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Sample records for inflamed synovial volume

  1. The role of popliteal lymph nodes in differentiating rheumatoid arthritis from osteoarthritis by using CE 3D-FSPGR MR imaging: relationship of the inflamed synovial volume

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    Huh, Yong Min; Kim, Sung Jun; Suh, Jin Suck; Song, Ho Taek; Song, Ki Jun; Shin, Kyoo Ho [Yonsei University, College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2005-06-15

    We wanted to assess the role of the popliteal lymph nodes for differentiating rheumatoid arthritis (RA) from osteoarthritis (OA), and we also wanted to investigate the relationship between the popliteal lymph nodes and the inflamed synovial volume (ISV) by using contrast enhanced (CE), fat suppressed, three dimensional-fast spoiled gradient echo (3D-FSPGR) MR imaging. Contrast enhanced 3D-FSGPR MR imaging of 94 knees (21 with RA and 73 with OA) was analyzed. A lymph node was defined as being 'observed' if it could be seen in at least two planes of the three orthogonal reformatted planes. The number of observed lymph nodes, the mean of the smallest dimension of each lymph node and the existence of central fatty change were recorded. The OA group was graded according to the ISV calculated by a segmentation method: grade I was < 20 cm{sup 3}; grade II ranged from 20 cm{sup 3} to 40 cm{sup 3}; and grade III was > 40 cm{sup 3}. Statistical analysis of the number and the mean size of the popliteal lymph nodes among the four groups (the RA group and the grade I-III OA groups) was performed. The prevalence of the observed popliteal lymph nodes was significantly different between all the OA group or between the grade III OA group and the RA group ({rho} < 0.0001, 0.0001, respectively). The popliteal lymph node was observed in 32 out of 73 OA cases, whereas it was visible in all of the 21 RA cases. The number (mean {+-} standard deviation) of lymph nodes in the grade I OA group, the grade II OA group, the grade III OA group and the RA group was 1.2 {+-} 0.4, 1.2 {+-} 0.4, 1.3 {+-} 0.5, and 2.7 {+-} 1.1, respectively. The mean size (mean {+-} standard deviation) of the lymph nodes was 3.8 {+-} 1.0 mm, 3.6 {+-} 1.1 mm, 4.1 {+-} 0.8 mm, and 5.4 {+-} 1.3 mm, respectively. The incidence of central fatty changes was significantly lower in the RA group than in all the OA group and the grade III OA group. When differentiating RA from OA, and when the differentiation was

  2. [In-vitro study on dissection of inflamed synovial tissue by hydro-jet cutting].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, K-H; Tarner, I H; Lange, U

    2012-10-01

    Surgical synovectomy is a useful therapeutic option for rheumatoid arthritis patients with ongoing active synovitis despite optimal medical therapy. The present experimental study evaluated the novel, minimally invasive surgical technique of hydro-jet cutting in vitro using synovial biopsies. Depending on the selected water pressure (30-100 bar) it is possible to achieve precise and selective dissection of the synovial membrane. It was found that application of a water jet at 60 bar for 15 s is ideal for dissecting the stratum synoviale from the stratum fibrosum without any alteration of the joint capsule. This finding was confirmed by histological analyses. This novel and precise dissection technique promises to be an excellent alternative to the established techniques of synovectomy in the near future.

  3. Effect of intraarticular osmic acid on synovial membrane volume and inflammation, determined by magnetic resonance imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, Mikkel; Stoltenberg, M; Gideon, P;

    1995-01-01

    The changes in MR-determined synovial membrane volume, early synovial enhancement, and cartilage and bone erosions after osmic acid knee synovectomy were studied. Gadolinium-DTPA enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of 18 knees with persistent arthritis was performed before and 1 month after...... treatment. The synovial membrane volume was significantly reduced (median -52%) in all 9 patients brought into clinical remission (p

  4. Effect of intraarticular osmic acid on synovial membrane volume and inflammation, determined by magnetic resonance imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, Mikkel; Stoltenberg, M; Gideon, P

    1995-01-01

    The changes in MR-determined synovial membrane volume, early synovial enhancement, and cartilage and bone erosions after osmic acid knee synovectomy were studied. Gadolinium-DTPA enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of 18 knees with persistent arthritis was performed before and 1 month after...

  5. Different approaches to synovial membrane volume determination by magnetic resonance imaging: manual versus automated segmentation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, Mikkel

    1997-01-01

    Automated fast (5-20 min) synovial membrane volume determination by MRI, based on pre-set post-gadolinium-DTPA enhancement thresholds, was evaluated as a substitute for a time-consuming (45-120 min), previously validated, manual segmentation method. Twenty-nine knees [rheumatoid arthritis (RA) 13...... or synovial membrane volume, e.g. no systematic errors were found. The inter-MRI variation, evaluated in three knees and three wrists, was higher than by manual segmentation, particularly due to sensitivity to malalignment artefacts. Examination of test objects proved the high accuracy of the general...... methodology for volume determinations (maximal error 6.3%). Preceded by the determination of reproducibility and the optimal threshold at the available MR unit, automated 'threshold' segmentation appears to be acceptable when changes rather than absolute values of synovial membrane volumes are most important...

  6. Synovial volume--a marker of disease severity in rheumatoid arthritis? Quantification by MRI

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, Mikkel; Gideon, P; Henriksen, O

    1994-01-01

    MR-images. Ten knees with clinically active gonarthritis (CAG), 8 knees with clinically inactive gonarthritis (CIG) and 5 healthy controls (HC) were examined. The synovial volume of CAG-, CIG- and HC-knees were significantly different. The median volumes were 79 ml, 21 ml and 3 ml, respectively...

  7. Synovial volume--a marker of disease severity in rheumatoid arthritis? Quantification by MRI

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, Mikkel; Gideon, P; Henriksen, O

    1994-01-01

    Volumes of synovial membrane and joint effusion were determined by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in patients with inflammatory gonarthritis. Volumes were calculated by adding the outlined areas of synovium/effusion from a continuous series of gadolinium-DTPA-enhanced 5 mm transversal T1-weighted...

  8. Synovial biopsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biopsy - synovial membrane ... fluid in and out of the area. A biopsy grasper is inserted through the trocar and turned ... Synovial biopsy helps diagnose gout and bacterial infections, or rule out other infections. It can be used to diagnose ...

  9. Changes in synovial membrane and joint effusion volumes after intraarticular methylprednisolone. Quantitative assessment of inflammatory and destructive changes in arthritis by MRI

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, Mikkel; Stoltenberg, M; Gideon, P

    1996-01-01

    , 7, 30 and 180 days after intraarticular methylprednisolone injection until clinical relapse. Intraobserver, interobserver, and inter-MRI variations were determined from 2 successive MRI of another 6 knees. RESULTS: In all knees synovial membrane and effusion volumes decreased within the first...

  10. Synovial sarcoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sucari S.C. Vlok

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Synovial sarcoma is a malignant, predominantly juxta-articular, soft-tissue tumour representing approximately 10% of all soft-tissue sarcomas. Frequently initially incorrectly diagnosed as a benign lesion, it should be considered as a diagnosis when a young adult patient presents with a calcified juxta-articular soft-tissue mass of insidious onset.

  11. Magnetic resonance imaging-determined synovial membrane volume as a marker of disease activity and a predictor of progressive joint destruction in the wrists of patients with rheumatoid arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, Mikkel; Hansen, M; Stoltenberg, M;

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the synovial membrane volume, determined by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), as a marker of joint disease activity and a predictor of progressive joint destruction in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). METHODS: Twenty-six patients with RA, randomized to receive disease-modifying a......OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the synovial membrane volume, determined by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), as a marker of joint disease activity and a predictor of progressive joint destruction in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). METHODS: Twenty-six patients with RA, randomized to receive disease......-Pratt analysis). The rate of erosive progression on MRI was highly correlated with baseline scores and, particularly, with area under the curve (AUC) values of synovial membrane volume (Spearman's sigma = 0.69, P

  12. Magnetic resonance imaging-determined synovial membrane volume as a marker of disease activity and a predictor of progressive joint destruction in the wrists of patients with rheumatoid arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, Mikkel; Hansen, M; Stoltenberg, M;

    1999-01-01

    -modifying antirheumatic drug (DMARD) therapy alone (11 patients) or DMARDs in combination with oral prednisolone (15 patients), were followed up for 1 year with contrast-enhanced MRI of the dominant wrist (months 0, 3, 6, and 12), conventional radiography (months 0 and 12), and clinical and biochemical examinations. Bone...... erosion (by MRI and radiography) and synovial membrane volumes (by MRI) were assessed. RESULTS: Significant synovial membrane volume reductions were observed after 3 and 6 months in the DMARD + prednisolone group, and after 6 and 12 months in the DMARD-alone group (P ...-Pratt analysis). The rate of erosive progression on MRI was highly correlated with baseline scores and, particularly, with area under the curve (AUC) values of synovial membrane volume (Spearman's sigma = 0.69, P

  13. Magnetic resonance imaging-determined synovial membrane volume as a marker of disease activity and a predictor of progressive joint destruction in the wrists of patients with rheumatoid arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, Mikkel; Hansen, M; Stoltenberg, M

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the synovial membrane volume, determined by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), as a marker of joint disease activity and a predictor of progressive joint destruction in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). METHODS: Twenty-six patients with RA, randomized to receive disease-modifying a......OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the synovial membrane volume, determined by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), as a marker of joint disease activity and a predictor of progressive joint destruction in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). METHODS: Twenty-six patients with RA, randomized to receive disease......-Pratt analysis). The rate of erosive progression on MRI was highly correlated with baseline scores and, particularly, with area under the curve (AUC) values of synovial membrane volume (Spearman's sigma = 0.69, P

  14. Synovial fluid analysis

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    ... bursae (fluid-filled sacs in the joints), and tendon sheaths. After the joint area is cleaned, the ... HS. Synovial fluid analysis, synovial biopsy, and synovial pathology. In: Firestein GS, Budd RC, Gabriel SE, McInnes ...

  15. Serum amyloid A isoforms in serum and synovial fluid from spontaneously diseased dogs with joint diseases or other conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjelgaard-Hansen, Mads Jens; Christensen, Michelle B.; Lee, Marcel Huisung

    2007-01-01

    with systemic inflammatory activity, and up to four major isoforms with apparent isoelectric points between 6.1 and 7.9 were identified. In synovial fluid from inflamed joints one or more highly alkaline SAA isoforms (with apparent isoelectric points above 9.3) were identified, with data suggesting local...... production of these isoforms in the canine inflamed joint....

  16. Microfluidic processing of synovial fluid for cytological analysis.

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    Krebs, John C; Alapan, Yunus; Dennstedt, Barbara A; Wera, Glenn D; Gurkan, Umut A

    2017-06-01

    Cytological analysis of synovial fluid is widely used in the clinic to assess joint health and disease. However, in general practice, only the total number of white blood cells (WBCs) are available for cytologic evaluation of the joint. Moreover, sufficient volume of synovial aspirates is critical to run conventional analyses, despite limited volume of aspiration that can normally be obtained from a joint. Therefore, there is a lack of consistent and standardized synovial fluid cytological tests in the clinic. To address these shortcomings, we developed a microfluidic platform (Synovial Chip), for the first time in the literature, to achieve repeatable, cost- and time-efficient, and standardized synovial fluid cytological analysis based on specific cell surface markers. Microfluidic channels functionalized with antibodies against specific cell surface antigens are connected in series to capture WBC subpopulations, including CD4+, CD8+, and CD66b+ cells, simultaneously from miniscule volumes (100 μL) of synovial fluid aspirates. Cell capture specificity was evaluated by fluorescent labeling of isolated cells in microchannels and was around 90% for all three WBC subpopulations. Furthermore, we investigated the effect of synovial fluid viscosity on capture efficiency in the microfluidic channels and utilized hyaluronidase enzyme treatment to reduce viscosity and to improve cell capture efficiency (>60%) from synovial fluid samples. Synovial Chip allows efficient and standardized point-of-care isolation and analysis of WBC subpopulations in miniscule volumes of patient synovial fluid samples in the clinic.

  17. SYNOVIAL CELL SARCOMA

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    M. Farzan

    1997-06-01

    Full Text Available Ten cases of synovial cell sarcoma are reported. The youngest patient was a 2'A years old boy with synovial cell sarcoma of the knee and the oldest one was a man with synovial cell sarcoma of the elbow.

  18. Extradural synovial thoracic cyst.

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    Hodges, S D; Fronczak, S; Zindrick, M R; Lorenz, M A; Vrbos, L A

    1994-11-01

    SUMMARY OF BACKGROUND DATA. Case studies documenting the incidence of thoracic intraspinal, extradural synovial cysts are limited. The occurrence of synovial cysts is associated with varied symptoms that differ among cervical, thoracic, and lumbar regions. The clinical appearance may be similar to other spinal diseases. METHODS. This report describes symptoms exhibited by and care provided for a patient with extradural synovial thoracic cyst.

  19. Synovial inflammation, immune cells and their cytokines in osteoarthritis: A review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lange-Brokaar, B.J.E. de; Ioan-Facsinay, A.; Osch, G.J.V.M. van; Zuurmond, A.-M.; Schoones, J.; Toes, R.E.M.; Huizinga, T.W.J.; Kloppenburg, M.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Although osteoarthritis (OA) is considered a non-inflammatory condition, it is widely accepted that synovial inflammation is a feature of OA. However, the role of immune cells and their cytokines in OA is largely unknown. This narrative systematic review summarizes the knowledge of inflam

  20. Up-regulation of prostaglandin E receptor EP2 and EP4 subtypes in rat synovial tissues with adjuvant arthritis.

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    Kurihara, Y; Endo, H; Akahoshi, T; Kondo, H

    2001-02-01

    To evaluate the role of the prostaglandin E receptor (EP) subtypes in the development of inflammatory synovitis, we examined EP subtype mRNA distribution in the synovial tissue of rats with adjuvant arthritis and the effect of selective EP agonists on cytokine production by cultured rat synovial cells. We used reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and in situ hybridization to measure the level of EP subtype (EP1, EP2, EP3, and EP4) mRNA expression in synovial tissues and cultured synovial cells from the arthritic joints of rats. RT-PCR and ELISA were used to analyse the effects of two selective EP agonists on IL-6 production by cultured rat synovial cells. EP2 and EP4 mRNA expression in inflamed synovial tissues was up-regulated. EP2 and EP4 mRNA were co-expressed in synovial macrophages and fibroblasts in inflamed tissues. EP4 and EP2 agonists both inhibited IL-1-induced IL-6 production. Our results suggest that prostaglandin E2 regulates the functions of synovial macrophages and fibroblasts through EP2 and EP4, which are induced by inflammatory stimuli in rats with adjuvant arthritis.

  1. Synovial tissue hypoxia and inflammation in vivo.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Ng, C T

    2012-02-01

    INTRODUCTION: Hypoxia is a microenvironmental feature in the inflamed joint, which promotes survival advantage for cells. The aim of this study was to examine the relationship of partial oxygen pressure in the synovial tissue (tPO(2)) in patients with inflammatory arthritis with macroscopic\\/microscopic inflammation and local levels of proinflammatory mediators. METHODS: Patients with inflammatory arthritis underwent full clinical assessment and video arthroscopy to quantify macroscopic synovitis and measure synovial tPO(2) under direct visualisation. Cell specific markers (CD3 (T cells), CD68 (macrophages), Ki67 (cell proliferation) and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labelling (cell apoptosis)) were quantified by immunohistology. In vitro migration was assessed in primary and normal synoviocytes (synovial fibroblast cells (SFCs)) using a wound repair scratch assay. Levels of tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNFalpha), interleukin 1beta (IL1beta), interferon gamma (IFNgamma), IL6, macrophage inflammatory protein 3alpha (MIP3alpha) and IL8 were quantified, in matched serum and synovial fluid, by multiplex cytokine assay and ELISA. RESULTS: The tPO(2) was 22.5 (range 3.2-54.1) mm Hg and correlated inversely with macroscopic synovitis (r=-0.421, p=0.02), sublining CD3 cells (-0.611, p<0.01) and sublining CD68 cells (r=-0.615, p<0.001). No relationship with cell proliferation or apoptosis was found. Primary and normal SFCs exposed to 1% and 3% oxygen (reflecting the median tPO(2) in vivo) induced cell migration. This was coupled with significantly higher levels of synovial fluid tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNFalpha), IL1beta, IFNgamma and MIP3alpha in patients with tPO(2) <20 mm Hg (all p values <0.05). CONCLUSIONS: This is the first study to show a direct in vivo correlation between synovial tPO(2), inflammation and cell migration, thus it is proposed that hypoxia is a possible primary driver of inflammatory processes in the arthritic joint.

  2. Synovial tissue research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Orr, Carl; Sousa, Elsa; Boyle, David L

    2017-01-01

    The synovium is the major target tissue of inflammatory arthritides such as rheumatoid arthritis. The study of synovial tissue has advanced considerably throughout the past few decades from arthroplasty and blind needle biopsy to the use of arthroscopic and ultrasonographic technologies that enable...... easier visualization and improve the reliability of synovial biopsies. Rapid progress has been made in using synovial tissue to study disease pathogenesis, to stratify patients, to discover biomarkers and novel targets, and to validate therapies, and this progress has been facilitated by increasingly...... diverse and sophisticated analytical and technological approaches. In this Review, we describe these approaches, and summarize how their use in synovial tissue research has improved our understanding of rheumatoid arthritis and identified candidate biomarkers that could be used in disease diagnosis...

  3. [Diagnosis: synovial fluid analysis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallo Vallejo, Francisco Javier; Giner Ruiz, Vicente

    2014-01-01

    Synovial fluid analysis in rheumatological diseases allows a more accurate diagnosis in some entities, mainly infectious and microcrystalline arthritis. Examination of synovial fluid in patients with osteoarthritis is useful if a differential diagnosis will be performed with other processes and to distinguish between inflammatory and non-inflammatory forms. Joint aspiration is a diagnostic and sometimes therapeutic procedure that is available to primary care physicians. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  4. Magnetic particle translation as a surrogate measure for synovial fluid mechanics.

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    Shah, Yash Y; Maldonado-Camargo, Lorena; Patel, Neal S; Biedrzycki, Adam H; Yarmola, Elena G; Dobson, Jon; Rinaldi, Carlos; Allen, Kyle D

    2017-07-26

    The mechanics of synovial fluid vary with disease progression, but are difficult to quantify quickly in a clinical setting due to small sample volumes. In this study, a novel technique to measure synovial fluid mechanics using magnetic nanoparticles is introduced. Briefly, microspheres embedded with superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles, termed magnetic particles, are distributed through a 100μL synovial fluid sample. Then, a permanent magnet inside a protective sheath is inserted into the synovial fluid sample. Magnetic particles translate toward the permanent magnet and the percentage of magnetic particles collected by the magnet in a given time can be related to synovial fluid viscosity. To validate this relationship, magnetic particle translation was demonstrated in three phases. First, magnetic particle translation was assessed in glycerol solutions with known viscosities, demonstrating that as fluid viscosity increased, magnetic particle translation decreased. Next, the relationship between magnetic particle translation and synovial fluid viscosity was assessed using bovine synovial fluid that was progressively degenerated via ultrasonication. Here, particle collection in a given amount of time increased as fluid degenerated, demonstrating that the relationship between particle collection and fluid mechanics holds in non-Newtonian synovial fluid. Finally, magnetic particle translation was used to assess differences between healthy and OA affected joints in equine synovial fluid. Here, particle collection in a given time was higher in OA joints relative to healthy horses (pmagnetic particle translation in a clinical setting to evaluate synovial fluid mechanics in limited volumes of synovial fluid sample. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Primary renal synovial sarcoma

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    Girish D. Bakhshi

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Primary Renal Sarcoma is rare tumor comprising only 1% of all renal tumours. Synovial sarcomas are generally deep-seated tumors arising in the proximity of large joints of adolescents and young adults and account for 5-10% of all soft tissue tumours. Primary synovial sarcoma of kidney is rare and has poor prognosis. It can only be diagnosed by immunohistochemistry. It should be considered as a differential in sarcomatoid and spindle cell tumours. We present a case of 33-year-old female, who underwent left sided radical nephrectomy for renal tumour. Histopathology and genetic analysis diagnosed it to be primary renal synovial sarcoma. Patient underwent radiation therapy and 2 years follow up is uneventful. A brief case report with review of literature is presented.

  6. Imaging appearances of synovial plicae syndrome of the knee

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    Osama Abdalla Mabrouk Kheiralla

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Synovial plicae are synovial folds that may be found as intraarticular structures within the knee joint. They are remnants of incomplete resorption of mesenchymal tissue during fetal development. Synovial plicae, if present, are supposed to be non-pathological and asymptomatic, however if they are exposed to special events like direct trauma or repeated activities, they may be inflamed and become fibrosed and rigid and irritates the synovium of the underlying femoral condyle resulting in secondary mechanical synovitis and chondromalacia leading to what is known as plica syndrome of the knee. Inspite plica syndrome is always suspected on clinical bases and can be clearly visualized by arthroscopic application, still diagnostic imaging by MRI, CT scan and Sonography play important role in the evaluation and diagnosis of this pathological condition. The aim of this article is to provide an overview of the imaging appearances of synovial plicae syndrome of the knee on ultrasound, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI and computerized tomography scan (CT scan.

  7. Cervical synovial cyst: case report.

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    Found, Ernest; Bewyer, Dennis

    2011-01-01

    A 47-year-old female school teacher with a six-week history of left-sided scapular and arm pain is presented. We report her evaluation and treatment Although lumbar degenerative synovial cysts have been reported over 200 times in the literature,6 cervical synovial cysts are much more rare. This case reports a cervicothoracic junction degenerative synovial cyst presenting as radiculopathy.

  8. Synovial hemangioma: A rare benign synovial lesion

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    Rajni

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available We report an unusual case of a 10-year-old female with complaints of pain and swelling of the right knee for the last 4 years along with the limitation of movement for last 1 year. Repeated fine needle aspirations yielded blood and a provisional diagnosis of hemarthrosis was suggested. Coagulation profile subsequently carried out was found to be within normal limits. Arthroscopic biopsy was performed and tissue was sent for histopathological examination. A diagnosis of synovial hemangioma was made. Subtotal synovectomy was performed and the lesion was completely excised. The patient is completely asymptomatic and shows no signs of recurrence at 1 year.

  9. Synovial sarcoma mechanisms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svejstrup, Jesper Q

    2013-01-01

    Human synovial sarcoma is caused by a chromosome translocation, which fuses DNA encoding SSX to that encoding the SS18 protein. Kadoch and Crabtree now show that the resulting cellular transformation stems from disruption of the normal architecture and function of the human SWI/SNF (BAF) complex....

  10. Synovial chondromatosis in raptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, E G; Walser, M M; Redig, P T; Rings, B; Howard, D J

    1999-01-01

    Fourteen raptors, consisting of 13 great horned owls (Bubo virginianus) and one red-tailed hawk (Buteo jamaicensis), from central and north central Minnesota, western Wisconsin, and eastern South Dakota (USA) were admitted to a raptor rehabilitation center between June 1992 and June 1995, with perisynovial and synovial chondromatosis affecting multiple joints. Birds were severely debilitated primarily due to loss of shoulder motion. The etiology of these lesions in raptors is unknown.

  11. Periodontal inflamed surface area : quantifying inflammatory burden

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nesse, Willem; Abbas, Frank; van der Ploeg, Ids; Spijkervet, Frederik Karst Lucien; Dijkstra, Pieter Ubele; Vissink, Arjan

    2008-01-01

    Background: Currently, a large variety of classifications is used for periodontitis as a risk factor for other diseases. None of these classifications quantifies the amount of inflamed periodontal tissue, while this information is needed to assess the inflammatory burden posed by periodontitis. Aim:

  12. Periodontal inflamed surface area : quantifying inflammatory burden

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nesse, Willem; Abbas, Frank; van der Ploeg, Ids; Spijkervet, Frederik Karst Lucien; Dijkstra, Pieter Ubele; Vissink, Arjan

    2008-01-01

    Background: Currently, a large variety of classifications is used for periodontitis as a risk factor for other diseases. None of these classifications quantifies the amount of inflamed periodontal tissue, while this information is needed to assess the inflammatory burden posed by periodontitis. Aim:

  13. For Inflamed Pancreas, Eating Right Away May Be Best Medicine

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    ... medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_165624.html For Inflamed Pancreas, Eating Right Away May Be Best Medicine Contrary ... people hospitalized for pancreatitis. This is when the pancreas becomes inflamed, causing pain and swelling in the ...

  14. [Synovial sarcoma. Case report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deme, Dániel; Abdulfatah, Bishr; Telekes, András

    2016-02-07

    In 2013 there were 94,770 new cancer patients reported in Hungary. Synovial sarcoma accounts for 0.05-0.1% of all cancers and, therefore its incidence is predicted to be 47-94 patients/year in Hungary. The authors report the history of a 18-year-old man who was operated on a right upper abdominal wall tumor with R1 resection. During the next 5 months the tumor grew up to 8 cm in largest diameter. Histology revealed monophasic synovial sarcoma. Immunohistochemistry showed bcl2, focal CD99 and high molecular weight cytokeratin positivity, while smooth muscle actin, S100 and CD34 immunostainings were negative. Becose of this reoperation was not possible, curative six cycles of doxorubicine and ifosfamide with granulocyte colony stimulating factor support and 60 Gy radiotherapy was given to the tumor bed. After these treatments computed tomography scan was negative and the patient attended regular imaging every 3 months. At the age of 20 years the patient developed two neoplastic lesions in the surgical scar measuring 10 mm and 45 × 10 mm in size. R0 resection, partial rib resection and abdominal wall reconstruction were performed. Histology confirmed residual monophasic synovial sarcoma. Radiotherapy was not given because of a risk of intestinal wall perforation. Staging positron emission tomography-computed tomography proved to be negative. At the age of 22 years magnetic resonance imaging scans indicated no tumor recurrence, but after one month a rapidly growing tumorous lesion was found on ultrasound in the surgical scar measuring 20 × 20 × 12 mm in size. Cytology confirmed local recurrence and fluorescence in situ hibridization indicated t(x;18). R0 exstirpation and partial mesh resection were performed and histology showed the same monophasic synovial sarcoma. Because of the presence of vascular invasion and a close resection margin (1 mm) the patient underwent 3 cycles of adjuvant chemotherapy (doxorubicine and ifosfamide) with granulocyte colony stimulating

  15. Biomimetic proteolipid vesicles for targeting inflamed tissues

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    Molinaro, R.; Corbo, C.; Martinez, J. O.; Taraballi, F.; Evangelopoulos, M.; Minardi, S.; Yazdi, I. K.; Zhao, P.; De Rosa, E.; Sherman, M. B.; de Vita, A.; Toledano Furman, N. E.; Wang, X.; Parodi, A.; Tasciotti, E.

    2016-09-01

    A multitude of micro- and nanoparticles have been developed to improve the delivery of systemically administered pharmaceuticals, which are subject to a number of biological barriers that limit their optimal biodistribution. Bioinspired drug-delivery carriers formulated by bottom-up or top-down strategies have emerged as an alternative approach to evade the mononuclear phagocytic system and facilitate transport across the endothelial vessel wall. Here, we describe a method that leverages the advantages of bottom-up and top-down strategies to incorporate proteins derived from the leukocyte plasma membrane into lipid nanoparticles. The resulting proteolipid vesicles--which we refer to as leukosomes--retained the versatility and physicochemical properties typical of liposomal formulations, preferentially targeted inflamed vasculature, enabled the selective and effective delivery of dexamethasone to inflamed tissues, and reduced phlogosis in a localized model of inflammation.

  16. Condromatose sinovial Synovial chondromatosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neylor Pace Lasmar

    2010-01-01

    the site. He was referred to a knee specialist with a suspected meniscal injury. Upon examination, we detected severe swelling of the joint with limitation of motion, pain exacerbated, and negative joint aspiration. Since simple radiographic results were normal, an MRI of the knee was requested. The MRI revealed massive accumulation of synovial fluid, together with marked synovial proliferation, especially focal thickening clumps with intermediate signal on T1 and T2, a hypointense signal on T2, and discreet suggestive of pigmented villonodular synovitis with intact meniscus and ligaments. The patient underwent arthroscopy of the left knee, which revealed whitish irregular fragments, and underwent arthrotomy with removal of the lesion and extensive synovectomy. The material was submitted to pathological examination, which showed the presence of synovial chondromatosis. Eight months after surgery, the patient presents with no complaints, with a 130° range in the left knee without joint bleeding or signs of inflammation. Synovial chondromatosis is a rare benign metaplasia of the synovial membrane, leading to the formation of cartilaginous loose bodies in the joint space. It is difficult to diagnose because 95% of the nodules, when not calcified, can be overlooked radiologically.

  17. Synovial folds in equine articular process joints

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Line Nymann; Berg, Lise Charlotte; Markussen, Bo;

    2013-01-01

    Cervical synovial folds have been suggested as a potential cause of neck pain in humans. Little is known about the extent and characteristics of cervical synovial folds in horses.......Cervical synovial folds have been suggested as a potential cause of neck pain in humans. Little is known about the extent and characteristics of cervical synovial folds in horses....

  18. Treatment of spinal synovial cysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bydon, Mohamad; Papadimitriou, Kyriakos; Witham, Timothy; Wolinsky, Jean-Paul; Sciubba, Daniel; Gokaslan, Ziya; Bydon, Ali

    2013-02-01

    Spinal synovial cysts are a known cause of back pain and radiculopathy. With the advent of high-resolution imaging techniques, synovial cysts are increasingly diagnosed. There are a variety of treatment options for these lesions. A systematic literature review of published articles reporting outcomes after nonsurgical and surgical management of spinal synovial cysts was performed. There were 51 published studies regarding the treatment of synovial cysts identified. Treatment modalities include observation, steroid injections, percutaneous cyst aspiration, hemilaminectomy or bilateral laminectomy with and without instrumented fusion, and minimally invasive cyst excision. Based on review of the treatment modalities and outcomes, recommendations for the management of patients with synovial cysts are proposed. Observation can be considered in cases where there is no intractable pain. High-risk surgical patients with intractable pain may consider corticosteroid injection or percutaneous cyst aspiration; however, the failure rate of such a procedure approaches 50%. Patients with intractable pain are candidates for surgical resection of the symptomatic cyst. In cases of significant neurologic deficit, motor weakness, back pain, multiple synovial cysts, or spondylolisthesis, bilateral laminectomy and instrumented fusion may offer the best long-term outcome. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Responses of synovial fluid and peripheral blood mononuclear cells to bacterial antigens and autologous antigen presenting cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klasen, I S; Melief, M J; Swaak, T J; Severijnen, A J; Hazenberg, M P

    1993-01-01

    The specificity of T cells in the inflamed joints of patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) has been the subject of much study. Bacterial antigens are suspect in the aetiology of rheumatic diseases. The responsiveness of the mononuclear cell fraction of peripheral blood and synovial fluid of patients with RA and of patients with rheumatic diseases other than RA to bacterial antigens such as cell wall fragments of the anaerobic intestinal flora, cell wall fragments of Streptococcus pyogenes, intestinal flora derived peptidoglycan polysaccharide complexes, the 65 kilodalton protein of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, and muramyldipeptide was investigated. No significant difference in response was found to all these bacterial antigens in the synovial fluid of patients with RA compared with the responses in patients with other rheumatic diseases. The highest responsiveness in the synovial fluid of the patients with RA was to the streptococcal cell wall fragments and to the 65 kilodalton protein. Higher responses to several bacterial antigens in the synovial fluid of patients with RA were found compared with peripheral blood from the same patient group. The antigen presenting cell population of the synovial fluid in patients with RA and the patients with other rheumatic diseases was found to be stimulatory for autologous peripheral blood T cells even in the absence of antigen. This suggests an important role for the synovial antigen presenting cell in the aetiology of inflammatory joint diseases. PMID:8447692

  20. Comparative analysis of inflamed and non-inflamed colon biopsies reveals strong proteomic inflammation profile in patients with ulcerative colitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Nina Aagaard; Andersen, Vibeke; Moller, Jens Christian

    2012-01-01

    Background: Accurate diagnostic and monitoring tools for ulcerative colitis (UC) are missing. Our aim was to describe the proteomic profile of UC and search for markers associated with disease exacerbation. Therefore, we aimed to characterize specific proteins associated with inflamed colon mucosa...... annotated by image analysis and 222 of these had a statistically different protein level between inflamed and non-inflamed tissue in the patient group. Principal component analysis clearly grouped non-inflamed samples separately from the inflamed samples indicating that the proteomic signature of colon......, thioredoxins and selenium binding protein). Conclusions: A distinct proteomic profile of inflamed tissue in UC patients was found. Specific proteins involved in energy metabolism and oxidative stress were identified as potential candidate markers for UC....

  1. Characterization of the porcine synovial fluid proteome and a comparison to the plasma proteome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bennike, Tue Bjerg; Barnaby, Omar; Steen, Hanno;

    2015-01-01

    Synovial fluid is present in all joint cavities, and protects the articular cartilage surfaces in large by lubricating the joint, thus reducing friction. Several studies have described changes in the protein composition of synovial fluid in patients with joint disease. However, the protein...... concentration, content, and synovial fluid volume change dramatically during active joint diseases and inflammation, and the proteome composition of healthy synovial fluid is incompletely characterized. We performed a normative proteomics analysis of porcine synovial fluid, and report data from optimizing...... data used in the method optimization, human plasma proteomics data, and search results, have been deposited to the ProteomeXchange Consortium via the PRIDE partner repository with the dataset identifier PXD000935....

  2. Synovial fluid over the centuries

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    P. Marson

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available This review deals with the most meaningful historical topics on the study of synovial fluid, by starting from the Greco- Roman Medicine, up to Paracelsus (1493-1541, who introduced the term “synovia” to name the intra-articular humour. Afterwards, some till now unreported historical sources are recorded, e.g., a short text by the Italian XVIII century physician Giambattista Contoli (“Breve Instruzione sopre il Glutine, ò Colla…, 1699”. Then, in keeping with some recent researches, a brief history of arthrocentesis is outlined, by considering the first procedures, which should have been performed in Mexico, during the precolonial period. Moreover, the first chemical analysis of synovial fluid, as carried out by the French chemist Jean-Louis Margueron (1792, and the first modern study on the synovial membrane by Marie-François-Xavier Bichat (1800 are explained. Finally, some XIX century investigations concerning the synovial pharmacodynamics, in particular an Italian one based on the elimination of certain chemical substances through the synovial membrane, are discussed.

  3. Gene Expression Profiling in Peripheral Blood Cells and Synovial Membranes of Patients with Psoriatic Arthritis.

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    Marzia Dolcino

    Full Text Available Psoriatic arthritis (PsA is an inflammatory arthritis whose pathogenesis is poorly understood; it is characterized by bone erosions and new bone formation. The diagnosis of PsA is mainly clinical and diagnostic biomarkers are not yet available. The aim of this work was to clarify some aspects of the disease pathogenesis and to identify specific gene signatures in paired peripheral blood cells (PBC and synovial biopsies of patients with PsA. Moreover, we tried to identify biomarkers that can be used in clinical practice.PBC and synovial biopsies of 10 patients with PsA were used to study gene expression using Affymetrix arrays. The expression values were validated by Q-PCR, FACS analysis and by the detection of soluble mediators.Synovial biopsies of patients showed a modulation of approximately 200 genes when compared to the biopsies of healthy donors. Among the differentially expressed genes we observed the upregulation of Th17 related genes and of type I interferon (IFN inducible genes. FACS analysis confirmed the Th17 polarization. Moreover, the synovial trascriptome shows gene clusters (bone remodeling, angiogenesis and inflammation involved in the pathogenesis of PsA. Interestingly 90 genes are modulated in both compartments (PBC and synovium suggesting that signature pathways in PBC mirror those of the inflamed synovium. Finally the osteoactivin gene was upregulared in both PBC and synovial biopsies and this finding was confirmed by the detection of high levels of osteoactivin in PsA sera but not in other inflammatory arthritides.We describe the first analysis of the trancriptome in paired synovial tissue and PBC of patients with PsA. This study strengthens the hypothesis that PsA is of autoimmune origin since the coactivity of IFN and Th17 pathways is typical of autoimmunity. Finally these findings have allowed the identification of a possible disease biomarker, osteoactivin, easily detectable in PsA serum.

  4. Identification of candidate synovial membrane biomarkers after Achyranthes aspera treatment for rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Wen; Lu, Xianghong; Fu, Zhirong; Zhang, Lin; Li, Ximin; Xu, Xiaobao; Ren, Yina; Lu, Yongzhuang; Fu, Hongwei; Tian, Jingkui

    2016-03-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a systemic autoimmune disease whose main symptom is a heightened inflammatory response in synovial tissues. To verify the anti-arthritic activities of Achyranthes aspera and its possible therapy-related factors on the pathogenesis of RA, the saponins in A. aspera root were isolated and identified to treat the collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) rats. Phytochemical analysis isolated and identified methyl caffeate, 25-S-inokosterone, 25-S-inokosterone β-D-glucopyranosyl 3-(O-β-D-glucopyranosyloxy)-oleanolate, and β-D-glucopyranosyl 3-(O-β-D-galactopyranosyl (1→2)(O-β-D-glucopyranosyloxy)-oleanolate as main compounds in the root of A. aspera. Proteomics was performed to determine the differentially expressed proteins in either inflamed or drug-treated synovium of CIA rats. Treatment resulted in dramatically decreased paw swelling, proliferation of inflammatory cells, and bone degradation. Fibrinogen, procollagen, protein disulfide-isomerase A3, and apolipoprotein A-I were all increased in inflamed synovial tissues and were found to decrease when administered drug therapy. Furthermore, Alpha-1-antiproteinase and manganese superoxide dismutase were both increased in drug-treated synovial tissues. The inhibition of RA progression shows that A. aspera is a promising candidate for future treatment of human arthritis. Importantly, the total saponins found within A. aspera are the active component. Finally, autoantigens such as fibrinogen and collagen could act as inducers of RA due to their aggravation of inflammation. Given this, it is possible that the vimentin and PDIA3 could be the candidate biomarkers specific to Achyranthes saponin therapy for rheumatoid arthritis in synovial membrane.

  5. Técnica de citometria de fluxo para avaliação da produção de espécies reativas de oxigênio pelas células do líquido sinovial de eqüinos Cytometry flow techniques for evaluation of reactive oxygen species produced by equine synovial cells fluid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C.O. Massoco

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Using the cytometry flow analysis and adapting the method proposed by Hasui et al. (1985, it was possible to quantify the reactive oxygen species (ROE produced by distinct cell populations of the synovial fluid from rigid and inflamed joints in horses, and to identify an increase in the polymorphonuclear cells population densities in the inflamed joints. These data strengthen the premise that cytometry flow techniques can contribute for future researches on the articular cartilage degeneration in horses.

  6. Synovial chondromatosis of the temporomandibular joint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyes Macías, Juan Francisco; Sánchez Prieto, Martín

    2007-01-01

    Synovial Chondromatosis (SC) is a disease whose etiology is unknown, can be defined as a benign synovial process characterized by the formation of metaplastic cartilaginous nodes inside connective tissue of articular surfaces, is considered an active metaplastic phenomenon better than a neoplastic process; it presents a greater preference to affect women who constitute almost 70% of reported cases, the age range is wide and oscillates between 18-75 years (average 44.6 years). Between the main clinical findings are: pain, crackle, volume augmentation and a limited buccal opening. SC is an unusual state and the reports in the English literature are no more than 75 cases, only 66 of those where histologically verified, most of those were affecting great joints like hip, knee and shoulder, but if SC is not frequent in this sites, is even more infrequent on temporomandibular joint. The aim of this paper is to report a clinical case and at the same time to realize a brief review of the literature.

  7. Efficacy of radiation synovectomy (radiosynovectomy or radiosynoviorthesis) with yttrium-90 in exudative inflammation of synovial membrane of knee joints in patients with rheumatic diseases – preliminary report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Węgierska, Małgorzata; Barczyńska, Tacjana; Waszczak, Marzena; Żuchowski, Paweł; Jeka, Sławomir

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Hypertrophic and exudative synovitis of the knee is one of the earliest symptoms in rheumatic diseases. In the case of pharmacotherapy failure, other methods which directly remove the inflamed synovial membrane are used – synovectomies. Radiosynovectomy (RSV) is the radiopharmaceutical application of colloidal solution to joint cavities. In this study, the authors assessed the efficacy of knee radiosynovectomy with yttrium-90 (Y-90) in several groups of patients divided into certain rheumatic diseases. Material and methods The study group consisted of 70 patients aged from 29 to 65 years with hypertrophic and exudative synovitis of the knee in rheumatic diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis, osteoarthrosis and spondyloarthropathies. Radiopharmaceutical colloid of Y-90, with a radiation dose of 185-222 MBq in a volume of 2-3 ml, was administered to joint. Then the knee joint was immobilized for 72 h. During visits V1, V2, V3 and V4, erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) and C-reactive protein (CRP) were measured and ultrasound of the knee was performed. Disease activity was evaluated by the WOMAC scale, HAQ and 100-mm visual analog scale (VAS). Results The most significant difference of synovial hypertrophy, before and after the procedure, was obtained in patients with rheumatoid arthritis. Variability of effusion before and after the procedure in all groups was comparable and statistically significant. The greatest improvement in variability of inflammatory parameters, before and 4 weeks after radiosynovectomy, was observed in patients with rheumatoid arthritis. Conclusions In the therapeutic algorithm radiosynovectomy should be located between conservative treatment and operative procedures. Radiosynovectomy does not require hospitalization or prolonged rehabilitation. Radiosynoviorthesis affects the patient's general condition, which is associated with eliminating pain and restoring joint function. PMID:27407269

  8. Monocarboxylate transporter 4, associated with the acidification of synovial fluid, is a novel therapeutic target for inflammatory arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujii, Wataru; Kawahito, Yutaka; Nagahara, Hidetake; Kukida, Yuji; Seno, Takahiro; Yamamoto, Aihiro; Kohno, Masataka; Oda, Ryo; Taniguchi, Daigo; Fujiwara, Hiroyoshi; Ejima, Akika; Kishida, Tsunao; Mazda, Osam; Ashihara, Eishi

    2015-11-01

    Synovial fluid pH is decreased in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA); however, the underlying mechanisms are unclear. We undertook this study to examine the mechanism by which synovial fluid pH is regulated and to explore the possibility of a therapeutic strategy by manipulating this mechanism. We determined the pH and lactate concentration in synovial fluid from 16 RA patients. Cultured synovial fibroblasts (SFs) from the inflamed joints of 9 RA patients (RASFs) were examined for the expression of ion transporters that regulate intracellular and extracellular pH. The ion transporter up-regulated in RASF lines was then suppressed in RASFs by small interfering RNA (siRNA), and the effect of transfection on viability and proliferation was investigated. Finally, we examined the therapeutic effect of electrotransfer of monocarboxylate transporter 4 (MCT4)-specific siRNA into the articular synovium of mice with collagen-induced arthritis (CIA). Synovial fluid pH correlated inversely with both the Disease Activity Score in 28 joints using the C-reactive protein level and the synovial fluid lactate levels. RASFs exhibited up-regulated transcription of MCT4 messenger RNA. MCT4 exported intracellular lactate into the extracellular space. RASFs had significantly higher MCT4 protein levels than did SFs from patients with osteoarthritis. Knockdown of MCT4 induced intrinsic apoptosis of RASFs, thereby inhibiting their proliferation. Moreover, electrotransfer of MCT4-specific siRNA into the articular synovium of mice with CIA significantly reduced the severity of arthritis. RA activity correlated with decreased synovial fluid pH. This may be due to increased MCT4 expression in RASFs. Silencing MCT4 induced apoptosis in RASFs and reduced the severity of CIA, suggesting that MCT4 is a potential therapeutic target for inflammatory arthritis. © 2015, American College of Rheumatology.

  9. Synovial Hemangioma in the Knee: MRI Findings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harun Arslan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Synovial hemangiomas are rare benign tumors of vascular origin. A 23-year-old boy presented with knee pain and swelling. The boy had developed symptoms 18-months earlier. He was diagnosed with synovial hemangioma based on magnetic resonnance imaging examination and histopathologic findings of the arthroscopic biopsy tissue. We present the magnetic resonance imaging and histopathologic findings of synovial hemangioma of the knee.

  10. Liquid crystals in biotribology synovial joint treatment

    CERN Document Server

    Ermakov, Sergey; Eismont, Oleg; Nikolaev, Vladimir

    2016-01-01

    This book summarizes the theoretical and experimental studies confirming the concept of the liquid-crystalline nature of boundary lubrication in synovial joints. It is shown that cholesteric liquid crystals in the synovial liquid play a significant role in the mechanism of intra-articular friction reduction. The results of structural, rheological and tribological research of the creation of artificial synovial liquids - containing cholesteric liquid crystals in natural synovial liquids - are described. These liquid crystals reproduce the lubrication properties of natural synovia and provide a high chondroprotective efficiency. They were tested in osteoarthritis models and in clinical practice.

  11. An inflamed trichilemmal (pilar cyst: Not so simple?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Maria Abreu Velez

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Context : Trichilemmal (pilar cysts are common skin lesions that often present on the scalps of mature men and women. These cysts often become inflamed when the wall of the cyst ruptures, but few reports have addressed the immunologic features of this process. Case Report: A 22-year-old female presented with rapidly growing nodule on her left cheek, with evidence of acute inflammation. Skin tissue for hematoxylin and eosin examination, as well as for immunohistochemical analysis was taken and reviewed. As controls, we utilized two archival, non-inflamed trichilemmal cysts. Hematoxylin and eosin staining demonstrated classic features of an inflamed trichilemmal cyst. No cytologic atypia was noted, and no significant number of mitotic figures was identified. Immunohistochemistry stains revealed that several cell cycle/tumor suppressor/apoptotic markers, antigen presenting cell markers, metalloproteinases and T cell response markers were highly expressed inside and around the disrupted cyst. The control, non-inflamed cysts were negative for the same markers. CD1a was also appreciated within the epidermis, suprajacent to the inflamed cyst. Conclusions : Upregulation and/or downregulation of selected cell cycle regulator and/or tumor suppressor/apoptotic markers, as well as antigen presenting cells and some protein kinases could recruit and activate T lymphocytes and other inflammatory cells to the non-disrupted cyst for unknown reasons. The immune response may be involved in the initial cyst rupture, or induced by an unknown alteration in the cyst. Larger studies are needed to address these questions.

  12. Efficacy of peripheral morphine analgesia in inflamed, non-inflamed and perineural tissue of dental surgery patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Likar, R; Koppert, W; Blatnig, H; Chiari, F; Sittl, R; Stein, C; Schäfer, M

    2001-04-01

    In a clinical model of dental pain, the analgesic efficacy of local morphine treatment was examined under three different conditions. Patients undergoing dental surgery were randomly assigned to an injection of local anesthetic (articaine) plus 1 mg morphine either into inflamed (n = 14; trial 1) or non-inflamed (n = 24; trial 2) submucous tissue or perineurally n = 19; trial 3). Patients in the control group for each condition (n = 13, trial 1; n = 26, trial 2; n = 16, trial 3) received articaine plus saline. Postoperative pain intensity was assessed by the visual analog scale (VAS) and numeric rating scale (NRS) at 0, 2, 4, 6, 8, 10, 12, 16, 20, and 24 h. In addition, patients recorded the occurrence of side effects and the supplemental consumption of diclofenac. Immediately after the operation, pain scores were reduced to a similar extent in all groups, most likely due to the local anesthetic effect. Thereafter, pain scores and supplemental consumption of diclofenac were significantly lower in patients receiving 1 mg morphine into inflamed submucous tissue than in the control group for up to 24 h. Patients receiving 1 mg morphine into non-inflamed tissue or perineurally did not show any further reduction in pain scores compared to each control group. Our results show in patients undergoing dental surgery that injection of 1 mg of morphine into inflamed tissue results in significant and prolonged postoperative analgesia, whereas administration into non-inflamed tissue or perineurally is not effective. Thus, consistent with experimental studies, the requirement of an inflammatory process for the occurrence of peripheral opioid effects is also found in the clinical setting.

  13. Nitric oxide-driven hypoxia initiates synovial angiogenesis, hyperplasia and inflammatory lesions in mice.

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    Fei Bao

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Rheumatoid arthritis (RA is an inflammatory articular disease with cartilage and bone damage due to hyperplasic synoviocyte invasion and subsequent matrix protease digestion. Although monoclonal antibodies against tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFα have been approved for clinical use in patients with RA, desired therapeutic regimens suitable for non-responders are still unavailable because etiological initiators leading to RA remain enigmatic and unidentified. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Bacteria-induced arthritis (BIA that simulates collagen-induced arthritis (CIA is developed in mice upon daily live bacterial feeding. The morphological lesions of paw erythema and edema together with the histological alterations of synovial hyperplasia and lymphocytic infiltration emerge as the early-phase manifestations of BIA and CIA. Bacteria- or collagen-mediated global upregulation of pro-inflammatory cytokines is accompanied by the burst of nitric oxide (NO. Elevation of the serum NO level is correlated with decline of the blood oxygen saturation percentage (SpO2, reflecting a hypoxic consequence during development towards arthritis. NO-driven hypoxia is further evident from a positive relationship between NO and lactic acid (LA, an end product from glycolysis. Upregulation of hypoxia inducible factor 1 alpha (HIF-1α and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF validates hypoxia-induced angiogenesis in the inflamed synovium of modeling mice. Administration of the NO donor compound sodium nitroprusside (SNP causes articular inflammation by inducing synovial hypoxia. Anti-bacteria by the antibiotic cefotaxime and/or the immunosuppressant rapamycin or artesunate that also inhibits nitric oxide synthase (NOS can abrogate NO production, mitigate hypoxia, and considerably ameliorate or even completely abort synovitis, hence highlighting that NO may serve as an initiator of inflammatory arthritis. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Like collagen

  14. Synovial Sarcoma in the Rectovesical Space: A Case Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kil, Min Chul; Cho, Bum Sang; Han, Gi Seok; Park, Kil Sun; Kim, Sung Jin; Cha, Sang Hoon; Lee, Seung Young; Kang, MIn Ho [Dept. of Radiology, Chungbuk National University Hospital, Chunju (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Ok Jun [Dept. of Pathology, Chungbuk National University Hospital, Chunju (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-08-15

    Synovial sarcoma is an uncommon soft tissue malignancy usually arising in the extremities of young adults. Synovial sarcomas at unusual anatomic locations have been reported; however, to the best of our knowledge, there are no reports on primary synovial sarcoma in the rectovesical space. Here, we describe the radiologic findings of primary synovial sarcoma in the rectovesical space and review relevant literature.

  15. The MAGIC syndrome (mouth and genital ulcers with inflamed cartilage).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orme, R L; Nordlund, J J; Barich, L; Brown, T

    1990-07-01

    We describe a 42-year-old man with features of both Behçet's disease and relapsing polychondritis. The term MAGIC syndrome (mouth and genital ulcers with inflamed cartilage) has previously been used to describe similarly affected patients. We discuss the diagnostic criteria and pathogenetic mechanisms.

  16. Blood flow in healed and inflamed periodontal tissues of dogs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hock, J.M.; Kim, S.

    1987-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to determine if increased blood flow associated with gingivitis would decrease following resolution of gingival inflammation in dogs with periodontitis; if increased blood flow in inflamed gingiva was associated with changes in the blood flow of alveolar bone, and if blood flow in gingiva and alveolar bone increased if periodontitis was reactivated by ligating teeth. Regional blood flow was measured in dogs with pre-existing periodontitis, using radioisotope-labelled, plastic microspheres. In the first experiment on 4 adult Beagle dogs, teeth in the left jaws were treated to resolve the periodontitis, while teeth in the right jaws were not treated. Gingival and bone blood flow were measured after 12 wk. Blood flow was significantly (p<0.05) lower in non-inflamed healed gingiva (32.1 +- 2.7 ml/min/100 g) than in inflamed gingiva (46.1 +- 5.3 ml/min/100 g). No differences in the blood flow of the alveolar bone underlying inflamed or non-inflamed gingiva were present. In the second experiment, the right mandibular teeth of 5 dogs were treated to resolve periodontitis while teeth in the other quadrants were ligated for 4, 10 or 12 wk. The duration of ligation did not alter blood flow. Gingival blood flow around ligated maxillary and mandibular teeth was comparable and approximately 54% higher than around non-ligated teeth (p<0.03). The difference in blood flow between gingiva with G.I.>1 and gingiva with G.I.<2 was significant (p<0.04). Blood flow in bone was not altered by changes in the inflammatory status of the overlying gingiva. The findings suggest that changes in blood flow associated with inflammation are reversible and that blood flow alveolar bone is regulated independently of gingival blood flow.

  17. SYNOVIAL GIANT CELL TUMOR OF THE KNEE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdalla, Rene Jorge; Cohen, Moisés; Nóbrega, Jezimar; Forgas, Andrea

    2009-01-01

    Synovial giant cell tumor is a benign neoplasm, rarely reported in the form of malignant metastasis. Synovial giant cell tumor most frequently occurs on the hand, and, most uncommon, on the ankle and knee. In the present study, the authors describe a rare case of synovial giant cell tumor on the knee as well as the treatment approach. Arthroscopy has been shown, in this case, to be the optimal method for treating this kind of lesion, once it allowed a less aggressive approach, while providing good visualization of all compartments of knee joint and full tumor resection.

  18. Gadolinium Contrast Agent is of Limited Value for Magnetic Resonance Imaging Assessment of Synovial Hypertrophy in Hemophiliacs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lundin, B.; Berntorp, E.; Pettersson, H.; Wirestam, R.; Jonsson, K.; Staahlberg, F.; Ljung, R. [Dept. of Radiology, Univ Hospital of Lund, Lund (Sweden)

    2007-07-15

    Purpose: To examine the influence of different doses of gadolinium contrast agent on synovial enhancement, to compare magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings of synovial hypertrophy and radiographic joint changes in hemophiliacs, and to investigate the value of gadolinium in MRI assessment of synovial hypertrophy in hemophiliacs using dynamic MRI and MRI scoring. Material and Methods: Twenty-one hemophiliacs on prophylactic factor treatment without recent bleeds were subjected to radiography and gadolinium contrast-enhanced dynamic and static MRI of the knee using a standard dose of 0.1 mmol/kg b.w. gadoteridol. In 17 of the patients, the MRI procedure was repeated after a triple dose of gadoteridol. Results: MRI findings of synovial hypertrophy were significantly correlated with Pettersson radiographic scores. In 19 of the 21 MRI investigated joints, administration of contrast agent did not alter the result of the evaluation of synovial hypertrophy. Conclusion: The optimal time interval for volume assessment of synovial hypertrophy after injection of gadolinium contrast agent is dose dependent. Hemophiliacs without recent bleeds have minor to abundant synovial hypertrophy in joints with pronounced radiographic changes. Dynamic MRI is not useful for evaluating hemophilic arthropathy, and gadolinium contrast agent is not routinely indicated for MRI scoring of joints in hemophiliacs.

  19. Osteochondroma and secondary synovial osteochondromatosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peh, W.C.G. [Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology, Univ. of Hong Kong (Hong Kong); Shek, T.W.H. [Department of Pathology, Univ. of Hong Kong (Hong Kong); Davies, A.M. [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Royal Orthopaedic Hospital, Birmingham (United Kingdom); Wong, J.W.K.; Chien, E.P. [Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Univ. of Hong Kong (Hong Kong)

    1999-03-01

    Secondary synovial osteochondromatosis (SOC) is a rare disorder caused by a variety of joint disorders. Two unusual cases of secondary SOC are presented. The first patient is a 43-year-old man with extensive SOC developing within a bursa surrounding an osteochondroma of the pubic bone. The second patient is a 23-year-old man who developed florid and progressive SOC of his hip joint following excision of a femoral neck osteochondroma. SOC recurred despite three excisions over a 15-month period. Imaging was useful in pre-operative diagnosis of bursal SOC in the first patient and in detecting multiple recurrences in the second patient. Both cases illustrate prominent SOC developing secondary to osteochondroma. The different hypotheses regarding bursal and secondary SOC are reviewed. (orig.) With 7 figs., 19 refs.

  20. Primary synovial sarcoma of lung

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Devleena

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A synovial sarcoma (SS is a rare form of cancer which usually occurs near the joints of the arm, neck, or leg, but has been documented in most human tissues and organs, including the brain, prostate, and heart. Primary pulmonary SS is an extremely rare tumor. We report a case of primary SS of lung who presented with severe chest pain and a large right lung mass with right-sided pleural effusion in computed tomography (CT scan of thorax. The diagnosis was made on the basis of CT-guided core biopsy and immunohistochemistry. On immunohistochemistry, tumor cell expressed epithelial membrane antigen, bcl 2, Vimentin and smooth muscle actin and were immunonegative for S100 and cytokeratin. So, the final diagnosis was primary SS.

  1. Sensitivities of PCR, MicroTrak, ChlamydiaEIA, IDEIA, and PACE 2 for purified Chlamydia trachomatis elementary bodies in urine, peripheral blood, peripheral blood leukocytes, and synovial fluid.

    OpenAIRE

    Kuipers, J G; Scharmann, K; Wollenhaupt, J; Nettelnbreker, E; Hopf, S.; Zeidler, H

    1995-01-01

    Routine microbiological diagnosis of Chlamydia-induced reactive arthritis is based mainly on the detection of Chlamydia trachomatis with urogenital swabs or in urine. Because chlamydial antigen, rRNA, and DNA are present in low quantities in the inflamed joint, highly sensitive assays are needed to detect C. trachomatis not only at the primary site of infection but also in peripheral blood and peripheral blood leukocytes, which are suspected carriers for dissemination, and in synovial fluid. ...

  2. Synovial chondromatosis of the shoulder: imaging findings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Renato Ticianelli Terazaki

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Synovial chondromatosis is a benign condition characterized by synovial proliferation and metaplasia, with development of cartilaginous or osteocartilaginous nodules within a joint, bursa or tendon sheath. In the shoulder, synovial osteochondromatosis may occur within the glenohumeral joint and its recesses (including the tendon sheath of the biceps long head, and in the subacromial-deltoid bursa. Such condition can be identified either by radiography, ultrasonography or magnetic resonance imaging, showing typical features according to each method. Radiography commonly shows ring-shaped calcified cartilages and periarticular soft tissues swelling with erosion of joint margins. Ultrasonography demonstrates hypoechogenic cartilaginous nodules with progressive increase in echogenicity as they become calcified, with development of posterior acoustic shadow in case of ossification. Besides identifying cartilaginous nodules, magnetic resonance imaging can also demonstrate the degree of synovial proliferation. The present study is aimed at describing the imaging findings of this entity in the shoulder.

  3. Equine articular synovial cysts: 16 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacourt, Mathieu; MacDonald, Melinda; Rossier, Yves; Laverty, Sheila

    2013-01-01

    To report the clinical findings, diagnosis, treatment and outcome of equine patients with articular synovial cysts. Retrospective case series. Horses (n = 16) with articular synovial cysts. Horses diagnosed with articular synovial cysts (1988-2009) at 2 veterinary teaching hospitals were studied. Signalment, history, clinical signs, diagnostic methods and treatment were retrieved and telephone follow-up was obtained. Sixteen horses with articular synovial cysts were identified. Lameness was the reason for referral in most (n = 9) horses. Diagnosis was based on a combination of palpation and imaging studies, including radiography, ultrasonography and/or arthrography. Excision of the cyst was performed in 8 horses. Outcome was available for 4 surgically and 2 conservatively treated horses. Lameness resolved in 3 horses treated surgically and the 4th died for unrelated reasons. The 2 conservatively treated horses performed satisfactorily for the rest of their career. Equine articular synovial cysts are rare and can be associated with lameness. The cysts had a synovial lining in all horses where it was assessed. Surgical excision may be successful in resolving the lameness and allowing selected horses to return to work. © Copyright 2012 by The American College of Veterinary Surgeons.

  4. Sonographic findings of the synovial fluid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Grassi

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The aim of this pictorial essay was to evaluate the sonographic features of synovial fluid in patients with arthritis. Methods: Sixty-nine patients with active synovitis (rheumatoid arthritis, psoriatic arthritis, osteoarthritis, septic arthritis, crystal arthropathies, post-traumatic arthritis were studied. Sonographic evaluation was performed with a AU-5 Harmonic, Esaote Biomedica (Genoa, Italy equipped with a 10-14 MHz broadband linear transducer and a Diasus Dynamic Imaging Ltd.(Livingston, Scotland UK equipped with a 8-16 MHz broadband linear transducer. Results: Six main different sonographic patterns were detected: 1 Anechoic: increased amount of homogeneous anechoic synovial fluid (exudative synovitis. 2 Cloudy: ecogenic structures (proteinaceous material. 3 Mixed: anechoic synovial fluid and proteinaceus material. 4 “Snow-storm” aspect: multiple mildly and heterogeneous echoic spots (9 out of 10 patients with acute gouty synovitis. 5 Dotted: multiple sparkling hyperechoic dots without posterior acoustic shadow (10 out of 12 patient with chondrocalcinosis. 6 Granular: irregular turbid aspect of the synovial fluid. It was present in 3 patient with septic arthritis. Conclusions: The results of this study indicate that high resolution ultrasonography is able to detect different features of synovial fluid. Further studies are needed to assess both sensitivity and specificity of ultrasonography in “in vivo” synovial fluid examination.

  5. Raman spectroscopy of synovial fluid as a tool for diagnosing osteoarthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esmonde-White, Karen A.; Mandair, Gurjit S.; Raaii, Farhang; Jacobson, Jon A.; Miller, Bruce S.; Urquhart, Andrew G.; Roessler, Blake J.; Morris, Michael D.

    2009-05-01

    For many years, viscosity has been the primary method used by researchers in rheumatology to assess the physiochemical properties of synovial fluid in both normal and osteoarthritic patients. However, progress has been limited by the lack of methods that provide multiple layers of information, use small sample volumes, and are rapid. Raman spectroscopy was used to assess the biochemical composition of synovial fluid collected from 40 patients with clinical evidence of knee osteoarthritis (OA) at the time of elective surgical treatment. Severity of knee osteoarthritis was assessed by a radiologist using Kellgren/Lawrence (K/L) scores from knee joint x rays, while light microscopy and Raman spectroscopy were used to examine synovial fluid (SF) aspirates (2 to 10 μL), deposited on fused silica slides. We show that Raman bands used to describe protein secondary structure and content can be used to detect changes in synovial fluid from osteoarthritic patients. Several Raman band intensity ratios increased significantly in spectra collected from synovial fluid in patients with radiological evidence of moderate-to-severe osteoarthritis damage. These ratios can be used to provide a ``yes/no'' damage assessment. These studies provide evidence that Raman spectroscopy would be a suitable candidate in the evaluation of joint damage in knee osteoarthritis patients.

  6. Inflamed psoriatic plaques: Drug toxicity or disease exacerbation?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nidhi Jindal

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We are presenting a case of Methotrexate treated stable plaque psoriasis, in whom inflamed psoriatic plaques of drug toxicity were misdiagnosed as disease exacerbation. Erosive psoriatic plaques were present in the absence of biochemical or hematological derangements. Ulceration of psoriatic plaques in the presence of disturbed hematological profile is well described as a harbinger of methotrexate toxicity, but this kind of erosions in the absence of any systemic involvement is the first report of its kind.

  7. Inflammation and Exercise (INFLAME): study rationale, design, and methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Angela; Mikus, Catherine; Rodarte, Ruben Q.; Distefano, Brandy; Priest, Elisa L.; Sinclair, Erin; Earnest, Conrad P.; Blair, Steven N.; Church, Timothy S.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose The INFLAME study is designed to determine the effect of exercise training on elevated high-sensitivity C-Reactive Protein (CRP) concentrations in initially sedentary women and men. Methods INFLAME will recruit 170 healthy, sedentary women and men with elevated CRP (≥2.0 mg/L) to be randomized to either an exercise group or non-exercise control group. Exercising individuals will participate in four months of supervised aerobic exercise with a total energy expenditure of 16 kcal • kg−1 • week−1 (KKW). Exercise intensity will be 60–80% of maximal oxygen consumption (VO2 max). Outcome The primary outcome will be change in plasma CRP concentration. Secondary outcomes include visceral adiposity, the cytokines IL-6 and TNF-α, and heart rate variability (HRV) in order to examine potential biological mechanisms whereby exercise might affect CRP concentrations. Summary INFLAME will help us understand the effects of moderate to vigorous exercise on CRP concentrations in sedentary individuals. To our knowledge this will be the largest training study specifically designed to examine the effect of exercise on CRP concentrations. This study has the potential to influence therapeutic applications since CRP measurement is becoming an important clinical measurement in Coronary Heart Disease risk assessment. This study will also contribute to the limited body of literature examining the effect of exercise on the variables of visceral adiposity, cytokines, and heart rate variability. PMID:18024231

  8. Human synovial lubricin expresses sialyl Lewis x determinant and has L-selectin ligand activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Chunsheng; Ekwall, Anna-Karin Hultgård; Bylund, Johan; Björkman, Lena; Estrella, Ruby P; Whitelock, John M; Eisler, Thomas; Bokarewa, Maria; Karlsson, Niclas G

    2012-10-19

    Lubricin (or proteoglycan 4 (PRG4)) is an abundant mucin-like glycoprotein in synovial fluid (SF) and a major component responsible for joint lubrication. In this study, it was shown that O-linked core 2 oligosaccharides (Galβ1-3(GlcNAcβ1-6)GalNAcα1-Thr/Ser) on lubricin isolated from rheumatoid arthritis SF contained both sulfate and fucose residues, and SF lubricin was capable of binding to recombinant L-selectin in a glycosylation-dependent manner. Using resting human polymorphonuclear granulocytes (PMN) from peripheral blood, confocal microscopy showed that lubricin coated circulating PMN and that it partly co-localized with L-selectin expressed by these cells. In agreement with this, activation-induced shedding of L-selectin also mediated decreased lubricin binding to PMN. It was also found that PMN recruited to inflamed synovial area and fluid in rheumatoid arthritis patients kept a coat of lubricin. These observations suggest that lubricin is able to bind to PMN via an L-selectin-dependent and -independent manner and may play a role in PMN-mediated inflammation.

  9. Human Synovial Lubricin Expresses Sialyl Lewis x Determinant and Has L-selectin Ligand Activity*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Chunsheng; Ekwall, Anna-Karin Hultgård; Bylund, Johan; Björkman, Lena; Estrella, Ruby P.; Whitelock, John M.; Eisler, Thomas; Bokarewa, Maria; Karlsson, Niclas G.

    2012-01-01

    Lubricin (or proteoglycan 4 (PRG4)) is an abundant mucin-like glycoprotein in synovial fluid (SF) and a major component responsible for joint lubrication. In this study, it was shown that O-linked core 2 oligosaccharides (Galβ1–3(GlcNAcβ1–6)GalNAcα1-Thr/Ser) on lubricin isolated from rheumatoid arthritis SF contained both sulfate and fucose residues, and SF lubricin was capable of binding to recombinant L-selectin in a glycosylation-dependent manner. Using resting human polymorphonuclear granulocytes (PMN) from peripheral blood, confocal microscopy showed that lubricin coated circulating PMN and that it partly co-localized with L-selectin expressed by these cells. In agreement with this, activation-induced shedding of L-selectin also mediated decreased lubricin binding to PMN. It was also found that PMN recruited to inflamed synovial area and fluid in rheumatoid arthritis patients kept a coat of lubricin. These observations suggest that lubricin is able to bind to PMN via an L-selectin-dependent and -independent manner and may play a role in PMN-mediated inflammation. PMID:22930755

  10. Synovial cysts of the lumbar spine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jankowski, Roman; Szymaś, Janusz; Nowak, Stanisław; Zukiel, Ryszard; Sokół, Bartosz; Paprzycki, Włodzmierz

    2012-01-01

    Synovial cysts of the spine occur most frequently in the lumbosacral region. Methods of treatment vary, but in cases of chronic pain or neurological deficits surgical intervention is undertaken. The aim of this paper is to present indications, surgical technique and efficacy of surgical treatment in patients with synovial cyst of the spinal canal. The retrospective analysis included 11 patients, aged from 47 to 72 years, treated at the Department of Neurosurgery and Neurotraumatology, Poznan University of Medical Sciences, between 2004 and 2009. The length of medical history ranged from 2 months to 6 years. Conservative treatment applied before surgery was not effective. Neurological examination revealed unilateral or bilateral sciatica, superficial sensory disturbance or lower limb paresis. Synovial cysts were located mainly at the L4-L5 level (9 cases). Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the spine was performed in all patients and showed the cystic lesion attached to the intervertebral joint. Surgical treatment consisted of a unilateral fenestration using microsurgical techniques in most cases. Back pain relief was observed in 9 cases. In 10 patients, symptoms of sciatica disappeared. Neurological deficits disappeared in 5 patients. Surgical treatment of spinal synovial cysts is safe, effective and ensures a long-lasting effect. Surgical treatment is indicated in patients in whom the clinical symptoms correlate with the presence of synovial cyst in imaging studies and do not resolve after conservative treatment.

  11. Synovial cell production of IL-26 induces bone mineralization in spondyloarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heftdal, Line Dam; Andersen, Thomas; Jæhger, Ditte; Woetmann, Anders; Østgård, René; Kenngott, Elisabeth E; Syrbe, Uta; Sieper, Joachim; Hvid, Malene; Deleuran, Bent; Kragstrup, Tue W

    2017-04-02

    Spondyloarthritis (SpA) is characterized by inflammation and new bone formation and can be treated by inhibition of the proinflammatory cytokines TNF-α and IL-17A. IL-26 is considered a proinflammatory cytokine, predominantly related to Th17 cells. In the present study, we investigate IL-26 expression in SpA patients, and examine the in vitro production of IL-26 by synovial cells and the effects of IL-26 on human osteoblasts. IL-26 was measured by ELISA in plasma and synovial fluid (SF) of 15 SpA patients and in plasma samples from 12 healthy controls. Facet joints from axial SpA patients were stained for IL-26 and analyzed by fluorescence microscopy. Synovial fluid mononuclear cells, C-C motif chemokine receptor 6 memory Th17 cells, and fibroblast-like synoviocytes (FLSs) were isolated, and supernatants were analyzed for IL-26 content by ELISA. FLSs were further stained for IL-26 production and the myofibroblast marker α-smooth-muscle-actin (αSMA) and analyzed by flow cytometry. Human osteoblasts were cultured in the presence of IL-26, and the degree of mineralization was quantified. We found that IL-26 levels in SF were increased compared with plasma (P < 0.0001). Moreover, IL-26 expression was found in facet joints of axial SpA patients within the bone marrow. IL-26 secretion was primarily found in αSMA(+) myofibroblasts. In contrast, Th17 cells did not produce detectable amounts of IL-26. Human osteoblasts treated with IL-26 showed increased mineralization compared with untreated osteoblasts (P = 0.02). In conclusion, IL-26 seems to be produced by myofibroblasts in the inflamed synovium and could be a possible facilitator of bone mineralization in SpA.

