光LED与红、绿、蓝LED合成可以获得色温L介于3500 K~12300 K、显色指数见介于92.0~97.7的白光;与红、绿、青LED合成可以获得Ra介于95.0~97.8的低色温白光(3500 K~4500 K).冷白光LED与红、绿、青LED合成可以获得Ra介于90.9~98.4的高色温白光(8200 K~13000 K).对理论计算的Tc=7803 K、Ra=97.29的LED配比进行实际制作,实验测量得到Tc=7992 K,Ra=97.1,理论计算结果与实验结果吻合.%Targeting poor color rendering property of current white light-emitting diode (LED) lamps,based on the colorimetry method,the calculation model for color rendering index of synthetic white light is studied and the parameters like color temperature and color rendering index of the synthetic LED light source are obtained based on the spectrum and quantity of light sources involved in the synthesis process.By using optimized traversal range,the spectra of cold and warm white light and single-color LEDs are imported into the program for simulating calculation,obtaining the maximum value of color rendering index of the synthesized light source under different color temperatures as well as corresponding matched quantity of various LEDs.The results show that the synthesis with warm white LEDs and red,green and blue LEDs can lead to white light whose color temperature falls in the range of 3500 K~12300 K and color rendering index Ra ranges between 92.0 and 97.7.The synthesis with warm white LEDs and red,green and bluish-green

  19. Dynamics of InGaN tandem blue-violet semiconductor lasers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Antohi, I.; Rusu, S.S.; Tronciu, V.Z.

    2013-01-01

    Full text: Blue-violet semiconductor lasers have received much attention because of their promise for high-density optical storage applications. In particular, blue-violet laser diodes operating at 400 nm are required for BD- systems and for use in medicine, biology, color printers and monitors, etc, In recent years, numerous fabrication methods have been proposed and developed for blue lasers with CW and self-pulsating operations and the lifetime of such lasers has been increased to over 15000 h. Recently, we have reported self-pulsation and excitable behaviour for an InGaN laser with a p-type saturable absorber, and SP in the frequency range from 1.6 to 2.9 GHz has been achieved with such lasers. In this paper, we present an investigation of the dynamics of tandem 400 nm blue-violet lasers with setup presented in Fig.1a. A particular feature of the devices is the connection of the contacts of the SA, to reduce the carrier lifetime in the SA with the intention of producing self-pulsation and excitability. We examine the laser dynamics in terms of bifurcation diagrams. A typical calculation of bifurcation for the periodic solution is shown in Fig. 1b. This figure shows the dependence of the peak of the photon number on the injected.

  20. LED based opto-wetting platforms for micromixing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Tony; Narayanan Unni, Harikrishnan

    2018-02-01

    The digital microfluidics utilizes the gradient in wettability for droplet transportation. This paper reports a novel technique of LED induced wetting ( Opto-wetting) where a single low power LED (Light emitting diode) emitting light of wavelength 395nm peak with luminous intensity of 300mcd (milli candela) is used to move two droplets of 20μL each on a photo responsive substrate of azobenzene (C12H10N2) coated PDMS (Poly Dimethyl Siloxane) substrate. The PDMS substrate of size 5cmx2cmx0.5cm were modified by thin film coating of Azobenzene dissolved in olive oil solution. The LED was aligned vertically on the top of the substrate. The pulsed operation of LED induces a spatial gradient of surface energy due to the reversible process of photo isomerization of Azobenzene molecules coated on the surface. The Photo-isomerization changes the conformation of the molecules thereby changing its surface energy .The change in surface energy of the substrate induces a change in contact angle of the droplet which initiates its movement. Two water droplets each of 20μL were dispensed on the substrate using micro syringe. Two droplets which were initially at a few cm distance apart were gradually moved towards the focus of light and merged together. The urine droplets (20μL) were moved and mixed with the red dye reagent (20μL) by controlling the light intensity of the LED. This concept provides a cost effective technique of droplet manipulation in the Lab on a chip domain where various multiplexed operations on proteins and DNA droplets can be done for point of care diagnostics.

  1. The prediction of engineering cost for green buildings based on information entropy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Guoqiang; Huang, Jinglian

    2018-03-01

    Green building is the developing trend in the world building industry. Additionally, construction costs are an essential consideration in building constructions. Therefore, it is necessary to investigate the problems of cost prediction in green building. On the basis of analyzing the cost of green building, this paper proposes the forecasting method of actual cost in green building based on information entropy and provides the forecasting working procedure. Using the probability density obtained from statistical data, such as labor costs, material costs, machinery costs, administration costs, profits, risk costs a unit project quotation and etc., situations can be predicted which lead to cost variations between budgeted cost and actual cost in constructions, through estimating the information entropy of budgeted cost and actual cost. The research results of this article have a practical significance in cost control of green building. Additionally, the method proposed in this article can be generalized and applied to a variety of other aspects in building management.

  2. Near-infrared emitting In-rich InGaN layers grown directly on Si: Towards the whole composition range

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aseev, Pavel, E-mail: pavel.aseev@upm.es; Rodriguez, Paul E. D. Soto; Gómez, Víctor J.; Alvi, Naveed ul Hassan; Calleja, Enrique [Instituto de Sistemas Optoelectrónicos y Microtecnología, Universidad Politécnica de Madrid, Ciudad Universitaria s/n, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Mánuel, José M.; Jiménez, Juan J.; García, Rafael [Departamente Ciencia de los Materiales e Ingeniería Metalúrgica y Química Inorgánica, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Cádiz, Puerto Real, 11510 Cádiz (Spain); Morales, Francisco M. [Departamente Ciencia de los Materiales e Ingeniería Metalúrgica y Química Inorgánica, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Cádiz, Puerto Real, 11510 Cádiz (Spain); IMEYMAT: Institute of Research on Electron Microscopy and Materials of the University of Cádiz, 11510 Cádiz (Spain); Senichev, Alexander [Max Planck Institute of Microstructure Physics, Weinberg 2, 06120 Halle (Germany); Lienau, Christoph [Institute of Physics and Center of Interface Science, Carl von Ossietzky Universität Oldenburg, Ammerländer Heerstr. 114-118, 26129 Oldenburg (Germany); and others

    2015-02-16

    The authors report compact and chemically homogeneous In-rich InGaN layers directly grown on Si (111) by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy. High structural and optical quality is evidenced by transmission electron microscopy, near-field scanning optical microscopy, and X-ray diffraction. Photoluminescence emission in the near-infrared is observed up to room temperature covering the important 1.3 and 1.55 μm telecom wavelength bands. The n-InGaN/p-Si interface is ohmic due to the absence of any insulating buffer layers. This qualitatively extends the application fields of III-nitrides and allows their integration with established Si technology.

  3. Near-infrared emitting In-rich InGaN layers grown directly on Si: Towards the whole composition range

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aseev, Pavel; Rodriguez, Paul E. D. Soto; Gómez, Víctor J.; Alvi, Naveed ul Hassan; Calleja, Enrique; Mánuel, José M.; Jiménez, Juan J.; García, Rafael; Morales, Francisco M.; Senichev, Alexander; Lienau, Christoph

    2015-01-01

    The authors report compact and chemically homogeneous In-rich InGaN layers directly grown on Si (111) by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy. High structural and optical quality is evidenced by transmission electron microscopy, near-field scanning optical microscopy, and X-ray diffraction. Photoluminescence emission in the near-infrared is observed up to room temperature covering the important 1.3 and 1.55 μm telecom wavelength bands. The n-InGaN/p-Si interface is ohmic due to the absence of any insulating buffer layers. This qualitatively extends the application fields of III-nitrides and allows their integration with established Si technology

  4. Design for The Indoor Visible Light Communication Application System Based on LED Visible Light

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lian Wenyu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper designs an indoor visible light communication application system based on LED. The system can modulate the original signal one or more times, move to a specific frequency band, transmit on the power line, in the LED terminal use this module to decode, restore the Ethernet signals. This design is applicable to the simplicity of the LED visible light communication applications, which provide the premise and guarantee for the construction of smart home network.

  5. Saccharide-based Approach to Green Metallic Nanostructure Synthesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engelbrekt, Christian; Sørensen, Karsten Holm; Jensen, Palle Skovhus

    A green approach to solution synthesis of metallic nanoparticles has been developed using harmless and bioapplicable chemicals as well as moderate temperatures. Metal precursors are reduced by glucose/buffers and sterically stabilized by starch. The saccharide based procedure is highly diverse pr...... producing specifically a wide range of spherical, anisotropic, metallic, semi - conductor and core-shell nanostructures....

  6. An inexpensive Arduino-based LED stimulator system for vision research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teikari, Petteri; Najjar, Raymond P; Malkki, Hemi; Knoblauch, Kenneth; Dumortier, Dominique; Gronfier, Claude; Cooper, Howard M

    2012-11-15

    Light emitting diodes (LEDs) are being used increasingly as light sources in life sciences applications such as in vision research, fluorescence microscopy and in brain-computer interfacing. Here we present an inexpensive but effective visual stimulator based on light emitting diodes (LEDs) and open-source Arduino microcontroller prototyping platform. The main design goal of our system was to use off-the-shelf and open-source components as much as possible, and to reduce design complexity allowing use of the system to end-users without advanced electronics skills. The main core of the system is a USB-connected Arduino microcontroller platform designed initially with a specific emphasis on the ease-of-use creating interactive physical computing environments. The pulse-width modulation (PWM) signal of Arduino was used to drive LEDs allowing linear light intensity control. The visual stimulator was demonstrated in applications such as murine pupillometry, rodent models for cognitive research, and heterochromatic flicker photometry in human psychophysics. These examples illustrate some of the possible applications that can be easily implemented and that are advantageous for students, educational purposes and universities with limited resources. The LED stimulator system was developed as an open-source project. Software interface was developed using Python with simplified examples provided for Matlab and LabVIEW. Source code and hardware information are distributed under the GNU General Public Licence (GPL, version 3). Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Innovations in LED lighting for reduced-ESM crop production in space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massa, Gioia; Mitchell, Cary; Bourget, C. Michael; Morrow, Robert

    In controlled-environment crop production such as will be practiced at the lunar outpost and Mars base, the single most energy-demanding aspect is electric lighting for plant growth, including energy costs for energizing lamps as well as for removing excess heat. For a variety of reasons, sunlight may not be a viable option as the main source of crop lighting off-Earth and traditional electric lamps for crop lighting have numerous drawbacks for use in a space environment. A collaborative research venture between the Advanced Life Support Crops Group at Purdue University and the Orbital Technologies Corporation (ORBITEC) has led to the development of efficient, reconfigurable LED lighting technologies for crop growth in an ALSS. The light sources use printed-circuit red and blue LEDs, which are individually tunable for a range of photosynthetic photon fluxes and photomorphogenic plant responses. Initial lighting arrays have LEDs that can be energized from the bottom upward when deployed in a vertical, intracanopy configuration, allowing the illumination to be tailored for stand height throughout the cropping cycle. Preliminary testing with the planophile crop cowpea (Vigna unguiculata L. Walp, breeding line IT87D-941-1), resulted in optimizing internal reflectance of growth compartments by lining walls, floor, and a movable ceiling with white Poly film, as well as by determining optimal planting density and plant positioning. Additionally, these light strips, called "lightsicles", can be configured into an overhead plane of light engines. When intracanopy and overhead-LED-lit cowpea crop production was compared, cowpea plants grown with intracanopy lighting had much greater understory leaf retention and produced more dry biomass per kilowatt-hour of lighting energy than did overhead-lit plants. The efficiency of light capture is reduced in overhead-lit scenarios due to mutual shading of lower leaves by upper leaves in closed canopies leading to premature abscission

