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Sample records for infected human gastric

  1. Human Gastric Mucosal Hydrophobicity Does dot Decrease with Helicobacter Pylori Infection or Chronological Age

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    Mohammed S Al-Marhoon

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND AIMS: Infection with cytotoxin-associated gene A (cagA Helicobacter pylori is associated with severe gastric diseases. Previous studies in humans have reported a decreased gastric hydrophobicity with H pylori infection. The aim of the present study was to differentiate between the effect of cagA+ and cagA- strains on gastric mucus hydrophobicity.

  2. Accumulation of 8-nitroguanine in human gastric epithelium induced by Helicobacter pylori infection

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    Ma, Ning; Adachi, Yukihiko; Hiraku, Yusuke; Horiki, Noriyuki; Horiike, Shinichirou; Imoto, Ichiro; Pinlaor, Somchai; Murata, Mariko; Semba, Reiji; Kawanishi, Shosuke

    2004-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori infection causes chronic inflammation, which can lead to gastric carcinoma. A double immunofluorescence labeling study demonstrated that the level of 8-nitroguanine and 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2 ' -deoxyguanosine (8-oxodG) apparent in gastric gland epithelium was significantly higher in gastritis patients with H. pylori infection than in those without infection. A significant accumulation of proliferating cell nuclear antigen, a prognostic factor for gastric cancer, was observed in gastric gland epithelial cells in patients with H. pylori infection as compared to those without infection, and its accumulation was closely correlated with the formation of 8-nitroguanine and 8-oxodG. These results suggest that nitrosative and oxidative DNA damage in gastric epithelial cells and their proliferation by H. pylori infection may lead to gastric carcinoma. 8-Nitroguanine could be not only a promising biomarker for inflammation but also a useful indicator of the risk of gastric cancer development in response to chronic H. pylori infection

  3. Development of gastric cancer associated with Helicobacter pylori infection.

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    Sugiyama, Toshiro

    2004-09-01

    Helicobacter pylori infection is associated with histological gastritis, gastric atrophy, gastric cancer and mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma in the stomach. However, gastric cancer only develops in a minority of infected individuals. Such clinical diversity is caused by variations in the interactions between H. pylori pathogenicity, host susceptibility, and environmental factors. Based on evidence from three prospective epidemiological studies, the International Agency for Research on Cancer and the World Health Organization (IARC/WHO) concluded in 1994 that H. pylori has a causal linkage to gastric carcinogenesis and is a definite carcinogen in humans. Two large-scale, prospective, epidemiological studies have recently been reported in Japan and have confirmed that H. pylori infection constitutes a high risk factor for the development of gastric cancer, at least in males. In order to obtain evidence that eradication of H. pylori leads to a reduction in the occurrence of gastric cancer, reversibility of precancerous lesions, gastric atrophy or intestinal metaplasia should be proven after eradication treatment. A biopsy specimen from the lesser curvature of the corpus is the most sensitive for evaluating the regression of gastric atrophy on histology, and the evaluation needs be conducted at least 13 months after treatment. In a Mongolian gerbil model with or without low-dose chemical carcinogens, it has been demonstrated that H. pylori can lead to the development of gastric cancer. Experimental studies have elucidated that virulence factors of H. pylori interact with gastric epithelial cell signaling related to carcinogenesis. The cag pathogenicity island (cagPAI) is a major virulence gene cluster; it encodes the type IV secretion machinery system forming a cylinder-like structure. The CagA protein is translocated into target cells via this secretion system and induces a hummingbird phenotype, a growth factor-like effect. The other gene products are

  4. Association of Helicobacter pylori infection with gastric cancer.

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    Alexander, G A; Brawley, O W

    2000-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori has generated public health interest since its identification in 1983. Past studies have suggested that the bacterium plays a role in the pathogenesis of gastric cancer. More recent studies support the conclusion that the association of H. pylori with gastric cancer is causal. The purpose of this article is to review the available evidence supporting the association of H. pylori with gastric cancer. We performed a critical review of the relevant literature published in the English language on H. pylori and gastric cancer using MEDLINE, Index Medicus for the years 1985 to 1997. The reference lists of selected articles also were reviewed to capture citations for further pertinent studies. H. pylori is thought to be the major cause of chronic atrophic gastritis. H. pylori gastritis is worldwide in distribution. H. pylori is now categorized by the International Agency for Cancer Research as a group 1 carcinogen, i.e., an agent that is carcinogenic to humans. Several reports from the United States have found the highest frequencies of gastric cancer in geographic areas and populations with the highest rates of acquisition of H. pylori infection. The high prevalence of H. pylori infection has been documented most notably in blacks and Hispanics, who also are at high risk for gastric cancer. New studies that focus on the epidemiology and pathology of H. pylori improve our understanding of its relationship with gastric cancer and advance the development of gastric cancer prevention and control strategies that are proposed.

  5. Human gastric cancer, Helicobacter pylori and bracken carcinogens: A connecting hypothesis.

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    Oliveros-Bastidas, Alberto; Calcagno-Pissarelli, María Pía; Naya, Marlene; Ávila-Núñez, Jorge Luis; Alonso-Amelot, Miguel E

    2016-03-01

    Long term infection of Helicobacter pylori (Hp) virulent strains is a key factor in the genesis of human gastric cancer, and so are certain dietary proinflammatory and genotoxic compounds. Carcinogenic bracken fern (Pteridium spp.) is one of these. Toxins from this plant are consumed as bracken culinary preparations, through milk and meat of bracken-exposed livestock, and drain waters from bracken swards. Bracken toxin ptaquiloside (PtQ), a suspected human carcinogen, elicits complex responses in animals leading to death. PtQ and Hp might cooperate in gastric pathologies. This paper presents an hypothesis on PtQ-Hp association leading to the enhancement of carcinogenesis in the human gastric environment that might explain the high gastric cancer incidence and death rates among Hp-infected people living in bracken zones at two levels: (1) The macroscopic scale comprising the flow of PtQ in the human diet. (2) the microscopic scale encompassing (A) gastric luminal medium; (B) gastric mucus structure and mucin degradation elicited by Hp; (C) bacterial pH gradient modification of the gastric mucosa that favors PtQ survival and its penetration into epithelial tissue; (D) combined PtQ/Hp effects on gastric immune and inflammatory responses; (E) PtQ-Hp complementary activity at selected cell signaling cascades and genome disturbance. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Epstein-Barr virus infection and gastric carcinoma in São Paulo State, Brazil

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    L.F. Lopes

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available Epstein-Barr virus (EBV is a ubiquitous herpesvirus, and most people have serological evidence of previous viral infection at adult age. EBV is associated with infectious mononucleosis and human cancers, including some lymphomas and gastric carcinomas. Although EBV was first reported in lymphoepithelioma-like gastric carcinoma, the virus was also found in conventional adenocarcinomas. In the present study, 53 gastric carcinomas diagnosed in São Paulo State, Brazil, were evaluated for EBV infection by non-isotopic in situ hybridization with a biotinylated probe (Biotin-AGACACCGTCCTCACCACCC GGGACTTGTA directed to the viral transcript EBER-I, which is actively expressed in EBV latently infected cells. EBV infection was found in 6 of 53 (11.32% gastric carcinomas, mostly from male patients (66.7%, with a mean age of 59 years old. Most EBV-positive tumors were in gastric antrum. Two EBV-positive tumors (33.3% were conventional adenocarcinomas, whereas four (66.7% were classified as lymphoepithelioma-like carcinomas. EBV infection in gastric carcinomas was reported elsewhere in frequencies that range from 5.6% (Korea up to 18% (Germany. In Brazil, a previous work found EBV infection in 4 of 80 (5% gastric carcinomas, whereas another study found 4.7 and 11.2% of EBV-positive gastric carcinomas of Brazilians of Japanese origin or not, respectively. In the present study, the frequency of EBV-positive gastric carcinomas is similar to that reported in other series, and the clinicopathologic characteristics of these EBV-positive tumors are in agreement with the data in the literature.

  7. Prevalence of Coinfection with Gastric Non-Helicobacter pylori Helicobacter (NHPH) Species in Helicobacter pylori-infected Patients Suffering from Gastric Disease in Beijing, China.

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    Liu, Jie; He, Lihua; Haesebrouck, Freddy; Gong, Yanan; Flahou, Bram; Cao, Qizhi; Zhang, Jianzhong

    2015-08-01

    The Helicobacter heilmannii sensu lato (H. heilmannii s.l.) group consists of long, spiral-shaped bacteria naturally colonizing the stomach of animals. Moreover, bacteria belonging to this group have been observed in 0.2-6% of human gastric biopsy specimens, and associations have been made with the development of chronic gastritis, peptic ulceration, and gastric MALT lymphoma in humans. To gain insight into the prevalence of H. heilmannii s.l. infections in patients suffering from gastric disease in China, H. heilmannii s.l. species-specific PCRs were performed on DNA extracts from rapid urease test (RUT)-positive gastric biopsies from 1517 patients followed by nucleotide sequencing. At the same time, Helicobacter pylori cultivation and specific PCR was performed to assess H. pylori infection in these patients. In total, H. heilmannii s.l. infection was detected in 11.87% (178/1499) of H. pylori-positive patients. The prevalence of H. suis, H. felis, H. bizzozeronii, H. heilmannii sensu stricto (s.s.), and H. salomonis in the patients was 6.94%, 2.20%, 0.13%, 0.07%, and 2.54%, respectively. Results revealed that all patients with H. heilmannii s.l. infection were co-infected with H. pylori, and some patients were co-infected with more than two different Helicobacter species. Helicobacter heilmannii s.l. infections are fairly common in Chinese patients. This should be kept in mind when diagnosing the cause of gastric pathologies in patients. Helicobacter suis was shown to be by far the most prevalent H. heilmannii s.l.species. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Effect of Helicobacter mustelae infection on ferret gastric epithelial cell proliferation.

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    Yu, J; Russell, R M; Salomon, R N; Murphy, J C; Palley, L S; Fox, J G

    1995-08-01

    The effect of Helicobacter mustelae infection on gastric epithelial proliferation was studied in ferrets colonized with H.mustelae and specific pathogen-free (SPF) ferrets not infected with H.mustelae. Thirteen H. mustelae-infected ferrets between the ages of 13 and 32 months and 16 SPF ferrets between 6 and 18 months were analyzed. Bacterial cultures, urease tests and Warthin-Starry stains were used to identify H.mustelae. Tissues obtained from the antrum and the body regions of the stomach were assayed by proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) immunohistochemistry and measured using a computerized color image analysis system. PCNA-expressing gastric epithelia in the antrum and the body regions were significantly increased in the H.mustelae-infected ferrets versus the SPF ferrets (P < 0.001). PCNA positivity in the antrum regions of both the H.mustelae-infected ferrets and SPF ferrets was significantly higher than that of the body regions (P < 0.001). Comparison of the histopathology of infected ferrets indicated that PCNA positivity correlated with the histological severity of gastritis. This study suggests that cell proliferation in ferret gastric mucosa increases with H.mustelae infection and provides evidence that PCNA is a useful biomarker for studying the changes in cell kinetics in the ferret stomach. The data also further support the use of the H.mustelae-infected ferret as an animal model for studying the pathogenesis of Helicobacter pylori-induced gastric diseases of humans.

  9. Gastric mucosa in Mongolian and Japanese patients with gastric cancer and Helicobacter pylori infection

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    Matsuhisa, Takeshi; Yamaoka, Yoshio; Uchida, Tomohisa; Duger, Davaadorj; Adiyasuren, Battulga; Khasag, Oyuntsetseg; Tegshee, Tserentogtokh; Tsogt-Ochir, Byambajav

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the characteristics of gastric cancer and gastric mucosa in a Mongolian population by comparison with a Japanese population. METHODS: A total of 484 Mongolian patients with gastric cancer were enrolled to study gastric cancer characteristics in Mongolians. In addition, a total of 208 Mongolian and 3205 Japanese consecutive outpatients who underwent endoscopy, had abdominal complaints, no history of gastric operation or Helicobacter pylori eradication treatment, and no use of gastric secretion inhibitors such as histamine H2-receptor antagonists or proton pump inhibitors were enrolled. This study was conducted with the approval of the ethics committees of all hospitals. The triple-site biopsy method was used for the histologic diagnosis of gastritis and H. pylori infection in all Mongolian and Japanese cases. The infection rate of H. pylori and the status of gastric mucosa in H. pylori-infected patients were compared between Mongolian and Japanese subjects. Age (± 5 years), sex, and endoscopic diagnosis were matched between the two countries. RESULTS: Approximately 70% of Mongolian patients with gastric cancer were 50-79 years of age, and approximately half of the cancers were located in the upper part of the stomach. Histologically, 65.7% of early cancers exhibited differentiated adenocarcinoma, whereas 73.9% of advanced cancers displayed undifferentiated adenocarcinoma. The infection rate of H. pylori was higher in Mongolian than Japanese patients (75.9% vs 48.3%, P gastritis changed from antrum-predominant gastritis to corpus-predominant gastritis with age in both populations. CONCLUSION: Gastric cancer was located in the upper part of the stomach in half of the Mongolian patients; Mongolian patients were infected with non-East-Asian-type H. pylori. PMID:26217093

  10. A method for establishing human primary gastric epithelial cell culture from fresh surgical gastric tissues.

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    Aziz, Faisal; Yang, Xuesong; Wen, Qingping; Yan, Qiu

    2015-08-01

    At present, biopsy specimens, cancer cell lines and tissues obtained by gastric surgery are used in the study and analysis of gastric cancer, including the molecular mechanisms and proteomics. However, fibroblasts and other tissue components may interfere with these techniques. Therefore, the present study aimed to develop a procedure for the isolation of viable human gastric epithelial cells from gastric surgical tissues. A method was developed to culture human gastric epithelial cells using fresh, surgically excised tissues and was evaluated using immunocytochemistry, periodic acid-Schiff (PAS) staining and cell viability assays. Low cell growth was observed surrounding the gastric tissue on the seventh day of tissue explant culture. Cell growth subsequently increased, and at 12 days post-explant a high number of pure epithelial cells were detected. The gastric cancer cells exhibited rapid growth with a doubling time of 13-52 h, as compared to normal cells, which had a doubling time of 20-53 h. Immunocytochemical analyses of primary gastric cells revealed positive staining for cytokeratin 18 and 19, which indicated that the culture was comprised of pure epithelial cells and contained no fibroblasts. Furthermore, PAS staining demonstrated that the cultured gastric cells produced neutral mucin. Granulin and carbohydrate antigen 724 staining confirmed the purity of gastric cancer and normal cells in culture. This method of cell culture indicated that the gastric cells in primary culture consisted of mucin-secreting gastric epithelial cells, which may be useful for the study of gastric infection with Helicobacter pylori and gastric cancer.

  11. Gastric angiogenesis and Helicobacter pylori infection

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    I. D. Pousa

    Full Text Available The formation of new blood vessels seen in conditions commonly associated with Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori infection, including gastritis, peptic ulcer, and gastric carcinoma, prompts consideration of a potential relationship between mucosal colonization by this organism and the angiogenic process. H. pylori directly or indirectly damages endothelial cells, which induces a number of changes in the microvasculature of the gastric mucosa. In H. pylori-associated conditions, that is, in gastritis, peptic ulcer and gastric carcinoma, there is an increased concentration of angiogenic factors, and subsequently a formation of new blood vessels. However, this early angiogenesis -which is activated to repair the gastric mucosa- is subsequently inhibited in patients with peptic ulcer, and ulcer healing is thus delayed. This may be due to the antiproliferative action of this organism on endothelial cells. While the angiogenic process becomes inhibited in infected patients with peptic ulcer, it remains seemingly active in those with gastritis or gastric cancer. This fact is in support of the notion suggested by various studies that peptic ulcer and gastric cancer are mutually excluding conditions. In the case of gastric cancer, neoangiogenesis would enhance nutrient and oxygen supply to cancer cells, and thus tumor growth and metastatic spread.

  12. Helicobacter pylori infection, glandular atrophy and intestinal metaplasia in superficial gastritis, gastric erosion, erosive gastritis, gastric ulcer and early gastric cancer

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    Zhang, Chuan; Yamada, Nobutaka; Wu, Yun-Lin; Wen, Min; Matsuhisa, Takeshi; Matsukura, Norio

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the histological features of gastric mucosa, including Helicobacter pylori infection in patients with early gastric cancer and endoscopically found superficial gastritis, gastric erosion, erosive gastritis, gastric ulcer.

  13. Enterococcus faecalis Infection Causes Inflammation, Intracellular Oxphos-Independent ROS Production, and DNA Damage in Human Gastric Cancer Cells

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    Strickertsson, Jesper A. B; Desler, Claus; Martin-Bertelsen, Tomas

    2013-01-01

    Background Achlorhydria caused by e.g. atrophic gastritis allows for bacterial overgrowth, which induces chronic inflammation and damage to the mucosal cells of infected individuals driving gastric malignancies and cancer. Enterococcus faecalis (E. faecalis) can colonize achlohydric stomachs and we...... therefore wanted to study the impact of E. faecalis infection on inflammatory response, reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation, mitochondrial respiration, and mitochondrial genetic stability in gastric mucosal cells. Methods To separate the changes induced by bacteria from those of the inflammatory cells...... we established an in vitro E. faecalis infection model system using the gastric carcinoma cell line MKN74. Total ROS and superoxide was measured by fluorescence microscopy. Cellular oxygen consumption was characterized non-invasively using XF24 microplate based respirometry. Gene expression...

  14. Serum and gastric fluid levels of cytokines and nitrates in gastric diseases infected with Helicobacter pylori.

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    Mehmet, N; Refik, M; Harputluoglu, M; Ersoy, Y; Aydin, N Engin; Yildirim, B

    2004-04-01

    This case control study presents data on the concentrations of nitrite and nitrate and a variety of pro-inflammatory cytokines such as interleukin-1 beta (IL-1 beta), interleukin-2R (IL-2R), interleukin-6 (IL-6), interleukin-8 (IL-8) and tumor necrosis factor TNF-alpha in gastric fluid and serum. Patients with gastritis, gastric ulcer and gastric cancer are studied and grouped according to infection by Helicobacter pylori. The 208 patients who underwent upper gastrointestinal endoscopic examination were classified as follows; H. pylori-positive gastritis (n = 32), H. pylori-negative gastritis (n = 32), H. pylori-positive ulcers (n = 34), H. pylori-negative ulcers (n = 34), 43 patients with H. pylori-positive gastric cancer in addition to 33 H. pylori-negative healthy control individuals. Gastric fluids and blood samples were taken concomitantly. Cytokines and nitrite and nitrate determinations were attempted as soon as possible after collection of the samples. Nitrite and nitrate levels of serum and gastric fluids of H. pylori-positive gastritis and ulcers were higher than H. pylori-negative gastritis and ulcers. The concentrations of total nitrite and nitrate and cytokines (TNF-alpha, IL-2R, IL-6, and IL-8) in gastric fluids and sera of H. pylori-positive gastric cancer patients were higher than H. pylori-negative control groups. IL-1 beta level was significantly elevated in gastric fluid of infected cancer patients but not in serum. Taken together, the results suggest that an increase in cytokine-NO combination in gastric mucosa previously reported by many studies is not restricted to local infected gastric tissue but also detected in gastric fluid and sera of H. pylori-positive subjects and may have an important role in the pathogenesis and development of common gastric diseases.

  15. Helicobacter pylori infection generates genetic instability in gastric cells

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    Machado, Ana Manuel Dantas; Figueiredo, Céu; Seruca, Raquel

    2010-01-01

    The discovery that Helicobacter pylori is associated with gastric cancer has led to numerous studies that investigate the mechanisms by which H. pylori induces carcinogenesis. Gastric cancer shows genetic instability both in nuclear and mitochondrial DNA, besides impairment of important DNA repair...... of the host, such as oxidative damage, methylation, chromosomal instability, microsatellite instability, and mutations. Interestingly, H. pylori infection generates genetic instability in nuclear and mitochondrial DNA. Based on the reviewed literature we conclude that H. pylori infection promotes gastric...

  16. Enterococcus faecalis Infection and Reactive Oxygen Species Down-Regulates the miR-17-92 Cluster in Gastric Adenocarcinoma Cell Culture

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    Strickertsson, Jesper A B; Rasmussen, Lene Juel; Friis-Hansen, Lennart

    2014-01-01

    Chronic inflammation due to bacterial overgrowth of the stomach predisposes to the development of gastric cancer and is also associated with high levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS). In recent years increasing attention has been drawn to microRNAs (miRNAs) due to their role in the pathogenesis...... of many human diseases including gastric cancer. Here we studied the impact of infection by the gram-positive bacteria Enterococcus faecalis (E. faecalis) on global miRNA expression as well as the effect of ROS on selected miRNAs. Human gastric adenocarcinoma cell line MKN74 was infected with living E...... by living E. faecalis bacteria caused a significant global response in miRNA expression in the MKN74 cell culture. E. faecalis infection as well as ROS stimulation down-regulated the expression of the miR-17-92 cluster. We believe that these changes could reflect a general response of gastric epithelial...

  17. DBGC: A Database of Human Gastric Cancer

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    Wang, Chao; Zhang, Jun; Cai, Mingdeng; Zhu, Zhenggang; Gu, Wenjie; Yu, Yingyan; Zhang, Xiaoyan

    2015-01-01

    The Database of Human Gastric Cancer (DBGC) is a comprehensive database that integrates various human gastric cancer-related data resources. Human gastric cancer-related transcriptomics projects, proteomics projects, mutations, biomarkers and drug-sensitive genes from different sources were collected and unified in this database. Moreover, epidemiological statistics of gastric cancer patients in China and clinicopathological information annotated with gastric cancer cases were also integrated into the DBGC. We believe that this database will greatly facilitate research regarding human gastric cancer in many fields. DBGC is freely available at http://bminfor.tongji.edu.cn/dbgc/index.do PMID:26566288

  18. Chemokines and antimicrobial peptides have a cag-dependent early response to Helicobacter pylori infection in primary human gastric epithelial cells.