  12. Ultrastructural characteristics of the synovial membrane in osteoarthritic temporomandibular joints

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijkgraaf, LC; Liem, RSB; deBont, LGM

    1997-01-01

    Purpose: This study analyzed the ultrastructural characteristics of the synovial membrane in various stages of osteoarthritis (OA) of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ), and developed a classification of this involvement based on these morphologic characteristics. Patients and Methods: Synovial membr

  13. Clinical Pathological Analysis of Synovial Sarcoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To investigate the clinical diagnosis and differential diagnosis of synovial sarcoma (SS).METHODS A total of 41 paraffin-embedded synovial sarcoma samples were examined by H&E staining, immunohistochemistry staining and the reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), in order to provide a scientific bases for diagnosis and differential diagnosis.RESULTS Twelve cases were a biphasic type, 22 cases were a monophasic fibrous type, and 7 cases were a poorly differentiated type. Thirty-six cases were both CK (and/or EMA) and Vim positive. Five cases were only Vim positive. A SYT-SSX fusion gene was detected in 18 cases by RT-PCR.CONCLUSION By observation of the histomorphology, immunohistochemistry markers and detection of a SYT-SSX fusion gene, we can make a clinical pathological diagnosis of synovial sarcoma.

  14. Synovial chondromatosis of the metacarpophalangeal joint of the ring finger

    OpenAIRE

    Ozcelik, Ismail Bulent; Kuvat, Samet Vasfi; Mersa, Berkan; Pilanci, Ozgur

    2010-01-01

    Synovial chondromatosis is an uncommon condition, characterized by multinodular cartilagineous proliferation of the joint synovium. There are only a few case reports of synovial chondromatosis involving the hand in the literature. A case of synovial chondromatosis of the ring finger is reported in this paper.

  15. Synovial chondromatosis of the metacarpophalangeal joint of the ring finger.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozçelik, Ismail Bülent; Kuvat, Samet Vasfi; Mersa, Berkan; Pilancı, Ozgür

    2010-01-01

    Synovial chondromatosis is an uncommon condition, characterized by multinodular cartilagineous proliferation of the joint synovium. There are only a few case reports of synovial chondromatosis involving the hand in the literature. A case of synovial chondromatosis of the ring finger is reported in this paper.

  16. Synovial Lipomatosis of the Glenohumeral Joint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beyth, Shaul; Safran, Ori

    2016-01-01

    Synovial lipomatosis (also known as lipoma arborescens) is a rare and benign lesion affecting synovium-lined cavities. It is characterized by hyperplasia of mature fat tissue in the subsynovial layer. Although the most commonly affected site is the knee joint, rarely additional locations such as tendon sheath and other joints are involved. We present a case of synovial lipomatosis of the glenohumeral joint in a 44-year-old man. The clinical data radiological studies and histopathologic results are described, as well as a review of the current literature.

  17. Chromosome rearrangements in synovial chondromatous lesions.

    OpenAIRE

    Mertens, F.; Jonsson, K.; Willén, H; Rydholm, A.; Kreicbergs, A.; Eriksson, L; Olsson-Sandin, G.; Mitelman, F.; Mandahl, N

    1996-01-01

    Short-term cultures from one synovial chondroma and three cases of synovial chondromatosis, a lesion for which no previous karyotypic information exists, were cytogenetically analysed. Whereas the chondroma displayed the relatively simple karyotype 46,XY,add(12)(q13),der(17)t(12;17)(q13;q21), more complex changes were found in the three cases of chondromatosis: case 1, 47,XY,der(1)inv(1)(p13q25)del (1)(q25q32), t(1;12)(q25;q13), + 5,der(12)add(12)(p11)t(1;12)(p22;q13); case 2, 47,XY,add(10)(q...

  18. Primary Renal Synovial Sarcoma: An Oncologic Surprise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Krishna Moorthy

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Primary renal synovial sarcoma is a rare tumor having a specific chromosomal translocation t(X; 18 (p11.2; q11.2. The clinical features of this tumor and radiologic appearances are quite similar to those of renal cell carcinoma. Confirmatory diagnosis requires fluorescent in situ hybridization or reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction validation for differentiating the tumors from sarcomatoid renal cell carcinoma. We present a case of primary renal synovial sarcoma that was diagnosed in a middle-aged man.

  19. Synovial Lipomatosis of the Glenohumeral Joint

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaul Beyth

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Synovial lipomatosis (also known as lipoma arborescens is a rare and benign lesion affecting synovium-lined cavities. It is characterized by hyperplasia of mature fat tissue in the subsynovial layer. Although the most commonly affected site is the knee joint, rarely additional locations such as tendon sheath and other joints are involved. We present a case of synovial lipomatosis of the glenohumeral joint in a 44-year-old man. The clinical data radiological studies and histopathologic results are described, as well as a review of the current literature.

  20. DIFFERENTIAL HISTOMORPHOMETRIC CHANGES IN NORMAL AND INFLAMED GINGIVAL EPITHELIUM

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    Tanaskovic Stankovic Sanja

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction and aim: In recent decades, many factors such as smoking, unhealthy diet as well as high alcohol intake were marked as risk factors that can lead to increased incidence of malignant alterations, gingivitis, periodontal disease and other oral epithelium pathological changes. Having in mind that in the group of non-malignant and non-dental oral pathology gingivitis and periodontal disease are the most common oral mucosa alterations aim of our research was to investigate histomorphometric characteristics of healthy and altered oral and gingival epithelium. Material and methods: Tissue samples of 24 oral and gingival mucosa specimens were collected. Samples were fixed in 10% buffered paraformaldehyde, routinely processed and embedded in paraffin blocks. From each block sections 5 micrometer thin were made and standard H/E staining as well as immunocytochemical detection of Ki-67 proliferation marker and CD79a lymphocyte marker were performed. Measurements and image analysis was performed with Image Pro Plus software (Media Cybernetics, USA and Axiovision (Ziess, USA. Results: We showed that inflamed gingival epithelium is increasing its thickness in proportion to the severity of adjacent inflammation. Furthermore, mitotic index is rising (up to 132% in the same manner as well as basal lamina length (up to 70% when normal and inflamed gingiva is compared. Architecture of epithelial ridges is changed from straightforward to mesh-like. Conclusion: Assessment of the free gingival epithelium thickness is directly related to the severity of the inflammation process i

  1. Intraspinal synovial cyst: Diagnosis by CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mercader, J.; Gomez Munoz, J.; Cardenal, C.

    1985-07-01

    We report a case of intraspinal synovial cyst with sciatic pain diagnosed by CT, that showed spontaneous resolution and clinical improvement with medical treatment and comment on another two cases of this unusual entity discovered among over 1500 spinal CT explorations.

  2. Thanatochemistry: Study of synovial fluid potassium

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Nilesh Keshav Tumram

    2014-03-28

    Mar 28, 2014 ... sion equations, but these may be useless when dealing with eye trauma, ocular disorders or in muti- lated remains. .... potassium concentration which rises more rapidly in the first .... postmortem interval based on differential behaviour of vitreous ... course of potassium ion activity in cadaveric synovial fluid.

  3. Mimicry of lyme arthritis by synovial hemangioma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hospach, Toni; Langendörfer, M; Kalle, T V; Tewald, F; Wirth, T; Dannecker, G E

    2011-12-01

    To report on the differential diagnosis of lyme arthritis and synovial hemangioma due to similar clinical and radiological signs and symptoms. A 15-year-old boy presented at the age of 9 with recurrent rather painless swelling of the right knee. Altogether four episodes lasting for 1-2 weeks each occurred over a period of 18 months before medical advice was sought. Physical examination revealed only a slightly limited range of motion. Living in an endemic area of borreliosis, he reported a tick bite 6 months prior to onset of his symptoms with erythema migrans and was treated for 10 days with amoxicillin. Serology revealed two positive unspecific bands in IgG immunoblot (p41 and 66) with slight positivity for ELISA. Ultrasound revealed synovial thickening and increased fluid. Despite the weak positive serology a diagnosis of lyme arthritis could not be excluded and intravenous antibiotic treatment with ceftriaxone was started. After two further relapses antiinflammatory therapy including intraarticular steroids were introduced with no long lasting effect. A chronical disease developed with alternate periods of swelling and almost complete remission. Ultrasound as well as MRI demonstrated ongoing signs of synovitis, therefore after further progression, a diagnostic arthroscopy was performed showing an inconspicuous knee joint. A second MRI showed focal suprapatellar enhancement and was followed by open arthrotomy revealing a histopathological proven synovial cavernous juxtaarticular hemangioma. To our knowledge, the differential diagnosis of lyme arthritis and synovial hemangioma has not yet been reported despite obvious clinical similarities. In conclusion, in children and adolescents synovial hemangioma has to be considered in differential diagnosis of recurrent knee swelling. Early diagnosis is important to prevent prolonged suffering from chronic joint swelling with probable joint damages, unnecessary treatment procedures and as well school and sports

  4. GLUT1 Expression in Synovial Sarcomas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gülşah KAYGUSUZ

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: In this study, the role of GLUT1 expression in synovial sarcomas and its association with disease pathogenesis were examined.Materials and Methods: Twenty two cases of synovial sarcoma were included in this study. The clinicopathological features of the cases, such as age, sex, localization of tumor, information of primary or metastatic tumor, histopathological type were recorded. The tissue microarray paraffin block containing tumor tissues was built by using tissue microarrayer. GLUT1 expression was analyzed on tissue sections by immunohistochemistry.Results: A total of 22 cases (mean age 36 years; range 14-54 years were analyzed. All cases except one were primary tumors. The tumors showed monophasic histological type in 13 cases and biphasic type in 9 cases. GLUT1 expression was found in 3 cases with biphasic type (14%. The cytoplasmic and incomplete membranous GLUT1 expression was seen in the tumor cells showing epithelial-glandular differentiation, whereas spindled cells were negative.Conclusion: Although GLUT1 expression is a diagnostic marker for juvenile capillary hemangioma and perineural tumors, both of which included in the group of mesenchymal tumors, it can be seen in a subset of synovial sarcomas. In our series, the observation of GLUT1 expression especially in the epithelial component of biphasic synovial sarcomas suggests that; i GLUT1 may be relatively used by tumoral cells composing epithelial component of the tumor, and ii the spindle cell component of the tumor would have been positive for other glucose transporters. The finding of uncommon GLUT1 expression in synovial sarcomas is indirectly consistent with the reported results of decreased standardized uptake value by Positron emission tomography with 2-[18F]fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose method in the literature.

  5. Influence of myeloperoxidase on colon tumor occurrence in inflamed versus non-inflamed colons of Apc(Min/+) mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Salihi, Mazin; Reichert, Ethan; Fitzpatrick, F A

    2015-12-01

    Control of colorectal cancer needs to be tailored to its etiology. Tumor promotion mechanisms in colitis-associated colon cancer differ somewhat from the mechanisms involved in hereditary and sporadic colorectal cancer. Unlike sporadic or inherited tumors, some experimental models show that colitis-associated colon tumors do not require cyclooxygenase (COX) expression for progression, and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) which prevent sporadic or inherited colon cancer do not prevent colitis-associated colon cancer. We report that myeloperoxidase (MPO), an ancestor of the COX isoenzymes, is a determinant of colitis-associated colon tumors in Apc(Min/+) mice. During experimentally induced colitis, inhibition of MPO by resorcinol dampened colon tumor development. Conversely, in the bowels of Apc(Min/+) mice without colitis, resorcinol administration or 'knockout' of MPO gene coincided with a slight, but discernible increase in colon tumor incidence. Acrolein, a by-product of MPO catalysis, formed a covalent adduct with the phosphatase tensin homolog (PTEN) tumor suppressor and enhanced the activity of the Akt kinase proto-oncogene in vitro and in vivo. Thus, MPO may be an important determinant of diet and inflammation on colon cancer risk via its effect on endogenous exposure to oxidants and acrolein. We propose a hypothetical model to explain an apparent dichotomy between colon tumor occurrence and MPO inhibition in inflamed versus non-inflamed colons.

  6. Inner Synovial Membrane Footprint of the Anterior Elbow Capsule: An Arthroscopic Boundary

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Srinath Kamineni

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. The purpose of this study is to describe the inner synovial membrane (SM of the anterior elbow capsule, both qualitatively and quantitatively. Materials and Methods. Twenty-two cadaveric human elbows were dissected and the distal humerus and SM attachments were digitized using a digitizer. The transepicondylar line (TEL was used as the primary descriptor of various landmarks. The distance between the medial epicondyle and medial SM edge, SM apex overlying the coronoid fossa, the central SM nadir, and the apex of the SM insertion overlying the radial fossa and distance from the lateral epicondyle to lateral SM edge along the TEL were measured and further analyzed. Gender and side-to-side statistical comparisons were calculated. Results. The mean age of the subjects was 80.4 years, with six male and five female cadavers. The SM had a distinctive double arched attachment overlying the radial and coronoid fossae. No gender-based or side-to-side quantitative differences were noted. In 18 out of 22 specimens (81.8%, an infolding extension of the SM was observed overlying the medial aspect of the trochlea. The SM did not coincide with the outer fibrous attachment in any specimen. Conclusion. The humeral footprint of the synovial membrane of the anterior elbow capsule is more complex and not as capacious as commonly understood from the current literature. The synovial membrane nadir between the two anterior fossae may help to explain and hence preempt technical difficulties, a reduction in working arthroscopic volume in inflammatory and posttraumatic pathologies. This knowledge should allow the surgeon to approach this aspect of the anterior elbow compartment space with the confidence that detachment of this synovial attachment, to create working space, does not equate to breaching the capsule. Alternatively, stripping the synovial attachment from the anterior humerus does not constitute an anterior capsular release.

  7. Synovial chondromatosis in a lumbar apophyseal joint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burrafato, V.; Campanacci, D.A.; Capanna, R. [Department of Orthopedic Oncology, Centro Traumatologico Ortopedico, Florence (Italy); Franchi, A. [Institute of Pathology, University of Florence, Florence (Italy)

    1998-07-01

    A 31-year-old woman presented with painful swelling in the right paravertebral region that had been present for 2 years. Radiography and CT revealed an area of increased density due to multiple calcifications localized at the fourth lumbar vertebra. Histological examination revealed that the lesion consisted of nodules of hyaline cartilage, with focal areas of calcification, growing within synovial tissue. (orig.) With 5 figs., 11 refs.

  8. Targeting the epigenetic modifications of synovial cells

    OpenAIRE

    Huber, L. C.; Jüngel, A.; Gay, S

    2009-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a systemic inflammatory disease that mainly affects the synovial tissues of joints. Like in other autoimmune-related disorders, both the etiology as well as the pathogenesis of RA has not yet been completely unravelled. It is generally accepted, though, that autoimmune disorders develop through a combination of the individual genetic susceptibility, environmental factors, and dysregulated immune responses. Genetic predisposition has been described in RA, in par...

  9. Recurrent synovial chondromatosis of the distal interphalangeal joint: case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craft, Randall O; Smith, Anthony A; Duncan, Scott F M

    2009-02-01

    A 59-year-old woman presented with recurrent synovial chondromatosis of the distal interphalangeal joint at the site of removal of what was thought to be a ganglion cyst in 2003 and the subsequent excision of a recurrent synovial chondromatosis in 2005. Although synovial chondromatosis is typically described as a benign, self-limiting process, recurrent disease and local erosion of the joint of this patient required wide excision with bone grafting and arthrodesis for definitive treatment.

  10. A double patella-like condition secondary to synovial osteochondromatosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kajikawa Yoshiteru

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract To our knowledge, this is the first case of synovial osteochondromatosis in a patient presenting with a double patella-like condition. The true duplication of the patella, which is called double patella, is extremely rare. In our case, the operative and histopathological findings showed that the double patella-like condition was secondarily induced by synovial osteochondromatosis. Synovial osteochondromatosis should be considered as a differential diagnosis for congenital double patella.

  11. A double patella-like condition secondary to synovial osteochondromatosis

    OpenAIRE

    Kajikawa Yoshiteru; Arai Yuji; Takamiya Hisatake; Higuchi Tetsuo; Mori Gen; Morisaki Shinsuke; Kubo Toshikazu

    2012-01-01

    Abstract To our knowledge, this is the first case of synovial osteochondromatosis in a patient presenting with a double patella-like condition. The true duplication of the patella, which is called double patella, is extremely rare. In our case, the operative and histopathological findings showed that the double patella-like condition was secondarily induced by synovial osteochondromatosis. Synovial osteochondromatosis should be considered as a differential diagnosis for congenital double pate...

  12. Synovial membrane involvement in osteoarthritic temporomandibular joints - A light microscopic study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijkgraaf, LC; Liem, RSB; deBont, LGM

    1997-01-01

    Objective. To study the light microscopic characteristics of the synovial membrane of osteoarthritic temporomandibular joints to evaluate synovial membrane involvement in the osteoarthritic process. Study design. Synovial membrane biopsies were obtained during unilateral arthroscopy in 40 patients.

  13. Atlantoaxial joint synovial cyst: diagnosis and percutaneous treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velán, Osvaldo; Rabadán, Alejandra; Paganini, Lisandro; Langhi, Luciano

    2008-01-01

    Synovial cysts at the atlantoaxial level are found uncommonly. Lumbar symptomatic cases are treated by percutaneous cyst aspiration with or without corticoid injection or by surgical resection, but synovial cysts at the C1-C2 level are usually treated by surgery. We report here a 92-year-old woman with a retro-odontoid synovial cyst producing spinal cord compression that was treated by percutaneous aspiration of the cyst under CT guidance. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of an atlantoaxial synovial cyst successfully treated with a minimally invasive procedure.

  14. Liposomal targeting of prednisolone phosphate to synovial lining macrophages during experimental arthritis inhibits M1 activation but does not favor M2 differentiation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wouter Hofkens

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: To determine the effects of liposomal targeting of prednisolone phosphate (Lip-PLP to synovial lining macrophages on M1 and M2 polarization in vitro and during experimental arthritis. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Experimental arthritis (antigen and immune complex induced was elicited in mice and prednisolone containing liposomes were given systemically. Synovium was investigated using microarray analysis, RT-PCR and histology. Bone-marrow macrophages were stimulated towards M1 using LPS and IFNγ before treatment by PLP-liposomes. M1 and M2 markers were determined using RT-PCR. RESULTS: Microarray analysis of biopsies of inflamed synovium during antigen induced arthritis (AIA showed an increased M1 signature characterized by upregulation of IL-1β, IL-6 and FcγRI starting from day 1 and lasting up until day 7 after arthritis induction. The M2 signature remained low throughout the 7 day course of arthritis. Treatment of AIA with intravenously delivered Lip-PLP strongly suppressed joint swelling and synovial infiltration whereas colloidal gold containing liposomes exclusively targeted the macrophages within the inflamed synovial intima layer. In vitro studies showed that Lip-PLP phagocytosed by M1 macrophages resulted in a suppression of the M1 phenotype and induction of M2 markers (IL-10, TGF-β, IL-1RII, CD163, CD206 and Ym1. In vivo, Lip-PLP treatment strongly suppressed M1 markers (TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6, IL-12p40, iNOS, FcγRI, Ciita and CD86 after local M1 activation of lining macrophages with LPS and IFN-γ and during experimental AIA and immune complex arthritis (ICA. In contrast, M2 markers were not significantly upregulated in antigen-induced arthritis and down regulated in immune complex arthritis. CONCLUSION: This study clearly shows that systemic treatment with PLP-liposomes selectively targets synovial lining macrophages and inhibits M1 activation. In contrast to in vitro findings, PLP-liposomes do not cause a shift of synovial

  15. Liposomal Targeting of Prednisolone Phosphate to Synovial Lining Macrophages during Experimental Arthritis Inhibits M1 Activation but Does Not Favor M2 Differentiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofkens, Wouter; Schelbergen, Rik; Storm, Gert; van den Berg, Wim B.; van Lent, Peter L.

    2013-01-01

    Background To determine the effects of liposomal targeting of prednisolone phosphate (Lip-PLP) to synovial lining macrophages on M1 and M2 polarization in vitro and during experimental arthritis. Material and Methods Experimental arthritis (antigen and immune complex induced) was elicited in mice and prednisolone containing liposomes were given systemically. Synovium was investigated using microarray analysis, RT-PCR and histology. Bone–marrow macrophages were stimulated towards M1 using LPS and IFNγ before treatment by PLP-liposomes. M1 and M2 markers were determined using RT-PCR. Results Microarray analysis of biopsies of inflamed synovium during antigen induced arthritis (AIA) showed an increased M1 signature characterized by upregulation of IL-1β, IL-6 and FcγRI starting from day 1 and lasting up until day 7 after arthritis induction. The M2 signature remained low throughout the 7 day course of arthritis. Treatment of AIA with intravenously delivered Lip-PLP strongly suppressed joint swelling and synovial infiltration whereas colloidal gold containing liposomes exclusively targeted the macrophages within the inflamed synovial intima layer. In vitro studies showed that Lip-PLP phagocytosed by M1 macrophages resulted in a suppression of the M1 phenotype and induction of M2 markers (IL-10, TGF-β, IL-1RII, CD163, CD206 and Ym1). In vivo, Lip-PLP treatment strongly suppressed M1 markers (TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6, IL-12p40, iNOS, FcγRI, Ciita and CD86) after local M1 activation of lining macrophages with LPS and IFN-γ and during experimental AIA and immune complex arthritis (ICA). In contrast, M2 markers were not significantly upregulated in antigen-induced arthritis and down regulated in immune complex arthritis. Conclusion This study clearly shows that systemic treatment with PLP-liposomes selectively targets synovial lining macrophages and inhibits M1 activation. In contrast to in vitro findings, PLP-liposomes do not cause a shift of synovial lining

  16. Adjuvant alternative treatment with chemical peeling and subsequent iontophoresis for postinflammatory hyperpigmentation, erosion with inflamed red papules and non-inflamed atrophic scars in acne vulgaris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurokawa, Ichiro; Oiso, Naoki; Kawada, Akira

    2017-04-01

    The standard management of acne vulgaris in Japan includes a combination of topical treatment with benzoyl peroxide (BPO) and BPO/clindamycin (CLDM), topical adapalene and systemic antimicrobials. However, the treatment of therapy-resistant complications such as postinflammatory hyperpigmentation (PIH), erosions with inflamed red papules and atrophic scars has not been established. We performed chemical peeling with glycolic acid and iontophoresis with ascorbyl 2-phosphate 6-palmitate and DL-α-tocopherol phosphate for the treatment of PIH, erosions with inflamed red papules and non-inflamed atrophic scars in 31 patients with acne vulgaris (mild to severe severity), and evaluated the efficacy and safety of these interventions. In most of cases, there was remarkable improvement in PIH and erosions with inflamed red papules after treatment. There was also some improvement in non-inflamed atrophic scars without erythema. Mild redness and irritation was observed in four cases as adverse reactions. Early initial treatment of PIH and erosions with red papules by chemical peeling and iontophoresis is an effective and safe method to prevent the formation of atrophic scars in patients with acne vulgaris. © 2016 Japanese Dermatological Association.

  17. MR findings of synovial disease in children and young adults: Part 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Hee K.; Zbojniewicz, Andrew M.; Merrow, Arnold C.; Emery, Kathleen H. [Cincinnati Children' s Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Cincinnati, OH (United States); Cheon, Jung-Eun; Kim, In-One [Seoul National University Children' s Hospital, Department of Radiology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-04-15

    Synovium is the thin membranous lining of a joint. It produces synovial fluid, which lubricates and nourishes the cartilage and bone in the joint capsule. Synovial diseases in children can be classified as normal structures as potential sources of pathology (synovial folds: plicae, infrapatellar fat pad clefts), noninfectious synovial proliferation (juvenile idiopathic arthritis, hemophilic arthropathy, lipoma arborescens, synovial osteochondromatosis, pigmented villonodular synovitis, reactive synovitis), infectious synovial proliferation (pyogenic arthritis, tuberculous arthritis), deposition disease (gouty arthropathy), vascular malformation, malignancy (metastasis) and intra-/periarticular cysts and cyst-like structures. Other intra-articular neoplasms, such as intra-articular synovial sarcoma, can mimic synovial disease in children. (orig.)

  18. MR findings of synovial disease in children and young adults: Part 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Hee Kyung; Zbojniewicz, Andrew M.; Merrow, Arnold C.; Emery, Kathleen H. [Cincinnati Children' s Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Cincinnati, OH (United States); Cheon, Jung-Eun; Kim, In-One [Seoul National University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-04-15

    Synovial diseases in children can be classified into normal structures as potential sources of pathology (synovial folds: plicae, infrapatellar fat pad clefts); noninfectious synovial proliferation (juvenile idiopathic arthritis, hemophilic arthropathy, lipoma arborescens, synovial osteochondromatosis, pigmented villonodular synovitis, reactive synovitis), and infectious synovial proliferation, deposition disease, vascular malformations, malignancy (including metastasis) and intra-articular/periarticular cysts and cyst-like structures (ganglia). Familiarity with characteristic MR imaging findings of synovial diseases in children and young adults will enable a more confident diagnosis for earlier intervention and directed therapy. The first part of this paper will cover potential pathology of normal synovial structures as well as noninfectious synovial proliferation. (orig.)

  19. Modulation of adult-born neurons in the inflamed hippocampus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karim eBelarbi

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Throughout life new neurons are continuously added to the hippocampal circuitry involved with spatial learning and memory. These new cells originate from neural precursors in the subgranular zone of the dentate gyrus, migrate into the granule cell layer and integrate into neural networks encoding spatial and contextual information. This process can be influenced by several environmental and endogenous factors and is modified in different animal models of neurological disorders. Neuroinflammation, as defined by the presence of activated microglia, is a common key factor to the progression of neurological disorders. Analysis of the literature shows that microglial activation impacts not only the production, but also the migration and the recruitment of new neurons. The impact of microglia on adult-born neurons appears much more multifaceted than ever envisioned before, combining both supportive and detrimental effects that are dependent upon the activation phenotype and the factors being released. The development of strategies aimed to change microglia toward states that promote functional neurogenesis could therefore offer novel therapeutic opportunities against neurological disorders associated with cognitive deficits and neuroinflammation. The present review summarizes the current knowledge on how production, distribution and recruitment of new neurons into behaviorally relevant neural networks are modified in the inflamed hippocampus.

  20. Osteoarthritic synovial fluid rheology and correlations with protein concentration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madkhali, Anwar; Chernos, Michael; Grecov, Dana; Kwok, Ezra

    2016-11-09

    Osteoarthritis is a common, localized joint disease that causes pain, stiffness and reduced mobility. Osteoarthritis is particularly common in the knees. The effects of osteoarthritis on the rheology of synovial fluid in the knees are not fully understood and consequently require further study. The purpose of this study is to investigate the effects of protein content on synovial fluid shear rheology. A secondary study outcome will include study of the temperature dependence of synovial fluid behaviour. 38 osteoarthritic synovial fluid samples were studied under shear flow. Shear properties were correlated with protein concentration. Viscosupplement was used as a comparison and to verify measurement reliability. The effects of temperature were investigated at 20, 29 and 37°C. Shear rheological properties were found to vary widely between samples, however all samples demonstrated clear non-Newtonian shear thinning behaviour. In general viscoelastic properties were lower in osteoarthritic samples than previously studied healthy synovial fluid. A moderate correlation was observed between synovial fluid dynamic moduli at a frequency of 2.5 Hz and protein concentration. Temperature was found to affect the rheology of osteoarthritic synovial fluid and was fitted with the Arrhenius model. Increased protein concentration has been correlated with decreased shear rheological parameters. Temperature dependence of synovial fluid was also demonstrated and modelled for use in Part 2 of this article.

  1. Synovial sarcoma presenting as iliotibial band friction syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mesiha, Mena; Bauer, Thomas; Andrish, Jack

    2009-10-01

    Iliotibial band friction syndrome is a common entity that is often quickly diagnosed in orthopedic clinics. However, synovial sarcoma is an elusive clinical entity that appears around many joints with variable presentations. This case report is an example of a patient with a classic presentation of iliotibial band friction syndrome that was diagnosed as a synovial sarcoma on further investigation.

  2. [Synovial sarcoma of the infratemporal fossa].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamarit Conejeros, José Manuel; Estrems Navas, Paloma; Estellés Ferriol, Enrique; Dalmau Galofre, José

    2010-01-01

    Synovial sarcoma is the fourth most common type of sarcoma. It is usually found in the knee or ankle joints, and is exceptional in the head and neck. Most cases are diagnosed in men between 20 and 40 years of age. Diagnosis is often casual due to the infrequent nature of this tumour and its non-specific clinical and radiological characteristics. Confirmation is therefore based on immunohistochemistry and electron microscopy techniques. We report a case of biphasic sinovial sarcoma located in the infratemporal fossa treated at our hospital and we make a review of the literature. Copyright © 2009 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  3. Epstein-Barr virus infection in chronically inflamed periapical granulomas.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kosuke Makino

    Full Text Available Periapical granulomas are lesions around the apex of a tooth caused by a polymicrobial infection. Treatment with antibacterial agents is normally performed to eliminate bacteria from root canals; however, loss of the supporting alveolar bone is typically observed, and tooth extraction is often selected if root canal treatment does not work well. Therefore, bacteria and other microorganisms could be involved in this disease. To understand the pathogenesis of periapical granulomas more precisely, we focused on the association with Epstein-Barr virus (EBV using surgically removed periapical granulomas (n = 32. EBV DNA was detected in 25 of 32 periapical granulomas (78.1% by real-time PCR, and the median number of EBV DNA copies was approximately 8,688.01/μg total DNA. In contrast, EBV DNA was not detected in healthy gingival tissues (n = 10; the difference was statistically significant according to the Mann-Whitney U test (p = 0.0001. Paraffin sections were also analyzed by in situ hybridization to detect EBV-encoded small RNA (EBER-expressing cells. EBER was detected in the cytoplasm and nuclei of B cells and plasma cells in six of nine periapical granulomas, but not in healthy gingival tissues. In addition, immunohistochemical analysis for latent membrane protein 1 (LMP-1 of EBV using serial tissue sections showed that LMP-1-expressing cells were localized to the same areas as EBER-expressing cells. These data suggest that B cells and plasma cells in inflamed granulomas are a major source of EBV infection, and that EBV could play a pivotal role in controlling immune cell responses in periapical granulomas.

  4. Primary Synovial Sarcoma of the Kidney

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takashi Kawahara

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available The case was a 40-year-old female. She visited a local doctor with a chief complaint of right side abdominal pain. A right kidney tumor measuring 10 cm in diameter was observed in an abdominal Computed Tomography (CT scan. Based on the CT image, the possibility of angiomiolipoma (AML could not be ruled out, but a high maximum standardized uptake value (SUVmax of 7.8 was observed in a Positron Emission Tomography CT (PET-CT scan and there was a possibility of malignancy. We therefore performed a transperitoneal right radial nephrectomy. Although adhesion of the tumor to the duodenum and the inferior vena cava was observed, it was possible to perform an excision. The tumor accounted for a large proportion of the excised kidney; the surrounding areas had taken on a cyst-like structure, and the interior comprised grayish brittle tissue exhibiting solid growth. Histologically, gland-like and cyst-like structures composed of cylindrical cuboidal cells and mainly characterized by the solid growth of short fusiform-shaped and oval-shaped basophilic cells were observed, and we believed it was a synovial sarcoma. There were no malignant findings in the adrenal gland. There have been approximately 30 reported cases around the world of synovial sarcoma that developed in the kidney, and we herein report this case with bibliographic considerations.

  5. Versican Expression during Synovial Joint Morphogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John B. Shepard, Heidi A. Krug, Brooklynn A. LaFoon, Stanley Hoffman, Anthony A. Capehart

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The extracellular matrix (ECM plays a critical role in governing cell behavior and phenotype during limb skeletogenesis. Chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans (Cspgs are highly expressed in the ECM of precartilage mesenchymal condensations and are important to limb chondrogenesis and cartilage structure, but little is known regarding their involvement in formation of synovial joints in the embryonic limb. Matrix versican Cspg expression has previously been reported in the epiphysis of developing long bones and presumptive joint; however, detailed analysis has not yet been conducted. In the present study we immunolocalized versican and aggrecan Cspgs during chick elbow joint morphogenesis between HH st25-41 of development. In this study we show that versican and aggrecan expression initially overlapped in the incipient cartilage model of long bones in the wing, but versican was also highly expressed in the perichondrium and presumptive joint interzone during early stages of morphogenesis (HH st25-34. By HH st36-41 versican localization was restricted to the future articular surfaces of the developing joint and surrounding joint capsule while aggrecan localized in an immediately adjacent and predominately non-overlapping region of chondrogenic cells at the epiphyses. These results suggest a potential role for versican proteoglycan in development and maintenance of the synovial joint interzone.

  6. [Synovialitis of the arthrofibrotic type: criteria of a new synovialitis type for the diagnosis of arthrofibrosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krenn, V; Ruppert, M; Knöß, P; Kendoff, D; Poremba, C; Thomsen, M; Skutek, M; Hassenpflug, J; Ascherl, R; Krukemeyer, M G; Matziolis, G; Thomas, P; Gehrke, T

    2013-04-01

    After rheumatologic conservative medical therapy has been exhausted in degenerative and inflammatory joint diseases, arthroplastic operations are an important option to restore quality of life. Endoprosthesis-associated arthrofibrosis is a severe fibrosing disease of the synovial membrane after endoprosthetic operations. Neither the morphological substrate nor histopathological criteria have been described. The aim was to describe the histopathological substrate of arthrofibrosis and to define histological and immunohistochemical criteria of arthrofibrosis on the basis of tissue samples derived from revision. In histopathological analyses arthrofibrosis revealed a synovialitis with varying fibrosis, without detectable ossification and without minimal wear particle reaction (so-called synovialitis of arthrofibrotic type, SAT). A 3-stage grading was determined based on the cellular density of the fibrous tissue (fibroblast cellularity). In 191 cases with SAT, grade 1 was found in 24.1 % (n = 46), grade 2 was found in 51.8 % (n = 99) and grade 3 was found in 24.1 % (n = 46). The control group consisted of 29 cases with synovialitis of indifferent type (type IV membrane). If SAT grades 2 and 3 are summed together, i.e. the distance between the fibroblasts was less than two cell lengths, the difference of the fibroblast cellularity compared with the type IV membrane was significant (p arthrofibrosis could be made with a sensitivity 0.7592 and specificity 0.8276. The SM-alpha-actin cytoplasmic positivity of fibroblasts indicates a myofibroblast phenotype and the β-catenin positivity suggests a resemblance to fibromatosis or a keloid-like process. In the quantitative evaluation of the β-catenin positive fibroblasts, there was a significant difference (p < 0.001) between type IV membrane and SAT. A threshold value of 20 beta-catenin positive cells per microscopic high power field (HPF) was determined, which represents in conjunction with the clinical

  7. MicroRNA221-3p modulates Ets-1 expression in synovial fibroblasts from patients with osteoarthritis of temporomandibular joint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, J; Liu, Y; Deng, M; Li, J; Cai, H; Meng, Q; Fang, W; Long, X; Ke, J

    2016-11-01

    This study aimed to screen differential expression of microRNAs (miRNAs), and investigate function of the specifically selected miRNA in synovial fibroblasts from patients suffering osteoarthritis of temporomandibular joint (TMJOA). MiRNA microarray was used to select differentially expressed miRNAs between TMJOA and normal synovial fibroblasts. The expression of screened miRNA221-3p was quantified using real-time PCR, and its specific target gene was predicted by bioinformatics. After transfection of miRNA221-3p mimics or inhibitor into synovial fibroblasts, the expression of v-Ets avian erythroblastosis virus E26 oncogene homolog 1 (Ets-1) was detected by immunohistochemistry, real-time PCR and Western blot, respectively. Dual luciferase activity was performed to identify the direct regulation of miRNA221-3p on Ets-1. Interlukin-1β (IL-1β) mimics an inflammatory situation. In TMJOA synovial fibroblasts, eight miRNAs were up-regulated and six miRNAs were down-regulated. MiRNA221-3p was the most down-expressed. A sequence in the 3'-untranslated (3'-UTR) of Ets-1 complementary to the seed sequence of miRNA221-3p. Elevated expression of Ets-1 associated with attenuation of miRNA221-3p. Over-expression of miRNA221-3p suppressed the activity of a reporter construct containing the 3'-UTR of Ets-1 transcript and inhibited the expression of Ets-1 as well as its downstream molecules, matrix metalloproteinase 1 (MMP1) and MMP9 in TMJOA synovial fibroblasts. IL-1β suppressed the expression of miRNA221-3p in both a dose-dependent and time-dependent manner. The reduction of miRNA221-3p in synovial fibroblasts, attributed from abundance of IL-1β in inflamed circumstance, induces Ets-1 up-regulation and then, initiates MMP1 and MMP9 secretion, thereby leading to continuously pathological development in TMJOA. Copyright © 2016 Osteoarthritis Research Society International. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. CXCR4 is dispensable for T cell egress from chronically inflamed skin via the afferent lymph.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Skye A Geherin

    Full Text Available T cell recirculation through extralymphoid tissues is essential to immune surveillance, host defense and inflammation. In this process, T cells enter the tissue from the blood and subsequently leave via the afferent lymph. In the absence of inflammation, T cells require CCR7 expression to egress from the skin or lung, which is consistent with the constitutive expression of the CCR7 ligand CCL21 on lymphatic endothelium. However, during chronic inflammation alternative chemoattractants come into play, allowing Ccr7-deficient (Ccr7-/- T cells to egress efficiently from affected skin. As T cell egress from inflamed sites is a potential control point of the inflammatory response, we aimed to determine alternative T cell exit receptors using a mouse and a sheep model. We show that CCR7+ and CCR7- T cells exiting from the chronically inflamed skin were highly responsive to the CXCR4 ligand CXCL12, which was induced in the lymphatics in the inflamed site. Based on these findings, we hypothesized that CXCR4 mediates T cell egress from inflamed skin. However, pharmacological inhibition of CXCR4 did not affect the tissue egress of wildtype or Ccr7-/- CD4 and CD8 T cells after adoptive transfer into chronically inflamed skin. Similarly, adoptively transferred Cxcr4-/- Ccr7-/- and Ccr7-/- T cells egressed from the inflamed skin equally well. Based on these data, we conclude that, while CXCR4 might play an essential role for other cell types that enter the afferent lymphatics, it is dispensable for T cell egress from the chronically inflamed skin.

  9. Primary mediastinal giant synovial sarcoma: A rare case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaetano Rea

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Synovial sarcoma has been defined by the World Health Organization (WHO in 2002 as a type of mesenchymal tissue cell tumor that exhibits epithelial differentiation and represents the third most common soft-tissue sarcoma in adults, accounting for approximately 10% of soft-tissue sarcomas. To date, only few reports have focused on mediastinal synovial sarcoma imaging findings. Herein, we report a case of a 13 cm primary mediastinal giant synovial sarcoma, diagnosed in a 56-year-old patient admitted in our Department of Radiology with a six-month history of dyspnea and back pain.

  10. Extra-articular Synovial Chondromatosis Eroding and Penetrating the Acromion

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Rassi, George; Matta, Jihad; Hijjawi, Ayman; Khair, Ousama Abou; Fahs, Sara

    2015-01-01

    Synovial chondromatosis of the shoulder is an uncommon disorder. It usually affects the glenohumeral joint and is characterized by metaplasia of the synovium leading to the formation of osteochondral loose bodies. Few cases of extra-articular subacromial synovial chondromatosis involving the rotator cuff tendon have been reported in the literature. The treatment of previously reported cases consisted of open bursectomy and removal of loose bodies. We report a case of subacromial synovial chondromatosis without rotator cuff involvement but with severe erosion and fracture of the acromion. Treatment consisted of shoulder arthroscopy to remove all loose bodies, total bursectomy, and debridement of the acromion. Potential benefits of arthroscopy were also evaluated. PMID:26697302

  11. Synovial chondromatosis of the acromioclavicular joint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kudawara, Ikuo; Aono, Masanari; Ohzono, Kenji [Osaka National Hospital, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Osaka (Japan); Mano, Masayuki [Osaka National Hospital, Department of Pathology, Osaka (Japan)

    2004-10-01

    A 53-year-old woman presented with swelling of 3 years' duration on the right anterior chest wall. A radiograph showed coarse calcifications around the subclavicular region and erosion of the ipsilateral acromioclavicular joint. Computed tomography also showed calcifications in soft tissue. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed a tumor around the clavicle extending to the anterior aspect of chest wall, which had low signal intensity on T1-weighted imaging and high signal intensity on T2-weighted imaging. The histologic findings were of a hyaline cartilage-like mass consisting of mature chondrocytes and an extracellular matrix. The histologic diagnosis of synovial chondromatosis was made. The present case is unusual in respect of the location and size of the tumor. (orig.)

  12. Taste of milk from inflamed breasts of breastfeeding mothers with mastitis evaluated using a taste sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Michiko; Shinohara, Hitomi; Sugiyama, Toshihiro; Kumagai, Masanori; Muto, Hajime; Kodama, Hideya

    2014-03-01

    The refusal of infants to suckle from a breast that is inflamed with mastitis suggests that the taste of the milk has changed. However, the taste of milk from a breast with mastitis has never been empirically determined. The present study compares the taste of milk from breastfeeding mothers with or without mastitis and identifies specific changes in the taste of milk from mothers with mastitis. The intensity of four basic tastes (sourness, saltiness, bitterness, and umami) of breastmilk from 24 healthy mothers at 3-5 days and at 2-3, 4-5, and 8-10 weeks postpartum and from 14 mothers with mastitis was determined objectively using a taste sensor. The intensity of each basic taste and the concentrations of main taste substances in milk were compared between the inflamed breasts and the normal breasts of control mothers or the contralateral asymptomatic breast of mothers with unilateral mastitis. The transition from colostrum to mature milk was accompanied by changes in the taste of the milk, such as decreased saltiness and umami and increased bitterness and sourness. Umami and saltiness increased in milk from inflamed breasts. Contents of sodium, glutamate, and guanosine monophosphate increased in milk from inflamed breasts. Tastes that were specifically associated with inflamed breasts appeared to include an increase in umami and saltiness, which might have resulted from an increased content in factors associated with umami and sodium.

  13. Interleukin 1-beta analysis in chronically inflamed and healthy human dental pulp

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Šubarić Ljiljana

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. Proinflammatory cytokines can act like endogenous pyrogen interleukin 1 (IL-1, interleukin 6 (IL-6 and tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNF α which regulate the synthesis of secondary mediators and other proinflammatory cytokines through macrophages and mesenchymal cells. They stimulate acute-phase proteins and attract inflammatory cells. The aim of this study was to determine interleukin 1-β (IL-1 β concentrations in chronically inflamed and healthy dental pulps. Methods. A total of 41 pulps (19 from patients with pulpitis chronic causa and 22 from patients with pulpatis chronic aperta, divided into two groups, were obtained from teeth with chronic pulp inflammation. The control group consisted of 12 teeth with healthy pulp. After extirpation, pulp samples were immediately placed in sterile Eppendorf tubes and frozen. After that, homogenisation was performed by a Teflon® pestle in ice-cold phosphate buffer solution at pH 7.4 whose volume was adjusted according to the weight of tissue. The supernatant was then frozen at -70°C until the performance of appropriate biochemical analyses. Cytokine IL-1 β value was determined by a commercial enzyme- linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA test. We applied the high sensitivity system technique, which may register low levels of cytokines, ranging from 0.125 to 8.0 pg/mL for IL-1 β. Results. By comparing the mean value of IL-1β, in the pulps we can see a statistically significant difference (p < 0.01 among them. The highest value of IL-1 β was in the subjects with pulpitis chronica clausa and it was 6.21 ± 2.70 pg/mL. Conclusion. Proinflammatory cytokine IL-1 β is present in detectable quantities in the pulp tissue of all vital pulps. Its highest concentrations were found in the sample group with pulpitis chronica clausa.

  14. Minimally invasive CT guided treatment of intraspinal synovial cyst

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sergeja Kozar; Miran Jeromel

    2014-01-01

    .... Percutaneous CT guided lumbar synovial cyst treatment is safe and reliable alternative to the surgical treatment in polymorbid patients with radiculopathy who are not able to tolerate general anesthesia and operation.

  15. Giant primary synovial sarcoma of the anterior mediastinum: A case ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2015-06-11

    Jun 11, 2015 ... Primary synovial sarcoma is a very rare tumor of the mediastinum, which is unreported in the entire ... and cytogenetics are required to therapeutic management ... off the left upper lung zone and resected from the anterior.

  16. Tribological and electrochemical studies on biomimetic synovial fluids

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    In this study, tribological and electrochemical performances of the new biomimetic synovial fluids were studied according to different composition concentrations, including hyaluronic acid, albumin and alendronic acid sodium. By using Taguchi method, the composition contents of the biomimetic synovial fluids were designed. Items such as friction coefficient, mean scar diameter and viscosity were investigated via a four-ball tribo-tester, viscosity meter and optical microscope. Polarization studies were carried out to analyze the electrochemical behaviour of the fluids. Results showed that hyaluronic acid dominates the viscosity of the fluids. High albumin concentration will reduce friction, while increasing wear rate due to the electro-chemical effect. Alendronic acid sodium is found to reduce the biocorrosion of CoCrMo as well as provide better lubricating. In conclusion, biomimetic synovial fluids partially recover the functions of natural synovial fluids and provide good lubricating property.

  17. Lyme arthritis. Spirochetes found in synovial microangiopathic lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, Y. E.; Duray, P. H.; Steere, A. C.; Kashgarian, M.; Buza, J.; Malawista, S. E.; Askenase, P. W.

    1985-01-01

    In 17 patients with Lyme disease, synovial specimens, obtained by synovectomy or needle biopsy, showed nonspecific villous hypertrophy, synovial cell hyperplasia, prominent microvasculature, lymphoplasmacellular infiltration, and sometimes lymphoid follicles. The larger surgically obtained specimens also showed striking deposition of fibrin in synovial stroma and a form of endarteritis obliterans. In 2 patients, spirochetes were seen in and around blood vessels by the Dieterle silver stain. Compared with 55 cases of other synovial disease, obliterative microvascular lesions were seen only in Lyme synovia, but marked stromal deposition of fibrin seemed nonspecific. These findings imply that the Lyme spirochete may survive for years in affected synovium and may be directly responsible for the microvascular injury. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 PMID:3966535

  18. Cervical synovial cyst: case report and review of literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menghetti, Claudia; Cardia, Andrea; Fornari, Maurizio; Ortolina, Alessandro

    2009-01-01

    Synovial cysts, typically observed in the lumbar spine eventually associated with degenerative changes of the facet joints, only rarely present in the cervical spine. Up to now, only 28 symptomatic cases are described in literature. Typically, the treatment of these cases is a decompressive laminectomy followed by complete surgical removal of the lesion. The authors present the case of an 84-year-old man with a symptomatic synovial cyst involving the space between C7 and T1. PMID:19603197

  19. Acute cauda equina syndrome secondary to a lumbar synovial cyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muir, Jeffery J; Pingree, Matthew J; Moeschler, Susan M

    2012-01-01

    Cauda equina syndrome is a well described state of neurologic compromise due to lumbosacral root compression. In most cases, it is due to a herniated disc, tumor, infection, or hematoma. We report a case of rapid lumbar synovial cyst expansion leading to acute cauda equina syndrome and compare it to similar cases in the literature. The patient is a 49-year-old woman with a history of chronic low back pain who developed cauda equina syndrome. Serial lumbar magnetic resonance imaging studies demonstrated a significant increase in the size of a lumbar synovial cyst over a 2 week interval. After an unsuccessful attempt to relieve her acute symptoms with computed tomography-guided cyst aspiration, an L4-5 posterior spinal decompression with excision of the synovial cyst was performed. Postoperatively the patient's perineal numbness, bladder incontinence, and associated pain complaints resolved. The only residual symptom at one month follow-up was continued numbness in the right lower limb in an L5 distribution. This report adds to 6 other well described similar cases found in the literature by illustrating several important points. First, a lumbar synovial cyst is a rare but possible cause of acute cauda equina syndrome. Second, magnetic resonance imaging is the test of choice to diagnose and characterize lumbar synovial cysts; serial imaging can detect fluctuations in cyst size. Third, percutaneous treatment of lumbar synovial cysts is variable in efficacy and proved to be unsuccessful in our patient. Finally, surgical management has shown high success rates for symptomatic cysts. Specifically, in the setting of acute cauda equina syndrome secondary to a lumbar synovial cyst, urgent surgical decompression has led to resolution of neurologic symptoms in most reported cases. A lumbar synovial cyst is an uncommon cause of acute cauda equina syndrome. Prompt diagnosis and treatment may lead to reduced morbidity associated with this condition.

  20. Local administration of glucocorticoids decreases synovial citrullination in rheumatoid arthritis

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Protein citrullination is present in the rheumatoid synovium, presumably contributing to the perpetuation of chronic inflammation, in the presence of specific autoimmunity. As a result, the present study examined the possibility that effective antirheumatic treatment will decrease the level of synovial citrullination. Methods Synovial biopsies were obtained from 11 rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients before and after 8 weeks of treatment with 20 mg methotrexate weekly, 15 RA patie...

  1. Expression of mu-opioid receptors in human chronic inflamed knee joint synovium tissue

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YUAN Hong-bin; HE Xing-ying; XU Hai-tao; ZHU Qiu-feng; WANG Ya-hua; SHI Xue-yin

    2006-01-01

    Objective:To examine the changes of mu-opioid receptors (MORs) expression in human chronic inflamed knee joint synovium tissue. Methods:Knee joint synovium tissues were taken from 21 patients with chronic arthritis(inflamed group) and 6 fresh bodies with normal knee joints(control group). And the expression of MORs was detected by using immunohistochemistry, flow cytometry (FCM) and reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction(RT-PCR). Results: The expression of MORs in the inflamed group was significantly higher than that in the normal group by using the 3 techniques(P<0.05).Conclusion: Chronic inflammation enhances the up-regulation of MORs in human knee joint synovium tissue.

  2. Giant Synovial Cyst of Thigh: A Rare Entity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kushagra Sinha

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Synovial cyst occurs secondary to traumatic, degenerative, or inflammatory conditions. Synovial cysts represent abnormal distension of bursae, which communicate with the joint. Giant synovial cysts are typically due to rheumatoid arthritis, other causes being trauma and synovial pseudoarthrosis. A 33-year-old male presented to an outpatient clinic with a massive swelling on his posterolateral aspect of right thigh extending from upper one-third to the knee joint which had been increasing in size over the past six months. This was associated with dull aching pain. All laboratory investigations were within normal parameters. Even FNAC was inconclusive. With time, swelling was increasing in size. Ultrasound revealed the cystic nature of swelling. MRI showed large cystic lesion 24 × 10 × 12 cm in posterolateral aspect of thigh extending up to knee joint. Following the MRI, an excision was planned. After excision, histological examination confirmed the synovial nature of the cyst, which had a collagenous wall and dense chronic inflammatory cells. As the disease is extremely rare and asymptomatic, precise diagnosis is difficult and often delayed. We consider that open surgical excision should be reserved for cases of large synovial cysts because it can provide a complete resection of the lesion and minimize the risk of recurrence.

  3. Effect of dexamethasone prodrug on inflamed temporomandibular joints in juvenile rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knudsen, Mitchell; Bury, Matthew; Holwegner, Callie; Reinhardt, Adam L; Yuan, Fang; Zhang, Yijia; Giannini, Peter; Marx, David B; Wang, Dong; Reinhardt, Richard A

    2015-09-24

    Juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) often causes inflammation of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) and has been treated with both systemic and intra-articular steroids, with concerns about effects on growing bones. In this study, we evaluated the impact of a macromolecular prodrug of dexamethasone (P-DEX) with inflammation-targeting potential applied systemically or directly to the TMJ. Joint inflammation was initiated by injecting two doses of complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA) at 1-month intervals into the right TMJs of 24 growing Sprague-Dawley male rats (controls on left side). Four additional rats were not manipulated. With the second CFA injection, animals received (1) 5 mg of P-DEX intra-articularly (n = 9), (2) 15 mg of P-DEX into the tail vein (n = 7), or (3) nothing in addition to CFA (n = 8). The rats were killed 28 days later and measured by radiography for ramus height (condylar superior to gonion inferior [CsGoInf]), by micro-computed tomography for condylar width (CW) and bone volume/standardized condylar volume (BV/CV), and by histology for retrodiscal inflammatory cells. Inflammation targeting of systemic P-DEX was confirmed by IVIS infrared dye imaging. Inflammation and bone growth were compared between groups using analysis of variance and Pearson's correlations. CFA caused a significant reduction in CsGoInf (p < 0.05), but neither route of P-DEX administration had an effect on CsGoInf or CW at CFA injection sites. BV/CV was significantly reduced in both inflamed and control condyles as a result of either steroid application (p < 0.05). The inflammatory infiltrate was overwhelmingly lymphocytic, comprising 16.4 ± 1.3 % of the field in CFA alone vs. <0.01 % lymphocytes in contralateral controls (p < 0.0001). Both P-DEX TMJ (10.1 ± 1.2 %) and systemic P-DEX (8.9 ± 1.7 %) reduced lymphocytes (p < 0.002). The total area of inflammatory infiltrate was significantly less in the systemic injection group than in the group that received CFA injections

  4. Primary intravascular synovial sarcoma: case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuncer, Osman Nuri; Erbasan, Ozan; Golbasi, Ilhan

    2012-10-01

    Synovial sarcoma (SS), a mesenchymal spindle cell tumor, displays variable epithelial differentiation, including glandular formation, and features a specific chromosomal translocation, t(X;18)(p11;q11). SS accounts for 5% to 10% of soft-tissue sarcomas. These tumors occur mostly in the joints, especially near the knee, but they also occur in other locations. Primary intravascular SS (IVSS) are extremely rare; only 6 well-documented cases have been reported in the English literature. We describe a new case of primary IVSS of the superior vena cava (SVC) in a 16-year-old boy. A transthoracic echocardiogram confirmed a large (4.8 × 4.6 cm) circumscribed mass filling the right atrium, as well as a moderate pericardial effusion. The mass extended from the SVC to the tricuspid valve but did not prevent valve coaptation. Surgery via a transatrial approach revealed a huge mass (8 to 12 cm) attached to the SVC via a 5-mm pedicle. The tumor was excised, and the patient experienced an uneventful postoperative course. Fluorescence in situ hybridization analysis revealed the presence of the SS-specific translocation.

  5. Comparison of hormone transfer to pleural and synovial exudates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rovensky, Jozef; Simorova, Elizabet; Radikova, Zofia; Imrich, Richard; Greguska, Ondrej; Vigas, Milan; Macho, Ladislav

    2006-06-01

    Local effects of hormones on immune and connective tissues could play some role in the development of local inflammation processes. The aim of this study was to investigate the levels of selected hormones in pleural exudates of patients with pleurisy and lung tumours, and compare these levels with hormone concentration in knee synovial fluid. Eleven patients with pleural exudate (mean age 62+/-3) and l9 subjects with rheumatoid arthritis (of the same mean age) participated in the observations. Plasma, pleural exudates and synovial fluid levels of cortisol, prolactin, aldosterone, testosterone, 17-beta-estradiol, dehydroepiandrosterone, progesterone, insulin and C-peptide were determined by specific radioimmunoassay. It was noted that all estimated hormones are transferred into pleural exudates and synovial fluid. Higher levels of dehydroepiandrosterone and C-peptide were observed in pleural exudates as compared to plasma. The concentrations of testosterone, prolactin and estradiol in males were lower in exudates as compared to plasma. Mean levels of cortisol, aldosterone, progesterone and insulin in plasma were similar to these found in pleural exudates. The comparison of hormone levels in pleural exudates and synovial fluid showed that the levels of cortisol, progesterone and dehydroepiandrosterone tended to be higher in the exudates as compared to synovial fluid. However, the levels of insulin, testosterone and estradiol in exudates were lower than these in inflammatory synovial fluid from patients with rheumatoid arthritis. This study showed the presence of hormones in pleural exudates. The differences in hormone concentrations in pleural exudates and synovial fluid were observed suggesting a specificity of hormone transfer from plasma to these exudates.

  6. Bacteriological examination of inflamed epidermal cysts: a survey between 2008 and 2009 at a hospital in southern Taiwan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yen-Hsi Liu

    2010-09-01

    Conclusions: Both aerobic and anaerobic microorganisms were present in the inflamed epidermal cysts, although the anaerobic bacteria, specifically, Propionibacterium spp and Peptostreptococcus spp, were isolated slightly more frequently. Antibiotics directed against anaerobes may be considered in the treatment regimen for inflamed epidermal cysts.

  7. Ultrasound-guided synovial Tru-cut biopsy: indications, technique, and outcome in 111 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sitt, Jacqueline C M; Griffith, James F; Lai, Fernand M; Hui, Mamie; Chiu, K H; Lee, Ryan K L; Ng, Alex W H; Leung, Jason

    2017-05-01

    To investigate the diagnostic performance of ultrasound-guided synovial biopsy. Clinical notes, pathology and microbiology reports, ultrasound and other imaging studies of 100 patients who underwent 111 ultrasound-guided synovial biopsies were reviewed. Biopsies were compared with the final clinical diagnosis established after synovectomy (n = 43) or clinical/imaging follow-up (n = 57) (mean 30 months). Other than a single vasovagal episode, no complication of synovial biopsy was encountered. One hundred and seven (96 %) of the 111 biopsies yielded synovium histologically. Pathology ± microbiology findings for these 107 conclusive biopsies comprised synovial tumour (n = 30, 28 %), synovial infection (n = 18, 17 %), synovial inflammation (n = 45, 42 %), including gouty arthritis (n = 3), and no abnormality (n = 14, 13 %). The accuracy, sensitivity, and specificity of synovial biopsy was 99 %, 97 %, and 100 % for synovial tumour; 100 %, 100 %, and 100 % for native joint infection; and 78 %, 45 %, and 100 % for prosthetic joint infection. False-negative synovial biopsy did not seem to be related to antibiotic therapy. Ultrasound-guided Tru-cut synovial biopsy is a safe and reliable technique with a high diagnostic yield for diagnosing synovial tumour and also, most likely, for joint infection. Regarding joint infection, synovial biopsy of native joints seems to have a higher diagnostic yield than that for infected prosthetic joints. • Ultrasound-guided Tru-cut synovial biopsy has high accuracy (99 %) for diagnosing synovial tumour. • It has good accuracy, sensitivity, and high specificity for diagnosis of joint infection. • Synovial biopsy of native joints works better than biopsy of prosthetic joints. • A negative synovial biopsy culture from a native joint largely excludes septic arthritis. • Ultrasound-guided Tru-cut synovial biopsy is a safe and well-tolerated procedure.

  8. False positive 18F-FDG PET/CT due to inflamed concha bullosa.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Arens, A.I.J.; Verbist, B.M.; Hendrickx, B.W.; Geus-Oei, L.F. de; Oyen, W.J.G.

    2012-01-01

    A 62-year-old woman with a history of breast cancer was referred for an (18)F-FDG PET/CT scan. She had an active upper respiratory infection at the time of examination. An FDG avid (SUV(max) = 7.7) middle turbinate was identified, correlating with an inflamed concha bullosa. A short review of concha

  9. Self assembled hyaluronic acid nanoparticles as a potential carrier for targeting the inflamed intestinal mucosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vafaei, Seyed Yaser; Esmaeili, Motahareh; Amini, Mohsen; Atyabi, Fatemeh; Ostad, Seyed Naser; Dinarvand, Rassoul

    2016-06-25

    To develop a nanoparticulate drug carrier for targeting of the inflamed intestinal mucosa, amphiphilic hyaluronic acid (HA) conjugates were synthesized, which could form self-assembled nanoparticles (NPs) in aqueous solution and budesonide (BDS) was loaded into the HANPs. Their particle sizes were in the range of 177 to 293nm with negative surface charge. The model of inflammatory CACO-2 cells was utilized to investigate the therapeutic potential of budesonide loaded HA nanocarriers. The highest expression of CD44 receptors was found on inflamed Caco-2 cells, as determined by flow cytometry. FITC-labeled HANPs revealed greater uptake in inflamed CACO-2 cells compared to untreated CACO-2 and CD44-negative cell lines, NIH3T3. BDS loaded HANPs displayed almost no toxicity indicating HANPs are excellent biocompatible nano-carriers. BDS loaded HANPs demonstrated higher anti-inflammatory effect on IL-8 and TNF-α secretion in inflamed cell model compared to the same dose of free drug. These results revealed the promising potential of HA nanoparticles as a targeted drug delivery system for IBD treatment.

  10. Mechanical small bowel obstruction due to an inflamed appendix wrapping around the last loop of ileum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assenza, M; Ricci, G; Bartolucci, P; Modini, C

    2005-01-01

    Acute apendicitis rarely presents with a clinical picture of mechanical small-bowel obstruction. The Authors report a case of this inusual clinical occurrence, arised like a complication of a common disease, characterized by a chronically inflamed appendix (mucocele) wrapping around the last loop of ileum that produced volvolus and strangulation. The few similar cases reported in the literature are moreover reviewed.

  11. TNF-alpha levels are not increased in inflamed patients carrying the CCR5 deletion 32

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Muntinghe, Friso L. H.; Carrero, Juan Jesus; Navis, Gerjan; Stenvinkel, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Background and aims: Recently we reported on a genetically predisposed protection from C-reactive protein (CRP) related mortality in dialysis patients carrying the functional CC-chemokine receptor 5 deletion 32 allele (CCR5 Delta 32) mutation. Since CCR5 Delta 32 is associated with a less pro-inflam

  12. Modulation of pro-inflammatory cytokines in normal and inflamed skin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.R. Companjen (Arjen)

    2001-01-01

    textabstractThis thesis describes the expression and modulation of pro-inflammatory cytokines in normal and inflamed skin. During the last few decades it has become clear that the skin comprises a complex network of interacting cells including keratinocytes (KC). dendritic cells (such as Langerhans

  13. Interplay between enterobactin, myeloperoxidase and lipocalin 2 regulates E. coli survival in the inflamed gut

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Singh, Vishal; Yeoh, Beng San; Xiao, Xia

    2015-01-01

    . Glycosylated Ent (salmochelin) and non-catecholate siderophores (yersiniabactin and ferrichrome) fail to inhibit MPO activity. An E. coli mutant (ΔfepA) that overproduces Ent, but not an Ent-deficient double mutant (ΔaroB/ΔfepA), inhibits MPO activity and exhibits enhanced survival in inflamed guts...

  14. Detection of Adhesion Molecules on Inflamed Macrophages at Early-Stage Using SERS Probe Gold Nanorods

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dakrong Pissuwan; Yusuke Hattori

    2017-01-01

    In recent years, it has been shown that inflammatory biomarkers can be used as an effective signal for disease diagnoses. The early detection of these signals provides useful information that could prevent the occurrence of severe diseases. Here, we employed surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) probe gold nanorods (GNRs) as a tool for the early detection of inflammatory molecules in inflamed cells. A murine macrophage cell line (Raw264.7) stimulated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) was used as a model in this study. The prepared SERS probe GNRs containing 4-mercapto-benzoic acid as a Raman reporter to generate SERS signals were used for detection of intracellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) in macrophages after treatment with LPS for varying lengths of time. Our results show that SERS probe GNRs could detect significant differences in the expression of ICAM-1 molecules in LPS-treated macrophages compared to those in untreated macrophages after only 1 h of LPS treatment. In contrast, when using fluorescent labeling or enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA) to detect ICAM-1, significant differences between inflamed and un-inflamed macrophages were not seen until the cells had been treated with LPS for 5 h. These results indicate that our SERS probe GNRs provide a higher sensitivity for detecting biomarker molecules in inflamed macrophages than the conventional fluorescence and ELISA techniques, and could therefore be useful as a potential diagnostic tool for managing disease risk.

  15. Hypoxia inducible factors are dispensable for myeloid cell migration into the inflamed mouse eye

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardner, Peter J.; Liyanage, Sidath E.; Cristante, Enrico; Sampson, Robert D.; Dick, Andrew D.; Ali, Robin R.; Bainbridge, James W.

    2017-01-01

    Hypoxia inducible factors (HIFs) are ubiquitously expressed transcription factors important for cell homeostasis during dynamic oxygen levels. Myeloid specific HIFs are crucial for aspects of myeloid cell function, including their ability to migrate into inflamed tissues during autoimmune disease. This contrasts with the concept that accumulation of myeloid cells at ischemic and hypoxic sites results from a lack of chemotactic responsiveness. Here we seek to address the role of HIFs in myeloid trafficking during inflammation in a mouse model of human uveitis. We show using mice with myeloid-specific Cre-deletion of HIFs that myeloid HIFs are dispensable for leukocyte migration into the inflamed eye. Myeloid-specific deletion of Hif1a, Epas1, or both together, had no impact on the number of myeloid cells migrating into the eye. Additionally, stabilization of HIF pathways via deletion of Vhl in myeloid cells had no impact on myeloid trafficking into the inflamed eye. Finally, we chemically induce hypoxemia via hemolytic anemia resulting in HIF stabilization within circulating leukocytes to demonstrate the dispensable role of HIFs in myeloid cell migration into the inflamed eye. These data suggest, contrary to previous reports, that HIF pathways in myeloid cells during inflammation and hypoxia are dispensable for myeloid cell tissue trafficking. PMID:28112274

  16. The glycosylation of human synovial lubricin: implications for its role in inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estrella, Ruby P; Whitelock, John M; Packer, Nicolle H; Karlsson, Niclas G

    2010-07-15

    Acidic proteins were isolated from synovial fluid from two osteoarthritic and two rheumatoid arthritic patients and identified by MS. It was found that the most abundant protein in all of the samples was the mucin-like protein lubricin. Further characterization of lubricin from the different patients by LC (liquid chromatography)-MS of released oligosaccharides showed that the core 1 O-linked oligosaccharides NeuAc alpha2-3Gal beta1-3GalNAc and NeuAc alpha2-3Gal beta1-3(NeuAc alpha2-6)GalNAc were the dominating structures on lubricin. The latter was found to be more prevalent in the rheumatoid arthritis samples, indicating that sialylation is up-regulated as part of the inflammatory response. In addition to these dominating structures, core 2 structures were also found in low amounts, where the largest was the disialylated hexasaccharide corresponding to the sequence NeuAc alpha2-3Ga lbeta1-3(NeuAc alpha2-3Gal beta1-3/4GlcNAc beta1-6)GalNAc. It was also found that a small proportion of the core 2 oligosaccharides carried sulfate. The ability of lubricin to present complex glycosylation reflecting the state of the joint tissue makes lubricin a candidate as a carrier of inflammatory oligosaccharide epitopes. In particular, it was shown that lubricin from inflamed arthritic tissue was recognized by the antibody MECA-79 and thus carried the sulfated epitope proposed to be part of the L-selectin ligand that is responsible for recruitment of leucocytes to inflammatory sites.

  17. Medial Calcar Erosion Is Associated With Synovial Thickness in Patients With ASR XL Total Hip Arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madanat, Rami; Rolfson, Ola; Donahue, Gabrielle S; Hussey, Daniel K; Potter, Hollis G; Wallace, Robert; Muratoglu, Orhun K; Malchau, Henrik

    2016-11-01

    Medial calcar erosion is considered a late finding in patients with severe adverse local tissue reactions (ALTRs) after total hip arthroplasty (THA) with dual modular neck stems. Although calcar erosion has been associated with dual modular neck stems, one would expect similar findings in standard stems owing to analogous corrosion at the taper junction. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether medial calcar erosion is also associated with ALTR in patients with standard stems in metal-on-metal (MoM) THA. A total of 96 patients (108 hips) with MoM THA had radiographs and a magnetic resonance imaging of the hip performed at a mean time of 5.7 years after surgery. Calcar erosion was assessed from radiographs. ALTR Anderson grade, diameter, volume, and synovial thickness were assessed from magnetic resonance imaging. Calcar erosion was present in 54 hips (50%) and was associated with ALTR synovial thickness but not with Anderson grade, diameter, or volume. Most of the hips with calcar erosion (n = 45) had an ALTR (positive predictive value 0.83, 95% confidence interval 0.70-0.92). The relative risk of having a synovial thickness > 3 mm increased by a factor of 3.0 (95% confidence interval 1.3-6.5) if calcar erosion was observed. Subtle erosions of the medial calcar after MoM THA may be an early indicator of an adverse reaction to wear particles warranting cross-sectional imaging. Synovial thickness may also be more relevant than absolute size in the classification of ALTR severity and collateral tissue damage. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Cystic synovial sarcomas: imaging features with clinical and histopathologic correlation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakanishi, Hirofumi; Araki, Nobuhito [Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Osaka Medical Center for Cancer and Cardiovascular Diseases, 1-3-3, Nakamichi, Higashinari-Ku, 537-8511, Osaka (Japan); Sawai, Yuka [Department of Radiology, Osaka Medical Center for Cancer and Cardiovascular Diseases, Osaka (Japan); Kudawara, Ikuo [Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Osaka National Hospital, Osaka (Japan); Mano, Masayuki; Ishiguro, Shingo [Department of Pathology, Osaka Medical Center for Cancer and Cardiovascular Diseases, Osaka (Japan); Ueda, Takafumi; Yoshikawa, Hideki [Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Osaka University Graduate School of Medicine, Suita, Osaka (Japan)

    2003-12-01

    To characterize the radiological and clinicopathologic features of cystic synovial sarcoma. Seven patients with primary cystic synovial sarcoma were evaluated. Computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging were undertaken at the first presentation. The diagnosis of synovial sarcoma was made on the basis of histological examinations followed by molecular analysis. Radiological and clinicopathologic findings were reviewed. CT showed well-defined soft tissue mass without cortical bone erosion and invasion. Calcification was seen at the periphery of the mass in three cases. T2-weighted MR images showed multilocular inhomogeneous intensity mass in all cases, five of which showed fluid-fluid levels. On gross appearance, old and/or fresh hematomas were detected in six cases. In the one remaining case, microscopic hemorrhage in the cystic lumen was proven. Four cases had poorly differentiated areas. In five cases prominent hemangiopericytomatous vasculature was observed. Histologic grade was intermediate in one tumor and high in six. One case had a history of misdiagnosis for tarsal tunnel syndrome, one for lymphadenopathy, two for sciatica and two for hematoma. All cystic synovial sarcomas demonstrated multilocularity with well-circumscribed walls and internal septae. Synovial sarcoma should be taken into consideration in patients with deeply situated multicystic mass with triple signal intensity on T2-weighted MR imaging. (orig.)

  19. Intraspinal synovial cysts: A retrospective study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Acharya R

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: We report the clinical presentation, radiographic studies, intraoperative findings, histopathological analysis, and post-treatment outcome in 26 patients diagnosed with spinal synovial cysts (SSCs. Aims: To describe the clinical presentation, radiographic studies, operative findings, and postoperative follow-up in 26 patients with SSCs. Settings and Design: The study was retrospective in design, involving chart review. Individual patient data was tabulated and patterns were recognized. Materials and Methods: The charts for 26 patients who underwent surgical extirpation of SSC between April 1993 and October 2002 were retrospectively reviewed. Specifically, initial clinical presentation, pertinent radiographs (X-rays, magnetic resonance imaging, computed tomography, intraoperative findings, histopathology, and postoperative follow-up were noted. Statistical Analysis Used: Patient data was tabulated and analyzed for patterns in demographics, symptoms and histopathology. Results: SSCs were more common in females than males (17:9 ratio. Presenting symptoms were back pain with radiculopathy in 13 (50%, radicular pain in the absence of back pain in 10 (38%, and back pain without radicular pain in three (11%. In addition, 17 patients (65% had sensory deficit, and 9 (35% had motor deficit. Most SSCs occurred at the lumbar (19/26 or lumbosacral (5/26 regions, with only 2 (2/26 in the thoracic region. One patient had bilateral SSC at the L4-5 level. Intraoperatively, each cyst was located adjacent to a degenerated facet joint. These lesions could grossly be identified intraoperatively and histopathological confirmation was achieved in all the cases. Conclusions: SSCs are important lesions to consider in the differential diagnosis of lumbar epidural masses and surgical resection leads to significant improvement in the majority of cases.

