WorldWideScience

Sample records for infrared laser fields

  1. Infrared laser-induced chemical reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Katayama, Mikio

    1978-01-01

    The experimental means which clearly distinguishes between infrared ray-induced reactions and thermal reactions has been furnished for the first time when an intense monochromatic light source has been obtained by the development of infrared laser. Consequently, infrared laser-induced chemical reactions have started to develop as one field of chemical reaction researches. Researches of laser-induced chemical reactions have become new means for the researches of chemical reactions since they were highlighted as a new promising technique for isotope separation. Specifically, since the success has been reported in 235 U separation using laser in 1974, comparison of this method with conventional separation techniques from the economic point of view has been conducted, and it was estimated by some people that the laser isotope separation is cheaper. This report briefly describes on the excitation of oscillation and reaction rate, and introduces the chemical reactions induced by CW laser and TEA CO 2 laser. Dependence of reaction yield on laser power, measurement of the absorbed quantity of infrared ray and excitation mechanism are explained. Next, isomerizing reactions are reported, and finally, isotope separation is explained. It was found that infrared laser-induced chemical reactions have the selectivity for isotopes. Since it is evident that there are many examples different from thermal and photo-chemical reactions, future collection of the data is expected. (Wakatsuki, Y.)

  2. Laser-induced filaments in the mid-infrared

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zheltikov, A M

    2017-01-01

    Laser-induced filamentation in the mid-infrared gives rise to unique regimes of nonlinear wave dynamics and reveals in many ways unusual nonlinear-optical properties of materials in this frequency range. The λ 2 scaling of the self-focusing threshold P cr , with radiation wavelength λ , allows the laser powers transmitted by single mid-IR filaments to be drastically increased without the loss of beam continuity and spatial coherence. When extended to the mid-infrared, laser filamentation enables new methods of pulse compression. Often working around the universal physical limitations, it helps generate few-cycle and subcycle field waveforms within an extraordinarily broad range of peak powers, from just a few up to hundreds of P cr . As a part of a bigger picture, laser-induced filamentation in the mid-infrared offers important physical insights into the general properties of the nonlinear-optical response of matter as a function of the wavelength. Unlike their near-infrared counterparts, which can be accurately described within the framework of perturbative nonlinear optics, mid-infrared filaments often entangle perturbative and nonperturbative nonlinear-optical effects, showing clear signatures of strong-field optical physics. With the role of nonperturbative nonlinear-optical phenomena growing, as a general tendency, with the field intensity and the driver wavelength, extension of laser filamentation to even longer driver wavelengths, toward the long-wavelength infrared, promises a hic sunt dracones land. (topical review)

  3. Energy levels and far-infrared optical absorption of impurity doped semiconductor nanorings: Intense laser and electric fields effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barseghyan, M.G., E-mail: mbarsegh@ysu.am

    2016-11-10

    Highlights: • The electron-impurity interaction on energy levels in nanoring have been investigated. • The electron-impurity interaction on far-infrared absorption have been investigated. • The energy levels are more stable for higher values of electric field. - Abstract: The effects of electron-impurity interaction on energy levels and far-infrared absorption in semiconductor nanoring under the action of intense laser and lateral electric fields have been investigated. Numerical calculations are performed using exact diagonalization technique. It is found that the electron-impurity interaction and external fields change the energy spectrum dramatically, and also have significant influence on the absorption spectrum. Strong dependence on laser field intensity and electric field of lowest energy levels, also supported by the Coulomb interaction with impurity, is clearly revealed.

  4. Band Gap Distortion in Semiconductors Strongly Driven by Intense Mid-Infrared Laser Fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kono, J.; Chin, A. H.

    2000-03-01

    Crystalline solids non-resonantly driven by intense time-periodic electric fields are predicted to exhibit unusual band-gap distortion.(e.g., Y. Yacoby, Phys. Rev. 169, 610 (1968); L.C.M. Miranda, Solid State Commun. 45, 783 (1983); J.Z. Kaminski, Acta Physica Polonica A 83, 495(1993).) Such non-perturbative effects have not been observed to date because of the unavoidable sample damage due to the very high intensity required using conventional lasers ( 1 eV photon energy). Here, we report the first clear evidence of laser-induced bandgap shrinkage in semiconductors under intense mid-infrared (MIR) laser fields. The use of long-wavelength light reduces the required intensity and prohibits strong interband absorption, thereby avoiding the damage problem. The significant sub-bandgap absorption persists only during the existence of the MIR laser pulse, indicating the virtual nature of the effect. We show that this particular example of non-perturbative behavior, known as the dynamical Franz-Keldysh effect, occurs when the effective ponderomotive potential energy is comparable to the photon energy of the applied field. This work was supported by ONR, NSF, JST and NEDO.

  5. Polarization effects in above-threshold ionization with a mid-infrared strong laser field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Hui-Peng; Xu, Song-Po; Wang, Yan-Lan; Yu, Shao-Gang; Zhao, Xiao-Yun; Hao, Xiao-Lei; Lai, Xuan-Yang; Pfeifer, Thomas; Liu, Xiao-Jun; Chen, Jing; Cheng, Ya; Xu, Zhi-Zhan

    2018-05-01

    Using a semiclassical approach, we theoretically study the above-threshold ionization of magnesium by intense, mid-infrared laser pulses. The formation of low-energy structures in the photoelectron spectrum is found to be enhanced by comparing with a calculation based on the single-active electron approximation. By performing electron trajectory and recollision-time distribution analysis, we demonstrate that this phenomenon is due to the laser-induced ionic core polarization effects on the recolliding electrons. We also show that the polarization effects should be experimentally detectable. Our finding provides new insight into ultrafast control of strong-field photoionization and imaging of polar molecules.

  6. Preferential flow pathways revealed by field based stable isotope analysis of CO2 by mid-infrared laser spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Geldern, Robert; Nowak, Martin; Zimmer, Martin; Szizybalski, Alexandra; Myrttinen, Anssi; Barth, Johannes A. C.; Jost, Hj

    2016-04-01

    A newly developed and commercially available isotope ratio laser spectrometer for CO2 analyses has been tested during a 10-day field monitoring campaign at the Ketzin pilot site for CO2 storage in northern Germany. The laser instrument is based on tunable laser direct absorption in the mid-infrared. The instrument recorded a continuous 10-day carbon stable isotope data set with 30 minutes resolution directly on-site in a field-based laboratory container during a tracer experiment. To test the instruments performance and accuracy the monitoring campaign was accompanied by daily CO2 sampling for laboratory analyses with isotope ratio mass spectrometry (IRMS). The carbon stable isotope ratios measured by conventional IRMS technique and by the new mid-infrared laser spectrometer agree remarkably well within 2σ analytical precision (<0.3 ‰). This proves the capability of the new mid-infrared direct absorption technique to measure high precision and accurate real-time table isotope data directly in the field. The injected CO2 tracer had a distinct δ13C value that was largely different from the reservoir background value. The laser spectroscopy data revealed a prior to this study unknown, intensive dynamic with fast changing δ13C values. The arrival pattern of the tracer suggest that the observed fluctuations were probably caused by migration along separate and distinct preferential flow paths between injection well and observation well. The new technique might contribute to a better tracing of the migration of the underground CO2 plume and help to ensure the long-term integrity of the reservoir.

  7. Infrared presensitization photography at deuterium fluoride laser wavelengths

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geary, J.M.; Ross, K.; Suter, K.

    1989-01-01

    Near-field irradiance distributions of a deuterium flouride laser system are obtained using infrared presensitization photography. This represents the shortest wavelength region to employ this technique thus far

  8. Transient Infrared Measurement of Laser Absorption Properties of Porous Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marynowicz Andrzej

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The infrared thermography measurements of porous building materials have become more frequent in recent years. Many accompanying techniques for the thermal field generation have been developed, including one based on laser radiation. This work presents a simple optimization technique for estimation of the laser beam absorption for selected porous building materials, namely clinker brick and cement mortar. The transient temperature measurements were performed with the use of infrared camera during laser-induced heating-up of the samples’ surfaces. As the results, the absorbed fractions of the incident laser beam together with its shape parameter are reported.

  9. Transient Infrared Measurement of Laser Absorption Properties of Porous Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marynowicz, Andrzej

    2016-06-01

    The infrared thermography measurements of porous building materials have become more frequent in recent years. Many accompanying techniques for the thermal field generation have been developed, including one based on laser radiation. This work presents a simple optimization technique for estimation of the laser beam absorption for selected porous building materials, namely clinker brick and cement mortar. The transient temperature measurements were performed with the use of infrared camera during laser-induced heating-up of the samples' surfaces. As the results, the absorbed fractions of the incident laser beam together with its shape parameter are reported.

  10. Coherent control of D2/H2 dissociative ionization by a mid-infrared two-color laser field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wanie, Vincent; Ibrahim, Heide; Beaulieu, Samuel; Thiré, Nicolas; Schmidt, Bruno E; Légaré, François; Deng, Yunpei; Alnaser, Ali S; Litvinyuk, Igor V; Tong, Xiao-Min

    2016-01-01

    Steering the electrons during an ultrafast photo-induced process in a molecule influences the chemical behavior of the system, opening the door to the control of photochemical reactions and photobiological processes. Electrons can be efficiently localized using a strong laser field with a well-designed temporal shape of the electric component. Consequently, many experiments have been performed with laser sources in the near-infrared region (800 nm) in the interest of studying and enhancing the electron localization. However, due to its limited accessibility, the mid-infrared (MIR) range has barely been investigated, although it allows to efficiently control small molecules and even more complex systems. To push further the manipulation of basic chemical mechanisms, we used a MIR two-color (1800 and 900 nm) laser field to ionize H 2 and D 2 molecules and to steer the remaining electron during the photo-induced dissociation. The study of this prototype reaction led to the simultaneous control of four fragmentation channels. The results are well reproduced by a theoretical model solving the time-dependent Schrödinger equation for the molecular ion, identifying the involved dissociation mechanisms. By varying the relative phase between the two colors, asymmetries (i.e., electron localization selectivity) of up to 65% were obtained, corresponding to enhanced or equivalent levels of control compared to previous experiments. Experimentally easier to implement, the use of a two-color laser field leads to a better electron localization than carrier-envelope phase stabilized pulses and applying the technique in the MIR range reveals more dissociation channels than at 800 nm. (paper)

  11. Mid infrared lasers for remote sensing applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walsh, Brian M., E-mail: brian.m.walsh@nasa.gov [NASA Langley Research Center, Hampton, VA 23681 (United States); Lee, Hyung R. [National Institute of Aerospace, Hampton, VA 23666 (United States); Barnes, Norman P. [Science Systems and Applications, Inc., Hampton, VA 23666 (United States)

    2016-01-15

    To accurately measure the concentrations of atmospheric gasses, especially the gasses with low concentrations, strong absorption features must be accessed. Each molecular species or constituent has characteristic mid-infrared absorption features by which either column content or range resolved concentrations can be measured. Because of these characteristic absorption features the mid infrared spectral region is known as the fingerprint region. However, as noted by the Decadal Survey, mid-infrared solid-state lasers needed for DIAL systems are not available. The primary reason is associated with short upper laser level lifetimes of mid infrared transitions. Energy gaps between the energy levels that produce mid-infrared laser transitions are small, promoting rapid nonradiative quenching. Nonradiative quenching is a multiphonon process, the more phonons needed, the smaller the effect. More low energy phonons are required to span an energy gap than high energy phonons. Thus, low energy phonon materials have less nonradiative quenching compared to high energy phonon materials. Common laser materials, such as oxides like YAG, are high phonon energy materials, while fluorides, chlorides and bromides are low phonon materials. Work at NASA Langley is focused on a systematic search for novel lanthanide-doped mid-infrared solid-state lasers using both quantum mechanical models (theoretical) and spectroscopy (experimental) techniques. Only the best candidates are chosen for laser studies. The capabilities of modeling materials, experimental challenges, material properties, spectroscopy, and prospects for lanthanide-doped mid-infrared solid-state laser devices will be presented. - Highlights: • We discuss mid infrared lasers and laser materials. • We discuss applications to remote sensing. • We survey the lanthanide ions in low phonon materials for potential. • We present examples of praseodymium mid infrared spectroscopy and laser design.

  12. Development and application of a far infrared laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakayama, Kazuya; Okajima, Shigeki; Kawahata, Kazuo

    2011-01-01

    There has been a 40 years history on the application of an infrared laser to interference, polarization and scattering light sources in fusion plasma diagnostics. It is one of important light sources in ITER plasma diagnostics too. In the present review, authors recall the history of the infrared laser development especially of cw infrared lasers. In addition, the state-of-the-art technology for infrared lasers, infrared components and its applications to plasma diagnostics are discussed. (J.P.N.)

  13. Optical system design with common aperture for mid-infrared and laser composite guidance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xuanzhi; Yang, Zijian; Sun, Ting; Yang, Huamei; Han, Kunye; Hu, Bo

    2017-02-01

    When the field of operation of precision strike missiles is more and more complicated, autonomous seekers will soon encounter serious difficulties, especially with regard to low signature targets and complex scenarios. So the dual-mode sensors combining an imaging sensor with a semi-active laser seeker are conceived to overcome these specific problems. Here the sensors composed a dual field of view mid-infrared thermal imaging camera and a laser range finder have the common optical aperture which produced the minization of seeker construction. The common aperture optical systems for mid-infrared and laser dual-mode guildance have been developed, which could meet the passive middle infrared high-resolution imaging and the active laser high-precision indication and ranging. The optical system had good image quality, and fulfilled the performance requirement of seeker system. The design and expected performance of such a dual-mode optical system will be discussed.

  14. Infrared laser system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cantrell, C.D.; Carbone, R.J.

    1977-01-01

    An infrared laser system and method for isotope separation may comprise a molecular gas laser oscillator to produce a laser beam at a first wavelength, Raman spin flip means for shifting the laser to a second wavelength, a molecular gas laser amplifier to amplify said second wavelength laser beam to high power, and optical means for directing the second wavelength, high power laser beam against a desired isotope for selective excitation thereof in a mixture with other isotopes. The optical means may include a medium which shifts the second wavelength high power laser beam to a third wavelength, high power laser beam at a wavelength coincidental with a corresponding vibrational state of said isotope and which is different from vibrational states of other isotopes in the gas mixture

  15. Mid-Infrared Lasers

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Mid infrared solid state lasers for Differential Absorption Lidar (DIAL) systems required for understanding atmospheric chemistry are not available. This program...

  16. Far-infrared laser interferometry measurements on the STP-3(M) reversed-field pinch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kubota, Shigeyuki; Nagatsu, Masaaki; Tsukishima, Takashige; Arimoto, Hideki; Sato, Koichi; Matsuoka, Akio.

    1993-09-01

    Far-infrared laser interferometry at 432 μm was carried out on the STP-3(M) reversed-field pinch. Measurements along two vertical chords showed a change from a parabolic-like to a flat-like electron density profile after field reversal. A density profile inversion and a correlated toroidal magnetic flux perturbation were also observed during the transition from the current rising to the current decay phase. Measurements of electron density fluctuations indicated relative fluctuation levels of ∼10% for both chords during the current rising phase and ∼5% and ∼15% during the current decay phase for the central and outer chords, respectively. Spectral analysis showed a ∼30 kHz mode consistent with poloidal mode number m=0 magnetic fluctuations, and a ∼90 kHz mode localized to the outer region of the plasma, which was strongly excited during the current decay phase and may be connected to particle and energy transport in STP-3(M). (author)

  17. Quantum optical signatures in strong-field laser physics: Infrared photon counting in high-order-harmonic generation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonoskov, I A; Tsatrafyllis, N; Kominis, I K; Tzallas, P

    2016-09-07

    We analytically describe the strong-field light-electron interaction using a quantized coherent laser state with arbitrary photon number. We obtain a light-electron wave function which is a closed-form solution of the time-dependent Schrödinger equation (TDSE). This wave function provides information about the quantum optical features of the interaction not accessible by semi-classical theories. With this approach we can reveal the quantum optical properties of high harmonic generation (HHG) process in gases by measuring the photon statistics of the transmitted infrared (IR) laser radiation. This work can lead to novel experiments in high-resolution spectroscopy in extreme-ultraviolet (XUV) and attosecond science without the need to measure the XUV light, while it can pave the way for the development of intense non-classical light sources.

  18. Infrared laser spectroscopic trace gas sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sigrist, Markus

    2016-04-01

    Chemical sensing and analyses of gas samples by laser spectroscopic methods are attractive owing to several advantages such as high sensitivity and specificity, large dynamic range, multi-component capability, and lack of pretreatment or preconcentration procedures. The preferred wavelength range comprises the fundamental molecular absorption range in the mid-infared between 3 and 15 μm, whereas the near-infrared range covers the (10-100 times weaker) higher harmonics and combination bands. The availability of near-infrared and, particularly, of broadly tunable mid-infrared sources like external cavity quantum cascade lasers (EC-QCLs), interband cascade lasers (ICLs), difference frequency generation (DFG), optical parametric oscillators (OPOs), recent developments of diode-pumped lead salt semiconductor lasers, of supercontinuum sources or of frequency combs have eased the implementation of laser-based sensing devices. Sensitive techniques for molecular absorption measurements include multipass absorption, various configurations of cavity-enhanced techniques such as cavity ringdown (CRD), or of photoacoustic spectroscopy (PAS) including quartz-enhanced (QEPAS) or cantilever-enhanced (CEPAS) techniques. The application requirements finally determine the optimum selection of laser source and detection scheme. In this tutorial talk I shall discuss the basic principles, present various experimental setups and illustrate the performance of selected systems for chemical sensing of selected key atmospheric species. Applications include an early example of continuous vehicle emission measurements with a mobile CO2-laser PAS system [1]. The fast analysis of C1-C4 alkanes at sub-ppm concentrations in gas mixtures is of great interest for the petrochemical industry and was recently achieved with a new type of mid-infrared diode-pumped piezoelectrically tuned lead salt vertical external cavity surface emitting laser (VECSEL) [2]. Another example concerns measurements on short

  19. Diagnostic studies of molecular plasmas using mid-infrared semiconductor lasers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Röpcke, J.; Welzel, S.; Lang, N.; Hempel, F.; Gatilova, L.; Guaitella, O.; Rousseau, A.; Davies, P.B.

    2008-01-01

    Within the last decade mid-infrared absorption spectroscopy between 3 and 20 µm, known as infrared laser absorption spectroscopy (IRLAS) and based on tuneable semiconductor lasers, namely lead salt diode lasers, often called tuneable diode lasers (TDL), and quantum cascade lasers (QCL) has

  20. A Stark-tuned, far-infrared laser for high frequency plasma diagnostics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mansfield, D.K.; Vocaturo, M.; Guttadora, L.; Rockmore, M.; Micai, K.; Krug, P.A.

    1992-03-01

    A Stark-tuned optically pumped far-infrared methanol laser operating at 119 micrometers has been built. The laser is designed to operate at high power while exhibiting a well-separated Stark doublet. At a pump power of 65 Watts and electric field of 1 kV/cm the laser has delivered over 100 mW c.w. while exhibiting a frequency splitting of 34 MHz. These parameters indicate that this laser would be suitable for use in the present generation of modulated interferometers on large thermonuclear plasma devices. The achieved modulation frequency is more than an order of magnitude higher than could be achieved using standard techniques

  1. Novel Infiltration Diagnostics based on Laser-line Scanning and Infrared Temperature Field Imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Xinwei [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2017-12-08

    This project targets the building energy efficiency problems induced by building infiltration/leaks. The current infiltration inspection techniques often require extensive visual inspection and/or whole building pressure test. These current techniques cannot meet more than three of the below five criteria of ideal infiltration diagnostics: 1. location and extent diagnostics, 2. building-level application, 3. least surface preparation, 4. weather-proof, and 5. non-disruption to building occupants. These techniques are either too expensive or time consuming, and often lack accuracy and repeatability. They are hardly applicable to facades/facades section. The goal of the project was to develop a novel infiltration diagnostics technology based on laser line-scanning and simultaneous infrared temperature imaging. A laboratory scale experimental setup was designed to mimic a model house of well-defined pressure difference below or above the outside pressure. Algorithms and Matlab-based programs had been developed for recognition of the hole location in infrared images. Our experiment based on laser wavelengths of 450 and 1550 nm and laser beam diameters of 4-25 mm showed that the location of the holes could be identified using laser heating; the diagnostic approach however could not readily distinguish between infiltration and non-infiltration points. To significantly improve the scanning throughput and recognition accuracy, a second approach was explored, developed, and extensively tested. It incorporates a liquid spray on the surface to induce extra phase change cooling effect. In this spray method, we termed it as PECIT (Phase-change Enhanced Cooling Infrared Thermography), phase-change enhanced cooling was used, which significantly amplifies the effect of air flow (infiltration and exfiltration). This heat transfer method worked extremely well to identify infiltration and exfiltration locations with high accuracy and increased throughput. The PECIT technique was

  2. Infrared laser diagnostics for ITER

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hutchinson, D.P.; Richards, R.K.; Ma, C.H.

    1995-01-01

    Two infrared laser-based diagnostics are under development at ORNL for measurements on burning plasmas such as ITER. The primary effort is the development of a CO 2 laser Thomson scattering diagnostic for the measurement of the velocity distribution of confined fusion-product alpha particles. Key components of the system include a high-power, single-mode CO 2 pulsed laser, an efficient optics system for beam transport and a multichannel low-noise infrared heterodyne receiver. A successful proof-of-principle experiment has been performed on the Advanced Toroidal Facility (ATF) stellerator at ORNL utilizing scattering from electron plasma frequency satellites. The diagnostic system is currently being installed on Alcator C-Mod at MIT for measurements of the fast ion tail produced by ICRH heating. A second diagnostic under development at ORNL is an infrared polarimeter for Faraday rotation measurements in future fusion experiments. A preliminary feasibility study of a CO 2 laser tangential viewing polarimeter for measuring electron density profiles in ITER has been completed. For ITER plasma parameters and a polarimeter wavelength of 10.6 microm, a Faraday rotation of up to 26 degree is predicted. An electro-optic polarization modulation technique has been developed at ORNL. Laboratory tests of this polarimeter demonstrated a sensitivity of ≤ 0.01 degree. Because of the similarity in the expected Faraday rotation in ITER and Alcator C-Mod, a collaboration between ORNL and the MIT Plasma Fusion Center has been undertaken to test this polarimeter system on Alcator C-Mod. A 10.6 microm polarimeter for this measurement has been constructed and integrated into the existing C-Mod multichannel two-color interferometer. With present experimental parameters for C-Mod, the predicted Faraday rotation was on the order of 0.1 degree. Significant output signals were observed during preliminary tests. Further experiment and detailed analyses are under way

  3. Heuristic modelling of laser written mid-infrared LiNbO3 stressed-cladding waveguides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Huu-Dat; Ródenas, Airán; Vázquez de Aldana, Javier R; Martínez, Javier; Chen, Feng; Aguiló, Magdalena; Pujol, Maria Cinta; Díaz, Francesc

    2016-04-04

    Mid-infrared lithium niobate cladding waveguides have great potential in low-loss on-chip non-linear optical instruments such as mid-infrared spectrometers and frequency converters, but their three-dimensional femtosecond-laser fabrication is currently not well understood due to the complex interplay between achievable depressed index values and the stress-optic refractive index changes arising as a function of both laser fabrication parameters, and cladding arrangement. Moreover, both the stress-field anisotropy and the asymmetric shape of low-index tracks yield highly birefringent waveguides not useful for most applications where controlling and manipulating the polarization state of a light beam is crucial. To achieve true high performance devices a fundamental understanding on how these waveguides behave and how they can be ultimately optimized is required. In this work we employ a heuristic modelling approach based on the use of standard optical characterization data along with standard computational numerical methods to obtain a satisfactory approximate solution to the problem of designing realistic laser-written circuit building-blocks, such as straight waveguides, bends and evanescent splitters. We infer basic waveguide design parameters such as the complex index of refraction of laser-written tracks at 3.68 µm mid-infrared wavelengths, as well as the cross-sectional stress-optic index maps, obtaining an overall waveguide simulation that closely matches the measured mid-infrared waveguide properties in terms of anisotropy, mode field distributions and propagation losses. We then explore experimentally feasible waveguide designs in the search of a single-mode low-loss behaviour for both ordinary and extraordinary polarizations. We evaluate the overall losses of s-bend components unveiling the expected radiation bend losses of this type of waveguides, and finally showcase a prototype design of a low-loss evanescent splitter. Developing a realistic waveguide

  4. Picosecond dissociation of amyloid fibrils with infrared laser: A nonequilibrium simulation study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoang Viet, Man; Roland, Christopher, E-mail: cmroland@ncsu.edu; Sagui, Celeste, E-mail: sagui@ncsu.edu [Department of Physics, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, North Carolina 27695-8202 (United States); Derreumaux, Philippe; Nguyen, Phuong H., E-mail: phuong.nguyen@ibpc.fr [Laboratoire de Biochimie Théorique, UPR 9080, CNRS Université Denis Diderot, Sorbonne Paris Cité IBPC, 13 rue Pierre et Marie Curie, 75005 Paris (France); Li, Mai Suan [Institute of Physics, Polish Academy of Sciences, Al. Lotnikow 32/46, 02-668 Warsaw (Poland); Institute for Computational Science and Technology, SBI Building, Quang Trung Software City, Tan Chanh Hiep Ward, District 12, Ho Chi Minh City (Viet Nam)

    2015-10-21

    Recently, mid-infrared free-electron laser technology has been developed to dissociate amyloid fibrils. Here, we present a theoretical framework for this type of experiment based on laser-induced nonequilibrium all-atom molecular dynamics simulations. We show that the fibril is destroyed due to the strong resonance between its amide I vibrational modes and the laser field. The effects of laser irradiation are determined by a balance between fibril formation and dissociation. While the overall rearrangements of the fibril finish over short time scales, the interaction between the peptides and the solvent continues over much longer times indicating that the waters play an important role in the dissociation process. Our results thus provide new insights into amyloid fibril dissociation by laser techniques and open up new venues to investigate the complex phenomena associated with amyloidogenesis.

  5. Diatomic infrared gas-dynamic laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mckenzie, R.L.

    1971-01-01

    A laser is provided which utilizes the infrared vibration rotation transitions of a diatomic gas such as carbon monoxide. The laser action is produced by an active diatomic gas such as carbon monoxide mixed with a vibrationally resonant pumping gas such as nitrogen. In addition, a noble gas such as argon may be employed as a third gas in the mixture. The gas mixture contains from 1 to 80 vol percent of the active gas based on the pumping gas, and the third gas, if used, can constitute up to 90 percent of the total gas volume. A number of significantly different wavelengths can be produced by the laser. A single laser may contain several optical resonators at different locations, so that the desired wave length can be selected at will

  6. Theoretical femtosecond physics atoms and molecules in strong laser fields

    CERN Document Server

    Grossmann, Frank

    2018-01-01

    This textbook extends from the basics of femtosecond physics all the way to some of the latest developments in the field. In this updated edition, the chapter on laser-driven atoms is augmented by the discussion of two-electron atoms interacting with strong and short laser pulses, as well as by a review of ATI rings and low energy structures in photo-electron spectra. In the chapter on laser-driven molecules a discussion of 2D infrared spectroscopy is incorporated. Theoretical investigations of atoms and molecules interacting with pulsed lasers up to atomic field strengths on the order of 10^16 W/cm² are leading to an understanding of many challenging experimental discoveries. The presentation starts with a brief introduction to pulsed laser physics. The basis for the non-perturbative treatment of laser-matter interaction in the book is the time-dependent Schrödinger equation. Its analytical as well as numerical solution are laid out in some detail. The light field is treated classically and different possi...

  7. Attosecond Electron Wave Packet Dynamics in Strong Laser Fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnsson, P.; Remetter, T.; Varju, K.; L'Huillier, A.; Lopez-Martens, R.; Valentin, C.; Balcou, Ph.; Kazamias, S.; Mauritsson, J.; Gaarde, M. B.; Schafer, K. J.; Mairesse, Y.; Wabnitz, H.; Salieres, P.

    2005-01-01

    We use a train of sub-200 attosecond extreme ultraviolet (XUV) pulses with energies just above the ionization threshold in argon to create a train of temporally localized electron wave packets. We study the energy transfer from a strong infrared (IR) laser field to the ionized electrons as a function of the delay between the XUV and IR fields. When the wave packets are born at the zero crossings of the IR field, a significant amount of energy (∼20 eV) is transferred from the field to the electrons. This results in dramatically enhanced above-threshold ionization in conditions where the IR field alone does not induce any significant ionization. Because both the energy and duration of the wave packets can be varied independently of the IR laser, they are valuable tools for studying and controlling strong-field processes

  8. Infrared laser scattering system for plasma diagnostics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muraoka, K; Hiraki, N; Kawasaki, S [Kyushu Univ., Fukuoka (Japan). Research Inst. for Applied Mechanics

    1975-05-01

    The possibility of observing the collective scattering of infrared laser light from plasmas is discussed in terms of the laser power requirement, the necessary optical system and the detector performance, and is shown to be feasible with the present day techniques to get the ion temperature by means of a CO/sub 2/ laser on theta pinch plasmas. Based on this estimate, the construction of the TEA CO/sub 2/ laser and the preparations of the optical components have been started and some preliminary results of these are described.

  9. Infrared laser scattering system for plasma diagnostics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muraoka, Katsunori; Hiraki, Naoji; Kawasaki, Shoji

    1975-01-01

    The possibility of observing the collective scattering of infrared laser light from plasmas is discussed in terms of the laser power requirement, the necessary optical system and the detector performance, and is shown to be feasible with the present day techniques to get the ion temperature by means of a CO 2 laser on theta pinch plasmas. Based on this estimate, the construction of the TEA CO 2 laser and the preparations of the optical components have been started and some preliminary results of these are described. (auth.)

  10. Cutting and skin-ablative properties of pulsed mid-infrared laser surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaufmann, R; Hartmann, A; Hibst, R

    1994-02-01

    Pulsed mid-infrared lasers allow a precise removal of soft tissues with only minimal thermal damage. To study the potential dermatosurgical usefulness of currently available systems at different wavelengths (2010-nm Thulium:YAG laser, 2100-nm Holmium:YAG laser, 2790-nm Erbium:YSGG laser, and 2940-nm Erbium:YAG laser) in vivo on pig skin. Immediate effects and wound healing of superficial laser-abrasions and incisions were compared with those of identical control lesions produced by dermabrasion, scalpel incisions, or laser surgery performed by a 1060-nm Nd:YAG and a 1060-nm CO2 laser (continuous and superpulsed mode). Best efficiency and least thermal injury was found for the pulsed Erbium:YAG laser, leading to ablative and incisional lesions comparable to those obtained by dermabrasion or superficial scalpel incisions, respectively. In contrast to other mid-infrared lasers tested, the 2940-nm Erbium:YAG laser thus provides a potential instrument for future applications in skin surgery, especially when aiming at a careful ablative removal of delicate superficial lesions with maximum sparing of adjacent tissue structures. However, in the purely incisional application mode pulsed mid-infrared lasers, though of potential usefulness in microsurgical indications (eg, surgery of the cornea), do not offer a suggestive alternative to simple scalpel surgery of the skin.

  11. High-order harmonics measured by the photon statistics of the infrared driving-field exiting the atomic medium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsatrafyllis, N; Kominis, I K; Gonoskov, I A; Tzallas, P

    2017-04-27

    High-order harmonics in the extreme-ultraviolet spectral range, resulting from the strong-field laser-atom interaction, have been used in a broad range of fascinating applications in all states of matter. In the majority of these studies the harmonic generation process is described using semi-classical theories which treat the electromagnetic field of the driving laser pulse classically without taking into account its quantum nature. In addition, for the measurement of the generated harmonics, all the experiments require diagnostics in the extreme-ultraviolet spectral region. Here by treating the driving laser field quantum mechanically we reveal the quantum-optical nature of the high-order harmonic generation process by measuring the photon number distribution of the infrared light exiting the harmonic generation medium. It is found that the high-order harmonics are imprinted in the photon number distribution of the infrared light and can be recorded without the need of a spectrometer in the extreme-ultraviolet.

  12. Infrared-laser-based fundus angiography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klingbeil, Ulrich; Canter, Joseph M.; Lesiecki, Michael L.; Reichel, Elias

    1994-06-01

    Infrared fundus angiography, using the fluorescent dye indocyanine green (ICG), has shown great potential in delineating choroidal neovascularization (CNV) otherwise not detectable. A digital retinal imaging system containing a diode laser for illumination has been developed and optimized to perform high sensitivity ICG angiography. The system requires less power and generates less pseudo-fluorescence background than nonlaser devices. During clinical evaluation at three retinal centers more than 200 patients, the majority of which had age-related macular degeneration, were analyzed. Laser based ICG angiography was successful in outlining many of the ill-defined or obscure CNV as defined by fluorescein angiography. The procedure was not as successful with classic CNV. ICG angiograms were used to prepare and guide laser treatment.

  13. Intensity dependence of nonsequential double ionization of helium in IR+XUV two-color laser fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jin, Facheng; Wang, Bingbing; Chen, Jing; Yang, Yujun; Yan, Zong-Chao

    2016-01-01

    By applying the frequency-domain theory, we investigate the dependence of momentum spectra on laser intensity in a nonsequential double ionization (NSDI) process of helium in infrared (IR) and extreme ultraviolet (XUV) two-color laser fields. We find that the two-color laser fields play distinct roles in an NSDI process, where the IR laser field mainly determines the width of each band, and the XUV laser field mainly plays a role on the NSDI probability. Furthermore, an NSDI process can be decoupled into a two-step process: an above-threshold ionization (ATI), followed by a laser-assisted collision (LAC). It is found that, the IR laser field is responsible for broadening the peak in the ATI process and providing additional momenta to the two ionized electrons in the LAC process; while the XUV laser field plays a crucial role on the strength of the spectrum in the ATI process, and influences the radii of orbits in momentum space in the LAC process. (paper)

  14. Infrared laser damage thresholds in corneal tissue phantoms using femtosecond laser pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boretsky, Adam R.; Clary, Joseph E.; Noojin, Gary D.; Rockwell, Benjamin A.

    2018-02-01

    Ultrafast lasers have become a fixture in many biomedical, industrial, telecommunications, and defense applications in recent years. These sources are capable of generating extremely high peak power that can cause laser-induced tissue breakdown through the formation of a plasma upon exposure. Despite the increasing prevalence of such lasers, current safety standards (ANSI Z136.1-2014) do not include maximum permissible exposure (MPE) values for the cornea with pulse durations less than one nanosecond. This study was designed to measure damage thresholds in corneal tissue phantoms in the near-infrared and mid-infrared to identify the wavelength dependence of laser damage thresholds from 1200-2500 nm. A high-energy regenerative amplifier and optical parametric amplifier outputting 100 femtosecond pulses with pulse energies up to 2 mJ were used to perform exposures and determine damage thresholds in transparent collagen gel tissue phantoms. Three-dimensional imaging, primarily optical coherence tomography, was used to evaluate tissue phantoms following exposure to determine ablation characteristics at the surface and within the bulk material. The determination of laser damage thresholds in the near-IR and mid-IR for ultrafast lasers will help to guide safety standards and establish the appropriate MPE levels for exposure sensitive ocular tissue such as the cornea. These data will help promote the safe use of ultrafast lasers for a wide range of applications.

  15. Improving executive function using transcranial infrared laser stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanco, Nathaniel J; Maddox, W Todd; Gonzalez-Lima, Francisco

    2017-03-01

    Transcranial infrared laser stimulation is a new non-invasive form of low-level light therapy that may have a wide range of neuropsychological applications. It entails using low-power and high-energy-density infrared light from lasers to increase metabolic energy. Preclinical work showed that this intervention can increase cortical metabolic energy, thereby improving frontal cortex-based memory function in rats. Barrett and Gonzalez-Lima (2013, Neuroscience, 230, 13) discovered that transcranial laser stimulation can enhance sustained attention and short-term memory in humans. We extend this line of work to executive function. Specifically, we ask whether transcranial laser stimulation enhances performance in the Wisconsin Card Sorting Task that is considered the gold standard of executive function and is compromised in normal ageing and a number of neuropsychological disorders. We used a laser of a specific wavelength (1,064 nm) that photostimulates cytochrome oxidase - the enzyme catalysing oxygen consumption for metabolic energy production. Increased cytochrome oxidase activity is considered the primary mechanism of action of this intervention. Participants who received laser treatment made fewer errors and showed improved set-shifting ability relative to placebo controls. These results suggest that transcranial laser stimulation improves executive function and may have exciting potential for treating or preventing deficits resulting from neuropsychological disorders or normal ageing. © 2015 The British Psychological Society.

  16. Mid-infrared quantum cascade laser spectroscopy probing of the ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Aparajeo Chattopadhyay

    2018-05-07

    May 7, 2018 ... cm3 molecule. −1 s. −1 ... Quantum cascade laser; time-resolved mid-infrared spectroscopy; transient absorption; peroxy radicals .... peak of the laser emission profile. .... cal with O2 is a termolecular reaction (Eq. 3) and the.

  17. Laser capture microdissection: Arcturus(XT) infrared capture and UV cutting methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallagher, Rosa I; Blakely, Steven R; Liotta, Lance A; Espina, Virginia

    2012-01-01

    Laser capture microdissection (LCM) is a technique that allows the precise procurement of enriched cell populations from a heterogeneous tissue under direct microscopic visualization. LCM can be used to harvest the cells of interest directly or can be used to isolate specific cells by ablating the unwanted cells, resulting in histologically enriched cell populations. The fundamental components of laser microdissection technology are (a) visualization of the cells of interest via microscopy, (b) transfer of laser energy to a thermolabile polymer with either the formation of a polymer-cell composite (capture method) or transfer of laser energy via an ultraviolet laser to photovolatize a region of tissue (cutting method), and (c) removal of cells of interest from the heterogeneous tissue section. Laser energy supplied by LCM instruments can be infrared (810 nm) or ultraviolet (355 nm). Infrared lasers melt thermolabile polymers for cell capture, whereas ultraviolet lasers ablate cells for either removal of unwanted cells or excision of a defined area of cells. LCM technology is applicable to an array of applications including mass spectrometry, DNA genotyping and loss-of-heterozygosity analysis, RNA transcript profiling, cDNA library generation, proteomics discovery, and signal kinase pathway profiling. This chapter describes the unique features of the Arcturus(XT) laser capture microdissection instrument, which incorporates both infrared capture and ultraviolet cutting technology in one instrument, using a proteomic downstream assay as a model.

  18. Measuring the electric field of few-cycle laser pulses by attosecond cross correlation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bandrauk, Andre D.; Chelkowski, Szczepan; Shon, Nguyen Hong

    2002-01-01

    A new technique for directly measuring the electric field of linearly polarized few-cycle laser pulses is proposed. Based on the solution of the time-dependent Schroedinger equation (TDSE) for an H atom in the combined field of infrared (IR) femtosecond (fs) and ultraviolet (UV) attosecond (as) laser pulses we show that, as a function of the time delay between two pulses, the difference (or equivalently, asymmetry) of photoelectron signals in opposite directions (along the polarization vector of laser pulses) reproduces very well the profile of the electric field (or vector potential) in the IR pulse. Such ionization asymmetry can be used for directly measuring the carrier-envelope phase difference (i.e., the relative phase of the carrier frequency with respect to the pulse envelope) of the IR fs laser pulse

  19. Infrared technique for decoding of invisible laser markings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haferkamp, Heinz; Jaeschke, Peter; Stein, Johannes; Goede, Martin

    2002-03-01

    Counterfeiting and product piracy continues to be an important issue not only for the Western industry, but also for the society in general. Due to the drastic increase in product imitation and the request for plagiarism protection as well as for reducing thefts there is a high interest in new protection methods providing new security features. The method presented here consists of security markings which are included below paint layers. These markings are invisible for the human eye due to the non-transparency of the upper layers in the visible spectral range. However, the markings can be detected by an infrared technique taking advantage on the partial transparency of the upper paint layers in the IR-region. Metal sheets are marked using laser radiation. The beam of a Nd:YAG-laser provides a modification of the surface structure, resulting in dark markings due to the annealing effect. After coating of the laser-marked material, the markings are invisible for the bare eye. In order to read out the invisible information below the coating, an infrared reflection technique is used. The samples are illuminated with halogen lamps or infrared radiators. Many coating materials (i. e. paints) show a certain transparency in the mid-infrared region, especially between 3 - 5 micrometers . The reflected radiation is detected using an IR-camera with a sensitivity range from 3.4 - 5 micrometers . Due to the different reflection properties between the markings and their surrounding, the information can be detected.

  20. Low-intensity infrared laser effects on zymosan-induced articular inflammatory response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Januária dos Anjos, Lúcia Mara; da Fonseca, Adenilson d. S.; Gameiro, Jacy; de Paoli, Flávia

    2015-03-01

    Low-level therapy laser is a phototherapy treatment that involves the application of low power light in the red or infrared wavelengths in various diseases such as arthritis. In this work, we investigated whether low-intensity infrared laser therapy could cause death by caspase-6 apoptosis or DNA damage pathways in cartilage cells after zymosaninduced articular inflammatory process. Inflammatory process was induced in C57BL/6 mouse by intra-articular injection of zymosan into rear tibio-tarsal joints. Thirty animals were divided in five groups: (I) control, (II) laser, (III) zymosan-induced, (IV) zymosan-induced + laser and (V). Laser exposure was performed after zymosan administration with low-intensity infrared laser (830 nm), power 10 mW, fluence 3.0 J/cm2 at continuous mode emission, in five doses. Twenty-four hours after last irradiation, the animals were sacrificed and the right joints fixed and demineralized. Morphological analysis was observed by hematoxylin and eosin stain, pro-apoptotic (caspase-6) was analyzed by immunocytochemistry and DNA fragmentation was performed by TUNEL assay in articular cartilage cells. Inflammatory process was observed in connective tissue near to articular cartilage, in IV and V groups, indicating zymosan effect. This process was decreased in both groups after laser treatment and dexamethasone. Although groups III and IV presented higher caspase-6 and DNA fragmentation percentages, statistical differences were not observed when compared to groups I and II. Our results suggest that therapies based on low-intensity infrared lasers could reduce inflammatory process and could not cause death by caspase-6 apoptosis or DNA damage pathways in cartilage cells after zymosan-induced articular inflammatory process.

  1. The design of infrared laser radar for vehicle initiative safety

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Ping; Xu, Xi-ping; Li, Xiao-yu; Li, Tian-zhi; Liu, Yu-long; Wu, Jia-hui

    2013-09-01

    Laser radar for vehicle is mainly used in advanced vehicle on-board active safety systems, such as forward anti-collision systems, active collision warning systems and adaptive cruise control systems, etc. Laser radar for vehicle plays an important role in the improvement of vehicle active safety and the reduction of traffic accidents. The stability of vehicle active anti-collision system in dynamic environment is still one of the most difficult problems to break through nowadays. According to people's driving habit and the existed detecting technique of sensor, combining the infrared laser range and galvanometer scanning technique , design a 3-D infrared laser radar which can be used to assist navigation, obstacle avoidance and the vehicle's speed control for the vehicle initiative safety. The device is fixed to the head of vehicle. Then if an accident happened, the device could give an alarm to remind the driver timely to decelerate or brake down, by which way can people get the purpose of preventing the collision accidents effectively. To accomplish the design, first of all, select the core components. Then apply Zemax to design the transmitting and receiving optical system. Adopt 1550 nm infrared laser transmitter as emission unit in the device, a galvanometer scanning as laser scanning unit and an InGaAs-APD detector as laser echo signal receiving unit. Perform the construction of experimental system using FPGA and ARM as the core controller. The system designed in this paper can not only detect obstacle in front of the vehicle and make the control subsystem to execute command, but also transfer laser data to PC in real time. Lots of experiments using the infrared laser radar prototype are made, and main performance of it is under tested. The results of these experiments show that the imaging speed of the laser radar can reach up to 25 frames per second, the frame resolution of each image can reach 30×30 pixels, the horizontal angle resolution is about 6. 98

  2. Separation of boron isotopes by infrared laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Kazuya

    1995-01-01

    Vibrationally excited chemical reaction of boron tribromide (BBr 3 ) with oxygen (O 2 ) is utilized to separate 10 B and 11 B. Infrared absorption of 10 BBr 3 is at 11.68μ and that of 11 BBr 3 is at 12.18μ. The wavelengths of ammonia laser made in the laboratory were mainly 11.71μ, 12.08μ and 12.26μ. Irradiation was done by focussing the laser with ZnSe lens on the sample gas (mixture of 1.5 torr of natural BBr 3 and 4.5 torr of O 2 ) in the reaction cell. Depletions of 10 BBr 3 and 11 BBr 3 due to chemical reaction of BBr 3 with O 2 was measured with infrared spectrometer. The maximum separation factor β( 10 B/ 11 B) obtained was about 4.5 (author)

  3. Low-intensity red and infrared laser effects at high fluences on Escherichia coli cultures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barboza, L.L.; Campos, V.M.A.; Magalhaes, L.A.G. [Instituto de Biologia Roberto Alcantara Gomes, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Departamento de Biofisica e Biometria; Paoli, F. [Universidade Federal de Juiz de Fora (UFJF), Juiz de Fora, MG (Brazil). Departamento de Morfologia; Fonseca, A.S., E-mail: adnfonseca@ig.com.br [Universidade Federal do Estado do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Departamento de Ciencias Fisiologicas

    2015-10-15

    Semiconductor laser devices are readily available and practical radiation sources providing wavelength tenability and high monochromaticity. Low-intensity red and near-infrared lasers are considered safe for use in clinical applications. However, adverse effects can occur via free radical generation, and the biological effects of these lasers from unusually high fluences or high doses have not yet been evaluated. Here, we evaluated the survival, filamentation induction and morphology of Escherichia coli cells deficient in repair of oxidative DNA lesions when exposed to low-intensity red and infrared lasers at unusually high fluences. Cultures of wild-type (AB1157), endonuclease III-deficient (JW1625-1), and endonuclease IV-deficient (JW2146-1) E. coli, in exponential and stationary growth phases, were exposed to red and infrared lasers (0, 250, 500, and 1000 J/cm{sup 2}) to evaluate their survival rates, filamentation phenotype induction and cell morphologies. The results showed that low-intensity red and infrared lasers at high fluences are lethal, induce a filamentation phenotype, and alter the morphology of the E. coli cells. Low-intensity red and infrared lasers have potential to induce adverse effects on cells, whether used at unusually high fluences, or at high doses. Hence, there is a need to reinforce the importance of accurate dosimetry in therapeutic protocols. (author)

  4. Transcranial infrared laser stimulation improves rule-based, but not information-integration, category learning in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanco, Nathaniel J; Saucedo, Celeste L; Gonzalez-Lima, F

    2017-03-01

    This is the first randomized, controlled study comparing the cognitive effects of transcranial laser stimulation on category learning tasks. Transcranial infrared laser stimulation is a new non-invasive form of brain stimulation that shows promise for wide-ranging experimental and neuropsychological applications. It involves using infrared laser to enhance cerebral oxygenation and energy metabolism through upregulation of the respiratory enzyme cytochrome oxidase, the primary infrared photon acceptor in cells. Previous research found that transcranial infrared laser stimulation aimed at the prefrontal cortex can improve sustained attention, short-term memory, and executive function. In this study, we directly investigated the influence of transcranial infrared laser stimulation on two neurobiologically dissociable systems of category learning: a prefrontal cortex mediated reflective system that learns categories using explicit rules, and a striatally mediated reflexive learning system that forms gradual stimulus-response associations. Participants (n=118) received either active infrared laser to the lateral prefrontal cortex or sham (placebo) stimulation, and then learned one of two category structures-a rule-based structure optimally learned by the reflective system, or an information-integration structure optimally learned by the reflexive system. We found that prefrontal rule-based learning was substantially improved following transcranial infrared laser stimulation as compared to placebo (treatment X block interaction: F(1, 298)=5.117, p=0.024), while information-integration learning did not show significant group differences (treatment X block interaction: F(1, 288)=1.633, p=0.202). These results highlight the exciting potential of transcranial infrared laser stimulation for cognitive enhancement and provide insight into the neurobiological underpinnings of category learning. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Application of a flow generated by IR laser and AC electric field in micropumping and micromixing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakano, M; Mizuno, A

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, it is described that measurement of fluid flow generated by simultaneous operation of an infrared (IR) laser and AC electric field in a microfabricated channel. When an IR laser (1026 nm) was focused under an intense AC electric field, a circulating flow was generated around the laser focus. The IR laser and the electric field generate two flow patterns of the electrohydrodynamicss. When the laser focus is placed at the center of the gap between electrodes, the flow pattern is parallel to the AC electric field toward electrodes from the centre. On the other hand, when the laser focus is placed close to one of the electrodes, one directional flow is generated. First flow pattern can be used as a micromixer and the second one as a micropump. Flow velocity profiles of the two flow patterns were measured as a function of the laser power, intensity of the AC electric field and AC frequency.

  6. Absorption Spectroscopy in Hollow-Glass Waveguides Using Infrared Diode Lasers[4817-25

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blake, Thomas A.; Kelly, James F.; Stewart, Timothy L.; Hartman, John S.; Sharpe, Steven W.; Sams, Robert L.; Alan Fried

    2002-01-01

    Near- and mid-infrared diode lasers combined with flexible, hollow waveguides hold the promise of light weight, field portable, fast response gas sensors. The advantages of using the waveguides compared to White or Herriott multireflection cells include a small gas volume, a high photon fill factor in the waveguide, which increases molecule-light interactions, and reduction or elimination of optical fringing, which usually sets the practical limit of detectivity in absorption spectroscopy. Though hollow waveguides have been commercially available for several years, relatively few results have been reported in the literature. We present here results from our laboratory where we have injected infrared laser light into straight and coiled lengths of hollow waveguides and performed direct and wavelength modulated absorption spectroscopy on nitrous oxide, ethylene, and nitric oxide. Using a 1 mm bore, 3 meter long coiled waveguide coated for the near infrared, nitrous oxide transitions near 6595 cm-1 were observed under flowing conditions. Signal-to-noise ratios on the order of 1500:1 with RMS noise equal to 2 X 10-5 were measured. In the mid-infrared light from either a 10.1 or 5.3 micron lead salt diode laser was injected into a three meter length of 1 mm bore hollow waveguide coated for the mid-infrared. The waveguide was coiled with one loop at a diameter of 52 cm. Ethylene transitions were observed in the vicinity of 985 cm-1 with a static fill of 0.2 Torr of pure ethylene in the waveguide and nitric oxide transitions were observed in the vicinity of 1906 cm-1 using either a flow or a static fill of 1 ppm NO in nitrogen. In direct absorption the NO transitions are observed to have a signal-to-noise of approximately 5:1 for transitions with absorbances on the order of 10-3. Using wavelength modulated techniques the signal-to-noise ratio improves at least an order of magnitude. These encouraging results indicate that waveguides can be used for in situ gas monitoring

  7. Low-intensity infrared lasers alter actin gene expression in skin and muscle tissue

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fonseca, A S; Mencalha, A L; Campos, V M A; Ferreira-Machado, S C; Peregrino, A A F; Magalhães, L A G; Geller, M; Paoli, F

    2013-01-01

    The biostimulative effect of low-intensity lasers is the basis for treatment of diseases in soft tissues. However, data about the influence of biostimulative lasers on gene expression are still scarce. The aim of this work was to evaluate the effects of low-intensity infrared lasers on the expression of actin mRNA in skin and muscle tissue. Skin and muscle tissue of Wistar rats was exposed to low-intensity infrared laser radiation at different fluences and frequencies. One and 24 hours after laser exposure, tissue samples were withdrawn for total RNA extraction, cDNA synthesis and evaluation of actin gene expression by quantitative polymerase chain reaction. The data obtained show that laser radiation alters the expression of actin mRNA differently in skin and muscle tissue of Wistar rats depending of the fluence, frequency and time after exposure. The results could be useful for laser dosimetry, as well as to justify the therapeutic protocols for treatment of diseases of skin and muscle tissues based on low-intensity infrared laser radiation. (paper)

  8. Infrared temperature measurement and interference analysis of magnesium alloys in hybrid laser-TIG welding process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, R.-S.; Liu, L.-M.; Song, G.

    2007-01-01

    Infrared (IR) temperature measurement, as a convenient, non-contact method for making temperature field measurements, has been widely used in the fields of welding, but the problem of interference from radiant reflection is a complicating factor in applying IR temperature sensing to welding. The object of this research is to make a deep understand about the formation of interference, explore a new method to eliminate the interfering radiation during laser-TIG hybrid welding of magnesium alloys and to obtain the distribution of temperature field accurately. The experimental results showed that the interferences caused by radiant specular reflection of arc light, ceramic nozzle, electrode and laser nozzle were transferred out of welding seam while the IR thermography system was placed perpendicularly to welding seam. And the welding temperature distribution captured by IR termography system which had been calibrated by thermocouple was reliable by using this method in hybrid laser-TIG welding process of AZ31B magnesium alloy

  9. Rugged and compact mid-infrared solid-state laser for avionics applications

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Esser, MJD

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available In order to demonstrate the feasibility of a helicopter-based application using advanced laser technology, the authors have developed a rugged and compact mid-infrared solid-state laser. The requirement for the laser was to simultaneously emit at 2...

  10. High-speed high-sensitivity infrared spectroscopy using mid-infrared swept lasers (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Childs, David T. D.; Groom, Kristian M.; Hogg, Richard A.; Revin, Dmitry G.; Cockburn, John W.; Rehman, Ihtesham U.; Matcher, Stephen J.

    2016-03-01

    Infrared spectroscopy is a highly attractive read-out technology for compositional analysis of biomedical specimens because of its unique combination of high molecular sensitivity without the need for exogenous labels. Traditional techniques such as FTIR and Raman have suffered from comparatively low speed and sensitivity however recent innovations are challenging this situation. Direct mid-IR spectroscopy is being speeded up by innovations such as MEMS-based FTIR instruments with very high mirror speeds and supercontinuum sources producing very high sample irradiation levels. Here we explore another possible method - external cavity quantum cascade lasers (EC-QCL's) with high cavity tuning speeds (mid-IR swept lasers). Swept lasers have been heavily developed in the near-infrared where they are used for non-destructive low-coherence imaging (OCT). We adapt these concepts in two ways. Firstly by combining mid-IR quantum cascade gain chips with external cavity designs adapted from OCT we achieve spectral acquisition rates approaching 1 kHz and demonstrate potential to reach 100 kHz. Secondly we show that mid-IR swept lasers share a fundamental sensitivity advantage with near-IR OCT swept lasers. This makes them potentially able to achieve the same spectral SNR as an FTIR instrument in a time x N shorter (N being the number of spectral points) under otherwise matched conditions. This effect is demonstrated using measurements of a PDMS sample. The combination of potentially very high spectral acquisition rates, fundamental SNR advantage and the use of low-cost detector systems could make mid-IR swept lasers a powerful technology for high-throughput biomedical spectroscopy.

  11. Generation of Raman lasers from nitrogen molecular ions driven by ultraintense laser fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Jinping; Chu, Wei; Liu, Zhaoxiang; Xu, Bo; Chen, Jinming; Cheng, Ya

    2018-03-01

    Atmospheric lasing has aroused much interest in the past few years. The ‘air–laser’ opens promising potential for remote chemical sensing of trace gases with high sensitivity and specificity. At present, several approaches have been successfully implemented for generating highly coherent laser beams in atmospheric condition, including both amplified-spontaneous emission, and narrow-bandwidth stimulated emission in the forward direction in the presence of self-generated or externally injected seed pulses. Here, we report on generation of multiple-wavelength Raman lasers from nitrogen molecular ions ({{{N}}}2+), driven by intense mid-infrared laser fields. Intuitively, the approach appears problematic for the small nonlinear susceptibility of {{{N}}}2+ ions, whereas the efficiency of Raman laser can be significantly promoted in near-resonant condition. More surprisingly, a Raman laser consisting of a supercontinuum spanning from ∼310 to ∼392 nm has been observed resulting from a series near-resonant nonlinear processes including four-wave mixing, stimulated Raman scattering and cross phase modulation. To date, extreme nonlinear optics in molecular ions remains largely unexplored, which provides an alternative means for air–laser-based remote sensing applications.

  12. Infrared laser scattering system for the plasma diagnostics: CO/sub 2/ laser characteristics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hiraki, N; Kawasaki, S; Muraoka, K

    1975-08-01

    A detailed study was conducted of the operating characteristics of a double discharge infrared TEA carbon dioxide laser used for scattering measurements of plasmas. The discharge condition, the laser output energy and power, the beam profile and divergence, the emission spectral line width, the time lag and jitter of the output from the discharge trigger, have been established. It is concluded that the carbon dioxide oscillator can deliver the allowable beam divergence and spectral line width for the measurement of ion temperature in light scattering studies of theta pinch plasmas. The results presented might be applicable to laser fusion experiments using carbon dioxide lasers.

  13. A dual far-infrared laser diagnostic of magnetized plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Darrow, D.S.; Park, H.K.

    1988-02-01

    A dual far-infrared laser has been constructed and its properties have been exploited to probe tokamak-like discharges in the CDX toroidal device. Thermal variation of the difference frequency between the two far-infrared cavities is slow, though the cavities lack thermal stabilization, simply because their assembly on the same chassis exposes them to virtually identical temperature changes. The optical arrangement beyond the laser permits conversion within minutes between interferometry and density fluctuation observation, and within an hour between different operating wavelengths. Line-average densities of 2 /times/ 10 13 cm -3 and coherent fluctuations in the neighborhood of 20 kHz have been measured with this diagnostic. 15 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs

  14. Theoretical considerations and preparatory experiments for poloidal field measurements in tokamaks by far-infrared polarimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kunz, W; Dodel, G [Stuttgart Univ. (TH) (Germany, F.R.). Inst. fuer Plasmaforschung

    1978-12-01

    Numerical calculations give an optimum wavelength and show the precision requirements for determining poloidal field profiles in tokamaks on the basis of the Faraday effect. The required precision of the polarimetric measurements can be achieved in the far-infrared as is verified in a model experiment using a ferrite modulated HCN laser beam.

  15. DNA fragmentation and nuclear phenotype in tendons exposed to low-intensity infrared laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Paoli, Flavia; Ramos Cerqueira, Larissa; Martins Ramos, Mayara; Campos, Vera M.; Ferreira-Machado, Samara C.; Geller, Mauro; de Souza da Fonseca, Adenilson

    2015-03-01

    Clinical protocols are recommended in device guidelines outlined for treating many diseases on empirical basis. However, effects of low-intensity infrared lasers at fluences used in clinical protocols on DNA are controversial. Excitation of endogenous chromophores in tissues and free radicals generation could be described as a consequence of laser used. DNA lesions induced by free radicals cause changes in DNA structure, chromatin organization, ploidy degrees and cell death. In this work, we investigated whether low-intensity infrared laser therapy could alter the fibroblasts nuclei characteristics and induce DNA fragmentation. Tendons of Wistar rats were exposed to low-intensity infrared laser (830 nm), at different fluences (1, 5 and 10 J/cm2), in continuous wave (power output of 10mW, power density of 79.6 mW/cm2). Different frequencies were analyzed for the higher fluence (10 J/cm2), at pulsed emission mode (2.5, 250 and 2500 Hz), with the laser source at surface of skin. Geometric, densitometric and textural parameters obtained for Feulgen-stained nuclei by image analysis were used to define nuclear phenotypes. Significant differences were observed on the nuclear phenotype of tendons after exposure to laser, as well as, high cell death percentages was observed for all fluences and frequencies analyzed here, exception 1 J/cm2 fluence. Our results indicate that low-intensity infrared laser can alter geometric, densitometric and textural parameters in tendon fibroblasts nuclei. Laser can also induce DNA fragmentation, chromatin lost and consequently cell death, using fluences, frequencies and emission modes took out from clinical protocols.

  16. Twin optically-pumped far-infrared CH3OH laser for plasma diagnostics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamanaka, M.; Takeda, Y.; Tanigawa, S.; Nishizawa, A.

    1980-01-01

    A twin optically-pumped far-infrared CH 3 OH laser has been constructed for use in plasma diagnostics. The antisymmetric doublet due to the Raman-type resonant two-photon transition is reproducibly observed at 118.8 microns. With the 118.8-micron line, it is found that CH 3 OH absorption line center is 16 + or - 1 MHz higher than the pump 9.7-micron P(36) CO 2 laser line center. It is shown that the Raman-type resonant two-photon transition is useful in order to get several MHz phase modulation for the far-infrared laser interferometer. Some preliminary performances of this twin laser for the modulated interferometer are described

  17. Low-intensity red and infrared lasers on XPA and XPC gene expression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fonseca, A S; Magalhães, L A G; Mencalha, A L; Ferreira-Machado, S C; Geller, M; Paoli, F

    2014-01-01

    Laser devices emit monochromatic, coherent, and highly collimated intense beams of light that are useful for a number of biomedical applications. However, for low-intensity lasers, possible adverse effects of laser light on DNA are still controversial. In this work, the expression of XPA and XPC genes in skin and muscle tissue exposed to low-intensity red and infrared lasers was evaluated. Skin and muscle tissue of Wistar rats were exposed to low-intensity red and infrared lasers at different fluences in continuous mode emission. Skin and muscle tissue samples were withdrawn for total RNA extraction, cDNA synthesis, and evaluation of actin gene expression by quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Data obtained show that laser radiation alters the expression of XPA and XPC mRNA differently in skin and muscle tissue of Wistar rats, depending on physical (fluence and wavelength) and biological (tissue) parameters. Laser light could modify expression of genes related to the nucleotide excision repair pathway at fluences and wavelengths used in clinical protocols. (letter)

  18. Apertureless near-field scanning optical microscope working with or without laser source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Formanek, F; De Wilde, Y; Aigouy, L; Chen, Y

    2004-01-01

    An apertureless near-field scanning optical microscope (ANSOM), used indifferent configurations, is presented. Our versatile home-made setup, based on a sharp tungsten tip glued onto a quartz tuning fork and working in tapping mode, allows to perform imaging over a broad spectral range. We have recorded optical images in the visible (wavelength, lambda = 655 nm) and in the infrared (lambda = 10.6 microm), proving that the setup routinely achieves an optical resolution of images recorded in the visible (lambda = 655 nm) in an inverted configuration where the tip does not perturb the focused spot of the illumination laser. Approach curves as well as image profiles have revealed that on demodulating the optical signal at higher harmonics, we can obtain an effective probe sharpening which results in an improvement of the resolution. Finally, we have presented optical images recorded in the infrared without any illumination, that is, the usual laser source is replaced by a simple heating of the sample. This has shown that the ANSOM can be used as a near-field thermal optical microscope (NTOM) to probe the near field generated by the thermal emission of the sample.

  19. Development of cryo-cell for infrared Raman laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harada, Tetsuro; Ohmori, Takao; Saito, Hideaki

    1984-01-01

    Laser isotope separation (LIS) for uranium enrichment is remarkable for its higher efficiency and cost effectiveness over the gaseous diffusion process. A prototype Raman Laser apparatus for uranium enrichment was developed and manufactured by IHI for the Institute of Physical and Chemical Research. This apparatus is capable of emitting tunable infrared Laser beam of a wave length from 13 μm to 17 μm from its multiple pass resonator by injecting a highly coherent CO 2 Laser beam into the para-hydrogen gas vessel (kept at 100 K) to induce Raman scattering. This paper describes the Laser oscillation mechanism and the structure of the multiple pass cell; it also discusses the technical aspects that are essential for a Raman Laser apparatus. Moreover, the cooling characteristics of the present apparatus are reported by analyzing the results of tests conducted in actual service thermal conditions. (author)

  20. Electric field detection of coherent synchrotron radiation in a storage ring generated using laser bunch slicing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Katayama, I.; Shimosato, H.; Bito, M.; Furusawa, K.; Adachi, M.; Zen, H.; Kimura, S.; Katoh, M.; Shimada, M.; Yamamoto, N.; Hosaka, M.; Ashida, M.

    2012-01-01

    The electric field of coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR) generated by laser bunch slicing in a storage ring has been detected by an electro-optic sampling method. The gate pulses for sampling are sent through a large-mode-area photonic-crystal fiber. The observed electric field profile of the CSR is in good agreement with the spectrum of the CSR observed using Fourier transform far-infrared spectrometry, indicating good phase stability in the CSR. The longitudinal density profiles of electrons modulated by laser pulses were evaluated from the electric field profile.

  1. Coherent atomic and molecular spectroscopy in the far infrared

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inguscio, M.

    1988-01-01

    Recent advances in far infrared spectroscopy of atoms (fine structure transitions) and molecules (rotational transitions) are reviewed. Results obtained by means of Laser Magnetic Resonance, using fixed frequency lasers, and Tunable Far Infrared spectrometers are illustrated. The importance of far infrared spectroscopy for several fields, including astrophysics, atmospheric physics, atomic structure and metology, is discussed. (orig.)

  2. Concept of infrared laser particle accelerators with oversized DBR and HFB waveguides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arnesson, J.; Gnepf, S.; Nessi, M.; Woelfli, W.; Kneubuehl, F.K.

    1986-01-01

    We present an infrared-laser accelerator scheme which makes use of hollow oversized linear periodic and helical waveguide structures originally designed for distributed feedback (DFB) and helical feedback (HFB) lasers

  3. The New High Magnetic Field Laboratory at Dresden: a Pulsed-Field Laboratory at an IR Free-Electron-Laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pobell, F.; Bianchi, A. D.; Herrmannsdoerfer, T.; Krug, H.; Zherlitsyn, S.; Zvyagin, S.; Wosnitza, J.

    2006-01-01

    We report on the construction of a new high magnetic field user laboratory which will offer pulsed-field coils in the range (60 T, 500 ms, 40 mm) to (100 T, 10 ms, 20 mm) for maximum field, pulse time, and bore diameter of the coils. These coils will be energized by a modular 50 MJ/24 kV capacitor bank. Besides many other experimental techniques, as unique possibilities NMR in pulsed fields as well as infrared spectroscopy at 5 to 150 μm will be available by connecting the pulsed field laboratory to a nearby free-electron-laser facility

  4. Comparison of laser-based mitigation of fused silica surface damage using mid- versus far-infrared lasers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, S T; Matthews, M J; Elhadj, S; Cooke, D; Guss, G M; Draggoo, V G; Wegner, P J

    2009-12-16

    Laser induced growth of optical damage can limit component lifetime and therefore operating costs of large-aperture fusion-class laser systems. While far-infrared (IR) lasers have been used previously to treat laser damage on fused silica optics and render it benign, little is known about the effectiveness of less-absorbing mid-IR lasers for this purpose. In this study, they quantitatively compare the effectiveness and efficiency of mid-IR (4.6 {micro}m) versus far-IR (10.6 {micro}m) lasers in mitigating damage growth on fused silica surfaces. The non-linear volumetric heating due to mid-IR laser absorption is analyzed by solving the heat equation numerically, taking into account the temperature-dependent absorption coefficient {alpha}(T) at {lambda} = 4.6 {micro}m, while far-IR laser heating is well-described by a linear analytic approximation to the laser-driven temperature rise. In both cases, the predicted results agree well with surface temperature measurements based on infrared radiometry, as well as sub-surface fictive temperature measurements based on confocal Raman microscopy. Damage mitigation efficiency is assessed using a figure of merit (FOM) relating the crack healing depth to laser power required, under minimally-ablative conditions. Based on their FOM, they show that for cracks up to at least 500 {micro}m in depth, mitigation with a 4.6 {micro}m mid-IR laser is more efficient than mitigation with a 10.6 {micro}m far-IR laser. This conclusion is corroborated by direct application of each laser system to the mitigation of pulsed laser-induced damage possessing fractures up to 225 {micro}m in depth.

