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Sample records for inflammation atherosclerosis calcification

  1. Periaortic Fat Tissue: A Predictor of Cardiac Valvular Calcification, Malnutrition, Inflammation, and Atherosclerosis Components in Hemodialysis Patients.

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    Genctoy, Gultekin; Eldem, Olcay; Ergun, Tarkan; Arikan, Serap

    2015-09-01

    Cardiac valvular calcification (CVC) in end-stage renal disease is shown to be a component of malnutrition, inflammation, atherosclerosis, calcification (MIAC) syndrome. Thoracic periaortic fat tissue (T-PAFT) is shown to be increased in patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD), and has positive correlation with MIAC. Negative correlation between CVC and vitamin D is shown in hemodialysis (HD) patients. In this study, we investigated a relationship between body composition, T-PAFT, metabolic and inflammatory parameters, and CVC in HD patients. Seventy-six HD patients (49M) were included. CVC is defined as bright echoes of >1 mm on one or more cusps on echocardiography. Results were expressed as the number of calcified valves (0,1,2). Calcium, phosphorus, parathyroid hormone (PTH), C-reactive protein (CRP), albumin and 25-hydroxy vitamin D levels were studied from predialysis blood samples. T-PAFT was calculated using a method with manual definition of borders on images from multislice computed tomography. Basal metabolic rate, muscle mass, total and truncal fat mass were measured by bioimpedance analysis. There were 65.8% of patients who had CVC. Patients with CVC were older (63.5 ± 14.6 ± 17, P = 0.02). T-PAFT (1599 ± 596, 739.7 ± 179 mm(2) , P = 0.001) and CRP (15.8 ± 11; 11.1 ± 13.2 mg/dL; P = 0.04) were higher in the group with CVC. T-PAFT had positive correlations with CRP, MIAC, body mass index (BMI) and number of calcified valves, negative correlation with left ventricular ejection fraction, and no correlation with albumin, calcium, phosphorus, and PTH. The logistic regression analysis revealed that T-PAFT was a significant predictor of CVC. In this study, T-PAFT showed a positive correlation with inflammation, CVC, and MIAC score in HD patients. T-PAFT was a significant predictor of CVC.

  2. Metabolic syndrome, inflammation and atherosclerosis

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    Rodolfo Paoletti

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Rodolfo Paoletti1,2, Chiara Bolego1, Andrea Poli2, Andrea Cignarella1,31Department of Pharmacological Sciences, University of Milan, Italy; 2Nutrition Foundation of Italy (NFI, Milan; 3Department of Pharmacology and Anesthesiology, University of Padova, ItalyAbstract: The inflammatory component of atherogenesis has been increasingly recognized over the last decade. Inflammation participates in all stages of atherosclerosis, not only during initiation and during evolution of lesions, but also with precipitation of acute thrombotic complications. The metabolic syndrome is associated with increased risk for development of both cardiovascular disease and type-2 diabetes in humans. Central obesity and insulin resistance are thought to represent common underlying factors of the syndrome, which features a chronic low-grade inflammatory state. Diagnosis of the metabolic syndrome occurs using defined threshold values for waist circumference, blood pressure, fasting glucose and dyslipidemia. The metabolic syndrome appears to affect a significant proportion of the population. Therapeutic approaches that reduce the levels of proinflammatory biomarkers and address traditional risk factors are particularly important in preventing cardiovascular disease and, potentially, diabetes. The primary management of metabolic syndrome involves healthy lifestyle promotion through moderate calorie restriction, moderate increase in physical activity and change in dietary composition. Treatment of individual components aims to control atherogenic dyslipidemia using fibrates and statins, elevated blood pressure, and hyperglycemia. While no single treatment for the metabolic syndrome as a whole yet exists, emerging therapies offer potential as future therapeutic approaches.Keywords: metabolic syndrome, systemic inflammation, coronary artery disease

  3. Pathology of Human Coronary and Carotid Artery Atherosclerosis and Vascular Calcification in Diabetes Mellitus.

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    Yahagi, Kazuyuki; Kolodgie, Frank D; Lutter, Christoph; Mori, Hiroyoshi; Romero, Maria E; Finn, Aloke V; Virmani, Renu

    2017-02-01

    The continuing increase in the prevalence of diabetes mellitus in the general population is predicted to result in a higher incidence of cardiovascular disease. Although the mechanisms of diabetes mellitus-associated progression of atherosclerosis are not fully understood, at clinical and pathological levels, there is an appreciation of increased disease burden and higher levels of arterial calcification in these subjects. Plaques within the coronary arteries of patients with diabetes mellitus generally exhibit larger necrotic cores and significantly greater inflammation consisting mainly of macrophages and T lymphocytes relative to patients without diabetes mellitus. Moreover, there is a higher incidence of healed plaque ruptures and positive remodeling in hearts from subjects with type 1 diabetes mellitus and type 2 diabetes mellitus, suggesting a more active atherogenic process. Lesion calcification in the coronary, carotid, and other arterial beds is also more extensive. Although the role of coronary artery calcification in identifying cardiovascular disease and predicting its outcome is undeniable, our understanding of how key hormonal and physiological alterations associated with diabetes mellitus such as insulin resistance and hyperglycemia influence the process of vascular calcification continues to grow. Important drivers of atherosclerotic calcification in diabetes mellitus include oxidative stress, endothelial dysfunction, alterations in mineral metabolism, increased inflammatory cytokine production, and release of osteoprogenitor cells from the marrow into the circulation. Our review will focus on the pathophysiology of type 1 diabetes mellitus- and type 2 diabetes mellitus-associated vascular disease with particular focus on coronary and carotid atherosclerotic calcification.

  4. Inflammation and its echo in atherosclerosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Leuven, S.I.

    2009-01-01

    Inflammation plays a major role during all phases of atherogenesis from plaque initiation up to plaque rupture. In this thesis the role of inflammation in the pathophysiology of atherosclerosis is examined from different angles. In part I the effect of various pro-inflammatory mediators is examined

  5. The association between coronary calcification assessed by electron beam computed tomography and measures of extracoronary atherosclerosis - The Rotterdam Coronary Calcification Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oei, HHS; Vliegenthart, R; Hak, AE; del Sol, AI; Hofman, A; Oudkerk, M; Witteman, JCM

    2002-01-01

    OBJECTIVES The present study was designed to examine the associations of coronary calcification assessed by electron beam computed tomography (CT) with measures of extracoronary atherosclerosis. BACKGROUND Although measures of extracoronary atherosclerosis have been used to predict coronary events,

  6. BMD PREDICTION OF DEATH IS ENCAPSULATED BY THE MORPHOLOGICAL ATHEROSCLEROSIS CALCIFICATION DISTRIBUTION (MACD) INDEX

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ganz, Melanie; Nielsen, Mads; Karsdal, Morten

    2009-01-01

    .3±0.3 years and of which CVD, cancer, and all cause deaths were recorded. The spine BMD and aortic calcification markers, AC24 and the recently proposed Morphological Atherosclerosis Calcification Distribution (MACD) index, were quantified from DXA scans and lateral X-rays respectively. The MACD...

  7. Intra-Section Analysis of Human Coronary Arteries Reveals a Potential Role for Micro-Calcifications in Macrophage Recruitment in the Early Stage of Atherosclerosis.

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    Martijn L L Chatrou

    Full Text Available Vascular calcification is associated with poor cardiovascular outcome. Histochemical analysis of calcification and the expression of proteins involved in mineralization are usually based on whole section analysis, thereby often ignoring regional differences in atherosclerotic lesions. At present, limited information is available about factors involved in the initiation and progression of atherosclerosis.This study investigates the intra-section association of micro-calcifications with markers for atherosclerosis in randomly chosen section areas of human coronary arteries. Moreover, the possible causal relationship between calcifying vascular smooth muscle cells and inflammation was explored in vitro.To gain insights into the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis, we performed analysis of the distribution of micro-calcifications using a 3-MeV proton microbeam. Additionally, we performed systematic analyses of 30 to 40 regions of 12 coronary sections obtained from 6 patients including histology and immuno-histochemistry. Section areas were classified according to CD68 positivity. In vitro experiments using human vascular smooth muscle cells (hVSMCs were performed to evaluate causal relationships between calcification and inflammation.From each section multiple areas were randomly chosen and subsequently analyzed. Depositions of calcium crystals at the micrometer scale were already observed in areas with early pre-atheroma type I lesions. Micro-calcifications were initiated at the elastica interna concomitantly with upregulation of the uncarboxylated form of matrix Gla-protein (ucMGP. Both the amount of calcium crystals and ucMGP staining increased from type I to IV atherosclerotic lesions. Osteochondrogenic markers BMP-2 and osteocalcin were only significantly increased in type IV atheroma lesions, and at this stage correlated with the degree of calcification. From atheroma area type III onwards a considerable number of CD68 positive cells were observed

  8. Osteocalcin, Vascular Calcification, and Atherosclerosis: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis

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    Sophie A. Millar

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundOsteocalcin (OC is an intriguing hormone, concomitantly being the most abundant non-collagenous peptide found in the mineralized matrix of bone, and expanding the endocrine function of the skeleton with far-reaching extra-osseous effects. A new line of enquiry between OC and vascular calcification has emerged in response to observations that the mechanism of vascular calcification resembles that of bone mineralisation. To date, studies have reported mixed results. This systematic review and meta-analysis aimed to identify any association between OC and vascular calcification and atherosclerosis.Methods and resultsDatabases were searched for original, peer reviewed human studies. A total of 1,453 articles were retrieved, of which 46 met the eligibility criteria. Overall 26 positive, 17 negative, and 29 neutral relationships were reported for assessments between OC (either concentration in blood, presence of OC-positive cells, or histological staining for OC and extent of calcification or atherosclerosis. Studies that measured OC-positive cells or histological staining for OC reported positive relationships (11 studies. A higher percentage of Asian studies found a negative relationship (36% in contrast to European studies (6%. Studies examining carboxylated and undercarboxylated forms of OC in the blood failed to report consistent results. The meta-analysis found no significant difference between OC concentration in the blood between patients with “atherosclerosis” and control (p = 0.13, n = 1,197.ConclusionNo definitive association was determined between OC and vascular calcification or atherosclerosis; however, the presence of OC-positive cells and histological staining had a consistent positive correlation with calcification or atherosclerosis. The review highlighted several themes, which may influence OC within differing populations leading to inconclusive results. Large, longitudinal studies are required to further

  9. Breast arterial calcification on mammogram: correlation with carotid arterial atherosclerosis on ultrasonogram

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    Lee, Nam Ju; Suh, Jung Ho [School of Medicine, Ajou Univ., Suwon (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Ji Hyung [College of Medicine, KonYang Univ., Nonsan (Korea, Republic of)

    2002-01-01

    To investigate the incidence of breast arterial calcification in Korean women, and to determine its association with systemic diseases and carotid arterial atherosclerosis. One thousand seven hundred and thirteen female subjects who underwent mammography at a health care center between May 1999 and May 2000 were included in this study. Of the total, 172 were found to have breast arterial calcification, and were classified according to age. The coincidence of hypertension, diabetes mellitus and hyperlipidemia was examined in both the subject group and the control group selected on the same age basis. To investigate the presence and degree of carotid atherosclerosis, sonographic imaging was performed and the findings were compared between the two groups. The incidence of breast arterial calcification showed statistically significant differences according to age, with a higher incidence in older patients (p<0.05). However, there was no statistical difference in the incidence of hypertension, hyperlipidemia, and diabetes mellitus between groups. Carotid atherosclerosis was subjects more prevalent among subjects than in the control group (p<0.05), though there was no statistically significant difference in the degree of luminal stenosis. The most common pathologic cause of breast arterial calcification is arteriosclerosis. Breast arterial calcification is demonstrated at mammography, along with other clinical risk factors for atherosclerosis or coincidental neurologic symptoms. We stress that further evaluation of the carotid artery is necessary.

  10. RIP3-dependent necrosis induced inflammation exacerbates atherosclerosis.

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    Meng, Lingjun; Jin, Wei; Wang, Yuhui; Huang, Huanwei; Li, Jia; Zhang, Cai

    2016-04-29

    Atherothrombotic vascular disease is already the leading cause of mortality worldwide. Atherosclerosis shares features with diseases caused by chronic inflammation. More attention should concentrates on the innate immunity effect atherosclerosis progress. RIP3 (receptor-interacting protein kinase 3) act through the transcription factor named Nr4a3 (Nuclear orphan receptors) to regulate cytokine production. Deletion RIP3 decreases IL-1α production. Injection of anti-IL-1α antibody protects against the progress of atherosclerosis in ApoE -/- mice. RIP3 as a molecular switch in necrosis, controls macrophage necrotic death caused inflammation. Inhibiting necrosis will certainly reduce atherosclerosis through limit inflammation. Necrotic cell death caused systemic inflammation exacerbated cardiovascular disease. Inhibition of necrosis may yield novel therapeutic targets for treatment in years to come.

  11. Heme oxygenase-1, oxidation, inflammation and atherosclerosis

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    Jesus A Araujo

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Atherosclerosis is an inflammatory process of the vascular wall characterized by the infiltration of lipids and inflammatory cells. Oxidative modifications of infiltrating low density lipoproteins and induction of oxidative stress play a major role in lipid retention in the vascular wall, uptake by macrophages and generation of foam cells, a hallmark of this disorder. The vasculature has a plethora of protective resources against oxidation and inflammation, many of them regulated by the Nrf2 transcription factor. Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1 is a Nrf2-regulated gene that plays a critical role in the prevention of vascular inflammation. It is the inducible isoform of heme oxygenase, responsible for the oxidative cleavage of heme groups leading to the generation of biliverdin, carbon monoxide and release of ferrous iron. HO-1 has important antioxidant, antiinflammatory, antiapoptotic, antiproliferative and immunomodulatory effects in vascular cells, most of which play a significant role in the protection against atherogenesis. HO-1 may also be an important feature in macrophage differentiation and polarization to certain subtypes. The biological effects of HO-1 are largely attributable to its enzymatic activity, which can be conceived as a system with three arms of action, corresponding to its three enzymatic byproducts. HO-1 mediated vascular protection may be due to a combination of systemic and vascular local effects. It is usually expressed at low levels but can be highly upregulated in the presence of several proatherogenic stimuli. The HO-1 system is amenable for use in the development of new therapies, some of them currently under experimental and clinical trials. Interestingly, in contrast to the HO-1 antiatherogenic actions, the expression of its transcriptional regulator Nrf2 leads to proatherogenic effects instead. This article reviews the evidence that supports the antiatherogenic role of HO-1, potential pathways and mechanisms mediating

  12. Inflammation and immune system interactions in atherosclerosis.

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    Legein, Bart; Temmerman, Lieve; Biessen, Erik A L; Lutgens, Esther

    2013-10-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the leading cause of mortality worldwide, accounting for 16.7 million deaths each year. The underlying cause of the majority of CVD is atherosclerosis. In the past, atherosclerosis was considered to be the result of passive lipid accumulation in the vessel wall. Today's picture is far more complex. Atherosclerosis is considered a chronic inflammatory disease that results in the formation of plaques in large and mid-sized arteries. Both cells of the innate and the adaptive immune system play a crucial role in its pathogenesis. By transforming immune cells into pro- and anti-inflammatory chemokine- and cytokine-producing units, and by guiding the interactions between the different immune cells, the immune system decisively influences the propensity of a given plaque to rupture and cause clinical symptoms like myocardial infarction and stroke. In this review, we give an overview on the newest insights in the role of different immune cells and subtypes in atherosclerosis.

  13. RIP3-dependent necrosis induced inflammation exacerbates atherosclerosis

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    Meng, Lingjun, E-mail: menglingjun@nibs.ac.cn [College of Biological Sciences, China Agricultural University, Beijing 100094 (China); National Institute of Biological Sciences, Beijing 102206 (China); Jin, Wei [Institute for Immunology, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Wang, Yuhui [Institute of Cardiovascular Sciences, Health Science Center, Peking University, Beijing 100191 (China); Huang, Huanwei; Li, Jia; Zhang, Cai [National Institute of Biological Sciences, Beijing 102206 (China)

    2016-04-29

    Atherothrombotic vascular disease is already the leading cause of mortality worldwide. Atherosclerosis shares features with diseases caused by chronic inflammation. More attention should concentrates on the innate immunity effect atherosclerosis progress. RIP3 (receptor-interacting protein kinase 3) act through the transcription factor named Nr4a3 (Nuclear orphan receptors) to regulate cytokine production. Deletion RIP3 decreases IL-1α production. Injection of anti-IL-1α antibody protects against the progress of atherosclerosis in ApoE −/− mice. RIP3 as a molecular switch in necrosis, controls macrophage necrotic death caused inflammation. Inhibiting necrosis will certainly reduce atherosclerosis through limit inflammation. Necrotic cell death caused systemic inflammation exacerbated cardiovascular disease. Inhibition of necrosis may yield novel therapeutic targets for treatment in years to come. - Highlights: • RIP3 regulate the Nr4a3 to control cytokine production. • Deletion RIP3 decreases IL-1a production. • Injection anti-IL-1a antibody protects against the progress of atherosclerosis. • RIP3 controls macrophage necrotic dead caused inflammation.

  14. Crosstalk between apoptosis and inflammation in atherosclerosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Westra, Marijke Marianne

    2010-01-01

    In this thesis the role of several apoptosis regulating proteins in the development of atherosclerosis and atherosclerotic plaque stability is investigated. Apoptosis of different cell types in atherosclerotic plaques, such as macrophages and smooth muscle cells may inhibit or promote plaque develop

  15. Crosstalk between apoptosis and inflammation in atherosclerosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Westra, Marijke Marianne

    2010-01-01

    In this thesis the role of several apoptosis regulating proteins in the development of atherosclerosis and atherosclerotic plaque stability is investigated. Apoptosis of different cell types in atherosclerotic plaques, such as macrophages and smooth muscle cells may inhibit or promote plaque

  16. Blood coagulation and fibrinolysis in aortic valve stenosis: links with inflammation and calcification.

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    Natorska, J; Undas, A

    2015-08-01

    Aortic valve stenosis (AS) increasingly afflicts our aging population. However, the pathobiology of the disease is still poorly understood and there is no effective pharmacotherapy for treating those at risk for clinical progression. The progression of AS involves complex inflammatory and fibroproliferative processes that resemble to some extent atherosclerosis. Accumulating evidence indicates that several coagulation proteins and its inhibitors, including tissue factor, tissue factor pathway inhibitor, prothrombin, factor XIII, von Willebrand factor, display increased expression within aortic stenotic valves, predominantly on macrophages and myofibroblasts around calcified areas. Systemic impaired fibrinolysis, along with increased plasma and valvular expression of plasminogen activator inhibitor-1, has also been observed in patients with AS in association with the severity of the disease. There is an extensive cross-talk between inflammation and coagulation in stenotic valve tissue which contributes to the calcification and mineralisation of the aortic valve leaflets. This review summarises the available data on blood coagulation and fibrinolysis in AS with the emphasis on their interactions with inflammation and calcification.

  17. Rebamipide ameliorates atherosclerosis by controlling lipid metabolism and inflammation.

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    Jhun, JooYeon; Kwon, Jeong-Eun; Kim, Se-Young; Jeong, Jeong-Hee; Na, Hyun Sik; Kim, Eun-Kyung; Lee, Seung Hoon; Jung, KyungAh; Min, Jun-Ki; Cho, Mi-La

    2017-01-01

    The oral administration of rebamipide decreased plaque formation in atherosclerotic lesions as well as the markers of metabolic disorder in ApoE-deficient mice with atherosclerosis. Pro-inflammatory cytokines were also suppressed by rebamapide. In addition, the population of Th17 was decreased, whereas Treg was increased in the spleen of rebamipide-treated ApoE deficient mice. Rebamipide also ameliorated the severity of obese arthritis and has the capability to reduce the development of atherosclerosis by controlling the balance between Th17 and Treg cells. Thus, rebamipide could be a therapeutic agent to improve the progression of inflammation in metabolic diseases.

  18. Pericardial adipose tissue and coronary artery calcification in the Multi-ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis (MESA).

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    McClain, Jill; Hsu, Fang; Brown, Elizabeth; Burke, Gregory; Carr, John; Harris, Tamara; Kritchevsky, Stephen; Szklo, Moyses; Tracy, Russell; Ding, Jingzhong

    2013-05-01

    To examine the relationship of pericardial adipose tissue (PAT) with coronary artery calcification in the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis. The baseline cohort comprised 6,814 Caucasian (38%), African-American (28%), Chinese American (12%), and Hispanic (22%) adults aged 45-84, without known clinical cardiovascular disease. Cardiac CT was used to measure PAT (cm(3) ) and calcification (Agatston score). We examined cross-sectional associations of PAT with the presence (score >0) and severity (continuous score if >0) of calcification using prevalence ratio (PR) (n = 6,672) and linear regression (n = 3,362), respectively. Main models were adjusted for age, age(2) , gender, race/ethnicity, field site, smoking, physical activity, alcohol, and education. PAT volume (adjusted for age, height, weight, and site) was greatest in Chinese males, whereas Black males had less PAT than all but Black females. PAT was associated with presence [PR per standard deviation (SD): 1.06 (95% CI: 1.04, 1.08)] and severity [difference in log Agatston score per SD: 0.15 (0.09, 0.21)] of calcification, but neither association varied by race/ethnicity. Adjustment for generalized adiposity attenuated but did not eliminate the associations. With further adjustment for traditional risk factors and inflammatory markers, only the association with severity remained statistically significant [PR: 1.02 (1.00, 1.04); difference: 0.10 (0.03, 0.17)]. Heterogeneity by sex was observed for the presence of calcification (PR in men: 1.04; in women: 1.08; P for interaction PAT was associated with the presence and severity of coronary artery calcification in this cohort, but neither association varied by race/ethnicity. Copyright © 2013 The Obesity Society.

  19. The Impact of Organokines on Insulin Resistance, Inflammation, and Atherosclerosis

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    Kyung Mook Choi

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Immoderate energy intake, a sedentary lifestyle, and aging have contributed to the increased prevalence of obesity, sarcopenia, metabolic syndrome, type 2 diabetes, and cardiovascular disease. There is an urgent need for the development of novel pharmacological interventions that can target excessive fat accumulation and decreased muscle mass and/or strength. Adipokines, bioactive molecules derived from adipose tissue, are involved in the regulation of appetite and satiety, inflammation, energy expenditure, insulin resistance and secretion, glucose and lipid metabolism, and atherosclerosis. Recently, there is emerging evidence that skeletal muscle and the liver also function as endocrine organs that secrete myokines and hepatokines, respectively. Novel discoveries and research into these organokines (adipokines, myokines, and hepatokines may lead to the development of promising biomarkers and therapeutics for cardiometabolic disease. In this review, I summarize recent data on these organokines and focus on the role of adipokines, myokines, and hepatokines in the regulation of insulin resistance, inflammation, and atherosclerosis.

  20. Effect of uremia on HDL composition, vascular inflammation, and atherosclerosis in wild-type mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bang, Christian A; Bro, Susanne; Bartels, Emil D

    2007-01-01

    Wild-type mice normally do not develop atherosclerosis, unless fed cholic acid. Uremia is proinflammatory and increases atherosclerosis 6- to 10-fold in apolipoprotein E-deficient mice. This study examined the effect of uremia on lipoproteins, vascular inflammation, and atherosclerosis in wild...... in cholic acid-fed sham mice. The results suggest that moderate uremia neither induces aortic inflammation nor atherosclerosis in C57BL/6J mice despite increased LDL/HDL cholesterol ratio and altered HDL composition....

  1. Inflammation of vertebral bone associated with acute calcific tendinitis of the longus colli muscle

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    Mihmanli, I.; Kanberoglu, K. [Dept. of Radiology, Istanbul Univ. (Turkey); Karaarslan, E. [Intermed Medical Center, Nisantasi, Istanbul (Turkey)

    2001-12-01

    We present a case of acute retropharyngeal calcific tendinitis with characteristic findings on radiographic, computed tomography, and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). To our knowledge, this is the first acute retropharyngeal calcific tendinitis report having inflammation of both the vertebra itself and the longus colli muscle diagnosed on MRI. In patients with neck pain, acute retropharyngeal calcific tendinitis should be kept in mind in the differential diagnosis, even if these patients had vertebral pathological signals on MRI. (orig.)

  2. Inflammation, oxidative stress and renin angiotensin system in atherosclerosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kazim; Husain; Wilfredo; Hernandez; Rais; A; Ansari; Leon; Ferder

    2015-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is a chronic inflammatory disease associated with cardiovascular dysfunction including myocardial infarction, unstable angina, sudden cardiac death, stroke and peripheral thromboses. It has been predicted that atherosclerosis will be the primary cause of death in the world by 2020. Atherogenesis is initiated by endothelial injury due to oxidative stress associated with cardiovascular risk factors including diabetes mellitus, hypertension, cigarette smoking, dyslipidemia, obesity, and metabolic syndrome. The impairment of the endothelium associated with cardiovascular risk factors creates an imbalance between vasodilating and vasoconstricting factors, in particular, an increase in angiotensin Ⅱ(Ang Ⅱ) and a decrease in nitric oxide. The renin-angiotensin system(RAS), and its primary mediator Ang Ⅱ, also have a direct influence on the progression of the atherosclerotic process via effects on endothelial function, inflammation, fibrinolytic balance, and plaque stability. Anti-inflammatory agents [statins, secretory phospholipase A2 inhibitor, lipoprotein-associated phospholipase A2 inhibitor, 5-lipoxygenase activating protein, chemokine motif ligand-2, C-C chemokine motif receptor 2 pathway inhibitors, methotrexate, IL-1 pathway inhibitor and RAS inhibitors(angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors)], Ang Ⅱ receptor blockers and ranin inhibitors may slow inflammatory processes and disease progression. Several studies in human using anti-inflammatory agents and RAS inhibitors revealed vascular benefits and reduced progression of coronary atherosclerosis in patients with stable angina pectoris; decreased vascular inflammatory markers, improved common carotid intima-media thickness and plaque volume in patients with diagnosed atherosclerosis. Recent preclinical studies have demonstrated therapeutic efficacy of vitamin D analogs paricalcitol in Apo E-deficient atherosclerotic mice.

  3. Protective role of heme oxygenase-1 against inflammation in atherosclerosis.

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    Durante, William

    2011-06-01

    Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) catalyzes the first and rate-limiting step in the metabolism of free heme into equimolar amounts of ferrous iron, carbon monoxide (CO), and biliverdin. Biliverdin is subsequently converted to bilirubin by biliverdin reductase. HO-1 has recently been identified as a promising therapeutic target in the treatment of vascular inflammatory disease, including atherosclerosis. HO-1 represses inflammation by removing the pro-inflammatory molecule heme and by generating CO and the bile pigments, biliverdin and bilirubin. These HO-1 reaction products are capable of blocking innate and adaptive immune responses by modifying the activation, differentiation, maturation, and/or polarization of numerous immune cells, including endothelial cells, monocytes/macrophages, dendritic cells, T lymphocytes, mast cells, and platelets. These cellular actions by CO and bile pigments result in diminished leukocyte recruitment and infiltration, and pro-inflammatory mediator production within atherosclerotic lesions. This review highlights the mechanisms by which HO-1 suppresses vascular inflammation in atherosclerosis, and explores possible therapeutic modalities by which HO-1 and its reaction products can be employed to ameliorate vascular inflammatory disease.

  4. Modulation of genes involved in inflammation and cell death in atherosclerosis-susceptible mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zadelaar, Anna Susanne Maria

    2006-01-01

    In this thesis we focus on atherosclerosis as the main cause of cardiovascular disease. Since inflammation and cell death are important processes in the onset and progression of atherosclerosis, we investigate the role of several genes involved in inflammation and cell death in the vessel wall and

  5. Interactions between inflammation and lipid metabolism: Relevance for efficacy of anti-inflammatory drugs in the treatment of atherosclerosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Diepen, J.A. van; Berbee, J.F.; Havekes, L.M.; Rensen, P.C.

    2013-01-01

    Dyslipidemia and inflammation are well known causal risk factors the development of atherosclerosis. The interplay between lipid metabolism and inflammation at multiple levels in metabolic active tissues may exacerbate the development of atherosclerosis, and will be discussed in this review.

  6. Calcifications

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    Reichelt, S.; Erlemann, R.

    1989-02-01

    Juvenile dermatomyositis is a rare disease in early to mid-childhood. We describe the case of a young girl who was found to have prominent soft-tissue calcifications on the preoperative chest study. The clinical and radiological symptoms of dermatomyositis are demonstrated and the differential diagnosis of this kind of calcification is discussed.

  7. Thoracic aorta calcification but not inflammation is associated with increased cardiovascular disease risk : results of the CAMONA study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blomberg, Bjorn A.; de Jong, Pim A.; Thomassen, Anders; Lam, Marnix G E; Vach, Werner; Olsen, Michael H.; Mali, Willem P T M; Narula, Jagat; Alavi, Abass; Høilund-Carlsen, Poul F.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: Arterial inflammation and vascular calcification are regarded as early prognostic markers of cardiovascular disease (CVD). In this study we investigated the relationship between CVD risk and arterial inflammation (18F-FDG PET/CT imaging), vascular calcification metabolism (Na18F PET/CT imag

  8. Atherosclerosis and liver inflammation induced by increased dietary cholesterol intake: A combined transcriptomics and metabolomics analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kleemann, R.; Verschuren, L.; Erk, M.J. van; Nikolsky, Y.; Cnubben, N.H.P.; Verheij, E.R.; Smilde, A.K.; Hendriks, H.F.J.; Zadelaar, A.S.M.; Smith, G.J.; Kaznacheev, V.; Nikolskaya, T.; Melnikov, A.; Hurt-Camejo, E.; Greef, J. van der; Ommen, B. van; Kooistra, T.

    2007-01-01

    Background: Increased dietary cholesterol intake is associated with atherosclerosis. Atherosclerosis development requires a lipid and an inflammatory component. It is unclear where and how the inflammatory component develops. To assess the role of the liver in the evolution of inflammation, we treat

  9. Coronary Artery Calcification Is Related to Inflammation in Rheumatoid Arthritis: A Long-Term Follow-Up Study

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    Bengt Wahlin

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. A long-term follow-up of patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA to evaluate factors related to coronary artery calcification (CAC. Methods. All 22 eligible patients (4 males/18 females, mean age 65 years, and RA-duration 30–36 years from the original (baseline; n=39 study of atherosclerosis were included. Inflammation, cardiovascular risk factors, and biomarkers were measured at baseline. At follow-up 13 years later, CAC was assessed by computed tomography (CT and the grade of inflammation was measured. Multivariate analysis of differences between patients with low (0–10 and high CAC (>10 was done by orthogonal projection to latent structures (OPLS. Results. Ten patients had CAC 0–10 and 12 had >10 (range 18–1700. Patients with high CAC had significantly higher ESR (24.3 versus 9.9 mm/h and swollen joint count (2 versus 0. The OPLS models discriminated between patients having high or low CAC. With only baseline variables, the sensitivity was 73% and the specificity 82%. The model that also included inflammatory variables from follow-up had a sensitivity of 89% and a specificity of 85%. Exclusion of baseline intima media thickness and plaque from the latter model modestly reduced the accuracy (sensitivity 80% and specificity 83%. Conclusions. CAC is related to inflammation in patients with RA.

  10. The Association between Fibroblast Growth Factor-23 and Vascular Calcification Is Mitigated by Inflammation Markers

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    Mohamed M. NasrAllah

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Fibroblast growth factor-23 (FGF-23 has been linked to vascular calcification, ventricular hypertrophy and mortality in chronic kidney disease (CKD, although these links may not be direct and independent. Similar grave outcomes are associated with inflammation and oxidative stress in CKD. Recently, accumulating evidence has linked components of phosphate homeostasis to inflammation and oxidative stress. The interaction between the triad of inflammation, FGF-23 and cardiovascular outcomes is underinvestigated. Methods: We studied 65 patients with stage 5 CKD on hemodialysis. Serum levels of FGF-23, high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP, endogenous soluble receptor of advanced glycation end products (esRAGE, advanced oxidation protein products (AOPP, parathormone, lipids, calcium and phosphorous were measured. The aortic calcification index (ACI was determined using non-contrast CT scans of the abdominal aorta. Results: FGF-23 was elevated (mean: 4,681 pg/ml, SD: 3,906 and correlated with hsCRP, esRAGE, AOPP, dialysis vintage and phosphorus in univariate analysis. In multiple regression analysis, hsCRP, AOPP and phosphorus but not esRAGE were all significantly correlated to FGF-23 (R2 = 0.7, p 2 = 0.65, p Conclusion: FGF-23 is strongly correlated to various markers of inflammation and oxidative stress in hemodialysis patients. The association between FGF-23 and vascular calcification was mitigated when corrected for inflammation markers.

  11. Inflammation in atherosclerosis: Imaging, biomarkers and novel therapeutic opportunities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Wijk, D.F.

    2014-01-01

    The vast majority of cardiovascular-related morbidity and mortality is caused by atherosclerosis. Although many patients with atherosclerosis never develop any symptoms, clinical manifestations can vary between acute life-threatening situations to chronic minor complaints. Over the past decades, inf

  12. Proatherogenic pathways leading to vascular calcification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mazzini, Michael J. [Department of Cardiology, Boston University Medical Center, Boston, MA (United States); Schulze, P. Christian [Department of Medicine, Boston University Medical Center, Boston, MA (United States)]. E-mail: christian.schulze@bmc.org

    2006-03-15

    Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of morbidity and mortality in the western world and atherosclerosis is the major common underlying disease. The pathogenesis of atherosclerosis involves local vascular injury, inflammation and oxidative stress as well as vascular calcification. Vascular calcification has long been regarded as a degenerative process leading to mineral deposition in the vascular wall characteristic for late stages of atherosclerosis. However, recent studies identified vascular calcification in early stages of atherosclerosis and its occurrence has been linked to clinical events in patients with cardiovascular disease. Its degree correlates with local vascular inflammation and with the overall impact and the progression of atherosclerosis. Over the last decade, diverse and highly regulated molecular signaling cascades controlling vascular calcification have been described. Local and circulating molecules such as osteopontin, osteoprogerin, leptin and matrix Gla protein were identified as critical regulators of vascular calcification. We here review the current knowledge on molecular pathways of vascular calcification and their relevance for the progression of cardiovascular disease.

  13. Thoracic aorta calcification but not inflammation is associated with increased cardiovascular disease risk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blomberg, Björn A; de Jong, Pim A; Thomassen, Anders

    2017-01-01

    /CT imaging), and vascular calcium burden (CT imaging) of the thoracic aorta in a population at low CVD risk. METHODS: Study participants underwent blood pressure measurements, blood analyses, and (18)F-FDG and Na(18)F PET/CT imaging. In addition, the 10-year risk for development of CVD, based......PURPOSE: Arterial inflammation and vascular calcification are regarded as early prognostic markers of cardiovascular disease (CVD). In this study we investigated the relationship between CVD risk and arterial inflammation ((18)F-FDG PET/CT imaging), vascular calcification metabolism (Na(18)F PET...... on the Framingham risk score (FRS), was estimated. CVD risk was compared across quartiles of thoracic aorta (18)F-FDG uptake, Na(18)F uptake, and calcium burden on CT. RESULTS: A total of 139 subjects (52 % men, mean age 49 years, age range 21 - 75 years, median FRS 6 %) were evaluated. CVD risk was, on average, 3...

  14. Thoracic aorta calcification but not inflammation is associated with increased cardiovascular disease risk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blomberg, Björn A; de Jong, Pim A; Thomassen, Anders;

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE: Arterial inflammation and vascular calcification are regarded as early prognostic markers of cardiovascular disease (CVD). In this study we investigated the relationship between CVD risk and arterial inflammation ((18)F-FDG PET/CT imaging), vascular calcification metabolism (Na(18)F PET....../CT imaging), and vascular calcium burden (CT imaging) of the thoracic aorta in a population at low CVD risk. METHODS: Study participants underwent blood pressure measurements, blood analyses, and (18)F-FDG and Na(18)F PET/CT imaging. In addition, the 10-year risk for development of CVD, based...... on the Framingham risk score (FRS), was estimated. CVD risk was compared across quartiles of thoracic aorta (18)F-FDG uptake, Na(18)F uptake, and calcium burden on CT. RESULTS: A total of 139 subjects (52 % men, mean age 49 years, age range 21 - 75 years, median FRS 6 %) were evaluated. CVD risk was, on average, 3...

  15. PDGFRβ signalling regulates local inflammation and synergizes with hypercholesterolaemia to promote atherosclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Chaoyong; Medley, Shayna C; Hu, Taishan; Hinsdale, Myron E; Lupu, Florea; Virmani, Renu; Olson, Lorin E

    2015-07-17

    Platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) is a mitogen and chemoattractant for vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs). However, the direct effects of PDGF receptor β (PDGFRβ) activation on VSMCs have not been studied in the context of atherosclerosis. Here we present a new mouse model of atherosclerosis with an activating mutation in PDGFRβ. Increased PDGFRβ signalling induces chemokine secretion and leads to leukocyte accumulation in the adventitia and media of the aorta. Furthermore, PDGFRβ(D849V) amplifies and accelerates atherosclerosis in hypercholesterolemic ApoE(-/-) or Ldlr(-/-) mice. Intriguingly, increased PDGFRβ signalling promotes advanced plaque formation at novel sites in the thoracic aorta and coronary arteries. However, deletion of the PDGFRβ-activated transcription factor STAT1 in VSMCs alleviates inflammation of the arterial wall and reduces plaque burden. These results demonstrate that PDGFRβ pathway activation has a profound effect on vascular disease and support the conclusion that inflammation in the outer arterial layers is a driving process for atherosclerosis.

  16. Engagement of specific innate immune signaling pathways during Porphyromonas gingivalis induced chronic inflammation and atherosclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, Frank C; Ukai, Takashi; Genco, Caroline A

    2008-01-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are a group of pathogen-associated molecular pattern receptors, which play an important role in innate immune signaling in response to microbial infection. It has been demonstrated that TLRs are differentially up regulated in response to microbial infection and chronic inflammatory diseases such as atherosclerosis. The expression of TLRs are markedly augmented in human atherosclerotic lesions and this occurs preferentially by endothelial cells and macrophages in areas infiltrated with inflammatory cells. Furthermore polymorphisms in the human gene encoding one TLR receptor (TLR4) which attenuates receptor signaling and diminishes the inflammatory response to gram-negative pathogens, is associated with low levels of certain circulating mediators of inflammation and a decreased risk for atherosclerosis in humans. Recent advances have established a fundamental role for inflammation in mediating all stages of atherosclerosis. However, the triggers that initiate and sustain the inflammatory process have not been definitively identified. Although definitive proof of a role of infection contributing to atherogenesis is lacking, multiple investigations have demonstrated that infectious agents evoke cellular and molecular changes supportive of such a role. Evidence in humans suggesting that periodontal infection predisposes to atherosclerosis is derived from studies demonstrating that the periodontal pathogen Porphyromonas gingivalis resides in the wall of atherosclerotic vessels and seroepidemiological studies demonstrating an association between pathogen-specific IgG antibodies and atherosclerosis. Our recent work with P. gingivalis has demonstrated the effectiveness of specific intervention strategies (immunization) in the prevention of pathogen-accelerated atherosclerosis. We have also established that the inflammatory signaling pathways that P. gingivalis utilizes is dependent on the cell type and this specificity clearly influences innate

  17. Breast arterial calcification and risk of carotid atherosclerosis: Focusing on the preferentially affected layer of the vessel wall

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sedighi, Nahid, E-mail: nsedighi@sina.tums.ac.ir [Department of Radiology, Shariati Hospital, Tehran University of Medical Sciences. North Kargar Ave., Tehran 14114 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Radmard, Amir Reza, E-mail: radmard@ams.ac.ir [Department of Radiology, Shariati Hospital, Tehran University of Medical Sciences. North Kargar Ave., Tehran 14114 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Radmehr, Ali, E-mail: radmehr@sina.tums.ac.ir [Department of Radiology, Shariati Hospital, Tehran University of Medical Sciences. North Kargar Ave., Tehran 14114 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Hashemi, Pari, E-mail: phtums@yahoo.com [Department of Radiology, Shariati Hospital, Tehran University of Medical Sciences. North Kargar Ave., Tehran 14114 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Hajizadeh, Abdolmahmoud, E-mail: mroomezi@yahoo.com [Department of Radiology, Shariati Hospital, Tehran University of Medical Sciences. North Kargar Ave., Tehran 14114 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Taheri, Amir Pejman Hashemi, E-mail: hashemip@sina.tums.ac.ir [Department of Radiology, Shariati Hospital, Tehran University of Medical Sciences. North Kargar Ave., Tehran 14114 (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2011-08-15

    Objective: To assess the relationship between breast arterial calcification (BAC) detected on screening mammography and atherosclerosis of carotid arteries considering the most likely involved layer of the arterial wall. Materials and methods: A total of 537 consecutive women who underwent screening mammography were enrolled in this study. Seventy-nine subjects having BAC, aged 46-75 years, and 125 age-matched controls from those without BAC were selected for ultrasound examination of carotid arteries assessing intima-media thickness (IMT) and plaque presence. Participants were divided into three groups of risk including, low-risk: IMT < 0.6 mm without plaque, medium-risk: 0.6 mm {<=} IMT {<=} 0.8 mm without plaque and high-risk: IMT > 0.8 mm and/or plaque. Risk factors for atherosclerosis were obtained from medical records for independent effects. Results: BAC was present in 14.7% of mammograms. According to multivariable logistic regression analyses, significant association was identified between the carotid atherosclerosis risk and presence of BAC. Compared to women with IMT < 0.6 mm, those with 0.6 mm {<=} IMT{<=} 0.8 mm and IMT > 0.8 mm had OR (95% CI) of 4.88 (1.47-16.16) and 23.36 (4.54-120.14), respectively. The OR (95% CI) for carotid plaque was 3.13 (1.3-7.57). There was no interaction between IMT category and plaque. Significant associations were also detected with postmenopausal duration (P = 0.02) and hypertension (P = 0.004). Conclusion: The risk of carotid atherosclerosis increases with the presence of BAC. Women with BAC are more likely to have thicker IMT than plaque, which could be attributed to the preferentially similar affected layer of media causing thick IMT rather than plaque.

  18. Interactions between inflammation and lipid metabolism: Relevance for efficacy of anti-inflammatory drugs in the treatment of atherosclerosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Diepen, J.A. van; Berbée, J.F.P.; Havekes, L.M.; Rensen, P.C.N.

    2013-01-01

    Dyslipidemia and inflammation are well known causal risk factors the development of atherosclerosis. The interplay between lipid metabolism and inflammation at multiple levels in metabolic active tissues may exacerbate the development of atherosclerosis, and will be discussed in this review. Cholest

  19. Atherosclerosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atherosclerosis is a disease in which plaque builds up inside your arteries. Plaque is a sticky substance ... flow of oxygen-rich blood to your body. Atherosclerosis can lead to serious problems, including Coronary artery ...

  20. Pathohistological Evidence of Smoldering Inflammation in Rheumatic Heart Disease with Massive Left Atrial Calcification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiba, Mikio; Sugano, Yasuo; Ikeda, Yoshihiko; Ishibashi-Ueda, Hatsue; Ohara, Takahiro; Hasegawa, Takuya; Kanzaki, Hideaki; Anzai, Toshihisa

    2016-01-01

    A 74-year-old man, who had a history of a mitral valve replacement for rheumatic heart disease (RHD) 30 years previously, was admitted with progressive heart failure. Massive calcification was observed around the left atrium on multidetector CT, in addition to a late gadolinium enhancement (LGE)-positive layer adjacently outside of the calcification on MRI. He underwent a second mitral valve replacement for the prosthetic valve failure. Pathohistological analyses of a tissue section of the left atrial wall from a surgical specimen revealed lymphocyte and macrophage infiltration that coincided with the LGE-positive layer on MRI, suggesting the existence of sustained active inflammation even after the long period of RHD.

  1. Short-term changes in arterial inflammation predict long-term changes in atherosclerosis progression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joseph, Philip [Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Cardiology Division and Cardiac MR PET CT Program, Boston, MA (United States); McMaster University, Population Health Research Institute, Department of Medicine, and Department of Radiology, Hamilton, ON (Canada); Ishai, Amorina; Tawakol, Ahmed [Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Cardiology Division and Cardiac MR PET CT Program, Boston, MA (United States); Mani, Venkatesh [Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai School of Medicine, Translational and Molecular Imaging Institute and Department of Radiology, New York, NY (United States); Kallend, David [The Medicines Company, Parsippany, NJ (United States); Rudd, James H.F. [University of Cambridge, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine, Cambridge (United Kingdom); Fayad, Zahi A. [Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai School of Medicine, Translational and Molecular Imaging Institute and Department of Radiology, New York, NY (United States); Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai School of Medicine, Hess CSM Building Floor TMII, Rm S1-104, Translational and Molecular Imaging Institute and Department of Radiology, New York, NY (United States)

    2017-01-15

    It remains unclear whether changes in arterial wall inflammation are associated with subsequent changes in the rate of structural progression of atherosclerosis. In this sub-study of the dal-PLAQUE clinical trial, multi-modal imaging was performed using 18-fludeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET, at 0 and 6 months) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI, at 0 and 24 months). The primary objective was to determine whether increasing FDG uptake at 6 months predicted atherosclerosis progression on MRI at 2 years. Arterial inflammation was measured by the carotid FDG target-to-background ratio (TBR), and atherosclerotic plaque progression was defined as the percentage change in carotid mean wall area (MWA) and mean wall thickness (MWT) on MRI between baseline and 24 months. A total of 42 participants were included in this sub-study. The mean age of the population was 62.5 years, and 12 (28.6 %) were women. In participants with (vs. without) any increase in arterial inflammation over 6 months, the long-term changes in both MWT (% change MWT: 17.49 % vs. 1.74 %, p = 0.038) and MWA (% change MWA: 25.50 % vs. 3.59 %, p = 0.027) were significantly greater. Results remained significant after adjusting for clinical and biochemical covariates. Individuals with no increase in arterial inflammation over 6 months had no significant structural progression of atherosclerosis over 24 months as measured by MWT (p = 0.616) or MWA (p = 0.373). Short-term changes in arterial inflammation are associated with long-term structural atherosclerosis progression. These data support the concept that therapies that reduce arterial inflammation may attenuate or halt progression of atherosclerosis. (orig.)

  2. Exendin-4 decreases liver inflammation and atherosclerosis development simultaneously by reducing macrophage infiltration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wang, Y.; Parlevliet, E.T.; Geerling, J.J.; Tuin, S.J.L. van der; Zhang, H.; Bieghs, V.; Jawad, A.H.M.; Shiri-Sverdlov, R.; Bot, I.; Jager, S.C.A. de; Havekes, L.M.; Romijn, J.A.; Willems Van Dijk, K.; Rensen, P.C.N.

    2014-01-01

    Background and Purpose The aetiology of inflammation in the liver and vessel wall, leading to non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) and atherosclerosis, respectively, shares common mechanisms including macrophage infiltration. To treat both disorders simultaneously, it is highly important to tackle t

  3. Calcification of coronary arteries and abdominal aorta in relation to traditional and novel risk factors of atherosclerosis in hemodialysis patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pencak Przemysław

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Process of accelerated atherosclerosis specific for uremia increases cardiovascular risk in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD and may be influenced by the different structure of arteries. The study assesses the influence of traditional and novel risk factors on calcification of coronary arteries (CAC and abdominal aorta (AAC in hemodialysis patients (HD. Methods CAC and AAC were assessed by CT in 104 prevalent adult HD and 14 apparently healthy subjects with normal kidney function (control group. Mineral metabolism parameters, plasma levels of FGF-23, MGP, osteoprotegerin, osteopontin, fetuin-A, CRP, IL-6 and TNF-α were measured. Results CAC and AAC (calcification score ≥ 1 were found in 76 (73.1% and 83 (79.8% HD respectively, more frequent than in the control group. In 7 HD with AAC no CAC were detected. The frequency and severity of calcifications increased with age. Both CAC and AAC were more frequently detected in diabetics (OR = 17.37 and 13.00, respectively. CAC score was significantly greater in males. CAC and AAC scores were correlated significantly with pack-years of smoking and plasma osteoprotegrin levels. However the independent contribution of plasma osteoprotegerin levels was not confirmed in multiple regression analysis. Age (OR = 1.13 and hemodialysis vintage (OR = 1.14 were the independent risk factor favoring the occurrence of CAC; while age (OR = 1.20 was the only predictor of AAC occurrence in HD. Conclusions 1. AAC precedes the occurrence of CAC in HD patients. 2. The exposition to uremic milieu and systemic chronic microinflammation has more deteriorative effect on the CAC than the AAC.

  4. Inflammation, thrombosis and atherosclerosis: results of the Glostrup study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maat, M de; Bladbjerg, E-M; Drivsholm, T;

    2003-01-01

    Inflammation and thrombosis are important mechanisms in cardiovascular disease, as illustrated by the consistent association between inflammatory and hemostatic variables and the risk of cardiovascular events in epidemiological studies. However, the relationship between plasma concentrations of i...

  5. The effect of aging on atherosclerotic plaque inflammation and molecular calcification: A PET CT imaging study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blomberg, Björn; Thomassen, Anders; Simonsen, Jane Angel;

    cardiovascular risk factors were prospectively assessed by 18F-FDG (inflammation) and sodium 18F-fluoride (18F-NaF) (molecular calcification) PET CT imaging. Global aortic uptake of 18F-FDG and 18F-NaF was determined semi-quantitatively by calculating the average blood pool corrected standardized uptake value (cSUV......) [Mean SUVAORTA - Mean SUVBLOOD POOL]. Furthermore, the average maximum 18F-NaF cSUV was determined in the coronary arteries. Calculating regression and correlation coefficients summarized the data. Results: A quadratic relationship was observed between aging and aortic 18F-FDG avidity. A second order...

  6. Niacin Suppresses Progression of Atherosclerosis by Inhibiting Vascular Inflammation and Apoptosis of Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Gang; Sun, Guangli; Liu, Hai; Shu, Liliang; Zhang, Jingchao; Guo, Longhui; Huang, Chen; Xu, Jing

    2015-12-29

    BACKGROUND Niacin is a broad-spectrum lipid-regulating drug used for the clinical therapy of atherosclerosis; however, the mechanisms by which niacin ameliorates atherosclerosis are not clear. MATERIAL AND METHODS The effect of niacin on atherosclerosis was assessed by detection of atherosclerotic lesion area. Adhesion molecules in arterial endothelial cells were determined by using qRT-PCR and Western blot analysis. The levels of serum inflammatory cytokines in ApoE-/- mice were detected by using ELISA. We detected the expression levels of phosphorylated nuclear factors-kB (NF-κB) p65 in aortic endothelial cells of mice using Western blot analysis. Furthermore, we investigated the anti-inflammation effect and endothelium-protecting function of niacin and their regulatory mechanisms in vitro. RESULTS Niacin inhibited the progress of atherosclerosis and decreased the levels of serum inflammatory cytokines and adhesion molecules in ApoE-/- mice. Niacin suppressed the activity of NF-κB and apoptosis of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs). Furthermore, niacin induced phosphorylated focal adhesion kinase (FAK) and FAK inhibitor PF-573228 reduced the level of Bcl-2 and elevated the level of cleaved caspase-3 in VSMCs. CONCLUSIONS Niacin inhibits vascular inflammation and apoptosis of VSMCs via inhibiting the NF-κB signaling and the FAK signaling pathway, respectively, thus protecting ApoE-/- mice against atherosclerosis.

  7. Liraglutide Reduces Both Atherosclerosis and Kidney Inflammation in Moderately Uremic LDLr-/- Mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bisgaard, Line S; Bosteen, Markus H; Fink, Lisbeth N

    2016-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) leads to uremia. CKD is characterized by a gradual increase in kidney fibrosis and loss of kidney function, which is associated with a progressive increase in risk of atherosclerosis and cardiovascular death. To prevent progression of both kidney fibrosis and atherosc......Chronic kidney disease (CKD) leads to uremia. CKD is characterized by a gradual increase in kidney fibrosis and loss of kidney function, which is associated with a progressive increase in risk of atherosclerosis and cardiovascular death. To prevent progression of both kidney fibrosis...... and atherosclerosis in uremic settings, insight into new treatment options with effects on both parameters is warranted. The GLP-1 analogue liraglutide improves glucose homeostasis, and is approved for treatment of type 2 diabetes. Animal studies suggest that GLP-1 also dampens inflammation and atherosclerosis. Our...... aim was to examine effects of liraglutide on kidney fibrosis and atherosclerosis in a mouse model of moderate uremia (5/6 nephrectomy (NX)). Uremic (n = 29) and sham-operated (n = 14) atherosclerosis-prone low density lipoprotein receptor knockout mice were treated with liraglutide (1000 μg/kg, s...

  8. Increased levels of the calcification marker matrix Gla Protein and the inflammatory markers YKL-40 and CRP in patients with type 2 diabetes and ischemic heart disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Stine B; Rathcke, Camilla N; Zerahn, Bo;

    2010-01-01

    Low grade inflammation is of pathogenic importance in atherosclerosis and in the development of cardiovascular disease (CVD) and type 2 diabetes (T2D). Matrix GLA protein (MGP), an inhibitor of medial calcification of arteries, is increased in patients with atherosclerosis. In the present study...... levels of markers of calcification (MGP) and inflammation (YKL-40, hsCRP) were evaluated in patients with T2 D and/or ischemic heart disease (IHD)....

  9. Linking CD11b+ Dendritic Cells and Natural Killer T Cells to Plaque Inflammation in Atherosclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miche Rombouts

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Atherosclerosis remains the leading cause of death and disability in our Western society. To investigate whether the dynamics of leukocyte (subpopulations could be predictive for plaque inflammation during atherosclerosis, we analyzed innate and adaptive immune cell distributions in blood, plaques, and lymphoid tissue reservoirs in apolipoprotein E-deficient (ApoE−/− mice and in blood and plaques from patients undergoing endarterectomy. Firstly, there was predominance of the CD11b+ conventional dendritic cell (cDC subset in the plaque. Secondly, a strong inverse correlation was observed between CD11b+ cDC or natural killer T (NKT cells in blood and markers of inflammation in the plaque (including CD3, T-bet, CCR5, and CCR7. This indicates that circulating CD11b+ cDC and NKT cells show great potential to reflect the inflammatory status in the atherosclerotic plaque. Our results suggest that distinct changes in inflammatory cell dynamics may carry biomarker potential reflecting atherosclerotic lesion progression. This not only is crucial for a better understanding of the immunopathogenesis but also bares therapeutic potential, since immune cell-based therapies are emerging as a promising novel strategy in the battle against atherosclerosis and its associated comorbidities. The cDC-NKT cell interaction in atherosclerosis serves as a good candidate for future investigations.

  10. Immune dysregulation mediated by the oral microbiome: potential link to chronic inflammation and atherosclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slocum, C; Kramer, C; Genco, C A

    2016-07-01

    Cardiovascular disease is an inflammatory disorder characterized by the progressive formation of plaque in coronary arteries, termed atherosclerosis. It is a multifactorial disease that is one of the leading causes of death worldwide. Although a number of risk factors have been associated with disease progression, the underlying inflammatory mechanisms contributing to atherosclerosis remain to be fully delineated. Within the last decade, the potential role for infection in inflammatory plaque progression has received considerable interest. Microbial pathogens associated with periodontal disease have been of particular interest due to the high levels of bacteremia that are observed after routine dental procedures and every day oral activities, such as tooth brushing. Here, we explore the potential mechanisms that may explain how periodontal pathogens either directly or indirectly elicit immune dysregulation and consequently progressive inflammation manifested as atherosclerosis. Periodontal pathogens have been shown to contribute directly to atherosclerosis by disrupting endothelial cell function, one of the earliest indicators of cardiovascular disease. Oral infection is thought to indirectly induce elevated production of inflammatory mediators in the systemic circulation. Recently, a number of studies have been conducted focusing on how disruption of the gut microbiome influences the systemic production of proinflammatory cytokines and consequently exacerbation of inflammatory diseases such as atherosclerosis. It is clear that the immune mechanisms leading to atherosclerotic plaque progression, by oral infection, are complex. Understanding the immune pathways leading to disease progression is essential for the future development of anti-inflammatory therapies for this chronic disease.

  11. Hypercholesterolemia Tunes Hematopoietic Stem/Progenitor Cells for Inflammation and Atherosclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Xiaojuan; Feng, Yingmei

    2016-07-19

    As the pathological basis of cardiovascular disease (CVD), atherosclerosis is featured as a chronic inflammation. Hypercholesterolemia is an independent risk factor for CVD. Accumulated studies have shown that hypercholesterolemia is associated with myeloid cell expansion, which stimulates innate and adaptive immune responses, strengthens inflammation, and accelerates atherosclerosis progression. Hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells (HSPC) in bone marrow (BM) expresses a panel of lipoprotein receptors to control cholesterol homeostasis. Deficiency of these receptors abrogates cellular cholesterol efflux, resulting in HSPC proliferation and differentiation in hypercholesterolemic mice. Reduction of the cholesterol level in the lipid rafts by infusion of reconstituted high-density lipoprotein (HDL) or its major apolipoprotein, apoA-I, reverses hypercholesterolemia-induced HSPC expansion. Apart from impaired cholesterol metabolism, inhibition of reactive oxygen species production suppresses HSPC activation and leukocytosis. These data indicate that the mechanisms underlying the effects of hypercholesterolemia on HSPC proliferation and differentiation could be multifaceted. Furthermore, dyslipidemia also regulates HSPC-neighboring cells, resulting in HSPC mobilization. In the article, we review how hypercholesterolemia evokes HSPC activation and mobilization directly or via its modification of BM microenvironment. We hope this review will bring light to finding key molecules to control HSPC expansion, inflammation, and atherosclerosis for the treatment of CVD.

  12. [Aortic valve calcification prevalence and association with coronary risk factors and atherosclerosis in Mexican population].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acuña-Valerio, Jorge; Rodas-Díaz, Marco A; Macias-Garrido, Enrico; Posadas-Sánchez, Rosalinda; Juárez-Rojas, Juan G; Medina-Urrutia, Aida X; Cardoso-Saldaña, Guillermo C; Joge-Galarza, Esteban; Torres-Tamayo, Margarita; Vargas-Alarcón, Gilberto; Posadas-Romero, Carlos

    The prevalence of aortic valve calcification (AVC), strongly influenced by ethnicity, is unknown in Mexican population. The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence of AVC and its associations with cardiovascular risk factors and coronary artery calcification (CAC), in Mexican subjects. In 1,267 subjects (53% women) without known coronary heart disease, aged 35 to 75 years, AVC and CAC were assessed by multidetector-computed tomography using the Agatston score. Cardiovascular risk factors were documented in all participants. The associations of AVC with CAC and risk factors were assessed by multivariable logistic regression analyses. The overall prevalence of AVC and CAC was 19.89% and 26.5%, respectively. AVC and CAC increased with age and were found more frequently in men (25.5% and 37.1%, respectively) than in women (14.9% and 13.0%, respectively). AVC was observed in only 8.5% of subjects without CAC, while those with CAC 1-99, 100-399, and >400 Agatston units had AVC prevalences of 36.8%, 56.8%, and 84.0%, respectively. The multivariable logistic regression analyses, adjusted for age, gender, obesity, physical inactivity, hypertension, dyslipidemia and high insulin levels, showed that the presence of CAC (OR [CI95%]: 3.23 [2.26-4.60]), obesity (1.94 [1.35-2.79]), male gender (1.44 [1.01-2.05]) and age (1.08 [1.03-1.10]), were significant independent predictors of AVC. Prevalence of AVC is high and significantly associated with atherosclerotic risk factors and CAC in this Mexican population. Copyright © 2016 Instituto Nacional de Cardiología Ignacio Chávez. Publicado por Masson Doyma México S.A. All rights reserved.

  13. Water-Soluble Components of Sesame Oil Reduce Inflammation and Atherosclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narasimhulu, Chandrakala Aluganti; Selvarajan, Krithika; Burge, Kathryn Young; Litvinov, Dmitry; Sengupta, Bhaswati; Parthasarathy, Sampath

    2016-07-01

    Atherosclerosis, a major form of cardiovascular disease, is now recognized as a chronic inflammatory disease. Nonpharmacological means of treating chronic diseases have gained attention recently. We previously reported that sesame oil aqueous extract (SOAE) has anti-inflammatory properties, both in vitro and in vivo. In this study, we have investigated the antiatherosclerotic properties of SOAE, and the mechanisms, through genes and inflammatory markers, by which SOAE might modulate atherosclerosis. Low-density lipoprotein receptor (LDL-R) knockout female mice were fed with either a high-fat (HF) diet or an HF diet supplemented with SOAE. Plasma lipids and atherosclerotic lesions were quantified after 3 months of feeding. Plasma samples were used for global cytokine array. RNA was extracted from both liver tissue and the aorta, and used for gene analysis. The high-fat diet supplemented with SOAE significantly reduced atherosclerotic lesions, plasma cholesterol, and LDL cholesterol levels in LDL-R(-/-) mice. Plasma inflammatory cytokines were reduced in the SOAE diet-fed animals, but not significantly, demonstrating potential anti-inflammatory properties of SOAE. Gene analysis showed the HF diet supplemented with SOAE reduced gene expression involved in inflammation and induced genes involved in cholesterol metabolism and reverse cholesterol transport, an anti-inflammatory process. Our studies suggest that a SOAE-enriched diet could be an effective nonpharmacological treatment for atherosclerosis by controlling inflammation and regulating lipid metabolism.

  14. Lysosomal cholesterol accumulation: driver on the road to inflammation during atherosclerosis and non-alcoholic steatohepatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendrikx, T; Walenbergh, S M A; Hofker, M H; Shiri-Sverdlov, R

    2014-05-01

    Many studies show an association between the accumulation of cholesterol inside lysosomes and the progression towards inflammatory disease states that are closely related to obesity. While in the past, the knowledge regarding lysosomal cholesterol accumulation was limited to its association with plaque severity during atherosclerosis, recently, a growing body of evidence indicates a causal link between lysosomal cholesterol accumulation and inflammation. These findings make lysosomal cholesterol accumulation an important target for intervention in metabolic diseases that are characterized by the presence of an inflammatory response. In this review, we aim to show the importance of cholesterol trapping inside lysosomes to the development of inflammation by focusing upon cardiovascular disease and non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) in particular. We summarize current data supporting the hypothesis that lysosomal cholesterol accumulation plays a key role in the development of inflammation during atherosclerosis and NASH. In addition, potential mechanisms by which disturbed lysosomal function can trigger the inflammatory response, the challenges in improving cholesterol trafficking in macrophages and recent successful research directions will be discussed.

  15. HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors (statins), inflammation, and endothelial progenitor cells-New mechanistic insights of atherosclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blum, Arnon

    2014-01-01

    Statins have been shown to favorably affect the prognosis of patients with risk factors to atherosclerosis-both as a primary and a secondary prevention. The beneficial effects observed with statin therapy are not merely related to changes in lipid profile but also are due to a positive effect on vascular inflammation and on immune-modulation of T lymphocytes and endothelial progenitor stem cells (EPCs). This dual effect has been demonstrated mainly in clinical trials where a change in endothelial function was observed within hours, much earlier than the effects of statins on the lipid profile (weeks). Based on all the knowledge that we have today questions were raised as to the mechanistic pathways that may explain the process of atherosclerosis and through this pathway to find better solutions and therapies to prevent and fight atherosclerosis. Our review will focus on the new updates in the field of inflammation and stem cells in vascular biology-in relation with atherosclerosis.

  16. Periodontal pathogens and atherosclerosis: implications of inflammation and oxidative modification of LDL.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurita-Ochiai, Tomoko; Yamamoto, Masafumi

    2014-01-01

    Inflammation is well accepted to play a crucial role in the development of atherosclerotic lesions, and recent studies have demonstrated an association between periodontal disease and cardiovascular disease. Porphyromonas gingivalis and Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, causative agents of destructive chronic inflammation in the periodontium, can accelerate atheroma deposition in animal models. Emerging evidence suggests that vaccination against virulence factors of these pathogens and anti-inflammatory therapy may confer disease resistance. In this review, we focus on the role of inflammatory mechanisms and oxidative modification in the formation and activation of atherosclerotic plaques accelerated by P. gingivalis or A. actinomycetemcomitans in an ApoE-deficient mouse model and high-fat-diet-fed mice. Furthermore, we examine whether mucosal vaccination with a periodontal pathogen or the anti-inflammatory activity of catechins can reduce periodontal pathogen-accelerated atherosclerosis.

  17. Periodontal Pathogens and Atherosclerosis: Implications of Inflammation and Oxidative Modification of LDL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomoko Kurita-Ochiai

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Inflammation is well accepted to play a crucial role in the development of atherosclerotic lesions, and recent studies have demonstrated an association between periodontal disease and cardiovascular disease. Porphyromonas gingivalis and Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, causative agents of destructive chronic inflammation in the periodontium, can accelerate atheroma deposition in animal models. Emerging evidence suggests that vaccination against virulence factors of these pathogens and anti-inflammatory therapy may confer disease resistance. In this review, we focus on the role of inflammatory mechanisms and oxidative modification in the formation and activation of atherosclerotic plaques accelerated by P. gingivalis or A. actinomycetemcomitans in an ApoE-deficient mouse model and high-fat-diet-fed mice. Furthermore, we examine whether mucosal vaccination with a periodontal pathogen or the anti-inflammatory activity of catechins can reduce periodontal pathogen-accelerated atherosclerosis.

  18. Gla-rich protein is involved in the cross-talk between calcification and inflammation in osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavaco, Sofia; Viegas, Carla S B; Rafael, Marta S; Ramos, Acácio; Magalhães, Joana; Blanco, Francisco J; Vermeer, Cees; Simes, Dina C

    2016-03-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a whole-joint disease characterized by articular cartilage loss, tissue inflammation, abnormal bone formation and extracellular matrix (ECM) mineralization. Disease-modifying treatments are not yet available and a better understanding of osteoarthritis pathophysiology should lead to the discovery of more effective treatments. Gla-rich protein (GRP) has been proposed to act as a mineralization inhibitor and was recently shown to be associated with OA in vivo. Here, we further investigated the association of GRP with OA mineralization-inflammation processes. Using a synoviocyte and chondrocyte OA cell system, we showed that GRP expression was up-regulated following cell differentiation throughout ECM calcification, and that inflammatory stimulation with IL-1β results in an increased expression of COX2 and MMP13 and up-regulation of GRP. Importantly, while treatment of articular cells with γ-carboxylated GRP inhibited ECM calcification, treatment with either GRP or GRP-coated basic calcium phosphate (BCP) crystals resulted in the down-regulation of inflammatory cytokines and mediators of inflammation, independently of its γ-carboxylation status. Our results strengthen the calcification inhibitory function of GRP and strongly suggest GRP as a novel anti-inflammatory agent, with potential beneficial effects on the main processes responsible for osteoarthritis progression. In conclusion, GRP is a strong candidate target to develop new therapeutic approaches.

  19. Atherosclerosis lesion is accelerated by persistent systemic inflammation but attenuated by saponins from Panax Notoginseng in rabbits

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jia Yi; Li Xiaohui; Liu Ya; Zhang Haigang

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To explore the roles of persistent systemic inflammation in atherosclerosis and the effects of saponins of Panax Notoginseng (PNS) on this process in rabbits. Methods: Thirty rabbits were divided randomly and equally into 6 groups, i.e., control, high-fat diet, inflammation, aspirin, PNS and simple-inflammation group. All the animals except that in control group and simple-inflammation group were fed with high-fat diet for 8 weeks. Based on that,rabbits in inflammation, aspirin and PNS groups were treated with zymosan injection (10 mg/kg, i.p.). Normal saline was given to rabbits in control group. Besides zymosan injection, animals in aspirin and PNS group were administrated with aspirin (12 mg/kg, i.g.) and PNS (120 mg/kg, i.g.) respectively. The animals in simple-inflammation group were treated with zymosan injection (10mg/kg, i.p.) and fed with normal diet. The atherosclerosis lesion in aortas was observed by Sudan IV staining. Serum total cholesterol, triglyceride (TG), TNF-α and activity of post-heparin lipoprotein lipase (LPL) were measured at the end of the 4th and 8th week after an overnight fast. Results: Compared with high-fat diet group, the area of atherosclerosis lesion, serum TG and TNF-α were markedly increased in rabbits of inflammation group, and the activity of LPL was decreased remarkably. Serum TNF-α level was negatively correlated with the activity of post-heparin LPL (r=-0.708, P<0.01). The area of atherosclerosis, serum TG and TNF-α were decreased in aspirin and PNS group compared with that in inflammation group, and the activity of LPL was increased remarkably. Compared with control group, serum TG and TNF-α were markedly increased in simple-inflammation group, while LPL activity was decreased. Atherosclerotic lesion did not occur in simple-inflammation group. Conclusion: Persistent systemic inflammation could accelerate the formation of atherosclerosis lesion in aortas, which partly depend on the decreasing of the activity

  20. Regulations of the key mediators in inflammation and atherosclerosis by Aspirin in human macrophages

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    Zhang Li

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Although its role to prevent secondary cardiovascular complications has been well established, how acetyl salicylic acid (ASA, aspirin regulates certain key molecules in the atherogenesis is still not known. Considering the role of matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9 to destabilize the atherosclerotic plaques, the roles of the scavenger receptor class BI (SR-BI and ATP-binding cassette transporter A1 (ABCA1 to promote cholesterol efflux in the foam cells at the plaques, and the role of NF-κB in the overall inflammation related to the atherosclerosis, we addressed whether these molecules are all related to a common mechanism that may be regulated by acetyl salicylic acid. We investigated the effect of ASA to regulate the expressions and activities of these molecules in THP-1 macrophages. Our results showed that ASA inhibited MMP-9 mRNA expression, and caused the decrease in the MMP-9 activities from the cell culture supernatants. In addition, it inhibited the nuclear translocation of NF-κB p65 subunit, thus the activity of this inflammatory molecule. On the contrary, acetyl salicylic acid induced the expressions of ABCA1 and SR-BI, two molecules known to reduce the progression of atherosclerosis, at both mRNA and protein levels. It also stimulated the cholesterol efflux out of macrophages. These data suggest that acetyl salicylic acid may alleviate symptoms of atherosclerosis by two potential mechanisms: maintaining the plaque stability via inhibiting activities of inflammatory molecules MMP-9 and NF-κB, and increasing the cholesterol efflux through inducing expressions of ABCA1 and SR-BI.