  20. Cell-mediated immune response of synovial fluid lymphocytes to ureaplasma antigen in Reiter's syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavlica Ljiljana

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION Reiter's syndrome (RS is an seronegative arthritis that occurs after urogenital or enteric infection which in addition with occular and/or mucocutaneous manifestations presents complete form of disease. According to previous understanding arthritis in the RS is the reactive one, which means that it is impossible to isolate its causative agent. However, there are the more and more authors suggesting that arthritis in the urogenital form of disease is caused by the infective agent in the affected joint. This suggestion is based on numerous studies on the presence of Chlmaydia trachomatis and Ureaplasma urealyticum in the inflamed joint by using new diagnostic methods in molecular biology published in the recent literature [1-3]. Besides, numerous studies of the humoral and cell-mediated immune response to "triggering" bacteria in the affected joint have supported previous suggestions [4-7]. Aim of the study was to determine whether synovial fluid T-cells specifically recognize the "triggering" bacteria presumably responsible for the Reiter's syndrome. METHOD The 3H-thymidine uptake procedure for measuring lymphocyte responses was applied to lymphocytes derived concurrently from synovial fluid (SF and from peripheral blood (PB [8]. Ureaplasma antigen and mitogen PHA stimulated lymphocytes in 24 RS patients (24 PB samples, 9 SF samples and the results were compared with those found in 10 patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA (10 PB samples, 5 SF samples. Preparation of ureaplasma antigen. Ureaplasma was cultured on cell-free liquid medium [9]. Sample of 8 ml was heat-inactivated for 15 minutes at 601C and permanently stirred with magnetic mixer. The sample was centrifuged at 2000 x g for 40 minutes and than deposits carefully carried to other sterile glass tubes (Corex and recentrifuged at 9000 x g for 30 minutes. The deposit was washed 3 times in sterile 0.9% NaCl, and final sediment was resuspended in 1.2 ml sterile 0.9% Na

  1. SYNOVIAL SARCOMA IN CHILDHOOD: CLINICAL AND RADIOLOGICAL FINDINGS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xu Deyong; Zhan Alai; Luan Hongmei; Feng Weihua; Sun Xihe; Yang Zuwen

    1998-01-01

    Objective: To study the clinical characteristics and radiological features of synovial sarcoma in childhood and its relation to the diagnosis and treatment. Methods:The clinical radiological features of 15 children with synovial sarcoma proved surgically and pathologically were analyzed. Results: In children, the tumor boundaries are poorly defined due to paucity of fat, and metastasis usually occurs early. Eight patients in this series had bone involvement, including: direct erosion by tumor causing cortical destruction, indirect pressure defect with sharp margin and reactive bone sclerosis and bone destruction of the primary intraosseous synovial sarcoma.Conclusion: The tumor is often misdiagnosed, the final confirmed diagnosis must be made by histological examination with imaging findings. It is emphasized that the patients should be treated with radiotherapy and chemotherapy preoperatively and postoperatively.

  2. Minimally invasive CT guided treatment of intraspinal synovial cyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozar, Sergeja; Jeromel, Miran

    2014-03-01

    Intraspinal synovial cysts of vertebral facet joints are uncommon cause of radicular pain as well as neurological deficits. They can be managed both conservatively and surgically. A 77-year old polymorbid patient presented with bilateral low back pain which worsened during the course of time and did not respond to the conservative treatment. A diagnosis of intraspinal synovial cyst was made using the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Percutaneous computed tomography (CT) guided injection with installation of local anesthetic together with corticosteroid and rupture of the cyst was successfully used. A month after the procedure his pain improved, the usage of analgesics diminished and his over-all quality of life improved. Percutaneous CT guided lumbar synovial cyst treatment is safe and reliable alternative to the surgical treatment in polymorbid patients with radiculopathy who are not able to tolerate general anesthesia and operation.

  3. Simulation Of The Synovial Fluid In A Deformable Cavity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez-Gutierrez, Nancy; Ibarra-Bracamontes, Laura A.

    2016-11-01

    The main components of a synovial joint are a cartilage and a biofluid known as the synovial fluid. The results were obtained using the FLUENT software to simulate the behavior of the synovial fluid within a deformable cavity with a simple geometry. The cartilage is represented as a porous region. By reducing the available region for the fluid, a fluid displacement into the cartilage is induced. The total pressure reached in the interface of the deformable cavity and the porous region is presented. The geometry and properties of the system are scaled to values found in a knee joint. The effect of deformation rate, fluid viscosity and properties of the porous medium on the total pressure reached are analyzed. The higher pressures are reached either for high deformation rate or when the fluid viscosity increases. This study was supported by the Mexican Council of Science and Technology (CONACyT) and by the Scientific Research Coordination of the University of Michoacan in Mexico.

  4. Heart failure resulting from giant left atrial synovial sarcoma metastasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winkler, B; Grapow, M; Seeberger, M; Matt, P; Aulitzky, W; Eckstein, F

    2012-02-01

    Synovial sarcoma metastasis affecting the heart and infiltrating the mitral valve is a very rare pathology. We report the case of a 44-year-old male treated with chemotherapy for atypical synovial sarcoma of the oral mucosa who presented to our clinic after cardiac decompensation with a presumptive diagnosis of myxoma of the left atrium. A large necrotic tumour positive for CK 22, EMA, CD 99 and BCL-2 but negative for translocation in COBRA-FISH analysis by break-apart probe could be excised and revealed a very rare subtype of synovial sarcoma metastasis arising from the endocard of the left atrium. The tumour was resected and the mitral valve reconstructed through ring annuloplasty. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  5. Osteochondroma and synovial chondromatosis of the temporomandibular joint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Sung Eun; Kim, Jae Duk [College of Dentistry, Chosun University, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    2002-03-15

    Osteochondroma is a benign lesion of osseous and cartilagenous origin. It is a relatively common benign tumor of the skeleton, occurring most often in the metaphyseal region of long bone. However, it is rare in the facial bones. Reported foci in the mandible were the condyle, coronoid process, and symphysis region. Synovial chondromatosis is an uncommon benign condition of unknown etiology which affects the articular joints. Foci of cartilage develop through metaplasia in the underlying connective tissue of the synovial membrane. These cartilagenous foci and fragments may undergo calcification and ossification. We experienced 4 patients with abnormal appearance of mandibular condyle. This report describes 3 cases of osteocondroma and 1 case of synovial chondromatosis of the mandibular condyle with review of the literature

  6. Synovial fistula after tension band plating for genu valgum correction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Momaya, Amit; Ray, Peter; Khoury, Joseph

    2015-01-01

    Tension band plating is a commonly performed procedure to address angular deformities about the knee in children. We present a case of a synovial fistula formation after tension band plate removal, an unreported complication in the literature. An 11-year-old girl underwent tension band plating for genu valgum. After removal of the plate, she developed a synovial fistula that was confirmed by magnetic resonance imaging. Her knee was immobilized in extension, which allowed the synovial fistula to heal. The unique capsular anatomy in the knee provides a possible etiology. Physicians performing tension band plating should be aware of this complication and consider a brief period of immobilization of 3 to 5 days after hardware removal to allow the capsular rent to heal.

  7. Are Bicipital Synovial Cysts in Children with Systemic Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis still a Significant Clinical Challenge?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kyvsgaard, Nini; Herlin, Troels

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Large synovial cysts are rarely seen in juvenile idiopathic arthritis. When they do appear, they usually appear in the popliteal space (Baker’s cyst). Less commonly, they occur in the antecubital area or as bicipital synovial cysts. Bicipital synovial cysts present as a sudden...

  8. Primary synovial sarcoma of the abdominal wall: A case report and review of the literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alsaif H Saif

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Synovial sarcoma is a malignant mesenchymal neoplasm which commonly occurs in the extremities of adults, in close association with joint capsules, tendon sheaths, bursae and fascial structures. Only a few cases of synovial sarcoma occurring in the abdominal wall have been reported. A case of a primary synovial sarcoma arising from the anterior abdominal wall fascial aponeurosis is presented.

  9. Giant rheumatoid synovial cyst of the hip joint: diagnosed by MRI.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patkar D

    1999-10-01

    Full Text Available Synovial cysts are commonly found in the knee joint. Hip Joint is an infrequent site for formation of synovial cysts. The features of a large, synovial cyst on magnetic resonance imaging, occurring in the hip joint, are described.

  10. Synovial chondromatosis and osteochondroma in TMJ with CBCT images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seo, Yo Seob; Lee, Gun Sun; Kim, Jin Soo; Kim, Jae Duk [Department of Oral and Maxilloficial Radiology, School of Dentistry, Oral Biology Research Institute, Chosun University, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-03-15

    Synovial chondromatosis is an uncommon disorder characterized by metaplastic formation of multiple cartilaginous and osteocartilaginous nodules within connective tissue of the synovial membrane of joints. Osteochondroma is a benign lesion of osseous and cartilagenous origin. It is frequently found in the general skeleton, but is rare in the mandibular condyle. We experienced 2 patients with abnormal appearance of temporomandibular joint. Histologic diagnoses were not obtained, because surgery was unwarranted in view of the lack of symptoms and the benign differential diagnosis. We describes 2 cases that show the characteristics of both disease simultaneously.

  11. Persistence of gene expression changes in noninflamed and inflamed colonic mucosa in ulcerative colitis and their presence in colonic carcinoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yuji Toiyama; Akira Mizoguchi; Kazushi Kimura; Toshimitsu Araki; Shigeyuki Yoshiyama; Kouhei Sakaguchi; Chikao Miki; Masato Kusunoki

    2005-01-01

    AIM: A few studies have applied genomic-wide gene expression analysis in inflamed colon tissue sample in ulcerative colitis (UC). We reported the first study of non-inflamed mucosal gene expression in UC and explored its clinical implication.METHODS: Non-inflamed mucosa was obtained from 6 UC patients who received total colectomy. The gene expression of UC in noninfliamed mucosa was monitored with a microarray. For a selected gene, RT-PCR was performed to verify array results and to further examine expression pattern in inflamed mucosa of UC, colorectal cancer tissue and normal mucosa using additional matched pairs.RESULTS: Two genes showing 2.5-fold decreased expression with significance set at in UC samples were bomeo box a4 (HOXa4) and mads box transcription enhancer factor 2, polypeptide B (MEF2b). RT-PCR showed that MEF2b expression in non-inflamed mucosa was significantly downregulated, whereas the expression of MEF2b increased in accordance with the severity of mucosal inflammation. HOXa4 expression both in inflamed and non-inflamed mucosa in UC was consistently downregulated, and the downregulation of HOXa4 was also found in colorectal carcinoma.CONCLUSION: It is suggested that the MEF2b expression in UC which increase in accordance with inflammation may be induced by the inflammatory mediator. In contrast the downregulation of HOXa4 may be partly involved in the pathogenesis of disease including UC and UC-related carcinogenesis.

  12. Fructose-Asparagine Is a Primary Nutrient during Growth of Salmonella in the Inflamed Intestine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Mohamed M.; Newsom, David L.; González, Juan F.; Sabag-Daigle, Anice; Stahl, Christopher; Steidley, Brandi; Dubena, Judith; Dyszel, Jessica L.; Smith, Jenee N.; Dieye, Yakhya; Arsenescu, Razvan; Boyaka, Prosper N.; Krakowka, Steven; Romeo, Tony; Behrman, Edward J.; White, Peter; Ahmer, Brian M. M.

    2014-01-01

    Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium (Salmonella) is one of the most significant food-borne pathogens affecting both humans and agriculture. We have determined that Salmonella encodes an uptake and utilization pathway specific for a novel nutrient, fructose-asparagine (F-Asn), which is essential for Salmonella fitness in the inflamed intestine (modeled using germ-free, streptomycin-treated, ex-germ-free with human microbiota, and IL10−/− mice). The locus encoding F-Asn utilization, fra, provides an advantage only if Salmonella can initiate inflammation and use tetrathionate as a terminal electron acceptor for anaerobic respiration (the fra phenotype is lost in Salmonella SPI1− SPI2− or ttrA mutants, respectively). The severe fitness defect of a Salmonella fra mutant suggests that F-Asn is the primary nutrient utilized by Salmonella in the inflamed intestine and that this system provides a valuable target for novel therapies. PMID:24967579

  13. Fructose-asparagine is a primary nutrient during growth of Salmonella in the inflamed intestine.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed M Ali

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium (Salmonella is one of the most significant food-borne pathogens affecting both humans and agriculture. We have determined that Salmonella encodes an uptake and utilization pathway specific for a novel nutrient, fructose-asparagine (F-Asn, which is essential for Salmonella fitness in the inflamed intestine (modeled using germ-free, streptomycin-treated, ex-germ-free with human microbiota, and IL10-/- mice. The locus encoding F-Asn utilization, fra, provides an advantage only if Salmonella can initiate inflammation and use tetrathionate as a terminal electron acceptor for anaerobic respiration (the fra phenotype is lost in Salmonella SPI1- SPI2- or ttrA mutants, respectively. The severe fitness defect of a Salmonella fra mutant suggests that F-Asn is the primary nutrient utilized by Salmonella in the inflamed intestine and that this system provides a valuable target for novel therapies.

  14. Antiinflammatory and antioxidant activities of Desmodium gangeticum fractions in carrageenan-induced inflamed rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Govindarajan, R; Vijayakumar, M; Rao, Ch V; Shirwaikar, A; Kumar, Santhosh; Rawat, A K S; Pushpangadan, P

    2007-10-01

    Flavonoid and alkaloid fractions of Desmodium gangeticum were evaluated for antiinflammatory and antioxidant activities in carrageenan-induced inflamed rats with the aim of studying the promising fraction for inhibitory action on ferrous sulphate induced lipid peroxidation, superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), glutathione peroxidase (GPX) and total reduced glutathione in liver and spleen homogenates of inflamed rats. The results showed that the flavonoid fraction of D. gangeticum possesses potent antioxidant activity compared with the alkaloid fraction and also with respect to the standard drug indomethacin, in terms of augmentation of the liver and spleen SOD, CAT and GPX activities, concomitant with a reduction in lipid peroxidation (TBARS). In addition, the quantification of caffeic and chlorogenic acid in the flavonoid fraction has also been carried out using HPLC, which can be utilized as a marker compound in the standardization.

  15. Zinc sequestration by the neutrophil protein calprotectin enhances Salmonella growth in the inflamed gut.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Janet Z; Jellbauer, Stefan; Poe, Adam J; Ton, Vivian; Pesciaroli, Michele; Kehl-Fie, Thomas E; Restrepo, Nicole A; Hosking, Martin P; Edwards, Robert A; Battistoni, Andrea; Pasquali, Paolo; Lane, Thomas E; Chazin, Walter J; Vogl, Thomas; Roth, Johannes; Skaar, Eric P; Raffatellu, Manuela

    2012-03-15

    Neutrophils are innate immune cells that counter pathogens by many mechanisms, including release of antimicrobial proteins such as calprotectin to inhibit bacterial growth. Calprotectin sequesters essential micronutrient metals such as zinc, thereby limiting their availability to microbes, a process termed nutritional immunity. We find that while calprotectin is induced by neutrophils during infection with the gut pathogen Salmonella Typhimurium, calprotectin-mediated metal sequestration does not inhibit S. Typhimurium proliferation. Remarkably, S. Typhimurium overcomes calprotectin-mediated zinc chelation by expressing a high affinity zinc transporter (ZnuABC). A S. Typhimurium znuA mutant impaired for growth in the inflamed gut was rescued in the absence of calprotectin. ZnuABC was also required to promote the growth of S. Typhimurium over that of competing commensal bacteria. Thus, our findings indicate that Salmonella thrives in the inflamed gut by overcoming the zinc sequestration of calprotectin and highlight the importance of zinc acquisition in bacterial intestinal colonization.

  16. Taste of Milk from Inflamed Breasts of Breastfeeding Mothers with Mastitis Evaluated Using a Taste Sensor

    OpenAIRE

    Yoshida, Michiko; Shinohara, Hitomi; Sugiyama, Toshihiro; Kumagai, Masanori; Muto, Hajime; Kodama, Hideya

    2014-01-01

    Background: The refusal of infants to suckle from a breast that is inflamed with mastitis suggests that the taste of the milk has changed. However, the taste of milk from a breast with mastitis has never been empirically determined. The present study compares the taste of milk from breastfeeding mothers with or without mastitis and identifies specific changes in the taste of milk from mothers with mastitis.

  17. A time-dependent degeneration manner of condyle in rat CFA-induced inflamed TMJ.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Liqin; Guo, Huilin; Li, Cheng; Xu, Jie; Fang, Wei; Long, Xing

    2016-01-01

    Temporomandibular joint (TMJ) inflammation is a potential risk factor of osteoarthritis (OA) but the detailed degenerative changes in the inflamed TMJ remain unclear. In this study, we evaluated the changes of condylar cartilage and subchondral bone in rat inflamed TMJ induced by Freund's complete adjuvant (CFA). Articular cavity was injected with CFA and the TMJ samples were collected 1, 2, 3, and 4-week post-injection. Hematoxylin & Eosin (H&E) staining, toluidine blue (TB) staining, Safranin O (S.O) staining, Masson trichrome staining and micro-CT were used to assess TMJ degeneration during inflammation. Osteoclast and osteoblast activities were analyzed by tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP) staining and osteocalcin (OCN) immunohistochemistry staining respectively. The expression of receptor activator of NF-kB ligand (RANKL) and osteoprotegerin (OPG) in condylar cartilage and subchondral bone was also evaluated through immunohistochemistry and RANKL/OPG ratio was evaluated. Reduced cartilage thickness, decreased number of chondrocytes, and down-regulated proteoglycan expression were observed in the condylar cartilage in the inflamed TMJ. Enhanced osteoclast activity, and expanded bone marrow cavity were reached the peak in the 2-week after CFA-injection. Meanwhile the RANKL/OPG ratio in the cartilage and subchondral bone also increased in the 2-week CFA-injection. Immature, unmineralized new bones with irregular trabecular bone structure, atypical condylar shape, up-regulated OCN expression, and decreased bone mineral density (BMD) were found in the inflamed TMJ. The time-dependent degeneration manner of TMJ cartilage and subchondral bone was found in CFA-induced arthritis rat model. The degeneration in the TMJ with inflammation might be a risk factor and should be concerned.

  18. Ultrastructural demonstration of spirochetal antigens in synovial fluid and synovial membrane in chronic Lyme disease: possible factors contributing to persistence of organisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nanagara, R; Duray, P H; Schumacher, H R

    1996-10-01

    To perform the first systematic electronmicroscopic (EM) and immunoelectron microscopy (IEM) study of the pathological changes and the evidence of spirochete presence in synovial membranes and synovial fluid (SF) cells of patients with chronic Lyme arthritis. EM examination was performed on four synovial membrane and eight SF cell samples from eight patients with chronic Lyme disease. Spirochetal antigens in the samples were sought by IEM using monoclonal antibody to Borrelia burgdorferi outer surface protein A (OspA) as the immunoprobe. Prominent ultrastructural findings were surface fibrin-like material, thickened synovial lining cell layer and signs of vascular injury. Borrelia-like structures were identified in all four synovial membranes and in two of eight SF cell samples. The presence of spirochetal antigens was confirmed by IEM in all four samples studied (one synovial membrane and three SF cell samples). OspA labelling was in perivascular areas, deep synovial stroma among collagen bundles, and in vacuoles of fibroblasts in synovial membranes; and in cytophagosomes of mononuclear cells in SF cell samples. Electron microscopy adds further evidence for persistence of spirochetal antigens in the joint in chronic Lyme disease. Locations of spirochetes or spirochetal antigens both intracellulary and extracellulary in deep synovial connective tissue as reported here suggest sites at which spirochaetes may elude host immune response and antibiotic treatment.

  19. Minimal contribution of cell-bound antibodies to the immunoscintigraphy of inflamed joints with {sup 99m}Tc-anti-CD4 monoclonal antibodies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kinne, R.W.; Palombo-Kinne, E. [Experimental Rheumatology Unit, Friedrich Schiller Univ. of Jena (Germany); Wolski, A.; Wolf, F. [Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Univ. of Erlangen-Nuremberg (Germany); Emmrich, F. [Inst. of Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine, Univ. of Leipzig (Germany); Becker, W. [Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Univ. of Goettingen (Germany)

    2002-06-01

    Aim: The cellular joint infiltrate in rheumatoid arthritis patients is rich in CD4-positive T-helper lymphocytes and macrophages, rendering anti-CD4 monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) suitable for specific immunoscintigraphy of human/experimental arthritis. Following intravenous injection, however, mAbs are present both in the free form and bound to CD4-positive, circulating monocytes and T-cells. Thus, the present study aimed at analyzing the relative contribution of the free and the cell-bound component to the imaging of inflamed joints in experimental adjuvant arthritis (AA). Methods: AA rat pertioneal macrophages or lymph node T-cells were incubated in vitro with saturating amounts of 99mTc-anti-CD4 mAb (W3/25) and injected i.v. into rats with AA. Results: In vitro release of {sup 99m}Tc-anti-CD4 mAb from the cells was limited (on average 1.57%/h for macrophages and 0.84%/h for T-cells). Following i.v. injection, whole body/joints scans and tissue measurements showed only negligible accumulation of radioactivity in inflamed ankle joints (tissue: 0.22 and 0.34% of the injected activity, respectively), whereas the radioactivity was concentrated in liver (tissue: 79% and 71%, respectively), kidney, and urinary bladder. Unlike macrophages, however, anti-CD4 mAb-coated T-cells significantly accumulated in lymphoid organs, the inflamed synovial membrane of the ankle joints, as well as in elbow and knee joints. Conclusion: While the overall contribution of cell-bound mAbs to the imaging of arthritic joints with anti-CD4 mAbs is minimal, differential accumulation of macrophages and T-cells in lymphoid organs and the inflamed synovial membrane indicates preferential migration patterns of these 2 cell populations in arthritic rats. Although only validated for {sup 99m}Tc-anti-CD4 mAbs, extrapolation of the results to other anticellular mAbs with similar affinity for their antigen may be possible. (orig.) [German] Ziel: Das zellulaere Gelenkinfiltrat von Patienten mit

  20. The (epi)genetics of human synovial sarcoma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Bruijn, Diederik R. H.; Nap, Jan-Peter; van Kessel, Ad Geurts

    2007-01-01

    Human synovial sarcomas are aggressive soft tissue tumors with relatively high rates of recurrences and metastases. They display a variable response to common treatment protocols such as radiation and chemotherapy. For the development of novel diagnostic, prognostic, and therapeutic approaches, deta

  1. The (epi)genetics of human synovial sarcoma.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bruijn, D.R.H. de; Nap, J.P.; Geurts van Kessel, A.H.M.

    2007-01-01

    Human synovial sarcomas are aggressive soft tissue tumors with relatively high rates of recurrences and metastases. They display a variable response to common treatment protocols such as radiation and chemotherapy. For the development of novel diagnostic, prognostic, and therapeutic approaches, deta

  2. Development of a Synthetic Synovial Fluid for Tribological Testing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emely Lea Bortel

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Wear tests of joint prostheses are usually performed using bovine calf serum. The results from different laboratories are hardly ever comparable as, for example, the protein concentration and the protein composition of the serum-based test liquids vary. In addition, the viscosity of these test liquids is similar to that of water and does not match the more viscous synovial fluid. The present work was aimed at developing a synthetic synovial fluid as an alternative to the existing test liquids. Improved consistency and reproducibility of results at a similar price were required. Hyaluronic acid (HA, the lyophilized proteins bovine serum albumin (BSA and immunoglobulin G (IgG, the phospholipid lecithin (PL and salts were applied in a stepwise approach to replace the actually used test liquid based on newborn calf serum. The in vitro results obtained with ultra-high-molecular-weight polyethylene (UHMWPE pins sliding against CoCrMo discs revealed that the developed synthetic synovial fluid fulfils the set requirements: increase of viscosity, reasonable cost, improved consistency and wear particles which resemble the ones found in vivo. The developed synthetic synovial fluid with 3 g/L HA, 19 g/L BSA, 11 g/L IgG, 0.1 g/L PL and Ringer solution is a more realistic alternative to the used serum-based test liquid.

  3. Automated counting of white blood cells in synovial fluid.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R. de Jonge (Robert); R.W. Brouwer (Reinoud); M. Smit (Marij); M. de Frankrijker-Merkestijn; R.J. Dolhain; J.M.W. Hazes (Mieke); A.W. van Toorenenbergen (Albert); J. Lindemans (Jan)

    2004-01-01

    textabstractOBJECTIVES: To evaluate the performance of automated leucocyte (white blood cell; WBC) counting by comparison with manual counting. METHODS: The number of WBC was determined in heparinized synovial fluid samples by the use of (i) a standard urine cytometer (Kova) and a

  4. ROLE OF NEEDLE SYNOVIAL BIOPSY IN JOINT DISEASES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Venkataraman

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available J oint disease is a common problem affecting all age groups presenting in orthopedic and rheumatology clinics. Diagnostic difficulties are encountered , particularly , in early stages when radiology and blood tests are inconclusive. The role of synovial analysis ( S ynovium and fluid using the Parker Pearson technique was studied in 50 patients with various j oint afflictions. There were 44 cases of monoarthritis and 6 cases of polyarthritis. Synovial fluid could be completely analyzed in 43 out of 50 cases and based on their physical , biochemical and cytological properties they were grouped as – a Non inflammat ory group b Mild to moderate inflammation and c Septic or severe inflammatory group. In this study , there were 6 cases of rheumatoid arthritis , 8 tuberculous arthritis , 16 non - specific synovitis , 4 traumatic arthritis , 4 osteoarthritis , 2 septic arthriti s , 6 normal synovium and one each of gout , villo - nodular synovitis , neuropathic joint and AVN femoral head. With Parker Pearson needle and their technique adequate representative synovial tissue could be obtained for histopathology in 41 out of 50 (82% cases. In the rest 9 cases , it was negative and open biopsy was done t o reach a diagnosis. Closed needle synovial biopsy is a simple , cost effective outpatient procedure and a helpful adjuvant for the diagnosis of joint diseases.

  5. Synovial hypertrophy causing recurrent hemarthrosis after total knee replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gajjar, Shreyash M; Platts, Andrew; Dowd, George

    2010-03-01

    Recurrent hemarthrosis following total knee replacement is relatively uncommon and can result from causes that may not always be easy to diagnose. We report three patients with late-onset recurrent hemarthrosis following total knee replacement due to synovial hypertrophy and impingement, which were successfully treated by embolization.

  6. Synovial sarcoma. An immunohistochemical study of the epithelial component

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, L J; Lyon, H; Myhre-Jensen, O;

    1994-01-01

    Twenty-five synovial sarcomas were studied with a battery of antibodies directed against keratin and epithelial membrane antigen (EMA). The keratin antibody MNF 116 showed reactivity in 24 tumors. In addition, 22 tumors showed reactivity with the antibody Keratin Wide Spectrum, 20 with the antibody...

  7. Synovial cysts of the lumbar spine: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radatz, M; Jakubowski, J; Cooper, J; Powell, T

    1997-12-01

    Four cases of synovial cyst (ganglion) arising from the facet joints of the lumbar spine are reported. A typical presenting feature was exacerbation of pain on standing or walking, mimicking vascular claudication. MRI proved in all four cases to be the definitive investigation and surgery the treatment of choice, producing excellent results.

  8. Osteoarthritis screening using Raman spectroscopy of dried human synovial fluid drops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esmonde-White, Karen A.; Mandair, Gurjit S.; Esmonde-White, Francis W. L.; Raaii, Farhang; Roessler, Blake J.; Morris, Michael D.

    2009-02-01

    We describe the use of Raman spectroscopy to investigate synovial fluid drops deposited onto fused silica microscope slides. This spectral information can be used to identify chemical changes in synovial fluid associated with osteoarthritis (OA) damage to knee joints. The chemical composition of synovial fluid is predominately proteins (enzymes, cytokines, or collagen fragments), glycosaminoglycans, and a mixture of minor components such as inorganic phosphate crystals. During osteoarthritis, the chemical, viscoelastic and biological properties of synovial fluid are altered. A pilot study was conducted to determine if Raman spectra of synovial fluid correlated with radiological scoring of knee joint damage. After informed consent, synovial fluid was drawn and x-rays were collected from the knee joints of 40 patients. Raman spectra and microscope images were obtained from the dried synovial fluid drops using a Raman microprobe and indicate a coarse separation of synovial fluid components. Individual protein signatures could not be identified; Raman spectra were useful as a general marker of overall protein content and secondary structure. Band intensity ratios used to describe protein and glycosaminoglycan structure were used in synovial fluid spectra. Band intensity ratios of Raman spectra indicate that there is less ordered protein secondary structure in synovial fluid from the damage group. Combination of drop deposition with Raman spectroscopy is a powerful approach to examining synovial fluid for the purposes of assessing osteoarthritis damage.

  9. MicroRNA expression in inflamed and noninflamed gingival tissues from Japanese patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogata, Yorimasa; Matsui, Sari; Kato, Ayako; Zhou, Liming; Nakayama, Yohei; Takai, Hideki

    2014-12-01

    Periodontitis is a chronic inflammatory disease caused by specific bacteria and viruses. Local, systemic, and environmental factors affect the rate of disease progression. Immune responses to bacterial products, and the subsequent production of inflammatory cytokines, are crucial in the destruction of periodontal tissue. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a class of small RNAs that control various cell processes by negatively regulating protein-coding genes. In this study, we compared miRNA expression in inflamed and noninflamed gingival tissues from Japanese dental patients. Total RNAs were isolated from inflamed and noninflamed gingival tissues. miRNA expression profiles were examined by an miRNA microarray, and the data were analyzed by GeneSpring GX, Ingenuity Pathways Analysis, and the TargetScan databases. Observed miRNA expression levels in inflamed gingiva were confirmed by real-time PCR. The three most overexpressed (by >2.72-fold) miRNAs were hsa-miR-150, hsa-miR-223, and hsa-miR-200b, and the three most underexpressed (by disease, organismal injury, abnormalities, urological disease, and cancer. The present findings suggest that miRNAs are associated with chronic periodontitis lesions in Japanese.

  10. Extensor and flexor digit synovial sheath, sac and synovial capsule in the distal part of the limbs in buffalos and camels and its relation of surgical interference

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. AL-sadi

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Sixty one samples of the distal parts of limbs were obtained from different ages of buffalo and camels of both sex to study the synovial structures to determine the suitable sites for injection of surgical interference. The result showed that extensor digit synovial sheath was extend between middle or distal part of metacarpal (metatarsal to the extensor processes and this formed with synovial capsule dorsal pouches which serve in surgical interference. The flexor digit synovial sheath extended to palmar (planter between distal extremity of metacarpal (metatarsal to the middle of second phalanx in buffalo while in camel it extended to the proximal extremity of second phalanx, that sheath was formed with suspensory ligament and sessamoid bone palmar or planter pouches which were serve the surgical interference. Fourth synovial bursa observed situated dorsally between the extensor digit laterals tendon and capsule of fetlock joint, forms site of injection during surgical interference, while the other two synovial bursa were located to palmer (planter between deep flexor tendon and distal sessamoid bone in buffalo while in camel these bursa were located between deep flexor tendon and cartilage of the second phalanx, these bursa were served for surgical interference. The synovial capsule which serve the surgical interference through digit cushion these were shown extended from the claw capsule. The result show that surgical interference was form six pouches in buffalo and eight pouches in camel, which formed by synovial structures and the tissue associated with them.

  11. T Cell Interstitial Migration: Motility Cues from the Inflamed Tissue for Micro- and Macro-Positioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaylo, Alison; Schrock, Dillon C; Fernandes, Ninoshka R J; Fowell, Deborah J

    2016-01-01

    Effector T cells exit the inflamed vasculature into an environment shaped by tissue-specific structural configurations and inflammation-imposed extrinsic modifications. Once within interstitial spaces of non-lymphoid tissues, T cells migrate in an apparent random, non-directional, fashion. Efficient T cell scanning of the tissue environment is essential for successful location of infected target cells or encounter with antigen-presenting cells that activate the T cell's antimicrobial effector functions. The mechanisms of interstitial T cell motility and the environmental cues that may promote or hinder efficient tissue scanning are poorly understood. The extracellular matrix (ECM) appears to play an important scaffolding role in guidance of T cell migration and likely provides a platform for the display of chemotactic factors that may help to direct the positioning of T cells. Here, we discuss how intravital imaging has provided insight into the motility patterns and cellular machinery that facilitates T cell interstitial migration and the critical environmental factors that may optimize the efficiency of effector T cell scanning of the inflamed tissue. Specifically, we highlight the local micro-positioning cues T cells encounter as they migrate within inflamed tissues, from surrounding ECM and signaling molecules, as well as a requirement for appropriate long-range macro-positioning within distinct tissue compartments or at discrete foci of infection or tissue damage. The central nervous system (CNS) responds to injury and infection by extensively remodeling the ECM and with the de novo generation of a fibroblastic reticular network that likely influences T cell motility. We examine how inflammation-induced changes to the CNS landscape may regulate T cell tissue exploration and modulate function.

  12. T Cell Interstitial Migration: Motility Cues from the Inflamed Tissue for Micro- and Macro-Positioning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaylo, Alison; Schrock, Dillon C.; Fernandes, Ninoshka R. J.; Fowell, Deborah J.

    2016-01-01

    Effector T cells exit the inflamed vasculature into an environment shaped by tissue-specific structural configurations and inflammation-imposed extrinsic modifications. Once within interstitial spaces of non-lymphoid tissues, T cells migrate in an apparent random, non-directional, fashion. Efficient T cell scanning of the tissue environment is essential for successful location of infected target cells or encounter with antigen-presenting cells that activate the T cell’s antimicrobial effector functions. The mechanisms of interstitial T cell motility and the environmental cues that may promote or hinder efficient tissue scanning are poorly understood. The extracellular matrix (ECM) appears to play an important scaffolding role in guidance of T cell migration and likely provides a platform for the display of chemotactic factors that may help to direct the positioning of T cells. Here, we discuss how intravital imaging has provided insight into the motility patterns and cellular machinery that facilitates T cell interstitial migration and the critical environmental factors that may optimize the efficiency of effector T cell scanning of the inflamed tissue. Specifically, we highlight the local micro-positioning cues T cells encounter as they migrate within inflamed tissues, from surrounding ECM and signaling molecules, as well as a requirement for appropriate long-range macro-positioning within distinct tissue compartments or at discrete foci of infection or tissue damage. The central nervous system (CNS) responds to injury and infection by extensively remodeling the ECM and with the de novo generation of a fibroblastic reticular network that likely influences T cell motility. We examine how inflammation-induced changes to the CNS landscape may regulate T cell tissue exploration and modulate function. PMID:27790220

  13. Synovial sarcoma. An immunohistochemical study of the epithelial component

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, L J; Lyon, H; Myhre-Jensen, O

    1994-01-01

    Twenty-five synovial sarcomas were studied with a battery of antibodies directed against keratin and epithelial membrane antigen (EMA). The keratin antibody MNF 116 showed reactivity in 24 tumors. In addition, 22 tumors showed reactivity with the antibody Keratin Wide Spectrum, 20 with the antibody...... Keratin 56, 64, and 19 with CAM 5.2. Seventeen tumors showed reactivity with EMA. The keratin and EMA reactivity was present in cells lining obvious cleft-like structures in biphasic tumors. In the spindle cell areas of both biphasic and monophasic fibrous tumors, we found clusters of a few reacting cells...... apparently located around small clefts. In the synovioblastic tumors, clusters of plump tumor cells reactive for both the keratins and EMA were present. In conclusion, we found that proper identification of epithelial differentiation in synovial sarcomas is facilitated by an immunohistochemical application...

  14. Hyaluronic acid production by irradiated human synovial fibroblasts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yaron, M.; Yaron, I.; Levita, M.; Herzberg, M.

    1977-03-01

    Radioactive particles as well as x irradiation from an external source has been used in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis, osteoarthritis, and ankylosing spondylitis. In order to clarify effects of ionizing irradiation on synovial cells, radioactive gold (/sup 198/Au) and yttrium (/sup 90/Y) were added to fibroblast cultures derived from human synovial membranes. Other cultures were irradiated by a Picker x-ray machine. Fibroblast growth and hyaluronic acid production were measured. Radioactive gold and yttrium particles induced a significant increase of hyaluronic acid synthesis rate (pg/cell/day) and inhibited fibroblast growth. Fibroblasts continued to overproduce hyaluronic acid and to show growth inhibition 3 weeks after irradiation with radioactive gold. Hydrocortisone inhibited hyaluronic acid overproduction induced by radioactive gold. Overproduction of hyaluronic acid induced by the x-ray machine was inhibited by hydrocortisone, actinomycin-D, and cycloheximide. Fibroblasts derived from normal and rheumatoid patients responded similarly to ionizing irradiation.

  15. Tuberculosis diagnosed by PCR analysis of synovial fluid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujimoto, Nobukazu; Gemba, Kenichi; Yao, Atsushi; Ozaki, Shinji; Ono, Katsuichiro; Wada, Sae; Fujii, Yasuhiro; Namba, Yoshifumi; Kishimoto, Takumi

    2010-02-01

    Tuberculosis is a leading cause of mortality due to an infectious agent worldwide. It often affects multiple organs by hematogenous spread of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, but knee-joint involvement is extremely rare, comprising approximately 0.1% of all forms of tuberculosis. We present a case of tuberculous pleuritis with knee-joint involvement. Cytological and biochemical analysis of the pleural fluid and a biopsy specimen of the cervical lymph node indicated tuberculosis, but a definitive diagnosis was not given. A confirmed diagnosis was finally obtained through PCR analysis of the synovial fluid. Tuberculosis should be included in the differential diagnosis in patients with persistent pain and swelling of the knee. PCR analysis of the synovial fluid is a quick and useful method for the diagnosis.

  16. Mouth and genital ulcers with inflamed cartilage (MAGIC) syndrome complicated by aneurysmal aortitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Chin Soon; Hogan, Patrick; McKenzie, Scott; Gibbs, Harry; Strutton, Geoff; Wong, Richard

    2007-08-01

    "MAGIC syndrome" (Mouth And Genital ulcers with Inflamed Cartilage) has been proposed to describe patients with clinical features of both relapsing polychondritis and Behcet disease. A total of 18 cases have been reported with only 1 case associated with aneurysmal aortitis described in 1997. Herein, we describe a patient with MAGIC syndrome complicated by aneurysmal aortitis requiring cardiothoracic surgery and intensive immunosuppression. Monitoring for the possible development of inflammatory aortic aneurysms should thus be considered in patients with MAGIC syndrome who have persistently elevated serum inflammatory markers. If an aortic aneurysm is detected, cardiothoracic surgical referral is necessary, close monitoring for enlargement is mandatory, and intensification of immunosuppressive therapy should be considered.

  17. The role of innate lymphoid cells in healthy and inflamed skin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bonefeld, Charlotte M.; Geisler, Carsten

    2016-01-01

    The skin constitutes the interface between the organism and the environment, and it protects the body from harmful substances in the environment via physical, chemical and immunological barriers. The immunological barrier of the skin comprises both cells from the innate and the adaptive immune...... system. During the last years, it has become clear that innate lymphoid cells play a role in homeostasis and inflammation of the skin in humans and mice. In this review, we will discuss the role of innate lymphoid cells in healthy and inflamed skin with special focus on their role in atopic dermatitis....

  18. Knee synovial cyst presenting as iliotibial band friction syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, M L; Marshall, T; Donell, S T; Phillips, H

    2004-06-01

    We present the case of a 28-year-old competitive runner with iliotibial band (ITB) friction syndrome associated with a synovial cyst. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) did not demonstrate a fluid collection. However, open exploration revealed a large cyst beneath the ITB arising from the capsule of the knee proximal to the lateral meniscus. The cyst disappeared on extension. The pre-operative MRI scan may have revealed the cyst, if it had been taken with the knee flexed.

  19. Oral bacterial DNAs in synovial fluids of arthritis patients

    OpenAIRE

    Moen, Ketil; Johan G. Brun; Eribe, Emenike R.K.; Olsen, Ingar; Jonsson, Roland

    2011-01-01

    Arthritis may be triggered by microbial constituents, more specifically, bacterial cell wall fragments, or bacterial DNA. The aim of this study was to analyze the amount of oral bacterial DNA in synovial fluids (SF) of arthritis patients. SF from 15 rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients, 15 arthritides (non-RA) patients and 9 osteoarthritis (control) patients were extracted for oral bacterial DNA. DNA was used in a checkerboard DNA/DNA hybridization set-up, in order to identify 40 different spec...

  20. Staphylococcal Superantigens in Synovial Fluid of 62 Patients With Arthritis

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    A Tabatabaei

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Determining the etiologic causes of septic arthritis is of the most importance. Goal of this study was to investigate presence of staphylococcal enterotoxins A, B, C and Toxic Shock Staphylococcal toxin-1 in the synovial fluid of patients with arthritis. Methods: This cross-sectional study was performed in the Pediatric and Orthopedic Wards of Hazrat Rasoul Hospital in Tehran, Iran during 2008- 2010. Gram stains, conventional cultures, direct detection of soluble bacterial antigens were used to detect H. influenza, S. pneumonia, group B streptococci, and N. meningitidis while Latex particle agglutination test was used for staphylococcal supper antigens (by enzyme immunoassays upon synovial fluid tapping of 62 individuals (5 mo to 16 yrs, mean=113.8 yrs. P<0.05 was considered statistically significant. Results: Positive SF cultures (n=11: 5 positive cases of S. aureus; 5 S. pneumonia; 1 H. influenza, and 1 Klebsiella. Positive gram stains: 10%; and positive LPA: 4%. Staphylococcal arthritis was diagnosed in 7 (39% cases upon positive culture or positive gram stain. The most common type was TSST-1 (47% and the least common was enterotoxin B (18%. Isolation of S. aureus (positive culture was correlated to presence of enterotoxin A in synovial fluid but not to enterotoxins B, C or TSST-1. Conclusion: Staph. aureus had a prominent role in arthritis. 47% of cases with negative culture for S. aureus had at least one type of staphylococcal super antigens in the synovial fluid. Searching for antigens of usual organisms or staphylococcal supper antigens could be helpful for diagnosis and subsequent treatment.

  1. Pathophysiology and imaging in inflammatory and blastomatous synovial diseases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Imhof, H.; Noebauer-Huhmann, I.-M.; Gahleitner, A.; Kainberger, F.; Krestan, C.; Trattnig, S. [Osteology, Universitaets Klinik fuer Radiodiagnostik, AKH Vienna (Austria); Sulzbacher, I. [Klinisches Institut fuer klinische Pathologie, AKH Vienna (Austria)

    2002-06-01

    Variable pathologies are subsumed under the term ''synovial disease'', including common pathologies such as rheumatoid arthritis. While formerly radiologists had to rely on conventional radiographs and bone scintigraphy with their inherent problems in visualizing soft tissue, noninvasive imaging of the synovium has recently improved substantially with the technical development of MRI and (Doppler) ultrasound. These imaging modalities allow differentiation of characteristic pathologic features based on a profound knowledge of normal anatomy and pathophysiology. (orig.)

  2. Synovial desmoplastic fibroblastoma of hip joint with bone erosion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beggs, I. [Department of Clinical Radiology, Royal Infirmary, Edinburgh (United Kingdom); Salter, D.S. [Department of Pathology, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh (United Kingdom); Dorfman, H.D. [Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Montefiore Medical Center, Bronx, NY (United States)

    1999-07-01

    A 78-year-old woman presented with pain at the left hip. Initial radiographs showed minimal age-related changes. Over the next 2 years she developed large erosions in the left femoral neck and proceeded to hip replacement. Histological examination showed bland spindle cells in a loose and hyalinised collagenous stroma considered to represent a desmoplastic fibroblastoma (collagenous fibroma). This is the first reported case of synovial desmoplastic fibroblastoma. (orig.) With 7 figs., 33 refs.

  3. Anterior mediastinal synovial sarcoma: A case report and literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen-xiang YUE

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective To study the clinical manifestations, pathologic features, diagnosis, treatment and prognosis of primary synovial sarcoma in the anterior mediastinum. Methods A case of primary synovial sarcoma in the anterior mediastinum was reported. Clinical features, imaging manifestations, pathology features and therapeutic effect were analysed and the relevant literature was reviewed. Results A 48-year-male patient was admitted with complaint of right chest pain for 4 days. Chest computerized tomography revealed a large mass located at the right anterior mediastinum, and it was primarily diagnosed as invasive thymoma. Pathological examination by CT-guided percutaneous needle biopsy manifested that, under microscope, the tumor cells were short and spindle in shape forming a nest structure, suggested it was a thymoma. The patient then underwent resection of thymoma with removal of fat and connective tissue in the anterior mediastinum. During the operation the size of the tumor was 15cm×15cm×10cm, being located at the anterior mediastinum, and it tended to bleed. The diagnosis of primary monophasic synovial sarcoma in the mediastinum was confirmed by postoperative/pathology examination. Immunohistochemistry staining showed that the tumor cells were positive for the markers Bcl-2 and EMA, but negative for the markers CK (pan and S100. The patient suffered from local recurrence with metastases to lung 4 months after surgery. The patient received 2 chemotherapeutic courses with ifosfamide, epirubicin and cisplatin. He died 6 months after surgery. Conclusion Primary synovial sarcoma in the anterior mediastinum is an extremely rare and highly malignant tumor with poor prognosis. The diagnosis depends on the pathological features, immunohistochemistry and RT-PCR. Radical resection combined with comprehensive treatment may improve the survival rate. DOI: 10.11855/j.issn.0577-7402.2014.12.12

  4. Postlaminectomy synovial cyst formation: a possible consequence of ligamentum flavum excision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walcott, Brian P; Coumans, Jean-Valery

    2012-02-01

    Ligamentum flavum is generally resected with impunity when a laminectomy is performed; it is a strong ligament and its removal may not be inconsequential. We sought to examine the consequence of resection of ligamentum flavum as it pertains to the formation of synovial cysts. Following IRB approval, we retrospectively reviewed the charts of consecutive patients who underwent a laminectomy for any diagnosis during the years 2009-2010. Exclusions were made for patients undergoing resection of a synovial cyst, laminectomy done as part of a fusion, and microdiscectomy. A total of 201 laminectomies were performed. 10 instances of post-laminectomy synovial cyst occurred in only the lumbar spine. Synovial cysts occurred exclusively after surgery for stenosis (n=10). Laminectomy and resection of the ligament flavum is a risk factor for the subsequent formation of a synovial cyst. Secondary synovial cyst formation should be suspected in individuals who develop radiculopathy after laminectomy for stenosis. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Cubital Tunnel Syndrome Due to Synovial Cyst: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zahir Kizilay

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available We report a rare case of ulnar nerve entrapment caused by a synovial cyst derived from the left elbow joint. A 57-year-old male patient with a seven-month history of pain in his left elbow and a progressive and increasing numbness and weakness complaints in his left hand came to our clinic. Weakness and sensory loss of the 4th and 5th fingers were determined in neurological examination. The results of Tinel’s sign and Phalen’s Test were positive, especially when his left elbow was flexed. In electromyelography, axonal damage and entrapment neuropathy were determined in the left cubital tunnel area. Total excision of the synovial cyst and ulnar nerve anterior subcutaneous transposition were performed in surgical treatment. The patient’s pain decreased immediately after the surgery. In this report, we have discussed the pathopysiology of cubital tunnel syndrome due to synovial cyst and which surgical technique may be suitable as our case report.

  6. RADIOGRAPHIC IMAGING OF BIPHASIC SYNOVIAL SARCOMA ON LEFT ELBOW

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sitanggang Firman P

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Synovial sarcoma is the fourth most common type of sarcoma. It represents between 5% -10% of all soft tissue sarcomas and most prevalent in aged between 15 - 40 years. Synovial sarcoma is the most commonly misdiagnosed soft tissue malignancy, initially as an inflammation process,often because it may be slow-growing, have a benign appearance on imaging studies, may vary in size, and may have pain similar to that associated with trauma.    A rare case is presented of 17 years old women with a synovial sarcoma biphasic. The primary tumor originated in the left elbow since 2004. Since then, the patient has had repeated passive or active left elbow pain and tenderness. No history of trauma. She has not developed metastases of the lung. The patient refused to have surgery and others medical procedures that already planned and explained to her. The conclusion of this case report point that radiology is important to diagnosis and planning for further management

  7. Synovial Sarcoma of the Larynx: Report of a Case and Review of Literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baby, Anto; Somanathan, Thara; Konoth, Sreedevi

    2017-01-01

    Sarcomas account for less than 1% of malignant neoplasms arising in the head and neck in adults. Laryngeal synovial sarcoma is an extremely rare form of laryngeal malignancy with less than 20 cases reported in the literature. We report the case of a 48-year-old man with synovial sarcoma of the larynx. He underwent excision of the tumor followed by radiation. He is alive in remission at 36 months. The literature on synovial sarcoma of the larynx is reviewed. PMID:28280643

  8. Staphylococcal Enterotoxin A Detection from Rheumatoid Arthritis Patients’ Blood and Synovial Fluid

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Direct detection of microbial super antigens in synovial fluid of patients with rheumatoid arthritis may be able to guide to the design of cost-effective therapies. The purpose of this study was to assess the existence of Staphylococcal enterotoxin A (superantigen A) in the synovial fluid of patients with RA by the PCR and ELISA methods. Methods This experimental study was conducted on the synovial fluid of 103 RA patients from Baqiyatallah University of Medical Sciences’ Rheumat...

  9. Inhibition of oncostatin M in osteoarthritic synovial fluid enhances GAG production in osteoarthritic cartilage repair

    OpenAIRE

    Beekhuizen, M.; GJVM van Osch; AGJ Bot; MCL Hoekstra; DBF Saris; WJA Dhert; LB Creemers

    2013-01-01

    Mediators in the synovial fluid are thought to play a major role in osteoarthritic cartilage turnover. The purpose of the current study was to investigate the role of oncostatin M (OSM) in osteoarthritis (OA) by evaluating the presence of the cytokine and its receptors in the OA joint and interfering with its activity in synovial fluid co-cultured with cartilage explants. OSM levels were increased in the synovial fluid of osteoarthritic patients compared to healthy donors. Immunohistochemistr...

  10. Synovial hemangioma of the knee with recurrent effusion and pain: a case report.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Naghi Tahmasbi

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Synovial hemangioma is a rare benign malformation of the synovium. It presents frequently in the knee with pain, tenderness, intermittent swelling and recurrent hemarthrosis. MRI can be helpful in diagnosis of synovial hemangioma. In this paper, we present a 45-year-old lady with chronic symptoms and obscure clinical symptoms for 35 years which finally diagnosed and managed arthroscopically as synovial hemangioma of the knee. The patient`s complaints resolved efficiently with no recurrence after one year.

  11. The role of lubricin in the mechanical behavior of synovial fluid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jay, G. D.; Torres, J. R.; Warman, M. L.; Laderer, M. C.; Breuer, K. S.

    2007-01-01

    Synovial fluid is a semidilute hyaluronate (HA) polymer solution, the rheology of which depends on HA–protein interactions, and lubricin is a HA-binding protein found in synovial fluid and at cartilage surfaces, where it contributes to boundary lubrication under load. Individuals with genetic deficiency of lubricin develop precocious joint failure. The role of lubricin in synovial fluid rheology is not known. We used a multiple-particle-tracking microrheology technique to study the molecular interactions between lubricin and HA in synovial fluid. Particles (200 nm mean diameter) embedded in normal and lubricin-deficient synovial fluid samples were tracked separately by using multiple-particle-tracking microrheology. The time-dependent ensemble-averaged mean-squared displacements of all of the particles were measured over a range of physiologically relevant frequencies. The mean-squared displacement correlation with time lag had slopes with values of unity for simple HA solutions and for synovial fluid from an individual who genetically lacked lubricin, in contrast to slopes with values less than unity (α ≈ 0.6) for normal synovial fluid. These data correlated with bulk rheology studies of the same samples. We found that the subdiffusive and elastic behavior of synovial fluid, at physiological shear rates, was absent in fluid from a patient who lacks lubricin. We conclude that lubricin provides synovial fluid with an ability to dissipate strain energy induced by mammalian locomotion, which is a chondroprotective feature that is distinct from boundary lubrication. PMID:17404241

  12. Monocyte-mediated delivery of polymeric backpacks to inflamed tissues: a generalized strategy to deliver drugs to treat inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anselmo, Aaron C; Gilbert, Jonathan B; Kumar, Sunny; Gupta, Vivek; Cohen, Robert E; Rubner, Michael F; Mitragotri, Samir

    2015-02-10

    Targeted delivery of drugs and imaging agents to inflamed tissues, as in the cases of cancer, Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, and arthritis, represents one of the major challenges in drug delivery. Monocytes possess a unique ability to target and penetrate into sites of inflammation. Here, we describe a broad approach to take advantage of the natural ability of monocytes to target and deliver flat polymeric particles ("Cellular Backpacks") to inflamed tissues. Cellular backpacks attach strongly to the surface of monocytes but do not undergo phagocytosis due to backpack's size, disk-like shape and flexibility. Following attachment of backpacks, monocytes retain important cellular functions including transmigration through an endothelial monolayer and differentiation into macrophages. In two separate in vivo inflammation models, backpack-laden monocytes exhibit increased targeting to inflamed tissues. Cellular backpacks, and their abilities to attach to monocytes without impairing monocyte functions and 'hitchhike' to a variety of inflamed tissues, offer a new platform for both cell-mediated therapies and broad targeting of inflamed tissues.

  13. Endoscopic resection of the inflamed bicipitoradial bursa extended around the radial neck

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lui, Tun Hing

    2013-01-01

    The bicipitoradial bursa lies at the insertion of the biceps tendon on the radial tuberosity. It is an unusual site for chronic bursitis and most often, results from repetitive mechanical trauma or overuse. Other causes include tuberculosis, immunological complications of the rheumatological disease, for example, psoriatic arthropathy, rheumatoid arthritis and synovial chondromatosis. Unlike ganglion cyst arising from the elbow joint, resection of the bursa through the elbow arthroscopy is not possible as the bursa is not communicated with the joint. We reported a patient with rheumatoid arthritis presenting with bicipitoradial bursitis extended around the radial neck which was successfully resected endoscopically. PMID:23704464

  14. Inhibition of chemokine expression in rat inflamed paws by systemic use of the antihyperalgesic oxidized ATP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ticozzi Paolo

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We previously showed that local use of periodate oxidized ATP (oATP, a selective inhibitor of P2X7 receptors for ATP in rat paw treated with Freund's adjuvant induced a significant reduction of hyperalgesia Herein we investigate the role of oATP, in the rat paws inflamed by carrageenan, which mimics acute inflammation in humans. Results Local, oral or intravenous administration of a single dose of oATP significantly reduced thermal hyperalgesia in hind paws of rats for 24 hours, and such effect was greater than that induced by diclofenac or indomethacin. Following oATP treatment, the expression of the pro-inflammatory chemokines interferon-gamma-inducible protein-10 (IP-10, mon ocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1 and interleukin-8 (IL-8 within the inflamed tissues markedly decreased on vessels and infiltrated cells. In parallel, the immunohistochemical findings showed an impairment, with respect to the untreated rats, in P2X7 expression, mainly on nerves and vessels close to the site of inflammation. Finally, oATP treatment significantly reduced the presence of infiltrating inflammatory macrophages in the paw tissue. Conclusion Taken together these results clearly show that oATP reduces carrageenan-induced inflammation in rats.

  15. The Effect of Full Crown Preparation on Normal and Inflamed Pulp Tissue: An Animal Study

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    Mandana Vardkar

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Full crown preparation may have adverse effects on pulp tissue. In this study, the effect of full-crown preparation on intact versus inflamed pulp tissue was studied. Methods: Fifteen healthy mature cats were randomly selected for this study. The study was performed on four canine teeth of each cat. Cats were anesthetized and then radiographs were taken from the canine teeth. Class V cavities were prepared in cat canine teeth. Soft decayed dentin was placed on the floor of cavities and sealed. After 1 month, all of the samples prepared for crown fabrication. Before crown preparation, an impression was taken in a custom tray. During crown preparation, the remnants of carious dentin were removed and undercuts were sealed by glass-ionomer. After preparation, self-cured acrylic temporary crowns were fabricated in a direct procedure and cemented permanently by glass-ionomer. One week later, teeth of the opposite jaw were prepared in a similar procedure. After 2 months, vital perfusion performed and the pulp tissue was histologically examined. Results: There was no significant difference between 4 groups, regarding to histologic status of the pulp. In healthy lower jaw, inflammation was the most frequent but in the other groups, necrosis was most frequent. Also, there was no significant difference between the upper jaw and the lower jaw groups regarding to the frequency of necrosis and inflammation. Conclusion: There is no significant difference between intact and inflamed groups regarding the frequency of necrosis and inflammation

  16. The Effect of Full Crown Preparation on Normal and Inflamed Pulp Tissue: An Animal Study

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    Maryam Bidar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Full crown preparation may have adverse effects on pulp tissue. In this study, the effect of full-crown preparation on intact versus inflamed pulp tissue was studied. Methods: Fifteen healthy mature cats were randomly selected for this study. The study was performed on four canine teeth of each cat. Cats were anesthetized and then radiographs were taken from the canine teeth. Class V cavities were prepared in cat canine teeth. Soft decayed dentin was placed on the floor of cavities and sealed. After 1 month, all of the samples prepared for crown fabrication. Before crown preparation, an impression was taken in a custom tray. During crown preparation, the remnants of carious dentin were removed and undercuts were sealed by glass-ionomer. After preparation, self-cured acrylic temporary crowns were fabricated in a direct procedure and cemented permanently by glass-ionomer. One week later, teeth of the opposite jaw were prepared in a similar procedure. After 2 months, vital perfusion performed and the pulp tissue was histologically examined. Results: There was no significant difference between 4 groups, regarding to histologic status of the pulp. In healthy lower jaw, inflammation was the most frequent but in the other groups, necrosis was most frequent. Also, there was no significant difference between the upper jaw and the lower jaw groups regarding to the frequency of necrosis and inflammation. Conclusion: There is no significant difference between intact and inflamed groups regarding the frequency of necrosis and inflammation

  17. Anti-TNF-Alpha-Adalimumab Therapy Had Time Lag of Improvement in Synovial Hypertrophy Compared to Rapid Response in Power Doppler Synovial Vascularity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying-Chou Chen

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. The quantification of synovitis is of great significance for follow-up in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA. This study aimed to validate the use of power Doppler ultrasonography (PDUS for evaluating synovial vascularity and synovial hypertrophy for synovitis in patients with rheumatoid arthritis treated with adalimumab. Materials and Methods. The synovial disease activity and vascularity of RA on both wrists (radio-carpal joint were assessed using GS and PDUS to derive the composite US scores based on abnormal counts and severity. The relationship between each measure was determined. Results. The 71 patients who received adalimumab therapy had significantly decreased DAS28, ESR, and CRP. After one month, PD score decreased and then remained low for 12 months. Synovial hypertrophy did not change until 3–6 months after, when it started to improve (p=0.017. By multivariate analysis, sex, age, BMI, and DAS28 did not lead to any difference between synovial hypertrophy and PDUS changes (p=0.498. Discussion. Composite US markers of synovial hypertrophy correlate significantly to the DAS28 score and ESR/CRP in adult RA. The time needed for synovial hypertrophy to decrease may be up to 3–6 months after adalimumab therapy. Switching to biological therapy before 3–6 months is inappropriate and ineffective.

  18. Release of Active Peptidyl Arginine Deiminases by Neutrophils Can Explain Production of Extracellular Citrullinated Autoantigens in Rheumatoid Arthritis Synovial Fluid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spengler, Julia; Lugonja, Božo; Jimmy Ytterberg, A.; Zubarev, Roman A.; Creese, Andrew J.; Pearson, Mark J.; Grant, Melissa M.; Milward, Michael; Lundberg, Karin; Buckley, Christopher D.; Filer, Andrew; Raza, Karim; Cooper, Paul R.; Chapple, Iain L.

    2015-01-01

    Objective In the majority of patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), antibodies specifically recognize citrullinated autoantigens that are generated by peptidylarginine deiminases (PADs). Neutrophils express high levels of PAD and accumulate in the synovial fluid (SF) of RA patients during disease flares. This study was undertaken to test the hypothesis that neutrophil cell death, induced by either NETosis (extrusion of genomic DNA–protein complexes known as neutrophil extracellular traps [NETs]) or necrosis, can contribute to production of autoantigens in the inflamed joint. Methods Extracellular DNA was quantified in the SF of patients with RA, patients with osteoarthritis (OA), and patients with psoriatic arthritis (PsA). Release of PAD from neutrophils was investigated by Western blotting, mass spectrometry, immunofluorescence staining, and PAD activity assays. PAD2 and PAD4 protein expression, as well as PAD enzymatic activity, were assessed in the SF of patients with RA and those with OA. Results Extracellular DNA was detected at significantly higher levels in RA SF than in OA SF (P < 0.001) or PsA SF (P < 0.05), and its expression levels correlated with neutrophil concentrations and PAD activity in RA SF. Necrotic neutrophils released less soluble extracellular DNA compared to NETotic cells in vitro (P < 0.05). Higher PAD activity was detected in RA SF than in OA SF (P < 0.05). The citrullinated proteins PAD2 and PAD4 were found attached to NETs and also freely diffused in the supernatant. PAD enzymatic activity was detected in supernatants of neutrophils undergoing either NETosis or necrosis. Conclusion Release of active PAD isoforms into the SF by neutrophil cell death is a plausible explanation for the generation of extracellular autoantigens in RA. PMID:26245941

  19. The role of {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT as a prognostic factor in patients with synovial sarcoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Kyoung Jin; Lim, Il Han; Park, Joon Yeun [Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-03-15

    This research aims to investigate the potential of 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography (FDG PET) to predict pathologic response after neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC) and overall survival (OS) of patients with synovial sarcoma in Korea. Twenty patients with synovial sarcoma from January 2001 to December 2011 were reviewed retrospectively. All patients underwent pre-treatment FDG PET and tumor removal. Patients were classified with the maximum SUV (SUVmax), metabolic tumor volume (MTV), total lesion glycolysis (TLG), age, sex, histologic subtype, tumor size, NAC, resection margin, and metastasis at diagnosis. Pathologic response was assessed using the French Federation of Cancer Centers system. Statistical analyses were analyzed using the Kaplan-Meier method, log-rank test, Cox proportional hazards regression model, and Mann-Whitney test. Nine patients (45 %) showed pathologic response, and ten patients survived. Higher SUVmax, higher MTV, higher TLG, monophasic epithelial type, and metastasis at diagnosis were significantly related to poorer OS (p = 0.047, 0.016, 0.016, 0.045, and 0.018, respectively). By multivariate analysis, metastasis at diagnosis was significantly related to poorer OS (p = 0.012/HR = 5.9, 95 % CI 1.47 to 24.1). The SUVmax, MTV, and TLG of the non-responder group were significantly higher than those of the responder group (p = 0.020, 0.020, and 0.020, respectively). There was no significant difference in size between the two groups (p = 0.062). A higher SUVmax on the pre-treatment scan, monophasic epithelial type, and metastasis at diagnosis were significantly associated with a poorer OS, and pathologic responders showed a higher SUVmax before NAC. The PET parameters can be used to predict OS and pathologic response in patients with synovial sarcomas before NAC.

  20. Ultrasound colour Doppler is associated with synovial pathology in biopsies from hand joints in rheumatoid arthritis patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Martin; Ellegaard, Karen; Hebsgaard, Josephine B

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Little is known regarding the association between ultrasound-determined pathological synovial blood flow and synovial pathology in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). We therefore examined the association between colour Doppler ultrasound imaging and synovitis assessed by histopathology...

  1. Profiling of endogenous peptides in human synovial fluid by NanoLC-MS : Method validation and peptide identification

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kamphorst, J.J.; Heijden, R. van der; Groot, J. de; Lafeber, F.P.J.G.; Reijmers, T.H.; El, B. van; Tjaden, U.R.; Greef, J. van der; Hankemeier, T.

    2007-01-01

    Synovial fluid potentially contains markers for early diagnosis and disease progression in degenerative joint diseases such as osteoarthritis. Here, a method is described for profiling endogenous peptides in human synovial fluid, using ultrafiltration, solid-phase extraction, nanoscale liquid chroma

  2. Treatment of a little finger synovial cyst by repair of an opening in the wrist capsule: case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meek, Marcel F; Heras-Palou, Carlos

    2009-01-01

    As synovial fluid from the wrist may leak into the ulnar bursa and from there into the flexor synovial sheath in the little finger, the origin of a synovial cyst of the pulp of the little finger may be in the wrist. Here we present the surgical treatment of a patient with a synovial cyst of the pulp of the little finger by surgery of the wrist and palm of the hand after failed conservative treatment.

  3. A rare cause of root-compression: Subaxial cervical synovial cyst in association with congenital fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breckwoldt, Tabea; Oktenoglu, Tunc; Sasani, Mehdi; Suzer, Tuncer; Ozer, Ali Fahir

    2015-01-01

    Synovial cyst in the cervical spine is a very rare pathology that develops from the facet joint. When a synovial cyst emerges into the surrounding space, it can compress the nervous tissue and cause neurological symptoms. In the cervical area there is additionally the risk of spinal cord compression comparing to the more common presentation of synovial cysts in the lumbar spine. Here, a cervical synovial cysts from the left facet joint grew into the spinal canal and compressed the C8 nerve root which led to root compressing symptoms. Interestingly we found this synovial cyst with congenital fusion. We identified only nine similar cases in the literature. The cyst was removed surgically and the patient discharged without complications. Numerous theories have been established to explain the pathogenesis of synovial cyst. Biomechanical alterations of the spine play a significant role in the development of synovial cyst. However, the etiology is still unclear. Surgical treatment should be considered in cervical synovial cysts with neurologic deficit or with cord compression or when the conservative treatment is ineffective. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  4. Auriculotemporal neuralgia secondary to TMJ synovial cyst: a rare presentation of a rare entity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ansari, Hossein; Robertson, Carrie E; Lane, John I; Viozzi, Christopher F; Garza, Ivan

    2013-01-01

    Synovial cysts of the temporomandibular joint are rare, and to our knowledge, only 14 cases have been reported. The most common presentation is local pain and swelling. We present a case of a synovial cyst presenting with neuralgia in the distribution of the auriculotemporal nerve, initially misdiagnosed as trigeminal neuralgia.

  5. Optimized “In Vitro” Culture Conditions for Human Rheumatoid Arthritis Synovial Fibroblasts

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    Claudia Casnici

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The composition of synovial fluid in rheumatoid arthritis (RA is complex and strongly influences the microenvironment of joints and it is an inseparable element of the disease. Currently, “in vitro” studies are performed on RA cells cultured in the presence of either recombinant proinflammatory cytokines-conditioned medium or medium alone. In this study, we evaluated the use of synovial fluid, derived from RA patients, as optimal culture condition to perform “in vitro” studies on RA synovial fibroblasts. We observed that synovial fluid is more effective in inducing cell proliferation with respect to TNF-alpha or culture medium alone. Spontaneous apoptosis in fibroblasts was also decreased in response to synovial fluid. The expression of proinflammatory cytokines in the presence of synovial fluid was significantly elevated with respect to cells cultured with TNF-alpha or medium, and the overall morphology of cells was also modified. In addition, modulation of intracellular calcium dynamics elicited in response to synovial fluid or TNF-alpha exposure is different and suggests a role for the purinergic signalling in the modulation of the effects. These results emphasize the importance of using RA synovial fluid in “in vitro” studies involving RA cells, in order to reproduce faithfully the physiopathological environmental characteristic of RA joints.

  6. Distinct synovial immunopathologic characteristics of juvenile-onset spondylarthritis and other forms of juvenile idiopathic arthritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E. Kruithof; V. van den Bossche; L. de Rycke; B. Vandooren; R. Joos; J.D. Canete; P.P. Tak; A.M.H. Boots; E.M. Veys; D. Baeten

    2006-01-01

    Objective. To characterize the synovial immunopathologic features of juvenile-onset spondylarthritis (SpA) in relation to adult SpA and other forms of juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA). Methods. Synovial biopsy samples were obtained from 10 patients with juvenile-onset SpA, 23 with adult SpA, 19 w

  7. Subcutaneous phaeohyphomycosis due to Pyrenochaeta romeroi mimicking a synovial cyst

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    Aurelien Dinh

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Opportunistic subcutaneous fungal infections are increasing nowadays due to the growing number of medical conditions causing immunosuppression, especially organ transplant. The incidence rate of subcutaneous phaeohyphomycosis is very low. Most studies found are case reports. They showed a wide variation of clinical presentations. Pyrenochaeta romeroi, a fungus from the Dematiaceae group is a saprophyte found in soil and plants and a possible causative agent of phaeohyphomycosis. We present a rare case of subcutaneous phaeohyphomycosis caused by P. romeroi mimicking a synovial cyst in a diabetic patient.

  8. Primary Pulmonary Synovial Sarcoma: A Very Rare Presentation

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    Ekrem Cengiz Seyhan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Synovial sarcoma (SS is a rare tumor originating from mesenchymal tissue and accounting for approximately 5–10% of all soft tissue sarcomas. A rare case of primary pulmonary SS in an asymptomatic 18-year-old man admitted to our hospital for investigation of a 6 × 6.5 cm, oval-shaped, well-delineated pleural based peripheral mass in the left lower lobe in his thorax CT is presented. Left lower lobectomy was done. Immunohistochemically, tumor cells were positive for cytokeratin, epithelial membrane antigen (EMA, and vimentin so that the histopathological diagnosis was compatible with biphasic spindle cell type SS in the lung.

  9. Synovial cysts of the lumbar spine; Cistos sinoviais lombares

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosa, Ana Claudia Ferreira; Machado, Marcio Martins [Goias Univ., Goiania, GO (Brazil). Faculdade de Medicina. Hospital das Clinicas]. E-mail: anaclaudiaferreira@ig.com.br; Figueiredo, Marco Antonio Junqueira [Hospital Sirio-Libanes, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Servico de Tomografia Computadorizada; Cerri, Giovanni Guido [Sao Paulo Univ., SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Medicina. Dept. de Radiologia

    2002-10-01

    Intraspinal synovial cysts of the lumbar spine are rare and commonly associated with osteoarthritis of the facet joints, particularly at level L4-L5. Symptoms are uncommon and may include low-back pain or sciatica. These cysts are accurately diagnosed by using computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging. Diagnosis is essential for the correct management of the cysts. Several treatment options are available including rest and immobilization, computed tomography guided corticosteroid injection, and surgery in patients that are nonresponsive to other treatment methods. (author)

  10. Synovial sarcoma of the abdominal wall: An unusual presentation

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    Parag J Karkera

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Synovial sarcoma (SS is a malignant mesenchymal neoplasm which commonly occurs in the extremities in close association with tendon sheaths, bursae, joint capsules, and fascial structures. Rarely, SS may be present in unexpected location such as the abdominal wall. Surgical resection with wide margins is the initial standard treatment; however, a multimodal approach including radiotherapy and chemotherapy is often favored. Here, we present a case of SS of the anterior abdominal wall in a 14-year-old patient with a right upper abdominal lump. He underwent wide surgical excision and has received adjuvant chemotherapy. He is doing well on follow-up of six months.