  5. Laser-assisted electron scattering in strong-field ionization of dense water vapor by ultrashort laser pulses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilke, M; Al-Obaidi, R; Moguilevski, A; Kothe, A; Engel, N; Metje, J; Kiyan, I Yu; Aziz, E F

    2014-01-01

    We report on strong-field ionization of dense water gas in a short infrared laser pulse. By employing a unique combination of photoelectron spectroscopy with a liquid micro-jet technique, we observe how the character of electron emission at high kinetic energies changes with the increase of the medium density. This change is associated with the process of laser-assisted electron scattering (LAES) on neighboring particles, which becomes a dominant mechanism of hot electron emission at higher medium densities. The manifestation of this mechanism is found to require densities that are orders of magnitude lower than those considered for heating the laser-generated plasmas via the LAES process. The experimental results are supported by simulations of the LAES yield with the use of the Kroll–Watson theory. (paper)

  6. Estimating optical feedback from a chalcogenide fiber in mid-infrared quantum cascade lasers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Jumpertz

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The amount of optical feedback originating from a chalcogenide fiber used to couple light from a mid-infrared quantum cascade laser is evaluated experimentally. Threshold reduction measurements on the fibered laser, combined with an analytical study of a rate equations model of the laser under optical feedback, allow estimating the feedback strength between 11% and 15% depending on the fiber cleavage quality. While this remains below the frontier of the chaotic regime, it is sufficient to deeply modify the optical spectrum of a quantum cascade laser. Hence for applications such as gas spectroscopy, where the shape of the optical spectrum is of prime importance, the use of mid-infrared optical isolators may be necessary for fibered quantum cascade lasers to be fully exploited.

  7. Raman fiber lasers

    CERN Document Server

    2017-01-01

    This book serves as a comprehensive, up-to-date reference about this cutting-edge laser technology and its many new and interesting developments. Various aspects and trends of Raman fiber lasers are described in detail by experts in their fields. Raman fiber lasers have progressed quickly in the past decade, and have emerged as a versatile laser technology for generating high power light sources covering a spectral range from visible to mid-infrared. The technology is already being applied in the fields of telecommunication, astronomy, cold atom physics, laser spectroscopy, environmental sensing, and laser medicine. This book covers various topics relating to Raman fiber laser research, including power scaling, cladding and diode pumping, cascade Raman shifting, single frequency operation and power amplification, mid-infrared laser generation, specialty optical fibers, and random distributed feedback Raman fiber lasers. The book will appeal to scientists, students, and technicians seeking to understand the re...

  8. Quantum cascade laser infrared spectroscopy of single cancer cells

    KAUST Repository

    Patel, Imran; Rajamanickam, Vijayakumar Palanisamy; Bertoncini, Andrea; Pagliari, Francesca; Tirinato, Luca; Laptenok, Sergey P.; Liberale, Carlo

    2017-01-01

    Quantum cascade laser infrared spectroscopy is a next generation novel imaging technique allowing high resolution spectral imaging of cells. We show after spectral pre-processing, identification of different cancer cell populations within minutes.

  9. Quantum cascade laser infrared spectroscopy of single cancer cells

    KAUST Repository

    Patel, Imran

    2017-03-27

    Quantum cascade laser infrared spectroscopy is a next generation novel imaging technique allowing high resolution spectral imaging of cells. We show after spectral pre-processing, identification of different cancer cell populations within minutes.

  10. Direct femtosecond laser writing of buried infrared waveguides in chalcogenide glasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Coq, D.; Bychkov, E.; Masselin, P.

    2016-02-01

    Direct laser writing technique is now widely used in particular in glass, to produce both passive and active photonic devices. This technique offers a real scientific opportunity to generate three-dimensional optical components and since chalcogenide glasses possess transparency properties from the visible up to mid-infrared range, they are of great interest. Moreover, they also have high optical non-linearity and high photo-sensitivity that make easy the inscription of refractive index modification. The understanding of the fundamental and physical processes induced by the laser pulses is the key to well-control the laser writing and consequently to realize integrated photonic devices. In this paper, we will focus on two different ways allowing infrared buried waveguide to be obtained. The first part will be devoted to a very original writing process based on a helical translation of the sample through the laser beam. In the second part, we will report on another original method based on both a filamentation phenomenon and a point by point technique. Finally, we will demonstrate that these two writing techniques are suitable for the design of single mode waveguide for wavelength ranging from the visible up to the infrared but also to fabricate optical components.

  11. Mass Spectrometric Fingerprinting of Tank Waste Using Tunable, Ultrafast Infrared Lasers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Richard Haglund Jr.

    2002-01-01

    The principal scientific thrust of this project was to demonstrate a novel method for precision matrix-assisted laser desorption-ionization (MALDI) mass spectrometry (MS) of model tank-waste materials using, using the sodium nitrate component of the tank waste both as the matrix and as an internal calibration standard. Conventional nanosecond and femtosecond single-frequency lasers and a tunable, mid-infrared free-electron laser were used in the development of the MS protocols and in measurements of the MALDI dynamics. In addition to developing a model of the processes which lead to efficient desorption and ionization of organic molecules (e.g., toluene, benzene, chelators, various organic acids, crown ethers) from sodium nitrate, we developed protocols for quantitative analysis based on the use of the sodium nitrate in tank waste as an internal standard. Comparisons of MALDI-MS using nanosecond and picosecond lasers, and of infrared and ultraviolet lasers, have been especially instructive, and demonstrate the superior potential of IR-MALDI for this purpose, as well as for a number of related analytical and thin-film applications

  12. Efficient, High-Power Mid-Infrared Laser for National Securityand Scientific Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kiani, Leily S. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2017-11-02

    The LLNL fiber laser group developed a unique short-wave-infrared, high-pulse energy, highaverage- power fiber based laser. This unique laser source has been used in combination with a nonlinear frequency converter to generate wavelengths, useful for remote sensing and other applications in the mid-wave infrared (MWIR). Sources with high average power and high efficiency in this MWIR wavelength region are not yet available with the size, weight, and power requirements or energy efficiency necessary for future deployment. The LLNL developed Fiber Laser Pulsed Source (FiLPS) design was adapted to Erbium doped silica fibers for 1.55 μm pumping of Cadmium Silicon Phosphide (CSP). We have demonstrated, for the first time optical parametric amplification of 2.4 μm light via difference frequency generation using CSP with an Erbium doped fiber source. In addition, for efficiency comparison purposes, we also demonstrated direct optical parametric generation (OPG) as well as optical parametric oscillation (OPO).

  13. Effects of laser radiation parameters of the infrared multiphoton dissociation of protonated trichloroethylene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ungureanu, C.; Almasan, V.

    1994-01-01

    The favorable properties of the infrared multiphoton absorption and dissociation of trichloroethylene-H, (C 2 HCl 3 ), by TEA-CO 2 laser radiation and rapid isotopic exchange between this molecule and water, indicate that it can be a promising further candidate for the final enrichment of heavy water (> 98% D 2 O), by laser method. We present the results obtained in the isotopic selectivity of multiphoton absorption measurements and in the study of the pulse energy and frequency laser radiation influence on the infrared multiphoton dissociation of C 2 HCl 3 in isotopic mixture with C 2 DCl 3 . (Author)

  14. Vibrational relaxation of CDCl3 induced by infrared laser radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alvarez, R.F.; Azcarate, M.L.; Alonso, E.M.; Dangelo, R.J.; Quel, E.J.

    1990-01-01

    A CO 2 TEA laser was used to excite mode ν 4 of CDCl 3 (914cm- 1 ). The laser was constructed at the laboratory, tuned in line 10P(48), (10.91 μm). Infrared fluorescence technique was used to determine V-T/R relaxation times for CDCl 3 both pure and in Ar mixtures. (Author). 9 refs., 3 figs

  15. A twin optically-pumped far-infrared CH3OH laser for plasma diagnostics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamanaka, M.; Takeda, Y.; Tanigawa, S.; Nishizawa, A.; Noda, N.

    1979-11-01

    A twin optically-pumped far-infrared CH 3 OH laser has been constructed for use in plasma diagnostics. The anti-symmetric doublet due to the Raman-type resonant two-photon transition is reproducibly observed at 118.8 μm. With the 118.8-μm line, it is obtained from the frequency separation of the anti-symmetric doublet that the CH 3 OH absorption line center is 16 +- 1 MHz higher than the pump 9.7-μm P(36) CO 2 laser line center. It is shown that the Raman-type resonant two-photon transition is useful in order to get several-MHz phase modulation for the far-infrared laser interferometer. Some preliminary performances of this twin laser for the modulated interferometer are described. (author)

  16. Isotope separation by selective dissociation of trifluoromethane with an infrared laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hartford, A.J.

    1982-01-01

    A process for obtaining compounds enriched in a desired isotope of an element selected from hydrogen and carbon comprises exposing subatmospheric pressure gaseous trifluoromethane containing said desired isotope and one or more other isotopes of the same element to infrared laser radiation of a predetermined frequency, which selectively dissociates trifluoromethane molecules containing said desired isotope and separating the resulting dissociation product enriched in said desired isotope from the remainder of the gas. The term 'trifluoromethane' (TFM) refers to a mixture of CF 3 H and CF 3 D, the latter constituting about 0.015 percent of the total. TFM is irradiated with a CO 2 laser at an appropriate infrared wavelength

  17. New infrared solid state laser materials for CALIOPE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DeLoach, L.D.; Page, R.H.; Wilke, G.D.

    1994-01-01

    Tunable infrared laser light may serve as a useful means by which to detect the presence of the targeted effluents. Since optical parametric oscillators (OPOs) have proven to be a versatile method of generating coherent light from the ultraviolet to the mid-infrared, this technology is a promising choice by which to service the CALIOPE applications. In addition, since some uncertainty remains regarding the precise wavelengths and molecules that will be targeted, the deployment of OPOs retains the greatest amount of wavelength flexibility. Another approach that the authors are considering is that of generating tunable infrared radiation directly with a diode-pumped solid state laser (DPSSL). One important advantage of a DPSSL is that it offers flexible pulse format modes that can be tailored to meet the needs of a particular application and target molecule. On the other hand, direct generation by a tunable DPSSL will generally be able to cover a more limited wavelength range than is possible with OPO technology. In support of the CALIOPE objectives the authors are exploring the potential for laser action among a class of materials comprised of transition metal-doped zinc chalcogenide crystals (i.e., ZnS, ZnSe and ZnTe). The Cr 2+ , Co 2+ and Ni 2+ dopants were selected as the most favorable candidates, on the basis of their documented spectral properties in the scientific literature. Thus far, the authors have characterized the absorption and emission properties of these ions in the ZnS and ZnSe crystals. The absorption spectra are used to determine the preferred wavelength at which the crystal should be pumped, while the emission spectra reveal the extent of the tuning range potentially offered by the material. In addition, measurements of the emission lifetime as a function of temperature turn out to be quite useful, since this data is suggestive of the room temperature emission yield

  18. 2 W high efficiency PbS mid-infrared surface emitting laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishida, A.; Sugiyama, Y.; Isaji, Y.; Kodama, K.; Takano, Y.; Sakata, H.; Rahim, M.; Khiar, A.; Fill, M.; Felder, F.; Zogg, H.

    2011-09-01

    High efficiency laser operation with output power exceeding 2 W was obtained for vertical external-cavity PbS based IV-VI compound surface emitting quantum-well structures. The laser showed external quantum efficiency as high as 16%. Generally, mid-infrared III-V or II-VI semiconductor laser operation utilizing interband electron transitions are restricted by Auger recombination and free carrier absorption. Auger recombination is much lower in the IV-VI semiconductors, and the free-carrier absorption is significantly reduced by an optically pumped laser structure including multi-step optical excitation layers.

  19. Mid-infrared optical parametric oscillator pumped by an amplified random fiber laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shang, Yaping; Shen, Meili; Wang, Peng; Li, Xiao; Xu, Xiaojun

    2017-01-01

    Recently, the concept of random fiber lasers has attracted a great deal of attention for its feature to generate incoherent light without a traditional laser resonator, which is free of mode competition and insure the stationary narrow-band continuous modeless spectrum. In this Letter, we reported the first, to the best of our knowledge, optical parametric oscillator (OPO) pumped by an amplified 1070 nm random fiber laser (RFL), in order to generate stationary mid-infrared (mid-IR) laser. The experiment realized a watt-level laser output in the mid-IR range and operated relatively stable. The use of the RFL seed source allowed us to take advantage of its respective stable time-domain characteristics. The beam profile, spectrum and time-domain properties of the signal light were measured to analyze the process of frequency down-conversion process under this new pumping condition. The results suggested that the near-infrared (near-IR) signal light `inherited' good beam performances from the pump light. Those would be benefit for further develop about optical parametric process based on different pumping circumstances.

  20. Measurement of light penetration of near-infrared laser at the lumbosacral nerves in rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishibashi, Naoya; Shimoyama, Hiroshi; Kawase, Yuki; Motohara, Shosaku; Okayama, Takamitsu; Niwa, Daisuke; Koyama, Jun

    2018-02-01

    Photobiomodulation or low level laser therapy (LLLT) has been utilized in various areas of medical practice including pain relief, wound healing, and inflammation treatment. Some recent animal studies have reported that near-infrared laser irradiation to the lumbosacral nerves transcutateously relieves neuropathic pain by controlling activity of lumbosacral nerves. However, transcutaneous laser penetration to the nerves has not yet been fully elucidated. Our aim is to determine the light penetration to lumbosacral nerves when near-infrared laser was irradiated transcutateously to lumbosacral nerves. We implanted photodiodes near the lumbosacral nerves of rats and connected the photodiodes to an oscilloscope through an amplifier. Near-infrared lasers (wavelengths: 808 nm and 830 nm) were irradiated through the skin at 2, 5 and 10 W pulses (Duty 10%, 5 Hz) and outputs of photodiodes were collected. After irradiation, the depth of the photodiodes and the nerves from the skin surface were determined by micro-CT device. The result showed that the fluence rate at the lumbosacral nerves was 179+/-19.2 mW/cm2 and 232+/-20.7 mW/cm2 when the 808-nm and 830-nm laser was irradiated at 10 W respectively. These findings would be beneficial for following study of photobiomodulation.

  1. New Opportunities in Mid-Infrared Emission Control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Geiser

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Tunable laser absorption spectroscopy (TLAS has been well accepted as a preferred measurement technique for many industrial applications in recent years, especially for in situ applications. Previously, mainly near-infrared lasers have been used in TLAS sensors. The advent of compact mid-infrared light sources, like quantum cascade lasers and interband cascade lasers, has made it possible to detect gases with better sensitivity by utilizing fundamental absorption bands and to measure species that do not have any absorption lines in the near-infrared spectral region. This technological advancement has allowed developing new sensors for gases, such as nitric oxide and sulfur dioxide, for industrial applications. Detection limits of better than 1 ppm·m for nitric oxide and better than 10 ppm·m for sulfur dioxide are demonstrated in field experiments.

  2. Femtosecond laser irradiation-induced infrared absorption on silicon surfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qinghua Zhu

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The near-infrared (NIR absorption below band gap energy of crystalline silicon is significantly increased after the silicon is irradiated with femtosecond laser pulses at a simple experimental condition. The absorption increase in the NIR range primarily depends on the femtosecond laser pulse energy, pulse number, and pulse duration. The Raman spectroscopy analysis shows that after the laser irradiation, the silicon surface consists of silicon nanostructure and amorphous silicon. The femtosecond laser irradiation leads to the formation of a composite of nanocrystalline, amorphous, and the crystal silicon substrate surface with microstructures. The composite has an optical absorption enhancement at visible wavelengths as well as at NIR wavelength. The composite may be useful for an NIR detector, for example, for gas sensing because of its large surface area.

  3. Mid-infrared, long wave infrared (4-12 μm) molecular emission signatures from pharmaceuticals using laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Clayton S-C; Brown, Ei E; Kumi-Barimah, Eric; Hommerich, Uwe H; Jin, Feng; Trivedi, Sudhir B; Samuels, Alan C; Snyder, A Peter

    2014-01-01

    In an effort to augment the atomic emission spectra of conventional laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) and to provide an increase in selectivity, mid-wave to long-wave infrared (IR), LIBS studies were performed on several organic pharmaceuticals. Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy signature molecular emissions of target organic compounds are observed for the first time in the IR fingerprint spectral region between 4-12 μm. The IR emission spectra of select organic pharmaceuticals closely correlate with their respective standard Fourier transform infrared spectra. Intact and/or fragment sample molecular species evidently survive the LIBS event. The combination of atomic emission signatures derived from conventional ultraviolet-visible-near-infrared LIBS with fingerprints of intact molecular entities determined from IR LIBS promises to be a powerful tool for chemical detection.

  4. Mid-infrared pulsed laser ultrasonic testing for carbon fiber reinforced plastics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kusano, Masahiro; Hatano, Hideki; Watanabe, Makoto; Takekawa, Shunji; Yamawaki, Hisashi; Oguchi, Kanae; Enoki, Manabu

    2018-03-01

    Laser ultrasonic testing (LUT) can realize contactless and instantaneous non-destructive testing, but its signal-to-noise ratio must be improved in order to measure carbon fiber reinforced plastics (CFRPs). We have developed a mid-infrared (mid-IR) laser source optimal for generating ultrasonic waves in CFRPs by using a wavelength conversion device based on an optical parametric oscillator. This paper reports a comparison of the ultrasonic generation behavior between the mid-IR laser and the Nd:YAG laser. The mid-IR laser generated a significantly larger ultrasonic amplitude in CFRP laminates than a conventional Nd:YAG laser. In addition, our study revealed that the surface epoxy matrix of CFRPs plays an important role in laser ultrasonic generation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Multispectral mid-infrared imaging using frequency upconversion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sanders, Nicolai Højer; Dam, Jeppe Seidelin; Jensen, Ole Bjarlin

    2013-01-01

    It has recently been shown that it is possible to upconvert infrared images to the near infrared region with high quantum efficiency and low noise by three-wave mixing with a laser field [1]. If the mixing laser is single-frequency, the upconverted image is simply a band-pass filtered version...... parameter, allowing for fast tuning and hence potentially fast image acquisition, paving the way for upconversion based real time multispectral imaging. In the present realization the upconversion module consists of an external cavity tapered diode laser in a Littrow configuration with a computer controlled...

  6. The effect of near-infrared MLS laser radiation on cell membrane structure and radical generation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kujawa, Jolanta; Pasternak, Kamila; Zavodnik, Ilya; Irzmański, Robert; Wróbel, Dominika; Bryszewska, Maria

    2014-09-01

    The therapeutic effects of low-power laser radiation of different wavelengths and light doses are well known, but the biochemical mechanism of the interaction of laser light with living cells is not fully understood. We have investigated the effect of MLS (Multiwave Locked System) laser near-infrared irradiation on cell membrane structure, functional properties, and free radical generation using human red blood cells and breast cancer MCF-4 cells. The cells were irradiated with low-intensity MLS near-infrared (simultaneously 808 nm, continuous emission and 905 nm, pulse emission, pulse-wave frequency, 1,000 or 2,000 Hz) laser light at light doses from 0 to 15 J (average power density 212.5 mW/cm(2), spot size was 3.18 cm(2)) at 22 °C, the activity membrane bound acetylcholinesterase, cell stability, anti-oxidative activity, and free radical generation were the parameters used in characterizing the structural and functional changes of the cell. Near-infrared low-intensity laser radiation changed the acetylcholinesterase activity of the red blood cell membrane in a dose-dependent manner: There was a considerable increase of maximal enzymatic rate and Michaelis constant due to changes in the membrane structure. Integral parameters such as erythrocyte stability, membrane lipid peroxidation, or methemoglobin levels remained unchanged. Anti-oxidative capacity of the red blood cells increased after MLS laser irradiation. This irradiation induced a time-dependent increase in free radical generation in MCF-4 cells. Low-intensity near-infrared MLS laser radiation induces free radical generation and changes enzymatic and anti-oxidative activities of cellular components. Free radical generation may be the mechanism of the biomodulative effect of laser radiation.

  7. Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy Infrared Emission From Inorganic and Organic Substances

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Yang, C.S; Brown, E; Hommerich, U; Trivedi, S. B; Snyder, A. P; Samuels, A. C

    2006-01-01

    .... The ultraviolet-visible-near infrared (UV-Vis- NIR) spectral region exploited in conventional LIBS largely elucidates the elemental composition of the laser target by profiling these atomic lines...

  8. Supercontinuum: broad as a lamp, bright as a laser, now in the mid-infrared

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moselund, Peter M.; Petersen, Christian; Dupont, Sune; Agger, Christian; Bang, Ole; Keiding, Søren R.

    2012-06-01

    Based on the experience gained developing our market leading visible spectrum supercontinuum sources NKT Photonics has built the first mid-infrared supercontinuum source based on modelocked picosecond fiber lasers. The source is pumped by a ~ 2 um laser based on a combination of erbium and thulium and use ZBLAN fibers to generate a 1.75-4.4 μm spectrum. We will present results obtained by applying the source for mid-infrared microscopy where absorption spectra can be used to identify the chemical nature of different parts of a sample. Subsequently, we discuss the possible application of a mid-IR supercontinuum source in other areas including infrared countermeasures.

  9. A thyratron-switched modular CO2 TEA laser for infrared photochemical studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamilton, N.; Kelly, J.W.; Struve, H.

    1982-09-01

    A thyratron-switched, ultraviolet pre-ionised CO 2 TEA laser, consisting of four modules connected in series, has been designed and constructed. The laser can be operated in the TEM 00 mode and is able to produce 2.5 J per pulse. The design and operation of the laser as a tool for infrared studies is discussed together with an evaluation of the effect of operating parameters on output characteristics

  10. Corneal tissue welding with infrared laser irradiation after clear corneal incision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasier, Rfat; Ozeren, Mediha; Artunay, Ozgür; Bahçecioğlu, Halil; Seçkin, Ismail; Kalaycoğlu, Hamit; Kurt, Adnan; Sennaroğlu, Alphan; Gülsoy, Murat

    2010-09-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the potential of infrared lasers for corneal welding to seal corneal cuts done in an experimental animal model. Full-thickness corneal cuts on freshly enucleated bovine eyes were irradiated with infrared (809-nm diode, 980-nm diode, 1070-nm YLF, and 1980-nm Tm:YAP) lasers to get immediate laser welding. An 809-nm laser was used with the topical application of indocyanine green to enhance the photothermal interaction at the weld site. In total, 60 bovine eyes were used in this study; 40 eyes were used in the first part of the study for the determination of optimal welding parameters (15 eyes were excluded because of macroscopic carbonization, opacification, or corneal shrinkage; 2 eyes were used for control), and 20 eyes were used for further investigation of more promising lasers (YLF and Tm:YAP). Laser wavelength, irradiating power, exposure time, and spot size were the dose parameters, and optimal dose for immediate closure with minimal thermal damage was estimated through histological examination of welded samples. In the first part of the study, results showed that none of the applications was satisfactory. Full-thickness success rates were 28% (2 of 7) for 809-nm and for 980-nm diode lasers and 67% (2 of 3) for 1070-nm YLF and (4 of 6) for 1980-nm Tm:YAP lasers. In the second part of the study, YLF and Tm:YAP lasers were investigated with bigger sample size. Results were not conclusive but promising again. Five corneal incisions were full-thickness welded out of 10 corneas with 1070-nm laser, and 4 corneal incisions were partially welded out of 10 corneas with 1980-nm laser in the second part of the study. Results showed that noteworthy corneal welding could be obtained with 1070-nm YLF laser and 1980-nm Tm:YAP laser wavelengths. Furthermore, in vitro and in vivo studies will shed light on the potential usage of corneal laser welding technique.

  11. Cell viability, reactive oxygen species, apoptosis, and necrosis in myoblast cultures exposed to low-level infrared laser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexsandra da Silva Neto Trajano, Larissa; da Silva, Camila Luna; de Carvalho, Simone Nunes; Cortez, Erika; Mencalha, André Luiz; de Souza da Fonseca, Adenilson; Stumbo, Ana Carolina

    2016-07-01

    Low-level infrared laser is considered safe and effective for treatment of muscle injuries. However, the mechanism involved on beneficial effects of laser therapy are not understood. The aim was to evaluate cell viability, reactive oxygen species, apoptosis, and necrosis in myoblast cultures exposed to low-level infrared laser at therapeutic fluences. C2C12 myoblast cultures at different (2 and 10 %) fetal bovine serum (FBS) concentrations were exposed to low-level infrared laser (808 nm, 100 mW) at different fluences (10, 35, and 70 J/cm(2)) and evaluated after 24, 48, and 72 h. Cell viability was evaluated by WST-1 assay; reactive oxygen species (ROS), apoptosis, and necrosis were evaluated by flow cytometry. Cell viability was decreased atthe lowest FBS concentration. Laser exposure increased the cell viability in myoblast cultures at 2 % FBS after 48 and 72 h, but no significant increase in ROS was observed. Apoptosis was decreased at the higher fluence and necrosis was increased at lower fluence in myoblast cultures after 24 h of laser exposure at 2 % FBS. No laser-induced alterations were obtained at 10 % FBS. Results show that level of reactive oxygen species is not altered, at least to those evaluated in this study, but low-level infrared laser exposure affects cell viability, apoptosis, and necrosis in myoblast cultures depending on laser fluence and physiologic conditions of cells.

  12. Comparative melting and healing of B-DNA and Z-DNA by an infrared laser pulse

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Man, Viet Hoang; Pan, Feng; Sagui, Celeste; Roland, Christopher

    2016-01-01

    We explore the use of a fast laser melting simulation approach combined with atomistic molecular dynamics simulations in order to determine the melting and healing responses of B-DNA and Z-DNA dodecamers with the same d(5′-CGCGCGCGCGCG-3′) 2 sequence. The frequency of the laser pulse is specifically tuned to disrupt Watson-Crick hydrogen bonds, thus inducing melting of the DNA duplexes. Subsequently, the structures relax and partially refold, depending on the field strength. In addition to the inherent interest of the nonequilibrium melting process, we propose that fast melting by an infrared laser pulse could be used as a technique for a fast comparison of relative stabilities of same-sequence oligonucleotides with different secondary structures with full atomistic detail of the structures and solvent. This could be particularly useful for nonstandard secondary structures involving non-canonical base pairs, mismatches, etc.

  13. Comparative melting and healing of B-DNA and Z-DNA by an infrared laser pulse

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Man, Viet Hoang; Pan, Feng; Sagui, Celeste, E-mail: sagui@ncsu.edu; Roland, Christopher, E-mail: cmroland@ncsu.edu [Department of Physics, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, North Carolina 27695-8202 (United States)

    2016-04-14

    We explore the use of a fast laser melting simulation approach combined with atomistic molecular dynamics simulations in order to determine the melting and healing responses of B-DNA and Z-DNA dodecamers with the same d(5′-CGCGCGCGCGCG-3′){sub 2} sequence. The frequency of the laser pulse is specifically tuned to disrupt Watson-Crick hydrogen bonds, thus inducing melting of the DNA duplexes. Subsequently, the structures relax and partially refold, depending on the field strength. In addition to the inherent interest of the nonequilibrium melting process, we propose that fast melting by an infrared laser pulse could be used as a technique for a fast comparison of relative stabilities of same-sequence oligonucleotides with different secondary structures with full atomistic detail of the structures and solvent. This could be particularly useful for nonstandard secondary structures involving non-canonical base pairs, mismatches, etc.

  14. Mid-infrared lasers for energy frontier plasma accelerators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. V. Pogorelsky

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Plasma wake field accelerators driven with solid-state near-IR lasers have been considered as an alternative to conventional rf accelerators for next-generation TeV-class lepton colliders. Here, we extend this study to the mid-IR spectral domain covered by CO_{2} lasers. We conclude that the increase in the laser driver wavelength favors the regime of laser wake field acceleration with a low plasma density and high electric charge. This regime is the most beneficial for gamma colliders to be converted from lepton colliders via inverse Compton scattering. Selecting a laser wavelength to drive a Compton gamma source is essential for the design of such a machine. The revealed benefits from spectral diversification of laser drivers for future colliders and off-spring applications validate ongoing efforts in advancing the ultrafast CO_{2} laser technology.

  15. A Tunable Mid-Infrared Solid-State Laser with a Compact Thermal Control System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deyang Yu

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Tunable mid-infrared lasers are widely used in laser spectroscopy, gas sensing and many other related areas. In order to solve heat dissipation problems and improve the environmental temperature adaptability of solid-state laser sources, a tunable all-fiber laser pumped optical parametric oscillator (OPO was established, and a compact thermal control system based on thermoelectric coolers, an automatic temperature control circuit, cooling fins, fans and heat pipes was integrated and designed for the laser. This system is compact, light and air-cooling which satisfies the demand for miniaturization of lasers. A mathematical model and method was established to estimate the cooling capacity of this thermal control system under different ambient environments. A finite-element model was built and simulated to analyze the thermal transfer process. Experiments in room and high temperature environments were carried out and showed that the substrate temperature of a pump module could be maintained at a stable value with controlled precision to 0.2 degrees, while the output power stability of the laser was within ±1%. The experimental results indicate that this compact air-cooling thermal control system could effectively solve the heat dissipation problem of mid-infrared solid-state lasers with a one hundred watts level pump module in room and high temperature environments.

  16. Towards diode-pumped mid-infrared praseodymium-ytterbium-doped fluoride fiber lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodward, R. I.; Hudson, D. D.; Jackson, S. D.

    2018-02-01

    We explore the potential of a new mid-infrared laser transition in praseodymium-doped fluoride fiber for emission around 3.4 μm, which can be conveniently pumped by 0.975 μm diodes via ytterbium sensitizer co-doping. Optimal cavity designs are determined through spectroscopic measurements and numerical modeling, suggesting that practical diode-pumped watt-level mid-infrared fiber sources beyond 3 μm could be achieved.

  17. DNA repair in bacterial cultures and plasmid DNA exposed to infrared laser for treatment of pain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Canuto, K S; Sergio, L P S; Marciano, R S; Guimarães, O R; Polignano, G A C; Geller, M; Fonseca, A S; Paoli, F

    2013-01-01

    Biostimulation of tissues by low intensity lasers has been described on a photobiological basis and clinical protocols are recommended for treatment of various diseases, but their effects on DNA are controversial. The objective of this work was to evaluate effects of low intensity infrared laser exposure on survival and bacterial filamentation in Escherichia coli cultures, and induction of DNA lesions in bacterial plasmids. In E. coli cultures and plasmids exposed to an infrared laser at fluences used to treat pain, bacterial survival and filamentation and DNA lesions in plasmids were evaluated by electrophoretic profile. Data indicate that the infrared laser (i) increases survival of E. coli wild type in 24 h of stationary growth phase, (ii) induces bacterial filamentation, (iii) does not alter topological forms of plasmids and (iv) does not alter the electrophoretic profile of plasmids incubated with exonuclease III or formamidopyrimidine DNA glycosylase. A low intensity infrared laser at the therapeutic fluences used to treat pain can alter survival of E. coli wild type, induce filamentation in bacterial cells, depending on physiologic conditions and DNA repair, and induce DNA lesions other than single or double DNA strand breaks or alkali-labile sites, which are not targeted by exonuclease III or formamidopyrimidine DNA glycosylase. (letter)

  18. Effects of infrared lasers on chemical extraction reactions in liquid-liquid systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baoyu, X.

    A study was made of the effects of infrared lasers on equilibrium distributions of uranyl ions between aqueous solution phases containing nitric acid or hydrochloric acid and organic solvent phases of tributyl phosphate (TBP). The experimental results indicated that uranium concentrations in the organic solvent phase increased under TEA CO 2 laser irradiation up to a maximum of 44% as compared to cases in which laser radiation was not applied. The possibility that this type of laser extraction effect might be applied to separation of uranium isotopes was also discussed

  19. Coherent infrared radiation from the ALS generated via femtosecond laser modulation of the electron beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Byrd, J.M.; Hao, Z.; Martin, M.C.; Robin, D.S.; Sannibale, F.; Schoenlein, R.W.; Venturini, M.; Zholents, A.A.; Zolotorev, M.S.

    2004-01-01

    Interaction of an electron beam with a femtosecond laser pulse co-propagating through a wiggler at the ALS produces large modulation of the electron energies within a short ∼100 fs slice of the electron bunch. Propagating around the storage ring, this bunch develops a longitudinal density perturbation due to the dispersion of electron trajectories. The length of the perturbation evolves with a distance from the wiggler but is much shorter than the electron bunch length. This perturbation causes the electron bunch to emit short pulses of temporally and spatially coherent infrared light which are automatically synchronized to the modulating laser. The intensity and spectra of the infrared light were measured in two storage ring locations for a nominal ALS lattice and for an experimental lattice with the higher momentum compaction factor. The onset of instability stimulated by laser e-beam interaction had been discovered. The infrared signal is now routinely used as a sensitive monitor for a fine tuning of the laser beam alignment during data accumulation in the experiments with femtosecond x-ray pulses

  20. Infrared problems in field perturbation theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    David, Francois.

    1982-12-01

    The work presented mainly covers questions related to the presence of ''infrared'' divergences in perturbation expansions of the Green functions of certain massless field theories. It is important to determine the mathematical status of perturbation expansions in field theory in order to define the region in which they are valid. Renormalization and the symmetry of a theory are important factors in infrared problems. The main object of this thesis resides in the mathematical techniques employed: integral representations of the Feynman amplitudes; methods for desingularization, regularization and dimensional renormalization. Nonlinear two dimensional space-time sigma models describing Goldstone's low energy boson dynamics associated with a breaking of continuous symmetry are studied. Random surface models are then investigated followed by infrared divergences in super-renormalizable theories. Finally, nonperturbation effects in massless theories are studied by expanding the two-dimensional nonlinear sigma model in 1/N [fr

  1. Infrared Laser Ablation with Vacuum Capture for Fingermark Sampling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donnarumma, Fabrizio; Camp, Eden E.; Cao, Fan; Murray, Kermit K.

    2017-09-01

    Infrared laser ablation coupled to vacuum capture was employed to collect material from fingermarks deposited on surfaces of different porosity and roughness. Laser ablation at 3 μm was performed in reflection mode with subsequent capture of the ejecta with a filter connected to vacuum. Ablation and capture of standards from fingermarks was demonstrated on glass, plastic, aluminum, and cardboard surfaces. Using matrix assisted laser desorption ionization (MALDI), it was possible to detect caffeine after spiking with amounts as low as 1 ng. MALDI detection of condom lubricants and detection of antibacterial peptides from an antiseptic cream was demonstrated. Detection of explosives from fingermarks left on plastic surfaces as well as from direct deposition on the same surface using gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GC-MS) was shown. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  2. Atom dynamics in laser fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jang, Su; Mi, No Gin

    2004-12-01

    This book introduces coherent dynamics of internal state, spread of atoms wave speed, semiclassical atoms density matrix such as dynamics equation in both still and moving atoms, excitation of atoms in movement by light, dipole radiating power, quantum statistical mechanics by atoms in movement, semiclassical atoms in movement, atoms in movement in the uniform magnetic field including effects of uniform magnetic field, atom cooling using laser such as Doppler cooling, atom traps using laser and mirrors, radiant heat which particles receive, and near field interactions among atoms in laser light.

  3. A portable infrared laser spectrometer for flux measurements of trace gases at the geosphere–atmosphere interface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guimbaud, C; Catoire, V; Robert, C; Chartier, M; Pomathiod, L; Gogo, S; Laggoun-Défarge, F; Albéric, P; Grossel, A; Nicoullaud, B; Richard, G

    2011-01-01

    A portable infrared laser absorption spectrometer named SPIRIT (SPectromètre Infra-Rouge In situ Troposphérique) has been set up for the simultaneous flux measurements of trace gases at the geosphere–atmosphere interface. It uses a continuous wave distributed feedback room temperature quantum cascade laser and a patented new optical multi-pass cell. The aim of SPIRIT field studies is to get a better understanding of land and water bodies to atmosphere exchange mechanisms of greenhouse gases (GHG). The analytical procedures to derive concentrations and fluxes are described, as well as the performances of the instrument under field conditions. The ability of SPIRIT to assess space and time dependence emissions of two GHG—nitrous oxide (N 2 O) and methane (CH 4 )—for different types of ecosystems is demonstrated through in situ measurements on peatland, on fertilized soil, and on water body systems. The objectives of these investigations and preliminary significant results are reported

  4. A Low-Energy-Spread Rf Accelerator for a Far-Infrared Free-Electron Laser

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Geer, C. A. J.; Bakker, R. J.; van der Meer, A. F. G.; van Amersfoort, P. W.; Gillespie, W. A.; Saxon, G.; Poole, M. W.

    1993-01-01

    A high electron current and a small energy spread are essential for the operation of a free electron laser (FEL). In this paper we discuss the design and performance of the accelerator for FELIX, the free electron laser for infrared experiments. The system consists of a thermionic gun, a prebuncher,

  5. Near-infrared laser-triggered carbon nanohorns for selective elimination of microbes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyako, Eijiro; Nagata, Hideya; Hirano, Ken; Makita, Yoji; Nakayama, Ken-ichi; Hirotsu, Takahiro

    2007-01-01

    Carbon nanomaterials, such as carbon nanohorns and carbon nanotubes, have attracted considerable attention for their biomedical applications. We report here the first application of carbon nanohorns (CNHs) as potent laser therapeutic agents for highly selective elimination of microorganisms. This is the first report, supported by direct observations, of the highly selective elimination of yeast and bacteria (Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Escherichia coli) by employing molecular recognition element-CNH complexes and a near-infrared laser

  6. Recent advances of mid-infrared compact, field deployable sensors: principles and applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tittel, Frank; Gluszek, Aleksander; Hudzikowski, Arkadiusz; Dong, Lei; Li, Chunguang; Patimisco, Pietro; Sampaolo, Angelo; Spagnolo, Vincenzo; Wojtas, Jacek

    2016-04-01

    The recent development of compact interband cascade lasers(ICLs) and quantum cascade lasers (QCLs) based trace gas sensors will permit the targeting of strong fundamental rotational-vibrational transitions in the mid-infrared which are one to two orders of magnitude more intense than transitions in the overtone and combination bands in the near-infrared. This has led to the design and fabrication of mid-infrared compact, field deployable sensors for use in the petrochemical industry, environmental monitoring and atmospheric chemistry. Specifically, the spectroscopic detection and monitoring of four molecular species, methane (CH4) [1], ethane (C2H6), formaldehyde (H2CO) [2] and hydrogen sulphide (H2S) [3] will be described. CH4, C2H6 and H2CO can be detected using two detection techniques: mid-infrared tunable laser absorption spectroscopy (TDLAS) using a compact multi-pass gas cell and quartz enhanced photoacoustic spectroscopy (QEPAS). Both techniques utilize state-of-the-art mid-IR, continuous wave (CW), distributed feedback (DFB) ICLs and QCLs. TDLAS was performed with an ultra-compact 54.6m effective optical path length innovative spherical multipass gas cell capable of 435 passes between two concave mirrors separated by 12.5 cm. QEPAS used a small robust absorption detection module (ADM) which consists of a quartz tuning fork (QTF), two optical windows, gas inlet/outlet ports and a low noise frequency pre-amplifier. Wavelength modulation and second harmonic detection were employed for spectral data processing. TDLAS and QEPAS can achieve minimum detectable absorption losses in the range from 10-8 to 10-11cm-1/Hz1/2. Several recent examples of real world applications of field deployable gas sensors will be described. For example, an ICL based TDLAS sensor system is capable of detecting CH4 and C2H6 concentration levels of 1 ppb in a 1 sec. sampling time, using an ultra-compact, robust sensor architecture. H2S detection was realized with a THz QEPAS sensor

  7. Near-infrared laser, time domain, breast tumour detection system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joblin, A.J.

    1996-01-01

    Full text: The use of near-infrared laser, time domain techniques have been proposed for some time now as an alternative to X-ray mammography, as a means of mass screening for breast disease. The great driving force behind this research has been that near-infrared photons are a non-ionising radiation, which affords a greater degree of patient safety than when using X-rays. This would mean that women at risk of breast disease could be screened with a near-infrared laser imaging system, much more regularly than with an X-ray mammography system, which should allow for the earlier detection and treatment of breast disease. This paper presents a theoretical investigation of the performance of a near-infrared, time domain breast imaging system. The performance of the imaging system is characterised by the resolution and contrast parameters, which were studied using a numerical finite difference calculation method. The finite difference method is used to solve the diffusion equation for the photon transport through the inhomogeneous breast tissue medium. Optimal performance was found to be obtained with short photon times of flight. However the signal to noise ratio decreases rapidly as the photon time of flight is decreased. The system performance will therefore be limited by the noise equivalent power of the time resolved detection system, which is the signal incident on the time resolved detection system which gives a signal to noise ratio of 1:1. Photon times of flight shorter than 500 ps are not practical with current technology, which places limits on the resolution and contrast. The photon signal throughput can be increased by increasing the size of the laser beam width, by increasing the size of the aperture stop of the detector, by increasing the laser pulse duration or decreasing the detector time resolution. Best system performance is found by optimising these parameters for a given time gating and detector system characteristic (NEP). It was found that the

  8. Optically pumped FIR lasers and their application in plasma diagnostics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bakos, J.S.

    1986-06-01

    The pysics and the construction of the far infrared lasers (FIRL) and of the infrared lasers pumping them are reviewed. The details of the construction, resonating and pumping systems, spectral and power characteristics of the FIRLs are discussed. Recently more than 1000 laser lines are known and used in the 27-80 mm wavelength range, but in many cases the laser kinetics are not fully understood, and some instability phenomena cannot be prevented. New nonlinear processes were found: two-photon pumping, hyper Raman laser tuning and relaxation phenomena. A broad application field, the plasma diagnostics by far infrared lasers is described. Scattering of infrared laser radiation can give new interesting information on the not understood effect of the anomalous transport in the high temperature plasma. (D.Gy.)

  9. Comparison of infrared laser beam shaping by diffractive and refractive methods

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Forbes, A

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available Infra-red laser beam shaping has the inherent difficulty that simple ray tracing methods often yield anomalous results, due primarily to the propagation effects at longer wavelengths. Techniques based on diffraction theory have been developed...

  10. Single attosecond pulse generation in an orthogonally polarized two-color laser field combined with a static electric field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xia Changlong; Zhang Gangtai; Wu Jie; Liu Xueshen

    2010-01-01

    We investigate theoretic high-order harmonic generation and single attosecond pulse generation in an orthogonally polarized two-color laser field, which is synthesized by a mid-infrared (IR) pulse (12.5 fs, 2000 nm) in the y component and a much weaker (12 fs, 800 nm) pulse in the x component. We find that the width of the harmonic plateau can be extended when a static electric field is added in the y component. We also investigate emission time of harmonics in terms of a time-frequency analysis to illustrate the physical mechanism of high-order harmonic generation. We calculate the ionization rate using the Ammosov-Delone-Krainov model and interpret the variation of harmonic intensity for different static electric field strengths. When the ratio of strengths of the static and the y-component laser fields is 0.1, a continuous harmonic spectrum is formed from 220 to 420 eV. By superposing a properly selected range of the harmonic spectrum from 300 to 350 eV, an isolated attosecond pulse with a duration of about 75 as is obtained, which is near linearly polarized.

  11. Investigation of SOI Raman Lasers for Mid-Infrared Gas Sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Passaro, Vittorio M.N.; De Leonardis, Francesco

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, the investigation and detailed modeling of a cascaded Raman laser, operating in the midwave infrared region, is described. The device is based on silicon-on-insulator optical waveguides and a coupled resonant microcavity. Theoretical results are compared with recent experiments, demonstrating a very good agreement. Design criteria are derived for cascaded Raman lasers working as continuous wave light sources to simultaneously sense two types of gases, namely C2H6 and CO2, at a moderate power level of 130 mW. PMID:22408481

  12. Recent progress in diode-pumped mid-infrared vibronic solid-state lasers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sorokina, I.T.; Sorokin, E.; Mirov, S.; Schaffers, K.

    2002-01-01

    Full text: The last few years were marked by the increased interest of researchers towards the new class of transition-metal doped zinc chalcogenides. In particular Cr:ZnSe attracts a lot of attention as broadly tunable continuous-wave (cw), mode-locked and diode-pumped lasers operating around 2.5 mm. This interest is explained by the absence of other comparable tunable room-temperature laser sources in this spectral region. However, another member of the II-VI compounds family Cr:ZnS, has yet remained barely studied as a laser medium. Recently we demonstrated the first continuous-wave room-temperature tunable over more than 280 nm around 2.3 μm Cr 2+ :ZnS laser, pumped with a Co:MgF2 laser and yielding over 100 mW of output power. The most recent result is the development of a compact tunable over 700 nm continuous-wave room-temperature Cr 2+ :ZnS laser, pumped by the diode-pumped Er-fiber laser at 1.6 μm and generating 0.7 W of the linearly polarized radiation. We also demonstrated direct diode-pumping at 1.6 μm of the Cr 2+ :ZnS. Although the Cr:ZnS exhibited lower (relatively to the Cr:ZnSe) efficiency and output power due to the higher passive losses of the available Cr:ZnS samples, the analysis of the spectroscopic and laser data indicates the high potential of Cr:ZnS for compact broadly tunable mid-infrared systems, as well as for high power applications. The physics of the novel diode-pumped laser systems is highly interesting. It comprises the features of the ion-doped dielectric crystalline lasers and semiconductors. For example, we observe in these media, for the first time to our knowledge, a new nonlinear phenomenon, which is analogous to the opto-optical switching process, where the laser output of the diode-pumped continuous-wave Cr:ZnSe and Cr:ZnS lasers around 2.5 μm is modulated by only a few milliwatt of the visible (470-500 nm) and near-infrared radiation (740-770 nm). We present a physical explanation of the observed effect. Refs. 4 (author)

  13. Low intensity infrared laser affects expression of oxidative DNA repair genes in mitochondria and nucleus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fonseca, A S; Magalhães, L A G; Mencalha, A L; Geller, M; Paoli, F

    2014-01-01

    Practical properties and physical characteristics of low intensity lasers have made possible their application to treat soft tissue diseases. Excitation of intracellular chromophores by red and infrared radiation at low energy fluences with increase of mitochondrial metabolism is the basis of the biostimulation effect but free radicals can be produced. DNA lesions induced by free radicals are repaired by the base excision repair pathway. In this work, we evaluate the expression of POLγ and APEX2 genes related to repair of mitochondrial and nuclear DNA, respectively. Skin and muscle tissue of Wistar rats were exposed to low intensity infrared laser at different fluences. One hour and 24 hours after laser exposure, tissue samples were withdrawn for total RNA extraction, cDNA synthesis, and evaluation of POLγ and APEX2 mRNA expression by real time quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Skin and muscle tissue of Wistar rats exposed to laser radiation show different expression of POLγ and APEX2 mRNA depending of the fluence and time after exposure. Our study suggests that a low intensity infrared laser affects expression of genes involved in repair of oxidative lesions in mitochondrial and nuclear DNA. (paper)

  14. Treatment of the calcaneal spur with infrared laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Orellana, Alina; Larrea, Pedro; Hernandez, Adel; Combarro, Andres; Corcho, Carlos; Fernandez, Sandra; Morales, Omar; Porrua, Agustin; Perez Ares, Jose

    2009-01-01

    The treatment with low power laser offers a beneficial and regenerating effect over nervous, muscular and skeletal tissues, soft tissues, and skin. This therapy has been used for more than three decades, based on the properties and effects of lasers in almost all medical specialties, due to it constitutes a novel, painless, non invasive, and easy to apply, in addition to the absence of any risk for patient and to have very good clinical results. Knowing the biological effects of the low power laser therapy (analgesic, anti-inflammatory, an tissue regenerator), we were dedicated to investigate the analgesic effect achieved with the application of infrared laser radiation in patients that suffering form calcaneal spur, who attended to the Natural and Traditional Medical Service of the clinic '30 de november', from January 2005 to January 2008. The whole of patients was 62, and the sample included 52 individuals from different sexes, races, and ages between 20 and 80 years, excluding pregnant women and neoplasia patients. Pain relief was achieved since second session of treatment, with 61,5 % of cases cured and 38,5 % improved, no one was worse, neither keep the same initial symptoms. (Author)

  15. Mid-infrared pulsed laser ablation of the arterial wall. Mechanical origin of "acoustic" wall damage and its effect on wall healing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Erven, L.; van Leeuwen, T. G.; Post, M. J.; van der Veen, M. J.; Velema, E.; Borst, C.

    1992-01-01

    Pulsed mid-infrared lasers are an alternative to excimer lasers for transluminal angioplasty. The mid-infrared lasers, however, were reported to produce "acoustic" wall damage that might impair the immediate and long-term results. To study the immediate and long-term effects on the arterial wall,

  16. Femtosecond few-cycle mid-infrared laser pulses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Xing

    The few-cycle pulses of mid-infrared (mid-IR, wavelength 2-10 microns) have attracted increasing attention owing to their great potentials for high order harmonic generation, time-resolved spectroscopy, precision of cutting and biomedical science.In this thesis, mid-IR frequency conversion.......2 - 5.5 μm with only one fixed pump wavelength, a feature absent in Kerr media. Finally, we experimentally observe supercontinuum generation spanning 1.5 octaves, generated in a 10 mm long silicon-rich nitride waveguide pumped by 100 pJ femtosecond pulses from an erbium fiber laser. The waveguide has...

  17. Visible to Infrared Diamond Photonics Enabled by Focused Femtosecond Laser Pulses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Belén Sotillo

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Diamond’s nitrogen-vacancy (NV centers show great promise in sensing applications and quantum computing due to their long electron spin coherence time and because they can be found, manipulated, and read out optically. An important step forward for diamond photonics would be connecting multiple diamond NVs together using optical waveguides. However, the inertness of diamond is a significant hurdle for the fabrication of integrated optics similar to those that revolutionized silicon photonics. In this work, we show the fabrication of optical waveguides in diamond, enabled by focused femtosecond high repetition rate laser pulses. By optimizing the geometry of the waveguide, we obtain single mode waveguides from the visible to the infrared. Additionally, we show the laser writing of individual NV centers within the bulk of diamond. We use µ-Raman spectroscopy to gain better insight on the stress and the refractive index profile of the optical waveguides. Using optically detected magnetic resonance and confocal photoluminescence characterization, high quality NV properties are observed in waveguides formed in various grades of diamond, making them promising for applications such as magnetometry, quantum information systems, and evanescent field sensors.

  18. Lasers plasmas and magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Albertazzi, Bruno

    2014-01-01

    We studied the coupling between a laser produced plasmas and a magnetic field in two cases: 1) in the context of Inertial Fusion Confinement (ICF), we first studied how magnetic fields are self generated during the interaction between a target and a laser, then 2) to progress in the understanding of the large-scale shaping of astrophysical jets, we studied the influence of an externally applied magnetic field on the dynamics of a laser-produced plasma expanding into vacuum. The first part of this thesis is thus dedicated to a numerical and experimental study of the self generated magnetic fields that are produced following the irradiation of a solid target by a high power laser (having pulse duration in the nanosecond and picosecond regimes). These fields play an important role in the frame of ICF since they influence the dynamics of the electrons produced during the laser-matter interaction, and thus condition the success of ICF experiments. The second part of this thesis is a numerical and experimental study of the influence of an externally applied magnetic field on the morphology of a laser produced plasma freely otherwise expanding into vacuum. This work aims at better understanding the observed large-scale collimation of astrophysical jets which cannot be understood in the frame of existing models. We notably show that a purely axial magnetic field can force an initially isotropic laboratory flow, scaled to be representative of a flow emerging from a Young Star Object, in a re-collimation shock, from which emerges a narrow, well collimated jet. We also show that the plasma heating induced at the re-collimation point could explain the 'puzzling' observations of stationary X ray emission zones embedded within astrophysical jets. (author) [fr

  19. Supercontinuum - broad as a lamp, bright as a laser, now in the mid-infrared

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moselund, Peter M.; Petersen, Christian; Dupont, Sune

    2012-01-01

    Based on the experience gained developing our market leading visible spectrum supercontinuum sources NKT Photonics has built the first mid-infrared supercontinuum source based on modelocked picosecond fiber lasers. The source is pumped by a ≈ 2 um laser based on a combination of erbium and thuliu...

  20. Vapor-phase infrared laser spectroscopy: from gas sensing to forensic urinalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartlome, Richard; Rey, Julien M; Sigrist, Markus W

    2008-07-15

    Numerous gas-sensing devices are based on infrared laser spectroscopy. In this paper, the technique is further developed and, for the first time, applied to forensic urinalysis. For this purpose, a difference frequency generation laser was coupled to an in-house-built, high-temperature multipass cell (HTMC). The continuous tuning range of the laser was extended to 329 cm(-1) in the fingerprint C-H stretching region between 3 and 4 microm. The HTMC is a long-path absorption cell designed to withstand organic samples in the vapor phase (Bartlome, R.; Baer, M.; Sigrist, M. W. Rev. Sci. Instrum. 2007, 78, 013110). Quantitative measurements were taken on pure ephedrine and pseudoephedrine vapors. Despite featuring similarities, the vapor-phase infrared spectra of these diastereoisomers are clearly distinguishable with respect to a vibrational band centered at 2970.5 and 2980.1 cm(-1), respectively. Ephedrine-positive and pseudoephedrine-positive urine samples were prepared by means of liquid-liquid extraction and directly evaporated in the HTMC without any preliminary chromatographic separation. When 10 or 20 mL of ephedrine-positive human urine is prepared, the detection limit of ephedrine, prohibited in sports as of 10 microg/mL, is 50 or 25 microg/mL, respectively. The laser spectrometer has room for much improvement; its potential is discussed with respect to doping agents detection.

  1. Infrared and laser-Raman spectroscopic studies of thermally-induced globular protein gels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, A H; Saunderson, D H; Suggett, A

    1981-03-01

    Infrared and laser-Raman spectroscopy have been used to follow secondary structure changes during the heat-set gelation of a number of aqueous (D2O) globular protein solutions. Measurements of the infrared Amide I' absorption band around 1650 cm-1, for BSA gels of varying clarity and texture, have shown that the very considerable variations in network structure underlying these materials are not reflected in obvious differences in secondary structure. In all cases aggregation is accompanied by development of beta-sheet of a kind common in fibrous protein systems, but for BSA at least this does not appear to vary significantly in amount from one gel type to another. Infrared studies of gels formed from other protein systems have confirmed this tendency for beta-sheet to develop during aggregation, and the tendency is further substantiated by laser-Raman evidence which provides the extra information that in most of the examples studied alpha-helix content simultaneously falls. From these, and other observations, some generalisations are made about the thermally-induced sol-to-gel transformations of globular proteins.

  2. Atoms in strong laser fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    L'Huillier, A.

    2002-01-01

    When a high-power laser focuses into a gas of atoms, the electromagnetic field becomes of the same magnitude as the Coulomb field which binds a 1s electron in a hydrogen atom. 3 highly non-linear phenomena can happen: 1) ATI (above threshold ionization): electrons initially in the ground state absorb a large number of photons, many more than the minimum number required for ionization; 2) multiple ionization: many electrons can be emitted one at a time, in a sequential process, or simultaneously in a mechanism called direct or non-sequential; and 3) high order harmonic generation (HHG): efficient photon emission in the extreme ultraviolet range, in the form of high-order harmonics of the fundamental laser field can occur. The theoretical problem consists in solving the time dependent Schroedinger equation (TDSE) that describes the interaction of a many-electron atom with a laser field. A number of methods have been proposed to solve this problem in the case of a hydrogen atom or a single-active electron atom in a strong laser field. A large effort is presently being devoted to go beyond the single-active approximation. The understanding of the physics of the interaction between atoms and strong laser fields has been provided by a very simple model called ''simple man's theory''. A unified view of HHG, ATI, and non-sequential ionization, originating from the simple man's model and the strong field approximation, expressed in terms of electrons trajectories or quantum paths is slowly emerging. (A.C.)

  3. Multiple photon infrared processes in polyatomic molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harrison, R.G.; Butcher, S.R.

    1980-01-01

    This paper reviews current understanding of the process of multiple photon excitation and dissociation of polyatomic molecules, whereby in the presence of an intense infrared laser field a molecule may absorb upwards of 30 photons. The application of this process to new photochemistry and in particular laser isotope separation is also discussed. (author)

  4. Infrared emission from a polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) excited by ultraviolet laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cherchneff, I.; Barker, J.R.

    1989-01-01

    The infrared fluorescence spectrum from the C-H stretch modes of vibrationally excited azulene (C10H8), a PAH was measured in the laboratory. PAHs are candidates as carriers of the unidentified infrared emission bands that are observed in many astronomical objects associated with dust and ultraviolet light. In the present experiment, gas phase azulene was excited with light from a 308 nm pulsed laser, and the infrared emission spectrum was time-resolved and wavelength-resolved. Moreover, the infrared absorption spectrum of gas phase azulene was obtained using an FTIR spectrometer. The laboratory emission spectrum resembles observed infrared emission spectra from the interstellar medium, providing support for the hypothesis that PAHs are the responsible carriers. The azulene C-H stretch emission spectrum is more asymmetric than the absorption spectrum, probably due to anharmonicity of levels higher than nu = 1. 36 refs

  5. Infrared and ultraviolet laser removal of crustose lichens on dolomite heritage stone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanz, Mikel; Oujja, Mohamed [Instituto de Química Física Rocasolano (IQFR), CSIC, Serrano 119, 28006 Madrid (Spain); Ascaso, Carmen; Ríos, Asunción de los; Pérez-Ortega, Sergio [Museo Nacional de Ciencia Naturales (MNCN), CSIC, Serrano 115 bis, 28006 Madrid (Spain); Souza-Egipsy, Virginia [Instituto de Ciencias Agrarias (ICA), CSIC, Serrano 115 bis, 28006 Madrid (Spain); Wierzchos, Jacek; Speranza, Mariela [Museo Nacional de Ciencia Naturales (MNCN), CSIC, Serrano 115 bis, 28006 Madrid (Spain); Cañamares, Maria Vega [Instituto de Estructura de la Materia (ICEM), CSIC, Serrano 121, 28006 Madrid (Spain); Castillejo, Marta, E-mail: marta.castillejo@iqfr.csic.es [Instituto de Química Física Rocasolano (IQFR), CSIC, Serrano 119, 28006 Madrid (Spain)

    2015-08-15

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Laser irradiation at 1064 nm (IR) or 355 nm (UV) partially removes epilithic lichens on dolostone. • Irradiation in a sequential, dual IR–UV mode efficiently eliminates lichen thalli. • Dual IR–UV irradiation mode induces severe damage on endolithic colonizers of dolostone. - Abstract: Laser removal of biodeteriogen layers warrants detailed studies due to the advantages it brings with respect to mechanical elimination or the use of biocides. We have investigated elimination of biological crusts on dolomite stones from heritage sites in central Spain. The samples were colonized by epilithic crustose lichens of different species, such as Caloplaca sp. and Verrucaria nigrescens. A comparative study was carried out by applying infrared (1064 nm) and ultraviolet (355 nm) nanosecond laser pulses and sequences pulses of the two wavelengths using a Q-switched Nd:YAG system. To detect anatomical and ultrastructural damage to the lichens, and to assess possible morphological and chemical changes on the underlying stone induced by laser irradiation, we used stereomicroscopy, scanning electron microscopy with backscattered electron imaging and Fourier transform Raman spectroscopy. The optimal conditions for removal of the colonization crust, while ensuring preservation of the lithic substrate, were obtained for dual infrared-ultraviolet sequential irradiation.

  6. Highlighting the DNA damage response with ultrashort laser pulses in the near infrared and kinetic modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisa eFerrando-May

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Our understanding of the mechanisms governing the response to DNA damage in higher eucaryotes crucially depends on our ability to dissect the temporal and spatial organization of the cellular machinery responsible for maintaining genomic integrity. To achieve this goal, we need experimental tools to inflict DNA lesions with high spatial precision at pre-defined locations, and to visualize the ensuing reactions with adequate temporal resolution. Near-infrared femtosecond laser pulses focused through high-aperture objective lenses of advanced scanning microscopes offer the advantage of inducing DNA damage in a 3D-confined volume of subnuclear dimensions. This high spatial resolution results from the highly nonlinear nature of the excitation process. Here we review recent progress based on the increasing availability of widely tunable and user-friendly technology of ultrafast lasers in the near infrared. We present a critical evaluation of this approach for DNA microdamage as compared to the currently prevalent use of UV or VIS laser irradiation, the latter in combination with photosensitizers. Current and future applications in the field of DNA repair and DNA-damage dependent chromatin dynamics are outlined. Finally, we discuss the requirement for proper simulation and quantitative modeling. We focus in particular on approaches to measure the effect of DNA damage on the mobility of nuclear proteins and consider the pros and cons of frequently used analysis models for FRAP and photoactivation and their applicability to nonlinear photoperturbation experiments.

  7. Infrared laser ablation atmospheric pressure photoionization mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaikkinen, Anu; Shrestha, Bindesh; Kauppila, Tiina J; Vertes, Akos; Kostiainen, Risto

    2012-02-07

    In this paper we introduce laser ablation atmospheric pressure photoionization (LAAPPI), a novel atmospheric pressure ion source for mass spectrometry. In LAAPPI the analytes are ablated from water-rich solid samples or from aqueous solutions with an infrared (IR) laser running at 2.94 μm wavelength. Approximately 12 mm above the sample surface, the ablation plume is intercepted with an orthogonal hot solvent (e.g., toluene or anisole) jet, which is generated by a heated nebulizer microchip and directed toward the mass spectrometer inlet. The ablated analytes are desolvated and ionized in the gas-phase by atmospheric pressure photoionization using a 10 eV vacuum ultraviolet krypton discharge lamp. The effect of operational parameters and spray solvent on the performance of LAAPPI is studied. LAAPPI offers ~300 μm lateral resolution comparable to, e.g., matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization. In addition to polar compounds, LAAPPI efficiently ionizes neutral and nonpolar compounds. The bioanalytical application of the method is demonstrated by the direct LAAPPI analysis of rat brain tissue sections and sour orange (Citrus aurantium) leaves. © 2012 American Chemical Society

  8. Electrons and atoms in intense laser fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davidovich, L.

    1982-11-01

    Several non-linear effects that show up when electrons and atoms interact with strong laser fields are considered. Thomson scattering, electron potential scattering in the presence of a laser beam, atomic ionization by strong laser fields, the refraction of electrons by laser beams and the Kapitza-Dirac effect are discussed. (Author) [pt

  9. Electrons and atoms in intense laser fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davidovich, L.

    1982-01-01

    Several non-linear effects that show up when electrons and atoms interact with strong laser fields are considered. Thomson scattering, electron potential scattering in the presence of a laser beam, atomic ionization by strong laser fields, the refraction of electrons by laser beams and the Kapitza-Dirac effect are discussed. (Author) [pt

  10. New enhanced sensitivity infrared laser spectroscopy techniques applied to reactive plasmas and trace gas detection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Welzel, S.

    2009-01-01

    Infrared laser absorption spectroscopy (IRLAS) employing both tuneable diode and quantum cascade lasers (TDLs, QCLs) has been applied with both high sensitivity and high time resolution to plasma diagnostics and trace gas measurements. TDLAS combined with a conventional White type multiple pass cell

  11. Magnetic fields in laser heated plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amiranoff, F.; Brackbill, J.; Colombant, D.; Grandjouan, N.

    1984-01-01

    With a fixed-ion code for the study of self-generated magentic fields in laser heated plasmas, the inhibition of thermal transport and the effect of the Nernst term are modeled for a KrF laser. For various values of the flux limiter, the response of a foil to a focused laser is calculated without a magnetic field and compared with the response calculated with a magnetic field. The results are: The Nernst term convects the magnetic field to densities above critical as found by Nishiguchi et al. (1984), but the field does not strongly inhibit transport into the foil. The field is also transported to sub-critical densities, where it inhibits thermal diffusion and enhance lateral transport by convection

  12. Enhanced optical confinement of dye-doped dielectric nanoparticles using a picosecond-pulsed near-infrared laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kittiravechote, A; Chiang, W-Y; Usman, A; Liau, I; Masuhara, H

    2014-01-01

    We demonstrate a novel strategy to increase the capability of confining numerous dye-doped polymeric nanobeads (diameter 100 nm) with laser trapping. Unlike most classical works of optical trapping that address mainly the stiffness of the optical trap, our work concerns an increase in the number of particles confined near the laser focus. We developed an imaging system of light scattering in which a condenser lamp was employed to illuminate the focal plane of the objective lens, and the scattering of the incoherent light was specifically measured to determine the number of confined nanobeads. In contrast to preceding work that used mainly continuous-wave or femtosecond-pulsed lasers, we employed a picosecond-pulsed laser with the half-wavelength of the laser particularly falling within the absorption band of the dopant. Our results show that the number of doped nanobeads held by the laser is significantly greater than that of the bare nanobeads of the same dimension. In striking contrast, the confinement of the nanobeads of the two types was comparable when a continuous-wave laser of the same wavelength and power was employed. The number of confined dye-doped nanobeads increased nonlinearly with the power of the pulsed laser; this dependence was fitted satisfactorily with a second-order polynomial. Supported by theoretical analysis, we attribute the enhanced confinement of doped nanobeads in part to an increased effective refractive index resulting from two-photon resonance between the optical field of the laser and the dopant of the nanobead. We envisage that our findings would evoke applications that benefit from controlled confinement or aggregation of nanomaterials with the employment of near-infrared pulsed lasers. (letter)

  13. Surface modification of UHMWPE with infrared femtosecond laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fernandez-Pradas, J.M., E-mail: jmfernandez@ub.edu [Departament de Fisica Aplicada i Optica, Universitat de Barcelona Marti i Franques 1, E-08028 Barcelona (Spain); Naranjo-Leon, S.; Morenza, J.L.; Serra, P. [Departament de Fisica Aplicada i Optica, Universitat de Barcelona Marti i Franques 1, E-08028 Barcelona (Spain)

    2012-09-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Ultra High Molecular Weight Polyethylene surface was modified with femtosecond laser pulses at 1027 nm wavelength. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Surface roughness is increased. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Ablation efficiency is maximum for 6 {mu}J pulses. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Irradiated surfaces remain almost chemically unaltered. - Abstract: Ultra-high-molecular-weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) is a polymer with mechanical and corrosion properties, which make it appropriate for using in biomedical devices such as hip and knee prostheses. The surface morphology and chemistry of UHMWPE influence its biocompatibility. A laser with wavelength at 1027 nm delivering 450 fs pulses at a repetition rate of 1 kHz is used to modify the surface of UHMWPE samples with 0.45 {mu}m root mean square surface roughness. Micrometric resolution is achieved with the use of a focusing lens of 0.25 NA and pulse energies of few microjoules. The study focuses in the influence of different pulse energies and pulse overlaps on the laser-induced surface roughness and ablation yield. Confocal microscopy is used to characterize changes in the morphology of the irradiated surfaces, and their chemical structure is analyzed by attenuated total reflectance infrared and Raman spectroscopies. The roughness increases as the pulse energy increases until it reaches a maximum. The ablation yield increases with the pulse energy and pulse overlap. However, the ablation yield per pulse is lower for higher pulse overlap. Pulses of 6 {mu}J have the highest ablation efficiency. Infrared and Raman spectra of samples irradiated with low energy pulses are similar to those of the pristine sample. However, some C=C and C=O bonds can be detected after irradiation with the highest pulse energies.

