WorldWideScience

Sample records for inflammatory eye disease

  1. Biologic Agents in Inflammatory Eye Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Chiara Posarelli; Ilir Arapi; Michele Figus; Piergiorgio Neri

    2011-01-01

    Non-infectious uveitis is a potentially sight threatening disease. Along the years, several therapeutic strategies have been proposed as a means to its treatment, including local and systemic steroids, immunosuppressives and more recently, biologic agents. The introduction of biologics can be defined as a new era: biologic therapies provide new options for patients with refractory and sight threatening inflammatory disorders. The availability of such novel treatment modalities has markedly im...

  2. Biologic Agents in Inflammatory Eye Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chiara Posarelli

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Non-infectious uveitis is a potentially sight threatening disease. Along the years, several therapeutic strategies have been proposed as a means to its treatment, including local and systemic steroids, immunosuppressives and more recently, biologic agents. The introduction of biologics can be defined as a new era: biologic therapies provide new options for patients with refractory and sight threatening inflammatory disorders. The availability of such novel treatment modalities has markedly improved the therapy of uveitis and considerably increased the possibility of long-term remissions. This article provides a review of current literature on biologic agents, such as tumor necrosis factor blockers, anti-interleukins and other related biologics, such as interferon alpha, for the treatment of uveitis. Several reports describe the efficacy of biologics in controlling a large number of refractory uveitides, suggesting a central role in managing ocular inflammatory diseases. However, there is still lack of randomized controlled trials to validate most of their applications. Biologics are promising drugs for the treatment of uveitis, showing a favorable safety and efficacy profile. On the other hand, lack of evidence from randomized controlled studies limits our understanding as to when commence treatment, which agent to choose, and how long to continue therapy. In addition, high cost and the potential for serious and unpredictable complications have very often limited their use in uveitis refractory to traditional immunosuppressive therapy.

  3. Biologic agents in inflammatory eye disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Posarelli, Chiara; Arapi, Ilir; Figus, Michele; Neri, Piergiorgio

    2011-10-01

    Non-infectious uveitis is a potentially sight threatening disease. Along the years, several therapeutic strategies have been proposed as a means to its treatment, including local and systemic steroids, immunosuppressives and more recently, biologic agents. The introduction of biologics can be defined as a new era: biologic therapies provide new options for patients with refractory and sight threatening inflammatory disorders. The availability of such novel treatment modalities has markedly improved the therapy of uveitis and considerably increased the possibility of long-term remissions. This article provides a review of current literature on biologic agents, such as tumor necrosis factor blockers, anti-interleukins and other related biologics, such as interferon alpha, for the treatment of uveitis. Several reports describe the efficacy of biologics in controlling a large number of refractory uveitides, suggesting a central role in managing ocular inflammatory diseases. However, there is still lack of randomized controlled trials to validate most of their applications. Biologics are promising drugs for the treatment of uveitis, showing a favorable safety and efficacy profile. On the other hand, lack of evidence from randomized controlled studies limits our understanding as to when commence treatment, which agent to choose, and how long to continue therapy. In addition, high cost and the potential for serious and unpredictable complications have very often limited their use in uveitis refractory to traditional immunosuppressive therapy.

  4. Eye Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the back of the eye Macular degeneration - a disease that destroys sharp, central vision Diabetic eye problems ... defense is to have regular checkups, because eye diseases do not always have symptoms. Early detection and ...

  5. Acidic mammalian chitinase and the eye: implications for ocular inflammatory diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudio eBucolo

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Chitinases have an important role in the defence of organisms against chitin containing parasites. An acidic mammalian chitinase (AMCase has been detected in epithelial cells in lung tissue samples taken from patients with asthma as well as in conjunctival epithelium of patients with inflammatory ocular diseases. Particularly, elevated AMCase activity has been observed in ocular tissues of patients with vernal keratoconjunctivitis, seasonal allergic conjunctivitis, and in patients affected by dry eye syndrome. This enzyme is induced via a TH2-specific, IL-13-dependent pathway. AMCase may thus be a key mediator of IL-13-induced responses in TH2-driven inflammatory ocular diseases.

  6. Diabetic Eye Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Other Dental Problems Diabetes & Sexual & Urologic Problems Diabetic Eye Disease What is diabetic eye disease? Diabetic eye disease is a group of ... loss can occur. How does diabetes affect my eyes? Diabetes affects your eyes when your blood glucose, ...

  7. Eye Disease Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... USAJobs Home > Eye Health Information > Eye Disease Simulations Eye Disease Simulations Age-Related Macular Degeneration Cataract Diabetic ... information page Back to top Diabetic Retinopathy Diabetic Eye Disease information page Back to top Glaucoma Glaucoma ...

  8. Pelvic Inflammatory Disease (PID)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Management Education & Events Advocacy For Patients About ACOG Pelvic Inflammatory Disease (PID) Home For Patients Search FAQs Pelvic Inflammatory ... Inflammatory Disease (PID) FAQ077, September 2015 PDF Format Pelvic Inflammatory Disease (PID) Gynecologic Problems What is pelvic inflammatory disease ( ...

  9. The application of optical coherence tomography angiography in uveitis and inflammatory eye diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pichi, Francesco; Sarraf, David; Arepalli, Sruthi; Lowder, Careen Y; Cunningham, Emmett T; Neri, Piergiorgio; Albini, Thomas A; Gupta, Vishali; Baynes, Kimberly; Srivastava, Sunil K

    2017-07-01

    Since its introduction in the early 1990s, optical coherence tomography (OCT) has evolved in resolution and technological advances, and in recent years its initial application of assessing the morphology of a tissue has been implemented by the study of its functional blood flow, through optical coherence tomography angiography (OCTA). This novel technique details capillary networks by comparing the amount of light returned from static and moving targets without the need for intravenous dye administration. While this imaging modality has been used for various ocular conditions, the application OCTA to uveitis conditions remains sparse. This review aims to establish the basis of OCTA and its current application to ocular inflammatory disorders, with an emphasis on monitoring progression and response to treatment, as well as predicting visual complications. In particular, this review explores the use of OCTA in iris vessel dilation seen in various forms of iritis, as a predictive factor for further episodes of inflammation. OCTA can also depict ischemia in the deep plexus layers of the retina and identify true choroicapillaris ischemia in cases of placoid diseases or masking of the indocyanine green dye, as in multiple evanescent white dot syndrome. In addition, OCTA can depict neovascularization in granulomatous disease of the retina or choroid not previously depicted with previous imaging methods. While OCTA provides several advancements in the imaging, management and prognosis of uveitis diseases, we emphasize that further studies are required to fully understand its application to these conditions. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Eye Disease and Development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Thomas Barnebeck; Dalgaard, Carl-Johan Lars; Selaya, Pablo

    This research advances the hypothesis that cross-country variation in the historical incidence of eye disease has influenced the current global distribution of per capita income. The theory is that pervasive eye disease diminished the incentive to accumulate skills, thereby delaying the fertility...... transition and the take-off to sustained economic growth. In order to estimate the influence from eye disease incidence empirically, we draw on an important fact from the field of epidemiology: Exposure to solar ultraviolet B radiation (UVB-R) is an underlying determinant of several forms of eye disease...... are robust to the inclusion of an extensive set of climate and geography controls. Moreover, using a global data set on economic activity for all terrestrial grid cells we show that the link between UVB-R and economic development survives the inclusion of country fixed effect....

  11. Pediatric inflammatory bowel disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Karen A Diefenbach; Christopher K Breuer

    2006-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease is an important cause of gastrointestinal pathology in children and adolescents.The incidence of pediatric inflammatory bowel disease is increasing; therefore, it is important for the clinician to be aware of the presentation of this disease in the pediatric population. Laboratory tests, radiology studies,and endoscopic procedures are helpful in diagnosing inflammatory bowel disease and differentiating between Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis. Once diagnosed,the goal of medical management is to induce remission of disease while minimizing the side effects of the medication. Specific attention needs to be paid to achieving normal growth in this susceptible population.Surgical management is usually indicated for failure of medical management, complication, or malignancy.Algorithms for diagnostic evaluation and treatment of pediatric inflammatory bowel disease are presented.The specific psychosocial issues facing these patients are also discussed in this review as are the future goals of research in the complex problem of pediatric inflammatory bowel disease.

  12. Pelvic Inflammatory Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and ambulatory settings. 17-20 While no single explanation exists for this declining trend, some have suggested ... Bacterial Vaginosis (BV) Chlamydia Genital Herpes Gonorrhea Hepatitis HIV/AIDS & STDs Human Papillomavirus (HPV) Pelvic Inflammatory Disease ( ...

  13. Inflammatory bowel disease - slideshow

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... presentations/100171.htm Inflammatory bowel disease - series—Normal anatomy To ... gastrointestinal tract starts at the mouth, which leads to the esophagus, stomach, small intestine, colon, and finally, the rectum and ...

  14. Dengue eye disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Aaron W; Teoh, Stephen C

    2015-01-01

    Dengue fever, a viral disease epidemic in some parts of the world, is of considerable international concern, with a growing incidence owing to developing urbanization, tourism, and trade. Ocular manifestations of dengue fever are uncommon, but of great significance. Proposed mechanisms include direct viral infection as well as immunologic phenomena. Common manifestations include subconjunctival, vitreous, and retinal hemorrhages; posterior uveitis; optic neuritis; and maculopathies such as foveolitis, hemorrhage, and edema. Main symptoms include blurring of vision, scotomata, metamorphopsia, and floaters. Diagnostic and monitoring investigations described included optical coherence tomography, fundus fluorescein and indocyanine green angiography, visual field analysis, and electrophysiologic tests. Management is based on clinical presentation and includes active surveillance as well as various anti-inflammatory and immunosuppressive therapies. There have been no prospective, randomized therapeutic trials, and it is unclear if the disease is self-limiting or if treatment is actually beneficial. Prognosis varies, ranging from full resolution to permanent vision loss despite intervention.

  15. Evolution of inflammatory diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okin, Daniel; Medzhitov, Ruslan

    2012-09-11

    The association of inflammation with modern human diseases (e.g. obesity, cardiovascular disease, type 2 diabetes mellitus, cancer) remains an unsolved mystery of current biology and medicine. Inflammation is a protective response to noxious stimuli that unavoidably occurs at a cost to normal tissue function. This fundamental trade-off between the cost and benefit of the inflammatory response has been optimized over evolutionary time for specific environmental conditions. Rapid change of the human environment due to niche construction outpaces genetic adaptation through natural selection, leading increasingly to a mismatch between the modern environment and selected traits. Consequently, multiple trade-offs that affect human physiology are not optimized to the modern environment, leading to increased disease susceptibility. Here we examine the inflammatory response from an evolutionary perspective. We discuss unique aspects of the inflammatory response and its evolutionary history that can help explain the association between inflammation and modern human diseases.

  16. Update on thyroid eye disease and management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erick D Bothun

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Erick D Bothun,1,2 Ryan A Scheurer,1 Andrew R Harrison,1,3 Michael S Lee1,4,51Departments of Ophthalmology, 2Pediatrics, 3Otolaryngology, 4Neurosurgery, and 5Neurology, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota, USAAbstract: Thyroid eye disease is a heterogeneous autoimmune orbital reaction typically manifesting in middle age. The inflammation may parallel or remain isolated from a related inflammatory cascade in the thyroid called Graves’ disease. The orbital manifestations can lead to severe proptosis, dry eyes, strabismus, and optic neuropathy. In this article, we will discuss this unique condition including the ophthalmic findings and management. Keywords: Graves’ disease, thyroid eye disease, proptosis, orbital decompression, enlarged extraocular muscles

  17. [Pelvic inflammatory disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoof, Kathrin

    2007-07-01

    Pelvic inflammatory disease and upper genital tract infection describe inflammatory changes in the upper female genital tract of any combination: endometritis, salpingitis, tubo-ovarian abscess and peritonitis in the small pelvis. In most cases the infection is ascending, Chlamydia trachomatis and Neisseria gonorrhoeae are common with increasing incidence. The spectrum ranges from subclinical, asymptomatic infection to severe, life-threatening illness. Antibiotic treatment should be initiated promptly and must cover a broad spectrum of germs. Surgical treatment is necessary in cases of failure of antibiotic treatment and in cases with persisting symptoms after antibiotic treatment. Pelvic inflammatory diseases are one of the main causes of tubal sterility, ectopic pregnancies and chronic abdominal pain.

  18. Inflammatory bowel disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kottler, R.E.; Freson, M. (Groote Schuur Hospital, Cape Town (South Africa). Dept. of Radiology)

    1985-06-01

    Radiology is of considerable value in all forms of inflammatory bowel disease to establish its presence and extent, and to differentiate lesions. The most common inflammatory bowel diseases are Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis. Crohn's disease may occur anywhere in the disgestive tract, but is most common in the terminal ileum. Since there is no practical endoscopic method of examining the small bowel, barium studies of the latter are most important. Modern radiological techniques, especially the double contrast barium enema, show excellent correlation between the macroscopic changes and the radiological features. Radiology alone does not provide the answers and the radiological features must be interpreted in conjunction with clinical investigation.

  19. Pelvic Inflammatory Disease (PID)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the ectopic pregnancy is not diagnosed early. Chronic pelvic pain —PID may lead to long-lasting pelvic pain. Who is at risk of PID? PID can ... lead to pelvic inflammatory disease and infertility. Chronic Pelvic Pain: Persistent pain in the pelvic region that has ...

  20. Inflammatory bowel disease epidemiology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burisch, Johan; Munkholm, Pia

    2013-01-01

    The occurrence of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is increasing worldwide, yet the reasons remain unknown. New therapeutic approaches have been introduced in medical IBD therapy, but their impact on the natural history of IBD remains uncertain. This review will summarize the recent findings in t...... in the epidemiology of IBD....

  1. Pelvic Inflammatory Disease (PID) Statistics

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Search Form Controls Cancel Submit Search the CDC Pelvic Inflammatory Disease (PID) Note: Javascript is disabled or is not ... Twitter STD on Facebook Sexually Transmitted Diseases (STDs) Pelvic Inflammatory Disease (PID) Statistics Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir ...

  2. Inflammatory Bowel Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wehkamp, Jan; Götz, Martin; Herrlinger, Klaus; Steurer, Wolfgang; Stange, Eduard F

    2016-02-05

    Inflammatory bowel diseases are common in Europe, with prevalences as high as 1 in 198 persons (ulcerative colitis) and 1 in 310 persons (Crohn's disease). This review is based on pertinent articles retrieved by a search in PubMed and in German and European guidelines and Cochrane reviews of controlled trials. Typically, the main clinical features of inflammatory bowel diseases are diarrhea, abdominal pain, and, in the case of ulcerative colitis, peranal bleeding. These diseases are due to a complex immunological disturbance with both genetic and environmental causes. A defective mucosal barrier against commensal bowel flora plays a major role in their pathogenesis. The diagnosis is based on laboratory testing, ultrasonography, imaging studies, and, above all, gastrointestinal endoscopy. Most patients with Crohn's disease respond to budesonide or systemic steroids; aminosalicylates are less effective. Refractory exacerbations may be treated with antibodies against tumor necrosis factor (TNF) or, more recently, antibodies against integrin, a protein of the cell membrane. In ulcerative colitis, aminosalicylates are given first; if necessary, steroids or antibodies against TNF-α or integrin are added. Maintenance therapy to prevent further relapses often involves immunosuppression with thiopurines and/or antibodies. Once all conservative treatment options have been exhausted, surgery may be necessary. The treatment of chronic inflammatory bowel diseases requires individually designed therapeutic strategies and the close interdisciplinary collaboration of internists and surgeons.

  3. Kirsner's inflammatory bowel disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    R Balfour Sarto; William J Sandborn

    2005-01-01

    @@ Very few medical textbooks have so thoroughly dominated,and even defined a field, as has Inflammatory Bowel Diseases by Joe Kirsner. Originally co-edited with Roy Shorter of Mayo Clinic, this book, beginning with its first edition in 1975, encapsulated the science and art of caring for patients with Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis. Thus it is with considerable respect, and indeed some awe and trepidation,that we eagerly embraced the opportunity to assume the editorship of this preeminent textbook and the obligation to transition it to reflect the changing, increasingly complex pathophysiology and treatment of these diseases.

  4. INFLAMMATORY BOWEL DISEASE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I Gusti Ayu Mahaprani Danastri

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Crohn disease (CD and ulcerative colitis (UC is an chronic inflammation in the gastrointestinal tract. Colecctively, they are called inflammatory bowel disease (IBD, and about 1,5 millions people in America suffering from UC and CD. The cause of UC and CD is unknown, but the expert believe that UC and CD are caused by a disturbed immune response in someone who has a genetic predisposition. UC and CD have a significant recurrency  and remission rate. Surgery in UC is a curative treatment for colon’s disease and a potentially colon’s malignancy, but it is not a curative treatment for CD.

  5. Pelvic inflammatory disease (PID) -- aftercare

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000710.htm Pelvic inflammatory disease (PID) - aftercare To use the sharing features on ... have just seen your health care provider for pelvic inflammatory disease (PID). PID refers to an infection of the ...

  6. Inflammatory bowel disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, Anne; Mabee, John; Trivedi, Kashyap

    2011-09-01

    Crohn disease and ulcerative colitis are the most common forms of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) likely to be encountered in primary care. Patient-centered care is essential for positive outcomes, and should include long-term continuity with an empathetic primary care provider who can provide skillful coordination of the requisite multidisciplinary approach. Early suspicion of the diagnosis and referral to expert gastroenterologists for confirmation and medical management is essential. Coordinating interdisciplinary consultations, including colorectal surgeons, radiologists, stoma therapists, psychologists, and rheumatologists, in combination with comprehensive patient education, is key to decreasing overall morbidity, mortality, and health care costs associated with IBD.

  7. Botanical Compounds: Effects on Major Eye Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tuan-Phat Huynh

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Botanical compounds have been widely used throughout history as cures for various diseases and ailments. Many of these compounds exhibit strong antioxidative, anti-inflammatory, and antiapoptotic properties. These are also common damaging mechanisms apparent in several ocular diseases, including age-related macular degeneration (AMD, glaucoma, diabetic retinopathy, cataract, and retinitis pigmentosa. In recent years, there have been many epidemiological and clinical studies that have demonstrated the beneficial effects of plant-derived compounds, such as curcumin, lutein and zeaxanthin, danshen, ginseng, and many more, on these ocular pathologies. Studies in cell cultures and animal models showed promising results for their uses in eye diseases. While there are many apparent significant correlations, further investigation is needed to uncover the mechanistic pathways of these botanical compounds in order to reach widespread pharmaceutical use and provide noninvasive alternatives for prevention and treatments of the major eye diseases.

  8. Anti-inflammatory and Antihistaminic Study of a Unani Eye Drop Formulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Latif Abdul

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available The Unani eye drop is an ophthalmic formulation prepared for its beneficial effects in the inflammatory and allergic conditions of the eyes. In the present study, the Unani eye drop formulation was prepared and investigated for its anti-inflammatory and antihistaminic activity, using in vivo and in vitro experimental models respectively. The Unani eye drop formulation exhibited significant anti-inflammatory activity in turpentine liniment-induced ocular inflammation in rabbits. The preparation also showed antihistaminic activity in isolated guinea-pig ileum. The anti-inflammatory and antihistaminic activity of eye drop may be due to presence of active ingredients in the formulation. Although there are many drugs in Unani repository which are mentioned in classical books or used in Unani clinical practice effectively in treatment of eye diseases by various Unani physicians. Inspite of the availability of vast literature, there is a dearth of commercial Unani ocular preparations. So, keeping this in mind, the eye drop formulation was prepared and its anti-inflammatory and antihistaminic activity was carried out in animal models. Thus, in view of the importance of alternative anti-inflammatory and anti- allergic drugs, it becomes imperative to bring these indigenous drugs to the front foot and evaluate their activities.

  9. Inflammatory bowel disease unclassified

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ning ZHOU; Wei-xing CHEN; Shao-hua CHEN; Cheng-fu XU; You-ming LI

    2011-01-01

    Objective: Inflammatory bowel diseases (IBDs) are idiopathic, chronic, and inflammatory intestinal disorders. The two main types, ulcerative colitis (UC) and Crohn's disease (CD), sometimes mimic each other and are not readily distinguishable. The purpose of this study was to present a series of hospitalized cases, which could not initially be classified as a subtype of IBD, and to try to note roles of the terms indeterminate colitis (IC) and inflammatory bowel disease unclassified (IBDU) when such a dilemma arises. Methods: Medical records of 477 patients hospitalized due to IBD, during the period of January 2002 to April 2009, were retrospectively studied in the present paper. All available previous biopsies from endoscopies of these patients were reanalyzed. Results: Twenty-seven of 477 IBD patients (5.7%) had been initially diagnosed as having IBDU. Of them, 23 received colonoscopy and histological examinations in our hospital. A total of 90% (9/10) and 66.7% (4/6) of patients, respectively, had a positive finding via wireless capsule endoscopy (CE) and double-balloon enteroscopy (DBE). The barium-swallow or small bowel follow-through (SBFT) was performed on 11 patients. Positive changes were observed under computer tomographic (CT) scanning in 89.5% (17/19) of patients. Reasonable treatment strategies were employed for all patients. Conclusions: Our data indicate that IBDU accounts for 5.7% of initial diagnoses of IBD. The definition of IBDU is valuable in clinical practice. For those who had no clear clinical, endoscopic, histological, or other features affording a diagnosis of either UC or CD,IBDU could be used parenthetically.

  10. Dry Eye as a Mucosal Autoimmune Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stern, Michael E.; Schaumburg, Chris S.; Pflugfelder, Stephen C.

    2013-01-01

    Dry eye is a common ocular surface inflammatory disease that significantly affects quality of life. Dysfunction of the lacrimal function unit (LFU) alters tear composition and breaks ocular surface homeostasis, facilitating chronic inflammation and tissue damage. Accordingly, the most effective treatments to date are geared towards reducing inflammation and restoring normal tear film. The pathogenic role of CD4+ T cells is well known, and the field is rapidly realizing the complexity of other innate and adaptive immune factors involved in the development and progression of disease. The data support the hypothesis that dry eye is a localized autoimmune disease originating from an imbalance in the protective immunoregulatory and proinflammatory pathways of the ocular surface. PMID:23360156

  11. Inflammatory bowel disease: pathogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yi-Zhen; Li, Yong-Yu

    2014-01-07

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), including Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis, is characterized by chronic relapsing intestinal inflammation. It has been a worldwide health-care problem with a continually increasing incidence. It is thought that IBD results from an aberrant and continuing immune response to the microbes in the gut, catalyzed by the genetic susceptibility of the individual. Although the etiology of IBD remains largely unknown, it involves a complex interaction between the genetic, environmental or microbial factors and the immune responses. Of the four components of IBD pathogenesis, most rapid progress has been made in the genetic study of gut inflammation. The latest internationally collaborative studies have ascertained 163 susceptibility gene loci for IBD. The genes implicated in childhood-onset and adult-onset IBD overlap, suggesting similar genetic predispositions. However, the fact that genetic factors account for only a portion of overall disease variance indicates that microbial and environmental factors may interact with genetic elements in the pathogenesis of IBD. Meanwhile, the adaptive immune response has been classically considered to play a major role in the pathogenesis of IBD, as new studies in immunology and genetics have clarified that the innate immune response maintains the same importance in inducing gut inflammation. Recent progress in understanding IBD pathogenesis sheds lights on relevant disease mechanisms, including the innate and adaptive immunity, and the interactions between genetic factors and microbial and environmental cues. In this review, we provide an update on the major advances that have occurred in above areas.

  12. MMF and eye disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zierhut, M; Stübiger, N; Siepmann, K; Deuter, C M E

    2005-01-01

    Immunosuppressive treatment has shown to be effective in various ocular inflammatory disorders. Factors limiting their use are the individual response and the rate of side effects. This report summarizes our knowledge about the use of mycophenolate mofetil (MMF) in the treatment of ocular cicatricial pemphigoid (OCP), uveitis, atopic keratoconjunctivitis (AKC), prevention of graft rejection after penetrating keratoplasty (PK) and scleritis. Controlled studies have been performed for prevention of graft rejection after PK, showing MMF as effective in the prevention of graft rejection as cyclosporine A. In experimental uveitis, MMF has been demonstrated to be highly effective in prevention of retinal destruction. A number of studies have now shown that MMF also seems effective in uveitis. There are also studies with smaller patient groups which point out the effectiveness of MMF in OCP, AKC, and scleritis. In most of the studies, the spectrum of side effects was small, compared to other immunosuppressives.

  13. Inflammatory muscle diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mastaglia F

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The three major immune-mediated inflammatory myopathies, dermatomyositis (DM, polymyositis (PM and inclusion body myositis (IBM, each have their own distinctive clinical features, underlying pathogenetic mechanisms and patterns of muscle gene expression. In DM a complement-dependent humoral process thought to be initiated by antibodies to endothelial cells results in a microangiopathy with secondary ischemic changes in muscles. On the other hand, in PM and IBM there is a T-cell response with invasion of muscle fibers by CD8+ lymphocytes and perforin-mediated cytotoxic necrosis. In IBM degenerative changes are also a feature and comprise autophagia with rimmed vacuole formation and inclusions containing β-amyloid and other proteins whose accumulation may be linked to impaired proteasomal function. The relationship between the inflammatory and degenerative component remains unclear, as does the basis for the selective vulnerability of certain muscles and the resistance to conventional forms of immunotherapy in most cases of IBM. Patients with DM or PM usually respond to treatment with glucocorticoids and immunosuppressive agents but their use remains largely empirical. Intravenous immunoglobulin therapy can be used to achieve disease control in patients with severe weakness or dysphagia, or in patients with immunodeficiency, but its use is limited by expense. Emerging therapies for resistant cases include TNFα inhibitors (etanercept, infliximab and monoclonal antibodies (rituximab, alemtuzumab. However, experience with these therapies is still limited and there is a need for randomized trials to test their efficacy and establish guidelines for their use in clinical practice.

  14. Immunogenetics of ocular inflammatory disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levinson, R D

    2007-02-01

    Ocular inflammatory disease comprises of a diverse group of clinical entities that may result from autoimmune processes, infections, or both. While many individual ocular inflammatory diseases are quite rare, ocular inflammation is one of the more common causes of visual disability, including blindness, in the developed world. Better understanding of ocular inflammatory disease is an important step in designing more sophisticated therapies that may help prevent loss of visual function for these patients.

  15. Metabolic syndrome and eye diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poh, Stanley; Mohamed Abdul, Riswana Banu Binte; Lamoureux, Ecosse L; Wong, Tien Y; Sabanayagam, Charumathi

    2016-03-01

    Metabolic syndrome is becoming a worldwide medical and public health challenge as it has been seen increasing in prevalence over the years. Age-related eye diseases, the leading cause of blindness globally and visual impairment in developed countries, are also on the rise due to aging of the population. Many of the individual components of the metabolic syndrome have been shown to be associated with these eye diseases. However, the association of metabolic syndrome with eye diseases is not clear. In this review, we reviewed the evidence for associations between metabolic syndrome and certain ocular diseases in populations. We also reviewed the association of individual metabolic syndrome components with ocular diseases due to a paucity of research in this area. Besides, we also summarised the current understanding of etiological mechanisms of how metabolic syndrome or the individual components lead to these ocular diseases. With increasing evidence of such associations, it may be important to identify patients who are at risk of developing metabolic syndrome as prompt treatment and intervention may potentially decrease the risk of developing certain ocular diseases.

  16. Leven met Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Duijvendijk J. van, [No Value

    2004-01-01

    Leven met Inflammatory Bowel Disease Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is de verzamelnaam voor Colitis ulcerosa en de ziekte van Crohn. Het zijn chronische darmontstekingen, waarvan de ziekteactiviteit wisselt en zich niet laat voorspellen. Door de lichamelijke klachten en het onvoorspelbare karakter

  17. Leven met Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Duijvendijk J. van, [No Value

    2004-01-01

    Leven met Inflammatory Bowel Disease Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is de verzamelnaam voor Colitis ulcerosa en de ziekte van Crohn. Het zijn chronische darmontstekingen, waarvan de ziekteactiviteit wisselt en zich niet laat voorspellen. Door de lichamelijke klachten en het onvoorspelbare karakter

  18. Nonnecrotizing anterior scleritis mimicking orbital inflammatory disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lynch MC

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Michelle Chen Lynch,1 Andrew B Mick21Optometry Clinic, Ocala West Veterans Affairs Specialty Clinic, Ocala, FL, USA; 2Eye Clinic, San Francisco VA Medical Center, San Francisco, CA, USABackground: Anterior scleritis is an uncommon form of ocular inflammation, often associated with coexisting autoimmune disease. With early recognition and aggressive systemic therapy, prognosis for resolution is good. The diagnosis of underlying autoimmune disease involves a multidisciplinary approach.Case report: A 42-year-old African American female presented to the Eye Clinic at the San Francisco Veteran Affairs Medical Center, with a tremendously painful left eye, worse on eye movement, with marked injection of conjunctiva. There was mild swelling of the upper eyelid. Visual acuity was unaffected, but there was a mild red cap desaturation. The posterior segment was unremarkable. The initial differential diagnoses included anterior scleritis and orbital inflammatory disease. Oral steroid treatment was initiated with rapid resolution over a few days. Orbital imaging was unremarkable, and extensive laboratory work-up was positive only for antinuclear antibodies. The patient was diagnosed with idiopathic diffuse, nonnecrotizing anterior scleritis and has been followed for over 5 years without recurrence. The rheumatology clinic monitors the patient closely, as suspicion remains for potential arthralgias including human leukocyte antigen-B27-associated arthritis, lupus-associated arthritis, seronegative rheumatoid arthritis, recurrent juvenile idiopathic arthritis, and scleroderma, based on her constitutional symptoms and clinical presentation, along with a positive anti-nuclear antibody lab result.Conclusion: Untreated anterior scleritis can progress to formation of cataracts, glaucoma, uveitis, corneal melting, and posterior segment disease with significant risk of vision loss. Patients with anterior scleritis must be aggressively treated with systemic anti-inflammatories

  19. Management of thyroid eye disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bartalena, Luigi; Tanda, Maria Laura [Department of Endocrinology, University of Insubria, Ospedale di Circolo, Viale Borri, 57, 21100 Varese (Italy); Marcocci, Claudio; Pinchera, Aldo [Department of Endocrinology and Metabolism, University of Pisa, Pisa (Italy)

    2002-08-01

    Thyroid eye disease (TED) is the most frequent extrathyroidal manifestation of Graves' disease. In most instances it is mild and non-progressive, but in 3%-5% of cases it is severe. Non-severe TED requires only supportive measures, such as eye ointments, sunglasses and prisms. By contrast, severe TED requires aggressive treatment, either medical (high-dose glucocorticoids, orbital radiotherapy) or surgical (orbital decompression). The choice of treatment relies on the assessment of both TED severity and activity. Removal of controllable risk factors, especially cigarette smoking, is important to improve the course and the therapeutic outcome. A coordinated approach to the treatment of hyperthyroidism and TED is also required. Novel promising treatments, to be verified in large series of patients, include somatostatin analogues and cytokine antagonists. (orig.)

  20. Investigating the anti-inflammatory effects of curcumin on Endotoxin-induced uveitis in rabbits' eyes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nader Kavian

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Corticosteriods are used in the treatment of inflammatory diseases of the eye such as uveitis, but these drugs have many side effects such as cataract and primary open angle glaucoma (POAG and aggravation of keratitis caused by herpes simplex, fungal keratitis, etc. Therefore, the efforts to find new medicines that control ocular inflammation while lacking any steroid side effects continue. Curcumin is a yellow substance found in turmeric and in traditional medicine it is used as an antiseptic, analgesic, anti-inflammatory and antioxidant. In this study, the anti-inflammatory effect of this substance was investigated. For this purpose, six adult rabbits of the same breed were used. To create the inflammation, 100mg of polysaccharide of Escherichia coli bacteria endotoxin was injected into the vitreous of the rabbits' both eyes. Then …0.1cc.. curcumin pure extract was injected into the vitreous of their right eye. After three days, the eyes were removed and placed in a formalin for 2 weeks to fixate them, and then using microscopic studies, the degrees of inflammation of both eyes, with and without the injection of the drug, were compared. The results show no inflammation or inflammatory cells in the eyes injected with curcumin. From the present study, it is concluded that curcumin can be considered in treatment of ocular inflammations as a complementary substance or drug.

  1. Cyclosporine for Ocular Inflammatory Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaçmaz, R. Oktay; Kempen, John H.; Newcomb, Craig; Daniel, Ebenezer; Gangaputra, Sapna; Nussenblatt, Robert B.; Rosenbaum, James T.; Suhler, Eric B.; Thorne, Jennifer E.; Jabs, Douglas A.; Levy-Clarke, Grace A.; Foster, C. Stephen

    2009-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the clinical outcomes of cyclosporine treatment for non-infectious ocular inflammation Design Retrospective cohort study Participants Three hundred seventy-three patients with non-infectious ocular inflammation managed at four tertiary ocular inflammation clinics in the United States observed to use cyclosporine as a single non-corticosteroid immunosuppressive agent to their treatment regimen, between 1979-2007 inclusive. Methods Participants were identified from the Systemic Immunosuppressive Therapy for Eye Diseases Cohort Study. Demographic and clinical characteristics, including dosage of cyclosporine and main outcome measures were obtained for every eye of every patient at every visit via medical record review by trained expert reviewers. Main Outcome Measures: Control of inflammation, sustained control after reducing corticosteroid dosages, and discontinuation of therapy because of toxicity. Results Of the 373 patients (681 eyes) initiating cyclosporine monotherapy, 33.4% by six months and 51.9% by one year gained sustained, complete control of inflammation over at least two visits spanning at least 28 days. Approximately 25% more improved to a level of slight inflammatory activity by each of these time points. Corticosteroid-sparing success (completely controlled inflammation for at least 28 days with prednisone 10 mg/day or less) was achieved by 22.1% by six months and 36.1% within one year. Toxicity led to discontinuation of therapy within one year by 10.7% of the population. Patients over 55 years of age were over 3-fold more likely to discontinue therapy because of toxicity than patients ages 18-39 years. Doses of 151-250 mg/day tended to be more successful than lower doses, and were not associated with a higher discontinuation for toxicity rate; higher doses did not appear to offer a therapeutic advantage. Conclusion Cyclosporine, with corticosteroid therapy as indicated, was modestly effective for controlling ocular inflammation

  2. Salpingitis and pelvic inflammatory disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swinker, M L

    1985-01-01

    Chlamydia trachomatis is becoming an increasingly important etiologic agent. The physician must also be aware of other nongonococcal causes of pelvic inflammatory disease, such as Mycoplasma, Ureaplasma, coliforms and anaerobes. Epidemiologic characteristics of the various microorganisms differ, with the frequency of nongonococcal disease higher in older women. Intrauterine devices increase the potential for pelvic inflammatory disease. The rising incidence of nongonococcal and dual infections has led to therapeutic and preventive techniques aimed at multiple etiologies.

  3. Inflammatory choroidal neovascularization in Indian eyes: Etiology, clinical features, and outcomes to anti-vascular endothelial growth factor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rupak Roy

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives: The aim was to study the clinical profile of inflammatory choroidal neovascularization (CNV and its treatment response to intravitreal bevacizumab or ranibizumab on pro re nata (PRN basis in Indian eyes. Materials and Methods: This was a retrospective case series of consecutive patients with inflammatory CNV treated with anti-vascular endothelial growth factor (anti-VEGF in a tertiary eye care center in Eastern India between 2009 and 2014. The data about clinical features, investigations, treatment, and outcomes were obtained from the medical records. We included patients with active inflammatory CNV but with no evidence of inflammation and were treated with anti-VEGF alone, with a minimum follow-up of 6 months. Main outcome measures were a clinical and etiological profile of inflammatory CNV in Indian eyes and their response to treatment. Results: Thirty eyes of 28 patients were included in the study. The mean follow-up was 17.93 ± 14.28 months (range 6–53 months. In our cohort, seven (23.33% eyes had inflammatory CNV secondary to idiopathic choroiditis, four (13.33% eyes had toxoplasmosis, idiopathic panuveitis, and Vogt Koyanaki Harada's disease each. Three (10% eyes had geographic helicoid peripapillary choroidopathy and tubercular choroiditis each. Remaining two (6.66% eyes had punctate inner choroidopathy, while multifocal choroiditis with panuveitis, resolved endogenous endophthalmitis and Hansen's diseases were the etiology in one (3.33% case of inflammatory CNV each. The mean number of injections were 2.76 (range 1–5. Among thirty eyes of inflammatory CNV, 16 (53.3% eyes showed improvement, eight (26.6% maintained the same vision, whereas six (20% eyes showed deterioration of vision. Interpretations and Conclusion: Idiopathic choroiditis was the most common cause of inflammatory CNV and PRN intravitreal anti-VEGF (ranibizumab or bevacizumab appears to have effective treatment response.

  4. Cefotaxime Treatment of Pelvic Inflammatory Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Monson, Thomas P; Miller, Timothy T.; Nolan, Charles M.

    1981-01-01

    We studied cefotaxime in the treatment of gonococcal and nongonococcal pelvic inflammatory disease. Cefotaxime was uniformly effective against gonococcal pelvic inflammatory disease. However, 4 of 11 patients with nongonococcal pelvic inflammatory disease had a suboptimal response.

  5. Inflammatory Bowel Disease and Thrombosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmet Tezel

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD is a group of chronic and relapsing inflammatory disorders of the gastrointestinal system. In these cases, findings are detected in extraintestinal systems also. There is a tendency for thrombotic events in IBD, as in the other inflammatory processes. The pathogenesis of this thrombotic tendency is multidimensional, including lack of natural anticoagulants, prothrombotic media induced via the inflammatory process, long-term sedentary life style, steroid use, surgery, and catheter placement. The aim of this review was to highlight the positive relationship between IBD and thrombotic events, and the proper treatment of at-risk patients.

  6. Molecular diagnosis of orbital inflammatory disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenbaum, James T; Choi, Dongseok; Wilson, David J; Grossniklaus, Hans E; Sibley, Cailin H; Harrington, Christina A; Planck, Stephen R

    2015-04-01

    Orbital inflammatory diseases include thyroid eye disease (TED), granulomatosis with polyangiitis (GPA), sarcoidosis, and nonspecific orbital inflammation (NSOI). Histopathological diagnosis usually relies on the clinical context and is not always definitive. Gene expression profiling provides diagnostic and therapeutic information in several malignancies, but its role in evaluating nonmalignant disease is relatively untested. We hypothesized that gene expression profiling could provide diagnostic information for NSOI. We collected formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded orbital biopsies from 10 institutions and 83 subjects including 25 with thyroid eye disease, 25 nonspecific orbital inflammation, 20 healthy controls, 6 with granulomatosis with polyangiitis, and 7 with sarcoidosis. Tissues were divided into discovery and validation sets. Gene expression was quantified using Affymetrix U133 Plus 2.0 microarrays. A random forest statistical algorithm based on data from 39 probe sets identified controls, GPA, or TED with an average accuracy of 76% (p=0.02). Random forest analysis indicated that 52% of tissues from patients with nonspecific inflammation were consistent with a diagnosis of GPA. Molecular diagnosis by gene expression profiling will augment clinical data and histopathology in differentiating forms of orbital inflammatory disease.

  7. Vitamin D in inflammatory diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thea K Wöbke

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Changes in vitamin D serum levels have been associated with inflammatory diseases, such as inflammatory bowel disease, rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus, multiple sclerosis, atherosclerosis or asthma. Genome- and transcriptome-wide studies indicate that vitamin D signalling modulates many inflammatory responses on several levels. This includes i the regulation of the expression of genes which generate pro-inflammatory mediators, such as cyclooxygenases or 5-lipoxygenase, ii the interference with transcription factors, such as NF-kB, which regulate the expression of inflammatory genes and iii the activation of signalling cascades, such as MAP kinases which mediate inflammatory responses. Vitamin D targets various tissues and cell types, a number of which belong to the immune system, such as monocytes/macrophages, dendritic cells as well as B- and T cells, leading to individual responses of each cell type. One hallmark of these specific vitamin D effects is the cell-type specific regulation of genes involved in the regulation of inflammatory processes and the interplay between vitamin D signalling and other signalling cascades involved in inflammation.An important task in the near future will be the elucidation of the regulatory mechanisms that are involved in the regulation of inflammatory responses by vitamin D on the molecular level by the use of techniques such as chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP, ChIP-seq and FAIRE-seq.

  8. Neuroinflammation in inflammatory bowel disease

    OpenAIRE

    Kirchgessner Annette; Lakhan Shaheen E

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Inflammatory bowel disease is a chronic intestinal inflammatory condition, the pathology of which is incompletely understood. Gut inflammation causes significant changes in neurally controlled gut functions including cramping, abdominal pain, fecal urgency, and explosive diarrhea. These symptoms are caused, at least in part, by prolonged hyperexcitability of enteric neurons that can occur following the resolution of colitis. Mast, enterochromaffin and other immune cells are increased...

  9. Autophagy in Inflammatory Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander J. S. Choi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Autophagy provides a mechanism for the turnover of cellular organelles and proteins through a lysosome-dependent degradation pathway. During starvation, autophagy exerts a homeostatic function that promotes cell survival by recycling metabolic precursors. Additionally, autophagy can interact with other vital processes such as programmed cell death, inflammation, and adaptive immune mechanisms, and thereby potentially influence disease pathogenesis. Macrophages deficient in autophagic proteins display enhanced caspase-1-dependent proinflammatory cytokine production and the activation of the inflammasome. Autophagy provides a functional role in infectious diseases and sepsis by promoting intracellular bacterial clearance. Mutations in autophagy-related genes, leading to loss of autophagic function, have been implicated in the pathogenesis of Crohn's disease. Furthermore, autophagy-dependent mechanisms have been proposed in the pathogenesis of several pulmonary diseases that involve inflammation, including cystic fibrosis and pulmonary hypertension. Strategies aimed at modulating autophagy may lead to therapeutic interventions for diseases associated with inflammation.

  10. Comorbidity in inflammatory bowel disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Antonio López San Román; Fernando Mu(n)oz

    2011-01-01

    Patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) can be affected by other unrelated diseases. These are called comorbid conditions, and can include any secondary health problem that affects a person suffering from a primary or main disease, and which is neither linked physiopathologically to the primary condition, nor is it due to the treatments used for the primary condition or to its long-term anatomical or physiological consequences.Different comorbid conditions, as well as their influence on IBD, are discussed.

  11. Diet and Inflammatory Bowel Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knight-Sepulveda, Karina; Kais, Susan; Santaolalla, Rebeca; Abreu, Maria T

    2015-08-01

    Patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) are increasingly becoming interested in nonpharmacologic approaches to managing their disease. One of the most frequently asked questions of IBD patients is what they should eat. The role of diet has become very important in the prevention and treatment of IBD. Although there is a general lack of rigorous scientific evidence that demonstrates which diet is best for certain patients, several diets-such as the low-fermentable oligosaccharide, disaccharide, monosaccharide, and polyol diet; the specific carbohydrate diet; the anti-inflammatory diet; and the Paleolithic diet-have become popular. This article discusses the diets commonly recommended to IBD patients and reviews the supporting data.

  12. The eye and its diseases in Ancient Egypt

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, S. Ry

    1997-01-01

    Ophthalmology, History of ophthalmology, eyes in the Ancient Egypt, eye disease in Ancient Egypt, porotic hyperostosis, mummification......Ophthalmology, History of ophthalmology, eyes in the Ancient Egypt, eye disease in Ancient Egypt, porotic hyperostosis, mummification...

  13. New drugs for the treatment of dry eye disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ridder III WH

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available William H Ridder III, Apoorva Karsolia Southern California College of Optometry, Marshall B Ketchum University, Fullerton, CA, USA Abstract: Dry eye disease (DED is one of the most commonly encountered conditions for eye care practitioners. The prevalence of DED can be as high as 30% of the population. In the past decade, only one drug has been approved for the treatment of DED by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA in the USA (ie, Restasis® by Allergan, Inc.. The total annual cost (ie, treatment and lost productivity due to symptoms to the US economy of dry eye can be more than $55 billion. Thus, the development of new drug treatments for dry eye is important for both the dry eye patient and the ophthalmic industry. There are many drugs in development for the treatment of dry eye. This manuscript reviews the drugs listed on the ClinicalTrials.gov website (FDA list of clinical trials being investigated for the treatment of dry eye. A large number of these drugs are designed to target a specific cause of dry eye and some of these drugs will be approved for clinical use in the next 10 years. This will result in a significant increase in the clinician’s choice of treatment and potentially better control of the dry eye patient's condition. Keywords: keratoconjunctivitis sicca, clinical trials, anti-inflammatory, secretagogues

  14. Extraintestinal manifestations in inflammatory bowel disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Silvio Danese; Stefano Semeraro; Alfredo Papa; Italia Roberto; Franco Scaldaferri; Giuseppe Fedeli; Giovanni Gasbarrini; Antonio Gasbarrini

    2005-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) can be really considered to be systemic diseases since they are often associated with extraintestinal manifestations,complications, and other autoimmune disorders. Indeed,physicians who care for patients with ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease, the two major forms of IBD, face a new clinical challenge every day, worsened by the very frequent rate of extraintestinal complications. The goal of this review is to provide an overview and an update on the extraintestinal complications occurring in IBD.Indeed, this paper highlights how virtually almost every organ system can be involved, principally eyes, skin,joints, kidneys, liver and biliary tracts, and vasculature (or vascular system) are the most common sites of systemic IBD and their involvement is dependent on different mechanisms.

  15. Heritability in inflammatory bowel disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gordon, Hannah; Trier Moller, Frederik; Andersen, Vibeke

    2015-01-01

    Since Tysk et al's pioneering analysis of the Swedish twin registry, twin and family studies continue to support a strong genetic basis of the inflammatory bowel diseases. The coefficient of heritability for siblings of inflammatory bowel disease probands is 25 to 42 for Crohn's disease and 4 to 15...... for ulcerative colitis. Heritability estimates for Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis from pooled twin studies are 0.75 and 0.67, respectively. However, this is at odds with the much lower heritability estimates from Genome-Wide Association Studies (GWAS). This "missing heritability" is likely due...... to shortfalls in both family studies and GWAS. The coefficient of heritability fails to account for familial shared environment. Heritability calculations from twin data are based on Falconer's method, with premises that are increasingly understood to be flawed. GWAS based heritability estimates may...

  16. Surgery for inflammatory bowel disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    John M Hwang; Madhulika G Varma

    2008-01-01

    Despite the new and ever expanding array of medications for the treatment of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD),there are still clear indications for operative management of IBD and its complications.We present an overview of indications,procedures,considerations,and controversies in the surgical therapy of IBD.

  17. Pelvic Inflammatory Disease (PID) Treatment and Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Search The CDC Cancel Submit Search The CDC Pelvic Inflammatory Disease (PID) Note: Javascript is disabled or is not ... Twitter STD on Facebook Sexually Transmitted Diseases (STDs) Pelvic Inflammatory Disease (PID) Treatment and Care Recommend on Facebook Tweet ...

  18. Investigating the anti-inflammatory effects of curcumin on Endotoxin-induced uveitis in rabbits' eyes

    OpenAIRE

    Nader Kavian; 2Mohammadreza Talebnjad; Aida Seif; Ladan Mirzaei

    2016-01-01

    Corticosteriods are used in the treatment of inflammatory diseases of the eye such as uveitis, but these drugs have many side effects such as cataract and primary open angle glaucoma (POAG) and aggravation of keratitis caused by herpes simplex, fungal keratitis, etc. Therefore, the efforts to find new medicines that control ocular inflammation while lacking any steroid side effects continue. Curcumin is a yellow substance found in turmeric and in traditional medicine it is used as...

  19. [Inflammatory Bowel Disease Competence Network].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schreiber, Stefan; Hartmann, Heinz; Kruis, Wolfgang; Kucharzik, Torsten; Mudter, Jonas; Siegmund, Britta; Stallmach, Andreas; Witte, Christine; Fitzke, Klaus; Bokemeyer, Bernd

    2016-04-01

    The Inflammatory Bowel Disease Competence Network is a network of more than 500 physicians and scientists from university clinics, hospitals and gastroenterology practices. The focus extends from the two major forms of inflammatory bowel diseases, Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis, into other chronic inflammatory conditions affecting the intestine, including coeliac disease and microscopic colitis. The network translates basic science discoveries (in particular in the molecular epidemiology research) into innovative diagnostics and therapy. Through its strong networking structures it supports a continuous process to improve quality and standardisation in patient care that is implemented in close interaction with European networks addressing this disease group.Optimisation of patient care based on scientifically proven evidence is a main focus of the network. Therefore, it supports and coordinates translational research and infrastructure projects that investigate aetiology, improvement of diagnostic methods, and development of new or improved use of established therapies. Members participate in various training projects, thus ensuring the rapid transfer of research results into clinical practice.The competence network cooperates with the main patient organisations to engage patients in all levels of activities. The network and the patient organisations have interest in promoting public awareness about the disease entities, because their importance and burden is underestimated in non-specialised medical fields and among the general public.

  20. Inflammatory bowel disease and airway diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vutcovici, Maria; Brassard, Paul; Bitton, Alain

    2016-01-01

    Airway diseases are the most commonly described lung manifestations of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). However, the similarities in disease pathogenesis and the sharing of important environmental risk factors and genetic susceptibility suggest that there is a complex interplay between IBD and airway diseases. Recent evidence of IBD occurrence among patients with airway diseases and the higher than estimated prevalence of subclinical airway injuries among IBD patients support the hypothesis of a two-way association. Future research efforts should be directed toward further exploration of this association, as airway diseases are highly prevalent conditions with a substantial public health impact. PMID:27678355

  1. Childhood Eye Diseases and Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... have a fever. More serious preseptal or orbital cellulitis infections can cause decreased vision, an inability to move the eye, and the appearance of the eye being pushed forward. What to do: Both forms of cellulitis are serious conditions that require urgent medical attention. ...

  2. Experimental models of autoimmune inflammatory ocular diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabio Gasparin

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Ocular inflammation is one of the leading causes of blindness and loss of vision. Human uveitis is a complex and heterogeneous group of diseases characterized by inflammation of intraocular tissues. The eye may be the only organ involved, or uveitis may be part of a systemic disease. A significant number of cases are of unknown etiology and are labeled idiopathic. Animal models have been developed to the study of the physiopathogenesis of autoimmune uveitis due to the difficulty in obtaining human eye inflamed tissues for experiments. Most of those models are induced by injection of specific photoreceptors proteins (e.g., S-antigen, interphotoreceptor retinoid-binding protein, rhodopsin, recoverin, phosducin. Non-retinal antigens, including melanin-associated proteins and myelin basic protein, are also good inducers of uveitis in animals. Understanding the basic mechanisms and pathogenesis of autoimmune ocular diseases are essential for the development of new treatment approaches and therapeutic agents. The present review describes the main experimental models of autoimmune ocular inflammatory diseases.

  3. Immunopathogenesis of inflammatory bowel disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    David Q Shih; Stephan R Targan

    2008-01-01

    Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis are chronic relapsing immune mediated disorders that results from an aberrant response to gut luminal antigen in genetically susceptible host. The adaptive immune response that is then triggered was widely considered to be a T-helper-1 mediated condition in Crohn's disease and T-helper-2 mediated condition in ulcerative colitis. Recent studies in animal models, genome wide association, and basic science has provided important insights in in the immunopathogenesis of inflammatory bowel disease, one of which was the characterization of the interleukin-23/Th-17 axis.

  4. Inflammatory responses in the rat superior colliculus after eye enucleation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernandes, Marina S; Britto, Luiz R G

    2014-02-01

    Ocular enucleation induces profound morphological alterations in central visual areas. However, little is known about the response of glial cells and possible inflammatory processes in visual brain areas resulting from eye enucleation. In this study, immunoblotting and immunostaining assays revealed increased expression of astrocyte and microglia markers in the rat superior colliculus (SC) between 1 and 15 days after contralateral enucleation. A transient increase of neuronal COX-2 protein expression was also found in the SC. To evaluate the role of an anti-inflammatory drug in attenuating both COX-2 and glial cell activation, the synthetic glucocorticoid dexamethasone (DEX) was administered (1 mg/kg i.p., for 3 days) to enucleated rats. Immunoblotting data revealed that DEX treatment significantly inhibited COX-2 protein expression. Postlesion immunostaining for astrocyte and microglia markers was also significantly reduced by DEX treatment. These findings suggest that the removal of retinal ganglion cell input generates inflammatory responses in central retinorecipient structures. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. High blood pressure and eye disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000999.htm High blood pressure and eye disease To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. High blood pressure can damage blood vessels in the retina . The ...

  6. Inflammatory diseases of the brain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haehnel, Stefan (ed.) [University of Heidelberg Medical Center (Germany). Div. of Neuroradiology

    2009-07-01

    This book provides a comprehensive overview of inflammatory brain diseases from a neuroradiological point of view. Such diseases may be either infectious (e.g., viral encephalitis and pyogenic brain abscess) or non-infectious (e.g., multiple sclerosis), and many of these entities are becoming increasingly important for differential diagnosis, particularly in immunocompromised persons. Neuroimaging contributes greatly to the differentiation of infectious and noninfectious brain diseases and to the distinction between brain inflammation and other, for instance neoplastic, diseases. In order to ensure a standardized approach throughout the book, each chapter is subdivided into three principal sections: epidemiology, clinical presentation and therapy; imaging; and differential diagnosis. A separate chapter addresses technical and methodological issues and imaging protocols. All of the authors are recognized experts in their fields, and numerous high-quality and informative illustrations are included. This book will be of great value not only to neuroradiologists but also to neurologists, neuropediatricians, and general radiologists. (orig.)

  7. T cells in vascular inflammatory diseases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lintermans, Lucas L.; Stegeman, Coen A.; Heeringa, Peter; Abdulahad, Wayel H.

    2014-01-01

    Inflammation of the human vasculature is a manifestation of many different diseases ranging from systemic autoimmune diseases to chronic inflammatory diseases, in which multiple types of immune cells are involved. For both autoimmune diseases and chronic inflammatory diseases several observations su

  8. Inflammatory eye reactions with bisphosphonates and other osteoporosis medications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clark, Emma M; Durup, Darshana

    2015-01-01

    Inflammatory eye reactions (IERs) are rare but have been associated with medications to treat osteoporosis. The aim of this review is to summarize the current literature on the association between IERs and specific medications to treat osteoporosis (bisphosphonates, selective estrogen receptor...... of the information available is from spontaneous case reports and case series reporting associations between bisphosphonates and IERs. No case reports describe IERs after other anti-osteoporosis medications. Importantly, some case reports describe recurrence of the IER after affected patients were rechallenged...... with the same or another bisphosphonate, and that no reported cases resolved without discontinuation of the bisphosphonate. However, three large population-based cohort studies have shown conflicting results between osteoporosis treatments and IERs, but overall these studies suggest that IERs may actually...

  9. Cancer in inflammatory bowel disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jianlin Xie; Steven H Itzkowitz

    2008-01-01

    Patients with long-standing inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) have an increased risk of developing colorectal cancer (CRC). Many of the molecular alterations responsible for sporadic colorectal cancer, namely chromosomal instability, microsatellite instability, and hypermethylation, also play a role in colitis-associated colon carcinogenesis. Colon cancer risk in inflammatory bowel disease increases with longer duration of colitis, greater anatomic extent of colitis, the presence of primary sclerosing cholangitis, family history of CRC and degree of inflammation of the bowel. Chemoprevention includes aminosalicylates, ursodeoxycholic acid, and possibly folic acid and statins. To reduce CRC mortality in IBD, colonoscopic surveillance with random biopsies remains the major way to detect early mucosal dysplasia. When dysplasia is confirmed, proctocolectomy is considered for these patients. Patients with small intestinal Crohn's disease are at increased risk of small bowel adenocarcinoma. Ulcerative colitis patients with total proctocolectomy and ileal pouch anal- anastomosis have a rather low risk of dysplasia in the ileal pouch, but the anal transition zone should be monitored periodically. Other extra intestinal cancers, such as hepatobiliary and hematopoietic cancer, have shown variable incidence rates. New endoscopic and molecular screening approaches may further refine our current surveillance guidelines and our understanding of the natural history of dysplasia.

  10. Ischemic heart disease in systemic inflammatory diseases. An appraisal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gargiulo, Paola; Marsico, Fabio; Parente, Antonio; Paolillo, Stefania; Cecere, Milena; Casaretti, Laura; Pellegrino, Angela Maria; Formisano, Tiziana; Fabiani, Irma; Soricelli, Andrea; Trimarco, Bruno; Perrone-Filardi, Pasquale

    2014-01-01

    Systemic inflammatory diseases are inflammatory syndromes that are associated with increased cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. The link between inflammatory and cardiovascular diseases can be attributed to coexistence of classical risk factors and of inflammatory mechanisms activated in systemic inflammatory diseases and involving the immune system. Yet, clinical implications of these findings are not entirely clear and deeper knowledge and awareness of cardiac involvement in inflammatory diseases are necessary. The aims of this review are to summarize cardiac involvement in systemic inflammatory diseases and to identify areas where evidence is currently lacking that deserve further investigation in the future.