  1. Modulation of ambient temperature promotes inflammation and initiates atherosclerosis in wild type C57BL/6 mice

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    Daniel A. Giles

    2016-11-01

    Conclusions: In sum, our novel data in WT C57Bl/6 mice suggest that modulation of a single environmental variable, temperature, dramatically alters mouse physiology, metabolism, and inflammation, allowing for an improved mouse model of atherosclerosis. Thus, thermoneutral housing of mice shows promise in yielding a better understanding of the cellular and molecular pathways underlying the pathogenesis of diverse diseases.

  2. Curcumin retunes cholesterol transport homeostasis and inflammation response in M1 macrophage to prevent atherosclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Fang-Yuan; Zhou, Juan; Guo, Ning; Ma, Wang-Ge; Huang, Xin; Wang, Huan; Yuan, Zu-Yi

    2015-11-27

    Lipoprotein cholesterol metabolism dysfunction in the arterial wall is a major contributor to atherosclerosis, and excessive lipid intake and failed cholesterol homeostasis may accelerate the atherogenic process. Curcumin exerts multiple effects by alleviating inflammation, hyperlipidemia, and atherosclerosis; however, its role in cholesterol transport homeostasis and its underlying impact on inflammatory M1 macrophages are poorly understood. This work aimed to investigate the effect of curcumin on cholesterol transport, the inflammatory response and cell apoptosis in M1 macrophages. RAW264.7 macrophages (M0) were induced with LPS plus IFN-γ for 12 h to develop a M1 subtype and were then incubated with curcumin at different concentrations (6.25 and 12.5 μmol/L) in the presence or absence of oxLDL. Then, cholesterol influx/efflux and foam cell formation as well as inflammation and apoptosis were evaluated. It was found that curcumin increased cholesterol uptake measured by the Dil-oxLDL binding assay, and simultaneously increased cholesterol efflux carried out by Apo-A1 and HDL in M1 cells. Curcumin further reinforced ox-LDL-induced cholesterol esterification and foam cell formation as determined by Oil Red O and BODIPY staining. Moreover, curcumin dramatically reduced ox-LDL-induced cytokine production such as IL-1β, IL-6 as well as TNF-α and M1 cell apoptosis. We also found that curcumin upregulated CD36 and ABCA1 in M1 macrophages. Curcumin increased PPARγ expression, which in turn promoted CD36 and ABCA1 expression. In conclusion, curcumin may increase the ability of M1 macrophages to handle harmful lipids, thus promoting lipid processing, disposal and removal, which may support cholesterol homeostasis and exert an anti-atherosclerotic effect.

  3. Thoracic aorta calcification but not inflammation is associated with increased cardiovascular disease risk: results of the CAMONA study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blomberg, Bjoern A. [Odense University Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Odense C (Denmark); University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Utrecht (Netherlands); Jong, Pim A. de; Lam, Marnix G.E.; Mali, Willem P.T.M. [University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Utrecht (Netherlands); Thomassen, Anders [Odense University Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Odense C (Denmark); Vach, Werner [University Medical Center Freiburg, Clinical Epidemiology, Institute of Medical Biometry and Medical Informatics, Freiburg (Germany); Olsen, Michael H. [Odense University Hospital, The Cardiovascular and Metabolic Preventive Clinic, Department of Endocrinology, Center for Individualized Medicine in Arterial Diseases, Odense (Denmark); Narula, Jagat [Mount Sinai Hospital, Icahn School of Medicine, New York, NY (United States); Alavi, Abass [Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, Department of Radiology, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Hoeilund-Carlsen, Poul F. [Odense University Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Odense C (Denmark); University of Southern Denmark, Institute of Clinical Research, Odense (Denmark)

    2017-02-15

    Arterial inflammation and vascular calcification are regarded as early prognostic markers of cardiovascular disease (CVD). In this study we investigated the relationship between CVD risk and arterial inflammation ({sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT imaging), vascular calcification metabolism (Na{sup 18}F PET/CT imaging), and vascular calcium burden (CT imaging) of the thoracic aorta in a population at low CVD risk. Study participants underwent blood pressure measurements, blood analyses, and {sup 18}F-FDG and Na{sup 18}F PET/CT imaging. In addition, the 10-year risk for development of CVD, based on the Framingham risk score (FRS), was estimated. CVD risk was compared across quartiles of thoracic aorta {sup 18}F-FDG uptake, Na{sup 18}F uptake, and calcium burden on CT. A total of 139 subjects (52 % men, mean age 49 years, age range 21 - 75 years, median FRS 6 %) were evaluated. CVD risk was, on average, 3.7 times higher among subjects with thoracic aorta Na{sup 18}F uptake in the highest quartile compared with those in the lowest quartile of the distribution (15.5 % vs. 4.2 %; P < 0.001). CVD risk was on average, 3.7 times higher among subjects with a thoracic aorta calcium burden on CT in the highest quartile compared with those in the lowest two quartiles of the distribution (18.0 % vs. 4.9 %; P < 0.001). CVD risk was similar in subjects in all quartiles of thoracic aorta {sup 18}F-FDG uptake. Our findings indicate that an unfavourable CVD risk profile is associated with marked increases in vascular calcification metabolism and vascular calcium burden of the thoracic aorta, but not with arterial inflammation. (orig.)

  4. Inflammation, lipid metabolism dysfunction, and hypertension: Active research fields in atherosclerosis-related cardiovascular disease in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YIN Kai; TANG ChaoKe

    2011-01-01

    Atherosclerosis-related cardiovascular disease is one of the leading causes of death in China [1].With advances in our understanding of the molecular mechanisms of atherosclerosis vascular inflammation,lipid metabolism dysfunction,and hypertension are regarded as the main pathogenetic pathways of both early atherogenesis and advanced plaque rupture [2,3].Currently,much attention is being paid to the control of these pathways,which offers the potential for development of novel therapeutic approaches in the treatment of cardiovascular disease in China.

  5. Effect of 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate-induced psoriasis-like skin lesions on systemic inflammation and atherosclerosis in hypercholesterolaemic apolipoprotein E deficient mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Marie; Hansen, Peter Riis; Nielsen, Lars Bo;

    2016-01-01

    to develop an animal model with combined atherosclerosis and psoriasis-like skin inflammation. METHODS: Topical 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA) was applied to the ears twice per week for 8 weeks in atherosclerosis-prone apolipoprotein E deficient (ApoE(-/-)) mice. RESULTS: TPA led to localized......, respectively. However, atherosclerotic plaque area and composition, and mRNA levels of several inflammatory genes in the aortic wall were not significantly affected by TPA-induced skin inflammation. CONCLUSIONS: TPA-induced psoriasis-like skin inflammation in atherosclerosis-prone ApoE(-/-) mice evoked...

  6. Exacerbated Skeletal Muscle Inflammation and Calcification in the Acute Phase of Infection by Mexican Trypanosoma cruzi DTUI Strain

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    Andrea Vizcaíno-Castillo

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A murine model was used to study the histopathological aspects and cytokine expression levels in skeletal muscle provoked by the infection with Mexican TcI strains. BALB/c mice were inoculated with the virulent Querétaro strain and the nonvirulent Ninoa strain. Parasite numbers were counted in blood and skeletal muscle at different times post-infection, and real time-PCR expression levels of the cytokines IL-12, IL-4, IL-10, IFN-γ, and TNF-α were evaluated. In the acute phase of infection, a high parasitic load, both in blood and skeletal muscle, was detected. The histopathological analyses showed an exacerbated inflammation and granulomatous-like infiltrate with the Querétaro strain. Interestingly, extensive calcification areas were observed in the skeletal muscle surrounded by inflammatory infiltrates. TNF-α and IL-10 expression exhibited a significant increase at the peak of infection. In summary, Querétaro strain, a Mexican TcI strain, is virulent enough to induce high inflammation and calcification in skeletal muscle of the hind limbs, which could be related to high expression levels of TNF-α.

  7. The association of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, obesity, and metabolic syndrome, with systemic inflammation and subclinical atherosclerosis: the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis (MESA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Rifai, Mahmoud; Silverman, Michael G; Nasir, Khurram; Budoff, Matthew J; Blankstein, Ron; Szklo, Moyses; Katz, Ronit; Blumenthal, Roger S; Blaha, Michael J

    2015-04-01

    We characterized the association of 3 metabolic conditions - obesity, metabolic syndrome, and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) - with increased inflammation and subclinical atherosclerosis. We conducted cross-sectional analysis of 3976 participants from the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis (MESA) with adequate CT imaging to diagnose NAFLD. Obesity was defined as BMI ≥ 30 kg/m(2), metabolic syndrome by AHA/NHLBI criteria, and NAFLD using non-contrast cardiac CT and a liver/spleen attenuation ratio (L/S)  0. We studied the association of a stepwise increase in number of these metabolic conditions (0-3) with increased inflammation and CAC, stratifying results by gender and ethnicity. Mean age of participants was 63 (±10) years, 45% were male, 37% white, 10% Chinese, 30% African American, and 23% were Hispanic. Adjusting for obesity, metabolic syndrome and traditional risk factors, NAFLD was associated with a prevalence odds ratio for hsCRP ≥2 mg/L and CAC >0 of 1.47 (1.20-1.79) and 1.37 (1.11-1.68) respectively. There was a positive interaction between female gender and NAFLD in the association with hsCRP ≥2 mg/L (p = 0.006), with no interaction by race. With increasing number of metabolic conditions, there was a graded increase in prevalence odds ratios of hsCRP ≥2 mg/L and CAC >0. NAFLD is associated with increased inflammation and CAC independent of traditional risk factors, obesity and metabolic syndrome. There is a graded association between obesity, metabolic syndrome, and NAFLD with inflammation and CAC. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. PREVALENCE OF METABOLIC SYNDROME IN PATIENTS WITH PSORIATIC ARTHRITIS: ITS ASSOCIATION WITH INFLAMMATION AND SUBCLINICAL ATHEROSCLEROSIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. I. Markelova

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Metabolic syndrome (MS is a cluster of metabolic disorders giving rise to atherosclerotic  cardiovascular diseases (CVD. The combination  of inflammatory activity and a high spread of traditional  risk factors (RF for CVD in patients with psoriatic arthritis (PsA permits them to be referred to as a higher cardiovascular risk group as compared to the general population.Objective: to estimate the spread of MS and its association with inflammation and subclinical atherosclerosis in patients with PsA.Subjects and methods. This investigation enrolled 128 patients with PsA (61.7% women and 38.3% men; their median age was 43 [34; 49.5] years; the duration of PsA and psoriasis – 7 [3; 13] and 15 [6; 26] years, respectively. There was a preponderance of patients with moderate (3.7 ≥ DAS > 2.4 and high (DAS > 3.7 disease activity: 33 (25.8% and 74 (57.8%, respectively. MS was diagnosed on the basis of the 2011 National  Guidelines of the Russian Cardiology Society for Cardiovascular Prevention.  All the patients underwent carotid Doppler ultrasound (CDU for the diagnosis of subclinical atherosclerosis. Results and discussion. MS was diagnosed in 49 (38.3% patients with PsA. The most common  MS criteria were abdominal  obesity in 72 (56.3% and dyslipidemia [an elevation of low-density lipoproteins (LDL  level in 101 (78.9%, and a decrease in high-density lipoproteins (HDL  level in 65 (50.8]. Hypertension was diagnosed in 32 (25%. 65 (50.8% patients were found to have subclinical atherosclerosis,  as evidenced by CDU.The patients with MS were older than those without this condition  (46 [43; 52] and 39 [31; 46] years, respectively; p < 0.0001. These groups did not differ in PsA duration (15 [7; 29] and 15 [5.5; 25] years respectively; p = 0.47. The patients with MS had higher DAS values (4.4 [3.2; 5.6] and 3.6 [2.5; 4.7], respectively; p = 0.02; mean intima media thickness (IMT  (0.78 [0.72; 0.86] and 0.73 [0.66; 0.77] mm; p < 0.0001 and

  9. Atherosclerosis and Alzheimer - diseases with a common cause? Inflammation, oxysterols, vasculature

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Aging is accompanied by increasing vulnerability to pathologies such as atherosclerosis (ATH) and Alzheimer disease (AD). Are these different pathologies, or different presentations with a similar underlying pathoetiology? Discussion Both ATH and AD involve inflammation, macrophage infiltration, and occlusion of the vasculature. Allelic variants in common genes including APOE predispose to both diseases. In both there is strong evidence of disease association with viral and bacterial pathogens including herpes simplex and Chlamydophila. Furthermore, ablation of components of the immune system (or of bone marrow-derived macrophages alone) in animal models restricts disease development in both cases, arguing that both are accentuated by inflammatory/immune pathways. We discuss that amyloid β, a distinguishing feature of AD, also plays a key role in ATH. Several drugs, at least in mouse models, are effective in preventing the development of both ATH and AD. Given similar age-dependence, genetic underpinnings, involvement of the vasculature, association with infection, Aβ involvement, the central role of macrophages, and drug overlap, we conclude that the two conditions reflect different manifestations of a common pathoetiology. Mechanism Infection and inflammation selectively induce the expression of cholesterol 25-hydroxylase (CH25H). Acutely, the production of ‘immunosterol’ 25-hydroxycholesterol (25OHC) defends against enveloped viruses. We present evidence that chronic macrophage CH25H upregulation leads to catalyzed esterification of sterols via 25OHC-driven allosteric activation of ACAT (acyl-CoA cholesterol acyltransferase/SOAT), intracellular accumulation of cholesteryl esters and lipid droplets, vascular occlusion, and overt disease. Summary We postulate that AD and ATH are both caused by chronic immunologic challenge that induces CH25H expression and protection against particular infectious agents, but at the expense of longer-term pathology

  10. Atherosclerosis and Alzheimer--diseases with a common cause? Inflammation, oxysterols, vasculature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lathe, Richard; Sapronova, Alexandra; Kotelevtsev, Yuri

    2014-03-21

    Aging is accompanied by increasing vulnerability to pathologies such as atherosclerosis (ATH) and Alzheimer disease (AD). Are these different pathologies, or different presentations with a similar underlying pathoetiology? Both ATH and AD involve inflammation, macrophage infiltration, and occlusion of the vasculature. Allelic variants in common genes including APOE predispose to both diseases. In both there is strong evidence of disease association with viral and bacterial pathogens including herpes simplex and Chlamydophila. Furthermore, ablation of components of the immune system (or of bone marrow-derived macrophages alone) in animal models restricts disease development in both cases, arguing that both are accentuated by inflammatory/immune pathways. We discuss that amyloid β, a distinguishing feature of AD, also plays a key role in ATH. Several drugs, at least in mouse models, are effective in preventing the development of both ATH and AD. Given similar age-dependence, genetic underpinnings, involvement of the vasculature, association with infection, Aβ involvement, the central role of macrophages, and drug overlap, we conclude that the two conditions reflect different manifestations of a common pathoetiology. Infection and inflammation selectively induce the expression of cholesterol 25-hydroxylase (CH25H). Acutely, the production of 'immunosterol' 25-hydroxycholesterol (25OHC) defends against enveloped viruses. We present evidence that chronic macrophage CH25H upregulation leads to catalyzed esterification of sterols via 25OHC-driven allosteric activation of ACAT (acyl-CoA cholesterol acyltransferase/SOAT), intracellular accumulation of cholesteryl esters and lipid droplets, vascular occlusion, and overt disease. We postulate that AD and ATH are both caused by chronic immunologic challenge that induces CH25H expression and protection against particular infectious agents, but at the expense of longer-term pathology.

  11. Commensal bacteria at the crossroad between cholesterol homeostasis and chronic inflammation in atherosclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasahara, Kazuyuki; Tanoue, Takeshi; Yamashita, Tomoya; Yodoi, Keiko; Matsumoto, Takuya; Emoto, Takuo; Mizoguchi, Taiji; Hayashi, Tomohiro; Kitano, Naoki; Sasaki, Naoto; Atarashi, Koji; Honda, Kenya; Hirata, Ken-Ichi

    2017-03-01

    The gut microbiota were shown to play critical roles in the development of atherosclerosis, but the detailed mechanism is limited. The purpose of this study is to clarify the influence of gut microbiota on atherogenesis via lipid metabolism and systemic inflammation. Germ-free or conventionally raised (Conv) ApoE-deficient (ApoE(-/-)) mice were fed chow diet and euthanized at 20 weeks of age. We found that the lack of gut microbiota in ApoE(-/-) mice caused a significant increase in the plasma and hepatic cholesterol levels compared with Conv ApoE(-/-) mice. The absence of gut microbiota changed the bile acid composition in the ileum, which was associated with activation of the enterohepatic fibroblast growth factor 15, fibroblast growth factor receptor 4 axis, and reduction of cholesterol 7α-hydroxylase and hepatic bile acid synthesis, resulting in the accumulation of liver cholesterol content. However, we found that the lack of microbiota caused a significant reduction in atherosclerotic lesion formation compared with Conv ApoE(-/-) mice, which might be associated with the attenuation of lipopolysaccharide-mediated inflammatory responses. Our findings indicated that the gut microbiota affected both hypercholesterolemia and atherogenesis in mice. Copyright © 2017 by the American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  12. Peptide Composition of Stroke Causing Emboli Correlate with Serum Markers of Atherosclerosis and Inflammation

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    Neal M. Rao

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available IntroductionThe specific protein composition of stroke-causing emboli is unknown. Because ischemic stroke has a varied etiology, it is possible that the composition of the thrombus from which an embolus originated will have distinctive molecular characteristics reflective of the underlying pathophysiology. We used mass spectrometry to evaluate the protein composition of retrieved emboli from patients with differing stroke etiologies and correlated the protein levels to serum predictors of atherosclerosis.MethodsEmboli from 20 consecutive acute stroke patients were retrieved by thrombectomy during routine stroke care. Thrombus proteins were extracted, digested, and multidimensional fractionation of peptides was performed. Fractionated peptides underwent nano-liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry. Spectra were searched using Mascot software in which results with p < 0.05 (95% confidence interval were considered significant and indicating identity. The results were correlated to A1C, low-density lipoprotein (LDL, and erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR taken on admission.ResultsEleven patients had atrial fibrillation, four had significant proximal vessel atherosclerosis, two were cryptogenic, and three had other identified stroke risk factors (left ventricular thrombus, dissection, endocarditis. Eighty-one common proteins (e.g., hemoglobin, fibrin, actin were found in all 20 emboli. Serum LDL levels correlated with Septin-2 (rs = 0.78, p = 0.028, Phosphoglycerate Kinase 1 (rs = 0.75, p = 0.036, Integrin Alpha-M (rs = 0.68, p = 0.033 and Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (rs = 0.63, p = 0.05. Septin-7 levels inversely correlated to ESR (rs = −0.84, p = 0.01. No significant protein correlations to A1C or tPA use were found.ConclusionOur exploratory study presents mass spectrometry analysis of thrombi retrieved from acute stroke patients and correlates the thrombus proteome to clinical

  13. The effect of aging on aortic atherosclerotic plaque inflammation and molecular calcification: A FDG and NaF PET CT imaging study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blomberg, Björn; Thomassen, Anders; Hildebrandt, Malene;

    2013-01-01

    prospectively assessed by 18-FDG (inflammation) and Sodium 18-Fluoride (Na-18F) (calcification metabolism) PET CT imaging. Global aortic uptake of 18-FDG and Na-18F was quantified by subtracting the blood pool SUVmean from the aortic SUVmax (cSUV) [maximum SUVaorta - mean SUVblood pool]. Calculating regression...

  14. Small-Nucleic-Acid-Based Therapeutic Strategy Targeting the Transcription Factors Regulating the Vascular Inflammation, Remodeling and Fibrosis in Atherosclerosis

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    Sung Won Youn

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Atherosclerosis arises when injury to the arterial wall induces an inflammatory cascade that is sustained by a complex network of cytokines, together with accumulation of lipids and fibrous material. Inflammatory cascades involve leukocyte adherence and chemotaxis, which are coordinated by the local secretion of adhesion molecules, chemotactic factors, and cytokines. Transcription factors are critical to the integration of the various steps of the cascade response to mediators of vascular injury, and are induced in a stimulus-dependent and cell-type-specific manner. Several small-nucleic-acid-based therapeutic strategies have recently been developed to target transcription factors: antisense oligodeoxynucleotides, RNA interference, microRNA, and decoy oligodeoxynucleotides. The aim of this review was to provide an overview of these particular targeted therapeutic strategies, toward regulation of the vascular inflammation, remodeling and fibrosis associated with atherosclerosis.

  15. Simvastatin suppresses vascular inflammation and atherosclerosis in ApoE-/-mice by downregulating the HMGB1-RAGE axis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ming LIU; Ying YU; Hong JIANG; Lei ZHANG; Pei-pei ZHANG; Peng YU; Jian-guo JIA

    2013-01-01

    Aim:High mobility group box protein 1 (HMGB1) and receptor for the advanced glycation end product (RAGE) play pivotal roles in vascular inflammation and atherosclerosis.The aim of this study was to determine whether the HMGB1-RAGE axis was involved in the actions of simvastatin on vascular inflammation and atherosclerosis in ApoE-/-mice.Methods:Five-week old ApoE-/-mice and wild-type C57BL/6 mice were fed a Western diet.At 8 weeks of age,ApoE-/-mice were administered simvastatin (50 mg.kg1.d-1) or vehicle by gavage,and the wild-type mice were treated with vehicle.The mice were sacrificed at 11 weeks of age,and the atherosclerotic lesions in aortic sinus were assessed with Oil Red 0 staining.Macrophage migration was determined with scanning EM and immunohistochemistry.Human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) were used for in vitro study.Western blots were used to quantify the protein expression of HMGB1,RAGE,vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1) and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1).Results:Vehicle-treated ApoE-/-mice exhibited significant increases in aortic inflammation and atherosclerosis as well as enhanced expression of HMGB1,RAGE,VCAM-1,and MCP-1 in aortic tissues as compared to the wild-type mice.Furthermore,serum total cholesterol,triglyceride and LDL levels were markedly increased,while serum HDL level was decreased in vehicle-treated ApoE-/-mice.Administration with simvastatin in ApoE-/-mice markedly attenuated the vascular inflammation and atherosclerotic lesion area,and decreased the aortic expression of HMGB1,RAGE,VCAM-1,and MCP-1.However,simvastatin did not affect the abnormal levels of serum total cholesterol,triglyceride,LDL and HDL in ApoE-/-mice.Exposure of HUVECs to HMGB1 (100 ng/mL) markedly increased the expression of HMGB1,RAGE and VCAM-1,whereas pretreatment of the cells with simvastatin (10 μmol/L) blocked the HMGB1-caused changes.Conclusion:Simvastatin inhibits vascular inflammation and atherosclerosis in Apo

  16. Testing the Role of Myeloid Cell Glucose Flux in Inflammation and Atherosclerosis

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    Tomohiro Nishizawa

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Inflammatory activation of myeloid cells is accompanied by increased glycolysis, which is required for the surge in cytokine production. Although in vitro studies suggest that increased macrophage glucose metabolism is sufficient for cytokine induction, the proinflammatory effects of increased myeloid cell glucose flux in vivo and the impact on atherosclerosis, a major complication of diabetes, are unknown. We therefore tested the hypothesis that increased glucose uptake in myeloid cells stimulates cytokine production and atherosclerosis. Overexpression of the glucose transporter GLUT1 in myeloid cells caused increased glycolysis and flux through the pentose phosphate pathway but did not induce cytokines. Moreover, myeloid-cell-specific overexpression of GLUT1 in LDL receptor-deficient mice was ineffective in promoting atherosclerosis. Thus, increased glucose flux is insufficient for inflammatory myeloid cell activation and atherogenesis. If glucose promotes atherosclerosis by increasing cellular glucose flux, myeloid cells do not appear to be the key targets.

  17. Subclinical heart failure in juvenile idiopathic arthritis: a consequence of chronic inflammation and subclinical atherosclerosis

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    Hamada S Ahmad

    2016-01-01

    Conclusion Our findings indicate the presence of subclinical heart failure in these patients. JIA patients with subclinical atherosclerosis, with systemic disease, and with active disease are at greatest risk of developing subclinical heart failure.

  18. Associations of Cigarette Smoking With Subclinical Inflammation and Atherosclerosis: ELSA-Brasil (The Brazilian Longitudinal Study of Adult Health).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kianoush, Sina; Yakoob, Mohammad Yawar; Al-Rifai, Mahmoud; DeFilippis, Andrew P; Bittencourt, Marcio S; Duncan, Bruce B; Bensenor, Isabela M; Bhatnagar, Aruni; Lotufo, Paulo A; Blaha, Michael J

    2017-06-24

    There is a need to identify sensitive biomarkers of early tobacco-related cardiovascular disease. We examined the association of smoking status, burden, time since quitting, and intensity, with markers of inflammation and subclinical atherosclerosis. We studied 14 103 participants without clinical cardiovascular disease in ELSA-Brasil (Brazilian Longitudinal Study of Adult Health). We evaluated baseline cross-sectional associations between smoking parameters and inflammation (high-sensitivity C-reactive protein [hsCRP]) and measures of subclinical atherosclerosis (carotid intima-media thickness, ankle-brachial index, and coronary artery calcium [CAC]). The cohort included 1844 current smokers, 4121 former smokers, and 8138 never smokers. Mean age was 51.7±8.9 years; 44.8% were male. After multivariable adjustment, compared with never smokers, current smokers had significantly higher levels of hsCRP (β=0.24, 0.19-0.29 mg/L; P0 (odds ratio: 1.83; 95% confidence interval, 1.46-2.30; P0 were lower with increasing time since quitting (P0 (P=0.03) after adjusting for duration of smoking. Strong associations were observed between smoking status, burden, and intensity with inflammation (hsCRP) and subclinical atherosclerosis (carotid intima-media thickness, ankle-brachial index, CAC). These markers of early cardiovascular disease injury may be used for the further study and regulation of traditional and novel tobacco products. © 2017 The Authors. Published on behalf of the American Heart Association, Inc., by Wiley.

  19. Is Lipoprotein-Associated Phospholipase A2 a Link between Inflammation and Subclinical Atherosclerosis in Rheumatoid Arthritis?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Södergren

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. Lipoprotein-associated phospholipase A2 (Lp-PLA2, a marker of vascular inflammation, is associated with cardiovascular disease. This prospective study of an inception cohort aimed to investigate whether the level of Lp-PLA2 is associated with subclinical atherosclerosis in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA. Methods. Patients from northern Sweden diagnosed with early RA were consecutively recruited into an ongoing prospective study. From these, all patients ≤60 years (n=71 were included for measurements of subclinical atherosclerosis at inclusion (T0 and five years later (T5. Forty age- and sex-matched controls were included. The patients were clinically assessed, SCORE, Reynolds Risk Score, and Larsen score were calculated, and blood samples were drawn from all individuals at T0 and T5. Results. There was no significant difference in the level of Lp-PLA2 between patients with RA and controls (p>0.05. In simple linear regression models among patients with RA, Lp-PLA2 at T0 was significantly associated with intima media thickness (IMT at T0 and T5, flow mediated dilation (FMD at T0 and T5, ever smoking, male sex, HDL-cholesterol (inversely, non-HDL-cholesterol, SCORE, Reynolds Risk Score, and Larsen score (p<0.05. Conclusion. In this cohort of patients with early RA, the concentration of Lp-PLA2 was associated with both subclinical atherosclerosis and disease severity.

  20. Effect of 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate-induced psoriasis-like skin lesions on systemic inflammation and atherosclerosis in hypercholesterolaemic apolipoprotein E deficient mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Marie; Hansen, Peter Riis; Nielsen, Lars Bo;

    2016-01-01

    skin inflammation with increased epidermal thickness, infiltration of inflammatory-like cells and augmented tissue interleukin-17F levels. Systemic effects of the topical application of TPA were demonstrated by increased plasma concentration of serum amyloid A and splenic immune modulation...... systemic immune-inflammatory effects, but did not affect atherogenesis. The results may question the role of psoriasis-induced inflammation in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis in psoriasis patients....... to develop an animal model with combined atherosclerosis and psoriasis-like skin inflammation. METHODS: Topical 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA) was applied to the ears twice per week for 8 weeks in atherosclerosis-prone apolipoprotein E deficient (ApoE(-/-)) mice. RESULTS: TPA led to localized...

  1. Visceral adipose tissue as a source of inflammation and promoter of atherosclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexopoulos, Nikolaos; Katritsis, Demosthenes; Raggi, Paolo

    2014-03-01

    The current epidemic of obesity with the associated increasing incidence of insulin resistance, diabetes mellitus and atherosclerosis affecting a large proportion of the North American and Western populations, has generated a strong interest in the potential role of visceral adipose tissue in the development of atherosclerosis and its complications. The intra-abdominal and epicardial space are two compartments that contain visceral adipose tissue with a similar embryological origin. These visceral fats are highly inflamed in obese patients, patients with the metabolic syndrome and in those with established coronary artery disease; additionally they are capable of secreting large quantities of pro-inflammatory cytokines and free fatty acids. There is accumulating evidence to support a direct involvement of these regional adipose tissue deposits in the development of atherosclerosis and its complicating events, as will be reviewed in this article.

  2. Interactions between inflammation and lipid metabolism: relevance for efficacy of anti-inflammatory drugs in the treatment of atherosclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Diepen, Janna A; Berbée, Jimmy F P; Havekes, Louis M; Rensen, Patrick C N

    2013-06-01

    Dyslipidemia and inflammation are well known causal risk factors the development of atherosclerosis. The interplay between lipid metabolism and inflammation at multiple levels in metabolic active tissues may exacerbate the development of atherosclerosis, and will be discussed in this review. Cholesterol, fatty acids and modified lipids can directly activate inflammatory pathways. In addition, circulating (modified) lipoproteins modulate the activity of leukocytes. Vice versa, proinflammatory signaling (i.e. cytokines) in pre-clinical models directly affects lipid metabolism. Whereas the main lipid-lowering drugs all have potent anti-inflammatory actions, the lipid-modulating actions of anti-inflammatory agents appear to be less straightforward. The latter have mainly been evaluated in pre-clinical models and in patients with chronic inflammatory diseases, which will be discussed. The clinical trials that are currently conducted to evaluate the efficacy of anti-inflammatory agents in the treatment of cardiovascular diseases may additionally reveal potential (beneficial) effects of these therapeutics on lipid metabolism in the general population at risk for CVD.

  3. Peculiarities of dyslipidemia in patients with psoriatic arthritis: connection with atherosclerosis, cardiovascular risk factors and inflammation activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebrov A.P.

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to found the dyslipidemia in patients with psoriatic arthritis and to study the connection between dyslipidemia and cardiovascular risk factors, atherosclerosis and inflammation activity. 40 persons with PsA without cardiovascular diseases were involved in the study, 25 healthy people were examined like controls. Activity of PsA was learned by DAS, Likert index, Ritchie Arthicular Index, Number of swelling joints (NSJ, ESR, C-reactive protein (CRP and fibrinogen. Total cholesterol, triglycerides, low and high density lipoprotein cholesterol, hypertension, body mass index, individual cardiac history were performed like cardiovascular risk markers. The ultrasound measuring the thickness of intima-media layer (IML in carotid arteries was performed to subclinical atherosclerosis study. Increase of total cholesterol, triglycerides and low density lipoprotein cholesterol level was found in patients with PsA comparative with controls. There was prevalence of high and moderate increase of total cholesterol in patients with PsA, and in controls only low increase was measured. Correlation between total cholesterol and NSJ, fibrinogen, hypertension and IML was found. Low density lipoproteins were tingly interrelated with ESR, hypertension and IML. Very low density lipoproteins were connected with age of disease beginning, hypertension and IML, and triglycerides-with hypertension, enthesitis and dactilitis. Dyslipidemia in patients with PsA characterizes by total cholesterol, triglycerides, low density lipoprotein cholesterol increase, but not high density lipoprotein decrease. There is the connection between dyslipidemia in PsA and inflammation activity, arterial hypertension and IML

  4. Effect of 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate-induced psoriasis-like skin lesions on systemic inflammation and atherosclerosis in hypercholesterolaemic apolipoprotein E deficient mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Marie; Hansen, Peter Riis; Nielsen, Lars Bo

    2016-01-01

    to develop an animal model with combined atherosclerosis and psoriasis-like skin inflammation. METHODS: Topical 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA) was applied to the ears twice per week for 8 weeks in atherosclerosis-prone apolipoprotein E deficient (ApoE(-/-)) mice. RESULTS: TPA led to localized...... skin inflammation with increased epidermal thickness, infiltration of inflammatory-like cells and augmented tissue interleukin-17F levels. Systemic effects of the topical application of TPA were demonstrated by increased plasma concentration of serum amyloid A and splenic immune modulation...

  5. Metabolic syndrome, inflammation and atherosclerosis - the role of adipokines in health and in systemic inflammatory rheumatic diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Maria José; Fonseca, João Eurico

    2009-01-01

    Cardiovascular (CV) events are among the leading causes of morbidity and mortality in patients with inflammatory rheumatic diseases. It has been hypothesized that, in addition to the traditional CV risk factors, inflammation is a major contributor to atherogenesis. Metabolic syndrome (MetS) stands for a cluster of risk factors associated with insulin resistance and increased abdominal fat. Inflammation and MetS are intimately linked. Inflammatory biomarkers are frequently elevated in people with MetS and, conversely, the prevalence of MetS is higher in patients with chronic inflammatory rheumatic diseases, such as Rheumatoid Arthritis and Systemic Lupus Erythematosus. Inflammatory cytokines impair insulin sensitivity and can induce an adverse lipoprotein profile as seen in MetS. Furthermore, the presence of MetS correlates with increased subclinical atherosclerosis, major adverse CV events and death, making an important contribution to the CV burden in inflammatory diseases. Adipose tissue has recently emerged as an active organ that produces and secretes numerous mediators - adipokines - particularly relevant in energy homeostasis, inflammation, immune regulation and angiogenesis. These mediators arise as a potential link between MetS, inflammation and atherogenesis. Understanding the complex regulation and function of adipokines in health and disease is a priority since it may lead to new preventive and therapeutic interventions aiming to decrease CV risk.

  6. Predictors of mortality in dialysis patients: Association between malnutrition, inflammation and atherosclerosis (Mia syndrome)

    OpenAIRE

    2004-01-01

    Introduction Numerous recent studies have shown increased comorbidity and mortality in dialysis patients with malnutrition. Protein-energy malnutrition with muscle wasting occurs in a large proportion of patients with chronic renal failure and is, in addition to atherosclerosis, a strong risk factor for mortality in patients undergoing dialysis. Malnutrition is also associated with increased cardiovascular mortality in dialysis patients. Pathogenic factors of malnutrition in dialysis patients...

  7. Periodontal Pathogens and Atherosclerosis: Implications of Inflammation and Oxidative Modification of LDL

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Inflammation is well accepted to play a crucial role in the development of atherosclerotic lesions, and recent studies have demonstrated an association between periodontal disease and cardiovascular disease. Porphyromonas gingivalis and Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, causative agents of destructive chronic inflammation in the periodontium, can accelerate atheroma deposition in animal models. Emerging evidence suggests that vaccination against virulence factors of these pathogens and a...

  8. Arterial calcification: A new perspective?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicoll, R; Henein, M

    2017-02-01

    Arterial calcification is commonly seen in atherosclerosis, chronic kidney disease (CKD) and diabetes and has long been considered a natural progression of atherosclerosis. Yet it is a systemic condition, occurring in a wide and diverse range of disease states and no medical treatment for cardiovascular disease has yet found a way to regress it; on the contrary, lipid-lowering therapy may worsen its progression. Although numerous studies have found associations between calcification and biomarkers, none has yet found a unifying mechanism that explains the calcification found in atherosclerosis, CKD or diabetes and many of the biomarkers are equally associated with atheroma development and cardiovascular events. Furthermore, both presence and absence of coronary artery calcification appear predictive of plaque rupture and cardiovascular events, indicating that the association is not causal. This suggests that we are no further forward in understanding the true nature of arterial calcification or its pathogenesis, other than noting that it is 'multifactorial'. This is because most researchers view arterial calcification as a progressive pathological condition which must be treated. Instead, we hypothesise that calcification develops as an immune response to endothelial injury, such as shear stress or oxidative stress in diabetics, and is consequently part of the body's natural defences. This would explain why it has been found to be protective of plaque rupture and why it is unresponsive to lipid-lowering agents. We propose that instead of attempting to treat arterial calcification, we should instead be attempting to prevent or treat all causes of endothelial injury.

  9. Modulation of oxidative stress, inflammation, and atherosclerosis by lipoprotein-associated phospholipase A2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenson, Robert S; Stafforini, Diana M

    2012-09-01

    Lipoprotein-associated phospholipase A(2) (Lp-PLA(2)), also known as platelet-activating factor acetylhydrolase (PAF-AH), is a unique member of the phospholipase A(2) superfamily. This enzyme is characterized by its ability to specifically hydrolyze PAF as well as glycerophospholipids containing short, truncated, and/or oxidized fatty acyl groups at the sn-2 position of the glycerol backbone. In humans, Lp-PLA(2) circulates in active form as a complex with low- and high-density lipoproteins. Clinical studies have reported that plasma Lp-PLA(2) activity and mass are strongly associated with atherogenic lipids and vascular risk. These observations led to the hypothesis that Lp-PLA(2) activity and/or mass levels could be used as biomarkers of cardiovascular disease and that inhibition of the activity could offer an attractive therapeutic strategy. Darapladib, a compound that inhibits Lp-PLA(2) activity, is anti-atherogenic in mice and other animals, and it decreases atherosclerotic plaque expansion in humans. However, disagreement continues to exist regarding the validity of Lp-PLA(2) as an independent marker of atherosclerosis and a scientifically justified target for intervention. Circulating Lp-PLA(2) mass and activity are associated with vascular risk, but the strength of the association is reduced after adjustment for basal concentrations of the lipoprotein carriers with which the enzyme associates. Genetic studies in humans harboring an inactivating mutation at this locus indicate that loss of Lp-PLA(2) function is a risk factor for inflammatory and vascular conditions in Japanese cohorts. Consistently, overexpression of Lp-PLA(2) has anti-inflammatory and anti-atherogenic properties in animal models. This thematic review critically discusses results from laboratory and animal studies, analyzes genetic evidence, reviews clinical work demonstrating associations between Lp-PLA(2) and vascular disease, and summarizes results from animal and human clinical trials in

  10. Metabolomic and Genomic Markers of Atherosclerosis as Related to Oxidative Stress, Inflammation, and Vascular Function in Twin Astronauts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Stuart M. C.; Rana, Brinda K.; Stenger, Michael B.; Sears, Dorothy D.; Smith, Scott M.; Macias, Brandon R.; Hargens, Alan R.; Sharma, Kumar; De Vivo, Immaculata

    2016-01-01

    Background: Future human space travel will consist primarily of long-duration missions onboard the International Space Station (ISS) or exploration-class missions to Mars, its moons, or nearby asteroids. Astronauts participating in long-duration missions may be at an increased risk of oxidative stress and inflammatory damage due to radiation, psychological stress, altered physical activity, nutritional insufficiency, and hyperoxia during extravehicular activity. By studying one identical twin during his 1-year ISS mission and one ground-based twin, this work extends a current NASA-funded investigation to determine whether these spaceflight factors contribute to an accelerated progression of atherosclerosis. This study of twins affords a unique opportunity to examine the spaceflight-related atherosclerosis risk independent of the confounding factors associated with different genotypes. Purpose: The purpose of this investigation is to determine whether biomarkers of oxidative and inflammatory stress are elevated during and after long-duration spaceflight and determine if a relation exists between levels of these biomarkers and structural and functional indices of atherosclerotic risk measured in the carotid and brachial arteries. These physiological and biochemical data will be extended by using an exploratory approach to investigate the relationship between intermediate phenotypes and risk factors for atherosclerosis and the metabolomic signature from plasma and urine samples. Since metabolites are often the indirect products of gene expression, we will simultaneously assess gene expression and DNA methylation in leukocytes. Hypothesis: We predict that the space-flown twin will experience elevated biomarkers of oxidative stress and inflammatory damage, altered arterial structure and function, accelerated telomere shortening, dysregulation of genes associated with oxidative stress and inflammation, and a metabolic profile shift that is associated with elevated

  11. Sialic Acid-Binding Immunoglobulin-like Lectin G Promotes Atherosclerosis and Liver Inflammation by Suppressing the Protective Functions of B-1 Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabrina Gruber

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Atherosclerosis is initiated and sustained by hypercholesterolemia, which results in the generation of oxidized LDL (OxLDL and other metabolic byproducts that trigger inflammation. Specific immune responses have been shown to modulate the inflammatory response during atherogenesis. The sialic acid-binding immunoglobulin-like lectin G (Siglec-G is a negative regulator of the functions of several immune cells, including myeloid cells and B-1 cells. Here, we show that deficiency of Siglec-G in atherosclerosis-prone mice inhibits plaque formation and diet-induced hepatic inflammation. We further demonstrate that selective deficiency of Siglec-G in B cells alone is sufficient to mediate these effects. Levels of B-1 cell-derived natural IgM with specificity for OxLDL were significantly increased in the plasma and peritoneal cavity of Siglec-G-deficient mice. Consistent with the neutralizing functions of OxLDL-specific IgM, Siglec-G-deficient mice were protected from OxLDL-induced sterile inflammation. Thus, Siglec-G promotes atherosclerosis and hepatic inflammation by suppressing protective anti-inflammatory effector functions of B cells.

  12. Effect of paricalcitol and enalapril on renal inflammation/oxidative stress in atherosclerosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kazim; Husain; Edu; Suarez; Angel; Isidro; Wilfredo; Hernandez; Leon; Ferder

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the protective effect of paricalcitol and enalapril on renal inflammation and oxidative stress in Apo E-knock out mice. METHODS: Animals treated for 4 mo as group(1) Apo E-knock out plus vehicle, group(2) Apo E-knock out plus paricalcitol(200 ng thrice a week),(3) Apo Eknock out plus enalapril(30 mg/L),(4) Apo E-knock out plus paricalcitol plus enalapril and(5) normal. Blood pressure(BP) was recorded using tail cuff method. The kidneys were isolated for biochemical assays using spectrophotometer and Western blot analyses. RESULTS: Apo E-deficient mice developed high BP(127 ± 3 mm Hg) and it was ameliorated by enalapril and enalapril plus paricalcitol treatments but not with paricalcitol alone. Renal malondialdehyde concentrations, p22 phox, manganese-superoxide dismutase, inducible nitric oxide synthase(NOS), monocyte chemoattractant protein-1, tumor necrosis factor-alpha and transforming growth factor-β1 levels significantly elevated but reduced glutathione, Cu Zn-SOD and e NOS levels significantly depleted in Apo E-knock out animals compared to normal. Administration of paricalcitol, enalapril and combined together ameliorated the renal inflammation and oxidative stress in Apo E-knock out animals. CONCLUSION: Paricalcitol and enalapril combo treatment ameliorates renal inflammation as well as oxidative stress in atherosclerotic animals.

  13. Early atherosclerosis and vascular inflammation in mice with diet-induced type 2 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bartels, E D; Bang, C A; Nielsen, L B

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Obesity and type 2 diabetes increase the risk of atherosclerosis. It is unknown to what extent this reflects direct effects on the arterial wall or secondary effects of hyperlipidaemia. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The effect of obesity and type 2 diabetes on the development...... and soluble vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (sVCAM-1) in both wild-type and apoB transgenic mice. In wild-type mice, plasma very low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (VLDL-C) and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) were unaffected by fat-feeding. ApoB transgenic mice had mildly elevated plasma LDL...... and the median lesion area was 8.0 times higher than in fat-fed wild-type mice (P = 0.001). Intracellular adhesion molecule-1 staining of the aortic endothelium was most pronounced in the fat-fed apoB transgenic mice. CONCLUSIONS: Our findings suggest that diet-induced type 2 diabetes causes early...

  14. Loneliness, Depression, and Inflammation: Evidence from the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Briana Mezuk

    Full Text Available Both objective and subjective aspects of social isolation have been associated with alterations in immune markers relevant to multiple chronic diseases among older adults. However, these associations may be confounded by health status, and it is unclear whether these social factors are associated with immune functioning among relatively healthy adults. The goal of this study was to examine the associations between perceived loneliness and circulating levels of inflammatory markers among a diverse sample of adults.Data come from a subset of the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis (n = 441. Loneliness was measured by three items derived from the UCLA Loneliness Scale. The association between loneliness and C-reactive protein (CRP and fibrinogen was assessed using multivariable linear regression analyses. Models were adjusted for demographic and health characteristics.Approximately 50% of participants reported that they hardly ever felt lonely and 17.2% felt highly lonely. Individuals who were unmarried/unpartnered or with higher depressive symptoms were more likely to report being highly lonely. There was no relationship between perceived loneliness and ln(CRP (β = -0.051, p = 0.239 adjusting for demographic and health characteristics. Loneliness was inversely associated with ln(fibrinogen (β = -0.091, p = 0.040, although the absolute magnitude of this relationship was small.These results indicate that loneliness is not positively associated with fibrinogen or CRP among relatively healthy middle-aged adults.

  15. Melatonin ameliorates vascular endothelial dysfunction, inflammation, and atherosclerosis by suppressing the TLR4/NF-κB system in high-fat-fed rabbits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Ze-Ping; Fang, Xiao-Ling; Fang, Nan; Wang, Xiao-Bian; Qian, Hai-Yan; Cao, Zhong; Cheng, Yuan; Wang, Bang-Ning; Wang, Yuan

    2013-11-01

    Vascular endothelial dysfunction (VED) and inflammation contribute to the initiation and progression of atherosclerosis. Melatonin (MLT) normalizes lipid profile, improves endothelial function, and possesses anti-inflammatory properties. However, the precise mechanisms are still unclear. This study investigated whether MLT could ameliorate VED, inflammation, and atherosclerosis by suppressing the Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4)/nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) system in high-fat-fed rabbits. Rabbits were randomly divided into three groups that received a standard diet (control group), high-cholesterol diet (atherosclerosis group), or high-cholesterol diet plus 10 mg/kg/day MLT (MLT group) for 12 wk. After treatment, high-fat diet significantly increased serum lipid and inflammatory markers in rabbits in atherosclerosis group compared with that in control group. In addition, high-fat diet also induced VED and typical atherosclerotic plaque formation and increased intima/media thickness ratio, which were significantly improved by MLT therapy as demonstrated in MLT group. Histological and immunoblot analysis further showed that high-fat diet enhanced the expressions of TLR4, myeloid differentiation primary response protein (MyD88), and NF-κB p65, but decreased inhibitor of NF-κB (IκB) expression. By contrast, MLT therapy decreased the expressions of TLR4, MyD88, and NF-κB p65 and increased IκB expression. This study has demonstrated that MLT ameliorates lipid metabolism, VED, and inflammation and inhibits the progression of atherosclerosis in high-fat-fed rabbits. Moreover, our study indicates for the first time that suppression of the TLR4/NF-κB system in local vasculature with atherosclerotic damage is important for the protective effects of MLT.

  16. [Ectopic calcification].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukumoto, Seiji

    2014-02-01

    Calcium deposition can be observed in many tissues in addition to bones and teeth which physiologically calcify. This unphysiological calcification can damage several organs. It has been shown that vascular calcification which is a risk factor for cardiovascular events develops through similar mechanisms to physiological calcification. Further studies to clarify detailed mechanisms of calcification are necessary to develop measures that inhibit unphysiological ectopic calcification without affecting physiological calcification in bones and teeth.

  17. Metabolomic and Genomic Markers of Atherosclerosis as Related to Oxidative Stress, Inflammation, and Vascular Function in Twin Astronauts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Stuart M. C.; Rana, Brinda K.; Stenger, Michael B.; Sears, Dorothy D.; Smith, Scott M.; Zwart, Sara R.; Macias, Brandon R.; Hargans, Alan R.; Sharma, Kumar; De Vivo, Immaculata

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Future human space travel will consist primarily of long-duration missions onboard the International Space Station (ISS) or exploration-class missions to Mars, its moons, or nearby asteroids. Astronauts participating in long-duration missions may be at an increased risk of oxidative stress and inflammatory damage due to radiation, psychological stress, altered physical activity, nutritional insufficiency, and hyperoxia during extravehicular activity. By studying one identical twin during his 1-year ISS mission and his ground-based twin, this work extends a current NASA-funded investigation to determine whether these spaceflight factors contribute to an accelerated progression of atherosclerosis. This study of twins affords a unique opportunity to examine spaceflight-related atherosclerosis risk that is independent of the confounding factors associated with different genotypes. PURPOSE: The purpose of this investigation was to determine whether biomarkers of oxidative and inflammatory stress are elevated during and after long-duration spaceflight and determine if a relation exists between levels of these biomarkers and structural and functional indices of atherosclerotic risk measured in the carotid and brachial arteries. These physiological and biochemical data will be extended by using an exploratory approach to investigate the relationship between intermediate phenotypes and risk factors for atherosclerosis and the metabolomic signature from plasma and urine samples. Since metabolites are often the indirect products of gene expression, we simultaneously assessed gene expression and DNA methylation in leukocytes. HYPOTHESIS: We predict that, compared to the ground-based twin, the space-flown twin will experience elevated biomarkers of oxidative stress and inflammatory damage, altered arterial structure and function, accelerated telomere shortening, dysregulation of genes associated with oxidative stress and inflammation, and a metabolic profile shift

  18. All-trans-Retinoic Acid Ameliorated High Fat Diet-Induced Atherosclerosis in Rabbits by Inhibiting Platelet Activation and Inflammation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Birong Zhou

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. All-trans-retinoic acid (atRA is effective for many proliferative diseases. We investigated the protective effects of atRA against atherosclerosis. Methods. Rabbits were randomly allocated to receive basal diet or an HFD for 4 weeks. HFD group then received rosuvastatin (3 mg/day, atRA (5 mg/kg/day, or the same volume of vehicle, respectively, for next 8 weeks. Results. HFD group showed increases in plasma lipids and aortic plaque formation. P-selectin expression and fibrinogen binding on platelets or deposition on the intima of the aorta also increased significantly as did the levels of TNF-α, IL-6, and fibrinogen in plasma. After 8 weeks of treatment with atRA, there was a significant decrease in plasma lipids and improvement in aortic lesions. AtRA also inhibited the expression of P-selectin and fibrinogen binding on platelets and deposition on the intima of the aorta. Conclusion. AtRA can ameliorate HFD-induced AS in rabbits by inhibiting platelet activation and inflammation.

  19. Atherosclerosis in Ancient Egyptian Mummies

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Allam, Adel H; Thompson, Randall C; Wann, L. Samuel; Miyamoto, Michael I; Nur el-Din, Abd el-Halim; el-Maksoud, Gomaa Abd; Al-Tohamy Soliman, Muhammad; Badr, Ibrahem; el-Rahman Amer, Hany Abd; Sutherland, James D; Sutherland, M. Linda; Thomas, Gregory S

    2011-01-01

    ... is exclusively a disease of modern society and did not affect our ancient ancestors. The findings of the present study provide evidence to the contrary. Atherosclerosis was first identified in ancient Egyptians when Johann Nepomuk Czermak found calcific aortic atherosclerosis during an autopsy of the mummy of an elderly Egyp...

  20. Morphological Atherosclerosis Calcification Distribution (MACD) Index is a Strong Predictor of Cardio-Vascular Death and Include Predictive Power of BMD

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Claus; Karsdal, Morten; Ganz, Melanie;

    followed for 8.3±0.3 years and CVD deaths were recorded. BMD and several aortic calcification markers were computed: number, morphology, distribution, from outlines of the calcified plaques in lumbar X-rays. These markers were compared to BMD, SCORE card, Framingham score, and the Aortic Calcification...... Severity score - AC24. AC24 adjusted by age, waist circumference, and triglyceride levels (ATW) predicted mortality in postmenopausal women (CVD p=0.03, All-cause p=0.006). The SCORE card and the Framingham score resulted in mortality odds ratios (MOR) of 5.0 and 5.2 - defining high risk as =6 and =18......, respectively. BMD and BMD adjusted for ATW was lower in the group of deceased than in survivors (pscores based on the calcification geometry provided highly significant predictions. The number of calcified deposits...

  1. α5β1 Integrin Signaling Mediates Oxidized LDL-Induced Inflammation and Early Atherosclerosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yurdagul, Arif; Green, Jonette; Albert, Patrick; McInnis, Marshall C.; Mazar, Andrew P.; Orr, A. Wayne

    2014-01-01

    Objective Endothelial cell activation drives early atherosclerotic plaque formation. Both fibronectin deposition and accumulation of oxidized LDL (oxLDL) occur early during atherogenesis and both are implicated in enhanced endothelial cell activation. However, interplay between these responses has not been established. The objective of our study was to determine whether endothelial matrix composition modulates the inflammatory properties of oxLDL. Approach and Results We now show that oxLDL-induced NF-κB activation, proinflammatory gene expression, and monocyte binding is significantly enhanced when endothelial cells are attached to fibronectin compared to basement membrane proteins. This enhanced response does not result from altered oxLDL receptor expression, oxLDL uptake, or reactive oxygen species production, but instead results from oxLDL-induced activation of the fibronectin-binding integrin α5β1. Preventing α5β1 signaling (blocking antibodies, knockout cells) inhibits oxLDL-induced NF-κB activation and VCAM-1 expression. Furthermore, oxLDL-drives α5β1-dependent integrin signaling through the focal adhesion kinase (FAK) pathway and FAK inhibition (PF-573228, siRNA) blunts oxLDL-induced NF-κB activation, VCAM-1 expression, and monocyte adhesion. Lastly, treatment with the α5β1 signaling inhibitor, ATN-161, significantly blunts atherosclerotic plaque development in ApoE deficient mice, characterized by reduced VCAM-1 expression and macrophage accumulation without affecting fibrous cap size. Conclusions Our data suggest that α5β1-mediated crosstalk between fibronectin and oxidized LDL regulates inflammation in early atherogenesis and therapeutics that inhibit α5 integrins may reduce inflammation without adversely affecting plaque structure. PMID:24833794

  2. Lipoprotein(a) and its role in inflammation, atherosclerosis and malignancies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orsó, Evelyn; Schmitz, Gerd

    2017-03-01

    Lipoprotein (a) (Lp(a)) is a modified low-density lipoprotein (LDL) particle with an additional specific apolipoprotein (a), covalently attached to apolipoprotein B‑100 of LDL by a single thioester bond. Increased plasma Lp(a) level is a genetically determined, independent, causal risk factor for cardiovascular disease.The precise quantification of Lp(a) in plasma is still hampered by mass-sensitive assays, large particle variation, poor standardization and lack of assay comparability.The physiological functions of Lp(a) include wound healing, promoting tissue repair and vascular remodeling. Similarly to other lipoproteins, Lp(a) is also susceptible for oxidative modifications, leading to extensive formation of pro-inflammatory and pro-atherogenic oxidized phospholipids, oxysterols, oxidized lipid-protein adducts in Lp(a) particles, that perpetuate atherosclerotic lesion progression and intima-media thickening through induction of M1-macrophages, inflammation, autoimmunity and apoptosis. The oxidation-specific epitopes of modified lipoproteins are major targets of pre-immune, natural IgM antibodies, that may attenuate the pro-inflammatory and pro-atherogenic effects of Lp(a).Although the data are still insufficient, recent studies suggest a potential anti-neoplastic role of Lp(a).

  3. Morphological Atherosclerosis Calcification Distribution (MACD) Index is a Strong Predictor of Cardio-Vascular Death and Include Predictive Power of BMD

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Claus; Karsdal, Morten; Ganz, Melanie

    Aortic calcification is a major risk factor for cardiovascular disease (CVD) related deaths. We investigated the relation between mortality and aspects of number, size, morphology and distribution of calcified plaques in the lumbar aorta and BMD of postmenopausal women. 308 women aged 48 to 76 were...

  4. Atorvastatin Protects Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells From TGF-β1-Stimulated Calcification by Inducing Autophagy via Suppression of the β-Catenin Pathway

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    Demin Liu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Arterial calcification is a major event in the progression of atherosclerosis. It is reported that statins exhibit various protective effects against vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC inflammation and proliferation in cardiovascular remodeling. Although statins counteract atherosclerosis, the molecular mechanisms of statins on the calcium release from VSMCs have not been clearly elucidated. Methods: Calcium content of VSMCs was measured using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA. The expression of proteins involved in cellular transdifferentiation was analyzed by western blot. Cell autophagy was measured by fluorescence microscopic analysis for acridine orange staining and transmission electron microscopy analysis. The autophagic inhibitors (3-MA, chloroquine, NH4Cl and bafilomycin A1 and β-catenin inhibitor JW74 were used to assess the effects of atorvastatin on autophagy and the involvement of β-catenin on cell calcification respectively. Furthermore, cell transfection was performed to overexpress β-catenin. Results: In VSMCs, atorvastatin significantly suppressed transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1-stimulated calcification, accompanied by the induction of autophagy. Downregulation of autophagy with autophagic inhibitors significantly suppressed the inhibitory effect of atorvastatin on cell calcification. Moreover, the beneficial effect of atorvastatin on calcification and autophagy was reversed by β-catenin overexpression. Conversely, JW74 supplement enhanced this effect. Conclusion: These data demonstrated that atorvastatin protect VSMC from TGF-β1-stimulated calcification by inducing autophagy through suppression of the β-catenin pathway, identifying autophagy induction might be a therapeutic strategy for use in vascular calcification.

  5. Abnormal blood rheology and chronic low grade inflammation: possible risk factors for accelerated atherosclerosis and coronary artery disease in Lewis negative subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexy, Tamas; Pais, Eszter; Wenby, Rosalinda B; Mack, Wendy J; Hodis, Howard N; Kono, Naoko; Wang, Jun; Baskurt, Oguz K; Fisher, Timothy C; Meiselman, Herbert J

    2015-03-01

    To test the hypothesis that abnormal hemorheology and chronic low-grade inflammation are more prevalent in Lewis negative individuals, possibly contributing to premature atherosclerosis. We enrolled 223 healthy subjects (154 females, mean age: 64yrs). Conventional risk factors, markers of inflammation and hemorheological profiles were measured; Lewis blood group was determined by serology. Conventional risk factors (age, gender, BMI, blood pressure, lipid profile, smoking habit) did not differ among Lewis phenotypes. However, markers of inflammation (WBC, hs-CRP, ESR) were significantly elevated and rheological parameters (RBC aggregation, plasma viscosity) were abnormal in Lewis negative subjects, especially when compared to the Le(a-b+) group. With a prevalence of 33% in select populations, our data support the hypothesis that Le(a-b-) represents a pro-inflammatory phenotype that may contribute to the elevated cardiovascular risk in this group. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Calcification of thoracic aorta - solar eclipse sign.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhoble, Abhijeet; Puttarajappa, Chethan

    2008-08-29

    Calcification of thoracic aorta is very common in old people, especially ones with hypertension. This can sometime be visible on plain chest radiograph. We present a case of a male patient who had extensive deposition of calcium in the thoracic aorta. The relationship between aortic calcification and coronary atherosclerosis remains contentious. Computed tomography of the thorax can display this calcification which appears like 'solar eclipse'.

  7. The apolipoprotein-AI mimetic peptide L4F at a modest dose does not attenuate weight gain, inflammation, or atherosclerosis in LDLR-null mice.

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    Michelle M Averill

    Full Text Available High density lipoprotein (HDL cholesterol levels are inversely related to cardiovascular disease risk and associated with a reduced risk of type 2 diabetes. Apolipoprotein A-I (apoA-I; major HDL protein mimetics have been reported to reduce atherosclerosis and decrease adiposity. This study investigated the effect of L4F mimetic peptide and apoA-I overexpression on weight gain, insulin resistance, and atherosclerosis in an LDL receptor deficient (Ldlr-/- model fed a high fat high sucrose with cholesterol (HFHSC diet.Studies in differentiated 3T3-L1 adipocytes tested whether L4F could inhibit palmitate-induced adipocyte inflammation. In vivo studies used male Ldlr-/- mice fed a HFHSC diet for 12 weeks and were injected daily with L4F (100 µg/mouse subcutaneously during the last 8 weeks. Wild-type and apoA-I overexpressing Ldlr-/- mice were fed HFHSC diet for 16 weeks.Neither L4F administration nor apoA-I overexpression affected weight gain, total plasma cholesterol or triglycerides in our studies. While pre-treatment of 3T3-L1 adipocytes with either L4F or HDL abolished palmitate-induced cytokine expression in vitro, L4F treatment did not affect circulating or adipose tissue inflammatory markers in vivo. Neither L4F administration nor apoA-I overexpression affected glucose tolerance. ApoA-I overexpression significantly reduced atherosclerotic lesion size, yet L4F treatment did not affect atherosclerosis.Our results suggest that neither L4F (100 µg/day/mouse nor apoA-I overexpression affects adiposity or insulin resistance in this model. We also were unable to confirm a reduction in atherosclerosis with L4F in our particular model. Further studies on the effect of apoA-I mimetics on atherosclerosis and insulin resistance in a variety of dietary contexts are warranted.

  8. Inflammasomes and Atherosclerosis

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    S. Vallurupalli, MD

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Inflammation plays an important role in atherosclerosis. Inflammasomes play a crucial role in innate immunity, which mediates the body’s response to various pathogens. Of the different types of inflammasomes, NLRP3 has been implicated in atherosclerosis through the production of proinflammatory cytokines, IL-1β and IL-18. This review describes the role of the NLRP3 inflammasome in atherosclerosis and discusses potential therapeutic targets in the inflammasome pathway.

  9. T-cell phenotypes, apoptosis and inflammation in HIV+ patients on virologically effective cART with early atherosclerosis.

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    Esther Merlini

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: We investigated the potential relationship between T-cell phenotype, inflammation, endotoxemia, and atherosclerosis evaluated by carotid intima-media thickness (IMT in a cohort of HIV-positive patients undergoing long-term virologically suppressive combination antiretroviral therapy (cART. DESIGN: We studied 163 patients receiving virologically suppressive cART. METHODS: We measured IMT (carotid ultrasound; CD4+/CD8+ T-cell activation (CD38, CD45R0, differentiation (CD127, apoptosis (CD95, and senescence (CD28, CD57 (flow cytometry; plasma sCD14, IL-6, TNF- α, sVCAM-1, hs-CRP, anti-CMV IgG (ELISA; LPS (LAL. The results were compared by Mann-Whitney, Kruskal-Wallis or Chi-square tests, and factors associated with IMT were evaluated by multivariable logistic regression. RESULTS: Of 163 patients, 112 demonstrated normal IMT (nIMT, whereas 51 (31.3% had pathological IMT (pIMT: ≥1 mm. Of the patients with pIMT, 22 demonstrated an increased IMT (iIMT, and 29 were shown to have plaques. These patient groups had comparable nadir and current CD4+, VLs and total length of time on cART. Despite similar proportions of CD38-expressing CD8+ cells (p = .95, pIMT patients exhibited higher activated memory CD8+CD38+CD45R0+ cells (p = .038 and apoptotic CD4+CD95+ (p = .01 and CD8+CD95+ cells (p = .003. In comparison to nIMT patients, iIMT patients tended to have lower numbers of early differentiated CD28+CD57- memory CD4+ (p = .048 and CD28-CD57-CD8+ cells (p = .006, both of which are associated with a higher proliferative potential. Despite no differences in plasma LPS levels, pIMT patients showed significantly higher circulating levels of sCD14 than did nIMT patients (p = .046. No differences in anti-CMV IgG was shown. Although circulating levels of sCD14 seemed to be associated with a risk of ATS in an unadjusted analysis, this effect was lost after adjusting for classical cardiovascular predictors. CONCLUSIONS: Despite the provision of full

  10. Microvascular inflammation in atherosclerosis

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    Laura Vitiello

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Atherogenesis is the pathogenetic process leading to formation of the atheroma lesion. It is associated to a chronic inflammatory state initially stimulated by an aberrant accumulation of lipid molecules beyond the endothelial barrier. This event triggers a cascade of deleterious events mainly through immune cell stimulation with the consequent liberation of potent pro-inflammatory and tissue damaging mediators. The atherogenetic process implies marked modifications of endothelial cell functions and a radical change in the endothelial–leukocyte interaction pattern. Moreover, accumulating evidence shows an important link between microvascular and inflammatory responses and major cardiovascular risk factors. This review illustrates the current knowledge on the effects of obesity, hypercholesterolemia and diabetes on microcirculation; their pathophysiological implications will be discussed.

  11. Hepatocellular calcification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ladefoged, Claus; Frifelt, J J

    1987-01-01

    Autopsy of a twenty year old girl dying from complications of renal and cardiac failure demonstrated severe hepatocellular calcification, a rare finding. The pathogenesis is thought to be a combination of dystrophic calcification caused by severe centrilobular necrosis and metastatic calcification...

  12. Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD – a new factor that interplays between inflammation, malnutrition, and atherosclerosis in elderly hemodialysis patients

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    Mikolasevic I

    2014-08-01

    remarkable positive correlation between NAFLD and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP (r=0.659; P<0.0001 and consequent negative correlation with the nutritional parameter, serum albumin (r=-0.321; P=0.004. Interestingly, we showed that in contrast to the general population, where NAFLD is associated with obesity, in the present study, there was no statistically significant association between NAFLD and overnutrition in elderly HD patients. Furthermore, the presence of NAFLD, low serum albumin levels, and high hs-CRP were strong predictors of poor outcome in our elderly HD patients. Conclusion: Our results indicated that NAFLD probably interplays between inflammation, malnutrition, and atherosclerosis in elderly HD patients. NAFLD could be a new factor that contributes to type 2 malnutrition in elderly HD patients, who may be amenable to adequate nutritional and HD support. Keywords: cardiovascular risk, serum albumin, high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP

  13. [Arterial calcification and risk of cardiovascular events in diabetes mellitus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwai, Kunimitu; Morimoto, Shigeto

    2010-11-01

    The cohort studies reported the subclinical vascular calcification including atheroslerosis starts during prediabetic state characterized by impaired fasting glucose. In the cardiovascular systems of diabetes mellitus there is an original mechanism to induce the medial calcification other than intimal calcification observed in the classical atherosclerosis. This is characterized as the ectipic osteogenesis induced by paracrine signals from inflammatory lesions in the adventitia. On the other hand, many internal systems have been discovered to inhibit vascular calcification.

  14. A tale of two plaques: convergent mechanisms of T-cell-mediated inflammation in psoriasis and atherosclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, April W; Voyles, Stephanie V; Armstrong, Ehrin J; Fuller, Erin N; Rutledge, John C

    2011-07-01

    Psoriasis and atherosclerosis are diseases in which effector T lymphocytes such as Helper T cells type 1 (Th1) and 17 (Th17) play integral roles in disease pathogenesis and progression. Regulatory T cells (Treg) also exert clinically important anti-inflammatory effects that are pathologically altered in psoriasis and atherosclerosis. We review the immunological pathways involving Th1, Th17 and Treg cells that are common to psoriasis and atherosclerosis. These shared pathways provide the basis for mechanisms that may explain the epidemiologic observation that patients with psoriasis have an increased risk of heart disease. Improved understanding of these pathways will guide future experiments and may lead to the development of therapeutics that prevent or treat cardiovascular complications in patients with psoriasis.

  15. Quercetin attenuates high fructose feeding-induced atherosclerosis by suppressing inflammation and apoptosis via ROS-regulated PI3K/AKT signaling pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Xue-Li; Zhao, Cui-Hua; Yao, Xin-Liang; Zhang, Han

    2017-01-01

    Quercetin is a dietary flavonoid compound extracted from various plants, such as apple and onions. Previous studies have revealed its anti-inflammatory, anti-cancer, antioxidant and anti-apoptotic activities. This study investigated the ability of quercetin to inhibit high fructose feeding- or LPS-induced atherosclerosis through regulating oxidative stress, apoptosis and inflammation response in vivo and in vitro experiments. 50 and 100mg/kg quercetin were used in our study, showing significant inhibitory role in high fructose-induced atherosclerosis via reducing reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels, Caspase-3 activation, inflammatory cytokines releasing, the number of terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick end-labeling (TUNEL)-positive cells and collagen contents as well as modulating apoptosis- and inflammation-related proteins expression. We also explored the protective effects of quercetin on atherosclerosis by phosphatidylinositide 3-kinases (PI3K)/Protein kinase B (AKT)-associated Bcl-2/Caspase-3 and nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) signal pathways activation, promoting AKT and Bcl-2 expression and reducing Caspase-3 and NF-κB activation. Quercetin reduced the atherosclerotic plaque size in vivo in high fructose feeding-induced mice assessed by oil red O. Also, in vitro experiments, quercetin displayed inhibitory role in LPS-induced ROS production, inflammatory response and apoptosis, which were linked with PI3K/AKT-regulated Caspase-3 and NF-κB activation. In conclusion, our results showed that quercetin inhibited atherosclerotic plaque development in high fructose feeding mice via PI3K/AKT activation regulated by ROS.

  16. Cardiac Calcification

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    Morteza Joorabian

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available There is a spectrum of different types of cardiac"ncalcifications with the importance and significance"nof each type of cardiac calcification, especially"ncoronary artery calcification. Radiologic detection of"ncalcifications within the heart is quite common. The"namount of coronary artery calcification correlates"nwith the severity of coronary artery disease (CAD."nCalcification of the aortic or mitral valve may indicate"nhemodynamically significant valvular stenosis."nMyocardial calcification is a sign of prior infarction,"nwhile pericardial calcification is strongly associated"nwith constrictive pericarditis. A spectrum of different"ntypes of cardiac calcifications (linear, annular,"ncurvilinear,... could be seen in chest radiography and"nother imaging modalities. So a carful inspection for"ndetection and reorganization of these calcifications"nshould be necessary. Numerous modalities exist for"nidentifying coronary calcification, including plain"nradiography, fluoroscopy, intravascular ultrasound,"nMRI, echocardiography, and conventional, helical and"nelectron-beam CT (EBCT. Coronary calcifications"ndetected on EBCT or helical CT can be quantifie,"nand a total calcification score (Cardiac Calcification"nScoring may be calculated. In an asymptomatic"npopulation and/or patients with concomitant risk"nfactors like diabetes mellitus, determination of the"npresence of coronary calcifications identifies the"npatients at risk for future myocardial infarction and"ncoronary artery disease. In patients without coronary"ncalcifications, future cardiovascular events could"nbe excluded. Therefore, detecting and recognizing"ncalcification related to the heart on chest radiography"nand other imaging modalities such as fluoroscopy, CT"nand echocardiography may have important clinical"nimplications.