  14. Characterization of silicon microstrip sensors with a pulsed infrared laser system for the CBM experiment at FAIR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghosh, Pradeep [Goethe Univ., Frankfurt (Germany); GSI (Germany); Eschke, Juergen [GSI (Germany); FAIR (Germany); Collaboration: CBM-Collaboration

    2014-07-01

    The Silicon Tracking System (STS) for the Compressed Baryonic Matter (CBM) experiment at FAIR will comprise more than 1200 double-sided silicon microstrip sensors. For the quality assurance of the prototype sensors a laser test system has been built up. The aim of the sensor scans with the pulsed infrared laser system is to determine the charge sharing between strips and to measure the uniformity of the sensor response over the whole active area. The laser system measures the sensor response in an automatized procedure at several thousand positions across the sensor with focused infrared laser light (σ∼15 μm, λ=1060 nm). The duration (5 ns) and power (few mW) of the laser pulses are selected such, that the absorption of the laser light in the 300 μm thick silicon sensors produces a number of about 24k electrons, which is similar to the charge created by minimum ionizing particles in these sensors. Results from the characterization of monolithic active pixel sensors, to understand the spot-size of the laser, and laser scans for different sensors are presented.

  15. Boundary conditions for 3D dynamic models of ablation of ceramics by pulsed mid-infrared lasers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vila Verde, A. [Department of Physics, University of Minho, Campus de Gualtar, 4710-057 Braga (Portugal); Ramos, Marta M.D. [Department of Physics, University of Minho, Campus de Gualtar, 4710-057 Braga (Portugal)]. E-mail: marta@fisica.uminho.pt

    2005-07-15

    We present and discuss a set of boundary conditions (BCs) to use in three-dimensional, mesoscopic, finite element models of mid-infrared pulsed laser ablation of brittle materials. These models allow the study of the transient displacement and stress fields generated at micrometer scales during and after one laser pulse, where using conventional BCs may lead to some results without physical significance that can be considered an artefact of the calculations. The proposed BCs are tested and applied to a micrometer-scale continuous model of human dental enamel under CO{sub 2} radiation (10.6 {mu}m, 0.35 {mu}s pulse, sub-ablative fluence), giving rise to the following results: the highest stress is obtained at the irradiated surface of the model, at the end of the laser pulse, but afterwards it decreases rapidly until it becomes significantly lower than the stress in a region 2.5 {mu}m deep in the model; a thermally induced vibration in the material is predicted. This non-intuitive dynamics in stress and displacement distribution cannot be neglected and has to be considered in dynamic laser ablation models, since it may have serious implications in the mechanisms of ablation.

  16. Amplitude and frequency stabilized solid-state lasers in the near infrared

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laporta, P.; Taccheo, S.; Marano, M.; Svelto, O.; Bava, E.; Galzerano, G.; Svelto, C.

    2001-01-01

    In this article we present a comprehensive review of the work done by our group on the amplitude and frequency stabilization of diode-pumped near-infrared solid-state lasers. In particular, we describe experiments based on single-mode Nd:YAG (1064 nm), Er-Yb:glass (1530-1560 nm), and Tm-Ho:YAG (2097 nm) lasers, end-pumped by semiconductor laser diodes. Amplitude stabilization is achieved by means of optoelectronic control loops sensing the laser intensity fluctuations and feeding back the error signal to the current of the pump diodes. Frequency stabilization is pursued using rovibrational molecular lines as absolute frequency references by means of various frequency locking techniques. The most interesting stability results are described in some detail whereas the wide literature cited through the paper provides for a useful reference list of related topics and experiments. (author)

  17. Dispersion of near-infrared laser energy through radicular dentine when using plain or conical tips.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teo, Christine Yi Jia; George, Roy; Walsh, Laurence J

    2018-02-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of tip design on patterns of laser energy dispersion through the dentine of tooth roots when using near-infrared diode lasers. Diode laser emissions of 810 or 940 nm were used in combination with optical fiber tips with either conventional plain ends or conical ends, to irradiate tooth roots of oval or round cross-sectional shapes. The lasers were operated in continuous wave mode at 0.5 W for 5 s with the distal end of the fiber tip placed in the apical or coronal third of the root canal at preset positions. Laser light exiting through the roots and apical foramen was imaged, and the extent of lateral spread calculated. There was a significant difference in infrared light exiting the root canal apex between plain and conical fiber tips for both laser wavelengths, with more forward transmission of laser energy through the apex for plain tips. For both laser wavelengths, there were no significant differences in emission patterns when the variable of canal shape was used and all other variables were kept the same (plain vs conical tip, tip position). To ensure optimal treatment effect and to prevent the risks of inadvertent laser effects on the adjacent periapical tissues, it is important to have a good understanding of laser transmission characteristics of the root canal and root dentine. Importantly, it is also essential to understand transmission characteristics of plain and conical fibers tips.

  18. Ar 3p photoelectron sideband spectra in two-color XUV + NIR laser fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minemoto, Shinichirou; Shimada, Hiroyuki; Komatsu, Kazma; Komatsubara, Wataru; Majima, Takuya; Mizuno, Tomoya; Owada, Shigeki; Sakai, Hirofumi; Togashi, Tadashi; Yoshida, Shintaro; Yabashi, Makina; Yagishita, Akira

    2018-04-01

    We performed photoelectron spectroscopy using femtosecond XUV pulses from a free-electron laser and femtosecond near-infrared pulses from a synchronized laser, and succeeded in measuring Ar 3p photoelectron sideband spectra due to the two-color above-threshold ionization. In our calculations of the first-order time-dependent perturbation theoretical model based on the strong field approximation, the photoelectron sideband spectra and their angular distributions are well reproduced by considering the timing jitter between the XUV and the NIR pulses, showing that the timing jitter in our experiments was distributed over the width of {1.0}+0.4-0.2 ps. The present approach can be used as a method to evaluate the timing jitter inevitable in FEL experiments.

  19. Infrared laser-induced chaos and conformational disorder in a model polymer crystal: Melting vs ablation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sumpter, B.G.; Noid, D.W.; Voth, G.A.; Wunderlich, B.

    1990-01-01

    Molecular dynamics-based computer simulations are presented for the interaction of one and two infrared (IR) laser beams with a model polymer surface. When a single laser beam system is studied over a wide range of intensities, only melting of the polymer, or melting followed by bond dissociation, is observed for up to 100 picoseconds. In contrast, the two-laser simulation results exhibit a marked difference in the energy absorption behavior of the irradiated polymer which, in turn, results in multiple bond dissociations. The results for the one- and two-laser cases studied can be divided into four different classes of physical behavior: (a) the polymer remains in the solid state; (b) the polymer crystal melts; (c) the polymer ablates, but with significant melting (charring); or (d) the polymer ablates with minimal melting. Damage to the model polymer crystal from absorption of energy from either one or two lasers occurs through a mechanism that involves the competition between the absorption of energy and internal energy redistribution. The rate of energy loss from the absorption site(s) relative to the rate of absorption of energy from the radiation field determines rather the polymer melts or ablates (low absorption rates lead to melting or no change and high rates lead to ablation). A sufficiently large rate of energy absorption is only obtainable through the use of two lasers. Two lasers also significantly decrease the total laser intensity required to cause polymer crystal melting. The differences between the one- and two-laser cases are studied by adapting novel signal/subspace techniques to analyze the dynamical changes in the mode spectrum of the polymer as it melts

  20. Strong field laser physics

    CERN Document Server

    2008-01-01

    Since the invention of the laser in the 1960s, people have strived to reach higher intensities and shorter pulse durations. High intensities and ultrashort pulse durations are intimately related. Recent developments have shown that high intensity lasers also open the way to realize pulses with the shortest durations to date, giving birth to the field of attosecond science (1 asec = 10-18s). This book is about high-intensity lasers and their applications. The goal is to give an up to date introduction to the technology behind these laser systems and to the broad range of intense laser applications. These applications include AMO (atomic molecular and optical) physics, x-ray science, attosecond science, plasma physics and particle acceleration, condensed matter science and laser micromachining, and finally even high-energy physics.

  1. Laser-based terahertz-field-driven streak camera for the temporal characterization of ultrashort processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schuette, Bernd

    2011-09-15

    In this work, a novel laser-based terahertz-field-driven streak camera is presented. It allows for a pulse length characterization of femtosecond (fs) extreme ultraviolet (XUV) pulses by a cross-correlation with terahertz (THz) pulses generated with a Ti:sapphire laser. The XUV pulses are emitted by a source of high-order harmonic generation (HHG) in which an intense near-infrared (NIR) fs laser pulse is focused into a gaseous medium. The design and characterization of a high-intensity THz source needed for the streak camera is also part of this thesis. The source is based on optical rectification of the same NIR laser pulse in a lithium niobate crystal. For this purpose, the pulse front of the NIR beam is tilted via a diffraction grating to achieve velocity matching between NIR and THz beams within the crystal. For the temporal characterization of the XUV pulses, both HHG and THz beams are focused onto a gas target. The harmonic radiation creates photoelectron wavepackets which are then accelerated by the THz field depending on its phase at the time of ionization. This principle adopted from a conventional streak camera and now widely used in attosecond metrology. The streak camera presented here is an advancement of a terahertz-field-driven streak camera implemented at the Free Electron Laser in Hamburg (FLASH). The advantages of the laser-based streak camera lie in its compactness, cost efficiency and accessibility, while providing the same good quality of measurements as obtained at FLASH. In addition, its flexibility allows for a systematic investigation of streaked Auger spectra which is presented in this thesis. With its fs time resolution, the terahertz-field-driven streak camera thereby bridges the gap between attosecond and conventional cameras. (orig.)

  2. Laser-based terahertz-field-driven streak camera for the temporal characterization of ultrashort processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schuette, Bernd

    2011-09-01

    In this work, a novel laser-based terahertz-field-driven streak camera is presented. It allows for a pulse length characterization of femtosecond (fs) extreme ultraviolet (XUV) pulses by a cross-correlation with terahertz (THz) pulses generated with a Ti:sapphire laser. The XUV pulses are emitted by a source of high-order harmonic generation (HHG) in which an intense near-infrared (NIR) fs laser pulse is focused into a gaseous medium. The design and characterization of a high-intensity THz source needed for the streak camera is also part of this thesis. The source is based on optical rectification of the same NIR laser pulse in a lithium niobate crystal. For this purpose, the pulse front of the NIR beam is tilted via a diffraction grating to achieve velocity matching between NIR and THz beams within the crystal. For the temporal characterization of the XUV pulses, both HHG and THz beams are focused onto a gas target. The harmonic radiation creates photoelectron wavepackets which are then accelerated by the THz field depending on its phase at the time of ionization. This principle adopted from a conventional streak camera and now widely used in attosecond metrology. The streak camera presented here is an advancement of a terahertz-field-driven streak camera implemented at the Free Electron Laser in Hamburg (FLASH). The advantages of the laser-based streak camera lie in its compactness, cost efficiency and accessibility, while providing the same good quality of measurements as obtained at FLASH. In addition, its flexibility allows for a systematic investigation of streaked Auger spectra which is presented in this thesis. With its fs time resolution, the terahertz-field-driven streak camera thereby bridges the gap between attosecond and conventional cameras. (orig.)

  3. Infrared laser sealing of porcine vascular tissues using a 1,470 nm diode laser: Preliminary in vivo studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cilip, Christopher M; Kerr, Duane; Latimer, Cassandra A; Rosenbury, Sarah B; Giglio, Nicholas C; Hutchens, Thomas C; Nau, William H; Fried, Nathaniel M

    2017-04-01

    Infrared (IR) lasers are being explored as an alternative to radiofrequency (RF) and ultrasonic (US) devices for rapid hemostasis with minimal collateral zones of thermal damage and tissue necrosis. Previously, a 1,470 nm IR laser sealed and cut ex vivo porcine renal arteries of 1-8 mm diameter in 2 seconds, yielding burst pressures greater than 1,200 mmHg and thermal coagulation zones less than 3 mm. This preliminary study describes in vivo testing of a handheld laser probe in a porcine model. A handheld prototype with vessel/tissue clasping mechanism was tested on 73 blood vessels less than 6 mm diameter using 1,470 nm laser power of 35 W for 1-5 seconds. Device power settings, irradiation time, tissue type, vessel diameter, and histology sample number were recorded for each procedure. The probe was evaluated for hemostasis after sealing isolated and bundled arteriole/venous (A/V) vasculature of porcine abdomen and hind leg. Sealed vessel samples were collected for histological analysis of lateral thermal damage. Hemostasis was achieved in 57 of 73 seals (78%). The probe consistently sealed vasculature in small bowel mesentery, mesometrium, and gastrosplenic and epiploic regions. Seal performance was less consistent on hind leg vasculature including saphenous arteries/bundles and femoral and iliac arteries. Collagen denaturation averaged 1.6 ± 0.9 mm in eight samples excised for histologic examination. A handheld laser probe sealed porcine vessels, in vivo. Further probe development and laser parameter optimization is necessary before infrared lasers may be evaluated as an alternative to RF and US vessel sealing devices. Lasers Surg. Med. 49:366-371, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Diminution of acute radiation reaction of mouse skin with low-intensity infrared laser/red diodes-emitted light

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meshcherikova, V.V.; Klimakov, B.D.; Goldobenko, G.V.; Vajnson, A.A.

    2000-01-01

    Efficiency of the application of different regimes of laser treatment of radiation-induced skin reactions in mice feet is compared. Posterior limb feet of mice were exposed to acute X radiation at 30-36 Gy dose or fractionated radiation at 45 Gy dose. In the day of primary irradiation or different time later the feet were treated using magnetic infrared laser therapeutic MILTA-01 apparatus. Magnetic and light components of the MILTA-01 apparatus reduce the effect of radiation on mice skin corresponding two time decrease in X-radiation dose [ru

  5. Non-invasive characterization and quality assurance of silicon micro-strip detectors using pulsed infrared laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, P.

    2016-01-01

    The Compressed Baryonic Matter (CBM) experiment at FAIR is composed of 8 tracking stations consisting of roughly 1300 double sided silicon micro-strip detectors of 3 different dimensions. For the quality assurance of prototype micro-strip detectors a non-invasive detector charaterization is developed. The test system is using a pulsed infrared laser for charge injection and characterization, called Laser Test System (LTS). The system is aimed to develop a set of characterization procedures which are non-invasive (non-destructive) in nature and could be used for quality assurances of several silicon micro-strip detectors in an efficient, reliable and reproducible way. The procedures developed (as reported here) uses the LTS to scan sensors with a pulsed infra-red laser driven by step motor to determine the charge sharing in-between strips and to measure qualitative uniformity of the sensor response over the whole active area. The prototype detector modules which are tested with the LTS so far have 1024 strips with a pitch of 58 μm on each side. They are read-out using a self-triggering prototype read-out electronic ASIC called n-XYTER. The LTS is designed to measure sensor response in an automatized procedure at several thousand positions across the sensor with focused infra-red laser light (spot size ≈ 12 μm, wavelength = 1060 nm). The pulse with a duration of ≈ 10 ns and power ≈ 5 mW of the laser pulse is selected such, that the absorption of the laser light in the 300 μm thick silicon sensor produces ≈ 24000 electrons, which is similar to the charge created by minimum ionizing particles (MIP) in these sensors. The laser scans different prototype sensors and various non-invasive techniques to determine characteristics of the detector modules for the quality assurance is reported.

  6. Trans-cranial infrared laser stimulation induces hemodynamic and metabolic response measured by broadband near infrared spectroscopy in vivo on human forehead (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xinlong; Nalawade, Sahil Sunil; Reddy, Divya Dhandapani; Tian, Fenghua; Gonzalez-Lima, F.; Liu, Hanli

    2017-02-01

    Transcranial infrared laser stimulation (TILS) uses infrared light (lasers or LEDs) for nondestructive and non-thermal photobiomodulation on the human brain. Although TILS has shown its beneficial effects to a variety of neurological and psychological conditions, its physiological mechanism remains unknown. Cytochrome-c-oxidase (CCO), the last enzyme in the electron transportation chain, is proposed to be the primary photoacceptor of this infrared laser. In this study, we wish to validate this proposed mechanism. We applied 8 minutes in vivo TILS on the right forehead of 11 human participants with a 1064-nm laser. Broad-band near infrared spectroscopy (bb-NIRS) from 740-900nm was also employed near the TILS site to monitor hemodynamic and metabolic responses during the stimulation and 5-minute recovery period. For rigorous comparison, we also performed similar 8-min bb-NIR measurements under placebo conditions. A multi-linear regression analysis based on the modified Beer-Lambert law was performed to estimate concentration changes of oxy-hemoglobin (Δ[HbO]), deoxy-hemoglobin (Δ[Hb]), and cytochrome-c-oxidase (Δ[CCO]). We found that TILS induced significant increases of [CCO], [HbO] and a decrease of [Hb] with dose-dependent manner as compared with placebo treatments. Furthermore, strong linear relationships or interplays between [CCO] versus [HbO] and [CCO] versus [Hb] induced by TILS were observed in vivo for the first time. These relationships have clearly revealed close coupling/relationship between the hemodynamic oxygen supply and blood volume versus up-regulation of CCO induced by photobiomodulation. Our results demonstrate the tremendous potential of bb-NIRS as a non-invasive in vivo means to study photobiomodulation mechanisms and perform treatment evaluations of TILS.

  7. Laser-induced down-conversion and infrared phosphorescence emissivity of novel ligand-free perovskite nanomaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, M. A.; Khafagy, Rasha M.; El-sayed, O.

    2014-03-01

    For the first time, standalone and ligand-free series of novel rare-earth-based perovskite nanomaterials are used as near infrared (NIR) and mid infrared (MIR) emitters. Nano-sized La0.7Sr0.3M0.1Fe0.9O3; where M = 0, Mn2+, Co2+ or Ni2+ were synthesized using the flash auto-combustion method and characterized using FTIR, FT-Raman, SEM and EDX. Photoluminescence spectra were spontaneously recorded during pumping the samples with 0.5 mW of green laser emitting continuously at 532 nm. La0.7Sr0.3FeO3 (where M = 0) did not result in any infrared emissivity, while intense near and mid infrared down-converted phosphorescence was released from the M-doped samples. The released phosphorescence greatly shifted among the infrared spectral region with changing the doping cation. Ni2+-doped perovskite emitted at the short-wavelength near-infrared region, while Mn2+ and Co2+-doped perovskites emitted at the mid-wavelength infrared region. The detected laser-induced spontaneous parametric down-conversion phosphorescence (SPDC) occurred through a two-photon process by emitting two NIR or MIR photons among a cooperative energy transfer between the La3+ cations and the M2+ cations. Combining SrFeO3 ceramic with both a rare earth cation (RE3+) and a transition metal cation (Mn2+, Co2+ or Ni2+), rather than introducing merely RE3+ cations, greatly improved and controlled the infrared emissivity properties of synthesized perovskites through destroying their crystal symmetry and giving rise to asymmetrical lattice vibration and the nonlinear optical character. The existence of SPDC in the M2+-doped samples verifies their nonlinear character after the absence of this character in La0.7Sr0.3FeO3. Obtained results verify that, for the first time, perovskite nanomaterials are considered as nonlinear optical crystals with intense infrared emissivity at low pumping power of visible wavelengths, which nominates them for photonic applications and requires further studies regarding their lasing

  8. Application and possible mechanisms of combining LLLT (low level laser therapy), infrared hyperthermia and ionizing radiation in the treatment of cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abraham, Edward H.; Woo, Van H.; Harlin-Jones, Cheryl; Heselich, Anja; Frohns, Florian

    2014-02-01

    Benefit of concomitant infrared hyperthermia and low level laser therapy and ionizing radiation is evaluated in this study. The purpose/objectives: presentation with locally advanced bulky superficial tumors is clinically challenging. To enhance the efficacy of chemotherapy and IMRT (intensity-modulated radiation therapy) and/or electron beam therapy we have developed an inexpensive and clinically effective infrared hyperthermia approach that combines black-body infrared radiation with halogen spectrum radiation and discrete wave length infrared clinical lasers LLLT. The goal is to produce a composite spectrum extending from the far infrared to near infrared and portions of the visible spectrum with discrete penetrating wavelengths generated by the clinical infrared lasers with frequencies of 810 nm and/or 830 nm. The composite spectrum from these sources is applied before and after radiation therapy. We monitor the surface and in some cases deeper temperatures with thermal probes, but use an array of surface probes as the limiting safe thermal constraint in patient treatment while at the same time maximizing infrared entry to deeper tissue layers. Fever-grade infrared hyperthermia is produced in the first centimeters while non-thermal infrared effects act at deeper tissue layers. The combination of these effects with ionizing radiation leads to improved tumor control in many cancers.

  9. Infrared Testing of the Wide-field Infrared Survey Telescope Grism Using Computer Generated Holograms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dominguez, Margaret Z.; Content, David A.; Gong, Qian; Griesmann, Ulf; Hagopian, John G.; Marx, Catherine T; Whipple, Arthur L.

    2017-01-01

    Infrared Computer Generated Holograms (CGHs) were designed, manufactured and used to measure the performance of the grism (grating prism) prototype which includes testing Diffractive Optical Elements (DOE). The grism in the Wide Field Infrared Survey Telescope (WFIRST) will allow the surveying of a large section of the sky to find bright galaxies.

  10. Spatial temperature distribution in human hairy and glabrous skin after infrared CO2 laser radiation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frahm, Ken Steffen; Andersen, Ole K.; Arendt-Nielsen, Lars

    2010-01-01

    Background: CO(2) lasers have been used for several decades as an experimental non-touching pain stimulator. The laser energy is absorbed by the water content in the most superficial layers of the skin. The deeper located nociceptors are activated by passive conduction of heat from superficial...... to deeper skin layers. Methods: In the current study, a 2D axial finite element model was developed and validated to describe the spatial temperature distribution in the skin after infrared CO(2) laser stimulation. The geometry of the model was based on high resolution ultrasound scans. The simulations were...... compared to the subjective pain intensity ratings from 16 subjects and to the surface skin temperature distributions measured by an infrared camera. Results: The stimulations were sensed significantly slower and less intense in glabrous skin than they were in hairy skin (MANOVA, p

  11. Infrared behavior of massless field theories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sapirstein, J.R.

    1979-01-01

    Typical infrared effects in several gauge field theories with massless particles are investigated in perturbation theory. It is first shown that divergences occurring in individual Feynman graphs arising from integrations over the long-wavelength modes of the fields cancel when the graphs are grouped together in a particular way, in a generalization of the Bloch-Nordsieck treatment of QED. As one of the requirements of finiteness is renormalization of the vector propagator off shell, the charge in these theories is not directly related to classical experiment. In an effort to find the meaning of charge the low-energy theorem is considered. Although in lowest order the graphs reproduce the Thompson limit, it is found that loop corrections are singular in the low-energy limit; a simple definition of the charge is thus precluded. Finally, the behavior of the quark color magnetic moment is treated. An apparent infrared singularity of this moment is shown to be due to an improper use of perturbation theory, and is removed and replaced with a finite, field-dependent moment, by use of Furry picture propagators

  12. Photothermal effect of infrared lasers on ex vivo lamb brain tissues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Özgürün, Baturay; Gülsoy, Murat

    2018-02-01

    Here, the most suitable infrared laser for a neurosurgery operation is suggested, among 1940-nm thulium fiber, 1470-nm diode, 1070-nm ytterbium fiber and 980-nm diode lasers. Cortical and subcortical ex-vivo lamb brain tissues are exposed to the laser light with the combinations of some laser parameters such as output power, energy density, operation mode (continuous and pulsed-modulated) and operation time. In this way, the greatest ablation efficiency associated with the best neurosurgical laser type can be defined. The research can be divided into two parts; pre-dosimetry and dosimetry studies. The former is used to determine safe operation zones for the dosimetry study by defining coagulation and carbonization onset times for each of the brain tissues. The latter is the main part of this research, and both tissues are exposed to laser irradiation with various energy density levels associated with the output power and operation time. In addition, photo-thermal effects are compared for two laser operation modes, and then coagulation and ablation diameters to calculate the ablation efficiency are measured under a light microscope. Consequently, results are compared graphically and statistically, and it is found that thulium and 1470-nm diode lasers can be utilized as subcortical and cortical tissue ablator devices, respectively.

  13. 3D features of modified photostructurable glass-ceramic with infrared femtosecond laser pulses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fernandez-Pradas, J.M., E-mail: jmfernandez@ub.edu [Universitat de Barcelona, Departament de Fisica Aplicada i Optica, Marti i Franques 1, E-08028 Barcelona (Spain); Serrano, D.; Bosch, S.; Morenza, J.L.; Serra, P. [Universitat de Barcelona, Departament de Fisica Aplicada i Optica, Marti i Franques 1, E-08028 Barcelona (Spain)

    2011-04-01

    The exclusive ability of laser radiation to be focused inside transparent materials makes lasers a unique tool to process inner parts of them unreachable with other techniques. Hence, laser direct-write can be used to create 3D structures inside bulk materials. Infrared femtosecond lasers are especially indicated for this purpose because a multiphoton process is usually required for absorption and high resolution can be attained. This work studies the modifications produced by 450 fs laser pulses at 1027 nm wavelength focused inside a photostructurable glass-ceramic (Foturan) at different depths. Irradiated samples were submitted to standard thermal treatment and subsequent soaking in HF solution to form the buried microchannels and thus unveil the modified material. The voxel dimensions of modified material depend on the laser pulse energy and the depth at which the laser is focused. Spherical aberration and self-focusing phenomena are required to explain the observed results.

  14. Tritium removal from contaminated water via infrared laser multiple-photon dissociation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maienschein, J.L.; Magnotta, F.; Herman, I.P.; Aldridge, F.T.; Hsiao, P.

    1983-01-01

    Isotope separation by means of infrared-laser multiple-photon dissociation offers an efficient way to recover tritium from contaminated light or heavy water found in fission and fusion reactors. For tritium recovery from heavy water, chemical exchange of tritium into deuterated chloroform is followed by selective laser dissociation of tritiated chloroform and removal of the tritiated photoproduct, TCl. The single-step separation factor is at least 2700 and is probably greater than 5000. Here we present a description of the tritium recovery process, along with recent accomplishments in photochemical studies and engineering analysis of a recovery system

  15. Nucleotide excision repair pathway assessment in DNA exposed to low-intensity red and infrared lasers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fonseca, A.S.; Campos, V.M.A.; Magalhaes, L.A.G.; Paoli, F.

    2015-01-01

    Low-intensity lasers are used for prevention and management of oral mucositis induced by anticancer therapy, but the effectiveness of treatment depends on the genetic characteristics of affected cells. This study evaluated the survival and induction of filamentation of Escherichia coli cells deficient in the nucleotide excision repair pathway, and the action of T 4 endonuclease V on plasmid DNA exposed to low-intensity red and near-infrared laser light. Cultures of wild-type (strain AB1157) E. coli and strain AB1886 (deficient in uvrA protein) were exposed to red (660 nm) and infrared (808 nm) lasers at various fluences, powers and emission modes to study bacterial survival and filamentation. Also, plasmid DNA was exposed to laser light to study DNA lesions produced in vitro by T 4 endonuclease V. Low-intensity lasers: i) had no effect on survival of wild-type E. coli but decreased the survival of uvrA protein-deficient cells, ii) induced bacterial filamentation, iii) did not alter the electrophoretic profile of plasmids in agarose gels, and iv) did not alter the electrophoretic profile of plasmids incubated with T 4 endonuclease V. These results increase our understanding of the effects of laser light on cells with various genetic characteristics, such as xeroderma pigmentosum cells deficient in nucleotide excision pathway activity in patients with mucositis treated by low-intensity lasers. (author)

  16. Nucleotide excision repair pathway assessment in DNA exposed to low-intensity red and infrared lasers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fonseca, A.S.; Campos, V.M.A.; Magalhaes, L.A.G., E-mail: adnfonseca@ig.com.br [Instituto de Biologia Roberto Alcantara Gomes, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Departamento de Biofisica e Biometria. Lab. de Ciencias Radiologicas; Paoli, F. [Universidade Federal de Juiz de Fora (UFJF), Juiz de Fora, MG (Brazil). Instituto de Ciencias Biologicas. Departamento de Morfologia

    2015-10-15

    Low-intensity lasers are used for prevention and management of oral mucositis induced by anticancer therapy, but the effectiveness of treatment depends on the genetic characteristics of affected cells. This study evaluated the survival and induction of filamentation of Escherichia coli cells deficient in the nucleotide excision repair pathway, and the action of T{sub 4} endonuclease V on plasmid DNA exposed to low-intensity red and near-infrared laser light. Cultures of wild-type (strain AB1157) E. coli and strain AB1886 (deficient in uvrA protein) were exposed to red (660 nm) and infrared (808 nm) lasers at various fluences, powers and emission modes to study bacterial survival and filamentation. Also, plasmid DNA was exposed to laser light to study DNA lesions produced in vitro by T{sub 4} endonuclease V. Low-intensity lasers: i) had no effect on survival of wild-type E. coli but decreased the survival of uvrA protein-deficient cells, ii) induced bacterial filamentation, iii) did not alter the electrophoretic profile of plasmids in agarose gels, and iv) did not alter the electrophoretic profile of plasmids incubated with T{sub 4} endonuclease V. These results increase our understanding of the effects of laser light on cells with various genetic characteristics, such as xeroderma pigmentosum cells deficient in nucleotide excision pathway activity in patients with mucositis treated by low-intensity lasers. (author)

  17. Application of mid-infrared tuneable diode laser absorption spectroscopy to plasma diagnostics: a review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roepcke, J; Lombardi, G; Rousseau, A; Davies, P B

    2006-01-01

    Within the last decade mid-infrared absorption spectroscopy over a region from 3 to 17μm and based on tuneable lead salt diode lasers, often called tuneable diode laser absorption spectroscopy or TDLAS, has progressed considerably as a powerful diagnostic technique for in situ studies of the fundamental physics and chemistry in molecular plasmas. The increasing interest in processing plasmas containing hydrocarbons, fluorocarbons, organo-silicon and boron compounds has led to further applications of TDLAS because most of these compounds and their decomposition products are infrared active. TDLAS provides a means of determining the absolute concentrations of the ground states of stable and transient molecular species, which is of particular importance for the investigation of reaction kinetic phenomena. Information about gas temperature and population densities can also be derived from TDLAS measurements. A variety of free radicals and molecular ions have been detected by TDLAS. Since plasmas with molecular feed gases are used in many applications such as thin film deposition, semiconductor processing, surface activation and cleaning, and materials and waste treatment, this has stimulated the adaptation of infrared spectroscopic techniques to industrial requirements. The recent development of quantum cascade lasers (QCLs) offers an attractive new option for the monitoring and control of industrial plasma processes. The aim of the present paper is threefold: (i) to review recent achievements in our understanding of molecular phenomena in plasmas (ii) to report on selected studies of the spectroscopic properties and kinetic behaviour of radicals and (iii) to describe the current status of advanced instrumentation for TDLAS in the mid-infrared

  18. Using a helium--neon laser to convert infrared radiation to visible emission on lithium niobate crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aurtyunyan, E.A.; Kostanyan, R.B.; Mkrtchyan, V.S.; Mkrtchyan, M.A.

    1975-01-01

    The conversion of infrared emission to the visible region was investigated by mixing with helium-neon laser emission in lithium niobate crystals. The infrared source was a Globar, and the laser was the LG-75. Emission of the sum frequencies was filtered out. The spectral composition of the converted radiation was analyzed by the ISP-51 spectrograph with an FEU-79 photomultiplier at the output. The amplified photomultiplier signal was recorded by the ChZ-33 frequency meter. By varying the angle between the optical axis of the crystal and the incident emission, infrared radiation in the 1.75 to 3.3 ..mu..m wavelength band could be converted to visible emission. It is suggested that measurement of the wavelength of converted emission might be used to study the distribution of concentration nonhomogeneities in crystals.

  19. Design study of a far-infrared free electron laser with a 20 MeV RF linear accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakata, S.; Tsukishima, C.; Hifumi, T.; Okuda, S.; Sato, S.; Yosojima, Y.

    1991-01-01

    A FEL in the far-infrared region has been designed using a low energy RF linear accelerator. First we estimate a small signal gain from spontaneous emission using the Madey's theorem. In the calculation following effects are included: an actual field distribution (using a measured magnetic field), beam envelope in the phase space through the undulator, energy spread, and electron beam mis-alignment to the undulator axis. We have developed a code which can simulate three dimensional processes of the electron interaction with multi-mode laser fields in the undulator. From this code we could obtain the time dependent bunching process of electrons and amplification of the laser field. During the calculation we assume an electron beam of 20 MeV, 100 mA with a pulse length of 3 μs, and an undulator of 28 periods, 6 cm periodic length and 2.5 kG peak field. The results from these calculations show that the small-signal gain over 40 % can be obtained, but mis-alignment of the beam severely degrades the gain. The results also show that the output power of several MW can be obtained under the above conditions. Considering the simulation results, a FEL beam line was constructed and the beam size at the undulator was measured. And electrons were focused enough for the FEL experiment. (author)

  20. Flaw evaluation of Nd:YAG laser welding based plume shape by infrared thermal camera

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jae Yeol; Yoo, Young Tae; Yang, Dong Jo; Song, Kyung Seol; Ro, Kyoung Bo

    2003-01-01

    In Nd:YAG laser welding evaluation methods of welding flaw are various. But, the method due to plume shape is difficult to classification od welding flaw. The Nd:YAG laser process is known to have high speed and deep penetration capability to become one of the most advanced welding technologies. At the present time, some methods are studied for measurement of plume shape by using high-speed camera and photo diode. This paper describes the machining characteristics of SM45C carbon steel welding by use of an Nd:YAG laser. In spite of its good mechanical characteristics, SM45C carbon steel has a high carbon contents and suffers a limitation in the industrial application due to the poor welding properties. In this study, plume shape was measured by infrared thermal camera that is non-contact/non-destructive thermal measurement equipment through change of laser generating power, speed, focus. Weld was performed on bead-on method. Measurement results are compared as two equipment. Here, two results are composed of measurement results of plume quantities due to plume shape by infrared thermal camera and inspection results of weld bead include weld flaws by ultrasonic inspector.

  1. Effects of Near-Infrared Laser on Neural Cell Activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mochizuki-Oda, Noriko; Kataoka, Yosky; Yamada, Hisao; Awazu, Kunio

    2004-01-01

    Near-infrared laser has been used to relieve patients from various kinds of pain caused by postherpetic neuralgesia, myofascial dysfunction, surgical and traumatic wound, cancer, and rheumatoid arthritis. Clinically, He-Ne (λ=632.8 nm, 780 nm) and Ga-Al-As (805 ± 25 nm) lasers are used to irradiate trigger points or nerve ganglion. However the precise mechanisms of such biological actions of the laser have not yet been resolved. Since laser therapy is often effective to suppress the pain caused by hyperactive excitation of sensory neurons, interactions with laser light and neural cells are suggested. As neural excitation requires large amount of energy liberated from adenosine triphosphate (ATP), we examined the effect of 830-nm laser irradiation on the energy metabolism of the rat central nervous system and isolated mitochondria from brain. The diode laser was applied for 15 min with irradiance of 4.8 W/cm2 on a 2 mm-diameter spot at the brain surface. Tissue ATP content of the irradiated area in the cerebral cortex was 19% higher than that of the non-treated area (opposite side of the cortex), whereas the ADP content showed no significant difference. Irradiation at another wavelength (652 nm) had no effect on either ATP or ADP contents. The temperature of the brain tissue was increased 4.5-5.0 deg. C during the irradiation of both 830-nm and 652-nm laser light. Direct irradiation of the mitochondrial suspension did not show any wavelength-dependent acceleration of respiration rate nor ATP synthesis. These results suggest that the increase in tissue ATP content did not result from the thermal effect, but from specific effect of the laser operated at 830 nm. Electrophysiological studies showed the hyperpolarization of membrane potential of isolated neurons and decrease in membrane resistance with irradiation of the laser, suggesting an activation of potassium channels. Intracellular ATP is reported to regulate some kinds of potassium channels. Possible mechanisms

  2. Generating Far-Infrared Radiation By Two-Wave Mixing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borenstain, Shmuel

    1992-01-01

    Far-infrared radiation 1 to 6 GHz generated by two-wave mixing in asymmetrically grown GaAs/AlxGa1-xAs multiple-quantum-well devices. Two near-infrared semiconductor diode lasers phase-locked. Outputs amplified, then combined in semiconductor nonlinear multiple-quantum-well planar waveguide. Necessary to optimize design of device with respect to three factors: high degree of confinement of electromagnetic field in nonlinear medium to maximize power density, phase matching to extend length of zone of interaction between laser beams in non-linear medium, and nonlinear susceptibility. Devices used as tunable local oscillators in heterodyne-detection radiometers.

  3. Strong field interaction of laser radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pukhov, Alexander

    2003-01-01

    The Review covers recent progress in laser-matter interaction at intensities above 10 18 W cm -2 . At these intensities electrons swing in the laser pulse with relativistic energies. The laser electric field is already much stronger than the atomic fields, and any material is instantaneously ionized, creating plasma. The physics of relativistic laser-plasma is highly non-linear and kinetic. The best numerical tools applicable here are particle-in-cell (PIC) codes, which provide the most fundamental plasma model as an ensemble of charged particles. The three-dimensional (3D) PIC code Virtual Laser-Plasma Laboratory runs on a massively parallel computer tracking trajectories of up to 10 9 particles simultaneously. This allows one to simulate real laser-plasma experiments for the first time. When the relativistically intense laser pulses propagate through plasma, a bunch of new physical effects appears. The laser pulses are subject to relativistic self-channelling and filamentation. The gigabar ponderomotive pressure of the laser pulse drives strong currents of plasma electrons in the laser propagation direction; these currents reach the Alfven limit and generate 100 MG quasistatic magnetic fields. These magnetic fields, in turn, lead to the mutual filament attraction and super-channel formation. The electrons in the channels are accelerated up to gigaelectronvolt energies and the ions gain multi-MeV energies. We discuss different mechanisms of particle acceleration and compare numerical simulations with experimental data. One of the very important applications of the relativistically strong laser beams is the fast ignition (FI) concept for the inertial fusion energy (IFE). Petawatt-class lasers may provide enough energy to isochorically ignite a pre-compressed target consisting of thermonuclear fuel. The FI approach would ease dramatically the constraints on the implosion symmetry and improve the energy gain. However, there is a set of problems to solve before the FI

  4. Advances in high field laser physics

    CERN Document Server

    Sheng, Zhengming; Chen, Liming; Lu, Wei; Shen, Baifei

    2019-01-01

    High field laser physics emerged with the advent of ultrashort intense lasers about 25 years ago. It has developed into a frontier of cross-disciplinary studies, covering attosecond X-ray physics, particle accelerator physics, and physics of inertial confined fusion, etc., with prospects of wide applications. Because this is a new and rapidly developing field, so far there are only 2-3 related books available. There are a few review articles in some journals, which are limited to specific topics in high field physics. There are quite a few conference proceedings in this field, which are the collections of papers presented at conferences. In this book, a few leading experts working on different subjects in this field are invited to introduce the key topics in high field laser physics, which cover the involved fundamental physics, the recent advances, as well as the prospects of future applications. It shall be very useful to graduate students, young researchers, and people who want to have an overview of thi...

  5. Fabrication of Shatter-Proof Metal Hollow-Core Optical Fibers for Endoscopic Mid-Infrared Laser Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katsumasa Iwai

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available A method for fabricating robust and thin hollow-core optical fibers that carry mid-infrared light is proposed for use in endoscopic laser applications. The fiber is made of stainless steel tubing, eliminating the risk of scattering small glass fragments inside the body if the fiber breaks. To reduce the inner surface roughness of the tubing, a polymer base layer is formed prior to depositing silver and optical-polymer layers that confine light inside the hollow core. The surface roughness is greatly decreased by re-coating thin polymer base layers. Because of this smooth base layer surface, a uniform optical-polymer film can be formed around the core. As a result, clear interference peaks are observed in both the visible and mid-infrared regions. Transmission losses were also low for the carbon dioxide laser used for medical treatments as well as the visible laser diode used for an aiming beam. Measurements of bending losses for these lasers demonstrate the feasibility of the designed fiber for endoscopic applications.

  6. Ferroelectric domain engineering by focused infrared femtosecond pulses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Xin; Shvedov, Vladlen; Sheng, Yan, E-mail: yan.sheng@anu.edu.au [Laser Physics Centre, Research School of Physics and Engineering, Australian National University, Canberra, ACT 0200 (Australia); Karpinski, Pawel [Laser Physics Centre, Research School of Physics and Engineering, Australian National University, Canberra, ACT 0200 (Australia); Wroclaw University of Technology, Wybrzeze Wyspianskiego, Wroclaw (Poland); Koynov, Kaloian [Max-Planck Institute for Polymer Research, Ackermannweg 10, D-55128 Mainz (Germany); Wang, Bingxia; Trull, Jose; Cojocaru, Crina [Departament de Fisica i Enginyeria Nuclear, Universitat Politecnica de Catalunya, Rambla Sant Nebridi, 08222 Terrassa, Barcelona (Spain); Krolikowski, Wieslaw [Laser Physics Centre, Research School of Physics and Engineering, Australian National University, Canberra, ACT 0200 (Australia); Texas A& M University at Qatar, Doha (Qatar)

    2015-10-05

    We demonstrate infrared femtosecond laser-induced inversion of ferroelectric domains. This process can be realised solely by using tightly focused laser pulses without application of any electric field prior to, in conjunction with, or subsequent to the laser irradiation. As most ferroelectric crystals like LiNbO{sub 3}, LiTaO{sub 3}, and KTiOPO{sub 4} are transparent in the infrared, this optical poling method allows one to form ferroelectric domain patterns much deeper inside a ferroelectric crystal than by using ultraviolet light and hence can be used to fabricate practical devices. We also propose in situ diagnostics of the ferroelectric domain inversion process by monitoring the Čerenkov second harmonic signal, which is sensitive to the appearance of ferroelectric domain walls.

  7. Permanent magnetic field, direct electric field, and infrared to reduce blood glucose level and hepatic function in mus musculus with diabetic mellitus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suhariningsih; Basuki Notobroto, Hari; Winarni, Dwi; Achmad Hussein, Saikhu; Anggono Prijo, Tri

    2017-05-01

    Blood contains several electrolytes with positive (cation) and negative (anion) ion load. Both electrolytes deliver impulse synergistically adjusting body needs. Those electrolytes give specific effect to external disturbance such as electric, magnetic, even infrared field. A study has been conducted to reduce blood glucose level and liver function, in type 2 Diabetes Mellitus patients, using Biophysics concept which uses combination therapy of permanent magnetic field, electric field, and infrared. This study used 48 healthy mice (mus musculus), male, age 3-4 weeks, with approximately 25-30 g in weight. Mice was fed with lard as high fat diet orally, before Streptozotocin (STZ) induction become diabetic mice. Therapy was conducted by putting mice in a chamber that emits the combination of permanent magnetic field, electric field, and infrared, every day for 1 hour for 28 days. There were 4 combinations of therapy/treatment, namely: (1) permanent magnetic field, direct electric field, and infrared; (2) permanent magnetic field, direct electric field, without infrared; (3) permanent magnetic field, alternating electric field, and infrared; and (4) permanent magnetic field, alternating electric field, without infrared. The results of therapy show that every combination is able to reduce blood glucose level, AST, and ALT. However, the best result is by using combination of permanent magnetic field, direct electric field, and infrared.

  8. Effects of laser-polarization and wiggler magnetic fields on electron acceleration in laser-cluster interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh Ghotra, Harjit; Kant, Niti

    2018-06-01

    We examine the electron dynamics during laser-cluster interaction. In addition to the electrostatic field of an individual cluster and laser field, we consider an external transverse wiggler magnetic field, which plays a pivotal role in enhancing the electron acceleration. Single-particle simulation has been presented with a short pulse linearly polarized as well as circularly polarized laser pulses for electron acceleration in a cluster. The persisting Coulomb field allows the electron to absorb energy from the laser field. The stochastically heated electron finds a weak electric field at the edge of the cluster from where it is ejected. The wiggler magnetic field connects the regions of the stochastically heated, ejected electron from the cluster and high energy gain by the electron from the laser field outside the cluster. This increases the field strength and hence supports the electron to meet the phase of the laser field for enhanced acceleration. A long duration resonance appears with an optimized magnetic wiggler field of about 3.4 kG. Hence, the relativistic energy gain by the electron is enhanced up to a few 100 MeV with an intense short pulse laser with an intensity of about 1019 W cm‑2 in the presence of a wiggler magnetic field.

  9. Field enhancement induced laser ablation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fiutowski, Jacek; Maibohm, Christian; Kjelstrup-Hansen, Jakob

    Sub-diffraction spatially resolved, quantitative mapping of strongly localized field intensity enhancement on gold nanostructures via laser ablation of polymer thin films is reported. Illumination using a femtosecond laser scanning microscope excites surface plasmons in the nanostructures....... The accompanying field enhancement substantially lowers the ablation threshold of the polymer film and thus creates local ablation spots and corresponding topographic modifications of the polymer film. Such modifications are quantified straightforwardly via scanning electron and atomic force microscopy. Thickness...

  10. Infrared and visible laser spectroscopy for highly-charged Ni-like ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ralchenko, Yuri

    2017-10-01

    Application of visible or infrared (IR) lasers for spectroscopy of highly-charged ions (HCI) has not been particularly extensive so far due to a mismatch in typical energies. We show here that the energy difference between the two lowest levels within the first excited configuration 3d9 4 s in Ni-like ions of heavy elements from ZN = 60 to ZN = 92 is within the range of visible or near-IR lasers. The wavelengths of these transitions are calculated within the relativistic model potential formalism and compared with other theoretical and limited experimental data. Detailed collisional-radiative simulations of non-Maxwellian and thermal plasmas are performed showing that photopumping between these levels using relatively moderate lasers is sufficient to provide a two-order of magnitude increase of the pumped level population. This accordingly results in a similar rise of the X-ray line intensity thereby allowing control of X-ray emission with visible/IR lasers.

  11. Patient identification using a near-infrared laser scanner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manit, Jirapong; Bremer, Christina; Schweikard, Achim; Ernst, Floris

    2017-03-01

    We propose a new biometric approach where the tissue thickness of a person's forehead is used as a biometric feature. Given that the spatial registration of two 3D laser scans of the same human face usually produces a low error value, the principle of point cloud registration and its error metric can be applied to human classification techniques. However, by only considering the spatial error, it is not possible to reliably verify a person's identity. We propose to use a novel near-infrared laser-based head tracking system to determine an additional feature, the tissue thickness, and include this in the error metric. Using MRI as a ground truth, data from the foreheads of 30 subjects was collected from which a 4D reference point cloud was created for each subject. The measurements from the near-infrared system were registered with all reference point clouds using the ICP algorithm. Afterwards, the spatial and tissue thickness errors were extracted, forming a 2D feature space. For all subjects, the lowest feature distance resulted from the registration of a measurement and the reference point cloud of the same person. The combined registration error features yielded two clusters in the feature space, one from the same subject and another from the other subjects. When only the tissue thickness error was considered, these clusters were less distinct but still present. These findings could help to raise safety standards for head and neck cancer patients and lays the foundation for a future human identification technique.

  12. Photoacoustic-based detector for infrared laser spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scholz, L.; Palzer, S., E-mail: stefan.palzer@imtek.uni-freiburg.de [Department of Microsystems Engineering-IMTEK, Laboratory for Gas Sensors, University of Freiburg, Georges-Köhler-Allee 102, Freiburg 79110 (Germany)

    2016-07-25

    In this contribution, we present an alternative detector technology for use in direct absorption spectroscopy setups. Instead of a semiconductor based detector, we use the photoacoustic effect to gauge the light intensity. To this end, the target gas species is hermetically sealed under excess pressure inside a miniature cell along with a MEMS microphone. Optical access to the cell is provided by a quartz window. The approach is particularly suitable for tunable diode laser spectroscopy in the mid-infrared range, where numerous molecules exhibit large absorption cross sections. Moreover, a frequency standard is integrated into the method since the number density and pressure inside the cell are constant. We demonstrate that the information extracted by our method is at least equivalent to that achieved using a semiconductor-based photon detector. As exemplary and highly relevant target gas, we have performed direct spectroscopy of methane at the R3-line of the 2v{sub 3} band at 6046.95 cm{sup −1} using both detector technologies in parallel. The results may be transferred to other infrared-active transitions without loss of generality.

  13. Control of the droplet generation by an infrared laser

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhibin Wang

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available In this work, the control of the droplet generation by a focused infrared (IR laser with a wavelength of 1550 nm was studied, in which the liquid water and the oil with the surfactant of Span 80 were employed as the disperse and continuous phases, respectively. The characteristics of the droplet generation controlled by the laser was explored under various flow rates, laser powers and spot positions and the comparison between the cases with/without the laser was also performed. The results showed that when the laser was focused on the region away from the outlet of the liquid water inflow channel, the droplet shedding was blocked due to the IR laser heating induced thermocapillary flow, leading to the increase of the droplet volume and the cycle time of the droplet generation as compared to the case without the laser. Decreasing the continuous phase flow rate led to the increase of the droplet volume, cycle time of the droplet generation and the volume increase ratio, while increasing the disperse phase flow rate led to the increase of the droplet volume and the decrease of the cycle time and volume increase ratio. For a given flow rate ratio between the continuous and disperse phases, the increase of the flow rates decreased the volume increase ratio. In addition, it is also found that the droplet volume, the cycle time and the volume increase ratio all increased with the laser power. When the laser was focused at the inlet of the downstream channel, the droplet volume, the cycle time and the volume increase ratio were the largest. Moving the laser spot to the downstream or upstream led to the decrease of them. When the laser was focused on the outlet of the liquid water inflow channel, the generated droplet volume and cycle time of the droplet generation were even lower than the case without the laser because of the lowered viscosity. This works provides a comprehensive understanding of the characteristics of the droplet generation controlled

  14. Fibre-optic laser-assisted infrared tumour diagnostics (FLAIR)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bindig, U.; Müller, G.

    2005-08-01

    Laser based fibre-optic surgery procedures are commonly used in minimal invasive surgery. Despite the development of precise and efficient laser systems there are also innovative attempts in the field of bio-medical diagnostics. As a direct result of the tissue's optical properties most applications are focused on the visible wavelength range of the spectrum. The extension of the spectrum up to the mid-infrared (IR) region will offer a broad range of possibilities for novel strategies with a view to non-invasive diagnostics in medicine. We describe a method to detect differences between diseased and normal tissues, which involve Fourier transform IR microspectroscopy and fibre-optics methods. Regions of interest on 10 µm thin tissue sections were mapped using an IR microscope in transmission mode. After IR-mapping, the samples were analysed using standard pathological techniques. Quadratic discriminant and correlation analyses were applied to the IR maps obtained allowing differentiation between cancerous and normal tissue. The use of optical fibres, transparent in the mid-IR, allowed measurements to be made in the attenuated total reflectance (ATR)-mode at a remote location. The IR sensor is in contact with the sample that shows characteristic absorption lines. The total transmission of the fibre and the sample will decrease at these lines. This method can be used to determine the absorption of a sample in a non-destructive manner. In this paper we report on our efforts to develop an IR fibre-optic sensor for tissue identification as well as to differentiate between malignant and healthy tissue in vivo. We also describe the technical design of the laboratory set-up and the results of developments made. Silver halide fibres and a special sensor tip were used for the ATR measurements on tissue specimens. The results indicate that fibre-optic IR spectrometry will be a useful tool for bio-diagnostics.

  15. Fibre-optic laser-assisted infrared tumour diagnostics (FLAIR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bindig, U; Mueller, G

    2005-01-01

    Laser based fibre-optic surgery procedures are commonly used in minimal invasive surgery. Despite the development of precise and efficient laser systems there are also innovative attempts in the field of bio-medical diagnostics. As a direct result of the tissue's optical properties most applications are focused on the visible wavelength range of the spectrum. The extension of the spectrum up to the mid-infrared (IR) region will offer a broad range of possibilities for novel strategies with a view to non-invasive diagnostics in medicine. We describe a method to detect differences between diseased and normal tissues, which involve Fourier transform IR microspectroscopy and fibre-optics methods. Regions of interest on 10 μm thin tissue sections were mapped using an IR microscope in transmission mode. After IR-mapping, the samples were analysed using standard pathological techniques. Quadratic discriminant and correlation analyses were applied to the IR maps obtained allowing differentiation between cancerous and normal tissue. The use of optical fibres, transparent in the mid-IR, allowed measurements to be made in the attenuated total reflectance (ATR)-mode at a remote location. The IR sensor is in contact with the sample that shows characteristic absorption lines. The total transmission of the fibre and the sample will decrease at these lines. This method can be used to determine the absorption of a sample in a non-destructive manner. In this paper we report on our efforts to develop an IR fibre-optic sensor for tissue identification as well as to differentiate between malignant and healthy tissue in vivo. We also describe the technical design of the laboratory set-up and the results of developments made. Silver halide fibres and a special sensor tip were used for the ATR measurements on tissue specimens. The results indicate that fibre-optic IR spectrometry will be a useful tool for bio-diagnostics

  16. The protozoan, Paramecium primaurelia, as a non-sentient model to test laser light irradiation: The effects of an 808nm infrared laser diode on cellular respiration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amaroli, Andrea; Ravera, Silvia; Parker, Steven; Panfoli, Isabella; Benedicenti, Alberico; Benedicenti, Stefano

    2015-07-01

    Photobiomodulation (PBM) has been used in clinical practice for more than 40 years. Unfortunately, conflicting literature has led to the labelling of PBM as a complementary or alternative medicine approach. However, past and ongoing clinical and research studies by reputable investigators have re-established the merits of PBM as a genuine medical therapy, and the technique has, in the last decade, seen an exponential increase in the numbers of clinical instruments available, and their applications. This resurgence has led to a clear need for appropriate experimental models to test the burgeoning laser technology being developed for medical applications. In this context, an ethical model that employs the protozoan, Paramecium primaurelia, is proposed. We studied the possibility of using the measure of oxygen consumption to test PBM by irradiation with an infrared or near-infrared laser. The results show that an 808nm infrared laser diode (1W; 64J/cm²) affects cellular respiration in P. primaurelia, inducing, in the irradiated cells, a significantly (p Paramecium can be an excellent tool in biological assays involving infrared and near-infrared PBM, as it combines the advantages of in vivo results with the practicality of in vitro testing. This test represents a fast, inexpensive and straightforward assay, which offers an alternative to both traditional in vivo testing and more expensive mammalian cellular cultures. 2015 FRAME.

  17. On the infrared behaviour of some non-Minkowskian quantum fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pathinayake, C.

    1989-01-01

    The infrared structure of some quantum fields in several spacetimes was studied. Here infrared refers to effects associated with modes whose wave length is large compared to the characteristic scale of the space. Several situations dealing with aspects of this question are analyzed. It is shown that the infrared behavior of a massless scalar field and an antisymmetric tensor field in de Sitter space are different even though these two fields appear to be formally equivalent. The scalar field does not have a de Sitter-invariant quantum state, while the antisymmetric tensor is shown to have a well-behaved de Sitter-invariant vacuum. The second topic considered is the behavior of the expectation value of phi squared for a massless scalar field phi whose quantum state is free from infrared divergences in spatially flat Robertson-Walker universes. If the universe expands as a power of comoving time and the power is greater than 3/2, then phi squared grows for a finite interval of time. The next topic discussed is zero-frequency modes of massless scalar fields and vector fields in compact spaces. In some spaces they are growing functions of time. It is shown that growth rates can be related to initial conditions of the theory if the mass of the field is a function of time which varies from a constant in the past to 0 in the future. Growth in zero modes of a scalar field phi would lead to growth in phi squared. The relevance of these growing expectation values of squared field operators in global symmetry breaking is studied

  18. Permanent magnetic field, direct electric field, and infrared to reduce blood glucose level and hepatic function in mus musculus with diabetic mellitus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suhariningsih; Prijo, Tri Anggono; Notobroto, Hari Basuki; Winarni, Dwi; Hussein, Saikhu Achmad

    2017-01-01

    Blood contains several electrolytes with positive (cation) and negative (anion) ion load. Both electrolytes deliver impulse synergistically adjusting body needs. Those electrolytes give specific effect to external disturbance such as electric, magnetic, even infrared field. A study has been conducted to reduce blood glucose level and liver function, in type 2 Diabetes Mellitus patients, using Biophysics concept which uses combination therapy of permanent magnetic field, electric field, and infrared. This study used 48 healthy mice ( mus musculus ), male, age 3-4 weeks, with approximately 25-30 g in weight. Mice was fed with lard as high fat diet orally, before Streptozotocin (STZ) induction become diabetic mice. Therapy was conducted by putting mice in a chamber that emits the combination of permanent magnetic field, electric field, and infrared, every day for 1 hour for 28 days. There were 4 combinations of therapy/treatment, namely: (1) permanent magnetic field, direct electric field, and infrared; (2) permanent magnetic field, direct electric field, without infrared; (3) permanent magnetic field, alternating electric field, and infrared; and (4) permanent magnetic field, alternating electric field, without infrared. The results of therapy show that every combination is able to reduce blood glucose level, AST, and ALT. However, the best result is by using combination of permanent magnetic field, direct electric field, and infrared. (paper)

  19. Low power infrared laser modifies the morphology of lung affected with acute injury induced by sepsis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sergio, L. P. S.; Trajano, L. A. S. N.; Thomé, A. M. C.; Mencalha, A. L.; Paoli, F.; Fonseca, A. S.

    2018-06-01

    Acute lung injury (ALI) is a potentially fatal disease characterized by uncontrolled hyperinflammatory responses in the lungs as a consequence of sepsis. ALI is divided into two sequential and time-dependent phases, exudative and fibroproliferative phases, with increased permeability of the alveolar barrier, causing edema and inflammation. However, there are no specific treatments for ALI. Low-power lasers have been successfully used in the resolution of acute inflammatory processes. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of low-power infrared laser exposure on alveolus and interalveolar septa of Wistar rats affected by ALI-induced by sepsis. Laser fluences, power, and the emission mode were those used in clinical protocols for the treatment of acute inflammation. Adult male Wistar rats were randomized into six groups: control, 10 J cm‑2, 20 J cm‑2, ALI, ALI  +  10 J cm‑2, and ALI  +  20 J cm‑2. ALI was induced by intraperitoneal Escherichia coli lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Lungs were removed and processed for hematoxylin–eosin staining. Morphological alterations induced by LPS in lung tissue were quantified by morphometry with a 32-point cyclic arcs test system in Stepanizer. Data showed that exposure to low-power infrared laser in both fluences reduced the thickening of interalveolar septa in lungs affected by ALI, increasing the alveolar space; however, inflammatory infiltrate was still observed. Our research showed that exposure to low-power infrared laser improves the lung parenchyma in Wistar rats affected by ALI, which could be an alternative approach for treatment of inflammatory lung injuries.

  20. Infrared laser induced organic reactions. 2. Laser vs. thermal inducment of unimolecular and hydrogen bromide catalyzed bimolecular dehydration of alcohols

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Danen, W.C.

    1979-01-01

    It has been demonstrated that a mixture of reactant molecules can be induced by pulsed infrared laser radiation to react via a route which is totally different from the pathway resulting from heating the mixture at 300 0 C. The high-energy unimolecular elimination of H 2 O from ethanol in the presence of 2-propanol and HBr can be selectively induced with a pulsed CO 2 laser in preference to either a lower energy bimolecular HBr-catalyzed dehydration or the more facile dehydration of 2-propanol. Heating the mixture resulted in the almost exclusive reaction of 2-propanol to produce propylene. It was demonstrated that the bimolecular ethanol + HBr reaction cannot be effectively induced by the infrared laser radiation as evidenced by the detrimental effect on the yield of ethylene as the HBr pressure was increased. The selective, nonthermal inducement of H 2 O elimination from vibrationally excited ethanol in the presence of 2-propanol required relatively low reactant pressures. At higher pressures intermolecular V--V energy transfer allowed the thermally more facile dehydration from 2-propanol to become the predominant reaction channel

  1. Pulsed-laser atom-probe field-ion microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kellogg, G.L.; Tsong, T.T.

    1980-01-01

    A time-of-flight atom-probe field-ion microscope has been developed which uses nanosecond laser pulses to field evaporate surface species. The ability to operate an atom-probe without using high-voltage pulses is advantageous for several reasons. The spread in energy arising from the desorption of surface species prior to the voltage pulse attaining its maximum amplitude is eliminated, resulting in increased mass resolution. Semiconductor and insulator samples, for which the electrical resistivity is too high to transmit a short-duration voltage pulse, can be examined using pulsed-laser assisted field desorption. Since the electric field at the surface can be significantly smaller, the dissociation of molecular adsorbates by the field can be reduced or eliminated, permitting well-defined studies of surface chemical reactions. In addition to atom-probe operation, pulsed-laser heating of field emitters can be used to study surface diffusion of adatoms and vacancies over a wide range of temperatures. Examples demonstrating each of these advantages are presented, including the first pulsed-laser atom-probe (PLAP) mass spectra for both metals (W, Mo, Rh) and semiconductors (Si). Molecular hydrogen, which desorbs exclusively as atomic hydrogen in the conventional atom probe, is shown to desorb undissociatively in the PLAP. Field-ion microscope observations of the diffusion and dissociation of atomic clusters, the migration of adatoms, and the formation of vacancies resulting from heating with a 7-ns laser pulse are also presented

  2. Cooperative effect of ultraviolet and near-infrared beams in laser-induced condensation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matthews, M.; Henin, S.; Pomel, F.; Kasparian, J.; Wolf, J.-P. [Université de Genève, GAP-Biophotonics, Chemin de Pinchat 22, 1211 Geneva 4 (Switzerland); Théberge, F.; Daigle, J.-F. [Defence R and D Canada Valcartier, 2459 de la Bravoure Blvd., Quebec (Qc) G3J 1X5 (Canada); Lassonde, P.; Kieffer, J.-C. [INRS-EMT, 1650 Lionel Boulet Blvd., Varennes, Quebec (Qc) J3X1S2 (Canada)

    2013-12-23

    We demonstrate the cooperative effect of near infrared (NIR) and ultraviolet (UV) beams on laser-induced condensation. Launching a UV laser after a NIR pulse yields up to a 5-fold increase in the production of nanoparticles (25–300 nm) as compared to a single NIR beam. This cooperative effect exceeds the sum of those from the individual beams and occurs for delays up to 1 μs. We attribute it to the UV photolysis of ozone created by the NIR pulses. The resulting OH radicals oxidize NO{sub 2} and volatile organic compounds, producing condensable species.

  3. Fiber-delivered mid-infrared (6-7) laser ablation of retinal tissue under perfluorodecalin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackanos, Mark A.; Joos, Karen M.; Jansen, E. Duco

    2003-07-01

    The Er:YAG laser (l=2.94mm) is an effective tool in vitreo-retinal surgery. Pulsed mid-infrared (l=6.45 mm) radiation from the Free Electron Laser has been touted as a potentially superior cutting tool. To date, use of this laser has been limited to applications in an air environment. The goal of this study was: 1) determine feasibility of fiberoptic delivery of 6.45mm using silverhalide fibers (d=700mm); 2) use infrared transparent vitreous substitute (perfluorodecalin) to allow non-contact ablation of the retina at 6.45mm. Fiber damage threshold=7.8J/cm2 (0.54GW/cm2) while transmission loss=0.54dB/m, allowing supra-ablative radiant exposures to the target. FTIR measurements of perfluorodecalin at 6.45mm yielded ma=3mm-1. Pump-probe imaging of ablation of a tissue-phantom through perfluorodecalin showed feasibility of non-contact ablation at l=6.45mm. Ablation of the retinal membranes of enucleated pig eyes was carried out under perfluorodecalin (5 Hz, 1.3 J/cm2). Each eye was cut along its equator to expose the retina. Vitreous was replaced by perfluorodecalin and laser radiation was delivered to the retina via the silverhalide fiber. The eye was rotated (at 2 rpm) using a stepper motor (0.9o/step) to create an ablation circle around the central axis of the retina (50% spot-to-spot overlap). Histological analysis of ablation yield and collateral damage will be presented. We have shown that using l=6.45mm delivered via silver halide fibers through perfluorodecalin allowed non-contact laser ablation. Remote structures are shielded, as the radiant exposure falls below the ablation threshold owing non-negligible absorption of perfluorodecalin at 6.45mm. This may optimize efficacy and safety of laser-based vitreoretinal surgery.

  4. Laser ion source with solenoid field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanesue, Takeshi; Fuwa, Yasuhiro; Kondo, Kotaro; Okamura, Masahiro

    2014-11-01

    Pulse length extension of highly charged ion beam generated from a laser ion source is experimentally demonstrated. The laser ion source (LIS) has been recognized as one of the most powerful heavy ion source. However, it was difficult to provide long pulse beams. By applying a solenoid field (90 mT, 1 m) at plasma drifting section, a pulse length of carbon ion beam reached 3.2 μs which was 4.4 times longer than the width from a conventional LIS. The particle number of carbon ions accelerated by a radio frequency quadrupole linear accelerator was 1.2 × 1011, which was provided by a single 1 J Nd-YAG laser shot. A laser ion source with solenoid field could be used in a next generation heavy ion accelerator.

  5. Effect of high-frequency near-infrared diode laser irradiation on periodontal tissues during experimental tooth movement in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunji, Hidemi; Kunimatsu, Ryo; Tsuka, Yuji; Yoshimi, Yuki; Sumi, Keisuke; Awada, Tetsuya; Nakajima, Kengo; Kimura, Aya; Hiraki, Tomoka; Hirose, Naoto; Yanoshita, Makoto; Tanimoto, Kotaro

    2018-02-05

    Tooth movement during orthodontic treatment is associated with bone neoplasticity and bone resorption on the tension and pressure sides. Previous clinical studies have suggested that low-power laser irradiation can accelerate tooth movement during orthodontic treatment, although the underlying mechanism remains unclear. In this study, we used a high-frequency near-infrared diode laser that generates less heat and examined the histologic changes in periodontal tissue during experimental tooth movement with laser irradiation. A nickel-titanium closed coil was mounted between the maxillary left side first molar and incisor of rats to model experimental tooth movement. The laser-irradiation and the control groups were set, and the amount of movement of the first molar on 7th and 14th days after the start of pulling of the first molar tooth on the maxillary left was measured by three-dimensional analysis of µCT. After tooth movement, tissue samples from the mesial and tension sides were collected, and successive horizontal sections were prepared and examined using hematoxylin-eosin and TRAP staining and immunohistochemical staining for RANKL, OPG, ALP, and proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA). Changes in tissue temperature following laser irradiation were also examined. Laser irradiation significantly increased tooth movement compared with non-irradiated controls. Histologic staining of the pressure-side mesial root in laser-irradiated rats revealed enhanced RANKL expression and increased numbers of TRAP-positive cells compared with controls. By contrast, on the tension side, laser irradiation led to increased expression of ALP and PCNA. These data indicate that high-frequency near-infrared diode laser irradiation on the pressure side upregulates RANKL expression and accelerates osteoclast differentiation, facilitating bone resorption, whereas bone formation is induced on the tension side. This study demonstrates that high-frequency near-infrared diode laser

  6. Atomic processes in strong bichromatic elliptically polarized laser fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Odžak, S., E-mail: senad.odzak@gmail.com; Hasović, E.; Gazibegović-Busuladžić, A.; Čerkić, A., E-mail: anercerkic@yahoo.com; Fetić, B. [Faculty of Science, University of Sarajevo, Zmaja od Bosne 35, 71000 Sarajevo (Bosnia and Herzegovina); Kramo, A. [BHANSA, Aeronautical Meteorology Department, Kurta Schorka 36, 71000 Sarajevo (Bosnia and Herzegovina); Busuladžić, M. [Medical Faculty, University of Sarajevo, Čekaluša 90, 71000 Sarajevo (Bosnia and Herzegovina); Milošević, D. B. [Faculty of Science, University of Sarajevo, Zmaja od Bosne 35, 71000 Sarajevo (Bosnia and Herzegovina); Academy of Sciences and Arts of Bosnia and Herzegovina, Bistrik 7, 71000 Sarajevo (Bosnia and Herzegovina); Max-Born-Institut, Max-Born-Strasse 2a, 12489 Berlin (Germany)

    2016-03-25

    Nonlinear quantum-mechanical phenomena in strong laser fields, such as high-order harmonic generation (HHG) and above-threshold ionization (ATI) are significantly modified if the applied laser field is bichromatic and/or elliptically polarized. Numerical results obtained within the strong-field approximation are presented for two special cases. We show results for HHG by plasma ablation in a bichromatic linearly polarized laser field. We also consider the ATI process in bicircular field which consists of two coplanar counter-rotating circularly polarized fields.