  11. Inflammatory bowel disease in pregnancy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dawn B Beaulieu; Sunanda Kane

    2011-01-01

    Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis affect women in their child-bearing years. Family planning has come to be a common discussion between the gastroenterologist and the inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) patient.Disease control prior to desired conception and throughout pregnancy is the most important thing to keep in mind when caring for the IBD patient. Continued medical management during pregnancy is crucial in optimizing outcomes. Studies indicate that quiescent disease prior to conception infer the best pregnancy outcomes, similar to those in the general population.Active disease prior to and during pregnancy, can lead to complications such as pre-term labor, low birth weight, and small for gestational age infants. Although there are no definitive long term effects of pregnancy on IBD, there are some limited studies that suggest that it may alter the disease course. Understanding the literature and its limitations is important in the modern era of IBD care. Educating the patient and taking a team approach with the obstetrician will help achieve successful outcomes for mother and baby.

  12. Selenium and inflammatory bowel disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kudva, Avinash K; Shay, Ashley E; Prabhu, K Sandeep

    2015-07-15

    Dietary intake of the micronutrient selenium is essential for normal immune functions. Selenium is cotranslationally incorporated as the 21st amino acid, selenocysteine, into selenoproteins that function to modulate pathways involved in inflammation. Epidemiological studies have suggested an inverse association between selenium levels and inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), which includes Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis that can potentially progress to colon cancer. However, the underlying mechanisms are not well understood. Here we summarize the current literature on the pathophysiology of IBD, which is multifactorial in origin with unknown etiology. We have focused on a few selenoproteins that mediate gastrointestinal inflammation and activate the host immune response, wherein macrophages play a pivotal role. Changes in cellular oxidative state coupled with altered expression of selenoproteins in macrophages drive the switch from a proinflammatory phenotype to an anti-inflammatory phenotype to efficiently resolve inflammation in the gut and restore epithelial barrier integrity. Such a phenotypic plasticity is accompanied by changes in cytokines, chemokines, and bioactive metabolites, including eicosanoids that not only mitigate inflammation but also partake in restoring gut homeostasis through diverse pathways involving differential regulation of transcription factors such as nuclear factor-κB and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ. The role of the intestinal microbiome in modulating inflammation and aiding in selenium-dependent resolution of gut injury is highlighted to provide novel insights into the beneficial effects of selenium in IBD.

  13. Microbiota biodiversity in inflammatory bowel disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Gut microbiota plays a significant role in human health and energy balance, and provides protection against disease states. An altered balance between microbiota and its host (dysbiosis) would appear to contribute to the development of Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD), Crohn’s Disease (CD) and Ulcerative Colitis (UC). CD and UC are chronic inflammatory diseases of the gastrointestinal tes. PMID:24684926

  14. Neuroimmune regulation of inflammatory responses in inflammatory bowel disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rijnierse, Anneke

    2006-01-01

    The term inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is used to describe chronic inflammatory conditions of the gastro-intestinal tract. Patients suffer from abdominal pain, diarrhea, rectal bleeding and a substantial personal burden. The etiology of IBD is gradually being unraveled but remains a complex

  15. Neuroimmune regulation of inflammatory responses in inflammatory bowel disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rijnierse, Anneke

    2006-01-01

    The term inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is used to describe chronic inflammatory conditions of the gastro-intestinal tract. Patients suffer from abdominal pain, diarrhea, rectal bleeding and a substantial personal burden. The etiology of IBD is gradually being unraveled but remains a complex inter

  16. Ivermectin for onchocercal eye disease (river blindness)

    OpenAIRE

    Ejere, HO; Schwartz, E; Wormald, R; Evans, JR

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: It is believed that ivermectin (a microfilaricide) could prevent blindness due to onchocerciasis. However, when given to everyone in communities where onchocerciasis is common, the effects of ivermectin on lesions affecting the eye are uncertain and data on whether the drug prevents visual loss are unclear. OBJECTIVES: The aim of this review was to assess the effectiveness of ivermectin in preventing visual impairment and visual field loss in onchocercal eye disease. The secondary...

  17. Ocular manifestations of inflammatory bowel disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Akshay S; Lin, Phoebe

    2016-11-01

    Extraintestinal manifestations (EIMs) of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) are numerous and can often involve the eye. This review highlights the ocular complications associated with IBD including the critical role the ophthalmologist can play in the diagnosis of IBD, the pathogenesis of IBD, its ocular complications, and the treatment of ocular inflammation associated with IBD. Polygenic and environmental influences, as well as gut microbial dysbiosis, have been implicated in the pathogenesis of IBD. IBD and its EIMs appear to respond well to TNFα-targeted biologics. IBD is thought to be caused by polygenic and environmental influences, including a dysbiotic gut microbiota. It is a systemic immune-mediated disease with varying types of ocular manifestations that can precede, occur simultaneously, or follow intestinal involvement. The diagnosis of IBD can be confused with other seronegative spondyloarthropathies as well as Behçet's disease. Treatment of IBD-associated ocular inflammation can range from corticosteroids to steroid-sparing immunosuppression such as azathioprine or methotrexate. Refractory disease can respond well to TNFα inhibitors.

  18. Extraintestinal Manifestations of Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoepfer, Alain; Scharl, Michael; Lakatos, Peter L.; Navarini, Alexander; Rogler, Gerhard

    2015-01-01

    Abstract: Extraintestinal manifestations (EIM) in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) are frequent and may occur before or after IBD diagnosis. EIM may impact the quality of life for patients with IBD significantly requiring specific treatment depending on the affected organ(s). They most frequently affect joints, skin, or eyes, but can also less frequently involve other organs such as liver, lungs, or pancreas. Certain EIM, such as peripheral arthritis, oral aphthous ulcers, episcleritis, or erythema nodosum, are frequently associated with active intestinal inflammation and usually improve by treatment of the intestinal activity. Other EIM, such as uveitis or ankylosing spondylitis, usually occur independent of intestinal inflammatory activity. For other not so rare EIM, such as pyoderma gangrenosum and primary sclerosing cholangitis, the association with the activity of the underlying IBD is unclear. Successful therapy of EIM is essential for improving quality of life of patients with IBD. Besides other options, tumor necrosis factor antibody therapy is an important therapy for EIM in patients with IBD. PMID:26154136

  19. Nutrition in inflammatory bowel disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez Gómez, María Josefa; Melián Fernández, Cristóbal; Romeo Donlo, María

    2016-07-12

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is a chronic pathology that has an outbreaks course that in recent years have seen an increase in incidence, especially at younger ages. Malnutrition is frequently associated with this condition, therefore, it is very important to ensure a right nutritional intervention, especially in pediatric patients, to ensure an optimal growth and also an improvement in the clinic. Our goal will be updated the role of nutrition in this disease and in its treatment based on the published evidence. Malnutrition in these patients is frequent and is influenced by various factors such as, decreased food intake, increased nutrient requirements, increased protein loss and malabsorption of nutrients. Therefore there should be a nutritional monitoring of all of them, in which anthropometric measurements, laboratory tests and densitometry were made to establish the needs and sufficient caloric intake tailored to each patient. The use of enteral nutrition as a treatment in Crohn’s disease with mild to moderate outbreak in child population, is amply demonstrated, has even shown to be superior to the use of corticosteroids. Therefore we can conclude by stressing that nutritional intervention is a mainstay in the management of patients with IBD, which aims to prevent and / or control disease-related malnutrition to decrease morbidity and mortality and improve quality of life.

  20. Hypertrophic osteoarthropathy of chronic inflammatory bowel disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oppenheimer, D.A.; Jones, H.H.

    1982-12-01

    The case of a 14-year old girl with painful periostitis and ulcerative colitis is reported. The association of chronic inflammatory bowel disease with osteoarthropathy is rare and has previously been reported in eight patients. The periosteal reaction found in association with inflammatory bowel disease is apparently related to a chronic disease course and may cause extreme localized pain.

  1. Pelvic Inflammatory Disease (PID) Fact Sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Search Form Controls Cancel Submit Search the CDC Pelvic Inflammatory Disease (PID) Note: Javascript is disabled or is not ... Twitter STD on Facebook Sexually Transmitted Diseases (STDs) Pelvic Inflammatory Disease (PID) - CDC Fact Sheet Language: English (US) Españ ...

  2. Etiopathogenesis of inflammatory bowel diseases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Silvio Danese; Claudio Fiocchi

    2006-01-01

    Theories explaining the etiopathogenesis of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) have been proposed ever since Crohn's disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC) were recognized as the two major forms of the disease. Although the exact cause(s) and mechanisms of tissue damage in CD and UC have yet to be completely understood, enough progress has occurred to accept the following hypothesis as valid: IBD is an inappropriate immune response that occurs in genetically susceptible individuals as the result of a complex interaction among environmental factors, microbial factors, and the intestinal immune system. Among an almost endless list of environmental factors, smoking has been identified as a risk factor for CD and a protective factor for UC. Among microbial factors, no convincing evidence indicates that classical infectious agents cause IBD, while mounting evidence points to an abnormal immune response against the normal enteric flora as being of central importance. Gut inflammation is mediated by cells of the innate as well as adaptive immune systems, with the additional contribution of non-immune cells, such as epithelial, mesenchymal and endothelial cells, and platelets.

  3. Socioeconomic Disparities in the Presentation and Treatment of Graves' Disease and Thyroid Eye Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargason, Caroline W; Chelnis, James G; Barahimi, Behin I; Mawn, Louise A

    2016-01-01

    Thyroid eye disease (TED) is an inflammatory, autoimmune orbitopathy with multifactorial etiology. Clinical presentation of TED spans a range from mild surface irritation to vision threatening compressive optic neuropathy. Potential vision loss underscores the importance of understanding genetic and environmental factors influencing the severity of TED presentation. This review will describe the classic risk factors for TED, outline treatments for Graves' disease (GD) and TED, and describe newer evidence of socioeconomic disparities in TED presentation.

  4. Pharmacogenetics in inflammatory bowel disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Marie Pierik; Paul Rutgeerts; Robert Vlietinck; Severine Vermeire

    2006-01-01

    Pharmacogenetics is the study of the association between variability in drug response and (or) drug toxicity and polymorphisms in genes. The goal of this field of science is to adapt drugs to a patient's specific genetic background and therefore make them more efficacious and safe. In this article we describe the variants in genes that influence either the efficacy or toxicity of common drugs used in the treatment of inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD), ulcerative colitis (UC),and Crohn's disease (CD) including sulfasalazine and mesalazine, azathioprine (AZA) and 6-mercaptopurine (6-MP), methotrexate (MTX), glucocorticosteroids (CSs) and infliximab. Furthermore, difficulties with pharmacogenetic studies in general and more specifically in IBD are described. Although pharmacogenetics is a promising field that already contributed to a better understanding of some of the underlying mechanisms of action of drugs used in IBD, the only discovery translated until now into daily practice is the relation between thiopurine S-methyltransferase (TPMT) gene polymorphisms and hematological toxicity of thiopurine treatment. In the future it is necessary to organize studies in well characterized patient cohorts who have been uniformly treated and systematically evaluated in order to quantitate drug response more objectively. An effort should be made to collect genomic DNA from all patients enrolled in clinical drug trials after appropriate informed consent for pharmacogenetic studies.

  5. Diagnosis and management of thyroid eye disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denniston, Alastair; Dodson, Paul; Reuser, Tristan

    2002-03-01

    Recent advances are helping elucidate the pathogenesis and improve the management of thyroid eye disease. While biochemical investigations and imaging may be supportive, ophthalmological and medical clinical assessments remain the key to the diagnosis and management of this sight-threatening disorder.

  6. Endothelial Dysfunction in Chronic Inflammatory Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Curtis M. Steyers

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Chronic inflammatory diseases are associated with accelerated atherosclerosis and increased risk of cardiovascular diseases (CVD. As the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis is increasingly recognized as an inflammatory process, similarities between atherosclerosis and systemic inflammatory diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis, inflammatory bowel diseases, lupus, psoriasis, spondyloarthritis and others have become a topic of interest. Endothelial dysfunction represents a key step in the initiation and maintenance of atherosclerosis and may serve as a marker for future risk of cardiovascular events. Patients with chronic inflammatory diseases manifest endothelial dysfunction, often early in the course of the disease. Therefore, mechanisms linking systemic inflammatory diseases and atherosclerosis may be best understood at the level of the endothelium. Multiple factors, including circulating inflammatory cytokines, TNF-α (tumor necrosis factor-α, reactive oxygen species, oxidized LDL (low density lipoprotein, autoantibodies and traditional risk factors directly and indirectly activate endothelial cells, leading to impaired vascular relaxation, increased leukocyte adhesion, increased endothelial permeability and generation of a pro-thrombotic state. Pharmacologic agents directed against TNF-α-mediated inflammation may decrease the risk of endothelial dysfunction and cardiovascular disease in these patients. Understanding the precise mechanisms driving endothelial dysfunction in patients with systemic inflammatory diseases may help elucidate the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis in the general population.

  7. Inflammatory bowel disease: the role of inflammatory cytokine gene polymorphisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joanna Balding

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available THE mechanisms responsible for development of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD have not been fully elucidated, although the main cause of disease pathology is attributed to up-regulated inflammatory processes. The aim of this study was to investigate frequencies of polymorphisms in genes encoding pro-inflammatory and anti-inflammatory markers in IBD patients and controls. We determined genotypes of patients with IBD (n=172 and healthy controls (n=389 for polymorphisms in genes encoding various cytokines (interleukin (IL-1β, IL-6, tumour necrosis factor (TNF, IL-10, IL-1 receptor antagonist. Association of these genotypes to disease incidence and pathophysiology was investigated. No strong association was found with occurrence of IBD. Variation was observed between the ulcerative colitis study group and the control population for the TNF-α-308 polymorphism (p=0.0135. There was also variation in the frequency of IL-6-174 and TNF-α-308 genotypes in the ulcerative colitis group compared with the Crohn's disease group (p=0.01. We concluded that polymorphisms in inflammatory genes are associated with variations in IBD phenotype and disease susceptibility. Whether the polymorphisms are directly involved in regulating cytokine production, and consequently pathophysiology of IBD, or serve merely as markers in linkage disequilibrium with susceptibility genes remains unclear.

  8. Novel susceptibility genes in inflammatory bowel disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Colin Noble; Elaine Nimmo; Daniel Gaya; Richard K Russell; Jack Satsangi

    2006-01-01

    The inflammatory bowel disease, Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis, are polygenic disorders with important environmental interactions. To date, the most widely adopted approach to identifying susceptibility genes in complex diseases has involved genome wide linkage studies followed by studies of positional candidate genes in loci of interest. This review encompasses data from studies into novel candidate genes implicated in the pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel disease. Novel techniques to identify candidate genes-genome wide association studies, yeast-two hybrid screening, microarray gene expression studies and proteomic profiling,are also reviewed and their potential role in unravelling the pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel disease are discussed.

  9. Use of thiopurines in inflammatory bowel disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frei, Pascal; Biedermann, Luc; Nielsen, Ole Haagen;

    2013-01-01

    The use of thiopurines as immunosuppression for the treatment of refractory or chronic active inflammatory bowel disease is established for both Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis. Nevertheless, many questions remain concerning the optimal treatment regimens of azathioprine, 6-mercaptopurine...

  10. [The temporomandibular joint and inflammatory rheumatic diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marotte, H

    2016-09-01

    Some inflammatory rheumatic diseases can involve the temporomandibular joint, such as rheumatoid arthritis and spondylarthritis. The aim of our work was to evaluate the current prevalence of these inflammatory TMJ diseases, to indicate the new therapeutics and to describe the collaboration between rheumatologist and maxillofacial surgeon in these pathologies. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  11. Update imaging in inflammatory bowel diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herfarth, Hans

    2013-01-01

    Imaging is a central component of the diagnostic process in inflammatory bowel diseases. This review summarizes the recent progress of various most commonly used imaging modalities including computed tomography enterography, magnetic resonance enterography and capsule endoscopy. Advantages and disadvantages of each imaging protocol in suspected and established inflammatory bowel diseases are reviewed and brought into context in proposed diagnostic algorithms.

  12. Inflammatory bowel disease: potential therapeutic strategies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, O H; Vainer, B; Bregenholt, S;

    1997-01-01

    This review deals with potential and possibly primary therapeutics that, through insight into the inflammatory cascade, result in more rational treatment principles replacing the classical therapy of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), i.e. Crohn's disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC). These ne...

  13. Neuropeptide receptor expression in inflammatory bowel disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beek, Willy Pascale ter

    2008-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), i.e. Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis are characterized by a chronic inflammation of the gastrointestinal tract. Neuropeptides are involved in the regulation of intestinal motility, chloride secretion and inflammatory response, three processes that are disturb

  14. Pregnancy outcome in inflammatory bowel disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bortoli, A; Pedersen, N; Duricova, D;

    2011-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) frequently affects women during their reproductive years. Pregnancy outcome in women with IBD is well described, particularly in retrospective studies.......Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) frequently affects women during their reproductive years. Pregnancy outcome in women with IBD is well described, particularly in retrospective studies....

  15. [Neurological complications of inflammatory bowel diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cieplik, N; Stangel, M; Bachmann, O

    2013-02-01

    Inflammatory bowel diseases, such as Crohn's disease, ulcerative colitis, autoantibody driven celiac disease and infectious Whipple's disease can all be associated with neurological symptoms. The neurological manifestation may occur even before the gastrointestinal symptoms or the enteropathic symptoms can even be absent as in celiac disease. These diseases can be caused by malresorption and lack of vitamins due to enteral inflammation as well as (auto-)immunological mechanisms and drug-associated side effects. Thus, inflammatory bowel diseases have to be considered in the differential diagnosis. In this review the most common neurological manifestations of these diseases will be described as well as the diagnostic approach.

  16. Treatment of pelvic inflammatory disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunha, B A

    1990-04-01

    The pathogenesis, risk factors, microbiology, sequelae, diagnosis, and treatment of pelvic inflammatory disease (PID) are reviewed, and factors associated with the selection of effective, safe, and economical drug therapy are discussed. PID is an acute clinical syndrome not related to surgery or pregnancy that is caused by the spread of microorganisms from the vagina and cervix to the endometrium, fallopian tubes, and other adnexal structures. Primary PID, the most common form of the disease, is the result of the ascent of sexually acquired or endogenous lower genital tract microorganisms to the upper genital tract. Presence of a sexually transmitted disease is the most common risk factor for PID, but a previous episode of PID, multiple sexual partners, intrauterine device use, and young age are also risk factors. PID is classified as gonococcal or nongonococcal (i.e., caused by anaerobic and aerobic pelvic organisms). The long-term consequences of PID are the most devastating aspects of the disease; infertility remains the most common sequela. Therapy of PID is aimed at preserving fertility, preventing long-term consequences, and relieving acute clinical symptoms. In areas in which penicillinase-producing Neisseria gonorrhoeae is endemic, therapy that is effective against penicillinase-producing N. gonorrhoeae is necessary. Gonococcal PID that is not penicillin resistant may be treated with a single intramuscular or oral dose of a penicillin; penicillin-resistant infection may be treated with a cephalosporin or ciprofloxacin. If chlamydia is a diagnostic consideration, a one- to two-week course of oral tetracycline or doxycycline (injectable-drug therapy is an alternative) should be added to the regimen. Single-agent therapy is a cost-effective alternative to combination regimens. Ampicillin-sulbactam is a cost-effective alternative to the more costly injectable cephalosporins or the combination regimens of an aminoglycoside plus clindamycin or metronidazole. With

  17. Musculoskeletal Manifestations in Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanni Fornaciari

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Muscoloskeletal manifestations are the most common extraintestinal complications of inflammatory bowel disease. Wide ranges in prevalence have been reported, depending on the criteria used to define spondylarthropathy. In 1991, the European Spondylarthropathy Study Group developed classification criteria that included previously neglected cases of undifferentiated spondylarthropathies, which had been ignored in most of the oldest epidemiological studies on inflammatory bowel disease. The spectrum of muscoloskeletal manifestations in inflammatory bowel disease patients includes all of the clinical features of spondylarthropathies: peripheral arthritis, inflammatory spinal pain, dactylitis, enthesitis (Achilles tendinitis and plantar fasciitis, buttock pain and anterior chest wall pain. Radiological evidence of sacroiliitis is common but not obligatory. The articular manifestations begin either concomitantly or subsequent to the bowel disease; however, the onset of spinal disease often precedes the diagnosis of inflammatory bowel disease. The prevalence of the different muscoloskeletal manifestations is similar in ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease. Symptoms usually disappear after proctocolectomy. The pathogenetic mechanisms that produce the muscoloskeletal manifestations in inflammatory bowel disease are unclear. Several arguments favour an important role of the intestinal mucosa in the development of spondylarthropathy. The natural history is characterized by periods of flares and remission; therefore, the efficacy of treatment is difficult to establish. Most patients respond to rest, physical therapy and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, but these drugs may activate bowel disease. Sulphasalazine may be recommended in some patients. There is no indication for the systemic use of steroids.

  18. Bilateral versus unilateral thyroid eye disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohsen Bahmani Kashkouli

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims: The aim of this study was to compare demographics, clinical manifestations, associated systemic and ocular factors, severity and activity of patients with unilateral thyroid eye disease (U-TED versus bilateral thyroid eye disease (B-TED. Materials and Methods: In a cross-sectional study, all patients with Graves′ hyperthyroidism and primary hypothyroidism seen in an endocrinology clinic were included from September 2003 to July 2006. Demographics, complete eye examination, severity score (NOSPECS, total eye score, and clinical activity score were recorded and compared in the B-TED and U-TED groups of patients. Results: From 851 patients with thyroid disorders, 303 (35.6% had TED. Thirty-two patients (32/ 303, 10.56% were found to have U-TED. Patients with U-TED (mean age 31.6 ± 11.6 years were significantly younger than patients with B-TED (mean age 37.7 ± 14.7 years. Monovariate analysis (Chi-square and independent sample t-test showed a significantly higher severity score in B-TED (U-TED 4.09±4.05, B-TED: 6.7±6.3; P= 0.002 and more activity score in B-TED (U-TED= 1.03±0.96, B-TED: 1.74±1.6, P= 0.001. However, multivariate analysis did not show any significant difference between the two groups in terms of age, gender, type of thyroid disease, duration of thyroid disease and TED, severity and activity of TED, smoking habit, and presentation of TED before or after the presentation of thyroid disease (0.1disease, associated findings, and severity and activity of TED.

  19. Inflammatory pathways of importance for management of inflammatory bowel disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Jannie; Coskun, Mehmet; Soendergaard, Christoffer

    2014-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is a group of chronic disorders of the gastrointestinal tract comprising Crohn's disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC). Their etiologies are unknown, but they are characterised by an imbalanced production of pro-inflammatory mediators, e.g., tumor necrosis factor...... (TNF)-α, as well as increased recruitment of leukocytes to the site of inflammation. Advantages in understanding the role of the inflammatory pathways in IBD and an inadequate response to conventional therapy in a large portion of patients, has over the last two decades lead to new therapies which...... includes the TNF inhibitors (TNFi), designed to target and neutralise the effect of TNF-α. TNFi have shown to be efficient in treating moderate to severe CD and UC. However, convenient alternative therapeutics targeting other immune pathways are needed for patients with IBD refractory to conventional...

  20. Genetics of Inflammatory Bowel Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGovern, Dermot P B; Kugathasan, Subra; Cho, Judy H

    2015-10-01

    In this review, we provide an update on genome-wide association studies (GWAS) in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). In addition, we summarize progress in defining the functional consequences of associated alleles for coding and noncoding genetic variation. In the small minority of loci where major association signals correspond to nonsynonymous variation, we summarize studies defining their functional effects and implications for therapeutic targeting. Importantly, the large majority of GWAS-associated loci involve noncoding variation, many of which modulate levels of gene expression. Recent expression quantitative trait loci (eQTL) studies have established that the expression of most human genes is regulated by noncoding genetic variations. Significant advances in defining the epigenetic landscape have demonstrated that IBD GWAS signals are highly enriched within cell-specific active enhancer marks. Studies in European ancestry populations have dominated the landscape of IBD genetics studies, but increasingly, studies in Asian and African-American populations are being reported. Common variation accounts for only a modest fraction of the predicted heritability and the role of rare genetic variation of higher effects (ie, odds ratios markedly deviating from 1) is increasingly being identified through sequencing efforts. These sequencing studies have been particularly productive in more severe very early onset cases. A major challenge in IBD genetics will be harnessing the vast array of genetic discovery for clinical utility through emerging precision medical initiatives. In this article, we discuss the rapidly evolving area of direct-to-consumer genetic testing and the current utility of clinical exome sequencing, especially in very early onset, severe IBD cases. We summarize recent progress in the pharmacogenetics of IBD with respect to partitioning patient responses to anti-TNF and thiopurine therapies. Highly collaborative studies across research centers and

  1. [Coexistence of coeliac disease and inflammatory bowel disease in children].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krawiec, Paulina; Pawłowska-Kamieniak, Agnieszka; Pac-Kożuchowska, Elżbieta; Mroczkowska-Juchkiewcz, Agnieszka; Kominek, Katarzyna

    2016-01-01

    Coeliac disease and inflammatory bowel disease are chronic inflammatory conditions of gastrointestinal tract with complex aetiology with genetic, environmental and immunological factors contributing to its pathogenesis. It was noted that immune-mediated disorders often coexist. There is well-known association between coeliac disease and type 1 diabetes and ulcerative colitis and primary sclerosing cholangitis. However, growing body of literature suggests the association between coeliac disease and inflammatory bowel disease, particularly ulcerative colitis. This is an extremely rare problem in paediatric gastroenterology. To date there have been reported several cases of children with coexisting coeliac disease and inflammatory bowel disease. Herewith we present review of current literature on coexistence of coeliac disease and inflammatory bowel disease in children. © 2016 MEDPRESS.

  2. Stem cell therapy for inflammatory bowel disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Duijvestein, Marjolijn

    2012-01-01

    Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) and mesenchymal stromal (MSC) cell therapy are currently under investigation as novel therapies for inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD). Hematopoietic stem cells are thought to repopulate the immune system and reset the immunological response to luminal

  3. Subclinical Pelvic Inflammatory Disease and Infertility

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Wiesenfeld, Harold C; Hillier, Sharon L; Meyn, Leslie A; Amortegui, Antonio J; Sweet, Richard L

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE:The reported incidence of acute pelvic inflammatory disease (PID) has decreased but rates of tubal infertility have not, suggesting that a large proportion of PID leading to infertility may be undetected...

  4. Best Drugs to Treat Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this message. See our privacy policy . A A Best drugs to treat inflammatory bowel disease Comparing effectiveness, ... are taking—which can be found here . Our 'Best Buy' pick We chose adalimumab (Humira) as a ...

  5. Use of Prebiotics for Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Andrew Szilagyi

    2005-01-01

    The relevance of diet in both the pathogenesis and the therapy of inflammatory bowel disease is an evolving science. Disturbance of intestinal microflora (dysbiosis) is putatively a key element in the environmental component causing inflammatory bowel disease. Prebiotics are among the dietary components used in an attempt to counteract dysbiosis. Such predominantly carbohydrate dietary components exert effects on the luminal environment by physicochemical changes through pH alteration, by pro...

  6. Inflammatory Bowel Disease. Medical and psychological aspects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Albersnagel, Frans; Dijkstra, Gerard

    2007-01-01

    A review is presented in which the state of the art of behavioural-scientific research on inflammatory bowel disease (BID) is sorted out. After a short introduction on medical aspects of the two diseases that constitute IBD, i.e. Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis, the factors that may have an i

  7. Nuclear medicine imaging of inflammatory bowel disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Froelich, J.W.

    1987-01-01

    With the availability of indium-labeled white blood cells, radionuclide imaging studies have a definite role in the diagnosis and staging of patients with inflammatory bowel disease. The In-/sup 111/ white blood cell study is particularly helpful in evaluating recurrent disease in patients with severe intercurrent diseases and in screening patients without the need for barium examinations.

  8. The genetic background of inflammatory bowel disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, H; Rotter, J I

    2000-01-01

    Available evidence indicates that genetic factors are essential in providing the susceptibility to the majority of the various forms of inflammatory bowel disease occurring in man. It is also clear that the genetic susceptibility to these diseases is complex, and that more than one gene may predispose (the concept of multilocus/oligogenic inheritance), and likely in different etiologic combinations (the concept of genetic heterogeneity). Paradigms are now available that should lead to the identification of a number of these predisposing genes. These paradigms include the candidate gene approach, systematic genome wide scans, and mouse human synteny. While genome wide scans are currently limited to multiplex family linkage studies, both candidate genes and mouse human synteny can be approached in either linkage or association paradigms. Eventually whole genome association studies will be available as well. Identification of inflammatory bowel disease predisposing genes should lead to their incorporation in studies of natural history, investigation of environmental risk factors, and especially utilization of genetic markers in clinical trials. This will allow us to identify the best therapy available for the individual patient based on their unique genetic constitution. With advances in molecular technology, the search for genes influencing traits and diseases with a complex genetic background, such as the inflammatory bowel diseases, has become a realistic task. Although exogenous or infectious agents may contribute to the pathogenesis or may trigger the onset of disease, and the immune system almost certainly mediates the tissue damage, it is clear from available data that genetic factors determine the susceptibility of a given individual to inflammatory bowel disease (reviewed below). Thus, genetic studies are essential for the delineation of the basic etiologies of the various forms of inflammatory bowel disease and thus can aid in the development of radically

  9. Seasonal trend of acute pelvic inflammatory disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xholli, Anjeza; Cannoletta, Marianna; Cagnacci, Angelo

    2014-05-01

    Many infections follow a seasonal trend. Aim of our study was to check whether acute pelvic inflammatory disease (PID) follows a seasonal progress. In a retrospective study on 12,152 hospital records, 158 cases of acute pelvic inflammatory disease were identified. Periodogram analysis was applied to the date of pelvic inflammatory disease admission and to related environmental factors, such as temperature and photoperiod. Pelvic inflammatory disease follows a seasonal rhythm with mean to peak variation of 23 % and maximal values in September (±37.2 days). The rhythm, more evident in married women, is related to the rhythm of temperature advanced by 2 months and of photoperiod advanced by 3 months. Cases of pelvic inflammatory disease are more frequent than expected in unmarried (36 vs. 17.3/34,626, p = 0.015), particularly divorced women 30-40 years of age. Our study evidences a seasonal trend and confirms unmarried, particularly divorced status, as important risk factor for acute pelvic inflammatory disease.

  10. Dry eye disease and uveitis: A closer look at immune mechanisms in animal models of two ocular autoimmune diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bose, Tanima; Diedrichs-Möhring, Maria; Wildner, Gerhild

    2016-12-01

    Understanding the immunopathogenesis of autoimmune and inflammatory diseases is a prerequisite for specific and effective therapeutical intervention. This review focuses on animal models of two common ocular inflammatory diseases, dry eye disease (DED), affecting the ocular surface, and uveitis with inflammation of the inner eye. In both diseases autoimmunity plays an important role, in idiopathic uveitis immune reactivity to intraocular autoantigens is pivotal, while in dry eye disease autoimmunity seems to play a role in one subtype of disease, Sjögren' syndrome (SjS). Comparing the immune mechanisms underlying both eye diseases reveals similarities, and significant differences. Studies have shown genetic predispositions, T and B cell involvement, cytokine and chemokine signatures and signaling pathways as well as environmental influences in both DED and uveitis. Uveitis and DED are heterogeneous diseases and there is no single animal model, which adequately represents both diseases. However, there is evidence to suggest that certain T cell-targeting therapies can be used to treat both, dry eye disease and uveitis. Animal models are essential to autoimmunity research, from the basic understanding of immune mechanisms to the pre-clinical testing of potential new therapies.

  11. The evolving epidemiology of inflammatory bowel disease.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Shanahan, Fergus

    2009-07-01

    Epidemiologic studies in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) include assessments of disease burden and evolving patterns of disease presentation. Although it is hoped that sound epidemiologic studies provide aetiological clues, traditional risk factor-based epidemiology has provided limited insights into either Crohn\\'s disease or ulcerative colitis etiopathogenesis. In this update, we will summarize how the changing epidemiology of IBD associated with modernization can be reconciled with current concepts of disease mechanisms and will discuss studies of clinically significant comorbidity in IBD.

  12. Familial occurrence of inflammatory bowel disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Orholm, M; Munkholm, P; Langholz, E

    1991-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND METHODS: We assessed the familial occurrence of inflammatory bowel disease in Copenhagen County, where there has been a long-term interest in the epidemiology of such disorders. In 1987 we interviewed 662 patients in whom inflammatory bowel disease had been diagnosed before 1979...... or Crohn's disease) among second-degree relatives was increased; the prevalence of the other disease was not increased. CONCLUSIONS: The 10-fold increase in the familial risk of ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease strongly suggests that these disorders have a genetic cause....... with ulcerative colitis or Crohn's disease had a 10-fold increase in the risk of having the same disease as the patients, after standardization for age and sex. The risk of having the other of the two diseases was also increased, but less so, and the increase in the risk of having Crohn's disease...

  13. Ivermectin for onchocercal eye disease (river blindness)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ejere, Henry OD; Schwartz, Ellen; Wormald, Richard; Evans, Jennifer R

    2015-01-01

    Background It is believed that ivermectin (a microfilaricide) could prevent blindness due to onchocerciasis. However, when given to everyone in communities where onchocerciasis is common, the effects of ivermectin on lesions affecting the eye are uncertain and data on whether the drug prevents visual loss are unclear. Objectives The aim of this review was to assess the effectiveness of ivermectin in preventing visual impairment and visual field loss in onchocercal eye disease. The secondary aim was to assess the effects of ivermectin on lesions affecting the eye in onchocerciasis. Search methods We searched CENTRAL (which contains the Cochrane Eyes and Vision Group Trials Register) (The Cochrane Library 2012, Issue 3), MEDLINE (January 1950 to April 2012), EMBASE (January 1980 to April 2012), the metaRegister of Controlled Trials (mRCT) (www.controlled-trials.com), ClinicalTrials.gov (www.clinicaltrials.gov) and the WHO International Clinical Trials Registry Platform (ICTRP) (www.who.int/ictrp/search/en). We did not use any date or language restrictions in the electronic searches for trials. We last searched the electronic databases on 2 April 2012. Selection criteria We included randomised controlled trials with at least one year of follow-up comparing ivermectin with placebo or no treatment. Participants in the trials were people normally resident in endemic onchocercal communities with or without one or more characteristic signs of ocular onchocerciasis. Data collection and analysis Two review authors independently extracted data and assessed trial quality. We contacted study authors for additional information. As trials varied in design and setting, we were unable to perform a meta-analysis. Main results The review included four trials: two small studies (n = 398) in which people with onchocercal infection were given one dose of ivermectin or placebo and followed up for one year; and two larger community-based studies (n = 4941) whereby all individuals in

  14. Current treatment for inflammatory bowel disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chang-tai Xu; Xiue-gan Guo; Bo-rong Pan

    2003-01-01

    @@Introduction Idiopathic inflammatory bowel disease consists of Crohn's disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC). CD can affect any part of the gastrointestinal tract, from the mouth to the anus, and is also known as regional enteritis, terminal ileitis, or granulomatous……

  15. Management of inflammatory bowel disease in pregnancy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S. Vermeire (Silvio); F. Carbonnel (Franck); P.G. Coulie (Pierre); V. Geenen (Vincent); J.M.W. Hazes (Mieke); P.L. Masson (Pierre); F. de Keyser (Filip); E. Louis (Edouard)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractBackground and Aims: Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is a chronic disease affecting mainly young people in their reproductive years. IBD therefore has a major impact on patients' family planning decisions. Management of IBD in pregnancy requires a challenging balance between optimal dis

  16. New pharmaceuticals in inflammatory bowel disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Łodyga, Michał; Eder, Piotr; Bartnik, Witold; Gonciarz, Maciej; Kłopocka, Maria; Linke, Krzysztof; Małecka-Panas, Ewa; Radwan, Piotr; Rydzewska, Grażyna

    2015-01-01

    This paper complements the previously published Guidelines of the Working Group of the Polish Society of Gastroenterology and former National Consultant in Gastroenterology regarding the management of patients with Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis. Attention was focused on the new pharmaceutical recently registered for inflammatory bowel disease treatment.

  17. [Chronic inflammatory bowel diseases and nutrition].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meier, R

    1996-01-01

    The etiology of inflammatory bowel disease is still unknown. Several potential mechanisms are discussed. The etiological and therapeutic importance of nutrition is controversial. Though changes in dietary habits and incidence of inflammatory bowel disease during the last century were in parallel, no specific nutritional factor has been isolated. No dietary prophylaxis of inflammatory bowel disease is yet known; all dietary therapies in inflammatory bowel disease aim to improve nutritional support and to diminish inflammation by bowel rest. Children and adolescents gain in weight and height. Total parenteral nutrition will not substantially reduce disease activity and operation rates. Total parenteral nutrition can only be recommended in ulcerative colitis patients with severe disease in the initial phase and in Crohn's patients with severe malnutrition and intestinal complications. Enteral nutrition support is less effective in ulcerative colitis than in Crohn's disease. Reported remission rates on enteral nutrition are 25% for ulcerative colitis and up to 80% for Crohn. However, in active Crohn's disease enteral nutrition is less effective than standard therapy with methylprednisolone and sulfasalizine. It is generally believed that nutrition therapy in combination with drugs is the best treatment modality. There is no evidence to support the importance of any combination of the formula diets such as elemental, oligopeptide, or polymeric formulations. Administration of formula diets by nasogastric tubes all show similar remission rates. Whether newer diets supplemented with arginine, glutamine, omega-3-fatty acids or short chain fatty acids increase remission rates is not known. Further studies in this field are warranted.

  18. Review article : inflammatory bowel disease and genetics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weersma, R. K.; Van Dullemen, H. M.; Van der Steege, G.; Nolte, I. M.; Kleibeuker, J. H.; Dijkstra, G.

    2007-01-01

    Introduction Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) comprising ulcerative colitis (UC) and Crohn's disease (CD) is multigenic disorder. Tremendous progress has been achieved in unravelling the genetic background of IBD. It has led to the discovery of mutations in NOD2 associated with ileal CD and numerous

  19. Current concepts in chronic inflammatory diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Garn, Holger; Bahn, Sabine; Baune, Bernhard T

    2016-01-01

    Recent research indicates that chronic inflammatory diseases, including allergies and autoimmune and neuropsychiatric diseases, share common pathways of cellular and molecular dysregulation. It was the aim of the International von-Behring-Röntgen Symposium (October 16-18, 2014, in Marburg, Germany...

  20. [Chronic inflammatory bowel diseases in cats].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghermai, A K

    1989-01-01

    The aetiology of chronic idiopathic intestinal inflammation is unknown. It is characterized by a diffuse infiltration with inflammatory cells into the intestinal mucosa and sometimes submucosa. Cats with chronic intermittent vomiting and diarrhoea, later on accompanied by anorexia and weight loss, are presented. Definitive diagnosis can be obtained by intestinal biopsy only. An immune pathogenesis is suspected, which is supported by the fact, that chronic inflammatory bowel disease responds to steroid therapy.

  1. Pharmacological nutrition in inflammatory bowel diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campos, F G; Waitzberg, D L; Teixeira, M G; Mucerino, D R; Kiss, D R; Habr-Gama, A

    2003-01-01

    Inflammatory Bowel Diseases--ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease--are chronic gastrointestinal inflammatory diseases of unknown etiology. Decreased oral intake, malabsorption, accelerated nutrient losses, increased requirements, and drug-nutrient interactions cause nutritional and functional deficiencies that require proper correction by nutritional therapy. The goals of the different forms of nutritional therapy are to correct nutritional disturbances and to modulate inflammatory response, thus influencing disease activity. Nutritional intervention may improve outcome in certain individuals; however, because of the costs and complications of such therapy, careful selection is warranted. Total parenteral nutrition has been used to correct and prevent nutritional disturbances and to promote bowel rest during active disease, mainly in cases of digestive fistulae with a high output. Its use should be reserved for patients who cannot tolerate enteral nutrition. Enteral nutrition is effective in inducing clinical remission of disease in adults and promoting growth in children. Recent research has focused on the use of specific nutrients as primary treatment agents. Although some reports have indicated that glutamine, short-chain fatty acids, antioxidants and immunonutrition with omega-3 fatty acids are an important therapeutic alternative in the management of inflammatory bowel diseases, the beneficial reported effects have yet to be translated into the clinical practice. The real efficacy of these nutrients still need further evaluation through prospective and randomized trials.

  2. Inflammatory Bowel Disease (For Teens)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Just like other organs in your body, the intestines can develop problems or diseases. IBD (which is not the same thing as irritable bowel syndrome, or IBS), can cause more serious problems than ...

  3. Quality of health care in inflammatory bowel disease: developement of a reliable questionnaire (QUOTE-IBD) and first results.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eijk, I. van der; Sixma, H.; Smeets, T.; Veloso, F.T.; Odes, S.; Montague, S.; Fornaciari, G.; Moum, B.; Stockbrugger, R.; Russel, M.

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: As inflammatory bowel disease is a chronic disorder, usually with an early onset in life, quality of care plays an important role for patients. The aim of this study was to develop a questionnaire to measure quality of care through the eyes of patients with inflammatory bowel disease. ME

  4. Diet and risk of inflammatory bowel disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Vibeke; Olsen, Anja; Carbonnel, Franck

    2012-01-01

    Library were searched for studies on diet and risk of inflammatory bowel disease. Results: Established non-diet risk factors include family predisposition, smoking, appendectomy, and antibiotics. Retrospective case–control studies are encumbered with methodological problems. Prospective studies...... on European cohorts, mainly including middle-aged adults, suggest that a diet high in protein from meat and fish is associated with a higher risk of inflammatory bowel disease. Intake of the n-6 polyunsaturated fatty acid linoleic acid may confer risk of ulcerative colitis, whereas n-3 polyunsaturated fatty...... dioxide and aluminium silicate). Conclusions: A diet high in protein, particular animal protein, may be associated with increased risk of inflammatory bowel disease and relapses. N-6 polyunsaturated fatty acids may predispose to ulcerative colitis whilst n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid may protect...

  5. The Immunological Basis of Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesca A. R. Silva

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Inflammatory bowel diseases (IBDs are chronic ailments, Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis being the most important. These diseases present an inflammatory profile and they differ according to pathophysiology, the affected area in the gastrointestinal tract, and the depth of the inflammation in the intestinal wall. The immune characteristics of IBD arise from abnormal responses of the innate and adaptive immune system. The number of Th17 cells increases in the peripheral blood of IBD patients, while Treg cells decrease, suggesting that the Th17/Treg proportion plays an important role in the development and maintenance of inflammation. The purpose of this review was to determine the current state of knowledge on the immunological basis of IBD. Many studies have shown the need for further explanation of the development and maintenance of the inflammatory process.

  6. Cutaneous manifestations of inflammatory bowel disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Al Roujayee Abdulaziz

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD has many extraintestinal manifestations, and skin lesions are one of the most frequently described extraintestinal findings. Reports indicate an incidence of cutaneous manifestations ranging from 2 to 34%, Cutaneous manifestations are usually related to the activity of the bowel disease but may have an independent course. In this review we aim to address the various cutaneous manifestations associated with IBD, their impact on the disease course, and the treatment options available.

  7. Inflammatory bowel disease: Genetic and epidemiologic considerations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Judy H Cho

    2008-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies have firmly established that many genomic loci contribute to inflammatory bowel disease, especially in Crohn's disease. These studies have newly-established the importance of the interleukin 23 and autophagy pathways in disease pathogenesis. Future challenges include: (1) the establishment of precisely causal alleles, (2) definition of altered functional outcomes of associated and causal alleles and (3) integration of genetic findings with environmental factors.

  8. Netra darpanamu - A Unique book on eye diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasad, Goli Penchala

    2007-10-01

    Netra Darpanamu is the only book written exclusively on Eye diseases in Telugu. This Ayurvedic book, which is famous in Andhra Pradesh, was first published in 1908 in Eluru. The book is written in chaste Telugu poetry, comprising the types of treatment followed by 36 recipes. This book contains names of various eye diseases, treatment procedures like bandages, plasters, collyriums and regimen of food and behaviour. This article aims to highlight the importance of this book in treating various eye diseases.

  9. Biomarkers in inflammatory bowel diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bennike, Tue; Birkelund, Svend; Stensballe, Allan

    2014-01-01

    with medications with the concomitant risk of adverse events. In addition, identification of disease and course specific biomarker profiles can be used to identify biological pathways involved in the disease development and treatment. Knowledge of disease mechanisms in general can lead to improved future...... development of preventive and treatment strategies. Thus, the clinical use of a panel of biomarkers represents a diagnostic and prognostic tool of potentially great value. The technological development in recent years within proteomic research (determination and quantification of the complete protein content......) has made the discovery of novel biomarkers feasible. Several IBD-associated protein biomarkers are known, but none have been successfully implemented in daily use to distinguish CD and UC patients. The intestinal tissue remains an obvious place to search for novel biomarkers, which blood, urine...

  10. Use of Prebiotics for Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew Szilagyi

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The relevance of diet in both the pathogenesis and the therapy of inflammatory bowel disease is an evolving science. Disturbance of intestinal microflora (dysbiosis is putatively a key element in the environmental component causing inflammatory bowel disease. Prebiotics are among the dietary components used in an attempt to counteract dysbiosis. Such predominantly carbohydrate dietary components exert effects on the luminal environment by physicochemical changes through pH alteration, by production of short chain fatty acids and by selectively promoting putatively 'health-beneficial' bacteria. The present review elaborates on some of the background rationale and mechanisms on the use of prebiotics. Additionally, published animal and human trials are discussed.

  11. Polyunsaturated fatty acids and inflammatory diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gil, A

    2002-10-01

    Inflammation is overall a protective response, whose main goal is to liberate the human being of cellular lesions caused by micro-organisms, toxins, allergens, etc., as well as its consequences, and of death cells and necrotic tissues. Chronic inflammation, which is detrimental to tissues, is the basic pathogenic mechanism of hypersensitivity reactions against xenobiotics. Other frequent pathologies, for instance atherosclerosis, chronic hepatitis, inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), liver cirrhosis, lung fibrosis, psoriasis, and rheumatoid arthritis are also chronic inflammatory diseases. Chemical mediators of inflammation are derived from blood plasma or different cell-type activity. Biogenic amines, eicosanoids and cytokines are within the most important mediators of inflammatory processes. The different activities of eicosanoids derived from arachidonic acid (20:4 n-6) versus those derived from eicosapentaenoic acid (20:5 n-3) are one of the most important mechanisms to explain why n-3, or omega-3, polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) exhibit anti-inflammatory properties in many inflammatory diseases. Dietary supplements ranging 1-8 g per day of n-3 PUFA have been reportedly beneficial in the treatment of IBD, eczema, psoriasis and rheumatoid arthritis. In addition, recent experimental studies in rats with experimental ulcerative colitis, induced by intrarectal injection of trinitrobenzene sulphonic acid, have documented that treatment with n-3 long-chain PUFA reduces mucosal damage as assessed by biochemical and histological markers of inflammation. Moreover, the defence antioxidant system in this model is enhanced in treated animals, provided that the n-3 PUFA supply is adequately preserved from oxidation.

  12. [Inflammatory bowel disease: importance of nutrition today].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jorquera Plaza, F; Espinel Díez, J; Olcoz Goñi, J L

    1997-01-01

    Malnutrition is a very common situation in patients inflammatory with intestinal disease (IID), which can be caused by a multitude of factors. It has been shown that nutritional support not only improves the nutritional condition of the patients, but in Crohn's disease it also has an effect on the activity of the disease, although this effect is smaller than that of steroids. Elemental diets are no more efficient than polymeric diets except under very special circumstances, but they are more expensive and patients tolerate them worse. A digestive pause is not recommended unless there is an absolute contraindication for the use of the digestive tract. Therefore, parenteral nutrition, which is more expensive and can cause serious complications, will be reserved for very specific indications. The use of fish oil supplements, either because it competes with arachidonic acid and prevents the initiation of the inflammatory cascade, or because it decreases the production of cytokines, has shown to be potentially useful in inflammatory intestinal disease, and this must be confirmed by further studies. Short chain fatty acids enemas have shown promising results in distal ulcerative colitis but the lack of homogeneity in the studies makes it necessary for these results to be consolidated in new studies. Nutritional support is especially interesting in children with inflammatory intestinal disease given that the growth retardation which is often seen in severe cases, can be controlled by adequate enteral or parenteral diets.

  13. Innovative therapeutics for inflammatory bowel disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jesus K Yamamoto-Furusho

    2007-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) are chronic inflammatory conditions of the gastrointestinal tract,which clinically present as one of two disorders, Crohn's disease or ulcerative colitis. Mainstays of drug treatments for IBD include aminosalicylates, corticosteroids and immunosuppressants such as azathioprine, methotrexate and cyclosporin. Advances in basic research of the pathophysiological process in IBD have been applied to generate a variety of new therapeutics targeting at different levels of the inflammatory processes. New therapies are classified as: (1) Anti-TNFα antibodies; (2) Recombinant cytokines; (3) Selective adhesion blockade;(4) Growth factors; (5) Innate immunostimulation; (6) Nucleic acid based therapies; (7) Gene therapy; (8) Autologous bone-marrow transplantation; (9) Helminths and (10) Extracorporeal immunomodulation. All treatments have the potential to provide more effective and safe treatment for IBD.

  14. Importance of nutrition in inflammatory bowel disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Alfredo José Lucendo; Livia Cristina De Rezende

    2009-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) results from the interaction between an individual's immune response and precipitant environmental factors, which generate an anomalous chronic inflammatory response in those who are genetically predisposed. Various feeding practices have been implicated in the origin of IBD based on epidemiological observations in developed countries, but we do not have solid evidence for the etiological role played by specific food types. IBD is associated with frequent nutritional deficiencies, the pattern and severity of which depends on the extent, duration and activity of the inflammation. Nutritional support allows these deficiencies in calories, macro and micronutrients to be rectified. Enteral nutrition is also a primary therapy for IBD, especially for Crohn's disease, as it allows the inflammatory activity to be controlled, kept in remission, and prevents or delays the need for surgery. Nutritional support is especially important in childhood IBD as an alternative to pharmacological t reatment . This repor t discusses the complex relationship between diet and IBD.

  15. Current medical therapy of inflammatory bowel disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kiron M. Das; Sherif A. Farag

    2000-01-01

    The current established drugs used to treat inflammatory bowel disease include glucocorticoids includingnewer agent budesonide, sulfasalazine and 5-ASA compounds such as Asacol, Pentasa, Dipentum andBalsalazide and immunomodulatory agents such as azathioprine, and 6-mercaptopurine. Additional drugswhich have been found to be useful, particularly in refractory cases of Crohn's disease including fistulizingtype of Crohn's disease, include cyclosporine A, methotrexate, humanized antibody against TNFa(cA2),FK506, IL-10, IL-11 and Probiotics. Various agents, whether used alone or in combination, have to betailored for each patient and none is ideal. Exciting new developments directed against proinflammatorypathways, cytokines, free oxygen radicals and cell surface related immune targets are areas of intense recentinvestigations and many novel therapeutic agents are expected to be available in the near future for medicaltreatment of inflammatory bowel disease.

  16. [Neurological complications of inflammatory bowel disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bermejo, Pedro Emilio; Burgos, Aurora

    2008-05-10

    Although ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease have traditionally been considered to be inflammatory diseases limited to the gastrointestinal tract, it has been shown that both pathologies are frequently accompanied by various extraintestinal disorders. There is an increasing evidence that they may also manifest in the nervous system, including the peripheral and the central parts. Although some of these neurological complications have been known for a long time, such as cerebrovascular disease, vasculitis and autoinmune processes including neuropathies and cerebral demyelination, others have been recently described. With the exception of some of this complications such as the thromboembolism, evidence for a casual relationship relies merely on single case reports or case series. In this article, we try to review the existing evidence on neurological manifestations of both variants of inflammatory bowel disease.

  17. Positron Emission Tomography in inflammatory cardiovascular diseases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Felix, Renata Christian Martins; Gouvea, Clecio Maria, E-mail: renatafelix@cardiol.br, E-mail: renata.felix@inc.saude.gov.br [Instituto Nacional de Cardiologia, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Carneiro, Michel Pontes [Instituto Nacional de Cancer (INCA), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Mesquita, Claudio Tinoco [Universidade Federal Fluminense (UFF), Niteroi, RJ (Brazil)

    2014-10-15

    Many articles have demonstrated the role of PET-CT in the evaluation of inflammatory and infectious diseases of the cardiovascular system. The purpose of this article is to provide a review of the literature on this topic to identify clinical situations in which there is evidence of the usefulness of PET-CT in diagnostic and therapeutic evaluation.

  18. Inflammatory Bowel Disease: School Nurse Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitto, Lisa

    2010-01-01

    Initial symptoms and diagnosis of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) usually occur between 10 and 20 years of age, although younger cases are reported. The complicated nature of IBD diagnosis and treatment can interfere with physical and emotional development that normally occurs in school-age children and adolescents. The school nurse should be…

  19. Environmental factors in inflammatory bowel disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Tanja Stenbaek; Jess, Tine; Vind, Ida;

    2011-01-01

    The role of environmental factors in development of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) remains uncertain. The aim of the present study was to assess a number of formerly suggested environmental factors in a case-control study of an unselected and recently diagnosed group of patients with IBD...

  20. Environmental Risk Factors for Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Natalie A Molodecky; Gilaad G. Kaplan

    2010-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is characterized by chronic inflammation of the gastrointestinal tract and is associated with significant morbidity. The etiology of IBD has been extensively studied during the last several decades; however, causative factors in disease pathology are not yet fully understood. IBD is thought to result from the interaction between genetic and environmental factors that influence the normal intestinal commensal flora to trigger an inappropriate mucosal immune res...

  1. Secondary syphilis mimicking inflammatory bowel disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasconcelos, Pedro; Borges-Costa, João; Loreto, Helena; Marques, Sacramento

    2013-03-01

    This study reports the case of a 15-year-old male patient with extensive anal inflammation, cobblestone-like mucosa and areas of ulceration, loose bloody stool and weight loss for 8 weeks, suggestive of inflammatory bowel disease. Genital lesions of syphilides were later observed and Venereal Disease Research Laboratory test was positive, thus benzyl penicillin treatment was prescribed with total resolution of genital and bowel symptoms.

  2. Review of Inflammatory Bowel Disease in China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lingna Ye

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Inflammatory bowel disease mainly consisting of ulcerative colitis and Crohn’s disease has been rising gradually during the last two decades in China. In this review article, we provide the latest epidemiological trends in incidence, prevalence, and mortality of IBD patients in China and summarize the risk factors and genetic susceptibility of Chinese IBD patients. We also compare these characteristics to those of IBD patients in Western countries.

  3. Pancreatic disorders in inflammatory bowel disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Filippo Antonini; Raffaele Pezzilli; Lucia Angelelli; Giampiero Macarri

    2016-01-01

    An increased incidence of pancreatic disorders either acute pancreatitis or chronic pancreatitis has been rec-orded in patients with inflammatory bowel disease(IBD) compared to the general population.Although most of the pancreatitis in patients with IBD seem to be related to biliary lithiasis or drug induced,in some cases pancreatitis were defined as idiopathic,suggesting a direct pancreatic damage in IBD.Pancreatitis and IBD may have similar presentation therefore a pancreatic disease could not be recognized in patients with Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis.This review will discuss the most common pancreatic diseases seen in patients with IBD.

  4. Pancreatic disorders in inflammatory bowel disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antonini, Filippo; Pezzilli, Raffaele; Angelelli, Lucia; Macarri, Giampiero

    2016-01-01

    An increased incidence of pancreatic disorders either acute pancreatitis or chronic pancreatitis has been recorded in patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) compared to the general population. Although most of the pancreatitis in patients with IBD seem to be related to biliary lithiasis or drug induced, in some cases pancreatitis were defined as idiopathic, suggesting a direct pancreatic damage in IBD. Pancreatitis and IBD may have similar presentation therefore a pancreatic disease could not be recognized in patients with Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis. This review will discuss the most common pancreatic diseases seen in patients with IBD. PMID:27574565

  5. Genetic testing and counselling in inherited eye disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brøndum-Nielsen, Karen; Jensen, Hanne; Timshel, Susanne

    2013-01-01

    Advances in genetics have made genetic testing in patients with inherited eye disease increasingly accessible, and the initiation of clinical intervention trials makes it increasingly clinically relevant. Based on a multidisciplinary collaboration between ophthalmologists and clinical geneticists......, the extensive register of families with monogenic inherited eye diseases at the National Eye Clinic of the Kennedy Center in Denmark provides a valuable asset waiting to be exploited in the global effort to reduce blindness caused by genetic defects....

  6. Inflammatory bowel diseases: principles of nutritional therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campos, Fábio Guilherme; Waitzberg, Dan L; Teixeira, Magaly Gemio; Mucerino, Donato Roberto; Habr-Gama, Angelita; Kiss, Desidério R

    2002-01-01

    Inflammatory Bowel Diseases - ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease- are chronic gastrointestinal inflammatory diseases of unknown etiology. Decreased oral intake, malabsorption, accelerated nutrient losses, increased requirements, and drug-nutrient interactions cause nutritional and functional deficiencies that require proper correction by nutritional therapy. The goals of the different forms of nutritional therapy are to correct nutritional disturbances and to modulate inflammatory response, thus influencing disease activity. Total parenteral nutrition has been used to correct and to prevent nutritional disturbances and to promote bowel rest during active disease, mainly in cases of digestive fistulae with high output. Its use should be reserved for patients who cannot tolerate enteral nutrition. Enteral nutrition is effective in inducing clinical remission in adults and promoting growth in children. Due to its low complication rate and lower costs, enteral nutrition should be preferred over total parenteral nutrition whenever possible. Both present equal effectiveness in primary therapy for remission of active Crohn's disease. Nutritional intervention may improve outcome in certain individuals; however, because of the costs and complications of such therapy, careful selection is warranted, especially in patients presumed to need total parenteral nutrition. Recent research has focused on the use of nutrients as primary treatment agents. Immunonutrition is an important therapeutic alternative in the management of inflammatory bowel diseases, modulating the inflammation and changing the eicosanoid synthesis profile. However, beneficial reported effects have yet to be translated into the clinical practice. The real efficacy of these and other nutrients (glutamine, short-chain fatty acids, antioxidants) still need further evaluation through prospective and randomized trials.