  8. Effect of green light spectra on the reduction of retinal damage and stress in goldfish, Carassius auratus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, Jin Ah; Kim, Na Na; Choi, Young Jae; Choi, Cheol Young

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the effect of light spectra on retinal damage and stress in goldfish using green (530 nm) and red (620 nm) light emitting diodes (LEDs) at three intensities each (0.5, 1.0, and 1.5 W/m"2). We measured the change in the levels of plasma cortisol and H_2O_2 and expression and levels of caspase-3. The apoptotic response of green and red LED spectra was assessed using the terminal transferase dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) assay. Stress indicator (cortisol and H_2O_2) and apoptosis-related genes (caspase-3) decreased in green light, but increased in red light with higher light intensities over time. The TUNEL assay revealed that more apoptotic cells were detected in outer nuclear layers after exposure to red LED over time with the increase in light intensity, than the other spectra. These results indicate that green light efficiently reduces retinal damage and stress, whereas red light induces it. Therefore, red light-induced retina damage may induce apoptosis in goldfish retina. -- Highlights: •Green light efficiently reduces retinal damage and stress. •Green spectra reduce caspase production and apoptosis. •Red light-induced retina damage may induce apoptosis in goldfish retina. •The retina of goldfish recognizes green spectra as a stable environment.

  9. Effect of green light spectra on the reduction of retinal damage and stress in goldfish, Carassius auratus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Jin Ah; Kim, Na Na; Choi, Young Jae; Choi, Cheol Young, E-mail: choic@kmou.ac.kr

    2016-07-22

    We investigated the effect of light spectra on retinal damage and stress in goldfish using green (530 nm) and red (620 nm) light emitting diodes (LEDs) at three intensities each (0.5, 1.0, and 1.5 W/m{sup 2}). We measured the change in the levels of plasma cortisol and H{sub 2}O{sub 2} and expression and levels of caspase-3. The apoptotic response of green and red LED spectra was assessed using the terminal transferase dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) assay. Stress indicator (cortisol and H{sub 2}O{sub 2}) and apoptosis-related genes (caspase-3) decreased in green light, but increased in red light with higher light intensities over time. The TUNEL assay revealed that more apoptotic cells were detected in outer nuclear layers after exposure to red LED over time with the increase in light intensity, than the other spectra. These results indicate that green light efficiently reduces retinal damage and stress, whereas red light induces it. Therefore, red light-induced retina damage may induce apoptosis in goldfish retina. -- Highlights: •Green light efficiently reduces retinal damage and stress. •Green spectra reduce caspase production and apoptosis. •Red light-induced retina damage may induce apoptosis in goldfish retina. •The retina of goldfish recognizes green spectra as a stable environment.

  10. Economic versus belief-based models: Shedding light on the adoption of novel green technologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Girod, Bastien; Mayer, Sebastian; Nägele, Florian

    2017-01-01

    Understanding the determinants for the adoption of novel green consumer technologies is important to effectively foster their diffusion. Energy and environmental science literature often takes an approach based on economic variables such as objectively measureable household and technology characteristics. Increasingly, also subjective variables based on personal belief are considered. On the basis of a survey about the intention to adopt an exemplary novel green consumer technology (intelligent thermostats), we contribute to the clarification of the explanatory power of these two approaches. We first compare the economic model to the belief-based model and second, investigate how beliefs about the green technology are influenced by personal environmental norms and innovativeness. Our evaluation shows that the belief-based model explains considerably higher variance in the intention to adopt. Thereby the perceived hedonic satisfaction, usefulness, habit and facilitating conditions reveal as key determinants. Moreover, environmental norms show lower impact than personal innovativeness. In the discussion we consolidate these findings and point to the risk of omitted variable bias when selectively including belief-based variables in adoption models. Our findings suggest that policies can effectively accelerate the early market diffusion of green consumer technologies by incentivizing retailers to introduce and market such technologies. - Highlights: • Adoption of a green consumer technology (energy-saving thermostats) is evaluated. • Subjective beliefs about the technology show higher impact than objective measures. • Key beliefs relate to pleasure, usefulness, habits and facilitating conditions. • Personal innovativeness is more relevant for adoption than environmental norms. • Isolated use of belief-based adoption determinants can lead to omitted variable bias.

  11. Downstream-based Scheduling for Energy Conservation in Green EPONs

    KAUST Repository

    Chen, Shen; Dhaini, Ahmad R.; Ho, Pin-Han; Shihada, Basem; Shen, Gangxiang; Lin, Chih-Hao

    2012-01-01

    the ONU sleep time, it jeopardizes the quality of service (QoS) performance of the network, especially for downstream traffic in case the overlapping is based on the upstream time slot. In this paper, we study the downstream traffic performance in green

  12. Blue laser diode (LD) and light emitting diode (LED) applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bergh, Arpad A.

    2004-01-01

    The family of blue LEDs, edge emitting and surface emitting lasers, enable a number of applications. Blue lasers are used in digital applications such as optical storage in high density DVDs. The resolution of the spot size and hence the storage density is diffraction limited and is inversely proportional to the square of the wavelength of the laser. Other applications include printing, optical scanners, and high-resolution photo-lithography. As light emitters, blue LEDs are used for signaling and in direct view large area emissive displays. They are also making inroads into signage and LCD back-lighting, mobile platforms, and decorative accent lighting in curtains, furniture, etc. Blue LEDs produce white light either with phosphor wavelength converters or in combination with red and green LEDs. The full potential of LED light sources will require three devices to enable complete control over color and intensity. Sensing and medical/bio applications have a major impact on home security, on monitoring the environment, and on health care. New emerging diagnostic and therapeutic applications will improve the quality and reduce the cost of health care. (copyright 2004 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  13. Blue laser diode (LD) and light emitting diode (LED) applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bergh, Arpad A [Optoelectronics Industry Development Association (OIDA), 1133 Connecticut Avenue, NW, Suite 600, Washington, DC 20036-4329 (United States)

    2004-09-01

    The family of blue LEDs, edge emitting and surface emitting lasers, enable a number of applications. Blue lasers are used in digital applications such as optical storage in high density DVDs. The resolution of the spot size and hence the storage density is diffraction limited and is inversely proportional to the square of the wavelength of the laser. Other applications include printing, optical scanners, and high-resolution photo-lithography. As light emitters, blue LEDs are used for signaling and in direct view large area emissive displays. They are also making inroads into signage and LCD back-lighting, mobile platforms, and decorative accent lighting in curtains, furniture, etc. Blue LEDs produce white light either with phosphor wavelength converters or in combination with red and green LEDs. The full potential of LED light sources will require three devices to enable complete control over color and intensity. Sensing and medical/bio applications have a major impact on home security, on monitoring the environment, and on health care. New emerging diagnostic and therapeutic applications will improve the quality and reduce the cost of health care. (copyright 2004 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  14. A clade uniting the green algae Mesostigma viride and Chlorokybus atmophyticus represents the deepest branch of the Streptophyta in chloroplast genome-based phylogenies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Turmel Monique

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Viridiplantae comprise two major phyla: the Streptophyta, containing the charophycean green algae and all land plants, and the Chlorophyta, containing the remaining green algae. Despite recent progress in unravelling phylogenetic relationships among major green plant lineages, problematic nodes still remain in the green tree of life. One of the major issues concerns the scaly biflagellate Mesostigma viride, which is either regarded as representing the earliest divergence of the Streptophyta or a separate lineage that diverged before the Chlorophyta and Streptophyta. Phylogenies based on chloroplast and mitochondrial genomes support the latter view. Because some green plant lineages are not represented in these phylogenies, sparse taxon sampling has been suspected to yield misleading topologies. Here, we describe the complete chloroplast DNA (cpDNA sequence of the early-diverging charophycean alga Chlorokybus atmophyticus and present chloroplast genome-based phylogenies with an expanded taxon sampling. Results The 152,254 bp Chlorokybus cpDNA closely resembles its Mesostigma homologue at the gene content and gene order levels. Using various methods of phylogenetic inference, we analyzed amino acid and nucleotide data sets that were derived from 45 protein-coding genes common to the cpDNAs of 37 green algal/land plant taxa and eight non-green algae. Unexpectedly, all best trees recovered a robust clade uniting Chlorokybus and Mesostigma. In protein trees, this clade was sister to all streptophytes and chlorophytes and this placement received moderate support. In contrast, gene trees provided unequivocal support to the notion that the Mesostigma + Chlorokybus clade represents the earliest-diverging branch of the Streptophyta. Independent analyses of structural data (gene content and/or gene order and of subsets of amino acid data progressively enriched in slow-evolving sites led us to conclude that the latter topology

  15. Comparative Policy Study for Green Buildings in U.S. and China

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khanna, Nina; Romankiewicz, John; Feng, Wei; Zhou, Nan; Ye, Qing

    2014-04-01

    Prominent barriers facing the U.S. green building industry include the fact that government bodies that supervise health, fire safety, land, and other public operations are slow to revise codes to accommodate green building (regulatory barrier). In China, the lack of a green building professional accreditation process similar to the Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) AP process limits the green building workforce capacity development (informational barrier). The main policies highlighted in this report to tackle these barriers are 1) comprehensive codes and labeling plan (informational, institutional), 2) government-led targets and demonstrations (risk), 3) education and awareness programs (informational), 4) fiscal policy that supports green building investment (financial), and 5) integrated design promotion (institutional, financial).

  16. Parent Interest in a School-Based, School Nurse-Led Weight Management Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubik, Martha Y.; Lee, Jiwoo

    2014-01-01

    Because one in three children is already overweight or obese, school-based interventions targeting secondary obesity prevention merit consideration. This study assessed parent interest in participating in a school-based, school nurse-led weight management program for young school-aged children. A random sample of parents ("n" = 122) of…

  17. Assembling and Using an LED-Based Detector to Monitor Absorbance Changes during Acid-Base Titrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Willy G.; Cavalheiro, E´der T. G.

    2015-01-01

    A simple photometric assembly based in an LED as a light source and a photodiode as a detector is proposed in order to follow the absorbance changes as a function of the titrant volume added during the course of acid-base titrations in the presence of a suitable visual indicator. The simplicity and low cost of the electronic device allow the…

  18. Metaphysical green

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Earon, Ofri

    2011-01-01

    example is a tiny Danish summer house from 1918 . The second example is ‘House before House’ , in Tokyo. The third example is a prefabricated house ‘CHU’ . The analysis evaluates the characteristics of diverse tones of green – from green image to green sensation. The analysis is based on the original...... of Sensation of Green is created by a physical interaction between the language of space and the language of nature” The notion of Sensation of Green was developed through a previous study ‘Learning from the Summer House’ investigating the unique architectural characteristics of the Danish summer houses...... the Sensation of Green? Three existing examples are agents to this discussion. The first example is a Danish summer house. The other two are international urban examples. While the summer house articulates the original meaning of Sensation of Green, the urban examples illustrate its urban context. The first...