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    Mustapha, Pascale; Paris, Isabelle; Garcia, Magali; Tran, Cong Tri; Cremniter, Julie; Garnier, Martine; Faure, Jean-Pierre; Barthes, Thierry; Boneca, Ivo G; Morel, Franck; Lecron, Jean-Claude; Burucoa, Christophe; Bodet, Charles

    2014-07-01

    Helicobacter pylori infection systematically causes chronic gastric inflammation that can persist asymptomatically or evolve toward more severe gastroduodenal pathologies, such as ulcer, mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT) lymphoma, and gastric cancer. The cag pathogenicity island (cag PAI) of H. pylori allows translocation of the virulence protein CagA and fragments of peptidoglycan into host cells, thereby inducing production of chemokines, cytokines, and antimicrobial peptides. In order to characterize the inflammatory response to H. pylori, a new experimental protocol for isolating and culturing primary human gastric epithelial cells was established using pieces of stomach from patients who had undergone sleeve gastrectomy. Isolated cells expressed markers indicating that they were mucin-secreting epithelial cells. Challenge of primary epithelial cells with H. pylori B128 underscored early dose-dependent induction of expression of mRNAs of the inflammatory mediators CXCL1 to -3, CXCL5, CXCL8, CCL20, BD2, and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α). In AGS cells, significant expression of only CXCL5 and CXCL8 was observed following infection, suggesting that these cells were less reactive than primary epithelial cells. Infection of both cellular models with H. pylori B128ΔcagM, a cag PAI mutant, resulted in weak inflammatory-mediator mRNA induction. At 24 h after infection of primary epithelial cells with H. pylori, inflammatory-mediator production was largely due to cag PAI substrate-independent virulence factors. Thus, H. pylori cag PAI substrate appears to be involved in eliciting an epithelial response during the early phases of infection. Afterwards, other virulence factors of the bacterium take over in development of the inflammatory response. Using a relevant cellular model, this study provides new information on the modulation of inflammation during H. pylori infection. Copyright © 2014, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  19. The influence of duodeno-gastric reflux on frequency of Helicobacter pylori infection at patients with ulcer gastric

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kopanski, Z.; Niziol, J.; Micherdzinski, J.; Wasilewska-Radwanska, M.; Cienciala, A.; Lasa, J.

    1996-01-01

    To estimate the correlation between frequency of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection and intensity of duodeno-gastric reflux it was analysed 61 species with ulcer gastric. Bacterial infection was diagnosed by the breath test with 14 C-labelled urea, whereas presence and intensity of the reflux was found with dynamic scintigraphy with 99 Tm MBrIDA support. The H. pylori infection was present at 42 (68.9%) patients. The presence of throwing back the duodenal liquid was found at 32 (52.5%) diagnosed patients. At 19 (31.2%) of them the reflux has intensity of 1%, at 11 (18%)-2 o and 2 (3.3%)-3 o .The investigations which were carried out, showed that at patients with ulcer gastric disease, duodeno-gastric reflux is an agent which slows down H. pylori infection, however it is easily seen not earlier than at 2 o of its intensity. (author)

  20. Enterococcus faecalis infection causes inflammation, intracellular oxphos-independent ROS production, and DNA damage in human gastric cancer cells.

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    Jesper A B Strickertsson

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Achlorhydria caused by e.g. atrophic gastritis allows for bacterial overgrowth, which induces chronic inflammation and damage to the mucosal cells of infected individuals driving gastric malignancies and cancer. Enterococcus faecalis (E. faecalis can colonize achlohydric stomachs and we therefore wanted to study the impact of E. faecalis infection on inflammatory response, reactive oxygen species (ROS formation, mitochondrial respiration, and mitochondrial genetic stability in gastric mucosal cells. METHODS: To separate the changes induced by bacteria from those of the inflammatory cells we established an in vitro E. faecalis infection model system using the gastric carcinoma cell line MKN74. Total ROS and superoxide was measured by fluorescence microscopy. Cellular oxygen consumption was characterized non-invasively using XF24 microplate based respirometry. Gene expression was examined by microarray, and response pathways were identified by Gene Set Analysis (GSA. Selected gene transcripts were verified by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR. Mitochondrial mutations were determined by sequencing. RESULTS: Infection of MKN74 cells with E. faecalis induced intracellular ROS production through a pathway independent of oxidative phosphorylation (oxphos. Furthermore, E. faecalis infection induced mitochondrial DNA instability. Following infection, genes coding for inflammatory response proteins were transcriptionally up-regulated while DNA damage repair and cell cycle control genes were down-regulated. Cell growth slowed down when infected with viable E. faecalis and responded in a dose dependent manner to E. faecalis lysate. CONCLUSIONS: Infection by E. faecalis induced an oxphos-independent intracellular ROS response and damaged the mitochondrial genome in gastric cell culture. Finally the bacteria induced an NF-κB inflammatory response as well as impaired DNA damage response and cell cycle control gene

  1. Molecular Mechanism of Gastric Carcinogenesis in Helicobacter pylori-Infected Rodent Models

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    Takeshi Toyoda

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Since the discovery of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori, many efforts have been made to establish animal models for the investigation of the pathological features and molecular mechanisms of gastric carcinogenesis. Among the animal models, Mongolian gerbils and mice are particularly useful for the analysis of H. pylori-associated inflammatory reactions and gastric cancer development. Inhibitors of oxidative stress, cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2 and nuclear factor-κB, exert preventive effects on chronic gastritis and the development of adenocarcinomas in H. pylori-infected gerbils. Genetically-modified mouse models, including transgenic and knockout mice, have also revealed the importance of p53, COX-2/prostaglandin, Wnt/β-catenin, proinflammatory cytokines, gastrin and type III mucin in the molecular mechanisms of gastric carcinogenesis. Microarray technology is available for comprehensive gene analysis in the gastric mucosa of mouse models, and epigenetics, such as DNA methylation, could be an alternative approach to correlate the observations in animal models with the etiology in humans.

  2. Epstein–Barr Virus Infection and Gastric Cancer

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    Chen, Xin-Zu; Chen, Hongda; Castro, Felipe A.; Hu, Jian-Kun; Brenner, Hermann

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Epstein–Barr virus (EBV) infection is found in a subset of gastric cancers. Previous reviews have exclusively focused on EBV-encoded small RNA (EBER) positivity in gastric cancer tissues, but a comprehensive evaluation of other type of studies is lacking. We searched the PubMed database up to September, 2014, and performed a systematic review. We considered studies comparing EBV nucleic acids positivity in gastric cancer tissue with positivity in either adjacent non-tumor tissue of cancer patients or non-tumor mucosa from healthy individuals, patients with benign gastric diseases, or deceased individuals. We also considered studies comparing EBV antibodies in serum from cancer patients and healthy controls. Selection of potentially eligible studies and data extraction were performed by 2 independent reviewers. Due to the heterogeneity of studies, we did not perform formal meta-analysis. Forty-seven studies (8069 cases and 1840 controls) were identified. EBER positivity determined by in situ hybridization (ISH) was significantly higher in cancer tissues (range 5.0%–17.9%) than in adjacent mucosa from the same patients or biopsies from all control groups (almost 0%). High EBV nuclear antigen-1 (EBNA-1) positivity by PCR was found in gastric cancer tissues, but most were not validated by ISH or adjusted for inflammatory severity and lymphocyte infiltration. Only 4 studies tested for EBV antibodies, with large variation in the seropositivities of different antibodies in both cases and controls, and did not find an association between EBV seropositivity and gastric cancer. In summary, tissue-based ISH methods strongly suggest an association between EBV infection and gastric cancer, but PCR method alone is invalid to confirm such association. Very limited evidence from serological studies and the lack of novel antibodies warrant further investigations to identify potential risk factors of EBV for gastric cancer. PMID:25997049

  3. Saccharomyces boulardii administration can inhibit the formation of gastric lymphoid follicles induced by Helicobacter suis infection.

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    Yang, Lin; Tian, Zi-Bin; Yu, Ya-Nan; Zhang, Cui-Ping; Li, Xiao-Yu; Mao, Tao; Jing, Xue; Zhao, Wen-Jun; Ding, Xue-Li; Yang, Ruo-Ming; Zhang, Shuai-Qing

    2017-01-01

    Helicobacter suis has a greater tendency to induce gastric mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma compared with other Helicobacter species in humans and animals. Saccharomyces boulardii has been established as an adjunct to H. pylori eradication treatment, but the effect of S. boulardii administration alone on Helicobacter infection remains unclear. Here, we found that S. boulardii administration effectively decreased the bacterial load of H. suis and inhibited the formation of lymphoid follicles in the stomach post-infection. The levels of H. suis-specific immunoglobulin A (IgA) and secretory IgA in the gastric juice and small intestinal secretions and the production of mouse β-defensin-3 in the small intestinal secretions were significantly increased by S. boulardii administration at 12 weeks after H. suis infection. In addition, feeding with S. boulardii inhibited the expression of inflammatory cytokines and lymphoid follicle formation-related factors after H. suis infection. These results suggested that S. boulardii may be useful for the prevention and treatment of Helicobacter infection-related diseases in humans. © FEMS 2017. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  4. The overmethylated genes in Helicobacter pylori-infected gastric mucosa are demethylated in gastric cancers

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    Choi Sang-Wook

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The transitional-CpG sites between weakly methylated genes and densely methylated retroelements are overmethylated in the gastric mucosa infected with Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori and they are undermethylated in the gastric cancers depending on the level of loss of heterozygosity (LOH events. This study delineated the transitional-CpG methylation patterns of CpG-island-containing and -lacking genes in view of the retroelements. Methods The transitional-CpG sites of eight CpG-island-containing genes and six CpG-island-lacking genes were semi-quantitatively examined by performing radioisotope-labelling methylation-specific PCR under stringent conditions. The level of LOH in the gastric cancers was estimated using the 40 microsatellite markers on eight cancer-associated chromosomes. Each gene was scored as overmethylated or undermethylated based on an intermediate level of transitional-CpG methylation common in the H. pylori-negative gastric mucosa. Results The eight CpG-island genes examined were overmethylated depending on the proximity to the nearest retroelement in the H. pylori-positive gastric mucosa. The six CpG-island-lacking genes were similarly methylated in the H. pylori-positive and -negative gastric mucosa. In the gastric cancers, long transitional-CpG segments of the CpG-island genes distant from the retroelements remained overmethylated, whereas the overmethylation of short transitional-CpG segments close to the retroelements was not significant. Both the CpG-island-containing and -lacking genes tended to be decreasingly methylated in a LOH-level-dependent manner. Conclusions The overmethylated genes under the influence of retroelement methylation in the H. pylori-infected stomach are demethylated in the gastric cancers influenced by LOH.

  5. Changes in gastric microbiota induced by Helicobacter pylori infection and preventive effects of Lactobacillus plantarum ZDY 2013 against such infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Mingfang; Wan, Cuixiang; Xie, Qiong; Huang, Renhui; Tao, Xueying; Shah, Nagendra P; Wei, Hua

    2016-02-01

    Helicobacter pylori is a gram-negative pathogen linked to gastric ulcers and stomach cancer. Gastric microbiota might play an essential role in the pathogenesis of these stomach diseases. In this study, we investigated the preventive effect of a probiotic candidate Lactobacillus plantarum ZDY 2013 as a protective agent against the gastric mucosal inflammation and alteration of gastric microbiota induced by H. pylori infection in a mouse model. Prior to infection, mice were pretreated with or without 400 µL of L. plantarum ZDY 2013 at a concentration of 10(9) cfu/mL per mouse. At 6 wk postinfection, gastric mucosal immune response and alteration in gastric microbiota mice were examined by quantitative real-time PCR and high-throughput 16S rRNA gene amplicon sequencing, respectively. The results showed that L. plantarum ZDY 2013 pretreatment prevented increase in inflammatory cytokines (e.g., IL-1β and IFN-γ) and inflammatory cell infiltration in gastric lamina propria induced by H. pylori infection. Weighted UniFrac principal coordinate analysis showed that L. plantarum ZDY 2013 pretreatment prevented the alteration in gastric microbiota post-H. pylori infection. Linear discriminant analysis coupled with effect size identified 22 bacterial taxa (e.g., Pasteurellaceae, Erysipelotrichaceae, Halomonadaceae, Helicobacteraceae, and Spirochaetaceae) that overgrew in the gastric microbiota of H. pylori-infected mice, and most of them belonged to the Proteobacteria phylum. Lactobacillus plantarum ZDY 2013 pretreatment prevented this alteration; only 6 taxa (e.g., Lachnospiraceae, Ruminococcaceae, and Clostridiaceae), mainly from the taxa of Firmicutes and Bacteroidetes, were dominant in the gastric microbiota of the L. plantarum ZDY 2013 pretreated mice. Administration of L. plantarum ZDY 2013 for 3 wk led to increase in several bacterial taxa (e.g., Rikenella, Staphylococcus, Bifidobacterium), although a nonsignificant alteration was found in the gastric microbiota

  6. A naturally derived gastric cancer cell line shows latency I Epstein-Barr virus infection closely resembling EBV-associated gastric cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oh, Sang Taek; Seo, Jung Seon; Moon, Uk Yeol; Kang, Kyeong Hee; Shin, Dong-Jik; Yoon, Sungjoo Kim; Kim, Woo Ho; Park, Jae-Gahb; Lee, Suk Kyeong

    2004-01-01

    In a process seeking out a good model cell line for Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-associated gastric cancer, we found that one previously established gastric adenocarcinoma cell line is infected with type 1 EBV. This SNU-719 cell line from a Korean patient expressed cytokeratin without CD19 or CD21 expression. In SNU-719, EBNA1 and LMP2A were expressed, while LMP1 and EBNA2 were not. None of the tested lytic EBV proteins were detected in this cell line unless stimulated with phorbol ester. EBV infection was also shown in the original carcinoma tissue of SNU-719 cell line. Our results support the possibility of a CD21-independent EBV infection of gastric epithelial cells in vivo. As the latent EBV gene expression pattern of SNU-719 closely resembles that of the EBV-associated gastric cancer, this naturally derived cell line may serve as a valuable model system to clarify the precise role of EBV in gastric carcinogenesis

  7. The frequency of Helicobacter pylor infection and cagA expression in the Korean patients with gastric carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jung, Sook Hyang; Kim, Yoo Chul

    1997-12-01

    Helicobacter pylori infection had been approved as a group 1 carcinogen by the international agency for research on cancer. However the association between H.pylori infection and gastric carcinoma was not so definite in South Asia including Korea, and the role of cagA gene of H.pylori in gastric carcinogenesis was a controversial issue. The aims of this study were firstly to study in vivo expression frequency of 16S rRNA and cagA gene of H.pylori, secondly to study the association between H.pylori infection and gastric cancer, the association between cagA expression and gastric cancer in Korean patients. In vivo expression rate of 16S rRNA was 74 % of gastric carcinoma patients and cagA expression rate was 51 % of gastric carcinoma patients with H.pylori infection. Although 90 % of gastric carcinoma patients had H.pylori infection, the association between H.pylori infection and gastric carcinoma was not significant. And there was no significant association between cagA expression and gastric carcinoma. (author). 37 refs., 2 tabs., 1 fig

  8. The frequency of Helicobacter pylor infection and cagA expression in the Korean patients with gastric carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, Sook Hyang; Kim, Yoo Chul [Korea Cancer Center Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1997-12-01

    Helicobacter pylori infection had been approved as a group 1 carcinogen by the international agency for research on cancer. However the association between H.pylori infection and gastric carcinoma was not so definite in South Asia including Korea, and the role of cagA gene of H.pylori in gastric carcinogenesis was a controversial issue. The aims of this study were firstly to study in vivo expression frequency of 16S rRNA and cagA gene of H.pylori, secondly to study the association between H.pylori infection and gastric cancer, the association between cagA expression and gastric cancer in Korean patients. In vivo expression rate of 16S rRNA was 74 % of gastric carcinoma patients and cagA expression rate was 51 % of gastric carcinoma patients with H.pylori infection. Although 90 % of gastric carcinoma patients had H.pylori infection, the association between H.pylori infection and gastric carcinoma was not significant. And there was no significant association between cagA expression and gastric carcinoma. (author). 37 refs., 2 tabs., 1 fig.

  9. Role of Helicobacter pylori infection in gastric carcinogenesis: Current knowledge and future directions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sokic-Milutinovic, Aleksandra; Alempijevic, Tamara; Milosavljevic, Tomica

    2015-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) plays a role in the pathogenesis of gastric cancer. The outcome of the infection depends on environmental factors and bacterial and host characteristics. Gastric carcinogenesis is a multistep process that is reversible in the early phase of mucosal damage, but the exact point of no return has not been identified. Therefore, two main therapeutic strategies could reduce gastric cancer incidence: (1) eradication of the already present infection; and (2) immunization (prior to or during the course of the infection). The success of a gastric cancer prevention strategy depends on timing because the prevention strategy must be introduced before the point of no return in gastric carcinogenesis. Although the exact point of no return has not been identified, infection should be eradicated before severe atrophy of the gastric mucosa develops. Eradication therapy rates remain suboptimal due to increasing H. pylori resistance to antibiotics and patient noncompliance. Vaccination against H. pylori would reduce the cost of eradication therapies and lower gastric cancer incidence. A vaccine against H. pylori is still a research challenge. An effective vaccine should have an adequate route of delivery, appropriate bacterial antigens and effective and safe adjuvants. Future research should focus on the development of rescue eradication therapy protocols until an efficacious vaccine against the bacterium becomes available. PMID:26556993

  10. Ureases as a target for the treatment of gastric and urinary infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Follmer, C

    2010-05-01

    Urease is known to be a major contributor to pathologies induced by Helicobacter pylori and Proteus species. In H pylori, urease allows the bacteria to survive in an acidic gastric environment during colonisation, playing an important role in the pathogenesis of gastric and peptic ulcers. Ureolytic activity also results in the production of ammonia in close proximity to the gastric epithelium, causing cell damage and inflammation. In the case of Proteus species (notably Proteus mirabilis) infection, stones are formed due to the presence of ammonia and carbon dioxide released by urease action. In addition, the ammonia released is able to damage the glycosaminoglycan layer, which protects the urothelial surface against bacterial infection. In this context, the administration of urease inhibitors may be an effective therapy for urease-dependent pathogenic bacteria. This is a review of the role of ureases in H pylori and Proteus species infections, focussing on the biochemical and clinical aspects of the most promising and/or potent urease inhibitors for the treatment of gastric and urinary tract infections.

  11. In vitro expansion of human gastric epithelial stem cells and their responses to bacterial infection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bartfeld, Sina; Bayram, Tülay; van de Wetering, Marc; Huch, Meritxell; Begthel, Harry; Kujala, Pekka; Vries, Robert; Peters, Peter J; Clevers, Hans

    BACKGROUND & AIMS: We previously established long-term, 3-dimensional culture of organoids from mouse tissues (intestine, stomach, pancreas, and liver) and human intestine and pancreas. Here we describe conditions required for long-term 3-dimensional culture of human gastric stem cells. The

  12. Enterococcus faecalis Infection and Reactive Oxygen Species Down-Regulates the miR-17-92 Cluster in Gastric Adenocarcinoma Cell Culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jesper A. B. Strickertsson

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Chronic inflammation due to bacterial overgrowth of the stomach predisposes to the development of gastric cancer and is also associated with high levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS. In recent years increasing attention has been drawn to microRNAs (miRNAs due to their role in the pathogenesis of many human diseases including gastric cancer. Here we studied the impact of infection by the gram-positive bacteria Enterococcus faecalis (E. faecalis on global miRNA expression as well as the effect of ROS on selected miRNAs. Human gastric adenocarcinoma cell line MKN74 was infected with living E. faecalis for 24 h or for 5 days or with E. faecalis lysate for 5 days. The miRNA expression was examined by microarray analysis using Affymetrix GeneChip miRNA Arrays. To test the effect of ROS, MKN74 cells were treated with 100 mM tert-Butyl hydroperoxide (TBHP. Following 5 days of E. faecalis infection we found 91 differentially expressed miRNAs in response to living bacteria and 2 miRNAs responded to E. faecalis lysate. We verified the down-regulation of the miR-17-92 and miR-106-363 clusters and of other miRNAs involved in the oxidative stress-response by qRT-PCR. We conclude that only infection by living E. faecalis bacteria caused a significant global response in miRNA expression in the MKN74 cell culture. E. faecalis infection as well as ROS stimulation down-regulated the expression of the miR-17-92 cluster. We believe that these changes could reflect a general response of gastric epithelial cells to bacterial infections.

  13. Metaplasia in the Stomach-Precursor of Gastric Cancer?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinoshita, Hiroto; Hayakawa, Yoku; Koike, Kazuhiko

    2017-09-27

    Despite a significant decrease in the incidence of gastric cancer in Western countries over the past century, gastric cancer is still one of the leading causes of cancer-related deaths worldwide. Most human gastric cancers develop after long-term Helicobacter pylori infection via the Correa pathway: the progression is from gastritis, atrophy, intestinal metaplasia, dysplasia, to cancer. However, it remains unclear whether metaplasia is a direct precursor of gastric cancer or merely a marker of high cancer risk. Here, we review human studies on the relationship between metaplasia and cancer in the stomach, data from mouse models of metaplasia regarding the mechanism of metaplasia development, and the cellular responses induced by H. pylori infection.

  14. Metaplasia in the Stomach—Precursor of Gastric Cancer?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroto Kinoshita

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Despite a significant decrease in the incidence of gastric cancer in Western countries over the past century, gastric cancer is still one of the leading causes of cancer-related deaths worldwide. Most human gastric cancers develop after long-term Helicobacter pylori infection via the Correa pathway: the progression is from gastritis, atrophy, intestinal metaplasia, dysplasia, to cancer. However, it remains unclear whether metaplasia is a direct precursor of gastric cancer or merely a marker of high cancer risk. Here, we review human studies on the relationship between metaplasia and cancer in the stomach, data from mouse models of metaplasia regarding the mechanism of metaplasia development, and the cellular responses induced by H. pylori infection.

