WorldWideScience

Sample records for inflammatory demyelinating diseases

  1. Myelin Oligodendrocyte Glycoprotein: Deciphering a Target in Inflammatory Demyelinating Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick Peschl

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG, a member of the immunoglobulin (Ig superfamily, is a myelin protein solely expressed at the outermost surface of myelin sheaths and oligodendrocyte membranes. This makes MOG a potential target of cellular and humoral immune responses in inflammatory demyelinating diseases. Due to its late postnatal developmental expression, MOG is an important marker for oligodendrocyte maturation. Discovered about 30 years ago, it is one of the best-studied autoantigens for experimental autoimmune models for multiple sclerosis (MS. Human studies, however, have yielded controversial results on the role of MOG, especially MOG antibodies (Abs, as a biomarker in MS. But with improved detection methods using different expression systems to detect Abs in patients’ samples, this is meanwhile no longer the case. Using cell-based assays with recombinant full-length, conformationally intact MOG, several recent studies have revealed that MOG Abs can be found in a subset of predominantly pediatric patients with acute disseminated encephalomyelitis (ADEM, aquaporin-4 (AQP4 seronegative neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorders (NMOSD, monophasic or recurrent isolated optic neuritis (ON, or transverse myelitis, in atypical MS and in N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor-encephalitis with overlapping demyelinating syndromes. Whereas MOG Abs are only transiently observed in monophasic diseases such as ADEM and their decline is associated with a favorable outcome, they are persistent in multiphasic ADEM, NMOSD, recurrent ON, or myelitis. Due to distinct clinical features within these diseases it is controversially disputed to classify MOG Ab-positive cases as a new disease entity. Neuropathologically, the presence of MOG Abs is characterized by MS-typical demyelination and oligodendrocyte pathology associated with Abs and complement. However, it remains unclear whether MOG Abs are a mere inflammatory bystander effect or truly pathogenetic

  2. Chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy in a patient with Crohn's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohyagi, Masaki; Ohkubo, Takuya; Yagi, Yousuke; Ishibashi, Satoru; Akiyama, Junko; Nagahori, Masakazu; Watanabe, Mamoru; Yokota, Takanori; Mizusawa, Hidehiro

    2013-01-01

    Crohn's disease (CD) is a chronic inflammatory disorder of the gastrointestinal tract that is frequently accompanied by systemic complications. Neuropathologies have not been well investigated as extraintestinal manifestations of CD. We herein report the case of a 36-year-old man with CD who presented with progressive weakness and numbness. A neurological examination and the results of a nerve conduction study and a sural nerve biopsy led to a diagnosis of chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy (CIDP). Plasma exchanges were initially effective; however, the effects gradually declined starting 10 days after the plasma exchange (PE). These results suggest that humoral factors may play an important role in CIDP associated with CD.

  3. The value of electromyography in differentiating intramedullary tumor from inflammatory demyelinating disease of cervical region

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王红芬

    2014-01-01

    Objective To investigate the value of needle electromyography(EMG)in differentiating intramedullary tumor from inflammatory demyelinating disease of cervical region.Methods Patients hospitalized in the Chinese PLA General Hospital from March 2008 to June 2013 with abnormalities on MRI of cervical vertabra and preliminary diagnosed as intramedullary tumor or inflammatory demyelinating disease of cervical region were enrolled in the

  4. Acquired inflammatory demyelinating neuropathies.

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    Ensrud, E R; Krivickas, L S

    2001-05-01

    The acquired demyelinating neuropathies can be divided into those with an acute onset and course and those with a more chronic course. The acute neuropathies present as Guillain-Barré syndrome and include acute inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy (AIDP), Miller Fisher syndrome, acute motor axonal neuropathy (AMAN), acute motor and sensory axonal neuropathy (AMSAN), and acute pandysautonomia. The chronic neuropathies are collectively known as chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy (CIDP) and include MADSAM (multifocal acquired demyelinating sensory and motor neuropathy, also know as Lewis-Sumner syndrome) and DADS (distal acquired demyelinating symmetric neuropathy) as variants. The clinical features, pathology, pathogenesis, diagnosis, treatment, rehabilitation, and prognosis of these neuropathies are discussed.

  5. [Chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy].

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    Franques, J; Azulay, J-P; Pouget, J; Attarian, S

    2010-06-01

    Chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy (CIDP) is a demyelinating chronic neuropathy of immune origin whose diagnosis is based upon clinical, biological and electrophysiological data; previously critical to the diagnosis the nerve biopsy is now restricted to the rare situations where accurate diagnosis cannot be reached using these data alone. CIDP are mainly idiopathic, but a few associated diseases must be sought for as they require specific attention. Such associated diseases must particularly be discussed when the manifestations are severe or resistant to immunomodulating or immunosuppressive agents. Indeed, idiopathic CIDP are usually responsive to these treatments. The effectiveness of these treatments is limited by the importance of the secondary axonal loss. The dependence or the resistance may sometimes justify the association of several immunomodulating treatments. A single randomized controlled trial support the use of cytotoxic drugs and none with rituximab.

  6. Idiopathic inflammatory-demyelinating diseases of the central nervous system

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    Rovira Canellas, A. [Vall d' Hebron University Hospital, Magnetic Resonance Unit (I.D.I.), Department of Radiology, Barcelona (Spain); Rovira Gols, A. [Parc Tauli University Institute - UAB, UDIAT, Diagnostic Centre, Sabadell (Spain); Rio Izquierdo, J.; Tintore Subirana, M.; Montalban Gairin, X. [Vall d' Hebron University Hospital, Neuroimmunology Unit, Department of Neurology, Barcelona (Spain)

    2007-05-15

    Idiopathic inflammatory-demyelinating diseases (IIDDs) include a broad spectrum of central nervous system disorders that can usually be differentiated on the basis of clinical, imaging, laboratory and pathological findings. However, there can be a considerable overlap between at least some of these disorders, leading to misdiagnoses or diagnostic uncertainty. The relapsing-remitting and secondary progressive forms of multiple sclerosis (MS) are the most common IIDDs. Other MS phenotypes include those with a progressive course from onset (primary progressive and progressive relapsing) or with a benign course continuing for years after onset (benign MS). Uncommon forms of IIDDs can be classified clinically into: (1) fulminant or acute IIDDs, such as the Marburg variant of MS, Balo's concentric sclerosis, Schilder's disease, and acute disseminated encephalomyelitis; (2) monosymptomatic IIDDs, such as those involving the spinal cord (transverse myelitis), optic nerve (optic neuritis) or brainstem and cerebellum; and (3) IIDDs with a restricted topographical distribution, including Devic's neuromyelitis optica, recurrent optic neuritis and relapsing transverse myelitis. Other forms of IIDD, which are classified clinically and radiologically as pseudotumoral, can have different forms of presentation and clinical courses. Although some of these uncommon IIDDs are variants of MS, others probably correspond to different entities. MR imaging of the brain and spine is the imaging technique of choice for diagnosing these disorders, and together with the clinical and laboratory findings can accurately classify them. Precise classification of these disorders may have relevant prognostic and treatment implications, and might be helpful in distinguishing them from tumoral or infectious lesions, avoiding unnecessary aggressive diagnostic or therapeutic procedures. (orig.)

  7. Chronic inflammatory demyelinative polyneuropathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Said, Gérard; Krarup, Christian

    2013-01-01

    Chronic inflammatory demyelinative polyneuropathy (CIDP) is an acquired polyneuropathy presumably of immunological origin. It is characterized by a progressive or a relapsing course with predominant motor deficit. The diagnosis rests on the association of non-length-dependent predominantly motor ...

  8. Chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van den Bergh, Peter Y K; Rajabally, Yusuf A

    2013-06-01

    Chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy (CIDP) is the most common autoimmune neuropathy. The diagnosis depends on the clinical presentation with a progressive or relapsing course over at least 2 months and electrophysiological evidence of primary demyelination. Whereas typical CIDP is quite easily recognizable because virtually no other neuropathies present with both distal and proximal motor and sensory deficit, atypical CIDP, focal and multifocal variants in particular, may represent a difficult diagnostic challenge. CIDP very likely is an underdiagnosed condition as suggested also by a positive correlation between prevalence rates and sensitivity of electrophysiological criteria. Since no 'gold standard' diagnostic marker exists, electrophysiological criteria have been optimized to be at the same time as sensitive and as specific as possible. Additional supportive laboratory features, such as increased spinal fluid protein, MRI abnormalities of nerve segments, and in selected cases nerve biopsy lead to the correct diagnosis in the large majority of the cases. Objective clinical improvement following immune therapy is also a useful parameter to confirm the diagnosis. The pathogenesis and pathophysiology of CIDP remain poorly understood, but the available evidence for an inflammatory origin is quite convincing. Steroids, intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG), and plasma exchange (PE) have been proven to be effective treatments. IVIG usually leads to rapid improvement, which is useful in severely disabled patients. Repeat treatment over regular time intervals for many years is often necessary. The effect of steroids is slower and the side-effect profile may be problematic, but they may induce disease remission more frequently than IVIG. An important and as of yet uncompletely resolved issue is the evaluation of long-term outcome to determine whether the disease is still active and responsive to treatment.

  9. Atypical idiopathic inflammatory demyelinating lesions

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    Wallner-Blazek, Mirja; Rovira, Alex; Fillipp, Massimo;

    2013-01-01

    Atypical lesions of a presumably idiopathic inflammatory demyelinating origin present quite variably and may pose diagnostic problems. The subsequent clinical course is also uncertain. We, therefore, wanted to clarify if atypical idiopathic inflammatory demyelinating lesions (AIIDLs) can be class...

  10. Chronic Inflammatory Demyelinating Polyneuropathy Following Anti-TNF-α Therapy With Infliximab for Crohn's Disease

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    Concepcion, Orestes; Schlachterman, Alexander; Glover, Sarah; Forsmark, Christopher Y.

    2016-01-01

    We present a 29-year-old male with Crohn's disease who developed chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP) related to infliximab therapy. He developed lower extremity weakness and dysesthesia 3 weeks after a fourth infliximab dose. Laboratory examination revealed an elevated cerebrospinal fluid protein without pleocytosis. The patient initially responded to plasmapheresis therapy with marked symptomatic improvement, but relapsed and was refractory to subsequent treatments with plasmaphereisis, intravenous immunoglobulin, and glucocorticoids. While a causal relationship between infliximab and CIDP cannot be proven, clinicians should monitor Crohn's disease patients who are receiving TNF-α antagonists for neurologic symptoms suggestive of demyelinating disease. PMID:27144200

  11. CD8+ T cells in inflammatory demyelinating disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weiss, Hanne A; Millward, Jason M; Owens, Trevor

    2007-01-01

    We review the contribution made by CD8+ T cells to inflammation in the central nervous system (CNS) in Multiple Sclerosis (MS), and discuss their role in the animal model Experimental Autoimmune Encephalomyelitis (EAE). We show that the inflammatory cytokines interferon-gamma and interleukin-17...... are differentially regulated in CNS-infiltrating CD4+ and CD8+ T cells in EAE, and that CD8+ T cells regulate disease. In MS, CD8+ T cells appear to play a role in promotion of disease, so cytokine regulation is likely different in CD8+ T cells in MS and EAE...

  12. THE SPECTRUM OF INFLAMMATORY DEMYELINATING DISEASES OF THE CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM

    OpenAIRE

    Rama Krishna; Naveen; Vengamma; Mohan; Sridhar

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Idiopathic inflammatory demyelinating diseases (IIDDs) are rare neurological diseases. Their features differ from region to region. We characterize features of these diseases in Chittor. METHODS We describe 100 patients of IDD from Sri Venkateswara Institute of Medical Sciences, Tirupathi from May 2012 – December 2013. RESULTS 10 patients with multiple sclerosis, 14 with ADEM, 6 NMO, 9 with ATM and 9 ON presented with the mean of 32 years wit...

  13. Chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy in two siblings.

    OpenAIRE

    Gabreëls-Festen, A A; Hageman, A T; Gabreëls, F J; Joosten, E M; Renier, W.O.; Weemaes, C M; ter Laak, H J

    1986-01-01

    A familial occurrence of chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy is reported. The diagnostic problems in distinguishing the progressive form of this disease in childhood from hereditary motor and sensory neuropathy types I and III are discussed. Criteria for a definite diagnosis of chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy are proposed.

  14. Neuroradiological evaluation of demyelinating disease

    OpenAIRE

    Tillema, Jan-Mendelt; Pirko, Istvan

    2013-01-01

    Central nervous system inflammatory demyelinating disease can affect patients across the life span. Consensus definitions and criteria of all of the different acquired demyelinating diseases that fall on this spectrum have magnetic resonance imaging criteria. The advances of both neuroimaging techniques and important discoveries in immunology have produced an improved understanding of these conditions and classification. Neuroimaging plays a central role in the accurate diagnosis, prognosis, ...

  15. Chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy disease activity status: recommendations for clinical research standards and use in clinical practice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    K.C. Gorson; I.N. van Schaik; I.S.J. Merkies; R.A. Lewis; R.J. Barohn; C.L. Koski; D.R. Cornblath; R.A.C. Hughes; A.F. Hahn; M. Baumgarten; J. Goldstein; J. Katz; M. Graves; G. Parry; P.A. van Doorn

    2010-01-01

    Defining long-term outcomes in chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP) has been complicated by varying definitions of treatment response and differing scales measuring impairment or disability. An expert panel was convened to devise a CIDP Disease Activity Status (CDAS) and to class

  16. Chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polyneuropathy - chronic inflammatory; CIDP; Chronic inflammatory polyneuropathy; Guillain-Barré - CIDP ... Health care providers also consider CIDP as the chronic form of Guillain-Barré syndrome. The specific triggers ...

  17. Targeting insulin-like growth factor 1 leads to amelioration of inflammatory demyelinating disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew F Cusick

    Full Text Available In patients with multiple sclerosis (MS and in mice with experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE, proliferating autoreactive T cells play an important role in the pathogenesis of the disease. Due to the importance of these myelin-specific T cells, these cells have been therapeutic targets in a variety of treatments. Previously we found that Lenaldekar (LDK, a novel small molecule, could inhibit exacerbations in a preclinical model of MS when given at the start of an EAE exacerbation. In those studies, we found that LDK could inhibit human T cell recall responses and murine myelin responses in vitro. In these new studies, we found that LDK could inhibit myelin specific T cell responses through the insulin-like growth factor-1 receptor (IGF-1R pathway. Alteration of this pathway led to marked reduction in T cell proliferation and expansion. Blocking this pathway could account for the observed decreases in clinical signs and inflammatory demyelinating disease, which was accompanied by axonal preservation. Our data indicate that IGF-1R could be a potential target for new therapies for the treatment of autoimmune diseases where autoreactive T cell expansion is a requisite for disease.

  18. Early identification of 'acute-onset' chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy.

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    Sung, Jia-Ying; Tani, Jowy; Park, Susanna B; Kiernan, Matthew C; Lin, Cindy Shin-Yi

    2014-08-01

    Distinguishing patients with acute-onset chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy from acute inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy prior to relapse is often challenging at the onset of their clinical presentation. In the present study, nerve excitability tests were used in conjunction with the clinical phenotype and disease staging, to differentiate between patients with acute-onset chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy and patients with acute inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy at an early stage, with the aim to better guide treatment. Clinical assessment, staging and nerve excitability tests were undertaken on patients initially fulfilling the diagnostic criteria of acute inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy soon after symptom onset and their initial presentation. Patients were subsequently followed up for minimum of 12 months to determine if their clinical presentations were more consistent with acute-onset chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy. Clinical severity as evaluated by Medical Research Council sum score and Hughes functional grading scale were not significantly different between the two cohorts. There was no difference between the time of onset of initial symptoms and nerve excitability test assessment between the two cohorts nor were there significant differences in conventional nerve conduction study parameters. However, nerve excitability test profiles obtained from patients with acute inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy demonstrated abnormalities in the recovery cycle of excitability, including significantly reduced superexcitability (P chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy, a different pattern occurred with the recovery cycle shifted downward (increased superexcitability, P inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy and acute-onset chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy could be clearly separated into two non-overlapping groups. Studies of nerve excitability may be able to

  19. Ultrasonographic nerve enlargement of the median and ulnar nerves and the cervical nerve roots in patients with demyelinating Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease: distinction from patients with chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy.

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    Sugimoto, Takamichi; Ochi, Kazuhide; Hosomi, Naohisa; Takahashi, Tetsuya; Ueno, Hiroki; Nakamura, Takeshi; Nagano, Yoshito; Maruyama, Hirofumi; Kohriyama, Tatsuo; Matsumoto, Masayasu

    2013-10-01

    Demyelinating Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT) and chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP) are both demyelinating polyneuropathies. The differences in nerve enlargement degree and pattern at multiple evaluation sites/levels are not well known. We investigated the differences in nerve enlargement degree and the distribution pattern of nerve enlargement in patients with demyelinating CMT and CIDP, and verified the appropriate combination of sites/levels to differentiate between these diseases. Ten patients (aged 23-84 years, three females) with demyelinating CMT and 16 patients (aged 30-85 years, five females) with CIDP were evaluated in this study. The nerve sizes were measured at 24 predetermined sites/levels from the median and ulnar nerves and the cervical nerve roots (CNR) using ultrasonography. The evaluation sites/levels were classified into three regions: distal, intermediate and cervical. The number of sites/levels that exhibited nerve enlargement (enlargement site number, ESN) in each region was determined from the 24 sites/levels and from the selected eight screening sites/levels, respectively. The cross-sectional areas of the peripheral nerves were markedly larger at all evaluation sites in patients with demyelinating CMT than in patients with CIDP (p demyelinating CMT and CIDP were 0.90 and 0.94, respectively, with the cut-off value set at four. Nerve ultrasonography is useful to detect nerve enlargement and can clarify morphological differences in nerves between patients with demyelinating CMT and CIDP.

  20. Challenges in pediatric chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy.

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    Haliloğlu, Göknur; Yüksel, Deniz; Temoçin, Cağri Mesut; Topaloğlu, Haluk

    2016-12-01

    Chronic inflammatory demyelinating neuropathy, a treatable immune-mediated disease of the peripheral nervous system is less common in childhood compared to adults. Despite different sets of diagnostic criteria, lack of a reliable biologic marker leads to challenges in diagnosis, follow-up and treatment. Our first aim was to review clinical presentation, course, response to treatment, and prognosis in our childhood patients. We also aimed to document diagnostic and therapeutic pitfalls and challenges at the bedside. Our original cohort consisted of 23 pediatric patients who were referred to us with a clinical diagnosis of chronic inflammatory demyelinating neuropathy. Seven patients reaching to an alternative diagnosis were excluded. In the remaining patients, diagnostic, treatment and follow-up data were compared in typical patients who satisfied both clinical and electrodiagnostic criteria and atypical patients who failed to meet minimal research chronic inflammatory demyelinating neuropathy electrodiagnostic requirements. Eight of 16 patients (50%) met the minimal chronic inflammatory demyelinating neuropathy research diagnostic requirements. There was only a statistically significant difference (p = 0.010) in terms of European Neuromuscular Centre childhood chronic inflammatory diagnostic mandatory clinical criteria between the two groups. Misdiagnosis due to errors in electrophysiological interpretation (100%, n = 8), cerebrospinal fluid cytoalbuminologic dissociation (100%, n = 4 and/or subjective improvement on any immunotherapy modality (80 ± 19.27%)) was frequent. Pediatric CIDP is challenging in terms of diagnostic and therapeutic pitfalls at the bedside. Diagnostic errors due to electrophysiological interpretation, cerebrospinal fluid cytoalbuminologic dissociation, and/or subjective improvement on immunotherapy should be considered.

  1. Inflammatory Demyelinating Central Nervous System Diseases in Childhood: Clinical and Paraclinical Profiles in 133 Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Derya Kaya

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In a retrospective review of patients with acquired demyelinating disorders of the central nervous system, 133 patients (5.6% whose diseases started in childhood, were selected from 2369 patients, who had medical records in the Neurology Department of Dokuz Eylul University. Out of 133, 98 had relapsing remitting multiple sclerosis, 21 had secondary progressive multiple sclerosis, 8 had clinically isolated syndrome, 3 had neuromyelitis optica, 2 had Marburg disease, and 1 had radiologically isolated syndrome. In 55 patients (41.3%, disease onset was before age 16. Polysymptomatic presentation (22.6% was the most common initial feature. The EDSS scores ranged from 0 to 9 with a median of 2.0 ( for 126 patients. MRI records of 111 patients were obtained. 97 patients had clinically definite multiple sclerosis. 11 MS patients (11.3% did not initially present the diagnostic MRI features. All of the remaining multiple sclerosis patients fulfilled Barkhof-Tintore criteria (100% and 88.7% fulfilled KIDMUS criteria. Cranial MRI of NMO patients was normal. Our findings demonstrate some important clinical and paraclinical features that can help the literature on acquired demyelinating disorders of childhood by utilizing data from Western Turkey.

  2. Treatment of chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy.

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    Lehmann, Helmar C; Hughes, Richard A C; Hartung, Hans-Peter

    2013-01-01

    Chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy (CIDP) is a sporadically occurring, acquired neuropathic condition of autoimmune origin with chronic progressive or relapsing-remitting disease course. CIDP is a treatable disorder; a variety of immunosuppressive and immunomodulatory agents are available to modify, impede, and even reverse the neurological deficits and sequelae that manifest in the course of the disease. However, in many cases CIDP is not curable. Challenges that remain in the treatment of CIDP patients are well recognized and include a remarkably individual heterogeneity in terms of disease course and treatment response as well as a lack of objective and feasible measures to predict and monitor the responsiveness to the available therapies. In this chapter an overview of the currently used drugs in the treatment of CIDP patients is given and some important and controversial issues that arise in the context of care for CIDP patients are discussed.

  3. Disease-modifying therapy in multiple sclerosis and chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy: common and divergent current and future strategies.

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    Melzer, N; Meuth, S G

    2014-03-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) and chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy (CIDP) represent chronic, autoimmune demyelinating disorders of the central and peripheral nervous system. Although both disorders share some fundamental pathogenic elements, treatments do not provide uniform effects across both disorders. We aim at providing an overview of current and future disease-modifying strategies in these disorders to demonstrate communalities and distinctions. Intravenous immunoglobulins (IVIG) have demonstrated short- and long-term beneficial effects in CIDP but are not effective in MS. Dimethyl fumarate (BG-12), teriflunomide and laquinimod are orally administered immunomodulatory drugs that are already approved or likely to be approved in the near future for the basic therapy of patients with relapsing-remitting MS (RRMS) due to positive results in Phase III clinical trials. However, clinical trials with these drugs in CIDP have not (yet) been initiated. Natalizumab and fingolimod are approved for the treatment of RRMS, and trials to evaluate their safety and efficacy in CIDP are now planned. Alemtuzumab, ocrelizumab and daclizumab respresent monoclonal antibodies in advanced stages of clinical development for their use in RRMS patients. Attempts to study the safety and efficacy of alemtuzumab and B cell-depleting anti-CD20 antibodies, i.e. rituximab, ocrelizumab or ofatumumab, in CIDP patients are currently under way. We provide an overview of the mechanism of action and clinical data available on disease-modifying immunotherapy options for MS and CIDP. Enhanced understanding of the relative effects of therapies in these two disorders may aid rational treatment selection and the development of innovative treatment approaches in the future.

  4. Steroids for Chronic Inflammatory Demyelinating Polyneuropathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Gordon Millichap

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available The efficacy and safety of high-dose, intermittent IV methylprednisolone (IVMP as initial and long-term maintenance therapy for chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP were analyzed by a retrospective review of outcome data derived from patients’ medical records between 1992 and 2003 at Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, MO.

  5. Management strategies in chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy

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    Patel Kamakshi

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy (CIDP is a chronic, proximal and distal, asymmetrical or symmetrical, motor and sensory demyelinating polyneuropathy with a progressive course for at least 2 months. The accurate diagnosis is crucial as CIDP is amenable to treatment. Recent advances have provided new strategies and options for management of this syndrome. In this article, we review the clinical and diagnostic features as well as discuss recent insights and treatment strategies along with our experience in the management of patients with CIDP.

  6. [Chronic inflammatory demyelinating neuropathies and their variants

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    Vallat, J.-M.; Tabaraud, F.; Magy, L.; Macian, F.

    2002-12-01

    The Chronic Inflammatory Demyelinating Polyradiculoneuropathies (CIDP) constitute a syndrome whose incidence is difficult to evaluate, and is probably underestimated. In the course of this presentation, we deliberately restricted discussion to issues raised in recent years concerning the extent of this syndrome. We discuss diagnostic criteria, especially electrophysiological ones. As the criteria proposed by the ad hoc committee of the American Academy of Neurology in 1991 have been questioned due to lack of sensitivity, new ones have been proposed recently. We briefly discuss the different types of chronic dysimmune demyelinating neuropathy: not only the CIDP, but also the Lewis and Sumner syndrome or multifocal inflammatory demyelinating neuropathy and the multiple conduction block neuropathies. At last, we point out the consistent finding of axonal involvement in the course of a chronic demyelinating neuropathy; over time, it can become predominant, which may make diagnosis difficult by suggesting a chronic axonal neuropathy that may be assumed to be primary. Consideration of these points may help clinicians recognize more chronic dysimmune neuropathies, for which immunosuppressive therapy has been found to be effective.

  7. A case of chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy presented with unilateral ptosis.

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    Izadi, Sadegh; Karamimagham, Sina; Poursadeghfard, Maryam

    2014-01-01

    Chronic Inflammatory Demyelinating Polyneuropathy is an autoimmune disease with progressive and relapsing courses. The main clinical presentations are diffuse deep tendon hyporeflexia or areflexia and symmetric proximal-distal muscles weakness. Myasthenia gravis is also an immune mediated disease with fluctuating ocular and bulbar symptoms and sometimes weakness. Although both myasthenia gravis and chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy are immune mediated disorders, clinical presentations are obviously different in the two diseases. Herein, we will report a case of chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy who presented with isolated unilateral ptosis. Initially, the patient was managed as ocular type of myasthenia gravis, but after progression to general limb weakness and areflexia, the diagnosis of chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy was made. Although unilateral ptosis is a typical feature of myasthenia gravis, it may be seen as the first presentation of chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy as well which mimics myasthenia gravis disease.

  8. Polarization of macrophages and microglia in inflammatory demyelination

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Cao; Cheng He

    2013-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is an autoimmune demyelinating disease of the central nervous system,and microglia and macrophages play important roles in its pathogenesis.The activation of microglia and macrophages accompanies disease development,whereas depletion of these cells significantly decreases disease severity.Microglia and macrophages usually have diverse and plastic phenotypes.Both pro-inflammatory and antiinflammatory microglia and macrophages exist in MS and its animal model,experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis.The polarization of microglia and macrophages may underlie the differing functional properties that have been reported.In this review,we discuss the responses and polarization of microglia and macrophages in MS,and their effects on its pathogenesis and repair.Harnessing their beneficial effects by modulating their polarization states holds great promise for the treatment of inflammatory demyelinating diseases.

  9. Chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy associated intracranial hypertension.

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    Altinkaya, Ayca; Topcular, Baris; Sakalli, Nazan Karagoz; Kuscu, Demet Yandim; Kirbas, Dursun

    2013-06-01

    Chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy (CIDP) is an acquired immune-mediated demyelinating neuropathy. In this report, we detail the course of a 58-year-old male patient who had headache and double vision followed by progressive paresthesia and difficulty in walking. The patient had bilateral papilledema and mild leg weakness, absent ankle jerks and loss of sensation in distal parts of his lower and upper extremities. His electromyography (EMG) was concordant with CIDP and lumbar puncture revealed high opening pressure. The polyradiculoneuropathy as well as the papilledema and elevated cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) pressure improved under steroids. The improvement in intracranial hypertension (IHT) and papilledema under steroid treatment suggests that the IHT in this patient might be associated with CIDP.

  10. [Pathogenesis of chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy].

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    Aranami, Toshimasa; Yamamura, Takashi

    2013-05-01

    Chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP) is considered to be a demyelinating autoimmune disorder in the peripheral nervous system. Concerning cellular immune response, activity of IFN-gamma producing Th1 and IL-17 producing Th17 cells might be accelerated in patients with CIDP, while regulatory function of CD4+ CD25(high) Foxp3+ regulatory T cells might be diminished. Humoral immune responses against several myelin components such as myelin protein zero and gangliosides such as GM1 might be also induced in a part of patients with CIDP. Besides, growing body of evidences suggest that immune response against several molecules expressed in the noncompact myelin might be involved in the pathogenesis of CIDP.

  11. Paediatric UK demyelinating disease longitudinal study (PUDDLS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Likeman Marcus

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There is evidence that at least 5% of Multiple sclerosis (MS cases manifest in childhood. Children with MS present with a demyelinating episode involving single or multiple symptoms prior to developing a second event (usually within two years to then meet criteria for diagnosis. There is evidence from adult cohorts that the incidence and sex ratios of MS are changing and that children of immigrants have a higher risk for developing MS. A paediatric population should reflect the vanguard of such changes and may reflect trends yet to be observed in adult cohorts. Studying a paediatric population from the first demyelinating event will allow us to test these hypotheses, and may offer further valuable insights into the genetic and environmental interactions in the pathogenesis of MS. Methods/Design The Paediatric UK Demyelinating Disease Longitudinal Study (PUDDLS is a prospective longitudinal observational study which aims to determine the natural history, predictors and outcomes of childhood CNS inflammatory demyelinating diseases. PUDDLS will involve centres in the UK, and will establish a cohort of children affected with a first CNS inflammatory demyelinating event for long-term follow up by recruiting for approximately 5 years. PUDDLS will also establish a biological sample archive (CSF, serum, and DNA, allowing future hypothesis driven research. For example, the future discovery of a biomarker will allow validation within this dataset for the evaluation of novel biomarkers. Patients will also be requested to consent to be contacted in the future. A secondary aim is to collaborate internationally with the International Paediatric Multiple Sclerosis Study Group when future collaborative studies are proposed, whilst sharing a minimal anonymised dataset. PUDDLS is the second of two jointly funded studies. The first (UCID-SS is an epidemiological surveillance study that already received ethical approvals, and started on the 1st

  12. Epidemiology of chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy abroad and in Russia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. E. Popova

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Current article provides an overview of the results of epidemiological studies of chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP in Russia and abroad. It is shown that the prevalence of CIDP is different in countries, due to the use of different diagnostic criteria. It should be noted that the reliability of epidemiological prevalence and incidence is affected by difficulties of diagnosis of atypical forms of the disease.

  13. The spectrum of post-vaccination inflammatory CNS demyelinating syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karussis, Dimitrios; Petrou, Panayiota

    2014-03-01

    A wide variety of inflammatory diseases temporally associated with the administration of various vaccines, has been reported in the literature. A PubMed search from 1979 to 2013 revealed seventy one (71) documented cases. The most commonly reported vaccinations that were associated with CNS demyelinating diseases included influenza (21 cases), human papilloma virus (HPV) (9 cases), hepatitis A or B (8 cases), rabies (5 cases), measles (5 cases), rubella (5 cases), yellow fever (3 cases), anthrax (2 cases),meningococcus (2 cases) and tetanus (2 cases). The vast majority of post-vaccination CNS demyelinating syndromes, are related to influenza vaccination and this could be attributed to the high percentage of the population that received the vaccine during the HI1N1 epidemia from 2009 to 2012. Usually the symptoms of the CNS demyelinating syndrome appear few days following the immunization (mean: 14.2 days) but there are cases where the clinical presentation was delayed (more than 3 weeks or even up to 5 months post-vaccination) (approximately a third of all the reported cases). In terms of the clinical presentation and the affected CNS areas, there is a great diversity among the reported cases of post-vaccination acute demyelinating syndromes. Optic neuritis was the prominent clinical presentation in 38 cases, multifocal disseminated demyelination in 30, myelitis in 24 and encephalitis in 17. Interestingly in a rather high proportion of the patients (and especially following influenza and human papiloma virus vaccination-HPV) the dominant localizations of demyelination were the optic nerves and the myelon, presenting as optic neuritis and myelitis (with or without additional manifestations of ADEM), reminiscent to neuromyelitic optica (or, more generally, the NMO-spectrum of diseases). Seven patients suffered an NMO-like disease following HPV and we had two similar cases in our Center. One patient with post-vaccination ADEM, subsequently developed NMO. Overall, the

  14. Childhood chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy: an overview of 10 cases in the modern era.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ware, Tyson L; Kornberg, Andrew J; Rodriguez-Casero, M Victoria; Ryan, Monique M

    2014-01-01

    Chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy is a rare condition in children. In this article, we report our experience in the management of 10 cases of childhood chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy in a single center, in the era of contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), genetic microarray, and chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy disease activity status. Robust neurophysiologic abnormalities were present in all cases and both MRI and lumbar puncture were useful adjuncts in diagnosis. Genetic microarray is a simple technique useful in excluding the most common hereditary demyelinating neuropathy. Intravenous immunoglobulin was an effective first-line therapy in most cases, with refractory cases responding to corticosteroids and rituximab. We found the chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy disease activity status useful for assessing outcome at final follow-up, whereas the modified Rankin score was better for assessing peak motor disability.

  15. [Acute-Onset Chronic Inflammatory Demyelinating Polyradiculoneuropathy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanbayashi, Takamichi; Sonoo, Masahiro

    2015-11-01

    Chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP) is characterized by an insidious onset showing progression over two months. However, up to 16% of CIDP patients may show acute presentation similar to Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS). Such cases are termed acute-onset CIDP (A-CIDP). Distinguishing A-CIDP from GBS, especially the acute inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (AIDP) subtype, is critical because therapeutic strategies and outcomes may differ between the two syndromes. Regarding clinical features, A-CIDP is less likely to have autonomic nervous system involvement, facial weakness, a preceding infectious illness, or the need for mechanical ventilation, in comparison with AIDP. Electrophysiological features are usually quite similar between the two, although follow-up studies may elucidate key differences. Around 8%-16% of GBS patients may show clinical deterioration shortly after improvement or stabilization following initial immunological therapy. Such a situation is termed treatment-related fluctuation (TRF; GBS-TRF). The distinction between GBS-TRF and A-CIDP is an important clinical issue because maintenance treatment is often required in CIDP. The diagnosis of A-CIDP should be considered when the condition of a patient with GBS deteriorates after nine weeks from onset, or when deterioration occurs three times or more.

  16. [Autopsy case of a patient with Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 1A and suspected chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy, which was later diagnosed as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higuchi, Yujiro; Sakiyama, Yusuke; Nishihira, Yasushi; Endo, Kazuhiro; Suwazono, Shugo; Suehara, Masahito

    2012-01-01

    We report an autopsy case of a 74-year-old man with late onset Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 1A (CMT1A) diagnosed by genetic screening, later associated with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). At the age of 70 years, the patient was admitted to our hospital because of progressive weakness and dysesthesia in the right upper limb. In the early stages of the illness, he was diagnosed with chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy (CIDP), and transient improvement was achieved with intravenous immunoglobulin. However, the symptoms progressively worsened and became refractory. Gene analysis revealed PMP22 gene duplication, which confirmed CMT1A. On sural nerve biopsy, severe demyelinating neuropathy and abundant onion-bulb formations with endoneurial infiltration of inflammatory cells were observed. Thereafter, pseudo-bulbar palsy and respiratory muscle weakness developed insidiously and progressed rapidly along with muscle weakness in the limbs and trunk. The patient died about four years after the onset of this disease. Postmortem examination showed moderate neuronal cell loss, Bunina bodies, and TDP-43-positive inclusions in the anterior horn cells. The spinal cord revealed axonal loss and extensive macrophage permeation in the corticospinal tracts. On the basis of these findings, the final neuropathological diagnosis was ALS. This is the first report of an autopsy case of CMT1A complicated with ALS. We here discuss the significant clinical and neuropathological findings of this case.

  17. Treatment of chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleyman, Inna; Brannagan, Thomas H

    2015-07-01

    Chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP) is one of the acquired demyelinating neuropathies and is considered to be immune mediated. Diagnosis is typically based on clinical history, neurologic examination, electrophysiologic studies, CSF studies, and pathologic examination. Early diagnosis and treatment is important to prevent irreversible axonal loss and optimize improvement in function. The first-line agents for treatment are intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIg), corticosteroids, and plasmapheresis, which have all been demonstrated to be effective in controlled studies. Studies have not shown a significant difference between these three treatments, and the initial choice of therapy is often based on availability, cost, ease of administration, and side effect profile. If patients do not respond to one of these agents, they may respond to one of the others and sometimes in combination. If the first-line agents are not effective, chemotherapeutic or immunosuppressive agents may be considered. There are limited controlled studies of these modalities, and they are often used in conjunction with a first-line treatment. The majority of patients require long-term therapy to maintain a response and to prevent relapse.

  18. Gene expression changes in chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy skin biopsies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puttini, Stefania; Panaite, Petrica-Adrian; Mermod, Nicolas; Renaud, Susanne; Steck, Andreas J; Kuntzer, Thierry

    2014-05-15

    Chronic-inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP) is an immune-mediated disease with no known biomarkers for diagnosing the disease or assessing its prognosis. We performed transcriptional profiling microarray analysis on skin punch biopsies from 20 CIDP patients and 17 healthy controls to identify disease-associated gene expression changes. We demonstrate changes in expression of genes involved in immune and chemokine regulation, growth and repair. We also found a combination of two upregulated genes that can be proposed as a novel biomarker of the disorder.

  19. Chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy: from pathology to phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathey, Emily K; Park, Susanna B; Hughes, Richard A C; Pollard, John D; Armati, Patricia J; Barnett, Michael H; Taylor, Bruce V; Dyck, P James B; Kiernan, Matthew C; Lin, Cindy S-Y

    2015-09-01

    Chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy (CIDP) is an inflammatory neuropathy, classically characterised by a slowly progressive onset and symmetrical, sensorimotor involvement. However, there are many phenotypic variants, suggesting that CIDP may not be a discrete disease entity but rather a spectrum of related conditions. While the abiding theory of CIDP pathogenesis is that cell-mediated and humoral mechanisms act together in an aberrant immune response to cause damage to peripheral nerves, the relative contributions of T cell and autoantibody responses remain largely undefined. In animal models of spontaneous inflammatory neuropathy, T cell responses to defined myelin antigens are responsible. In other human inflammatory neuropathies, there is evidence of antibody responses to Schwann cell, compact myelin or nodal antigens. In this review, the roles of the cellular and humoral immune systems in the pathogenesis of CIDP will be discussed. In time, it is anticipated that delineation of clinical phenotypes and the underlying disease mechanisms might help guide diagnostic and individualised treatment strategies for CIDP.

  20. Aquaporin-4 Immuneglobulin G testing in 36 consecutive Jamaican patients with inflammatory central nervous system demyelinating disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sherri Sandy

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Epidemiological studies of neuromyelitis optica (NMO in Jamaica are lacking. Here we reviewed the clinical records of 700 patients undergoing neurological evaluation at the Kingston Public Hospital, the largest tertiary institution in Jamaica over a 4 month period. We investigated the diagnostic utility of Aquaporin-4 ImmuneglobulinG (AQP4-IgG testing in 36 consecutive patients with a diagnosis of an inflammatory demyelinating disorder (IDD of the central nervous system (CNS. Patients were classified into 3 categories: i NMO, n=10; ii multiple sclerosis (MS, n=14 and iii unclassified IDD (n=12. All sera were tested for AQP-IgG status by cell binding assay (Euroimmun. No MS cases were positive. Ninety per cent of NMO cases were positive. Four of 12 patients with unclassified IDD tested positive for AQP4-IgG. AQP4-IgG seropositivity was associated with a lower socioeconomic status, higher EDSS (P=0.04 and lower pulmonary function than the seronegative cases (P=0.007. Aquaporin-4 autoimmunity may account for a significant proportion of Jamaican CNS IDDs.

  1. [Anesthetic Management of Three Patients with Chronic Inflammatory Demyelinating Polyradiculoneuropathy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maruyama, Naoko; Wakimoto, Mayuko; Inamori, Noriko; Nishimura, Shinya; Mori, Takahiko

    2015-08-01

    Chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy (CIDP) is a chronically progressing or relapsing disease caused by immune-mediated peripheral neuropathy. We report the anesthetic management of three CIDP patients who underwent elective orthopedic surgeries. Owing to the risk of neuraxial anesthetics triggering demyelination, general anesthesia was selected to avoid epidural or spinal anesthesia or other neuraxial blockade. It was also judged prudent to avoid prolonged perioperative immobilization, which might compress vulnerable peripheral nerves. For Patient 1, general anesthesia was induced with propofol, remifentanil, and sevoflurane, and was maintained with sevoflurane and remifentanil. For Patients 2 and 3, general anesthesia was induced and maintained with propofol and remifentanil. For tracheal intubation, under careful monitoring with peripheral nerve stimulators, minimal doses of rocuronium (0.6-0.7 mg x kg(-1)) were administered. When sugammadex was administered to reverse the effect of rocuronium, all patients rapidly regained muscular strength. Postoperative courses were satisfactory without sequelae.

  2. Acute clinical onset chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy in a dog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molín, Jéssica; Márquez, Mercedes; Raurell, Xavier; Matiasek, Kaspar; Ferrer, Isidre; Pumarola, Martí

    2011-09-01

    We report a case of acute-onset ambulatory paraparesis with electrophysiological abnormalities compatible with axonal and demyelinating lesions in a Rottweiler dog. Although the clinical findings were compatible with acute canine idiopathic polyneuropathy, postmortem investigations revealed a chronic demyelinating polyneuropathy affecting the nerve roots. Due to the combination of acute clinical presentation and chronic pathologic features, this case is consistent with the acute-onset form of chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (A-CIDP).

  3. Imaging and clinical properties of inflammatory demyelinating pseudotumor in the spinal cord

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ying Wang; Min Wang; Hui Liang; Quntao Yu; Zhihui Yan; Min Kong

    2013-01-01

    Inflammatory demyelinating pseudotumor usual y occurs in the brain and rarely occurs in the spinal cord. On imaging, inflammatory demyelinating pseudotumor appears very similar to intramedul ary tumors such as gliomas. It is often misdiagnosed as intramedul ary tumor and surgical y resected. In view of this, the clinical and magnetic resonance imaging manifestations and the pathological fea-tures of 36 cases of inflammatory demyelinating pseudotumor in the spinal cord were retrospec-tively analyzed and summarized. Most of these cases suffered from acute or subacute onset and exhibited a sensorimotor disorder. Among them, six cases were misdiagnosed as having intrame-dul ary gliomas, and inflammatory demyelinating pseudotumor was only identified and pathologi-cal y confirmed after surgical resection. Lesions in the cervical and thoracic spinal cord were com-mon. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed edema and space-occupying lesions to varying de-grees at the cervical-thoracic junction, with a predominant feature of non-closed rosette-like rein-forcement (open-loop sign). Pathological examination showed perivascular cuffing of predominantly dense lymphocytes, and demyelination was observed in six of the misdiagnosed cases. These re-sults suggest that tumor-like inflammatory demyelinating disease in the spinal cord is a kind of special demyelinating disease that can be categorized as inflammatory pseudotumor. These solitary lesions are easily confused with intramedul ary neoplasms. Patchy or non-closed reinforcement (open-ring sign) on magnetic resonance imaging is the predominant property of inflammatory de-myelinating pseudotumor, and inflammatory cel infiltration and demyelination are additional patho-logical properties.

  4. Inhibition of System Xc(-) Transporter Attenuates Autoimmune Inflammatory Demyelination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evonuk, Kirsten S; Baker, Brandi J; Doyle, Ryan E; Moseley, Carson E; Sestero, Christine M; Johnston, Bryce P; De Sarno, Patrizia; Tang, Andrew; Gembitsky, Igor; Hewett, Sandra J; Weaver, Casey T; Raman, Chander; DeSilva, Tara M

    2015-07-15

    T cell infiltration into the CNS is a significant underlying pathogenesis in autoimmune inflammatory demyelinating diseases. Several lines of evidence suggest that glutamate dysregulation in the CNS is an important consequence of immune cell infiltration in neuroinflammatory demyelinating diseases; yet, the causal link between inflammation and glutamate dysregulation is not well understood. A major source of glutamate release during oxidative stress is the system Xc(-) transporter; however, this mechanism has not been tested in animal models of autoimmune inflammatory demyelination. We find that pharmacological and genetic inhibition of system Xc(-) attenuates chronic and relapsing-remitting experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE). Remarkably, pharmacological blockade of system Xc(-) 7 d after induction of EAE attenuated T cell infiltration into the CNS, but not T cell activation in the periphery. Mice harboring a Slc7a11 (xCT) mutation that inactivated system Xc(-) were resistant to EAE, corroborating a central role for system Xc(-) in mediating immune cell infiltration. We next examined the role of the system Xc(-) transporter in the CNS after immune cell infiltration. Pharmacological inhibitors of the system Xc(-) transporter administered during the first relapse in a SJL animal model of relapsing-remitting EAE abrogated clinical disease, inflammation, and myelin loss. Primary coculture studies demonstrate that myelin-specific CD4(+) Th1 cells provoke microglia to release glutamate via the system Xc(-) transporter, causing excitotoxic death to mature myelin-producing oligodendrocytes. Taken together, these studies support a novel role for the system Xc(-) transporter in mediating T cell infiltration into the CNS as well as promoting myelin destruction after immune cell infiltration in EAE.

  5. Specific features of chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. L. Kurenkov

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP is an autoimmune peripheral neuropathy that affects both adults and children. The basis for the paper is the analysis of 5 cases of CIDP in children (3 girls and 2 boys aged 5 to 17 years, followed up for 3 to 6 years. The types of its clinical picture and electromyographic changes at different disease stages are considered in detail. The course of the disease is traced during therapy with corticosteroids and intravenous human immunoglobulin and plasmapheresis. The results of the authors’ observations are compared with those of investigations conducted by other authors. The consideration of the diagnosis of CIDP and its treatment options focuses on that the international standards must be necessarily met to minimize errors in its differential diagnosis and management of these patients, and to make the prognosis for the disease.

  6. Ocular Neuromyotonia Associated with Chronic Inflammatory Demyelinating Polyneuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kung, Nathan H; Bucelli, Robert C; McClelland, Collin M; Van Stavern, Gregory P

    2015-10-01

    Ocular neuromyotonia (ONM) is a neuro-ophthalmic disorder characterized by episodic diplopia caused by contraction of one or more ocular muscles due to spontaneous excitation of the respective ocular motor nerve. We report a patient whose ocular neuromyotonia arose in the setting of a subacute demyelinating polyneuropathy consistent with chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP) and subsequently resolved following the initiation of intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIg) for her neuropathy. Our patient provides additional evidence towards the role of demyelination and ephaptic neurotransmission in ocular neuromyotonia and also represents the first reported case of ocular neuromyotonia associated with a systemic neurological condition.

  7. Chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy: from bench to bedside.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peltier, Amanda C; Donofrio, Peter D

    2012-07-01

    Chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy (CIDP) is the most common treatable chronic autoimmune neuropathy. Multiple diagnostic criteria have been established, with the primary goal of identifying neurophysiologic hallmarks of acquired demyelination. Treatment modalities have expanded to include numerous immunomodulatory therapies, although the best evidence continues to be for corticosteroids, plasma exchange, and intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIg). This review describes the pathology, epidemiology, pathogenesis, diagnosis, and treatment of CIDP.

  8. IFNγ Influences Type I Interferon Response and Susceptibility to Theiler's Virus-Induced Demyelinating Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Bowen, Jenna L.; Olson, Julie K.

    2013-01-01

    Theiler's murine encephalomyelitis virus (TMEV) induces a demyelinating disease in susceptible SJL mice that has similarities to multiple sclerosis in humans. TMEV infection of susceptible mice leads to a persistent virus infection of the central nervous system (CNS), which promotes the development of demyelinating disease associated with an inflammatory immune response in the CNS. TMEV infection of resistant C57BL6 mice results in viral clearance without development of demyelinating disease....

  9. pSTAT1, pSTAT3, and T-bet as markers of disease activity in chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madia, Francesca; Frisullo, Giovanni; Nociti, Viviana; Conte, Amelia; Luigetti, Marco; Del Grande, Alessandra; Patanella, Agata Katia; Iorio, Raffaele; Tonali, Pietro Attilio; Batocchi, Anna Paola; Sabatelli, Mario

    2009-06-01

    Chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy (CIDP) is considered an auto-immune disorder. We evaluated expression of pSTAT1, T-bet, and pSTAT3 in circulating T-cells, B-cells, and monocytes and spontaneous production of interleukin-17 (IL17), interferon-gamma (IFN gamma), and interleukin-10 (IL10) by peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from 14 active CIDP patients compared with 6 patients with long-lasting remission and 20 controls. Active disease patients showed higher pSTAT1, T-bet, and pSTAT3 in CD4(+) T-cells than controls (p CIDP patients than controls (p = 0.0011, p = 0.0041, p = 0.0413, respectively) and remission patients (p = 0.0073, p = 0.0274, p = 0.0251, respectively). Moreover in CD8(+) T-cells, pSTAT3 expression was higher in active CIDP patients than in remission patients (p = 0.0345) and in controls (p = 0.0023). IL17 and IFN gamma production were significantly higher in active CIDP patients than in controls (p CIDP patients (p = 0.0073). IL10 levels were higher in active phase patients than in controls (p = 0.0334). Our data suggest that pSTAT1, T-bet, and pSTAT3 can be considered putative markers of disease activity and potential targets for specific therapies.

  10. Demyelinating disease masquerading as a surgical problem: a case series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Awang Saufi M

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction We report three cases of demyelinating disease with tumor-like presentation. This information is particularly important to both neurosurgeons and neurologists who should be aware that inflammatory demyelinating diseases can present as a mass lesion, which is indistinguishable from a tumor, both clinically and radiologically, especially when there is no evidence of temporal dissemination of this disease. Case presentation The first patient was a 42-year-old Malay woman who developed subacute onset of progressive quadriparesis with urinary incontinence. Magnetic resonance imaging of her spine showed an intramedullary lesion at the C5-C7 level. She was operated on and biopsy was suggestive of a demyelinating disease. Retrospective history discovered two episodes of acute onset of neurological deficits with partial recovery and magnetic resonance imaging of her brain revealed demyelinating plaques in the centrum semiovale. The second patient was a 16-year-old Malay boy who presented with symptoms of raised intracranial pressure. A computed tomography brain scan revealed obstructive hydrocephalus with a lesion adjacent to the fourth ventricle. An external ventricular drainage was inserted. Subsequently, a stereotactic biopsy was taken and histopathology was reported as demyelination. Retrospective history revealed similar episodes with full recovery in between episodes. The third case was a 28-year-old Malay man who presented with acute bilateral visual loss and confusion. Magnetic resonance imaging of his brain showed a large mass lesion in the right temporoparietal region. Biopsy was consistent with demyelinating disease. Reexamination of the patient revealed bilateral papillitis and not papilledema. Visual evoked potential was prolonged bilaterally. In all three cases, lumbar puncture for cerebrospinal fluid study was not carried out due to lack of patient consent. Conclusions These cases illustrate the importance of

  11. Motor variant of chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy in a child.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinno, Durriyah D; Darras, Basil T; Yamout, Bassem I; Rebeiz, Jean G; Mikati, Mohamad A

    2008-06-01

    Only 2 cases of pure motor chronic demyelinating inflammatory polyneuropathy in the pediatric age group have been reported in the literature. We report on a motor variant of chronic demyelinating inflammatory polyneuropathy with anti-ganglioside antibodies, diagnosed in a 5-year-old girl who presented with progressive motor weakness over a period of 12 months with no sensory involvement. She initially responded partially to intravenous immunoglobulin therapy (1 gm/kg/month for 6 months), and then demonstrated sustained but incomplete improvement on chronic prednisone therapy (1-2 mg/kg/day), on which she has continued since 1 year and 4 months after her initial presentation 3 years ago.

  12. [Subcutaneous immunoglobulin. Treatment in chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculo-neuropathy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nogués, Martín A; Varela, Francisco J; Seminario, Gisela; Insúa, María C; Bezrodnik, Liliana

    2016-01-01

    Chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy (CIDP) is an acquired disease that may affect nerve roots and peripheral nerves. Despite its low incidence, diagnosis is particularly important because there are different effective treatments. Human immunoglobulin is one of the mainstays of the treatment. Although there are few studies up to date, subcutaneous immunoglobulin (IgSC) has been proposed as an alternative to intravenous administration with similar efficacy. We present three cases with definite CIDP, classified according to the European Federation of Neurological Societies / Peripheral Nerve, Society (EFNS /PNS) criteria in which was used SCIgG as a treatment after success with the intravenous route. The Overall Neuropathy Limitations Scale (ONLS) was used to estimate the changes in the muscular strength before and after treatment.

  13. Long-term immunoglobulin therapy for chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajabally, Yusuf A

    2015-05-01

    Immunoglobulins are an effective but expensive treatment for chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy (CIDP). Although the goal is to improve function, use of functional scales to monitor therapy is not widespread. Limited recent evidence suggests that doses lower than those used traditionally may be as effective. There are no proven correlations of effective dose with weight, disease severity, or duration. The clinical course of CIDP is heterogeneous and includes monophasic forms and complete remissions. Careful monitoring of immunoglobulin use is necessary to avoid overtreatment. Definitive evidence for immunoglobulin superiority over steroids is lacking. Although latest trial evidence favors immunoglobulins over steroids, the latter may result in higher remission rates and longer remission periods. This article addresses the appropriateness of first-line, high-dose immunoglobulin treatment for CIDP and reviews important clinical questions regarding the need for long-term therapy protocols, adequate monitoring, treatment withdrawal, and consideration of corticosteroids as an alternative to immunoglobulin therapy.

  14. [Chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy: clinical heterogeneity and therapeutic perspectives].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leger, Jean-Marc; Bombelli, Francesco; Tran-Thanh, Hung; Chassande, Bénédicte; Maisonobe, Thierry; Viala, Karine

    2010-01-01

    Since the first description of chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy (CIDP) by PJ Dyck's group at the Mayo Clinic 35 years ago, a wide range of publications have underlined the clinical, electrophysiologic and histopathologic heterogeneity of this disease. Expert consensus opinion is that CIDP should be considered in any patient with progressive symmetrical or asymmetrical polyradiculoneuropathy whose clinical course is relapsing and remitting or progresses for more than two months, especially if there are positive sensory symptoms, proximal weakness, are flexia without wasting, or preferential loss of vibration or joint-position sense. Electrophysiologic features of demyelinating polyneuropathy (especially conduction blocks) and elevated protein levels in cerebrospinal fluid may assist with the diagnosis. However, various clinical pictures have been described in patients with CIDP including pure motor or sensory impairment, and distal, multifocal or focal distribution. Two specific points have recently been emphasized:--while most CIDP patients have chronic onset, acute onset resembling Guillain-Barré syndrome may sometimes occur;--pure sensory forms may require different diagnostic strategies, including the use of somatosensory evoked potentials showing abnormal proximal sensory conduction, and nerve biopsy showing macrophage-associated demyelination, onion bulb formation, demyelinated and partially remyelinated nerve fibres, endoneurial edema, endoneurial mononuclear cell infiltration, and variation between fascicles. Several sets of diagnostic criteria for CIDP have been proposed, with different sensitivities and specificities. The European Federation of Neurological Societies/Peripheral Nerve Society criteria strike a balance between specificity, which needs to be higher for research purposes than for clinical diagnosis, and sensitivity, which, if too low, might lead to some cases being missed. CIDP patients may have a variety of

  15. Chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy associated with primary biliary cirrhosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murata, Ken-ya; Ishiguchi, Hiroshi; Ando, Ryuki; Miwa, Hideto; Kondo, Tomoyoshi

    2013-12-01

    We report a patient with chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy associated with primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC). Except for minimal biochemical abnormalities, clinical symptoms of PBC were not observed, and we diagnosed our patient with asymptomatic PBC from the results of a liver biopsy. Although the patient noticed little muscle weakness, an electrophysiological study demonstrated slow conduction velocities and prolonged distal latencies, with definite conduction blocks in the median, ulnar, and tibial nerves. The disturbed sensory pattern was asymmetrical, and sensory nerve action potentials were not evoked. From these observations, we diagnosed this patient with chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy. Neuropathy associated with PBC is very rare. We must differentiate demyelinating neuropathy with PBC in patients with asymmetrical sensory dominant neuropathy with high immunoglobulin M titers, and investigate for the presence of anti-mitochondrial antibodies to rule out a complication of asymptomatic PBC.

  16. Contactin 1 IgG4 associates to chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy with sensory ataxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miura, Yumako; Devaux, Jérôme J; Fukami, Yuki; Manso, Constance; Belghazi, Maya; Wong, Anna Hiu Yi; Yuki, Nobuhiro

    2015-06-01

    A Spanish group recently reported that four patients with chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy carrying IgG4 autoantibodies against contactin 1 showed aggressive symptom onset and poor response to intravenous immunoglobulin. We aimed to describe the clinical and serological features of Japanese chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy patients displaying the anti-contactin 1 antibodies. Thirteen of 533 (2.4%) patients with chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy had anti-contactin 1 IgG4 whereas neither patients from disease or normal control subjects did (P = 0.02). Three of 13 (23%) patients showed subacute symptom onset, but all of the patients presented with sensory ataxia. Six of 10 (60%) anti-contactin 1 antibody-positive patients had poor response to intravenous immunoglobulin, whereas 8 of 11 (73%) antibody-positive patients had good response to corticosteroids. Anti-contactin 1 IgG4 antibodies are a possible biomarker to guide treatment option.

  17. Intravenous immunoglobulin treatment in chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P.A. van Doorn (Pieter)

    1990-01-01

    textabstractPatients with a chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP) may respond to treatment with corticosteroids and to plasmapheresis, which was demonstrated in controlled clinical studies. In an uncontrolled study it was found that 13/17 CIDP patients had a rapid and clinical imp

  18. Peripheral nerve proteins as potential autoantigens in acute and chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Jia Pei; Devaux, Jérôme; Yuki, Nobuhiro

    2014-10-01

    Guillain-Barré syndrome is classified into acute inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy and acute motor axonal neuropathy. Whereas autoantibodies to GM1 or GD1a induce the development of acute motor axonal neuropathy, pathogenic autoantibodies have yet to be identified in acute inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy and chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy. This review highlights the importance of autoantibodies to peripheral nerve proteins in the physiopathology of acute and chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathies. Moreover, we listed up other potential antigens, which may become helpful biomarkers for acquired, dysimmune demyelinating neuropathies based on their critical functions during myelination and their implications in hereditary demyelinating neuropathies.

  19. Clinical and electrophysiological parameters distinguishing acute-onset chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy from acute inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dionne, Annie; Nicolle, Michael W; Hahn, Angelika F

    2010-02-01

    Up to 16% of chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP) patients may present acutely. We performed a retrospective chart review on 30 acute inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (AIDP) and 15 acute-onset CIDP (A-CIDP) patients looking for any clinical or electrophysiological parameters that might differentiate AIDP from acutely presenting CIDP. A-CIDP patients were significantly more likely to have prominent sensory signs. They were significantly less likely to have autonomic nervous system involvement, facial weakness, a preceding infectious illness, or need for mechanical ventilation. With regard to electrophysiological features, neither sural-sparing pattern, sensory ratio >1, nor the presence of A-waves was different between the two groups. This study suggests that patients presenting acutely with a demyelinating polyneuropathy and the aforementioned clinical features should be closely monitored as they may be more likely to have CIDP at follow-up.

  20. CNS expression of B7-H1 regulates pro-inflammatory cytokine production and alters severity of Theiler's virus-induced demyelinating disease.

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    D'Anne S Duncan

    Full Text Available The CNS is a unique organ due to its limited capacity for immune surveillance. As macrophages of the CNS, microglia represent a population originally known for the ability to assist neuronal stability, are now appreciated for their role in initiating and regulating immune responses in the brain. Theiler's murine encephalomyelitis virus (TMEV-induced demyelinating disease is a mouse model of multiple sclerosis (MS. In response to TMEV infection in vitro, microglia produce high levels of inflammatory cytokines and chemokines, and are efficient antigen-presenting cells (APCs for activating CD4(+ T cells. However, the regulatory function of microglia and other CNS-infiltrating APCs in response to TMEV in vivo remains unclear. Here we demonstrate that microglia increase expression of proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA, and phenotypically express high levels of major histocompatibility complex (MHC-Class I and II in response to acute infection with TMEV in SJL/J mice. Microglia increase expression of the inhibitory co-stimulatory molecule, B7-H1 as early as day 5 post-infection, while CNS-infiltrating CD11b(+CD11c(-CD45(HIGH monocytes/macrophages and CD11b(+CD11c(+CD45(HIGH dendritic cells upregulate expression of B7-H1 by day 3 post-infection. Utilizing a neutralizing antibody, we demonstrate that B7-H1 negatively regulates TMEV-specific ex vivo production of interferon (IFN-γ, interleukin (IL-17, IL-10, and IL-2 from CD4(+ and CD8(+ T cells. In vivo blockade of B7-H1 in SJL/J mice significantly exacerbates clinical disease symptoms during the chronic autoimmune stage of TMEV-IDD, but only has minimal effects on viral clearance. Collectively, these results suggest that CNS expression of B7-H1 regulates activation of TMEV-specific T cells, which affects protection against TMEV-IDD.

  1. Child neurology: chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy in children.

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    Markowitz, Jennifer A; Jeste, Shafali S; Kang, Peter B

    2008-12-01

    Chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy (CIDP) is an autoimmune disorder characterized by patchy demyelination of nerve roots and distal nerves. The course may be monophasic progressive or relapsing-remitting. CIDP is less common in children than in adults. As in adults, children with CIDP present with proximal and distal weakness and loss of deep tendon reflexes. Children are most often brought to medical attention due to gait disturbance and falling. As in adults, immunomodulatory treatment is the mainstay of therapy. Based on the small number of case series available, children with CIDP seem have a more favorable long-term course than adults.

  2. Characteristic MRI features of chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy.

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    Abe, Yuichi; Terashima, Hiroshi; Hoshino, Hideki; Sassa, Kaori; Sakai, Tetsuro; Ohtake, Akira; Kubota, Masaya; Yamanouchi, Hideo

    2015-10-01

    We present characteristic magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) features in a pediatric female patient with chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy (CIDP). Muscle weakness developed at 8 years old and fluctuated during the clinical course over 7 years. Electrophysiological studies showed a demyelination pattern with moderately delayed nerve conduction velocity, as well as dispersion phenomenon. MRI showed marked changes in thickening of the spinal nerve roots and their peripheral nerves in the lumber and brachial plexuses, as well as in the bilateral trigeminal nerves. It is suggested that these MRI features are characteristic and strongly supportive of the diagnosis of CIDP with a prolonged clinical course.

  3. The Prevalence of Anti-Aquaporin 4 Antibody in Patients with Idiopathic Inflammatory Demyelinating Diseases Presented to a Tertiary Hospital in Malaysia: Presentation and Prognosis

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    Tan, C. T.

    2017-01-01

    Background. There have been inconsistent reports on the prevalence and pathogenicity of anti-Aquaporin 4 (AQP4) in patients presented with idiopathic inflammatory demyelinating diseases (IIDDs). Objective. To estimate the prevalence of anti-AQP4 antibody in patients with IIDDs presented to University Malaya Medical Centre in terms of patients' clinical and radiological presentations and prognoses. Methods. Retrospective data review of IIDDs patients presented from 2005 to 2015. Patients were classified into classical multiple sclerosis (CMS), opticospinal (OS) presentation, optic neuritis (ON), transverse myelitis (TM), brainstem syndrome (BS), and tumefactive MS. Anti-Aquaporin 4 antibody was tested using the Indirect Immunofluorescence Test (IIFT) cell-based assay. Statistical analysis was done using the SPSS version 20. Results. Anti-AQP4 antibody was detected in 53% of patients presented with IIDDs. CMS was more common in the seronegative group, 27/47 (57.45%; p < 0.001). Conversely, OS involvement was more common in the seropositive group, 26/53 (49.06%; p < 0.001). Longitudinally extensive spinal cord lesions (LESCLs) on MRI were also more common in the seropositive group, 29/40 (72.50%; p = 0.004). Only 2/40 (5.00%) had MRI evidence of patchy or multiple short-segment spinal cord lesions in the AQP4-positive group (p = 0.003). The relapse rate and Expanded Disability Status Scale (EDSS) were also higher in the seropositive group (5.43 versus 3.17, p = 0.005; 4.07 versus 2.51, p = 0.006, resp.). Typical clinical presentations that defined NMO were also seen in the seronegative patients, but in a lower frequency. Conclusion. Our cohort of patients had a higher prevalence of seropositivity of anti-AQP4 antibody as compared to those in Western countries. This was also associated with a more typical presentation of opticospinal involvement with LESCLs on MRI, a higher rate of relapse, and EDSS. PMID:28203460

  4. Chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy in common variable immunodeficiency.

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    Özdemir, Özlem; Okan, Mehmet S; Kilic, Sara S

    2012-04-01

    Common variable immunodeficiency comprises a heterogeneous group of primary antibody deficiencies with complex clinical and immunologic phenotypes. Immune dysregulation leads to the generation of multiple autoantibodies against various antigenic targets in patients with common variable immunodeficiency. Chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy is a heterogeneous disorder that indicates an autoimmune response against peripheral nerve myelin. We describe a 7-year-old girl with common variable immunodeficiency who developed chronic inflammatory polyneuropathy. A 5-day course of intravenous immunoglobulin (500 mg/kg/day) improved her neurologic disorder. Chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy should be added to the broadening spectrum of neurologic complications in common variable immunodeficiency. Early detection and consequent treatment may reverse the neurologic sequelae.