  7. High speed FPGA-based Phasemeter for the far-infrared laser interferometers on EAST

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Y.; Liu, H.; Zou, Z.; Li, W.; Lian, H.; Jie, Y.

    2017-12-01

    The far-infrared laser-based HCN interferometer and POlarimeter/INTerferometer\\break (POINT) system are important diagnostics for plasma density measurement on EAST tokamak. Both HCN and POINT provide high spatial and temporal resolution of electron density measurement and used for plasma density feedback control. The density is calculated by measuring the real-time phase difference between the reference beams and the probe beams. For long-pulse operations on EAST, the calculation of density has to meet the requirements of Real-Time and high precision. In this paper, a Phasemeter for far-infrared laser-based interferometers will be introduced. The FPGA-based Phasemeter leverages fast ADCs to obtain the three-frequency signals from VDI planar-diode Mixers, and realizes digital filters and an FFT algorithm in FPGA to provide real-time, high precision electron density output. Implementation of the Phasemeter will be helpful for the future plasma real-time feedback control in long-pulse discharge.

  8. Evanescent fields of laser written waveguides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jukić, Dario; Pohl, Thomas; Götte, Jörg B.

    2015-03-01

    We investigate the evanescent field at the surface of laser written waveguides. The waveguides are written by a direct femtosecond laser writing process into fused silica, which is then sanded down to expose the guiding layer. These waveguides support eigenmodes which have an evanescent field reaching into the vacuum above the waveguide. We study the governing wave equations and present solution for the fundamental eigenmodes of the modified waveguides.

  9. Effects of near infrared laser radiation associated with photoabsorbing cream in preventing white spot lesions around orthodontic brackets: an in vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacerda, Ângela Sueli Soares Braga; Hanashiro, Fernando Seishim; de Sant'Anna, Giselle Rodrigues; Steagall Júnior, Washington; Barbosa, Patrícia Silva; de Souza-Zaroni, Wanessa Christine

    2014-12-01

    The present study aims to investigate the effect of a low-power infrared laser on the inhibition of bovine enamel demineralization around orthodontic brackets. Near infrared lasers have been suggested as alternative approaches because they may produce an increase in resistance to dental caries. Forty-eight blocks of enamel obtained from bovine incisor teeth were divided into six groups: Group 1 (control), without treatment; Group 2 (C), photoabsorbing cream; Group 3 (CF), photoabsorbing cream with fluoride; Group 4 (L), irradiation with low-level infrared laser (λ=830 nm) at an energy density of 4.47 J/cm2; Group 5 (L+C), photoabsorbing cream followed by low-level infrared laser irradiation; and Group 6 (L+CF), photoabsorbing cream with fluoride followed by low-level infrared laser irradiation. After these procedures, the enamel blocks received an assortment of orthodontic brackets and were then submitted to pH cycling to simulate a highly cariogenic challenge. The enamel surface demineralization around the orthodontic brackets, according to the different treatments, was quantified by fluorescence loss analysis by quantitative light-induced fluorescence (QLF). The fluorescence loss, expressed as ΔF (percentage of loss fluorescence), was statistically examined by analysis of variance and the Tukey test. The control group (-10.48±2.85) was statistically similar to Group C (-14.52±7.80), which presented the lowest values of ΔF when compared with Groups FC (-3.67±3.21), L (-2.79±1.68), CL (-1.05±0:50), and CFL (-0.60±0:43). However, Groups FC, L, CL, and CFL showed no statistically significant differences among them. It can be concluded that both the low-level infrared laser and photoabsorbing cream with fluoride were effective in inhibiting the development of caries in enamel around orthodontic brackets, even in situations of high cariogenic challenge.

  10. Few-cycle high energy mid-infrared pulse from Ho:YLF laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murari, Krishna

    2017-04-01

    Over the past decade, development of high-energy ultrafast laser sources has led to important breakthroughs in attoscience and strong-field physics study in atoms and molecules. Coherent pulse synthesis of few-cycle high-energy laser pulse is a promising tool to generate isolated attosecond pulses via high harmonics generation (HHG). An effective way to extend the HHG cut-off energy to higher values is making use of long mid-infrared (MIR) driver wavelength, as the ponderomotive potential scales quadratically with wavelength. If properly scaled in energy to multi-mJ level and few-cycle duration, such pulses provide a direct path to intriguing attoscience experiments in gases and solids, which even permit the realization of bright coherent table-top HHG sources in the water-window and keV X-ray region. However, the generation of high-intensity long-wavelength MIR pulses has always remained challenging, in particular starting from high-energy picosecond 2-μm laser driver, that is suitable for further energy scaling of the MIR pulses to multi-mJ energies by utilizing optical parametric amplifiers (OPAs). In this thesis, a front-end source for such MIR OPA is presented. In particular, a novel and robust strong-field few-cycle 2-μm laser driver directly from picosecond Ho:YLF laser and utilizing Kagome fiber based compression is presented. We achieved: a 70-fold compression of 140-μJ, 3.3-ps pulses from Ho:YLF amplifier to 48 fs with 11 μJ energy. The work presented in this thesis demonstrates a straightforward path towards generation of few-cycle MIR pulses and we believe that in the future the ultrafast community will benefit from this enabling technology. The results are summarized in mainly four parts: The first part is focused on the development of a 2-μm, high-energy laser source as the front-end. Comparison of available technology in general and promising gain media at MIR wavelength are discussed. Starting from the basics of an OPA, the design criteria

  11. Few-cycle high energy mid-infrared pulse from Ho:YLF laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murari, Krishna

    2017-04-15

    Over the past decade, development of high-energy ultrafast laser sources has led to important breakthroughs in attoscience and strong-field physics study in atoms and molecules. Coherent pulse synthesis of few-cycle high-energy laser pulse is a promising tool to generate isolated attosecond pulses via high harmonics generation (HHG). An effective way to extend the HHG cut-off energy to higher values is making use of long mid-infrared (MIR) driver wavelength, as the ponderomotive potential scales quadratically with wavelength. If properly scaled in energy to multi-mJ level and few-cycle duration, such pulses provide a direct path to intriguing attoscience experiments in gases and solids, which even permit the realization of bright coherent table-top HHG sources in the water-window and keV X-ray region. However, the generation of high-intensity long-wavelength MIR pulses has always remained challenging, in particular starting from high-energy picosecond 2-μm laser driver, that is suitable for further energy scaling of the MIR pulses to multi-mJ energies by utilizing optical parametric amplifiers (OPAs). In this thesis, a front-end source for such MIR OPA is presented. In particular, a novel and robust strong-field few-cycle 2-μm laser driver directly from picosecond Ho:YLF laser and utilizing Kagome fiber based compression is presented. We achieved: a 70-fold compression of 140-μJ, 3.3-ps pulses from Ho:YLF amplifier to 48 fs with 11 μJ energy. The work presented in this thesis demonstrates a straightforward path towards generation of few-cycle MIR pulses and we believe that in the future the ultrafast community will benefit from this enabling technology. The results are summarized in mainly four parts: The first part is focused on the development of a 2-μm, high-energy laser source as the front-end. Comparison of available technology in general and promising gain media at MIR wavelength are discussed. Starting from the basics of an OPA, the design criteria

  12. [Authentication of Trace Material Evidence in Forensic Science Field with Infrared Microscopic Technique].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Zhi-quan; Hu, Ke-liang

    2016-03-01

    In the field of forensic science, conventional infrared spectral analysis technique is usually unable to meet the detection requirements, because only very a few trace material evidence with diverse shapes and complex compositions, can be extracted from the crime scene. Infrared microscopic technique is developed based on a combination of Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopic technique and microscopic technique. Infrared microscopic technique has a lot of advantages over conventional infrared spectroscopic technique, such as high detection sensitivity, micro-area analysisand nondestructive examination. It has effectively solved the problem of authentication of trace material evidence in the field of forensic science. Additionally, almost no external interference is introduced during measurements by infrared microscopic technique. It can satisfy the special need that the trace material evidence must be reserved for witness in court. It is illustrated in detail through real case analysis in this experimental center that, infrared microscopic technique has advantages in authentication of trace material evidence in forensic science field. In this paper, the vibration features in infrared spectra of material evidences, including paints, plastics, rubbers, fibers, drugs and toxicants, can be comparatively analyzed by means of infrared microscopic technique, in an attempt to provide powerful spectroscopic evidence for qualitative diagnosis of various criminal and traffic accident cases. The experimental results clearly suggest that infrared microscopic technique has an incomparable advantage and it has become an effective method for authentication of trace material evidence in the field of forensic science.

  13. Infrared scanning laser ophthalmoscope imaging of the macula and its correlation with functional loss and structural changes in patients with stargardt disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anastasakis, Anastasios; Fishman, Gerald A; Lindeman, Martin; Genead, Mohamed A; Zhou, Wensheng

    2011-05-01

    To correlate the degree of functional loss with structural changes in patients with Stargardt disease. Eighteen eyes of 10 patients with Stargardt disease were studied. Scanning laser ophthalmoscope infrared images were compared with corresponding spectral-domain optical coherence tomography scans. Additionally, scanning laser ophthalmoscope microperimetry was performed, and results were superimposed on scanning laser ophthalmoscope infrared images and in selected cases on fundus autofluorescence images. Seventeen of 18 eyes showed a distinct hyporeflective foveal and/or perifoveal area with distinct borders on scanning laser ophthalmoscope infrared images, which was less evident on funduscopy and incompletely depicted in fundus autofluorescence images. This hyporeflective zone corresponded to areas of significantly elevated psychophysical thresholds on microperimetry testing, in addition to thinning of the retinal pigment epithelium and disorganization or loss of the photoreceptor cell inner segment-outer segment junction and external-limiting membrane on spectral-domain optical coherence tomography. Scanning laser ophthalmoscope infrared fundus images are useful for depicting retinal structural changes in patients with Stargardt disease. A spectral-domain optical coherence tomography/scanning laser ophthalmoscope microperimetry device allows for a direct correlation of structural abnormalities with functional defects that will likely be applicable for the determination of retinal areas for potential improvement of retinal function in these patients during future clinical trials and for the monitoring of the diseases' natural history.

  14. Black phosphorus saturable absorber for a diode-pumped passively Q-switched Er:CaF2 mid-infrared laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chun; Liu, Jie; Guo, Zhinan; Zhang, Han; Ma, Weiwei; Wang, Jingya; Xu, Xiaodong; Su, Liangbi

    2018-01-01

    A multilayer black phosphorus, as a novel two dimensional saturable absorber, has superb saturable absorption properties for a Er:CaF2 solid-state pulse laser. The pulse laser is realized at mid-infrared region with the passively Q-switched technology by a diode-pumping. The high-quality black phosphorus saturable absorber is fabricated by liquid phase exfoliation method. The pulse laser generates the pulses operation with the pulse duration of 954.8 ns, the repetition rate of 41.93 kHz, the pulse energy of 4.25 μJ and the peak power of 4.45 W. Our work demonstrates that black phosphorus could be used as a kind of efficient mid-infrared region optical absorber for ultrafast photonics.

  15. Near-Infrared Confocal Laser Reflectance Cytoarchitectural Imaging of the Substantia Nigra and Cerebellum in the Fresh Human Cadaver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheyuo, Cletus; Grand, Walter; Balos, Lucia L

    2017-01-01

    Cytoarchitectural neuroimaging remains critical for diagnosis of many brain diseases. Fluorescent dye-enhanced, near-infrared confocal in situ cellular imaging of the brain has been reported. However, impermeability of the blood-brain barrier to most fluorescent dyes limits clinical utility of this modality. The differential degree of reflectance from brain tissue with unenhanced near-infrared imaging may represent an alternative technique for in situ cytoarchitectural neuroimaging. We assessed the utility of unenhanced near-infrared confocal laser reflectance imaging of the cytoarchitecture of the cerebellum and substantia nigra in 2 fresh human cadaver brains using a confocal near-infrared laser probe. Cellular images based on near-infrared differential reflectance were captured at depths of 20-180 μm from the brain surface. Parts of the cerebellum and substantia nigra imaged using the probe were subsequently excised and stained with hematoxylin and eosin for histologic correlation. Near-infrared reflectance imaging revealed the 3-layered cytoarchitecture of the cerebellum, with Purkinje cells appearing hyperreflectant. In the substantia nigra, neurons appeared hyporeflectant with hyperreflectant neuromelanin cytoplasmic inclusions. Cytoarchitecture of the cerebellum and substantia nigra revealed on near-infrared imaging closely correlated with the histology on hematoxylin-eosin staining. We showed that unenhanced near-infrared reflectance imaging of fresh human cadaver brain can reliably identify and distinguish neurons and detailed cytoarchitecture of the cerebellum and substantia nigra. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Coaxial monitoring of temperature field in selective pulsed laser melting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Che; Chen, Zhongyun; Cao, Hongzhong; Zhou, Jianhong

    2017-10-01

    Selective Laser Melting is a rapid manufacturing technology which produces complex parts layer by layer. The presence of thermal stress and thermal strain in the forming process often leads to defects in the formed parts. In order to detect fabricate errors and avoid failure which caused by thermal gradient in time. An infrared thermal imager and a high speed CCD camera were applied to build a coaxial optical system for real-time monitoring the temperature distribution and changing trend of laser affected zone in SLM forming process. Molten tracks were fabricated by SLM under different laser parameters such as frequency, pulse width. And the relationship between the laser parameters and the temperature distribution were all obtained and analyzed.

  17. Indirect absorption spectroscopy using quantum cascade lasers: mid-infrared refractometry and photothermal spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfeifer, Marcel; Ruf, Alexander; Fischer, Peer

    2013-11-04

    We record vibrational spectra with two indirect schemes that depend on the real part of the index of refraction: mid-infrared refractometry and photothermal spectroscopy. In the former, a quantum cascade laser (QCL) spot is imaged to determine the angles of total internal reflection, which yields the absorption line via a beam profile analysis. In the photothermal measurements, a tunable QCL excites vibrational resonances of a molecular monolayer, which heats the surrounding medium and changes its refractive index. This is observed with a probe laser in the visible. Sub-monolayer sensitivities are demonstrated.

  18. Quantum Cascade Laser-Based Infrared Microscopy for Label-Free and Automated Cancer Classification in Tissue Sections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuepper, Claus; Kallenbach-Thieltges, Angela; Juette, Hendrik; Tannapfel, Andrea; Großerueschkamp, Frederik; Gerwert, Klaus

    2018-05-16

    A feasibility study using a quantum cascade laser-based infrared microscope for the rapid and label-free classification of colorectal cancer tissues is presented. Infrared imaging is a reliable, robust, automated, and operator-independent tissue classification method that has been used for differential classification of tissue thin sections identifying tumorous regions. However, long acquisition time by the so far used FT-IR-based microscopes hampered the clinical translation of this technique. Here, the used quantum cascade laser-based microscope provides now infrared images for precise tissue classification within few minutes. We analyzed 110 patients with UICC-Stage II and III colorectal cancer, showing 96% sensitivity and 100% specificity of this label-free method as compared to histopathology, the gold standard in routine clinical diagnostics. The main hurdle for the clinical translation of IR-Imaging is overcome now by the short acquisition time for high quality diagnostic images, which is in the same time range as frozen sections by pathologists.

  19. Laser ion source with solenoid field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanesue, Takeshi; Okamura, Masahiro; Fuwa, Yasuhiro; Kondo, Kotaro

    2014-01-01

    Pulse length extension of highly charged ion beam generated from a laser ion source is experimentally demonstrated. The laser ion source (LIS) has been recognized as one of the most powerful heavy ion source. However, it was difficult to provide long pulse beams. By applying a solenoid field (90 mT, 1 m) at plasma drifting section, a pulse length of carbon ion beam reached 3.2 μs which was 4.4 times longer than the width from a conventional LIS. The particle number of carbon ions accelerated by a radio frequency quadrupole linear accelerator was 1.2 × 10 11 , which was provided by a single 1 J Nd-YAG laser shot. A laser ion source with solenoid field could be used in a next generation heavy ion accelerator

  20. Laser ion source with solenoid field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kanesue, Takeshi, E-mail: tkanesue@bnl.gov; Okamura, Masahiro [Collider-Accelerator Department, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York 11973 (United States); Fuwa, Yasuhiro [Graduate School of Science, Kyoto University, Kitashirakawa, Sakyo, Kyoto 606-7501 (Japan); RIKEN, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Kondo, Kotaro [Research Laboratory for Nuclear Reactors, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 2-12-1 Ookayama, Meguro, Tokyo 152-8550 (Japan)

    2014-11-10

    Pulse length extension of highly charged ion beam generated from a laser ion source is experimentally demonstrated. The laser ion source (LIS) has been recognized as one of the most powerful heavy ion source. However, it was difficult to provide long pulse beams. By applying a solenoid field (90 mT, 1 m) at plasma drifting section, a pulse length of carbon ion beam reached 3.2 μs which was 4.4 times longer than the width from a conventional LIS. The particle number of carbon ions accelerated by a radio frequency quadrupole linear accelerator was 1.2 × 10{sup 11}, which was provided by a single 1 J Nd-YAG laser shot. A laser ion source with solenoid field could be used in a next generation heavy ion accelerator.

  1. Combining infrared- and green-laser stimulation sources in single-grain luminescence measurements of feldspar and quartz

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Duller, G.A.T.; Bøtter-Jensen, L.; Murray, A.S.

    2003-01-01

    A system designed for measurement of the optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) from individual sand-sized mineral grains has been constructed. Previously, this system was equipped only with a green laser emitting at 532 run, but now an infrared (IR) laser at 830 run has been added. It is now...... possible to interchangeably use the two laser sources for optical stimulation. This is especially valuable for the measurement of feldspars. The power density using the IR laser at the grain is similar to500 W cm(-2), and stimulation for 1 s reduces the OSL signal to near background level. Initial results...

  2. Opto-injection into single living cells by femtosecond near-infrared laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Cheng

    This dissertation presents a novel technique to deliver membrane impermeable molecules into single living cells with the assistance of femtosecond (fs) near-infrared (NIR) laser pulses. This approach merges ultrafast laser technology with key biological, biomedical, and medical applications, such as gene transfection, gene therapy and drug delivery. This technique promises several major advantages, namely, very high transfection efficiency, high cell survival rate (≈100%) and fully preserved cell viabilities. It is also a promising method to deliver molecules into cells that are difficult or even completely resistant to established physical methods, such as microinjection by glass pipettes, electroporation, and biolistics. In this work, the system for fs NIR opto-injection was designed and built. Successful fs NIR opto-injection has been performed on several cell systems including single mammalian cells (bovine aortic endothelial cells), marine animal eggs (Spisula solidissima oocytes), and human cancer cells (fibrosarcoma HT1080) cultured in a tissue-like environment. The connections between laser parameters and cell responses were explored through further experiments and in-depth analyses, especially the relationship between dye uptake rate and incident laser intensity, and the relationship between pore size created on cell membranes and incident laser intensity. Dye uptake rate of the target cells was observed to depend on incident laser intensity. Pore size was found dependent on incident laser intensity. The conclusion was made that laser-induced breakdown and plasma-induced ablation in cell membrane are the physical principles that govern the process of fs NIR opto-injection.

  3. Atomic excitation and acceleration in strong laser fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zimmermann, H; Eichmann, U

    2016-01-01

    Atomic excitation in the tunneling regime of a strong-field laser–matter interaction has been recently observed. It is conveniently explained by the concept of frustrated tunneling ionization (FTI), which naturally evolves from the well-established tunneling picture followed by classical dynamics of the electron in the combined laser field and Coulomb field of the ionic core. Important predictions of the FTI model such as the n distribution of Rydberg states after strong-field excitation and the dependence on the laser polarization have been confirmed in experiments. The model also establishes a sound basis to understand strong-field acceleration of neutral atoms in strong laser fields. The experimental observation has become possible recently and initiated a variety of experiments such as atomic acceleration in an intense standing wave and the survival of Rydberg states in strong laser fields. Furthermore, the experimental investigations on strong-field dissociation of molecules, where neutral excited fragments after the Coulomb explosion of simple molecules have been observed, can be explained. In this review, we introduce the subject and give an overview over relevant experiments supplemented by new results. (paper)

  4. Effect of an absorbent overlay on the residual stress field induced by laser shock processing on aluminum samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rubio-Gonzalez, C.; Gomez-Rosas, G.; Ocana, J.L.; Molpeceres, C.; Banderas, A.; Porro, J.; Morales, M.

    2006-01-01

    Laser shock processing (LSP) or laser shock peening is a new technique for strengthening metals. This process induces a compressive residual stress field, which increases fatigue crack initiation life and reduces fatigue crack growth rate. Specimens of 6061-T6 aluminum alloy are used in this investigation. A convergent lens is used to deliver 2.5 J, 8 ns laser pulses by a Q-switch Nd:YAG laser, operating at 10 Hz. The pulses are focused to a diameter of 1.5 mm onto aluminum samples. Density of 2500 pulses/cm 2 with infrared (1064 nm) radiation was used. The effect of an absorbent overlay on the residual stress field using this LSP setup and this energy level is evaluated. Residual stress distribution as a function of depth is assessed by the hole drilling method. It is observed that the overlay makes the compressive residual stress profile move to the surface. This effect is explained on the basis of the vaporization of the coat layer suppressing thermal effects on the metallic substrate. The effect of coating the specimen surface before LSP treatment may have advantages on improving wear and contact fatigue properties of this aluminum alloy

  5. Laser-induced extreme magnetic field in nanorod targets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lécz, Zsolt; Andreev, Alexander

    2018-03-01

    The application of nano-structured target surfaces in laser-solid interaction has attracted significant attention in the last few years. Their ability to absorb significantly more laser energy promises a possible route for advancing the currently established laser ion acceleration concepts. However, it is crucial to have a better understanding of field evolution and electron dynamics during laser-matter interactions before the employment of such exotic targets. This paper focuses on the magnetic field generation in nano-forest targets consisting of parallel nanorods grown on plane surfaces. A general scaling law for the self-generated quasi-static magnetic field amplitude is given and it is shown that amplitudes up to 1 MT field are achievable with current technology. Analytical results are supported by three-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations. Non-parallel arrangements of nanorods has also been considered which result in the generation of donut-shaped azimuthal magnetic fields in a larger volume.

  6. Laser-generated magnetic fields in quasi-hohlraum geometries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollock, Bradley; Turnbull, David; Ross, Steven; Hazi, Andrew; Ralph, Joseph; Lepape, Sebastian; Froula, Dustin; Haberberger, Dan; Moody, John

    2014-10-01

    Laser-generated magnetic fields of 10--40 T have been produced with 100--4000 J laser drives at Omega EP and Titan. The fields are generated using the technique described by Daido et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 56, 846 (1986)], which works by directing a laser through a hole in one plate to strike a second plate. Hot electrons generated in the laser-produced plasma on the second plate collect on the first plate. A strap connects the two plates allowing a current of 10 s of kA to flow and generate a solenoidal magnetic field. The magnetic field is characterized using Faraday rotation, b-dot probes, and proton radiography. Further experiments to study the effect of the magnetic field on hohlraum performance are currently scheduled for Omega. This work was performed under the auspices of the United States Department of Energy by the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract No. DE-AC52-07NA-27344.

  7. Porcine skin visible lesion thresholds for near-infrared lasers including modeling at two pulse durations and spot sizes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cain, C P; Polhamus, G D; Roach, W P; Stolarski, D J; Schuster, K J; Stockton, K L; Rockwell, B A; Chen, Bo; Welch, A J

    2006-01-01

    With the advent of such systems as the airborne laser and advanced tactical laser, high-energy lasers that use 1315-nm wavelengths in the near-infrared band will soon present a new laser safety challenge to armed forces and civilian populations. Experiments in nonhuman primates using this wavelength have demonstrated a range of ocular injuries, including corneal, lenticular, and retinal lesions as a function of pulse duration. American National Standards Institute (ANSI) laser safety standards have traditionally been based on experimental data, and there is scant data for this wavelength. We are reporting minimum visible lesion (MVL) threshold measurements using a porcine skin model for two different pulse durations and spot sizes for this wavelength. We also compare our measurements to results from our model based on the heat transfer equation and rate process equation, together with actual temperature measurements on the skin surface using a high-speed infrared camera. Our MVL-ED50 thresholds for long pulses (350 micros) at 24-h postexposure are measured to be 99 and 83 J cm(-2) for spot sizes of 0.7 and 1.3 mm diam, respectively. Q-switched laser pulses of 50 ns have a lower threshold of 11 J cm(-2) for a 5-mm-diam top-hat laser pulse.

  8. Infrared divergences for free quantum fields in cosmological spacetimes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higuchi, Atsushi; Rendell, Nicola

    2018-06-01

    We investigate the nature of infrared divergences for the free graviton and inflaton two-point functions in flat Friedman–Lemaître–Robertson–Walker spacetime. These divergences arise because the momentum integral for these two-point functions diverges in the infrared. It is straightforward to see that the power of the momentum in the integrand can be increased by 2 in the infrared using large gauge transformations, which are sufficient for rendering these two-point functions infrared finite for slow-roll inflation. In other words, if the integrand of the momentum integral for these two-point functions behaves like , where p is the momentum, in the infrared, then it can be made to behave like by large gauge transformations. On the other hand, it is known that, if one smears these two-point functions in a gauge-invariant manner, the power of the momentum in the integrand is changed from to . This fact suggests that the power of the momentum in the integrand for these two-point functions can be increased by 4 using large gauge transformations. In this paper we show that this is indeed the case. Thus, the two-point functions for the graviton and inflaton fields can be made finite by large gauge transformations for a large class of potentials and states in single-field inflation.

  9. Simple locking of infrared and ultraviolet diode lasers to a visible laser using a LabVIEW proportional-integral-derivative controller on a Fabry-Perot signal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwolek, J M; Wells, J E; Goodman, D S; Smith, W W

    2016-05-01

    Simultaneous laser locking of infrared (IR) and ultraviolet lasers to a visible stabilized reference laser is demonstrated via a Fabry-Perot (FP) cavity. LabVIEW is used to analyze the input, and an internal proportional-integral-derivative algorithm converts the FP signal to an analog locking feedback signal. The locking program stabilized both lasers to a long term stability of better than 9 MHz, with a custom-built IR laser undergoing significant improvement in frequency stabilization. The results of this study demonstrate the viability of a simple, computer-controlled, non-temperature-stabilized FP locking scheme for our applications, laser cooling of Ca(+) ions, and its use in other applications with similar modest frequency stabilization requirements.

  10. Active mode-locking of mid-infrared quantum cascade lasers with short gain recovery time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yongrui; Belyanin, Alexey

    2015-02-23

    We investigate the dynamics of actively modulated mid-infrared quantum cascade lasers (QCLs) using space- and time-domain simulations of coupled density matrix and Maxwell equations with resonant tunneling current taken into account. We show that it is possible to achieve active mode locking and stable generation of picosecond pulses in high performance QCLs with a vertical laser transition and a short gain recovery time by bias modulation of a short section of a monolithic Fabry-Perot cavity. In fact, active mode locking in QCLs with a short gain recovery time turns out to be more robust to the variation of parameters as compared to previously studied lasers with a long gain recovery time. We investigate the effects of spatial hole burning and phase locking on the laser output.

  11. Near-field mapping by laser ablation of PMMA coatings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fiutowski, J.; Maibohm, C.; Kostiucenko, O.

    2011-01-01

    The optical near-field of lithography-defined gold nanostructures, arranged into regular arrays on a gold film, is characterized via ablation of a polymer coating by laser illumination. The method utilizes femto-second laser pulses from a laser scanning microscope which induces electrical field...... that the different stages in the ablation process can be controlled and characterized making the technique suitable for characterizing optical near-fields of metal nanostructures....

  12. Control and dynamics of attosecond electron wave packets in strong laser fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnsson, P.; Remetter, T.; Varju, K.; L'Huillier; Lopez-Martens, R.; Valentin, C.; Balcou, P.; Kazamias, S.; Mauritsson, J.; Gaarde, M.B.; Schafer, K.J.; Mairess, Y.; Wabnitz, H.; Boutu, W.; Salieres, P.

    2005-01-01

    of 160 as duration. In the second experiment, we use these pulses to create electron wave packets of duration 180 as in argon and study the energy transfer from a strong infrared (IR) laser field to the ionized electrons as a function of the delay between the XUV and IR fields. At the zero crossings of the laser field, a significant energy (∼ 20 eV) is transferred from the IR field to the electrons resulting in dramatically enhanced above-threshold-ionization in conditions where the IR field alone does not induce any significant ionization of the medium. Further, by increasing the pulse length of the individual attosecond pulses, using a different thickness of the aluminum filter, a clear effect is seen in the delay-dependence of the photoelectron spectrum. In conclusion, the manipulations of the XUV amplitudes and phases that we have performed are the first step towards the production of arbitrary attosecond waveforms, which will facilitate broadband coherent control in the XUV range. Using these pulses as the injection mechanism of electron wave packets through ionization, we have studied the interaction between the EWPs and a strong IR field. With the pulse parameters used, the ionization is dominated by the APT, and tunable ATI plateaus appear as an effect of the dressing field. The strong delay dependence seen for these ATI spectra, is a direct consequence of the temporal localization of the EWPs to a time range much shorter than the period of the IR field. Because both the energy and duration of the EWPs can be varied independent of the IR laser, they should be very useful for the study and control of strong field processes. Refs. 2 (author)

  13. Cyclotron resonance cooling by strong laser field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tagcuhi, Toshihiro; Mima, Kunioka

    1995-01-01

    Reduction of energy spread of electron beam is very important to increase a total output radiation power in free electron lasers. Although several cooling systems of particle beams such as a stochastic cooling are successfully operated in the accelerator physics, these cooling mechanisms are very slow and they are only applicable to high energy charged particle beams of ring accelerators. We propose here a new concept of laser cooling system by means of cyclotron resonance. Electrons being in cyclotron motion under a strong magnetic field can resonate with circular polarized electromagnetic field, and the resonance take place selectively depending on the velocity of the electrons. If cyclotron frequency of electrons is equal to the frequency of the electromagnetic field, they absorb the electromagnetic field energy strongly, but the other electrons remain unchanged. The absorbed energy will be converted to transverse kinetic energy, and the energy will be dumped into the radiation energy through bremastrahlung. To build a cooling system, we must use two laser beams, where one of them is counter-propagating and the other is co-propagating with electron beam. When the frequency of the counter-propagating laser is tuned with the cyclotron frequency of fast electrons and the co-propagating laser is tuned with the cyclotron frequency of slow electrons, the energy of two groups will approach and the cooling will be achieved. We solve relativistic motions of electrons with relativistic radiation dumping force, and estimate the cooling rate of this mechanism. We will report optimum parameters for the electron beam cooling system for free electron lasers

  14. Comparison of human skin opto-thermal response to near-infrared and visible laser irradiations: a theoretical investigation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dai Tianhong [Department of Bioengineering, Rice University, Houston, TX 77251 (United States); Pikkula, Brian M [Department of Bioengineering, Rice University, Houston, TX 77251 (United States); Wang, Lihong V [Department of Biomedical Engineering, Texas A and M University, College Station, TX 77843 (United States); Anvari, Bahman [Department of Bioengineering, Rice University, Houston, TX 77251 (United States)

    2004-11-07

    Near-infrared wavelengths are absorbed less by epidermal melanin, and penetrate deeper into human skin dermis and blood than visible wavelengths. Therefore, laser irradiation using near-infrared wavelengths may improve the therapeutic outcome of cutaneous hyper-vascular malformations in moderately to heavily pigmented skin patients and those with large-sized blood vessels or blood vessels extending deeply into the skin. A mathematical model composed of a Monte Carlo algorithm to estimate the distribution of absorbed light, numerical solution of a bio-heat diffusion equation to calculate the transient temperature distribution, and a damage integral based on an empirical Arrhenius relationship to quantify the tissue damage was utilized to investigate the opto-thermal response of human skin to near-infrared and visible laser irradiations in conjunction with cryogen spray cooling. In addition, the thermal effects of a single continuous laser pulse and micropulse-composed laser pulse profiles were compared. Simulation results indicated that a 940 nm wavelength induces improved therapeutic outcome compared with a 585 and 595 nm wavelengths for the treatment of patients with large-sized blood vessels and moderately to heavily pigmented skin. On the other hand, a 585 nm wavelength shows the best efficacy in treating small-sized blood vessels, as characterized by the largest laser-induced blood vessel damage depth compared with 595 and 940 nm wavelengths. Dermal blood content has a considerable effect on the threshold incident dosage for epidermal damage, while the effect of blood vessel size is minimal. For the same macropulse duration and incident dosage, a micropulse-composed pulse profile results in higher peak temperature at the basal layer of skin epidermis than an ideal single continuous pulse profile.

  15. Application of diamond window for infrared laser diagnostics in a tokamak device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawano, Yasunori; Chiba, Shinichi; Inoue, Akira

    2004-01-01

    Chemical vapor deposited diamond disks have been successfully applied as the vacuum windows for infrared CO 2 laser interferometry and polarimetry used in electron density measurement in the JT-60U tokamak. In comparison with the conventional zinc-selenide windows, the Faraday rotation component of diamond windows was negligible. This results in an improvement of the Faraday rotation measurement of tokamak plasma by polarimetry

  16. A near infrared laser frequency comb for high precision Doppler planet surveys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bally J.

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Perhaps the most exciting area of astronomical research today is the study of exoplanets and exoplanetary systems, engaging the imagination not just of the astronomical community, but of the general population. Astronomical instrumentation has matured to the level where it is possible to detect terrestrial planets orbiting distant stars via radial velocity (RV measurements, with the most stable visible light spectrographs reporting RV results the order of 1 m/s. This, however, is an order of magnitude away from the precision needed to detect an Earth analog orbiting a star such as our sun, the Holy Grail of these efforts. By performing these observations in near infrared (NIR there is the potential to simplify the search for distant terrestrial planets by studying cooler, less massive, much more numerous class M stars, with a tighter habitable zone and correspondingly larger RV signal. This NIR advantage is undone by the lack of a suitable high precision, high stability wavelength standard, limiting NIR RV measurements to tens or hundreds of m/s [1, 2]. With the improved spectroscopic precision provided by a laser frequency comb based wavelength reference producing a set of bright, densely and uniformly spaced lines, it will be possible to achieve up to two orders of magnitude improvement in RV precision, limited only by the precision and sensitivity of existing spectrographs, enabling the observation of Earth analogs through RV measurements. We discuss the laser frequency comb as an astronomical wavelength reference, and describe progress towards a near infrared laser frequency comb at the National Institute of Standards and Technology and at the University of Colorado where we are operating a laser frequency comb suitable for use with a high resolution H band astronomical spectrograph.

  17. Hyperfine spectrum measurement of an optically pumped far-infrared laser with a Michelson interferometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zuo, Z G; Ling, F R; Wang, P; Liu, J S; Yao, J Q; Weng, C X

    2013-01-01

    In this letter, we present a Michelson interferometer for the hyperfine spectrum measurement of an optically pumped far-infrared laser with a highest frequency resolution of 3–5 GHz. CH 3 OH gas with a purity of 99.9%, is pumped by the CO 2 9P36 and 9R10 laser lines to generate terahertz lasers with frequencies of 2.52 and 3.11 THz, respectively. Moreover, except for the center frequency, which is in good agreement with theoretical work, some additional frequencies on both sides of the center frequency are obtained at a frequency interval of 0.15 THz. Meanwhile, the mechanism behind the observed experimental results is also investigated. (letter)

  18. Field-free molecular alignment probed by the free electron laser in Hamburg (FLASH)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnsson, P; Rouzee, A; Siu, W; Huismans, Y; Vrakking, M J J [FOM Institute for Atomic and Molecular Physics (AMOLF), Science Park 113, 1098 XG Amsterdam (Netherlands); Lepine, F [Universite Lyon 1, CNRS, LASIM, UMR 5579, 43 bvd. du 11 novembre 1918, F-69622 Villeurbanne (France); Marchenko, T [Laboratoire d' Optique Applique, ENSTA/Ecole Polytechnique, Chemin de la Huniere, 91761 Palaiseau (France); Duesterer, S; Tavella, F; Stojanovic, N; Azima, A; Treusch, R [Hamburger Synchrotronstrahlungslabor (HASYLAB) at Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY) Notkestrasse 85, D-22607 Hamburg (Germany); Kling, M F [Max-Planck Institut fuer Quantenoptik, Hans-Kopfermann Strasse 1, D-85748 Garching (Germany)], E-mail: per.johnsson@fysik.lth.se

    2009-07-14

    High flux extreme ultraviolet (XUV) sources like the free electron laser (FEL) in Hamburg (FLASH) offer the possibility of diffractive imaging of small objects. Irrespective of whether the diffraction is based on the detection of photons or photoelectrons, it is required that the measurement is done in the reference frame of the molecule meaning that, for a sample of several molecules, it is necessary to pre-align the molecules in the sample. As a step towards performing molecular frame diffraction experiments, we report experiments on field-free molecular alignment performed at FLASH. The impulsive alignment induced by a 100 fs near-infrared laser pulse in a rotationally cold CO{sub 2} sample is characterized by ionizing and dissociating the molecules with a time-delayed XUV-FEL pulse. The time-dependent angular distributions of ionic fragments measured by a velocity map imaging spectrometer exhibit rapid changes associated with the induced rotational dynamics. The experimental results show hints of a dissociation process that depends nonlinearly on the XUV intensity.

  19. Plasma diagnostics in infrared and far-infrared range for Heliotron E

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sudo, S.; Zushi, H.; Hondo, K.; Takeiri, Y.; Sano, F.; Besshou, S.; Suematsu, H.; Motojima, O.; Iiyoshi, A.; Muraoka, K.; Tsukishima, T.; Tsunawaki, Y.

    1989-01-01

    In this paper diagnostics in infrared and far-infrared range for Heliotron E are described: FIR interferometer for measuring electron density profile and ECE for electron temperature profile as routine work, and Fraunhofer diffraction method with a CO 2 laser for density fluctuation and Thomson scattering with a D 2 O laser (λ = 385 μm) for ion temperature, as new methods

  20. Tracheal anastomosis using indocyanine green dye enhanced fibrinogen with a near-infrared diode laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auteri, Joseph S.; Jeevanandam, Valluvan; Oz, Mehmet C.; Libutti, Steven K.; Kirby, Thomas J.; Smith, Craig R.; Treat, Michael R.

    1990-06-01

    A major obstacle to lung transplantation and combined heart- lung transplantation is dehiscence of the tracheobronchial anastomosis. We explored the possibility of laser welded anastomoses in canine tracheas in vivo. Laser anastomoses were performed on three-quarter circumferential anterior tracheotomies. A continous wave diode laser (808 +1 nm) at a power density of 9.6 watts/cm was used. Human fibrinogen was mixed with indocyanine green dye (ICG, max absorbance 805 nm) and applied to the anastomosis site prior to laser exposure. Animals were sacrificed at 0, 21 and 28 days post-operatively. At sacrifice weld bursting pressures were measured by raising intratracheal pressure using forced ventilation via an endotracheal tube. Sutured and laser welded anastomoses had similar bursting pressures, and exhibited satisfactory histologic evidence of healing. However, compared to polypropylene sutured controls, the laser welded anastomoses exhibited less peritracheal inflammatory reaction and showed visibly smoother luminal surfaces at 21 and 28 days post- operatively. Tracheal anastomosis using ICG dye enhanced fibrinogen combined with the near-infrared diode laser is a promising extension of the technology of laser tissue fusion and deserves further study.

  1. Spin effects in strong-field laser-electron interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahrens, S; Bauke, H; Müller, T-O; Villalba-Chávez, S; Müller, C

    2013-01-01

    The electron spin degree of freedom can play a significant role in relativistic scattering processes involving intense laser fields. In this contribution we discuss the influence of the electron spin on (i) Kapitza-Dirac scattering in an x-ray laser field of high intensity, (ii) photo-induced electron-positron pair production in a strong laser wave and (iii) multiphoton electron-positron pair production on an atomic nucleus. We show that in all cases under consideration the electron spin can have a characteristic impact on the process properties and their total probabilities. To this end, spin-resolved calculations based on the Dirac equation in the presence of an intense laser field are performed. The predictions from Dirac theory are also compared with the corresponding results from the Klein-Gordon equation.

  2. Incubation behaviour in triazenepolymer thin films upon near-infrared femtosecond laser pulse irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonse, J; Wiggins, S M; Solis, J; Sturm, H; Urech, L; Wokaun, A; Lippert, T

    2007-01-01

    The effects of laser radiation induced by a sequence of ultrashort (130 fs), near-infrared (800 nm) Ti:sapphire laser pulses in ∼1 μm thick triazenepolymer films on glass substrates have been investigated by means of in-situ real-time reflectivity measurements featuring a ps-resolution streak camera and a ns-resolution photodiode set-up. The polymer films show incubation effects when each laser pulse in the sequence has a fluence below the single-pulse damage threshold. Non-damage conditions are maintained for several incubation pulses such that the reflectivity of the film shows a rapid decrease of up to 30% within 1 ns but subsequently recovers to its initial value on a ms timescale. Additional pulses lead to a permanent film damage. The critical number of laser pulses needed to generate a permanent damage of the film has been studied as a function of the laser fluence. Once damage is created, further laser pulses cause a partial removal of the film material from the glass substrate. Scanning force microscopy has been used to characterise ex-situ the irradiated surface areas. Based on these complementary measurements possible incubation mechanisms are discussed

  3. A study of high field quantum electrodynamics in the collision of high energy electrons with a terawatt laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horton-Smith, G.A.

    1998-07-01

    An experiment is described which studied quantum electrodynamic interactions under conditions of extremely high fields, along with a review of the relevant theory. The high fields were created by an intense, tightly-focused pulse of laser light at green or infrared wavelengths, into which was sent an ultra-relativistic electron beam of 46.6-GeV energy. The relevant theory is that of an electron in an electromagnetic wave so intense that the electron's mass is effectively shifted by the transverse momentum imparted to it by the wave, and the electron encounters field strengths comparable to the Schwinger critical field strength of 511 kV per Compton wavelength. An electron in the intense wave may radiate a photon and balance 4-momentum by absorbing multiple photons from the laser, which can lead to real photons with energies above the kinematic limit for conventional Compton scattering. All particles have significant probability of scattering multiple times while in the focus of the laser, including the photons radiated by the electrons, which may convert into electron-positron pairs, again with absorption of multiple photons from the laser. This experiment was able to measure the rates and spectra of positrons, electrons, and photons emerging from the interaction region. Results from both experiment and theoretical simulations are presented and compared. The results from the electron and positron measurements are compatible with the accepted theory, within experimental uncertainties due mainly to the laser intensity measurement. The photon spectrum shows the correct shape, but the ratio of rates in the linear and two-absorbed-photon portions of the spectrum does not vary as expected with the laser intensity, suggesting a disagreement with the accepted theory, with a significance of roughly two standard deviations. A follow-up experiment would be in order

  4. A study of high field quantum electrodynamics in the collision of high energy electrons with a terawatt laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Horton-Smith, G.A.

    1998-07-01

    An experiment is described which studied quantum electrodynamic interactions under conditions of extremely high fields, along with a review of the relevant theory. The high fields were created by an intense, tightly-focused pulse of laser light at green or infrared wavelengths, into which was sent an ultra-relativistic electron beam of 46.6-GeV energy. The relevant theory is that of an electron in an electromagnetic wave so intense that the electron's mass is effectively shifted by the transverse momentum imparted to it by the wave, and the electron encounters field strengths comparable to the Schwinger critical field strength of 511 kV per Compton wavelength. An electron in the intense wave may radiate a photon and balance 4-momentum by absorbing multiple photons from the laser, which can lead to real photons with energies above the kinematic limit for conventional Compton scattering. All particles have significant probability of scattering multiple times while in the focus of the laser, including the photons radiated by the electrons, which may convert into electron-positron pairs, again with absorption of multiple photons from the laser. This experiment was able to measure the rates and spectra of positrons, electrons, and photons emerging from the interaction region. Results from both experiment and theoretical simulations are presented and compared. The results from the electron and positron measurements are compatible with the accepted theory, within experimental uncertainties due mainly to the laser intensity measurement. The photon spectrum shows the correct shape, but the ratio of rates in the linear and two-absorbed-photon portions of the spectrum does not vary as expected with the laser intensity, suggesting a disagreement with the accepted theory, with a significance of roughly two standard deviations. A follow-up experiment would be in order.

  5. 21 CFR 886.1360 - Visual field laser instrument.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Visual field laser instrument. 886.1360 Section 886.1360 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES OPHTHALMIC DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 886.1360 Visual field laser instrument...

  6. Steering neutral atoms in strong laser fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eilzer, S; Eichmann, U

    2014-01-01

    The seminal strong-field tunnelling theory introduced by L V Keldysh plays a pivotal role. It has shaped our understanding of atomic strong-field processes, where it represents the first step in complex ionisation dynamics and provides reliable tunnelling rates. Tunnelling rates, however, cannot be necessarily equated with ionisation rates. Taking into account the electron dynamics in the Coulomb potential following the tunnelling process, the process of frustrated tunnelling ionisation has been found to lead to excited Rydberg atoms. Here, we excite He atoms in the strong-field tunnelling regime into Rydberg states. A high percentage of these Rydberg atoms survive in high intensity laser fields. We exploit this fact together with their high polarisability to kinematically manipulate the Rydberg atoms with a second elliptically polarised focused strong laser field. By varying the spatial overlap of the two laser foci, we are able to selectively control the deflection of the Rydberg atoms. The results of semi-classical calculations, which are based on the frustrated tunnelling model and on the ponderomotive acceleration, are in accord with our experimental data. (paper)

  7. Self-guiding of high-intensity laser pulses for laser wake field acceleration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Umstader, D.; Liu, X.

    1992-01-01

    A means of self-guiding an ultrashort and high-intensity laser pulse is demonstrated both experimentally and numerically. Its relevance to the laser wake field accelerator concept is discussed. Self-focusing and multiple foci formation are observed when a high peak power (P>100 GW), 1 μm, subpicosecond laser is focused onto various gases (air or hydrogen). It appears to result from the combined effects of self-focusing by the gas, and de-focusing both by diffraction and the plasma formed in the central high-intensity region. Quasi-stationary computer simulations show the same multiple foci behavior as the experiments. The results suggest much larger nonlinear electronic susceptibilities of a gas near or undergoing ionization in the high field of the laser pulse. Although self-guiding of a laser beam by this mechanism appears to significantly extend its high-intensity focal region, small-scale self-focusing due to beam non-uniformity is currently a limitation

  8. Temporally asymmetric laser pulse for magnetic-field generation in plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, Mamta; Gopal, Krishna; Gupta, Devki Nandan, E-mail: dngupta@physics.du.ac.in

    2016-04-01

    Of particular interest in this article, the case study of an asymmetric laser pulse interaction with a plasma for magnetic field enhancement has been investigated. The strong ponderomotive force due to the short leading edge of the propagating laser pulse drives a large nonlinear current, producing a stronger quasistatic magnetic field. An analytical expression for the magnetic field is derived and the strength of the magnetic field is estimated for the current laser-plasma parameters. The theoretical results are validated through the particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations and are in very close agreement with the simulation based estimations. This kind of magnetic field can be useful in the plasma based accelerators as well as in the laser-fusion based experiments. - Highlights: • We employ an asymmetric laser pulse to enhance the magnetic field strength in a plasma. • Short leading front of the pulse drives a strong ponderomotive force. • An analytical expression for the magnetic field is derived. • The strength of the magnetic field is estimated for the current laser–plasma parameters.

  9. Temporally asymmetric laser pulse for magnetic-field generation in plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, Mamta; Gopal, Krishna; Gupta, Devki Nandan

    2016-01-01

    Of particular interest in this article, the case study of an asymmetric laser pulse interaction with a plasma for magnetic field enhancement has been investigated. The strong ponderomotive force due to the short leading edge of the propagating laser pulse drives a large nonlinear current, producing a stronger quasistatic magnetic field. An analytical expression for the magnetic field is derived and the strength of the magnetic field is estimated for the current laser-plasma parameters. The theoretical results are validated through the particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations and are in very close agreement with the simulation based estimations. This kind of magnetic field can be useful in the plasma based accelerators as well as in the laser-fusion based experiments. - Highlights: • We employ an asymmetric laser pulse to enhance the magnetic field strength in a plasma. • Short leading front of the pulse drives a strong ponderomotive force. • An analytical expression for the magnetic field is derived. • The strength of the magnetic field is estimated for the current laser–plasma parameters.

  10. The electron accelerator for FELIX [Free Electron Laser for Infrared eXperiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amersfoort, P.W. van; Geer, C.A.J. van der; Meer, A.F.G. van der; Bruinsma, P.J.T.; Hoekstra, R.; Kroes, F.B.; Luyckx, G.; Noomen, J.G.; Poole, M.W.; Saxon, G.

    1989-01-01

    The authors discuss the design of the electron accelerator for the Free Electron Laser for Infrared eXperiments (FELIX), which is meant to provide the Dutch science community with a rapidly tunable source of infrared radiation. The first stage of the project will (at least) cover the wavelength range between 8 and 80 μm. The accelerator consists of a triode with a grid modulated at 1 GHz, a 3.8-MeV buncher, and two travelling-wave S-band linac structures, with which 70-A, 3-ps bunches are accelerated to an energy between 15 and 4-5 MeV. The system has been designed to minimize the energy spread in the electron beam. 8 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab

  11. Optical reprogramming of human somatic cells using ultrashort Bessel-shaped near-infrared femtosecond laser pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchugonova, Aisada; Breunig, Hans Georg; Batista, Ana; König, Karsten

    2015-11-01

    We report a virus-free optical approach to human cell reprogramming into induced pluripotent stem cells with low-power nanoporation using ultrashort Bessel-shaped laser pulses. Picojoule near-infrared sub-20 fs laser pulses at a high 85 MHz repetition frequency are employed to generate transient nanopores in the membrane of dermal fibroblasts for the introduction of four transcription factors to induce the reprogramming process. In contrast to conventional approaches which utilize retro- or lentiviruses to deliver genes or transcription factors into the host genome, the laser method is virus-free; hence, the risk of virus-induced cancer generation limiting clinical application is avoided.

  12. Turbid Media Extinction Coefficient for Near-Infrared Laser Radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dreischuh, T; Gurdev, L; Vankov, O; Stoyanov, D; Avramov, L

    2015-01-01

    In this work, extended investigations are performed of the extinction coefficient of Intralipid-20% dilutions in distilled water depending on the Intralipid concentration, for laser radiation wavelengths in the red and near-infrared regions covering the so-called tissue optical window. The extinction is measured by using an approach we have developed recently based on the features of the spatial intensity distribution of laser-radiation beams propagating through semi-infinite turbid media. The measurements are conducted using separately two dilution- containing plexiglass boxes of different sizes and volumes, in order to prove the appropriateness of the assumption of semi-infinite turbid medium. The experimental results for the extinction are in agreement with our previous results and with empiric formulae found by other authors concerning the wavelength dependence of the scattering coefficient of Intralipid – 10% and Intralipid – 20%. They are also in agreement with known data of the water absorptance. It is estimated as well that the wavelengths around 1320 nm would be advantageous for deep harmless sensing and diagnostics of tissues

  13. Sensitive Multi-Species Emissions Monitoring: Infrared Laser-Based Detection of Trace-Level Contaminants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steill, Jeffrey D. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States); Huang, Haifeng [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States); Hoops, Alexandra A. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States); Patterson, Brian D. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States); Birtola, Salvatore R. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States); Jaska, Mark [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States); Strecker, Kevin E. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States); Chandler, David W. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States); Bisson, Soott [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2014-09-01

    This report summarizes our development of spectroscopic chemical analysis techniques and spectral modeling for trace-gas measurements of highly-regulated low-concentration species present in flue gas emissions from utility coal boilers such as HCl under conditions of high humidity. Detailed spectral modeling of the spectroscopy of HCl and other important combustion and atmospheric species such as H 2 O, CO 2 , N 2 O, NO 2 , SO 2 , and CH 4 demonstrates that IR-laser spectroscopy is a sensitive multi-component analysis strategy. Experimental measurements from techniques based on IR laser spectroscopy are presented that demonstrate sub-ppm sensitivity levels to these species. Photoacoustic infrared spectroscopy is used to detect and quantify HCl at ppm levels with extremely high signal-to-noise even under conditions of high relative humidity. Additionally, cavity ring-down IR spectroscopy is used to achieve an extremely high sensitivity to combustion trace gases in this spectral region; ppm level CH 4 is one demonstrated example. The importance of spectral resolution in the sensitivity of a trace-gas measurement is examined by spectral modeling in the mid- and near-IR, and efforts to improve measurement resolution through novel instrument development are described. While previous project reports focused on benefits and complexities of the dual-etalon cavity ring-down infrared spectrometer, here details on steps taken to implement this unique and potentially revolutionary instrument are described. This report also illustrates and critiques the general strategy of IR- laser photodetection of trace gases leading to the conclusion that mid-IR laser spectroscopy techniques provide a promising basis for further instrument development and implementation that will enable cost-effective sensitive detection of multiple key contaminant species simultaneously.

  14. Interaction between laser-produced plasma and guiding magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hasegawa, Jun; Takahashi, Kazumasa; Ikeda, Shunsuke; Nakajima, Mitsuo; Horioka, Kazuhiko

    2013-01-01

    Transportation properties of laser-produced plasma through a guiding magnetic field were examined. A drifting dense plasma produced by a KrF laser was injected into an axisymmetric magnetic field induced by permanent ring magnets. The plasma ion flux in the guiding magnetic field was measured by a Faraday cup at various distances from the laser target. Numerical analyses based on a collective focusing model were performed to simulate plasma particle trajectories and then compared with the experimental results. (author)

  15. Cascade laser applications: trends and challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    d'Humières, B.; Margoto, Éric; Fazilleau, Yves

    2016-03-01

    When analyses need rapid measurements, cost effective monitoring and miniaturization, tunable semiconductor lasers can be very good sources. Indeed, applications like on-field environmental gas analysis or in-line industrial process control are becoming available thanks to the advantage of tunable semiconductor lasers. Advances in cascade lasers (CL) are revolutionizing Mid-IR spectroscopy with two alternatives: interband cascade lasers (ICL) in the 3-6μm spectrum and quantum cascade lasers (QCL), with more power from 3 to 300μm. The market is getting mature with strong players for driving applications like industry, environment, life science or transports. CL are not the only Mid-IR laser source. In fact, a strong competition is now taking place with other technologies like: OPO, VCSEL, Solid State lasers, Gas, SC Infrared or fiber lasers. In other words, CL have to conquer a share of the Mid-IR application market. Our study is a market analysis of CL technologies and their applications. It shows that improvements of components performance, along with the progress of infrared laser spectroscopy will drive the CL market growth. We compare CL technologies with other Mid-IR sources and estimate their share in each application market.

  16. Adiabatic pair creation in heavy-ion and laser fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pickl, P.; Durr, D.

    2008-01-01

    The planned generation of lasers and heavy-ion colliders renews the hope to see electron-positron pair creation in strong classical fields. This old prediction is usually referred to as spontaneous pair creation. We observe that both heavy-ion collisions and pair creation in strong laser fields, are instances of the theory of adiabatic pair creation. We shall present the theory, thereby correcting earlier results. We give the momentum distribution of created pairs in overcritical fields. We discuss carefully the proposed experimental verifications and conclude that pure laser-based experiments are highly questionable. We propose a new experiment, joining laser fields and heavy ions, which may be feasible with present-day technology and which may indeed verify the theoretical prediction of adiabatic pair creation. Our presentation relies on recent rigorous works in mathematical physics. (authors)

  17. Infrared thermal measurements of laser soft tissue ablation as a function of air/water coolant for Nd:YAG and diode lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gekelman, Diana; Yamamoto, Andrew; Oto, Marvin G.; White, Joel M.

    2003-06-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to measure the maximum temperature at the Nd:YAG and Diode lasers fiberoptic tips as a function of air/water coolant, during soft tissue ablation in pig jaws. A pulsed Nd:YAG laser (1064nm) and a Diode laser (800-830 nm) were used varying parameters of power, conditioning or not of the fiber tip, under 4 settings of air/water coolant. The maximum temperature at the fiber tip was measured using an infra-red camera and the interaction of the fiber with the porcine soft tissue was evaluated. A two-factor ANOVA was used for statistical analysis (plaser interaction with soft tissues produced temperatures levels directly proportional to power increase, but the conditioning of the fiber tip did not influence the temperature rise. On the other hand, conditioning of the fiber tip did influence the temperature rise for Diode laser. The addition of air/water coolant, for both lasers, did not promote temperature rise consistent with cutting and coagulation of porcine soft tissue. Laser parameters affect the fiberoptic surface temperature, and the addition of air/water coolant significantly lowered surface temperature on the fiberoptic tip for all lasers and parameters tested.

  18. Additional external electromagnetic fields for laser microprocessing of metals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schütz, V; Bischoff, K; Brief, S; Koch, J; Suttmann, O; Overmeyer, L

    2016-11-14

    Ultra-short pulsed laser processing is a potent tool for microstructuring of a lot of materials. At certain laser parameters, particular periodical and/or quasi-periodical µm-size surface structures evolve apparently during processing. With extended plasmonics theory, it is possible to predict the structure formation, and a systematic technology can be derived to alter the surface for laser processing. In this work, we have demonstrated the modification of the laser processing with applying tailored dynamic surface electro-magnetic fields. Possible improvement in applications is seen in the fields of process efficiency of laser ablation and a superior control of the surface topography.

  19. Probing the ionization wave packet and recollision dynamics with an elliptically polarized strong laser field in the nondipole regime

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maurer, J.; Willenberg, B.; Daněk, J.; Mayer, B. W.; Phillips, C. R.; Gallmann, L.; Klaiber, M.; Hatsagortsyan, K. Z.; Keitel, C. H.; Keller, U.

    2018-01-01

    We explore ionization and rescattering in strong mid-infrared laser fields in the nondipole regime over the full range of polarization ellipticity. In three-dimensional photoelectron momentum distributions (3D PMDs) measured with velocity map imaging spectroscopy, we observe the appearance of a sharp ridge structure along the major polarization axis. Within a certain range of ellipticity, the electrons in this ridge are clearly separated from the two lobes that commonly appear in the PMD with elliptically polarized laser fields. In contrast to the well-known lobes of direct electrons, the sharp ridge is created by Coulomb focusing of the softly recolliding electrons. These ridge electrons are directly related to a counterintuitive shift of the PMD peak opposite to the laser beam propagation direction when the dipole approximation breaks down. The ellipticity-dependent 3D PMDs give access to different ionization and recollision dynamics with appropriate filters in the momentum space. For example, we can extract information about the spread of the initial wave packet and the Coulomb momentum transfer of the rescattering electrons.

  20. Laser processing and analysis of materials

    CERN Document Server

    Duley, W W

    1983-01-01

    It has often been said that the laser is a solution searching for a problem. The rapid development of laser technology over the past dozen years has led to the availability of reliable, industrially rated laser sources with a wide variety of output characteristics. This, in turn, has resulted in new laser applications as the laser becomes a familiar processing and analytical tool. The field of materials science, in particular, has become a fertile one for new laser applications. Laser annealing, alloying, cladding, and heat treating were all but unknown 10 years ago. Today, each is a separate, dynamic field of research activity with many of the early laboratory experiments resulting in the development of new industrial processing techniques using laser technology. Ten years ago, chemical processing was in its infancy awaiting, primarily, the development of reliable tunable laser sources. Now, with tunability over the entire spectrum from the vacuum ultraviolet to the far infrared, photo­ chemistry is undergo...

  1. Near-field enhanced optical tweezers utilizing femtosecond-laser nanostructured substrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kotsifaki, D. G., E-mail: dkotsif@eie.gr; Kandyla, M. [Theoretical and Physical Chemistry Institute, National Hellenic Research Foundation, 48 Vasileos Constantinou Avenue, 11635 Athens (Greece); Lagoudakis, P. G. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Southampton, Southampton SO17 1BJ (United Kingdom)

    2015-11-23

    We present experimental evidence of plasmonic-enhanced optical tweezers, of polystyrene beads in deionized water in the vicinity of metal-coated nanostructures. The optical tweezers operate with a continuous wave near-infrared laser. We employ a Cu/Au bilayer that significantly improves dissipation of heat generated by the trapping laser beam and avoid de-trapping from heat convection currents. We investigate the improvement of the optical trapping force and the effective trapping quality factor, and observe an exponential distance dependence of the trapping force from the nanostructures, indicative of evanescent plasmonic enhancement.

  2. [Design of flat field holographic concave grating for near-infrared spectrophotometer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiang, Xian-Yi; Wen, Zhi-Yu

    2008-07-01

    Near-infrared spectrum analysis can be used to determine the nature or test quantitatively some chemical compositions by detecting molecular double frequency and multiple frequency absorption. It has been used in agriculture, biology, petrifaction, foodstuff, medicament, spinning and other fields. Near-infrared spectrophotometer is the main apparatus for near-infrared spectrum analysis, and the grating is the most important part of the apparatus. Based on holographic concave grating theory and optic design software CODE V, a flat field holographic concave grating for near-infrared spectrophotometer was designed from primary structure, which relied on global optimization of the software. The contradiction between wide spectrum bound and limited spectrum extension was resolved, aberrations were reduced successfully, spectrum information was utilized fully, and the optic structure of spectrometer was highly efficient. Using CODE V software, complex high-order aberration equations need not be solved, the result can be evaluated quickly, flat field and resolving power can be kept in balance, and the work efficiency is also enhanced. A paradigm of flat field holographic concave grating is given, it works between 900 nm to 1 700 nm, the diameter of the concave grating is 25 mm, and F/ # is 1. 5. The design result was analyzed and evaluated. It was showed that if the slit source, whose width is 50 microm, is used to reconstruction, the theoretic resolution capacity is better than 6.3 nm.

  3. Evaluation of human papillomavirus elimination from cervix uteri by infrared laser exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dymkovets, V P; Ezhov, V V; Manykin, A A; Belov, S V; Danileiko, Yu K; Osiko, V V; Salyuk, V A

    2011-12-01

    Elimination of types 16 and 18 human papilloma virus from the surface of cervix uteri for secondary prevention of cervical cancer was evaluated. The method is protected by patent of invention of the Russian Federation. Infrared laser therapy of cervix uteri was carried out in patients with precancer diseases of cervix uteri at Department of Gynecology of Municipal Clinical Hospital No. 52 (Moscow). Papillomavirus infection was eliminated using a Russian diode laser (lambda=1.06 μ, radiation power 10 W) with a collimating headpiece using carbon die at a distance of 10-12 cm from the exposed surface. The treatment resulted in a high percentage of elimination of types 16 and 18 oncogenic virus 4-6 weeks and during delayed periods after exposure.

  4. Pulsed low-level infrared laser alters mRNA levels from muscle repair genes dependent on power output in Wistar rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trajano, L. A. S. N.; Trajano, E. T. L.; Thomé, A. M. C.; Sergio, L. P. S.; Mencalha, A. L.; Stumbo, A. C.; Fonseca, A. S.

    2017-10-01

    Satellite cells are present in skeletal muscle functioning in the repair and regeneration of muscle injury. Activation of these cells depends on the expression of myogenic factor 5 (Myf5), myogenic determination factor 1(MyoD), myogenic regulatory factor 4 (MRF4), myogenin (MyoG), paired box transcription factors 3 (Pax3), and 7 (Pax7). Low-level laser irradiation accelerates the repair of muscle injuries. However, data from the expression of myogenic factors have been controversial. Furthermore, the effects of different laser beam powers on the repair of muscle injuries have been not evaluated. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of low-level infrared laser at different powers and in pulsed emission mode on the expression of myogenic regulatory factors and on Pax3 and Pax7 in injured skeletal muscle from Wistar rats. Animals that underwent cryoinjury were divided into three groups: injury, injury laser 25 Mw, and injury laser 75 mW. Low-level infrared laser irradiation (904 nm, 3 J cm-2, 5 kHz) was carried out at 25 and 75 mW. After euthanasia, skeletal muscle samples were withdrawn and the total RNA was extracted for the evaluation of mRNA levels from the MyoD, MyoG, MRF4, Myf5, Pax3, and Pax7 gene. Pax 7 mRNA levels did not alter, but Pax3 mRNA levels increased in the injured and laser-irradiated group at 25 mW. MyoD, MyoG, and MYf5 mRNA levels increased in the injured and laser-irradiated animals at both powers, and MRF4 mRNA levels decreased in the injured and laser-irradiated group at 75 mW. In conclusion, exposure to pulsed low-level infrared laser, by power-dependent effect, could accelerate the muscle repair process altering mRNA levels from paired box transcription factors and myogenic regulatory factors.