  15. Helicobacter pylori Infection Causes Characteristic DNA Damage Patterns in Human Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Max Koeppel

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Infection with the human pathogen Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori is a major risk factor for gastric cancer. Since the bacterium exerts multiple genotoxic effects, we examined the circumstances of DNA damage accumulation and identified regions within the host genome with high susceptibility to H. pylori-induced damage. Infection impaired several DNA repair factors, the extent of which depends on a functional cagPAI. This leads to accumulation of a unique DNA damage pattern, preferentially in transcribed regions and proximal to telomeres, in both gastric cell lines and primary gastric epithelial cells. The observed pattern correlates with focal amplifications in adenocarcinomas of the stomach and partly overlaps with known cancer genes. We thus demonstrate an impact of a bacterial infection directed toward specific host genomic regions and describe underlying characteristics that make such regions more likely to acquire heritable changes during infection, which could contribute to cellular transformation.

  16. [Giant gastric ulcer by cytomegalovirus in infection VIH/SIDA].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Pereyra, Julia; Morales, Domingo; Díaz, Ramiro; Yoza, Max; Frisancho, Oscar

    2008-01-01

    Cytomegalovirus infection is an important cause of morbidity in immunosupressed patients with Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV). In this paper we present a 43 years old man with renal failure under hemodialysis, several blood transfusions because of anemia and three months of disease characterized by epigastric pain, specially at nights, ameliorated with antacid drugs. Other symptoms were early satisfy, vomits and weigh loss (18Kg). At clinical exam, the patient was pallid, presented adenopathies at cervical and inguinal regions and had a pain at epigastric region in profound touch palpation. The most important exams were HB: 10mg/dl, CMV: 83.5, leukocytes 7000, lymphocytes: 1715, erythrocyte sedimentation rate 49mm/h, the venon test (-), and Giardia lamblia trophozoites in stools. The studies demonstrated the patient was seropositive for HIV and the tests for IgG CMV and IgG Herpes virus resulted seropositives too. At endoscopy the esophagus mucosa was covered by a white plaque which suggests candida infection. In the stomach, over the body gastric, we found a big and deep ulcerated lesion (45 x 41mm), with defined rims and white fund. Biopsy from the edges of the gastric ulcer had the characteristic CMV intranuclear and intracytoplasmic inclusions; we confirmed the diagnosis by immunohystochemistry. The patient receives ganciclovir an then HAART and is getting well.

  17. Relationship of Halitosis with Gastric Helicobacter Pylori Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farnaz HajiFattahi

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Gastric infection with Helicobacter pylori may be one of the main causes of halitosis. This study was performed to evaluate the relationship of Heli- cobacter pylori infection with halitosis.Materials and Methods: This case control study was performed on 44 dyspeptic patients with a mean age of 34.29±13.71 years (range 17 to 76 years. The case group included 22 patients with halitosis and no signs of diabetes mellitus, renal or liver failure, upper respiratory tract infection, malignancies, deep carious teeth, severe  periodontitis,  coated  tongue,  dry  mouth  or poor  oral  hygiene.  Control group included 22 patients without halitosis and the same age, sex, systemic and oral conditions as the case group. Halitosis was evaluated using organoleptic test (OLT and Helicobacter pylori infection was evaluated by Rapid Urease Test (RUT during endoscopy. The data were statistically analyzed using chi square, Mann Whitney and t-tests.Results: Helicobacter pylori infection was detected in 20 (91% out of 22 halitosis patients, and 7 control subjects (32% (P<0.001.Conclusion: Helicobacter pylori gastric infection can be a cause of bad breath. Dentists should pay more attention to this infection and refer these patients to in- ternists to prevent further gastrointestinal (GI complications and probable malig- nancies.

  18. Will Treatment of Helicobacter Pylori Infection in Childhood Alter the Risk of Developing Gastric Cancer?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Billy Bourke

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Helicobacter pylori has been classified as a group 1 carcinogen for gastric cancer. It is estimated that there is between a two- and sixfold increase in the risk of developing gastric cancer among infected patients. Among different populations, the risk of H pylori-infected individuals developing gastric cancer varies greatly. However, on a worldwide scale, gastric cancer is the second most common cause of cancer-related death. Therefore, H pylori eradication could help prevent up to three to four million gastric cancer deaths per year. H pylori is usually acquired in childhood. Because infected children have not harboured the organism for long enough to have developed precancerous lesions, childhood is theoretically an attractive time for H pylori eradication and, thus, could help prevent gastric cancer later in life. However, as H pylori prevalence and the incidence of gastric cancer are falling rapidly in developed nations, widespread population screening programs aimed at the eradication of H pylori in these countries would be enormously expensive. Therefore, except in groups with a high risk for development of gastric cancer (eg, Japanese or those with a strong positive family history of gastric cancer, a population-based test-and-treat policy is not justified.

  19. Effects of EGFR Inhibitor on Helicobacter pylori Induced Gastric Epithelial Pathology in Vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philip A. Robinson

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Helicobacter pylori transactivates the Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor (EGFR and predisposes to gastric cancer development in humans and animal models. To examine the importance of EGFR signalling to gastric pathology, this study investigated whether treatment of Mongolian gerbils with a selective EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitor, EKB-569, altered gastric pathology in chronic H. pylori infection. Gerbils were infected with H. pylori and six weeks later received either EKB-569-supplemented, or control diet, for 32 weeks prior to sacrifice. EKB-569-treated H. pylori-infected gerbils had no difference in H. pylori colonisation or inflammation scores compared to infected animals on control diet, but showed significantly less corpus atrophy, mucous metaplasia and submucosal glandular herniations along with markedly reduced antral and corpus epithelial proliferation to apoptosis ratios. EKB-569-treated infected gerbils had significantly decreased abundance of Cox-2, Adam17 and Egfr gastric transcripts relative to infected animals on control diet. EGFR inhibition by EKB-569 therefore reduced the severity of pre-neoplastic gastric pathology in chronically H. pylori-infected gerbils. EKB-569 increased gastric epithelial apoptosis in H. pylori-infected gerbils which counteracted some of the consequences of increased gastric epithelial cell proliferation. Similar chemopreventative strategies may be useful in humans who are at high risk of developing H.pylori-induced gastric adenocarcinoma.

  20. Epstein-Barr Virus in Gastric Carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nishikawa, Jun, E-mail: junnis@yamaguchi-u.ac.jp [Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Yamaguchi University Graduate School of Medicine, Minami-Kogushi 1-1-1, Ube, Yamaguchi 755-8505 (Japan); Yoshiyama, Hironori; Iizasa, Hisashi; Kanehiro, Yuichi [Department of Microbiology, Shimane University Faculty of Medicine, 89-1 Enyacho, Izumo City, Shimane 693-8501 (Japan); Nakamura, Munetaka; Nishimura, Junichi; Saito, Mari; Okamoto, Takeshi [Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Yamaguchi University Graduate School of Medicine, Minami-Kogushi 1-1-1, Ube, Yamaguchi 755-8505 (Japan); Sakai, Kouhei; Suehiro, Yutaka; Yamasaki, Takahiro [Department of Oncology and Laboratory Medicine, Yamaguchi University Graduate School of Medicine, Minami-Kogushi 1-1-1, Ube, Yamaguchi 755-8505 (Japan); Oga, Atsunori [Department of Pathology, Yamaguchi University Graduate School of Medicine, Minami-Kogushi 1-1-1, Ube, Yamaguchi 755-8505 (Japan); Yanai, Hideo [Department of Clinical Research, National Hospital Organization Kanmon Medical Center, 1-1 Sotoura, Chofu, Shimonoseki, Yamaguchi 752-8510 (Japan); Sakaida, Isao [Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Yamaguchi University Graduate School of Medicine, Minami-Kogushi 1-1-1, Ube, Yamaguchi 755-8505 (Japan)

    2014-11-07

    The Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is detected in about 10% of gastric carcinoma cases throughout the world. In EBV-associated gastric carcinoma, all tumor cells harbor the clonal EBV genome. Gastric carcinoma associated with EBV has distinct clinicopathological features, occurs predominately in men and in younger-aged individuals, and presents a generally diffuse histological type. Most cases of EBV-associated gastric carcinoma exhibit a histology rich in lymphocyte infiltration. The immunological reactiveness in the host may represent a relatively preferable prognosis in EBV-positive cases. This fact highlights the important role of EBV in the development of EBV-associated gastric carcinoma. We have clearly proved direct infection of human gastric epithelialcells by EBV. The infection was achieved by using a recombinant EBV. Promotion of growth by EBV infection was observed in the cells. Considerable data suggest that EBV may directly contribute to the development of EBV-associated GC. This tumor-promoting effect seems to involve multiple mechanisms, because EBV affects several host proteins and pathways that normally promote apoptosis and regulate cell proliferation.

  1. Epstein-Barr Virus in Gastric Carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishikawa, Jun; Yoshiyama, Hironori; Iizasa, Hisashi; Kanehiro, Yuichi; Nakamura, Munetaka; Nishimura, Junichi; Saito, Mari; Okamoto, Takeshi; Sakai, Kouhei; Suehiro, Yutaka; Yamasaki, Takahiro; Oga, Atsunori; Yanai, Hideo; Sakaida, Isao

    2014-01-01

    The Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is detected in about 10% of gastric carcinoma cases throughout the world. In EBV-associated gastric carcinoma, all tumor cells harbor the clonal EBV genome. Gastric carcinoma associated with EBV has distinct clinicopathological features, occurs predominately in men and in younger-aged individuals, and presents a generally diffuse histological type. Most cases of EBV-associated gastric carcinoma exhibit a histology rich in lymphocyte infiltration. The immunological reactiveness in the host may represent a relatively preferable prognosis in EBV-positive cases. This fact highlights the important role of EBV in the development of EBV-associated gastric carcinoma. We have clearly proved direct infection of human gastric epithelialcells by EBV. The infection was achieved by using a recombinant EBV. Promotion of growth by EBV infection was observed in the cells. Considerable data suggest that EBV may directly contribute to the development of EBV-associated GC. This tumor-promoting effect seems to involve multiple mechanisms, because EBV affects several host proteins and pathways that normally promote apoptosis and regulate cell proliferation

  2. Host Epithelial Interactions with Helicobacter Pylori: A Role for Disrupted Gastric Barrier Function in the Clinical Outcome of Infection?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andre G Buret

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Infection of the human stomach with Helicobacter pylori may develop into gastritis, ulceration, adenocarcinoma and mucosal lymphomas. The pathogenic mechanisms that determine the clinical outcome from this microbial-epithelial interaction remain poorly understood. An increasing number of reports suggests that disruptions of epithelial barrier function may contribute to pathology and postinfectious complications in a variety of gastrointestinal infections. The aim of this review is to critically discuss the implications of H pylori persistence on gastric disease, with emphasis on the role of myosin light chain kinase, claudins and matrix metalloproteinases in gastric permeability defects, and their contribution to the development of cancer. These mechanisms and the associated signalling events may represent novel therapeutic targets to control disease processes induced by H pylori, a microbial pathogen that colonizes the stomach of over 50% of the human population.

  3. Characterization of fasted human gastric fluid for relevant rheological parameters and gastric lipase activities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Pernille Barbre; Vilmann, Peter; Bar-Shalom, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    be considered important during development of gastric simulated media. Further, the activity of the HGL is active even under fasted gastric conditions and might contribute to the digestion and emulsification of lipid-based drug delivery systems in the entire gastrointestinal tract. HGL should therefore......PURPOSE: To characterize human gastric fluid with regard to rheological properties and gastric lipase activity. In addition, traditional physicochemical properties were determined. METHODS: Fasted HGA were collected from 19 healthy volunteers during a gastroscopic examination. Rheological...... be considered in gastric evaluation of lipid-based drug delivery systems....

  4. Curcumin Inhibits Gastric Inflammation Induced by Helicobacter Pylori Infection in a Mouse Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    António M. Santos

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori infection triggers a sequence of gastric alterations starting with an inflammation of the gastric mucosa that, in some cases, evolves to gastric cancer. Efficient vaccination has not been achieved, thus it is essential to find alternative therapies, particularly in the nutritional field. The current study evaluated whether curcumin could attenuate inflammation of the gastric mucosa due to H. pylori infection. Twenty-eight C57BL/6 mice, were inoculated with the H. pylori SS1 strain; ten non-infected mice were used as controls. H. pylori infection in live mice was followed-up using a modified 13C-Urea Breath Test (13C-UBT and quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR. Histologically confirmed, gastritis was observed in 42% of infected non-treated mice at both 6 and 18 weeks post-infection. These mice showed an up-regulation of the expression of inflammatory cytokines and chemokines, as well as of toll-like receptors (TLRs and MyD88, at both time points. Treatment with curcumin decreased the expression of all these mediators. No inflammation was observed by histology in this group. Curcumin treatment exerted a significant anti-inflammatory effect in H. pylori-infected mucosa, pointing to the promising role of a nutritional approach in the prevention of H. pylori induced deleterious inflammation while the eradication or prevention of colonization by effective vaccine is not available.

  5. Comparative analysis of gastric bacterial microbiota in Mongolian gerbils after long-term infection with Helicobacter pylori.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osaki, Takako; Matsuki, Takahiro; Asahara, Takashi; Zaman, Cynthia; Hanawa, Tomoko; Yonezawa, Hideo; Kurata, Satoshi; Woo, Timothy Derg-hoong; Nomoto, Koji; Kamiya, Shigeru

    2012-07-01

    Quantitative (qt) real time PCR using 16SrDNA primers is useful for determination of the bacterial composition of the gastric microbiota in Mongolian gerbils. The aim of this study was to determine the change in the gastric microbiota after long-term infection with Helicobacter pylori. One year after inoculation with H. pylori, five gerbils were determined as H. pylori-positive and 6 gerbils H. pylori-negative by culture and real time qt PCR methods. The gastric microbiota of each group of gerbils was also compared with that of 6 gerbils uninfected with H. pylori. DNA from the Atopobium cluster, Bifidobacterium spp., Clostridium coccoides group, Clostridium leptum subgroup, Enterococcus spp. and Lactobacillus spp. were detected in the gastric mucus of both infected and uninfected gerbils. In contrast, Eubacterium cylindroides group and Prevotella spp. were detected only in H. pylori-negative gerbils. The numbers of C. leptum subgroup, C. coccoides group and Bifidobacterium spp. in gastric mucus of H. pylori-negative Mongolian gerbils were significantly lower than those in non-infected gerbils. The results obtained suggest that the composition of gastric indigenous microbiota in Mongolian gerbils may be disturbed by long-term infection with H. pylori, and that these changes may in fact inhibit H. pylori infection.

  6. Radiation-induced Epstein-Barr virus reactivation in gastric cancer cells with latent EBV infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nandakumar, Athira; Uwatoko, Futoshi; Yamamoto, Megumi; Tomita, Kazuo; Majima, Hideyuki J; Akiba, Suminori; Koriyama, Chihaya

    2017-07-01

    Epstein-Barr virus, a ubiquitous human herpes virus with oncogenic activity, can be found in 6%-16% of gastric carcinomas worldwide. In Epstein-Barr virus-associated gastric carcinoma, only a few latent genes of the virus are expressed. Ionizing irradiation was shown to induce lytic Epstein-Barr virus infection in lymphoblastoid cell lines with latent Epstein-Barr virus infection. In this study, we examined the effect of ionizing radiation on the Epstein-Barr virus reactivation in a gastric epithelial cancer cell line (SNU-719, an Epstein-Barr virus-associated gastric carcinoma cell line). Irradiation with X-ray (dose = 5 and 10 Gy; dose rate = 0.5398 Gy/min) killed approximately 25% and 50% of cultured SNU-719 cells, respectively, in 48 h. Ionizing radiation increased the messenger RNA expression of immediate early Epstein-Barr virus lytic genes (BZLF1 and BRLF1), determined by real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction, in a dose-dependent manner at 48 h and, to a slightly lesser extent, at 72 h after irradiation. Similar findings were observed for other Epstein-Barr virus lytic genes (BMRF1, BLLF1, and BcLF1). After radiation, the expression of transforming growth factor beta 1 messenger RNA increased and reached a peak in 12-24 h, and the high-level expression of the Epstein-Barr virus immediate early genes can convert latent Epstein-Barr virus infection into the lytic form and result in the release of infectious Epstein-Barr virus. To conclude, Ionizing radiation activates lytic Epstein-Barr virus gene expression in the SNU-719 cell line mainly through nuclear factor kappaB activation. We made a brief review of literature to explore underlying mechanism involved in transforming growth factor beta-induced Epstein-Barr virus reactivation. A possible involvement of nuclear factor kappaB was hypothesized.

  7. Epidemiology of Helicobacter pylori and CagA-Positive Infections and Global Variations in Gastric Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forman, David; Crabtree, Jean E.

    2018-01-01

    Gastric cancer is a major health burden and is the fifth most common malignancy and the third most common cause of death from cancer worldwide. Development of gastric cancer involves several aspects, including host genetics, environmental factors, and Helicobacter pylori infection. There is increasing evidence from epidemiological studies of the association of H. pylori infection and specific virulence factors with gastric cancer. Studies in animal models indicate H. pylori is a primary factor in the development of gastric cancer. One major virulence factor in H. pylori is the cytotoxin-associated gene A (cagA), which encodes the CagA protein in the cag pathogenicity island (cag PAI). Meta-analysis of studies investigating CagA seropositivity irrespective of H. pylori status identified that CagA seropositivity increases the risk of gastric cancer (OR = 2.87, 95% CI: 1.95–4.22) relative to the risk of H. pylori infection alone (OR = 2.31, 95% CI: 1.58–3.39). Eradicating H. pylori is a strategy for reducing gastric cancer incidence. A meta-analysis of six randomised controlled trials (RCTs) suggests that searching for and eradicating H. pylori infection reduces the subsequent incidence of gastric cancer with a pooled relative risk of 0.66 (95% CI: 0.46–0.95). The introduction in regions of high gastric cancer incidence of population-based H. pylori screening and treatment programmes, with a scientifically valid assessment of programme processes, feasibility, effectiveness and possible adverse consequences, would impact the incidence of H. pylori-induced gastric cancer. Given the recent molecular understanding of the oncogenic role of CagA, targeting H. pylori screening and treatment programmes in populations with a high prevalence of H. pylori CagA-positive strains, particularly the more oncogenic East Asian H. pylori CagA strains, may be worth further investigation to optimise the benefits of such strategies. PMID:29671784

  8. Epidemiology of Helicobacter pylori and CagA-Positive Infections and Global Variations in Gastric Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin Young Park

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Gastric cancer is a major health burden and is the fifth most common malignancy and the third most common cause of death from cancer worldwide. Development of gastric cancer involves several aspects, including host genetics, environmental factors, and Helicobacter pylori infection. There is increasing evidence from epidemiological studies of the association of H. pylori infection and specific virulence factors with gastric cancer. Studies in animal models indicate H. pylori is a primary factor in the development of gastric cancer. One major virulence factor in H. pylori is the cytotoxin-associated gene A (cagA, which encodes the CagA protein in the cag pathogenicity island (cag PAI. Meta-analysis of studies investigating CagA seropositivity irrespective of H. pylori status identified that CagA seropositivity increases the risk of gastric cancer (OR = 2.87, 95% CI: 1.95–4.22 relative to the risk of H. pylori infection alone (OR = 2.31, 95% CI: 1.58–3.39. Eradicating H. pylori is a strategy for reducing gastric cancer incidence. A meta-analysis of six randomised controlled trials (RCTs suggests that searching for and eradicating H. pylori infection reduces the subsequent incidence of gastric cancer with a pooled relative risk of 0.66 (95% CI: 0.46–0.95. The introduction in regions of high gastric cancer incidence of population-based H. pylori screening and treatment programmes, with a scientifically valid assessment of programme processes, feasibility, effectiveness and possible adverse consequences, would impact the incidence of H. pylori-induced gastric cancer. Given the recent molecular understanding of the oncogenic role of CagA, targeting H. pylori screening and treatment programmes in populations with a high prevalence of H. pylori CagA-positive strains, particularly the more oncogenic East Asian H. pylori CagA strains, may be worth further investigation to optimise the benefits of such strategies.

  9. Translating Developmental Principles to Generate Human Gastric Organoids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandra K. Eicher

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Gastric diseases, including peptic ulcer disease and gastric cancer, are highly prevalent in human beings. Despite this, the cellular biology of the stomach remains poorly understood relative to other gastrointestinal organs such as the liver, intestine, and colon. In particular, little is known about the molecular basis of stomach development and the differentiation of gastric lineages. Although animal models are useful for studying gastric development, function, and disease, there are major structural and physiological differences in human stomachs that render these models insufficient. To look at gastric development, function, and disease in a human context, a model system of the human stomach is imperative. This review details how this was achieved through the directed differentiation of human pluripotent stem cells in a 3-dimensional environment into human gastric organoids (HGOs. Similar to previous work that has generated human intestine, colon, and lung tissue in vitro, HGOs were generated in vitro through a step-wise differentiation designed to mimic the temporal-spatial signaling dynamics that control stomach development in vivo. HGOs can be used for a variety of purposes, including genetic modeling, drug screening, and potentially even in future patient transplantation. Moreover, HGOs are well suited to study the development and interactions of nonepithelial cell types, such as endothelial, neuronal, and mesenchymal, which remain almost completely unstudied. This review discusses the basics of stomach morphology, function, and developmental pathways involved in generating HGOs. We also highlight important gaps in our understanding of how epithelial and mesenchymal interactions are essential for the development and overall function of the human stomach.

  10. Treatment of Helicobacter pylori infection favourably affects gastric mucosal superoxide dismutases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Götz, J. M.; Thio, J. L.; Verspaget, H. W.; Offerhaus, G. J.; Biemond, I.; Lamers, C. B.; Veenendaal, R. A.

    1997-01-01

    Excessive production of reactive oxygen metabolites (ROMs) by phagocytic cells is thought to contribute to the mucosal pathology of Helicobacter pylori infection. Previously, H pylori infection was shown to have a differential effect on some gastric mucosal scavenger enzymes of ROMs-namely,

  11. Enterococcus faecalis Infection Causes Inflammation, Intracellular Oxphos-Independent ROS Production, and DNA Damage in Human Gastric Cancer Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Strickertsson, Jesper A. B; Desler, Claus; Martin-Bertelsen, Tomas

    2013-01-01

    therefore wanted to study the impact of E. faecalis infection on inflammatory response, reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation, mitochondrial respiration, and mitochondrial genetic stability in gastric mucosal cells. Methods To separate the changes induced by bacteria from those of the inflammatory cells...... intracellular ROS production through a pathway independent of oxidative phosphorylation (oxphos). Furthermore, E. faecalis infection induced mitochondrial DNA instability. Following infection, genes coding for inflammatory response proteins were transcriptionally up-regulated while DNA damage repair and cell...... cycle control genes were down-regulated. Cell growth slowed down when infected with viable E. faecalis and responded in a dose dependent manner to E. faecalis lysate. Conclusions Infection by E. faecalis induced an oxphos-independent intracellular ROS response and damaged the mitochondrial genome...