  5. Newer therapeutic options for chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy.

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    Kuitwaard, Krista; van Doorn, Pieter A

    2009-05-29

    Chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy (CIDP) is an immune-mediated disorder with variable symptoms and severity that can be difficult to diagnose. Intravenous immunoglobulin, plasma exchange and corticosteroids have all been proven to be beneficial in randomized controlled trials, although the proof for corticosteroids is less clear. Although these treatments are likely to be similar in efficacy, they differ in terms of their cost, availability and adverse effects. These characteristics should be taken into account when deciding which treatment to offer a patient. If there is no response to the first treatment option, one of the other treatments should be tried. Patients with a pure motor CIDP may deteriorate after corticosteroid treatment. Some patients do not respond or become refractory or intolerant to these conventional treatments. Those who become unresponsive to therapy should be checked again for the appearance of a monoclonal protein or other signs of malignancy. Over the years, small non-randomized studies have reported possible beneficial effects of various immunosuppressive agents. A Cochrane review concluded that currently there is insufficient evidence to decide whether these immunosuppressive drugs are beneficial in CIDP. When giving immunosuppressive drugs, one should be aware that some might even cause demyelinating disease. It is difficult to prove beneficial effects of these newer treatments since they have only been used in small groups of patients, who are refractory to other treatments, and often in combination with other treatments. CIDP patients can deteriorate during or after infections or improve spontaneously, making it more difficult to judge treatment efficacy. Various treatments for CIDP are described such as azathioprine, ciclosporin, cyclophosphamide, interferons, methotrexate, mycophenolate mofetil, rituximab and etanercept. An overview of these newer treatments, their mode of action, adverse effects and

  6. Cerebrospinal fluid analysis in the context of CNS demyelinating diseases

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    Sandro Luiz de Andrade Matas

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The central nervous system demyelinating diseases are a group of disorders with different etiologies, characterized by inflammatory lesions that are associated with loss of myelin and eventually axonal damage. In this group the most studied ones are multiple sclerosis (MS, neuromyelitis optic (NMO and acute disseminated encephalomyelitis (ADEM. The cerebrospinal fluid is essential to differentiate between these different syndromes and to define multiple sclerosis, helping to assess the probability of Clinical Isolated Syndrome turn into multiple sclerosis.

  7. Central neuroinvasion and demyelination by inflammatory macrophages after peripheral virus infection is controlled by SHP-1.

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    Christophi, George P; Massa, Paul T

    2009-12-01

    SHP-1 is a protein tyrosine phosphatase that negatively regulates cytokine signaling and inflammatory gene expression. Mice genetically lacking SHP-1 (me/me) display severe inflammatory demyelinating disease following intracranial inoculation with the BeAn strain of Theiler's murine encephalomyelitis virus (TMEV) compared to infected wild-type mice. Furthermore, SHP-1-deficient mice show a profound and predominant infiltration of blood-derived macrophages into the CNS following intracerebral injection of TMEV, and these macrophages are concentrated in areas of demyelination in brain and spinal cord. In the present study we investigated the role of SHP-1 in controlling CNS inflammatory demyelination following a peripheral instead of an intracerebral inoculation of TMEV. Surprisingly, we found that while wild-type mice were entirely refractory to intraperitoneal (IP) infection by TMEV, in agreement with previous studies, all SHP-1-deficient mice displayed profound macrophage neuroinvasion and macrophage-mediated inflammatory demyelination. Moreover, SHP-1 deficiency led to increased expression of inflammatory molecules in macrophages, serum, and CNS following IP infection with TMEV. Importantly, pharmacological depletion of peripheral macrophages significantly decreased both paralysis and CNS viral loads in SHP-1-deficient mice. In addition, peripheral MCP-1 neutralization attenuated disease severity, decreased macrophage infiltration into the CNS, and decreased monocyte numbers in the blood of SHP-1-deficient mice, implicating MCP-1 as an important mediator of monocyte migration between multiple tissues. These results demonstrate that peripheral TMEV infection results in a unique evolution of macrophage-mediated demyelination in SHP-1-deficient mice, implicating SHP-1 in the control of neuroinvasion of inflammatory macrophages and neurotropic viruses into the CNS.

  8. Central nervous system inflammatory demyelinating disorders of childhood

    OpenAIRE

    Kamate Mahesh; Chetal Vivek; Tonape Venkatesh; Mahantshetti Niranjana; Hattiholi Virupaxi

    2010-01-01

    Background and Objectives: Childhood Central Nervous System (CNS) inflammatory demyelinating disorders (CIDD) are being diagnosed more commonly now. There is ambiguity in the use of different terms in relation to CIDD. Recently, consensus definitions have been proposed so that there is uniformity in studies across the world. The prevalence of these disorders and the spectrum varies from place to place. This study was undertaken to study the clinico-radiological profile and outcome of children...

  9. Central nervous system inflammatory demyelinating disorders of childhood

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    Kamate Mahesh

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives: Childhood Central Nervous System (CNS inflammatory demyelinating disorders (CIDD are being diagnosed more commonly now. There is ambiguity in the use of different terms in relation to CIDD. Recently, consensus definitions have been proposed so that there is uniformity in studies across the world. The prevalence of these disorders and the spectrum varies from place to place. This study was undertaken to study the clinico-radiological profile and outcome of children with CIDD using the recent consensus definition. Study design: Prospective descriptive study. Materials and Methods: All patients admitted in pediatric ward and pediatric intensive care with neurological symptoms and signs suggestive of CNS inflammatory demyelinating disorders from July 2007−August 2008 were enrolled. The details of clinical presentation, neuroimaging findings, laboratory results, treatment, and outcome were noted and analyzed. Results: Fifteen patients (11 with acute disseminated encephalomyelitis and 4 with clinically isolated syndrome were diagnosed with CIDD. Clinical presentation was quite varied. Eight patients recovered completely; 4 cases were left with sequelae and 3 patients expired. There were no cases of multiple sclerosis or neuromyelitis optica. Conclusions: CNS inflammatory demyelinating disorders are common illnesses in developing countries because of recurrent infections. Even the spectrum of CIDD is different. Neuroimaging in the form of magnetic resonance imaging is essential for diagnosis.

  10. Childhood chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy with nonuniform pathologic features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luan, Xinghua; Zheng, Riliang; Chen, Bin; Yuan, Yun

    2010-08-01

    Nonuniform pathologic changes in chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy were previously reported only in adult humans. We analyzed the pathologic features of 12 children, aged 2-17 years, with chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy. Six patients manifested a preceding illness. Five patients presented a chronic, monophasic course, and seven presented a relapsing-remitting course. Three patients exhibited multiple cranial-nerve involvement. Five of 12 (41.7%) patients presented nonuniform features. Two subtypes of nonuniform lesions were revealed. One exhibited varying myelinated fiber content between nerve fascicles, and one exhibited onion bulbs involving a variable number of fascicles. Macrophages were evident in 11 patients, and the number of CD3-positive T cells in the nonuniform group was greater compared with the uniform group (P = 0.045). Our results demonstrate that childhood chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy exhibits pathologically nonuniform features, thus providing more evidence to assist in differential diagnoses of pediatric patients. However, clinical and electrophysiologic features, as well as responses to treatment, were similar in the nonuniform and uniform groups.

  11. The Prevalence of Anti-Aquaporin 4 Antibody in Patients with Idiopathic Inflammatory Demyelinating Diseases Presented to a Tertiary Hospital in Malaysia: Presentation and Prognosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Abdullah

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. There have been inconsistent reports on the prevalence and pathogenicity of anti-Aquaporin 4 (AQP4 in patients presented with idiopathic inflammatory demyelinating diseases (IIDDs. Objective. To estimate the prevalence of anti-AQP4 antibody in patients with IIDDs presented to University Malaya Medical Centre in terms of patients’ clinical and radiological presentations and prognoses. Methods. Retrospective data review of IIDDs patients presented from 2005 to 2015. Patients were classified into classical multiple sclerosis (CMS, opticospinal (OS presentation, optic neuritis (ON, transverse myelitis (TM, brainstem syndrome (BS, and tumefactive MS. Anti-Aquaporin 4 antibody was tested using the Indirect Immunofluorescence Test (IIFT cell-based assay. Statistical analysis was done using the SPSS version 20. Results. Anti-AQP4 antibody was detected in 53% of patients presented with IIDDs. CMS was more common in the seronegative group, 27/47 (57.45%; p<0.001. Conversely, OS involvement was more common in the seropositive group, 26/53 (49.06%; p<0.001. Longitudinally extensive spinal cord lesions (LESCLs on MRI were also more common in the seropositive group, 29/40 (72.50%; p=0.004. Only 2/40 (5.00% had MRI evidence of patchy or multiple short-segment spinal cord lesions in the AQP4-positive group (p=0.003. The relapse rate and Expanded Disability Status Scale (EDSS were also higher in the seropositive group (5.43 versus 3.17, p=0.005; 4.07 versus 2.51, p=0.006, resp.. Typical clinical presentations that defined NMO were also seen in the seronegative patients, but in a lower frequency. Conclusion. Our cohort of patients had a higher prevalence of seropositivity of anti-AQP4 antibody as compared to those in Western countries. This was also associated with a more typical presentation of opticospinal involvement with LESCLs on MRI, a higher rate of relapse, and EDSS.

  12. [Therapeutic responsiveness in chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iijima, Masahiro

    2011-11-01

    CIDP is autoimmune-associated peripheral neuropathy characterized by motor and sensory disturbances in each limb. While various phenotypes have been reported in CIDP, the essential pathogenesis is not elucidated yet. Clinicopathological study indicated axonal dysfunction (muscle atrophy and decreased compound muscular action potentials) is one of the most important factors in IVIg Non-responders. Furthermore, single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) haplotype/diplotype analysis within a linkage disequilibrium block indicates transient axonal glycoprotein 1 (TAG-1), which controls proper distribution of potassium channels in juxtaparanode, is an important factor for IVIg responsiveness. Gene expression analysis of biopsied nerves supported the hypothesis that CIDP pathogenesis is involved in humoral and cellular immune system. With respect to IVIg responsiveness, expression profiles indicate whole CIDP patients need conventional immune-modulating therapies in somewhat, while we should re-consider how to use them. From aspects of gene expression results, Non-responders need not only conventional immune-modulating therapies but also other original modalities which could intervene the pathogenesis except Schwann/inflammatory cells while Responders with IVIg dependence should need stronger and longer immune-suppression.

  13. Fibrillary glomerulonephritis combined with chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy

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    Woo Kyung Sung

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available A 58-yr-old man presented with leg edema and subacute weakness of his bilateral lower extremities. Urinary and serum immunoelectrophoresis revealed the presence of lambda-type Bence Jones proteins. He was ultimately diagnosed with monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS. A renal biopsy specimen showed fibrillary glomerulonephritis (FGN, which was randomly arranged as 12–20 m nonbranching fibrils in the basement membranes. Immunofluorescence studies were negative for immunoglobulin (IgG, IgM, IgA, C3, and kappa light chains in the capillary walls and mesangial areas. A Congo red stain for amyloid was negative. Electromyography and nerve conduction velocity examinations results were compatible with the presence of demyelinating polyneuropathy. This case showed a rare combination of FGN, without Ig deposition, and MGUS combined with chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP.

  14. A 17 year-old girl with a demyelinating disease requiring mechanical ventilation: a case report

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    Katsenos Chrysostomos

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Demyelinating diseases cause destruction of the myelin sheath, while axons are relatively spared. Pathologically, demyelination can be the result of an inflammatory process, viral infection, acquired metabolic derangement and ischemic insult. Three diseases that can cause inflammatory demyelination of the CNS are: Multiple sclerosis (MS, Acute disseminated encephalomyelitis (ADEM and Acute hemorrhagic leucoencephalitis. Differentiation is not always easy and there is considerable overlaping. Data about adults with acute demyelination requiring ICU admission is limited. Case presentation A 17 year old Greek female was hospitalised in the ICU because of acute respiratory failure requiring mechanical ventilation. She had a history of febrile disease one month before, acute onset of paraplegia, diplopia, progressive arm weakness and dyspnea. Her consciousness was not impaired. A demyelinating central nervous system (CNS disease, possibly post infectious encephalomyelitis (ADEM was the underlying condition. The MRI of the brain disclosed diffused expanded cerebral lesions involving the optic nerve, basal ganglia cerebellum, pons and medulla oblongata. There was also extended involvement of the cervical and thoracic part of the spinal cord. CSF leukocyte count was elevated with lymphocyte predominance. The patient required mechanical ventilation for two months. Then she was transferred to a rehabilitation centre. Three years later she remains paraplegic. Since then she has not suffered any other demyelination attack. Conclusions Demyelinating diseases can cause acute respiratory failure when the spinal cord is affected. Severe forms of these diseases, making necessary ICU admission, is less frequently reported. Intensivists should be aware of the features of these rare diseases.

  15. Reconstruction magnetic resonance neurography in chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy.

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    Shibuya, Kazumoto; Sugiyama, Atsuhiko; Ito, Sho-ichi; Misawa, Sonoko; Sekiguchi, Yukari; Mitsuma, Satsuki; Iwai, Yuta; Watanabe, Keisuke; Shimada, Hitoshi; Kawaguchi, Hiroshi; Suhara, Tetsuya; Yokota, Hajime; Matsumoto, Hiroshi; Kuwabara, Satoshi

    2015-02-01

    To study distribution and patterns of nerve hypertrophy in chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP), magnetic resonance neurography with 3-dimensional reconstruction of short tau inversion recovery images was performed in 33 patients. This technique clearly showed longitudinal morphological changes from the cervical roots to the nerve trunks in the proximal arm. Nerve enlargement was detected in 88% of the patients. According to the clinical subtype of CIDP, typical CIDP patients showed symmetric and root-dominant hypertrophy, whereas Lewis-Sumner syndrome patients had multifocal fusiform hypertrophy in the nerve trunks. The patterns of nerve hypertrophy presumably reflect the different pathophysiology of each CIDP subtype.

  16. Thrombocytosis distinguishes POEMS syndrome from chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naddaf, Elie; Dispenzieri, Angela; Mandrekar, Jay; Mauermann, Michelle L

    2015-10-01

    POEMS (polyneuropathy, organomegaly, endocrinopathy, monoclonal plasma cell disorder, and skin changes) syndrome may be mistaken for chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP). Differentiating the 2 entities is crucial, as there are major treatment implications. We compared platelet counts in 136 POEMS patients and 67 CIDP controls. Of the patients with POEMS, 53.7% had thrombocytosis, compared with 1.5% of those with CIDP (P Thrombocytosis is a helpful indicator to prompt clinicians to consider the diagnosis of POEMS syndrome in patients who are thought to have CIDP, and is an important reminder of the increased risk of thrombotic events in POEMS syndrome. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Autoantibodies against vinculin in patients with chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy.

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    Beppu, Minako; Sawai, Setsu; Satoh, Mamoru; Mori, Masahiro; Kazami, Takahiro; Misawa, Sonoko; Shibuya, Kazumoto; Ishibashi, Masumi; Sogawa, Kazuyuki; Kado, Sayaka; Kodera, Yoshio; Nomura, Fumio; Kuwabara, Satoshi

    2015-10-15

    To identify the target molecules of chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP), we used proteomic-based approach in the extracted proteins from porcine cauda equina. Two of 31 CIDP patients had markedly elevated serum autoantibodies against vinculin, a cell adhesion protein. Both of the patients with anti-vinculin antibodies had similar clinical manifestation, which are compatible with those of "typical" CIDP. Immunocytochemistry showed that vinculin was stained at the myelin sheath of the sciatic nerves by serum samples. Our results suggest that vinculin is a possible immunological target molecule in a subpopulation of typical CIDP patients.

  18. Chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy after treatment with interferon-alpha.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirotani, Makoto; Nakano, Hitoshi; Ura, Shigehisa; Yoshida, Kazuto; Niino, Masaaki; Yabe, Ichiro; Sasaki, Hidenao

    2009-01-01

    Interferon-alpha (IFN-alpha), though widely used for the treatment of chronic viral hepatitis, may be associated with the occurrence of autoimmune disorders. In this case report, a patient with chronic hepatitis C virus infection had chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP) after the initiation of IFN-alpha therapy. The neurological symptoms of this patient continued to progress even though the treatment with IFN-alpha had been withdrawn; the symptoms improved dramatically following treatment with intravenous immunoglobulin. This case may therefore provide an important clue to understand the immune mechanism of CIDP and IFN-alpha.

  19. A review of the use of biological agents for chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stübgen, Joerg-Patrick

    2013-03-15

    Chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP) is a group of idiopathic, acquired, immune-mediated inflammatory demyelinating diseases of the peripheral nervous system. A majority of patients with CIDP respond to "first-line" treatment with IVIG, plasmapheresis and/or corticosteroids. There exists insufficient evidence to ascertain the benefit of treatment with "conventional" immunosuppressive drugs. The inconsistent efficacy, long-term financial burden and health risks of non-specific immune altering therapy have drawn recurrent attention to the possible usefulness of a variety of biological agents that target key aspects in the CIDP immunopathogenic pathways. This review aims to give an updated account of the scientific rationale and potential use of biological therapeutics in patients with CIDP. No specific treatment recommendations are given. The discovery, development and application of biological markers by modern molecular diagnostic techniques may help identify drug-naïve or treatment-resistant CIDP patients most likely to respond to targeted immunotherapy.

  20. 肌电图对颈髓髓内肿瘤和炎性脱髓鞘病的鉴别诊断研究%The value of electromyography in differentiating intramedullary tumor from inflammatory demyelinating disease of cervical region

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王红芬; 陈朝晖; 凌丽; 尚爱加; 乔广宇; 崔芳; 杨飞; 黄旭升

    2014-01-01

    Objective To investigate the value of needle electromyography (EMG) in differentiating intramedullary tumor from inflammatory demyelinating disease of cervical region.Methods Patients hospitalized in the Chinese PLA General Hospital from March 2008 to June 2013 with abnormalities on MRI of cervical vertebra and preliminary diagnosed as intramedullary tumor or inflammatory demyelinating disease of cervical region were enrolled in the study.Electrophysiological examination was performed before any treatment.Pathological findings were analyzed and prognosis was evaluated in all the subjects.Results A total of fifty-five patients were enrolled in the study with 33 cases of inflammatory demyelinating disease and 22 cases of intramedullary tumor defined by the postoperative pathological findings.In all the 33 cases with demyelinating disease,only one case (3.03%) presented as neurogenic damage by needle EMG.While in all the 22 cases with intramedullary tumor,needle EMG revealed neurogenic damage in 15 cases (68.18%) and the spinal segments of muscles with neurogenic damage were all within the spinal lesions demonstrated by MRI.The diagnostic sensitivity of EMG for intramedullary tumor was 68.18% and the diagnostic specificity was 96.97%,while the diagnostic sensitivity and specificity for intramedullary tumor by the medical history,symptoms and signs were 59.09% and 75.76% respectively.Conclusion Needle EMG might play an important role in distinguishing intramedullary tumor from inflammatory demyelinating disease of cervical spinal cord.%目的 探讨肌电图(EMG)对颈髓髓内肿瘤和炎性脱髓鞘病的鉴别诊断价值.方法 选择2008年3月至2013年6月解放军总医院收治的颈椎MRI呈现异常信号,拟诊髓内肿瘤或炎性脱髓鞘病的住院患者为研究对象,于手术等治疗前行电生理检查,结合手术病理结果进行分析,对预后进行随访观察,并比较EMG诊断以及依据病史、症状和体征对髓内肿

  1. Inflammatory/demyelinating central nervous system involvement in familial Mediterranean fever (FMF): coincidence or association?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akman-Demir, G; Gul, A; Gurol, E; Ozdogan, H; Bahar, S; Oge, A E; Gurvit, H; Saruhan-Direskeneli, G; Yazici, H; Eraksoy, M

    2006-07-01

    Familial Mediterranean fever (FMF) is an inherited inflammatory disease characterized by recurrent febrile polyserositis. Central nervous system (CNS) involvement in FMF is uncommon, but recently cases with multiple sclerosis (MS) and FMF have been reported. Here we assess patients with both FMF and MS, in order to clarify any relationship between FMF and MS, and to evaluate disease characteristics. Our MS database between 1986-2005 was screened retrospectively, and patients with both FMF and inflammatory/demyelinating CNS disease were evaluated among a total of 2800 patients including definite MS (n = 2268) and other demyelinating disorders. There were 12 patients with FMF, who developed a CNS disorder with multifocal white matter lesions. Median age at onset of FMF was 7 years, and median age at neurological onset was 26.8 years. Nine patients (including two siblings) had definite MS according to clinical and MRI findings, whereas 3 patients had atypical features suggesting other demyelinating disorders. Disease severity varied among the patients between very mild to a fatal course. All 8 patients evaluated for oligoclonal IgG bands in CSF were positive. The rate of FMF among our patients with definite MS is almost 4 times the expected prevalence in Turkey. Our series including a sibling pair concordant for FMF and MS may suggest that similar genetic susceptibility and environmental factors might be responsible, although coincidence still remains a possibility. A prospective study on a larger sample seems to be justified.

  2. Progressive multiple sclerosis cerebrospinal fluid induces inflammatory demyelination, axonal loss, and astrogliosis in mice.

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    Cristofanilli, Massimiliano; Rosenthal, Hannah; Cymring, Barbara; Gratch, Daniel; Pagano, Benjamin; Xie, Boxun; Sadiq, Saud A

    2014-11-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is an autoimmune disease characterized by inflammatory demyelination and neurodegeneration throughout the CNS, which lead over time to a condition of irreversible functional decline known as progressive MS. Currently, there are no satisfactory treatments for this condition because the mechanisms that underlie disease progression are not well understood. This is partly due to the lack of a specific animal model that represents progressive MS. We investigated the effects of intracerebroventricular injections of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) derived from untreated primary progressive (PPMS), secondary progressive (SPMS), and relapsing/remitting (RRMS) MS patients into mice. We found discrete inflammatory demyelinating lesions containing macrophages, B cell and T cell infiltrates in the brains of animals injected with CSF from patients with progressive MS. These lesions were rarely found in animals injected with RRMS-CSF and never in those treated with control-CSF. Animals that developed brain lesions also presented extensive inflammation in their spinal cord. However, discrete spinal cord lesions were rare and only seen in animals injected with PPMS-CSF. Axonal loss and astrogliosis were seen within the lesions following the initial demyelination. In addition, Th17 cell activity was enhanced in the CNS and in lymph nodes of progressive MS-CSF injected animals compared to controls. Furthermore, CSF derived from MS patients who were clinically stable following therapy had greatly diminished capacity to induce CNS lesions in mice. Finally, we provided evidence suggesting that differential expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines present in the progressive MS CSF might be involved in the observed mouse pathology. Our data suggests that the agent(s) responsible for the demyelination and neurodegeneration characteristic of progressive MS is present in patient CSF and is amenable to further characterization in experimental models of the disease.

  3. [Treatment's initiation in chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculopathy (CIDP)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uzenot, D; Azulay, J-P; Pouget, J

    2007-09-01

    Treatment's initiation in chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculopathy (CIDP) remains a difficult medical decision. Only plasma exchanges, intravenous immunoglobulins (IVIg) and corticosteroids are proven effective treatments. Immunosuppressors are actually not first-line treatments in CIDP. Particular CIDP forms are associated with different response to treatments: pure motor CIDP should be treated by IVIg, and corticosteroids should only carefully be used in Lewis-Sumner syndrome. Otherwise, IVIg are first-line treatment in diabetic patients. Patients must be informed of side's effects and expected clinical effects. Early treatment was actually not proved to prevent axonal damages in CIDP patients, and waiting seems to be the best therapeutic option in poorly symptomatic patients. Recently, clinical guidelines were proposed to help clinician in this treatment choice, but there is no consensus about the best dose, duration or administration way to CIDP treatments. Further studies should be performed to clarify these points and to determine immunosuppressor agents place in treatment strategy.

  4. Improving the management of chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Jeffrey A; Bril, Vera

    2016-06-01

    This article considers several issues of current interest relating to the management of chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy (CIDP), including diagnostic pitfalls, differences between CIDP patients with and without concurrent diabetes mellitus and how to best measure treatment response in daily practice. Despite the availability of diagnostic criteria, many patients diagnosed with CIDP do not meet these criteria; reasons for misdiagnosis are discussed. There are no definitive predictors of treatment response in CIDP; however, certain clinical and electrophysiological characteristics may be helpful. Patients with CIDP and concurrent diabetes present an additional diagnostic challenge; the differences between these groups, including possible differences in response predictors are discussed. Finally, the most appropriate outcome measures for use in daily practice are considered.

  5. New insights into the management of chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajabally, Yusuf A; Blomkwist-Markens, Patricia H; Katzberg, Hans D

    2015-01-01

    Chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy (CIDP) and its variants can be challenging to diagnose and treat. A combination of clinical, electrophysiological and laboratory features is often required to reach a diagnosis. New data are emerging about potential biomarkers and factors that may indicate treatment needs in individual patients. High-quality evidence exists for the efficacy of intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) in the treatment of CIDP, including quality of life (QoL) benefits. Besides pharmacological treatment, psychological factors must also be addressed to improve patients' QoL. Home-based IVIG infusion therapy is currently a well-established approach in some countries. A 6-month pilot study conducted in Ontario, Canada, provided proof of safety and patient acceptance of home-based IVIG therapy, although some logistical issues emerged.

  6. Chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy associated with diabetes mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farzad Fatehi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Various forms of neuropathy are seen diabetic patients; chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP seems not to be infrequent neuropathy in patients suffering from diabetes and it seems to be more common than in the general population; on the contrary, some authorities do not support pathogenetic association between diabetes mellitus (DM and CIDP. Also, there are some controversies on the subject of CIDP treatment in diabetic patients. Some studies showed that patients with CIDP-DM considerably had recovered following treatment with immunotherapeutic modalities like (Intravenous immunoglobulin IVIG and conversely, some else have argued against the prescription of IVIG in this group and recommend treatment with corticosteroids and provided that resistant, rituximab may be beneficial. The main limitation in most studies is the inadequate number of cases and as a result, problematic decision making in treatment. This article represents an inclusive review of diabetic CIDP presentation and treatment.

  7. Subcutaneous immunoglobulin preserves muscle strength in chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Markvardsen, Lars Høj; Harbo, Thomas; Sindrup, Søren Hein

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Subcutaneous immunoglobulin (SCIG) is superior to placebo treatment for maintenance of muscle strength during 12 weeks in patients with chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP). The present study evaluated whether SCIG preserves muscle strength for 1 year...... evaluated after 3, 6 and 12 months. Primary end-points were changes in muscle strength evaluated by isokinetic dynamometry in four affected muscle groups and a composite score of muscle performance and function tests, including Medical Research Council (MRC) score, grip strength, 40-m walking test (40-MWT...... remained unchanged. CONCLUSION: SCIG preserves muscle strength and functional ability in patients with CIDP who previously responded to IVIG. SCIG should be considered as an alternative in long-term treatment of CIDP patients....

  8. Novel immunotherapeutic strategies in chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathis, Stéphane; Vallat, Jean-Michel; Magy, Laurent

    2016-02-01

    Chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy (CIDP) is a chronic immune-mediated neuropathy: it is clinically heterogeneous (relapsing-remitting form, chronic progressive form, monophasic form or CIDP having a Guillain-Barré syndrome-like onset), but potentially treatable. Although its pathophysiology remains largely unknown, CIDP is considered an immune-mediated neuropathy. Therefore, many immunotherapies have been proposed in this peripheral nervous system disorder, the most known efficient treatments being intravenous immunoglobulin, corticosteroids and plasma exchange. However, these therapies remain unsatisfactory for many patients, so numerous other immunotherapeutic strategies have been evaluated, based on their immunosuppressant or immunomodulatory potency. We have performed a large review of the literature about treatment in CIDP, with a special emphasis on novel and alternative immunotherapeutic strategies.

  9. Oligodendrocyte ablation as a tool to study demyelinating diseases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ahdeah Pajoohesh-Ganji; Robert H. Miller

    2016-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is an autoimmune mediated neurodegenerative disease characterized by demyelin-ation and oligodendrocyte (OL) loss in the central nervous system and accompanied by local inlfammation and inifltration of peripheral immune cells. Although many risk factors and symptoms have been iden-tified in MS, the pathology is complicated and the cause remains unknown. It is also unclear whether OL apoptosis precedes the inlfammation or whether the local inlfammation is the cause of OL death and demyelination. This review brielfy discusses several models that have been developed to speciifcally ablate oligodendrocytes in an effort to separate the effects of demyelination from inlfammation.

  10. An Occult Malignancy Behind a Demyelinating Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo Presti, Saberio; Kanagarajah, Prashanth; Pirela, Daniela; Morlote, Diana; Cusnir, Mike

    2016-01-01

    We report a case of a 38-year-old man presenting with bilateral lower extremity weakness and paresthesias that progressed during a 4-month period to severe polyneuropathy forcing the patient to be bed bound. Throughout his multiple hospitalizations, he was treated erroneously for chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy, without significant improvement in his symptoms. In addition, he developed hepatosplenomegaly (organomegaly); endocrinopathies such as diabetes mellitus, central hypogonadism, and hypothyroidism; monoclonal spike evidenced in the serum electrophoresis; and hyperpigmentation of skin, altogether consistent with POEMS syndrome. During his last hospitalization he developed excruciating pain on his left hip, and imaging revealed the presence of a 9 × 6 cm osteolytic mass with sclerotic rim in the left acetabulum. Biopsy of the mass confirmed an isolated IgG lambda plasmacytoma. The patient received radiation to his left acetabular lesion followed by left hip replacement. Subsequently, the patient underwent autologous bone marrow transplant. Eighteen months after his initial presentation, he had satisfactory clinical response and is functional without significant limitations. POEMS syndrome is a rare paraneoplastic syndrome secondary to an underlying plasma cell disorder, which can oftentimes be overlooked and misdiagnosed. The median age of presentation is 51 years, and only 31% of the cases occur in fairly young patients under the age of 45 as evidenced in this case. As clinicians, we should be aware of the constellation of features associated with POEMS syndrome and be able to recognize them promptly. PMID:27790622

  11. An Occult Malignancy Behind a Demyelinating Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saberio Lo Presti MD

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available We report a case of a 38-year-old man presenting with bilateral lower extremity weakness and paresthesias that progressed during a 4-month period to severe polyneuropathy forcing the patient to be bed bound. Throughout his multiple hospitalizations, he was treated erroneously for chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy, without significant improvement in his symptoms. In addition, he developed hepatosplenomegaly (organomegaly; endocrinopathies such as diabetes mellitus, central hypogonadism, and hypothyroidism; monoclonal spike evidenced in the serum electrophoresis; and hyperpigmentation of skin, altogether consistent with POEMS syndrome. During his last hospitalization he developed excruciating pain on his left hip, and imaging revealed the presence of a 9 × 6 cm osteolytic mass with sclerotic rim in the left acetabulum. Biopsy of the mass confirmed an isolated IgG lambda plasmacytoma. The patient received radiation to his left acetabular lesion followed by left hip replacement. Subsequently, the patient underwent autologous bone marrow transplant. Eighteen months after his initial presentation, he had satisfactory clinical response and is functional without significant limitations. POEMS syndrome is a rare paraneoplastic syndrome secondary to an underlying plasma cell disorder, which can oftentimes be overlooked and misdiagnosed. The median age of presentation is 51 years, and only 31% of the cases occur in fairly young patients under the age of 45 as evidenced in this case. As clinicians, we should be aware of the constellation of features associated with POEMS syndrome and be able to recognize them promptly.

  12. Intrathecal Dexmedetomidine for Anaesthetic Management of a Patient with Chronic Inflammatory Demyelinating Polyneuropathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srinivasalu, D

    2016-01-01

    Chronic demyelinating disorders have multifactorial origin but common important physiologic and anaesthetic considerations. Choice of anaesthesia technique and the drugs used, undertanding the pros and cons of using central neuraxial blocks will help in successful management of such patients. We describe the anaesthetic management of a 34-year-old male with chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy posted for cystolithotripsy. PMID:27790558

  13. Acute paretic syndrome in juvenile White Leghorn chickens resembles late stages of acute inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathies in humans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Preisinger Rudolf

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sudden limb paresis is a common problem in White Leghorn flocks, affecting about 1% of the chicken population before achievement of sexual maturity. Previously, a similar clinical syndrome has been reported as being caused by inflammatory demyelination of peripheral nerve fibres. Here, we investigated in detail the immunopathology of this paretic syndrome and its possible resemblance to human neuropathies. Methods Neurologically affected chickens and control animals from one single flock underwent clinical and neuropathological examination. Peripheral nervous system (PNS alterations were characterised using standard morphological techniques, including nerve fibre teasing and transmission electron microscopy. Infiltrating cells were phenotyped immunohistologically and quantified by flow cytometry. The cytokine expression pattern was assessed by quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR. These investigations were accomplished by MHC genotyping and a PCR screen for Marek's disease virus (MDV. Results Spontaneous paresis of White Leghorns is caused by cell-mediated, inflammatory demyelination affecting multiple cranial and spinal nerves and nerve roots with a proximodistal tapering. Clinical manifestation coincides with the employment of humoral immune mechanisms, enrolling plasma cell recruitment, deposition of myelin-bound IgG and antibody-dependent macrophageal myelin-stripping. Disease development was significantly linked to a 539 bp microsatellite in MHC locus LEI0258. An aetiological role for MDV was excluded. Conclusions The paretic phase of avian inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuritis immunobiologically resembles the late-acute disease stages of human acute inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy, and is characterised by a Th1-to-Th2 shift.

  14. Resistance training and aerobic training improve muscle strength and aerobic capacity in chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Markvardsen, Lars H; Overgaard, Kristian; Heje, Karen

    2017-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: We investigated the effects of aerobic and resistance exercise in patients with chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP). METHODS: Eighteen CIDP patients treated with subcutaneous immunoglobulin performed 12 weeks of aerobic exercise and 12 weeks of resistance exerci...

  15. Randomised controlled trial comparing two different intravenous immunoglobulins in chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    K. Kuitwaard; L.H. van den Berg; M. Vermeulen; E. Brusse; E.A. Cats; A.J. van der Kooi; N.C. Notermans; W.L. van der Pol; I.N. van Schaik; S.I. van Nes; W.C.J. Hop; P.A. van Doorn

    2010-01-01

    Background Different preparations of intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIg) are considered to have comparable clinical efficacy but this has never been formally investigated. Some patients with chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy (CIDP) report that some IVIg brands are more effectiv

  16. Clinical and electrophysiological study of chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    秦绍森; 玛依努尔; 王湘

    2001-01-01

    Objective To investigate the clinical and electrophysiological features of chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP) . Methods The clinical symptoms and signs of 11 patients with CIDP were studied, motor conduction velocity( MCV), sensory con-duction velocity (SCV) and Electromyography (EMG) were also respectively carried out on 54 motor nerves, 28 sensory nerves and 21 musclesof these 11 cases. The amplitudes of compound muscle action potential(CAMP) obtained from distal and proximal ends were compared to as-certain the presence of conduction block (CB) by stimulating the segments starting from the distal ends. Results More than 3 nerves werefound involved in 10 out of 11 cases, slow MCV were found in 52%, prolongation of the distal latency in 64%, reduction of the amplitudes ofCAMP in 68%, CB in 26%, slow SCV in 85. 7%. EMG revealed neurogenic damage in 81%. Conclusion CIDP is a peripheral de- myelinating neuropathy involving not only the prox imal and distal segments but also the sensory and motor nerves. If there were no conditionsto perform nerve biopsy, testing of protein in CSF and electrophysiology mightbe of important diagnostic value for CIDP.

  17. Electrophysiological features of POEMS syndrome and chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Xiuming; Qin, Xinyue; Zhang, Yuping; Huang, Cheng; Yu, Gang

    2014-04-01

    Polyneuropathy is often an initial manifestation of polyneuropathy, organomegaly, endocrinopathy, M protein and skin changes (POEMS) syndrome and therefore this disorder is frequently misdiagnosed as chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP). We reviewed electrophysiological data in 20 patients with POEMS syndrome and 36 matched patients with CIDP to compare the electrophysiological features of POEMS syndrome and CIDP. Compared with CIDP controls, POEMS patients demonstrated (1) less prolonged distal motor latency and less reduced motor nerve and sensory nerve conduction velocities, (2) greater reduction of amplitudes of compound motor action potentials (CMAP) in distal stimulation, and similar reduction of amplitudes of CMAP in proximal stimulation, (3) similar reduction of amplitudes of sensory nerve action potentials (SNAP) in median and ulnar nerves, and a greater reduction of amplitudes of SNAP in tibial and peroneal nerves, (4) less temporal dispersion, (5) less frequent conduction block, (6) more frequent neurogenic injury in the muscles of the upper and lower limbs, and more frequent neurogenic injury in the muscles of the lower than upper limbs, (7) similar F wave and H reflex abnormalities, and (8) less frequent skin sympathetic response abnormalities. We concluded that before development of typical clinical manifestations, POEMS neuropathy can be distinguished from CIDP by neural electrophysiological examination. These electrophysiological features can be used for early diagnosis and initiating correct treatment of POEMS syndrome.

  18. Stance Postural Strategies in Patients with Chronic Inflammatory Demyelinating Polyradiculoneuropathy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steno Rinalduzzi

    Full Text Available Polyneuropathy leads to postural instability and an increased risk of falling. We investigated how impaired motor impairment and proprioceptive input due to neuropathy influences postural strategies.Platformless bisegmental posturography data were recorded in healthy subjects and patients with chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy (CIDP. Each subject stood on the floor, wore a head and a hip electromagnetic tracker. Sway amplitude and velocity were recorded and the mean direction difference (MDD in the velocity vector between trackers was calculated as a flexibility index.Head and hip postural sway increased more in patients with CIDP than in healthy controls. MDD values reflecting hip strategies also increased more in patients than in controls. In the eyes closed condition MDD values in healthy subjects decreased but in patients remained unchanged.Sensori-motor impairment changes the balance between postural strategies that patients adopt to maintain upright quiet stance. Motor impairment leads to hip postural strategy overweight (eyes open, and prevents strategy re-balancing when the sensory context predominantly relies on proprioceptive input (eyes closed.

  19. Dispersion of compound muscle action potential in hereditary neuropathies and chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanton, Michael; Pannoni, Valerie; Lewis, Richard A; Logigian, Eric L; Naguib, Demian; Shy, Michael E; Cleland, James; Herrmann, David N

    2006-10-01

    Distal compound muscle action potential (DCMAP) dispersion, defined as a DCMAP duration > or = 9 ms, and proximal-distal (P-D) CMAP dispersion are considered useful in the electrodiagnosis of chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP). Distal and P-D CMAP dispersion have not been fully studied in hereditary neuropathies, and it is not known whether these measures distinguish hereditary from acquired demyelination. We compared DCMAP duration and P-D CMAP dispersion in 91 genetically characterized hereditary neuropathies and 33 subjects with CIDP. DCMAP dispersion was more frequent in nerves affected by CIDP (41.5%) than in Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT)1A (24.4%), CMT1B (7.4%), hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies (HNPP) (10.5%), or CMTX (9.8%). P-D CMAP dispersion was more frequent in CIDP (27.7% of nerves) than in hereditary neuropathies (16.3%) when applying American Academy of Neurology (AAN) criteria; however, its frequency was similar in CIDP and the hereditary neuropathies using the more restrictive criteria of the American Association of Neuromuscular and Electrodiagnostic Medicine (AANEM). Although dispersion is more common in CIDP than in the hereditary neuropathies, DCMAP and P-D dispersion occur in at least one motor nerve in a significant proportion of hereditary neuropathies, and cannot be used in isolation to distinguish acquired from hereditary demyelination.

  20. Acute Demyelinating Disease after Oral Therapy with Herbal Extracts

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    Alex Kostianovsky

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Central nervous system demyelinating processes such as multiple sclerosis and acute disseminated encephalomyelitis constitute a group of diseases not completely understood in their physiopathology. Environmental and toxic insults are thought to play a role in priming autoimmunity. The aim of the present report is to describe a case of acute demyelinating disease with fatal outcome occurring 15 days after oral exposure to herbal extracts.

  1. Human immunodeficiency virus seroconversion presenting with acute inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy: a case report

    OpenAIRE

    Sloan Derek J; Nicolson Andrew; Miller Alastair RO; Beeching Nick J; Beadsworth Mike BJ

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Introduction Acute Human Immunodeficiency Virus infection is associated with a range of neurological conditions. Guillain-Barré syndrome is a rare presentation; acute inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy is the commonest form of Guillain-Barré syndrome. Acute inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy has occasionally been reported in acute Immunodeficiency Virus infection but little data exists on frequency, management and outcome. Case presentation We describe an episode of Gui...

  2. IFNγ influences type I interferon response and susceptibility to Theiler's virus-induced demyelinating disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowen, Jenna L; Olson, Julie K

    2013-08-01

    Theiler's murine encephalomyelitis virus (TMEV) induces a demyelinating disease in susceptible SJL mice that has similarities to multiple sclerosis in humans. TMEV infection of susceptible mice leads to a persistent virus infection of the central nervous system (CNS), which promotes the development of demyelinating disease associated with an inflammatory immune response in the CNS. TMEV infection of resistant C57BL6 mice results in viral clearance without development of demyelinating disease. Interestingly, TMEV infection of resistant mice deficient in IFNγ leads to a persistent virus infection in the CNS and development of demyelinating disease. We have previously shown that the innate immune response affects development of TMEV- induced demyelinating disease, thus we wanted to determine the role of IFNγ during the innate immune response. TMEV-infected IFNγ-deficient mice had an altered innate immune response, including reduced expression of innate immune cytokines, especially type I interferons. Administration of type I interferons, IFNα and IFNß, to TMEV-infected IFNγ-deficient mice during the innate immune response restored the expression of innate immune cytokines. Most importantly, administration of type I interferons to IFNγ-deficient mice during the innate immune response decreased the virus load in the CNS and decreased development of demyelinating disease. Microglia are the CNS resident immune cells that express innate immune receptors. In TMEV-infected IFNγ-deficient mice, microglia had reduced expression of innate immune cytokines, and administration of type I interferons to these mice restored the innate immune response by microglia. In the absence of IFNγ, microglia from TMEV-infected mice had reduced expression of some innate immune receptors and signaling molecules, especially IRF1. These results suggest that IFNγ plays an important role in the innate immune response to TMEV by enhancing the expression of innate immune cytokines

  3. [Treatment options for chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy (CIDP)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuntzer, T

    2006-04-01

    Limits of treatment in chronic inflammatory demyelinating poly(radiculo)neuropathies (CIDP) patients are better known thanks to recent Cochrane reviews. (1) Randomized controlled trials have only focused on short-term effects, but most patients need long-term therapy, (2) There are three proven effective treatments available (prednisone; intravenous immunoglobulin or IVIg and plasma exchange or PE) which are useful in more than 60 p. 100 of patients, (3) New open studies indicated possible efficacy for mycophenolate, rituximab, etanercept, ciclosporine and interferons, and (4) Whether CIDP variants need specific treatment is still unknown. Many CIDP patients need treatment for years. The fear of side effects during long-term steroid treatment, the high costs of IVIg, the necessity for specialized equipment and the invasive nature of PE, are important factors determining the choice for one of these treatments. In most up-to-date treatment options, patients are initially treated with IVIg at a dosage of 2 g/kg administered for 25 days, clinical improvement can be judged within 10 days. The percentage of patients responding seems to be approximately 70 percent, with a very high chance (approximately 85 percent) that repeated administration of IVIg will be necessary, explaining why most neurologists add an immunosuppressive drug at this stage, but there is no consensus concerning the best drug to be used. Combinations of drugs are most likely to be useful in the next future, using IVIg, prednisone, and a immunosuppressor agent, such as mycophenolate, rituximab, etanercept, or ciclosporine. General measures to rehabilitate patients and to manage symptoms like fatigue and other residual findings are important.

  4. Challenges in the treatment of chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guimarães-Costa, R; Iancu Ferfoglia, R; Viala, K; Léger, J-M

    2014-10-01

    Chronic idiopathic demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy (CIDP) is a rare disease, the most frequent one within the spectrum of the so-called "chronic immune-mediated neuropathies". Challenges in the treatment of CIDP firstly concern its diagnosis, which may be difficult, mainly for the atypical forms. Secondly, challenges encompass the choice of the first-line treatment, such as corticosteroids, intravenous immunoglobulins (IVIg), and plasma exchanges (PE) that have been proven as efficacious by several randomized controlled trials (RCT). Recent reports have focused on both different regimens of corticosteroids, and the occurrence of relapses following treatment with either corticosteroids or IVIg. These data may be helpful for the choice of the first-line treatment and may result in changing the guidelines for treatment of CIDP in clinical practice. The third and more difficult challenge is to manage long-term treatment for CIDP, since no immunomodulatory treatment has to date been proven as efficacious in this situation. Lastly, challenges in the treatment concern the choice of the best outcome measure for CIDP in RCT and clinical practice. The aim of this article is to overview the results of the more recently reported published trials for CIDP, and to give some insights for the current and future management of CIDP.

  5. Treatment of Chronic Inflammatory Demyelinating Polyneuropathy: From Molecular Bases to Practical Considerations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paolo Ripellino

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP is an autoimmune disease of the peripheral nervous system, in which both cellular and humoral immune responses are involved. The disease is clinically heterogeneous with some patients displaying pure motor form and others also showing a variable degree of sensory dysfunction; disease evolution may also differ from patient to patient, since monophasic, progressive, and relapsing forms are reported. Underlying such clinical variability there is probably a broad spectrum of molecular dysfunctions that are and will be the target of therapeutic strategies. In this review we first explore the biological bases of current treatments and subsequently we focus on the practical management that must also take into account pharmacoeconomic issues.

  6. POEMS Syndrome in a Juvenile Initially Diagnosed as Treatment Resistant Chronic Inflammatory Demyelinating Polyneuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krish, Sonia N; Nguyen, Thy; Biliciler, Suur; Kumaravel, Manickam; Wahed, Amer; Risin, Semyon; Sheikh, Kazim A

    2015-12-01

    POEMS (polyneuropathy, organomegaly, endocrinopathy, monoclonal protein, skin changes) is a disorder that mainly affects adults. We report a pediatric patient, initially considered to have Guillain-Barré syndrome, who continued to have progression of neuropathic disease leading to the diagnosis of chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy. Diagnosis of POEMS was established by an abnormal bone marrow biopsy, prompted by laboratory and imaging findings, which became abnormal later in the course of the disease. POEMS syndrome is extremely rare in children, and neuropathic features in this age group have not been previously described. This case illustrates that "Guillain-Barré syndrome-like" initial presentation for POEMS, which has not been previously reported. It also emphasizes that in children with progressive acquired neuropathies that are treatment unresponsive, POEMS syndrome should be considered.

  7. Treatment of pediatric chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy: Challenges, controversies and questions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desai, Jay; Ramos-Platt, Leigh; Mitchell, Wendy G

    2015-01-01

    Pediatric chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP) is an uncommon acquired disorder of unknown cause, presumed to have an immunological basis. We report 20 patients seen at Children's Hospital Los Angeles over a period of 10 years. The outcome of our patients was favorable in a vast majority with good response to various treatments instituted. However, residual neurologic deficit was common. The choice of treatment modality was empirical and selected by the treating neurologist. Intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) and corticosteroids were most commonly utilized for treatment. Plasmapheresis, mycophenolate mofetil, rituximab, cyclophosphamide, azathioprine, and abatacept were added if the patients were refractory to IVIG or became corticosteroid dependent. The spectrum of disease severity ranged from a single monophasic episode, to multiphasic with infrequent relapses with good response to IVIG, to progressive disease refractory to multiple therapies.

  8. Treatment of pediatric chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy: Challenges, controversies, and questions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jay Desai

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Pediatric chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP is an uncommon acquired disorder of unknown cause, presumed to have an immunological basis. We report 20 patients seen at Children′s Hospital Los Angeles over a period of 10 years. The outcome of our patients was favorable in a vast majority with good response to various treatments instituted. However, residual neurologic deficit was common. The choice of treatment modality was empirical and selected by the treating neurologist. Intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG and corticosteroids were most commonly utilized for treatment. Plasmapheresis, mycophenolate mofetil, rituximab, cyclophosphamide, azathioprine, and abatacept were added if the patients were refractory to IVIG or became corticosteroid dependent. The spectrum of disease severity ranged from a single monophasic episode, to multiphasic with infrequent relapses with good response to IVIG, to progressive disease refractory to multiple therapies.

  9. Intravenous immunoglobulin inhibits BAFF production in chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy - a new mechanism of action?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bick, Sandra; Tschernatsch, Marlene; Karg, Anne; Fuehlhuber, Verena; Trenczek, Tina E; Faltermeier, Kathrin; Hackstein, Holger; Kaps, Manfred; Blaes, Franz

    2013-03-15

    Chronic-inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP) is an immune-mediated disease treated with intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIg). The underlying mechanism of action remains incompletely understood. The B-cell activating factor BAFF contributes to B-cell homeostasis and (auto-)antibody production. BAFF was recently identified as one key molecule in the development of autoimmune diseases. Herein, we demonstrate that BAFF serum levels are elevated in CIDP patients. IVIg treatment resulted in a significant decrease of BAFF serum level. In vitro, IVIg inhibited BAFF in monocytes. Consequently, we identified BAFF as a new target for IVIg in CIDP treatment and provide a new, Fcγ-receptor independent, mechanism of action for IVIg.

  10. Optic neuritis: Experience from a south Indian demyelinating disease registry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lekha Pandit

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Natural history of optic neuritis (OPN has not been studied in India. Aim: To study consecutive patients with optic neuritis as the initial manifestation of the neurologic disease and with disease duration of 3 or more years registered in the Mangalore Demyelinating Disease Registry. Materials and Methods: The study included 59 patients with a primary diagnosis of optic neuritis (confirmed by either an ophthalmologist or a neurologist or both. All the patients were investigated and followed-up in the clinic. Results: During the follow-up of the 59 patients, 29 (49% patients developed multiple sclerosis (MS; 3 (5% patients neuromyelitis optica (NMO; and 13 (22% patients chronic relapsing inflammatory optic neuritis (CRION, while the remaining 14 (24% did not either progress or relapse, monophasic OPN. An initial abnormal magnetic resonance imaging predicted conversion to MS in all 7 patients who had imaging at onset. Patients with NMO were left with significant residual visual loss distinguishing NMO from MS. In this large series of patients with CRION, nearly 50% of patients had deterioration in vision while steroids were being tapered. Long-term immunosuppression was essential for maintaining good visual outcome in both NMO and CRION. Conclusions: Optic neuritis in India appears similar to that in the West with nearly 50% developing MS in the long term.

  11. Does the chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy due to secondary cause differ from primary?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vaibhav Wadwekar

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The clinical presentation, neurophysiological findings, and outcome may vary between primary and secondary chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculopathy (CIDP. Objective: To compare clinical and electrodiagnostic features of primary and secondary CIDP. Setting: Tertiary care teaching referral hospital. Materials and Methods: The CIDP patients who were diagnosed as per European Federation of Neurological Societies/Peripheral Nerve Society criteria were included and subjected to detailed history and examinations. The clinical disability was graded on a 0-10 scale. Neurophysiology included motor and sensory nerve conductions and F wave studies of all four limbs. Based on investigations for underlying diseases, the patients were categorized into primary or secondary CIDP. Prednisolone was prescribed in all and azathioprine added in resistant cases. The secondary CIDP group received specific treatment in addition. The outcome was assessed at 3 months, 6 months, and last follow-up. Results: A total of 65 patients aged 17 to 72 years were included and 20 were females. Twenty-five patients had secondary CIDP and include diabetes mellitus (16, POEMS (polyneuropathy, organomegaly, endocrinopathy, M protein, and skin changes (4, monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (2, myeloma (1, lymphoma (1, and malignancy (1. The secondary CIDP patients were older (48.35 vs 41.0 years, had less relapsing remitting (0 vs 6 and more frequent dysautonomia (7 vs 1. The demyelinating features were more marked in primary CIDP group and had better outcome compared with secondary CIDP. Conclusions: Of the total patients with CIDP, 38.5% of patients had secondary CIDP which was associated with progressive course, less demyelinating features, and worse prognosis.

  12. Chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy in a boy with systemic lupus erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zoilo, Morel Ayala; Eduardo, Benadón; Enrique, Faugier; del Rocio, Maldonado V M

    2010-05-01

    Chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy (CIDP) is an acquired, autoimmune peripheral neuropathy. Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a multisystemic, autoimmune disease that can affect the central nervous system in about 40% of patients, with prevalence and incidence unknown in the pediatric population due to lack of multicenter studies. We report the case of a 13-year-old Mexican boy, diagnosed with CIDP at the onset of SLE, beginning with progressive muscle weakness of lower and upper limbs, without affection of the central nervous system. The patient had positive ANA, antiDNAdc, antiBeta2glycoprotein, anti-cardiolipin, ANCA-C and X. He received intravenous immunoglobulin, cyclophosphamide, steroids, and azathioprine and showed clinical improvement. It is important to take into account the presence of peripheral neurological disorders in patients with pediatric SLE, considering CIDP as an uncommon presentation, making the diagnosis important for better treatment and evolution.

  13. Chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy: diagnostic and therapeutic challenges for a treatable condition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vallat, Jean-Michel; Sommer, Claudia; Magy, Laurent

    2010-04-01

    Chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy (CIDP) is a chronic neuropathy of supposed immune origin. Understanding of its pathophysiology has recently improved, although its causes remain unclear. The classic presentation of CIDP includes sensory and motor symptoms in the distal and proximal segments of the four limbs with areflexia, evolving over more than 8 weeks. Raised protein concentrations in CSF and heterogeneous slowing of nerve conduction are typical of the condition. In addition to this usual phenotype, distribution of symptoms, disease course, and disability can be heterogeneous, leading to underdiagnosis of the disorder. Diagnosis is sometimes challenging and can require use of imaging and nerve biopsy. Steroids and intravenous immunoglobulin are effective, and plasma exchange can be helpful as rescue therapy. The usefulness of immunosuppressants needs to be established. The identification of specific diagnostic markers and new therapeutic strategies with conventional or targeted immunotherapy are needed to improve the outlook for patients with CIDP.

  14. Chronic Inflammatory Demyelinating Polyneuropathy in Children: A Review of Clinical Characteristics and Recommendations for Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Narges Karimi

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Context: Chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculopathy (CIDP is an acquired and autoimmune neuropathy, characterized by a chronic, rapidly progressive, symmetric weakness. In children, abnormal gait is as a first symptom of muscle weakness. Evidence Acquisition: The diagnosis of CIDP is on the basis of clinical characteristics, electrodiagnostic that shows the severity of the disease, lumbar puncture and spine magnetic resonance imaging (MRI. Results: The first-line treatments in childhood CIDP are intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG, corticosteroids, and plasmapheresis. Response to first-line therapies is usually satisfactory; nevertheless, recommendations regarding the choice of second-line therapy can only be prepared on the basis of the existing practice described in some of the case reports. Conclusions: This review demonstrated the clinical presentation, diagnosis, and treatment of childhood CIDP.

  15. Pelvic Inflammatory Disease (PID)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Management Education & Events Advocacy For Patients About ACOG Pelvic Inflammatory Disease (PID) Home For Patients Search FAQs Pelvic Inflammatory ... Inflammatory Disease (PID) FAQ077, September 2015 PDF Format Pelvic Inflammatory Disease (PID) Gynecologic Problems What is pelvic inflammatory disease ( ...

  16. MRI and MRS diagnosis of single acute inflammatory demyelinating disease of the brain Value Analysis%MRI及MRS诊断单发急性炎性脑脱髓鞘疾病的应用价值探析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杜碧茵

    2014-01-01

    Objective Study investigated the characteristics and MRI imaging single acute inflammatory demyelinating disease of the brain, MRS applications in disease diagnosis. Methods Admitted to our hospital in recent years, single acute inflammatory demyelinating disease of the brain in patients with nine cases for the study, the basic clinical data and imaging findings were retrospectively analyzed patients and analyzed for signs of central nervous system imaging discuss its clinical characteristic. Results By MRI diagnosis of basal ganglia lesions in one case, the white matter is located eight cases, the lesion edges smooth, round shape rules, hierarchy typical. DWI and FLIAR, ADC figure are low signal lesion center, the surrounding high signal;T1WI center of low signal, T2WI high signal center. Through enhanced scan showed irregular lesions strengthening the open-loop and no significant mass effect. After MRS diagnosis, al patients had lesions in the central region increased Cho and NAA peak lower peak performance. Three patients had a peak increase in mI, 5 patients had lower Cr peak condition. Review of al patients seen by the relevant treatment lesion volume, area shrink, Cho and NAA peak reduce peak recovery. Conclusion Patients with single acute inflammatory demyelinating disease of the brain detected by MRI, the lesion can be clearly observed in the location, number, morphology, signal characteristics, such as MRI performance, but also can accurately display the NAA peak in the MRS diagnosis, Cho peak, changes Cr peak, mI peak, to help doctors accurately diagnose and determine the progress of the disease in patients from the characteristic radiographic signs of.%目的:研究探讨单发急性炎性脑脱髓鞘疾病的影像学特征及MRI、MRS在疾病诊断中的应用价值。方法选取我院近年来收治的单发急性炎性脑脱髓鞘疾病患者9例作为研究对象,回顾性分析患者的基本临床资料和影像学检查结果,并对其

  17. Involvement of morbilliviruses in the pathogenesis of demyelinating disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sips, G. J.; Chesik, D.; Glazenburg, L.; Wilschut, J.; De Keyser, J.; Wilczak, N.

    2007-01-01

    Two members of the morbillivirus genus of the family Paramyxoviridae, canine distemper virus (CDV) and measles virus (MV), are well-known for their ability to cause a chronic demyelinating disease of the CNS in their natural hosts, dogs and humans, respectively. Both viruses have been studied for

  18. Intravenous transplantation of mouse embryonic stem cells attenuates demyelination in an ICR outbred mouse model of demyelinating diseases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kidsadagon Pringproa; Anucha Sathanawongs; Chananthida Khamphilai; Sarocha Sukkarinprom; Apichart Oranratnachai

    2016-01-01

    Induction of demyelination in the central nervous system (CNS) of experimental mice using cuprizone is widely used as an animal model for studying the pathogenesis and treatment of demyelination. How-ever, different mouse strains used result in different pathological outcomes. Moreover, because current medicinal treatments are not always effective in multiple sclerosis patients, so the study of exogenous cell transplantation in an animal model is of great importance. hTe aims of the present study were to establish an alternative ICR outbred mouse model for studying demyelination and to evaluate the effects of intrave-nous cell transplantation in the present developed mouse model. Two sets of experiments were conducted. Firstly, ICR outbred and BALB/c inbred mice were fed with 0.2% cuprizone for 6 consecutive weeks; then demyelinating scores determined by luxol fast blue stain or immunolabeling with CNPase were evaluated. Secondly, attenuation of demyelination in ICR mice by intravenous injection of mES cells was studied. Scores for demyelination in the brains of ICR mice receiving cell injection (mES cells-injected group) and vehicle (sham-inoculated group) were assessed and compared. hTe results showed that cuprizone signiif-cantly induced demyelination in the cerebral cortex and corpus callosum of both ICR and BALB/c mice. Additionally, intravenous transplantation of mES cells potentially attenuated demyelination in ICR mice compared with sham-inoculated groups. hTe present study is among the earliest reports to describe the cuprizone-induced demyelination in ICR outbred mice. Although it remains unclear whether mES cells or trophic effects from mES cells are the cause of enhanced remyelination, the results of the present study may shed some light on exogenous cell therapy in central nervous system demyelinating diseases.

  19. Anaesthetic management and implications of a case of chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Babita Gupta

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available A 60-year-old man with chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP was posted for surgery of the neck femur fracture and was successfully managed. We discuss the anaesthetic considerations during regional and general anaesthesia of this patient with CIDP. A brief review of the available literature reveals no consensus on the choice of anaesthetic management.

  20. 瘤样炎性脱髓鞘病临床影像特点%The clinical features, neuroimaging findings and pathological characteristics of 26 patients with pathologically proven tumor-like inflammatory demyelinating diseases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    戚晓昆; 刘建国; 钱海蓉; 邱峰; 姚生; 李长青; 王亚明

    2010-01-01

    目的 总结经病理证实的26例瘤样炎性脱髓鞘病(TIDD)临床、影像及病理特点以期提高诊治水平.方法 对24例脑型和2例脊髓型TIDD的临床、影像及病理资料进行回顾性分析.结果 26例(男14例、女12例)患者发病年龄6~69(36.7±13.8)岁.3例失访,2例死亡.TIDD首发以头痛多见,其次为淡漠伴记忆力减退4例.病变以双侧受累及多发病灶最为多见.22例行脑CT示病灶均为低密度.MRI上呈片状长T1、长T2信号,呈开环形或闭合环形强化;病理除炎性脱髓鞘表现外,少数可见核分裂状的Creutzfeuldt细胞.脑脊液寡克隆带(OCB)阳性率(72.2%)及髓鞘碱性蛋白(MBP)异常率(77.8%)较高.结论 TIDD为特殊类型的脱髓鞘病,虽与肿瘤相似,但其病灶以双侧、多发且彼此孤立,CT为低密度,若示高密度基本可除外TIDD;脑脊液OCB及MBP检查对TIDD有价值.%Objective To summarize the clinical features, neuroimaging findings and pathological characteristics of 26 patients with tumor-like inflammatory demyelinating diseases (TIDD) confirmed by histopathology for better diagnosis and differential diagnosis. Methods The clinical features, neuroimaging findings and pathological characteristics of 26 patients (14 male, 12 female) with pathologically proven TIDD(24 brain-type and 2 spinal cord-type ) were retrospectively analysed. Results The mean onset age was 6-69 (36.7±13.8) years. Twenty-one patients had good prognosis with a median followed-up duration of 51.0 months. Two patients were died of post-operative complication and pulmonary infection respectively and the remaining 3 patients were lost to followed up. The TIDD patients almost showed monophasic clinical setting. Headache, indifference accompanied with hypomnesis were the commonest initial symptoms. The positive or abnormol rates of cerebrospinal fluid oligoclonal bands (OCB) and myelin basic protein (MBP)in TIDD patients were high. The involvements of bilateral and multi

  1. Diffuse spinal and intercostal nerve involvement in chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy: MRI findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oguz, B.; Oguz, K.K.; Cila, A. [Dept. of Radiology, Hacettepe Univ. Faculty of Medicine, Ankara (Turkey); Tan, E. [Dept. of Neurology, Hacettepe Univ. Faculty of Medicine, Ankara (Turkey)

    2003-12-01

    Chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy (CIDP) is an uncommon demyelinating disorder with a relapsing and remitting or continuously progressive course. Hypertrophic nerve roots, sometimes associated with gadolinium enhancement, has been reported more commonly in lumbar spine and less commonly in the brachial plexus and cervical roots; however, diffuse involvement of intercostal nerves bilaterally has never been reported previously. We present MRI findings which include diffuse enlargement and mild enhancement of roots and extraforaminal segments of nerves in all segments except a short segment between T12-L2 as well as all the intercostal nerves in a case of CIPD with a 10-year history. (orig.)

  2. Serum cytokine and chemokine profiles in patients with chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beppu, Minako; Sawai, Setsu; Misawa, Sonoko; Sogawa, Kazuyuki; Mori, Masahiro; Ishige, Takayuki; Satoh, Mamoru; Nomura, Fumio; Kuwabara, Satoshi

    2015-02-15

    To identify serum cytokine networks specific to chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP), serum samples of two subgroups (18 patients with typical CIDP and 12 patients with multifocal acquired demyelinating sensory and motor neuropathy [MADSAM]) were analyzed with multiplex magnetic bead-based cytokine assay. TNF-α, HGF, MIP-1β and IL-1β levels were significantly higher in total CIDP patients than in normal controls. Of these, HGF levels were elevated in typical CIDP patients, but not in MADSAM patients. Patients with high HGF levels showed good responses to steroid treatment. Different cytokine profiles among the CIDP subtypes presumably reflect differences in pathophysiology.

  3. Alemtuzumab in the treatment of IVIG-dependent chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Marsh, E A

    2010-06-01

    Chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP) is an idiopathic immune mediated neuropathy causing demyelination and conduction block thought to occur as the result of an aberrant autoimmune response resulting in peripheral nerve inflammation mediated by T cells and humoral factors. Diagnosis commonly prompts initial treatment with steroids or intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) on which 5-35% subsequently become dependent to maintain function. Despite a number of small scale trials, the role for alternative long-term immunosuppression remains unclear. Alemtuzumab is a humanised monoclonal antibody targeting the CD52 antigen present on the surface of lymphocytes and monocytes. A single intravenous infusion results in rapid and profound lymphopoenia lasting >12 months. We report its use and clinical outcome in a small series of patients with severe IVIG-dependent CIDP. Seven patients (4 Males; 3 Females) who had failed to respond to conventional immunosuppression were treated in 5 centres receiving 9 courses of alemtuzumab (dose range 60-150 mg). Following treatment, mean monthly IVIG use fell 26% from 202 to 149 g and IVIG administration frequency from 22 to 136 days. Two patients had prolonged remission, two patients had a partial response and no clear benefit was observed in the remaining three patients (2 Males, 1 Females). Responding patients had a younger age at onset (19.5 years) and shorter disease duration than non-responders. Three patients developed autoimmune disease following treatment. Alemtuzumab may offer an alternative treatment for a subset of early onset IVIG dependent CIDP patients failing conventional immunosuppressive agents, but concerns about toxicity may limit its use.