  5. Greenhouse gas profiling by infrared-laser and microwave occultation: retrieval algorithm and demonstration results from end-to-end simulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Proschek

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Measuring greenhouse gas (GHG profiles with global coverage and high accuracy and vertical resolution in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere (UTLS is key for improved monitoring of GHG concentrations in the free atmosphere. In this respect a new satellite mission concept adding an infrared-laser part to the already well studied microwave occultation technique exploits the joint propagation of infrared-laser and microwave signals between Low Earth Orbit (LEO satellites. This synergetic combination, referred to as LEO-LEO microwave and infrared-laser occultation (LMIO method, enables to retrieve thermodynamic profiles (pressure, temperature, humidity and accurate altitude levels from the microwave signals and GHG profiles from the simultaneously measured infrared-laser signals. However, due to the novelty of the LMIO method, a retrieval algorithm for GHG profiling is not yet available. Here we introduce such an algorithm for retrieving GHGs from LEO-LEO infrared-laser occultation (LIO data, applied as a second step after retrieving thermodynamic profiles from LEO-LEO microwave occultation (LMO data. We thoroughly describe the LIO retrieval algorithm and unveil the synergy with the LMO-retrieved pressure, temperature, and altitude information. We furthermore demonstrate the effective independence of the GHG retrieval results from background (a priori information in discussing demonstration results from LMIO end-to-end simulations for a representative set of GHG profiles, including carbon dioxide (CO2, water vapor (H2O, methane (CH4, and ozone (O3. The GHGs except for ozone are well retrieved throughout the UTLS, while ozone is well retrieved from about 10 km to 15 km upwards, since the ozone layer resides in the lower stratosphere. The GHG retrieval errors are generally smaller than 1% to 3% r.m.s., at a vertical resolution of about 1 km. The retrieved profiles also appear unbiased, which points

  6. Methanogenic activity tests by Infrared Tunable Diode Laser Absorption Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez-Cruz, Karla; Sepulveda-Jauregui, Armando; Escobar-Orozco, Nayeli; Thalasso, Frederic

    2012-10-01

    Methanogenic activity (MA) tests are commonly carried out to estimate the capability of anaerobic biomass to treat effluents, to evaluate anaerobic activity in bioreactors or natural ecosystems, or to quantify inhibitory effects on methanogenic activity. These activity tests are usually based on the measurement of the volume of biogas produced by volumetric, pressure increase or gas chromatography (GC) methods. In this study, we present an alternative method for non-invasive measurement of methane produced during activity tests in closed vials, based on Infrared Tunable Diode Laser Absorption Spectroscopy (MA-TDLAS). This new method was tested during model acetoclastic and hydrogenotrophic methanogenic activity tests and was compared to a more traditional method based on gas chromatography. From the results obtained, the CH(4) detection limit of the method was estimated to 60 ppm and the minimum measurable methane production rate was estimated to 1.09(.)10(-3) mg l(-1) h(-1), which is below CH(4) production rate usually reported in both anaerobic reactors and natural ecosystems. Additionally to sensitivity, the method has several potential interests compared to more traditional methods among which short measurements time allowing the measurement of a large number of MA test vials, non-invasive measurements avoiding leakage or external interferences and similar cost to GC based methods. It is concluded that MA-TDLAS is a promising method that could be of interest not only in the field of anaerobic digestion but also, in the field of environmental ecology where CH(4) production rates are usually very low. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Research on propane leak detection system and device based on mid infrared laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Meng; Wang, Xuefeng; Wang, Junlong; Wang, Yizhao; Li, Pan; Feng, Qiaoling

    2017-10-01

    Propane is a key component of liquefied petroleum gas (LPG) and crude oil volatile. This issue summarizes the recent progress of propane detection technology. Meanwhile, base on the development trend, our latest progress is also provided. We demonstrated a mid infrared propane sensor system, which is based on wavelength modulation spectroscopy (WMS) technique with a CW interband cascade laser (ICL) emitting at 3370.4nm. The ICL laser scanned over a sharp feature in the broader spectrum of propane, and harmonic signals are obtained by lock-in amplifier for gas concentration deduction. The surrounding gas is extracted into the fine optical absorption cell through the pump to realize online detection. The absorption cell is designed in mid infrared windows range. An example experimental setup is shown. The second harmonic signals 2f and first harmonic signals1f are obtained. We present the sensor performance test data including dynamic precision and temperature stability. The propane detection sensor system and device is portable can carried on the mobile inspection vehicle platforms or intelligent robot inspection platform to realize the leakage monitoring of whole oil gas tank area.

  8. Quality assurance tests of the CBM silicon tracking system sensors with an infrared laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teklishyn, Maksym [FAIR GmbH, Darmstadt (Germany); KINR, Kyiv (Ukraine); Collaboration: CBM-Collaboration

    2016-07-01

    Double-sided 300 μm thick silicon microstrip sensors are planned to be used in the Silicon Tracking System (STS) of the future CBM experiment. Different tools, including an infrared laser, are used to induce charge in the sensor medium to study the sensor response. We use present installation to develop a procedure for the sensor quality assurance during mass production. The precise positioning of the laser spot allows to make a clear judgment about the sensor interstrip gap response which provides information about the charge distribution inside the sensor medium. Results are compared with the model estimations.

  9. Use of the smartt interferometer as an alignement tool for infrared laser systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Viswanathan, V.K.; Bolen, P.D.

    1979-01-01

    The ability to minimize the pointing and focusing errors at the focal plane is crucial in many applications involving infrared laser systems. This is particularly the case for systems involving multiple beams reaching the focal plane, as in the case of the LASL CO 2 laser fusion systems. For example, the LASL Helios CO 2 Laser Fusion System has eight 34-cm diameter beams each with an f number of approximately 2.4 coming to focus, the last element being an off-aperture parabola with a focal length of approximately 77.3 cm. The design tolerance for pointing accuracy is + 25 microns and for focusing acccuracy is +- 50 microns for the Helios system. The Smartt interferometer shows promise of not only evaluating the optical quality of the beam, but it can be used to align the beam to the tolerance levels stated above. This paper describes the procedure, as well as experimental results obtained, which show that pointing accuracies of +-12.5 microns and focusing accuracies of +- 25 microns are obtained at the focus of a CO 2 laser beam in a setup which duplicates the target regionn of the Helios CO 2 Laser Fusion System

  10. A fuzzy automated object classification by infrared laser camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanazawa, Seigo; Taniguchi, Kazuhiko; Asari, Kazunari; Kuramoto, Kei; Kobashi, Syoji; Hata, Yutaka

    2011-06-01

    Home security in night is very important, and the system that watches a person's movements is useful in the security. This paper describes a classification system of adult, child and the other object from distance distribution measured by an infrared laser camera. This camera radiates near infrared waves and receives reflected ones. Then, it converts the time of flight into distance distribution. Our method consists of 4 steps. First, we do background subtraction and noise rejection in the distance distribution. Second, we do fuzzy clustering in the distance distribution, and form several clusters. Third, we extract features such as the height, thickness, aspect ratio, area ratio of the cluster. Then, we make fuzzy if-then rules from knowledge of adult, child and the other object so as to classify the cluster to one of adult, child and the other object. Here, we made the fuzzy membership function with respect to each features. Finally, we classify the clusters to one with the highest fuzzy degree among adult, child and the other object. In our experiment, we set up the camera in room and tested three cases. The method successfully classified them in real time processing.

  11. In vivo comparison of near infrared lasers for skin welding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabakoğlu, Haşim Ozgür; Gülsoy, Murat

    2010-05-01

    The skin closure abilities of near infrared lasers and suturing were compared by histological examination and mechanical tensile tests during a 21-day healing period. One-centimeter incisions on the dorsal skin of Wistar rats were treated by one of the closing techniques: (a) soldering, using an 809 nm diode laser (0.5 W, 5 s) with 25% bovine serum albumin (BSA) and 2.5 mg/ml indocyanine green (ICG); (b) direct welding with a 980 nm diode laser (0.5 W, 5 s); (c) direct welding with a 1,070 nm fiber laser (0.5 W, 5 s); (d) suturing. Six spots (79.61 J/cm(2) for each spot) were applied through the incisions. Healing was inspected on the 1st, 4th, 7th, 14th, and 21st post-operative days. The closure index (CI), thermally altered area (TAA), granulation area (GA) and epidermal thickness (ET) were determined by histological examination. Tensile tests were performed at a 5 mm/min crosshead speed up to the first opening along the incision. Immediate superficial closure with high CI values was found for the laser-irradiated incisions at the early phase of recovery. Clear welds without thermal damage were observed for the group irradiated at 1,070 nm. For the sutured group, the incisions remained unclosed for the first day, and openings through the incision were observed. At the end of the 21-day recovery period, no differences between experimental groups were observed in terms of the CI, GA and ET values. However, the tensile strength of the groups irradiated at 980 nm and 1,070 nm was found to be higher than that of the sutured incisions. The laser welding techniques were found to be reliable in terms of immediate and mechanically strong closure compared with suturing. Of them, 1,070 nm laser welding yielded noticeably stronger bonds, with minimal scarring at the end of the 21-days of recovery.

  12. Characterization of a novel miniaturized burst-mode infrared laser system for IR-MALDESI mass spectrometry imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekelöf, Måns; Manni, Jeffrey; Nazari, Milad; Bokhart, Mark; Muddiman, David C

    2018-03-01

    Laser systems are widely used in mass spectrometry as sample probes and ionization sources. Mid-infrared lasers are particularly suitable for analysis of high water content samples such as animal and plant tissues, using water as a resonantly excited sacrificial matrix. Commercially available mid-IR lasers have historically been bulky and expensive due to cooling requirements. This work presents a novel air-cooled miniature mid-IR laser with adjustable burst-mode output and details an evaluation of its performance for mass spectrometry imaging. The miniature laser was found capable of generating sufficient energy for complete ablation of animal tissue in the context of an IR-MALDESI experiment with exogenously added ice matrix, yielding several hundred confident metabolite identifications. Graphical abstract The use of a novel miniature 2.94 μm burst-mode laser in IR-MALDESI allows for rapid and sensitive mass spectrometry imaging of a whole mouse.

  13. Laser heating of field-reversed configurations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carson, R.S.; Vlases, G.C.

    1983-01-01

    The experimental facility is a 21-cm-long solenoid with a 5.5-cm bore. The 4-cm ID quartz tube is filled with slowly flowing H 2 to 0.5-3.0 torr. Fields up to 6.5 T in 3.7 μsec are produced, with reverse-bias fields up -1.9 T. Preionization is by 40kA axial discharge 4.5 μsec before field-reversal is begun. The CO 2 laser used produces 300 to 400 J in 2 μsec, in an annular beam that can be defocused for preheating the outer edges of the plasma, or focused tightly for central-column heating and beam propagation during formation. The focusing system includes a return mirror for multiple passing of the laser energy. Diagnostics include compensated, diamagnetic flux loops, internal field probes, cross-tube and axial interferometers, fast photography, and spectroscopy

  14. Spatial temperature distribution in human hairy and glabrous skin after infrared CO2 laser radiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arendt-Nielsen Lars

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background CO2 lasers have been used for several decades as an experimental non-touching pain stimulator. The laser energy is absorbed by the water content in the most superficial layers of the skin. The deeper located nociceptors are activated by passive conduction of heat from superficial to deeper skin layers. Methods In the current study, a 2D axial finite element model was developed and validated to describe the spatial temperature distribution in the skin after infrared CO2 laser stimulation. The geometry of the model was based on high resolution ultrasound scans. The simulations were compared to the subjective pain intensity ratings from 16 subjects and to the surface skin temperature distributions measured by an infrared camera. Results The stimulations were sensed significantly slower and less intense in glabrous skin than they were in hairy skin (MANOVA, p 0.90, p 2 (5 W, 0.12 s, d1/e2 = 11.4 mm only two reported pain to glabrous skin stimulation using the same stimulus intensity. The temperature at the epidermal-dermal junction (depth 50 μm in hairy and depth 133 μm in glabrous skin was estimated to 46°C for hairy skin stimulation and 39°C for glabrous skin stimulation. Conclusions As compared to previous one dimensional heat distribution models, the current two dimensional model provides new possibilities for detailed studies regarding CO2 laser stimulation intensity, temperature levels and nociceptor activation.

  15. Frequency modulation of high-order harmonic generation in an orthogonally polarized two-color laser field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Guicun; Zheng, Yinghui; Ge, Xiaochun; Zeng, Zhinan; Li, Ruxin

    2016-08-08

    We have experimentally investigated the frequency modulation of high-order harmonics in an orthogonally polarized two-color laser field consisting of a mid-infrared 1800nm fundamental pulse and its second harmonic pulse. It is demonstrated that the high harmonic spectra can be fine-tuned as we slightly change the relative delay of the two-color laser pulses. By analyzing the relative frequency shift of each harmonic at different two-color delays, the nonadiabatic spectral shift induced by the rapid variation of the intensity-dependent intrinsic dipole phase can be distinguished from the blueshift induced by the change of the refractive index during self-phase modulation (SPM). Our comprehensive analysis shows that the frequency modulation pattern is a reflection of the average emission time of high-order harmonic generation (HHG), thus offering a simple method to fine-tune the spectra of the harmonics on a sub-cycle time scale.

  16. Sacrificial-layer free transfer of mammalian cells using near infrared femtosecond laser pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jun; Hartmann, Bastian; Siegel, Julian; Marchi, Gabriele; Clausen-Schaumann, Hauke; Sudhop, Stefanie; Huber, Heinz P.

    2018-01-01

    Laser-induced cell transfer has been developed in recent years for the flexible and gentle printing of cells. Because of the high transfer rates and the superior cell survival rates, this technique has great potential for tissue engineering applications. However, the fact that material from an inorganic sacrificial layer, which is required for laser energy absorption, is usually transferred to the printed target structure, constitutes a major drawback of laser based cell printing. Therefore alternative approaches using deep UV laser sources and protein based acceptor films for energy absorption, have been introduced. Nevertheless, deep UV radiation can introduce DNA double strand breaks, thereby imposing the risk of carcinogenesis. Here we present a method for the laser-induced transfer of hydrogels and mammalian cells, which neither requires any sacrificial material for energy absorption, nor the use of UV lasers. Instead, we focus a near infrared femtosecond (fs) laser pulse (λ = 1030 nm, 450 fs) directly underneath a thin cell layer, suspended on top of a hydrogel reservoir, to induce a rapidly expanding cavitation bubble in the gel, which generates a jet of material, transferring cells and hydrogel from the gel/cell reservoir to an acceptor stage. By controlling laser pulse energy, well-defined cell-laden droplets can be transferred with high spatial resolution. The transferred human (SCP1) and murine (B16F1) cells show high survival rates, and good cell viability. Time laps microscopy reveals unaffected cell behavior including normal cell proliferation. PMID:29718923

  17. Laser safety in design of near-infrared scanning LIDARs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, X.; Elgin, D.

    2015-05-01

    3D LIDARs (Light Detection and Ranging) with 1.5μm nanosecond pulse lasers have been increasingly used in different applications. The main reason for their popularity is that these LIDARs have high performance while at the same time can be made eye-safe. Because the laser hazard effect on eyes or skin at this wavelength region (industrial mining applications. We have incorporated the laser safety requirements in the LIDAR design and conducted laser safety analysis for different operational scenarios. While 1.5μm is normally said to be the eye-safe wavelength, in reality a high performance 3D LIDAR needs high pulse energy, small beam size and high pulse repetition frequency (PRF) to achieve long range, high resolution and high density images. The resulting radiant exposure of its stationary beam could be many times higher than the limit for a Class 1 laser device. Without carefully choosing laser and scanning parameters, including field-of-view, scan speed and pattern, a scanning LIDAR can't be eye- or skin-safe based only on its wavelength. This paper discusses the laser safety considerations in the design of eye-safe scanning LIDARs, including laser pulse energy, PRF, beam size and scanning parameters in two basic designs of scanning mechanisms, i.e. galvanometer based scanner and Risley prism based scanner. The laser safety is discussed in terms of device classification, nominal ocular hazard distance (NOHD) and safety glasses optical density (OD).

  18. Infrared behavior of the Reggeon field theory for the pomeron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bardeen, W.A.; Dash, J.W.; Pinsky, S.S.; Rabl, V.

    1975-01-01

    The infrared structure of Reggeon field theory is investigated using renormalization group methods. The infrared fixed point where only the phi 3 interaction is nontrivial is shown to be stable with respect to all higher order interactions within the context of perturbation theory both at D = 2 and in the epsilon-expansion. This may imply that the asymptotic behavior of the total cross section is model independent

  19. Interaction of neutral particles with strong laser fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meuren, Sebastian; Keitel, Christoph H.; Di Piazza, Antonino [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik, Saupfercheckweg 1, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany)

    2013-07-01

    Since the invention of the laser in the 1960s the experimentally available field strengths have continuously increased. The current peak intensity record is 2 x 10{sup 22} W/cm{sup 2} and next generation facilities such as ELI, HiPER and XCELS plan to reach even intensities of the order of 10{sup 24} W/cm{sup 2}. Thus, modern laser facilities are a clean source for very strong external electromagnetic fields and promise new and interesting high-energy physics experiments. In particular, strong laser fields could be used to test non-linear effects in quantum field theory. Earlier we have investigated how radiative corrections modify the coupling of a charged particle inside a strong plane-wave electromagnetic background field. However, a charged particle couples already at tree level to electromagnetic radiation. Therefore, we have now analyzed how the coupling between neutral particles and radiation is affected by a very strong plane-wave electromagnetic background field, when loop corrections are taken into account. In particular, the case of neutrinos is discussed.

  20. Confinement of laser plasma by solenoidal field for laser ion source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okamura, M.; Kanesue, T.; Kondo, K.; Dabrowski, R.

    2010-01-01

    A laser ion source can provide high current, highly charged ions with a simple structure. However, it was not easy to control the ion pulse width. To provide a longer ion beam pulse, the plasma drift length, which is the distance between laser target and extraction point, has to be extended and as a result the plasma is diluted severely. Previously, we applied a solenoid field to prevent reduction of ion density at the extraction point. Although a current enhancement by a solenoid field was observed, plasma behavior after a solenoid magnet was unclear because plasma behavior can be different from usual ion beam dynamics. We measured a transverse ion distribution along the beam axis to understand plasma motion in the presence of a solenoid field.

  1. Resonant infrared laser deposition of polymer-nanocomposite materials for optoelectronic applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Hee K.; Schriver, Kenneth E.; Haglund, Richard F.

    2011-11-01

    Polymers find a number of potentially useful applications in optoelectronic devices. These include both active layers, such as light-emitting polymers and hole-transport layers, and passive layers, such as polymer barrier coatings and light-management films. This paper reports the experimental results for polymer films deposited by resonant infrared matrix-assisted pulsed laser evaporation (RIR-MAPLE) and resonant infrared pulsed laser deposition (RIR-PLD) for commercial optoelectronic device applications. In particular, light-management films, such as anti-reflection coatings, require refractive-index engineering of a material. However, refractive indices of polymers fall within a relatively narrow range, leading to major efforts to develop both low- and high-refractive-index polymers. Polymer nanocomposites can expand the range of refractive indices by incorporating low- or high-refractive-index nanoscale materials. RIR-MAPLE is an excellent technique for depositing polymer-nanocomposite films in multilayer structures, which are essential to light-management coatings. In this paper, we report our efforts to engineer the refractive index of a barrier polymer by combining RIR-MAPLE of nanomaterials (for example, high refractive-index TiO2 nanoparticles) and RIR-PLD of host polymer. In addition, we report on the properties of organic and polymer films deposited by RIR-MAPLE and/or RIR-PLD, such as Alq3 [tris(8-hydroxyquinoline) aluminum] and PEDOT:PSS [poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene): poly(styrenesulfonate)]. Finally, the challenges and potential for commercializing RIR-MAPLE/PLD, such as industrial scale-up issues, are discussed.

  2. Continuously tunable monomode mid-infrared vertical external cavity surface emitting laser on Si

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khiar, A.; Rahim, M.; Fill, M.; Felder, F.; Hobrecker, F.; Zogg, H.

    2010-10-01

    A tunable PbTe based mid-infrared vertical external cavity surface emitting laser is described. The active part is a ˜1 μm thick PbTe layer grown epitaxially on a Bragg mirror on the Si-substrate. The cavity is terminated with a curved Si/SiO Bragg top mirror and pumped optically with a 1.55 μm laser. Cavity length is <100 μm in order that only one longitudinal mode is supported. By changing the cavity length, up to 5% wavelength continuous and mode-hop free tuning is achieved at fixed temperature. The total tuning extends from 5.6 to 4.7 μm at 100-170 K operation temperature.

  3. Bethe-Heitler pair creation in a bichromatic laser field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Augustin, Sven

    2014-01-01

    Within this thesis, the non-linear creation of electron-positron pairs in the superposition of a nuclear Coulomb field and a two-colour laser field of high intensity is studied. Primarily, two complementary scenarios are investigated: On the one hand, if the two laser frequencies are commensurable, quantum interference may occur. This interference manifests in the total pair-creation rate and the angular distribution of the created particles, which are studied in the nuclear rest frame and the laboratory frame. Furthermore, the relative phase between the two laser modes allows to tune the strength of the terms arising from interference. Therefore, this parameter may be used to optimize the pair-creation yield. On the other hand, for incommensurable frequencies, a set-up of largely differing frequencies is considered. This way, a strong laser field in the non-perturbative regime assisted by a single highly-energetic γ-photon is described. Due to the assistance of the latter, a strong enhancement of the total pair-creation rate can be found depending on the laser intensity. Additionally, the influence of the γ-photon on the angular and energetic distribution of the created particles is investigated, again in the nuclear rest frame and the laboratory frame. Furthermore, the differences arising in the two former cases are directly compared by means of a continuous variation of the laser frequency ratio. This illustrates the strong modifications due to the interference in the commensurable case. Finally, for the special case of two modes with identical frequency, the total pair-creation rate is studied as a function of the ellipticity of the combined laser field. Here, the cases of a constant total field intensity and a constant maximum field intensity are compared.

  4. The suppression of radiation reaction and laser field depletion in laser-electron beam interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ong, J. F.; Moritaka, T.; Takabe, H.

    2018-03-01

    The effects of radiation reaction (RR) have been studied extensively by using the interaction of ultraintense lasers with a counter-propagating relativistic electron. At the laser intensity at the order of 1023 W/cm2, the effects of RR are significant in a few laser periods for a relativistic electron. However, a laser at such intensity is tightly focused and the laser energy is usually assumed to be fixed. Then, the signal of RR and energy conservation cannot be guaranteed. To assess the effects of RR in a tightly focused laser pulse and the evolution of the laser energy, we simulated this interaction with a beam of 109 electrons by means of a Particle-In-Cell method. We observe that the effects of RR are suppressed due to the ponderomotive force and accompanied by a non-negligible amount of laser field energy reduction. This is because the ponderomotive force prevents the electrons from approaching the center of the laser pulse and leads to an interaction at the weaker field region. At the same time, the laser energy is absorbed through ponderomotive acceleration. Thus, the kinetic energy of the electron beam has to be carefully selected such that the effects of RR become obvious.

  5. Spin and radiation in intense laser fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walser, M.W.; Urbach, D.J.; Hatsagortsyan, K.Z.; Hu, S.X.; Keitel, C.H.

    2002-01-01

    The spin dynamics and its reaction on the particle motion are investigated for free and bound electrons in intense linearly polarized laser fields. Employing both classical and quantum treatments we analytically evaluate the spin oscillation of free electrons in intense laser fields and indicate the effect of spin-orbit coupling on the motion of the electron. In Mott scattering an estimation for the spin oscillation is derived. In intense laser ion dynamics spin signatures are studied in detail with emphasis on high-order harmonic generation in the tunneling regime. First- and second-order calculations in the ratio of electron velocity and the speed of light show spin signatures in the radiation spectrum and spin-orbit effects in the electron polarization

  6. Dense xenon nanoplasmas in intense laser fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hilse, P.; Moll, M.; Schlanges, M.; Bornath, Th.

    2010-01-01

    Complete text of publication follows. One reason for the on-going interest in laser-cluster interactions is the efficient absorption of the radiation energy of near-infrared femtosecond laser pulses by clusters. Consequently, in laser-cluster experiments the emission of highly charged ions, very energetic electrons, higher harmonics, fast fragments as well at strong x-rays in the multi-keV range is observed. The cluster response is highly nonlinear. Different theoretical models and simulations indicate that resonant collective absorption plays a central role. The rapid expansion of irradiated clusters is essential as, at a certain time, the cluster reaches the density fulfilling the resonance condition. This can occur during a single pulse. A better control can be achieved by dual-pulse laser excitation with varying time delay between two pulses. A further optimization is possible by pulse shaping which is a modern tool in laser experiments. With pulse shaping, the dynamics of the system determined by heating, ionization and expansion can be specifically affected. For an understanding of the underlying physical processes in the dynamics of laser-cluster interaction, a theoretical description is presented using a genetic algorithm and basing on the relatively simple nanoplasma model. Recently, experiments as well as calculations were performed for silver clusters. Highly charged silver ions could be produced very efficiently with a pulse structure consisting of a smaller pre-pulse followed by a larger main pulse. The focus of the present contribution is on xenon clusters and their different behavior compared to metallic clusters as silver. Acknowledgements. This work was supported by the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft via SFB 652.

  7. Ambient infrared laser ablation mass spectrometry (AIRLAB-MS) with plume capture by continuous flow solvent probe

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brien, Jeremy T.; Williams, Evan R.; Holman, Hoi-Ying N.

    2017-10-31

    A new experimental setup for spatially resolved ambient infrared laser ablation mass spectrometry (AIRLAB-MS) that uses an infrared microscope with an infinity-corrected reflective objective and a continuous flow solvent probe coupled to a Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometer is described. The efficiency of material transfer from the sample to the electrospray ionization emitter was determined using glycerol/methanol droplets containing 1 mM nicotine and is .about.50%. This transfer efficiency is significantly higher than values reported for similar techniques.

  8. Measurements of magnetic fields generated in underdense plasmas by intense lasers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Najmudin, Z.; Walton, B. R.; Mangles, S. P. D.; Dangor, A. E.; Krushelnick, K.; Fritzler, S.; Malka, V.; Faure, J.; Tatarakis, M.

    2006-01-01

    Measurements have been made of the magnetic field generated by the passage of high intensity short laser pulses through underdense plasmas. For a 30 fs, 1 J, 800 nm linearly-polarised laser pulse, an azimuthal magnetic field is observed at a radial extent of approximately 200 μm. The field is found to exceed 2.8 MG. For a 1 ps, 40 J, 1054 nm circularly-polarised laser pulse, a solenoidal field is observed that can exceed 7 MG. This solenoidal field is absent with linear polarised light, and hence can be considered as an Inverse Faraday effect. Both types of field are found to decay on the picosecond timescale. For both the azimuthal and solenoidal fields produced by such intense lasers, the production of energetic electrons by the interaction is thought to be vital for magnetic field generation

  9. Transient Infrared Emission Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Roger W.; McClelland, John F.

    1989-12-01

    Transient Infrared Emission Spectroscopy (TIRES) is a new technique that reduces the occurrence of self-absorption in optically thick solid samples so that analytically useful emission spectra may be observed. Conventional emission spectroscopy, in which the sample is held at an elevated, uniform temperature, is practical only for optically thin samples. In thick samples the emission from deep layers of the material is partially absorbed by overlying layers.1 This self-absorption results in emission spectra from most optically thick samples that closely resemble black-body spectra. The characteristic discrete emission bands are severely truncated and altered in shape. TIRES bypasses this difficulty by using a laser to heat only an optically thin surface layer. The increased temperature of the layer is transient since the layer will rapidly cool and thicken by thermal diffusion; hence the emission collection must be correlated with the laser heating. TIRES may be done with both pulsed and cw lasers.2,3 When a pulsed laser is used, the spectrometer sampling must be synchronized with the laser pulsing so that only emission during and immediately after each laser pulse is observed.3 If a cw laser is used, the sample must move rapidly through the beam. The hot, transient layer is then in the beam track on the sample at and immediately behind the beam position, so the spectrometer field of view must be limited to this region near the beam position.2 How much self-absorption the observed emission suffers depends on how thick the heated layer has grown by thermal diffusion when the spectrometer samples the emission. Use of a pulsed laser synchronized with the spectrometer sampling readily permits reduction of the time available for heat diffusion to about 100 acs .3 When a cw laser is used, the heat-diffusion time is controlled by how small the spectrometer field of view is and by how rapidly the sample moves past within this field. Both a very small field of view and a

  10. Confinement of laser plasma expansion with strong external magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Hui-bo; Hu, Guang-yue; Liang, Yi-han; Tao, Tao; Wang, Yu-lin; Hu, Peng; Zhao, Bin; Zheng, Jian

    2018-05-01

    The evolutions of laser ablation plasma, expanding in strong (∼10 T) transverse external magnetic field, were investigated in experiments and simulations. The experimental results show that the magnetic field pressure causes the plasma decelerate and accumulate at the plasma-field interface, and then form a low-density plasma bubble. The saturation size of the plasma bubble has a scaling law on laser energy and magnetic field intensity. Magnetohydrodynamic simulation results support the observation and find that the scaling law (V max ∝ E p /B 2, where V max is the maximum volume of the plasma bubble, E p is the absorbed laser energy, and B is the magnetic field intensity) is effective in a broad laser energy range from several joules to kilo-joules, since the plasma is always in the state of magnetic field frozen while expanding. About 15% absorbed laser energy converts into magnetic field energy stored in compressed and curved magnetic field lines. The duration that the plasma bubble comes to maximum size has another scaling law t max ∝ E p 1/2/B 2. The plasma expanding dynamics in external magnetic field have a similar character with that in underdense gas, which indicates that the external magnetic field may be a feasible approach to replace the gas filled in hohlraum to suppress the wall plasma expansion and mitigate the stimulated scattering process in indirect drive ignition.

  11. Fluorescence imaging of lattice re-distribution on step-index direct laser written Nd:YAG waveguide lasers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martínez de Mendívil, Jon; Pérez Delgado, Alberto; Lifante, Ginés; Jaque, Daniel [Departamento de Física de Materiales, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, Madrid 28049 (Spain); Ródenas, Airán [Departament de Química Física i Inorgànica, Universitat Rovira i Virgili, Tarragona 43007 (Spain); Institute of Photonics and Quantum Sciences, Heriot-Watt University, Edinburgh EH14 4AS (United Kingdom); Benayas, Antonio, E-mail: antonio.benayas@emt.inrs.ca [Departamento de Física de Materiales, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, Madrid 28049 (Spain); Institut National de la Recherche Scientifique, Centre – Énergie Matériaux et Télécommunications, 1650, Boul. Lionel Boulet Varennes, Quebec J3X 1S2 (Canada); Aguiló, Magdalena; Diaz, Francesc [Departament de Química Física i Inorgànica, Universitat Rovira i Virgili, Tarragona 43007 (Spain); Kar, Ajoy K. [Institute of Photonics and Quantum Sciences, Heriot-Watt University, Edinburgh EH14 4AS (United Kingdom)

    2015-01-14

    The laser performance and crystalline micro-structural properties of near-infrared step-index channel waveguides fabricated inside Neodymium doped YAG laser ceramics by means of three-dimensional sub-picosecond pulse laser direct writing are reported. Fluorescence micro-mapping of the waveguide cross-sections reveals that an essential crystal lattice re-distribution has been induced after short pulse irradiation. Such lattice re-distribution is evidenced at the waveguide core corresponding to the laser written refractive index increased volume. The waveguides core surroundings also present diverse changes including slight lattice disorder and bi-axial strain fields. The step-index waveguide laser performance is compared with previous laser fabricated waveguides with a stress-optic guiding mechanism in absence of laser induced lattice re-distribution.

  12. Status of the Northrop Grumman Compact Infrared Free-Electron Laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lehrman, I.S.; Krishnaswamy, J.; Hartley, R.A. [Northrop Grumman Advanced Technology & Development Center, Princeton, NJ (United States)] [and others

    1995-12-31

    The Compact Infrared Free Electron Laser (CIRFEL) was built as part of a joint collaboration between the Northrop Grumman Corporation and Princeton University to develop FEL`s for use by researchers in the materials, medical and physical sciences. The CIRFEL was designed to lase in the Mid-IR and Far-IR regimes with picosecond pulses, megawatt level peak powers and an average power of a few watts. The micropulse separation is 7 nsec which allows a number of relaxation phenomenon to be observed. The CIRFEL utilizes an RF photocathode gun to produce high-brightness time synchronized electron bunches. The operational status and experimental results of the CERFEL will be presented.

  13. Status of the Northrop Grumman Compact Infrared Free-Electron Laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lehrman, I.S.; Krishnaswamy, J.; Hartley, R.A.

    1995-01-01

    The Compact Infrared Free Electron Laser (CIRFEL) was built as part of a joint collaboration between the Northrop Grumman Corporation and Princeton University to develop FEL's for use by researchers in the materials, medical and physical sciences. The CIRFEL was designed to lase in the Mid-IR and Far-IR regimes with picosecond pulses, megawatt level peak powers and an average power of a few watts. The micropulse separation is 7 nsec which allows a number of relaxation phenomenon to be observed. The CIRFEL utilizes an RF photocathode gun to produce high-brightness time synchronized electron bunches. The operational status and experimental results of the CERFEL will be presented

  14. Characterization of silicon micro-strip sensors with a pulsed infra-red laser system for the CBM experiment at FAIR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghosh, P.

    2015-01-01

    The Compressed Baryonic Matter (CBM) experiment at FAIR is composed of 8 tracking stations consisting of 1292 double sided silicon micro-strip sensors. For the quality assurance of produced prototype sensors a laser test system (LTS) has been developed. The aim of the LTS is to scan sensors with a pulsed infra-red laser driven by step motor to determine the charge sharing in-between strips and to measure qualitative uniformity of the sensor response over the whole active area. The prototype sensors which are tested with the LTS so far have 256 strips with a pitch of 50 μm on each side. They are read-out using a self-triggering prototype read-out electronic ASIC called n-XYTER. The LTS is designed to measure sensor response in an automatized procedure at several thousand positions across the sensor with focused infra-red laser light (spot size ≈ 12 μm , wavelength = 1060 nm). The pulse with duration (≈ 10 ns) and power (≈ 5 mW) of the laser pulses is selected such, that the absorption of the laser light in the 300 μm thick silicon sensors produces a number of about 24000 electrons, which is similar to the charge created by minimum ionizing particles (MIP) in these sensors. Laser scans different prototype sensors is reported

  15. Up-regulation of cerebral cytochrome-c-oxidase and hemodynamics by transcranial infrared laser stimulation: A broadband near-infrared spectroscopy study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xinlong; Tian, Fenghua; Reddy, Divya D; Nalawade, Sahil S; Barrett, Douglas W; Gonzalez-Lima, Francisco; Liu, Hanli

    2017-12-01

    Transcranial infrared laser stimulation (TILS) is a noninvasive form of brain photobiomulation. Cytochrome-c-oxidase (CCO), the terminal enzyme in the mitochondrial electron transport chain, is hypothesized to be the primary intracellular photoacceptor. We hypothesized that TILS up-regulates cerebral CCO and causes hemodynamic changes. We delivered 1064-nm laser stimulation to the forehead of healthy participants ( n = 11), while broadband near-infrared spectroscopy was utilized to acquire light reflectance from the TILS-treated cortical region before, during, and after TILS. Placebo experiments were also performed for accurate comparison. Time course of spectroscopic readings were analyzed and fitted to the modified Beer-Lambert law. With respect to the placebo readings, we observed (1) significant increases in cerebral concentrations of oxidized CCO (Δ[CCO]; >0.08 µM; p 0.8 µM; p 0.5 µM; p < 0.01) during and after TILS, and (2) linear interplays between Δ[CCO] versus Δ[HbO] and between Δ[CCO] versus Δ[HbT]. Ratios of Δ[CCO]/Δ[HbO] and Δ[CCO]/Δ[HbT] were introduced as TILS-induced metabolic-hemodynamic coupling indices to quantify the coupling strength between TILS-enhanced cerebral metabolism and blood oxygen supply. This study provides the first demonstration that TILS causes up-regulation of oxidized CCO in the human brain, and contributes important insight into the physiological mechanisms.

  16. Laser Light-field Fusion for Wide-field Lensfree On-chip Phase Contrast Microscopy of Nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazemzadeh, Farnoud; Wong, Alexander

    2016-12-01

    Wide-field lensfree on-chip microscopy, which leverages holography principles to capture interferometric light-field encodings without lenses, is an emerging imaging modality with widespread interest given the large field-of-view compared to lens-based techniques. In this study, we introduce the idea of laser light-field fusion for lensfree on-chip phase contrast microscopy for detecting nanoparticles, where interferometric laser light-field encodings acquired using a lensfree, on-chip setup with laser pulsations at different wavelengths are fused to produce marker-free phase contrast images of particles at the nanometer scale. As a proof of concept, we demonstrate, for the first time, a wide-field lensfree on-chip instrument successfully detecting 300 nm particles across a large field-of-view of ~30 mm2 without any specialized or intricate sample preparation, or the use of synthetic aperture- or shift-based techniques.

  17. Deposition of Methylammonium Lead Triiodide by Resonant Infrared Matrix-Assisted Pulsed Laser Evaporation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barraza, E. Tomas; Dunlap-Shohl, Wiley A.; Mitzi, David B.; Stiff-Roberts, Adrienne D.

    2018-02-01

    Resonant infrared matrix-assisted pulsed laser evaporation (RIR-MAPLE) was used to deposit the metal-halide perovskite (MHP) CH3NH3PbI3 (methylammonium lead triiodide, or MAPbI), creating phase-pure films. Given the moisture sensitivity of these crystalline, multi-component organic-inorganic hybrid materials, deposition of MAPbI by RIR-MAPLE required a departure from the use of water-based emulsions as deposition targets. Different chemistries were explored to create targets that properly dissolved MAPbI components, were stable under vacuum conditions, and enabled resonant laser energy absorption. Secondary phases and solvent contamination in the resulting films were studied through Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) absorbance and x-ray diffraction (XRD) measurements, suggesting that lingering excess methylammonium iodide (MAI) and low-vapor pressure solvents can distort the microstructure, creating crystalline and amorphous non-perovskite phases. Thermal annealing of films deposited by RIR-MAPLE allowed for excess solvent to be evaporated from films without degrading the MAPbI structure. Further, it was demonstrated that RIR-MAPLE does not require excess MAI to create stoichiometric films with optoelectronic properties, crystal structure, and film morphology comparable to films created using more established spin-coating methods for processing MHPs. This work marks the first time a MAPLE-related technique was used to deposit MHPs.

  18. High energy bremsstrahlung in an intense laser field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schlessinger, L.; Wright, J.A.

    1980-02-01

    The cross section for bremsstrahlung emission and absorption by electrons in an intense laser field has been calculated in the Born approximation for the electron-ion potential. Typical numerical results are presented as a function of the ratio of the electron guiver energy to its energy and the ratio of the bremsstrahlung energy to the electron energy. The intense field correction factor for the rate of bremsstrahlung emission and absorption for electrons with a Boltzmann distribution of energies has been calculated. Numerical results for the correction factor are presented for the Boltzmann case as a function of the ratio of the electron quiver energy to its thermal energy and the ratio of the bremsstrahlung energy to the thermal energy. For typical laser fusion parameters, this correction factor which is the ratio of the thermal bremsstrahlung emission rate in the intense laser field to the rate at zero field can be quite significant. For a laser of wavelength 1.06 μm at an intensity of 3 x 10 15 w/cm 2 and an electron temperature of 1 keV, the correction factor varies from 0.98 at a bremsstrahlung energy of 100 V to greater than 5 at a bremsstrahlung energy of 10 keV

  19. Next-generation mid-infrared sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, D.; Bank, S.; Lee, M. L.; Wasserman, D.

    2017-12-01

    The mid-infrared (mid-IR) is a wavelength range with a variety of technologically vital applications in molecular sensing, security and defense, energy conservation, and potentially in free-space communication. The recent development and rapid commercialization of new coherent mid-infrared sources have spurred significant interest in the development of mid-infrared optical systems for the above applications. However, optical systems designers still do not have the extensive optical infrastructure available to them that exists at shorter wavelengths (for instance, in the visible and near-IR/telecom wavelengths). Even in the field of optoelectronic sources, which has largely driven the growing interest in the mid-infrared, the inherent limitations of state-of-the-art sources and the gaps in spectral coverage offer opportunities for the development of new classes of lasers, light emitting diodes and emitters for a range of potential applications. In this topical review, we will first present an overview of the current state-of-the-art mid-IR sources, in particular thermal emitters, which have long been utilized, and the relatively new quantum- and interband-cascade lasers, as well as the applications served by these sources. Subsequently, we will discuss potential mid-infrared applications and wavelength ranges which are poorly served by the current stable of mid-IR sources, with an emphasis on understanding the fundamental limitations of the current source technology. The bulk of the manuscript will then explore both past and recent developments in mid-infrared source technology, including narrow bandgap quantum well lasers, type-I and type-II quantum dot materials, type-II superlattices, highly mismatched alloys, lead-salts and transition-metal-doped II-VI materials. We will discuss both the advantages and limitations of each of the above material systems, as well as the potential new applications which they might serve. All in all, this topical review does not aim

  20. Electron-positron pair production in ultrastrong laser fields

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bai Song Xie

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Electron–positron pair production due to the decay of vacuum in ultrastrong laser fields is an interesting topic which is revived recently because of the rapid development of current laser technology. The theoretical and numerical research progress of this challenging topic is reviewed. Many new findings are presented by different approaches such as the worldline instantons, the S-matrix theory, the kinetic method by solving the quantum Vlasov equation or/and the real-time Dirac–Heisenberg–Wigner formalism, the computational quantum field theory by solving the Dirac equation and so on. In particular, the effects of electric field polarizations on pair production are unveiled with different patterns of created momentum spectra. The effects of polarizations on the number density of created particles and the nonperturbative signatures of multiphoton process are also presented. The competitive interplay between the multiphoton process and nonperturbation process plays a key role in these new findings. These newly discovered phenomena are valuable to deepen the understanding of pair production in complex fields and even have an implication to the study of strong-field ionization. More recent studies on the pair production in complex fields as well as beyond laser fields are briefly presented in the view point of perspective future.

  1. Limit on Excitation and Stabilization of Atoms in Intense Optical Laser Fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmermann, H; Meise, S; Khujakulov, A; Magaña, A; Saenz, A; Eichmann, U

    2018-03-23

    Atomic excitation in strong optical laser fields has been found to take place even at intensities exceeding saturation. The concomitant acceleration of the atom in the focused laser field has been considered a strong link to, if not proof of, the existence of the so-called Kramers-Henneberger (KH) atom, a bound atomic system in an intense laser field. Recent findings have moved the importance of the KH atom from being purely of theoretical interest toward real world applications; for instance, in the context of laser filamentation. Considering this increasing importance, we explore the limits of strong-field excitation in optical fields, which are basically imposed by ionization through the spatial field envelope and the field propagation.

  2. An experimental study of noise in mid-infrared quantum cascade lasers of different designs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schilt, Stéphane; Tombez, Lionel; Tardy, Camille; Bismuto, Alfredo; Blaser, Stéphane; Maulini, Richard; Terazzi, Romain; Rochat, Michel; Südmeyer, Thomas

    2015-04-01

    We present an experimental study of noise in mid-infrared quantum cascade lasers (QCLs) of different designs. By quantifying the high degree of correlation occurring between fluctuations of the optical frequency and voltage between the QCL terminals, we show that electrical noise is a powerful and simple mean to study noise in QCLs. Based on this outcome, we investigated the electrical noise in a large set of 22 QCLs emitting in the range of 7.6-8 μm and consisting of both ridge-waveguide and buried-heterostructure (BH) lasers with different geometrical designs and operation parameters. From a statistical data processing based on an analysis of variance, we assessed that ridge-waveguide lasers have a lower noise than BH lasers. Our physical interpretation is that additional current leakages or spare injection channels occur at the interface between the active region and the lateral insulator in the BH geometry, which induces some extra noise. In addition, Schottky-type contacts occurring at the interface between the n-doped regions and the lateral insulator, i.e., iron-doped InP, are also believed to be a potential source of additional noise in some BH lasers, as observed from the slight reduction in the integrated voltage noise observed at the laser threshold in several BH-QCLs.

  3. Polarization control of multi-photon absorption under intermediate femtosecond laser field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheng Wenjing; Liang Guo; Wu Ping; Liu Pei; Jia Tianqing; Sun Zhenrong; Zhang Shian

    2017-01-01

    It has been shown that the femtosecond laser polarization modulation is a very simple and well-established method to control the multi-photon absorption process by the light–matter interaction. Previous studies mainly focused on the multi-photon absorption control in the weak field. In this paper, we further explore the polarization control behavior of multi-photon absorption process in the intermediate femtosecond laser field. In the weak femtosecond laser field, the second-order perturbation theory can well describe the non-resonant two-photon absorption process. However, the higher order nonlinear effect (e.g., four-photon absorption) can occur in the intermediate femtosecond laser field, and thus it is necessary to establish new theoretical model to describe the multi-photon absorption process, which includes the two-photon and four-photon transitions. Here, we construct a fourth-order perturbation theory to study the polarization control behavior of this multi-photon absorption under the intermediate femtosecond laser field excitation, and our theoretical results show that the two-photon and four-photon excitation pathways can induce a coherent interference, while the coherent interference is constructive or destructive that depends on the femtosecond laser center frequency. Moreover, the two-photon and four-photon transitions have the different polarization control efficiency, and the four-photon absorption can obtain the higher polarization control efficiency. Thus, the polarization control efficiency of the whole excitation process can be increased or decreased by properly designing the femtosecond laser field intensity and laser center frequency. These studies can provide a clear physical picture for understanding and controlling the multi-photon absorption process in the intermediate femtosecond laser field, and also can provide a theoretical guidance for the future experimental realization. (paper)

  4. Numerical studies of pair creation in counterpropagating laser fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruf, Matthias

    2009-05-27

    Pair creation from vacuum induced by electromagnetic fields is probably one of the most intriguing phenomena in physics. If the fields are sufficiently strong, the QED vacuum become unstable. Due to the remarkable progress in laser technology during recent years an experimental investigation of pair creation by pure laser light is coming into reach. The focus of this thesis is on pair creation in counterpropagating laser beams. The pair creation probability is calculated employing the numerically obtained solutions of the Dirac equation. This numerical ansatz has the capability of calculating the momentum distribution of the created pairs in a single propagation, for pure time dependent field configurations. Furthermore, it allows to take the magnetic component of the laser fields into account, which is usually neglected. The latter strongly affects the creation process at high laser frequency. The involved numerical calculations are rather time consuming, therefore the second project of this thesis was to develop a highly efficient code for solving relativistic quantum mechanical problems. This is accomplished by adopting the split-operator method to the Klein-Gordon equation. Here the possibility arises to use parallel computing. However the corresponding spin-statistics becomes crucial in the case of pair creation, demonstrated in several examples. (orig.)

  5. Numerical studies of pair creation in counterpropagating laser fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruf, Matthias

    2009-01-01

    Pair creation from vacuum induced by electromagnetic fields is probably one of the most intriguing phenomena in physics. If the fields are sufficiently strong, the QED vacuum become unstable. Due to the remarkable progress in laser technology during recent years an experimental investigation of pair creation by pure laser light is coming into reach. The focus of this thesis is on pair creation in counterpropagating laser beams. The pair creation probability is calculated employing the numerically obtained solutions of the Dirac equation. This numerical ansatz has the capability of calculating the momentum distribution of the created pairs in a single propagation, for pure time dependent field configurations. Furthermore, it allows to take the magnetic component of the laser fields into account, which is usually neglected. The latter strongly affects the creation process at high laser frequency. The involved numerical calculations are rather time consuming, therefore the second project of this thesis was to develop a highly efficient code for solving relativistic quantum mechanical problems. This is accomplished by adopting the split-operator method to the Klein-Gordon equation. Here the possibility arises to use parallel computing. However the corresponding spin-statistics becomes crucial in the case of pair creation, demonstrated in several examples. (orig.)

  6. Airborne Laser Infrared Absorption Spectrometer (ALIAS-II) for in situ Atmospheric Measurements of N(sub 2)0, CH(sub 4), CO, HCl, and NO(sub 2) from Balloon or RPA Platforms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, D.; Herman, R.; Webster, C.; May, R.; Flesch, G.; Moyer, E.

    1998-01-01

    The Airborne Laser Infrared Absorption Spectrometer II (ALIAS-II) is a lightweight, high-resolution (0.0003 cm-1), scanning, mid-infrared absorption spectrometer based on cooled (80 K) lead-salt tunable diode laser sources.

  7. Magnetic Field Generation and Electron Acceleration in Relativistic Laser Channel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kostyukov, I.Yu.; Shvets, G.; Fisch, N.J.; Rax, J.M.

    2001-01-01

    The interaction between energetic electrons and a circularly polarized laser pulse inside an ion channel is studied. Laser radiation can be resonantly absorbed by electrons executing betatron oscillations in the ion channel and absorbing angular momentum from the laser. The absorbed angular momentum manifests itself as a strong axial magnetic field (inverse Faraday effect). The magnitude of this magnetic field is calculated and related to the amount of the absorbed energy. Absorbed energy and generated magnetic field are estimated for the small and large energy gain regimes. Qualitative comparisons with recent experiments are also made

  8. Creation of electron-positron plasma with superstrong laser field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Narozhny, N.B.; Fedotov, A.M.

    2014-01-01

    We present a short review of recent progress in studying QED effects within the interaction of ultra-relativistic laser pulses with vacuum and e - e + plasma. Current development in laser technologies promises very rapid growth of laser intensities in the near future. Two exa-watt class facilities (ELI and XCELS, Russia) in Europe are already in the planning stage. Realization of these projects will make available a laser intensity of 10 26 W/cm 2 or even higher. Therefore, discussion of nonlinear optical effects in vacuum are becoming compelling for experimentalists and are currently gaining much attention. We show that, in spite of the fact that the expected field strength is still essentially less than E S = m 2 c 3 /eℎ = 1.32*10 16 V/cm, the nonlinear vacuum effects will be accessible for observation at the ELI and XCELS facilities. The most promising effect for observation is pair creation by a laser pulse in vacuum. It is shown, that at intensities of about 5*10 25 W/cm 2 , creation even of a single pair is accompanied by the development of an avalanche QED cascade. There exists a distinctive feature of the laser-induced cascades, as compared with the air showers arising due primarily to cosmic rays entering the atmosphere. In our case the laser field plays not only the role of a target (similar to a nucleus in the case of air showers) but is also responsible for the acceleration of slow particles. It is shown that the effect of pair creation imposes a natural limit for the attainable laser intensity and, apparently, the field strength E ≅ E S is not accessible for a pair-creating electromagnetic field at all. (authors)

  9. Frequency stabilization of an optically pumped far-infrared laser to the harmonic of a microwave synthesizer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danylov, A A; Light, A R; Waldman, J; Erickson, N

    2015-12-10

    Measurements of the frequency stability of a far-infrared molecular laser have been made by mixing the harmonic of an ultrastable microwave source with a portion of the laser output signal in a terahertz (THz) Schottky diode balanced mixer. A 3 GHz difference-frequency signal was used in a frequency discriminator circuit to lock the laser to the microwave source. Comparisons of the short- and long-term laser frequency stability under free-running and locked conditions show a significant improvement with locking. Short-term frequency jitter was reduced by an order of magnitude, from approximately 40 to 4 kHz, and long-term drift was reduced by more than three orders of magnitude, from approximately 250 kHz to 80 Hz. The results, enabled by the efficient Schottky diode balanced mixer downconverter, demonstrate that ultrastable microwave-based frequency stabilization of THz optically pumped lasers (OPLs) will now be possible at frequencies extending well above 4.0 THz.

  10. Field-glass range finder with a semiconductor laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwanejko, Leszek; Jankiewicz, Zdzislaw; Jarocki, Roman; Marczak, Jan

    1995-03-01

    This paper presents the project of a laboratory model of a field-glasses range-finger. The optical transmitter of the device contains a commercial pulse semiconductor laser which generates IR wavelength around 905 nm. Some of the technical parameters of this device are: a maximum range of up to 3 km; an accuracy of +/- 5 m, divergence of a laser beam of 1 mrad; a repetition rate of 1 kHz. Dichroic elements of the receiver ensure a capability of an optimization of a field of view, without the worsening of luminance and size of an observation field.

  11. In-system Performance of MQW Lasers Exposed to High Magnetic Field

    CERN Document Server

    Jensen, Fredrik Bjorn Henning; Azevedo, C S; Cervelli, Giovanni; Gill, Karl; Grabit, Robert; Vasey, François

    2000-01-01

    The effect of magnetic field has been investigated on 1310nm edge-emitting multi-quantum-well lasers. These lasers are candidate transmitters for the CMS tracker optical link, which will be operated in a 4T solenoidal magnetic field. In-situ measurements up to 2.4T of in-system laser analogue performance and laser spectral characteristics were carried out. No degradation of performance and spectral characteristics was observed

  12. Single bead near-infrared random laser based on silica-gel infiltrated with Rhodamine 640

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moura, André L.; Barbosa-Silva, Renato; Dominguez, Christian T.; Pecoraro, Édison; Gomes, Anderson S. L.; de Araújo, Cid B.

    2018-04-01

    Photoluminescence properties of single bead silica-gel (SG) embedded with a laser-dye were studied aiming at the operation of near-infrared (NIR) Random Lasers (RLs). The operation of RLs in the NIR spectral region is especially important for biological applications since the optical radiation has deep tissue penetration with negligible damage. Since laser-dyes operating in the NIR have poor stability and are poor emitters, ethanol solutions of Rhodamine 640 (Rh640) infiltrated in SG beads were used. The Rh640 concentrations in ethanol varied from 10-5 to 10-2 M and the excitation at 532 nm was made by using a 7 ns pulsed laser. The proof-of-principle RL scheme herein presented was adopted in order to protect the dye-molecules from the environment and to favor formation of aggregates. The RL emission from ≈650 nm to 720 nm, beyond the typical Rh640 monomer and dimer wavelengths emissions range, was attributed to the trade-off between reabsorption and reemission processes along the light pathways inside the SG bead and the contribution of Rh640 aggregates.

  13. Laser discrimination by stimulated emission of a phosphor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathur, V. K.; Chakrabarti, K.

    1991-01-01

    A method for discriminating sources of UV, near infrared, and far infrared laser radiation was discovered. This technology is based on the use of a single magnesium sulfide phosphor doubly doped with rare earth ions, which is thermally/optically stimulated to generate colors correlatable to the incident laser radiation. The phosphor, after initial charging by visible light, exhibits green stimulated luminescence when exposed to a near infrared source (Nd: YAG laser). On exposure to far infrared sources (CO2 laser) the phosphor emission changes to orange color. A UV laser produces both an orange red as well as green color. A device using this phosphor is useful for detecting the laser and for discriminating between the near infrared, far infrared, and UV lasers. The technology is also capable of infrared laser diode beam profiling since the radiation source leaves an imprint on the phosphor that can be photographed. Continued development of the technology offers potential for discrimination between even smaller bandwidths within the infrared spectrum, a possible aid to communication or wavemixing devices that need to rapidly identify and process optical signals.

  14. Ultraviolet versus infrared: Effects of ablation laser wavelength on the expansion of laser-induced plasma into one-atmosphere argon gas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma Qianli; Motto-Ros, Vincent; Laye, Fabrice; Yu Jin; Lei Wenqi; Bai Xueshi; Zheng Lijuan; Zeng Heping

    2012-01-01

    Laser-induced plasma from an aluminum target in one-atmosphere argon background has been investigated with ablation using nanosecond ultraviolet (UV: 355 nm) or infrared (IR: 1064 nm) laser pulses. Time- and space-resolved emission spectroscopy was used as a diagnostics tool to have access to the plasma parameters during its propagation into the background, such as optical emission intensity, electron density, and temperature. The specific feature of nanosecond laser ablation is that the pulse duration is significantly longer than the initiation time of the plasma. Laser-supported absorption wave due to post-ablation absorption of the laser radiation by the vapor plume and the shocked background gas plays a dominant role in the propagation and subsequently the behavior of the plasma. We demonstrate that the difference in absorption rate between UV and IR radiations leads to different propagation behaviors of the plasma produced with these radiations. The consequence is that higher electron density and temperature are observed for UV ablation. While for IR ablation, the plasma is found with lower electron density and temperature in a larger and more homogenous axial profile. The difference is also that for UV ablation, the background gas is principally evacuated by the expansion of the vapor plume as predicted by the standard piston model. While for IR ablation, the background gas is effectively mixed to the ejected vapor at least hundreds of nanoseconds after the initiation of the plasma. Our observations suggest a description by laser-supported combustion wave for the propagation of the plasma produced by UV laser, while that by laser-supported detonation wave for the propagation of the plasma produced by IR laser. Finally, practical consequences of specific expansion behavior for UV or IR ablation are discussed in terms of analytical performance promised by corresponding plasmas for application with laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy.

  15. Thermal and infrared-diode laser effects on indocyanine-green-treated corneal collagen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timberlake, George T.; Patmore, Ann; Shallal, Assaad; McHugh, Dominic; Marshall, John

    1993-07-01

    It has been suggested that laser welds of collagenous tissues form by interdigitation and chemical bonding of thermally 'unraveled' collagen fibrils. We investigated this proposal by attempting to weld highly collagenous, avascular corneal tissue with an infrared (IR) diode laser as follows. First, the temperature at which corneal collagen shrinks and collagen fibrils 'split' into subfibrillary components was determined. Second, since use of a near-IR laser wavelength necessitated addition of an absorbing dye (indocyanine green (ICG) to the cornea, we measured absorption spectra of ICG-treated tissue to ensure that peak ICG absorbance did not change markedly when ICG was present in the cornea. Third, using gel electrophoresis of thermally altered corneal collagen, we searched for covalently crosslinked compounds predicted by the proposed welding mechanism. Finally, we attempted to weld partial thickness corneal incisions infused with ICG. Principal experimental findings were as follows: (1) Human corneal (type I) collagen splits into subfibrillary components at approximately 63 degree(s)C, the same temperature that produces collagen shrinkage. (2) Peak ICG absorption does not change significantly in corneal stroma or with laser heating. (3) No evidence was found for the formation of novel compounds or the loss of proteins as a result of tissue heating. All tissue treated with ICG, however, exhibited a novel 244 kD protein band indicating chemical activity between collagen and corneal stromal components. (4) Laser welding corneal incisions was unsuccessful possibly due to shrinkage of the sides of the incision, lack of incision compression during heating, or a less than optimal combination of ICG concentration and radiant exposure. In summary, these experiments demonstrate the biochemical and morphological complexity of ICG-enhanced IR laser-tissue welding and the need for further investigation of laser welding mechanisms.

  16. Strong-Field Modulated Diffraction Effects in the Correlated Electron-Nuclear Motion in Dissociating H2+

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    He Feng; Becker, Andreas; Thumm, Uwe

    2008-01-01

    We show that the electronic dynamics in a molecule driven by a strong field is complex and potentially even counterintuitive. As a prototype example, we simulate the interaction of a dissociating H 2 + molecule with an intense infrared laser pulse. Depending on the laser intensity, the direction of the electron's motion between the two nuclei is found to follow or oppose the classical laser-electric force. We explain the sensitive dependence of the correlated electronic-nuclear motion in terms of the diffracting electronic momentum distribution of the dissociating two-center system. The distribution is dynamically modulated by the nuclear motion and periodically shifted in the oscillating infrared electric field

  17. Resonant infrared pulsed laser deposition of a polyimide precursor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dygert, N L; Schriver, K E; Jr, R F Haglund [Department of Physics and Astronomy and W M Keck Foundation Free-Electron Laser Centre, Vanderbilt University, Nashville TN 37235 (United States)

    2007-04-15

    Poly(amic acid) (PAA), a precursor to polyimide, was successfully deposited on substrates without reaching curing temperature, by resonant infrared pulsed laser ablation. The PAA was prepared by dissolving pyromellitic dianhydride and 4, 4' oxidianiline in the polar solvent Nmethyl pyrrolidinone (NMP). The PAA was deposited in droplet-like morphologies when ablation occurred in air, and in string-like moieties in the case of ablation in vacuum. In the as-deposited condition, the PAA was easily removed by washing with NMP; however, once cured thermally for thirty minutes, the PAA hardened, indicating the expected thermosetting property. Plume shadowgraphy showed very clear contrasts in the ablation mechanism between ablation of the solvent alone and the ablation of the PAA, even at low concentrations. A Wavelength dependence in plume velocity was also observed.

  18. Aligning molecules with intense nonresonant laser fields

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, J.J.; Safvan, C.P.; Sakai, H.

    1999-01-01

    Molecules in a seeded supersonic beam are aligned by the interaction between an intense nonresonant linearly polarized laser field and the molecular polarizability. We demonstrate the general applicability of the scheme by aligning I2, ICl, CS2, CH3I, and C6H5I molecules. The alignment is probed...... by mass selective two dimensional imaging of the photofragment ions produced by femtosecond laser pulses. Calculations on the degree of alignment of I2 are in good agreement with the experiments. We discuss some future applications of laser aligned molecules....

  19. FY 2005 Infrared Photonics Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anheier, Norman C.; Allen, Paul J.; Ho, Nicolas; Krishnaswami, Kannan; Johnson, Bradley R.; Sundaram, S. K.; Riley, Bradley M.; Martinez, James E.; Qiao, Hong (Amy); Schultz, John F.

    2005-12-01

    Research done by the Infrared Photonics team at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is focused on developing miniaturized integrated optics for mid-wave infrared (MWIR) and long-wave infrared (LWIR) sensing applications by exploiting the unique optical and material properties of chalcogenide glass. PNNL has developed thin-film deposition capabilities, direct laser writing techniques, infrared photonic device demonstration, holographic optical element design and fabrication, photonic device modeling, and advanced optical metrology—all specific to chalcogenide glass. Chalcogenide infrared photonics provides a pathway to quantum cascade laser (QCL) transmitter miniaturization. QCLs provide a viable infrared laser source for a new class of laser transmitters capable of meeting the performance requirements for a variety of national security sensing applications. The high output power, small size, and superb stability and modulation characteristics of QCLs make them amenable for integration as transmitters into ultra-sensitive, ultra-selective point sampling and remote short-range chemical sensors that are particularly useful for nuclear nonproliferation missions. During FY 2005, PNNL’s Infrared Photonics research team made measurable progress exploiting the extraordinary optical and material properties of chalcogenide glass to develop miniaturized integrated optics for mid-wave infrared (MWIR) and long-wave infrared (LWIR) sensing applications. We investigated sulfur purification methods that will eventually lead to routine production of optical quality chalcogenide glass. We also discovered a glass degradation phenomenon and our investigation uncovered the underlying surface chemistry mechanism and developed mitigation actions. Key research was performed to understand and control the photomodification properties. This research was then used to demonstrate several essential infrared photonic devices, including LWIR single-mode waveguide devices and

  20. A new collective-field acceleration mechanism using a powerful laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Willis, W.J.

    1975-01-01

    Performance estimates for a linear accelerator for positive ions are presented. Focusing and acceleration is performed by means of a local, strong modulation of a relativistic electron beam using the electromagnetic field of a laser. For high-power laser beams of 1010 watts per square wavelength, the accelerating field strength can be several GV/m, assuming free electrons. Various interaction mechanisms of the laser beam with the electron beam are briefly discussed, notably inverse bremsstrahlung and interaction with the self-magnetic field of the electron beam. Finally, coherent effects and the injection of ions are dealt with. (author)

  1. Spatial temperature distribution in human hairy and glabrous skin after infrared CO2 laser radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Background CO2 lasers have been used for several decades as an experimental non-touching pain stimulator. The laser energy is absorbed by the water content in the most superficial layers of the skin. The deeper located nociceptors are activated by passive conduction of heat from superficial to deeper skin layers. Methods In the current study, a 2D axial finite element model was developed and validated to describe the spatial temperature distribution in the skin after infrared CO2 laser stimulation. The geometry of the model was based on high resolution ultrasound scans. The simulations were compared to the subjective pain intensity ratings from 16 subjects and to the surface skin temperature distributions measured by an infrared camera. Results The stimulations were sensed significantly slower and less intense in glabrous skin than they were in hairy skin (MANOVA, p 0.90, p < 0.001). Of the 16 subjects tested; eight subjects reported pricking pain in the hairy skin following a stimulus of 0.6 J/cm2 (5 W, 0.12 s, d1/e2 = 11.4 mm) only two reported pain to glabrous skin stimulation using the same stimulus intensity. The temperature at the epidermal-dermal junction (depth 50 μm in hairy and depth 133 μm in glabrous skin) was estimated to 46°C for hairy skin stimulation and 39°C for glabrous skin stimulation. Conclusions As compared to previous one dimensional heat distribution models, the current two dimensional model provides new possibilities for detailed studies regarding CO2 laser stimulation intensity, temperature levels and nociceptor activation. PMID:21059226

  2. Chaotic scattering from hydrogen atoms in a circularly polarized laser field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okon, Elias; Parker, William; Chism, Will; Reichl, Linda E.

    2002-01-01

    We investigate the classical dynamics of a hydrogen atom in a circularly polarized laser beam with finite radius. The spatial cutoff for the laser field allows us to use scattering processes to examine the laser-atom dynamics. We find that for certain field parameters, the delay times, the angular momentum, and the distance of closest approach of the scattered electron exhibit fractal behavior. This fractal behavior is a signature of chaos in the dynamics of the atom-field system

  3. Exotic behavior of molecules in intense laser light fields. New research directions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamanouchi, Kaoru [Tokyo Univ., Department of Chemistry, Tokyo (Japan)

    2002-08-01

    The recent investigation of the dynamical behavior of molecules and clusters in intense laser fields has afforded us invaluable opportunities to understand fundamentals of the interaction between molecular species and light fields as well as to manipulate molecules and their dynamical pathways by taking advantage of characteristics of coherent ultrashort laser light fields. In the present report, new directions of this rapidly growing interdisciplinary research fields called molecular science in intense laser fields are discussed by referring to our recent studies. (author)

  4. Instantaneous temperature field measurements using planar laser-induced fluorescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seitzman, J M; Kychakoff, G; Hanson, R K

    1985-09-01

    A single-pulse, laser-induced-fluorescence diagnostic for the measurement of two-dimensional temperature fields in combustion flows is described. The method uses sheet illumination from a tunable laser to excite planar laserinduced fluorescence in a stable tracer molecule, seeded at constant mole fraction into the flow field. The temporal resolution of this technique is determined by the laser pulse length. Experimental results are presented for a rodstabilized, premixed methane-air flame, using the Q(1) (22) line of the nitric oxide A(2) Sigma(+) (v = 0) ? X(2)II((1/2))(v = 0) transition (lambda approximately 225.6 nm).

  5. Electron acceleration by laser produced wake field: Pulse shape effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malik, Hitendra K.; Kumar, Sandeep; Nishida, Yasushi

    2007-12-01

    Analytical expressions are obtained for the longitudinal field (wake field: Ex), density perturbations ( ne') and the potential ( ϕ) behind a laser pulse propagating in a plasma with the pulse duration of the electron plasma period. A feasibility study on the wake field is carried out with Gaussian-like (GL) pulse, rectangular-triangular (RT) pulse and rectangular-Gaussian (RG) pulse considering one-dimensional weakly nonlinear theory ( ne'/n0≪1), and the maximum energy gain acquired by an electron is calculated for all these three types of the laser pulse shapes. A comparative study infers that the RT pulse yields the best results: In its case maximum electron energy gain is 33.5 MeV for a 30 fs pulse duration whereas in case of GL (RG) pulse of the same duration the gain is 28.6 (28.8)MeV at the laser frequency of 1.6 PHz and the intensity of 3.0 × 10 18 W/m 2. The field of the wake and hence the energy gain get enhanced for the higher laser frequency, larger pulse duration and higher laser intensity for all types of the pulses.

  6. The effects of infrared laser therapy and weightbath traction hydrotherapy as components of complex physical treatment in disorders of the lumbar spine: a controlled pilot study with follow-up

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oláh, Csaba; Oláh, Mihály; Demeter, Béla; Jancsó, Zoltán; Páll, Valéria; Bender, Tamás

    2010-02-01

    Introduction: The therapeutic modalities available for the conservative management of chronic lumbar pain included infrared laser therapy and underwater traction, which usefulness is not universally acknowledged. This study was intended to ascertain any beneficial impact of infrared laser therapy and weightbath treatment on the clinical parameters and quality of life of patients with lumbar discopathy. Material and methods: The study population comprised 54 randomised subjects. I. group of 18 patents received only infrared laser therapy to lumbar region and painful Valley points. II. group of 18 subjects each received underwater traction therapy of lumbar spine with add-on McKenzie exercise and iontophoresis. The remaining III. group treated with exercise and iontophoresis, served as control. VAS, Oswestry index, SF36 scores, range of motion, neurological findings and thermography were monitored to appraise therapeutic afficacy in lumbar discopathy. A CT or MRI scan was done at baseline and after 3 months follow-up. Result:Infrared laser therapy and underwater traction for discopathy achieved significant improvement of all study parameters, which was evident 3 months later. Among the controls, significant improvement of only a single parameter was seen in patients with lumbar discopathy. Conclusions: Infrared laser therapy and underwater traction treatment effectively mitigate pain, muscle spasms, enhance joint flexibility, and improve the quality of life of patients with lumbar discopathy.