  17. Molecular imaging of inflammation in the ApoE -/- mouse model of atherosclerosis with IodoDPA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Foss, Catherine A., E-mail: cfoss1@jhmi.edu [Russell H. Morgan Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD 21287 (United States); Bedja, Djahida [Department of Medicine, Division of Cardiology, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD 21287 (United States); Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, Macquarie University, Sydney (Australia); Mease, Ronnie C.; Wang, Haofan [Russell H. Morgan Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD 21287 (United States); Kass, David A. [Department of Medicine, Division of Cardiology, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD 21287 (United States); Chatterjee, Subroto [Department of Pediatrics, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD 21287 (United States); Pomper, Martin G. [Russell H. Morgan Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD 21287 (United States)

    2015-05-22

    Background: Atherosclerosis is a common and serious vascular disease predisposing individuals to myocardial infarction and stroke. Intravascular plaques, the pathologic lesions of atherosclerosis, are largely composed of cholesterol-laden luminal macrophage-rich infiltrates within a fibrous cap. The ability to detect those macrophages non-invasively within the aorta, carotid artery and other vessels would allow physicians to determine plaque burden, aiding management of patients with atherosclerosis. Methods and results: We previously developed a low-molecular-weight imaging agent, [{sup 125}I]iodo-DPA-713 (iodoDPA), which selectively targets macrophages. Here we use it to detect both intravascular macrophages and macrophage infiltrates within the myocardium in the ApoE -/- mouse model of atherosclerosis using single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). SPECT data were confirmed by echocardiography, near-infrared fluorescence imaging and histology. SPECT images showed focal uptake of radiotracer at the aortic root in all ApoE -/- mice, while the age-matched controls were nearly devoid of radiotracer uptake. Focal radiotracer uptake along the descending aorta and within the myocardium was also observed in affected animals. Conclusions: IodoDPA is a promising new imaging agent for atherosclerosis, with specificity for the macrophage component of the lesions involved. - Highlights: • [{sup 125}I]iodoDPA SPECT detects atherosclerotic plaques in ApoE -/- mice with high contrast. • Plaques are detected in ApoE -/- mice regardless of diet with iodoDPA. • iodoDPA has very low uptake in healthy tissue including healthy TSPO + tissues at 24 h.

  18. Vascular calcification: Inducers and inhibitors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Donghyun, E-mail: dhlee@cau.ac.kr [Department of Biomedical Engineering, Division of Integrative Engineering, Chung-Ang University, 221 Heukseok-Dong, Dongjak-Gu, Seoul 156-756 (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-09-15

    Highlights: {center_dot} Types of vascular calcification processes. {center_dot} Inducers of vascular calcification. {center_dot} Inhibitors of vascular calcifications. {center_dot} Clinical utility for vascular calcification therapy. {center_dot} Implications for the development of new tissue engineering strategies. - Abstract: Unlike the traditional beliefs, there are mounting evidences suggesting that ectopic mineral depositions, including vascular calcification are mostly active processes, many times resembling that of the bone mineralization. Numbers of agents are involved in the differentiation of certain subpopulation of smooth muscle cells (SMCs) into the osteoblast-like entity, and the activation and initiation of extracellular matrix ossification process. On the other hand, there are factors as well, that prevent such differentiation and ectopic calcium phosphate formation. In normal physiological environments, activities of such procalcific and anticalcific regulatory factors are in harmony, prohibiting abnormal calcification from occurring. However, in certain pathophysiological conditions, such as atherosclerosis, chronic kidney disease (CKD), and diabetes, such balances are altered, resulting in abnormal ectopic mineral deposition. Understanding the factors that regulate the formation and inhibition of ectopic mineral formation would be beneficial in the development of tissue engineering strategies for prevention and/or treatment of such soft-tissue calcification. Current review focuses on the factors that seem to be clinically relevant and/or could be useful in developing future tissue regeneration strategies. Clinical utilities and implications of such factors are also discussed.

  19. [Calcified aortic valve disease: association with atherosclerosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toro, Rocío; Mangas, Alipio; Gómez, Francisco

    2011-05-14

    Calcified aortic valve disease (CAVD) is a prevalent condition, affecting 25% of people older than 65 years. CAVD and atherosclerosis share common risk factors and pathogenic mechanisms. Nevertheless, they present different pathologic lesions. The main factors involved in the pathogenesis of CAVD are genetic predisposition, the process of valvular calcification, deposition of lipoproteins, and chronic inflammation. Studies have suggested a potential benefit from early treatment with angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors or angiotensin-II receptor blockers, and particularly with statins. Observational studies on risk factors for the CAVD, and randomized clinical trials on primary and secondary prevention in subjects with high risk for the disease, would be necessary to improve the clinical management of CAVD. Copyright © 2009 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  20. FGF23 and inflammation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharaf El Din, Usama A A; Salem, Mona M; Abdulazim, Dina O

    2017-01-01

    Systemic inflammation is a recognized feature in chronic kidney disease (CKD). The role of systemic inflammation in the pathogenesis of vascular calcification was recently settled. FGF23 was recently accused as a direct stimulus of systemic inflammation. This finding explains the strong association of FGF23 to vascular calcification and increased mortality among CKD. PMID:28101453

  1. 5-Lipoxygenase-activating protein: a potential link between innate and adaptive immunity in atherosclerosis and adipose tissue inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bäck, Magnus; Sultan, Ariane; Ovchinnikova, Olga; Hansson, Göran K

    2007-04-13

    Transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta) is a major antiinflammatory mediator in atherosclerosis. Transgenic ApoE(-/-) mice with a dominant-negative TGFbeta type II receptor (dnTGFbetaRII) on CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells display aggravated atherosclerosis. The aim of the present study was to elucidate the mechanisms involved in this enhanced inflammatory response. Gene array analyses identified the 5-lipoxygenase-activating protein (FLAP) among the most upregulated genes in both the aorta and adipose tissue of dnTGFbetaRII transgenic ApoE(-/-) mice compared with their ApoE(-/-) littermates, a finding that was confirmed by real-time quantitative RT-PCR. Aortas from the former mice in addition produced increased amounts of the lipoxygenase product leukotriene B(4) after ex vivo stimulation. FLAP protein expression in both the aorta and adipose tissue was detected in macrophages, but not in T cells. Four weeks of treatment with the FLAP inhibitor MK-886 (10 mg/kg in 1% tylose delivered by osmotic pumps) significantly reduced atherosclerotic lesion size and T-cell content. Finally, FLAP mRNA levels were upregulated approximately 8-fold in adipose tissue derived from obese ob/ob mice. In conclusion, the results of the present study suggest a key role for mediators of the 5-lipoxygenase pathway in inflammatory reactions of atherosclerosis and metabolic disease.

  2. Relationship of Insulin Resistance to Prevalence and Progression of Coronary Artery Calcification Beyond Metabolic Syndrome Components: Shiga Epidemiological Study of Subclinical Atherosclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamazoe, Masahiro; Hisamatsu, Takashi; Miura, Katsuyuki; Kadowaki, Sayaka; Zaid, Maryam; Kadota, Aya; Torii, Sayuki; Miyazawa, Itsuko; Fujiyoshi, Akira; Arima, Hisatomi; Sekikawa, Akira; Maegawa, Hiroshi; Horie, Minoru; Ueshima, Hirotsugu

    2016-08-01

    The association between insulin resistance (IR) and coronary artery calcification (CAC) has been uncertain after adjustment for metabolic syndrome components. We aimed to evaluate whether IR is associated with CAC prevalence or progression independently of metabolic syndrome components. We conducted a population-based study in a random sample of Japanese men aged 40 to 79 years and determined IR using the homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR). The associations of HOMA-IR and other diabetic parameters per 1-SD increase with CAC prevalence and progression were evaluated using multivariable logistic regression. Of 1006 total participants at baseline (mean age, 64±10 years), CAC prevalence was observed in 646 (64.2%), and of 789 participants at follow-up (mean duration, 4.9±1.3 years), CAC progression was observed in 365 (46.3%). After adjustment for covariates including metabolic syndrome components, higher HOMA-IR was independently associated with CAC prevalence (adjusted odds ratio 1.34, 95% confidence interval 1.10-1.63; P=0.003) and progression (odds ratio 1.32, 95% confidence interval 1.09-1.60; P=0.004). In participants without diabetes mellitus, positive associations were similarly observed (prevalence: odds ratio 1.29, 95% confidence interval 1.04-1.60; P=0.022; and progression: odds ratio 1.25, 95% confidence interval 1.01-1.55; P=0.042), whereas glucose and hemoglobin A1c were not associated with CAC prevalence and progression. Higher IR was associated with CAC prevalence and progression independently of metabolic syndrome components in Japanese men and also in those without diabetes mellitus. Among diabetic measures, IR and fasting insulin, but not glucose and hemoglobin A1c, predicted CAC progression in men without diabetes mellitus. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  3. Role of Uric Acid Metabolism-Related Inflammation in the Pathogenesis of Metabolic Syndrome Components Such as Atherosclerosis and Nonalcoholic Steatohepatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakatsu, Yusuke; Matsunaga, Yasuka; Yamamotoya, Takeshi; Mori, Keiichi; Ueda, Koji; Inoue, Yuki; Sakoda, Hideyuki; Fujishiro, Midori; Ono, Hiraku; Asano, Tomoichiro

    2016-01-01

    Uric acid (UA) is the end product of purine metabolism and can reportedly act as an antioxidant. However, recently, numerous clinical and basic research approaches have revealed close associations of hyperuricemia with several disorders, particularly those comprising the metabolic syndrome. In this review, we first outline the two molecular mechanisms underlying inflammation occurrence in relation to UA metabolism; one is inflammasome activation by UA crystallization and the other involves superoxide free radicals generated by xanthine oxidase (XO). Importantly, recent studies have demonstrated the therapeutic or preventive effects of XO inhibitors against atherosclerosis and nonalcoholic steatohepatitis, which were not previously considered to be related, at least not directly, to hyperuricemia. Such beneficial effects of XO inhibitors have been reported for other organs including the kidneys and the heart. Thus, a major portion of this review focuses on the relationships between UA metabolism and the development of atherosclerosis, nonalcoholic steatohepatitis, and related disorders. Although further studies are necessary, XO inhibitors are a potentially novel strategy for reducing the risk of many forms of organ failure characteristic of the metabolic syndrome. PMID:28070145

  4. Role of Uric Acid Metabolism-Related Inflammation in the Pathogenesis of Metabolic Syndrome Components Such as Atherosclerosis and Nonalcoholic Steatohepatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akifumi Kushiyama

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Uric acid (UA is the end product of purine metabolism and can reportedly act as an antioxidant. However, recently, numerous clinical and basic research approaches have revealed close associations of hyperuricemia with several disorders, particularly those comprising the metabolic syndrome. In this review, we first outline the two molecular mechanisms underlying inflammation occurrence in relation to UA metabolism; one is inflammasome activation by UA crystallization and the other involves superoxide free radicals generated by xanthine oxidase (XO. Importantly, recent studies have demonstrated the therapeutic or preventive effects of XO inhibitors against atherosclerosis and nonalcoholic steatohepatitis, which were not previously considered to be related, at least not directly, to hyperuricemia. Such beneficial effects of XO inhibitors have been reported for other organs including the kidneys and the heart. Thus, a major portion of this review focuses on the relationships between UA metabolism and the development of atherosclerosis, nonalcoholic steatohepatitis, and related disorders. Although further studies are necessary, XO inhibitors are a potentially novel strategy for reducing the risk of many forms of organ failure characteristic of the metabolic syndrome.

  5. Relationship of the total atrial conduction time to subclinical atherosclerosis, inflammation and echocardiographic parameters in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eftal Murat Bakirci

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: The aim of our study was to evaluate the total atrial conduction time and its relationship to subclinical atherosclerosis, inflammation and echocardiographic parameters in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. METHODS: A total of 132 patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (mean age 54.5±9.6 years; 57.6% male and 80 age- and gender-matched controls were evaluated. The total atrial conduction time was measured by tissue-Doppler imaging and the carotid intima-media thickness was measured by B-mode ultrasonography. RESULTS: The total atrial conduction time was significantly longer in the patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus than in the control group (131.7±23.6 vs. 113.1±21.3, p<0.001. The patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus had significantly increased carotid intima-media thicknesses, neutrophil to lymphocyte ratios and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein levels than those of the controls. The total atrial conduction time was positively correlated with the high-sensitivity C-reactive protein level, neutrophil to lymphocyte ratio, carotid intima-media thickness and left atrial volume index and negatively correlated with the early diastolic velocity (Em, Em/late diastolic velocity (Am ratio and global peak left atrial longitudinal strain. A multiple logistic regression analysis demonstrated that the neutrophil to lymphocyte ratio, carotid intima-media thickness and global peak left atrial longitudinal strain were independent predictors of the total atrial conduction time. CONCLUSIONS: We suggest that subclinical atherosclerosis and inflammation may represent a mechanism related to prolonged total atrial conduction time and that prolonged total atrial conduction time and impaired left atrial myocardial deformation may be represent early subclinical cardiac involvement in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus.

  6. Porphyromonas gingivalis-derived outer membrane vesicles promote calcification of vascular smooth muscle cells through ERK1/2-RUNX2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Wen Wei; Guo, Bin; Jia, Wen Yuan; Jia, Yue

    2016-12-01

    The outer membrane vesicle (OMV) derived from Porphyromonas gingivalis plays an essential role in causing inflammation which, in turn, plays an important part in the pathogenesis of cardiovascular diseases such as atherosclerosis and thromboembolism. However, the contribution of oral bacteria to vascular calcification is yet to be determined. Here, we evaluated the effect of OMV on vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) calcification both in vitro and ex vivo. We established a reproducible P. gingivalis OMV-induced differentiation and calcification model of VSMCs in vitro. The results indicate that OMV promotes VSMC calcification in a concentration-dependent manner, modulating the expression of bone markers and SMC markers both on genes and proteins that are important for osteoblastic differentiation and mineralization of VSMCs. We also showed that the key osteogenic transcription factor, runt-related transcription factor 2 (Runx2), which is affected by upstream extracellular-regulated kinase (ERK) signaling, is a key regulator of OMV-induced VSMC differentiation and calcification. Taken together, our research demonstrates that Runx2 is a crucial component of OMV-induced calcification of VSMCs, and ERK signaling plays a vital role in mediating Runx2 up-regulation and VSMC calcification.

  7. An essential role for diet in exercise-mediated protection against dyslipidemia, inflammation and atherosclerosis in ApoE⁻/⁻ mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liliana Cesar

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Diet and exercise promote cardiovascular health but their relative contributions to atherosclerosis are not fully known. The transition from a sedentary to active lifestyle requires increased caloric intake to achieve energy balance. Using atherosclerosis-prone ApoE-null mice we sought to determine whether the benefits of exercise for arterial disease are dependent on the food source of the additional calories. METHODS AND RESULTS: Mice were fed a high-fat diet (HF for 4.5 months to initiate atherosclerosis after which time half were continued on HF while the other half were switched to a high protein/fish oil diet (HP. Half of each group underwent voluntary running. Food intake, running distance, body weight, lipids, inflammation markers, and atherosclerotic plaque were quantified. Two-way ANOVA tests were used to assess differences and interactions between groups. Exercised mice ran approximately 6-km per day with no difference between groups. Both groups increased food intake during exercise and there was a significant main effect of exercise F((1,44 = 9.86, p<0.01 without interaction. Diet or exercise produced significant independent effects on body weight (diet: F(1,52 = 6.85, p = 0.012; exercise: F(1,52 = 9.52, p<0.01 with no significant interaction. The combination of HP diet and exercise produced a greater decrease in total cholesterol (F(1, 46 = 7.9, p<0.01 and LDL (F(1, 46 = 7.33, p<0.01 with a large effect on the size of the interaction. HP diet and exercise independently reduced TGL and VLDL (p<0.05 and 0.001 respectively. Interleukin 6 and C-reactive protein were highest in the HF-sedentary group and were significantly reduced by exercise only in this group. Plaque accumulation in the aortic arch, a marker of cardiovascular events was reduced by the HP diet and the effect was significantly potentiated by exercise only in this group resulting in significant plaque regression (F1, 49 = 4.77, p<0

  8. AGE and their receptor RAGE in systemic autoimmune diseases : An inflammation propagating factor contributing to accelerated atherosclerosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nienhuis, Hans L. A.; Westra, Johanna; Smit, Andries J.; Limburg, Pieter C.; Kallenberg, Cees G. M.; Bijl, Marc

    2009-01-01

    Systemic autoimmune diseases are associated with inflammation, and oxidative stress favouring the formation of advanced glycation endproducts (AGE), able to modulate cellular functions by activation of receptor for advanced glycation endproducts (RAGE). As RAGE expression is increased in an

  9. AGE and their receptor RAGE in systemic autoimmune diseases : An inflammation propagating factor contributing to accelerated atherosclerosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nienhuis, Hans L. A.; Westra, Johanna; Smit, Andries J.; Limburg, Pieter C.; Kallenberg, Cees G. M.; Bijl, Marc

    2009-01-01

    Systemic autoimmune diseases are associated with inflammation, and oxidative stress favouring the formation of advanced glycation endproducts (AGE), able to modulate cellular functions by activation of receptor for advanced glycation endproducts (RAGE). As RAGE expression is increased in an inflamma

  10. p-Cresol affects reactive oxygen species generation, cell cycle arrest, cytotoxicity and inflammation/atherosclerosis-related modulators production in endothelial cells and mononuclear cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mei-Chi Chang

    Full Text Available AIMS: Cresols are present in antiseptics, coal tar, some resins, pesticides, and industrial solvents. Cresol intoxication leads to hepatic injury due to coagulopathy as well as disturbance of hepatic circulation in fatal cases. Patients with uremia suffer from cardiovascular complications, such as atherosclerosis, thrombosis, hemolysis, and bleeding, which may be partly due to p-cresol toxicity and its effects on vascular endothelial and mononuclear cells. Given the role of reactive oxygen species (ROS and inflammation in vascular thrombosis, the objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of p-cresol on endothelial and mononuclear cells. METHODS: EA.hy926 (EAHY endothelial cells and U937 cells were exposed to different concentrations of p-cresol. Cytotoxicity was evaluated by 3-(4,5-Dimethylthiazol-2-yl-2,5 -diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT assay and trypan blue dye exclusion technique, respectively. Cell cycle distribution was analyzed by propidium iodide flow cytometry. Endothelial cell migration was studied by wound closure assay. ROS level was measured by 2',7'-dichlorofluorescein diacetate (DCF fluorescence flow cytometry. Prostaglandin F2α (PGF2α, plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1, soluble urokinase plasminogen activator receptor (suPAR, and uPA production were determined by Enzyme-linked immunosorbant assay (ELISA. RESULTS: Exposure to 100-500 µM p-cresol decreased EAHY cell number by 30-61%. P-cresol also decreased the viability of U937 mononuclear cells. The inhibition of EAHY and U937 cell growth by p-cresol was related to induction of S-phase cell cycle arrest. Closure of endothelial wounds was inhibited by p-cresol (>100 µM. P-cresol (>50 µM also stimulated ROS production in U937 cells and EAHY cells but to a lesser extent. Moreover, p-cresol markedly stimulated PAI-1 and suPAR, but not PGF2α, and uPA production in EAHY cells. CONCLUSIONS: p-Cresol may contribute to atherosclerosis and thrombosis in patients with

  11. ROLE OF INFLAMMATION MARKERS IN DEVELOPMENT OF ATHEROSCLEROSIS AND ITS COMPICATIONS IN PATIENTS WITH SYSTEMIC LUPUS ERYTHEMATOSUS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatiyana Valentinovna Popkova

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Cardiovascular events caused by early development and rapid progression of atherosclerotic vascular disease are the main reason behind early lethality among patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE. The rapid development of atherosclerosis in patients with this disease is related to the inflammatory nature of SLE and associated with different inflammatory mediators.Objective. To specify the role of markers and inflammatory mediators (soluble CD40L (sCD40L, soluble tumor necrosis factor α receptors (sTNFα, and neopterin in the development of atherosclerosis in SLE patients. Materials and Methods. 227 patients (156 females and 71 males with SLE were examined; median age was 35.6±0.7 years; mean duration of disease was 132.9±7.7 months. The presence of the conventional risk factors (RF of cardiovascular diseases was determined in SLE patients and control group individuals. Thickening of the intima-media complex and presence of atherosclerotic plaques are signs of atherosclerotic lesion of vessels. The control group consisted of 116 individuals having no rheumatic diseases. Serum concentrations of sCD40L, sTNFα, and neopterin were determined in 187, 193, and 155 SLE patients, respectively, and in 20 control group individuals.Results. sCD40L, sTNFα, and neopterin levels in SLE patients were higher than those in the control group (p<0.05. sCD40L concentration was associated with age, presence of conventional RFs, cholesterol (CS level, low-density lipoprotein CS, SLE-related factors (SLEDAI-2K score, duration of disease, subclinical manifestations of atherosclerosis, and presence of ischemic heart disease (p>0.05 in all cases. A relationship was found between sTNFα concentration and arterial hypertension, systolic and diastolic arterial blood pressure levels, concentrations of triglycerides (TG, high-density lipoprotein CS (HDL CS, apolipoprotein A1, factors associated with SLE (duration of disease, chronic kidney disease

  12. Does treatment with statins have the potential of enhancing Vascular calcification?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Ming; LI Xu-ping; QIAO Yan; NIE Shao-ping; MA Chang-sheng

    2008-01-01

    @@ Vascular calcification is commonly found in atherosclerosis and recognized as a marker of atherosclerotic plaque burden.Many evdiences have demonstrated that vascular calcification is an active process and can be seen in all stages of development and intimately associated with atherosclerosis.

  13. Arterial calcification: friend or foe?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicoll, Rachel; Henein, Michael Y

    2013-07-31

    There is a significant relationship between the presence, extent and progression of coronary artery calcification (CAC) and cardiovascular (CV) events and mortality in both CV and renal patients and CAC scoring can provide improved predictive ability over risk factor scoring alone. There is also a close relationship between CAC presence and atherosclerotic plaque burden, with angiography studies showing very high sensitivity but poor specificity of CAC score for predicting obstructive disease. Nevertheless, there are objections to CAC screening because of uncertainties and lack of studies showing improved outcome. Furthermore, histopathology studies indicate that heavily calcified plaque is unlikely to result in a CV event, while the vulnerable plaque tends to be uncalcified or 'mixed', suggesting that calcification may be protective. This scenario highlights a number of paradoxes, which may indicate that the association between CAC and CV events is spurious, following from the adoption of CAC as a surrogate for high plaque burden, which itself is a surrogate for the presence of vulnerable plaque. Since studies indicate that arterial calcification is a complex, organised and regulated process similar to bone formation, there is no particular reason why it should be a reliable indicator of either the plaque burden or the risk of a future CV event. We suggest that it is time to divorce arterial calcification from atherosclerosis and to view it as a distinct pathology in its own right, albeit one which frequently coexists with atherosclerosis and is related to it for reasons which are not yet fully understood.

  14. Dietary interesterified fat enriched with palmitic acid induces atherosclerosis by impairing macrophage cholesterol efflux and eliciting inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afonso, Milessa Silva; Lavrador, Maria Silvia Ferrari; Koike, Marcia Kiyomi; Cintra, Dennys Esper; Ferreira, Fabiana Dias; Nunes, Valeria Sutti; Castilho, Gabriela; Gioielli, Luiz Antonio; Paula Bombo, Renata; Catanozi, Sergio; Caldini, Elia Garcia; Damaceno-Rodrigues, Nilsa Regina; Passarelli, Marisa; Nakandakare, Edna Regina; Lottenberg, Ana Maria

    2016-06-01

    Interesterified fats are currently being used to replace trans fatty acids. However, their impact on biological pathways involved in the atherosclerosis development was not investigated. Weaning male LDLr-KO mice were fed for 16weeks on a high-fat diet (40% energy as fat) containing polyunsaturated (PUFA), TRANS, palmitic (PALM), palmitic interesterified (PALM INTER), stearic (STEAR) or stearic interesterified (STEAR INTER). Plasma lipids, lipoprotein profile, arterial lesion area, macrophage infiltration, collagen content and inflammatory response modulation were determined. Macrophage cholesterol efflux and the arterial expression of cholesterol uptake and efflux receptors were also performed. The interesterification process did not alter plasma lipid concentrations. Although PALM INTER did not increase plasma cholesterol concentration as much as TRANS, the cholesterol enrichment in the LDL particle was similar in both groups. Moreover, PALM INTER induced the highest IL-1β, MCP-1 and IL-6 secretion from peritoneal macrophages as compared to others. This inflammatory response elicited by PALM INTER was confirmed in arterial wall, as compared to PALM. These deleterious effects of PALM INTER culminate in higher atherosclerotic lesion, macrophage infiltration and collagen content than PALM, STEAR, STEAR INTER and PUFA. These events can partially be attributed to a macrophage cholesterol accumulation, promoted by apoAI and HDL2-mediated cholesterol efflux impairment and increased Olr-1 and decreased Abca1 and Nr1h3 expressions in the arterial wall. Interesterified fats containing palmitic acid induce atherosclerosis development by promoting cholesterol accumulation in LDL particles and macrophagic cells, activating the inflammatory process in LDLr-KO mice.

  15. Calcification of thoracic aorta – solar eclipse sign

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhoble, Abhijeet; Puttarajappa, Chethan

    2008-01-01

    Background Calcification of thoracic aorta is very common in old people, especially ones with hypertension. This can sometime be visible on plain chest radiograph. Case Presentation We present a case of a male patient who had extensive deposition of calcium in the thoracic aorta. Conclusion The relationship between aortic calcification and coronary atherosclerosis remains contentious. Computed tomography of the thorax can display this calcification which appears like 'solar eclipse'. PMID:18759981

  16. Mechanisms of vascular calcification and associated diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marulanda, Juliana; Alqarni, Saleh; Murshed, Monzur

    2014-01-01

    Mineralization of bone and tooth extracellular matrix (ECM) is a physiologic process, while soft tissue mineralization, also known as ectopic mineralization (calcification), is a pathologic condition. Vascular calcification is common in aging and also in a number of genetic and metabolic disorders. The calcific deposits in arteries complicate the prognosis and increase the morbidity in diseases such as atherosclerosis, diabetes and chronic kidney disease (CKD). To completely understand the pathophysiology of these lifethreatening diseases, it is critical to elucidate the molecular mechanisms underlying vascular calcification. Unveiling these mechanisms will eventually identify new therapeutic targets and also improve the management of the associated complications. In the current review, we discussed the common determinants of ECM mineralization, the mechanism of vascular calcification associated with several human diseases and outlined the most common therapeutic approaches to prevent its progression.

  17. Self-reported experiences of discrimination and inflammation among men and women: The Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kershaw, Kiarri; Lewis, Tené T.; Diez Roux, Ana V.; Jenny, Nancy S.; Liu, Kiang; Penedo, Frank J.; Carnethon, Mercedes

    2016-01-01

    Objective To examine associations of lifetime and everyday discrimination with inflammation independent of sociodemographic characteristics. Method Cross-sectional associations of self-reported experiences of everyday discrimination and lifetime discrimination with interleukin-6 (IL-6) and C-reactive protein (CRP) were examined by gender in a multi-ethnic sample of 3099 men and 3468 women aged 45–84 years. Everyday discrimination, lifetime discrimination due to any attribution, and lifetime discrimination attributed to race/ethnicity were based on self-report, and IL-6 and CRP were assayed from blood samples. Results Among women, higher levels of all 3 discrimination measures were significantly associated with higher IL-6 in models adjusted for sociodemographic characteristics, recent infection, anti-inflammatory medication use, and hormone replacement therapy use. All associations were attenuated with adjustment for BMI. For men, everyday discrimination was inversely associated with IL-6 in all adjusted models. Lifetime discrimination was not related to IL-6 among men. Discrimination was unassociated with CRP in all models for both men and women. Conclusions The association between discrimination and inflammation varied by gender and marker of inflammation. These findings highlight the complex relationship between discrimination and CVD risk and point to areas in need of further research. PMID:27018725

  18. Inflammation in coronary artery diseases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Jian-jun

    2011-01-01

    The concept that atherosclerosis is an inflammation has been increasingly recognized,and subsequently resulted in great interest in revealing the inflammatory nature of the atherosclerotic process.More recently,a large body of evidence has supported the idea that inflammatory mechanisms play a pivotal role throughout all phases of atherogenesis,from endothelial dysfunction and the formation of fatty streaks to plaque destabilization and the acute coronary events due to vulnerable plaque rupture.Indeed,although triggers and pathways of inflammation are probably multiple and vary in different clinical entities of atherosclerotic disorders,an imbalance between anti-inflammatory mechanisms and pro-inflammatory factors will result in an atherosclerotic progression.Vascular endothelial dysfunction and lipoprotein retention into the arterial intima have been reported as the earliest events in atherogenesis with which inflammation is linked.Inflammatory has also been extended to the disorders of coronary microvasculature,and associated with special subsets of coronary artery disease such as silent myocardial ischemia,myocardial ischemia-reperfusion,cardiac syndrome X,variant angina,coronary artery ectasia,coronary calcification and in-stent restenosis.Inflammatory biomarkers,originally studied to better understand the pathophysiology of atherosclerosis,have generated increasing interest among researches and clinicians.The identification of inflammatory biomarkers and cellular/molecular pathways in atherosclerotic disease represent important goals in cardiovascular disease research,in particular with respect of the development of therapeutic strategies to prevent or reverse atherosclerotic diseases.

  19. Inflammation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holst-Hansen, Thomas

    Inflammation is an intricate response relying on the activation and response of both the innate immune system and the infected tissue to remove a threat. The pro-inflammatory NF-kappaB pathway has been studied extensively, among others because of its key role in regulation of inflammation. However...

  20. Inflammation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holst-Hansen, Thomas

    Inflammation is an intricate response relying on the activation and response of both the innate immune system and the infected tissue to remove a threat. The pro-inflammatory NF-kappaB pathway has been studied extensively, among others because of its key role in regulation of inflammation. However...

  1. Infection and Atherosclerosis Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Lee Ann; Rosenfeld, Michael E.

    2015-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is a chronic disease hallmarked by chronic inflammation, endothelial dysfunction and lipid accumulation in the vasculature. Although lipid modification and deposition are thought to be a major source of the continuous inflammatory stimulus, a large body of evidence suggests that infectious agents may contribute to atherosclerotic processes. This could occur by either direct effects through infection of vascular cells and/or through indirect effects by induction of cytokine and acute phase reactant proteins by infection at other sites. Multiple bacterial and viral pathogens have been associated with atherosclerosis by seroepidemiological studies, identification of the infectious agent in human atherosclerotic tissue, and experimental studies demonstrating an acceleration of atherosclerosis following infection in animal models of atherosclerosis. This review will focus on those infectious agents for which biological plausibility has been demonstrated in animal models and on the challenges of proving a role of infection in human atherosclerotic disease. PMID:26004263

  2. Prevention of Diet-Induced Metabolic Dysregulation, Inflammation, and Atherosclerosis in Ldlr(-/-) Mice by Treatment With the ATP-Citrate Lyase Inhibitor Bempedoic Acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samsoondar, Joshua P; Burke, Amy C; Sutherland, Brian G; Telford, Dawn E; Sawyez, Cynthia G; Edwards, Jane Y; Pinkosky, Stephen L; Newton, Roger S; Huff, Murray W

    2017-04-01

    Bempedoic acid (ETC-1002, 8-hydroxy-2,2,14,14-tetramethylpentadecanedioic acid) is a novel low-density lipoprotein cholesterol-lowering compound. In animals, bempedoic acid targets the liver where it inhibits cholesterol and fatty acid synthesis through inhibition of ATP-citrate lyase and through activation of AMP-activated protein kinase. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that bempedoic acid would prevent diet-induced metabolic dysregulation, inflammation, and atherosclerosis. APPROACH AND RESULTS: Ldlr(-/-) mice were fed a high-fat, high-cholesterol diet (42% kcal fat, 0.2% cholesterol) supplemented with bempedoic acid at 0, 3, 10 and 30 mg/kg body weight/day. Treatment for 12 weeks dose-dependently attenuated diet-induced hypercholesterolemia, hypertriglyceridemia, hyperglycemia, hyperinsulinemia, fatty liver and obesity. Compared to high-fat, high-cholesterol alone, the addition of bempedoic acid decreased plasma triglyceride (up to 64%) and cholesterol (up to 50%) concentrations, and improved glucose tolerance. Adiposity was significantly reduced with treatment. In liver, bempedoic acid prevented cholesterol and triglyceride accumulation, which was associated with increased fatty acid oxidation and reduced fatty acid synthesis. Hepatic gene expression analysis revealed that treatment significantly increased expression of genes involved in fatty acid oxidation while suppressing inflammatory gene expression. In full-length aorta, bempedoic acid markedly suppressed cholesteryl ester accumulation, attenuated the expression of proinflammatory M1 genes and attenuated the iNos/Arg1 ratio. Treatment robustly attenuated atherosclerotic lesion development in the aortic sinus by 44%, with beneficial changes in morphology, characteristic of earlier-stage lesions. Bempedoic acid effectively prevents plasma and tissue lipid elevations and attenuates the onset of inflammation, leading to the prevention of atherosclerotic lesion development in a mouse model of metabolic

  3. Emphysema is associated with increased inflammation in lungs of atherosclerosis-prone mice by cigarette smoke: implications in comorbidities of COPD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yao Hongwei

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease is associated with numerous vascular effects including endothelial dysfunction, arterial stiffness and atherogenesis. It is also known that a decline in lung function is associated with increased cardiovascular comorbidity in smokers. The mechanism of this cardiopulmonary dual risk by cigarette smoke (CS is not known. We studied the molecular mechanisms involved in development of emphysema in atherosclerosis-prone apolipoprotein E-deficient (ApoE-/- mice in response to CS exposure. Methods Adult male and female wild-type (WT mice of genetic background C57BL/6J and ApoE-/- mice were exposed to CS, and lung inflammatory responses, oxidative stress (lipid peroxidation products, mechanical properties as well as airspace enlargement were assessed. Results and Discussion The lungs of ApoE-/- mice showed augmented inflammatory response and increased oxidative stress with development of distal airspace enlargement which was accompanied with decline in lung function. Interestingly, the levels and activities of matrix metalloproteinases (MMP-9 and MMP-12 were increased, whereas the level of eNOS was decreased in lungs of CS-exposed ApoE-/- mice as compared to air-exposed ApoE-/- mice or CS-exposed WT mice. Conclusion These findings suggest that CS causes premature emphysema and a decline of lung function in mice susceptible to cardiovascular abnormalities via abnormal lung inflammation, increased oxidative stress and alterations in levels of MMPs and eNOS.

  4. α5β1 integrin signaling mediates oxidized low-density lipoprotein-induced inflammation and early atherosclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yurdagul, Arif; Green, Jonette; Albert, Patrick; McInnis, Marshall C; Mazar, Andrew P; Orr, A Wayne

    2014-07-01

    Endothelial cell activation drives early atherosclerotic plaque formation. Both fibronectin deposition and accumulation of oxidized low-density lipoprotein (oxLDL) occur early during atherogenesis, and both are implicated in enhanced endothelial cell activation. However, interplay between these responses has not been established. The objective of our study was to determine whether endothelial matrix composition modulates the inflammatory properties of oxLDL. We now show that oxLDL-induced nuclear factor-κB activation, proinflammatory gene expression, and monocyte binding are significantly enhanced when endothelial cells are attached to fibronectin compared with basement membrane proteins. This enhanced response does not result from altered oxLDL receptor expression, oxLDL uptake, or reactive oxygen species production, but results from oxLDL-induced activation of the fibronectin-binding integrin α5β1. Preventing α5β1 signaling (blocking antibodies, knockout cells) inhibits oxLDL-induced nuclear factor-κB activation and vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 expression. Furthermore, oxLDL drives α5β1-dependent integrin signaling through the focal adhesion kinase pathway, and focal adhesion kinase inhibition (PF-573228, small interfering RNA) blunts oxLDL-induced nuclear factor-κB activation, vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 expression, and monocyte adhesion. Last, treatment with the α5β1 signaling inhibitor, ATN-161, significantly blunts atherosclerotic plaque development in apolipoprotein E-deficient mice, characterized by reduced vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 expression and macrophage accumulation without affecting fibrous cap size. Our data suggest that α5β1-mediated cross-talk between fibronectin and oxLDL regulates inflammation in early atherogenesis and that therapeutics that inhibit α5 integrins may reduce inflammation without adversely affecting plaque structure. © 2014 American Heart Association, Inc.

  5. [Eight cases of calcific retropharyngeal tendinitis/retropharyngeal calcific tendinitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohtsuka, Yuichiro; Chazono, Hideaki; Suzuki, Homare; Ohkuma, Yusuke; Sakurai, Toshioki; Hanazawa, Toyoyuki; Okamoto, Yoshitaka

    2013-11-01

    Calcific retropharyngeal tendinitis/retropharyngeal calcific tendinitis is an inflammation of the longus colli muscle caused by calcium hydroxyapatite crystal depositon in the longus colli muscle tendon. The three major symptoms are neck pain, limitations of neck movement, and swallowing pain. We treated 8 cases of calcific retropharyngeal tendinitis/ retropharyngeal calcific tendinitis. Each patient complained of neck pain, limitations of neck movement, and swallowing pain. The only local finding was the smooth swelling of the posterior pharyngeal wall. CT imaging showed calcification of the tendon of the longus colli muscle and a low density area in the retropharyngeal space without ring enhancement, suggesting a retropharyngeal abscess. MR imaging showed the smooth swelling of the retropharyngeal space and an increased signal intensity on T2-weighted MR imaging. Calcific retropharyngeal tendinitis heals spontaneously, and treatment is not usually required. However, the clinical outcomes are similar and can be confused with retropharyngeal abscess and pyogenic spondylitis, so antibiotics are administrated in many cases. In our report, 7 patients were hospitalized and were treated with the intravenous administration of antibiotics, while 1 patient who refused hospitalization was treated with an oral antibiotic. Steroids were administrated in 2 cases. The 7 patients who were hospitalized were cured within 6 to 10 days.

  6. Coronary atherosclerosis in sudden cardiac death: An autopsy study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sudha M

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: The incidence of ischemic heart disease (IHD has markedly increased in India over the past few years. Considering the variations in racial, dietary and lifestyle patterns in our population, it is essential to study the biology of coronary atherosclerosis in our patients. Vulnerable plaques have a large number of foam cells, extracellular lipid, thin fibrous caps and clusters of inflammatory cells and are more prone to rupture. These plaques are nourished by the microvessels arising from the vasa vasorum of the blood vessels and by lumen-derived microvessels through the fibrous cap. This autopsy study was designed to analyse the coronary arterial tree in cases of sudden cardiac death, classify coronary atherosclerotic plaques and to assess the factors contributing to vulnerability of the plaques including inflammation, calcification and microvascular density. Materials and Methods: Seven cases of sudden cardiac death were included in the study. The hearts were perfusion-fixed and the coronary arteries along with their main branches were dissected and studied. The location of the plaques, type of plaques, presence of inflammation and calcification were assessed. The cap thickness and microvessel density per 1000um 2 were assessed. The statistical significance was estimated. Results and Conclusions: Extensive high-grade coronary atherosclerotic disease was seen in all sudden cardiac death cases. Majority of the plaques were vulnerable. High-grade inflammation was seen in most of the vulnerable and ruptured plaques. All the ruptured plaques were uncalcified indicating that calcification probably stabilizes the plaques and protects against rupture. Increased microvessel density was noted in ruptured plaques compared to vulnerable plaques. However, it was not statistically significant.

  7. Atherosclerosis (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atherosclerosis is a disease of the arteries in which fatty material is deposited in the vessel wall, ... muscle leads to symptoms such as chest pain. Atherosclerosis shows no symptoms until a complication occurs.

  8. Curcuma oil attenuates accelerated atherosclerosis and macrophage foam-cell formation by modulating genes involved in plaque stability, lipid homeostasis and inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Vishal; Rana, Minakshi; Jain, Manish; Singh, Niharika; Naqvi, Arshi; Malasoni, Richa; Dwivedi, Anil Kumar; Dikshit, Madhu; Barthwal, Manoj Kumar

    2015-01-14

    In the present study, the anti-atherosclerotic effect and the underlying mechanism of curcuma oil (C. oil), a lipophilic fraction from turmeric (Curcuma longa L.), was evaluated in a hamster model of accelerated atherosclerosis and in THP-1 macrophages. Male golden Syrian hamsters were subjected to partial carotid ligation (PCL) or FeCl3-induced arterial oxidative injury (Ox-injury) after 1 week of treatment with a high-cholesterol (HC) diet or HC diet plus C. oil (100 and 300 mg/kg, orally). Hamsters fed with the HC diet were analysed at 1, 3 and 5 weeks following carotid injury. The HC diet plus C. oil-fed group was analysed at 5 weeks. In hyperlipidaemic hamsters with PCL or Ox-injury, C. oil (300 mg/kg) reduced elevated plasma and aortic lipid levels, arterial macrophage accumulation, and stenosis when compared with those subjected to arterial injury alone. Similarly, elevated mRNA transcripts of matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2), MMP-9, cluster of differentiation 45 (CD45), TNF-α, interferon-γ (IFN-γ), IL-1β and IL-6 were reduced in atherosclerotic arteries, while those of transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) and IL-10 were increased after the C. oil treatment (300 mg/kg). The treatment with C. oil prevented HC diet- and oxidised LDL (OxLDL)-induced lipid accumulation, decreased the mRNA expression of CD68 and CD36, and increased the mRNA expression of PPARα, LXRα, ABCA1 and ABCG1 in both hyperlipidaemic hamster-derived peritoneal and THP-1 macrophages. The administration of C. oil suppressed the mRNA expression of TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6 and IFN-γ and increased the expression of TGF-β in peritoneal macrophages. In THP-1 macrophages, C. oil supplementation prevented OxLDL-induced production of TNF-α and IL-1β and increased the levels of TGF-β. The present study shows that C. oil attenuates arterial injury-induced accelerated atherosclerosis, inflammation and macrophage foam-cell formation.

  9. Pterostilbene, a novel natural plant conduct, inhibits high fat-induced atherosclerosis inflammation via NF-κB signaling pathway in Toll-like receptor 5 (TLR5) deficient mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yuan; Zhang, Yi

    2016-07-01

    Atherosclerosis is a specific form of an artery wall thickens, a syndrome affecting arterial blood vessels due to a chronic inflammatory response in the walls of arteries, which is promoted by fat accumulation. Toll-like receptors (TLRs) play prominent roles in inflammatory responses. And TLR5 is overexpressed in several diseases. Here in our study, we investigated the effect of TLR5 in high fat-induced atherosclerosis via NF-κB signaling pathway modulating pro-inflammatory cytokines releasing. Our results found that high fat induced atherosclerosis in wild type mice with fat accumulation and inflammatory response through NF-κB activation. Contrastly, TLR5 knockout mice displayed lower fat accumulation and ameliorated inflammation after high fat feeding with NF-κB inactivation. In addition, pterostilbene, as a natural dimethyl ether derivative of resveratrol mainly from blueberries, has diverse pharmacological activities, especially anti-inflammation. Our study also found that pterostilbene displayed inhibited role in suppressing inflammatory response through inactivating NF-κB signaling pathway regulated by TLR5 down-regulation in high fat-induced mice. Moreover, in vitro experiments of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) challenged with LPS or TNF-α, further indicated that NF-κB was involved in atherosclerosis progression, leading to high secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines. However, VSMCs from TLR5 deficient mice inhibited phosphorylated levels of NF-κB signalilng pathway, finally resulting in down-regulation of inflammatory cytokines. Notably, pterostilbene also displayed suppressed role in inflammatory response via NF-κB inactivity in LPS or TNF-α-induced VSMCs by decreasing TLR5 expression. The results above indicated a novel therapeutic strategy of pterostilbene to protect against atherosclerosis via TLR5 regulation for clinic treatment in the future.

  10. [Atherosclerosis and infection?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeman, K

    2006-09-01

    Atherosclerosis is guided by chronicle inflammation process. In the last decades of the 20th century, studies considering infection another possible risk factor of atherosclerosis development were written. Helicobacter pylori, Porphyromas gingivalis, some viruses but most frequently Chlamydia pneumonie are infection agens mentioned in these studies. Some of them emphasize also combined infections caused by more pathogenic factors having influence on vascular inflammation. Serological, epidemiological, histological and imunological studies show the pathogenic influence of acute or chronic infections. Many studies selected makrolid antibiotics as treatment in patients with ischaemic heart disease. However, existing experience with antibiotics did not bring clear results. These studies have mentioned the fact antibiotics have not been indicated as treatment in patients with acute or chronic vascular system infliction by atherosclerosis. Since the experimental and clinical research of influence of inflammations on the development of atherosclerosis moved forward a lot, no exact evidence of this complicated pathogenic mechanism was given. It will obviously take some time to confirm whether the relation between infections and artherosclerosis is causal, i.e. initiating the pathogenic process, accelerating it or keeping it alive.

  11. Göttingen minipig model of diet-induced atherosclerosis: influence of mild streptozotocin-induced diabetes on lesion severity and markers of inflammation evaluated in obese, obese and diabetic, and lean control animals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ludvigsen, Trine Pagh; Kirk, Rikke Kaae; Christoffersen, Berit Østergaard

    2015-01-01

    Göttingen minipigs were fed standard chow (CD), atherogenic diet alone (HFD) or with superimposed mild streptozotocin-induced diabetes (HFD-D). Circulating markers of inflammation (C-reactive protein (CRP), oxidized low-density lipoprotein (oxLDL), plasminogen activator inhibitor-1, lipid and glucose......From a pharmacological perspective, readily-available, well-characterized animal models of cardiovascular disease, including relevant in vivo markers of atherosclerosis are important for evaluation of novel drug candidates. Furthermore, considering the impact of diabetes mellitus on atherosclerosis...... in human patients, inclusion of this disease aspect in the characterization of a such model, is highly relevant. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of mild streptozotocin-induced diabetes on ex- and in vivo end-points in a diet-induced atherosclerotic minipig model. Castrated male...

  12. p-Cresol Affects Reactive Oxygen Species Generation, Cell Cycle Arrest, Cytotoxicity and Inflammation/Atherosclerosis-Related Modulators Production in Endothelial Cells and Mononuclear Cells: e114446

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Mei-Chi Chang; Hsiao-Hua Chang; Chiu-Po Chan; Sin-Yuet Yeung; Hsiang-Chi Hsien; Bor-Ru Lin; Chien-Yang Yeh; Wan-Yu Tseng; Shui-Kuan Tseng; Jiiang-Huei Jeng

    2014-01-01

    .... Patients with uremia suffer from cardiovascular complications, such as atherosclerosis, thrombosis, hemolysis, and bleeding, which may be partly due to p-cresol toxicity and its effects on vascular...

  13. Genome-Wide Association Study for Coronary Artery Calcification With Follow-Up in Myocardial Infarction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    O'Donnell, Christopher J.; Kavousi, Maryam; Smith, Albert V.; Kardia, Sharon L. R.; Feitosa, Mary F.; Hwang, Shih-Jen; Sun, Yan V.; Province, Michael A.; Aspelund, Thor; Dehghan, Abbas; Hoffmann, Udo; Bielak, Lawrence F.; Zhang, Qunyuan; Eiriksdottir, Gudny; van Duijn, Cornelia M.; Fox, Caroline S.; de Andrade, Mariza; Kraja, Aldi T.; Sigurdsson, Sigurdur; Elias-Smale, Suzette E.; Murabito, Joanne M.; Launer, Lenore J.; van der Lugt, Aad; Kathiresan, Sekar; Krestin, Gabriel P.; Herrington, David M.; Howard, Timothy D.; Liu, Yongmei; Post, Wendy S.; Mitchell, Braxton D.; O'Connell, Jeffrey R.; Shen, Haiqing; Shuldiner, Alan R.; Altshuler, David; Elosua, Roberto; Salomaa, Veikko; Schwartz, Stephen M.; Siscovick, David S.; Voight, Benjamin F.; Bis, Joshua C.; Glazer, Nicole L.; Psaty, Bruce M.; Boerwinkle, Eric; Heiss, Gerardo; Blankenberg, Stefan; Zeller, Tanja; Wild, Philipp S.; Schnabel, Renate B.; Schillert, Arne; Ziegler, Andreas; Muenzel, Thomas; White, Charles C.; Rotter, Jerome I.; Nalls, Michael; Oudkerk, Matthijs; Johnson, Andrew D.; Newman, Anne B.; Uitterlinden, Andre G.; Massaro, Joseph M.; Cunningham, Julie; Harris, Tamara B.; Hofman, Albert; Peyser, Patricia A.; Borecki, Ingrid B.; Cupples, L. Adrienne; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Witteman, Jacqueline C. M.

    2011-01-01

    Background-Coronary artery calcification (CAC) detected by computed tomography is a noninvasive measure of coronary atherosclerosis, which underlies most cases of myocardial infarction (MI). We sought to identify common genetic variants associated with CAC and further investigate their associations

  14. Increased arterial inflammation in individuals with stage 3 chronic kidney disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takx, Richard A.P. [Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Cardiac MR PET CT Program, Boston, MA (United States); University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Radiology, Utrecht (Netherlands); MacNabb, Megan H.; Emami, Hamed; Abdelbaky, Amr; Lavender, Zachary R. [Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Cardiac MR PET CT Program, Boston, MA (United States); Singh, Parmanand [Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Cardiac MR PET CT Program, Boston, MA (United States); New York Presbyterian Hospital, Weill Cornell Medical College, Division of Cardiology, New York, NY (United States); Di Carli, Marcelo; Taqueti, Viviany; Foster, Courtney [Brigham and Women' s Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Division of Radiology, Department of Medicine, Boston, MA (United States); Mann, Jessica; Comley, Robert A.; Weber, Chek Ing Kiu [F. Hoffmann-La Roche Ltd., Basel (Switzerland); Tawakol, Ahmed [Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Cardiac MR PET CT Program, Boston, MA (United States); Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Cardiology Division, Boston, MA (United States); Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States)

    2016-02-15

    While it is well known that patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) are at increased risk for the development and progression of atherosclerosis, it is not known whether arterial inflammation is increased in mild CKD. The aim of this study was to compare arterial inflammation using {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT in patients with CKD and in matched controls. This retrospective study included 128 patients undergoing FDG PET/CT imaging for clinical indications, comprising 64 patients with stage 3 CKD and 64 control patients matched by age, gender, and cancer history. CKD was defined according to guidelines using a calculated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR). Arterial inflammation was measured in the ascending aorta as FDG uptake on PET. Background FDG uptake (venous, subcutaneous fat and muscle) were recorded. Coronary artery calcification (CAC) was assessed using the CT images. The impact of CKD on arterial inflammation and CAC was then assessed. Arterial inflammation was higher in patients with CKD than in matched controls (standardized uptake value, SUV: 2.41 ± 0.49 vs. 2.16 ± 0.43; p = 0.002). Arterial SUV correlated inversely with eGFR (r = -0.299, p = 0.001). Venous SUV was also significantly elevated in patients with CKD, while subcutaneous fat and muscle tissue SUVs did not differ between groups. Moreover, arterial SUV remained significantly elevated in patients with CKD compared to controls after correcting for muscle and fat background, and also remained significant after adjusting for clinical risk factors. Further, CKD was associated with arterial inflammation (SUV) independent of the presence of subclinical atherosclerosis (CAC). Moderate CKD is associated with increased arterial inflammation beyond that of controls. Further, the increased arterial inflammation is independent of presence of subclinical atherosclerosis. Current risk stratification tools may underestimate the presence of atherosclerosis in patients with CKD and thereby the risk of

  15. Markers of inflammation and endothelial dysfunction are associated with incident cardiovascular disease, all-cause mortality, and progression of coronary calcification in type 2 diabetic patients with microalbuminuria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    von Scholten, Bernt Johan; Reinhard, Henrik; Hansen, Tine Willum

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: We evaluated markers of inflammation and endothelial dysfunction and their associations with incident cardiovascular disease (CVD), all-cause mortality and progression of coronary artery calcium (CAC) in patients with type 2 diabetes (T2D) and microalbuminuria but without known coronary...... artery disease (CAD). METHODS: Prospective study including 200 patients receiving multifactorial treatment. Markers of inflammation (TNF-ɑ, sICAM-1, sICAM-3, hsCRP, SAA, IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8) and endothelial dysfunction (thrombomodulin, sVCAM-1, sICAM-1, sICAM-3, sE-selectin, sP-selectin) were measured...... with T2D and microalbuminuria without known CAD and receiving multifactorial treatment, biomarkers of inflammation and endothelial dysfunction were independently associated with CVD, all-cause mortality and CAC progression. Especially TNF-ɑ was a robust determinant, even after adjusting for NT...

  16. Vitamin K Status and Vascular Calcification: Evidence from Observational and Clinical Studies12

    OpenAIRE

    Shea, M. Kyla; Holden, Rachel M.

    2012-01-01

    Vascular calcification occurs when calcium accumulates in the intima (associated with atherosclerosis) and/or media layers of the vessel wall. Coronary artery calcification (CAC) reflects the calcium burden within the intima and media of the coronary arteries. In population-based studies, CAC independently predicts cardiovascular disease (CVD) and mortality. A preventive role for vitamin K in vascular calcification has been proposed based on its role in activating matrix Gla protein (MGP), a ...

  17. Mesenchymal Stem Cells Reduce Murine Atherosclerosis Development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Frodermann, Vanessa; van Duijn, Janine; van Pel, Melissa; van Santbrink, Peter J.; Bot, Ilze; Kuiper, Johan; de Jager, Saskia C. A.

    2015-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have regenerative properties, but recently they were also found to have immunomodulatory capacities. We therefore investigated whether MSCs could reduce atherosclerosis, which is determined by dyslipidaemia and chronic inflammation. We adoptively transferred MSCs into l

  18. Alcohol and atherosclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DA LUZ PROTASIO L.

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Atherosclerosis is manifested as coronary artery disease (CAD, ischemic stroke and peripheral vascular disease. Moderate alcohol consumption has been associated with reduction of CAD complications. Apparently, red wine offers more benefits than any other kind of drinks, probably due to flavonoids. Alcohol alters lipoproteins and the coagulation system. The flavonoids induce vascular relaxation by mechanisms that are both dependent and independent of nitric oxide, inhibits many of the cellular reactions associated with atherosclerosis and inflammation, such as endothelial expression of vascular adhesion molecules and release of cytokines from polymorphonuclear leukocytes. Hypertension is also influenced by the alcohol intake. Thus, heavy alcohol intake is almost always associated with systemic hypertension, and hence shall be avoided. In individuals that ingest excess alcohol, there is higher risk of coronary occlusion, arrhythmias, hepatic cirrhosis, upper gastrointestinal cancers, fetal alcohol syndrome, murders, sex crimes, traffic and industrial accidents, robberies, and psychosis. Alcohol is no treatment for atherosclerosis; but it doesn't need to be prohibited for everyone. Thus moderate amounts of alcohol (1-2 drinks/day, especially red wine, may be allowed for those at risk for atherosclerosis complications.

  19. Doença renal crônica, inflamação e aterosclerose: novos conceitos de um velho problema Chronic renal disease, inflammation and atherosclerosis: new concepts about an old problem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claus Dieter Dummer

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available A doença renal crônica (DRC atinge hoje proporções epidêmicas e constitui um problema emergente de saúde pública. Fatores de risco comuns entre a uremia e a doença cardiovascular (DCV são reconhecidos e resultam na elevada prevalência de eventos cardiovasculares que são a principal causa de morte em pacientes com DRC. O desenvolvimento de aterosclerose acelerada está relacionado a fatores de risco tradicionais, como diabetes mellitus, hipertensão arterial, dislipidemia e tabagismo, mas recentemente tem sido verificado que outros fatores não tradicionais também estão fortemente associados, entre os quais inflamação, estresse oxidativo, disfunção endotelial e a uremia per se, mesmo em estágios mais precoces da DRC. Marcadores do estado inflamatório, como proteína C-reativa, interleucina 6 e fibrinogênio, correlacionam-se com mortalidade cardiovascular. A associação entre inflamação, desnutrição e aterosclerose acelerada compõe a síndrome MIA (malnutrition, inflammation and atherosclerosis, comumente detectada em urêmicos, e que está diretamente relacionada com a gênese da DCV. Outros fatores importantes são o estresse oxidativo exacerbado, medido pela oxidação lipídica, protéica e de carboidratos (AGES e que ocasiona dano tecidual, e a disfunção endotelial, agravada pelo ambiente urêmico e por outros fatores. Estas alterações, em conjunto, constituem a base do processo patogênico de aterosclerose e da DCV em pacientes com DRC, contribuindo para a sua elevada morbi-mortalidade. Este artigo é uma revisão atualizada dos mecanismos de inflamação e estresse oxidativo e sua relação com aterosclerose na doença renal crônica.Chronic kidney disease (CKD has reached epidemic proportions in the last few years, generating an emergent public health problem. Common risk factors for CKD and cardiovascular disease (CVD are now well known resulting in a high prevalence rate of cardiovascular events which are

  20. Comparison of CT and CMR for detection and quantification of carotid artery calcification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mujaj, Blerim; Lorza, Andrés M. Arias; van Engelen, Arna

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Carotid artery atherosclerosis is an important risk factor for stroke. As such, quantitative imaging of carotid artery calcification, as a proxy of atherosclerosis, has become a cornerstone of current stroke research. Yet, population-based data comparing the computed tomography (CT......) and cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) for the detection and quantification of calcification remain scarce. METHODS: A total of 684 participants from the population-based Rotterdam Study underwent both a CT and CMR of the carotid artery bifurcation to quantify the amount of carotid artery calcification (mean...

  1. Calcific aortic valve damage as a risk factor for cardiovascular events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wasilewski, Jarosław; Mirota, Kryspin; Wilczek, Krzysztof; Głowacki, Jan; Poloński, Lech

    2012-10-01

    Aortic valve calcification (AVC) is a common disease of the elderly. It is a progressive disease ranging from mild valve thickening to severe calcification with aortic valve stenosis. Risk factors for AVC are similar to those for atherosclerosis: age, gender, hypercholesterolemia, diabetes, hypertension, smoking and renal failure. AVC shares many similarities to atherosclerosis, including inflammatory cells and calcium deposits, and correlates with coronary plaque burden. Presence of AVC is associated with increased risk of adverse cardiovascular events. The objective for this review is to discuss the clinical features, natural history and prognostic significance of aortic valve calcifications, including mechanical and hemodynamic factors of flow distribution.

  2. Ultrasound Biomicroscopic Imaging for Interleukin-1 Receptor Antagonist-Inhibiting Atherosclerosis and Markers of Inflammation in Atherosclerotic Development in Apolipoprotein-E Knockout Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Rong-Juan; Sun, Yan; Wang, Qin; Yang, Jiao; Yang, Ya; Song, Li; Wang, Zheng; Luo, Xiang-Hong; Su, Rui-Juan

    2015-08-01

    We sought to validate the hypothesis that the development of atherosclerosis can be suppressed by the interleukin-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1Ra) in murine models of atherosclerosis in vivo, noninvasively seen by means of high-resolution ultrasound biomicroscopy, and we studied changes in inflammatory markers such as IL-1 and C-reactive protein (CRP) plasma levels in these models of atherosclerosis. We divided IL-1Ra(+/-)/apolipoprotein-E (apoE)(-/-) and IL-1Ra(+/+)/apoE(-/-) mice into 2 age groups, used as atherosclerotic models. The control groups were age-matched IL-1Ra(+/+)/apoE(+/+) mice. Plaque thickness was measured in the ascending aorta in short-axis images by means of ultrasound and histology. Plasma levels of IL-1 and CRP were quantified in the 3 murine groups. At 16 weeks, plaque thickness in the ascending aortas of the IL-1Ra(+/-)/apoE(-/-) mice was significantly greater than that in the IL-1Ra(+/+)/apoE(-/-) mice, on ultrasound and histology (P <0.01). In contrast, at 32 weeks, the differences between these 2 genotypes were not statistically significant. Serum IL-1 levels were lower in the IL-1Ra(+/-)/apoE(-/-) mice than in the IL-1Ra(+/+)/apoE(-/-) mice at 16 and 32 weeks (P <0.05). At 16 weeks, serum CRP levels in the IL-1Ra(+/-)/apoE(-/-) mice were higher than in the IL-1Ra(+/+)/apoE(-/-) mice (P <0.01). Our results suggest that ultrasound biomicroscopy enables evaluation of atherosclerotic lesions in vivo, noninvasively and in real-time, in apoE(-/-) mice. Partial IL-1Ra deficiencies might promote early plaque development in 16-week-old apoE(-/-) mice. The balance of IL-1 and IL-1Ra might influence atherosclerotic development. Finally, CRP might affect the initiation of atherosclerosis, rather than its progression.

  3. Possible roles of platelet-derived microparticles in atherosclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhi-Ting; Wang, Zi; Hu, Yan-Wei

    2016-05-01

    Platelets and platelet-derived microparticles (PMPs) play important roles in cardiovascular diseases, especially atherosclerosis. Continued research has revealed that PMPs have numerous functions in atherosclerosis, not only in thrombosis formation, but also by induction of inflammation. PMPs also induce formation of foam cells. Recent evidence strongly indicates a significant role of PMPs in atherosclerosis. Here, current research on the function of PMPs in atherosclerosis is reviewed.

  4. The role of the vascular dendritic cell network in atherosclerosis

    OpenAIRE

    Alberts-Grill, Noah; Denning, Timothy L.; Rezvan, Amir; Jo, Hanjoong

    2013-01-01

    A complex role has been described for dendritic cells (DCs) in the potentiation and control of vascular inflammation and atherosclerosis. Resident vascular DCs are found in the intima of atherosclerosis-prone vascular regions exposed to disturbed blood flow patterns. Several phenotypically and functionally distinct vascular DC subsets have been described. The functional heterogeneity of these cells and their contributions to vascular homeostasis, inflammation, and atherosclerosis are only rec...

  5. Immune response to lipoproteins in atherosclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samson, Sonia; Mundkur, Lakshmi; Kakkar, Vijay V

    2012-01-01

    Atherosclerosis, the underlying cause of cardiovascular disease, is characterized by chronic inflammation and altered immune response. Cholesterol is a well-known risk factor associated with the development of cardiovascular diseases. Elevated serum cholesterol is unique because it can lead to development of atherosclerosis in animals and humans even in the absence of other risk factors. Modifications of low-density lipoproteins mediated by oxidation, enzymatic degradation, and aggregation result in changes in their function and activate both innate and adaptive immune system. Oxidized low-density lipoprotein (LDL) has been identified as one of the most important autoantigens in atherosclerosis. This escape from self-tolerance is dependent on the formation of oxidized phospholipids. The emerging understanding of the importance of immune responses against oxidized LDL in atherosclerosis has focused attention on the possibility of development of novel therapy for atherosclerosis. This review provides an overview of immune response to lipoproteins and the fascinating possibility of developing an immunomodulatory therapy for atherosclerosis.

  6. Association of mitral annulus calcification, aortic valve calcification with carotid intima media thickness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scuteri Angelo

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mitral annular calcification (MAC and aortic annular calcification (AVC may represent a manifestation of generalized atherosclerosis in the elederly. Alterations in vascular structure, as indexed by the intima media thickness (IMT, are also recognized as independent predictors of adverse cardiovascular outcomes. Aim To examine the relationship between the degree of calcification at mitral and/or aortic valve annulus and large artery structure (thickness. Methods We evaluated 102 consecutive patients who underwent transthoracic echocardiography and carotid artery echoDoppler for various indications; variables measured were: systemic blood pressure (BP, pulse pressure (PP=SBP-DBP, body mass index (BMI, fasting glucose, total, HDL, LDL chlolesterol, triglycerides, cIMT. The patients were divided according to a grading of valvular/annular lesions independent scores based on acoustic densitometry: 1 = annular/valvular sclerosis/calcification absence; 2 = annular/valvular sclerosis; 3 = annular calcification; 4 = annular-valvular calcification; 5 = valvular calcification with no recognition of the leaflets. Results Patient score was the highest observed for either valvular/annulus. Mean cIMT increased linearly with increasing valvular calcification score, ranging from 3.9 ± 0.48 mm in controls to 12.9 ± 1.8 mm in those subjects scored 5 (p 0.0001. Conclusion MAC and AVC score can identify subgroups of patients with different cIMT values which indicate different incidence and prevalence of systemic artery diseases. This data may confirm MAC-AVC as a useful important diagnostic parameter of systemic atherosclerotic disease.

  7. Ultrasound Biomicroscopic Imaging for Interleukin-1 Receptor Antagonist–Inhibiting Atherosclerosis and Markers of Inflammation in Atherosclerotic Development in Apolipoprotein-E Knockout Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Rong-Juan; Sun, Yan; Wang, Qin; Yang, Jiao; Song, Li; Wang, Zheng; Luo, Xiang-Hong; Su, Rui-Juan

    2015-01-01

    We sought to validate the hypothesis that the development of atherosclerosis can be suppressed by the interleukin-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1Ra) in murine models of atherosclerosis in vivo, noninvasively seen by means of high-resolution ultrasound biomicroscopy, and we studied changes in inflammatory markers such as IL-1 and C-reactive protein (CRP) plasma levels in these models of atherosclerosis. We divided IL-1Ra+/−/apolipoprotein-E (apoE)−/− and IL-1Ra+/+/apoE−/− mice into 2 age groups, used as atherosclerotic models. The control groups were age-matched IL-1Ra+/+/apoE+/+ mice. Plaque thickness was measured in the ascending aorta in short-axis images by means of ultrasound and histology. Plasma levels of IL-1 and CRP were quantified in the 3 murine groups. At 16 weeks, plaque thickness in the ascending aortas of the IL-1Ra+/−/apoE−/− mice was significantly greater than that in the IL-1Ra+/+/apoE−/− mice, on ultrasound and histology (P <0.01). In contrast, at 32 weeks, the differences between these 2 genotypes were not statistically significant. Serum IL-1 levels were lower in the IL-1Ra+/−/apoE−/− mice than in the IL-1Ra+/+/apoE−/− mice at 16 and 32 weeks (P <0.05). At 16 weeks, serum CRP levels in the IL-1Ra+/−/apoE−/− mice were higher than in the IL-1Ra+/+/apoE−/− mice (P <0.01). Our results suggest that ultrasound biomicroscopy enables evaluation of atherosclerotic lesions in vivo, noninvasively and in real-time, in apoE−/− mice. Partial IL-1Ra deficiencies might promote early plaque development in 16-week-old apoE−/− mice. The balance of IL-1 and IL-1Ra might influence atherosclerotic development. Finally, CRP might affect the initiation of atherosclerosis, rather than its progression. PMID:26413013

  8. Long noncoding RNAs and atherosclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Tian; Ding, Jia-wang; Wang, Xin-an; Zheng, Xia-xia

    2016-05-01

    Atherosclerosis is universally recognized as a chronic lipid-induced inflammation of the vessel wall in response to dyslipidemia and haemodynamic stress involving dysfunction and activation of resident vascular cells as well as infiltration of leukocytes. As members of nonprotein-coding RNAs, the long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) are implicated in various biological processes. Accumulating evidences suggest that lncRNAs regulate the function of vascular wall, activation of macrophages, lipid metabolism and immune response. Here, we review the effects of lncRNAs on the progress of atherosclerosis.

  9. Role of Platelet-Derived Microvesicles As Crosstalk Mediators in Atherothrombosis and Future Pharmacology Targets: A Link between Inflammation, Atherosclerosis, and Thrombosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badimon, Lina; Suades, Rosa; Fuentes, Eduardo; Palomo, Iván; Padró, Teresa

    2016-01-01

    Reports in the last decade have suggested that the role of platelets in atherosclerosis and its thrombotic complications may be mediated, in part, by local secretion of platelet-derived microvesicles (pMVs), small cell blebs released during the platelet activation process. MVs are the most abundant cell-derived microvesicle subtype in the circulation. High concentrations of circulating MVs have been reported in patients with atherosclerosis, acute vascular syndromes, and/or diabetes mellitus, suggesting a potential correlation between the quantity of microvesicles and the clinical severity of the atherosclerotic disease. pMVs are considered to be biomarkers of disease but new information indicates that pMVs are also involved in signaling functions. pMVs evoke or promote haemostatic and inflammatory responses, neovascularization, cell survival, and apoptosis, processes involved in the pathophysiology of cardiovascular disease. This review is focused on the complex cross-talk between platelet-derived microvesicles, inflammatory cells and vascular elements and their relevance in the development of the atherosclerotic disease and its clinical outcomes, providing an updated state-of-the art of pMV involvement in atherothrombosis and pMV potential use as therapeutic agent influencing cardiovascular biomedicine in the future. PMID:27630570

  10. Role of Platelet-derived Microvesicles as Crosstalk Mediators in Atherothrombosis and Future Pharmacology Targets: a Link between Inflammation, Atherosclerosis and Thrombosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lina Badimon

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Reports in the last decade have suggested that the role of platelets in atherosclerosis and its thrombotic complications may be mediated, in part, by local secretion of platelet-derived microvesicles (pMVs, small cell blebs released during the platelet activation process. MVs are the most abundant cell-derived microvesicle subtype in the circulation. High concentrations of circulating MVs have been reported in patients with atherosclerosis, acute vascular syndromes, and/or diabetes mellitus, suggesting a potential correlation between the quantity of microvesicles and the clinical severity of the atherosclerotic disease. pMVs are considered to be biomarkers of disease but new information indicates that pMVs are also involved in signaling functions. pMVs evoke or promote haemostatic and inflammatory responses, neovascularization, cell survival and apoptosis, processes involved in the pathophysiology of cardiovascular disease. This review is focused on the complex cross-talk between platelet-derived microvesicles, inflammatory cells and vascular elements and their relevance in the development of the atherosclerotic disease and its clinical outcomes, providing an updated state-of-the art of pMV involvement in atherothrombosis and pMV potential use as therapeutic agent influencing cardiovascular biomedicine in the future.

  11. Role of Platelet-Derived Microvesicles As Crosstalk Mediators in Atherothrombosis and Future Pharmacology Targets: A Link between Inflammation, Atherosclerosis, and Thrombosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badimon, Lina; Suades, Rosa; Fuentes, Eduardo; Palomo, Iván; Padró, Teresa

    2016-01-01

    Reports in the last decade have suggested that the role of platelets in atherosclerosis and its thrombotic complications may be mediated, in part, by local secretion of platelet-derived microvesicles (pMVs), small cell blebs released during the platelet activation process. MVs are the most abundant cell-derived microvesicle subtype in the circulation. High concentrations of circulating MVs have been reported in patients with atherosclerosis, acute vascular syndromes, and/or diabetes mellitus, suggesting a potential correlation between the quantity of microvesicles and the clinical severity of the atherosclerotic disease. pMVs are considered to be biomarkers of disease but new information indicates that pMVs are also involved in signaling functions. pMVs evoke or promote haemostatic and inflammatory responses, neovascularization, cell survival, and apoptosis, processes involved in the pathophysiology of cardiovascular disease. This review is focused on the complex cross-talk between platelet-derived microvesicles, inflammatory cells and vascular elements and their relevance in the development of the atherosclerotic disease and its clinical outcomes, providing an updated state-of-the art of pMV involvement in atherothrombosis and pMV potential use as therapeutic agent influencing cardiovascular biomedicine in the future.