  11. Mouth and genital ulcers with inflamed cartilage (MAGIC syndrome): a case report and literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imai, H; Motegi, M; Mizuki, N; Ohtani, H; Komatsuda, A; Hamai, K; Miura, A B

    1997-11-01

    A 39-year-old woman had relapsing polychondritis and Behçet's disease, which was described as mouth and genital ulcers with inflamed cartilage syndrome (MAGIC). Serologic human leukocyte antigen analysis showed A24 (9), A31 (19), B56 (22), B62 (15), Cw6, DR4, DR9. Human leukocyte antigen allele analysis revealed DRB1* 0406/0901, DQA1* 0301/0301, DQB1* 0302/0303, DPB1* 0201/0501 through determining the genotype using the polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) technique. Treatment with methotrexate (5 mg/week) and pentoxifylline (300 mg/d) was effective to control oral ulcers, erythema nodosum, and arthritis.

  12. Tiresias en Villa Inflamable. Hacia una cronografía de la dominación

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    Javier Auyero

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Este artículo explora los lazos entre el sufrimiento ambiental, la dominación social y las percepciones colectivas del tiempo en base al trabajo etnográfico realizado a lo largo de 30 meses en Villa Inflamable, un barrio pobre y altamente contaminado de la Argentina. El artículo muestra que los modos en que los habitantes de esta villa piensan y sienten la contaminación (y el modo en que conviven con ella están profundamente entrelazados con sus percepciones sobre el futuro. En consecuencia, el trabajo propone que un análisis etnográfico de las experiencias vividas de la contaminación también debe ser una cronografía -i.e. una descripción densa del orden socio-temporal vernáculo.

  13. Enzyme/pH dual sensitive polymeric nanoparticles for targeted drug delivery to the inflamed colon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naeem, Muhammad; Kim, Wooseong; Cao, Jiafu; Jung, Yunjin; Yoo, Jin-Wook

    2014-11-01

    Novel nanoparticles whose drug release profiles are controlled by both enzyme and pH were prepared for the colon-specific drug delivery using a polymeric mixture of enzyme-sensitive azo-polyurethane and pH-sensitive Eudragit S100 (ES-Azo.pu). The enzyme/pH dual sensitive nanoparticles were designed to release a drug based on a two-fold approach which specifically aimed to target drug delivery to the inflamed colon while preventing the burst release of drugs in the stomach and small intestine. Single pH-sensitive (ES) and dual sensitive (ES-Azo.pu) nanoparticles were prepared using an oil-in-water emulsion solvent evaporation method and coumarin-6 (C-6) was used as a model drug. The successful formation of ES and ES-azo.pu nanoparticles that have 214 nm and 244 nm in mean particle size, respectively, was confirmed by scanning electron microscopy and qNano. ES nanoparticles showed almost 100% of burst drug release at pH 7.4, whereas ES-Azo.pu nanoparticles prevented the burst drug release at pH 7.4, followed by a sustained release phase thereafter. Furthermore, ES-Azo.pu nanoparticles exhibited enzyme-triggered drug release in the presence of rat cecal contents obtained from a rat model of colitis. An in vivo localization study in rat gastrointestinal tract demonstrated that ES-Azo.pu nanoparticles were selectively distributed in the inflamed colon, showing 5.5-fold higher C-6 than ES nanoparticles. In conclusion, the enzyme/pH dual sensitive nanoparticles presented in this study can serve as a promising strategy for colon-specific drug delivery against inflammatory bowel disease and other colon disorders.

  14. Visfatin as a novel mediator released by inflamed human endothelial cells.

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    Tania Romacho

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Visfatin is a multifaceted adipokine whose circulating levels are enhanced in different metabolic diseases. Extracellular visfatin can exert various deleterious effects on vascular cells, including inflammation and proliferation. Limited evidence exists, however, on the capacity of human vascular cells to synthesize and release visfatin by themselves, under basal or pro-inflammatory conditions. METHODS AND RESULTS: Intracellular visfatin was detected by Western blot in non-stimulated human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC. However, exposing HUVEC for 18 h to a series of pro-inflammatory stimulus, such as interleukin (IL-1β (1 to 10 ng/mL, tumor necrosis factor-α (1 to 10 ng/mL or angiotensin II (10 pmol/L to 1 μmol/L markedly enhanced intracellular visfatin content. Using IL-1β (10 ng/mL; 18 h, it was determined that the increase in intracellular visfatin, which was paralleled by enhanced visfatin mRNA levels, relied on a signalling mechanism involving both nuclear factor-κB and poly (ADP ribose polymerase-1 activation. Moreover, IL-1β modified the sub-cellular localization of visfatin; while in non-stimulated HUVEC immunoreactive visfatin predominantly showed an intra-nuclear granular pattern, in IL-1β-inflamed cells an extra-nuclear filamentous staining, co-localising with F-actin fibers and suggesting a secretory pattern, was mainly found. Indeed, IL-1β promoted visfatin secretion, as determined by both ELISA and immunocytochemistry. CONCLUSIONS: Human endothelial cells synthesize and release visfatin, particularly in response to inflammation. We suggest that the inflamed endothelium can be a source of visfatin, which arises as a local inflammatory mediator and a potential therapeutic target to interfere with vascular inflammation.

  15. Tracking the Spatial and Functional Gradient of Monocyte-To-Macrophage Differentiation in Inflamed Lung.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sen, Debasish; Jones, Stephen M; Oswald, Erin M; Pinkard, Henry; Corbin, Kaitlin; Krummel, Matthew F

    2016-01-01

    Myeloid-derived cells such as monocytes, dendritic cells (DCs), and macrophages are at the heart of the immune effector function in an inflammatory response. But because of the lack of an efficient imaging system to trace these cells live during their migration and maturation in their native environment at sub-cellular resolution, our knowledge is limited to data available from specific time-points analyzed by flow cytometry, histology, genomics and other immunological methods. Here, we have developed a ratiometric imaging method for measuring monocyte maturation in inflamed mouse lungs in situ using real-time using 2-photon imaging and complementary methods. We visualized that while undifferentiated monocytes were predominantly found only in the vasculature, a semi-differentiated monocyte/macrophage population could enter the tissue and resembled more mature and differentiated populations by morphology and surface phenotype. As these cells entered and differentiated, they were already selectively localized near inflamed airways and their entry was associated with changes in motility and morphology. We were able to visualize these during the act of differentiation, a process that can be demonstrated in this way to be faster on a per-cell basis under inflammatory conditions. Finally, our in situ analyses demonstrated increases, in the differentiating cells, for both antigen uptake and the ability to mediate interactions with T cells. This work, while largely confirming proposed models for in situ differentiation, provides important in situ data on the coordinated site-specific recruitment and differentiation of these cells and helps elaborate the predominance of immune pathology at the airways. Our novel imaging technology to trace immunogenic cell maturation in situ will complement existing information available on in situ differentiation deduced from other immunological methods, and assist better understanding of the spatio-temporal cellular behavior during an

  16. Synovial sarcoma of the kidney in a young patient with a review of the literature

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    Mahmoud Abbas

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Synovial sarcoma (SS is a soft tissue, generally deep seated neoplasms that occurs generally in the proximity of large joints. We report of a case of a 33-year-old man who was diagnosed with primary SS of the kidney which is an extremely rare tumor that accounts for less than 2% of malignant renal tumors. Contemporary management of renal synovial sarcoma includes surgical resection and ifosfamide-based chemotherapy and they remain the mainstay of therapy of synovial sarcoma, which is often applied, combined as part of an aggressive treatment approach. Fewer than 50 patients have been described in the English literature. Physicians should be aware of the possibility of malignancy in cystic renal masses and raise the suspicion of synovial sarcoma, especially when patients with renal masses are young adults. Along with the case report a literature review on primary synovial sarcomas of the kidney is provided with focus on the renal tumors’ differential diagnosis.

  17. Plasma and synovial fluid meclofenamic acid concentrations in patients with rheumatoid arthritis of the knee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koup, J R; Thomas, D; Tucker, E; Black, A; Ruderman, M; Dixon, J A; Kinkel, A

    1988-01-01

    We have measured plasma and synovial fluid concentrations of meclofenamic acid at 2, 4, 8, and 12 h during steady-state administration (100 mg three times daily for 4-7 days). Paired plasma and synovial samples were obtained pre-treatment and at one of the above times in twelve patients with a diagnosis of rheumatoid arthritis. In addition, the extent of protein binding of meclofenamic acid was assessed in vitro in the pre-treatment plasma and synovial fluid specimens. Peak total concentrations of 1.73 and 0.86 micrograms.ml-1 were observed in plasma (at 2 h) and synovial fluid (at 4 h) respectively. The extent of protein binding was 99.7 and 99.6% (not significantly different) in plasma and synovial fluid respectively. The results of this study are compared to those from similar reported studies of other nonsteroidal anti-inflamatory compounds.

  18. Changes of synovial fluid protein concentrations in supra-patellar bursitis patients after the injection of different molecular weights of hyaluronic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Carl P C; Hsu, Chih Chin; Pei, Yu-Cheng; Chen, Ruo Li; Zhou, Shaobo; Shen, Hsuan-Chen; Lin, Shih-Cherng; Tsai, Wen Chung

    2014-04-01

    Knee pain is commonly seen in orthopedic and rehabilitation outpatient clinical settings, and in the aging population. Bursitis of the knee joint, especially when the volume of the synovial fluid is large enough, can compress and distend the nearby soft tissues, causing pain in the knee joint. Out of all the bursae surrounding the knee joint, supra-patellar bursitis is most often associated with knee pain. Treatment strategies in managing supra-patellar bursitis include the aspiration of joint synovial fluid and then followed by steroid injection into the bursa. When supra-patellar bursitis is caused by degenerative disorders, the concept of viscosupplementation treatment may be effective by injecting hyaluronic acid into the bursa. However, the rheology or the changes in the concentrations of proteins (biomarkers) that are related to the development of bursitis in the synovial fluid is virtually unexplored. Therefore, this study aimed to identify the concentration changes in the synovial fluid total protein amount and individual proteins associated with supra-patellar bursitis using the Bradford protein assay and western immunoglobulin methods. A total of 20 patients were divided into two groups with 10 patients in each group. One group received the high molecular weight hyaluronic acid product of Synvisc Hylan G-F 20 and the other group received the low molecular weight hyaluronic acid product of Hya-Joint Synovial Fluid Supplement once per week injection into the bursa for a total of 3 weeks. Significant decreases in the synovial fluid total protein concentrations were observed after the second dosage of high molecular weight hyaluronic acid injections. Apolipoprotein A-I, interleukin 1 beta, alpha 1 antitrypsin, and matrix metalloproteinase 1 proteins revealed a trend of decreasing western immunoblotting band densities after hyaluronic acid injections. The decreases in apolipoprotein A-I and interleukin 1 beta protein band densities were significant in the high

  19. Immunostaining for SYT protein discriminates synovial sarcoma from other soft tissue tumors: analysis of 146 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Rui; Patel, Rajiv M; Alkan, Serhan; Hammadeh, Rasheed; Weiss, Sharon W; Goldblum, John R; Venkataraman, Girish; Baila, Horea

    2007-05-01

    Synovial sarcoma in its classic biphasic form can be distinguished readily from other soft tissue lesions; however, monophasic and poorly differentiated forms are diagnostically more problematic. For this reason, we assessed the efficacy of immunostaining for SYT and SSX1 proteins, the gene products resulting from unique synovial sarcoma translocation, to distinguish synovial sarcoma from other soft tissue lesions. A total number of 146 cases were analyzed, including 47 synovial sarcoma cases (all of which were verified by FISH to have t(X; 18) translocation and SYT-SSX fusion gene) and 99 soft tissue tumors of various types. A polyclonal IgG antibody against SYT was used to stain formalin-fixed paraffin embedded tissues. Forty-one out of 47 (87%) synovial sarcoma displayed strong positive nuclear staining (ranging from 80 to 90% of the tumor cells) for SYT antibody. Nineteen of 99 (19%) non-synovial sarcoma cases showed variable nuclear and cytoplasmic staining with SYT, which ranged from 20 to 60% of tumor nuclei, and included malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor (5/25), solitary fibrous tumor (2/14), Ewing sarcoma (2/6), low grade fibromyxoid tumor (2/4), extraskeletal mesenchymal chondrosarcoma (2/6), gastrointestinal tumor (4/17), epithelioid sarcoma (2/2). The remaining non-synovial sarcomas were negative. This is the first study demonstrating SYT protein expression in tissue sections of synovial sarcoma. This method could provide an easy, rapid and widely applicable means of assisting in the diagnosis of synovial sarcoma, particularly when material and/or resources are unavailable for PCR or FISH-based testing. However, as variable weak staining for SYT may be encountered in a small percentage of non-synovial sarcoma sarcomas, a positive interpretation should be made only when the staining is strong, nuclear and present in the majority of cells.

  20. Expression of high mobility group box 1 in inflamed dental pulp and its chemotactic effect on dental pulp cells

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    Zhang, Xufang, E-mail: xufang.zhang@student.qut.edu.au [Department of Operative Dentistry and Endodontics, Guanghua School of Stomatology, Guangdong Province Key Laboratory of Stomatology, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou 510055 (China); Institute of Health and Biomedical Innovation, Queensland University of Technology, Brisbane, QLD 4059 (Australia); Jiang, Hongwei, E-mail: jianghw@163.com [Department of Operative Dentistry and Endodontics, Guanghua School of Stomatology, Guangdong Province Key Laboratory of Stomatology, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou 510055 (China); Gong, Qimei, E-mail: gongqmei@gmail.com [Department of Operative Dentistry and Endodontics, Guanghua School of Stomatology, Guangdong Province Key Laboratory of Stomatology, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou 510055 (China); Fan, Chen, E-mail: c3.fan@student.qut.edu.au [Institute of Health and Biomedical Innovation, Queensland University of Technology, Brisbane, QLD 4059 (Australia); Huang, Yihua, E-mail: enu0701@163.com [Department of Operative Dentistry and Endodontics, Guanghua School of Stomatology, Guangdong Province Key Laboratory of Stomatology, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou 510055 (China); Ling, Junqi, E-mail: lingjq@mail.sysu.edu.cn [Department of Operative Dentistry and Endodontics, Guanghua School of Stomatology, Guangdong Province Key Laboratory of Stomatology, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou 510055 (China)

    2014-08-08

    Highlights: • HMGB1 translocated from nucleus to cytoplasm during dental pulp inflammation. • HMGB1and its receptor RAGE were up-regulated in hDPCs under LPS stimulation. • HMGB1 enhanced hDPCs migration and induces cytoskeleton reorganization. • HMGB1 may play a critical role in dental pulp repair during inflamed state. - Abstract: High mobility group box 1 protein (HMGB1) is a chromatin protein which can be released extracellularly, eliciting a pro-inflammatory response and promoting tissue repair process. This study aimed to examine the expression and distribution of HMGB1 and its receptor RAGE in inflamed dental pulp tissues, and to assess its effects on proliferation, migration and cytoskeleton of cultured human dental pulp cells (DPCs). Our data demonstrated that cytoplasmic expression of HMGB1 was observed in inflamed pulp tissues, while HMGB1 expression was confined in the nuclei in healthy dental pulp. The mRNA expression of HMGB1 and RAGE were significantly increased in inflamed pulps. In in vitro cultured DPCs, expression of HMGB1 in both protein and mRNA level was up-regulated after treated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Exogenous HMGB1 enhanced DPCs migration in a dose-dependent manner and induced the reorganization of f-actin in DPCs. Our results suggests that HMGB1 are not only involved in the process of dental pulp inflammation, but also play an important role in the recruitment of dental pulp stem cells, promoting pulp repair and regeneration.

  1. Dose-response relationship between periodontal inflamed surface area and HbA1c in type 2 Diabetics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nesse, Willem; Linde, Annemiek; Abbas, Frank; Spijkervet, Frederik Karst Lucien; Dijkstra, Pieter Ubele; de Brabander, Eric Carl; Gerstenbluth, Izzy; Vissink, Arjan

    2009-01-01

    Nesse W, Linde A, Abbas F, Spijkervet FKL, Dijkstra PU, de Brabander EC, Gerstenbluth I, Vissink A. Dose-response relationship between periodontal inflamed surface area and HbA1c in type 2 diabetics. J Clin Periodontol 2009; 36: 295-300. doi: 10.1111/j.1600-051X.2009.01377.x. A dose-response relatio

  2. Dose-response relationship between periodontal inflamed surface area and HbA1c in type 2 Diabetics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nesse, Willem; Linde, Annemiek; Abbas, Frank; Spijkervet, Frederik Karst Lucien; Dijkstra, Pieter Ubele; de Brabander, Eric Carl; Gerstenbluth, Izzy; Vissink, Arjan

    Nesse W, Linde A, Abbas F, Spijkervet FKL, Dijkstra PU, de Brabander EC, Gerstenbluth I, Vissink A. Dose-response relationship between periodontal inflamed surface area and HbA1c in type 2 diabetics. J Clin Periodontol 2009; 36: 295-300. doi: 10.1111/j.1600-051X.2009.01377.x. A dose-response

  3. What drives osteoarthritis?-synovial versus subchondral bone pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hügle, Thomas; Geurts, Jeroen

    2017-09-01

    Subchondral bone and the synovium play an important role in the initiation and progression of OA. MRI often permits an early detection of synovial hypertrophy and bone marrow lesions, both of which can precede cartilage damage. Newer imaging modalities including CT osteoabsorptiometry and hybrid SPECT-CT have underlined the importance of bone in OA pathogenesis. The subchondral bone in OA undergoes an uncoupled remodelling process, which is notably characterized by macrophage infiltration and osteoclast formation. Concomitant increased osteoblast activity leads to spatial remineralization and osteosclerosis in end-stage disease. A plethora of metabolic and mechanical factors can lead to synovitis in OA. Synovial tissue is highly vascularized and thus exposed to systemic influences such as hypercholesterolaemia or low grade inflammation. This review aims to describe the current understanding of synovitis and subchondral bone pathology and their connection in OA. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society for Rheumatology. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  4. Sphingolipids in human synovial fluid--a lipidomic study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Krystyna Kosinska

    Full Text Available Articular synovial fluid (SF is a complex mixture of components that regulate nutrition, communication, shock absorption, and lubrication. Alterations in its composition can be pathogenic. This lipidomic investigation aims to quantify the composition of sphingolipids (sphingomyelins, ceramides, and hexosyl- and dihexosylceramides and minor glycerophospholipid species, including (lysophosphatidic acid, (lysophosphatidylglycerol, and bis(monoacylglycerophosphate species, in the SF of knee joints from unaffected controls and from patients with early (eOA and late (lOA stages of osteoarthritis (OA, and rheumatoid arthritis (RA. SF without cells and cellular debris from 9 postmortem donors (control, 18 RA, 17 eOA, and 13 lOA patients were extracted to measure lipid species using electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry--directly or coupled with hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography. We provide a novel, detailed overview of sphingolipid and minor glycerophospholipid species in human SF. A total of 41, 48, and 50 lipid species were significantly increased in eOA, lOA, and RA SF, respectively when compared with normal SF. The level of 21 lipid species differed in eOA SF versus SF from lOA, an observation that can be used to develop biomarkers. Sphingolipids can alter synovial inflammation and the repair responses of damaged joints. Thus, our lipidomic study provides the foundation for studying the biosynthesis and function of lipid species in health and most prevalent joint diseases.

  5. Inducible nitric oxide synthase is expressed in synovial fluid granulocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cedergren, J; Forslund, T; Sundqvist, T; Skogh, T

    2002-10-01

    The objective of the study was to evaluate the NO-producing potential of synovial fluid (SF) cells. SF from 15 patients with arthritis was compared with blood from the same individuals and with blood from 10 healthy controls. Cellular expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) was analysed by flow cytometry. High-performance liquid chromatography was used to measure l-arginine and l-citrulline. Nitrite and nitrate were measured colourimetrically utilizing the Griess' reaction. Compared to whole blood granulocytes in patients with chronic arthritis, a prominent iNOS expression was observed in SF granulocytes (P < 0.001). A slight, but statistically significant, increase in iNOS expression was also recorded in lymphocytes and monocytes from SF. l-arginine was elevated in SF compared to serum (257 +/- 78 versus 176 +/- 65 micro mol/l, P = 0.008), whereas a slight increase in l-citrulline (33 +/- 11 versus 26 +/- 9 micro mol/l), did not reach statistical significance. Great variations but no significant differences were observed comparing serum and SF levels of nitrite and nitrate, respectively, although the sum of nitrite and nitrate tended to be elevated in SF (19.2 +/- 20.7 versus 8.6 +/- 6.5 micro mol/l, P = 0.054). Synovial fluid leucocytes, in particular granulocytes, express iNOS and may thus contribute to intra-articular NO production in arthritis.

  6. Identification of α1-Antitrypsin as a Potential Candidate for Internal Control for Human Synovial Fluid in Western Blot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shaowei; Zhou, Jingming; Wei, Xiaochun; Li, Pengcui; Li, Kai; Wang, Dongming; Wei, Fangyuan; Zhang, Jianzhong; Wei, Lei

    Western blot of synovial fluid has been widely used for osteoarthritis (OA) research and diagnosis, but there is no ideal loading control for this purpose. Although β-actin is extensively used as loading control in western blot, it is not suitable for synovial fluid because it is not required in synovial fluid as a cytoskeletal protein. A good loading control for synovial fluid in OA studies should have unchanged content in synovial fluids from normal and OA groups, because synovial fluid protein content can vary with changes in synovial vascular permeability with OA onset. In this study, we explore the potential of using α1-antitripsin (A1AT) as loading control for OA synovial fluid in western blot. A1AT level is elevated in inflammatory conditions such as rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Unlike RA, OA is a non-inflammation disease, which does not induce A1AT. In this study, we identified A1AT as an abundant component of synovial fluid by Mass Spectrometry and confirmed that the level of A1AT is relative constant between human OA and normal synovial fluid by western blot and ELISA. Hence, we proposed that A1AT may be a good loading control for western blot in human OA synovial fluid studies provided that pathological conditions such as RA or A1AT deficiency associated liver or lung diseases are excluded.

  7. Symptomatic intraspinal synovial cysts of the lumbar spine: correlation of MR and surgical findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tillich, M.; Lindbichler, F. [Graz Univ. (Austria). Dept. of Radiology; Trummer, M.; Flaschka, G. [Dept. of Neurosurgery, Karl-Franzens Medical School and University Hospital (Austria)

    2001-12-01

    The purpose of the study was to determine the frequency of associated MR imaging findings in patients with symptomatic lumbar intraspinal synovial cysts, and to correlate MR with surgical findings. MR imaging studies of 18 patients with surgically and histopathologically proven lumbar intraspinal synovial cysts were retrospectively analyzed and correlated with surgical findings. The diameters of the synovial cysts ranged from 10 mm to 28 mm, with a mean of 16 mm. A nonhemorrhagic cyst was found in 15 patients (83%), and a hemorrhagic cyst in three patients (17%). Degenerative spondylolisthesis was found in six patients (33%) at the level of the synovial cyst, with displacement ranging from 3 to 5 mm, mean 4 mm. Surgery revealed instability and hypermobility of the facet joint at the level of the synovial cyst in all patients with degenerative spondylolisthesis, and in five additional patients. Symptomatic synovial cysts of the lumbar spine were associated with degenerative spondylolisthesis in six of 18 patients (33%) and with instability of the facet joint in 11 (61%). These findings may support the theory that increased segmental motion plays a role in the pathogenesis of synovial cysts. (orig.)

  8. Gene Expression Profiling of IL-17A-Treated Synovial Fibroblasts from the Human Temporomandibular Joint

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toshio Hattori

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Synovial fibroblasts contribute to the inflammatory temporomandibular joint under pathogenic stimuli. Synovial fibroblasts and T cells participate in the perpetuation of joint inflammation in a mutual activation feedback, via secretion of cytokines and chemokines that stimulate each other. IL-17 is an inflammatory cytokine produced primarily by Th17 cells which plays critical role in the pathogenesis of numerous autoimmune and inflammatory diseases. Here, we investigated the roles of IL-17A in temporomandibular joint disorders (TMD using genome-wide analysis of synovial fibroblasts isolated from patients with TMD. IL-17 receptors were expressed in synovial fibroblasts as assessed using real-time PCR. Microarray analysis indicated that IL-17A treatment of synovial fibroblasts upregulated the expression of IL-6 and chemokines. Real-time PCR analysis showed that the gene expression of IL-6, CXCL1, IL-8, and CCL20 was significantly higher in IL-17A-treated synovial fibroblasts compared to nontreated controls. IL-6 protein production was increased by IL-17A in a time- and a dose-dependent manner. Additionally, IL-17A simulated IL-6 protein production in synovial fibroblasts samples isolated from three patients. Furthermore, signal inhibitor experiments indicated that IL-17-mediated induction of IL-6 was transduced via activation of NFκB and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/Akt. These results suggest that IL-17A is associated with the inflammatory progression of TMD.

  9. Inhibition of oncostatin M in osteoarthritic synovial fluid enhances GAG production in osteoarthritic cartilage repair

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    M Beekhuizen

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Mediators in the synovial fluid are thought to play a major role in osteoarthritic cartilage turnover. The purpose of the current study was to investigate the role of oncostatin M (OSM in osteoarthritis (OA by evaluating the presence of the cytokine and its receptors in the OA joint and interfering with its activity in synovial fluid co-cultured with cartilage explants. OSM levels were increased in the synovial fluid of osteoarthritic patients compared to healthy donors. Immunohistochemistry confirmed the presence of both the leukaemia inhibitory factor (LIF and OSM receptors for OSM throughout the whole depth of osteoarthritic cartilage and synovial tissue, whereas in healthy cartilage their presence seemed more restricted to the superficial zone. Blocking OSM activity, using an activity inhibiting antibody, in 25 % osteoarthritic synovial fluid added to OA cartilage explant cultures increased glycosaminoglycan (GAG content from 18.6 mg/g to 24.3 mg/g (P < 0.03 and total production from 7.0 mg/g to 11.9 mg/g (P < 0.003. However, OSM exogenously added to cartilage explant cultures reflecting low and high concentrations in the synovial fluid (5 and 50 pg/mL did not affect cartilage matrix turnover, suggesting that factors present in the synovial fluid act in concert with OSM to inhibit GAG production. The current study indicates the potential to enhance cartilage repair in osteoarthritis by modulating the joint environment by interfering with OSM activity.

  10. Periarticular Cysts of the Temporomandibular Joint Are More Frequently Synovial Than Ganglion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Partridge, Justin C; Cipriani, Nicole; Faquin, William C; Chuang, Sung K; Keith, David A; Lahey, Edward Thomas

    2016-07-01

    Differentiating between ganglion and synovial cysts by standard histology is difficult, leading to inaccurate statements on frequency for each of these periarticular lesions. The purpose of this study was to use immunohistochemical (IHC) analysis to 1) calculate the accuracy of the histologic diagnoses, 2) determine the frequency of ganglion and synovial cysts of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ), and 3) compare the frequency of these lesions in the TMJ compared with the extracranial skeleton in patients treated at Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH). This is a retrospective cohort study of all patients undergoing treatment of TMJ cysts at MGH from 2001 through 2013. IHC analysis of tissue samples for each patient was completed and compared with the original histologic diagnoses. Categorical variables, including age, gender, and sidedness, were recorded. A natural language search of the MGH Department of Pathology database determined the frequency of extracranial periarticular cysts during the same period. Thirteen patients met the inclusion criteria. Eleven cysts were synovial and 2 were ganglion based on histology. IHC analysis identified 2 false-positive synovial cyst diagnoses, resulting in 100% sensitivity and 50% specificity for the original histologic assessment and a percentage error of 22%. Of the periarticular TMJ lesions, 69% were synovial cysts and 31% were ganglion cysts. The frequency of TMJ versus extracranial ganglion cysts was 0.24%, and the frequency of TMJ versus extracranial synovial cysts was 0.60% based on 3,176 extracranial cysts (1,506 synovial; 1,670 ganglion). This study represents the largest single-institution experience with periarticular cysts of the TMJ, and contrary to previous reports, TMJ cysts appear to be more frequently synovial than ganglion. IHC can be used to overcome the relatively poor specificity of histologic diagnosis of synovial cysts. Copyright © 2016 American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published

  11. Interapophyseal joint synovial cyst of lumbar spine. CT scan and MR imaging correlation in two cases

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    Granat, O.; Jeanbourquin,D.; Perfettini, C.; Pernot, P.; Ducolombier, A.; Cosnard, G.

    1987-05-01

    Two patients presenting with L5 radiculagia were investigated by CT scan imaging. The origin of the pain was determined with certitude as arising from intraspinal development of an interapophyseal synovial cyst. Examination of the two cases by MR imaging provided conflicting results: in one patient images obtained by MR were not contributive and the synovial cyst would probably have been missed while in the other patient images were specific and very sensitive for diagnosis of interapophyseal synovial lesions. Treatment was surgical in both cases.

  12. Editorial Commentary: Role of Synovial Biomarkers in Patient Outcomes After Knee Arthroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brand, Jefferson C

    2016-03-01

    Humans are notably poor at predicting event outcomes. In "Correlation of Synovial Fluid Biomarkers With Cartilage Pathology and Associated Outcomes in Knee Arthroscopy," Cuellar, Cuellar, Kirsch, and Strauss show that some synovial fluid biomarkers (20 were sampled for the investigation) may predict operative findings at the time of arthroscopy and patient-reported outcome measures at follow-up. Further research will clarify the role of synovial biomarkers in knee pathology and, hopefully, narrow the choices to one or two pertinent markers that can be used to improve our ability to predict outcomes from arthroscopic knee surgery.

  13. Development of synovial membrane in the temporomandibular joint of the human fetus

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    L.O. Carvalho de Moraes

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The development of the synovial membrane was analyzed in serial sections of 21 temporomandibular joints of human fetuses at 9 to 13 weeks of gestation. Sections of two fetuses at 12 weeks of development were used to perform immunohistochemical expression of the markers CD68 and Hsp27 on the synovial lining. Macrophage-like type A and fibroblast-like type B cells, which express CD68 and Hsp27, respectively, were observed at the twelfth week of development. Our results suggest that the development of the synovial membrane is related to the vascularization of the joint and the formation of the articular cavities.

  14. Development of synovial membrane in the temporomandibular joint of the human fetus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho de Moraes, L O; Tedesco, R C; Arraez-Aybar, L A; Klein, O; Mérida-Velasco, J R; Alonso, L G

    2015-11-26

    The development of the synovial membrane was analyzed in serial sections of 21 temporomandibular joints of human fetuses at 9 to 13 weeks of gestation. Sections of two fetuses at 12 weeks of development were used to perform immunohistochemical expression of the markers CD68 and Hsp27 on the synovial lining. Macrophage-like type A and fibroblast-like type B cells, which express CD68 and Hsp27, respectively, were observed at the twelfth week of development. Our results suggest that the development of the synovial membrane is related to the vascularization of the joint and the formation of the articular cavities.

  15. Primary Cardiac Synovial Sarcoma: A Case Report and Brief Review of the Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian Boulmay

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Synovial sarcoma comprises approximately 10% of all soft tissue sarcoma diagnoses; a primary synovial sarcoma of the myocardium is exceedingly rare. There have been very few cases reported in the literature thus far. With the identification of the characteristic and diagnostic chromosomal abnormality t(X;18, this may become an increasingly recognized entity. Our report adds to the limited published cases of primary cardiac synovial sarcoma with the characteristic t(X;18. Further elucidation of the effects of this translocation on the cell cycle may lead to directed therapies in the future.

  16. Synovial chondromatosis of the temporomandibular joint: a clinical, radiological and histological study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martín-Granizo, Rafael; Sánchez, Juan Jesús; Jorquera, Manuela; Ortega, Luis

    2005-01-01

    Synovial chondromatosis (SC) is a cartilaginous metaplasy of the mesenchymal remnants of the synovial tissue of the joints. It is characterized by the formation of cartilaginous nodules in the synovium and inside the articular space (loose bodies). SC mainly affects to big synovial joints such as the knee and the elbow, being uncommon the onset within the TMJ, where 75 cases have been published. The main symptoms are pain, inflammation, limitation of the movements of the jaw and crepitation. Different methods of diagnosis include panoramic radiograph, CT, MR and arthroscopy of the TMJ. We report a new case of unilateral SC of the TMJ, including diagnostic images, treatment performed and histological analysis.

  17. Primary pulmonary synovial sarcoma: a rare case report

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    Sumalatha Kasturi

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Primary lung sarcoma is an extremely rare tumor, accounting for less than 0.5% of all lung tumors. Histological subtypes are differentiated on the basis of immunohistochemical markers, such as vimentin, desmin, actin, CD99, and epithelial membrane antigen. A 50-year-old male presented with progressively increasing shortness of breath with cough for 2 months. On Contrast Enhanced Computed Tomography (CECT of thorax a large heterogeneous mass with multiple areas of necrosis, occupying almost whole of left hemithorax was seen. CT-guided Fine Needle Aspiration Cytology (FNAC revealed spindle cell neoplasm. Histopathological examination revealed a spindle cell sarcoma. On immunohistochemistry the tumor cells expressed both epithelial membrane antigen and vimentin. Hence, final impression from immunohistochemistry was primary monophasic synovial sarcoma of lung. [Int J Res Med Sci 2014; 2(4.000: 1729-1731

  18. Synovial hemangioma of the hip joint in a pediatric patient

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    Demertzis, Jennifer L.; Loomans, Rachel; Wessell, Daniel E. [Washington University School of Medicine, Mallinckrodt Institute of Radiology, St. Louis, MO (United States); Kyriakos, Michael [Washington University School of Medicine, Division of Surgical Pathology, St. Louis, MO (United States); McDonald, Douglas J. [Washington University School of Medicine, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, St. Louis, MO (United States)

    2014-01-15

    Hemangiomas of the articular synovium are rare and commonly associated with recurrent joint swelling and painful limitation of motion. The knee joint is the most commonly involved site, with most patients diagnosed in the second to third decade of life [1]. Although over 200 cases have been reported in the English-language medical literature, only three have originated within the hip joint, all of which were in adult patients reported in the surgical literature [2-4]. We describe a histologically proven synovial hemangioma of the hip joint in a pediatric patient that invaded the femur, acetabulum, and adjacent soft tissues, with a detailed discussion of the differential diagnosis based on the radiographic and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings. (orig.)

  19. Synovial sarcoma of the foot; Synovialsarkom des Fusses

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    Beus, J. [Mainz Univ. (Germany). Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Radiologie; Kreitner, K.F. [Mainz Univ. (Germany). Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Radiologie; Rompe, J.D. [Mainz Univ. (Germany). Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Orthopaedie; Riehle, H.M. [Mainz Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Pathologie

    1996-09-01

    The case of a 29 year-old female patient who had experienced pain in the right midfoot for 5 years which was diagnosed as a degenerative or rheumatic change and treated by physiotherapy and medication. By means of magnetic resonance imaging we identified a soft-tissue tumor of the midfoot. Histology provided the findings of a monophasic fibrous synovial sarcoma. The case history is reported together with a presentation of the disease and its radiological diagnosis. (orig.) [Deutsch] Es wird ueber den Fall einer 29jaehrigen Patientin berichtet, die 5 Jahre lang wegen Schmerzen im rechten Mittelfuss unter der Diagnose degenerativer oder rheumatischer Veraenderungen physikalisch und medikamentoes behandelt wurde. Magnetresonanztomographisch wurde ein Weichteiltumor des Mittelfusses diagnostiziert. Die histologische Untersuchung erbrachte den Befund eines monophasisch-fibroesen Synovialsarkoms. Mit der Kasuistik verbunden ist eine Darstellung des Krankheitsbildes und dessen radiologischer Diagnostik. (orig.)

  20. Phenotype of Antigen Unexperienced TH Cells in the Inflamed Central Nervous System in Experimental Autoimmune Encephalomyelitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franck, Sophia; Paterka, Magdalena; Birkenstock, Jerome; Zipp, Frauke; Siffrin, Volker; Witsch, Esther

    2016-11-10

    Multiple sclerosis is a chronic, disseminated inflammation of the central nervous system which is thought to be driven by autoimmune T cells. Genetic association studies in multiple sclerosis and a large number of studies in the animal model of the disease support a role for effector/memory T helper cells. However, the mechanisms underlying relapses, remission and chronic progression in multiple sclerosis or the animal model experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis, are not clear. In particular, there is only scarce information on the role of central nervous system-invading naive T helper cells in these processes. By applying two-photon laser scanning microscopy we could show in vivo that antigen unexperienced T helper cells migrated into the deep parenchyma of the inflamed central nervous system in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis, independent of their antigen specificity. Using flow cytometric analyses of central nervous system-derived lymphocytes we found that only antigen-specific, formerly naive T helper cells became activated during inflammation of the central nervous system encountering their corresponding antigen.

  1. Specific transfection of inflamed brain by macrophages: a new therapeutic strategy for neurodegenerative diseases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew J Haney

    Full Text Available The ability to precisely upregulate genes in inflamed brain holds great therapeutic promise. Here we report a novel class of vectors, genetically modified macrophages that carry reporter and therapeutic genes to neural cells. Systemic administration of macrophages transfected ex vivo with a plasmid DNA (pDNA encoding a potent antioxidant enzyme, catalase, produced month-long expression levels of catalase in the brain resulting in three-fold reductions in inflammation and complete neuroprotection in mouse models of Parkinson's disease (PD. This resulted in significant improvements in motor functions in PD mice. Mechanistic studies revealed that transfected macrophages secreted extracellular vesicles, exosomes, packed with catalase genetic material, pDNA and mRNA, active catalase, and NF-κb, a transcription factor involved in the encoded gene expression. Exosomes efficiently transfer their contents to contiguous neurons resulting in de novo protein synthesis in target cells. Thus, genetically modified macrophages serve as a highly efficient system for reproduction, packaging, and targeted gene and drug delivery to treat inflammatory and neurodegenerative disorders.

  2. Resveratrol Suppresses PAI-1 Gene Expression in a Human In Vitro Model of Inflamed Adipose Tissue

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    Ivana Zagotta

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Increased plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1 levels are associated with a number of pathophysiological complications; among them is obesity. Resveratrol was proposed to improve obesity-related health problems, but the effect of resveratrol on PAI-1 gene expression in obesity is not completely understood. In this study, we used SGBS adipocytes and a model of human adipose tissue inflammation to examine the effects of resveratrol on the production of PAI-1. Treatment of SGBS adipocytes with resveratrol reduced PAI-1 mRNA and protein in a time- and concentration-dependent manner. Further experiments showed that obesity-associated inflammatory conditions lead to the upregulation of PAI-1 gene expression which was antagonized by resveratrol. Although signaling via PI3K, Sirt1, AMPK, ROS, and Nrf2 appeared to play a significant role in the modulation of PAI-1 gene expression under noninflammatory conditions, those signaling components were not involved in mediating the resveratrol effects on PAI-1 production under inflammatory conditions. Instead, we demonstrate that the resveratrol effects on PAI-1 induction under inflammatory conditions were mediated via inhibition of the NFκB pathway. Together, resveratrol can act as NFκB inhibitor in adipocytes and thus the subsequently reduced PAI-1 expression in inflamed adipose tissue might provide a new insight towards novel treatment options of obesity.

  3. Regulatory T cells with superior immunosuppressive capacity emigrate from the inflamed colon to draining lymph nodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakanishi, Y; Ikebuchi, R; Chtanova, T; Kusumoto, Y; Okuyama, H; Moriya, T; Honda, T; Kabashima, K; Watanabe, T; Sakai, Y; Tomura, M

    2017-08-02

    Foxp3(+) Regulatory T cells (Tregs) play a critical role in the maintenance of colon homeostasis. Here we utilized photoconvertible KikGR mice to track immune cells from the caecum and ascending (proximal) colon in the steady state and DSS-induced colitis. We found that Tregs from the proximal colon (colonic migratory Tregs) migrated exclusively to the distal part of mesenteric lymph nodes (dMLN) in an S1PR1-dependent process. In the steady state, colonic migratory CD25(+) Tregs expressed higher levels of CD103, ICOS, LAG3 and CTLA-4 in comparison with pre-existing LN Tregs. Intestinal inflammation led to accelerated Treg replacement in the colon, bidirectional Treg migration from the colon to dMLN and vice versa, as well as increases in Treg number, proliferation and expression of immunosuppressive molecules. This was especially apparent for CD25 very high Tregs induced in colitis. Furthermore, colonic migratory Tregs from the inflamed colon included more interleukin (IL)-10 producing cells, and demonstrated greater inhibition of T-cell proliferation in comparison with pre-existing LN Tregs. Thus, our results suggest that Tregs with superior immunosuppressive capacity are increased both in the colon and dMLN upon inflammation. These Tregs recirculate between the colon and dMLN, and are likely to contribute to the downregulation of intestinal inflammation.Mucosal Immunology advance online publication, 2 August 2017. doi:10.1038/mi.2017.64.

  4. Comparative analysis of Salmonella genomes identifies a metabolic network for escalating growth in the inflamed gut.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuccio, Sean-Paul; Bäumler, Andreas J

    2014-03-18

    The Salmonella genus comprises a group of pathogens associated with illnesses ranging from gastroenteritis to typhoid fever. We performed an in silico analysis of comparatively reannotated Salmonella genomes to identify genomic signatures indicative of disease potential. By removing numerous annotation inconsistencies and inaccuracies, the process of reannotation identified a network of 469 genes involved in central anaerobic metabolism, which was intact in genomes of gastrointestinal pathogens but degrading in genomes of extraintestinal pathogens. This large network contained pathways that enable gastrointestinal pathogens to utilize inflammation-derived nutrients as well as many of the biochemical reactions used for the enrichment and biochemical discrimination of Salmonella serovars. Thus, comparative genome analysis identifies a metabolic network that provides clues about the strategies for nutrient acquisition and utilization that are characteristic of gastrointestinal pathogens. IMPORTANCE While some Salmonella serovars cause infections that remain localized to the gut, others disseminate throughout the body. Here, we compared Salmonella genomes to identify characteristics that distinguish gastrointestinal from extraintestinal pathogens. We identified a large metabolic network that is functional in gastrointestinal pathogens but decaying in extraintestinal pathogens. While taxonomists have used traits from this network empirically for many decades for the enrichment and biochemical discrimination of Salmonella serovars, our findings suggest that it is part of a "business plan" for growth in the inflamed gastrointestinal tract. By identifying a large metabolic network characteristic of Salmonella serovars associated with gastroenteritis, our in silico analysis provides a blueprint for potential strategies to utilize inflammation-derived nutrients and edge out competing gut microbes.

  5. Mouth and Genital Ulcers with Inflamed Cartilage Syndrome: Case Report and Review of the Published Work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaneko, Yuka; Nakai, Noriaki; Kida, Takashi; Kawahito, Yutaka; Katoh, Norito

    2016-01-01

    Mouth and genital ulcers with inflamed cartilage (MAGIC) syndrome are disease that fulfilled criteria for diagnosis of Behcet's disease (BD) and relapsing polychondritis (RP). We report a 22-year-old Japanese woman presented with MAGIC syndrome and we described the clinicopathological characteristics of MAGIC syndrome based on a review of published cases from July 1985 to December 2015. In our case, the patient with oral aphthae, erythema nodosum, acne-like eruptions, uveitis, and polyarthritis fulfilled criteria for diagnosis of incomplete form of BD. The patient with uveitis, polyarthritis, and histological confirmation of chondritis also fulfilled criteria for diagnosis of RP. The patient was successfully treated with oral colchicine followed by prednisolone. The symptoms of MAGIC syndrome gradually disappeared, and the prednisolone dosage was gradually decreased and stopped. She has been in remission without active medication for a further 8 months. In the previous reports, some authors suggested that MAGIC syndrome was not a disease entity and might be RP occurring secondary to BD, another association of an autoimmune disease, or vasculitis with RP. However, the pathogenic association between MAGIC syndrome, BD, and RP is still unclear, and the number of reported cases of MAGIC syndrome is insufficient to establish a clear explanation. Therefore, further accumulation of data and careful observation of the clinical course are required to improve the understanding of MAGIC syndrome.

  6. Mouth and genital ulcers with inflamed cartilage syndrome: Case report and review of the published work

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuka Kaneko

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Mouth and genital ulcers with inflamed cartilage (MAGIC syndrome are disease that fulfilled criteria for diagnosis of Behcet's disease (BD and relapsing polychondritis (RP. We report a 22-year-old Japanese woman presented with MAGIC syndrome and we described the clinicopathological characteristics of MAGIC syndrome based on a review of published cases from July 1985 to December 2015. In our case, the patient with oral aphthae, erythema nodosum, acne-like eruptions, uveitis, and polyarthritis fulfilled criteria for diagnosis of incomplete form of BD. The patient with uveitis, polyarthritis, and histological confirmation of chondritis also fulfilled criteria for diagnosis of RP. The patient was successfully treated with oral colchicine followed by prednisolone. The symptoms of MAGIC syndrome gradually disappeared, and the prednisolone dosage was gradually decreased and stopped. She has been in remission without active medication for a further 8 months. In the previous reports, some authors suggested that MAGIC syndrome was not a disease entity and might be RP occurring secondary to BD, another association of an autoimmune disease, or vasculitis with RP. However, the pathogenic association between MAGIC syndrome, BD, and RP is still unclear, and the number of reported cases of MAGIC syndrome is insufficient to establish a clear explanation. Therefore, further accumulation of data and careful observation of the clinical course are required to improve the understanding of MAGIC syndrome.

  7. Quantitative and phenotypic analysis of bone marrow-derived cells in the intact and inflamed central nervous system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Short, Martin A; Campanale, Naomi; Litwak, Sara; Bernard, Claude C A

    2011-01-01

    Bone marrow has been proposed as a possible source of cells capable of replacing injured neural cells in diseases such as Multiple Sclerosis (MS). Previous studies have reported conflicting results regarding the transformation of bone marrow cells into neural cells in vivo. This study is a detailed analysis of the fate of bone marrow derived cells (BMDC) in the CNS of C57Bl/6 mice with and without experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis using flow cytometry to identify GFP-labeled BMDC that lacked the pan-hematopoietic marker, CD45 and co-expressed neural markers polysialic acid-neural cell adhesion molecule or A2B5. A small number of BMDC displaying neural markers and lacking CD45 expression was identified within both the non-inflamed and inflamed CNS. However, the majority of BMDC exhibited a hematopoietic phenotype.

  8. Synovial chondromatosis of the shoulder: imaging findings; Osteocondromatose sinovial no ombro: achados por metodos de imagem

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Terazaki, Carlos Renato Ticianelli; Trippia, Carlos Henrique; Caboclo, Maria Fernanda Sales Ferreira; Medaglia, Carla Regina Miranda, E-mail: reticianelli@hotmail.com [Hospital Sao Vicente (FUNEF), Curitiba, PR (Brazil). Servico de Radiologia e Diagnostico por Imagem; Trippia, Cesar Rodrigo [Hospital Sao Vicente (FUNEF), Curitiba, PR (Brazil)

    2014-01-15

    Synovial chondromatosis is a benign condition characterized by synovial proliferation and metaplasia, with development of cartilaginous or osteocartilaginous nodules within a joint, bursa or tendon sheath. In the shoulder, synovial osteochondromatosis may occur within the glenohumeral joint and its recesses (including the tendon sheath of the biceps long head), and in the subacromial-deltoid bursa. Such condition can be identified either by radiography, ultrasonography or magnetic resonance imaging, showing typical features according to each method. Radiography commonly shows ring-shaped calcified cartilages and periarticular soft tissues swelling with erosion of joint margins. Ultrasonography demonstrates hypoechogenic cartilaginous nodules with progressive increase in echogenicity as they become calcified, with development of posterior acoustic shadow in case of ossification. Besides identifying cartilaginous nodules, magnetic resonance imaging can also demonstrate the degree of synovial proliferation. The present study is aimed at describing the imaging findings of this entity in the shoulder. (author)

  9. Pediatric Synovial Sarcoma in the Retropharyngeal Space: A Rare and Unusual Presentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanjay Vaid

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Synovial sarcomas in the head and neck are extremely rare tumors, especially in the pediatric population. 3–5% of synovial sarcomas occur in the head and neck region displaying varied imaging and histopathological features resulting in frequent misdiagnosis. These tumors have a poor prognosis; hence early diagnosis and accurate classification based on imaging, histopathology, and immunohistochemistry are critical for prompt treatment. To the best of our knowledge, imaging findings of pediatric retropharyngeal lipomatous synovial sarcoma have not been reported to date in English medical literature. We report, for the first time, a rare case of retropharyngeal lipomatous synovial sarcoma in a ten-year-old child and discuss the case-specific imaging findings in our patient using magnetic resonance imaging and computed tomography.

  10. The arterial blood supply for the synovial tendon sheaths of the hand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de la Garza, Oscar; Lierse, Werner; de los Angeles-García, Ma; Elizondo, Rodrigo; Guzmán, Santos

    2008-01-01

    The blood supply for the synovial tendon sheaths of the hand was carefully investigated. We show that the origin of those arteries, supplying the synovial tendon-sheaths of the Mm. flexor pollicis longus, flexor digitorum superficialis and profundus, lies in the Canalis carpi. We also describe that the branches of the Aa. digitales palmares propriae arise independently. We emphasize that the terminal branches of the A. interossea posterior and the Rete carpi dorsalis form an arterial network on the synovial tendon sheaths of the Dorsum manus. The synovial membranes of the proximal joints of the fingers receive an ample blood supply from the Rami ascendentes of the Aa. metacarpeae palmares and the Aa. digitales palmares propriae (Aa. recurrentes).

  11. Unusual Presentation of Synovial Sarcoma as Meniscal Cyst: A Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamshidi, Khodamorad; Yahyazadeh, Hooman; Bagherifard, Abolfazl

    2015-10-01

    Periarticular cyst and cystic soft tissue lesion around the knee are common. Synovial sarcoma is a rare and malignant soft tissue tumor accounting for approximately 5% of soft tissue sarcoma. A case is presented where a lesion adjacent to the joint line of the knee was diagnosed clinically and on imaging as a meniscal cyst. MRI signal was homogenous and no concomitant meniscal tears were seen. The tissue diagnosis was monophasic synovial sarcoma.

  12. Unusual Presentation of Synovial Sarcoma as Meniscal Cyst: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khodamorad Jamshidi

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Periarticular cyst and cystic soft tissue lesion around the knee are common. Synovial sarcoma is a rare and malignant soft tissue tumor accounting for approximately 5% of soft tissue sarcoma. A case is presented where a lesion adjacent to the joint line of the knee was diagnosed clinically and on imaging as a meniscal cyst. MRI signal was homogenous and no concomitant meniscal tears were seen. The tissue diagnosis was monophasic synovial sarcoma.

  13. Type II collagen C2C epitope in human synovial fluid and serum after knee injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kumahashi, N; Swärd, P; Larsson, S

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE: Investigate in a cross-sectional study time-dependent changes of synovial fluid type II collagen epitope C2C concentrations after knee injury and correlate to other joint injury biomarkers. METHODS: Synovial fluid samples were aspirated between 0 days and 7 years after injury (n = 235...... = 0.403, P collagen (r = 0.444, P = 0.003), ARGS-aggrecan (r = 0.337, P ... with an immediate and sustained local degradation of type II collagen....

  14. Recurrent Primary Synovial Sarcoma of Median Nerve: A Case Report and Literature Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhat, A K; Jayakrishnan, K N; Acharya, A M

    2016-10-01

    We report a case of intraneural synovial sarcoma of the median nerve in a 39 year old lady with multiple local recurrences over thirteen years with no distant metastasis. The diagnosis of biphasic type of synovial sarcoma was confirmed by histopathology and immunohistochemistry. At the time of the fourth recurrence below elbow amputation was performed. This case is being reported for its rarity and propensity for local recurrence without distant metastasis.

  15. OSTEOCHONDROMA OF THE PROXIMAL HUMERUS WITH FRICTIONAL BURSITIS AND SECONDARY SYNOVIAL OSTEOCHONDROMATOSIS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Groote, J; Geerts, B; Mermuys, K; Verstraete, K

    2015-01-01

    We report a case of multiple hereditary exostosis in a 33-year old patient with clinical symptoms of pain and impression of a growing mass of the left shoulder alerting potential risk of malignant transformation of an osteochondroma. Imaging studies illustrated perilesional bursitis surrounding an osteochondroma of the proximal humerus. Malignant transformation was excluded with MRI. Fragments of the osteochondroma were dislocated in the inflammatory synovial bursa illustrating a case of secondary synovial osteochondromatosis.

  16. Intraperitoneal but not intravenous cryopreserved mesenchymal stromal cells home to the inflamed colon and ameliorate experimental colitis.

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    Morgana T L Castelo-Branco

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND AIMS: Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs were shown to have immunomodulatory activity and have been applied for treating immune-mediated disorders. We compared the homing and therapeutic action of cryopreserved subcutaneous adipose tissue (AT-MSCs and bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stromal cells (BM-MSCs in rats with trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid (TNBS-induced colitis. METHODS: After colonoscopic detection of inflammation AT-MSCs or BM-MSCs were injected intraperitoneally. Colonoscopic and histologic scores were obtained. Density of collagen fibres and apoptotic rates were evaluated. Cytokine levels were measured in supernatants of colon explants. For cell migration studies MSCs and skin fibroblasts were labelled with Tc-99m or CM-DiI and injected intraperitonealy or intravenously. RESULTS: Intraperitoneal injection of AT-MSCs or BM-MSCs reduced the endoscopic and histopathologic severity of colitis, the collagen deposition, and the epithelial apoptosis. Levels of TNF-α and interleukin-1β decreased, while VEGF and TGF-β did not change following cell-therapy. Scintigraphy showed that MSCs migrated towards the inflamed colon and the uptake increased from 0.5 to 24 h. Tc-99m-MSCs injected intravenously distributed into various organs, but not the colon. Cm-DiI-positive MSCs were detected throughout the colon wall 72 h after inoculation, predominantly in the submucosa and muscular layer of inflamed areas. CONCLUSIONS: Intraperitoneally injected cryopreserved MSCs home to and engraft into the inflamed colon and ameliorate TNBS-colitis.

  17. Intraperitoneal but Not Intravenous Cryopreserved Mesenchymal Stromal Cells Home to the Inflamed Colon and Ameliorate Experimental Colitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castelo-Branco, Morgana T. L.; Soares, Igor D. P.; Lopes, Daiana V.; Buongusto, Fernanda; Martinusso, Cesonia A.; do Rosario, Alyson; Souza, Sergio A. L.; Gutfilen, Bianca; Fonseca, Lea Mirian B.; Elia, Celeste; Madi, Kalil; Schanaider, Alberto; Rossi, Maria Isabel D.; Souza, Heitor S. P.

    2012-01-01

    Background and Aims Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) were shown to have immunomodulatory activity and have been applied for treating immune-mediated disorders. We compared the homing and therapeutic action of cryopreserved subcutaneous adipose tissue (AT-MSCs) and bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stromal cells (BM-MSCs) in rats with trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid (TNBS)–induced colitis. Methods After colonoscopic detection of inflammation AT-MSCs or BM-MSCs were injected intraperitoneally. Colonoscopic and histologic scores were obtained. Density of collagen fibres and apoptotic rates were evaluated. Cytokine levels were measured in supernatants of colon explants. For cell migration studies MSCs and skin fibroblasts were labelled with Tc-99m or CM-DiI and injected intraperitonealy or intravenously. Results Intraperitoneal injection of AT-MSCs or BM-MSCs reduced the endoscopic and histopathologic severity of colitis, the collagen deposition, and the epithelial apoptosis. Levels of TNF-α and interleukin-1β decreased, while VEGF and TGF-β did not change following cell-therapy. Scintigraphy showed that MSCs migrated towards the inflamed colon and the uptake increased from 0.5 to 24 h. Tc-99m-MSCs injected intravenously distributed into various organs, but not the colon. Cm-DiI-positive MSCs were detected throughout the colon wall 72 h after inoculation, predominantly in the submucosa and muscular layer of inflamed areas. Conclusions Intraperitoneally injected cryopreserved MSCs home to and engraft into the inflamed colon and ameliorate TNBS-colitis. PMID:22432015

  18. Extracts from rabbit skin inflamed by the vaccinia virus attenuate bupivacaine-induced spinal neurotoxicity in pregnant rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Rui Cui; Shiyuan Xu; Liang Wang; Hongyi Lei; Qingxiang Cai; Hongfei Zhang; Dongmei Wang

    2013-01-01

    Extracts from rabbit skin inflamed by the vaccinia virus can relieve pain and promote repair of nerve injury. The present study intraperitoneally injected extracts from rabbit skin inflamed by the vaccinia virus for 3 and 4 days prior to and following intrathecal injection of bupivacaine into pregnant rats. The pain threshold test after bupivacaine injection showed that the maximum possible effect of tail-flick latency peaked 1 day after intrathecal injection of bupivacaine in the extract-pretreatment group, and gradually decreased, while the maximum possible effect in the bupivacaine group continued to increase after intrathecal injection of bupivacaine. Histological observation showed that after 4 days of intrathecal injection of bupivacaine, the number of shrunken, vacuolated, apoptotic and caspase-9-positive cells in the dorsal root ganglion in the extract-pretreatment group was significantly reduced compared with the bupivacaine group. These findings indicate that extracts from rabbit skin inflamed by the vaccinia virus can attenuate neurotoxicity induced by intrathecal injection of bupivacaine in pregnant rats, possibly by inhibiting caspase-9 protein expression and suppressing nerve cell apoptosis.

  19. Clonal heterogeneity of synovial fluid T lymphocytes from patients with rheumatoid arthritis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duby, A.D.; Sinclair, A.K.; Osborne-Lawrence, S.L. (Univ. of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas (USA)); Zeldes, W.; Kan, Li; Fox, D.A. (Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor (USA))

    1989-08-01

    Although substantial evidence suggests that synovial T lymphocytes are critical in the pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis (RA), little is known regarding their antigenic specificities, antigen receptor gene rearrangements, and mechanisms of activation. To assess the extend of expansion of specific clones among RA synovial fluid T cells, Southern blot analyses of T-cell receptor (TCR) gene rearrangements were performed on 40 RA synovial fluid T-cell clones, as well as on fresh and polyclonally activated T cells from RA synovial fluid, RA peripheral blood, and normal peripheral blood. Two of the clones had identical TCR rearrangement patterns, but the remainder were unique. The nonclonal RA T-cell samples showed the same pattern of TCR {beta}-chain rearrangement that was observed among normal peripheral blood T cells, indicating no dominant clonal T-cell population in these samples. It was noted that with sufficient exposure of autoradiograms of the Southern blots, discrete TCR gene rearrangements, representing in some cases common D{sub {beta}}J{sub {beta}} (D, diversity; J, joining) rearrangements, were evident in T cells from peripheral blood of normal individuals and patients with RA, as well as T cells from RA synovial fluid. Taken together, the findings indicate that only a minor degree of oligoclonality can be demonstrated among T lymphocytes from RA synovial fluid.

  20. The diagnosis and management of synovial cysts: Efficacy of surgery versus cyst aspiration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epstein, Nancy E; Baisden, Jamie

    2012-01-01

    The surgical management of lumbar synovial cysts that have extruded into the spinal canal remains controversial (e.g. decompression with/without fusion). The neurological presentation, anatomy, pathophysiology, and surgical challenges posed by synovial cysts in the lumbar spine are well known. Neurological complaints typically include unilateral or, more rarely, bilateral radicular complaints, and/or cauda equina syndromes. Anatomically, synovial cysts constitute cystic dilatations of synovial sheaths that directly extrude from facet joints into the spinal canal. Pathophysiologically, these cysts reflect disruption of the facet joints often with accompanying instability, and potentially compromise both the cephalad and caudad nerve roots. Aspiration of lumbar synovial cysts, which are typically gelatinous and non-aspirable, and typically performed by "pain specialists" (e.g. pain management, rehabilitation, radiologists, others) utilizing fluoroscopy or CT-guided aspiration, is associated with 50-100% failure rates. Surgical decompression with/without fusion (as the issue regarding fusion remains unsettled) results in the resolution of back and radicular pain in 91.6-92.5% and 91.1-91.9% of cases, respectively. After a thorough review of the literature, it appears that the treatment with the best outcome for patients with synovial cysts is cyst removal utilizing surgical decompression; the need for attendant fusion remains unsettled. The use of an alternative treatment, percutaneous aspiration of cysts, appears to have a much higher recurrence and failure rate, but may be followed by surgery if warranted.

  1. Synovial fluid lubrication of artificial joints: protein film formation and composition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Jingyun; Myant, Connor; Underwood, Richard; Cann, Philippa

    2012-01-01

    Despite design improvements, wear of artificial implants remains a serious health issue particularly for Metal-on-Metal (MoM) hips where the formation of metallic wear debris has been linked to adverse tissue response. Clearly it is important to understand the fundamental lubrication mechanisms which control the wear process. It is usually assumed that MoM hips operate in the ElastoHydrodynamic Lubrication (EHL) regime where film formation is governed by the bulk fluid viscosity; however there is little experimental evidence of this. The current paper critically examines synovial fluid lubrication mechanisms and the effect of synovial fluid chemistry. Two composition parameters were chosen; protein content and pH, both of which are known to change in diseased or post-operative synovial fluid. Film thickness and wear tests were carried out for a series of model synovial fluid solutions. Two distinct film formation mechanisms were identified; an adsorbed surface film and a high-viscosity gel. The entrainment of this gel controls film formation particularly at low speeds. However wear of the femoral head still occurs and this is thought to be due primarily to a tribo-corrosion mechanisms. The implications of this new lubrication mechanism and the effect of different synovial fluid chemistries are examined. One important conclusion is that patient synovial fluid chemistry plays an important role in determining implant wear and the likelihood of failure.

  2. Patellar Subluxation With Early-Phase Synovial Chondromatosis of the Knee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bashaireh, Khaldoon M

    2016-01-01

    Primary synovial chondromatosis is a rare, benign, monoarticular disease process that affects the synovial membrane of the joint, the synovial sheath, or the bursa around the joint. The etiology is unknown, but it has been associated with trauma in some cases. Although it is a benign lesion, if left untreated, it may lead to early secondary osteoarthritis of the joint. The knee joint is affected in 50% to 65% of cases, followed by the elbow and the hip. This article reports a 30-year-old active woman who presented to the author's clinic with a large infrapatellar mass that caused lateral subluxation of the patella, swelling, and episodic pain with crepitations 14 months after direct trauma to the knee. Clinical examination, magnetic resonance imaging, and arthroscopy revealed a large infrapatellar mass causing lateral subluxation of the patella with no loose bodies. Hoffa's disease, para-articular osteochondroma, and early-phase synovial chondromatosis were considered in the differential diagnosis. The histopathologic and clinical features were consistent with early synovial chondromatosis. The patient underwent local excision of the mass through a medial parapatellar arthrotomy. At 5 years of follow-up, she had no recurrence of the lesion or progression of the disease. Early diagnosis of synovial chondromatosis with local excision offers a reliable cure. However, long-term follow-up is advised because of the high recurrence rates as well as the risk of metaplastic transformation.

  3. Hemichannels in the neurovascular unit and white matter under normal and inflamed conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orellana, Juan A; Figueroa, Xavier F; Sánchez, Helmuth A; Contreras-Duarte, Susana; Velarde, Victoria; Sáez, Juan C

    2011-05-01

    In the normal brain, cellular types that compose the neurovascular unit, including neurons, astrocytes and endothelial cells express pannexins and connexins, which are protein subunits of two families that form plasma membrane channels. Most available evidence in mammals indicated that endogenously expressed pannexins only form hemichannels, and connexins form both gap junction channels and hemichannels. While gap junction channels connect the cytoplasm of contacting cells and coordinate electrical and metabolic activities, hemichannels communicate intra- and extracellular compartments and serve as diffusional pathways for ions and small molecules. Here, evidence supporting the functional role of hemichannels in the neurovascular unit and white matter under physiological and pathological conditions are reviewed. A sub-threshold acute pathological threatening condition (e.g., stroke and brain infection) leads to glial cell activation, which maintains an active defense and restores the normal function of the neurovascular unit. However, if the stimulus is deleterious, microglia and the endothelium become overactivated, both releasing bioactive molecules (e.g., glutamate, cytokines, prostaglandins and ATP) that increase the activity of astroglial hemichannels, reducing the astrocyte neuroprotective functions, and further reducing neuronal cell viability. Moreover, ATP is known to contribute to myelin degeneration of axons. Consequently, hemichannels might play a relevant role in the excitotoxic response of oligodendrocytes observed in ischemia and encephalomyelitis. Regulated changes in hemichannel permeability in healthy brain cells can have positive consequences in terms of paracrine/autocrine signaling, whereas persistent changes in cells affected by neurological disorders can be detrimental. Therefore, blocking hemichannels expressed by glial cells and/or neurons of the inflamed central nervous system might prevent neurovascular unit dysfunction and

  4. Characterization of VCAM-1-binding peptide-functionalized quantum dots for molecular imaging of inflamed endothelium.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yun Chen

    Full Text Available Inflammation-induced activation of endothelium constitutes one of the earliest changes during atherogenesis. New imaging techniques that allow detecting activated endothelial cells can improve the identification of persons at high cardiovascular risk in early stages. Quantum dots (QDs have attractive optical properties such as bright fluorescence and high photostability, and have been increasingly studied and developed for bio-imaging and bio-targeting applications. We report here the development of vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 binding peptide (VCAM-1 binding peptide functionalized QDs (VQDs from amino QDs. It was found that the QD fluorescence signal in tumor necrosis factor [Formula: see text] (TNF-[Formula: see text] treated endothelial cells in vitro was significantly higher when these cells were labeled with VQDs than amino QDs. The VQD labeling of TNF-[Formula: see text]-treated endothelial cells was VCAM-1 specific since pre-incubation with recombinant VCAM-1 blocked cells' uptake of VQDs. Our ex vivo and in vivo experiments showed that in the inflamed endothelium, QD fluorescence signal from VQDs was also much stronger than that of amino QDs. Moreover, we observed that the QD fluorescence peak was significantly blue-shifted after VQDs interacted with aortic endothelial cells in vivo and in vitro. A similar blue-shift was observed after VQDs were incubated with recombinant VCAM-1 in tube. We anticipate that the specific interaction between VQDs and VCAM-1 and the blue-shift of the QD fluorescence peak can be very useful for VCAM-1 detection in vivo.

  5. Oxidative stress-induced DNA damage in the synovial cells of the temporomandibular joint in the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaza, T; Masuda, K F; Atsuta, I; Nishijima, K; Kido, M A; Tanaka, T

    2004-08-01

    Synovial hyperplasia is a feature of degenerative temporomandibular joint (TMJ) disease. However, the mechanism by which hyperplasia progresses in the TMJ is unknown. Based on the hypothesis that the oxidative stress generated by mechanical loading causes degenerative changes in the TMJ synovium, we investigated the generation of the highly reactive species, peroxynitrite, and the occurrence of DNA damage in the synovium. After condylar hypermobility of rat TMJs, a marker of peroxynitrite, nitrotyrosine, was localized to the nuclei and cytoplasm of the synovial lining cells and fibroblasts in synovitis-induced TMJ. DNA single-strand breaks were found in the nuclei of the synovial cells only after enzyme treatment, whereas DNA double-strand breaks were not detected. These findings indicate that condylar hypermovement induces the proliferation of synovial cells, and suggest that oxidative stress leads to the progression of synovial hyperplasia via DNA damage of the synovial cells in TMJs after mechanical loading.

  6. Synovial cyst of the hip joint as a rare cause of unlateral leg edema; A case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Ji Hun; Chang, Il Soo; Park, Sang Woo; Yun, Ik Jin; Park, Hyung Kyu; Kim, Wan Seop; Lee, Hui Jin; Kim, Na Ra; Moon, Sung Gyu [Konkuk University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-06-15

    A synovial cyst of the hip joint is a rare cause of unilateral leg edema, and it is usually associated with arthropathies such as rheumatoid arthritis and osteoarthritis. An asymptomatic synovial cyst of the hip joint that is not associated with an arthritic condition occurs infrequently. In this paper, we described the case of a 52-year-old woman who presented with unilateral right leg edema caused by a synovial cyst of the hip joint.

  7. Cutaneous Metaplastic Synovial Cyst: A Case Report and Literature Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kermani, Hamed; Dehghani, Nima; Dehghani, Siavash; Behnia, Hossein; Pourdanesh, Fereydoun; Mohajerani, Hassan

    2015-12-01

    Cutaneous metaplastic synovial cyst (CMSC) is a rare cutaneous lesion characterized by a tender subcutaneous nodule, which usually occurs at the site of previous surgical or local trauma. Histologically, the lesion includes a cystic structure with villous-like projections and a lining mimicking hyperplastic synovium. We reported the first case of CMSC which developed at the surgical incision site of treatment of a maxillofacial fracture. In addition, we reviewed English literature to evaluate all previously reported CMSC cases and discussed its clinical and histopathological features and etiology. From 1987 to now, reviewing the English literature about CMSC includes 17 studies that described 28 cases, and our presented case was the 29th. There was no sex predilection and age of patients ranged from 7 to 82 years, but most of them were over 40 years. We can see this lesion in any site of the body and hand/arm is the most prevalent involved region (28% cases). Most of the patients had a history of previous local trauma or operation in the involved area. Although the actual etiology of CMSC remains unclear, trauma, as the most probable etiologic factor, plays a role in development of CMSC. Surgical excision of the lesion is the preferable treatment choice and rate of recurrence is low.

  8. Cistos sinoviais lombares Synovial cysts of the lumbar spine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Cláudia Ferreira Rosa

    2002-10-01

    Full Text Available Os cistos sinoviais localizados na coluna lombar são raros, em geral associados a alterações degenerativas das articulações facetárias, mais freqüentemente vistos na transição L4-L5. Raramente causam sintomas, que, quando ocorrem, são sobretudo lombociatalgia. O diagnóstico é feito de maneira satisfatória pela tomografia computadorizada e pela ressonância magnética e é importante para que se institua o correto tratamento dos cistos. Existem diversas formas de tratamento, desde repouso e imobilização até a injeção de corticóide no cisto sinovial guiada por tomografia computadorizada, e mesmo cirurgia nos casos refratários aos outros tipos de tratamento.Intraspinal synovial cysts of the lumbar spine are rare and commonly associated with osteoarthritis of the facet joints, particularly at level L4-L5. Symptoms are uncommon and may include low-back pain or sciatica. These cysts are accurately diagnosed by using computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging. Diagnosis is essential for the correct management of the cysts. Several treatment options are available including rest and immobilization, computed tomography guided corticosteroids injection, and surgery in patients that are nonresponsive to other treatment methods.