  19. Spectral effects of light-emitting diodes on plant growth and development: The importance of green and blue light

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cope, K. R.; Bugbee, B.

    2011-12-01

    Light-emitting diodes (LEDs) are an emerging technology for plant growth lighting. Due to their narrow spectral output, colored LEDs provide many options for studying the spectral effects of light on plants. Early on, efficient red LEDs were the primary focus of photobiological research; however, subsequent studies have shown that normal plant growth and development cannot be achieved under red light without blue light supplementation. More recent studies have shown that red and blue (RB) LEDs supplemented with green light increase plant dry mass. This is because green light transmits more effectively through the leaf canopy than red and blue light, thus illuminating lower plant leaves and increasing whole-plant photosynthesis. Red, green and blue (RGB) light can be provided by either a conventional white light source (such as fluorescent lights), a combination of RGB LEDs, or from recently developed white LEDs. White LEDs exceed the efficiency of fluorescent lights and have a comparable broad spectrum. As such, they have the potential to replace fluorescent lighting for growth-chamber-based crop production both on Earth and in space. Here we report the results of studies on the effects of three white LED types (warm, neutral and cool) on plant growth and development compared to combinations of RB and RGB LEDs. Plants were grown under two constant light intensities (200 and 500 μmol m-2 s-1). Temperature, environmental conditions and root-zone environment were uniformly maintained across treatments. Phytochrome photoequilbria and red/far-red ratios were similar among treatments and were comparable to conventional fluorescent lights. Blue light had a significant effect on both plant growth (dry mass gain) and development (dry mass partitioning). An increase in the absolute amount (μmol m-2 s-1) of blue light from 0-80 μmol m-2 s-1 resulted in a decrease in stem elongation, independent of the light intensity. However, an increase in the relative amount (%) of blue

  20. Factors associated with the implementation of community-based peer-led health promotion programs: A scoping review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorthios-Guilledroit, Agathe; Richard, Lucie; Filiatrault, Johanne

    2018-06-01

    Peer education is growing in popularity as a useful health promotion strategy. However, optimal conditions for implementing peer-led health promotion programs (HPPs) remain unclear. This scoping review aimed to describe factors that can influence implementation of peer-led HPPs targeting adult populations. Five databases were searched using the keywords "health promotion/prevention", "implementation", "peers", and related terms. Studies were included if they reported at least one factor associated with the implementation of community-based peer-led HPPs. Fifty-five studies were selected for the analysis. The method known as "best fit framework synthesis" was used to analyze the factors identified in the selected papers. Many factors included in existing implementation conceptual frameworks were deemed applicable to peer-led HPPs. However, other factors related to individuals, programs, and implementation context also emerged from the analysis. Based on this synthesis, an adapted theoretical framework was elaborated, grounded in a complex adaptive system perspective and specifying potential mechanisms through which factors may influence implementation of community-based peer-led HPPs. Further research is needed to test the theoretical framework against empirical data. Findings from this scoping review increase our knowledge of the optimal conditions for implementing peer-led HPPs and thereby maximizing the benefits of such programs. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. InN/GaN Superlattices: Band Structures and Their Pressure Dependence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gorczyca, Iza; Suski, Tadek; Staszczak, Grzegorz

    2013-01-01

    Creation of short-period InN/GaN superlattices is one of the possible ways of conducting band gap engineering in the green-blue range of the spectrum. The present paper reports results of photoluminescence experiments, including pressure effects, on a superlattice sample consisting of unit cells...... with one monolayer of InN and 40 monolayers of GaN. The results are compared with calculations performed for different types of superlattices: InN/GaN, InGaN/GaN, and InN/InGaN/GaN with single monolayers of InN and/or InGaN. The superlattices are simulated by band structure calculations based on the local...... density approximation (LDA) with a semi-empirical correction for the ‘‘LDA gap error’’. A similarity is observed between the results of calculations for an InGaN/GaN superlattice (with one monolayer of InGaN) and the experimental results. This indicates that the fabricated InN quantum wells may contain...

  2. A Learner-led, Discussion-based Elective on Emerging Infectious Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathias, Clinton

    2015-08-25

    Objective. To implement a learner-led, discussion-based course aimed at exposing second-year pharmacy learners to the study of emerging infectious diseases from a global health perspective and to assess the role and importance of pharmacists in the management of disease outbreaks. Design. Learners examined literature pertinent to an emerging infectious disease in a 3-credit, discussion-based course and participated in peer discussion led by a designated learner. Instructional materials included journal articles, audio-visual presentations, documentaries, book chapters, movies, newspaper/magazine articles, and other materials. Learning outcomes were measured based on the ability of learners to perform critical thinking and analysis, communicate with their peers, and participate in class discussions. Assessment. The course was offered to 2 consecutive cohorts consisting of 14 and 16 learners, respectively. Overall, every learner in the first cohort achieved a final grade of A for the course. In the second cohort, the overall grade distribution consisted of grades of A, B, and C for the course. Learner evaluations indicated that the active-learning, discussion-based environment significantly enhanced interest in the topic and overall performance in the course. Conclusion. The elective course on emerging infectious diseases provided in-depth exposure to disease topics normally not encountered in the pharmacy curriculum. Learners found the material and format valuable, and the course enhanced their appreciation of infectious diseases, research methodology, critical thinking and analysis, and their roles as pharmacists.

  3. Expedited patent examination for green inventions: Developing countries' policy choices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu, Bingbin

    2013-01-01

    Innovation in green technology is important. Patent rights can provide incentives for green technology research and development. Expedited patent examination for green inventions has emerged as a policy instrument to provide such incentives. Developing countries were never opposed to patents for green technologies. China and Brazil have led the way by offering expedited examinations for green patent applications. More developing countries are expected to follow. Expedited examination for green technologies is consistent with the intellectual property system objectives and is justified by the clear social benefit from green technologies. Introducing such expedited programs in developing countries has sufficient advantages. Existing models of expedited programs for green technologies are analyzed to generalize key issues and to discern suitable policy choices for developing countries. When introducing such programs, a balanced definition for green technology is preferred; a special classification requirement is premature and is not recommended; a pre-examination search requirement is generally recommended to balance patent office workloads, and a green patent database is recommended. - Highlights: • There is no north–south divide in promoting green technologies. • Earlier issuance of green patents has its great social benefit. • Green patent application should receive expedited examination. • Developing countries should introduce such expedited programs. • A suitable approach for developing countries is searched and recommended

  4. 76 FR 25328 - New Mexico Green Initiatives, LLC; Supplemental Notice That Initial Market-Based Rate Filing...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-04

    ... Mexico Green Initiatives, LLC's application for market-based rate authority, with an accompanying rate... DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission [Docket No. ER11-3431-000] New Mexico Green Initiatives, LLC; Supplemental Notice That Initial Market-Based Rate Filing Includes Request for...

  5. Micro and nano-structured green gallium indium nitride/gallium nitride light-emitting diodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stark, Christoph J. M.

    Light-emitting diodes (LEDs) are commonly designed and studied based on bulk material properties. In this thesis different approaches based on patterns in the nano and micrometer length scale range are used to tackle low efficiency in the green spectral region, which is known as “green gap”. Since light generation and extraction are governed by microscopic processes, it is instructive to study LEDs with lateral mesa sizes scaled to the nanometer range. Besides the well-known case of the quantum size effect along the growth direction, a continuous lateral scaling could reveal the mechanisms behind the purported absence of a green gap in nanowire LEDs and the role of their extraction enhancement. Furthermore the possibility to modulate strain and piezoelectric polarization by post growth patterning is of practical interest, because the internal electric fields in conventional wurtzite GaN LEDs cause performance problems. A possible alternative is cubic phase GaN, which is free of built-in polarization fields. LEDs on cubic GaN could show the link between strong polarization fields and efficiency roll-off at high current densities, also known as droop. An additional problem for all nitride-based LEDs is efficient light extraction. For a planar GaN LED only roughly 8% of the generated light can be extracted. Novel lightextraction structures with extraction-favoring geometry can yield significant increase in light output power. To investigate the effect of scaling the mesa dimension, micro and nano-sized LED arrays of variable structure size were fabricated. The nano-LEDs were patterned by electron beam lithography and dry etching. They contained up to 100 parallel nano-stripe LEDs connected to one common contact area. The mesa width was varied over 1 μm, 200 nm, and 50 nm. These LEDs were characterized electrically and optically, and the peak emission wavelength was found to depend on the lateral structure size. An electroluminescence (EL) wavelength shift of 3 nm

  6. Off-axis low coherence digital holographic interferometry for quantitative phase imaging with an LED

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Rongli; Wang, Fan; Hu, Xiaoying; Yang, Wenqian

    2017-11-01

    Off-axis digital holographic interferometry with the light source of a light emitting diode (LED) is presented and its application for quantitative phase imaging in a large range with low noise is demonstrated. The scheme is implemented in a grating based Mach-Zehnder interferometer. To achieve off-axis interferometry, firstly, the collimated beam emitted from an LED is diffracted into multiple orders by a grating and they are split into two copies by a beam splitter; secondly, in the object arm the zero order of one copy is filtered in the Fourier plane and is reshaped to illuminate the sample, while in the reference arm one of its first order of another copy is selected to serve as the reference beam, and then an off-axis hologram can be obtained at the image plane. The main advantage stemming from an LED illumination is its high spatial phase resolution, due to the subdued speckle effect. The off-axis geometry enables one-shot recording of the hologram in the millisecond scale. The utility of the proposed setup is illustrated with measurements of a resolution target and part of a wing of green-lacewing, and dynamic evaporation process of an ethanol film.