  12. 单核细胞及其来源细胞在动脉粥样硬化炎症发病机制中的作用%Roles of monocytes and monocyte-induced cells in the inflammation pathogenesis of atherosclerosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    夏承来; 卢泳妍

    2012-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is the primary cause of heart disease and becomes the leading causes of death. Because of its complex, it was unclear that the formation of the atherosclerosis lesions. The new appreciation of the role of inflammation in atherosclerosis provided a mechanistic framework for understanding the clinical benefits of lipid-lowering therapies. The role of monocytes, macrophages and dendritic cells in the inflammation pathogenesis of atherosclerosis will be reviewed here. It might be benefit to exploit new anti-atherosclerosis drug targets.%心血管疾病尤其是冠状动脉粥样硬化心脏病,已经成为威胁人类健康的主要杀手.但是由于动脉粥样斑块形成的复杂性,动脉粥样硬化发生机制并不明确,该疾病发生的炎症学说成为研究热点.本文将对单核细胞及其来源的巨噬细胞和树突状细胞在动脉粥样硬化炎症发病机制中的作用做一综述,为寻找该疾病新的药物靶点提供思路.

  13. Early Detection of Subclinical Atherosclerosis in Asymptomatic Patients Assessed by Carotid Duplex and Coronary Computed Tomography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng-Hsi Chen

    2013-03-01

    Conclusion: Carotid duplex may detect subclinical vascular atherosclerosis in more than half of asymptomatic patients without coronary artery calcification detected by coronary computed tomography. These findings have important implications for early-stage atherosclerosis screening and implementation of primary preventive intervention.

  14. Dystrophic calcification of the prostate after cryotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dru, Christopher; Bender, Leon

    2014-01-01

    We present a previously undocumented complication of dystrophic calcification of the prostate after cryotherapy. An 87-year-old male presented with recurrent lower urinary tract infections and was found to have an obstructing large calcified mass in the right lobe of the prostate. Subsequently, he underwent transurethral resection of the prostate (TURP) and bladder neck with laser lithotripsy to remove the calculus. We propose that chronic inflammation and necrosis of the prostate from cryotherapy resulted in dystrophic calcification of the prostate. As the use of cryotherapy for the treatment of localized prostate cancer continues to increase, it is important that clinicians be aware of this scenario and the technical challenges it poses.

  15. Early life socioeconomic adversity is associated in adult life with chronic inflammation, carotid atherosclerosis, poorer lung function and decreased cognitive performance: a cross-sectional, population-based study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sattar Naveed

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Socioeconomic gradients in health persist despite public health campaigns and improvements in healthcare. The Psychosocial and Biological Determinants of Ill-health (pSoBid study was designed to uncover novel biomarkers of chronic disease that may help explain pathways between socioeconomic adversity and poorer physical and mental health. Methods We examined links between indicators of early life adversity, possible intermediary phenotypes, and markers of ill health in adult subjects (n = 666 recruited from affluent and deprived areas. Classical and novel risk factors for chronic disease (lung function and atherosclerosis and for cognitive performance were assessed, and associations sought with early life variables including conditions in the parental home, family size and leg length. Results Associations were observed between father's occupation, childhood home status (owner-occupier; overcrowding and biomarkers of chronic inflammation and endothelial activation in adults (C reactive protein, interleukin 6, intercellular adhesion molecule; P P Conclusions Adverse levels of biomarkers of ill health in adults appear to be influenced by father's occupation and childhood home conditions. Chronic inflammation and endothelial activation may in part act as intermediary phenotypes in this complex relationship. Reducing the 'health divide' requires that these life course determinants are taken into account.

  16. Göttingen minipig model of diet-induced atherosclerosis: influence of mild streptozotocin-induced diabetes on lesion severity and markers of inflammation evaluated in obese, obese and diabetic, and lean control animals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ludvigsen, Trine Pagh; Kirk, Rikke Kaae; Christoffersen, Berit Østergaard

    2015-01-01

    From a pharmacological perspective, readily-available, well-characterized animal models of cardiovascular disease, including relevant in vivo markers of atherosclerosis are important for evaluation of novel drug candidates. Furthermore, considering the impact of diabetes mellitus on atherosclerosis...

  17. Göttingen minipig model of diet-induced atherosclerosis: influence of mild streptozotocin-induced diabetes on lesion severity and markers of inflammation evaluated in obese, obese and diabetic, and lean control animals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ludvigsen, Trine Pagh; Kirk, Rikke Kaae; Christoffersen, Berit Østergaard;

    2015-01-01

    From a pharmacological perspective, readily-available, well-characterized animal models of cardiovascular disease, including relevant in vivo markers of atherosclerosis are important for evaluation of novel drug candidates. Furthermore, considering the impact of diabetes mellitus on atherosclerosis...

  18. What Causes Atherosclerosis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Causes Atherosclerosis? The exact cause of atherosclerosis isn't known. ... Rate This Content: NEXT >> Featured Video What is atherosclerosis? 05/22/2014 Describes how the build-up ...

  19. How Is Atherosclerosis Treated?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page from the NHLBI on Twitter. How Is Atherosclerosis Treated? Treatments for atherosclerosis may include heart-healthy ... Rate This Content: NEXT >> Featured Video What is atherosclerosis? 05/22/2014 Describes how the build-up ...

  20. How Is Atherosclerosis Diagnosed?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page from the NHLBI on Twitter. How Is Atherosclerosis Diagnosed? Your doctor will diagnose atherosclerosis based on ... Rate This Content: NEXT >> Featured Video What is atherosclerosis? 05/22/2014 Describes how the build-up ...

  1. What Is Atherosclerosis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Is Atherosclerosis? Español Atherosclerosis is a disease in which plaque ... problems, including heart attack , stroke , or even death. Atherosclerosis Figure A shows a normal artery with normal ...

  2. Oral microbiota in patients with atherosclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fåk, Frida; Tremaroli, Valentina; Bergström, Göran

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND AIMS: Recent evidence suggests that the microbiota may be considered as an environmental factor that contributes to the development of atherosclerosis. Periodontal disease has been associated with cardio- and cerebrovascular events, and inflammation in the periodontium is suggested...... patients with asymptomatic and symptomatic atherosclerosis we performed pyrosequencing of the oral microbiota of 92 individuals including patients with asymptomatic and symptomatic atherosclerosis and control individuals without carotid plaques or previous stroke or myocardial infarction. RESULTS......: The overall microbial structure was similar in controls and atherosclerosis patients, but patients with symptomatic atherosclerosis had higher relative abundance of Anaeroglobus (mean 0.040% (SD 0.049)) than the control group (0.010% (SD 0.028)) (P = 0.03). Using linear regression analysis, we found...

  3. Immune Response to Lipoproteins in Atherosclerosis

    OpenAIRE

    Sonia Samson; Lakshmi Mundkur; Kakkar, Vijay V

    2012-01-01

    Atherosclerosis, the underlying cause of cardiovascular disease, is characterized by chronic inflammation and altered immune response. Cholesterol is a well-known risk factor associated with the development of cardiovascular diseases. Elevated serum cholesterol is unique because it can lead to development of atherosclerosis in animals and humans even in the absence of other risk factors. Modifications of low-density lipoproteins mediated by oxidation, enzymatic degradation, and aggregation re...

  4. [Calcifications of the prostate: a transrectal echographic study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bock, E; Calugi, V; Stolfi, V; Rossi, P; D'Ascenzo, R; Solivetti, F M

    1989-05-01

    Prostatic lithiasis is a well know phenomenon. It has little clinical significance and is not easily shown by conventional radiography, which has poor sensitivity and specificity. The authors have studied 612 patients with both suprapubic and transrectal US in order to 1) assess US sensitivity and specificity and 2) report the frequency, spatial distribution, number and features of prostatic calcifications with special emphasis on differential diagnosis between prostatic neoplasms and chronic prostatitis. The authors have also studied the relationship between morphology and symptoms and the results agree with those reported in the scanty literature. The authors conclude that the parameters studied are directly related to age, except for a younger group with clear evidence of genital inflammation. The authors emphasize the impossibility to correlate morphology of prostatic calcifications with pathologic conditions: there are no specific symptoms clearly connected with calcification even though the inflammation is often associated with calcifications.

  5. Calcific periarthritis of the elbow presenting as acute tennis elbow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jawad, F; Jawad, A S M

    2014-01-01

    A 28-year-old woman presented with sudden acute lateral epicondylitis. There was no history of preceding trauma or repetitive use of the arm. Because of the acute onset and signs of acute inflammation, an X-ray was arranged. The X-ray showed a hyperdense calcified elongated globule distal to the lateral epicondyle. A diagnosis of calcific periarthritis (calcium apatite) of the elbow was made. Calcific periarthritis has rarely been reported as a cause of acute elbow pain.

  6. Aortic root, not valve, calcification correlates with coronary artery calcification in patients with severe aortic stenosis: A two-center study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henein, Michael; Hällgren, Peter; Holmgren, Anders; Sörensen, Karen; Ibrahimi, Pranvera; Kofoed, Klaus Fuglsang; Larsen, Linnea Hornbech; Hassager, Christian

    2015-12-01

    The underlying pathology in aortic stenosis (AS) and coronary artery stenosis (CAS) is similar including atherosclerosis and calcification. We hypothesize that coronary artery calcification (CAC) is likely to correlate with aortic root calcification (ARC) rather than with aortic valve calcification (AVC), due to tissue similarity between the two types of vessel rather than with the valve leaflet tissue. We studied 212 consecutive patients (age 72.5 ± 7.9 years, 91 females) with AS requiring aortic valve replacement (AVR) in two Heart Centers, who underwent multidetector cardiac CT preoperatively. CAC, AVC and ARC were quantified using Agatston scoring. Correlations were tested by Spearman's test and Mann-Whitney U-test was used for comparing different subgroups; bicuspid (BAV) vs tricuspid (TAV) aortic valve. CAC was present in 92%, AVC in 100% and ARC in 82% of patients. CAC correlated with ARC (rho = 0.51, p coronary arteries correlated with ARC (rho = 0.45, p coronary stenosis (>50%), but these were not different in the pattern of calcification from those without CAS. CAC was consistently higher in patients with risk factors for atherosclerosis compared to those without. The observed relationship between coronary and aortic root calcification suggests a diffuse arterial disease. The lack of relationship between coronary and aortic valve calcification suggests a different pathology. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Early life socioeconomic adversity is associated in adult life with chronic inflammation, carotid atherosclerosis, poorer lung function and decreased cognitive performance: a cross-sectional, population-based study

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Packard, Chris J

    2011-01-17

    Abstract Background Socioeconomic gradients in health persist despite public health campaigns and improvements in healthcare. The Psychosocial and Biological Determinants of Ill-health (pSoBid) study was designed to uncover novel biomarkers of chronic disease that may help explain pathways between socioeconomic adversity and poorer physical and mental health. Methods We examined links between indicators of early life adversity, possible intermediary phenotypes, and markers of ill health in adult subjects (n = 666) recruited from affluent and deprived areas. Classical and novel risk factors for chronic disease (lung function and atherosclerosis) and for cognitive performance were assessed, and associations sought with early life variables including conditions in the parental home, family size and leg length. Results Associations were observed between father\\'s occupation, childhood home status (owner-occupier; overcrowding) and biomarkers of chronic inflammation and endothelial activation in adults (C reactive protein, interleukin 6, intercellular adhesion molecule; P < 0.0001) but not number of siblings and leg length. Lung function (forced expiratory volume in 1 second) and cognition (Choice Reaction Time, the Stroop test, Auditory Verbal Learning Test) were likewise related to early life conditions (P < 0.001). In multivariate models inclusion of inflammatory variables reduced the impact and independence of early life conditions on lung function and measures of cognitive ability. Including variables of adult socioeconomic status attenuated the early life associations with disease biomarkers. Conclusions Adverse levels of biomarkers of ill health in adults appear to be influenced by father\\'s occupation and childhood home conditions. Chronic inflammation and endothelial activation may in part act as intermediary phenotypes in this complex relationship. Reducing the \\'health divide\\' requires that these life course determinants are taken into account.

  8. Growth Pattern of Atherosclerotic Calcifications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Lene Lillemark; Ganz, Melanie; Dam, Erik

    2008-01-01

    of the calcifications are matched longitudinally using thin plate spline registration and area overlap calculations. The growth of the calcifications is measured by the distribution of the geometry statistics of the calcifications. The method was evaluated on 135 subjects with a total number of 611 calcifications. Our...

  9. Prevalence, Vascular Distribution, and Multiterritorial Extent of Subclinical Atherosclerosis in a Middle-Aged Cohort

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fernández-Friera, Leticia; Peñalvo, José L; Fernández-Ortiz, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Data are limited on the presence, distribution, and extent of subclinical atherosclerosis in middle-aged populations. METHODS AND RESULTS: The PESA (Progression of Early Subclinical Atherosclerosis) study prospectively enrolled 4184 asymptomatic participants 40 to 54 years of age (mean...... age, 45.8 years; 63% male) to evaluate the systemic extent of atherosclerosis in the carotid, abdominal aortic, and iliofemoral territories by 2-/3-dimensional ultrasound and coronary artery calcification by computed tomography. The extent of subclinical atherosclerosis, defined as presence of plaque...... or coronary artery calcification ≥1, was classified as focal (1 site affected), intermediate (2-3 sites), or generalized (4-6 sites) after exploration of each vascular site (right/left carotids, aorta, right/left iliofemorals, and coronary arteries). Subclinical atherosclerosis was present in 63...

  10. Mitral annular calcification and aortic valve calcification may help in predicting significant coronary artery disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acartürk, Esmeray; Bozkurt, Abdi; Cayli, Murat; Demir, Mesut

    2003-01-01

    Mitral annular calcification (MAC) and aortic valve calcification (AVC) are manifestations of atherosclerosis. To determine whether mitral annular calcification and aortic valve calcification detected by transthoracic echocardiography (TTE) might help in predicting significant coronary artery disease (CAD), 123 patients with significant CAD and 93 patients without CAD detected by coronary angiography were investigated. MAC and AVC identified CAD with a sensitivity and specificity of 60.2%, 55.9% and 74.8%, 52.7%, respectively, and with a negative and a positive predictive values of 51.5%, 64.3% and 61.3% and 67.6%, respectively. The positive predictive value of MAC was greater than gender, hypertension, and hypercholesterolemia. AVC showed a positive predictive value greater than gender, hypertension, family history, and hypercholesterolemia. The negative predictive values of MAC and AVC for CAD were greater than those of all risk factors except diabetes mellitus. In conclusion, presence of MAC and AVC on TTE may help in predicting CAD and should be added to conventional risk factors. Absence of MVC and AVC is a stronger predictor for absence of CAD than all conventional risk factors, except diabetes mellitus. Patients with MAC and AVC should be taken into consideration for the presence of significant CAD and thereby for diagnostic and therapeutic interventions in order to improve the prognosis.

  11. Calcific Uremic Arteriolopathy: Pathophysiology, Reactive Oxygen Species and Therapeutic Approaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kurt M. Sowers

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Calcific uremic arteriolopathy (CUA/calciphylaxis is an important cause of morbidity and mortality in patients with chronic kidney disease requiring renal replacement. Once thought to be rare, it is being increasingly recognized and reported on a global scale. The uremic milieu predisposes to multiple metabolic toxicities including increased levels of reactive oxygen species and inflammation. Increased oxidative stress and inflammation promote this arteriolopathy by adversely affecting endothelial function resulting in a prothrombotic milieu and significant remodeling effects on vascular smooth muscle cells. These arteriolar pathological effects include intimal hyperplasia, inflammation, endovascular fibrosis and vascular smooth muscle cell apoptosis and differentiation into bone forming osteoblast-like cells resulting in medial calcification. Systemic factors promoting this vascular condition include elevated calcium, parathyroid hormone and hyperphosphatemia with consequent increases in the calcium × phosphate product. The uremic milieu contributes to a marked increased in upstream reactive oxygen species—oxidative stress and subsequent downstream increased inflammation, in part, via activation of the nuclear transcription factor NFκB and associated downstream cytokine pathways. Consitutive anti-calcification proteins such as Fetuin-A and matrix GLA proteins and their signaling pathways may be decreased, which further contributes to medial vascular calcification. The resulting clinical entity is painful, debilitating and contributes to the excess morbidity and mortality associated with chronic kidney disease and end stage renal disease. These same histopathologic conditions also occur in patients without uremia and therefore, the term calcific obliterative arteriolopathy could be utilized in these conditions.

  12. Adaptive immunity against gut microbiota enhances apoE-mediated immune regulation and reduces atherosclerosis and western-diet-related inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saita, Diego; Ferrarese, Roberto; Foglieni, Chiara; Esposito, Antonio; Canu, Tamara; Perani, Laura; Ceresola, Elisa Rita; Visconti, Laura; Burioni, Roberto; Clementi, Massimo; Canducci, Filippo

    2016-07-07

    Common features of immune-metabolic and inflammatory diseases such as metabolic syndrome, diabetes, obesity and cardiovascular diseases are an altered gut microbiota composition and a systemic pro-inflammatory state. We demonstrate that active immunization against the outer membrane protein of bacteria present in the gut enhances local and systemic immune control via apoE-mediated immune-modulation. Reduction of western-diet-associated inflammation was obtained for more than eighteen weeks after immunization. Immunized mice had reduced serum cytokine levels, reduced insulin and fasting glucose concentrations; and gene expression in both liver and visceral adipose tissue confirmed a reduced inflammatory steady-state after immunization. Moreover, both gut and atherosclerotic plaques of immunized mice showed reduced inflammatory cells and an increased M2 macrophage fraction. These results suggest that adaptive responses directed against microbes present in our microbiota have systemic beneficial consequences and demonstrate the key role of apoE in this mechanism that could be exploited to treat immune-metabolic diseases.

  13. A Review of the Effect of Diet on Cardiovascular Calcification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachel Nicoll

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Cardiovascular (CV calcification is known as sub-clinical atherosclerosis and is recognised as a predictor of CV events and mortality. As yet there is no treatment for CV calcification and conventional CV risk factors are not consistently correlated, leaving clinicians uncertain as to optimum management for these patients. For this reason, a review of studies investigating diet and serum levels of macro- and micronutrients was carried out. Although there were few human studies of macronutrients, nevertheless transfats and simple sugars should be avoided, while long chain ω-3 fats from oily fish may be protective. Among the micronutrients, an intake of 800 μg/day calcium was beneficial in those without renal disease or hyperparathyroidism, while inorganic phosphorus from food preservatives and colas may induce calcification. A high intake of magnesium (≥380 mg/day and phylloquinone (500 μg/day proved protective, as did a serum 25(OHD concentration of ≥75 nmol/L. Although oxidative damage appears to be a cause of CV calcification, the antioxidant vitamins proved to be largely ineffective, while supplementation of α-tocopherol may induce calcification. Nevertheless other antioxidant compounds (epigallocatechin gallate from green tea and resveratrol from red wine were protective. Finally, a homocysteine concentration >12 µmol/L was predictive of CV calcification, although a plasma folate concentration of >39.4 nmol/L could both lower homocysteine and protect against calcification. In terms of a dietary programme, these recommendations indicate avoiding sugar and the transfats and preservatives found in processed foods and drinks and adopting a diet high in oily fish and vegetables. The micronutrients magnesium and vitamin K may be worthy of further investigation as a treatment option for CV calcification.

  14. Cytokines and Immune Responses in Murine Atherosclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kusters, Pascal J H; Lutgens, Esther

    2015-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is an inflammatory disease of the vessel wall characterized by activation of the innate immune system, with macrophages as the main players, as well as the adaptive immune system, characterized by a Th1-dominant immune response. Cytokines play a major role in the initiation and regulation of inflammation. In recent years, many studies have investigated the role of these molecules in experimental models of atherosclerosis. While some cytokines such as TNF or IFNγ clearly had atherogenic effects, others such as IL-10 were found to be atheroprotective. However, studies investigating the different cytokines in experimental atherosclerosis revealed that the cytokine system is complex with both disease stage-dependent and site-specific effects. In this review, we strive to provide an overview of the main cytokines involved in atherosclerosis and to shed light on their individual role during atherogenesis.

  15. Naringenin and atherosclerosis: a review of literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orhan, Ilkay E; Nabavi, Seyed F; Daglia, Maria; Tenore, Gian C; Mansouri, Kowsar; Nabavi, Seyed M

    2015-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is a multifactorial disease mainly caused by deposition of low-density lipoprotein (LD) cholesterol in macrophages of arterial walls. Atherosclerosis leads to heart attacks as well as stroke. Epidemiological studies showed that there is an inverse correlation between fruit and vegetable consumption and the risk of atherosclerosis. The promising effect of high vegetable and fruit containing diet on atherosclerosis is approved by several experimental studies on isolated phytochemicals such as flavonoids. Flavonoids are known to up-regulate endogenous antioxidant system, suppress oxidative and nitrosative stress, decrease macrophage oxidative stress through cellular oxygenase inhibition as well as interaction with several signal transduction pathways and from these ways, have therapeutic effects against atherosclerosis. Naringenin is a well known flavonoid belonging to the chemical class of flavanones. It is especially abundant in citrus fruits, especially grapefruits. A plethora of evidences ascribes to naringenin antiatherosclerotic effects. Naringenin abilities to decrease LDL and triglycerides as well as inhibit glucose uptake; increase high-density lipoprotein (HDL); co-oxidation of NADH; suppress protein oxidation; protect against intercellular adhesion molecule-1(ICAM-1); suppress macrophage inflammation; inhibit leukotriene B4, monocyte adhesion and foam cell formation; induce of HO-1 and G 0/G 1 cell cycle arrest in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC) and down regulate atherosclerosis related genes are believed to have crucial role in the promising role against atherosclerosis. In the present review, we have summarized the available literature data on the anti-atherosclerotic effects of naringenin and its possible mechanisms of action.

  16. Retropharyngeal Calcific Tendonitis Mimics a Retropharyngeal Abscess

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natasha Pollak

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Retropharyngeal calcific tendonitis (RCT is an uncommon, self-limiting condition that is often omitted in the differential diagnosis of a retropharyngeal fluid collection. This condition mimics a retropharyngeal abscess and should be considered when evaluating a fluid collection in the retropharyngeal space. Although calcific tendonitis at other sites has been well described in the medical literature, it appears that this entity has been underreported in the otolaryngology literature where only a few case reports have been identified. Presumably, the actual incidence is higher than the reported incidence, due to lack of familiarity with this disorder. As an otolaryngologist’s scope of practice includes the managements of retropharyngeal lesions, it is important for the otolaryngologist to recognize the presentation of acute RCT and be familiar with appropriate treatment strategies. Retropharyngeal calcific tendonitis presents with neck pain, limitation of neck range of motion and includes inflammation, calcifications, and a sterile effusion within the longus colli muscle. Treatment is medical with nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory medications. RCT does not require surgical treatment, and an accurate diagnosis can prevent unnecessary attempts at operative drainage. In this study, we discuss two cases of RCT, summarize the salient features in diagnosis, including key radiologic features, discuss treatment options, and review the literature.

  17. Study on Atherosclerosis Treated with Theory of Detoxification

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xu Yingchun; Wang Hualiang; Ding Jing

    2006-01-01

    Starting with the contents, classification and pathogenic characteristics of the toxic pathogen and combining the modem medical research on the correlation of atherosclerosis with inflammation and immune reaction,authors have studied and expounded the interrelationship between the toxic pathogen and atherosclerosis.The toxic pathogen affecting the whole pathological process of atherosclerosis is a key factor for the disease to remain lingering and a cause of various cardiocerebrovascular diseases. Detoxification can be used to treat atherosclerosis so as to enhance the toxin-removing ability of the body and resist the damage to the body from the toxic pathogen.

  18. Intracranial calcifications. A pictorial review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grech, R; Grech, S; Mizzi, A

    2012-09-01

    Brain calcifications are a common radiographic finding. The pathogenesis is diverse and ranges from benign physiological calcifications to a variety of pathological disorders. Whereas certain calcifications are considered an incidental finding, their presence can sometimes be crucial in making a specific diagnosis. Several pathological conditions affecting the brain parenchyma are associated with calcifications and their recognition and location might help in narrowing the differential. Knowledge of physiological calcifications is essential to avoid misinterpretation. This review illustrates a broad spectrum of CNS disorders associated with calcifications, and tries to highlight the salient radiological findings.

  19. Atherosclerosis: a chronic inflammatory disease mediated by mast cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conti, Pio; Shaik-Dasthagirisaeb, Yazdami

    2015-01-01

    Inflammation is a process that plays an important role in the initiation and progression of atherosclerosis and immune disease, involving multiple cell types, including macrophages, T-lymphocytes, endothelial cells, smooth muscle cells and mast cells. The fundamental damage of atherosclerosis is the atheromatous or fibro-fatty plaque which is a lesion that causes several diseases. In atherosclerosis the innate immune response, which involves macrophages, is initiated by the arterial endothelial cells which respond to modified lipoproteins and lead to Th1 cell subset activation and generation of inflammatory cytokines and chemoattractant chemokines. Other immune cells, such as CD4+ T inflammatory cells, which play a critical role in the development and progression of atherosclerosis, and regulatory T cells [Treg], which have a protective effect on the development of atherosclerosis are involved. Considerable evidence indicates that mast cells and their products play a key role in inflammation and atherosclerosis. Activated mast cells can have detrimental effects, provoking matrix degradation, apoptosis, and enhancement as well as recruitment of inflammatory cells, which actively contributes to atherosclerosis and plaque formation. Here we discuss the relationship between atherosclerosis, inflammation and mast cells.

  20. Calcific tendonitis : a model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gohr, Claudia M; Fahey, Mark; Rosenthal, Ann K

    2007-01-01

    Calcific tendonitis is a common clinical condition associated with high rates of tendon rupture, prolonged symptoms, and poor response to therapy. Little is known about the pathogenesis of calcifications in tendons and consequently few effective therapies are available. We hypothesized that tendon calcification, like pathologic calcification in other sites, was generated by extracellular organelles known as matrix vesicles and that isolated matrix vesicles would constitute the basis for a useful model of this process. Tendon matrix vesicles were isolated from adult porcine patellar tendons using enzymatic digestion and differential centrifugation. Vesicle morphology was examined with electron microscopy. Levels of calcium, phosphate, pyrophosphate, ATP, and mineralization-associated enzymes were measured and compared with articular cartilage vesicles from porcine articular cartilage. Vesicles were embedded in agarose gels with or without type I collagen or dermatan sulfate and incubated in calcifying salt solution trace labeled with (45)calcium. (45)Calcium in the vesicle fraction was measured after 5-7 days. The type of mineral formed was determined by micro-x-ray diffraction. Matrix vesicles isolated from adult porcine tendon were similar morphologically to those obtained from articular cartilage. They contained mineralization-related enzymes and formed hydroxyapatite mineral in vitro. Mineralization was suppressed by levamisole and modulated by extracellular matrix components. Matrix vesicles isolated from tendons mineralize in vitro. This model may aid in the study of the pathogenesis of calcific tendonitis as well as serve as a means to identify effective therapies for this common disorder.

  1. Living with Atherosclerosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page from the NHLBI on Twitter. Living With Atherosclerosis Improved treatments have reduced the number of deaths ... Rate This Content: NEXT >> Featured Video What is atherosclerosis? 05/22/2014 Describes how the build-up ...

  2. Atherosclerosis and Stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... After Stroke Inspirational Stories Stroke Heroes Among Us Atherosclerosis and Stroke Updated:Oct 24,2016 Excerpted and ... cause difficulty walking and eventually gangrene. Stroke and atherosclerosis There are two types of ischemic stroke caused ...

  3. Dystrophic Calcification of the Prostate after Cryotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher Dru

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a previously undocumented complication of dystrophic calcification of the prostate after cryotherapy. An 87-year-old male presented with recurrent lower urinary tract infections and was found to have an obstructing large calcified mass in the right lobe of the prostate. Subsequently, he underwent transurethral resection of the prostate (TURP and bladder neck with laser lithotripsy to remove the calculus. We propose that chronic inflammation and necrosis of the prostate from cryotherapy resulted in dystrophic calcification of the prostate. As the use of cryotherapy for the treatment of localized prostate cancer continues to increase, it is important that clinicians be aware of this scenario and the technical challenges it poses.

  4. Dystrophic Calcification of the Prostate after Cryotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    We present a previously undocumented complication of dystrophic calcification of the prostate after cryotherapy. An 87-year-old male presented with recurrent lower urinary tract infections and was found to have an obstructing large calcified mass in the right lobe of the prostate. Subsequently, he underwent transurethral resection of the prostate (TURP) and bladder neck with laser lithotripsy to remove the calculus. We propose that chronic inflammation and necrosis of the prostate from cryotherapy resulted in dystrophic calcification of the prostate. As the use of cryotherapy for the treatment of localized prostate cancer continues to increase, it is important that clinicians be aware of this scenario and the technical challenges it poses. PMID:25548712

  5. Atherosclerosis and Physical Activity

    OpenAIRE

    Al-Mamari, Ali

    2009-01-01

    Atherosclerosis and coronary heart disease have been considered as major health problem worldwide. Abnormalities in lipids and lipoprotein metabolism and impairment of endothelial function have been implicated as the main contributing factors in atherosclerosis and its progression. Physical activity has been recognized as a preventive measure for atherosclerosis.

  6. Acute Prevertebral Calcific Tendinitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamm, Alexander; Jeffery, Caroline C; Ansari, Khalid; Naik, Sandeep

    2015-11-01

    We present a case of neck pain in a middle-aged woman, initially attributed to a retropharyngeal infection and treated with urgent intubation. With the help of computed tomography, the diagnosis was later revised to acute prevertebral calcific tendinitis, a self-limiting condition caused by abnormal calcium hydroxyapatite deposition in the longus colli muscles. It is critical to differentiate between these two disease entities due to dramatic differences in management. A discussion of acute prevertebral calcific tendinitis and its imaging findings is provided below.

  7. [Vascular Calcification - Pathological Mechanism and Clinical Application - . Role of vascular smooth muscle cells in vascular calcification].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurabayashi, Masahiko

    2015-05-01

    Vascular calcification is commonly seen with aging, chronic kidney disese (CKD), diabetes, and atherosclerosis, and is closely associated with cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Vascular calcification has long been regarded as the final stage of degeneration and necrosis of arterial wall and a passive, unregulated process. However, it is now known to be an active and tightly regulated process involved with phenotypic transition of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC) that resembles bone mineralization. Briefly, calcium deposits of atherosclerotic plaque consist of hydroxyapatite and may appear identical to fully formed lamellar bone. By using a genetic fate mapping strategy, VSMC of the vascular media give rise to the majority of the osteochondrogenic precursor- and chondrocyte-like cells observed in the calcified arterial media of MGP (- / -) mice. Osteogenic differentiation of VSMC is characterized by the expression of bone-related molecules including bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) -2, Msx2 and osteopontin, which are produced by osteoblasts and chondrocytes. Our recent findings are that (i) Runx2 and Notch1 induce osteogenic differentiation, and (ii) advanced glycation end-product (AGE) /receptor for AGE (RAGE) and palmitic acid promote osteogenic differentiation of VSMC. To understand of the molecular mechanisms of vascular calcification is now under intensive research area.

  8. Vinpocetine attenuates lipid accumulation and atherosclerosis formation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cai, Yujun [Aab Cardiovascular Research Institute, Department of Medicine, University of Rochester, 601 Elmwood Ave, Rochester, NY 14642 (United States); Li, Jian-Dong [Center for Inflammation, Immunity and Infection, and Department of Biology, Georgia State University, Atlanta, GA 30303 (United States); Yan, Chen, E-mail: Chen_Yan@urmc.rochester.edu [Aab Cardiovascular Research Institute, Department of Medicine, University of Rochester, 601 Elmwood Ave, Rochester, NY 14642 (United States)

    2013-05-10

    Highlights: •Vinpocetine attenuates hyperlipidemia-induced atherosclerosis in a mouse model. •Vinpocetine antagonizes ox-LDL uptake and accumulation in macrophages. •Vinpocetine blocks the induction of ox-LDL receptor LOX-1 in vitro and in vivo. -- Abstract: Atherosclerosis, the major cause of myocardial infarction and stroke, is a chronic arterial disease characterized by lipid deposition and inflammation in the vessel wall. Cholesterol, in low-density lipoprotein (LDL), plays a critical role in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. Vinpocetine, a derivative of the alkaloid vincamine, has long been used as a cerebral blood flow enhancer for treating cognitive impairment. Recent study indicated that vinpocetine is a potent anti-inflammatory agent. However, its role in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis remains unexplored. In the present study, we show that vinpocetine significantly reduced atherosclerotic lesion formation in ApoE knockout mice fed with a high-fat diet. In cultured murine macrophage RAW264.7 cells, vinpocetine markedly attenuated oxidized LDL (ox-LDL) uptake and foam cell formation. Moreover, vinpocetine greatly blocked the induction of ox-LDL receptor 1 (LOX-1) in cultured macrophages as well as in the LOX-1 level in atherosclerotic lesions. Taken together, our data reveal a novel role of vinpocetine in reduction of pathogenesis of atherosclerosis, at least partially through suppressing LOX-1 signaling pathway. Given the excellent safety profile of vinpocetine, this study suggests vinpocetine may be a therapeutic candidate for treating atherosclerosis.

  9. Immune Response to Lipoproteins in Atherosclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonia Samson

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Atherosclerosis, the underlying cause of cardiovascular disease, is characterized by chronic inflammation and altered immune response. Cholesterol is a well-known risk factor associated with the development of cardiovascular diseases. Elevated serum cholesterol is unique because it can lead to development of atherosclerosis in animals and humans even in the absence of other risk factors. Modifications of low-density lipoproteins mediated by oxidation, enzymatic degradation, and aggregation result in changes in their function and activate both innate and adaptive immune system. Oxidized low-density lipoprotein (LDL has been identified as one of the most important autoantigens in atherosclerosis. This escape from self-tolerance is dependent on the formation of oxidized phospholipids. The emerging understanding of the importance of immune responses against oxidized LDL in atherosclerosis has focused attention on the possibility of development of novel therapy for atherosclerosis. This review provides an overview of immune response to lipoproteins and the fascinating possibility of developing an immunomodulatory therapy for atherosclerosis.

  10. Incidental internal carotid artery calcifications on temporal bone CT in children

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koch, Bernadette; Jones, Blaise [Cincinnati Children' s Hospital Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Cincinnati, OH (United States); Blackham, Aaron [University of Cincinnati College of Medicine, Cincinnati, OH (United States)

    2007-02-15

    Incidental internal carotid artery (ICA) calcifications are occasionally noted on CT images of the brain and temporal bone. In adults, incidental calcifications have been correlated with increased incidence of hypercholesterolemia, cardiac disease, diabetes and carotid stenosis. To determine the incidence of incidental calcifications of the carotid siphon on temporal bone CT in children. We retrospectively reviewed 24 months of consecutive temporal bone CT examinations in children aged 18 years and younger. CT examinations on 663 patients were reviewed and the presence or absence of ICA calcifications was ranked as absent, questionable or definitive. In patients in whom definitive calcifications were identified, hospital charts were reviewed for evidence of diabetes mellitus, hypercholesterolemia, hypertriglyceridemia, hyperlipidemia and chronic renal disease as potential causes of early atherosclerosis. Of the 663 patients, 25% had definitive calcifications within the wall of the ICA: 6% of children younger than 2 years and 28% of children 12-19 years of age. Incidentally noted ICA calcifications are a common finding on temporal bone CT in children, most likely a physiologic response to turbulent flow at natural bends in the artery rather than secondary to underlying disease predisposing to early atherosclerotic calcification. (orig.)

  11. LXR signaling pathways and atherosclerosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calkin, Anna; Tontonoz, Peter

    2010-01-01

    First discovered as orphan receptors, liver X receptors (LXRs) were subsequently identified as the nuclear receptor target of the cholesterol metabolites, oxysterols.1 There are 2 LXR receptors encoded by distinct genes: LXRα is most highly expressed in the liver, adipose, kidney, adrenal tissues and macrophages, and LXRβ is ubiquitously expressed. Despite differential tissue distribution, these isoforms have 78% homology in their ligand-binding domain and appear to respond to the same endogenous ligands. Work over the past 10 years has shown that the LXR pathway regulates lipid metabolism and inflammation via both the induction and repression of target genes. Given the importance of cholesterol regulation and inflammation in the development of cardiovascular disease, it is not surprising that activation of the LXR pathway attenuates various mechanisms underlying atherosclerotic plaque development.2 In this minireview we will discuss the impact of the LXR pathway on both cholesterol metabolism and atherosclerosis. PMID:20631351

  12. Pineal calcification among black patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, K J

    1983-08-01

    A postmortem histopathological study was done in 233 pineal glands of black patients. Among them, 70 percent showed microscopic evidence of calcification in the pineal parenchyma. The frequency of calcification increased with age. However, the severity of calcification reached the peak in the 60 to 69 year old age group and then gradually declined. As compared to males, females had slightly higher frequency and reached the peak of severity in younger age groups. When pineal calcification was compared among patients with various malignancies, a higher frequency and more severe calcification were observed in patients with carcinoma of the prostate and the pancreas. A lower frequency and less severe calcification were observed in patients with carcinoma of the breast and the cervix. The results of this study emphasize the important role of sex hormone in genesis of pineal calcification.

  13. Atherosclerosis & inflammation: Macrophage heterogeneity in focus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stöger, J.L.

    2014-01-01

    Macrophages characteristically feature a considerable degree of heterogeneity and plasticity to accommodate for the enormous variety in stimuli and challenges that their microenvironment presents them with. By virtue of their activation status, these cells can be classified into one of several subse

  14. Oxyradical Stress, Endocannabinoids, and Atherosclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anberitha T. Matthews

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Atherosclerosis is responsible for most cardiovascular disease (CVD and is caused by several factors including hypertension, hypercholesterolemia, and chronic inflammation. Oxidants and electrophiles have roles in the pathophysiology of atherosclerosis and the concentrations of these reactive molecules are an important factor in disease initiation and progression. Overactive NADPH oxidase (Nox produces excess superoxide resulting in oxidized macromolecules, which is an important factor in atherogenesis. Although superoxide and reactive oxygen species (ROS have obvious toxic properties, they also have fundamental roles in signaling pathways that enable cells to adapt to stress. In addition to inflammation and ROS, the endocannabinoid system (eCB is also important in atherogenesis. Linkages have been postulated between the eCB system, Nox, oxidative stress, and atherosclerosis. For instance, CB2 receptor-evoked signaling has been shown to upregulate anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidative pathways, whereas CB1 signaling appears to induce opposite effects. The second messenger lipid molecule diacylglycerol is implicated in the regulation of Nox activity and diacylglycerol lipase β (DAGLβ is a key biosynthetic enzyme in the biosynthesis eCB ligand 2-arachidonylglycerol (2-AG. Furthermore, Nrf2 is a vital transcription factor that protects against the cytotoxic effects of both oxidant and electrophile stress. This review will highlight the role of reactive oxygen species (ROS in intracellular signaling and the impact of deregulated ROS-mediated signaling in atherogenesis. In addition, there is also emerging knowledge that the eCB system has an important role in atherogenesis. We will attempt to integrate oxidative stress and the eCB system into a conceptual framework that provides insights into this pathology.

  15. Rectus Femoris Tendon Calcification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zini, Raul; Panascì, Manlio; Papalia, Rocco; Franceschi, Francesco; Vasta, Sebastiano; Denaro, Vincenzo

    2014-01-01

    Background: Since it was developed, hip arthroscopy has become the favored treatment for femoroacetabular impingement. Due to recent considerable improvements, the indications for this technique have been widely extended. Injuries of the rectus femoris tendon origin, after an acute phase, could result in a chronic tendinopathy with calcium hydroxyapatite crystal deposition, leading to pain and loss of function. Traditionally, this condition is addressed by local injection of anesthetic and corticosteroids or, when conservative measures fail, by open excision of the calcific lesion by an anterior approach. Purpose: To assess whether arthroscopic excision of calcification of the proximal rectus is a safe and effective treatment. Study Design: Case series; Level of evidence, 4. Methods: Outcomes were studied from 6 top amateur athletes (age range, 30-43 years; mean, 32.6 years) affected by calcification of the proximal rectus who underwent arthroscopic excision of the calcification. Patients were preoperatively assessed radiographically, and diagnosis was confirmed by a 3-dimensional computed tomography scan. To evaluate the outcome, standardized hip rating scores were used pre- and postoperatively (at 6 and 12 months): the Hip disability and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score, Oxford Hip Score, and Modified Harris Hip Score. Moreover, visual analog scales (VAS) for pain, sport activity level (SAL), and activities of daily living (ADL) were also used. Results: One year after surgery, all patients reported satisfactory outcomes, with 3 of 6 rating their return-to-sport level as high as preinjury level, and the remaining 3 with a percentage higher than 80%. Five patients ranked their ability to carry on daily activities at 100%. Statistical analysis showed significant improvement of the Oxford Hip Score, the Modified Harris Hip Score, and all 3 VAS subscales (pain, SAL, and ADL) from pre- to latest postoperative assessment (P < .05). Conclusion: Arthroscopic excision of

  16. Survival of Atherosclerotic Calcifications in Skeletonized Material: Forensic and Pathological Implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biehler-Gomez, Lucie; Cappella, Annalisa; Castoldi, Elisa; Martrille, Laurent; Cattaneo, Cristina

    2017-07-18

    Atherosclerosis is a chronic inflammatory disease creating calcifying plaques in the arterial walls. Because its paleopathological diagnosis remains little studied on skeletal remains, its impact on forensic and archeological data is completely underestimated. Here, 24 skeletal remains from the Milano Cemetery Skeletal Collection have been studied to evaluate the chance of atherosclerotic calcification survival, retrieval, and identification. Through direct comparison with a known autopsy collection and literature, the identification and categorization of several types of calcifications were performed. Clothing elements such as tights or socks played a definitive role in the preservation of the calcifications; hence they are more likely to be found in forensic cases than in archeological ones. Therefore, vascular calcifications are possible to collect and identify in skeletal remains if sufficient care is given to their recovery. Consequently and as markers of the disease, such identification can provide valuable pathological information for forensic and archeological cases. © 2017 American Academy of Forensic Sciences.

  17. Evaluation and nonsurgical management of rotator cuff calcific tendinopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greis, Ari C; Derrington, Stephen M; McAuliffe, Matthew

    2015-04-01

    Rotator cuff calcific tendinopathy is a common finding that accounts for about 7% of patients with shoulder pain. There are numerous theories on the pathogenesis of rotator cuff calcific tendinopathy. The diagnosis is confirmed with radiography, MRI or ultrasound. There are numerous conservative treatment options available and most patients can be managed successfully without surgical intervention. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and multiple modalities are often used to manage pain and inflammation; physical therapy can help improve scapular mechanics and decrease dynamic impingement; ultrasound-guided needle aspiration and lavage techniques can provide long-term improvement in pain and function in these patients. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Atherosclerosis Induced by Chlamydophila pneumoniae: A Controversial Theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamidreza Honarmand

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available More than a century ago, inflammation and infection were considered to have atherogenic effects. The old idea that coronary heart disease (CHD possibly has an infectious etiology has only reemerged in recent years. Atherosclerosis is the main pathological process involved in CHD and is, logically, the first place to look for infectious etiology. The process of atherosclerosis itself provides the first hints of potential infectious cause. Smooth muscle proliferation, with subsequent intimal thickening, luminal narrowing, and endothelial degeneration, constitutes the natural history of atherosclerosis, being with the severity and speed of these changes. Both viral and bacterial pathogens have been proposed to be associated with the inflammatory changes found in atherosclerosis. Recently, Chlamydophila pneumoniae (C. pneumoniae has been implicated as a possible etiologic agent of coronary artery disease and atherosclerosis. New evidence which supports a role for C. pneumoniae in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis has emerged. C. pneumoniae has been detected in atherosclerotic arteries by several techniques, and the organism has been isolated from both coronary and carotid atheromas. Recent animal models have suggested that C. pneumoniae is capable of inducing atherosclerosis in both rabbit and mouse models of atherosclerosis. Furthermore, human clinical treatment studies which examined the use of antichlamydial macrolide antibiotics in patients with coronary atherosclerosis have been carried out. The causal relationship has not yet been proven, but ongoing large intervention trials and research on pathogenetic mechanisms may lead to the use of antimicrobial agents in the treatment of CHD in the future.

  19. Bilateral acute corneal calcification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freddo, T F; Leibowitz, H M

    1985-04-01

    A 38-year-old man with brittle, juvenile onset diabetes mellitus and bilateral severe dry eyes with recurrent corneal ulcers developed atypical band-shaped calcifications of both corneas during a 24-hour period. Serum calcium, phosphate, and carbon dioxide levels all were within normal limits. The patient was mildly uremic but was not in renal failure. When EDTA chelation failed to clear the deposits, partial keratectomies were performed in both eyes and the specimens were examined by light and electron microscopy, including energy dispersive x-ray analysis. Microscopic studies revealed an atypical calcific keratopathy which involved neither Bowman's layer nor the most superficial stromal lamellae. The deposits were confined to deeper lamellae in the anterior stroma and by electron microscopy were composed of extracellular crystalline aggregates. Energy dispersive x-ray analysis of these aggregates confirmed the presence of calcium and phosphate. Corneal dessication appeared to be a major contributing factor in the rapid formation of these deposits.

  20. Taurine and atherosclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murakami, Shigeru

    2014-01-01

    Taurine is abundantly present in most mammalian tissues and plays a role in many important physiological functions. Atherosclerosis is the underlying mechanism of cardiovascular disease including myocardial infarctions, strokes and peripheral artery disease and remains a major cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Studies conducted in laboratory animal models using both genetic and dietary models of hyperlipidemia have demonstrated that taurine supplementation retards the initiation and progression of atherosclerosis. Epidemiological studies have also suggested that taurine exerts preventive effects on cardiovascular diseases. The present review focuses on the effects of taurine on the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. In addition, the potential mechanisms by which taurine suppress the development of atherosclerosis will be discussed.

  1. Endogenous hydrogen sulfide is involved in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qiao, Wang [Department of Pediatrics, Peking University First Hospital, Beijing 100034 (China); Chaoshu, Tang [Department of Physiology and Pathophysiology, Health Sciences Center, Peking University, Beijing 100034 (China); Key Laboratory of Molecular Cardiovascular Medicine, Ministry of Education (China); Hongfang, Jin, E-mail: jinhongfang51@126.com [Department of Pediatrics, Peking University First Hospital, Beijing 100034 (China); Junbao, Du, E-mail: junbaodu1@126.com [Department of Pediatrics, Peking University First Hospital, Beijing 100034 (China)

    2010-05-28

    Atherosclerosis is a chronic, complex, and progressive pathological process in large and medium sized arteries. The exact mechanism of this process remains unclear. Hydrogen sulfide (H{sub 2}S), a novel gasotransmitter, was confirmed as playing a major role in the pathogenesis of many cardiovascular diseases. It plays a role in vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) proliferation and apoptosis, participates in the progress of hyperhomocysteinemia (HHCY), inhibits atherogenic modification of LDL, interferes with vascular calcification, intervenes with platelet function, and there are interactions between H{sub 2}S and inflammatory processes. The role of H{sub 2}S in atherosclerotic pathogenesis highlights the mysteries of atherosclerosis and inspires the search for innovative therapeutic strategies. Here, we review the studies to date that have considered the role of H{sub 2}S in atherosclerosis.

  2. Idiopathic arterial calcification in childhood

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patel, Maya [Department of Paediatric Radiology, Red Cross Children' s Hospital, Cape Town (South Africa); Red Cross Children' s Hospital, School of Child and Adolescent Health, University of Cape Town, Klipfontein Road, Rondebosch, Cape Town (South Africa); Andronikou, Savvas; Solomon, Rustum; Sinclair, Paul; McCulloch, Mignon [Department of Paediatric Radiology, Red Cross Children' s Hospital, Cape Town (South Africa)

    2004-08-01

    Idiopathic arterial calcification in infancy is usually fatal with death in early life and diagnosis at post mortem. This report describes a unique, late presentation with hypertension and cardiac failure in a child aged 33 months, found to have widespread arterial calcification at radiological imaging. The calcium-phosphate axis was normal and there was no other demonstrable cause for calcification. Additionally, the histological features of arterial calcification at renal biopsy paralleled the findings in infants with this disorder. The late presentation in this case is unusual and has not been previously reported. Ultrasound and CT are sensitive for calcification, and the disease should be suspected in children presenting with cardiac or respiratory manifestations and features of arterial calcification, where no metabolic cause is established. (orig.)

  3. Necrotic and apoptotic cells serve as nuclei for calcification on osteoblastic differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujita, Hirofumi; Yamamoto, Masanao; Ogino, Tetsuya; Kobuchi, Hirotsugu; Ohmoto, Naoko; Aoyama, Eriko; Oka, Takashi; Nakanishi, Tohru; Inoue, Keiji; Sasaki, Junzo

    2014-01-01

    A close relationship between cell death and pathological calcification has recently been reported, such as vascular calcification in atherosclerosis. However, the roles of cell death in calcification by osteoblast lineage have not been elucidated in detail. In this study, we investigated whether cell death is involved in the calcification on osteoblastic differentiation of human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (hMSC) under osteogenic culture in vitro. Apoptosis and necrosis occurred in an osteogenic culture of hMSC, and cell death preceded calcification. The generation of intracellular reactive oxygen species, chromatin condensation and fragmentation, and caspase-3 activation increased in this culture. A pan-caspase inhibitor (Z-VAD-FMK) and anti-oxidants (Tiron and n-acetylcysteine) inhibited osteogenic culture-induced cell death and calcification. Furthermore, calcification was significantly promoted by the addition of necrotic dead cells or its membrane fraction. Spontaneously dead cells by osteogenic culture and exogenously added necrotic cells were surrounded by calcium deposits. Induction of localized cell death by photodynamic treatment in the osteogenic culture resulted in co-localized calcification. These findings show that necrotic and apoptotic cell deaths were induced in an osteogenic culture of hMSC and indicated that both necrotic and apoptotic cells of osteoblast lineage served as nuclei for calcification on osteoblastic differentiation of hMSC in vitro.

  4. Medial arterial calcification, calcific aortic stenosis and mitral annular calcification in a diabetic patient with severe autonomic neuropathy.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Cronin, C C

    2012-02-03

    Medial arterial calcification (Monckeberg\\'s arteriosclerosis) is well described in diabetic patients with autonomic neuropathy. There is also a high prevalence of diabetes mellitus among subjects with calcific aortic stenosis and mitral annular calcification. We describe a diabetic patient with autonomic neuropathy and extensive medial arterial calcification who also had calcification of the aortic valve and of the mitral valve annulus. We propose that autonomic neuropathy may play a role in calcification of these structures at the base of the heart.

  5. Arterial calcification: Conscripted by collagen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Jordan D.

    2016-03-01

    In atherosclerotic plaques, patterns of calcification -- which have profound implications for plaque stability and vulnerability to rupture -- are determined by the collagen's content and patterning throughout the plaque.

  6. Intervertebral disc calcifications in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beluffi, G; Fiori, P; Sileo, C

    2009-03-01

    This study was done to assess the presence of both asymptomatic and symptomatic intervertebral disc calcifications in a large paediatric population. We retrospectively reviewed the radiographs taken during the past 26 years in children (age 0-18 years) undergoing imaging of the spine or of other body segments in which the spine was adequately depicted, to determine possible intervertebral disc calcifications. The following clinical evaluation was extrapolated from the patients' charts: presence of spinal symptoms, history of trauma, suspected or clinically evident scoliosis, suspected or clinically evident syndromes, bone dysplasias, and pre- or postoperative chest or abdominal X-rays. We detected intervertebral disc calcifications in six patients only. Five calcifications were asymptomatic (one newborn baby with Patau syndrome; three patients studied to rule out scoliosis, hypochondroplasia and syndromic traits; one for dyspnoea due to sunflower seeds inhalation). Only one was symptomatic, with acute neck pain. Calcifications varied in number from one in one patient to two to five in the others. Apart from the calcification in the patient with cervical pain, all calcifications were asymptomatic and constituted an incidental finding (particularly those detected at the thoracic level in the patient studied for sunflower-seed inhalation). Calcification shapes were either linear or round. Our series confirms that intervertebral disc calcifications are a rare finding in childhood and should not be a source of concern: symptomatic calcifications tend to regress spontaneously within a short time with or without therapy and immobilisation, whereas asymptomatic calcifications may last for years but disappear before the age of 20 years. Only very few cases, such as those of medullary compression or severe dysphagia due to anterior herniation of cervical discs, may require surgical procedures.

  7. Inflammation: an important mechanism for different clinical entities of coronary artery diseases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Jian-jun

    2005-01-01

    @@ Although atherosclerosis has been considered to be multi-factorial disease in which genetic, environmental, metabolic factors have been implicated, the gaps remain in our knowledge of the etiopathogenesis of atherosclerosis. There is mounting evidence that inflammation plays an important role in the initiation, development as well as evolution of atherosclerosis, suggesting that atherosclerosis is an inflammation disease.1,2 Although triggers and pathways of inflammation are probably multiple and different in different clinical settings, the data from animals as well as humans including our groups indicated that an inflammatory process was involved in all stages of atherosclerosis appeared in different clinical entities.

  8. Novel anti-inflammatory therapies for the treatment of atherosclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Razi; Spagnoli, Vincent; Tardif, Jean-Claude; L'Allier, Philippe L

    2015-06-01

    The underlying role of inflammation in atherosclerosis has been characterized. However, current treatment of coronary artery disease (CAD) predominantly consists of targeted reductions in serum lipoprotein levels rather than combating the deleterious effects of acute and chronic inflammation. Vascular inflammation acts by a number of different molecular and cellular pathways to contribute to atherogenesis. Over the last decades, both basic studies and clinical trials have provided evidence for the potential benefits of treatment of inflammation in CAD. During this period, development of pharmacotherapies directed towards inflammation in atherosclerosis has accelerated quickly. This review will highlight specific therapies targeting interleukin-1β (IL-1β), P-selectin and 5-lipoxygenase (5-LO). It will also aim to examine the anti-inflammatory effects of serpin administration, colchicine and intravenous HDL-directed treatment of CAD. We summarize the mechanistic rationale and evidence for these novel anti-inflammatory treatments at both the experimental and clinical levels.

  9. Inflammatory, metabolic, and genetic mechanisms of vascular calcification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demer, Linda L; Tintut, Yin

    2014-04-01

    This review centers on updating the active research area of vascular calcification. This pathology underlies substantial cardiovascular morbidity and mortality, through adverse mechanical effects on vascular compliance, vasomotion, and, most likely, plaque stability. Biomineralization is a complex, regulated process occurring widely throughout nature. Decades ago, its presence in the vasculature was considered a mere curiosity and an unregulated, dystrophic process that does not involve biological mechanisms. Although it remains controversial whether the process has any adaptive value or past evolutionary advantage, substantial advances have been made in understanding the biological mechanisms driving the process. Different types of calcific vasculopathy, such as inflammatory versus metabolic, have parallel mechanisms in skeletal bone calcification, such as intramembranous and endochondral ossification. Recent work has identified important regulatory roles for inflammation, oxidized lipids, elastin, alkaline phosphatase, osteoprogenitor cells, matrix γ-carboxyglutamic acid protein, transglutaminase, osteoclastic regulatory factors, phosphate regulatory hormones and receptors, apoptosis, prelamin A, autophagy, and microvesicles or microparticles similar to the matrix vesicles of skeletal bone. Recent work has uncovered fascinating interactions between matrix γ-carboxyglutamic acid protein, vitamin K, warfarin, and transport proteins. And, lastly, recent breakthroughs in inherited forms of calcific vasculopathy have identified the genes responsible as well as an unexpected overlap of phenotypes. Until recently, vascular calcification was considered a purely degenerative, unregulated process. Since then, investigative groups around the world have identified a wide range of causative mechanisms and regulatory pathways, and some of the recent developments are highlighted in this review.

  10. Apoptosis-mediated endothelial toxicity but not direct calcification or functional changes in anti-calcification proteins defines pathogenic effects of calcium phosphate bions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kutikhin, Anton G.; Velikanova, Elena A.; Mukhamadiyarov, Rinat A.; Glushkova, Tatiana V.; Borisov, Vadim V.; Matveeva, Vera G.; Antonova, Larisa V.; Filip’Ev, Dmitriy E.; Golovkin, Alexey S.; Shishkova, Daria K.; Burago, Andrey Yu.; Frolov, Alexey V.; Dolgov, Viktor Yu.; Efimova, Olga S.; Popova, Anna N.; Malysheva, Valentina Yu.; Vladimirov, Alexandr A.; Sozinov, Sergey A.; Ismagilov, Zinfer R.; Russakov, Dmitriy M.; Lomzov, Alexander A.; Pyshnyi, Dmitriy V.; Gutakovsky, Anton K.; Zhivodkov, Yuriy A.; Demidov, Evgeniy A.; Peltek, Sergey E.; Dolganyuk, Viatcheslav F.; Babich, Olga O.; Grigoriev, Evgeniy V.; Brusina, Elena B.; Barbarash, Olga L.; Yuzhalin, Arseniy E.

    2016-06-01

    Calcium phosphate bions (CPB) are biomimetic mineralo-organic nanoparticles which represent a physiological mechanism regulating the function, transport and disposal of calcium and phosphorus in the human body. We hypothesised that CPB may be pathogenic entities and even a cause of cardiovascular calcification. Here we revealed that CPB isolated from calcified atherosclerotic plaques and artificially synthesised CPB are morphologically and chemically indistinguishable entities. Their formation is accelerated along with the increase in calcium salts-phosphates/serum concentration ratio. Experiments in vitro and in vivo showed that pathogenic effects of CPB are defined by apoptosis-mediated endothelial toxicity but not by direct tissue calcification or functional changes in anti-calcification proteins. Since the factors underlying the formation of CPB and their pathogenic mechanism closely resemble those responsible for atherosclerosis development, further research in this direction may help us to uncover triggers of this disease.

  11. Recent advances in pathogenesis, assessment, and treatment of atherosclerosis [version 1; referees: 3 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. David Spence

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, there have been a number of advances in the pathogenesis and treatment of atherosclerosis and in assessing prognosis in carotid atherosclerosis. Risk stratification to improve vascular prevention by identifying patients most likely to benefit from intensive therapy is much improved by measuring carotid plaque burden. In patients with asymptomatic carotid stenosis, a number of modalities can be used to identify the 10-15% who could benefit from endarterectomy or stenting. Transcranial Doppler embolus detection, echolucency and ulceration on 3D ultrasound, intraplaque hemorrhage on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI, and reduced cerebrovascular reserve are useful already; new approaches including plaque texture on ultrasound and imaging of plaque inflammation and early calcification on positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT are in development. The discovery that the intestinal microbiome produces vasculotoxic metabolites from dietary constituents such as carnitine in meat (particularly red meat and phosphatidylcholine from egg yolk and other sources has revolutionized nutritional aspects of vascular prevention. Because many of these vasculotoxic metabolites are removed by the kidney, it is particularly important in patients with renal failure to limit their intake of red meat and egg yolk. A new approach to lowering low-density lipoprotein (LDL cholesterol by blocking the action of an enzyme that destroys LDL receptors promises to revolutionize vascular prevention once less costly treatments are developed, and a new approach to vascular prevention—“treating arteries instead of risk factors”—shows promise but requires randomized trials. These advances all promise to help in the quest to prevent strokes in high-risk patients.

  12. [Calcification in nonfunctioning transplanted kidneys].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peces, R; Sánchez, R J; Fernández, E J; Peces, C

    2007-01-01

    Failed renal allografts often are left in situ in patients who revert to chronic dialysis therapy or who undergo retransplantation. These organs may be the site of massive calcification despite their lack of physiological function. Calcification of an endstage renal allograft is sometimes found incidentally. We report here two patients who developed extensive calcification of the renal graft, one was on chronic hemodialysis and the other had a second renal transplantation with normal renal function. The precise pathogenesis of calcification and the factors which determine its tissue localization are unclear. Factors postulated to promote the development of metastatic calcification include an elevated calcium phosphate product, severe secondary hyperparathyroidism, aluminium toxicity and duration of dialytic therapy. In some cases local factors related with the chronic inflammatory rejection process are probably involved as well. However, the exact relative contribution of these factors remains unresolved. Unless specific clinical indications are present, transplant nephrectomy is not necessary for calcified end-stage renal allografts.

  13. Activated TLR signaling in atherosclerosis among women with lower Framingham risk score: the multi-ethnic study of atherosclerosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chiang-Ching Huang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Atherosclerosis is the leading cause of cardiovascular disease (CVD. Traditional risk factors can be used to identify individuals at high risk for developing CVD and are generally associated with the extent of atherosclerosis; however, substantial numbers of individuals at low or intermediate risk still develop atherosclerosis. RESULTS: A case-control study was performed using microarray gene expression profiling of peripheral blood from 119 healthy women in the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis cohort aged 50 or above. All participants had low (100 and carotid intima-media thickness (IMT >1.0 mm, whereas controls (N = 71 had CAC<10 and IMT <0.65 mm. We identified two major expression profiles significantly associated with significant atherosclerosis (odds ratio 4.85; P<0.001; among those with Framingham risk score <10%, the odds ratio was 5.30 (P<0.001. Ontology analysis of the gene signature reveals activation of a major innate immune pathway, toll-like receptors and IL-1R signaling, in individuals with significant atherosclerosis. CONCLUSION: Gene expression profiles of peripheral blood may be a useful tool to identify individuals with significant burden of atherosclerosis, even among those with low predicted risk by clinical factors. Furthermore, our data suggest an intimate connection between atherosclerosis and the innate immune system and inflammation via TLR signaling in lower risk individuals.

  14. Vitamin K status and vascular calcification: evidence from observational and clinical studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shea, M Kyla; Holden, Rachel M

    2012-03-01

    Vascular calcification occurs when calcium accumulates in the intima (associated with atherosclerosis) and/or media layers of the vessel wall. Coronary artery calcification (CAC) reflects the calcium burden within the intima and media of the coronary arteries. In population-based studies, CAC independently predicts cardiovascular disease (CVD) and mortality. A preventive role for vitamin K in vascular calcification has been proposed based on its role in activating matrix Gla protein (MGP), a calcification inhibitor that is expressed in vascular tissue. Although animal and in vitro data support this role of vitamin K, overall data from human studies are inconsistent. The majority of population-based studies have relied on vitamin K intake to measure status. Phylloquinone is the primary dietary form of vitamin K and available supplementation trials, albeit limited, suggest phylloquinone supplementation is relevant to CAC. Yet observational studies have found higher dietary menaquinone, but not phylloquinone, to be associated with less calcification. Vascular calcification is highly prevalent in certain patient populations, especially in those with chronic kidney disease (CKD), and it is plausible vitamin K may contribute to reducing vascular calcification in patients at higher risk. Subclinical vitamin K deficiency has been reported in CKD patients, but studies linking vitamin K status to calcification outcomes in CKD are needed to clarify whether or not improving vitamin K status is associated with improved vascular health in CKD. This review summarizes the available evidence of vitamin K and vascular calcification in population-based studies and clinic-based studies, with a specific focus on CKD patients.

  15. Histone deacetylases and atherosclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Xia-xia; Zhou, Tian; Wang, Xin-An; Tong, Xiao-hong; Ding, Jia-wang

    2015-06-01

    Atherosclerosis is the most common pathological process that leads to cardiovascular diseases, a disease of large- and medium-sized arteries that is characterized by a formation of atherosclerotic plaques consisting of necrotic cores, calcified regions, accumulated modified lipids, smooth muscle cells (SMCs), endothelial cells, leukocytes, and foam cells. Recently, the question about how to suppress the occurrence of atherosclerosis and alleviate the progress of cardiovascular disease becomes the hot topic. Accumulating evidence suggests that histone deacetylases(HDACs) play crucial roles in arteriosclerosis. This review summarizes the effect of HDACs and HDAC inhibitors(HDACi) on the progress of atherosclerosis.

  16. Connective tissue diseases and noninvasive evaluation of atherosclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ardita G

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Giorgio Ardita, Giacomo Failla, Paolo Maria Finocchiaro, Francesco Mugno, Luigi Attanasio, Salvatore Timineri, Michelangelo Maria Di SalvoCardiovascular Department, Angiology Unit, Ferrarotto Hospital, Catania, ItalyAbstract: Connective tissue diseases (CTDs are associated with increased risk of cardiovascular disease due to accelerated atherosclerosis. In patients with autoimmune disorders, in addition to traditional risk factors, an immune-mediated inflammatory process of the vasculature seems to contribute to atherogenesis. Several pathogenetic mechanisms have been proposed, including chronic inflammation and immunologic abnormalities, both able to produce vascular damage. Macrovascular atherosclerosis can be noninvasively evaluated by ultrasound measurement of carotid or femoral plaque. Subclinical atherosclerosis can be evaluated by well-established noninvasive techniques which rely on ultrasound detection of carotid intima-media thickness. Flow-mediated vasodilatation and arterial stiffness are considered markers of endothelial dysfunction and subclinical atherosclerosis, respectively, and have been recently found to be impaired early in a wide spectrum of autoimmune diseases. Carotid intima-media thickness turns out to be a leading marker of subclinical atherosclerosis, and many studies recognize its role as a predictor of future vascular events, both in non-CTD individuals and in CTD patients. In rheumatic diseases, flow-mediated dilatation and arterial stiffness prove to be strongly correlated with inflammation, disease damage index, and with subclinical atherosclerosis, although their prognostic role has not yet been conclusively shown. Systemic lupus erythematosus, rheumatoid arthritis, and likely antiphospholipid syndrome are better associated with premature and accelerated atherosclerosis. Inconclusive results were reported in systemic sclerosis.Keywords: rheumatic disease, subclinical atherosclerosis, arterial stiffness

  17. The dark side of innate immune memory: the development of atherosclerosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bekkering, S.

    2017-01-01

    Cardiovascular diseases, specifically atherosclerosis, are the leading cause of death worldwide. In the Netherlands alone, each year 100 people die from atherosclerosis. It is important to better understand the progression of this disease. In the last 15 years, the role of inflammation and the

  18. [Diet and atherosclerosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrido, J A; Garcés, C; de Oya, M

    1998-01-01

    The relationship between diet and atherosclerosis is due to the diet influence on lipoprotein composition. However, because of the multifactorial basis of the atherosclerosis, diet components have another potential intervention mechanisms in the atherosclerosis process, such as the influence on other cardiovascular risk factors (hypertension, obesity, diabetes) or the influence on the coagulation system and the relationship endothelium-platelets. We will review the effect of diet components on these factors, specially its effects on the haemostasia system, which alteration is responsible for provoking ischemic heart disease. We have to consider that the main objective when treating dyslipidaemias, besides of avoiding acute pancreatitis in cases of strong hypertrigliceridaemia, is to prevent arteriosclerosis development and its clinical manifestations such as ischemic heart disease. Besides, we know that genetic, in addition to provoke familial susceptibility to atherosclerosis, has an essential importance in the response to ambiental factors as diet is.

  19. Extra-coronary calcification (aortic valve calcification, mitral annular calcification, aortic valve ring calcification and thoracic aortic calcification) in HIV seropositive and seronegative men: Multicenter AIDS Cohort Study.

    OpenAIRE

    Rezaeian, P.; Miller, PE; Haberlen, SA; Razipour, A; Bahrami, H; Castillo, R.; Witt, MD; Kingsley, L; Palella, FJ; Nakanishi, R; Matsumoto, S.; Alani, A; Jacobson, LP; Post, WS; Budoff, MJ

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated an association between HIV infection and coronary artery disease (CAD); little is known about potential associations between HIV infection and extra-coronary calcification (ECC).We analyzed 621 HIV infected (HIV+) and 384 HIV uninfected (HIV-) men from the Multicenter AIDS Cohort Study who underwent non-contrast computed tomography (CT) from 2010-2013. Agatston scores were calculated for mitral annular calcification (MAC), aortic valve calcification (AVC), a...

  20. Effect of age on aortic atherosclerosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Michael A. Chen; Miwa Kawakubo; Patrick M. Colletti; Dongxiang Xu; Laurie LaBree Dustin; Robert Detrano; Stanley P Azen; Nathan D. Wong; Xue-Qiao Zhao

    2013-01-01

    Objective To examine the association of atherosclerosis burden in the survivors of an asymptomatic elderly cohort study and its relationship to other coronary risk factors (specifically, age) by evaluating aortic atherosclerotic wall burden by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Methods A total of 312 participants in an ongoing observational cohort study underwent cardiac and descending thoracic aorta imaging by MRI. Maximum wall thickness was measured and the mean wall thickness calculated. Wall/outer wall ratio was used as a normalized wall index (NWI) adjusted for artery size difference among participants. Percent wall volume (PWV) was calculated as NWI × 100. Results In this asymptomatic cohort (mean age: 76 years), the mean (SD) aortic wall area and wall thickness were 222 ± 45 mm2 and 2.7 ± 0.4 mm, respectively. Maximum wall thickness was 3.4 ± 0.6 mm, and PWV was 32% ± 4%. Women appeared to have smaller wall area, but after correcting for their smaller artery size, had significantly higher PWV than men (P = 0.03). Older age was associated with larger wall area (P = 0.04 for trend) with similar PWVs. However, there were no statistically significant associations between standard risk factors, Framingham global risk, or metabolic syndrome status, therapy for cholesterol or hypertension, coronary or aortic calcium score, and the aortic wall burden. Aortic calcification was associated with coronary calcification. Conclusions Asymptomatic elderly in this cohort had a greater descending thoracic aortic wall volume that correlated with age, and women had a significantly increased PWV compared to men. In these survivors, the atherosclerotic aortic wall burden was not significantly associated with traditional risk factors or with coronary or aortic calcium scores or coronary calcium progression. Results suggest that age, or as yet unidentified risk factor(s), may be responsible for the increase in atherosclerosis.