  7. Cestode regulation of inflammation and inflammatory diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernandez, Jose-Luis Reyes; Leung, Gabriella; McKay, Derek M

    2013-03-01

    Helminth parasites are masters of immune regulation; a likely prerequisite for long-term survival by circumventing their hosts' attempt to eradicate them. From a translational perspective, knowledge of immune events as a response to infection with a helminth parasite could be used to reduce the intensity of unwanted inflammatory reactions. Substantial data have accumulated showing that inflammatory reactions that promote a variety of auto-inflammatory diseases are dampened as a consequence of infection with helminth parasites, via either the mobilization of an anti-worm spectrum of immune events or by the direct effect of secretory/excretory bioactive immunomodulatory molecules released from the parasite. However, many issues are outstanding in the definition of the mechanism(s) by which infection with helminth parasites can affect the outcome, positively or negatively, of concomitant disease. We focus on a subgroup of this complex group of metazoan parasites, the cestodes, summarizing studies from rodent models that illustrate if, and by what mechanisms, infection with tapeworms ameliorate or exaggerate disease in their host. The ability of infection with cestodes, or other classes of helminth, to worsen a disease course or confer susceptibility to intracellular pathogens should be carefully considered in the context of 'helminth therapy'. In addition, poorly characterised cestode extracts can regulate murine and human immunocyte function, yet the impact of these in the context of autoimmune or allergic diseases is poorly understood. Thus, studies with cestodes, as representative helminths, have helped cement the concept that infection with parasitic helminths can inhibit concomitant disease; however, issues relating to long-term effects, potential side-effects, mixed pathogen infections and purification of immunomodulatory molecules from the parasite remain as challenges that need to be addressed in order to achieve the use of helminths as anti-inflammatory

  8. Current medical therapy of inflammatory bowel disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kiron M. Das; Sherif A. Farag

    2000-01-01

    The 1990's have brought a significant promise and the hope for a better and brighter future in the new millennium for patients with inflammatory bowel disease (I3D). A better understanding of the pathophysiology of IBD symptoms has led to newer treatnent modalities and streamlining of therapy for specific subsets of patients. ULCERATIVE COUTISThe treatnent for ulcerative colitis (UC) is aimed at modulating the inflammatory response. The drugs which are found to be effective are sulfasalazine (Azulfidine, Salazopyrin) and its 5ASA derivatives, glucocorticosteroids, immunomodulators/immunosuppressants, and other new potential drugs (Table 1).

  9. Advances in the genetics of eye diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Stephanie; Freund, Paul R; MacDonald, Ian

    2013-12-01

    An update on heritable eye disease will allow informed patient counseling and improved patient care. New loci and genes have been associated with identifiable heritable ocular traits. Molecular genetic analysis is available for many of these genes either as part of research or for clinical testing. The advent of gene array technologies has enabled screening of samples for known mutations in genes linked to various disorders. Exomic sequencing has proven to be particularly successful in research protocols in identifying the genetic causation of rare genetic traits by pooling patient resources and discovering new genes. Further, genetic analysis has led improvement in patient care and counselling, as exemplified by the continued advances in our treatment of retinoblastoma. Patients and families are commonly eager to participate in either research or clinical testing to improve their understanding of the cause and heritability of an ocular condition. Many patients hope that testing will then lead to appropriate treatments or cures. The success of gene therapy in the RPE65 form of Leber congenital amaurosis has provided a brilliant example of this hope; that a similar trial may become available to other patients and families burdened by genetic disease.

  10. Confocal Laser Endomicroscopy in Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Ditlev Nytoft; Karstensen, John Gásdal; Riis, Lene Buhl

    2015-01-01

    of histological features such as colonic crypts, epithelial gaps and epithelial leakiness to fluorescein. CONCLUSIONS: Confocal laser endomicroscopy remains an experimental but emerging tool for assessment of inflammatory bowel disease. It is the only method that enables in vivo functional assessment......BACKGROUND AND AIMS: Confocal laser endomicroscopy is an endoscopic method that provides in vivo real-time imaging of the mucosa at a cellular level, elucidating mucosal changes that are undetectable by white light endoscopy. This paper systematically reviews current indications and perspectives...... of confocal laser endomicroscopy for inflammatory bowel disease. METHODS: Available literature was searched systematically for studies applying confocal laser endomicroscopy in Crohn's disease or ulcerative colitis. Relevant literature was reviewed and only studies reporting original clinical data were...

  11. Cytomegalovirus infection associated with inflammatory bowel disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegmund, Britta

    2017-05-01

    Refractory colitis in patients with inflammatory bowel disease is a complicated clinical disorder that might, in some patients, even necessitate surgery. Hence the diagnosis of additional complications is of utmost importance. Colitis mediated by cytomegalovirus is one such complication. The high seroprevalence and latent nature of cytomegalovirus, with the possibility of viral replication without mediating disease, poses a real challenge for the diagnosis of cytomegalovirus-mediated colitis. The challenge in daily clinical practice is to distinguish cytomegalovirus replication from cytomegalovirus-mediated colitis in patients with inflammatory bowel disease who have refractory colitis. This Review discusses the scientific literature and provides a diagnostic and therapeutic algorithm for clinical practice. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. NATURAL AGENTS FOR INFLAMMATORY BOWEL DISEASE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darji Vinay Chhanalal

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD is a chronic inflammatory disease of gastrointestinal tract. It comprises the two conditions, Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis, characterized by chronic recurrent ulceration of the bowel. Conventional drugs for colitis treatment include aminosalicylate, corticosteroids,antibiotics & immunomodulators. 5- Amino salicylic acid having side effects in 30% of the patients. Systemic corticosteroids producing incidence of complication is 4.3%. Antibiotic therapy is beneficial in 70% of the patients & Immunomodulators having 50 to 70% beneficial effects. This report shows that there is no any appropriate treatment available to treat IBD without side effects. A natural agent with reduced or no toxicity is therefore essential. In nature there are so many types of natural agents which are used as protective agents in IBD. This article emphasizes many natural products obtained from plant & other sources, which possess potent activity against experimentally induced IBD.

  13. Diabetes mellitus and inflammatory periodontal diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mealey, Brian L; Rose, Louis F

    2008-09-01

    THE PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Periodontal diseases are inflammatory conditions that were once thought to have manifestations localized to the oral cavity alone, and were therefore considered the concern of only dentists and other oral health professionals. Emerging evidence has changed this view and now suggests that periodontal diseases may play a role in numerous conditions that impact systemic well-being, including diabetes mellitus. This review examines the relationships that exist between periodontal diseases and diabetes mellitus, with a focus on potential common pathophysiologic pathways including those associated with inflammation, altered host responses, and insulin resistance. Periodontal inflammation is associated with an elevated systemic inflammatory state and an increased risk of major cardiovascular events such as myocardial infarction and stroke, adverse pregnancy outcomes such as preeclampsia, low birth weight, and preterm birth, and altered glycemic control in people with diabetes. Intervention trials suggest that periodontal therapy, which decreases the intraoral bacterial bioburden and reduces periodontal inflammation, can have a significant impact on systemic inflammatory status. Evidence suggests that periodontal therapy is associated with improved glycemic control in many patients with both diabetes and periodontal diseases. Recognition of the bilateral relationships between oral and systemic health will challenge physicians and dentists to work together closely in the future when managing patients with diabetes and periodontal disease.

  14. Zinc absorption in inflammatory bowel disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valberg, L.S.; Flanagan, P.R.; Kertesz, A.; Bondy, D.C.

    1986-07-01

    Zinc absorption was measured in 29 patients with inflammatory bowel disease and a wide spectrum of disease activity to determine its relationship to disease activity, general nutritional state, and zinc status. Patients with severe disease requiring either supplementary oral or parenteral nutrition were excluded. The mean 65ZnCl2 absorption, in the patients, determined using a 65Zn and 51Cr stool-counting test, 45 +/- 17% (SD), was significantly lower than the values, 54 +/- 16%, in 30 healthy controls, P less than 0.05. Low 65ZnCl2 absorption was related to undernutrition, but not to disease activity in the absence of undernutrition or to zinc status estimated by leukocyte zinc measurements. Mean plasma zinc or leukocyte zinc concentrations in patients did not differ significantly from controls, and only two patients with moderate disease had leukocyte zinc values below the 5th percentile of normal. In another group of nine patients with inflammatory bowel disease of mild-to-moderate severity and minimal nutritional impairment, 65Zn absorption from an extrinsically labeled turkey test meal was 31 +/- 10% compared to 33 +/- 7% in 17 healthy controls, P greater than 0.1. Thus, impairment in 65ZnCl2 absorption in the patients selected for this study was only evident in undernourished persons with moderate or severe disease activity, but biochemical evidence of zinc deficiency was uncommon, and clinical features of zinc depletion were not encountered.

  15. Immunogenetic phenotypes in inflammatory bowel disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Marla C Dubinsky; Kent Taylor; Stephan R Targan; Jerome I Rotter

    2006-01-01

    The currently accepted etiopathogenic hypothesis suggests that the chronic intestinal inflammation and related systemic manifestations characteristic of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) are due to an overly aggressive or pathologic immune response to resident luminal bacterial constituents. Predisposing factors are genetic dysregulation of mucosal immune responses and/or barrier function, with onset triggered by environmental stimuli. These factors and their interactions may also be important determinants of disease phenotype and disease progression. The emergence of immunogenetic phenotypes lends support to the proposed hypothesis that susceptibility genes regulate distinct immune processes, driven by luminal antigens, expressed as specific immune phenotypes which in turn influence clinical phenotypes in IBD patient

  16. Closed head injury--an inflammatory disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Oliver I; Heyde, Christoph E; Ertel, Wolfgang; Stahel, Philip F

    2005-04-01

    Closed head injury (CHI) remains the leading cause of death and persisting neurological impairment in young individuals in industrialized nations. Research efforts in the past years have brought evidence that the intracranial inflammatory response in the injured brain contributes to the neuropathological sequelae which are, in large part, responsible for the adverse outcome after head injury. The presence of hypoxia and hypotension in the early resuscitative period of brain-injured patients further aggravates the inflammatory response in the brain due to ischemia/reperfusion-mediated injuries. The profound endogenous neuroinflammatory response after CHI, which is phylogenetically aimed at defending the intrathecal compartment from invading pathogens and repairing lesioned brain tissue, contributes to the development of cerebral edema, breakdown of the blood-brain barrier, and ultimately to delayed neuronal cell death. However, aside from these deleterious effects, neuroinflammation has been recently shown to mediate neuroreparative mechanisms after brain injury as well. This "dual effect" of neuroinflammation was the focus of extensive experimental and clinical research in the past years and has lead to an expanded basic knowledge on the cellular and molecular mechanisms which regulate the intracranial inflammatory response after CHI. Thus, head injury has recently evolved as an inflammatory and immunological disease much more than a pure traumatological, neurological, or neurosurgical entity. The present review will summarize the so far known mechanisms of posttraumatic neuroinflammation after CHI, based on data from clinical and experimental studies, with a special focus on the role of pro-inflammatory cytokines, chemokines, and the complement system.

  17. Inflammatory diseases of the parathyroid gland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talat, Nadia; Diaz-Cano, Salvador; Schulte, Klaus-Martin

    2011-11-01

    Inflammatory disorders of the parathyroid gland are very rare as compared with those of other endocrine organs. The aim of this study was to provide the first systematic review of this condition. A 42-year-old patient underwent surgery for recurrent secondary hyperparathyroidism. Histology showed hyperplastic parathyroiditis defined by a mixed inflammatory infiltrate with active germinal centres. Molecular markers revealed significant upregulation of CD68 in an ischaemic background (hypoxia-inducible factor 1 upregulation) with mitochondrial reaction (malate dehydrogenase 2 upregulation) and hyperparathyroidism (carbonic anhydrase 4 upregulation). Our case demonstrates true intraparathyroid inflammation with terminal B-cell differentiation. We searched PubMed, ISI Thompson and Google Scholar up to January 2011, using the terms 'parathyroiditis', 'inflammation of parathyroid gland', 'lymphocytic infiltrate', 'tuberculosis of the parathyroid', 'sarcoidosis', and 'graulomatous inflammation'. Three autopsy series, 27 articles and 96 case reports with inflammatory parathyroid disorders were identified. Autopsy series showed lymphocytic infiltrates in up to 16% of all cases. The entire material reported lymphocytic infiltrates (n=69), parathyroiditis with germinal centres (n=15), sarcoidosis (n=6), tuberculosis (n=4), and other granulomatous diseases (n=2). Distinct inflammatory and granulomatous processes in the parathyroid gland are rare. Scanty lymphocytic infiltrates are common, and occur in generalized inflammatory conditions or venous congestion. We note the surprising absence of an association between histological proof of parathyroiditis and hypoparathyroidism. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Limited.

  18. Changes in ion transport in inflammatory disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eisenhut Michael

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Ion transport is essential for maintenance of transmembranous and transcellular electric potential, fluid transport and cellular volume. Disturbance of ion transport has been associated with cellular dysfunction, intra and extracellular edema and abnormalities of epithelial surface liquid volume. There is increasing evidence that conditions characterized by an intense local or systemic inflammatory response are associated with abnormal ion transport. This abnormal ion transport has been involved in the pathogenesis of conditions like hypovolemia due to fluid losses, hyponatremia and hypokalemia in diarrhoeal diseases, electrolyte abnormalites in pyelonephritis of early infancy, septicemia induced pulmonary edema, and in hypersecretion and edema induced by inflammatory reactions of the mucosa of the upper respiratory tract. Components of membranous ion transport systems, which have been shown to undergo a change in function during an inflammatory response include the sodium potassium ATPase, the epithelial sodium channel, the Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator and calcium activated chloride channels and the sodium potassium chloride co-transporter. Inflammatory mediators, which influence ion transport are tumor necrosis factor, gamma interferon, interleukins, transforming growth factor, leukotrienes and bradykinin. They trigger the release of specific messengers like prostaglandins, nitric oxide and histamine which alter ion transport system function through specific receptors, intracellular second messengers and protein kinases. This review summarizes data on in vivo measurements of changes in ion transport in acute inflammatory conditions and in vitro studies, which have explored the underlying mechanisms. Potential interventions directed at a correction of the observed abnormalities are discussed.

  19. Microbiome, Metabolome and Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Ishfaq; Roy, Badal C.; Khan, Salman A.; Septer, Seth; Umar, Shahid

    2016-01-01

    Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD) is a multifactorial disorder that conceptually occurs as a result of altered immune responses to commensal and/or pathogenic gut microbes in individuals most susceptible to the disease. During Crohn’s Disease (CD) or Ulcerative Colitis (UC), two components of the human IBD, distinct stages define the disease onset, severity, progression and remission. Epigenetic, environmental (microbiome, metabolome) and nutritional factors are important in IBD pathogenesis. While the dysbiotic microbiota has been proposed to play a role in disease pathogenesis, the data on IBD and diet are still less convincing. Nonetheless, studies are ongoing to examine the effect of pre/probiotics and/or FODMAP reduced diets on both the gut microbiome and its metabolome in an effort to define the healthy diet in patients with IBD. Knowledge of a unique metabolomic fingerprint in IBD could be useful for diagnosis, treatment and detection of disease pathogenesis. PMID:27681914

  20. Microbiome, Metabolome and Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ishfaq Ahmed

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD is a multifactorial disorder that conceptually occurs as a result of altered immune responses to commensal and/or pathogenic gut microbes in individuals most susceptible to the disease. During Crohn’s Disease (CD or Ulcerative Colitis (UC, two components of the human IBD, distinct stages define the disease onset, severity, progression and remission. Epigenetic, environmental (microbiome, metabolome and nutritional factors are important in IBD pathogenesis. While the dysbiotic microbiota has been proposed to play a role in disease pathogenesis, the data on IBD and diet are still less convincing. Nonetheless, studies are ongoing to examine the effect of pre/probiotics and/or FODMAP reduced diets on both the gut microbiome and its metabolome in an effort to define the healthy diet in patients with IBD. Knowledge of a unique metabolomic fingerprint in IBD could be useful for diagnosis, treatment and detection of disease pathogenesis.

  1. Video capsule endoscopy in inflammatory bowel disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Paul D

    2016-01-01

    Video capsule endoscopy (VCE) has evolved to become an important tool for the non-invasive examination of the small bowel, which hitherto had been relatively inaccessible to direct visualisation. VCE has been shown to play a role in monitoring the activity of small bowel Crohn’s disease and can be used to assess the response to anti-inflammatory treatment in Crohn’s disease. For those patients with Crohn’s disease who have undergone an intestinal resection, VCE has been assessed as a tool to detect post-operative recurrence. VCE may also aid in the reclassification of patients with a diagnosis of Inflammatory Bowel Disease Unclassified to Crohn’s disease. The evolution of colon capsule endoscopy (CCE) has expanded the application of this technology further. The use of CCE to assess the activity of ulcerative colitis has been described. This advance in capsule technology has also fuelled interest in its potential role as a minimally invasive tool to assess the whole of GI tract opening the possibility of its use for the panenteric assessment of Crohn’s disease. VCE is a safe procedure. However, the risk of a retained capsule is higher in patients with suspected or confirmed Crohn’s disease compared with patients having VCE examination for other indications. A retained video capsule is rare after successful passage of a patency capsule which may be utilised to pre-screen patients undergoing VCE. This paper describes the use of VCE in the assessment of inflammatory bowel disease. PMID:27499830

  2. Neurological Manifestations In Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    youssef HNACH

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available IntroductionThe purpose of this retrospective study was to report neurological manifestations noted in patients who were monitored for inflammatory bowel disease, in order to document the pathophysiological, clinical, progressive, and therapeutic characteristics of this entity.Material and methodsWe conducted a retrospective study on patients monitored -in the gastroenterology service in Ibn Sina Hospital in Rabat, Morocco- for inflammatory bowel disease from 1992 till 2013 and who developed neurological manifestations during its course. Patients with iatrogenic complications were excluded, as well as patients with cerebrovascular risk factors.ResultsThere were 6 patients, 4 of whom have developed peripheral manifestations. Electromyography enabled the diagnosis to be made and the outcome was favorable with disappearance of clinical manifestations and normalization of the electromyography.The other 2 patients, monitored for Crohn’s disease, developed ischemic stroke. Cerebral computed tomography angiography provided positive and topographic diagnosis. Two patients were admitted to specialized facilities.ConclusionNeurological manifestations in inflammatory bowel disease are rarely reported.  Peripheral neuropathies and stroke remain the most common manifestations. The mechanisms of these manifestations are not clearly defined yet. Currently, we hypothesize the interaction of immune mediators.

  3. SLPI and inflammatory lung disease in females.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McKiernan, Paul J

    2012-02-01

    During the course of certain inflammatory lung diseases, SLPI (secretory leucoprotease inhibitor) plays a number of important roles. As a serine antiprotease it functions to protect the airways from proteolytic damage due to neutrophil and other immune cell-derived serine proteases. With respect to infection it has known antimicrobial and anti-viral properties that are likely to contribute to host defence. Another of its properties is the ability to control inflammation within the lung where it can interfere with the transcriptional induction of pro-inflammatory gene expression induced by NF-kappaB (nuclear factor kappaB). Thus, factors that regulate the expression of SLPI in the airways can impact on disease severity and outcome. Gender represents once such idiosyncratic factor. In females with CF (cystic fibrosis), it is now thought that circulating oestrogen contributes, in part, to the observed gender gap whereby females have worse disease and poorer prognosis than males. Conversely, in asthma, sufferers who are females have more frequent exacerbations at times of low-circulating oestrogen. In the present paper, we discuss how SLPI participates in these events and speculate on whether regulatory mechanisms such as post-transcriptional modulation by miRNAs (microRNAs) are important in the control of SLPI expression in inflammatory lung disease.

  4. Developmental origins of inflammatory and immune diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ting; Liu, Han-Xiao; Yan, Hui-Yi; Wu, Dong-Mei; Ping, Jie

    2016-08-01

    Epidemiological and experimental animal studies show that suboptimal environments in fetal and neonatal life exert a profound influence on physiological function and risk of diseases in adult life. The concepts of the 'developmental programming' and Developmental Origins of Health and Diseases (DOHaD) have become well accepted and have been applied across almost all fields of medicine. Adverse intrauterine environments may have programming effects on the crucial functions of the immune system during critical periods of fetal development, which can permanently alter the immune function of offspring. Immune dysfunction may in turn lead offspring to be susceptible to inflammatory and immune diseases in adulthood. These facts suggest that inflammatory and immune disorders might have developmental origins. In recent years, inflammatory and immune disorders have become a growing health problem worldwide. However, there is no systematic report in the literature on the developmental origins of inflammatory and immune diseases and the potential mechanisms involved. Here, we review the impacts of adverse intrauterine environments on the immune function in offspring. This review shows the results from human and different animal species and highlights the underlying mechanisms, including damaged development of cells in the thymus, helper T cell 1/helper T cell 2 balance disturbance, abnormal epigenetic modification, effects of maternal glucocorticoid overexposure on fetal lymphocytes and effects of the fetal hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis on the immune system. Although the phenomena have already been clearly implicated in epidemiologic and experimental studies, new studies investigating the mechanisms of these effects may provide new avenues for exploiting these pathways for disease prevention.

  5. Inflammatory oral cavity diseases of the cat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedersen, N C

    1992-11-01

    There is a great deal of frustration among veterinarians about the diagnosis and treatment of inflammatory diseases of the oral cavity of the cat. This frustration is due to both the high frequency of feline oral inflammatory lesions and our poor understanding of their causes. This poor understanding can be blamed on several things: (1) a rapidly emerging, but still relatively poor, understanding of feline diseases in general and nutrition in particular; (2) a tendency to lump rather than separate specific oral inflammations; (3) a tendency not to use a thorough and systematic approach to diagnosing oral cavity disease; and (4) the reluctance of veterinarians to apply what is already known about human oral cavity diseases to cats. When problems 2 through 4 are adequately addressed, it becomes apparent that we really know more about oral cavity disease in the cat than we thought we knew and that great progress has been made. The task ahead is to define, in precise medical terms, those remaining disease entities of the oral cavity that pose the greatest health risk to cats, to apply what has been already been discovered from human disease counterparts, and to study them systematically.

  6. Is the disease course predictable in inflammatory bowel diseases?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Peter; Laszlo; Lakatos; Lajos; S; Kiss

    2010-01-01

    During the course of the disease,most patients with Crohn's disease(CD) may eventually develop a stricturing or a perforating complication,and a significant number of patients with both CD and ulcerative colitis will undergo surgery.In recent years,research has focused on the determination of factors important in the prediction of disease course in inflammatory bowel diseases to improve stratification of patients,identify individual patient profiles,including clinical,laboratory and molecular markers,which ...

  7. Inflammatory bowel disease in pediatric patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Charron, M. [Children`s Hospital of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh (United States). Dept. of Radiology

    1997-12-01

    Optimal management of chronic idiopathic inflammatory bowel disease requires determination of disease localization and intensity. Scintigraphy with the use of {sup 99m}Tc - HMPAO- White Bloods Cells ({sup 99m}Tc - HMPAO-WBC) is a relatively new noninvasive nuclear medicine procedure. They have evaluated more than 230 children and have found a high correspondence between the disease distribution shown by the {sup 99m}Tc - HMPAO- WBC scan and that shown by endoscopic, radiologic, or surgical methods. Additionally the {sup 99m}Tc - HMPAO-WBC scan has the ability of identifying extra intestinal site of inflammation, such as appendicitis and others. The {sup 99m}Tc - HMPAO-WBC scan is reliable in differentiating Crohn`s disease from ulcerative colitis. Some patients because of unequivocal demonstrable small bowel uptake are reclassified from ulcerative colitis to Crohn`s disease. The medication regimen is frequently altered because of the intensity of uptake displayed by the {sup 99m}Tc - HMPAO-WBC scan. It is a practical and safe study even in an acutely ill patient who may not tolerate endoscopic or radiological study. At their institution, the {sup 99m}Tc - HMPAO-WBC scan is now part of the initial evaluation, and follow-up of patients with inflammatory bowel disease. In conclusion the {sup 99m}Tc - HMPAO-WBC is excellent for the detection, localization and characterization of inflammatory bowel disease in children. Compared with the other methods of investigation this study requires no bowel preparation, is noninvasive and has excellent diagnostic accuracy.

  8. Extraluminal factors contributing to inflammatory bowel disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Arvind Batra; Thorsten Stroh; Britta Siegmund

    2011-01-01

    Many identified and yet unknown factors contribute to the pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD).The genome-wide association studies clearly support the earlier developed concept that IBD occurs in genetically predisposed individuals who are exposed to distinct environmental factors, which together result in dysregulation of the mucosal immune system. Thus, the majority of previous studies have focused on the immune response within the intestinal wall. The present review aims to emphasize the contribution of three extraluminal structures to this inflammatory process, namely the mesenteric fat tissue, the lymphatics and the microvasculature.Broadening our view across the intestinal wall will not only facilitate our understanding of the disease,but will also us to identify future therapeutic targets.

  9. Intestinal epithelium in inflammatory bowel disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehmet eCoskun

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The intestinal epithelium has a strategic position as a protective physical barrier to luminal microbiota and actively contributes to the mucosal immune system. This barrier is mainly formed by a monolayer of specialized intestinal epithelial cells (IECs that are crucial in maintaining intestinal homeostasis. Therefore, dysregulation within the epithelial layer can increase intestinal permeability, lead to abnormalities in interactions between IECs and immune cells in underlying lamina propria, and disturb the intestinal immune homeostasis, all of which are linked to the clinical disease course of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD. Understanding the role of the intestinal epithelium in IBD pathogenesis might contribute to an improved knowledge of the inflammatory processes and the identification of potential therapeutic targets.

  10. Intestinal epithelium in inflammatory bowel disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Coskun, Mehmet

    2014-01-01

    The intestinal epithelium has a strategic position as a protective physical barrier to luminal microbiota and actively contributes to the mucosal immune system. This barrier is mainly formed by a monolayer of specialized intestinal epithelial cells (IECs) that are crucial in maintaining intestinal...... homeostasis. Therefore, dysregulation within the epithelial layer can increase intestinal permeability, lead to abnormalities in interactions between IECs and immune cells in underlying lamina propria, and disturb the intestinal immune homeostasis, all of which are linked to the clinical disease course...... of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Understanding the role of the intestinal epithelium in IBD pathogenesis might contribute to an improved knowledge of the inflammatory processes and the identification of potential therapeutic targets....

  11. Extraluminal factors contributing to inflammatory bowel disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batra, Arvind; Stroh, Thorsten; Siegmund, Britta

    2011-01-01

    Many identified and yet unknown factors contribute to the pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). The genome-wide association studies clearly support the earlier developed concept that IBD occurs in genetically predisposed individuals who are exposed to distinct environmental factors, which together result in dysregulation of the mucosal immune system. Thus, the majority of previous studies have focused on the immune response within the intestinal wall. The present review aims to emphasize the contribution of three extraluminal structures to this inflammatory process, namely the mesenteric fat tissue, the lymphatics and the microvasculature. Broadening our view across the intestinal wall will not only facilitate our understanding of the disease, but will also us to identify future therapeutic targets. PMID:21350706

  12. Human secretory phospholipase A(2), group IB in normal eyes and in eye diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prause, Jan U; Bazan, Nicolas G; Heegaard, Steffen

    2007-01-01

    study was to identify human GIB (hGIB) in the normal human eye and investigate the pattern of expression in patients with eye diseases involving hGIB-rich cells. METHODS: Human GIB mRNA was identified in the human retina by means of in situ hybridization and polymerase chain reaction. Antibodies against...... hGIB were obtained and immunohistochemical staining was performed on paraffin-embedded sections of normal and pathological eyes. Donor eyes from patients with descemetization of the cornea, Fuchs' corneal endothelial dystrophy, age-related macular degeneration, malignant choroidal melanoma......, retinitis pigmentosa and glaucoma were evaluated. RESULTS: Expression of hGIB was found in various cells of the eye. The most abundant expression was found in retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) cells, the inner photoreceptor segments, ganglion cells and the corneal endothelium. We explored diseases involving...

  13. Primary sclerosing cholangitis and disease distribution in inflammatory bowel disease.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Toole, Aoibhlinn

    2012-04-01

    The relationship between site of intestinal inflammation and primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC) development in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) has not been studied extensively, but may be important in understanding the pathogenesis of PSC. We aimed to determine patterns of disease distribution in IBD patients with and without PSC.

  14. Inflammatory bowel disease-associated spondyloarthropathies

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Walter Fries

    2009-01-01

    This issue presents a symposium held in Messina talking about inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and associated spondyloarthropathies. The topic covers epidemiology and clinical manifestations of IBD-related arthropathies,common genetic and immunologic features, combined therapies for gut and joint inflammation, and future biologic therapies etc. I believe this series of articles will deeply facilitate understanding of and the approach to IBD and associated arthropathies.

  15. Intestinal epithelial cells in inflammatory bowel diseases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Giulia; Roda; Alessandro; Sartini; Elisabetta; Zambon; Andrea; Calafiore; Margherita; Marocchi; Alessandra; Caponi; Andrea; Belluzzi; Enrico; Roda

    2010-01-01

    The pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel diseases (IBDs) seems to involve a primary defect in one or more of the elements responsible for the maintenance of intestinal homeostasis and oral tolerance. The most important element is represented by the intestinal barrier, a complex system formed mostly by intestinal epithelial cells (IECs). IECs have an active role in producing mucus and regulating its composition; they provide a physical barrier capable of controlling antigen traff ic through the intestinal muco...

  16. Nutritional concerns in pediatric inflammatory bowel disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    The pathophysiology and fundamental etiologic mechanism of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is not well understood even though therapeutic regimens and drugs are rapidly evolutionary. IBD has complicated connections with genetic, immunologic, gut microbial, environmental, and nutritional factors. It is not clearly well known to the physicians how to feed, what nutrients are more helpful, and what food to be avoided. This review discusses the issues of growth and important nutritional concerns in the management of IBD in childhood. PMID:27462352

  17. Clostridium difficile and pediatric inflammatory bowel disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martinelli, Massimo; Strisciuglio, Caterina; Veres, Gabor;

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Clostridium difficile infection is associated with pediatric inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) in several ways. We sought to investigate C. difficile infection in pediatric patients with IBD in comparison with a group of children with celiac disease and to evaluate IBD disease course...... of C. difficile infected patients. METHODS: In this prospective, comparative, multicenter study, 211 pediatric patients with IBD were enrolled from October 2010 to October 2011 and tested for the presence of C. difficile toxins A and B in their stools at 0, 6, and 12 months. During the same study.......08, respectively). Hospitalizations were higher at 6 months in C. difficile group (P = 0.05). CONCLUSIONS: In conclusion, this study demonstrates that pediatric IBD is associated with increased C. difficile detection. Patients with C. difficile tend to have active colonic disease and a more severe disease course....

  18. Interaction of obesity and inflammatory bowel disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harper, Jason W; Zisman, Timothy L

    2016-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is a chronic inflammatory condition of unknown etiology that is thought to result from a combination of genetic, immunologic and environmental factors. The incidence of IBD has been increasing in recent decades, especially in developing and developed nations, and this is hypothesized to be in part related to the change in dietary and lifestyle factors associated with modernization. The prevalence of obesity has risen in parallel with the rise in IBD, suggesting a possible shared environmental link between these two conditions. Studies have shown that obesity impacts disease development and response to therapy in patients with IBD and other autoimmune conditions. The observation that adipose tissue produces pro-inflammatory adipokines provides a potential mechanism for the observed epidemiologic links between obesity and IBD, and this has developed into an active area of investigative inquiry. Additionally, emerging evidence highlights a role for the intestinal microbiota in the development of both obesity and IBD, representing another potential mechanistic connection between the two conditions. In this review we discuss the epidemiology of obesity and IBD, possible pathophysiologic links, and the clinical impact of obesity on IBD disease course and implications for management. PMID:27672284

  19. Reflectance Confocal Microscopy for Inflammatory Skin Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agozzino, M; Gonzalez, S; Ardigò, M

    2016-10-01

    In vivo reflectance confocal microscopy (RCM) is a relatively novel non-invasive tool for microscopic evaluation of the skin used prevalently for diagnosis and management of skin tumour. Its axial resolution, its non-invasive and easy clinical application represents the goals for a large diffusion of this technique. During the last 15 years, RCM has been demonstrated to be able to increase the sensibility and sensitivity of dermoscopy in the diagnosis of skin tumours integrating in real time clinic, dermoscopic and microscopic information useful for the definition of malignancy. Despite to date, no large comparative studies on inflammatory skin diseases has been published in the literature, several papers already showed that RCM has a potential for the evaluation of the descriptive features of the most common inflammatory skin diseases as psoriasis, lupus erythematosus, contact dermatitis and others. The aim of the application of this technique in non-neoplastic skin diseases has been prevalently focused on the possibility of clinical diagnosis confirmation, as well as therapeutic management. Moreover, the use of RCM as driver for an optimised skin biopsy has been also followed in order to reduce the number of unsuccessful histopathological examination. In this review article we describe the confocal features of the major groups of inflammatory skin disorders focusing on psoriasiform dermatitis, interface dermatitis and spongiotic dermatitis.

  20. Inflammatory Bowel Disease and Cervical Neoplasia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rungoe, Christine; Simonsen, Jacob; Riis, Lene

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND & AIMS: We examined the risk of cervical neoplasia (dysplasia or cancer) in women with ulcerative colitis (UC) or Crohn's disease (CD). We also calculated the reverse, the risk for diagnosis with cervical neoplasia before development of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). METHODS: We...... with IBD were assessed by Cox proportional hazards regression analysis. Odds ratios (ORs) of cervical neoplasia before diagnosis of IBD were calculated by using conditional logistic regression. RESULTS: Women with CD underwent cervical cancer screening as often as women in the general population (IRR, 0...

  1. Inflammatory Process in Alzheimer’s Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MARCO ANTONIO eMERAZ RIOS

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Alzheimer Disease (AD is a neurodegenerative disorder and the most common form of dementia. Histopathologically is characterized by the presence of two major hallmarks, the intracellular neurofibrillary tangles (NFTs and extracellular neuritic plaques (NPs surrounded by activated astrocytes and microglia. NFTs consist of paired helical filaments of truncated tau protein that is abnormally hyperphosphorylated. The main component in the NP is the amyloid-β peptide (Aβ, a small fragment of 40-42 amino acids with a molecular weight of 4kD. It has been proposed that the amyloid aggregates and microglia activation are able to favor the neurodegenerative process observed in AD patients. However, the role of inflammation in AD is controversial, because in early stages the inflammation could have a beneficial role in the pathology, since it has been thought that the microglia and astrocytes activated could be involved in Aβ clearance. Nevertheless the chronic activation of the microglia has been related with an increase of Aβ and possibly with tau phosphorylation. Studies in AD brains have shown an upregulation of complement molecules, pro-inflammatory cytokines, acute phase reactants and other inflammatory mediators that could contribute with the neurodegenerative process. Clinical trials and animal models with nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs indicate that these drugs may decrease the risk of developing AD and apparently reduce Aβ deposition. Finally, further studies are needed to determine whether treatment with anti-inflammatory strategies, may decrease the neurodegenerative process that affects these patients.

  2. Preventive health measures in inflammatory bowel disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abegunde, Ayokunle T; Muhammad, Bashir H; Ali, Tauseef

    2016-01-01

    We aim to review the literature and provide guidance on preventive health measures in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Structured searches were performed in PubMed, MEDLINE, EMBASE, Web of Science and Cochrane Library from January 1976 to June 2016 using the following keywords: (inflammatory bowel disease OR Crohn’s disease OR ulcerative colitis) AND (health maintenance OR preventive health OR health promotion). Abstracts of the articles selected from each of these multiple searches were reviewed, and those meeting the inclusion criteria (that is, providing data regarding preventive health or health maintenance in IBD patients) were recorded. Reference lists from the selected articles were manually reviewed to identify further relevant studies. Patients with IBD are at increased risk of developing adverse events related to the disease course, therapeutic interventions, or non-adherence to medication. Recent studies have suggested that IBD patients do not receive preventive services with the same thoroughness as patients with other chronic diseases. Preventive health measures can avert morbidity and improve the quality of life of patients with IBD. Gastroenterologists and primary care physicians (PCPs) should have an up to date working knowledge of preventive health measures for IBD patients. A holistic approach and better communication between gastroenterologists and PCPs with explicit clarification of roles will prevent duplication of services and streamline care. PMID:27678347

  3. The Social Toll of Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard G Farmer

    1994-01-01

    Full Text Available Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD – ulcerative colitis and Crohn’s disease – has become one the most important chronic digestive disorders found in the younger population. As a result of the nature of the illness, with remission and exacerbation of the inflammatory process, there has been increasing concern regarding the costs, both financial and social, of IBD. There have been attempts to quantify disease activity and to assess the results of treatment and the ability of the patient to function in society. As a result, there has been an increased interest in the ‘social toll’ of IBD. Begi1ming in 1988, and using a direct interview technique, ambulatory patients with IBD were evaluated for quality of life at the Cleveland Clinic Foundation. Included were patients whose disease had been present for about 10 years, and both surgical and nonsurgical patients. The interview questionnaire consisted of 47 items in four categories: functional/economic, social/recreational, affect/life in general and medical/symptoms. Patients with ulcerative colitis had better quality of life than those with Crohn’s disease and patients without surgery had better quality of life than those who had undergone surgery. Over the ensuing five-year period, it was shown that quality of life measures are of value in assessing the results of medical and surgical therapy, and the measures frequently give information not usually obtained by physicians and have implications for quality assurance and outcome measurement.

  4. Fecal Microbiota Transplantation in Inflammatory Bowel Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinisch, Walter

    2017-01-01

    The etiology of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is unknown, but it is thought to arise from an aberrant immune response to a change in colonic environment in a genetically susceptible individual. The intestinal microbiota are located at the complex interface of the epithelial barrier and are sensitive to changes in environmental factors, such as diets, drugs or smoking and signals derived from the intestinal immune system and the gut-brain axis. In patients with IBD, an imbalance in the structural and/or functional configuration of the intestinal microbiota leading to the disruption of the host-microorganism homeostasis (dysbiosis) has been reproducibly reported. As animal models of IBD require gut bacteria to induce inflammation, it is hypothesized that the dysbiosis observed in patients is not only a surrogate of changes at the intestinal barrier but also a potential cause or at least enhancer of the mucosal inflammatory process. That burgeoning notion has stimulated thoughts to modify the intestinal microbiota and rekindled interest in previous work on the efficacy of antibiotics in patients with IBD. The feasibility and tremendous success of fecal microbiota transplantation (FMT) to treat antibiotic resistant Clostridium difficile has finally paved the way to embark into the unchartered territory of IBD using FMT. Different routes and number of administrations, choices of donors, disease status and permitted therapies might have contributed to mixed results, particularly from the so far published randomized controlled trials. However, microbiome analysis suggests that a durable transplantation of donor bacteria to the host appears feasible and might be associated with a higher likelihood of response. On the other hand, this raises the concern of transplanting not only anti-inflammatory active bacteria and their products, but also not-yet-known dispositions for other diseases including cancer. Attempts are being made to better characterize those components of

  5. Selecting Therapeutic Targets in Inflammatory Bowel Disease (STRIDE)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peyrin-Biroulet, L; Sandborn, W; Sands, B E

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The Selecting Therapeutic Targets in Inflammatory Bowel Disease (STRIDE) program was initiated by the International Organization for the Study of Inflammatory Bowel Diseases (IOIBD). It examined potential treatment targets for inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) to be used for a "treat...

  6. Oral pathology in inflammatory bowel disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muhvić-Urek, Miranda; Tomac-Stojmenović, Marija; Mijandrušić-Sinčić, Brankica

    2016-01-01

    The incidence of inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) - Crohn’s disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC) - has been increasing on a global scale, and progressively, more gastroenterologists will be included in the diagnosis and treatment of IBD. Although IBD primarily affects the intestinal tract, extraintestinal manifestations of the disease are often apparent, including in the oral cavity, especially in CD. Specific oral manifestations in patients with CD are as follows: indurate mucosal tags, cobblestoning and mucogingivitis, deep linear ulcerations and lip swelling with vertical fissures. The most common non-specific manifestations, such as aphthous stomatitis and angular cheilitis, occur in both diseases, while pyostomatitis vegetans is more pronounced in patients with UC. Non-specific lesions in the oral cavity can also be the result of malnutrition and drugs. Malnutrition, followed by anemia and mineral and vitamin deficiency, affects the oral cavity and teeth. Furthermore, all of the drug classes that are applied to the treatment of inflammatory bowel diseases can lead to alterations in the oral cavity due to the direct toxic effects of the drugs on oral tissues, as well as indirect immunosuppressive effects with a risk of developing opportunistic infections or bone marrow suppression. There is a higher occurrence of malignant diseases in patients with IBD, which is related to the disease itself and to the IBD-related therapy with a possible oral pathology. Treatment of oral lesions includes treatment of the alterations in the oral cavity according to the etiology together with treatment of the primary intestinal disease, which requires adequate knowledge and a strong cooperation between gastroenterologists and specialists in oral medicine. PMID:27433081

  7. Can Probiotics Cure Inflammatory Bowel Diseases?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korada, Siva Kumar; Yarla, Nagendra Sastry; Bishayee, Anupam; Aliev, Gjumrakch; Aruna Lakshmi, K; Arunasree, M K; Dananajaya, B L; Mishra, Vijendra

    2016-01-01

    Gastrointestinal (GI) disorders, especially microbial dysbiosis play role in several GI ailments such as irritable bowel syndrome, colorectal cancer, inflammatory bowel diseases, and antibiotic-associated diarrhoea. Role of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is multifactorial as it involves loss of maintaining intestinal epithelial barrier integrity, increased release of pro-inflammatory molecules, and microbial dysbiosis in gut microflora. Some specific pathogens also play a key role in the IBD development. The origin and causation are still in unfathomable condition and the exact root cause is unknown. Recently probiotic studies have been gaining importance because of their positive responses in their IBD experimental results. According to joint Food and Agricultural Organisation/World Health Organisation working group, probiotics are defined as live microorganisms which when administered in adequate amount confer health benefit on the host. These live beneficial microorganisms are considered helpful in improving gut colonization and perseverance thereby improves prophylactic effect. In the direction of IBD research, a number of studies are needed to standardize its methodology and its applicability on human usage. The particular review presents an overview of gut microflora and its impact on host health, types of IBD and existing therapies to treat this disorder, mechanism of several probiotic actions, role of probiotics in IBD prevention with their supporting evidences.

  8. Use of biosimilars in inflammatory bowel disease: Statements of the Italian Group for Inflammatory Bowel Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Annese, Vito; Vecchi, Maurizio

    2014-11-01

    The introduction of biological therapies, particularly anti-TNFα agents, has revolutionized the management of inflammatory bowel disease in those cases which are refractory to conventional treatment; however these drugs are not risk-free and their use has substantially increased the cost of treatment. As marketing protection expires for original, first-generation biopharmaceuticals, lower-cost "copies" of these drugs produced by competitor companies-referred to as biosimilars-are already entering the market. In September 2013, the European Medicines Agency approved two infliximab biosimilars for treatment of adult and paediatric inflammatory bowel disease patients, a decision based largely on efficacy and safety data generated in studies of patients with ankylosing spondylitis and rheumatoid arthritis. For many clinicians, extrapolation practices and the general question of interchangeability between biosimilars and reference biologics are cause for concern. In the present paper, the Italian Group for inflammatory bowel disease presents its statements on these issues, with emphasis on the peculiar clinical characteristics of inflammatory bowel disease and the importance of providing physicians and patients with adequate information and guarantees on the safety and efficacy of these new drugs in the specific setting of inflammatory bowel disease.

  9. Scintigraphic detection of inflammatory heart disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morguet, A.J. (Dept. of Cardiology and Pulmonology, Centre of Internal Medicine, Georg August Univ., Goettingen (Germany)); Munz, D.L. (Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Centre of Radiology, Georg August Univ., Goettingen (Germany)); Kreuzer, H. (Dept. of Cardiology and Pulmonology, Centre of Internal Medicine, Georg August Univ., Goettingen (Germany)); Emrich, D. (Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Centre of Radiology, Georg August Univ., Goettingen (Germany))

    1994-07-01

    Inflammatory diseases of the heart encompass myocarditis, endocarditis and pericarditis. This paper discusses the diagnostic potential of scintigraphy in these entities. In myocarditis, indium-111 antimyosin Fab imaging can visualize active myocyte damage and thus contribute substantially to the diagnosis. Antimyosin uptake is also seen in a large subset of patients with dilated cardiomyopathy, indicating ongoing myocyte injury in these cases. In endocarditis, immunoscintigraphy using monoclonal technetium-99m-labelled antigranulocyte antibodies provides useful diagnostic information in patients with equivocal echocardiographic findings. Immunoscintigraphy seems to indicate the floridity of the inflammatory process in endocarditis and may be used to monitor antibiotic therapy. In pericarditis, the clinical value of scintigraphy has not been convincingly demonstrated. (orig.)

  10. Radioisotope scanning in inflammatory muscle disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, M.B.; Swift, T.R.; Spies, S.M.

    1976-06-01

    Fourteen whole-body rectilinear bone scans using technetium 99m-polyphosphate were done in nine patients with well-documented inflammatory myopathy (either polymyositis or dermatomyositis). In all nine patients the scans showed evidence of increased muscle labeling. Muscle uptake was markedly increased in one patient, moderately increased in two patients, and minimally increased in six patients. The degree of muscle labeling correlated with the severity of the muscle weakness at the time the scan was done. In four patients, who received high-dose corticosteroid treatment, muscle uptake was decreased following therapy. These findings suggest that radioisotope scanning may be useful in the diagnosis and management of patients with inflammatory muscle diseases.

  11. Venous thromboembolism with inflammatory bowel disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hugh James Freeman

    2008-01-01

    Venous thrombosis and thromboembolism appear to be increased in patients with inflammatory bowel disease.Although several acquired and genetic risk factors are known,about half that develop a thromboembolic event have no identifiable risk factor.Control of the inflammatory process is thought to be the key factor in risk reduction for thrombotic events.Prophylactic use of anticoagulants is not universally recommended,but possible use should be reviewed in an individual patient after evaluation of the risks,such as hemorrhage,compared to potential benefits.Particular consideration should be given if there has been a prior thrombotic event,if hospitalization will require surgery,or if an underlying coagulation disorder is present.

  12. Neutrophilic dermatoses and inflammatory bowel diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marzano, A V; Menicanti, C; Crosti, C; Trevisan, V

    2013-04-01

    Pyoderma gangrenosum (PG) and Sweet's Syndrome (SS) are inflammatory skin diseases caused by the accumulation of neutrophils in the skin and, rarely, in internal organs, which led to coining the term of neutrophilic dermatoses (ND) to define these conditions. Recently, ND have been included among the autoinflammatory diseases, which are forms due to mutations of genes regulating the innate immune responses. Both PG and SS are frequently associated with inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD), a group of chronic intestinal disorders which comprises ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease and whose pathogenesis involves both the innate and adaptive immunity in genetically prone individuals. Patients with IBD develop PG in 1-3% of cases, while SS is rarer. PG presents with deep erythematous-to-violaceous painful ulcers with undermined borders, but bullous, pustular, and vegetative variants can also occur. SS, also known as acute febrile neutrophilic dermatosis, is characterized by the abrupt onset of fever, peripheral neutrophilia, tender erythematous skin lesions and a diffuse neutrophilic dermal infiltrate. In this review that will be focused on PG and SS, we will describe also the aseptic abscesses syndrome, a new entity within the spectrum of ND which frequently occurs in association with IBD and is characterized by deep abscesses mainly involving the spleen and skin and by polymorphic cutaneous manifestations including PG- and SS-like lesions.

  13. Osteomyelitis and Osteonecrosis in Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hugh J Freeman

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available Osteomyelitis and osteonecrosis are skeletal disorders seen in patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD. Osteomyelitis usually occurs in the pelvic bones, especially in complicated Crohn's disease, presumably by direct extension from a pelvic inflammatory mass, abscess or fistulous tract. Diagnosis of osteomyelitis may be difficult and can lead to spinal extension of the septic process with a resultant neurological deficit, including paraplegia. Osteonecrosis or avascular necrosis has been reported in patients with either ulcerative colitis or Crohn's disease, often, but not exclusively, during or following steroid treatment. The disease is often multifocal, but its natural history is unknown, especially if diagnosed early with modern imaging methods, such as magnetic resonance. In IBD patients, the relationship between osteonecrosis and steroid use is unknown. An adverse steroid effect on bones, especially the femoral heads, may develop in some patients with IBD but, to date, this hypothesis remains unproven. Critical evaluation of published data reveals no consistent association between osteonecrosis and steroid treatment in IBD patients.

  14. Structural brain lesions in inflammatory bowel disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Can; Dolapcioglu; Hatice; Dolapcioglu

    2015-01-01

    Central nervous system(CNS) complications or manifes-tations of inflammatory bowel disease deserve particular attention because symptomatic conditions can require early diagnosis and treatment, whereas unexplained manifestations might be linked with pathogenic me-chanisms. This review focuses on both symptomatic and asymptomatic brain lesions detectable on imaging studies, as well as their frequency and potential mecha-nisms. A direct causal relationship between inflammatory bowel disease(IBD) and asymptomatic structural brain changes has not been demonstrated, but several possible explanations, including vasculitis, thromboembolism and malnutrition, have been proposed. IBD is associated with a tendency for thromboembolisms; therefore, cerebro-vascular thromboembolism represents the most frequent and grave CNS complication. Vasculitis, demyelinating conditions and CNS infections are among the other CNS manifestations of the disease. Biological agents also represent a risk factor, particularly for demyelination. Identification of the nature and potential mechanisms of brain lesions detectable on imaging studies would shed further light on the disease process and could improve patient care through early diagnosis and treatment.

  15. Gastric emptying and disease activity in inflammatory bowel disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Keller, Jutta; Binnewies, Ulrich; Rösch, Marie;

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Gastric emptying (GE) is delayed in a subset of patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). We have shown before that altered release of gastrointestinal hormones may contribute to GE disturbances, but overall effects of disease activity remain unclear. Thus, we aimed to evaluate GE...... in patients with IBD during active disease and following therapy. DESIGN: A total of 20 healthy subjects (HC) and 26 patients with IBD hospitalized because of an acute episode of their disease (Crohn's disease (CD) n = 13, ulcerative colitis (UC) n = 13) underwent a standardized (13) C-octanoic acid GE breath...

  16. Caffeic acid phenethyl ester: its protective role against certain major eye diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akyol, Sumeyya; Ugurcu, Veli; Balci, Mehmet; Gurel, Ayse; Erden, Gonul; Cakmak, Ozlem; Akyol, Omer

    2014-11-01

    As an effective compound found mainly in the honeybee product propolis, caffeic acid phenethyl ester (CAPE) has been commonly utilized as a medicine and remedial agent, in a number of countries. Specifically, it might inhibit nuclear factor kappa B at micromolar concentrations and demonstrate antioxidant, antineoplastic, antiproliferative, cytostatic, antiviral, antibacterial, antifungal, and anti-inflammatory features. This review article summarizes the recent progress regarding the favorable effects of CAPE on a number of eye disease models, including cataract and posterior capsule opacification, corneal diseases, retina and optic nerve-related diseases, ischemia/reperfusion injury of retina, inflammation and infection-related diseases. CAPE has been found to exhibit promising efficacy, with minimal adverse effects, in animal and cell culture studies of several eye diseases.

  17. Stem Cells Hold Promise, Peril in Treating Seniors' Eye Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_164099.html Stem Cells Hold Promise, Peril in Treating Seniors' Eye Disease ... 15, 2017 WEDNESDAY, March 15, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Stem cells may offer new hope for people losing their ...

  18. The eye in systemic disease | Lenake | South African Family Practice

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Abstract. The eye is a unique organ which is often involved in systemic disease. ... virus/acquired immune deficiency syndrome, syphilis, some dermatological conditions and the ocular side-effects of certain drugs, are discussed in this article.

  19. Biologic therapy in inflammatory bowel disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Theede, Klaus; Dahlerup, Jens Frederik; Fallingborg, Jan

    2013-01-01

    In luminal Crohn's disease with moderate to severe inflammatory activity, infliximab and adalimumab can be used in the case of treatment failure with conventional therapies, such as systemic steroids and immunosuppressive therapy or if this treatment is not tolerated. Further treatment strategy...... depends on the primary response to induction therapy. Effect of maintenance therapy should be evaluated clinically and paraclinically at least every 26-52 weeks, and maybe supplemented by endoscopy or MRI scan. Decision of treatment discontinuation is based on disease manifestation, treatment response...... and paraclinical parameters. In fistulising Crohn's disease, treatment with infliximab or adalimumab can be initiated in simple fistula with rectal inflammation or complex fistula when the initial treatment has insufficient effect. Further treatment strategy depends on the primary response to induction therapy...

  20. Newer treatments for inflammatory bowel disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stotland, B R; Lichtenstein, G R

    1998-02-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease represents chronic idiopathic disorders which involve either the colon exclusively (ulcerative colitis) of any part of the gastrointestinal tract (Crohn's disease). The course of these entities is typified by periods of symptomatic exacerbation interspersed with clinical remissions. Management is based upon regimens which decrease mucosal inflammation. Colonic disease distal to the splenic flexure may be treated with topical therapy, but other regions generally necessitate oral therapy. Currently used medications include the aminosalicylates, glucocorticoids, antibiotics and immunomodulators. The immunomodulator class of medications includes azathioprine, 6-mercaptopurine, cyclosporine A and methotrexate. Newer agents include short-chain fatty acids, omega-3 fatty acids and antibodies directed to tumor necrosis factor. Medical management also occasionally involves optimizing nutritional status with the addition of elemental diets or total parenteral nutrition. Management of specific clinical presentations is discussed.

  1. Biologic therapy in inflammatory bowel disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Theede, Klaus; Dahlerup, Jens Frederik; Fallingborg, Jan;

    2013-01-01

    In luminal Crohn's disease with moderate to severe inflammatory activity, infliximab and adalimumab can be used in the case of treatment failure with conventional therapies, such as systemic steroids and immunosuppressive therapy or if this treatment is not tolerated. Further treatment strategy...... depends on the primary response to induction therapy. Effect of maintenance therapy should be evaluated clinically and paraclinically at least every 26-52 weeks, and maybe supplemented by endoscopy or MRI scan. Decision of treatment discontinuation is based on disease manifestation, treatment response...... and paraclinical parameters. In fistulising Crohn's disease, treatment with infliximab or adalimumab can be initiated in simple fistula with rectal inflammation or complex fistula when the initial treatment has insufficient effect. Further treatment strategy depends on the primary response to induction therapy...

  2. Role of scintigraphy in inflammatory bowel disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Maria I Stathaki; Sophia I Koukouraki; Nikolaos S Karkavitsas; Ioannis E Koutroubakis

    2009-01-01

    The diagnosis of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) depends on direct endoscopic visualization of the colonic and ileal mucosa and the histological study of the obtained samples.Radiological and scintigraphic methods are mainly used as an adjunct to endoscopy.In this review,we focus on the diagnostic potential of nuclear medicine procedures.The value of all radiotracers is described with special reference to those with greater experience and more satisfactory results.Tc-99m hexamethylpropylene amine oxime white blood cells remain a widely acceptable scintigraphic method for the diagnosis of IBD,as well as for the evaluation of disease extension and severity.Recently,pentavalent Tc-99m dimercaptosuccinic acid has been recommended as an accurate variant and a complementary technique to endoscopy for the follow-up and assessment of disease activity.Positron emission tomography alone or with computed tomography using fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose appears to be a promising method of measuring inflammation in IBD patients.

  3. Inflammatory bowel disease and colorectal cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreja Ocepek

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Colorectal cancer is one of the most frequent cancers in developed countries and Slovenia, and the incidence is still rising. Groups of people with higher risk for colorectal cancer are well defined. Among them are patients with inflammatory bowel disease. The risk is highest in patients in whom whole large bowel is affected by inflammation, it rises after 8 to 10 years and increases with the duration of the disease. Precancerous lesion is a displastic, chronically inflammed mucosa and not an adenoma as in cases of sporadic colorectal carcinoma.Conclusions: Many studies suggest that the influence of genetic factors differs between sporadic and inflammatory bowel disease related colorectal cancer. Symptomatic patients at the time of diagnosis have a much worse prognosis. The goal of prevention programes is therefore discovering early precancerous lesions. Established screening protocols are based on relatively frequent colonoscopies which are inconvinient for the patient as well as the endoscopist. Use of specific genetic markers, mutations of candidate genes, as a screening method and a prognostic predictor could greatly lighten therapeutic decisions.