  4. Gastroparesis secondary to a demyelinating disease: a case series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bonino John

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Gastroparesis has a number of etiologies. The main ones are secondary to a complication from diabetes mellitus, related to post vagotomy or post gastric surgical resections, or idiopathic when the etiology is unclear. Gastroparesis secondary to a demyelinating disease of the brain is unusual. Case presentation A 22-year-old woman was referred for acute onset of intractable nausea and vomiting. She also had cerebellar deficits, dysphagia and paresthesias. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI of the brain revealed an isolated area of demyelination in the medullary region. Another 24-year-old woman had a similar presentation with right hemiplegia and MRI of the brain revealed a distal medullary region. Both these patients had an abnormal gastric emptying test. Gastroparesis and neurological deficits improved with intravenous corticosteroids. While the former patient has had no further recurrences, the latter patient developed multiple sclerosis within three months of presentation. Conclusion A demyelinating disease is a rare cause gastropareis, but should be suspected when symptoms of gastroparesis are associated with neurological deficits. MRI might help in the diagnosis and intravenous coriticosteroids can address the underlying disease process and improve gastric emptying, especially when used early during the course of the disease.

  5. Gastroparesis secondary to a demyelinating disease: a case series

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddymasu, Savio C; Bonino, John; McCallum, Richard W

    2007-01-01

    Background Gastroparesis has a number of etiologies. The main ones are secondary to a complication from diabetes mellitus, related to post vagotomy or post gastric surgical resections, or idiopathic when the etiology is unclear. Gastroparesis secondary to a demyelinating disease of the brain is unusual. Case presentation A 22-year-old woman was referred for acute onset of intractable nausea and vomiting. She also had cerebellar deficits, dysphagia and paresthesias. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the brain revealed an isolated area of demyelination in the medullary region. Another 24-year-old woman had a similar presentation with right hemiplegia and MRI of the brain revealed a distal medullary region. Both these patients had an abnormal gastric emptying test. Gastroparesis and neurological deficits improved with intravenous corticosteroids. While the former patient has had no further recurrences, the latter patient developed multiple sclerosis within three months of presentation. Conclusion A demyelinating disease is a rare cause gastropareis, but should be suspected when symptoms of gastroparesis are associated with neurological deficits. MRI might help in the diagnosis and intravenous coriticosteroids can address the underlying disease process and improve gastric emptying, especially when used early during the course of the disease. PMID:17266755

  6. Distribution of Th17 cells and Th1 cells in peripheral blood and cerebrospinal fluid in chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chi, Li Jun; Xu, Wan Hai; Zhang, Zong Wen; Huang, Hui Tao; Zhang, Li Ming; Zhou, Jin

    2010-12-01

    Chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy (CIDP) is an immune-mediated demyelinating disease of the peripheral nervous system. Th17 and Th1 cells contribute to the pathogenesis of most autoimmune diseases, but little is known about their distribution and reciprocal relationship in CIDP. In this study, we analyzed the distribution of Th17, Th1, and Th17/Th1 cells in the peripheral blood and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). The results showed that the frequency of Th17 cells was significantly higher in the peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMCs) and CSF of active CIDP in comparison with remitting CIDP or to other non-inflammatory neurological diseases (ONDs), accompanied by similar findings for Th17/Th1 cells. Both active and remitting CIDP have higher percentage of Th1 cells in the CSF than OND. CSF protein levels positively correlated with the frequencies of Th17 cells either in the PBMCs or CSF of active CIDP, while there was no significant correlation with Th1 cells. In line with these observations, the levels of interleukin-17 (IL-17) in plasma and transcript factors retinoic acid receptor-related orphan receptor (ROR)γt expressed by PBMCs were significantly higher in the active CIDP than remitting CIDP or OND. In summary, our preliminary findings suggest that elevated numbers of inflammatory T cells, especially for Th17 cells, might be an important determinant in the evolution of CIDP.

  7. Acute-onset chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy with focal segmental glomerulosclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quek, Amy May Lin; Soon, Derek; Chan, Yee Cheun; Thamboo, Thomas Paulraj; Yuki, Nobuhiro

    2014-06-15

    Inflammatory neuropathies have been reported to occur in association with nephrotic syndrome. Their underlying immuno-pathogenic mechanisms remain unknown. A 50-year-old woman concurrently presented with acute-onset chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy and nephrotic syndrome secondary to focal segmental glomerulosclerosis. Both neuropathy and proteinuria improved after plasma exchange and steroids. Literature review of cases of concurrent inflammatory neuropathies and nephrotic syndrome revealed similar neuro-renal presentations. This neuro-renal condition may be mediated by autoantibodies targeting myelin and podocytes.

  8. Variations of the perforin gene in patients with chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buttini, S; Cappellano, G; Ripellino, P; Briani, C; Cocito, D; Osio, M; Cantello, R; Dianzani, U; Comi, C

    2015-01-01

    Perforin (PRF) has a key role in the function of cytotoxic T and natural killer cells. Rare variations of PRF1 predispose to autoimmunity. Chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy (CIDP) is an autoimmune disease of the peripheral nervous system, involving defective lymphocyte apoptosis. The aim of this study was to investigate the role of PRF1 in CIDP. The entire coding region of PRF1 was sequenced in 94 patients and 158 controls. We found three missense variations leading to amino acid substitutions and one nonsense variation resulting in a premature stop codon. All variations would decrease PRF activity. Their overall frequency was significantly higher in patients than in controls (odds ratio (OR)=4.47). The most frequent variation was p.Ala91Val (OR=3.92) previously associated with other autoimmune diseases. Clinical analysis showed that PRF1 variations were more frequent in relapsing patients and in patients displaying axonal damage. These data suggest that PRF1 variations may influence CIDP development and course.

  9. Childhood chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy: combined analysis of a large cohort and eleven published series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMillan, Hugh J; Kang, Peter B; Jones, H Royden; Darras, Basil T

    2013-02-01

    The clinical presentation, disease course, response to treatment, and long-term outcome of thirty childhood chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy (CIDP) patients are presented representing the largest cohort reported to date. Most children (60%) presented with chronic (>8-weeks) symptom-onset while a smaller proportion showed sub-acute (4-8 weeks) or acute (''GBS-like''; CIDP series providing a comprehensive review of 143 childhood CIDP cases. The combined initial or first-line treatment response across all studies was favourable for IVIG (79% patients) and corticosteroids (84% patients). Response to first-line plasma exchange was poor (only 14% patients improved) although it may offer some transient or partial benefit as an adjuvant or temporary therapy for selected patients. The combined long-term outcome of our cohort and the literature reveals a favourable prognosis for most patients. The combined modified Rankin scale decreased from 3.7 (at presentation) to 0.7 (at last follow-up). This review provides important data pertaining to clinical course, treatment response and long-term outcome of this relatively uncommon paediatric autoimmune disease.

  10. Overview of the pathogenesis and treatment of chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy with intravenous immunoglobulins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed Mahdi-Rogers

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Mohamed Mahdi-Rogers, Yusuf A RajaballyNeuromuscular Clinic, Department of Neurology, University Hospitals of Leicester, Leicester, UKAbstract: Chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP is an acquired heterogeneous disorder of immune origin affecting the peripheral nerves, causing motor weakness and sensory symptoms and signs. The precise pathophysiology of CIDP remains uncertain although B and T cell mechanisms are believed to be implicated. Intravenous immunoglobulins (IVIg have been shown in a number of trials to be an effective treatment for CIDP. IVIg is thought to exert its immunomodulatory effects by affecting several components of the immune system including B-cells, T-cells, macrophages and complement. This article provides an overview of the pathogenesis of CIDP and of its treatment with IVIg.Keywords: chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy, intravenous immunoglobulin, pathogenesis, treatment

  11. Chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy in adults: diagnostic approaches and first line therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. А. Suponevа

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP is among the key reasons of chronic polyneuropathies in adults. Diagnostic algorithm of CIDP in adults is presented. Diagnosis of CIDP is based on clinical and electrodiagnostic criteria of European Federation of Neurological Societies/Peripheral Nervous System in 2010. Principles of CIDP treatment are discussed, including modern trends of standard and 10 % IVIG solutions. 

  12. Human immunodeficiency virus seroconversion presenting with acute inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sloan Derek J

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Acute Human Immunodeficiency Virus infection is associated with a range of neurological conditions. Guillain-Barré syndrome is a rare presentation; acute inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy is the commonest form of Guillain-Barré syndrome. Acute inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy has occasionally been reported in acute Immunodeficiency Virus infection but little data exists on frequency, management and outcome. Case presentation We describe an episode of Guillain-Barré syndrome presenting as acute inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy in a 30-year-old man testing positive for Immunodeficiency Virus, probably during acute seroconversion. Clinical suspicion was confirmed by cerebrospinal fluid analysis and nerve conduction studies. Rapid clinical deterioration prompted intravenous immunoglobulin therapy and early commencement of highly active anti-retroviral therapy. All symptoms resolved within nine weeks. Conclusion Unusual neurological presentations in previously fit patients are an appropriate indication for Immunodeficiency-Virus testing. Highly active anti-retroviral therapy with adequate penetration of the central nervous system should be considered as an early intervention, alongside conventional therapies such as intravenous immunoglobulin.

  13. What's new in chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy in 2007-2008?

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Schaik, Ivo N

    2008-12-01

    Chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy (CIDP)-related research has made progress in the field of pathogenesis, genetics, and treatment. The number of circulating CD4(+) CD25(+) T-regulatory cells was shown to be reduced in CIDP patients. Increased frequency of genotype GA13-16 of the SH2D2A gene encoding for a T-cell-specific adapter protein in CIDP patients may result in a defective control and elimination of autoreactive T cells. IVIg treatment has been shown to increase numbers and function of peripheral CD4(+) CD25(+) T-regulatory cell in a mouse model. These findings shed new light on the understanding of why peripheral tolerance is breached in CIDP patients and why the disease becomes chronic and adds another possible mechanism of action of intravenous immunoglobulin to the already long list. Long-term effectiveness of IVIg has now been proven. Subcutaneous immunoglobulin could be an alternative for IVIg, but this has to be explored further in well-designed trials. Autologous stem cell transplantation has been tried in refractory patients, but larger trials are necessary to assess safety and effect of this treatment.

  14. Spinal cord involvement in chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy: a clinical and MRI study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ioannidis, Panagiotis; Parissis, Dimitris; Karapanayiotides, Theodoros; Maiovis, Pantelis; Karacostas, Dimitris; Grigoriadis, Nikolaos

    2015-06-01

    Concomitant central nervous system (CNS) involvement in chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy (CIDP) is rare. Although the spinal nerve roots may present MRI abnormalities in CIDP, hitherto, the spinal cord has been investigated in a single study. We retrospectively investigated clinically and with MRI a cohort of patients with definite CIDP diagnosis (EFNS/PNS criteria) for evidence of brain and spinal cord involvement, who were initially admitted in our department during the last 4 years. Among 12 patients with CIDP (men: 8, mean age: 59.3 years, mean disease duration: 3.8 years), nine patients had their MRI scan during a clinical relapse and three during remission. Brain MRI did not document typical multiple sclerosis lesions in any patient. We did not identify any MRI abnormalities in ten patients without clinical evidence of spinal cord involvement. Conversely, MRI disclosed extensive lesions of the thoracic cord in two patients with an overt spinal cord syndrome, whom we describe. This represents the biggest MRI study of CIDP patients who have been investigated for spinal cord involvement. Our data support earlier observations that a minority of CIDP patients may additionally develop CNS involvement of variable degree.

  15. Chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy: quality of life, sociodemographic profile and physical complaints

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia Leila dos Santos

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Whereas an evaluation of quality of life and possible impacts on the mental state of a patient may help to evaluate the evolution of chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP, the aim of this study was to study the psychological profile of patients, and evaluate quality of life associated with the disease. Method 41 patients were evaluated using a Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE and a Short-Form Health Survey (SF-36. Results The mean age of the patients was 50.6 years, 63.4% men. Of the participants, 65.9% had other health problems, 39% reported needing help with activities of daily living, 49% slept less than 8 hours per night, and 34.1% complained of some memory deficit. The average MMSE score was 26. Impairment of functional capacity and pain were the more important altered health states. Conclusion CIDP has important social and economic impacts, owing to functional impairments that can lead to professional and personal limitations.

  16. Successful treatment of chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP) in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) with oral cyclophosphamide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jasmin, R; Sockalingam, S; Shahrizaila, N; Cheah, T-E; Zain, A A; Goh, K-J

    2012-09-01

    Peripheral neuropathy is a known manifestation of systemic lupus erythematosus. However, the association of primary autoimmune inflammatory neuropathies such as chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP) with SLE is uncommon. We report a 26-year-old man who simultaneously presented with severe CIDP and photosensitive rash, but was unresponsive to intravenous immunoglobulin infusion and continued to progress. He was found to have underlying SLE and improved with combined corticosteroid and immunosuppressive therapy with oral cyclophosphamide. CIDP with underlying SLE may be more resistant to conventional therapy with IVIG, requiring the addition of other immunosuppressive agents.

  17. Sural nerve biopsy in chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy: Are supportive pathologic criteria useful in diagnosis?

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    Kulkarni Girish

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background : According to American Academy of Neurology (AAN criteria, demonstration of demyelination in the sural nerve by teased fiber or ultrastructure is considered mandatory for diagnosis of chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathies (CIDP. In resource-restricted settings where these techniques are not freely available, it is useful to determine the utility of ′supportive′ pathologic criteria (subperineurial edema, inflammation, onion bulb formation, and demyelination proposed by AAN for diagnosis of CIDP. Settings and Design : Tertiary care hospital, retrospective study. Patients and Methods : Forty-six patients with idiopathic CIDP (32 with progressive course and 14 with relapsing-remitting course satisfying AAN clinical and electrophysiologic criteria evaluated between January 1991 and August 2004 were reviewed. Frequency of specific pathological alterations such as demyelination, inflammation, onion bulb formation, and axonal changes in sural nerve biopsies was evaluated. Statistical Analysis : SPSS statistical package was used to calculate mean, range, and standard deviation. Student′s t test, chi-square test, and ANOVA were used for determining statistical significance. Results and Conclusion : Reduction in myelinated fiber density was most frequent (93.5%, followed by demyelination (82.8%, inflammation (58.7%, and onion bulb formation (28.3%. Endoneurial inflammation was frequent in the relapsing-remitting form and epineurial inflammation and axonal changes in those with progressive course. Greater disability at presentation, poor response to immunomodulation, and lower CSF protein levels was seen in those with axonal pathology. Pathological abnormalities were demonstrable in all (100%, whereas electrophysiological abnormalities were detected in 90.8%, suggesting that supportive histologic AAN criteria are helpful in diagnosis of CIDP.

  18. Circulating subsets and CD4(+)CD25(+) regulatory T cell function in chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy.

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    Sanvito, Lara; Makowska, Anna; Gregson, Norman; Nemni, Raffaello; Hughes, Richard A C

    2009-01-01

    Chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy (CIDP) is an inflammatory disease of the peripheral nervous system that is probably autoimmune in origin. Different components of the adaptive and innate immunity may be responsible for the aberrant response towards nerve antigens. To investigate this, we examined lymphocyte subsets and regulatory T cell (Treg) function in the blood of CIDP patients, healthy controls (HC) and subjects with non-immune mediated neuropathies (other neuropathies, ON). We used flow cytometry to determine the frequency of monocytes, B cells, natural killer (NK) and NK-T cells, total and activated CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells, effector memory and central memory CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells, and CD4(+)CD25(high)Foxp3(+) Tregs. Treg function was studied after polyclonal stimulation and antigen specific stimulation with myelin protein peptides in CIDP and HC. There was an increased frequency of monocytes (p = 0.02) and decreased frequency of NK cells (p = 0.02) in CIDP compared with HC but not ON. There were no significant differences in other populations. Treg function was impaired in CIDP compared to HC (p = 0.02), whilst T cell proliferation to myelin protein peptides before and after depletion of Tregs was not different between patients and controls. This study shows increased circulating monocytes and reduced NK cells in CIDP. Although Treg frequency was not altered, we confirm that Tregs display a defect of suppressive function. Myelin protein peptides were not the target of the altered peripheral regulation of the immune response. The mechanisms of peripheral immune tolerance in CIDP and their relevance to the pathogenesis deserve further exploration.

  19. Acute Inflammatory Demyelinating Polyneuropathy in Children; Clinical and Electrophysiologic Findings

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    Seyed-Hasan Tonekaboni

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective:The aim of this study was to evaluate the electrophysiologic findings of Guillain Barre Syndrome (GBS in children and their relation with clinical progress of the disease. Methods:Twenty-three children with GBS were evaluated between 2005 and 2007. Electrophysiologic evaluations were performed at admission and one month later. Findings: Five patients needed respirator, 15 were bedridden, 1 developed recurrence 6 months later, and 2 experienced chronic GBS. The most common findings included: decreased amplitude of muscle action potential (CMAP (96%, increased distal latency (74%, increased F wave latency (69%, and decreased nerve conduction velocity (NCV (61%. Sensory nerve conduction (evaluating sural nerve was normal in 78% of the cases. These measures did not significantly change after 1 month. Conclusion:Electrodiagnostic evaluations are helpful at the primary stages of GBS for diagnosis. Fibrillation potentials and positive sharp waves showing denervation and axonal injury are presentative of longer duration of the disease and a worse prognosis.

  20. [A case of asymmetric demyelinating neuropathy in a patient with chronic graft-versus-host disease].

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    Matsumoto, Hideyuki; Seki, Naoko; Yamamoto, Tomotaka; Oshima, Kumi; Asai, Takashi; Motokura, Toru; Ugawa, Yoshikazu; Goto, Jun; Tsuji, Shoji

    2005-10-01

    A 47-year-old man, who suffered from acute lymphocytic leukemia at 45 years old and was treated with hematopoietic stem cell transplantation at 46 years old after the induction of complete remission by the standard chemotherapy, developed the symptoms of chronic graft-versus-host disease (cGVHD) such as dry eyes, dry mouth, skin thickening, skin scaling, skin pigmentation and impaired liver function. He was admitted to our hospital because of the acute development of diplopia and weakness of his left upper extremity accompanying with the exacerbation of other symptoms of cGVHD. Neurological examinations revealed the right abducens nerve palsy and asymmetric muscular weakness of the extremities; the proximal part of the left upper extremity and the distal part of the right upper extremity were markedly involved. Neurophysiological studies including magnetic motor root stimulation revealed demyelinating neuropathy specifically involving the motor nerves. On the basis of these findings, a diagnosis of peripheral neuropathy associated with cGVHD was made. Nighteen reports are available on peripheral neuropathy in cGVHD patients, but to date little is known about the pathophysiology of this condition. Most of those patients have been diagnosed as having symmetric demyelinating polyneuropathy, such as Guillain-Barré syndrome or chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy. In this study, contrary to previous reports, the asymmetric involvement of motor nerves is noteworthy. Accumulation and further analyses of the cases like the present case are necessary to elucidate the pathogenesis of peripheral neuropathy in cGVHD.

  1. Genetics of Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS) and chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy (CIDP): current knowledge and future directions.

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    Blum, Stefan; McCombe, Pamela A

    2014-06-01

    Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS) and chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy (CIDP) are thought to be autoimmune diseases. There have been many attempts to find a human leukocyte antigen (HLA) association with GBS and CIDP with little success. There have been studies of other plausible genes in GBS and CIDP and the role of these genes in GBS and CIDP and the data from these genetic studies is reviewed. Some of the genes that have been studied are immune related and some others have nervous system effects. The studies are limited by small numbers. Some of the genes show association with disease severity rather than disease susceptibility. The need for more detailed molecular studies of the role of HLA molecules and the need for modern genetic approaches to GBS and CIDP are explained.

  2. Involvement of the central nervous system in chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy: a clinical, electrophysiological and magnetic resonance imaging study.

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    Ormerod, I E; Waddy, H M; Kermode, A G; Murray, N M; Thomas, P. K.

    1990-01-01

    In a consecutive series of 30 patients with chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP) minor clinical evidence of CNS involvement was found in five. Cranial magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was performed in 28 and revealed abnormalities consistent with demyelination in nine patients aged less than 50 years and abnormalities in five aged 50 years or over. Measurements of central motor conduction time (CMCT) were obtained in 18 and showed unilateral or bilateral abnormalities in s...

  3. Chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy and variants: where we are and where we should go.

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    Nobile-Orazio, Eduardo

    2014-03-01

    Chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy (CIDP) is a chronic and often disabling sensory motor neuropathy postulated as caused by an immune attack against peripheral nerve myelin. In addition to a classic sensory–motor polyneuropathy, other phenotypes of CIDP have been described including the Lewis- Sumner syndrome, distal acquired demyelinating symmetric (DADS) neuropathy, pure motor CIDP, pure sensory CIDP including chronic immune sensory polyradiculopathy (CISP), and focal CIDP. These phenotypes are currently considered to be variants of CIDP, even if the possibility that they represent different demyelinating neuropathies cannot be fully excluded considering differences in their response to therapy. Several data support the role of the immune system in the pathogenesis of CIDP even if the precise targets and actors (antibodies and lymphocytes) of this immune response remain uncertain. Recent studies have shown that the therapeutic response may differ in patients with peculiar clinical presentations supporting the hypothesis that different pathogenetic mechanisms may underlie the heterogeneity of CIDP. The majority of patients with CIDP show improvement after immune therapies including corticosteroids, plasma exchange, and high-dose intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIg). It remains unclear why none of the other immune therapies that were reported to be variably effective in other immune disorders proved to be effective also in CIDP.

  4. Acute Inflammatory Demyelinating Polyneuropathy and a Unilateral Babinski/Plantar Reflex

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    Davide Cattano

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Acquired acute demyelinating peripheral polyneuropathy (AADP is a general classification of pathologies that could affect secondary the peripheral nervous system. They are characterized by an autoimmune process directed towards myelin. Clinically they are characterized by progressive weakness and mild sensory changes. Acute inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy often is referred to as Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS. GBS is the major cause of acute nontraumatic paralysis in healthy people and it is caused by autoimmune response to viral agents (influenza, coxsackie, Epstein-Barr virus, or cytomegalovirus or bacterial infective organisms (Campylobacter jejuni, Mycoplasma pneumoniae. A detailed history, with symptoms of progressive usually bilateral weakness, hyporeflexia, with a typical demyelinating EMG pattern supports the diagnosis. Progressive affection of respiratory muscles and autonomic instability coupled with a protracted and unpredictable recovery normally results in the need for ICU management. We present a case report of a patient with a typical GBS presentation but with a unilateral upgoing plantar reflex (Babinski sign. A unifying diagnosis was made and based on a literature search in Pubmed appears to be the first described case of its kind.

  5. Acute inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy and a unilateral babinski/plantar reflex.

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    Cattano, Davide; O'connor, Brian; Shakir, Ra'ad; Giunta, Francesco; Palazzo, Mark

    2008-01-01

    Acquired acute demyelinating peripheral polyneuropathy (AADP) is a general classification of pathologies that could affect secondary the peripheral nervous system. They are characterized by an autoimmune process directed towards myelin. Clinically they are characterized by progressive weakness and mild sensory changes. Acute inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy often is referred to as Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS). GBS is the major cause of acute nontraumatic paralysis in healthy people and it is caused by autoimmune response to viral agents (influenza, coxsackie, Epstein-Barr virus, or cytomegalovirus) or bacterial infective organisms (Campylobacter jejuni, Mycoplasma pneumoniae). A detailed history, with symptoms of progressive usually bilateral weakness, hyporeflexia, with a typical demyelinating EMG pattern supports the diagnosis. Progressive affection of respiratory muscles and autonomic instability coupled with a protracted and unpredictable recovery normally results in the need for ICU management. We present a case report of a patient with a typical GBS presentation but with a unilateral upgoing plantar reflex (Babinski sign). A unifying diagnosis was made and based on a literature search in Pubmed appears to be the first described case of its kind.

  6. Primary demyelinating disease simulating infiltrating glioma on CT

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    Nakasu, Yoko; Suda, Kinya; Handa, Jyoji; Hazama, Fumitada (Shiga Univ. of Medical Science, Otsu (Japan))

    1982-12-01

    Demyelinating diseases of the brain may show mass effects and/or contrast enhancement on CT scans, simulating the appearance of infiltrating glioma. A 36-year-old male, had suffered from gait disturbance and convulsive attacks involving the right lower limb since the age of 30. He had gradually developed character changes and urine incontinence. Six months prior to admission he experienced several attacks of generalized convulsions. On admission, he showed a mild hemiparesis, bilateral Babinski signs, and ataxic gait. He was disoriented and had memory disturbance and moria. CT scan showed low density areas in the bilateral frontal lobes Fand corpus callosum associated with a mild mass effect. Contrast study revealed irregular enhancement along the edge of the low density area and another small enhancing lesion in the left temporal lobe. This CT finding was interpreted as that of ''butterfly'' glioma. Craniotomy and right frontal lobectomy were performed. Histological study, however, demonstrated demyelination in the white matter associated with perivascular proliferation of lymphocytes. The final diagnosis was the 'transitional sclerosis' of Poser.

  7. Relapse with Dysphagia in a Case of Chronic Inflammatory Demyelinating Polyradiculoneuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teramoto, Hiroko; Morita, Akihiko; Hara, Makoto; Ninomiya, Satoko; Shigihara, Shuntaro; Kusunoki, Susumu; Kamei, Satoshi

    2015-01-01

    Glossopharyngeal and/or vagus nerve involvement is infrequent in patients with chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy (CIDP). We herein report the case of a 69-year-old Japanese woman who presented with muscle weakness and numbness of the extremities with dysphagia. The serum anti-ganglioside GM1 immunoglobulin IgM antibody levels were elevated, and treatment with intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIg) resulted in a dramatic improvement; the weakness, numbness and dysphagia all resolved. However, relapse comprising dysphagia alone occurred on hospital day 26, and treatment with IVIg again proved extremely effective. IVIg therapy can be effective against cranial nerve involvement in cases of CIDP.

  8. Subcutaneous immunoglobulin in responders to intravenous therapy with chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Markvardsen, Lars Høj; Debost, J-C; Harbo, Thomas;

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: We hypothesized that subcutaneous administration of immunoglobulins (SCIG) in chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy (CIDP) is feasible, safe and superior to treatment with saline for the performance of muscle strength. METHODS: Thirty patients with motor...... involvement in maintenance therapy with intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) fulfilling the EFNS/PNS criteria for CIDP, aged 18-80 years, were randomized either to SCIG at a dose corresponding to their pre-study IVIG dose or to subcutaneous saline given twice or thrice weekly for 12 weeks at home. At the start...

  9. Chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy complicating anti TNF α therapy for chronic plaque psoriasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Zahra; Powell, Robert; Llewelyn, Gareth; Anstey, Alex

    2011-12-01

    A 53-year-old woman with chronic plaque psoriasis treated with adalimumab (antitumour necrosis factor (anti TNF) α therapy) for 10 months presented with an 8 week history of hyperesthesia in a 'glove and stocking' distribution and clumsiness on walking. Nerve conduction studies confirmed the clinical diagnosis of a chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy (CIDP). She was admitted and treated with intravenous immunoglobulin and oral steroids and made an excellent recovery. To our knowledge, this is the first published report of CIDP associated with anti TNF α therapy given to treat psoriasis.

  10. [Diagnostic strategy for chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy. Recommendations of the French working group].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magy, L

    2008-12-01

    The diagnosis of chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy (CIDP) requires a careful clinical and neurophysiological evaluation, often completed by CSF analysis. In numerous cases, this diagnosis is straightforward and leads to rapid initiation of an immunomodulatory treatment. However, some patients are not diagnosed because of atypical clinical and/or neurophysiological features, and do not benefit from a potentially effective treatment. In this context, a working group was composed with the task of establishing recommendations on diagnostic strategies for CIDP in the main clinical situations where this diagnosis may be suspected. We have summarized these recommendations and tried to present them in the form of a decision-making algorithm.

  11. Unusual features in chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy: Good outcome after prolonged ventilatory support

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    Sanjeev Jha

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Severe respiratory muscle paralysis and ventilatory failure is rare in chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP. We report a 14 year child who presented with respiratory failure, bulbar and multiple cranial nerves involvement along with bilateral phrenic nerve paralysis. He was diagnosed with CIDP after electrophysiological evaluation. He required AMBU ventilation for about 4 months (including domiciliary use, after which he recovered significantly. Along with several unusual features of CIDP, this report highlights good example of steady basic intensive care to save lives and rewarding outcome of prolonged respiratory support, provided by AMBU ventilation which is a rather primitive, but inexpensive device.

  12. Epidemiologic variability of chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy with different diagnostic criteria: study of a UK population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajabally, Yusuf A; Simpson, Benjamin S; Beri, Sushil; Bankart, John; Gosalakkal, Jayaprakash A

    2009-04-01

    Epidemiologic data on chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP) is limited, and previous studies have shown variable results. The frequencies of CIDP subtypes remain unknown. Variations due to use of different diagnostic criteria have not been studied. We examined the prevalence and incidence of CIDP in Leicestershire and Rutland, UK (population 963,600). Prevalence day was 1 May 2008. The prevalence of CIDP fulfilling the 2006 clinical and electrophysiologic European Federation of Neurological Societies/Peripheral Nerve Society (EFNS/PNS) criteria was 4.77 per 100,000 (95% confidence interval [CI] 3.49-6.37). Using the 1991 American Academy of Neurology (AAN) criteria, the prevalence was 1.97 per 100,000 in this population (95% CI 1.19-3.08). Lewis-Sumner syndrome was diagnosed in 15.2% of patients, and 23.9% had pure sensory onset. Over 40% required no immunotherapy, and 84.6% of those treated responded. More than 80% of the AAN criteria-negative but EFNS/PNS criteria-positive patients were responsive to treatment. Both sets of criteria were equally likely to identify patients who required therapy. The mean annual incidence rate over the 3 years preceding the prevalence day was 0.70 per 100,000/year using EFNS/PNS criteria (95% CI 0.43-1.08), and 0.35 per 100,000/year using AAN criteria (95% CI 0.17-0.64). We conclude that the AAN criteria may underestimate prevalence and incidence of the disease. The EFNS/PNS criteria provide higher diagnostic sensitivity and are of greater clinical relevance, and they also offer a useful breakdown of the epidemiologic data for CIDP subtypes.

  13. Cortical grey matter demyelination can be induced by elevated pro-inflammatory cytokines in the subarachnoid space of MOG-immunized rats.

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    Gardner, Christopher; Magliozzi, Roberta; Durrenberger, Pascal F; Howell, Owain W; Rundle, Jon; Reynolds, Richard

    2013-12-01

    A substantial proportion of cases with secondary progressive multiple sclerosis have extensive inflammation in the leptomeninges that is associated with increased subpial demyelination, neuronal loss and an exacerbated disease course. However, the mechanisms underlying this extensive subpial pathology are poorly understood. We hypothesize that pro-inflammatory cytokine production within the meninges may be a key to this process. Post-mortem cerebrospinal fluid and dissected cerebral leptomeningeal tissue from patients with multiple sclerosis were used to study the presence of tumour necrosis factor and interferon gamma protein and messenger RNA levels. A novel model of subpial cortical grey matter demyelination was set up in Dark Agouti rats and analysed using quantitative immunohistochemistry. Increased expression of the pro-inflammatory cytokines tumour necrosis factor and interferon gamma was found in the meninges of cases with secondary progressive multiple sclerosis exhibiting tertiary lymphoid-like structures. Injection of tumour necrosis factor and interferon gamma into the subarachnoid space of female Dark Agouti rats pre-immunized with a subclinical dose of myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein mimicked the pathology seen in multiple sclerosis, including infiltration of lymphocytes (CD4+ and CD8+ T cells and CD79+ B cells) into the meninges and extensive subpial demyelination. Extensive microglial/macrophage activation was present in a gradient from the pial surface to deeper cortical layers. Demyelination did not occur in control animals immunized with incomplete Freund's adjuvant and injected with cytokines. These results support the hypothesis that pro-inflammatory molecules produced in the meninges play a major role in cortical demyelination in multiple sclerosis, but also emphasize the involvement of an anti-myelin immune response.

  14. Chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy in chronic graft-versus-host disease following allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation: case report Polirradiculoneuropatia desmielinizante inflamatória crônica na doença do enxerto contra o hospedeiro após transplante de células hematopoiéticas alogênicas: relato de caso

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    Paulo José Lorenzoni

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available The chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy (CIDP is an unusual but important complication of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT rarely reported to date. We describe a 17-year-old woman with a diagnosis of acute myeloid leukemia due to Fanconi's anemia who was submitted to allogeneic HSCT and developed CIDP as part of graft-versus-host disease. Investigation showed high cerebrospinal fluid protein; electrophysiological studies revealed sensory-motor demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy; muscle and nerve biopsy were compatible with CIDP.A polirradiculoneuropatia desmielinizante inflamatória crônica (CIDP é uma incomum, porém, importante complicação do transplante de células hematopoiéticas (HSCT raramente relatada até a data. Nós descrevemos uma mulher de 17 anos com diagnóstico de leucemia mielóide aguda por anemia de Fanconi que foi submetida à HSCT e desenvolveu CIDP como parte da doença do enxerto contra o hospedeiro. A investigação mostrou elevação na proteína no líquor; estudo eletrofisiológico revelando polirradiculoneuropatia desmielinizante sensitivo-motora; e biópsia de músculo e nervo compatível com CIDP.

  15. Patient with neuromyelitis optica and inflammatory demyelinating lesions comprising whole spinal cord from C2 level till conus: case report

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    Pavlisa Goran

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Neuromyelitis optica (NMO is an idiopathic, severe, inflammatory demyelinating disease of the central nervous system, that causes severe optic neuritis and myelitis attacks. Early discrimination between multiple sclerosis (MS and NMO is important, as optimum treatment for both diseases may differ considerably. Case Presentation We report a case of a patient who initially presented as longitudinally extensive transverse myelitis (LETM, having spastic upper extremities diparesis and spastic paraplegia, C2/C3 sensory level and urinary incontinence, as well as extensive inflammatory spinal cord lesions from C2 level to conus. After 5 months the patient had another attack of transverse myelitis, had electrophysiological findings consistent with optic neuritis, was seropositive for NMO-IgG (aquaporin-4 IgG and thus fulfilled NMO diagnostic criteria. Following treatment of disease attacks with pulse corticosteroid therapy and intravenous immunoglobulins, we included oral azathioprine in a combination with oral prednisone in the therapy. Since there was no significant clinical improvement, we decided to use cyclophosphamide therapy, which resulted in good clinical improvement and gradual decrease of cord swelling. Conclusion In this NMO case report we wanted to emphasize the extensiveness of inflammatory spinal cord changes in our patient, from C2 level to conus. In the conclusion it is important to say that accurate, early diagnosis and distinction from MS is critical to facilitate initiation of immunosuppressive therapy for attack prevention.

  16. IVIG regulates BAFF expression in patients with chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP).

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    Ritter, Christian; Förster, Dominik; Albrecht, Philipp; Hartung, Hans-Peter; Kieseier, Bernd C; Lehmann, Helmar C

    2014-09-15

    Recent studies indicate that the cytokine B-cell activating factor (BAFF) is involved in the pathogenesis of chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP). Intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIg) is standard treatment for CIDP and is known to rapidly modulate increased serum levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines. We evaluated the expression profile of BAFF and its corresponding BAFF-receptor in samples from CIDP patients, focusing on rapid changes before and after IVIg treatment. In CIDP patients BAFF serum concentrations were elevated compared to controls. Treatment with high-dose IVIg restored those elevated BAFF serum levels. Whereas treatment with IVIg did not affect BAFF production in monocytes, antibodies against BAFF could be detected in IVIg preparations, which may explain the short-term decrease of BAFF levels after IVIg treatment. Our data suggest that BAFF plays an important role in the pathogenesis of CIDP and may serve as marker for IVIg treatment response.

  17. Intravenous immunoglobulin treatment in chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy, a time to start and a time to stop.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adrichem, Max E; Eftimov, Filip; van Schaik, Ivo N

    2016-09-01

    Intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIg) is often used as preferred treatment in chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy (CIDP). Several studies highlighted the short-term efficacy of IVIg for CIDP yet many patients need maintenance therapy. Notwithstanding the fact IVIg has been used for over 30 years in CIDP, there is only limited evidence to guide dosage and interval during maintenance treatment. The variation in disease course, lack of biomarkers, and fear of deterioration after stopping IVIg makes long-term treatment challenging. Recent studies suggest a proportion of patients receive unnecessary IVIg maintenance treatment. This review provides an overview of the use of IVIg for CIDP treatment, focusing on evidence for long-term IVIg use.

  18. Characterization of a new rat model for chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brun, Susana; Beaino, Wissam; Kremer, Laurent; Taleb, Omar; Mensah-Nyagan, Ayikoe Guy; Lam, Chanh D; Greer, Judith M; de Seze, Jérôme; Trifilieff, Elisabeth

    2015-01-15

    Our objective was to develop a chronic model of EAN which could be used as a tool to test treatment strategies for CIDP. Lewis rats injected with S-palmitoylated P0(180-199) peptide developed a chronic, sometimes relapsing-remitting type of disease. Our model fulfills electrophysiological criteria of demyelination with axonal degeneration, confirmed by immunohistopathology. The late phase of the chronic disease was characterized by accumulation of IL-17(+) cells and macrophages in sciatic nerves and by high serum IL-17 levels. In conclusion, we have developed a reliable and reproducible animal model resembling CIDP that can now be used for translational drug studies.

  19. Chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy presenting as cauda equina syndrome in a diabetic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Wayne W L; Ubogu, Eroboghene E

    2007-09-15

    Chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy (CIDP) may occur in association with diabetes mellitus (DM). We report a case of a poorly controlled diabetic patient who presented with rapid onset of bilateral lower extremity weakness and sensory loss associated with sacral and posterior thigh paresthesias and urinary and bowel incontinence, indicative of cauda equina syndrome (CES). Subsequent evaluation was consistent with CIDP. Monthly infusions with intravenous immunoglobulins (IVIg) with strict glycemic control using insulin resulted in remarkable clinical and electrophysiological recovery. This case report describes a rare presentation of CIDP and emphasizes the importance of early utility of electrodiagnostic (EDX) studies in the clinical evaluation of diabetic patients presenting with rapidly progressive lower extremity weakness and sensory loss associated with diminished reflexes.

  20. Nerve sonography in multifocal motor neuropathy and chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy

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    D. S. Druzhinin

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The quantitative ultrasound characteristics (USC of the median, ulnar nerve at different levels and the spinal nerves in patients with multifocal motor neuropathy (MMN; n=13; 40,4 ± 12,6 years old and chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP; n = 7; 47,3 ± 11,2 year old did not reveal statistical difference in cross sectional area (CSA between analyzed groups. Patients with MMN have more pronounced asymmetry of CSA in comparison with CIDP patients which have a symmetrical pattern of diffuse nerve involvement. Quantitative USC has shown to be not informative enough in differentiation of MMN and CIDP. The qualitative analysis (QA according to 3 described types of nerve changes has shown that CIDP is characterized by the prevalence of type 3 pattern (85.8 % while MMN – by type 2 (69.2 %. The sensitivity and specificity of proposed QA patterns in nerve USC need to be analyzed in additional investigations. 

  1. Recurrent hypogeusia in a patient with chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy (CIDP).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawaguchi, Norihiko; Sugeno, Naoto; Endo, Kaoru; Miura, Emiko; Misu, Tatsuro; Nakashima, Ichiro; Itoyama, Yasuto

    2012-04-01

    Hypogeusia, a condition with diminished sense of taste, is caused by several conditions, including zinc deficiency and as a side-effect of drugs, but is not common in neurological disorders. A 55-year-old Japanese man with a 30-year history of chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy (CIDP) presented with hypogeusia during hospitalization for a recurrence of CIDP. The hypogeusia improved after treatment with high-dose intravenous methylprednisolone (HIMP). Two years later, hypogeusia developed again. A complete taste deficit was revealed by a filter paper test. Brain MRI showed enhancement of the bilateral facial nerve ganglia. Hypogeusia was partially ameliorated after extensive immunosuppressive therapy with repeated HIMP and plasma exchange. Improvement was more prominent in the area innervated by the chorda tympani nerve than that innervated by the glossopharyngeal nerve. To our knowledge, this is the first report of recurrent hypogeusia, which might be caused by cranial nerve injury associated with CIDP.

  2. Subcutaneous immunoglobulin in responders to intravenous therapy with chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Markvardsen, L. H.; Debost, J. C.; Harbo, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: We hypothesized that subcutaneous administration of immunoglobulins (SCIG) in chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy (CIDP) is feasible, safe and superior to treatment with saline for the performance of muscle strength. METHODS: Thirty patients with motor...... involvement in maintenance therapy with intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) fulfilling the EFNS/PNS criteria for CIDP, aged 18-80 years, were randomized either to SCIG at a dose corresponding to their pre-study IVIG dose or to subcutaneous saline given twice or thrice weekly for 12 weeks at home. At the start...... Research Council (MRC) score, grip strength, standardized electrophysiological recordings from three nerves, and plasma IgG levels were evaluated. RESULTS: SCIG treatment was well tolerated in all 14 patients. Six patients complained of mild side-effects at the injection site. In the SCIG group...

  3. Office immunotherapy in chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy and multifocal motor neuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyck, Peter J; Taylor, Bruce V; Davies, Jenny L; Mauermann, Michelle L; Litchy, William J; Klein, Christopher J; Dyck, P James B

    2015-10-01

    Intravenous immunoglobulin [IVIg], plasma exchange [PE], and corticosteroids are efficacious treatment in chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy [CIDP]. IVIg is effective in multifocal motor neuropathy [MMN]. NIS, NIS-weakness, sum scores of raw amplitudes of motor fiber (CMAPs) amplitudes, and Dyck/Rankin score provided reliable measures to detect and scale abnormality and reflect change; they are therefore ideal for office management of response-based immunotherapy (R-IRx) of CIDP. Using efficacious R-IRx, a large early and late therapeutic response (≥ one-fourth were in remission or had recovered) was demonstrated in CIDP. In MMN only an early improvement with late non-significant worsening was observed. The difference in immunotherapy response supports a fundamental difference between CIDP (immune attack on Schwann cells and myelin) and MMN (attack on nodes of Ranvier and axons).

  4. [Anesthetic management of a Dialysis Patient with Chronic Inflammatory Demyelinating Polyneuropathy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Yoshihiro; Hara, Koji; Sata, Takeyoshi

    2015-11-01

    We report the successful management of anesthesia in a 46-year-old male dialysis patient with chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP). He underwent an osteosynthesis of the ankle joint using general anesthesia combined with epidural anesthesia. The anesthetic concerns in patients with CIDP are the possibility of postoperative respiratory dysfunction due to anesthetics or muscle relaxants and that of postoperative neurological deterioration due to spinal or epidural anesthesia. In this case, sevoflurane (1.5-2%) did not cause respiratory dysfunction postoperatively and muscle relaxant effect of rocuronium was effectively reversed by sugammadex. Epidural anesthesia using ropivacaine (0.2-0.375%) and fentanyl did not worsen the neurological symptoms of CIDP post-operatively.

  5. Tumefactive Demyelinating Lesions in Multiple Sclerosis and Associated Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frederick, Meredith C; Cameron, Michelle H

    2016-03-01

    Tumefactive demyelinating lesions are rare consequences of central nervous system (CNS) idiopathic inflammatory demyelinating diseases. Tumefactive demyelinating lesions pose a diagnostic challenge because they can mimic tumors and abscesses and because they can be caused by a heterogeneous range of disorders. This article reviews the recent literature on the clinical presentation; radiographic features; prognosis; and management of tumefactive demyelinating lesions in multiple sclerosis, acute demyelinating encephalomyelitis, neuromyelitis optica, and the rare variants of multiple sclerosis including Schilder's disease, Marburg acute multiple sclerosis, and Balo's concentric sclerosis.

  6. Viral induced demyelination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stohlman, S A; Hinton, D R

    2001-01-01

    Viral induced demyelination, in both humans and rodent models, has provided unique insights into the cell biology of oligodendroglia, their complex cell-cell interactions and mechanisms of myelin destruction. They illustrate mechanisms of viral persistence, including latent infections in which no infectious virus is readily evident, virus reactivation and viral-induced tissue damage. These studies have also provided excellent paradigms to study the interactions between the immune system and the central nervous system (CNS). Although of interest in their own right, an understanding of the diverse mechanisms used by viruses to induce demyelination may shed light into the etiology and pathogenesis of the common demyelinating disorder multiple sclerosis (MS). This notion is supported by the persistent view that a viral infection acquired during adolescence might initiate MS after a long period of quiescence. Demyelination in both humans and rodents can be initiated by infection with a diverse group of enveloped and non-enveloped RNA and DNA viruses (Table 1). The mechanisms that ultimately result in the loss of CNS myelin appear to be equally diverse as the etiological agents capable of causing diseases which result in demyelination. Although demyelination can be a secondary result of axonal loss, in many examples of viral induced demyelination, myelin loss is primary and associated with axonal sparing. This suggests that demyelination induced by viral infections can result from: 1) a direct viral infection of oligodendroglia resulting in cell death with degeneration of myelin and its subsequent removal; 2) a persistent viral infection, in the presence or absence of infectious virus, resulting in the loss of normal cellular homeostasis and subsequent oligodendroglial death; 3) a vigorous virus-specific inflammatory response wherein the virus replicates in a cell type other than oligodendroglia, but cytokines and other immune mediators directly damage the

  7. Ultrasound pattern sum score, homogeneity score and regional nerve enlargement index for differentiation of demyelinating inflammatory and hereditary neuropathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimm, Alexander; Vittore, Debora; Schubert, Victoria; Lipski, Christina; Heiling, Bianka; Décard, Bernhard F; Axer, Hubertus

    2016-07-01

    To investigate the use of nerve ultrasound in the differentiation between Charcot-Marie Tooth hereditary neuropathy (CMT1) and chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathies (CIDP), multifocal motor neuropathy (MMN) and multifocal acquired demyelinating sensory and motor neuropathies (MADSAM). Ultrasound/electrophysiology of predefined nerves was performed in CMT1a/b, immunoneuropathies, and healthy controls. Ultrasound pattern sum score (UPSS, sum of the amount of 12 predefined measurement points), homogeneity score (HS) and regional nerve enlargement index (RNEI) in ulnar, median, and tibial nerve were used for evaluation of morphology. 13 CMT1, 27 CIDP, 10 MADSAM, 12 MMN, and 23 controls were included. Significant enlargement was shown in all neuropathies compared to the controls, (pneuropathies by the use of boundary values. By the use of quantitative scores, ultrasound differentiation of demyelinating neuropathies is operationalized and ameliorated compared to CSA measurements only. Copyright © 2016 International Federation of Clinical Neurophysiology. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Tumefactive Brain Demyelination Accompanying MADSAM Neuropathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Şefik Evren Erdener

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Multifocal acquired demyelinating sensory and motor (MADSAM neuropathy is characterized by asymmetric multifocal motor and sensory loss and conduction blocks in peripheral nerves. Peripheral demyelinating diseases may be accompanied by demyelination in central nervous system (CNS. In this report, a MADSAM patient with a solitary tumefactive demyelinating lesion in brain is presented. Neuroimaging due to a visual field defect revealed a right parietooccipital lesion, which was initially misdiagnosed as a tumor. Pathological examination showed that it was demyelinating in nature. Peripheral nervous symptoms of the patient developed two years later and she was then diagnosed with MADSAM. There was prominent clinical and electrophysiological response to steroid treatment. Tumefactive brain involvement was not previously reported for MADSAM neuropathy, although it was documented in a single case with typical chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP. CNS involvement should therefore be considered in MADSAM patients.

  9. Pediatric inflammatory bowel disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Karen A Diefenbach; Christopher K Breuer

    2006-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease is an important cause of gastrointestinal pathology in children and adolescents.The incidence of pediatric inflammatory bowel disease is increasing; therefore, it is important for the clinician to be aware of the presentation of this disease in the pediatric population. Laboratory tests, radiology studies,and endoscopic procedures are helpful in diagnosing inflammatory bowel disease and differentiating between Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis. Once diagnosed,the goal of medical management is to induce remission of disease while minimizing the side effects of the medication. Specific attention needs to be paid to achieving normal growth in this susceptible population.Surgical management is usually indicated for failure of medical management, complication, or malignancy.Algorithms for diagnostic evaluation and treatment of pediatric inflammatory bowel disease are presented.The specific psychosocial issues facing these patients are also discussed in this review as are the future goals of research in the complex problem of pediatric inflammatory bowel disease.

  10. [Chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy after treatment with pegylated interferon alpha 2b in a patient with HIV/HCV coinfection: case report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bassetti, Bil Randerson; Trés, Eduardo Sturzeneker; Ciríaco, Jovana Gobbi Marchesi; Pinto Neto, Lauro Ferreira Silva

    2010-01-01

    Chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy has a strong association with HIV and HCV infection. A rare association between chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy and hepatitis C treatment with pegylated interferon alpha was described recently. We described the first case of chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy associated with pegylated interferon alpha 2b in a white man infected with HIV and HCV. The patient recovered completely with the use of intravenous hyperimmune immunoglobulin. Infectologists and hepatologists should be alert regarding this rare and serious association, which requires immediately drug discontinuation and early treatment.

  11. Chronic Inflammatory Demyelinating Polyneuropathy with Reversible Dementia: A New Clinical Entity?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samaniego, Jorge

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Classic chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP), an acquired demyelination of peripheral nerves and nerve roots presents with symmetric motor and sensory involvement, weakness in proximal and distal muscles, globally diminished or absent reflexes, painful dysesthesias, and back pain with no brain involvement. In this case, a highly functional lawyer presents with reversible dementia and motor and sensory symptoms consistent with CIDP. This case may represent a new clinical entity of CIDP with reversible dementia. Case Report A 60-year-old man presented with progressive weakness, and cognitive dysfunction in the form of dementia over the last 8 weeks. Sensory and motor weakness continued to progress affecting upper and lower extremities with both proximal and distal muscle groups to the point where the patient was unable to move without assistance. The patient had word finding difficulty, short-term memory impairment, and was disoriented, despite his comprehension being intact. Initial Montreal Cognitive Assessment (MoCA) was 12/30. Initial neurologic exam was notable for muscle strength 3/5, globally depressed deep tendon reflexes. Lumbar puncture revealed elevated protein with no pleocytosis and no serum paraprotein. EMG/NCS demonstrated mixed sensorimotor axonal and demyelination peripheral polyneuropathy. CIDP was diagnosed based on clinical history according to Koski criteria. He was started on a 5-day treatment of IVIG, after which he had marked cognitive improvement after just one dose and improvement in weakness after the second dose of IVIG. Three weeks after IVIG treatment, the patient's cognitive function was back at baseline with MoCA score 29/30; no further word finding difficulty, and no short term memory impairment. At discharge, the patient's weakness had significantly improved to the point where he was able to walk with only the aid of a walker. His neurologic exam had improved as well as his muscle strength 4/5 and 2

  12. Treatments for chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy (CIDP): an overview of systematic reviews.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oaklander, Anne Louise; Lunn, Michael Pt; Hughes, Richard Ac; van Schaik, Ivo N; Frost, Chris; Chalk, Colin H

    2017-01-13

    Chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy (CIDP) is a chronic progressive or relapsing and remitting disease that usually causes weakness and sensory loss. The symptoms are due to autoimmune inflammation of peripheral nerves. CIPD affects about 2 to 3 per 100,000 of the population. More than half of affected people cannot walk unaided when symptoms are at their worst. CIDP usually responds to treatments that reduce inflammation, but there is disagreement about which treatment is most effective. To summarise the evidence from Cochrane systematic reviews (CSRs) and non-Cochrane systematic reviews of any treatment for CIDP and to compare the effects of treatments. We considered all systematic reviews of randomised controlled trials (RCTs) of any treatment for any form of CIDP. We reported their primary outcomes, giving priority to change in disability after 12 months.Two overview authors independently identified published systematic reviews for inclusion and collected data. We reported the quality of evidence using GRADE criteria. Two other review authors independently checked review selection, data extraction and quality assessments.On 31 October 2016, we searched the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, the Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (in theCochrane Library), MEDLINE, Embase, and CINAHL Plus for systematic reviews of CIDP. We supplemented the RCTs in the existing CSRs by searching on the same date for RCTs of any treatment of CIDP (including treatment of fatigue or pain in CIDP), in the Cochrane Neuromuscular Specialised Register, CENTRAL, MEDLINE, Embase, and CINAHL Plus. Five CSRs met our inclusion criteria. We identified 23 randomised trials, of which 15 had been included in these CSRs. We were unable to compare treatments as originally planned, because outcomes and outcome intervals differed. CorticosteroidsIt is uncertain whether daily oral prednisone improved impairment compared to no treatment because the quality of the

  13. Clinical and radiological characteristics of 17 Chinese patients with pathology confirmed tumefactive demyelinating diseases: follow-up study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Jiarui; Huang, Dehui; Gui, Qiuping; Chen, Xiaolei; Lou, Xin; Wu, Lei; Cheng, Chen; Li, Jie; Wu, Weiping

    2015-01-15

    Tumefactive demyelinating disease is a rare inflammatory demyelinating disease (IDD) of the central nervous system (CNS). The literature lacks a clear and consistent description of the clinical and radiological spectrum of this disorder, and few Chinese cases have been studied. Here we report 17 Chinese patients, with pathology confirmed CNS IDD, who had distinct clinical and imaging features from those in previous reports. Median age at onset was 47 years, with a female to male ratio of 1.1:1. Multifocal lesions were present in nine cases (53%) on their pre-biopsy magnetic resonance imagings (MRIs), with locations predominantly involving periventricular white matter (41%), subcortical white matter (41%), juxtacortical regions (41%), and cortical gray matter (35%). Moderate to severe perilesional edema and/or mass effect were present in 35% of cases. A variety of enhancement patterns were observed; most were heterogeneous, including ring-like, patchy, venular-like, nodular, punctate, and diffuse in a decreased frequency. Perilesional restriction on diffusion-weighted images (DWI) were evident in 70% cases. Clinical course prior to biopsy was a first neurological event in 82% cases. During a median follow-up of 4.1 years, 76% of cases remained as isolated demyelinating syndrome, and 70% experienced a total or near-total recovery regardless of whether they received immunotherapy. Further studies are needed, especially concerning series with pathological confirmation and long-term follow-up information.

  14. Impairment of circulating CD4+CD25+ regulatory T cells in patients with chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chi, Li-Jun; Wang, Hua-Bing; Wang, Wei-Zhi

    2008-03-01

    Chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy (CIDP) is an immune-mediated peripheral nervous system disease. CD4+CD25+ T regulatory cells (Tregs) have been unequivocally shown to be critical in maintaining immune tolerance and preventing auto-immune diseases by suppressing self-reactive T cells. Thus, we hypothesized that the numbers and/or the function of Tregs would be deranged during the progressive or relapse phases of CIDP. The number of Tregs was determined by flow cytometry according to their characteristic CD4+CD25(high) membrane phenotype. Functional characterization of Tregs was analyzed by suppression of proliferation and secretion of cytokines by co-cultured effector CD4+CD25- T cells. FOXP3 message expression level was assessed by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. The results showed significant reduction in both the number and the suppressive function of Tregs in the patients with CIDP compared with healthy controls. Also, Tregs isolated from CIDP patients expressed lower levels of FoxP3 mRNA. During the progressive or the relapsing phases of CIDP, the number of Tregs was reduced, and the suppressive function of them decreased. These findings may be helpful to our understanding of the possible role of Tregs in the pathogenesis of CIDP.

  15. Spinal primitive neuroectodermal tumor mimicking as chronic inflammatory demyelination polyneuropathy: a case report and review of literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Sophelia H S; Tsang, Dickson S F; Wong, Virginia C N; Chan, Godfrey C F

    2015-02-01

    We report a young boy who presented with progressive weakness of lower extremities associated with areflexia and abnormal electrophysiological findings initially suggestive of chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy. Initial lumbosacral spinal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed thickened descending spinal nerve roots only. Immunomodulating therapy was given but with limited clinical response. Repeated spine magnetic resonance imaging showed cauda equina and also new spinal cord extramedullary contrast enhancement. The initial extensive investigations including open biopsy did not point to any specific diagnosis. Only through pursuing a repeated biopsy, the diagnosis of the spinal peripheral primitive neuroectodermal tumor was confirmed. This case highlights the diagnostic challenges of the spinal peripheral primitive neuroectodermal tumor that could have an initial chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy-like presentation. The literature review confirms that this is a rare condition and cauda equina origin has only been reported in adults and teenagers, and this is the first reported case in a young child.

  16. [Neurological complications of inflammatory bowel disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bermejo, Pedro Emilio; Burgos, Aurora

    2008-05-10

    Although ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease have traditionally been considered to be inflammatory diseases limited to the gastrointestinal tract, it has been shown that both pathologies are frequently accompanied by various extraintestinal disorders. There is an increasing evidence that they may also manifest in the nervous system, including the peripheral and the central parts. Although some of these neurological complications have been known for a long time, such as cerebrovascular disease, vasculitis and autoinmune processes including neuropathies and cerebral demyelination, others have been recently described. With the exception of some of this complications such as the thromboembolism, evidence for a casual relationship relies merely on single case reports or case series. In this article, we try to review the existing evidence on neurological manifestations of both variants of inflammatory bowel disease.

  17. Demyelinizing neurological disease after treatment with tumor necrosis factor alpha-inhibiting agents in a rheumatological outpatient clinic

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Theibich, Ali; Dreyer, Lene; Magyari, Melinda

    2014-01-01

    Biological treatment with inhibitors of the pro-inflammatory cytokine TNF-alpha has dramatically improved the disease course of several chronic rheumatologic conditions. Adverse events (AEs) are primarily infections and hypersensitivity reactions. Demyelinizing neurological symptoms resembling...... treatment with anti TNF-alpha in a cohort of patients from a large rheumatologic outpatient clinic in Copenhagen. In a 4-year period from January 2008 to December 2011, approximately 550 patients annually were undergoing treatment with anti TNF-alpha inhibitors in our department. We collected data on all...

  18. Treatment of chronic immune-mediated neuropathies: chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy, multifocal motor neuropathy, and the Lewis-Sumner syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sederholm, Benson H

    2010-09-01

    Current treatment approaches for the management of chronic immune-mediated peripheral neuropathies are reviewed, including chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy (CIDP), multifocal motor neuropathy (MMN), and the Lewis-Sumner syndrome (LSS). A summary of existing evidence for commonly used treatment modalities, such as corticosteroids, intravenous immune globulin (IVIG), and plasma exchange is provided. Evidence for the use of additional immunosuppressant and immunomodulatory agents is also reviewed.

  19. Long-Lasting Cranial Nerve III Palsy as a Presenting Feature of Chronic Inflammatory Demyelinating Polyneuropathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rossella Spataro

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We describe a patient with chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP in which an adduction deficit and ptosis in the left eye presented several years before the polyneuropathy. A 52-year-old man presented with a 14-year history of unremitting diplopia, adduction deficit, and ptosis in the left eye. At the age of 45 a mild bilateral foot drop and impaired sensation in the four limbs appeared, with these symptoms showing a progressive course. The diagnostic workup included EMG/ENG which demonstrated reduced conduction velocity with bilateral and symmetrical sensory and motor involvement. Cerebrospinal fluid studies revealed a cytoalbuminologic dissociation. A prolonged treatment with corticosteroids allowed a significant improvement of the limb weakness. Diplopia and ptosis remained unchanged. This unusual form of CIDP presented as a long-lasting isolated cranial nerve palsy. A diagnostic workup for CIDP should therefore be performed in those patients in which an isolated and unremitting cranial nerve palsy cannot be explained by common causes.

  20. Diffusion tensor imaging of peripheral nerve in patients with chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy: a feasibility study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kakuda, Takako; Fukuda, Hiroshi; Tanitame, Keizo; Takasu, Miyuki; Date, Shuji; Awai, Kazuo [Hiroshima University, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, Hiroshima (Japan); Ochi, Kazuhide; Ohshita, Tomohiko; Matsumoto, Masayasu [Hiroshima University, Department of Clinical Neuroscience and Therapeutics, Graduate School of Biomedical Science, Hiroshima (Japan); Kohriyama, Tatsuo [Department of Neurology, Hiroshima City Hospital, Hiroshima (Japan); Ito, Katsuhide [Department of Radiology, Onomichi General Hospital, Onomichi, Hiroshima-ken (Japan)

    2011-12-15

    The purpose of this study was to assess the clinical feasibility of diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) for the evaluation of peripheral nerves in patients with chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy (CIDP). Using a 3-T magnetic resonance imaging scanner, we obtained DTI scans of the tibial nerves of 10 CIDP patients and 10 sex- and age-matched healthy volunteers. We prepared fractional anisotropy (FA) maps, measured the FA values of tibial nerves, and compared these values in the two study groups. In nine patients, we also performed tibial nerve conduction studies and analyzed the correlation between the FA values and parameters of the nerve conduction study. The tibial nerve FA values in CIDP patients (median 0.401, range 0.312-0.510) were significantly lower than those in healthy volunteers (median 0.530, range 0.469-0.647) (Mann-Whitney test, p < 0.01). They were significantly correlated with the amplitude of action potential (Spearman correlation coefficient, p = 0.04, r = 0.86) but not with nerve conduction velocity (p = 0.79, r = 0.11). Our preliminary data suggest that the noninvasive DTI assessment of peripheral nerves may provide useful information in patients with CIDP. (orig.)

  1. [A case of chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy concomitant with acquired von Willebrand syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueda, Maki; Kawamura, Nobutoshi; Tateishi, Takahisa; Shigeto, Hiroshi; Ohyagi, Yasumasa; Kira, Jun-ichi

    2011-05-01

    We report a case of chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy (CIDP) concomitant with acquired von Willebrand syndrome. A 33-year-old man developed motor and sensory polyneuropathy with electrophysiological conduction slowing. At this time, M-protein was absent He was diagnosed with CIDP and received intravenous immunoglobulin and subsequent oral corticosteroids, which resulted in almost complete remission for over 10 years. At the age of 44, he presented with chronic anemia. Laboratory tests and colonoscopy revealed that he had acquired von Willebrand syndrome with monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (IgG lambda type) and colon cancer. Bleeding symptoms were.resolved with intravenous immunoglobulin, but not with supplementation of factor VIII. Shortly after successful excision of the cancer, CIDP and acquired von Willebrand syndrome simultaneously recurred. Intravenous immunoglobulin produced rapid improvement of both neurological and hematological abnormalities. Concurring CIDP and acquired von Willebrand syndrome in the present case may indicate that the conditions have a partly common immunological background including monoclonal gammopathy and a potential common autoantibody-mediated mechanism. Alternatively, dysfunction of von Willebrand factor may increase blood-nerve barrier permeability, inducing the recurrence of CIDP.

  2. Acute-onset chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy in hantavirus and hepatitis B virus coinfection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Jong Youb; Lim, Young-Ho; Choi, Eun-Hi

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Introduction: Chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP) is an acquired autoimmune disorder with progressive weakness. Acute-onset CIDP resembles Guillain-Barre syndrome (GBS), a rapidly progressive disorder, and follows a chronic course. To our knowledge, no case of acute-onset CIDP in hantavirus and hepatitis B virus (HBV) coinfection has been reported previously. Clinical findings: We report a case of acute-onset CIDP that was initially diagnosed as GBS. Diagnoses: A 44-year-old male logger complained of acute quadriplegia and dyspnea. Mechanical ventilation was initiated. He was an HBV carrier with mild elevation of hepatic enzyme, and positive for hantavirus antibody. He was diagnosed with GBS and immunoglobulin therapy was administered. Interventions: After 8 months, quadriplegia and hypesthesia recurred. Immunoglobulin therapy at this time had no effect, but steroid therapy had some effect. Outcomes: A diagnosis of CIDP was made. After 2 months, severe extremity pain and dyspnea developed again, and steroid pulse therapy was initiated. Conclusion: Besides GBS, acute-onset CIDP can occur with hantavirus and HBV coinfection. Patients with this coinfection in whom GBS has been initially diagnosed should be followed up for a long time, because of the possibility of relapse or deterioration, and acute-onset CIDP should always be considered. PMID:27930572

  3. Severity and patterns of blood-nerve barrier breakdown in patients with chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy: correlations with clinical subtypes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fumitaka Shimizu

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy (CIDP is currently classified into clinical subtypes, including typical and atypical forms (multifocal acquired demyelinating sensory and motor neuropathy (MADSAM and distal acquired demyelinating symmetric neuropathy (DADS. The aim of this study was to elucidate the patterns and severity of breakdown of the blood-nerve barrier (BNB in each CIDP subtype. METHODS: We evaluated the effects of sera obtained from patients with typical CIDP, MADSAM and DADS and control subjects on the expression levels of tight junction proteins and transendothelial electrical resistance (TEER value in human peripheral nerve microvascular endothelial cells (PnMECs. RESULTS: The sera obtained from the patients with the three clinical phenotypes of CIDP decreased the amount of claudin-5 protein levels and TEER values in the PnMECs. In addition, the sera obtained from typical CIDP patients more prominently reduced claudin-5 protein levels and TEER values in the PnMECs than did that obtained from the MADSAM and DADS patients. Furthermore, the severity of BNB disruption after exposure to the sera was associated with higher Hughes grade, lower MRC score, more pronounced slowing of motor nerve conduction in the median nerve and higher frequency of abnormal temporal dispersion. CONCLUSIONS: Sera derived from typical CIDP patients destroy the BNB more severely than those from MADSAM or DADS patients. The extent of BNB disruption in the setting of CIDP is associated with clinical disability and demyelination in the nerve trunk. These observations may explain the phenotypical differences between CIDP subtypes.