  7. Pulpal blood flow recorded from exposed dentine with a laser Doppler flow meter using red or infrared light.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kijsamanmith, Kanittha; Vongsavan, Noppakun; Matthews, Bruce

    2018-03-01

    To determine the percentage of the blood flow signal that is derived from dental pulp when recording from exposed dentine in a human premolar. Recordings were made from 7 healthy teeth in 5 subjects (aged 22-33 yr.) with a laser Doppler flow meter (Periflux 4001) using either a red (635 nm) or an infrared (780 nm) laser. After exposing dentine above the buccal pulpal horn (cavity diam. 1.6 mm, depth 3 mm) and isolating the crown with opaque rubber dam, blood flow was recorded alternately with infrared or red light from the exposed dentine under four conditions: before and after injecting local anaesthetic (3% Mepivacaine without vasoconstrictor) (LA) over the apex of the root of the tooth; after exposing the pulp by cutting a buccal, class V cavity in the tooth; and after sectioning the coronal pulp transversely through the exposure. There was no significant change in mean blood flow recorded with either light source when the tooth was anaesthetized or when the pulp was exposed. After the pulp had been sectioned, the blood flow recorded with infrared light fell by 67.8% and with red light, by 68.4%. The difference between these effects was not significant. When recording blood flow from exposed coronal dentine with either infrared or red light in a tooth isolated with opaque rubber dam, about 68% to the signal was contributed by the pulp. The signal:noise ratio was better with infrared than red light, and when recording from dentine than enamel. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Long-wave, infrared laser-induced breakdown (LIBS) spectroscopy emissions from energetic materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Clayton S-C; Brown, Ei E; Hommerich, Uwe; Jin, Feng; Trivedi, Sudhir B; Samuels, Alan C; Snyder, A Peter

    2012-12-01

    Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) has shown great promise for applications in chemical, biological, and explosives sensing and has significant potential for real-time standoff detection and analysis. In this study, LIBS emissions were obtained in the mid-infrared (MIR) and long-wave infrared (LWIR) spectral regions for potential applications in explosive material sensing. The IR spectroscopy region revealed vibrational and rotational signatures of functional groups in molecules and fragments thereof. The silicon-based detector for conventional ultraviolet-visible LIBS operations was replaced with a mercury-cadmium-telluride detector for MIR-LWIR spectral detection. The IR spectral signature region between 4 and 12 μm was mined for the appearance of MIR and LWIR-LIBS emissions directly indicative of oxygenated breakdown products as well as dissociated, and/or recombined sample molecular fragments. Distinct LWIR-LIBS emission signatures from dissociated-recombination sample molecular fragments between 4 and 12 μm are observed for the first time.

  9. Third harmonic generation of high power far infrared radiation in semiconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Urban, M [Ecole Polytechnique Federale, Lausanne (Switzerland). Centre de Recherche en Physique des Plasma (CRPP)

    1996-04-01

    We investigated the third harmonic generation of high power infrared radiation in doped semiconductors with emphasis on the conversion efficiency. The third harmonic generation effect is based on the nonlinear response of the conduction band electrons in the semiconductor with respect to the electric field of the incident electromagnetic wave. Because this work is directed towards a proposed application in fusion plasma diagnostics, the experimental requirements for the radiation source at the fundamental frequency are roughly given as follows: a wavelength of the radiation at the fundamental frequency in the order of 1 mm and an incident power greater than 1 MW. The most important experiments of this work were performed using the high power far infrared laser of the CRPP. With this laser a new laser line was discovered, which fits exactly the source specifications given above: the wavelength is 676 {mu}m and the maximum power is up to 2 MW. Additional experiments were carried out using a 496 {mu}m laser and a 140 GHz (2.1 mm) gyrotron. The main experimental progress with respect to previous work in this field is, in addition to the use of a very high power laser, the possibility of an absolute calibration of the detectors for the far infrared radiation and the availability of a new type of detector with a very fast response. This detector made it possible to measure the power at the fundamental as well as the third harmonic frequency with full temporal resolution of the fluctuations during the laser pulse. Therefore the power dependence of the third harmonic generation efficiency could be measured directly. The materials investigated were InSb as an example of a narrow gap semiconductor and Si as standard material. The main results are: narrow gap semiconductors indeed have a highly nonlinear electronic response, but the narrow band gap leads at the same time to a low power threshold for internal breakdown, which is due to impact ionization. figs., tabs., refs.

  10. Third harmonic generation of high power far infrared radiation in semiconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Urban, M.

    1996-04-01

    In this work we investigated the third harmonic generation of high power infrared radiation in doped semiconductors with emphasis on the conversion efficiency. The third harmonic generation effect is based on the nonlinear response of the conduction band electrons in the semiconductor with respect to the electric field of the incident electromagnetic wave. Because this work is directed towards a proposed application in fusion plasma diagnostics, the experimental requirements for the radiation source at the fundamental frequency are roughly given as follows: a wavelength of the radiation at the fundamental frequency in the order of 1 mm and an incident power greater than 1 MW. The most important experiments of this work were performed using the high power far infrared laser of the CRPP. With this laser a new laser line was discovered, which fits exactly the source specifications given above: the wavelength is 676 μm and the maximum power is up to 2 MW. Additional experiments were carried out using a 496 μm laser and a 140 GHz (2.1 mm) gyrotron. The main experimental progress with respect to previous work in this field is, in addition to the use of a very high power laser, the possibility of an absolute calibration of the detectors for the far infrared radiation and the availability of a new type of detector with a very fast response. This detector made it possible to measure the power at the fundamental as well as the third harmonic frequency with full temporal resolution of the fluctuations during the laser pulse. Therefore the power dependence of the third harmonic generation efficiency could be measured directly. The materials investigated were InSb as an example of a narrow gap semiconductor and Si as standard material. The main results are: narrow gap semiconductors indeed have a highly nonlinear electronic response, but the narrow band gap leads at the same time to a low power threshold for internal breakdown, which is due to impact ionization. (author) figs

  11. Trigger effect of infrared femtosecond laser irradiation on neoplasm in experimental cervical cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gening, Tatyana; Voronova, Olga; Zolotovskii, Igor; Sysoliatin, Alexey; Dolgova, Dinara; Abakumova, Tatyana

    2013-02-01

    The present work discusses effect of infrared (IR) femtosecond laser irradiation on neoplasm of white mice with experimental cervical cancer- 5 (CC-5 on the 20th and 30th days after tumor transplantation). Tumor tissue was irradiated by femtosecond erbium doped fiber laser: the wavelength is 1.55 μm, average and peak powers are1,25 mW and 6kW, respectively, irradiation trials n=10. The average energy density (energy dose) on a tissue for two groups of animals was 0,24 J/cm2 and 0,36 J/cm2 for a single trial. Irradiation was followed by biochemical determination of LPO AOS parameters ("Lipid peroxidation-antioxidants" system): malondialdehyde (MDA), activity of superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase and glutathione-reductase (GR), glutathione-S-transferase (GST). A subsequent morphological study of tumor tissue was performed. Mathematical analysis of data demonstrates a weak dependence of the studied parameters on energy dose. The latter implies the trigger effect of IR femtosecond laser irradiation on redox-dependent processes in neoplasm at experimental cervical cancer.

  12. A quantum-mechanical study of atom-diatom collisions in a laser field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, Sintarng.

    1989-01-01

    A quantum-mechanical formalism, in both space-fixed (SF) and body-fixed (BF) coordinate systems, is developed for describing an S-state structureless atom (A) colliding with a Estate vibrating rotor diatomic molecule (BC) in the presence of a laser field. The additional Hamiltonians H rad and H int , which describe the laser field and its interaction with the atom-diatom collision system, have been added to the field-free Hamiltonian Ho. And the collision problem can be solved by this extended Hamiltonian. The laser field Hamiltonian is represented by the number state representation. The interaction Hamiltonian is expressed by rvec μ BC . rvec ε, where rvec μ BC is the dipole moment of the diatomic molecule BC, and rvec ε is the electric field strength of the laser field. Since the field-free total angular momentum J is coupling with the laser field, J and its z-axis projection M are no longer conserved. To facilitate the collision problem, the laser field is restricted to a single mode, and its interaction with the collision only involves dipole allowed transitions in which a single photon is absorbed or emitted. For convenience, the coupled-channel equations are solved by the real boundary conditions instead of the complex boundary conditions. On applying the real boundary conditions, the author obtains the K-matrix, which is related to the S-matrix by S = (I + iK)(I - iK) -1 . A model calculation is discussed for the Ar + CO collision system in a laser intensity of 10 9 W/cm 2

  13. Pulpal blood flow recorded from human premolar teeth with a laser Doppler flow meter using either red or infrared light.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kijsamanmith, Kanittha; Timpawat, Siriporn; Vongsavan, Noppakun; Matthews, Bruce

    2011-07-01

    To compare red (635 nm) and infrared (780 nm) light for recording pulpal blood flow from human premolar teeth. Recordings were made from 11 healthy teeth in 9 subjects (aged 16-30 years) using a laser Doppler flow meter (Periflux 4001) equipped with both red and infrared lasers. Average blood flow signals were obtained with both light sources alternately from each tooth under five conditions: intact tooth without opaque rubber dam, intact tooth with dam, after injecting local anaesthetic (3% Mepivacaine) (LA) over the apex of the tooth and cavity preparation to almost expose the pulp, after removal and replacement of the pulp, and with the root canal empty. With infrared light, the dam significantly decreased the mean blood flow by 80%. Injecting LA and cavity preparation had no significant effect. Removal and replacement of the pulp reduced the mean blood flow by 58%. There was no further change when the pulp was removed. With red light, the dam reduced the signal from intact teeth by 60%. Injecting LA and cavity preparation had no significant effect. The signal fell by 67% after pulp removal and replacement and did not change significantly when the pulp was removed. Opaque rubber dam minimises the contribution of non-pulpal tissues to the laser Doppler signal recorded from premolars. Using dam, the pulp contributed about 60% to the blood flow signal with both red and infrared light. The difference between them in this respect was not significant. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Relativistic derivation of the ponderomotive force produced by two intense laser fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stroscio, M.A.

    1985-01-01

    The ponderomotive force plays a fundamental role in the absorption of laser light on self-consistent plasma density profiles, in multiple-photon ionization, and in intense field electrodynamics. The relativistic corrections to the ponderomotive force of a transversely polarized electromagnetic wave lead to an approximately 20-percent reduction in the single particle ponderomotive force produced by a 10-γm 10 16 -W/cm 2 laser field. Recent experimental investigations are based on using two intense laser fields to produce desired lasermatter interactions. This paper presents the first derivation of the nonlinear relativistic ponderomotive force produced by two intense laser fields. The results demonstrate that relativistic ponderomotive forces are not additive

  15. Mode structure in an optically pumped D2O far infrared ring laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yuan, D.C.; Soumagne, G.; Siegrist, M.R.

    1989-07-01

    The mode structures in an optically pumped D 2 O far infrared ring laser and a corresponding linear resonator have been compared. While single mode operation can be obtained over the whole useful pressure range in the ring structure, this is only possible at pressures greater than 8 Torr in the linear resonator case. A numerical model predicts quite well the pulse shape, pressure dependence and influence of the resonator quality in the ring cavity. (author) 12 figs., 8 refs

  16. Paramecium: a promising non-animal bioassay to study the effect of 808 nm infrared diode laser photobiomodulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amaroli, Andrea; Parker, Steven; Dorigo, Gianluca; Benedicenti, Alberico; Benedicenti, Stefano

    2015-01-01

    Photobiostimulation and photobiomodulation (PBM) are terms applied to the manipulation of cellular behavior using low intensity light sources, which works on the principle of inducing a biological response through energy transfer. The aim of this investigation was to identify a laboratory assay to test the effect of an infrared diode laser light (808 nm) on cell fission rate. Sixty cells of Paramecium primaurelia were divided in two groups of 30. The first group (test group) was irradiated, at a temperature of 24°C, for 50 sec by a 808 nm diode laser with a flat top handpiece [1 cm of spot diameter, 1 W in continuous wave (CW), 50 sec irradiation time, 64 J/cm(2) of fluence]. The second group (control group) received no laser irradiation. All cells were transferred onto a depression slide, fed, and incubated in a moist chamber at a temperature of 24°C. The cells were exposed and monitored for 10 consecutive fission rates. Changes in temperature and pH were also evaluated. The exposed cells had a fission rate rhythm faster than the control cells, showing a binary fission significantly (pParamecium's lettuce infusion medium were observed. The 808 nm infrared diode laser light, at the irradiation parameters used in our work, results in a precocious fission rate in P. primaurelia cells, probably through an increase in metabolic activity, secondary to an energy transfer.

  17. A comparison between red and infrared light for recording pulpal blood flow from human anterior teeth with a laser Doppler flow meter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kijsamanmith, Kanittha; Timpawat, Siriporn; Vongsavan, Noppakun; Matthews, Bruce

    2011-06-01

    To compare red (635 nm) and infrared (780 nm) light for recording pulpal blood flow from human anterior teeth with a laser Doppler flow meter. Recordings were made from 7 healthy teeth in 5 subjects (aged 22-55 years) using a laser Doppler flow meter (Periflux 4001) equipped with both red and infrared lasers. Average blood flow signals were obtained with both light sources alternately from each tooth under five conditions: intact tooth without opaque rubber dam, intact tooth with dam, after injecting local anaesthetic (3% Mepivacaine) (LA) over the apex of the tooth and cavity preparation to almost expose the pulp, after removal and replacement of the pulp, and with the root canal empty. With infrared light, because of technical limitations, data were obtained for the first three conditions only. The dam significantly decreased the mean blood flow by 82%. Injecting LA and cavity preparation had no significant effect. With red light, dam produced a decrease of 56%, and the resulting signal was reduced by 33% after LA and cavity preparation. The remaining signal fell by 46% after pulp removal and replacement. This contribution of the pulp is similar to that recorded previously with infrared light. There was no significant further change when the pulp was finally removed. The importance of using opaque rubber dam is confirmed. With dam, there is no advantage to using red rather than infrared light, and in each case the pulp contributes less than 50% to the blood flow signal. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Supra-threshold epidermis injury from near-infrared laser radiation prior to ablation onset

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeLisi, Michael P.; Peterson, Amanda M.; Lile, Lily A.; Noojin, Gary D.; Shingledecker, Aurora D.; Stolarski, David J.; Zohner, Justin J.; Kumru, Semih S.; Thomas, Robert J.

    2017-02-01

    With continued advancement of solid-state laser technology, high-energy lasers operating in the near-infrared (NIR) band are being applied in an increasing number of manufacturing techniques and medical treatments. Safety-related investigations of potentially harmful laser interaction with skin are commonplace, consisting of establishing the maximum permissible exposure (MPE) thresholds under various conditions, often utilizing the minimally-visible lesion (MVL) metric as an indication of damage. Likewise, characterization of ablation onset and velocity is of interest for therapeutic and surgical use, and concerns exceptionally high irradiance levels. However, skin injury response between these two exposure ranges is not well understood. This study utilized a 1070-nm Yb-doped, diode-pumped fiber laser to explore the response of excised porcine skin tissue to high-energy exposures within the supra-threshold injury region without inducing ablation. Concurrent high-speed videography was employed to assess the effect on the epidermis, with a dichotomous response determination given for three progressive damage event categories: observable permanent distortion on the surface, formation of an epidermal bubble due to bounded intra-cutaneous water vaporization, and rupture of said bubble during laser exposure. ED50 values were calculated for these categories under various pulse configurations and beam diameters, and logistic regression models predicted injury events with approximately 90% accuracy. The distinction of skin response into categories of increasing degrees of damage expands the current understanding of high-energy laser safety while also underlining the unique biophysical effects during induced water phase change in tissue. These observations could prove useful in augmenting biothermomechanical models of laser exposure in the supra-threshold region.

  19. Intense laser field effects on a Woods-Saxon potential quantum well

    Science.gov (United States)

    Restrepo, R. L.; Morales, A. L.; Akimov, V.; Tulupenko, V.; Kasapoglu, E.; Ungan, F.; Duque, C. A.

    2015-11-01

    This paper presents the results of the theoretical study of the effects of non-resonant intense laser field and electric and magnetic fields on the optical properties in an quantum well (QW) make with Woods-Saxon potential profile. The electric field and intense laser field are applied along the growth direction of the Woods-Saxon quantum well and the magnetic field is oriented perpendicularly. To calculate the energy and the wave functions of the electron in the Woods-Saxon quantum well, the effective mass approximation and the method of envelope wave function are used. The confinement in the Woods-Saxon quantum well is changed drastically by the application of intense laser field or either the effect of electric and magnetic fields. The optical properties are calculated using the compact density matrix.

  20. Rydberg excitation of neutral nitric oxide molecules in strong UV and near-IR laser fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lv Hang; Zhang Jun-Feng; Zuo Wan-Long; Xu Hai-Feng; Jin Ming-Xing; Ding Da-Jun

    2015-01-01

    Rydberg state excitations of neutral nitric oxide molecules are studied in strong ultraviolet (UV) and near-infra-red (IR) laser fields using a linear time-of-flight (TOF) mass spectrometer with the pulsed electronic field ionization method. The yield of Rydberg molecules is measured as a function of laser intensity and ellipticity, and the results in UV laser fields are compared with those in near-IR laser fields. The present study provides the first experimental evidence of neutral Rydberg molecules surviving in a strong laser field. The results indicate that a rescattering-after-tunneling process is the main contribution to the formation of Rydberg molecules in strong near-IR laser fields, while multi-photon excitation may play an important role in the strong UV laser fields. (paper)

  1. Morphology of magnetic fields generated in laser-produced plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boyd, T.J.M.; Cooke, D.

    1988-01-01

    Magnetic fields in the megagauss range have been measured in experiments on plasmas generated by irradiating targets with high power lasers. A study of the morphology of these self-generated fields is important not only for its intrinsic interest but for possible implications in laser--target physics. In this paper work on the numerical modeling of large magnetic fields generated in target experiments is reported. The results show generally satisfactory agreement with the fields measured experimentally both in terms of the magnitude of the peak fields and their morphology. In the numerical model the contribution from the Hall term in describing the evolution of the magnetic field is shown to be important especially in short pulse (≅100 psec) experiments

  2. Interplay between up-regulation of cytochrome-c-oxidase and hemoglobin oxygenation induced by near-infrared laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xinlong; Tian, Fenghua; Soni, Sagar S.; Gonzalez-Lima, F.; Liu, Hanli

    2016-08-01

    Photobiomodulation, also known as low-level laser/light therapy (LLLT), refers to the use of red-to-near-infrared light to stimulate cellular functions for physiological or clinical benefits. The mechanism of LLLT is assumed to rely on photon absorption by cytochrome c oxidase (CCO), the terminal enzyme in the mitochondrial respiratory chain that catalyzes the reduction of oxygen for energy metabolism. In this study, we used broadband near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) to measure the LLLT-induced changes in CCO and hemoglobin concentrations in human forearms in vivo. Eleven healthy participants were administered with 1064-nm laser and placebo treatments on their right forearms. The spectroscopic data were analyzed and fitted with wavelength-dependent, modified Beer-Lambert Law. We found that LLLT induced significant increases of CCO concentration (Δ[CCO]) and oxygenated hemoglobin concentration (Δ[HbO]) on the treated site as the laser energy dose accumulated over time. A strong linear interplay between Δ[CCO] and Δ[HbO] was observed for the first time during LLLT, indicating a hemodynamic response of oxygen supply and blood volume closely coupled to the up-regulation of CCO induced by photobiomodulation. These results demonstrate the tremendous potential of broadband NIRS as a non-invasive, in vivo means to study mechanisms of photobiomodulation and perform treatment evaluations of LLLT.

  3. Elsa: an infrared free electron laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guimbal, P.; Chaix, P.

    1998-01-01

    Since the first experiments, twenty years ago, free-electron lasers (FEL) have known a strong development because of their promise: broadband tunability from X-rays to microwaves and high (peak or average) power, limited only by technological issues. ELSA has been designed as a research tool to investigate the physics of high-power FELs. After a brief introduction of the FEL field of research, we point out the unique characteristics of ELSA and why it is a valuable tool for the study of FEL interaction in the strong electron-photon coupling. The main experimental results are reviewed. We conclude on the concept of Two-Frequency-Wiggler. (author)

  4. Laser terahertz emission microscopy with near-field probes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Pernille Klarskov; Mittleman, Daniel M.

    2016-01-01

    Using an AFM, an optical near-field image at 800 nm of a dipole antenna for THz emission is measured, and by simultaneously collecting the emitted THz radiation, the laser light confined under the AFM probe gives a THz emission resolution of less than 50 nm.......Using an AFM, an optical near-field image at 800 nm of a dipole antenna for THz emission is measured, and by simultaneously collecting the emitted THz radiation, the laser light confined under the AFM probe gives a THz emission resolution of less than 50 nm....

  5. Changes in Cell Viability of Wounded Fibroblasts following Laser Irradiation in Broad-Spectrum or Infrared Light

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hawkins, D.; Abrahamse, H.

    2007-01-01

    Objective. This study aimed to establish if broad-spectrum or infrared (IR) light in combination with laser therapy can assist phototherapy to improve the cell function of wounded cells. Background. The effect of laser light may be partly or completely reduced by broad-spectrum light. Methods. Wounded human skin fibroblasts were irradiated with 5 J/cm2 using a helium-neon laser, a diode laser, or an Nd:YAG laser in the dark, in the light, or in IR. Changes in cell viability were evaluated by cell morphology, ATP cell viability, LDH membrane integrity, and caspase 3/7 as an early marker of apoptosis. Results. Wounded cells exposed to 5 J/cm2 using 632.8 nm in the dark or 830 nm in the light or 1064 nm in the dark showed an increase in ATP viability, an increase in cytokine expression, and a decrease in LDH cytotoxicity indicating that the metabolic activity of the wounded cells was stimulated. Conclusion. Wounded cells irradiated in IR light showed an undesirable thermal effect that was proportional to the duration of exposure.

  6. MID-INFRARED SELECTION OF ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI WITH THE WIDE-FIELD INFRARED SURVEY EXPLORER. I. CHARACTERIZING WISE-SELECTED ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI IN COSMOS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stern, Daniel; Assef, Roberto J.; Eisenhardt, Peter; Benford, Dominic J.; Blain, Andrew; Cutri, Roc; Griffith, Roger L.; Jarrett, T. H.; Masci, Frank; Tsai, Chao-Wei; Yan, Lin; Dey, Arjun; Lake, Sean; Petty, Sara; Wright, E. L.; Stanford, S. A.; Harrison, Fiona; Madsen, Kristin

    2012-01-01

    The Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) is an extremely capable and efficient black hole finder. We present a simple mid-infrared color criterion, W1 – W2 ≥ 0.8 (i.e., [3.4]–[4.6] ≥0.8, Vega), which identifies 61.9 ± 5.4 active galactic nucleus (AGN) candidates per deg 2 to a depth of W2 ∼ 15.0. This implies a much larger census of luminous AGNs than found by typical wide-area surveys, attributable to the fact that mid-infrared selection identifies both unobscured (type 1) and obscured (type 2) AGNs. Optical and soft X-ray surveys alone are highly biased toward only unobscured AGNs, while this simple WISE selection likely identifies even heavily obscured, Compton-thick AGNs. Using deep, public data in the COSMOS field, we explore the properties of WISE-selected AGN candidates. At the mid-infrared depth considered, 160 μJy at 4.6 μm, this simple criterion identifies 78% of Spitzer mid-infrared AGN candidates according to the criteria of Stern et al. and the reliability is 95%. We explore the demographics, multiwavelength properties and redshift distribution of WISE-selected AGN candidates in the COSMOS field.

  7. FY 2004 Infrared Photonics Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anheier, Norman C.; Allen, Paul J.; Keller, Paul E.; Bennett, Wendy D.; Martin, Peter M.; Johnson, Bradley R.; Sundaram, S. K.; Riley, Brian J.; Martinez, James E.; Qiao, Hong (Amy); Schultz, John F.

    2004-10-01

    Research done by the Infrared Photonics team at PNNL is focused on developing miniaturized integrated optics for the MWIR and LWIR by exploiting the unique optical and material properties of chalcogenide glass. PNNL has developed thin film deposition capabilities, direct-laser writing techniques, IR photonic device demonstration, holographic optical element design and fabrication, photonic device modeling, and advanced optical metrology - all specific to chalcogenide glass. Chalcogenide infrared photonics provides a pathway to Quantum Cascade Laser (QCL) transmitter miniaturization. QCLs provide a viable infrared laser source for a new class of laser transmitters capable of meeting the performance requirements for a variety of national security sensing applications. The high output power, small size, and superb stability and modulation characteristics of QCLs make them amenable for integration as transmitters into ultra-sensitive, ultra-selective point sampling and remote short-range chemical sensors that are particularly useful for nuclear nonproliferation missions.

  8. Highly-efficient mid-infrared CW laser operation in a lightly-doped 3 at.% Er:SrF2 single crystal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Liangbi; Guo, Xinsheng; Jiang, Dapeng; Wu, Qinghui; Qin, Zhipeng; Xie, Guoqiang

    2018-03-05

    3 at.% Er:SrF 2 laser crystals with high optical quality were successfully grown using the temperature gradient technique (TGT). The intense mid-infrared emission was observed around 2.7 μm with excitation by a 970 nm LD. Based on the Judd-Ofelt theory, the emission cross-sections of the 4 I 13/2 - 4 I 11/2 transition were calculated by using the Fuchtbauer-Ladenburg (FL) method. Efficient continuous-wave laser operation at 2.8 µm was achieved with the lightly-doped 3 at.% Er:SrF 2 crystal pumped by a 970 nm laser diode. The laser output power reached up to 1.06 W with a maximum slope efficiency of 26%.

  9. Objective assessment of skin rejuvenation using near-infrared 1064-nm neodymium: YAG laser in Asians

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tanaka Y

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Yohei Tanaka1,2, Kiyoshi Matsuo1, Shunsuke Yuzuriha11Department of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Shinshu University School of Medicine, Matsumoto, Japan; 2Clinica Tanaka Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery and Anti-aging Center, Matsumoto, JapanBackground: We reported previously that near-infrared (NIR irradiation provides long-lasting stimulation of elastin, and is efficient for skin rejuvenation. Many studies have indicated the efficacy of various types of laser, but did not include sufficiently objective evaluation. Therefore, we evaluated the efficacy of NIR laser treatment not only subjectively but also objectively.Methods: Fifty Japanese patients were treated with a NIR 1064-nm neodymium: YAG laser. Objective computer assessments were performed by Canfield VISIA Complexion Analysis for improvement of dilated pores, skin texture, and wrinkles. The volunteers then provided subjective assessments. Histological evaluations of elastin were performed by Victoria blue staining up to 90 days post-treatment in four Japanese volunteers.Results: Mean pretreatment percentiles of dilated pores, skin texture, and wrinkles were 51.08 ± 24.82, 54.7 ± 26.33, and 58.02 ± 28.61, respectively. Mean post-treatment percentiles of dilated pores, skin texture, and wrinkles were 53.58 ± 23.89, 58.58 ± 24.44, and 62.2 ± 25.39, respectively. All objective computer assessments evaluated by percentiles in dilated pores, skin texture, and wrinkles showed significant improvement after NIR laser treatment. Ninety-six percent, 100%, and 98% of volunteers reported satisfaction with the improvement of dilated pores, skin texture, and wrinkles, respectively. NIR laser treatment appeared to increase the amount of elastin at day 30, which then decreased slightly but was still elevated at day 90 compared with nonirradiated controls on day 0. Thickening of the epidermis was detected on day 30, and epidermal smoothness persisted for up to 90 days. No treatment

  10. Characterisation of beams of low power infrared lasers for medical uses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Welch, M.; Ramsay, D.

    1996-01-01

    Full text: The initial aim of this work was to investigate the power stability, both temporally and spatially, of the beams of low power infrared diode lasers of the type used by physiotherapists and vascular surgeons. Most of the lasers in this category are small, handheld devices, often with on/off switches which are manually held on while the laser is running. Two of those tested were larger, on stands, and could be set to run for a nominated time. Measurements made by one of us prior to the project had indicated that the power output of at least one of the lasers in use at Westmead Hospital was varying significantly over the treatment time. It is not at present known whether or not uniformity of power output is a significant factor in low power laser therapy, which has been shown to have beneficial effects for conditions ranging from torn muscles and arthritis to birth marks. Dramatic improvement in the healing of skin ulcers and wounds such as amputation scars has also been recorded. Equipment was chosen and a set of techniques developed for analysing the laser beams (some of which operated in continuous wave mode, some in pulsed mode, and some in both) with respect to: power output over time; power distribution within the beam, ie., beam profile; beam divergence; and pulse repetition frequency and pulse shape, if applicable. The fact that some of the lasers were continuous wave, some were pulsed and that some had very high pulse repetition frequencies placed restrictions on the type of power meter which could be used. Eventually a surface absorbing thermal power meter, responsive over a wide range of wavelengths, was chosen for temporal power measurements. Pulse repetition rates and pulse shapes were shown on a CRO; and spatial power distribution, beam shape, power distribution and divergence were recorded via a CCD camera and Spiricon laser beam analyser. 3D printouts from the Spiricon were made showing distribution of beam power. Nine lasers were analysed

  11. High contrast laser marking of alumina

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Penide, J.; Quintero, F.; Riveiro, A.; Fernández, A.; Val, J. del; Comesaña, R.; Lusquiños, F.; Pou, J.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Laser marking of alumina using near infrared (NIR) lasers was experimentally analyzed. • Color change produced by NIR lasers is due to thermally induced oxygen vacancies. • Laser marking results obtained using NIR lasers and green laser are compared. • High contrast marks on alumina were achieved. - Abstract: Alumina serves as raw material for a broad range of advanced ceramic products. These elements should usually be identified by some characters or symbols printed directly on them. In this sense, laser marking is an efficient, reliable and widely implemented process in industry. However, laser marking of alumina still leads to poor results since the process is not able to produce a dark mark, yielding bad contrast. In this paper, we present an experimental study on the process of marking alumina by three different lasers working in two wavelengths: 1064 nm (Near-infrared) and 532 nm (visible, green radiation). A colorimetric analysis has been carried out in order to compare the resulting marks and its contrast. The most suitable laser operating conditions were also defined and are reported here. Moreover, the physical process of marking by NIR lasers is discussed in detail. Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscopy, High Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopy and X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy were also employed to analyze the results. Finally, we propose an explanation for the differences of the coloration induced under different atmospheres and laser parameters. We concluded that the atmosphere is the key parameter, being the inert one the best choice to produce the darkest marks

  12. OH megamasers: dense gas & the infrared radiation field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yong; Zhang, JiangShui; Liu, Wei; Xu, Jie

    2018-06-01

    To investigate possible factors related to OH megamaser formation (OH MM, L_{H2O}>10L_{⊙}), we compiled a large HCN sample from all well-sampled HCN measurements so far in local galaxies and identified with the OH MM, OH kilomasers (L_{H2O}gas and the dense gas, respectively), we found that OH MM galaxies tend to have stronger HCN emission and no obvious difference on CO luminosity exists between OH MM and non-OH MM. This implies that OH MM formation should be related to the dense molecular gas, instead of the low-density molecular gas. It can be also supported by other facts: (1) OH MMs are confirmed to have higher mean molecular gas density and higher dense gas fraction (L_{HCN}/L_{CO}) than non-OH MMs. (2) After taking the distance effect into account, the apparent maser luminosity is still correlated with the HCN luminosity, while no significant correlation can be found at all between the maser luminosity and the CO luminosity. (3) The OH kMs tend to have lower values than those of OH MMs, including the dense gas luminosity and the dense gas fraction. (4) From analysis of known data of another dense gas tracer HCO^+, similar results can also be obtained. However, from our analysis, the infrared radiation field can not be ruled out for the OH MM trigger, which was proposed by previous works on one small sample (Darling in ApJ 669:L9, 2007). On the contrary, the infrared radiation field should play one more important role. The dense gas (good tracers of the star formation) and its surrounding dust are heated by the ultra-violet (UV) radiation generated by the star formation and the heating of the high-density gas raises the emission of the molecules. The infrared radiation field produced by the re-radiation of the heated dust in turn serves for the pumping of the OH MM.

  13. Electron-atom collisions in a laser field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ehlotzky, F.

    1998-01-01

    The present work is a report on recent progress made in our understanding of electron-atom collisions in a laser field. To some extent it is a continuation of a previous review covering a somewhat larger subject (Can. J. Phys. 63 (1985)). We shall discuss the present status of investigations in this field from the theoretical as well as experimental point of view but most of the report will be devoted to an analysis of the various approximation schemes used at present in this field to describe the different aspects of laser-assisted electron-atom interactions. As the table of contents shows, most of the work done so far is treating the atom as a spectator, described by a potential and only very little has been achieved over the years to include the atomic structure into consideration since the inclusion of these structure effects poses considerable computational problems. Since, for example, multiphoton ionization and its inverse process laser-assisted recombination may be considered as one half of a scattering process, it is quite natural that some of the theoretical techniques described here are also of interest for the treatment of other multiphoton processes not considered here since there are several other recent reviews available on these topics. (orig.)

  14. The effects of intense laser field and applied electric and magnetic fields on optical properties of an asymmetric quantum well

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Restrepo, R.L., E-mail: pfrire@eia.edu.co [Department of Physics, Cumhuriyet University, 58140 Sivas (Turkey); Escuela de Ingeniería de Antioquia-EIA, Envigado (Colombia); Grupo de Materia Condensada-UdeA, Instituto de Física, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales, Universidad de Antioquia-UdeA, Calle 70 No. 52-21, Medellín (Colombia); Ungan, F.; Kasapoglu, E. [Department of Physics, Cumhuriyet University, 58140 Sivas (Turkey); Mora-Ramos, M.E. [Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Autonóma del Estado de Morelos, Ave. Universidad 1001, CP 62209, Cuernavaca, Morelos (Mexico); Morales, A.L.; Duque, C.A. [Grupo de Materia Condensada-UdeA, Instituto de Física, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales, Universidad de Antioquia-UdeA, Calle 70 No. 52-21, Medellín (Colombia)

    2015-01-15

    This paper presents the results of the theoretical study of the effects of non-resonant intense laser field and electric and magnetic fields on the optical properties (the linear and third-order nonlinear refractive index and absorption coefficients) in an asymmetric quantum well. The electric field and intense laser field are applied along the growth direction of the asymmetric quantum well and the magnetic field is oriented perpendicularly. To calculate the energy and the wave functions of the electron in the asymmetric quantum well, the effective mass approximation and the method of envelope wave function are used. The asymmetric quantum well is constructed by using different aluminium concentrations in both right and left barriers. The confinement in the quantum well is changed drastically by either the effect of electric and magnetic fields or by the application of intense laser field. The optical properties are calculated using the compact density matrix approach. The results show that the effect of the intense laser field competes with the effects of the electric and magnetic fields. Consequently, peak position shifts to lower photon energies due to the effect of the intense laser field and it shifts to higher photon energies by the effects of electric and magnetic fields. In general, it is found that the concentration of aluminum, electric and magnetic fields and intense laser field are external agents that modify the optical responses in the asymmetric quantum well.

  15. Infrared lasers for the treatment of moderate to severe periodontitis: An american academy of periodontology best evidence review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chambrone, Leandro; Ramos, Umberto D; Reynolds, Mark A

    2018-04-22

    This systematic review assesses the efficacy of infrared laser therapy used alone or as an adjunct to nonsurgical or surgical periodontal therapy, on clinical and patient-centered outcomes in patients with periodontitis. Randomized clinical trials (RCTs) with a follow-up duration ≥ 3 months that evaluated root surface debridement (i.e., scaling and root debridement with or without surgical access) to laser therapy alone or laser therapy plus root surface debridement for the treatment of adult patients (≥18 years old) with moderate to severe aggressive or chronic periodontitis were considered eligible for inclusion. The MEDLINE, EMBASE and CENTRAL databases were searched for articles published up to and including March 2016. Random effects meta-analyses were used throughout the review using continuous data (i.e., mean changes from baseline), and pooled estimates were expressed as weighted mean differences (MDs) with their associated 95% confidence intervals (CIs). Additionally, summaries are presented of the included RCTs, critical remarks of the literature and evidence quality rating/strength of recommendation of laser procedures. Of the 475 potentially eligible articles, 28 were included in the review. Individual study outcomes and seven sets of meta-analysis (1 for the nonsurgical treatment of AgP and 9 for nonsurgical and surgical treatment of CP) showed a benefit of laser therapy in improving clinical attachment level (CAL) and probing depth (PD). However, the comparative differences in clinical outcomes were modest (laser therapies were considered weak or based on expert opinion. In patients with moderate to severe periodontitis, the nonsurgical treatment of AgP and CP by SRP plus infrared diode laser, and the surgical treatment of CP by Er:YAG laser therapy alone may promote statistically significant improvements in PD and/or CAL. However, these gains are relatively small (< 1 mm) and provide modest clinical relevance compared to SRP alone. This article

  16. Cropland Field Monitoring: MMV Page 1 Montana Cropland Enrolled Farm Fields Carbon Sequestration Field Sampling, Measurement, Monitoring, and Verification: Application of Visible-Near Infrared Diffuse Reflectance Spectroscopy (VNIR) and Laser-induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee Spangler; Ross Bricklemyer; David Brown

    2012-03-15

    There is growing need for rapid, accurate, and inexpensive methods to measure, and verify soil organic carbon (SOC) change for national greenhouse gas accounting and the development of a soil carbon trading market. Laboratory based soil characterization typically requires significant soil processing, which is time and resource intensive. This severely limits application for large-region soil characterization. Thus, development of rapid and accurate methods for characterizing soils are needed to map soil properties for precision agriculture applications, improve regional and global soil carbon (C) stock and flux estimates and efficiently map sub-surface metal contamination, among others. The greatest gains for efficient soil characterization will come from collecting soil data in situ, thus minimizing soil sample transportation, processing, and lab-based measurement costs. Visible and near-infrared diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (VisNIR) and laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) are two complementary, yet fundamentally different spectroscopic techniques that have the potential to meet this need. These sensors have the potential to be mounted on a soil penetrometer and deployed for rapid soil profile characterization at field and landscape scales. Details of sensor interaction, efficient data management, and appropriate statistical analysis techniques for model calibrations are first needed. In situ or on-the-go VisNIR spectroscopy has been proposed as a rapid and inexpensive tool for intensively mapping soil texture and organic carbon (SOC). While lab-based VisNIR has been established as a viable technique for estimating various soil properties, few experiments have compared the predictive accuracy of on-the-go and lab-based VisNIR. Eight north central Montana wheat fields were intensively interrogated using on-the-go and lab-based VisNIR. Lab-based spectral data consistently provided more accurate predictions than on-the-go data. However, neither in situ

  17. On the theory of magnetic field generation by relativistically strong laser radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berezhiani, V.I.; Shatashvili, N.L.; Mahajan, S.M.

    1996-07-01

    The authors consider the interaction of subpicosecond relativistically strong short laser pulses with an underdense cold unmagnetized electron plasma. It is shown that the strong plasma inhomogeneity caused by laser pulses results in the generation of a low frequency (quasistatic) magnetic field. Since the electron density distribution is determined completely by the pump wave intensity, the generated magnetic field is negligibly small for nonrelativistic laser pulses but increases rapidly in the ultrarelativistic case. Due to the possibility of electron cavitation (complete expulsion of electrons from the central region) for narrow and intense beams, the increase in the generated magnetic field slows down as the beam intensity is increased. The structure of the magnetic field closely resembles that of the field produced by a solenoid; the field is maximum and uniform in the cavitation region, then it falls, changes polarity and vanishes. In extremely dense plasmas, highly intense laser pulses in the self-channeling regime can generate magnetic fields ∼ 100 Mg and greater

  18. Observation of enhanced infrared absorption in silicon supersaturated with gold by pulsed laser melting of nanometer-thick gold films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chow, Philippe K.; Yang, Wenjie; Hudspeth, Quentin; Lim, Shao Qi; Williams, Jim S.; Warrender, Jeffrey M.

    2018-04-01

    We demonstrate that pulsed laser melting (PLM) of thin 1, 5, and 10 nm-thick vapor-deposited gold layers on silicon enhances its room-temperature sub-band gap infrared absorption, as in the case of ion-implanted and PLM-treated silicon. The former approach offers reduced fabrication complexity and avoids implantation-induced lattice damage compared to ion implantation and pulsed laser melting, while exhibiting comparable optical absorptance. We additionally observed strong broadband absorptance enhancement in PLM samples made using 5- and 10-nm-thick gold layers. Raman spectroscopy and Rutherford backscattering analysis indicate that such an enhancement could be explained by absorption by a metastable, disordered and gold-rich surface layer. The sheet resistance and the diode electrical characteristics further elucidate the role of gold-supersaturation in silicon, revealing the promise for future silicon-based infrared device applications.

  19. Laser sub-Doppler cooling of atoms in an arbitrarily directed magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, Soo; Kwon, Taeg Yong; Lee, Ho Seong; Minogin, V.G.

    2002-01-01

    We analyze the influence of an arbitrarily directed uniform magnetic field on the laser sub-Doppler cooling of atoms. The analysis is done for a (3+5)-level atom excited by a σ + -σ - laser field configuration. Our analysis shows that the effects of the magnetic field depend strongly on the direction of the magnetic field. In an arbitrarily directed magnetic field the laser cooling configuration produces both the main resonance existing already at zero magnetic field and additional sub-Doppler resonances caused by two-photon and higher-order multiphoton processes. These sub-Doppler resonances are, however, well separated on the velocity scale if the Zeeman shift exceeds the widths of the resonances. This allows one to use the main sub-Doppler resonance for an effective laser cooling of atoms even in the presence of the magnetic field. The effective temperature of the atomic ensemble at the velocity of the main resonance is found to be almost the same as in the absence of the magnetic field. The defined structure of the multiphoton resonances may be of importance for the sub-Doppler laser cooling of atoms, atomic extraction from magneto-optical traps, and applications related to the control of atomic motion

  20. Direct analysis of triterpenes from high-salt fermented cucumbers using infrared matrix-assisted laser desorption electrospray ionization (IR-MALDESI)

    Science.gov (United States)

    High-salt samples present a challenge to mass spectrometry (MS) analysis, particularly when electrospray ionization (ESI) is used, requiring extensive sample preparation steps such as desalting, extraction, and purification. In this study, infrared matrix-assisted laser desorption electrospray ioniz...

  1. Geological characterization of remote field sites using visible and infrared spectroscopy: Results from the 1999 Marsokhod field test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, J. R.; Ruff, S.W.; Moersch, J.; Roush, T.; Horton, K.; Bishop, J.; Cabrol, N.A.; Cockell, C.; Gazis, P.; Newsom, Horton E.; Stoker, C.

    2001-01-01

    Upcoming Mars Surveyor lander missions will include extensive spectroscopic capabilities designed to improve interpretations of the mineralogy and geology of landing sites on Mars. The 1999 Marsokhod Field Experiment (MFE) was a Mars rover simulation designed in part to investigate the utility of visible/near-infrared and thermal infrared field spectrometers to contribute to the remote geological exploration of a Mars analog field site in the California Mojave Desert. The experiment simultaneously investigated the abilities of an off-site science team to effectively analyze and acquire useful imaging and spectroscopic data and to communicate efficiently with rover engineers and an on-site field team to provide meaningful input to rover operations and traverse planning. Experiences gained during the MFE regarding effective communication between different mission operation teams will be useful to upcoming Mars mission teams. Field spectra acquired during the MFE mission exhibited features interpreted at the time as indicative of carbonates (both dolomitic and calcitic), mafic rocks and associated weathering products, and silicic rocks with desert varnish-like coatings. The visible/near-infrared spectra also suggested the presence of organic compounds, including chlorophyll in one rock. Postmission laboratory petrologic and spectral analyses of returned samples confirmed that all rocks identified as carbonates using field measurements alone were calc-silicates and that chlorophyll associated with endolithic organisms was present in the one rock for which it was predicted. Rocks classified from field spectra as silicics and weathered mafics were recognized in the laboratory as metamorphosed monzonites and diorite schists. This discrepancy was likely due to rock coatings sampled by the field spectrometers compared to fresh rock interiors analyzed petrographically, in addition to somewhat different surfaces analyzed by laboratory thermal spectroscopy compared to field

  2. Generation of 70-fs pulses at 286 μm from a mid-infrared fiber laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodward, R. I.; Hudson, D. D.; Fuerbach, A.; Jackson, S. D.

    2017-12-01

    We propose and demonstrate a simple route to few-optical-cycle pulse generation from a mid-infrared fiber laser through nonlinear compression of pulses from a holmium-doped fiber oscillator using a short length of chalcogenide fiber and a grating pair. Pulses from the oscillator with 265-fs duration at 2.86 {\\mu}m are spectrally broadened through self-phase modulation in step-index As2S3 fiber to 141-nm bandwidth and then re-compressed to 70 fs (7.3 optical cycles). These are the shortest pulses from a mid-infrared fiber system to date, and we note that our system is compact, robust, and uses only commercially available components. The scalability of this approach is also discussed, supported by numerical modeling.

  3. Influence of external magnetic field on laser-induced gold nanoparticles fragmentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Serkov, A. A.; Rakov, I. I.; Simakin, A. V.; Kuzmin, P. G.; Shafeev, G. A.; Mikhailova, G. N.; Antonova, L. Kh.; Troitskii, A. V.; Kuzmin, G. P.

    2016-01-01

    Laser-assisted fragmentation is an efficient method of the nanoparticles size and morphology control. However, its exact mechanisms are still under consideration. One of the remaining problems is the plasma formation, inevitably occurring upon the high intensity laser irradiation. In this Letter, the role of the laser-induced plasma is studied via introduction of high-intensity external magnetic field (up to 7.5 T). Its presence is found to cause the plasma emission to start earlier regarding to a laser pulse, also increasing the plume luminosity. Under these conditions, the acceleration of nanoparticles fragmentation down to a few nanometers is observed. Laser-induced plasma interaction with magnetic field and consequent energy transfer from plasma to nanoparticles are discussed.

  4. Near infrared spectral imaging of explosives using a tunable laser source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klunder, G L; Margalith, E; Nguyen, L K

    2010-03-26

    Diffuse reflectance near infrared hyperspectral imaging is an important analytical tool for a wide variety of industries, including agriculture consumer products, chemical and pharmaceutical development and production. Using this technique as a method for the standoff detection of explosive particles is presented and discussed. The detection of the particles is based on the diffuse reflectance of light from the particle in the near infrared wavelength range where CH, NH, OH vibrational overtones and combination bands are prominent. The imaging system is a NIR focal plane array camera with a tunable OPO/laser system as the illumination source. The OPO is programmed to scan over a wide spectral range in the NIR and the camera is synchronized to record the light reflected from the target for each wavelength. The spectral resolution of this system is significantly higher than that of hyperspectral systems that incorporate filters or dispersive elements. The data acquisition is very fast and the entire hyperspectral cube can be collected in seconds. A comparison of data collected with the OPO system to data obtained with a broadband light source with LCTF filters is presented.

  5. A new project, SPIRALE. Balloon-borne in situ multi-component measurement using infrared diode lasers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moreau, G.; Pirre, M.; Robert, C. [Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS), 45 - Orleans-la-Source (France); Rosier, B.; Louvet, Y.; Ramaroson, R. [Office National d`Etudes et de Recherches Aerospatiales, 91 - Palaiseau (France); Peyret, C.C. [Universite Pierre et Marie Curie, 75 - Paris (France); Macleod, Y. [Universite Pierreet Marie Curie, 75 - Paris (France); Courtois, D. [Reims Univ., 51 (France). Faculte des Sciences

    1997-12-31

    The scientific goals and the description of a new experiment for stratospheric studies SPIRALE are presented which is a balloon-borne instrument, able to measure in situ several air components (up to 10). Infrared diode laser spectroscopy is applied for monitoring simultaneously atmospheric trace gases at high rate. Its specificity, sensitivity, and wide range of compounds to which it can be applied is described. (R.P.) 5 refs.

  6. A new project, SPIRALE. Balloon-borne in situ multi-component measurement using infrared diode lasers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moreau, G; Pirre, M; Robert, C [Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS), 45 - Orleans-la-Source (France); Rosier, B; Louvet, Y; Ramaroson, R [Office National d` Etudes et de Recherches Aerospatiales, 91 - Palaiseau (France); Peyret, C C [Universite Pierre et Marie Curie, 75 - Paris (France); Macleod, Y [Universite Pierreet Marie Curie, 75 - Paris (France); Courtois, D [Reims Univ., 51 (France). Faculte des Sciences

    1998-12-31

    The scientific goals and the description of a new experiment for stratospheric studies SPIRALE are presented which is a balloon-borne instrument, able to measure in situ several air components (up to 10). Infrared diode laser spectroscopy is applied for monitoring simultaneously atmospheric trace gases at high rate. Its specificity, sensitivity, and wide range of compounds to which it can be applied is described. (R.P.) 5 refs.

  7. Blue diode laser versus traditional infrared diode laser and quantic molecular resonance scalpel: clinical and histological findings after excisional biopsy of benign oral lesions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gobbo, Margherita; Bussani, Rossana; Perinetti, Giuseppe; Rupel, Katia; Bevilaqua, Lorenzo; Ottaviani, Giulia; Biasotto, Matteo

    2017-12-01

    This study aims to compare the use of the innovative blue diode laser (BLUE group) with two traditional surgical techniques: the infrared diode laser (IR group) and the quantic molecular resonance scalpel (QMR group) in the excision of benign oral lesions. Ninety-three patients underwent surgical excision of a benign oral lesion and were followed up for 30 days for pain (0 to 10 visual analogue scale), bleeding, and painkillers' assumption (yes/no). A blind pathologist evaluated the thermal damage along the cutting margin. Although referred pain was lowest in the BLUE group from day 7 on (plaser minimizes risk of bleeding with limited thermal damage.

  8. Improving the performance of infrared reflective night curtains for warming field plots

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bruhn, Dan; Larsen, Klaus S.; de Dato, Giovanbattista D.

    2013-01-01

    Infrared reflective (IR) curtains have been widely used to obtain passive nighttime warming in field ecosystem experiments in order to simulate and study climate warming effects on ecosystems. For any field installation with IR-reflective curtains in an ecosystem the achieved heating effect depen...

  9. Time evolution of the vacuum - pair production in high intensity laser fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woellert, Anton; Bauke, Heiko; Keitel, Christoph H. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik, Heidelberg (Germany)

    2013-07-01

    Interaction between the vacuum and high intensity lasers will lead to new possibilities in high-field physics. We present numerical ab initio studies for time evolution of the vacuum state into multiple pair states. The high intensity laser field of two counter-propagating beams is treated classically and in the non-perturbative regime (E{sub 0}/ω ∝ 1). In this regime, the time needed by an electron to become relativistic in presence of a static field E{sub 0} is of same order as the period of the laser field. Pair state probabilities as well as correlations are investigated in real-time depending on polarization and field strength.

  10. Para-hydrogen raman laser and its application to laser induced chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tashiro, Hideo

    1988-01-01

    The report outlines the mechanism of the para-hydrogen Raman laser as a infrared light source, and its application to laser induced chemistry. The Stoke's wave number after a Raman shift is equal to the difference between the wave number of the CO 2 laser used for excitation and the rotation Raman wave number of the hydrogen molecule. A Raman laser can serve as an infrared source. CO 2 laser oscillation beam in the range of 9∼11 micrometers is selected and the frequency of infrared beam is varied by changing the wave number of the CO 2 laser beam. A problem with the Raman laser is that the Raman scatterring gain is small due to a large wavelength. In developing equipment, a special mechanism is required to solve this problem. A Raman laser comprises a CO 2 laser for excitation and multi-pulse Raman cells. The combination of a TEA oscillator and amplifiers gives CO 2 pulses with a peak power of about several tens of MW. Many heavy metal compounds including fluorides, carbonyl compounds and other organic compounds, absorb light with wavelengths in the same range as those of the Raman laser. Such compounds can be dissociated directly by applying Raman laser beams. The laser will be helpful for separation of isotopes, etc. (Nogami, K.)

  11. Effects of external magnetic field on harmonics generated in laser interaction with underdense plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faghihi-Nik, M.; Ghorbanalilu, M.; Shokri, B.

    2010-01-01

    Complete text of publication follows. Generation of harmonic radiation is an important subject of laser plasma interaction and attracts great attention due to a wide range of applications. It has been seen that intense electromagnetic and quasi-static transverse magnetic fields are generated in laser plasma interaction. An extremely intense magnetic field (up to hundreds of MG) has been observed by experimental measurements in interaction of short laser pulses with plasma. These self-generated or applied magnetic fields affect the propagation of the laser pulses. In most laser interactions with homogeneous plasma, odd harmonics of laser frequency are generated. In this paper, we point out the possibility of even harmonics generation when a linearly polarized laser beam propagates in homogeneous plasma in the presence of a transverse magnetic field. It is shown that applying external field induces a transverse current density oscillating twice of the laser field which leds to generation of second harmonic radiation. This current density is derived using the perturbation method, and the steady state amplitude of the second harmonic obtained by solution of the wave equation. By the same procedure the current density and then the steady state amplitude of higher order harmonics are calculated. The efficiency of harmonic generation (the ratio of harmonic power to incident power) is a drastically function of the strength of external magnetic field. It is found that the efficiency of even harmonics is zero in the absence of magnetic field and increases as the magnetic field is increased. For odd harmonics, applying the external magnetic field enhances the generated harmonics as well. The conversion efficiency also increases with increase in plasma density and intensity of the laser beam.

  12. Influence of the virtual photon field on the squeezing properties of an atom laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jian-Gang, Zhao; Chang-Yong, Sun; Ling-Hua, Wen; Bao-Long, Liang

    2009-01-01

    This paper investigates the squeezing properties of an atom laser without rotating-wave approximation in the system of a binomial states field interacting with a two-level atomic Bose–Einstein condensate. It discusses the influences of atomic eigenfrequency, the interaction intensity between the optical field and atoms, parameter of the binomial states field and virtual photon field on the squeezing properties. The results show that two quadrature components of an atom laser can be squeezed periodically. The duration and the degree of squeezing an atom laser have something to do with the atomic eigenfrequency and the parameter of the binomial states field, respectively. The collapse and revival frequency of atom laser fluctuation depends on the interaction intensity between the optical field and atoms. The effect of the virtual photon field deepens the depth of squeezing an atom laser

  13. Ultrafast probing of magnetic field growth inside a laser-driven solenoid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goyon, C.; Pollock, B. B.; Turnbull, D. P.; Hazi, A.; Divol, L.; Farmer, W. A.; Haberberger, D.; Javedani, J.; Johnson, A. J.; Kemp, A.; Levy, M. C.; Grant Logan, B.; Mariscal, D. A.; Landen, O. L.; Patankar, S.; Ross, J. S.; Rubenchik, A. M.; Swadling, G. F.; Williams, G. J.; Fujioka, S.; Law, K. F. F.; Moody, J. D.

    2017-03-01

    We report on the detection of the time-dependent B-field amplitude and topology in a laser-driven solenoid. The B-field inferred from both proton deflectometry and Faraday rotation ramps up linearly in time reaching 210 ± 35 T at the end of a 0.75-ns laser drive with 1 TW at 351 nm. A lumped-element circuit model agrees well with the linear rise and suggests that the blow-off plasma screens the field between the plates leading to an increased plate capacitance that converts the laser-generated hot-electron current into a voltage source that drives current through the solenoid. ALE3D modeling shows that target disassembly and current diffusion may limit the B-field increase for longer laser drive. Scaling of these experimental results to a National Ignition Facility (NIF) hohlraum target size (˜0.2 cm3 ) indicates that it is possible to achieve several tens of Tesla.

  14. An annular laser for penetrating radiations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marie, G.R.P.

    1974-01-01

    Description is given of an annular laser generating an emission of X rays or gamma rays, from a pumping beam provided by a light wave or infra-red laser and applied to an active substance. Said laser essentially comprises a semi toroidal metal groove wherein is placed said active substance. That substance is illuminated by the pumping beam after reflection of the latter on a mirror provided with an opening through which pass X rays or gamma rays after several reflections on the groove bottom. The pumping-beam uses a revolution symmetry mode, the electric field lines of which are circles coaxial with said beam [fr

  15. Towards a petawatt-class few-cycle infrared laser system via dual-chirped optical parametric amplification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Yuxi; Midorikawa, Katsumi; Takahashi, Eiji J

    2018-05-16

    Expansion of the wavelength range for an ultrafast laser is an important ingredient for extending its range of applications. Conventionally, optical parametric amplification (OPA) has been employed to expand the laser wavelength to the infrared (IR) region. However, the achievable pulse energy and peak power have been limited to the mJ and the GW level, respectively. A major difficulty in the further energy scaling of OPA results from a lack of suitable large nonlinear crystals. Here, we circumvent this difficulty by employing a dual-chirped optical parametric amplification (DC-OPA) scheme. We successfully generate a multi-TW IR femtosecond laser pulse with an energy of 100 mJ order, which is higher than that reported in previous works. We also obtain excellent energy scaling ability, ultrashort pulses, flexiable wavelength tunability, and high-energy stability, which prove that DC-OPA is a superior method for the energy scaling of IR pulses to the 10 J/PW level.

  16. Simulation of Temperature Field Distribution for Cutting the Temperated Glass by Ultraviolet Laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, B. J.; He, Y. C.; Dai, F.; Lin, X. C.

    2017-03-01

    The finite element software ANSYS was adopted to simulate the temperature field distribution for laser cutting tempered glass, and the influence of different process parameters, including laser power, glass thickness and cutting speed, on temperature field distribution was studied in detail. The results show that the laser power has a greater influence on temperature field distribution than other paremeters, and when the laser power gets to 60W, the highest temperature reaches 749°C, which is higher than the glass softening temperature. It reflects the material near the laser spot is melted and the molten slag is removed by the high-energy water beam quickly. Finally, through the water guided laser cutting tempered glass experiment the FEM theoretical analysis was verified.

  17. Magnetic field in laser plasmas: non-local electron transport and reconnection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Riquier, Raphael

    2016-01-01

    In the framework of the inertial confinement fusion, a pellet filled with the deuterium-tritium fuel is imploded, either through laser irradiation (direct drive, laser - low atomic number target interaction) or by the black body radiation from a cavity converting the laser radiation (indirect drive, laser - high atomic number target interaction). In both cases, a correct modeling of the electron transport is of first importance in order to have predictive hydro-radiative simulations. Nonetheless, it has been shown early on that the hypothesis of the linear transport are not valid in the framework of a solid target irradiated by a high power laser (I≅10 14 W/cm 2 ). This is due in part to very steep temperature gradients (kinetic effects, so-called 'non-local') and because of a magnetic field self-generated through the thermo-electric effect. Finally, the heat flux and the magnetic field are strongly coupled through two mechanisms: the advection of the field with the heat flux (Nernst effect) and the rotation and inhibition of the heat flux by the plasma's magnetization (Righi-Leduc effect).In this manuscript, we will first present the various electron transport models, particularly the non-local with magnetic field model included in the hydro-radiative code FCI2. Following, in order to validate this model, we will compare it first against a kinetic code, and then with an experiment during which the magnetic field has been probed through proton radiography. Once the model validated, we will use FCI2 simulations to explain the source and transport of the field, as well as its effect on the interaction. Finally, the reconnection of the magnetic field, during the irradiation of a solid target by two laser beams, will be studied. (author) [fr

  18. Electronic properties of asymmetrical quantum dots dressed by laser field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kibis, O.V. [Department of Applied and Theoretical Physics, Novosibirsk State Technical University, Karl Marx Avenue 20, 630092 Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Slepyan, G.Ya.; Maksimenko, S.A. [Institute for Nuclear Problems, Belarus State University, Bobruyskaya St. 11, 220050 Minsk (Belarus); Hoffmann, A. [Institut fuer Festkoerperphysik, Technische Universitaet Berlin, Hardenbergstrasse 36, 10623 Berlin (Germany)

    2012-05-15

    In the present paper, we demonstrate theoretically that the strong non-resonant interaction between asymmetrical quantum dots (QDs) and a laser field results in harmonic oscillations of their band gap. It is shown that such oscillations change the spectrum of elementary electron excitations in QDs: in the absence of the laser pumping there is only one resonant electron frequency, but QDs dressed by the laser field have a set of electron resonant frequencies. One expects that this modification of elementary electron excitations in QDs can be observable in optical experiments. (Copyright copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  19. Channeling of electrons in a crossed laser field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. B. Dabagov

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available In this article a new analytical description of the effective interaction potential for a charged particle with the field of two interfering laser beams is presented. The potential dependence on the lasers intensities, orientation and parameters of the particle entering the considered system is analyzed. For the first time the phenomenon of effective potential inversion (or “relativistic reversal” is described for arbitrary lasers crossing angle. Threshold electron velocity values for the phenomenon are introduced and its extended illustration based on numerical simulations for two laser beams polarizations is presented. In addition the projectile radiation spectral distribution is given and general estimations on the expected beam radiation yield are outlined.

  20. Strong-Field Control of Laser Filamentation Mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levis, Robert; Romanov, Dmitri; Filin, Aleskey; Compton, Ryan

    2008-05-01

    The propagation of short strong-file laser pulses in gas and solution phases often result in formation of filaments. This phenomenon involves many nonlinear processes including Kerr lensing, group velocity dispersion, multi-photon ionization, plasma defocusing, intensity clamping, and self-steepening. Of these, formation and dynamics of pencil-shape plasma areas plays a crucial role. The fundamental understanding of these laser-induced plasmas requires additional effort, because the process is highly nonlinear and complex. We studied the ultrafast laser-generated plasma dynamics both experimentally and theoretically. Ultrafast plasma dynamics was probed using Coherent Anti-Stokes Raman Scattering. The measurements were made in a room temperature gas maintained at 1 atm in a flowing cell. The time dependent scattering was measured by delaying the CARS probe with respect to the intense laser excitation pulse. A general trend is observed between the spacing of the ground state and the first allowed excited state with the rise time for the noble gas series and the molecular gases. This trend is consistent with our theoretical model, which considers the ultrafast dynamics of the strong field generated plasma as a three-step process; (i) strong-field ionization followed by the electron gaining considerable kinetic energy during the pulse; (ii) immediate post-pulse dynamics: fast thermalization, impact-ionization-driven electron multiplication and cooling; (iii) ensuing relaxation: evolution to electron-ion equilibrium and eventual recombination.

  1. Plasmonic Moon: a Fano-like approach for squeezing the magnetic field in the infrared

    KAUST Repository

    Panaro, Simone

    2015-08-11

    Outstanding results have been achieved in the localization of optical electric fields via ultrasmall plasmonic cavities, paving the way to the subdiffractive confinement of local electromagnetic fields. However, due to the intrinsic constraints related to conventional architectures, no comparable squeezing factors have been managed yet for the magnetic counterpart of radiation, practically hindering the detection and manipulation of magneto-optical effects at the nanoscale. Here, we observe a strong magnetic field nanofocusing in the infrared, promoted by the induction of a coil-type Fano resonance. By triggering the coil current via a quadrupole-like plasmonic mode, we straightforwardly boost the enhancement of the infrared magnetic field and perform its efficient squeezing in localized nanovolumes.

  2. Developing Wide-Field Spatio-Spectral Interferometry for Far-Infrared Space Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leisawitz, David; Bolcar, Matthew R.; Lyon, Richard G.; Maher, Stephen F.; Memarsadeghi, Nargess; Rinehart, Stephen A.; Sinukoff, Evan J.

    2012-01-01

    Interferometry is an affordable way to bring the benefits of high resolution to space far-IR astrophysics. We summarize an ongoing effort to develop and learn the practical limitations of an interferometric technique that will enable the acquisition of high-resolution far-IR integral field spectroscopic data with a single instrument in a future space-based interferometer. This technique was central to the Space Infrared Interferometric Telescope (SPIRIT) and Submillimeter Probe of the Evolution of Cosmic Structure (SPECS) space mission design concepts, and it will first be used on the Balloon Experimental Twin Telescope for Infrared Interferometry (BETTII). Our experimental approach combines data from a laboratory optical interferometer (the Wide-field Imaging Interferometry Testbed, WIIT), computational optical system modeling, and spatio-spectral synthesis algorithm development. We summarize recent experimental results and future plans.

  3. Proton radiography of magnetic field in laser produced plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Pape, S.; Patel, P.; Chen, S.; Town, R.; Mackinnon, A.

    2009-01-01

    Electromagnetic fields generated by the interaction with plasmas of long-pulse laser beams relevant to inertial confinement fusion have been measure. A proton beam generated by the interaction of an ultra intense laser with a thin metallic foil is used to probe the B-fields. The proton beam then generated is temporally short (of the order of a ps), highly laminar and hence equivalent to a virtual point which makes it an ideal source for radiography. We have investigated, using face-on radiography, B fields at intensity around 10 14 W/cm 2 due to the non co-linearity of temperature and density gradients. (authors)

  4. FY 2006 Infrared Photonics Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anheier, Norman C.; Allen, Paul J.; Bernacki, Bruce E.; Ho, Nicolas; Krishnaswami, Kannan; Qiao, Hong (Amy); Schultz, John F.

    2006-12-28

    Research done by the Infrared Photonics team at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is focused on developing miniaturized integrated optics and optical fiber processing methods for mid-wave infrared (MWIR) and long-wave infrared (LWIR) sensing applications by exploiting the unique optical and material properties of chalcogenide glass. PNNL has developed thin-film deposition capabilities, direct laser writing techniques, infrared photonic device demonstration, holographic optical element design and fabrication, photonic device modeling, and advanced optical metrology—all specific to chalcogenide glass. Chalcogenide infrared photonics provides a pathway to quantum cascade laser (QCL) transmitter miniaturization. The high output power, small size, and superb stability and modulation characteristics of QCLs make them amenable for integration as transmitters into ultra-sensitive, ultra-selective point sampling and remote short-range chemical sensors that are particularly useful for nuclear nonproliferation missions.

  5. Second harmonic generation spectroscopy in the Reststrahl band of SiC using an infrared free-electron laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paarmann, Alexander, E-mail: alexander.paarmann@fhi-berlin.mpg.de; Razdolski, Ilya; Melnikov, Alexey; Gewinner, Sandy; Schöllkopf, Wieland; Wolf, Martin [Fritz-Haber-Institut der Max-Planck-Gesellschaft, Faradayweg 4-6, 14195 Berlin (Germany)

    2015-08-24

    The Reststrahl spectral region of silicon carbide has recently attracted much attention owing to its potential for mid-infrared nanophotonic applications based on surface phonon polaritons (SPhPs). Studies of optical phonon resonances responsible for surface polariton formation, however, have so far been limited to linear optics. In this Letter, we report the first nonlinear optical investigation of the Reststrahl region of SiC, employing an infrared free-electron laser to perform second harmonic generation (SHG) spectroscopy. We observe two distinct resonance features in the SHG spectra, one attributed to resonant enhancement of the nonlinear susceptibility χ{sup (2)} and the other due to a resonance in the Fresnel transmission. Our work clearly demonstrates high sensitivity of mid-infrared SHG to phonon-driven phenomena and opens a route to studying nonlinear effects in nanophotonic structures based on SPhPs.