  1. Vascular and inflammatory stresses mediate atherosclerosis via RAGE and its ligands in apoE-/- mice

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Harja, Evis; Bu, De-xiu; Hudson, Barry I; Chang, Jong Sun; Shen, Xiaoping; Hallam, Kellie; Kalea, Anastasia Z; Lu, Yan; Rosario, Rosa H; Oruganti, Sai; Nikolla, Zana; Belov, Dmitri; Lalla, Evanthia; Ramasamy, Ravichandran; Yan, Shi Fang; Schmidt, Ann Marie

    2008-01-01

    .... Here, we demonstrate critical roles for RAGE and its ligands in vascular inflammation, endothelial dysfunction, and atherosclerotic plaque development in a mouse model of atherosclerosis, apoE-/- mice...

  2. Toll-Like Receptors, Their Ligands, and Atherosclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Conrad P. Hodgkinson

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Atherosclerosis is a disease characterized by inflammation in the arterial wall. Atherogenesis is dependent on the innate immune response involving activation of Toll-like receptors (TLRs and the expression of inflammatory proteins. TLRs, which recognize various pathogen-associated molecular patterns, are expressed in various cell types within the atherosclerotic plaque. Microbial agents are associated with an increased risk of atherosclerosis and this is, in part, due to activation of TLRs. Recently considerable evidence has been provided suggesting that endogenous proteins promote atherosclerosis by binding to TLRs. In this review, we describe the role of TLRs in atherosclerosis with particular emphasis on those atherogenic endogenous proteins that have been implicated as TLR ligands.

  3. T Lymphocyte Autoreactivity in Inflammatory Mechanisms Regulating Atherosclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisabetta Profumo

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Atherosclerosis has been clearly demonstrated to be a chronic inflammatory disease of the arterial wall. Both cells of the innate and the acquired immune system, particularly monocytes and T lymphocytes, are implicated in the atherogenic process, producing different cytokines with pro- and anti-inflammatory effects. The majority of pathogenic T cells involved in atherosclerosis are of the Th1 profile, that has been correlated positively with coronary artery disease. Many studies conducted to evaluate the molecular factors responsible for the activation of T cells have demonstrated that the main antigenic targets in atherosclerosis are modified endogenous structures. These self-molecules activate autoimmune reactions mainly characterized by the production of Th1 cytokines, thus sustaining the inflammatory mechanisms involved in endothelial dysfunction and plaque development. In this paper we will summarize the different T-cell subsets involved in atherosclerosis and the best characterized autoantigens involved in cardiovascular inflammation.

  4. Oxidative Stress-Mediated Atherosclerosis: Mechanisms and Therapies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xinyu Yang

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Atherogenesis, the formation of atherosclerotic plaques, is a complex process that involves several mechanisms, including endothelial dysfunction, neovascularization, vascular proliferation, apoptosis, matrix degradation, inflammation, and thrombosis. The pathogenesis and progression of atherosclerosis are explained differently by different scholars. One of the most common theories is the destruction of well-balanced homeostatic mechanisms, which incurs the oxidative stress. And oxidative stress is widely regarded as the redox status realized when an imbalance exists between antioxidant capability and activity species including reactive oxygen (ROS, nitrogen (RNS and halogen species, non-radical as well as free radical species. This occurrence results in cell injury due to direct oxidation of cellular protein, lipid, and DNA or via cell death signaling pathways responsible for accelerating atherogenesis. This paper discusses inflammation, mitochondria, autophagy, apoptosis, and epigenetics as they induce oxidative stress in atherosclerosis, as well as various treatments for antioxidative stress that may prevent atherosclerosis.

  5. Arthroscopic Treatment of Calcific Tendonitis

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Calcific tendonitis, or calcifying tendonitis, is a common disorder characterized by the multifocal accumulation of basic calcium phosphate crystals within the rotator cuff tendons. In most cases, the multifocal calcifications are located 1 to 2 cm from the insertion of the supraspinatus tendon on the greater tuberosity. The initial treatment should be nonoperative including oral anti-inflammatory medication and physical therapy. If this is unsuccessful, arthroscopic debridement of the deposi...

  6. Calcific tendinopathy of the shoulder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bureau, Nathalie J

    2013-02-01

    This review article presents the current knowledge on the epidemiology and the pathogenesis of calcific tendinopathy of the shoulder and discusses the clinical presentation in relation to the stage of the disease process and the appearance of the calcific deposits. The outcome and the available treatment modalities for this common shoulder disorder are also examined, emphasizing the technique of percutaneous lavage and aspiration under ultrasound guidance.

  7. Calcifications simulating peroneus longus tendinitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carvalho, A. de; Illum, F.; Joergensen, J.

    1984-06-01

    In two patients with sprains of the ankle joint calcification adjacent to the posterior tibial margin was evident in the lateral projection of a standard radiographic examination. Calcifying peroneus longus tendinitis was suggested. Further tangential views and computed tomography (CT) scan disclosed, however, that the calcifications in both patients were located in the tibial insertion of the posterior and inferior tibio-fibular ligament. In such cases, a correct diagnosis will avoid unnecessary treatment for a non-existent tendinitis.

  8. Lipids, atherosclerosis and CVD risk: is CRP an innocent bystander?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nordestgaard, B G; Zacho, J

    2009-01-01

    exclude that genetically elevated CRP cause CVD. CONCLUSION: These data suggest that elevated CRP per se does not cause CVD; however, inflammation per se possibly contributes to CVD. Elevated CRP levels more likely is a marker for the extent of atherosclerosis or for the inflammatory activity...

  9. Who Is at Risk for Atherosclerosis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... NHLBI on Twitter. Who Is at Risk for Atherosclerosis? The exact cause of atherosclerosis isn't known. ... role in atherosclerosis risk. Other Factors That Affect Atherosclerosis Other factors also may raise your risk for ...

  10. Coronary Artery Calcification in Japanese Men in Japan and Hawaii

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbott, Robert D.; Ueshima, Hirotsugu; Rodriguez, Beatriz L.; Kadowaki, Takashi; Masaki, Kamal H.; Willcox, Bradley J.; Sekikawa, Akira; Kuller, Lewis H.; Edmundowicz, Daniel; Shin, Chol; Kashiwagi, Atsunori; Nakamura, Yasuyuki; El-Saed, Aiman; Okamura, Tomonori; White, Roger; Curb, J. David

    2013-01-01

    Explanations for the low prevalence of atherosclerosis in Japan versus United States are often confounded with genetic variation. To help remove such confounding, coronary artery calcification (CAC), a marker of subclinical atherosclerosis, was compared between Japanese men in Japan and Japanese men in Hawaii. Findings are based on risk factor and CAC measurements that were made from 2001 to 2005 in 311 men in Japan and 300 men in Hawaii. Men were aged 40 to 50 years and without cardiovascular disease. After age-adjustment, there was a 3-fold excess in the odds of prevalent CAC scores ≥10 in Hawaii versus Japan (relative odds [RO] = 3.2; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 2.1,4.9). While men in Hawaii had a generally poorer risk factor profile, men in Japan were 4-times more likely to smoke cigarettes (49.5 vs. 12.7%, pHawaii versus Japan was 4.0 (95% CI = 2.2,7.4). Further studies are needed to identify factors that offer protection against atherosclerosis in Japanese men in Japan. PMID:17728270

  11. A preliminary study of periodontitis and vascular calcification compound model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MENGYun; DENGJing; PanKe-qing

    2015-01-01

    Objective This experiment is desired to establish a compound model of chronic periodontitis and vascular calcification,so as to study the relation of periodontal and vascular calcification.Methods Forty male Wistar rats were randomly divided into:control group(group C),periodontitis group(group CP),vascular calcification group(group VDN),compound group (group CP+VDN).Every groups accepted the corresponding manages to establish the animal model.Eight weeks later,al the rats were sacrificed and the fol owing items were observed:inflam-matory factor in serum were tested,Hematoxylin-eosin staining(HE)staining of vascular tissue were taken to test.Results Through detection of periodontal tissue,serum and vascular tissue,an-imal models were successful.Histopathologic observation revealed:obvious inflammation of periodontal tissue was obversed in group CP and CP+VDN.The red Mineralized nodules deposition in group VDN and CP+VDN were higher than in group C and CP(P<0.05)by HE staining,and that in group CP+VDN was significantly higher than in group VDN(P<0.05);Animals in group CP+VDN showed higher level of IL-1 in serum than that in group CP,VDN and C.Conclusion This study has demonstrated that periodontitis have some promoting ef ect on vascular cal-cification.

  12. Calcification prevention tablets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindsay, Geoffrey A.; Hasting, Michael A.; Gustavson, Michael A.

    1991-01-01

    Citric acid tablets, which slowly release citric acid when flushed with water, are under development by the Navy for calcification prevention. The citric acid dissolves calcium carbonate deposits and chelates the calcium. For use in urinals, a dispenser is not required because the tablets are non-toxic and safe to handle. The tablets are placed in the bottom of the urinal, and are consumed in several hundred flushes (the release rate can be tailored by adjusting the formulation). All of the ingredients are environmentally biodegradable. Mass production of the tablets on commercial tableting machines was demonstrated. The tablets are inexpensive (about 75 cents apiece). Incidences of clogged pipes and urinals were greatly decreased in long term shipboard tests. The corrosion rate of sewage collection pipe (90/10 Cu/Ni) in citric acid solution in the laboratory is several mils per year at conditions typically found in traps under the urinals. The only shipboard corrosion seen to date is of the yellow brass urinal tail pieces. While this is acceptable, the search for a nontoxic corrosion inhibitor is underway. The shelf life of the tablets is at least one year if stored at 50 percent relative humidity, and longer if stored in sealed plastic buckets.

  13. Phytosterols and atherosclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schrøder, Malene

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the major cause of premature deaths worldwide. Coronary heart disease is the most common CVD, caused by atherosclerosis in the coronary arteries. Atherosclerosis is a multifactorial disease influenced by both genetic and environmental factors. WHO has in 2007 listed...... for decades for their natural ability to reduce cholesterol levels in the blood. In the last decade numerous food products added phytosterol esters have been placed on the market, e.g. yellow fat spread, yoghurt, dressing. The products are being marketed as a natural means for people who want to lower...... than 3% brassicasterol are not accepted on the European market. The aim of the study was to investigate the effect of dietary supplementation of RSO derived sterol, with high content of brassicasterols, and stanol esters on the development of atherosclerosis in cholesterol-fed heterozygous WHHL rabbits...

  14. Molecular imaging of atherosclerosis in translational medicine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perrone-Filardi, Pasquale; Costanzo, Pierluigi; Marciano, Caterina; Vassallo, Enrico; Marsico, Fabio; Ruggiero, Donatella; Petretta, Maria Piera; Chiariello, Massimo [University Federico II, Department of Internal Medicine, Cardiovascular and Immunological Sciences, Naples (Italy); Dellegrottaglie, Santo [University Federico II, Department of Internal Medicine, Cardiovascular and Immunological Sciences, Naples (Italy); Mount Sinai Medical Center, Z. and M.A. Wiener Cardiovascular Institute and M.-J. and H.R. Kravis Center for Cardiovascular Health, New York, NY (United States); Rudd, James H.F. [University of Cambridge, School of Clinical Medicine, Cambridge (United Kingdom); Cuocolo, Alberto [University Federico II, Department of Biomorphological and Functional Sciences, Naples (Italy); SDN Foundation, Institute of Diagnostic and Nuclear Development, Naples (Italy)

    2011-05-15

    Functional characterization of atherosclerosis is a promising application of molecular imaging. Radionuclide-based techniques for molecular imaging in the large arteries (e.g. aorta and carotids), along with ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), have been studied both experimentally and in clinical studies. Technical factors including cardiac and respiratory motion, low spatial resolution and partial volume effects mean that noninvasive molecular imaging of atherosclerosis in the coronary arteries is not ready for prime time. Positron emission tomography imaging with fluorodeoxyglucose can measure vascular inflammation in the large arteries with high reproducibility, and signal change in response to anti-inflammatory therapy has been described. MRI has proven of value for quantifying carotid artery inflammation when iron oxide nanoparticles are used as a contrast agent. Macrophage accumulation of the iron particles allows regression of inflammation to be measured with drug therapy. Similarly, contrast-enhanced ultrasound imaging is also being evaluated for functional characterization of atherosclerotic plaques. For all of these techniques, however, large-scale clinical trials are mandatory to define the prognostic importance of the imaging signals in terms of risk of future vascular events. (orig.)

  15. Immune Vasculitis Induced Atherosclerosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    The relationship between immune vasculitis and atherosclerosis was studied. The experimental model of weanling rabbits for immune vasculitis was reproduced by intravenous injection of 10 % bovine serum albumin. There were 6 groups: group A, 25 weanling rabbits with immune vasculitis subject to coronary arteriography; group B, 10 normal mature rabbits subject to coronary arteriography; group C, 10 weanling rabbits subject to coronary arteriography; group D, 8 weanling rabbits with vasculitis and cholesterol diet; group E, 8 weanling rabbits receiving single cholesterol diet; group F: 8 weanling rabbits receiving basic diet. Four weeks later, coronary arteriography was performed in groups A, B and C. The rabbits in groups D, E and F were sacrificed for the study of pathological changes in the coronary artery after 12 weeks. The results showed that the dilatation of coronary artery occurred in 6 rabbits of group A, but in groups B and C, no dilatation of coronary artery appeared. In comparison with group E, more severe atherosclerosis occurred in group D, showing the thickened plaque, fibrous sclerosis and atherosclerotic lesion. Percentage of plaques covering aortic intima, incidence of atherosclerosis of small coronary arteries and degree of stenosis of coronary arteries were significantly higher in group D than in group E (P<0.01). No atherosclerosis changes were found in group F. It was concluded that in the acute phase, the serum immune vasculitis can induce the dilatation of coronary artery of some weanling rabbits, and aggravate the formation of atherosclerosis in rabbits fed with cholesterol diet. Immune vasculitis is a new risk factor of atherosclerosis and ischemic heart disease.

  16. Experimental Animal Models Evaluating the Causal Role of Lipoprotein(a) in Atherosclerosis and Aortic Stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeang, Calvin; Cotter, Bruno; Tsimikas, Sotirios

    2016-02-01

    Lipoprotein(a) [Lp(a)], comprised of apolipoprotein(a) [apo(a)] and a low-density lipoprotein-like particle, is a genetically determined, causal risk factor for cardiovascular disease and calcific aortic valve stenosis. Lp(a) is the major plasma lipoprotein carrier of oxidized phospholipids, is pro-inflammatory, inhibits plasminogen activation, and promotes smooth muscle cell proliferation, as defined mostly through in vitro studies. Although Lp(a) is not expressed in commonly studied laboratory animals, mouse and rabbit models transgenic for Lp(a) and apo(a) have been developed to address their pathogenicity in vivo. These models have provided significant insights into the pathophysiology of Lp(a), particularly in understanding the mechanisms of Lp(a) in mediating atherosclerosis. Studies in Lp(a)-transgenic mouse models have demonstrated that apo(a) is retained in atheromas and suggest that it promotes fatty streak formation. Furthermore, rabbit models have shown that Lp(a) promotes atherosclerosis and vascular calcification. However, many of these models have limitations. Mouse models need to be transgenic for both apo(a) and human apolipoprotein B-100 since apo(a) does not covalently associated with mouse apoB to form Lp(a). In established mouse and rabbit models of atherosclerosis, Lp(a) levels are low, generally model whereas over 40 isoforms exist in humans. Mouse models should also ideally be studied in an LDL receptor negative background for atherosclerosis studies, as mice don't develop sufficiently elevated plasma cholesterol to study atherosclerosis in detail. With recent data that cardiovascular disease and calcific aortic valve stenosis is causally mediated by the LPA gene, development of optimized Lp(a)-transgenic animal models will provide an opportunity to further understand the mechanistic role of Lp(a) in atherosclerosis and aortic stenosis and provide a platform to test novel therapies for cardiovascular disease.

  17. Calcification Transformation of Diasporic Bauxite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Qiuyue; Zhu, Xiaofeng; Lv, Guozhi; Zhang, Zimu; Yin, Zhengnan; Zhang, Tingan

    2016-06-01

    The disposal of red mud, which is a solid waste that is generated during the extraction of alumina from bauxite, is one of major problems faced by the aluminum industry. Alkali in red mud seeping under the soil may pollute land and water. The Northeastern University, China, has proposed a calcification-carbonation method to deal with low-grade bauxite or red mud. Its main purpose is to change the equilibrium phase of red mud to 2CaO·SiO2 and CaCO3 hydrometallurgically, so that recomposed alkali-free red mud can be widely used. We conducted calcification transformation experiments using diasporic bauxite sampled from Wenshan, and investigated the effects of parameters such as diasporic bauxite grain size, temperature and treatment time on the calcification transformation digestion rate, which is also termed the calcification transformation rate (CTR). The main phase in the calcification transformation slag (CTS) is hydrogarnet with different grain sizes. The CTR increases with decrease in diasporic bauxite grain size, or increase in temperature or reaction time. The CTR reaches a maximum of 87% after 120 min reaction at 240°C. The Na2O/Al2O3 ratio decreases with increase in temperature and reaches 1.5. The sodium content in the CTS decreases with increasing reaction time and is lower than that in the red mud treated using the Bayer process (4-12%).

  18. Yindanxinnaotong, a Chinese compound medicine, synergistically attenuates atherosclerosis progress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Long; Pan, Guo-feng; Zhang, Xiao-dong; Wang, Jian-lu; Wang, Wan-dan; Zhang, Jian-yong; Wang, Hui; Liang, Ri-xin; Sun, Xiao-bo

    2015-07-21

    Yindanxinnaotong (YD), a traditional Chinese medicine, has been introduced to clinical medicine for more than a decade, while its pharmacological properties are still not to be well addressed. This report aimed to explore the anti-atherosclerosis properties and underlying mechanisms of YD. We initially performed a computational prediction based on a network pharmacology simulation, which clued YD exerted synergistically anti-atherosclerosis properties by vascular endothelium protection, lipid-lowering, anti-inflammation, and anti-oxidation. These outcomes were then validated in atherosclerosis rats. The experiments provided evidences indicating YD's contribution in this study included, (1) significantly reduced the severity of atherosclerosis, inhibited reconstruction of the artery wall and regulated the lipid profile; (2) enhanced antioxidant power, strengthened the activity of antioxidant enzymes, and decreased malondialdhyde levels; (3) significantly increased the viability of umbilical vein endothelial cells exposed to oxidative stress due to pretreatment with YD; (4) significantly reduced the level of pro-inflammatory cytokines; (5) significantly down-regulated NF-kB/p65 and up-regulated IkB in the YD-treated groups. Overall, these results demonstrated that YD intervention relieves atherosclerosis through regulating lipids, reducing lipid particle deposition in the endothelial layer of artery, enhancing antioxidant power, and repressing inflammation activity by inhibiting the nuclear factor-kappa B signal pathway.

  19. Human interstitial cellular model in therapeutics of heart valve calcification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Caimei; Tang, Hai; Mei, Zijian; Li, Nichujie; Zeng, Zhi; Darko, Kwame Oteng; Yin, Yulong; Hu, Chien-An Andy; Yang, Xiaoping

    2017-05-23

    Calcific aortic valve disease is a common, severe heart condition that is currently with no proven, effective drug treatment and requires a surgical valve replacement or an entire heart explanation. Thus, developing novel, targeted therapeutic approaches becomes a major goal for cardiovascular disease research. To achieve this goal, isolated heart valve interstitial cells could be an advanced model to explore molecular mechanisms and measure drug efficacy. Based on this progress, molecular mechanisms that harbor components of  inflammation and fibrosis coupled with proteins, for example, BMP-2, TLRs, RANKL, Osteoprotegerin, have been proposed. Small molecules or antibodies targeting these proteins have shown promising efficacy for either reversing or slowing down calcification development in vitro. In this review, we summarize these potential therapeutics with some highlights of interstitial cellular models.

  20. Vasoreactivity, Inflammation and vascular effects of Thiazolidinediones in Insulin resistance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Martens, Fabrice Marcel Anne Clément

    2006-01-01

    In the pathophysiology of atherosclerosis, based on the respons to injury mechanism, the pathophysiological phenomenons endothelial dysfunction and inflammation are playing a pivitol role. Endothelial dysfunction is characterized by a shift towards reduced vasodilation, a pro-inflammatory state, a

  1. Vitamin K-antagonists accelerate atherosclerotic calcification and induce a vulnerable plaque phenotype.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leon J Schurgers

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Vitamin K-antagonists (VKA are treatment of choice and standard care for patients with venous thrombosis and thromboembolic risk. In experimental animal models as well as humans, VKA have been shown to promote medial elastocalcinosis. As vascular calcification is considered an independent risk factor for plaque instability, we here investigated the effect of VKA on coronary calcification in patients and on calcification of atherosclerotic plaques in the ApoE(-/- model of atherosclerosis. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: A total of 266 patients (133 VKA users and 133 gender and Framingham Risk Score matched non-VKA users underwent 64-slice MDCT to assess the degree of coronary artery disease (CAD. VKA-users developed significantly more calcified coronary plaques as compared to non-VKA users. ApoE(-/- mice (10 weeks received a Western type diet (WTD for 12 weeks, after which mice were fed a WTD supplemented with vitamin K(1 (VK(1, 1.5 mg/g or vitamin K(1 and warfarin (VK(1&W; 1.5 mg/g & 3.0 mg/g for 1 or 4 weeks, after which mice were sacrificed. Warfarin significantly increased frequency and extent of vascular calcification. Also, plaque calcification comprised microcalcification of the intimal layer. Furthermore, warfarin treatment decreased plaque expression of calcification regulatory protein carboxylated matrix Gla-protein, increased apoptosis and, surprisingly outward plaque remodeling, without affecting overall plaque burden. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: VKA use is associated with coronary artery plaque calcification in patients with suspected CAD and causes changes in plaque morphology with features of plaque vulnerability in ApoE(-/- mice. Our findings underscore the need for alternative anticoagulants that do not interfere with the vitamin K cycle.

  2. [About etiology and pathogenesis of atherosclerosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitruk, S K

    2013-01-01

    On the ground own researches and researches of other authors etiology and pathogenesis of atherosclerosis are proved and refuted existing concept about leading role of disturbance of lipid exchange and atherogenicity of lipoproteins of low and very low density. Established basic etiological factors of damage intima of artery and reason of penetration of lipoproteins in intima after her damage. Is determined that development and progression of atherosclerosis do not depend also from quantitative content of lipoproteins of low density in blood and from normalization of them under influence of drugs. According to our researches atherosclerosis is the polyetiological chronic disease basis of pathogeny which is infringement of blood supply (chronic microcirculatory insufficiency) in arterial wall causing damage of it, and in first place, damage of intima with her most vulnerable microcirculation; inflammation intima hence influence of endogenous and exogenous factors; destruction of antiaggregatic and fibrinolytic properties of intima in places of her damage; formation atherosclerotic plaque with level-by-level imposing of lipoproteins in result of cyclic process of restoration or balance between coagulation and anticoagulation of blood systems.

  3. Chronic rhinosinusitis, endothelial dysfunction, and atherosclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elcioglu, Omer Celal; Afsar, Baris; Bakan, Ali; Takir, Mumtaz; Ozkok, Abdullah; Oral, Alihan; Kostek, Osman; Basci, Semih; Kanbay, Asiye; Toprak, Aybala Erek; Bahat, Kubra Aydin; Kalcioglu, M Tayyar; Kanbay, Mehmet

    2016-05-01

    Chronic inflammation is associated with accelerated atherosclerosis, endothelial dysfunction (ED), and cardiovascular diseases. Because chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS) is an inflammatory disease, it may be associated with the development of ED and accelerated atherosclerosis. To investigate the relationship between CRS and carotid intima-media thickness (CIMT), flow-mediated dilation (FMD) of the brachial artery, and microalbuminuria. This cross-sectional study included 38 patients with CRS and 29 healthy controls. In addition to measuring spot urine albumin-creatinine ratios, FMD of the brachial artery and CIMT were assessed noninvasively. Patients with CRS had lower FMD scores (p = 0.031), higher CIMT scores (p = 0.005), and a higher urinary albumin-creatinine ratio (p = 0.036) compared with healthy controls. In a multivariate analysis, CIMT and FMD were independently associated with the presence of CRS. However, the relationship between urinary albumin and creatinine, and the presence of CRS was no longer observed. CRS is associated with ED and atherosclerosis, as indicated by decreased FMD and increased CIMT in patients with CRS. Further studies are necessary to identify the exact pathophysiologic mechanisms responsible for our findings.

  4. CT of schistosomal calcification of the intestine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fataar, S.; Bassiony, H.; Satyanath, S.; Rudwan, M.; Hebbar, G.; Khalifa, A.; Cherian, M.J.

    1985-01-01

    The spectrum of schistosomal colonic calcification on abdominal radiographs has been described. The appearance on computed tomography (CT) is equally distinctive and occurs with varying degrees of genitourinary calcification. The authors have experience in three cases with the appearance on CT of intestinal calcification due to schistosomiasis.

  5. Calcification of intracranial vessels in neurocysticercosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fernandez-Bouzas, A. [ENEP Iztacala, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Mexico (Mexico); Ballesteros-Maresma, A. [Radiologia Clinica de Cuernavaca (Mexico); Casian, G.; Hernandez-Martinez, P. [Hospital Juarez de Mexico S. S. (Mexico); Martinez-Lopez, M. [Fundacion Clinica Medica Sur (Mexico)

    2000-07-01

    We report calcification of intracranial vessels in neurocysticercosis. Calcification was observed in the middle cerebral arteries in two patients, and the circle of Willis in two others. The patients with middle cerebral artery calcification underwent CT with inhaled stable xenon and an area of mild hypoperfusion was observed in the ipsilateral cerebral hemisphere. (orig.)

  6. Chronic calcific tendinitis of the neck

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Newmark, H.; Zee, C.S.; Frankel, P.; Robinson, A.; Blau, L.; Gans, D.C.

    1981-12-01

    The authors present the first three cases of chronic calcific tendinits of the neck. This condition is diagnosed radiologically by the presence of calcification located just inferior to the anterior tubercle of C1. The calcification is at the insertion of the longus colli muscle. No soft tissue swelling is present and the patients are asymptomatic.

  7. Intracranial calcification in central diabetes insipidus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Kandari, Salwa Ramadan; Pandey, Tarun; Badawi, Mona H

    2008-01-01

    Intracranial calcification is a known but extremely rare complication of diabetes insipidus. To date, only 16 patients have been reported and all had the peripheral (nephrogenic) type of diabetes insipidus. We report a child with intracranial calcification complicating central diabetes insipidus. We also report a child with nephrogenic diabetes insipidus, and compare the patterns of intracranial calcification.

  8. Intracranial calcification in central diabetes insipidus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Al-Kandari, Salwa R. [Al Razi Hospital, Department of Clinical Radiology, Kuwait (Kuwait); Pandey, Tarun [Al Razi Hospital, Department of Clinical Radiology, Kuwait (Kuwait); University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Radiology Department, Little Rock, AR (United States); Badawi, Mona H. [Al-Adan Hospital, Department of Paediatrics, Kuwait (Kuwait)

    2008-01-15

    Intracranial calcification is a known but extremely rare complication of diabetes insipidus. To date, only 16 patients have been reported and all had the peripheral (nephrogenic) type of diabetes insipidus. We report a child with intracranial calcification complicating central diabetes insipidus. We also report a child with nephrogenic diabetes insipidus, and compare the patterns of intracranial calcification. (orig.)

  9. Cardiorespiratory Fitness and Atherosclerosis: Recent Data and Future Directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehanna, Emile; Hamik, Anne; Josephson, Richard A

    2016-05-01

    Historically, the relationship between exercise and the cardiovascular system was viewed as unidirectional, with a disease resulting in exercise limitation and hazard. This article reviews and explores the bidirectional nature, delineating the effects, generally positive, on the cardiovascular system and atherosclerosis. Exercise augments eNOS, affects redox potential, and favorably affects mediators of atherosclerosis including lipids, glucose homeostasis, and inflammation. There are direct effects on the vasculature as well as indirect benefits related to exercise-induced changes in body composition and skeletal muscle. Application of aerobic exercise to specific populations is described, with the hope that this knowledge will move the science forward and improve individual patient outcome.

  10. [¹⁸F]-fluorodeoxyglucose PET imaging of atherosclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blomberg, Björn Alexander; Høilund-Carlsen, Poul Flemming

    2015-01-01

    [(18)F]-fluorodeoxyglucose PET ((18)FDG PET) imaging has emerged as a promising tool for assessment of atherosclerosis. By targeting atherosclerotic plaque glycolysis, a marker for plaque inflammation and hypoxia, (18)FDG PET can assess plaque vulnerability and potentially predict risk...... of atherosclerosis-related disease, such as stroke and myocardial infarction. With excellent reproducibility, (18)FDG PET can be a surrogate end point in clinical drug trials, improving trial efficiency. This article summarizes key findings in the literature, discusses limitations of (18)FDG PET imaging...

  11. Coffee Consumption and Coronary Calcification: The Rotterdam Coronary Calcification Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Woudenbergh, van G.J.; Vliegenthart, R.; Rooij, van F.J.A.; Hofman, A.; Oudkerk, M.; Witteman, J.C.M.; Geleijnse, J.M.

    2008-01-01

    Background¿ The role of coffee in the cardiovascular system is not yet clear. We examined the relation of coffee intake with coronary calcification in a population-based cohort. Methods and Results¿ The study involved 1570 older men and women without coronary heart disease who participated in the Ro

  12. Coffee consumption and coronary calcification - The Rotterdam Coronary Calcification Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Woudenbergh, Geertruida J.; Vliegenthart, Rozemarijn; van Rooij, Frank J. A.; Hofman, Albert; Oudkerk, Matthijs; Witteman, Jacqueline C. M.; Geleijnse, Johanna M.

    2008-01-01

    Background-The role of coffee in the cardiovascular system is not yet clear. We examined the relation of coffee intake with coronary calcification in a population-based cohort. Methods and Results-The study involved 1570 older men and women without coronary heart disease who participated in the Rott

  13. Coffee consumption and coronary calcification: The Rotterdam coronary calcification study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    G.J. van Woudenbergh (Geertruida); R. Vliegenthart (Rozemarijn); F.J.A. van Rooij (Frank); A. Hofman (Albert); M. Oudkerk (Matthijs); J.C.M. Witteman (Jacqueline); J.M. Geleijnse (Marianne)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractBACKGROUND - The role of coffee in the cardiovascular system is not yet clear. We examined the relation of coffee intake with coronary calcification in a population-based cohort. METHODS AND RESULTS - The study involved 1570 older men and women without coronary heart disease who particip

  14. Acute retropharyngeal calcific tendinitis: a case report with unusual location of calcification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, So Young; Jin, Wook; Yang, Dal Mo [East-West Neo-Medical Center, College of Medicine, Kyung Hee University, Department of Radiology, Seoul (Korea); Lee, Sang Hun [East-West Neo Medical Center, College of Medicine, Kyung Hee University, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Seoul (Korea); Park, Ji Seon; Ryu, Kyung Nam [Kyung Hee University Medical Center, College of Medicine, Kyung Hee University, Department of Radiology, Seoul (Korea)

    2010-08-15

    Retropharyngeal calcific tendinitis is an inflammatory process caused by calcium hydroxyapatite crystal deposition in the longus colli tendon of the prevertebral space, and it may mimic a retropharyngeal infection or abscess. The diagnosis of retropharyngeal calcific tendinitis will be made radiologically by the detection of calcifications anterior to C1-C3 and prevertebral soft tissue swelling. We present a case of acute retropharyngeal calcific tendinitis with an unusual location of calcification anterior to the C5-C6 disc. (orig.)

  15. Microparticle-Induced Coagulation Relates to Coronary Artery Atherosclerosis in Severe Aortic Valve Stenosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick Horn

    Full Text Available Circulating microparticles (MPs derived from endothelial cells and blood cells bear procoagulant activity and promote thrombin generation. Thrombin exerts proinflammatory effects mediating the progression of atherosclerosis. Aortic valve stenosis may represent an atherosclerosis-like process involving both the aortic valve and the vascular system. The aim of this study was to investigate whether MP-induced thrombin generation is related to coronary atherosclerosis and aortic valve calcification.In a cross-sectional study of 55 patients with severe aortic valve stenosis, we assessed the coronary calcification score (CAC as indicator of total coronary atherosclerosis burden, and aortic valve calcification (AVC by computed tomography. Thrombin-antithrombin complex (TATc levels were measured as a marker for thrombin formation. Circulating MPs were characterized by flow cytometry according to the expression of established surface antigens and by measuring MP-induced thrombin generation.Patients with CAC score below the median were classified as patients with low CAC, patients with CAC Score above the median as high CAC. In patients with high CAC compared to patients with low CAC we detected higher levels of TATc, platelet-derived MPs (PMPs, endothelial-derived MPs (EMPs and MP-induced thrombin generation. Increased level of PMPs and MP-induced thrombin generation were independent predictors for the severity of CAC. In contrast, AVC Score did not differ between patients with high and low CAC and did neither correlate with MPs levels nor with MP-induced thrombin generation.In patients with severe aortic valve stenosis MP-induced thrombin generation was independently associated with the severity of CAC but not AVC indicating different pathomechanisms involved in coronary artery and aortic valve calcification.

  16. An abdominal aortic calcification as a RISK FACTOR FOR cardio -cerebral events in patients with peripheral arterial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. A. Zelinskiy

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. The patients with abdominal aortic calcification have a high risk of cardiocerebral events, but the pathways of them have not been reported so far. The goal of our study was to assess the structure and function of myocardium and to determine the morphological features of carotid artery atherosclerosis in patients with abdominal aortic calcification.Materials and methods. A total of 167 executive patients with peripheral arterial disease were enrolled in study. The study group included 85 patients with abdominal aortic calcification (men – 95.3 %; age median was – 66.6 ± 12. Control group included 82 patients without objective signs of abdominal aortic calcification. Abdominal aortic calcification was detected by CT imaging. All patients have undergone echocardiography and duplex scanning of carotid arteries.Results. Prevalence and severity of ischemic heart disease and cerebrovascular disease were statistically significant higher in patients with abdominal aortic calcification (91.7, 65.8 % vs. 67, 37.3 % (р < 0.01. We have found statistically significant differences between groupsin heart structure and function. A high left ventricular wall thickness (р < 0.01, left atrium dilation (р < 0.01 and enhanced of left ventricular mass (р < 0.05, ejection fraction reduction (р < 0.05 and more common diastolic dysfunction (р < 0.05 were determined inpatients with abdominal aortic calcification. An intima-media thickness of the common carotid artery was significantly higher in study group patients (1.38 ± 0.07 mm vs. 1.14 ± 0.06 mm (р < 0.001.Conclusion. Our findings suggested that abdominal aortic calcification is main reason of hypertrophy and dilation in the left heart due to enhanced peripheral resistance. Hypertrophy and dilation in the left heart is provided a high risk of cardiovascular events in patients withabdominal aortic calcification.

  17. Cholesterol and hematopoietic stem cells: inflammatory mediators of atherosclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, Jennifer K; Cimato, Thomas R

    2014-05-01

    Atherosclerosis causing heart attack and stroke is the leading cause of death in the modern world. Therapy for end-stage atherosclerotic disease using CD34(+) hematopoietic cells has shown promise in human clinical trials, and the in vivo function of hematopoietic and progenitor cells in atherogenesis is becoming apparent. Inflammation plays a central role in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. Cholesterol is a modifiable risk factor in atherosclerosis, but in many patients cholesterol levels are only mildly elevated. Those with high cholesterol levels often have elevated circulating monocyte and neutrophil counts. How cholesterol affects inflammatory cell levels was not well understood. Recent findings have provided new insight into the interaction among hematopoietic stem cells, cholesterol, and atherosclerosis. In mice, high cholesterol levels or inactivation of cholesterol efflux transporters have multiple effects on hematopoietic stem cells (HSPCs), including promoting their mobilization into the bloodstream, increasing proliferation, and differentiating HSPCs to the inflammatory monocytes and neutrophils that participate in atherosclerosis. Increased levels of interleukin-23 (IL-23) stimulate IL-17 production, resulting in granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) secretion, which subsequently leads to HSPC release into the bloodstream. Collectively, these findings clearly link elevated cholesterol levels to increased circulating HSPC levels and differentiation to inflammatory cells that participate in atherosclerosis. Seminal questions remain to be answered to understand how cholesterol affects HSPC-mobilizing cytokines and the role they play in atherosclerosis. Translation of findings in animal models to human subjects may include HSPCs as new targets for therapy to prevent or regress atherosclerosis in patients.

  18. Fibrinogen and P-selectin expression in atherosclerosis model of Sprague Dawley rat

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Bi-rong; PAN Ying; ZHAI Zhi-min

    2011-01-01

    Background Platelet P-selectin plays an important role in inflammation and contributes to thrombosis and hemostasis.Fibrinogen may take part in inflammation,thrombosis,and hemostasis via enhancement of platelet P-selectin expression.This study aimed to discover the correlation between them in atherosclerosis model of Sprague Dawley (SD) rat.Methods Diet-induced atherosclerosis SD rats were adopted as experimental models.The blood from the common abdominal aorta of the rats was obtained to measure the biochemical characteristics and for the check of flow cytometry.Then the aortas were separated carefully,taken out,put into 10% (w/v) neutral formalin for later use.Then fibrinogen and P-selectin expression were detected by flow cytometry and immunohistochemistry.Results SD rats were induced to atherosclerosis model by high fat diet and vitamin D2 injected.It was discovered that the binding of fibrinogen and the expression of P-selectin on the platelet increase in atherosclerosis model (Group H)than in that in the control group (Group Z),there were closely interrelated.High levels of fibrinogen and P-selectin express on the artery of atherosclerosis rat model.Conclusions Fibrinogen and P-selectin are concerned with atherosclerosis.Fibrinogen can interact with P-selectin in order to contribute to the development of atherosclerosis,high levels of fibrinogen and P-selectin can be regarded as risk factors for markers of atherosclerosis.

  19. Serum Resistin Level and Progression of Atherosclerosis during Glucocorticoid Therapy for Systemic Autoimmune Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Nahoko; Masuoka, Shotaro; Kusunoki, Natsuko; Nanki, Toshihiro; Kawai, Shinichi

    2016-09-16

    Adipokines are important regulators of several processes, including inflammation and atherosclerosis. In patients with systemic autoimmune diseases, atherosclerosis is accelerated with higher cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. We prospectively investigated the association of adipokines and glucocorticoid therapy with progression of premature atherosclerosis in 38 patients starting glucocorticoid therapy for systemic autoimmune diseases. To detect premature atherosclerosis, carotid ultrasonography was performed at initiation of glucocorticoid therapy and after a mean three-year follow-up period. The ankle-brachial pressure index and cardio-ankle vascular index (CAVI) were measured. Serum adipokine levels were determined with enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay kits. Twenty-three patients (60.5%) had carotid artery plaque at baseline. The carotid artery intima-media thickness (IMT) increased significantly during follow-up. Glucocorticoids reduced the serum resistin level, while increasing serum leptin and high molecular weight-adiponectin. There was slower progression of atherosclerosis (carotid IMT and CAVI) at follow-up in patients with greater reduction of serum resistin and with higher cumulative prednisolone dose. In conclusion, progression of premature atherosclerosis occurred at an early stage of systemic autoimmune diseases before initiation of glucocorticoid therapy. Since resistin, an inflammation and atherosclerosis related adipokine, is reduced by glucocorticoids, glucocortidoid therapy may not accelerate atherosclerosis in patients with systemic autoimmune diseases.

  20. Probiotics and atherosclerosis – a new challenge?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chan Yee Kwan

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Background Atherosclerosis is the major cause of cardiovascular disease and stroke, which are among the top 10 leading causes of death worldwide. Pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs can activate toll-like receptors (TLRs and activate nuclear factor kappa B (NFκB signaling, a central pathway in inflammation, which regulates genes that encode proinflammatory molecules essential in atherogenesis. Lipopolysaccharides (LPS, which is unique to gram negative bacteria, as well as peptidoglycan (PGN, which is found in gram positive bacteria are PAMPS and ligands of TLR4 and TLR2, respectively, both of which are essential in plaque progression in atherosclerosis. Gastrointestinal tract is suggested to be the major site for absorption and translocation of TLR2 and TLR4 stimulants. Inflammation can result in a ‘leaky gut’ that leads to higher bacterial translocation, eventually the accumulation of LPS and PGN would activate TLRs and trigger inflammation through NFκB and promote further systemic complication like atherosclerosis. Probiotics, can protect the intestinal barrier to reduce bacterial translocation and have potential systemic anti-inflammatory properties.To evaluate whether probiotics can help reduce atherosclerotic development using in vivo study.Apolipoprotein E knockout (ApoE−/ −  mice were fed on high fat diet alone, with telmisartan (Tel (1 or 5 mg/kg/day, positive controls or with probiotics (VSL#3/LGG with or without Tel (1 mg/kg/day for 12 weeks.Probiotics, Tel, or a combination of both reduced lesion size at the aortic root significantly; VSL#3 reduced serum inflammatory adhesion molecules soluble E- (sE-selectin, soluble intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (sICAM-1, soluble vascular cell adhesion molecule 1 (sVCAM-1, and plaque disrupting factor matrix metalloproteinase (MMP-9 significantly; probiotics and Tel at 5 mg/kg/day could induce changes in gut microbiota population; the efficiency of lesion reduction seemed

  1. Arthroscopic treatment of calcific tendonitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barber, F Alan; Cowden, Courtney H

    2014-04-01

    Calcific tendonitis, or calcifying tendonitis, is a common disorder characterized by the multifocal accumulation of basic calcium phosphate crystals within the rotator cuff tendons. In most cases, the multifocal calcifications are located 1 to 2 cm from the insertion of the supraspinatus tendon on the greater tuberosity. The initial treatment should be nonoperative including oral anti-inflammatory medication and physical therapy. If this is unsuccessful, arthroscopic debridement of the deposit is effective. The technique used is an arthroscopic localization and debridement without associated subacromial decompression. The rotator cuff should be evaluated for partial- and full-thickness tears before and after the debridement of calcifications. If a partial- or full-thickness rotator cuff tendon tear is identified, it should be treated in a fashion consistent with those without associated calcium deposits. In our hands, tears 5 mm or greater in depth are repaired using a tendon-to-tendon or tendon-to-bone technique. Tears with less depth are debrided and then left alone. Arthroscopic debridement of calcific tendonitis can yield excellent functional results and high patient satisfaction.

  2. Genetic Susceptibility to Atherosclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanja Kovacic

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Atherosclerosis is a complex multifocal arterial disease involving interactions of multiple genetic and environmental factors. Advances in techniques of molecular genetics have revealed that genetic ground significantly influences susceptibility to atherosclerotic vascular diseases. Besides further investigations of monogenetic diseases, candidate genes, genetic polymorphisms, and susceptibility loci associated with atherosclerotic diseases have been identified in recent years, and their number is rapidly increasing. This paper discusses main genetic investigations fields associated with human atherosclerotic vascular diseases. The paper concludes with a discussion of the directions and implications of future genetic research in arteriosclerosis with an emphasis on prospective prediction from an early age of individuals who are predisposed to develop premature atherosclerosis as well as to facilitate the discovery of novel drug targets.

  3. Blood pressure and atherosclerosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    2008412 Association between single nucleotide polymorphisms of matrix metalloproteinase-3 gene and the severity of coronary atherosclerosis in patients with coronary artery disease. WU Naqiong(吴娜琼),et al. Cardiovasc Instit, Fuwai Hosp, Beijing 100037. Chin J Cardiol 2008;36(6):501-505. Objective To investigate the association between the severity of coronary arteries in patients with coronary artery disease and the single nucleotide polymorphisms of MMP-3 gene.

  4. Alcohol and Atherosclerosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gao Yinglan; Song Jingyu; Jin Junshuo; Zhong Xiuhong; Ren Xiangshan; Liu Shuangping

    2005-01-01

    Objectives To study the relationship between alcohol and atherosclerosis (AS).Methods The paper reviewed the mechanism of the alcohol leading to AS from four aspects such as the introduction of alcohol and AS, imbalance of oxidationantioxidation system, oxygen free radical (OFR) and endothelium cell (EC) apoptosis, apoptosis and AS.Results Excessive alcohol could lead to imbalance of oxidation-antioxidation system, and increase OFR, in the meanwhile, OFR could lead to EC apoptosis,which could lead to AS.

  5. Nuclear Transport Modulation Reduces Hypercholesterolemia, Atherosclerosis, and Fatty Liver

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yan; Major, Amy S.; Zienkiewicz, Jozef; Gabriel, Curtis L.; Veach, Ruth Ann; Moore, Daniel J.; Collins, Robert D.; Hawiger, Jacek

    2013-01-01

    Background Elevated cholesterol and triglycerides in blood lead to atherosclerosis and fatty liver, contributing to rising cardiovascular and hepatobiliary morbidity and mortality worldwide. Methods and Results A cell‐penetrating nuclear transport modifier (NTM) reduced hyperlipidemia, atherosclerosis, and fatty liver in low‐density lipoprotein receptor‐deficient mice fed a Western diet. NTM treatment led to lower cholesterol and triglyceride levels in blood compared with control animals (36% and 53%, respectively; Ptriglyceride, and fatty acid synthesis. NTM‐modulated translocation of SREBPs to the nucleus was associated with attenuated transactivation of their cognate genes that contribute to hyperlipidemia. Conclusions Two‐pronged control of inflammation and dyslipidemia by modulating nuclear transport of their critical regulators offers a new approach to comprehensive amelioration of hyperlipidemia, atherosclerosis, fatty liver, and their potential complications. PMID:23563994

  6. Fetal programming of atherosclerosis: possible role of the mitochondria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leduc, Line; Levy, Emile; Bouity-Voubou, Maurice; Delvin, Edgard

    2010-04-01

    Growing evidence indicates that being small size at birth from malnutrition is associated with an increased risk of developing type 2 diabetes (T2D), metabolic syndrome and cardiovascular disease in adulthood. Atherosclerosis is common to these aforementioned disorders, and oxidative stress and chronic inflammation are now considered as initiating events in its development, with endothelial cell dysfunction being an early, fundamental step. According to the fetal programming hypothesis, growth-restricted neonates exposed to placental insufficiency exhibit endothelial cell dysfunction very early in life that later on predisposes them to atherosclerosis. Although many investigations have reported early alterations in vascular function in children and adolescents with low birth weight, the mechanisms of such fetal programming of atherosclerosis remain largely unknown. Experimental studies have demonstrated that low birth weight infants are prenatally subjected to conditions of oxidative stress and inflammation that might be involved in the later occurrence of atherosclerosis. Arterial endothelial dysfunction has been encountered in term infants, children and young adults with low birth weight. The loss of appropriate endothelium function with decreased nitric oxide production or activity, manifested as impaired vasodilatation, is considered a basic step in atherosclerosis development and progression. Several lines of evidence indicate that mitochondrial damage is central to this process and that reactive oxygen species (ROS) may act as a double-edged sword. On the one hand, it is well-accepted that the mitochondria are a major source of chronic ROS production under physiological conditions. On the other hand, it is known that ROS generation damages lipids, proteins and mitochondrial DNA, leading to dysregulated mitochondrial function. Elevated mitochondrial ROS production is associated with endothelial cell dysfunction as well as vascular smooth muscle cell

  7. Combined treatment with olmesartan medoxomil and amlodipine besylate attenuates atherosclerotic lesion progression in a model of advanced atherosclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sievers P

    2015-07-01

    did not reach significance. However, a trend toward a decrease in lesion size in the amlodipine besylate-treated animals could be observed. In the histological analysis of atherosclerotic lesion composition, significantly thicker fibrous caps were found in treatment with amlodipine besylate (amlodipine: 5.12±0.26 µm, n=6; versus control: 3.98±0.18 µm, n=10; P<0.01. Furthermore, all sections revealed morphological signs of calcification, but no difference could be detected. Treatment with the combination of olmesartan medoxomil and amlodipine besylate showed no effect on lesion composition. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays of nuclear extracts demonstrated reduced activity of the transcription factor NF-κB when treated with olmesartan medoxomil, amlodipine besylate, or their combination, as compared to controls.Conclusion: Combined treatment with olmesartan medoxomil and amlodipine besylate attenuated atherosclerotic lesion progression, possibly due to anti-inflammatory mechanisms. Our data support the hypothesis that even in advanced atherosclerosis anti-inflammatory treatment, using angiotensin II type 1 receptor blockers and calcium channel antagonists of the dihydropyridine type can attenuate atherosclerotic lesion progression.Keywords: advanced atherosclerosis, AT1 receptor blocker, calcium channel antagonist, inflammation, NF-κB, ApoE

  8. Immunity and early atherosclerosis in the course of systemic lupus erythematosus, mixed connective tissue disease and antiphospholipid syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haładyj, Ewa; Paradowska-Gorycka, Agnieszka; Felis-Giemza, Anna; Olesińska, Marzena

    2016-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is a chronic inflammatory disease of the arteries associated with various risk factors that promote lipid abnormalities, development and progression of atherosclerotic lesions, plaque rupture, and vascular thrombosis. Atherosclerosis is accelerated in autoimmune diseases. Non-invasive investigations showed increased intima-media thickness (IMT), carotid plaque, and coronary artery calcifications in patients with antiphospholipid syndrome, systemic lupus erythematosus and mixed connective tissue disease compared to controls. The balance between the proinflammatory and anti-inflammatory cytokines allows the immune equilibrium to be maintained. In autoimmune diseases the prevalence of proinflammatory factors leads to premature atherosclerosis. This review presents complementary knowledge on innate and adaptive immunity, cytokines and the role of inflammasomes in progression of early atherosclerosis.

  9. Immunity and early atherosclerosis in the course of systemic lupus erythematosus, mixed connective tissue disease and antiphospholipid syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paradowska-Gorycka, Agnieszka; Felis-Giemza, Anna; Olesińska, Marzena

    2016-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is a chronic inflammatory disease of the arteries associated with various risk factors that promote lipid abnormalities, development and progression of atherosclerotic lesions, plaque rupture, and vascular thrombosis. Atherosclerosis is accelerated in autoimmune diseases. Non-invasive investigations showed increased intima-media thickness (IMT), carotid plaque, and coronary artery calcifications in patients with antiphospholipid syndrome, systemic lupus erythematosus and mixed connective tissue disease compared to controls. The balance between the proinflammatory and anti-inflammatory cytokines allows the immune equilibrium to be maintained. In autoimmune diseases the prevalence of proinflammatory factors leads to premature atherosclerosis. This review presents complementary knowledge on innate and adaptive immunity, cytokines and the role of inflammasomes in progression of early atherosclerosis. PMID:27826173

  10. Association between circulating vitamin K1 and coronary calcium progression in community-dwelling adults: the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    While animal studies found vitamin K treatment reduced vascular calcification, human data are limited. Using a case-cohort design, we determined the association between vitamin K status and coronary artery calcium (CAC) progression in the Multi-ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis. Serum phylloquinone (v...

  11. Assessment by cardiovascular magnetic resonance, electron beam computed tomography, and carotid ultrasonography of the distribution of subclinical atherosclerosis across Framingham risk strata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kathiresan, Sekar; Larson, Martin G; Keyes, Michelle J; Polak, Joseph F; Wolf, Philip A; D'Agostino, Ralph B; Jaffer, Farouc A; Clouse, Melvin E; Levy, Daniel; Manning, Warren J; O'Donnell, Christopher J

    2007-02-01

    Screening for subclinical atherosclerosis has been advocated for individuals at intermediate global risk for coronary heart disease (CHD). However, the distribution of subclinical atherosclerosis test values across CHD risk strata is unknown. We studied a stratified random sample of 292 participants (mean age 59.5 years, 50% women) from the offspring cohort of the Framingham Heart Study who were free of clinically apparent cardiovascular disease. We assessed abdominal and thoracic aortic plaque burden by cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR), coronary artery calcification (CAC) and thoracic aortic calcification (TAC) by electron beam computed tomography, and common carotid intima-media thickness (C-IMT) by ultrasonography. We categorized the upper 20% of each measurement as a high level of atherosclerosis and evaluated these variables across clinically relevant Framingham CHD risk score strata (low, intermediate, and high risk). In age-adjusted analyses in men and women, correlations across CMR aortic plaque, CAC, TAC, and C-IMT were low (maximum r = 0.30 for CAC:TAC in women, p or=2 measurements. However, different participants were identified as having high atherosclerosis by each modality. For example, in a comparison of the overlap across CMR aortic plaque, CAC, and C-IMT, only 4% of men and 16% of women were classified as having high atherosclerosis on all 3 measurements. In conclusion, in a community-based sample, correlations among subclinical atherosclerosis test results are low, and a substantial proportion has high levels of subclinical atherosclerosis detected on >or=2 imaging tests.

  12. Role of Resistin in Inflammation and Inflammation-Related Diseases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shanshan Pang; Yingying Le

    2006-01-01

    Resistin is a newly identified adipocyte secreted hormone belonging to a cysteine-rich protein family. It is expressed in white adipose tissues in rodents and has also been found in several other tissues in human. Insulin, glucose,many cytokines and anti-diabetic thiazolidinediones are regulators of resistin gene expression. Resistin was firstly proposed to be involved in insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes. Recently, it was found to be relevant to inflammation and inflammation-related diseases like atherosclerosis and arthritis.

  13. Immune mechanisms in atherosclerosis, especially in diabetes type 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frostegård, Johan

    2013-10-29

    Atherosclerosis and ensuing cardiovascular disease (CVD) are major complications of diabetes type 2. Atherosclerosis is a chronic inflammatory condition involving immunocompetent cells of different types present in the lesions. Even though inflammation and immune activation may be more pronounced in atherosclerosis in diabetes type 2, there does not appear to be any major differences between diabetics and non-diabetics. Similar factors are thus implicated in atherosclerosis-associated immune activation in both groups. The cause of immune activation is not known and different mutually non-exclusive possibilities exist. Oxidized and/or enzymatically modified forms of low-density lipoprotein (OxLDL) and dead cells are present in atherosclerotic plaques. OxLDL could play a role, being pro-inflammatory and immunostimulatory as it activates T-cells and is cytotoxic at higher concentrations. Inflammatory phospholipids in OxLDL are implicated, with phosphorylcholine (PC) as one of the exposed antigens. Antibodies against PC (anti-PC) are anti-atherogenic in mouse studies, and anti-PC is negatively associated with development of atherosclerosis and CVD in humans. Bacteria and virus have been discussed as potential causes of immune activation, but it has been difficult to find direct evidence supporting this hypothesis, and antibiotic trials in humans have been negative or inconclusive. Heat shock proteins (HSP) could be one major target for atherogenic immune reactions. More direct causes of plaque rupture include cytokines such as interleukin 1β (IL-1β), tumor necrosis factor (TNF), and also lipid mediators as leukotrienes. In addition, in diabetes, hyperglycemia and oxidative stress appear to accelerate the development of atherosclerosis, one mechanism could be via promotion of immune reactions. To prove that immune reactions are causative of atherosclerosis and CVD, further studies with immune-modulatory treatments are needed.

  14. Interleukin 27 inhibits atherosclerosis via immunoregulation of macrophages in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirase, Tetsuaki; Hara, Hiromitsu; Miyazaki, Yoshiyuki; Ide, Noriko; Nishimoto-Hazuku, Ai; Fujimoto, Hirokazu; Saris, Christiaan J M; Yoshida, Hiroki; Node, Koichi

    2013-08-01

    Chronic inflammation in arterial wall that is driven by immune cells and cytokines plays pivotal roles in the development of atherosclerosis. Interleukin 27 (IL-27) is a member of the IL-12 family of cytokines that consists of IL-27p28 and Epstein-Barr virus induced gene 3 (EBI3) and has anti-inflammatory properties that regulate T cell polarization and cytokine production. IL-27-deficient (Ldlr-/-Ebi3-/-) and IL-27 receptor-deficient (Ldlr-/-WSX-1-/-) Ldlr-/- mice were generated and fed with a high-cholesterol diet to induce atherosclerosis. Roles of bone marrow-derived cells in vivo and macrophages in vitro were studied using bone marrow reconstitution by transplantation and cultured peritoneal macrophages, respectively. We demonstrate that mice lacking IL-27 or IL-27 receptor are more susceptible to atherosclerosis compared with wild type due to enhanced accumulation and activation of macrophages in arterial walls. The number of circulating proinflammatory Ly6C(hi) monocytes showed no significant difference between wild-type mice and mice lacking IL-27 or IL-27 receptor. Administration of IL-27 suppressed the development of atherosclerosis in vivo and macrophage activation in vitro that was indicated by increased uptake of modified low-density lipoprotein and augmented production of proinflammatory cytokines. These findings define a novel inhibitory role for IL-27 in atherosclerosis that regulates macrophage activation in mice.

  15. Suppression of atherosclerosis by synthetic REV-ERB agonist

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sitaula, Sadichha [Department of Molecular Therapeutics, The Scripps Research Institute, Jupiter, FL 33458 (United States); Billon, Cyrielle [Department of Pharmacological & Physiological Science, Saint Louis University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO 63104 (United States); Kamenecka, Theodore M.; Solt, Laura A. [Department of Molecular Therapeutics, The Scripps Research Institute, Jupiter, FL 33458 (United States); Burris, Thomas P., E-mail: burristp@slu.edu [Department of Pharmacological & Physiological Science, Saint Louis University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO 63104 (United States)

    2015-05-08

    The nuclear receptors for heme, REV-ERBα and REV-ERBβ, play important roles in the regulation of metabolism and inflammation. Recently it was demonstrated that reduced REV-ERBα expression in hematopoetic cells in LDL receptor null mice led to increased atherosclerosis. We sought to determine if synthetic REV-ERB agonists that we have developed might have the ability to suppress atherosclerosis in this model. A previously characterized synthetic REV-ERB agonist, SR9009, was used to determine if activation of REV-ERB activity would affect atherosclerosis in LDL receptor deficient mice. Atherosclerotic plaque size was significantly reduced (p < 0.05) in mice administered SR9009 (100 mg/kg) for seven weeks compared to control mice (n = 10 per group). SR9009 treatment of bone marrow-derived mouse macrophages (BMDM) reduced the polarization of BMDMs to proinflammatory M1 macrophage while increasing the polarization of BMDMs to anti-inflammatory M2 macrophages. Our results suggest that pharmacological targeting of REV-ERBs may be a viable therapeutic option for treatment of atherosclerosis. - Highlights: • Synthetic REV-ERB agonist treatment reduced atherosclerosis in a mouse model. • Pharmacological activation of REV-ERB decreased M1 macrophage polarization. • Pharmacological activation of REV-ERB increased M2 macrophage polarization.

  16. Coral calcification and ocean acidification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jokiel, Paul L.; Jury, Christopher P.; Kuffner, Ilsa B.

    2016-01-01

    Over 60 years ago, the discovery that light increased calcification in the coral plant-animal symbiosis triggered interest in explaining the phenomenon and understanding the mechanisms involved. Major findings along the way include the observation that carbon fixed by photosynthesis in the zooxanthellae is translocated to animal cells throughout the colony and that corals can therefore live as autotrophs in many situations. Recent research has focused on explaining the observed reduction in calcification rate with increasing ocean acidification (OA). Experiments have shown a direct correlation between declining ocean pH, declining aragonite saturation state (Ωarag), declining [CO32_] and coral calcification. Nearly all previous reports on OA identify Ωarag or its surrogate [CO32] as the factor driving coral calcification. However, the alternate “Proton Flux Hypothesis” stated that coral calcification is controlled by diffusion limitation of net H+ transport through the boundary layer in relation to availability of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC). The “Two Compartment Proton Flux Model” expanded this explanation and synthesized diverse observations into a universal model that explains many paradoxes of coral metabolism, morphology and plasticity of growth form in addition to observed coral skeletal growth response to OA. It is now clear that irradiance is the main driver of net photosynthesis (Pnet), which in turn drives net calcification (Gnet), and alters pH in the bulk water surrounding the coral. Pnet controls [CO32] and thus Ωarag of the bulk water over the diel cycle. Changes in Ωarag and pH lag behind Gnet throughout the daily cycle by two or more hours. The flux rate Pnet, rather than concentration-based parameters (e.g., Ωarag, [CO3 2], pH and [DIC]:[H+] ratio) is the primary driver of Gnet. Daytime coral metabolism rapidly removes DIC from the bulk seawater. Photosynthesis increases the bulk seawater pH while providing the energy that drives

  17. Cerebral calcifications and schizophreniform disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonardo Fernandez Meyer

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: Discuss pathophysiological aspects of cerebral calcifications (CC and highlight its importance related to the occurrence of neuropsychiatric syndromes. METHOD: Single case report. RESULT: Man 52 years old, 20 years after going through a total thyroidectomy, starts showing behavioral disturbance (psychotic syndrome. He was diagnosed as schizophrenic (paranoid subtype and submitted to outpatient psychiatric treatment. During a psychiatric admission to evaluate his progressive cognitive and motor deterioration, we identified a dementia syndrome and extensive cerebral calcifications, derived from iatrogenic hypoparathyroidism. CONCLUSION: The calcium and phosphorus disturbances, including hypoparathyroidism, are common causes of CC. Its symptoms can imitate psychiatric disorders and produce serious and permanent cognitive sequelae. The exclusion of organicity is mandatory in any psychiatric investigative diagnosis in order to avoid unfavorable outcomes, such as in the present case report.

  18. Calcific retropharyngeal tendinitis. [Radiological findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karasick, D.; Karasick, S.

    1981-12-01

    Calcific retropharyngeal tendinitis is an imflammation of the longus colli muscle tendon which is located on the anterior surface of the verterbral column extending from the atlas to the third thoracic vertebra. The acute inflammatory condition is selflimiting with symptoms consisting of a gradually increasing neck pain often associated with throat pain and difficulty swallowing. The pain is aggravated by head and neck movement. Clinically the condition can be confused with retropharyngeal absecess, meningitis, infectious spondylitis, and post-traumatic muscle spasm. The radiographic features of this condition consist of pre-vertebral soft tissue swelling from C1 to C4 and amorphous calcific density in the longus colli tendon anterior to the body of C2 and inferior to the anterior arch of C1.

  19. Atypical Steatocystoma Multiplex with Calcification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, Muhammad Hasibur; Islam, Muhammad Saiful; Ansari, Nazma Parvin

    2011-01-01

    A 60-year-old male reported to us with an atypical case of giant steatocystoma multiplex in the scrotum with calcification. There was no family history of similar lesions. Yellowish, creamy material was expressed from a nodule during punch biopsy. The diagnosis was based on clinical as well as histological findings. Successful surgical excision was done to cure the case without any complications. PMID:22363850

  20. Humic acid in drinking well water induces inflammation through reactive oxygen species generation and activation of nuclear factor-κB/activator protein-1 signaling pathways: A possible role in atherosclerosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hseu, You-Cheng [Department of Cosmeceutics, China Medical University, Taichung 40402, Taiwan (China); Department of Molecular and Cellular Oncology, University of Texas, MD Anderson Cancer Center, TX 77030 (United States); Senthil Kumar, K.J. [Department of Cosmeceutics, China Medical University, Taichung 40402, Taiwan (China); Chen, Chih-Sheng; Cho, Hsin-Ju; Lin, Shu-Wei; Shen, Pei-Chun [Institute of Nutrition, China Medical University, Taichung 40402, Taiwan (China); Lin, Cheng-Wen [Department of Medical Laboratory Science and Biotechnology, China Medical University, Taichung 40402, Taiwan (China); Lu, Fung-Jou [Institute of Medicine, Chun Shan Medical University, Taichung 40201, Taiwan (China); Yang, Hsin-Ling, E-mail: hlyang@mail.cmu.edu.tw [Institute of Nutrition, China Medical University, Taichung 40402, Taiwan (China); Department of Molecular and Cellular Oncology, University of Texas, MD Anderson Cancer Center, TX 77030 (United States)

    2014-01-15

    Humic acid (HA) has been implicated as one of the etiological factors in the peripheral vasculopathy of blackfoot disease (BFD) in Taiwan. However, the underlying pathophysiological mechanisms of BFD are not well defined. In this study, we used an in vitro and in vivo model, in which HA (25–200 μg/mL) activated macrophages to produce pro-inflammatory molecules by activating their transcriptional factors. HA exposure induced NO and PGE{sub 2} production followed by induction of iNOS and COX-2 through NF-κB/AP-1 transactivation in macrophages. In addition, the production of TNF-α and IL-1β was significantly increased by HA. Moreover, HA-induced iNOS and COX-2 expression were down-regulated by the NF-κB and AP-1 inhibitors pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate (PDTC) and Tanshinone, respectively. Furthermore, generations of ROS and nitrotyrosine, as well as activation of the AKT and MAPKs signaling cascades were observed after HA exposure. Specifically, HA-induced NF-κB activation was mediated by ROS and AKT, and that HA-induced AP-1 activation was mediated by JNK and ERK. Notably, HA-mediated AKT, JNK, and ERK activation was ROS-independent. The inflammatory potential of HA was correlated with increased expression of HO-1 and Nrf2. Furthermore, an in vivo study confirms that mice exposed to HA, the serum levels of TNF-α and IL-1β was significantly increased in a dose-dependent manner. This report marks the first confirmation that environmental exposure of HA induces inflammation in macrophages, which may be one of the main causes of early atherogenesis in blackfoot disease. - Highlights: • Humic acid (HA) induce pro-inflammatory cytokines and mediators in macrophages. • HA-induced inflammation is mediated by ROS and NF-κB/AP-1 signaling pathways. • The inflammatory potential of HA correlated with activation of Nrf2/HO-1 genes. • HA exposure to mice increased pro-inflammatory cytokines production in vivo. • HA may be one of the main causes of early

  1. Innate immunity, Toll-like receptors, and atherosclerosis: mouse models and methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorrentino, Rosalinda; Arditi, Moshe

    2009-01-01

    Chronic inflammation and aberrant lipid metabolism represent hallmarks of atherosclerosis. Innate immunity critically depends upon Toll-like receptor (TLR) signalling. Recent data directly implicate signalling by TLR4 and TLR2 in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. The role that TLRs play in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis can be assessed by using several animal models, which provide a double genetic deficiency in TLRs and molecules implicated in the lipid metabolism, such as ApoE or LDL receptor. Furthermore, a more recent technique, such as the bone marrow transplantation (BMT), can be a useful and straightforward method to elucidate the role of stromal versus hematopoietic cells in the acceleration of the atheroma.

  2. Characteristics of erythrocyte-derived microvesicles and its relation with atherosclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Kai-Yin; Zheng, Lei; Wang, Qian; Hu, Yan-Wei

    2016-12-01

    Microvesicles are formed under many circumstances, especially in atheromatous plaques. Erythrocyte-derived microvesicles (ErMVs) have been proved to promote atherosclerosis by promoting hypercoagulation, mediating inflammation and inducing cell adhesion. Several clinical studies have reported potential roles of ErMVs in cardiovascular disease diagnosis, but the current understanding of ErMVs remains insufficient. In this paper, we will review current research on the formation and degradation of ErMVs and the possible effects of ErMVs in atherosclerosis, discuss potential clinical applications in cardiovascular disease, and hope to raise awareness of the relation with atherosclerosis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Retropharyngeal Calcific Tendinitis Mimicking a Retropharyngeal Phlegmon

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    Nathalie Gabra

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Acute retropharyngeal tendinitis is a little known but not an uncommon condition. It was first described by Hartley in 1964 as an inflammation of the longus colli muscle secondary to calcium crystals deposition on its insertion. The calcifications are mostly located on the oblique portion of the muscle at the level of C1-C2. Methods. We will describe this disease through 4 cases that presented in our institution. Results. The most common symptoms are severe neck pain, odynophagia, and a painful restriction of neck movement. It is associated with mild fever and inflammatory lab findings such as a slight elevation of white blood cell count, erythrocyte sedimentation rate, and C-reactive protein. CT scan is recommended as the first-line imaging modality to establish a diagnosis. Treatments consist of NSAIDs and analgesics to accelerate the healing process. If symptoms are severe, a course of corticosteroids is required. Conclusion. Since the clinical and laboratory findings of this condition and those of a retropharyngeal abscess overlap, it is important to establish the right diagnosis in order to prevent more invasive procedures. A good knowledge of this clinical entity by otolaryngologists would prevent delays in hospital discharge and unnecessary anxiety.

  4. A review of plant-based compounds and medicinal plants effective on atherosclerosis

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    Mehrnoosh Sedighi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Atherosclerosis is one of the most important cardiovascular diseases that involve vessels through the development of fatty streaks and plaques. Plant-based compounds can help treat or prevent atherosclerosis through affecting the involved factors. The main purpose of this review article is to investigate and introduce medicinal plants and their potential activities regarding antioxidant properties, effective on lipids level and development of plaque, atherosclerosis, and progression of atherosclerosis as well as the development of cardiovascular disease and ischemia. To search for the relevant articles indexed in Information Sciences Institute, PubMed, Scientific Information Database, IranMedex, and Scopus between 1980 and 2013, with further emphasis on those indexed from 2004 to 2015, we used these search terms: atherosclerosis, antioxidant, cholesterol, inflammation, and the medicinal plants below. Then, the articles with inclusion criteria were used in the final analysis of the findings. Plant-based active compounds, including phenols, flavonoids, and antioxidants, can be effective on atherosclerosis predisposing factors and hence in preventing this disease and associated harmful complications, especially through reducing cholesterol, preventing increase in free radicals, and ultimately decreasing vascular plaque and vascular resistance. Hence, medicinal plants can contribute to treating atherosclerosis and preventing its progression through reducing cholesterolemia, free radicals, inflammation, vascular resistance, and certain enzymes. They, alone or in combination with hypocholesterolemic drugs, can therefore be useful for patients with hyperlipidemia and its complications.