  12. Reduction of hexavalent chromium by fasted and fed human gastric fluid. II. Ex vivo gastric reduction modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kirman, Christopher R., E-mail: ckirman@summittoxicology.com [Summit Toxicology, Orange Village, OH, 44022 (United States); Suh, Mina, E-mail: msuh@toxstrategies.com [ToxStrategies, Inc., Mission Viejo, CA, 92692 (United States); Hays, Sean M., E-mail: shays@summittoxicology.com [Summit Toxicology, Allenspark, CO, 8040 (United States); Gürleyük, Hakan, E-mail: hakan@brooksrand.com [Brooks Applied Labs, Bothell, WA, 98011 (United States); Gerads, Russ, E-mail: russ@brooksrand.com [Brooks Applied Labs, Bothell, WA, 98011 (United States); De Flora, Silvio, E-mail: sdf@unige.it [Department of Health Sciences, University of Genoa, 16132 Genoa (Italy); Parker, William, E-mail: william.parker@duke.edu [Duke University Medical Center, Department of Surgery, Durham, NC, 27710 (United States); Lin, Shu, E-mail: shu.lin@duke.edu [Duke University Medical Center, Department of Surgery, Durham, NC, 27710 (United States); Haws, Laurie C., E-mail: lhaws@toxstrategies.com [ToxStrategies, Inc., Katy, TX, 77494 (United States); Harris, Mark A., E-mail: mharris@toxstrategies.com [ToxStrategies, Inc., Austin, TX, 78751 (United States); Proctor, Deborah M., E-mail: dproctor@toxstrategies.com [ToxStrategies, Inc., Mission Viejo, CA, 92692 (United States)

    2016-09-01

    To extend previous models of hexavalent chromium [Cr(VI)] reduction by gastric fluid (GF), ex vivo experiments were conducted to address data gaps and limitations identified with respect to (1) GF dilution in the model; (2) reduction of Cr(VI) in fed human GF samples; (3) the number of Cr(VI) reduction pools present in human GF under fed, fasted, and proton pump inhibitor (PPI)-use conditions; and (4) an appropriate form for the pH-dependence of Cr(VI) reduction rate constants. Rates and capacities of Cr(VI) reduction were characterized in gastric contents from fed and fasted volunteers, and from fasted pre-operative patients treated with PPIs. Reduction capacities were first estimated over a 4-h reduction period. Once reduction capacity was established, a dual-spike approach was used in speciated isotope dilution mass spectrometry analyses to characterize the concentration-dependence of the 2nd order reduction rate constants. These data, when combined with previously collected data, were well described by a three-pool model (pool 1 = fast reaction with low capacity; pool 2 = slow reaction with higher capacity; pool 3 = very slow reaction with higher capacity) using pH-dependent rate constants characterized by a piecewise, log-linear relationship. These data indicate that human gastric samples, like those collected from rats and mice, contain multiple pools of reducing agents, and low concentrations of Cr(VI) (< 0.7 mg/L) are reduced more rapidly than high concentrations. The data and revised modeling results herein provide improved characterization of Cr(VI) gastric reduction kinetics, critical for Cr(VI) pharmacokinetic modeling and human health risk assessment. - Highlights: • SIDMS allows for measurement of Cr(VI) reduction rate in gastric fluid ex vivo • Human gastric fluid has three reducing pools • Cr(VI) in drinking water at < 0.7 mg/L is rapidly reduced in human gastric fluid • Reduction rate is concentration- and pH-dependent • A refined PK

  13. Characterizing lamina propria of human gastric mucosa by multiphoton microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Y C; Yang, H Q; Zhuo, S M [Institute of Laser and Optoelectronics Technology, Fujian Provincial Key Laboratory for Photonics Technology, Key Laboratory of OptoElectronic Science and Technology for Medicine of Ministry of Education, Fujian Normal University, Fuzhou 350007 (China); Chen, G; Chen, J X [Department of Pathology, Fujian Provincial Tumor Hospital, Fuzhou, 350014 (China); Yan, J, E-mail: chenjianxin@fjnu.edu.cn, E-mail: ynjun@yahoo.com [Department of Surgery, Fujian Provincial Tumor Hospital, Fuzhou, 350014 (China)

    2011-01-01

    Lamina propria (LP) of gastric mucosa plays an important role in progression of gastric cancer because of the site at where inflammatory reactions occur. Multiphoton imaging has been recently employed for microscopic examination of intact tissue. In this paper, using multiphoton microscopy (MPM) based on two-photon excited fluorescence (TPEF) and second harmonic generation (SHG), high resolution multiphoton microscopic images of lamina propria (LP) are obtained in normal human gastric mucosa at excitation wavelength {lambda}{sub ex} = 800 nm. The main source of tissue TPEF originated from the cells of gastric glands, and loose connective tissue, collagen, produced SHG signals. Our results demonstrated that MPM can be effective for characterizing the microstructure of LP in human gastric mucosa. The findings will be helpful for diagnosing and staging early gastric cancer in the clinics.

  14. Characterizing lamina propria of human gastric mucosa by multiphoton microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Y. C.; Yang, H. Q.; Chen, G.; Zhuo, S. M.; Chen, J. X.; Yan, J.

    2011-01-01

    Lamina propria (LP) of gastric mucosa plays an important role in progression of gastric cancer because of the site at where inflammatory reactions occur. Multiphoton imaging has been recently employed for microscopic examination of intact tissue. In this paper, using multiphoton microscopy (MPM) based on two-photon excited fluorescence (TPEF) and second harmonic generation (SHG), high resolution multiphoton microscopic images of lamina propria (LP) are obtained in normal human gastric mucosa at excitation wavelength λex = 800 nm. The main source of tissue TPEF originated from the cells of gastric glands, and loose connective tissue, collagen, produced SHG signals. Our results demonstrated that MPM can be effective for characterizing the microstructure of LP in human gastric mucosa. The findings will be helpful for diagnosing and staging early gastric cancer in the clinics.

  15. Epstein-Barr Virus (EBV)-associated Gastric Carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iizasa, Hisashi; Nanbo, Asuka; Nishikawa, Jun; Jinushi, Masahisa; Yoshiyama, Hironori

    2012-01-01

    The ubiquitous Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is associated with several human tumors, which include lymphoid and epithelial malignancies. It is known that EBV persistently infects the memory B cell pool of healthy individuals by activating growth and survival signaling pathways that can contribute to B cell lymphomagenesis. Although the monoclonal proliferation of EBV-infected cells can be observed in epithelial tumors, such as nasopharyngeal carcinoma and EBV-associated gastric carcinoma, the precise role of EBV in the carcinogenic progress is not fully understood. This review features characteristics and current understanding of EBV-associated gastric carcinoma. EBV-associated gastric carcinoma comprises almost 10% of all gastric carcinoma cases and expresses restricted EBV latent genes (Latency I). Firstly, definition, epidemiology, and clinical features are discussed. Then, the route of infection and carcinogenic role of viral genes are presented. Of particular interest, the association with frequent genomic CpG methylation and role of miRNA for carcinogenesis are topically discussed. Finally, the possibility of therapies targeting EBV-associated gastric carcinoma is proposed. PMID:23342366

  16. Epstein-Barr Virus (EBV-associated Gastric Carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hironori Yoshiyama

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The ubiquitous Epstein-Barr virus (EBV is associated with several human tumors, which include lymphoid and epithelial malignancies. It is known that EBV persistently infects the memory B cell pool of healthy individuals by activating growth and survival signaling pathways that can contribute to B cell lymphomagenesis.  Although the monoclonal proliferation of EBV-infected cells can be observed in epithelial tumors, such as nasopharyngeal carcinoma and EBV-associated gastric carcinoma, the precise role of EBV in the carcinogenic progress is not fully understood. This review features characteristics and current understanding of EBV-associated gastric carcinoma. EBV-associated gastric carcinoma comprises almost 10% of all gastric carcinoma cases and expresses restricted EBV latent genes (Latency I. Firstly, definition, epidemiology, and clinical features are discussed. Then, the route of infection and carcinogenic role of viral genes are presented.  Of particular interest, the association with frequent genomic CpG methylation and role of miRNA for carcinogenesis are topically discussed. Finally, the possibility of therapies targeting EBV-associated gastric carcinoma is proposed. 

  17. Translating Developmental Principles to Generate Human Gastric Organoids

    OpenAIRE

    Alexandra K. Eicher; H. Matthew Berns; James M. Wells

    2018-01-01

    Gastric diseases, including peptic ulcer disease and gastric cancer, are highly prevalent in human beings. Despite this, the cellular biology of the stomach remains poorly understood relative to other gastrointestinal organs such as the liver, intestine, and colon. In particular, little is known about the molecular basis of stomach development and the differentiation of gastric lineages. Although animal models are useful for studying gastric development, function, and disease, there are major...

  18. H. pylori infection and gastric cancer in Bangladesh: a case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarker, Khandker Kawser; Kabir, Md Jahangir; Bhuyian, A K M Minhaj Uddin; Alam, Md Shahjadul; Chowdhury, Fazle Rabbi; Ahad, M Abdul; Rahman, Md Anisur; Rahman, M Mizanur

    2017-11-01

    Like that of other Asian countries gastric cancer (GC) is also a leading cancer in Bangladesh and also a cause for cancer-related mortality. Infection with Helicobacter pylori ( H. pylori ) is the strongest recognized risk factor for gastric adenocarcinoma. The infection is also prevalent in common people. This case-control study was carried out to find an association between GC and H. pylori infection in the community. To evaluate association of H. pylori and carcinoma of stomach this study was conducted at National Institute of Cancer Research & Hospital, Dhaka from January 2013 to December 2014. H. pylori status was determined serologically by using H. pylori kit in the department of Biochemistry laboratory of Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujib Medical University. In total, 114 patients with GC and 520 patients not having GC were studied as controls. Logistic regression method was used to calculate the odds ratio. Significantly more patients in the case group (86.8%) were found to be seropositive for H. pylori antigen in contrast to the control group (67.5%). All of the cases in the present study were in advanced stage. No significant association between H. pylori seropositivity and tumor location was found. It was noted that undifferentiated gastric carcinoma had slightly more association with H. pylori infection. Younger H. pylori -infected patients had been found to be at higher relative risk for GC than older patients. As there is a strong association found between GC and H. pylori infection special emphasis to eradicate H. pylori infection might reduce the incidence of this dreadly disease.

  19. Evidence of helicobacter pylori infection in dental plaque and gastric mucosa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siddiq, M.; Haseeb-ur-Rehman; Mahmood, A.

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To determine the presence of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) in dental plaque of individuals suffering from H. pylori associated gastric disease. Patients and Methods: Patients presenting with symptoms/signs of chronic gastritis were included in the study. Specimens of dental plaque and gastric biopsy were collected from all the patients. The dental plaque specimen was processed for helicourease test and the gastric biopsy specimens were processed both for the helicourease test and histopathology. Results: Out of all patients studied (n=52), 32 (61.53%) were positive for helicourease test with gastric biopsy while 48 (92.30%) were positive with dental plaque. The histopathology of gastric biopsy showed H. pylori associated chronic active gastritis in 42 (80.76%) patients. Eight (15.38%) patients showed chronic active gastritis which was not associated with H. pylori while in 2 (3.84%) patients the gastric biopsy specimen was unremarkable. Conclusion: Majority of the patients have possible H. pylori colonization in dental plaque while about two-thirds have H. pylori associated chronic active gastritis. Oral cavity may be the first place for colonization and then the infection involves the gastric mucosa. (author)

  20. [A man with candida pyopneumopericarditis and cardiac tamponade in conjunction with gastric tube infection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beek, L.M. van; Landman, J.J.; Verheugt, F.W.A.

    2005-01-01

    A 55-year-old man who had undergone oesophagectomy with retrosternal gastric tube reconstruction for oesophageal carcinoma several years before, presented with retrosternal pain, fever and chills. He appeared to have Candida glabratarelated pyopneumopericarditis and a fungal infection in the gastric

  1. Prevalence of Helicobacter Pylori in Gastric Fluid in the Surgical Patient

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Mc

    1998-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori is a bacterium that infects the human gastric mucosa. It is well established as a primary factor in peptic ulcer disease and has been implicated in the pathogenesis of gastric adenocarcinoma...

  2. Male non-insulin users with type 2 diabetes mellitus are predisposed to gastric corpus-predominant inflammation after H. pylori infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yao-Jong; Wu, Chung-Tai; Ou, Horng-Yih; Lin, Chin-Han; Cheng, Hsiu-Chi; Chang, Wei-Lun; Chen, Wei-Ying; Yang, Hsiao-Bai; Lu, Cheng-Chan; Sheu, Bor-Shyang

    2017-10-30

    Both H. pylori infection and diabetes increase the risk of gastric cancer. This study investigated whether patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and H. pylori infection had more severe corpus gastric inflammation and higher prevalence of precancerous lesions than non-diabetic controls. A total of 797 patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus were screened for H. pylori, of whom 264 had H. pylori infection. Of these patients, 129 received esophagogastroduodenoscopy to obtain topographic gastric specimens for gastric histology according to the modified Updated Sydney System, corpus-predominant gastritis index (CGI), Operative Link on Gastritis Assessment, and Operative Link on Gastric Intestinal Metaplasia Assessment. Non-diabetic dyspeptic patients who had H. pylori infection confirmed by esophagogastroduodenoscopy were enrolled as controls. The male as well as total T2DM patients had higher acute/chronic inflammatory and lymphoid follicle scores in the corpus than non-diabetic controls (p H. pylori-infected patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. Patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus and H. pylori infection had more severe corpus gastric inflammation than non-diabetic controls. Moreover, male gender and non-insulin users of T2DM patients were predisposed to have corpus-predominant gastritis after H. pylori infection. ClinicalTrial: NCT02466919 , retrospectively registered may 17, 2015.

  3. Mouse Models of Gastric Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayakawa, Yoku; Fox, James G.; Gonda, Tamas; Worthley, Daniel L.; Muthupalani, Sureshkumar; Wang, Timothy C.

    2013-01-01

    Animal models have greatly enriched our understanding of the molecular mechanisms of numerous types of cancers. Gastric cancer is one of the most common cancers worldwide, with a poor prognosis and high incidence of drug-resistance. However, most inbred strains of mice have proven resistant to gastric carcinogenesis. To establish useful models which mimic human gastric cancer phenotypes, investigators have utilized animals infected with Helicobacter species and treated with carcinogens. In addition, by exploiting genetic engineering, a variety of transgenic and knockout mouse models of gastric cancer have emerged, such as INS-GAS mice and TFF1 knockout mice. Investigators have used the combination of carcinogens and gene alteration to accelerate gastric cancer development, but rarely do mouse models show an aggressive and metastatic gastric cancer phenotype that could be relevant to preclinical studies, which may require more specific targeting of gastric progenitor cells. Here, we review current gastric carcinogenesis mouse models and provide our future perspectives on this field. PMID:24216700

  4. Oxidative Phosphorylation System in Gastric Carcinomas and Gastritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feichtinger, René G; Neureiter, Daniel; Skaria, Tom; Wessler, Silja; Cover, Timothy L; Mayr, Johannes A; Zimmermann, Franz A; Posselt, Gernot; Sperl, Wolfgang; Kofler, Barbara

    2017-01-01

    Switching of cellular energy production from oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) by mitochondria to aerobic glycolysis occurs in many types of tumors. However, the significance of this switching for the development of gastric carcinoma and what connection it may have to Helicobacter pylori infection of the gut, a primary cause of gastric cancer, are poorly understood. Therefore, we investigated the expression of OXPHOS complexes in two types of human gastric carcinomas ("intestinal" and "diffuse"), bacterial gastritis with and without metaplasia, and chemically induced gastritis by using immunohistochemistry. Furthermore, we analyzed the effect of HP infection on several key mitochondrial proteins. Complex I expression was significantly reduced in intestinal type (but not diffuse) gastric carcinomas compared to adjacent control tissue, and the reduction was independent of HP infection. Significantly, higher complex I and complex II expression was present in large tumors. Furthermore, higher complex II and complex III protein levels were also obvious in grade 3 versus grade 2. No differences of OXPHOS complexes and markers of mitochondrial biogenesis were found between bacterially caused and chemically induced gastritis. Thus, intestinal gastric carcinomas, but not precancerous stages, are frequently characterized by loss of complex I, and this pathophysiology occurs independently of HP infection.

  5. Oxidative Stress Resulting From Helicobacter pylori Infection Contributes to Gastric CarcinogenesisSummary

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lindsay D. Butcher

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Helicobacter pylori is a gram-negative, microaerophilic bacterium that infects the stomach and can lead to, among other disorders, the development of gastric cancer. The inability of the host to clear the infection results in a chronic inflammatory state with continued oxidative stress within the tissue. Reactive oxygen species and reactive nitrogen species produced by the immune and epithelial cells damage the host cells and can result in DNA damage. H pylori has evolved to evoke this damaging response while blunting the host’s efforts to kill the bacteria. This long-lasting state with inflammation and oxidative stress can result in gastric carcinogenesis. Continued efforts to better understand the bacterium and the host response will serve to prevent or provide improved early diagnosis and treatment of gastric cancer. Keywords: AP Endonuclease, DNA Damage, H pylori, Gastric Cancer, Oxidative Stress

  6. The role of the obestatin/GPR39 system in human gastric adenocarcinomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alén, Begoña O; Leal-López, Saúl; Alén, María Otero; Viaño, Patricia; García-Castro, Victoria; Mosteiro, Carlos S; Beiras, Andrés; Casanueva, Felipe F; Gallego, Rosalía; García-Caballero, Tomás; Camiña, Jesús P; Pazos, Yolanda

    2016-02-02

    Obestatin, a 23-amino acid peptide encoded by the ghrelin gene, and the GPR39 receptor were reported to be involved in the control of mitogenesis of gastric cancer cell lines; however, the relationship between the obestatin/GPR39 system and gastric cancer progression remains unknown. In the present study, we determined the expression levels of the obestatin/GPR39 system in human gastric adenocarcinomas and explored their potential functional roles. Twenty-eight patients with gastric adenocarcinomas were retrospectively studied, and clinical data were obtained. The role of obestatin/GPR39 in gastric cancer progression was studied in vitro using the human gastric adenocarcinoma AGS cell line. Obestatin exogenous administration in these GPR39-bearing cells deregulated the expression of several hallmarks of the epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) and angiogenesis. Moreover, obestatin signaling promoted phenotypic changes via GPR39, increasingly impacting on the cell morphology, proliferation, migration and invasion of these cells. In healthy human stomachs, obestatin expression was observed in the neuroendocrine cells and GPR39 expression was localized mainly in the chief cells of the oxyntic glands. In human gastric adenocarcinomas, no obestatin expression was found; however, an aberrant pattern of GPR39 expression was discovered, correlating to the dedifferentiation of the tumor. Altogether, our data strongly suggest the involvement of the obestatin/GPR39 system in the pathogenesis and/or clinical outcome of human gastric adenocarcinomas and highlight the potential usefulness of GPR39 as a prognostic marker in gastric cancer.

  7. Intraluminal erosion of laparoscopic gastric band tubing into duodenum with recurrent port-site infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cintolo, Jessica A; Levine, Marc S; Huang, Stephanie; Dumon, Kristoffel

    2012-01-01

    Intraluminal erosion of a laparoscopic gastric band into the stomach has been reported as a complication of laparoscopic adjustable gastric banding. To our knowledge, however, intraluminal erosion of the band tubing into the duodenum has not been described. We report a 46-year-old man in whom a laparoscopic adjustable gastric band tubing eroded into the duodenal lumen, causing recurrent port-site infections. This complication was diagnosed on upper endoscopy and also, in retrospect, on an upper gastrointestinal barium study and computed tomography. The patient underwent surgical removal of the band and tubing, with a primary duodenal repair, and made a complete recovery without complications. Erosion of laparoscopic band tubing into the duodenum should be included in the differential diagnosis for recurrent port-site infections after laparoscopic adjustable gastric banding. Radiographic or endoscopic visualization of the intraluminal portion of the tubing may be required for confirmation. Definitive treatment of this complication entails surgical removal of the tubing from the duodenum.