  4. Peripheral Nerve Ultrasonography in Chronic Inflammatory Demyelinating Polyradiculoneuropathy and Multifocal Motor Neuropathy: Correlations with Clinical and Neurophysiological Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aristide Merola

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. This cross-sectional study analyzes the pattern of ultrasound peripheral nerve alterations in patients with chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy (CIDP and multifocal motor neuropathy (MMN at different stages of functional disability. Material and Methods. 22 CIDP and 10 MMN patients and a group of 70 healthy controls were evaluated with an ultrasound scan of the median, ulnar, peroneal, tibial, and sural nerves. Results were correlated with clinical disability scales and nerve conduction studies. Results. Patients with intermediate functional impairment showed relatively larger cross-sectional areas than subjects with either a milder (p<0.05 or more severe impairment (p<0.05, both in CIDP and in MMN. In addition, MMN was associated with greater side-to-side intranerve variability (p<0.05, while higher cross-sectional areas were observed in CIDP (p<0.05 and in nerve segments with predominantly demyelinating features (p<0.05. Higher CSA values were observed in nerves with demyelinating features versus axonal damage (p<0.05 for CIDP; p<0.05 for MMN. Discussion and Conclusions. Greater extent of quantitative and qualitative US alterations was observed in patients at intermediate versus higher functional disability and in nerves with demyelinating versus axonal damage. CIDP and MMN showed differential US aspects, with greater side-to-side intranerve variability in MMN and higher cross-sectional areas in CIDP.

  5. Demyelination versus remyelination in progressive multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bramow, Stephan; Frischer, Josa M; Lassmann, Hans; Koch-Henriksen, Nils; Lucchinetti, Claudia F; Sørensen, Per S; Laursen, Henning

    2010-10-01

    The causes of incomplete remyelination in progressive multiple sclerosis are unknown, as are the pathological correlates of the different clinical characteristics of patients with primary and secondary progressive disease. We analysed brains and spinal cords from 51 patients with progressive multiple sclerosis by planimetry. Thirteen patients with primary progressive disease were compared with 34 with secondary progressive disease. In patients with secondary progressive multiple sclerosis, we found larger brain plaques, more demyelination in total and higher brain loads of active demyelination compared with patients with primary progressive disease. In addition, the brain density of plaques with high-grade inflammation and active demyelination was highest in secondary progressive multiple sclerosis and remained ~18% higher than in primary progressive multiple sclerosis after adjustments for other plaque types and plaque number (Pprogressive multiple sclerosis. By contrast, there were no group differences in the brain load or frequency of low-grade inflammatory plaques with slowly expanding demyelination. Spinal cord lesion loads and remyelination capacity were also comparable in the two patient groups. Remyelinated areas were more vulnerable than the normal-appearing white matter to new demyelination, including active demyelination in secondary progressive multiple sclerosis. 'Recurrent' slowly expanding demyelination, affecting remyelinated areas, and the load of slowly expanding demyelination correlated with incomplete remyelination in both groups. In turn, incomplete remyelination in the spinal cord correlated with higher disease-related disability (determined retrospectively; r = -0.53; Pprogressive multiple sclerosis. These patients may, thereby, be spared symptoms until the spinal cord is affected. By contrast, recurrent active demyelination of repaired myelin could explain why similar symptoms often develop in consecutive relapses in relapsing

  6. Structural brain lesions in inflammatory bowel disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Can; Dolapcioglu; Hatice; Dolapcioglu

    2015-01-01

    Central nervous system(CNS) complications or manifes-tations of inflammatory bowel disease deserve particular attention because symptomatic conditions can require early diagnosis and treatment, whereas unexplained manifestations might be linked with pathogenic me-chanisms. This review focuses on both symptomatic and asymptomatic brain lesions detectable on imaging studies, as well as their frequency and potential mecha-nisms. A direct causal relationship between inflammatory bowel disease(IBD) and asymptomatic structural brain changes has not been demonstrated, but several possible explanations, including vasculitis, thromboembolism and malnutrition, have been proposed. IBD is associated with a tendency for thromboembolisms; therefore, cerebro-vascular thromboembolism represents the most frequent and grave CNS complication. Vasculitis, demyelinating conditions and CNS infections are among the other CNS manifestations of the disease. Biological agents also represent a risk factor, particularly for demyelination. Identification of the nature and potential mechanisms of brain lesions detectable on imaging studies would shed further light on the disease process and could improve patient care through early diagnosis and treatment.

  7. Pelvic Inflammatory Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and ambulatory settings. 17-20 While no single explanation exists for this declining trend, some have suggested ... Bacterial Vaginosis (BV) Chlamydia Genital Herpes Gonorrhea Hepatitis HIV/AIDS & STDs Human Papillomavirus (HPV) Pelvic Inflammatory Disease ( ...

  8. Inflammatory bowel disease - slideshow

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... presentations/100171.htm Inflammatory bowel disease - series—Normal anatomy To ... gastrointestinal tract starts at the mouth, which leads to the esophagus, stomach, small intestine, colon, and finally, the rectum and ...

  9. A recurrence of Guillain-Barr and eacute; syndrome or a case of acute-onset chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy in the course of chronic hepatitis B?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guner Celik Koyuncu

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy is a demyelinating polyneuropathy characterized by distal/proximal weakness, which shows gradual progression over a period of 8 weeks or longer. Guillan-Barre Syndrome is a condition characterized by acute monophasic paralysis typically following an infectious assault, and it usually peaks in severity over 3-4 weeks at most. Although rare, there are acute-onset chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy cases that show progression over a period shorter than 4 weeks, as is the case in Guillan-Barre Syndrome .This report discusses a case of chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy in a HBsAg-positive patient, which started as Guillan-Barre Syndrome but showed 3 recurrences within 6 months, each with rapidly progressing quadriplegia, respiratory arrest, and elevated liver enzymes and HBV DNA. [Cukurova Med J 2016; 41(4.000: 782-786

  10. Pain and spinal cord imaging measures in children with demyelinating disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadia Barakat

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Pain is a significant problem in diseases affecting the spinal cord, including demyelinating disease. To date, studies have examined the reliability of clinical measures for assessing and classifying the severity of spinal cord injury (SCI and also to evaluate SCI-related pain. Most of this research has focused on adult populations and patients with traumatic injuries. Little research exists regarding pediatric spinal cord demyelinating disease. One reason for this is the lack of reliable and useful approaches to measuring spinal cord changes since currently used diagnostic imaging has limited specificity for quantitative measures of demyelination. No single imaging technique demonstrates sufficiently high sensitivity or specificity to myelin, and strong correlation with clinical measures. However, recent advances in diffusion tensor imaging (DTI and magnetization transfer imaging (MTI measures are considered promising in providing increasingly useful and specific information on spinal cord damage. Findings from these quantitative imaging modalities correlate with the extent of demyelination and remyelination. These techniques may be of potential use for defining the evolution of the disease state, how it may affect specific spinal cord pathways, and contribute to the management of pediatric demyelination syndromes. Since pain is a major presenting symptom in patients with transverse myelitis, the disease is an ideal model to evaluate imaging methods to define these regional changes within the spinal cord. In this review we summarize (1 pediatric demyelinating conditions affecting the spinal cord; (2 their distinguishing features; and (3 current diagnostic and classification methods with particular focus on pain pathways. We also focus on concepts that are essential in developing strategies for the detection, monitoring, treatment and repair of pediatric myelitis.

  11. A diagnosis challenge-L4 nerve root compression as the initial presentation of chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cojocaru, Inimioara Mihaela; Alexianu, Marilena; Bastian, Alexandra; Sapira, Violeta; Herţea, Cristina; Cojocaru, M

    2012-01-01

    The authors present the case of a 65-year-old woman who was admitted for paraparesis and paresthesias in the inferior limbs. The neurological examination revealed the difficulty in extension of the right foot and of the right toe, accompanied by paresthesias located in the anterolateral area of the right leg, dorsum and plantar area of the foot, the reduction of the right knee jerk, and of the ankle tendon jerk both sides. The vertebro-spinal MRI showed lumbar canal stenosis with L4 intraforaminal compression on the right, and L2-L3 on the left. CSF examination revealed mild increase in protein concentration. The morphological picture of the sural nerve biopsy was compatible with a chronic inflammatory neuropathy and severe muscular lesions of neurogenic origin were observed on right gastrocnemius muscle biopsy. The diagnosis of chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP) was established. Solu-medrol (0.5 g/d)-5 days, then medrol (prednisolone) was done, followed by improving of the symptomatology. For the relapse of the disease intravenous immunoglobulins (IVIG)-0.4 g/kg/d-5 days was the elective treatment. Six months later she presented a new relapse. IVIG were administered with the remission of the sensitive symptoms. A chronic treatment with medrol was recommended. The diagnosis of L4 disc herniation was obvious in the studied case, but the electroneurographic examination brought extra data for the associated diagnosis of CIDP whose onset was asymmetrical and initially paucisymptomatic. Neither the electroneurographic examination nor the CSF examination were total relevant for CIDP, imposing the sural nerve biopsy. The diagnosis of CIDP involves a team-work composed of neurologist, electroneurophysiologist and neuropathologist.

  12. Brachial and lumbar plexuses in chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy: MRI assessment including apparent diffusion coefficient

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adachi, Yuko; Sato, Noriko; Yamashita, Fumio; Kida, Jiro; Takahashi, Tomoyuki [National Center Hospital of Neurology and Psychiatry, Department of Radiology, Kodaira, Tokyo (Japan); Okamoto, Tomoko [National Center Hospital of Neurology and Psychiatry, Department of Neurology, Kodaira, Tokyo (Japan); Sasaki, Masayuki; Komaki, Hirofumi [National Center Hospital of Neurology and Psychiatry, Department of Child Neurology, Kodaira, Tokyo (Japan); Matsuda, Hiroshi [Saitama Medial University Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Iruma-gun, Saitama (Japan)

    2011-01-15

    Our purpose was to clarify the magnetic resonance (MR) imaging characteristics of the brachial and lumbar plexuses in patients with chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy (CIDP) using various kinds of sequences, including diffusion-weighted images (DWI). We evaluated the MR imaging findings for lumbar and/or brachial nerve plexuses in 13 CIDP patients and 11 normal volunteers. The nerve swelling was evaluated in comparison with normal controls by coronal short tau inversion recovery (STIR), and signal abnormalities were evaluated by coronal STIR, T1-weighted images, and DWIs. The degrees of contrast enhancement and apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) values of the plexus were also assessed. In the patient group, diffuse enlargement and abnormally high signals were detected in 16 out of 24 plexuses (66.7%) on STIR, a slightly high signal was detected in 12 of 24 plexuses (50%) on T1-weighted images, and a high-intensity signal was detected in 10 of 18 plexuses (55.6%) on DWIs with high ADC values. Contrast enhancement of the plexuses was revealed in 6 of 19 plexuses (31.6%) and was mild in all cases. There were statistically significant differences between the ADC values of patients with either swelling or abnormal signals and those of both normal volunteers and patients without neither swelling nor abnormal signals. There were no relationships between MR imaging and any clinical findings. STIR is sufficient to assist clinicians in diagnosing CIDP. T1-weighted images and DWIs seemed useful for speculating about the pathological changes in swollen plexuses in CIDP patients. (orig.)

  13. Steroids for chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy: evidence base and clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Press, R; Hiew, F L; Rajabally, Y A

    2016-04-01

    Evidence-based therapies for chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy (CIDP) consist of corticosteroids, intravenous immunglobulins (IVIg), and plasma exchange. Steroids represent the oldest treatment used historically. In countries where readily available and affordable, IVIg tends to be favored as first-line treatment. The reason for this preference, despite substantially higher costs, is the perception that IVIg is more efficacious and safer than corticosteroids. However, the unselected use of IVIg as a first-line treatment option in all cases of CIDP raises issues of cost-effectiveness in the long-term. Furthermore, serious although rare, particularly thromboembolic side effects may result from their use. Recent data from randomized trials suggest pulsed corticosteroids to have a higher potential in achieving therapy-free remission or longer remission-free periods compared with IVIg, as well as relatively low rates of serious side effects when given as pulsed intravenous infusions during short periods of time. These specific advantages suggest that pulsed steroids could in many cases be used, as the first, rather than second choice of treatment when initiating immunomodulation in CIDP, primarily in hopes of achieving a remission after the short-term use. This article reviews the evidence base for the use of corticosteroids in its various forms in CIDP and factors that may influence clinicians' choice between IVIg and pulsed steroid treatment. The issue of efficacy, relapse rate and time, and side effect profile are analyzed, and some aspects from the authors' experience are discussed in relation to the possibility of using the steroid option as first-line therapy in a large proportion of patients with CIDP.

  14. Evolution of inflammatory diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okin, Daniel; Medzhitov, Ruslan

    2012-09-11

    The association of inflammation with modern human diseases (e.g. obesity, cardiovascular disease, type 2 diabetes mellitus, cancer) remains an unsolved mystery of current biology and medicine. Inflammation is a protective response to noxious stimuli that unavoidably occurs at a cost to normal tissue function. This fundamental trade-off between the cost and benefit of the inflammatory response has been optimized over evolutionary time for specific environmental conditions. Rapid change of the human environment due to niche construction outpaces genetic adaptation through natural selection, leading increasingly to a mismatch between the modern environment and selected traits. Consequently, multiple trade-offs that affect human physiology are not optimized to the modern environment, leading to increased disease susceptibility. Here we examine the inflammatory response from an evolutionary perspective. We discuss unique aspects of the inflammatory response and its evolutionary history that can help explain the association between inflammation and modern human diseases.

  15. [Successful treatment of HIV-associated chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy by early initiation of highly active anti-retroviral therapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kume, Kodai; Ikeda, Kazuyo; Kamada, Masaki; Touge, Tetsuo; Deguchi, Kazushi; Masaki, Tsutomu

    2013-01-01

    A 47-year-old man with HIV infection presented with lower leg dominant dysesthesia, muscle weakness and sensory ataxia of 3 month's duration. Nerve conduction studies (NCS) showed demyelination change in the median and tibial nerves and sensory nerve action potential (SNAP) in the sural nerve was not evoked. Somatosensory evoked potential (SEP) showed the delayed N9 latency. Diagnose of HIV-associated chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP) was made. Although the CD4 lymphocyte counts were relatively preserved (466/μl), highly active anti-retroviral therapy (HAART) was started according to a new guideline for the use of antiretroviral agents in HIV-1-infected adults and adolescents recommending early initiation of treatment. After six months, HIV1-RNA was not detected and the CD4 lymphocyte counts showed a recovering trend (585/μl). His symptoms had disappeared, except for dysesthesia in the tip of a toe. Repeated NCS demonstrated full recovery from the demyelination and appearance of SNAP in the sural nerve. The improvement of his symptoms and NCS findings has been maintained for two years. Although effectiveness of immunotherapies such as oral prednisone, high-dose immunoglobulins and plasmapheresis have been reported in HIV-associated CIDP, early initiation of HAART may be also important for favorable prognosis in HIV-associated CIDP.

  16. Comparison of clinical manifestations and electrophysiological features in patients with chronic inflamma-tory demyelinating polyneuropathy and Type-I Charcot Marie Tooth Disease%慢性炎性脱髓鞘性多发性神经病与腓骨肌萎缩症-I型的临床及神经电生理比较

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘璟洁; 韩萍; 高震; 巩付华; 马晓灵; 向莉

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To compare clinical manifestations and electrophysiological features in patients with chron⁃ic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP) and Type-I Charcot Marie Tooth Disease (CMT-I) for guiding dif⁃ferential diagnosis. Methods Data including clinical manifestations and electrophysiological indexes was collected from thirty-one CIDP cases and 28 CMT-I cases. Correlation analysis was used to assess the association of the severity of electrophysiology with the severity of clinical symptoms. Results There were statistically significant differences in onset site, sensory dysfunction, foot deformity and cerebrospinal fluid protein between these two groups (P0.05). Conclusions Differential diagnoses of CIDP and CMT-I can be made based on clinical manifestations and electro⁃physiological features.%目的:比较慢性炎性脱髓鞘性多发性神经病(chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy, CI⁃DP)与腓骨肌萎缩症-I型(type-I Charcot Marie Tooth disease,CMT-I)的临床及神经电生理特点,以指导两者的鉴别诊断。方法纳入CIDP患者31例、CMT-I患者28例,收集其一般临床资料并对两组患者进行神经电生理检测,比较两组患者的临床特点及电生理指标,并对电生理严重程度与临床症状严重程度进行相关性分析。结果CIDP与CMT-I两组患者起病部位、主观感觉障碍、足部畸形、脑脊液蛋白比较有统计学差异(P<0.05)。运动末梢潜伏期(distal motor latency, DML)、运动传导速度(motor conduction velocity, MCV)、感觉传导速度(sensory conduction velocity, SCV)、传导阻滞/波形离散、下肢神经继发性轴索变性具有统计学差异(P<0.05)。失神经电位、MUAP形态异常、募集减少具有统计学差异(P<0.05)。CIDP临床症状严重程度与电生理严重程度有相关性(r=0.84, P<0.05);而CMT-I临床症状严重程度与电生理严重程度分离,不具有相关性(r=0.27, P

  17. Sildenafil (Viagra Protective Effects on Neuroinflammation: The Role of iNOS/NO System in an Inflammatory Demyelination Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catarina Raposo

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We recently demonstrated that sildenafil reduces the expression of cytokines, COX-2, and GFAP in a demyelinating model induced in wild-type (WT mice. Herein, the understandings of the neuroprotective effect of sildenafil and the mediation of iNOS/NO system on inflammatory demyelination induced by cuprizone were investigated. The cerebella of iNOS−/− mice were examined after four weeks of treatment with cuprizone alone or combined with sildenafil. Cuprizone increased GFAP, Iba-1, TNF-α, COX-2, IL-1β, and IFN-γ expression, decreased expression of glutathione S-transferase pi (GSTpi, and damaged myelin in iNOS−/− mice. Sildenafil reduced Iba-1, IFN-γ, and IL-1β levels but had no effect on the expression of GFAP, TNF-α, and COX-2 compared to the cuprizone group. Sildenafil elevated GSTpi levels and improved the myelin structure/ultrastructure. iNOS−/− mice suffered from severe inflammation following treatment with cuprizone, while WT mice had milder inflammation, as found in the previous study. It is possible that inflammatory regulation through iNOS-feedback is absent in iNOS−/− mice, making them more susceptible to inflammation. Sildenafil has at least a partial anti-inflammatory effect through iNOS inhibition, as its effect on iNOS−/− mice was limited. Further studies are required to explain the underlying mechanism of the sildenafil effects.

  18. Sildenafil (Viagra) Protective Effects on Neuroinflammation: The Role of iNOS/NO System in an Inflammatory Demyelination Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raposo, Catarina; Nunes, Ana Karolina de Santana; Luna, Rayana Leal de Almeida; Araújo, Shyrlene Meiry da Rocha; da Cruz-Höfling, Maria Alice; Peixoto, Christina Alves

    2013-01-01

    We recently demonstrated that sildenafil reduces the expression of cytokines, COX-2, and GFAP in a demyelinating model induced in wild-type (WT) mice. Herein, the understandings of the neuroprotective effect of sildenafil and the mediation of iNOS/NO system on inflammatory demyelination induced by cuprizone were investigated. The cerebella of iNOS−/− mice were examined after four weeks of treatment with cuprizone alone or combined with sildenafil. Cuprizone increased GFAP, Iba-1, TNF-α, COX-2, IL-1β, and IFN-γ expression, decreased expression of glutathione S-transferase pi (GSTpi), and damaged myelin in iNOS−/− mice. Sildenafil reduced Iba-1, IFN-γ, and IL-1β levels but had no effect on the expression of GFAP, TNF-α, and COX-2 compared to the cuprizone group. Sildenafil elevated GSTpi levels and improved the myelin structure/ultrastructure. iNOS−/− mice suffered from severe inflammation following treatment with cuprizone, while WT mice had milder inflammation, as found in the previous study. It is possible that inflammatory regulation through iNOS-feedback is absent in iNOS−/− mice, making them more susceptible to inflammation. Sildenafil has at least a partial anti-inflammatory effect through iNOS inhibition, as its effect on iNOS−/− mice was limited. Further studies are required to explain the underlying mechanism of the sildenafil effects. PMID:23970812

  19. Subcutaneous immunoglobulin for maintenance treatment in chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (The PATH Study): study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    OpenAIRE

    van Schaik, Ivo N; van Geloven, Nan; Bril, Vera; Hartung, Hans-Peter; Lewis, Richard A.; Sobue, Gen; Lawo, John-Philip; Mielke, Orell; Cornblath, David R.; Merkies, Ingemar S. J.; ,

    2016-01-01

    Background Subcutaneous administration of Ig (SCIg) has gained popularity as an alternative route of administration but has never been rigorously examined in chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP). Methods/design The primary objective of the PATH study (Polyneuropathy and Treatment with Hizentra) is to determine the efficacy of two different doses of SCIg IgPro20 (0.2 g/kg bw or 0.4 g/kg bw) in a 24-week maintenance treatment of CIDP in comparison to placebo. The primary eff...

  20. Multifocal visual evoked potential analysis of inflammatory or demyelinating optic neuritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraser, Clare L; Klistorner, Alexander; Graham, Stuart L; Garrick, Raymond; Billson, Francis A; Grigg, John R

    2006-02-01

    To determine the sensitivity of multifocal visual evoked potentials (mVEP) in optic neuritis of an inflammatory or demyelinating nature. Cross-sectional study. Sixty-four patients participated who had a confirmed diagnosis of optic neuritis (ON) (past and acute). Based on the McDonald multiple sclerosis (MS) criteria, 25 patients (27 eyes with ON) were deemed to have isolated optic neuritis and thus not have MS (i.e., the not-MS group), and 19 patients (24 eyes with ON) had a diagnosis of MS (i.e., the MS group). The remaining 20 patients (25 eyes with ON) were at a high risk of MS, but diagnostic evaluation was equivocal, and thus were classified as the possible MS group. A control group of 20 normal patients was enrolled. The mVEP test was performed using the Accumap. All ON patients had recent magnetic resonance imaging scans of the brain and spinal cord. Multifocal visual evoked potentials amplitude and latency values were analyzed within each group and were compared with the normal controls. No abnormality was recorded on mVEP in the control group. Of all the ON eyes, 74 (97.3%) were abnormal on mVEP testing. Amplitude values were abnormal in 92.6% of not-MS eyes, 92.0% of possible MS eyes, and 100% of those with MS, and latency was abnormal in 33.3%, 76.0%, and 100%, respectively. There was a significant difference in the mVEP latency z-scores among all ON groups (P<0.01; Kruskal-Wallis test). Although distribution graphs of latency z-scores in the not-MS and MS groups had single peaks and were clearly separate from each other, the latency z-score distribution within the possible MS group in postacute patients was bimodal, with each peak corresponding to the distribution of the not-MS and MS group, respectively. The mVEP latency z-scores had a sensitivity and specificity of 100% in detecting patients with ON due to MS when compared with normal patients. The mVEP test is a sensitive and specific tool for detecting optic neuritis. There was a significant

  1. [Pelvic inflammatory disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoof, Kathrin

    2007-07-01

    Pelvic inflammatory disease and upper genital tract infection describe inflammatory changes in the upper female genital tract of any combination: endometritis, salpingitis, tubo-ovarian abscess and peritonitis in the small pelvis. In most cases the infection is ascending, Chlamydia trachomatis and Neisseria gonorrhoeae are common with increasing incidence. The spectrum ranges from subclinical, asymptomatic infection to severe, life-threatening illness. Antibiotic treatment should be initiated promptly and must cover a broad spectrum of germs. Surgical treatment is necessary in cases of failure of antibiotic treatment and in cases with persisting symptoms after antibiotic treatment. Pelvic inflammatory diseases are one of the main causes of tubal sterility, ectopic pregnancies and chronic abdominal pain.

  2. Inflammatory bowel disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kottler, R.E.; Freson, M. (Groote Schuur Hospital, Cape Town (South Africa). Dept. of Radiology)

    1985-06-01

    Radiology is of considerable value in all forms of inflammatory bowel disease to establish its presence and extent, and to differentiate lesions. The most common inflammatory bowel diseases are Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis. Crohn's disease may occur anywhere in the disgestive tract, but is most common in the terminal ileum. Since there is no practical endoscopic method of examining the small bowel, barium studies of the latter are most important. Modern radiological techniques, especially the double contrast barium enema, show excellent correlation between the macroscopic changes and the radiological features. Radiology alone does not provide the answers and the radiological features must be interpreted in conjunction with clinical investigation.

  3. Pelvic Inflammatory Disease (PID)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the ectopic pregnancy is not diagnosed early. Chronic pelvic pain —PID may lead to long-lasting pelvic pain. Who is at risk of PID? PID can ... lead to pelvic inflammatory disease and infertility. Chronic Pelvic Pain: Persistent pain in the pelvic region that has ...

  4. Inflammatory bowel disease epidemiology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burisch, Johan; Munkholm, Pia

    2013-01-01

    The occurrence of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is increasing worldwide, yet the reasons remain unknown. New therapeutic approaches have been introduced in medical IBD therapy, but their impact on the natural history of IBD remains uncertain. This review will summarize the recent findings in t...... in the epidemiology of IBD....

  5. Pelvic Inflammatory Disease (PID) Statistics

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Search Form Controls Cancel Submit Search the CDC Pelvic Inflammatory Disease (PID) Note: Javascript is disabled or is not ... Twitter STD on Facebook Sexually Transmitted Diseases (STDs) Pelvic Inflammatory Disease (PID) Statistics Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir ...

  6. Inflammatory Bowel Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wehkamp, Jan; Götz, Martin; Herrlinger, Klaus; Steurer, Wolfgang; Stange, Eduard F

    2016-02-05

    Inflammatory bowel diseases are common in Europe, with prevalences as high as 1 in 198 persons (ulcerative colitis) and 1 in 310 persons (Crohn's disease). This review is based on pertinent articles retrieved by a search in PubMed and in German and European guidelines and Cochrane reviews of controlled trials. Typically, the main clinical features of inflammatory bowel diseases are diarrhea, abdominal pain, and, in the case of ulcerative colitis, peranal bleeding. These diseases are due to a complex immunological disturbance with both genetic and environmental causes. A defective mucosal barrier against commensal bowel flora plays a major role in their pathogenesis. The diagnosis is based on laboratory testing, ultrasonography, imaging studies, and, above all, gastrointestinal endoscopy. Most patients with Crohn's disease respond to budesonide or systemic steroids; aminosalicylates are less effective. Refractory exacerbations may be treated with antibodies against tumor necrosis factor (TNF) or, more recently, antibodies against integrin, a protein of the cell membrane. In ulcerative colitis, aminosalicylates are given first; if necessary, steroids or antibodies against TNF-α or integrin are added. Maintenance therapy to prevent further relapses often involves immunosuppression with thiopurines and/or antibodies. Once all conservative treatment options have been exhausted, surgery may be necessary. The treatment of chronic inflammatory bowel diseases requires individually designed therapeutic strategies and the close interdisciplinary collaboration of internists and surgeons.

  7. Loss of Myelin Basic Protein Function Triggers Myelin Breakdown in Models of Demyelinating Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie-Theres Weil

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Breakdown of myelin sheaths is a pathological hallmark of several autoimmune diseases of the nervous system. We employed autoantibody-mediated animal models of demyelinating diseases, including a rat model of neuromyelitis optica (NMO, to target myelin and found that myelin lamellae are broken down into vesicular structures at the innermost region of the myelin sheath. We demonstrated that myelin basic proteins (MBP, which form a polymer in between the myelin membrane layers, are targeted in these models. Elevation of intracellular Ca2+ levels resulted in MBP network disassembly and myelin vesiculation. We propose that the aberrant phase transition of MBP molecules from their cohesive to soluble and non-adhesive state is a mechanism triggering myelin breakdown in NMO and possibly in other demyelinating diseases.

  8. Loss of Myelin Basic Protein Function Triggers Myelin Breakdown in Models of Demyelinating Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weil, Marie-Theres; Möbius, Wiebke; Winkler, Anne; Ruhwedel, Torben; Wrzos, Claudia; Romanelli, Elisa; Bennett, Jeffrey L; Enz, Lukas; Goebels, Norbert; Nave, Klaus-Armin; Kerschensteiner, Martin; Schaeren-Wiemers, Nicole; Stadelmann, Christine; Simons, Mikael

    2016-07-12

    Breakdown of myelin sheaths is a pathological hallmark of several autoimmune diseases of the nervous system. We employed autoantibody-mediated animal models of demyelinating diseases, including a rat model of neuromyelitis optica (NMO), to target myelin and found that myelin lamellae are broken down into vesicular structures at the innermost region of the myelin sheath. We demonstrated that myelin basic proteins (MBP), which form a polymer in between the myelin membrane layers, are targeted in these models. Elevation of intracellular Ca(2+) levels resulted in MBP network disassembly and myelin vesiculation. We propose that the aberrant phase transition of MBP molecules from their cohesive to soluble and non-adhesive state is a mechanism triggering myelin breakdown in NMO and possibly in other demyelinating diseases.

  9. Kirsner's inflammatory bowel disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    R Balfour Sarto; William J Sandborn

    2005-01-01

    @@ Very few medical textbooks have so thoroughly dominated,and even defined a field, as has Inflammatory Bowel Diseases by Joe Kirsner. Originally co-edited with Roy Shorter of Mayo Clinic, this book, beginning with its first edition in 1975, encapsulated the science and art of caring for patients with Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis. Thus it is with considerable respect, and indeed some awe and trepidation,that we eagerly embraced the opportunity to assume the editorship of this preeminent textbook and the obligation to transition it to reflect the changing, increasingly complex pathophysiology and treatment of these diseases.

  10. INFLAMMATORY BOWEL DISEASE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I Gusti Ayu Mahaprani Danastri

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Crohn disease (CD and ulcerative colitis (UC is an chronic inflammation in the gastrointestinal tract. Colecctively, they are called inflammatory bowel disease (IBD, and about 1,5 millions people in America suffering from UC and CD. The cause of UC and CD is unknown, but the expert believe that UC and CD are caused by a disturbed immune response in someone who has a genetic predisposition. UC and CD have a significant recurrency  and remission rate. Surgery in UC is a curative treatment for colon’s disease and a potentially colon’s malignancy, but it is not a curative treatment for CD.

  11. Studies of HLA associations in male and female patients with Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS) and chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy (CIDP).

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCombe, Pamela A; Csurhes, Peter A; Greer, Judith M

    2006-11-01

    HLA associations are found to differ with the gender of the patient in some autoimmune diseases. Here we have investigated whether there are gender-related HLA associations in Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS) and chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy (CIDP), both of which occur more frequently in male patients than in females. In GBS, no particular HLA associations were noted, except for a slight negative association in both males and females for carriage of HLA-DR5. In CIDP, the gene frequency and the frequency of individuals positive for HLA-DR2 were greater in female patients than female controls, although this was statistically significant only for the gene frequency. Furthermore more female CIDP patients were homozygous for DR2, than male CIDP patients, or male or female controls and patients with GBS. This suggests that sex-related factors may interact with the risk associated with carriage of HLA-DR2 for development of CIDP.

  12. Epstein-Barr virus antibodies in serum and cerebrospinal fluid from multiple sclerosis, chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nociti, V; Frisullo, G; Marti, A; Luigetti, M; Iorio, R; Patanella, A K; Bianco, A; Tonali, P A; Grillo, R L; Sabatelli, M; Batocchi, A P

    2010-08-25

    Elevated anti-Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) antibody levels are present in serum of Multiple sclerosis (MS) patients but literature lacks of studies comparing anti-EBV antibody levels between MS and other neurological diseases. We evaluate anti-VCA IgG and IgM, anti-EBNA1 IgG, anti-Cytomegalovirus IgG and IgM titres in serum and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of 267 MS, 50 Chronic Inflammatory Demyelinating Polyradiculoneuropathy (CIDP) and 88 Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS) patients. We found increased titres of anti-EBV-IgG in serum and CSF of MS subjects as compared to CIDP and ALS patients thus providing additional evidence for a possible involvement of EBV in MS.

  13. Autoimmune Demyelinating Polyneuropathy as a Manifestation of Chronic Graft-versus-Host Disease after Adult Cord Blood Transplantation in a Patient with Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fredrick Hogan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Immune mediated demyelinating disease after allogeneic stem cell transplantation is a rare entity with unclear etiology. Acute inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (AIDP has been reported after related and adult unrelated allogeneic stem cell transplantation but no such case has been reported after unrelated cord blood transplantation. We hereby present the first case of AIDP after double umbilical cord blood transplantation (DUCBT. A 55-year-old man with chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL received a cord blood transplant for relapsed refractory disease with high risk cytogenetics. On day 221, patient presented with skin rash, tingling in both lower extremites, and ascending paralysis that progressed rapidly over the course of 2 days. The workup resulted in a diagnosis of AIDP and administration of intravenous immunoglobulins plus steroids was initiated. Motor and sensory powers were fully recovered and his chronic GVHD was managed for several months with single agent sirolimus.

  14. Absence of Multiple Sclerosis and Demyelinating Diseases among Lacandonians, a Pure Amerindian Ethnic Group in Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flores, Jose; González, Silvia; Morales, Ximena; Yescas, Petra; Ochoa, Adriana; Corona, Teresa

    2012-01-01

    Multiple Sclerosis (MS) is a highly polymorphic disease characterized by different neurologic signs and symptoms. In MS, racial and genetic factors may play an important role in the geographic distribution of this disease. Studies have reported the presence of several protective alleles against the development of autoimmune disorders. In the case of MS, however, they help define MS as a complex disease, and confirm the importance of environmental agents as an independent variable not associated with ethnicity. We carried out an on-site epidemiological study to confirm the absence of MS or NMO among Lacandonians, a pure Amerindian ethnic group in Mexico. We administered a structured interview to 5,372 Lacandonians to assess by family background any clinical data consistent with the presence of a prior demyelinating event. Every participating subject underwent a comprehensive neurological examination by a group of three members of the research team with experience in the diagnosis and treatment of demyelinating disorders to detect clinical signs compatible with a demyelinating disease. We did not find any clinical signs compatible with multiple sclerosis among study participants.

  15. Absence of Multiple Sclerosis and Demyelinating Diseases among Lacandonians, a Pure Amerindian Ethnic Group in Mexico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jose Flores

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Multiple Sclerosis (MS is a highly polymorphic disease characterized by different neurologic signs and symptoms. In MS, racial and genetic factors may play an important role in the geographic distribution of this disease. Studies have reported the presence of several protective alleles against the development of autoimmune disorders. In the case of MS, however, they help define MS as a complex disease, and confirm the importance of environmental agents as an independent variable not associated with ethnicity. We carried out an on-site epidemiological study to confirm the absence of MS or NMO among Lacandonians, a pure Amerindian ethnic group in Mexico. We administered a structured interview to 5,372 Lacandonians to assess by family background any clinical data consistent with the presence of a prior demyelinating event. Every participating subject underwent a comprehensive neurological examination by a group of three members of the research team with experience in the diagnosis and treatment of demyelinating disorders to detect clinical signs compatible with a demyelinating disease. We did not find any clinical signs compatible with multiple sclerosis among study participants.

  16. Syringomyelia in demyelinating disease of the central nervous system: Report of two cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Savić Dejan

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Syringomyelia is a cavitary extension inside the spinal cord which can be either symptomatic or congenitally-idiopathic. Syringomyelia during the course of the disease in patients presenting with clinically definite multiple sclerosis was described earlier. Syringomyelia in patients presenting with a clinically isolated syndrome suggestive of multiple sclerosis is unusual. Case Outline. We present two patients presenting with demy-elinating disease of the central nervous system with syringomyelia in the cervical and thoracic spinal cord. We did not find classical clinical signs of syringomyelia in our patients, but we disclosed syringomyelia incidentally during magnetic resonance exploration. Magnetic resonance exploration using the gadolinium contrast revealed the signs of active demyelinating lesions in the spinal cord in one patient but not in the other. Conclusion. Syringomyelia in demyelinating disease of the central nervous system opens the question whether it is a coincidental finding or a part of clinical features of the disease. Differentiation of the significance of syringomyelia finding in these patients plays a role in the choice of treatment concept in such patients.

  17. Pelvic inflammatory disease (PID) -- aftercare

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000710.htm Pelvic inflammatory disease (PID) - aftercare To use the sharing features on ... have just seen your health care provider for pelvic inflammatory disease (PID). PID refers to an infection of the ...

  18. Combination of Cerebral Demyelination and Graves Disease in a Case with Miller Fisher Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Sibel Güler; Levent Sinan Bir

    2010-01-01

    A 44-year-old male patient with a diagnosis of Miller Fisher syndrome, Graves disease and central nervous system demyelination is presented. Clinical and laboratory findings supported the diagnosis of Miller Fisher syndrome. On T2-weighted sections of cranial magnetic resonance imaging, many ovoid-shaped, hyperintense lesions in bilateral deep white matter were detected. Magnetic resonance imaging spectroscopy demonstrated low N-acetylaspartate to creatine (NAA/Cr) ratio consistent with demye...

  19. Inflammatory bowel disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, Anne; Mabee, John; Trivedi, Kashyap

    2011-09-01

    Crohn disease and ulcerative colitis are the most common forms of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) likely to be encountered in primary care. Patient-centered care is essential for positive outcomes, and should include long-term continuity with an empathetic primary care provider who can provide skillful coordination of the requisite multidisciplinary approach. Early suspicion of the diagnosis and referral to expert gastroenterologists for confirmation and medical management is essential. Coordinating interdisciplinary consultations, including colorectal surgeons, radiologists, stoma therapists, psychologists, and rheumatologists, in combination with comprehensive patient education, is key to decreasing overall morbidity, mortality, and health care costs associated with IBD.

  20. Acute inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy associated with pegylated interferon 2a therapy for chronic hepatitis C virus infection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Vijay Khiani; Thomas Kelly; Adeel Shibli; Donald Jensen; Smruti R Mohanty

    2008-01-01

    The combination of pogylated interferon (Peg-IFN) and ribavirin is the standard of care for chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection treatment. In general, common side effects related to this combination therapy are mild and are very well tolerated. However, peripheral neuropathy including demyelinating polyneuropathy related to Peg-IFN is extremely rare. We present the first case of an acute inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (AIDP)associated with Peg-IFN-α 2a (Pegasys) after 16 wk of a combination therapy with Pegasys and ribavirin in a 65-year-old woman with chronic HCV infection.She developed tingling, numbness, and weakness of her upper and lower extremities and was hospitalized for acute neurological deficits. Her clinical course,neurological findings, an electromyogram (EHG), nerve conductions studies (NCS), muscle biopsy, and a sural nerve biopsy were all consistent with AIDP likely related to Pegasys use. The patient recovered completely with the use of intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) including physical therapy and neurological rehabilitation. It is very important that gastroenterologists and/or hepatologists recognize this rare neurological complication related to Peg-IFN treatment very early, since it requires a prompt discontinuation of therapy including an immediate referral to a neurologist for the confirmation of diagnosis, management, and the prevention of long-term neurological deficits.

  1. The characteristics of chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy in patients with and without diabetes--an observational study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samantha K Dunnigan

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: We aimed to determine whether the clinical characteristics and electrodiagnostic classification of nerve injury, and response to treatment differed in patients diagnosed with chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP with and without diabetes. METHODS: CIDP patients with diabetes (CIDP+DM (n = 67 and without diabetes (CIDP-DM (n = 67 underwent clinical examination and nerve conduction studies (NCS. CIDP-DM patients were selected using age and gender matching with the existing CIDP+DM cohort. Patients treated with immunotherapies were classified as responders (R (n = 46 or non-responders (NR (n = 54 based on clinical response to treatment. The groups were compared using analysis of variance, contingency tables and Kruskal-Wallis analyses. RESULTS: CIDP+DM subjects had more severe neuropathy based on higher lower limb vibration potential thresholds (VPT(p = 0.004, higher Toronto Clinical Neuropathy Score (TCNS (p = 0.0009, more proximal weakness (p = 0.03, more gait abnormality (p = 0.03 and more abnormal NCS. CIDP+DM subjects had more abnormal sural NCS with lower sural sensory nerve action potential amplitudes (2.4±3.0 µV, 6.6±6.0 µV, p<0.0001 and slower sural nerve conduction velocities (38.6±5.4 m/s, 41.0±5.3 m/s, p = 0.04. CIDP-DM subjects were more likely to receive immune therapies (93% vs 57%, p = <0.0001, despite no significant differences in treatment responder rates (p = 0.71. Patients who responded to therapy had shorter duration of CIDP than non-responders (8.0±6.0 y vs 11.9±7.6 y, p = 0.004. DISCUSSION: The clinical phenotype and electrophysiological profile of CIDP patients differs according to the presence or absence of diabetes. Despite CIDP+DM patients having more severe clinical and electrophysiological neuropathy, they are less likely to receive disease-modifying/specific therapy, yet have similar response rates to treatment as those without

  2. Inflammatory bowel disease unclassified

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ning ZHOU; Wei-xing CHEN; Shao-hua CHEN; Cheng-fu XU; You-ming LI

    2011-01-01

    Objective: Inflammatory bowel diseases (IBDs) are idiopathic, chronic, and inflammatory intestinal disorders. The two main types, ulcerative colitis (UC) and Crohn's disease (CD), sometimes mimic each other and are not readily distinguishable. The purpose of this study was to present a series of hospitalized cases, which could not initially be classified as a subtype of IBD, and to try to note roles of the terms indeterminate colitis (IC) and inflammatory bowel disease unclassified (IBDU) when such a dilemma arises. Methods: Medical records of 477 patients hospitalized due to IBD, during the period of January 2002 to April 2009, were retrospectively studied in the present paper. All available previous biopsies from endoscopies of these patients were reanalyzed. Results: Twenty-seven of 477 IBD patients (5.7%) had been initially diagnosed as having IBDU. Of them, 23 received colonoscopy and histological examinations in our hospital. A total of 90% (9/10) and 66.7% (4/6) of patients, respectively, had a positive finding via wireless capsule endoscopy (CE) and double-balloon enteroscopy (DBE). The barium-swallow or small bowel follow-through (SBFT) was performed on 11 patients. Positive changes were observed under computer tomographic (CT) scanning in 89.5% (17/19) of patients. Reasonable treatment strategies were employed for all patients. Conclusions: Our data indicate that IBDU accounts for 5.7% of initial diagnoses of IBD. The definition of IBDU is valuable in clinical practice. For those who had no clear clinical, endoscopic, histological, or other features affording a diagnosis of either UC or CD,IBDU could be used parenthetically.

  3. Differential diagnosis of cervical spinal cord demyelinating diseases and cervical intramedullary gliomas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gui-nü HE

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective To analyze the imaging characteristics of cervical spinal cord demyelinating diseases and cervical intramedullary gliomas, so as to improve the differential diagnosis between them.  Methods A retrospective analysis was conducted using clinical and MRI data from 22 cases of cervical spinal cord demyelinating diseases and 16 cases of cervical intramedullary gliomas.  Results Clinical features in both groups included paresthesia [77.27% (17/22, 12/16], weakness of limbs [72.73% (16/22, 10/16], and dysfunction of autonomic nerve [45.45% (10/22, 4/16]. In cervical MRI, the lesions involving more than 3 vertebras were 63.64% (14/22 in demyelinating group and 15/16 in glioma group, and the average lengths of lesions were (3.41 ± 1.74 and (3.59 ± 1.28 vertebras in 2 groups. The lesions showed long T1 signal [68.18% (15/22, 7/16], equisignal T1 [31.82% (7/22, 6/16] and long T2 signal [100% (22/22, 8/15] in 2 groups. Mixed T1 and T2 signals (3/16, 6/15 could be seen in glioma group. Demyelinating lesions had unclear boundary [90.91% (20/22] with patchy and ribbon-like enhancement (13/16. Limited enlargement of spinal cord (15/16 and thickening spinal meninges (14/16 were more common in glioma group, usually with block and circular enhancement (12/16. Spinal cord involvement around central canal could be seen (14/15, and the cysts or central canal enlargement, hemorrhage and "cap sign" were showed frequently (7/16, 5/16 and 4/16.  Conclusions Although none of one single clinical or MRI feature was sufficient enough to identify cervical spinal demyelinating diseases from cervical glioma, the comprehensive analysis of multiple features could help to make differential diagnosis of these diseases. doi: 10.3969/j.issn.1672-6731.2014.09.008

  4. Intravenous immune globulin (10% caprylate-chromatography purified) for the treatment of chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy (ICE study): a randomised placebo-controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R.A.C. Hughes (Richard); P. Donofrio (Peter); V. Bril (Vera); M.C. Dalakas (Marinos); C. Deng (Chunqin); K. Hanna (Kim); H.P. Hartung; N. Latov (Norman); I.S.J. Merkies (Ingemar); P.A. van Doorn (Pieter)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Short-term studies suggest that intravenous immunoglobulin might reduce disability caused by chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy (CIDP) but long-term effects have not been shown. We aimed to establish whether 10% caprylate-chromatography purified immune

  5. Pulsed high-dose dexamethasone versus standard prednisolone treatment for chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy (PREDICT study): a double-blind, randomised, controlled trial.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schaik, I.N. van; Eftimov, F.; Doorn, P.A. van; Brusse, E.; Berg, L.H. van den; Pol, W.L. van der; Faber, C.G.; Oostrom, J.C. van; Vogels, O.J.M.; Hadden, R.D.; Kleine, B.U.; Norden, A.G.W. van; Verschuuren, J.J.; Dijkgraaf, M.G.; Vermeulen, M.

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Pulsed high-dose dexamethasone induced long-lasting remission in patients with chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy (CIDP) in a pilot study. The PREDICT study aimed to compare remission rates in patients with CIDP treated with high-dose dexamethasone with rates in pa

  6. Pulsed high-dose dexamethasone versus standard prednisolone treatment for chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy (PREDICT study) : a double-blind, randomised, controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Schaik, Ivo N.; Eftimov, Filip; van Doorn, Pieter A.; Brusse, Esther; van den Berg, Leonard H.; van der Pol, W. Ludo; Faber, Catharina G.; van Oostrom, Joost C. H.; Vogels, Oscar J. M.; Hadden, Rob D. M.; Kleine, Bert U.; van Norden, Anouk G. W.; Verschuuren, Jan J. G. M.; Dijkgraaf, Marcel G. W.; Vermeulen, Marinus

    2010-01-01

    Background Pulsed high-dose dexamethasone induced long-lasting remission in patients with chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy (CIDP) in a pilot study. The PREDICT study aimed to compare remission rates in patients with CIDP treated with high-dose dexamethasone with rates in pat

  7. Pulsed high-dose dexamethasone versus standard prednisolone treatment for chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy (PREDICT study): a double-blind, randomised, controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    I.N. van Schaik; F. Eftimov; P.A. van Doorn; E. Brusse; L.H. van den Berg; W.L. van der Pol; C.G. Faber; J.C. van Oostrom; O.J. Vogels; R.D. Hadden; B.U. Kleine; A.G. van Norden; J.J. Verschuuren; M.G. Dijkgraaf; M. Vermeulen

    2010-01-01

    Background Pulsed high-dose dexamethasone induced long-lasting remission in patients with chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy (CIDP) in a pilot study. The PREDICT study aimed to compare remission rates in patients with CIDP treated with high-dose dexamethasone with rates in pat

  8. A randomised, double-blinded, placebo controlled trial of the effect of subcutaneous immunoglobulin on muscular performance in chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Johannes Klitgaard; Markvardsen, Lars Høj; Harbo, Thomas;

    Objective: We hypothesised that the effect of subcutaneous infusion of immunoglobulins(SCIG) on muscular performance in chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy(CIDP) is superior to that of placebo and equals the therapeutic effect of intravenous infusion(IVIG). Background Subcutaneous...

  9. Peripheral Nerve Ultrasonography in Chronic Inflammatory Demyelinating Polyradiculoneuropathy and Multifocal Motor Neuropathy: Correlations with Clinical and Neurophysiological Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merola, Aristide; Rosso, Michela; Romagnolo, Alberto; Peci, Erdita; Cocito, Dario

    2016-01-01

    Objective. This cross-sectional study analyzes the pattern of ultrasound peripheral nerve alterations in patients with chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy (CIDP) and multifocal motor neuropathy (MMN) at different stages of functional disability. Material and Methods. 22 CIDP and 10 MMN patients and a group of 70 healthy controls were evaluated with an ultrasound scan of the median, ulnar, peroneal, tibial, and sural nerves. Results were correlated with clinical disability scales and nerve conduction studies. Results. Patients with intermediate functional impairment showed relatively larger cross-sectional areas than subjects with either a milder (p CIDP and in MMN. In addition, MMN was associated with greater side-to-side intranerve variability (p CIDP (p CIDP; p CIDP and MMN showed differential US aspects, with greater side-to-side intranerve variability in MMN and higher cross-sectional areas in CIDP.

  10. Subcutaneous versus intravenous immunoglobulin in drug-naïve patients with chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Markvardsen, L H; Sindrup, S H; Christiansen, I;

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Subcutaneous immunoglobulin (SCIG) is superior to placebo treatment for maintenance of muscle strength during 12 weeks in patients with chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP). The present study evaluated whether SCIG preserves muscle strength for 1 year...... in an open-label follow-up study. METHODS: Seventeen responders to intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) who had participated in the previous study of SCIG versus placebo in CIDP were included. After one IVIG infusion 2 weeks prior to baseline, all continued on SCIG treatment at weekly equal dosage and were...... remained unchanged. CONCLUSION: SCIG preserves muscle strength and functional ability in patients with CIDP who previously responded to IVIG. SCIG should be considered as an alternative in long-term treatment of CIDP patients....

  11. Demyelinating Disease following Anti-TNFa Treatment: A Causal or Coincidental Association? Report of Four Cases and Review of the Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Andreadou

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Tumor necrosis factor antagonists (anti-TNFa are an established therapeutic option for several autoimmune and inflammatory bowel diseases. Despite their clinical effectiveness, neurological adverse events have been reported and literature data suggest a potential role of anti-TNFa in the induction of demyelination of the CNS. We present four patients treated with anti-TNFa who developed symptoms suggestive of CNS demyelination. The first patient, a 17-year-old male who received etanercept for psoriatic arthritis for eight months, presented with dysesthesias up to T4 level. The second patient, a 30-year-old male treated with adalimumab for three years due to ankylosing spondylitis, presented with right unilateral tinnitus. The third case, a 47-year-old female, received etanercept for four years because of psoriatic arthritis and developed persistent headache and left-sided face and head numbness. Finally, the fourth patient, a 57-years-old female treated with etanercept for six years due to ankylosing spondylitis, presented with difficulty in speech, swallowing, and ptosis of the right corner of the mouth. In all cases, brain MRI showed lesions suggestive of demyelination, while positive oligoclonal bands were detected in the CSF. Anti-TNFa treatments were discontinued and patients showed clinical improvement with pulsed intravenous corticosteroid therapy. CNS demyelination following anti-TNFa treatment represents a relatively rare but potential serious complication. Close follow-up and MRI monitoring of these patients is mandatory to elucidate whether the clinical manifestations represent adverse events occurring during anti-TNFa therapy or a first demyelinating episode.

  12. Central Nervous System Idiopathic Inflammatory Demyelinating Disorders in South Americans: A Descriptive, Multicenter, Cross-Sectional Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Regina Maria Papais-Alvarenga

    Full Text Available The idiopathic inflammatory demyelinating disease (IIDD spectrum has been investigated among different populations, and the results have indicated a low relative frequency of neuromyelitis optica (NMO among multiple sclerosis (MS cases in whites (1.2%-1.5%, increasing in Mestizos (8% and Africans (15.4%-27.5% living in areas of low MS prevalence. South America (SA was colonized by Europeans from the Iberian Peninsula, and their miscegenation with natives and Africans slaves resulted in significant racial mixing. The current study analyzed the IIDD spectrum in SA after accounting for the ethnic heterogeneity of its population. A cross-sectional multicenter study was performed. Only individuals followed in 2011 with a confirmed diagnosis of IIDD using new diagnostic criteria were considered eligible. Patients' demographic, clinical and laboratory data were collected. In all, 1,917 individuals from 22 MS centers were included (73.7% female, 63.0% white, 28.0% African, 7.0% Mestizo, and 0.2% Asian. The main disease categories and their associated frequencies were MS (76.9%, NMO (11.8%, other NMO syndromes (6.5%, CIS (3.5%, ADEM (1.0%, and acute encephalopathy (0.4%. Females predominated in all main categories. The white ethnicity also predominated, except in NMO. Except in ADEM, the disease onset occurred between 20 and 39 years old, early onset in 8.2% of all cases, and late onset occurred in 8.9%. The long-term morbidity after a mean disease time of 9.28±7.7 years was characterized by mild disability in all categories except in NMO, which was scored as moderate. Disease time among those with MS was positively correlated with the expanded disability status scale (EDSS score (r=0.374; p=<0.001. This correlation was not observed in people with NMO or those with other NMO spectrum disorders (NMOSDs. Among patients with NMO, 83.2% showed a relapsing-remitting course, and 16.8% showed a monophasic course. The NMO-IgG antibody tested using indirect

  13. Central Nervous System Idiopathic Inflammatory Demyelinating Disorders in South Americans: A Descriptive, Multicenter, Cross-Sectional Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papais-Alvarenga, Regina Maria; Vasconcelos, Claudia Cristina Ferreira; Carra, Adriana; de Castillo, Ibis Soto; Florentin, Sara; Diaz de Bedoya, Fernando Hamuy; Mandler, Raul; de Siervi, Luiza Campanella; Pimentel, Maria Lúcia Vellutini; Alvarenga, Marina Papais; Papais Alvarenga, Marcos; Grzesiuk, Anderson Kuntz; Gama Pereira, Ana Beatriz Calmon; Gomes Neto, Antonio Pereira; Velasquez, Carolina; Soublette, Carlos; Fleitas, Cynthia Veronica; Diniz, Denise Sisteroli; Armas, Elizabeth; Batista, Elizabeth; Hernandez, Freda; Pereira, Fernanda Ferreira Chaves da Costa; Siqueira, Heloise Helena; Cabeça, Hideraldo; Sanchez, Jose; Brooks, Joseph Bruno Bidin; Gonçalves, Marcus Vinicius; Barroso, Maria Cristina Del Negro; Ravelo, Maria Elena; Castillo, Maria Carlota; Ferreira, Maria Lúcia Brito; Rocha, Maria Sheila Guimarães; Parolin, Monica Koncke Fiuza; Molina, Omaira; Marinho, Patricia Beatriz Christino; Christo, Paulo Pereira; Brant de Souza, Renata; Pessanha Neto, Silvio; Camargo, Solange Maria das Graças; Machado, Suzana Costa; Neri, Vanderson Carvalho; Fragoso, Yara Dadalti; Alvarenga, Helcio; Thuler, Luiz Claudio Santos

    2015-01-01

    The idiopathic inflammatory demyelinating disease (IIDD) spectrum has been investigated among different populations, and the results have indicated a low relative frequency of neuromyelitis optica (NMO) among multiple sclerosis (MS) cases in whites (1.2%-1.5%), increasing in Mestizos (8%) and Africans (15.4%-27.5%) living in areas of low MS prevalence. South America (SA) was colonized by Europeans from the Iberian Peninsula, and their miscegenation with natives and Africans slaves resulted in significant racial mixing. The current study analyzed the IIDD spectrum in SA after accounting for the ethnic heterogeneity of its population. A cross-sectional multicenter study was performed. Only individuals followed in 2011 with a confirmed diagnosis of IIDD using new diagnostic criteria were considered eligible. Patients’ demographic, clinical and laboratory data were collected. In all, 1,917 individuals from 22 MS centers were included (73.7% female, 63.0% white, 28.0% African, 7.0% Mestizo, and 0.2% Asian). The main disease categories and their associated frequencies were MS (76.9%), NMO (11.8%), other NMO syndromes (6.5%), CIS (3.5%), ADEM (1.0%), and acute encephalopathy (0.4%). Females predominated in all main categories. The white ethnicity also predominated, except in NMO. Except in ADEM, the disease onset occurred between 20 and 39 years old, early onset in 8.2% of all cases, and late onset occurred in 8.9%. The long-term morbidity after a mean disease time of 9.28±7.7 years was characterized by mild disability in all categories except in NMO, which was scored as moderate. Disease time among those with MS was positively correlated with the expanded disability status scale (EDSS) score (r=0.374; p=<0.001). This correlation was not observed in people with NMO or those with other NMO spectrum disorders (NMOSDs). Among patients with NMO, 83.2% showed a relapsing-remitting course, and 16.8% showed a monophasic course. The NMO-IgG antibody tested using indirect

  14. Directional diffusivity as a magnetic resonance (MR) biomarker in demyelinating disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benzinger, Tammie L. S.; Cross, Anne H.; Xu, Junqian; Naismith, Robert; Sun, Shu-Wei; Song, Sheng-Kwei

    2007-09-01

    Directional diffusivities derived from diffusion tensor magnetic resonance imaging (DTI) measurements describe water movement parallel to (λ ||, axial diffusivity) and perpendicular to (λ⊥radial diffusivity) axonal tracts. λ || and λ⊥ have been shown to differentially detect axon and myelin abnormalities in several mouse models of central nervous system white matter pathology in our laboratory. These models include experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), (1) myelin basic protein mutant mice with dysmyelination and intact axons, (2) cuprizone-induced demyelination, and remyelination, with reversible axon injury (2, 3) and a model of retinal ischemia in which retinal ganglion cell death is followed by Wallerian degeneration of optic nerve, with axonal injury preceding demyelination. (4) Decreased λ|| correlates with acute axonal injury and increased λ⊥ indicates myelin damage. (4) More recently, we have translated this approach to human MR, investigating acute and chronic optic neuritis in adults with multiple sclerosis, brain lesions in adults with multiple sclerosis, and acute disseminated encephalomyelitis (ADEM) in children. We are also investigating the use of this technique to probe the underlying structural change of the cervical spinal cord in acute and chronic T2- hyperintense lesions in spinal stenosis, trauma, and transverse myelitis. In each of these demyelinating diseases, the discrimination between axonal and myelin injury which we can achieve has important prognostic and therapeutic implications. For those patients with myelin injury but intact axons, early, directed drug therapy has the potential to prevent progression to axonal loss and permanent disability.

  15. Demyelination in mild cognitive impairment suggests progression path to Alzheimer's disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristian Carmeli

    Full Text Available The preclinical Alzheimer's disease (AD - amnestic mild cognitive impairment (MCI - is manifested by phenotypes classified into exclusively memory (single-domain MCI (sMCI and multiple-domain MCI (mMCI. We suggest that typical MCI-to-AD progression occurs through the sMCI-to-mMCI sequence as a result of the extension of initial pathological processes. To support this hypothesis, we assess myelin content with a Magnetization Transfer Ratio (MTR in 21 sMCI and 21 mMCI patients and in 42 age-, sex-, and education-matched controls. A conjunction analysis revealed MTR reduction shared by sMCI and mMCI groups in the medial temporal lobe and posterior structures including white matter (WM: splenium, posterior corona radiata and gray matter (GM: hippocampus; parahippocampal and lingual gyri. A disjunction analysis showed the spread of demyelination to prefrontal WM and insula GM in executive mMCI. Our findings suggest that demyelination starts in the structures affected by neurofibrillary pathology; its presence correlates with the clinical picture and indicates the method of MCI-to-AD progression. In vivo staging of preclinical AD can be developed in terms of WM/GM demyelination.

  16. Acquired Demyelinating Syndromes and Pediatric Multiple Sclerosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    I.A. Ketelslegers (Immy)

    2014-01-01

    markdownabstract__Abstract__ Acquired inflammatory demyelinating diseases of the central nervous system (CNS) cause damage to myelin sheaths and typically result in white matter lesions due to inflammation, myelin loss and axonal pathology. Clinically, this may result in transient, relapsing or pro

  17. Intravenous immune globulin (10% caprylate-chromatography purified) for the treatment of chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy (ICE study): a randomised placebo-controlled trial

    OpenAIRE

    Hughes, Richard; Donofrio, Peter; Bril, Vera; Dalakas, Marinos; Deng, Chunqin; Hanna, Kim; Hartung, H P; Latov, Norman; Merkies, Ingemar; van Doorn, Pieter

    2008-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Short-term studies suggest that intravenous immunoglobulin might reduce disability caused by chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy (CIDP) but long-term effects have not been shown. We aimed to establish whether 10% caprylate-chromatography purified immune globulin intravenous (IGIV-C) has short-term and long-term benefit in patients with CIDP. Methods: 117 patients with CIDP who met specific neurophysiological inflammatory neuropathy cause and treat...

  18. Inflammatory bowel disease: pathogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yi-Zhen; Li, Yong-Yu

    2014-01-07

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), including Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis, is characterized by chronic relapsing intestinal inflammation. It has been a worldwide health-care problem with a continually increasing incidence. It is thought that IBD results from an aberrant and continuing immune response to the microbes in the gut, catalyzed by the genetic susceptibility of the individual. Although the etiology of IBD remains largely unknown, it involves a complex interaction between the genetic, environmental or microbial factors and the immune responses. Of the four components of IBD pathogenesis, most rapid progress has been made in the genetic study of gut inflammation. The latest internationally collaborative studies have ascertained 163 susceptibility gene loci for IBD. The genes implicated in childhood-onset and adult-onset IBD overlap, suggesting similar genetic predispositions. However, the fact that genetic factors account for only a portion of overall disease variance indicates that microbial and environmental factors may interact with genetic elements in the pathogenesis of IBD. Meanwhile, the adaptive immune response has been classically considered to play a major role in the pathogenesis of IBD, as new studies in immunology and genetics have clarified that the innate immune response maintains the same importance in inducing gut inflammation. Recent progress in understanding IBD pathogenesis sheds lights on relevant disease mechanisms, including the innate and adaptive immunity, and the interactions between genetic factors and microbial and environmental cues. In this review, we provide an update on the major advances that have occurred in above areas.

  19. Gray Matter Changes in Demyelinating Disease: Correlations with Clinical Scores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onu, Mihaela; Aroceanu, Adina; Ferastraoaru, Victor; Bajenaru, Ovidiu

    2015-09-01

    Recent MR studies have shown that, in multiple sclerosis, selective regional, but not global gray matter atrophy occurs in multiple sclerosis. Our aim was to identify specific areas of gray matter volume changes and explore the relationship between atrophy and clinical motor outcomes. Nine patients with relapsing remitting MS and 9 matched healthy controls were recruited. The Multiple Sclerosis Functional Composite was administered. For MR acquisitions, a GE- Genesis- Signa, 1.5T MR system, was used. A voxel-based morphometry (VBM), subcortical structures segmentation (FIRST) and volumetric (SIENAx) FSL tools were used in the study. Group comparison showed atrophy for several gray matter regions. The most important volume reductions were found for subcortical deep gray matter areas. Correlations with clinical scores were checked and specific gray matter areas showed significant volume reductions associated with motor scores (9-hole peg time and 25-feet walk time) and EDSS (Expanded Disability Status Scale). We performed a voxelwise analysis of gray matter changes in MS and found a more prominent atrophy for the subcortical structures than for cortical gray matter. Using an additional analysis (FIRST and SIENAx segmentation/volumetry) we were able to confirm the VBM results and to quantify the degree of atrophy in specific structures. Specific gray matter regions which volume reductions correlate with 25-feet walk, 9-hole peg times and EDSS suggest that 25-feet walk time is the best predictor of disease progression in terms of gray matter reduction.

  20. Diffusion abnormality maps in demyelinating disease: correlations with clinical scores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onu, Mihaela; Roceanu, Adina; Sboto-Frankenstein, Uta; Bendic, Robert; Tarta, Eugen; Preoteasa, Florentin; Bajenaru, Ovidiu

    2012-03-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has been explored as a noninvasive tool to assess pathology in multiple sclerosis (MS) patients. However, the correlation between classical MRI measures and physical disability is modest in MS. The diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) MRI technique holds particular promise in this regard. The present study shows brain regions where FA and individual diffusivities abnormalities are present and check their correlations with physical disability clinical scores. Eight patients and 12 matched healthy controls were recruited. The Multiple Sclerosis Functional Composite was administered. For MR-DTI acquisitions, a Genesis Signa 1.5 T MR system, an EP/SE scanning sequence, 25 gradient directions were used. Tract Based Spatial Statistics (TBSS) group comparisons showed reduced FA and increased individual diffusivities in several brain regions in patients. Significant correlations were found between FA and: EDSS, 9-HPT(NON)DOM and 25 FW score; between λ2 and: P100 (r&l), 9-HPT(NON)DOM and 25 FW; between λ3 and: 9-HPT(NON)DOM and 25 FW score. Fractional anisotropy and individual radial diffusivities proved to be important markers of motor disabilities in MS patients when the disease duration mean and the disability scores values range are relatively high. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Inflammatory muscle diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mastaglia F

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The three major immune-mediated inflammatory myopathies, dermatomyositis (DM, polymyositis (PM and inclusion body myositis (IBM, each have their own distinctive clinical features, underlying pathogenetic mechanisms and patterns of muscle gene expression. In DM a complement-dependent humoral process thought to be initiated by antibodies to endothelial cells results in a microangiopathy with secondary ischemic changes in muscles. On the other hand, in PM and IBM there is a T-cell response with invasion of muscle fibers by CD8+ lymphocytes and perforin-mediated cytotoxic necrosis. In IBM degenerative changes are also a feature and comprise autophagia with rimmed vacuole formation and inclusions containing β-amyloid and other proteins whose accumulation may be linked to impaired proteasomal function. The relationship between the inflammatory and degenerative component remains unclear, as does the basis for the selective vulnerability of certain muscles and the resistance to conventional forms of immunotherapy in most cases of IBM. Patients with DM or PM usually respond to treatment with glucocorticoids and immunosuppressive agents but their use remains largely empirical. Intravenous immunoglobulin therapy can be used to achieve disease control in patients with severe weakness or dysphagia, or in patients with immunodeficiency, but its use is limited by expense. Emerging therapies for resistant cases include TNFα inhibitors (etanercept, infliximab and monoclonal antibodies (rituximab, alemtuzumab. However, experience with these therapies is still limited and there is a need for randomized trials to test their efficacy and establish guidelines for their use in clinical practice.