  9. MR imaging of lumbar facet joint synovial cysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Apostolaki, E.; Davies, A.M.; Evans, N. [Royal Orthopaedic Hospital, Birmingham (United Kingdom). Dept. of Radiology; Cassar-Pullicino, V.N. [Robert Jones and Agnes Hunt Orthopaedic Hospital, Oswestry (United Kingdom)

    2000-04-01

    The increasing application of magnetic resonance (MR) imaging of the spine has raised the awareness of lumbar facet synovial cysts (LFSC). This well recognised, yet uncommon condition, presents with low back pain and radiculopathy due to the presence of an extradural mass. The commonest affected level is L4/5 with a mild degenerative spondylolisthesis a frequent associated finding. MR imaging is the technique of choice to detect and diagnose a LFSC. This pictorial essay, drawing on experience of 43 cases seen in 40 patients, illustrates the spectrum of appearances that can be encountered and suggest differing causes for the variable signal characteristics exhibited. Computed tomography (CT) can be of value in some cases to aid interpretation of the MR images. In addition, CT facet arthrography by injection of air or iodinated non-ionic contrast medium may be used to confirm the diagnosis in doubtful cases as well as noting whether the patients presenting symptoms can be provoked. A comprehensive review of the existing literature is presented. (orig.)

  10. Interleukin-29 Enhances Synovial Inflammation and Cartilage Degradation in Osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Lingxiao; Peng, Qiuyue; Xuan, Wenhua; Feng, Xiaoke; Kong, Xiangqing; Zhang, Miaojia; Tan, Wenfeng; Xue, Meilang; Wang, Fang

    2016-01-01

    We have recently shown that IL-29 was an important proinflammatory cytokine in pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Inflammation also contributes to the pathogenesis of osteoarthritis (OA). The aim of this study was to investigate the effect and mechanism of IL-29 on cytokine production and cartilage degradation in OA. The mRNA levels of IL-29 and its specific receptor IL-28Ra in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) were significantly increased in OA patients when compared to healthy controls (HC). In the serum, IL-29 protein levels were higher in OA patients than those in HC. Immunohistochemistry revealed that both IL-29 and IL-28Ra were dramatically elevated in OA synovium compared to HC; synovial fibroblasts (FLS) and macrophages were the main IL-29-producing cells in OA synovium. Furthermore, recombinant IL-29 augmented the mRNA expression of IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8, and matrix-metalloproteinase-3 (MMP-3) in OA FLS and increased cartilage degradation when ex vivo OA cartilage explant was coincubated with OA FLS. Finally, in OA FLS, IL-29 dominantly activated MAPK and nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB), but not Jak-STAT and AKT signaling pathway as examined by western blot. In conclusion, IL-29 stimulates inflammation and cartilage degradation by OA FLS, indicating that this cytokine is likely involved in the pathogenesis of OA.

  11. Progressive growth of primary synovial sarcoma of the lung.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakano, Jun; Yokomise, Hiroyasu; Huang, Cheng-Long; Misaki, Noriyuki; Chang, Sung-Soo; Okuda, Masaya; Kushida, Yoshio; Haba, Reiji

    2010-06-01

    An 80-year-old male was admitted because of a giant mass in the left lower lobe of the lung on a routine chest X-ray. Chest computed tomography verified this to be a well-defined heterogeneous mass as described with no associated lymphadenopathy. FDG-PET depicted moderately marginal FDG uptake. The patient underwent a left lower lobectomy and lymphadenectomy. Grossly, the tumor measured 60 × 50 mm and was uniformly filled with a pure white, pudding-like friable substance. No lymph node metastasis was observed microscopically. Histologically, the tumor showed a dense proliferation of rounded or spindled malignant cells with a frequent mitotic activity and an increased nuclear-to-cytoplasmic ratio. The immunohistochemical staining was positive for vimentin, negative for cytokeratin, keratin-wide, EMA, CD34. A SYT-SSX2 fusion gene transcript was detected as a result of RT-PCR analysis. Because of these results, the tumor was diagnosed as a monophasic synovial sarcoma.

  12. Minimally invasive surgery for lumbar synovial cysts with coexisting degenerative spondylolisthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denis, Daniel R; Hirt, Daniel; Shah, Saumya; Lu, Daniel C; Holly, Langston T

    2016-01-01

    About one third of lumbar synovial cysts are associated with degenerative spondylolisthesis. Segmental instability is thought to contribute to the pathogenesis and recurrence of synovial cysts and lumbar fusion has been advocated as a treatment of choice in the presence of spondylolisthesis. In patients with spondylolisthesis, minimally invasive resection of lumbar synovial cysts, without fusion, could minimize surgically induced segmental instability while providing good pain relief. Clinical and radiological outcomes of lumbar synovial cyst patients with and without spondylolisthesis were retrospectively compared. Pain outcomes were assessed with modified Macnab criteria. Fifty-three patients (18 with grade 1 spondylolisthesis) underwent minimally invasive synovial cyst resection and all had either excellent or good pain outcome at ≤ 8 post- operative weeks (P = 1.000, n = 53). At > 8 post-operative weeks (mean (SD) follow-up of 200 (175) weeks), excellent or good outcomes were noted in 89% of patients without spondylolisthesis and in 75% of patients with spondylolisthesis (P = 0.425, n = 40). Four patients developed a new grade 1 spondylolisthesis at a mean follow-up of 2.6 ± 2.1 years. Nine patients were assessed for spondylolisthesis measurements at 1.2 ± 1.3 years of follow up and no significant difference was observed (5 ± 0 vs 5 ± 1 mm; P = 0.791). Two patients without spondylolisthesis and none of the patients with spondylolisthesis had a synovial cyst recurrence. Patients with concomitant lumbar degenerative spondylolisthesis and synovial cyst can have good short- and long-term clinical outcomes with minimally invasive surgery without fusion. Post-operative segmental instability does not appear to be significant in patients with spondylolisthesis. All patients included in this article signed an informed consent for the use of their medical information for research.

  13. Minimally Invasive Tubular Resection of Lumbar Synovial Cysts: Report of 40 Consecutive Cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birch, Barry D; Aoun, Rami James N; Elbert, Gregg A; Patel, Naresh P; Krishna, Chandan; Lyons, Mark K

    2016-10-01

    Lumbar synovial cysts are a relatively common clinical finding. Surgical treatment of symptomatic synovial cysts includes computed tomography-guided aspiration, open resection and minimally invasive tubular resection. We report our series of 40 consecutive minimally invasive microscopic tubular lumbar synovial cyst resections. Following Institutional Review Board approval, a retrospective analysis of 40 cases of minimally invasive microscopic tubular retractor synovial cyst resections at a single institution by a single surgeon (B.D.B.) was conducted. Gross total resection was performed in all cases. Patient characteristics, surgical operating time, complications, and outcomes were analyzed. Lumbar radiculopathy was the presenting symptoms in all but 1 patient, who presented with neurogenic claudication. The mean duration of symptoms was 6.5 months (range, 1-25 months), mean operating time was 58 minutes (range, 25-110 minutes), and mean blood loss was 20 mL (range, 5-50 mL). Seven patients required overnight observation. The median length of stay in the remaining 33 patients was 4 hours. There were 2 cerebrospinal fluid leaks repaired directly without sequelae. The mean follow-up duration was 80.7 months. Outcomes were good or excellent in 37 of the 40 patients, fair in 1 patient, and poor in 2 patients. Minimally invasive microscopic tubular retractor resection of lumbar synovial cysts can be done safely and with comparable outcomes and complication rates as open procedures with potentially reduced operative time, length of stay, and healthcare costs. Patient selection for microscopic tubular synovial cyst resection is based in part on the anatomy of the spine and synovial cyst and is critical when recommending minimally invasive vs. open resection to patients. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Minimally invasive surgery for lumbar synovial cysts with coexisting degenerative spondylolisthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirt, Daniel; Shah, Saumya; Lu, Daniel C.; Holly, Langston T.

    2016-01-01

    Background About one third of lumbar synovial cysts are associated with degenerative spondylolisthesis. Segmental instability is thought to contribute to the pathogenesis and recurrence of synovial cysts and lumbar fusion has been advocated as a treatment of choice in the presence of spondylolisthesis. In patients with spondylolisthesis, minimally invasive resection of lumbar synovial cysts, without fusion, could minimize surgically induced segmental instability while providing good pain relief. Methods Clinical and radiological outcomes of lumbar synovial cyst patients with and without spondylolisthesis were retrospectively compared. Pain outcomes were assessed with modified Macnab criteria. Results Fifty-three patients (18 with grade 1 spondylolisthesis) underwent minimally invasive synovial cyst resection and all had either excellent or good pain outcome at ≤ 8 post- operative weeks (P = 1.000, n = 53). At > 8 post-operative weeks (mean (SD) follow-up of 200 (175) weeks), excellent or good outcomes were noted in 89% of patients without spondylolisthesis and in 75% of patients with spondylolisthesis (P = 0.425, n = 40). Four patients developed a new grade 1 spondylolisthesis at a mean follow-up of 2.6 ± 2.1 years. Nine patients were assessed for spondylolisthesis measurements at 1.2 ± 1.3 years of follow up and no significant difference was observed (5 ± 0 vs 5 ± 1 mm; P = 0.791). Two patients without spondylolisthesis and none of the patients with spondylolisthesis had a synovial cyst recurrence. Conclusion Patients with concomitant lumbar degenerative spondylolisthesis and synovial cyst can have good short- and long-term clinical outcomes with minimally invasive surgery without fusion. Post-operative segmental instability does not appear to be significant in patients with spondylolisthesis. All patients included in this article signed an informed consent for the use of their medical information for research. PMID:27909658

  15. The JAK inhibitor tofacitinib suppresses synovial JAK1-STAT signalling in rheumatoid arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyle, D L; Soma, K; Hodge, J; Kavanaugh, A; Mandel, D; Mease, P; Shurmur, R; Singhal, A K; Wei, N; Rosengren, S; Kaplan, I; Krishnaswami, S; Luo, Z; Bradley, J; Firestein, G S

    2015-01-01

    Objective Tofacitinib is an oral Janus kinase (JAK) inhibitor for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). The pathways affected by tofacitinib and the effects on gene expression in situ are unknown. Therefore, tofacitinib effects on synovial pathobiology were investigated. Methods A randomised, double-blind, phase II serial synovial biopsy study (A3921073; NCT00976599) in patients with RA with an inadequate methotrexate response. Patients on background methotrexate received tofacitinib 10 mg twice daily or placebo for 28 days. Synovial biopsies were performed on Days -7 and 28 and analysed by immunoassay or quantitative PCR. Clinical response was determined by disease activity score and European League Against Rheumatism (EULAR) response on Day 28 in A3921073, and at Month 3 in a long-term extension study (A3921024; NCT00413699). Results Tofacitinib exposure led to EULAR moderate to good responses (11/14 patients), while placebo was ineffective (1/14 patients) on Day 28. Tofacitinib treatment significantly reduced synovial mRNA expression of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-1 and MMP-3 (p<0.05) and chemokines CCL2, CXCL10 and CXCL13 (p<0.05). No overall changes were observed in synovial inflammation score or the presence of T cells, B cells or macrophages. Changes in synovial phosphorylation of signal transducer and activator of transcription 1 (STAT1) and STAT3 strongly correlated with 4-month clinical responses (p<0.002). Tofacitinib significantly decreased plasma CXCL10 (p<0.005) at Day 28 compared with placebo. Conclusions Tofacitinib reduces metalloproteinase and interferon-regulated gene expression in rheumatoid synovium, and clinical improvement correlates with reductions in STAT1 and STAT3 phosphorylation. JAK1-mediated interferon and interleukin-6 signalling likely play a key role in the synovial response. Trial registration number NCT00976599. PMID:25398374

  16. Long-term outcomes of percutaneous lumbar facet synovial cyst rupture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Ambrose J; Bos, Stijn A; Torriani, Martin; Simeone, F Joseph; Chang, Connie Y; Pomerantz, Stuart R; Bredella, Miriam A

    2017-01-01

    To evaluate the therapeutic value, safety, and long-term clinical outcomes of percutaneous lumbar facet synovial cyst (LFSC) rupture. Our study was institutional review board (IRB)-approved and Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA)-compliant. The study group comprised 71 patients (44 women, mean age: 65 ± 17 years) who underwent CT- or fluoroscopy-guided percutaneous LFSC rupture. The technical success of LFSC rupture, the long-term clinical outcome, including repeat procedures or surgery, and imaging findings on MRI and CT were recorded. Seventy-nine LFSC ruptures were performed in 71 patients. CT guidance was used in 57 cases and fluoroscopy guidance in 22 cases. LFSC rupture was technically successful in 58 out of 79 cases (73 %). Mean injection volume for cyst rupture was 3.6 ± 2.2 mL and a combination of steroid and anesthetic was injected in all cases. Over a mean follow-up time of 44 months, 12 % of patients underwent repeat cyst rupture, and 46 % eventually underwent surgery, whereas the majority of patients (55 %) experienced symptomatic relief and did not undergo surgery. There was no significant association between a successful outcome and age, sex, level, or size of LFSC (p > 0.1). LFSCs with T2 hypointensity were more likely to require surgery (p = 0.02). There was one complication, a bacterial skin infection that completely resolved following antibiotic therapy. Percutaneous LFSC rupture is an effective and safe nonsurgical treatment option for LFSC. More than half of treated patients were able to avoid subsequent surgery. Therefore, percutaneous LFSC rupture should be considered before surgical intervention.

  17. Long-term outcomes of percutaneous lumbar facet synovial cyst rupture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Ambrose J.; Bos, Stijn A.; Torriani, Martin; Simeone, F.J.; Chang, Connie Y.; Pomerantz, Stuart R.; Bredella, Miriam A. [Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Department of Radiology, Boston, MA (United States)

    2017-01-15

    To evaluate the therapeutic value, safety, and long-term clinical outcomes of percutaneous lumbar facet synovial cyst (LFSC) rupture. Our study was institutional review board (IRB)-approved and Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA)-compliant. The study group comprised 71 patients (44 women, mean age: 65 ± 17 years) who underwent CT- or fluoroscopy-guided percutaneous LFSC rupture. The technical success of LFSC rupture, the long-term clinical outcome, including repeat procedures or surgery, and imaging findings on MRI and CT were recorded. Seventy-nine LFSC ruptures were performed in 71 patients. CT guidance was used in 57 cases and fluoroscopy guidance in 22 cases. LFSC rupture was technically successful in 58 out of 79 cases (73 %). Mean injection volume for cyst rupture was 3.6 ± 2.2 mL and a combination of steroid and anesthetic was injected in all cases. Over a mean follow-up time of 44 months, 12 % of patients underwent repeat cyst rupture, and 46 % eventually underwent surgery, whereas the majority of patients (55 %) experienced symptomatic relief and did not undergo surgery. There was no significant association between a successful outcome and age, sex, level, or size of LFSC (p > 0.1). LFSCs with T2 hypointensity were more likely to require surgery (p = 0.02). There was one complication, a bacterial skin infection that completely resolved following antibiotic therapy. Percutaneous LFSC rupture is an effective and safe nonsurgical treatment option for LFSC. More than half of treated patients were able to avoid subsequent surgery. Therefore, percutaneous LFSC rupture should be considered before surgical intervention. (orig.)

  18. Lumbar synovial cysts: presentation of a series of 10 cases and literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lista-Martínez, O; Moreno-Barrueco, V M; Castro-Castro, J; Varela-Rois, P; Pastor-Zapata, A

    Although they are freqqently described in the literature, lumbar synovial cysts are a relative uncommon cause of low back and radicular leg pain. To evaluate the treatment and surgical outcomes of the lumbar synovial cysts operated on in our hospital during a 5 year period. A retrospective study was conducted on patients surgically treated in our department from August 2009 to September 2014, using a visual analogue scale for the clinical follow-up in the first year after surgery. After the surgical treatment (surgical removal of the synovial cyst with or without instrumented arthrodesis with transpedicular screws) of 10 patients (5 female and 5 male) with a mean age of 70.2 years (range 50-80), the clinical outcome was satisfactory in 80% of the patients, with the resolving of their symptoms. Lumbar synovial cysts have to be considered in the differential diagnosis in patients with low back and radicular leg pain. The majority of the patients are in their sixties and have lumbar degenerative spondylopathy. Nowadays, surgical resection of the lumbar synovial cysts and spinal fusion are the recommended treatment, because it is thought that the increased movement of the spine is one to the causes of the cyst formation. More studies are still needed, hence the relevance of this article. Copyright © 2016 SECOT. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  19. Aspiration and triamcinolone acetonide injection of wrist synovial cysts in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colberg, Ricardo E; Sánchez, Carlos F; Lugo-Vicente, Humberto

    2008-11-01

    The aim of this case series report is to assess the effectiveness of aspiration and injection of triamcinolone acetonide for treatment of wrist synovial cysts in children. Twenty-one records of pediatric patients with synovial cyst on the wrist treated with aspiration and triamcinolone acetonide injection were selected for analysis of their outcomes. All cases were aspirated and injected at the operating room under mask induction anesthesia. Three categories were used to classify the patients' outcomes: (1) successful treatment with no recurrence, (2) successful treatment with residual sclerotic lump, and (3) recurrence of cyst. Fourteen females and 7 males with an average age of 7.2 years had a mean time with the cyst of 1 year. All children were asymptomatic. After aspiration, 13 (62%) of 21 patients experienced successful treatment of the synovial cyst with no recurrence after a single intervention. Five patients had a residual lump at the site of the cyst (24%), which disappeared after an average of 6 months. Three patients experienced true recurrence of the synovial cyst (14%). Average follow-up was 2.5 years. Aspiration and injection of triamcinolone accounted for a considerable reduction in recurrence. Aspiration and triamcinolone acetonide injection of wrist synovial cysts is an effective and safe treatment that may be considered as first-line treatment in the pediatric population if there is no resolution after 1 year of observation.

  20. Synovial cyst of the temporomandibular joint: a case report and literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spinzia, A; Panetta, D; Russo, D; Califano, L

    2011-08-01

    Synovial cysts are lesions that usually occur on the wrist, foot and knee. They are rarely involved in the region of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ), with only 10 cases reported from 1978 to 2007. The authors report a case of a synovial cyst of the TMJ in a 45-year-old woman. The patient presented with a right preauricular swelling, 1cm anterior to the tragus. A computed tomography (CT) scan showed a small oval hypodense mass of soft tissue in the right temporomandibular region with no relation to the condyle. Fine needle aspiration reported a synovial cyst of the TMJ. The patient was taken to the operating room and a preauricular approach extending to the temporal region was carried out resulting in surgical excision of the mass. The histological findings were consistent with the diagnosis of a synovial cyst. The long term clinical and radiological follow-up (after 18 months) showed no sign of recurrence. The authors suggest, in accordance with the literature, that a surgical approach should be the treatment of choice in the case of a synovial cyst of the TMJ. Copyright © 2011 International Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Pathophysiology of regression of synovial cysts of the lumbar spine: the 'anti-inflammatory hypothesis'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattei, Tobias A; Goulart, Carlos R; McCall, Todd D

    2012-12-01

    The term 'synovial cysts' of the lumbar spine refers to cysts that arise from the zygapophyseal joint capsule of the lumbar spine. Although several cases of regression of lumbar spine synovial cysts after oral anti-inflammatory therapy as well as local steroid injection have already been reported in the literature, no study up to now has addressed the role of 'inflammation suppression' in the regression of such lesions. In fact most of the previous studies have regarded 'spontaneous rupture' as well as 'instability resolution' as the most probable explanations for such phenomenon. In this article the authors review the current experimental data about the role of cytokines and inflammation in the development of synovial cysts of the lumbar spine. Additionally with basis on both our clinical experience of regression of a synovial cyst after conservative treatment with a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (Cox-2 inhibitor) as well as on the experimental data supporting the multi-factorial effects of such drugs on the lumbar facet joints, the authors hypothesize that inhibition of inflammation might play a significant role in the pathophysiology of lumbar spine synovial cysts' regression. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Transoral surgical approach for treatment of symptomatic atlantoaxial cervical synovial cysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyons, Mark K; Birch, Barry

    2011-01-01

    Synovial cysts are relatively common in the lumbar spine and very uncommon in the cervical spine. Several case reports and a few small series have been reported in the literature over the past four decades. There are two distinct cervical spine synovial cyst categories: atlantoaxial and the subaxial cervical spine. The surgical treatments are very different. We report eleven patients undergoing transoral resection and posterior fusion for histologically confirmed symptomatic atlantoaxial synovial cysts. This represents a retrospective review over 18 years. The authors analyzed the literature of patients who underwent surgical treatment for symptomatic atlantoaxial synovial cysts. There were four male and seven female patients with a mean age of 76 years (range 54-84 years). All patients presented with cervical myelopathy. Patients were neurologically assessed pre- and postoperatively and outcome reported using the Modified Rankin Outcome score. Mean follow-up period was 22 months (range 6-120 months). Ten of the eleven patients had improvement in their postoperative assessment and one patient remained unchanged. Myelopathy is the presenting symptom in the vast majority of these patients. Surgical resection and decompression of the neural structures can be an effective treatment for symptomatic atlantoaxial synovial cysts.

  3. Resolution of a synovial cyst of the lumbar spine without surgical therapy -- a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ewald, C; Kalff, R

    2005-08-01

    Synovial cysts originating from the facet joint of the lumbar spine are a rare cause of radiculopathy. Surgical resection is considered to be the treatment of choice, although very little is known about the natural history of spinal synovial cysts. Only six cases have been published up to now concerning the spontaneous regression of a cyst without invasive therapy. We present the history of a patient suffering from sciatic pain caused by a synovial cyst at the level of L4/5, and we describe the spontaneous remission of the cyst, discussing the radiological and clinical findings and comparing our findings with respect to the current literature. The patient suffered from sciatic pain for 5 months without neurological deficits. Magnetic resonance tomography revealed a cystic structure adjacent to the facet joint L4/5. Presuming a synovial cyst, we scheduled surgery and at the same time started conservative treatment, including physical therapy and analgesic medication. The patient's condition improved significantly during conservative treatment, so that surgery was cancelled. A second magnetic resonance tomography showed that the cyst had dramatically shrunken, without any narrowing of the spinal canal. Up to now, synovial cysts of the lumbar spine have usually been treated operatively, but we and others have shown that spontaneous resolution of the cyst seems possible, so that extensive conservative treatment should always be considered as the first therapeutic option, provided that there are no severe neurological deficits.

  4. The role of protein content on the steady and oscillatory shear rheology of model synovial fluids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Z; Barman, S; Christopher, G F

    2014-08-28

    Recent studies have debated the role of protein content on the bulk rheology of synovial fluid; in particular, it has been questioned if proteins aggregate or interact with hyaluronic acid in synovial fluid to enhance bulk rheology, or if observed effects were due to systematic measurement error caused by interfacial rheology, stemming from protein adsorption to the interface. Utilizing several techniques to ensure results reflect only bulk rheology, an examination of the role of bovine serum albumin and γ-globulin on model synovial fluid rheology has been undertaken. When interfacial rheology caused by protein adsorption to the interface is abrogated, the bulk rheology of a model synovial fluid composed of bovine serum albumin, γ-globulin, and hyaluronic acid is found to be dominated solely by the hyaluronic acid over a wide range of shear rates, strains and frequencies. These results show that the previously reported enhanced rheological properties of model synovial fluids are solely due to interfacial rheology and not from any type of protein aggregation/interaction in bulk solution.

  5. RELEVANCE OF ARTHROSCOPIC SYNOVIAL BIOPSY IN JOINT DISORDERS - A PROSPECTIVE STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kali Vara Prasad

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available BACK GROUND : Synovial biopsy is considered as the gold standard in the diagnosis of various joint disorders and synovial diseases. But sometimes the definitive diagnosis is elusive only by doing biopsy then clinical, hematological and x - ray examinations will help. The advantage with arthroscopic synovial biopsy is that it is easy to perform, minimal discomfort to the patient and can be done at intervals if the diagnosis can n ot be made in the first examination. MATERIAL & METHODS : The present study was conducted in the Department of Orthopedics & Traumatology, Osmania General Hospital/ Medical College, Hyderabad. The duration of the study was from Sept 2012 to Sept 2014. CONCLUSIONS : Arthroscopic synovial biopsy is the mainstay in the management of Joint disorders and Synovial diseases. It is patient friendly and repeated procedures can be undertaken when the definitive diagnosis could not be established in the initial attempt, as is common in some cases of Non - specific synovitis, later being diagnosed either as Osteoarthritis or Rheumatoid Arthritis. This is the greatest advantage in using this procedure.

  6. A systematic literature review of synovial chondromatosis and pigmented villonodular synovitis of the hip.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Startzman, Ashley; Collins, Devin; Carreira, Dominic

    2016-11-01

    Benign synovial diseases of the hip including Synovial Chondromatosis (SC) and Pigmented Villonodular Synovitis (PVNS) are devastating diseases. Initially, patients present with hip pain unrelieved by conservative measures. The diagnosis of PVNS and SC are often delayed, leading to progression of joint damage. The purpose of this review is to present the latest on the diagnosis, management, and prognosis of SC and PVNS of the hip. An extensive systematic search of MEDLINE and PUBMED Databases was performed. Data parameters were set from 2005 to present day with set inclusion criteria. Systematic reviews were excluded. 427 abstracts were identified, with 12 articles meeting all inclusion criteria. Eight studies focused on SC, and 5 on PVNS. 233 patients with SC of the hip and 98 patients with PVNS of the hip were identified, a total of 331 patients. Benign Synovial disorders of the hip are rare. In patients with chronic hip pain secondary to benign synovial disorders, early diagnosis and surgical intervention demonstrate good outcomes, and patients may benefit due to prevention of morbidity from further joint destruction. There is no clear consensus between higher successes through open versus arthroscopic surgical debridement. In the final phase of benign synovial disorders of the hip, THA of different types based on the patient's age should be considered.

  7. Intra-Articular Synovial Sarcomas: Incidence and Differentiating Features from Localized Pigmented Villonodular Synovitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nordemar, D; Öberg, J; Brosjö, O; Skorpil, M

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. To determine the incidence of intra-articular synovial sarcomas and investigate if any radiological variables can differentiate them from localized (unifocal) pigmented villonodular synovitis (PVNS) and if multivariate data analysis could be used as a complementary clinical tool. Methods. Magnetic resonance images and radiographs of 7 cases of intra-articular synovial sarcomas and 14 cases of localized PVNS were blindedly reviewed. Variables analyzed were size, extra-articular growth, tumor border, blooming, calcification, contrast media enhancement, effusion, bowl of grapes sign, triple signal intensity sign, synovial low signal intensity, synovitis, age, and gender. Univariate and multivariate data analysis, the method of partial least squares-discriminant analysis (PLS-DA), were used. Register data on all synovial sarcomas were extracted for comparison. Results. The incidence of intra-articular synovial sarcomas was 3%. PLS-DA showed that age, effusion, size, and gender were the most important factors for discrimination between sarcomas and localized PVNS. No sarcomas were misclassified as PVNS with PLS-DA, while some PVNS were misclassified as sarcomas. Conclusions. The most important variables in differentiating intra-articular sarcomas from localized PVNS were age, effusion, size, and gender. Multivariate data analysis can be helpful as additive information to avoid a biopsy, if the tumor is classified as most likely being PVNS.

  8. Intra-Articular Synovial Sarcomas: Incidence and Differentiating Features from Localized Pigmented Villonodular Synovitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Nordemar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To determine the incidence of intra-articular synovial sarcomas and investigate if any radiological variables can differentiate them from localized (unifocal pigmented villonodular synovitis (PVNS and if multivariate data analysis could be used as a complementary clinical tool. Methods. Magnetic resonance images and radiographs of 7 cases of intra-articular synovial sarcomas and 14 cases of localized PVNS were blindedly reviewed. Variables analyzed were size, extra-articular growth, tumor border, blooming, calcification, contrast media enhancement, effusion, bowl of grapes sign, triple signal intensity sign, synovial low signal intensity, synovitis, age, and gender. Univariate and multivariate data analysis, the method of partial least squares-discriminant analysis (PLS-DA, were used. Register data on all synovial sarcomas were extracted for comparison. Results. The incidence of intra-articular synovial sarcomas was 3%. PLS-DA showed that age, effusion, size, and gender were the most important factors for discrimination between sarcomas and localized PVNS. No sarcomas were misclassified as PVNS with PLS-DA, while some PVNS were misclassified as sarcomas. Conclusions. The most important variables in differentiating intra-articular sarcomas from localized PVNS were age, effusion, size, and gender. Multivariate data analysis can be helpful as additive information to avoid a biopsy, if the tumor is classified as most likely being PVNS.

  9. Bilateral synovial chondromatosis of the first metatarsophalangeal joint: a report case

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Stecco

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Synovial chondromatosis is a rare pathology of unknown aetiology. It originates from the chondroid metaplasia of the connective tissue of the synovial membrane. Consequently, cartilaginous nodules develop in the affected joints, first calcifying and then ossifying. The bursae mucosae, the vaginae tendinis and the para-articular connective tissue are less frequently affected. The most common locations of this pathology are the knee, the hip, the shoulder, the elbow and the ankle. The small articulations are rarely affected, even less the bilateral involving of joints, above all of hand or foot, is exceptional. In a clinical and radiological valuation, it is difficult to distinguish synovial chondromatosis from arthrosis and from degenerative arthopathies in general. A sure diagnosis can be obtained only by means of a histological examination. We here report a case of synovial chondromatosis bilaterally located on the first metatarsophalangeal joint. Clinical and radiological features were analogous to those of hallux rigidus, a typical and peculiar metatarsophalangeal joint pathology. The diagnostic suspicion that it was a synovial chondromatosis arose during surgical surgery, and was subsequently confirmed by histological examination. During the following visits, the patient did not present any painful symptomatology.

  10. Rapidly progressive course of primary renal synovial sarcoma: Case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marković-Lipkovski Jasmina

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Primary kidney sarcoma, especially synovial sarcoma (SS, is a very rare neoplasm. Pre-operative signs and symptoms are very similar to renal cell carcinoma, therefore, the proper diagnosis is very difficult and usually made after nephrectomy. This is a case report of primary renal SS. Case Outline. A 38-year-old man presented with a history of fever and hematuria, and right flank pain 3 weeks ago. Abdominal computerized tomography revealed a heterogeneous well-marginated soft tissue mass arising in the lower part of the right kidney. Right nephrectomy was performed. A cystic tumor of 120x85 mm in size with soft solid growth, and with the extensive areas of hemorrhage and necrosis was seen on gross examination. Histopathology revealed a neoplasm composed of solid monomorphic sheets of spindle cells. Immunohistochemistry showed tumor cells strongly positive for BCL2, CD99, CD56 and vimentin, and focally positive for epithelial membrane antigen (EMA. The histological diagnosis of primary renal SS was based on morphology and immunohistochemistry. FISH analysis and RT-PCR was carried out on formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissue sections. The molecular analysis demonstrated translocation of SYT gene on chromosome 18 and SSX2 gene on chromosome X. The findings were consistent with diagnosis of SS. Conclusion. Our case shows that histopathological diagnosis of primary kidney SS, although difficult, is possible to be made on the basis of morphological and immunohistochemical analysis. However, this diagnosis should be corroborated by molecular techniques confirming SYT-SSX translocation on chromosome 18 and chromosome X. Here we present visceral monophasic SS with aggressive clinical course and poor outcome. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. OI 175047

  11. Role of hydrophobicity on the adsorption of synovial fluid proteins and biolubrication of polycarbonate urethanes : Materials for permanent meniscus implants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Majd, Sara Ehsani; Kuijer, Roel; Schmidt, Tannin A.; Sharma, Prashant K.

    2015-01-01

    Both absorption and release of synovial fluid components lubricate the porous natural meniscus, whereas only adsorption can lubricate non-porous meniscus prostheses. The aim of this study was to establish the adsorption characteristics of the synovial fluid proteoglycan 4 (PRG4) and albumin on modif

  12. Stifle synovial cyst in a Labrador Retriever with concurrent cranial cruciate ligament deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franklin, A D; Havlicek, M; Krockenberger, M B

    2011-01-01

    A seven-year-old Labrador Retriever dog was presented with the complaint of chronic left hindlimb lameness. A diagnosis of partial rupture of the left cranial cruciate ligament with concurrent cranio-medial synovial cyst formation was made. This cystic structure was assumed to be communicating with the stifle joint. There was no evidence of a meniscal tear, but superficial fibrillation of the axial border was present. Surgical excision of the cyst with concurrent treatment of the cranial cruciate ligament deficiency by tibial tuberosity advancement was performed with a successful outcome. Whilst commonly encountered in humans, synovial cysts are uncommon in dogs. To the authors' knowledge this is the first reported case of synovial cyst formation in the stifle of a dog.

  13. Minimally Invasive Approach For Extraforaminal Synovial Cyst L5-S1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres Campa-Santamarina, Jose; Towne, Sara; Alimi, Marjan; Navarro-Ramirez, Rodrigo; Härtl, Roger

    2015-10-22

    Symptoms from synovial cysts are produced by neural compression in the spinal canal or the foramen. Few cases of extraforaminal synovial cyst have been published in the literature. This is a case report of a 65-year-old female who presented with a three-month history of sciatic pain and no relief with conservative treatment. MRI showed a left-sided extraforaminal synovial cyst at L5-S1 with compression of the L5 nerve root at the lateral portion of the foramen. Minimally invasive surgery for resection was performed using an extraforaminal tubular microscopic endoscopy-assisted approach. The patient improved clinically and remained symptom-free for the entire follow-up of 30 months.

  14. [Synovial cysts of unusual localization. 2 cases and review of the literature].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lerais, J M; Baudrillard, J C; Durot, J F; Segal, P; Tellart, M O; Wallays, C; Auquier, F; Toubas, O; Petit, J

    1986-03-01

    Two patients with true synovial cysts in atypical sites (internal compartment of knee and inguinal hollow) were investigated by radioarthrography, ultrasound and computed tomography imaging. The cyst in the hip region originated from a dilated serous bursa of the iliopsoas muscle that did not communicate or was no longer in communication with the joint. In contrast, the cyst of the knee appeared to be a lateral synovial capsule hernia. Positive diagnosis in both cases was dependent on combined ultrasound-CT scan imaging, this eliminating a tumor (sarcoma) of soft tissues. However, affirmation of the synovial origin (mesothelial covering of the wall) of the lesion was obtained by histology only, this allowing differentiation from a "capsular" (fibrous wall) cyst, which probably provokes similar ultrasound and CT scan images.

  15. Gross and histopathological findings in synovial membranes of pigs with experimentally induced Mycoplasma hyosynoviae arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hagedorn-Olsen, T.; Basse, A.; Jensen, Tim Kåre

    1999-01-01

    as follows: An acute preimmune phase with inflammatory changes and synovial membrane reactions dominates the first week of the infection. By the second and third week, the peak of the immune phase with masses of plasma cells and lymphocytes is seen. By 7 weeks, there is healing with moderate fibrosis. Mild...... and moderate villous proliferation of the synovial membrane. In the chronic phase moderate fibrosis was seen, but no periarticular or articular cartilage involvement. The acute to subacute histopathological characteristics were edema, hyperaemia, variable hyperplasia of synovial lining cells, increased density...... ongoing reactions or recurrence of arthritis, perhaps related to persistence of mycoplasma antigens, may be seen in later phases and local antibody production may be important in this infection....

  16. SYNOVIAL CHONDROMATOSIS OF THE TEMPORO-MANDIBULAR JOINT. A CASE REPORT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. MALANCHUK

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The study describes a rare clinical case of synovial chondromatosis of the temporo-mandibular joint, in a 53 year-old patient. In the prehospital stage, the patient was examined by additional diagnostic methods – 3D CT and subsequent computer simulation, in view of subsequent surgery. In January 2015, partial synovektomy of the right temporo-mandibular joint with removal of cartilaginous impurities was performed under general anesthesia. After histopathological confirmation of the clinical diagnosis, the patient was discharged in satisfactory condition, with recommendations for further examination and radiological control. Synovial chondromatosis of the temporo-mandibular joint is a disease characterized by impaired formation of cartilage or of intraarticular, cartilaginous, and relatively rare bone impurities. An important role in the diagnosis of joints’ synovial chondromatosis is played by the instrumental research methods, especially X-ray. Surgical treatment is recommended as a function of the prevalence of lesions.

  17. On the matter of synovial fluid lubrication: implications for Metal-on-Metal hip tribology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myant, Connor; Cann, Philippa

    2014-06-01

    Artificial articular joints present an interesting, and difficult, tribological problem. These bearing contacts undergo complex transient loading and multi axes kinematic cycles, over extremely long periods of time (>10 years). Despite extensive research, wear of the bearing surfaces, particularly metal-metal hips, remains a major problem. Comparatively little is known about the prevailing lubrication mechanism in artificial joints which is a serious gap in our knowledge as this determines film formation and hence wear. In this paper we review the accepted lubrication models for artificial hips and present a new concept to explain film formation with synovial fluid. This model, recently proposed by the authors, suggests that interfacial film formation is determined by rheological changes local to the contact and is driven by aggregation of synovial fluid proteins. The implications of this new mechanism for the tribological performance of new implant designs and the effect of patient synovial fluid properties are discussed.

  18. Arthroscopic Treatment of a Case with Concomitant Subacromial and Subdeltoid Synovial Chondromatosis and Labrum Tear

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nevres Hurriyet Aydogan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Synovial chondromatosis is a disease that seldomly seen in shoulder joint and is related to benign synovial proliferation and synchronous chondral tissue formation within the joint cavity. Patients suffer from progressive restriction of range of motion and shoulder pain. Extra-articular involvement is an extremely rare condition. Degenerative osteoarthritis, joint subluxation, and bursitis are common complications in untreated patients. Open or arthroscopic surgery is suitable while there is no consensus related to superiority of different approaches. We presented an arthroscopic treatment of a male patient, 48 years old with labrum tear and synovial chondromatosis localized in subacromial and subdeltoid region. Advantages of arthroscopic surgery in the presence of intra- and extra-articular combined pathologies are also discussed.

  19. Chiropractic treatment of lumbar spine synovial cysts: a report of two cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, James M; Cox, James M

    2005-02-01

    To present the treatment of low back and radicular pain due to synovial cysts of the lumbar spine including chiropractic distraction manipulation and physiological therapeutic care. Two patients (71-year-old man and 59-year-old woman) with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-diagnosed large synovial cysts at the L3 through L4 and L4 through L5 vertebral levels, respectively, had lower extremity pain, numbness, and tingling of the respective L4 and L5 dermatomes. Chiropractic distraction manipulation was performed at the level of the synovial cyst. The manipulation was performed daily until 50% pain relief was attained, followed by diminished frequency of care. Physiotherapy included positive galvanism, iontophoresis, tetanizing electrical stimulation, stabilization exercises, and home cryotherapy. The male patient's pain was reduced by 50% in 14 days and 100% at 60 days. Range of motion of the thoracolumbar spine increased, walking distance increased from 1 to 2 blocks to 1 mile without pain, and repeat MRI showed reduced size of the cyst. The female patient, under the same treatment regimen, was pain free in 6 weeks. Chiropractic distraction manipulation and physiological therapeutic care relieved 2 patients with low back and radicular pain attributed to MRI-confirmed synovial cysts of the lumbar spine. This treatment may be an initial conservative treatment option for synovial cysts with careful patient monitoring for progressive neurologic deficit which would necessitate surgery. Distraction manipulation may be a safe and effective conservative treatment of synovial cyst causing radicular pain; further data collection of clinical outcomes is warranted.

  20. [A review of diagnosis and causes of synovial cyst of the hip joint].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Li-Feng; Xu, San-Zhong; Lin, Xiang-Jin

    2010-04-01

    To analyze the clinical and radiological characteristics of hip joint synovial cyst, and to study the main causes and the early economical effective ways for diagnosis. Twenty-five patients with hip joint synovial cyst were studied in this research, including 16 males and 9 females aged from 14 to 76 with an average age of 52.8 years old (4 cases from clinical treatment from 1999 to 2007; 1 case searched with keyword "synovial cyst" and "hip" on CNKI form 1978 to 2002, 20 cases searched with keyword synovial cyst and hip on the Medline. The clinical manifestation of 25 cases were painless mass at medial of groin middle point and lower limb venous insufficiency. Synovial cysts of the hip joint were diagnosed by ultrasonography, computer tomography (CT) or nuclear magnetic resonance (MRI). All cases were analyzed retrospectively on the cause of a diseace, clinical features and radiological examinations. The possible causes of this disease included rheumatoid arthritis in 8 cases, osteoarthritis in 1, total hip replacement in 3, hip tramatic in 3, femoral head necrosis in 2 and unknown origin in 9. The main clinical features included painless groin mass in 9 cases; compression of the common femoral and external iliac veins (lead to outflow obstruction and leg swelling) in 7 cases; inguinal swelling in 5 cases; deep vein thrombosis (DVT) in 3 cases; compression of artery in 1 case. The correct preoperative diagnosis were made by ultrasonography or combined with colour duplex Doppler ultrasonography (CDDS) in 13 cases; CDDS combined with CT in 8 cases; CDDS combined with CT and MRI in 2 cases; articular cavity visualization in 1 case; puncture herniography in 1 case. The hip joint synovial cyst is mainly caused by the chronic inflammation of the hip joint. As the disease is extremely rare and asymptomatically, precise diagnoses are difficult and and often delayed. More attentions should be paid because of its severe complications. CDDS is an economical effective way for

  1. Diffusion of mepivacaine to adjacent synovial structures after intrasynovial analgesia of the digital flexor tendon sheath.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordana, M; Martens, A; Duchateau, L; Haspeslagh, M; Vanderperren, K; Oosterlinck, M; Pille, F

    2016-05-01

    Controversy exists about the specificity of diagnostic analgesia of the digital flexor tendon sheath (DFTS) in horses. To evaluate the degree of diffusion of mepivacaine from the equine DFTS to adjacent synovial structures. Crossover experiment. Under general anaesthesia, the DFTS of one front and one hindlimb of 8 horses were injected simultaneously with mepivacaine. Synovial fluid samples of the injected DFTS, the adjacent metacarpo-/metatarsophalangeal (MCP/MTP) joint, proximal interphalangeal joint, distal interphalangeal joint, navicular bursa and contralateral MCP/MTP joint were collected 15 min post injection (T15) from one of the injected limbs and 60 min post injection (T60) from the other limb. Venous blood samples were obtained at T0, T15 and T60 to evaluate systemic distribution of mepivacaine. After a 2-week washout period, the procedure was repeated using the same limbs but reversing the time of sampling (front vs. hindlimbs). The concentration of mepivacaine in samples was measured with a commercial ELISA kit. Mepivacaine concentrations in the DFTS samples, at both T15 (5077 mg/l) and T60 (3503 mg/l), exceeded those estimated sufficient to produce synovial analgesia (100 mg/l or 300 mg/l). Mepivacaine was found in all synovial structures adjacent to the injected DFTS and in the contralateral MCP/MTP joints, but concentrations were low, with a maximum value of only 3.2 mg/l. With the exception of the navicular bursa samples, the mepivacaine concentrations in the adjacent synovial structures were significantly higher at T60 than at T15 (Pmepivacaine concentrations were found in the ipsilateral than the contralateral MCP/MTP joints at T60 (Pmepivacaine concentrations at T15 and T60 than at T0 (PMepivacaine injected into the DFTS of horses diffuses towards adjacent synovial structures without achieving clinically relevant concentrations. © 2015 EVJ Ltd.

  2. Technical and imaging report: fluoroscopic guidance for diagnosis and treatment of lumbar synovial cyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rauchwerger, Jacob J; Candido, Kenneth D; Zoarski, Gregg H

    2011-01-01

    Lumbar synovial cysts can be a source of low back pain with or without radiculopathy depending upon the size and location of the mass. Options for treatment range from analgesics to surgery, depending upon the degree of nerve root or spinal cord impingement. Attempts at minimally invasive treatment such as computed tomography-assisted aspiration and cyst rupture are documented in the radiology literature with varying degrees of reported success. This case report is the first to document the fluoroscopically-guided management of a lumbar synovial cyst in the pain medicine literature and highlights the knowledge and technical skills required when treating such cases. © 2010 World Institute of Pain.

  3. Use of greater omentum in the surgical treatment of a synovial cyst in a cat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stegen, L; Van Goethem, B; Beerden, C; Grussendorf, C; de Rooster, H

    2015-01-01

    A 13-year-old cat was diagnosed with a synovial cyst originating from the glenohumeral joint. The cat presented with severe front limb lameness and a non-painful fluctuating swelling on the medial aspect of the humerus. Radiographic examination showed severe bilateral shoulder osteoarthritis with osteophyte formation. The mass was surgically resected and histopathology confirmed the diagnosis of a synovial cyst. Three weeks postoperatively the cyst recurred. Surgical resection was repeated followed by omentalisation of the defect. Throughout the following 3 months the cyst did not recur. Unfortunately, for reasons unrelated to the presented disease, the cat was euthanized shortly afterwards, therefore making a long-term follow-up impossible.

  4. Synovial Cyst: A Culprit for Recalcitrant Iliotibial Band Syndrome: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yeoh CSN

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available We present the case of a 56-year old gentleman who presented with recalcitrant iliotibial band (ITB friction syndrome which did not improve with various modalities of conservative treatment. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI of the affected knee did not show pathology typical of ITB friction syndrome. However, open exploration revealed a synovial cyst deep to the iliotibial band, abutting against the anterolateral capsule. The presence of distinctive clinical signs on physical examination should alert clinicians to consider knee synovial cyst as a differential diagnosis when dealing with recalcitrant ITB syndrome.

  5. Peripheral neuropathies associated with rheumatoid synovial cysts of the elbow joint: three case reports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muramatsu, Keiichi; Kojima, Takanori; Yoshida, Koji; Miyoshi, Tomoyuki; Taguchi, Toshihiko

    2006-12-01

    We present 3 cases with peripheral neuropathies of the median, posterior interosseous, and ulnar nerves associated with rheumatoid synovial cysts of the elbow joint. Magnetic resonance imaging and electrophysiological examination led to the final diagnosis of the relation to synovial cysts of the elbow joint. All patients underwent surgical decompression of these nerves and synovectomy of the elbow joint. Functional recovery was excellent in the 2 patients with median and posterior interosseous nerve palsy but incomplete in the patient with ulnar nerve palsy. Such neuropathies require consideration in the differential diagnosis of wrist and hand disability in patients with rheumatoid arthritis. This awareness should enhance early diagnosis and treatment by surgical decompression.

  6. The lateral synovial recess of the knee: anatomy and role in chronic Iliotibial band friction syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemeth, W C; Sanders, B L

    1996-10-01

    The tissue deep to the iliotibial band (ITB) and its relationship to the lateral knee joint capsule was studied anatomically and the histopathology of this tissue in chronic iliotibial band friction syndrome (ITBFS) was examined. Findings show that the tissue under the ITB consists of a synovium that is a lateral extension and invagination of the actual knee joint capsule and is not a separate bursa as described in the literature. Additionally, in cases of chronic ITBFS seen in young elite athletes, synovial tissue taken from this lateral synovial recess reveals histological evidence of inflammation and hyperplasia that suggests its involvement in the pathological process.

  7. Descriptions of therapeutic arthrocenthesis and of synovial fluid in a Nahuatl text from prehispanic Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alarcon-Segovia, D

    1980-06-01

    Paracelsus is considered to have been the first to record the viscid quality of the synovial fluid. However, his contemporary Bernardino de Sahagún, a Franciscan friar who came to Mexico shortly after the Spanish conquest, obtained from elderly Aztec Indians who spoke only Nahuatl the descriptions of therapeutic arthrocentesis and of the viscid nature of the synovial fluid. They compared the fluid from the knee joint to the viscid fluid from the leaves of the nopal cactus (Opuntia sp.). We here record their description and confirm the accuracy of their comparison.

  8. [Primary Synovial Sarcoma in the Anterior Mediastinum;Report of a Case].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanagawa, Naoki; Shiono, Satoshi; Katahira, Masato; Osakabe, Mitsumasa; Abiko, Masami; Ogata, Shinya

    2016-06-01

    We report a rare case of synovial sarcoma in the anterior mediastinum. A 43-year-old man consulted our hospital with a complaint of dyspnea and chest discomfort. Chest computed tomography revealed an anterior mediastinal mass. Small open biopsy was performed, and the pathological examination revealed spindle-shaped cells with severe atypia. Tumor resection was performed. On pathology, fascicular and storiform patterns of spindle-shaped cells with severe atypia were noted. The tumor cells were positive for cytokeratin 7, vimentin, Bcl -2 and CD99, and the amplification of SYT-SSX fusion gene was also found. Therefore it was diagnosed as a synovial sarcoma.

  9. Recurrent hemarthrosis in a boy with synovial hemangioma: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Heng-Kuei; Wang, Jiaan-Der; Fu, Lin-Shien

    2011-03-01

    We describe an unusual case of hemarthrosis caused by a synovial hemangioma in an 11-year-old boy. The initial presentations were sudden onset of spontaneous knee swelling and painful sensation accompanied by limitation of joint movement. The patient had a history of recurrent swelling with spontaneous remission over the same location in the past year. In addition, diffuse cutaneous hemangioma since infancy was also noted. Synovial involvement of a cutaneous hemangioma was confirmed by multidetector computed tomography and arthroscopy. The patient was started on oral corticosteroid and β-blocker. No recurrence was noted on multidetector computed tomographic images or clinical examination at the 2-month follow-up.

  10. Response to pazopanib in two pediatric patients with pretreated relapsing synovial sarcoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casanova, Michela; Basso, Eleonora; Magni, Chiara; Bergamaschi, Luca; Chiaravalli, Stefano; Carta, Roberto; Tirtei, Elisa; Massimino, Maura; Fagioli, Franca; Ferrari, Andrea

    2017-01-21

    Pazopanib is an oral multikinase inhibitor that has proved effective in adults treated for relapsing soft tissue sarcoma and synovial sarcoma in particular. Two cases are reported here of pediatric patients with pretreated relapsing synovial sarcoma whose tumors showed a prolonged response to pazopanib given on compassionate grounds. These results suggest that new agents found effective in adult patients might achieve similar results in adolescents with the same disease. Facilitating the availability of new drugs for children and adolescents is a major challenge for pediatric oncologists.

  11. TGF-ß1 enhances the BMP-2-induced chondrogenesis of bovine synovial explants and arrests downstream differentiation at an early stage of hypertrophy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nahoko Shintani

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Synovial explants furnish an in-situ population of mesenchymal stem cells for the repair of articular cartilage. Although bone morphogenetic protein 2 (BMP-2 induces the chondrogenesis of bovine synovial explants, the cartilage formed is neither homogeneously distributed nor of an exclusively hyaline type. Furthermore, the downstream differentiation of chondrocytes proceeds to the stage of terminal hypertrophy, which is inextricably coupled with undesired matrix mineralization. With a view to optimizing BMP-2-induced chondrogenesis, the modulating influences of fibroblast growth factor 2 (FGF-2 and transforming growth factor beta 1 (TGF-ß1 were investigated. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Explants of bovine calf metacarpal synovium were exposed to BMP-2 (200 ng/ml for 4 (or 6 weeks. FGF-2 (10 ng/ml or TGF-ß1 (10 ng/ml was introduced at the onset of incubation and was present either during the first week of culturing alone or throughout its entire course. FGF-2 enhanced the BMP-2-induced increase in metachromatic staining for glycosaminoglycans (GAGs only when it was present during the first week of culturing alone. TGF-ß1 enhanced not only the BMP-2-induced increase in metachromasia (to a greater degree than FGF-2, but also the biochemically-assayed accumulation of GAGs, when it was present throughout the entire culturing period; in addition, it arrested the downstream differentiation of cells at an early stage of hypertrophy. These findings were corroborated by an analysis of the gene- and protein-expression levels of key cartilaginous markers and by an estimation of individual cell volume. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: TGF-ß1 enhances the BMP-2-induced chondrogenesis of bovine synovial explants, improves the hyaline-like properties of the neocartilage, and arrests the downstream differentiation of cells at an early stage of hypertrophy. With the prospect of engineering a mature, truly articular type of cartilage in the context of

  12. Blockade of Toll-like receptor 2 prevents spontaneous cytokine release from rheumatoid arthritis ex vivo synovial explant cultures

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Nic An Ultaigh, Sinead

    2011-02-23

    Abstract Introduction The aim of this study was to examine the effect of blocking Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2) in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) synovial cells. Methods RA synovial tissue biopsies, obtained under direct visualization at arthroscopy, were established as synovial explant cultures ex vivo or snap frozen for immunohistology. Mononuclear cell cultures were isolated from peripheral blood and synovial fluid of RA patients. Cultures were incubated with the TLR1\\/2 ligand, Pam3CSK4 (200 ng, 1 and 10 μg\\/ml), an anti-TLR2 antibody (OPN301, 1 μg\\/ml) or an immunoglobulin G (IgG) (1 μg\\/ml) matched control. The comparative effect of OPN301 and adalimumab (anti-tumour necrosis factor alpha) on spontaneous release of proinflammatory cytokines from RA synovial explants was determined using quantitative cytokine MSD multiplex assays or ELISA. OPN301 penetration into RA synovial tissue explants cultures was assessed by immunohistology. Results Pam3CSK4 significantly upregulated interleukin (IL)-6 and IL-8 in RA peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs), RA synovial fluid mononuclear cells (SFMCs) and RA synovial explant cultures (P < 0.05). OPN301 significantly decreased Pam3CSK4-induced cytokine production of tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), IL-1β, IL-6, interferon (IFN)-γ and IL-8 compared to IgG control in RA PBMCs and SFMCs cultures (all P < 0.05). OPN301 penetration of RA synovial tissue cultures was detected in the lining layer and perivascular regions. OPN301 significantly decreased spontaneous cytokine production of TNF-α, IL-1β, IFN-γ and IL-8 from RA synovial tissue explant cultures (all P < 0.05). Importantly, the inhibitory effect of OPN on spontaneous cytokine secretion was comparable to inhibition by anti-TNFα monoclonal antibody adalimumab. Conclusions These findings further support targeting TLR2 as a potential therapeutic agent for the treatment of RA.

  13. Platelet-Rich Gel Supernatants Stimulate the Release of Anti-Inflammatory Proteins on Culture Media of Normal Equine Synovial Membrane Explants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ríos, Diana L; López, Catalina; Carmona, Jorge U

    2015-01-01

    The aims were as follows: (1) to evaluate the effects at 48 and 96 h of two concentrations (25 and 50%) of leukocyte and platelet-rich gel (L-PRG) and pure PRG (P-PRG) supernatants on the production/degradation in normal equine synovial membrane explants (SME) of platelet derived growth factor isoform BB, transforming growth factor beta-1, tumor necrosis factor alpha, interleukin (IL-) 4 (IL-4), IL-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1ra), and hyaluronan (HA) synthesis and (2) to correlate these molecules with their respective PRG supernatant treatments. SME from 6 horses were cultured for 96 h with L-PRG and P-PRG supernatants at 25 and 50% concentrations, respectively. SME culture media were changed each 48 h and used for determination by ELISA of the molecules, which were also determined in synovial fluid. 25% L-PRG supernatant produced a sustained release over time of IL-1ra and a gradual release of HA, whereas 50% L-PRG supernatant produced a sustained increase over time of IL-4 and HA. 50% P-PRG supernatant produced an increased and sustained production of IL-1ra and IL-4. The cellular composition and the articular concentration (volume) of a platelet-rich plasma preparation could affect the anti-inflammatory and anabolic joint responses in horses with osteoarthritis.

  14. Overexpression of linker for activated T cells, cyclooxygenase-2, CD1a, CD68 and myeloid/histiocyte antigen in an inflamed seborrheic keratosis

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    Ana Maria Abreu-Velez

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Inflamed seborrheic keratoses are generally associated with the accumulation of variable numbers of lymphocytes and histiocytes in the superficial dermis. The precise immunologic mechanism of this histologic phenomenon is not known Case Report: A 62-year-old male presented with a patch on the right neck with additional features of inflammation. Skin biopsies for hematoxylin and eosin examination, as well as for immunohistochemistry analysis were performed. Results: H&E staining demonstrated classic features of an inflamed seborrheic keratosis. Overexpression of LAT, COX-2, CD1a, and CD68 was noticed in the inflammatory infiltrate. A strong presence of CD1a was also seen in the epidermis suprajacent to the inflammation. Myeloid/histiocyte antigen was strongly expressed by the keratinocytes . Conclusion : A complex immune response seems to be involved in the pathophysiology of an inflamed seborrheic keratosis.

  15. Localization and expression pattern of amelotin, odontogenic ameloblast-associated protein and follicular dendritic cell-secreted protein in the junctional epithelium of inflamed gingiva.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakayama, Yohei; Kobayashi, Ryoki; Matsui, Sari; Matsumura, Hiroyoshi; Iwai, Yasunobu; Noda, Keisuke; Yamazaki, Mizuho; Kurita-Ochiai, Tomoko; Yoshimura, Atsutoshi; Shinomura, Tamayuki; Ganss, Bernhard; Ogata, Yorimasa

    2017-07-01

    The purpose of this study is to elucidate the localization of amelotin (AMTN), odontogenic ameloblast-associated protein (ODAM) and follicular dendritic cell-secreted protein (FDC-SP) at the junctional epithelium (JE) in Porphyromonas gingivalis and Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans infected mice and inflamed and non-inflamed human gingiva. We performed immunostaining to determine the localization and expression pattern of AMTN, ODAM and FDC-SP. AMTN, ODAM and FDC-SP in A. actinomycetemcomitans infected mice did not change dramatically compared with non-infected mice. AMTN and FDC-SP expressions were observed stronger in P. gingivalis infected mice at early stage. However, at the following stage, the coronal part of the AMTN expression disappeared from the JE, and FDC-SP expression decreased due to severe inflammation by P. gingivalis. ODAM expressed internal and external basal lamina, and the expression increased not only at early stage but also at the following stage in the inflammatory JE induced by P. gingivalis. In the human gingival tissues, AMTN was detected at the surface of the sulcular epithelium and JE in the non-inflamed and inflamed gingiva, and the localization did not change the process of inflammation. ODAM and FDC-SP were more widely detected at the sulcular epithelium and JE in the non-inflamed gingiva. In the inflamed gingiva, localization of ODAM and FDC-SP was spread into the gingival epithelium, compared to AMTN. These studies demonstrated that the expression pattern of AMTN, ODAM and FDC-SP at the JE were changed during inflammation process and these three proteins might play an important role in the resistance to inflammation.

  16. Dynamic gadolinium-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging allows accurate assessment of the synovial inflammatory activity in rheumatoid arthritis knee joints: a comparison with synovial histology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Axelsen, Mette Bjørndal; Stoltenberg, M.; Poggenborg, R.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To determine whether dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) evaluated using semi-automatic image processing software can accurately assess synovial inflammation in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) knee joints. Methods: In 17 RA patients undergoing knee surgery, the ave......Objective: To determine whether dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) evaluated using semi-automatic image processing software can accurately assess synovial inflammation in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) knee joints. Methods: In 17 RA patients undergoing knee surgery......, the average grade of histological synovial inflammation was determined from four biopsies obtained during surgery. A preoperative series of T(1)-weighted dynamic fast low-angle shot (FLASH) MR images was obtained. Parameters characterizing contrast uptake dynamics, including the initial rate of enhancement...... capsule of the knee joint (Precise ROI). Intra- and interreader agreement was assessed using the intra-class correlation coefficient (ICC). Results: The IRE from the Quick ROI and the Precise ROI revealed high correlations to the grade of histological inflammation (Spearman's correlation coefficient (rho...

  17. Simultaneous assessment of blood flow in UVB-inflamed human skin by laser Doppler flowmetry and the 133-xenon cashout technique

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    1991-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to compare skin bloood flow by laser Doppler flowmetry (LDF) and the 133-Xenon washout technique in UVB-inflamed human skin. Six healthy subjects participated in the study. Forearm skin blood flow was measured prior to irradiation and then 8, 24, 48 and 72 h the expos......The purpose of the study was to compare skin bloood flow by laser Doppler flowmetry (LDF) and the 133-Xenon washout technique in UVB-inflamed human skin. Six healthy subjects participated in the study. Forearm skin blood flow was measured prior to irradiation and then 8, 24, 48 and 72 h...

  18. Synovial Fluid Antioxidant Vitamins and Trace Elements in Clinically Healthy and Arthritic Joints of Dromedary Camels

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    Aliasghar CHALMEH

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Forty six male dromedary camels (Camelus dromedarius, 5 to 10 years of age were entered in this study. Before slaughtering, the animals were visually examined for abnormalities in musculoskeletal system. 33 out of 46 camels did not have any clinical articular abnormalities, whereas 13 ones had gross problems such as lameness and swollen tarsal joints. Based on clinical signs and disease history, these animals were suspected to arthritis. After slaughtering, synovial fluid specimens were taken from tarsal joints of all animals, aseptically and concentrations of zinc, copper, selenium, iron and vitamin A, E and C were assayed. Concentrations of selenium and vitamin C in arthritic joints were significantly lower than clinically healthy camels (P<0.05. Zinc concentration of arthritic synovial fluid was significantly higher than normal joints. These data showed that the arthritis could change the synovial fluid vitamins and trace elements in dromedary camels. In conclusion, the results of the current research showed that arthritic joints are in an oxidative stress situation and information regarding the changing patterns of vitamins and trace elements in synovial fluids can be considered as prognostic and diagnostic criteria for articular inflammatory processes.

  19. Spontaneous hemorrhage in an upper lumbar synovial cyst causing subacute cauda equina syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machino, Masaaki; Yukawa, Yasutsugu; Ito, Keigo; Kanbara, Shunsuke; Kato, Fumihiko

    2012-09-01

    Lumbar spine synovial cysts are becoming more frequent, and they are generally associated with degenerative lumbar spinal disease. They are common in lower lumbar lesions but rare in upper lumbar lesions. Several cases of hemorrhage into lower lumbar juxtafacet cysts after trauma or anticoagulation therapy have been reported in the literature. This article describes a case of subacute cauda equina syndrome resulting from spontaneous hemorrhage into an upper lumbar synovial cyst. A 65-year-old man presented with a 3-month history of intermittent bilateral lumbar pain. One week before, he experienced a sudden exacerbation of lumbar pain and began falling frequently; he also reported weakness and tingling in his lower limbs. A hematic collection associated with a large juxtafacet cyst at L2-L3 was suspected on magnetic resonance imaging. He underwent surgical decompression, and the cyst was resected. Microscopic examination was consistent with the diagnosis of a synovial cyst. Two days postoperatively, he was walking independently. Although several descriptions exist of hemorrhagic lumbar juxtafacet cysts after trauma or anticoagulant therapy, to the authors' knowledge, this is the first documented case of hemorrhage in an upper lumbar synovial cyst with no previous traumatic event or medication use. Magnetic resonance imaging was essential in making the preoperative diagnosis. Surgical removal of the cyst was an effective treatment. Copyright 2012, SLACK Incorporated.

  20. An ARGS-aggrecan assay for analysis in blood and synovial fluid

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsson, S; Lohmander, Stefan; Struglics, A

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To validate a modified ligand-binding assay for the detection of aggrecanase generated aggrecan fragments with the ARGS neoepitope in synovial fluid (SF) and blood, and to verify the identity of aggrecan fragments found in blood. DESIGN: An enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) on ...

  1. CLINICO-PATHOLOGICAL STUDY OF INFLAMMATORY SYNOVIAL LESIONS OF KNEE JOINT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mamatha

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION Synovial joints account for most of body’s articulation and characterised by wide range of almost frictionless movements. Synovium is the central area of pathology in a number of inflammatory joint diseases. Joint effusions present as diagnostic challenge to physicians and need careful evaluation and interpretation of both clinical and laboratory findings to make accurate diagnosis and avoid unnecessary hospital stay. Joint effusions present as diagnostic challenge to physicians and requiring careful evaluation and interpretation of both clinical and laboratory findings to make accurate diagnosis to avoid unnecessary hospital stay. AIM OF THE STUDY Is to study the diagnostic features joint effusion in cases of inflammatory synovitis of the knee joint. MATERIALS AND METHODS Prospective study was done over a period of two years in the Department of Pathology in a tertiary care hospital. Joint fluid was obtained by arthrocentesis in patients with joint effusions. Gross, microscopic, microbiological and biochemical parameters were examined in 50 samples of synovial fluids with synovial biopsy correlation. RESULTS Out of 50 cases, 20 cases were rheumatoid arthritis, 12 cases of chronic inflammatory arthritis not specified. 10 cases tuberculous arthritis, septic arthritis in 7 cases and gout 1 case. CONCLUSION Combination of clinical, radiological, serological, biochemical and microbiologic findings along with synovial fluid and biopsy findings help in diagnosis of specific inflammatory lesions of the synovium and treating the particular condition.

  2. IL-17/Th17 mediated synovial inflammation is IL-22 independent

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.P. van Hamburg (Jan Piet); O.B.J. Corneth (Odilia); S.M.J. Paulissen (Sandra); N. Davelaar (Nadine); P. Asmawidjaja (Patrick); A.M.C. Mus (Adriana); E.W. Lubberts (Erik)

    2013-01-01

    markdownabstractABSTRACT Background: Interleukin (IL)-17A and Th17 cells are critically involved in T cell-mediated synovial inflammation. Besides IL-17A, Th17 cells produce IL-22. Recently, Th22 cells were discovered, which produce IL- 22 in the absence of IL-17. However, it remains

  3. Cricoarytenoid Articulation in Elderly Japanese With Special Reference to Morphology of the Synovial Tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawamoto-Hirano, Ai; Honkura, Yohei; Shibata, Shunichi; Abe, Shin-ichi; Murakami, Gen; Katori, Yukio

    2016-03-01

    To clarify composite fibers and cells in the synovial tissues of the cricoarytenoid joint (CA joint). Routine histology and immunohistrochemistry using sagittal or nearly sagittal sections obtained from 18 elderly cadaveric specimens. The CA joint capsule was thin and contained few elastic fibers. A limited supportive ligament, namely, a thickened fascia of the posterior cricoarytenoid muscles, was sometimes evident on the lateral aspect of the CA joint. However, even in the weaker medial aspect of the joint, no marked destruction of the synovial tissues was found. The CA joint always contained synovial folds--a short medial fold and long lateral folds--but these contained no or few macrophages, lymphocytes, and blood capillaries. In 2 exceptional specimens showing inflammatory cell infiltration in the submucosal tissue of the larynx, the macrophage-rich area extended toward the capsule and medial synovial fold. The lateral aspect of the CA joint was likely to be supported mechanically by the muscle-associated tissues. Strong support of the arytenoid by muscles might reduce the degree of CA joint injury with age. However, some patients with hoarseness due to mucosal inflammation of the larynx might have accompanying synovitis and subsequent cartilage injury in the CA joint. © The Author(s) 2015.

  4. Influence of development and joint pathology on stromelysin enzyme activity in equine synovial fluid

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brama, P.A.J.; TeKoppele, J.M.; Beekman, B.; El, B. van; Barneveld, A.; Weeren, P.R. van

    2000-01-01

    Objective - To investigate the role of stromelysin (MMP-3) activity in synovial fluid (SF) at different stages of development and in common joint disorders in the horse. Methods - Stromelysin activity was determined with a fluorogenic enzyme activity assay in SF of normal joints of fetal, juvenile a

  5. Synovial inflammation, immune cells and their cytokines in osteoarthritis: A review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lange-Brokaar, B.J.E. de; Ioan-Facsinay, A.; Osch, G.J.V.M. van; Zuurmond, A.-M.; Schoones, J.; Toes, R.E.M.; Huizinga, T.W.J.; Kloppenburg, M.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Although osteoarthritis (OA) is considered a non-inflammatory condition, it is widely accepted that synovial inflammation is a feature of OA. However, the role of immune cells and their cytokines in OA is largely unknown. This narrative systematic review summarizes the knowledge of

  6. FEATURES OF SYNOVIAL ENVIRONMENT AND SUBHONDRAL AREA OF JOINTS IN PATIENS SUFFERING FROM GONARTROSIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. L. Matveeva

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the work was to investigate the changes in the values of synovial fluid electrolyte composition in patients with degenerative-and-dystrophic involvements of the joints, as well as to study the dynamics of the mean optical density of femoral and tibial epiphyseal bone structures. The samples of synovial fluid have been studied, as well as the x-rays of 37 patients with deforming arthrosis of the knee of idiopathic and posttraumatic etiology. The decrease of ionized calcium value and the increase of total calcium/inorganic phosphate ratio value have been found. The change in the mean optical density of epiphysis shadow has been demonstrated to be depended on the stage of the pathological process. The relationship of the values of bone structure mean optical density and the concentration of synovial fluid electrolytes evidences the involvement of subchondral zone mineral component in the development of joint pathology. These values can be used as an additional criterion in osteoarthrosis diagnosis, as well as for assessment of subchondral bone condition by biochemical synovial fluid test.

  7. Synovial sarcoma with relevant immunocytochemistry and special emphasis on the monophasic fibrous variant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kottu Radhika

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Monophasic fibrous synovial sarcoma (SS is the most common variant of SS. Only a few cytological studies are available on this entity. Bcl-2 protein expression has been described as a characteristic marker of SS and is useful for its differentiation from other sarcomas. Cytokeratin and CD99 are also used in detecting SS. Aims: To evaluate synovial sarcoma and its variants cytomorphologically. Materials and Methods: During a period of 10 years 7 months, i.e. from January 1998 to July 2008, 12 cytologic specimens diagnosed as synovial sarcoma were reviewed. Ten cases were diagnosed as SS on aspiration alone but two cases required ancillary technique i.e., immunocytochemistry staining with bcl-2 and cytokeratin. The smears were stained with Papanicolaou and May-Grόnwald-Giemsa stains. Results: All cytologic specimens in our study had similar appearance. Most smears were highly cellular and were made up of densely packed tri-dimensional groups and singly scattered round to oval cells. Cellular monomorphism and vascular channels within the cell groups were the remarkable findings. Only one case showed cytologic evidence of epithelial differentiation. Bcl-2, cytokeratin, CD99 positivity was seen on immunohistochemistry staining. Results were categorized according to age, sex and morphologic variants. Conclusions: Although cytomorphologic features of synovial sarcomas are characteristic enough to permit its recognition, clinical correlation is necessary for accurate diagnosis. Monophasic variant is the most common entity observed in the present study.

  8. Influence of estrogen cycle on temporomandibular joint synovial membrane in rat with deviated mandible.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kishimoto, Giovanna; Hosomichi, Jun; Muramoto, Takeshi; Kanno, Zuisei; Soma, Kunimichi

    2007-03-01

    Temporomandibular disorders (TMD) are known to be more prevalent and severe in women than in men, especially in those who are in their reproductive age. In those patients reproductive hormones may play a vital role in the host adaptive capacity of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ). In order to clarify the relationship between TMD prevalence and estrogen cycle, a mandible deviated animal model was carried out, and the expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), an essential enzyme in the pathogenesis of inflammatory arthritis, was investigated in the rat's synovial tissue. An appliance was attached to the rat's incisors to produce a lateral deviation of the mandible during the metestrus phase, and the animals were sacrificed in the proestrus and estrus phase, when the estrogen was at the highest and lowest level, respectively. Immunostaining was then performed for 2 consecutive estrous cycles to demonstrate iNOS expression in the synovial membrane of the TMJ. The immunoreactivity for iNOS was more intense in the synovial membrane on the contralateral side in the proestrus phase (estrogen peak phase). These observations suggest that iNOS expression in the synovial membrane with mandibular deviation may be exacerbated in the presence of estrogen.

  9. Diagnostic accuracy of FISH and RT-PCR in 50 routinely processed synovial sarcomas

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ten Heuvel, Suzan E.; Hoekstra, Harald J.; Suurmeijer, Albert J. H.