  8. Gastric fluid versus amniotic fluid analysis for the identification of intra-amniotic infection due to Ureaplasma species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sun Min; Romero, Roberto; Lee, JoonHo; Chaemsaithong, Piya; Docheva, Nikolina; Yoon, Bo Hyun

    2016-01-01

    Early neonatal sepsis is often due to intra-amniotic infection. The stomach of the neonate contains fluid swallowed before and during delivery. The presence of bacteria as well as neutrophils detected by culture or Gram stain of the gastric fluid during the first day of life is suggestive of exposure to bacteria or inflammation. We undertook this study to determine the relationship between gastric fluid analysis and amniotic fluid obtained by transabdominal amniocentesis in the detection of Ureaplasma species, the most frequent microorganisms responsible for intra-amniotic infection. The study population consisted of 100 singleton pregnant women who delivered preterm neonates (Ureaplasma species was performed. Intra-amniotic inflammation was defined as an elevated amniotic fluid matrix metalloproteinase-8 concentration (>23 ng/mL). (1) Ureaplasma species were detected by culture or PCR in 18% (18/100) of amniotic fluid samples and in 5% (5/100) of gastric fluid samples; (2) among the amniotic fluid cases positive for Ureaplasma species, these microorganisms were identified in 27.8% (5/18) of gastric fluid samples; (3) none of the cases negative for Ureaplasma species in the amniotic fluid were found to be positive for these microorganisms in the gastric fluid; (4) patients with amniotic fluid positive for Ureaplasma species but with gastric fluid negative for these microorganisms had a significantly higher rate of intra-amniotic inflammation, acute histologic chorioamnionitis, and neonatal death than those with both amniotic fluid and gastric fluid negative for Ureaplasma species; and (5) no significant differences were observed in the rate of intra-amniotic inflammation, acute histologic chorioamnionitis, and neonatal death between patients with amniotic fluid positive for Ureaplasma species but with gastric fluid negative for these microorganisms and those with both amniotic fluid and gastric fluid positive for Ureaplasma species. Gastric fluid analysis has 100

  9. Oxidative Phosphorylation System in Gastric Carcinomas and Gastritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skaria, Tom; Wessler, Silja; Cover, Timothy L.; Posselt, Gernot; Sperl, Wolfgang; Kofler, Barbara

    2017-01-01

    Switching of cellular energy production from oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) by mitochondria to aerobic glycolysis occurs in many types of tumors. However, the significance of this switching for the development of gastric carcinoma and what connection it may have to Helicobacter pylori infection of the gut, a primary cause of gastric cancer, are poorly understood. Therefore, we investigated the expression of OXPHOS complexes in two types of human gastric carcinomas (“intestinal” and “diffuse”), bacterial gastritis with and without metaplasia, and chemically induced gastritis by using immunohistochemistry. Furthermore, we analyzed the effect of HP infection on several key mitochondrial proteins. Complex I expression was significantly reduced in intestinal type (but not diffuse) gastric carcinomas compared to adjacent control tissue, and the reduction was independent of HP infection. Significantly, higher complex I and complex II expression was present in large tumors. Furthermore, higher complex II and complex III protein levels were also obvious in grade 3 versus grade 2. No differences of OXPHOS complexes and markers of mitochondrial biogenesis were found between bacterially caused and chemically induced gastritis. Thus, intestinal gastric carcinomas, but not precancerous stages, are frequently characterized by loss of complex I, and this pathophysiology occurs independently of HP infection. PMID:28744336

  10. Spontaneous gastric ulcer perforation and acute spleen infarction caused by invasive gastric and splenic mucormycosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mushira Abdulaziz Enani

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Mucormycosis is a rare life-threatening fungal infection mostly affecting immunocompromised hosts. The main categories of human disease with the Mucorales are sinusitis/rhinocerebral, pulmonary, cutaneous/subcutaneous, gastrointestinal and disseminated disease. Other disease states occur with a much lower frequency and include cystitis, vaginitis; external otitis and allergic disease. We report a diabetic patient with comorbidities, who developed gastric perforation clinically indistinguishable from perforated peptic ulcer due to invasive gastric mucormycosis complicated by spleen infarction.

  11. KITENIN is associated with tumor progression in human gastric cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryu, Ho-Seong; Park, Young-Lan; Park, Su-Jin; Lee, Ji-Hee; Cho, Sung-Bum; Lee, Wan-Sik; Chung, Ik-Joo; Kim, Kyung-Keun; Lee, Kyung-Hwa; Kweon, Sun-Seog; Joo, Young-Eun

    2010-09-01

    KAI1 COOH-terminal interacting tetraspanin (KITENIN) promotes tumor cell migration, invasion and metastasis in colon, bladder, head and neck cancer. The aims of current study were to evaluate whether KITENIN affects tumor cell behavior in human gastric cancer cell line and to document the expression of KITENIN in a well-defined series of gastric tumors, including complete long-term follow-up, with special reference to patient prognosis. To evaluate the impact of KITENIN knockdown on behavior of a human gastric cancer cell line, AGS, migration, invasion and proliferation assays using small-interfering RNA were performed. The expression of activator protein-1 (AP-1) target genes and AP-1 transcriptional activity were evaluated by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and luciferase reporter assay. The expression of KITENIN and AP-1 target genes by RT-PCR and Western blotting or immunohistochemistry was also investigated in human gastric cancer tissues. The knockdown of KITENIN suppressed tumor cell migration, invasion and proliferation in AGS cells. The mRNA expression of matrix metalloproteinase-1 (MMP-1), MMP-3, cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), and CD44 was reduced by knockdown of KITENIN in AGS. AP-1 transcriptional activity was significantly decreased by knockdown of KITENIN in AGS cells. KITENIN expression was significantly increased in human cancer tissues at RNA and protein levels. Expression of MMP-1, MMP-3, COX-2 and CD44 were significantly increased in human gastric cancer tissues. Immunostaining of KITENIN was predominantly identified in the cytoplasm of cancer cells. Expression of KITENIN was significantly associated with tumor size, Lauren classification, depth of invasion, lymph node metastasis, tumor stage and poor survival. These results indicate that KITENIN plays an important role in human gastric cancer progression by AP-1 activation.

  12. Gallic Acid Induces Apoptosis in Human Gastric Adenocarcinoma Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Chung-Lin; Chiu, Ying-Ming; Ho, Tin-Yun; Hsieh, Chin-Tung; Shieh, Dong-Chen; Lee, Yi-Ju; Tsay, Gregory J; Wu, Yi-Ying

    2018-04-01

    Gastric cancer is one of the most common malignant cancers with a poor prognosis and high mortality rate worldwide. Current treatment of gastric cancer includes surgery and chemotherapy as the main modalities, but the potentially severe side-effects of chemotherapy present a considerable challenge. Gallic acid is a trihydroxybenzoic acid found to exert an anticancer effect against a variety of cancer cells. The purpose of this study was to determine the anti-cancer activity of Galla chinensis and its main component gallic acid on human gastric adenocarcinoma cells. MTT assay and cell death ELISA were used to determine the apoptotic effect of Gallic Chinensis and gallic acid on human gastric adenocarcinoma cells. To determine the pathway and relevant components by which gallic acid-induced apoptosis is mediated through, cells were transfected with siRNA (Fas, FasL, DR5, p53) using Lipofectamine 2000. Reults: Gallic Chinensis and gallic acid induced apoptosis of human gastric adenocarcinoma cells. Gallic acid induced up-regulation of Fas, FasL, and DR5 expression in AGS cells. Transfection of cells with Fas, FasL, or DR5 siRNA reduced gallic acid-induced cell death. In addition, p53 was shown to be involved in gallic acid-mediated Fas, FasL, and DR5 expression as well as cell apoptosis in AGS cells. These results suggest that gallic acid has a potential role in the treatment of gastric cancer. Copyright© 2018, International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. George J. Delinasios), All rights reserved.

  13. Molecular mimicry between Helicobacter pylori antigens and H+, K+ --adenosine triphosphatase in human gastric autoimmunity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Amedei, Amedeo; Bergman, Mathijs P.; Appelmelk, Ben J.; Azzurri, Annalisa; Benagiano, Marisa; Tamburini, Carlo; van der Zee, Ruurd; Telford, John L.; Vandenbroucke-Grauls, Christina M. J. E.; D'Elios, Mario M.; del Prete, Gianfranco

    2003-01-01

    Autoimmune gastritis and Helicobacter pylori-associated gastric atrophy develop through similar mechanisms involving the proton pump H+,K+-adenosine triphosphatase as autoantigen. Here, we report that H. pylori-infected patients with gastric autoimmunity harbor in vivo-activated gastric CD4+ T cells

  14. Infection with Helicobacter pylori strains lacking dupA is associated with an increased risk of gastric ulcer and gastric cancer development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abadi, Amin Talebi Bezmin; Taghvaei, Tarang; Wolfram, Lutz; Kusters, Johannes G

    2012-01-01

    Recently, dupA was reported as a new virulence factor in Helicobacter pylori, but its association with gastroduodenal disorders and its mode of action are still unclear. Here, an association of the dupA status with different disease groups was determined and a biological explanation for the observed associations was tested. In total, 216 H. pylori isolates were obtained from 232 presumed H. pylori-infected patients. A positive association was observed between the occurrence of duodenal ulcer (DU) and the presence of dupA [odds ratio (OR) 24.2; 95 % confidence interval (CI) 10.6-54.8]. In addition, an inverse association between the occurrence of gastric cancer (GC) [OR 0.16; 95 % CI 0.05-0.47] and gastric ulcer (GU) [OR 0.34; 95 % CI 0.16-0.68] with the presence of dupA was observed. A putative explanation for the observed associations might be a more corpus-located infection (pan-gastritis) by the dupA-positive strains due to their increased acid resistance. Indeed, a strong association between dupA-positive H. pylori isolated from gastritis patients and in vitro acid resistance was observed (PdupA-positive strains suggests that these strains are adapted to a stomach with high gastric acid output. This may in part explain the observed associations, as an increased gastric acid output is thought to be typical for an antrum-predominant H. pylori infection and, whilst this is associated with an increased risk of DU formation, it also decreases the risk for the genesis of GUs and GC.

  15. Helicobacter pylori stool antigen test (HpSA) for the diagnosis of gastric infection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faruqui, A.N.; Majid, U.; Ahmed, L.; Khalil, M.; Hussan, M.U.

    2007-01-01

    To determine the accuracy of Helicobacter pylori Stool Antigen test (HpSA), compared with endoscopic histopathology for the diagnosis of gastric Helicobecter pylori infection. A total of 50 patients underwent endoscopy for gastric antral mucosal tissue biopsy for histopathology of H.pylori and advised for HpSA. Patient's information including age, gender, past history, presenting signs and symptoms, results of HpSA and histopathology were recorded. Sensitivity analysis was performed to calculate sensitivity, specificity, and predictive values of HpSA. Among 50 patients, 48% males and 52% females (M: F 1: 1.08), a total of 27 (54%) were true positive while 20 (40%) were true negative. Two patients were false negative and only one was false positive. Sensitivity of HpSA was, therefore, 93.1%, specificity 95% and positive and negative predictive values were 96.42% and 90.9% respectively. Helicobacter pylori stool antigen was an accurate and reliable test for the diagnosis of gastric H. pylori infection. (author)

  16. Effect of depression on Helicobacter pylori infection in patients with gastric cancer and its correlation with oncogene expression

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chun-Rong Xiao

    2017-01-01

    Objective: To study the effect of depression on Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection in patients with gastric cancer and its correlation with oncogene expression. Methods: A total of 82 patients who accepted radical operation for gastric cancer in Zigong Third People's Hospital between March 2015 and February 2017 were selected as the research subjects and divided into depression group and non-depression group according to the preoperative HAMD scores, and helicobacter pylori infection as well as the mRNA expression of proliferation genes and invasion genes in gastric cancer lesions was detected. Results: The positive rate of H. pylori in gastric cancer lesions of depression group was significantly higher than that of non-depression group; LOXL2, RAB1A, UHRF1, Slug and ADAM8 mRNA expression in gastric cancer lesions of depression group were significantly higher than those of non-depression group while MTS1, NOX, E-cadherin and TIMP1 mRNA expression were significantly lower than those of non-depression group; LOXL2, RAB1A, UHRF1, Slug and ADAM8 mRNA expression in H. pylori-positive gastric cancer lesions of depression group were significantly higher than those in H. pylori-negative gastric cancer lesions of depression group while MTS1, NOX, E-cadherin and TIMP1 mRNA expression were significantly lower than those in H. pylori-negative gastric cancer lesions of depression group. Conclusion: Depression can increase the H. pylori infection rate and promote the proliferation and invasion of cancer cells in gastric cancer lesions.

  17. Effect of helicobacter pylori L-form infection on proliferation, apoptosis and invasion molecule expression in gastric cancer tissue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hua Xin

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To study the effect of Helicobacter pylori L-form infection on proliferation, apoptosis and invasion molecule expression in gastric cancer tissue. Methods: The gastric cancer tissues surgically removed in our hospital between May 2013 and October 2016 were collected and divided into Hp negative, Hp-L negative and Hp-L positive according to the condition of helicobacter pylori infection. The proliferation, apoptosis and invasion gene expression were detected. Results: LOXL2, PCNA, CyclinD1, Rab1A, Bcl-2, Snail, N-cadherin, UHRF1 and AnnexinII mRNA expression in Hp-L-positive gastric cancer tissues were significantly higher than those in Hp-L-negative and Hp-negative gastric cancer tissues while ING5, PTPN13, Beclin1 and Mst1 mRNA expression were significantly lower than those in Hp-L-negative and Hp-negative gastric cancer tissues; LOXL2, PCNA, CyclinD1, Rab1A, Bcl-2, ING5, PTPN13, Beclin1, Mst1, Snail, N-cadherin, UHRF1 and AnnexinII mRNA expression in Hp-L-negative gastric cancer tissues were not different from those in Hpnegative gastric cancer tissues. Conclusion: Helicobacter pylori L-form infection can influence the proliferation, apoptosis and invasion gene expression to promote cell proliferation and invasion, and inhibit cell apoptosis.

  18. Apoptosis induced by GanoPoly in human gastric cancer cell line ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In order to investigate polysaccharide effect on the cultured human gastric cancer cells (SGC7901), DNA ladder, flow cytometry and western blot were used to examine the morpholog, proliferation and apoptosis of human gastric cancer SGC-7901 cells when they were affected by polysaccharide. Results show that ...

  19. Prevention of Gastric Cancer: Eradication of Helicobacter Pylori and Beyond

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tetsuya Tsukamoto

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Although its prevalence is declining, gastric cancer remains a significant public health issue. The bacterium Helicobacter pylori is known to colonize the human stomach and induce chronic atrophic gastritis, intestinal metaplasia, and gastric cancer. Results using a Mongolian gerbil model revealed that H. pylori infection increased the incidence of carcinogen-induced adenocarcinoma, whereas curative treatment of H. pylori significantly lowered cancer incidence. Furthermore, some epidemiological studies have shown that eradication of H. pylori reduces the development of metachronous cancer in humans. However, other reports have warned that human cases of atrophic metaplastic gastritis are already at risk for gastric cancer development, even after eradication of these bacteria. In this article, we discuss the effectiveness of H. pylori eradication and the morphological changes that occur in gastric dysplasia/cancer lesions. We further assess the control of gastric cancer using various chemopreventive agents.

  20. Epithelial cell kinetics of the gastric mucosa during Helicobacter pylori infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Norn, Svend

    2007-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori is an important pathogen in major gastroduodenal diseases, including inflammation with ulceration and gastric malignancies. Alterations in H. pylori associated cell turnover in gastric epithelial cells are examined in relation to inflammatory activity, bacteria load and cytoki......Helicobacter pylori is an important pathogen in major gastroduodenal diseases, including inflammation with ulceration and gastric malignancies. Alterations in H. pylori associated cell turnover in gastric epithelial cells are examined in relation to inflammatory activity, bacteria load...... and the proliferative marker Ki-67. H. pylori infection, bacteria load and inflammatory activity were associated with increased cell turnover as judged by enhanced activities of TUNEL, p53 and Ki-67. Only p53 was significantly correlated to IFN-γ, IL-8 and IL-10. The H. pylori-positive state was furthermore accompanied...... of the gastrointestinal tract, such studies in cell turnover may provide insights valuable in the investigations of potential precursors of gastric malignancies....

  1. The influence of duodeno-gastric reflux on frequency of Helicobacter pylori infection at patients with ulcer gastric; Wplyw refluksu dwunastniczo-zoladkowego na czestosc wystepowania zakazenia Helicobacter pylori u chorych z wrzodem zoladka

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kopanski, Z.; Niziol, J.; Micherdzinski, J.; Wasilewska-Radwanska, M.; Cienciala, A.; Lasa, J. [Kliniczny Oddzial Chirurgii Ogolnej, Pracownia Medycyny Nuklearnej, Szpital Wojskowy, Cracow (Poland)]|[Wydzial Fizyki i Techniki Jadrowej AGH, Cracow (Poland)]|[Pracownia Chromatografii Gazowej, Instytut Fizyki Jadrowej, Cracow (Poland)

    1996-12-31

    To estimate the correlation between frequency of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection and intensity of duodeno-gastric reflux it was analysed 61 species with ulcer gastric. Bacterial infection was diagnosed by the breath test with {sup 14}C-labelled urea, whereas presence and intensity of the reflux was found with dynamic scintigraphy with {sup 99}Tm MBrIDA support. The H. pylori infection was present at 42 (68.9%) patients. The presence of throwing back the duodenal liquid was found at 32 (52.5%) diagnosed patients. At 19 (31.2%) of them the reflux has intensity of 1%, at 11 (18%)-2{sup o} and 2 (3.3%)-3{sup o}.The investigations which were carried out, showed that at patients with ulcer gastric disease, duodeno-gastric reflux is an agent which slows down H. pylori infection, however it is easily seen not earlier than at 2{sup o} of its intensity. (author) 33 refs, 1 tab

  2. Helicobacter pylori-induced gastric pathology: insights from in vivo and ex vivo models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael D. Burkitt

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Gastric colonization with Helicobacter pylori induces diverse human pathological conditions, including superficial gastritis, peptic ulcer disease, mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT lymphoma, and gastric adenocarcinoma and its precursors. The treatment of these conditions often relies on the eradication of H. pylori, an intervention that is increasingly difficult to achieve and that does not prevent disease progression in some contexts. There is, therefore, a pressing need to develop new experimental models of H. pylori-associated gastric pathology to support novel drug development in this field. Here, we review the current status of in vivo and ex vivo models of gastric H. pylori colonization, and of Helicobacter-induced gastric pathology, focusing on models of gastric pathology induced by H. pylori, Helicobacter felis and Helicobacter suis in rodents and large animals. We also discuss the more recent development of gastric organoid cultures from murine and human gastric tissue, as well as from human pluripotent stem cells, and the outcomes of H. pylori infection in these systems.

  3. Helicobacter pylori infection-induced H3Ser10 phosphorylation in stepwise gastric carcinogenesis and its clinical implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Tao-Tao; Cao, Na; Zhang, Hai-Hui; Wei, Jian-Bo; Song, Xiao-Xia; Yi, Dong-Min; Chao, Shuai-Heng; Zhang, Li-Da; Kong, Ling-Fei; Han, Shuang-Yin; Yang, Yu-Xiu; Ding, Song-Ze

    2018-04-15

    Our previous works have demonstrated that Helicobacter pylori (Hp) infection can alter histone H3 serine 10 phosphorylation status in gastric epithelial cells. However, whether Helicobacter pylori-induced histone H3 serine 10 phosphorylation participates in gastric carcinogenesis is unknown. We investigate the expression of histone H3 serine 10 phosphorylation in various stages of gastric disease and explore its clinical implication. Stomach biopsy samples from 129 patients were collected and stained with histone H3 serine 10 phosphorylation, Ki67, and Helicobacter pylori by immunohistochemistry staining, expressed as labeling index. They were categorized into nonatrophic gastritis, chronic atrophic gastritis, intestinal metaplasia, low-grade intraepithelial neoplasia, high-grade intraepithelial neoplasia, and intestinal-type gastric cancer groups. Helicobacter pylori infection was determined by either 13 C-urea breath test or immunohistochemistry staining. In Helicobacter pylori-negative patients, labeling index of histone H3 serine 10 phosphorylation was gradually increased in nonatrophic gastritis, chronic atrophic gastritis, intestinal metaplasia groups, peaked at low-grade intraepithelial neoplasia, and declined in high-grade intraepithelial neoplasia and gastric cancer groups. In Helicobacter pylori-infected patients, labeling index of histone H3 serine 10 phosphorylation followed the similar pattern as above, with increased expression over the corresponding Helicobacter pylori-negative controls except in nonatrophic gastritis patient whose labeling index was decreased when compared with Helicobacter pylori-negative control. Labeling index of Ki67 in Helicobacter pylori-negative groups was higher in gastric cancer than chronic atrophic gastritis and low-grade intraepithelial neoplasia groups, and higher in intestinal metaplasia group compared with chronic atrophic gastritis group. In Helicobacter pylori-positive groups, Ki67 labeling index was increased

  4. Regulation of tumour related genes by dynamic epigenetic alteration at enhancer regions in gastric epithelial cells infected by Epstein-Barr virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okabe, Atsushi; Funata, Sayaka; Matsusaka, Keisuke; Namba, Hiroe; Fukuyo, Masaki; Rahmutulla, Bahityar; Oshima, Motohiko; Iwama, Atsushi; Fukayama, Masashi; Kaneda, Atsushi

    2017-08-11

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection is associated with tumours such as Burkitt lymphoma, nasopharyngeal carcinoma, and gastric cancer. We previously showed that EBV(+) gastric cancer presents an extremely high-methylation epigenotype and this aberrant DNA methylation causes silencing of multiple tumour suppressor genes. However, the mechanisms that drive EBV infection-mediated tumorigenesis, including other epigenomic alteration, remain unclear. We analysed epigenetic alterations induced by EBV infection especially at enhancer regions, to elucidate their contribution to tumorigenesis. We performed ChIP sequencing on H3K4me3, H3K4me1, H3K27ac, H3K27me3, and H3K9me3 in gastric epithelial cells infected or not with EBV. We showed that repressive marks were redistributed after EBV infection, resulting in aberrant enhancer activation and repression. Enhancer dysfunction led to the activation of pathways related to cancer hallmarks (e.g., resisting cell death, disrupting cellular energetics, inducing invasion, evading growth suppressors, sustaining proliferative signalling, angiogenesis, and tumour-promoting inflammation) and inactivation of tumour suppressive pathways. Deregulation of cancer-related genes in EBV-infected gastric epithelial cells was also observed in clinical EBV(+) gastric cancer specimens. Our analysis showed that epigenetic alteration associated with EBV-infection may contribute to tumorigenesis through enhancer activation and repression.