  4. Purinergic Signalling in Inflammatory Renal Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nishkantha eArulkumaran

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Extracellular purines have a role in renal physiology and adaption to inflammation. However, inflammatory renal disease may be mediated by extracellular purines, resulting in renal injury. The role of purinergic signalling is dependent on the concentrations of extracellular purines. Low basal levels of purines are important in normal homeostasis and growth. Concentrations of extracellular purines are significantly elevated during inflammation and mediate either an adaptive role or propagate local inflammation. Adenosine signalling mediates alterations in regional renal blood flow by regulation of the renal microcirculation, tubulo-glomerular feedback, and tubular transport of sodium and water. Increased extracellular ATP and renal P2 receptor-mediated inflammation are associated with various renal diseases, including hypertension, diabetic nephropathy, and glomerulonephritis. Experimental data suggests P2 receptor deficiency or receptor antagonism is associated with amelioration of antibody-mediated nephritis, suggesting a pathogenic (rather than adaptive role of purinergic signalling. We discuss the role of extracellular nucleotides in adaptation to ischaemic renal injury and in the pathogenesis of inflammatory renal disease.

  5. Fecal Microbiota Transplantation for Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez, Joanna

    2016-01-01

    The gut bacterial microbiome, particularly its role in disease and inflammation, has gained international attention with the successful use of fecal microbiota transplantation (FMT) in the treatment of Clostridium difficile infection. This success has led to studies exploring the role of FMT in other conditions, including inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Both Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis are chronic inflammatory conditions of the gastrointestinal system that have multifactorial etiologies. A shift in gut microbial composition in genetically susceptible individuals, an altered immune system, and environmental factors are all hypothesized to have a role in the pathogenesis of IBD. While numerous case reports and cohort studies have described the use of FMT in patients with IBD over the last 2 decades, the development of new sequencing techniques and results from 2 recent randomized, controlled trials have allowed for a better understanding of the relationship between the microbiome and the human host. However, despite these efforts, knowledge remains limited and the role of FMT in the management of IBD remains uncertain. Further investigation is necessary before FMT joins the current armamentarium of treatment options in clinical practice. PMID:27493597

  6. [Etiology and pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukáš, Milan

    2014-01-01

    Zdenek Mařatka has been the first physician, who had brought a new information for the Czech medical community with topic of inflammatory bowel diseases, which had been systematic studied for him. He had prepared an original theory - two component hypothesis about origin of ulcerative colitis, which had been developed and innovated by him for long time. From the international point of view, Mařatka has had an extraordinary impact and significant contribution for recognition of ulcerative colitis and Crohn´s disease. Despite the fact that the true origin of ulcerative colitis and Crohn´s disease (UC) still remain elusive, basic as well as clinical research bring many new data on etiology and pathogenesis of this inflammatory condition. It seems clear that IBD originate from interaction of several intrinsic and extrinsic factors that contribute individually in a particular patient. Among internal factors the genes play an important role, because its influence on the mucosal immunity system and immunological response. Among the external factors importance are recognized the gut microbiota content, cigarette smoking and psychological stress.

  7. Nutrition and chronic inflammatory rheumatic disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semerano, Luca; Julia, Chantal; Aitisha, Ouidade; Boissier, Marie-Christophe

    2016-11-30

    Nutrition is a major environmental influence on human health. Epidemiological and interventional studies suggest a pathophysiological or therapeutic role, respectively, for nutrition in inflammatory rheumatic diseases (IRDs). Nevertheless, the associations between nutrition and IRDs are often weak and inconsistent, and the available clinical trials on nutrition are methodologically flawed. Experimental evidence is accumulating that micronutrients in the diet may influence intestinal and systemic immune responses via complex interactions involving the gut microbiota. Micronutrients may, therefore, contribute to the pathogenesis of inflammatory diseases. No interventions targeting these interactions for diagnostic, prophylactic, or therapeutic purposes have been developed to date. Moreover, the relevance to human disease of experimental results obtained in animals or in vitro is unclear. Novel high-throughput technologies (-omics) may prove useful for a systems biology approach to these results that takes the complexity of the interactions into account. Concomitant cohort studies combining clinical and laboratory data collected over time may provide new impetus to research into the connections between nutrition and IRDs.

  8. Disease Course and Surgery Rates in Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vester-Andersen, Marianne K; Prosberg, Michelle V; Jess, Tine;

    2014-01-01

    . METHODS: From 1 January 2003 to 31 December 2004, all incident cases (562) of patients diagnosed with UC, CD, or inflammatory bowel disease unclassified in a well-defined Copenhagen area were registered. Medical records were reviewed from 1 November 2011 to 30 November 2012, and clinical data were...

  9. The Toxicity of Nonsteroidal Anti-inflammatory Eye Drops against Human Corneal Epithelial Cells in Vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jong Soo; Kim, Young Hi; Park, Young Min

    2015-12-01

    This study investigated the toxicity of commercial non-steroid anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) eye solutions against corneal epithelial cells in vitro. The biologic effects of 1/100-, 1/50-, and 1/10-diluted bromfenac sodium, pranoprofen, diclofenac sodium, and the fluorometholone on corneal epithelial cells were evaluated after 1-, 4-, 12-, and 24-hr of exposure compared to corneal epithelial cell treated with balanced salt solution as control. Cellular metabolic activity, cellular damage, and morphology were assessed. Corneal epithelial cell migration was quantified by the scratch-wound assay. Compared to bromfenac and pranoprofen, the cellular metabolic activity of diclofenac and fluorometholone significantly decreased after 12-hr exposure, which was maintained for 24-hr compared to control. Especially, at 1/10-diluted eye solution for 24-hr exposure, the LDH titers of fluorometholone and diclofenac sodium markedly increased more than those of bromfenac and pranoprofen. In diclofenac sodium, the Na(+) concentration was lower and amount of preservatives was higher than other NSAIDs eye solutions tested. However, the K(+) and Cl(-) concentration, pH, and osmolarity were similar for all NSAIDs eye solutions. Bromfenac and pranoprofen significantly promoted cell migration, and restored wound gap after 48-hr exposure, compared with that of diclofenac or fluorometholone. At 1/50-diluted eye solution for 48-hr exposure, the corneal epithelial cellular morphology of diclofenac and fluorometholone induced more damage than that of bromfenac or pranoprofen. Overall, the corneal epithelial cells in bromfenac and pranoprofen NSAID eye solutions are less damaged compared to those in diclofenac, included fluorometholone as steroid eye solution.

  10. Symptoms in Inflammatory Bowel Disease: pathophysiologic aspects and their relation with disease activity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Minderhoud, I.M.

    2007-01-01

    Symptoms in Inflammatory Bowel Disease: pathophysiologic aspects and their relation with disease activity Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) comprises ulcerative colitis (UC) and Crohn's disease (CD). IBD patients frequently complain of fatigue, and a substantial proportion of the patients have gastro

  11. Symptoms in Inflammatory Bowel Disease: pathophysiologic aspects and their relation with disease activity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Minderhoud, I.M.

    2007-01-01

    Symptoms in Inflammatory Bowel Disease: pathophysiologic aspects and their relation with disease activity Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) comprises ulcerative colitis (UC) and Crohn's disease (CD). IBD patients frequently complain of fatigue, and a substantial proportion of the patients have gastro

  12. Risk of ischaemic heart disease in patients with inflammatory bowel disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rungoe, Christine; Basit, Saima; Ranthe, Mattis Flyvholm

    2013-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is a chronic inflammatory disorder. Systemic inflammation increases the risk of atherosclerosis and ischaemic heart disease (IHD).......Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is a chronic inflammatory disorder. Systemic inflammation increases the risk of atherosclerosis and ischaemic heart disease (IHD)....

  13. Discordant Dry Eye Disease (An American Ophthalmological Society Thesis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shtein, Roni M; Harper, Daniel E; Pallazola, Vincent; Harte, Steven E; Hussain, Munira; Sugar, Alan; Williams, David A; Clauw, Daniel J

    2016-08-01

    To improve understanding of dry eye disease and highlight a subgroup of patients who have a component of central sensitization and neuropathic pain contributing to their condition. Prospective, cross-sectional, IRB-approved study comparing isolated dry eye disease (n=48) to fibromyalgia (positive control; n=23) and healthy (negative control; n=26) individuals with ocular surface examination, corneal confocal microscopy, quantitative sensory testing, and self-reported ocular symptoms and systemic associations. A subset of patients also underwent skin biopsy and/or brain neuroimaging. Dry eye patients were split into concordant (ie, those with dry eyes on examination) and discordant (ie, those with dry eye symptoms but normal examination) subgroups for further analysis. We hypothesized that on the systemic measures included, concordant patients would resemble healthy controls, whereas discordant patients would show evidence of centralized mechanisms similar to fibromyalgia. Schirmer test and Ocular Surface Disease Index (OSDI) scores indicated significant decreases in tear production (Schirmer: healthy, 18.5±8.2 mm; dry, 11.2±5.4 mm; fibromyalgia, 14.4±7.5; P<.001) and increases in self-reported dry eye symptoms (OSDI: healthy, 1.9±3.0; dry, 20.3±17.7; fibromyalgia, 20.3±17.1; P<.001) in the dry eye and fibromyalgia patients, compared to controls. The discordant subgroup had decreased corneal nerve density and decreased visual quality-of-life scores, similar to patients with fibromyalgia. Concordant patients were more similar to healthy controls on these measures. Individuals with discordant dry eye may have a central pathophysiologic mechanism leading to their eye pain symptoms, which could be an important factor to consider in treatment of chronic idiopathic dry eye.

  14. Mesalamine for inflammatory bowel disease: recent reappraisals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Actis, Giovanni C; Pazienza, Paola; Rosina, Floriano

    2008-03-01

    Derived from the historical molecule sulfasalazine, mesalamine has remained one of the mainstays for treatment of inflammatory bowel disease in the last 50 years. Recent advancement in both clinical and basic research has led to reappraise the drug under two crucial aspects. Firstly, there has been a re-evaluation of the chemo-protective effect of mesalamine against sporadic colorectal cancer. Evidence that inflammation plays a strong role in tumor induction from one side, and demonstration that mesalamine can touch on specific molecular steps enhancing apoptosis on the other side have re-shaped the indications of mesalamine for ulcerative colitis. Secondly, the role of thiopurines (azathioprine and 6-MP) in the maintenance of remission of ulcerative colitis has been reiterated by the results of several clinical trials. During attempts at clarifying the reasons why certain patients appear to be resistant to thiopurines, it was interestingly found that mesalamine can interfere thiopurine metabolism, causing an increased blood concentration of the specific immunosuppressive metabolites and a sequential enhancement of drug effectiveness. Mesalamine is therefore being studied as a means to overcome the genetically determined resistance to thiopurines. Such sharpened indications have reiterated attention to correct dosing: the results of controlled trials have shown mesalamine to be fully effective at twice the traditional daily dosage (4.8 grams instead of 2.4). The attendant problems of compliance seem to find solution in the availability of multi-matrix system formulations. This mesalamine story reminds us that in the absence of an etiological target capable to guide research to trace one abrogating molecule, (as it has happened for viral hepatitides for example), treatment of inflammatory bowel disease remains anti-inflammatory in nature and thus multifaceted. Besides justified use of cutting-edge technology to find novel molecules, smart re-evaluation of what is

  15. Targeting intestinal microflora in inflammatory bowel disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mario Guslandi

    2006-01-01

    @@ TO THE EDITOR In their recent review article[1], Andoh and Fujiyama examined the various therapeutic approaches targeting intestinal microflora in patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). I would like to provide some additional data to complete and update their comments. First of all, when considering the role of probiotics in 1BD treatment it must be emphasized that, in addition to Bifidobacteria, the Nissle 1917 E. coli strain and cocktails of microorganisms such as VSL # 3 mentioned in the article, other probiotic agents have been tested in the short- and long-term treatment of either ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease, the results of those studies being reported in major international scientific journals.

  16. Familial risk of inflammatory bowel disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moller, Frederik Trier; Andersen, Vibeke; Wohlfahrt, Jan;

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Estimates of familial risk of inflammatory bowel diseases (IBDs), Crohn's disease (CD), and ulcerative colitis (UC) are needed for counseling of patients and could be used to target future prevention. We aimed to provide comprehensive population-based estimates of familial risk of IBD....... METHODS: The study encompassed the entire Danish population during 1977-2011 (N=8,295,773; 200 million person-years). From national registries, we obtained information on diagnosis date of IBD (N=45,780) and family ties. Using Poisson regression, we estimated incidence rate ratios (IRRs) of IBD...... in relatives of IBD cases compared with individuals with relatives of the same type without IBD. RESULTS: The risk of CD was significantly increased in first-degree (IRR, 7.77; 95% confidence interval (CI), 7.05-8.56), second-degree (IRR, 2.44; 95% CI, 2.01-2.96), and third-degree relatives (IRR, 1.88; 95% CI...

  17. Liver Disorders in Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victor Uko

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Disorders of the hepatobiliary system are relatively common extraintestinal manifestations of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD. These disorders are sometimes due to a shared pathogenesis with IBD as seen in primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC and small-duct primary sclerosing cholangitis (small-duct PSC. There are also hepatobiliary manifestations such as cholelithiasis and portal vein thrombosis that occur due to the effects of chronic inflammation and the severity of bowel disease. Lastly, medications used in IBD such as sulfasalazine, thiopurines, and methotrexate can adversely affect the liver. It is important to be cognizant of these disorders as some do have serious long-term consequences. The management of these disorders often requires the expertise of multidisciplinary teams to achieve the best outcomes.

  18. Inflammatory mechanisms linking obesity and metabolic disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saltiel, Alan R; Olefsky, Jerrold M

    2017-01-03

    There are currently over 1.9 billion people who are obese or overweight, leading to a rise in related health complications, including insulin resistance, type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular disease, liver disease, cancer, and neurodegeneration. The finding that obesity and metabolic disorder are accompanied by chronic low-grade inflammation has fundamentally changed our view of the underlying causes and progression of obesity and metabolic syndrome. We now know that an inflammatory program is activated early in adipose expansion and during chronic obesity, permanently skewing the immune system to a proinflammatory phenotype, and we are beginning to delineate the reciprocal influence of obesity and inflammation. Reviews in this series examine the activation of the innate and adaptive immune system in obesity; inflammation within diabetic islets, brain, liver, gut, and muscle; the role of inflammation in fibrosis and angiogenesis; the factors that contribute to the initiation of inflammation; and therapeutic approaches to modulate inflammation in the context of obesity and metabolic syndrome.

  19. Inflammatory bowel disease pathogenesis: where are we?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiocchi, Claudio

    2015-03-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is presently one of the most investigated human disorders. Expansion of knowledge of its pathophysiology has helped in developing novel medications to combat gut inflammation with a considerably degree of success. Despite this progress, much more remains to be done in regard to gaining a more profound understanding of IBD pathogenesis, detecting inflammation before it clinically manifests, implementing lifestyle modifications, and developing agents that can modify the natural course of the disease. One of the limitations to achieve these goals is the lack of integration of the major components of IBD pathogenesis, that is the exposome, the genome, the gut microbiome, and the immunome. An "IBD integrome" approach that takes advantage of all functional information derived from the detailed investigation of each single pathogenic component through the use of systems biology may offer the solution to understand IBD and cure it. © 2015 Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology Foundation and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  20. Fertility and pregnancy in inflammatory bowel disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Elspeth Alstead

    2001-01-01

    @@ INTRODUCTION Inflammatory bowel disease(IBD)is a chronic disorder affecting young adults in the reproductive years.It is comon for both female and male patients with IBD to ask questions about IBD's effect on their relationships,sexual and reproductive function,in particular fertility,the outcome of pregnancy and its possible effets on the disease.An open discussion of the social situation and education targeted at these issues therefore forms an essential part of the management of any young person with IBD.the questions that are most commonly asked are summarised in Table 1.In order to answer these questions we need evidence.There are few large prospective case controlled studies to provide the information which is required but the available data,some of it from small observational studies,will be summarised in this chapter.

  1. Special issues in pediatric inflammatory bowel disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Maria Dubinsky

    2008-01-01

    The incidence of pediatric inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is rising and recent advances in diagnostics and therapeutics have improved the care provided to these children. There are distinguishing features worth noting between early onset and adult onset IBD. Physical and psychosocial development remains a critical target for the comprehensive management of pediatric IBD. Children are not just little adults and consideration must be given to the stages of development and how these stages impact disease presentation and management. The final stage will be the transition from pediatric care to that of adult oriented care and special consideration must be given to make this a successful process. This review highlights special considerations in the management of the child with IBD.

  2. Biomarkers in canine inflammatory bowel disease diagnostics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wdowiak, M; Rychlik, A; Kołodziejska-Sawerska, A

    2013-01-01

    Canine inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is a heterogeneous group of chronic gastrointestinal disorders. The etiology, similar to human IBD, remains unknown. Canine IBD is diagnosed by exclusion, which is a long, time and money-consuming process due to the need of elimination of other diseases presenting with similar symptoms. Therefore, a search for a specific and sensitive marker is needed to overcome these difficulties. The article is divided into 3 sections presenting up-to-date information about laboratory markers, immunohistochemical markers and changes in the neurochemical coding of the enteric nervous system, concentrating on their usefulness and future applications. Data concerning laboratory and immunohistochemical markers is based mainly on canine IBD, while the neuroimmunohistochemistry section presents knowledge from human IBD due to the lack of such studies in veterinary medicine.

  3. Role of cytokines in inflammatory bowel disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), which includes Crohn's disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC), rep- resents a group of chronic disorders characterized by inflammation of the gastrointestinal tract, typically with a relapsing and remitting clinical course. Mucosal mac- rophages play an important role in the mucosal im- mune system, and an increase in the number of newly recruited monocytes and activated macrophages has been noted in the inflamed gut of patients with IBD. Activated macrophages are thought to be major con- tributors to the production of inflammatory cytokines in the gut, and imbalance of cytokines is contributing to the pathogenesis of IBD. The intestinal inflammation in IBD is controlled by a complex interplay of innate and adaptive immune mechanisms. Cytokines play a key role in IBD that determine T cell differentiation of Th1, Th2, T regulatory and newly described Th17 cells. Cytokines levels in time and space orchestrate the development, recurrence and exacerbation of theinflammatory process in IBD. Therefore, several cyto- kine therapies have been developed and tested for the treatment of IBD patients.

  4. [Risk factors associated with pelvic inflammatory disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelayo Vera, Salvador; Hernández Landa, Tomás; Rodríguez Guzmán, Leoncio Miguel; Hernández Cruz, Leticia

    2002-08-01

    To determine the socio-demographic and gynecological risk factors in pelvic inflammatory disease (EPI). A study of the cases and controls divided by the age and the medical attention unit was performed. Women with an active sex life, who chose to participate in the study, were included. The definition of a case were the women who presented at least four of the clinical manifestations identified as critical as the principal criteria for EPI. For both groups a questionnaire was applied which contained the socio-demographical, gynecological and obstetric variables. 50 cases and 50 controls were evaluated. The risk factors associated with EPI were: scholastic level below high school, RMp 2.22 (IC95% 1.03-5.13); low scholastic level of the couple, RMp 2.33 (0.91-6.6); working women, RMp 3.17 (IC95% 1.3-8.7); women with a low socioeconomic level, RMp 2.86 (IC95% 1.24-7.26); a history of infectious vaginitis in the previous three months, RMp 41 (IC95% 7.94-838). The history of a use of intrauterine devices (DIU) did not present any association (RMp 0.06). The presence of EPI was found to be associated to socio-demographic and previous infectious vaginitis variables. The use of oral hormones and IUD did not show any relation. A greater amount of sexual education is needed for women with an active sex life in order to avoid the pelvic inflammatory disease.

  5. Correlations between Psoriasis and Inflammatory Bowel Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nevena Skroza

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available For a long time the relationship between inflammatory bowel diseases (IBDs and psoriasis has been investigated by epidemiological studies. It is only starting from the 1990s that genetic and immunological aspects have been focused on. Psoriasis and IBD are strictly related inflammatory diseases. Skin and bowel represent, at the same time, barrier and connection between the inner and the outer sides of the body. The most important genetic correlations involve the chromosomal loci 6p22, 16q, 1p31, and 5q33 which map several genes involved in innate and adaptive immunity. The genetic background represents the substrate to the common immune processes involved in psoriasis and IBD. In the past, psoriasis and IBD were considered Th1-related disorders. Nowadays the role of new T cells populations has been highlighted. A key role is played by Th17 and T-regs cells as by the balance between these two cells types. New cytokines and T cells populations, as IL-17A, IL-22, and Th22 cells, could play an important pathogenetic role in psoriasis and IBD. The therapeutic overlaps further support the hypothesis of a common pathogenesis.

  6. Pulse cyclophosphamide therapy for inflammatory bowel disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zsolt Barta; László Tóth; Margit Zeher

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To assess the efficacy of intravenous cyclophosphamide pulse therapy for refractory inflammatory bowel disease (IBD).METHODS: We included in our cohort eight patients with (moderate/severe) steroid refractory IBD (4 with ulcerative colitis and 4 with Crohn's disease). They all received 6 cycles of intravenous cyclophosphamide (800mg) per month.RESULTS: Patients entered into remission after the second/third cyclophosphamide pulse. Disease activity decreased. There were no side effects and toxicity. All the patients went into long lasting remission. All Crohn's disease patients and 3 of 4 ulcerative colitis patients achieved complete remission. One patient with ulcerative colitis showed an impressive clinical response but did not enter into remission. For the maintenance, patients with Crohn's disease were treated with methotrexate (15 mg/wk) and patients with ulcerative colitis were treated with azathioprine (2.5 mg/kg body weight/d).CONCLUSION: Remission was maintained in all patients for 6 mo on the average. The drug was well tolerated. These findings suggest that aggressive immunosuppressive therapy may be useful in some refractory patients and further controlled study should be considered in order to fully evaluate this type of treatment as a potential therapy for IBD.

  7. The Role of the Immune Response in the Pathogenesis of Thyroid Eye Disease: A Reassessment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James T Rosenbaum

    Full Text Available Although thyroid eye disease is a common complication of Graves' disease, the pathogenesis of the orbital disease is poorly understood. Most authorities implicate the immune response as an important causal factor. We sought to clarify pathogenesis by using gene expression microarray.An international consortium of ocular pathologists and orbital surgeons contributed formalin fixed orbital biopsies. RNA was extracted from orbital tissue from 20 healthy controls, 25 patients with thyroid eye disease (TED, 25 patients with nonspecific orbital inflammation (NSOI, 7 patients with sarcoidosis and 6 patients with granulomatosis with polyangiitis (GPA. Tissue was divided into a discovery set and a validation set. Gene expression was quantified using Affymetrix U133 Plus 2.0 microarrays which include 54,000 probe sets.Principal component analysis showed that gene expression from tissue from patients with TED more closely resembled gene expression from healthy control tissue in comparison to gene expression characteristic of sarcoidosis, NSOI, or granulomatosis with polyangiitis. Unsupervised cluster dendrograms further indicated the similarity between TED and healthy controls. Heat maps based on gene expression for cytokines, chemokines, or their receptors showed that these inflammatory markers were associated with NSOI, sarcoidosis, or GPA much more frequently than with TED.This is the first study to compare gene expression in TED to gene expression associated with other causes of exophthalmos. The juxtaposition shows that inflammatory markers are far less characteristic of TED relative to other orbital inflammatory diseases.

  8. Etiology, prevalence, and treatment of dry eye disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johnny L Gayton

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Johnny L GaytonEyesight Associates, Warner Robins, GA, USAPurpose: This review article examines the prevalence, etiology, and current therapies of dry eye disease, with special focus on postmenopausal women.Method: A systematic literature search utilizing MEDLINE was conducted to identify peer-reviewed articles related to dry eye published prior to September 2008. The terms “dry eye” and “women” were searched in combination with one or more of the following words or phrases: prevalence, postmenopausal, etiology, risk factors, therapy, medications, surgery, tear film, and quality of life. Articles were selected based on their direct applicability to the subject matter. A manual search was also conducted based on citations in the published literature.Results: Epidemiologic studies identified prevalence rates ranging from 7% in the United States to 33% in Taiwan and Japan. Risk factors include advanced age, female sex, smoking, extreme heat or cold weather conditions, low relative humidity, use of video display terminals, refractive surgery, contact lens wear, and certain medications.Conclusion: The last decade has brought about a better understanding of the etiology of dry eye disease. New therapies that can alleviate the signs and symptoms of dry eye disease and, consequently, improve the quality of life of dry eye patients are available in the market.Keywords: dry eye disease, etiology, prevalence, postmenopausal women

  9. Inflammatory diseases of the orbit; Entzuendungen der Orbita

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zimmer, A.; Reith, W. [Universitaetsklinikum des Saarlandes, Klinik fuer Diagnostische und Interventionelle Neuroradiologie, Homburg (Germany)

    2008-12-15

    Inflammatory conditions belong to the most important diseases of the orbit. Children and adolescents are mostly affected and the most common cause is secondary pathogen invasion from acute sinusitis. However in adults most cases involve idiopathic orbital inflammation, previously termed pseudotumor orbitae. Clinical presentation may include painful exophthalmus, skin redness and warming, chemosis and disturbed eye motility. The challenge for imaging investigations, mainly a combination of CT scanning and MRI, is to distinguish inflammatory from malignant conditions, to define the extent of lesions and to document possible complications, such as cavernous sinus thrombosis, meningoencephalitis or cerebral abscesses. Serious potential consequences of orbital infections, including loss of vision or death, are still a risk factor and must be averted by avoidance of delays in diagnosis and appropriate clinical management. (orig.) [German] Entzuendliche Veraenderungen zaehlen zu den wichtigen Erkrankungen der Orbita. Meist sind Kinder und Jugendliche betroffen, wobei eine fortgeleitete Infektion der Nasennebenhoehlen die haeufigste Ursache darstellt. Bei Erwachsenen handelt es sich in den meisten Faellen um eine idiopathische Orbitaentzuendung - frueher unter dem Begriff Pseudotumor orbitae zusammengefasst. Zu den Leitsymptomen zaehlen schmerzhafter Exophthalmus, Ueberwaermung und Roetung der Haut, Chemosis sowie eine Bewegungseinschraenkung des Bulbus. Die Rolle bildgebender Verfahren - hier ergaenzen sich Computer- und Magnetresonanztomographie - besteht in der Differenzierung inflammatorischer und tumoroeser Prozesse und insbesondere in der Darstellung der Laesionsausdehnung sowie dem Nachweis von Komplikationen, wie einer Sinus-cavernosus-Thrombose, einer Meningoenzephalitis oder zerebralen Abszessen. Auch heute noch koennen Infektionen der Orbita schwerwiegende Folgen wie komplette Erblindung oder Tod nach sich ziehen. (orig.)

  10. Pelvic inflammatory diseases in perimenopause and menopause

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cabunac Petar

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: In the gynecological profession Pelvic Inflammatory Disease (PID has a significant role due to its frequency, many complications and high costs of treatment Aim: The aim of this study was to investigate frequency and complications caused by these diseases, and used methods of treatment. Methods: The research was conducted in Clinic of Obstetrics and Gynecology 'Narodni Front', Belgrade, and included all consecutive patients diagnosed with PID during the period from year 2007 to 2010. The diagnosis of PID was set on the basis of: gynecological examination, test analysis (leucocytes, sedimentation, platelets, CRP, CA125, and ultrasound examination. A clinical criterion is divided into minimal and additional. The study included 112 patients. There were 33.93% of women in perimenopause/menopause (experimental group, while the control group consisted of 66.07% female subjects. Results: The frequency of surgically treated patients in experimental and control group was: 44.74% : 39.19% (χ2 test; p > 0.05. Women in experimental group used Intrauterine Device (IUD more than other patients 57.89% : 13.15% (χ2 test; p = 0.0001. A link was established between the use of intrauterine devicela in (χ2 test; p = 0.0516, patients’ irregular control of IUD (χ2 test; p = 0.0114 and surgical treatments of women in experimental group. The conservative treatment usually applies dual antibiotic therapy. Costs of surgically treated patients are around 1300 and conservatively treated around 210 €. Conclusion: Women in perimenopause and menopause are not exposed to higher risks of contracting PID. Women in perimenopause and menopause which use intrauterine device and don’t have regular controls, have higher risk of surgical treatments in case of pelvic inflammatory disease. Costs of treatment are 6-7 times in lower with conservatively treated patients compared to operatively treated ones.

  11. Serological markers of inflammatory bowel disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuna, Andrea Tesija

    2013-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is a heterogeneous group of chronic inflammatory disorders of the gastrointestinal tract with two main distinguishable entities, Crohn's disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC). IBD-unclassified (IBD-U) is a diagnosis that covers the "grey" zone of diagnostic uncertainty between UC and CD. Current diagnosis of IBD relies on the clinical, endoscopic, radiological, histological and biochemical features, but this approach has shortcomings especially in cases of overlapping symptoms of CD and UC. The need for a diagnostic tool that would improve the conventional methods in IBD diagnosis directed the search towards potential immunological markers, since an aberrant immune response against microbial or endogenous antigens in a genetically susceptible host seems to be implicated in IBD pathogenesis. The spectrum of antibodies to different microbial antigens and autoantibodies associated with IBD is rapidly expanding. Most of these antibodies are associated with CD like anti-glycan antibodies: anti-Saccharomices cerevisiae (ASCA) and the recently described anti-laminaribioside (ALCA), anti-chitobioside (ACCA), anti-mannobioside (AMCA), anti-laminarin (anti-L) and anti-chitin (anti-C) antibodies; in addition to other antibodies that target microbial antigens: anti-outer membrane porin C (anti-OmpC), anti-Cbir1 flagellin and anti-12 antibody. Also, autoantibodies targeting the exocrine pancreas (PAB) were shown to be highly specific for CD. In contrast, UC has been associated with anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic autoantibodies (pANCA) and antibodies against goblet cells (GAB). Current evidence suggests that serologic panels of multiple antibodies are useful in differential diagnosis of CD versus UC and can be a valuable aid in stratifying patients according to disease phenotype and risk of complications.

  12. Pelvic Inflammatory Disease: Diagnosis And Treatment In The Emergency Department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bugg, Charles Walter; Taira, Taku

    2016-12-01

    Pelvic inflammatory disease is a common disease that is associated with significant complications including infertility, chronic pelvic pain, ruptured tubo-ovarian abscess, and ectopic pregnancy. The diagnosis may be delayed when the presentation has nonspecific signs and symptoms. Even when it is properly identified, pelvic inflammatory disease is often treated suboptimally. This review provides evidence-based recommendations for the diagnosis, treatment, disposition, and follow-up of patients with pelvic inflammatory disease. Arranging follow-up of patients within 48 to 72 hours and providing clear patient education are fundamental to ensuring good patient outcomes. Emerging issues, including new pathogens and evolving resistance patterns among pelvic inflammatory disease pathogens are reviewed.

  13. Inflammatory bowel disease, to personalized nutrition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Ortiz-Suárez

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The incidence of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD is increasing in countries that acquire a Western lifestyle. Its pathogenesis is not well defined but is associated with multifactorial causes. In genetically predisposed people, different environmental factors trigger alterations in the immune response; as a result, tolerance is lost towards commensal gut microbiota, with tissues damage and chronic inflammation. Among the environmental risk factors identified is diet. Diets high in sucrose, refined carbohydrates, omega-6 polyunsaturated fatty acids, and low in fruit, vegetables, and fiber are associated with an increased risk of IBD, particularly Crohn disease (CD. Nutritional recommendations in IBD cannot be generalized because patients respond differently. The emergence of disciplines such as nutrigenetics, nutrigenomics and epigenetics allow a greater understanding of the pathogenesis of the disease, and at the same time, it opens up the possibility to an individualized approach from the nutritional standpoint. An example of this is found in carriers of the polymorphism 857C/T in the gene TNF (Tumor Necrosis Factor, in which a diet high in saturated and monounsaturated fatty acids is harmful and is associated with a more active disease phenotype. This paper reviews the latest scientific articles in these disciplines in relation to IBD and nutritional potential therapeutic applications, like antioxidants application or the ratio of polyunsaturated fatty acids v-6/v-3. It was used the database of the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI to search for articles, including selecting the most interest from 2007 to 2012.

  14. Smell and taste in inflammatory bowel disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinbach, Silke; Reindl, Wolfgang; Dempfle, Astrid; Schuster, Anna; Wolf, Petra; Hundt, Walter; Huber, Wolfgang

    2013-01-01

    To investigate the olfactory/gustatory functions of patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) by smell/taste tests, and to determine if disease activity or medication might influence the olfactory/gustatory functions of patients. In total, 59 IBD patients (37 Crohn's disease (CD) and 22 ulcerative colitis (UC) patients) were studied using "Sniffin' sticks" and "taste strips" for olfactory and gustatory tests, respectively, and compared to healthy controls and published normative data. Among IBD (CD and UC) patients, the values for odor threshold, but not for odor identification or discrimination, were significantly lower than that of the normative data. Further, these patients showed lower values than the normative taste values and the control group for all tastes, except sour; 57.6% of the IBD patients were hyposmic, while 30.5% were hypogeusic. Subjective self-assessments showed that the patients were not aware of their reduced olfactory/gustatory functions. There were no relevant differences in taste and smell abilities between the CD and UC patients. Disease activity and treatment did not influence the olfactory/gustatory functions. IBD (CD and UC) patients exhibited significant reductions in the olfactory and gustatory functions. Therefore, patients should be tested by smell/taste tests, in order to be adequately informed of their olfactory/gustatory functions and provided an understanding of how to overcome their limitations, and thus improve their quality of life.

  15. Iron deficiency anemia in inflammatory bowel disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaitha, Sindhu; Bashir, Muhammad; Ali, Tauseef

    2015-01-01

    Anemia is a common extraintestinal manifestation of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and is frequently overlooked as a complication. Patients with IBD are commonly found to have iron deficiency anemia (IDA) secondary to chronic blood loss, and impaired iron absorption due to tissue inflammation. Patients with iron deficiency may not always manifest with signs and symptoms; so, hemoglobin levels in patients with IBD must be regularly monitored for earlier detection of anemia. IDA in IBD is associated with poor quality of life, necessitating prompt diagnosis and appropriate treatment. IDA is often associated with inflammation in patients with IBD. Thus, commonly used laboratory parameters are inadequate to diagnose IDA, and newer iron indices, such as reticulocyte hemoglobin content or percentage of hypochromic red cells or zinc protoporphyrin, are required to differentiate IDA from anemia of chronic disease. Oral iron preparations are available and are used in patients with mild disease activity. These preparations are inexpensive and convenient, but can produce gastrointestinal side effects, such as abdominal pain and diarrhea, that limit their use and patient compliance. These preparations are partly absorbed due to inflammation. Non-absorbed iron can be toxic and worsen IBD disease activity. Although cost-effective intravenous iron formulations are widely available and have improved safety profiles, physicians are reluctant to use them. We present a review of the pathophysiologic mechanisms of IDA in IBD, improved diagnostic and therapeutic strategies, efficacy, and safety of iron replacement in IBD. PMID:26301120

  16. Inflammatory bowel disease: immunodiagnostics, immunotherapeutics, and ecotherapeutics.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Shanahan, F

    2012-02-03

    Treatment options for inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) reflect a continuing shift from empiricism to strategies based on improved understanding of the pathophysiology of disease. In susceptible individuals, IBD appears to be the result of defective regulation of mucosal immune interactions with the enteric microflora. This has prompted research directed at the interface of the traditional disciplines of immunology, microbiology, and epithelial cell biology. Whereas immunodiagnostics have been of limited clinical value in IBD, assessments of mucosal rather than systemic immune function are promising. Therapeutically, there is an increasing trend toward more aggressive and earlier use of immunomodulatory agents, particularly for prevention of relapse, with cytokine manipulation as a bridge therapy to achieve remission in patients with acute severe disease. Although most drug treatments are directed toward altering the host response, the rationale for manipulating the enteric flora appears sound and will be the basis of additional future therapeutic strategies. Notwithstanding the widening range of options for drug therapy in IBD, other outcome modifiers and well-established principles of managing chronic disease are as important as ever.

  17. Iron deficiency anemia in inflammatory bowel disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sindhu; Kaitha; Muhammad; Bashir; Tauseef; Ali

    2015-01-01

    Anemia is a common extraintestinal manifestation of inflammatory bowel disease(IBD) and is frequently overlooked as a complication. Patients with IBD are commonly found to have iron deficiency anemia(IDA) secondary to chronic blood loss, and impaired iron absorption due to tissue inflammation. Patients with iron deficiency may not always manifest with signs and symptoms; so, hemoglobin levels in patients with IBD must be regularly monitored for earlier detection of anemia. IDA in IBD is associated with poor quality of life, necessitating prompt diagnosis and appropriate treatment. IDA is often associated with inflammation in patients with IBD. Thus, commonly used labora-tory parameters are inadequate to diagnose IDA, and newer iron indices, such as reticulocyte hemoglobin content or percentage of hypochromic red cells or zinc protoporphyrin, are required to differentiate IDA from anemia of chronic disease. Oral iron preparations are available and are used in patients with mild disease activity. These preparations are inexpensive and con-venient, but can produce gastrointestinal side effects, such as abdominal pain and diarrhea, that limit their use and patient compliance. These preparations are partly absorbed due to inflammation. Non-absorbed iron can be toxic and worsen IBD disease activity. Although cost-effective intravenous iron formulations are widely available and have improved safety profiles, physicians are reluctant to use them. We present a review of the pathophysiologic mechanisms of IDA in IBD, improved diagnostic and therapeutic strategies, efficacy, and safety of iron replacement in IBD.

  18. ROENTGEN-OPTHALMOLOGICAL ASPECTS OF SOME EYE DISEASES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gordana Stanković-Babić

    2002-03-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the roentgen-ophtalmological image, the diagnostic procedures and the differential diagnostics of the eye diseases that can be recognized by the proper roentgen examination of the cranium, the orbit, the saddle pit, the craniostenosis, the M. Sturge-Weber-Krabbe, the congenital hydrocephalus, the eye melanoma malign, the chiasmal syndrome, the retrobulbar tumors, tie primary meningeom n. opticus, the face tumors.

  19. Etiology, prevalence, and treatment of dry eye disease

    OpenAIRE

    Gayton, Johnny L

    2009-01-01

    Johnny L GaytonEyesight Associates, Warner Robins, GA, USAPurpose: This review article examines the prevalence, etiology, and current therapies of dry eye disease, with special focus on postmenopausal women.Method: A systematic literature search utilizing MEDLINE was conducted to identify peer-reviewed articles related to dry eye published prior to September 2008. The terms “dry eye” and “women” were searched in combination with one or more of the follo...

  20. Intestinal barrier homeostasis in inflammatory bowel disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goll, Rasmus; van Beelen Granlund, Atle

    2015-01-01

    The single-cell thick intestinal epithelial cell (IEC) lining with its protective layer of mucus is the primary barrier protecting the organism from the harsh environment of the intestinal lumen. Today it is clear that the balancing act necessary to maintain intestinal homeostasis is dependent on the coordinated action of all cell types of the IEC, and that there are no passive bystanders to gut immunity solely acting as absorptive or regenerative cells: Mucin and antimicrobial peptides on the epithelial surface are continually being replenished by goblet and Paneth's cells. Luminal antigens are being sensed by pattern recognition receptors on the enterocytes. The enteroendocrine cells sense the environment and coordinate the intestinal function by releasing neuropeptides acting both on IEC and inflammatory cells. All this while cells are continuously and rapidly being regenerated from a limited number of stem cells close to the intestinal crypt base. This review seeks to describe the cell types and structures of the intestinal epithelial barrier supporting intestinal homeostasis, and how disturbance in these systems might relate to inflammatory bowel disease.

  1. Etiology, prevalence, and treatment of dry eye disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gayton, Johnny L

    2009-01-01

    This review article examines the prevalence, etiology, and current therapies of dry eye disease, with special focus on postmenopausal women. A systematic literature search utilizing MEDLINE was conducted to identify peer-reviewed articles related to dry eye published prior to September 2008. The terms "dry eye" and "women" were searched in combination with one or more of the following words or phrases: prevalence, postmenopausal, etiology, risk factors, therapy, medications, surgery, tear film, and quality of life. Articles were selected based on their direct applicability to the subject matter. A manual search was also conducted based on citations in the published literature. Epidemiologic studies identified prevalence rates ranging from 7% in the United States to 33% in Taiwan and Japan. Risk factors include advanced age, female sex, smoking, extreme heat or cold weather conditions, low relative humidity, use of video display terminals, refractive surgery, contact lens wear, and certain medications. The last decade has brought about a better understanding of the etiology of dry eye disease. New therapies that can alleviate the signs and symptoms of dry eye disease and, consequently, improve the quality of life of dry eye patients are available in the market.

  2. Flavonoids in Inflammatory Bowel Disease: A Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vezza, Teresa; Rodríguez-Nogales, Alba; Algieri, Francesca; Utrilla, Maria Pilar; Rodriguez-Cabezas, Maria Elena; Galvez, Julio

    2016-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is characterized by chronic inflammation of the intestine that compromises the patients’ life quality and requires sustained pharmacological and surgical treatments. Since their etiology is not completely understood, non-fully-efficient drugs have been developed and those that have shown effectiveness are not devoid of quite important adverse effects that impair their long-term use. In this regard, a growing body of evidence confirms the health benefits of flavonoids. Flavonoids are compounds with low molecular weight that are widely distributed throughout the vegetable kingdom, including in edible plants. They may be of great utility in conditions of acute or chronic intestinal inflammation through different mechanisms including protection against oxidative stress, and preservation of epithelial barrier function and immunomodulatory properties in the gut. In this review we have revised the main flavonoid classes that have been assessed in different experimental models of colitis as well as the proposed mechanisms that support their beneficial effects. PMID:27070642

  3. Flavonoids in Inflammatory Bowel Disease: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teresa Vezza

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD is characterized by chronic inflammation of the intestine that compromises the patients’ life quality and requires sustained pharmacological and surgical treatments. Since their etiology is not completely understood, non-fully-efficient drugs have been developed and those that have shown effectiveness are not devoid of quite important adverse effects that impair their long-term use. In this regard, a growing body of evidence confirms the health benefits of flavonoids. Flavonoids are compounds with low molecular weight that are widely distributed throughout the vegetable kingdom, including in edible plants. They may be of great utility in conditions of acute or chronic intestinal inflammation through different mechanisms including protection against oxidative stress, and preservation of epithelial barrier function and immunomodulatory properties in the gut. In this review we have revised the main flavonoid classes that have been assessed in different experimental models of colitis as well as the proposed mechanisms that support their beneficial effects.

  4. Vedolizumab in pediatric inflammatory bowel disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ledder, Oren; Assa, Amit; Levine, Arie

    2017-01-01

    Background: Vedolizumab, an anti-integrin antibody, has proven to be effective in adults with Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD), but the data in pediatrics are limited. We describe the short-term effectiveness and safety of vedolizumab in a European multi-center pediatric IBD cohort. Method...... surgery, 6 of whom had colectomy for UC. Concomitant immunomodulatory drugs did not affect remission rate (42% vs 35%; p=0.35 at week 22). There were 3 minor drug-related adverse events. Overall 5% achieved endoscopic mucosal healing with 9% achieving stool calprotectin ... was safe and effective in this cohort of pediatric refractory IBD. These data support previous findings of slow induction rate of vedolizumab in CD and a trend to be less effective compared to patients with UC....

  5. Chlamydia trachomatis in pelvic inflammatory disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrikhande, S N; Joshi, S G; Zodpey, S P; Saoji, A M

    1995-04-01

    The prevalence of genital Chlamydia trachomatis infection and some epidemiologic factors associated with it were studied in 273 pelvic inflammatory disease (PID) patients attending Gynaecologic clinic, Government Medical College, Nagpur. For detection of chlamydial antigen Pharmacia Diagnostics Chlamydia EIA test was used. This study revealed an overall positivity rate of 33% for C. trachomatis infection in PID patients. Of the hypothesised risk factors low socioeconomic status, history of sexual contacts with multiple partners and use of intrauterine devices (IUD) were significantly associated with C. trachomatis infections. However, use of oral contraceptives, barrier contraceptives and increasing age were found to be protective factors for C. trachomatis infection. Thus considering the significant contribution of C. trachomatis in etiology of PID and its independent association with some epidemiologic risk factors, extensive epidemiologic measures are recommended for prevention of these infections.

  6. Innate immunity in inflammatory bowel disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    The human intestinal tract is home to an enormous bacterial flora. The host defense against microorganisms can be divided into innate and adaptive immunity. The former is the most immediate line of response to immunologic challenges presented by bacteria, viruses, and fungi. The mucosal immune system has evolved to balance the need to respond to pathogens while co-existing with commensal bacteria and food antigens. In inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), this hyporesponsiveness or tolerance breaks-down and inflammation supervenes driven by the intestinal microbial flora. Bacteria contain compounds and are recognized by a variety of receptors, including Toll-like receptors (TLRs) and NODs (a family of intracellular bacterial sensors) and are potent stimuli of innate immune responses. Several mutations in these receptors have been associated with development of IBD.

  7. Harnessing dendritic cells in inflammatory skin diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Chung-Ching; Di Meglio, Paola; Nestle, Frank O

    2011-02-01

    The skin immune system harbors a complex network of dendritic cells (DCs). Recent studies highlight a diverse functional specialization of skin DC subsets. In addition to generating cellular and humoral immunity against pathogens, skin DCs are involved in tolerogenic mechanisms to ensure the maintenance of immune homeostasis, as well as in pathogenesis of chronic inflammation in the skin when excessive immune responses are initiated and unrestrained. Harnessing DCs by directly targeting DC-derived molecules or selectively modulate DC subsets is a convincing strategy to tackle inflammatory skin diseases. In this review we discuss recent advances underlining the functional specialization of skin DCs and discuss the potential implication for future DC-based therapeutic strategies.

  8. [Systemic inflammatory rheumatic diseases competence network].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rufenach, C; Burmester, G-R; Zeidler, H; Radbruch, A

    2004-04-01

    The foundation of the competence network for rheumatology, which is funded by the "Bundesministerium für Bildung und Forschung" (BMBF) since 1999, succeeded to create a unique research structure in Germany: medical doctors and scientists from six university rheumatology centres (Berlin, Düsseldorf, Erlangen, Freiburg, Hannover und Lübeck/Bad Bramstedt) work closely together with scientists doing basic research at the Deutsches Rheuma-Forschungszentrum (DRFZ), with rheumatological hospitals, reha-clinics, and rheumatologists. Jointly they are searching for causes of systemic inflammatory rheumatic diseases and try to improve therapies-nationwide and with an interdisciplinary approach. The primary objective of this collaboration is to transfer new scientific insights more rapidly in order to improve methods for diagnosis and patients treatment.

  9. Neurological disorders and inflammatory bowel diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casella, Giovanni; Tontini, Gian Eugenio; Bassotti, Gabrio; Pastorelli, Luca; Villanacci, Vincenzo; Spina, Luisa; Baldini, Vittorio; Vecchi, Maurizio

    2014-07-21

    Extraintestinal manifestations occur in about one-third of patients living with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and may precede the onset of gastrointestinal symptoms by many years. Neurologic disorders associated with IBD are not frequent, being reported in 3% of patients, but they often represent an important cause of morbidity and a relevant diagnostic issue. In addition, the increasing use of immunosuppressant and biological therapies for IBD may also play a pivotal role in the development of neurological disorders of different type and pathogenesis. Hence, we provide a complete and profound review of the main features of neurological complications associated with IBD, with particular reference to those related to drugs and with a specific focus on their clinical presentation and possible pathophysiological mechanisms.

  10. [Enteric microflora in inflammatory bowel disease patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahmouni, Oumaira; Dubuquoy, Laurent; Desreumaux, Pierre; Neut, Christel

    2016-11-01

    During the last years, the importance of a well equilibrated intestinal microbiota (eubiosis) has become more and more obvious in human health. Dysbiosis is now a well-recognized feature associated with IBD (inflammatory bowel disease). Rupture of the normal microbiota can occur through different mechanisms: (1) by a typical Western diet rich in fat and low in fiber, (2) by an acute disruption of the microbiota (by an acute gastroenteritis or by intake of antibiotics) or (3) by a combination of event in early childhood avoiding the establishment of eubiosis (the hygiene hypothesis). Risk factors for IBD are stated for each disruption mechanism. Dysbiosis can also induce colonization by several pathobionts able to aggravate inflammation. Among the potential candidates in IBD, most attention has been paid on AIEC during the last years.

  11. Nutritional impact of inflammatory bowel diseases on children and adolescents☆

    OpenAIRE

    dos Santos, Gilton Marques; Santos,Gilton Marques dos; Silva, Luciana Rodrigues; Santana, Genoile Oliveira

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To perform a sistematiy review of the literature about the nutritional impact of inflammatory bowel diseases in children and adolescents. DATA SOURCES: A systematic review was performed using PubMed/MEDLINE, LILACS and SciELO databases, with inclusion of articles in Portuguese and in English with original data, that analyzed nutritional aspects of inflammatory bowel diseases in children and adolescents. The initial search used the terms "inflammatory bowel diseases" and "children" ...

  12. Nutritional impact of inflammatory bowel diseases on children and adolescents

    OpenAIRE

    Gilton Marques dos Santos; Luciana Rodrigues Silva; Genoile Oliveira Santana

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To perform a sistematiy review of the literature about the nutritional impact of inflammatory bowel diseases in children and adolescents.DATA SOURCES: A systematic review was performed using PubMed/MEDLINE, LILACS and SciELO databases, with inclusion of articles in Portuguese and in English with original data, that analyzed nutritional aspects of inflammatory bowel diseases in children and adolescents. The initial search used the terms "inflammatory bowel diseases" and "children" o...

  13. Management of Cardiovascular Risk in Patients with Chronic Inflammatory Diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindhardsen, Jesper; Kristensen, Søren Lund; Ahlehoff, Ole

    2016-01-01

    An increased risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD) has been observed in a range of chronic inflammatory diseases (CID), including rheumatoid arthritis (RA), psoriasis, inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD), and systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). The increased risk of CVDs and reduced life expectancy...

  14. Transcriptomic landscape of lncRNAs in inflammatory bowel disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mirza, Aashiq Hussain; Bang-Berthelsen, Claus Heiner; Seemann, Ernst Stefan;

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is a complex multi-factorial inflammatory disease with Crohn's disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC) being the two most common forms. A number of transcriptional profiling studies have provided compelling evidence that describe the role of protein...

  15. Inflammatory Bowel Disease: Progress Towards a Gene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David A van Heel

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available The pathogenesis of ulcerative colitis (UC and Crohn’s disease (CD is still unknown, but the importance of genetic susceptibility has been clearly shown by epidemiological data from family and twin studies. Linkage studies have identified two susceptibility loci for inflammatory bowel disease (IBD on chromosomes 12 and 16. Importantly, these linkages have been replicated by independent investigators, and studies of positional candidates within these regions continue, together with fine mapping strategies. Regions of ’suggestive’ linkage on chromosomes 1, 3, 4, 6, 7, 10, 22 and X have also been reported in individual studies. Other important candidate genes investigated include the interleukin-1 receptor antagonist, MUC3 and genes of the human leukocyte antigen (HLA system. The apparently conflicting data in different studies from around the world may be explained by ethnic differences, case mix and genetic heterogeneity. Replicated class II HLA associations include HLA DRB1*0103 and DR2 (DRB1*1502, involved in UC susceptibility, and HLA DRB1*03 and DR4 as resistance alleles for CD and UC respectively. Animal studies have provided insights from targeted mutations and quantitative trait locus analysis. The goals of continuing research include narrowing the regions of linkages and analysis of candidate genes, and possibly the application of newly developed methods using single nucleotide polymorphisms. Advances in IBD genetics hold the potential to provide knowledge about the disease pathogenesis at the molecular level, with ensuing benefits for clinical practice.

  16. Denovo Post Renal Transplantation Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Halim M

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Post-renal transplant de-novo inflammatory bowel disease (IBD may develop despite the presence of mycophenolate mofetil (MMF, a drug used for treatment of IBD, in the immunosuppressive regimen. A 39-year-old man received live unrelated renal transplant, and was started postoperatively on prednisolone, MMF, and tacrolimus, which was changed to sirolimus when he developed diabetes mellitus two months post-transplant. Nine months post-transplant, the patient developed recurrent attacks of bloody diarrhea and ischio-rectal abscesses complicated by anal fistulae not responding to routine surgical treatment. Colonoscopy diagnosed IBD, a Crohn′s disease-like pattern. The patient was treated with steroids and 5-aminosalicylic acid (5-ASA in addition to a two months course of ciprofloxacin and metronidazole. He became asymptomatic and rectal lesions healed within one month of treatment. The patient continued to be asymptomatic, and he maintained normal graft function on the same immunosuppressive treatment in addition to 5-ASA. We conclude that de-novo IBD disease can develop in renal transplant recipients in spite of immunosuppressive therapy including MMF.

  17. Novel genetic markers in inflammatory bowel disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Genetic factors play a significant role in determining inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) susceptibility. Epidemiologic data support genetic contribution to the pathogenesis of IBD, which include familial aggregation, twin studies, racial and ethnic differences in disease prevalence. Linkage studies have identified several susceptibility genes contained in different genomic regions named IBD1 to IBD9. Nucleotide oligomerization domain (NOD2) and human leukocyte antigen (HLA) genes are the most extensively studied genetic regions (IBD1 and IBD3 respectively) in IBD. Mutations of the NOD2 gene are associated with Crohn's disease (CD) and several HLA genes are associated with ulcerative colitis (UC) and CD. Toll like receptors (TLRs) have an important role in the innate immune response against infections by mediating recognition of pathogen-associated microbial patterns. Studying single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in molecules involved in bacterial recognition seems to be essential to define genetic backgrounds at risk of IBD. Recently, numerous new genes have been identified to be involved in the genetic susceptibility to IBD: NOD1/Caspase-activation recruitment domains 4 (CARD4), Chemokine ligand 20 (CCL20), IL-11, and IL-18 among others. The characterization of these novel genes potentially will lead to the identification of therapeutic agents and clinical assessment of phenotype and prognosis in patients with IBD.

  18. Inflammatory cytokines and risk of coronary heart disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaptoge, Stephen; Seshasai, Sreenivasa Rao Kondapally; Gao, Pei

    2014-01-01

    Because low-grade inflammation may play a role in the pathogenesis of coronary heart disease (CHD), and pro-inflammatory cytokines govern inflammatory cascades, this study aimed to assess the associations of several pro-inflammatory cytokines and CHD risk in a new prospective study, including meta...

  19. [Medical therapy of inflammatory bowel diseases: Crohn's disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakatos, László; Lakatos, Péter László

    2007-06-17

    The therapy of inflammatory bowel diseases is based on 5-aminosalicylates (5-ASAs) that are the forefront of treatment of mild-to-moderate active disease and maintenance; steroids are used for the treatment of moderate-to-severe active disease; immunosuppressives and sometimes antibiotics in moderate-to-severe disease; maintenance and for the treatment of selected complications. The last few years have witnessed a significant change in the treatment of Crohn's disease. Based on evidence from new clinical studies and recent meta-analyses, the role of and indications for conventional therapy have been reassessed. The 5-ASAs are nowadays less frequently used in both active disease and maintenance therapy. Instead, budesonide has been introduced in the treatment of mild-to-moderate ileal disease. Besides the modest use of 5-ASAs, steroids are prescribed for active colonic disease. Immunosuppressives, especially azathioprine, are more commonly used in moderate-to-severe disease as well as in maintenance. The preferred maintenance regimen following medically- and surgically-induced remission, in addition to relationship between medical and surgical therapies, has also changed. The recent introduction of new "biological" therapy represents a major, promising change in the therapy of resistant and penetrating disease.

  20. Biologic therapies for chronic inflammatory bowel disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. P. Martínez-Montiel

    Full Text Available Crohn's disease (CD and ulcerative colitis (UC make up the so-called chronic inflammatory bowel disease (IBD. Advances in the understanding of IBD pathophysiologic mechanisms in the last few years have allowed the development of novel therapies such as biologic therapies, which at least theoretically represent a more specific management of this disease with fewer side effects. Currently, the only effective and widely accepted biologic therapy for the treatment of intraluminal, fistulizing CD, both for remission induction and maintenance, is infliximab. The role of other monoclonal antibodies such as adalimumab is not clearly established. It could be deemed an alternative for patients with allergic reactions to infliximab, and for those with lost response because of anti-infliximab antibody development. However, relevant issues such as dosage and administration regimen remain to be established. Anti-integrin α4 therapies, despite encouraging results in phase-3 studies, are still unavailable, as their marketing authorization was held back in view of a number of reports regarding progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy cases. Immunostimulating therapy may be highly relevant in the near future, as it represents a novel strategy against disease with the inclusion of granulocyte-monocyte colony-stimulating factors. Regarding ulcerative colitis, results from the ACT-1 and ACT-2 studies showed that infliximab is also useful for the management of serious UC flare-ups not responding to standard treatment, which will lead to a revision of therapeutic algorithms, where this drug should be given preference before intravenous cyclosporine. In the next few years, the role of anti-CD3 drugs (vilisilizumab, T-cell inhibiting therapies, and epithelial repair and healing stimulating factors will be established.

  1. Genetics of Crohn disease, an archetypal inflammatory barrier disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schreiber, Stefan; Rosenstiel, Philip; Albrecht, Mario; Hampe, Jochen; Krawczak, Michael

    2005-05-01

    Chronic inflammatory disorders such as Crohn disease, atopic eczema, asthma and psoriasis are triggered by hitherto unknown environmental factors that function on the background of some polygenic susceptibility. Recent technological advances have allowed us to unravel the genetic aetiology of these and other complex diseases. Using Crohn disease as an example, we show how the discovery of susceptibility genes furthers our understanding of the underlying disease mechanisms and how it will, ultimately, give rise to new therapeutic developments. The long-term goal of such endeavours is to develop targeted prophylactic strategies. These will probably target the molecular interaction on the mucosal surface between the products of the genome and the microbial metagenome of a patient.