    Background: Molecular detection of SYT-SSX fusion genes is the most reliable tool for diagnosing synovial sarcoma (SS). The objective of this study was to investigate the accuracy of reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and a commercially available fluorescence in situ

  10. Condromatose sinovial de joelho: relato de caso Synovial chondromatosis of the knee: case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge Sayum Filho

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Os autores apresentam o relato de caso de um paciente ex-atleta de futebol com osteocondromatose sinovial em joelho.The authors report the case of a patient with synovial osteochondromatosis of the knee, who had previously been a soccer player.

  11. Genetherapy with adenovirus expressing ATF-BPTI hybrid protein inhibits proteolysis by rheumatoid synovial fibroblasts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Laan, W.H. van der; Grimbergen, J.M.; Verheijen, J.H.; Pha, Q.

    1998-01-01

    In rheumatoid arthritis (RA), irreversible joint damage is the result of degradation of articular structures such as cartilage, bone and tendons. The plasminogen activator (PA) system has been shown to be involved in the proteolytic degradation of cartilage matrix by rheumatoid synovial fibroblasts

  12. Comparative lipidomic analysis of synovial fluid in human and canine osteoarthritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kosinska, M. K.; Mastbergen, S. C.; Liebisch, G.; Wilhelm, J.; Dettmeyer, R. B.; Ishaque, B.; Rickert, M.; Schmitz, G.; Lafeber, F. P.; Steinmeyer, J.

    Objective: The lipid profile of synovial fluid (SF) is related to the health status of joints. The early stages of human osteoarthritis (OA) are poorly understood, which larger animals are expected to be able to model closely. This study examined whether the canine groove model of OA represents

  13. Comparative lipidomic analysis of synovial fluid in human and canine osteoarthritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kosinska, M. K.; Mastbergen, S. C.; Liebisch, G.; Wilhelm, J.; Dettmeyer, R. B.; Ishaque, B.; Rickert, M.; Schmitz, G.; Lafeber, F. P.; Steinmeyer, J.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The lipid profile of synovial fluid (SF) is related to the health status of joints. The early stages of human osteoarthritis (OA) are poorly understood, which larger animals are expected to be able to model closely. This study examined whether the canine groove model of OA represents earl

  14. Synovial explant inflammatory mediator production corresponds to rheumatoid arthritis imaging hallmarks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Martin; Boesen, Mikael; Ellegaard, Karen

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Despite the widespread use of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and Doppler ultrasound for the detection of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) disease activity, little is known regarding the association of imaging-detected activity and synovial pathology. The purpose of this study was to comp...

  15. Effect of Toll-Like Receptor 4 on Synovial Injury of Temporomandibular Joint in Rats Caused by Occlusal Interference

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingjing Kong

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Synovitis is an important disease that causes intractable pain in TMJ. Some investigations suggested that the increasing expression of IL-1β secreted by synovial lining cells plays an important role in synovial inflammation and cartilage destruction in TMJ. In our previous research, the results demonstrated that TLR4 is involved in the expression of IL-1β in SFs from TMJ with lipopolysaccharide stimulation. However, the inflammatory response that occurred in synovial membrane is not caused by bacterial infection. In the current study, we investigated whether or not TLR4 participates in the inflammatory responses and the expression of IL-1β in synovial membrane of rats induced by occlusal interference. The results showed that obvious inflammation changes were observed in the synovial membranes and the expression of TLR4 and IL-1β was increased at both mRNA and protein levels in the occlusal interference rats. In addition, the inflammation reactions and the increased expression of IL-1β could be restrained by treatment with TAK-242, a blocker of TLR4 signaling. The results prompted us that the activation of TLR4 may be involved in the inflammatory reactions and increased expression of IL-1β in patients with synovitis and participate in the mechanisms of the initiation and development of synovial injury by regulating the expression of inflammatory mediators like IL-1β in synovial membranes.

  16. Discoidin domain receptor 2 is associated with the increased expression of matrix metalloproteinase-13 in synovial fibroblasts of rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Jin; Yu, Jiangtian; Ren, Tingting; Zhang, Wei; Zhang, Yuanqiang; Liu, Xinping; Sun, Tiezheng; Lu, Houshan; Miyazawa, Keiji; Yao, Libo

    2009-10-01

    Regulation of matrix metalloproteinase-13 (MMP-13) by collagen matrix in the synovial fibroblasts of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is critical event in the progressive joint destruction. Our previous study indicated that a collagen receptor, discoidin receptor 2 (DDR2), was highly expressed in the synovial fibroblasts of RA. However, the functional role of DDR2 in the regulation of MMP-13 production in synovial fibroblasts has not been elucidated. In this study, we initially demonstrated that the DDR2 and MMP-13 proteins are both highly expressed in the synovial lining layer of RA. MMP-13 mRNA and protein in synovial fibroblasts of RA were preferentially induced by collagen type II compared with MMP-1. Furthermore, stable overexpression of wild type DDR2 in murine synoviocytes dramatically augments the production of MMP-13. The activation of DDR2 also mediates the up-regulation of MMP-13 promoter activity in 293T cells. Inhibitor specific for extracellular signal-regulated kinase mitogen-activated protein kinase (ERK MAPK) cascade was shown to decrease MMP-13 level induced by collagen II in RA synovial fibroblasts and DDR2-induced MMP-13 promoter activity. Runx2 and activator protein-1 (AP-1) binding sites in MMP-13 promoter region are required for DDR2-induced transcription. The data in this study suggest that DDR2-mediated MMP-13 induction by collagen matrix in synovial fibroblasts of RA contributed to articular cartilage destruction.

  17. Percutaneous Rupture of Zygapophyseal Joint Synovial Cysts: a Prospective Assessment of Nonsurgical Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lutz, Gregory E; Nicoletti, Michael R; Cyril, George E; Harrison, Julian R; Lutz, Christopher; Solomon, Jennifer L; Cooke, Paul M; Wyss, James F; Herzog, Richard J; Moley, Peter J

    2017-08-07

    Although lumbar zygapophyseal joint synovial cysts are fairly well recognized, they are an uncommon cause of lumbosacral radicular pain. Non-operative treatments include percutaneous aspiration of the cysts under computed tomography or fluoroscopic guidance with a subsequent corticosteroid injection. However, there are mixed results in terms of long-term outcomes and cyst reoccurrence. This study prospectively evaluates percutaneous ruptures of zygapophyseal joint (Z-joint) synovial cysts for the treatment of lumbosacral radicular pain. Primary: To determine if percutaneous rupture of symptomatic Z-joint synovial cysts leads to sustained improvements in radicular pain and function. To assess the rates of cyst recurrence and progression to surgical intervention following percutaneous rupture of symptomatic Z-joint synovial cysts. Prospective cohort study. Outpatient academic spine practice. Adults with primary radicular pain due to a facet synovial cyst. Participants underwent fluoroscopically guided percutaneous Z-joint synovial cyst ruptures under standard-of-care practice. Data on pain, physical function, satisfaction, and progression to surgery were collected at 2 weeks, 6 weeks, 3 months, 6 months, and 1 year post-rupture. An intention-to-treat analysis was utilized for assessment of patient-reported outcome measures. The Numerical Rating Scale, Oswestry Disability Index (ODI), and modified North American Spine Society questionnaires were used to measure pain, function, and satisfaction with the procedure, respectively. Thirty-five participants were included in the study, and data were analyzed by an independent researcher. Statistically significant changes in ODI were reported at 2 weeks, 3 months, and 1 year post-intervention (p=.034, .040, and .039, respectively). A statistically and clinically significant relief of current pain was reported at 2 weeks (p=.025) and 6 weeks (p=.014) with respect to baseline. Patients showed significant improvements for best

  18. Outcome of Percutaneous Lumbar Synovial Cyst Rupture in Patients with Lumbar Radiculopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eshraghi, Yashar; Desai, Vimal; Cajigal Cajigal, Calvin; Tabbaa, Kutaiba

    2016-01-01

    Lumbar synovial cysts can result from spondylosis of facet joints. These cysts can encroach on adjacent nerve roots, causing symptoms of radiculopathy. Currently the only definitive treatment for these symptoms is surgery, which may involve laminectomy or laminotomy, with or without spinal fusion. Surgery has been reported to successfully relieve radicular pain in 83.5% of patients by Zhenbo et al. Little information is available concerning the efficacy and outcome of percutaneous fluoroscopic synovial cyst rupture for treatment of facet joint synovial cysts. The goal of this investigation was to assess the efficacy of fluoroscopically guided lumbar synovial cyst rupture, in particular for its relief of radicular symptoms and its potential to reduce the need for surgical intervention. Retrospective evaluation of a case series. University hospital and urban public health care system. With approval from the Institutional Review Board of Case Western Reserve University/ MetroHealth Medical Center, we reviewed the medical charts of patients with lumbar radiculopathy who underwent percutaneous lumbar synovial cyst rupture. The 30 patients in the cohort were treated by one pain specialist between 2006 and 2013. These patients were diagnosed with moderate to severe lower back pain, radiculopathy, and ranged in age from 42 to 80 years. Patients were followed up for a minimum of 6 months and up to 24 months. Pre- and post-procedure pain assessments were reviewed by clinical chart review. In addition post-procedure pain assessments and duration of pain relief were obtained with telephone interviews. Pain had been reported by the patients using a numeric rating scale of 0 - 10 (0 = no pain; 10 = worst possible pain). Charts were reviewed to determine if surgery was eventually performed to correct radicular symptoms. More than 6 months of pain relief was achieved in 14/30 patients (46%) and between one and 6 months of pain relief was achieved in 7/30 patients (23.3%). Nine

  19. Matrix metalloproteinase protein expression profiles cannot distinguish between normal and early osteoarthritic synovial fluid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heard Bryan J

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Osteoarthritis (OA and Rheumatoid arthritis (RA are diseases which result in the degeneration of the joint surface articular cartilage. Matrix Metalloproteinases (MMPs are enzymes that aid in the natural remodelling of tissues throughout the body including cartilage. However, some MMPs have been implicated in the progression of OA and RA as their expression levels and activation states can change dramatically with the onset of disease. Yet, it remains unknown if normal and arthritic joints demonstrate unique MMPs expression profiles, and if so, can the MMP expression profile be used to identify patients with early OA. In this study, the synovial fluid protein expression levels for MMPs 1, 2, 3, 7, 8, 9, 12 & 13, as well as those for the Tissue Inhibitors of MMPs (TIMPs 1, 2, 3, & 4 were examined in highly characterized normal knee joints, and knee joints with clinically diagnosed OA (early and advanced or RA. The purpose of this study was to determine if normal, OA, and RA patients exhibit unique expression profiles for a sub-set of MMPs, and if early OA patients have a unique MMP expression profile that could be used as an early diagnostic marker. Methods Synovial fluid was aspirated from stringently characterized normal knee joints, and in joints diagnosed with either OA (early and advanced or RA. Multiplexing technology was employed to quantify protein expression levels for 8 MMPs and 4 TIMPs in the synovial fluid of 12 patients with early OA, 17 patients diagnosed with advanced OA, 15 with RA and 25 normal knee joints. Principle component analysis (PCA was used to reveal which MMPs were most influential in the distinction between treatment groups. K – means clustering was used to verify the visual grouping of subjects via PCA. Results Significant differences in the expression levels of MMPs and TIMPs were observed between normal and arthritic synovial fluids (with the exception of MMP 12. PCA demonstrated that MMPs 2, 8

  20. [Analysis of factors related to the number of mesenchymal stem cells derived from synovial fluid of the temporomandibular joint].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Y P; Zheng, Y H; Zhang, Z G

    2017-06-09

    Objective: To analyze related factors on the number of mesenchymal stem cells in the synovial fluid of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) and provide an research basis for understanding of the source and biological role of mesenchymal stem cells derived from synovial fluid in TMJ. Methods: One hundred and twenty-two synovial fluid samples from 91 temporomandibular disorders (TMD) patients who visited in Department of TMJ Center, Guanghua School of Stomatology, Hospital of Stomatology, Sun Yat-sen University from March 2013 to December 2013 were collected in this study, and 6 TMJ synovial fluid samples from 6 normal volunteers who were studying in the North Campus of Sun Yat-sen University were also collected, so did their clinical information. Then the relation between the number of mesenchymal stem cells derived from synovial fluid and the health status of the joints, age of donor, disc perforation, condylar bony destruction, blood containing and visual analogue scale score of pain were investigated using Mann-Whitney U test and Spearman rank correlation test. Results: The number of mesenchymal stem cells derived from synovial fluid had no significant relation with visual analogue scale score of pain (r=0.041, P=0.672), blood containing (P=0.063), condylar bony destruction (P= 0.371). Linear correlation between the number of mesenchymal stem cells derived from synovial fluid and age of donor was very week (r=0.186, P=0.043). The number of mesenchymal stem cells up-regulated when the joint was in a disease state (P=0.001). The disc perforation group had more mesenchymal stem cells in synovial fluid than without disc perforation group (P=0.042). Conclusions: The number of mesenchymal stem cells derived from synovial fluid in TMJ has no correlation with peripheral blood circulation and condylar bony destruction, while has close relation with soft tissue structure damage of the joint.

  1. Cutaneous Metaplastic Synovial Cyst: Case Report and Literature Review from the Dermatological Point of View.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuyama, Masahiro; Sato, Yohei; Hayakawa, Jun; Ohyama, Manabu

    2017-03-25

    Cutaneous metaplastic synovial cysts (CMSCs) are rare tumors typically comprising a solitary, well-circumscribed cystic mass that is not connected to the joint. Synovial cysts have been reported predominantly by orthopedists or pathologists; however, the presence of CMSC is not generally well recognized by dermatologists. Herein, we report a CMSC in a 68-year-old woman receiving systemic corticosteroid therapy for the treatment of eosinophilic granulomatosis with polyangiitis (EGPA). We attempt to delineate the clinical characteristics of this unusual neoplasm by reviewing the literature, focusing especially on dermatological descriptions. Histologic examination of the surgical specimen in the current case revealed that the cystic wall was lined with layers of flattened synovial cell-like cells and connective tissues, mimicking the synovial membrane. Positive immunoreactivity of the lining cells against vimentin was detected, but no immunoreactivity against cytokeratin, carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA), CD68, or S-100 was detected. The pathogenesis of CMSC remains unclear, but it has been tightly linked to direct traumatic stimuli or relative tissue fragility, which potentially accounts for CMSC development in our case. Most CMSCs reported by dermatologists are located on the extremities, whereas those described by other specialists tend to be distributed more globally. Preoperative diagnoses are often either epidermal cyst or suture/foreign body granuloma. Incomplete surgical excision of usual synovial cysts may lead to local recurrence, which has been reported in oral and maxillofacial surgery, but not in dermatologic surgery. This fact could be explained by the technical difficulties of surgical excision related to anatomical location. Dermatologists need to be aware of CMSC, and CMSC should be included in the differential diagnosis of subcutaneous cysts.

  2. Outcome of percutaneous rupture of lumbar synovial cysts: a case series of 101 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martha, Julia F; Swaim, Bryan; Wang, David A; Kim, David H; Hill, James; Bode, Rita; Schwartz, Carolyn E

    2009-11-01

    Lumbar facet joint synovial cysts are benign degenerative abnormalities of the lumbar spine. Previous reports have supported operative and nonoperative management. Facet joint steroid injection with cyst rupture is occasionally performed, but there has been no systematic evaluation of this treatment option. To profile the role of facet joint steroid injections with cyst rupture in the treatment of lumbar facet joint synovial cysts. Retrospective chart review and long-term follow-up of patients treated for lumbar facet joint synovial cysts. One hundred one patients treated for lumbar facet joint synovial cysts with fluoroscopically guided corticosteroid facet joint injection and attempted cyst rupture. Oswestry Disability Index and numeric rating scale score for back and leg pain. A retrospective review and a subsequent interview were conducted to collect pretreatment and posttreatment pain and disability scores along with details of subsequent treatment interventions. Group differences in pain and disability scores were assessed using paired t test. Multiple clinical factors were analyzed in terms of risk for surgical intervention using logistic regression modeling and Cox proportional hazards modeling. Successful cyst rupture was confirmed fluoroscopically in 81% of cases. Fifty-five patients (54%) required subsequent surgery over a period averaging 8.4 months because of inadequate symptom relief. All patients reported significant improvement in back pain, leg pain, and disability at 3.2 years postinjection, regardless of their subsequent treatment course (ptreatment for lumbar facet joint synovial cysts. Lumbar facet joint steroid injection with attempted cyst rupture is correlated with avoiding subsequent surgery in half of treated patients. Successful cyst rupture does not appear to have added benefit, and it was associated with worse disability 3 years postinjection. Long-term outcomes are similar, regardless of subsequent surgery.

  3. Staphylococcal Enterotoxin A Detection from Rheumatoid Arthritis Patients’ Blood and Synovial Fluid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ataee, Ramezan Ali; Kahani, Mahboobeh Sadat; Alishiri, Gholam Hossein; Ahamadi, Zyenab

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Direct detection of microbial super antigens in synovial fluid of patients with rheumatoid arthritis may be able to guide to the design of cost-effective therapies. The purpose of this study was to assess the existence of Staphylococcal enterotoxin A (superantigen A) in the synovial fluid of patients with RA by the PCR and ELISA methods. Methods This experimental study was conducted on the synovial fluid of 103 RA patients from Baqiyatallah University of Medical Sciences’ Rheumatology Clinic in Tehran, Iran in 2011–2014. Bacterial cultures, polymerase chain reaction with specific primer pairs and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) methods were used. The PCR products were subjected to sequence as a confirmatory molecular method results. The data were descriptively analyzed by SPSS Version 19. Results The bacteriological study result indicated that, in four cases (3.8%) of the patients, bacterial strains were isolated. The result of PCR molecular method for staphylococcal enterotoxin A gene showed that, 42 of the patients (40.7%) tested positive for the ent A gene. The results of ELISA were positive for staphylococcal enterotoxin A (superantigen A) in 51 cases (49.51%) of the patients’ synovial fluids. The results indicated that the possibility of detecting superantigen A in the SF of RA patients, but the origin of the enterotoxin A gene remained unknown. Conclusions The findings of this study may be able to alter the actual theory on the pathogenesis, diagnosis, and treatment of RA patients. In addition, the results have shown the probability of an endogenous origin for the involved superantigen A in RA patients’ synovial fluids. PMID:27053990

  4. Expression of molecules involved in B lymphocyte survival and differentiation by synovial fibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, J C; Leigh, R D; Cambridge, G

    1997-06-01

    The synovitis of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is one of few pathological lesions in which B lymphocyte accumulation progresses to the extent of germinal centre formation. The present study was designed to assess the ability of synovial fibroblasts to express molecules implicated in B lymphocyte survival and differentiation, both in vivo, and in response to cytokines in vitro. Normal and diseased synovia were examined by indirect immunofluorescence. In all tissues synovial intimal fibroblasts showed co-expression of vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1) and complement decay-accelerating factor (DAF) comparable to that of follicular dendritic cells (FDC), but not complement receptor 2 (CR2). In rheumatoid synovia, subintimal cells showed variable expression of VCAM-1 and DAF, with bright co-expression of VCAM-1, DAF and CR2 in lymphoid follicle centres. B lymphocytes, some of which were proliferating cell nuclear antigen-positive, were present in contact with subintimal cells expressing VCAM-1 with or without DAF or CR2. B lymphocytes were rarely present in the intimal layer, and, where present, showed fragmentation. In vitro, synovial fibroblasts exposed to tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) in combination with interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) showed enhanced expression of VCAM-1, in comparison with fibroblasts from skin and lung and, unlike skin and lung fibroblasts, also expressed DAF and CR2. These findings support the hypothesis that synovial targeting in RA involves an enhanced ability of synovial fibroblasts to support B lymphocyte survival. This appears to be dependent, not on the constitutive expression of VCAM-1 and DAF on intimal cells, but on the increased ability of subintimal cells to respond to proinflammatory cytokines, perhaps critically in the expression of VCAM-1.

  5. CXCR2-specific chemokines mediate leukotriene B4-dependent recruitment of neutrophils to inflamed joints in mice with antigen-induced arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grespan, Renata; Fukada, Sandra Y; Lemos, Henrique P; Vieira, Silvio M; Napimoga, Marcelo H; Teixeira, Mauro M; Fraser, Alasdair R; Liew, Foo Y; McInnes, Iain B; Cunha, Fernando Q

    2008-07-01

    To investigate the mechanism underlying neutrophil migration into the articular cavity in experimental arthritis and, by extension, human inflammatory synovitis. Antigen-induced arthritis (AIA) was generated in mice with methylated bovine serum albumin (mBSA). Migration assays and histologic analysis were used to evaluate neutrophil recruitment to knee joints. Levels of inflammatory mediators were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Antibodies and pharmacologic inhibitors were used in vivo to determine the role of specific disease mediators. Samples of synovial tissue and synovial fluid from rheumatoid arthritis (RA) or osteoarthritis patients were evaluated for CXCL1 and CXCL5 expression. High levels of CXCL1, CXCL5, and leukotriene B4 (LTB4) were expressed in the joints of arthritic mice. Confirming their respective functional roles, repertaxin (a CXCR1/CXCR2 receptor antagonist), anti-CXCL1 antibody, anti-CXCL5 antibody, and MK886 (a leukotriene synthesis inhibitor) reduced mBSA-induced neutrophil migration to knee joints. Repertaxin reduced LTB4 production in joint tissue, and neutrophil recruitment induced by CXCL1 or CXCL5 was inhibited by MK886, suggesting a sequential mechanism. Levels of both CXCL1 and CXCL5 were elevated in synovial fluid and were released in vitro by RA synovial tissues. Moreover, RA synovial fluid neutrophils stimulated with CXCL1 or CXCL5 released significant amounts of LTB4. Our data implicate CXCL1, CXCL5, and LTB4, acting sequentially, in neutrophil migration in AIA. Elevated levels of CXCL1 and CXCL5 in the synovial compartment of RA patients provide robust comparative data indicating that this mechanism plays a role in inflammatory joint disease. Together, these results suggest that inhibition of CXCL1, CXCL5, or LTB4 may represent a potential therapeutic strategy in RA.

  6. Local fibroblast proliferation but not influx is responsible for synovial hyperplasia in a murine model of rheumatoid arthritis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsuo, Yusuke; Mizoguchi, Fumitaka; Saito, Tetsuya [Department of Rheumatology, Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, Tokyo Medical and Dental University (TMDU), 1-5-45 Yushima, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo, 113-8519 (Japan); Japan Science and Technology Agency (JST), Core Research for Evolutional Science and Technology (CREST) Program, Sanbancho, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo, 102-0075 (Japan); Kawahata, Kimito [Department of Rheumatology, Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, Tokyo Medical and Dental University (TMDU), 1-5-45 Yushima, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo, 113-8519 (Japan); Ueha, Satoshi; Matsushima, Kouji [Japan Science and Technology Agency (JST), Core Research for Evolutional Science and Technology (CREST) Program, Sanbancho, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo, 102-0075 (Japan); Department of Molecular Preventive Medicine, Graduate School of Medicine, University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo, 113-0033 (Japan); Inagaki, Yutaka [Japan Science and Technology Agency (JST), Core Research for Evolutional Science and Technology (CREST) Program, Sanbancho, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo, 102-0075 (Japan); Center for Matrix Biology and Medicine, Graduate School of Medicine and the Institute of Medical Sciences, Tokai University, 143 Shimo-kasuya, Isehara, Kanagawa, 259-1193 (Japan); Miyasaka, Nobuyuki [Department of Rheumatology, Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, Tokyo Medical and Dental University (TMDU), 1-5-45 Yushima, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo, 113-8519 (Japan); Kohsaka, Hitoshi, E-mail: kohsaka.rheu@tmd.ac.jp [Department of Rheumatology, Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, Tokyo Medical and Dental University (TMDU), 1-5-45 Yushima, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo, 113-8519 (Japan); Japan Science and Technology Agency (JST), Core Research for Evolutional Science and Technology (CREST) Program, Sanbancho, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo, 102-0075 (Japan)

    2016-02-12

    Synovial fibroblasts play crucial roles in inflammation and joint destruction in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). How they accumulate in the RA joints remains unclear. This study was conducted to discern whether cellular influx from the outside of the joints and local proliferation are responsible for synovial fibroblast accumulation in an animal model of RA. We found that synovial fibroblasts were identified as GFP+ cells using collagen type I alpha 2 (Col1a2)-GFP transgenic reporter mice. Then, bone marrow transplantation and parabiosis techniques were utilized to study the cellular influx. Irradiated wild-type mice were transplanted with bone marrow from Col1a2-GFP mice. Col1a2-GFP and wild-type mice were conjoined for parabiosis. The transplanted mice and the parabionts were subjected to collagen antibody-induced arthritis (CAIA). We found no GFP+ cells in the hyperplastic synovial tissues from the transplanted mice with CAIA and from the wild-type parabionts with CAIA. Furthermore, normal and CAIA synovial tissues from Col1a2-GFP mice and from fluorescent ubiquitination-based cell cycle indicator (Fucci) transgenic mice, in which cells in S/G{sub 2}/M phases of the cell cycle express Azami-Green, were studied for Ki67, a cellular proliferation marker, and vimentin, a fibroblast marker, expression. The percentages of Ki67+/GFP+ and Azami-Green+/vimentin+ cells in the CAIA synovial tissues were higher than those in the untreated synovial tissues (34% vs. 0.40% and 19% vs. 0.26%, respectively). These findings indicate that local fibroblast proliferation but not cellular influx is responsible for the synovial hyperplasia in CAIA. Suppression of proliferation of the local synovial fibroblasts should be a promising treatment for RA. - Highlights: • We studied how synovial fibroblasts accumulate in joints in a murine model of RA. • Bone marrow-derived cells did not accumulate in arthritic joints. • Synovial fibroblasts did not accumulate in arthritic joints via

  7. Primary monophasic synovial sarcoma lung with brain metastasis diagnosed on transthoracic FNAC: Report of a case with literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paras Nuwal

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Synovial sarcoma is highly malignant tumor of soft tissues, occurring chiefly in the extremities and limb girdle with a propensity for local recurrence and sometimes metastases to the lungs. Primary synovial sarcoma arising in the lungs is rare and brain metastasis as presentation is further uncommon. We report a case of primary monophasic synovial sarcoma lung presenting with brain metastasis in a 35-year-old male patient. The diagnosis was made on percutaneous transthoracic needle aspiration from left-sided pulmonary mass and later confirmed by immunohistochemistry. The utility of preoperative diagnosis by percutaneous aspiration cytology is also stressed.

  8. Periodontal inflamed surface area and C-reactive protein as predictors of HbA1c : a study in Indonesia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Susanto, Hendri; Nesse, Willem; Dijkstra, Pieter U.; Hoedemaker, Evelien; van Reenen, Yvonne Huijser; Agustina, Dewi; Vissink, Arjan; Abbas, Frank

    2012-01-01

    Periodontitis may exert an infectious and inflammatory burden, evidenced by increased C-reactive protein (CRP). This burden may impair blood glucose control (HbA1c). The aim of our study was to analyze whether periodontitis severity as measured with the periodontal inflamed surface area (PISA) and C

  9. Collagen type I Density on dental pulp inflamation of sprague-dawley rats following the application of trigona sp propolis from south sulawesi province,Indonesia

    OpenAIRE

    Ardo Sabir, Dr.drg. M.Kes

    2015-01-01

    The Result show That there is no significants difference of the collagen fibers density among 4 time periods of each group and among 5 groups of each time periods. The aim was to analyse the collagen type I density as the result of trigona sp propolis application in the dental pulp inflamation of sprague-dawley rats.

  10. Mouth and genital ulcers with inflamed cartilage: MAGIC syndrome. Five patients with features of relapsing polychondritis and Behçet's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Firestein, G S; Gruber, H E; Weisman, M H; Zvaifler, N J; Barber, J; O'Duffy, J D

    1985-07-01

    Five patients with features of coexistent relapsing polychondritis and Behçet's disease are described. Review of the literature supports the overlap of the clinical manifestations of these two conditions. A common immunologic abnormality is likely, and elastin is cited as a possible target antigen. The "mouth and genital ulcers with inflamed cartilage (MAGIC) syndrome" is the proposed name for this entity.

  11. Periodontal inflamed surface area and C-reactive protein as predictors of HbA1c : a study in Indonesia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Susanto, Hendri; Nesse, Willem; Dijkstra, Pieter U.; Hoedemaker, Evelien; van Reenen, Yvonne Huijser; Agustina, Dewi; Vissink, Arjan; Abbas, Frank

    Periodontitis may exert an infectious and inflammatory burden, evidenced by increased C-reactive protein (CRP). This burden may impair blood glucose control (HbA1c). The aim of our study was to analyze whether periodontitis severity as measured with the periodontal inflamed surface area (PISA) and

  12. Enhanced transferrin receptor expression by proinflammatory cytokines in enterocytes as a means for local delivery of drugs to inflamed gut mucosa.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Efrat Harel

    Full Text Available Therapeutic intervention in inflammatory bowel diseases (IBDs is often associated with adverse effects related to drug distribution into non-diseased tissues, a situation which attracts a rational design of a targeted treatment confined to the inflamed mucosa. Upon activation of immune cells, transferrin receptor (TfR expression increases at their surface. Because TfR is expressed in all cell types we hypothesized that its cell surface levels are regulated also in enterocytes. We, therefore, compared TfR expression in healthy and inflamed human colonic mucosa, as well as healthy and inflamed colonic mucosa of the DNBS-induced rat model. TfR expression was elevated in the colonic mucosa of IBD patients in both the basolateral and apical membranes of the enterocytes. Increased TfR expression was also observed in colonocytes of the induced colitis rats. To explore the underlying mechanism CaCo-2 cells were treated with various proinflammatory cytokines, which increased both TfR expression and transferrin cellular uptake in a mechanism that did not involve hyper proliferation. These findings were then exploited for the design of targetable carrier towards inflamed regions of the colon. Anti-TfR antibodies were conjugated to nano-liposomes. As expected, iron-starved Caco-2 cells internalized anti-TfR immunoliposomes better than controls. Ex vivo binding studies to inflamed mucosa showed that the anti-TfR immunoliposomes accumulated significantly better in the mucosa of DNBS-induced rats than the accumulation of non-specific immunoliposomes. It is concluded that targeting mucosal inflammation can be accomplished by nano-liposomes decorated with anti-TfR due to inflammation-dependent, apical, elevated expression of the receptor.

  13. Spontaneous recurrent hemarthrosis of the knee joint in elderly patients with osteoarthritis: an infrequent presentation of synovial lipoma arborescens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Jong-Hun; Lee, Yeon-Soo; Shafi, Mohamed

    2010-10-01

    Synovial lipoma arborescens (SLA) is a rare, benign, fat-containing synovial proliferative lesion that is typically known to affect the knee joint in adults, although it has also been described in other joints. SLA usually presents as a painless swelling and recurrent joint effusion, and the laboratory test results, including aspirated synovial fluid, are usually normal. We present here two cases of SLA of the knee, which presented as spontaneous recurrent hemarthroses in elderly patients with osteoarthritis (OA) with bloody aspirated synovial fluid. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and arthroscopic synovectomy suggested the diagnosis of SLA; the histopathologic examination confirmed the diagnosis. One year later, both patients remain symptom-free and report no new episodes of hemarthrosis. We postulate that SLA should be included in the differential diagnosis of patients with recurrent joint effusions with hemarthrosis in elderly patients with OA. The clinical presentation, MRI findings, and treatment of SLA are described, and the entity is briefly reviewed.

  14. SYT-SSX fusion is absent in sarcomatoid mesothelioma allowing its distinction from synovial sarcoma of the pleura.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinbreck, Nicolas; Vignaud, Jean Michel; Begueret, Hugues; Burke, Louise; Benhattar, Jean; Guillou, Louis; Capron, Frédérique; Galateau-Salle, Françoise

    2007-06-01

    The diagnosis of sarcomatoid mesothelioma is still a worldwide challenge and it is often difficult, both clinically and by morphological analysis, to differentiate sarcomatoid mesothelioma from synovial sarcoma, the most frequent intrathoracic sarcoma. To confirm the absence of the synovial sarcoma translocation t(X; 18) (SYT-SSX) in sarcomatoid mesothelioma, and to test its usefulness differentiating sarcomatoid mesothelioma from synovial sarcoma, 28 tumours were examined using the reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction. RNA was extracted from paraffin blocks using standard methods, reverse-transcribed and PCR performed. Molecular analysis completed in two independent laboratories showed that sarcomatoid mesothelioma samples were negative for the t(X-18). This result confirms the usefulness of this analysis in differentiating sarcomatoid mesothelioma from synovial sarcoma.

  15. Infiltration of the synovial membrane with macrophage subsets and polymorphonuclear cells reflects global disease activity in spondyloarthropathy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baeten, D; Kruithof, E; De Rycke, L; Boots, AM; Mielants, H; Veys, EM; De Keyser, F

    2005-01-01

    Considering the relation between synovial inflammation and global disease activity in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and the distinct but heterogeneous histology of spondyloarthropathy (SpA) synovitis, the present study analyzed whether histopathological features of synovium reflect specific phenotypes

  16. Infiltration of the synovial membrane with macrophage subsets and polymorphonuclear cells reflects global disease activity in spondyloarthropathy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baeten, D; Kruithof, E; De Rycke, L; Boots, AM; Mielants, H; Veys, EM; De Keyser, F

    2005-01-01

    Considering the relation between synovial inflammation and global disease activity in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and the distinct but heterogeneous histology of spondyloarthropathy (SpA) synovitis, the present study analyzed whether histopathological features of synovium reflect specific phenotypes a

  17. Oxidative damage in synovial tissue is associated with in vivo hypoxic status in the arthritic joint.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Biniecka, Monika

    2012-02-01

    OBJECTIVES: To assess levels of oxidative DNA damage (8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2\\'-deoxyguanine; 8-oxo-dG) and lipid peroxidation (4-hydroxy-2-nonenal; 4-HNE) in serum, synovial fluid and tissue of patients with inflammatory arthritis in relation to in vivo hypoxia levels, disease activity and angiogenic markers. METHODS: Oxygen levels in synovial tissue were assessed using an oxygen\\/temperature probe. Nuclear and cytoplasmic 8-oxo-dG and 4-HNE levels were assessed in synovial tissue from 23 patients by immunohistochemistry. 8-Oxo-dG and 4-HNE levels in serum and synovial fluid were determined using 8-oxo-dG and hexanoyl-Lys (HEL) adduct ELISAs, respectively. Serum vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and angiopoietin 2 (Ang2) levels were also measured by ELISA. RESULTS: The median oxygen tension in synovial tissue was profoundly hypoxic at 19.35 mm Hg (2.5%). Nuclear 8-oxo-dG levels were significantly higher than nuclear 4-HNE levels in the lining and sublining layers (all p<0.001). In contrast, cytoplasmic 4-HNE levels were higher than cytoplasmic 8-oxo-dG levels in both cell layers (all p<0.001). Reduced in vivo oxygen tension correlated with high lipid peroxidation in synovial fluid (p=0.027; r=0.54) and tissue (p=0.004; r=0.58). Serum VEGF levels were positively correlated with cytoplasmic 4-HNE expression (p=0.05; r=0.43) and intensity (p=0.006; r=0.59) in the lining layer. Serum Ang2 levels were positively correlated with nuclear 4-HNE expression and intensity in both cell layers (all p < or = 0.05). DAS28-C-reactive protein was correlated with nuclear 4-HNE expression in the sublining layer (p=0.02; r=0.48) and DAS28-erythrocyte sedimentation rate was correlated with nuclear 4-HNE expression in both cell layers (p < or = 0.03). CONCLUSIONS: Lipid peroxidation is associated with low oxygen tension in vivo, disease activity and angiogenic marker expression in inflammatory arthritis.

  18. The Tissue Engineering Research on Synovialization of Non-synovial Membrane Tendon%无滑膜肌腱滑膜化的组织工程学研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张正治; 刘正津; 钟世镇; 糜建红; 李忠华

    2001-01-01

    The synovial membrane tissue within the flexor digital ten don sheath of the rabbit's toes was cultured in vitro. The synovial cells suspen sion of the subculture was cultured with the segments of the non-synovial membr ane tendon of the rabbit's toes. Under the light microscopy, scanning electronic microscopy and immunohistochemical examination, the result showed that the syno vial cells crawled and covered the surface of the segments of the non-synovial membrane tendons. It is suggested that the non-synovial membrane tendon could t ransform into a synovial membrane tendon.%我们将兔趾腱鞘内滑膜组织进行体外培养,经原代培养和传代培养,制成 滑膜细胞悬液,再把兔腱鞘外无滑膜肌腱段放入滑膜细胞悬液中混合培养。经光镜、扫描电 镜和免疫组织化学检测,结果显示,滑膜细胞爬行并覆盖了无滑膜肌腱段的表面,使无滑膜 肌腱形成了有滑膜肌腱。

  19. Chemerin induces CCL2 and TLR4 in synovial fibroblasts of patients with rheumatoid arthritis and osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisinger, Kristina; Bauer, Sabrina; Schäffler, Andreas; Walter, Roland; Neumann, Elena; Buechler, Christa; Müller-Ladner, Ulf; Frommer, Klaus W

    2012-02-01

    Chemerin stimulates migration of leukocytes to sites of inflammation and also increases inflammatory signaling in chondrocytes suggesting a function of chemerin in joint inflammation. Synovial fibroblasts (SF) are critically involved in synovitis and subsequent cartilage destruction. Here, we analyzed whether synovial fibroblasts express chemerin and its receptor CMKLR1. Further, the role of chemerin in synovial fibroblast chemotaxis, proliferation, insulin response and release of inflammatory proteins was studied. Synovial tissue sections were labeled with chemerin antibody and chemerin was measured in synovial fluid by ELISA. Chemerin mRNA and protein as well as CMKLR1 expression were determined in SFs from patients with osteoarthritis (OA) and rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Effects of chemerin on cytokines, chemokines and matrix metalloproteinases (MMP), and on proliferation, migration and insulin signaling were analyzed appropriately. SFs expressed CMKLR1 and chemerin mRNA, and chemerin protein was found in cell supernatants of synovial fibroblasts. Immunohistochemistry detected chemerin in synovial tissue predominantly localized within the lining layer. Chemerin was present in synovial fluids of RA, OA and psoriatic arthritis patients in similar concentrations. Chemerin neither increased IL-6 levels nor MMP-2 or -9 activity in SFs. Also, it did not act as a chemoattractant for these cells. With respect to intracellular signaling, neither basal nor insulin-mediated phosphorylation of Akt was affected. However, chemerin significantly increased TLR4 mRNA and synthesis of CCL2 in SFs while CCL4 and -5 were not altered. Cell proliferation of SFs, however, was modestly reduced by chemerin. These data show that human SFs express both chemerin and its receptor. As chemerin enhanced expression of TLR4 and induced release of CCL2 in SFs, a role of this protein in innate immune system-associated joint inflammation is proposed. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights

  20. The pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis in radiological studies. Part I: Formation of inflammatory infiltrates within the synovial membrane

    OpenAIRE

    Sudoł-Szopińska, Iwona; Kontny, Ewa; Maśliński, Włodzimierz; Prochorec-Sobieszek, Monika; Kwiatkowska, Brygida; Zaniewicz-Kaniewska, Katarzyna; Warczyńska, Agnieszka

    2012-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis is a chronic inflammatory disease with a multifactorial etiology and varied course, which in the majority of patients leads to partial disability or to permanent handicap. Its characteristic trait is a persistent inflammation of the synovial membrane and the formation of an invasive synovial tissue, called the pannus, which in time leads to destruction of the cartilage, subchondral bone tissue, and the soft tissue of the affected joint(s). The pathogenesis of rheumatoid a...

  1. Alterações no líquido sinovial do joelho de cães com osteoartrite induzida pelo modelo Pond e Nuki Synovial fluid changes in the dog knee with osteoarthritis induced by Pond and Nuki model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. De Biasi

    2001-10-01

    Full Text Available Avaliaram-se as alterações do líquido sinovial do joelho de 19 cães submetidos à desmotomia unilateral do cruzado cranial, baseado no modelo experimental de Pond & Nuki, colhido e analisado aos 30 dias de pós-operatório. Cinco animais foram analisados novamente aos 90 dias de pós-operatório. As características analisadas foram volume, cor, aspecto, densidade, pH, proteínas, fibrinogênio, coágulo de mucina, contagem de hemácias e contagem total e diferencial de células nucleadas. O líquido sinovial apresentou padrão inflamatório que persistiu durante todo o período de observação, com efusão articular. Houve aumento na contagem de células nucleadas e na concentração de fibrinogênio aos 90 dias. A qualidade da precipitação da mucina apresentou melhora aos 90 dias quando comparada à de 30 dias, porém ainda marcadamente anormal. Foi possível concluir que até 90 dias de pós-operatório no modelo utilizado o fluído sinovial apresenta características inflamatórias e não degenerativas.The purpose of this study was to evaluate the changes in knee synovial fluid of 19 dogs with experimentally-induced cranial cruciate ligament rupture, based on Pond & Nuki model. Synovial fluid was achieved and analyzed at 30 days postoperative time. Five animals had further synovial fluid evaluation at 90 days postoperatively. The characteristics observed were color, turbidity, density, pH, protein, fibrinogen, mucin clot, cell count and citology. The synovial fluid exhibited an inflammatory pattern during the postoperative observation time and joint effusion was observed. An increased number of nucleated cells and increased fibrinogen concentration were observed at 90 days when compared to 30 days after desmotomy. Although severely abnormal, an improvement of the mucin clot was observed at 90 days. It can be concluded that synovial fluid in this experimental model, showed inflammatory and no degenerative changes until 90 days

  2. Lunasin Inhibits Cell Proliferation via Apoptosis and Reduces the Production of Proinflammatory Cytokines in Cultured Rheumatoid Arthritis Synovial Fibroblasts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaohui Jia

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Lunasin, a peptide with 43 amino acid residues and initially isolated and identified in soybean cotyledon, has gained extensive attention due to its anti-inflammatory and anticancer properties. However, its treatment efficacy on rheumatoid arthritis (RA and corresponding mechanisms have not been reported. Herein, the synovial fibroblasts harvested and isolated from patients with RA were treated with lunasin at various concentrations to examine the proliferation, apoptosis status, and corresponding cell cycle of cultured RA synovial fibroblasts. Meanwhile, the underlying mechanisms of lunasin for RA treatment are explored through Western blot, real-time PCR, ELISA, and luciferase reporter assays. Lunasin significantly inhibited the proliferation and induced the apoptosis of cultured RA synovial fibroblasts. In addition, lunasin reduced the production of interleukin-6 (IL-6, IL-8, and matrix metalloproteinase-3 (MMP-3 and suppressed the activation of NF-κB in cultured RA synovial fibroblasts but did not reveal obvious modulation on the secretion and gene expression of MMP-1. Therefore, lunasin will have promising potential as a novel nutritional supplement or drug candidate for RA due to its potency of suppressing synovial cell proliferation and decreasing the production of proinflammatory cytokines and MMPs in synovial cells.

  3. INCREASED CONCENTRATION OF NITRITE IN SYNOVIAL FLUID AND SERUM SAMPLES IN STEROID INDUCED FEMORAL HEAD NECROSIS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1999-01-01

    To investigate the role of nitric oxide (NO) in steroid-induced femoral head necrosis, NO production was measured indirectly as nitrite in serum and synovial fluid samples from patients with steroid-induced femoral head necrosis together with serum samples from healthy volunteers matched for age and sex. The results showed that:① serum nitrite concentration in patients with femoral head necrosis were significantly lower than that in controls (P<0.001); ② nitrite level of synovial fluid was markedly higher than that of serum. In addition, there was a positive correlation between them (r=0.378,P<0.05). We reach the conclusion:① NO is synthesized by synovium and chondrocytes; ② the decreased NO concentration in serum suggests a protective role in steroid-induced femoral head necrosis.

  4. Synovial Sarcoma Associated With Indwelling Intramedullary Pin in a Peach-Faced Lovebird (Agapornis roseicollis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakano, Yumiko; Une, Yumi

    2016-03-01

    Sarcoma developing in association with a metallic orthopedic procedure is an uncommon but well-recognized complication in mammals. We report on a synovial sarcoma that developed at the site of an intramedullary pin after surgery to treat a bone fracture. A 17-year-old female peach-faced lovebird (Agapornis roseicollis) developed a spherical mass on the distal right dorsal wing at a site that was previously fractured and surgically repaired with an indwelling intramedullary pin. The right wing was amputated at the scapulohumeral joint. One year later, the bird died. Postmortem examination revealed metastases in the right lung, left thoracic wall, and proventricular serosa. Histologically, the tumor had a characteristic biphasic pattern. The tumor was immunohistologically and ultrastructurally identified as a synovial sarcoma. This is the first report of a suspected fracture-associated sarcoma in a bird.

  5. Molecular Mechanisms of the Lubrucating Function of the Synovial Fluid Control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dmitry A. Antonov

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The author in his review presents up-to-date information, concerning the composition and properties of human synovial fluid with an emphasis on detailed description of the molecular mechanisms of the lubricating function control. Three main groups of molecules: (surface-active phospholipids (1, hyaluronic acid (2, and proteins group SZP/lubricine (3, were described in synovial fluid being able to support lubrication; the latter group was considered as the main biopolymers, ensuring the boundary lubrication. On author’s opinion, the modern practice of viscosupplementation is not fully functional, since it did not restore the function of the boundary lubrication, lost in the osteoarthritis progression. Besides the need to correct the composition of current drugs for viscosupplementary therapy, the ensuring of lubricating properties of tissue engineering constructs and media to grow cartilage tissue was in vitro attributed to the practical tasks of joints regenerative biomedicine.

  6. The surprising outcome of a giant primary mediastinal synovial sarcoma treated with neoadjuvant chemotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balieiro, Marcos Alexandre; Lopes, Agnaldo José; Costa, Bruno Pinheiro; Veras, Gustavo Perissé Moreira; Perelson, Paulo Sergio; Acatauassú Nunes, Rodolfo; Saito, Eduardo Haruo

    2013-02-01

    There are only a few cases of primary mediastinal synovial sarcoma in the literature. Normally, they do not respond well to chemotherapy. In our case, a 30-year-old patient was admitted due to thoracic pain, dyspnea, orthopnea, cough, hoarseness and weight loss over a 3-month period as well as a dramatic worsening a week before the admission. A chest radiography showed a completely white left hemithorax and contralateral mediastinal shift; in addition, a chest tomography revealed a giant heterogeneous mediastinal mass, lung atelectasia and a small pleural effusion. The patient was submitted to Chamberlain procedure (biopsy) under local anesthesia and the diagnosis of a synovial sarcoma was obtained after immunohistochemical analysis. Due to his poor general condition, he received chemotherapy first, with a dramatic response, after what, the mass that had been reduced was removed surgically. After a 5-year- follow-up period there are no signs of disease recurrence.

  7. Diagnosing Septic Arthritis in the Synovial White Cell Count "Gray Zone".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruzbarsky, Joseph J; Gladnick, Brian P; Dodwell, Emily

    2016-07-01

    Differentiating septic arthritis of the pediatric hip from other causes of hip pain and effusion continues to present a diagnostic challenge for the clinician. Although septic arthritis traditionally has been reported to have a synovial white blood cell count of 75,000 cells/mm3 or greater, lower counts can be seen in this condition. In cases where a synovial sample has been obtained and the cell count falls in the intermediate range between 25,000 and 75,000 cells/mm(3), it is unclear what proportion of these cases may be truly septic hips. In this evidence-based review, we examine Heyworth et al's study focusing on the predictive value of this intermediate white cell count range in a Lyme-endemic region.

  8. Recurrent atlantoaxial synovial cyst resection via a navigation-guided, endoscope-assisted posterior approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Colasanti

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Atlantoaxial cysts are rare, and only 46 histologically confirmed cases have been reported. Case Description: A 75-year-old male presented 2 years ago with headache, neck pain, loss of balance, and episodic dysphagia, for which he had undergone posterior cervical drainage of a left-sided atlantoaxial cyst. Although his original symptoms resolved, they recurred 2 years later and were correlated with an enhanced MR that showed a recurrent left C1-C2 synovial cyst causing marked cervical cord compression. It was successfully resected through a navigation-guided, endoscope-assisted posterior approach. The patient′s symptoms/signs resolved completely, and he has remained symptom-free for over 30 months postoperatively, with no evidence of recurrence on MR or craniocervical instability. Conclusions: A patient who successfully underwent resection of a recurrent synovial cervical cyst using a navigation-guided, endoscope-assisted posterior approach has been reported here.

  9. Mesenchymal stem cell therapy in osteoarthritis: advanced tissue repair or intervention with smouldering synovial activation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Lent, Peter L E M; van den Berg, Wim B

    2013-03-20

    Although it is generally accepted that osteoarthritis is a degenerative condition of the cartilage, other tissues such as synovium in which immunological and inflammatory reactions occur contribute to the development of joint pathology. This sheds new light on the potential mechanism of action of mesenchymal stem cell therapy in osteoarthritis. Rather than tissue repair due to local transformation of injected mesenchymal stem cells to chondrocytes and filling defects in cartilage, such treatment might suppress synovial activation and indirectly ameliorate cartilage damage. Desando and co-workers report in Arthritis Research & Therapy that intra-articular delivery of adipose-derived stem cells attenuates progression of synovial activation and joint destruction in osteoarthritis in an experimental rabbit model. Clinical studies are warranted to see whether this approach might be a novel way to combat development of joint destruction in inflammatory subtypes of osteoarthritis.

  10. Expression of NF-κB and osteopontin of synovial fluid of patientswith knee osteoarthritis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li-Feng Qin; Dan Peng; Wan-Chun Wang; Han Fang; Xin-Zhan Mao; Guo-Liang Huang; You Chen; Hou-De Zhou; Yi Shen; Li-Hua Qin

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To explore the significance of osteopontin and nuclear factorκB (NF-κB) expression in patients with knee osteoarthritis. Methods: RT-PCR and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay were used to measure the Osteopontin (OPN) and NF-κB concentration of knee joint synovial fluid of patients with knee osteoarthritis and trauma fractures, and analyze the relationship between the expressiones of them. Results: OPN and NF-κB expression at the mRNA and protein levels of patients with knee osteoarthritis were significantly higher than the control group. the result showed statistical significance (P<0.05). There was a positive correlation between the OPN levels in synovial fluid of patients with knee osteoarthritis and NF-κB expression levels (P<0.05). Conclusions: The high expression of OPN and NF-κB are closely related to occurrence and development of knee osteoarthritis.

  11. The effect of endotoxin and anti-endotoxin serum on synovial fluid parameters in the horse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R.D. Gottschalk

    1998-07-01

    Full Text Available The effects of a commercially available equine hyperimmune anti-endotoxin serum on synovial fluid parameters were evaluated in an induced synovitis model in normal horses. Four groups of 3 horses each received lipopolysaccharide (LPS plus hyperimmune antiendotoxin (anti-LPS, LPS, anti-LPS, and Ringers lactate (control respectively injected into the left intercarpal joint. Synovial fluid parameters were measured at 4, 8, 24 and 72 h. It was found that anti-LPS had no attenuating effect on the LPS and that it induced a synovitis almost equivalent to that induced by LPS alone. The introduction of sterile Ringers lactate solution into the carpal joint together with repeated aseptic arthrocentesis induces a mild inflammatory response.

  12. Pediatric Subtalar Joint Synovial Chondromatosis Report of a Case and an Up-to-date Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saibaba, Balaji; Sudesh, Pebam; Govindan, Gokul; Prakash, Mahesh

    2015-09-01

    Synovial chondromatosis is a rare, usually benign disorder affecting the population predominantly in the third and fourth decades of life and mainly involving the large weightbearing joints of the lower limb-the knees and the hip. In this report, we highlight an unusual pediatric clinical presentation of synovial osteochondromatosis involving the subtalar joint and discuss its surgical management; we also provide a comprehensive up-to-date literature review of the disorder. This patient was successfully treated with en masse surgical excision. He has been doing well, with complete pain relief and improved range of motion at 1-year follow-up. An exceptional involvement of the subtalar joint and an unusual presentation in the pediatric age group makes this case unique.

  13. A three-dimensional coculture of enterocytes, monocytes and dendritic cells to model inflamed intestinal mucosa in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonard, Fransisca; Collnot, Eva-Maria; Lehr, Claus-Michael

    2010-12-06

    While epithelial cell culture models (e.g., Caco-2 cell line) are widely used to assess the absorption of drug molecules across healthy intestinal mucosa, there are no suitable in vitro models of the intestinal barrier in the state of inflammation. Thus development of novel drugs and formulations for the treatment of inflammatory bowel disease is largely bound to animal models. We here report on the development of a complex in vitro model of the inflamed intestinal mucosa, starting with the selection of suitable enterocyte cell line and proinflammatory stimulus and progressing to the setup and characterization of a three-dimensional coculture of human intestinal epithelial cells and immunocompetent macrophages and dendritic cells. In the 3D setup, controlled inflammation can be induced allowing the mimicking of pathophysiological changes occurring in vivo in the inflamed intestine. Different combinations of proinflammatory stimuli (lipopolysaccharides from Escherichia coli and Salmonella typhimurium, interleukin-1β, interferon-γ) and intestinal epithelial cell lines (Caco-2, HT-29, T84) were evaluated, and only Caco-2 cells were responsive to stimulation, with interleukin-1β being the strongest stimulator. Caco-2 cells responded to the proinflammatory stimulus with a moderate upregulation of proinflammatory markers and a slight, but significant, decrease (20%) of transepithelial electrical resistance (TEER) indicating changes in the epithelial barrier properties. Setting up the coculture model, macrophages and dendritic cells derived from periphery blood monocytes were embedded in a collagen layer on a Transwell filter insert and Caco-2 cells were seeded atop. Even in the presence of immunocompetent cells Caco-2 cells formed a tight monolayer. Addition of IL-1β increased inflammatory cytokine response more strongly compared to Caco-2 single culture and stimulated immunocompetent cells proved to be highly active in sampling apically applied nanoparticles. Thus

  14. Acute Liver Failure Due to Budd-Chiari Syndrome in the Setting of Cardiac Synovial Sarcoma

    OpenAIRE

    Stine, Jonathan G.; Newton, Kelly; Vinayak, Ajeet G

    2015-01-01

    Primary malignant tumors of the heart, specifically cardiac sarcomas, are rare and mainly diagnosed at autopsy. Acute Budd-Chiari syndrome is a recognized cause of acute liver failure and has been associated with several rare cardiac tumors: atrial myxoma, caval rhabdomyosarcoma, and primary cardiac adenocarcinoma. We present the first case of a fatal, highly differentiated cardiac synovial sarcoma that presented as acute liver failure from Budd-Chiari syndrome.

  15. Lumbar spine joint synovial cysts of intraspinal development. CT scan imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vallee, C.; Chevrot, A.; Benhamouda, M. and others

    CT scan imaging findings are described in 22 patients with lumbar spine joint synovial cysts, of intraspinal development, provoking sciatica or lumbosciatica from nerve compression in spinal canal. Diagnosis was suggested by a mass at the posterior joint level, of variable density, sometimes with peripheral calcification, presenting a vacuum appearance on occasions, and with enhanced image with contrast. Differential diagnosis is from excluded hernia and postoperative fibrosis. Posterior intra-articular arthrography can confirm diagnosis and allow treatment with prolonged action corticoid infiltrations.

  16. In vivo role of phagocytic synovial lining cells in onset of experimental arthritis.

    OpenAIRE

    van Lent, P. L.; Van den Hoek, A. E.; van den Bersselaar, L. A.; Spanjaards, M. F.; van Rooijen, N; Dijkstra, C.D.; Van De Putte, L B; van den Berg, W B

    1993-01-01

    The in vivo role of phagocytic synovial lining cells (SLC) was studied in acute experimental arthritis in the mouse. SLCs were selectively depleted by injecting liposomes encapsulating the drug dichloromethylene diphosphonate (CL2MDP, Clodronate). Optimal depletion of phagocytic lining cells occurred 7 days after CL2MDP liposome injection. Eliciting an immune complex-mediated arthritis in SLC-depleted knee joints largely prevented inflammation if compared to control arthritic knee joints. Joi...

  17. 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase enzymes modulate effects of glucocorticoids in rheumatoid arthritis synovial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Martin; Straub, Rainer H

    2015-01-01

    The tissue availability of active glucocorticoids (cortisol in humans) depends on their rate of synthesis from cholesterol, downstream metabolism, excretion and interconversion. The latter is mediated by the 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenases (11βHSDs). In this review, we summarize the features of the two isoenzymes, 11βHSD1 and 11βHSD2, and current available experimental data related to 11βHSDs, which are relevant in the context of synovial cells in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). We conclude that due to complex feedback mechanisms inherent to the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis, currently available transgenic animal models cannot display the full potential otherwise inherent to the techniques. Studies with tissue explants, mixed synovial cell preparations, cell lines derived from synovial cells, and related primary cells or established cell lines indicate that there are relatively clear differences between the two isoenzymes. 11βHSD1 is expressed primarily in fibroblasts and osteoblasts, and may be responsible for fibroblast survival and aid in the resolution of inflammation, but it is also involved in bone damage. 11βHSD2 is expressed primarily in macrophages and lymphocytes, and may be responsible for their survival, suggesting that it is critical in chronic inflammation. The situation in synovial tissue would allow 11βHSD2-expressing cells to tap the energy resources of 11βHSD1-expressing cells. The overall properties of this local glucocorticoid interconversion system might limit therapeutic use of glucocorticoids in RA. © 2014 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  18. The molecular structure and lubricating activity of lubricin isolated from bovine and human synovial fluids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swann, D A; Silver, F H; Slayter, H S; Stafford, W; Shore, E

    1985-01-01

    Lubricin was isolated from bovine ankle, metacarpophalangeal and knee and human knee synovial fluids. The lubricins isolated from the bovine joint fluids had the same amino acid and carbohydrate compositions, but differences were observed in the relative molecular masses. The Mr values of bovine metacarpophalangeal and ankle lubricin determined by light-scattering measurements were about 200 000, whereas values of 132 000 and 143 000 were obtained for the bovine knee lubricin. The human knee lubricin had a similar carbohydrate composition to bovine knee lubricin except for the higher glucosamine content, and the amino acid composition differed slightly. The human sample had a lower glutamic acid content and a leucine/isoleucine ratio of 2:1 compared with 1:1 in the bovine. The Mr value of the human knee lubricin (166 000) was also lower than that of the bovine metacarpophalangeal and ankle samples. The Mr value of the bovine knee lubricin determined by sedimentation-equilibrium measurements was 171 000. The length measurements determined by electron microscopy and also the sedimentation measurements showed considerable polydispersity and indicate that the degree of extension of lubricin molecules can vary. Friction measurements showed that the human knee synovial-fluid lubricin had equivalent lubricating ability in a test system in vitro to that observed for lubricin isolated from normal bovine synovial fluids. The lubricating ability of lubricin was concentration-dependent, and each lubricin sample was able to act as a lubricant in vitro in an equivalent manner to whole synovial fluid at concentrations that are thought to occur in vivo. PMID:3977823

  19. Distinguishing multiple rice body formation in chronic subacromial-subdeltoid bursitis from synovial chondromatosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Albert; Wong, Lun-Yick; Sheu, Chin-Yin [Department of Radiology, Mackay Memorial Hospital, Taipei (Taiwan); Chen, Be-Fong [Department of Pathology, Mackay Memorial Hospital, Taipei (Taiwan)

    2002-02-01

    Multiple rice body formation is a complication of chronic bursitis. Although it resembles synovial chondromatosis clinically and on imaging, the literature suggests that analysis of radiographic and MR appearances should allow discrimination. We report the imaging findings in a 41-year-old man presenting with rice body formation in chronic subacromial-subdeltoid bursitis. We found that the signal intensity of the rice bodies is helpful in making the diagnosis. (orig.)

  20. Effects of leflunomide on inflamation and fibrosis in bleomycine induced pulmonary fibrosis in wistar albino rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kayhan, Servet; Guzel, Aygul; Duran, Latif; Tutuncu, Serife; Guzel, Ahmet; Gunaydın, Mithat; Salis, Osman; Okuyucu, Ali; Selcuk, Mustafa Yasin

    2013-10-01

    Pulmonary fibrosis is a rare and progressive lung disease with a high mortality rate. The treatment regimens still fail to recover the disease. Leflunomide (LEF) is an immunomodulatory agent with antiproliferative activity that is used for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis. The purpose of the study is to investigate the potential therapeutic efficacy of LEF in bleomycin (BLM) induced pulmonary fibrosis. A total of 21 male, adult wistar albino rats were used. The animals were divided into three groups as control, BLM and BLM plus LEF groups (n=7). In BLM group, mice were treated with intratracheal instillation of BLM (2.5 U/kg). Control group received the same volume of saline instead of BLM. In LEF group, in addition to BLM, LEF (10 mg/kg, daily) was administrated by oral gavage. The effect of LEF on pulmonary inflammation and fibrosis was studied by measurements of serum clara cell protein-16 (CC-16), thiobarbituric acid reactive substance levels (TBARS), superoxide dismutase (SOD) and advanced oxidation protein products (AOPP) levels and lung tissue contents of IL-6, TNF-α and NF-κB by immunhistochemical examinations. LEF significantly increased the level of CC-16 and decreased the level of AOPP (P=0.042 and P=0.003 respectively). Lung tissue contents of IL-6, TNF-α and NF-κB significantly decreased in LEF group compared to BLM group by immunhistochemical examinations (P<0.001). LEF reduces oxidative stress factors, alveolar inflammation and attenuates lung injury and fibrosis.

  1. Use of biofluorescence imaging to compare the distribution of certolizumab pegol, adalimumab, and infliximab in the inflamed paws of mice with collagen-induced arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palframan, Roger; Airey, Michael; Moore, Adrian; Vugler, Alex; Nesbitt, Andrew

    2009-08-31

    Exposure to a drug at the site of inflammation may be an important consideration for the effective treatment of inflammatory disorders such as rheumatoid arthritis (RA). The purpose of this in vivo study was to identify a methodology to enable effective quantification of antibody-type reagents in normal and inflamed tissue by investigating the distribution of the tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) inhibitors, certolizumab pegol, adalimumab, and infliximab, in healthy and inflamed murine tissue using a novel non-invasive biofluorescence method. Certolizumab pegol, adalimumab, and infliximab were labeled with the low molecular weight dye alexa680. The agents were administered intravenously at a dose of 2mg/kg in naïve DBA/1 mice and in DBA/1 mice with ongoing collagen-induced arthritis. Concentrations of the TNF inhibitors in the hind paws were measured using a Xenogen IVIS200 biofluorescence imager at multiple time points up to 26h post-administration. In 2 independent experiments, the distribution of certolizumab pegol was compared with that of adalimumab and infliximab. Certolizumab pegol, adalimumab, and infliximab all distributed more effectively into inflamed tissue than non-inflamed tissue in this animal model of arthritis. However, the ratio of penetration of certolizumab pegol into inflamed arthritic paws compared with normal tissue was greater than that observed with adalimumab and infliximab. Furthermore, the duration of exposure in the inflamed versus normal tissue was more prolonged for certolizumab pegol than for both adalimumab and infliximab, and the accumulation of certolizumab pegol in diseased tissue was more responsive to the severity of inflammation when compared with adalimumab and infliximab. It is probable that these features of certolizumab pegol are conferred on the molecule by PEGylation. It is important to assess exposure to drug at the site of inflammation, because distinct structural features of certain agents may affect efficacy

  2. Posterior interosseous nerve palsy by synovial cyst of proximal radioulnar joint: our experience after 5 years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monacelli, G; Ceci, F; Prezzemoli, G; Spagnoli, A; Lotito, S; Irace, S

    2011-06-01

    The posterior interosseous nerve palsy is a neuropathy of radial nerve interesting its deep motor branch. The neuropathy can appear with a hollow in the proximal half of the forearm without significant swelling, a complete loss of extension of the fingers with radial deviation of the wrist during extension. In some cases, PIN compression may simulate tendon rupture in rheumatologic diseases, because the pain and the paralysis occur suddenly, so often can be difficult to make a diagnosis. The palsy is caused by compression of the posterior interosseous nerve from soft tissue tumours or tumour-like masses: ganglions, lipomas, rheumatoid synovitis, synovial chondromatosis, fibromas, neurofibromas, bursitis, synovial cysts of the elbow and radioulnar proximal joints. The aim of our research was to individuate the better treatment for the posterior interosseous nerve palsy. From 2002 to 2007 we examined 8 patients: 2 female and 6 male. Median age was 43 years. The diagnosis was made by clinical examination, ultrasound, nerve conduction studies and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Patients underwent to decompressing posterior interosseous nerve surgery. After the surgical exploration in 8 cases a globular mass of around 2.5 cm to 4.5 cm diameter was discovered. At the histological examination, a synovial cyst of the elbow joint was found in 7 out of 8 patients and an hemangioma tumor in the one remaining patient. 12 months was the median time for a complete recovery after the operation, confirmed by EMG. The surgical treatment offers a complete resolution in all cases.

  3. Chiropractic management of a patient with lumbar spine pain due to synovial cyst: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, James M

    2012-03-01

    The purpose of this study is to report the findings resulting from chiropractic care using flexion distraction spinal manipulation for a patient with low back and radicular pain due to spinal stenosis caused by a synovial cyst. A 75-year-old man presented with low back pain radiating to the right anterior thigh and down the left posterior leg of 3 years' duration. Physical and imaging examinations showed a synovial cyst-induced spinal stenosis at the right L3-L4 level and bilateral L4-L5 spinal stenosis. Flexion distraction spinal manipulation and physiological therapeutics were applied at the levels of stenosis. After 4 visits, the patient noted total absence of the right and left lower extremity pain and no adverse reaction to treatment. After 3 months of treatment and 16 visits, his low back and buttock pain were minimal; and he had no leg pain. Lumbar synovial cyst and stenosis-generated low back and radicular pain was 80% relieved in a 75-year-old man following Cox flexion distraction spinal manipulation.

  4. A rare case of synovial chondromatosis of the inferior TMJ compartment. Diagnosis and treatment aspect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sozzi, Davide; Bocchialini, Gabriele; Novelli, Giorgio; Valente, Maria Gabriella; Moltrasio, Francesca; Bozzetti, Alberto

    2015-01-01

    Synovial Chondromatosis (SC) is a rare, benign non neoplastic arthopathy characterized by the metaplastic development of cartilaginous nodules within the synovial membrane. In only 3% of all cases does it affect the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) and cases that arise from the lower compartment are rarely found in literature. The aim of this paper is to report a new case of SC of the inferior TMJ compartment with the description of the clinical, therapeutic and histopathological findings. This article presents a 68-year-old woman with preauricular swelling on the right side, pain, crepitus and limited joint motion. This patient was evaluated by preoperative clinical manifestation, CT scan and MR images. Both showed multiple, calcified loose bodies in the inferior compartment. Based on these images as well as the patient's signs and symptoms, a surgical intervention was performed. A good functional recovery with no signs of recurrence at 36 months of follow up was obtained. Among cases of synovial chondromatosis in literature, only twelve originating in the lower compartment have been reported, this one included. In all the cases treated for SC in the lower compartment, both in literature and in our case report, surgical treatment led to healing.

  5. Plasma and synovial fluid concentrations of calcium pentosan polysulphate achieved in the horse following intramuscular injection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuller, C J; Ghosh, P; Barr, A R S

    2002-01-01

    Results from in vitro studies have indicated that calcium pentosan polysulphate (CaPPS) may be of therapeutic value in osteoarthritis (OA) in the horse. However, no controlled clinical trials using this drug in equine OA have yet been reported. If CaPPS is to be developed for such use, the relationship between the proposed i.m. dose of CaPPS to be used and the concentrations of drug attained in plasma and synovial fluid of the target joint should first be established. An investigation was undertaken to determine these concentrations after a single 2 mg/kg i.m. injection of CaPPS. Blood and synovial fluid samples were taken from 6 healthy, sound horses following i.m. CaPPS administration. Concentrations of CaPPS measured in the synovial fluid were, on the basis of published studies, sufficient to elicit a potential therapeutic effect on synoviocyte metabolism, and possibly also to stimulate proteoglycan synthesis and reduce matrix metalloproteinase activities in articular cartilage. It would therefore seem justified to investigate further the therapeutic effect of CaPPS in OA in the horse.

  6. Biphasic synovial sarcoma in a 19-year-old pregnant woman: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adameşteanu, Mădălina Olivia; Scurtu, Răzvan; Lascăr, Ioan; Vâlcu, Marek; Popescu, Şerban Arghir; Sebe, Ioana Teona

    2015-01-01

    Synovial sarcoma is a rare malignant tumor of mesenchymal multipotent cells. We hereby present a case of synovial sarcoma of the upper left thigh. A 19-year-old patient was referred to our clinic by another hospital in Bucharest, Romania, for a soft tissue mass in the left upper thigh. Local examination of the left thigh revealed a 15÷13 cm, ovoid, painful upon touch, soft tissue mass occupying the proximal-medial aspect of the thigh. Bilateral inguinal nodes' enlargement was noticed. Upon suspecting regional node involvement, the surgical team decided to perform left limb amputation due to tumor size and the proximity to major arterial and nervous trunks as well as the femoral shaft, making curative surgery and 'free of disease' resection margins improbable. The patient refused the operation. The surgical team (plastic surgeon, orthopedic surgeon) decided to attempt limb-sparing surgery. After tumor resection, free-of-disease surgical margins were achieved. The pathological examination as well as the immunohistochemistry (IHC) diagnosed a large biphasic synovial sarcoma warranting oncologic treatment. The association between tumor growth and pregnancy poses important therapeutic problems, such as the use of preoperative chemotherapy, potential pregnancy termination, limb amputation versus limb salvage intervention and types of protocols of chemotherapy or radiotherapy indicated.

  7. Relationship between the conformity and the lubricating ability of synovial joints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mabuchi, K.; Ujihira, M.; Sasada, T.

    1998-06-01

    OBJECTIVE: To relate conformity of sliding surfaces with the lubricating ability of synovial joints. DESIGN: Measurement of start-up friction in the stifles of various animals. Assessment of conformity by Hertzian contact area. BACKGROUND: Past studies showed that the start-up friction in synovial joints sharply increased with the loading duration. The reasons why the friction increased and why the increasing rate is different in different joints were, however, not found. METHODS: Nine stifle joints from various animals were used. A robotic arm was used to give the compressive force and the sliding motion to the joint. Start-up friction was measured by a universal force sensor. The principal curvatures of the sliding surfaces were directly measured by a radius-gauge. Hertzian contact area was calculated from the principal curvatures of the sliding surfaces. RESULTS: The duration until the frictional coefficient reached 0.1 was related to the Hertzian contact area. CONCLUSION: The conformity of sliding surfaces is related to the lubrication ability in synovial joints. The squeeze-film mechanism plays an important role in joint lubrication.