  5. 补肾和脉方治疗动脉粥样硬化炎症的效果及机制探讨%Therapeutic effects of Bu-shen-he-mai-fang (HMF) on inflammation in atherosclerosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    AbdulaiFallahTengbeh; 郝青青; 陈旭; 曹新冉; 王莹; 徐飞飞; 董波; 杨传华

    2016-01-01

    目的 研究补肾和脉方(HMF)对载脂蛋白E基因敲除(ApoE-/-)小鼠动脉粥样硬化(AS)的治疗效果及可能机制.方法 将24只ApoE-/-小鼠随机分为高脂组、HMF组和阿托伐他汀组,每组8只.高脂组给予高脂饲料(0.25%胆固醇和15%可可脂)喂养,HMF组给予高脂饲料+HMF[1.37 g/(kg·d)]喂养,阿托伐他汀组给予高脂饲料+阿托伐他汀[5 mg/(kg·d)]喂养.8周后,戊巴比妥钠(0.8%,0.05 mL/10 g)腹腔注射麻醉,取小鼠胸主动脉切片,行常规HE染色观察胸主动脉斑块大小;行免疫组化染色检测巨噬细胞CD68、肿瘤坏死因子(TNF)-α、白细胞介素(IL)-1β和IL-8的表达水平.并采用日本全自动生化分析仪测量小鼠总胆固醇(TC)和总三酰甘油(TG)水平.结果 HMF组胸主动脉斑块大小,胸主动脉斑块内CD68、TNF-α、IL-1β和IL-8的表达水平,TC、TG水平均明显低于高脂组,高于阿托伐他汀组(均P<0.05).结论 HMF具有抗动脉硬化作用,可抑制AS进展,其机制可能与降低血脂,减轻斑块炎症细胞浸润,减少炎症因子分泌有关.%Objective To observe the therapeutic effect and mechanism of Bu-shen-he-mai-fang (HMF) on experi-mental atherosclerosis (AS) in apolipoprotein-E knockout(ApoE-/-)mice. Methods Twenty-four male ApoE-/-mice were randomly divided into three groups including high-fat group (0.25%cholesterol and 15%cocoa butter), HMF group [(high-fat diet+HMF decoction 1.37 g/(kg · d)] and atrovastatin group [(high-fat diet+atrovastatin 5 mg/(kg · d)], 8 mice for each group. The serum level of lipid was evaluated by a kit. The extent of AS was evaluated by HE staining. The macrophage infil-tration and expression of tumor necrosis factor-α(TNF-α), interleukin-1β(IL-1β) and interleukin-8 (IL-8) were evaluated by immunohistochemical staining. Results The serum level of lipid was lower in HMF group and atrovastatin group than that in high-fat group (P<0.05). The degree of AS was significantly lower in HMF group and

  6. Evaluation and Management of Breast Calcifications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Behrooz Zandi

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available When evaluating mammograms, one looks for masses, areas of asymmetry or architectural distortion and microcalcifications."nCalcification found on screening and diagnostic mammography may be typically benign, of intermediate type, or have a high probability of malignancy."nThe calcifications that most radiologists have prob-lems dealing with are those of "intermediate con-cern.""nOccasionally spot compression-magnification views are necessary to evaluate and analyze the calcification characteristics."nThe morphology and distribution of calcifications are often clues to the differential diagnosis and appropriate management. Calcifications deserve closer scrutiny than those in a regional or diffuse distribution."nIn this article, we discuss the imaging evaluation and management of lesions found on screening and diagnostic mammography, with the focus on commonly encumbered questions and problems. We will also present our interesting cases with breast calcification.

  7. B cell subsets in atherosclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heather M. Perry

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Atherosclerosis, the underlying cause of heart attacks and strokes, is a chronic inflammatory disease of the artery wall. Immune cells, including lymphocytes modulate atherosclerotic lesion development through interconnected mechanisms. Elegant studies over the past decades have begun to unravel a role for B cells in atherosclerosis. Recent findings provide evidence that B cell effects on atherosclerosis may be subset-dependent. B-1a B cells have been reported to protect from atherosclerosis by secretion of natural IgM antibodies. Conventional B-2 B cells can promote atherosclerosis through less clearly defined mechanism that may involve CD4 T cells. Yet, there may be other populations of B cells within these subsets with different phenotypes altering their impact on atherosclerosis. Additionally, the role of B cell subsets in atherosclerosis may depend on their environmental niche and/or the stage of atherogenesis. This review will highlight key findings in the evolving field of B cells and atherosclerosis and touch on the potential and importance of translating these findings to human disease.

  8. Cardiac calcification in acute intermittent porphyria

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    Tanmoy Ghatak

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Aetiology of pericardial calcifications can be multifactorial. Tuberculosis has been reported as the most common cause. Other known causes include uraemia, asbestosis, post-traumatic or postoperative. We report a rare case of pericardial calcification seen in a patient with established acute intermittent porphyria. A direct causal relationship cannot be established between porphyria and pericardial calcification, but it may be due to deposition of the porphyrin in the pericardium.

  9. Incidental Anterior Cruciate Ligament Calcification: Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, Hisami; Fischer, Hans

    2016-03-01

    The calcification of knee ligaments is a finding noted only in a handful of case reports. The finding of an anterior cruciate ligament calcification has been reported once in the literature. Comparable studies involving the posterior cruciate ligament, medial collateral ligament and an ossicle within the anterior cruciate ligament are likewise discussed in reports of symptomatic patients. We report a case of incidentally discovered anterior cruciate ligament calcification. We discuss the likely etiology and clinical implications of this finding.

  10. Menaquinone-7 Supplementation to Reduce Vascular Calcification in Patients with Coronary Artery Disease: Rationale and Study Protocol (VitaK-CAC Trial).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vossen, Liv M; Schurgers, Leon J; van Varik, Bernard J; Kietselaer, Bas L J H; Vermeer, Cees; Meeder, Johannes G; Rahel, Braim M; van Cauteren, Yvonne J M; Hoffland, Ge A; Rennenberg, Roger J M W; Reesink, Koen D; de Leeuw, Peter W; Kroon, Abraham A

    2015-10-28

    Coronary artery calcification (CAC) develops early in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis and is a strong and independent predictor of cardiovascular disease (CVD). Arterial calcification is caused by an imbalance in calcification regulatory mechanisms. An important inhibitor of calcification is vitamin K-dependent matrix Gla protein (MGP). Both preclinical and clinical studies have shown that inhibition of the vitamin K-cycle by vitamin K antagonists (VKA) results in elevated uncarboxylated MGP (ucMGP) and subsequently in extensive arterial calcification. This led us to hypothesize that vitamin K supplementation may slow down the progression of calcification. To test this, we designed the VitaK-CAC trial which analyses effects of menaquinone-7 (MK-7) supplementation on progression of CAC. The trial is a double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled trial including patients with coronary artery disease (CAD). Patients with a baseline Agatston CAC-score between 50 and 400 will be randomized to an intervention-group (360 microgram MK-7) or a placebo group. Treatment duration will be 24 months. The primary endpoint is the difference in CAC-score progression between both groups. Secondary endpoints include changes in arterial structure and function, and associations with biomarkers. We hypothesize that treatment with MK-7 will slow down or arrest the progression of CAC and that this trial may lead to a treatment option for vascular calcification and subsequent CVD.

  11. Endothelial dysfunction and inflammation in asymptomatic proteinuria

    OpenAIRE

    Paisley, K.E.; Beaman, M; Tooke, J. E.; Mohamed-Ali, V; Lowe, G. D. O.; Shore, A C

    2003-01-01

    Background. Proteinuria is associated with vascular risk and a systemic increase in vascular permeability. Endothelial dysfunction occurs early in atherosclerosis and modulates vascular permeability. Vascular risk and chronic inflammation are associated. This study investigates whether the increased vascular permeability in proteinuria reflects systemic endothelial dysfunction and chronic inflammation. Methods. Twenty-one patients with asymptomatic proteinuria (1.29 g/24 h; range 0.18 to 3.17...

  12. Arterial ageing: from endothelial dysfunction to vascular calcification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tesauro, M; Mauriello, A; Rovella, V; Annicchiarico-Petruzzelli, M; Cardillo, C; Melino, G; Di Daniele, N

    2017-05-01

    Complex structural and functional changes occur in the arterial system with advancing age. The aged artery is characterized by changes in microRNA expression patterns, autophagy, smooth muscle cell migration and proliferation, and arterial calcification with progressively increased mechanical vessel rigidity and stiffness. With age the vascular smooth muscle cells modify their phenotype from contractile to 'synthetic' determining the development of intimal thickening as early as the second decade of life as an adaptive response to forces acting on the arterial wall. The increased permeability observed in intimal thickening could represent the substrate on which low-level atherosclerotic stimuli can promote the development of advanced atherosclerotic lesions. In elderly patients the atherosclerotic plaques tend to be larger with increased vascular stenosis. In these plaques there is a progressive accumulation of both lipids and collagen and a decrease of inflammation. Similarly the plaques from elderly patients show more calcification as compared with those from younger patients. The coronary artery calcium score is a well-established marker of adverse cardiovascular outcomes. The presence of diffuse calcification in a severely stenotic segment probably induces changes in mechanical properties and shear stress of the arterial wall favouring the rupture of a vulnerable lesion in a less stenotic adjacent segment. Oxidative stress and inflammation appear to be the two primary pathological mechanisms of ageing-related endothelial dysfunction even in the absence of clinical disease. Arterial ageing is no longer considered an inexorable process. Only a better understanding of the link between ageing and vascular dysfunction can lead to significant advances in both preventative and therapeutic treatments with the aim that in the future vascular ageing may be halted or even reversed. © 2017 The Association for the Publication of the Journal of Internal Medicine.

  13. Association between Density of Coronary Artery Calcification and Serum Magnesium Levels among Patients with Chronic Kidney Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakaguchi, Yusuke; Hamano, Takayuki; Nakano, Chikako; Obi, Yoshitsugu; Matsui, Isao; Kusunoki, Yasuo; Mori, Daisuke; Oka, Tatsufumi; Hashimoto, Nobuhiro; Takabatake, Yoshitsugu; Takahashi, Atsushi; Kaimori, Jun-Ya; Moriyama, Toshiki; Yamamoto, Ryohei; Horio, Masaru; Sugimoto, Ken; Yamamoto, Koichi; Rakugi, Hiromi; Isaka, Yoshitaka

    2016-01-01

    Background The Agatston score, commonly used to quantify coronary artery calcification (CAC), is determined by the plaque area and density. Despite an excellent predictability of the Agatston score for cardiovascular events, the density of CAC has never been studied in patients with pre-dialysis chronic kidney disease (CKD). This study aimed to analyze the CAC density and its association with serum mineral levels in CKD. Methods We enrolled patients with pre-dialysis CKD who had diabetes mellitus, prior cardiovascular disease history, elevated low-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels, or smoking history. The average CAC density was calculated by dividing the Agatston score by the total area of CAC. Results The mean estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) of 109 enrolled patients was 35.7 mL/min/1.73 m2. The correlation of the Agatston score with density was much weaker than that with the total area (R2 = 0.19, P < 0.001; and R2 = 0.99, P < 0.001, respectively). Multivariate analyses showed that serum magnesium level was inversely associated with the density, but not with the total area, after adjustment for demographics and clinical factors related to malnutrition-inflammation-atherosclerosis syndrome and mineral and bone disorders including fibroblast growth factor 23 (P = 0.006). This inverse association was pronounced among patients with higher serum phosphate levels (P for interaction = 0.02). Conclusion CAC density was inversely associated with serum magnesium levels, particularly in patients with higher serum phosphate levels. PMID:27662624

  14. Acute Retropharyngeal Calcific Tendinitis in an Unusual Location: a Case Report in a Patient with Rheumatoid Arthritis and Atlantoaxial Subluxation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Seung Hun; Joo, Kyung Bin; Lee, Kyu Hoon; Uhm, Wan Sik [Hanyang University Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-08-15

    Retropharyngeal calcific tendinitis is defined as inflammation of the longus colli muscle and is caused by the deposition of calcium hydroxyapatite crystals, which usually involves the superior oblique fibers of the longus colli muscle from C1-3. Diagnosis is usually made by detecting amorphous calcification and prevertebral soft tissue swelling on radiograph, CT or MRI. In this report, we introduce a case of this disease which was misdiagnosed as a retropharyngeal tuberculous abscess, or a muscle strain of the ongus colli muscle. No calcifications were visible along the vertical fibers of the longus colli muscle. The lesion was located anterior to the C4-5 disc, in a rheumatoid arthritis patient with atlantoaxial subluxation. Calcific tendinitis of the longus colli muscle at this location in a rheumatoid arthritis patient has not been reported in the English literature.

  15. Sex Steroids Block the Initiation of Atherosclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naftolin, Frederick; Mehr, Holly; Fadiel, Ahmed

    2016-12-01

    Atherosclerosis is the main cause of death in men and women. This so-called "hardening of the arteries" results from advanced atherogenesis, the accumulation and death of subendothelial fat-laden macrophages (vascular plaque). The macrophages are attracted as the result of signals from injured vessels recruiting and activating cells to quell the injury by inflammation. Among the recruited cells are circulating monocytes that may be captured by the formation of neural cell adhesion molecule (nCAM) tethers between the monocytes and vascular endothelium; the tethers are dependent on electrostatic binding between distal segments of apposed nCAM molecules. The capture of monocytes is followed by their entry into the subendothelial area as macrophages, many of which will remain and become the fat-laden foam cells in vascular plaque. Neural cell adhesion molecules are subject to sialylation that blocks their electrostatic binding. We showed that estradiol-induced nCAM sialylases are present in vascular endothelial cells and tested whether sex steroid pretreatment of human vascular endothelium could inhibit the capture of monocytes. Using in vitro techniques, pretreatment of human arterial endothelial cells with estradiol, testosterone, dehydroepiandrosterone and dihydrotestosterone all induced sialylation of endothelial cells and, in a dose-response manner, reduced the capture of monocytes. Steroid hormones are protective against atherogenesis and its sequellae. Sex steroid depletion is associated with atherosclerosis. Based on this knowledge plus our results using sex steroid pretreatment of endothelial cells, we propose that the blockade of the initial step in atherogenesis by sex steroid-induced nCAM sialylation may be crucial to hormonal prevention of atherosclerosis.

  16. Elevated levels of plasma osteoprotegerin are associated with all-cause mortality risk and atherosclerosis in patients with stages 3 to 5 chronic kidney disease

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    M.M. Nascimento

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Osteoprotegerin (OPG regulates bone mass by inhibiting osteoclast differentiation and activation, and plays a role in vascular calcification. We evaluated the relationship between osteoprotegerin levels and inflammatory markers, atherosclerosis, and mortality in patients with stages 3-5 chronic kidney disease. A total of 145 subjects (median age 61 years, 61% men; 36 patients on hemodialysis, 55 patients on peritoneal dialysis, and 54 patients with stages 3-5 chronic kidney disease were studied. Clinical characteristics, markers of mineral metabolism (including fibroblast growth factor-23 [FGF-23] and inflammation (high-sensitivity C-reactive protein [hsCRP] and interleukin-6 [IL-6], and the intima-media thickness (IMT in the common carotid arteries were measured at baseline. Cardiac function was assessed by color tissue Doppler echocardiography. After 36 months follow-up, the survival rate by Kaplan-Meier analysis was significantly different according to OPG levels (χ 2=14.33; P=0.002. Increased OPG levels were positively associated with IL-6 (r=0.38, P<0.001, FGF-23 (r=0.26, P<0.001 and hsCRP (r=0.0.24, P=0.003. In addition, OPG was positively associated with troponin I (r=0.54, P<0.001 and IMT (r=0.39, P<0.0001. Finally, in Cox analysis, only OPG (HR=1.07, 95%CI=1.02-1.13 and hsCRP (HR=1.02, 95%CI=1.01-1.04 were independently associated with increased risk of death. These results suggested that elevated levels of serum OPG might be associated with atherosclerosis and all-cause mortality in patients with chronic kidney disease.

  17. Association between serum vitamin D levels and subclinical coronary atherosclerosis and plaque burden/composition in young adult population

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    Seckin Satilmis

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Evidence suggests that low 25-OH vitamin D 25(OHD concentrations may increase the risk of several cardiovascular diseases such as hypertension, peripheral vascular disease, diabetes mellitus, obesity, myocardial infarction, heart failure and cardiovascular mortality. Recent studies suggested a possible relationship between vitamin D deficiency and increased carotid intima-media wall thickness and vascular calcification. We hypothesized that low 25(OHD may be associated with coronary atherosclerosis and coronary plaque burden and composition, and investigated the relationship between serum vitamin D levels and coronary atherosclerosis, plaque burden or structure, in young adult patients by using dual-source 128x2 slice coronary computed tomography angiography (CCTA. We included 98 patients with coronary atherosclerosis and 110, age and gender matched, subjects with normal findings on CCTA examinations. Patients with subclinical atherosclerosis had significantly higher serum total cholesterol, triglycerides, hs-CRP, uric acid, HbA1c and creatinine levels and lower serum 25(OHD levels in comparison with controls. There was no significant correlation between 25(OHD and plaque morphology. There was also a positive relationship between 25(OHD and plaque burden of coronary atherosclerosis. In multivariate analysis, coronary atherosclerosis was associated high hs-CRP (adjusted OR: 2.832, uric acid (adjusted OR: 3.671 and low 25(OHD (adjusted OR: 0.689. Low levels of 25(OHD were associated with coronary atherosclerosis and plaque burden, but there was no significant correlation between 25(OHD and plaque morphology.

  18. Environmental factors influencing the development of atherosclerosis

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    Andrzej Brodziak

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the paper is to present an overview of recent findings on the environmental and behavioral factors influencing the development of atherosclerosis. The authors primarily concentrated on deliberations of possibile main causes of the damage of the endothelium. At the same time the following pathogenic mechanisms as cellular dysfunction, inflammation and coagulation disorders have been enumerated. The links between the state of the vascular endothelium and life style have been emphasized. It is also important to note that the primary causes of the endothelial damage should be traced as originally suggested many years ago viewing such factors as anger, hostility, aggression, impulsiveness and depression but with a new approach. The authors supplement the comments, on the environmental factors influencing the development of atherosclerosis, with basic data on family predisposition to the development of this disease. They highlight that current genetic research have not determined genes responsible for atheroscelosis. According to the authors the considerations and conclusions presented in this overview are important for the educational purposes related to the most frequent disease process resulting in many diseases in medical disciplines.

  19. Alcohol and atherosclerosis

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    Murilo Foppa

    2001-02-01

    Full Text Available Observational studies have attributed a protective effect to alcohol consumption on the development of atherosclerosis and cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Alcohol intake in the amount of one to two drinks per day results in an estimated 20-40% reduction in cardiovascular events. An additional protective effect, according to major cohort studies, has been attributed to wine, probably due to antioxidant effects and platelet antiaggregation agents. On the other hand, the influence of different patterns of alcohol consumption and environmental factors may explain a great part of the additional effect of wine. Protection may be mediated by modulation of other risk factors, because alcohol increases HDL-C, produces a biphasic response on blood pressure, and modulates the endothelial function, while it neither increases body weight nor impairs glucose-insulin homeostasis. Alcohol may also have a direct effect on atherogenesis. Despite these favorable effects, the current evidence is not enough to justify prescribing alcohol to prevent cardiovascular disease.

  20. THE MAMMOGRAPHIC CALCIFICATIONS IN BREAST CANCER

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tang Ruiying; Liu Jingxian; Gaowen

    1998-01-01

    Objective: This study was performed to exam the relativeship between mammographic calcifications and breast cancer. Methods: All of the 184 patients with breast diseases underwent mammography before either an open biopsy or a mastectomy. The presence,morphology, and distribution of calcifications visualized on mammograms for breast cancer were compared with the controls who remained cancer free. Statistical comparisons were made by using the x2 test. Results:Of the 184 patients with breast diaeases, 93 malignant and 91 benign lesions were histologically confirmed.Calcifications were visualized on mammograms in 60(64%) of 93 breast cancers and 26 (28%) of 91 non breast cancers. The estimated odds ratio (OR) of breast cancer was 4.5 in women with calcifications seen on mammograms, compared with those having none (P<0.01). Of the 60 breast carcinomas having mammographic calcifications, 28 (47%) were infiltrating ductal carcinomas.There were only 8 (24%) cases with infiltrating ductal cancers in the group of without calcifications seen on the mammograms (P<0.05). Conclusion: Our finding suggests that mammographic calcification appears to be a risk factor for breast cancer. The granular and linear cast type calcification provide clues to the presence of breast cancer, especially when the carcinomas without associated masses were seen on mammograms.

  1. Vascular Adventitia Calcification and Its Underlying Mechanism.

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    Na Li

    Full Text Available Previous research on vascular calcification has mainly focused on the vascular intima and media. However, we show here that vascular calcification may also occur in the adventitia. The purpose of this work is to help elucidate the pathogenic mechanisms underlying vascular calcification. The calcified lesions were examined by Von Kossa staining in ApoE-/- mice which were fed high fat diets (HFD for 48 weeks and human subjects aged 60 years and older that had died of coronary heart disease, heart failure or acute renal failure. Explant cultured fibroblasts and smooth muscle cells (SMCswere obtained from rat adventitia and media, respectively. After calcification induction, cells were collected for Alizarin Red S staining. Calcified lesions were observed in the aorta adventitia and coronary artery adventitia of ApoE-/-mice, as well as in the aorta adventitia of human subjects examined. Explant culture of fibroblasts, the primary cell type comprising the adventitia, was successfully induced for calcification after incubation with TGF-β1 (20 ng/ml + mineralization media for 4 days, and the phenotype conversion vascular adventitia fibroblasts into myofibroblasts was identified. Culture of SMCs, which comprise only a small percentage of all cells in the adventitia, in calcifying medium for 14 days resulted in significant calcification.Vascular calcification can occur in the adventitia. Adventitia calcification may arise from the fibroblasts which were transformed into myofibroblasts or smooth muscle cells.

  2. Atypical Radiological Manifestation of Pulmonary Metastatic Calcification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Eun Hae; Kim, Eun Sun; Kim, Chul Hwan; Ham, Soo Youn; Oh, Yu Whan [Korea University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-04-15

    Metastatic pulmonary calcification is a condition of calcium deposition in the normal pulmonary parenchyma, and this is secondary to abnormal calcium metabolism without any prior soft tissue damage. The predisposing factors for this condition include chronic renal failure, hypercalcemia and increased tissue alkalinity. The most common radiologic manifestation consists of poorly defined nodular opacities in the upper lung zone. These opacities reflect the deposition of calcium salts in the pulmonary interstitium. We present here a case of metastatic pulmonary calcification in a patient who recovered from pneumonia with sepsis and whose high-resolution CT (HRCT) images demonstrated localized parenchymal airspace calcification that was limited to the bilateral lower lobes. These lower lobes had been involved with pneumonic consolidation without calcification, as seen on the previous CT scan. In summary, we report here on an atypical presentation of metastatic pulmonary calcification that showed dense airspace consolidation localized to the bilateral lower lobes in a patient with primary hyperparathyroidism and pneumonia.

  3. Physiopathology of intratendinous calcific deposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oliva Francesco

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In calcific tendinopathy (CT, calcium deposits in the substance of the tendon, with chronic activity-related pain, tenderness, localized edema and various degrees of decreased range of motion. CT is particularly common in the rotator cuff, and supraspinatus, Achilles and patellar tendons. The presence of calcific deposits may worsen the clinical manifestations of tendinopathy with an increase in rupture rate, slower recovery times and a higher frequency of post-operative complications. The aetiopathogenesis of CT is still controversial, but seems to be the result of an active cell-mediated process and a localized attempt of the tendon to compensate the original decreased stiffness. Tendon healing includes many sequential processes, and disturbances at different stages of healing may lead to different combinations of histopathological changes, diverting the normal healing processes to an abnormal pathway. In this review, we discuss the theories of pathogenesis behind CT. Better understanding of the pathogenesis is essential for development of effective treatment modalities and for improvement of clinical outcomes.

  4. Targeted therapeutics in inflammatory atherosclerosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alaarg, Amr Muhmed Sabry Abdelhakeem

    2017-01-01

    Atherosclerosis, a chronic inflammatory vascular disease, which has been recently identified in 5000-year mummies, remains undefeated. It is the most common underlying cause of deadly cardiovascular diseases (CVD), including heart attacks, strokes, and peripheral vascular diseases. This tremendous

  5. Obstructive Sleep Apnea and Atherosclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zulkifli Amin

    2016-09-01

    Endothelial dysfunction, sympathetic stimulation, and proinflammatory cytokine modulation caused by OSA play significant role to an atherosclesrotic event. Other risk factors of atherosclerosis like hypertension and diabetes mellitus also associated with OSA. Animal and clinical studies recently showed promising data to prove association between OSA, atherosclerosis, and its risk factors. However, provided data has not showed consistent result. In the future, demand of further research both basic and clinical sciences need to be fulfilled.

  6. Unraveling the Complex Relationship Triad between Lipids, Obesity, and Inflammation

    OpenAIRE

    Shahida A. Khan; Ashraf Ali; Khan, Sarah A.; Zahran, Solafa A.; Ghazi Damanhouri; Esam Azhar; Ishtiaq Qadri

    2014-01-01

    Obesity today stands at the intersection between inflammation and metabolic disorders causing an aberration of immune activity, and resulting in increased risk for diabetes, atherosclerosis, fatty liver, and pulmonary inflammation to name a few. Increases in mortality and morbidity in obesity related inflammation have initiated studies to explore different lipid mediated molecular pathways of attempting resolution that uncover newer therapeutic opportunities of anti-inflammatory components. M...

  7. Ageing induced vascular smooth muscle cell senescence in atherosclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uryga, Anna K; Bennett, Martin R

    2016-04-15

    Atherosclerosis is a disease of ageing in that its incidence and prevalence increase with age. However, atherosclerosis is also associated with biological ageing, manifest by a number of typical hallmarks of ageing in the atherosclerotic plaque. Thus, accelerated biological ageing may be superimposed on the effects of chronological ageing in atherosclerosis. Tissue ageing is seen in all cells that comprise the plaque, but particularly in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs). Hallmarks of ageing include evidence of cell senescence, DNA damage (including telomere attrition), mitochondrial dysfunction, a pro-inflammatory secretory phenotype, defects in proteostasis, epigenetic changes, deregulated nutrient sensing, and exhaustion of progenitor cells. In this model, initial damage to DNA (genomic, telomeric, mitochondrial and epigenetic changes) results in a number of cellular responses (cellular senescence, deregulated nutrient sensing and defects in proteostasis). Ultimately, ongoing damage and attempts at repair by continued proliferation overwhelm reparative capacity, causing loss of specialised cell functions, cell death and inflammation. This review summarises the evidence for accelerated biological ageing in atherosclerosis, the functional consequences of cell ageing on cells comprising the plaque, and the causal role that VSMC senescence plays in atherogenesis. © 2015 The Authors. The Journal of Physiology © 2015 The Physiological Society.

  8. Intermittent hypoxia-activated cyclooxygenase pathway: role in atherosclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gautier-Veyret, Elodie; Arnaud, Claire; Bäck, Magnus; Pépin, Jean-Louis; Petri, Marcelo H; Baguet, Jean-Philippe; Tamisier, Renaud; Lévy, Patrick; Stanke-Labesque, Françoise

    2013-08-01

    Intermittent hypoxia, the main stimulus of obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA), induces inflammation, leading to early atherosclerosis. Whether the cyclooxygenase (COX) pathway contributes to intermittent hypoxia-induced atherosclerosis remains to be determined. We studied the effects of 8-weeks of intermittent hypoxia exposure on COX-pathway gene expression and atherosclerosis, and the influence of COX-1 inhibition by SC-560 on atherosclerosis progression in aortas of apolipoprotein E(-/-) mice. Urinary 11-dehydrothromboxane B2 (11-dTXB2) was assessed in 50 OSA subjects free of cardiovascular risk factor matched for age and body mass index with 25 controls, and 56 OSA with cardiovascular risk factor. Intermittent hypoxia significantly increased atherosclerotic lesion sizes, mRNA levels of COX-1 and thromboxane synthase (TXBS). Lesion sizes correlated to COX-1 (r = 0.654, p = 0.0003) and TXBS (r = 0.693, pintermittent hypoxia mice only (p = 0.04). Urinary 11-dTXB2 was similar in OSA subjects free of cardiovascular risk factor and controls, but was increased by 13% (p = 0.007) in OSA subjects with cardiovascular risk factor compared with those without. Although OSA itself was not associated with increased urinary 11-dTXB2 concentration, the COX-1 pathway was activated in intermittent hypoxia-exposed mice and in OSA subjects presenting with cardiovascular risk factor, and may contribute to intermittent hypoxia-induced atherogenesis. COX-1 inhibition could be of clinical interest in the prevention of cardiovascular morbidity in OSA.

  9. Calcification

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... In: Kumar V, Abbas AK, Aster JC, eds. Robbins and Cotran Pathologic Basis of Disease . 9th ed. ... In: Kumar V, Abbas AK, Aster JC, eds. Robbins and Cotran Pathologic Basis of Disease . 9th ed. ...

  10. Gastrointestinal inflammation: lessons from metabolic modulators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arulampalam, V

    2008-06-01

    The link between inflammation and metabolism was apparent already early last century, but has recently been revitalized following molecular studies of atherosclerosis, obesity and insulin resistance. A growing list of nuclear receptors, pivotal players in lipid, xenobiotic and energy metabolism has been identified as having immunomodulatory functions. These receptors might hold the key to some of the questions pertinent to chronic inflammation, and can lend themselves to be manipulated as therapeutic agents. This review will attempt to appraise the importance of such mediators in the pathophysiology of chronic inflammation in the colon.

  11. Retroperitoneal inflammation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/001255.htm Retroperitoneal inflammation To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Retroperitoneal inflammation is swelling that occurs in the retroperitoneal space. ...

  12. Computed tomographic demonstration of ocular calcification: Correlations with clinical and pathological findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hedges, T.R. III; Pozzi-Mucelli, R.; Char, D.H.; Newton, T.H.

    1982-03-01

    The computed tomographic features of calcification in the eye were correlated with clinical and pathological findings in a variety of ophthalmic and systemic disorders. These consisted of ocular neoplasms, trauma and inflammation of the eye, idiopathic ocular lesions, and disorders of calcium metabolism. Computed tomographic documentation of ocular clarification was found to be useful in the differential diagnosis and management of patients with these disorders.

  13. Cardiovascular disease due to accelerated atherosclerosis in systemic vasculitides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen Tervaert, Jan Willem

    2013-02-01

    systemic vasculitis. Furthermore, cholesterol and its modifications play a pivotal role in the pathogenesis of accelerated atherosclerosis in vasculitis. The (preventive) therapy for accelerated atherosclerosis in systemic vasculitis is based on an aggressive approach against inflammation and against risk factors of premature atherosclerosis such as smoking, inactivity, obesity and unhealthy diet. In addition, patients should be treated with angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors and/or angiotensin receptor-1 blockers for hypertension and statins for dyslipidemia. Finally, low dose acetylsalicylic acid should be prescribed in patients with large vessel vasculitis, i.e., both in GCA and TA, who do not have contraindications for ASA.

  14. Calcifications in the breast in Filaria loa infection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Novak, R. (Karolinska Sjukhuset, Stockholm (Sweden). Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology)

    A 40-year-old patient underwent mammography for evaluation of a mass. Atypical calcifications were observed in the opposite breast. Two types of calcification were observed: One type was spiral-shaped and the other type rod-shaped. These calcifications were caused by Filaria loa. Parasitic calcifications in the breast are uncommon. (orig.).

  15. [Potential protective role of nitric oxide and Hsp70 linked to functional foods in the atherosclerosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camargo, Alejandra B; Manucha, Walter

    Atherosclerosis, one of the main pathologic entities considered epidemic and a worldwide public health problem, is currently under constant review as regards its basic determining mechanisms and therapeutic possibilities. In this regard, all patients afflicted with the disease exhibit mitochondrial dysfunction, oxidative stress and inflammation. Interestingly, nitric oxide - a known vasoactive messenger gas - has been closely related to the inflammatory, oxidative and mitochondrial dysfunctional process that characterizes atherosclerosis. In addition, it has recently been demonstrated that alterations in the bioavailability of nitric oxide would induce the expression of heat shock proteins. This agrees with the use of functional foods as a strategy to prevent both vascular aging and the development of atherosclerosis. Finally, a greater knowledge regarding the mechanisms implied in the development of atherosclerosis will enable proposing new and possible hygiene, health and therapeutic interventions. Copyright © 2016 Sociedad Española de Arteriosclerosis. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  16. Association between the surfactant protein D (SFTPD) gene and subclinical carotid artery atherosclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sorensen, Grith L; Bladbjerg, Else Marie; Steffensen, Rudi;

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Surfactant protein D (SP-D) is a defense collectin with inflammation-modulating properties. SP-D deficiency inhibits atherosclerosis in vivo, and the circulatory SP-D levels have been previously associated with cardiovascular disease mortality. We hypothesized that plasma SP-D (p......SP-D) and SP-D gene (SFTPD) single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) are risk factors for atherosclerosis. METHODS: We evaluated individuals who were all 60 years old and participated in The Glostrup Population Study. Subclinical atherosclerosis was diagnosed based on the ultrasonographic measurement of intima......: The results do not support that pSP-D levels influence the development of subclinical atherosclerosis. However, the SFTPD SNP data support previous observations from animal studies that SP-D plays a role in the etiology of atherosclerotic disease development. The nominal significant effects are likely...

  17. Fetal calcifications are associated with chromosomal abnormalities.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ellika Sahlin

    Full Text Available The biological importance of calcifications occasionally noted in fetal tissues (mainly liver at autopsy or ultrasound is largely unexplored. Previous reports hint at an association to infection, circulatory compromise, malformations or chromosomal abnormalities. To identify factors associated with calcifications, we have performed a case-control study on the largest cohort of fetuses with calcifications described thus far.One-hundred and fifty-one fetuses with calcifications and 302 matched controls were selected from the archives of the Department of Pathology, Karolinska University Hospital. Chromosome analysis by karyotyping or quantitative fluorescence-polymerase chain reaction was performed. Autopsy and placenta reports were scrutinized for presence of malformations and signs of infection.Calcifications were mainly located in the liver, but also in heart, bowel, and other tissues. Fetuses with calcifications showed a significantly higher proportion of chromosomal abnormalities than controls; 50% vs. 20% (p<0.001. The most frequent aberrations among cases included trisomy 21 (33%, trisomy 18 (22%, and monosomy X (18%. A similar distribution was seen among controls. When comparing cases and controls with chromosomal abnormalities, the cases had a significantly higher prevalence of malformations (95% vs. 77%, p=0.004. Analyzed the other way around, cases with malformations had a significantly higher proportion of chromosomal abnormalities compared with controls, (66% vs. 31%, p<0.001.The presence of fetal calcifications is associated with high risk of chromosomal abnormality in combination with malformations. Identification of a calcification together with a malformation at autopsy more than doubles the probability of detecting a chromosomal abnormality, compared with identification of a malformation only. We propose that identification of a fetal tissue calcification at autopsy, and potentially also at ultrasound examination, should infer

  18. The protective role of Sirt1 in vascular tissue: its relationship to vascular aging and atherosclerosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitada, Munehiro; Ogura, Yoshio; Koya, Daisuke

    2016-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) due to atherosclerosis is the main cause of death in both the elderly and patients with metabolic diseases, including diabetes. Aging processes contribute to the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. Calorie restriction (CR) is recognized as a dietary intervention for promoting longevity and delaying age-related diseases, including atherosclerosis. Sirt1, an NAD+-dependent deacetylase, is considered an anti-aging molecule and is induced during CR. Sirt1 deacetylates target proteins and is linked to cellular metabolism, the redox state and survival pathways. Sirt1 expression/activation is decreased in vascular tissue undergoing senescence. Sirt1 deficiency in endothelial cells (ECs), vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) and monocytes/macrophages contributes to increased oxidative stress, inflammation, foam cell formation, senescences impaired nitric oxide production and autophagy, thereby promoting vascular aging and atherosclerosis. Endothelial dysfunction, activation of monocytes/macrophages, and the functional and phenotypical plasticity of VSMCs are critically implicated in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis through multiple mechanisms. Therefore, the activation of Sirt1 in vascular tissue, which includes ECs, monocytes/macrophages and VSMCs, may be a new therapeutic strategy against atherosclerosis and the increasing resistance to the metabolic disorder-related causal factors of CVD. In this review, we discuss the protective role of Sirt1 in the pathophysiology of vascular aging and atherosclerosis. PMID:27744418

  19. Correlation between Systemic Arterial Hypertension and Bone Morphogenetic Protein-2 in Central Obese Non-Diabetic Men with Evidence of Coronary Artery Calcification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonia Anna Lukito

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Previous studies have confirmed separately the relationship between obesity, insulin-resistance, hypertension and bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP-2 with coronary artery calcification, a parameter of subclinical atherosclerosis. It was also reported that BMPs may function as proinflammatory, prohypertensive and proatherogenic mediators. The study aimed to assess the correlation between systemic hypertension and BMP-2 plasma concentration in central-obese non-diabetic men with evidence of coronary artery calcification. METHODS: This was a cross sectional study on 60 central-obese non-diabetic men, of an average age of 55.2 years, with evidence of coronary calcification, who came for health check-up and met the inclusion criteria consecutively as defined by waist circumference >90 cm and fasting blood glucose <126 mg/dL. Coronary calcification was defined by coronary artery calcium (CAC score ≥10 Agatson-unit Dual Source 64 slice CT scan. RESULTS: There is positive correlation between hypertension and BMP-2 in central-obese non-diabetic men with evidence of coronary artery calcification. BMP-2 plasma concentration was higher in the hypertensive subjects. The correlation was stronger in younger (<55 years old subjects and subjects with insulin-resitance. KEYWORDS: hypertension, BMP-2, coronary calcification, central obesity, age, insulin resistance.

  20. Cigarette Smoking-Induced Cardiac Hypertrophy, Vascular Inflammation and Injury are Attenuated by Antioxidant Supplementation in An Animal Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moustafa Al Hariri

    2016-11-01

    hypertrophy in cigarette smoke exposed animals.Conclusion Findings from this work showed that cigarette smoking exposure is associated with significant cardiovascular pathology such as cardiac hypertrophy, inflammation, pro-fibrotic and atherogenic markers and aortic calcification in an animal model as assessed 1 month post exposure. Antioxidant supplementation prevented cardiac hypertrophy and attenuated indicators of atherosclerosis markers associated with cigarette smoke exposure.Key words: Cigarette smoking, pomegranate Juice, inflammation, hypertrophy, calcification, reactive oxygen species, cardiovascular diseases.

  1. Atherosclerosis in ancient humans, accelerated aging syndromes and normal aging: is lamin a protein a common link?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyamoto, Michael I; Djabali, Karima; Gordon, Leslie B

    2014-06-01

    Imaging studies of ancient human mummies have demonstrated the presence of vascular calcification that is consistent with the presence of atherosclerosis. These findings have stimulated interest in the underlying biological processes that might impart to humans an inherent predisposition to the development of atherosclerosis. Clues to these processes may possibly be found in accelerated aging syndromes, such as Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS), an ultra-rare disorder characterized by premature aging phenotypes, including very aggressive forms of atherosclerosis, occurring in childhood. The genetic defect in HGPS eventuates in the production of a mutant form of the nuclear structural protein lamin A, called progerin, which is thought to interfere with normal nuclear functioning. Progerin appears to be expressed in vascular cells, resulting in vessel wall cell loss and replacement by fibrous tissue, reducing vessel compliance and promoting calcification, leading to the vascular dysfunction and atherosclerosis seen in HGPS. Interestingly, vascular progerin is detectable in lower levels, in an age-related manner, in the general population, providing the basis for further study of the potential role of abnormal forms of lamin A in the atherosclerotic process of normal aging.

  2. Fibrinogen gene haplotypes in relation to risk of coronary events and coronary and extracoronary atherosclerosis: the Rotterdam Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kardys, Isabella; Uitterlinden, André G; Hofman, Albert; Witteman, Jacqueline C M; de Maat, Moniek P M

    2007-02-01

    Fibrin network structure has been correlated with coronary disease. Fibrinogen gamma and alpha (FGG and FGA) gene haplotypes (chromosome 4q28) may be associated with fibrin network structure, and thereby with rigidity of the fibrin clot and sensitivity of the fibrin clot to the fibrinolytic system. Through these mechanisms they may influence risk of cardiovascular disease. We set out to investigate the relation between combined fibrinogen FGG and FGA gene haplotypes, representing the common variation of the fibrinogen FGG and FGA genes, coronary events and measures of coronary and extracoronary atherosclerosis. The study was embedded in the Rotterdam Study, a prospective population-based study among men and women aged >or=55 years. Common haplotypes were studied using seven tagging SNPs across a 30-kb region with the FGG and FGA genes. Incident coronary events were registered, and carotid intima-media thickness, carotid plaques, ankle-arm index, aortic calcification and coronary calcification were assessed. Seven haplotypes with frequencies >1% covered 97.5% of the genetic variation. In 5,667 participants without history of coronary heart disease (CHD), 733 CHD cases occurred during a median follow-up time of 11.9 years. Fibrinogen gene haplotypes were not associated with coronary events. Fibrinogen gene haplotypes did not show a consistent association with measures of coronary and extracoronary atherosclerosis. In conclusion, fibrinogen FGG and FGA gene haplotypes are not associated with coronary events, coronary atherosclerosis or extracoronary atherosclerosis. Confirmation of these findings by future population-based studies is warranted.

  3. Imaging findings in acute calcific prevertebral tendinitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grassi, Caio Giometti; Diniz, Fabio de Vilhena; Garcia, Marcio Ricardo Taveira; Gomes, Regina Lucia Elia; Daniel, Mauro Miguel; Funari, Marcelo Buarque de Gusmao [Hospital Israelita Albert Einstein (HIAE), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Imaging Dept.

    2011-09-15

    Acute calcific prevertebral tendinitis is a benign and rare condition that presents calcification of the superior oblique fibers of longus colli muscle with local inflammatory reaction. Such condition is one of the less common presentations of calcium hydroxyapatite deposition disease. Clinical signs are usually acute neck pain and odynophagia, and it may be misdiagnosed as retropharyngeal abscess, spondylodiscitis or traumatic injury. The imaging findings in calcific prevertebral tendinitis are pathognomonic. The knowledge of such findings is extremely important to avoid unnecessary interventions in a patient presenting a condition with a good response to conservative treatment. (author)

  4. Atypical calcific tendinitis with cortical erosions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kraemer, E.J. [College of Medicine, Univ. of Iowa, Iowa City, IA (United States); El-Khoury, G.Y. [Dept. of Radiology and Orthopaedics, Univ. of Iowa, Iowa City, IA (United States)

    2000-12-01

    Objective. To present and discuss six cases of calcific tendinitis in atypical locations (one at the insertion of the pectoralis major and five at the insertion of the gluteus maximus).Patients and results. All cases were associated with cortical erosions, and five had soft tissue calcifications. The initial presentation was confusing and the patients were suspected of having infection or neoplastic disease.Conclusion. Calcific tendinitis is a self-limiting condition. It is important to recognize the imaging features of this condition to avoid unnecessary investigation and surgery. (orig.)

  5. Correlates of endothelial function and their relationship with inflammation in patients with familial hypercholesterolaemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Haelst, PL; van Doormaal, JJ; Asselbergs, FW; van Roon, AM; Veeger, NJGM; Henneman, MM; Smit, AJ; Tervaert, JWC; May, JF; Gans, ROB

    Atherosclerosis is characterized by a low-grade systemic inflammatory response and endothelial dysfunction. The aim of the present study was to investigate a possible relationship between systemic markers of inflammation, serum markers of endothelial activation and endothelium-dependent

  6. The complement system and toll-like receptors as integrated players in the pathophysiology of atherosclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hovland, Anders; Jonasson, Lena; Garred, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Despite recent medical advances, atherosclerosis is a global burden accounting for numerous deaths and hospital admissions. Immune-mediated inflammation is a major component of the atherosclerotic process, but earlier research focus on adaptive immunity has gradually switched towards the role...... of innate immunity. The complement system and toll-like receptors (TLRs), and the crosstalk between them, may be of particular interest both with respect to pathogenesis and as therapeutic targets in atherosclerosis. Animal studies indicate that inhibition of C3a and C5a reduces atherosclerosis. In humans...... modified LDL-cholesterol activate complement and TLRs leading to downstream inflammation, and histopathological studies indicate that the innate immune system is present in atherosclerotic lesions. Moreover, clinical studies have demonstrated that both complement and TLRs are upregulated in atherosclerotic...

  7. Acute calcific prevertebral tendonitis mimicking tension-type headache.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wakabayashi, Yukihiro; Hori, Yuzo; Kondoh, Yayoi; Asano, Tomoshige; Yamada, Akira; Yamashita, Masanori; Nagatomi, Hirofumi

    2012-01-01

    A 74-year-old woman was admitted to our hospital due to severe nuchal pain and occipitalgia. Neurological examination found neck stiffness but no throat pain or dysphagia. Blood examination showed slight elevation of white blood cell count, but C-reactive protein level was normal. Cerebrospinal fluid examination found no abnormalities. Computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging demonstrated no abnormalities in the brain. Cervical CT showed a small calcification in front of the C1 body. Cervical T(2)-weighted MR imaging showed a high intensity area in front of the upper cervical vertebral body from C1 to C4, suggesting inflammation of the longus colli muscles. We diagnosed acute calcific prevertebral tendonitis. She was administered nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. Her symptoms gradually improved and she was discharged without neurological deficit 8 days after admission. It is important to be aware of the possibility of this rare disease in a patient with severe occipitalgia but no sign of intracerebral lesion.

  8. Atherogenic index as a predictor of atherosclerosis in subjects with familial Mediterranean fever

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akif Acay

    2014-01-01

    Conclusions: Elaboration of clinical models of inflammation-induced atherogenesis may further advance our knowledge of multiple inflammatory pathways implicated in atherogenesis and provide a useful tool for cardiovascular prevention. We believe that the atherogenic index also be used as a preliminary indication of accelerated atherosclerosis in FMF. However, large-scale prospective studies on this issue are needed.

  9. Oxidized lipoprotein lipids and atherosclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahotupa, Markku

    2017-04-01

    Plasma lipoproteins contain variable amounts of lipid oxidation products (LOP), which are known to impair normal physiological functions and stimulate atherosclerotic processes. Recent evidence indicates that plasma lipoproteins are active carriers of LOP, low-density lipoprotein (LDL) directing transport toward peripheral tissues, and high-density lipoprotein (HDL) being active in the reverse transport. It has been proposed that the lipoprotein-specific transport of LOP could play a role in atherosclerosis-related effects of LDL and HDL. This article gives an overview of the present knowledge of lipoprotein LOP transport and its association with the risk of atherosclerosis and cardiovascular diseases (CVD). Evidence of the significance of lipoprotein LOP transport comes mainly from studies of physiological oxidative stress and is supported by studies of the functionality apolipoprotein A-1 mimetic peptides. A large body of data has accumulated indicating that lipoprotein LOP transport is connected to the risk of atherosclerosis. While high levels of LOP carried by LDL are indicative of elevated risk, high LOP level in HDL appears to associate with protection. If confirmed, the proposed lipoprotein LOP transport function would affect conception of the etiology of atherosclerosis, but would not conflict current views of the pathophysiological mechanisms. It could open new perspectives, such as the dietary origin of LOP, and the protective function of HDL in clearance of LOP. Focusing on LOP could give additional tools especially for prevention and diagnosis, but would not radically change the management of atherosclerosis and CVD.

  10. Proton pumping accompanies calcification in foraminifera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toyofuku, Takashi; Matsuo, Miki Y.; de Nooijer, Lennart Jan; Nagai, Yukiko; Kawada, Sachiko; Fujita, Kazuhiko; Reichart, Gert-Jan; Nomaki, Hidetaka; Tsuchiya, Masashi; Sakaguchi, Hide; Kitazato, Hiroshi

    2017-01-01

    Ongoing ocean acidification is widely reported to reduce the ability of calcifying marine organisms to produce their shells and skeletons. Whereas increased dissolution due to acidification is a largely inorganic process, strong organismal control over biomineralization influences calcification and hence complicates predicting the response of marine calcifyers. Here we show that calcification is driven by rapid transformation of bicarbonate into carbonate inside the cytoplasm, achieved by active outward proton pumping. Moreover, this proton flux is maintained over a wide range of pCO2 levels. We furthermore show that a V-type H+ ATPase is responsible for the proton flux and thereby calcification. External transformation of bicarbonate into CO2 due to the proton pumping implies that biomineralization does not rely on availability of carbonate ions, but total dissolved CO2 may not reduce calcification, thereby potentially maintaining the current global marine carbonate production.

  11. Expansion of CD25+ Innate Lymphoid Cells Reduces Atherosclerosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engelbertsen, Daniel; Foks, Amanda C.; Alberts-Grill, Noah; Kuperwaser, Felicia; Chen, Tao; Lederer, James A.; Jarolim, Petr; Grabie, Nir; Lichtman, Andrew H.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Innate lymphoid cells (ILCs) are a newly discovered subset of immune cells that promote tissue homeostasis and protect against pathogens. ILCs produce cytokines also produced by T lymphocytes that have been shown to affect atherosclerosis, but the influence of ILCs on atherosclerosis has not been explored. Approach and Results We demonstrate that CD25+ ILCs that produce type 2 cytokines (ILC2s) are present in the aorta of atherosclerotic immunodeficient ldlr−/−rag1−/− mice. To investigate the role of ILCs in atherosclerosis, ldlr−/−rag1−/− mice were concurrently fed an atherogenic diet and treated with either ILC-depleting anti-CD90.2 antibodies or with IL-2/anti-IL-2 complexes that expand CD25+ ILCs. Lesion development was not affected by anti-CD90.2 treatment, but was reduced in IL-2/anti-IL-2 -treated mice. These IL-2 treated mice had reduced VLDL cholesterol and increased triglycerides compared to controls and reduced apolipoprotein B100 gene expression in the liver. IL-2/anti-IL-2 treatment caused expansion of ILC2s in aorta and other tissues, elevated levels of IL-5, systemic eosinophila and hepatic eosinophilic inflammation. Blockade of IL-5 reversed the IL-2-complex-induced eosinophilia but did not change lesion size. Conclusions This study demonstrates that expansion of CD25-expressing ILCs by IL-2/anti-IL-2 complexes leads to a reduction in VLDL cholesterol and atherosclerosis. Global depletion of ILCs by anti-CD90.2 did not significantly affect lesion size indicating that different ILC subsets may have divergent effects on atherosclerosis. PMID:26494229

  12. Progressive liver calcifications in neonatal coxsackievirus infection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Konen, O.; Rathaus, V.; Shapiro, M. [Dept. of Diagnostic Imaging, Sapir Medical Center, Meir General Hospital, Kfar Saba (Israel); Bauer, S.; Dolfin, T. [Neonatal Dept. Neonatal intensive Care, Sapir Medical Center, Meir General Hospital Affiliated with the Sackler School of Medicine, Tel-Aviv University, Tel-Aviv (Israel)

    2000-05-01

    Coxsackievirus group B can cause a severe systemic disease in the perinatal period. Severe manifestations like meningitis, encephalitis, hepatitis, and myocarditis have been previously reported. A case of a twin neonate infected by coxsackievirus group B is described, who developed progressive extensive hepatic calcifications demonstrated by ultrasound and computed tomography with follow-up. Hepatic calcifications in coxsackievirus infection have not been previously reported. (orig.)

  13. Coral calcification in a changing ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuffner, Ilsa B.

    2010-01-01

    Animals and plants that live in the ocean form skeletons and other hard parts by combining calcium ions and carbonate ions to create calcium carbonate. This process is called calcification. In tropical and subtropical oceans, the calcification of corals and other organisms creates reefs that protect islands, produce beautiful white-sand beaches, and create habitat for thousands of species that live on coral reefs.

  14. Targeting paraoxonase-1 in atherosclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackness, Mike; Mackness, Bharti

    2013-07-01

    Paraoxonase-1 (PON1) is a Ca(2+) dependent, high-density lipoprotein-associated lactonase which is capable of retarding/inhibiting low-density lipoprotein (LDL) oxidation. LDL oxidation is believed to be central to the initiation and progression of atherosclerosis, therefore, PON1 is considered to be atheroprotective. Relevant literature on PON1 was identified in PubMed. Here, we discuss the background to research on PON1 in atherosclerosis, the evidence for and against PON1 being atheroprotective, potential mechanisms of this atheroprotection and current knowledge on human PON1 regulation. Although current knowledge on PON1 indicates it to be atheroprotective, further clinical and basic studies are warranted to show that PON1 is causally linked to atherosclerosis, how it is atheroprotective and how it is regulated in vivo in humans.

  15. Treating dyslipidemias: is inflammation the missing link?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papoutsidakis, Nikolaos; Deftereos, Spyridon; Giannopoulos, Georgios; Panagopoulou, Vasiliki; Manolis, Antonis S; Bouras, Georgios

    2014-01-01

    Low-grade chronic inflammation is now being held as an important process in the development of atherosclerosis, with new links between dyslipidemia and inflammation being constantly found. While most studies aim to discover inflammatory pathways leading from dyslipidemia to atherogenesis, there is evidence that inflammation can also act in reverse, altering lipid metabolism in unfavorable ways, possibly creating a vicious cycle of inflammationdyslipidemia- inflammation. This is highly relevant for the search of novel therapeutic targets. In this review, after a brief account of the inflammatory mechanisms leading from dyslipidemia to atherogenesis, we focus on what is currently known about the ways inflammation can impair lipid metabolism and whether anti-inflammatory therapies could have a role in dyslipidemia management.

  16. Protective role for TLR4 signaling in atherosclerosis progression as revealed by infection with a common oral pathogen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, Chie; Papadopoulos, George; Gudino, Cynthia V; Weinberg, Ellen O; Barth, Kenneth R; Madrigal, Andrés G; Chen, Yang; Ning, Hua; LaValley, Michael; Gibson, Frank C; Hamilton, James A; Genco, Caroline A

    2012-10-01

    Clinical and epidemiological studies have implicated chronic infections in the development of atherosclerosis. It has been proposed that common mechanisms of signaling via TLRs link stimulation by multiple pathogens to atherosclerosis. However, how pathogen-specific stimulation of TLR4 contributes to atherosclerosis progression remains poorly understood. In this study, atherosclerosis-prone apolipoprotein-E null (ApoE(-/-)) and TLR4-deficient (ApoE(-/-)TLR4(-/-)) mice were orally infected with the periodontal pathogen Porphyromonas gingivalis. ApoE(-/-)TLR4(-/-) mice were markedly more susceptible to atherosclerosis after oral infection with P. gingivalis. Using live animal imaging, we demonstrate that enhanced lesion progression occurs progressively and was increasingly evident with advancing age. Immunohistochemical analysis of lesions from ApoE(-/-)TLR4(-/-) mice revealed an increased inflammatory cell infiltrate composed primarily of macrophages and IL-17 effector T cells (Th17), a subset linked with chronic inflammation. Furthermore, enhanced atherosclerosis in TLR4-deficient mice was associated with impaired development of Th1 immunity and regulatory T cell infiltration. In vitro studies suggest that the mechanism of TLR4-mediated protective immunity may be orchestrated by dendritic cell IL-12 and IL-10, which are prototypic Th1 and regulatory T cell polarizing cytokines. We demonstrate an atheroprotective role for TLR4 in response to infection with the oral pathogen P. gingivalis. Our results point to a role for pathogen-specific TLR signaling in chronic inflammation and atherosclerosis.

  17. How Can Atherosclerosis Be Prevented or Delayed?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page from the NHLBI on Twitter. How Can Atherosclerosis Be Prevented or Delayed? Taking action to control ... Rate This Content: NEXT >> Featured Video What is atherosclerosis? 05/22/2014 Describes how the build-up ...

  18. Gastrointestinal stromal tumor presenting with prominent calcification

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Naoki Izawa; Takeshi Sawada; Ryuichi Abiko; Daisuke Kumon; Mami Hirakawa; Mika Kobayashi; Nobuyuki Obinata

    2012-01-01

    We present a rare case of a gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST) in the stomach with prominent calcification at presentation.A 61-year-old woman visited our hospital because of epigastric discomfort.A spherical calcified lesion with a diameter of about 30 mm was incidentally shown in the left upper quadrant on an abdominal X-ray.Computed tomography demonstrated that the tumor was growing from the upper gastric body,with calcification in the peripheral ring area.A laparoscopic partial gastrectomy was performed,and the resected specimen revealed a well-circumscribed tumor with exophytic growth from the gastric muscularis propria.Microscopic examination revealed spindleshaped tumor cells with calcification and hemorrhage.Additionally,positive immunoreactivity of the tumor to KIT and CD34 and a low mitotic index resulted in the diagnosis of very low risk GIST.There are a few case reports of heavily calcified GIST,although solitary or punctate calcification of primary GIST has been reported in several case series.Dystrophic calcification of necrotic or degenerative tissue is the supposed cause of primary calcified GISTs.In contrast,appearance of calcification after administration of imatinib mesylate,which may be one indicator of disease response,is possibly caused by a different mechanism.

  19. Intracranial physiological calcification on computed tomography, 1. Calcification of pineal region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwak, Ryungchan; Takeuchi, Fumihiko; Ito, Shotaro; Kadoya, Satoru

    1988-06-01

    Of intracranial physiological calcification, common calcification of pineal region, choroid plexus of lateral ventricles and of basal ganglia was examined based on the frequency of occurence of age and sex and type of CT scanners. Consecutive cases of 2877 (1450 males and 1427 females) underwent plain CT scanning were studied. Pathological calcification was excluded from this study. Three types of CT scanners (SCN-200, Somatom 2 and TCT-10 A) were used. As a whole, calcification was shown in 67.7 % in pineal region, 57.6 % in choroid plexus of lateral ventricles and 7.5 % in basal ganglia. First, we reported in detail the calcification of pineal region, in which calcification occurred most frequently. Calcification in pineal region had a close relation with age by increasing with aging. The youngest patient was 8 years old. There was a striking increase in number of patients aged from 10 to 39 years. There was a gradual increase in those aged over 40 years. Of patients aged from 70 to 79 years, calcification was found in 81.5 %. The incidence was noted no changes in patients aged over 80 years. As for patients aged over 20 years, calcification was observed in 75.1 % (82.6 % males and 68.0 % females). In patients aged from 20 to 79 years, the calcification was significantly higher in male than female. Although there was a different incidence of calcification examined by three types of CT scanners, it was not significant. There was no significant difference between thickness of 8 mm section and 10 mm.

  20. Periodontal Innate Immune Mechanisms Relevant to Atherosclerosis

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is a common cardiovascular disease in the United States. The disease is a leading cause of illness and death in the United States. Atherosclerosis is the most common cause for heart attack and stroke. Most commonly, people develop atherosclerosis as a result of diabetes, genetic risk factors, high blood pressure, a high-fat diet, obesity, high blood cholesterol levels, and smoking. However a sizable amount of patients suffering from atherosclerosis do not harbor the classical ...

  1. Human endotoxemia as a model of systemic inflammation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krabbe, K.S.; Krogh-Madsen, R.; Taudorf, S.;

    2008-01-01

    Systemic inflammation is a pathogenetic component in a vast number of acute and chronic diseases such as sepsis, trauma, type 2 diabetes, atherosclerosis, and Alzheimer's disease, all of which are associated with a substantial morbidity and mortality. However, the molecular mechanisms and physiol......Systemic inflammation is a pathogenetic component in a vast number of acute and chronic diseases such as sepsis, trauma, type 2 diabetes, atherosclerosis, and Alzheimer's disease, all of which are associated with a substantial morbidity and mortality. However, the molecular mechanisms...

  2. Apolipoprotein-containing lipoprotein subclasses and subclinical atherosclerosis in systemic lupus erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiani, Adnan N; Fang, Hong; Akhter, Ehtisham; Quiroga, Carmen; Simpson, Nancy; Alaupovic, Petar; Magder, Laurence S; Petri, Michelle

    2015-03-01

    Traditional classification of hyperlipidemia using high-density lipoprotein, low-density lipoprotein (LDL), and very low-density lipoprotein does not provide information on lipoprotein function. Apolipoproteins (Apos), which are protein components of plasma lipoproteins (including A, B, C, D, E) with their different composition, metabolic, and atherogenic properties, provide insight on lipoprotein functioning. In particular, the Apo B/A-I ratio is associated with atherogenic LDL and development of cardiovascular disease. We explored the baseline association between these nontraditional risk factors with subclinical measures of atherosclerosis (coronary artery calcification [CAC] and carotid intima-media thickness [IMT]) in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). A total of 58 SLE patients (97% women, 58% white, 40% African American, and 2% other, mean ± SD age 44 ± 11 years) had measurement of Apo and lipoproteins by immunoturbidimetric procedures, electroimmunoassays, and immunoprecipitation. CAC was measured by helical computed tomography and carotid IMT by carotid duplex. This study was based on the baseline assessment of subclinical atherosclerosis in the Lupus Atherosclerosis Prevention Study. The measurement of the lipoproteins was made on sera collected at the same time. There was no association between cardioprotective Apos (Apo A-I, LpA-I, LpA-I:A-II) and CAC (P Systemic Lupus Erythematosus Disease Activity Index, were not associated with CAC or carotid IMT. Neither cardioprotective nor atherogenic lipoproteins were associated with measures of subclinical atherosclerosis in this series of SLE patients. Further studies with a larger sample size are warranted to confirm our findings.

  3. Acute renal infarction secondary to calcific embolus from mitral annular calcification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bande, Dinesh; Abbara, Suhny; Kalva, Sanjeeva P

    2011-06-01

    We report a case of a 62-year-old man who presented with right groin pain who subsequently was found to have a renal infarct secondary to calcific embolus from mitral annular calcification on CT and angiography. We briefly review the literature and discuss the importance of this entity in clinical practice.

  4. Clinical and imaging features associated with intracranial internal carotid artery calcifications in patients with ischemic stroke

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yilmaz, Arda [Mersin University, Department of Neurology, Faculty of Medicine, Mersin (Turkey); Akpinar, Erhan [Hacettepe University, Department of Radiology, Faculty of Medicine, Ankara (Turkey); Topcuoglu, Mehmet Akif; Arsava, Ethem Murat [Hacettepe University, Department of Neurology, Faculty of Medicine, Ankara (Turkey)

    2015-05-01

    Intracranial internal carotid artery calcifications (ICAC), a frequent finding on imaging studies, are predictive of future stroke risk in population-based studies. The clinical significance of this observation among ischemic stroke patients is however less clear. In this study, we analyzed ICAC burden in relation to vascular risk factor profile, stroke etiology, and extent of craniocervical vascular calcifications in a consecutive series of ischemic stroke patients. The burden of ICAC was determined both on non-contrast CT and CT-angiography source images by semiquantitative scoring algorithms. The distribution of vascular risk factors, etiologic stroke subtype, and calcification burden in other craniocervical arteries was assessed among patients with no ICAC, mild-moderate ICAC, and severe ICAC. Of 319 patients included into the study, 28 % had no ICAC, 35 % had mild-moderate ICAC, and 37 % had severe ICAC on CT angiography. Independent factors associated with ICAC burden in multivariate analysis included age (p < 0.001), diabetes mellitus (p = 0.006), and coronary artery disease (p < 0.001). Furthermore, a stroke etiology of large artery atherosclerosis or cardioaortic embolism was significantly related to higher ICAC burden (p = 0.006). Patients with severe ICAC were more likely to harbor calcifications in other vascular beds (p < 0.001). All of these findings persisted when analyses were repeated with CT-based ICAC burden assessments. ICAC burden reflects a continuum of atherosclerotic disease involving carotid arteries together with other craniocervical vascular beds. ICAC is significantly associated with stroke of large vessel or cardioembolic origin. This information might help the clinician in prioritizing etiologic work-up in the acute period. (orig.)

  5. [Detection of coronary calcifications by electron beam tomography and multislice spiral CT: clinical relevance].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Achenbach, S; Schmermund, A; Erbel, R; Silber, S; Haberl, R; Moshage, W; Daniel, W G

    2003-11-01

    Coronary calcifications can be detected and quantified using electron beam tomography (EBT) or newer generation multi-slice spiral CT (MSCT) scanners. An abundance of data has been acquired by EBT. It could be shown that the amount of coronary calcium correlates to the coronary plaque burden. The detection of coronary calcium with CT imaging methods therefore provides a unique opportunity to detect and quantify coronary atherosclerosis in a subclinical stage. Consequently, the presence and amount of coronary calcium has been shown to be indicative for an increased coronary event risk in symptomatic and asymptomatic individuals. Several clinical studies found a predictive value that was superior to conventional risk factors. Clinically, the use of coronary calcification assessment may therefore be beneficial in patients who, based on traditional risk factors, seem to be at "intermediate risk" for coronary events (10-year event risk 10-20%) in order to decide on the aggressiveness of risk factor modification. The role of coronary calcium quantification to monitor the progression of disease has not been clarified yet. Large, ongoing trials will provide further data as to the relative merit of coronary calcium assessment for risk stratification and will help to more clearly define its clinical role. The relationship between coronary calcium and coronary stenoses is more complex. While the absence of coronary calcifications makes significant coronary stenoses unlikely, even large amounts of coronary calcium do not necessarily indicate the presence of coronary artery stenoses. Pronounced coronary calcifications as an isolated finding should therefore not be the motivation for invasive diagnostic procedures in the absence of other evidence of ischemic heart disease.

  6. Calcifications of the thoracic aorta on extended non-contrast-enhanced cardiac CT.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Damian Craiem

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The presence of calcified atherosclerosis in different vascular beds has been associated with a higher risk of mortality. Thoracic aorta calcium (TAC can be assessed from computed tomography (CT scans, originally aimed at coronary artery calcium (CAC assessment. CAC screening improves cardiovascular risk prediction, beyond standard risk assessment, whereas TAC performance remains controversial. However, the curvilinear portion of the thoracic aorta (TA, that includes the aortic arch, is systematically excluded from TAC analysis. We investigated the prevalence and spatial distribution of TAC all along the TA, to see how those segments that remain invisible in standard TA evaluation were affected. METHODS AND RESULTS: A total of 970 patients (77% men underwent extended non-contrast cardiac CT scans including the aortic arch. An automated algorithm was designed to extract the vessel centerline and to estimate the vessel diameter in perpendicular planes. Then, calcifications were quantified using the Agatston score and associated with the corresponding thoracic aorta segment. The aortic arch and the proximal descending aorta, "invisible" in routine CAC screening, appeared as two vulnerable sites concentrating 60% of almost 11000 calcifications. The aortic arch was the most affected segment per cm length. Using the extended measurement method, TAC prevalence doubled from 31% to 64%, meaning that 52% of patients would escape detection with a standard scan. In a stratified analysis for CAC and/or TAC assessment, 111 subjects (46% women were exclusively identified with the enlarged scan. CONCLUSIONS: Calcium screening in the TA revealed that the aortic arch and the proximal descending aorta, hidden in standard TA evaluations, concentrated most of the calcifications. Middle-aged women were more prone to have calcifications in those hidden portions and became candidates for reclassification.

  7. Periodontal Disease-Induced Atherosclerosis and Oxidative Stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomoko Kurita-Ochiai

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Periodontal disease is a highly prevalent disorder affecting up to 80% of the global population. Recent epidemiological studies have shown an association between periodontal disease and cardiovascular disease, as oxidative stress plays an important role in chronic inflammatory diseases such as periodontal disease and cardiovascular disease. In this review, we focus on the mechanisms by which periodontopathic bacteria cause chronic inflammation through the enhancement of oxidative stress and accelerate cardiovascular disease. Furthermore, we comment on the antioxidative activity of catechin in atherosclerosis accelerated by periodontitis.

  8. Atherosclerosis and cardiovascular risk reduction with PPAR agonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuusisto, Johanna; Andrulionyte, Laura; Laakso, Markku

    2007-10-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) are transcriptional factors belonging to the nuclear receptor superfamily. Three isoforms, PPARalpha, PPARgamma, and PPARdelta, which are encoded by separate genes, have been identified. The PPARs act as gene regulators of various metabolic pathways in energy and lipid metabolism, glucose homeostasis, adipogenesis, and inflammation. Two key classes of synthetic compounds, fibrates and thiazolidinediones (glitazones), activate PPARalpha and PPARgamma, respectively. Both of these drugs have several properties that prevent atherosclerosis in the vascular wall and reduce the levels of risk factors for cardiovascular disease. However, clinical trials have not produced convincing evidence that cardiovascular disease is prevented with the use of PPARalpha and PPARgamma agonists.

  9. Imaging patterns of intratumoral calcification in the abdominopelvic cavity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Mi Hye; Kim, Young Jun; Park, Hee Sun; Jung, Sung Il; Jeon, Hae Jeong [Dept. of Radiology, Konkuk University Medical Center, Seoul(Korea, Republic of)

    2017-04-15

    Intratumoral calcification is one of the most noticeable of radiologic findings. It facilitates detection and provides information important for correctly diagnosing tumors. In the abdominopelvic cavity, a wide variety of tumors have calcifications with various imaging features, though the majority of such calcifications are dystrophic in nature. In this article, we classify the imaging patterns of intratumoral calcification according to number, location, and morphology. Then, we describe commonly-encountered abdominopelvic tumors containing typical calcification patterns, focusing on their differentiable characteristics using the imaging patterns of intratumoral calcification.

  10. Imaging Patterns of Intratumoral Calcification in the Abdominopelvic Cavity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Mi Hye; Park, Hee Sun; Jung, Sung Il; Jeon, Hae Jeong

    2017-01-01

    Intratumoral calcification is one of the most noticeable of radiologic findings. It facilitates detection and provides information important for correctly diagnosing tumors. In the abdominopelvic cavity, a wide variety of tumors have calcifications with various imaging features, though the majority of such calcifications are dystrophic in nature. In this article, we classify the imaging patterns of intratumoral calcification according to number, location, and morphology. Then, we describe commonly-encountered abdominopelvic tumors containing typical calcification patterns, focusing on their differentiable characteristics using the imaging patterns of intratumoral calcification. PMID:28246512

  11. Intestinal Microbiota Metabolism and Atherosclerosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tian-Xing Liu; Hai-Tao Niu; Shu-Yang Zhang

    2015-01-01

    Objective:This review aimed to summarize the relationship between intestinal microbiota metabolism and cardiovascular disease (CVD) and to propose a novel CVD therapeutic target.Data Sources:This study was based on data obtained from PubMed and EMBASE up to June 30,2015.Articles were selected using the following search temps:"Intestinal microbiota","trimethylamine N-oxide (TMAO)","trimethylamine (TMA)","cardiovascular",and "atherosclerosis".Study Selection:Studies were eligible if they present information on intestinal microbiota metabolism and atherosclerosis.Studies on TMA-containing nutrients were also included.Results:A new CVD risk factor,TMAO,was recently identified.It has been observed that several TMA-containing compounds may be catabolized by specific intestinal microbiota,resulting in TMA release.TMA is subsequently converted to TMAO in the liver.Several preliminary studies have linked TMAO to CVD,particularly atherosclerosis;however,the details of this relationship remain unclear.Conclusions:Intestinal microbiota metabolism is associated with atherosclerosis and may represent a promising therapeutic target with respect to CVD management.