  2. Infection with Theiler's murine encephalomyelitis virus directly induces proinflammatory cytokines in primary astrocytes via NF-kappaB activation: potential role for the initiation of demyelinating disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palma, JoAnn P; Kwon, Daeho; Clipstone, Neil A; Kim, Byung S

    2003-06-01

    Theiler's virus infection in the central nervous system (CNS) induces a demyelinating disease very similar to human multiple sclerosis. We have assessed cytokine gene activation upon Theiler's murine encephalomyelitis virus (TMEV) infection and potential mechanisms in order to delineate the early events in viral infection that lead to immune-mediated demyelinating disease. Infection of SJL/J primary astrocyte cultures induces selective proinflammatory cytokine genes (interleukin-12p40 [IL-12p40], IL-1, IL-6, tumor necrosis factor alpha, and beta interferon [IFN-beta]) important in the innate immune response to infection. We find that TMEV-induced cytokine gene expression is mediated by the NF-kappaB pathway based on the early nuclear NF-kappaB translocation and suppression of cytokine activation in the presence of specific inhibitors of the NF-kappaB pathway. Further studies show this to be partly independent of dsRNA-dependent protein kinase (PKR) and IFN-alpha/beta pathways. Altogether, these results demonstrate that infection of astrocytes and other CNS-resident cells by TMEV provides the early NF-kappaB-mediated signals that directly activate various proinflammatory cytokine genes involved in the initiation and amplification of inflammatory responses in the CNS known to be critical for the development of immune-mediated demyelination.

  3. Acute inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy after treatment with pegylated interferon alfa-2a in a patient with chronic hepatitis C virus infection: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lahbabi Mounia

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction The combination of polyethylene glycol (PEGylated interferon (pegylated interferon and ribavirin has been shown to be an effective treatment for chronic hepatitis C virus. In general, common side effects related to this combination therapy are mild and are well tolerated. However, peripheral neuropathy including demyelinating polyneuropathy related to PEG-interferon α2a (pegylated interferon alfa-2a is extremely rare. In the literature, only one case of acute inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy related to PEG-interferon α2a has been published previously. Case presentation To the best of our knowledge we present only the second case of acute inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy related to PEG-interferon α2a, occurring in a 63-year-old Caucasian man. He developed tingling, numbness, and weakness of his upper and lower extremities with acute neurological deficits after five weeks of a combination therapy with PEG-interferon α2a and ribavirin for chronic hepatitis C virus infection. His clinical course, neurological findings, and his electromyogram results were all consistent with acute inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy. Our patient recovered completely after interferon was stopped and symptomatic treatment and a further electromyogram showed a disappearance of neuropathy. Four weeks later, PEG-interferon α2a was reintroduced with a gradually increasing dose without any reappearance of neurological symptoms allowing hepatitis C seroconversion. Conclusions Recognition of this rare yet possible presentation is important for early and accurate diagnosis and treatment. This case report also suggests that the reintroduction of PEGylated interferon in patients who had presented with acute inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy related to interferon α may be safe, but this must be confirmed by further studies.

  4. Immunogenetics of ocular inflammatory disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levinson, R D

    2007-02-01

    Ocular inflammatory disease comprises of a diverse group of clinical entities that may result from autoimmune processes, infections, or both. While many individual ocular inflammatory diseases are quite rare, ocular inflammation is one of the more common causes of visual disability, including blindness, in the developed world. Better understanding of ocular inflammatory disease is an important step in designing more sophisticated therapies that may help prevent loss of visual function for these patients.

  5. Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease masquerading as acute demyelinating encephalomyelitis-like illness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Gun-Ha; Kim, Kyoung Min; Suh, Sang-Il; Ki, Chang-Seok; Eun, Baik-Lin

    2014-07-01

    X-linked Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMTX1) is a clinically heterogeneous hereditary motor and sensory neuropathy with X-linked transmission. Common clinical manifestations of CMTX1 disease, as in other forms of Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT) disease, are distal muscle wasting and weakness, hyporeflexia, distal sensory disturbance, and foot deformities. Mutations in the connexin-32 gene (gap junction protein β1 [GJB1]) are responsible for CMTX1 disease. In this report, we describe a patient with CMTX1 disease presenting with recurrent attacks of transient and episodic acute demyelinating encephalomyelitis (ADEM)-like symptoms without previous signs of lower extremity weakness or foot deformities; the patient, as well as his asymptomatic mother, exhibited a novel GJB1 mutation (p.Met1Ile). Differential diagnosis of recurrent and transient ADEM-like illness, if unexplained, should include the possibility of CMTX1 disease. Copyright © 2014 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  6. Physiological Dynamics in Demyelinating Diseases: Unraveling Complex Relationships through Computer Modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jay S. Coggan

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Despite intense research, few treatments are available for most neurological disorders. Demyelinating diseases are no exception. This is perhaps not surprising considering the multifactorial nature of these diseases, which involve complex interactions between immune system cells, glia and neurons. In the case of multiple sclerosis, for example, there is no unanimity among researchers about the cause or even which system or cell type could be ground zero. This situation precludes the development and strategic application of mechanism-based therapies. We will discuss how computational modeling applied to questions at different biological levels can help link together disparate observations and decipher complex mechanisms whose solutions are not amenable to simple reductionism. By making testable predictions and revealing critical gaps in existing knowledge, such models can help direct research and will provide a rigorous framework in which to integrate new data as they are collected. Nowadays, there is no shortage of data; the challenge is to make sense of it all. In that respect, computational modeling is an invaluable tool that could, ultimately, transform how we understand, diagnose, and treat demyelinating diseases.

  7. Inflammation, demyelination, and degeneration - recent insights from MS pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stadelmann, Christine; Wegner, Christiane; Brück, Wolfgang

    2011-02-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a chronic inflammatory disease of the central nervous system which responds to anti-inflammatory treatments in the early disease phase. However, the pathogenesis of the progressive disease phase is less well understood, and inflammatory as well as neurodegenerative mechanisms of tissue damage are currently being discussed. This review summarizes current knowledge on the interrelation between inflammation, demyelination, and neurodegeneration derived from the study of human autopsy and biopsy brain tissue and experimental models of MS.

  8. Leven met Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Duijvendijk J. van, [No Value

    2004-01-01

    Leven met Inflammatory Bowel Disease Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is de verzamelnaam voor Colitis ulcerosa en de ziekte van Crohn. Het zijn chronische darmontstekingen, waarvan de ziekteactiviteit wisselt en zich niet laat voorspellen. Door de lichamelijke klachten en het onvoorspelbare karakter

  9. Leven met Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Duijvendijk J. van, [No Value

    2004-01-01

    Leven met Inflammatory Bowel Disease Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is de verzamelnaam voor Colitis ulcerosa en de ziekte van Crohn. Het zijn chronische darmontstekingen, waarvan de ziekteactiviteit wisselt en zich niet laat voorspellen. Door de lichamelijke klachten en het onvoorspelbare karakter

  10. Cranial magnetic resonance imaging in chronic demyelinating polyneuropathy.

    OpenAIRE

    Hawke, S H; Hallinan, J M; McLeod, J G

    1990-01-01

    Twenty one patients with chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy (CIDP) and five patients with chronic demyelinating polyneuropathy associated with benign monoclonal paraproteinaemia none of whom had signs or symptoms of central nervous system disease, had cranial magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) on a 1.5 Tesla unit. Areas of increased white matter signal intensity were seen in one of 10 patients aged less than 50 years and in five of 16 patients aged more than 50 years. In ...

  11. A randomised, double-blinded, placebo-controlled trial of the effect of subcuta-neous immunoglobulin on muscular performance in chronic inflammatory de-myelinating polyneuropathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harbo, Thomas; Markvardsen, Lars Høj; Sindrup, Søren Hein;

    Objectives: Subcutaneous treatment with large amounts of immunoglobulins is feasible and effective in multifocal motor neuropathy and has been reported in a few cases in chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP). We hypothesized that the effect of subcutaneous treatment with immuno......Objectives: Subcutaneous treatment with large amounts of immunoglobulins is feasible and effective in multifocal motor neuropathy and has been reported in a few cases in chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP). We hypothesized that the effect of subcutaneous treatment...... with immunoglobulins (SCIG) on muscular performance is superior to placebo and equals the effect of intravenous infusion (IVIG). Methods: Subjects with motor involvement in maintenance therapy with IVIG fulfilling the EFNS/PNS criteria for CIDP, aged 18 - 80 years were considered for participation. Exclusion criteria...

  12. A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial of the effect of subcutaneous immunoglobulin on muscular performance in chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Markvardsen, Lars Høj; Harbo, Thomas; Sindrup, Søren Hein;

    We hypothesized that subcutaneous administration of immunoglobulins (SCIG) in chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP) is feasible and safe and superior to treatment with saline for the performance of muscle strength. Patients with motor involvement in maintenance therapy with int......We hypothesized that subcutaneous administration of immunoglobulins (SCIG) in chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP) is feasible and safe and superior to treatment with saline for the performance of muscle strength. Patients with motor involvement in maintenance therapy...... with intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIg) fulfilling the EFNS/PNS criteria for CIDP, aged 18-80 years, were randomised either to SCIG at a dose determined from their pre-study IVIg dose or to subcutaneous saline given twice or thrice weekly for 12 weeks at home. At the start and end of the trial, as well as two weeks...... of immunoglobulins in CIDP is feasible, safe and effective and seems an attractive alternative to IVIg....

  13. European Federation of Neurological Societies/Peripheral Nerve Society Guideline on management of chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy: Report of a joint task force of the European Federation of Neurological Societies and the Peripheral Nerve Society - First Revision

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P.Y.K. van den Bergh; R.D.M. Hadden; P. Bouche; D.R. Cornblath; A. Hahn; I. Illa; C.L. Koski; J.M. Leger; E. Nobile-Orazio; J. Pollard; C. Sommer; P.A. van Doorn; I.N. van Schaik

    2010-01-01

    Background: Consensus guidelines on the definition, investigation, and treatment of chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy (CIDP) have been previously published in European Journal of Neurology and Journal of the Peripheral Nervous System. Objectives: To revise these guidelines. M

  14. 慢性炎性脱髓鞘性多发性神经病的治疗进展%Therapeutic advance of chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张兴文; 崔丽英

    2005-01-01

    慢性炎性脱髓鞘性多发性神经病(chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculopathy,CIDP)是一种获得性的免疫介导的周围神经病.临床特征包括进展性或复发性的肢体无力、感觉缺失和腱反射消失等.

  15. Multiple Sites Ultrasonography of Peripheral Nerves in Differentiating Charcot–Marie–Tooth Type 1A from Chronic Inflammatory Demyelinating Polyradiculoneuropathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingwen Niu

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available IntroductionMultiple sites measurement of cross-sectional areas (CSA by ultrasound was performed to differentiate Charcot–Marie–Tooth type 1A (CMT1A and chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy (CIDP.MethodsNine patients with CMT1A, 28 patients with CIDP, and 14 healthy controls (HC were recruited prospectively. Consecutive ultrasonography scanning was performed from wrist to axilla on median and ulnar nerves. CSAs were measured at 10 predetermined sites of each nerve.ResultsCMT1A had significantly larger CSAs at all sites of median and ulnar nerves (p < 0.01. In CMT1A, CSAs increased gradually and homogeneously from distal to proximal along the nerve, except potential entrapment sites. CIDP displayed three different morphological patterns, including mild enlargement in 15 patients, prominent segmental enlargement in 12, and slight enlargement in 1, among which different treatment responses were observed. All patients with mild nerve enlargement treated with intravenous immunoglobulin were responsive (7/7, while less than half of those with prominent segmental enlargement (3/7 were responsive (p < 0.01.DiscussionConsecutive scan along the nerve and multiple sites measurement by ultrasound could supply more detailed morphological feature of the nerve and help to differentiate CMT1A from CIDP.

  16. A current view of the diagnosis, clinical variants, response to treatment and prognosis of chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viala, Karine; Maisonobe, Thierry; Stojkovic, Tanya; Koutlidis, Régine; Ayrignac, Xavier; Musset, Lucile; Fournier, Emmanuel; Léger, Jean-Marc; Bouche, Pierre

    2010-03-01

    We retrospectively analyzed 146 patients fulfilling the European Federation of Neurological Societies and the Peripheral Nerve Society (EFNS/PNS) criteria for definite chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy (CIDP) to (1) evaluate the relevance of these criteria, (2) assess the frequency of CIDP variants, and (3) determine the response to treatment and the prognosis. We found that 75% of these patients fulfilled the main EFNS/PNS clinical and electrophysiological criteria (type I). The remaining patients were diagnosed using laboratory tools as supportive criteria. The common form of CIDP represented 51% of patients. We observed a high frequency of the sensory variant (35% of patients) and the rapid onset form (18%). A positive response to treatment was observed in 87% of patients, with a similar efficacy of prednisone and IVIg. However, in the long term, 40% of treated patients remained dependent on treatment. The IVIg dependency rate was higher than the prednisone or plasma exchange dependency rate (55%, 18%, and 23%, respectively; p = 0.0054). Severe handicap was observed in 24% of patients.

  17. Subcutaneous vs intravenous administration of immunoglobulin in chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy: an Italian cost-minimization analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazzaro, Carlo; Lopiano, Leonardo; Cocito, Dario

    2014-07-01

    Prior researches have suggested that home-based subcutaneous immunoglobulin (SCIG) is equally effective and can be less expensive than hospital-based intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) in treating chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP) patients. This economic evaluation aims at comparing costs of SCIG vs IVIG for CIDP patients in Italy. A 1-year model-based cost-minimization analysis basically populated via neurologists' opinion was undertaken from a societal perspective. Health care resources included immunoglobulin; drugs for premedication and complications (rash, headache, and hypertension) management; time of various health care professionals; pump for SCIG self-administration; infusion disposables. Non-health care resources encompassed transport and parking; losses of working and leisure time for patients and caregivers. Unit or yearly costs for resources valuation were mainly obtained from published sources. Costs were expressed in Euro () 2013. An extensive one-way sensitivity analysis (OWSA) and a scenario SA tested the robustness of the base case findings. Overall costs per patient amount to 49,534.75 (SCIG) and 50,895.73 (IVIG); saving in favour of SCIG reaches 1360.98. For both SCIG and IVIG, the cost driver was immunoglobulin (94.06 vs 86.06 % of the overall costs, respectively). Sensitivity analyses confirmed the consistency of the baseline results. SCIG may be a cost-saving therapy for Italian CIDP patients.

  18. Salpingitis and pelvic inflammatory disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swinker, M L

    1985-01-01

    Chlamydia trachomatis is becoming an increasingly important etiologic agent. The physician must also be aware of other nongonococcal causes of pelvic inflammatory disease, such as Mycoplasma, Ureaplasma, coliforms and anaerobes. Epidemiologic characteristics of the various microorganisms differ, with the frequency of nongonococcal disease higher in older women. Intrauterine devices increase the potential for pelvic inflammatory disease. The rising incidence of nongonococcal and dual infections has led to therapeutic and preventive techniques aimed at multiple etiologies.

  19. Cefotaxime Treatment of Pelvic Inflammatory Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Monson, Thomas P; Miller, Timothy T.; Nolan, Charles M.

    1981-01-01

    We studied cefotaxime in the treatment of gonococcal and nongonococcal pelvic inflammatory disease. Cefotaxime was uniformly effective against gonococcal pelvic inflammatory disease. However, 4 of 11 patients with nongonococcal pelvic inflammatory disease had a suboptimal response.

  20. Inflammatory Bowel Disease and Thrombosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmet Tezel

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD is a group of chronic and relapsing inflammatory disorders of the gastrointestinal system. In these cases, findings are detected in extraintestinal systems also. There is a tendency for thrombotic events in IBD, as in the other inflammatory processes. The pathogenesis of this thrombotic tendency is multidimensional, including lack of natural anticoagulants, prothrombotic media induced via the inflammatory process, long-term sedentary life style, steroid use, surgery, and catheter placement. The aim of this review was to highlight the positive relationship between IBD and thrombotic events, and the proper treatment of at-risk patients.

  1. Evaluation of a patient with suspected chronic demyelinating polyneuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jani-Acsadi, Agnes; Lewis, Richard A

    2013-01-01

    Demyelinating neuropathies are typically characterized by physiological slowing of conduction velocity and pathologically by segmental loss of myelin and in some instances, evidence of remyelination. Clinically, patients with demyelinating neuropathy can be seen with inherited disorders (Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease) or acquired disorders, typically immune-mediated or inflammatory. The acquired disorders can be either acute or subacute as seen in the acute inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (AIDP) form of Guillain-Barré syndrome or chronic progressive or relapsing disorders such as chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy. It is important to develop a logical approach to diagnosing these disorders. This requires an understanding of the clinical, genetic, physiological, and pathological features of these neuropathies. Clinically, important features to consider are the temporal progression, degree of symmetry, and involvement of proximal as well as distal muscles. Genetically, recognizing the different inheritance patterns and age of onset allow for a coordinated approach to determining a specific genotype. Physiologically, besides nerve conduction slowing, other physiological hallmarks of demyelination include temporal dispersion of compound motor action potentials (CMAP) on proximal stimulation, conduction block, and distal CMAP duration prolongation with certain patterns of involvement pointing to specific disorders. This chapter focuses on these various aspects of the evaluation of patients with chronic acquired demyelinating neuropathies to develop a comprehensive and thoughtful diagnostic concept.

  2. Vitamin D in inflammatory diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thea K Wöbke

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Changes in vitamin D serum levels have been associated with inflammatory diseases, such as inflammatory bowel disease, rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus, multiple sclerosis, atherosclerosis or asthma. Genome- and transcriptome-wide studies indicate that vitamin D signalling modulates many inflammatory responses on several levels. This includes i the regulation of the expression of genes which generate pro-inflammatory mediators, such as cyclooxygenases or 5-lipoxygenase, ii the interference with transcription factors, such as NF-kB, which regulate the expression of inflammatory genes and iii the activation of signalling cascades, such as MAP kinases which mediate inflammatory responses. Vitamin D targets various tissues and cell types, a number of which belong to the immune system, such as monocytes/macrophages, dendritic cells as well as B- and T cells, leading to individual responses of each cell type. One hallmark of these specific vitamin D effects is the cell-type specific regulation of genes involved in the regulation of inflammatory processes and the interplay between vitamin D signalling and other signalling cascades involved in inflammation.An important task in the near future will be the elucidation of the regulatory mechanisms that are involved in the regulation of inflammatory responses by vitamin D on the molecular level by the use of techniques such as chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP, ChIP-seq and FAIRE-seq.

  3. 中枢神经脱髓鞘疾病血清水通道蛋白4抗体检测的临床意义%Seroprevalence and diagnostic value of aquaporin-4 antibody in patients with inflammatory central nervous system demyelinating diseases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    武雷; 杨扬; 黄德晖; 吴卫平

    2011-01-01

    Objective To assess the seroprevalence and diagnostic value of aquaporin-4 antibody (AQP4-Ab) in patients with inflammatory central nervous system demyelinating diseases. Methods Seventy-two patients with neuromyelitis optica (NMO), 68 with multiple sclerosis (MS), 4 with optic neuritis (ON), and 41 with transverse myelitis (TM) were included in this study. The TM group comprised 19 patients with non-longitudinally extensive transverse myelitis (nLETM), 14 with monophasic longitudinally extensive transverse myelitis (mLETM), and 8 with recurrent longitudinally extensive transverse myelitis (rLETM). The serum levels of AQP4-Ab was detected by indirect immunofluorence assay in these patients. Results AQP4-Ab was detected in 72.2% (52/72) patients with NMO, 5.9% (4/ 68) patients with MS, 25.0% (1/4) patients with ON, and 17.1% (7/41) patients with TM, showing a significant difference in the positivity between NMO and MS groups (P<0.01). AQP4-Ab seropositivity rate was 5.3% (1/19) in nLETM patients, 62.5% (5/8) in rLETM patients and 7.1% (1/14) in mLETM patients, significantly higher in rLETM than in nLETM (P<0.01) and mLETM groups (P<0.05), but no statistical difference was found between rLETM and NMO groups. Conclusions A high seroprevalence of AQP4-Ab is observed in patients with NMO and rLETM, which support the hypothesis that NMO and rLETM belong to NMO spectrum disorders. AQP4-Ab can serve as a useful index for diagnosing NMO and differential diagnosis from MS. More attention and effective immunosuppressive treatments should be given to patients positive for AQP4-Ab.%目的 研究中枢神经脱髓鞘疾病患者血清水通道蛋白4抗体(AQP4-Ab)阳性率,并探讨其临床意义.方法 采集2008年11月至2010年10月间就诊于我院神经内科门诊和病房的185例中枢神经系统脱髓鞘疾病患者血清,其中视神经脊髓炎(NMO)72例,多发性硬化(MS)68例,视神经炎(ON)4例,横贯性脊髓炎(TM)41例;后者包括非长

  4. Neuroinflammation in inflammatory bowel disease

    OpenAIRE

    Kirchgessner Annette; Lakhan Shaheen E

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Inflammatory bowel disease is a chronic intestinal inflammatory condition, the pathology of which is incompletely understood. Gut inflammation causes significant changes in neurally controlled gut functions including cramping, abdominal pain, fecal urgency, and explosive diarrhea. These symptoms are caused, at least in part, by prolonged hyperexcitability of enteric neurons that can occur following the resolution of colitis. Mast, enterochromaffin and other immune cells are increased...

  5. Autophagy in Inflammatory Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander J. S. Choi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Autophagy provides a mechanism for the turnover of cellular organelles and proteins through a lysosome-dependent degradation pathway. During starvation, autophagy exerts a homeostatic function that promotes cell survival by recycling metabolic precursors. Additionally, autophagy can interact with other vital processes such as programmed cell death, inflammation, and adaptive immune mechanisms, and thereby potentially influence disease pathogenesis. Macrophages deficient in autophagic proteins display enhanced caspase-1-dependent proinflammatory cytokine production and the activation of the inflammasome. Autophagy provides a functional role in infectious diseases and sepsis by promoting intracellular bacterial clearance. Mutations in autophagy-related genes, leading to loss of autophagic function, have been implicated in the pathogenesis of Crohn's disease. Furthermore, autophagy-dependent mechanisms have been proposed in the pathogenesis of several pulmonary diseases that involve inflammation, including cystic fibrosis and pulmonary hypertension. Strategies aimed at modulating autophagy may lead to therapeutic interventions for diseases associated with inflammation.

  6. Actualización en el tratamiento de la neuropatía óptica inflamatoria desmielinizante Updating on the treatment of the demyelinating inflammatory optical neuropathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yaimara Hernández Silva

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Se realizó una revisión bibliográfica con el objetivo de proporcionar una actualización de las drogas que se emplean para retrasar la aparición de esclerosis múltiple en el manejo de la neuropatía óptica inflamatoria desmielinizante. El artículo presenta el origen y la justificación de la terapia esteroidea en este grupo de enfermedad, así como los mecanismos de acción y beneficios de tratamientos más modernos como los inmunomoduladores e inmunosupresores. El trabajo también introduce muchas de las drogas con efectos neuroprotectores que se encuentran en fases experimentales, cuyo uso prevendría la neurodegeneración que se produce a nivel de las células ganglionares retinianas en esta enfermedad neurológica. Las opciones terapéuticas actuales ofrecen variantes de tratamiento adicionales a pacientes con mayores probabilidades de desarrollo de esclerosis múltiple y retrasan la aparición de un segundo brote, así como las secuelas invalidantes que esta suele originar.A bibliographic review was conducted to provide an updating of drugs used to retard the appearance of multiple sclerosis in the management of the demyelinating inflammatory optical neuropathy. Present paper shows the origin and the justification of the steroid therapy in this disease, as well as the mechanisms of action and benefits of more recent treatments, e.g. the ongoing immunomodulations and immunosuppressive ones and also to introduce many drugs in experimental phase having neuroprotection effects whose use will prevent the neurodegenerative effect produced at level of the retinal ganglion cells in this neurologic disease. The current therapeutical options offer variants of additional treatment to those patients with greater possibilities to development multiple sclerosis and retarding the appearance of a second outbreak, as well as its disabling sequelae.

  7. Comorbidity in inflammatory bowel disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Antonio López San Román; Fernando Mu(n)oz

    2011-01-01

    Patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) can be affected by other unrelated diseases. These are called comorbid conditions, and can include any secondary health problem that affects a person suffering from a primary or main disease, and which is neither linked physiopathologically to the primary condition, nor is it due to the treatments used for the primary condition or to its long-term anatomical or physiological consequences.Different comorbid conditions, as well as their influence on IBD, are discussed.

  8. Diet and Inflammatory Bowel Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knight-Sepulveda, Karina; Kais, Susan; Santaolalla, Rebeca; Abreu, Maria T

    2015-08-01

    Patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) are increasingly becoming interested in nonpharmacologic approaches to managing their disease. One of the most frequently asked questions of IBD patients is what they should eat. The role of diet has become very important in the prevention and treatment of IBD. Although there is a general lack of rigorous scientific evidence that demonstrates which diet is best for certain patients, several diets-such as the low-fermentable oligosaccharide, disaccharide, monosaccharide, and polyol diet; the specific carbohydrate diet; the anti-inflammatory diet; and the Paleolithic diet-have become popular. This article discusses the diets commonly recommended to IBD patients and reviews the supporting data.

  9. Chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy due to the administration of pegylated interferon α-2b: a neuropathology case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiga, Kensuke; Tanaka, Eijiroh; Isayama, Reina; Mizuno, Toshiki; Itoh, Kyoko; Nakagawa, Masanori

    2012-01-01

    We report a 35-year-old man who developed weakness in his extremities five months after pegylated interferon α (IFNα)-2b was administered. The serum tumor necrosis factor-α (TNFα) was elevated and nerve conduction studies revealed demyelination both in the distal and intermediate segments. The sural nerve pathology showed mild demyelinating process. The cessation of IFNα and administration of intravenous immunoglobulin improved both his clinical symptoms and the temporal dispersion in motor nerve conduction study. IFNα-induced CIDP is presumably a transient immunological condition that requires immunomodulatory therapy. The elevated serum TNFα may implicate the degree of downstream autoimmunity induced by IFNα.

  10. Low Prevalence of Sleep Disorders in Demyelinating Disease in a Northern Tenerife Population

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Platas, Montserrat; González-Platas, Javier; Bermúdez-Hernández, Moises; Pérez-Martín, Maria Yaiza; Croissier-Elías, Cristina; Pérez-Lorensu, Pedro Javier

    2016-01-01

    Study Objectives: Sleep disorders are seen in patients with demyelinating disease (DD) more often than in the general population. Combination of physical and psychological factors such as pain, spasms, nocturia, depression, anxiety, or medication effects could contribute to sleep disruption. Frequently, these disturbances have a major impact on health and quality of life of patients. The aim of this study was to estimate the prevalence of sleep disorders in patients seen in the DD consultation. Methods: 240 patients; mean age 43 years, 187 women; 163 patients with multiple sclerosis (MS): 144 relapsing-remitting, 19 progressive forms, 36 clinically isolated syndrome, 26 radiological isolated syndrome, and 15 patients with others DD. All participants completed questionnaires: Pittsburgh, Epworth, and Stanford scales, indirect symptoms of RLS and Obstructive Sleep Apnea, Fatigue Severity Scale, and Multiple Sclerosis Quality of Life-54. Results: Moderate/severe insomnia 12.5%, OSA 5.8%, RLS 9.6% (confirmed 3 cases), narcolepsy 0, fatigue (> 4) 24.6%. Physical QoL 66.6 ± 19.6, Mental QoL 66.1 ± 21.9. Patients with an established diagnosis showed higher scores on insomnia compared to the group of CIS and RIS (F = 3.85; p = 0.023), no differences were in the other parameters. Fatigue showed high correlation with insomnia (r = 0.443; p < 0.001), RLS (r = 0.513; p < 0.001), and sleepiness (r = 0.211; p = 0.001). None of the variables included in the regression model were shown to be predictors of Physical and Mental QoL. Conclusions: A high percentage of our sample sleeps well. Emphasize the low prevalence of sleep disorders (insomnia, fatigue, RLS, etc). We detected an overestimation in the RLS questionnaire and the low QoL recorded. Citation: González-Platas M, González-Platas J, Bermúdez-Hernández M, Pérez-Martín MY, Croissier-Elías C, Pérez-Lorensu PJ. Low prevalence of sleep disorders in demyelinating disease in a northern tenerife population. J Clin Sleep

  11. Electrotonic potentials in simulated chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy at 20°C-42°C.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephanova, D I; Daskalova, M

    2015-06-01

    Threshold electrotonus changes have been studied following warming to 37°C and cooling to 25°C in patients with chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP). To extend the tracking of these changes also during hypothermia (≤ 25°C) and hyperthermia (≥ 40°C), and to explain their mechanisms, we investigate the effects of temperature (from 20°C to 42°C) on polarizing nodal and internodal electrotonic potentials and their current kinetics in previously simulated case of 70% CIDP. The computations use our temperature-dependent multi-layered model of the myelinated human motor nerve fiber. While the changes of electrotonic potentials and their current kinetics are largely similar for the physiological range of 28-37°C, they are altered during hypothermia and hyperthermia in the normal and CIDP cases. The normal (at 37°C) resting membrane potential is further depolarized or hyperpolarized during hypothermia or hyperthermia, respectively, and the internodal current types defining these changes are the same for both cases. Unexpectedly, our results show that in the CIDP case, the lowest and highest critical temperatures for blocking of electrotonic potentials are 20°C and 39°C, while in the normal case the highest critical temperature for blocking of these potentials is 42°C. In the temperature range of 20-39°C, the relevant potentials in the CIDP case, except for the lesser value (at 39°C) in hyperpolarized resting membrane potential, are modified: (i) polarizing nodal and depolarizing internodal electrotonic potentials and their defining currents are increased in magnitude; (ii) inward rectifier (I IR ) and leakage (I Lk ) currents, defining the hyperpolarizing internodal electrotonic potential, are gradually increased with the rise of temperature from 20°C to 39°C, and (iii) the accommodation to long-lasting hyperpolarization is greater than to depolarization. The present results suggest that the electrotonic potentials in patients with

  12. Heritability in inflammatory bowel disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gordon, Hannah; Trier Moller, Frederik; Andersen, Vibeke

    2015-01-01

    Since Tysk et al's pioneering analysis of the Swedish twin registry, twin and family studies continue to support a strong genetic basis of the inflammatory bowel diseases. The coefficient of heritability for siblings of inflammatory bowel disease probands is 25 to 42 for Crohn's disease and 4 to 15...... for ulcerative colitis. Heritability estimates for Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis from pooled twin studies are 0.75 and 0.67, respectively. However, this is at odds with the much lower heritability estimates from Genome-Wide Association Studies (GWAS). This "missing heritability" is likely due...... to shortfalls in both family studies and GWAS. The coefficient of heritability fails to account for familial shared environment. Heritability calculations from twin data are based on Falconer's method, with premises that are increasingly understood to be flawed. GWAS based heritability estimates may...

  13. Surgery for inflammatory bowel disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    John M Hwang; Madhulika G Varma

    2008-01-01

    Despite the new and ever expanding array of medications for the treatment of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD),there are still clear indications for operative management of IBD and its complications.We present an overview of indications,procedures,considerations,and controversies in the surgical therapy of IBD.

  14. Pelvic Inflammatory Disease (PID) Treatment and Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Search The CDC Cancel Submit Search The CDC Pelvic Inflammatory Disease (PID) Note: Javascript is disabled or is not ... Twitter STD on Facebook Sexually Transmitted Diseases (STDs) Pelvic Inflammatory Disease (PID) Treatment and Care Recommend on Facebook Tweet ...

  15. [Inflammatory Bowel Disease Competence Network].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schreiber, Stefan; Hartmann, Heinz; Kruis, Wolfgang; Kucharzik, Torsten; Mudter, Jonas; Siegmund, Britta; Stallmach, Andreas; Witte, Christine; Fitzke, Klaus; Bokemeyer, Bernd

    2016-04-01

    The Inflammatory Bowel Disease Competence Network is a network of more than 500 physicians and scientists from university clinics, hospitals and gastroenterology practices. The focus extends from the two major forms of inflammatory bowel diseases, Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis, into other chronic inflammatory conditions affecting the intestine, including coeliac disease and microscopic colitis. The network translates basic science discoveries (in particular in the molecular epidemiology research) into innovative diagnostics and therapy. Through its strong networking structures it supports a continuous process to improve quality and standardisation in patient care that is implemented in close interaction with European networks addressing this disease group.Optimisation of patient care based on scientifically proven evidence is a main focus of the network. Therefore, it supports and coordinates translational research and infrastructure projects that investigate aetiology, improvement of diagnostic methods, and development of new or improved use of established therapies. Members participate in various training projects, thus ensuring the rapid transfer of research results into clinical practice.The competence network cooperates with the main patient organisations to engage patients in all levels of activities. The network and the patient organisations have interest in promoting public awareness about the disease entities, because their importance and burden is underestimated in non-specialised medical fields and among the general public.

  16. Inflammatory bowel disease and airway diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vutcovici, Maria; Brassard, Paul; Bitton, Alain

    2016-01-01

    Airway diseases are the most commonly described lung manifestations of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). However, the similarities in disease pathogenesis and the sharing of important environmental risk factors and genetic susceptibility suggest that there is a complex interplay between IBD and airway diseases. Recent evidence of IBD occurrence among patients with airway diseases and the higher than estimated prevalence of subclinical airway injuries among IBD patients support the hypothesis of a two-way association. Future research efforts should be directed toward further exploration of this association, as airway diseases are highly prevalent conditions with a substantial public health impact. PMID:27678355

  17. Quantifying Demyelination in NK venom treated nerve using its electric circuit model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, H. K.; Das, D.; Doley, R.; Sahu, P. P.

    2016-03-01

    Reduction of myelin in peripheral nerve causes critical demyelinating diseases such as chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy, Guillain-Barre syndrome, etc. Clinical monitoring of these diseases requires rapid and non-invasive quantification of demyelination. Here we have developed formulation of nerve conduction velocity (NCV) in terms of demyelination considering electric circuit model of a nerve having bundle of axons for its quantification from NCV measurements. This approach has been validated and demonstrated with toad nerve model treated with crude Naja kaouthia (NK) venom and also shows the effect of Phospholipase A2 and three finger neurotoxin from NK-venom on peripheral nerve. This opens future scope for non-invasive clinical measurement of demyelination.

  18. Osmotic demyelination syndrome in a normonatremic patient of chronic kidney disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atul Abhishek Jha

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Osmotic Demyelination Syndrome (ODS is associated with rapid correction of hyponatremia or fluid shifts, and is characterized by neurological involvement related to pons, brainstem or other areas of the brain. All possible measures should be taken to prevent this serious disorder. Diagnosing this condition early is very important and requires a high index of suspicion. The treatment is purely supportive and most patients may show dramatic recovery. ODS occurring in normonatremic and hypernatremic patients is very rare. We report a case of an 18-year-old boy of end-stage renal disease who presented with an episode of acute gastroenteritis. He was managed with aggressive intravenous fluids, hemodialysis and other supportive therapy. But, he developed altered sensorium and seizures that progressed to features of spastic quadriparesis and lower cranial nerve palsy. Neuroimaging showed hyperintensities in pons and midbrain suggestive of ODS. The patient had normal sodium levels at all times and had no evidence of hyponatremia. The patient was managed with hemodialysis, physiotherapy and other conservative measures and had a gradual clinical and radiological recovery.

  19. Imaging of demyelinating and neoplastic diseases of the spinal cord; Bildgebung bei demyelinisierenden und tumoroesen Erkrankungen des Rueckenmarks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mueller-Mang, C. [Institut fuer CT und MRT Gaenserndorf, Gaenserndorf (Austria)

    2010-12-15

    The clinical symptoms of myelopathy are variable and non-specific. Demyelinating as well as neoplastic spinal cord diseases can cause paresthesia, progressive sensomotoric deficits and bowel and bladder dysfunction. Imaging of the spine, especially with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), is an essential component in the diagnostic assessment of myelopathy and makes a substantial contribution to achieving the correct diagnosis. Although intramedullary neoplasms are far less common than demyelinating spinal cord diseases, radiologists should be familiar with the three most common entities, astrocytoma, ependymoma and hemangioblastoma, which represent over 70% of all spinal cord neoplasms. An early diagnosis and therapy is essential with neoplastic and demyelinating spinal cord diseases to hold residual neurological deficits as low as possible. (orig.) [German] Die klinische Symptomatik von Myelopathien ist aeusserst variabel und unspezifisch. Sowohl demyelinisierende als auch tumoroese Rueckenmarkerkrankungen koennen Paraesthesien, progrediente sensomotorische Ausfaelle und eine Sphinkterdysfunktion hervorrufen. Bildgebende Untersuchungen, und hier allen voran die MRT, sind ein unerlaesslicher Bestandteil zur Abklaerung von Myelopathien und tragen wesentlich zur korrekten Diagnose bei. Intramedullaere Tumoren sind zwar weitaus seltener als demyelinisierende Rueckenmarkerkrankungen, dennoch sollte der Radiologe mit den Bildmerkmalen der 3 haeufigsten Tumorarten, dem Astrozytom, Ependymom und Haemangioblastom vertraut sein, die ueber 70% aller Rueckenmarktumoren verursachen. Eine moeglichst fruehe Diagnostik und Therapie sind bei tumoroesen und demyelinisierenden Rueckenmarkerkrankungen essenziell, um bleibende neurologische Defizite moeglichst gering zu halten. (orig.)

  20. Constitutive expression of a costimulatory ligand on antigen-presenting cells in the nervous system drives demyelinating disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zehntner, Simone P; Brisebois, Marcel; Tran, Elise

    2003-01-01

    that transgenic mice constitutively expressing the costimulatory ligand B7.2/CD86 on microglia in the central nervous system (CNS) and on related cells in the proximal peripheral nervous tissue spontaneously develop autoimmune demyelinating disease. Disease-affected nervous tissue in transgenic mice showed...... recipients but not into non-transgenic recipients. These data provide evidence that B7/CD28 interactions within the nervous tissue are critical determinants of disease development. Our findings have important implications for understanding the etiology of nervous system autoimmune diseases such as multiple...

  1. Immunopathogenesis of inflammatory bowel disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    David Q Shih; Stephan R Targan

    2008-01-01

    Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis are chronic relapsing immune mediated disorders that results from an aberrant response to gut luminal antigen in genetically susceptible host. The adaptive immune response that is then triggered was widely considered to be a T-helper-1 mediated condition in Crohn's disease and T-helper-2 mediated condition in ulcerative colitis. Recent studies in animal models, genome wide association, and basic science has provided important insights in in the immunopathogenesis of inflammatory bowel disease, one of which was the characterization of the interleukin-23/Th-17 axis.

  2. Transcriptional changes in canine distemper virus-induced demyelinating leukoencephalitis favor a biphasic mode of demyelination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulrich, Reiner; Puff, Christina; Wewetzer, Konstantin; Kalkuhl, Arno; Deschl, Ulrich; Baumgärtner, Wolfgang

    2014-01-01

    Canine distemper virus (CDV)-induced demyelinating leukoencephalitis in dogs (Canis familiaris) is suggested to represent a naturally occurring translational model for subacute sclerosing panencephalitis and multiple sclerosis in humans. The aim of this study was a hypothesis-free microarray analysis of the transcriptional changes within cerebellar specimens of five cases of acute, six cases of subacute demyelinating, and three cases of chronic demyelinating and inflammatory CDV leukoencephalitis as compared to twelve non-infected control dogs. Frozen cerebellar specimens were used for analysis of histopathological changes including demyelination, transcriptional changes employing microarrays, and presence of CDV nucleoprotein RNA and protein using microarrays, RT-qPCR and immunohistochemistry. Microarray analysis revealed 780 differentially expressed probe sets. The dominating change was an up-regulation of genes related to the innate and the humoral immune response, and less distinct the cytotoxic T-cell-mediated immune response in all subtypes of CDV leukoencephalitis as compared to controls. Multiple myelin genes including myelin basic protein and proteolipid protein displayed a selective down-regulation in subacute CDV leukoencephalitis, suggestive of an oligodendrocyte dystrophy. In contrast, a marked up-regulation of multiple immunoglobulin-like expressed sequence tags and the delta polypeptide of the CD3 antigen was observed in chronic CDV leukoencephalitis, in agreement with the hypothesis of an immune-mediated demyelination in the late inflammatory phase of the disease. Analysis of pathways intimately linked to demyelination as determined by morphometry employing correlation-based Gene Set Enrichment Analysis highlighted the pathomechanistic importance of up-regulated genes comprised by the gene ontology terms "viral replication" and "humoral immune response" as well as down-regulated genes functionally related to "metabolite and energy generation".

  3. Transcriptional changes in canine distemper virus-induced demyelinating leukoencephalitis favor a biphasic mode of demyelination.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reiner Ulrich

    Full Text Available Canine distemper virus (CDV-induced demyelinating leukoencephalitis in dogs (Canis familiaris is suggested to represent a naturally occurring translational model for subacute sclerosing panencephalitis and multiple sclerosis in humans. The aim of this study was a hypothesis-free microarray analysis of the transcriptional changes within cerebellar specimens of five cases of acute, six cases of subacute demyelinating, and three cases of chronic demyelinating and inflammatory CDV leukoencephalitis as compared to twelve non-infected control dogs. Frozen cerebellar specimens were used for analysis of histopathological changes including demyelination, transcriptional changes employing microarrays, and presence of CDV nucleoprotein RNA and protein using microarrays, RT-qPCR and immunohistochemistry. Microarray analysis revealed 780 differentially expressed probe sets. The dominating change was an up-regulation of genes related to the innate and the humoral immune response, and less distinct the cytotoxic T-cell-mediated immune response in all subtypes of CDV leukoencephalitis as compared to controls. Multiple myelin genes including myelin basic protein and proteolipid protein displayed a selective down-regulation in subacute CDV leukoencephalitis, suggestive of an oligodendrocyte dystrophy. In contrast, a marked up-regulation of multiple immunoglobulin-like expressed sequence tags and the delta polypeptide of the CD3 antigen was observed in chronic CDV leukoencephalitis, in agreement with the hypothesis of an immune-mediated demyelination in the late inflammatory phase of the disease. Analysis of pathways intimately linked to demyelination as determined by morphometry employing correlation-based Gene Set Enrichment Analysis highlighted the pathomechanistic importance of up-regulated genes comprised by the gene ontology terms "viral replication" and "humoral immune response" as well as down-regulated genes functionally related to "metabolite and energy

  4. Transcriptome Analysis of Peripheral Blood in Chronic Inflammatory Demyelinating Polyradiculoneuropathy Patients Identifies TNFR1 and TLR Pathways in the IVIg Response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richard, Alexandra; Corvol, Jean-Christophe; Debs, Rabab; Reach, Pauline; Tahiri, Khadija; Carpentier, Wassila; Gueguen, Justine; Guillemot, Vincent; Labeyrie, Céline; Adams, David; Viala, Karine; Cohen Aubart, Fleur

    2016-05-01

    We have studied the response to intravenous immunoglobulins (IVIg) by a transcriptomic approach in 11 chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy (CIDP) patients (CIDP duration = 6 [0.83-6.5] years). RNA was extracted from cells in whole blood collected before and 3 weeks after IVIg treatment, and hybridized on Illumina chips. After RNA quality controls, gene expression was analyzed using statistical tests fitted for microarrays (R software, limma package), and a pathway analysis was performed using DAVID software. We identified 52 genes with expression that varied significantly after IVIg (fold change [FC] > 1.2, P CIDP pathophysiology and the response to IVIg. We conclude that responder patients have stronger inflammatory activity that is lessened by IVIg.

  5. 水通道蛋白4抗体对中枢神经炎性脱髓鞘疾病诊断及复发的预测价值%Prognostic value of aquaporin-4 antibody in patients of inflammatory demyelinating diseases in central nervous system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨扬; 吴卫平; 黄德晖; 武雷

    2012-01-01

    Objective To determine the prognostic value of AQP4 antibody in the cohort of Chinese patients with neuromyelitis optica ( NMO),HR-NMO( high-risk NMO) and classic multiple sclerosis (MS).Methods Sera of patients with NMO,HR-NMO and MS were all investigated for the presence of AQP4 antibody by indirect immunofluorescence in human AQP4-transfected cells.The diagnostic and prognostic values of anti-AQP4 antibody were evaluated in 352 patients with NMO ( n =106),HR-NMO ( n =84 )including optico-spinal MS (OSMS),longitudinally extensive transverse myelitis (LETM),recurrent optic neuritis (RON) and optic neuritis (ON) or transverse myelitis (TM) with other antoimmune disease and classic MS (n =162).All patients were followed up at outpatient clinics or by telephone.Results In our study,the anti-AQP4 antibody's seropositivity in all demyelinating cases (n =352) was 31.3%.And 72 (65.5%) seropositive patients presented with severe ON,82(74.5% ) with TM,60(54.4% ) with spinalcord lesion more than 3 segments,16( 14.5% ) had relapses of ON and 38(34.5% ) relapses of TM during a follow-up period of 24 months.Significant differences existed between anti-AQP4 antibody seropositivity and seronegative in terms of concurrent severe ON,TM,spinal-cord lesion more than 3 segments and relapses of ON and TM (P < 0.05 ).Also,in NMO patient seropositive for anti-AQP4 antibody ( n =78),28 (35.9%)developed relapses of TM.However,in HR-NMO patient with seropositivity (n =28 ),4 (14.3%)developed relapses of ON and 10(35.7% ) relapses of TM.The relapse of ON or TM occurred in 57/110 seropositive patients versus 17/242 seronegative ones ( P < 0.05 ).Conclusion As compared with antiAQP4 antibody-negative ones,anti-AQP4 antibody-positive patients show significantly higher frequencies of severe ON,TM,longitudinal spinal-cord segments and they are more predisposed to ON or TM relapse.And seropositive NMO and HR-NMO patients are more likely to develop relapses of ON or TM

  6. [Demyelinating polyneuropathies in patients with diabetes mellitus and chronic alcoholic intoxication].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovrazhkina, E A

    2012-01-01

    Frequency and nosological attribution of demyelinating polyneuropathies in patients with diabetes mellitus and alcoholism were determined. Eighty-six inpatients with alcoholic (n=46) and diabetic (n=40) polyneuropathy were examined clinically and using electroneuromyography (ENMG). A demyelinating pathogenetic variant was identified by clinical and ENMG data in 27 (31%) patients. Nine patients (33%) had dysimmune polyneuropathies (acute and chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy). Polyneuropathies were specified as toxic/metabolic with the prevalence of a demyelinating component within the main disease in 18 (67%) patients. Clinical and ENMG-signs of the demyelinating variant of alcoholic and diabetic neuropathy are presented. The efficacy of the antioxidant berlition was shown for toxic/metabolic polyneuropathies while the addition of immune modulators was needed for treatment of dysimmune polyneuropathy.

  7. Inflammatory diseases of the brain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haehnel, Stefan (ed.) [University of Heidelberg Medical Center (Germany). Div. of Neuroradiology

    2009-07-01

    This book provides a comprehensive overview of inflammatory brain diseases from a neuroradiological point of view. Such diseases may be either infectious (e.g., viral encephalitis and pyogenic brain abscess) or non-infectious (e.g., multiple sclerosis), and many of these entities are becoming increasingly important for differential diagnosis, particularly in immunocompromised persons. Neuroimaging contributes greatly to the differentiation of infectious and noninfectious brain diseases and to the distinction between brain inflammation and other, for instance neoplastic, diseases. In order to ensure a standardized approach throughout the book, each chapter is subdivided into three principal sections: epidemiology, clinical presentation and therapy; imaging; and differential diagnosis. A separate chapter addresses technical and methodological issues and imaging protocols. All of the authors are recognized experts in their fields, and numerous high-quality and informative illustrations are included. This book will be of great value not only to neuroradiologists but also to neurologists, neuropediatricians, and general radiologists. (orig.)

  8. Early Electrodiagnostic Features of Upper Extremity Sensory Nerves Can Differentiate Axonal Guillain-Barré Syndrome from Acute Inflammatory Demyelinating Polyneuropathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koo, Yong Seo; Shin, Ha Young; Kim, Jong Kuk; Nam, Tai-Seung; Shin, Kyong Jin; Bae, Jong-Seok; Suh, Bum Chun; Oh, Jeeyoung; Yoon, Byeol-A

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose Serial nerve conduction studies (NCSs) are recommended for differentiating axonal and demyelinating Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS), but this approach is not suitable for early diagnoses. This study was designed to identify possible NCS parameters for differentiating GBS subtypes. Methods We retrospectively reviewed the medical records of 70 patients with GBS who underwent NCS within 10 days of symptom onset. Patients with axonal GBS and acute inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (AIDP) were selected based on clinical characteristics and serial NCSs. An antiganglioside antibody study was used to increase the diagnostic certainty. Results The amplitudes of median and ulnar nerve sensory nerve action potentials (SNAPs) were significantly smaller in the AIDP group than in the axonal-GBS group. Classification and regression-tree analysis revealed that the distal ulnar sensory nerve SNAP amplitude was the best predictor of axonal GBS. Conclusions Early upper extremity sensory NCS findings are helpful in differentiating axonal-GBS patients with antiganglioside antibodies from AIDP patients. PMID:27819421

  9. A case of a 17-year-old male with neurofascin-155 antibody-positive chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy presenting with tremor and ataxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itaya, Kazuhiro; Inoue, Manabu; Iizuka, Natsuko; Shimizu, Yuki; Yuki, Nobuhiro; Ichikawa, Hiroo

    2016-09-29

    A 17-year-old male with no medical history noticed weakness of his limbs with imbalance and subsequent finger tremors. Physical examination revealed features of polyneuropathy, including diffuse weakness, distal symmetrical numbness with impaired deep sensation and areflexia in all limbs. Postural tremor was present in fingers. Ataxia was apparent in both lower limbs, causing a wide-based gait with a positive Romberg sign. Cerebrospinal fluid contained elevated total protein without pleocytosis. A nerve conduction study disclosed demyelinating features with prolonged terminal latencies, slow velocities with delayed F-wave latencies, and prominent temporal dispersion. These findings led to diagnosis of typical chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy (CIDP) with notable feature of postural finger tremor and ataxia of unknown cause. These atypical features prompted us to examine neurofascin-155 (NF155) antibodies, which were positive. No significant improvement occurred after initial administration of intravenous immunoglobulin and subsequent plasma exchange. However, corticosteroids with intravenous pulse therapy followed by oral prednisolone significantly improved the symptoms. Patients with CIDP with anti-NF155 antibodies may have similar clinical features and constitute a CIDP subgroup. In such patients, corticosteroids may be more effective than intravenous immunoglobulin. Further studies are needed to define the features of this subgroup and determine effective therapy for CIDP.

  10. T cells in vascular inflammatory diseases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lintermans, Lucas L.; Stegeman, Coen A.; Heeringa, Peter; Abdulahad, Wayel H.

    2014-01-01

    Inflammation of the human vasculature is a manifestation of many different diseases ranging from systemic autoimmune diseases to chronic inflammatory diseases, in which multiple types of immune cells are involved. For both autoimmune diseases and chronic inflammatory diseases several observations su

  11. Cerebrospinal fluid interleukin-6 in central nervous system inflammatory diseases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandre Wullschleger

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Interleukin (IL-6 is recognised as an important cytokine involved in inflammatory diseases of the central nervous system (CNS. OBJECTIVE: To perform a large retrospective study designed to test cerebrospinal fluid (CSF IL-6 levels in the context of neurological diseases, and evaluate its usefulness as a biomarker to help discriminate multiple sclerosis (MS from other inflammatory neurological diseases (OIND. PATIENTS AND METHODS: We analyzed 374 CSF samples for IL-6 using a quantitative enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Groups tested were composed of demyelinating diseases of the CNS (DD, n = 117, including relapsing-remitting MS (RRMS, n = 65, primary progressive MS (PPMS, n = 11, clinically isolated syndrome (CIS, n = 11, optic neuritis (ON, n = 30; idiopathic transverse myelitis (ITM, n = 10; other inflammatory neurological diseases (OIND, n = 35; and non-inflammatory neurological diseases (NIND, n = 212. Differences between groups were analysed using Kruskal-Wallis test and Mann-Whitney U-test. RESULTS: CSF IL-6 levels exceeded the positivity cut-off of 10 pg/ml in 18 (51.4% of the 35 OIND samples, but in only three (3.9% of the 76 MS samples collected. CSF IL-6 was negative for all NIND samples tested (0/212. IL-6 cut-off of 10 pg/ml offers 96% sensitivity to exclude MS. CONCLUSION: CSF IL-6 may help to differentiate MS from its major differential diagnosis group, OIND.

  12. Cancer in inflammatory bowel disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jianlin Xie; Steven H Itzkowitz

    2008-01-01

    Patients with long-standing inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) have an increased risk of developing colorectal cancer (CRC). Many of the molecular alterations responsible for sporadic colorectal cancer, namely chromosomal instability, microsatellite instability, and hypermethylation, also play a role in colitis-associated colon carcinogenesis. Colon cancer risk in inflammatory bowel disease increases with longer duration of colitis, greater anatomic extent of colitis, the presence of primary sclerosing cholangitis, family history of CRC and degree of inflammation of the bowel. Chemoprevention includes aminosalicylates, ursodeoxycholic acid, and possibly folic acid and statins. To reduce CRC mortality in IBD, colonoscopic surveillance with random biopsies remains the major way to detect early mucosal dysplasia. When dysplasia is confirmed, proctocolectomy is considered for these patients. Patients with small intestinal Crohn's disease are at increased risk of small bowel adenocarcinoma. Ulcerative colitis patients with total proctocolectomy and ileal pouch anal- anastomosis have a rather low risk of dysplasia in the ileal pouch, but the anal transition zone should be monitored periodically. Other extra intestinal cancers, such as hepatobiliary and hematopoietic cancer, have shown variable incidence rates. New endoscopic and molecular screening approaches may further refine our current surveillance guidelines and our understanding of the natural history of dysplasia.

  13. Vaccines and the risk of multiple sclerosis and other central nervous system demyelinating diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langer-Gould, Annette; Qian, Lei; Tartof, Sara Y; Brara, Sonu M; Jacobsen, Steve J; Beaber, Brandon E; Sy, Lina S; Chao, Chun; Hechter, Rulin; Tseng, Hung Fu

    2014-12-01

    Because vaccinations are common, even a small increased risk of multiple sclerosis (MS) or other acquired central nervous system demyelinating syndromes (CNS ADS) could have a significant effect on public health. To determine whether vaccines, particularly those for hepatitis B (HepB) and human papillomavirus (HPV), increase the risk of MS or other CNS ADS. A nested case-control study was conducted using data obtained from the complete electronic health records of Kaiser Permanente Southern California (KPSC) members. Cases were identified through the KPSC CNS ADS cohort between 2008 and 2011, which included extensive review of medical records by an MS specialist. Five controls per case were matched on age, sex, and zip code. Vaccination of any type (particularly HepB and HPV) identified through the electronic vaccination records system. All forms of CNS ADS were analyzed using conditional logistic regression adjusted for race/ethnicity, health care utilization, comorbid diseases, and infectious illnesses before symptom onset. We identified 780 incident cases of CNS ADS and 3885 controls; 92 cases and 459 controls were females aged 9 to 26 years, which is the indicated age range for HPV vaccination. There were no associations between HepB vaccination (odds ratio [OR], 1.12; 95% CI, 0.72-1.73), HPV vaccination (OR, 1.05; 95% CI, 0.62-1.78), or any vaccination (OR, 1.03; 95% CI, 0.86-1.22) and the risk of CNS ADS up to 3 years later. Vaccination of any type was associated with an increased risk of CNS ADS onset within the first 30 days after vaccination only in younger (vaccines with MS or any other CNS ADS, which argues against a causal association. The short-term increase in risk suggests that vaccines may accelerate the transition from subclinical to overt autoimmunity in patients with existing disease. Our findings support clinical anecdotes of CNS ADS symptom onset shortly after vaccination but do not suggest a need for a change in vaccine policy.

  14. Ischemic heart disease in systemic inflammatory diseases. An appraisal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gargiulo, Paola; Marsico, Fabio; Parente, Antonio; Paolillo, Stefania; Cecere, Milena; Casaretti, Laura; Pellegrino, Angela Maria; Formisano, Tiziana; Fabiani, Irma; Soricelli, Andrea; Trimarco, Bruno; Perrone-Filardi, Pasquale

    2014-01-01

    Systemic inflammatory diseases are inflammatory syndromes that are associated with increased cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. The link between inflammatory and cardiovascular diseases can be attributed to coexistence of classical risk factors and of inflammatory mechanisms activated in systemic inflammatory diseases and involving the immune system. Yet, clinical implications of these findings are not entirely clear and deeper knowledge and awareness of cardiac involvement in inflammatory diseases are necessary. The aims of this review are to summarize cardiac involvement in systemic inflammatory diseases and to identify areas where evidence is currently lacking that deserve further investigation in the future.

  15. 慢性炎性脱髓鞘性多发性神经病的药物治疗现状%Current Medical Treatment of Chronic Inflammatory Demyelinating Polyradiculopathy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈远春

    2010-01-01

    @@ 慢性炎性脱髓鞘性多发性神经病(Chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculopathy,CIDP)是一种获得性的周围神经脱髓鞘性疾病,以反复发作的肌无力为特征,可伴感觉缺失和腱反射消失等.

  16. Inflammatory bowel disease in pregnancy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dawn B Beaulieu; Sunanda Kane

    2011-01-01

    Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis affect women in their child-bearing years. Family planning has come to be a common discussion between the gastroenterologist and the inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) patient.Disease control prior to desired conception and throughout pregnancy is the most important thing to keep in mind when caring for the IBD patient. Continued medical management during pregnancy is crucial in optimizing outcomes. Studies indicate that quiescent disease prior to conception infer the best pregnancy outcomes, similar to those in the general population.Active disease prior to and during pregnancy, can lead to complications such as pre-term labor, low birth weight, and small for gestational age infants. Although there are no definitive long term effects of pregnancy on IBD, there are some limited studies that suggest that it may alter the disease course. Understanding the literature and its limitations is important in the modern era of IBD care. Educating the patient and taking a team approach with the obstetrician will help achieve successful outcomes for mother and baby.

  17. Demyelinating disease in patients with myasthenia gravis Doenças desmielinizantes em pacientes com miastenia gravis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denis Bernardi Bichuetti

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Myasthenia gravis (MG is an autoimmune disease characterized by fluctuating muscle weakness, caused by impaired neuromuscular transmission. Patients with MG can present other autoimmune diseases in association, commonly hypo or hyperthyroidism. The association of MG to demyelinating disease is rare and has been described before. We report on three Brazilian patients with MG that presented distinct demyelinating diseases, two monophasic and one recurrent neuromyelitis optica, several years after the diagnosis of MG, and discuss their clinical courses.Miastenia gravis (MG é doença autoimune caracterizada por episódios de fraqueza muscular alternados com melhora, causada por bloqueio da junção neuromuscular. Pacientes com MG podem apresentar outras doenças autoimunes, comumente hipo ou hipertiroidismo, e a associação de MG com doenças desmielinizantes é raramente descrita. Relatamos três pacientes brasileiros com MG que desenvolveram doenças desmielinizantes, dois monofásicos e um neuromielite óptica recorrente, vários anos após o diagnóstico de MG e discutimos seus cursos clínicos.

  18. Consensus Statement on medication use in multiple sclerosis by the Spanish Society of Neurology's study group for demyelinating diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Merino, A; Fernández, O; Montalbán, X; de Andrés, C; Oreja-Guevara, C; Rodríguez-Antigüedad, A; Arbizu, T

    2013-01-01

    Treatments for multiple sclerosis therapy are rapidly evolving. It is believed that new drugs will be approved in the near future, thereby changing current indications for treatment. In this context, the Spanish Society of Neurology's study group on demyelinating diseases, which evaluates medication use in MS, has decided to draw up a consensus statement on the current indications and guidelines for multiple sclerosis treatment. Copyright © 2013 Sociedad Española de Neurología. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  19. Selenium and inflammatory bowel disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kudva, Avinash K; Shay, Ashley E; Prabhu, K Sandeep

    2015-07-15

    Dietary intake of the micronutrient selenium is essential for normal immune functions. Selenium is cotranslationally incorporated as the 21st amino acid, selenocysteine, into selenoproteins that function to modulate pathways involved in inflammation. Epidemiological studies have suggested an inverse association between selenium levels and inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), which includes Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis that can potentially progress to colon cancer. However, the underlying mechanisms are not well understood. Here we summarize the current literature on the pathophysiology of IBD, which is multifactorial in origin with unknown etiology. We have focused on a few selenoproteins that mediate gastrointestinal inflammation and activate the host immune response, wherein macrophages play a pivotal role. Changes in cellular oxidative state coupled with altered expression of selenoproteins in macrophages drive the switch from a proinflammatory phenotype to an anti-inflammatory phenotype to efficiently resolve inflammation in the gut and restore epithelial barrier integrity. Such a phenotypic plasticity is accompanied by changes in cytokines, chemokines, and bioactive metabolites, including eicosanoids that not only mitigate inflammation but also partake in restoring gut homeostasis through diverse pathways involving differential regulation of transcription factors such as nuclear factor-κB and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ. The role of the intestinal microbiome in modulating inflammation and aiding in selenium-dependent resolution of gut injury is highlighted to provide novel insights into the beneficial effects of selenium in IBD.

  20. Microbiota biodiversity in inflammatory bowel disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Gut microbiota plays a significant role in human health and energy balance, and provides protection against disease states. An altered balance between microbiota and its host (dysbiosis) would appear to contribute to the development of Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD), Crohn’s Disease (CD) and Ulcerative Colitis (UC). CD and UC are chronic inflammatory diseases of the gastrointestinal tes. PMID:24684926

  1. Neuroimmune regulation of inflammatory responses in inflammatory bowel disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rijnierse, Anneke

    2006-01-01

    The term inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is used to describe chronic inflammatory conditions of the gastro-intestinal tract. Patients suffer from abdominal pain, diarrhea, rectal bleeding and a substantial personal burden. The etiology of IBD is gradually being unraveled but remains a complex

  2. Neuroimmune regulation of inflammatory responses in inflammatory bowel disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rijnierse, Anneke

    2006-01-01

    The term inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is used to describe chronic inflammatory conditions of the gastro-intestinal tract. Patients suffer from abdominal pain, diarrhea, rectal bleeding and a substantial personal burden. The etiology of IBD is gradually being unraveled but remains a complex inter

  3. Nutrition in inflammatory bowel disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez Gómez, María Josefa; Melián Fernández, Cristóbal; Romeo Donlo, María

    2016-07-12

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is a chronic pathology that has an outbreaks course that in recent years have seen an increase in incidence, especially at younger ages. Malnutrition is frequently associated with this condition, therefore, it is very important to ensure a right nutritional intervention, especially in pediatric patients, to ensure an optimal growth and also an improvement in the clinic. Our goal will be updated the role of nutrition in this disease and in its treatment based on the published evidence. Malnutrition in these patients is frequent and is influenced by various factors such as, decreased food intake, increased nutrient requirements, increased protein loss and malabsorption of nutrients. Therefore there should be a nutritional monitoring of all of them, in which anthropometric measurements, laboratory tests and densitometry were made to establish the needs and sufficient caloric intake tailored to each patient. The use of enteral nutrition as a treatment in Crohn’s disease with mild to moderate outbreak in child population, is amply demonstrated, has even shown to be superior to the use of corticosteroids. Therefore we can conclude by stressing that nutritional intervention is a mainstay in the management of patients with IBD, which aims to prevent and / or control disease-related malnutrition to decrease morbidity and mortality and improve quality of life.

  4. Elevation of AQP4 and selective cytokines in experimental autoimmune encephalitis mice provides some potential biomarkers in optic neuritis and demyelinating diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Li; Weng, Huan; Li, Zhenxin

    2015-01-01

    Idiopathic optic neuritis (ION) is an inflammation of the optic nerve that may result in a complete or partial loss of vision. ION is usually due to the immune attack of the myelin sheath covering the optic nerve. ION acts frequently as the first symptoms of multiple sclerosis (MS) and neuromyelitis optica (NMO), or other inflammatory demyelinating disorders. The pathogenic progression of ION remains unclear. Experimental autoimmune encephalitis (EAE) is a commonly used model of idiopathic inflammatory demyelinating disorders (IIDDs); the optic nerve is affected in EAE as well. The specific mediators of demyelination in optic neuritis are unknown. Recent studies have indicated what T-cell activation in peripheral blood is associated with optic neuritis pathogenesis. The object of the present study was to determine whether certain cytokines (IL-6, IL-17A, and IL-23) and AQP4 contribute to the demyelinating process using EAE model. We have found that IL-6R, AQP4 and IL-23R are significantly increased in mRNA and protein levels in optic nerves in EAE mice compared to control mice; serum AQP4, IL-6, IL-17A, IL-23 are increased whereas transforming growth factor beta (TGF-β) is decreased in EAE mice. These results suggest that AQP4 and selective cytokines in serum are associated with ION pathogenesis in the animal model, and these results shine light for future clinical diagnosis as potential biomarkers in ION patients.