  7. Towards nanorod LEDs: Numerical predictions and controlled growth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koelper, Christopher [Osram Opto Semiconductors GmbH, Leibnizstr. 4, 93055 Regensburg (Germany); Computational Electronics and Photonics, Universitaet Kassel, Wilhelmshoeher Allee 71, 34121 Kassel (Germany); Bergbauer, Werner [Osram Opto Semiconductors GmbH, Leibnizstr. 4, 93055 Regensburg (Germany); Institut fuer Halbleitertechnik, TU Braunschweig, Hans-Sommer-Strasse 66, 38106 Braunschweig (Germany); Drechsel, Philipp; Sabathil, Matthias; Strassburg, Martin; Lugauer, Hans-Juergen [Osram Opto Semiconductors GmbH, Leibnizstr. 4, 93055 Regensburg (Germany); Witzigmann, Bernd [Computational Electronics and Photonics, Universitaet Kassel, Wilhelmshoeher Allee 71, 34121 Kassel (Germany); Fuendling, Soenke; Li, Shunfeng; Wehmann, Hergo-Heinrich; Waag, Andreas [Institut fuer Halbleitertechnik, TU Braunschweig, Hans-Sommer-Strasse 66, 38106 Braunschweig (Germany)

    2011-07-15

    We present a numerical optimization of nanorod geometries with respect to the optical properties of an electrically driven LED emitting in the green spectral range. It is shown that an overall Purcell enhancement as well as directional emission can be achieved at an emission wavelength of 550 nm with nanorods of 110 nm radius. Position-controlled growth on patterned substrates demonstrates that the required dimensions are accessible by varying growth parameters and growth time in a large volume MOVPE reactor. (copyright 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  8. Prognostics-based qualification of high-power white LEDs using Lévy process approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yung, Kam-Chuen; Sun, Bo; Jiang, Xiaopeng

    2017-01-01

    Due to their versatility in a variety of applications and the growing market demand, high-power white light-emitting diodes (LEDs) have attracted considerable attention. Reliability qualification testing is an essential part of the product development process to ensure the reliability of a new LED product before its release. However, the widely used IES-TM-21 method does not provide comprehensive reliability information. For more accurate and effective qualification, this paper presents a novel method based on prognostics techniques. Prognostics is an engineering technology predicting the future reliability or determining the remaining useful lifetime (RUL) of a product by assessing the extent of deviation or degradation from its expected normal operating conditions. A Lévy subordinator of a mixed Gamma and compound Poisson process is used to describe the actual degradation process of LEDs characterized by random sporadic small jumps of degradation degree, and the reliability function is derived for qualification with different distribution forms of jump sizes. The IES LM-80 test results reported by different LED vendors are used to develop and validate the qualification methodology. This study will be helpful for LED manufacturers to reduce the total test time and cost required to qualify the reliability of an LED product.

  9. Are Red Apples Sweeter Than Green Apples?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraser, Chris

    1999-01-01

    Describes how a classroom observation of apples led to the development of a science project. Discusses the correlation between the greenness and the acidity of apples. Finds that the greener the apple, the lower its pH, and thus the more acidic and less sweet it tastes. (Author/CCM)

  10. Green Suppliers Performance Evaluation in Belt and Road Using Fuzzy Weighted Average with Social Media Information

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuo-Ping Lin

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available A decision model for selecting a suitable supplier is a key to reducing the environmental impact in green supply chain management for high-tech companies. Traditional fuzzy weight average (FWA adopts linguistic variable to determine weight by experts. However, the weights of FWA have not considered the public voice, meaning the viewpoints of consumers in green supply chain management. This paper focuses on developing a novel decision model for green supplier selection in the One Belt and One Road (OBOR initiative through a fuzzy weighted average approach with social media. The proposed decision model uses the membership grade of the criteria and sub-criteria and its relative weights, which consider the volume of social media, to establish an analysis matrix of green supplier selection. Then, the proposed fuzzy weighted average approach is considered as an aggregating tool to calculate a synthetic score for each green supplier in the Belt and Road initiative. The final score of the green supplier is ordered by a non-fuzzy performance value ranking method to help the consumer make a decision. A case of green supplier selection in the light-emitting diode (LED industry is used to demonstrate the proposed decision model. The findings demonstrate (1 the consumer’s main concerns are the “Quality” and “Green products” in LED industry, hence, the ranking of suitable supplier in FWA with social media information model obtained the difference result with tradition FWA; (2 OBOR in the LED industry is not fervently discussed in searches of Google and Twitter; and (3 the FWA with social media information could objectively analyze the green supplier selection because the novel model considers the viewpoints of the consumer.

  11. ‘No Blue’ White LED

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ou, Haiyan; Corell, Dennis Dan; Dam-Hansen, Carsten

    2010-01-01

    This paper explored the feasibility of making a white LED light source by color mixing method without using the blue color. This ‘no blue’ white LED has potential applications in photolithography room illumination, medical treatment and biophotonics research. A no-blue LED was designed......-2005. Even after 15 days of illumination, no effect was observed. So this LED-based solution was demonstrated to be a very promising light source for photolithography room illumination due to its better color rendering in addition to energy efficiency, long life time and design flexibility. Additionally......, and the prototype was fabricated. The spectral power distribution of both the LED bulb and the yellow fluorescent tube was measured. Based on that, colorimetric values were calculated and compared on terms of chromatic coordinates, correlated color temperature, color rendering index, and chromatic deviation...

  12. Spatial layout optimization design of multi-type LEDs lighting source based on photoelectrothermal coupling theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Lingyun; Li, Guang; Chen, Qingguang; Rao, Huanle; Xu, Ping

    2018-03-01

    Multiple LED-based spectral synthesis technology has been widely used in the fields of solar simulator, color mixing, and artificial lighting of plant factory and so on. Generally, amounts of LEDs are spatially arranged with compact layout to obtain the high power density output. Mutual thermal spreading among LEDs will produce the coupled thermal effect which will additionally increase the junction temperature of LED. Affected by the Photoelectric thermal coupling effect of LED, the spectrum of LED will shift and luminous efficiency will decrease. Correspondingly, the spectral synthesis result will mismatch. Therefore, thermal management of LED spatial layout plays an important role for multi-LEDs light source system. In the paper, the thermal dissipation network topology model considering the mutual thermal spreading effect among the LEDs is proposed for multi-LEDs system with various types of power. The junction temperature increment cased by the thermal coupling has the great relation with the spatial arrangement. To minimize the thermal coupling effect, an optimized method of LED spatial layout for the specific light source structure is presented and analyzed. The results showed that layout of LED with high-power are arranged in the corner and low-power in the center. Finally, according to this method, it is convenient to determine the spatial layout of LEDs in a system having any kind of light source structure, and has the advantages of being universally applicable to facilitate adjustment.

  13. Web-based automation of green building rating index and life cycle cost analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahzaib Khan, Jam; Zakaria, Rozana; Aminuddin, Eeydzah; IzieAdiana Abidin, Nur; Sahamir, Shaza Rina; Ahmad, Rosli; Nafis Abas, Darul

    2018-04-01

    Sudden decline in financial markets and economic meltdown has slow down adaptation and lowered interest of investors towards green certified buildings due to their higher initial costs. Similarly, it is essential to fetch investor’s attention towards more development of green buildings through automated tools for the construction projects. Though, historical dearth is found on the automation of green building rating tools that brings up an essential gap to develop an automated analog computerized programming tool. This paper present a proposed research aim to develop an integrated web-based automated analog computerized programming that applies green building rating assessment tool, green technology and life cycle cost analysis. It also emphasizes to identify variables of MyCrest and LCC to be integrated and developed in a framework then transformed into automated analog computerized programming. A mix methodology of qualitative and quantitative survey and its development portray the planned to carry MyCrest-LCC integration to an automated level. In this study, the preliminary literature review enriches better understanding of Green Building Rating Tools (GBRT) integration to LCC. The outcome of this research is a pave way for future researchers to integrate other efficient tool and parameters that contributes towards green buildings and future agendas.

  14. Improving the Green Building Evaluation System in China Based on the DANP Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qi-Gan Shao

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Against the background of sustainable development, green building practices could be part of the strategy for solving environmental and energy problems in developing countries. The aim of this paper is to explore a system for the assessment of green buildings in China that provides the government and stakeholders with ways to improve their strategies for green building development. We apply a hybrid model, developed by integrating the Decision-Making Trial and Evaluation Laboratory and Analytical Network Process (called DANP method, to build an influential network relationship map (INRM between assessment systems and to derive the criterion weights. The INRM and derived weights can help us to understand this complex assessment system and to set improvement priorities for green building development. The results demonstrate that indoor environment, materials, and smart facilities are the top three critical factors for green building evaluation. Finally, we discuss some management implications based on an actual case study with solutions provided using this model.

  15. Growth mechanisms of plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy of green emission InGaN/GaN single quantum wells at high growth temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, W. C.; Wu, C. H.; Tseng, Y. T.; Chiu, S. Y.; Cheng, K. Y.

    2015-01-01

    The results of the growth of thin (∼3 nm) InGaN/GaN single quantum wells (SQWs) with emission wavelengths in the green region by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy are present. An improved two-step growth method using a high growth temperature up to 650 °C is developed to increase the In content of the InGaN SQW to 30% while maintaining a strong luminescence intensity near a wavelength of 506 nm. The indium composition in InGaN/GaN SQW grown under group-III-rich condition increases with increasing growth temperature following the growth model of liquid phase epitaxy. Further increase in the growth temperature to 670 °C does not improve the photoluminescence property of the material due to rapid loss of indium from the surface and, under certain growth conditions, the onset of phase separation

  16. Broadband Radiometric LED Measurements

    OpenAIRE

    Eppeldauer, G. P.; Cooksey, C. C.; Yoon, H. W.; Hanssen, L. M.; Podobedov, V. B.; Vest, R. E.; Arp, U.; Miller, C. C.

    2016-01-01

    At present, broadband radiometric measurements of LEDs with uniform and low-uncertainty results are not available. Currently, either complicated and expensive spectral radiometric measurements or broadband photometric LED measurements are used. The broadband photometric measurements are based on the CIE standardized V(��) function, which cannot be used in the UV range and leads to large errors when blue or red LEDs are measured in its wings, where the realization is always poor. Reference irr...

  17. Development and validation of sustainability criteria of administrative green schools in Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meiboudi, Hossein; Lahijanian, Akramolmolok; Shobeiri, Seyed Mohammad; Jozi, Seyed Ali; Azizinezhad, Reza

    2017-07-15

    Environmental responsibility in school has led to the emergence of a variety of criteria to administer green schools' contributions to sustainability. Sustainability criteria of administrative green schools need validity, reliability and norms. The aim of the current study was to develop and validate assessment criteria for green schools in Iran based on the role of academia. A national survey was conducted to obtain data on sustainability criteria initiatives for green schools and the Iranian profile was defined. An initial pool of 71 items was generated and after its first edition, 63 items were selected to comprise the sustainability criteria. Engineering-architectural and behavioral aspects of this sustainability criteria were evaluated through a sample of 1218 graduate students with environmental degrees from Iran's universities. Exploratory factor analysis using principal components and promax rotation method showed that these 9 criteria have simple structures and are consistent with the theoretical framework. The reliability coefficients of subscales ranged between 0.62 (participation) and 0.84 (building location and position). The study's survey of correlation coefficients between items and subscales illustrated that those coefficients varied between 0.24 and 0.68. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Nano-roughening n-side surface of AlGaInP-based LEDs for increasing extraction efficiency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Y.J.; Lu, T.C.; Kuo, H.C.; Wang, S.C.; Hsu, T.C.; Hsieh, M.H.; Jou, M.J.; Lee, B.J.