  12. Cyclodextrin promotes atherosclerosis regression via macrophage reprogramming

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2016-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is an inflammatory disease linked to elevated blood cholesterol concentrations. Despite ongoing advances in the prevention and treatment of atherosclerosis, cardiovascular disease remains the leading cause of death worldwide. Continuous retention of apolipoprotein B...... that increases cholesterol solubility in preventing and reversing atherosclerosis. We showed that CD treatment of murine atherosclerosis reduced atherosclerotic plaque size and CC load and promoted plaque regression even with a continued cholesterol-rich diet. Mechanistically, CD increased oxysterol production...... of CD as well as for augmented reverse cholesterol transport. Because CD treatment in humans is safe and CD beneficially affects key mechanisms of atherogenesis, it may therefore be used clinically to prevent or treat human atherosclerosis....

  13. Preclinical mouse models and methods for the discovery of the causes and treatments of atherosclerosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hewing, Bernd; Fisher, Edward A

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Atherosclerosis is the leading cause of death in the Western world. Despite huge advances in understanding its pathophysiological mechanisms, current treatment is mostly based on ‘traditional’ risk factors. The introduction of statins more than 20 years ago reduced morbidity and mortality of atherosclerosis by 30%, leaving a residual cardiovascular risk. Therefore, efforts continue toward the development of novel therapies that can be added to established treatments. Besides targeting dyslipidemia, recent focus has been put on preventing or resolving inflammatory processes involved in atherosclerosis. Areas covered The article discusses therapeutic and diagnostic targets in atherosclerosis and how they can be discovered and studied in preclinical animal models. The roles of immune cells, specifically macrophages and monocytes, in plaque inflammation are discussed. The article also describes current preclinical models of atherosclerosis, specifically the mouse, study designs (for progression and regression studies), basic and advanced methods of analysis of atherosclerotic lesions, and discusses the challenges of translating the findings to humans. Expert opinion Advances in genomics, proteomics, lipidomics and the development of high-throughput screening techniques help to improve our understanding of atherosclerosis disease mechanisms immensely and facilitate the discovery of new diagnostic and therapeutic targets. Preclinical studies in animals are still indispensable to uncover pathways involved in atherosclerotic disease and to evaluate novel drug targets. The translation of these targets, however, from animal studies to humans remains challenging. There is a strong need for novel biomarkers that can be used to prove the concept of a new target in humans. PMID:22468952

  14. Chronic intermittent hypoxia induces atherosclerosis by NF-κB-dependent mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, D; Fang, G; Mao, S-Z; Ye, X; Liu, G; Gong, Y; Liu, S F

    2012-11-01

    Chronic intermittent hypoxia (CIH) causes atherosclerosis in mice fed a high cholesterol diet (HCD). The mechanisms by which CIH promotes atherosclerosis are incompletely understood. This study defined the mechanistic role of NF-κB pathway in CIH+HCD induced atherosclerosis. Wild type (WT) and mice deficient in the p50 subunit of NF-κB (p50-KO) were fed normal chow diet (ND) or HCD, and exposed to sham or CIH. Atherosclerotic lesions on the en face aortic preparation and cross-sections of aortic root were examined. In WT mice, neither CIH nor HCD exposure alone caused, but CIH+HCD caused evident atherosclerotic lesions on both preparations after 20weeks of exposure. WT mice on ND and exposed to CIH for 35.6weeks did not develop atherosclerotic lesions. P50 gene deletion diminished CIH+HCD induced NF-κB activation and abolished CIH+HCD induced atherosclerosis. P50 gene deletion inhibited vascular wall inflammation, reduced hepatic TNF-α level, attenuated the elevation in serum cholesterol level and diminished macrophage foam cell formation induced by CIH+HCD exposure. These results demonstrate that inhibition of NF-κB activation abrogates the activation of three major atherogenic mechanisms associated with an abolition of CIH+HCD induced atherosclerosis. NF-κB may be a central common pathway through which CIH+HCD exposure activates multiple atherogenic mechanisms, leading to atherosclerosis.

  15. Pentraxin-3 as a marker of advanced atherosclerosis results from the Bruneck, ARMY and ARFY Studies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Knoflach

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Pentraxins like C-reactive protein are key components of the innate immune system. Recently, pentraxin-3 (PTX3 has been proposed to be a specific marker of vascular inflammation, yet its association with atherosclerosis is still unclear. METHODS AND RESULTS: PTX3 serum levels were measured in three independent studies of 132 young men (ARMY Study, 205 young women (ARFY Study and 562 individuals 55 to 94 years old (Bruneck Study. In contrast to C-reactive protein, PTX3 showed little relationships with classic vascular risk factors and pro-inflammatory conditions. In the population based Bruneck Study, PTX3 level was independently associated with prevalent cardiovascular diseases (multivariable odds ratio [95%CI] 3.09 [1.65-5.79]; P<0.001. Moreover, PTX3 level correlated with the severity of carotid and femoral atherosclerosis and was highest in individuals with multiple vascular territories affected. In contrast, there was no association with elevated intima-media thickness, a precursor lesion of atherosclerosis, in any of the three populations investigated. CONCLUSIONS: Level of PTX3 is independently associated with atherosclerosis and manifest cardiovascular disease but not early vessel pathology. Unlike C-reactive protein, PTX3 is not a component of the classic acute phase response (systemic inflammation but appears to be more specific for vascular inflammation.

  16. Roles of oxidative stress and redox regulation in atherosclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondo, Takahito; Hirose, Makoto; Kageyama, Kan

    2009-10-01

    Oxidative stress is believed to be a cause of aging and cardiovascular disorders. In response to inflam-mation or endothelial cell injury, production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) is enhanced in vascular cells. These changes contribute to the initiation of atherosclerosis. Vascular cells possess anti-oxidant systems to protect against oxidative stress, in addition to the redox system. The redox status of pro-tein thiols is important for cellular functions. The Akt signaling pathway exerts effects on survival and apoptosis, and is regulated by the glutathione (GSH)/glutaredoxin (GRX)-dependent redox sys-tem. Sex hormones such as estrogens protect against oxidative stress by protecting the Akt signaling pathway but the physiological role of the extracellular GSH/GRX system has not been clarified, although found an increase in the levels of S-glutathionylated serum proteins in patients with athero-sclerosis obliterans. The results suggested that impaired serum redox potential is a marker of the development vascular dysfunction and estrogen has a possible role in the prevention of atherosclerosis.

  17. Readapting the adaptive immune response - therapeutic strategies for atherosclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sage, Andrew P; Mallat, Ziad

    2017-01-04

    Cardiovascular diseases remain a major global health issue, with the development of atherosclerosis as a major underlying cause. Our treatment of cardiovascular disease has improved greatly over the past three decades, but much remains to be done reduce disease burden. Current priorities include reducing atherosclerosis advancement to clinically significant stages and preventing plaque rupture or erosion. Inflammation and involvement of the adaptive immune system influences all these aspects and therefore is one focus for future therapeutic development. The atherosclerotic vascular wall is now recognized to be invaded from both sides (arterial lumen and adventitia), for better or worse, by the adaptive immune system. Atherosclerosis is also affected at several stages by adaptive immune responses, overall providing many opportunities to target these responses and to reduce disease progression. Protective influences that may be defective in diseased individuals include humoral responses to modified LDL and regulatory T cell responses. There are many strategies in development to boost these pathways in humans, including vaccine-based therapies. The effects of various existing adaptive immune targeting therapies, such as blocking critical co-stimulatory pathways or B cell depletion, on cardiovascular disease are beginning to emerge with important consequences for both autoimmune disease patients and the potential for wider use of such therapies. Entering the translation phase for adaptive immune targeting therapies is an exciting and promising prospect.

  18. Vascular ossification – calcification in metabolic syndrome, type 2 diabetes mellitus, chronic kidney disease, and calciphylaxis – calcific uremic arteriolopathy: the emerging role of sodium thiosulfate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sowers James R

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Vascular calcification is associated with metabolic syndrome, diabetes, hypertension, atherosclerosis, chronic kidney disease, and end stage renal disease. Each of the above contributes to an accelerated and premature demise primarily due to cardiovascular disease. The above conditions are associated with multiple metabolic toxicities resulting in an increase in reactive oxygen species to the arterial vessel wall, which results in a response to injury wound healing (remodeling. The endothelium seems to be at the very center of these disease processes, acting as the first line of defense against these multiple metabolic toxicities and the first to encounter their damaging effects to the arterial vessel wall. Results The pathobiomolecular mechanisms of vascular calcification are presented in order to provide the clinician – researcher a database of knowledge to assist in the clinical management of these high-risk patients and examine newer therapies. Calciphylaxis is associated with medial arteriolar vascular calcification and results in ischemic subcutaneous necrosis with vulnerable skin ulcerations and high mortality. Recently, this clinical syndrome (once thought to be rare is presenting with increasing frequency. Consequently, newer therapeutic modalities need to be explored. Intravenous sodium thiosulfate is currently used as an antidote for the treatment of cyanide poisioning and prevention of toxicities of cisplatin cancer therapies. It is used as a food and medicinal preservative and topically used as an antifungal medication. Conclusion A discussion of sodium thiosulfate's dual role as a potent antioxidant and chelator of calcium is presented in order to better understand its role as an emerging novel therapy for the clinical syndrome of calciphylaxis and its complications.

  19. Anti-inflammatory salicylate beneficially modulates pre-existing atherosclerosis through quenching of NF-κB activity and lowering of cholesterol

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vries-van der Weij, J. de; Toet, K.; Zadelaar, A.S.M.; Wielinga, P.Y.; Kleemann, R.; Rensen, P.C.N.; Kooistra, T.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: Inflammation plays an important role in all stages of atherosclerosis, but little is known about the therapeutic effects of quenching inflammation in already existing atherosclerotic lesions. Putative beneficial effects of salicylate, an inhibitor of NF-κB activation, were studied in mice

  20. Genetics Home Reference: familial idiopathic basal ganglia calcification

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... idiopathic basal ganglia calcification ( FIBGC , formerly known as Fahr disease) is a condition characterized by abnormal deposits of ... on chromosome 14q for idiopathic basal ganglia calcification (Fahr disease). Am J Hum Genet. 1999 Sep;65(3): ...

  1. Genetic associations with valvular calcification and aortic stenosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thanassoulis, George; Campbell, Catherine Y; Owens, David S

    2013-01-01

    Limited information is available regarding genetic contributions to valvular calcification, which is an important precursor of clinical valve disease.......Limited information is available regarding genetic contributions to valvular calcification, which is an important precursor of clinical valve disease....

  2. High-Dose Menaquinone-7 Supplementation Reduces Cardiovascular Calcification in a Murine Model of Extraosseous Calcification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Scheiber

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Cardiovascular calcification is prevalent in the aging population and in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD and diabetes mellitus, giving rise to substantial morbidity and mortality. Vitamin K-dependent matrix Gla-protein (MGP is an important inhibitor of calcification. The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of high-dose menaquinone-7 (MK-7 supplementation (100 µg/g diet on the development of extraosseous calcification in a murine model. Calcification was induced by 5/6 nephrectomy combined with high phosphate diet in rats. Sham operated animals served as controls. Animals received high or low MK-7 diets for 12 weeks. We assessed vital parameters, serum chemistry, creatinine clearance, and cardiac function. CKD provoked increased aortic (1.3 fold; p < 0.05 and myocardial (2.4 fold; p < 0.05 calcification in line with increased alkaline phosphatase levels (2.2 fold; p < 0.01. MK-7 supplementation inhibited cardiovascular calcification and decreased aortic alkaline phosphatase tissue concentrations. Furthermore, MK-7 supplementation increased aortic MGP messenger ribonucleic acid (mRNA expression (10-fold; p < 0.05. CKD-induced arterial hypertension with secondary myocardial hypertrophy and increased elastic fiber breaking points in the arterial tunica media did not change with MK-7 supplementation. Our results show that high-dose MK-7 supplementation inhibits the development of cardiovascular calcification. The protective effect of MK-7 may be related to the inhibition of secondary mineralization of damaged vascular structures.

  3. FIBROBLAST INVOLVEMENT IN SOFT CONNECTIVE TISSUE CALCIFICATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivonne eRonchetti

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Soft connective tissue calcification is not a passive process, but the consequence of metabolic changes of local mesenchymal cells that, depending on both genetic and environmental factors, alter the balance between pro- and anti-calcifying pathways. While the role of smooth muscle cells and pericytes in ectopic calcifications has been widely investigated, the involvement of fibroblasts is still elusive. Fibroblasts isolated from the dermis of PXE patients and of patients exhibiting PXE-like clinical and histopathological findings offer an attractive model to investigate the mechanisms leading to the precipitation of mineral deposits within elastic fibres and to explore the influence of the genetic background and of the extracellular environment on fibroblast-associated calcifications, thus improving the knowledge on the role of mesenchymal cells on pathologic mineralization.

  4. Atherosclerosis: from biology to pharmacological treatment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Graziano Riccioni; Valeriana Sblendorio

    2012-01-01

    A recent explosion in the amount of cardiovascular risk has swept across the globe. Primary prevention is the preferred method to lower cardiovascular risk. Lowering the prevalence of obesity is the most urgent matter, and is pleiotropic since it affects blood pressure, lipid profiles, glucose metabolism, inflammation, and atherothrombotic disease progression. Given the current obstacles, success of primary prevention remains uncertain. At the same time, the consequences of delay and inaction will inevitably be disastrous, and the sense of urgency mounts. Pathological and epidemiological data confirm that atherosclerosis begins in early childhood, and advances seamlessly and inexorably throughout life. Risk factors in childhood are similar to those in adults, and track between stages of life. When indicated, aggressive treatment should begin at the earliest indication, and be continued for many years. For those patients at intermediate risk according to global risk scores, C-reactive protein, coronary artery calcium, and carotid intima-media thickness are available for further stratification. Using statins for primary prevention is recommended by guidelines, is prevalent, but remains under prescribed. Statin drugs are unrivaled, evidence-based, major weapons to lower cardiovascular risk. Even when low density lipoprotein cholesterol targets are attained, over half of patients continue to have disease progression and clinical events. Though clinical evidence is incomplete, altering or raising the blood high density lipoprotein cholesterol level continues to be pursued. The aim of this review is to point out the attention of key aspects of vulnerable plaques regarding their pathogenesis and treatment.

  5. Acute neck pain in the ED: Consider longus colli calcific tendinitis vs meningitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Tyag K; Weis, James C

    2017-06-01

    Presented here is a rare cause of severe neck pain - acute longus colli calcific tendinitis - in a 54year old man who presented to the emergency department. The neck pain is due to inflammation caused by calcium hydroxyapatite crystal deposition in the tendons on the longus colli muscles. This is non-infectious. The gold standard for diagnosis is a CT neck which best shows the calcifications in the anterior vertebral column of C1-C4, where the tendons of these muscles insert bilaterally. Longus colli calcific tendinitis is not life-threatening and patients will make a full recovery after treatment with NSAIDs. However, this condition is often confused with life-threatening conditions such as infection (meningitis or retropharyngeal abscess), intracranial hemorrhage, trauma, herniation of cervical discs, or malignancy (Estimable et al. (2015) [1]). Symptoms associated with calcific tendinitis of the longus colli muscle are non-specific and include mild fever, moderate-severe headache, neck pain, and drastically reduced range of motion of the neck. More specific symptoms are the presence of dysphagia and odynophagia. Lab findings usually are significant for mild leukocytosis, and elevated ESR and CRP. Awareness of this condition by E.D. physicians can avoid unnecessary invasive interventions, increased costs, and delays that result from incorrect diagnosis and treatment. This is a unique case in which a patient who was afebrile with a normal ESR was worked up for meningitis and an intracranial process, and also empirically treated for meningitis before finally being diagnosed with acute calcific tendinitis of the longus colli muscle in the E.D. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Bisphenol A exposure enhances atherosclerosis in WHHL rabbits.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chao Fang

    Full Text Available Bisphenol A (BPA is an environmental endocrine disrupter. Excess exposure to BPA may increase susceptibility to many metabolic disorders, but it is unclear whether BPA exposure has any adverse effects on the development of atherosclerosis. To determine whether there are such effects, we investigated the response of Watanabe heritable hyperlipidemic (WHHL rabbits to 400-µg/kg BPA per day, administered orally by gavage, over the course of 12 weeks and compared aortic and coronary atherosclerosis in these rabbits to the vehicle group using histological and morphometric methods. In addition, serum BPA, cytokines levels and plasma lipids as well as pathologic changes in liver, adipose and heart were analyzed. Moreover, we treated human umbilical cord vein endothelial cells (HUVECs and rabbit aortic smooth muscle cells (SMCs with different doses of BPA to investigate the underlying molecular mechanisms involved in BPA action(s. BPA treatment did not change the plasma lipids and body weights of the WHHL rabbits; however, the gross atherosclerotic lesion area in the aortic arch was increased by 57% compared to the vehicle group. Histological and immunohistochemical analyses revealed marked increases in advanced lesions (37% accompanied by smooth muscle cells (60% but no significant changes in the numbers of macrophages. With regard to coronary atherosclerosis, incidents of coronary stenosis increased by 11% and smooth muscle cells increased by 73% compared to the vehicle group. Furthermore, BPA-treated WHHL rabbits showed increased adipose accumulation and hepatic and myocardial injuries accompanied by up-regulation of endoplasmic reticulum (ER stress and inflammatory and lipid metabolism markers in livers. Treatment with BPA also induced the expression of ER stress and inflammation related genes in cultured HUVECs. These results demonstrate for the first time that BPA exposure may increase susceptibility to atherosclerosis in WHHL rabbits.

  7. NLRP3 inflammasomes link inflammation and metabolic disease

    OpenAIRE

    De Nardo, Dominic; Latz, Eicke

    2011-01-01

    A strong link between inflammation and metabolism is becoming increasingly evident. A number of recent landmark studies have implicated the activation of the NLRP3 inflammasome, an interleukin-1β family cytokine-activating protein complex, in a variety of metabolic diseases including obesity, atherosclerosis and type 2 diabetes. Here we review these new developments and discuss their implications for better understanding inflammation in metabolic disease and the prospects of targeting the NLR...

  8. NLRP3 inflammasomes link inflammation and metabolic disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Nardo, Dominic; Latz, Eicke

    2011-08-01

    A strong link between inflammation and metabolism is becoming increasingly evident. A number of recent landmark studies have implicated the activation of the NLRP3 inflammasome, an interleukin-1β family cytokine-activating protein complex, in a variety of metabolic diseases including obesity, atherosclerosis and type 2 diabetes. Here, we review these new developments and discuss their implications for a better understanding of inflammation in metabolic disease, and the prospects of targeting the NLRP3 inflammasome for therapeutic intervention.

  9. Vitamin K intake and calcifications in breast arteries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maas, Angela H. E. M.; van der Schouw, Yvonne T.; Beijerinck, David; Deurenberg, Jan J. M.; Mali, Willem P. Th. M.; Grobbee, Diederick E.; van der Graaf, Yolanda

    2007-01-01

    Objectives: Vitamin K is an important co-factor in the production of proteins that inhibit vascular calcification. A low dietary Vitamin K intake has been associated with aortic and coronary calcifications and an elevated cardiovascular risk. Calcifications in the arteries of the breasts have also b

  10. Calcific tendinitis of the gluteus maximus tendon (Gluteus maximus tendinitis)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wepfer, J.F.; Reed, J.G.; Cullen, G.M.; McDevitt, W.P.

    1983-02-01

    Seven cases of calcific tendinitis of the gluteus maximus tendon are presented. Awareness of the precise anatomic location of the calcific deposit is essential for the accurate diagnosis of this uncommon site of tendinitis. Clinically, the presenting complaint is that of pain. In some instances, however, the patients are asymptomatic and the calcification is an incidental finding.

  11. Vitamin K intake and calcifications in breast arteries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maas, Angela H. E. M.; van der Schouw, Yvonne T.; Beijerinck, David; Deurenberg, Jan J. M.; Mali, Willem P. Th. M.; Grobbee, Diederick E.; van der Graaf, Yolanda

    2007-01-01

    Objectives: Vitamin K is an important co-factor in the production of proteins that inhibit vascular calcification. A low dietary Vitamin K intake has been associated with aortic and coronary calcifications and an elevated cardiovascular risk. Calcifications in the arteries of the breasts have also b

  12. Atherosclerosis--an immune disease: The Anitschkov Lecture 2007.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansson, Göran K

    2009-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is an inflammatory disease. This article reviews the emergence of this concept from studies of patients and their lesions, experimental animal models, and epidemiological cohorts. Immunohistochemical studies identified immune cells and mediators and provided evidence for inflammatory activation in the atherosclerotic lesion. In parallel, cell culture studies demonstrated the capacity of vascular cells to interact with immune cells. Subsequent studies of clinical and epidemiological materials have identified inflammatory markers and immunoregulatory genes as contributors of risk for myocardial infarction and stroke. Finally, experiments using gene-targeted mice have provided mechanistic understanding of the disease process. It is now thought that the atherosclerotic process is initiated when low-density lipoproteins accumulate in the intima, activate the endothelium, and promote recruitment of monocytes and T cells. Monocytes differentiate into macrophages, internalize modified lipoproteins, and end up as foam cells. T cells in lesions recognize local antigens and mount T helper-1 responses that contribute to local inflammation and plaque growth. This atherogenic pathway is counterbalanced by anti-inflammatory signals provided by regulatory immunity. Intensified inflammatory activation may lead to local proteolysis, plaque rupture, thrombus formation, ischemia and infarction. Novel therapeutic opportunities may emerge from understanding the role of inflammation in atherosclerosis.

  13. [Is regression of atherosclerosis possible?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, D; Richard, J L; Emmerich, J; Bruckert, E; Delahaye, F

    1992-10-01

    Experimental studies have shown the regression of atherosclerosis in animals given a cholesterol-rich diet and then given a normal diet or hypolipidemic therapy. Despite favourable results of clinical trials of primary prevention modifying the lipid profile, the concept of atherosclerosis regression in man remains very controversial. The methodological approach is difficult: this is based on angiographic data and requires strict standardisation of angiographic views and reliable quantitative techniques of analysis which are available with image processing. Several methodologically acceptable clinical coronary studies have shown not only stabilisation but also regression of atherosclerotic lesions with reductions of about 25% in total cholesterol levels and of about 40% in LDL cholesterol levels. These reductions were obtained either by drugs as in CLAS (Cholesterol Lowering Atherosclerosis Study), FATS (Familial Atherosclerosis Treatment Study) and SCOR (Specialized Center of Research Intervention Trial), by profound modifications in dietary habits as in the Lifestyle Heart Trial, or by surgery (ileo-caecal bypass) as in POSCH (Program On the Surgical Control of the Hyperlipidemias). On the other hand, trials with non-lipid lowering drugs such as the calcium antagonists (INTACT, MHIS) have not shown significant regression of existing atherosclerotic lesions but only a decrease on the number of new lesions. The clinical benefits of these regression studies are difficult to demonstrate given the limited period of observation, relatively small population numbers and the fact that in some cases the subjects were asymptomatic. The decrease in the number of cardiovascular events therefore seems relatively modest and concerns essentially subjects who were symptomatic initially. The clinical repercussion of studies of prevention involving a single lipid factor is probably partially due to the reduction in progression and anatomical regression of the atherosclerotic plaque

  14. Atherosclerosis in Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ewa Jednacz

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Atherosclerosis is a chronic inflammatory disease of the arteries. Clinical consequences of the atherosclerotic process occur in the adult population, however atherosclerotic process begins in childhood. The classic risk factors for atherosclerosis include obesity, dyslipidaemia, age, gender or family history. In recent years, attention has been drawn to the similarity between atherosclerotic inflammatory processes and inflammatory changes in the course of systemic connective tissue disease, in particular systemic lupus etythematosus (SLE or rheumatoid arthritis (RA. There is also observed the similarity of the pathogenetic background of development of atherosclerosis and juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA. Elevated levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines are observed in the course of juvenile idiopathic arthritis. Also homocysteine concentrations, which may play a significant role in the development of atherosclerotic lesions, are observed higher in patients with JIA. Some studies revealed higher carotid intima-media thickness (IMT index values in children with JIA. In view of the fact that atherosclerotic process begins as early as in childhood, the introduction of appropriate preventive measures in children is a matter of utmost importance.

  15. Disrupting functional interactions between platelet chemokines inhibits atherosclerosis in hyperlipidemic mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koenen, RR; Hundelshausen, P; Nesmelova, IV

    2009-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is characterized by chronic inflammation of the arterial wall due to chemokine-driven mononuclear cell recruitment. Activated platelets can synergize with chemokines to exacerbate atherogenesis; for example, by deposition of the chemokines platelet factor-4 (PF4, also known as CXCL4...... and by enhanced monocyte arrest resulting from CCL5-CXCL4 interactions. The CCL5 antagonist Met-RANTES reduces diet-induced atherosclerosis; however, CCL5 antagonism may not be therapeutically feasible, as suggested by studies using Ccl5-deficient mice which imply that direct CCL5 blockade would severely...... monocyte recruitment and reducing atherosclerosis without the aforementioned side effects. These results establish the in vivo relevance of chemokine heteromers and show the potential of targeting heteromer formation to achieve therapeutic effects...

  16. Lack of Correlation Between Depression and Coronary Artery Calcification in a Non-Selected Danish Population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Devantier, Torben Albert; Nørgaard, Bjarne Linde; Sand, Niels Peter;

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Depression is associated with coronary artery disease, and atherosclerosis seems to play a central role in this relation. In several studies, multislice computed tomography (CT) has been applied for detection and quantification of coronary artery calcification (CAC) in relation...... to depression. To our knowledge, only one previous study has investigated the relation between CAC and depression in an unselected population. METHODS: A total of 617 persons were randomly selected from the background population. The participants underwent CT of the heart and were screened for depression by use...... of the Major Depression Inventory questionnaire. Quantification of CAC was performed using the Agatston method. The Mann-Whitney U test, Spearman's correlational analysis, and logistic regression were used to assess the association between depression and CAC. RESULTS: The median Agatston score...

  17. Associations between Thyroid Hormones, Calcification Inhibitor Levels and Vascular Calcification in End-Stage Renal Disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christiaan Lucas Meuwese

    Full Text Available Vascular calcification is a common, serious and elusive complication of end-stage renal disease (ESRD. As a pro-calcifying risk factor, non-thyroidal illness may promote vascular calcification through a systemic lowering of vascular calcification inhibitors such as matrix-gla protein (MGP and Klotho.In 97 ESRD patients eligible for living donor kidney transplantation, blood levels of thyroid hormones (fT3, fT4 and TSH, total uncarboxylated MGP (t-ucMGP, desphospho-uncarboxylated MGP (dp-ucMGP, descarboxyprothrombin (PIVKA-II, and soluble Klotho (sKlotho were measured. The degree of coronary calcification and arterial stiffness were assessed by means of cardiac CT-scans and applanation tonometry, respectively.fT3 levels were inversely associated with coronary artery calcification (CAC scores and measures of arterial stiffness, and positively with dp-ucMGP and sKlotho concentrations. Subfractions of MGP, PIVKA-II and sKlotho did not associate with CAC scores and arterial stiffness. fT4 and TSH levels were both inversely associated with CAC scores, but not with arterial stiffness.The positive associations between fT3 and dp-ucMGP and sKlotho suggest that synthesis of MGP and Klotho is influenced by thyroid hormones, and supports a link between non-thyroidal illness and alterations in calcification inhibitor levels. However, the absence of an association between serum calcification inhibitor levels and coronary calcification/arterial stiffness and the fact that MGP and Klotho undergo post-translational modifications underscore the complexity of this association. Further studies, measuring total levels of MGP and membrane bound Klotho, should examine this proposed pathway in further detail.

  18. Direct Promotion of Collagen Calcification by Alkaline Phosphatase

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Alkaline phosphatase promotes hydrolysis of phosphate containing substrates, causes a rise in inorganic phosphate and, therefore, enhances calcification of biological tissues. In this work, the calcification of collagen in a model serum was used as a model of collagenous tissue biomaterials to study the possible calcification promotion mechanism of alkaline phosphatase. In the enzyme concentration range of 0.10.5mg/mL, the enzyme shows a direct calcification promoting effect which is independent of the hydrolysis of its phosphate containing substrates but proportional to the enzyme concentration. Potassium pyrophosphate somewhat inhibits the calcification promotion.

  19. Sclerosing peritonitis with gross calcification: case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Cheung Sook; Kim, Young Jae; Min, Seon Jeong; Cho, Seong Whi; Lee, Gyung Kyu; Lee, Eil Seong; Kang, Ik Won [Hallym University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2003-09-01

    Sclerosing peritonitis is an uncommon complication of continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis (CAPD) and can lead to small bowel dysfunction involving abdominal pain, progressive loss of ultrafiltration, and small intestinal obstruction. Peritoneal thickening, in which calcification can develop, often starts as al small plaque which gradually becomes larger. We report a case of CAPD-related calcifying peritonitis.

  20. Differential diagnosis of disseminated periventricular calcifications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rieger, P.; Piepgras, U.

    1986-08-01

    Juvenile disseminated periventricular calcifications may occur in tuberous sclerosis, toxoplasmosis, cytomegaly, and in tuberculous meningitis. Cysticercosis, by contrast, does not result in corresponding intracerebral foci until an older age. Differential diagnosis is no problem if clinical findings are typical (tuberous sclerosis) or if serological verification is positive. However, any unclear clinical diagnosis can often be secured by CT.

  1. Plasma apolipoprotein C-III levels, triglycerides, and coronary artery calcification in type 2 diabetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qamar, Arman; Khetarpal, Sumeet A; Khera, Amit V; Qasim, Atif; Rader, Daniel J; Reilly, Muredach P

    2015-08-01

    Triglyceride-rich lipoproteins have emerged as causal risk factors for developing coronary heart disease independent of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels. Apolipoprotein C-III (ApoC-III) modulates triglyceride-rich lipoprotein metabolism through inhibition of lipoprotein lipase and hepatic uptake of triglyceride-rich lipoproteins. Mutations causing loss-of-function of ApoC-III lower triglycerides and reduce coronary heart disease risk, suggestive of a causal role for ApoC-III. Little data exist about the relationship of ApoC-III, triglycerides, and atherosclerosis in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Here, we examined the relationships between plasma ApoC-III, triglycerides, and coronary artery calcification in patients with T2DM. Plasma ApoC-III levels were measured in a cross-sectional study of 1422 subjects with T2DM but without clinically manifest coronary heart disease. ApoC-III levels were positively associated with total cholesterol (Spearman r=0.36), triglycerides (r=0.59), low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (r=0.16), fasting glucose (r=0.16), and glycosylated hemoglobin (r=0.12; Ptriglycerides (Tobit regression ratio, 1.43; 95% confidence interval, 0.94-2.18; P=0.086) and separately for very low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (Tobit regression ratio, 1.14; 95% confidence interval, 0.75-1.71; P=0.53). In persons with T2DM, increased plasma ApoC-III is associated with higher triglycerides, less favorable cardiometabolic phenotypes, and higher coronary artery calcification, a measure of subclinical atherosclerosis. Therapeutic inhibition of ApoC-III may thus be a novel strategy for reducing plasma triglyceride-rich lipoproteins and cardiovascular risk in T2DM. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.

  2. Relation of heart rate recovery after exercise testing to coronary artery calcification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jae, Sae Young; Kurl, Sudhir; Laukkanen, Jari A; Yoon, Eun Sun; Choi, Yoon-Ho; Fernhall, Bo; Franklin, Barry A

    2017-08-01

    We examined whether slow heart rate recovery (HRR) after exercise testing as an estimate of impaired autonomic function is related to coronary artery calcification (CAC), an emerging marker of coronary atherosclerosis. We evaluated 2088 men who participated in a health-screening program that included measures of CAC and peak or symptom-limited cardiopulmonary exercise testing. HRR was calculated as the difference between peak heart rate (HR) during exercise testing and the HR at 2 min of recovery after peak exercise. We measured CAC using multidetector computed tomography to calculate the Agatston coronary artery calcium score. Advanced CAC was defined as a mean CAC >75th percentile for each age group. HRR was negatively correlated with CAC (r = -.14, p 52 bpm). Each 1 bpm decrease in HRR was associated with 1% increase in advanced CAC after adjusting for potential confounders. An attenuated HRR after exercise testing is associated with advanced CAC, independent of coronary risk factors and other related hemodynamic response. KEY MESSAGES Slow heart rate recovery (HRR) after maximal exercise testing, indicating decreased autonomic function, is associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular event and mortality. Slow HRR has been linked with the occurrence of malignant ventricular arrhythmias, but it remains unclear whether slow HRR is associated with an increased risk of coronary artery calcification (CAC), an emerging marker of coronary atherosclerosis. An attenuated HRR after exercise testing was associated with advanced CAC, independent of coronary risk factors and other potential hemodynamic confounder, supporting the hypothesis that slow HRR is related to the burden of atherosclerotic coronary artery disease.

  3. Cholesterol-Lowering Atherosclerosis Study (CLAS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-12

    Arterial Occlusive Diseases; Cardiovascular Diseases; Carotid Artery Diseases; Cerebral Arteriosclerosis; Cerebrovascular Disorders; Coronary Arteriosclerosis; Coronary Disease; Heart Diseases; Myocardial Ischemia; Atherosclerosis

  4. Haptoglobin genotype predicts development of coronary artery calcification in a prospective cohort of patients with type 1 diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simpson Melissa

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Coronary artery disease has been linked with genotypes for haptoglobin (Hp which modulates extracorpuscular hemoglobin. We hypothesized that the Hp genotype would predict progression of coronary artery calcification (CAC, a marker of subclinical atherosclerosis. Methods CAC was measured three times in six years among 436 subjects with type 1 diabetes and 526 control subjects participating in the Coronary Artery Calcification in Type 1 Diabetes (CACTI study. Hp typing was performed on plasma samples by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Results The Hp 2-2 genotype predicted development of significant CAC only in subjects with diabetes who were free of CAC at baseline (OR: 1.95, 95% CI: 1.07-3.56, p = 0.03, compared to those without the Hp 2-2 genotype, controlling for age, sex, blood pressure and HDL-cholesterol. Hp 2 appeared to have an allele-dose effect on development of CAC. Hp genotype did not predict CAC progression in individuals without diabetes. Conclusions Hp genotype may aid prediction of accelerated coronary atherosclerosis in subjects with type 1 diabetes.

  5. Activation of nuclear factor-κB and the onset of atherosclerosis%核因子-κB的活化与动脉粥样硬化的启动

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    史立宏; 王守训; 高尔

    2003-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is a chronic inflammatory disease in arteries. Nuclear factor- kappa B(NF-κB), a redox - sensitive transcription factor, has been indicated to play a critical role in both initiation and expansion of atherosclerosis. Activation of NF-κB activates a variety of target genes that promote inflam-mation, such as leukocyte adhesion molecules, cytokines, and chemokines, as well as genes that regulate cellproliferation and differentiation. Multiple risk factors relevant to atherosclerosis including hypertension, dia-betes mellitus, smoking and lipoprotein disorders also activate NF-κB. Thus the activation of NF-κB may belinked to the onset of atherosclerosis.

  6. Fatty Acid binding protein 4 is associated with carotid atherosclerosis and outcome in patients with acute ischemic stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, Sverre; Ueland, Thor; Dahl, Tuva B

    2011-01-01

    Fatty acid binding protein 4 (FABP4) has been shown to play an important role in macrophage cholesterol trafficking and associated inflammation. To further elucidate the role of FABP4 in atherogenesis in humans, we examined the regulation of FABP4 in carotid atherosclerosis and ischemic stroke....

  7. The pathological changes of inflammatory cells,smooth muscle cell and neo-vessels in the vulnerable carotid atherosclerosis plaque

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吕鹤

    2006-01-01

    Objective To study the inflammation, smooth muscle cells and neovessels change in the vulnerable carotid atherosclerosis plaque. Methods 6 male patients, aged between 66~73 years old, had the history of stroke or transient cerebral ischemic attacks of internal carotid artery system in a few days to 5 months. MRI and DSA re-

  8. What Are the Signs and Symptoms of Atherosclerosis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Twitter. What Are the Signs and Symptoms of Atherosclerosis? Atherosclerosis usually doesn't cause signs and symptoms ... Rate This Content: NEXT >> Featured Video What is atherosclerosis? 05/22/2014 Describes how the build-up ...

  9. Adipocyte induced arterial calcification is prevented with sodium thiosulfate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Neal X., E-mail: xuechen@iupui.edu [Divison of Nephrology, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, IN (United States); O’Neill, Kalisha; Akl, Nader Kassis [Divison of Nephrology, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, IN (United States); Moe, Sharon M. [Divison of Nephrology, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, IN (United States); Roudebush VA Medical Center, Indianapolis, IN (United States)

    2014-06-20

    Highlights: • High phosphorus can induce calcification of adipocytes, even when fully differentiated. • Adipocytes can induce vascular calcification in an autocrine manner. • Sodium thiosulfate inhibits adipocyte calcification. - Abstract: Background: Calcification can occur in fat in multiple clinical conditions including in the dermis, breasts and in the abdomen in calciphylaxis. All of these are more common in patients with advanced kidney disease. Clinically, hyperphosphatemia and obesity are risk factors. Thus we tested the hypothesis that adipocytes can calcify in the presence of elevated phosphorus and/or that adipocytes exposed to phosphorus can induce vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) calcification. Methods: 3T3-L1 preadipocytes were induced into mature adipocytes and then treated with media containing high phosphorus. Calcification was assessed biochemically and PCR performed to determine the expression of genes for osteoblast and adipocyte differentiation. Adipocytes were also co-cultured with bovine VSMC to determine paracrine effects, and the efficacy of sodium thiosulfate was determined. Results: The results demonstrated that high phosphorus induced the calcification of differentiated adipocytes with increased expression of osteopontin, the osteoblast transcription factor Runx2 and decreased expression of adipocyte transcription factors peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ) and CCAAT-enhancer-binding protein α (CEBPα), indicating that high phosphorus led to a phenotypic switch of adipocytes to an osteoblast like phenotype. Sodium thiosulfate, dose dependently decreased adipocyte calcification and inhibited adipocyte induced increase of VSMC calcification. Co-culture studies demonstrated that adipocytes facilitated VSMC calcification partially mediated by changes of secretion of leptin and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) from adipocytes. Conclusion: High phosphorus induced calcification of mature adipocytes, and

  10. The complement system and toll-like receptors as integrated players in the pathophysiology of atherosclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hovland, Anders; Jonasson, Lena; Garred, Peter; Yndestad, Arne; Aukrust, Pål; Lappegård, Knut T; Espevik, Terje; Mollnes, Tom E

    2015-08-01

    Despite recent medical advances, atherosclerosis is a global burden accounting for numerous deaths and hospital admissions. Immune-mediated inflammation is a major component of the atherosclerotic process, but earlier research focus on adaptive immunity has gradually switched towards the role of innate immunity. The complement system and toll-like receptors (TLRs), and the crosstalk between them, may be of particular interest both with respect to pathogenesis and as therapeutic targets in atherosclerosis. Animal studies indicate that inhibition of C3a and C5a reduces atherosclerosis. In humans modified LDL-cholesterol activate complement and TLRs leading to downstream inflammation, and histopathological studies indicate that the innate immune system is present in atherosclerotic lesions. Moreover, clinical studies have demonstrated that both complement and TLRs are upregulated in atherosclerotic diseases, although interventional trials have this far been disappointing. However, based on recent research showing an intimate interplay between complement and TLRs we propose a model in which combined inhibition of both complement and TLRs may represent a potent anti-inflammatory therapeutic approach to reduce atherosclerosis.

  11. Pentosan polysulfate inhibits atherosclerosis in Watanabe heritable hyperlipidemic rabbits: differential modulation of metalloproteinase-2 and -9.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lupia, Enrico; Zheng, Feng; Grosjean, Fabrizio; Tack, Ivan; Doublier, Sophie; Elliot, Sharon J; Vlassara, Helen; Striker, Gary E

    2012-02-01

    Pentosan polysulfate (PPS), a heparinoid compound essentially devoid of anticoagulant activity, modulates cell growth and decreases inflammation. We investigated the effect of PPS on the progression of established atherosclerosis in Watanabe heritable hyperlipidemic (WHHL) rabbits. After severe atherosclerosis developed on an atherogenic diet, WHHL rabbits were treated with oral PPS or tap water for 1 month. The aortic intima-to-media ratio and macrophage infiltration were reduced, plaque collagen content was increased, and plaque fibrous caps were preserved by PPS treatment. Plasma lipid levels and post-heparin hepatic lipase activity remained unchanged. However, net collagenolytic activity in aortic extracts was decreased, and the levels of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2 and tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase (TIMP) activity were increased by PPS. Moreover, PPS treatment decreased tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα)-stimulated proinflammatory responses, in particular activation of nuclear factor-κB and p38, and activation of MMPs in macrophages. In conclusion, oral PPS treatment prevents progression of established atherosclerosis in WHHL rabbits. This effect may be partially mediated by increased MMP-2 and TIMP activities in the aortic wall and reduced TNFα-stimulated inflammation and MMP activation in macrophages. Thus, PPS may be a useful agent in inhibiting the progression of atherosclerosis.

  12. An Obesity Paradox: Increased Body Mass Index Is Associated with Decreased Aortic Atherosclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barth, Rolf F; Maximilian Buja, L; Cao, Lei; Brodsky, Sergey V

    2017-07-01

    Brodsky et al. (Cardiovasc Pathol 25(6), 515-520, 2016) recently have reported that there was an unexpected and highly significant inverse correlation between body mass index (BMI) and atherosclerosis of the aortas of morbidly obese decedents (BMI >40 kg/m(2)). In a series of 304 decedents, 65 of whom were morbidly obese, minimal or no atherosclerosis was seen in 46 of them (70%) versus 20 (30%) who had severe atherosclerosis (P = 0.008). This obesity paradox was unexpected and raises important questions about the etiology and pathogenesis of atherosclerosis, which will be the subject of this commentary. The concept of healthy versus unhealthy adiposity may in part provide an explanation for the "obesity paradox." Another factor that will be considered is the possible role of adipokines and their genetic determinants that may significantly reduce the risk of developing aortic atherosclerosis in morbidly obese individuals. Considering the marked variability in the pattern and extent of atherosclerosis of the aorta, hemodynamic factors and endothelial cell shear stress may be the most important determinants that might explain the obesity paradox that we have observed. Finally, the possible role of gut microbiota and inflammation as factors in the etiopathogenesis of atherosclerosis will be considered, but their importance is less clear than that of hemodynamic factors. We conclude with the remarkable finding that a 5300-year-old, well-preserved mummy of the "Iceman," Ötzi had atherosclerotic disease of a number of major arteries and the interesting questions that this raises.

  13. Impact of Hydroxychloroquine on Atherosclerosis and Vascular Stiffness in the Presence of Chronic Kidney Disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashutosh M Shukla

    Full Text Available Cardiovascular disease is the largest cause of morbidity and mortality among patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD and end-stage kidney disease, with nearly half of all deaths attributed to cardiovascular disease. Hydroxychloroquine (HCQ, an anti-inflammatory drug, has been shown to have multiple pleiotropic actions relevant to atherosclerosis. We conducted a proof-of-efficacy study to evaluate the effects of hydroxychloroquine in an animal model of atherosclerosis in ApoE knockout mice with and without chronic kidney disease. Forty male, 6-week-old mice were divided into four groups in a 2 x 2 design: sham placebo group; sham treatment group; CKD placebo group; and CKD treatment group. CKD was induced by a two-step surgical procedure. All mice received a high-fat diet through the study duration and were sacrificed after 16 weeks of therapy. Mice were monitored with ante-mortem ultrasonic echography (AUE for atherosclerosis and vascular stiffness and with post-mortem histology studies for atherosclerosis. Therapy with HCQ significantly reduced the severity of atherosclerosis in CKD mice and sham treated mice. HCQ reduced the area of aortic atherosclerosis on en face examination by approximately 60% in HCQ treated groups compared to the non-treated groups. Additionally, therapy with HCQ resulted in significant reduction in vascular endothelial dysfunction with improvement in vascular elasticity and flow patterns and better-preserved vascular wall thickness across multiple vascular beds. More importantly, we found that presence of CKD had no mitigating effect on HCQ's anti-atherosclerotic and vasculoprotective effects. These beneficial effects were not due to any significant effect of HCQ on inflammation, renal function, or lipid profile at the end of 16 weeks of therapy. This study, which demonstrates structural and functional protection against atherosclerosis by HCQ, provides a rationale to evaluate its use in CKD patients. Further studies

  14. Transcriptional profiling uncovers a network of cholesterol-responsive atherosclerosis target genes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josefin Skogsberg

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Despite the well-documented effects of plasma lipid lowering regimes halting atherosclerosis lesion development and reducing morbidity and mortality of coronary artery disease and stroke, the transcriptional response in the atherosclerotic lesion mediating these beneficial effects has not yet been carefully investigated. We performed transcriptional profiling at 10-week intervals in atherosclerosis-prone mice with human-like hypercholesterolemia and a genetic switch to lower plasma lipoproteins (Ldlr(-/-Apo(100/100Mttp(flox/flox Mx1-Cre. Atherosclerotic lesions progressed slowly at first, then expanded rapidly, and plateaued after advanced lesions formed. Analysis of lesion expression profiles indicated that accumulation of lipid-poor macrophages reached a point that led to the rapid expansion phase with accelerated foam-cell formation and inflammation, an interpretation supported by lesion histology. Genetic lowering of plasma cholesterol (e.g., lipoproteins at this point all together prevented the formation of advanced plaques and parallel transcriptional profiling of the atherosclerotic arterial wall identified 37 cholesterol-responsive genes mediating this effect. Validation by siRNA-inhibition in macrophages incubated with acetylated-LDL revealed a network of eight cholesterol-responsive atherosclerosis genes regulating cholesterol-ester accumulation. Taken together, we have identified a network of atherosclerosis genes that in response to plasma cholesterol-lowering prevents the formation of advanced plaques. This network should be of interest for the development of novel atherosclerosis therapies.

  15. Transcriptional profiling uncovers a network of cholesterol-responsive atherosclerosis target genes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josefin Skogsberg

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Despite the well-documented effects of plasma lipid lowering regimes halting atherosclerosis lesion development and reducing morbidity and mortality of coronary artery disease and stroke, the transcriptional response in the atherosclerotic lesion mediating these beneficial effects has not yet been carefully investigated. We performed transcriptional profiling at 10-week intervals in atherosclerosis-prone mice with human-like hypercholesterolemia and a genetic switch to lower plasma lipoproteins (Ldlr(-/-Apo(100/100Mttp(flox/flox Mx1-Cre. Atherosclerotic lesions progressed slowly at first, then expanded rapidly, and plateaued after advanced lesions formed. Analysis of lesion expression profiles indicated that accumulation of lipid-poor macrophages reached a point that led to the rapid expansion phase with accelerated foam-cell formation and inflammation, an interpretation supported by lesion histology. Genetic lowering of plasma cholesterol (e.g., lipoproteins at this point all together prevented the formation of advanced plaques and parallel transcriptional profiling of the atherosclerotic arterial wall identified 37 cholesterol-responsive genes mediating this effect. Validation by siRNA-inhibition in macrophages incubated with acetylated-LDL revealed a network of eight cholesterol-responsive atherosclerosis genes regulating cholesterol-ester accumulation. Taken together, we have identified a network of atherosclerosis genes that in response to plasma cholesterol-lowering prevents the formation of advanced plaques. This network should be of interest for the development of novel atherosclerosis therapies.

  16. Regulation of the renin–angiotensin system in coronary atherosclerosis: A review of the literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramadan A Hammoud

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Ramadan A Hammoud, Christopher S Vaccari, Sameer H Nagamia, Bobby V KhanEmory University School of Medicine, Division of Cardiology, Grady Memorial Hospital Vascular Research Laboratory, Atlanta, Georgia, USAAbstract: Activation of the renin–angiotensin system (RAS is significant in the pathogenesis of cardiovascular disease and specifically coronary atherosclerosis. There is strong evidence that the RAS has effects on the mechanisms of action of atherosclerosis, including fibrinolytic balance, endothelial function, and plaque stability. Pharmacological inhibition of the renin angiotensin system includes angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE inhibitors, angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs, and renin inhibitors. These agents have clinical benefits in reducing morbidity and mortality in the management of hypertension. In addition, ACE inhibitors and ARBs have shown to be effective in the management of congestive heart failure and acute myocardial infarction. This review article discusses the biochemical and molecular mechanisms involving the RAS in coronary atherosclerosis as well as the effects of RAS inhibition in clinical studies involving coronary atherosclerosis.Keywords: angiotensin II, atherosclerosis, endothelium, inflammation, vasculature

  17. Systemic atherosclerosis and voiding symptom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeniel, A Ozgur; Ergenoglu, A Mete; Meseri, Reci; Ari, Anıl; Sancar, Ceren; Itil, Ismail Mete

    2017-03-01

    To evaluate the effect of atherosclerosis on the storage and voiding symptoms of the bladder in women with overactive bladder (OAB). We retrospectively reviewed the charts of women with OAB who were evaluated between 2013 and 2015 in our urogynecology unit. Charts were assessed for history, examination findings, urinary diary, quality of life (QOL) questionnaires, urodynamic studies (UDSs), and four main risk factors for atherosclerosis: hypertension, diabetes mellitus, smoking, and hyperlipidemia. In a previous study, these were defined as vascular risk factors. Cases were excluded for insufficient data, diabetes mellitus with dysregulated blood glucose, or prolapse greater than 1cm to avoid confusing bladder outlet obstruction. We included 167 eligible cases in this study. We evaluated storage and voiding symptoms such as frequency, nocturia, residual urine volume, and voiding difficulties and UDS findings such as maximum bladder capacity, first desire, strong desire, detrusor overactivity, and bladder contractility index. The vascular risk score was categorized as "no risk" if the woman did not have any of the four risk factors and "at risk" if she had any of the factors. Independent sample t-test and chi-square tests were performed for analyses. Among the participants (n=167), 71.9% had at least one vascular risk factor. Those who were at risk were facing significantly more wet-type OAB (p=0.003) and nocturia (p=0.023). Moreover, mean age (p=0.008) and mean gravidity (p=0.020) were significantly higher in the at-risk group, whereas mean total nocturia QOL questionnaire scores (p=0.029) were significantly lower. Our findings suggest that aging and atherosclerosis may be associated with severe OAB and poorer QOL. Nocturia and related parameters of poor quality can be explained by impaired bladder neck perfusion. Future trials need to assess vascular and molecular changes in women with OAB. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Losartan Inhibits Vascular Calcification by Suppressing the BMP2 and Runx2 Expression in Rats In Vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Mincai; Wu, Panfeng; Shao, Juan; Ke, Zhiqiang; Li, Dan; Wu, Jiliang

    2016-04-01

    The blockade of renin-angiotensin II system has been shown to reduce morbidity and mortality in hypertension, atherosclerosis, diabetes and chronic kidney disease. Since vascular calcification (VC) is commonly found in these diseases, the aim of this study was to examine whether or not losartan, a widely used angiotensin II receptor blockers, inhibits VC in rats in vivo. A rat model of VC was generated by treating rats with a combination of warfarin and vitamin K1. Two weeks after the treatments, the rats were treated with vehicle or without losartan (100 ng/kg/day) for 2 weeks. At the end of the experiments, aortic arteries were isolated for the examination of calcification morphology, mRNA and protein expression of BMP2 and Runx2, and osteoblast differentiation. Warfarin and vitamin K instigated vascular remodeling with calcified plaques in the aortic arteries in rats. Losartan significantly attenuated warfarin- and vitamin K-induced vascular injury and calcification. Consistently, losartan suppressed the levels of mRNA and protein expression of BMP2 and Runx2, two key factors for VC. Further, vascular calcified lesion areas expressed angiotensin II 1 receptor (AT1R). Finally, losartan treatment significantly inhibited apoptosis in vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) in rat arteries. We conclude that losartan suppresses VC by lowering the expression of AT1R, Runx2 and BMP2, and by inhibiting the apoptosis of VSMC in rat aortic arteries.

  19. Prevalence, Impact, and Predictive Value of Detecting Subclinical Coronary and Carotid Atherosclerosis in Asymptomatic Adults

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baber, Usman; Mehran, Roxana; Sartori, Samantha;

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Although recent studies suggest that measuring coronary artery calcification (CAC) may be superior to indirect atherosclerotic markers in predicting cardiac risk, there are limited data evaluating imaging-based biomarkers that directly quantify atherosclerosis in different vascular beds...... (mean age: 69 years, 56.5% female) in a prospective cohort evaluating the role of vascular imaging on cardiovascular risk prediction. All patients were evaluated by CAC and novel 3-dimensional carotid ultrasound. Plaque areas from both carotid arteries were summed as the carotid plaque burden (c.......92) with increasing cPB tertile, with similar results for CAC. Net reclassification significantly improved with either cPB (0.23) or CAC (0.25). MACE rates increased simultaneously with higher levels of both cPB and CAC. CONCLUSIONS: Detection of subclinical carotid or coronary atherosclerosis improves risk...

  20. Calcification by reef-building sclerobionts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennie Mallela

    Full Text Available It is widely accepted that deteriorating water quality associated with increased sediment stress has reduced calcification rates on coral reefs. However, there is limited information regarding the growth and development of reef building organisms, aside from the corals themselves. This study investigated encruster calcification on five fore-reefs in Tobago subjected to a range of sedimentation rates (1.2 to 15.9 mg cm(-2 d(-1. Experimental substrates were used to assess rates of calcification in sclerobionts (e.g. crustose coralline algae, bryozoans and barnacles across key reef microhabitats: cryptic (low-light, exposed (open-horizontal and vertical topographic settings. Sedimentation negatively impacted calcification by photosynthesising crustose coralline algae in exposed microhabitats and encrusting foram cover (% in exposed and cryptic substrates. Heterotrophs were not affected by sedimentation. Fore-reef, turbid water encruster assemblages calcified at a mean rate of 757 (SD ±317 g m(-2 y(-1. Different microhabitats were characterised by distinct calcareous encruster assemblages with different rates of calcification. Taxa with rapid lateral growth dominated areal cover but were not responsible for the majority of CaCO3 production. Cryptobiont assemblages were composed of a suite of calcifying taxa which included sciaphilic cheilostome bryozoans and suspension feeding barnacles. These calcified at mean rates of 20.1 (SD ±27 and 4.0 (SD ±3.6 g m(-2 y(-1 respectively. Encruster cover (% on exposed and vertical substrates was dominated by crustose coralline algae which calcified at rates of 105.3 (SD ±67.7 g m(-2 y(-1 and 56.3 (SD ±8.3 g m(-2 y(-1 respectively. Globally, encrusting organisms contribute significant amounts of carbonate to the reef framework. These results provide experimental evidence that calcification rates, and the importance of different encrusting organisms, vary significantly according to topography and sediment

  1. Calcification by reef-building sclerobionts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallela, Jennie

    2013-01-01

    It is widely accepted that deteriorating water quality associated with increased sediment stress has reduced calcification rates on coral reefs. However, there is limited information regarding the growth and development of reef building organisms, aside from the corals themselves. This study investigated encruster calcification on five fore-reefs in Tobago subjected to a range of sedimentation rates (1.2 to 15.9 mg cm(-2) d(-1)). Experimental substrates were used to assess rates of calcification in sclerobionts (e.g. crustose coralline algae, bryozoans and barnacles) across key reef microhabitats: cryptic (low-light), exposed (open-horizontal) and vertical topographic settings. Sedimentation negatively impacted calcification by photosynthesising crustose coralline algae in exposed microhabitats and encrusting foram cover (%) in exposed and cryptic substrates. Heterotrophs were not affected by sedimentation. Fore-reef, turbid water encruster assemblages calcified at a mean rate of 757 (SD ±317) g m(-2) y(-1). Different microhabitats were characterised by distinct calcareous encruster assemblages with different rates of calcification. Taxa with rapid lateral growth dominated areal cover but were not responsible for the majority of CaCO3 production. Cryptobiont assemblages were composed of a suite of calcifying taxa which included sciaphilic cheilostome bryozoans and suspension feeding barnacles. These calcified at mean rates of 20.1 (SD ±27) and 4.0 (SD ±3.6) g m(-2) y(-1) respectively. Encruster cover (%) on exposed and vertical substrates was dominated by crustose coralline algae which calcified at rates of 105.3 (SD ±67.7) g m(-2) y(-1) and 56.3 (SD ±8.3) g m(-2) y(-1) respectively. Globally, encrusting organisms contribute significant amounts of carbonate to the reef framework. These results provide experimental evidence that calcification rates, and the importance of different encrusting organisms, vary significantly according to topography and sediment

  2. In-Vivo Assessment of Coronary Atherosclerosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    G.A. Rodriguez-Granillo

    2006-01-01

    textabstractIntravascular ultrasound (IVUS) has emerged as a highly accurate tool for the serial assessment of the natural history of coronary atherosclerosis and to evaluate the effect of different conventional and emerging drug therapies on the progression of atherosclerosis. The contemporary a

  3. Cytokines in atherosclerosis: an intricate balance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boshuizen, M.C.S.

    2016-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is the underlying pathology in the majority of clinical manifestations of cardiovascular diseases, which are nowadays the main global cause of mortality. Atherosclerosis is a lipid-driven chronic inflammatory disease of the arterial wall. This inflammatory response, with cytokines as

  4. Increased risk for intracranial arterial stenosis in subjects with coronary artery calcification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Hyung-Geun; Chung, Pil-Wook; Rhee, Eun-Jung

    2015-01-01

    Intracranial arterial stenosis (ICAS) is considered an important cause of stroke in Asians. Coronary artery calcification (CAC) is a surrogate marker for subclinical atherosclerosis. We aimed to analyze the association of ICAS assessed by transcranial Doppler ultrasonography and CAC in middle-aged Korean population. This study included 10 550 participants (81.3% men, mean age 43 years) from a health screening program, in whom transcranial Doppler ultrasonography was used to detect >50% intracranial stenosis based on criteria modified from the stroke outcomes and neuroimaging of intracranial atherosclerosis trial. Multidetector computed tomography was used to assess coronary artery calcium score (CACS). CAC grade (0, 1-100, and >100) was defined by CACS. The subjects with CAC showed significantly higher proportion of subjects with ICAS compared with those without CAC (4.4% versus 2.8%; P400 compared with those with CACS=0 (odds ratio, 2.754; 95% confidence interval, 1.205-2.936). The risk for ICAS was significantly increased in middle-aged Korean subjects with CAC compared with that in those without CAC. These findings suggest the possibility of a separate undetected atherosclerotic focus in subjects with 1 atherosclerotic event. © 2014 American Heart Association, Inc.

  5. Do neighborhood socioeconomic deprivation and low social cohesion predict coronary calcification?: the CARDIA study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Daniel; Diez Roux, Ana V; Kiefe, Catarina I; Kawachi, Ichiro; Liu, Kiang

    2010-08-01

    Growing evidence suggests that neighborhood characteristics may influence the risk of coronary heart disease. No studies have yet explored associations of neighborhood attributes with subclinical atherosclerosis in younger adult populations. Using data on 2,974 adults (1,699 women, 1,275 men) aged 32-50 years in 2000 from the Coronary Artery Disease Risk Development in Young Adults (CARDIA) Study and 2000 US Census block-group-level data, the authors estimated multivariable-adjusted associations of neighborhood socioeconomic deprivation and perceived neighborhood cohesion with odds of coronary artery calcification (CAC) 5 years later. Among women, the quartiles of highest neighborhood deprivation and lowest cohesion were associated with higher odds of CAC after adjustment for individual-level demographic and socioeconomic factors (for deprivation, odds ratio = 2.49, 95% confidence interval: 1.22, 5.08 (P for trend = 0.03); for cohesion, odds ratio = 1.87, 95% confidence interval: 1.10, 3.16 (P for trend = 0.02)). Associations changed only slightly after adjustment for behavioral, psychosocial, and biologic factors. Among men, neither neighborhood deprivation nor cohesion was related to CAC. However, among men in deprived neighborhoods, low cohesion predicted higher CAC odds (for interaction between neighborhood deprivation and cohesion, P = 0.03). This study provides evidence on associations of neighborhood deprivation and cohesion with CAC in younger, asymptomatic adults. Neighborhood attributes may contribute to subclinical atherosclerosis.

  6. Persistent low-grade inflammation and regular exercise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Astrom, Maj-Briit; Feigh, Michael; Pedersen, Bente Klarlund

    2010-01-01

    Persistent low-grade systemic inflammation is a feature of chronic diseases such as cardiovascular disease (CVD), type 2 diabetes and dementia and evidence exists that inflammation is a causal factor in the development of insulin resistance and atherosclerosis. Regular exercise offers protection...... against all of these diseases and recent evidence suggests that the protective effect of exercise may to some extent be ascribed to an anti-inflammatory effect of regular exercise. Visceral adiposity contributes to systemic inflammation and is independently associated with the occurrence of CVD, type 2...

  7. Vasa Vasorum in Atherosclerosis and Clinical Significance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junyan Xu

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Atherosclerosis is a chronic inflammatory disease that leads to several acute cardiovascular complications with poor prognosis. For decades, the role of the adventitial vasa vasorum (VV in the initiation and progression of atherosclerosis has received broad attention. The presence of VV neovascularization precedes the apparent symptoms of clinical atherosclerosis. VV also mediates inflammatory cell infiltration, intimal thickening, intraplaque hemorrhage, and subsequent atherothrombosis that results in stroke or myocardial infarction. Intraplaque neovessels originating from VV can be immature and hence susceptible to leakage, and are thus regarded as the leading cause of intraplaque hemorrhage. Evidence supports VV as a new surrogate target of atherosclerosis evaluation and treatment. This review provides an overview into the relationship between VV and atherosclerosis, including the anatomy and function of VV, the stimuli of VV neovascularization, and the available underlying mechanisms that lead to poor prognosis. We also summarize translational researches on VV imaging modalities and potential therapies that target VV neovascularization or its stimuli.

  8. Unraveling the environmental and genetic interactions in atherosclerosis: Central role of the gut microbiota.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Org, Elin; Mehrabian, Margarete; Lusis, Aldons J

    2015-08-01

    Recent studies have convincingly linked gut microbiota to traits relevant to atherosclerosis, such as insulin resistance, dyslipidemia and inflammation, and have revealed novel disease pathways involving microbe-derived metabolites. These results have important implications for understanding how environmental and genetic factors act together to influence cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk. Thus, dietary constituents are not only absorbed and metabolized by the host but they also perturb the gut microbiota, which in turn influence host metabolism and inflammation. It also appears that host genetics helps to shape the gut microbiota community. Here, we discuss challenges in understanding these interactions and the role they play in CVD.

  9. Unraveling the environmental and genetic interactions in atherosclerosis: Central role of the gut microbiota

    Science.gov (United States)

    Org, Elin; Mehrabian, Margarete; Lusis, Aldons J.

    2015-01-01

    Recent studies have convincingly linked gut microbiota to traits relevant to atherosclerosis, such as insulin resistance, dyslipidemia and inflammation, and have revealed novel disease pathways involving microbe-derived metabolites. These results have important implications for understanding how environmental and genetic factors act together to influence cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk. Thus, dietary constituents are not only absorbed and metabolized by the host but they also perturb the gut microbiota, which in turn influence host metabolism and inflammation. It also appears that host genetics helps to shape the gut microbiota community. Here, we discuss challenges in understanding these interactions and the role they play in CVD. PMID:26071662

  10. The relationship between aortic calcification volume and obstructive coronary artery disease: comparison with coronary calcification volume

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Dae Seok; Kim, Jeong Ho; Park, Chul Hi; Park, Seon Young; Choe, Soo Jin; Hwang, Hee Young; Kim, Hyung Sik [Gachon University Gil Medical Center, Incheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-12-15

    We compared the diagnostic performance of aortic calcification volume with that of coronary artery calcification volume at CT in diagnosing obstructive coronary artery disease (OCAD). A total of 308 patients (M: F 141: 167) underwent coronary CT angiography using a 64-slice MDCT. We measured the calcification volume (mm{sup 3}) of coronary artery (CAC), thoracic aorta (TAC), abdominal aorta (AAC), and whole aorta (AC) at unenhanced CT. OCAD was defined as the significant stenosis ({>=} 50%) in any coronary artery at CT angiography. The diagnostic performance for OCAD was evaluated by calculating the area under the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve. Among the 308 patients studied, 45 patients were diagnosed with OCAD. The mean volumes of TAC, AAC, AC, and CAC were 518.8 mm{sup 3}, 551.5 mm{sup 3}, 1069.9 mm{sup 3}, 57.6 mm{sup 3} respectively. The areas under the ROC curve of TAC, AAC, AC, and CAC for OCAD were 0.766 (0.694 < 95% confidence interval < 0.838), 0.837 (0.784 < 95% confidence interval < 0.892), 0.814 (0.755 < 95% confidence interval < 0.873), 0.871 (0.812 < 95% confidence interval < 0.930), respectively. The volume of aortic calcification as well as coronary artery calcification is associated with obstructive coronary artery disease.

  11. Atherosclerosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... possible causes of damage are: Elevated levels of cholesterol and triglycerides in the blood High blood pressure Cigarette smoking ... Your Cholesterol Score Explained What Are High Blood Cholesterol and Triglycerides? How Can I Improve My Cholesterol? | Spanish What ...

  12. Unusual ganglioglioma with extensive calcification and ossification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vikas Shashikant Kavishwar

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Ganglioglioma is a slow-growing relatively low-grade mixed glioneuronal tumor with most cases corresponding to the WHO Grade I category. It frequently presents with seizures. The temporal lobe is the most common location followed by frontal, parietal, and occipital lobes. These generally behave in a benign fashion and have a favorable prognosis. We describe a case of a 24-year-old male presenting with convulsions and a calcified parieto-occipital mass. This mass removed from the parietal lobe showed neoplastic glial and dysplastic neuronal tissue amidst extensive areas of calcification and foci of ossification. On immunohistochemistry, the glial component expressed glial fibrillary acidic protein whereas the dysplastic neuronal component expressed synaptophysin and CD34. Epithelial membrane antigen was negative and Ki-67 showed a low proliferative index. After the surgery, the patient is free of neurological symptoms. Widespread calcification and ossification are very unusual in ganglioglioma, which prompted us to report this case.

  13. Intervertebral disc calcification in a child

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahemad Athar

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Disc calcification in children is a rare condition of which only approximately 200 cases have been reported worldwide and one from India and we report one such case. A five year-old boy presented with neck pain, torticollis and limitations of cervical motions following a fall while playing 3 months back. He had low grade fever cervical lymphadenopthy, paraspinal muscle spasm. His blood counts and ESR was raised. Fine needle aspiration cytology of lymph node revealed reactive lymphadenitis. His cervical radiograph slowed calcification of C 6-7. MRI scan showed hypointense signals in C6-C7 and D5-D6 disc on both T1 and T2 W images. Cerebrospinal fluid examination was normal. He improved on analgesics, bed rest and cervical traction.

  14. Neurological manifestations of calcific aortic stenosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. V. Egorov

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Despite being thoroughly studied, senile aortic stenosis (AS remains a disease that is frequently underestimated by Russian clinicians. Meanwhile, its manifestations can not only deteriorate quality of life in patients, but can also be poor prognostic signs. The most common sequels of this disease include heart failure and severe arrhythmias. However, there may be also rare, but no less dangerous complications: enteric bleeding associated with common dysembriogenetic backgrounds, infarctions of various organs, the basis for which is spontaneous calcium embolism, and consciousness loss episodes. The latter are manifestations of cardiocerebral syndrome. Apart from syncope, embolic stroke may develop within this syndrome. There is evidence that after syncope occurs, life expectancy averages 3 years. Global practice is elaborating approaches to the intracardiac calcification prevention based on the rapid development of new pathogenetic ideas on this disease. In particular, it is clear that valvular calcification is extraskeletal leaflet ossification rather than commonplace impregnation with calcium salts, i.e. the case in point is the reverse of osteoporosis. This is the basis for a new concept of drug prevention of both calcification and the latter-induced heart disease. But the view of senile AS remains more than conservative in Russia. The paper describes a clinical case of a rare complication as cerebral calcium embolism and discusses the nature of neurological symptoms of the disease, such as vertigo and syncope.

  15. Calcification of intraocular implant lens surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Wenju; Guan, Xiangying; Tang, Ruikang; Hook, Daniel; Yan, Wenyan; Grobe, George; Nancollas, George H

    2004-02-17

    Calcification of octacalcium phosphate [Ca8H2(PO4)6 x 5H2O, OCP] on differently packaged "Ultem" and "Surefold" intraocular implant lens surfaces has been studied in vitro in solutions supersaturated with respect to OCP at pH = 7.10 and 37 degrees C. No mineral deposition was observed on the lenses packaged in Ultem vials even after treatment with behenic acid, one of the fatty acids identified on explanted lenses. Following treatment with behenic acid, nucleation of OCP occurred on the lenses from Surefold vials, which incorporate silicone gaskets; induction periods preceding calcification were about 6 h. No mineralization was found on the lenses in vials with other gasket materials, including polytetrafluoroethylene, fluorocarbon elastomer, and polypropylene. The results of this study indicate that both silicone and fatty acids such as behenic acid play important roles in inducing the in vivo calcification of OCP on IOL lenses; all of the lens treatment steps were necessary for nucleation induction.

  16. Retropharyngeal calcific tendonitis: report of two cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razon, Rhea Victoria B; Nasir, Asad; Wu, George S; Soliman, Manal; Trilling, Jeffrey

    2009-01-01

    Retropharyngeal calcific tendonitis is an inflammatory process of the superior oblique tendons of the longus colli muscle, a neck flexor in the upper cervical spine, caused by deposition of calcium hydroxyapatite crystals; the definitive diagnostic test is computed tomography (CT). Presented in this article are two cases seen at our institution. Patients typically present with acute onset of neck pain/spasm, odynophagia, dysphagia, and/or low grade fevers. Leukocytosis and elevated erythrocyte sedimentation rate may be noted. It is important to understand this entity because its signs and symptoms are mimickers of those of the more serious condition of retropharyngeal space abscess. Calcific tendonitis is managed conservatively whereas retropharyngeal abscess requires incision and drainage. Some may argue that this entity is a zebra because its reported incidence in the literature is low. However, most of these studies were done in an era when CT was not yet in vogue. With today's widespread use of CT and its superb ability to visualize the calcification, the true incidence of this condition is probably higher and, thus, it is important for the family practitioner to be aware of this entity. The astute clinician may save the patient from unnecessary diagnostic workup, undue anxiety, and delays in hospital discharge.