  5. Hypertrophic osteoarthropathy of chronic inflammatory bowel disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oppenheimer, D.A.; Jones, H.H.

    1982-12-01

    The case of a 14-year old girl with painful periostitis and ulcerative colitis is reported. The association of chronic inflammatory bowel disease with osteoarthropathy is rare and has previously been reported in eight patients. The periosteal reaction found in association with inflammatory bowel disease is apparently related to a chronic disease course and may cause extreme localized pain.

  6. Pelvic Inflammatory Disease (PID) Fact Sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Search Form Controls Cancel Submit Search the CDC Pelvic Inflammatory Disease (PID) Note: Javascript is disabled or is not ... Twitter STD on Facebook Sexually Transmitted Diseases (STDs) Pelvic Inflammatory Disease (PID) - CDC Fact Sheet Language: English (US) Españ ...

  7. Chronic Acquired Demyelinating Polyneuropathy following Renal Transplantation

    OpenAIRE

    Younger, D. S.; Stuart Orsher

    2013-01-01

    The clinical, laboratory, and treatment findings of a patient with chronic acquired demyelinating polyneuropathy (CADP) in association with renal transplantation are described. Like the present case, many such patients have been described under the rubric of chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy (CIDP).

  8. Etiopathogenesis of inflammatory bowel diseases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Silvio Danese; Claudio Fiocchi

    2006-01-01

    Theories explaining the etiopathogenesis of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) have been proposed ever since Crohn's disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC) were recognized as the two major forms of the disease. Although the exact cause(s) and mechanisms of tissue damage in CD and UC have yet to be completely understood, enough progress has occurred to accept the following hypothesis as valid: IBD is an inappropriate immune response that occurs in genetically susceptible individuals as the result of a complex interaction among environmental factors, microbial factors, and the intestinal immune system. Among an almost endless list of environmental factors, smoking has been identified as a risk factor for CD and a protective factor for UC. Among microbial factors, no convincing evidence indicates that classical infectious agents cause IBD, while mounting evidence points to an abnormal immune response against the normal enteric flora as being of central importance. Gut inflammation is mediated by cells of the innate as well as adaptive immune systems, with the additional contribution of non-immune cells, such as epithelial, mesenchymal and endothelial cells, and platelets.

  9. Complement activation in autoimmune demyelination: dual role in neuroinflammation and neuroprotection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rus, Horea; Cudrici, Cornelia; Niculescu, Florin; Shin, Moon L

    2006-11-01

    Multiple sclerosis and its animal model experimental allergic encephalomyelitis are inflammatory demyelinating diseases of the central nervous system mediated by activated lymphocytes, macrophages/microglia and the complement system. Complement activation and the C5b-9 terminal complex contribute to the pathogenesis of these diseases through its role to promote demyelination. C5b-9 was also shown to protect oligodendrocytes from apoptosis both in vitro and in vivo. Our findings indicate that activation of complement and C5b-9 assembly plays a pro-inflammatory role in the acute phase, but may also be neuroprotective.

  10. Interleukin-10 overexpression promotes Fas-ligand-dependent chronic macrophage-mediated demyelinating polyneuropathy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dru S Dace

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Demyelinating polyneuropathy is a debilitating, poorly understood disease that can exist in acute (Guillain-Barré syndrome or chronic forms. Interleukin-10 (IL-10, although traditionally considered an anti-inflammatory cytokine, has also been implicated in promoting abnormal angiogenesis in the eye and in the pathobiology of autoimmune diseases such as lupus and encephalomyelitis. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Overexpression of IL-10 in a transgenic mouse model leads to macrophage-mediated demyelinating polyneuropathy. IL-10 upregulates ICAM-1 within neural tissues, promoting massive macrophage influx, inflammation-induced demyelination, and subsequent loss of neural tissue resulting in muscle weakness and paralysis. The primary insult is to perineural myelin followed by secondary axonal loss. Infiltrating macrophages within the peripheral nerves demonstrate a highly pro-inflammatory signature. Macrophages are central players in the pathophysiology, as in vivo depletion of macrophages using clodronate liposomes reverses the phenotype, including progressive nerve loss and paralysis. Macrophage-mediate demyelination is dependent on Fas-ligand (FasL-mediated Schwann cell death. SIGNIFICANCE: These findings mimic the human disease chronic idiopathic demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP and may also promote further understanding of the pathobiology of related conditions such as acute idiopathic demyelinating polyneuropathy (AIDP or Guillain-Barré syndrome.

  11. The topograpy of demyelination and neurodegeneration in the multiple sclerosis brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haider, Lukas; Zrzavy, Tobias; Hametner, Simon; Höftberger, Romana; Bagnato, Francesca; Grabner, Günther; Trattnig, Siegfried; Pfeifenbring, Sabine; Brück, Wolfgang; Lassmann, Hans

    2016-03-01

    Multiple sclerosis is a chronic inflammatory disease with primary demyelination and neurodegeneration in the central nervous system. In our study we analysed demyelination and neurodegeneration in a large series of multiple sclerosis brains and provide a map that displays the frequency of different brain areas to be affected by these processes. Demyelination in the cerebral cortex was related to inflammatory infiltrates in the meninges, which was pronounced in invaginations of the brain surface (sulci) and possibly promoted by low flow of the cerebrospinal fluid in these areas. Focal demyelinated lesions in the white matter occurred at sites with high venous density and additionally accumulated in watershed areas of low arterial blood supply. Two different patterns of neurodegeneration in the cortex were identified: oxidative injury of cortical neurons and retrograde neurodegeneration due to axonal injury in the white matter. While oxidative injury was related to the inflammatory process in the meninges and pronounced in actively demyelinating cortical lesions, retrograde degeneration was mainly related to demyelinated lesions and axonal loss in the white matter. Our data show that accumulation of lesions and neurodegeneration in the multiple sclerosis brain does not affect all brain regions equally and provides the pathological basis for the selection of brain areas for monitoring regional injury and atrophy development in future magnetic resonance imaging studies.

  12. Pharmacogenetics in inflammatory bowel disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Marie Pierik; Paul Rutgeerts; Robert Vlietinck; Severine Vermeire

    2006-01-01

    Pharmacogenetics is the study of the association between variability in drug response and (or) drug toxicity and polymorphisms in genes. The goal of this field of science is to adapt drugs to a patient's specific genetic background and therefore make them more efficacious and safe. In this article we describe the variants in genes that influence either the efficacy or toxicity of common drugs used in the treatment of inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD), ulcerative colitis (UC),and Crohn's disease (CD) including sulfasalazine and mesalazine, azathioprine (AZA) and 6-mercaptopurine (6-MP), methotrexate (MTX), glucocorticosteroids (CSs) and infliximab. Furthermore, difficulties with pharmacogenetic studies in general and more specifically in IBD are described. Although pharmacogenetics is a promising field that already contributed to a better understanding of some of the underlying mechanisms of action of drugs used in IBD, the only discovery translated until now into daily practice is the relation between thiopurine S-methyltransferase (TPMT) gene polymorphisms and hematological toxicity of thiopurine treatment. In the future it is necessary to organize studies in well characterized patient cohorts who have been uniformly treated and systematically evaluated in order to quantitate drug response more objectively. An effort should be made to collect genomic DNA from all patients enrolled in clinical drug trials after appropriate informed consent for pharmacogenetic studies.

  13. Understanding the consequences of chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy from impairments to activity and participation restrictions and reduced quality of life: the ICE study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merkies, Ingemar S J; Hughes, Richard A C; Donofrio, Peter; Bril, Vera; Dalakas, Marinos C; Hanna, Kim; Hartung, Hans-Peter; Latov, Norman; van Doorn, Pieter A; Deng, Chunqin

    2010-09-01

    A randomized trial (ICE trial) in chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy (CIDP) demonstrated significantly more improvement with intravenous immunoglobulin (Gamunex(®), Talecris Biotherapeutics, Inc., Research Triangle Park, NC) than placebo. To understand the relationship between CIDP impairments, activity and participation restrictions, and quality of life (QoL) in this trial, we investigated the association between scales representing these outcome levels. Gamunex or placebo was given every 3 weeks for up to 24 weeks to 117 patients in an initial treatment period after which treatment failures were crossed over (alternative treatment). We assessed impairments, activity and participation, and SF-36 component mental (MCS) and physical summaries (PCS). Regression analyses of baseline data were performed (all subjects) and change from baseline to endpoint (Gamunex-treated group only) to determine correlations between outcomes. Grip strength, medical research council (MRC) sum score, and inflammatory neuropathy cause and treatment (INCAT) sensory sum score were the strongest explanatory variables of disability (at baseline: r(2) = 0.46; change from baseline: r(2) = 0.66). Only up to half of the variance in QoL scores (PCS at baseline: r(2) = 0.30; change from baseline: r(2) = 0.41; MCS: at baseline: r(2) = 0.10; change from baseline: r(2) = 0.24) was explained by impairment and activity and participation measures. Future studies are required to elucidate the impact of CIDP on disability and QoL changes, because the obtained correlations provide only partial explanation.

  14. Paraneoplastic brainstem encephalomyelitis and atypical form of chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy in patient with testicular germinal tumor-is this an overlap syndrome? a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gogol, Paweł; Gogol, Anna; Opuchlik, Andrzej; Dziewulska, Dorota

    2015-01-01

    Paraneoplastic neurologic syndromes are diagnosed when neurologic symptoms are associated with neoplasm and other causative factors are excluded. They may precede or be simultaneous to various types of neoplasms, mainly malignant. In men up to 45-50 years old the most common cancer causing the paraneoplastic syndrome is testicle tumor, manifesting usually as limbic/brain stem encephalitis and myelitis. Usually effective treatment of underlying neoplasm brings resolution of neurologic symptoms. But corticosteroids and intravenuous immunoglobulins are also used. In the presented case a 37-year-old man was primarily diagnosed and treated for progressive tetraparesis with signs of both upper and lower motor neuron dysfunction, associated with bulbar symptoms. Having various diagnostic procedures performed an atypical form of chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuronopathy was primarily suspected, but eventually a discovery of endodermal sinus tumor in the testicle enabled to state the diagnosis of possible paraneoplastic syndrome. In spite of chemotherapy the patient died shortly after the diagnosis because of infectious complications. Histopathology displayed intense inflammatory changes in the brain stem as well as in cranial nerves and cervical spinal cord. The same immunological process evoked by various pathogenetic factors (infection vs. neoplasm) may cause similar clinical picture and hinder the diagnosis. Most importantly it may delay the proper way of treatment.

  15. Endothelial Dysfunction in Chronic Inflammatory Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Curtis M. Steyers

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Chronic inflammatory diseases are associated with accelerated atherosclerosis and increased risk of cardiovascular diseases (CVD. As the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis is increasingly recognized as an inflammatory process, similarities between atherosclerosis and systemic inflammatory diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis, inflammatory bowel diseases, lupus, psoriasis, spondyloarthritis and others have become a topic of interest. Endothelial dysfunction represents a key step in the initiation and maintenance of atherosclerosis and may serve as a marker for future risk of cardiovascular events. Patients with chronic inflammatory diseases manifest endothelial dysfunction, often early in the course of the disease. Therefore, mechanisms linking systemic inflammatory diseases and atherosclerosis may be best understood at the level of the endothelium. Multiple factors, including circulating inflammatory cytokines, TNF-α (tumor necrosis factor-α, reactive oxygen species, oxidized LDL (low density lipoprotein, autoantibodies and traditional risk factors directly and indirectly activate endothelial cells, leading to impaired vascular relaxation, increased leukocyte adhesion, increased endothelial permeability and generation of a pro-thrombotic state. Pharmacologic agents directed against TNF-α-mediated inflammation may decrease the risk of endothelial dysfunction and cardiovascular disease in these patients. Understanding the precise mechanisms driving endothelial dysfunction in patients with systemic inflammatory diseases may help elucidate the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis in the general population.

  16. Experimental mouse model of optic neuritis with inflammatory demyelination produced by passive transfer of neuromyelitis optica-immunoglobulin G

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Although optic neuritis (ON) is a defining feature of neuromyelitis optica (NMO), appropriate animal models of NMO ON are lacking. Most NMO patients are seropositive for immunoglobulin G autoantibodies (NMO-IgG) against the astrocyte water channel aquaporin-4 (AQP4). Methods Several approaches were tested to develop a robust, passive-transfer mouse model of NMO ON, including NMO-IgG and complement delivery by: (i) retrobulbar infusion; (ii) intravitreal injection; (iii) a single intracranial injection near the optic chiasm; and (iv) 3-days continuous intracranial infusion near the optic chiasm. Results Little ON or retinal pathology was seen using approaches (i) to (iii). Using approach (iv), however, optic nerves showed characteristic NMO pathology, with loss of AQP4 and glial fibrillary acidic protein immunoreactivity, granulocyte and macrophage infiltration, deposition of activated complement, demyelination and axonal injury. Even more extensive pathology was created in mice lacking complement inhibitor protein CD59, or using a genetically modified NMO-IgG with enhanced complement effector function, including significant loss of retinal ganglion cells. In control studies, optic nerve pathology was absent in treated AQP4-deficient mice, or in wild-type mice receiving control (non-NMO) IgG and complement. Conclusion Passive transfer of NMO-IgG and complement by continuous infusion near the optic chiasm in mice is sufficient to produce ON with characteristic NMO pathology. The mouse model of NMO ON should be useful in further studies of NMO pathogenesis mechanisms and therapeutics. PMID:24468108

  17. Inflammatory bowel disease: the role of inflammatory cytokine gene polymorphisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joanna Balding

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available THE mechanisms responsible for development of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD have not been fully elucidated, although the main cause of disease pathology is attributed to up-regulated inflammatory processes. The aim of this study was to investigate frequencies of polymorphisms in genes encoding pro-inflammatory and anti-inflammatory markers in IBD patients and controls. We determined genotypes of patients with IBD (n=172 and healthy controls (n=389 for polymorphisms in genes encoding various cytokines (interleukin (IL-1β, IL-6, tumour necrosis factor (TNF, IL-10, IL-1 receptor antagonist. Association of these genotypes to disease incidence and pathophysiology was investigated. No strong association was found with occurrence of IBD. Variation was observed between the ulcerative colitis study group and the control population for the TNF-α-308 polymorphism (p=0.0135. There was also variation in the frequency of IL-6-174 and TNF-α-308 genotypes in the ulcerative colitis group compared with the Crohn's disease group (p=0.01. We concluded that polymorphisms in inflammatory genes are associated with variations in IBD phenotype and disease susceptibility. Whether the polymorphisms are directly involved in regulating cytokine production, and consequently pathophysiology of IBD, or serve merely as markers in linkage disequilibrium with susceptibility genes remains unclear.

  18. Novel susceptibility genes in inflammatory bowel disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Colin Noble; Elaine Nimmo; Daniel Gaya; Richard K Russell; Jack Satsangi

    2006-01-01

    The inflammatory bowel disease, Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis, are polygenic disorders with important environmental interactions. To date, the most widely adopted approach to identifying susceptibility genes in complex diseases has involved genome wide linkage studies followed by studies of positional candidate genes in loci of interest. This review encompasses data from studies into novel candidate genes implicated in the pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel disease. Novel techniques to identify candidate genes-genome wide association studies, yeast-two hybrid screening, microarray gene expression studies and proteomic profiling,are also reviewed and their potential role in unravelling the pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel disease are discussed.

  19. DEMYELINATING OPTIC NEURITIS IN CHILDREN

    OpenAIRE

    Alper, Gulay; Wang, Li

    2008-01-01

    Acute demyelinating optic neuritis in children can occur in isolation or be associated with acute disseminated encephalomyelitis, multiple sclerosis or neuromyelitis optica. Clinical features, neuroimaging, cerebrospinal fluid findings and long term prognosis were reviewed in 26 children diagnosed with optic neuritis at the first presentation of demyelinating disease. The risk factors for the subsequent diagnosis of multiple sclerosis were analyzed. The mean duration of follow-up was 6.2 year...

  20. Use of thiopurines in inflammatory bowel disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frei, Pascal; Biedermann, Luc; Nielsen, Ole Haagen;

    2013-01-01

    The use of thiopurines as immunosuppression for the treatment of refractory or chronic active inflammatory bowel disease is established for both Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis. Nevertheless, many questions remain concerning the optimal treatment regimens of azathioprine, 6-mercaptopurine...

  1. [The temporomandibular joint and inflammatory rheumatic diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marotte, H

    2016-09-01

    Some inflammatory rheumatic diseases can involve the temporomandibular joint, such as rheumatoid arthritis and spondylarthritis. The aim of our work was to evaluate the current prevalence of these inflammatory TMJ diseases, to indicate the new therapeutics and to describe the collaboration between rheumatologist and maxillofacial surgeon in these pathologies. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  2. Update imaging in inflammatory bowel diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herfarth, Hans

    2013-01-01

    Imaging is a central component of the diagnostic process in inflammatory bowel diseases. This review summarizes the recent progress of various most commonly used imaging modalities including computed tomography enterography, magnetic resonance enterography and capsule endoscopy. Advantages and disadvantages of each imaging protocol in suspected and established inflammatory bowel diseases are reviewed and brought into context in proposed diagnostic algorithms.

  3. Inflammatory bowel disease: potential therapeutic strategies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, O H; Vainer, B; Bregenholt, S;

    1997-01-01

    This review deals with potential and possibly primary therapeutics that, through insight into the inflammatory cascade, result in more rational treatment principles replacing the classical therapy of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), i.e. Crohn's disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC). These ne...

  4. Neuropeptide receptor expression in inflammatory bowel disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beek, Willy Pascale ter

    2008-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), i.e. Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis are characterized by a chronic inflammation of the gastrointestinal tract. Neuropeptides are involved in the regulation of intestinal motility, chloride secretion and inflammatory response, three processes that are disturb

  5. Pregnancy outcome in inflammatory bowel disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bortoli, A; Pedersen, N; Duricova, D;

    2011-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) frequently affects women during their reproductive years. Pregnancy outcome in women with IBD is well described, particularly in retrospective studies.......Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) frequently affects women during their reproductive years. Pregnancy outcome in women with IBD is well described, particularly in retrospective studies....

  6. [Neurological complications of inflammatory bowel diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cieplik, N; Stangel, M; Bachmann, O

    2013-02-01

    Inflammatory bowel diseases, such as Crohn's disease, ulcerative colitis, autoantibody driven celiac disease and infectious Whipple's disease can all be associated with neurological symptoms. The neurological manifestation may occur even before the gastrointestinal symptoms or the enteropathic symptoms can even be absent as in celiac disease. These diseases can be caused by malresorption and lack of vitamins due to enteral inflammation as well as (auto-)immunological mechanisms and drug-associated side effects. Thus, inflammatory bowel diseases have to be considered in the differential diagnosis. In this review the most common neurological manifestations of these diseases will be described as well as the diagnostic approach.

  7. Treatment of pelvic inflammatory disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunha, B A

    1990-04-01

    The pathogenesis, risk factors, microbiology, sequelae, diagnosis, and treatment of pelvic inflammatory disease (PID) are reviewed, and factors associated with the selection of effective, safe, and economical drug therapy are discussed. PID is an acute clinical syndrome not related to surgery or pregnancy that is caused by the spread of microorganisms from the vagina and cervix to the endometrium, fallopian tubes, and other adnexal structures. Primary PID, the most common form of the disease, is the result of the ascent of sexually acquired or endogenous lower genital tract microorganisms to the upper genital tract. Presence of a sexually transmitted disease is the most common risk factor for PID, but a previous episode of PID, multiple sexual partners, intrauterine device use, and young age are also risk factors. PID is classified as gonococcal or nongonococcal (i.e., caused by anaerobic and aerobic pelvic organisms). The long-term consequences of PID are the most devastating aspects of the disease; infertility remains the most common sequela. Therapy of PID is aimed at preserving fertility, preventing long-term consequences, and relieving acute clinical symptoms. In areas in which penicillinase-producing Neisseria gonorrhoeae is endemic, therapy that is effective against penicillinase-producing N. gonorrhoeae is necessary. Gonococcal PID that is not penicillin resistant may be treated with a single intramuscular or oral dose of a penicillin; penicillin-resistant infection may be treated with a cephalosporin or ciprofloxacin. If chlamydia is a diagnostic consideration, a one- to two-week course of oral tetracycline or doxycycline (injectable-drug therapy is an alternative) should be added to the regimen. Single-agent therapy is a cost-effective alternative to combination regimens. Ampicillin-sulbactam is a cost-effective alternative to the more costly injectable cephalosporins or the combination regimens of an aminoglycoside plus clindamycin or metronidazole. With

  8. Musculoskeletal Manifestations in Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanni Fornaciari

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Muscoloskeletal manifestations are the most common extraintestinal complications of inflammatory bowel disease. Wide ranges in prevalence have been reported, depending on the criteria used to define spondylarthropathy. In 1991, the European Spondylarthropathy Study Group developed classification criteria that included previously neglected cases of undifferentiated spondylarthropathies, which had been ignored in most of the oldest epidemiological studies on inflammatory bowel disease. The spectrum of muscoloskeletal manifestations in inflammatory bowel disease patients includes all of the clinical features of spondylarthropathies: peripheral arthritis, inflammatory spinal pain, dactylitis, enthesitis (Achilles tendinitis and plantar fasciitis, buttock pain and anterior chest wall pain. Radiological evidence of sacroiliitis is common but not obligatory. The articular manifestations begin either concomitantly or subsequent to the bowel disease; however, the onset of spinal disease often precedes the diagnosis of inflammatory bowel disease. The prevalence of the different muscoloskeletal manifestations is similar in ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease. Symptoms usually disappear after proctocolectomy. The pathogenetic mechanisms that produce the muscoloskeletal manifestations in inflammatory bowel disease are unclear. Several arguments favour an important role of the intestinal mucosa in the development of spondylarthropathy. The natural history is characterized by periods of flares and remission; therefore, the efficacy of treatment is difficult to establish. Most patients respond to rest, physical therapy and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, but these drugs may activate bowel disease. Sulphasalazine may be recommended in some patients. There is no indication for the systemic use of steroids.

  9. The effect of glia-glia interactions on oligodendrocyte precursor cell biology during development and in demyelinating diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diego eClemente

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Oligodendrocyte precursor cells (OPCs originate in specific areas of the developing central nervous system (CNS. Once generated, they migrate towards their destinations where they differentiate into mature oligodendrocytes. In the adult, 5-8% of all cells in the CNS are OPCs, cells that retain the capacity to proliferate, migrate and differentiate into oligodendrocytes. Indeed, these endogenous OPCs react to damage in demyelinating diseases, like multiple sclerosis (MS, representing a key element in spontaneous remyelination. In the present work, we review the specific interactions between OPCs and other glial cells (astrocytes, microglia during CNS development and in the pathological scenario of MS. We focus on: i the role of astrocytes in maintaining the homeostasis and spatial distribution of different secreted cues that determine OPC proliferation, migration and differentiation during CNS development; ii the role of microglia and astrocytes in the redistribution of iron, which is crucial for myelin synthesis during CNS development and for myelin repair in MS; iii how microglia secrete different molecules, e.g. growth factors, that favor the recruitment of OPCs in acute phases of MS lesions; and iv how astrocytes modify the extracellular matrix in MS lesions, affecting the ability of OPCs to attempt spontaneous remyelination. Together, these issues demonstrate how both astroglia and microglia influence OPCs in physiological and pathological situations, reinforcing the concept that both development and neural repair are complex and global phenomena. Understanding the molecular and cellular mechanisms that control OPC survival, proliferation, migration and differentiation during development, as well as in the mature CNS, may open new opportunities in the search for reparative therapies in demyelinating diseases like MS.

  10. Inflammatory pathways of importance for management of inflammatory bowel disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Jannie; Coskun, Mehmet; Soendergaard, Christoffer

    2014-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is a group of chronic disorders of the gastrointestinal tract comprising Crohn's disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC). Their etiologies are unknown, but they are characterised by an imbalanced production of pro-inflammatory mediators, e.g., tumor necrosis factor...... (TNF)-α, as well as increased recruitment of leukocytes to the site of inflammation. Advantages in understanding the role of the inflammatory pathways in IBD and an inadequate response to conventional therapy in a large portion of patients, has over the last two decades lead to new therapies which...... includes the TNF inhibitors (TNFi), designed to target and neutralise the effect of TNF-α. TNFi have shown to be efficient in treating moderate to severe CD and UC. However, convenient alternative therapeutics targeting other immune pathways are needed for patients with IBD refractory to conventional...

  11. Genetics of Inflammatory Bowel Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGovern, Dermot P B; Kugathasan, Subra; Cho, Judy H

    2015-10-01

    In this review, we provide an update on genome-wide association studies (GWAS) in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). In addition, we summarize progress in defining the functional consequences of associated alleles for coding and noncoding genetic variation. In the small minority of loci where major association signals correspond to nonsynonymous variation, we summarize studies defining their functional effects and implications for therapeutic targeting. Importantly, the large majority of GWAS-associated loci involve noncoding variation, many of which modulate levels of gene expression. Recent expression quantitative trait loci (eQTL) studies have established that the expression of most human genes is regulated by noncoding genetic variations. Significant advances in defining the epigenetic landscape have demonstrated that IBD GWAS signals are highly enriched within cell-specific active enhancer marks. Studies in European ancestry populations have dominated the landscape of IBD genetics studies, but increasingly, studies in Asian and African-American populations are being reported. Common variation accounts for only a modest fraction of the predicted heritability and the role of rare genetic variation of higher effects (ie, odds ratios markedly deviating from 1) is increasingly being identified through sequencing efforts. These sequencing studies have been particularly productive in more severe very early onset cases. A major challenge in IBD genetics will be harnessing the vast array of genetic discovery for clinical utility through emerging precision medical initiatives. In this article, we discuss the rapidly evolving area of direct-to-consumer genetic testing and the current utility of clinical exome sequencing, especially in very early onset, severe IBD cases. We summarize recent progress in the pharmacogenetics of IBD with respect to partitioning patient responses to anti-TNF and thiopurine therapies. Highly collaborative studies across research centers and

  12. Atypical idiopathic inflammatory demyelinating lesions (IIDL): Conventional and diffusion-weighted MR imaging (DWI) findings in 42 cases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koelblinger, Claus; Fruehwald-Pallamar, Julia [Department of Biomedical Imaging and Image-Guided Therapy, Medical University Vienna, Vienna (Austria); Kubin, Klaus [CT/MRI Institut Dr. Klaus Kubin, Salzburg (Austria); Wallner-Blazek, Mirja [Department of Neurology, Medical University Graz, Graz (Austria); Hauwe, Luc van den [Department of Radiology, Medical University of Antwerp, Antwerp (Belgium); Macedo, Leonardo [Department of Radiology, CEDIMAGEM, Centro - Juiz de Fora (Brazil); Puchner, Stefan B. [Department of Biomedical Imaging and Image-Guided Therapy, Medical University Vienna, Vienna (Austria); Thurnher, Majda M., E-mail: majda.thurnher@meduniwien.ac.at [Department of Biomedical Imaging and Image-Guided Therapy, Medical University Vienna, Vienna (Austria)

    2013-11-01

    Introduction: The purpose of this study was to evaluate MR imaging characteristics with conventional and advanced MR imaging techniques in patients with IIDL. Methods: MR images of the brain in 42 patients (20 male, 22 female) with suspected or known multiple sclerosis (MS) from four institutions were retrospectively analyzed. Lesions were classified into five different subtypes: (1) ring-like lesions; (2) Balo-like lesions; (3) diffuse infiltrating lesions; (4) megacystic lesions; and (5) unclassified lesions. The location, size, margins, and signal intensities on T1WI, T2WI, and diffusion-weighted images (DWI), and the ADC values/ratios for all lesions, as well as the contrast enhancement pattern, and the presence of edema, were recorded. Results: There were 30 ring-like, 10 Balo-like, 3 megacystic-like and 16 diffuse infiltrating-like lesions were detected. Three lesions were categorized as unclassified lesions. Of the 30 ring-like lesions, 23 were hypointense centrally with a hyperintense rim. The mean ADC, measured centrally, was 1.50 ± 0.41 × 10{sup −3} mm{sup 2}/s. The mean ADC in the non-enhancing layers of the Balo-like lesions was 2.29 ± 0.17 × 10{sup −3} mm{sup 2}/s, and the mean ADC in enhancing layers was 1.03 ± 0.30 × 10{sup −3} mm{sup 2}/s. Megacystic lesions had a mean ADC of 2.14 ± 0.26 × 10{sup −3} mm{sup 2}/s. Peripheral strong enhancement with high signal on DWI was present in all diffuse infiltrating lesions. Unclassified lesions showed a mean ADC of 1.43 ± 0.13 mm{sup 2}/s. Conclusion: Restriction of diffusion will be seen in the outer layers of active inflammation/demyelination in Balo-like lesions, in the enhancing part of ring-like lesions, and at the periphery of infiltrative-type lesions.

  13. European Federation of Neurological Societies Peripheral Nerve Society guideline on management of chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy: report of a joint task force of the European Federation of Neurological Societies and the Peripheral Nerve Society (Reprinted from Journal of the Peripheral Nervous System, vol 10, pg 220-228, 2005)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R.A.C. Hughes; P. Bouche; D.R. Cornblath; E. Evers; R.D.M. Hadden; A. Hahn; I. Illa; C.L. Koski; J.M. Leger; E. Nobile-Orazio; J. Pollard; C. Sommer; P. van den Bergh; P.A. van Doorn; I.N. van Schaik; M.M. Mehndiratta; R. Hughes; J.B. Winer; R. de Haan; M. Vermeulen; P. Agarwal

    2006-01-01

    Numerous sets of diagnostic criteria have sought to define chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy (CIDP) and randomized trials and systematic reviews of treatment have been published. The objective is to prepare consensus guidelines on the definition, investigation and treatment o

  14. Chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy (CIDP) associated to hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies (HNPP) and revealed after influenza AH1N1 vaccination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Remiche, Gauthier; Abramowicz, Marc; Mavroudakis, Nicolas

    2013-12-01

    Neurological complications of AH1N1 vaccination such as Guillain-Barré syndrome were described in the previous years. Several reports suggest that hereditary neuropathies may be a predisposing factor for immune-mediated neuropathies. We report the case of a 54-year-old female who developed chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy (CIDP) 5 weeks after AH1N1 vaccination. She had no previous neurological history, but neurophysiological features led us to suspect an underlying hereditary neuropathy. PMP22 gene analysis showed a typical deletion, confirming the diagnosis of hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies (HNPP). We observed a significant clinical and neurophysiological improvement of the neuropathy after intravenous immunoglobulin treatment. This is, to our knowledge, the first reported case of CIDP potentially triggered by AH1N1 vaccination. This and previous observations suggest that genetic-determined neuropathies could predispose to the occurrence of immune-mediated neuropathies. One must recall the possibility of a superimposed hereditary neuropathy like HNPP in patients with a clinical presentation of CIDP, especially when positive family history or unexpected neurophysiological features are present.

  15. Cost-utility of Intravenous Immunoglobulin (IVIG compared with corticosteroids for the treatment of Chronic Inflammatory Demyelinating Polyneuropathy (CIDP in Canada

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Campbell Kaitryn

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objectives Intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG has demonstrated improvement in chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP patients in placebo controlled trials. However, IVIG is also much more expensive than alternative treatments such as corticosteroids. The objective of the paper is to evaluate, from a Canadian perspective, the cost-effectiveness of IVIG compared to corticosteroid treatment of CIDP. Methods A markov model was used to evaluate the costs and QALYs for IVIG and corticosteroids over 5 years of treatment for CIDP. Patients initially responding to IVIG could remain a responder or relapse every 12 week model cycle. Non-responding IVIG patients were assumed to be switched to corticosteroids. Patients on corticosteroids were at risk of a number of adverse events (fracture, diabetes, glaucoma, cataract, serious infection in each cycle. Results Over the 5 year time horizon, the model estimated the incremental costs and QALYs of IVIG treatment compared to corticosteroid treatment to be $124,065 and 0.177 respectively. The incremental cost per QALY gained of IVIG was estimated to be $687,287. The cost per QALY of IVIG was sensitive to the assumptions regarding frequency and dosing of maintenance IVIG. Conclusions Based on common willingness to pay thresholds, IVIG would not be perceived as a cost effective treatment for CIDP.

  16. Machine learning approach identifies new pathways associated with demyelination in a viral model of multiple sclerosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulrich, Reiner; Kalkuhl, Arno; Deschl, Ulrich; Baumgärtner, Wolfgang

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Theiler’s murine encephalomyelitis is an experimentally virus-induced inflammatory demyelinating disease of the spinal cord, displaying clinical and pathological similarities to chronic progressive multiple sclerosis. The aim of this study was to identify pathways associated with chronic demyelination using an assumption-free combined microarray and immunohistology approach. Movement control as determined by rotarod assay significantly worsened in Theiler’s murine encephalomyelitis -virus-infected SJL/J mice from 42 to 196 days after infection (dpi). In the spinal cords, inflammatory changes were detected 14 to 196 dpi, and demyelination progressively increased from 42 to 196 dpi. Microarray analysis revealed 1001 differentially expressed genes over the study period. The dominating changes as revealed by k-means and functional annotation clustering included up-regulations related to intrathecal antibody production and antigen processing and presentation via major histocompatibility class II molecules. A random forest machine learning algorithm revealed that down-regulated lipid and cholesterol biosynthesis, differentially expressed neurite morphogenesis and up-regulated toll-like receptor-4-induced pathways were intimately associated with demyelination as measured by immunohistology. Conclusively, although transcriptional changes were dominated by the adaptive immune response, the main pathways associated with demyelination included up-regulation of toll-like receptor 4 and down-regulation of cholesterol biosynthesis. Cholesterol biosynthesis is a rate limiting step of myelination and its down-regulation is suggested to be involved in chronic demyelination by an inhibition of remyelination. PMID:19183246

  17. [Coexistence of coeliac disease and inflammatory bowel disease in children].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krawiec, Paulina; Pawłowska-Kamieniak, Agnieszka; Pac-Kożuchowska, Elżbieta; Mroczkowska-Juchkiewcz, Agnieszka; Kominek, Katarzyna

    2016-01-01

    Coeliac disease and inflammatory bowel disease are chronic inflammatory conditions of gastrointestinal tract with complex aetiology with genetic, environmental and immunological factors contributing to its pathogenesis. It was noted that immune-mediated disorders often coexist. There is well-known association between coeliac disease and type 1 diabetes and ulcerative colitis and primary sclerosing cholangitis. However, growing body of literature suggests the association between coeliac disease and inflammatory bowel disease, particularly ulcerative colitis. This is an extremely rare problem in paediatric gastroenterology. To date there have been reported several cases of children with coexisting coeliac disease and inflammatory bowel disease. Herewith we present review of current literature on coexistence of coeliac disease and inflammatory bowel disease in children. © 2016 MEDPRESS.

  18. A case of severe chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy with monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance with alternating immunoglobulin class to IgM from IgA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, Shintaro; Nagamine, Shun; Makioka, Kouki; Kusunoki, Susumu; Okamoto, Koichi

    2016-09-29

    A 71-year-old woman with chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy (CIDP) with IgA-λ monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS) showed the acute development of tetraplegia, respiratory failure, and a marked fluctuation of the blood pressure. Intravenous (IV) high-dose steroid therapy (methylprednisolone: 1 g/day × 3 days), followed by oral prednisolone (PSL) (40 mg/day), and IV immunoglobulin (IVIg, 0.4 g/kg/day × 5 days) administrations resulted in the amelioration of these symptoms. However, they soon relapsed, which eventually led to complete tetraplegia and the need for mechanical ventilation. At this time, serum components of IgA-λ and IgM-λ were biclonally positive. Seven courses of plasma exchange and the alternative administration of dexamethasone (12 mg/day) and methtorexate (15 mg/week) were conducted, but with no significant improvement. Nine months after admission, she showed totally-locked in syndrome. Cryo-preserved serum obtained at this time showed high titers of IgM class antibodies against ganglioside (GD3 +++, GT1a ++++, GT1b ++, GQ1b +++, and GD1b +++), which had been negative on admission. Biopsy of the left sural nerve showed moderate reductions of large and small myelinated fibers with no inflammation, no depositions of amyloid, IgG, IgA, or IgM, and teased fiber findings revealed neither myelin ovoids nor segmental demyelination. Alternatively, melphalan at 5 mg and PSL at 32 mg were administered, with no amelioration, while serum IgA-λ monoclonal protein diminished, and IgM-λ M protein positivity was continuously observed. She frequently developed sepsis; therefore, we could no longer continue any immunosupressive therapies, but monthly IVIg administrations were given. Twelve months after admission, her neurological symptoms gradually improved and she was weaned off of mechanical ventilation. Eighteen months after admission, her muscle strength corresponded to 2 on manual muscle testing

  19. Optimizing the management of neuromyelitis optica and spectrum disorders in resource poor settings: Experience from the Mangalore demyelinating disease registry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lekha Pandit

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: In resource-poor settings, the management of neuromyelitis optica (NMO and NMO spectrum (NMOS disorders is limited because of delayed diagnosis and financial constraints. Aim: To device a cost-effective strategy for the management of NMO and related disorders in India. Materials and Methods: A cost-effective and disease-specific protocol was used for evaluating the course and treatment outcome of 70 consecutive patients. Results: Forty-five patients (65% had a relapse from the onset and included NMO (n = 20, recurrent transverse myelitis (RTM; n = 10, and recurrent optic neuritis (ROPN; n = 15. In 38 (84.4% patients presenting after multiple attacks, the diagnosis was made clinically. Only 7 patients with a relapsing course were seen at the onset and included ROPN (n = 5, NMO (n = 1, and RTM (n = 1. They had a second attack after a median interval of 1 ± 0.9 years, which was captured through our dedicated review process. Twenty-five patients had isolated longitudinally extensive transverse myelitis (LETM, of which 20 (80% remained ambulant at follow-up of 3 ± 1.9 years. Twelve patients (17% with median expanded disability status scale (EDSS of 8.5 at entry had a fatal outcome. Serum NMO-IgG testing was done in selected patients, and it was positive in 7 of 18 patients (39%. Irrespective of the NMO-IgG status, the treatment compliant patients (44.4% showed significant improvement in EDSS (P ≤ 0.001. Conclusions : Early clinical diagnosis and treatment compliance were important for good outcome. Isolated LETM was most likely a post-infectious demyelinating disorder in our set-up. NMO and NMOS disorders contributed to 14.9% (45/303 of all demyelinating disorders in our registry.

  20. Cyclosporine for Ocular Inflammatory Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaçmaz, R. Oktay; Kempen, John H.; Newcomb, Craig; Daniel, Ebenezer; Gangaputra, Sapna; Nussenblatt, Robert B.; Rosenbaum, James T.; Suhler, Eric B.; Thorne, Jennifer E.; Jabs, Douglas A.; Levy-Clarke, Grace A.; Foster, C. Stephen

    2009-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the clinical outcomes of cyclosporine treatment for non-infectious ocular inflammation Design Retrospective cohort study Participants Three hundred seventy-three patients with non-infectious ocular inflammation managed at four tertiary ocular inflammation clinics in the United States observed to use cyclosporine as a single non-corticosteroid immunosuppressive agent to their treatment regimen, between 1979-2007 inclusive. Methods Participants were identified from the Systemic Immunosuppressive Therapy for Eye Diseases Cohort Study. Demographic and clinical characteristics, including dosage of cyclosporine and main outcome measures were obtained for every eye of every patient at every visit via medical record review by trained expert reviewers. Main Outcome Measures: Control of inflammation, sustained control after reducing corticosteroid dosages, and discontinuation of therapy because of toxicity. Results Of the 373 patients (681 eyes) initiating cyclosporine monotherapy, 33.4% by six months and 51.9% by one year gained sustained, complete control of inflammation over at least two visits spanning at least 28 days. Approximately 25% more improved to a level of slight inflammatory activity by each of these time points. Corticosteroid-sparing success (completely controlled inflammation for at least 28 days with prednisone 10 mg/day or less) was achieved by 22.1% by six months and 36.1% within one year. Toxicity led to discontinuation of therapy within one year by 10.7% of the population. Patients over 55 years of age were over 3-fold more likely to discontinue therapy because of toxicity than patients ages 18-39 years. Doses of 151-250 mg/day tended to be more successful than lower doses, and were not associated with a higher discontinuation for toxicity rate; higher doses did not appear to offer a therapeutic advantage. Conclusion Cyclosporine, with corticosteroid therapy as indicated, was modestly effective for controlling ocular inflammation

  1. Polirradiculoneuropatia desmielinizante inflamatória crônica: estudo de 18 pacientes Chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy: study of 18 patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leandro C. Calia

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available Neste estudo prospectivo, analisamos as características clínicas, evolução e resposta terapêutica de 18 pacientes com a forma idiopática de polirradiculoneuropatia desmielinizante inflamatória crônica, que foram acompanhados por período que variou de 4 a 127 meses. O sexo masculino predominou sobre o feminino (1,25:1 e a idade de início dos sintomas variou de 6 a 85 anos. Observamos a preponderância da forma de evolução progressiva (61,1% sobre a forma recidivante (38,9%, bem como a baixa ocorrência de fatores predisponentes (16,7%. Todos os pacientes apresentavam comprometimento sensitivo e motor, associado a hipo ou arreflexia, enquanto apenas três (16,7% apresentavam comprometimento de nervos cranianos. No exame do liquor, as taxas de proteínas estavam elevadas em 88,9% dos pacientes, com média de 203,4 mg/dl. A eletroneuromiografia mostrou alterações desmielinizantes em todos os pacientes, associadas a alterações axonais em 94,4% deles. Em todos os sete pacientes submetidos a biopsia de nervo sural encontramos alterações compatíveis com desmielinização/remielinização. A análise com imunofluorescência, realizada em três pacientes foi normal em um e evidenciou depósito de anticorpos anti-CD3 em dois e anti-HLA-Dr em um. Optamos pela prednisona como tratamento inicial em todos os pacientes, sendo mantida posteriormente em doses reduzidas e em dias alternados em 72,2% deles. Dois pacientes (11,1% estão assintomáticos mesmo após retirada total da medicação e introduzimos azatioprína, associada ou não ao corticóide, nos quatro pacientes com má resposta à prednisona. Até a última avaliação, 16 pacientes (88,9% evoluíram com melhora funcional.This is a prospective study that describes 18 patients with chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy (CIDP, idiopathic type. The patients have been followed for a period of 4 to 127 months. We evaluated the clinical characteristics, the evolution

  2. Stem cell therapy for inflammatory bowel disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Duijvestein, Marjolijn

    2012-01-01

    Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) and mesenchymal stromal (MSC) cell therapy are currently under investigation as novel therapies for inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD). Hematopoietic stem cells are thought to repopulate the immune system and reset the immunological response to luminal

  3. Subclinical Pelvic Inflammatory Disease and Infertility

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Wiesenfeld, Harold C; Hillier, Sharon L; Meyn, Leslie A; Amortegui, Antonio J; Sweet, Richard L

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE:The reported incidence of acute pelvic inflammatory disease (PID) has decreased but rates of tubal infertility have not, suggesting that a large proportion of PID leading to infertility may be undetected...

  4. Best Drugs to Treat Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this message. See our privacy policy . A A Best drugs to treat inflammatory bowel disease Comparing effectiveness, ... are taking—which can be found here . Our 'Best Buy' pick We chose adalimumab (Humira) as a ...

  5. Acquired versus familial demyelinative neuropathies in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, R G; Gutmann, L; Lewis, R A; Sumner, A J

    1985-01-01

    The electrophysiologic differences between chronic acquired demyelinative neuropathy and the demyelinative form of Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease have recently been reported. The present report extends these observations to include the genetically determined demyelinating neuropathies seen in metachromatic leukodystrophy, Krabbe's leukodystrophy, and Cockayne's syndrome. The electrophysiologic features of metachromatic leukodystrophy (five patients), Krabbe's (four patients), and Cockayne's syndrome (three patients) were all similar. There was uniform slowing of conduction (both in different nerves and in different nerve segments), and conduction block was not seen. These findings are consistent with a uniform degree of demyelination in multiple nerves and throughout the entire length of individual axons. Thus, uniform slowing of nerve conduction constitutes strong evidence for a familial demyelinative neuropathy, as opposed to the multifocal slowing seen in acute and chronic acquired demyelinative neuropathy.

  6. Use of Prebiotics for Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Andrew Szilagyi

    2005-01-01

    The relevance of diet in both the pathogenesis and the therapy of inflammatory bowel disease is an evolving science. Disturbance of intestinal microflora (dysbiosis) is putatively a key element in the environmental component causing inflammatory bowel disease. Prebiotics are among the dietary components used in an attempt to counteract dysbiosis. Such predominantly carbohydrate dietary components exert effects on the luminal environment by physicochemical changes through pH alteration, by pro...

  7. Inflammatory Bowel Disease. Medical and psychological aspects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Albersnagel, Frans; Dijkstra, Gerard

    2007-01-01

    A review is presented in which the state of the art of behavioural-scientific research on inflammatory bowel disease (BID) is sorted out. After a short introduction on medical aspects of the two diseases that constitute IBD, i.e. Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis, the factors that may have an i

  8. Nuclear medicine imaging of inflammatory bowel disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Froelich, J.W.

    1987-01-01

    With the availability of indium-labeled white blood cells, radionuclide imaging studies have a definite role in the diagnosis and staging of patients with inflammatory bowel disease. The In-/sup 111/ white blood cell study is particularly helpful in evaluating recurrent disease in patients with severe intercurrent diseases and in screening patients without the need for barium examinations.

  9. Disinhibition of Cathepsin C Caused by Cystatin F Deficiency Aggravates the Demyelination in a Cuprizone Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Junjie; Li, Ning; Zhang, Yanli; Hou, Changyi; Yang, Xiaohan; Shimizu, Takahiro; Wang, Xiaoyu; Ikenaka, Kazuhiro; Fan, Kai; Ma, Jianmei

    2016-01-01

    Although the precise mechanism underlying initial lesion development in multiple sclerosis (MS) remains unclear, CNS inflammation has long been associated with demyelination, and axonal degeneration. The activation of microglia/macrophages, which serve as innate immune cells in the CNS, is the first reaction to even minor pathologic changes in the CNS and is considered an initial pathogenic event in MS. Microglial activation accompanies a variety of gene expressions, including cystatin F (Cys F), which belongs to the cystatin superfamily and is one of the cathepsin inhibitors. In our previous study we showed that Cys F has a unique expression pattern in microglia/macrophages in the demyelination process. Specifically, the timing of Cys F induction correlated with ongoing demyelination, and the sites of Cys F expression overlapped with areas of remyelination. Cys F induction ceased in chronic demyelination when remyelination capacity was lost, suggesting that Cys F expressed by microglia/macrophages may play an important role in demyelination and/or remyelination. The functional role of Cys F in demyelinating disease of the CNS, however, is unclear. Cys F gene knockout mice were used in the current study to clarify the functional role of Cys F in the demyelination process in a cuprizone-induced demyelination animal model. We demonstrated that absence of the Cys F gene and the resulting disinhibition of cathepsin C (Cat C) aggravates the demyelination, and this finding may be related to the increased expression of the glia-derived chemokine, CXCL2, which may attract inflammatory cells to sites of myelin sheath damage. This effect was reversed by knock down of the Cat C gene. The findings gain further insight to function of Cat C in pathophysiology of MS, which may have implications for therapeutics for the prevention of neuroinflammation-involved neurological disorders in the future. PMID:28066178

  10. The genetic background of inflammatory bowel disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, H; Rotter, J I

    2000-01-01

    Available evidence indicates that genetic factors are essential in providing the susceptibility to the majority of the various forms of inflammatory bowel disease occurring in man. It is also clear that the genetic susceptibility to these diseases is complex, and that more than one gene may predispose (the concept of multilocus/oligogenic inheritance), and likely in different etiologic combinations (the concept of genetic heterogeneity). Paradigms are now available that should lead to the identification of a number of these predisposing genes. These paradigms include the candidate gene approach, systematic genome wide scans, and mouse human synteny. While genome wide scans are currently limited to multiplex family linkage studies, both candidate genes and mouse human synteny can be approached in either linkage or association paradigms. Eventually whole genome association studies will be available as well. Identification of inflammatory bowel disease predisposing genes should lead to their incorporation in studies of natural history, investigation of environmental risk factors, and especially utilization of genetic markers in clinical trials. This will allow us to identify the best therapy available for the individual patient based on their unique genetic constitution. With advances in molecular technology, the search for genes influencing traits and diseases with a complex genetic background, such as the inflammatory bowel diseases, has become a realistic task. Although exogenous or infectious agents may contribute to the pathogenesis or may trigger the onset of disease, and the immune system almost certainly mediates the tissue damage, it is clear from available data that genetic factors determine the susceptibility of a given individual to inflammatory bowel disease (reviewed below). Thus, genetic studies are essential for the delineation of the basic etiologies of the various forms of inflammatory bowel disease and thus can aid in the development of radically

  11. Seasonal trend of acute pelvic inflammatory disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xholli, Anjeza; Cannoletta, Marianna; Cagnacci, Angelo

    2014-05-01

    Many infections follow a seasonal trend. Aim of our study was to check whether acute pelvic inflammatory disease (PID) follows a seasonal progress. In a retrospective study on 12,152 hospital records, 158 cases of acute pelvic inflammatory disease were identified. Periodogram analysis was applied to the date of pelvic inflammatory disease admission and to related environmental factors, such as temperature and photoperiod. Pelvic inflammatory disease follows a seasonal rhythm with mean to peak variation of 23 % and maximal values in September (±37.2 days). The rhythm, more evident in married women, is related to the rhythm of temperature advanced by 2 months and of photoperiod advanced by 3 months. Cases of pelvic inflammatory disease are more frequent than expected in unmarried (36 vs. 17.3/34,626, p = 0.015), particularly divorced women 30-40 years of age. Our study evidences a seasonal trend and confirms unmarried, particularly divorced status, as important risk factor for acute pelvic inflammatory disease.

  12. The evolving epidemiology of inflammatory bowel disease.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Shanahan, Fergus

    2009-07-01

    Epidemiologic studies in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) include assessments of disease burden and evolving patterns of disease presentation. Although it is hoped that sound epidemiologic studies provide aetiological clues, traditional risk factor-based epidemiology has provided limited insights into either Crohn\\'s disease or ulcerative colitis etiopathogenesis. In this update, we will summarize how the changing epidemiology of IBD associated with modernization can be reconciled with current concepts of disease mechanisms and will discuss studies of clinically significant comorbidity in IBD.

  13. Familial occurrence of inflammatory bowel disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Orholm, M; Munkholm, P; Langholz, E

    1991-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND METHODS: We assessed the familial occurrence of inflammatory bowel disease in Copenhagen County, where there has been a long-term interest in the epidemiology of such disorders. In 1987 we interviewed 662 patients in whom inflammatory bowel disease had been diagnosed before 1979...... or Crohn's disease) among second-degree relatives was increased; the prevalence of the other disease was not increased. CONCLUSIONS: The 10-fold increase in the familial risk of ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease strongly suggests that these disorders have a genetic cause....... with ulcerative colitis or Crohn's disease had a 10-fold increase in the risk of having the same disease as the patients, after standardization for age and sex. The risk of having the other of the two diseases was also increased, but less so, and the increase in the risk of having Crohn's disease...

  14. Gadolinium enhancement patterns of tumefactive demyelinating lesions: correlations with brain biopsy findings and pathophysiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Masaki; Shimizu, Yuko; Shibata, Noriyuki; Uchiyama, Shinichiro

    2014-10-01

    Tumefactive demyelinating lesions (TDLs) can mimic brain tumors on radiological images. TDLs are often referred to as tumefactive multiple sclerosis (TMS), but the heterogeneous nature and monophasic course of TDLs do not fulfill clinical and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) criteria for multiple sclerosis. Redefining TDLs, TMS and other inflammatory brain lesions is essential for the accurate clinical diagnosis of extensive demyelinating brain lesions. We retrospectively analyzed MRI from nine TDL cases that underwent brain biopsy. Patterns of gadolinium enhancement on MRI were categorized as homogenous, inhomogeneous, patchy and diffuse, open ring or irregular rim, and were compared with pathological hallmarks including demyelination, central necrosis, macrophage infiltration, angiogenesis and perivascular lymphocytic cuffing. All cases had coexistence of demyelinating features and axonal loss. Open-ring and irregular rim patterns of gadolinium enhancement were associated with macrophage infiltrations and angiogenesis at the inflammatory border. An inhomogeneous pattern of gadolinium enhancement was associated with perivascular lymphocytic cuffing. Central necrosis was seen in cases of severe multiple sclerosis and hemorrhagic leukoencephalopathy. These results suggest that the radiological features of TDLs may be related to different pathological processes, and indicate that MRI may be useful in understanding their pathophysiology. Further investigation is needed to determine the precise disease entity of these inflammatory demyelinating brain lesions.

  15. Diffusion tensor imaging can be used to detect lesions in peripheral nerves in patients with chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy treated with subcutaneous immunoglobulin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Markvardsen, Lars H.; Andersen, Henning [Aarhus University Hospital, Department of Neurology, Aarhus C (Denmark); Vaeggemose, Michael [Aarhus University Hospital, Department of Neurology, Aarhus C (Denmark); Aarhus University Hospital, Department of Diagnostic Imaging: MR Research Centre, Aarhus (Denmark); Ringgaard, Steffen [Aarhus University Hospital, Department of Diagnostic Imaging: MR Research Centre, Aarhus (Denmark)

    2016-08-15

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) has shown that fractional anisotropy (FA) is lower in peripheral nerves in chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP). We examined whether DTI correlates to muscle strength or impairment. MRI of sciatic and tibial nerves was performed on 3-T MR scanner by obtaining T2- and DTI-weighted sequences with fat saturation. On each slice of T2-weighted (T2w) and DTI, the tibial and sciatic nerves were segmented and served for calculation of signal intensity. On DTI images, pixel-by-pixel calculation of FA and apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) was done. Muscle strength at knee and ankle was determined by isokinetic dynamometry and severity of CIDP by neuropathy impairment score (NIS). Fourteen CIDP patients treated with subcutaneous immunoglobulin were compared to gender- and age-matched controls. T2w values expressed as a nerve/muscle ratio (nT2w) were unchanged in CIDP versus controls 0.93 ± 0.21 versus 1.02 ± 0.21 (P = 0.10). FA values were lower in CIDP compared to controls 0.38 ± 0.07 versus 0.45 ± 0.05 (P < 0.0001), and ADC values were higher in CIDP versus controls 1735 ± 232 versus 1593 ± 116 x 10{sup -6} mm{sup 2}/s (P = 0.005). In CIDP, FA values correlated to clinical impairment (NIS) (r = -0.57, P = 0.03), but not to muscle strength. FA value in the sciatic nerve distinguishes CIDP from controls with a sensitivity and a specificity of 92.9 %. CIDP patients have unchanged nT2w values, lower FA values, and higher ADC values of sciatic and tibial nerves compared to controls. FA values correlated to NIS but were unrelated to muscle strength. DTI of sciatic nerves seems promising to differentiate CIDP from controls. (orig.)

  16. The Oligodendrocyte Progenitor Response to Demyelination

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-01-01

    most prevalent demyelinating disease, remyelination becomes limited with repeated or chronic episodes of demyelination (Ozawa et al., 1994). Factors...mice exhibit deformity of the spinal cord ( scoliosis ) and die within the first few postnatal weeks. Therefore, this study used heterozygous hPDGF-A tg

  17. Current treatment for inflammatory bowel disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chang-tai Xu; Xiue-gan Guo; Bo-rong Pan

    2003-01-01

    @@Introduction Idiopathic inflammatory bowel disease consists of Crohn's disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC). CD can affect any part of the gastrointestinal tract, from the mouth to the anus, and is also known as regional enteritis, terminal ileitis, or granulomatous……

  18. Management of inflammatory bowel disease in pregnancy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S. Vermeire (Silvio); F. Carbonnel (Franck); P.G. Coulie (Pierre); V. Geenen (Vincent); J.M.W. Hazes (Mieke); P.L. Masson (Pierre); F. de Keyser (Filip); E. Louis (Edouard)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractBackground and Aims: Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is a chronic disease affecting mainly young people in their reproductive years. IBD therefore has a major impact on patients' family planning decisions. Management of IBD in pregnancy requires a challenging balance between optimal dis

  19. New pharmaceuticals in inflammatory bowel disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Łodyga, Michał; Eder, Piotr; Bartnik, Witold; Gonciarz, Maciej; Kłopocka, Maria; Linke, Krzysztof; Małecka-Panas, Ewa; Radwan, Piotr; Rydzewska, Grażyna

    2015-01-01

    This paper complements the previously published Guidelines of the Working Group of the Polish Society of Gastroenterology and former National Consultant in Gastroenterology regarding the management of patients with Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis. Attention was focused on the new pharmaceutical recently registered for inflammatory bowel disease treatment.

  20. [Chronic inflammatory bowel diseases and nutrition].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meier, R

    1996-01-01

    The etiology of inflammatory bowel disease is still unknown. Several potential mechanisms are discussed. The etiological and therapeutic importance of nutrition is controversial. Though changes in dietary habits and incidence of inflammatory bowel disease during the last century were in parallel, no specific nutritional factor has been isolated. No dietary prophylaxis of inflammatory bowel disease is yet known; all dietary therapies in inflammatory bowel disease aim to improve nutritional support and to diminish inflammation by bowel rest. Children and adolescents gain in weight and height. Total parenteral nutrition will not substantially reduce disease activity and operation rates. Total parenteral nutrition can only be recommended in ulcerative colitis patients with severe disease in the initial phase and in Crohn's patients with severe malnutrition and intestinal complications. Enteral nutrition support is less effective in ulcerative colitis than in Crohn's disease. Reported remission rates on enteral nutrition are 25% for ulcerative colitis and up to 80% for Crohn. However, in active Crohn's disease enteral nutrition is less effective than standard therapy with methylprednisolone and sulfasalizine. It is generally believed that nutrition therapy in combination with drugs is the best treatment modality. There is no evidence to support the importance of any combination of the formula diets such as elemental, oligopeptide, or polymeric formulations. Administration of formula diets by nasogastric tubes all show similar remission rates. Whether newer diets supplemented with arginine, glutamine, omega-3-fatty acids or short chain fatty acids increase remission rates is not known. Further studies in this field are warranted.

  1. Review article : inflammatory bowel disease and genetics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weersma, R. K.; Van Dullemen, H. M.; Van der Steege, G.; Nolte, I. M.; Kleibeuker, J. H.; Dijkstra, G.

    2007-01-01

    Introduction Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) comprising ulcerative colitis (UC) and Crohn's disease (CD) is multigenic disorder. Tremendous progress has been achieved in unravelling the genetic background of IBD. It has led to the discovery of mutations in NOD2 associated with ileal CD and numerous

  2. Current concepts in chronic inflammatory diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Garn, Holger; Bahn, Sabine; Baune, Bernhard T

    2016-01-01

    Recent research indicates that chronic inflammatory diseases, including allergies and autoimmune and neuropsychiatric diseases, share common pathways of cellular and molecular dysregulation. It was the aim of the International von-Behring-Röntgen Symposium (October 16-18, 2014, in Marburg, Germany...

  3. [Chronic inflammatory bowel diseases in cats].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghermai, A K

    1989-01-01

    The aetiology of chronic idiopathic intestinal inflammation is unknown. It is characterized by a diffuse infiltration with inflammatory cells into the intestinal mucosa and sometimes submucosa. Cats with chronic intermittent vomiting and diarrhoea, later on accompanied by anorexia and weight loss, are presented. Definitive diagnosis can be obtained by intestinal biopsy only. An immune pathogenesis is suspected, which is supported by the fact, that chronic inflammatory bowel disease responds to steroid therapy.

  4. Pharmacological nutrition in inflammatory bowel diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campos, F G; Waitzberg, D L; Teixeira, M G; Mucerino, D R; Kiss, D R; Habr-Gama, A

    2003-01-01

    Inflammatory Bowel Diseases--ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease--are chronic gastrointestinal inflammatory diseases of unknown etiology. Decreased oral intake, malabsorption, accelerated nutrient losses, increased requirements, and drug-nutrient interactions cause nutritional and functional deficiencies that require proper correction by nutritional therapy. The goals of the different forms of nutritional therapy are to correct nutritional disturbances and to modulate inflammatory response, thus influencing disease activity. Nutritional intervention may improve outcome in certain individuals; however, because of the costs and complications of such therapy, careful selection is warranted. Total parenteral nutrition has been used to correct and prevent nutritional disturbances and to promote bowel rest during active disease, mainly in cases of digestive fistulae with a high output. Its use should be reserved for patients who cannot tolerate enteral nutrition. Enteral nutrition is effective in inducing clinical remission of disease in adults and promoting growth in children. Recent research has focused on the use of specific nutrients as primary treatment agents. Although some reports have indicated that glutamine, short-chain fatty acids, antioxidants and immunonutrition with omega-3 fatty acids are an important therapeutic alternative in the management of inflammatory bowel diseases, the beneficial reported effects have yet to be translated into the clinical practice. The real efficacy of these nutrients still need further evaluation through prospective and randomized trials.

  5. The effect of high-dose steroid treatment used for the treatment of acute demyelinating diseases on endothelial and cardiac functions

    OpenAIRE

    ?ald?r, Mehmet Vedat; ?elik, G?ner Koyuncu; ?ift?i, ?zg?r; M?derriso?lu, ?brahim Haldun

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The cardiovascular effects of short-term high-dose steroid treatment (pulse steroid treatment) have not yet been clarified. We exa- mined the short- and long-term effects of pulse steroid treatment in demyelinating diseases on endothelial and cardiac functions. Methods: In this prospective study, we included 35 patients (20 females and 15 males; mean age, 32.8?9.3 years) who were not treated with steroids and who were previously diagnosed with multiple sclerosis or neuromyelitis op...

  6. Inflammatory Bowel Disease (For Teens)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Just like other organs in your body, the intestines can develop problems or diseases. IBD (which is not the same thing as irritable bowel syndrome, or IBS), can cause more serious problems than ...

  7. Diet and risk of inflammatory bowel disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Vibeke; Olsen, Anja; Carbonnel, Franck

    2012-01-01

    Library were searched for studies on diet and risk of inflammatory bowel disease. Results: Established non-diet risk factors include family predisposition, smoking, appendectomy, and antibiotics. Retrospective case–control studies are encumbered with methodological problems. Prospective studies...... on European cohorts, mainly including middle-aged adults, suggest that a diet high in protein from meat and fish is associated with a higher risk of inflammatory bowel disease. Intake of the n-6 polyunsaturated fatty acid linoleic acid may confer risk of ulcerative colitis, whereas n-3 polyunsaturated fatty...... dioxide and aluminium silicate). Conclusions: A diet high in protein, particular animal protein, may be associated with increased risk of inflammatory bowel disease and relapses. N-6 polyunsaturated fatty acids may predispose to ulcerative colitis whilst n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid may protect...

  8. The Immunological Basis of Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesca A. R. Silva

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Inflammatory bowel diseases (IBDs are chronic ailments, Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis being the most important. These diseases present an inflammatory profile and they differ according to pathophysiology, the affected area in the gastrointestinal tract, and the depth of the inflammation in the intestinal wall. The immune characteristics of IBD arise from abnormal responses of the innate and adaptive immune system. The number of Th17 cells increases in the peripheral blood of IBD patients, while Treg cells decrease, suggesting that the Th17/Treg proportion plays an important role in the development and maintenance of inflammation. The purpose of this review was to determine the current state of knowledge on the immunological basis of IBD. Many studies have shown the need for further explanation of the development and maintenance of the inflammatory process.

  9. 慢性炎症性脱髓鞘性多发性神经病治疗的研究进展%Research Progress of Treatment of Chronic Inflammatory Demyelinating Polyneuropathy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王书玉

    2012-01-01

    Chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy is an immune-mediated disease of the peripheral nervous system, which can be difficult to diagnose and treat due to the diversity of the clinical manifestations and disease process. Intravenous immunoglobulin, corticosteroids and plasma exchange have all been proven to be beneficial in randomized controlled trials. Treatment solution should be made taking the cost,effect and adverse effects into account. When patients do not respond or become refractory or intolerant to these conventional treatments,other treatments such as azathioprine, ciclosporin A, cyclophosphamide, in-terferons,methotrexate,mycophenolate mofetil,rituximab and etanercept should be considered.%慢性炎症性脱髓鞘性多发性神经病是由免疫介导的周围神经病,其临床表现及病程多样,诊断及治疗困难.静脉注射免疫球蛋白、糖皮质激素及血浆置换在随机对照试验中被证明有效,在制订治疗方案时应结合医疗成本、药物疗效、不良反应等因素.如果对常规治疗无效或变得难治不能耐受时应该考虑其他治疗,如硫唑嘌呤、环孢素、环磷酰胺、干扰素、甲氨蝶呤、霉酚酸酯、利妥昔单抗、依那西普等药物.

  10. Cutaneous manifestations of inflammatory bowel disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Al Roujayee Abdulaziz

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD has many extraintestinal manifestations, and skin lesions are one of the most frequently described extraintestinal findings. Reports indicate an incidence of cutaneous manifestations ranging from 2 to 34%, Cutaneous manifestations are usually related to the activity of the bowel disease but may have an independent course. In this review we aim to address the various cutaneous manifestations associated with IBD, their impact on the disease course, and the treatment options available.

  11. Inflammatory bowel disease: Genetic and epidemiologic considerations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Judy H Cho

    2008-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies have firmly established that many genomic loci contribute to inflammatory bowel disease, especially in Crohn's disease. These studies have newly-established the importance of the interleukin 23 and autophagy pathways in disease pathogenesis. Future challenges include: (1) the establishment of precisely causal alleles, (2) definition of altered functional outcomes of associated and causal alleles and (3) integration of genetic findings with environmental factors.