    2007-01-01

    A chemical wet etching technique is presented to form a nano-roughened surface with triangle-like morphology on n-side-up AlGaInP-based LEDs fabricated by adopting adhesive layer bonding scheme. A simple and commonly used H 3 PO 4 -based solution was applied for chemical wet etching. The morphology of nano-roughened surfaces is analyzed by the atomic force microscope (AFM) and significantly related to the enhancement factor of the LED output power. The output power shows 80% increase after optimizing the nano-roughened morphology of n-side surface, as compared to the ordinary flat surface LED

  19. Making green infrastructure healthier infrastructure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lõhmus, Mare; Balbus, John

    2015-01-01

    Increasing urban green and blue structure is often pointed out to be critical for sustainable development and climate change adaptation, which has led to the rapid expansion of greening activities in cities throughout the world. This process is likely to have a direct impact on the citizens' quality of life and public health. However, alongside numerous benefits, green and blue infrastructure also has the potential to create unexpected, undesirable, side-effects for health. This paper considers several potential harmful public health effects that might result from increased urban biodiversity, urban bodies of water, and urban tree cover projects. It does so with the intent of improving awareness and motivating preventive measures when designing and initiating such projects. Although biodiversity has been found to be associated with physiological benefits for humans in several studies, efforts to increase the biodiversity of urban environments may also promote the introduction and survival of vector or host organisms for infectious pathogens with resulting spread of a variety of diseases. In addition, more green connectivity in urban areas may potentiate the role of rats and ticks in the spread of infectious diseases. Bodies of water and wetlands play a crucial role in the urban climate adaptation and mitigation process. However, they also provide habitats for mosquitoes and toxic algal blooms. Finally, increasing urban green space may also adversely affect citizens allergic to pollen. Increased awareness of the potential hazards of urban green and blue infrastructure should not be a reason to stop or scale back projects. Instead, incorporating public health awareness and interventions into urban planning at the earliest stages can help insure that green and blue infrastructure achieves full potential for health promotion.

  20. Green roof rainfall-runoff modelling: is the comparison between conceptual and physically based approaches relevant?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Versini, Pierre-Antoine; Tchiguirinskaia, Ioulia; Schertzer, Daniel

    2017-04-01

    Green roofs are commonly considered as efficient tools to mitigate urban runoff as they can store precipitation, and consequently provide retention and detention performances. Designed as a compromise between water holding capacity, weight and hydraulic conductivity, their substrate is usually an artificial media differentiating significantly from a traditional soil. In order to assess green roofs hydrological performances, many models have been developed. Classified into two categories (conceptual and physically based), they are usually applied to reproduce the discharge of a particular monitored green roof considered as homogeneous. Although the resulted simulations could be satisfactory, the question of robustness and consistency of the calibrated parameters is often not addressed. Here, a modeling framework has been developed to assess the efficiency and the robustness of both modelling approaches (conceptual and physically based) in reproducing green roof hydrological behaviour. SWMM and VS2DT models have been used for this purpose. This work also benefits from an experimental setup where several green roofs differentiated by their substrate thickness and vegetation cover are monitored. Based on the data collected for several rainfall events, it has been studied how the calibrated parameters are effectively linked to their physical properties and how they can vary from one green roof configuration to another. Although both models reproduce correctly the observed discharges in most of the cases, their calibrated parameters exhibit a high inconsistency. For a same green roof configuration, these parameters can vary significantly from one rainfall event to another, even if they are supposed to be linked to the green roof characteristics (roughness, residual moisture content for instance). They can also be different from one green roof configuration to another although the implemented substrate is the same. Finally, it appears very difficult to find any

  1. The structural properties of InGaN alloys and the interdependence on the thermoelectric behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kucukgok, Bahadir; Wu, Xuewang; Wang, Xiaojia; Liu, Zhiqiang; Ferguson, Ian T.; Lu, Na

    2016-02-01

    The III-Nitrides are promising candidate for high efficiency thermoelectric (TE) materials and devices due to their unique features which includes high thermal stability. A systematic study of the room temperature TE properties of metalorganic chemical vapor deposition grown InxGa1-xN were investigated for x = 0.07 to 0.24. This paper investigated the role of indium composition on the TE properties of InGaN alloys in particular the structural properties for homogenous material that did not show significant phase separation. The highest Seebeck and power factor values of 507 μV K-1 and 21.84 × 10-4 Wm-1K-1 were observed, respectively for In0.07Ga0.93N at room temperature. The highest value of figure-of-merit (ZT) was calculated to be 0.072 for In0.20Ga0.80N alloy at room temperature.

  2. 340nm UV LED excitation in time-resolved fluorescence system for europium-based immunoassays detection

    OpenAIRE

    Rodenko, Olga; Fodgaard, Henrik; Tidemand-Lichtenberg, Peter; Pedersen, Christian

    2017-01-01

    In immunoassay analyzers for in-vitro diagnostics, Xenon flash lamps have been widely used as excitation light sources. Recent advancements in UV LED technology and its advantages over the flash lamps such as smaller footprint, better wall-plug efficiency, narrow emission spectrum, and no significant afterglow, have made them attractive light sources for gated detection systems. In this paper, we report on the implementation of a 340 nm UV LED based time-resolved fluorescence system based on ...

  3. Going Green in Business - A Study on the Eco-friendly Initiatives towards Sustainable Development in India

    OpenAIRE

    Pradeep M. D

    2017-01-01

    Increasing awareness on the various environmental problems has led to a shift in consumer behaviour. There has been a change in consumer attitude towards a green lifestyle. Thus green Marketing has evolved special implications in the modern market. Green indicates purity through quality, fairness in price and worthy in dealings. Green marketing focuses on marketing eco-friendly products to satisfy the needs and wants of the customers. It adopts innovative techniques of product modification, d...

  4. Measurement of the photometric characteristics of LEDs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nazarenko, L.A.; Zubkov, D.P.

    2015-01-01

    Proposed and implemented a method for measuring LEDs, which is based on self-calibration of the LED goniophotometer facility by using a trap-detector. Designed and manufactured automated goniophotometer, which provides a measurement of high power LEDs at a specified junction temperature. Designed and experimentally researched the photometer with a photometric sphere based diffuser, which meets all requirements of CIE for photometric measurements of LEDs

  5. Broadband radiometric LED measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eppeldauer, G. P.; Cooksey, C. C.; Yoon, H. W.; Hanssen, L. M.; Podobedov, V. B.; Vest, R. E.; Arp, U.; Miller, C. C.

    2016-09-01

    At present, broadband radiometric LED measurements with uniform and low-uncertainty results are not available. Currently, either complicated and expensive spectral radiometric measurements or broadband photometric LED measurements are used. The broadband photometric measurements are based on the CIE standardized V(λ) function, which cannot be used in the UV range and leads to large errors when blue or red LEDs are measured in its wings, where the realization is always poor. Reference irradiance meters with spectrally constant response and high-intensity LED irradiance sources were developed here to implement the previously suggested broadband radiometric LED measurement procedure [1, 2]. Using a detector with spectrally constant response, the broadband radiometric quantities of any LEDs or LED groups can be simply measured with low uncertainty without using any source standard. The spectral flatness of filtered-Si detectors and low-noise pyroelectric radiometers are compared. Examples are given for integrated irradiance measurement of UV and blue LED sources using the here introduced reference (standard) pyroelectric irradiance meters. For validation, the broadband measured integrated irradiance of several LED-365 sources were compared with the spectrally determined integrated irradiance derived from an FEL spectral irradiance lamp-standard. Integrated responsivity transfer from the reference irradiance meter to transfer standard and field UV irradiance meters is discussed.

  6. Green consumerism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    de Groot, Judith I.M.; Schuitema, Geertje; Garson, Carrie Lee

    and biospheric values influence the importance of such ‘green’ product characteristics on purchasing intentions. In two within-subjects full-factorial experimental studies (N = 100 and N = 107), we found that purchase intentions of products were only steered by green characteristics if prices were low...... and the brand was familiar. Green product characteristics did not influence purchase intentions at all when these proself product characteristics were not fulfilled (i.e., high prices and unfamiliar brands). The importance of proself and green product characteristics on purchasing intentions was also......Our presentation will focus on the influence of product characteristics and values on green consumerism. Although generally a majority of consumers support the idea of purchasing green products, we argue, based on social dilemma theory, that proself product characteristics and egoistic...

  7. Study on the mechanism of color coordinate shift of LED package

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhuang, Yunyi; Wang, Yong; Yang, Bobo; Li, Zhanguo; Yang, Lei; Zou, Jun

    2017-07-01

    In the paper, the influences of the chip, silicone and phosphors on the color coordinate shift of LED were studied. In the process of LED baking, it was found that the effect of the chip and silicone on the color coordinate drift is less than 3% through the analysis of each influencing factor. But the influence of the phosphors is large and accounted for 11.11% of the overall impact factors. Therefore, it is important to select the better green phosphors in thermal stability for the LED package and it has a guiding significance to the color coordinate of LED distribution. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (No. 11474036), the Natural Science Foundation of Shanghai (No. 12ZR1430900), the Shanghai Institute of Technology Talents Scheme (No. YJ2014-04), the Shanghai Municipal Alliance Program (Nos. Lm201514, Lm201505, Lm201455), the Science and Technology Commission of Shanghai Municipality (CN) (No. 14500503300), the Shanghai Cooperative Project (No. ShanghaiCXY-2013-61), and the Jiashan County Technology Program (No. 20141316).

  8. Polylactide-based renewable green composites from agricultural residues and their hybrids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyambo, Calistor; Mohanty, Amar K; Misra, Manjusri

    2010-06-14

    Agricultural natural fibers like jute, kenaf, sisal, flax, and industrial hemp have been extensively studied in green composites. The continuous supply of biofibers in high volumes to automotive part makers has raised concerns. Because extrusion followed by injection molding drastically reduces the aspect ratio of biofibers, the mechanical performance of injection molded agricultural residue and agricultural fiber-based composites are comparable. Here, the use of inexpensive agricultural residues and their hybrids that are 8-10 times cheaper than agricultural fibers is demonstrated to be a better way of getting sustainable materials with better performance. Green renewable composites from polylactide (PLA), agricultural residues (wheat straw, corn stover, soy stalks, and their hybrids) were successfully prepared through twin-screw extrusion, followed by injection molding. The effect on mechanical properties of varying the wheat straw amount from 10 to 40 wt % in PLA-wheat straw composites was studied. Tensile moduli were compared with theoretical calculations from the rule of mixture (ROM). Combination of agricultural residues as hybrids is proved to reduce the supply chain concerns for injection molded green composites. Densities of the green composites were found to be lower than those of conventional glass fiber composites.

  9. Energy or compost from green waste? - A CO2 - Based assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kranert, Martin; Gottschall, Ralf; Bruns, Christian; Hafner, Gerold

    2010-01-01

    Green waste is increasingly extracted from the material recycling chain and, as a result of the financial subsidy arising from the German renewable energy law for the generation of energy from renewable raw materials; it is fed into the energy recovery process in biomass power stations. A reduction in climate relevant gases is also linked to the material recovery of green waste - in particular when using composts gained from the process as a new raw material in different types of potting compost and plant culture media as a replacement for peat. Unlike energy recovery, material valorisation is not currently subsidised. Through the analysis of material and energy valorisation methods for green waste, with particular emphasis on primary resource consumption and CO 2 -balance, it could be determined that the use of green waste for energy generation and its recovery for material and peat replacement purposes can be considered to be on a par. Based on energy recovery or material oriented scenarios, it can be further deduced that no method on its own will achieve the desired outcome and that a combination of recycling processes is more likely to lead to a significant decrease of greenhouse gas emissions.