  8. HMGB1-mediated autophagy decreases sensitivity to oxymatrine in SW982 human synovial sarcoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Yongsong; Xu, Peng; Yang, Le; Xu, Ke; Zhu, Jialin; Wu, Xiaoqing; Jiang, Congshan; Yuan, Qiling; Wang, Bo; Li, Yuanbo; Qiu, Yusheng

    2016-11-29

    Oxymatrine (OMT) is a type of alkaloid extracted from a traditional Chinese medicinal herb, Sophora flavescens. Although the antitumor activities of OMT have been observed in various cancers, there are no reports regarding the effects of OMT on human synovial sarcoma. In the present study, we analyzed the antitumor activities of OMT in SW982 human synovial sarcoma cells and determine whether high mobility group box protein 1 (HMGB1)-mediated autophagy was associated with its therapeutic effects. We found that OMT exhibited antitumor activity in SW982 cells and facilitated increases in autophagy. Inhibition of autophagy by 3-MA or ATG7 siRNA increased the level of apoptosis, which indicated that OMT-induced autophagy protected cells from the cytotoxicity of OMT. Administration of OMT to SW982 cells increased the expression of HMGB1. When HMGB1 was inhibited via HMGB1-siRNA, OMT-induced autophagy was decreased, and apoptosis was increased. Furthermore, we found that HMGB1-siRNA significantly increased the expression of p-Akt and p-mTOR. OMT-induced autophagy may be mediated by the Akt/mTOR pathway, and HMGB1 plays a vital role in the regulation of autophagy. Therefore, we believe that combining OMT with an inhibitor of autophagy or HMGB1 may make OMT more effective in the treatment of human synovial sarcoma.

  9. Synovial sarcoma presenting with huge mediastinal mass: a case report and review of literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Synovial sarcoma presenting in the mediastinum is exceedingly rare. Furthermore, data addressing optimal therapy is limited. Herein we present a case where an attempt to downsize the tumor to a resectable state with chemotherapy was employed. Case presentation A 32 year female presented with massive pericardial effusion and unresectable huge mediastinal mass. Computed axial tomography scan - guided biopsy with adjunctive immunostains and molecular studies confirmed a diagnosis of synovial sarcoma. Following three cycles of combination Ifosfamide and doxorubicin chemotherapy, no response was demonstrated. The patient refused further therapy and had progression of her disease 4 months following the last cycle. Conclusion Synovial sarcoma presenting with unresectable mediastinal mass carry a poor prognosis. Up to the best of our knowledge there are only four previous reports where primary chemotherapy was employed, unfortunately; none of these cases had subsequent complete surgical resection. Identification of the best treatment strategy for patients with unresectable disease is warranted. Our case can be of benefit to medical oncologists and thoracic surgeons who might be faced with this unique and exceedingly rare clinical scenario. PMID:23800262

  10. [A synovial cyst accompanied by asymptomatic lumbar vertebral fracture requiring differentiation from spinal metastasis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miura, Isamu; Ujiie, Hiroshi; Nakagawa, Masanori; Saito, Taiichi; Shiono, Saori; Okada, Yoshikazu

    2015-06-01

    We experienced a case with a synovial cyst accompanied by asymptomatic lumbar vertebral fracture that required differentiation from spinal metastasis. An 82-year-old man suffered from right leg and anal pain. Computed tomography (CT) showed L5 spondylolysis. Magnetic resonance images (MRI) revealed an intra spinal cyst and acute lumbar vertebral fracture of L5 vertebral body. The surrounding area of the cyst presented contrast enhancement, and the extradural mass compressed the dural sac. Bone scintigraphy with 99m technetium-MDP demonstrated intense uptake on the right first, fourth, fifth, and seventh ribs and L2, L3, and L5 vertebra. The F-18 fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) image demonstrated an increased radiotracer uptake in the L5 vertebra(standardized uptake value(SUV) max=3.5). Spinal metastasis was suspected. Because of the cauda equina compression syndrome, it was surgically removed. Intraoperatively, a well-demarcated extradural cyst was found and compressed the dural sac markedly. The cyst capsule was thin and contained clear, thin fluid with no signs of bleeding. The histological diagnosis was a synovial cyst. His neurological symptoms improved after the surgery. The synovial cyst may enlarge after asymptomatic vertebral fractures.

  11. Abundant lubricin expression suggests a link between synoviocytes, synovial tumors, and myxomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solka, Kathryn A; Schmid, Thomas M; Miller, Ira J

    2016-10-01

    Progenitor cell differentiation into fibroblast-like synoviocytes (FLSs) and their ensuing phenotypic changes are incompletely explored. Synovial lining is composed of intimal macrophages and FLSs. FLSs have epithelioid morphology and directionally secrete components of synovial fluid, including lubricin. We stained human tissues and tumors using two anti-lubricin antibodies. Lubricin was found in FLSs in synovium and in tenosynovial giant cell tumors (TSGCTs) and not in the associated monocyte/macrophage cells, which were identified by double immunostaining for CD163. In TSGCTs, giant cells, known to form by fusion of mononuclear cells, were negative for both lubricin and CD163. Occasional mononuclear cells with the same phenotype were also seen, suggesting that the precursors of the giant cells are derived from the minor CD163-negative monocyte subset. Lubricin was also detected in intramuscular myxomas, in early myxoid changes of ganglion cysts, and in one of five low-grade myxofibrosarcomas, but not in other fibroconnective tissues, epithelial tissues, or other tumors tested. This suggests that lubricin expression may typify adaptive and neoplastic changes along a pathway toward FLSs. Further support for this concept comes from ganglion cysts and juxta-articular myxoma tumors, which show a spectrum of myxoid, cystic and synovial differentiation, and in which moderate lubricin staining of myxoid stroma was seen.

  12. Epigenetic modifications of interleukin-6 in synovial fibroblasts from osteoarthritis patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Fei; Zhou, Song; Wang, Chuandong; Huang, Yan; Li, Huiwu; Wang, You; Zhu, Zhenan; Tang, Jian; Yan, Mengning

    2017-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is the most common degenerative disease of the synovial joint. The synovial membrane is responsible for the inflammatory reaction leading to the secretion of macrophage-derived pro-inflammatory cytokines, such as IL-6. Suppressing IL-6 over-expression in synovial fibroblasts (SF) is a promising method to prevent OA development and progression, in which the prerequisite is the elucidation of the molecular mechanisms underlying IL-6 over-expression in SF. Currently, there are few reports concerning epigenetic modifications in IL-6 in OA SF. In the present study, we attempted to investigate this phenomenon. SF over-expressing IL-6 was collected from OA patients. DNA hypomethylation and histone hyperacetylation were observed in the IL-6 promoter regions in OA SF compared with normal SF. No differences in the status of H3K9 di-methylation, H3K27 tri-methylation and H3K4 tri-methylation were observed in the IL-6 promoter regions between normal and OA SF. DNA (cytosine-5-)-methyltransferase 3 alpha (Dnmt3a) overexpression and anacardic acid (histone acetyltransferase inhibitor) treatment increased DNA methylation and decreased histone acetylation in the IL-6 promoter, and IL-6 over-expression in OA SF was suppressed. These observations provide deeper insight into the pathogenesis of OA and can be used to design new drugs and develop new therapeutic methods to treat OA. PMID:28262826

  13. Serum and synovial fluid lipidomic profiles predict obesity-associated osteoarthritis, synovitis, and wound repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Chia-Lung; Kimmerling, Kelly A.; Little, Dianne; Guilak, Farshid

    2017-01-01

    High-fat diet-induced obesity is a major risk factor for osteoarthritis (OA) and diminished wound healing. The objective of this study was to determine the associations among serum and synovial fluid lipid levels with OA, synovitis, adipokine levels, and wound healing in a pre-clinical obese mouse model of OA. Male C57BL/6 J mice were fed either a low-fat (10% kcal) or one of three high-fat (HF, 60% kcal) diets rich in saturated fatty acids (SFAs), ω-6 or ω-3 polyunsaturated FAs (PUFAs). OA was induced by destabilization of the medial meniscus. Mice also received an ear punch for evaluating wound healing. Serum and synovial fluid were collected for lipidomic and adipokine analyses. We demonstrated that the serum levels of ω-3 PUFAs were negatively correlated with OA and wound size, but positively correlated with adiponectin levels. In contrast, most ω-6 PUFAs exhibited positive correlations with OA, impaired healing, and inflammatory adipokines. Interestingly, levels of pentadecylic acid (C15:0, an odd-chain SFA) and palmitoleic acid were inversely correlated with joint degradation. This study extends our understanding of the links of FAs with OA, synovitis and wound healing, and reports newly identified serum and synovial fluid FAs as predictive biomarkers of OA in obesity. PMID:28317846

  14. Pre-tibial synovial cyst after reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament: case report,

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luís Eduardo Pedigoni Bulisani

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Arthroscopic reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament has been modernized through new surgical techniques and new materials. When tibial fixation is performed using an absorbable screw, complications may occur, such as formation of a pre-tibial cyst. The case described here is about a patient who presented an anteromedial synovial cyst in his right knee, three years after having undergone ACL reconstruction. The patient did not present any pain nor any complaints other than a mass that progressively increased in size, worsened after physical activities. Imaging examinations were requested: simple radiography of the knee and magnetic resonance. Anteromedial imaging of the knee showed a mass with well-delimited borders and internal fluid content, suggestive of a synovial cyst, with communication with the joint cavity through the tibial tunnel, without presenting enlargement or absorption of the bone tunnel. The cyst was surgically resected and the tibial tunnel occlusion was performed using a bone plug. The diagnosis of a synovial cyst was subsequently confirmed through the results from the anatomopathological examination. The patient presented good clinical evolution, with disappearance of the symptoms and a return to physical activities.

  15. Sciatica as the first manifestation of synovial sarcoma. Contribution of magnetic resonance imaging to the diagnosis; Sciatique revelatrice d`un synovialosarcome. Interet de l`IRM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Veillard, E.; Le Dantec, P.; Chales, G.; Jean, S.; Pawlotsky, Y. [Centre Hospitalier Universitaire, 35 - Rennes (France)

    1995-07-01

    A 38-year-old man presented with paralyzing sciatica as the first manifestation of synovial sarcoma of his right leg. Although neurologic symptoms sometimes occur as manifestations of synovial sarcoma, they are exceptionally inaugural. Magnetic resonance imaging is a valuable tool in patients with synovial tumors, both for establishing the diagnosis and for evaluating the extent of the lesion. (authors). 13 refs., 3 figs.

  16. Foxp3⁺ Treg cells in the inflamed CNS are insensitive to IL-6-driven IL-17 production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Connor, Richard A; Floess, Stefan; Huehn, Jochen; Jones, Simon A; Anderton, Stephen M

    2012-05-01

    Foxp3(+) T regulatory (Treg) cells can be induced to produce interleukin (IL)-17 by in vitro exposure to proinflammatory cytokines, drawing into question their functional stability at sites of inflammation. Unlike their splenic counterparts, Treg cells from the inflamed central nervous system (CNS-Treg cells) during EAE resisted conversion to IL-17 production when exposed to IL-6. We show that the highly activated phenotype of CNS-Treg cells includes elevated expression of the Th1-associated molecules CXCR3 and T-bet, but reduced expression of the IL-6 receptor α chain (CD126) and the signaling chain gp130. We found a lack of IL-6 receptor on all CNS CD4(+) T cells, which was reflected by an absence of both classical and trans-IL-6 signaling in CNS CD4(+) cells, compared with their splenic counterparts. We propose that extinguished responsiveness to IL-6 (via down-regulation of CD126 and gp130) stabilizes the regulatory phenotype of activated Treg cells at sites of autoimmune inflammation.

  17. Targeted PET imaging strategy to differentiate malignant from inflamed lymph nodes in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Jun; Salloum, Darin; Carney, Brandon; Brand, Christian; Kossatz, Susanne; Sadique, Ahmad; Lewis, Jason S; Weber, Wolfgang A; Wendel, Hans-Guido; Reiner, Thomas

    2017-09-05

    Diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) is the most common lymphoma in adults. DLBCL exhibits highly aggressive and systemic progression into multiple tissues in patients, particularly in lymph nodes. Whole-body (18)F-fluodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography ([(18)F]FDG-PET) imaging has an essential role in diagnosing DLBCL in the clinic; however, [(18)F]FDG-PET often faces difficulty in differentiating malignant tissues from certain nonmalignant tissues with high glucose uptake. We have developed a PET imaging strategy for DLBCL that targets poly[ADP ribose] polymerase 1 (PARP1), the expression of which has been found to be much higher in DLBCL than in healthy tissues. In a syngeneic DLBCL mouse model, this PARP1-targeted PET imaging approach allowed us to discriminate between malignant and inflamed lymph nodes, whereas [(18)F]FDG-PET failed to do so. Our PARP1-targeted PET imaging approach may be an attractive addition to the current PET imaging strategy to differentiate inflammation from malignancy in DLBCL.

  18. THP-1 macrophages and SGBS adipocytes - a new human in vitro model system of inflamed adipose tissue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michaela eKeuper

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Obesity is associated with an accumulation of macrophages in adipose tissue. This inflammation of adipose tissue is a key event in the pathogenesis of several obesity-related disorders, particularly insulin resistance.Here, we summarized existing model systems that mimic the situation of inflamed adipose tissue in vitro, most of them being murine. Importantly, we introduce our newly established human model system which combines the THP-1 monocytic cell line and the preadipocyte cell strain SGBS. THP-1 cells, which originate from an acute monocytic leukemia, differentiate easily into macrophages in vitro. The human preadipocyte cell strain SGBS (Simpson-Golabi-Behmel syndrome was recently introduced as a unique to tool to study human fat cell functions. SGBS cells are characterized by a high capacity for adipogenic differentiation. SGBS adipocytes are capable of fat cell-specific metabolic functions such as insulin-stimulated glucose uptake, insulin-stimulated de novo lipogenesis and beta-adrenergic-stimulated lipolysis and they secrete typical adipokines including leptin, adiponectin, and RBP4. Applying either macrophage-conditioned medium or a direct co-culture of macrophages and fat cells, our model system can be used to distinguish between paracrine and cell-contact dependent effects.In conclusion, we propose this model as a useful tool to study adipose inflammation in vitro. It represents an inexpensive, highly reproducible human system. The methods described here can be easily extended for usage of primary human macrophages and fat cells.

  19. Spatial organization of bacterial flora in normal and inflamed intestine:A fluorescence in situ hybridization study in mice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Alexander Swidsinski; Vera Loening-Baucke; Herbert Lochs; Laura P. Hale

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To studythe role of intestinal flora in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD).METHODS: The spatial organization of intestinal flora was investigated in normal mice and in two models of murine colitis using fluorescence in situ hybridization.RESULTS: The murine small intestine was nearly bacteriafree. The normal colonic flora was organized in three distinct compartments (crypt, interlaced, and fecal), each with different bacterial compositions. Crypt bacteria were present in the cecum and proximal colon. The fecal compartment was composed of homogeneously mixed bacterial groups that directly contacted the colonic wall in the cecum but were separated from the proximal colonic wall by a dense interlaced layer. Beginning in the middle colon, a mucus gap of growing thickness physically separated all intestinal bacteria from contact with the epithelium. Colonic inflammation was accompanied with a depletion of bacteria within the fecal compartment, a reduced surface area in which feces had direct contact with the colonic wall, increased thickness and spread of the mucus gap, and massive increases of bacterial concentrations in the crypt and interlaced compartments. Adhesive and infiltrative bacteria were observed in inflamed colon only, with dominant Bacteroides species.CONCLUSION: The proximal and distal colons are functionally different organs with respect to the intestinal flora, representing a bioreactor and a Segregation device.The highly organized structure of the colonic flora, its specific arrangement in different colonic segments, and its specialized response to inflammatory stimuli indicate that the intestinal flora is an innate part of host immunity that is under complex control.

  20. Synovial Sarcoma Microvesicles Harbor the SYT-SSX Fusion Gene Transcript: Comparison of Different Methods of Detection and Implications in Biomarker Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fricke, A; Ullrich, P V; Cimniak, A F V; Follo, M; Nestel, S; Heimrich, B; Nazarenko, I; Stark, G B; Bannasch, H; Braig, D; Eisenhardt, S U

    2016-01-01

    Background. Synovial sarcoma is an aggressive soft-tissue malignancy. This study examines the presence of the SYT-SSX fusion transcript in synovial sarcoma microvesicles as well as its potential role as a biomarker for synovial sarcoma. Patients and Methods. Microvesicle release of synovial sarcoma cells was examined by transmission electron microscopy. RNA-content was analyzed by qPCR, nested PCR, nested qPCR, and droplet digital PCR to compare their sensitivity for detection of the SYT-SSX fusion gene transcript. Whole blood RNA, RNA of mononuclear cells, and microvesicle RNA of synovial sarcoma patients were analyzed for the presence of the fusion gene transcripts. Results. Electron microscopic analysis revealed synovial sarcoma cells releasing membrane-enclosed microvesicles. In vitro, the SYT-SSX fusion gene transcript was detected in both synovial sarcoma cells and microvesicles. Nested qPCR proved to be the most sensitive in detecting the SYT-SSX fusion gene mRNA. In contrast, the fusion gene transcript was not detected in peripheral blood cells and microvesicles of synovial sarcoma patients. Conclusion. Synovial sarcoma cells release microvesicles harboring the SYT-SSX fusion transcript. Nested qPCR proved to be the most sensitive in detecting the SYT-SSX fusion gene mRNA; however, more sensitive assays are needed to detect cancer-specific microvesicles in the peripheral blood of cancer patients.

  1. Improved outcomes with direct percutaneous CT guided lumbar synovial cyst treatment: advanced approaches and techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortiz, A Orlando; Tekchandani, Leena

    2014-12-01

    To determine if lumbar synovial cyst rupture in symptomatic patients results in improved clinical outcome when using direct tandem and/or coaxial percutaneous CT guided techniques. 20 patients with unilateral lower extremity radiculopathy and/or low back pain underwent CT guided percutaneous treatment for their symptomatic lumbar synovial cysts. Cysts were identified with the use of a low osmolar non-ionic contrast agent via facet joint injection or through direct injection. Cyst rupture, using a direct tandem and/or coaxial technique, was attempted in all patients using an 18 gauge guide needle and a 22 gauge insert needle. Following attempted cyst aspiration, cyst rupture was performed using 1-3 mL of a mixture of methylprednisolone (2 mL, 80 mg) and bupivacaine (3 mL, 0.5%). All patients were followed-up in clinic for a minimum of 6 months after their procedures and up to a maximum of 24 months. 11 patients were male and nine were female, with an average age of 65.6 years. 17 patients presented with severe unilateral lower extremity radiculopathy and three patients were experiencing low back pain. One of the patients had two synovial cysts, and therefore a total of 21 lumbar synovial cysts were treated in this group of patients. Direct cyst puncture was achieved using a tandem technique in nine patients, a coaxial interlaminar approach in seven patients, a coaxial transforaminal approach in two patients, and a coaxial trans-facet approach in three patients. Cyst rupture was documented in all cases, as evidenced by CT confirmation of cyst decompression and contrast agent extravasation into the epidural space. The mean surveillance period in these patients was 18 months. Six patients experienced their usual radicular pain within 2 months of their treatment. Four of these patients were re-treated for recurrent smaller cysts. These patients have not had a recurrence at 24 months of follow up. Two of these six patients elected to undergo open

  2. MRI features of three paediatric intra-articular synovial lesions: a comparative study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kan, J.H. [Monroe Carell Jr. Children' s Hospital at Vanderbilt, Nashville, TN (United States)], E-mail: herman.kan@vanderbilt.edu; Hernanz-Schulman, M. [Monroe Carell Jr. Children' s Hospital at Vanderbilt, Nashville, TN (United States); Damon, B.M.; Yu, Chang [Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN (United States); Connolly, S.A. [Boston Children' s Hospital, Boston, IL (United States)

    2008-07-15

    Aim: To determine reliable magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) features differentiating three paediatric intra-articular congenital or neoplastic synovial lesions that contain blood products, from post-traumatic or haemorrhagic inflammatory processes. Materials and methods: This was a retrospective review of MRI findings of 22 paediatric intra-articular congenital or neoplastic synovial lesions, including venous malformation (VM) (n = 12), pigmented villonodular synovitis (PVNS; n = 8), and synovial sarcoma (SS; n = 2). These MRI features were compared with 22 paediatric post-traumatic or inflammatory intra-articular processes containing blood products and producing mass effect. The following imaging features were assessed: presence of a discrete mass, extension, extra-articular oedema, susceptibility, joint effusion, and size. Fisher's exact test was used and results were considered statistically significant when p < 0.05. Results: The three intra-articular synovial lesions, compared with controls, were more likely to directly invade osseous structures when a discrete mass was present (13/16, 81.3% versus 1/9, 11.1%; p < 0.002) and extend into extra-articular soft tissues (13/21, 61.9% versus 2/17, 11.8%; p < 0.003), but were less likely to show extra-articular oedema (3/22, 13.6% versus 13/22, 59.1%; p < 0.004), a joint effusion (10/22,45.5% versus 19/22, 86.4%, p < 0.01), susceptibility within a joint effusion (0/22, 0% versus 11/22, 40.9%; p = 0.00), osseous oedema (3/16, 18.8% versus 7/9, 77.8%; p < 0.009), and synovial enhancement (8/21, 38.1% versus 14/16, 87.5%; p < 0.003). VMs had characteristic tubular vessels with internal fluid-fluid levels (11/12) that extended into bone (10/12) and extracapsular soft tissues (11/12). Conclusion: Our study indicates that, despite the overlapping presence of haemorrhagic products, intra-articular VM, PVNS, and SS show MRI features that permit distinction from acquired post-traumatic and haemorrhagic inflammatory

  3. An incidentally found inflamed uterine myoma Causing low abdominal pain, using TC-99m-tektrotyd single photon emission computed tomography-CT hybrid imaging

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    Zandieh, Shahin; Schuetz, Matthias; Bernt, Reinhard; Zwerina, Jochen; Haller, Joerg [Hanusch-Hospital, Teaching Hospital of Medical University of Vienna, Vienna (Australia)

    2013-10-15

    We report the case of a 50-year-old woman presented with a history of right hemicolectomy due to an ileocecal neuroendocrine tumor and left breast metastasis. Owing to a slightly elevated chromogranin A-level and lower abdominal pain, single photon emission computed tomography-computer tomography (SPECT-CT) was performed. There were no signs of recurrence on the SPECT-CT scan, but the patient was incidentally found to have an inflamed intramural myoma. We believe that the slightly elevated chromogranin A-level was caused by the hypertension that the patient presented. In the clinical context, this is a report of an inflamed uterine myoma seen as a false positive result detected by TC-99m-Tc-EDDA/HYNIC-Tyr3-Octreotide (Tektrotyd) SPECT-CT hybrid imaging.

  4. Anti-inflammatory properties of fruit juices enriched with pine bark extract in an in vitro model of inflamed human intestinal epithelium: the effect of gastrointestinal digestion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frontela-Saseta, Carmen; López-Nicolás, Rubén; González-Bermúdez, Carlos A; Martínez-Graciá, Carmen; Ros-Berruezo, Gaspar

    2013-03-01

    Enrichment of fruit juices with pine bark extract (PBE) could be a strategy to compensate for phenolic losses during the gastrointestinal digestion. A coculture system with Caco-2 cells and RAW 264.7 macrophages was established as an in vitro model of inflamed human intestinal epithelium for evaluating the anti-inflammatory capacity of fruit juices enriched with PBE (0.5 g L(-1)) before and after in vitro digestion. The digestion of both PBE-enriched pineapple and red fruit juice led to significant changes in most of the analysed phenolic compounds. The in vitro inflammatory state showed cell barrier dysfunction and overproduction of IL-8, nitric oxide (NO) and reactive oxygen species (ROS). In the inflamed cells, incubation with nondigested samples reduced (Pproperties of PBE-enriched fruit juices decreased after digestion; further research on the bioavailability of the assayed compounds is needed to properly assess their usefulness for the treatment of gut inflammation.

  5. Chikungunya virus exploits miR-146a to regulate NF-κB pathway in human synovial fibroblasts.

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    Sakthi Priya Selvamani

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: Chikungunya virus causes chronic infection with manifestations of joint pain. Human synovial fibroblasts get infected with CHIKV and could lead to pro-inflammatory responses. MicroRNAs have potentials to regulate the gene expression of various anti-viral and pro-inflammatory genes. The study aims to investigate the role of miR-146a in modulation of inflammatory responses of human synovial fibroblasts by Chikungunya virus. METHODS: To study the role of miR-146a in CHIKV pathogenesis in human synovial cells and underlying inflammatory manifestations, we performed CHIKV infection in primary human synovial fibroblasts. Western blotting, real-time PCR, luciferase reporter assay, overexpression and knockdown of cellular miR-146a strategies have been employed to validate the role of miR-146a in regulation of pro-inflammatory NF-κB pathway. RESULTS: CHIKV infection induced the expression of cellular miR-146a, which resulted into down-regulation of TRAF6, IRAK1, IRAK2 and increased replication of CHIKV in human synovial fibroblasts. Exogenous expression of miR-146a in human synovial fibroblasts led to decreased expression of TRAF6, IRAK1, IRAK2 and decreased replication of CHIKV. Inhibition of cellular miR-146a by anti-miR-146a restored the expression levels of TRAF6, IRAK1 and IRAK2. Downregulation of TRAF6, IRAK1 and IRAK2 led to downstream decreased NF-κB activation through negative feedback loop. CONCLUSION: This study demonstrated the mechanism of exploitation of cellular miR-146a by CHIKV in modulating the host antiviral immune response in primary human synovial fibroblasts.

  6. Selection of housekeeping genes for gene expression studies in the adult rat submandibular gland under normal, inflamed, atrophic and regenerative states

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    Osailan Samira

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Real-time PCR is a reliable tool with which to measure mRNA transcripts, and provides valuable information on gene expression profiles. Endogenous controls such as housekeeping genes are used to normalise mRNA levels between samples for sensitive comparisons of mRNA transcription. Selection of the most stable control gene(s is therefore critical for the reliable interpretation of gene expression data. For the purpose of this study, 7 commonly used housekeeping genes were investigated in salivary submandibular glands under normal, inflamed, atrophic and regenerative states. Results The program NormFinder identified the suitability of HPRT to use as a single gene for normalisation within the normal, inflamed and regenerative states, and GAPDH in the atrophic state. For normalisation to multiple housekeeping genes, for each individual state, the optimal number of housekeeping genes as given by geNorm was: ACTB/UBC in the normal, ACTB/YWHAZ in the inflamed, ACTB/HPRT in the atrophic and ACTB/GAPDH in the regenerative state. The most stable housekeeping gene identified between states (compared to normal was UBC. However, ACTB, identified as one of the most stably expressed genes within states, was found to be one of the most variable between states. Furthermore we demonstrated that normalising between states to ACTB, rather than UBC, introduced an approximately 3 fold magnitude of error. Conclusion Using NormFinder, our studies demonstrated the suitability of HPRT to use as a single gene for normalisation within the normal, inflamed and regenerative groups and GAPDH in the atrophic group. However, if normalising to multiple housekeeping genes, we recommend normalising to those identified by geNorm. For normalisation across the physiological states, we recommend the use of UBC.

  7. Comparison and Efficacy of LigaSure and Rubber Band Ligature in Closing the Inflamed Cecal Stump in a Rat Model of Acute Appendicitis

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    Chun-Chieh Yeh

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Safety of either LigaSure or rubber band in closing inflamed appendiceal stump in acute appendicitis has been less investigated. In this study, cecal ligation followed by resecting inflamed cecum was performed to mimic appendectomy in a rat model of acute appendicitis. Rats were sacrificed immediately (Group A and 7 days (Group B after cecal resection, respectively. The cecal stumps were closed by silk ligature (S, 5 mm LigaSure (L, or rubber band (R. Seven days after cecal resection, the LigaSure (BL and silk subgroups (BS had significantly less intra-abdominal adhesion and better laparotomy wound healing than rubber band subgroup (BR. The initial bursting pressure at cecal stump was comparable among the three methods; along with tissue healing process, both BL and BS provided a higher bursting pressure than BR 7 days after appendectomy. BL subgroup had more abundant hydroxyproline deposition than BS and BR subgroup. Furthermore, serum TNF-α in BR group kept persistently increasing along with time after cecal resection. Thus, the finding that LigaSure but not rubber band is safe in sealing off the inflamed cecal stump in rat model of acute appendicitis suggests the possibility of applying LigaSure for appendectomy via single port procedure or natural orifice transluminal endoscopic surgery (NOTES.

  8. Connexin43 Mediated Delivery of ADAMTS5 Targeting siRNAs from Mesenchymal Stem Cells to Synovial Fibroblasts.

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    Shuo Liu

    Full Text Available Osteoarthritis is a joint-destructive disease that has no effective cure. Human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs could offer therapeutic benefit in the treatment of arthritic diseases by suppressing inflammation and permitting tissue regeneration, but first these cells must overcome the catabolic environment of the diseased joint. Likewise, gene therapy also offers therapeutic promise given its ability to directly modulate key catabolic factors that mediate joint deterioration, although it too has limitations. In the current study, we explore an approach that combines hMSCs and gene therapy. Specifically, we test the use of hMSC as a vehicle to deliver ADAMTS5 (an aggrecanase with a key role in osteoarthritis-targeting siRNAs to SW982 synovial fibroblast-like cells via connexin43 containing gap junctions. Accordingly, we transduced hMSCs with ADAMTS5-targeting shRNA or non-targeted shRNA, and co-cultured them with synovial fibroblasts to allow delivery of siRNAs from hMSC to synovial fibroblasts. We found that co-culture of hMSCs-shRNA-ADAMTS5 and synovial fibroblasts reduced ADAMTS5 expression relative to co-culture of hMSCs-shRNA-control and synovial fibroblasts. Furthermore, ADAMTS5 was specifically reduced in the synovial fibroblasts populations as determined by fluorescence-activated cell sorting, suggesting transfer of the siRNA between cells. To test if Cx43-containing gap junctions are involved in the transfer of siRNA, we co-cultured hMSCs-shRNA-ADAMTS5 cells with synovial fibroblasts in which connexin43 was knocked down. Under these conditions, ADAMTS5 levels were not inhibited by co-culture, indicating that connexin43 mediates the delivery of siRNA from hMSCs to synovial fibroblasts. In total, our findings demonstrate that hMSCs can function as donor cells to host and deliver siRNAs to synovial fibroblasts via connexin43 gap junction in vitro. These data may have implications in the combination of hMSCs and gene therapy to treat diseases

  9. The amount of citrullinated proteins in synovial tissue is related to serum anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide (anti-CCP) antibody levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olivares-Martínez, Elizabeth; Hernández-Ramírez, Diego F; Núñez-Álvarez, Carlos A; Cabral, Antonio R; Llorente, Luis

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the relationship between citrullinated proteins in synovial tissue with peripheral anti-citrullinated peptides autoantibodies (ACPA) and peptidylarginine deiminase (PADI) PADI2, PADI3, and PADI4 messenger RNA (mRNA) expressions in synovial tissue and fibroblast-like synoviocytes in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients. Eleven RA and 12 osteoarthritis (OA) patients who underwent knee replacement surgery were studied. We detected citrullinated proteins in synovial tissue homogenates by western blot and serum ACPA by ELISA to anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide (anti-CCP) antibodies, and PADI2, PADI3, and PADI4 mRNA expressions in synovial tissue and in fibroblast-like synoviocytes. Patients with high amount of citrullinated proteins in synovial tissue (3 out of 7) have high levels of anti-CCP in serum. However, in the remaining 4 patients, the amount of synovial citrullinated proteins was minimal and their sera showed low levels of anti-CCP antibodies. Furthermore, we observed an increase in PADI2 mRNA expression in RA synovial tissue compared with OA patients (p = 0.02). We detected PADI3 mRNA in the synovial tissue of RA patients, but not in the tissue of OA patients. Even though fibroblast-type synoviocytes in RA are not the main source of PADs in the synovial tissue, they express PADI2 mRNA moderately, PADI4 mRNA weakly, while there is no detectable expression of PADI3 mRNA. In conclusion, we found a variety of citrullinated proteins in the synovial tissue of RA patients and the amount of such proteins is related to serum concentration of anti-CCP antibodies. We identified the presence of PADI3 mRNA expression in synovial tissue and PADI2 and PADI4 mRNA expressions in fibroblast-like synoviocytes from patients with RA.

  10. Synovial fluid and plasma selenium, copper, zinc, and iron concentrations in patients with rheumatoid arthritis and osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yazar, M; Sarban, S; Kocyigit, A; Isikan, U E

    2005-08-01

    In recent years, a great number of studies have investigated the possible role of trace elements in the etiology and pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and osteoartritis (OA). We studied synovial fluid and plasma concentrations of selenium (Se), zinc (Zn), copper (Cu), and iron (Fe) in patients with RA and OA and compared them with sex- and age-matched healthy subjects. Plasma albumin levels were measured as an index of nutritional status. Plasma Se, Cu, and Zn concentrations were determined by atomic absorption spectrophotometry and Fe concentrations were determined by the colorimetric method. Although plasma and synovial fluid Se concentration were found to be significantly lower (p 0.05). On the other hand, synovial fluid Cu and Fe concentrations were significantly higher in patients with OA than those of healthy subjects (p < 0.05). There was a significantly positive correlation between synovial fluid Se-Cu values and Zn-Fe values in patients with RA. Our results showed that synovial fluid and plasma trace element concentrations, excluding Zn, change in inflammatory RA, but not in OA. These alterations in trace element concentrations in inflammatory RA might be a result of the changes of the immunoregulatory cytokines.

  11. Immediate Reduction of a Retro-odontoid Synovial Cyst Following Lateral Atlantoaxial Joint Puncture and Arthrography: A Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikegami, Daisuke; Matsuoka, Takashi; Aoki, Yasuaki

    2015-05-15

    Case report. We report on a case with a retro-odontoid synovial cyst, and the immediate reduction of the cyst was confirmed after lateral atlantoaxial joint puncture and arthrography. Retro-odontoid synovial cysts are rare diseases located posteriorly to a dense axis. Because most reports have focused on surgical treatment, only a few have examined nonsurgical treatment. However, several months are required after nonsurgical treatment until cyst regression. A 52-year-old female presented with atlantoaxial instability. She complained of neck pain and numbness in her hands. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed a retro-odontoid synovial cyst. Lateral atlantoaxial joint puncture and arthrography were performed. Two days after treatment, the patient showed significant improvement in the numbness of her hands, and a follow-up magnetic resonance imaging revealed an immediate reduction in the cyst. During a 4.5-year follow-up period, no recurrence of the clinical symptoms occurred. Lateral atlantoaxial joint puncture may immediately reduce retro-odontoid synovial cysts, and the lateral atlantoaxial joint has a communication channel with the retro-odontoid synovial cyst via the atlantodental joint. Once disappearance of the cyst is confirmed, an acceptable long-term outcome can be achieved with nonsurgical treatment even in cases with atlantoaxial instability. N/A.

  12. Do blood components affect the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS by equine synovial cells in vitro?

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    Patrícia M. Brossi

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Blood-derived products are commonly administered to horses and humans to treat many musculoskeletal diseases, due to their potential antioxidant and anti-inflammatory effects. Nevertheless, antioxidant effects have never been shown upon horse synovial fluid cells in vitro. If proved, this could give a new perspective to justify the clinical application of blood-derived products. The aim of the present study was to investigate the antioxidant effects of two blood-derived products - plasma (unconditioned blood product - UBP and a commercial blood preparation (conditioned blood product - CBP¹ - upon stimulated equine synovial fluid cells. Healthy tarsocrural joints (60 were tapped to obtain synovial fluid cells; these cells were pooled, processed, stimulated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS or phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA, and evaluated by flow cytometry for the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS. Upon addition of any blood-derived product here used - UBP and CBP - there was a significant decrease in the oxidative burst of synovial fluid cells (P<0.05. There was no difference between UBP and CBP effects. In conclusion, treatment of stimulated equine synovial cells with either UBP or CBP efficiently restored their redox equilibrium.

  13. Epigallocatechin-3-gallate suppresses TNF-alpha -induced production of MMP-1 and -3 in rheumatoid arthritis synovial fibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yun, Hee-Jin; Yoo, Wan-Hee; Han, Myung-Kwan; Lee, Young-Rae; Kim, Jong-Suk; Lee, Sang-Il

    2008-11-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) synovial fibroblasts produce matrix metaloproteinases (MMPs), which destroy cartilage and bone in RA joint. Tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) is one of the most important mediator leading to MMP production in RA synovial fibroblasts. Here we show that epigallocatechin-3-Gallate (EGCG) suppresses TNF-alpha-induced production of MMP-1 and MMP-3 in RA synovial fibroblasts, which was accompanied by inhibition of mitogen activated protein kinase (MAPK) and activator protein-1 (AP-1) pathways. EGCG treatment resulted in dose-dependent inhibition of TNF-alpha-induced production of MMP-1 and MMP-3 at the protein and mRNA levels in RA synovial fibroblast. EGCG treatment also inhibited TNF-alpha-induced phosphorylation of MAPKs, such as ERK1/2, p38, JNK. Electrophoretic mobility shift assay revealed that EGCG inhibits binding of AP-1 proteins to its response elements in synovial fibroblast treated. Thus, EGCG may play a role in regulating inflammation and bone destruction in RA patients.

  14. Snapping elbow caused by hypertrophic synovial plica in the radiohumeral joint: a report of three cases and review of literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinert, Andre F; Goebel, Sascha; Rucker, Alexander; Barthel, Thomas

    2010-03-01

    The snapping elbow caused by hypertrophic synovial radiohumeral plica is a rare form of lateral elbow impingement. In this article we report on hypertrophic radiohumeral synovial folds in three male patients, aged 54, 65 and 27 years. All three patients suffered isolated lateral elbow pain, painful snapping and unsuccessful conservative treatment over at least 5 months (range 5-9 months, mean 7.7 months) prior to surgical treatment. None of the patients had lateral epicondylitis, instability, osteochondrosis dissecans, loose bodies, arthritis or neurological disorders. Upon clinical examination the range of motion in the respective painful elbows was found to be normal in all three cases, but a painful snapping occurred between 80 degrees and 100 degrees of flexion with the forearm in pronation. While there were no pathologic findings in standard radiographs, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed hypertrophic synovial plicae in the radiohumeral joints associated with effusion in each of the diseased elbows. Arthroscopic examinations confirmed the presence of a hypertrophic synovial plica in all three radiocapitellar joints, and revealed a transient interposition and compression of the folds in the articulation from extension until 90 degrees -100 degrees elbow flexion, with replacement beyond 90 degrees elbow flexion with a visible jump. Surgical management in all three cases comprised arthroscopic diagnosis confirmation and removal of the synovial plicae, leading to excellent outcomes at 6-12 months follow-up.

  15. On Modeling the Response of Synovial Fluid: Unsteady Flow of a Shear-Thinning, Chemically-Reacting Fluid Mixture

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    Bridges, Craig; Rajagopal, K R

    2010-01-01

    We study the flow of a shear-thinning, chemically-reacting fluid that could be used to model the flow of the synovial fluid. The actual geometry where the flow of the synovial fluid takes place is very complicated, and therefore the governing equations are not amenable to simple mathematical analysis. In order to understand the response of the model, we choose to study the flow in a simple geometry. While the flow domain is not a geometry relevant to the flow of the synovial fluid in the human body it yet provides a flow which can be used to assess the efficacy of different models that have been proposed to describe synovial fluids. We study the flow in the annular region between two cylinders, one of which is undergoing unsteady oscillations about their common axis, in order to understand the quintessential behavioral characteristics of the synovial fluid. We use the three models suggested by Hron et al. [ J. Hron, J. M\\'{a}lek, P. Pust\\v{e}jovsk\\'{a}, K. R. Rajagopal, On concentration dependent shear-thinni...

  16. The Impact of Synovial NF-κB Activation on Apoptosis Pattern Change During Adjuvant-induced Inflammation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golabi, Sahar; Zaringhalam, Jalal; Manaheji, Homa

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: Apoptosis dysregulation plays a substantial role in the pathophysiology of chronic inflammation and its related symptoms such as edema. Regulation of NF-κB activation is involved in apoptosis pattern change. The current study aimed at verifying the effects of local inflammation on edema and changes in apoptotic markers, and investigating the possible role of NF-κB in apoptosis pattern change during different stages of complete Freund’s adjuvant (CFA)-induced knee arthritis in rats. Methods: A total of 96 male Wistar rats were divided into different experimental groups. Arthritis was evoked into the right knee articular joint. Changes made in knee edema were assessed by caliper on the days 0, 7, 14, and 21 of the study. Synovial NF-κB and levels of apoptotic markers were evaluated during different stages of the study using Western blot technique. Results: CFA injection caused intense edema during the whole study period. Synovial NF-κB level increased during the whole study period. The level of apoptotic markers increased during the acute phase of study. But during chronic phase, the apoptosis level decreased. Inh-NF-κB administration increased synovial apoptosis during the whole study period. Conclusion: It seems that apoptosis pattern change plays an important role in the progression and modulation of CFA-induced inflammation and its related symptoms. Also, it can be concluded that synovial NF-κB had a crucial role in synovial apoptosis change during the study period. PMID:28781725

  17. ToF-SIMS and principal component analysis of lipids and amino acids from inflamed and dysplastic human colonic mucosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urbini, Marco; Petito, Valentina; de Notaristefani, Francesco; Scaldaferri, Franco; Gasbarrini, Antonio; Tortora, Luca

    2017-08-03

    Here, time of flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS) and multivariate analysis were combined to study the role of ulcerative colitis (UC), a type of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), in the colon cancer progression. ToF-SIMS was used to obtain mass spectra and chemical maps from the mucosal surface of human normal (NC), inflamed (IC), and dysplastic (DC) colon tissues. Chemical mapping with a lateral resolution of ≈ 1 μm allowed to evaluate zonation of fatty acids and amino acids as well as the morphological condition of the intestinal glands. High mass resolution ToF-SIMS spectra showed chemical differences in lipid and amino acid composition as a function of pathological state. In positive ion mode, mono- (MAG), di- (DAG), and triacylglycerol (TAG) signals were detected in NC tissues, while in IC and DC tissues, the only cholesterol was present as lipid class representative. Signals from fatty acids, collected in negative ion mode, were subjected to principal component analysis (PCA). PCA showed a strict correlation between IC and DC samples, due to an increase of stearic, arachidonic, and linoleic acid. In the same way, differences in the amino acid composition were highlighted through multivariate analysis. PCA revealed that glutamic acid, leucine/isoleucine, and valine fragments are related to IC tissues. On the other hand, tyrosine, methionine, and tryptophan peaks contributed highly to the separation of DC tissues. Finally, a classification of NC, IC, and DC patients was also achieved through hierarchical cluster analysis of amino acid fragments. In this case, human colonic inflammation showed a stronger relationship with normal than dysplastic condition. Graphical Abstract ᅟ.

  18. Influence of fuel injection timing and pressure on in-flame soot particles in an automotive-size diesel engine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Renlin; Kook, Sanghoon

    2014-07-15

    The current understanding of soot particle morphology in diesel engines and their dependency on the fuel injection timing and pressure is limited to those sampled from the exhaust. In this study, a thermophoretic sampling and subsequent transmission electron microscope imaging were applied to the in-flame soot particles inside the cylinder of a working diesel engine for various fuel injection timings and pressures. The results show that the number count of soot particles per image decreases by more than 80% when the injection timing is retarded from -12 to -2 crank angle degrees after the top dead center. The late injection also results in over 90% reduction of the projection area of soot particles on the TEM image and the size of soot aggregates also become smaller. The primary particle size, however, is found to be insensitive to the variations in fuel injection timing. For injection pressure variations, both the size of primary particles and soot aggregates are found to decrease with increasing injection pressure, demonstrating the benefits of high injection velocity and momentum. Detailed analysis shows that the number count of soot particles per image increases with increasing injection pressure up to 130 MPa, primarily due to the increased small particle aggregates that are less than 40 nm in the radius of gyration. The fractal dimension shows an overall decrease with the increasing injection pressure. However, there is a case that the fractal dimension shows an unexpected increase between 100 and 130 MPa injection pressure. It is because the small aggregates with more compact and agglomerated structures outnumber the large aggregates with more stretched chain-like structures.

  19. Novel urease-negative Helicobacter sp. 'H. enhydrae sp. nov.' isolated from inflamed gastric tissue of southern sea otters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Zeli; Batac, Francesca; Mannion, Anthony; Miller, Melissa A; Bakthavatchalu, Vasudevan; Ho, Calvin; Manning, Sean; Paster, Bruce J; Fox, James G

    2017-02-08

    A total of 31 sea otters Enhydra lutris nereis found dead or moribund (and then euthanized) were necropsied in California, USA. Stomach biopsies were collected and transected with equal portions frozen or placed in formalin and analyzed histologically and screened for Helicobacter spp. in gastric tissue. Helicobacter spp. were isolated from 9 sea otters (29%); 58% (18 of 31) animals were positive for helicobacter by PCR. The Helicobacter sp. was catalase- and oxidase-positive and urease-negative. By electron microscopy, the Helicobacter sp. had lateral and polar sheathed flagella and had a slightly curved rod morphology. 16S and 23S rRNA sequence analyses of all 'H. enhydrae' isolates had similar sequences, which clustered as a novel Helicobacter sp. closely related to H. mustelae (96-97%). The genome sequence of isolate MIT 01-6242 was assembled into a single ~1.6 Mb long contig with a 40.8% G+C content. The annotated genome contained 1699 protein-coding sequences and 43 RNAs, including 65 genes homologous to known Helicobacter spp. and Campylobacter spp. virulence factors. Histological changes in the gastric tissues extended from mild cystic degeneration of gastric glands to severe mucosal erosions and ulcers. Silver stains of infected tissues demonstrated slightly curved bacterial rods at the periphery of the gastric ulcers and on the epithelial surface of glands. The underlying mucosa and submucosa were infiltrated by low numbers of neutrophils, macrophages, and lymphocytes, with occasional lymphoid aggregates and well-defined lymphoid follicles. This is the second novel Helicobacter sp., which we have named 'H. enhydrae', isolated from inflamed stomachs of mustelids, the first being H. mustelae from a ferret.

  20. A Protocol for the Comprehensive Flow Cytometric Analysis of Immune Cells in Normal and Inflamed Murine Non-Lymphoid Tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Yen-Rei A; O'Koren, Emily G; Hotten, Danielle F; Kan, Matthew J; Kopin, David; Nelson, Erik R; Que, Loretta; Gunn, Michael D

    2016-01-01

    Flow cytometry is used extensively to examine immune cells in non-lymphoid tissues. However, a method of flow cytometric analysis that is both comprehensive and widely applicable has not been described. We developed a protocol for the flow cytometric analysis of non-lymphoid tissues, including methods of tissue preparation, a 10-fluorochrome panel for cell staining, and a standardized gating strategy, that allows the simultaneous identification and quantification of all major immune cell types in a variety of normal and inflamed non-lymphoid tissues. We demonstrate that our basic protocol minimizes cell loss, reliably distinguishes macrophages from dendritic cells (DC), and identifies all major granulocytic and mononuclear phagocytic cell types. This protocol is able to accurately quantify 11 distinct immune cell types, including T cells, B cells, NK cells, neutrophils, eosinophils, inflammatory monocytes, resident monocytes, alveolar macrophages, resident/interstitial macrophages, CD11b- DC, and CD11b+ DC, in normal lung, heart, liver, kidney, intestine, skin, eyes, and mammary gland. We also characterized the expression patterns of several commonly used myeloid and macrophage markers. This basic protocol can be expanded to identify additional cell types such as mast cells, basophils, and plasmacytoid DC, or perform detailed phenotyping of specific cell types. In examining models of primary and metastatic mammary tumors, this protocol allowed the identification of several distinct tumor associated macrophage phenotypes, the appearance of which was highly specific to individual tumor cell lines. This protocol provides a valuable tool to examine immune cell repertoires and follow immune responses in a wide variety of tissues and experimental conditions.

  1. Identification of a dendritic cell population in normal testis and in chronically inflamed testis of rats with autoimmune orchitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rival, Claudia; Lustig, Livia; Iosub, Radu; Guazzone, Vanesa A; Schneider, Eva; Meinhardt, Andreas; Fijak, Monika

    2006-05-01

    Experimental autoimmune orchitis (EAO) in the rat is the primary chronic animal model for the investigation of one of the main causes of male infertility, viz., testicular inflammation. Dendritic cells (DC) are potent antigen-presenting cells that play a fundamental role in autoimmune disease. We investigated the number of DC in normal testis and examined whether DC infiltrated the testis during the development of EAO. EAO was induced by active immunization with testis homogenate and adjuvants in two strains of rat (Wistar and Sprague Dawley). The presence of DC in testis was determined, 50 and 80 days after the first immunization, by immunohistochemical staining with specific antibodies (OX-62 and CD11c), and then the total number of DC was measured by stereological analysis. Labeled cells were found only in the interstitial compartment and within granulomas of EAO animals. The number of DC in EAO testes increased compared with control rats in both strains, whereas the number of OX-62+ and CD11c+ cells in adjuvant controls remained unchanged compared with untreated rats. Interspecies variations in the quantity of DC were found, with the total number of DC per testis in untreated and adjuvant control Sprague-Dawley rats being about three times higher than that seen in Wistar rats. Moreover, the increase in DC numbers at 80 days was less prominent in EAO testes of Sprague-Dawley rats than in the Wistar strain in which EAO was more severe and showed a higher number of granulomae. Thus, we have identified the DC population in normal and chronically inflamed testis. The increase in DC observed in EAO suggests that, under inflammatory conditions, the modified action(s) of these cells is a factor in the induction of the autoimmune response in testis.

  2. The effect of watermelon frost on prostaglandin E2 (PGE2 in inflamed pulp tissue (in vitro study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dennis Dennis

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Pulp inflammation can be marked by the increase of prostaglandin E2(PGE2 level compared to normal pulp. The increase of PGE2 may lead to vasodilatation, increase of vascular permeability, pain and bone resorption. Watermelon frost has been well known in Chinese society for pain relief and inflammation in oral cavity and teeth. Purpose: The aim of this study was to investigate that watermelon frost can be used to decrease the PGE2 level. Method: 27 samples of pulp tissues used in this in-vitro study, were extirpated from the patients’ teeth with symptomatic irreversible pulpitis referred to clinic of Conservative Dentistry, RSPGM Faculty of Dentistry, USU. Trial materials were applied to 27 samples i.e. watermelon frost as a trial material and commercial watermelon frost and eugenol to observe their effect on PGE2. PGE2 level of each material was detected through ELISA method by measuring and comparing the absorbance reading of the wells of the samples against standards with a micro plate reader at W1 = 650 nm and W2 = 490 nm. Result: The result showed the biggest effect was found in the third group (eugenol, mean 4.6933, followed by the first group (watermelon frost as a trial material, mean 18,1578 then the second group (commercial watermelon frost, mean 82,2689. OneWay ANOVA revealed that there were significant differences among all trial materials (p < 0.001 on PGE2 level. Conclusion: This study demonstrated that watermelon frost can be used to decrease the PGE2 level in inflamed pulp tissue and led to the acceptance of traditional medicine and natural products as an alternative form of dental care.

  3. The relative composition of the inflammatory infiltrate as an additional tool for synovial tissue classification.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina Della Beffa

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: Traditionally, differences in absolute numbers of cells expressing a certain marker (e.g., positive staining cells per mm² have been used in immunohistological synovial tissue classification. We have begun to evaluate the relative composition of the inflammatory infiltrates, i.e. percentages of inflammatory cell types in inflammatory infiltrates, as an alternate classification tool that may potentially improve tissue diagnostics, subgrouping in clinical trials, and understanding of pathogenesis of inflammatory and noninflammatory arthropathies. METHODS: Synovial tissue specimens (normal synovium, n=15; orthopedic arthropathies, n=6; osteoarthritis, n=26; early undifferentiated arthritis, n=10; rheumatoid arthritis, n=26; chronic septic arthritis, n=11 were stained for CD15, CD68, CD3, CD20, and CD38. Densities of cells expressing a given marker were determined in the superficial subintima. Binary and multicategory receiver operating characteristic (ROC analysis and naïve Bayes classifier were used to compare the abilities of (1 the absolute densities of cells expressing a given marker (absolute method with (2 the percentages of these cells in the inflammatory cell population (relative method to differentiate among the six tissue classes. RESULTS: The inflammatory infiltrates in normal synovium and the orthopedic arthropathies consisted almost exclusively of CD68+ and CD3+ cells. Notable fractions of CD20+ and CD38+ cells appeared in a subset of osteoarthritis samples, and increased further in early, rheumatoid and chronic septic arthritis. ROC analyses and naïve Bayes classifier ranked the absolute method above the relative method in terms of overall discriminatory ability. The relative method became slightly superior when the samples were also stratified according to the total number of inflammatory cells/mm². CONCLUSIONS: This exploratory investigation featuring a variety of joint disorders revealed that measuring the relative

  4. Phase I vaccination trial of SYT-SSX junction peptide in patients with disseminated synovial sarcoma

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    Asanuma Hiroko

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Synovial sarcoma is a high-grade malignant tumor of soft tissue, characterized by the specific chromosomal translocation t(X;18, and its resultant SYT-SSX fusion gene. Despite intensive multimodality therapy, the majority of metastatic or relapsed diseases still remain incurable, thus suggesting a need for new therapeutic options. We previously demonstrated the antigenicity of SYT-SSX gene-derived peptides by in vitro analyses. The present study was designed to evaluate in vivo immunological property of a SYT-SSX junction peptide in selected patients with synovial sarcoma. Methods A 9-mer peptide (SYT-SSX B: GYDQIMPKK spanning the SYT-SSX fusion region was synthesized. Eligible patients were those (i who have histologically and genetically confirmed, unresectable synovial sarcoma (SYT-SSX1 or SYT-SSX2 positive, (ii HLA-A*2402 positive, (iii between 20 and 70 years old, (iv ECOG performance status between 0 and 3, and (v who gave informed consent. Vaccinations with SYT-SSX B peptide (0.1 mg or 1.0 mg were given subcutaneously six times at 14-day intervals. These patients were evaluated for DTH skin test, adverse events, tumor size, tetramer staining, and peptide-specific CTL induction. Results A total of 16 vaccinations were carried out in six patients. The results were (i no serious adverse effects or DTH reactions, (ii suppression of tumor progression in one patient, (iii increases in the frequency of peptide-specific CTLs in three patients and a decrease in one patient, and (iv successful induction of peptide-specific CTLs from four patients. Conclusions Our findings indicate the safety of the SYT-SSX junction peptide in the use of vaccination and also give support to the property of the peptide to evoke in vivo immunological responses. Modification of both the peptide itself and the related protocol is required to further improve the therapeutic efficacy.

  5. [Diagnosis and treatment of the ganglion cysts and synovial cysts arising from the temporomandibular joints].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Juan-hong; Guo, Chuan-bin; Ma, Xu-chen

    2014-02-18

    To give a reference for the early diagnosis and treatment of the cysts arising from the temporomandibular joint. Nine patients finally diagnosed as temporomandibular joint cysts at the Peking University Hospital of Stomatology from May 1998 to August 2013 were selected and reviewed. Their clinical manifestations, imaging features, diagnoses and differential diagnoses, treatments and follow-ups were summarized and discussed. In the 9 patients, 3 were males and 6 females. Their ages ranged from 33 to 62 years with a median age of 39 years; the course of the disease ranged from 2 weeks to 3 years with a median of 4 months. The image examinations were performed with conventional X-ray examinations in 7 cases, CT scans in 8 cases, MRI in 6 cases and ultrasound in one case. Of the 9 cases, 7 were finally diagnosed as ganglion cyst and 2 as synovial cyst. Ganglion cysts mainly presented as the mass of preauricular area or joint area, with no obvious symptoms or only local discomfort, occasionally with pain. The synovial cysts manifested as the painful swelling of preauricular area and limited mouth-opening, accompanying with occlusal disorders. The treatments included surgical resection in 8 cases, repeated arthrocenteses and lavages in one case. The follow-ups were from 3 months to 9 years, one case with recurrence, and the remaining eight cases without recurrence. MRI examinations are very helpful in the early diagnosis and treatment planning of temporomandibular joint cysts. Surgical resection can have good results. Repeated arthrocenteses and lavages also have a good result, which may be an alternative choice for synovial cyst, but more accumulation of clinical experience is further needed.

  6. Decrease of CD68 Synovial Macrophages in Celastrol Treated Arthritic Rats.

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    Rita Cascão

    Full Text Available Rheumatoid arthritis (RA is a chronic immune-mediated inflammatory disease characterized by cellular infiltration into the joints, hyperproliferation of synovial cells and bone damage. Available treatments for RA only induce remission in around 30% of the patients, have important adverse effects and its use is limited by their high cost. Therefore, compounds that can control arthritis, with an acceptable safety profile and low production costs are still an unmet need. We have shown, in vitro, that celastrol inhibits both IL-1β and TNF, which play an important role in RA, and, in vivo, that celastrol has significant anti-inflammatory properties. Our main goal in this work was to test the effect of celastrol in the number of sublining CD68 macrophages (a biomarker of therapeutic response for novel RA treatments and on the overall synovial tissue cellularity and joint structure in the adjuvant-induced rat model of arthritis (AIA.Celastrol was administered to AIA rats both in the early (4 days after disease induction and late (11 days after disease induction phases of arthritis development. The inflammatory score, ankle perimeter and body weight were evaluated during treatment period. Rats were sacrificed after 22 days of disease progression and blood, internal organs and paw samples were collected for toxicological blood parameters and serum proinflammatory cytokine quantification, as well as histopathological and immunohistochemical evaluation, respectively.Here we report that celastrol significantly decreases the number of sublining CD68 macrophages and the overall synovial inflammatory cellularity, and halted joint destruction without side effects.Our results validate celastrol as a promising compound for the treatment of arthritis.

  7. Kingella kingae expresses type IV pili that mediate adherence to respiratory epithelial and synovial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kehl-Fie, Thomas E; Miller, Sara E; St Geme, Joseph W

    2008-11-01

    Kingella kingae is a gram-negative bacterium that colonizes the respiratory tract and is a common cause of septic arthritis and osteomyelitis. Despite the increasing frequency of K. kingae disease, little is known about the mechanism by which this organism adheres to respiratory epithelium and seeds joints and bones. Previous work showed that K. kingae expresses long surface fibers that vary in surface density. In the current study, we found that these fibers are type IV pili and are necessary for efficient adherence to respiratory epithelial and synovial cells and that the number of pili expressed by the bacterium correlates with the level of adherence to synovial cells but not with the level of adherence to respiratory cells. In addition, we established that the major pilin subunit is encoded by a pilA homolog in a conserved region of the chromosome that also contains a second pilin gene and a type IV pilus accessory gene, both of which are dispensable for pilus assembly and pilus-mediated adherence. Upon examination of the K. kingae genome, we identified two genes in physically separate locations on the chromosome that encode homologs of the Neisseria PilC proteins and that have only a low level homology to each other. Examination of mutant strains revealed that both of the K. kingae PilC homologs are essential for a wild-type level of adherence to both respiratory epithelial and synovial cells. Taken together, these results demonstrate that type IV pili and the two PilC homologs play important roles in mediating K. kingae adherence.

  8. Kingella kingae Expresses Type IV Pili That Mediate Adherence to Respiratory Epithelial and Synovial Cells▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kehl-Fie, Thomas E.; Miller, Sara E.; St. Geme, Joseph W.

    2008-01-01

    Kingella kingae is a gram-negative bacterium that colonizes the respiratory tract and is a common cause of septic arthritis and osteomyelitis. Despite the increasing frequency of K. kingae disease, little is known about the mechanism by which this organism adheres to respiratory epithelium and seeds joints and bones. Previous work showed that K. kingae expresses long surface fibers that vary in surface density. In the current study, we found that these fibers are type IV pili and are necessary for efficient adherence to respiratory epithelial and synovial cells and that the number of pili expressed by the bacterium correlates with the level of adherence to synovial cells but not with the level of adherence to respiratory cells. In addition, we established that the major pilin subunit is encoded by a pilA homolog in a conserved region of the chromosome that also contains a second pilin gene and a type IV pilus accessory gene, both of which are dispensable for pilus assembly and pilus-mediated adherence. Upon examination of the K. kingae genome, we identified two genes in physically separate locations on the chromosome that encode homologs of the Neisseria PilC proteins and that have only a low level homology to each other. Examination of mutant strains revealed that both of the K. kingae PilC homologs are essential for a wild-type level of adherence to both respiratory epithelial and synovial cells. Taken together, these results demonstrate that type IV pili and the two PilC homologs play important roles in mediating K. kingae adherence. PMID:18757541

  9. The Relative Composition of the Inflammatory Infiltrate as an Additional Tool for Synovial Tissue Classification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Della Beffa, Cristina; Slansky, Elisabeth; Pommerenke, Claudia; Klawonn, Frank; Li, Jialiang; Dai, Lie; Schumacher, H. Ralph; Pessler, Frank

    2013-01-01

    Objectives Traditionally, differences in absolute numbers of cells expressing a certain marker (e.g., positive staining cells per mm2) have been used in immunohistological synovial tissue classification. We have begun to evaluate the relative composition of the inflammatory infiltrates, i.e. percentages of inflammatory cell types in inflammatory infiltrates, as an alternate classification tool that may potentially improve tissue diagnostics, subgrouping in clinical trials, and understanding of pathogenesis of inflammatory and noninflammatory arthropathies. Methods Synovial tissue specimens (normal synovium, n=15; orthopedic arthropathies, n=6; osteoarthritis, n=26; early undifferentiated arthritis, n=10; rheumatoid arthritis, n=26; chronic septic arthritis, n=11) were stained for CD15, CD68, CD3, CD20, and CD38. Densities of cells expressing a given marker were determined in the superficial subintima. Binary and multicategory receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis and naïve Bayes classifier were used to compare the abilities of (1) the absolute densities of cells expressing a given marker (absolute method) with (2) the percentages of these cells in the inflammatory cell population (relative method) to differentiate among the six tissue classes. Results The inflammatory infiltrates in normal synovium and the orthopedic arthropathies consisted almost exclusively of CD68+ and CD3+ cells. Notable fractions of CD20+ and CD38+ cells appeared in a subset of osteoarthritis samples, and increased further in early, rheumatoid and chronic septic arthritis. ROC analyses and naïve Bayes classifier ranked the absolute method above the relative method in terms of overall discriminatory ability. The relative method became slightly superior when the samples were also stratified according to the total number of inflammatory cells/mm2. Conclusions This exploratory investigation featuring a variety of joint disorders revealed that measuring the relative proportions of

  10. Quantitative assessment of synovial inflammation by dynamic gadolinium-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging. A study of the effect of intra-articular methylprednisolone on the rate of early synovial enhancement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, Mikkel; Stoltenberg, M; Henriksen, O;

    1996-01-01

    The effect of temporary inflammatory suppression on synovial membrane enhancement, as determined by dynamic and static gadolinium-DTPA enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), was studied. MRI of 18 arthritic knees was performed before and 1, 7, 30 and 180 days after intra-articular methylpredn......The effect of temporary inflammatory suppression on synovial membrane enhancement, as determined by dynamic and static gadolinium-DTPA enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), was studied. MRI of 18 arthritic knees was performed before and 1, 7, 30 and 180 days after intra...

  11. Detection of synovial pseudarthrosis by 99mTc scintigraphy: application to treatment of traumatic nonunion with constant direct current

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Esterhai, J.L. Jr.; Brighton, C.T.; Heppenstall, R.B.; Alavi, A.; Desai, A.G.

    A prospective study utilizing technetium scintigraphy to evaluate nonunion patients prior to the electrical stimulation of osteogenesis is reported. Roentgenographic evaluation and scintigraphy must include four views (anteroposterior, lateral and both obliques). Although all nonunion technetium scans showed increased uptake of the radionuclide at the fracture site, three bone scan patterns were identified: (1) intense, uniformly increased uptake at the nonunion site (69.5%); (2) photon deficient (cold) cleft between two intense areas of uptake (23.4%); and (3) indeterminate pattern (7.1%). The presence of a cold cleft between two intense areas of uptake on scintigraphy correlated closely with the presence of a synovial pseudarthrosis at surgery. Nonunions of the humerus were most frequently associated with synovial pseudarthrosis (57.1%). The presence of a synovial pseudarthrosis as suggested by technetium scintigraphy mandates open excision of the lining membrane at the time of electrode insertion.

  12. Synovial haemangioma of the knee joint: an unusual cause of knee pain in a 14-month old girl

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    Wen, D.W.; Rasheed, S. [KK Women' s and Children' s Hospital, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Imaging, Singapore (Singapore); Tan, T.J. [Changi General Hospital, Department of Radiology, Singapore (Singapore)

    2016-06-15

    We report a histologically proven case of synovial haemangioma of the knee in a 14-month old girl who presented to the emergency department with an acute 1-day history of refusing to weight-bear on the right leg and a preceding 3-week history of a right knee lump. Physical examination revealed a non-tender, soft lump over the lateral infrapatellar region. Radiographs revealed a poorly defined soft tissue density over the infrapatellar fat pad and a suprapatellar joint effusion. Ultrasound was used to confirm the presence of a vascular soft tissue mass compatible with a synovial haemangioma within the infrapatellar fat pad which showed both intra-articular and extra-articular extension. There was good correlation of the ultrasound findings with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), highlighting the potential clinical utility of ultrasound as an alternative imaging modality in establishing the pre-operative diagnosis and extent of a synovial haemangioma about the knee joint. (orig.)

  13. Dumb-bell shaped poorly differentiated pelvic synovial sarcoma with molecular confirmation: a rare presentation of an uncommon disease entity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasan, Roumina; Kumar, Sandeep; Rao, Lakshmi

    2013-01-01

    Pelvic localization of synovial sarcoma is a rare phenomenon and to the best of our knowledge its presentation as a large "dumb-bell"-shaped abdomino-pelvic mass showing extension to the thigh has never been reported in the literature. We report a case of a young adult presenting with retention of urine and was found to have a large abdomino-pelvic mass causing bony destruction and compression of pelvic viscera. A biopsy revealed a cellular tumor composed of spindle to oval cells arranged in a hemangiopericytomatous pattern. Histopathology was suggestive of poorly differentiated synovial sarcoma. Immunohistochemistry (IHC) was positive for vimentin, CD 99, Bcl2, Mic2 and focally for EMA and negative for CD 34, CK, desmin, synaptophysin, and WT1. Due to equivocal IHC findings molecular analysis was done which confirmed the diagnosis as synovial sarcoma.

  14. Dumb-bell shaped poorly differentiated pelvic synovial sarcoma with molecular confirmation: A rare presentation of an uncommon disease entity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roumina Hasan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Pelvic localization of synovial sarcoma is a rare phenomenon and to the best of our knowledge its presentation as a large "dumb-bell"-shaped abdomino-pelvic mass showing extension to the thigh has never been reported in the literature. We report a case of a young adult presenting with retention of urine and was found to have a large abdomino-pelvic mass causing bony destruction and compression of pelvic viscera. A biopsy revealed a cellular tumor composed of spindle to oval cells arranged in a hemangiopericytomatous pattern. Histopathology was suggestive of poorly differentiated synovial sarcoma. Immunohistochemistry (IHC was positive for vimentin, CD 99, Bcl2, Mic2 and focally for EMA and negative for CD 34, CK, desmin, synaptophysin, and WT1. Due to equivocal IHC findings molecular analysis was done which confirmed the diagnosis as synovial sarcoma.

  15. Synovial chondromatosis of the temporomandibular joint: report of 2 patients whose joints were reconstructed with costochondral graft and alloplastic prosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goizueta-Adame, Carlos C; González-García, Raúl

    2010-07-01

    Synovial chondromatosis of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) is rare, and only about 100 cases have been reported. Among these, intracranial extension was reported in only 9. Although some patterns of clinical presentation and evolution, synovial histological changes, and diagnosis by computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging have been described, there is little information about surgical treatment. We report two new cases that focus particularly on reconstruction with costochondral graft and alloplastic TMJ prosthesis. We report what is to our knowledge the youngest reported case of synovial chondromatosis of the TMJ, which is also the tenth reported case with extension into the middle cranial fossa. Copyright 2009 The British Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Detection of Porphyromonas gingivalis DNA in the synovial fluid of rheumatoid arthritis patients by real-time PCR

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    Reza Ghotaslou

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Microbial infections are believed to play an important role in the initiation and perpetuation of rheumatoid arthritis. This study aimed to investigate the relationship between the presence of Porphyromonas gingivalis DNA in the synovial fluid and rheumatoid arthritis. The synovial fluid samples were collected from 22 patients with rheumatoid arthritis and 20 patients with not suffering from rheumatism, overall 42 patients were investigated. The presence of P. gingivalis DNA was evaluated by the real-time PCR method. There was a significant relationship between rheumatoid arthritis and non-rheumatoid arthritis with the DNA number (Pv 0.05. DNA of periodontal pathogens can be found in the synovial fluid of rheumatoid arthritis patients. It shows oral bacteria may play a role in the pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis.

  17. Statistical analysis of synovial fluid layers phase maps in the diagnostics of development and differentiation of pathological changes severity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kvasniuk, D. I.; Vasyuk, V. L.

    2012-01-01

    A new method for differential diagnosis of pathological changes of the joints on the basis of synovial fluid was founded. Adduced description scheme and the principles of polarization filtering to determine the coordinate distributions of phase shifts.The optical model of polycrystalline networks of knee joint synovial fluid is suggested. The results of investigating the interrelation between the values of statistical (statistical moments of the 1st-4th order) parameters are presented. They characterize the coordinate distributions of phase shifts between the orthogonal components of the amplitude in the points of laser images of synovial fluid smears and the change in optical anisotropy of this biological object. The diagnostic criteria of knee joint inflammation processes are determined.

  18. Intra-articular synovial sarcoma treated with a transfemoral amputation: a case report and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gresswell, Steven D; Corsini, Anthony A; Balsamo, Luke H; Miles, Edward F

    2013-08-01

    A case of monophasic intra-articular synovial sarcoma in the right knee of a 39-year-old active duty serviceman treated with a transfemoral amputation is presented. The patient was evaluated for right knee pain and fullness. After further workup, the patient underwent computed tomography guided biopsy, with the tissue specimen consistent with intra-articular synovial sarcoma. The patient elected for a transfemoral amputation rather than limb or joint-sparing surgery. The gross specimen measured 3.5 × 3.0 × 1.7 cm in the posteromedial knee. No metastatic lesions were seen on positron emission tomography-computed tomography. Chemotherapy and radiation therapy have not been utilized. The transfemoral amputation adds to the uniqueness of this report and is discussed with a review of the multimodality treatment toward intra-articular synovial sarcoma in prior published literature.

  19. In vivo electrochemical corrosion study of a CoCrMo biomedical alloy in human synovial fluids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Igual Munoz, A; Schwiesau, J; Jolles, B M; Mischler, S

    2015-07-01

    The present study was initiated with the aim to assess the in vivo electrochemical corrosion behaviour of CoCrMo biomedical alloys in human synovial fluids in an attempt to identify possible patient or pathology specific effects. For this, electrochemical measurements (open circuit potential OCP, polarization resistance Rp, potentiodynamic polarization curves, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy EIS) were carried out on fluids extracted from patients with different articular pathologies and prosthesis revisions. Those electrochemical measurements could be carried out with outstanding precision and signal stability. The results show that the corrosion behaviour of CoCrMo alloy in synovial fluids not only depends on material reactivity but also on the specific reactions of synovial fluid components, most likely involving reactive oxygen species. In some patients the latter were found to determine the whole cathodic and anodic electrochemical response. Depending on patients, corrosion rates varied significantly between 50 and 750 mg dm(-2)year(-1).