  2. T Cell Repertoire and Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenneth Croitoru

    1996-01-01

    Full Text Available The diversity of the T cell receptor repertoire is generated through rearrangement of the variable, junctional and constant region genes. Selection processes in the thymus and periphery serve to eliminate self-reacting T cells, thereby preventing autoimmune disease. The possibility that inflammatory bowel disease (IBD is an autoimmune disease has led to the search for an auto-antigen. In addition, studies are exploring the T cell receptor repertoire in IBD patients for changes that may provide clues regarding etiopathogenesis. Using monoclonal antibodies to T cell receptor variable-gene products or polymerase chain reaction analysis of variable-gene mRNA expression, the mucosal T cell repertoire has been examined in humans. The intestinal intraepithelial lymphocytes show a significant degree of oligoclonal expansion that may represent local antigen exposure or unique selection processes. This is in keeping with studies that show that murine intestinal intraepithelial lymphocytes undergo positive and possibly negative selection independent of the thymus. In the inflamed human gut, shifts in the T cell receptor repertoire may also reflect recruitment of peripheral T cells to the gut. In one study, a subset of Crohn’s disease patients was shown to have an increase in the proportion of variable β8 peripheral blood lymphocyte and mesenteric lymph node cells, suggesting a superantigen effect. The authors hypothesized that changes in the functional T cell receptor repertoire can also occur which might be independent of changes in the distribution of T cells expressing variable β T cell receptors. In fact, the authors have shown there is a selective decrease in the cytotoxic function of peripheral variable β8 T cells in Crohn’s disease. Furthermore, stimulation with the variable β8 selective bacterial enterotoxin staphylococcal enterotoxin E failed to increase the cytotoxic function in this subset of Crohn’s disease patients compared with

  3. Home hyperalimentation for inflammatory bowel disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodzin, J H

    1992-04-01

    Total parenteral nutrition (TPN) has become a useful tool in the management of patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). In the past, it was felt that TPN would have a therapeutic role in IBD, but experience has shown that it functions more as an adjunct to other therapeutic interventions. The specific roles of TPN in IBD include: (1) nutritional maintenance in the short bowel syndrome, (2) TPN as adjunctive therapy in jejunoileitis of Crohn's disease, (3) home TPN (HTPN) in Crohn's colitis, and (4) preoperative repletion of significantly depleted patients going to surgery. The adaptation of hospital techniques to the home situation has allowed patients to carry out long-term TPN therapy at home. Patients with IBD on HTPN are subject to the same mechanical and metabolic problems as are other patients on HTPN and, in addition, have a higher infection rate. When carried out appropriately, however, HTPN is a valuable technique in the management of patients with IBD and may provide an improved quality of life.

  4. Infertility in men with inflammatory bowel disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Takeshi; Okada, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) predominantly affects young adults. Fertility-related issues are therefore important in the management of patients with IBD. However, relatively modest attention has been paid to reproductive issues faced by men with IBD. To investigate the effects of IBD and its treatment on male fertility, we reviewed the current literature using a systematic search for published studies. A PubMed search were performed using the main search terms “IBD AND male infertility”, “Crohn’s disease AND male infertility”, “ulcerative colitis AND male infertility”. References in review articles were used if relevant. We noted that active inflammation, poor nutrition, alcohol use, smoking, medications, and surgery may cause infertility in men with IBD. In surgery such as proctocolectomy with ileal pouch-anal anastomosis, rectal incision seems to be associated with sexual dysfunction. Of the medications used for IBD, sulfasalazine reversibly reduces male fertility. No other medications appear to affect male fertility significantly, although small studies suggested some adverse effects. There are limited data on the effects of drugs for IBD on male fertility and pregnancy outcomes; however, patients should be informed of the possible effects of paternal drug exposure. This review provides information on fertility-related issues in men with IBD and discusses treatment options. PMID:27602237

  5. Faecal calprotectin: Management in inflammatory bowel disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    José; Manuel; Benítez; Valle; García-Sánchez

    2015-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease(IBD) is a chronic and relapsing disorder which leads to an inflammation of the gastrointestinal tract. A tailored therapy to achieve mucosal healing with the less adverse events has become a key issue in the management of IBD. In the past, the clinical remission was the most important factor to consider for adapting diagnostic procedures and therapeutic strategies. However, there is no a good correlation between symptoms and intestinal lesions, so currently the goals of treatment are to achieve not only the control of symptoms, but deep remission, which is related with a favourable prognosis. Thus, the determination of biological markers or biomarkers of intestinal inflammation play a crucial role. Many biomarkers have been extensively evaluated in IBD showing significant correlation with endoscopic lesions, risk of recurrence and response to treatment. One of the most important markers is faecal calprotectin(FC). Despite calprotectin limitations, this biomarker represents a reliable and noninvasive alternative to reduce the need for endoscopic procedures. FC has demonstrated its performance for regular monitoring of IBD patients, not only to the diagnosis for discriminating IBD from non-IBD diagnosis, but for assessing disease activity, relapse prediction and response to therapy. Although, FC provides better results than other biomarkers such as C-reactive protein and erythrocyte sedimentation rate, these surrogate markers of intestinal inflammation should not be used isolation but in combination with other clinical, endoscopic, radiological or/and histological parameters enabling a comprehensive assessment of IBD patients.

  6. Rheumatic manifestations of inflammatory bowel disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tatiana Sofía Rodríguez-Reyna; Cynthia Martínez-Reyes; Jesús Kazúo Yamamoto-Furusho

    2009-01-01

    This article reviews the literature concerning rheumatic manifestations of inflammatory bowel disease(IBD), including common immune-mediated pathways,frequency, clinical course and therapy. Musculoskeletal complications are frequent and well-recognized manifestations in IBD, and affect up to 33% of patients with IBD. The strong link between the bowel and the osteo-articular system is suggested by many clinical and experimental observations, notably in HLA-B27 transgenic rats. The autoimmune pathogenic mechanisms shared by IBD and spondyloarthropathies include genetic susceptibility to abnormal antigen presentation,aberrant recognition of self, the presence of autoantibodies against specific antigens shared by the colon and other extra-colonic tissues, and increased intestinal permeability. The response against microorganisms may have an important role through molecular mimicry and other mechanisms. Rheumatic manifestations of IBD have been divided into peripheral arthritis, and axial involvement, including sacroiliitis,with or without spondylitis, similar to idiopathic ankylosing spondylitis. Other periarticular features can occur,including enthesopathy, tendonitis, clubbing, periostitis,and granulomatous lesions of joints and bones.Osteoporosis and osteomalacia secondary to IBD and iatrogenic complications can also occur. The management of the rheumatic manifestations of IBD consists of physical therapy in combination with local injection of corticosteroids and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs; caution is in order however, because of their possible harmful effects on intestinal integrity, permeability,and even on gut inflammation. Sulfasalazine,methotrexate, azathioprine, cyclosporine and leflunomide should be used for selected indications. In some cases, tumor necrosis factor-α blocking agents should be considered as first-line therapy.

  7. Inflammatory bowel disease in Turkish children

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Murat Cakir; Fatih Unal; Gonul Dinler; Masallah Baran; Hasan Ali Yuksekkaya; Gokhan Tumgor; Erhun Kasirga; Ayhan Gazi Kalayci; Sema Aydogdu

    2015-01-01

    Background: This study was undertaken to evaluate demographics, clinical manifestations, laboratoryfi ndings and outcomes of children with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) in Turkey. Methods: We analyzed the medical records of 127 children diagnosed with IBD (under 18 years old) between January 2004 and January 2012 in 8 pediatric gastroenterology centers. Results: Of the 127 patients, 90 (70.9%) suffered from ulcerative colitis (UC), 29 (22.8%) from Crohn's disease (CD), and 8 (6.3%) from IBD unclassified. The mean age of the 127 patients was 11.6±4.1 years, and 11.8% of the patients were below 5 years old. Of the patients, 49.6% were male, and males were more predominant in patients with CD than in those with UC (72.4%vs. 42.2%,P=0.008; a male/female ratio of 2.62 in CD, P=0.0016). Approximately one fifth of the patients had extra-intestinal manifestations and 13.3% of the patients had associated diseases. Extraintestinal manifestations and associated diseases were more common in early onset disease [P=0.017, odds ratio (OR)=4.02;P=0.03, OR=4.1]. Of the patients, 15% had normal laboratory parameters including anemia, high platelet count, hypoalbuminemia, hypoferritinemia, and high sedimentation rate. Area under receiver operation characteristics was used to predict pancolitis in patients with UC. The values of C-reactive protein, sedimentation rate and pediatric ulcerative colitis activity were 0.61 (P=0.06), 0.66 (P=0.01) and 0.76 (P=0.0001), respectively. Four (4.4%) patients with UC underwent colectomy, andfi nally two (1.5%, 95% confidence interval: 0-3.7%) patients died from primary disease or complications. Conclusions: IBD is an increasing clinical entity in Turkey. Features of IBD are similar to those in other populations, but prospective multicenter studies are needed to analyze the true incidence of IBD in Turkish children.

  8. New serological biomarkers of inflammatory bowel disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xuhang Li; Laurie Conldin; Philip Alex

    2008-01-01

    Serological biomarkers in inflammatory bowel disease(IBD)are a rapidty expanding list of non-invasive tests for objective assessments of disease activity,early diagnosis,prognosis evaluation and surveillance.This review summarizes both old and new biomarkers in IBD,but focuses on the development and characterization of new serological iomarkers(identified since 2007).These include five new anti-glycan antibodies,anti-chitobioside IgA(ACCA),anti-laminaribioside IgG(ALCA),anti-manobioside IgG(AMCA),and antibodies against chemically synthesized(∑)two major oligomannose epitopes,Man α-1,3 Man α-1,2 Man(∑Man3)and Man α-1,3 Man α-1,2 Man α-1,2 Man(∑Man4).These new biomarkers erve as valuable complementary tools to existing biomarkers not only in differentiating Crohn's disease(CD),ulcerative colitis(UC),normal and other non-IBD gut diseases,but also in predicting disease involvement(ileum vs colon),IBD risk(as subclinical biomarkers),and disease course(risk of complication and surgery).Interestingly,the prevalence of he antiglycan antibodies,including anti-Saccharomyces cerevisiae antibodies(ASCA),ALCA and AMCA,was found to be associated with single nucleotide polymorphisms(SNPs)of IBD susceptible genes such as NOD2/CARDl5,NOD1/CARD4,toll-like receptors(TLR)2 and 4,and β-defensin-1.Further more,a gene dosage effect was observed:anti-glycan positivity became more requent as the number of NOD2/CARDl5 SNPS increased.Other new serum/plasma IBD biomarkers reviewed include ubiquitination factor E4A(UBE4A),CXCL16(a chemokine),resistin,and apolipoprotein A-Ⅳ.This review also discusses the most recent studies in IBD biomarker discovery by the application of new technologies such as proteomics,fourier transform near-infrared spectroscopy,and multiplex enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay(ELISA)'s(with an emphasis on cytokine/chemokine profiling).Finally,the prospects of developing more clinically useful novel diagnostic algorithms by incorporating new technologies in

  9. New serological biomarkers of inflammatory bowel disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xuhang; Conklin, Laurie; Alex, Philip

    2008-09-01

    Serological biomarkers in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) are a rapidly expanding list of non-invasive tests for objective assessments of disease activity, early diagnosis, prognosis evaluation and surveillance. This review summarizes both old and new biomarkers in IBD, but focuses on the development and characterization of new serological biomarkers (identified since 2007). These include five new anti-glycan antibodies, anti-chitobioside IgA (ACCA), anti-laminaribioside IgG (ALCA), anti-manobioside IgG (AMCA), and antibodies against chemically synthesized (Sigma) two major oligomannose epitopes, Man alpha-1,3 Man alpha-1,2 Man (SigmaMan3) and Man alpha-1,3 Man alpha-1,2 Man alpha-1,2 Man (SigmaMan4). These new biomarkers serve as valuable complementary tools to existing biomarkers not only in differentiating Crohn's disease (CD), ulcerative colitis (UC), normal and other non-IBD gut diseases, but also in predicting disease involvement (ileum vs colon), IBD risk (as subclinical biomarkers), and disease course (risk of complication and surgery). Interestingly, the prevalence of the antiglycan antibodies, including anti-Saccharomyces cerevisiae antibodies (ASCA), ALCA and AMCA, was found to be associated with single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of IBD susceptible genes such as NOD2/CARD15, NOD1/CARD4, toll-like receptors (TLR) 2 and 4, and beta-defensin-1. Furthermore, a gene dosage effect was observed: anti-glycan positivity became more frequent as the number of NOD2/CARD15 SNPS increased. Other new serum/plasma IBD biomarkers reviewed include ubiquitination factor E4A (UBE4A), CXCL16 (a chemokine), resistin, and apolipoprotein A-IV. This review also discusses the most recent studies in IBD biomarker discovery by the application of new technologies such as proteomics, fourier transform near-infrared spectroscopy, and multiplex enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA)'s (with an emphasis on cytokine/chemokine profiling). Finally, the prospects of developing more

  10. Diagnosis of dry eye disease and emerging technologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zeev MSB

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Maya Salomon-Ben Zeev,1 Darby Douglas Miller,2,3 Robert Latkany1,21The Dry Eye Center at Physician Eyecare of New York, 2New York Eye and Ear Infirmary, 3Laser and Corneal Surgery Associates, New York, NY, USAAbstract: Dry eye is one of the most commonly encountered problems in ophthalmology. Signs can include punctate epithelial erosions, hyperemia, low tear lakes, rapid tear break-up time, and meibomian gland disease. Current methods of diagnosis include a slit-lamp examination with and without different stains, including fluorescein, rose bengal, and lissamine green. Other methods are the Schirmer test, tear function index, tear break-up time, and functional visual acuity. Emerging technologies include meniscometry, optical coherence tomography, tear film stability analysis, interferometry, tear osmolarity, the tear film normalization test, ocular surface thermography, and tear biomarkers. Patient-specific considerations involve relevant history of autoimmune disease, refractive surgery or use of oral medications, and allergies or rosacea. Other patient considerations include clinical examination for lid margin disease and presence of lagophthalmos or blink abnormalities. Given a complex presentation and a variety of signs and symptoms, it would be beneficial if there was an inexpensive, readily available, and reproducible diagnostic test for dry eye.Keywords: cornea, dry eye, tear film, stain

  11. Rheumatoid Arthritis: Can It Affect the Eyes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... arthritis: Can it affect the eyes? Can rheumatoid arthritis affect the eyes? Answers from April Chang-Miller, M.D. Rheumatoid arthritis is a chronic inflammatory disease that primarily affects ...

  12. Extraintestinal manifestations of inflammatory bowel disease: Do they influence treatment and outcome?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fernando Tavarela Veloso

    2011-01-01

    Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis are chronic inflammatory bowel diseases that often involve organs other than those of the gastrointestinal tract. Immune-related extraintestinal manifestations (EIMs) are usually related to disease activity, but sometimes may take an independent course. Globally, about one third of patients develop these systemic manifestations. Phenotypic classification shows that certain subsets of patients are more susceptible to developing EIMs, which frequently occur simultaneously in the same patient overlapping joints, skin, mouth, and eyes. The clinical spectrum of these manifestations varies from mild transitory to very severe lesions, sometimes more incapacitating than the intestinal disease itself. The great majority of these EIMs accompany the activity of intestinal disease and patients run a higher risk of a severe clinical course. For most of the inflammatory EIMs, the primary therapeutic target remains the bowel. Early aggressive therapy can minimize severe complications and maintenance treatment has the potential to prevent some devastating consequences.

  13. Prediction of disease course in inflammatory bowel diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakatos, Peter Laszlo

    2010-06-07

    Clinical presentation at diagnosis and disease course of both Crohn's disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis are heterogeneous and variable over time. Since most patients have a relapsing course and most CD patients develop complications (e.g. stricture and/or perforation), much emphasis has been placed in the recent years on the determination of important predictive factors. The identification of these factors may eventually lead to a more personalized, tailored therapy. In this TOPIC HIGHLIGHT series, we provide an update on the available literature regarding important clinical, endoscopic, fecal, serological/routine laboratory and genetic factors. Our aim is to assist clinicians in the everyday practical decision-making when choosing the treatment strategy for their patients suffering from inflammatory bowel diseases.

  14. Extraintestinal manifestations of inflammatory bowel disease: epidemiology, diagnosis, and management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Signe; Bendtzen, Klaus; Nielsen, Ole Haagen

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Extraintestinal manifestations occur rather frequently in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), e.g. ulcerative colitis (UC) and Crohn's disease (CD). The present paper provides an overview of the epidemiology, clinical characteristics, diagnostic process, and management of rheumatic, metabo...

  15. Pediatric Inflammatory Bowel Disease: from diagnosis to transition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C.I. de Bie (Charlotte)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractThe inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) are chronic relapsing inflammatory disorders of the gastrointestinal tract, comprising Crohn’s disease (CD), ulcerative colitis (UC), and IBD-unclassified (IBD-U). CD is characterized by a transmural and often granulomatous inflammation that can invo

  16. Understanding Microbial Sensing in Inflammatory Bowel Disease Using Click Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-01

    endotoxin, capsular polysaccharide, inflammatory bowel disease,microbiome microbiota , carbohydrate chemistry, fluorescent microscopy, 2-photon...lipopolysaccharide, endotoxin, capsular polysaccharide, inflammatory bowel disease, microbiome, microbiota , carbohydrate chemistry, fluorescent microscopy...labeling of a wide range of anaerobic and facultative commensal bacteria, including Bacteroides fragilis, Bacteroides vulgatus, Parabacteroides

  17. Early cervical cancer coexistent with idiopathic inflammatory bowel disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoffman, M.; Kalter, C.; Roberts, W.S.; Cavanagh, D.

    1989-07-01

    Early invasive carcinoma of the cervix may be treated by surgery or radiation therapy. Two patients with early cervical cancer are presented whose concomitant inflammatory bowel disease figured significantly in the selection of surgery as treatment. The use of radiotherapy in the face of inflammatory bowel disease, however, is not clearly addressed in the literature.

  18. Pediatric Inflammatory Bowel Disease: from a translational perspective

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    G.M. Damen (Gerard)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractCrohn’s disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC), the two main subtypes of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), are chronic relapsing inflammatory disorders of the gastrointestinal tract that have a peak age of onset in the second decade of life in children. There is strong evidence to supp

  19. Familial occurrence of inflammatory bowel disease in celiac disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cottone, Mario; Marrone, Ciro; Casà, Angelo; Oliva, Lorenzo; Orlando, Ambrogio; Calabrese, Emma; Martorana, Giuseppe; Pagliaro, Luigi

    2003-09-01

    The authors have previously reported a possible increased risk of the familial occurrence of Crohn's disease in patients with celiac disease. The aim of the current study was to evaluate in a case-control study the familial occurrence of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) in first-degree relatives of patients with celiac disease. One hundred eleven consecutive patients with biopsy-proven celiac disease were interviewed to ascertain whether IBD was present in first-degree relatives. The number of relatives, their ages, and possible IBD status were collected in a questionnaire. When a diagnosis of familial IBD was reported, the diagnosis was checked in the hospital records. Two hundred twenty-two controls matched for age and sex (111 from the general population and 111 from orthopedic wards) were also interviewed regarding the possible occurrence of IBD in first-degree relatives. The chi2 test was used to evaluate the difference in proportion of familial occurrence of IBD among individuals with celiac disease and controls. Among 600 first-degree relatives of patients with celiac disease, 10 cases of IBD were identified among first-degree relatives (7 cases of ulcerative colitis and 3 cases of Crohn's disease), whereas only 1 case of IBD was identified among the 1,196 first-degree relatives of control patients (p case-control study shows that there is a significantly increased prevalence of familial ulcerative colitis in patients with celiac disease. There was no significant increase in the prevalence of Crohn's disease in patients with celiac disease. The possible role of this association is discussed.

  20. Maternal inflammatory bowel disease and offspring body size

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ajslev, Teresa Adeltoft; Sorensen, Thorkild I A; Jess, Tine

    2012-01-01

    Maternal inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) may influence intrauterine growth and hence size at birth, but the consequences for offspring in later life remain uncertain. This study investigated the growth of children of mothers with Crohn's disease (CD) or ulcerative colitis (UC).......Maternal inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) may influence intrauterine growth and hence size at birth, but the consequences for offspring in later life remain uncertain. This study investigated the growth of children of mothers with Crohn's disease (CD) or ulcerative colitis (UC)....

  1. Exploitation of the nicotinic anti-inflammatory pathway for the treatment of epithelial inflammatory diseases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    David A Scott; Michael Martin

    2006-01-01

    Discoveries in the first few years of the 21st century have led to an understanding of important interactions between the nervous system and the inflammatory response at the molecular level, most notably the acetylcholine (ACh)-triggered, α7-nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (α7nAChR)-dependent nicotinic anti-inflammatory pathway. Studies using the α7nAChR agonist, nicotine, for the treatment of mucosal inflammation have been undertaken but the efficacy of nicotine as a treatment for inflammatory bowel diseases remains debatable. Further understanding of the nicotinic anti-inflammatory pathway and other endogenous anti-inflammatory mechanisms is required in order to develop refined and specific therapeutic strategies for the treatment of a number of inflammatory diseases and conditions, including periodontitis, psoriasis,sarcoidosis, and ulcerative colitis.

  2. Pelvic inflammatory disease and oral contraceptive use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feldblum, P J; Burton, N; Rosenberg, M J

    1986-10-01

    Oral contraceptive use has been shown to protect against gonococcal pelvic inflammatory disease (PID), but the effect on chlamydial PID is uncertain. Chlamydia infection is rising in incidence and has become the major cause of PID in many areas. PID may cause infertility, impairing the future reproduction of women. Previous studies on oral contraceptives and PID relied on hospitalized women, which may have biased the sample to include mainly gonococcal PID. Several studies show increased risk of endocervical chlamydia infection in users of oral contraceptives. The postulated mechanism is cervical ectopy, exposing more squamous epithelium to the organisms. Nevertheless, there is evidence indicating that despite the increased incidence of endocervical infection, oral contraceptives may inhibit the organisms from ascending, thus still offering a protective affect against both gonococcal and chlamydial PID. Future research must focus on the prevalence of chlamydia infection in Africa, and the natural history of the illness. The effect of different types of oral contraceptives on chlamydia infection must be evaluated.

  3. Metabolic syndrome in inflammatory rheumatic diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. La Montagna

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Toward the end of the last century a better knowledge of cardiovascular (CV risk factors and their associations led investigators to propose the existence of a unique pathophysiological condition called “metabolic” or “insulin resistance syndrome”. Among all, insulin-resistance and compensatory hyperinsulinemia are considered its most important treatment targets. Different definitions have been provided by World Health Organization (WHO and by The Third Report of The National Cholesterol Education Program’s Adult Treatment Panel (NCEP-ATP III. In particular, abdominal obesity, hypertension, low HDL cholesterol and hyperglicemia are the most common items used for its definition. The presence of MetS is effective in predicting the future risk of diabetes and coronaropathies. The evidence of a higher CV risk rate among different rheumatic inflammatory diseases has recently been associated with high prevalence of MetS in some cases. Rheumatoid or psoriatic arthritis have the large series among arthritis, whereas systemic lupus erythematosus among connective tissue disorders. This review analyses all most important studies about the evidence of MetS in rheumatic patients and the main clinical and prognostic significance of this relation.

  4. [Metabolic syndrome in inflammatory rheumatic diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malesci, D; Valentini, G; La Montagna, G

    2006-01-01

    Toward the end of the last century a better knowledge of cardiovascular (CV) risk factors and their associations led investigators to propose the existence of a unique pathophysiological condition called "metabolic" or "insulin resistance syndrome". Among all, insulin-resistance and compensatory hyperinsulinemia are considered its most important treatment targets. Different definitions have been provided by World Health Organization (WHO) and by The Third Report of The National Cholesterol Education Program's Adult Treatment Panel (NCEP-ATP III). In particular, abdominal obesity, hypertension, low HDL cholesterol and hyperglicemia are the most common items used for its definition. The presence of MetS is effective in predicting the future risk of diabetes and coronaropathies. The evidence of a higher CV risk rate among different rheumatic inflammatory diseases has recently been associated with high prevalence of MetS in some cases. Rheumatoid or psoriatic arthritis have the large series among arthritis, whereas systemic lupus erythematosus among connective tissue disorders. This review analyses all most important studies about the evidence of MetS in rheumatic patients and the main clinical and prognostic significance of this relation.

  5. CT findings of acute pelvic inflammatory disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Mi Hee; Moon, Min Hoan; Sung, Chang Kyu; Woo, Hyunsik; Oh, Sohee

    2014-12-01

    To determine the computed tomographic (CT) findings of acute pelvic inflammatory disease (PID). This retrospective, single-institution case-control study was approved by our institutional review board, and the informed consent was waived owing to the retrospective nature of the study. CT images of 32 women with clinically proven acute PID and 32 control subjects with other conditions of similar presentation were retrospectively reviewed. Analysis of CT findings included hepatic capsular enhancement, pelvic fat haziness, complicated ascites, uterine serosal enhancement, tubal thickening, endometritis, and oophoritis. Comparison of CT findings was performed with the Chi square test or the Fisher exact test and logistic regression analysis was used to determine significant CT findings in predicting PID. The CT findings that showed a statistically significant difference were hepatic capsular enhancement on late arterial phase (p = 0.003), pelvic fat haziness (p = 0.045), and tubal thickening (p = 0.001). Subsequent multivariate logistic regression analysis revealed that the presence of hepatic capsular enhancement on late arterial phase and tubal thickening were significant predictors of PID (hepatic capsular enhancement on late arterial phase, p = 0.015, odds ratio [OR] = 4.8; tubal thickening, p = 0.005, OR = 10.5). Diagnostic morphological CT findings in women with clinically proven PID and acute abdominal pain include hepatic capsular enhancement on late arterial phase and tubal thickening.

  6. New markers in pelvic inflammatory disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Shun-Fa; Wu, Tzu-Fan; Tsai, Hsiu-Ting; Lin, Long-Yau; Wang, Po-Hui

    2014-04-20

    Pelvic inflammatory disease (PID) is a common infection in women of reproductive age. However, diagnosis of PID can be difficult due to the wide variation in the symptoms and signs, ranging from subtle or mild symptoms to severe pain in the lower abdomen. Clinical diagnosis alone has only 87% sensitivity and 50% specificity. Therefore, identifying biological factors that are useful for early diagnosis and correlating their expression with the severity of PID could provide significant benefits to women suffering from PID. Pentraxin 3 (PTX3), E-cadherin, myeloperoxidase, stromal cell-derived factor 1 (SDF-1) and the matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9)/MMP-2 ratio are potential candidates for detecting PID reliably. As PID is often subtle, highly sensitive PID detection methods are needed to promote the prevention of severe sequelae. Growth arrest-specific 6 (Gas6), in combination with its soluble tyrosine kinase receptor, sAxl, could elevate the sensitivity to 92%, which was higher than all other markers tested. Moreover, PTX3, D-dimer and YKL-40 concentrations can predict the clinical course of PID. Although single nucleotide polymorphisms of biomarker genes are not associated with the development of PID, myeloperoxidase SNP -463 G/A and SDF-1 SNP 801 G/A may affect the aggravated expression of their biomarkers in PID. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  7. Transvaginal sonography of acute pelvic inflammatory disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Jin Soo; Kim, Young Hwa; Shin, Hyung Chul; Han, Gun Soo; Kim, Il Young [Chonan Hospital, Soonchunhyang University College of Medicine, Chonan (Korea, Republic of)

    1999-12-15

    To determine the value of transvaginal sonography in evaluating women with acute pelvic inflammatory disease (PID). Transvaginal sonography was performed in 25 patients with clinically suggested PID during recent 36 months. The sonographic findings of fallopian tubes and ovaries were analyzed and correlated with pathological findings of 2 fallopian tubes and 19 ovaries in 16 patients who had operations. The correct diagnosis of acute PID was made in 20/25 (80%) by transvaginal sonography. the abnormal sonographic findings of the fallopian tube include tubal thickening or dilatation with internal echo. The sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy for tubal abnormality were 88%, 96%, and 86% , respectively. Ovarian changes were seen on TVS in 14/19 (73%), which include multiple follicular enlargement in 5, tubo-ovarian complex in 9 (tubo-ovarian adhesion in 3, tubo-ovarian abscess in 6). At surgery, the ovay was not involved in all three women who showed tubo-ovarian adhesion on TVS. Among 6 women who showed tubo-ovarian abscess on TVS, tubo-ovarian abscess was confirmed in 3 and the remaining 3 had ovarian cysts. Trandvaginal sonography, a facilitative and accurate modality, is highly sensitive in detecting the abnormality of the tube and useful in differentiating the tubo-ovarian complex in patients with acute PID.

  8. Occult spondyloarthritis in inflammatory bowel disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandinelli, Francesca; Manetti, Mirko; Ibba-Manneschi, Lidia

    2016-02-01

    Spondyloarthritis (SpA) is a frequent extra-intestinal manifestation in patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), although its real diffusion is commonly considered underestimated. Abnormalities in the microbioma and genetic predisposition have been implicated in the link between bowel and joint inflammation. Otherwise, up to date, pathogenetic mechanisms are still largely unknown and the exact influence of the bowel activity on rheumatic manifestations is not clearly explained. Due to evidence-based results of clinical studies, the interest on clinically asymptomatic SpA in IBD patients increased in the last few years. Actually, occult enthesitis and sacroiliitis are discovered in high percentages of IBD patients by different imaging techniques, mainly enthesis ultrasound (US) and sacroiliac joint X-ray examinations. Several diagnostic approaches and biomarkers have been proposed in an attempt to correctly classify and diagnose clinically occult joint manifestations and to define clusters of risk for patient screening, although definitive results are still lacking. The correct recognition of occult SpA in IBD requires an integrated multidisciplinary approach in order to identify common diagnostic and therapeutic strategies. The use of inexpensive and rapid imaging techniques, such as US and X-ray, should be routinely included in daily clinical practice and trials to correctly evaluate occult SpA, thus preventing future disability and worsening of quality of life in IBD patients.

  9. Treatment of Acute Pelvic Inflammatory Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard L. Sweet

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Pelvic inflammatory disease (PID, one of the most common infections in nonpregnant women of reproductive age, remains an important public health problem. It is associated with major long-term sequelae, including tubal factor infertility, ectopic pregnancy, and chronic pelvic pain. In addition, treatment of acute PID and its complications incurs substantial health care costs. Prevention of these long-term sequelae is dependent upon development of treatment strategies based on knowledge of the microbiologic etiology of acute PID. It is well accepted that acute PID is a polymicrobic infection. The sexually transmitted organisms, Neisseria gonorrhoeae and Chlamydia trachomatis, are present in many cases, and microorganisms comprising the endogenous vaginal and cervical flora are frequently associated with PID. This includes anaerobic and facultative bacteria, similar to those associated with bacterial vaginosis. Genital tract mycoplasmas, most importantly Mycoplasma genitalium, have recently also been implicated as a cause of acute PID. As a consequence, treatment regimens for acute PID should provide broad spectrum coverage that is effective against these microorganisms.

  10. The etiology of pelvic inflammatory disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keith, L; Berger, G S

    1984-05-01

    The etiology of pelvic inflammatory disease (PID) is speculated upon based on reported incidence and epidemiological studies. In Western society, the incidence of PID (annual) is 1% among women aged 15-34 years and 2% in the high risk group of women aged 15-24 years. The annual incidence in the US is higher, at least 2% among fecund sexually active women aged 13-44 years. The medical consequences of PID are infertility, ectopic pregnancy, and chronic pelvic pain. Causative agents include Neisseria gonorrhoeae, Chlamydia trachomatis, Mycoplasma hominis and various other aerobic and anaerobic microorganisms; however, the natural genital flora of females is so varied that determining actual causative agents is difficult. some case-control studies have determined risk factors for PID; these include particularly current or prior use of IUD, prior pelvic surgery, sexual activity (including number of partners), race, and prior PID acute infection. PID is not a sexually transmitted disease, but rather is classified as sexually derived. Use of barrier methods and oral contraceptives protects against PID. IUD use greatly increases the risk of PID, probably because of the avenue the device provides for organisms to ascend from the lower to the upper genital tract. The role of males in PID etiology is currently the subject of much discussion. It is theorized that the mechanical action of penis insertion in intercourse helps to move causative agents to the upper genital region; also, semen may carry vaginal flora through the cervical opening into the uterus and tubes. Menstruation and PID are closely associated, perhaps because the cervix dilates during bleedings. Research areas include: determination of role of sexual activity (and number of partners) in PID etiology; evaluation of events of menstruation that are predisposing; evaluation of relationship between bacteriosperma and lower and upper genital infections; relationship of particular contraceptive methods to PID

  11. Role of Diet in Inflammatory Bowel Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruemmele, Frank M

    2016-01-01

    The incidence of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is steadily in the rise in Western as well as in developing countries paralleling the increase of westernized diets, characterized by high protein and fat as well as excessive sugar intake, with less vegetables and fiber. An interesting hypothesis is that environmental (food-) triggered changes of the intestinal microbiome might cause a proinflammatory state preceding the development of IBD. Indeed, an intact intestinal epithelial barrier assuring a normal bacterial clearance of the intestinal surface is crucial to guarantee intestinal homeostasis. Any factors affecting the epithelial barrier function directly or indirectly may impact on this homeostasis, as well as any changes of the intestinal microbial composition. It is intriguing to learn that some frequently used food components impact on the quality of the intestinal barrier, as well as on the composition of the intestinal microbiome. This highlights the close interaction between living conditions, hygiene, food habits and food quality with the bacterial composition of the intestinal microbiome and the activation status of the intestinal immune system. There is clear evidence that nutritional therapy is highly successful in the treatment of Crohn's disease (CD). Exclusive enteral nutrition is well established as induction therapy of CD. New diets, such as a CD exclusion diet or defined diets (specific carbohydrate diets, FODMAP diet, Paleolithic diet) are being discussed as treatment options for IBD. Well-designed clinical trials in IBD are urgently required to define the precise role of each of these diets in the prevention or management of IBD. Up to now, the role of diet in IBD is highly undermined by lay and anecdotal reports without sufficient scientific proof. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  12. Inflammatory Lung Disease in Rett Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudio De Felice

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Rett syndrome (RTT is a pervasive neurodevelopmental disorder mainly linked to mutations in the gene encoding the methyl-CpG-binding protein 2 (MeCP2. Respiratory dysfunction, historically credited to brainstem immaturity, represents a major challenge in RTT. Our aim was to characterize the relationships between pulmonary gas exchange abnormality (GEA, upper airway obstruction, and redox status in patients with typical RTT (n = 228 and to examine lung histology in a Mecp2-null mouse model of the disease. GEA was detectable in ~80% (184/228 of patients versus ~18% of healthy controls, with “high” (39.8% and “low” (34.8% patterns dominating over “mixed” (19.6% and “simple mismatch” (5.9% types. Increased plasma levels of non-protein-bound iron (NPBI, F2-isoprostanes (F2-IsoPs, intraerythrocyte NPBI (IE-NPBI, and reduced and oxidized glutathione (i.e., GSH and GSSG were evidenced in RTT with consequently decreased GSH/GSSG ratios. Apnea frequency/severity was positively correlated with IE-NPBI, F2-IsoPs, and GSSG and negatively with GSH/GSSG ratio. A diffuse inflammatory infiltrate of the terminal bronchioles and alveoli was evidenced in half of the examined Mecp2-mutant mice, well fitting with the radiological findings previously observed in RTT patients. Our findings indicate that GEA is a key feature of RTT and that terminal bronchioles are a likely major target of the disease.

  13. Infertility in men with inflammatory bowel disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Takeshi Shin; Hiroshi Okada

    2016-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease(IBD) predominantly affects young adults. Fertility-related issues are therefore im-portant in the m-anagem-ent of patients with IBD. However, relatively m-odest attention has been paid to reproductive issues faced by m-en with IBD. To investigate the effects of IBD and its treatm-ent on m-ale fertility, we reviewed the current literature using a system-atic search for published studies. A PubM ed search were perform-ed using the m-ain search term-s "IBD AND m-ale infertility", "Crohn’s disease AND m-ale infertility", "ulcerative colitis AND m-ale infertility". References in review articles were used if relevant. We noted that active inflammation, poor nutrition, alcohol use, sm-oking, m-edications, and surgery m-ay cause infertility in m-en with IBD. In surgery such as proctocolectom-y with ileal pouch-anal anastom-osis, rectal incision seem-s to be associated with sexual dysfunction. Of the m-edications used for IBD, sulfasalazine reversibly reduces m-ale fertility. No other m-edications appear to affect m-ale fertility significantly, although sm-all studies suggested som-e adverse effects. There are lim-ited data on the effects of drugs for IBD on m-ale fertility and pregnancy outcom-es; however, patients should be inform-ed of the possible effects of paternal drug exposure. This review provides inform-ation on fertility-related issues in m-en with IBD and discusses treatm-ent options.

  14. Vision, eye disease, and art: 2015 Keeler Lecture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marmor, M F

    2016-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine normal vision and eye disease in relation to art. Ophthalmology cannot explain art, but vision is a tool for artists and its normal and abnormal characteristics may influence what an artist can do. The retina codes for contrast, and the impact of this is evident throughout art history from Asian brush painting, to Renaissance chiaroscuro, to Op Art. Art exists, and can portray day or night, only because of the way retina adjusts to light. Color processing is complex, but artists have exploited it to create shimmer (Seurat, Op Art), or to disconnect color from form (fauvists, expressionists, Andy Warhol). It is hazardous to diagnose eye disease from an artist's work, because artists have license to create as they wish. El Greco was not astigmatic; Monet was not myopic; Turner did not have cataracts. But when eye disease is documented, the effects can be analyzed. Color-blind artists limit their palette to ambers and blues, and avoid greens. Dense brown cataracts destroy color distinctions, and Monet's late canvases (before surgery) showed strange and intense uses of color. Degas had failing vision for 40 years, and his pastels grew coarser and coarser. He may have continued working because his blurred vision smoothed over the rough work. This paper can barely touch upon the complexity of either vision or art. However, it demonstrates some ways in which understanding vision and eye disease give insight into art, and thereby an appreciation of both art and ophthalmology.

  15. Increased risk of venous thromboembolism and arterial cardiovascular events in patients with inflammatory bowel disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Søren Lund; Ahlehoff, Ole; Lindhardsen, Jesper

    2012-01-01

    This focused review describes the current knowledge of the association between inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and cardiovascular disease. Atherosclerosis is a chronic inflammatory disease, and as well as venous thromboembolism this disease shares inflammatory mechanisms with IBD. Patients...

  16. Risk of cardiovascular disease in inflammatory bowel disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Nynne; Nyboe; Andersen; Tine; Jess

    2014-01-01

    Abundant scientific evidence supporting an association between inflammatory bowel disease(IBD) and venous thromboembolic events, caused by an IBD related hypercoagulability, is acknowledged and thromboprophylactic treatment strategies are now implemented in the management of IBD patients. In contrary, the risk of arterial thromboembolic disease, as ischemic heart disease, cerebrovascular events, and mesenteric ischemia in patients with IBD remains uncertain and the magnitude of a potentially increased risk is continuously debated, with ambiguous risk estimates among studies. The evident role of inflammation in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis forms the basis of a biological plausible link; the chronic systemic inflammation in IBD patients increases the risk of atherosclerosis and thereby the risk of thrombotic events. Further, studies have shown that the burden of traditional risk factors for atherosclerosis, such as obesity, diabetes mellitus, and dyslipidemia is lower in IBD populations, thus further strengthen the role of non-traditional risk factors, as chronic inflammation in the linking of the two disease entities. Likewise, mortality from cardiovascular disease in IBD remains questioned. The aim of the current review is to give an up-date on the existing evidence of the possible association between IBD and cardiovascular disease and to discuss traditional and non-traditional risk factors.

  17. Inflammatory cytokine expression on the ocular surface in the Botulium toxin B induced murine dry eye model

    OpenAIRE

    Zhu, Lei; Shen, Jikui; Zhang, Cheng; Park, Choul Yong; Kohanim, Sahar; Yew, Margaret; Parker, John S.; Chuck, Roy S.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose Inflammation plays an important role in dry eye syndrome. In this study, inflammatory cytokine expression on the ocular surface in the Botulium toxin B (BTX-B) induced mouse dry eye model was investigated. Methods CBA/J mice received an injection of saline or 20 milliunits (mU) of BTX-B into the lacrimal gland. Tear production and corneal fluorescein staining were evaluated in all groups before injection and at 3 time points after. The pro-inflammatory cytokines macrophage inhibitory ...

  18. Extraintestinal manifestations and complications in inflammatory bowel diseases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Katja S Rothfuss; Eduard F Stange; Klaus R Herrlinger

    2006-01-01

    Crohn's disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC) are chronic inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) that often involve organs other than those of the gastrointestinal tract. These nonintestinal affections are termed extraintestinal symptoms. Differentiating the true extraintestinal manifestations of inflammatory bowel diseases from secondary extraintestinal complications, caused by malnutrition, chronic inflammation or side effects of therapy, may be difficult. This review concentrates on frequency, clinical presentation and therapeutic implications of extraintestinal symptoms in inflammatory bowel diseases. If possible, extraintestinal manifestations are differentiated from extraintestinal complications. Special attention is given to the more recently described sites of involvement; I.e. Thromboembolic events, osteoporosis, pulmonary involvement and affection of the central nervous system.

  19. Pelvic floor dysfunction in inflammatory bowel disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bondurri, A; Maffioli, A; Danelli, P

    2015-12-01

    Advances in tailored medical therapy and introduction of biologic agents for inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) treatment have ensured long-term disease remission. Some patients, however, still report defecatory symptoms. Patients present with a wide spectrum of conditions - anal incontinence, obstructed defecation and pelvic pain among the most frequent - that have a great impact on their quality of life. Due to IBD diagnosis, little relevance is attributed to this type of symptoms and their epidemiologic distribution is unknown. Pathogenetic hypotheses are currently under investigation. Routine diagnostic workflow and therapeutic options in pelvic floor service are often underused. The evaluation of these disorders starts with an endoscopy to rule out ongoing disease; the following diagnostic workflow is the same as in patients without IBD. For fecal incontinence and obstructed defecation, simple conservative therapy with dietary modifications and appropriate fluid intake is effective in most cases. In non-responding patients, anorectal physiology tests and imaging are required to select patients for pelvic floor muscle training and biofeedback. These treatments have been proven effective in IBD patients. Some new minimally invasive alternative strategies are available for IBD patients, as sacral nerve and posterior tibial nerve stimulation; for other ones (e.g., bulking agent implantation) IBD still remains an exclusion criterion. In order to preserve anatomical areas that could be useful for future reconstructive techniques, surgical options to cure pelvic floor dysfunction are indicated only in a small group of IBD patients, due to the high risk of failure in wound healing and to the possible side effects of surgery, which can lead to anal incontinence or to a possible proctectomy. A particular issue among defecatory symptoms in patients with IBD is paradoxical puborectalis contraction after restorative proctocolectomy: if this disorder is properly diagnosed, a

  20. Advances in Gene Therapy for Diseases of the Eye.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petit, Lolita; Khanna, Hemant; Punzo, Claudio

    2016-08-01

    Over the last few years, huge progress has been made with regard to the understanding of molecular mechanisms underlying the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative diseases of the eye. Such knowledge has led to the development of gene therapy approaches to treat these devastating disorders. Challenges regarding the efficacy and efficiency of therapeutic gene delivery have driven the development of novel therapeutic approaches, which continue to evolve the field of ocular gene therapy. In this review article, we will discuss the evolution of preclinical and clinical strategies that have improved gene therapy in the eye, showing that treatment of vision loss has a bright future.

  1. Advances in Gene Therapy for Diseases of the Eye

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petit, Lolita; Khanna, Hemant; Punzo, Claudio

    2016-01-01

    Over the last few years, huge progress has been made with regard to the understanding of molecular mechanisms underlying the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative diseases of the eye. Such knowledge has led to the development of gene therapy approaches to treat these devastating disorders. Challenges regarding the efficacy and efficiency of therapeutic gene delivery have driven the development of novel therapeutic approaches, which continue to evolve the field of ocular gene therapy. In this review article, we will discuss the evolution of preclinical and clinical strategies that have improved gene therapy in the eye, showing that treatment of vision loss has a bright future. PMID:27178388

  2. Dissecting Out Differences in the Transcriptomes of Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    OpenAIRE

    2005-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The differential pathophysiologic mechanisms that trigger and maintain the two forms of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), Crohn disease (CD), and ulcerative colitis (UC) are only partially understood. cDNA microarrays can be used to decipher gene regulation events at a genome-wide level and to identify novel unknown genes that might be involved in perpetuating inflammatory disease progression. METHODS AND FINDINGS: High-density cDNA microarrays representing 33,792 UniGene clusters...

  3. Limitations in assessment of mucosal healing in inflammatory bowel disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hugh; James; Freeman

    2010-01-01

    An emerging parameter to define the effectiveness of new therapeutic agents in clinical trials,and by extension,for use in day-to-day clinical practice has been labeled mucosal healing.It has been hypothesized that complete healing of the intestinal mucosa in inflammatory bowel diseases should result in reduced disease complications,reduced hospitalization and reduced surgical treatment.By implication,the natural history of inflammatory bowel disease might then be altered. Measurement of mucosal healing,how...

  4. Skeletal demineralization and growth retardation in inflammatory bowel disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Genant, H.K.; Mall, J.C.; Wagonfeld, J.B.; Vander Horst, J.; Lanzl, L.H.

    1976-01-01

    Skeletal growth and mineralization in 54 adolescent and adult patients with inflammatory bowel disease have been analyzed comprehensively. Quantitative and qualitative radiologic techniques consisted of conventional roentgenography, photon absorptiometry, and radiographic morphometry. The data are correlated with the type, duration, and severity of disease, and with several modes of therapy. The results indicate that osteopenia and retardation of growth are common in patients with inflammatory bowel disease, particularly in adolescents, in whom the effects of corticosteroids on the skeleton are most deleterious.

  5. Thyroid eye disease: honing your skills to improve outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dagi, Linda R; Elliott, Alexandra T; Roper-Hall, Gill; Cruz, Oscar A

    2010-10-01

    Thyroid eye disease affects the eyelids, orbital compartment, and extraocular muscles, resulting in a highly variable degree of chemosis and enlargement of the preorbital fat pads, eyelid retraction, proptosis, restrictive strabismus, torticollis, and, rarely, compressive or congestive optic neuropathy. Although most patients with thyroid eye disease are best treated conservatively, those more severely affected may benefit from orbital decompression, strabismus surgery, or eyelid retraction repair after stabilization has occurred. Botulinum A toxin, high-dose intravenous corticosteroids, and radiation treatment are therapeutic options in select cases. Compressive or congestive optic neuropathy and severe corneal exposure warrant consideration of surgical intervention on an urgent basis without waiting for stabilization. Epidemiology and risks and benefits of high-dose steroids and radiation therapy are reviewed along with recommendations to improve conservative as well as surgical management of this disease. Strategies to manage strabismus and optimize outcomes are provided.

  6. Toxoplasmosis in two cats with inflammatory intestinal disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, J L; Willard, M D; Lees, G E; Lappin, M R; Dieringer, T; Floyd, E

    1991-08-15

    Lymphocytic-plasmacytic enteritis, a chronic inflammatory intestinal disease, was diagnosed in 2 cats. In 1 cat, recurrence of clinical signs after initiating treatment was attributed to relapse of the inflammatory intestinal disease, but was found to be attributable to relapsing toxoplasmosis secondary to immunosuppressive drug therapy. Treatment with clindamycin resolved the recurrent toxoplasmosis. In the second cat, clinical signs of toxoplasmosis did not develop, but serologic testing yielded evidence of active toxoplasmosis. Treatment with clindamycin caused the titers to decrease. Relapsing toxoplasmosis may be responsible for apparent resistance to treatment in cats for inflammatory intestinal disease being treated with immunosuppressive drugs.

  7. Role of CT colonography in inflammatory bowel disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Regge, Daniele [Institute for Cancer Research and Treatment, Candiolo, Turin (Italy)], E-mail: dregge@mauriziano.it; Neri, Emanuele; Turini, Francesca [Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, University of Pisa (Italy); Chiara, Gabriele [Institute for Cancer Research and Treatment, Candiolo, Turin (Italy)

    2009-03-15

    CT colonography (CTC), or virtual colonoscopy, is a non-invasive imaging method that uses CT data sets combined with specialized imaging software to examine the colon. CTC is not used routinely in patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). However, investigating contemporarily the colon, other abdominal organs and the peritoneum with CTC is at times useful in patients with IBD, especially when other diagnostic tools fail. Furthermore, since symptoms of colorectal cancer sometimes superimpose to those of inflammatory disease, it may happen to image patients with IBD incidentally. If clinical signs are suggestive for inflammatory disease, exam technique should be modified accordingly and distinguishing radiological findings searched for.

  8. [Update on the use of PET radiopharmaceuticals in inflammatory disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Rodríguez, I; Carril, J M

    2013-01-01

    The use of molecular imaging with PET/CT technology using different radiotracers, especially the (18)F-FDG is currently spreading beyond the area of oncology, the most interest being placed on inflammatory and infectious diseases. This article presents a review of its contribution in different inflammatory conditions in the context of structural and conventional nuclear medicine imaging. Special emphasis is placed on the more significant diseases such as large-vessel vasculitis, sarcoidosis, rheumatoid arthritis and inflammatory bowel disease and the study of the atheroma plaque. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L. and SEMNIM. All rights reserved.

  9. Psychosocial factors in peptic ulcer and inflammatory bowel disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levenstein, Susan

    2002-06-01

    Over the past decade, while gastroenterologists' interest in mind-body interactions in organic disorders dwindled, stronger evidence has linked psychosocial factors with the incidence and recurrence of peptic ulcer and with the course of inflammatory bowel disease. Psychological-behavioral approaches to treatment continue to be disappointing. Psychosocial factors may affect ulcer by increasing duodenal acid load, altering local circulation or motility, intensifying Helicobacter pylori infection, stimulating corticosteroid secretion, and affecting health risk behaviors; possible mechanisms for inflammatory bowel disease include immune deregulation, gut permeability changes, and poor medication adherence. Both belong to the growing category of diseases thought to have an infectious component: for peptic ulcer the bacterium Helicobacter pylori, for inflammatory bowel disease an exaggerated immune response to gut bacteria. Peptic ulcer and inflammatory bowel disease, which present unique interactions among psychological, immunologic, endocrine, infectious, and behavioral factors, are splendid paradigms of the biopsychosocial model.

  10. Inflammatory Bowel Disease Associated with Virulence Factors in Escherichia coli

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mirsepasi-Lauridsen, Hengameh

    and influence of the gastrointestinal microbiota. The gut microbiota of IBD patients contributes to initiation and/ or maintaining the inflammatory state by providing antigens or co-stimulatory factors that drive the immune response in a misdirection in these genetically susceptible hosts. Alterations......Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD) is a chronic inflammatory disease of the gastrointestinal tract, traditionally divided into Crohn’s disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC). UC is a relapsing non-transmural chronic inflammatory disease that is restricted to the colon and during flares the disease...... with B2 E. coli (Manuscript IV). Previous studies have shown that the UC-associated E. coli strain p19A, which belongs to the B2 phylogenetic group and harbours ExPEC genes, induces cell death in dendritic cells, as well as stimulates the TNF-α, IL-6 and IL-23 cytokine production (Poster 1). p19A...

  11. Sleep disorders and inflammatory disease activity: chicken or the egg?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parekh, Parth J; Oldfield Iv, Edward C; Challapallisri, Vaishnavi; Ware, J Catsby; Johnson, David A

    2015-04-01

    Sleep dysfunction is a highly prevalent condition that has long been implicated in accelerating disease states characterized by having an inflammatory component such as systemic lupus erythematosus, HIV, and multiple sclerosis. Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is a chronic, debilitating disease that is characterized by waxing and waning symptoms, which are a direct result of increased circulating inflammatory cytokines. Recent studies have demonstrated sleep dysfunction and the disruption of the circadian rhythm to result in an upregulation of inflammatory cytokines. Not only does this pose a potential trigger for disease flares but also an increased risk of malignancy in this subset of patients. This begs to question whether or not there is a therapeutic role of sleep cycle and circadian rhythm optimization in the prevention of IBD flares. Further research is needed to clarify the role of sleep dysfunction and alterations of the circadian rhythm in modifying disease activity and also in reducing the risk of malignancy in patients suffering from IBD.

  12. The Role of Lutein in Eye-Related Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kakarla V. Chalam

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The lens and retina of the human eye are exposed constantly to light and oxygen. In situ phototransduction and oxidative phosphorylation within photoreceptors produces a high level of phototoxic and oxidative related stress. Within the eye, the carotenoids lutein and zeaxanthin are present in high concentrations in contrast to other human tissues. We discuss the role of lutein and zeaxanthin in ameliorating light and oxygen damage, and preventing age-related cellular and tissue deterioration in the eye. Epidemiologic research shows an inverse association between levels of lutein and zeaxanthin in eye tissues and age related degenerative diseases such as macular degeneration (AMD and cataracts. We examine the role of these carotenoids as blockers of blue-light damage and quenchers of oxygen free radicals. This article provides a review of possible mechanisms of lutein action at a cellular and molecular level. Our review offers insight into current clinical trials and experimental animal studies involving lutein, and possible role of nutritional intervention in common ocular diseases that cause blindness.

  13. The Role of Lutein in Eye-Related Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koushan, Keyvan; Rusovici, Raluca; Li, Wenhua; Ferguson, Lee R.; Chalam, Kakarla V.

    2013-01-01

    The lens and retina of the human eye are exposed constantly to light and oxygen. In situ phototransduction and oxidative phosphorylation within photoreceptors produces a high level of phototoxic and oxidative related stress. Within the eye, the carotenoids lutein and zeaxanthin are present in high concentrations in contrast to other human tissues. We discuss the role of lutein and zeaxanthin in ameliorating light and oxygen damage, and preventing age-related cellular and tissue deterioration in the eye. Epidemiologic research shows an inverse association between levels of lutein and zeaxanthin in eye tissues and age related degenerative diseases such as macular degeneration (AMD) and cataracts. We examine the role of these carotenoids as blockers of blue-light damage and quenchers of oxygen free radicals. This article provides a review of possible mechanisms of lutein action at a cellular and molecular level. Our review offers insight into current clinical trials and experimental animal studies involving lutein, and possible role of nutritional intervention in common ocular diseases that cause blindness. PMID:23698168

  14. Do nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs decrease the risk for Alzheimer's disease?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, K; Launer, L J; Ott, A

    1995-01-01

    Based on reports that the use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) may reduce the risk for Alzheimer's disease (AD), we studied the cross-sectional relation between NSAID use and the risk for AD in a population-based study of disease and disability in older people. After controlling...... were using topical medication for ear, eye, or dermatologic conditions (n = 365). In this comparison, the adjusted RR for AD was 0.54 (0.16 to 1.78). These findings are compatible with a possible protective effect of NSAIDs on the risk for AD....

  15. Genes, diet and inflammatory bowel disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferguson, Lynnette R; Shelling, Andrew N; Browning, Brian L; Huebner, Claudia; Petermann, Ivonne

    2007-09-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) arises in part from a genetic predisposition, through the inheritance of a number of contributory genetic polymorphisms. These variant forms of genes may be associated with an abnormal response to normal luminal bacteria. A consistent observation across most populations is that any of three polymorphisms of the Caspase-activated recruitment domain (CARD15) gene are more prevalent in IBD patients as compared with unaffected controls. Similar aberrant responses to bacteria are associated with variants in Autophagy-related 16-like 1 (ATG16L1) and human defensin (HBD-2, -3 and -4) genes. The defective bacterial signal in turn leads to an excessive immune response, presenting as chronic gut inflammation in susceptible individuals. Inconsistent population reports implicate the major histocompatability complex (MHC), that encodes a number of human leukocyte antigens (HLA), MHC class I chain-related gene A (MICA) or cytokines, such as tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha). Toll-like receptors encoded by the TLR4 or TLR9 genes may also play a role. Recent whole genome scans suggest that a rare variant in the interleukin-23 receptor (IL23R) gene may actually protect against IBD. Other implicated genes may affect mucosal cell polarity (Drosophila discs large homologue 5, DLG5) or mucosal transporter function (sodium dependent organic cation transporters, SLC22A4 and SLC22A5). A variant in ABCB1 (ATP-binding cassette subfamily B member 1) may be especially associated with increased risk of UC. While pharmacogenetics is increasingly being used to predict and optimise clinical response to therapy, nutrigenetics may have even greater potential. In many cases, IBD can be controlled through prescribing an elemental diet, which appears to act through modulating cytokine response and changing the gut microbiota. More generally, no single group of dietary items is beneficial or detrimental to all patients, and elimination diets have been used to

  16. The role of fecal calprotectin in investigating inflammatory bowel diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mustafa Erbayrak

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Invasive and non-invasive tests can be used to evaluate the activity of inflammatory bowel diseases. OBJECTIVE: The aim of the present study was to investigate the role of fecal calprotectin in evaluating inflammatory bowel disease activity and the correlation of fecal calprotectin with the erythrocyte sedimentation rate and C reactive protein values in inflammatory bowel disease. METHOD: Sixty-five patients affected with inflammatory bowel disease were enrolled. Twenty outpatients diagnosed with inflammatory bowel disease comprised the control group. RESULTS: In the present study, all patients in the control group had an fecal calprotectin value lower than the cut-off point (50 mg/kg. CONCLUSION: In conclusion, fecal calprotectin was found to be strongly associated with colorectal inflammation indicating organic disease. Fecal calprotectin is a simple and non-invasive method for assessing excretion of macrophages into the gut lumen. Fecal calprotectin values can be used to evaluate the response to treatment, to screen asymptomatic patients, and to predict inflammatory bowel disease relapses.