  6. Jet engine noise and infrared plume correlation field campaign

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunio, Phillip M.; Weber, Reed A.; Knobel, Kimberly R.; Smith, Christine; Draudt, Andy

    2015-09-01

    Jet engine noise can be a health hazard and environmental pollutant, particularly affecting personnel working in close proximity to jet engines, such as airline mechanics. Mitigating noise could reduce the potential for hearing loss in runway workers; however, there exists a very complex relationship between jet engine design parameters, operating conditions, and resultant noise power levels, and understanding and characterizing this relationship is a key step in mitigating jet engine noise effects. We demonstrate initial results highlighting the utility of high-speed imaging (hypertemporal imaging) in correlating the infrared signatures of jet engines with acoustic noise. This paper builds on prior theoretical analysis of jet engine infrared signatures and their potential relationships to jet engine acoustic emissions. This previous work identified the region of the jet plume most likely to emit both in infrared and in acoustic domains, and it prompted the investigation of wave packets as a physical construct tying together acoustic and infrared energy emissions. As a means of verifying these assertions, a field campaign to collect relevant data was proposed, and data collection was carried out with a bank of infrared instruments imaging a T700 turboshaft engine undergoing routine operational testing. The detection of hypertemporal signatures in association with acoustic signatures of jet engines enables the use of a new domain in characterizing jet engine noise. This may in turn enable new methods of predicting or mitigating jet engine noise, which could lead to socioeconomic benefits for airlines and other operators of large numbers of jet engines.

  7. The influence of wavelength, temporal sequencing, and pulse duration on resonant infrared matrix-assisted laser processing of polymer films

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Malley, S. M.; Schoeffling, Jonathan; Jimenez, Richard; Zinderman, Brian; Yi, SunYong; Bubb, D. M.

    2014-06-01

    We have carried out a systematic investigation of laser ablation plume interactions in resonant infrared matrix-assisted pulsed laser evaporation. The laser source utilized in this study was a mid-infrared OPO capable of dual sequential ns pulses with adjustable delay ranging from 1 to 100 μs. This unique capability enabled us both to probe the ablation plume with a second laser pulse, and to effectively double the laser fluence. The primary ablation target used for this study consisted of poly(methyl methacrylate) dissolved in a binary mixture of methanol and toluene. Both the critical thermodynamic and optical properties of the binary mixture were determined and used to interpret our results. We found that deposition rates associated with single pulse irradiation tracks with the optical absorption coefficient in the spectral range from 2,700 to 3,800 nm. In the case of dual sequential pulses, discrepancies in this trend have been linked to the rate of change in the optical absorption coefficient with temperature. The influence of fluence on deposition rate was found to follow a sigmoidal dependence. Surface roughness was observed to have a diametrically opposed trend with pulse delay depending on whether the OH or CH vibrational mode was excited. In the case of CH excitation, we suggest that the rougher films are due to the absorbance of the second pulse by droplets within the plume containing residual solvent which leads to the formation of molecular balloons and hence irregularly shaped features on the substrate.

  8. Optical properties of a multibarrier structure under intense laser fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ospina, D. A.; Akimov, V.; Mora-Ramos, M. E.; Morales, A. L.; Tulupenko, V.; Duque, C. A.

    2015-11-01

    Using the diagonalization method and within the effective mass and parabolic band approximations, the energy spectrum and the wave functions are investigated in biased multibarrier structure taking into account the effects of nonresonant intense laser fields. We calculated the optical properties from the susceptibility using a nonperturbative formalism recently reported. We study the changes in the intersubband optical absorption coefficients and refraction index for several values of the dressing laser parameter and for some specific values of the electric field applied along the growth direction of the heterostructure. It is concluded from our study that the peaks in the optical absorption spectrum have redshifts or blueshifts as a function of the laser parameter and the electric field. These parameters could be suitable tools for tuning the electronic and optical properties of the multibarrier structure.

  9. Radiofrequency/infrared double resonance spectroscopy of the HD+ ion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carrington, Alan; McNab, I.R.; Montgomerie, C.A.

    1989-01-01

    We describe a double resonance technique for obtaining radiofrequency spectra of the HD + ion in vibration-rotation levels close to the dissociation limit. Infrared transitions are driven by Doppler tuning an HD + ion beam into resonance with a carbon dioxide infrared laser, and are detected by measuring H + fragment ions produced by electric field dissociation of the upper vibration-rotation level. Radiofrequency transitions between nuclear hyperfine components of the lower vibration-rotation level are then detected through resonant increases in the H + fragment ion current. The high spectroscopic resolution obtained, and the ability to measure magnetic dipole hyperfine transitions, will enable the hyperfine constants to be determined accurately. (author)

  10. Classical field configurations and infrared slavery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swanson, Mark S.

    1987-09-01

    The problem of determining the energy of two spinor particles interacting through massless-particle exchange is analyzed using the path-integral method. A form for the long-range interaction energy is obtained by analyzing an abridged vertex derived from the parent theory. This abridged vertex describes the radiation of zero-momentum particles by pointlike sources. A path-integral formalism for calculating the energy of the radiation field associated with this abridged vertex is developed and applications are made to determine the energy necessary for adiabatic separation of two sources in quantum electrodynamics and for an SU(2) Yang-Mills theory. The latter theory is shown to be consistent with confinement via infrared slavery.

  11. Highly efficient dual-wavelength mid-infrared CW Laser in diode end-pumped Er:SrF2 single crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Weiwei; Qian, Xiaobo; Wang, Jingya; Liu, Jingjing; Fan, Xiuwei; Liu, Jie; Su, Liangbi; Xu, Jun

    2016-11-01

    The spectral properties and laser performance of Er:SrF2 single crystals were investigated and compared with Er:CaF2. Er:SrF2 crystals have larger absorption cross-sections at the pumping wavelength, larger mid-infrared stimulated emission cross-sections and much longer fluorescence lifetimes of the upper laser level (Er3+:4I11/2 level) than those of Er:CaF2 crystals. Dual-wavelength continuous-wave (CW) lasers around 2.8 μm were demonstrated in both 4at.% and 10at.% Er:SrF2 single crystals under 972 nm laser diode (LD) end pumping. The laser wavelengths are 2789.3 nm and 2791.8 nm in the former, and 2786.4 nm and 2790.7 nm in the latter, respectively. The best laser performance has been demonstrated in lightly doped 4at.% Er:SrF2 with a low threshold of 0.100 W, a high slope efficiency of 22.0%, an maximum output power of 0.483 W.

  12. Strong-field ionization of linear molecules by a bicircular laser field: Symmetry considerations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gazibegović-Busuladžić, A.; Busuladžić, M.; Hasović, E.; Becker, W.; Milošević, D. B.

    2018-04-01

    Using the improved molecular strong-field approximation, we investigate (high-order) above-threshold ionization [(H)ATI] of various linear polyatomic molecules by a two-color laser field of frequencies r ω and s ω (with integer numbers r and s ) having coplanar counter-rotating circularly polarized components (a so-called bicircular field). Reflection and rotational symmetries for molecules aligned in the laser-field polarization plane, analyzed for diatomic homonuclear molecules in Phys. Rev. A 95, 033411 (2017), 10.1103/PhysRevA.95.033411, are now considered for diatomic heteronuclear molecules and symmetric and asymmetric linear triatomic molecules. There are additional rotational symmetries for (H)ATI spectra of symmetric linear molecules compared to (H)ATI spectra of the asymmetric ones. It is shown that these symmetries manifest themselves differently for r +s odd and r +s even. For example, HATI spectra for symmetric molecules with r +s even obey inversion symmetry. For ATI spectra of linear molecules, reflection symmetry appears only for certain molecular orientation angles ±90∘-j r 180∘/(r +s ) (j integer). For symmetric linear molecules, reflection symmetry appears also for the angles -j r 180∘/(r +s ) . For perpendicular orientation of molecules with respect to the laser-field polarization plane, the HATI spectra are very similar to those of the atomic targets, i.e., both spectra are characterized by the same type of the (r +s )-fold symmetry.

  13. Infrared

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vollmer, M.

    2013-11-01

    underlying physics. There are now at least six different disciplines that deal with infrared radiation in one form or another, and in one or several different spectral portions of the whole IR range. These are spectroscopy, astronomy, thermal imaging, detector and source development and metrology, as well the field of optical data transmission. Scientists working in these fields range from chemists and astronomers through to physicists and even photographers. This issue presents examples from some of these fields. All the papers—though some of them deal with fundamental or applied research—include interesting elements that make them directly applicable to university-level teaching at the graduate or postgraduate level. Source (e.g. quantum cascade lasers) and detector development (e.g. multispectral sensors), as well as metrology issues and optical data transmission, are omitted since they belong to fundamental research journals. Using a more-or-less arbitrary order according to wavelength range, the issue starts with a paper on the physics of near-infrared photography using consumer product cameras in the spectral range from 800 nm to 1.1 µm [1]. It is followed by a series of three papers dealing with IR imaging in spectral ranges from 3 to 14 µm [2-4]. One of them deals with laboratory courses that may help to characterize the IR camera response [2], the second discusses potential applications for nondestructive testing techniques [3] and the third gives an example of how IR thermal imaging may be used to understand cloud cover of the Earth [4], which is the prerequisite for successful climate modelling. The next two papers cover the vast field of IR spectroscopy [5, 6]. The first of these deals with Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy in the spectral range from 2.5 to 25 µm, studying e.g. ro-vibrational excitations in gases or optical phonon interactions within solids [5]. The second deals mostly with the spectroscopy of liquids such as biofuels and special

  14. Fast elastic e-H(2s) scattering in laser fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vucic, S.; Hewitt, R.; Hewitt, R.

    1997-01-01

    A numerical method for the evaluation of the Born endash Floquet amplitude for laser-assisted scattering is proposed for the case when a large basis set is required to achieve convergence. The method is applied to analyze the elastic scattering of fast electrons by the H(2s) state in a low-intensity laser field of varying frequency and to study the resonant scattering with increasing laser intensity. While the behavior of an atom in a resonant field of low intensity is determined by virtual transitions between resonant levels, at high intensity a great number of nonresonant virtual transitions may significantly influence laser-assisted processes. As a consequence, the attenuation of resonant effects could appear, as well as the open-quotes localclose quotes stabilization of the atom against ionization. copyright 1997 The American Physical Society

  15. Infrared and ultraviolet behaviour of effective scalar field theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ball, R.D.; Thorne, R.S.

    1995-01-01

    We consider the infrared and ultraviolet behaviour of the effective quantum field theory of a single Z 2 symmetric scalar field. In a previous paper we proved to all orders in perturbation theory the renormalizability of massive effective scalar field theory using Wilson's exact renormalization group equation. Here we show that away from exceptional momenta the massless theory is similarly renormalizable, and we prove detailed bounds on Green's functions as arbitrary combinations of exceptional Euclidean momenta are approached. As a corollary we also Weinberg's Theorem for the massive effective theory, n the form of bounds on Green's functions at Euclidean momenta much greater than the particle mass but below the naturalness scale of theory. 12 refs

  16. Infrared and ultraviolet behaviour of effective scalar field theory

    CERN Document Server

    Ball, R D

    1995-01-01

    We consider the infrared and ultraviolet behaviour of the effective quantum field theory of a single Z_2 symmetric scalar field. In a previous paper we proved to all orders in perturbation theory the renormalizability of massive effective scalar field theory using Wilson's exact renormalization group equation. Here we show that away from exceptional momenta the massless theory is similarly renormalizable, and we prove detailed bounds on Green's functions as arbitrary combinations of exceptional Euclidean momenta are approached. As a corollary we also prove Weinberg's Theorem for the massive effective theory, in the form of bounds on Green's functions at Euclidean momenta much greater than the particle mass but below the naturalness scale of the theory.

  17. The safety and efficacy of a combined diode laser and bipolar radiofrequency compared with combined infrared light and bipolar radiofrequency for skin rejuvenation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yeon Jin Choi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: As the demand for noninvasive procedures for skin rejuvenation is increasing, combined diode laser and radiofrequency and combined infrared and radiofrequency devices have recently emerged. Aim: To compare Polaris WRA TM , a combination device of diode light and RF, and ReFirme ST TM , a combination device of infrared and bipolar RF, in terms of safety and efficacy on skin rejuvenation. Methods: Fourteen Korean volunteers of skin type II-IV, with facial laxity and periorbital rhytids, received three treatments at 3-week intervals with combined diode laser and bipolar radiofrequency (laser fluence 30 J/cm 2 , RF fluence 90 J/cm 3 on the right half of their faces and combined infrared light and bipolar radiofrequency (RF fluence 120 J/cm 3 on the left half of their faces. Clinical photos of front and bilateral sides of the subjects′ faces were taken at baseline and at 6, 9, 12 weeks after the treatment initiation. The investigators′ and the subjects′ global assessments were performed. Results: There is no statistically significant difference in the overall outcome between Polaris WRA TM and Refirme ST TM based on pre- and post-treatment objective measurements. Polaris WRA TM was more effective than Refirme ST TM at reducing wrinkles when therapeutic results of the two appliances were compared based on the patient satisfaction measurements. After the treatment with both instruments, histological increase in the production and rearrangement of collagen fibers at the dermal layer was observed. The density of the collagen fibers was more increased with the Polaris WRA TM -treated facial area than that of Refirme ST TM . Treatment was generally well tolerated, and there was no serious complication. Conclusion: In this study, both the lasers appeared to be safe, and effective methods for treating skin laxity and facial wrinkles. Combined diode laser and radiofrequency was more effective than combined infrared and radiofrequency at

  18. The safety and efficacy of a combined diode laser and bipolar radiofrequency compared with combined infrared light and bipolar radiofrequency for skin rejuvenation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Yeon Jin; Lee, Jung Yeon; Ahn, Ji Young; Kim, Myeung Nam; Park, Mi Youn

    2012-01-01

    As the demand for noninvasive procedures for skin rejuvenation is increasing, combined diode laser and radiofrequency and combined infrared and radiofrequency devices have recently emerged. To compare Polaris WRA(TM), a combination device of diode light and RF, and ReFirme ST(TM), a combination device of infrared and bipolar RF, in terms of safety and efficacy on skin rejuvenation. Fourteen Korean volunteers of skin type II-IV, with facial laxity and periorbital rhytids, received three treatments at 3-week intervals with combined diode laser and bipolar radiofrequency (laser fluence 30 J/cm2, RF fluence 90 J/cm3) on the right half of their faces and combined infrared light and bipolar radiofrequency (RF fluence 120 J/cm3) on the left half of their faces. Clinical photos of front and bilateral sides of the subjects' faces were taken at baseline and at 6, 9, 12 weeks after the treatment initiation. The investigators' and the subjects' global assessments were performed. There is no statistically significant difference in the overall outcome between Polaris WRA(TM) and Refirme ST(TM) based on pre- and post-treatment objective measurements. Polaris WRA(TM) was more effective than Refirme ST(TM) at reducing wrinkles when therapeutic results of the two appliances were compared based on the patient satisfaction measurements. After the treatment with both instruments, histological increase in the production and rearrangement of collagen fibers at the dermal layer was observed. The density of the collagen fibers was more increased with the Polaris WRA(TM)-treated facial area than that of Refirme ST(TM). Treatment was generally well tolerated, and there was no serious complication. In this study, both the lasers appeared to be safe, and effective methods for treating skin laxity and facial wrinkles. Combined diode laser and radiofrequency was more effective than combined infrared and radiofrequency at reducing wrinkles and pores when the therapeutic results of both the

  19. Strong-field QED processes in short laser pulses. One- and two-photon Compton scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seipt, Daniel

    2012-12-20

    The purpose of this thesis is to advance the understanding of strong-field QED processes in short laser pulses. The processes of non-linear one-photon and two-photon Compton scattering are studied, that is the scattering of photons in the interaction of relativistic electrons with ultra-short high-intensity laser pulses. These investigations are done in view of the present and next generation of ultra-high intensity optical lasers which are supposed to achieve unprecedented intensities of the order of 10{sup 24} W/cm{sup 2} and beyond, with pulse lengths in the order of some femtoseconds. The ultra-high laser intensity requires a non-perturbative description of the interaction of charged particles with the laser field to allow for multi-photon interactions, which is beyond the usual perturbative expansion of QED organized in powers of the fine structure constant. This is achieved in strong-field QED by employing the Furry picture and non-perturbative solutions of the Dirac equation in the presence of a background laser field as initial and final state wave functions, as well as the laser dressed Dirac-Volkov propagator. The primary objective is a realistic description of scattering processes with regard to the finite laser pulse duration beyond the common approximation of infinite plane waves, which is made necessary by the ultra-short pulse length of modern high-intensity lasers. Non-linear finite size effects are identified, which are a result of the interplay between the ultra-high intensity and the ultra-short pulse length. In particular, the frequency spectra and azimuthal photon emission spectra are studied emphasizing the differences between pulsed and infinite laser fields. The proper description of the finite temporal duration of the laser pulse leads to a regularization of unphysical infinities (due to the infinite plane-wave description) of the laser-dressed Dirac-Volkov propagator and in the second-order strong-field process of two-photon Compton

  20. Modelling infrared temperature measurements: implications for laser irradiation and cryogen cooling studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, B.; Pearce, J.A.; Welch, A.J.

    2000-01-01

    The use of thermographic techniques has increased as infrared detector technology has evolved and improved. For laser-tissue interactions, thermal cameras have been used to monitor the thermal response of tissue to pulsed and continuous wave irradiation. It is important to note that the temperature indicated by the thermal camera may not be equal to the actual surface temperature. It is crucial to understand the limitations of using thermal cameras to measure temperature during laser irradiation of tissue. The goal of this study was to demonstrate the potential difference between measured and actual surface temperatures in a quantitative fashion using a 1D finite difference model. Three ablation models and one cryogen spray cooling simulation were adapted from the literature, and predictions of radiometric temperature measurements were calculated. In general, (a) steep superficial temperature gradients, with a surface peak, resulted in an underestimation of the actual surface temperature, (b) steep superficial temperature gradients, with a subsurface peak, resulted in an overestimation, and (c) small gradients led to a relatively accurate temperature estimate. (author)

  1. S-matrix analysis of vibrational and alignment effects in intense-field multiphoton ionization of molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Requate, A.

    2007-03-01

    Theoretical analysis of the vibrational excitation of small molecules during multiphoton ionization in intense laser fields of optical and infrared frequencies. Analysis of the alignment dependence of the electron impact ionization of diatomic molecules in the presence of an intense laser field as the final step in the process of Nonsequential Double Ionization. Quantum mechanical description using S-matrix theory in Strong Field Approximation (SFA), i.e. beyond perturbation theory. (orig.)

  2. S-matrix analysis of vibrational and alignment effects in intense-field multiphoton ionization of molecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Requate, A

    2007-03-15

    Theoretical analysis of the vibrational excitation of small molecules during multiphoton ionization in intense laser fields of optical and infrared frequencies. Analysis of the alignment dependence of the electron impact ionization of diatomic molecules in the presence of an intense laser field as the final step in the process of Nonsequential Double Ionization. Quantum mechanical description using S-matrix theory in Strong Field Approximation (SFA), i.e. beyond perturbation theory. (orig.)

  3. Modeling of anisotropic properties of double quantum rings by the terahertz laser field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baghramyan, Henrikh M; Barseghyan, Manuk G; Kirakosyan, Albert A; Ojeda, Judith H; Bragard, Jean; Laroze, David

    2018-04-18

    The rendering of different shapes of just a single sample of a concentric double quantum ring is demonstrated realizable with a terahertz laser field, that in turn, allows the manipulation of electronic and optical properties of a sample. It is shown that by changing the intensity or frequency of laser field, one can come to a new set of degenerated levels in double quantum rings and switch the charge distribution between the rings. In addition, depending on the direction of an additional static electric field, the linear and quadratic quantum confined Stark effects are observed. The absorption spectrum shifts and the additive absorption coefficient variations affected by laser and electric fields are discussed. Finally, anisotropic electronic and optical properties of isotropic concentric double quantum rings are modeled with the help of terahertz laser field.

  4. Use of the pulsed infrared diode laser (904 nm) in the treatment of alopecia areata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waiz, Makram; Saleh, Anmar Z; Hayani, Raafa; Jubory, Samar O

    2006-04-01

    Alopecia areata is a rapid and complete loss of hair in one or several patches, usually on the scalp, affecting both males and females equally. It is thought to be an autoimmune disease which is treated with different modalities with variable success. Laser treatment of different wavelengths has been used in the management of this problem. To study the effect of the pulsed infrared diode laser (904 nm) in the treatment of alopecia areata.Methods. Sixteen patients with 34 resistant patches that had not responded to different treatment modalities for alopecia areata were enrolled in this study. In patients with multiple patches, one patch was left as a control for comparison. Patients were treated on a four-session basis, once a week, with a pulsed diode laser (904 nm) at a pulse rate of 40/s. A photograph was taken of each patient before and after treatment. The treated patients were 11 males (68.75%) and five females (31.25%). Their ages ranged between 4 and 50 years with a mean of 26.6+/-SD of +/-13.8, and the durations of their disease were between 12 months and 6 years with a mean of 13.43+/-SD of +/-18.34. Regrowth of hair was observed in 32 patches (94%), while only two patches (6%) failed to show any response. No regrowth of hair was observed in the control patches. The regrowth of hair appeared as terminal hair with its original color in 29 patches (90.6%), while three patches (9.4%) appeared as a white villous hair. In patients who showed response, the response was detected as early as 1 week after the first session in 24 patches (75%), while eight patients (25%) started to show response from the second session. The pulsed infrared diode laser is an effective mode of therapy with a high success rate for resistant patches of alopecia areata.

  5. Collective-field-corrected strong field approximation for laser-irradiated metal clusters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keil, Th; Bauer, D

    2014-01-01

    The strong field approximation (SFA) formulated in terms of so-called ‘quantum orbits’ led to much insight into intense-laser driven ionization dynamics. In plain SFA, the emitted electron is treated as a free electron in the laser field alone. However, with improving experimental techniques and more advanced numerical simulations, it becomes more and more obvious that the plain SFA misses interesting effects even on a qualitative level. Examples are holographic side lobes, the low-energy structure, radial patterns in photoelectron spectra at low kinetic energies and strongly rotated angular distributions. For this reason, increasing efforts have been recently devoted to Coulomb corrections of the SFA. In the current paper, we follow a similar line but consider ionization of metal clusters. It is known that photoelectrons from clusters can be much more energetic than those emitted from atoms or small molecules, especially if the Mie resonance of the expanding cluster is evoked. We develop a SFA that takes the collective field inside the cluster via the simple rigid-sphere model into account. Our approach is based on field-corrected quantum orbits so that the acceleration process (or any other spectral feature of interest) can be investigated in detail. (paper)

  6. Imaging live humans through smoke and flames using far-infrared digital holography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Locatelli, M; Pugliese, E; Paturzo, M; Bianco, V; Finizio, A; Pelagotti, A; Poggi, P; Miccio, L; Meucci, R; Ferraro, P

    2013-03-11

    The ability to see behind flames is a key challenge for the industrial field and particularly for the safety field. Development of new technologies to detect live people through smoke and flames in fire scenes is an extremely desirable goal since it can save human lives. The latest technologies, including equipment adopted by fire departments, use infrared bolometers for infrared digital cameras that allow users to see through smoke. However, such detectors are blinded by flame-emitted radiation. Here we show a completely different approach that makes use of lensless digital holography technology in the infrared range for successful imaging through smoke and flames. Notably, we demonstrate that digital holography with a cw laser allows the recording of dynamic human-size targets. In this work, easy detection of live, moving people is achieved through both smoke and flames, thus demonstrating the capability of digital holography at 10.6 μm.

  7. Optical response of laser-doped silicon carbide for an uncooled midwave infrared detector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Geunsik; Manzur, Tariq; Kar, Aravinda

    2011-06-10

    An uncooled mid-wave infrared (MWIR) detector is developed by doping an n-type 4H-SiC with Ga using a laser doping technique. 4H-SiC is one of the polytypes of crystalline silicon carbide and a wide bandgap semiconductor. The dopant creates an energy level of 0.30  eV, which was confirmed by optical spectroscopy of the doped sample. This energy level corresponds to the MWIR wavelength of 4.21  μm. The detection mechanism is based on the photoexcitation of electrons by the photons of this wavelength absorbed in the semiconductor. This process modifies the electron density, which changes the refractive index, and, therefore, the reflectance of the semiconductor is also changed. The change in the reflectance, which is the optical response of the detector, can be measured remotely with a laser beam, such as a He-Ne laser. This capability of measuring the detector response remotely makes it a wireless detector. The variation of refractive index was calculated as a function of absorbed irradiance based on the reflectance data for the as-received and doped samples. A distinct change was observed for the refractive index of the doped sample, indicating that the detector is suitable for applications at the 4.21  μm wavelength.

  8. Laser ablation of titanium in liquid in external electric field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Serkov, A.A. [Wave Research Center of A.M. Prokhorov General Physics Institute of the Russian Academy of Sciences, 38, Vavilov Street, 119991 Moscow (Russian Federation); The Federal State Educational Institution of Higher Professional Education, “Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology (State University)”, 9 Institutskiy per., 141700, Dolgoprudny, Moscow Region (Russian Federation); Barmina, E.V., E-mail: barminaev@gmail.com [Wave Research Center of A.M. Prokhorov General Physics Institute of the Russian Academy of Sciences, 38, Vavilov Street, 119991 Moscow (Russian Federation); Shafeev, G.A. [Wave Research Center of A.M. Prokhorov General Physics Institute of the Russian Academy of Sciences, 38, Vavilov Street, 119991 Moscow (Russian Federation); National Research Nuclear University MEPhI (Moscow Engineering Physics Institute), 31, Kashirskoye Highway, 115409 Moscow (Russian Federation); Voronov, V.V. [A.M. Prokhorov General Physics Institute of the Russian Academy of Sciences, 38, Vavilov Street, 119991 Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2015-09-01

    Highlights: • Ablation of a bulk Ti target by 10 ps laser pulses in liquid is experimentally studied in external DC electric field. • Applied cathodic bias leads to increase in average size of self-organized nanostructures formed upon ablation of titanium target. • Laser ablation of Ti target in external electric field results in generation of elongated titanium oxide nanoparticles. - Abstract: Ablation of a bulk Ti target by 10 ps laser pulses in water is experimentally studied in external DC electric field. It is demonstrated that both lateral size of nanostructures (NS) on Ti surface and their density depend on the electric field applied to the target. Scanning Electron Microscopy of NS reveals the shift of their size distribution function toward larger sizes with applied field (cathodic bias, 25 V DC). Density of mushroom-like NS with applied electric field amounts to 10{sup 10} cm{sup −2}. X-ray diffraction of generated nanoparticles (NPs) shows difference in the crystallographic structure of NPs of non-stoichiometric Ti oxides generated with and without electric field. This conclusion is corroborated with the optical absorption spectroscopy of obtained colloids. Transmission Electron Microscopy of NPs also shows difference in morphology of particles produced with and without cathodic bias. The results are interpreted on the basis of instability of the melt on Ti surface in the electric field.

  9. Development of an optical resonator with high-efficient output coupler for the JAERI far-infrared free-electron laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagai, Ryoji; Hajima, Ryoichi; Nishimori, Nobuyuki; Sawamura, Masaru; Kikuzawa, Nobuhiro; Shizuma, Toshiyuki; Minehara, Eisuke

    2001-01-01

    An optical resonator with a high-efficient output coupler was developed for the JAERI far-infrared free-electron laser. The optical resonator is symmetrical near-concentric geometry with an insertable scraper output coupler. As a result of the development of the optical resonator, the JAERI-FEL has been successfully, lased with averaged power over 1 kW. Performance of the optical resonator with the output coupler was evaluated at optical wavelength of 22 μm by using an optical mode calculation code. The output coupling and diffractive loss with a dominant eigen-mode of the resonator were calculated using an iterative computation called Fox-Li procedure. An efficiency factor of the optical resonator was introduced for the evaluation of the optical resonator performance. The efficiency factor was derived by the amount of the output coupling and diffractive loss of the optical resonator. It was found that the optical resonator with the insertable scraper coupler was the most suitable to a high-power and high-efficient far-infrared free-electron laser. (author)

  10. Fugitive methane leak detection using mid-infrared hollow-core photonic crystal fiber containing ultrafast laser drilled side-holes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karp, Jason; Challener, William; Kasten, Matthias; Choudhury, Niloy; Palit, Sabarni; Pickrell, Gary; Homa, Daniel; Floyd, Adam; Cheng, Yujie; Yu, Fei; Knight, Jonathan

    2016-05-01

    The increase in domestic natural gas production has brought attention to the environmental impacts of persistent gas leakages. The desire to identify fugitive gas emission, specifically for methane, presents new sensing challenges within the production and distribution supply chain. A spectroscopic gas sensing solution would ideally combine a long optical path length for high sensitivity and distributed detection over large areas. Specialty micro-structured fiber with a hollow core can exhibit a relatively low attenuation at mid-infrared wavelengths where methane has strong absorption lines. Methane diffusion into the hollow core is enabled by machining side-holes along the fiber length through ultrafast laser drilling methods. The complete system provides hundreds of meters of optical path for routing along well pads and pipelines while being interrogated by a single laser and detector. This work will present transmission and methane detection capabilities of mid-infrared photonic crystal fibers. Side-hole drilling techniques for methane diffusion will be highlighted as a means to convert hollow-core fibers into applicable gas sensors.

  11. BENCHMARKING MOBILE LASER SCANNING SYSTEMS USING A PERMANENT TEST FIELD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Kaartinen

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the study was to benchmark the geometric accuracy of mobile laser scanning (MLS systems using a permanent test field under good coverage of GNSS. Mobile laser scanning, also called mobile terrestrial laser scanning, is currently a rapidly developing area in laser scanning where laser scanners, GNSS and IMU are mounted onboard a moving vehicle. MLS can be considered to fill the gap between airborne and terrestrial laser scanning. Data provided by MLS systems can be characterized with the following technical parameters: a point density in the range of 100-1000 points per m2 at 10 m distance, b distance measurement accuracy of 2-5 cm, and c operational scanning range from 1 to 100 m. Several commercial, including e.g. Riegl, Optech and others, and some research mobile laser scanning systems surveyed the test field using predefined driving speed and directions. The acquired georeferenced point clouds were delivered for analyzing. The geometric accuracy of the point clouds was determined using the reference targets that could be identified and measured from the point cloud. Results show that in good GNSS conditions most systems can reach an accuracy of 2 cm both in plane and elevation. The accuracy of a low cost system, the price of which is less than tenth of the other systems, seems to be within a few centimetres at least in ground elevation determination. Inaccuracies in the relative orientation of the instruments lead to systematic errors and when several scanners are used, in multiple reproductions of the objects. Mobile laser scanning systems can collect high density point cloud data with high accuracy. A permanent test field suits well for verifying and comparing the performance of different mobile laser scanning systems. The accuracy of the relative orientation between the mapping instruments needs more attention. For example, if the object is seen double in the point cloud due to imperfect boresight calibration between two

  12. Athermalization of infrared dual field optical system based on wavefront coding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Kai; Jiang, Bo; Liu, Kai; Yan, Peipei; Duan, Jing; Shan, Qiu-sha

    2017-02-01

    Wavefront coding is a technology which combination of the optical design and digital image processing. By inserting a phase mask closed to the pupil plane of the optical system the wavefront of the system is re-modulated. And the depth of focus is extended consequently. In reality the idea is same as the athermalization theory of infrared optical system. In this paper, an uncooled infrared dual field optical system with effective focal as 38mm/19mm, F number as 1.2 of both focal length, operating wavelength varying from 8μm to 12μm was designed. A cubic phase mask was used at the pupil plane to re-modulate the wavefront. Then the performance of the infrared system was simulated with CODEV as the environment temperature varying from -40° to 60°. MTF curve of the optical system with phase mask are compared with the outcome before using phase mask. The result show that wavefront coding technology can make the system not sensitive to thermal defocus, and then realize the athermal design of the infrared optical system.

  13. Photoacoustic determination of glucose concentration in whole blood by a near-infrared laser diode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Zuomin; Myllylae, Risto A.

    2001-06-01

    The near-infrared photoacoustic technique is recognized as a potential method for the non-invasive determination of human glucose, because near-infrared light can incident a few millimeters into human tissue, where it produces an acoustic wave capable of carrying information about the composition of the tissue. This paper demonstrates a photoacoustic glucose measurement in a blood sample as a step toward a non-invasive measurement. The experimental apparatus consists of a near-infrared laser diode operating with 4 micro joules pulse energy at 905 nm, a roller pump connected to a silicon plastic tube and a cuvette for circulating the blood sample. In addition, the apparatus comprises a PZT piezoelectric transducer integrated with a battery-powered preamplifier to receive the photoacoustic signal. During the experiment, a glucose solution is mixed into a human blood sample to change its concentration. Although the absorption coefficient of glucose is much smaller than that of blood in the near-infrared region, the osmotic and hydrophilic properties of glucose decrease the reduced scattering coefficient of blood caused by the dissolved glucose surrounding the blood cells. This changes the distribution of the absorbed optical energy in blood, which, in turn, produces a change in the photoacoustic signal. Our experiment demonstrates that signal amplitudes in fresh and stored blood samples in crease about 7% and 10%, respectively, when the glucose concentration reaches the upper limit of the physiological region (500 mg/dl).

  14. High magnetic field generation for laser-plasma experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pollock, B. B.; Froula, D. H.; Davis, P. F.; Ross, J. S.; Fulkerson, S.; Bower, J.; Satariano, J.; Price, D.; Krushelnick, K.; Glenzer, S. H.

    2006-01-01

    An electromagnetic solenoid was developed to study the effect of magnetic fields on electron thermal transport in laser plasmas. The solenoid, which is driven by a pulsed power system supplying 30 kJ, achieves magnetic fields of 13 T. The field strength was measured on the solenoid axis with a magnetic probe and optical Zeeman splitting. The measurements agree well with analytical estimates. A method for optimizing the solenoid design to achieve magnetic fields exceeding 20 T is presented

  15. Vis-Near-Infrared Photodetectors Based on Methyl Ammonium Lead Iodide Thin Films by Pulsed Laser Deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Nagabhushan; Dias, Sandra; Krupanidhi, S. B.

    2018-04-01

    Organic-inorganic hybrid perovskite materials are considered as promising candidates for emerging thin-film photodetectors. In this work, we discuss the application of the CH3NH3PbI3 thin films by pulsed laser deposition for photodetection applications. With this method, we obtained good perovskite film coverage on fluorine-doped tin oxide-coated substrates and observed wel- developed grains. The films showed no sign of degradation over several months of testing. We investigated the surface morphology and surface roughness of the films by field emission scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy. The optical response of the films was studied using ultraviolet-visible and photoluminescence spectroscopy. We carried out a study on the solar and infrared photodetection of CH3NH3PbI3 thin films. The values of the responsivity, sensitivity, external quantum efficiency and specific detectivity under 1 sun illumination and 0.7 V bias were 105.4 A/W, 1.9, 2.38 × 104% and 1.5 × 1012 Jones, respectively.

  16. Far-infrared laser scattering from spontaneous and driven fluctuations in the UCLA microtor tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, P.; Luhmann, N.C.; Park, H. Jr.; Peebles, W.A.; Taylor, R.J.; Xu, Ying; Yu, C.X.

    1982-01-01

    A far-infrared (FIR) laser scattering system for the study of tokamak density fluctuations is described. Recent scattering data from low frequency microturbulence in high density (n >= 5 x 10 13 cm -3 ) microtor discharges are presented. In addition, the first observation and identification of internal modes generated during ICRF heating are described. The latter study directly conforms to fast wave mode conversion theory in a two-ion species plasma. In particular, the first internal observation of mode converted ion Bernstein waves in a tokamak plasma has been made. (author)

  17. Near-field enhanced femtosecond laser nano-drilling of glass substrate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou, Y.; Hong, M.H.; Fuh, J.Y.H.; Lu, L.; Lukyanchuk, B.S.; Wang, Z.B.

    2008-01-01

    Particle mask assisted near-field enhanced femtosecond laser nano-drilling of transparent glass substrate was demonstrated in this paper. A particle mask was fabricated by self-assembly of spherical 1 μm silica particles on the substrate surface. Then the samples were exposed to femtosecond laser (800 nm, 100 fs) and characterized by field emission scanning electron microscope (FESEM) and atomic force microscope (AFM). The nano-hole array was found on the glass surface. The hole sizes were measured from 200 to 300 nm with an average depth of 150 nm and increased with laser fluence. Non-linear triple-photon absorption and near-field enhancement were the main mechanisms of the nano-feature formation. Calculations based on Mie theory shows an agreement with experiment results. More debris, however, was found at high laser fluence. This can be attributed to the explosion of silica particles because the focusing point is inside the 1 μm particle. The simulation predicts that the focusing point will move outside the particle if the particle size increases. The experiment performed under 6.84 μm silica particles verified that no debris was formed. And for all the samples, no cracks were found on the substrate surface because of ultra-short pulse width of femtosecond laser. This method has potential applications in nano-patterning of transparent glass substrate for nano-structure device fabrication

  18. Infrared Faint Radio Sources in the Extended Chandra Deep Field South

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huynh, Minh T.

    2009-01-01

    Infrared-Faint Radio Sources (IFRSs) are a class of radio objects found in the Australia Telescope Large Area Survey (ATLAS) which have no observable counterpart in the Spitzer Wide-area Infrared Extragalactic Survey (SWIRE). The extended Chandra Deep Field South now has even deeper Spitzer imaging (3.6 to 70 micron) from a number of Legacy surveys. We report the detections of two IFRS sources in IRAC images. The non-detection of two other IFRSs allows us to constrain the source type. Detailed modeling of the SED of these objects shows that they are consistent with high redshift AGN (z > 2).

  19. Propulsion Utilizing Laser-Driven Ponderomotive Fields for Deep-Space Missions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, George J.; Gilland, James H.

    2009-01-01

    The generation of large amplitude electric fields in plasmas by high-power lasers has been studied for several years in the context of high-energy particle acceleration. Fields on the order of GeV/m are generated in the plasma wake of the laser by non-linear ponderomotive forces. The laser fields generate longitudinal and translational electron plasma waves with phase velocities close to the speed of light. These fields and velocities offer the potential to revolutionize spacecraft propulsion, leading to extended deep space robotic probes. Based on these initial calculations, plasma acceleration by means of laser-induced ponderomotive forces appears to offer significant potential for spacecraft propulsion. Relatively high-efficiencies appear possible with proper beam conditioning, resulting in an order of magnitude more thrust than alternative concepts for high I SP (>10 5 s) and elimination of the primary life-limiting erosion phenomena associated with conventional electric propulsion systems. Ponderomotive propulsion readily lends itself to beamed power which might overcome some of the constraints of power-limited propulsion concepts. A preliminary assessment of the impact of these propulsion systems for several promising configurations on mission architectures has been conducted. Emphasizing interstellar and interstellar-precursor applications, performance and technical requirements are identified for a number of missions. The use of in-situ plasma and gas for propellant is evaluated as well.

  20. THE MAGNETIC FIELD IN TAURUS PROBED BY INFRARED POLARIZATION

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chapman, Nicholas L.; Goldsmith, Paul F.; Pineda, Jorge L.; Li Di; Clemens, D. P.; Krco, Marko

    2011-01-01

    We present maps of the plane-of-sky magnetic field within two regions of the Taurus molecular cloud: one in the dense core L1495/B213 filament and the other in a diffuse region to the west. The field is measured from the polarization of background starlight seen through the cloud. In total, we measured 287 high-quality near-infrared polarization vectors in these regions. In L1495/B213, the percent polarization increases with column density up to A V ∼ 9 mag, the limits of our data. The radiative torques model for grain alignment can explain this behavior, but models that invoke turbulence are inconsistent with the data. We also combine our data with published optical and near-infrared polarization measurements in Taurus. Using this large sample, we estimate the strength of the plane-of-sky component of the magnetic field in nine subregions. This estimation is done with two different techniques that use the observed dispersion in polarization angles. Our values range from 5 to 82 μG and tend to be higher in denser regions. In all subregions, the critical index of the mass-to-magnetic flux ratio is sub-unity, implying that Taurus is magnetically supported on large scales (∼2 pc). Within the region observed, the B213 filament takes a sharp turn to the north and the direction of the magnetic field also takes a sharp turn, switching from being perpendicular to the filament to becoming parallel. This behavior can be understood if we are observing the rim of a bubble. We argue that it has resulted from a supernova remnant associated with a recently discovered nearby gamma-ray pulsar.

  1. Current role of resurfacing lasers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hantash, B M; Gladstone, H B

    2009-06-01

    Resurfacing lasers have been the treatment of choice for diminishing rhytids and tightening skin. The carbon dioxide and erbium lasers have been the gold and silver standards. Despite their effectiveness, these resurfacing lasers have a very high risk profile including scarring, hyperpigmentation and hypopigmentation. Because of these side effects, various practitioners have tried alternative settings for these lasers as well as alternative wavelengths, particularly in the infrared spectrum. These devices have had less downtime, but their effectiveness has been limited to fine wrinkles. As with selective photothemolysis, a major advance in the field has been fractionated resurfacing which incorporates grids of microthermal zones that spares islands of skin. This concept permits less tissue damage and quicker tissue regeneration. Initially, fractionated resurfacing was limited to the nonablative mid-infrared spectrum. These resurfacing lasers is appropriate for those patients with acne scars, uneven skin tone, mild to moderate photodamage, and is somewhat effective for melasma. Importantly, because there is less overall tissue damage and stimulation of melanocytes, these lasers can be used in darker skin types. Downtime is 2-4 days of erythema and scaling. Yet, these nonablative fractionated devices required 5-6 treatments to achieve a moderate effect. Logically, the fractionated resurfacing has now been applied to the CO2 and the Erbium:Yag lasers. These devices can treat deeper wrinkles and tighten skin. Downtime appears to be 5-7 days. The long term effectiveness and the question of whether these fractionated devices will approach the efficacy of the standard resurfacing lasers is still in question. Ultimately either integrated devices which may use fractionated resurfacing, radiofrequency and a sensitizer, or combining different lasers in a single treatment may prove to be the most effective in reducing rhtyides, smoothing the skin topography and tightening the

  2. Perturbative formulation of pure space-like axial gauge QED with infrared divergences regularized by residual gauge fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakawaki, Yuji; McCartor, Gary

    2006-01-01

    We construct a new perturbative formulation of pure space-like axial gauge QED in which the inherent infrared divergences are regularized by residual gauge fields. For this purpose, we carry out our calculations in the coordinates x μ =(x + , x - , x 1 , x 2 ), where x + =x 0 sinθ + x 3 cosθ and x - = x 0 cosθ - x 3 sinθ. Here, A=A 0 cosθ + A 3 sinθ = n·A=0 is taken as the gauge fixing condition. We show in detail that, in perturbation theory, infrared divergences resulting from the residual gauge fields cancel infrared divergences resulting from the physical parts of the gauge field. As a result, we obtain the gauge field propagator proposed by Mandelstam and Leibbrandt. By taking the limit θ→π/4, we are able to construct a light-cone formulation that is free from infrared divergences. With that analysis complete, we next calculate the one-loop electron self-energy, something not previously done in the light-cone quantization and light-cone gauge. (author)

  3. Laser annealed HWCVD and PECVD thin silicon films. Electron field emission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Neill, K.A.; Shaikh, M.Z.; Lyttle, G.; Anthony, S.; Fan, Y.C.; Persheyev, S.K.; Rose, M.J.

    2006-01-01

    Electron Field Emission (FE) properties of various laser annealed thin silicon films on different substrates were investigated. HWCVD microcrystalline and PECVD amorphous silicon films were irradiated with Nd : YAG and XeCl Excimer lasers at varying energy densities. Encouraging FE results were mainly from XeCl Excimer laser processed PECVD and HWCVD films on metal backplanes. FE measurements were complemented by the study of film surface morphology. Geometric field enhancement factors from surface measurements and Fowler-Nordheim Theory (FNT) were compared. FE properties of the films were also found to be particularly influenced by the backplane material

  4. Infrared interference patterns for new capabilities in laser end point detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heason, D J; Spencer, A G

    2003-01-01

    Standard laser interferometry is used in dry etch fabrication of semiconductor and MEMS devices to measure etch depth, rate and to detect the process end point. However, many wafer materials, such as silicon are absorbing at probing wavelengths in the visible, severely limiting the amount of information that can be obtained using this technique. At infrared (IR) wavelengths around 1500 nm and above, silicon is highly transparent. In this paper we describe an instrument that can be used to monitor etch depth throughout a thru-wafer etch. The provision of this information could eliminate the requirement of an 'etch stop' layer and improve the performance of fabricated devices. We have added a further new capability by using tuneable lasers to scan through wavelengths in the near IR to generate an interference pattern. Fitting a theoretical curve to this interference pattern gives in situ measurement of film thickness. Whereas conventional interferometry would only allow etch depth to be monitored in real time, we can use a pre-etch thickness measurement to terminate the etch on a remaining thickness of film material. This paper discusses the capabilities of, and the opportunities offered by, this new technique and gives examples of applications in MEMS and waveguides

  5. Effect of infrared laser in the prevention and treatment of paresthesia in orthognathic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prazeres, Lady Dayane Kalline Travassos; Muniz, Yuri Victor Siqueira; Barros, Keylla Marinho Albuquerque; Gerbi, Marleny Elizabeth Marquez de Martinez; Laureano Filho, José Rodrigues

    2013-05-01

    Orthognathic surgery is the surgical procedure that makes correcting deformities of the bones in the region of the maxilla and mandible a reality in the Brazilian dentistry. However, this type of surgery usually involves paresthesia in the postoperative period, concerning the surgeons who perform them and generating discomfort to patients. This study aimed at evaluating the effect of infrared laser (830 nm) in the prevention and treatment of paresthesias after orthognathic surgery. Six patients underwent orthognathic surgery: the experimental group composed of 4 patients and the control group that did not receive laser therapy composed of 2 patients. The experimental group received laser applications during the transoperative and 12 postoperative sessions. Tests for mechanical (deep and shallow) and thermal (cold) sensitivity were performed in the preoperative and postoperative period (during 12 sessions) in the lip and chin areas by the same operator. The paresthesia was classified into 1, strong; 2, moderate; 3, mild; and 4, absent, through the patient's response to stimuli. The results showed that all patients had no disturbance of sensitivity in the preoperative period, but paresthesia was presented at various levels in the postoperative period. Both groups showed recovery of deep mechanical sensitivity within a shorter time interval compared with the superficial mechanical and thermal sensitivity. However, at the 12th assessment, patients who underwent the laser therapy showed better reduction in the level of paresthesia or even complete regression of this. The laser, therefore, brought benefits to the treatment of paresthesia, accelerating the return of neurosensorial sensitivity.

  6. Theory of the photoelectric effect assisted by an elliptically polarized laser field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Shumin; Jentschura, Ulrich D

    2009-01-01

    The laser-assisted photoelectric effect in atomic hydrogen is investigated for linear, circular and general elliptic polarizations. The perturbative dressed state of the atom in an elliptically polarized nonresonant laser field is derived in the velocity gauge. The continuum state of the ejected electron is described by a Coulomb-Volkov wavefunction. Numerical results show that the ionization cross section by a vacuum ultraviolet photon is enhanced at high laser field intensities and low frequencies. At small and extremely large scattering angles (measured with respect to the wave vector of the incoming vacuum ultraviolet photon), the process for emitting a laser photon is predominant, while at medium angles, the result favours the process without a laser photon exchange. The dependence of the results on the laser polarization and on various geometries is studied, and an interesting pattern is found for the dependence on the frequency of the dressing laser; an intuitive explanation is offered.

  7. Classical trajectory perspective of atomic ionization in strong laser fields. Semiclassical modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Jie

    2014-01-01

    Dealing with timely and interesting issues in strong laser physics. Illustrates complex strong field atomic ionization with the simple semiclassical model of classical trajectory perspective for the first time. Provides a theoretical model that can be used to account for recent experiments. The ionization of atoms and molecules in strong laser fields is an active field in modern physics and has versatile applications in such as attosecond physics, X-ray generation, inertial confined fusion (ICF), medical science and so on. Classical Trajectory Perspective of Atomic Ionization in Strong Laser Fields covers the basic concepts in this field and discusses many interesting topics using the semiclassical model of classical trajectory ensemble simulation, which is one of the most successful ionization models and has the advantages of a clear picture, feasible computing and accounting for many exquisite experiments quantitatively. The book also presents many applications of the model in such topics as the single ionization, double ionization, neutral atom acceleration and other timely issues in strong field physics, and delivers useful messages to readers with presenting the classical trajectory perspective on the strong field atomic ionization. The book is intended for graduate students and researchers in the field of laser physics, atom molecule physics and theoretical physics. Dr. Jie Liu is a professor of Institute of Applied Physics and Computational Mathematics, China and Peking University.

  8. Seeding magnetic fields for laser-driven flux compression in high-energy-density plasmas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gotchev, O V; Knauer, J P; Chang, P Y; Jang, N W; Shoup, M J; Meyerhofer, D D; Betti, R

    2009-04-01

    A compact, self-contained magnetic-seed-field generator (5 to 16 T) is the enabling technology for a novel laser-driven flux-compression scheme in laser-driven targets. A magnetized target is directly irradiated by a kilojoule or megajoule laser to compress the preseeded magnetic field to thousands of teslas. A fast (300 ns), 80 kA current pulse delivered by a portable pulsed-power system is discharged into a low-mass coil that surrounds the laser target. A >15 T target field has been demonstrated using a hot spot of a compressed target. This can lead to the ignition of massive shells imploded with low velocity-a way of reaching higher gains than is possible with conventional ICF.

  9. Theoretical femtosecond physics atoms and molecules in strong laser fields

    CERN Document Server

    Grossmann, Frank

    2013-01-01

    Theoretical investigations of atoms and molecules interacting with pulsed or continuous wave lasers up to atomic field strengths on the order of 10^16 W/cm² are leading to an understanding of many challenging experimental discoveries. This book deals with the basics of femtosecond physics and goes up to the latest applications of new phenomena. The book presents an introduction to laser physics with mode-locking and pulsed laser operation. The solution of the time-dependent Schrödinger equation is discussed both analytically and numerically. The basis for the non-perturbative treatment of laser-matter interaction in the book is the numerical solution of the time-dependent Schrödinger equation. The light field is treated classically, and different possible gauges are discussed. Physical phenonema, ranging from Rabi-oscillations in two-level systems to the ionization of atoms, the generation of high harmonics, the ionization and dissociation of molecules as well as the control of chemical reactions are pre...

  10. Vibrational Spectroscopy of Intramolecular Hydrogen Bonds in the Infrared and Near-Infrared Regions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schrøder, Sidsel Dahl

    and 1,4-diaminobutane). Experimentally, the hydrogen bonds have been studied with vibrational spectroscopy in the infrared and near-infrared regions. The focus is primarily on spectra recorded in the near-infrared regions, which in these studies are dominated by O-H and N-H stretching overtones....... Overtone spectra have been recorded with intracavity laser photoacoustic laser spectroscopy and conventional long path absorption spectroscopy. Theoretically, a combination of electronic structure calculations and local mode models have been employed to guide the assignment of bands in the vibrational......,4-diaminobutane, no sign of intramolecular N-H···N hydrogen bonds were identified in the overtone spectra. However, theoretical analyzes indicate that intramolecular N-H···N hydrogen bonds are present in all three diamines if two hydrogen atoms on one of the methylene groups are substituted with triuoromethyl...

  11. Laser-assisted electron emission from gated field-emitters

    CERN Document Server

    Ishizuka, H; Yokoo, K; Mimura, H; Shimawaki, H; Hosono, A

    2002-01-01

    Enhancement of electron emission by illumination of gated field-emitters was studied using a 100 mW cw YAG laser at a wavelength of 532 nm, intensities up to 10 sup 7 W/m sup 2 and mechanically chopped with a rise time of 4 mu s. When shining an array of 640 silicon emitters, the emission current responded quickly to on-off of the laser. The increase of the emission current was proportional to the basic emission current at low gate voltages, but it was saturated at approx 3 mu A as the basic current approached 100 mu A with the increase of gate voltage. The emission increase was proportional to the square root of laser power at low gate voltages and to the laser power at elevated gate voltages. For 1- and 3-tip silicon emitters, the rise and fall of the current due to on-off of the laser showed a significant time lag. The magnitude of emission increase was independent of the position of laser spot on the emitter base and reached 2 mu A at a basic current of 5 mu A without showing signs of saturation. The mech...

  12. b-dipole transitions in trans-HOCO observed by far infrared laser magnetic resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sears, T.J.; Radford, H.E.; Moore, M.A.

    1993-01-01

    Far infrared laser magnetic resonance spectroscopy is used to measure components of 12 rotational transitions in the ground state of the HOCO radical. The transitions are all b-dipole in character in contrast to the a-dipole rotational spectrum previously reported [Radford, Wei, and Sears, J. Chem. Phys. 97, 3989 (1992)]. The new data determine the A rotational constant to high precision and allow the determination of several centrifugal distortion constants for the first time. The hyperfine coupling in the radical leads to observable splittings in several of the observed transitions and these are used to estimate two of the four expected nonzero hyperfine parameters in the radical

  13. Dipole and quadrupole forces exerted on atoms in laser fields: The nonperturbative approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sindelka, Milan; Moiseyev, Nimrod; Cederbaum, Lorenz S.

    2006-01-01

    Manipulation of cold atoms by lasers has so far been studied solely within the framework of the conventional dipole approximation, and the atom-light interaction has been treated using low order perturbation theory. Laser control of atomic motions has been ascribed exclusively to the corresponding light-induced dipole forces. In this work, we present a general theory to derive the potential experienced by an atom in a monochromatic laser field in a context analogous to the Born-Oppenheimer approximation for molecules in the field-free case. The formulation goes beyond the dipole approximation and gives rise to the field-atom coupling potential terms which so far have not been taken into consideration in theoretical or experimental studies. Contrary to conventional approaches, our method is based upon the many electron Floquet theory and remains valid also for high intensity laser fields (i.e., for a strongly nonperturbative atom-light interaction). As an illustration of the developed theory, we investigate the trapping of cold atoms in optical lattices. We find that for some atoms for specific laser parameters, despite the absence of the dipole force, the laser trapping is still possible due to the electric quadrupole forces. Namely, we show that by using realistic laser parameters one can form a quadrupole optical lattice which is sufficiently strong to trap Ca and Na atoms

  14. Optical field emission from resonant gold nanorods driven by femtosecond mid-infrared pulses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kusa, F. [Department of Applied Physics, Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology, 2-24-16 Nakacho, Koganei Tokyo 184-8588 (Japan); Institute of Industrial Science, the University of Tokyo, 4-6-1 Komaba, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 153-8505 (Japan); Echternkamp, K. E.; Herink, G.; Ropers, C. [4th Physical Institute – Solids and Nanostructures, University of Göttingen, 37077 Göttingen (Germany); Ashihara, S., E-mail: ashihara@iis.u-tokyo.ac.jp [Institute of Industrial Science, the University of Tokyo, 4-6-1 Komaba, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 153-8505 (Japan)

    2015-07-15

    We demonstrate strong-field photoelectron emission from gold nanorods driven by femtosecond mid-infrared optical pulses. The maximum photoelectron yield is reached at the localized surface plasmon resonance, indicating that the photoemission is governed by the resonantly-enhanced optical near-field. The wavelength- and field-dependent photoemission yield allows for a noninvasive determination of local field enhancements, and we obtain intensity enhancement factors close to 1300, in good agreement with finite-difference time domain computations.

  15. Time-resolved FTIR [Fourier transform infrared] emission studies of laser photofragmentation and chain reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leone, S.R.

    1990-01-01

    Recent progress is described resulting from the past three years of DOE support for studies of combustion-related photofragmentation dynamics, energy transfer, and reaction processes using a time-resolved Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) emission technique. The FTIR is coupled to a high repetition rate excimer laser which produces radicals by photolysis to obtain novel, high resolution measurements on vibrational and rotational state dynamics. The results are important for the study of numerous radical species relevant to combustion processes. The method has been applied to the detailed study of photofragmentation dynamics in systems such as acetylene, which produces C 2 H; chlorofluoroethylene to study the HF product channel; vinyl chloride and dichloroethylene, which produce HCl; acetone, which produces CO and CH 3 ; and ammonia, which produces NH 2 . In addition, we have recently demonstrated use of the FTIR technique for preliminary studies of energy transfer events under near single collision conditions, radical-radical reactions, and laser-initiated chain reaction processes

  16. Portable Infrared Laser Spectroscopy for On-site Mycotoxin Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sieger, Markus; Kos, Gregor; Sulyok, Michael; Godejohann, Matthias; Krska, Rudolf; Mizaikoff, Boris

    2017-03-01

    Mycotoxins are toxic secondary metabolites of fungi that spoil food, and severely impact human health (e.g., causing cancer). Therefore, the rapid determination of mycotoxin contamination including deoxynivalenol and aflatoxin B1 in food and feed samples is of prime interest for commodity importers and processors. While chromatography-based techniques are well established in laboratory environments, only very few (i.e., mostly immunochemical) techniques exist enabling direct on-site analysis for traders and manufacturers. In this study, we present MYCOSPEC - an innovative approach for spectroscopic mycotoxin contamination analysis at EU regulatory limits for the first time utilizing mid-infrared tunable quantum cascade laser (QCL) spectroscopy. This analysis technique facilitates on-site mycotoxin analysis by combining QCL technology with GaAs/AlGaAs thin-film waveguides. Multivariate data mining strategies (i.e., principal component analysis) enabled the classification of deoxynivalenol-contaminated maize and wheat samples, and of aflatoxin B1 affected peanuts at EU regulatory limits of 1250 μg kg-1 and 8 μg kg-1, respectively.

  17. Muonic atoms in super-intense laser fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shahbaz, Atif

    2009-01-28

    Nuclear effects in hydrogenlike muonic atoms exposed to intense high-frequency laser fields have been studied. Systems of low nuclear charge number are considered where a nonrelativistic description applies. By comparing the radiative response for different isotopes we demonstrate characteristic signatures of the finite nuclear mass, size and shape in the high-harmonic spectra. Cutoff energies in the MeV domain can be achieved, offering prospects for the generation of ultrashort coherent {gamma}-ray pulses. Also, the nucleus can be excited while the laser-driven muon moves periodically across it. The nuclear transition is caused by the time-dependent Coulomb field of the oscillating charge density of the bound muon. A closed-form analytical expression for electric multipole transitions is derived within a fully quantum mechanical approach and applied to various isotopes. The excitation probabilities are in general very small. We compare the process with other nuclear excitation mechanisms through coupling with atomic shells and discuss the prospects to observe it in experiment. (orig.)

  18. Muonic atoms in super-intense laser fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shahbaz, Atif

    2009-01-01

    Nuclear effects in hydrogenlike muonic atoms exposed to intense high-frequency laser fields have been studied. Systems of low nuclear charge number are considered where a nonrelativistic description applies. By comparing the radiative response for different isotopes we demonstrate characteristic signatures of the finite nuclear mass, size and shape in the high-harmonic spectra. Cutoff energies in the MeV domain can be achieved, offering prospects for the generation of ultrashort coherent γ-ray pulses. Also, the nucleus can be excited while the laser-driven muon moves periodically across it. The nuclear transition is caused by the time-dependent Coulomb field of the oscillating charge density of the bound muon. A closed-form analytical expression for electric multipole transitions is derived within a fully quantum mechanical approach and applied to various isotopes. The excitation probabilities are in general very small. We compare the process with other nuclear excitation mechanisms through coupling with atomic shells and discuss the prospects to observe it in experiment. (orig.)

  19. Relative Nonlinear Electrodynamics Interaction of Charged Particles with Strong and Super Strong Laser Fields

    CERN Document Server

    Avetissian, Hamlet

    2006-01-01

    This book covers a large class of fundamental investigations into Relativistic Nonlinear Electrodynamics. It explores the interaction between charged particles and strong laser fields, mainly concentrating on contemporary problems of x-ray lasers, new type small set-up high-energy accelerators of charged particles, as well as electron-positron pair production from super powerful laser fields of relativistic intensities. It will also discuss nonlinear phenomena of threshold nature that eliminate the concurrent inverse processes in the problems of Laser Accelerator and Free Electron Laser, thus creating new opportunities for solving these problems.

  20. Infrared Dual-Line Hanle Diagnostic of the Coronal Vector Magnetic Field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dima, Gabriel I.; Kuhn, Jeffrey R. [Institute for Astronomy, University of Hawaii, Pukalani, HI (United States); Berdyugina, Svetlana V., E-mail: gdima@hawaii.edu [Institute for Astronomy, University of Hawaii, Pukalani, HI (United States); Kiepenheuer Institut fuer Sonnenphysik, Freiburg (Germany); Predictive Science Inc., San Diego, CA (United States)

    2016-04-20

    Measuring the coronal vector magnetic field is still a major challenge in solar physics. This is due to the intrinsic weakness of the field (e.g., ~4G at a height of 0.1R⊙ above an active region) and the large thermal broadening of coronal emission lines. We propose using concurrent linear polarization measurements of near-infrared forbidden and permitted lines together with Hanle effect models to calculate the coronal vector magnetic field. In the unsaturated Hanle regime both the direction and strength of the magnetic field affect the linear polarization, while in the saturated regime the polarization is insensitive to the strength of the field. The relatively long radiative lifetimes of coronal forbidden atomic transitions implies that the emission lines are formed in the saturated Hanle regime and the linear polarization is insensitive to the strength of the field. By combining measurements of both forbidden and permitted lines, the direction and strength of the field can be obtained. For example, the SiX 1.4301 μm line shows strong linear polarization and has been observed in emission over a large field-of-view (out to elongations of 0.5 R⊙). Here we describe an algorithm that combines linear polarization measurements of the SiX 1.4301 μm forbidden line with linear polarization observations of the HeI 1.0830 μm permitted coronal line to obtain the vector magnetic field. To illustrate the concept we assume that the emitting gas for both atomic transitions is located in the plane of the sky. The further development of this method and associated tools will be a critical step toward interpreting the high spectral, spatial and temporal infrared spectro-polarimetric measurements that will be possible when the Daniel K. Inouye Solar Telescope (DKIST) is completed in 2019.

  1. The mechanism underlying calcium phosphate precipitation on titanium via ultraviolet, visible, and near infrared laser-assisted biomimetic process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahanti, Moumita; Nakamura, Maki; Pyatenko, Alexander; Sakamaki, Ikuko; Koga, Kenji; Oyane, Ayako

    2016-01-01

    We recently developed a rapid single-step calcium phosphate (CaP) precipitation technique on several substrates using a laser-assisted biomimetic process (LAB process). In this process, ultraviolet (UV, λ   =  355 nm) pulsed laser irradiation has been applied to a substrate that is immersed in a supersaturated CaP solution. In the present study, the LAB process for CaP precipitation on a titanium substrate was successfully expanded to include not only UV but also visible (VIS, λ   =  532 nm) and near infrared (NIR, λ   =  1064 nm) lasers. Surface heating and plasma-mediated surface reactions (micro-deformation, oxidization, photoexcitation, and wetting) generated by UV, VIS, or NIR lasers are considered to be involved in the CaP precipitation on the titanium surface in the LAB process. The kinetics of these reactions and consequently of CaP precipitation were dependent on the laser wavelength and fluence. The higher laser fluence did not always accelerate CaP precipitation on the substrate; rather, it was found that an optimal range of fluence exists for each laser wavelength. These results suggest that for efficient CaP precipitation, a suitable laser wavelength should be selected according to the optical absorption properties of the substrate material and the laser fluence should also be adjusted to induce surface heating and plasma-mediated surface reactions that are favorable for CaP precipitation. (paper)

  2. Determining the field emitter temperature during laser irradiation in the pulsed laser atom probe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kellogg, G.L.

    1981-01-01

    Three methods are discussed for determining the field emitter temperature during laser irradiation in the recently developed Pulsed Laser Atom Probe. A procedure based on the reduction of the lattice evaporation field with increasing emitter temperature is found to be the most convenient and reliable method between 60 and 500 K. Calibration curves (plots of the evaporation field versus temperature) are presented for dc and pulsed field evaporation of W, Mo, and Rh. These results show directly the important influence of the evaporation rate on the temperature dependence of the evaporation field. The possibility of a temperature calibration based on the ionic charge state distribution of field evaporated lattice atoms is also discussed. The shift in the charge state distributions which occurs when the emitter temperature is increased and the applied field strength is decreased at a constant rate of evaporation is shown to be due to the changing field and not the changing temperature. Nevertheless, the emitter temperature can be deduced from the charge state distribution for a specified evaporation rate. Charge state distributions as a function of field strength and temperature are presented for the same three materials. Finally, a preliminary experiment is reported which shows that the emitter temperature can be determined from field ion microscope observations of single atom surface diffusion over low index crystal planes. This last calibration procedure is shown to be very useful at higher temperatures (>600 K) where the other two methods become unreliable

  3. Freedom from band-gap slavery: from diode lasers to quantum cascade lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capasso, Federico

    2010-02-01

    Semiconductor heterostructure lasers, for which Alferov and Kromer received part of the Nobel Prize in Physics in 2000, are the workhorse of technologies such as optical communications, optical recording, supermarket scanners, laser printers and fax machines. They exhibit high performance in the visible and near infrared and rely for their operation on electrons and holes emitting photons across the semiconductor bandgap. This mechanism turns into a curse at longer wavelengths (mid-infrared) because as the bandgap, shrinks laser operation becomes much more sensitive to temperature, material defects and processing. Quantum Cascade Laser (QCL), invented in 1994, rely on a radically different process for light emission. QCLs are unipolar devices in which electrons undergo transitions between quantum well energy levels and are recycled through many stages emitting a cascade of photons. Thus by suitable tailoring of the layers' thickness, using the same heterostructure material, they can lase across the molecular fingerprint region from 3 to 25 microns and beyond into the far-infrared and submillimiter wave spectrum. High power cw room temperature QCLs and QCLs with large continuous single mode tuning range have found many applications (infrared countermeasures, spectroscopy, trace gas analysis and atmospheric chemistry) and are commercially available. )

  4. MIRI: A multichannel far-infrared laser interferometer for electron density measurements on TFTR [Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mansfield, D.K.; Park, H.K.; Johnson, L.C.; Anderson, H.M.; Chouinard, R.; Foote, V.S.; Ma, C.H.; Clifton, B.J.

    1987-07-01

    A ten-channel far-infrared laser interferometer which is routinely used to measure the spatial and temporal behavior of the electron density profile on the TFTR tokamak is described and representative results are presented. This system has been designed for remote operation in the very hostile environment of a fusion reactor. The possible expansion of the system to include polarimetric measurements is briefly outlined. 13 refs., 8 figs

  5. Investigation of field emission properties of laser irradiated tungsten

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akram, Mahreen; Bashir, Shazia; Hayat, Asma; Mahmood, Khaliq; Jalil, Sohail Abdul; Rafique, Muhammad Shahid

    2018-01-01

    Nd:YAG laser irradiation of Tungsten (W) has been performed in air at atmospheric pressure for four laser fluences ranging from 130 to 500 J/cm 2 . Scanning electron microscope analysis revealed the formation of micro and nanoscale surface features including cones, grains, mounds and pores. Field emission (FE) studies have been performed in a planar diode configuration under ultra-high vacuum conditions by recording I-V characteristics and plotting corresponding electric field (E) versus emission current density (J). The Fowler-Nordheim (FN) plots are found to be linear confirming the quantum mechanical tunneling phenomena for the structured targets. The irradiated samples at different fluences exhibit a turn-on field, field enhancement factor β and a maximum current density ranging from 5 to 8.5 V/μm, 1300 to 3490 and 107 to 350 μA/cm 2 , respectively. The difference in the FE properties is attributed to the variation in the nature and density of the grown structures at different fluences. (orig.)