  17. Corals concentrate dissolved inorganic carbon to facilitate calcification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allison, Nicola; Cohen, Itay; Finch, Adrian A; Erez, Jonathan; Tudhope, Alexander W

    2014-01-01

    The sources of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) used to produce scleractinian coral skeletons are not understood. Yet this knowledge is essential for understanding coral biomineralization and assessing the potential impacts of ocean acidification on coral reefs. Here we use skeletal boron geochemistry to reconstruct the DIC chemistry of the fluid used for coral calcification. We show that corals concentrate DIC at the calcification site substantially above seawater values and that bicarbonate contributes a significant amount of the DIC pool used to build the skeleton. Corals actively increase the pH of the calcification fluid, decreasing the proportion of DIC present as CO2 and creating a diffusion gradient favouring the transport of molecular CO2 from the overlying coral tissue into the calcification site. Coupling the increases in calcification fluid pH and [DIC] yields high calcification fluid [CO3(2-)] and induces high aragonite saturation states, favourable to the precipitation of the skeleton.

  18. Medial arterial calcification in diabetes and its relationship to neuropathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jeffcoate, W J; Rasmussen, Lars Melholt; Hofbauer, L C

    2009-01-01

    Calcification of the media of arterial walls is common in diabetes and is particularly associated with distal symmetrical neuropathy. Arterial calcification also complicates chronic kidney disease and is an independent risk factor for cardiovascular and all-cause mortality. The term calcification...... factor linked to the development of arterial calcification is distal symmetrical neuropathy; indeed, it has been suggested that neuropathy explains the distal distribution of arterial calcification in diabetes. It has also been suggested that the link with neuropathy results from loss of neuropeptides......, such as calcitonin gene-related peptide, which are inherently protective. The association between distal symmetrical neuropathy and calcification of the arterial wall highlights the fact that neuropathy may be an independent risk factor for cardiovascular mortality....

  19. Subclinical atherosclerosis in northern and southern China:the Chinese paradox

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jie Huang; Stanley P Azen; Robert C Detrano; Yang-Feng Wu; Xiao-Qing Liu; Ding Ding; Lian-Cheng Zhao; Bin Lu; Man Li; Nathan D Wong; Laurie D Dustin

    2011-01-01

    Background The incidence of coronary heart disease (CHD) is higher in Northern than that in Southern China ,however differences in traditional CHD risk factors do not fully explain this.No study has examined the differences in subclinical atherosclerosis that may help explain the differences in incidence. This study examined these differences in subclinical atherosclerosis using coronary computed tomography(CT]for calcification between the Northern and Southern China.Methods.We selected a random sample of participants in a large multi-center ongoing epidemiologic study for coronary calcium scanning in one northern city (North) (Beijing,n=49) and in two southern cities (South) (Shanghai,n=50,and Guangzhou,n=50).Participants firm the three field centers (mean age 67 years) underwent coronary risk factor evaluation and cardiac CT scanning for coronary calcium measurement using the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis scanning protocol.Results Adjusted log-transformed coronary artery calcium score in North China (Beijing) was 3.1±0.4 and in South China (Shanghai and Guangzhou) was 2.2±0.3 (P=0.04).Mean calcium score for the northern city of Beijing was three times higher thanthat of the southern city of Guangzhou (P=0.01) and 2.5 times higher than for the southern city of Shanghai (P = 0.03).Conclusions The extent of subclinical atherosclerosis is significantly higher in the northern city of Beijing than that in the two southern cities of Guangzhou and Shanghai,even after adjusting for standard cardiac risk factors.This finding suggests that standard risk factors do not fully explain north south differences in clinical CHD incidence.

  20. Mast Cells Might Have a Protective Role against the Development of Calcification and Hyalinisation in Severe Aortic Valve Stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milutinovic, A; Petrovič, D; Zorc, M; Vraspir Porenta, O; Arko, M; Pleskovič, A; Alibegovic, A; Zorc-Pleskovic, R

    2016-01-01

    Aortic valve stenosis is characterized by inflammation and extracellular matrix remodelling. The aim of this study was to analyse the impact of mast cells on the occurrence of histopathological changes of aortic valves in patients with severe grade, non-rheumatic degenerative aortic valve stenosis. Valve specimens were obtained from 38 patients undergoing valve replacement. The role of mast cells was analysed by dividing the specimens into two groups, characterized by the presence (group A, N = 13) or absence of mast cells (group B, N = 25). There were no significant differences in clinical data between the two groups. In group A, T cells and macrophages were present in all aortic valves, as compared to a significantly lower proportion of valves with T cells and macrophages in group B. Valves in group A were less often calcified and hyaline-degenerated than valves in group B. There were no changes in fibrosis between the two groups. We found a positive correlation between the presence of mast cells and macrophages/T cells, a negative correlation between the presence of mast cells and calcification/ hyaline degeneration, and no correlation between the presence of mast cells and fibrosis. There was also a negative correlation between the presence of macrophages/T cells and calcification. The linear regression model identified only the presence of mast cells as an independent negative prediction value for calcification. In conclusion, mast cells might have a protective role against the development of calcification and hyaline degeneration in severe grade, non-rheumatic aortic valve stenosis.

  1. Prognostic Utility of Neutrophil-to-Lymphocyte Ratio on Adverse Clinical Outcomes in Patients with Severe Calcific Aortic Stenosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Kyoung Im; Cho, Sang Hoon; Her, Ae-Young; Singh, Gillian Balbir; Shin, Eun-Seok

    2016-01-01

    Background Inflammation is an important factor in the pathogenesis of calcific aortic stenosis (AS). We aimed to evaluate the association between an inflammatory marker, neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio (NLR) and major adverse cardiovascular events (MACE) in patients with severe calcific AS. Methods A total of 336 patients with isolated severe calcific AS newly diagnosed between 2010 and 2015 were enrolled in this study. Using Cox proportional hazards (PH) regression models, we investigated the prognostic value of NLR adjusted for baseline covariates including logistic European System for Cardiac Operative Risk Evaluation score (EuroSCORE-I) and undergoing aortic valve replacement (AVR). We also evaluated the clinical relevance of NLR risk groups (divided into low, intermediate, high risk) as categorized by NLR cutoff values. MACE was defined as a composite of all-cause mortality, cardiac death and non-fatal myocardial infarction during the follow-up period. Results The inflammatory marker NLR was an independent prognostic factor most significantly associated with MACE [hazard ratio (HR), 1.06; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.04–1.09; p-value 9), respectively. Conclusion The findings of the present study demonstrate the potential utility of NLR in risk stratification of patients with severe calcific AS. PMID:27548384

  2. An unusual case of neonatal peritoneal calcifications associated with hydrometrocolpos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, M.X.; Methratta, S. [College of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey - New Jersey Medical School, Newark (United States). Dept. of Radiology

    2001-10-01

    Neonatal peritoneal calcifications usually suggest a diagnosis of meconium peritonitis, but in this case, a premature baby girl, peritoneal calcifications were caused by hydrometrocolpos secondary to imperforate hymen, a rare association. The patient presented with respiratory distress and ascites and demonstrated abdominal calcifications on plain film. Other radiographic work-up revealed hydrometrocolpos without evidence of gastrointestinal tract obstruction. The patient was diagnosed and treated for imperforate hymen; she was recovered fully. (orig.)

  3. Calcific tendonitis of pectoralis major: CT and MRI findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cahir, John [Royal National Orthopaedic Hospital NHS Trust, Department of Radiology, Middlesex (United Kingdom); Saifuddin, Asif [Royal National Orthopaedic Hospital NHS Trust, Department of Radiology, Middlesex (United Kingdom); University College London, The Institute of Orthopaedics and Musculoskeletal Sciences, London (United Kingdom); London Bone and Soft Tissue Tumour Service, London (United Kingdom)

    2005-04-01

    The shoulder is the most common location for calcific tendonitis. Presentation of calcific tendonitis at other sites is unusual and may lead to diagnostic difficulty. We report a case of calcific tendonitis of the pectoralis major insertion and describe the CT and MRI findings. The presence of an associated cortical defect at the site of tendon insertion may lead to the incorrect diagnosis of neoplastic process. (orig.)

  4. Significance of density and demarcation of calcifications in calcifying tendinitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uhthoff, H.K.; Sarkar, K.; Hammond, I.

    1982-04-01

    Calcification of tendons can be either degenerative and progressive in nature or reactive and selfhealing. Radiologic examinations permit to distinguish between both kinds. The reactive calcification, known also as calcifying tendinitis, passes through two main phases, the formative and the resorptive phase. Since treatment is different for each phase, their roentgenologic distinction is important. Dense, well demarcated and homogenous calcifications indicate the presence of a formative phase whereas less dense, ill defined and fluffy deposits point toward an ongoing resorption.

  5. Atraumatic quadriceps tendon tear associated with calcific tendonitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abram, Simon G F; Sharma, Akash D; Arvind, Chinnakonda

    2012-11-27

    Calcific tendonitis of the quadriceps tendon is an uncommon condition. We present the first case of a quadriceps tendon tear associated with calcific tendonitis. In this case, the patient presented with symptoms mimicking a rupture of the quadriceps tendon. This case illustrates that although calcific tendonitis of the quadriceps is a rare condition it is not benign and should be considered when investigating acute symptoms associated with the extensor mechanism of the knee.

  6. Eggshell calcification of the heart in constrictive pericarditis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Rajesh; Vijayvergiya; Ramalingam; Vadivelu; Sachin; Mahajan; Sandeep; S; Rana; Manphool; Singhal

    2015-01-01

    Constrictive pericarditis(CP) is an inflammatory disease of pericardium. Pericardial calcification in X-ray provides a clue for the diagnosis of CP. An extensive "eggshell" type of calcification is rarely seen in CP. We hereby report a case of CP with eggshell calcification of pericardium, encircling whole of the heart. A need for multimodality imaging and hemodynamic assessment followed by surgical pericardiectomy is discussed.

  7. Familial idiopathic basal ganglia calcification (Fahr’s disease)

    OpenAIRE

    Mufaddel, Amir A.; Al-Hassani, Ghanem A.

    2014-01-01

    Familial idiopathic basal ganglia calcification (Fahr’s disease) is a rare neurodegenerative disorder characterized by symmetrical and bilateral calcification of the basal ganglia. Calcifications may also occur in other brain regions such as dentate nucleus, thalamus, and cerebral cortex. Both familial and non-familial cases of Fahr’s disease have been reported, predominantly with autosomal-dominant fashion. The disease has a wide range of clinical presentations, predominantly with neuropsych...

  8. Progressive pulmonary calcification in a child after orthotopic liver transplantation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weaver, Olena O.; Stazzone, Madelyn M.; Bhalla, Sanjeev [Washington University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, 660 S. Euclid Ave., Campus Box 8131, St. Louis, MO (United States)

    2006-06-15

    We present a case of progressive pulmonary calcification associated with prolonged respiratory insufficiency in a 2-year-old boy with a history of orthotopic liver transplantation. This case demonstrates the potentially progressive nature of pulmonary calcification and that it can present with respiratory insufficiency at a later period after transplantation than previously thought. We describe radiological findings and discuss established as well as plausible pathological mechanisms contributing to the development of calcifications in these patients. (orig.)

  9. Calcification Changes of Mesozoic Calcareous Nannofossils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bornemann, A.; Mutterlose, J.

    2003-12-01

    Studies on plankton samples and cultures revealed a variety factors which presumably control calcification and the size of coccoliths. Among others temperature, nutrients and seawater pH are thought to influence nannoplankton calcification. Whereas these studies only provide information of very short time intervals from hours to years, global climatic and oceanographic changes occur, however, on geological timescales. Thus their impact on nannofossil calcification and carbonate production can only be studied from the fossil record. We investigated DSDP sites from the western Atlantic of late Jurassic to early Cretaceous age in order to better understand long-term variations of the size of common nannofossil taxa and the resulting carbonate accumulation. The studied interval is characterized by two events in the pelagic carbonate record: (1) the onset of pelagic carbonate accumulation in the Tithonian, and (2) the Valanginian 'nannoconid crisis'. The Tithonian event went along with high abundances of strongly calcified nannofossils which presumably have an affinity to more oligotrophic surface water conditions. The mid Valanginian is marked by a positive carbon isotope excursion (CIE). This coincides with a sea level rise, volcanic activity and elevated atmospheric pCO2 levels. Greenhouse climate and an accelerated hydrological cycle presumably intensified weathering processes causing enhanced nutrient transfer from the continents into the oceans. Increasing surface water fertility is indicated by high abundances of nannofossils which possibly indicate more eutrophic conditions. In the western Tethys the CIE is predated by a sharp decrease in the abundance of rockforming nannoconids. This event is less pronounced in the western Atlantic due to a general scarcity of nannoconids. Low nannofossil carbonate accumulation rates and a dominance of less calcified taxa were observed and may reflect a general marine biocalcification crisis. Possible factors, which may have

  10. Circulating Endothelial Microparticles: A Key Hallmark of Atherosclerosis Progression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keshav Raj Paudel

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The levels of circulating microparticles (MPs are raised in various cardiovascular diseases. Their increased level in plasma is regarded as a biomarker of alteration in vascular function. The prominent MPs present in blood are endothelial microparticles (EMPs described as complex submicron (0.1 to 1.0 μm vesicles like structure, released in response to endothelium cell activation or apoptosis. EMPs possess both physiological and pathological effects and may promote oxidative stress and vascular inflammation. EMPs release is triggered by inducer like angiotensin II, lipopolysaccharide, and hydrogen peroxide leading to the progression of atherosclerosis. However, there are multiple physiological pathways for EMPs generation like NADPH oxidase derived endothelial ROS formation, Rho kinase pathway, and mitogen-activated protein kinases. Endothelial dysfunction is a key initiating event in atherosclerotic plaque formation. Atheroemboli, resulting from ruptured carotid plaques, is a major cause of stroke. Increasing evidence suggests that EMPs play an important role in the pathogenesis of cardiovascular disease, acting as a marker of damage, either exacerbating disease progression or triggering a repair response. In this regard, it has been suggested that EMPs have the potential to act as biomarkers of disease status. This review aims to provide updated information of EMPs in relation to atherosclerosis pathogenesis.

  11. Inhibitory role of Notch1 in calcific aortic valve disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asha Acharya

    Full Text Available Aortic valve calcification is the most common form of valvular heart disease, but the mechanisms of calcific aortic valve disease (CAVD are unknown. NOTCH1 mutations are associated with aortic valve malformations and adult-onset calcification in families with inherited disease. The Notch signaling pathway is critical for multiple cell differentiation processes, but its role in the development of CAVD is not well understood. The aim of this study was to investigate the molecular changes that occur with inhibition of Notch signaling in the aortic valve. Notch signaling pathway members are expressed in adult aortic valve cusps, and examination of diseased human aortic valves revealed decreased expression of NOTCH1 in areas of calcium deposition. To identify downstream mediators of Notch1, we examined gene expression changes that occur with chemical inhibition of Notch signaling in rat aortic valve interstitial cells (AVICs. We found significant downregulation of Sox9 along with several cartilage-specific genes that were direct targets of the transcription factor, Sox9. Loss of Sox9 expression has been published to be associated with aortic valve calcification. Utilizing an in vitro porcine aortic valve calcification model system, inhibition of Notch activity resulted in accelerated calcification while stimulation of Notch signaling attenuated the calcific process. Finally, the addition of Sox9 was able to prevent the calcification of porcine AVICs that occurs with Notch inhibition. In conclusion, loss of Notch signaling contributes to aortic valve calcification via a Sox9-dependent mechanism.

  12. Calcific tendinitis of the gluteus maximus tendon: CT findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hottat, N.; Fumiere, E.; Delcour, C. [C. H. U. de Charleroi (Belgium). Dept. of Radiology

    1999-08-01

    Two cases of calcific tendinitis of gluteus maximus muscle are presented. The CT findings, including amorphous calcification without soft tissue mass and possible cortical erosion at the femoral enthesis of the gluteus maximus muscle, are highly suggestive of calcific tendinitis at this unusual but classical location. Ossifying entheses with well-defined cortical defect are frequent at the femoral insertion of the gluteus maximus muscle in asymptomatic subjects and must be differentiated from a real cortical erosion sometimes associated with these calcific tendinitis. (orig.) With 3 figs., 7 refs.

  13. Association of gastrocnemius tendon calcification with chondrocalcinosis of the knee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Foldes, K. [Department of Radiology, Veterans Administration Medical Center (VAMC), San Diego, CA (United States)]|[University of California San Diego Medical Center (UCSD), San Diego, CA (United States)]|[National Institute of Rheumatology and Physiotherapy, Budapest (Hungary); Lenchik, L. [Department of Radiology, Veterans Administration Medical Center (VAMC), San Diego, CA (United States)]|[University of California San Diego Medical Center (UCSD), San Diego, CA (United States); Jaovisidha, S. [Department of Radiology, Veterans Administration Medical Center (VAMC), San Diego, CA (United States)]|[University of California San Diego Medical Center (UCSD), San Diego, CA (United States); Clopton, P. [Department of Radiology, Veterans Administration Medical Center (VAMC), San Diego, CA (United States); Sartoris, D.J. [Department of Radiology, Veterans Administration Medical Center (VAMC), San Diego, CA (United States)]|[University of California San Diego Medical Center (UCSD), San Diego, CA (United States); Resnick, D. [Department of Radiology, Veterans Administration Medical Center (VAMC), San Diego, CA (United States)]|[University of California San Diego Medical Center (UCSD), San Diego, CA (United States)

    1996-10-01

    Objective. Chondrocalcinosis of the knee is a common radiological finding in the elderly. However, visualization of chondrocalcinosis may be difficult in patients with advanced cartilage loss.The purpose of this study was to determine sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of gastrocnemius tendon calcification that might serve as a radiographic marker of chondrocalcinosis in patients with painful knees. Design and patients. We prospectively evaluated 37 knee radiographs in 30 consecutive patients (29 men, 8 women; mean age 67 years, age range 37-90 years) with painful knees who had radiographic evidence of chondrocalcinosis. The frequency of fibrocartilage, hyaline cartilage, and gastrocnemius tendon calcification was determined. For a control group, we evaluated knee radiographs in 65 consecutive patients with knee pain (54 men, 11 women; mean age 59 years, age range 40-93 years) who had no radiological signs of chondrocalcinosis. The frequency of gastrocnemius tendon calcification in the control group was determined. Results. Gastrocnemius tendon calcification was 41% sensitive, 100% specific, and 78% accurate in predicting chondrocalcinosis. The gastrocnemius tendon was calcified on 15 of 37 (41%) radiographs in the experimental group and on 0 of 67 radiographs in the control group. In the chondrocalcinosis group, 23 (62%) had posterior hyaline cartilage calcification, 14 (38%) had anterior hyaline cartilage calcification, 31 (84%) had medial meniscus calcification, and 36 (97%) had lateral meniscus calcification. Conclusions. Our results show that gastrocnemius tendon calcification is an accurate radiographic marker of chondrocalcinosis in patients with knee pain. (orig.). With 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  14. The roentgenographic study of placental calcifications in Korean pregnant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Chung Che [Chungang Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1980-12-15

    Calcifications in the placenta have been considered as a sign of the maturity because it is found frequently in variable degrees in full-term placentas. The placentas studied were those from deliveries at Chung-Ang University Hospital during the period of January 1978 to June 1980 and were excluded if their deliveries were by Caesarean section. Roentgenographic studies of placenta were performed postnatally in 135 cases delivered from normal pregnant. The results were as follows: 1. The incidence of calcification in the placenta was 53.3%. 2. The tendency of placenta calcification was increased as progress of maturity but not indicated as postmaturity. 3. Calcifications were less correlated with increasing gravidity or maternal age. 4. Calcifications occurred more frequently with increasing birth weight. 5. Calcifications in placentas were more frequently in the neonates with 10 scores of Apgar and normal level of maternal hemoglobin. 6. No significant correlation between incidence of calcification and maternal toxemia was observed. In the pregnant with an episode of previous abortion or S. P. R. M., incidence of calcification was apparently increased but statistically not significant. On the whole, placental calcifications are not harmful and identified as normal or proper aging process.

  15. Chronic parotitis with multiple calcifications: Clinical and sialendoscopic findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jáuregui, Emmanuel; Kiringoda, Ruwan; Ryan, William R; Eisele, David W; Chang, Jolie L

    2017-07-01

    To characterize clinical, imaging, and sialendoscopy findings in patients with chronic parotitis and multiple parotid calcifications. Retrospective review. Clinical history, radiographic images and reports, lab tests, and operative reports were reviewed for adult patients with chronic parotitis and multiple parotid calcifications who underwent parotid sialendoscopy. Thirteen of 133 (10%) patients undergoing parotid sialendoscopy for chronic sialadenitis had more than one calcification in the region of the parotid gland. Seven patients (54%) were diagnosed with immune-mediated disease from autoimmune parotitis (positive Sjögren's antibodies or antinuclear antibodies) or human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) disease. The six patients (46%) who did not have an immune-mediated disorder had most calcifications located anterior or along the masseter muscle. Eight of 13 patients (61%) had at least one calculus found in the parotid duct on sialendoscopy. Four patients (38%) had multiple punctate calcifications within the parotid gland, all of whom had either autoimmune parotitis or HIV. None of the proximal or punctate parotid calcifications posterior to the masseter were visualized on sialendoscopy. Chronic parotitis in conjunction with multiple parotid calcifications is uncommon and was identified in 10% of our cohort. We contrast two classifications of parotid calcifications: 1) intraductal stones that cause recurrent duct obstruction and are often located within the main parotid duct along or anterior to the masseter and 2) punctate intraparenchymal parotid gland calcifications that are not visualized on sialendoscopy and may represent underlying inflammatory disease. 4 Laryngoscope, 127:1565-1570, 2017. © 2016 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  16. Dynamic Aspects of Macrophage Polarizationduring Atherosclerosis Progression and Regression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael ePeled

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available It is well recognized that macrophages in many contexts in vitro and in vivo display a spectrum of inflammatory features and functional properties. A convenient system to group together different subsets of macrophages has been the M1(inflammatory/M2(anti-inflammatory classification. In addition to other sites of inflammation, it is now established that atherosclerotic plaques contain both M1 and M2 macrophages. We review results made possible by a number of recent mouse models of atherosclerotic regression that, taken with other literature, have shown the M1/M2 balance in plaques to be dynamic, with M1 predominating in disease progression and M2 in regression. The regulation of the macrophage phenotype in plaques and the functional consequences of the M1 and M2 states in atherosclerosis will also be discussed.

  17. Implications of chemokines, chemokine receptors, and inflammatory lipids in atherosclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rolin, Johannes; Maghazachi, Azzam A

    2014-04-01

    Chemokines are a diverse group of molecules with important implications for the development of solid tissues and normal function of the immune system. However, change of the conditions for such a complex system can have important and dangerous consequences leading to diseases. The specific implications of the various chemokines in diseases have been elucidated in the last few years, prompting hope of manipulating this system for therapy or prevention of diseases. On the other hand, inflammatory lipids are biologically active molecules with crucial impacts on the function of various cell types, including immune cells in health and disease. Here, we describe how these lipids affect the chemokine system and how they interact with chemokines to shape chronic inflammation in the case of atherosclerosis.

  18. Macrophage plasticity in experimental atherosclerosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jamila Khallou-Laschet

    Full Text Available As in human disease, macrophages (MØ are central players in the development and progression of experimental atherosclerosis. In this study we have evaluated the phenotype of MØ associated with progression of atherosclerosis in the apolipoprotein E (ApoE knockout (KO mouse model.We found that bone marrow-derived MØ submitted to M1 and M2 polarization specifically expressed arginase (Arg II and Arg I, respectively. This distinct arginase expression was used to evaluate the frequency and distribution of M1 and M2 MØ in cross-sections of atherosclerotic plaques of ApoE KO mice. Early lesions were infiltrated by Arg I(+ (M2 MØ. This type of MØ favored the proliferation of smooth muscle cells, in vitro. Arg II(+ (M1 MØ appeared and prevailed in lesions of aged ApoE KO mice and lesion progression was correlated with the dominance of M1 over the M2 MØ phenotype. In order to address whether the M2->M1 switch could be due to a phenotypic switch of the infiltrated cells, we performed in vitro repolarization experiments. We found that fully polarized MØ retained their plasticity since they could revert their phenotype. The analysis of the distribution of Arg I- and Arg II-expressing MØ also argued against a recent recruitment of M1 MØ in the lesion. The combined data therefore suggest that the M2->M1 switch observed in vivo is due to a conversion of cells already present in the lesion. Our study suggests that interventional tools able to revert the MØ infiltrate towards the M2 phenotype may exert an atheroprotective action.

  19. The Progression and Early detection of Subclinical Atherosclerosis (PESA) study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fernández-Ortiz, Antonio; Jiménez-Borreguero, L Jesús; Peñalvo, José L

    2013-01-01

    The presence of subclinical atherosclerosis is a likely predictor of cardiovascular events; however, factors associated with the early stages and progression of atherosclerosis are poorly defined.......The presence of subclinical atherosclerosis is a likely predictor of cardiovascular events; however, factors associated with the early stages and progression of atherosclerosis are poorly defined....

  20. Magnesium intake is inversely associated with coronary artery calcification: the Framingham Heart Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    OBJECTIVES: The aim of this study was to examine whether magnesium intake is associated with coronary artery calcification (CAC) and abdominal aortic calcification (AAC). BACKGROUND: Animal and cell studies suggest that magnesium may prevent calcification within atherosclerotic plaques underlying c...

  1. Calcification and photosynthesis of the coral acropora cervicornis under calcium limited conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rathfon, Megan; Brewer, Debbie

    1997-01-01

    Differing hypothesis about the function of calcification are based on an interesting dilemma. Is the purpose of calcification mainly a structural and protective one or does calcification serve other functions? Does photosynthesis increase carbonate ion activity and cause calcification or does calcification increase CO2 levels and stimulate photsynthesis? It is proposed that calcification in corals is not dependent upon photosynthesis but upon calcium levels in the water. Under normal ocean conditions, corals convert a certain percentage of energy to photosynthesis and respiration and another percentage to calcification. As corals become nutrient stressed, particularly calcium limited, the ratio of photosynthesis to calcification shifts towards calcification in order to generate protons. The protons generated during calcification may stimulate photosynthesis and aid in the uptake of nutrients and biocarbonates. The results of the calcification experiment show a trend towards increased calcification and decreased photosynthesis when the coral Acropora cervicornis is calcium limited, but the data are inconclusive and further research is needed.

  2. Dystrophic calcification and stone formation on the entire bladder neck after potassium-titanyl phosphate laser vaporization for the prostate: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeon, Sang-Wohn; Park, Yong-Koo; Chang, Sung-Goo

    2009-08-01

    Dystrophic calcification can be defined as a calcification that occurs in degenerated or necrotic tissue. It is associated with multiple clinical conditions, such as collagen vascular diseases. It involves the deposition of calcium in soft tissues despite no generalized disturbance in the calcium or phosphorus metabolism, and this is often seen at sites of previous inflammation or damage. Potassium-titanyl phosphate (KTP) laser vaporization of the prostate is safe and relatively bloodless procedure that results in a shorter catheterization, immediate symptomatic improvement, and less severe postoperative irritative symptoms. However, longer follow-up studies or reports about complications are lacking. Here in we report a case of dystrophic calcification and stone formation on the entire bladder neck after performing KTP laser vaporization of benign prostate hyperplasia. That was treated by lithotripsy and transurethral resection.

  3. Genome-Wide Association Studies Candidate Gene to Dual Modifier of Nonalcoholic Steatohepatitis and Atherosclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clint L. Miller, PhD

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Nonalcoholic steatohepatitis is a common disease involving chronic accumulation of fat and inflammation in the liver, often leading to advanced fibrosis, cirrhosis, and cancer. It is known that nonalcoholic steatohepatitis shares many features with atherosclerosis; however, there are still no effective therapeutics. In a recent study published in Nature, investigators demonstrated that mice lacking a high-density lipoprotein–associated gene were surprisingly protected from both steatohepatitis and atherosclerosis through the stabilization of the liver X receptor. This work reveals a timely candidate target for 2 highly prevalent cardiovascular diseases.

  4. The relationship between neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio and vascular calcification in end-stage renal disease patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turkmen, Kultigin; Ozcicek, Fatih; Ozcicek, Adalet; Akbas, Emin Murat; Erdur, Fatih Mehmet; Tonbul, Halil Zeki

    2014-01-01

    Chronic inflammation was found to be correlated with coronary (CAC) and thoracic peri-aortic calcification (TAC) in end-stage renal disease (ESRD) patients. Neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio (NLR) was introduced as a potential marker to determine inflammation in cardiac and noncardiac disorders. Data regarding NLR and its association with TAC and CAC are lacking. We aimed to determine the relationship between NLR and vascular calcification in ESRD patients. This was a cross-sectional study involving 56 ESRD patients (22 females, 34 males; mean age, 49.9 ± 14.2 years) receiving peritoneal dialysis or hemodialysis for ≥6 months in the Dialysis Unit of Necmettin Erbakan University. TAC and CAC scores were measured by using an electrocardiogram-gated 64-multidetector computed tomography. NLR was calculated as the ratio of the neutrophils and lymphocytes. There was a statistically significant correlation between NLR, TACS and CACS in ESRD patients (r = 0.43, P = 0.001 and r = 0.30, P = 0.02, respectively). The stepwise linear regression analysis revealed that age, as well as NLR were independent predictors of TACS. However, increased age was the only independent predictor of CACS according to linear regression analysis. Simple calculation of NLR can predict vascular calcification in ESRD patients.

  5. Apolipoprotein A-I and A-I mimetic peptides: a role in atherosclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Getz GS

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Godfrey S Getz, Catherine A ReardonThe University of Chicago, Department of Pathology, Chicago, IL, USAAbstract: Cardiovascular disease remains a major cause of morbidity and mortality in the westernized world. Atherosclerosis is the underlying cause of most cardiovascular diseases. Atherosclerosis is a slowly evolving chronic inflammatory disorder involving the intima of large and medium sized arteries that is initiated in response to high plasma lipid levels, especially LDL. Cells of both the innate and adaptive immunity are involved in this chronic inflammation. Although high plasma LDL levels are a major contributor to most stages of the evolution of atherosclerosis, HDL and its major protein apoA-I possess properties that attenuate and may even reverse atherosclerosis. Two major functions are the ability to induce the efflux of cholesterol from cells, particularly lipid-loaded macrophages, in the artery wall for transfer to the liver, a process referred to as reverse cholesterol transport, and the ability to attenuate the pro-inflammatory properties of LDL. The removal of cellular cholesterol from lipid-loaded macrophages may also be anti-inflammatory. One of the most promising therapies to enhance the anti-atherogenic, anti-inflammatory properties of HDL is apoA-I mimetic peptides. Several of these peptides have been shown to promote cellular cholesterol efflux, attenuate the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines by macrophages, and to attenuate the pro-inflammatory properties of LDL. This latter effect may be related to their high affinity for oxidized lipids present in LDL. This review discusses the functional properties of the peptides and their effect on experimental atherosclerosis and the results of initial clinical studies in humans.Keywords: apoA-I, mimetic peptides, HDL, anti-inflammatory, atherosclerosis

  6. Atherosclerosis: Process, Indicators, Risk Factors and New Hopes

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Background: Atherosclerosis is the major cause of morbidities and mortalities worldwide. In this study we aimed to review the mechanism of atherosclerosis and its risk factors, focusing on new findings in atherosclerosis markers and its risk factors. Furthermore, the role of antioxidants and medicinal herbs in atherosclerosis and endothelial damage has been discussed and a list of important medicinal plants effective in the treatment and prevention of hyperlipidemia and atherosclerosis is pre...

  7. The Relation between Calcium Supplement Consumption and Calcific Shoulder Tendonitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alireza Rouhani

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Calcific tendonitis is a common cause of non-traumatic shoulder pain. Previous studies have suggested a relation between minerals and endocrine and calcium deposition. Thus, hypercalcemia is probably related to calcific tendonitis. This study aims at evaluating the relation found between calcium supplement consumption and calcific shoulder tendonitis. Methods: This analytical-descriptive study was conducted on 250 patients with shoulder pain referring to clinics and emergency department of Shohada Orthopedics Hospital during one year for considering calcific shoulder tendonitis and calcium supplement consumption. Patients with calcific tendonitis were treated and their functional ability was evaluated using DASH questionnaire, pain severity and range of motion (ROM before and after treatment and their correlation with calcium supplement consumption. Results: Calcific tendonitis and calcium consumption were generally seen in 30 (12% and 73 (29.2% cases, respectively. Calcium consumption frequency in patients with calcific tendonitis was significantly higher than the patients who did not consume calcium supplements (76.7% vs. 22.7%. Patients with calcific tendonitis who did not consume calcium supplements suffered from significantly longer periods of shoulder pain. All patients having consumed calcium supplement were female. The group who consumed calcium supplement had significantly severe pain and higher DASH score before and after treatment, while there was no significant difference in number of impaired ROM before and after treatment. Also, there was a negative correlation between calcium supplement consumption, pain severity and DASH score before and after treatment. Conclusion: Calcium supplement consumption is related to calcific tendonitis and is also accompanied with more pain and lower functional ability in patients with calcific tendonitis.    Keywords: Calcific tendonitis; Shoulder; Calcium supplement; Pain

  8. Substrate properties influence calcification in valvular interstitial cell culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benton, Julie A; Kern, Hanna B; Anseth, Kristi S

    2008-11-01

    Valvular calcification is an active, cell-mediated process that results in significant morbidity and mortality. In standard culture, valvular interstitial cells (VICs) elicit significant calcification as a result of myofibroblast activation, and this limits their use in characterization studies. The study aim was to identify culturing substrates that would suppress atypical VIC calcification, and to investigate culture substrates representing a more physiological system. Several culture platforms were selected to compare and contrast the influence of biochemical and mechanical properties on VIC calcification. Substrates investigated included: tissue culture polystyrene (TCPS), TCPS coated with either fibronectin or fibrin, and an elastic poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) hydrogel, also with fibronectin or fibrin coupled to the surface. Experiments were repeated with profibrotic growth factor transforming growth factor-beta 1 (TGF-beta1). VIC calcification was characterized by calcific nodule formation, alkaline phosphatase activity and calcium accumulation. Gene and protein expression of alpha smooth muscle actin (aSMA) and core binding factor-1 (CBFa-1) were analyzed with qRT-PCR and immunostaining. Unmodified TCPS substrates had an innate ability to promote the markers of calcification studied. The addition of TGF-beta1 enhanced levels of all osteoblastic markers studied. When TCPS surfaces were modified with fibronectin, all markers for calcification were repressed, but alphaSMA - a marker for myofibroblastic activity was unchanged. Meanwhile, fibrin-modified TCPS surfaces enhanced calcification over unmodified TCPS substrates. On soft PEG hydrogels, all markers for calcification were repressed, regardless of the surface chemistry, while alphaSMA expression remained unaffected. Collectively, VIC properties are highly linked to the culture microenvironment. Both, the biochemical and mechanical environment of tissue culture has an effect on the spontaneous calcification

  9. The time of onset of abnormal calcification in spondylometaepiphyseal dysplasia, short limb-abnormal calcification type

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tueysuez, Beyhan [Istanbul University, Department of Pediatric Genetics, Cerrahpasa Medical School, Istanbul (Turkey); Gazioglu, Nurperi [Istanbul University, Department of Neurosurgery, Cerrahpasa Medical School, Istanbul (Turkey); Uenguer, Savas [Istanbul University, Department of Pediatric Radiology, Cerrahpasa Medical School, Istanbul (Turkey); Aji, Dolly Yafet [Istanbul University, Department of Pediatrics, Cerrahpasa Medical School, Istanbul (Turkey); Tuerkmen, Seval [Istanbul University, Department of Pediatric Genetics, Cerrahpasa Medical School, Istanbul (Turkey); Universitatsklinikum Berlin, Charite Virchow-Klinik, Berlin (Germany)

    2009-01-15

    A 1-month-old boy with shortness of extremities on prenatal US was referred to our department with a provisional diagnosis of achondroplasia. His height was normal but he had short extremities and platyspondyly, premature carpal epiphyses on both hands, and short tubular bones with irregular metaphyses on radiographs. Re-evaluation of the patient at the age of 1 year revealed very short height and premature calcification of the costal cartilages and epiphyses. Spondylometaepiphyseal dysplasia (SMED), short limb-abnormal calcification type was diagnosed. This condition is a very rare autosomal recessively inherited disorder, and most of the patients die in early childhood due to neurological involvement. At the age of 2 years and 5 months, a CT scan showed narrowing of the cervical spinal canal. One month later he died suddenly because of spinal cord injury. In conclusion early diagnosis is very important because the recurrence risk is high and patients may die due to early neurological complications. The time of onset of abnormal calcifications, a diagnostic finding of the disease, is at the age of around 1 year in most patients. When abnormal calcifications are not yet present, but radiological changes associated with SMED are present, this rare disease must be considered. (orig.)

  10. Aortic root, not valve, calcification correlates with coronary artery calcification in patients with severe aortic stenosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henein, Michael; Hällgren, Peter; Holmgren, Anders

    2015-01-01

    calcification (AVC), due to tissue similarity between the two types of vessel rather than with the valve leaflet tissue. MATERIAL AND METHODS: We studied 212 consecutive patients (age 72.5 ± 7.9 years, 91 females) with AS requiring aortic valve replacement (AVR) in two Heart Centers, who underwent multidetector...

  11. The time of onset of abnormal calcification in spondylometaepiphyseal dysplasia, short limb-abnormal calcification type.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tüysüz, Beyhan; Gazioğlu, Nurperi; Ungür, Savaş; Aji, Dolly Yafet; Türkmen, Seval

    2009-01-01

    A 1-month-old boy with shortness of extremities on prenatal US was referred to our department with a provisional diagnosis of achondroplasia. His height was normal but he had short extremities and platyspondyly, premature carpal epiphyses on both hands, and short tubular bones with irregular metaphyses on radiographs. Re-evaluation of the patient at the age of 1 year revealed very short height and premature calcification of the costal cartilages and epiphyses. Spondylometaepiphyseal dysplasia (SMED), short limb-abnormal calcification type was diagnosed. This condition is a very rare autosomal recessively inherited disorder, and most of the patients die in early childhood due to neurological involvement. At the age of 2 years and 5 months, a CT scan showed narrowing of the cervical spinal canal. One month later he died suddenly because of spinal cord injury. In conclusion early diagnosis is very important because the recurrence risk is high and patients may die due to early neurological complications. The time of onset of abnormal calcifications, a diagnostic finding of the disease, is at the age of around 1 year in most patients. When abnormal calcifications are not yet present, but radiological changes associated with SMED are present, this rare disease must be considered.

  12. Lipoprotein-associated phospholipase A2 and coronary calcification - The Rotterdam coronary calcification study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kardys, Isabella; Oei, Hok-Hay S.; Hofman, Albert; Oudkerk, Matthijs; Witteman, Jacqueline C. M.

    2007-01-01

    Objectives: Although several studies have recently suggested that lipoprotein-associated phospholipase A2 (Lp-PLA2) is an independent predictor of coronary events, only one study has examined the association between Lp-PLA2 and coronary calcification, using young adults. We investigated the associat

  13. Mouse models for atherosclerosis and pharmaceutical modifiers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zadelaar, A.S.M.; Kleemann, R.; Verschuren, L.; Vries-van der Weij, J. de; Hoorn, J. van der; Princen, H.M.; Kooistra, T.

    2007-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is a multifactorial highly-complex disease with numerous etiologies that work synergistically to promote lesion development. The ability to develop preventive and ameliorative treatments will depend on animal models that mimic the human subject metabolically and pathophysiologically

  14. Mouse models for atherosclerosis and pharmaceutical modifiers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zadelaar, A.S.M.; Kleemann, R.; Verschuren, L.; Vries-van der Weij, J. de; Hoorn, J. van der; Princen, H.M.; Kooistra, T.

    2007-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is a multifactorial highly-complex disease with numerous etiologies that work synergistically to promote lesion development. The ability to develop preventive and ameliorative treatments will depend on animal models that mimic the human subject metabolically and pathophysiologically

  15. Role of gut microbiota in atherosclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jonsson, Annika Lindskog; Bäckhed, Gert Fredrik

    2017-01-01

    Infections have been linked to the development of cardiovascular disease and atherosclerosis. Findings from the past decade have identified microbial ecosystems residing in different habitats of the human body that contribute to metabolic and cardiovascular-related disorders. In this Review, we...... of atherosclerotic plaques. Third, diet and specific components that are metabolized by gut microbiota can have various effects on atherosclerosis; for example, dietary fibre is beneficial, whereas the bacterial metabolite trimethylamine-N-oxide is considered harmful. Although specific bacterial taxa have been...... associated with atherosclerosis, which is supported by increasing mechanistic evidence, several questions remain to be answered to understand fully how the microbiota contributes to atherosclerosis and cardiovascular disease. Such knowledge might pave the way for novel diagnostics and therapeutics based...

  16. How hyperglycemia promotes atherosclerosis: molecular mechanisms

    OpenAIRE

    2002-01-01

    Abstract Both type I and type II diabetes are powerful and independent risk factors for coronary artery disease (CAD), stroke, and peripheral arterial disease. Atherosclerosis accounts for virtually 80% of all deaths among diabetic patients. Prolonged exposure to hyperglycemia is now recognized a major factor in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis in diabetes. Hyperglycemia induces a large number of alterations at the cellular level of vascular tissue that potentially accelerate the atheroscl...

  17. Environmental carcinogens and mutational pathways in atherosclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pulliero, A; Godschalk, R; Andreassi, M G; Curfs, D; Van Schooten, F J; Izzotti, A

    2015-05-01

    Atherosclerosis is associated with DNA damage in both circulating and vessel-wall cells and DNA adducts derived from exposure to environmental mutagens are abundant in atherosclerotic vessels. Environmental chemical carcinogens identified as risk factor for atherosclerosis include polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (benzo(a)pyrene, dimethylbenz(a)anthracene, beta-naphthoflavone, pyrene, 3-methylcolanthrene), arsenic, cadmium, 1,3-butadiene, cigarette smoke. Accordingly, polymorphisms of genes encoding for phase I/II metabolic reaction and DNA repair are risk factor for cardiovascular diseases, although their role is negligible as compared to other risk factors. The pathogenic relevance of mutation-related molecular damage in atherosclerosis has been demonstrated in experimental animal models involving the exposure to chemical mutagens. The relevance of mutation-related events in worsening atherosclerosis prognosis has been demonstrated in human clinical studies mainly as referred to mitochondrial DNA damage. Atherosclerosis is characterized by the occurrence of high level of oxidative damage in blood vessel resulting from both endogenous and exogenous sources. Mitochondrial damage is a main endogenous source of oxidative stress whose accumulation causes activation of intrinsic apoptosis through BIRC2 inhibition and cell loss contributing to plaque development and instability. Environmental physical mutagens, including ionizing radiation, are a risk factor for atherosclerosis even at the low exposure dose occurring in case of occupational exposure or the high exposure doses occurring during radiotherapy. Conversely, the role of exciting UV radiation in atherosclerosis is still uncertain. This review summarizes the experimental and clinical evidence supporting the pathogenic role of mutation-related pathway in atherosclerosis examining the underlying molecular mechanisms.

  18. ULTRASONOGRAPHIC ASSESSMENT OF COMMON CAROTID ARTERY ATHEROSCLEROSIS IN PATIENTS OF RHEUMATOID ARTHRITIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jayakumar

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND & OBJECTIVES: Patients with Rheumatoid Arthritis (R.A. have a marked increase in Carotid Atherosclerosis independent of traditional risk factors like family history of myocardial infarction in first degree male relatives younger than 55 years of age or first degree female relatives younger than 65 years of age, smoking, hypertension (D efined as blood pressure of 140/90 mm hg or higher, diabetes mellitus and fasting serum cholesterol levels including age. Chronic inflammation and possibly disease severity and duration are atherogenic in Rheumatoid Arthritis patients. Preclinical disease may also be identified by using ultrasonography to determine carotid intimal - media thickness, an indirect measure of atherosclerosis. The common carotid artery Intima media thickness in Rheumatoid Arthritis patients is positively associated with disease duration, Early Rheumatoid Arthritis (D uration less or = 1 year is associated with lesser Intima media thickness than was Rheumatoid Arthritis of longer duration. Increased carotid artery Intima media thickness and the presence of carotid plaque are associated with markers of systemic inflammation in patients with Rheumatoid Arthritis and in healthy subjects. OBJECTIVE OF THE STUDY: To determine preclinical atherosclerosis occurring prematurely in patients of Rheumatoid Arthritis by ultrasonograhic measurement Common Carotid Artery Intima media thickness and to evaluate the risk factors associated with arterial intima media thickness in patient of Rheumatoid Arthritis. RESULTS: In RA patients, common carotid artery IMT was significantly higher when compared to healthy controls (0.65 ± 0.06 v/s 0.57 ± 0.049 and was significantly associated with the duration of RA, swollen joint count and erosive changes on hand x - ray independently of other confounding variables. CONCLUSION: Patients with rheumatoid arthritis have a marked increase in carotid atherosclerosis independent of traditional risk factors

  19. Pulmonary metastatic calcification: a case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bozi, Lilian Christine Franchiotti [Radiology, Hospital Universitario Antonio Pedro (HUAP), Niteroi, RJ (Brazil); Melo, Alessandro Severo Alves de; Marchiori, Edson, E-mail: edmarchiori@gmail.com [Department of Radiology, School of Medicine, Universidade Federal Fluminense (UFF), Niteroi, RJ (Brazil)

    2012-09-15

    The present report describes the case of a 48-year-old female patient suffering from chronic renal failure on dialysis for 13 years. She presented with hemoptysis, fever, productive cough and dyspnoea. Chest radiography showed predominance of ill-defined opacities in the middle and lower lung fields, bilaterally. Chest computed tomography showed ground glass opacities associated with poorly defined centrilobular nodules with ground-glass attenuation. The patient was submitted to bronchoalveolar lavage that was negative for mycobacteria and fungi. On the basis of such findings, open lung biopsy was performed, which revealed metastatic pulmonary calcification. (author)

  20. Ideal Cardiovascular Health Metrics and Coronary Artery Calcification in Northern Chinese Population:A Cross-sectional Study

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LUO Tai Yang; LIU Xiao Hui; DAI Tian Yi; LIU Xin Min; ZHANG Qian; DONG Jian Zeng

    2016-01-01

    Objective Coronary artery calcification (CAC) is a well-established risk predictor of coronary heart disease events and is recognized as an indicator of subclinical atherosclerosis. Methods A cross-sectional study consisting of 2999 participants aged ≥40 years from the Jidong community of Tangshan City, an industrial and modern city of China, was conducted between 2013 and 2014 to examine the association between the ideal cardiovascular health (CVH) metrics and CAC. The ideal CVH metrics were determined based on the definition of the American Heart Association (AHA). The participants were then grouped into 4 categories according to the quartiles of their CVH metric scores as follows: first quartile (0-2), second quartile (3), third quartile (4), and fourth quartile (5-7). CAC was assessed by using high-pitch dual-source CT, and patients were identified based on thresholds of 0, 10, 100, or 400 Agatston units, as per common practice. Results The prevalence of subclinical atherosclerosis was 15.92%, 13.85%, 6.76%, and 1.93%, determined by using the CAC scores at thresholds of 0, 10, 100, and 400 Agatston units, respectively. Compared with the group in the first quartile, the other three CVH groups had a lower odds ratio of CAC>0 after adjusting for age, sex, income level, education level, and alcohol use in the logistic regression analysis. The odds ratios in these groups were 0.86 [95% confidence interval (CI), 0.63-1.17; P Conclusion The participants with more-ideal cardiovascular metrics had a lower prevalence of subclinical atherosclerosis determined according to CAC score. Maintaining an ideal cardiovascular health may be valuable in the prevention of atherosclerosis in the general population.

  1. Angiotensin converting enzyme 2 and atherosclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yutang; Tikellis, Chris; Thomas, Merlin C; Golledge, Jonathan

    2013-01-01

    Angiotensin converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) is a homolog of angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) which generates angiotensin II from angiotensin I. ACE, its product angiotensin II and the downstream angiotensin type I receptor are important components of the renin-angiotensin system (RAS). Angiotensin II, the most important component of the RAS, promotes the development of atherosclerosis. The identification of ACE2 in 2000 opened a new chapter of research on the regulation of the RAS. ACE2 degrades pro-atherosclerotic angiotensin II and generates anti-atherosclerotic angiotensin 1-7. In this review, we explored the importance of ACE2 in protecting experimental animals from developing atherosclerosis and its involvement in human atherosclerosis. We also examined the published evidence assessing the importance of ACE2 in different cell types relevant to atherosclerosis and putative underlying cellular and molecular mechanisms linking ACE2 with protection from atherosclerosis. ACE2 shifts the balance from angiotensin II to angiotensin 1-7 inhibiting the progression of atherosclerosis in animal models.

  2. Periodontal innate immune mechanisms relevant to atherosclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amar, S; Engelke, M

    2015-06-01

    Atherosclerosis is a common cardiovascular disease in the USA where it is a leading cause of illness and death. Atherosclerosis is the most common cause for heart attack and stroke. Most commonly, people develop atherosclerosis as a result of diabetes, genetic risk factors, high blood pressure, a high-fat diet, obesity, high blood cholesterol levels, and smoking. However, a sizable number of patients suffering from atherosclerosis do not harbor the classical risk factors. Ongoing infections have been suggested to play a role in this process. Periodontal disease is perhaps the most common chronic infection in adults with a wide range of clinical variability and severity. Research in the past decade has shed substantial light on both the initiating infectious agents and host immunological responses in periodontal disease. Up to 46% of the general population harbors the microorganism(s) associated with periodontal disease, although many are able to limit the progression of periodontal disease or even clear the organism(s) if infected. In the last decade, several epidemiological studies have found an association between periodontal infection and atherosclerosis. This review focuses on exploring the molecular consequences of infection by pathogens that exacerbate atherosclerosis, with the focus on infections by the periodontal bacterium Porphyromonas gingivalis as a running example.

  3. Hyperglycemia impairs atherosclerosis regression in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaudreault, Nathalie; Kumar, Nikit; Olivas, Victor R; Eberlé, Delphine; Stephens, Kyle; Raffai, Robert L

    2013-12-01

    Diabetic patients are known to be more susceptible to atherosclerosis and its associated cardiovascular complications. However, the effects of hyperglycemia on atherosclerosis regression remain unclear. We hypothesized that hyperglycemia impairs atherosclerosis regression by modulating the biological function of lesional macrophages. HypoE (Apoe(h/h)Mx1-Cre) mice express low levels of apolipoprotein E (apoE) and develop atherosclerosis when fed a high-fat diet. Atherosclerosis regression occurs in these mice upon plasma lipid lowering induced by a change in diet and the restoration of apoE expression. We examined the morphological characteristics of regressed lesions and assessed the biological function of lesional macrophages isolated with laser-capture microdissection in euglycemic and hyperglycemic HypoE mice. Hyperglycemia induced by streptozotocin treatment impaired lesion size reduction (36% versus 14%) and lipid loss (38% versus 26%) after the reversal of hyperlipidemia. However, decreases in lesional macrophage content and remodeling in both groups of mice were similar. Gene expression analysis revealed that hyperglycemia impaired cholesterol transport by modulating ATP-binding cassette A1, ATP-binding cassette G1, scavenger receptor class B family member (CD36), scavenger receptor class B1, and wound healing pathways in lesional macrophages during atherosclerosis regression. Hyperglycemia impairs both reduction in size and loss of lipids from atherosclerotic lesions upon plasma lipid lowering without significantly affecting the remodeling of the vascular wall.

  4. Liposarcoma of the thigh with mixed calcification and ossification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeremy R. Child, MD

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Liposarcoma is one of the most common soft-tissue sarcomas. Calcification and ossification can occur in liposarcoma; however, the presence of both ossification and calcification is a very rare entity. We present a case of a partially calcified and ossified dedifferentiated liposarcoma of the thigh in a 76-year-old woman, which contained heterologous elements of chondrosarcoma and rhabdomyosarcoma.

  5. Acute calcific tendinitis of the finger--a case report.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Ali, S N

    2004-07-01

    Acute calcific tendinitis of the hand is rare and often misdiagnosed as infection, fracture or periarthritis. It frequently occurs in peri-menopausal women and is caused by deposits of hydroxyapatite crystals. We describe acute calcific tendinitis of the flexor digitorum superficialis insertion in an elderly man taking oral anticoagulants. The differential diagnoses and recommended treatment are discussed.

  6. Hyperprolactinemia associated to calcification of the pituitary stalk: case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    OLIVEIRA MIRIAM DA COSTA

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available In this work, the authors report the case of a female patient with 24 years of age with hyperprolactinemia, who presented a pituitary stalk calcification as seen by CT scan. Once other possible etiologies were excluded, we concluded that the calcification was probably related to hyperprolactinemia caused by interruption of the input of dopamine to the pituitary gland.

  7. Cardiovascular calcifications in chronic kidney disease: Potential therapeutic implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bover, Jordi; Ureña-Torres, Pablo; Górriz, José Luis; Lloret, María Jesús; da Silva, Iara; Ruiz-García, César; Chang, Pamela; Rodríguez, Mariano; Ballarín, José

    Cardiovascular (CV) calcification is a highly prevalent condition at all stages of chronic kidney disease (CKD) and is directly associated with increased CV and global morbidity and mortality. In the first part of this review, we have shown that CV calcifications represent an important part of the CKD-MBD complex and are a superior predictor of clinical outcomes in our patients. However, it is also necessary to demonstrate that CV calcification is a modifiable risk factor including the possibility of decreasing (or at least not aggravating) its progression with iatrogenic manoeuvres. Although, strictly speaking, only circumstantial evidence is available, it is known that certain drugs may modify the progression of CV calcifications, even though a direct causal link with improved survival has not been demonstrated. For example, non-calcium-based phosphate binders demonstrated the ability to attenuate the progression of CV calcification compared with the liberal use of calcium-based phosphate binders in several randomised clinical trials. Moreover, although only in experimental conditions, selective activators of the vitamin D receptor seem to have a wider therapeutic margin against CV calcification. Finally, calcimimetics seem to attenuate the progression of CV calcification in dialysis patients. While new therapeutic strategies are being developed (i.e. vitamin K, SNF472, etc.), we suggest that the evaluation of CV calcifications could be a diagnostic tool used by nephrologists to personalise their therapeutic decisions.

  8. Matrix Gla Protein polymorphisms are associated with coronary artery calcification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matrix Gla Protein (MGP) is a key regulator of vascular calcification. Genetic variation at the MGP locus could modulate the development of coronary artery calcification (CAC). We examined the cross-sectional association between MGP SNPs [rs1800802 (T-138C), rs1800801 (G-7A),and rs4236 (Ala102Thr)...

  9. Umbilical and portal vein calcification following umbilical vein catheterization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schneider, K.; Fendel, H.; Hartl, M.

    1989-07-01

    Calcifications of the umbilical vein and intrahepatic branches of the portal vein developed in a newborn who had inserted an umbilical vein catheter for 11 days postnatally. The calcified intrahepatic portal veins can still be demonstrated sonographically at the age of three years, whereby these calcifications were no longer detectable radiologically. (orig.).

  10. [Endomyocardial fibrosis with massive calcification of the left ventricle].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trigo, Joana; Camacho, Ana; Gago, Paula; Candeias, Rui; Santos, Walter; Marques, Nuno; Matos, Pedro; Brandão, Victor; Gomes, Veloso

    2010-03-01

    Endomyocardial fibrosis is a rare disease, endemic in tropical countries. It is characterized by fibrosis of the endocardium that can extend to myocardium. Important calcification of the endocardium is rare with only a few cases reported in the literature. We report a case of endomyocardial fibrosis in a european caucasian patient, associated with massive calcification of left ventricle.

  11. Left atrial calcification in a hemodialysis patient with cor triatriatum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peces, R; Pobes, A; Rodriguez, M; Simarro, C; Iglesias, G; Simarro, E

    2000-05-01

    Myocardial calcification is a rare manifestation of abnormal calcium metabolism seen in some patients with chronic renal failure. This report describes the transesophageal echocardiographic and spiral computed tomography (CT) findings in a young hemodialysis female with severe secondary hyperparathyroidism. These findings included calcification of the multiperforated membrane of a cor triatriatum and the wall of the left atrium.

  12. Effects of a novel pharmacologic inhibitor of myeloperoxidase in a mouse atherosclerosis model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Cuiqing; Desikan, Rajagopal; Ying, Zhekang; Gushchina, Liubov; Kampfrath, Thomas; Deiuliis, Jeffrey; Wang, Aixia; Xu, Xiaohua; Zhong, Jixin; Rao, Xiaoquan; Sun, Qinghua; Maiseyeu, Andrei; Parthasarathy, Sampath; Rajagopalan, Sanjay

    2012-01-01

    Inflammation and oxidative stress play fundamental roles in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. Myeloperoxidase has been extensively implicated as a key mediator of inflammatory and redox-dependent processes in atherosclerosis. However, the effect of synthetic myeloperoxidase inhibitors on atherosclerosis has been insufficiently studied. In this study, ApoE(-/-) mice were randomized to low- and high-dose INV-315 groups for 16 weeks on high-fat diet. INV-315 resulted in reduced plaque burden and improved endothelial function in response to acetylcholine. These effects occurred without adverse events or changes in body weight or blood pressure. INV-315 treatment resulted in a decrease in iNOS gene expression, superoxide production and nitrotyrosine content in the aorta. Circulating IL-6 and inflammatory CD11b(+)/Ly6G(low)/7/4(hi) monocytes were significantly decreased in response to INV-315 treatment. Acute pretreatment with INV-315 blocked TNFα-mediated leukocyte adhesion in cremasteric venules and inhibited myeloperoxidase activity. Cholesterol efflux was significantly increased by high-dose INV-315 via ex-vivo reverse cholesterol transport assays. Our results suggest that myeloperoxidase inhibition may exert anti-atherosclerotic effects via inhibition of oxidative stress and enhancement of cholesterol efflux. These findings demonstrate a role for pharmacologic modulation of myeloperoxidase in atherosclerosis.

  13. [Scavenger receptor CD36: its expression, regulation, and role in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. Part I].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuliczkowska-Płaksej, Justyna; Bednarek-Tupikowska, Grazyna; Płaksej, Rafał; Filus, Alicja

    2006-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is a progressive pathological process based on endothelial dysfunction and chronic inflammation. Monocytes, macrophages, and modified lipoproteins, especially oxidized LDLs (oxLDLs), play a fundamental role in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. Monocytes evolve into macrophages in the vascular wall and then accumulate oxLDLs, forming foam cells. OxLDLs are toxic and activate foam cells, stimulate the replication of macrophages and their migration into atherosclerotic plaque, and increase the expression of metaloproteinases. Macrophages bind oxLDLs through many types of receptors, among them scavenger receptors. One of these is CD36, a membrane glycoprotein expressed by endothelial cells, adipocytes, smooth and skeletal muscle cells, cardiomiocytes, platelets, monocytes, and macrophages. CD36 recognizes and binds many ligands, such as oxLDLs, long-chain fatty acids, collagen, thrombospondin 1, apoptotic cells, anionic phospholipids, and Plasmodium falciparum-infected erythrocytes. CD36 is involved in many processes, e.g. inner immune system responses, removal of apoptotic cells and Plasmodium falciparum-infected erythrocytes, and the transport of long-chain fatty acids, and it also mediates collagen and thrombospondin action. Recent reports indicate that CD36 may play a role in the development of atherosclerosis. An animal model revealed that lack of CD36 expression restrains atheroslerosis. Increased expression of CD36 was shown in atheroslerotic plaque and damaged vascular tissue. Contradictory data about the effects of antiatherosclerotic drugs on CD36 expression indicate the necessity for further investigation of the role of CD36 in the development of atherosclerosis.

  14. The magic and mystery of microRNA-27 in atherosclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wu-Jun; Yin, Kai; Zhao, Guo-Jun; Fu, Yu-Chang; Tang, Chao-Ke

    2012-06-01

    Atherosclerosis (As) is now widely appreciated to represent a chronic inflammatory reaction of the vascular wall in response to dyslipidemia and endothelial distress involving the inflammatory recruitment of leukocytes and the activation of resident vascular cells. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a group of endogenous, small (~22 nucleotides in length) non-coding RNA molecules, which function specifically by base pairing with mRNA of genes, thereby induce translation repressions of the genes within metazoan cells. Recently, the function of miR-27, one of the miRNAs, in the initiation and progression of atherosclerosis has been identified. In vivo and in vitro studies suggest that miR-27 may serve as a diagnostic and prognostic marker for atherosclerosis. More recently, studies have identified important roles for miR-27 in angiogenesis, adipogenesis, inflammation, lipid metabolism, oxidative stress, insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes, etc. In this review, we focus on the role of miR-27 in the development of vulnerable atherosclerotic plaques, potential as a disease biomarker and novel therapeutic target in atherosclerosis.

  15. The role of oxidative stress and NADPH oxidase in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dorota Bryk

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Reactive oxygen species (ROS play a key role in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. The main mechanisms which are involved are low-density lipoprotein oxidative modification, inactivation of nitric oxide and modulation of redox-sensitive signaling pathways. ROS contribute to several aspects of atherosclerosis including endothelial cell dysfunction, monocyte/macrophage recruitment and activation, stimulation of inflammation, and inducing smooth muscle cell migration and proliferation. NADPH oxidase is the main source of ROS in the vasculature. This enzyme consists of a membrane-bound heterodimer of gp91phox and p22phox, cytosolic regulatory subunits p47phox, p67phox and p40phox, and small GTP-binding proteins rac1 and rac 2. Seven distinct isoforms of this enzyme have been identified, of which four (NOX1, 2, 4 and 5 may have cardiovascular function. In this paper, we review the current state of knowledge concerning the role of oxidative stress and NOX enzymes in pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. Moreover, we analyze the experimental studies that explore the relationship between the NOX family and atherosclerosis.

  16. Mitigated calcification of glutaraldehyde-fixed bovine pericardium by tannic acid in rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG De; JIANG Hong; LI Jun; ZHOU Jian-ye; HU Sheng-shou

    2008-01-01

    Background Bioprosthetic heart valves derived from glutaraldehyde (Glut)-fixed xenografts have been widely used to replace diseased cardiac valves.However,calcification and degeneration are common following their implantation.Inflammation is closely associated with calcification of Glut-fixed xenografts via macrophage infiltration.Tannic acid (TA)possesses anti-inflammatory effects.This study was designed to investigate the anti-calcification of TA treatment on the Glut-fixed bovine pericardium (BP) in a rat subdermal model.Methods Fresh BP was divided into two groups (10 in each group) and separately subjected to different fixation procedures as follows:(1) Glut group:fixation with 0.6% Glut alone;(2) Glut/TA group:fixation with 0.6% Glut and subsequent 0.3% TA.Then the BP samples were subdermally implanted in juvenile male Sprague-Dawley rats and explanted 21 days after implantation.Each explanted BP sample was divided into three parts for calcium content analysis,von Kossa's staining and immunohistochemical staining,and reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction study.Results The data from quantitative calcium analysis and von Kossa's staining showed that Glut-fixed BP developed significantly more calcification than Glut/TA-fixed BP ((90.3±32.5) mg/g dry weight vs (6.4±1.3) mg/g dry tissue,P<0.01).Immunostaining demonstrated lower matrix metalloproteinase-9 and tenascin-C expression as well as macrophage infiltration into Glut/TA-fixed BP than in its Glut-fixed counterpart (P<0.01 for all).Additionally,the reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction study showed that higher levels of expression of matrix metalloproteinase-9 and tenascin-C mRNA occurred within Glut-fixed BP than within the Glut/TA-flxed ones (P<0.01 for all).Conclusion TA exerts excellent anti-calcification effects on Glut-fixed BP via inhibiting macrophage infiltration and expression of matrix metalloproteinase-9 and tenascin-C.

  17. Relationship Between Lifelong Exercise Volume and Coronary Atherosclerosis in Athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aengevaeren, Vincent L; Mosterd, Arend; Braber, Thijs L; Prakken, Niek H J; Doevendans, Pieter A; Grobbee, Diederick E; Thompson, Paul D; Eijsvogels, Thijs M H; Velthuis, Birgitta K

    2017-07-11

    Higher levels of physical activity are associated with a lower risk of cardiovascular events. Nevertheless, there is debate on the dose-response relationship of exercise and cardiovascular disease outcomes and whether high volumes of exercise may accelerate coronary atherosclerosis. We aimed to determine the relationship between lifelong exercise volumes and coronary atherosclerosis. Middle-aged men engaged in competitive or recreational leisure sports underwent a noncontrast and contrast-enhanced computed tomography scan to assess coronary artery calcification (CAC) and plaque characteristics. Participants reported lifelong exercise history patterns. Exercise volumes were multiplied by metabolic equivalent of task (MET) scores to calculate MET-minutes per week. Participants' activity was categorized as 2000 MET-min/wk. A total of 284 men (age, 55±7 years) were included. CAC was present in 150 of 284 participants (53%) with a median CAC score of 35.8 (interquartile range, 9.3-145.8). Athletes with a lifelong exercise volume >2000 MET-min/wk (n=75) had a significantly higher CAC score (9.4 [interquartile range, 0-60.9] versus 0 [interquartile range, 0-43.5]; P=0.02) and prevalence of CAC (68%; adjusted odds ratio [ORadjusted]=3.2; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.6-6.6) and plaque (77%; ORadjusted=3.3; 95% CI, 1.6-7.1) compared with exercise (≥9 MET) was associated with CAC (ORadjusted=1.47; 95% CI, 1.14-1.91) and plaque (ORadjusted=1.56; 95% CI, 1.17-2.08). Among participants with CAC>0, there was no difference in CAC score (P=0.20), area (P=0.21), density (P=0.25), and regions of interest (P=0.20) across exercise volume groups. Among participants with plaque, the most active group (>2000 MET-min/wk) had a lower prevalence of mixed plaques (48% versus 69%; ORadjusted=0.35; 95% CI, 0.15-0.85) and more often had only calcified plaques (38% versus 16%; ORadjusted=3.57; 95% CI, 1.28-9.97) compared with the least active group (2000 MET-min/wk group had a higher

  18. Susceptibility weighted imaging: differentiating between calcification and hemosiderin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barbosa, Jeam Haroldo Oliveira; Salmon, Carlos Ernesto Garrido, E-mail: jeamharoldo@hotmail.com [Universidade de Sao Paulo (FFCLRP/USP), Ribeirao Preto, SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Filosofia, Ciencias e Letras; Santos, Antonio Carlos [Universidade de Sao Paulo (FMRP/USP), Ribeirao Preto, SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Medicina

    2015-03-15

    Objective: to present a detailed explanation on the processing of magnetic susceptibility weighted imaging (SWI), demonstrating the effects of echo time and sensitive mask on the differentiation between calcification and hemosiderin. Materials and methods: computed tomography and magnetic resonance (magnitude and phase) images of six patients (age range 41-54 years; four men) were retrospectively selected. The SWI images processing was performed using the Matlab's own routine. Results: four out of the six patients showed calcifications at computed tomography images and their SWI images demonstrated hyperintense signal at the calcification regions. The other patients did not show any calcifications at computed tomography, and SWI revealed the presence of hemosiderin deposits with hypointense signal. Conclusion: the selection of echo time and of the mask may change all the information on SWI images, and compromise the diagnostic reliability. Amongst the possible masks, the authors highlight that the sigmoid mask allows for contrasting calcifications and hemosiderin on a single SWI image. (author)

  19. Basal ganglia calcification on computed tomography in systemic lupus erythematosus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagaoka, Shohei; Tani, Kenji; Ishigatsubo, Yoshiaki and others

    1988-09-01

    The development of basal ganglia calcification was studied in 85 patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) by computed tomography (CT). Bilateral calcification of the basal ganglia was found to occur in 5 patients (5.9 %) with SLE, but was not seen in patients with rheumatoid arthritis and progressive systemic sclerosis. All were female with a mean age of 42 years (range 29 - 49). The patients with calcification of the basal ganglia had neurological symptoms, such as psychiatric problems (3 cases), grand mal seizures (1 case), CSF abnormalities (2 cases), and EEG changes (4 cases). There were significantly higher incidences of alopecia, cutaneous vasculitis, leukopenia, and thrombocytopenia in the group with calcifications than those in the group with normal CT findings. Circulating immune complexes were detected and LE tests were positive in 2 patients. Endocrinological examination showed no abnormality in any. We suggest that basal ganglia calcification in SLE might be related to cerebral vasculitis.

  20. Hepatocyte-specific IKKβ expression aggravates atherosclerosis development in APOE*3-Leiden mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Man C.; van Diepen, Janna A.; Hu, Lihui; Guigas, Bruno; de Boer, Hetty C.; van Puijvelde, Gijs H.; Kuiper, Johan; van Zonneveld, Anton J.; Shoelson, Steven E.; Voshol, Peter J.; Romijn, Johannes A.; Havekes, Louis M.; Tamsma, Jouke T.; Rensen, Patrick C.N.; Hiemstra, Pieter S.; Berbée, Jimmy F.P.

    2014-01-01

    Objective The liver is the key organ involved in systemic inflammation, but the relation between hepatic inflammation and atherogenesis is poorly understood. Since nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) is a central regulator of inflammatory processes, we hypothesized that chronically enhanced hepatic NF-κB activation, through hepatocyte-specific expression of IκB kinase-β (IKKβ) (LIKK), will aggravate atherosclerosis development in APOE*3-Leiden (E3L) mice. Methods and Results E3L.LIKK and E3L control littermates were fed a Western-type diet for 24 weeks. E3L.LIKK mice showed a 2.3-fold increased atherosclerotic lesion area and more advanced atherosclerosis in the aortic root with less segments without atherosclerotic lesions (11 vs. 42%), and more segments with mild (63% vs. 44%) and severe (26% vs. 14 %) lesions. Expression of LIKK did not affect basal levels of inflammatory parameters, but plasma cytokine levels tended to be higher in E3L.LIKK mice after lipopolysaccharide (LPS) administration. E3L.LIKK mice showed transiently increased plasma cholesterol levels, confined to (V)LDL. This transient character resulted in a mild (+17%) increased cumulative plasma cholesterol exposure. Conclusion We conclude that selective activation of NF-κB in hepatocytes considerably promotes atherosclerosis development which is (at least partly) explained by an increased sensitivity to proinflammatory triggers and transiently increased plasma cholesterol levels. PMID:21798539