  17. Nutritional impact of inflammatory bowel diseases on children and adolescents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gilton Marques dos Santos

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To perform a sistematiy review of the literature about the nutritional impact of inflammatory bowel diseases in children and adolescents.DATA SOURCES: A systematic review was performed using PubMed/MEDLINE, LILACS and SciELO databases, with inclusion of articles in Portuguese and in English with original data, that analyzed nutritional aspects of inflammatory bowel diseases in children and adolescents. The initial search used the terms "inflammatory bowel diseases" and "children" or "adolescents" and "nutritional evaluation" or "nutrition deficiency". The selection of studies was initially performed by reading the titles and abstracts. Review studies and those withouth data for pediatric patients were excluded. Subsequently, the full reading of the articles considered relevant was performed.RESULTS: 237 studies were identified, and 12 of them were selected according to the inclusion criteria. None of them was performed in South America. During the analysis of the studies, it was observed that nutritional characteristics of patients with inflammatory bowel disease may be altered; the main reports were related to malnutrition, growth stunting, delayed puberty and vitamin D deficiency.CONCLUSION: There are nutritional consequences of inflammatory bowel diseases in children and adolescents, mainly growth stunting, slower pubertal development, underweight and vitamin deficiencies. Nutritional impairments were more significant in patients with Crohn's disease; overweight and obesity were more common in patients with ulcerative rectocolitis. A detailed nutritional assessment should be performed periodically in children and adolescents with inflammatory bowel disease.

  18. Noninvasive Tests for Inflammatory Bowel Disease : A Meta-analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Holtman, Gea A.; Lisman-van Leeuwen, Yvonne; Reitsma, Johannes B.; Berger, Marjolein Y.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The clinical presentation of pediatric inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is often nonspecific and overlaps with functional gastrointestinal disorders. OBJECTIVE: To determine the diagnostic accuracy of symptoms, signs, noninvasive tests, and test combinations that can assist the clinician

  19. [Non steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and rheumatic diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cossermelli, W; Pastor, E H

    1995-01-01

    Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAID) comprise an important class of medicaments that reduced the symptoms of inflamation in rheumatic disease. This article emphasizes similarities and class characteristics of the NSAID, mechanisms of action, and drug-interactions.

  20. Steroid allergy in patients with inflammatory bowel disease.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Malik, M

    2007-11-01

    Background: Contact allergy to a steroid enema leading to worsening of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) has recently been reported. This study was designed to look for evidence of steroid allergy in patients with IBD.

  1. Hansen's disease in association with immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, Anju; Vidyadharan, Suja

    2016-01-01

    Immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome is characterized by a paradoxical worsening of an existing infection or disease process, soon after initiation of highly active antiretroviral therapy. The first case of leprosy presenting as immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome was published in 2003. Here we report a case of Hansen's disease borderline tuberculoid presenting with type 1 lepra reaction 5 months after initiation of highly active antiretroviral therapy.

  2. Irritable bowel syndrome, inflammatory bowel disease and the microbiome

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Purpose of review The review aims to update the reader on current developments in our understanding of how the gut microbiota impact on inflammatory bowel disease and the irritable bowel syndrome. It will also consider current efforts to modulate the microbiota for therapeutic effect. Recent findings Gene polymorphisms associated with inflammatory bowel disease increasingly suggest that interaction with the microbiota drives pathogenesis. This may be through modulation of the immune response,...

  3. Advances in the pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel diseases: Capri 2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caprilli, Renzo; Latella, Giovanni; Frieri, Giuseppe

    2010-07-01

    The 5th International Meeting of Inflammatory Bowel Diseases was held in Capri (Italy) at Gran Hotel Quisisana from April 8 to 10, 2010. The meeting was restricted to 130 participants including invited speakers, authors of selected papers and key opinion leaders. The structure of the meeting consisted of eight sessions covering selected basic aspects of inflammatory bowel disease, and were designed to be very interactive and more focused on basic science than purely clinical aspects.

  4. Toward an antifibrotic therapy for inflammatory bowel disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Fibrosis in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is a largely unresolved clinical problem. Despite recent advances in anti-inflammatory therapies over the last few decades, the occurrence of intestinal strictures in Crohn’s disease patients has not significantly changed. No antifibrotic therapies are available. This journal supplement will address novel mechanisms of intestinal fibrosis, biomarker and imaging techniques and is intended to provide a roadmap toward antifibrotic therapies in IBD. PMID:27536358

  5. Pediatric inflammatory bowel disease: Diagnostics, treatment and psychosocial consequences

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hummel, T.Z.

    2013-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is a lifelong disease, characterized by chronic relapsing inflammation of the gastrointestinal tract. Crohn’s disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC) are two main phenotypes of IBD. In this thesis, several aspects of pediatric IBD are evaluated, including pathogenes

  6. Established and emerging biological activity markers of inflammatory bowel disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, O H; Vainer, B; Madsen, S M;

    2000-01-01

    Assessment of disease activity in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), i.e., ulcerative colitis (UC) and Crohn's disease (CD), is done using clinical parameters and various biological disease markers. Ideally, a disease marker must: be able to identify individuals at risk of a given disorder......, be disease specific, mirror the disease activity and, finally, be easily applicable for routine clinical purposes. However, no such disease markers have yet been identified for IBD. In this article, classical disease markers including erythrocyte sedimentation rate, acute phase proteins (especially...

  7. Antibiotic therapy for pelvic inflammatory disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savaris, Ricardo F; Fuhrich, Daniele G; Duarte, Rui V; Franik, Sebastian; Ross, Jonathan

    2017-04-24

    Pelvic inflammatory disease (PID) is an infection that affects 4% to 12% of young women, and is one of the most common causes of morbidity in this age group. The main intervention for acute PID is the use of broad-spectrum antibiotics which cover Chlamydia trachomatis, Neisseria gonorrhoeae, and anaerobic bacteria, administered intravenously, intramuscularly, or orally. In this review, we assessed the optimal treatment regimen for PID. To assess the effectiveness and safety of antibiotic regimens used to treat pelvic inflammatory disease. We searched the Cochrane Sexually Transmitted Infections Review Group's Specialized Register, which included randomized controlled trials (RCTs) from 1944 to 2016, located through electronic searching and handsearching; the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), Ovid platform (1991 to July 2016); MEDLINE (1946 to July 2016); Embase (1947 to July 2016); LILACS, iAHx interface (1982 to July 2016); World Health Organization International Clinical Trials Registry Platform (July 2016); Web of Science (2001 to July 2016); OpenGrey (1990, 1992, 1995, 1996, and 1997); and abstracts in selected publications. We included RCTs comparing the use of antibiotics with placebo or other antibiotics for the treatment of PID in women of reproductive age, either as inpatient or outpatient treatment. We limited our review to comparison of drugs in current use that are recommended for consideration by the 2015 US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) guidelines for treatment of PID. At least two review authors independently selected trials for inclusion, extracted data, and assessed risk of bias. We contacted investigators to obtain missing information. We resolved disagreements by consensus or by consulting a fourth review author if necessary. We assessed the quality of the evidence using GRADE criteria, classifying it as high, moderate, low, or very low. We calculated Mantel-Haenszel risk ratios (RR), using either random

  8. Bacterial Intestinal Superinfections in Inflammatory Bowel Diseases Beyond Clostridum difficile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobatón, Triana; Domènech, Eugeni

    2016-07-01

    Besides genetics and environmental factors, intestinal microbiota seem to play a major role in the pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel diseases. For many decades, it has been said that some enteropathogens may even trigger both inflammatory bowel disease development and disease flares. For this reason, stool testing had been performed in inflammatory bowel disease flares but current guidelines only recommend to rule out Clostridium difficile infection and there is no clear advice for other enteropathogens given that the scarce available evidence points at a low prevalence of this sort of intestinal superinfections with no clear impact on disease course. The present article reviews the current knowledge about the role of bacterial enteropathogens on disease pathogenesis and flares beyond C. difficile.

  9. Myocarditis in auto-immune or auto-inflammatory diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comarmond, Cloé; Cacoub, Patrice

    2017-08-01

    Myocarditis is a major cause of heart disease in young patients and a common precursor of heart failure due to dilated cardiomyopathy. Some auto-immune and/or auto-inflammatory diseases may be accompanied by myocarditis, such as sarcoidosis, Behçet's disease, eosinophilic granulomatosis with polyangiitis, myositis, and systemic lupus erythematosus. However, data concerning myocarditis in such auto-immune and/or auto-inflammatory diseases are sparse. New therapeutic strategies should better target the modulation of the immune system, depending on the phase of the disease and the type of underlying auto-immune and/or auto-inflammatory disease. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Coincidental Optic Nerve Meningioma and Thyroid Eye Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garg, Aakriti; Patel, Payal; Lignelli, Angela; Baron, Edward; Kazim, Michael

    2015-01-01

    A 57-year-old woman with diabetes mellitus, hypertension, obesity, and Graves disease presented with clinical evidence of thyroid eye disease (TED) and optic neuropathy. She was referred when a tapered dose of steroids prompted worsening of her TED. CT and MRI were consistent with TED and bilateral optic nerve meningioma. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first reported case of concurrent TED and unsuspected bilateral optic nerve meningioma. When investigating the etiology of TED-associated optic neuropathy, careful attention to orbital imaging is required because coexisting pathology may exist.

  11. Cytomegalovirus infection in inflammatory bowel disease is not associated with worsening of intestinal inflammatory activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandre Medeiros do Carmo

    Full Text Available Cytomegalovirus is highly prevalent virus and usually occurs in immunocompromised patients. The pathophysiology and treatment of inflammatory bowel disease often induce a state of immunosuppression. Because this, there are still doubts and controversies about the relationship between inflammatory bowel disease and cytomegalovirus.Evaluate the frequency of cytomegalovirus in patients with inflammatory bowel disease and identify correlations.Patients with inflammatory bowel disease underwent an interview, review of records and collection of blood and fecal samples. The search for cytomegalovirus was performed by IgG and IgM blood serology, by real-time PCR in the blood and by qualitative PCR in feces. Results were correlated with red blood cell levels, C-reactive protein levels, erythrocyte sedimentation rates and fecal calprotectin levels for each patient.Among the 400 eligible patients, 249 had Crohn's disease, and 151 had ulcerative colitis. In the group of Crohn's disease, 67 of the patients had moderate or severe disease, but 126 patients presented with active disease, based on the evaluation of the fecal calprotectin. In patients with ulcerative colitis, only 21 patients had moderate disease, but 76 patients presented with active disease, based on the evaluation of the fecal calprotectin. A large majority of patients had positive CMV IgG. Overall, 10 patients had positive CMV IgM, and 9 patients had a positive qualitative detection of CMV DNA by PCR in the feces. All 400 patients returned negative results after the quantitative detection of CMV DNA in blood by real-time PCR. Analyzing the 19 patients with active infections, we only found that such an association occurred with the use of combined therapy (anti-TNF-alpha + azathioprine.The findings show that latent cytomegalovirus infections are frequent and active cytomegalovirus infection is rare. We did not find any association between an active infection of CMV and inflammatory bowel

  12. Therapeutic antibodies that target inflammatory cytokines in autoimmune diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Yuping; Dong, Chen

    2016-04-01

    Inflammatory cytokines are key regulators of immune responses. Persistent and excessive production of inflammatory cytokines underscores the development of autoimmune diseases. Therefore, neutralizing inflammatory cytokines or antagonizing their receptor function is considered as a useful therapeutic strategy to treat autoimmune diseases. To achieve the success of such a strategy, understanding of the complex actions of these cytokines and cytokine networks is required. In this review we focus on four inflammatory cytokines--tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα), interleukin-6 (IL-6), IL-23 and IL-17--and dissect how the dysregulation of these cytokines regulates autoimmune diseases. On the basis of pre-clinical and clinical data, we specifically discuss the therapeutic rationale for targeting these cytokines and describe the potential adverse effects.

  13. Prevalence of eye disease in Brazilian patients with psoriatic arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernanda B. F. de Lima

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: The aim of this study was to report the type and frequency of ocular manifestations in Brazilian psoriatic arthritis patients. METHODS: We conducted a cross-sectional study in a Brazilian tertiary hospital. The test group included 40 patients who had psoriatic arthritis according to the Classification Criteria for Psoriatic Arthritis. A control group of 40 individuals was matched for age and gender. All of the patients underwent ophthalmic evaluation, which included best-corrected visual acuity, slit lamp and fundus examinations, and dry eye diagnostic tests (Schirmer I, tear breakup time and rose bengal. Demographic parameters were also evaluated. RESULTS: The mean age of the patients was 53.9±13.1 years; the mean disease duration was 8±10.5 years. Most of the patients were women (60%, and the majority had polyarticular disease (57.5%. Several ocular abnormalities were found, including punctate keratitis, pinguecula, blepharitis, pterygium, cataract, glaucoma, uveitis, and retinal microvascular abnormalities. There were no significant differences in the rates of these abnormalities compared with the control group, however. The Keratoconjunctivitis sicca and dry eye diagnostic tests were more often positive in the patients with psoriatic arthritis than in the control group. CONCLUSIONS: In this study, keratoconjunctivitis sicca was the most common ocular finding related to psoriatic arthritis. Therefore, we recommend early ophthalmologic evaluations for all psoriatic arthritis patients who complain of eye symptoms.

  14. Role of the endothelium in inflammatory bowel diseases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Walter E Cromer; J Michael Mathis; Daniel N Granger; Ganta V Chaitanya; J Steven Alexander

    2011-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) are a complex group of diseases involving alterations in mucosal immunity and gastrointestinal physiology during both initiation and progressive phases of the disease. At the core of these alterations are endothelial cells, whose continual adjustments in structure and function coordinate vascular supply, immune cell emigration, and regulation of the tissue environment. Expansion of the endothelium in IBD (angiogenesis), mediated by inflammatory growth factors, cytokines and chemokines, is a hallmark of active gut disease and is closely related to disease severity. The endothelium in newly formed or inflamed vessels differs from that in normal vessels in the production of and response to inflammatory cytokines,growth factors, and adhesion molecules, altering coagulant capacity, barrier function and blood cell recruitment in injury. This review examines the roles of the endothelium in the initiation and propagation of IBD pathology and distinctive features of the intestinal endothelium contributing to these conditions.

  15. Combined therapeutic approach: Inflammatory bowel diseases and peripheral or axial arthritis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fabiola Atzeni; Sandro Ardizzone; Luca Bertani; Marco Antivalle; Alberto Batticciotto; Piercarlo Sarzi-Puttini

    2009-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel diseases (IBDs), particularly Crohn's disease(CD) and ulcerative colitis(UC), are associated with a variety of extra-intestinal manifestations (EIMs). About 36% of IBD patients have at least one EIM, which most frequently affect the joints,skin, eyes and the biliary tract. The EIMs associated with IBD have a negative impact on patients with UC and CD, and the resolution of most of them parallels that of the active IBD in terms of timing and required therapy; however, the clinical course of EIMs such as axial arthritis, pyoderma gangrenosum, uveitis, and primary sclerosing cholangitis is independent of IBD activity. The peripheral and axial arthritis associated with IBD have traditionally been treated with simple analgesics, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs,steroids, sulfasalazine, methotrexate, local steroid injections and physiotherapy, but the introduction of biological response modifiers such as tumor necrosis factor-α blockers, has led to further improvements.

  16. Ocular inserts - Advancement in therapy of eye diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anita Kumari

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The ocular insert represents a significant advancement in the therapy of eye disease. Ocular inserts are defined as sterile, thin, multilayered, drug-impregnated, solid or semisolid consistency devices placed into the cul-de-sac or conjuctival sac, whose size and shape are especially designed for ophthalmic application. They are composed of a polymeric support that may or may not contain a drug. The drug can later be incorporated as dispersion or a solution in the polymeric support. They offer several advantages as increased ocular residence and sustained release of medication into the eye. The insert includes a body portion sized to position within a lachrymal canaliculus of the eyelid. The inserts are classified according to their solubility as insoluble, soluble, or bioerodible inserts. The release of drug from the insert depends upon the diffusion, osmosis, and bioerosion of the drug, and this article is an attempt to present a brief about this newer drug delivery system.

  17. Rationale for anti-inflammatory therapy in dry eye syndrome Bases da terapia antiinflamatória em síndrome do olho seco

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CS De Paiva

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Dry eye is a multifactorial condition that results in a dysfunctional lacrimal functional unit. Evidence suggests that inflammation is involved in the pathogenesis of the disease. Changes in tear composition including increased cytokines, chemokines, metalloproteinases and the number of T cells in the conjunctiva are found in dry eye patients and in animal models. This inflammation is responsible in part for the irritation symptoms, ocular surface epithelial disease, and altered corneal epithelial barrier function in dry eye. There are several anti-inflammatory therapies for dry eye that target one or more of the inflammatory mediators/pathways that have been identified and are discussed in detail.Olho seco é uma doença multifatorial que resulta em disfunção da unidade lacrimal glandular. Evidências sugerem que inflamação está involvida na patogênese da doença. Mudanças na composição das lágrimas, incluindo aumento de citocinas, quimiocinas, metaloproteinases e o número de células T na conjuntiva são encontrados em pacientes com olho seco e em modelos animais. Esta inflamação é responsável em parte pelos sintomas de irritação, doença epitelial de surperfície ocular e função epitelial de barreira alterada em olho seco. Existem várias terapias antiinflamatórias que se direcionam para um ou mais mediadores/vias que foram identificados e são discutidos em detalhe.

  18. Urine metabolome profiling of immune-mediated inflammatory diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Alonso, Arnald; Julià, Antonio; Vinaixa, Maria; Domènech, Eugeni; Fernández-Nebro, Antonio; Cañete, Juan D.; Ferrándiz, Carlos; Tornero, Jesús; Gisbert, Javier P; Nos, Pilar; Casbas, Ana Gutiérrez; Puig, Lluís; González-Álvaro, Isidoro; Pinto-Tasende, José A.; Blanco, Ricardo

    2016-01-01

    Background Immune-mediated inflammatory diseases (IMIDs) are a group of complex and prevalent diseases where disease diagnostic and activity monitoring is highly challenging. The determination of the metabolite profiles of biological samples is becoming a powerful approach to identify new biomarkers of clinical utility. In order to identify new metabolite biomarkers of diagnosis and disease activity, we have performed the first large-scale profiling of the urine metabolome of the six most pre...

  19. The novel interleukin-1 cytokine family members in inflammatory diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahn, Madelaine; Frey, Silke; Hueber, Axel J

    2017-03-01

    This review provides an update on the new interleukin-1 (IL-1) cytokine family members in inflammatory diseases with focus on recent findings concerning the family members IL-36, IL-37, and IL-38 and their different expression patterns. The IL-1 cytokines are known to be involved in many different inflammatory and autoimmune diseases. The latest IL-1 family members, IL-36, IL-37, and IL-38 have been shown to be differently regulated during course of disease. Studies of patients suffering from inflammatory diseases revealed that those cytokines are upregulated in the serum as well as in inflamed tissue. Both, epithelial cells and infiltrating peripheral mononuclear blood cells serve as source of the cytokines IL-36, IL-37, and IL-38 triggering different outcomes. These results could be confirmed in different mouse models and in-vitro and ex-vivo studies. IL-36, IL-37, and IL-38 are involved in the pathogenesis of the inflammatory diseases psoriasis, rheumatoid arthritis, gout, systemic lupus erythematosus as well as Crohn's disease. Thereby IL-36 acts proinflammatory triggering further inflammatory mediators. In contrast, IL-37 and IL-38 are upregulated to counteract. Understanding the imbalance of the IL-1 family is crucial for future therapeutics.

  20. Review article: antibiotics and probiotics in inflammatory bowel disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruis, W

    2004-10-01

    Treatment with antibiotics in inflammatory bowel disease has a long tradition and is widely used. The indications for antibiotic therapy are wide ranging, from specific situations such as abscesses or fistulae, to patients with severe disease (as an unspecific 'protective' measure), and to address the hypothesis that the enteric flora as a whole, or specific microorganisms such as mycobacteria, are involved in the pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel disease. The best-studied single antibiotic compound is metronidazole. However, overall, the scientific basis for the use of antibiotics is limited, which may reflect a lack of interest from sponsors within the pharmaceutical industry. Despite this weak evidence base, antibiotics are a globally established therapeutic tool in inflammatory bowel disease. Growing evidence from human and animal studies points towards a pivotal pathogenetic role of intestinal bacteria in inflammatory bowel disease. In view of these experimental findings, clinical trials have been undertaken to elucidate the therapeutic effects of probiotics in inflammatory bowel disease. Probiotics are viable nonpathogenic microorganisms which confer health benefits to the host by improving the microbial balance of the indigenous microflora. So far, of the many candidates, one specific strain (Escherichia coli Nissle 1917) and a mixture of eight different bacteria have demonstrated convincing therapeutic efficacy in controlled studies. Maintenance therapy in ulcerative colitis and prevention therapy, as well as the treatment of pouchitis, have emerged as areas in which probiotic therapy offers a valid therapeutic alternative to current treatments. Further investigations may detect additional clinically effective probiotics and other clinical indications.

  1. Focal inflammatory diseases of the liver

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oto, Aytekin; Akhan, Okan; Oezmen, Mustafa

    1999-10-01

    Inflammatory lesions constitute an important subgroup of focal liver lesions. They may mimic primary or metastatic neoplastic lesions and their differentiation from neoplasia is clinically very important since management of the patient significantly changes. Radiologists should have an important role in both the diagnosis and therapy of these lesions by performing percutaneous aspirations and drainages. In this review we discussed the radiological findings of pyogenic abscesses, amebic abscesses, candidiasis, tuberculosis, hydatic cysts, fascioliasis, ascariasis, schistosomiasis, and sarcoidosis with a special emphasis on US, CT and MR characteristics.

  2. Contribution of genetics to a new vision in the understanding of inflammatory bowel disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    AS Pe(n)a

    2006-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD), such as Crohn's disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC), are chronic inflammatory autoimmune conditions of the gastrointestinal tract. Other organs, such as the eyes, skin and articulations, are often affected and IBD may be accompanied by other diseases of autoimmune origin. There is no single etiological factor responsible for the onset of IBD. Recent advances in genetics and in the molecular mechanisms of the proteins coded by these genes have given rise to a new vision in understanding these complex diseases. Activation of specific genes that affect antigen presentation and the handling of cells by innate immunity may lead to autoimmunity with the consequent activation of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) and multiple cytokines involved in the regulation of acquired immunity. In this review IBD is described as a constellation of diseases that can best be classified as barrier diseases. This vision, developed by Kiel in Germany, includes the idea that changes in our environment due to the westernization of civilization have not been met with adaptation of the innate immune system, and this has given rise to autoimmune diseases. These diseases affect 1-5 of 1000 individuals and represent a major burden on the national health systems of many countries on different continents. On a world scale, a major challenge is to generate interventions to prevent the development of these diseases in Asia, Latin America and Africa.

  3. Fine-mapping inflammatory bowel disease loci to single-variant resolution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huang, Hailiang; Fang, Ming; Jostins, Luke

    2017-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel diseases are chronic gastrointestinal inflammatory disorders that affect millions of people worldwide. Genome-wide association studies have identified 200 inflammatory bowel disease-associated loci, but few have been conclusively resolved to specific functional variants. Here w...

  4. Inflammatory bowel disease of the lung: The role of infliximab?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam J. Hayek

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Pulmonary extra-intestinal manifestations (EIM of inflammatory bowel disease are well described with a variable incidence. We present a case of Crohn's disease with pulmonary EIM including chronic bronchitis with non-resolving bilateral cavitary pulmonary nodules and mediastinal lymphadenopathy successfully treated with infliximab. Additionally, we present a case summary from a literature review on pulmonary EIM successfully treated with infliximab. Current treatment recommendations include an inhaled and/or systemic corticosteroid regimen which is largely based on case reports and expert opinion. We offer infliximab as an adjunctive therapy or alternative to corticosteroids for treatment of inflammatory bowel disease related pulmonary EIM.

  5. Inflammatory bowel disease related innate immunity and adaptive immunity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yuan; Chen, Zhonge

    2016-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is a chronic nonspecific intestinal inflammatory disease, including ulcerative colitis (UC) and Crohn’s disease (CD). Its pathogenesis remains not yet clear. Current researchers believe that after environmental factors act on individuals with genetic susceptibility, an abnormal intestinal immune response is launched under stimulation of intestinal flora. However, previous studies only focused on adaptive immunity in the pathogenesis of IBD. Currently, roles of innate immune response in the pathogenesis of intestinal inflammation have also drawn much attention. In this study, IBD related innate immunity and adaptive immunity were explained, especially the immune mechanisms in the pathogenesis of IBD. PMID:27398134

  6. [Inflammatory spinal diseases: axial spondyloarthritis : Central importance of imaging].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baraliakos, X; Fruth, M; Kiltz, U; Braun, J

    2017-03-01

    The diagnosis of axial spondyloarthritis (axSpA) includes classical ankylosing spondylitis (AS) as well as earlier stages and abortive courses of the disease, in which structural alterations have not yet occurred. These are classified as non-radiographic axSpA (nr-axSpa). Inflammatory changes in the entire axial skeleton are characteristic for axSpA and can be visualized by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), while in most patients structural alterations, such as new bone formation with syndesmophytes and ankylosis develop in the later course of the disease. These bony alterations can best be visualized by conventional radiography and by computed tomography. Certain MRI sequences are nowadays considered as the standard method for depiction of inflammatory changes in axSpA. The introduction of MRI has led to a paradigm shift for this disease because the inflammatory lesions characteristic for the disease can be visualized at an early stage using appropriate MRI sequences.

  7. Endoscopic Diagnosis and Differentiation of Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ji Min; Lee, Kang-Moon

    2016-01-01

    Patients with inflammatory bowel disease have significantly increased in recent decades in Korea. Intestinal tuberculosis (ITB) and intestinal Behcet’s disease (BD), which should be differentiated from Crohn’s disease (CD), are more frequent in Korea than in the West. Thus, the accurate diagnosis of these inflammatory diseases is problematic in Korea and clinicians should fully understand their clinical and endoscopic characteristics. Ulcerative colitis mostly presents with rectal inflammation and continuous lesions, while CD presents with discontinuous inflammatory lesions and frequently involves the ileocecal area. Involvement of fewer than four segments, a patulous ileocecal valve, transverse ulcers, and scars or pseudopolyps are more frequently seen in ITB than in CD. A few ulcers with discrete margins are a typical endoscopic finding of intestinal BD. However, the differential diagnosis is difficult in many clinical situations because typical endoscopic findings are not always observed. Therefore, clinicians should also consider symptoms and laboratory, pathological, and radiological findings, in addition to endoscopic findings. PMID:27484813

  8. Management of Musculoskeletal Manifestations in Inflammatory Bowel Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheth, Tejas; Pitchumoni, C S; Das, Kiron M

    2015-01-01

    Musculoskeletal manifestations are the most common extraintestinal manifestations in inflammatory bowel diseases. Some appendicular manifestations are independent of gut inflammation and are treated with standard anti-inflammatory strategies. On the other hand, axial involvement is linked to gut inflammatory activity; hence, there is a considerable amount of treatment overlap. Biological therapies have revolutionized management of inflammatory bowel diseases as well as of associated articular manifestations. Newer mechanisms driving gut associated arthropathy have surfaced in the past decade and have enhanced our interests in novel treatment targets. Introduction of biosimilar molecules is expected in the US market in the near future and will provide an opportunity for considerable cost savings on healthcare. A multidisciplinary approach involving a gastroenterologist, rheumatologist, and physical therapist is ideal for these patients.

  9. Management of Musculoskeletal Manifestations in Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tejas Sheth

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Musculoskeletal manifestations are the most common extraintestinal manifestations in inflammatory bowel diseases. Some appendicular manifestations are independent of gut inflammation and are treated with standard anti-inflammatory strategies. On the other hand, axial involvement is linked to gut inflammatory activity; hence, there is a considerable amount of treatment overlap. Biological therapies have revolutionized management of inflammatory bowel diseases as well as of associated articular manifestations. Newer mechanisms driving gut associated arthropathy have surfaced in the past decade and have enhanced our interests in novel treatment targets. Introduction of biosimilar molecules is expected in the US market in the near future and will provide an opportunity for considerable cost savings on healthcare. A multidisciplinary approach involving a gastroenterologist, rheumatologist, and physical therapist is ideal for these patients.

  10. Proinflammatory and anti-inflammatory cytokines in meningococcal disease.

    OpenAIRE

    Riordan, F A; Marzouk, O; Thomson, A. P.; Sills, J A; Hart, C. A.

    1996-01-01

    Interleukin-10 (IL-10), an anti-inflammatory cytokine, was measured in 131 children with meningococcal disease. IL-10 concentrations were significantly higher in children who died and correlated positively with proinflammatory cytokines. Children who die from meningococcal disease have high IL-10 concentrations, which do not suppress proinflammatory cytokines.

  11. Genetics of inflammatory bowel diseases--past, present, and future.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pena, A.S.

    2003-01-01

    In this review, the evidence to support the multifactorial and polygenic nature of the disease is briefly described. The past of genetics of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is characterized by unfulfilled promises and is now closed with a new vision and a new promise coming from a genetic

  12. The burden of inflammatory bowel disease in Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burisch, Johan; Jess, Tine; Martinato, Matteo

    2013-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) are chronic disabling gastrointestinal disorders impacting every aspect of the affected individual's life and account for substantial costs to the health care system and society. New epidemiological data suggest that the incidence and prevalence of the diseases a...

  13. Performance of the Montreal classification for inflammatory bowel diseases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spekhorst, Lieke M.; Visschedijk, Marijn C.; Alberts, Rudi; Festen, Eleonora A.; van der Wouden, Egbert-Jan; Dijkstra, Gerard; Weersma, Rinse K.

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To validate the Montreal classification system for Crohn's disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC) within the Netherlands. METHODS: A selection of 20 de-identified medical records with an appropriate representation of the inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) sub phenotypes were scored by 30 observ

  14. Understanding Mircrobial Sensing in Inflammatory Bowel Disease Using Click Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-01

    bowel disease,microbiome microbiota , carbohydrate chemistry, fluorescent microscopy, 2-photon microscopy, confocal microscopy 16. SECURITY...bacterial outer membrane, peptidoglycan, lipopolysaccharide, endotoxin, capsular polysaccharide, inflammatory bowel disease, microbiome, microbiota ...resulted in the successful labeling of a wide range of anaerobic and facultative commensal bacteria, including Bacteroides fragilis, Bacteroides vulgatus

  15. Imaging of inflammatory and infectious diseases in the temporal bone.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lemmerling, M.M.; Foer, B. De; Verbist, B.M.; Vyver, V. van de

    2009-01-01

    Inflammatory and infectious diseases of the temporal bone are a major indication to perform high-resolution CT and MR imaging studies. Such studies allow one to evaluate the extent of the disease in the soft tissues and in the bony structures of the temporal bone. On these same imaging studies the p

  16. Inflammatory pseudotumor in the liver and right omentum caused by pelvic inflammatory disease: A case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Byun, Hyuk Jun; Kim, Seong Hoon [Dept. of Radiology, Daegu Fatima Hospital, Daegu (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-08-15

    Inflammatory pseudotumor can develop in any part of the human body. It is one of the most important tumor-mimicking lesions that require differential diagnosis. There are various causes of inflammatory pseudotumor, one of which is infection and its resultant inflammation. Pelvic inflammatory disease (PID) often causes perihepatitis, which is called Fitz-Hugh-Curtis syndrome. In Fitz-Hugh-Curtis syndrome, bacteria spread along the right paracolic gutter, causing inflammation of the right upper quadrant peritoneal surfaces and the right lobe of the liver. We experienced a case of PID with accompanying inflammatory pseudotumor in the liver and the right omentum. This case identically correlates with the known intraperitoneal spreading pathway involved in Fitz-Hugh-Curtis syndrome, and hence, we present this case report.

  17. The Vitamin D Receptor, Inflammatory Bowel Diseases, and Colon Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Lu, Rong; Wu, Shaoping; Xia, Yinglin; Sun, Jun

    2012-01-01

    The nuclear receptor is an emerging therapeutic target in various human diseases. Vitamin D receptor (VDR), a nuclear receptor, mediates the biological functions of vitamin D. Classically, vitamin D is recognized as an essential contributor to mineral and bone homeostasis. Increasing evidence demonstrates that vitamin D is involved in inflammatory responses. Persistent intestinal inflammation is associated with colon cancer. This review focuses on vitamin D and VDR in inflammatory bowel disea...

  18. Irritable bowel syndrome - An inflammatory disease involving mast cells

    OpenAIRE

    Philpott, Hamish; Gibson, Peter; Thien, Frank

    2011-01-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is traditionally defined as a functional disorder - that is the presence of symptoms in the absence of demonstrable pathological abnormalities. In recent times, low grade inflammatory infiltrates in both the small and large bowel of some patients with IBS - often rich in mast cells, along with serological markers of low grade inflammation have focussed attention on IBS as an inflammatory disease. The observation that mast cells often lie in close association to ...

  19. The epidemiology of inflammatory bowel disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burisch, Johan; Munkholm, Pia

    2015-01-01

    inflammation, long-standing disease, extensive disease, young age at diagnosis, family history of CRC and co-existing primary sclerosing cholangitis. The risk of extra-intestinal cancers, including lymphoproliferative disorders (LD) and intra- and extrahepatic cholangio carcinoma, is significantly higher among...

  20. Development of lifitegrast: a novel T-cell inhibitor for the treatment of dry eye disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Semba CP

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Charles P Semba,1 Thomas R Gadek2 1Vascular and Interventional Radiology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA, USA; 2Ophthalma Logic Consulting, Park City, UT, USA Abstract: Dry eye disease (DED is a multifactorial disorder of the ocular surface characterized by symptoms of discomfort, decreased tear quality, and chronic inflammation that affects an estimated 20 million patients in the US alone. DED is associated with localized inflammation of the ocular surface and periocular tissues leading to homing and activation of T cells, cytokine release, and development of hyperosmolar tears. This inflammatory milieu results in symptoms of eye dryness and discomfort. Homing of T cells to the ocular surface is influenced by the binding of lymphocyte function-associated antigen-1 (LFA-1; CD11a/CD18; αLβ2, a cell surface adhesion protein, to its cognate ligand, intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1; CD54, which is expressed on inflamed ocular/periocular epithelium and vascular endothelium. LFA-1/ICAM-1 binding within the immunologic synapse enables both T-cell activation and cytokine release. Lifitegrast is a novel T-cell integrin antagonist that is designed to mimic the binding epitope of ICAM-1. It serves as a molecular decoy to block the binding of LFA-1/ICAM-1 and inhibits the downstream inflammatory process. In vitro studies have demonstrated that lifitegrast inhibits T-cell adhesion to ICAM-1-expressing cells and inhibits secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines including interferon gamma, tumor necrosis factor alpha, macrophage inflammatory protein 1 alpha, interleukin (IL-1α, IL-1β, IL-2, IL-4, and IL-6, all of which are known to be associated with DED. Lifitegrast has the potential to be the first pharmaceutical product approved in the US indicated for the treatment of both symptoms and signs of DED. Clinical trials involving over 2,500 adult DED patients have demonstrated that topically administered lifitegrast 5

  1. Associations between subjective happiness and dry eye disease: a new perspective from the Osaka study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawashima, Motoko; Uchino, Miki; Yokoi, Norihiko; Uchino, Yuichi; Dogru, Murat; Komuro, Aoi; Sonomura, Yukiko; Kato, Hiroaki; Kinoshita, Shigeru; Mimura, Masaru; Tsubota, Kazuo

    2015-01-01

    Dry eye disease has become an important health problem. A lack of concordance between self-reported symptoms and the outcome of dry eye examinations has raised questions about dry eye disease. To explore the association between subjective happiness and objective and subjective symptoms of dry eye disease. The study adopted a cross-sectional design. All the employees of a company in Osaka, Japan. 672 Japanese office workers using Visual Display Terminals (age range: 26-64 years). The dry eye measurement tools included the Schirmer test, conjunctivocorneal staining, the tear film break-up time, as well as the administration of a dry eye symptoms questionnaire. Happiness was measured by the Subjective Happiness Scale. Dry eye examination parameters, dry eye symptoms questionnaires, and the Subjective Happiness Scale score. Of the 672 workers, 561 (83.5%) completed the questionnaires and examinations. The mean Subjective Happiness Scale score was 4.91 (SD = 1.01). This score was inversely correlated with the dry eye symptom score (r = -0.188, p happiness was the lowest in the group without objective results, but reported subjective symptoms of dry eyes (p happiness and self-reported symptoms of dry eyes. Findings of this study revealed a new perspective on dry eye disease, including the potential for innovative treatments of a specific population with dry eye disease.

  2. Common Eye Diseases in Children in Saudi Arabia (Jazan)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darraj, Abdulrahman; Barakat, Walid; Kenani, Mona; Shajry, Reem; Khawaji, Abdullah; Bakri, Sultan; Makin, Abdulrahman; Mohanna, Azza; Yassin, Abu Obaida

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND The rise in childhood eye diseases has become a matter of concern in Saudi Arabia, and hence a study has been conducted on the residents of Jazan. The aim of the research was to find out the root cause of such issues and provide a solution to prevent such circumstances for it may affect the vision of children. In this study, therefore, we aimed to determine the types of childhood eye diseases in Jazan and to discuss the best ways to prevent them or prevent their effect on the vision of our children. Our institutions are working toward the longevity and welfare of the residents, and healthcare is one of the important aspects in such a field. METHODS This is a retrospective review of all patients less than 18 years of age who presented to the pediatric ophthalmology clinic of Prince Mohammed Bin Nasser Hospital, Jazan, between October 2014 and October 2015. The data, collected on 385 cases, included the age at first presentation, sex, clinical diagnosis, refractive error (RE) if present, and whether the child had amblyopia. If the child did not undergo complete ophthalmic examination with cycloplegic refraction, he/she was excluded. All data were collected and analyzed using the software SPSS. A P-value sex among children with REs and squint. Trauma was seen more commonly among males and in the group aged 12–18 years. CONCLUSION In this retrospective study, the focus was on the common childhood eye diseases that were considerably high. Hypermetropia was the predominant RE, which is in contrast to other studies where myopia was more common. However, it is important to promote public education on the significance of early detection of strabismus, REs, and amblyopia and have periodic screening in schools. The discussion of the various issues is aimed at increasing the awareness and building a support for the cause by creating the knowledge base to treat things on time and acknowledging the severity of the issues. PMID:27679531

  3. Diagnosis of dry eye disease and emerging technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeev, Maya Salomon-Ben; Miller, Darby Douglas; Latkany, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Dry eye is one of the most commonly encountered problems in ophthalmology. Signs can include punctate epithelial erosions, hyperemia, low tear lakes, rapid tear break-up time, and meibomian gland disease. Current methods of diagnosis include a slit-lamp examination with and without different stains, including fluorescein, rose bengal, and lissamine green. Other methods are the Schirmer test, tear function index, tear break-up time, and functional visual acuity. Emerging technologies include meniscometry, optical coherence tomography, tear film stability analysis, interferometry, tear osmolarity, the tear film normalization test, ocular surface thermography, and tear biomarkers. Patient-specific considerations involve relevant history of autoimmune disease, refractive surgery or use of oral medications, and allergies or rosacea. Other patient considerations include clinical examination for lid margin disease and presence of lagophthalmos or blink abnormalities. Given a complex presentation and a variety of signs and symptoms, it would be beneficial if there was an inexpensive, readily available, and reproducible diagnostic test for dry eye. PMID:24672224

  4. Chronic Inflammatory Periodontal Disease in Patients with Human Immunodeficiency Virus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vania López Rodríguez

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: The Chronic Inflammatory Periodontal Disease is related with multiple risk factors. Those patients with human immunodeficiency virus have higher risk of presenting this disease and it is usually more serious in these cases. Objective: To describe the prevalence of Chronic Inflammatory Periodontal Disease in patients with HIV. Methods: Descriptive, observational, cross-sectional study including patients with HIV in Sancti Spiritus province. The occurrence of the disease was determined after the Periodontics Cuban Standards, and oral hygiene was assessed through the simplified oral hygiene index. Other variables were measured, such as smoking habits, T CD4+ lymphocyte counting and virus load. The independent association of each risk factor with the disease was determined through a logistic regression model. Results: The 56, 5 % of the 154 patients presented Chronic Inflammatory Periodontal Disease; 60 (39.0% gingivitis and 27 (17,5% periodontitis. Gingivitis was associated with poor oral hygiene (OR: 3,71 and periodontitis with smoking habit (OR: 5,20. The severe forms of periodontitis occurred mainly in patients with lymphocyte counting lower than 500 cells/mm3 . Conclusions: The prevalence of Chronic Inflammatory Periodontal Disease in patients with HIV in Sancti Spiritus province is linked to known risk factors such as smoking habits and oral hygiene.

  5. Interleukin-1 in the pathogenesis and treatment of inflammatory diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    More than any other cytokine family, the IL-1 family of ligands and receptors is primarily associated with acute and chronic inflammation. The cytosolic segment of each IL-1 receptor family member contains the Toll-IL-1-receptor domain. This domain is also present in each Toll-like receptor, the receptors that respond to microbial products and viruses. Since Toll-IL-1-receptor domains are functional for both receptor families, responses to the IL-1 family are fundamental to innate immunity. Of the 11 members of the IL-1 family, IL-1β has emerged as a therapeutic target for an expanding number of systemic and local inflammatory conditions called autoinflammatory diseases. For these, neutralization of IL-1β results in a rapid and sustained reduction in disease severity. Treatment for autoimmune diseases often includes immunosuppressive drugs whereas neutralization of IL-1β is mostly anti-inflammatory. Although some autoinflammatory diseases are due to gain-of-function mutations for caspase-1 activity, common diseases such as gout, type 2 diabetes, heart failure, recurrent pericarditis, rheumatoid arthritis, and smoldering myeloma also are responsive to IL-1β neutralization. This review summarizes acute and chronic inflammatory diseases that are treated by reducing IL-1β activity and proposes that disease severity is affected by the anti-inflammatory members of the IL-1 family of ligands and receptors. PMID:21304099

  6. Smoking in inflammatory bowel diseases: Good, bad or ugly?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Smoking is an important environmental factor in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), having different effects in ulcerative colitis (UC) and Crohn's disease (CD). A recent meta-analysis partially confirmed previous findings that smoking was found to be protective against ulcerative colitis and, after onset of the disease, might improve its course,decreasing the need for colectomy. However,smoking increases the risk of developing Crohn's disease and worsens its course, increasing the need for steroids, immunosuppressants and re-operations.Smoking cessation aggravates ulcerative colitis and improves Crohn's disease. Data are however, largely conflictive as well as the potential mechanisms involved in this dual relationship are still unknown. In this review article, the authors review the role of smoking in inflammatory bowel diseases.

  7. Marine Bioactives: Pharmacological Properties and Potential Applications against Inflammatory Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Graziano Riccioni

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Inflammation is a hot topic in medical research, because it plays a key role in inflammatory diseases: rheumatoid arthritis (RA and other forms of arthritis, diabetes, heart diseases, irritable bowel syndrome, Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s disease, allergies, asthma, even cancer and many others. Over the past few decades, it was realized that the process of inflammation is virtually the same in different disorders, and a better understanding of inflammation may lead to better treatments for numerous diseases. Inflammation is the activation of the immune system in response to infection, irritation, or injury, with an influx of white blood cells, redness, heat, swelling, pain, and dysfunction of the organs involved. Although the pathophysiological basis of these conditions is not yet fully understood, reactive oxygen species (ROS have often been implicated in their pathogenesis. In fact, in inflammatory diseases the antioxidant defense system is compromised, as evidenced by increased markers of oxidative stress, and decreased levels of protective antioxidant enzymes in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA. An enriched diet containing antioxidants, such as vitamin E, vitamin C, β-carotene and phenolic substances, has been suggested to improve symptoms by reducing disease-related oxidative stress. In this respect, the marine world represents a largely untapped reserve of bioactive ingredients, and considerable potential exists for exploitation of these bioactives as functional food ingredients. Substances such as n-3 oils, carotenoids, vitamins, minerals and peptides provide a myriad of health benefits, including reduction of cardiovascular diseases, anticarcinogenic and anti-inflammatory activities. New marine bioactives are recently gaining attention, since they could be helpful in combating chronic inflammatory degenerative conditions. The aim of this review is to examine the published studies concerning the potential pharmacological

  8. The relationship between sex and symmetry in thyroid eye disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kavoussi SC

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Shaheen C Kavoussi,1 Joseph N Giacometti,2 J Javier Servat,1 Flora Levin11Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Science, Yale University, New Haven, CT, USA; 2Cullen Eye Institute, Department of Ophthalmology, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX, USAPurpose: To examine the relationships between sex and symmetry in the context of disease activity, severity, and thyroid status in thyroid eye disease.Methods: Retrospective chart review of 31 men and 31 women with untreated thyroid eye disease. Subjective complaints, smoking status, thyroid status, and objective findings pertinent to the clinical activity score (CAS and “NO SPECS” classification were recorded. Overall disease asymmetry was defined as having simultaneous asymmetry of both more than one symptom and more than one external finding. Asymmetry was compared across sex and thyroid status. CAS and NO SPECS severity were compared across sex, symmetry, and thyroid status. Results: Asymmetric appearance was reported by 58% of men and 19% of women. Asymmetric proptosis (>2 mm difference was seen in 45% of men and 23% of women (P=0.036. Overall asymmetry was seen in 55% of men and 19% of women (P=0.017. Thyroid status and sex had a combined effect on symmetry, as 15 of 16 hyperthyroid females (94% demonstrated symmetric disease. Average NO SPECS severity was 3.5 (standard deviation [SD] 1.4 in men and 3.3 (SD 1.1 in women (P=0.51, and was 3.8 (SD 1.4 in asymmetric patients versus 3.2 (SD 1.3 in symmetric patients (P=0.08. The CAS was higher in asymmetric than symmetric patients (1.84 versus 0.97; P=0.012. Conclusion: Men demonstrated more asymmetric disease (proptosis and overall asymmetry than women, while hyperthyroid females demonstrated more symmetry than euthyroid and hypothyroid males and females. NO SPECS severity score was unaffected by sex, thyroid status, or symmetry. Asymmetric patients demonstrated higher clinical activity scores.Keywords: Graves

  9. The mediterranean diet model in inflammatory rheumatic diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Spinella

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The Mediterranean diet is based on a pattern of eating that’s closely tied to the Mediterranean region, which includes Greece and southern Italy. Essentially, the traditional diet emphasizes foods from plant sources, limited meat consumption, small amounts of wine and olive oil as the main fat source. The beneficial effects of the Mediterranean diet has been proven not only to cardiovascular diseases but also for diabetes, obesity, arthritis and cancer. Its anti-inflammatory and protective properties are linked to the large presence of ω-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids, vitamins, but especially to the constituents of extra virgin olive oil: oleic acid, phenolic compounds olecanthal, a new recently discovered molecule, with natural anti-inflammatory properties. It has been shown that the Mediterranean diet can reduce disease activity, pain and stiffness in patients with inflammatory arthritis and may thus constitute a valuable support for patients suffering from these diseases.

  10. Dry Eye Disease Incidence Associated with Chronic Graft-Host Disease: Nonconcurrent Cohort Study (An American Ophthalmological Society Thesis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mian, Shahzad I; De la Parra-Colín, Paola; De Melo-Franco, Rafael; Johnson, Christopher; Barrientos-Gutierrez, Tonatiuh

    2015-09-01

    To determine if chronic graft-versus-host disease (cGVHD) after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) is associated with stable or progressive dry eye disease and to determine the true incidence in patients with no prior history of dry eye disease. A nonconcurrent cohort study at a single institution with 136 patients who had no previous history of dry eye disease before HSCT. Survival analysis was used to estimate dry eye disease incidence. The incidence rate was calculated using life tables as the number of observed dry eye disease cases divided by the person-time at risk accumulated by the cohort. Transition probabilities were calculated from time of transplant to time of diagnosis, and then to last recorded visit. Incidence rate was 0.8 cases of dry eye disease per person-year, and half of the population at risk developed dry eye disease during the first 10 months post transplant. Time to develop dry eye disease was 2.5 months for mild dry eye disease, 9.6 months for moderate dry eye disease, and 13.2 months for severe dry eye disease. In terms of cumulative incidence, 73% of subjects developed dry eye disease (50% mild, 16% moderate, and 7% severe) at the time of diagnosis. Our findings suggest that dry eye disease associated with cGVHD is an extremely frequent event and shows a wide spectrum of severity, with a mild form presenting early and a moderate to severe form presenting later after HSCT. These findings need to be studied further to elucidate if these are two different pathophysiological entities or just different expressions of the same pathology.

  11. Dry Eye Disease Incidence Associated with Chronic Graft-Host Disease: Nonconcurrent Cohort Study (An American Ophthalmological Society Thesis)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mian, Shahzad I.; De la Parra-Colín, Paola; De Melo-Franco, Rafael; Johnson, Christopher; Barrientos-Gutierrez, Tonatiuh

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To determine if chronic graft-versus-host disease (cGVHD) after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) is associated with stable or progressive dry eye disease and to determine the true incidence in patients with no prior history of dry eye disease. Methods: A nonconcurrent cohort study at a single institution with 136 patients who had no previous history of dry eye disease before HSCT. Survival analysis was used to estimate dry eye disease incidence. The incidence rate was calculated using life tables as the number of observed dry eye disease cases divided by the person-time at risk accumulated by the cohort. Transition probabilities were calculated from time of transplant to time of diagnosis, and then to last recorded visit. Results: Incidence rate was 0.8 cases of dry eye disease per person-year, and half of the population at risk developed dry eye disease during the first 10 months post transplant. Time to develop dry eye disease was 2.5 months for mild dry eye disease, 9.6 months for moderate dry eye disease, and 13.2 months for severe dry eye disease. In terms of cumulative incidence, 73% of subjects developed dry eye disease (50% mild, 16% moderate, and 7% severe) at the time of diagnosis. Conclusions: Our findings suggest that dry eye disease associated with cGVHD is an extremely frequent event and shows a wide spectrum of severity, with a mild form presenting early and a moderate to severe form presenting later after HSCT. These findings need to be studied further to elucidate if these are two different pathophysiological entities or just different expressions of the same pathology. PMID:27507907

  12. Inflammatory Markers for Arterial Stiffness in Cardiovascular Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ioana Mozos

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Arterial stiffness predicts an increased risk of cardiovascular events. Inflammation plays a major role in large arteries stiffening, related to atherosclerosis, arteriosclerosis, endothelial dysfunction, smooth muscle cell migration, vascular calcification, increased activity of metalloproteinases, extracellular matrix degradation, oxidative stress, elastolysis, and degradation of collagen. The present paper reviews main mechanisms explaining the crosstalk between inflammation and arterial stiffness and the most common inflammatory markers associated with increased arterial stiffness, considering the most recent clinical and experimental studies. Diverse studies revealed significant correlations between the severity of arterial stiffness and inflammatory markers, such as white blood cell count, neutrophil/lymphocyte ratio, adhesion molecules, fibrinogen, C-reactive protein, cytokines, microRNAs, and cyclooxygenase-2, in patients with a broad variety of diseases, such as metabolic syndrome, diabetes, coronary heart disease, peripheral arterial disease, malignant and rheumatic disorders, polycystic kidney disease, renal transplant, familial Mediterranean fever, and oral infections, and in women with preeclampsia or after menopause. There is strong evidence that inflammation plays an important and, at least, partly reversible role in the development of arterial stiffness, and inflammatory markers may be useful additional tools in the assessment of the cardiovascular risk in clinical practice. Combined assessment of arterial stiffness and inflammatory markers may improve non-invasive assessment of cardiovascular risk, enabling selection of high-risk patients for prophylactic treatment or more regular medical examination. Development of future destiffening therapies may target pro-inflammatory mechanisms.

  13. Could Pomegranate Juice Help in the Control of Inflammatory Diseases?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesca Danesi

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Fruits rich in polyphenols, such as pomegranates, have been shown to have health benefits relating to their antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties. Using data obtained from PubMed and Scopus, this article provides a brief overview of the therapeutic effects of pomegranate on chronic inflammatory diseases (CID such as inflammatory bowel disease (IBD, rheumatoid arthritis (RA, metabolic and cardiovascular disorders, and other inflammatory-associated conditions, with an emphasis on fruit-derived juices. Most studies regarding the effects of pomegranate juice have focused on its ability to treat prostate cancer, diabetes, and atherosclerosis. However, pomegranate juice has shown therapeutic potential for many other illnesses. For instance, a small number of human clinical trials have highlighted the positive effects of pomegranate juice and extract consumption on cardiovascular health. The beneficial effects of pomegranate components have also been observed in animal models for respiratory diseases, RA, neurodegenerative disease, and hyperlipidaemia. Furthermore, there exists strong evidence from rodent models suggesting that pomegranate juice can be used to effectively treat IBD, and as an anti-inflammatory agent to treat CID. The effects of pomegranate intake should be further investigated by conducting larger and more well-defined human trials.

  14. Intestinal microbiota, probiotics and prebiotics in inflammatory bowel disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orel, Rok; Kamhi Trop, Tina

    2014-09-07

    It has been presumed that aberrant immune response to intestinal microorganisms in genetically predisposed individuals may play a major role in the pathogenesis of the inflammatory bowel disease, and there is a good deal of evidence supporting this hypothesis. Commensal enteric bacteria probably play a central role in pathogenesis, providing continuous antigenic stimulation that causes chronic intestinal injury. A strong biologic rationale supports the use of probiotics and prebiotics for inflammatory bowel disease therapy. Many probiotic strains exhibit anti-inflammatory properties through their effects on different immune cells, pro-inflammatory cytokine secretion depression, and the induction of anti-inflammatory cytokines. There is very strong evidence supporting the use of multispecies probiotic VSL#3 for the prevention or recurrence of postoperative pouchitis in patients. For treatment of active ulcerative colitis, as well as for maintenance therapy, the clinical evidence of efficacy is strongest for VSL#3 and Escherichia coli Nissle 1917. Moreover, some prebiotics, such as germinated barley foodstuff, Psyllium or oligofructose-enriched inulin, might provide some benefit in patients with active ulcerative colitis or ulcerative colitis in remission. The results of clinical trials in the treatment of active Crohn's disease or the maintenance of its remission with probiotics and prebiotics are disappointing and do not support their use in this disease. The only exception is weak evidence of advantageous use of Saccharomyces boulardii concomitantly with medical therapy in maintenance treatment.

  15. Prognosis and prognostic factors in inflammatory bowel disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thompson Nicholas

    1995-01-01

    Full Text Available The chance of normal survival for patients with inflammatory bowel disease is generally good. There may be a small excess mortality for those with Crohn′s disease; however recent studies do not confirm this trend. For those with ulcerative colitis, there may be an excess mortality in the first two years after diagnosis, especially in those who undergo surgery. The necessity for an operation varies, but at least 50% of patients with Crohn′s disease will be an operation in the first 10 years; whereas only about 20% of patients with ulcerative colitis will require a colectomy. Most patients with inflammatory bowel disease are able to lead a normal life and are not disabled by their disease. The prognosis in the elderly is usually good; however there is an increased mortality over younger patients, which is probably due to the presence of coexistent disease. Children also have a slightly higher mortality; this may be due to the relative frequency of a particularly extensive disease and the development of colorectal cancer. Growth retardation occurs in up to one-third of children with Crohn′s disease, but it may be resol" d if remission can be obtained. Pregnancy has not been shown to have an impact on inflammatory bowel disease, but its onset during pregnancy confers a significant risk for both mother and child. Extensive involvement is a poor prognosis factor in both diseases; conversely, isolated small bowel Crohn′s disease and ulcerative proctitis carry particularly good prognoses. A short clinical history, fistulae or abscesses at presentation probably represent an aggressive form of Crohn′s disease. Hypoalbuminemia, anemia and raised inflammatory markers are laboratory markers which suggest a worse prognosis in the short and possibly long-term.

  16. Probiotics: An overview and their role in inflammatory bowel disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Almeghaiseeb Ebtissam

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, novel insights have been gained into the role of bacterial microflora in health and disease. Commensal flora manipulation by probiotic bacteria has been investigated in human and experimental inflammatory bowel disease. Various probiotic species have shown promise in the treatment of ulcerative colitis, Crohn′s disease and pouchitis in small studies, although a clear clinical benefit remains to be established.