  5. Gastric epithelial expression of IL-12 cytokine family in Helicobacter pylori infection in human: is it head or tail of the coin?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fadi Al-Sammak

    Full Text Available Recently, there has been a growing interest in an expanding group of cytokines known as "IL-12 family". The so far gained knowledge about these cytokines, as crucial playmakers in mucosal immunity, has not yet been sufficiently investigated in the context of Helicobacter pylori infection. All genes encoding the monomeric components of these cytokines and their corresponding receptors were examined in gastric epithelial cell lines (AGS and MKN-28 after being infected with 4 H. pylori strains: BCM-300, P1 wild-type, and P1-derived isogenic mutants lacking cytotoxin-associated gene A (cagA or virulence gene virB7 (multiplicity of infection=50. Both infected and uninfected samples were analyzed after 24h and 48h using real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR. Gene expression analysis demonstrated a strong upregulation of IL23A (encodes p19 by infection, whereas IL23R, Epstein-Barr virus-induced gene 3 (EBI3, IL6ST, IL12A, and IL27RA were found to be expressed, but not regulated, or to a lesser extent. Transcripts of IL12RB2, IL12B, IL12RB1, and IL27A were not detected. Interestingly, P1 resulted in stronger alterations of expression than CagA mutant and BCM-300, particularly for IL23A (59.7-fold versus 32.4- and 6.7-fold, respectively in AGS after 48h, P<.05, whereas no changes were seen with VirB7 mutant. In a proof-of-principle experiment, we demonstrated epithelial-derived expression of IL-12, p19, and Ebi3 in gastric mucosa of gastritis patients using immunohistochemistry (IHC. Unlike IL-12 and Ebi3, increased immunostaining of p19 was observed in H. pylori gastritis. Herein, we highlight the potential role of gastric epithelial cells in mucosal immunity, not only because they are predominant cell type in mucosa and initial site of host-bacterial interaction, but also as a major contributor to molecules that are thought to be primarily expressed by immune cells so far. Of these molecules, p19 was the most relevant one to H

  6. Relationship between caga-positive Helicobacter pylori infection and risk of gastric cancer: a case control study in Porto Alegre, RS, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gilmara Coelho Meine

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available CONTEXT: Gastric cancer is the second most common cause of cancer related death worldwide. Although Helicobacter pylori has been classified as a class I carcinogen, the presence of infection is not a factor that alone is able to lead to gastric cancer, and one of the possible explanations for this is the existence of different strains of H. pylori with different degrees of virulence. OBJECTIVES: To investigate the association between cagA-positive H. pylori and gastric cancer, using polymerase chain reaction (PCR for the detection of this bacterial strain. METHODS: Twenty-nine patients with gastric cancer were matched by sex and age (± 5 years with 58 patients without gastric cancer, submitted to upper gastrointestinal endoscopy. All patients were evaluated for the status of infection by H. pylori (through urease test, histological analysis and PCR for the genes ureA and 16SrRNA and by cagA-positive strain (through PCR for cagA gene. RESULTS: Evaluating the presence of infection by cagA-positive H. pylori, it was verified that the rate of infection was significantly higher in the group with gastric cancer when compared with the matched controls, occurring in 62.1% and 29.3%, respectively (OR = 3.95; CI 95% 1.543-10.096. CONCLUSIONS: There is an association between cagA-positive H. pylori strain and risk of gastric cancer.

  7. EGFR and Bcl-2 in gastric mucosa of children infected with Helicobacter pylori

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ewa Ryszczuk

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The aim of the study was to evaluate the expression of EGFR and Bcl-2 proteins as inhibitory markers of apoptosis in surface epithelial cells and gland cells of antral gastric mucosa in children infected with Helicobacter pylori according to the severity and activity of antral gastritis and to assess the correlation between the number of cells expressing EGFR and the number of cells expressing Bcl-2 in H. pylori infected children.Materials and methods: The study included 44 children: 68.2% with chronic gastritis and positive IgG against H. pylori, and 31.8% with functional disorders of the gastrointestinal tract and with normal IgG against H. pylori. The evaluation of EGFR expression in gastric mucosa was performed immunohistochemically using monoclonal mouse anti-EGFR antibody. The polyclonal antibody was used to determine the expression of anti-Bcl-2.Results: A significant increase in the number of cells expressing EGFR and Bcl-2 protein was found in the epithelial cells in severe as well as mild and moderate gastritis in the group of children infected with H. pylori. An increase in the number of cells expressing EGFR and Bcl-2 protein was also found in the epithelial cells in group I according to the activity of gastritis. There was a statistically significant positive correlation between the numbers of cells expressing EGFR and Bcl-2 in H. pylori infected children.Conclusion: Increased expression of EGFR and Bcl-2 proteins in the epithelial cells and a statistically significant positive correlation between the numbers of cells expressing EGFR and Bcl-2 in H. pylori infected children could suggest increased regeneration abilities of gastric mucosa.

  8. Colonization and infection by Helicobacter pylori in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersen, Leif Percival

    2007-11-01

    When Helicobacter pylori arrives in the human stomach, it may penetrate the mucin layer and adhere to the gastric epithelial cells or it may pass through the stomach without colonizing the mucosa. In this paper, the colonization process and the ensuing immunological response will be briefly described. Urease production is necessary for H. pylori to establish a pH-neutral microenvironment around the bacteria. The flagella enable the bacteria to move and the shape of H. pylori makes it possible to penetrate the mucin layer where it comes into contact with the gastric epithelial cells. H. pylori contains several adhesins that enable it to adhere to the epithelial cells. This adherence activates IL-8 which, together with bacterial antigens, attracts polymorphs and monocytes and causes acute gastritis. Antigen-presenting cells activate lymphocytes and other mononuclear cells that are attracted to the inflamed mucosa, causing chronic superficial gastritis and initiating a cytotoxic or an antigen-producing Th response. The infection is established within a few weeks after the primary exposure to H. pylori. After this initial colonization, many chemical, biochemical, and immunologic reactions take place that are of importance in the progress of the infection and the development of disease.

  9. The Prevalence of Gastric Intestinal Metaplasia and Distribution of Helicobacter pylori Infection, Atrophy, Dysplasia, and Cancer in Its Subtypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olmez, Sehmus; Aslan, Mehmet; Erten, Remzi; Sayar, Suleyman; Bayram, Irfan

    2015-01-01

    Objectives. Gastric intestinal metaplasia (IM) is frequently encountered and is considered a precursor of gastric adenocarcinoma. In the Van region of Turkey, gastric adenocarcinoma incidence is high but the prevalence of gastric IM is not known. Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection is a main factor leading to atrophy, IM, and cancer development in the stomach. The aim of the current study was to investigate the prevalence of IM and its subtypes and the prevalence of H. pylori infection, atrophy, dysplasia, and cancer in gastric IM subtypes. Materials and Methods. This retrospective study was conducted on 560 IM among the 4050 consecutive patients who were undergoing esophagogastroduodenoscopy (EGD) with biopsy between June 2010 and October 2014. Clinical records and endoscopic and histopathologic reports of patients with IM were analyzed. Results. The prevalence of gastric IM was 13.8%. The prevalence of incomplete IM was statistically significantly higher than complete IM. Type III IM was the most frequent subtype. Conclusions. Gastric IM is a common finding in patients undergoing EGD with biopsy in this region. High prevalence of incomplete type IM, especially type III, can be associated with the high prevalence of gastric cancer in our region.

  10. The Prevalence of Gastric Intestinal Metaplasia and Distribution of Helicobacter pylori Infection, Atrophy, Dysplasia, and Cancer in Its Subtypes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sehmus Olmez

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. Gastric intestinal metaplasia (IM is frequently encountered and is considered a precursor of gastric adenocarcinoma. In the Van region of Turkey, gastric adenocarcinoma incidence is high but the prevalence of gastric IM is not known. Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori infection is a main factor leading to atrophy, IM, and cancer development in the stomach. The aim of the current study was to investigate the prevalence of IM and its subtypes and the prevalence of H. pylori infection, atrophy, dysplasia, and cancer in gastric IM subtypes. Materials and Methods. This retrospective study was conducted on 560 IM among the 4050 consecutive patients who were undergoing esophagogastroduodenoscopy (EGD with biopsy between June 2010 and October 2014. Clinical records and endoscopic and histopathologic reports of patients with IM were analyzed. Results. The prevalence of gastric IM was 13.8%. The prevalence of incomplete IM was statistically significantly higher than complete IM. Type III IM was the most frequent subtype. Conclusions. Gastric IM is a common finding in patients undergoing EGD with biopsy in this region. High prevalence of incomplete type IM, especially type III, can be associated with the high prevalence of gastric cancer in our region.

  11. Host pathogen interactions in Helicobacter pylori related gastric cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chmiela, Magdalena; Karwowska, Zuzanna; Gonciarz, Weronika; Allushi, Bujana; Stączek, Paweł

    2017-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori), discovered in 1982, is a microaerophilic, spiral-shaped gram-negative bacterium that is able to colonize the human stomach. Nearly half of the world's population is infected by this pathogen. Its ability to induce gastritis, peptic ulcers, gastric cancer and mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma has been confirmed. The susceptibility of an individual to these clinical outcomes is multifactorial and depends on H. pylori virulence, environmental factors, the genetic susceptibility of the host and the reactivity of the host immune system. Despite the host immune response, H. pylori infection can be difficult to eradicate. H. pylori is categorized as a group I carcinogen since this bacterium is responsible for the highest rate of cancer-related deaths worldwide. Early detection of cancer can be lifesaving. The 5-year survival rate for gastric cancer patients diagnosed in the early stages is nearly 90%. Gastric cancer is asymptomatic in the early stages but always progresses over time and begins to cause symptoms when untreated. In 97% of stomach cancer cases, cancer cells metastasize to other organs. H. pylori infection is responsible for nearly 60% of the intestinal-type gastric cancer cases but also influences the development of diffuse gastric cancer. The host genetic susceptibility depends on polymorphisms of genes involved in H. pylori-related inflammation and the cytokine response of gastric epithelial and immune cells. H. pylori strains differ in their ability to induce a deleterious inflammatory response. H. pylori-driven cytokines accelerate the inflammatory response and promote malignancy. Chronic H. pylori infection induces genetic instability in gastric epithelial cells and affects the DNA damage repair systems. Therefore, H. pylori infection should always be considered a pro-cancerous factor. PMID:28321154

  12. Does the presence of the Helicobacter pylori in the dental plaque associate with its gastric infection? A meta-analysis and systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nader Navabi

    2011-01-01

    Conclusion: Co-infection of gastric H. pylori and dental plaque is reported by half of the studies. However, there is not enough evidence for the efficacy of dental treatment on prevention of recurrent gastric H. pylori infection.

  13. Effect of sialoadenectomy and synthetic human urogastrone on healing of chronic gastric ulcers in rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Steen Seier; Nexø, Ebba

    1986-01-01

    The effect of extirpation of the submandibular glands, an exocrine organ for epidermal growth factor/urogastrone (EGF/URO), and the effect of oral administration of synthetic human (EGF/URO) on healing of chronic gastric ulcers in rats has been investigated. Removal of the submandibular glands...... delayed healing of chronic gastric ulcers when examined after 50, 100, and 200 days. Oral administration of synthetic human EGF/URO stimulated gastric ulcer healing when examined after 25 and 50 days of treatment. The effect of synthetic human EGF/URO was comparable with that of cimetidine. The combined...... administration of synthetic human EGF/URO and cimetidine further increased healing of gastric ulcers compared with administration of each substance. Neither synthetic human EGF/URO, nor removal of the submandibular glands had any influence on gastric acid secretion. This study showed that the submandibular...

  14. Restoration of tumor suppressor miR-34 inhibits human p53-mutant gastric cancer tumorspheres

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ji, Qing; Hao, Xinbao; Meng, Yang; Zhang, Min; DeSano, Jeffrey; Fan, Daiming; Xu, Liang

    2008-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs), some of which function as oncogenes or tumor suppressor genes, are involved in carcinogenesis via regulating cell proliferation and/or cell death. MicroRNA miR-34 was recently found to be a direct target of p53, functioning downstream of the p53 pathway as a tumor suppressor. miR-34 targets Notch, HMGA2, and Bcl-2, genes involved in the self-renewal and survival of cancer stem cells. The role of miR-34 in gastric cancer has not been reported previously. In this study, we examined the effects of miR-34 restoration on p53-mutant human gastric cancer cells and potential target gene expression. Human gastric cancer cells were transfected with miR-34 mimics or infected with the lentiviral miR-34-MIF expression system, and validated by miR-34 reporter assay using Bcl-2 3'UTR reporter. Potential target gene expression was assessed by Western blot for proteins, and by quantitative real-time RT-PCR for mRNAs. The effects of miR-34 restoration were assessed by cell growth assay, cell cycle analysis, caspase-3 activation, and cytotoxicity assay, as well as by tumorsphere formation and growth. Human gastric cancer Kato III cells with miR-34 restoration reduced the expression of target genes Bcl-2, Notch, and HMGA2. Bcl-2 3'UTR reporter assay showed that the transfected miR-34s were functional and confirmed that Bcl-2 is a direct target of miR-34. Restoration of miR-34 chemosensitized Kato III cells with a high level of Bcl-2, but not MKN-45 cells with a low level of Bcl-2. miR-34 impaired cell growth, accumulated the cells in G1 phase, increased caspase-3 activation, and, more significantly, inhibited tumorsphere formation and growth. Our results demonstrate that in p53-deficient human gastric cancer cells, restoration of functional miR-34 inhibits cell growth and induces chemosensitization and apoptosis, indicating that miR-34 may restore p53 function. Restoration of miR-34 inhibits tumorsphere formation and growth, which is reported to be

  15. Association between Virulence Factors and TRAF1/4-1BB/Bcl-xL Expression in Gastric Mucosa Infected with Helicobacter pylori

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    Fen Wang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. CagA+/vacAs1+/vacAm1+ Helicobacter pylori upregulates the expression of tumor necrosis factor receptor–associated factor 1 (TRAF1, tumor necrosis factor receptor superfamily member 9 (4-1BB, and B-cell lymphoma-extra large (Bcl-xL in human gastric epithelial cells. We investigated the correlation between cagA/vacAs1/vacAm1 and TRAF1/4-1BB/Bcl-xL expression in gastric mucosal tissue of patients with gastric disorders. Methods. We collected gastric mucosa samples from 35 chronic, nonatrophic gastritis (CG patients, 41 atrophic gastritis patients, 44 intestinal metaplasia with atypical hyperplasia (IM patients, and 28 gastric carcinoma (Ca patients. The expression of  TRAF1, 4-1BB, and Bcl-xL was determined using western blotting. The expression of cagA, vacAs1, and vacAm1 in H. pylori was examined with polymerase chain reaction. Results. The expression of TRAF1, 4-1BB, and Bcl-xL was significantly upregulated in IM and Ca patients (P<0.05 compared with CG. There were more cases of cagA+/vacAs1+/vacAm1+ H. pylori infection in samples with elevated TRAF1, 4-1BB, or Bcl-xL expression (P<0.05. Additionally, there were a remarkably large number of samples with upregulated TRAF1/4-1BB/Bcl-xL expression in cases of cagA+/vacAs1+/vacAm1+ H. pylori infection (44 cases, 67.7%; P<0.05. Conclusions. The pathogenesis of IM and Ca may be promoted by cagA+/vacAs1+/vacAm1+ H. pylori, possibly via upregulated TRAF1, 4-1BB, and Bcl-xL in gastric mucosal tissue.

  16. History of Helicobacter pylori, duodenal ulcer, gastric ulcer and gastric cancer.

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    Graham, David Y

    2014-05-14

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection underlies gastric ulcer disease, gastric cancer and duodenal ulcer disease. The disease expression reflects the pattern and extent of gastritis/gastric atrophy (i.e., duodenal ulcer with non-atrophic and gastric ulcer and gastric cancer with atrophic gastritis). Gastric and duodenal ulcers and gastric cancer have been known for thousands of years. Ulcers are generally non-fatal and until the 20th century were difficult to diagnose. However, the presence and pattern of gastritis in past civilizations can be deduced based on the diseases present. It has been suggested that gastric ulcer and duodenal ulcer both arose or became more frequent in Europe in the 19th century. Here, we show that gastric cancer and gastric ulcer were present throughout the 17th to 19th centuries consistent with atrophic gastritis being the predominant pattern, as it proved to be when it could be examined directly in the late 19th century. The environment before the 20th century favored acquisition of H. pylori infection and atrophic gastritis (e.g., poor sanitation and standards of living, seasonal diets poor in fresh fruits and vegetables, especially in winter, vitamin deficiencies, and frequent febrile infections in childhood). The latter part of the 19th century saw improvements in standards of living, sanitation, and diets with a corresponding decrease in rate of development of atrophic gastritis allowing duodenal ulcers to become more prominent. In the early 20th century physician's believed they could diagnose ulcers clinically and that the diagnosis required hospitalization for "surgical disease" or for "Sippy" diets. We show that while H. pylori remained common and virulent in Europe and the United States, environmental changes resulted in changes of the pattern of gastritis producing a change in the manifestations of H. pylori infections and subsequently to a rapid decline in transmission and a rapid decline in all H. pylori-related diseases.

  17. Honey and Apoptosis in Human Gastric Mucosa

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    Alireza Ostadrahimi

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Gastric cancer is the fourth most common malignancy in the world. Honey is acomplex mixture of special biological active constituents. Honey possesses antioxidant and antitumorproperties. Nutritional studies have indicated that consumption of honey modulates therisk of developing gastric cancer. On the other hand, apoptosis has been reported to play a decisiverole in precancerous changes. Our chief study was conducted to assess the relationship betweenconsumption of honey and apoptosis in human gastric mucosa.Method: This cross-sectional study was conducted on 98 subjects over 18 years old, referred totwo hospitals in Tabriz, Iran. Subjects were undergone an upper gastrointestinal endoscopy, 62subjects were finally enrolled. Honey consumption was assessed by a Food Frequency Questionnaire(FFQ and apoptosis was detected by TUNEL technique. We tested polynomial curve tofind the best fit between honey consumption and apoptosis.Results: A positive relation between honey consumption and apoptosis was found (P=0.024.Our results indicated that the final and the best fit curve was: apoptosis = 1.714+1.648(honeyamount - 0.533(honey amount2 +1.833×10-5(honey amount7.Conclusion: Honey consumption had positive effects on gastric cancer by inducing apoptosis ingastric mucosa.

  18. Interleukin-1 gene polymorphisms in chronic gastritis patients infected with Helicobacter pylori as risk factors of gastric cancer development.

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    Hnatyszyn, Andrzej; Wielgus, Karolina; Kaczmarek-Rys, Marta; Skrzypczak-Zielinska, Marzena; Szalata, Marlena; Mikolajczyk-Stecyna, Joanna; Stanczyk, Jerzy; Dziuba, Ireneusz; Mikstacki, Adam; Slomski, Ryszard

    2013-12-01

    Epidemiological investigations indicated association of the Helicobacter pylori infections with the occurrence of inflammatory conditions of the gastric mucosa and development of chronic gastritis and intestinal type of gastric cancer. IL1A and IL1B genes have been proposed as key factors in determining risk of gastritis and malignant transformation. The aim of this paper was to evaluate association of interleukin-1 gene polymorphisms with chronic gastritis, atrophy, intestinal metaplasia, dysplasia and intestinal type of gastric cancer in H. pylori-infected patients. Patients subjected to analysis represent group of 144 consecutive cases that suffered from dyspepsia with coexisting infection of H. pylori and chronic gastritis, chronic atrophic gastritis, intestinal metaplasia, dysplasia or gastric cancer. Molecular studies involved analysis of -889C>T polymorphism of IL1A gene and +3954C>T polymorphism of IL1B gene. Statistical analysis of association of polymorphism -889C>T of gene IL1A with changes in gastric mucosa showed lack of significance, whereas +3954C>T polymorphism of IL1B gene showed significant association. Frequency of allele T of +3954C>T polymorphism of IL1B gene was higher in group of patients with chronic gastritis, atrophy, intestinal metaplasia, dysplasia or intestinal type of gastric cancer (32.1 %) as compared with population group (23 %), χ(2) = 4.61 and p = 0.03. This corresponds to odds ratio: 1.58, 95 % CI: 1.04-2.4. Our results indicate that +3954C>T polymorphism of IL1B gene increase susceptibility to inflammatory response of gastric mucosa H. pylori-infected patients and plays a significant role in the development of chronic gastritis, atrophy, intestinal metaplasia, dysplasia and the initiation of carcinogenesis.

  19. Magnetogastrographic detection of gastric electrical response activity in humans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Irimia, Andrei; Richards, William O; Bradshaw, L Alan

    2006-01-01

    The detection and characterization of gastric electrical activity has important clinical applications, including the early diagnosis of gastric diseases in humans. In mammals, this phenomenon has two important features: an electrical control activity (ECA) that manifests itself as an electric slow wave (with a frequency of 3 cycles per minute in humans) and an electrical response activity (ERA) that is characterized by spiking potentials during the plateau phase of the ECA. Whereas the ECA has been recorded in humans both invasively and non-invasively (magnetogastrography-MGG), the ERA has never been detected non-invasively in humans before. In this paper, we report on our progress towards the non-invasive detection of ERA from the human stomach using a procedure that involves the application of principal component analysis to MGG recordings, which were acquired in our case from ten normal human patients using a Superconducting QUantum Interference Device (SQUID) magnetometer. Both pre- and post-prandial recordings were acquired for each patient and 20 min of recordings (10 min of pre-prandial and 10 min of post-prandial data) were analysed for each patient. The mean percentage of ECA slow waves that were found to exhibit spikes of suspected ERA origin was 41% and 61% for pre- and post-prandial recordings, respectively, implying a 47% ERA increase post-prandially (P < 0.0001 at a 95% confidence level). The detection of ERA in humans is highly encouraging and points to the possible use of non-invasive ERA recordings as a valuable tool for the study of human gastric disorders

  20. Genetic mutation analysis of human gastric adenocarcinomas using ion torrent sequencing platform.

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    Zhi Xu

    Full Text Available Gastric cancer is the one of the major causes of cancer-related death, especially in Asia. Gastric adenocarcinoma, the most common type of gastric cancer, is heterogeneous and its incidence and cause varies widely with geographical regions, gender, ethnicity, and diet. Since unique mutations have been observed in individual human cancer samples, identification and characterization of the molecular alterations underlying individual gastric adenocarcinomas is a critical step for developing more effective, personalized therapies. Until recently, identifying genetic mutations on an individual basis by DNA sequencing remained a daunting task. Recent advances in new next-generation DNA sequencing technologies, such as the semiconductor-based Ion Torrent sequencing platform, makes DNA sequencing cheaper, faster, and more reliable. In this study, we aim to identify genetic mutations in the genes which are targeted by drugs in clinical use or are under development in individual human gastric adenocarcinoma samples using Ion Torrent sequencing. We sequenced 737 loci from 45 cancer-related genes in 238 human gastric adenocarcinoma samples using the Ion Torrent Ampliseq Cancer Panel. The sequencing analysis revealed a high occurrence of mutations along the TP53 locus (9.7% in our sample set. Thus, this study indicates the utility of a cost and time efficient tool such as Ion Torrent sequencing to screen cancer mutations for the development of personalized cancer therapy.