  12. Biomarkers in inflammatory bowel diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bennike, Tue; Birkelund, Svend; Stensballe, Allan

    2014-01-01

    with medications with the concomitant risk of adverse events. In addition, identification of disease and course specific biomarker profiles can be used to identify biological pathways involved in the disease development and treatment. Knowledge of disease mechanisms in general can lead to improved future...... development of preventive and treatment strategies. Thus, the clinical use of a panel of biomarkers represents a diagnostic and prognostic tool of potentially great value. The technological development in recent years within proteomic research (determination and quantification of the complete protein content......) has made the discovery of novel biomarkers feasible. Several IBD-associated protein biomarkers are known, but none have been successfully implemented in daily use to distinguish CD and UC patients. The intestinal tissue remains an obvious place to search for novel biomarkers, which blood, urine...

  13. TLR3 signaling is either protective or pathogenic for the development of Theiler's virus-induced demyelinating disease depending on the time of viral infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin Young-Hee

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We have previously shown that toll-like receptor 3 (TLR3-mediated signaling plays an important role in the induction of innate cytokine responses to Theiler's murine encephalomyelitis virus (TMEV infection. In addition, cytokine levels produced after TMEV infection are significantly higher in the glial cells of susceptible SJL mice compared to those of resistant C57BL/6 mice. However, it is not known whether TLR3-mediated signaling plays a protective or pathogenic role in the development of demyelinating disease. Methods SJL/J and B6;129S-Tlr3tm1Flv/J (TLR3KO-B6 mice, and TLR3KO-SJL mice that TLR3KO-B6 mice were backcrossed to SJL/J mice for 6 generations were infected with Theiler's murine encephalomyelitis virus (2 × 105 PFU with or without treatment with 50 μg of poly IC. Cytokine production and immune responses in the CNS and periphery of infected mice were analyzed. Results We investigated the role of TLR3-mediated signaling in the protection and pathogenesis of TMEV-induced demyelinating disease. TLR3KO-B6 mice did not develop demyelinating disease although they displayed elevated viral loads in the CNS. However, TLR3KO-SJL mice displayed increased viral loads and cellular infiltration in the CNS, accompanied by exacerbated development of demyelinating disease, compared to the normal littermate mice. Late, but not early, anti-viral CD4+ and CD8+ T cell responses in the CNS were compromised in TLR3KO-SJL mice. However, activation of TLR3 with poly IC prior to viral infection also exacerbated disease development, whereas such activation after viral infection restrained disease development. Activation of TLR3 signaling prior to viral infection hindered the induction of protective IFN-γ-producing CD4+ and CD8+ T cell populations. In contrast, activation of these signals after viral infection improved the induction of IFN-γ-producing CD4+ and CD8+ T cells. In addition, poly IC-pretreated mice displayed elevated PDL-1 and

  14. Use of Prebiotics for Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew Szilagyi

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The relevance of diet in both the pathogenesis and the therapy of inflammatory bowel disease is an evolving science. Disturbance of intestinal microflora (dysbiosis is putatively a key element in the environmental component causing inflammatory bowel disease. Prebiotics are among the dietary components used in an attempt to counteract dysbiosis. Such predominantly carbohydrate dietary components exert effects on the luminal environment by physicochemical changes through pH alteration, by production of short chain fatty acids and by selectively promoting putatively 'health-beneficial' bacteria. The present review elaborates on some of the background rationale and mechanisms on the use of prebiotics. Additionally, published animal and human trials are discussed.

  15. Polyunsaturated fatty acids and inflammatory diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gil, A

    2002-10-01

    Inflammation is overall a protective response, whose main goal is to liberate the human being of cellular lesions caused by micro-organisms, toxins, allergens, etc., as well as its consequences, and of death cells and necrotic tissues. Chronic inflammation, which is detrimental to tissues, is the basic pathogenic mechanism of hypersensitivity reactions against xenobiotics. Other frequent pathologies, for instance atherosclerosis, chronic hepatitis, inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), liver cirrhosis, lung fibrosis, psoriasis, and rheumatoid arthritis are also chronic inflammatory diseases. Chemical mediators of inflammation are derived from blood plasma or different cell-type activity. Biogenic amines, eicosanoids and cytokines are within the most important mediators of inflammatory processes. The different activities of eicosanoids derived from arachidonic acid (20:4 n-6) versus those derived from eicosapentaenoic acid (20:5 n-3) are one of the most important mechanisms to explain why n-3, or omega-3, polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) exhibit anti-inflammatory properties in many inflammatory diseases. Dietary supplements ranging 1-8 g per day of n-3 PUFA have been reportedly beneficial in the treatment of IBD, eczema, psoriasis and rheumatoid arthritis. In addition, recent experimental studies in rats with experimental ulcerative colitis, induced by intrarectal injection of trinitrobenzene sulphonic acid, have documented that treatment with n-3 long-chain PUFA reduces mucosal damage as assessed by biochemical and histological markers of inflammation. Moreover, the defence antioxidant system in this model is enhanced in treated animals, provided that the n-3 PUFA supply is adequately preserved from oxidation.

  16. [Inflammatory bowel disease: importance of nutrition today].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jorquera Plaza, F; Espinel Díez, J; Olcoz Goñi, J L

    1997-01-01

    Malnutrition is a very common situation in patients inflammatory with intestinal disease (IID), which can be caused by a multitude of factors. It has been shown that nutritional support not only improves the nutritional condition of the patients, but in Crohn's disease it also has an effect on the activity of the disease, although this effect is smaller than that of steroids. Elemental diets are no more efficient than polymeric diets except under very special circumstances, but they are more expensive and patients tolerate them worse. A digestive pause is not recommended unless there is an absolute contraindication for the use of the digestive tract. Therefore, parenteral nutrition, which is more expensive and can cause serious complications, will be reserved for very specific indications. The use of fish oil supplements, either because it competes with arachidonic acid and prevents the initiation of the inflammatory cascade, or because it decreases the production of cytokines, has shown to be potentially useful in inflammatory intestinal disease, and this must be confirmed by further studies. Short chain fatty acids enemas have shown promising results in distal ulcerative colitis but the lack of homogeneity in the studies makes it necessary for these results to be consolidated in new studies. Nutritional support is especially interesting in children with inflammatory intestinal disease given that the growth retardation which is often seen in severe cases, can be controlled by adequate enteral or parenteral diets.

  17. 慢性炎症性脱髓鞘性多发性神经病的神经电图与肌电图研究%Study the Neural Electrical Diagram and Electromyography in Chronic Inflammatory Demyelinating Multiple Psycho

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨颖颖

    2016-01-01

    目的:分析在患有慢性炎症脱髓鞘多发神经病患者的临床诊断和治疗中,神经电图与肌电图的相关情况。方法选择我院2015年4月~2016年4月收治的21例慢性炎症脱髓鞘多发神经病患者作为实验的研究组,再选择同期到我院接受体检的正常人作为对照组,对两组对象分别进行神经电图与肌电图检测,分析两组对象的相关指标。结果研究组的各项指标与对照组相比差异具有统计学意义(P<0.05)。结论在慢性炎症脱髓鞘多发神经病患者诊治中,神经电图与肌电图值得应用。%ObjectiveTo analyze the clinical diagnosis and treatment of chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy patients,related electroneurography and electromyography.MethodsIn our hospital from April 2015 to April 2016,21 cases of chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy patients were treated as experimental study group,normal people over to our hospital for physical examination selected as the control group,the subjects of two groups were electroneurography and electromyography detection,analysis of the relevant indicators of the two groups.Results The indexes compared with the control group,the difference was statisticaly significant(P<0.05). Conclusion In the treatment of chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy patients.

  18. [Multifocal demyelinating polyneuropathy with persistent conduction block (Lewis-Sumner syndrome)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mezaki, T; Kaji, R; Hamano, T; Kimura, J; Kameyama, M

    1990-11-01

    Multifocal demyelinating neuropathy with persistent conduction block (Lewis-Sumner syndrome) is a variant of chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy (CIDP), which often clinically simulates a motor neuron disease (MND). We report here three patients initially suspected to have MND, who later were diagnosed as a Lewis-Sumner syndrome. One of them showed a remarkable clinical improvement after immunoglobulin therapy. The definitive diagnosis of this syndrome rests upon nerve conduction studies, uncovering multiple sites of persistent conduction block. Technically, it is important to exclude insufficient stimulus which may lead to an erroneous impression of conduction block. Magnetic stimulation, as compared to electric current, elicited larger responses possibly because of deeper current penetration. We found this mode of stimulation useful especially in testing focal demyelination requiring full activation of a diseased nerve at a most proximal segment.

  19. A rare presentation of atypical demyelination: tumefactive multiple sclerosis causing Gerstmann’s syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Tumefactive demyelinating lesions are a rare manifestation of multiple sclerosis (MS). Differential diagnosis of such space occupying lesions may not be straightforward and sometimes necessitate brain biopsy. Impaired cognition is the second most common clinical manifestation of tumefactive MS; however complex cognitive syndromes are unusual. Case presentation We report the case of a 30 year old woman who presented with Gerstmann’s syndrome. MRI revealed a large heterogeneous contrast enhancing lesion in the left cerebral hemisphere. Intravenous corticosteroids did not stop disease progression. A tumour or cerebral lymphoma was suspected, however brain biopsy confirmed inflammatory demyelination. Following diagnosis of tumefactive MS treatment with natalizumab effectively suppressed disease activity. Conclusions The case highlights the need for clinicians, radiologists and surgeons to appreciate the heterogeneous presentation of tumefactive MS. Early brain biopsy facilitates rapid diagnosis and management. Treatment with natalizumab may be useful in cases of tumefactive demyelination where additional evidence supports a diagnosis of relapsing MS. PMID:24694183

  20. Hereditary And Acquired Chronic Demyelination Neuropathies : A Clinical, electrophysiological And Histopathological Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Menon A

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Differentiating hereditary motor sensory neuropathy (HMSN from chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP is often difficult especially when the disease starts at an early age and has protracted course. This study compares the clinical, electro, physiological and histopathological features of hereditary and acquired chronic demyelinating neuropathies. Records of 26 patients of chronic demyelinating neuropathy who underwent sural nerve biopsy were reviewed; HMSN 9, CIDP 13, chronic relapsing demyelinating polyneuropathy (CRDP-4, Salient features of the HMSN group were: Consanguineous parentage-4, onset in first decade-9, skeletal markers-7, absence of positive sensory symptoms- 7 and clinically thickened nerves-6. None of the patients with acquired neuropathy had skeletal markers, 11 had positive sensory symptoms and only 4 had nerve thickening. Electrophysiological evaluation in 22 motor nerves in the HMSN group revealed: inexcitable nerves -13, prolonged distal latency - 6, slow conduction velocity-8 and prolonged f wave latency-3. The 44 motor nerves in patients with acquired neuropathy showed: inexcitable nerves- 7, prolonged distal latency-35, slow conduction velocity-34, f wave prolongation-30 and conduction block 9. Elevated CSF protein was noticed only in acquired group (77%. Pathologically in HMSN the fibre loss was always diffuse and onion bulb formation was frequent while endoneural edema and inflammatory infiltration were absent in this group. Selection of patients with chronic demyelinating neuropathies for therapeutic modulation needs comprehensive clinical and laboratory evaluation.

  1. Innovative therapeutics for inflammatory bowel disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jesus K Yamamoto-Furusho

    2007-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) are chronic inflammatory conditions of the gastrointestinal tract,which clinically present as one of two disorders, Crohn's disease or ulcerative colitis. Mainstays of drug treatments for IBD include aminosalicylates, corticosteroids and immunosuppressants such as azathioprine, methotrexate and cyclosporin. Advances in basic research of the pathophysiological process in IBD have been applied to generate a variety of new therapeutics targeting at different levels of the inflammatory processes. New therapies are classified as: (1) Anti-TNFα antibodies; (2) Recombinant cytokines; (3) Selective adhesion blockade;(4) Growth factors; (5) Innate immunostimulation; (6) Nucleic acid based therapies; (7) Gene therapy; (8) Autologous bone-marrow transplantation; (9) Helminths and (10) Extracorporeal immunomodulation. All treatments have the potential to provide more effective and safe treatment for IBD.

  2. Importance of nutrition in inflammatory bowel disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Alfredo José Lucendo; Livia Cristina De Rezende

    2009-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) results from the interaction between an individual's immune response and precipitant environmental factors, which generate an anomalous chronic inflammatory response in those who are genetically predisposed. Various feeding practices have been implicated in the origin of IBD based on epidemiological observations in developed countries, but we do not have solid evidence for the etiological role played by specific food types. IBD is associated with frequent nutritional deficiencies, the pattern and severity of which depends on the extent, duration and activity of the inflammation. Nutritional support allows these deficiencies in calories, macro and micronutrients to be rectified. Enteral nutrition is also a primary therapy for IBD, especially for Crohn's disease, as it allows the inflammatory activity to be controlled, kept in remission, and prevents or delays the need for surgery. Nutritional support is especially important in childhood IBD as an alternative to pharmacological t reatment . This repor t discusses the complex relationship between diet and IBD.

  3. Therapeutical Advances in Chronic Inflammatory Demyelinating Polyneuropathy (review)%慢性炎症性脱髓鞘性多发性神经病的治疗进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    矫毓娟; 张伟赫

    2011-01-01

    Chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP) is one of the acquired autoimmune peripheral neuropathy with various therapeutical methods. This article reviewed the therapeutical advances in CIDP.%慢性炎症性脱髓鞘性多发性神经病是一种获得性周围神经自身免疫性疾病,是可治疗的慢性多发性神经病之一.本文就其各种治疗方法作一综述.

  4. Current medical therapy of inflammatory bowel disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kiron M. Das; Sherif A. Farag

    2000-01-01

    The current established drugs used to treat inflammatory bowel disease include glucocorticoids includingnewer agent budesonide, sulfasalazine and 5-ASA compounds such as Asacol, Pentasa, Dipentum andBalsalazide and immunomodulatory agents such as azathioprine, and 6-mercaptopurine. Additional drugswhich have been found to be useful, particularly in refractory cases of Crohn's disease including fistulizingtype of Crohn's disease, include cyclosporine A, methotrexate, humanized antibody against TNFa(cA2),FK506, IL-10, IL-11 and Probiotics. Various agents, whether used alone or in combination, have to betailored for each patient and none is ideal. Exciting new developments directed against proinflammatorypathways, cytokines, free oxygen radicals and cell surface related immune targets are areas of intense recentinvestigations and many novel therapeutic agents are expected to be available in the near future for medicaltreatment of inflammatory bowel disease.

  5. Chronic Inflammatory Demyelinating Polyneuropathy (CIDP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and abnormal sensations. CIDP is closely related to Guillain-Barre syndrome and it is considered the chronic counterpart ... and abnormal sensations. CIDP is closely related to Guillain-Barre syndrome and it is considered the chronic counterpart ...

  6. Positron Emission Tomography in inflammatory cardiovascular diseases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Felix, Renata Christian Martins; Gouvea, Clecio Maria, E-mail: renatafelix@cardiol.br, E-mail: renata.felix@inc.saude.gov.br [Instituto Nacional de Cardiologia, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Carneiro, Michel Pontes [Instituto Nacional de Cancer (INCA), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Mesquita, Claudio Tinoco [Universidade Federal Fluminense (UFF), Niteroi, RJ (Brazil)

    2014-10-15

    Many articles have demonstrated the role of PET-CT in the evaluation of inflammatory and infectious diseases of the cardiovascular system. The purpose of this article is to provide a review of the literature on this topic to identify clinical situations in which there is evidence of the usefulness of PET-CT in diagnostic and therapeutic evaluation.

  7. Inflammatory Bowel Disease: School Nurse Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitto, Lisa

    2010-01-01

    Initial symptoms and diagnosis of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) usually occur between 10 and 20 years of age, although younger cases are reported. The complicated nature of IBD diagnosis and treatment can interfere with physical and emotional development that normally occurs in school-age children and adolescents. The school nurse should be…

  8. Environmental factors in inflammatory bowel disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Tanja Stenbaek; Jess, Tine; Vind, Ida;

    2011-01-01

    The role of environmental factors in development of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) remains uncertain. The aim of the present study was to assess a number of formerly suggested environmental factors in a case-control study of an unselected and recently diagnosed group of patients with IBD...

  9. Interferon beta-1a in chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy: case report Interferon beta en polineuropatía crónica inflamatoria desmienlinizante: caso clínico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrés Maria Villa

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available Chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP is an acquired immune-mediated neuropathy. It presents with a course of progression which may be slow and steady or step-wise or relapsing. Sensory ataxic polyneuropathy may be the only clinical manifestation of this disease. Treatment with interferon beta1a (INF beta1a has been tried with different results in patients who were refractory to other, more conventional, immunomodulatory therapies. Here we report on a patient who had a relapsing form of pure sensory ataxic CIDP and who failed to respond to intravenous human immunoglobulin. He was put on INF beta1a for 3 years. During this period he suffered no relapses while his condition stabilized.La polineuropatía crónica inflamatoria desmielinizante (PCID es una neuropatía inmuno-mediada, que presenta un curso clínico primariamente progresivo o en forma de recaídas. Las manifestaciones sensoriales pueden ser su unica forma de expresión clínica. El tratamiento con interferon beta 1a (IFN beta1a ha sido ensayado en varias oportunidades, con diferentes respuestas terapéuticas, en pacientes refractarios a las terapias inmunomoduladoras convencionales. Nosotros comunicamos un paciente con una forma ataxica recurrente de PCID, que no respondió al tratamiento con inmunoglobulina endovenosa. Posteriormente fue tratado con IFN beta 1 a por tres años. Durante el período de seguimiento no mostró nuevas recaídas y su cuadro neurológico se estabilizó.

  10. Environmental Risk Factors for Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Natalie A Molodecky; Gilaad G. Kaplan

    2010-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is characterized by chronic inflammation of the gastrointestinal tract and is associated with significant morbidity. The etiology of IBD has been extensively studied during the last several decades; however, causative factors in disease pathology are not yet fully understood. IBD is thought to result from the interaction between genetic and environmental factors that influence the normal intestinal commensal flora to trigger an inappropriate mucosal immune res...

  11. Secondary syphilis mimicking inflammatory bowel disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasconcelos, Pedro; Borges-Costa, João; Loreto, Helena; Marques, Sacramento

    2013-03-01

    This study reports the case of a 15-year-old male patient with extensive anal inflammation, cobblestone-like mucosa and areas of ulceration, loose bloody stool and weight loss for 8 weeks, suggestive of inflammatory bowel disease. Genital lesions of syphilides were later observed and Venereal Disease Research Laboratory test was positive, thus benzyl penicillin treatment was prescribed with total resolution of genital and bowel symptoms.

  12. Review of Inflammatory Bowel Disease in China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lingna Ye

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Inflammatory bowel disease mainly consisting of ulcerative colitis and Crohn’s disease has been rising gradually during the last two decades in China. In this review article, we provide the latest epidemiological trends in incidence, prevalence, and mortality of IBD patients in China and summarize the risk factors and genetic susceptibility of Chinese IBD patients. We also compare these characteristics to those of IBD patients in Western countries.

  13. Pancreatic disorders in inflammatory bowel disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Filippo Antonini; Raffaele Pezzilli; Lucia Angelelli; Giampiero Macarri

    2016-01-01

    An increased incidence of pancreatic disorders either acute pancreatitis or chronic pancreatitis has been rec-orded in patients with inflammatory bowel disease(IBD) compared to the general population.Although most of the pancreatitis in patients with IBD seem to be related to biliary lithiasis or drug induced,in some cases pancreatitis were defined as idiopathic,suggesting a direct pancreatic damage in IBD.Pancreatitis and IBD may have similar presentation therefore a pancreatic disease could not be recognized in patients with Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis.This review will discuss the most common pancreatic diseases seen in patients with IBD.

  14. Pancreatic disorders in inflammatory bowel disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antonini, Filippo; Pezzilli, Raffaele; Angelelli, Lucia; Macarri, Giampiero

    2016-01-01

    An increased incidence of pancreatic disorders either acute pancreatitis or chronic pancreatitis has been recorded in patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) compared to the general population. Although most of the pancreatitis in patients with IBD seem to be related to biliary lithiasis or drug induced, in some cases pancreatitis were defined as idiopathic, suggesting a direct pancreatic damage in IBD. Pancreatitis and IBD may have similar presentation therefore a pancreatic disease could not be recognized in patients with Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis. This review will discuss the most common pancreatic diseases seen in patients with IBD. PMID:27574565

  15. Role of Th1 and Th2 cells in autoimmune demyelinating disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nagelkerken, L.

    1998-01-01

    Evidence is accumulating that Th1 cells play an important role in the development of multiple sclerosis (MS) and experimental allergic encephalomyelitis (EAE), whereas Th2 cells contribute to recovery from disease. A maj or determinant in the development of Th1 and Th2 cells is the type of antigen-p

  16. Inflammatory bowel diseases: principles of nutritional therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campos, Fábio Guilherme; Waitzberg, Dan L; Teixeira, Magaly Gemio; Mucerino, Donato Roberto; Habr-Gama, Angelita; Kiss, Desidério R

    2002-01-01

    Inflammatory Bowel Diseases - ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease- are chronic gastrointestinal inflammatory diseases of unknown etiology. Decreased oral intake, malabsorption, accelerated nutrient losses, increased requirements, and drug-nutrient interactions cause nutritional and functional deficiencies that require proper correction by nutritional therapy. The goals of the different forms of nutritional therapy are to correct nutritional disturbances and to modulate inflammatory response, thus influencing disease activity. Total parenteral nutrition has been used to correct and to prevent nutritional disturbances and to promote bowel rest during active disease, mainly in cases of digestive fistulae with high output. Its use should be reserved for patients who cannot tolerate enteral nutrition. Enteral nutrition is effective in inducing clinical remission in adults and promoting growth in children. Due to its low complication rate and lower costs, enteral nutrition should be preferred over total parenteral nutrition whenever possible. Both present equal effectiveness in primary therapy for remission of active Crohn's disease. Nutritional intervention may improve outcome in certain individuals; however, because of the costs and complications of such therapy, careful selection is warranted, especially in patients presumed to need total parenteral nutrition. Recent research has focused on the use of nutrients as primary treatment agents. Immunonutrition is an important therapeutic alternative in the management of inflammatory bowel diseases, modulating the inflammation and changing the eicosanoid synthesis profile. However, beneficial reported effects have yet to be translated into the clinical practice. The real efficacy of these and other nutrients (glutamine, short-chain fatty acids, antioxidants) still need further evaluation through prospective and randomized trials.

  17. Cestode regulation of inflammation and inflammatory diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernandez, Jose-Luis Reyes; Leung, Gabriella; McKay, Derek M

    2013-03-01

    Helminth parasites are masters of immune regulation; a likely prerequisite for long-term survival by circumventing their hosts' attempt to eradicate them. From a translational perspective, knowledge of immune events as a response to infection with a helminth parasite could be used to reduce the intensity of unwanted inflammatory reactions. Substantial data have accumulated showing that inflammatory reactions that promote a variety of auto-inflammatory diseases are dampened as a consequence of infection with helminth parasites, via either the mobilization of an anti-worm spectrum of immune events or by the direct effect of secretory/excretory bioactive immunomodulatory molecules released from the parasite. However, many issues are outstanding in the definition of the mechanism(s) by which infection with helminth parasites can affect the outcome, positively or negatively, of concomitant disease. We focus on a subgroup of this complex group of metazoan parasites, the cestodes, summarizing studies from rodent models that illustrate if, and by what mechanisms, infection with tapeworms ameliorate or exaggerate disease in their host. The ability of infection with cestodes, or other classes of helminth, to worsen a disease course or confer susceptibility to intracellular pathogens should be carefully considered in the context of 'helminth therapy'. In addition, poorly characterised cestode extracts can regulate murine and human immunocyte function, yet the impact of these in the context of autoimmune or allergic diseases is poorly understood. Thus, studies with cestodes, as representative helminths, have helped cement the concept that infection with parasitic helminths can inhibit concomitant disease; however, issues relating to long-term effects, potential side-effects, mixed pathogen infections and purification of immunomodulatory molecules from the parasite remain as challenges that need to be addressed in order to achieve the use of helminths as anti-inflammatory

  18. Current medical therapy of inflammatory bowel disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kiron M. Das; Sherif A. Farag

    2000-01-01

    The 1990's have brought a significant promise and the hope for a better and brighter future in the new millennium for patients with inflammatory bowel disease (I3D). A better understanding of the pathophysiology of IBD symptoms has led to newer treatnent modalities and streamlining of therapy for specific subsets of patients. ULCERATIVE COUTISThe treatnent for ulcerative colitis (UC) is aimed at modulating the inflammatory response. The drugs which are found to be effective are sulfasalazine (Azulfidine, Salazopyrin) and its 5ASA derivatives, glucocorticosteroids, immunomodulators/immunosuppressants, and other new potential drugs (Table 1).

  19. THE MOST FREQUENT TYPES OF DEMYELINATIVE CHARCOT-MARIE-TOOTH DISEASE IN SLOVENIA: A POPULATION-BASED STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lea Leonardis

    2003-10-01

    Full Text Available Background. The most common genetic defect in demyelinative type of Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT1 is dominantly inherited duplication of 17p11.2 (CMT1A. Phenotipically rather different, but genetically related to CMT1A, is hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies (HNPP which is linked to deletion of the same part of chromosome 17 as duplication in CMT1A. The aim of our study was to analyse the frequency of duplication and deletion of 17p11.2 in CMT1 and HNPP Slovene patients, respectively. We also sought for eventual point mutations in connexin-32 (Cx32, protein zero (P0, peripheral myelin protein-22 (PMP22 genes and in N-myc downstream-regulated gene1 (NDRG1.Methods. Probes pVAW409R3a, pNEA102 and pLR7.8 were used for Southern blotting and primers RM-11 in Mfd-41 for the polymerase chain reaction. Sequencing was used for the demonstration of eventual point mutations.Results and conclusions. The duplication or deletion of 17p11.2 was found in 76% and 100% of unrelated CMT1 and HNPP patients, respectively. Point mutations in P0 were found in 8% of unrelated patients. In a Gypsy family, point mutation in NDRG1 was revealed. The prevalence of CMT1A in Slovenia was found to be 4.7/100,000 which is most likely less than true average (10/100,000 elsewhere. The Slovene prevalence of HNPP was calculated at 2,2/100,000 (2–16/100.000 elsewhere.

  20. Confocal Laser Endomicroscopy in Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Ditlev Nytoft; Karstensen, John Gásdal; Riis, Lene Buhl

    2015-01-01

    of histological features such as colonic crypts, epithelial gaps and epithelial leakiness to fluorescein. CONCLUSIONS: Confocal laser endomicroscopy remains an experimental but emerging tool for assessment of inflammatory bowel disease. It is the only method that enables in vivo functional assessment......BACKGROUND AND AIMS: Confocal laser endomicroscopy is an endoscopic method that provides in vivo real-time imaging of the mucosa at a cellular level, elucidating mucosal changes that are undetectable by white light endoscopy. This paper systematically reviews current indications and perspectives...... of confocal laser endomicroscopy for inflammatory bowel disease. METHODS: Available literature was searched systematically for studies applying confocal laser endomicroscopy in Crohn's disease or ulcerative colitis. Relevant literature was reviewed and only studies reporting original clinical data were...

  1. Cytomegalovirus infection associated with inflammatory bowel disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegmund, Britta

    2017-05-01

    Refractory colitis in patients with inflammatory bowel disease is a complicated clinical disorder that might, in some patients, even necessitate surgery. Hence the diagnosis of additional complications is of utmost importance. Colitis mediated by cytomegalovirus is one such complication. The high seroprevalence and latent nature of cytomegalovirus, with the possibility of viral replication without mediating disease, poses a real challenge for the diagnosis of cytomegalovirus-mediated colitis. The challenge in daily clinical practice is to distinguish cytomegalovirus replication from cytomegalovirus-mediated colitis in patients with inflammatory bowel disease who have refractory colitis. This Review discusses the scientific literature and provides a diagnostic and therapeutic algorithm for clinical practice. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. NATURAL AGENTS FOR INFLAMMATORY BOWEL DISEASE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darji Vinay Chhanalal

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD is a chronic inflammatory disease of gastrointestinal tract. It comprises the two conditions, Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis, characterized by chronic recurrent ulceration of the bowel. Conventional drugs for colitis treatment include aminosalicylate, corticosteroids,antibiotics & immunomodulators. 5- Amino salicylic acid having side effects in 30% of the patients. Systemic corticosteroids producing incidence of complication is 4.3%. Antibiotic therapy is beneficial in 70% of the patients & Immunomodulators having 50 to 70% beneficial effects. This report shows that there is no any appropriate treatment available to treat IBD without side effects. A natural agent with reduced or no toxicity is therefore essential. In nature there are so many types of natural agents which are used as protective agents in IBD. This article emphasizes many natural products obtained from plant & other sources, which possess potent activity against experimentally induced IBD.

  3. Diabetes mellitus and inflammatory periodontal diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mealey, Brian L; Rose, Louis F

    2008-09-01

    THE PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Periodontal diseases are inflammatory conditions that were once thought to have manifestations localized to the oral cavity alone, and were therefore considered the concern of only dentists and other oral health professionals. Emerging evidence has changed this view and now suggests that periodontal diseases may play a role in numerous conditions that impact systemic well-being, including diabetes mellitus. This review examines the relationships that exist between periodontal diseases and diabetes mellitus, with a focus on potential common pathophysiologic pathways including those associated with inflammation, altered host responses, and insulin resistance. Periodontal inflammation is associated with an elevated systemic inflammatory state and an increased risk of major cardiovascular events such as myocardial infarction and stroke, adverse pregnancy outcomes such as preeclampsia, low birth weight, and preterm birth, and altered glycemic control in people with diabetes. Intervention trials suggest that periodontal therapy, which decreases the intraoral bacterial bioburden and reduces periodontal inflammation, can have a significant impact on systemic inflammatory status. Evidence suggests that periodontal therapy is associated with improved glycemic control in many patients with both diabetes and periodontal diseases. Recognition of the bilateral relationships between oral and systemic health will challenge physicians and dentists to work together closely in the future when managing patients with diabetes and periodontal disease.

  4. Antibody response against gastrointestinal antigens in demyelinating diseases of the central nervous system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Banati, M; Csecsei, P; Koszegi, E

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Antibodies against gastrointestinal antigens may indicate altered microbiota and immune responses in the gut. Recent experimental data suggest a connection between gastrointestinal immune responses and CNS autoimmunity. METHODS: Antibodies against gliadin, tissue transglutaminase (t......TG), intrinsic factor (IF), parietal cells (PC) and Saccharomyces cerevisiae (ASCA) were screened in the sera of 45 patients with AQP4-seropositive neuromyelitis optica (NMO) and NMO spectrum diseases (NMO/NMO-SD), 17 patients with AQP4-seronegative NMO, 85 patients with clinically definite multiple sclerosis...

  5. Zinc absorption in inflammatory bowel disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valberg, L.S.; Flanagan, P.R.; Kertesz, A.; Bondy, D.C.

    1986-07-01

    Zinc absorption was measured in 29 patients with inflammatory bowel disease and a wide spectrum of disease activity to determine its relationship to disease activity, general nutritional state, and zinc status. Patients with severe disease requiring either supplementary oral or parenteral nutrition were excluded. The mean 65ZnCl2 absorption, in the patients, determined using a 65Zn and 51Cr stool-counting test, 45 +/- 17% (SD), was significantly lower than the values, 54 +/- 16%, in 30 healthy controls, P less than 0.05. Low 65ZnCl2 absorption was related to undernutrition, but not to disease activity in the absence of undernutrition or to zinc status estimated by leukocyte zinc measurements. Mean plasma zinc or leukocyte zinc concentrations in patients did not differ significantly from controls, and only two patients with moderate disease had leukocyte zinc values below the 5th percentile of normal. In another group of nine patients with inflammatory bowel disease of mild-to-moderate severity and minimal nutritional impairment, 65Zn absorption from an extrinsically labeled turkey test meal was 31 +/- 10% compared to 33 +/- 7% in 17 healthy controls, P greater than 0.1. Thus, impairment in 65ZnCl2 absorption in the patients selected for this study was only evident in undernourished persons with moderate or severe disease activity, but biochemical evidence of zinc deficiency was uncommon, and clinical features of zinc depletion were not encountered.

  6. Immunogenetic phenotypes in inflammatory bowel disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Marla C Dubinsky; Kent Taylor; Stephan R Targan; Jerome I Rotter

    2006-01-01

    The currently accepted etiopathogenic hypothesis suggests that the chronic intestinal inflammation and related systemic manifestations characteristic of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) are due to an overly aggressive or pathologic immune response to resident luminal bacterial constituents. Predisposing factors are genetic dysregulation of mucosal immune responses and/or barrier function, with onset triggered by environmental stimuli. These factors and their interactions may also be important determinants of disease phenotype and disease progression. The emergence of immunogenetic phenotypes lends support to the proposed hypothesis that susceptibility genes regulate distinct immune processes, driven by luminal antigens, expressed as specific immune phenotypes which in turn influence clinical phenotypes in IBD patient

  7. Closed head injury--an inflammatory disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Oliver I; Heyde, Christoph E; Ertel, Wolfgang; Stahel, Philip F

    2005-04-01

    Closed head injury (CHI) remains the leading cause of death and persisting neurological impairment in young individuals in industrialized nations. Research efforts in the past years have brought evidence that the intracranial inflammatory response in the injured brain contributes to the neuropathological sequelae which are, in large part, responsible for the adverse outcome after head injury. The presence of hypoxia and hypotension in the early resuscitative period of brain-injured patients further aggravates the inflammatory response in the brain due to ischemia/reperfusion-mediated injuries. The profound endogenous neuroinflammatory response after CHI, which is phylogenetically aimed at defending the intrathecal compartment from invading pathogens and repairing lesioned brain tissue, contributes to the development of cerebral edema, breakdown of the blood-brain barrier, and ultimately to delayed neuronal cell death. However, aside from these deleterious effects, neuroinflammation has been recently shown to mediate neuroreparative mechanisms after brain injury as well. This "dual effect" of neuroinflammation was the focus of extensive experimental and clinical research in the past years and has lead to an expanded basic knowledge on the cellular and molecular mechanisms which regulate the intracranial inflammatory response after CHI. Thus, head injury has recently evolved as an inflammatory and immunological disease much more than a pure traumatological, neurological, or neurosurgical entity. The present review will summarize the so far known mechanisms of posttraumatic neuroinflammation after CHI, based on data from clinical and experimental studies, with a special focus on the role of pro-inflammatory cytokines, chemokines, and the complement system.

  8. Inflammatory diseases of the parathyroid gland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talat, Nadia; Diaz-Cano, Salvador; Schulte, Klaus-Martin

    2011-11-01

    Inflammatory disorders of the parathyroid gland are very rare as compared with those of other endocrine organs. The aim of this study was to provide the first systematic review of this condition. A 42-year-old patient underwent surgery for recurrent secondary hyperparathyroidism. Histology showed hyperplastic parathyroiditis defined by a mixed inflammatory infiltrate with active germinal centres. Molecular markers revealed significant upregulation of CD68 in an ischaemic background (hypoxia-inducible factor 1 upregulation) with mitochondrial reaction (malate dehydrogenase 2 upregulation) and hyperparathyroidism (carbonic anhydrase 4 upregulation). Our case demonstrates true intraparathyroid inflammation with terminal B-cell differentiation. We searched PubMed, ISI Thompson and Google Scholar up to January 2011, using the terms 'parathyroiditis', 'inflammation of parathyroid gland', 'lymphocytic infiltrate', 'tuberculosis of the parathyroid', 'sarcoidosis', and 'graulomatous inflammation'. Three autopsy series, 27 articles and 96 case reports with inflammatory parathyroid disorders were identified. Autopsy series showed lymphocytic infiltrates in up to 16% of all cases. The entire material reported lymphocytic infiltrates (n=69), parathyroiditis with germinal centres (n=15), sarcoidosis (n=6), tuberculosis (n=4), and other granulomatous diseases (n=2). Distinct inflammatory and granulomatous processes in the parathyroid gland are rare. Scanty lymphocytic infiltrates are common, and occur in generalized inflammatory conditions or venous congestion. We note the surprising absence of an association between histological proof of parathyroiditis and hypoparathyroidism. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Limited.

  9. Changes in ion transport in inflammatory disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eisenhut Michael

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Ion transport is essential for maintenance of transmembranous and transcellular electric potential, fluid transport and cellular volume. Disturbance of ion transport has been associated with cellular dysfunction, intra and extracellular edema and abnormalities of epithelial surface liquid volume. There is increasing evidence that conditions characterized by an intense local or systemic inflammatory response are associated with abnormal ion transport. This abnormal ion transport has been involved in the pathogenesis of conditions like hypovolemia due to fluid losses, hyponatremia and hypokalemia in diarrhoeal diseases, electrolyte abnormalites in pyelonephritis of early infancy, septicemia induced pulmonary edema, and in hypersecretion and edema induced by inflammatory reactions of the mucosa of the upper respiratory tract. Components of membranous ion transport systems, which have been shown to undergo a change in function during an inflammatory response include the sodium potassium ATPase, the epithelial sodium channel, the Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator and calcium activated chloride channels and the sodium potassium chloride co-transporter. Inflammatory mediators, which influence ion transport are tumor necrosis factor, gamma interferon, interleukins, transforming growth factor, leukotrienes and bradykinin. They trigger the release of specific messengers like prostaglandins, nitric oxide and histamine which alter ion transport system function through specific receptors, intracellular second messengers and protein kinases. This review summarizes data on in vivo measurements of changes in ion transport in acute inflammatory conditions and in vitro studies, which have explored the underlying mechanisms. Potential interventions directed at a correction of the observed abnormalities are discussed.

  10. Microbiome, Metabolome and Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Ishfaq; Roy, Badal C.; Khan, Salman A.; Septer, Seth; Umar, Shahid

    2016-01-01

    Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD) is a multifactorial disorder that conceptually occurs as a result of altered immune responses to commensal and/or pathogenic gut microbes in individuals most susceptible to the disease. During Crohn’s Disease (CD) or Ulcerative Colitis (UC), two components of the human IBD, distinct stages define the disease onset, severity, progression and remission. Epigenetic, environmental (microbiome, metabolome) and nutritional factors are important in IBD pathogenesis. While the dysbiotic microbiota has been proposed to play a role in disease pathogenesis, the data on IBD and diet are still less convincing. Nonetheless, studies are ongoing to examine the effect of pre/probiotics and/or FODMAP reduced diets on both the gut microbiome and its metabolome in an effort to define the healthy diet in patients with IBD. Knowledge of a unique metabolomic fingerprint in IBD could be useful for diagnosis, treatment and detection of disease pathogenesis. PMID:27681914

  11. Microbiome, Metabolome and Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ishfaq Ahmed

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD is a multifactorial disorder that conceptually occurs as a result of altered immune responses to commensal and/or pathogenic gut microbes in individuals most susceptible to the disease. During Crohn’s Disease (CD or Ulcerative Colitis (UC, two components of the human IBD, distinct stages define the disease onset, severity, progression and remission. Epigenetic, environmental (microbiome, metabolome and nutritional factors are important in IBD pathogenesis. While the dysbiotic microbiota has been proposed to play a role in disease pathogenesis, the data on IBD and diet are still less convincing. Nonetheless, studies are ongoing to examine the effect of pre/probiotics and/or FODMAP reduced diets on both the gut microbiome and its metabolome in an effort to define the healthy diet in patients with IBD. Knowledge of a unique metabolomic fingerprint in IBD could be useful for diagnosis, treatment and detection of disease pathogenesis.

  12. Video capsule endoscopy in inflammatory bowel disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Paul D

    2016-01-01

    Video capsule endoscopy (VCE) has evolved to become an important tool for the non-invasive examination of the small bowel, which hitherto had been relatively inaccessible to direct visualisation. VCE has been shown to play a role in monitoring the activity of small bowel Crohn’s disease and can be used to assess the response to anti-inflammatory treatment in Crohn’s disease. For those patients with Crohn’s disease who have undergone an intestinal resection, VCE has been assessed as a tool to detect post-operative recurrence. VCE may also aid in the reclassification of patients with a diagnosis of Inflammatory Bowel Disease Unclassified to Crohn’s disease. The evolution of colon capsule endoscopy (CCE) has expanded the application of this technology further. The use of CCE to assess the activity of ulcerative colitis has been described. This advance in capsule technology has also fuelled interest in its potential role as a minimally invasive tool to assess the whole of GI tract opening the possibility of its use for the panenteric assessment of Crohn’s disease. VCE is a safe procedure. However, the risk of a retained capsule is higher in patients with suspected or confirmed Crohn’s disease compared with patients having VCE examination for other indications. A retained video capsule is rare after successful passage of a patency capsule which may be utilised to pre-screen patients undergoing VCE. This paper describes the use of VCE in the assessment of inflammatory bowel disease. PMID:27499830

  13. Neurological Manifestations In Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    youssef HNACH

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available IntroductionThe purpose of this retrospective study was to report neurological manifestations noted in patients who were monitored for inflammatory bowel disease, in order to document the pathophysiological, clinical, progressive, and therapeutic characteristics of this entity.Material and methodsWe conducted a retrospective study on patients monitored -in the gastroenterology service in Ibn Sina Hospital in Rabat, Morocco- for inflammatory bowel disease from 1992 till 2013 and who developed neurological manifestations during its course. Patients with iatrogenic complications were excluded, as well as patients with cerebrovascular risk factors.ResultsThere were 6 patients, 4 of whom have developed peripheral manifestations. Electromyography enabled the diagnosis to be made and the outcome was favorable with disappearance of clinical manifestations and normalization of the electromyography.The other 2 patients, monitored for Crohn’s disease, developed ischemic stroke. Cerebral computed tomography angiography provided positive and topographic diagnosis. Two patients were admitted to specialized facilities.ConclusionNeurological manifestations in inflammatory bowel disease are rarely reported.  Peripheral neuropathies and stroke remain the most common manifestations. The mechanisms of these manifestations are not clearly defined yet. Currently, we hypothesize the interaction of immune mediators.

  14. SLPI and inflammatory lung disease in females.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McKiernan, Paul J

    2012-02-01

    During the course of certain inflammatory lung diseases, SLPI (secretory leucoprotease inhibitor) plays a number of important roles. As a serine antiprotease it functions to protect the airways from proteolytic damage due to neutrophil and other immune cell-derived serine proteases. With respect to infection it has known antimicrobial and anti-viral properties that are likely to contribute to host defence. Another of its properties is the ability to control inflammation within the lung where it can interfere with the transcriptional induction of pro-inflammatory gene expression induced by NF-kappaB (nuclear factor kappaB). Thus, factors that regulate the expression of SLPI in the airways can impact on disease severity and outcome. Gender represents once such idiosyncratic factor. In females with CF (cystic fibrosis), it is now thought that circulating oestrogen contributes, in part, to the observed gender gap whereby females have worse disease and poorer prognosis than males. Conversely, in asthma, sufferers who are females have more frequent exacerbations at times of low-circulating oestrogen. In the present paper, we discuss how SLPI participates in these events and speculate on whether regulatory mechanisms such as post-transcriptional modulation by miRNAs (microRNAs) are important in the control of SLPI expression in inflammatory lung disease.

  15. Developmental origins of inflammatory and immune diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ting; Liu, Han-Xiao; Yan, Hui-Yi; Wu, Dong-Mei; Ping, Jie

    2016-08-01

    Epidemiological and experimental animal studies show that suboptimal environments in fetal and neonatal life exert a profound influence on physiological function and risk of diseases in adult life. The concepts of the 'developmental programming' and Developmental Origins of Health and Diseases (DOHaD) have become well accepted and have been applied across almost all fields of medicine. Adverse intrauterine environments may have programming effects on the crucial functions of the immune system during critical periods of fetal development, which can permanently alter the immune function of offspring. Immune dysfunction may in turn lead offspring to be susceptible to inflammatory and immune diseases in adulthood. These facts suggest that inflammatory and immune disorders might have developmental origins. In recent years, inflammatory and immune disorders have become a growing health problem worldwide. However, there is no systematic report in the literature on the developmental origins of inflammatory and immune diseases and the potential mechanisms involved. Here, we review the impacts of adverse intrauterine environments on the immune function in offspring. This review shows the results from human and different animal species and highlights the underlying mechanisms, including damaged development of cells in the thymus, helper T cell 1/helper T cell 2 balance disturbance, abnormal epigenetic modification, effects of maternal glucocorticoid overexposure on fetal lymphocytes and effects of the fetal hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis on the immune system. Although the phenomena have already been clearly implicated in epidemiologic and experimental studies, new studies investigating the mechanisms of these effects may provide new avenues for exploiting these pathways for disease prevention.

  16. Inflammatory oral cavity diseases of the cat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedersen, N C

    1992-11-01

    There is a great deal of frustration among veterinarians about the diagnosis and treatment of inflammatory diseases of the oral cavity of the cat. This frustration is due to both the high frequency of feline oral inflammatory lesions and our poor understanding of their causes. This poor understanding can be blamed on several things: (1) a rapidly emerging, but still relatively poor, understanding of feline diseases in general and nutrition in particular; (2) a tendency to lump rather than separate specific oral inflammations; (3) a tendency not to use a thorough and systematic approach to diagnosing oral cavity disease; and (4) the reluctance of veterinarians to apply what is already known about human oral cavity diseases to cats. When problems 2 through 4 are adequately addressed, it becomes apparent that we really know more about oral cavity disease in the cat than we thought we knew and that great progress has been made. The task ahead is to define, in precise medical terms, those remaining disease entities of the oral cavity that pose the greatest health risk to cats, to apply what has been already been discovered from human disease counterparts, and to study them systematically.

  17. Is the disease course predictable in inflammatory bowel diseases?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Peter; Laszlo; Lakatos; Lajos; S; Kiss

    2010-01-01

    During the course of the disease,most patients with Crohn's disease(CD) may eventually develop a stricturing or a perforating complication,and a significant number of patients with both CD and ulcerative colitis will undergo surgery.In recent years,research has focused on the determination of factors important in the prediction of disease course in inflammatory bowel diseases to improve stratification of patients,identify individual patient profiles,including clinical,laboratory and molecular markers,which ...

  18. The frequencies of Killer immunoglobulin-like receptors and their HLA ligands in chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy are similar to those in Guillian Barre syndrome but differ from those of controls, suggesting a role for NK cells in pathogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blum, Stefan; Csurhes, Peter; McCombe, Pamela

    2015-08-15

    Chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy (CIDP) is an acquired inflammatory neuropathy, which has similar clinical and pathological features to Guillain-Barré Syndrome (GBS), but differs in time course. We investigated the frequency of genes encoding Killer immunoglobulin-like receptors and their HLA ligands in subjects with CIDP, in subjects with GBS and in healthy controls. There were no differences in KIR gene frequency among the 3 groups. The gene frequencies for HLA-B Bw4-I were significantly greater in CIDP than HC, but did not differ from GBS. The frequency of the combination of 3DL1/HLA-B Bw4I was greater in CIDP than HC, but did not differ from that of GBS. These data raise the possibility of NK cell function being an important factor in the pathogenesis of CIDP.

  19. Inflammatory bowel disease in pediatric patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Charron, M. [Children`s Hospital of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh (United States). Dept. of Radiology

    1997-12-01

    Optimal management of chronic idiopathic inflammatory bowel disease requires determination of disease localization and intensity. Scintigraphy with the use of {sup 99m}Tc - HMPAO- White Bloods Cells ({sup 99m}Tc - HMPAO-WBC) is a relatively new noninvasive nuclear medicine procedure. They have evaluated more than 230 children and have found a high correspondence between the disease distribution shown by the {sup 99m}Tc - HMPAO- WBC scan and that shown by endoscopic, radiologic, or surgical methods. Additionally the {sup 99m}Tc - HMPAO-WBC scan has the ability of identifying extra intestinal site of inflammation, such as appendicitis and others. The {sup 99m}Tc - HMPAO-WBC scan is reliable in differentiating Crohn`s disease from ulcerative colitis. Some patients because of unequivocal demonstrable small bowel uptake are reclassified from ulcerative colitis to Crohn`s disease. The medication regimen is frequently altered because of the intensity of uptake displayed by the {sup 99m}Tc - HMPAO-WBC scan. It is a practical and safe study even in an acutely ill patient who may not tolerate endoscopic or radiological study. At their institution, the {sup 99m}Tc - HMPAO-WBC scan is now part of the initial evaluation, and follow-up of patients with inflammatory bowel disease. In conclusion the {sup 99m}Tc - HMPAO-WBC is excellent for the detection, localization and characterization of inflammatory bowel disease in children. Compared with the other methods of investigation this study requires no bowel preparation, is noninvasive and has excellent diagnostic accuracy.

  20. Extraluminal factors contributing to inflammatory bowel disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Arvind Batra; Thorsten Stroh; Britta Siegmund

    2011-01-01

    Many identified and yet unknown factors contribute to the pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD).The genome-wide association studies clearly support the earlier developed concept that IBD occurs in genetically predisposed individuals who are exposed to distinct environmental factors, which together result in dysregulation of the mucosal immune system. Thus, the majority of previous studies have focused on the immune response within the intestinal wall. The present review aims to emphasize the contribution of three extraluminal structures to this inflammatory process, namely the mesenteric fat tissue, the lymphatics and the microvasculature.Broadening our view across the intestinal wall will not only facilitate our understanding of the disease,but will also us to identify future therapeutic targets.

  1. Intestinal epithelium in inflammatory bowel disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehmet eCoskun

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The intestinal epithelium has a strategic position as a protective physical barrier to luminal microbiota and actively contributes to the mucosal immune system. This barrier is mainly formed by a monolayer of specialized intestinal epithelial cells (IECs that are crucial in maintaining intestinal homeostasis. Therefore, dysregulation within the epithelial layer can increase intestinal permeability, lead to abnormalities in interactions between IECs and immune cells in underlying lamina propria, and disturb the intestinal immune homeostasis, all of which are linked to the clinical disease course of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD. Understanding the role of the intestinal epithelium in IBD pathogenesis might contribute to an improved knowledge of the inflammatory processes and the identification of potential therapeutic targets.

  2. Intestinal epithelium in inflammatory bowel disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Coskun, Mehmet

    2014-01-01

    The intestinal epithelium has a strategic position as a protective physical barrier to luminal microbiota and actively contributes to the mucosal immune system. This barrier is mainly formed by a monolayer of specialized intestinal epithelial cells (IECs) that are crucial in maintaining intestinal...... homeostasis. Therefore, dysregulation within the epithelial layer can increase intestinal permeability, lead to abnormalities in interactions between IECs and immune cells in underlying lamina propria, and disturb the intestinal immune homeostasis, all of which are linked to the clinical disease course...... of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Understanding the role of the intestinal epithelium in IBD pathogenesis might contribute to an improved knowledge of the inflammatory processes and the identification of potential therapeutic targets....

  3. Extraluminal factors contributing to inflammatory bowel disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batra, Arvind; Stroh, Thorsten; Siegmund, Britta

    2011-01-01

    Many identified and yet unknown factors contribute to the pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). The genome-wide association studies clearly support the earlier developed concept that IBD occurs in genetically predisposed individuals who are exposed to distinct environmental factors, which together result in dysregulation of the mucosal immune system. Thus, the majority of previous studies have focused on the immune response within the intestinal wall. The present review aims to emphasize the contribution of three extraluminal structures to this inflammatory process, namely the mesenteric fat tissue, the lymphatics and the microvasculature. Broadening our view across the intestinal wall will not only facilitate our understanding of the disease, but will also us to identify future therapeutic targets. PMID:21350706

  4. Primary sclerosing cholangitis and disease distribution in inflammatory bowel disease.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Toole, Aoibhlinn

    2012-04-01

    The relationship between site of intestinal inflammation and primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC) development in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) has not been studied extensively, but may be important in understanding the pathogenesis of PSC. We aimed to determine patterns of disease distribution in IBD patients with and without PSC.

  5. Protective Effect of a cAMP Analogue on Behavioral Deficits and Neuropathological Changes in Cuprizone Model of Demyelination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vakilzadeh, Gelareh; Khodagholi, Fariba; Ghadiri, Tahereh; Darvishi, Marzieh; Ghaemi, Amir; Noorbakhsh, Farshid; Gorji, Ali; Sharifzadeh, Mohammad

    2015-08-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is an inflammatory demyelinating disease that leads to neuronal cell loss. Cyclic AMP and its analogs are well known to decrease inflammation and apoptosis. In the present study, we examined the effects of bucladesine, a cell-permeable analogue of cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP), on myelin proteins (PLP, PMP-22), inflammation, and apoptotic, as well as anti-apoptotic factors in cuprizone model of demyelination. C57BL/6J mice were fed with chow containing 0.2% copper chelator cuprizone or vehicle by daily oral gavage for 5 weeks to induce reversible demyelination predominantly of the corpus callosum. Bucladesine was administered intraperitoneally at different doses (0.24, 0.48, or 0.7 μg/kg body weight) during the last 7 days of 5-week cuprizone treatment. Bucladesine exhibited a protective effect on myelination. Furthermore, bucladesine significantly decreased the production of interleukin-6 pro-inflammatory mediator as well as nuclear factor-κB activation and reduced the mean number of apoptotic cells compared to cuprizone-treated mice. Bucladesine also decreased production of caspase-3 as well as Bax and increased Bcl-2 levels. Our data revealed that enhancement of intracellular cAMP prevents demyelination and plays anti-inflammatory and anti-apoptotic properties in mice cuprizone model of demyelination. This suggests the modulation of intracellular cAMP as a potential target for treatment of MS.

  6. Inflammatory bowel disease-associated spondyloarthropathies

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Walter Fries

    2009-01-01

    This issue presents a symposium held in Messina talking about inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and associated spondyloarthropathies. The topic covers epidemiology and clinical manifestations of IBD-related arthropathies,common genetic and immunologic features, combined therapies for gut and joint inflammation, and future biologic therapies etc. I believe this series of articles will deeply facilitate understanding of and the approach to IBD and associated arthropathies.

  7. Intestinal epithelial cells in inflammatory bowel diseases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Giulia; Roda; Alessandro; Sartini; Elisabetta; Zambon; Andrea; Calafiore; Margherita; Marocchi; Alessandra; Caponi; Andrea; Belluzzi; Enrico; Roda

    2010-01-01

    The pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel diseases (IBDs) seems to involve a primary defect in one or more of the elements responsible for the maintenance of intestinal homeostasis and oral tolerance. The most important element is represented by the intestinal barrier, a complex system formed mostly by intestinal epithelial cells (IECs). IECs have an active role in producing mucus and regulating its composition; they provide a physical barrier capable of controlling antigen traff ic through the intestinal muco...

  8. Nutritional concerns in pediatric inflammatory bowel disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    The pathophysiology and fundamental etiologic mechanism of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is not well understood even though therapeutic regimens and drugs are rapidly evolutionary. IBD has complicated connections with genetic, immunologic, gut microbial, environmental, and nutritional factors. It is not clearly well known to the physicians how to feed, what nutrients are more helpful, and what food to be avoided. This review discusses the issues of growth and important nutritional concerns in the management of IBD in childhood. PMID:27462352

  9. Biologic Agents in Inflammatory Eye Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Chiara Posarelli; Ilir Arapi; Michele Figus; Piergiorgio Neri

    2011-01-01

    Non-infectious uveitis is a potentially sight threatening disease. Along the years, several therapeutic strategies have been proposed as a means to its treatment, including local and systemic steroids, immunosuppressives and more recently, biologic agents. The introduction of biologics can be defined as a new era: biologic therapies provide new options for patients with refractory and sight threatening inflammatory disorders. The availability of such novel treatment modalities has markedly im...

  10. Clostridium difficile and pediatric inflammatory bowel disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martinelli, Massimo; Strisciuglio, Caterina; Veres, Gabor;

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Clostridium difficile infection is associated with pediatric inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) in several ways. We sought to investigate C. difficile infection in pediatric patients with IBD in comparison with a group of children with celiac disease and to evaluate IBD disease course...... of C. difficile infected patients. METHODS: In this prospective, comparative, multicenter study, 211 pediatric patients with IBD were enrolled from October 2010 to October 2011 and tested for the presence of C. difficile toxins A and B in their stools at 0, 6, and 12 months. During the same study.......08, respectively). Hospitalizations were higher at 6 months in C. difficile group (P = 0.05). CONCLUSIONS: In conclusion, this study demonstrates that pediatric IBD is associated with increased C. difficile detection. Patients with C. difficile tend to have active colonic disease and a more severe disease course....

  11. Interaction of obesity and inflammatory bowel disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harper, Jason W; Zisman, Timothy L

    2016-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is a chronic inflammatory condition of unknown etiology that is thought to result from a combination of genetic, immunologic and environmental factors. The incidence of IBD has been increasing in recent decades, especially in developing and developed nations, and this is hypothesized to be in part related to the change in dietary and lifestyle factors associated with modernization. The prevalence of obesity has risen in parallel with the rise in IBD, suggesting a possible shared environmental link between these two conditions. Studies have shown that obesity impacts disease development and response to therapy in patients with IBD and other autoimmune conditions. The observation that adipose tissue produces pro-inflammatory adipokines provides a potential mechanism for the observed epidemiologic links between obesity and IBD, and this has developed into an active area of investigative inquiry. Additionally, emerging evidence highlights a role for the intestinal microbiota in the development of both obesity and IBD, representing another potential mechanistic connection between the two conditions. In this review we discuss the epidemiology of obesity and IBD, possible pathophysiologic links, and the clinical impact of obesity on IBD disease course and implications for management. PMID:27672284

  12. Reflectance Confocal Microscopy for Inflammatory Skin Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agozzino, M; Gonzalez, S; Ardigò, M

    2016-10-01

    In vivo reflectance confocal microscopy (RCM) is a relatively novel non-invasive tool for microscopic evaluation of the skin used prevalently for diagnosis and management of skin tumour. Its axial resolution, its non-invasive and easy clinical application represents the goals for a large diffusion of this technique. During the last 15 years, RCM has been demonstrated to be able to increase the sensibility and sensitivity of dermoscopy in the diagnosis of skin tumours integrating in real time clinic, dermoscopic and microscopic information useful for the definition of malignancy. Despite to date, no large comparative studies on inflammatory skin diseases has been published in the literature, several papers already showed that RCM has a potential for the evaluation of the descriptive features of the most common inflammatory skin diseases as psoriasis, lupus erythematosus, contact dermatitis and others. The aim of the application of this technique in non-neoplastic skin diseases has been prevalently focused on the possibility of clinical diagnosis confirmation, as well as therapeutic management. Moreover, the use of RCM as driver for an optimised skin biopsy has been also followed in order to reduce the number of unsuccessful histopathological examination. In this review article we describe the confocal features of the major groups of inflammatory skin disorders focusing on psoriasiform dermatitis, interface dermatitis and spongiotic dermatitis.

  13. Patients with neuromyelitis optica have a more severe disease than patients with relapsingremitting multiple sclerosis, including higher risk of dying of a demyelinating disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denis Bernardi Bichuetti

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Although neuromyelitis optica (NMO is known to be a more severe disease than relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (RRMS, few studies comparing both conditions in a single center have been done. Methods: Comparison of our previously published cohort of 41 NMO patients with 177 RRMS patients followed in the same center, from 1994 to 2007. Results: Mean age of onset was 32.6 for NMO and 30.2 for RRMS (p=0.2062 with mean disease duration of 7.4 years for NMO and 10.3 years for RRMS. Patients with NMO had a higher annualized relapse rate (1.0 versus 0.8, p=0.0013 and progression index (0.9 versus 0.6, p≪0.0001, with more patients reaching expanded disability status scale (EDSS 6.0 (39 versus 17%, p=0.0036. The odds ratio for reaching EDSS 6.0 and being deceased due to NMO in comparison to RRMS were, respectively, 3.14 and 12.15. Conclusion: Patients with NMO have a more severe disease than patients with RRMS, including higher risk of dying of a demyelinating disease.

  14. Inflammatory Bowel Disease and Cervical Neoplasia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rungoe, Christine; Simonsen, Jacob; Riis, Lene

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND & AIMS: We examined the risk of cervical neoplasia (dysplasia or cancer) in women with ulcerative colitis (UC) or Crohn's disease (CD). We also calculated the reverse, the risk for diagnosis with cervical neoplasia before development of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). METHODS: We...... with IBD were assessed by Cox proportional hazards regression analysis. Odds ratios (ORs) of cervical neoplasia before diagnosis of IBD were calculated by using conditional logistic regression. RESULTS: Women with CD underwent cervical cancer screening as often as women in the general population (IRR, 0...

  15. Inflammatory Process in Alzheimer’s Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MARCO ANTONIO eMERAZ RIOS

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Alzheimer Disease (AD is a neurodegenerative disorder and the most common form of dementia. Histopathologically is characterized by the presence of two major hallmarks, the intracellular neurofibrillary tangles (NFTs and extracellular neuritic plaques (NPs surrounded by activated astrocytes and microglia. NFTs consist of paired helical filaments of truncated tau protein that is abnormally hyperphosphorylated. The main component in the NP is the amyloid-β peptide (Aβ, a small fragment of 40-42 amino acids with a molecular weight of 4kD. It has been proposed that the amyloid aggregates and microglia activation are able to favor the neurodegenerative process observed in AD patients. However, the role of inflammation in AD is controversial, because in early stages the inflammation could have a beneficial role in the pathology, since it has been thought that the microglia and astrocytes activated could be involved in Aβ clearance. Nevertheless the chronic activation of the microglia has been related with an increase of Aβ and possibly with tau phosphorylation. Studies in AD brains have shown an upregulation of complement molecules, pro-inflammatory cytokines, acute phase reactants and other inflammatory mediators that could contribute with the neurodegenerative process. Clinical trials and animal models with nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs indicate that these drugs may decrease the risk of developing AD and apparently reduce Aβ deposition. Finally, further studies are needed to determine whether treatment with anti-inflammatory strategies, may decrease the neurodegenerative process that affects these patients.

  16. Preventive health measures in inflammatory bowel disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abegunde, Ayokunle T; Muhammad, Bashir H; Ali, Tauseef

    2016-01-01

    We aim to review the literature and provide guidance on preventive health measures in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Structured searches were performed in PubMed, MEDLINE, EMBASE, Web of Science and Cochrane Library from January 1976 to June 2016 using the following keywords: (inflammatory bowel disease OR Crohn’s disease OR ulcerative colitis) AND (health maintenance OR preventive health OR health promotion). Abstracts of the articles selected from each of these multiple searches were reviewed, and those meeting the inclusion criteria (that is, providing data regarding preventive health or health maintenance in IBD patients) were recorded. Reference lists from the selected articles were manually reviewed to identify further relevant studies. Patients with IBD are at increased risk of developing adverse events related to the disease course, therapeutic interventions, or non-adherence to medication. Recent studies have suggested that IBD patients do not receive preventive services with the same thoroughness as patients with other chronic diseases. Preventive health measures can avert morbidity and improve the quality of life of patients with IBD. Gastroenterologists and primary care physicians (PCPs) should have an up to date working knowledge of preventive health measures for IBD patients. A holistic approach and better communication between gastroenterologists and PCPs with explicit clarification of roles will prevent duplication of services and streamline care. PMID:27678347

  17. Molecular diagnosis of orbital inflammatory disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenbaum, James T; Choi, Dongseok; Wilson, David J; Grossniklaus, Hans E; Sibley, Cailin H; Harrington, Christina A; Planck, Stephen R

    2015-04-01

    Orbital inflammatory diseases include thyroid eye disease (TED), granulomatosis with polyangiitis (GPA), sarcoidosis, and nonspecific orbital inflammation (NSOI). Histopathological diagnosis usually relies on the clinical context and is not always definitive. Gene expression profiling provides diagnostic and therapeutic information in several malignancies, but its role in evaluating nonmalignant disease is relatively untested. We hypothesized that gene expression profiling could provide diagnostic information for NSOI. We collected formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded orbital biopsies from 10 institutions and 83 subjects including 25 with thyroid eye disease, 25 nonspecific orbital inflammation, 20 healthy controls, 6 with granulomatosis with polyangiitis, and 7 with sarcoidosis. Tissues were divided into discovery and validation sets. Gene expression was quantified using Affymetrix U133 Plus 2.0 microarrays. A random forest statistical algorithm based on data from 39 probe sets identified controls, GPA, or TED with an average accuracy of 76% (p=0.02). Random forest analysis indicated that 52% of tissues from patients with nonspecific inflammation were consistent with a diagnosis of GPA. Molecular diagnosis by gene expression profiling will augment clinical data and histopathology in differentiating forms of orbital inflammatory disease.

  18. The Social Toll of Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard G Farmer

    1994-01-01

    Full Text Available Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD – ulcerative colitis and Crohn’s disease – has become one the most important chronic digestive disorders found in the younger population. As a result of the nature of the illness, with remission and exacerbation of the inflammatory process, there has been increasing concern regarding the costs, both financial and social, of IBD. There have been attempts to quantify disease activity and to assess the results of treatment and the ability of the patient to function in society. As a result, there has been an increased interest in the ‘social toll’ of IBD. Begi1ming in 1988, and using a direct interview technique, ambulatory patients with IBD were evaluated for quality of life at the Cleveland Clinic Foundation. Included were patients whose disease had been present for about 10 years, and both surgical and nonsurgical patients. The interview questionnaire consisted of 47 items in four categories: functional/economic, social/recreational, affect/life in general and medical/symptoms. Patients with ulcerative colitis had better quality of life than those with Crohn’s disease and patients without surgery had better quality of life than those who had undergone surgery. Over the ensuing five-year period, it was shown that quality of life measures are of value in assessing the results of medical and surgical therapy, and the measures frequently give information not usually obtained by physicians and have implications for quality assurance and outcome measurement.