  10. Association of neighborhood greenness with self-perceived stress, depression and anxiety symptoms in older U.S adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pun, Vivian C; Manjourides, Justin; Suh, Helen H

    2018-04-16

    Neighborhood environment, such as green vegetation, has been shown to play a role in coping with stress and mental ill health. Yet, epidemiological evidence of the association between greenness and mental health is inconsistent. We examined whether living in green space is associated with self-perceived stress, depressive and anxiety symptoms in a nationally representative, longitudinal sample of community-dwelling older adults (N = 4118; aged 57-85 years) in the United States. We evaluated perceived stress, depression and anxiety symptoms using the Cohen's Perceived Stress Scale, the Center for Epidemiological Studies - Depression, and the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale - anxiety subscale, respectively. Greenness was assessed for each participant using the Normalized Difference Vegetation Index at 250-m resolution, as well as a buffer of 1000-m. We conducted longitudinal analyses to assess the associations between greenness and mental health upon adjusting for confounders (e.g., education), and to examine potential mediation and effect modification. An interquartile range (0.25 point) increase in contemporaneous greenness was significantly associated with 0.238 unit (95% CI: - 0.346, - 0.130) and 0.162 unit (95% CI: - 0.271, - 0.054) decrease in the perceived stress in base and multivariable models, respectively. The magnitude of the association was similar or even stronger when examining summer (- 0.161; 95% CI: - 0.295, - 0.027) and annual average of greenness (- 0.188; 95% CI: - 0.337, - 0.038), as well as greenness buffer of 1000-m. The greenness-stress association was partially mediated by physical activity (15.1% mediated), where increased greenness led to increased physical activity and less stress, and by history of respiratory diseases (- 3.8% mediated), where increased greenness led to increased respiratory disease and more stress. The association was also significantly modified by race, social support, physical function

  11. Advances in LEDs for automotive applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhardwaj, Jy; Peddada, Rao; Spinger, Benno

    2016-03-01

    High power LEDs were introduced in automotive headlights in 2006-2007, for example as full LED headlights in the Audi R8 or low beam in Lexus. Since then, LED headlighting has become established in premium and volume automotive segments and beginning to enable new compact form factors such as distributed low beam and new functions such as adaptive driving beam. New generations of highly versatile high power LEDs are emerging to meet these application needs. In this paper, we will detail ongoing advances in LED technology that enable revolutionary styling, performance and adaptive control in automotive headlights. As the standards which govern the necessary lumens on the road are well established, increasing luminance enables not only more design freedom but also headlight cost reduction with space and weight saving through more compact optics. Adaptive headlighting is based on LED pixelation and requires high contrast, high luminance, smaller LEDs with high-packing density for pixelated Matrix Lighting sources. Matrix applications require an extremely tight tolerance on not only the X, Y placement accuracy, but also on the Z height of the LEDs given the precision optics used to image the LEDs onto the road. A new generation of chip scale packaged (CSP) LEDs based on Wafer Level Packaging (WLP) have been developed to meet these needs, offering a form factor less than 20% increase over the LED emitter surface footprint. These miniature LEDs are surface mount devices compatible with automated tools for L2 board direct attach (without the need for an interposer or L1 substrate), meeting the high position accuracy as well as the optical and thermal performance. To illustrate the versatility of the CSP LEDs, we will show the results of, firstly, a reflector-based distributed low beam using multiple individual cavities each with only 20mm height and secondly 3x4 to 3x28 Matrix arrays for adaptive full beam. Also a few key trends in rear lighting and impact on LED light

  12. Green Transformational Leadership and Green Performance: The Mediation Effects of Green Mindfulness and Green Self-Efficacy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Shan Chen

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available No prior literature explores the influence of green transformational leadership on green performance, thus, this study develops a novel research framework to fill the research gap. This study investigates the influence of green transformational leadership on green performance and discusses the mediation effects of green mindfulness and green self-efficacy by means of structural equation modeling (SEM. The results indicate that green transformational leadership positively influences green mindfulness, green self-efficacy, and green performance. Moreover, this study demonstrates that the positive relationship between green transformational leadership and green performance is partially mediated by the two mediators: green mindfulness and green self-efficacy. It means that green transformational leadership can not only directly affect green performance positively but also indirectly affect it positively through green mindfulness and green self-efficacy. Therefore, firms need to raise their green transformational leadership, green mindfulness, and green self-efficacy to increase their green performance.

  13. DMD-based LED-illumination super-resolution and optical sectioning microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dan, Dan; Lei, Ming; Yao, Baoli; Wang, Wen; Winterhalder, Martin; Zumbusch, Andreas; Qi, Yujiao; Xia, Liang; Yan, Shaohui; Yang, Yanlong; Gao, Peng; Ye, Tong; Zhao, Wei

    2013-01-01

    Super-resolution three-dimensional (3D) optical microscopy has incomparable advantages over other high-resolution microscopic technologies, such as electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy, in the study of biological molecules, pathways and events in live cells and tissues. We present a novel approach of structured illumination microscopy (SIM) by using a digital micromirror device (DMD) for fringe projection and a low-coherence LED light for illumination. The lateral resolution of 90 nm and the optical sectioning depth of 120 μm were achieved. The maximum acquisition speed for 3D imaging in the optical sectioning mode was 1.6×10(7) pixels/second, which was mainly limited by the sensitivity and speed of the CCD camera. In contrast to other SIM techniques, the DMD-based LED-illumination SIM is cost-effective, ease of multi-wavelength switchable and speckle-noise-free. The 2D super-resolution and 3D optical sectioning modalities can be easily switched and applied to either fluorescent or non-fluorescent specimens.

  14. 340 nm pulsed UV LED system for europium-based time-resolved fluorescence detection of immunoassays

    OpenAIRE

    Rodenko, Olga; Fodgaard, Henrik; Tidemand-Lichtenberg, Peter; Petersen, Paul Michael; Pedersen, Christian

    2016-01-01

    We report on the design, development and investigation of an optical system based on UV light emitting diode (LED) excitation at 340 nm for time-resolved fluorescence detection of immunoassays. The system was tested to measure cardiac marker Troponin I with a concentration of 200 ng/L in immunoassay. The signal-to-noise ratio was comparable to state-of-the-art Xenon flash lamp based unit with equal excitation energy and without overdriving the LED. We performed a comparative study of the flas...

  15. Smart and Green Energy (SAGE) for Base Camps Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Engels, Matthias; Boyd, Paul A.; Koehler, Theresa M.; Goel, Supriya; Sisk, Daniel R.; Hatley, Darrel D.; Mendon, Vrushali V.; Hail, John C.

    2014-02-11

    The U.S. Army Logistics Innovation Agency’s (LIA’s) Smart and Green Energy (SAGE) for Base Camps project was to investigate how base camps’ fuel consumption can be reduced by 30% to 60% using commercial off-the-shelf (COTS) technologies for power generation, renewables, and energy efficient building systems. Field tests and calibrated energy models successfully demonstrated that the fuel reductions are achievable.

  16. Quantification and analysis of color stability based on thermal transient behavior in white LED lamps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nisa Khan, M

    2017-09-20

    We present measurement and analysis of color stability over time for two categories of white LED lamps based on their thermal management scheme, which also affects their transient lumen depreciation. We previously reported that lumen depreciation in LED lamps can be minimized by properly designing the heat sink configuration that allows lamps to reach a thermal equilibrium condition quickly. Although it is well known that lumen depreciation degrades color stability of white light since color coordinates vary with total lumen power by definition, quantification and characterization of color shifts based on thermal transient behavior have not been previously reported in literature for LED lamps. Here we provide experimental data and analysis of transient color shifts for two categories of household LED lamps (from a total of six lamps in two categories) and demonstrate that reaching thermal equilibrium more quickly provides better stability for color rendering, color temperature, and less deviation of color coordinates from the Planckian blackbody locus line, which are all very important characterization parameters of color for white light. We report for the first time that a lamp's color degradation from the turn-on time primarily depends on thermal transient behavior of the semiconductor LED chip, which experiences a wavelength shift as well as a decrease in its dominant wavelength peak value with time, which in turn degrades the phosphor conversion. For the first time, we also provide a comprehensive quantitative analysis that differentiates color degradation due to the heat rise in GaN/GaInN LED chips and subsequently the boards these chips are mounted on-from that caused by phosphor heating in a white LED module. Finally, we briefly discuss why there are some inevitable trade-offs between omnidirectionality and color and luminous output stability in current household LED lamps and what will help eliminate these trade-offs in future lamp designs.

  17. Contribution Index Based on Green Building Certification Systems

    OpenAIRE

    Yuting Sun; Bee Hua Goh

    2015-01-01

    Green Building Certification Systems (GBCS) are carried out in many countries due to the rising awareness of the importance of sustainability in the building industry. The intention should have motivated participants to construct and operate buildings sustainably, however, there is not yet a method developed to investigate the motivation of the participants. Based on the GBCS, this paper proposes the contribution index as a standard global method to analyze the performance of participants in ...

  18. Characterization of ι-carrageenan and its derivative based green polymer electrolytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jumaah, Fatihah Najirah; Mobaraka, Nadhratun Naiim; Ahmad, Azizan; Ramli, Nazaruddin [School of Chemical Sciences and Food Technology, Faculty of Science and Technology, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, 43600, Bangi, Selangor Darul Ehsan (Malaysia)

    2013-11-27

    The new types of green polymer electrolytes based on ι-carrageenan derivative have been prepared. ι-carrageenan act as precursor was reacted with monochloroacetic acid to produce carboxymethyl ι-carrageenan. The powders were characterized by Attenuated Total Reflection Fourier Transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) spectroscopy and {sup 1}H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) to confirm the substitution of targeted functional group in ι-carrageenan. The green polymer electrolyte based on ι-carrageenan and carboxymethyl ι-carrageenan was prepared by solution-casting technique. The films were characterized by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy to determine the ionic conductivity. The ionic conductivity ι-carrageenan film were higher than carboxymethyl ι-carrageenan which 4.87 ×10{sup −6} S cm{sup −1} and 2.19 ×10{sup −8} S cm{sup −1}, respectively.

  19. Ground-and satellite-based evidence of the biophysical mechanisms behind the greening Sahel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brandt, Martin Stefan; Mbow, Cheikh; Diouf, Abdoul A.

    2015-01-01

    After a dry period with prolonged droughts in the 1970s and 1980s, recent scientific outcome suggests that the decades of abnormally dry conditions in the Sahel have been reversed by positive anomalies in rainfall. Various remote sensing studies observed a positive trend in vegetation greenness...... over the last decades which is known as the re-greening of the Sahel. However, little investment has been made in including long-term ground-based data collections to evaluate and better understand the biophysical mechanisms behind these findings. Thus, deductions on a possible increment in biomass...... remain speculative. Our aim is to bridge these gaps and give specifics on the biophysical background factors of the re-greening Sahel. Therefore, a trend analysis was applied on long time series (1987-2013) of satellite-based vegetation and rainfall data, as well as on ground-observations of leaf biomass...