  6. Test field for airborne laser scanning in Finland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahokas, E.; Kaartinen, H.; Kukko, A.; Litkey, P.

    2014-11-01

    Airborne laser scanning (ALS) is a widely spread operational measurement tool for obtaining 3D coordinates of the ground surface. There is a need for calibrating the ALS system and a test field for ALS was established at the end of 2013. The test field is situated in the city of Lahti, about 100 km to the north of Helsinki. The size of the area is approximately 3.5 km × 3.2 km. Reference data was collected with a mobile laser scanning (MLS) system assembled on a car roof. Some streets were measured both ways and most of them in one driving direction only. The MLS system of the Finnish Geodetic Institute (FGI) consists of a navigation system (NovAtel SPAN GNSS-IMU) and a laser scanner (FARO Focus3D 120). In addition to the MLS measurements more than 800 reference points were measured using a Trimble R8 VRS-GNSS system. Reference points are along the streets, on parking lots, and white pedestrian crossing line corners which can be used as reference targets. The National Land Survey of Finland has already used this test field this spring for calibrating their Leica ALS-70 scanner. Especially it was easier to determine the encoder scale factor parameter using this test field. Accuracy analysis of the MLS points showed that the point height RMSE is 2.8 cm and standard deviation is 2.6 cm. Our purpose is to measure both more MLS data and more reference points in the test field area to get a better spatial coverage. Calibration flight heights are planned to be 1000 m and 2500 m above ground level. A cross pattern, southwest-northeast and northwest-southeast, will be flown both in opposite directions.

  7. Atomic spectroscopy with diode lasers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tino, G.M.

    1994-01-01

    Some applications of semiconductor diode lasers in atomic spectroscopy are discussed by describing different experiments performed with lasers emitting in the visible and in the near-infrared region. I illustrate the results obtained in the investigation of near-infrared transitions of atomic oxygen and of the visible intercombination line of strontium. I also describe how two offset-frequency-locked diode lasers can be used to excite velocity selective Raman transitions in Cs. I discuss the spectral resolution, the accuracy of frequency measurements, and the detection sensitivity achievable with diode lasers. (orig.)

  8. Atmospheric influences on infrared-laser signals used for occultation measurements between Low Earth Orbit satellites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Schweitzer

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available LEO-LEO infrared-laser occultation (LIO is a new occultation technique between Low Earth Orbit (LEO satellites, which applies signals in the short wave infrared spectral range (SWIR within 2 μm to 2.5 μm. It is part of the LEO-LEO microwave and infrared-laser occultation (LMIO method that enables to retrieve thermodynamic profiles (pressure, temperature, humidity and altitude levels from microwave signals and profiles of greenhouse gases and further variables such as line-of-sight wind speed from simultaneously measured LIO signals. Due to the novelty of the LMIO method, detailed knowledge of atmospheric influences on LIO signals and of their suitability for accurate trace species retrieval did not yet exist. Here we discuss these influences, assessing effects from refraction, trace species absorption, aerosol extinction and Rayleigh scattering in detail, and addressing clouds, turbulence, wind, scattered solar radiation and terrestrial thermal radiation as well. We show that the influence of refractive defocusing, foreign species absorption, aerosols and turbulence is observable, but can be rendered small to negligible by use of the differential transmission principle with a close frequency spacing of LIO absorption and reference signals within 0.5%. The influences of Rayleigh scattering and terrestrial thermal radiation are found negligible. Cloud-scattered solar radiation can be observable under bright-day conditions, but this influence can be made negligible by a close time spacing (within 5 ms of interleaved laser-pulse and background signals. Cloud extinction loss generally blocks SWIR signals, except very thin or sub-visible cirrus clouds, which can be addressed by retrieving a cloud layering profile and exploiting it in the trace species retrieval. Wind can have a small influence on the trace species absorption, which can be made negligible by using a simultaneously retrieved or a moderately accurate background wind speed profile. We

  9. Single mode operation of a hybrid optically pumped D2O far infrared laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yuan, D.C.; Siegrist, M.R.

    1990-04-01

    We have achieved single mode operation in a hybrid optically pumped D 2 O far infrared laser. The active volume of the resonator was divided into two sections separated by a thin plastic foil. The larger section served as the main gain medium and the shorter section as mode selective element. The vapor pressure in the smaller volume was either very low or alternatively about 3 times higher than the pressure in the main part. In both cases single mode operation was achieved without any reduction of the total output energy. (author) 13 refs., 7 figs

  10. Quantum chaos in the Henon-Heiles oscillator under intense laser fields. IT-1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gupta, Neetu; Deb, B.M.

    2004-01-01

    Full text: The quantum domain behaviour of the classically chaotic Henon-Heiles oscillator (HHO) has been studied earlier by several workers, without invoking either a weak or strong time- dependent external perturbation. This work looks at the motion of an electron moving in the HH potential under intense laser fields. The time-dependent Schroedinger equation is numerically solved in order to study the sensitivity of the system to initial conditions. The similarities in responses between the HHO and atoms/molecules to intense laser fields are examined; from this one might speculate that atoms/molecules in intense laser fields might exhibit quantum chaos

  11. Generation of pulsed far-infrared radiation and its application for far-infrared time-resolved spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kondo, Yasuhiro [Tohoku Univ., Sendai (Japan). Faculty of Engineering

    1996-07-01

    So-called time-resolved spectroscopy technique has been used from old time as the means for studying the dynamic optical property, light-induced reaction and so on of matters. As an example, there is the method called pump and probe, and here, the wavelength of this probe light is the problem. If the object energy region is limited to about 0.1 eV, fast time-resolved spectroscopy is feasible relatively easily. However, energy region is extended to low energy region, the light source which is available as the pulsed probe light having sufficient intensity is limited. In this paper, the attempt of time-resolved spectroscopy utilizing coherent radiation, which has ended in failure, and the laser pulse-induced far-infrared radiation which can be utilized as new far-infrared probe light are reported. The reason why far-infrared radiation is used is explained. The attempt of time-resolved spectroscopy using NaCl crystals is reported on the equipment, the method of measuring absorption spectra and the results. Laser pulse-induced far-infrared radiation and the method of generating it are described. The multi-channel detector for far-infrared radiation which was made for trial is shown. (K.I.)

  12. Kinetic and diagnostic studies of molecular plasmas using laser absorption techniques

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Welzel, S.; Rousseau, A.; Davies, P.B.; Röpcke, J.

    2007-01-01

    Within the last decade mid infrared absorption spectroscopy between 3 and 20 µm, known as Infrared Laser Absorption Spectroscopy (IRLAS) and based on tuneable semiconductor lasers, namely lead salt diode lasers, often called tuneable diode lasers (TDL), and quantum cascade lasers (QCL) has

  13. Selective treatment of carious dentin using a mid-infrared tunable pulsed laser at 6 μm wavelength range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saiki, Masayuki; Ishii, Katsunori; Yoshikawa, Kazushi; Yasuo, Kenzo; Yamamoto, Kazuyo; Awazu, Kunio

    2011-03-01

    Optical technologies have good potential for caries detection, prevention, excavation, and the realization of minimal intervention dentistry. This study aimed to develop a selective excavation technique of carious tissue using the specific absorption in 6 μm wavelength range. Bovine dentin demineralized with lactic acid solution was used as a carious dentin model. A mid-infrared tunable pulsed laser was obtained by difference-frequency generation technique. The wavelength was tuned to 6.02 and 6.42 μm which correspond to absorption bands called amide I and amide II, respectively. The laser delivers 5 ns pulse width at a repetition rate of 10 Hz. The morphological change after irradiation was observed with a scanning electron microscope, and the measurement of ablation depth was performed with a confocal laser microscope. At λ = 6.02 μm and the average power density of 15 W/cm2, demineralized dentin was removed selectively with less-invasive effect on sound dentin. The wavelength of 6.42 μm also showed the possibility of selective removal. High ablation efficiency and low thermal side effect were observed using the nanosecond pulsed laser with λ = 6.02 μm. In the near future, development of compact laser device will open the minimal invasive laser treatment to the dental clinic.

  14. Superintense fields from multiple ultrashort laser pulses retroreflected in circular geometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ooi, C. H. Raymond

    2010-02-01

    Laser field with superintensity beyond 1029 W/cm2 can be generated by coherent superposition of multiple 100 fs laser pulses in circular geometry setup upon retroreflection by a ring mirror. We have found the criteria for attaining such intensities using broadband ring mirror within the practical damage threshold and paraxial focusing regime. Simple expressions for the intensity enhancement factor are obtained, providing insight for achieving unlimited laser intensity. Higher intensities can be achieved by using few-cycle laser pulses.

  15. Curved laser microjet in near field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotlyar, Victor V; Stafeev, Sergey S; Kovalev, Alexey A

    2013-06-20

    With the use of the finite-difference time-domain-based simulation and a scanning near-field optical microscope that has a metal cantilever tip, the diffraction of a linearly polarized plane wave of wavelength λ by a glass corner step of height 2λ is shown to generate a low divergence laser jet of a root-parabolic form: over a distance of 4.7λ on the optical axis, the beam path is shifted by 2.1λ. The curved laser jet of the FWHM length depth of focus=9.5λ has the diameter FWHM=1.94λ over the distance 5.5λ, and the intensity maximum is 5 times higher than the incident wave intensity. The discrepancy between the analytical and the experimental results amounts to 11%.

  16. Infrared signatures for remote sensing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McDowell, R.S.; Sharpe, S.W.; Kelly, J.F.

    1994-04-01

    PNL's capabilities for infrared and near-infrared spectroscopy include tunable-diode-laser (TDL) systems covering 300--3,000 cm -1 at 2 laser. PNL also has a beam expansion source with a 12-cm slit, which provides a 3-m effective path for gases at ∼10 K, giving a Doppler width of typically 10 MHz; and long-path static gas cells (to 100 m). In applying this equipment to signatures work, the authors emphasize the importance of high spectral resolution for detecting and identifying atmospheric interferences; for identifying the optimum analytical frequencies; for deriving, by spectroscopic analysis, the molecular parameters needed for modeling; and for obtaining data on species and/or bands that are not in existing databases. As an example of such spectroscopy, the authors have assigned and analyzed the C-Cl stretching region of CCl 4 at 770--800 cm -1 . This is an important potential signature species whose IR absorption has remained puzzling because of the natural isotopic mix, extensive hot-band structure, and a Fermi resonance involving a nearby combination band. Instrument development projects include the IR sniffer, a small high-sensitivity, high-discrimination (Doppler-limited) device for fence-line or downwind monitoring that is effective even in regions of atmospheric absorption; preliminary work has achieved sensitivities at the low-ppb level. Other work covers trace species detection with TDLs, and FM-modulated CO 2 laser LIDAR. The authors are planning a field experiment to interrogate the Hanford tank farm for signature species from Rattlesnake Mountain, a standoff of ca. 15 km, to be accompanied by simultaneous ground-truthing at the tanks

  17. Near-field enhanced electron acceleration from dielectric nanospheres in intense few-cycle laser fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zherebtsov, S.; Znakovskaya, I.; Wirth, A.; Herrwerth, O.; Suessmann, F.; Ahmad, I.; Trushin, S.; Fennel, Th.; Plenge, J.; Antonsson, E.

    2010-01-01

    Complete text of publication follows. The interaction of nanostructured materials with few-cycle laser light has attracted significant attention lately. This interest is driven by both the quest for fundamental insight into the real-time dynamics of many-electron systems and a wide range of far-reaching applications, such as, e.g. ultrafast computation and information storage on the nanoscale and the generation of XUV frequency combs. We investigated the above-threshold electron emission from isolated SiO 2 nanoparticles in waveform controlled few-cycle laser fields at intensities close to the tunneling regime. The enhancement of the electron acceleration from the silica nanoparticles was explored as a function of the particle size (ranging from 50 to 147 nm) and the laser peak intensity (1 - 4x10 13 W/cm 2 ). Obtained cut-off values in the kinetic energy spectra are displayed in Fig. 1. The cut-off values show a linear dependence with intensity within the studied intensity range, with the average cut-off energy being 53 U P , indicated by the black line. Quasi-classical simulations of the emission process reveal that electron rescattering in the locally enhanced near-field of the particle is responsible for the large energy gain. The observed near-field enhancement offers promising new routes for pushing the limits of strong-field phenomena relying on electron rescattering, such as, high-harmonic generation and molecular imaging.

  18. Gain and Threshold Current in Type II In(AsSb Mid-Infrared Quantum Dot Lasers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qi Lu

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available In this work, we improved the performance of mid-infrared type II InSb/InAs quantum dot (QD laser diodes by incorporating a lattice-matched p-InAsSbP cladding layer. The resulting devices exhibited emission around 3.1 µm and operated up to 120 K in pulsed mode, which is the highest working temperature for this type of QD laser. The modal gain was estimated to be 2.9 cm−1 per QD layer. A large blue shift (~150 nm was observed in the spontaneous emission spectrum below threshold due to charging effects. Because of the QD size distribution, only a small fraction of QDs achieve threshold at the same injection level at 4 K. Carrier leakage from the waveguide into the cladding layers was found to be the main reason for the high threshold current at higher temperatures.

  19. Compton scattering and electron-atom scattering in an elliptically polarized laser field of relativistic radiation power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Panek, P.; Kaminski, J.Z.; Ehlotzky, F.

    2003-01-01

    Presently available laser sources can yield powers for which the ponderomotive energy of an electron U p can be equal to or even larger than the rest energy mc 2 of an electron. Therefore it has become of interest to consider fundamental radiation-induced or assisted processes in such powerful laser fields. In the present work we consider laser-induced Compton scattering and laser-assisted electron atom scattering in such fields, assuming that the laser beam has arbitrary elliptic polarization. We investigate in detail the angular and polarisation dependence of the differential cross-sections of the two laser-induced or laser-assisted nonlinear processes as a function of the order N of absorbed or emitted laser photons ω. The present work is a generalization of our previous analysis of Compton scattering and electron-atom scattering in a linearly polarized laser field. (authors)

  20. A procedure for calibration and validation of FE modelling of laser-assisted metal to polymer direct joining

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambiase, F.; Genna, S.; Kant, R.

    2018-01-01

    The quality of the joints produced by means of Laser-Assisted Metal to Polymer direct joining (LAMP) is strongly influenced by the temperature field produced during the laser treatment. The main phenomena including the adhesion of the plastic to the metal sheet and the development of bubbles (on the plastic surface) depend on the temperature reached by the polymer at the interface. Such a temperature should be higher than the softening temperature, but lower than the degradation temperature of the polymer. However, the temperature distribution is difficult to be measured by experimental tests since the most polymers (which are transparent to the laser radiation) are often opaque to the infrared wavelength. Thus, infrared analysis involving pyrometers and infrared camera is not suitable for this purpose. On the other hand, thermocouples are difficult to be placed at the interface without influencing the temperature conditions. In this paper, an integrated approach involving both experimental measurements and a Finite Element (FE) model were used to perform such an analysis. LAMP of Polycarbonate and AISI304 stainless steel was performed by means of high power diode laser and the main process parameters i.e. laser power and scanning speed were varied. Comparing the experimental measurements and the FE model prediction of the thermal field, a good correspondence was achieved proving the suitability of the developed model and the proposed calibration procedure to be ready used for process design and optimization.

  1. Pulsed laser deposition of semiconductor-ITO composite films on electric-field-applied substrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Narazaki, Aiko; Sato, Tadatake; Kawaguchi, Yoshizo; Niino, Hiroyuki; Yabe, Akira; Sasaki, Takeshi; Koshizaki, Naoto

    2002-01-01

    The DC electric-field effect on the crystallinity of II-VI semiconductor in composite systems has been investigated for CdS-ITO films fabricated via alternative pulsed laser deposition (PLD) of CdS and indium tin oxide (ITO) on electric-field-applied substrates. The alternative laser ablation was performed under irradiation of ArF excimer laser in mixture gas of helium and oxygen. The application of electric-field facilitated the preferential crystal-growth of CdS in nanometer scale at low pressure, whereas all the films grown without the field were amorphous. There is a large difference in the crystallization between the films grown on field-applied and heated substrates; the latter showed the crystal-growth with random orientations. This difference indicates that the existence of electric-field has an influence on the transformation from amorphous to crystalline phase of CdS. The driving force for the field-induced crystallization is also discussed in the light of the Joule heat

  2. Controlling the optical field chaos in storage ring free-electron lasers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Wenjie

    1995-01-01

    The controlling of optical field chaos in a storage ring free-electron laser oscillator is discussed by using a phenomenal model. A novel method (which is called the 'beating method') of controlling chaos in a nonlinear dynamical system described by non-autonomous ordinary differential equations was developed. The result of theoretical analysis and numerical simulation shows that the optical field chaos in a storage ring free-electron laser oscillator can be suppressed and a periodic laser intensity can be obtained when a weak periodic control field is added to the optical cavity. The validity of this method of eliminating chaos is confirmed by the fact that the leading Lyapunov characteristic exponent of the system changes from a positive real number to a negative one. A further research is carried out, and it is found that only when the period of the control field equals to an integral multiple of that of the gain modulation in the optical cavity can the optical field chaos be suppressed. This means that the 'beating method' of controlling chaos is a kind of resonant method. A way to determine the 'best beating position' in the phase trajectory has also been obtained

  3. Ground-based infrared surveys: imaging the thermal fields at volcanoes and revealing the controlling parameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pantaleo, Michele; Walter, Thomas

    2013-04-01

    Temperature monitoring is a widespread procedure in the frame of volcano hazard monitoring. Indeed temperature changes are expected to reflect changes in volcanic activity. We propose a new approach, within the thermal monitoring, which is meant to shed light on the parameters controlling the fluid pathways and the fumarole sites by using infrared measurements. Ground-based infrared cameras allow one to remotely image the spatial distribution, geometric pattern and amplitude of fumarole fields on volcanoes at metre to centimetre resolution. Infrared mosaics and time series are generated and interpreted, by integrating geological field observations and modeling, to define the setting of the volcanic degassing system at shallow level. We present results for different volcano morphologies and show that lithology, structures and topography control the appearance of fumarole field by the creation of permeability contrasts. We also show that the relative importance of those parameters is site-dependent. Deciphering the setting of the degassing system is essential for hazard assessment studies because it would improve our understanding on how the system responds to endogenous or exogenous modification.

  4. Free-Free Transitions in the Presence of Laser Fields at Very Low Incident Electron Energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatia, A. K.; Sinha, Chandana

    2010-01-01

    We study the free-free transition in electron-hydrogenic systems in ground state in presence of an external laser field at very loud incident energies. The laser field is treated classically while the collision dynamics is treated quantum mechanically. The laser field is chosen to be monochromatic, linearly polarized and homogeneous. The incident electron is considered to be dressed by the laser in a nonperturbative manner by choosing a Volkov wave function for it. The scattering weave function for the electron is solved numerically by taking into account the effect of the electron exchange, short-range as well as of the long-range interactions to get the S and P wave phase shifts while for the higher angular momentum phase shifts the exchange approximation has only been considered. We calculate the laser assisted differential cross sections (LADCS) for the aforesaid free-free transition process for single photon absorption/emission. The laser intensity is chosen to be much less than the atomic field intensity. A strong suppression is noted in the LADCS as compared to the field free (FF) cross sections. Unlike the FF ones, the LADCS exhibit some oscillations having a distinct maximum at a low value of the scattering angle depending on the laser parameters as well as on the incident energies.

  5. Laser-based irradiation apparatus and method to measure the functional dose-rate response of semiconductor devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horn, Kevin M [Albuquerque, NM

    2008-05-20

    A broad-beam laser irradiation apparatus can measure the parametric or functional response of a semiconductor device to exposure to dose-rate equivalent infrared laser light. Comparisons of dose-rate response from before, during, and after accelerated aging of a device, or from periodic sampling of devices from fielded operational systems can determine if aging has affected the device's overall functionality. The dependence of these changes on equivalent dose-rate pulse intensity and/or duration can be measured with the apparatus. The synchronized introduction of external electrical transients into the device under test can be used to simulate the electrical effects of the surrounding circuitry's response to a radiation exposure while exposing the device to dose-rate equivalent infrared laser light.

  6. Bracket debonding by mid-infrared laser radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jelínková, H; Šulc, J; Koranda, P; Němec, M; Dostálová, T; Hofmanova, P

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to determine the proper laser radiation for ceramic bracket debonding and the investigation of the tooth root temperature injury. The debonding was investigated by diode-pumped continuously running Tm:YAP and Nd:YAG lasers, and by GaAs laser diode generating radiation with the wavelengths 1.997 μm, 1.444 μm, and 0.808 μm, respectively. The possibility of brackets removal by laser radiation was investigated together with the tooth and, it specifically, root temperature rise. From the results it follows that continuously running diode pumped Tm:YAG or Nd:YAG laser generating wavelengths 1.997 μm or 1.444 μm, respectively, having the output power 1 W can be good candidates for ceramic brackets debonding

  7. Atomic motion in a high-intensity standing wave laser field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saez Ramdohr, L.F.

    1987-01-01

    This work discusses the effect of a high-intensity standing wave laser field on the motion of neutral atoms moving with a relatively high velocity. The analysis involves a detailed calculation of the force acting on the atoms and the calculation of the diffusion tensor associated with the fluctuations of the quantum force operator. The high-intensity laser field limit corresponds to a Rabi frequency much greater than the natural rate of the atom. The general results are valid for any atomic velocity. Results are then specialized to the case of slow and fast atoms where the Doppler shift of the laser frequency due to the atomic motion is either smaller or larger than the natural decay rate of the atom. The results obtained for the force and diffusion tensor are applied to a particular ideal experiment that studies the evolution of a fast atomic beam crossing a high-intensity laser beam. The theories developed previously, for a similar laser configuration, discuss only the low atomic velocities case and not the more realistic case of fast atoms. Here, an approximate solution of the equation for the distribution is obtained. Starting from the approximate distribution function, the deflection angle and dispersion angle for the atomic beam with respect to the free motion are calculated

  8. Ambient fields generated by a laser spark

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Rohlena, Karel; Mašek, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 61, č. 2 (2016), s. 119-124 ISSN 0029-5922 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LD14089; GA MŠk(CZ) LG13031 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : laser spark * radiation chemistry * field generation Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics Impact factor: 0.760, year: 2016

  9. Rapid long-wave infrared laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy measurements using a mercury-cadmium-telluride linear array detection system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Clayton S-C; Brown, Eiei; Kumi-Barimah, Eric; Hommerich, Uwe; Jin, Feng; Jia, Yingqing; Trivedi, Sudhir; D'souza, Arvind I; Decuir, Eric A; Wijewarnasuriya, Priyalal S; Samuels, Alan C

    2015-11-20

    In this work, we develop a mercury-cadmium-telluride linear array detection system that is capable of rapidly capturing (∼1-5  s) a broad spectrum of atomic and molecular laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) emissions in the long-wave infrared (LWIR) region (∼5.6-10  μm). Similar to the conventional UV-Vis LIBS, a broadband emission spectrum of condensed phase samples covering the whole 5.6-10 μm region can be acquired from just a single laser-induced microplasma or averaging a few single laser-induced microplasmas. Atomic and molecular signature emission spectra of solid inorganic and organic tablets and thin liquid films deposited on a rough asphalt surface are observed. This setup is capable of rapidly probing samples "as is" without the need of elaborate sample preparation and also offers the possibility of a simultaneous UV-Vis and LWIR LIBS measurement.

  10. Near field imaging of transient collisional excitation x-ray laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Momoko; Kado, Masataka; Hasegawa, Noboru; Kawachi, Tetsuya; Sukegawa, Kouta; Lu, Peixiang; Nagashima, Akira; Kato, Yoshiaki

    2001-01-01

    We observed the spatial profile of the transient collisional excitation Ni-like Ag laser (λ=13.9 nm) for various plasma lengths using the near field imaging method. The gain coefficient of the x-ray laser was estimated as 24 cm -1 . The gain region was a 50 μm crescent shape and included localized high gain areas. (author)

  11. Estudo experimental da aplicação retiniana do laser infravermelho via transescleral sob condições de baixa visibilidade Transscleral infrared laser retinal photocoagulation experimental study under low visibility conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dario Grechi Goulart

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVOS: Pesquisa experimental, com laser de diodo infravermelho, para estimar a segurança, a reprodutibilidade e a permeabilidade da parede ocular à sua atuação clínica, quando aplicado via transescleral, em condições de baixa visibilidade. MÉTODOS: Submetemos olhos de coelhos pigmentados da raça Nova Zelândia à fotocoagulação retiniana por laser de diodo infravermelho. No olho direito, realizamos fotocoagulação via transescleral sob parâmetros de potência e tempo pré-determinados clinicamente. No olho esquerdo, foram repetidos os mesmos valores da potência e tempo usados no olho direito, desta vez, via transpupilar. Imediatamente e após 2 meses, estudos clínicos baseados na retinografia e histopatológicos foram realizados. RESULTADOS: A permeabilidade da parede ocular, quando da aplicação do laser de diodo infravermelho via transescleral, variou entre 58,95 e 63,87%. A média da permeabilidade da parede ocular a 300 mW (63,14% mostrou-se significativamente superior àquela da permeabilidade da parede ocular encontrada a 500 mW (59,11%, (PPURPOSE: Retinal photocoagulation under poor visualization condition is often required. Transscleral infrared laser can be used as an alternative to regular transpupillary treatment. Based upon retinographic measurements, we proposed to estimate the reproducibility as well as ocular wall permeability rate for this treatment. Our primary goal was to evaluate whether this technique can deliver adequate photocoagulation at predetermined parameters without direct retinal visualization. METHODS: In New Zealand pigmented rabbits, optimal transscleral infrared diode laser settings were administered to the right eye. With the same parameters, transpupillary photocoagulation was repeated in the left eye. Retinographic and clinical examinations were performed immediately and two months later. RESULTS: Ocular wall permeability rate varied between 58.95 and 63.87%. Average permeability using a

  12. Broadening the applications of the atom probe technique by ultraviolet femtosecond laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hono, K., E-mail: kazuhiro.hono@nims.go.jp [National Institute for Materials Science, Tsukuba 305-0047 (Japan); Graduate School of Pure and Applied Sciences, University of Tsukuba, Tsukuba 305-0047 (Japan); CREST, Japan Science and Technology Agency (Japan); Ohkubo, T. [National Institute for Materials Science, Tsukuba 305-0047 (Japan); CREST, Japan Science and Technology Agency (Japan); Chen, Y.M.; Kodzuka, M. [Graduate School of Pure and Applied Sciences, University of Tsukuba, Tsukuba 305-0047 (Japan); Oh-ishi, K. [National Institute for Materials Science, Tsukuba 305-0047 (Japan); CREST, Japan Science and Technology Agency (Japan); Sepehri-Amin, H. [Graduate School of Pure and Applied Sciences, University of Tsukuba, Tsukuba 305-0047 (Japan); Li, F. [National Institute for Materials Science, Tsukuba 305-0047 (Japan); CREST, Japan Science and Technology Agency (Japan); Kinno, T. [Corporate R and D Center, Toshiba Corporation, Saiwai-ku, Kawasaki 212-8582 (Japan); CREST, Japan Science and Technology Agency (Japan); Tomiya, S.; Kanitani, Y. [Advanced Materials Laboratory, Sony Corporation, Atsugi, Kanagawa 243-0021 (Japan)

    2011-05-15

    Laser assisted field evaporation using ultraviolet (UV) wavelength gives rise to better mass resolution and signal-to-noise ratio in atom probe mass spectra of metals, semiconductors and insulators compared to infrared and green lasers. Combined with the site specific specimen preparation techniques using the lift-out and annular Ga ion milling in a focused ion beam machine, a wide variety of materials including insulating oxides can be quantitatively analyzed by the three-dimensional atom probe using UV laser assisted field evaporation. After discussing laser irradiation conditions for optimized atom probe analyses, recent atom probe tomography results on oxides, semiconductor devices and grain boundaries of sintered magnets are presented. -- Research highlights: {yields} Application of ultraviolet (UV) femtosecond pulsed laser in a three dimensional atom probe (3DAP). {yields} Improved mass resolution and signal-to-noise ratio in atom probe mass spectra using UV laser. {yields} UV laser facilitates 3DAP analysis of insulating oxides. {yields} Quantitative analysis of wide variety of materials including insulating oxides using UV femotosecond laser.

  13. Picosecond mid-infrared amplifier for high average power.

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Botha, LR

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available High pressure CO2 lasers are good candidates for amplifying picosecond mid infrared pulses. High pressure CO2 lasers are notorious for being unreliable and difficult to operate. In this paper a high pressure CO2 laser is presented based on well...

  14. Classical origins of stabilization in circularly polarized laser fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chism, Will; Choi, Dae-Il; Reichl, L. E.

    2000-01-01

    We investigate the interaction of a two-dimensional model atom with an intense, high-frequency circularly polarized laser pulse. As the laser intensity is increased, the ionization rate initially increases, then decreases dramatically, with the electron wave function developing an asymmetric ring form which rotates with the electric field. We provide evidence that this wave form is due to localization of the electron onto nonlinear classical structures. (c) 2000 The American Physical Society

  15. Evolution of laser skin resurfacing: from scanning to fractional technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aslam, Arif; Alster, Tina S

    2014-11-01

    Laser skin resurfacing was popularized for photoaged and scarred skin 2 decades ago. Since then, several technologic advancements have led to a new generation of delivery systems that produce excellent clinical outcomes with reduced treatment risks and faster recovery times. To review the evolution of laser skin resurfacing from pulsed and scanned infrared laser technology to the latest techniques of nonablative and ablative fractional photothermolysis. All published literature regarding laser skin resurfacing was analyzed and collated. A comprehensive review of laser skin resurfacing was outlined and future developments in the field of fractionated laser skin treatment were introduced. Laser skin resurfacing has evolved such that excellent clinical outcomes in photodamaged and scarred skin are achieved with rapid wound healing. As newer devices are developed, the applications of this technology will have a dramatic effect on the delivery of medical and aesthetic dermatology.

  16. Photoionization cross-section of donor impurity in spherical quantum dots under electric and intense laser fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burileanu, L.M.

    2014-01-01

    Using a perturbative method we have investigated the behavior of the binding energy and photoionization cross-section of a donor impurity in spherical GaAs–GaAlAs quantum dots under the influence of electric and intense high-frequency laser fields. The dependencies of the binding energy and photoionization cross-section on electric and laser field strength, dot radius and impurity position were investigated. Our results show that the amplitude of photoionization cross-section grows with the dot radius increase and the peak of the cross-section blue shifts with the laser intensity increment. We have found that the binding energy is not a monotonically function of laser intensity: it decreases or increases depending on electric field regime. The studied effects are even more pronounced as the quantum dot radius is smaller. -- Highlights: • A photoionization cross-section study in quantum dots under laser and electric fields. • The photoionization cross-section peaks are red shifted by the electric field. • The photoionization cross-section peaks are blue shifted by the laser field. • The combined effects of applied fields strongly affect the binding energy

  17. Effect of solenoidal magnetic field on drifting laser plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Kazumasa; Okamura, Masahiro; Sekine, Megumi; Cushing, Eric; Jandovitz, Peter

    2013-04-01

    An ion source for accelerators requires to provide a stable waveform with a certain pulse length appropriate to the application. The pulse length of laser ion source is easy to control because it is expected to be proportional to plasma drifting distance. However, current density decay is proportional to the cube of the drifting distance, so large current loss will occur under unconfined drift. We investigated the stability and current decay of a Nd:YAG laser generated copper plasma confined by a solenoidal field using a Faraday cup to measure the current waveform. It was found that the plasma was unstable at certain magnetic field strengths, so a baffle was introduced to limit the plasma diameter at injection and improve the stability. Magnetic field, solenoid length, and plasma diameter were varied in order to find the conditions that minimize current decay and maximize stability.

  18. Effect of solenoidal magnetic field on drifting laser plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, Kazumasa; Sekine, Megumi; Okamura, Masahiro; Cushing, Eric; Jandovitz, Peter

    2013-01-01

    An ion source for accelerators requires to provide a stable waveform with a certain pulse length appropriate to the application. The pulse length of laser ion source is easy to control because it is expected to be proportional to plasma drifting distance. However, current density decay is proportional to the cube of the drifting distance, so large current loss will occur under unconfined drift. We investigated the stability and current decay of a Nd:YAG laser generated copper plasma confined by a solenoidal field using a Faraday cup to measure the current waveform. It was found that the plasma was unstable at certain magnetic field strengths, so a baffle was introduced to limit the plasma diameter at injection and improve the stability. Magnetic field, solenoid length, and plasma diameter were varied in order to find the conditions that minimize current decay and maximize stability.

  19. Effect of solenoidal magnetic field on drifting laser plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takahashi, Kazumasa; Sekine, Megumi [Tokyo Institute of Technology, Yokohama 226-8502 (Japan); Okamura, Masahiro [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States) and RIKEN, Wako-shi, Saitama 351-0198 (United States); Cushing, Eric [Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Jandovitz, Peter [Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853 (United States)

    2013-04-19

    An ion source for accelerators requires to provide a stable waveform with a certain pulse length appropriate to the application. The pulse length of laser ion source is easy to control because it is expected to be proportional to plasma drifting distance. However, current density decay is proportional to the cube of the drifting distance, so large current loss will occur under unconfined drift. We investigated the stability and current decay of a Nd:YAG laser generated copper plasma confined by a solenoidal field using a Faraday cup to measure the current waveform. It was found that the plasma was unstable at certain magnetic field strengths, so a baffle was introduced to limit the plasma diameter at injection and improve the stability. Magnetic field, solenoid length, and plasma diameter were varied in order to find the conditions that minimize current decay and maximize stability.

  20. Characterization of collisionally pumped optical-field-ionization soft X-ray lasers

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mocek, Tomáš; Sebban, S.; Bettaibi, I.; Upcraft, L. M.; Balcou, P.; Breger, P.; Zeitoun, P.; Le Pape, S.; Ros, D.; Klisnick, A.; Carillon, A.; Jamelot, G.; Rus, Bedřich; Wyart, J. F.

    2004-01-01

    Roč. 78, - (2004), s. 939-944 ISSN 0946-2171 Grant - others:HPRI(XE) 199900086 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z1010921 Keywords : X-ray lasers * optical-field-ionization * collisional excitation Subject RIV: BH - Optics, Masers, Lasers Impact factor: 2.215, year: 2004

  1. Features of laser spectroscopy and diagnostics of plasma ions in high magnetic fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Semerok, A F; Fomichev, S V

    2003-01-01

    Laser induced fluorescence and laser absorption spectroscopies of plasma ions in high magnetic fields have been investigated. Both the high degree of Zeeman splitting of the resonant transitions and the ion rotational movement drastically change the properties of the resonance interaction of the continuous wave laser radiation with ions in highly magnetized plasma. Numerical solution of the density matrix equation for a dissipative two-level system with time-dependent detuning from resonance was used to analyse this interaction. A theoretical simulation was performed and compared with the experimental results obtained from the laser spectroscopy diagnostics of barium plasma ions in high magnetic fields in the several tesla range

  2. Infrared diode laser spectroscopy of lithium hydride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamada, C.; Hirota, E.

    1988-01-01

    The fundamental and hot bands of the vibration--rotation transitions of 6 LiH, 7 LiH, 6 LiD, and 7 LiD were observed by infrared diode laser spectroscopy at Doppler-limited resolution. Lithium hydride molecules were produced by the reaction of the Li vapor with hydrogen at elevated temperatures. Some 40 transitions were observed and, after combined with submillimeter-wave spectra reported by G. M. Plummer et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 81, 4893 (1984)], were analyzed to yield Dunham-type constants with accuracies more than an order of magnitude higher than those published in the literature. It was clearly demonstrated that the Born--Oppenheimer approximation did not hold, and some parameters representing the breakdown were evaluated. The Born--Oppenheimer internuclear distance r/sup BO//sub e/ was derived to be 1.594 914 26 (59) A, where a new value of Planck's constant recommended by CODATA was employed. The relative intensity of absorption lines was measured to determine the ratio of the permanent dipole moment to its first derivative with respect to the internuclear distance: μ/sub e/ [(partialμpartialr)/sub e/ r/sub e/ ] = 1.743(86). The pressure broadening parameter Δν/sub p/ P was determined to be 6.40 (22) MHzTorr by measuring the linewidth dependence on the pressure of hydrogen, which was about four times larger than the value for the dipole--quadrupole interaction estimated by Kiefer and Bushkovitch's theory

  3. Infrared laser driven double proton transfer. An optimal control theory study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdel-Latif, Mahmoud K.; Kühn, Oliver

    2010-02-01

    Laser control of ultrafast double proton transfer is investigated for a two-dimensional model system describing stepwise and concerted transfer pathways. The pulse design has been done by employing optimal control theory in combination with the multiconfiguration time-dependent Hartree wave packet propagation. The obtained laser fields correspond to multiple pump-dump pulse sequences. Special emphasis is paid to the relative importance of stepwise and concerted transfer pathways for the driven wave packet and its dependence on the parameters of the model Hamiltonian as well as on the propagation time. While stepwise transfer is dominating in all cases considered, for high barrier systems concerted transfer proceeding via tunneling can make a contribution.

  4. Modelling of infrared multiphoton absorption and dissociation for design of reactors for isotope separation by lasers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takeuchi, Kazuo; Nakane, Ryohei; Inoue, Cihiro

    1981-01-01

    A series of experiments were performed on infrared laser beam absorption (multiphoton absorption) and subsequent dissociation (multiphoton dissociation) of CF 3 Cl to propose models for the design of reactors for isotope separation by lasers. A parallel beam geometry was utilized in batch irradiation experiments to make direct compilation of lumped-parameter data possible. Multiphoton absorption is found to be expressed by a power-law extension of the law of Lambert and by an addition of a new term for buffer gas effect to the law of Beer. For reaction analysis, a method to evaluate the effect of incomplete mixing on apparent reaction rates is first presented. Secondly, multiphoton dissociation of Cf 3 Cl is found to occur in pseudo-first order fashion and the specific reaction rates for different beam fluence are shown to be correlated to the absorbed energy. (author)

  5. Controlling the alignment of neutral molecules by a strong laser field

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sakai, H.; Hilligsøe, Karen Marie; Hald, K.

    1999-01-01

    by lowering the initial rotational energy of the molecules or by increasing the laser intensity. The alignment is measured by photodissociating the molecules with a femtosecond laser pulse and detecting the direction of the photofragments by imaging techniques. The strongest degree of alignment observed......A strong nonresonant nanosecond laser pulse is used to align neutral iodine molecules. The technique, applicable to both polar and nonpolar molecules, relies on the interaction between the strong laser field and the induced dipole moment of the molecules. The degree of alignment is enhanced...

  6. Long-term reduction in infrared autofluorescence caused by infrared light below the maximum permissible exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masella, Benjamin D; Williams, David R; Fischer, William S; Rossi, Ethan A; Hunter, Jennifer J

    2014-05-20

    Many retinal imaging instruments use infrared wavelengths to reduce the risk of light damage. However, we have discovered that exposure to infrared illumination causes a long-lasting reduction in infrared autofluorescence (IRAF). We have characterized the dependence of this effect on radiant exposure and investigated its origin. A scanning laser ophthalmoscope was used to obtain IRAF images from two macaques before and after exposure to 790-nm light (15-450 J/cm(2)). Exposures were performed with either raster-scanning or uniform illumination. Infrared autofluorescence images also were obtained in two humans exposed to 790-nm light in a separate study. Humans were assessed with direct ophthalmoscopy, Goldmann visual fields, multifocal ERG, and photopic microperimetry to determine whether these measures revealed any effects in the exposed locations. A significant decrease in IRAF after exposure to infrared light was seen in both monkeys and humans. In monkeys, the magnitude of this reduction increased with retinal radiant exposure. Partial recovery was seen at 1 month, with full recovery within 21 months. Consistent with a photochemical origin, IRAF decreases caused by either raster-scanning or uniform illumination were not significantly different. We were unable to detect any effect of the light exposure with any measure other than IRAF imaging. We cannot exclude the possibility that changes could be detected with more sensitive tests or longer follow-up. This long-lasting effect of infrared illumination in both humans and monkeys occurs at exposure levels four to five times below current safety limits. The photochemical basis for this phenomenon remains unknown. Copyright 2014 The Association for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology, Inc.

  7. Mid-Infrared Fiber Lasers (Les fibres laser infrarouge moyen)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-01

    Marcel Poulain, Université de Rennes / Le Verre Fluoré, France Fluoride Fiber Sources: Problems and Prospects Prof. Marcel Poulain from Rennes...currently valid OMB control number. PLEASE DO NOT RETURN YOUR FORM TO THE ABOVE ADDRESS. 1. REPORT DATE (DD-MM-YYYY) 2. REPORT TYPE 3. DATES...Les fibres laser infrarouge moyen (RTO-MP-SET-171) Synthèse Les sources laser en infrarouge moyen sont nécessaires aux systèmes actifs de

  8. Multiphoton dissociation and thermal unimolecular reactions induced by infrared lasers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dai, H.L.

    1981-04-01

    Multiphoton dissociation (MPD) of ethyl chloride was studied using a tunable 3.3 μm laser to excite CH stretches. The absorbed energy increases almost linearly with fluence, while for 10 μm excitation there is substantial saturation. Much higher dissociation yields were observed for 3.3 μm excitation than for 10 μm excitation, reflecting bottlenecking in the discrete region of 10 μm excitation. The resonant nature of the excitation allows the rate equations description for transitions in the quasicontinuum and continuum to be extended to the discrete levels. Absorption cross sections are estimated from ordinary ir spectra. A set of cross sections which is constant or slowly decreasing with increasing vibrational excitation gives good fits to both absorption and dissociation yield data. The rate equations model was also used to quantitatively calculate the pressure dependence of the MPD yield of SF 6 caused by vibrational self-quenching. Between 1000-3000 cm -1 of energy is removed from SF 6 excited to approx. > 60 kcal/mole by collision with a cold SF 6 molecule at gas kinetic rate. Calculation showed the fluence dependence of dissociation varies strongly with the gas pressure. Infrared multiphoton excitation was applied to study thermal unimolecular reactions. With SiF 4 as absorbing gas for the CO 2 laser pulse, transient high temperature pulses were generated in a gas mixture. IR fluorescence from the medium reflected the decay of the temperature. The activation energy and the preexponential factor of the reactant dissociation were obtained from a phenomenological model calculation. Results are presented in detail

  9. Diode laser absorption spectrometry for (CO2)-C-13/(CO2)-C-12 isotope ratio analysis : Investigation on precision and accuracy levels

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Castrillo, A; Casa, G; Kerstel, E; Gianfrani, L

    2005-01-01

    Near-infrared laser spectroscopy is used to measure the C-13/C-12 isotope abundance ratio in gas phase carbon dioxide. The spectrometer, developed expressly for field applications, is based on a 2 mu m distributed feedback diode laser in combination with sensitive wavelength modulation detection. It

  10. Optical shaping of a nano-scale tip by femtosecond laser assisted field evaporation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Russo, E.; Houard, J.; Langolff, V.; Moldovan, S.; Rigutti, L.; Deconihout, B.; Blavette, D.; Bogdanowicz, J.; Vella, A.

    2018-04-01

    We have investigated the morphology of a nanotip under femtosecond laser pulse illumination and a high electric field. We show that both the symmetry and the local radius of the tip change with the direction of laser polarization as against the tip axis. The experiments were performed on the very same GaN nanotip by laser-assisted atom probe tomography and electron tomography. This allowed an accurate assessment of the tip features by following the order of evaporation of single atoms from the surface. A change of atom emission sites was observed when a change of the angle between the tip axis and the linearly polarized electric field of the laser was imposed. This enables an optical control of field-evaporation sites. A close optical control of the tip morphology on a scale below 10 nm is thus achievable. Calculations of the field at nanotip apex and absorption maps support the experimental observations. Based on the present study, methods can be developed for reshaping nanotips at the nanometer level. This finding opens perspectives for numerous applications, making use of nanotips as probes or field emitters, and for plasmonic devices.

  11. Infrared rectification in a nanoantenna-coupled metal-oxide-semiconductor tunnel diode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davids, Paul S; Jarecki, Robert L; Starbuck, Andrew; Burckel, D Bruce; Kadlec, Emil A; Ribaudo, Troy; Shaner, Eric A; Peters, David W

    2015-12-01

    Direct rectification of electromagnetic radiation is a well-established method for wireless power conversion in the microwave region of the spectrum, for which conversion efficiencies in excess of 84% have been demonstrated. Scaling to the infrared or optical part of the spectrum requires ultrafast rectification that can only be obtained by direct tunnelling. Many research groups have looked to plasmonics to overcome antenna-scaling limits and to increase the confinement. Recently, surface plasmons on heavily doped Si surfaces were investigated as a way of extending surface-mode confinement to the thermal infrared region. Here we combine a nanostructured metallic surface with a heavily doped Si infrared-reflective ground plane designed to confine infrared radiation in an active electronic direct-conversion device. The interplay of strong infrared photon-phonon coupling and electromagnetic confinement in nanoscale devices is demonstrated to have a large impact on ultrafast electronic tunnelling in metal-oxide-semiconductor (MOS) structures. Infrared dispersion of SiO2 near a longitudinal optical (LO) phonon mode gives large transverse-field confinement in a nanometre-scale oxide-tunnel gap as the wavelength-dependent permittivity changes from 1 to 0, which leads to enhanced electromagnetic fields at material interfaces and a rectified displacement current that provides a direct conversion of infrared radiation into electric current. The spectral and electrical signatures of the nanoantenna-coupled tunnel diodes are examined under broadband blackbody and quantum-cascade laser (QCL) illumination. In the region near the LO phonon resonance, we obtained a measured photoresponsivity of 2.7 mA W(-1) cm(-2) at -0.1 V.

  12. Effect of Thermal Fields on the Structure of Corrosion-Resistant Steels Under Different Modes of Laser Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarasova, T. V.; Gusarov, A. V.; Protasov, K. E.; Filatova, A. A.

    2017-11-01

    The influence of temperature fields on the structure and properties of corrosion-resistant chromium steels under different modes of laser treatment is investigated. A model of heat transfer under laser impact on target is used to plot thermal fields and cycles and cooling rates. It is shown that the model used for computing thermal fields gives tentative geometric sizes of the fusion zones under laser treatment and selective laser fusion. The cooling rate is shown to have decisive influence on the structure of corrosion-resistant steels after laser treatment with surface fusion in devices for pulsed, continuous, and selective laser melting.

  13. Spectroscopic properties of a novel near-infrared tunable laser material Ni:MgGa2O4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Takenobu; Senthil Murugan, Ganapathy; Ohishi, Yasutake

    2005-01-01

    An intense emission band from Ni 2+ in MgGa 2 O 4 spinel in the range of 1.1-1.6μm was observed at room temperature. The emission band could be assigned to the downward d-d transition of T2g3->A2g3 of Ni 2+ ions in octahedral sites. The lifetime of the emission was more than 1.6ms from 5 to 300K. This material has potential as a near-infrared tunable-laser host

  14. Infrared Multiphoton Dissociation Spectroscopy with Free-Electron Lasers: On the Road from Small Molecules to Biomolecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jašíková, Lucie; Roithová, Jana

    2018-03-07

    Infrared multiphoton dissociation (IRMPD) spectroscopy is commonly used to determine the structure of isolated, mass-selected ions in the gas phase. This method has been widely used since it became available at free-electron laser (FEL) user facilities. Thus, in this Minireview, we examine the use of IRMPD/FEL spectroscopy for investigating ions derived from small molecules, metal complexes, organometallic compounds and biorelevant ions. Furthermore, we outline new applications of IRMPD spectroscopy to study biomolecules. © 2018 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  15. Infrared diode laser spectroscopy

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Civiš, Svatopluk; Cihelka, Jaroslav; Matulková, Irena

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 18, č. 4 (2010), s. 408-420 ISSN 1230-3402 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA400400705 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40400503 Keywords : FTIR spectroscopy * absorption spectroscopy * laser diodes Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 1.027, year: 2010

  16. Extreme field limits in the interaction of laser light with ultrarelativistic electrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bulanov, S. V.; Esirkepov, T. Zh.; Hayashi, Y.; Kando, M.; Kiriyama, H.; Koga, J.; Kondo, K.; Kotaki, H.; Pirozhkov, A.; Bulanov, S. S.; Zhidkov, A.; Chen, P.; Neely, D.; Kato, Y.; Narozhny, N. B.; Korn, G. [Kansai Photon Science Institute, JAEA, Kizugawa, Kyoto 619-0215 (Japan); University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Osaka University, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); National Taiwan University, Taipei 10617, Taiwan (China); Central Laser Facility, STFC, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Didcot OX11 0QX (United Kingdom); Graduate School for the Creation of New Photonics Industries, Hamamatsu, Shizuoka 431-1202 (Japan); Moscow Engineering Physics Institute (State University), Moscow 115409 (Russian Federation); Max-Planck-Institut fuer Quantenoptik, Garching 85748 (Germany) and ELI Beamline Facility, Institute of Physics, CAS, Prague 18221 (Czech Republic)

    2012-07-11

    The critical electric field of quantum electrodynamics is so strong that it produces electron-positron pairs from vacuum, converting the energy of light into matter. This field has become feasible through the construction of extremely high power lasers or/and with the sophisticated use of nonlinear processes in relativistic plasmas. A feasibility of the experiments on the collision of laser light and high intensity electromagnetic pulses, generated by relativistic flying mirrors, with relativistic electrons for the studying of extreme field limits in the nonlinear interaction of electromagnetic waves is discussed.

  17. Characterization of silicon micro-strip sensors with a pulsed infra-red laser system for the CBM experiment at FAIR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghosh, Pradeep [Goethe University, Frankfurt am Main (Germany); GSI Helmholtz Center for Heavy Ion Research GmbH, Darmstadt (Germany); Eschke, Juergen [GSI Helmholtz Center for Heavy Ion Research GmbH, Darmstadt (Germany); Facility for Anti-proton and Ion Research, GmbH, Darmstadt (Germany); Collaboration: CBM-Collaboration

    2015-07-01

    The Silicon Tracking System (STS) of the CBM experiment at FAIR is composed of 8 tracking stations comprising of 1292 double-sided silicon micro-strip sensors. A Laser Test System (LTS) has been developed for the quality assurance of prototype sensors. The aim is to scan sensors with a pulsed infra-red laser driven by step motor to determine the charge sharing in-between strips and to measure qualitative uniformity of the sensor response over the whole active area. Several prototype sensors with strip pitch of 50 and 58 μm have been tested, as well as a prototype module with realistic mechanical arrangement of sensor and read-out cables. The LTS is designed to measure sensor response in an automatized procedure across the sensor with focused laser beam (spot-size ∼ 12 μm, wavelength = 1060 nm). The pulse with duration (∼ 10 ns) and power (∼ 5 mW) of the laser pulses is selected such, that the absorption of the laser light in the 300 μm thick silicon sensors produces a number of about 24000 electrons, which is similar to the charge created by minimum ionizing particles (MIP) in these sensors. Results from laser scans of prototype sensors and detector module are reported.

  18. Collimation of laser-produced plasmas using axial magnetic field

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Roy, Amitava; Harilal, S.S.; Hassan, S.M.; Endo, Akira; Mocek, Tomáš; Hassanein, A.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 33, č. 2 (2015), s. 175-182 ISSN 0263-0346 R&D Projects: GA MŠk ED2.1.00/01.0027; GA MŠk EE2.3.20.0143; GA MŠk EE2.3.30.0057 Grant - others:HILASE(XE) CZ.1.05/2.1.00/01.0027; OP VK 6(XE) CZ.1.07/2.3.00/20.0143; OP VK 4 POSTDOK(XE) CZ.1.07/2.3.00/30.0057 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : laser-produced plasma * optical emission spectroscopy * plasma-B field interaction * plasma temperature and density * tin plasma Subject RIV: BH - Optics, Masers, Lasers OBOR OECD: Optics (including laser optics and quantum optics) Impact factor: 1.649, year: 2015

  19. Infrared Thermography Approach for Effective Shielding Area of Field Smoke Based on Background Subtraction and Transmittance Interpolation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Runze; Zhang, Tonglai; Chen, Yongpeng; Liang, Hao; Li, Bingyang; Zhou, Zunning

    2018-05-06

    Effective shielding area is a crucial indicator for the evaluation of the infrared smoke-obscuring effectiveness on the battlefield. The conventional methods for assessing the shielding area of the smoke screen are time-consuming and labor intensive, in addition to lacking precision. Therefore, an efficient and convincing technique for testing the effective shielding area of the smoke screen has great potential benefits in the smoke screen applications in the field trial. In this study, a thermal infrared sensor with a mid-wavelength infrared (MWIR) range of 3 to 5 μm was first used to capture the target scene images through clear as well as obscuring smoke, at regular intervals. The background subtraction in motion detection was then applied to obtain the contour of the smoke cloud at each frame. The smoke transmittance at each pixel within the smoke contour was interpolated based on the data that was collected from the image. Finally, the smoke effective shielding area was calculated, based on the accumulation of the effective shielding pixel points. One advantage of this approach is that it utilizes only one thermal infrared sensor without any other additional equipment in the field trial, which significantly contributes to the efficiency and its convenience. Experiments have been carried out to demonstrate that this approach can determine the effective shielding area of the field infrared smoke both practically and efficiently.

  20. Infrared Thermography Approach for Effective Shielding Area of Field Smoke Based on Background Subtraction and Transmittance Interpolation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Runze Tang

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Effective shielding area is a crucial indicator for the evaluation of the infrared smoke-obscuring effectiveness on the battlefield. The conventional methods for assessing the shielding area of the smoke screen are time-consuming and labor intensive, in addition to lacking precision. Therefore, an efficient and convincing technique for testing the effective shielding area of the smoke screen has great potential benefits in the smoke screen applications in the field trial. In this study, a thermal infrared sensor with a mid-wavelength infrared (MWIR range of 3 to 5 μm was first used to capture the target scene images through clear as well as obscuring smoke, at regular intervals. The background subtraction in motion detection was then applied to obtain the contour of the smoke cloud at each frame. The smoke transmittance at each pixel within the smoke contour was interpolated based on the data that was collected from the image. Finally, the smoke effective shielding area was calculated, based on the accumulation of the effective shielding pixel points. One advantage of this approach is that it utilizes only one thermal infrared sensor without any other additional equipment in the field trial, which significantly contributes to the efficiency and its convenience. Experiments have been carried out to demonstrate that this approach can determine the effective shielding area of the field infrared smoke both practically and efficiently.

  1. Tracking nuclear wave-packet dynamics in molecular oxygen ions with few-cycle infrared laser pulses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De, S.; Bocharova, I. A.; Magrakvelidze, M.; Ray, D.; Cao, W.; Thumm, U.; Cocke, C. L.; Bergues, B.; Kling, M. F.; Litvinyuk, I. V.

    2010-01-01

    We have tracked nuclear wave-packet dynamics in doubly charged states of molecular oxygen using few-cycle infrared laser pulses. Bound and dissociating wave packets were launched and subsequently probed via a pair of 8-fs pulses of 790 nm radiation. Ionic fragments from the dissociating molecules were monitored by velocity-map imaging. Pronounced oscillations in the delay-dependent kinetic energy release spectra were observed. The occurrence of vibrational revivals permits us to identify the potential curves of the O 2 dication which are most relevant to the molecular dynamics. These studies show the accessibility to the dynamics of such higher-charged molecules.

  2. Optimal laser heating of plasmas confined in strong solenoidal magnetic fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vitela, J.; Akcasu, A.Z.

    1987-01-01

    Optimal Control Theory is used to analyze the laser-heating of plasmas confined in strong solenoidal magnetic fields. Heating strategies that minimize a linear combination of heating time and total energy spent by the laser system are found. A numerical example is used to illustrate the theory. Results of this example show that by an appropriate modulation of the laser intensity, significant savings in the laser energy are possible with only slight increases in the heating time. However, results may depend strongly on the initial state of the plasma and on the final ion temperature. (orig.)

  3. Generation of ten kilotesla longitudinal magnetic fields in ultraintense laser-solenoid target interactions

    OpenAIRE

    Xiao, K. D.; Zhou, C. T.; Zhang, H.; Huang, T. W.; Li, R.; Qiao, B.; Cao, J. M.; Cai, T. X.; Ruan, S. C.; He, X. T.

    2018-01-01

    Production of the huge longitudinal magnetic fields by using an ultraintense laser pulse irradiating a solenoid target is considered. Through three-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations, it is shown that the longitudinal magnetic field up to ten kilotesla can be observed in the ultraintense laser-solenoid target interactions. The finding is associated with both fast and return electron currents in the solenoid target. The huge longitudinal magnetic field is of interest for a number of impo...

  4. Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer Observations of the Evolution of Massive Star-forming Regions

    OpenAIRE

    Koenig, X. P.; Leisawitz, D. T.; Benford, D. J.; Rebull, L. M.; Padgett, D. L.; Assef, R. J.

    2012-01-01

    We present the results of a mid-infrared survey of 11 outer Galaxy massive star-forming regions and 3 open clusters with data from the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE). Using a newly developed photometric scheme to identify young stellar objects and exclude extragalactic contamination, we have studied the distribution of young stars within each region. These data tend to support the hypothesis that latter generations may be triggered by the interaction of winds and radiation from th...

  5. RAPID INFRARED VARIABILITY OF THREE RADIO-LOUD NARROW-LINE SEYFERT 1 GALAXIES: A VIEW FROM THE WIDE-FIELD INFRARED SURVEY EXPLORER

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiang Ning; Zhou Hongyan; Wang Tinggui; Dong Xiaobo; Jiang Peng [Key Laboratory for Research in Galaxies and Cosmology, University of Science and Technology of China, Chinese Academy of Science, Hefei, Anhui 230026 (China); Ho, Luis C. [The Observatories of the Carnegie Institution for Science, 813 Santa Barbara Street, Pasadena, CA 91101 (United States); Yuan Weimin [National Astronomical Observatories, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100012 (China); Ji Tuo; Tian Qiguo, E-mail: jnac@mail.ustc.edu.cn [Polar Research Institute of China, 451 Jinqiao Road, Pudong, Shanghai 200136 (China)

    2012-11-10

    Using newly released data from the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer, we report the discovery of rapid infrared variability in three radio-loud narrow-line Seyfert 1 galaxies (NLS1s) selected from the 23 sources in the sample of Yuan et al. J0849+5108 and J0948+0022 clearly show intraday variability, while J1505+0326 has a longer measurable timescale within 180 days. Their variability amplitudes, corrected for measurement errors, are {approx}0.1-0.2 mag. The detection of intraday variability restricts the size of the infrared-emitting region to {approx}10{sup -3} pc, significantly smaller than the scale of the torus but consistent with the base of a jet. The three variable sources are exceptionally radio-loud, have the highest radio brightness temperature among the whole sample, and all show detected {gamma}-ray emission in Fermi/LAT observations. Their spectral energy distributions resemble those of low-energy-peaked blazars, with a synchrotron peak around infrared wavelengths. This result strongly confirms the view that at least some radio-loud NLS1s are blazars with a relativistic jet close to our line of sight. The beamed synchrotron emission from the jet contributes significantly to and probably dominates the spectra in the infrared and even optical bands.

  6. Infrared laser scattering system for the plasma diagnostics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hiraki, Naoji; Kawasaki, Shoji; Muraoka, Katsunori

    1975-01-01

    As the results of the parametric studies of the double discharge TEA CO 2 laser, the required properties on the laser system for the scattering diagnostics of plasmas are shown to be realized with our CO 2 laser. The direction of the future improvements of the laser performance is also discussed. (auth.)

  7. A widely tunable, near-infrared laser-based trace gas sensor for hydrogen cyanide (HCN) detection in exhaled breath

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azhar, M.; Mandon, J.; Neerincx, A. H.; Liu, Z.; Mink, J.; Merkus, P. J. F. M.; Cristescu, S. M.; Harren, F. J. M.

    2017-11-01

    A compact, cost-effective sensor is developed for detection of hydrogen cyanide (HCN) in exhaled breath within seconds. For this, an off-axis integrated cavity output spectroscopy setup is combined with a widely tunable compact near-infrared laser (tunability 1527-1564 nm). For HCN a detection sensitivity has been obtained of 8 ppbv in nitrogen (within 1 s), equal to a noise equivalent absorption sensitivity of 1.9 × 10-9 cm-1 Hz-1/2. With this sensor we demonstrated the presence of HCN in exhaled breath; its detection could be a good indicator for bacterial lung infection. Due to its compact, cost-effective and user-friendly design, this laser-based sensor has the potential to be implemented in future clinical applications.

  8. Resonant Infrared Matrix-Assisted Pulsed Laser Evaporation Of Inorganic Nanoparticles And Organic/Inorganic Hybrid Nanocomposites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pate, Ryan; Lantz, Kevin R.; Dhawan, Anuj; Vo-Dinh, Tuan; Stiff-Roberts, Adrienne D.

    2010-10-01

    In this research, resonant infrared matrix-assisted pulsed laser evaporation (RIR-MAPLE) has been used to deposit different classes of inorganic nanoparticles, including bare, un-encapsulated ZnO and Au nanoparticles, as well as ligand-encapsulated CdSe colloidal quantum dots (CQDs). RIR-MAPLE has been used for thin-film deposition of different organic/inorganic hybrid nanocomposites using some of these inorganic nanoparticles, including CdSe CQD-poly[2-methoxy-5-(2'-ethylhexyloxy)-1,4-(1-cyanovinylene)phenylene] (MEH-CN-PPV) nanocomposites and Au nanoparticle-poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) nanocomposites. The unique contribution of this research is that a technique is demonstrated for the deposition of organic-based thin-films requiring solvents with bond energies that do not have to be resonant with the laser energy. By creating an emulsion of solvent and ice in the target, RIR-MAPLE using a 2.94 μm laser can deposit most material systems because the hydroxyl bonds in the ice component of the emulsion matrix are strongly resonant with the 2.94 μm laser. In this way, the types of materials that can be deposited using RIR-MAPLE has been significantly expanded. Furthermore, materials with different solvent bond energies can be co-deposited without concern for material degradation and without the need to specifically tune the laser energy to each material solvent bond energy, thereby facilitating the realization of organic/inorganic hybrid nanocomposite thin-films. In addition to the structural characterization of the inorganic nanoparticle and hybrid nanocomposite thin-films deposited using this RIR-MAPLE technique, optical characterization is presented to demonstrate the potential of such films for optoelectronic device applications.

  9. Resonant Infrared Matrix-Assisted Pulsed Laser Evaporation Of Inorganic Nanoparticles And Organic/Inorganic Hybrid Nanocomposites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pate, Ryan; Lantz, Kevin R.; Stiff-Roberts, Adrienne D.; Dhawan, Anuj; Vo-Dinh, Tuan

    2010-01-01

    In this research, resonant infrared matrix-assisted pulsed laser evaporation (RIR-MAPLE) has been used to deposit different classes of inorganic nanoparticles, including bare, un-encapsulated ZnO and Au nanoparticles, as well as ligand-encapsulated CdSe colloidal quantum dots (CQDs). RIR-MAPLE has been used for thin-film deposition of different organic/inorganic hybrid nanocomposites using some of these inorganic nanoparticles, including CdSe CQD-poly[2-methoxy-5-(2'-ethylhexyloxy )-1,4-(1-cyanovinylene)phenylene](MEH-CN-PPV) nanocomposites and Au nanoparticle-poly(methyl methacrylate)(PMMA) nanocomposites. The unique contribution of this research is that a technique is demonstrated for the deposition of organic-based thin-films requiring solvents with bond energies that do not have to be resonant with the laser energy. By creating an emulsion of solvent and ice in the target, RIR-MAPLE using a 2.94 μm laser can deposit most material systems because the hydroxyl bonds in the ice component of the emulsion matrix are strongly resonant with the 2.94 μm laser. In this way, the types of materials that can be deposited using RIR-MAPLE has been significantly expanded. Furthermore, materials with different solvent bond energies can be co-deposited without concern for material degradation and without the need to specifically tune the laser energy to each material solvent bond energy, thereby facilitating the realization of organic/inorganic hybrid nanocomposite thin-films. In addition to the structural characterization of the inorganic nanoparticle and hybrid nanocomposite thin-films deposited using this RIR-MAPLE technique, optical characterization is presented to demonstrate the potential of such films for optoelectronic device applications.

  10. Tailored optical vector fields for ultrashort-pulse laser induced complex surface plasmon structuring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouyang, J; Perrie, W; Allegre, O J; Heil, T; Jin, Y; Fearon, E; Eckford, D; Edwardson, S P; Dearden, G

    2015-05-18

    Precise tailoring of optical vector beams is demonstrated, shaping their focal electric fields and used to create complex laser micro-patterning on a metal surface. A Spatial Light Modulator (SLM) and a micro-structured S-waveplate were integrated with a picosecond laser system and employed to structure the vector fields into radial and azimuthal polarizations with and without a vortex phase wavefront as well as superposition states. Imprinting Laser Induced Periodic Surface Structures (LIPSS) elucidates the detailed vector fields around the focal region. In addition to clear azimuthal and radial plasmon surface structures, unique, variable logarithmic spiral micro-structures with a pitch Λ ∼1μm, not observed previously, were imprinted on the surface, confirming unambiguously the complex 2D focal electric fields. We show clearly also how the Orbital Angular Momentum(OAM) associated with a helical wavefront induces rotation of vector fields along the optic axis of a focusing lens and confirmed by the observed surface micro-structures.

  11. Observations of the Hubble Deep Field with the Infrared Space Observatory .4. Association of sources with Hubble Deep Field galaxies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mann, R.G.; Oliver, S.J.; Serjeant, S.B.G.

    1997-01-01

    We discuss the identification of sources detected by the Infrared Space Observatory (ISO) at 6.7 and 15 mu m in the Hubble Deep Field (HDF) region. We conservatively associate ISO sources with objects in existing optical and near-infrared HDF catalogues using the likelihood ratio method, confirming...... these results (and, in one case, clarifying them) with independent visual searches, We find 15 ISO sources to be reliably associated with bright [I-814(AB) HDF, and one with an I-814(AB)=19.9 star, while a further 11 are associated with objects in the Hubble Flanking Fields (10 galaxies...... and one star), Amongst optically bright HDF galaxies, ISO tends to detect luminous, star-forming galaxies at fairly high redshift and with disturbed morphologies, in preference to nearby ellipticals....

  12. Modular PbSrS/PbS mid-infrared vertical external cavity surface emitting laser on Si

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khiar, A.; Rahim, M.; Fill, M.; Felder, F.; Zogg, H.; Cao, D.; Kobayashi, S.; Yokoyama, T.; Ishida, A.

    2011-07-01

    A mid-infrared vertical external cavity surface emitting laser (VECSEL) based on undoped PbS is described herein. A 200 nm-thick PbS active layer embedded between PbSrS cladding layers forms a double heterostructure. The layers are grown on a lattice and thermal expansion mismatched Si-substrate. The substrate is placed onto a flat bottom Bragg mirror again grown on a Si substrate, and the VECSEL is completed with a curved top mirror. Pumping is done optically with a 1.55 μm laser diode. This leads to an extremely simple modular fabrication process. Lasing wavelengths range from 3-3.8 μm at 100-260 K heat sink temperature. The lowest threshold power is ˜210 mWp and highest output power is ˜250 mWp. The influence of the different recombination mechanism as well as free carrier absorption on the threshold power is modeled.

  13. Shaping of pulses in optical grating-based laser systems for optimal control of electrons in laser pl