  17. Anti-Oxidant, Anti-Inflammatory and Anti-Angiogenic Properties of Resveratrol in Ocular Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allan Lançon

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Resveratrol (3,4′,5 trihydroxy-trans-stilbene is one of the best known phytophenols with pleiotropic properties. It is a phytoalexin produced by vine and it leads to the stimulation of natural plant defenses but also exhibits many beneficial effects in animals and humans by acting on a wide range of organs and tissues. These include the prevention of cardiovascular diseases, anti-cancer potential, neuroprotective effects, homeostasia maintenance, aging delay and a decrease in inflammation. Age-related macular degeneration (AMD is one of the main causes of deterioration of vision in adults in developed countries This review deals with resveratrol and ophthalmology by focusing on the antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and anti-angiogenic effects of this molecule. The literature reports that resveratrol is able to act on various cell types of the eye by increasing the level of natural antioxidant enzymatic and molecular defenses. Resveratrol anti-inflammatory effects are due to its capacity to limit the expression of pro-inflammatory factors, such as interleukins and prostaglandins, and also to decrease the chemo-attraction and recruitment of immune cells to the inflammatory site. In addition to this, resveratrol was shown to possess anti-VEGF effects and to inhibit the proliferation and migration of vascular endothelial cells. Resveratrol has the potential to be used in a range of human ocular diseases and conditions, based on animal models and in vitro experiments.

  18. Anti-Oxidant, Anti-Inflammatory and Anti-Angiogenic Properties of Resveratrol in Ocular Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lançon, Allan; Frazzi, Raffaele; Latruffe, Norbert

    2016-03-02

    Resveratrol (3,4',5 trihydroxy-trans-stilbene) is one of the best known phytophenols with pleiotropic properties. It is a phytoalexin produced by vine and it leads to the stimulation of natural plant defenses but also exhibits many beneficial effects in animals and humans by acting on a wide range of organs and tissues. These include the prevention of cardiovascular diseases, anti-cancer potential, neuroprotective effects, homeostasia maintenance, aging delay and a decrease in inflammation. Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is one of the main causes of deterioration of vision in adults in developed countries This review deals with resveratrol and ophthalmology by focusing on the antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and anti-angiogenic effects of this molecule. The literature reports that resveratrol is able to act on various cell types of the eye by increasing the level of natural antioxidant enzymatic and molecular defenses. Resveratrol anti-inflammatory effects are due to its capacity to limit the expression of pro-inflammatory factors, such as interleukins and prostaglandins, and also to decrease the chemo-attraction and recruitment of immune cells to the inflammatory site. In addition to this, resveratrol was shown to possess anti-VEGF effects and to inhibit the proliferation and migration of vascular endothelial cells. Resveratrol has the potential to be used in a range of human ocular diseases and conditions, based on animal models and in vitro experiments.

  19. Lymphocyte homing antagonists in the treatment of inflammatory bowel diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saruta, Masayuki; Papadakis, Konstantinos A

    2014-09-01

    Lymphocyte homing antagonists represent promising therapeutic agents for the treatment of idiopathic inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Several critical molecules involved in the recruitment of inflammatory cells in the intestine, including integrins and chemokine receptors, have been successfully targeted for the treatment of IBD. These agents have shown great promise for the induction and maintenance of remission for both Crohn disease and ulcerative colitis. This article discusses currently approved prototypic agents for the treatment of IBD (natalizumab, anti-α4 integrin; vedolizumab, anti-α4β7 integrin), and several other agents in the same class currently under development. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Perceptions of Eye Diseases and Eye Care Needs of Children among Parents in Rural South India: The Kariapatti Pediatric Eye Evaluation Project (KEEP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nirmalan Praveen

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available We conducted 24 focus group discussions for parents and grandparents as part of a population-based survey of ocular morbidity to determine awareness and perceptions of eye diseases in children among parents and guardians of children in a rural south Indian population. Focus group discussions were conducted separately for mothers, fathers and grandparents. They were audiotaped and subsequently transcribed to the local language and English. Content analysis of the focus group discussions was done to identify key concepts, and this yielded five broad areas of interest relating to awareness and attitudes towards: 1 eye problems in children, 2 specific eye diseases in children, 3 vision problems in children, 4 existing health practices, and 5 utilization of services. Vision impairment did not figure in the top ten eye problems cited for children. There was a predominant belief that children below 4 years should not wear spectacles. Strabismus was considered as untreatable and was seen as a sign of good luck. Differing advice provided by the medical community for the same condition was an issue. The discussions also brought out that eye doctors were approached last for eye care, after traditional healers and general physicians. The discussions raise several issues of relevance that eye care programs need to address for better community involvement with programs. This will require a far greater focus than the current curative focus adopted by most programs.

  1. Recent advances in inflammatory bowel disease

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2009-05-12

    May 12, 2009 ... Osteoporosis has been increasingly recog- nised in patients with ... or UC, the risk of osteoporosis appears similar. ... –2.5) screening for other causes of low bone ..... restores growth in children with Crohn's disease. Dig Liver ...

  2. Phenomics in Autoimmune and Inflammatory Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-12-12

    Healthy Volunteer; Rheumatoid Arthritis; Ankylosing Spondylitis; Systemic Lupus Erythematosus/Antiphospholipid Syndrome; FMF; Cryopyrin-Associated Periodic Syndromes /TNF-receptor Associated Periodic Syndrome; Vasculitis; Uveitis; Myositis; Crohn's Disease; Ulcerative Rectocolitis; Type 1 Diabetes; Unclassified IAD Knee and/or Hip Arthritis, Muscular Dystrophy

  3. Phlyctenular eye disease in association with Hymenolepis nana in Egypt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Hussaini, M K; Khalifa, R; Al-Ansary, A T; Hussain, G H; Moustafa, K M

    1979-01-01

    It had been previously noticed that infection with parasites was common in children suffering from phlyctenulosis. In the present study the stools of 471 patients suffering from phlyctenular disease were examined and it was found that 62.6% of them had Hymenolepis nana ova in their stools as compared with 10.8% of the controls. All patients had Hymenolipis nana immune sera. Many of these patients had abdominal symptoms. Hymenolepis nana is a cestode parasite discovered by Bilharz in Cairo in 1851. Infections with it have the same age incidence and geographical distribution as phlyctenular eye disease. It has a tissue stage responsible for a state of hypersensitivity which is thought to be responsible for the phlyctenules. PMID:486380

  4. [Parkinson Disease With Rapid Eye Movement Sleep Behavior Disorder].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Yang; Zhang, Wei

    2015-06-01

    Rapid eye movement (REM) sleep behavior disorder (RBD) is characterized by lack of muscle atonia during REM sleep and enactment of dream content. RBD is associated with Parkinson disease (PD) and has high incidence in PD patients. PD patient with RBD mainly presents rigid type, has longer disease duration, more severe motor and non-motor symptoms and poorer activity of daily living and life quality. The pathophysiological mechanisms of RBD may be related to dysfunctions of pontine tegmentum, locus coeruleus/sub-locus coeruleus complex and related projections. The diagnosis of RBD depends on clinical histories and video-polysomnography (v-PSG). Besides treatment for PD, protective measures have to be taken for patients and their sleep partners. If abnormal behaviors during sleep cause distress and danger,patients should be given drug therapy.

  5. Spiral CT colonography in inflammatory bowel disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tarjan, Zsolt E-mail: tarjan@radi.sote.hu; Zagoni, Tamas; Gyoerke, Tamas; Mester, Adam; Karlinger, Kinga; Mako, Erno K

    2000-09-01

    Objective: Most of the studies on virtual colonoscopy are dealing with the role of detecting colorectal polyps or neoplasms. We have undertaken this study to evaluate the value of CT colonography in patients with colonic Crohn's disease. Methods and material: Five patients (three males, two females, 23-51 years, mean age 42 years) with known (4) or suspected (1) Crohn's disease of the colon underwent fiberoptic colonoscopy and CT colonography in the same day or during a 1-week period. The images were evaluated with the so called zoomed axial slice movie technique and in some regions intra- and extraluminal surface shaded and volume rendered images were generated on a separate workstation. The results were compared to those of a colonoscopy. Results: The final diagnosis was Crohn's disease in four patients and colitis ulcerosa in one. Total examination was possible by colonoscopy in two cases, and with CT colonography in all five cases. The wall of those segments severely affected by the disease were depicted by the axial CT scans to be thickened. The thick walled, segments with narrow lumen seen on CT colonography corresponded to the regions where colonoscopy was failed to pass. Air filled sinus tracts, thickening of the wall of the terminal ileum, loss of haustration pseudopolyps and deep ulcers were seen in CT colonography. Three dimensional (3D) endoluminal views demonstrated pseudopolyps similar to endoscopic images None of the colonoscopically reported shallow ulcerations or aphtoid ulcerations or granular mucosal surface were observed on 2- or 3D CT colonographic images. Conclusion: CT colonography by depicting colonic wall thickening seems to be a useful tool in the diagnosis of Crohn's colitis, which could be a single examination depicting the intraluminal, and transmural extent of the disease.

  6. Measurement and clinical implications of choroidal thickness in patients with inflammatory bowel disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ibrahim Koral Onal

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACTPurpose:Ocular inflammation is a frequent extraintestinal manifestation of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD and may parallel disease activity. In this study, we evaluated the utility of a choroidal thickness measurement in assessing IBD activity.Methods:A total of 62 eyes of 31 patients with IBD [Crohn's disease (CD, n=10 and ulcerative colitis (UC, n=21] and 104 eyes of 52 healthy blood donors were included in this study. Choroidal thickness was measured using enhanced depth imaging optical coherence tomography. The Crohn's disease activity index (CDAI and the modified Truelove Witts score were used to assess disease activity in CD and UC, respectively.Results:No significant differences in mean subfoveal, nasal 3000 μm, or temporal 3000 μm choroidal thickness measurements (P>0.05 for all were observed between IBD patients and healthy controls. Age, smoking, CD site of involvement (ileal and ileocolonic involvement, CDAI, CD activity, and UC endoscopic activity index were all found to be significantly correlated with choroidal thickness by univariate analysis (P<0.05. Smoking (P<0.05 and the CD site of involvement (P<0.01 were the only independent parameters associated with increased choroidal thickness at all measurement locations.Conclusions:Choroidal thickness is not a useful marker of disease activity in patients with IBD but may be an indicator of ileal involvement in patients with CD.

  7. Job Strain and the Risk of Inflammatory Bowel Diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heikkilä, Katriina; Madsen, Ida E H; Nyberg, Solja T;

    2014-01-01

    -Work Consortium. Work-related psychosocial stress was operationalised as job strain (a combination of high demands and low control at work) and was self-reported at baseline. Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis were ascertained from national hospitalisation and drug reimbursement registers. The associations...... between job strain and inflammatory bowel disease outcomes were modelled using Cox proportional hazards regression. The study-specific results were combined in random effects meta-analyses. RESULTS: Of the 95,379 participants who were free of inflammatory bowel disease at baseline, 111 men and women...... developed Crohn's disease and 414 developed ulcerative colitis during follow-up. Job strain at baseline was not associated with incident Crohn's disease (multivariable-adjusted random effects hazard ratio: 0.83, 95% confidence interval: 0.48, 1.43) or ulcerative colitis (hazard ratio: 1.06, 95% CI: 0.76, 1...

  8. Mucosal biomarkers in inflammatory bowel disease:Key pathogenic players or disease predictors?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Franco; Scaldaferrii; Carmen; Correale; Antonio; Gasbarrini; Silvio; Danese

    2010-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel diseases(IBDs) are chronic inflammatory disorders of the bowel,including ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease.A single etiology has not been identified,but rather the pathogenesis of IBD is very complex and involves several major and minor contributors,employing different inflammatory pathways which have different roles in different patients.Although new and powerful medical treatments are available,many are biological drugs or immunosuppressants,which are associated with significant si...

  9. Noninvasive Testing for Mucosal Inflammation in Inflammatory Bowel Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iborra, Marisa; Beltrán, Belén; Nos, Pilar

    2016-10-01

    Biomarkers have gained increasing attention for the diagnosis and follow-up of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Endoscopy remains the gold standard for assessing disease activity. Biomarkers are rapid, inexpensive, and noninvasive, and can be used in different stages of the disease with high sensitivity and specificity. Calprotectin and tests for C-reactive protein are used to assess the disease activity, predict relapse, and monitor treatment response. New noninvasive tests are being studied. This review discusses current evidence for these surrogate markers, their potential clinical applications, and limitations in disease management. We highlight recent advances in IBD biomarkers and future uses.

  10. The Role of Physical Exercise in Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Bilski

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We reviewed and analyzed the relationship between physical exercise and inflammatory bowel disease (IBD which covers a group of chronic, relapsing, and remitting intestinal disorders including Crohn’s disease (CD and ulcerative colitis. The etiology of IBD likely involves a combination of genetic predisposition and environmental risk factors. Physical training has been suggested to be protective against the onset of IBD, but there are inconsistencies in the findings of the published literature. Hypertrophy of the mesenteric white adipose tissue (mWAT is recognized as a characteristic feature of CD, but its importance for the perpetuation of onset of this intestinal disease is unknown. Adipocytes synthesize proinflammatory and anti-inflammatory cytokines. Hypertrophy of mWAT could play a role as a barrier to the inflammatory process, but recent data suggest that deregulation of adipokine secretion is involved in the pathogenesis of CD. Adipocytokines and macrophage mediators perpetuate the intestinal inflammatory process, leading to mucosal ulcerations along the mesenteric border, a typical feature of CD. Contracting skeletal muscles release biologically active myokines, known to exert the direct anti-inflammatory effects, and inhibit the release of proinflammatory mediators from visceral fat. Further research is required to confirm these observations and establish exercise regimes for IBD patients.

  11. Chronic inflammatory diseases and cardiovascular risk: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roifman, Idan; Beck, Paul L; Anderson, Todd J; Eisenberg, Mark J; Genest, Jacques

    2011-01-01

    Despite recent advancements in the treatment of coronary artery disease (CAD), it remains the number one cause of death in the world. While traditional risk factors partially account for the development of CAD, other novel risk factors have recently been implicated. Specifically, chronic inflammation has been postulated to play a role in the development and propagation of this disease. The purpose of this systematic review is to examine the available evidence to determine if patients with chronic inflammatory diseases have higher rates of cardiovascular disease. A MEDLINE search was conducted for articles published between 1980-2009. We focused on studies that assessed hard cardiovascular endpoints in subjects with chronic inflammatory conditions such as systemic lupus erythematosus, rheumatoid arthritis, ankylosing spondylitis, psoriatic arthritis, polymyositis/dermatomyositis, and inflammatory bowel disease. Although largely based on small studies, our review indicates that patients with chronic inflammatory conditions are likely at elevated risk for the development of CAD. Further research consisting of prospective cohort studies is needed to better quantify this risk.

  12. Changes of the cytokine profile in inflammatory bowel diseases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gy(o)rgyi Müzes; Béla Molnár; Zsolt Tulassay; Ferenc Sipos

    2012-01-01

    Cytokines are indispensable signals of the mucosaassociated immune system for maintaining normal gut homeostasis.An imbalance of their profile in favour of inflammation initiation may lead to disease states,such as that is observed in inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD).Although Crohn's disease (CD) is often described as a prototype of T-helper 1-type diseases,and ulcerative colitis (UC) is traditionally viewed as a T-helper 2-mediated condition,the classic paradigm,which categorises cytokines into pro-and anti-inflammatory groups,has recently been changed.The inflammation regulatory pathways may not be mutually exclusive as individual cytokines can have diverse and even opposing functions in various clinical and immunological settings.None the less there are many common immunological responses in IBD that are mediated by cytokines.Although they regulate and influence the development,course and recurrence of the inflammatory process,the concrete pathogenic role of these small signaling molecules is sometimes not unambiguous in the subtypes of the disease.Our aim is to review the current information about pro-and anti-inflammatory effects of traditionally studied and recently discovered cytokines in the pathogenesis of UC and CD.The better understanding of their production and functional activity may lead to the development of new therapeutic modalities.

  13. Inflammatory bowel disease: An archetype disorder of outer environment sensor systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Actis, Giovanni C; Rosina, Floriano

    2013-08-06

    The pathogenesis of the two inflammatory bowel diseases (IBDs) phenotypes ulcerative colitis (UC) and Crohn's disease (CD) has remained elusive, thus frustrating attempts at defining a cure. IBD often presents as a complex inflammatory process wherein colon lesions (UC) or widespread ulceration and fissure (CD) might be accompanied by ancillary extra-intestinal manifestations involving the eye, skin, joints or liver, but also by full-blown "autoimmune" disorders from psoriasis and multiple sclerosis to rheumatoid arthritis; attempts at unraveling a link or a hierarchical order in these entities have proven almost fruitless. More recently, the input of genetics has suggested that the IBDs might be multi-organ inflammatory processes, elicited by a large number of low-penetrance susceptibility genes, with environmental factors needed to induce full-blown disease. At a noteworthy exception to this rule, the description of the nucleotide-oligomerization domain (NOD) gene mutations in CD came at the beginning of the 2000s: the NOD-LRR are part of a highly conserved microbial sensor system which respond to bacterial peptidoglycans by mounting an inflammatory response. At least in Caucasian patients, the prevalently loss-of-function mutation of NOD permitted to unexpectedly define CD as an immune deficiency state, and upon its recent description in apparently unrelated disorders such as the Blau syndrome (a granulomatous pediatric syndrome), and perhaps in psoriasis and chronic obstructive pulmonary disorders, has contributed to revolutionize our view of IBD and CD in particular. The latter affection, together with psoriasis and chronic pulmonary disease can now be included into a newly identified category named "barrier organ disease", wherein a barrier organ is defined as a large mucosal or epithelial surface with an abundant metagenomic microbial population and an underneath reactive tissue, the whole structure being in contact with the outer environment and capable to

  14. The bacterial microbiota in inflammatory lung diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huffnagle, Gary B; Dickson, Robert P

    2015-08-01

    Numerous lines of evidence, ranging from recent studies back to those in the 1920s, have demonstrated that the lungs are NOT bacteria-free during health. We have recently proposed that the entire respiratory tract should be considered a single ecosystem extending from the nasal and oral cavities to the alveoli, which includes gradients and niches that modulate microbiome dispersion, retention, survival and proliferation. Bacterial exposure and colonization of the lungs during health is most likely constant and transient, respectively. Host microanatomy, cell biology and innate defenses are altered during chronic lung disease, which in turn, alters the dynamics of bacterial turnover in the lungs and can lead to longer term bacterial colonization, as well as blooms of well-recognized respiratory bacterial pathogens. A few new respiratory colonizers have been identified by culture-independent methods, such as Pseudomonas fluorescens; however, the role of these bacteria in respiratory disease remains to be determined.

  15. The Bacterial Microbiota in Inflammatory Lung Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huffnagle, Gary B.; Dickson, Robert P.

    2016-01-01

    Numerous lines of evidence, ranging from recent studies back to those in the 1920's, have demonstrated that the lungs are NOT bacteria-free during health. We have recently proposed that the entire respiratory tract should be considered a single ecosystem extending from the nasal and oral cavities to the alveoli, which includes gradients and niches that modulate microbiome dispersion, retention, survival and proliferation. Bacterial exposure and colonization of the lungs during health is most likely constant and transient, respectively. Host microanatomy, cell biology and innate defenses are altered during chronic lung disease, which in turn, alters the dynamics of bacterial turnover in the lungs and can lead to longer term bacterial colonization, as well as blooms of well-recognized respiratory bacterial pathogens. A few new respiratory colonizers have been identified by culture-independent methods, such as Pseudomonas fluorescens; however, the role of these bacteria in respiratory disease remains to be determined. PMID:26122174

  16. Magnetic resonance imaging in inflammatory rheumatoid diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sudoł-Szopińska, Iwona; Mróz, Joanna; Ostrowska, Monika; Kwiatkowska, Brygida

    2016-01-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) is used more and more frequently to diagnose changes in the musculoskeletal system in the course of rheumatic diseases, at their initial assessment, for treatment monitoring and for identification of complications. The article presents the history of magnetic resonance imaging, the basic principles underlying its operation as well as types of magnets, coils and MRI protocols used in the diagnostic process of rheumatic diseases. It enumerates advantages and disadvantages of individual MRI scanners. The principles of MRI coil operation are explained, and the sequences used for MR image analysis are described, particularly in terms of their application in rheumatology, including T1-, T2-, PD-weighted, STIR/TIRM and contrast-enhanced T1-weighted images. Furthermore, views on the need to use contrast agents to optimise diagnosis, particularly in synovitis-like changes, are presented. Finally, methods for the assessment of MR images are listed, including the semi-quantitative method by RAMRIS and quantitative dynamic examination.

  17. [Biological treatment of rare inflammatory rheumatic diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baslund, B.

    2008-01-01

    The current status of the use of biological medicine in the treatment of adult onset morbus still, Wegeners granulomatosis and systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is reviewed. The need for controlled trials is emphasized. Anti-CD20 treatment for SLE patients with kidney involvement and patients wi...... with Wegeners granulomatosis seems promising. Anti-TNF and IL1 receptor antagonist can control disease activity in most patients with adult morbus still Udgivelsesdato: 2008/6/9...

  18. Genomic responses in mouse models poorly mimic human inflammatory diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seok, Junhee; Warren, H Shaw; Cuenca, Alex G; Mindrinos, Michael N; Baker, Henry V; Xu, Weihong; Richards, Daniel R; McDonald-Smith, Grace P; Gao, Hong; Hennessy, Laura; Finnerty, Celeste C; López, Cecilia M; Honari, Shari; Moore, Ernest E; Minei, Joseph P; Cuschieri, Joseph; Bankey, Paul E; Johnson, Jeffrey L; Sperry, Jason; Nathens, Avery B; Billiar, Timothy R; West, Michael A; Jeschke, Marc G; Klein, Matthew B; Gamelli, Richard L; Gibran, Nicole S; Brownstein, Bernard H; Miller-Graziano, Carol; Calvano, Steve E; Mason, Philip H; Cobb, J Perren; Rahme, Laurence G; Lowry, Stephen F; Maier, Ronald V; Moldawer, Lyle L; Herndon, David N; Davis, Ronald W; Xiao, Wenzhong; Tompkins, Ronald G

    2013-02-26

    A cornerstone of modern biomedical research is the use of mouse models to explore basic pathophysiological mechanisms, evaluate new therapeutic approaches, and make go or no-go decisions to carry new drug candidates forward into clinical trials. Systematic studies evaluating how well murine models mimic human inflammatory diseases are nonexistent. Here, we show that, although acute inflammatory stresses from different etiologies result in highly similar genomic responses in humans, the responses in corresponding mouse models correlate poorly with the human conditions and also, one another. Among genes changed significantly in humans, the murine orthologs are close to random in matching their human counterparts (e.g., R(2) between 0.0 and 0.1). In addition to improvements in the current animal model systems, our study supports higher priority for translational medical research to focus on the more complex human conditions rather than relying on mouse models to study human inflammatory diseases.

  19. Adenosine: An immune modulator of inflammatory bowel diseases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jeff Huaqing Ye; Vazhaikkurichi M Rajendran

    2009-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is a common and lifelong disabling gastrointestinal disease. Emerging treatments are being developed to target inflammatory cytokines which initiate and perpetuate the immune response. Adenosine is an important modulator of inflammation and its anti-inflammatory effects have been well established in humans as well as in animal models. High extracellular adenosine suppresses and resolves chronic inflammation in IBD models. High extracellular adenosine levels could be achieved by enhanced adenosine absorption and increased de novo synthesis. Increased adenosine concentration leads to activation of the A2a receptor on the cell surface of immune and epithelial cells that would be a potential therapeutic target for chronic intestinal inflammation. Adenosine is transported via concentrative nucleoside transporter and equilibrative nucleoside transporter transporters that are localized in apical and basolateral membranes of intestinal epithelial cells, respectively. Increased extracellular adenosine levels activate the A2a receptor, which would reduce cytokines responsible for chronic inflammation.

  20. Matrix Metalloproteinases in Inflammatory Bowel Disease: An Update

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shane O’Sullivan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs are known to be upregulated in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD and other inflammatory conditions, but while their involvement is clear, their role in many settings has yet to be determined. Studies of the involvement of MMPs in IBD since 2006 have revealed an array of immune and stromal cells which release the proteases in response to inflammatory cytokines and growth factors. Through digestion of the extracellular matrix and cleavage of bioactive proteins, a huge diversity of roles have been revealed for the MMPs in IBD, where they have been shown to regulate epithelial barrier function, immune response, angiogenesis, fibrosis, and wound healing. For this reason, MMPs have been recognised as potential biomarkers for disease activity in IBD and inhibition remains a huge area of interest. This review describes new roles of MMPs in the pathophysiology of IBD and suggests future directions for the development of treatment strategies in this condition.

  1. Genomic responses in mouse models poorly mimic human inflammatory diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seok, Junhee; Warren, H. Shaw; Cuenca, Alex G.; Mindrinos, Michael N.; Baker, Henry V.; Xu, Weihong; Richards, Daniel R.; McDonald-Smith, Grace P.; Gao, Hong; Hennessy, Laura; Finnerty, Celeste C.; López, Cecilia M.; Honari, Shari; Moore, Ernest E.; Minei, Joseph P.; Cuschieri, Joseph; Bankey, Paul E.; Johnson, Jeffrey L.; Sperry, Jason; Nathens, Avery B.; Billiar, Timothy R.; West, Michael A.; Jeschke, Marc G.; Klein, Matthew B.; Gamelli, Richard L.; Gibran, Nicole S.; Brownstein, Bernard H.; Miller-Graziano, Carol; Calvano, Steve E.; Mason, Philip H.; Cobb, J. Perren; Rahme, Laurence G.; Lowry, Stephen F.; Maier, Ronald V.; Moldawer, Lyle L.; Herndon, David N.; Davis, Ronald W.; Xiao, Wenzhong; Tompkins, Ronald G.; Abouhamze, Amer; Balis, Ulysses G. J.; Camp, David G.; De, Asit K.; Harbrecht, Brian G.; Hayden, Douglas L.; Kaushal, Amit; O’Keefe, Grant E.; Kotz, Kenneth T.; Qian, Weijun; Schoenfeld, David A.; Shapiro, Michael B.; Silver, Geoffrey M.; Smith, Richard D.; Storey, John D.; Tibshirani, Robert; Toner, Mehmet; Wilhelmy, Julie; Wispelwey, Bram; Wong, Wing H

    2013-01-01

    A cornerstone of modern biomedical research is the use of mouse models to explore basic pathophysiological mechanisms, evaluate new therapeutic approaches, and make go or no-go decisions to carry new drug candidates forward into clinical trials. Systematic studies evaluating how well murine models mimic human inflammatory diseases are nonexistent. Here, we show that, although acute inflammatory stresses from different etiologies result in highly similar genomic responses in humans, the responses in corresponding mouse models correlate poorly with the human conditions and also, one another. Among genes changed significantly in humans, the murine orthologs are close to random in matching their human counterparts (e.g., R2 between 0.0 and 0.1). In addition to improvements in the current animal model systems, our study supports higher priority for translational medical research to focus on the more complex human conditions rather than relying on mouse models to study human inflammatory diseases. PMID:23401516

  2. Enterobius Vermicularis-Associated Pelvic Inflammatory Disease in a Child.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mentessidou, Anastasia; Theocharides, Constantine; Patoulias, Ioannis; Panteli, Christina

    2016-04-01

    Enterobius vermicularis is the most highly prevalent intestinal worm in childhood and is generally considered of low pathogenicity. Little is known about the inflammatory complications of the female genital tract induced by E. vermicularis in childhood. A case of E. vermicularis-associated pelvic inflammatory disease with right salpingitis mimicking acute abdomen due to appendicitis in an 11-year-old girl is presented. E. vermicularis-related pelvic inflammatory disease should be included in the differential diagnosis of abdominal pain in children. Increased awareness is necessary to avoid an unnecessary surgery and to choose the correct antibiotic treatment. Copyright © 2016 North American Society for Pediatric and Adolescent Gynecology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Applying genetics in inflammatory disease drug discovery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Folkersen, Lasse; Biswas, Shameek; Frederiksen, Klaus Stensgaard

    2015-01-01

    Recent groundbreaking work in genetics has identified thousands of small-effect genetic variants throughout the genome that are associated with almost all major diseases. These genome-wide association studies (GWAS) are often proposed as a source of future medical breakthroughs. However......, with several notable exceptions, the journey from a small-effect genetic variant to a functional drug has proven arduous, and few examples of actual contributions to drug discovery exist. Here, we discuss novel approaches of overcoming this hurdle by using instead public genetics resources as a pragmatic guide...... alongside existing drug discovery methods. Our aim is to evaluate human genetic confidence as a rationale for drug target selection....

  4. Risk factors for astigmatism in preschool children: the multi-ethnic pediatric eye disease and Baltimore pediatric eye disease studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKean-Cowdin, Roberta; Varma, Rohit; Cotter, Susan A; Tarczy-Hornoch, Kristina; Borchert, Mark S; Lin, Jesse H; Wen, Ge; Azen, Stanley P; Torres, Mina; Tielsch, James M; Friedman, David S; Repka, Michael X; Katz, Joanne; Ibironke, Josephine; Giordano, Lydia

    2011-10-01

    To evaluate risk factors for astigmatism in a population-based sample of preschool children. Population-based cross-sectional study. Population-based samples of 9970 children ages 6 to 72 months from Los Angeles County, California, and Baltimore, Maryland. A cross-sectional study of children participating in the Multiethnic Pediatric Eye Disease Study and the Baltimore Eye Disease Study was completed. Data were obtained by clinical examination or by in-person interview. Odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were calculated to evaluate potential associations between clinical, behavioral, or demographic factors and astigmatism. Odds ratios (ORs) for various risk factors associated with astigmatism. Participants with myopia (≤-1.0 diopters) were 4.6 times as likely to have astigmatism (95% CI, 3.56-5.96) than those without refractive error, whereas participants with hyperopia (≥+2.00 diopters) were 1.6 times as likely (95% CI, 1.39-1.94). Children 6 to materials discussed in this article. Copyright © 2011 American Academy of Ophthalmology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. ANTI-CYTOKINE THERAPY FOR CHILDREN WITH INFLAMMATORY BOWEL DISEASES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.S. Potapov

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The article describes the findings of a pilot research devoted to the estimation of the efficiency of a therapy with TNF α inhibitors for children with inflammatory bowel diseases. Methods: we carried out the retrospective analysis for a therapy with Infliximab in 15 children with a nonspecific ulcerative colitis and Сrohn's disease. Results: 66% of the children with inflammatory bowel diseases react to the first injection of Infliximab, whereas 13% of the children demonstrate a clinical remission of their diseases. After the third injection, a positive response to the used therapy is shown by 60% of the children with inflammatory bowel diseases, and 33% of the children are diagnosed with a clinical remission. Conclusion: The use of Infliximab allowed the children with a refractory course of nonspecific ulcerative colitis and Сrohn's disease to make their inflammation significantly less active and improve the quality of their life.Key words: nonspecific ulcerative colitis, Сrohn's disease, treatment, TNF α inhibitors, children

  6. Role of antibiotics for treatment of inflammatory bowel disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nitzan, Orna; Elias, Mazen; Peretz, Avi; Saliba, Walid

    2016-01-21

    Inflammatory bowel disease is thought to be caused by an aberrant immune response to gut bacteria in a genetically susceptible host. The gut microbiota plays an important role in the pathogenesis and complications of the two main inflammatory bowel diseases: Crohn's disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis. Alterations in gut microbiota, and specifically reduced intestinal microbial diversity, have been found to be associated with chronic gut inflammation in these disorders. Specific bacterial pathogens, such as virulent Escherichia coli strains, Bacteroides spp, and Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis, have been linked to the pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel disease. Antibiotics may influence the course of these diseases by decreasing concentrations of bacteria in the gut lumen and altering the composition of intestinal microbiota. Different antibiotics, including ciprofloxacin, metronidazole, the combination of both, rifaximin, and anti-tuberculous regimens have been evaluated in clinical trials for the treatment of inflammatory bowel disease. For the treatment of active luminal CD, antibiotics may have a modest effect in decreasing disease activity and achieving remission, and are more effective in patients with disease involving the colon. Rifamixin, a non absorbable rifamycin has shown promising results. Treatment of suppurative complications of CD such as abscesses and fistulas, includes drainage and antibiotic therapy, most often ciprofloxacin, metronidazole, or a combination of both. Antibiotics might also play a role in maintenance of remission and prevention of post operative recurrence of CD. Data is more sparse for ulcerative colitis, and mostly consists of small trials evaluating ciprofloxacin, metronidazole and rifaximin. Most trials did not show a benefit for the treatment of active ulcerative colitis with antibiotics, though 2 meta-analyses concluded that antibiotic therapy is associated with a modest improvement in clinical symptoms

  7. [Changes in the epidemiology of inflammatory bowel diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakatos, László; Lakatos, Péter László

    2007-02-04

    Significant changes have been observed in the epidemiology of inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) in the last two decades. Traditionally, the incidence of IBD was higher in the developed, industrialized countries, in contrast, nowadays it became more prevalent in the previously low incidence areas. In particular, the incidence of ulcerative colitis (UC) is similar to that observed in North America and Western Europe, while the incidence of Crohn's disease (CD) in developing countries is still low, suggesting that the environmental factors may act faster or differently in UC than in CD. In Europe, the North to South gradient disappeared, and also the West to East gradient is diminishing. Smoking and appendectomy may be considered as important environmental factors in both UC and CD, however, with opposite effects. In addition, the use of oral contraceptives is associated to disease susceptibility in both diseases. The role of diet, perinatal events, stress and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs in the pathogenesis is still controversial.

  8. Retrograde spreading of hydrocortisone enema in inflammatory bowel disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jay, M.; Digenis, G.A.; Foster, T.S.; Antonow, D.R.

    1986-02-01

    A hydrocortisone suspension enema was radiolabeled with (/sup 99m/Tc)technetium sulfur colloid and administered to four normal subjects and eight patients with varying degrees of inflammatory bowel disease. The extent of enema spreading was monitored using external scintigraphy for a period of up to 4 hr after administration. Pretreatment of normal subjects with an evacuation enema resulted in spreading of the radiolabeled enema throughout the entire colon. In seven of the eight patients studied, the enema migrated a distance equal to or greater than the extent of disease involvement. An in vivo stability study with an indium-111-labeled enema, using the perturbed angular correlation technique, revealed that the enema retains its stability for up to 90 min after administration. These results indicate that the use of hydrocortisone enemas may not be restricted to distal bowel disease, but may also be effective in inflammatory bowel diseases involving proximal regions of the colon.

  9. ANEMIA IN INFLAMMATORY BOWEL DISEASE MORE THAN AN EXTRAINTESTINAL COMPLICATION.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemeş, Roxana Maria; Pop, Corina Silvia; Calagiu, Dorina; Dobrin, Denisa; Chetroiu, Diana; Jantea, Petruta; Postolache, Paraschiva

    2016-01-01

    The most common hematologic complication of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD)--ulcerative colitis and Crohn's Disease is anemia. Anemia in patients with IBD may be a result of iron, vitamin B12 or folate deficiency; anemia of chronic disease and hemolytic anemia are other causes in these patients. Factors contributing to the development of anemia include chronic gastrointestinal blood loss, vitamin B12 malabsorption secondary to terminal ileitis, folate deficiency as a result of sulfasalazine therapy. Approximately 30% of patients with IBD have hemoglobin levels below 12 g/dl. The risk of developing anemia relates to disease activity, given that blood loss and inflammatory anemia are triggered by intestinal inflammation. In the management strategy of IBD patients with anemia it is important to distinguish between the different types of anemia in order to decide an appropriate manner of treatment.

  10. Smoking in inflammatory bowel diseases: good, bad or ugly?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakatos, Peter Laszlo; Szamosi, Tamas; Lakatos, Laszlo

    2007-12-14

    Smoking is an important environmental factor in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), having different effects in ulcerative colitis (UC) and Crohn's disease (CD). A recent meta-analysis partially confirmed previous findings that smoking was found to be protective against ulcerative colitis and, after onset of the disease, might improve its course, decreasing the need for colectomy. However, smoking increases the risk of developing CD and worsens its course, increasing the need for steroids, immunosuppressants and re-operations. Smoking cessation aggravates ulcerative colitis and improves CD. Data are however, largely conflictive as well as the potential mechanisms involved in this dual relationship are still unknown. In this review article, the authors review the role of smoking in inflammatory bowel diseases.

  11. IL-8 as antibody therapeutic target in inflammatory diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skov, Lone; Beurskens, Frank J; Zachariae, Claus O C

    2008-01-01

    IL-8 is a chemokine that has been implicated in a number of inflammatory diseases involving neutrophil activation. HuMab 10F8 is a novel fully human mAb against IL-8, which binds a discontinuous epitope on IL-8 overlapping the receptor binding site, and which effectively neutralizes IL-8-dependen...

  12. Vaccination of patients with autoimmune inflammatory rheumatic diseases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Westra, Johanna; Rondaan, Christien; van Assen, Sander; Bijl, Marc

    2015-01-01

    Patients with autoimmune inflammatory rheumatic diseases (AIRDs) are at increased risk of infections. This risk has been further increased by the introduction of biologic agents over the past two decades. One of the most effective strategies to prevent infection is vaccination. However, patients wit

  13. Inflammatory glycoproteins in cardiometabolic disorders, autoimmune diseases and cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Connelly, Margery A.; Gruppen, Eke G.; Otvos, James D.; Dullaart, Robin P. F.

    2016-01-01

    The physiological function initially attributed to the oligosaccharide moieties or glycans on inflammatory glycoproteins was to improve protein stability. However, it is now clear that glycans play a prominent role in glycoprotein structure and function and in some cases contribute to disease

  14. European guideline for the management of pelvic inflammatory disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ross, J; Judlin, P; Nilas, Lisbeth

    2007-01-01

    Pelvic inflammatory disease (PID) remains one of the most important consequences of sexually transmitted infections (STIs) resulting in severe morbidity and acting as the economic justification for STI screening programmes. Early and appropriate therapy has the potential to significantly reduce t...

  15. What's new about inflammatory bowel diseases in 2011

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JonasMudter

    2011-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) are chronic disorders of the intestine with increasing incidence in Europe, Northern America and asiatic countries such as china. Thus, we have putted together these topic highlight articles to give insights into the current understanding of IBD pathogenesis, diagnostics and treatment.

  16. The microbiome and its therapeutic potential in inflammatory bowel diseases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rossen, N.G.M.

    2016-01-01

    While the etiology of inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) remains unclear, there is substantial evidence for the link between the microbiota and the pathogenesis of IBD. Interest for the application of Fecal Microbiota Transplantation (FMT) increases, especially now the insight in the intestinal micro

  17. Maintenance Therapy and Prospects for Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Chang-tai; PAN Bo-rong; GUO Xiue-gan

    2003-01-01

    @@ Introduction Medical therapy of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) can be considered in several subcategories, and this review is designed to provide selective updates for some of the most important therapeutic entities currently marketed or soon to be available for the medical management of IBD [1-6].

  18. Integrin activation as an alternative treatment approach for inflammatory diseases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Vincent Kam Wai WONG; Liang LIU

    2011-01-01

    Regulation of immune responses is a complex process that involves many signaling molecules in their specific interactions and interplays.For instance,the leukocytic integrin CD11b/CD18 plays a crucial role in leukocyte infiltration,which is commonly found in most inflammatory diseases.

  19. Labor participation among patients with inflammatory bowel disease.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Netjes, J.E.; Rijken, M.

    2013-01-01

    Background: The aims of the present study are twofold. First, to describe labor participation rates of people with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) in the Netherlands compared with the total Dutch population and to people with chronic illness in general. Second, to explore differences in labor parti

  20. Distinctive inflammatory bowel disease phenotype in primary sclerosing cholangitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Vries, A. Boudewijn; Janse, Marcel; Blokzijl, Hans; Weersma, Rinse K.

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To review the current literature for the specific clinical characteristics of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) associated with primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC). METHODS: A systematical review for clinical characteristics of IBD in PSC was performed by conducting a broad search for "primary

  1. Immunoglobulin coating of faecal bacteria in inflammatory bowel disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Waaij, LA; Kroese, FGM; Visser, A; Nelis, FG; Westerveld, BD; Jansen, PLM; Hunter, JO

    2004-01-01

    Objective An inappropriate mucosal immune response to the commensal bacterial flora may play a role in the pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). In this study we determined the percentage of immunoglobulin-coated bacteria in the stools of patients and controls. Methods Faecal samples wer

  2. Is Pelvic Inflammatory Disease a Risk Factor for Ovarian Cancer?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Christina B; Jensen, Allan; Albieri, Vanna;

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Pelvic inflammatory disease (PID) has been proposed as a risk factor for ovarian cancer. However, the existing literature on the association between PID and ovarian cancer risk is inconclusive, and only few cohort studies have been conducted. METHODS: Using nationwide Danish registries...

  3. Prevalence of chronic diseases at the onset of inflammatory arthritis.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ursum, J.; Korevaar, J.C.; Twisk, J.W.R.; Peters, M.J.L.; Schellevis, F.G.; Nurmohamed, M.T.; Nielen, M.M.J.

    2012-01-01

    Background: To explore the prevalence of chronic diseases at the onset of inflammatory arthritis (IA) in the general practice and compare this to a group of control patients without IA. Methods: In this nested-case-control study, data were used from the Netherlands Information Network of eneral Pra

  4. What's new about inflammatory bowel diseases in 2011

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jonas Mudter

    2011-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) are chronic disorders of the intestine with increasing incidence in Europe, Northern America and asiatic countries such as china. Thus, we have putted together these topic highlight articles to give insights into the current understanding of IBD pathogenesis, diagnostics and treatment.

  5. Perceptions of medication safety among patients with inflammatory bowel disease.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Cullen, Garret

    2010-09-01

    The aim of this study was to assess attitudes towards and knowledge of medication safety in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). IBD patients frequently require long-term treatment with potentially toxic medications. Techniques are employed to improve patient awareness of medication safety, but there are sparse data on their effectiveness.

  6. Levator excursion as a predictor of both eyelid lag and lagophthalmos in thyroid eye disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lelli, Gary J; Duong, Jimmy K; Kazim, Michael

    2010-01-01

    To evaluate the relationship between levator excursion and both eyelid lag and lagophthalmos in thyroid eye disease. We retrospectively reviewed 104 eyelids of 52 thyroid eye disease patients over a 9-month interval by measuring levator function (mm), eyelid lag (0-4+) and lagophthalmos (mm). Lower levator excursion is associated with higher eyelid lag scores (p lagophthalmos (p lagophthalmos increases on average by 0.23 mm. Diminished levator excursion is associated with increasing levels of eyelid lag and lagophthalmos. Levator excursion is an important clinical measurement in thyroid eye disease patients and may replace eyelid lag grading and lagophthalmos as a more accurate indicator of eyelid retraction in thyroid eye disease.

  7. Mesenteric Inflammatory Venoocclusive Disease in a Patient with Sjögren’s Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raquel Rios-Fernández

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Mesenteric inflammatory venoocclusive disease is an uncommon cause of intestinal ischemia. Certain diseases, such as hypercoagulation disorders, autoimmune diseases, or drugs have been associated with the pathogenesis of mesenteric inflammatory venoocclusive disease. Here, we report a patient with Sjögren’s syndrome who underwent surgery for suspected acute appendicitis with a subsequent pathological diagnosis of mesenteric inflammatory venoocclusive disease.

  8. [Quantification of ocular dominance for better management of eye disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaumillon, R; Alahyane, N; Senot, P; Vergne, J; Lemoine, C; Doré-Mazars, K; Blouin, J; Vergilino-Perez, D; Guillaume, A

    2015-04-01

    The dominant eye is defined as the one we unconsciously choose when we have to perform monocular tasks. In the field of clinical neuro-ophthalmology, it is well-established that ocular dominance plays a key role in several eye diseases. Furthermore, the accurate quantification of ocular dominance is crucial with regard to certain surgical techniques. However, classical preoperative tests cannot determine the amount of ocular dominance. In order to obtain further insight into the phenomenon of ocular dominance, we study its influence at behavioral and neurophysiological levels (experiments 1 and 2). Based on these new data, we suggest a method to improve quantification of ocular dominance (experiment 3). We demonstrate that ocular dominance has an influence on hand movements and on interhemispheric transfer time. Moreover, we show that an analysis of the dynamics of saccades allows us to sort out participants with strong or weak ocular dominance. In conclusion, this better understanding of the phenomenon of ocular dominance, coupled with the analysis of saccadic dynamics, might, in the short or medium term, lead to the establishment of a quick and straightforward battery of tests allowing determination of the amount of ocular dominance for each patient. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  9. A Review: Inflammatory Process in Alzheimer's Disease, Role of Cytokines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jose Miguel Rubio-Perez

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Alzheimer's disease (AD is the most common neurodegenerative disorder to date. Neuropathological hallmarks are β-amyloid (Aβ plaques and neurofibrillary tangles, but the inflammatory process has a fundamental role in the pathogenesis of AD. Inflammatory components related to AD neuroinflammation include brain cells such as microglia and astrocytes, the complement system, as well as cytokines and chemokines. Cytokines play a key role in inflammatory and anti-inflammatory processes in AD. An important factor in the onset of inflammatory process is the overexpression of interleukin (IL-1, which produces many reactions in a vicious circle that cause dysfunction and neuronal death. Other important cytokines in neuroinflammation are IL-6 and tumor necrosis factor (TNF-α. By contrast, other cytokines such as IL-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1ra, IL-4, IL-10, and transforming growth factor (TGF-β can suppress both proinflammatory cytokine production and their action, subsequently protecting the brain. It has been observed in epidemiological studies that treatment with nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs decreases the risk for developing AD. Unfortunately, clinical trials of NSAIDs in AD patients have not been very fruitful. Proinflammatory responses may be countered through polyphenols. Supplementation of these natural compounds may provide a new therapeutic line of approach to this brain disorder.

  10. Extraintestinal manifestations of inflammatory bowel disease: epidemiology, diagnosis, and management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Signe; Bendtzen, Klaus; Nielsen, Ole Haagen

    2010-01-01

    , metabolic, dermatologic (mucocutaneous), ophthalmologic, hepatobiliary, hematologic, thromboembolic, urinary tract, pulmonary, and pancreatic extraintestinal manifestations related to IBD. Articles were identified through search of the PubMed and Embase databases, the Cochrane Library, and the web sites...... of the European Agency for the Evaluation of Medicinal Products (EMEA) and the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) (cut-off date October 2009). The search terms 'Crohn's disease', 'inflammatory bowel disease', or 'ulcerative colitis' were combined with the terms 'adalimumab', 'anemia', 'arthritis...

  11. What's new in inflammatory bowel disease in 2008?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Daniel C Baumgart

    2008-01-01

    Ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease represent the two major forms of inflammatory bowel disease. In this highlight topic series of articles we cover the latest developments in genetics and epiderniology, intestinal physiology, mucosal immunology, mechanisms of epithelial cell injury and restitution, current medical therapy, modern surgical management, important extraintestinal complications such as primary sclerosing cholangitis, cholangiocellular carcinoma and autoimmune hepatitis as well as endoscopic and molecular screening, detection and prevention of small bowel and colorectal cancer.

  12. Protein kinases are potential targets to treat inflammatory bowel disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lei; Yang; Yutao; Yan

    2014-01-01

    Protein kinases play a crucial role in the pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel disease(IBD), the two main forms of which are ulcerative colitis and Crohn’s dis-ease. In this article, we will review the mechanisms of involvement of protein kinases in the pathogenesis of and intervention against IBD, in terms of their effects on genetics, microbiota, mucous layer and tight junc-tion, and the potential of protein kinases as therapeutic targets against IBD.

  13. Vitamin D, immune regulation, the microbiota, and inflammatory bowel disease

    OpenAIRE

    Cantorna, Margherita T.; McDaniel, Kaitlin; Bora, Stephanie; Chen, Jing; James, Jamaal

    2014-01-01

    The inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) are complex diseases caused by environmental, immunological and genetic factors. Vitamin D status is low in patients with IBD and experimental IBD is more severe in vitamin D deficient or vitamin D receptor knockout animals. Vitamin D is beneficial in IBD because it regulates multiple checkpoints and processes essential for homeostasis in the gut. Vitamin D inhibits IFN-γ and IL-17 production while inducing regulatory T cells. In addition, vitamin D regul...

  14. Management of inflammatory bowel disease in the pregnant patient

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Flavio M Habal; Nikila C Ravindran

    2008-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is a chronic disorder affecting young adults in their reproductive years.Many young women with IBD express concern about the effect their disease will have on fertility,pregnancy course and fetal development This article presents an approach to management of IBD in the pregnant patient,including counseling and investigation,and summarizes existing data on the safety of medications used to treat IBD in pregnancy and breastfeeding.

  15. Role of diet in the management of inflammatory bowel disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Nirooshun; Rajendran; Devinder; Kumar

    2010-01-01

    Many studies have looked at connections between diet,etiology,signs and symptoms associated with inflammatory bowel disease(IBD).Although these connections are apparent to clinicians,they are difficult to prove qualitatively or quantitatively.Enteral feeding and polymeric diets are equally effective at bringing about remission in Crohn's disease(CD).Parenteral feeding is also effective,although none of these methods is as effective as corticosteroid therapy.However,enteral feeding is preferred in the pediat...

  16. Family and twin studies in inflammatory bowel disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Leena Halme; Paulina Paavola-Sakki; Ulla Turunen; Maarit Lappalainen; Martti F(a)rkkil(a); Kimmo Kontula

    2006-01-01

    Studies examining the inheritance of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) within different family groups have been the basis for recent molecular advances in the genetics of IBD. The derived heritability in Crohn's disease (CD) is higher than in many other complex diseases. The risk of IBD is highest in first-degree relatives of a CD proband,but first-degree relatives of a proband suffering from ulcerative colitis (UC) and more distant relatives are also at increased risk. Disease concordance rates in IBD have been examined in multiplex families and in three large European twin studies.

  17. Biomarkers of Chronic Inflammatory State in Uremia and Cardiovascular Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vincenzo Panichi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of death in the general population; traditional risk factors seem inadequate to explain completely the remarkable prevalence of cardiovascular mortality and morbidity observed in the uremic population. A role for chronic inflammation has been well established in the development of atherosclerotic disease, and, on the basis of these observations, atherosclerosis might be considered an inflammatory disease. Inflammation has been implicated in the etiology of coronary artery disease in the general population, and traditional inflammatory biomarkers such as C-reactive protein (CRP and interleukin-6 (IL-6 have been shown to predict cardiovascular events in both symptomatic and asymptomatic individuals as well as those in the uremic population. Later on, new nontraditional markers were related to the risk of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality in general and in uremic population. As a consequence of the expanding research base and availability of assays, the number of inflammatory marker tests ordered by clinicians for cardiovascular disease (CVD risk prediction has grown rapidly and several commercial assays have become available. So, up to now we can consider that several new nontraditional markers as CD40-CD40 ligand system and pentraxin-3 seem to be significant features of cardiovascular disease in general and in ESRD population.

  18. The microbiota in inflammatory bowel disease: current and therapeutic insights

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lane ER

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Erin R Lane,1 Timothy L Zisman,2 David L Suskind1 1Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Seattle Children’s Hospital, 2Division of Gastroenterology, University of Washington, Seattle, WA, USA Abstract: Inflammatory bowel disease is a heterogeneous group of chronic disorders that result from the interaction of the intestinal immune system with the gut microbiome. Until recently, most investigative efforts and therapeutic breakthroughs were centered on understanding and manipulating the altered mucosal immune response that characterizes these diseases. However, more recent studies have highlighted the important role of environmental factors, and in particular the microbiota, in disease onset and disease exacerbation. Advances in genomic sequencing technology and bioinformatics have facilitated an explosion of investigative inquiries into the composition and function of the intestinal microbiome in health and disease and have advanced our understanding of the interplay between the gut microbiota and the host immune system. The gut microbiome is dynamic and changes with age and in response to diet, antibiotics and other environmental factors, and these alterations in the microbiome contribute to disease onset and exacerbation. Strategies to manipulate the microbiome through diet, probiotics, antibiotics or fecal microbiota transplantation may potentially be used therapeutically to influence modulate disease activity. This review will characterize the factors involved in the development of the intestinal microbiome and will describe the typical alterations in the microbiota that are characteristic of inflammatory bowel disease. Additionally, this manuscript will summarize the early but promising literature on the role of the gut microbiota in the pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel disease with implications for utilizing this data for diagnostic or therapeutic application in the clinical management of patients with these diseases. Keywords

  19. The association of sleep quality with dry eye disease: the Osaka study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kawashima M

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Motoko Kawashima,1 Miki Uchino,1,2 Norihiko Yokoi,3 Yuichi Uchino,1,2 Murat Dogru,1 Aoi Komuro,3 Yukiko Sonomura,3 Hiroaki Kato,3 Shigeru Kinoshita,3 Kazuo Tsubota1 1Department of Ophthalmology, Keio University School of Medicine, Shinjuku-ku, 2Ryogoku Eye Clinic, Sumida-ku, Tokyo, 3Department of Ophthalmology, Kyoto Prefectural University of Medicine, Kyoto, Japan Purpose: To investigate the association of dry eye disease with sleep quality. Methods: In 2011, a cross-sectional survey was conducted among all the employees, mainly young and middle-aged Japanese office workers, who used visual display technology, at a company in Osaka, Japan (N=672; age range =26–64 years. The participants were classified according to the Japanese dry eye diagnosis criteria by dry eye examination results including the Schirmer test, fluorescein and lissamine green staining, tear film break-up time, and symptom questionnaire into three groups as follows: definite dry eye disease, probable dry eye disease, and no dry eye disease. To determine sleep quality, Japanese version of the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (global score was implemented. The global score (range =0–21 was calculated by summing seven sleep variable scores (scale, 0–3; scores ≥5.5 indicated poor sleep. Results: The total mean global score was 5.1±2.3 (completed N=383; 45% of the dry eye disease participants reported having poor sleep quality, while 34% of the no dry eye disease participants did so, with a significant difference found in the global score (P=0.002. Furthermore, a statistically significant association was observed between the global score and dry eye disease (P=0.005. Conclusion: Poor sleep quality is associated with dry eye disease, especially with dry eye symptoms. Keywords: dry eye, sleep quality, symptom, questionnaire, Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index, tear film break-up time, visual display terminals

  20. Small bowel imaging of inflammatory bowel disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Emanuele; Casciani; Chiara; De; Vincentiis; Gianfranco; Gualdi

    2015-01-01

    The study of the small bowel(SB) has always beenchallenging both for clinicians and radiologist. It is a long and tortuous tube that can be affected by various pathologies whose signs and symptoms are usually non specific and can mimic other acute abdominal disorders. For these reasons, imaging plays a central role in the diagnosis of the different pathological conditions that can occur. They are important also in the management and follow up of chronic diseases. We expose and evaluate all the radiological methods that are now available for the study of the SB with particular emphasis on the technological improvement of cross-sectional imaging, such as computed tomography(CT) and magnetic resonance imaging(MRI). These techniques have, infact, highly improved in terms of execution times(fast acquisitions images), patients discomfort and radiation dose, for CT, with consequent reduced biological risks. Moreover, the new post-processing options with multiplanar reconstruction and isotropic images have made significant changes in the evaluation of the exams. Especially MRI scans have been improved by the advent of new sequences, such as diffusion weighted imaging and cine-MRI, parallel imaging and breath-hold sequences and can provide excellent soft-tissue contrast without the use of ionizing radiations.

  1. [Artificial nutrition in inflammatory bowel disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ansaldo, G L; Varaldo, E; Assalino, M; Borgonovo, G

    2004-01-01

    Malnutrition is often a major clinical problem in patients affected by IBD. Assessment of nutritional status should be routinely carried out in these patients and, in case of severe malnutrition, artificial nutrition should be used. In ulcerative colitis and in Crohn disease localized to colonic segments both Parenteral Nutrition (PN) and Enteral Nutrition (EN) have similar results as support treatments but they have no primary therapeutic effects and then they are indicated only in case of severe malnutrition and/or when a surgical procedure is planned. Some theoretical advantages derived from supplementation of short chain fatty acids and omega3-series is still debated. More evident are the advantages of nutritional support in Crohn enteritis. Both PN and EN have a role as a primary therapy capable to induce remission although these results are not prolonged in time when nutrition is not associated with pharmacological treatments. Experiments of pharmaco-nutrition with glutamine and fish fatty acid have to be validated in the clinical practice. In case of integrity of the small bowel and tolerance of the patient, EN is preferable to PN for its lower costs and reduced related complications. PN is still indicated in more severe cases or in acute phase when the need of restoring rapidly the hydroelectrolitic and nitrogen/caloric balance prevails.

  2. Zinc distribution in blood components, inflammatory status, and clinical indexes of disease activity during zinc supplementation in inflammatory rheumatic diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peretz, A; Nève, J; Jeghers, O; Pelen, F

    1993-05-01

    The effects of zinc supplementation on zinc status and on clinical and biological indicators of inflammation were investigated in 18 patients with chronic inflammatory rheumatic diseases and in 9 healthy control subjects. Patients with mild and recent onset disease were assigned to a 60-d trial to receive either 45 mg Zn (as gluconate)/d or a placebo, while control subjects received the zinc supplement. Baseline mean plasma zinc of the patients was low whereas mononuclear cell zinc content was elevated, suggesting a redistribution of the element related to the inflammatory process rather than to a zinc-deficient state. Zinc supplementation increased plasma zinc to a similar extent in patients and in control subjects, which suggested no impairment of zinc intestinal absorption as a result of the inflammatory process. On the contrary, erythrocyte and leukocyte zinc concentrations were not modified in the two groups examined. No beneficial effect of zinc treatment could be demonstrated on either clinical or inflammation indexes.