  20. Research on Green Manufacturing Innovation Based on Resource Environment Protection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jie, Xu

    2017-11-01

    Green manufacturing is a trend of manufacturing industry in the future, and is of great significance to resource protection and environmental protection. This paper first studies the green manufacturing innovation system, and then decomposes the green manufacturing innovation dimensions, and constructs the green manufacturing innovation dimension space. Finally, from the view of resource protection and environmental protection, this paper explores the path of green manufacturing innovation.

  1. Structural optimization of a microjet based cooling system for high power LEDs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sheng Liu; Zhiyin Gan [Institute for Microsystems, School of Mechanical Engineering, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan (China); Wuhan National Lab of Optoelectronics, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan (China); Jianghui Yang [School of Energy and Power Engineering, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan (China); Xiaobing Luo [Wuhan National Lab of Optoelectronics, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan (China); School of Energy and Power Engineering, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan (China)

    2008-08-15

    Based on the previous experiments and simulations reported by the present authors, it was found the cooling system could be optimized to obtain better performance. In this paper, the microjet cooling systems with three different microjet structures were numerically investigated. The numerical model was proven by the experiments. The optimization results demonstrate that the microjet structure with one single inlet but two outlets can achieve better cooling performance. The simulation results show that the maximum temperature of the LED substrate cooled by the optimized microjet cooling device was 23 K lower than that of the LED substrate cooled by the present experimental cooling system. (author)

  2. The LED and fiber based calibration system for the photomultiplier array of SNO+

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seabra, L.; Alves, R.; Andringa, S.; Bradbury, S.; Carvalho, J.; Clark, K.; Coulter, I.; Descamps, F.; Falk, L.; Gurriana, L.; Kraus, C.; Lefeuvre, G.; Maio, A.; Maneira, J.; Mottram, M.; Peeters, S.; Rose, J.; Sinclair, J.; Skensved, P.; Waterfield, J.; White, R.; Wilson, J.; SNO+ Collaboration

    2015-02-01

    A new external LED/fiber light injection calibration system was designed for the calibration and monitoring of the photomultiplier array of the SNO+ experiment at SNOLAB. The goal of the calibration system is to allow an accurate and regular measurement of the photomultiplier array's performance, while minimizing the risk of radioactivity ingress. The choice in SNO+ was to use a set of optical fiber cables to convey into the detector the light pulses produced by external LEDs. The quality control was carried out using a modified test bench that was used in QC of optical fibers for TileCal/ATLAS. The optical fibers were characterized for transmission, timing and angular dispersions. This article describes the setups used for the characterization and quality control of the system based on LEDs and optical fibers and their results.

  3. Temperature increase inside LED-based illuminators for in vitro aPDT photodamage studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Battisti, A.; Morici, P.; Tortora, G.; Menciassi, A.; Checcucci, G.; Ghetti, F.; Sgarbossa, A.

    2018-06-01

    Antimicrobial PhotoDynamic Therapy (aPDT) is an emerging strategy aimed at the eradication of bacterial infections, with a special focus on antibiotic-resistant bacteria. This method is easy to apply, not expensive and particularly interesting in case of bacteria that spontaneously produce the required photosensitizers. In the framework of a project aimed at the development of an ingestible pill for the application of aPDT to gastric infections by Helicobacter pylori, a LED-based illuminating prototype (LED-BIP) was purposely designed in order to evaluate the photodamage induced by light of different wavelengths on porphyrin-producing bacteria. This short paper reports about temperature tests performed to assess the maximum exposure time and light dose that can be administered to bacterial cultures inside LED-BIP without reaching temperatures exceeding the physiological range.

  4. Visible light communication based vehicle positioning using LED street light and rolling shutter CMOS sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Do, Trong Hop; Yoo, Myungsik

    2018-01-01

    This paper proposes a vehicle positioning system using LED street lights and two rolling shutter CMOS sensor cameras. In this system, identification codes for the LED street lights are transmitted to camera-equipped vehicles through a visible light communication (VLC) channel. Given that the camera parameters are known, the positions of the vehicles are determined based on the geometric relationship between the coordinates of the LEDs in the images and their real world coordinates, which are obtained through the LED identification codes. The main contributions of the paper are twofold. First, the collinear arrangement of the LED street lights makes traditional camera-based positioning algorithms fail to determine the position of the vehicles. In this paper, an algorithm is proposed to fuse data received from the two cameras attached to the vehicles in order to solve the collinearity problem of the LEDs. Second, the rolling shutter mechanism of the CMOS sensors combined with the movement of the vehicles creates image artifacts that may severely degrade the positioning accuracy. This paper also proposes a method to compensate for the rolling shutter artifact, and a high positioning accuracy can be achieved even when the vehicle is moving at high speeds. The performance of the proposed positioning system corresponding to different system parameters is examined by conducting Matlab simulations. Small-scale experiments are also conducted to study the performance of the proposed algorithm in real applications.

  5. GPS-Based Exposure to Greenness and Walkability and Accelerometry-Based Physical Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, Peter; Hart, Jaime E; Hipp, J Aaron; Mitchell, Jonathan A; Kerr, Jacqueline; Hurvitz, Philip M; Glanz, Karen; Laden, Francine

    2017-04-01

    Background: Physical inactivity is a risk factor for cancer that may be influenced by environmental factors. Indeed, dense and well-connected built environments and environments with natural vegetation may create opportunities for higher routine physical activity. However, studies have focused primarily on residential environments to define exposure and self-reported methods to estimate physical activity. This study explores the momentary association between minute-level global positioning systems (GPS)-based greenness exposure and time-matched objectively measured physical activity. Methods: Adult women were recruited from sites across the United States. Participants wore a GPS device and accelerometer on the hip for 7 days to assess location and physical activity at minute-level epochs. GPS records were linked to 250 m resolution satellite-based vegetation data and Census Block Group-level U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Smart Location Database walkability data. Minute-level generalized additive mixed models were conducted to test for associations between GPS measures and accelerometer count data, accounting for repeated measures within participant and allowing for deviations from linearity using splines. Results: Among 360 adult women (mean age of 55.3 ± 10.2 years), we observed positive nonlinear relationships between physical activity and both greenness and walkability. In exploratory analyses, the relationships between environmental factors and physical activity were strongest among those who were white, had higher incomes, and who were middle-aged. Conclusions: Our results indicate that higher levels of physical activity occurred in areas with higher greenness and higher walkability. Impact: Findings suggest that planning and design policies should focus on these environments to optimize opportunities for physical activity. Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev; 26(4); 525-32. ©2017 AACR See all the articles in this CEBP Focus section, "Geospatial

  6. Nurse led home-based care for people with HIV/AIDS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Elizabeth M; Zani, Babalwa; Esterhuizen, Tonya M; Young, Taryn

    2018-03-27

    Home-based care is used in many countries to increase quality of life and limit hospital stay, particularly where public health services are overburdened. Home-based care objectives for HIV/AIDS can include medical care, delivery of antiretroviral treatment and psychosocial support. This review assesses the effects of home-based nursing on morbidity in people infected with HIV/AIDS. The trials studied are in HIV positive adults and children, regardless of sex or setting and all randomised controlled. Home-based care provided by qualified nurses was compared with hospital or health-facility based treatment. The following electronic databases were searched from January 1980 to March 2015: AIDSearch, CINAHL, Cochrane Register of Controlled Trials, EMBASE, MEDLINE and PsycINFO/LIT, with an updated search in November 2016. Two authors independently screened titles and abstracts from the electronic search based on the study design, interventions and types of participant. For all selected abstracts, full text articles were obtained. The final study selection was determined with use of an eligibility form. Data extraction was performed independently from assessment of risk of bias. The results were analysed by narrative synthesis, in order to be able to obtain relevant effect measures plus 95% confidence intervals. Seven studies met the inclusion criteria. The trial size varied from 37 to 238 participants. Only one trial was conducted in children. Five studies were conducted in the USA and two in China. Four studies looked at home-based adherence support and the rest at providing home-based psychosocial support. Reported adherence to antiretroviral drugs improved with nurse-led home-based care but did not affect viral load. Psychiatric nurse support in those with existing mental health conditions improved mental health and depressive symptoms. Home-based psychological support impacted on HIV stigma, worry and physical functioning and in certain cases depressive symptoms

  7. Improved power quality based high brightness LED lamp driver

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    consists of a PFC Cuk DC-DC converter which operates in continuous conduction mode (CCM) to improve the ... In proposed LED driver as shown in Figure 1, a Cuk buck boost AC-DC converter ... Design and Analysis of Proposed LED Driver.

  8. Design strategies for enhancing carrier localization in InGaN-based light-emitting diodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Yujue; Ma, Ping; Wei, Xuecheng; Yan, Dan; Wang, Yafang; Zeng, Yiping

    2014-01-01

    By designing the quantum well structure with the introduction of GaN and InN interlayers into the InGaN wells, the carrier localization is enhanced by demonstrating temperature-dependent photoluminescence (PL) measurements. Two emission peaks corresponding to In-rich localized state and quantum well ground state emissions are observed from the electroluminescence (EL) spectra, which demonstrates that the phase separation takes place in our designed structures and the enhanced phase separation is most likely the dominated mechanism for the formation of In-rich localized states, accounting for the stronger localization and hence improved light-emission characteristics. Therefore, it is suggested that enhancing localization is possible, to some extent, by modulating the QW structures with the introduction of the GaN and InN interlayers for superior light-emission performances in InGaN-based light-emitting diodes (LEDs). Moreover, the nonradiative channel probably associated with InN droplet is proved to be existent from the Arrhenius plots in our InGaN–delta-InN MQW structure. - Highlights: • By designing the quantum well structure with the introduction of GaN and InN interlayers into the InGaN wells, the carrier localization is enhanced. • Two emission peaks observed from electroluminescence (EL) spectra demonstrate that the enhanced phase separation is most likely the dominated mechanism for the formation of In-rich localized states, accounting for the stronger localization. • The nonradiative channel associated with InN droplet is proved to be existent from the Arrhenius plots

  9. Making green infrastructure healthier infrastructure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mare Lõhmus

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Increasing urban green and blue structure is often pointed out to be critical for sustainable development and climate change adaptation, which has led to the rapid expansion of greening activities in cities throughout the world. This process is likely to have a direct impact on the citizens’ quality of life and public health. However, alongside numerous benefits, green and blue infrastructure also has the potential to create unexpected, undesirable, side-effects for health. This paper considers several potential harmful public health effects that might result from increased urban biodiversity, urban bodies of water, and urban tree cover projects. It does so with the intent of improving awareness and motivating preventive measures when designing and initiating such projects. Although biodiversity has been found to be associated with physiological benefits for humans in several studies, efforts to increase the biodiversity of urban environments may also promote the introduction and survival of vector or host organisms for infectious pathogens with resulting spread of a variety of diseases. In addition, more green connectivity in urban areas may potentiate the role of rats and ticks in the spread of infectious diseases. Bodies of water and wetlands play a crucial role in the urban climate adaptation and mitigation process. However, they also provide habitats for mosquitoes and toxic algal blooms. Finally, increasing urban green space may also adversely affect citizens allergic to pollen. Increased awareness of the potential hazards of urban green and blue infrastructure should not be a reason to stop or scale back projects. Instead, incorporating public health awareness and interventions into urban planning at the earliest stages can help insure that green and blue infrastructure achieves full potential for health promotion.