  1. Infection with CagA-positive Helicobacter pylori strain containing three EPIYA C phosphorylation sites is associated with more severe gastric lesions in experimentally infected Mongolian gerbils (Meriones unguiculatus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira Júnior, M; Batista, S A; Vidigal, P V T; Cordeiro, A A C; Oliveira, F M S; Prata, L O; Diniz, A E T; Barral, C M; Barbuto, R C; Gomes, A D; Araújo, I D; Queiroz, D M M; Caliari, M V

    2015-04-27

    Infection with Helicobacter pylori strains containing high number of EPIYA-C phosphorylation sites in the CagA is associated with significant gastritis and increased risk of developing pre-malignant gastric lesions and gastric carcinoma. However, these findings have not been reproduced in animal models yet. Therefore, we investigated the effect on the gastric mucosa of Mongolian gerbil (Meriones unguiculatus) infected with CagA-positive H. pylori strains exhibiting one or three EPIYA-C phosphorilation sites. Mongolian gerbils were inoculated with H. pylori clonal isolates containing one or three EPIYA-C phosphorylation sites. Control group was composed by uninfected animals challenged with Brucella broth alone. Gastric fragments were evaluated by the modified Sydney System and digital morphometry. Clonal relatedness between the isolates was considered by the identical RAPD-PCR profiles and sequencing of five housekeeping genes, vacA i/d region and of oipA. The other virulence markers were present in both isolates (vacA s1i1d1m1, iceA2, and intact dupA). CagA of both isolates was translocated and phosphorylated in AGS cells. After 45 days of infection, there was a significant increase in the number of inflammatory cells and in the area of the lamina propria in the infected animals, notably in those infected by the CagA-positive strain with three EPIYA-C phosphorylation sites. After six months of infection, a high number of EPIYA-C phosphorylation sites was associated with progressive increase in the intensity of gastritis and in the area of the lamina propria. Atrophy, intestinal metaplasia, and dysplasia were also observed more frequently in animals infected with the CagA-positive isolate with three EPIYA-C sites.  We conclude that infection with H. pylori strain carrying a high number of CagA EPIYA-C phosphorylation sites is associated with more severe gastric lesions in an animal model of H. pylori infection.

  2. Infection with CagA-positive Helicobacter pylori strain containing three EPIYA C phosphorylation sites is associated with more severe gastric lesions in experimentally infected Mongolian gerbils (Meriones unguiculatus

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    M. Ferreira Júnior

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Infection with Helicobacter pylori strains containing high number of EPIYA-C phosphorylation sites in the CagA is associated with significant gastritis and increased risk of developing pre-malignant gastric lesions and gastric carcinoma. However, these findings have not been reproduced in animal models yet. Therefore, we investigated the effect on the gastric mucosa of Mongolian gerbil (Meriones unguiculatus infected with CagA-positive H. pylori strains exhibiting one or three EPIYA-C phosphorilation sites. Mongolian gerbils were inoculated with H. pylori clonal isolates containing one or three EPIYA-C phosphorylation sites. Control group was composed by uninfected animals challenged with Brucella broth alone. Gastric fragments were evaluated by the modified Sydney System and digital morphometry. Clonal relatedness between the isolates was considered by the identical RAPD-PCR profiles and sequencing of five housekeeping genes, vacA i/d region and of oipA. The other virulence markers were present in both isolates (vacA s1i1d1m1, iceA2, and intact dupA. CagA of both isolates was translocated and phosphorylated in AGS cells. After 45 days of infection, there was a significant increase in the number of inflammatory cells and in the area of the lamina propria in the infected animals, notably in those infected by the CagA-positive strain with three EPIYA-C phosphorylation sites. After six months of infection, a high number of EPIYA-C phosphorylation sites was associated with progressive increase in the intensity of gastritis and in the area of the lamina propria. Atrophy, intestinal metaplasia, and dysplasia were also observed more frequently in animals infected with the CagA-positive isolate with three EPIYA-C sites.  We conclude that infection with H. pylori strain carrying a high number of CagA EPIYA-C phosphorylation sites is associated with more severe gastric lesions in an animal model of H. pylori infection.

  3. Trends in gastric cancer mortality and in the prevalence of Helicobacter pylori infection in Portugal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morais, Samantha; Ferro, Ana; Bastos, Ana; Castro, Clara; Lunet, Nuno; Peleteiro, Bárbara

    2016-07-01

    Portugal has the highest gastric cancer mortality rates in Western Europe, along with high prevalences of Helicobacter pylori infection. Monitoring their trends is essential to predict the burden of this cancer. We aimed to quantify time trends in gastric cancer mortality in Portugal and in each administrative region, and to compute short-term predictions, as well as to describe the prevalence of H. pylori infection, through a systematic review. Joinpoint analyses were used to identify significant changes in sex-specific trends in gastric cancer age-standardized mortality rates (ASMR) and to estimate annual percent changes (APC). The most recent trends were considered to compute estimates up to 2020 by adjusting Poisson regression models. We searched PubMed and IndexRMP to identify studies carried out in Portugal reporting the prevalence of H. pylori. Gastric cancer mortality has been decreasing in Portugal since 1971 in men (from ASMR=55.3/100 000; APC=-2.4, 95% confidence interval: -2.5 to -2.3) and since 1970 in women (from ASMR=28.0/100 000; APC=-2.8, 95% confidence interval: -2.9 to -2.7), although large regional differences were observed. Predicted ASMR for 2015 and 2020 were 18.8/100 000 and 16.7/100 000 for men and 8.5/100 000 and 7.4/100 000 for women, respectively. The prevalence of H. pylori varied from almost 5% at 0.5-2 years to just over 90% at 70 years or more. No consistent variation was observed since the 1990s. The downward trends in mortality rates are expected to remain in the next decades. The high prevalence of H. pylori infection across age groups and studies from different periods shows a large potential for decrease in the burden of gastric cancer in Portugal.

  4. Associations among Gastric Juice pH, Atrophic Gastritis, Intestinal Metaplasia and Helicobacter pylori Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sung, Jihee; Lee, Jongchan; Hwang, Young-Jae; Kim, Hyoung Woo; Chung, Jung Wha; Kim, Jin-Wook; Lee, Dong Ho

    2018-01-01

    Background/Aims Gastric juice plays a crucial role in the physiology of the stomach. The aim of this study is to evaluate associations among the pH of gastric juice, atrophic gastritis (AG), intestinal metaplasia (IM), pepsinogen, and Helicobacter pylori infection. Methods Gastric biopsies and juice were collected from 46 subjects who underwent endoscopies at Seoul National University Bundang Hospital between November 2011 and March 2013. H. pylori, AG and IM were evaluated, and pepsinogen I or II, I/II ratio, and interleukin (IL)-1β levels were measured. Results The mean pH of gastric juice was higher in the H. pylori-positive group (n=17) than that in the H. pylori-negative group (n=29) (4.54 vs 2.46, p=0.002). When patients were divided into pH <3 (n=28) and pH ≥3 (n=18) groups, H. pylori was lower in the pH <3 group (21.4%) than in the pH ≥3 group (61.1%) (p=0.007). The pH ≥3 group demonstrated AG and IM more frequently than the pH <3 group in the body (p=0.047 and p=0.051, respectively) but not in the antrum. There were no differences in pepsinogen I or II, I/II ratio, and IL-1β levels between the two groups. Conclusions There is a relationship between chronic H. pylori infection and gastric juice pH ≥3, which may originate from AG and IM in the body. PMID:28918609

  5. Associations among Gastric Juice pH, Atrophic Gastritis, Intestinal Metaplasia and Helicobacter pylori Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sung, Jihee; Kim, Nayoung; Lee, Jongchan; Hwang, Young-Jae; Kim, Hyoung Woo; Chung, Jung Wha; Kim, Jin-Wook; Lee, Dong Ho

    2018-03-15

    Gastric juice plays a crucial role in the physiology of the stomach. The aim of this study is to evaluate associations among the pH of gastric juice, atrophic gastritis (AG), intestinal metaplasia (IM), pepsinogen, and Helicobacter pylori infection. Gastric biopsies and juice were collected from 46 subjects who underwent endoscopies at Seoul National University Bundang Hospital between November 2011 and March 2013. H. pylori , AG and IM were evaluated, and pepsinogen I or II, I/II ratio, and interleukin (IL)-1β levels were measured. The mean pH of gastric juice was higher in the H. pylori -positive group (n=17) than that in the H. pylori -negative group (n=29) (4.54 vs 2.46, p=0.002). When patients were divided into pH <3 (n=28) and pH ≥3 (n=18) groups, H. pylori was lower in the pH <3 group (21.4%) than in the pH ≥3 group (61.1%) (p=0.007). The pH ≥3 group demonstrated AG and IM more frequently than the pH <3 group in the body (p=0.047 and p=0.051, respectively) but not in the antrum. There were no differences in pepsinogen I or II, I/II ratio, and IL-1β levels between the two groups. There is a relationship between chronic H. pylori infection and gastric juice pH ≥3, which may originate from AG and IM in the body.

  6. Helicobacter pylori infection as a cause of gastritis, duodenal ulcer, gastric cancer and nonulcer dyspepsia: a systematic overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veldhuyzen van Zanten, S J; Sherman, P M

    1994-01-15

    To evaluate current evidence for a causal relation between Helicobacter pylori infection and gastritis, duodenal ulcer, gastric cancer and nonulcer dyspepsia. A MEDLINE search for articles published in English between January 1983 and December 1992 with the use of MeSH terms Helicobacter pylori, gastritis, duodenal ulcer, gastric cancer, dyspepsia and clinical trial; abstracts were excluded. Six journals and Current Contents were searched manually for pertinent articles published in that time frame. Original studies with at least 25 patients, case reports and reviews that examined the relation between H. pylori and the four gastrointestinal disorders; 350 articles were on gastritis, 122 on duodenal ulcer, 44 on gastric cancer and 96 on nonulcer dyspepsia. The quality of the studies was rated independently on a four-point scale. The strength of the evidence was assessed using a six-point scale for each of the eight established guidelines for determining a causal relation. There was conclusive evidence of a causal relation between H. pylori infection and histologic gastritis. Koch's postulates for the identification of a microorganism as the causative agent of a disease were fulfilled for H. pylori as a causative agent of gastritis. There was strong evidence that H. pylori is the main cause of duodenal ulcers not induced by nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, but all of Koch's postulates were not fulfilled. There was moderate epidemiologic evidence of an association between chronic H. pylori infection and gastric cancer. There was a lack of convincing evidence of a causal association between H. pylori and nonulcer dyspepsia. The evidence supports a strong causal relation between H. pylori infection and gastritis and duodenal ulcer and a moderate relation between such infection and gastric cancer. Further studies are needed to clarify the role of H. pylori in these disorders. Thus far, there is no evidence of a causal relation between H. pylori and nonulcer

  7. Effect of Helicobacter pylori infection on IL-8, IL-1beta and COX-2 expression in patients with chronic gastritis and gastric cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartchewsky, Waldemar; Martini, Mariana Rocha; Masiero, Mariana; Squassoni, Aline Candido; Alvarez, Marisa Claudia; Ladeira, Marcelo Sady; Salvatore, Daisy; Trevisan, Miriam; Pedrazzoli, José; Ribeiro, Marcelo Lima

    2009-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori infection is related to gastric cancer development, and chronic inflammation is presumed to be the main cause. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the influence of H. pylori cagA, vacA, iceA, and babA genotypes on COX-2, IL-1beta, and IL-8 expression. Of the 217 patients included in the study, 26 were uninfected, 127 had chronic gastritis and were H. pylori-positive, and 64 had gastric cancer. Bacterial genotypes were evaluated by polymerase chain reaction (PCR), and the expression values were determined by quantitative real-time PCR and immunohistochemistry. An association was found between the infection with cagA, vacA s1m1 strains and gastric cancer development. Regarding the 3' region of the cagA gene, we also found an association between the infection with cagA EPIYA-ABCCC strains and clinical outcome. Higher levels of IL-8, IL-1beta, and COX-2 were detected in gastric mucosa from infected patients with chronic gastritis, and they were also associated with the infection by cagA, vacA s1m1 strains. The IL-8 and IL-1beta levels decrease significantly from chronic gastritis to gastric cancer, while the relative expression remained unaltered when COX-2 expression was analyzed among patients with gastritis and cancer. Since inflammatory response to H. pylori infection plays an important role in cellular proliferation and gastric mucosal damage, the up-regulation of IL-1beta, IL-8, and COX-2 in patients with chronic gastritis has an important clinical implication in gastric carcinogenesis.

  8. A Decrease of Histone Deacetylase 6 Expression Caused by Helicobacter Pylori Infection is Associated with Oncogenic Transformation in Gastric Cancer

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    Qing He

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Histone deacetylase 6 (HDAC6 plays a role in the progression of many tumors. However, the relationship between the level of HDAC6 expression and gastric tumorigenesis is still unclear. Here, we illustrate the potential correlation between Helicobacter pylori (HP infection and the variation of HDAC6 expression in different gastric lesions, as well as the clinical significance of HDAC6 expression in gastric cancer (GC patients. Materials and Methods: Between 2011 and 2016, 364 patients with different types of gastric lesions were enrolled in Baotou City Central Hospital. Immunostaining of HDAC6 expression and HP infection were performed in the following cohort including 21 normal tissues (Normal; 40 samples with chronic superficial gastritis (CSG; 106 with chronic atrophic gastritis (CAG; 94 with intestinal metaplasia (IM; 64 with dysplasia (DYS and 39 with gastric cancer (GC. Survival analysis was performed in another 80 GC patients using the Kaplan-Meier method and multivariate Cox regression analyses. The level of HDAC6 expression was determined by Real-time PCR, Western blotting and IHC staining in gastric cell lines and tissues. Furthermore, the correlation between HDAC6 expression and clinicopathological features and prognosis was analyzed in the GC cohort. HP strains were lavaged into Kunming mice to investigate the effects of HP infection on the expression of different HDAC members in this mouse model. Results: Higher levels of HDAC6 expression were detected in normal and premalignant lesions than in the GC tissues (p<0.01, and decreased HDAC6 expression was associated with HP infection and TNM stage (p<0.01 and p=0.048, respectively. Multivariate analysis revealed that HDAC6 expression was an independent predictor of the outcome of GC patients (p=0.04. HP mediated HDAC6 expression in the cell lines and KM mice. HP infection could promote HDAC1 and HDAC4 expression as determined by Western blotting. Conclusions: HDAC6 is a

  9. Helicobacter pylori infection affects mitochondrial function and DNA repair, thus, mediating genetic instability in gastric cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Machado, Ana Manuel Dantas; Desler, Claus; Boggild, Sisse

    2013-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori infection is an important factor for the development of atrophic gastritis and gastric carcinogenesis. However, the mechanisms explaining the effects of H. pylori infection are not fully elucidated. H. pylori infection is known to induce genetic instability in both nuclear and....... pylori infection, furthermore, the results demonstrate that multiple DNA repair activities are involved in protecting mtDNA during infection. (C) 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved....

  10. Gastric angiogenesis and Helicobacter pylori infection Angiogénesis gástrica e infección por Helicobacter pylori

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    I. D. Pousa

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available The formation of new blood vessels seen in conditions commonly associated with Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori infection, including gastritis, peptic ulcer, and gastric carcinoma, prompts consideration of a potential relationship between mucosal colonization by this organism and the angiogenic process. H. pylori directly or indirectly damages endothelial cells, which induces a number of changes in the microvasculature of the gastric mucosa. In H. pylori-associated conditions, that is, in gastritis, peptic ulcer and gastric carcinoma, there is an increased concentration of angiogenic factors, and subsequently a formation of new blood vessels. However, this early angiogenesis -which is activated to repair the gastric mucosa- is subsequently inhibited in patients with peptic ulcer, and ulcer healing is thus delayed. This may be due to the antiproliferative action of this organism on endothelial cells. While the angiogenic process becomes inhibited in infected patients with peptic ulcer, it remains seemingly active in those with gastritis or gastric cancer. This fact is in support of the notion suggested by various studies that peptic ulcer and gastric cancer are mutually excluding conditions. In the case of gastric cancer, neoangiogenesis would enhance nutrient and oxygen supply to cancer cells, and thus tumor growth and metastatic spread.

  11. Telomere length in non-neoplastic gastric mucosa and its relationship to H. pylori infection, degree of gastritis, and NSAID use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tahara, Tomomitsu; Shibata, Tomoyuki; Kawamura, Tomohiko; Ishizuka, Takamitsu; Okubo, Masaaki; Nagasaka, Mitsuo; Nakagawa, Yoshihito; Arisawa, Tomiyasu; Ohmiya, Naoki; Hirata, Ichiro

    2016-02-01

    Telomere shortening occurs with human aging in many organs and tissues and is accelerated by rapid cell turnover and oxidative injury. We measured average telomere length using quantitative real-time PCR in non-neoplastic gastric mucosa and assessed its relationship to H. pylori-related gastritis, DNA methylation, ulcer disease, and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) usage. Gastric biopsies were obtained from 151 cancer-free subjects including 49 chronic NSAID users and 102 nonusers. Relative telomere length in genomic DNA was measured by real-time PCR. H. pylori infection status, histological severity of gastritis, and serum pepsinogens (PGs) were also investigated. E-cadherin (CDH1) methylation status was determined by methylation-specific PCR (MSP). Average relative telomere length of H. pylori-infected subjects was significantly shortened when compared to H. pylori-negative subjects (p = 0.002) and was closely associated with all histological parameter of gastritis (all p values gastritis and CDH1 methylation status. Also, telomere shortening is accelerated by NSAID usage especially in H. pylori-negative subjects.

  12. Tumour gastrin expression and serum gastrin concentrations in dogs with gastric carcinoma are poor diagnostic indicators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Seim-Wikse, T.; Kolbjørnsen, Ø.; Jörundsson, E.

    2014-01-01

    Hypergastrinaemia is observed commonly in human patients with gastric carcinoma and is associated with atrophic gastritis and Helicobacter pylori infection, both of which predispose to development of gastric tumours. Increased expression of gastrin is also described as a prognostic indicator...

  13. Helicobacter and Gastric Malignancies

    OpenAIRE

    Ferreira, António Carlos; Isomoto, Hajime; Moriyama, Masatsugu; Fujioka, Toshio; Machado, José Carlos; Yamaoka, Yoshio

    2008-01-01

    Individuals infected with Helicobacter pylori, a stomach colonizing bacteria, have an increased risk of developing gastric malignancies. The risk for developing cancer relates to the physiologic and histologic changes that H. pylori infection induces in the stomach. In the last year numerous studies have been conducted in order to characterize the association between H. pylori infection and gastric cancer. These studies range from epidemiologic approaches aiming at the identification of envir...

  14. Gastric inhibitory polypeptide does not inhibit gastric emptying in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meier, Juris J; Goetze, Oliver; Anstipp, Jens

    2004-01-01

    ) = 0.15, P = 0.15 for intact GIP; r(2) = 0.21, P = 0.086 for total GIP). We conclude that gastric emptying does not appear to be influenced by GIP. The secretion of GIP after meal ingestion is not suppressed by its exogenous administration. The lack of effect of GIP on gastric emptying underlines......The insulinotropic gut hormone gastric inhibitory polypeptide (GIP) has been demonstrated to inhibit gastric acid secretion and was proposed to possess "enterogastrone" activity. GIP effects on gastric emptying have not yet been studied. Fifteen healthy male volunteers (23.9 +/- 3.3 yr, body mass....... Gastric emptying was calculated from the (13)CO(2) exhalation rates in breath samples collected over 360 min. Venous blood was drawn in 30-min intervals for the determination of glucose, insulin, C-peptide, and GIP (total and intact). Statistical calculations were made by use of repeated-measures ANOVA...

  15. Genetic polymorphisms of miR-146a and miR-27a, H. pylori infection, and risk of gastric lesions in a Chinese population.

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    Ming-yang Song

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: MicroRNAs (miRNAs have been implicated in various human diseases. Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs in inflammation-related miRNA may play an important role in Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori-induced gastric lesions. To evaluate the associations between miRNA SNPs, H. pylori and gastric lesions, a population-based study was conducted in Linqu County, China. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Based on serum miRNA array conducted in this population, two SNP loci (miR-146a rs2910164: G>C and miR-27a rs895819: T>C were determined by polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism in 2,380 participants with diverse gastric lesions. Using participants with superficial gastritis and mild chronic atrophic gastritis as the reference group, we found that rs2910164 CC carriers had a significantly increased risk of intestinal metaplasia [adjusted odds ratio (OR, 1.42; 95% confidence interval (CI, 1.03-1.97] and dysplasia (OR, 1.54; 95% CI, 1.05-2.25 compared to GG carriers, whereas no significant association was observed for rs895819. Stratified analysis by H. pylori infection indicated that rs2910164 C allele was associated with an increased risk of intestinal metaplasia and dysplasia only among individuals infected with H. pylori (CC vs. GG: OR, 1.53; 95% CI, 1.12-2.08, P for trend = 0.004. Participants who simultaneously carried variant alleles and H. pylori infection were more likely to develop intestinal metaplasia and dysplasia, although the interaction between genetic variants and H. pylori infection was not significant (P for interaction = 0.35 for rs2910164 and 0.92 for rs895819. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These findings suggest that miR-146a rs2910164 polymorphism may contribute to the evolution of H. pylori-associated gastric lesions in this high-risk population.

  16. Non-detection of Epstein-Barr virus and human papillomavirus in a region of high gastric cancer risk indicates a lack of a role for these viruses in gastric carcinomas

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    Xiao-yan Yuan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Gastric mucosa tissue was collected from patients with gastroduodenal diseases in a region of norrteastern China showing a high risk of gastric cancer incidence. The presence of EBV and HPV were assayed to investigate the relationship between gastric carcinomas and virus infection. Neither EBV nor HPV DNA was detected in tissue from the patients. The role of EBV and HPV in gastric cancer is not well understood and still needs to be clarified.

  17. Gastric intestinal metaplasia: an intermediate precancerous lesion in the cascade of gastric carcinogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malik, T.H.; Hong, X.; Sayahan, M.Y.A.