  3. Eosinophil associated genes in the inflammatory bowel disease 4 region: Correlation to inflammatory bowel disease revealed

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kristin Blom; Jenny Rubin; Jonas Halfvarson; Leif T(o)rkvist; Anders R(o)nnblom; Per Sangfelt; Mikael L(o)rdal

    2012-01-01

    AIM:To study the association between inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and genetic variations in eosinophil protein X (EPX) and eosinophil cationic protein (ECP).METHODS:DNA was extracted from ethylene diamine tetraacetic acid blood of 587 patients with Crohn's disease (CD),592 with ulcerative colitis (UC) and 300healthy subjects.The EPX405 (G > C,rs2013109),ECP434 (G > C,rs2073342) and ECP562 (G > C,rs2233860) gene polymorphisms were analysed,by the 5'-nuclease alleiic discrimination assay.For determination of intracellular content of EPX and ECP in granulocytes,39 blood samples was collected and extracted with a buffer containing cetyltrimethylammonium bromide.The intracellular content of EPX was analysed using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay.The intracellular content of ECP was analysed with the UniCAP(R) system as described by the manufacturer.Statistical tests for calculations of results were x2 test,Fisher's exact test,ANOVA,Student-Newman-Keuls test,and Kaplan-Meier survival curve with Log-rank test for trend,the probability values of P < 0.05 were considered statistically significant.RESULTS:The genotype frequency for males with UC and with an age of disease onset of ≥ 45 years (n =57) was for ECP434 and ECP562,GG =37%,GC =60%,CC =4% and GG =51%,GC =49%,CC =0%respectively.This was significantly different from the healthy subject's genotype frequencies of ECP434 (GG =57%,GC =38%,CC =5%; P =0.010) and ECP562(GG =68%,GC =29%,CC =3%; P =0.009).The genotype frequencies for females,with an age of disease onset of ≥ 45 years with CD (n =62),was for the ECP434 and ECP562 genotypes GG =37%,GC =52%,CC =11% and GG =48%,GC =47% and CC=5% respectively.This was also statistically different from healthy controls for both ECP434 (P =0.010) and ECP562 (P =0.013).The intracellular protein concentration of EPX and ECP was calculated in μg/106 eosinophils and then correlated to the EPX 405 genotypes.The protein content of

  4. Chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy in a patient with Crohn's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohyagi, Masaki; Ohkubo, Takuya; Yagi, Yousuke; Ishibashi, Satoru; Akiyama, Junko; Nagahori, Masakazu; Watanabe, Mamoru; Yokota, Takanori; Mizusawa, Hidehiro

    2013-01-01

    Crohn's disease (CD) is a chronic inflammatory disorder of the gastrointestinal tract that is frequently accompanied by systemic complications. Neuropathologies have not been well investigated as extraintestinal manifestations of CD. We herein report the case of a 36-year-old man with CD who presented with progressive weakness and numbness. A neurological examination and the results of a nerve conduction study and a sural nerve biopsy led to a diagnosis of chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy (CIDP). Plasma exchanges were initially effective; however, the effects gradually declined starting 10 days after the plasma exchange (PE). These results suggest that humoral factors may play an important role in CIDP associated with CD.

  5. The Search for Causative Environmental Factors in Inflammatory Bowel Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogler, Gerhard; Zeitz, Jonas; Biedermann, Luc

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) has become a 'prototype disease' for chronic auto-inflammatory disorders with a polygenic background and important multifaceted environmental trigger components. The environmental factors contribute both to pathogenesis and disease flares. Thus, IBD is a disease par excellence to study the interactions between host genetics, environmental factors (such as infections or smoking) and 'in-vironmental' factors - for example, our intestinal microbiota. Longitudinal intercurrent events, including the impact of long-term medication on disease progression or stabilization, can exemplarily be studied in this disease group. Whilst alterations in the human genome coding relevant variant protein products have most likely not emerged significantly over the last 50 years, the incidence of Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis has dramatically increased in Western countries and more recently in the Asia Pacific area. An interesting concept indicates that 'Western lifestyle factors' trigger chronic intestinal inflammation or disease flares in a genetically susceptible host. To understand the disease pathogenesis as well as triggers for flares or determinants of disease courses, we must further investigate potential en(in)vironmental factors. As environmental conditions, in contrast to genetic risk factors, can be influenced, knowledge on those risk factors becomes crucial to modulate disease incidence, disease course or clinical presentation. It is obvious that prevention of environmentally triggered disease flares would be a goal most relevant for IBD patients. An increased prevalence of IBD in urban environment has been documented in Switzerland by the Swiss IBD cohort study. Several studies have attempted to identify such factors; however, only a few have been validated. The best investigated environmental factor identified in IBD cohort analyses is smoking. Other environmental factors that have been associated with clinical presentation or

  6. Non-invasive investigation of inflammatory bowel disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JA Tibble; I Bjarnason

    2001-01-01

    The assessment of inflammatory activity in intestinal disease in man can be done using a variety of different techniques. These range from the use of non - invasive acute phase inflammatory markers measured in plasma such as C reactive protein (CRP) and the erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) (both of which give an indirect assessment of disease activity) to the direct assessment of disease activity by intestinal biopsy performed during endoscopy in association with endoscopic scoring systems. Both radiology and endoscopy are conventional for the diagnosis of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD).However these techniques have severe limitations when it comes to assessing functional components of the disease such as activity and prognosis. Here we briefly review the value of two emerging intestinal function tests. Intestinal permeability, although ideally suited for diagnostic screening for small bowel Crohns disease, appears to give reliable predictive data for imminent relapse of small bowel Crohns disease and it can be used to assess responses to treatment. More significantly it is now clear that single stool assay of neutrophil specific proteins (calprotectin, lactoferrin) give the same quantitative data on intestinal inflammation as the 4 - day faecal excretion of 111lndium labelled white cells. Faecal calprotectin is shown to be increased in over 95% of patients with IBD and correlates with clinical disease activity. It reliably differentiates between patients with IBD and irritable bowel syndrome. More importantly, at a given faecal calprotectin concentration in patients with quiescent IBD,the test has a specificity and sensitivity in excess of 85% in predicting clinical relapse of disease. This suggests that relapse of IBD is closely related to the degree of intestinal inflammation and suggests that targeted treatment at an asymptomatic stage of the disease may be indicated.

  7. Nephrolithiasis in patients with inflammatory bowel disease in the community

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cury DB

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Dídia Bismara Cury,1,2 Alan C Moss,2 Nestor Schor3 1Scope Clinic, Campo Grande, Brazil; 2Center for Inflammatory Bowel Diseases, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA; 3Division of Nephrology, Federal University of São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil Background: Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD has been associated with renal stone formation. The objective of this study was to determine prospectively the prevalence of nephrolithiasis in a community-based population of patients with IBD and to analyze factors associated with renal calculus formation. Methods: Screening renal ultrasound was performed in a well characterized cohort of patients seen between 2009 and 2012 at an IBD clinic. We enrolled 168 patients, including 93 with Crohn’s disease and 75 with ulcerative colitis. Clinical and phenotypic variables associated with asymptomatic nephrolithiasis were determined. Results: Nephrolithiasis was detected in 36 patients with Crohn’s disease and in 28 patients with ulcerative colitis (38% for both. Although none of the patients had been previously hospitalized for symptomatic nephrolithiasis, nine with Crohn’s disease and five with ulcerative colitis had recurrent urinary tract infections or hydronephrosis. In patients with Crohn’s disease, ileocolonic (L3 disease was associated with a greater risk of nephrolithiasis than was ileal (L1 or colonic (L2 disease (odds ratio [OR] 2.3, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.8–7. Active ulcerative colitis (regardless of severity represented a significant risk factor for formation of renal calculi (OR 4.2, 95% CI 1.1–15, P = 0.02. Conclusion: In surgery-naïve patients with IBD in the community, asymptomatic nephrolithiasis is common and should be considered when renal dysfunction or infection is detected. Keywords: clinical activity indices, Crohn’s disease, inflammatory bowel disease, nephrolithiasis, ulcerative colitis

  8. Established and emerging biological activity markers of inflammatory bowel disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, O H; Vainer, B; Madsen, S M;

    2000-01-01

    Assessment of disease activity in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), i.e., ulcerative colitis (UC) and Crohn's disease (CD), is done using clinical parameters and various biological disease markers. Ideally, a disease marker must: be able to identify individuals at risk of a given disorder...... molecules. It is concluded that none of the pertinent laboratory surrogate markers of disease activity in IBD are specific or sensitive enough to replace basic clinical observation such as the number of daily bowel movements, general well-being, and other parameters in parallel. Further studies are highly...... warranted to identify and assess the clinical importance and applicability of new laboratory markers for the diagnosis or the disease activity of IBD....

  9. The clinical implications of thalidomide in inflammatory bowel diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diamanti, Antonella; Capriati, Teresa; Papadatou, Bronislava; Knafelz, Daniela; Bracci, Fiammetta; Corsetti, Tiziana; Elia, Domenica; Torre, Giuliano

    2015-06-01

    Thalidomide has anti-inflammatory and anti-angiogenetic activity that makes it suitable for treating inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD). The recent guidelines from the European Crohn's and Colitis Organization/European Society for Pediatric Gastroenterology Hepatology and Nutrition conclude that thalidomide cannot be recommended in refractory pediatric Crohn's disease but that it may be considered in selected cohorts of patients who are not anti-TNFα agent responders. The main adverse effect is the potential teratogenicity that renders the long-term use of thalidomide problematic in young adults due to the strict need for contraceptive use. In short-term use it is relatively safe; the most likely adverse effect is the neuropathy, which is highly reversible in children. So far the use of thalidomide is reported in 223 adult and pediatric IBD patients (206 with Crohn's disease). In the following sections, the authors will discuss efficacy and safety of thalidomide, in the short-term treatment of IBD.

  10. Mind–Body Interventions for Pediatric Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ann Ming Yeh

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Pediatric inflammatory bowel disease is an autoimmune disease that causes chronic inflammation of the gastrointestinal mucosa. There is emerging evidence that the brain–gut connection affects inflammatory bowel disease (IBD patients more than previously thought. This is evidenced by comorbid mood disorders, irritable bowel symptoms concurrent with quiescent IBD, and the potential of psychosocial stressors to trigger IBD flares. Mind–body interventions such as psychotherapy, relaxation, mindfulness, biofeedback, yoga, and clinical hypnosis offer an adjunct to standard medical treatment for IBD. We will review the current evidence base for these mind– body interventions in the treatment of pediatric IBD, illustrate a case study, and offer suggestions for future research for this promising field.

  11. Endoscopic scoring systems for inflammatory bowel disease: pros and cons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tontini, Gian Eugenio; Bisschops, Raf; Neumann, Helmut

    2014-07-01

    Endoscopy plays a pivotal role for diagnosis and assessment of disease activity and extent in patients with inflammatory bowel diseases. International guidelines recommend the use of endoscopic scoring systems for evaluation of the prognosis and efficacy of medical treatments. Ideal scoring systems are easy to use, reproducible, reliable, responsive to changes, and validated in different clinical settings in order to guide therapeutic strategies. However, currently available endoscopic scoring systems often appear as complex for routine endoscopy and suffer from insufficient interobserver agreement and lack of formal validation which often limit their use in clinical trials. Here, we describe the role of endoscopic scoring systems in inflammatory bowel diseases focusing on pros and cons in the era of advanced endoscopic imaging and mucosal healing.

  12. Involvement of Reduced Microbial Diversity in Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dawei Gong

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A considerable number of studies have been conducted to study the microbial profiles in inflammatory conditions. A common phenomenon in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD is the reduction of the diversity of microbiota, which demonstrates that microbial diversity negatively correlates with disease severity in IBD. Increased microbial diversity is known to occur in disease remission. Species diversity plays an important role in maintaining the stability of the intestinal ecosystem as well as normal ecological function. A reduction in microbial diversity corresponds to a decrease in the stability of the ecosystem and can impair ecological function. Fecal microbiota transplantation (FMT, probiotics, and prebiotics, which aim to modulate the microbiota and restore its normal diversity, have been shown to be clinically efficacious. In this study, we hypothesized that a reduction in microbial diversity could play a role in the development of IBD.

  13. The Inflammatory Heart Diseases: Causes, Symptoms, and Treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Lei; Sun, RongRong; Liu, Min; Zheng, Yi; Zhang, Peiying

    2015-07-01

    The inflammation of the heart muscles, such as myocarditis, the membrane sac which surrounds the heart called as pericarditis, and the inner lining of the heart or the myocardium, heart muscle as endocarditis are known as the inflammatory heart diseases. Inflammation of heart is caused by known infectious agents, viruses, bacteria, fungi or parasites, and by toxic materials from the environment, water, food, air, toxic gases, smoke, and pollution, or by an unknown origin. Myocarditis is induced by infection of heart muscle by virus like sarcoidosis and immune diseases. The symptoms include chest pain, angina, pain in heart muscle, and shortness of breath, edema, swelling of feet or ankles, and fatigue. The ECG, X-ray, and MRI can diagnose the disease; blood test and rise in enzymes levels provide abnormality in heart function. The treatment includes use of antibiotics for inflammation of heart muscle and medications. The ultrasound imaging indicates further damage to the heart muscle. In severe cases of infection heart failure can occur so long-term medications are necessary to control inflammation. The various biomarkers are reported for the inflammatory heart diseases. The causes, symptoms and treatments of inflammatory heart diseases are described.

  14. The gut microbiota in mouse models of inflammatory bowel disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kalliopi eGkouskou

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The intestine and the intestinal immune system have evolved through a symbiotic homeostasis under which a highly diverse microbial flora is maintained in the gastrointestinal tract while pathogenic bacteria are recognized and eliminated. Disruption of the balance between the immune system and the gut microbiota results in the development of multiple pathologies in humans. Inflammatory bowel diseases have been associated with alterations in the composition of intestinal flora but whether these changes are causal or result of inflammation is still under dispute. Various chemical and genetic models of inflammatory bowel diseases have been developed and utilized to elucidate the complex relationship between intestinal epithelium, immune system and the gut microbiota. In this review we describe some of the most commonly used mouse models of colitis and Crohn’s disease and summarize the current knowledge of how changes in microbiota composition may affect intestinal disease pathogenesis. The pursuit of gut-microbiota interactions will no doubt continue to provide invaluable insight into the complex biology of inflammatory bowel diseases.

  15. Modulation by Melatonin of the Pathogenesis of Inflammatory Autoimmune Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huey-Kang Sytwu

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Melatonin is the major secretory product of the pineal gland during the night and has multiple activities including the regulation of circadian and seasonal rhythms, and antioxidant and anti-inflammatory effects. It also possesses the ability to modulate immune responses by regulation of the T helper 1/2 balance and cytokine production. Autoimmune diseases, which result from the activation of immune cells by autoantigens released from normal tissues, affect around 5% of the population. Activation of autoantigen-specific immune cells leads to subsequent damage of target tissues by these activated cells. Melatonin therapy has been investigated in several animal models of autoimmune disease, where it has a beneficial effect in a number of models excepting rheumatoid arthritis, and has been evaluated in clinical autoimmune diseases including rheumatoid arthritis and ulcerative colitis. This review summarizes and highlights the role and the modulatory effects of melatonin in several inflammatory autoimmune diseases including multiple sclerosis, systemic lupus erythematosus, rheumatoid arthritis, type 1 diabetes mellitus, and inflammatory bowel disease.

  16. Role of emerging Campylobacter species in inflammatory bowel diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaakoush, Nadeem O; Mitchell, Hazel M; Man, Si Ming

    2014-11-01

    The gut microbiota is a central player in the etiology of inflammatory bowel diseases. As such, there is intense scientific interest in elucidating the specific group/s of bacteria responsible for driving barrier damage and perpetuating the chronic inflammation that results in disease. Because of their ability to colonize close to the surface of the host intestinal epithelium, mucosa-associated bacteria are considered key players in the initiation and development of both Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis. The leading bacterial candidates include adherent and invasive Escherichia coli, Helicobacter, Fusobacteria, Mycobacteria, and Campylobacter species. Of these, a member of the Campylobacter genus, Campylobacter concisus, has recently emerged as a putative player in the pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel diseases. Current research indicates that this bacterium possesses extraordinarily diverse pathogenic capacities as well as unique genetic and functional signatures that are defined by their ability to adhere to and invade host cells, secrete toxins, and the presence of a virulence-associated restriction-modification system. These characteristics enable the potential classification of C. concisus into distinct pathotypes, which we have named adherent and invasive C. concisus and adherent and toxinogenic C. concisus. In this review, we evaluate evidence for the role of emerging Campylobacter species in the pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel diseases.

  17. Cerebrospinal fluid interleukin-6 in central nervous system inflammatory diseases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandre Wullschleger

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Interleukin (IL-6 is recognised as an important cytokine involved in inflammatory diseases of the central nervous system (CNS. OBJECTIVE: To perform a large retrospective study designed to test cerebrospinal fluid (CSF IL-6 levels in the context of neurological diseases, and evaluate its usefulness as a biomarker to help discriminate multiple sclerosis (MS from other inflammatory neurological diseases (OIND. PATIENTS AND METHODS: We analyzed 374 CSF samples for IL-6 using a quantitative enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Groups tested were composed of demyelinating diseases of the CNS (DD, n = 117, including relapsing-remitting MS (RRMS, n = 65, primary progressive MS (PPMS, n = 11, clinically isolated syndrome (CIS, n = 11, optic neuritis (ON, n = 30; idiopathic transverse myelitis (ITM, n = 10; other inflammatory neurological diseases (OIND, n = 35; and non-inflammatory neurological diseases (NIND, n = 212. Differences between groups were analysed using Kruskal-Wallis test and Mann-Whitney U-test. RESULTS: CSF IL-6 levels exceeded the positivity cut-off of 10 pg/ml in 18 (51.4% of the 35 OIND samples, but in only three (3.9% of the 76 MS samples collected. CSF IL-6 was negative for all NIND samples tested (0/212. IL-6 cut-off of 10 pg/ml offers 96% sensitivity to exclude MS. CONCLUSION: CSF IL-6 may help to differentiate MS from its major differential diagnosis group, OIND.

  18. Novel specific microRNA biomarkers in idiopathic inflammatory bowel disease unrelated to disease activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Jingmei; Welker, Noah C; Zhao, Zijin; Li, Yong; Zhang, Jianjun; Reuss, Sarah A; Zhang, Xinjun; Lee, Hwajeong; Liu, Yunlong; Bronner, Mary P

    2014-04-01

    The diagnosis of idiopathic inflammatory bowel disease can be challenging. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small, non-coding RNAs that regulate protein synthesis through post-transcriptional suppression. This study is to identify new miRNA markers in inflammatory bowel disease, and to examine whether miRNA biomarkers might assist in the diagnosis of inflammatory bowel disease. Illumina small RNA sequencing was performed on non-dysplastic fresh-frozen colonic mucosa samples of the distalmost colectomy tissue from 19 patients with inflammatory bowel disease (10 ulcerative colitis and 9 Crohn disease) and 18 patients with diverticular disease serving as controls. To determine differentially expressed miRNAs, the USeq software package identified 44 miRNAs with altered expression (fold change ≥ 2 and false discovery rate ≤ 0.10) compared with the controls. Among them, a panel of nine miRNAs was aberrantly expressed in both ulcerative colitis and Crohn disease. Validation assays performed using quantitative reverse transcription PCR (qRT-PCR) on additional frozen tissue from ulcerative colitis, Crohn disease, and control groups confirmed specific differential expression in inflammatory bowel disease for miR-31, miR-206, miR-424, and miR-146a (Pdisease controls (n=29), ulcerative colitis (n=36), Crohn disease (n=26), and the other diseases mimicking inflammatory bowel disease including infectious colitis (n=12) and chronic ischemic colitis (n=19), again confirming increased expression specific to inflammatory bowel disease (Pdisease. Furthermore, miR-31 is universally expressed in both ulcerative colitis and Crohn disease not only in fresh-frozen but also in formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissues.

  19. Modeling inflammatory bowel disease: the zebrafish as a way forward.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Love, Donald R; Lan, Chuan-Ching; Dodd, Andrew; Shelling, Andrew N; McNabb, Warren C; Ferguson, Lynnette R

    2007-03-01

    The zebrafish has proved to be an informative model of vertebrate development and, more recently, an emerging model of human disease. The realization of the full potential of the zebrafish as a disease model lies in two interdependent areas. The first is an appreciation that the often overlooked strength of this species lies in allowing the design of experiments that address the interplay of genetics and the environment in a manipulable manner. The second is in the application and further development of gene targeting approaches. These twin features will be addressed in this review in the context of modeling inflammatory bowel disease.

  20. Inflammatory Bowel Disease, the Oral Contraceptive Pill and Pregnancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert N Allan

    1994-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper summarizes our current knowledge of the role of the oral contraceptive pill in the pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel disease (IBO, followed by a review of fertility in women and men. IBD and pregnancy, including the impact on the fetus and the mother with ulcerative colitis or Crohn’s disease, is considered. The safety of drug treatment during pregnancy, the outcome of surgical treatment during pregnancy and the problems that may be encountered during pregnancy in patients with an ileostomy or ileo-anal pouch are discussed, followed by a review of the short and long term prognosis of ulcerative colitis and Crohn’s disease partition.

  1. Clinical applications of radiolabeled blood elements in inflammatory bowel disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin-Comin, J. (Hospital Princeps d' Espanya, Barcelona (Spain). S. Medicina Nuclear); Prats, E. (Hospital Cinico, Zaragoza (Spain). S.Medicina Nuclear)

    1999-03-01

    The work discusses the main clinical features of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and the methods to obtain an accurate diagnostic. Nuclear medicine procedures are deeply analysed, with special emphasis in those where clinical experience is larger and that are available for clinical practice in most countries. In the opinion of the authors [sup 99m]Tc-HMPAO is the first choice agent, while [sup 111]In-oxine could be considered as a gold standard for evaluation of new agents. In the context of IBD, the WBC scintigraphy is useful for its diagnosis and the evaluation of disease extension. The evaluation of disease severity deserves further experiences.

  2. Motility Evaluation in the Patient with Inflammatory Bowel Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdalla, Sherine M; Kalra, Gorav; Moshiree, Baha

    2016-10-01

    Patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) suffer frequently from functional bowel diseases (FBD) and motility disorders. Management of FBD and motility disorders in IBD combined with continued treatment of a patient's IBD symptoms will likely lead to better clinical outcomes and improve the patient's quality of life. The goals of this review were to summarize the most recent literature on motility disturbances in patients with IBD and to give a brief overview of the ranges of motility disturbances, from reflux disease to anorectal disorders, and discuss their diagnosis and specific management.

  3. Genetic factors associated with the development of inflammatory bowel disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Crohn's disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC) are complex polygenic disorders, characterized by several genes together with environmental factors contributing to the development of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Recent advances in research on genetic susceptibility have allowed the identification of diverse genes at different levels: (1) Innate immunity; (2) Antigen presentation molecules; (3) Epithelial integrity; (4) Drug transporter; (5) Cell adhesion. The application of genetic testing into clinical practice is close and all genetic markers may have several clinical implications: prediction of disease phenotype, molecular classification, prevention of complications, and prognosis.

  4. Initially unrecognised group A streptococcal pelvic inflammatory disease in a postmenopausal woman.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kouijzer, I J E; Polderman, F N; Bekers, E M; Bloks, P H C J; Schneeberger, P M; de Jager, C P C

    2014-11-01

    Invasive group A streptococcal infection is a severe disease with high mortality. Invasive group A streptococcal infection may arise after pelvic inflammatory disease. Pelvic inflammatory disease in postmenopausal women is rare. Here, we report a unique case of a postmenopausal woman with fatal invasive group A streptococcal infection due to pelvic inflammatory disease and an extraordinary course of diagnosis.

  5. Advances in the assessment of disease activity in inflammatory bowel disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Camilleri, M.; Proano, M. (Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN (USA))

    1989-07-01

    Knowledge of the severity and extent of the inflammation in inflammatory bowel diseases provides a means of determining rational therapeutic strategies in affected patients. During the past 3 decades, several clinical, laboratory, and combined indices have been proposed for the assessment of inflammatory bowel disease; refinements in radiologic methods and the availability of endoscopy and biopsy have facilitated the accurate assessment of the extent and severity of the disease. In relapsing conditions such as inflammatory bowel disease, however, the use of such procedures is limited by the radiation exposure or the relatively invasive nature of the technique. In this article, we review the proposed methods and recent advances in assessment of patients with inflammatory bowel disease; we also discuss possible strategies at the time of diagnosis, during recurrence, and in evaluation of the efficacy of drug or dietic therapy. 58 references.

  6. RNA interference-based nanosystems for inflammatory bowel disease therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guo J

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Jian Guo,1 Xiaojing Jiang,1 Shuangying Gui1,2 1Department of Pharmaceutics, College of Pharmacy, Anhui University of Chinese Medicine, 2Institute of Pharmaceutics, Anhui Academy of Chinese Medicine, Hefei, Anhui, People’s Republic of China Abstract: Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD, which includes ulcerative colitis and Crohn’s disease, is a chronic, recrudescent disease that invades the gastrointestinal tract, and it requires surgery or lifelong medicinal therapy. The conventional medicinal therapies for IBD, such as anti-inflammatories, glucocorticoids, and immunosuppressants, are limited because of their systemic adverse effects and toxicity during long-term treatment. RNA interference (RNAi precisely regulates susceptibility genes to decrease the expression of proinflammatory cytokines related to IBD, which effectively alleviates IBD progression and promotes intestinal mucosa recovery. RNAi molecules generally include short interfering RNA (siRNA and microRNA (miRNA. However, naked RNA tends to degrade in vivo as a consequence of endogenous ribonucleases and pH variations. Furthermore, RNAi treatment may cause unintended off-target effects and immunostimulation. Therefore, nanovectors of siRNA and miRNA were introduced to circumvent these obstacles. Herein, we introduce non-viral nanosystems of RNAi molecules and discuss these systems in detail. Additionally, the delivery barriers and challenges associated with RNAi molecules will be discussed from the perspectives of developing efficient delivery systems and potential clinical use. Keywords: RNA interference, siRNA, miRNA, nanoparticles, inflammatory bowel disease, target therapy

  7. Osteoarthritis as an inflammatory disease (osteoarthritis is not osteoarthrosis!).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berenbaum, F

    2013-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) has long been considered a "wear and tear" disease leading to loss of cartilage. OA used to be considered the sole consequence of any process leading to increased pressure on one particular joint or fragility of cartilage matrix. Progress in molecular biology in the 1990s has profoundly modified this paradigm. The discovery that many soluble mediators such as cytokines or prostaglandins can increase the production of matrix metalloproteinases by chondrocytes led to the first steps of an "inflammatory" theory. However, it took a decade before synovitis was accepted as a critical feature of OA, and some studies are now opening the way to consider the condition a driver of the OA process. Recent experimental data have shown that subchondral bone may have a substantial role in the OA process, as a mechanical damper, as well as a source of inflammatory mediators implicated in the OA pain process and in the degradation of the deep layer of cartilage. Thus, initially considered cartilage driven, OA is a much more complex disease with inflammatory mediators released by cartilage, bone and synovium. Low-grade inflammation induced by the metabolic syndrome, innate immunity and inflammaging are some of the more recent arguments in favor of the inflammatory theory of OA and highlighted in this review.

  8. Biologic targeting in the treatment of inflammatory bowel diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matteo Bosani

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Matteo Bosani, Sandro Ardizzone, Gabriele Bianchi PorroChair of Gastroenterology, “L. Sacco” University Hospital, Milan, ItalyAbstract: The etiology of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD has not yet been clarified and immunosuppressive agents which nonspecifically reduce inflammation and immunity have been used in the conventional therapies for IBD. Evidence indicates that a dysregulation of mucosal immunity in the gut of IBD causes an overproduction of inflammatory cytokines and trafficking of effector leukocytes into the bowel, thus leading to an uncontrolled intestinal inflammation. Under normal situations, the intestinal mucosa is in a state of “controlled” inflammation regulated by a delicate balance of proinflammatory (tumor necrosis factor [TNF-α], interferon-gamma [IFN-γ], interleukin-1 [IL-1], IL-6, IL-12 and anti-inflammatory cytokines IL-4, IL-10, IL-11. The mucosal immune system is the central effector of intestinal inflammation and injury, with cytokines playing a central role in modulating inflammation. Cytokines may therefore be a logical target for inflammatory bowel disease therapy using specific cytokine inhibitors. Biotechnology agents targeted against TNF, leukocyte adhesion, Th1 polarization, T cell activation, nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-κB, and other miscellaneous therapies are being evaluated as potential therapies for the treatment of inflammatory bowel disease. In this context, infliximab and adalimumab are currently the only biologic agents approved in Europe for the treatment of inflammatory Crohn’s disease. Other anti-TNF biologic agents have emerged, including CDP571, certolizumab pegol, etanercept, onercept. However, ongoing research continues to generate new biologic agents targeted at specific pathogenic mechanism involved in the inflammatory process. Lymphocyte-endothelial interactions mediated by adhesion molecules are important in leukocyte migration and recruitment to sites of inflammation, and

  9. An (Anti)-Inflammatory Microbiota: Defining the Role in Inflammatory Bowel Disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burman, S; Hoedt, E C; Pottenger, S; Mohd-Najman, N-S; Ó Cuív, P; Morrison, Mark

    2016-01-01

    While it is now accepted that the gut microbiota contribute to the genotype-environment-lifestyle interactions triggering inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) episodes, efforts to identify the pathogen(s) that cause these diseases have met with limited success. The advent of culture-independent techniques for characterizing the structure and/or function of microbial communities (hereafter referred to as metagenomics) has provided new insights into the events associated with the onset, remission and recurrence of IBD. A large number of observational and/or case-control studies of IBD patients have confirmed substantive changes in gut bacterial profiles (dysbiosis) associated with disease. These types of studies have been augmented by new profiling approaches that support the identification of more 'colitogenic' bacteria from numerically predominant taxa. Evidence of alterations in lesser abundant taxa such as the methanogenic archaea, to favor types that are more immunogenic, has also been forthcoming. Several recent longitudinal studies of patients with Crohn's disease have produced additional insights, including evidence for the role of 'anti-inflammatory' microbiota in providing a protective effect and/or promoting remission. In summation, the implications of dysbiosis and restoration of a 'healthy microbiota' in IBD patients requires definition beyond a taxonomic assessment of the changes in the gut microbiota during disease course. The available evidence does suggest that specific members of the gut microbiota can contribute either pro- or anti-inflammatory effects, and their ecological fitness in the large bowel affects the onset and recurrence of IBD. While metagenomics and related approaches offer the potential to provide novel and important insights into these microbiota and thereby the pathophysiology of IBD, we also need to better understand factors affecting the ecological fitness of these microbes, if new treatment of IBD patients are to be delivered.

  10. The coeruleus/subcoeruleus complex in rapid eye movement sleep behaviour disorders in Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Lorenzo, Daniel; Longo-Dos Santos, Clarisse; Ewenczyk, Claire; Leu-Semenescu, Smaranda; Gallea, Cecile; Quattrocchi, Graziella; Pita Lobo, Patricia; Poupon, Cyril; Benali, Habib; Arnulf, Isabelle; Vidailhet, Marie; Lehericy, Stéphane

    2013-07-01

    In Parkinson's disease, rapid eye movement sleep behaviour disorder is an early non-dopaminergic syndrome with nocturnal violence and increased muscle tone during rapid eye movement sleep that can precede Parkinsonism by several years. The neuronal origin of rapid eye movement sleep behaviour disorder in Parkinson's disease is not precisely known; however, the locus subcoeruleus in the brainstem has been implicated as this structure blocks muscle tone during normal rapid eye movement sleep in animal models and can be damaged in Parkinson's disease. Here, we studied the integrity of the locus coeruleus/subcoeruleus complex in patients with Parkinson's disease using combined neuromelanin-sensitive, structural and diffusion magnetic resonance imaging approaches. We compared 24 patients with Parkinson's disease and rapid eye movement sleep behaviour disorder, 12 patients without rapid eye movement sleep behaviour disorder and 19 age- and gender-matched healthy volunteers. All subjects underwent clinical examination and characterization of rapid eye movement sleep using video-polysomnography and multimodal imaging at 3 T. Using neuromelanin-sensitive imaging, reduced signal intensity was evident in the locus coeruleus/subcoeruleus area in patients with Parkinson's disease that was more marked in patients with than those without rapid eye movement sleep behaviour disorder. Reduced signal intensity correlated with the percentage of abnormally increased muscle tone during rapid eye movement sleep. The results confirmed that this complex is affected in Parkinson's disease and showed a gradual relationship between damage to this structure, presumably the locus subcoeruleus, and abnormal muscle tone during rapid eye movement sleep, which is the cardinal marker of rapid eye movement sleep behaviour disorder. In longitudinal studies, the technique may also provide early markers of non-dopaminergic Parkinson's disease pathology to predict the occurrence of Parkinson's disease.

  11. A new era of uveitis: impact of polymerase chain reaction in intraocular inflammatory diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mochizuki, Manabu; Sugita, Sunao; Kamoi, Koju; Takase, Hiroshi

    2017-01-01

    Uveitis is a sight-threatening intraocular inflammatory disorder which may occur from both infectious and non-infectious or autoimmune causes. The frequency of infectious uveitis and autoimmune uveitis varies depending on countries and regions. According to a nationwide survey conducted by the Japanese Ocular Inflammation Society, infectious and non-infectious uveitis accounted for 16.4 and 50.1% of new patients, respectively while the remaining 33.5% of new uveitis cases were not classified or were idiopathic uveitis. Infectious uveitis is particularly important because it causes tissue damage to the eye and may result in blindness unless treated. However, it can be treated if the pathogenic microorganisms are identified promptly and accurately. Remarkable advancements in molecular and immunological technologies have been made in the last decade, and the diagnosis of infectious uveitis has been greatly improved by the application of molecular and immunological investigations, particularly polymerase chain reaction (PCR). PCR performed on a small amount of ocular samples provides a prompt, sensitive, and specific molecular diagnosis of pathogenic microorganisms in the eye. This technology has opened a new era in the diagnosis and treatment of uveitis, enabling physicians to establish new clinical entities of uveitis caused by infectious microorganisms, identify pathogens in the eyes of many patients with uveitis, and determine prompt diagnosis and appropriate therapy. Here we review the PCR process, new PCR tests specialized for ocular diseases, microorganisms detected by the PCR tests, diseases in the eye caused by these microorganisms, and the clinical characteristics, diagnosis, and therapy of uveitis.

  12. Associations between subjective happiness and dry eye disease: a new perspective from the Osaka study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Motoko Kawashima

    Full Text Available Dry eye disease has become an important health problem. A lack of concordance between self-reported symptoms and the outcome of dry eye examinations has raised questions about dry eye disease.To explore the association between subjective happiness and objective and subjective symptoms of dry eye disease.The study adopted a cross-sectional design.All the employees of a company in Osaka, Japan.672 Japanese office workers using Visual Display Terminals (age range: 26-64 years.The dry eye measurement tools included the Schirmer test, conjunctivocorneal staining, the tear film break-up time, as well as the administration of a dry eye symptoms questionnaire. Happiness was measured by the Subjective Happiness Scale.Dry eye examination parameters, dry eye symptoms questionnaires, and the Subjective Happiness Scale score.Of the 672 workers, 561 (83.5% completed the questionnaires and examinations. The mean Subjective Happiness Scale score was 4.91 (SD = 1.01. This score was inversely correlated with the dry eye symptom score (r = -0.188, p < 0.001, but was not associated with objective findings which include conjunctivocorneal staining, low Schirmer test score, or low tear film break-up time. The level of subjective happiness was the lowest in the group without objective results, but reported subjective symptoms of dry eyes (p < 0.05.There is evidence of the relationship between subjective happiness and self-reported symptoms of dry eyes. Findings of this study revealed a new perspective on dry eye disease, including the potential for innovative treatments of a specific population with dry eye disease.

  13. Novel retinal findings in an infant with muscle-eye-brain disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Mehnaz; Hamid, Rizwan; Recchia, Franco M

    2012-01-01

    To describe novel retinal findings in an infant with muscle-eye-brain disease and suggest a novel mechanism for congenital retinal detachment. Case report. A 7-week-old, white, female infant presented with total retinal detachment, peripheral retinal avascularity, and neovascularization of the right eye. In the left eye, there was hypoplastic optic nerve, no identifiable foveal avascular zone, and a small area of avascularity in the temporal peripheral retina. Genetic testing ultimately confirmed the diagnosis of muscle-eye-brain disease, a disorder of aberrant neuronal migration. This case describes retinal findings that, to our knowledge, have not been reported in previous cases of muscle-eye-brain disease: peripheral avascularity, leading to retinal detachment in one eye, and foveal dysplasia. It is speculated that aberrant retinal vasculogenesis arose from disordered migration and patterning of retinal neurons.

  14. Eye Health in New Zealand: A Study of Public Knowledge, Attitudes, and Practices Related to Eye Health and Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Mark J.; Frederikson, Lesley; Borman, Barry; Bednarek, Rebecca

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: This study seeks to measure the public knowledge, attitudes, and practices related to eye health and disease in New Zealand (NZ). Design/methodology/approach: A 22-item survey of 507 adults in NZ was conducted. The survey was developed using interviews and focus groups, as well as comparisons with other benchmark international studies.…

  15. Eye Health in New Zealand: A Study of Public Knowledge, Attitudes, and Practices Related to Eye Health and Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Mark J.; Frederikson, Lesley; Borman, Barry; Bednarek, Rebecca

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: This study seeks to measure the public knowledge, attitudes, and practices related to eye health and disease in New Zealand (NZ). Design/methodology/approach: A 22-item survey of 507 adults in NZ was conducted. The survey was developed using interviews and focus groups, as well as comparisons with other benchmark international studies.…

  16. Phytochemicals and their potential usefulness in inflammatory bowel disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somani, Sahil J; Modi, Ketan P; Majumdar, Anuradha S; Sadarani, Bhakti N

    2015-03-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is a chronic inflammatory condition of the gastrointestinal tract with unclear etiology, namely ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease. Various drug therapies including aminosalicylates and immunomodulators have been approved for use; they have shown to produce diverse side effects. To overcome these limitations of the current therapeutics for IBD, extensive research is underway to identify drugs that are effective and free of undesirable side effects. Recently, various naturally occurring phytochemicals that cover a wide range of chemical entities such as polyphenols, terpeniods, flavonoids, and alkaloids have received attention as alternative candidates for IBD therapy. These phytochemicals act by modulating the immune response, various transcription factors, or reduce cytokine secretion. This review summarizes the findings of recent studies on phytochemicals as therapeutic agents in the management of IBD.

  17. The role of antimicrobial peptides in chronic inflammatory skin diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majewski, Sławomir

    2016-01-01

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are effector molecules of the innate immune system of the skin. They present an activity against a broad spectrum of Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria as well as some fungi, parasites and enveloped viruses. Several inflammatory skin diseases including psoriasis, atopic dermatitis, acne vulgaris and rosacea are characterized by a dysregulated expression of AMPs. Antimicrobial peptides are excessively produced in lesional psoriatic scales or rosacea in contrast to the atopic skin that shows lower AMP levels when compared with psoriasis. The importance of the AMPs contribution to host immunity is indisputable as alterations in the antimicrobial peptide expression have been associated with various pathologic processes. This review discusses the biology and clinical relevance of antimicrobial peptides expressed in the skin and their role in the pathogenesis of inflammatory skin diseases. PMID:26985172

  18. [Chronic inflammatory bowel diseases. Clinical aspects and new therapy approaches].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegmund, B

    2012-11-01

    There is a continuously increasing incidence in inflammatory bowel diseases affecting mostly young people who are in a vulnerable phase of life. Thus, early diagnosis and initiation of an effective therapeutic regimen is critical in order to maintain a good quality of life. In Germany, the standard therapeutic strategy is an accelerated step up approach, including the introduction of early immunosuppressive therapy if required. Although novel therapeutic strategies have found their way into clinical use there is still a substantial subgroup of patients where effective therapy is lacking. The future introduction of anti-adhesion molecule antibodies might provide a realistic option for this subgroup. Equally important is the availability of predictive markers allowing stratification of patients into subgroups at the time of diagnosis. Assuming that the CD8(+) T cell transcriptome approach will be confirmed in prospective trials, personalized therapy in patients with inflammatory bowel disease will be the next step.

  19. The Changing Face of Inflammatory Bowel Disease: Etiology, Physiopathology, Epidemiology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clemente Actis

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Context The term inflammatory bowel disease (IBD classically includes ulcerative colitis (UC and Crohn’s disease (CD. An abnormally increased mucosal permeability seems to underlie UC, whereas CD is thought to be the result of an immune deficiency state. Evidence Acquisition While these phenomena may well be labeled as genetic factors, the environment has its role as well. Drugs (chiefly, antibiotics and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory molecules, with proton pump inhibitors recently joining the list and smoking habits are all being scrutinized as IBD causative factors. Results Once almost unknown, the prevalence of IBD, in the Eastern World and China, is now increasing by manifold, therefore arousing warning signals. Conclusions A multidisciplinary approach will soon be necessary, to face the tenacious behavior of IBD, on a global perspective.

  20. Is CD69 an effective brake to control inflammatory diseases?

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Amaro, Roberto; Cortés, Jose R.; Sánchez-Madrid, Francisco; Martín, Pilar

    2014-01-01

    Early studies described CD69 as a leukocyte activation marker, and suggested its involvement in the activation of different leukocyte subsets as well as in the pathogenesis of chronic inflammation. However, recent investigations have showed that CD69 knockout mice exhibit an enhanced susceptibility to different inflammatory diseases, mainly those mediated by Th17 lymphocytes. The recent discovery of a ligand for CD69 expressed on Dendritic cells, Galectin-1, has confirmed the immunoregulatory role of CD69 mainly by the inhibition of Th17 differentiation and function in mice and humans. In this regard, the expression of CD69, both in Th17 lymphocytes and by a subset of regulatory T cells, has an important role in the control of the immune response and the inflammatory phenomenon. Therefore, different evidences indicate that CD69 exerts a complex immuno-regulatory role in humans, and that it could be considered as target molecule for the therapy of immune-mediated diseases. PMID:23954168

  1. Oral Manifestations of Inflammatory Bowel Diseases: Two Case Reports

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Manoela Seadi; Munerato, Maria Cristina

    2016-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) are known as chronic inflammatory disorders of the digestive tract, represented mainly by Crohn’s disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC). Among the main oral manifestations of IBD are cobblestoning of the oral mucosa, labial swellings with vertical fissures, pyostomatitis vegetans, angular cheilitis, perioral erythema, and glossitis. In this sense, understanding these nosological entities by dentists would help reach early and differential diagnosis. Thus, two case reports are presented and discussed based on theoretical references obtained by a literature review. The first case report refers to an adult patient whose IBD diagnosis was established after stomatological assessment. The second case was a patient with CD diagnosed in childhood with characteristic oral lesions. PMID:26864508

  2. Microscopic colitis: Is it a spectrum of inflammatory bowel disease?

    OpenAIRE

    Jegadeesan, Ramprasad; Liu, Xiuli; Pagadala, Mangesh R.; Gutierrez, Norma; Butt, Mujtaba; Navaneethan, Udayakumar

    2013-01-01

    Lymphocytic and collagenous colitis are forms of microscopic colitis which typically presents in elderly patients as chronic watery diarrhea. The association between microscopic colitis and inflammatory bowel disease is weak and unclear. Lymphocytic colitis progressing to ulcerative colitis has been previously reported; however there is limited data on ulcerative colitis evolving into microscopic (lymphocytic or collagenous) colitis. We report a series of six patients with documented ulcerati...

  3. Pulmonary involvement and allergic disorders in inflammatory bowel disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Nikolaos; E; Tzanakis; Ioanna; G; Tsiligianni; Nikolaos; M; Siafakas

    2010-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) has been associated with either clinical or subclinical airway and parenchymal lung involvement and interstitial lung complications. Several studies have reported that atopy has a high prevalence in IBD patients. Overlapping allergic disorders seem to be present in both the respiratory and gastrointestinal systems. The purpose of this review is to update clinicians on recent available literature and to discuss the need for a highly suspicious approach by clinicians.

  4. Interstitial Nephritis in a Patient with Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Payaswini Vasanth

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Tubulointerstitial nephritis in patients with inflammatory bowel disease has been linked to the use of 5-ASA derivatives. Various aspects of this theory have been challenged with a potential role for the underlying autoimmune disorder. Steroids are the mainstay of treatment and mycophenolate mofetil might be an effective alternative. We report a patient who responded well to mycophenolate despite continuing mesalamine, the suspected offending agent.

  5. Herbal and plant therapy in patients with inflammatory bowel disease

    OpenAIRE

    Triantafyllidi, Aikaterini; Xanthos, Theodoros; Papalois, Apostolos; John K. Triantafillidis

    2015-01-01

    The use of herbal therapy in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is increasing worldwide. The aim of this study was to review the literature on the efficacy of herbal therapy in IBD patients. Studies on herbal therapy for IBD published in Medline and Embase were reviewed, and response to treatment and remission rates were recorded. Although the number of the relevant clinical studies is relatively small, it can be assumed that the efficacy of herbal therapies in IBD is promising. The most import...

  6. Vaccination recommendations for adult patients with autoimmune inflammatory rheumatic diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Bühler, Silja; Eperon, Gilles; Ribi, Camillo; Kyburz, Diego; van Gompel, Fons; Visser, Leo G.; Siegrist, Claire-Anne; Hatz, Christoph

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND The number of individuals with autoimmune inflammatory rheumatic diseases (AIIRDs) treated with immunosuppressive drugs is increasing steadily. The variety of immunosuppressive drugs and, in particular, biological therapies is also rising. The immunosuppressants, as well as the AIIRD itself, increase the risk of infection in this population. Thus, preventing infections by means of vaccination is of utmost importance. New Swiss vaccination recommendations for AIIRD patients were in...

  7. European guideline for the management of pelvic inflammatory disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ross, J; Judlin, P; Nilas, Lisbeth

    2007-01-01

    Pelvic inflammatory disease (PID) remains one of the most important consequences of sexually transmitted infections (STIs) resulting in severe morbidity and acting as the economic justification for STI screening programmes. Early and appropriate therapy has the potential to significantly reduce...... the long-term complications of PID, and these evidence-based guidelines provide advice on the management of pelvic infection including the use of appropriate antimicrobial regimens....

  8. Role of anaerobes in acute pelvic inflammatory disease

    OpenAIRE

    2003-01-01

    Pouch of Douglas aspirates were collected from 50 women with history and examination suggestive of acute pelvic inflammatory disease (PID) and 20 healthy women admitted for tubal ligation served as control. A total of 57 microorganisms were isolated from 37 patients out of 50 in study group. Of 37 positive cultures 21(56.7%) were monomicrobial and 16(43.2%) were polymicrobial. Most common symptom in study group was lower abdominal pain (90%), vaginal discharge (70%...

  9. CT of complicated inflammatory bowel disease in children

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Riddlesberger, M.M. Jr.

    1985-09-01

    Most children with inflammatory bowel disease do not need a CT scan. However, when the course becomes complicated if often is necessary to evaluate what is happening outside the bowel lumen. CT is the examination of choice for that evaluation. With CT, the presence and extent of an abscess can be diagnosed and followed; fistulae can be detected; bowel wall and mesenteric thickening can generally be differentiated from an abscess.

  10. Interstitial Nephritis in a Patient with Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasanth, Payaswini; Parmley, Michelle; Torrealba, Jose

    2016-01-01

    Tubulointerstitial nephritis in patients with inflammatory bowel disease has been linked to the use of 5-ASA derivatives. Various aspects of this theory have been challenged with a potential role for the underlying autoimmune disorder. Steroids are the mainstay of treatment and mycophenolate mofetil might be an effective alternative. We report a patient who responded well to mycophenolate despite continuing mesalamine, the suspected offending agent. PMID:27703822

  11. Inflammatory bowel disease in adolescents: What problems does it pose?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ying Lu; James Markowitz

    2011-01-01

    Adolescents with inflammatory bowel disease face daily and long-term challenges that may be difficult for teenagers to manage. The developmental and psychosocial changes unique to this age group include becoming more autonomous and being more vulnerable to peer influence. These changes may lead to problems in medical management such as poor medication adherence and risky behavior. Being aware of these issues will help the medical team provide anticipatory guidance to address these concerns.

  12. European guideline for the management of pelvic inflammatory disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ross, J; Judlin, P; Nilas, Lisbeth

    2007-01-01

    Pelvic inflammatory disease (PID) remains one of the most important consequences of sexually transmitted infections (STIs) resulting in severe morbidity and acting as the economic justification for STI screening programmes. Early and appropriate therapy has the potential to significantly reduce...... the long-term complications of PID, and these evidence-based guidelines provide advice on the management of pelvic infection including the use of appropriate antimicrobial regimens....

  13. Probiotic yogurt Affects Pro- and Anti-inflammatory Factors in Patients with Inflammatory Bowel Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shadnoush, Mahdi; Shaker Hosseini, Rahebeh; Mehrabi, Yadollah; Delpisheh, Ali; Alipoor, Elham; Faghfoori, Zeinab; Mohammadpour, Nakisa; Zaringhalam Moghadam, Jalal

    2013-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is an irregular response of immune system accompanied with different inflammatory manifestations including alterations in cytokines. Probiotics are non-pathogenic organisms with probable effects in various conditions such as inflammation. The present study hypothesized whether oral intake of bifidobacterium and lactobacillus in form of probiotic yogurt may represent an immunomodulatory effect in IBD patients. Overally, 210 patients in remission phase and 95 healthy people were recruited. Patients were randomly divided into two groups of either 250 grams of probiotic yogurt (PI) or 250 grams of plain yogurt (PC) daily for 8 weeks. The healthy control group (HG) also received probiotic yogurt as noted. The serum levels of cytokines TNF-α, IL-6, IL-1β, IL-10 and CRP levels were measured at baseline and at termination time. A significant difference was observed between intervention groups of PI and PC with HG group (p probiotics.

  14. Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug use and the risk of Parkinson's disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Manthripragada, Angelika D; Schernhammer, Eva S; Qiu, Jiaheng;

    2011-01-01

    Experimental evidence supports a preventative role for non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) in Parkinson's disease (PD).......Experimental evidence supports a preventative role for non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) in Parkinson's disease (PD)....

  15. DMPD: Pathophysiological roles of interleukin-18 in inflammatory liver diseases. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 10807517 Pathophysiological roles of interleukin-18 in inflammatory liver diseases....l) Show Pathophysiological roles of interleukin-18 in inflammatory liver diseases. PubmedID 10807517 Title Pathophysiological role

  16. Microbiome Heterogeneity Characterizing Intestinal Tissue and Inflammatory Bowel Disease Phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyler, Andrea D; Kirsch, Richard; Milgrom, Raquel; Stempak, Joanne M; Kabakchiev, Boyko; Silverberg, Mark S

    2016-04-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease has been associated with differential abundance of numerous organisms when compared to healthy controls (HCs); however, few studies have investigated variability in the microbiome across intestinal locations and how this variability might be related to disease location and phenotype. In this study, we have analyzed the microbiome of a large cohort of individuals recruited at Mount Sinai Hospital in Toronto, Canada. Biopsies were taken from subjects with Crohn's disease, ulcerative colitis, and HC, and also individuals having undergone ileal pouch-anal anastomosis for treatment of ulcerative colitis or familial adenomatous polyposis. Microbial 16S rRNA was sequenced using the Illumina MiSeq platform. We observed a great deal of variability in the microbiome characterizing different sampling locations. Samples from pouch and afferent limb were comparable in microbial composition. When comparing sigmoid and terminal ileum samples, more differences were observed. The greatest number of differentially abundant microbes was observed when comparing either pouch or afferent limb samples to sigmoid or terminal ileum. Despite these differences, we were able to observe modest microbial variability between inflammatory bowel disease phenotypes and HCs, even when controlling for sampling location and additional experimental factors. Most detected associations were observed between HCs and Crohn's disease, with decreases in specific genera in the families Ruminococcaceae and Lachnospiraceae characterizing tissue samples from individuals with Crohn's disease. This study highlights important considerations when analyzing the composition of the microbiome and also provides useful insight into differences in the microbiome characterizing these seemingly related phenotypes.

  17. Treatment of the Pregnant Patient with Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Winter, Rachel; Nørgård, Bente M; Friedman, Sonia

    2016-01-01

    and on the rates of pregnancy loss and ectopic pregnancies. We do not know how to reliably measure disease activity during pregnancy or the effect of pregnancy on the microbiome. Although immunomodulators and anti-tumor necrosis factor medications are relatively safe during pregnancy, the long-term effects......Research regarding fertility, medication safety, and pregnancy outcomes is increasing, but there are still many knowledge gaps in these areas. Women with ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease may have decreased fertility because of voluntary childlessness and inflammatory bowel disease (IBD......) surgery, and women with Crohn's disease may also have decreased ovarian reserve. Initial studies show that in vitro fertilization is a viable option, and laparoscopic ileoanal pouch anastomosis surgery improves fertility rates. Additional research is needed on the effect of disease activity on fertility...

  18. Perioperative corticosteroid management for patients with inflammatory bowel disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hicks, Caitlin W; Wick, Elizabeth C; Salvatori, Roberto; Ha, Christina Y

    2015-01-01

    Guidelines on the appropriate use of perioperative steroids in patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) are lacking. As a result, corticosteroid supplementation during and after colorectal surgery procedures has been shown to be highly variable. A clearer understanding of the indications for perioperative corticosteroid administration relative to preoperative corticosteroid dosing and duration of therapy is essential. In this review, we outline the basic tenets of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis and its normal response to stress, describe how corticosteroid use is thought to affect this system, and provide an overview of the currently available data on perioperative corticosteroid supplementation including the limited evidence pertaining to patients with inflammatory bowel disease. Based on currently existing data, we define "adrenal suppression," and propose a patient-based approach to perioperative corticosteroid management in the inflammatory bowel disease population based on an individual's historical use of corticosteroids, the type of surgery they are undergoing, and HPA axis testing when applicable. Patients without adrenal suppression (corticosteroid supplementation in the perioperative period; patients with adrenal suppression (>20 mg prednisone per day) should be treated with additional perioperative corticosteroid coverage above their baseline home regimen; and patients with unclear HPA axis function (>5 and <20 mg prednisone per day) should undergo preoperative HPA axis testing to determine the best management practices. The proposed management algorithm attempts to balance the risks of adrenal insufficiency and immunosuppression.

  19. Lifestyle Issues in Inflammatory Bowel Disease – Smoking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cecilia Benoni

    1994-01-01

    Full Text Available During the pa t decade, smoking habit has been identified as a major exogenous factor in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD. It is associated not only with the development of the disease but al o with the clinical course in established disease. IBD combines absolute opposites as smoking is associated with Crohn’s disease and nonsmoking or former smoking with ulcerative colitis. The first reports of a negative association between smoking and ulcerative colitis were based on independent, clinical observations; from those studies a positive association was found between smoking and Crohn’s disease. Epidemiological studies that followed consistently showed that smokers have a reduced risk of ulcerative colitis and an increased risk of Crohn’s disease and that exsmokers have an increased risk of ulcerative colitis. In ulcerative colitis, but not in Crohn’s disease, a dose-response pattern has been demonstrated. Changes in clinical course, in disease severity and extension, and in recurrence rate indicate substantial clinical effects of smoking with a protective effect of smoking in ulcerative colitis and an aggravating effect in Crohn’s disease. There are also indications of smoking’s effects on changes in IBD epidemiology and sex distribution. The biological explanation to the finding is unknown. Smoking may aggravate Crohn’s disease by vascular effects. Theories on the protective effect in ulcerative colitis include effects on immune and inflammatory response, on mucus and on intestinal permeability. Possibly, beneficial effects in ulcerative colitis are exerted by nicotine but further studies are needed. Due to overall negative effects of smoking, IBD patients should not smoke. It seems, however, reasonable to give individual advice in patients with ulcerative colitis who have experienced a beneficial effect of ·making considering both current health status and life situation.

  20. Treg inducing adjuvants for therapeutic vaccination against chronic inflammatory diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chantal eKeijzer

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Many existing therapies in autoimmune diseases are based on systemic suppression of inflammation, the observed side effects illustrate the need for more specific interventions. Regulatory T cells (Treg are pivotal controllers of (autoaggressive immune responses, and decreased Treg numbers and/or functioning have been associated with autoimmune disease. Especially antigen-specific targeting of Treg would enable tailor made interventions, while obviating negative side effects of general immuno-suppression. Self-antigens that participate in inflammation, irrespective of the etiology of the different autoimmune diseases, are held to be candidate antigens for such interventions. Rather than tolerance induction to disease inciting self-antigens, which are frequently unknown, general self-antigens expressed at sites of inflammation would allow targeting of disease independent, but inflammatory-site specific, regulatory mechanisms. Preferably, such self-antigens should be abundantly expressed and up-regulated at the inflammatory site. Heat shock proteins show several of these characteristics.The development of antigen-specific Treg inducing vaccines is a major novel goal in the field of immunotherapy in autoimmune diseases. Progress is hampered by the lack of effective antigens and by the fact that other factors such as dose, route and the presence or absence of an adjuvant, turned out to be critical unknowns, with respect to effective induction of Treg. The use of a Treg inducing adjuvant might be required to achieve effective regulatory responses, in the case of ongoing inflammation. Future goals will be the optimization of natural Treg expansion (or the induction of adaptive Treg without loss of their suppressive function or the concomitant induction of non-regulatory T cells. Here, we discuss the potential use of protein/peptide-based vaccines combined with Treg inducing adjuvants for the development of therapeutic vaccines against chronic