  19. Fecal Microbiota Transplantation in Inflammatory Bowel Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinisch, Walter

    2017-01-01

    The etiology of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is unknown, but it is thought to arise from an aberrant immune response to a change in colonic environment in a genetically susceptible individual. The intestinal microbiota are located at the complex interface of the epithelial barrier and are sensitive to changes in environmental factors, such as diets, drugs or smoking and signals derived from the intestinal immune system and the gut-brain axis. In patients with IBD, an imbalance in the structural and/or functional configuration of the intestinal microbiota leading to the disruption of the host-microorganism homeostasis (dysbiosis) has been reproducibly reported. As animal models of IBD require gut bacteria to induce inflammation, it is hypothesized that the dysbiosis observed in patients is not only a surrogate of changes at the intestinal barrier but also a potential cause or at least enhancer of the mucosal inflammatory process. That burgeoning notion has stimulated thoughts to modify the intestinal microbiota and rekindled interest in previous work on the efficacy of antibiotics in patients with IBD. The feasibility and tremendous success of fecal microbiota transplantation (FMT) to treat antibiotic resistant Clostridium difficile has finally paved the way to embark into the unchartered territory of IBD using FMT. Different routes and number of administrations, choices of donors, disease status and permitted therapies might have contributed to mixed results, particularly from the so far published randomized controlled trials. However, microbiome analysis suggests that a durable transplantation of donor bacteria to the host appears feasible and might be associated with a higher likelihood of response. On the other hand, this raises the concern of transplanting not only anti-inflammatory active bacteria and their products, but also not-yet-known dispositions for other diseases including cancer. Attempts are being made to better characterize those components of

  20. Selecting Therapeutic Targets in Inflammatory Bowel Disease (STRIDE)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peyrin-Biroulet, L; Sandborn, W; Sands, B E

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The Selecting Therapeutic Targets in Inflammatory Bowel Disease (STRIDE) program was initiated by the International Organization for the Study of Inflammatory Bowel Diseases (IOIBD). It examined potential treatment targets for inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) to be used for a "treat...

  1. Immunological reaction of the demyelinating Semliki Forest virus with immune serum to glycolipids and its possible importance to central nervous system viral auto-immune disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, H E; Mehta, S; Gregson, N A; Leibowitz, S

    1984-01-01

    The avirulent demyelinating strain A7(74) of Semliki Forest virus after passage through mouse brain in vivo and mouse brain cell cultures has been shown to react immunologically with immune sera against galactocerebroside, glucocerebroside, total ganglioside and GT1b ganglioside but not against myelin or sulphatide . Semliki Forest virus is known to take host membrane glycolipid into its coat. The importance of the findings is discussed in relation to the production of a possible anti-brain cell auto-immune phenomenon and its implication in a disease such as multiple sclerosis.

  2. Alcoholism with central pontine demyelination: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rohit Arora

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Central pontine myelinolysis is a non-inflammatory demyelinating disease characterized by loss of myelin with relative neuron sparing, associated with rapid correction of hyponatremia and sometimes hypernatremia or chronic alcoholism. We are reporting a case of 52 year old male patient who was chronic alcoholic from past 20 years, presented to us with complaints of altered sensorium and dysarthria of 5 days duration .He was investigated and diagnosed as case of central pontine myelinosis associated with chronic alcoholism. [Int J Basic Clin Pharmacol 2014; 3(1.000: 230-232

  3. Nonnecrotizing anterior scleritis mimicking orbital inflammatory disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lynch MC

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Michelle Chen Lynch,1 Andrew B Mick21Optometry Clinic, Ocala West Veterans Affairs Specialty Clinic, Ocala, FL, USA; 2Eye Clinic, San Francisco VA Medical Center, San Francisco, CA, USABackground: Anterior scleritis is an uncommon form of ocular inflammation, often associated with coexisting autoimmune disease. With early recognition and aggressive systemic therapy, prognosis for resolution is good. The diagnosis of underlying autoimmune disease involves a multidisciplinary approach.Case report: A 42-year-old African American female presented to the Eye Clinic at the San Francisco Veteran Affairs Medical Center, with a tremendously painful left eye, worse on eye movement, with marked injection of conjunctiva. There was mild swelling of the upper eyelid. Visual acuity was unaffected, but there was a mild red cap desaturation. The posterior segment was unremarkable. The initial differential diagnoses included anterior scleritis and orbital inflammatory disease. Oral steroid treatment was initiated with rapid resolution over a few days. Orbital imaging was unremarkable, and extensive laboratory work-up was positive only for antinuclear antibodies. The patient was diagnosed with idiopathic diffuse, nonnecrotizing anterior scleritis and has been followed for over 5 years without recurrence. The rheumatology clinic monitors the patient closely, as suspicion remains for potential arthralgias including human leukocyte antigen-B27-associated arthritis, lupus-associated arthritis, seronegative rheumatoid arthritis, recurrent juvenile idiopathic arthritis, and scleroderma, based on her constitutional symptoms and clinical presentation, along with a positive anti-nuclear antibody lab result.Conclusion: Untreated anterior scleritis can progress to formation of cataracts, glaucoma, uveitis, corneal melting, and posterior segment disease with significant risk of vision loss. Patients with anterior scleritis must be aggressively treated with systemic anti-inflammatories

  4. Oral pathology in inflammatory bowel disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muhvić-Urek, Miranda; Tomac-Stojmenović, Marija; Mijandrušić-Sinčić, Brankica

    2016-01-01

    The incidence of inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) - Crohn’s disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC) - has been increasing on a global scale, and progressively, more gastroenterologists will be included in the diagnosis and treatment of IBD. Although IBD primarily affects the intestinal tract, extraintestinal manifestations of the disease are often apparent, including in the oral cavity, especially in CD. Specific oral manifestations in patients with CD are as follows: indurate mucosal tags, cobblestoning and mucogingivitis, deep linear ulcerations and lip swelling with vertical fissures. The most common non-specific manifestations, such as aphthous stomatitis and angular cheilitis, occur in both diseases, while pyostomatitis vegetans is more pronounced in patients with UC. Non-specific lesions in the oral cavity can also be the result of malnutrition and drugs. Malnutrition, followed by anemia and mineral and vitamin deficiency, affects the oral cavity and teeth. Furthermore, all of the drug classes that are applied to the treatment of inflammatory bowel diseases can lead to alterations in the oral cavity due to the direct toxic effects of the drugs on oral tissues, as well as indirect immunosuppressive effects with a risk of developing opportunistic infections or bone marrow suppression. There is a higher occurrence of malignant diseases in patients with IBD, which is related to the disease itself and to the IBD-related therapy with a possible oral pathology. Treatment of oral lesions includes treatment of the alterations in the oral cavity according to the etiology together with treatment of the primary intestinal disease, which requires adequate knowledge and a strong cooperation between gastroenterologists and specialists in oral medicine. PMID:27433081

  5. Can Probiotics Cure Inflammatory Bowel Diseases?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korada, Siva Kumar; Yarla, Nagendra Sastry; Bishayee, Anupam; Aliev, Gjumrakch; Aruna Lakshmi, K; Arunasree, M K; Dananajaya, B L; Mishra, Vijendra

    2016-01-01

    Gastrointestinal (GI) disorders, especially microbial dysbiosis play role in several GI ailments such as irritable bowel syndrome, colorectal cancer, inflammatory bowel diseases, and antibiotic-associated diarrhoea. Role of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is multifactorial as it involves loss of maintaining intestinal epithelial barrier integrity, increased release of pro-inflammatory molecules, and microbial dysbiosis in gut microflora. Some specific pathogens also play a key role in the IBD development. The origin and causation are still in unfathomable condition and the exact root cause is unknown. Recently probiotic studies have been gaining importance because of their positive responses in their IBD experimental results. According to joint Food and Agricultural Organisation/World Health Organisation working group, probiotics are defined as live microorganisms which when administered in adequate amount confer health benefit on the host. These live beneficial microorganisms are considered helpful in improving gut colonization and perseverance thereby improves prophylactic effect. In the direction of IBD research, a number of studies are needed to standardize its methodology and its applicability on human usage. The particular review presents an overview of gut microflora and its impact on host health, types of IBD and existing therapies to treat this disorder, mechanism of several probiotic actions, role of probiotics in IBD prevention with their supporting evidences.

  6. Use of biosimilars in inflammatory bowel disease: Statements of the Italian Group for Inflammatory Bowel Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Annese, Vito; Vecchi, Maurizio

    2014-11-01

    The introduction of biological therapies, particularly anti-TNFα agents, has revolutionized the management of inflammatory bowel disease in those cases which are refractory to conventional treatment; however these drugs are not risk-free and their use has substantially increased the cost of treatment. As marketing protection expires for original, first-generation biopharmaceuticals, lower-cost "copies" of these drugs produced by competitor companies-referred to as biosimilars-are already entering the market. In September 2013, the European Medicines Agency approved two infliximab biosimilars for treatment of adult and paediatric inflammatory bowel disease patients, a decision based largely on efficacy and safety data generated in studies of patients with ankylosing spondylitis and rheumatoid arthritis. For many clinicians, extrapolation practices and the general question of interchangeability between biosimilars and reference biologics are cause for concern. In the present paper, the Italian Group for inflammatory bowel disease presents its statements on these issues, with emphasis on the peculiar clinical characteristics of inflammatory bowel disease and the importance of providing physicians and patients with adequate information and guarantees on the safety and efficacy of these new drugs in the specific setting of inflammatory bowel disease.

  7. Autoimmune antigenic targets at the node of Ranvier in demyelinating disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stathopoulos, Panos; Alexopoulos, Harry; Dalakas, Marinos C

    2015-03-01

    Mounting evidence suggests that autoantibodies contribute to the pathogenesis of demyelination in the PNS and CNS. Rapid reversal of electrophysiological blockade after plasmapheresis or intravenous immunoglobulin treatment for acute or chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy is more likely to result from removal or neutralization of an antibody that impairs saltatory conduction than from remyelination. Although up to 30% of patients with acute or chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy harbour autoantibodies, specific antigens have been identified in no more than 13% of cases. To date, autoantigens identified at the node of Ranvier include neurofascin 186, gliomedin and possibly moesin in the nodal domain, and contactin-1, Caspr1 and neurofascin 155 in the paranodal domain. In some patients with multiple sclerosis, paranodal CNPase and juxtaparanodal contactin-2 trigger a humoral response. This Review explores the molecular anatomy of the node of Ranvier, focusing on proteins with extracellular domains that could serve as antigens. The clinical implications of node-specific antibody responses are addressed, and the best approaches to identify antibodies that target nodal proteins are highlighted. Also discussed are the roles of these antibodies as either secondary, disease-exacerbating responses, or as a primary effector mechanism that defines demyelination or axonal degeneration at the node, identifies disease subtypes or determines response to treatments.

  8. Scintigraphic detection of inflammatory heart disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morguet, A.J. (Dept. of Cardiology and Pulmonology, Centre of Internal Medicine, Georg August Univ., Goettingen (Germany)); Munz, D.L. (Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Centre of Radiology, Georg August Univ., Goettingen (Germany)); Kreuzer, H. (Dept. of Cardiology and Pulmonology, Centre of Internal Medicine, Georg August Univ., Goettingen (Germany)); Emrich, D. (Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Centre of Radiology, Georg August Univ., Goettingen (Germany))

    1994-07-01

    Inflammatory diseases of the heart encompass myocarditis, endocarditis and pericarditis. This paper discusses the diagnostic potential of scintigraphy in these entities. In myocarditis, indium-111 antimyosin Fab imaging can visualize active myocyte damage and thus contribute substantially to the diagnosis. Antimyosin uptake is also seen in a large subset of patients with dilated cardiomyopathy, indicating ongoing myocyte injury in these cases. In endocarditis, immunoscintigraphy using monoclonal technetium-99m-labelled antigranulocyte antibodies provides useful diagnostic information in patients with equivocal echocardiographic findings. Immunoscintigraphy seems to indicate the floridity of the inflammatory process in endocarditis and may be used to monitor antibiotic therapy. In pericarditis, the clinical value of scintigraphy has not been convincingly demonstrated. (orig.)

  9. Radioisotope scanning in inflammatory muscle disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, M.B.; Swift, T.R.; Spies, S.M.

    1976-06-01

    Fourteen whole-body rectilinear bone scans using technetium 99m-polyphosphate were done in nine patients with well-documented inflammatory myopathy (either polymyositis or dermatomyositis). In all nine patients the scans showed evidence of increased muscle labeling. Muscle uptake was markedly increased in one patient, moderately increased in two patients, and minimally increased in six patients. The degree of muscle labeling correlated with the severity of the muscle weakness at the time the scan was done. In four patients, who received high-dose corticosteroid treatment, muscle uptake was decreased following therapy. These findings suggest that radioisotope scanning may be useful in the diagnosis and management of patients with inflammatory muscle diseases.

  10. Venous thromboembolism with inflammatory bowel disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hugh James Freeman

    2008-01-01

    Venous thrombosis and thromboembolism appear to be increased in patients with inflammatory bowel disease.Although several acquired and genetic risk factors are known,about half that develop a thromboembolic event have no identifiable risk factor.Control of the inflammatory process is thought to be the key factor in risk reduction for thrombotic events.Prophylactic use of anticoagulants is not universally recommended,but possible use should be reviewed in an individual patient after evaluation of the risks,such as hemorrhage,compared to potential benefits.Particular consideration should be given if there has been a prior thrombotic event,if hospitalization will require surgery,or if an underlying coagulation disorder is present.

  11. Neutrophilic dermatoses and inflammatory bowel diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marzano, A V; Menicanti, C; Crosti, C; Trevisan, V

    2013-04-01

    Pyoderma gangrenosum (PG) and Sweet's Syndrome (SS) are inflammatory skin diseases caused by the accumulation of neutrophils in the skin and, rarely, in internal organs, which led to coining the term of neutrophilic dermatoses (ND) to define these conditions. Recently, ND have been included among the autoinflammatory diseases, which are forms due to mutations of genes regulating the innate immune responses. Both PG and SS are frequently associated with inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD), a group of chronic intestinal disorders which comprises ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease and whose pathogenesis involves both the innate and adaptive immunity in genetically prone individuals. Patients with IBD develop PG in 1-3% of cases, while SS is rarer. PG presents with deep erythematous-to-violaceous painful ulcers with undermined borders, but bullous, pustular, and vegetative variants can also occur. SS, also known as acute febrile neutrophilic dermatosis, is characterized by the abrupt onset of fever, peripheral neutrophilia, tender erythematous skin lesions and a diffuse neutrophilic dermal infiltrate. In this review that will be focused on PG and SS, we will describe also the aseptic abscesses syndrome, a new entity within the spectrum of ND which frequently occurs in association with IBD and is characterized by deep abscesses mainly involving the spleen and skin and by polymorphic cutaneous manifestations including PG- and SS-like lesions.

  12. Osteomyelitis and Osteonecrosis in Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hugh J Freeman

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available Osteomyelitis and osteonecrosis are skeletal disorders seen in patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD. Osteomyelitis usually occurs in the pelvic bones, especially in complicated Crohn's disease, presumably by direct extension from a pelvic inflammatory mass, abscess or fistulous tract. Diagnosis of osteomyelitis may be difficult and can lead to spinal extension of the septic process with a resultant neurological deficit, including paraplegia. Osteonecrosis or avascular necrosis has been reported in patients with either ulcerative colitis or Crohn's disease, often, but not exclusively, during or following steroid treatment. The disease is often multifocal, but its natural history is unknown, especially if diagnosed early with modern imaging methods, such as magnetic resonance. In IBD patients, the relationship between osteonecrosis and steroid use is unknown. An adverse steroid effect on bones, especially the femoral heads, may develop in some patients with IBD but, to date, this hypothesis remains unproven. Critical evaluation of published data reveals no consistent association between osteonecrosis and steroid treatment in IBD patients.

  13. Gastric emptying and disease activity in inflammatory bowel disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Keller, Jutta; Binnewies, Ulrich; Rösch, Marie;

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Gastric emptying (GE) is delayed in a subset of patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). We have shown before that altered release of gastrointestinal hormones may contribute to GE disturbances, but overall effects of disease activity remain unclear. Thus, we aimed to evaluate GE...... in patients with IBD during active disease and following therapy. DESIGN: A total of 20 healthy subjects (HC) and 26 patients with IBD hospitalized because of an acute episode of their disease (Crohn's disease (CD) n = 13, ulcerative colitis (UC) n = 13) underwent a standardized (13) C-octanoic acid GE breath...

  14. Extraintestinal manifestations in inflammatory bowel disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Silvio Danese; Stefano Semeraro; Alfredo Papa; Italia Roberto; Franco Scaldaferri; Giuseppe Fedeli; Giovanni Gasbarrini; Antonio Gasbarrini

    2005-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) can be really considered to be systemic diseases since they are often associated with extraintestinal manifestations,complications, and other autoimmune disorders. Indeed,physicians who care for patients with ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease, the two major forms of IBD, face a new clinical challenge every day, worsened by the very frequent rate of extraintestinal complications. The goal of this review is to provide an overview and an update on the extraintestinal complications occurring in IBD.Indeed, this paper highlights how virtually almost every organ system can be involved, principally eyes, skin,joints, kidneys, liver and biliary tracts, and vasculature (or vascular system) are the most common sites of systemic IBD and their involvement is dependent on different mechanisms.

  15. Biologic therapy in inflammatory bowel disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Theede, Klaus; Dahlerup, Jens Frederik; Fallingborg, Jan

    2013-01-01

    In luminal Crohn's disease with moderate to severe inflammatory activity, infliximab and adalimumab can be used in the case of treatment failure with conventional therapies, such as systemic steroids and immunosuppressive therapy or if this treatment is not tolerated. Further treatment strategy...... depends on the primary response to induction therapy. Effect of maintenance therapy should be evaluated clinically and paraclinically at least every 26-52 weeks, and maybe supplemented by endoscopy or MRI scan. Decision of treatment discontinuation is based on disease manifestation, treatment response...... and paraclinical parameters. In fistulising Crohn's disease, treatment with infliximab or adalimumab can be initiated in simple fistula with rectal inflammation or complex fistula when the initial treatment has insufficient effect. Further treatment strategy depends on the primary response to induction therapy...

  16. Newer treatments for inflammatory bowel disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stotland, B R; Lichtenstein, G R

    1998-02-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease represents chronic idiopathic disorders which involve either the colon exclusively (ulcerative colitis) of any part of the gastrointestinal tract (Crohn's disease). The course of these entities is typified by periods of symptomatic exacerbation interspersed with clinical remissions. Management is based upon regimens which decrease mucosal inflammation. Colonic disease distal to the splenic flexure may be treated with topical therapy, but other regions generally necessitate oral therapy. Currently used medications include the aminosalicylates, glucocorticoids, antibiotics and immunomodulators. The immunomodulator class of medications includes azathioprine, 6-mercaptopurine, cyclosporine A and methotrexate. Newer agents include short-chain fatty acids, omega-3 fatty acids and antibodies directed to tumor necrosis factor. Medical management also occasionally involves optimizing nutritional status with the addition of elemental diets or total parenteral nutrition. Management of specific clinical presentations is discussed.

  17. Biologic therapy in inflammatory bowel disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Theede, Klaus; Dahlerup, Jens Frederik; Fallingborg, Jan;

    2013-01-01

    In luminal Crohn's disease with moderate to severe inflammatory activity, infliximab and adalimumab can be used in the case of treatment failure with conventional therapies, such as systemic steroids and immunosuppressive therapy or if this treatment is not tolerated. Further treatment strategy...... depends on the primary response to induction therapy. Effect of maintenance therapy should be evaluated clinically and paraclinically at least every 26-52 weeks, and maybe supplemented by endoscopy or MRI scan. Decision of treatment discontinuation is based on disease manifestation, treatment response...... and paraclinical parameters. In fistulising Crohn's disease, treatment with infliximab or adalimumab can be initiated in simple fistula with rectal inflammation or complex fistula when the initial treatment has insufficient effect. Further treatment strategy depends on the primary response to induction therapy...

  18. Role of scintigraphy in inflammatory bowel disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Maria I Stathaki; Sophia I Koukouraki; Nikolaos S Karkavitsas; Ioannis E Koutroubakis

    2009-01-01

    The diagnosis of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) depends on direct endoscopic visualization of the colonic and ileal mucosa and the histological study of the obtained samples.Radiological and scintigraphic methods are mainly used as an adjunct to endoscopy.In this review,we focus on the diagnostic potential of nuclear medicine procedures.The value of all radiotracers is described with special reference to those with greater experience and more satisfactory results.Tc-99m hexamethylpropylene amine oxime white blood cells remain a widely acceptable scintigraphic method for the diagnosis of IBD,as well as for the evaluation of disease extension and severity.Recently,pentavalent Tc-99m dimercaptosuccinic acid has been recommended as an accurate variant and a complementary technique to endoscopy for the follow-up and assessment of disease activity.Positron emission tomography alone or with computed tomography using fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose appears to be a promising method of measuring inflammation in IBD patients.

  19. Inflammatory bowel disease and colorectal cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreja Ocepek

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Colorectal cancer is one of the most frequent cancers in developed countries and Slovenia, and the incidence is still rising. Groups of people with higher risk for colorectal cancer are well defined. Among them are patients with inflammatory bowel disease. The risk is highest in patients in whom whole large bowel is affected by inflammation, it rises after 8 to 10 years and increases with the duration of the disease. Precancerous lesion is a displastic, chronically inflammed mucosa and not an adenoma as in cases of sporadic colorectal carcinoma.Conclusions: Many studies suggest that the influence of genetic factors differs between sporadic and inflammatory bowel disease related colorectal cancer. Symptomatic patients at the time of diagnosis have a much worse prognosis. The goal of prevention programes is therefore discovering early precancerous lesions. Established screening protocols are based on relatively frequent colonoscopies which are inconvinient for the patient as well as the endoscopist. Use of specific genetic markers, mutations of candidate genes, as a screening method and a prognostic predictor could greatly lighten therapeutic decisions.

  20. Purinergic Signalling in Inflammatory Renal Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nishkantha eArulkumaran

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Extracellular purines have a role in renal physiology and adaption to inflammation. However, inflammatory renal disease may be mediated by extracellular purines, resulting in renal injury. The role of purinergic signalling is dependent on the concentrations of extracellular purines. Low basal levels of purines are important in normal homeostasis and growth. Concentrations of extracellular purines are significantly elevated during inflammation and mediate either an adaptive role or propagate local inflammation. Adenosine signalling mediates alterations in regional renal blood flow by regulation of the renal microcirculation, tubulo-glomerular feedback, and tubular transport of sodium and water. Increased extracellular ATP and renal P2 receptor-mediated inflammation are associated with various renal diseases, including hypertension, diabetic nephropathy, and glomerulonephritis. Experimental data suggests P2 receptor deficiency or receptor antagonism is associated with amelioration of antibody-mediated nephritis, suggesting a pathogenic (rather than adaptive role of purinergic signalling. We discuss the role of extracellular nucleotides in adaptation to ischaemic renal injury and in the pathogenesis of inflammatory renal disease.

  1. Fecal Microbiota Transplantation for Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez, Joanna

    2016-01-01

    The gut bacterial microbiome, particularly its role in disease and inflammation, has gained international attention with the successful use of fecal microbiota transplantation (FMT) in the treatment of Clostridium difficile infection. This success has led to studies exploring the role of FMT in other conditions, including inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Both Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis are chronic inflammatory conditions of the gastrointestinal system that have multifactorial etiologies. A shift in gut microbial composition in genetically susceptible individuals, an altered immune system, and environmental factors are all hypothesized to have a role in the pathogenesis of IBD. While numerous case reports and cohort studies have described the use of FMT in patients with IBD over the last 2 decades, the development of new sequencing techniques and results from 2 recent randomized, controlled trials have allowed for a better understanding of the relationship between the microbiome and the human host. However, despite these efforts, knowledge remains limited and the role of FMT in the management of IBD remains uncertain. Further investigation is necessary before FMT joins the current armamentarium of treatment options in clinical practice. PMID:27493597

  2. [Etiology and pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukáš, Milan

    2014-01-01

    Zdenek Mařatka has been the first physician, who had brought a new information for the Czech medical community with topic of inflammatory bowel diseases, which had been systematic studied for him. He had prepared an original theory - two component hypothesis about origin of ulcerative colitis, which had been developed and innovated by him for long time. From the international point of view, Mařatka has had an extraordinary impact and significant contribution for recognition of ulcerative colitis and Crohn´s disease. Despite the fact that the true origin of ulcerative colitis and Crohn´s disease (UC) still remain elusive, basic as well as clinical research bring many new data on etiology and pathogenesis of this inflammatory condition. It seems clear that IBD originate from interaction of several intrinsic and extrinsic factors that contribute individually in a particular patient. Among internal factors the genes play an important role, because its influence on the mucosal immunity system and immunological response. Among the external factors importance are recognized the gut microbiota content, cigarette smoking and psychological stress.

  3. Nutrition and chronic inflammatory rheumatic disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semerano, Luca; Julia, Chantal; Aitisha, Ouidade; Boissier, Marie-Christophe

    2016-11-30

    Nutrition is a major environmental influence on human health. Epidemiological and interventional studies suggest a pathophysiological or therapeutic role, respectively, for nutrition in inflammatory rheumatic diseases (IRDs). Nevertheless, the associations between nutrition and IRDs are often weak and inconsistent, and the available clinical trials on nutrition are methodologically flawed. Experimental evidence is accumulating that micronutrients in the diet may influence intestinal and systemic immune responses via complex interactions involving the gut microbiota. Micronutrients may, therefore, contribute to the pathogenesis of inflammatory diseases. No interventions targeting these interactions for diagnostic, prophylactic, or therapeutic purposes have been developed to date. Moreover, the relevance to human disease of experimental results obtained in animals or in vitro is unclear. Novel high-throughput technologies (-omics) may prove useful for a systems biology approach to these results that takes the complexity of the interactions into account. Concomitant cohort studies combining clinical and laboratory data collected over time may provide new impetus to research into the connections between nutrition and IRDs.

  4. Disease Course and Surgery Rates in Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vester-Andersen, Marianne K; Prosberg, Michelle V; Jess, Tine;

    2014-01-01

    . METHODS: From 1 January 2003 to 31 December 2004, all incident cases (562) of patients diagnosed with UC, CD, or inflammatory bowel disease unclassified in a well-defined Copenhagen area were registered. Medical records were reviewed from 1 November 2011 to 30 November 2012, and clinical data were...

  5. Olfactory system and demyelination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Gonzalez, D; Murcia-Belmonte, V; Clemente, D; De Castro, F

    2013-09-01

    Within the central nervous system, the olfactory system represents one of the most exciting scenarios since it presents relevant examples of long-life sustained neurogenesis and continuous axonal outgrowth from the olfactory epithelium with the subsequent plasticity phenomena in the olfactory bulb. The olfactory nerve is composed of nonmyelinated axons with interesting ontogenetic interpretations. However, the centripetal projections from the olfactory bulb are myelinated axons which project to more caudal areas along the lateral olfactory tract. In consequence, demyelination has not been considered as a possible cause of the olfactory symptoms in those diseases in which this sense is impaired. One prototypical example of an olfactory disease is Kallmann syndrome, in which different mutations give rise to combined anosmia and hypogonadotropic hypogonadism, together with different satellite symptoms. Anosmin-1 is the extracellular matrix glycoprotein altered in the X-linked form of this disease, which participates in cell adhesion and migration, and axonal outgrowth in the olfactory system and in other regions of the central nervous system. Recently, we have described a new patho-physiological role of this protein in the absence of spontaneous remyelination in multiple sclerosis. In the present review, we hypothesize about how both main and satellite neurological symptoms of Kallmann syndrome may be explained by alterations in the myelination. We revisit the relationship between the olfactory system and myelin highlighting that minor histological changes should not be forgotten as putative causes of olfactory malfunction.

  6. Symptoms in Inflammatory Bowel Disease: pathophysiologic aspects and their relation with disease activity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Minderhoud, I.M.

    2007-01-01

    Symptoms in Inflammatory Bowel Disease: pathophysiologic aspects and their relation with disease activity Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) comprises ulcerative colitis (UC) and Crohn's disease (CD). IBD patients frequently complain of fatigue, and a substantial proportion of the patients have gastro

  7. Symptoms in Inflammatory Bowel Disease: pathophysiologic aspects and their relation with disease activity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Minderhoud, I.M.

    2007-01-01

    Symptoms in Inflammatory Bowel Disease: pathophysiologic aspects and their relation with disease activity Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) comprises ulcerative colitis (UC) and Crohn's disease (CD). IBD patients frequently complain of fatigue, and a substantial proportion of the patients have gastro

  8. Cuprizone inhibits demyelinating leukomyelitis by reducing immune responses without virus exacerbation in an infectious model of multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herder, Vanessa; Hansmann, Florian; Stangel, Martin; Schaudien, Dirk; Rohn, Karl; Baumgärtner, Wolfgang; Beineke, Andreas

    2012-03-01

    Multiple sclerosis is one of the most common demyelinating central nervous system diseases in young adults. Theiler's murine encephalomyelitis (TME) is a widely used virus-induced murine model for human myelin disorders. Immunosuppressive approaches generally reduce antiviral immunity and therefore increase virus dissemination with clinical worsening. In the present study, the progressive course of TME was significantly delayed due to a five-week cuprizone feeding period. Cuprizone was able to minimize demyelinating leukomyelitis without virus exacerbation. This phenomenon is supposed to be a consequence of selective inhibition of detrimental inflammatory responses with maintained protective immunity against the virus.

  9. Risk of ischaemic heart disease in patients with inflammatory bowel disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rungoe, Christine; Basit, Saima; Ranthe, Mattis Flyvholm

    2013-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is a chronic inflammatory disorder. Systemic inflammation increases the risk of atherosclerosis and ischaemic heart disease (IHD).......Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is a chronic inflammatory disorder. Systemic inflammation increases the risk of atherosclerosis and ischaemic heart disease (IHD)....

  10. Mesalamine for inflammatory bowel disease: recent reappraisals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Actis, Giovanni C; Pazienza, Paola; Rosina, Floriano

    2008-03-01

    Derived from the historical molecule sulfasalazine, mesalamine has remained one of the mainstays for treatment of inflammatory bowel disease in the last 50 years. Recent advancement in both clinical and basic research has led to reappraise the drug under two crucial aspects. Firstly, there has been a re-evaluation of the chemo-protective effect of mesalamine against sporadic colorectal cancer. Evidence that inflammation plays a strong role in tumor induction from one side, and demonstration that mesalamine can touch on specific molecular steps enhancing apoptosis on the other side have re-shaped the indications of mesalamine for ulcerative colitis. Secondly, the role of thiopurines (azathioprine and 6-MP) in the maintenance of remission of ulcerative colitis has been reiterated by the results of several clinical trials. During attempts at clarifying the reasons why certain patients appear to be resistant to thiopurines, it was interestingly found that mesalamine can interfere thiopurine metabolism, causing an increased blood concentration of the specific immunosuppressive metabolites and a sequential enhancement of drug effectiveness. Mesalamine is therefore being studied as a means to overcome the genetically determined resistance to thiopurines. Such sharpened indications have reiterated attention to correct dosing: the results of controlled trials have shown mesalamine to be fully effective at twice the traditional daily dosage (4.8 grams instead of 2.4). The attendant problems of compliance seem to find solution in the availability of multi-matrix system formulations. This mesalamine story reminds us that in the absence of an etiological target capable to guide research to trace one abrogating molecule, (as it has happened for viral hepatitides for example), treatment of inflammatory bowel disease remains anti-inflammatory in nature and thus multifaceted. Besides justified use of cutting-edge technology to find novel molecules, smart re-evaluation of what is

  11. Targeting intestinal microflora in inflammatory bowel disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mario Guslandi

    2006-01-01

    @@ TO THE EDITOR In their recent review article[1], Andoh and Fujiyama examined the various therapeutic approaches targeting intestinal microflora in patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). I would like to provide some additional data to complete and update their comments. First of all, when considering the role of probiotics in 1BD treatment it must be emphasized that, in addition to Bifidobacteria, the Nissle 1917 E. coli strain and cocktails of microorganisms such as VSL # 3 mentioned in the article, other probiotic agents have been tested in the short- and long-term treatment of either ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease, the results of those studies being reported in major international scientific journals.

  12. Familial risk of inflammatory bowel disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moller, Frederik Trier; Andersen, Vibeke; Wohlfahrt, Jan;

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Estimates of familial risk of inflammatory bowel diseases (IBDs), Crohn's disease (CD), and ulcerative colitis (UC) are needed for counseling of patients and could be used to target future prevention. We aimed to provide comprehensive population-based estimates of familial risk of IBD....... METHODS: The study encompassed the entire Danish population during 1977-2011 (N=8,295,773; 200 million person-years). From national registries, we obtained information on diagnosis date of IBD (N=45,780) and family ties. Using Poisson regression, we estimated incidence rate ratios (IRRs) of IBD...... in relatives of IBD cases compared with individuals with relatives of the same type without IBD. RESULTS: The risk of CD was significantly increased in first-degree (IRR, 7.77; 95% confidence interval (CI), 7.05-8.56), second-degree (IRR, 2.44; 95% CI, 2.01-2.96), and third-degree relatives (IRR, 1.88; 95% CI...

  13. Liver Disorders in Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victor Uko

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Disorders of the hepatobiliary system are relatively common extraintestinal manifestations of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD. These disorders are sometimes due to a shared pathogenesis with IBD as seen in primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC and small-duct primary sclerosing cholangitis (small-duct PSC. There are also hepatobiliary manifestations such as cholelithiasis and portal vein thrombosis that occur due to the effects of chronic inflammation and the severity of bowel disease. Lastly, medications used in IBD such as sulfasalazine, thiopurines, and methotrexate can adversely affect the liver. It is important to be cognizant of these disorders as some do have serious long-term consequences. The management of these disorders often requires the expertise of multidisciplinary teams to achieve the best outcomes.

  14. Inflammatory mechanisms linking obesity and metabolic disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saltiel, Alan R; Olefsky, Jerrold M

    2017-01-03

    There are currently over 1.9 billion people who are obese or overweight, leading to a rise in related health complications, including insulin resistance, type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular disease, liver disease, cancer, and neurodegeneration. The finding that obesity and metabolic disorder are accompanied by chronic low-grade inflammation has fundamentally changed our view of the underlying causes and progression of obesity and metabolic syndrome. We now know that an inflammatory program is activated early in adipose expansion and during chronic obesity, permanently skewing the immune system to a proinflammatory phenotype, and we are beginning to delineate the reciprocal influence of obesity and inflammation. Reviews in this series examine the activation of the innate and adaptive immune system in obesity; inflammation within diabetic islets, brain, liver, gut, and muscle; the role of inflammation in fibrosis and angiogenesis; the factors that contribute to the initiation of inflammation; and therapeutic approaches to modulate inflammation in the context of obesity and metabolic syndrome.

  15. Inflammatory bowel disease pathogenesis: where are we?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiocchi, Claudio

    2015-03-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is presently one of the most investigated human disorders. Expansion of knowledge of its pathophysiology has helped in developing novel medications to combat gut inflammation with a considerably degree of success. Despite this progress, much more remains to be done in regard to gaining a more profound understanding of IBD pathogenesis, detecting inflammation before it clinically manifests, implementing lifestyle modifications, and developing agents that can modify the natural course of the disease. One of the limitations to achieve these goals is the lack of integration of the major components of IBD pathogenesis, that is the exposome, the genome, the gut microbiome, and the immunome. An "IBD integrome" approach that takes advantage of all functional information derived from the detailed investigation of each single pathogenic component through the use of systems biology may offer the solution to understand IBD and cure it. © 2015 Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology Foundation and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  16. Fertility and pregnancy in inflammatory bowel disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Elspeth Alstead

    2001-01-01

    @@ INTRODUCTION Inflammatory bowel disease(IBD)is a chronic disorder affecting young adults in the reproductive years.It is comon for both female and male patients with IBD to ask questions about IBD's effect on their relationships,sexual and reproductive function,in particular fertility,the outcome of pregnancy and its possible effets on the disease.An open discussion of the social situation and education targeted at these issues therefore forms an essential part of the management of any young person with IBD.the questions that are most commonly asked are summarised in Table 1.In order to answer these questions we need evidence.There are few large prospective case controlled studies to provide the information which is required but the available data,some of it from small observational studies,will be summarised in this chapter.

  17. Special issues in pediatric inflammatory bowel disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Maria Dubinsky

    2008-01-01

    The incidence of pediatric inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is rising and recent advances in diagnostics and therapeutics have improved the care provided to these children. There are distinguishing features worth noting between early onset and adult onset IBD. Physical and psychosocial development remains a critical target for the comprehensive management of pediatric IBD. Children are not just little adults and consideration must be given to the stages of development and how these stages impact disease presentation and management. The final stage will be the transition from pediatric care to that of adult oriented care and special consideration must be given to make this a successful process. This review highlights special considerations in the management of the child with IBD.

  18. Biomarkers in canine inflammatory bowel disease diagnostics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wdowiak, M; Rychlik, A; Kołodziejska-Sawerska, A

    2013-01-01

    Canine inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is a heterogeneous group of chronic gastrointestinal disorders. The etiology, similar to human IBD, remains unknown. Canine IBD is diagnosed by exclusion, which is a long, time and money-consuming process due to the need of elimination of other diseases presenting with similar symptoms. Therefore, a search for a specific and sensitive marker is needed to overcome these difficulties. The article is divided into 3 sections presenting up-to-date information about laboratory markers, immunohistochemical markers and changes in the neurochemical coding of the enteric nervous system, concentrating on their usefulness and future applications. Data concerning laboratory and immunohistochemical markers is based mainly on canine IBD, while the neuroimmunohistochemistry section presents knowledge from human IBD due to the lack of such studies in veterinary medicine.

  19. Role of cytokines in inflammatory bowel disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), which includes Crohn's disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC), rep- resents a group of chronic disorders characterized by inflammation of the gastrointestinal tract, typically with a relapsing and remitting clinical course. Mucosal mac- rophages play an important role in the mucosal im- mune system, and an increase in the number of newly recruited monocytes and activated macrophages has been noted in the inflamed gut of patients with IBD. Activated macrophages are thought to be major con- tributors to the production of inflammatory cytokines in the gut, and imbalance of cytokines is contributing to the pathogenesis of IBD. The intestinal inflammation in IBD is controlled by a complex interplay of innate and adaptive immune mechanisms. Cytokines play a key role in IBD that determine T cell differentiation of Th1, Th2, T regulatory and newly described Th17 cells. Cytokines levels in time and space orchestrate the development, recurrence and exacerbation of theinflammatory process in IBD. Therefore, several cyto- kine therapies have been developed and tested for the treatment of IBD patients.

  20. [Risk factors associated with pelvic inflammatory disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelayo Vera, Salvador; Hernández Landa, Tomás; Rodríguez Guzmán, Leoncio Miguel; Hernández Cruz, Leticia

    2002-08-01

    To determine the socio-demographic and gynecological risk factors in pelvic inflammatory disease (EPI). A study of the cases and controls divided by the age and the medical attention unit was performed. Women with an active sex life, who chose to participate in the study, were included. The definition of a case were the women who presented at least four of the clinical manifestations identified as critical as the principal criteria for EPI. For both groups a questionnaire was applied which contained the socio-demographical, gynecological and obstetric variables. 50 cases and 50 controls were evaluated. The risk factors associated with EPI were: scholastic level below high school, RMp 2.22 (IC95% 1.03-5.13); low scholastic level of the couple, RMp 2.33 (0.91-6.6); working women, RMp 3.17 (IC95% 1.3-8.7); women with a low socioeconomic level, RMp 2.86 (IC95% 1.24-7.26); a history of infectious vaginitis in the previous three months, RMp 41 (IC95% 7.94-838). The history of a use of intrauterine devices (DIU) did not present any association (RMp 0.06). The presence of EPI was found to be associated to socio-demographic and previous infectious vaginitis variables. The use of oral hormones and IUD did not show any relation. A greater amount of sexual education is needed for women with an active sex life in order to avoid the pelvic inflammatory disease.

  1. Correlations between Psoriasis and Inflammatory Bowel Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nevena Skroza

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available For a long time the relationship between inflammatory bowel diseases (IBDs and psoriasis has been investigated by epidemiological studies. It is only starting from the 1990s that genetic and immunological aspects have been focused on. Psoriasis and IBD are strictly related inflammatory diseases. Skin and bowel represent, at the same time, barrier and connection between the inner and the outer sides of the body. The most important genetic correlations involve the chromosomal loci 6p22, 16q, 1p31, and 5q33 which map several genes involved in innate and adaptive immunity. The genetic background represents the substrate to the common immune processes involved in psoriasis and IBD. In the past, psoriasis and IBD were considered Th1-related disorders. Nowadays the role of new T cells populations has been highlighted. A key role is played by Th17 and T-regs cells as by the balance between these two cells types. New cytokines and T cells populations, as IL-17A, IL-22, and Th22 cells, could play an important pathogenetic role in psoriasis and IBD. The therapeutic overlaps further support the hypothesis of a common pathogenesis.

  2. Biologic Agents in Inflammatory Eye Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chiara Posarelli

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Non-infectious uveitis is a potentially sight threatening disease. Along the years, several therapeutic strategies have been proposed as a means to its treatment, including local and systemic steroids, immunosuppressives and more recently, biologic agents. The introduction of biologics can be defined as a new era: biologic therapies provide new options for patients with refractory and sight threatening inflammatory disorders. The availability of such novel treatment modalities has markedly improved the therapy of uveitis and considerably increased the possibility of long-term remissions. This article provides a review of current literature on biologic agents, such as tumor necrosis factor blockers, anti-interleukins and other related biologics, such as interferon alpha, for the treatment of uveitis. Several reports describe the efficacy of biologics in controlling a large number of refractory uveitides, suggesting a central role in managing ocular inflammatory diseases. However, there is still lack of randomized controlled trials to validate most of their applications. Biologics are promising drugs for the treatment of uveitis, showing a favorable safety and efficacy profile. On the other hand, lack of evidence from randomized controlled studies limits our understanding as to when commence treatment, which agent to choose, and how long to continue therapy. In addition, high cost and the potential for serious and unpredictable complications have very often limited their use in uveitis refractory to traditional immunosuppressive therapy.

  3. Biologic agents in inflammatory eye disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Posarelli, Chiara; Arapi, Ilir; Figus, Michele; Neri, Piergiorgio

    2011-10-01

    Non-infectious uveitis is a potentially sight threatening disease. Along the years, several therapeutic strategies have been proposed as a means to its treatment, including local and systemic steroids, immunosuppressives and more recently, biologic agents. The introduction of biologics can be defined as a new era: biologic therapies provide new options for patients with refractory and sight threatening inflammatory disorders. The availability of such novel treatment modalities has markedly improved the therapy of uveitis and considerably increased the possibility of long-term remissions. This article provides a review of current literature on biologic agents, such as tumor necrosis factor blockers, anti-interleukins and other related biologics, such as interferon alpha, for the treatment of uveitis. Several reports describe the efficacy of biologics in controlling a large number of refractory uveitides, suggesting a central role in managing ocular inflammatory diseases. However, there is still lack of randomized controlled trials to validate most of their applications. Biologics are promising drugs for the treatment of uveitis, showing a favorable safety and efficacy profile. On the other hand, lack of evidence from randomized controlled studies limits our understanding as to when commence treatment, which agent to choose, and how long to continue therapy. In addition, high cost and the potential for serious and unpredictable complications have very often limited their use in uveitis refractory to traditional immunosuppressive therapy.

  4. Pulse cyclophosphamide therapy for inflammatory bowel disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zsolt Barta; László Tóth; Margit Zeher

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To assess the efficacy of intravenous cyclophosphamide pulse therapy for refractory inflammatory bowel disease (IBD).METHODS: We included in our cohort eight patients with (moderate/severe) steroid refractory IBD (4 with ulcerative colitis and 4 with Crohn's disease). They all received 6 cycles of intravenous cyclophosphamide (800mg) per month.RESULTS: Patients entered into remission after the second/third cyclophosphamide pulse. Disease activity decreased. There were no side effects and toxicity. All the patients went into long lasting remission. All Crohn's disease patients and 3 of 4 ulcerative colitis patients achieved complete remission. One patient with ulcerative colitis showed an impressive clinical response but did not enter into remission. For the maintenance, patients with Crohn's disease were treated with methotrexate (15 mg/wk) and patients with ulcerative colitis were treated with azathioprine (2.5 mg/kg body weight/d).CONCLUSION: Remission was maintained in all patients for 6 mo on the average. The drug was well tolerated. These findings suggest that aggressive immunosuppressive therapy may be useful in some refractory patients and further controlled study should be considered in order to fully evaluate this type of treatment as a potential therapy for IBD.

  5. Screening for SH3TC2 gene mutations in a series of demyelinating recessive Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT4).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piscosquito, Giuseppe; Saveri, Paola; Magri, Stefania; Ciano, Claudia; Gandioli, Claudia; Morbin, Michela; Bella, Daniela D; Moroni, Isabella; Taroni, Franco; Pareyson, Davide

    2016-09-01

    Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 4C (CMT4C) is an autosomal recessive (AR) demyelinating neuropathy associated to SH3TC2 mutations, characterized by early onset, spine deformities, and cranial nerve involvement. We screened 43 CMT4 patients (36 index cases) with AR inheritance, demyelinating nerve conductions, and negative testing for PMP22 duplication, GJB1 and MPZ mutations, for SH3TC2 mutations. Twelve patients (11 index cases) had CMT4C as they carried homozygous or compound heterozygous mutations in SH3TC2. We found six mutations: three nonsense (p.R1109*, p.R954*, p.Q892*), one splice site (c.805+2T>C), one synonymous variant (p.K93K) predicting altered splicing, and one frameshift (p.F491Lfs*32) mutation. The splice site and the frameshift mutations are novel. Mean onset age was 7 years (range: 1-14). Neuropathy was moderate-to-severe. Scoliosis was present in 11 patients (severe in 4), and cranial nerve deficits in 9 (hearing loss in 7). Scoliosis and cranial nerve involvement are frequent features of this CMT4 subtype, and their presence should prompt the clinician to look for SH3TC2 gene mutations. In our series of undiagnosed CMT4 patients, SH3TC2 mutation frequency is 30%, confirming that CMT4C may be the most common AR-CMT type.

  6. Central nervous system Toll-like receptor expression in response to Theiler's murine encephalomyelitis virus-induced demyelination disease in resistant and susceptible mouse strains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Turrin Nicolas P

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In immunopathological diseases, such as multiple sclerosis (MS, genetic and environmental factors that contribute to the initiation and progression of the disease are often discussed. The Theiler murine encephalomyelitis virus-induced demyelination disease (TMEV-IDD model used to study MS reflects this: genetically susceptible mice infected intra-cerebrally with TMEV develop a chronic demyelination disease. TMEV-IDD can be induced in resistant mouse strains by inducing innate immunity with lipopolysaccharide (LPS. Interestingly, Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4 is the cognate receptor for LPS and its activation can induces up-regulation of other TLRs, such as TLR7 (the receptor for TMEV and 9, known to be involved in autoimmunity. Up-regulation of TLRs could be involved in precipitating an autoimmune susceptible state. Consequently, we looked at TLR expression in the susceptible (SJL/J and resistant (C57BL/6 strains of mice infected with TMEV. The resistant mice were induced to develop TMEV-IDD by two LPS injections following TMEV infection. Results Both strains were found to up-regulate multiple TLRs (TLR2, 7 and 9 following the TMEV infection. Expression of these TLRs and of viral mRNA was significantly greater in infected SJL/J mice. The susceptible SJL/J mice showed up-regulation of TLR3, 6 and 8, which was not seen in C57BL/6 mice. Conclusion Expression of TLRs by susceptible mice and the up-regulation of the TLRs in resistant mice could participate in priming the mice toward an autoimmune state and develop TMEV-IDD. This could have implications on therapies that target TLRs to prevent the emergence of conditions such as MS in patients at risk for the disease.

  7. Pelvic inflammatory diseases in perimenopause and menopause

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cabunac Petar

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: In the gynecological profession Pelvic Inflammatory Disease (PID has a significant role due to its frequency, many complications and high costs of treatment Aim: The aim of this study was to investigate frequency and complications caused by these diseases, and used methods of treatment. Methods: The research was conducted in Clinic of Obstetrics and Gynecology 'Narodni Front', Belgrade, and included all consecutive patients diagnosed with PID during the period from year 2007 to 2010. The diagnosis of PID was set on the basis of: gynecological examination, test analysis (leucocytes, sedimentation, platelets, CRP, CA125, and ultrasound examination. A clinical criterion is divided into minimal and additional. The study included 112 patients. There were 33.93% of women in perimenopause/menopause (experimental group, while the control group consisted of 66.07% female subjects. Results: The frequency of surgically treated patients in experimental and control group was: 44.74% : 39.19% (χ2 test; p > 0.05. Women in experimental group used Intrauterine Device (IUD more than other patients 57.89% : 13.15% (χ2 test; p = 0.0001. A link was established between the use of intrauterine devicela in (χ2 test; p = 0.0516, patients’ irregular control of IUD (χ2 test; p = 0.0114 and surgical treatments of women in experimental group. The conservative treatment usually applies dual antibiotic therapy. Costs of surgically treated patients are around 1300 and conservatively treated around 210 €. Conclusion: Women in perimenopause and menopause are not exposed to higher risks of contracting PID. Women in perimenopause and menopause which use intrauterine device and don’t have regular controls, have higher risk of surgical treatments in case of pelvic inflammatory disease. Costs of treatment are 6-7 times in lower with conservatively treated patients compared to operatively treated ones.

  8. Serological markers of inflammatory bowel disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuna, Andrea Tesija

    2013-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is a heterogeneous group of chronic inflammatory disorders of the gastrointestinal tract with two main distinguishable entities, Crohn's disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC). IBD-unclassified (IBD-U) is a diagnosis that covers the "grey" zone of diagnostic uncertainty between UC and CD. Current diagnosis of IBD relies on the clinical, endoscopic, radiological, histological and biochemical features, but this approach has shortcomings especially in cases of overlapping symptoms of CD and UC. The need for a diagnostic tool that would improve the conventional methods in IBD diagnosis directed the search towards potential immunological markers, since an aberrant immune response against microbial or endogenous antigens in a genetically susceptible host seems to be implicated in IBD pathogenesis. The spectrum of antibodies to different microbial antigens and autoantibodies associated with IBD is rapidly expanding. Most of these antibodies are associated with CD like anti-glycan antibodies: anti-Saccharomices cerevisiae (ASCA) and the recently described anti-laminaribioside (ALCA), anti-chitobioside (ACCA), anti-mannobioside (AMCA), anti-laminarin (anti-L) and anti-chitin (anti-C) antibodies; in addition to other antibodies that target microbial antigens: anti-outer membrane porin C (anti-OmpC), anti-Cbir1 flagellin and anti-12 antibody. Also, autoantibodies targeting the exocrine pancreas (PAB) were shown to be highly specific for CD. In contrast, UC has been associated with anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic autoantibodies (pANCA) and antibodies against goblet cells (GAB). Current evidence suggests that serologic panels of multiple antibodies are useful in differential diagnosis of CD versus UC and can be a valuable aid in stratifying patients according to disease phenotype and risk of complications.

  9. Pelvic Inflammatory Disease: Diagnosis And Treatment In The Emergency Department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bugg, Charles Walter; Taira, Taku

    2016-12-01

    Pelvic inflammatory disease is a common disease that is associated with significant complications including infertility, chronic pelvic pain, ruptured tubo-ovarian abscess, and ectopic pregnancy. The diagnosis may be delayed when the presentation has nonspecific signs and symptoms. Even when it is properly identified, pelvic inflammatory disease is often treated suboptimally. This review provides evidence-based recommendations for the diagnosis, treatment, disposition, and follow-up of patients with pelvic inflammatory disease. Arranging follow-up of patients within 48 to 72 hours and providing clear patient education are fundamental to ensuring good patient outcomes. Emerging issues, including new pathogens and evolving resistance patterns among pelvic inflammatory disease pathogens are reviewed.

  10. Inflammatory bowel disease, to personalized nutrition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Ortiz-Suárez

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The incidence of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD is increasing in countries that acquire a Western lifestyle. Its pathogenesis is not well defined but is associated with multifactorial causes. In genetically predisposed people, different environmental factors trigger alterations in the immune response; as a result, tolerance is lost towards commensal gut microbiota, with tissues damage and chronic inflammation. Among the environmental risk factors identified is diet. Diets high in sucrose, refined carbohydrates, omega-6 polyunsaturated fatty acids, and low in fruit, vegetables, and fiber are associated with an increased risk of IBD, particularly Crohn disease (CD. Nutritional recommendations in IBD cannot be generalized because patients respond differently. The emergence of disciplines such as nutrigenetics, nutrigenomics and epigenetics allow a greater understanding of the pathogenesis of the disease, and at the same time, it opens up the possibility to an individualized approach from the nutritional standpoint. An example of this is found in carriers of the polymorphism 857C/T in the gene TNF (Tumor Necrosis Factor, in which a diet high in saturated and monounsaturated fatty acids is harmful and is associated with a more active disease phenotype. This paper reviews the latest scientific articles in these disciplines in relation to IBD and nutritional potential therapeutic applications, like antioxidants application or the ratio of polyunsaturated fatty acids v-6/v-3. It was used the database of the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI to search for articles, including selecting the most interest from 2007 to 2012.

  11. Smell and taste in inflammatory bowel disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinbach, Silke; Reindl, Wolfgang; Dempfle, Astrid; Schuster, Anna; Wolf, Petra; Hundt, Walter; Huber, Wolfgang

    2013-01-01

    To investigate the olfactory/gustatory functions of patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) by smell/taste tests, and to determine if disease activity or medication might influence the olfactory/gustatory functions of patients. In total, 59 IBD patients (37 Crohn's disease (CD) and 22 ulcerative colitis (UC) patients) were studied using "Sniffin' sticks" and "taste strips" for olfactory and gustatory tests, respectively, and compared to healthy controls and published normative data. Among IBD (CD and UC) patients, the values for odor threshold, but not for odor identification or discrimination, were significantly lower than that of the normative data. Further, these patients showed lower values than the normative taste values and the control group for all tastes, except sour; 57.6% of the IBD patients were hyposmic, while 30.5% were hypogeusic. Subjective self-assessments showed that the patients were not aware of their reduced olfactory/gustatory functions. There were no relevant differences in taste and smell abilities between the CD and UC patients. Disease activity and treatment did not influence the olfactory/gustatory functions. IBD (CD and UC) patients exhibited significant reductions in the olfactory and gustatory functions. Therefore, patients should be tested by smell/taste tests, in order to be adequately informed of their olfactory/gustatory functions and provided an understanding of how to overcome their limitations, and thus improve their quality of life.

  12. Experimental models of autoimmune inflammatory ocular diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabio Gasparin

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Ocular inflammation is one of the leading causes of blindness and loss of vision. Human uveitis is a complex and heterogeneous group of diseases characterized by inflammation of intraocular tissues. The eye may be the only organ involved, or uveitis may be part of a systemic disease. A significant number of cases are of unknown etiology and are labeled idiopathic. Animal models have been developed to the study of the physiopathogenesis of autoimmune uveitis due to the difficulty in obtaining human eye inflamed tissues for experiments. Most of those models are induced by injection of specific photoreceptors proteins (e.g., S-antigen, interphotoreceptor retinoid-binding protein, rhodopsin, recoverin, phosducin. Non-retinal antigens, including melanin-associated proteins and myelin basic protein, are also good inducers of uveitis in animals. Understanding the basic mechanisms and pathogenesis of autoimmune ocular diseases are essential for the development of new treatment approaches and therapeutic agents. The present review describes the main experimental models of autoimmune ocular inflammatory diseases.

  13. Ocular manifestations of inflammatory bowel disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Akshay S; Lin, Phoebe

    2016-11-01

    Extraintestinal manifestations (EIMs) of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) are numerous and can often involve the eye. This review highlights the ocular complications associated with IBD including the critical role the ophthalmologist can play in the diagnosis of IBD, the pathogenesis of IBD, its ocular complications, and the treatment of ocular inflammation associated with IBD. Polygenic and environmental influences, as well as gut microbial dysbiosis, have been implicated in the pathogenesis of IBD. IBD and its EIMs appear to respond well to TNFα-targeted biologics. IBD is thought to be caused by polygenic and environmental influences, including a dysbiotic gut microbiota. It is a systemic immune-mediated disease with varying types of ocular manifestations that can precede, occur simultaneously, or follow intestinal involvement. The diagnosis of IBD can be confused with other seronegative spondyloarthropathies as well as Behçet's disease. Treatment of IBD-associated ocular inflammation can range from corticosteroids to steroid-sparing immunosuppression such as azathioprine or methotrexate. Refractory disease can respond well to TNFα inhibitors.

  14. Iron deficiency anemia in inflammatory bowel disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaitha, Sindhu; Bashir, Muhammad; Ali, Tauseef

    2015-01-01

    Anemia is a common extraintestinal manifestation of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and is frequently overlooked as a complication. Patients with IBD are commonly found to have iron deficiency anemia (IDA) secondary to chronic blood loss, and impaired iron absorption due to tissue inflammation. Patients with iron deficiency may not always manifest with signs and symptoms; so, hemoglobin levels in patients with IBD must be regularly monitored for earlier detection of anemia. IDA in IBD is associated with poor quality of life, necessitating prompt diagnosis and appropriate treatment. IDA is often associated with inflammation in patients with IBD. Thus, commonly used laboratory parameters are inadequate to diagnose IDA, and newer iron indices, such as reticulocyte hemoglobin content or percentage of hypochromic red cells or zinc protoporphyrin, are required to differentiate IDA from anemia of chronic disease. Oral iron preparations are available and are used in patients with mild disease activity. These preparations are inexpensive and convenient, but can produce gastrointestinal side effects, such as abdominal pain and diarrhea, that limit their use and patient compliance. These preparations are partly absorbed due to inflammation. Non-absorbed iron can be toxic and worsen IBD disease activity. Although cost-effective intravenous iron formulations are widely available and have improved safety profiles, physicians are reluctant to use them. We present a review of the pathophysiologic mechanisms of IDA in IBD, improved diagnostic and therapeutic strategies, efficacy, and safety of iron replacement in IBD. PMID:26301120

  15. Inflammatory bowel disease: immunodiagnostics, immunotherapeutics, and ecotherapeutics.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Shanahan, F

    2012-02-03

    Treatment options for inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) reflect a continuing shift from empiricism to strategies based on improved understanding of the pathophysiology of disease. In susceptible individuals, IBD appears to be the result of defective regulation of mucosal immune interactions with the enteric microflora. This has prompted research directed at the interface of the traditional disciplines of immunology, microbiology, and epithelial cell biology. Whereas immunodiagnostics have been of limited clinical value in IBD, assessments of mucosal rather than systemic immune function are promising. Therapeutically, there is an increasing trend toward more aggressive and earlier use of immunomodulatory agents, particularly for prevention of relapse, with cytokine manipulation as a bridge therapy to achieve remission in patients with acute severe disease. Although most drug treatments are directed toward altering the host response, the rationale for manipulating the enteric flora appears sound and will be the basis of additional future therapeutic strategies. Notwithstanding the widening range of options for drug therapy in IBD, other outcome modifiers and well-established principles of managing chronic disease are as important as ever.

  16. Iron deficiency anemia in inflammatory bowel disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sindhu; Kaitha; Muhammad; Bashir; Tauseef; Ali

    2015-01-01

    Anemia is a common extraintestinal manifestation of inflammatory bowel disease(IBD) and is frequently overlooked as a complication. Patients with IBD are commonly found to have iron deficiency anemia(IDA) secondary to chronic blood loss, and impaired iron absorption due to tissue inflammation. Patients with iron deficiency may not always manifest with signs and symptoms; so, hemoglobin levels in patients with IBD must be regularly monitored for earlier detection of anemia. IDA in IBD is associated with poor quality of life, necessitating prompt diagnosis and appropriate treatment. IDA is often associated with inflammation in patients with IBD. Thus, commonly used labora-tory parameters are inadequate to diagnose IDA, and newer iron indices, such as reticulocyte hemoglobin content or percentage of hypochromic red cells or zinc protoporphyrin, are required to differentiate IDA from anemia of chronic disease. Oral iron preparations are available and are used in patients with mild disease activity. These preparations are inexpensive and con-venient, but can produce gastrointestinal side effects, such as abdominal pain and diarrhea, that limit their use and patient compliance. These preparations are partly absorbed due to inflammation. Non-absorbed iron can be toxic and worsen IBD disease activity. Although cost-effective intravenous iron formulations are widely available and have improved safety profiles, physicians are reluctant to use them. We present a review of the pathophysiologic mechanisms of IDA in IBD, improved diagnostic and therapeutic strategies, efficacy, and safety of iron replacement in IBD.

  17. A Mechanism of Virus-Induced Demyelination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jayasri Das Sarma

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Myelin forms an insulating sheath surrounding axons in the central and peripheral nervous systems and is essential for rapid propagation of neuronal action potentials. Demyelination is an acquired disorder in which normally formed myelin degenerates, exposing axons to the extracellular environment. The result is dysfunction of normal neuron-to-neuron communication and in many cases, varying degrees of axonal degeneration. Numerous central nervous system demyelinating disorders exist, including multiple sclerosis. Although demyelination is the major manifestation of most of the demyelinating diseases, recent studies have clearly documented concomitant axonal loss to varying degrees resulting in long-term disability. Axonal injury may occur secondary to myelin damage (outside-in model or myelin damage may occur secondary to axonal injury (inside-out model. Viral induced demyelination models, has provided unique imminent into the cellular mechanisms of myelin destruction. They illustrate mechanisms of viral persistence, including latent infections, virus reactivation and viral-induced tissue damage. These studies have also provided excellent paradigms to study the interactions between the immune system and the central nervous system (CNS. In this review we will discuss potential cellular and molecular mechanism of central nervous system axonal loss and demyelination in a viral induced mouse model of multiple sclerosis.

  18. Demyelination versus remyelination in progressive multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bramow, Stephan; Frischer, Josa M; Lassmann, Hans

    2010-01-01

    The causes of incomplete remyelination in progressive multiple sclerosis are unknown, as are the pathological correlates of the different clinical characteristics of patients with primary and secondary progressive disease. We analysed brains and spinal cords from 51 patients with progressive...... multiple sclerosis by planimetry. Thirteen patients with primary progressive disease were compared with 34 with secondary progressive disease. In patients with secondary progressive multiple sclerosis, we found larger brain plaques, more demyelination in total and higher brain loads of active demyelination...... compared with patients with primary progressive disease. In addition, the brain density of plaques with high-grade inflammation and active demyelination was highest in secondary progressive multiple sclerosis and remained ~18% higher than in primary progressive multiple sclerosis after adjustments...

  19. Blocking mitochondrial calcium release in Schwann cells prevents demyelinating neuropathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez, Sergio; Berthelot, Jade; Jiner, Jennifer; Perrin-Tricaud, Claire; Fernando, Ruani; Chrast, Roman; Lenaers, Guy; Tricaud, Nicolas

    2016-03-01

    Schwann cells produce myelin sheath around peripheral nerve axons. Myelination is critical for rapid propagation of action potentials, as illustrated by the large number of acquired and hereditary peripheral neuropathies, such as diabetic neuropathy or Charcot-Marie-Tooth diseases, that are commonly associated with a process of demyelination. However, the early molecular events that trigger the demyelination program in these diseases remain unknown. Here, we used virally delivered fluorescent probes and in vivo time-lapse imaging in a mouse model of demyelination to investigate the underlying mechanisms of the demyelination process. We demonstrated that mitochondrial calcium released by voltage-dependent anion channel 1 (VDAC1) after sciatic nerve injury triggers Schwann cell demyelination via ERK1/2, p38, JNK, and c-JUN activation. In diabetic mice, VDAC1 activity was altered, resulting in a mitochondrial calcium leak in Schwann cell cytoplasm, thereby priming the cell for demyelination. Moreover, reduction of mitochondrial calcium release, either by shRNA-mediated VDAC1 silencing or pharmacological inhibition, prevented demyelination, leading to nerve conduction and neuromuscular performance recovery in rodent models of diabetic neuropathy and Charcot-Marie-Tooth diseases. Therefore, this study identifies mitochondria as the early key factor in the molecular mechanism of peripheral demyelination and opens a potential opportunity for the treatment of demyelinating peripheral neuropathies.

  20. Intestinal barrier homeostasis in inflammatory bowel disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goll, Rasmus; van Beelen Granlund, Atle

    2015-01-01

    The single-cell thick intestinal epithelial cell (IEC) lining with its protective layer of mucus is the primary barrier protecting the organism from the harsh environment of the intestinal lumen. Today it is clear that the balancing act necessary to maintain intestinal homeostasis is dependent on the coordinated action of all cell types of the IEC, and that there are no passive bystanders to gut immunity solely acting as absorptive or regenerative cells: Mucin and antimicrobial peptides on the epithelial surface are continually being replenished by goblet and Paneth's cells. Luminal antigens are being sensed by pattern recognition receptors on the enterocytes. The enteroendocrine cells sense the environment and coordinate the intestinal function by releasing neuropeptides acting both on IEC and inflammatory cells. All this while cells are continuously and rapidly being regenerated from a limited number of stem cells close to the intestinal crypt base. This review seeks to describe the cell types and structures of the intestinal epithelial barrier supporting intestinal homeostasis, and how disturbance in these systems might relate to inflammatory bowel disease.