  20. Nitrated type III collagen as a biological marker of nitric oxide-mediated synovial tissue metabolism in osteoarthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Richardot, P; Charni-Ben Tabassi, N; Toh, L

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Nitric oxide (NO) is a major mediator of joint tissue inflammation and damage in osteoarthritis (OA) and mediates the nitration of tyrosine (Y*) residues in proteins. We investigated the nitration of type III collagen, a major constituent of synovial membrane, in knee OA. METHODS...... in healthy controls and significantly correlated with C-reactive protein values (r=0.40, Pcollagen N-telopeptide is increased in the synovial tissue of patients with knee OA. Measurements of serum IIINys level may be useful for the clinical......: A polyclonal antibody directed against the nitrated QY*DSY*DVKSG sequence from type III collagen N-telopeptide was generated. Synovial tissues from patients with knee OA (n=4) and rheumatoid arthritis (RA, n=4) were analyzed by immunohistochemistry for IIINys. Serum IIINys levels were measured by enzyme...

  1. Musculosceletal tuberculosis with involvement of tendon sheaths and formation of synovial cyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zieliński, Michał; Mazur-Zielińska, Henryka; Kozielski, Jerzy

    2016-01-01

    Due to an increasing amount of patients on immunosuppressive treatment, the number of tuberculosis (TB) of atypical course and extrapulmonary tuberculosis cases increase. Locomotor system is a place of every fifth case of extrapulmonary TB. Because of lack of characteristic symptoms, as well as rare co-occurrence of active lung lesions in radiological imaging, proper diagnosis is hard to establish. We present a case of patient on immunosuppressive therapy due to myositis, in whom we diagnosed musculoskeletal tuberculosis in form of involvement of tendon sheath and formation of synovial cyst.

  2. CULTURES OF FIBROBLAST-LIKE SYNOVIAL CELLS FROM PATIENTS WITH RHEUMATOID ARTHRITIS: PROPERTIES AND OPPORTUNITIES

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    M. A. Schneider

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The present review contains data from literature concerning the in vivo structure of synovial membranes in healthy people and patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA. The properties of in vitro cultured fibroblast-like synovial cells (FLS from RA patients are considered, including FLS morphology, phenotype and function. A standard protocol of in vitro FLS culturing is described. Notably, the FLS are characterized by autonomic functioning, ability for invasive growth/migration, e.g., into non-affected joints. These FLS properties may a reason of multiple joint involvement typical to RA. Special attention is drawn to characterization of stable phenotypic profile of FLS which results from certain epigenetic disturbances, i.e., changes of the DNA methylation, histone acetylation, and micro-RNA effects.The FLS from RA patients are characterized with stable and extensive hypomethylation of genes which occurs in vivo and persists after repeated culture passages. Some promoters of genes involved into RA pathogenesis (for example, CXCL12, IL-6 are hypomethylated. By contrary, some other gene promoters (e.g., the death receptor 3 gene are shown to be hypermethylated. An increased histone acetylation of genes encoding proinflammatory mediators (such as MMP1 may be an important mechanism of persistent inflammation in RA. Changes in histone acetylation in FLS are related to high levels of ubiquitin-like SUMO-1 protein and concurrent decrease in specific protease SENP1activity. A role of histone acetylation in RA pathogenesis is supported by efficacy of a histone deacetylase inhibitor (Trichostatin A in collagen-induced murine arthritis. Local concentrations of micro RNA-155, micro-RNA-146а, and micro-RNA-203 are permanently increased in FLS cultures, synovial tissues, and PBMC of the RA patients. Expression of micro RNA-124а is decreased in FLS from RA, as compared with OA FLS.One may conclude that the fibroblast-like synovial cells are key cellular

  3. Acquired hemophagocytic syndrome in a patient with synovial sarcoma: a case report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciccarese, Chiara; Ferrara, Roberto; Fantinel, Emanuela; Zecchetto, Camilla; Simionato, Francesca; Grego, Elisabetta; Ortolani, Silvia; Caccese, Mario; Bimbatti, Davide; Cingarlini, Sara; Brunelli, Matteo; Andreini, Angelo; Tortora, Giampaolo; Massari, Francesco

    2015-01-01

    Hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (HLH) is a syndrome characterized by severe hyperinflammation due to an overwhelming ineffective immune response to different triggers. Most important symptoms are fever, hepatosplenomegaly and cytopenias. Biochemical signs include elevated ferritin, hypertriglyceridemia and low fibrinogen. Hemophagocytosis in the bone marrow is a hallmark of this syndrome. Based on the pathogenetic mechanism, it can be classified into primary (inherited) or secondary (acquired) HLH. We report, to our knowledge, the first case of acquired hemophagocytic syndrome that arose in a 20-year-old man affected by synovial sarcoma as a complication during chemotherapy. PMID:28031902

  4. Differentiation in vitro of inflammatory from non inflammatory synovial fluid by nuclear magnetic relaxation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teyssier, R.; Teyssier, M.; Colson, F.

    1987-01-01

    The differentiation between inflammatory and non inflammatory states has been performed using Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) in vitro by measuring relaxation times T/sub 1/ and T/sub 2/ in 84 synovials fluids obtained from various rheumatologic diseases. The results show that the T/sub 1//T/sub 2/ ratio is more sensitive to distinguish these two situations rather than the isolated T/sub 1/ or T/sub /2 values. In particular, high values of T/sub 1//T/sub 2/ ratio are found in septic arthritis.

  5. Inflamed shoulder tendons (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tearing and inflammation of the tendons of the shoulder muscles can occur in sports which require the arm to be moved over the head repeatedly as in tennis, pitching, swimming, and lifting weights. Most often the shoulder will heal if a break is taken from ...

  6. Inflamed by the Flames?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canetti, Daphna; Russ, Eric; Luborsky, Judith; Gerhart, James; Hobfoll, Stevan

    2015-01-01

    The physiological impact of citizens’ prolonged exposure to violence and conflict is a crucial, yet underexplored issue within the political science and biology literature. We examined the impact of high levels of exposure to rocket and terrorist attacks on biological markers of immunity and inflammation in a sample of Israelis. A stratified random sample of individuals were drawn from a pool of subjects in Israel who have previously been interviewed regarding their stress exposure and psychological distress during a period of active rocket and terrorist attacks. These individuals were re-interviewed and blood samples were collected to assess antibodies to cytomegalovirus (CMV antibodies) and C-reactive protein (CRP). We concluded that PTSD was significantly related to CRP, controlling for BMI, depression, and exposure to terrorism. Depression scores did not significantly predict CRP (or CMV antibodies levels). In contrast to the established convention that psychological distress is the sole outcome of terrorism exposure, these findings reveal that individuals exposed to terrorism are at dual risk for PTSD/depression, and inflammation. This study has important ramifications for how policy makers and medical health professionals formulate public health policies and medically treat individuals living in conflict zones. PMID:24948537

  7. Double synovial cyst of the proximal tibiofibular joint confirmed by MRI as a cause of the peroneal tunnel syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pećina, H I; Borić, I; Pećina, T C; Smoljanović, T; Pećina, M

    2008-08-01

    The aim of this case report is to present an unusual double synovial cyst that arose from the proximal tibiofibular joint compressing the peroneal nerve in the peroneal tunnel and was unrecognized at the beginning. According to the review of literature back to 1891, only 62 cases of cysts originating from the proximal tibiofibular joint (PTFJ) have been described. We report a case of a 32 year old male patient who was admitted to the Department of Orthopaedic Surgery because of a classic peroneal tunnel syndrome of the left leg. On the lateral side of the proximal third of his left leg a tumefaction of 12 x 2.5 cm was visible. The sonography showed a characteristic image of the para-articular synovial cyst of the left knee. A surgical extirpation of the synovial cyst and decompression of the peroneal nerve in the peroneal tunnel were performed. PHD confirmed a classic synovial cyst. Postoperatively, the symptoms of the peroneal nerve compression disappeared. Three years after the first surgical intervention the patient was readmitted to the Department because of quite similar problems, only the neurological symptoms were less intensive than during the first admittance. This time the performed MR imaging showed a double synovial cyst originating from the proximal tibiofibular joint. The surgical treatment consisted of a total extirpation of both cysts including the narrow stalks of communication with the PTFJ. The joint was opened and a synovectomy was done using an electrocauter and a sharp curette. Regular check-ups were done every 6 months and twice during the control period of 4 years, as was the MR imaging control. MRI findings 4 years after the second surgical intervention were normal. Clinical findings after 7 years were normal and we are sure that the recidivation of the synovial cyst excluded. The MRI diagnostics was crucial for an adequate surgical treatment and the relief of the peroneal tunnel syndrome symptoms.

  8. Truncated SSX protein suppresses synovial sarcoma cell proliferation by inhibiting the localization of SS18-SSX fusion protein.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasushi Yoneda

    Full Text Available Synovial sarcoma is a relatively rare high-grade soft tissue sarcoma that often develops in the limbs of young people and induces the lung and the lymph node metastasis resulting in poor prognosis. In patients with synovial sarcoma, specific chromosomal translocation of t(X; 18 (p11.2;q11.2 is observed, and SS18-SSX fusion protein expressed by this translocation is reported to be associated with pathogenesis. However, role of the fusion protein in the pathogenesis of synovial sarcoma has not yet been completely clarified. In this study, we focused on the localization patterns of SS18-SSX fusion protein. We constructed expression plasmids coding for the full length SS18-SSX, the truncated SS18 moiety (tSS18 and the truncated SSX moiety (tSSX of SS18-SSX, tagged with fluorescent proteins. These plasmids were transfected in synovial sarcoma SYO-1 cells and we observed the expression of these proteins using a fluorescence microscope. The SS18-SSX fusion protein showed a characteristic speckle pattern in the nucleus. However, when SS18-SSX was co-expressed with tSSX, localization of SS18-SSX changed from speckle patterns to the diffused pattern similar to the localization pattern of tSSX and SSX. Furthermore, cell proliferation and colony formation of synovial sarcoma SYO-1 and YaFuSS cells were suppressed by exogenous tSSX expression. Our results suggest that the characteristic speckle localization pattern of SS18-SSX is strongly involved in the tumorigenesis through the SSX moiety of the SS18-SSX fusion protein. These findings could be applied to further understand the pathogenic mechanisms, and towards the development of molecular targeting approach for synovial sarcoma.

  9. The synovial prostaglandin system in chronic inflammatory arthritis: differential effects of steroidal and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bombardieri, S.; Cattani, P.; Ciabattoni, G.; Di Munno, O.; Pasero, G.; Patrono, C.; Pinca, E.; Pugliese, F.

    1981-01-01

    1 The present study was undertaken to characterize the spectrum of arachidonic acid metabolites present in synovial effusions of patients with rheumatoid or psoriatic arthritis, and to compare changes in their concentration following a short-term treatment with 6α-methyl-prednisolone (6-MeP: 4-8 mg/day) or indoprofen (1.2 g/day), a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory agent with proven synovial prostaglandin inhibitory effect. 2 Measurements of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), thromboxane (TX) B2, 6-keto-PGF1α and PGF2α were performed by radioimmunoassay techniques in synovial effusions obtained from 23 patients, and validated by thin-layer chromatographic analysis of the extracted immunoreactivity. 3 PGE2 and TXB2 accounted for more than 60% of the total immunoreactivity in untreated patients. The absence of any constant ratio between the different arachidonic acid metabolites detected in synovial fluid is consistent with a heterogeneous cellular origin of these compounds. 4 Indoprofen treatment was associated with a consistent reduction of synovial prostaglandin and thromboxane concentrations, ranging from 36% in the case of 6-keto-PGF1α to 90% in the case of PGE2. 5 In contrast, 6-MeP caused opposite changes on different metabolites originating via the cyclo-oxygenase pathway. Thus, 6-keto-PGF1α concentrations were reduced by 35%, PGF2α concentrations were increased by 30%, while PGE2 and TXB2 were unchanged following 6-MeP. 6 Although the mechanism(s) underlying the failure of 6-MeP to reduce synovial PGE2 and TXB2 levels are uncertain, the results of the present study clearly indicate that therapeutic doses of steroidal and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs cause quite distinct changes in arachidonic acid metabolism, which might be relevant to their specific therapeutic actions and side-effects. PMID:6895043

  10. Quantification of synovistis by MRI: correlation between dynamic and static gadolinium-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging and microscopic and macroscopic signs of synovial inflammation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, Mikkel; Stoltenberg, M; Løvgreen-Nielsen, P

    1998-01-01

    injection, as the highest correlation coefficients to histologic inflammation were observed in this interval. Dynamic MRI can be used to determine synovial inflammation. Evaluation of large synovial areas one-half to one minute after Gd injection best reflects joint inflammation....... as at the four biopsy sites, and compared to synovial pathology. The rate of early enhancement of the total synovial membrane of the preselected slice, determined by dynamic MRI, was highly correlated with microscopic evidence of active inflammation (Spearman p = 0.73; p ... knees with and without synovial inflammation with a high predictive value (0.81-0.90). Moderate and severe inflammation could not be differentiated. The early enhancement rate was correlated with histologic features of active inflammation, particularly vessel proliferation and mononuclear leucocyte...

  11. Correlation and fractional analysis of synovial fluid microscopic images for diagnostics and differentiation of pathological conditions in joints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kvasniuk, D. I.; Vasyuk, V. L.

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, was given the basis of the method of spectral Stokes polarimetry of human synovial fluid. The optical model of polycrystalline networks of human knee joint synovial fluid is suggested. The results of investigating the interrelation between the values of statistical (statistical moments of the 1st-4th order), correlation (correlation area, asymmetry coefficient and autocorrelation function excess) and fractal (dispersion of logarithmic dependencies of power spectra) parameters are presented. They characterize spectral distributions of polarization azimuth and ellipticity of the body's electromagnetic radiation and dynamics of change in optical anisotropy of this biological object. The diagnostic criteria of human knee joint inflammation processes are determined.

  12. Histopathological Analysis of PEEK Wear Particle Effects on the Synovial Tissue of Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. C. Paulus

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Increasing interest developed in the use of carbon-fiber-reinforced-poly-ether-ether-ketones (CFR-PEEK as an alternative bearing material in knee arthroplasty. The effects of CFR-PEEK wear in in vitro and animal studies are controversially discussed, as there are no data available concerning human tissue. The aim of this study was to analyze human tissue containing CFR-PEEK as well as UHMWPE wear debris. The authors hypothesized no difference between the used biomaterials. Methods and Materials. In 10 patients during knee revision surgery of a rotating-hinge-knee-implant-design, synovial tissue samples were achieved (tibial inserts: UHMWPE; bushings and flanges: CFR-PEEK. One additional patient received revision surgery without any PEEK components as a control. The tissue was paraffin-embedded, sliced into 2 μm thick sections, and stained with hematoxylin and eosin in a standard process. A modified panoptical staining was also done. Results. A “wear-type” reaction was seen in the testing and the control group. In all samples, the UHMWPE particles were scattered in the tissue or incorporated in giant cells. CFR-PEEK particles were seen as conglomerates and only could be found next to vessels. CFR-PEEK particles showed no giant-cell reactions. In conclusion, the hypothesis has to be rejected. UHMWPE and PEEK showed a different scatter-behavior in human synovial tissue.

  13. Synovial fluid cytology in experimental acute canine monocytic ehrlichiosis (Ehrlichia canis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theodorou, Konstantina; Leontides, Leonidas; Siarkou, Victoria I; Petanides, Theodoros; Tsafas, Konstantinos; Harrus, Shimon; Mylonakis, Mathios E

    2015-05-15

    Evidence-based information of a cause-and-effect relationship between Ehrlichia canis infection and polyarthritis in naturally- or experimentally-infected dogs is currently lacking. The aim of this prospective study was to investigate whether synovial fluid cytological evidence of arthritis could be documented in dogs with acute monocytic ehrlichiosis. Direct synovial fluid cytology smears from eight Beagle dogs experimentally infected with E. canis were examined prior to, and on 21, 35 and 63 days post-inoculation. The cytological variables assessed included cellularity, percentages of mononuclear cells and neutrophils, macrophage reactivity and evidence of E. canis morulae. The median cellularity and percentages of mononuclear cells and neutrophils prior to inoculation did not differ when compared to post-inoculation cytological evaluation. Increased cellularity, E. canis morulae or cytological evidence of arthritis or macrophage reactivity were not observed throughout the course of the study. In the present study, no cytological evidence of arthritis was found in dogs with experimental acute canine monocytic ehrlichiosis, suggesting that E. canis infection should be considered a rather uncommon cause of arthritis in dogs.

  14. Lumbar intraforaminal synovial cyst in young adulthood: case report and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalevski, Svetoslav K; Haritonov, Dimitar Georgiev; Peev, Nikolay Angelov

    2014-08-01

    Study Design Case report. Objective Lumbar juxtafacet cysts (synovial and ganglion cysts) are a rare cause of low back and radicular leg pain. Most patients with lumbar cysts are in their sixth decade of life and have significant facet joint and disk degeneration. Lumbar synovial cysts (LSCs) are extremely rare in adolescence and young adulthood, and to our knowledge, only two pediatric cases of LSC have been reported in the literature. We aim to prove the existence of LSC in adolescent patients as a real entity that causes low back and radicular complaints and to discuss the possibility of traumatic injury as a pathogenic cause of LSC formation in adolescence. A case of an 18-year old patient with LSC is presented. We report the clinical presentation, management, outcome, and review of the literature, focusing on issues that remain debatable. Methods The case is presented together with its clinical course, the diagnostic techniques, the surgical findings, histologic results, and the treatment outcome. Results After surgical treatment, the patient's complaints were alleviated and almost no complaints were registered during the next 6 months' follow-up. Conclusions LSCs are extremely rare in adolescence, but they could be considered in the differential diagnosis in adolescent patients with low back pain and radiculopathy. Surgical removal of LSC could be considered as a treatment option to provide immediate and safe symptomatic relief.

  15. Primary peripheral neurolymphomatosis mimicking synovial sarcoma: FDG PETCT to the rescue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Padma

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Our understanding of the association between synovial sarcoma and peripheral neurolymphomatosis is limited to a few case reports in literature. Delay in diagnosis or misdiagnosis is possible due to its insidious onset and varied presentation compounded by non-specific imaging findings. Needle biopsy also may not be confirmatory especially, in cases of biphasic sarcoma as in our case, and it may be necessary to proceed to open biopsy. Here, is a case of a non-tender right calf muscle mass, which was reported as biphasic synovial sarcoma by FNAC. Positron emission tomography computed tomography - computed tomography (PETCT showed right sciatic nerve involvement and multiple infra diaphragmatic lymph nodal lesions. Intensity of 18 F FDG ( 18 Flourine labeled fluro de oxy glucose uptake and the infra diaphragmatic lymph nodal lesions distribution, was more in favour of a lymphoma diagnosis rather than a sarcoma, (which are usually low metabolically active tumors. Thus, this case highlights the usefulness of FDG PETCT in arriving at a diagnosis in the background of indeterminate clinicopathological and radiologic findings.

  16. The Effect of SHH-Gli Signaling Pathway on the Synovial Fibroblast Proliferation in Rheumatoid Arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Suping; Sun, Dexu; Li, Hui; Li, Xiangyang; Pan, Wei; Yan, Chao; Tang, Renxian; Liu, Xiaomei

    2016-04-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic autoimmune disease characterized by chronic synovitis. This study aims to investigate the role of sonic hedgehog (SHH)-Gli signaling pathway in synovial fibroblast proliferation in rheumatoid arthritis. The expression of serum SHH in RA patients group was significantly increased compared with the systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), ankylosing spondylitis (AS), and healthy subject (healthy control, HC) groups, respectively; serum SHH expression of RA patients was positively correlated with rheumatoid factor (RF) and anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide antibodies (anti-CCP Ab), while there was no significant correlation between SHH expression and erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR). SHH, Ptch, Smo, and Gli molecules were highly expressed in rat RA-synovial fibroblast (RA-SF); after blocking the SHH-Gli signaling pathway with a Gli specific inhibitor, Gli-antagonist 61 (GANT61), RA-SF proliferation was inhibited in a dose-dependent manner and the apoptosis rate of RA-SF was increased as well; the expression levels of fibroblast growth factor receptor 1 (FGFR1) and FGFR3 declined in SF cells after GANT61 treatment. Our results suggest that SHH-Gli pathway is involved in the pathogenesis of RA, and blocking SHH-Gli pathway inhibits RA-SF cell proliferation and increases cell apoptosis, which may shed light on developing new ideas for RA treatment.

  17. [Imaging of the elbow joint with focus MRI. Part 2: muscles, nerves and synovial membranes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rehm, J; Zeifang, F; Weber, M-A

    2014-03-01

    This review article discusses the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) features and pathological changes of muscles, nerves and the synovial lining of the elbow joint. Typical imaging findings are illustrated and discussed. In addition, the cross-sectional anatomy and anatomical variants, such as accessory muscles and plicae are discussed. Injuries of the muscles surrounding the elbow joint, as well as chronic irritation are particularly common in athletes. Morphological changes in MRI, for example tennis or golfer's elbow are typical and often groundbreaking. By adapting the examination sequences, imaging planes and slices, complete and incomplete tendon ruptures can be reliably diagnosed. Although the clinical and electrophysiological examinations form the basis for the diagnosis of peripheral neuropathies, MRI provides useful additional information about the precise localization due to its high resolution and good soft tissue contrast and helps to rule out differential diagnoses. Synovial diseases, such as inflammatory arthritis, proliferative diseases and also impinging plicae must be considered in the MRI diagnostics of the elbow joint.

  18. Boundary conditions at the cartilage-synovial fluid interface for joint lubrication and theoretical verifications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, J S; Holmes, M H; Lai, W M; Mow, V C

    1989-02-01

    The objective of this study is to establish and verify the set of boundary conditions at the interface between a biphasic mixture (articular cartilage) and a Newtonian or non-Newtonian fluid (synovial fluid) such that a set of well-posed mathematical problems may be formulated to investigate joint lubrication problems. A "pseudo-no-slip" kinematic boundary condition is proposed based upon the principle that the conditions at the interface between mixtures or mixtures and fluids must reduce to those boundary conditions in single phase continuum mechanics. From this proposed kinematic boundary condition, and balances of mass, momentum and energy, the boundary conditions at the interface between a biphasic mixture and a Newtonian or non-Newtonian fluid are mathematically derived. Based upon these general results, the appropriate boundary conditions needed in modeling the cartilage-synovial fluid-cartilage lubrication problem are deduced. For two simple cases where a Newtonian viscous fluid is forced to flow (with imposed Couette or Poiseuille flow conditions) over a porous-permeable biphasic material of relatively low permeability, the well known empirical Taylor slip condition may be derived using matched asymptotic analysis of the boundary layer at the interface.

  19. Effects of Thapsigargin on the Proliferation and Survival of Human Rheumatoid Arthritis Synovial Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui Wang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A series of experiments have been carried out to investigate the effects of different concentrations of thapsigargin (0, 0.001, 0.1, and 1 μM on the proliferation and survival of human rheumatoid arthritis synovial cells (MH7A. The results showed that thapsigargin can block the cell proliferation in human rheumatoid arthritis synovial cells in a time- and dose-dependent manner. Results of Hoechst staining suggested that thapsigargin may induce cell apoptosis in MH7A cells in a time- and dose-dependent manner, and the percentages of cell death reached 44.6% at thapsigargin concentration of 1 μM treated for 4 days compared to the control. The protein and mRNA levels of cyclin D1 decreased gradually with the increasing of thapsigargin concentration and treatment times. Moreover, the protein levels of mTORC1 downstream indicators pS6K and p4EBP-1 were reduced by thapsigargin treatment at different concentrations and times, which should be responsible for the reduced cyclin D1 expressions. Our results revealed that thapsigargin may effectively impair the cell proliferation and survival of MH7A cells. The present findings will help to understand the molecular mechanism of fibroblast-like synoviocytes proliferations and suggest that thapsigargin is of potential for the clinical treatment of rheumatoid arthritis.

  20. Synovial fluid from an African spur-thighed tortoise (Geochelone sulcata).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casimire-Etzioni, Athema L; Wellehan, James F X; Embury, Jennifer E; Terrell, Scott P; Raskin, Rose E

    2004-01-01

    A 4.5-year old, male African spur-thighed tortoise (Geochelone sulcata) was presented to the University of Florida Veterinary Teaching Hospital with a 2-week history of lethargy, anorexia, constipation, dyspnea, and coughing up fluid or vomiting. Laboratory results included an inflammatory leukogram and a marked increase in plasma uric acid concentration. Synovial fluid from multiple joints was thick, chalky white, and opaque, with a grainy consistency. Microscopically, the fluid contained numerous brown, needle-like crystals consistent with urates (gout). Gross necropsy findings and histopathology confirmed a diagnosis of systemic gout, with urate deposition, gout tophi, and underlying necrosis in multiple organs, including kidneys, lung, and liver. Dehydration with concurrent renal insufficiency may have impaired urate excretion and led to a build-up of urates in the blood and tissues of this tortoise. A high protein diet also may have contributed to the development of gout. Cytologic evaluation of synovial fluid can be used as a quick and definitive tool to diagnose gout in tortoises.

  1. Mycetoma or synovial sarcoma? A case report with review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jimenez, A Louis; Salvo, Nichol L

    2011-01-01

    Mycetoma, also commonly referred to as Madura foot, is statistically rare in the United States. However, it is endemic to other parts of the world. It is a pseudotumor characterized by a triad of tumefaction, draining sinuses, and grains. Two types exist, with each caused by different groups of organisms that require different treatment approaches. Therefore, the exact diagnosis and culture of the organism is vital to successful treatment outcomes. Synovial sarcoma, in contrast, is a malignancy much more commonly seen in the United States. It is characterized by a well-circumscribed, often palpable, mass that is usually well delineated on magnetic resonance imaging. It has characteristic histologic and genetic features that help distinguish it from other soft tissue masses. We present a case of a soft tissue mass diagnosed in the United States. The patient had several clinical and radiographic features of synovial sarcoma but the histologic outcome was mycetoma. The case is followed by a review of the published data. Copyright © 2011 American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Shikonin Inhibits Inflammatory Response in Rheumatoid Arthritis Synovial Fibroblasts via lncRNA-NR024118

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ke-ya Yang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Shikonin is a major chemical component of zicao that possesses anti-inflammatory properties and the ability to mediate cellular and humoral immunity, especially in rheumatoid arthritis (RA. We investigated the impact of shikonin on inflammatory response in RA synovial fibroblasts using the CAIA model. Methods. Severe polyarticular arthritis was induced in Balb/c female mice. Expressions of lncRNA-NR024118, SOCS3, proinflammatory cytokines, and MMPs were evaluated using RT-RCR. Histone acetylation and SOCS3 protein expression were assessed by ChIP assay and western blot, respectively. Results. Mice treated with shikonin showed an abrogation of soft tissue and bone lesions. Shikonin remarkably enhanced the expression of NR024118 and SOCS3 and suppressed the secretion and expression of IL-6, IL-8, and MMPs. Proliferation of cultured RA synovial fibroblasts in the presence of IL-1β was also significantly inhibited by shikonin. Moreover, shikonin dose-dependently increased acetylation of histone H3 at the promoter of NR024118. Finally, NR024118 overexpression and interference significantly changed SOCS3 expression and NR024118 interference could reverse regulation of shikonin on SOCS3, proinflammatory cytokines, and MMPs expression level in MH7A cells. Conclusion. Our results reveal that, in the CAIA mouse model of RA, shikonin has disease modifying activity that is attributable to the inhibition of inflammatory response via lncRNA-NR024118.

  3. Identification of dendritic cells in the blood and synovial fluid of children with Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ewa Tuszkiewicz-Misztal

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Childhood chronic arthritis of unknown etiology is known collectively as juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA and consists of heterogeneous subtypes with unique clinical patterns of disease. JIA is the commonest rheumatic disease in children and may still result in significant disability, with joint deformity, growth impairment, and persistence of active arthritis into adulthood. Basic research is rather focused on rheumatoid arthritis, and this lead to small number of publications considering JIA. In this study we examine, by flow cytometry, the expression of dendritic cells (DCs in the peripheral blood and synovial fluid of children with active JIA in a group of 220 patients. We reveal a significant decrease in the percentage of immature DCs in the blood of patients compared to control children. Surprisingly, we found higher percentages of mature circulating dendritic cells. Both populations of DCs, immature and mature, were accumulated in patients’ synovial fluid. We also confirmed the presence of CD206+/CD209+ in JIA samples, which can represent a population of macrophages with dendritic cells morphology. Our results support the thesis that dendritic cells are crucial in the induction and maintenance of autoimmune response and local inflammation during juvenile idiopathic arthritis. (Folia Histochemica et Cytobiologica 2011; Vol. 49, No. 1, pp. 188–199

  4. Increased IL-20 and IL-24 target osteoblasts and synovial monocytes in spondyloarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kragstrup, Tue Wenzel; Andersen, Morten Nørgaard; Schiøttz-Christensen, Berit; Jurik, Anne Grethe; Hvid, Malene; Deleuran, Bent

    2017-04-02

    The pathogenesis of spondyloarthritis (SpA) involves activation of the innate immune system, inflammation and new bone formation. The two cytokines IL-20 and IL-24 have been shown to link innate immune activation and tissue homeostasis. We hypothesized that these two cytokines are secreted as part of activation of the innate immune system and affect bone homeostasis in SpA. IL-20 and IL-24 were measured in plasma from axial SpA patients (n=83). Peripheral SpA patients (n=16) were included for in vitro cell culture studies. The plasma IL-20 and IL-24 levels were increased in SpA patients compared with healthy controls (HCs) by 57% and 83%, respectively (both p<0.0001). The Toll like receptor 4 induced secretion of the two cytokines was greater in SpA peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) compared with HC PBMCs. IL-20 and IL-24 increased the production of monocyte chemo attractant protein-1 by activated SpA synovial fluid monocytes, decreased the production of dickkopf-1 by SpA fibroblast-like synovial cells and induced mineralization in human osteoblasts. Taken together, our findings indicate disease-aggravating functions of IL-20 and IL-24 in SpA. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  5. Effect of Fibroblast Growth Factor 2 on Equine Synovial Fluid Chondroprogenitor Expansion and Chondrogenesis

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    Marta Bianchessi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Mesenchymal stem cells have been identified in the synovial fluid of several species. This study was conducted to characterize chondroprogenitor (CP cells in equine synovial fluid (SF and to determine the effect of fibroblast growth factor 2 (FGF-2 on SF-CP monolayer proliferation and subsequent chondrogenesis. We hypothesized that FGF-2 would stimulate SF-CP proliferation and postexpansion chondrogenesis. SF aspirates were collected from adult equine joints. Colony-forming unit (CFU assays were performed during primary cultures. At first passage, SF-cells were seeded at low density, with or without FGF-2. Following monolayer expansion and serial immunophenotyping, cells were transferred to chondrogenic pellet cultures. Pellets were analyzed for chondrogenic mRNA expression and cartilage matrix secretion. There was a mean of 59.2 CFU/mL of SF. FGF-2 increased the number of population doublings during two monolayer passages and halved the population doubling times. FGF-2 did not alter the immunophenotype of SF-CPs during monolayer expansion, nor did FGF-2 compromise chondrogenesis. Hypertrophic phenotypic markers were not expressed in control or FGF-2 groups. FGF-2 did prevent the development of a “fibroblastic” cell layer around pellet periphery. FGF-2 significantly accelerates in vitro SF-CP expansion, the major hurdle to clinical application of this cell population, without detrimentally affecting subsequent chondrogenic capacity.

  6. Determination of marbofloxacin in plasma and synovial fluid by ultrafiltration followed by HPLC-MS/MS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montesano, Camilla; Curini, Roberta; Sergi, Manuel; Compagnone, Dario; Celani, Gianluca; Varasano, Vincenzo; Petrizzi, Lucio; Amorena, Michele

    2016-05-10

    A rapid LC-MS/MS method for the determination of marbofloxacin in plasma and synovial fluid is presented in this study. The method uses a rapid sample preparation which only requires an ultrafiltration step with centrifugal filter devices. The optimized procedure allows a minimal need of sample (175 μL), particularly useful for synovial fluid samples which amount is rather limited; it is simple, rapid and easily applicable providing anyhow a satisfactory clean up, demonstrated by post-infusion experiments. On the other hand to maximize the speed of the analysis an ultrafast chromatographic separation has been obtained by selecting a column of 20 mm; the reduced run-time is suitable for processing numerous samples on a daily basis. Linearity was assessed in the range 5-2500 ng mL(-1); ofloxacin was used as internal standard. LOD and LOQ were respectively 1 and 5 ng/mL. The method was successfully applied to a set of samples generated during an experimental veterinary study.

  7. Histopathological Analysis of PEEK Wear Particle Effects on the Synovial Tissue of Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jansson, V.; Giurea, A.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Increasing interest developed in the use of carbon-fiber-reinforced-poly-ether-ether-ketones (CFR-PEEK) as an alternative bearing material in knee arthroplasty. The effects of CFR-PEEK wear in in vitro and animal studies are controversially discussed, as there are no data available concerning human tissue. The aim of this study was to analyze human tissue containing CFR-PEEK as well as UHMWPE wear debris. The authors hypothesized no difference between the used biomaterials. Methods and Materials. In 10 patients during knee revision surgery of a rotating-hinge-knee-implant-design, synovial tissue samples were achieved (tibial inserts: UHMWPE; bushings and flanges: CFR-PEEK). One additional patient received revision surgery without any PEEK components as a control. The tissue was paraffin-embedded, sliced into 2 μm thick sections, and stained with hematoxylin and eosin in a standard process. A modified panoptical staining was also done. Results. A “wear-type” reaction was seen in the testing and the control group. In all samples, the UHMWPE particles were scattered in the tissue or incorporated in giant cells. CFR-PEEK particles were seen as conglomerates and only could be found next to vessels. CFR-PEEK particles showed no giant-cell reactions. In conclusion, the hypothesis has to be rejected. UHMWPE and PEEK showed a different scatter-behavior in human synovial tissue. PMID:27766256

  8. Pharmacokinetics and penetration into synovial fluid of systemical and electroporation administered sinomenine to rabbits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Huan; Yan, Miao; Li, Huan-De; Jiang, Pei; Deng, Yang; Cai, Hua-Lin

    2015-06-01

    Sinomenine is an anti-rheumatoid arthritis (RA) drug derived from the Sinomenium acutum. The major site of RA treatment is within the synovial compartment. However, the pharmacokinetic and penetration into synovial fluid (SF) of sinomenine have not been reported. In our study, the pharmacokinetics and penetration into SF of systemic and electroporation administered sinomenine were investigated by microdialysis incorporated with HPLC-MS/MS. Sinomenine went into plasma and SF more rapidly with higher peak concentration (Cmax ) by intramuscular injection compared with oral administration. The area under the concentration-time graph (AUC0-∞ ) of intramuscularly injected sinomenine was 1,403,294.75 ± 125,534.567 ng min/mL in plasma and 456,116.37 ± 62,648.36 ng min/mL in SF, which were equivalent with those for an oral dose. These results indicated that equal amounts of sinomenine could penetrate into SF by the two administration routes, and the permeation ratios were approximately 1:3. The AUC0-∞ and Cmax were lower with electroporation compared with systemic administration, but the CSF /CPlasma (concentration of sinomenine in SF vs that of plasma) at 90, 120, 150, 180, 240 and 480 min by electroporation was 3- to 10-fold higher relative to systemic administration. This illustrated that sinomenine can be targeted into joints by electroporation, and electroporation is a potential technique for sinomenine's transdermal delivery.

  9. The Effects of Amphiregulin Induced MMP-13 Production in Human Osteoarthritis Synovial Fibroblast

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi-Te Chen

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Osteoarthritis (OA belongs to a group of degenerative diseases. Synovial inflammation, cartilage abrasion, and subchondral sclerosis are characteristics of OA. Researchers do not fully understand the exact etiology of OA. However, matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs, which are responsible for cartilage matrix degradation, play a pivotal role in the progression of OA. Amphiregulin (AREG binds to the EGF receptor (EGFR and activates downstream proteins. AREG is involved in a variety of pathological processes, such as the development of tumors, inflammatory diseases, and rheumatoid arthritis. However, the relationship between AREG and MMP-13 in OA synovial fibroblasts (SFs remains unclear. We investigated the signaling pathway involved in AREG-induced MMP-13 production in SFs. AREG caused MMP-13 production in a concentration- and time-dependent manner. The results of using pharmacological inhibitors and EGFR siRNA to block EGFR revealed that the EGFR receptor was involved in the AREG-mediated upregulation of MMP-13. AREG-mediated MMP-13 production was attenuated by PI3K and Akt inhibitors. The stimulation of cells by using AREG activated p65 phosphorylation and p65 translocation from the cytosol to the nucleus. Our results provide evidence that AREG acts through the EGFR and activates PI3K, Akt, and finally NF-kappaB on the MMP-13 promoter, thus contributing to cartilage destruction during osteoarthritis.

  10. Effects of ACL Reconstructive Surgery on Temporal Variations of Cytokine Levels in Synovial Fluid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Bigoni

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL reconstruction restores knee stability but does not reduce the incidence of posttraumatic osteoarthritis induced by inflammatory cytokines. The aim of this research was to longitudinally measure IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8, IL-10, and TNF-α levels in patients subjected to ACL reconstruction using bone-patellar tendon-bone graft. Synovial fluid was collected within 24–72 hours of ACL rupture (acute, 1 month after injury immediately prior to surgery (presurgery, and 1 month thereafter (postsurgery. For comparison, a “control” group consisted of individuals presenting chronic ACL tears. Our results indicate that levels of IL-6, IL-8, and IL-10 vary significantly over time in reconstruction patients. In the acute phase, the levels of these cytokines in reconstruction patients were significantly greater than those in controls. In the presurgery phase, cytokine levels in reconstruction patients were reduced and comparable with those in controls. Finally, cytokine levels increased again with respect to control group in the postsurgery phase. The levels of IL-1β and TNF-α showed no temporal variation. Our data show that the history of an ACL injury, including trauma and reconstruction, has a significant impact on levels of IL-6, IL-8, and IL-10 in synovial fluid but does not affect levels of TNF-α and IL-1β.

  11. Lubricin in synovial fluid of mild and severe temporomandibular joint internal derangements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perrotta, Rosario E.; Almeida, Luis-Eduardo; Loreto, Carla; Musumeci, Giuseppe

    2016-01-01

    Background To understand the molecular basis of temporomandibular joint (TMJ) pathologies, we aimed to investigate the lubricin levels in the TMJ synovial fluid (SF) of patients with mild to severe internal derangements (IDs). Material and Methods A total, 34 joints were the study group. Only patients, with a Wilkes stage of III, IV and V were included, in this sample. Control group consisted of SF from eight joints, from patients undergoing to orthognatic surgery. Concentrations of lubricin in the SF from both samples were measured using ELISA system. Results The mean lubricin concentration was 7.029 ± 0.21 µg/mL in stage III patients; 5.64 ± 0.10 µg/mL in stage IV patients, and 4.78 ± 0.11 µg/mL in stage V patients. The lubricin levels from stage IV and stage V patients differed significantly (P ≤ 0.001) from those of control subjects. Lubricin levels were inversely correlated with age and to VAS score. Conclusions The results of this cross-sectional study highlight the relationship between disease severity and the levels of lubricin in TMJ SF. Our findings suggest that novel biotherapeutic approaches, including the administration of recombinant lubricin in the joint cavity, for the treatment of TMJ diseases can be developed. Key words:Lubricin, TMJ, derangements, synovial fluid. PMID:27694778

  12. Condromatosis sinovial de la articulación temporomandibular Synovial chondromatosis of the temporomandibular joint

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Quirós Alvarez

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available La afectación de la ATM por una condromatosis sinovial es un hecho muy poco frecuente. Trastorno metaplásico del tejido sinovial, suele producir cuerpos libres, condromas, intraarticulares. Tiene una clínica variable y muy inespecífica. Las pruebas diagnósticas de elección son la RM y la artroscopia. La retirada de cuerpos libres y sinovectomía parcial suele ser terapéutica. Ocasionalmente puede destruir la base del cráneo y extenderse intracranealmente. Se han descrito casos de malignización secundaria. Es necesario el seguimiento a largo plazo del paciente. Presentamos un caso con osteolisis incipiente de la fosa cerebral media.Synovial chondromatosis very rarely affects the TMJ. It is a metaplastic disorder of the synovial tissue that usually produces intra-articular loose bodies, or chondromas. It has variable clinical features and the symptoms are unspecific. Examination by means of magnetic resonance imaging and arthroscopic observation are the diagnostic techniques of choice. Treatment consists in the removal the loose bodies and partial synovectomy. Occasionally the skull has been destroyed and the middle cranial fossa invaded. There are cases of malignant transformation to chondrosarcoma. A long-term follow up is necessary. We describe a case with incipient intracranial extension.

  13. Detection of a fluorescent-labeled avidin-nucleic acid nanoassembly by confocal laser endomicroscopy in the microvasculature of chronically inflamed intestinal mucosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Buda A

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Andrea Buda,1,* Sonia Facchin,1,* Elisa Dassie,2 Elisabetta Casarin,3 Mark A Jepson,4 Helmut Neumann,5 Giorgia Hatem,1 Stefano Realdon,6 Renata D’Incà,1 Giacomo Carlo Sturniolo,1 Margherita Morpurgo3 1Department of Surgical, Oncological, and Gastroenterological Sciences, University of Padova, 2Department of Molecular Medicine, University of Padova, Padova, Italy; 3Department of Pharmaceutical and Pharmacological Sciences, University of Padova, Padova, Italy; 4School of Biochemistry and Wolfson Bioimaging Facility, University of Bristol, Bristol, UK; 5Ludwig Demlig Endoscopic Center of Excellence, ESGE Endoscopy Training Center, University of Erlangen-Nuremberg, Erlangen, Germany; 6Veneto Institute of Oncology IOV-IRCCS, Padova, Italy *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: Inflammatory bowel diseases are chronic gastrointestinal pathologies causing great discomfort in both children and adults. The pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel diseases is not yet fully understood and their diagnosis and treatment are often challenging. Nanoparticle-based strategies have been tested in local drug delivery to the inflamed colon. Here, we have investigated the use of the novel avidin-nucleic acid nanoassembly (ANANAS platform as a potential diagnostic carrier in an experimental model of inflammatory bowel diseases. Fluorescent-labeled ANANAS nanoparticles were administered to mice with chemically induced chronic inflammation of the large intestine. Localization of mucosal nanoparticles was assessed in vivo by dual-band confocal laser endomicroscopy. This technique enables characterization of the mucosal microvasculature and crypt architecture at subcellular resolution. Intravascular nanoparticle distribution was observed in the inflamed mucosa but not in healthy controls, demonstrating the utility of the combination of ANANAS and confocal laser endomicroscopy for highlighting intestinal inflammatory conditions. The specific localization of

  14. Differential effects of α4β7 and GPR15 on homing of effector and regulatory T cells from patients with UC to the inflamed gut in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Anika; Zundler, Sebastian; Atreya, Raja; Rath, Timo; Voskens, Caroline; Hirschmann, Simon; López-Posadas, Rocío; Watson, Alastair; Becker, Christoph; Schuler, Gerold; Neufert, Clemens; Atreya, Imke; Neurath, Markus F

    2016-10-01

    Gut homing of lymphocytes via adhesion molecules has recently emerged as new target for therapy in IBDs. We aimed to analyse the in vivo homing of effector (Teff) and regulatory (Treg) T cells to the inflamed gut via α4β7 and G protein receptor GPR15. We assessed the expression of homing receptors on T cells in peripheral blood and inflamed mucosa. We studied the migration pattern and homing of Teff and Treg cells to the inflamed gut using intravital confocal microscopy and FACS in a humanised mouse model in dextran sodium sulfate-treated NSG (NOD.Cg-Prkdcscid-Il2rgtm1Wjl/SzJ) mice. Expression of GPR15 and α4β7 was significantly increased on Treg rather than Teff cells in peripheral blood of patients with UC as compared with Crohn's disease and controls. In vivo analysis in a humanised mouse model showed augmented gut homing of UC Treg cells as compared with controls. Moreover, suppression of UC (but not control) Teff and Treg cell homing was noted upon treatment with the α4β7 antibody vedolizumab. In contrast, siRNA blockade of GPR15 had only effects on homing of Teff cells but did not affect Treg homing in UC. Clinical vedolizumab treatment was associated with marked expansion of UC Treg cells in peripheral blood. α4β7 rather than GPR15 is crucial for increased colonic homing of UC Treg cells in vivo, while both receptors control UC Teff cell homing. Vedolizumab treatment impairs homing of UC Treg cells leading to their accumulation in peripheral blood with subsequent suppression of systemic Teff cell expansion. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  15. Lung ICAM-1 and ICAM-2 support spontaneous intravascular effector lymphocyte entrapment but are not required for neutrophil entrapment or emigration inside endotoxin-inflamed lungs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrovich, Ekaterina; Feigelson, Sara W; Stoler-Barak, Liat; Hatzav, Miki; Solomon, Adam; Bar-Shai, Amir; Ilan, Neta; Li, Jin-Ping; Engelhardt, Britta; Vlodavsky, Israel; Alon, Ronen

    2016-05-01

    The pulmonary vasculature constitutively expresses the integrin lymphocyte function-associated antigen-1 ligands intercellular adhesion molecule (ICAM)-1 and -2. In this study, effector T cells were temporarily entrapped by the lung vasculature on their way to inflamed lymph nodes, and this entrapment was strongly reduced in ICAM-1 and -2 double-deficient mice (79 and 86% reduction for CD8(+) and CD4(+) effectors, respectively, compared with wild-type mice). Although the pulmonary vasculature has been suggested to be masked by the heparan sulfate-containing glycocalyx, which is susceptible to heparanase-mediated shedding, lung and lymphocyte heparanase have been found to be unnecessary for this entrapment. Systemic LPS induced rapid neutrophil entrapment in the lung vasculature, but in contrast to T-cell entrapment, this sequestration was ICAM-1, ICAM-2, and heparanase independent. Furthermore, neutrophil migration into the bronchoalveolar space induced by LPS inhalation and LPS-induced leakage of red blood cells into this space were not dependent on lung ICAMs or heparanase activity. Nevertheless, heparanase was critical for neutrophil accumulation in smoke-exposed lungs. Our results indicate that, whereas T cells use ICAM-1 and -2 for temporary pulmonary entrapment, neutrophils get sequestered and extravasate into inflamed lungs independent of ICAMs. This is the first demonstration that the pulmonary vasculature is differentially recognized by T cells and neutrophils.-Petrovich, E., Feigelson, S. W., Stoler-Barak, L., Hatzav, M., Solomon, A., Bar-Shai, A., Ilan, N., Li, J.-P., Engelhardt, B., Vlodavsky, I., Alon, R. Lung ICAM-1 and ICAM-2 support spontaneous intravascular effector lymphocyte entrapment but are not required for neutrophil entrapment or emigration inside endotoxin-inflamed lungs.

  16. A reappraisal of hemangiopericytoma of bone; analysis of cases reclassified as synovial sarcoma and solitary fibrous tumor of bone

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Verbeke, Sofie L J; Fletcher, Christopher D M; Alberghini, Marco

    2010-01-01

    Hemangiopericytoma (HPC) was first described as a neoplasm with distinct morphologic features, presumably composed of pericytes. In soft tissue, it is accepted that most such lesions are solitary fibrous tumors (SFTs), monophasic synovial sarcomas (SSs), or myofibromatoses. It is unclear whether...

  17. The dual regulation of substance P-mediated inflammation via human synovial mast cells in rheumatoid arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuki Okamura

    2017-09-01

    Conclusions: Activated synovial MCs may rapidly degrade SP, which may downregulate the SP-mediated activation of synoviocytes in RA. On the other hand, SP activates MCs to induce inflammatory mediators, suggesting the dual regulation of SP-mediated inflammation by MCs in RA.

  18. Crucial role of synovial lining macrophages in the promotion of transforming growth factor beta-mediated osteophyte formation.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lent, P.L.E.M. van; Blom, A.B.; Kraan, P.M. van der; Holthuysen, A.E.M.; Vitters, E.L.; Rooijen, N. van; Smeets, R.L.L.; Nabbe, K.C.A.M.; Berg, W.B. van den

    2004-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate in vivo and in vitro whether macrophages have an intermediate role in transforming growth factor beta (TGFbeta)-induced osteophyte formation. METHODS: In vivo, synovial lining macrophages were selectively depleted by injection of clodronate-laden liposomes 7 days prior to i

  19. Sarcoma sinovial extra-articular em cão Extra-articular synovial sarcoma in a dog

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    S.A. França

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available One four-year-old, female, Collie, dog presented subcutaneous enlarged mass at the lateral aspect of the left hindlimb, close to the knee joint. Based on the anatomopathological and immunohistochemical findings it was confirmed the diagnosis of extra-articular bifasic synovial sarcoma - grade II.

  20. Three-dimensional structures of human phospholipase A2 from pancreas and synovial fluid by model building

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, I T; Jørgensen, Flemming Steen; Svensson, L A

    1993-01-01

    Three-dimensional structures of the enzyme phospholipase A2 (PLA2) from human pancreas and from human synovial fluid were constructed by model building based on high-resolution X-ray crystallographic structures and homology considerations. The structure of the human pancreatic PLA2 was based...

  1. Activity of lysosomal exoglycosidases in serum and synovial fluid in patients with chronic Lyme and rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pancewicz, Slawomir; Popko, Janusz; Rutkowski, Ryszard; Knaś, Malgorzata; Grygorczuk, Sambor; Guszczyn, Tomasz; Bruczko, Marta; Szajda, Slawomir; Zajkowska, Joanna; Kondrusik, Maciej; Sierakowski, Stanislaw; Zwierz, Krzysztof

    2009-01-01

    Lysosomal exoglycosidases participate in the destruction of the articular cartilage by cleaving glycoside bonds in glycoproteins and proteoglycans. The aim of the study was to determine the activity of exoglycosidases: hexosaminidase, beta-glucuronidase, beta-galactosidase, alpha-mannosidase and alpha-fucosidase in serum and synovial fluid of patients with Lyme and rheumatoid arthritis. The study group consisted of 10 patients with chronic Lyme arthritis (age 18 - 74 y), 13 with rheumatoid arthritis (age 32 - 70 y) and 10 with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (age 8 - 17 y). The control group consisted of 9 healthy volunteers (age 24 - 62 y). The activity of the exoglycosidases was determined with the p-nitrophenyl derivatives of sugars as substrates. A significant increase of the activity of all the exoglycosidases in serum and in synovial fluid of the patients with different forms of arthritis was found. The ratio of synovial fluid/serum activity of exoglycosidases was above 2.0 in LA but not in JIA and RA patients. As the main source of exoglycosidases in the joint is the synovial membrane, this result supports the appropriateness of therapeutic synovectomy in chronic Lyme arthritis with knee effusion. The serum activity of hexosaminidase may be used in monitoring the course of Lyme arthritis and the efficiency of treatment.

  2. Localization of X chromosome short arm markers relative to synovial sarcoma- and renal adenocarcinoma-associated translocation breakpoints

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sinke, R J; de Leeuw, B; Janssen, H A; Weghuis, D O; Suijkerbuijk, R F; Meloni, A M; Gilgenkrantz, S; Berger, W; Ropers, H H; Sandberg, A A

    1993-01-01

    A series of thirteen different DNA markers was mapped relative to papillary renal cell carcinoma- and synovial sarcoma-associated translocation breakpoints in Xp11.2 using a panel of tumor-derived somatic cell hybrids in conjunction with Southern blot analysis. Our results indicate that the two tran

  3. Des-Lys58-beta 2m and native beta 2m in rheumatoid arthritis serum and synovial fluid

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Williams, R C; Malone, C C; Nissen, Mogens Holst;

    1995-01-01

    OBJECTIVE. Levels of beta 2-microglobulin and modified beta 2-microglobulin (Des-Lys58-beta 2m) were measured in serum and synovial fluids from patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and other inflammatory joint disorders using rabbit antisera prepared against the beta 2m peptide VEHSDLSFS...

  4. Occasional presence of herpes viruses in synovial fluid and blood from patients with rheumatoid arthritis and axial spondyloarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgos, Rubén; Ordoñez, Graciela; Vázquez-Mellado, Janitzia; Pineda, Benjamín; Sotelo, Julio

    2015-10-01

    Viral agents have been suspected as participants of immune-mediated disorders. In the case of rheumatic diseases, the synovial joint cavity represents a secluded area of inflammation which could harbor etiological agents. We analyzed by polymerase chain reaction the possible presence of DNA from various herpes viruses in blood and synovial fluid from patients with either rheumatoid arthritis (n = 18), axial spondyloarthritis (n = 11), or osteoarthritis (n = 8). Relevant findings were as follows: DNA from varicella zoster virus was found in synovial fluid but not in blood mononuclear cells from 33 % of patients with rheumatoid arthritis and in 45 % of patients with axial spondyloarthritis but not in patients with osteoarthritis. Also, DNA from herpes simplex viruses 1 and 2 was found both in the blood and in the synovial fluid from 33 % of patients with rheumatoid arthritis. Our results indicate the occasional presence of DNA from herpes viruses in patients with rheumatoid arthritis or with axial spondyloarthritis. However, these findings might represent a parallel epiphenomenon of viral activation associated either with immunosuppressive therapy or with primary immune disturbances, rather than the etiological participation of herpes viruses in these disorders.

  5. Three-dimensional structures of human phospholipase A2 from pancreas and synovial fluid by model building

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, I T; Jørgensen, Flemming Steen; Svensson, L A;

    1993-01-01

    Three-dimensional structures of the enzyme phospholipase A2 (PLA2) from human pancreas and from human synovial fluid were constructed by model building based on high-resolution X-ray crystallographic structures and homology considerations. The structure of the human pancreatic PLA2 was based on t...

  6. Adiponectin and Leptin Synovial Fluid Concentration as a Marker for the Severity of Knee Osteoarthritis in Obese Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eddy Mart Salim

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Osteoarthritis (OA is a chronic degenerative joint disorder of the synovial joint characterized by loss of articular cartilage, osteophyte formation, and alterations of subchondral bone. An increase of weight bearing affect on knee joint biomechanically and alter concentration of adipokines, such as adiponectin and leptin. Herein we reported a correlation between adiponectin and leptin synovial fluid concentration with the severity of knee OA in obese patients. Material and Methods: Totally 45 patients were included in this research. ELISA was used to determine adiponectin and leptin concentrations of synovial fluid. The severity of knee OA was classified by Kellgren-Lawrence grading scale. Data analysis was conducted using SPSS for windows. Results: Based on the leptin measurement, it was shown that leptin concentrations were correlated positively with the severity of knee OA. Vice versa, adiponectin concentrations were correlated negative. Conclusion: Our study was support the biomarker function of adiponectin and leptin concentration on synovial fluids, in which those concentrations were related with the severity of OA. Those results also suggested the function of leptin and adiponectin on OA. [Cukurova Med J 2015; 40(4.000: 746-756

  7. A Challenging Case of Metastatic Intra-Abdominal Synovial Sarcoma with Unusual Immunophenotype and Its Differential Diagnosis

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    Yi-Che Changchien

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The primary and metastatic gastrointestinal synovial sarcoma is rare with a wide differential diagnosis. It usually expresses cytokeratins EMA, BCL2 with an occasional CD99, and S100 positivity but not desmin. We present a case of metastatic synovial sarcoma with unusual immunophenotype causing diagnostic challenges. The tumor cells showed focal cytokeratin, EMA, and, unexpectedly, desmin positivity. Additional intranuclear TLE-1 positivity and negativity for CD34 and DOG-1 were also identified. A diagnosis of monophasic synovial sarcoma was confirmed by using FISH break-apart probe. RT-PCR revealed the SYT-SSX1 fusion gene. Intra-abdominal synovial sarcoma, either primary or metastatic, with unusual desmin positivity raises the diagnostic challenge, since a wide range of differential diagnoses could show a similar immunophenotype (leiomyosarcoma, desmoid tumor, myofibroblastic tumor, and rarely GIST etc.. Typical morphology and focal cytokeratin/EMA positivity should alert to this tumor, and FISH and RT-PCR remain the gold standard for the confirmation.

  8. Volume Entropy

    CERN Document Server

    Astuti, Valerio; Rovelli, Carlo

    2016-01-01

    Building on a technical result by Brunnemann and Rideout on the spectrum of the Volume operator in Loop Quantum Gravity, we show that the dimension of the space of the quadrivalent states --with finite-volume individual nodes-- describing a region with total volume smaller than $V$, has \\emph{finite} dimension, bounded by $V \\log V$. This allows us to introduce the notion of "volume entropy": the von Neumann entropy associated to the measurement of volume.

  9. Synovial Chondromatosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... bodies The condition of the synovium In a traditional open procedure, the doctor will usually make one ... Editorial Board & Staff Contributors Online Agreements Linking Policy Advertising & Sponsorship Privacy Policy AAOS News Bureau Copyright ©1995- ...

  10. Chondrogenic potential of subpopulations of cells expressing mesenchymal stem cell markers derived from human synovial membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arufe, M C; De la Fuente, A; Fuentes, I; de Toro, F J; Blanco, F J

    2010-11-01

    In this study we analyzed the chondrogenic potential of subpopulations of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) derived from human synovial membranes enriched for CD73, CD106, and CD271 markers. Subpopulations of human synovial membrane MSCs enriched for CD73, CD106, and CD271 markers were isolated using a cytometry sorter and characterized by flow cytometry for MSC markers. The expression of Sox9, Nanog, and Runx2 genes by these cells was measured by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction. The chondrogenesis of each subpopulation was assessed by culturing the cells in a defined medium to produce spontaneous spheroid formation and differentiation towards chondrocyte-like cells. The examination of the spheroids by histological and immunohistochemical analyses for collagen type II (COL2), aggrecan, collagen type I (COL1), metalloprotease 13 (MMP13), and collagen type X (COLX) levels were performed to assess their chondrogenesis capacity. The adipogenesis and osteogenesis potential of each subpopulation was determined using commercial media; the resulting cells were stained with oil red O or red alizarin to test the degree of differentiation. The subpopulations had different profiles of cells positive for the MSC markers CD44, CD69, CD73, CD90, and CD105 and showed different expression levels of the genes Sox9, Nanog, and Runx2 involved in chondrogenesis, undifferentiation, and osteoblastogenesis, respectively. Immunohistochemical analysis demonstrated that COL1, COL2, COLX, MMP13, and aggrecan were expressed in the spheroids as soon as 14 days of culture. The CD271(+) subpopulation expressed the highest levels of COL2 staining compared to the other subpopulations. CD105 and Runx2 were shown by immunohistochemistry and genetic analysis to have significantly higher expression CD271(+) subpopulation than the other subpopulations. Spheroids formed from CD271-enriched and CD73-enriched MSCs from normal human synovial membranes mimic the native cartilage extracellular

  11. Targeted gene delivery to the synovial pannus in antigen-induced arthritis by ultrasound-targeted microbubble destruction in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiang, Xi; Tang, Yuanjiao; Leng, Qianying; Zhang, Lingyan; Qiu, Li

    2016-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to optimize an ultrasound-targeted microbubble destruction (UTMD) technique to improve the in vivo transfection efficiency of the gene encoding enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) in the synovial pannus in an antigen-induced arthritis rabbit model. A mixture of microbubbles and plasmids was locally injected into the knee joints of an antigen-induced arthritis (AIA) rabbits. The plasmid concentrations and ultrasound conditions were varied in the experiments. We also tested local articular and intravenous injections. The rabbits were divided into five groups: (1) ultrasound+microbubbles+plasmid; (2) ultrasound+plasmid; (3) microbubble+plasmid; (4) plasmid only; (5) untreated controls. EGFP expression was observed by fluorescent microscope and immunohistochemical staining in the synovial pannus of each group. The optimal plasmid dosage and ultrasound parameter were determined based on the results of EGFP expression and the present and absent of tissue damage under light microscopy. The irradiation procedure was performed to observe the duration of the EGFP expression in the synovial pannus and other tissues and organs, as well as the damage to the normal cells. The optimal condition was determined to be a 1-MHz ultrasound pulse applied for 5 min with a power output of 2 W/cm(2) and a 20% duty cycle along with 300 μg of plasmid. Under these conditions, the synovial pannus showed significant EGFP expression without significant damage to the surrounding normal tissue. The EGFP expression induced by the local intra-articular injection was significantly more increased than that induced by the intravenous injection. The EGFP expression in the synovial pannus of the ultrasound+microbubbles+plasmid group was significantly higher than that of the other four groups (Parthritis therapy.

  12. Subaxial cervical synovial cysts: report of 35 histologically confirmed surgically treated cases and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyons, Mark K; Birch, Barry D; Krauss, William E; Patel, Naresh P; Nottmeier, Eric W; Boucher, Orland K

    2011-09-15

    Retrospective study The authors' aim of the present study is to report their experience with subaxial cervical synovial cysts hoping to provide further insight into these lesions including the presenting symptoms, possible mechanisms of cyst development associated with cervical level, surgical treatments and clinical outcomes. Synovial cysts are relatively common in the lumbar spine and very uncommonly identified in the subaxial cervical spine. Several case reports and a few small series have been reported in the literature over the past four decades. The authors retrospectively reviewed the cases of 35 patients who underwent surgical treatment for histologically confirmed symptomatic subaxial cervical synovial cysts between 1993 and 2009. The presenting symptoms, age, sex, cervical level, operation, complications and outcomes were analyzed in this cohort. Preoperative and postoperative neurologic assessments were done by staff neurologists independent of the operating surgeon. This study was approved by the Mayo Clinic institutional review board. Thirty-five patients underwent surgical treatment for their synovial cysts and follow-up for at least 12 months postoperatively. The mean follow-up time was 49 months (range, 12-134). There were no deaths associated with the surgery. There was one postoperative infection in a patient undergoing a decompressive laminectomy and posterior instrumented fusion. Patient outcomes were assessed using the Modified Rankin Score for 12 patients was 0, 17 patients was 1, 4 patients was 2, and 2 patients was 3. This series of 35 patients with subaxial cervical synovial cysts surgically treated over a period of 17 years illustrates the relative rarity of these lesions. Magnetic resonance imaging is currently the optimal radiographic study to identify these lesions. Surgical resection can be an effective treatment.

  13. Programmed cell death 5 correlates with disease activity and interleukin-17 in serum and synovial fluid of rheumatoid arthritis patients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Jun-feng; GUAN Zhen-peng; ZHANG Shao-long; PEI Zheng; CHEN Ying-yu; PAN Huan

    2013-01-01

    Background Programmed cell death 5 (PDCD5) is a novel apoptotic regulatory gene that promotes apoptosis in various tumor cells.Studies have shown that PDCD5 accelerates the apoptosis of synoviocytes in vitro,implying a potential role in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) pathogenesis.This study examined the expression of PDCD5 in serum and synovial fluid of RA patients,its effect on the expression of inflammatory cytokine,interleukin-17 (IL-17),and the assessment of disease activity in RA.Methods PDCD5 and IL-17 levels in serum and synovial fluid from 18 patients with RA and 22 patients with osteoarthritis (OA) were detected using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA).Concentrations of serum PDCD5 in 40 healthy people were also detected as controls.As disease activity indices,C-reactive protein (CRP),erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR),rheumatoid factor (RF),and X-ray grading scale were also evaluated.Results Serum and synovial fluid PDCD5 levels in RA patients were significantly higher than those in OA and healthy controls.Serum PDCD5 level was inversely correlated to CRP and ESR,and was significantly higher in the RF negative group than in the positive group.PDCD5 level was also negatively correlated with IL-17 levels both in serum and synovial fluid of RA patients.However,differences in synovial fluid PDCD5 level from RA patients at different Larsen stages were not detectable.Conclusions PDCD5 affects RA pathogenesis.Insufficient apoptosis of fibroblast-like synoviocytes and inflammatory cells in RA could increase the expression of PDCD5 protein.As PDCD5 levels correlated negatively with disease activity indices and IL-17 level,PDCD5 could become a target in the diagnosis and treatment of RA.

  14. Cytoskeletal rearrangements in synovial fibroblasts as a novel pathophysiological determinant of modeled rheumatoid arthritis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vassilis Aidinis

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Rheumatoid arthritis is a chronic inflammatory disease with a high prevalence and substantial socioeconomic burden. Despite intense research efforts, its aetiology and pathogenesis remain poorly understood. To identify novel genes and/or cellular pathways involved in the pathogenesis of the disease, we utilized a well-recognized tumour necrosis factor-driven animal model of this disease and performed high-throughput expression profiling with subtractive cDNA libraries and oligonucleotide microarray hybridizations, coupled with independent statistical analysis. This twin approach was validated by a number of different methods in other animal models of arthritis as well as in human patient samples, thus creating a unique list of disease modifiers of potential therapeutic value. Importantly, and through the integration of genetic linkage analysis and Gene Ontology-assisted functional discovery, we identified the gelsolin-driven synovial fibroblast cytoskeletal rearrangements as a novel pathophysiological determinant of the disease.

  15. EFFECTS OF HIGH-IMPACT MECHANICAL LOADING ON SYNOVIAL CELL CULTURES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui Bin Sun

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available Cartilage metabolism in response to mechanical loading is an important subject in sports science and medicine. In animal studies high-impact exercise is known to stimulate bone adaptation and increase bone mass. However, mechanical impacts potentially induce tissue swelling and occasionally degradation of connective tissues in synovium and articular cartilage. These detrimental outcomes should be properly evaluated clinically and biochemically. Using two synovial cell cultures derived from normal and rheumatic tissues, we examined the biochemical effects of impulsive mechanical loads on expression and activities of influential proteolytic enzymes in joints, matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs, and their natural inhibitors, tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinases (TIMPs. The molecular analysis demonstrates that an impact factor (Im, the ratio of the maximum force to weight, served as a good indicator for assessment of the inflammatory responses. The results showed that high impact above Im = 40 to 80 elevated not only expression but also enzymatic activities of MMPs

  16. Current status of engineered T-cell therapy for synovial sarcoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dallos, Matthew; Tap, William D; D'Angelo, Sandra P

    2016-09-01

    Synovial sarcoma is a rare soft tissue sarcoma characterized by a t(X;18) translocation, which results in a SYT-SSX gene fusion. In the metastatic setting, chemotherapy has limited, durable efficacy prompting the necessity for new therapeutic modalities. One emerging new strategy involves T-cell-directed therapy such as tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes or the development of T cells that are genetically engineered to express a T-cell receptor against a cancer testis antigen. Of these approaches, engineered T cells that recognize NY-ESO-1 are the furthest along in development. Completed and on-going clinical trials have shown promise and there are efforts to continue to optimize the current approach.

  17. Synovial fluid matrix metalloproteinase-2 and -9 activities in dogs suffering from joint disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murakami, Kohei; Maeda, Shingo; Yonezawa, Tomohiro; Matsuki, Naoaki

    2016-07-01

    The activity of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2 and MMP-9 in synovial fluids (SF) sampled from dogs with joint disorders was investigated by gelatin zymography and densitometry. Pro-MMP-2 showed similar activity levels in dogs with idiopathic polyarthritis (IPA; n=17) or canine rheumatoid arthritis (cRA; n=4), and healthy controls (n=10). However, dogs with cranial cruciate ligament rupture (CCLR; n=5) presented significantly higher pro-MMP-2 activity than IPA and healthy dogs. Meanwhile, dogs with IPA exhibited significantly higher activity of pro- and active MMP-9 than other groups. Activity levels in pro- and active MMP-9 in cRA and CCLR dogs were not significantly different from those in healthy controls. Different patterns of MMP-2 and MMP-9 activity may reflect the differences in the underlying pathological processes.

  18. Synovial hemangiohamartoma presenting as knee pain, swelling and a soft tissue mass: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Senol Serkan

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction We present a case of a patient with juxtaarticular hemangiohamartoma with a synovial extension associated with hemorrhagic synovitis and recurrent spontaneous hemarthrosis. Case presentation A 21-year-old Caucasian woman was admitted to our hospital complaining of pain and swelling at her knee for 6 months. In the magnetic resonance imaging, T2-weighted and fat-suppressed scans revealed a mass with high signal intensity just posterior to the patellar tendon. We performed an excisional biopsy of the mass through an anterior longitudinal incision. Excised material included arterial and venous vascular structures, which were found to be spread among the fat, connective and peripheral nerve tissues microscopically. Conclusion Although hemangiohamartomas are not true neoplasms, they may cause knee pain, swelling and hemarthrosis that warrant surgical resection. This lesion, although rare, should be considered in the differential diagnosis, especially in teenagers and young adults.

  19. Synovial Chondromatosis of the Subacromial Bursa Causing a Bursal-Sided Rotator Cuff Tear

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julie A. Neumann

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Synovial chondromatosis is an uncommon condition, and involvement of the shoulder is even more rare. We report on a 39-year-old female who presented with symptoms, radiographic features, and intraoperative findings consistent with multiple subacromial loose bodies resulting in a partial-thickness, bursal-sided rotator cuff tear of the supraspinatus muscle. She was treated with an arthroscopic removal of loose bodies, complete excision of the subacromial/subdeltoid bursa, acromioplasty, and rotator cuff repair. To our knowledge, this is the first report of arthroscopic treatment for a bursal-sided, partial-thickness rotator cuff tear treated with greater than two-year clinical and radiographic follow-up. We utilized shoulder scores, preoperative and postoperative range of motion, and imaging to assess the results of treatment and surveillance for recurrence in our patient after two-year follow-up.

  20. Stromal cell markers are differentially expressed in the synovial tissue of patients with early arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Ivy Y; Karpus, Olga N; Turner, Jason D; Hardie, Debbie; Marshall, Jennifer L; de Hair, Maria J H; Maijer, Karen I; Tak, Paul P; Raza, Karim; Hamann, Jörg; Buckley, Christopher D; Gerlag, Danielle M; Filer, Andrew

    2017-01-01

    Previous studies have shown increased expression of stromal markers in synovial tissue (ST) of patients with established rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Here, ST expression of stromal markers in early arthritis in relationship to diagnosis and prognostic outcome was studied. ST from 56 patients included in two different early arthritis cohorts and 7 non-inflammatory controls was analysed using immunofluorescence to detect stromal markers CD55, CD248, fibroblast activation protein (FAP) and podoplanin. Diagnostic classification (gout, psoriatic arthritis, unclassified arthritis (UA), parvovirus associated arthritis, reactive arthritis and RA), disease outcome (resolving vs persistent) and clinical variables were determined at baseline and after follow-up, and related to the expression of stromal markers. We observed expression of all stromal markers in ST of early arthritis patients, independent of diagnosis or prognostic outcome. Synovial expression of FAP was significantly higher in patients developing early RA compared to other diagnostic groups and non-inflammatory controls. In RA FAP protein was expressed in both lining and sublining layers. Podoplanin expression was higher in all early inflammatory arthritis patients than controls, but did not differentiate diagnostic outcomes. Stromal marker expression was not associated with prognostic outcomes of disease persistence or resolution. There was no association with clinical or sonographic variables. Stromal cell markers CD55, CD248, FAP and podoplanin are expressed in ST in the earliest stage of arthritis. Baseline expression of FAP is higher in early synovitis patients who fulfil classification criteria for RA over time. These results suggest that significant fibroblast activation occurs in RA in the early window of disease.