  10. Green power programs in Canada : 2002 : Overview of Government green power policies, utility green power development programs, green power and certificate marketing initiatives, and their benefits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bramley, M.; Boustie, S.; Vadgama, J.; Wieler, C.; Pape-Salmon, A.; Holmes, R.

    2003-11-01

    Green power is generally defined as electricity produced from renewable sources, and whose production has low adverse impacts on the environment, human health and communities. Green power has near-zero greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and includes sources such as wind, hydro, and solar power. Green power offers several environmental benefits, as well as the enhancement of energy security, regional development, economic diversification and the creation of skilled jobs. There are four categories of programs related to green power development in Canada: government green power policies, utility green power development programs, green power marketing initiatives, and green power certificate marketing initiatives. Most of the activities associated with these four categories in 2002 were discussed in this report. However, difficulties with quantification prevented the inclusion of some green power activities in the report, such as (1) the generation of green power not certified or identified by the generator as green power, (2) industry or residential self-generation, (3) net metering, and (4) small government programs. Each category was presented in detail. The information included in the report was based on surveys sent to each program proponent. Follow-up communications and other publicly available information was also included. New programs operating in 2003 or currently under development were listed. refs., 8 tabs

  11. Construction Performance Optimization toward Green Building Premium Cost Based on Greenship Rating Tools Assessment with Value Engineering Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latief, Yusuf; Berawi, Mohammed Ali; Basten, Van; Riswanto; Budiman, Rachmat

    2017-07-01

    Green building concept becomes important in current building life cycle to mitigate environment issues. The purpose of this paper is to optimize building construction performance towards green building premium cost, achieving green building rating tools with optimizing life cycle cost. Therefore, this study helps building stakeholder determining building fixture to achieve green building certification target. Empirically the paper collects data of green building in the Indonesian construction industry such as green building fixture, initial cost, operational and maintenance cost, and certification score achievement. After that, using value engineering method optimized green building fixture based on building function and cost aspects. Findings indicate that construction performance optimization affected green building achievement with increasing energy and water efficiency factors and life cycle cost effectively especially chosen green building fixture.

  12. Nanorods on surface of GaN-based thin-film LEDs deposited by post-annealing after photo-assisted chemical etching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Lung-Chien; Lin, Wun-Wei; Liu, Te-Yu

    2017-01-01

    This study investigates the optoelectronic characteristics of gallium nitride (GaN)-based thin-film light-emitting diodes (TF-LEDs) that are formed by a two-step transfer process that involves wet etching and post-annealing. In the two-step transfer process, GaN LEDs were stripped from sapphire substrates by the laser lift-off (LLO) method using a KrF laser and then transferred onto ceramic substrates. Ga-K nanorods were formed on the surface of the GaN-based TF-LEDs following photo-assisted chemical etching and photo-enhanced post-annealing at 100 °C for 1 min. As a result, the light output power of GaN-based TF-LEDs with wet etching and post-annealing was over 72% more than that of LEDs that did not undergo these treatments.

  13. A new approach to preparation of standard LEDs for luminous intensity and flux measurement of LEDs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Seung-Nam; Park, Seongchong; Lee, Dong-Hoon

    2006-09-01

    This work presents an alternative approach for preparing photometric standard LEDs, which is based on a novel functional seasoning method. The main idea of our seasoning method is simultaneously monitoring the light output and the junction voltage to obtain quantitative information on the temperature dependence and the aging effect of the LED emission. We suggested a general model describing the seasoning process by taking junction temperature variation and aging effect into account and implemented a fully automated seasoning facility, which is capable of seasoning 12 LEDs at the same time. By independent measurements of the temperature dependence, we confirmed the discrepancy of the theoretical model to be less than 0.5 % and evaluate the uncertainty contribution of the functional seasoning to be less than 0.5 % for all the seasoned samples. To demonstrate assigning the reference value to a standard LED, the CIE averaged LED intensity (ALI) of the seasoned LEDs was measured with a spectroradiometer-based instrument and the measurement uncertainty was analyzed. The expanded uncertainty of the standard LED prepared by the new approach amounts to be 4 % ~ 5 % (k=2) depending on color without correction of spectral stray light in the spectroradiometer.

  14. A new method to manipulate broiler chicken growth and metabolism: Response to mixed LED light system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yefeng; Yu, Yonghua; Pan, Jinming; Ying, Yibin; Zhou, Hong

    2016-05-01

    Present study introduced a new method to manipulate broiler chicken growth and metabolism by mixing the growth-advantage LED. We found that the green/blue LED mixed light system (G-B and G × B) have the similar stimulatory effect on chick body weight with single green light and single blue light (G and B), compared with normal artificial light (P = 0.028). Moreover, the percentage of carcass was significantly greater in the mixed light (G × B) when compared with the single light (P = 0.003). Synchronized with body weight, the mixed light (G-B and G × B) had a significant improved influence on the feed conversion of birds compared with normal light (P = 0.002). A significant improvement in feed conversion were found in mixed light (G × B) compared with single LED light (P = 0.037). G group resulted in a greater high-density lipoprotein cholesterol level than B group (P = 0.002), whereas B group resulted in a greater low-density lipoprotein cholesterol level than G group (P = 0.017). The mixed light significantly increased the birds’ glucose level in comparison with the single light (P = 0.003). This study might establish an effective strategy for maximizing growth of chickens by mixed LED technology.

  15. On the impact of indium distribution on the electronic properties in InGaN nanodisks

    KAUST Repository

    Benaissa, M.

    2015-03-09

    We analyze an epitaxially grown heterostructure composed of InGaN nanodisks inserted in GaN nanowires in order to relate indium concentration to the electronic properties. This study was achieved with spatially resolved low-loss electron energy-loss spectroscopy using monochromated electrons to probe optical excitations - plasmons - at nanometer scale. Our findings show that each nanowire has its own indium fluctuation and therefore its own average composition. Due to this indium distribution, a scatter is obtained in plasmon energies, and therefore in the optical dielectric function, of the nanowire ensemble. We suppose that these inhomogeneous electronic properties significantly alter band-to-band transitions and consequently induce emission broadening. In addition, the observation of tailing indium composition into the GaN barrier suggests a graded well-barrier interface leading to further inhomogeneous broadening of the electro-optical properties. An improvement in the indium incorporation during growth is therefore needed to narrow the emission linewidth of the presently studied heterostructures.

  16. The structural properties of InGaN alloys and the interdependence on the thermoelectric behavior

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bahadir Kucukgok

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The III-Nitrides are promising candidate for high efficiency thermoelectric (TE materials and devices due to their unique features which includes high thermal stability. A systematic study of the room temperature TE properties of metalorganic chemical vapor deposition grown InxGa1-xN were investigated for x =  0.07 to 0.24. This paper investigated the role of indium composition on the TE properties of InGaN alloys in particular the structural properties for homogenous material that did not show significant phase separation. The highest Seebeck and power factor values of 507 μV K−1 and 21.84 × 10−4 Wm−1K−1 were observed, respectively for In0.07Ga0.93N at room temperature. The highest value of figure-of-merit (ZT was calculated to be 0.072 for In0.20Ga0.80N alloy at room temperature.

  17. The structural properties of InGaN alloys and the interdependence on the thermoelectric behavior

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kucukgok, Bahadir; Lu, Na, E-mail: Luna@purdue.edu [Lyles School of Civil Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907 (United States); Wu, Xuewang; Wang, Xiaojia [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN 55455 (United States); Liu, Zhiqiang [Institute of Semiconductors, Chinese Academy of Science, Beijing (China); Ferguson, Ian T. [College of Engineering and Computing, Missouri University of Science and Technology, Rolla, MO 65409 (United States)

    2016-02-15

    The III-Nitrides are promising candidate for high efficiency thermoelectric (TE) materials and devices due to their unique features which includes high thermal stability. A systematic study of the room temperature TE properties of metalorganic chemical vapor deposition grown In{sub x}Ga{sub 1-x}N were investigated for x =  0.07 to 0.24. This paper investigated the role of indium composition on the TE properties of InGaN alloys in particular the structural properties for homogenous material that did not show significant phase separation. The highest Seebeck and power factor values of 507 μV K{sup −1} and 21.84 × 10{sup −4} Wm{sup −1}K{sup −1} were observed, respectively for In{sub 0.07}Ga{sub 0.93}N at room temperature. The highest value of figure-of-merit (ZT) was calculated to be 0.072 for In{sub 0.20}Ga{sub 0.80}N alloy at room temperature.

  18. On the impact of indium distribution on the electronic properties in InGaN nanodisks

    KAUST Repository

    Benaissa, M.; Sigle, W.; Ng, Tien Khee; El Bouayadi, R.; van Aken, P. A.; Jahangir, S.; Bhattacharya, P.; Ooi, Boon S.

    2015-01-01

    We analyze an epitaxially grown heterostructure composed of InGaN nanodisks inserted in GaN nanowires in order to relate indium concentration to the electronic properties. This study was achieved with spatially resolved low-loss electron energy-loss spectroscopy using monochromated electrons to probe optical excitations - plasmons - at nanometer scale. Our findings show that each nanowire has its own indium fluctuation and therefore its own average composition. Due to this indium distribution, a scatter is obtained in plasmon energies, and therefore in the optical dielectric function, of the nanowire ensemble. We suppose that these inhomogeneous electronic properties significantly alter band-to-band transitions and consequently induce emission broadening. In addition, the observation of tailing indium composition into the GaN barrier suggests a graded well-barrier interface leading to further inhomogeneous broadening of the electro-optical properties. An improvement in the indium incorporation during growth is therefore needed to narrow the emission linewidth of the presently studied heterostructures.

  19. Study on Green Supply Chain Management Based on Circular Economy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ying, Jiang; Li-jun, Zhou

    The article starts with circular economy and the connotation of green supply chain, then analyzes the difference between green supply chain and traditional supply chain and elaborates the content of green supply chain management. On that basis, the approach to implement green supply chain management in china shall be put forward.

  20. A nanosilver-based spectrophotometric method for determination of malachite green in surface water samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahraei, R; Farmany, A; Mortazavi, S S; Noorizadeh, H

    2013-07-01

    A new spectrophotometric method is reported for the determination of nanomolar level of malachite green in surface water samples. The method is based on the catalytic effect of silver nanoparticles on the oxidation of malachite green by hexacyanoferrate (III) in acetate-acetic acid medium. The absorbance is measured at 610 nm with the fixed-time method. Under the optimum conditions, the linear range was 8.0 × 10(-9)-2.0 × 10(-7) mol L(-1) malachite green with a correlation coefficient of 0.996. The limit of detection (S/N = 3) was 2.0 × 10(-9) mol L(-1). Relative standard deviation for ten replicate determinations of 1.0 × 10(-8) mol L(-1) malachite green was 1.86%. The method is featured with good accuracy and reproducibility for malachite green determination in surface water samples without any pre-concentration and separation step.