    2017-01-01

    Gastric intestinal metaplasia, an intermediate lesion in the development of intestinal-type gastric cancer, is observed in the milieu of long standing non-atrophic gastritis and atrophic gastritis. Most patients with intestinal metaplasia remain asymptomatic unless cobalamin deficiency occurs secondary to loss of glands (that produce intrinsic factor and acid). Genetic events that predispose to development of gastric intestinal metaplasia remains an enigma. Mechanisms leading to the progression of atrophy to metaplasia still needs to be comprehensively explored. Many studies in the literature describe a positive effect of typing intestinal metaplasia and concluded that intestinal metaplasia type III carries the highest risk for developing gastric cancer while others refute it. It is well established that Helicobacter pylori infection is the most important factor for the development of chronic gastritis, gastric intestinal metaplasia as well as gastric cancer. Countries with a higher prevalence of Helicobacter pylori infection and gastric cancer also have a high tendency of being prevalent for intestinal metaplasia. However, it remains elusive whether eradication of Helicobacter pylori infection tends to regress gastric intestinal metaplasia or reduce the subsequent risk of cancer development. Putting together, more prospective cohort studies should be designed to identify factors (antioxidants; anti-inflammatory drugs; food therapy) that may contribute in the regression of intestinal metaplasia, when used simultaneously with eradication therapy. Furthermore, molecular markers for evaluation of intestinal metaplasia, and the potential point-of-no-return should be further investigated. Consensus is also required to advocate a timeframe for surveillance of patients with gastric intestinal metaplasia. (author)

  18. Differential growth factor induction and modulation of human gastric epithelial regeneration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tetreault, Marie-Pier; Chailler, Pierre; Rivard, Nathalie; Menard, Daniel

    2005-01-01

    While several autocrine/paracrine growth factors (GFs) can all stimulate epithelial regeneration in experimentally wounded primary gastric cultures, clinical relevance for their non-redundant cooperative actions in human gastric ulcer healing is suggested by the sequential pattern of GF gene induction in vivo. Using new HGE cell lines able to form a coherent monolayer with tight junctions as well as using primary human gastric epithelial cultures, we show that EGF, TGFα, HGF and IGFs accelerate epithelial restitution upon wounding, independently of the TGFβ pathway (as opposed to intestinal cells). However, they differently modulate cell behavior: TGFα exerts strong effects (even more than EGF) on cytoplasmic spreading and non-oriented protruding activity of bordering cells whereas HGF preferentially coordinates single lamella formation, cell elongation and migration into the wound. IGF-I and IGF-II rather induce the alignment of bordering cells and maintain a compact monolayer front. The number of mitotic cells maximally increases with EGF, followed by TGFα and IGF-I,-II. The current study demonstrates that GFs differentially regulate the regeneration of human gastric epithelial cells through specific modulation of cell shape adaptation, migration and proliferation, further stressing that a coordination of GF activities would be necessary for the normal progression of post-wounding epithelial repair

  19. Involvement of microRNAs-MMPs-E-cadherin in the migration and invasion of gastric cancer cells infected with Helicobacter pylori.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yongmei; Li, Xiaohui; Du, Jie; Yin, Youcong; Li, Yuanjian

    2018-06-15

    It has been found that Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori)is not only the main cause of gastric cancer, but also closely related to its metastasis. E-cadherin cleavage induced by matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) plays an important role in the tumor metastasis. In the present study, we investigated the role of microRNAs-MMPs-E-cadherin in migration and invasion of gastric cancer cells treated with H. pylori. The results showed that H. pylori induced migration and invasion of SGC-7901 cells with a down-regulation of E-cadherin expression, which were abolished by MMPs knock down, E-cadherin overexpression, mimics of miR128 and miR148a. MiR128/miR148a inhibitors restored MMP-3/MMP-7 expression, down-regulated E-cadherin level, and accelerated cellular migration and invasion. This study suggests that H. pylori induces migration and invasion of gastric cancer cells through reduction of E-cadherin function by activation of MMP-3, - 7. The present results also suggest that the activated MMPs/E-cadherin pathway is related with down-regulation of miR128/miR148a in the human gastric cancer cells infected with H. pylori. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  20. Unique mechanism of Helicobacter pylori for colonizing the gastric mucus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshiyama, H; Nakazawa, T

    2000-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori is a human gastric pathogen causing chronic infection. Urease and motility using flagella are essential factors for its colonization. Urease of H. pylori exists both on the surface and in the cytoplasm, and is involved in neutralizing gastric acid and in chemotactic motility. H. pylori senses the concentration gradients of urea in the gastric mucus layer, then moves toward the epithelial surface by chemotactic movement. The energy source for the flagella movement is the proton motive force. The hydrolysis of urea by the cytoplasmic urease possibly generates additional energy for the flagellar rotation in the mucus gel layer.

  1. Genetic battle between Helicobacter pylori and humans. The mechanism underlying homologous recombination in bacteria, which can infect human cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanada, Katsuhiro; Yamaoka, Yoshio

    2014-10-01

    Helicobacter pylori is a gram-negative pathogenic bacterium that colonises the human stomach. The chronic infection it causes results in peptic ulcers and gastric cancers. H. pylori can easily establish a chronic infection even if the immune system attacks this pathogen with oxidative stress agents and immunoglobulins. This is attributed to bacterial defence mechanisms against these stresses. As a defence mechanism against oxidative stresses, in bacterial genomes, homologous recombination can act as a repair pathway of DNA's double-strand breaks (DSBs). Moreover, homologous recombination is also involved in the antigenic variation in H. pylori. Gene conversion alters genomic structures of babA and babB (encoding outer membrane proteins), resulting in escape from immunoglobulin attacks. Thus, homologous recombination in bacteria plays an important role in the maintenance of a chronic infection. In addition, H. pylori infection causes DSBs in human cells. Homologous recombination is also involved in the repair of DSBs in human cells. In this review, we describe the roles of homologous recombination with an emphasis on the maintenance of a chronic infection. Copyright © 2014 Institut Pasteur. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  2. Molecular Characterization of the Human Stomach Microbiota in Gastric Cancer Patients

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    Guoqin Yu

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Helicobacter pylori (Hp is the primary cause of gastric cancer but we know little of its relative abundance and other microbes in the stomach, especially at the time of gastric cancer diagnosis. Here we characterized the taxonomic and derived functional profiles of gastric microbiota in two different sets of gastric cancer patients, and compared them with microbial profiles in other body sites. Paired non-malignant and tumor tissues were sampled from 160 gastric cancer patients with 80 from China and 80 from Mexico. The 16S rRNA gene V3–V4 region was sequenced using MiSeq platform for taxonomic profiles. PICRUSt was used to predict functional profiles. Human Microbiome Project was used for comparison. We showed that Hp is the most abundant member of gastric microbiota in both Chinese and Mexican samples (51 and 24%, respectively, followed by oral-associated bacteria. Taxonomic (phylum-level profiles of stomach microbiota resembled oral microbiota, especially when the Helicobacter reads were removed. The functional profiles of stomach microbiota, however, were distinct from those found in other body sites and had higher inter-subject dissimilarity. Gastric microbiota composition did not differ by Hp colonization status or stomach anatomic sites, but did differ between paired non-malignant and tumor tissues in either Chinese or Mexican samples. Our study showed that Hp is the dominant member of the non-malignant gastric tissue microbiota in many gastric cancer patients. Our results provide insights on the gastric microbiota composition and function in gastric cancer patients, which may have important clinical implications.

  3. Helicobacter pylori genotypes associated with gastric histo-pathological damages in a Moroccan population.

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    Samia Alaoui Boukhris

    Full Text Available H. pylori persistent infection induces chronic gastritis and is associated with peptic ulcer disease and gastric carcinoma development. The severity of these diseases is related to human's genetic diversity, H. pylori genetic variability and environmental factors. To identify the prevalence of histo-pathological damages caused by H. pylori infection in Moroccan population, and to determine their association to H. pylori genotypes, a prospective study has been conducted during 3 years on patients attending the gastroenterology department of Hassan II University Hospital (CHU of Fez, Morocco. A total of 801 Moroccan adults' patients were recruited; H. pylori was diagnosed and genotyped by PCR in biopsy specimens and histological exam was performed. We found a high rate of glandular atrophy. Chronic inflammation, neutrophil activity and glandular atrophy showed statistically significant association with H. pylori infection. However, intestinal metaplasia was inversely associated to this infection and no association was observed with gastric cancer cases. A statistically significant association was found between intestinal metaplasia and vacAs1 and vac Am1 genotypes in patients aged 50 years and more but not in younger. This last genotype is also associated to gastric cancer. In this study, gastric cancer showed no significant association with H. pylori. Further studies are warranted to determine the role of other etiological agents such as Epstein-Barr virus, human papillomavirus and possibly environmental and dietetic factors in the occurrence of this pathology.

  4. Neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (NGAL/Lcn2) is upregulated in gastric mucosa infected with Helicobacter pylori

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alpízar-Alpízar, Warner; Laerum, Ole Didrik; Illemann, Martin

    2009-01-01

    characterized here the pattern of expression of NGAL/Lcn2 in gastric mucosa (45 non-neoplastic and 38 neoplastic tissue samples) and explored the connection between NGAL/Lcn2 expression and H. pylori infection. Immunohistochemical analysis showed high NGAL/Lcn2 expression in normal and gastritis-affected mucosa...... compared to low expression in intestinal metaplasia, dysplasia, and gastric cancer. In normal and gastritis-affected mucosa (n=36 tissue samples), NGAL/Lcn2 was more frequently seen in epithelial cells located at the neck and base of the glands in H. pylori-positive cases than in similar epithelial cells...... of noninfected cases (Fisher's exact test, p=0.04). In conclusion, the high expression of NGAL/Lcn2 in normal and gastritis-affected mucosa infected with H. pylori suggests that NGAL/Lcn2 is upregulated locally in response to this bacterial infection. It is discussed whether this may have a causal relation...

  5. Prevalence of Helicobacter pylori infection in advanced gastric carcinoma

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    Irami Araújo-Filho

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUD: There is substantial evidence that infection with Helicobacter pylori plays a role in the development of gastric cancer and that it is rarely found in gastric biopsy of atrophic gastritis and gastric cancer. On advanced gastric tumors, the bacteria can be lost from the stomach. AIMS: To analyze the hypothesis that the prevalence of H.pylori in operated advanced gastric carcinomas and adjacent non-tumor tissues is high, comparing intestinal and diffuse tumors according to Lauren's classification METHODS: A prospective controlled study enrolled 56 patients from "Hospital Universitário", Federal University of Rio Grande do Norte, Natal, RN, Brazil, with advanced gastric cancer, treated from February 2000 to March 2003. Immediately after partial gastrectomy, the resected stomach was opened and several mucosal biopsy samples were taken from the gastric tumor and from the adjacent mucosa within 4 cm distance from the tumor margin. Tissue sections were stained with hematoxylin and eosin. Lauren's classification for gastric cancer was used, to analyse the prevalence of H. pylori in intestinal or diffuse carcinomas assessed by the urease rapid test, IgG by ELISA and Giemsa staining. H. pylori infected patients were treated with omeprazole, clarithromycin and amoxicillin for 7 days. Follow-up endoscopy and serology were performed 6 months after treatment to determine successful eradication of H. pylori in non-tumor tissue. Thereafter, follow-up endoscopies were scheduled annually. Chi-square and MacNemar tests with 0.05 significance were used. RESULTS: Thirty-four tumors (60.7% were intestinal-type and 22 (39.3% diffuse type carcinomas. In adjacent non-tumor gastric mucosa, chronic gastritis were found in 53 cases (94.6% and atrophic mucosa in 36 patients (64.3%. All the patients with atrophic mucosa were H. pylori positive. When examined by Giemsa and urease test, H. pylori positive rate in tumor tissue of intestinal type carcinomas was

  6. Helicobacter pylori colonization critically depends on postprandial gastric conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bücker, Roland; Azevedo-Vethacke, Marina; Groll, Claudia; Garten, Désirée; Josenhans, Christine; Suerbaum, Sebastian; Schreiber, Sören

    2012-01-01

    The risk of Helicobacter pylori infection is highest in childhood, but the colonization process of the stomach mucosa is poorly understood. We used anesthetized Mongolian gerbils to study the initial stages of H. pylori colonization. Prandial and postprandial gastric conditions characteristic of humans of different ages were simulated. The fraction of bacteria that reached the deep mucus layer varied strongly with the modelled postprandial conditions. Colonization success was weak with fast gastric reacidification typical of adults. The efficiency of deep mucus entry was also low with a slow pH decrease as seen in pH profiles simulating the situation in babies. Initial colonization was most efficient under conditions simulating the postprandial reacidification and pepsin activation profiles in young children. In conclusion, initial H. pylori colonization depends on age-related gastric physiology, providing evidence from an in vivo infection model that suggests an explanation why the bacterium is predominantly acquired in early childhood. PMID:23251780

  7. The corpus-predominant gastritis index may serve as an early marker of Helicobacter pylori-infected patients at risk of gastric cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Y-C; Hsiao, W-H; Yang, H-B; Cheng, H-C; Chang, W-L; Lu, C-C; Sheu, B-S

    2013-05-01

    To eradicate Helicobacter pylori before the occurrence of precancerous changes is important to prevent gastric carcinogenesis. To validate whether the corpus-predominant gastritis index (CGI) can serve as an early marker to identify the H. pylori-infected patients at risk of gastric carcinogenesis. This study enrolled 188 subjects, including 43 noncardiac gastric cancer patients, 63 of their first-degree relatives and 82 sex- and age-matched duodenal ulcer patients as controls. All received endoscopy to provide topographic gastric specimens to test for H. pylori infection and its related histological features, translated into the operative link on gastritis assessment (OLGA), operative link on gastric intestinal metaplasia assessment (OLGIM) stages, and the presence of CGI. Spasmolytic polypeptide-expressing metaplasia (SPEM) was assessed by immunohistochemistry staining of trefoil factor 2. Gastric cancer patients had higher prevalence of CGI and OLGIM stage II-IV, but not OLGA stage II-IV, than the controls (P = 0.001, OR = 3.4[95% CI: 1.4-8.1] for CGI; OR = 5.0[95% CI: 2.0-12.8] for OLGIM). In patients with the combined presence of CGI and OLGIM stage II-IV, the risk of gastric cancer increased to 9.8 (P cancer patients had a higher rate of the presence of CGI, but not OLGA or OLGIM stage II-IV than the duodenal ulcer controls (P = 0.001). Of the first-degree relatives, the presence of CGI increased the risk of SPEM (P = 0.003, OR = 5.5[95% CI: 1.8-17.0]). The corpus-predominant gastritis index, which is highly correlated to SPEM, may serve as an early marker to identify the H. pylori-infected patients at a higher risk of gastric cancer. © 2013 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  8. Dietary Composition Influences Incidence of Helicobacter pylori-Induced Iron Deficiency Anemia and Gastric Ulceration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beckett, Amber C.; Piazuelo, M. Blanca; Noto, Jennifer M.; Peek, Richard M.; Washington, M. Kay; Algood, Holly M. Scott

    2016-01-01

    Epidemiologic studies have provided conflicting data regarding an association between Helicobacter pylori infection and iron deficiency anemia (IDA) in humans. Here, a Mongolian gerbil model was used to investigate a potential role of H. pylori infection, as well as a possible role of diet, in H. pylori-associated IDA. Mongolian gerbils (either H. pylori infected or uninfected) received a normal diet or one of three diets associated with increased H. pylori virulence: high-salt, low-iron, or a combination of a high-salt and low-iron diet. In an analysis of all infected animals compared to uninfected animals (independent of diet), H. pylori-infected gerbils had significantly lower hemoglobin values than their uninfected counterparts at 16 weeks postinfection (P Anemia was associated with the presence of gastric ulceration but not gastric cancer. Infected gerbils consuming diets with a high salt content developed gastric ulcers significantly more frequently than gerbils consuming a normal-salt diet, and the lowest hemoglobin levels were in infected gerbils consuming a high-salt/low-iron diet. These data indicate that H. pylori infection can cause IDA and that the composition of the diet influences the incidence and severity of H. pylori-induced IDA. PMID:27620719

  9. Gastric mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphomas and Helicobacter pylori infection: A Colombian perspective

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sally Yepes; Maria Mercedes Torres; Carlos Saavedra; Rafael Andrade

    2012-01-01

    AIM:To assess the significance of chromosome translocation t(11;18)(q21;q21),B-cell lymphoma 10 (BCL-10)protein and Helicobacter pylori (H.pylori) infection in gastric mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT) lymphoma in Colombia.METHODS:Fifty cases of gastric MALT lymphoma and their respective post-treatment follow-up biopsies were examined to assess the presence of the translocation t(11;18)(q21;q21) as identified by fluorescence in situ hybridization; to detect protein expression patterns of BCL10 using immunohistochemistry; and for evaluation of tumor histology to determine the correlation of these factors and resistance to H.pylori eradication.RESULTS:Infection with H.pylori was confirmed in all cases of gastric MALT lymphoma in association with chronic gastritis.Bacterial eradication led to tumor regression in 66% of cases.The translocation t(11;18)(q21;q21) was not present in any of these cases,nor was there evidence of tumor transformation to diffuse large B-cell lymphoma.Thirty-four percent of the patients showed resistance to tumor regression,and within this group,7 cases,representing 14% of all those analyzed,were considered to be t(11;18)(q21;q21)-positive gastric MALT lymphomas.Protein expression of BCL10 in the nucleus was associated with the presence of translocation and treatment resistance.Cases that were considered unresponsive to therapy were histologically characterized by the presence of homogeneous tumor cells and a lack of plasmacytic differentiation.Responder cases exhibited higher cellular heterogeneity and a greater frequency of plasma cells.CONCLUSION:Both t(11;18)(q21;q21)-positive MALT lymphoma cases and those with nuclear BCL10 expression are considered resistant to H,pylori eradication.It is suggested that chronic antigenic stimulation is not a dominant event in resistant cases.

  10. Factors that mediate colonization of the human stomach by Helicobacter pylori.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunne, Ciara; Dolan, Brendan; Clyne, Marguerite

    2014-05-21

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) colonizes the stomach of humans and causes chronic infection. The majority of bacteria live in the mucus layer overlying the gastric epithelial cells and only a small proportion of bacteria are found interacting with the epithelial cells. The bacteria living in the gastric mucus may act as a reservoir of infection for the underlying cells which is essential for the development of disease. Colonization of gastric mucus is likely to be key to the establishment of chronic infection. How H. pylori manages to colonise and survive in the hostile environment of the human stomach and avoid removal by mucus flow and killing by gastric acid is the subject of this review. We also discuss how bacterial and host factors may together go some way to explaining the susceptibility to colonization and the outcome of infection in different individuals. H. pylori infection of the gastric mucosa has become a paradigm for chronic infection. Understanding of why H. pylori is such a successful pathogen may help us understand how other bacterial species colonise mucosal surfaces and cause disease.

  11. Polymorphisms of the DNA methyltransferase 1 associated with reduced risks of Helicobacter pylori infection and increased risks of gastric atrophy.

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    Jing Jiang

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: DNA methyltransferase-1(DNMT1 is an important enzyme in determining genomic methylation patterns in mammalian cells. We investigated the associations between SNPs in the DNMT1 gene and risks of developing H. pylori seropositivity, gastric atrophy and gastric cancer in the Chinese population. METHODS: The study consisted of 447 patients with gastric cancer; 111 patients with gastric atrophy; and 961 healthy controls. Five SNPs, rs10420321, rs16999593, rs8101866, rs8111085 and rs2288349 of the DNMT1 gene were genotyped. Anti-H.pylori IgG was detected by ELISA. Gastric atrophy was screened by the level of serum pepsinogen Ι and II and then confirmed by endoscopy and histopatholgical examinations. RESULTS: The age- and sex-adjusted OR of H. pylori seropositivity was 0.67 (95%CI: 0.51-0.87 for rs8111085 TC/CC genotypes, significantly lower than the TT genotype in healthy controls. The adjusted OR of H.pylori seropositivity was 0.68 (95%CI: 0.52-0.89 for rs10420321 AG/GG genotypes. In addition, patients carrying rs2228349 AA genotype have a significantly increased risk for H.pylori seropositivity (OR=1.67; 95%CI: 1.02-2.75. Further haplotype analyses also showed that the ATTTG and ATCTA are significantly associated with increased risks in H.pylori infection compared to the GTCCG haplotype (OR=1.38, 95%CI: 1.08-1.77; OR=1.40, 95% CI: 1.09-1.80. The adjusted ORs of gastric atrophy were 1.66 (95%CI: 1.06-2.61 for rs10420321 GG genotype, and 1.67 (95%CI 1.06-2.63, P=0.03 for rs8111085 CC genotype, but no association was found between SNPs in the DNMT1 gene and risk of developing gastric cancer. CONCLUSIONS: Individuals with rs10420321 GG and rs8111085 CC genotype of the DNMT1 gene were associated with reduced risks for H.pylori infection. On the other hand, higher risks of gastric atrophy were found in the carriers with these two genotypes compared to other genotypes. Our results suggested that SNPs of DNMT1 could be used as genotypic

  12. Association of helicobacter pylori infection and chronic atrophic gastritis with risk of colonic, pancreatic and gastric cancer: A ten-year follow-up of the ESTHER cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xin-Zu; Schöttker, Ben; Castro, Felipe Andres; Chen, Hongda; Zhang, Yan; Holleczek, Bernd; Brenner, Hermann

    2016-03-29

    To assess the association of H. pylori and chronic atrophic gastritis (AG) with colonic, pancreatic and gastric cancer in a population-based prospective cohort. Serum antibodies against H. pylori in general and specific to cytotoxin-associated gene A (CagA), as well as serum pepsinogen I and II were analyzed in 9,506 men and women, aged 50-75 years in a cohort study from Saarland, Germany. Incident cases of colonic, pancreatic and gastric cancer were ascertained by record linkage with data from the Saarland Cancer Registry. During an average follow-up of 10.6 years, 108 colonic, 46 pancreatic and 27 gastric incident cancers were recorded. There was no association between H. pylori infection and colonic cancer (HR = 1.07; 95% CI 0.73-1.56) or pancreatic cancer (HR = 1.32; 0.73-2.39), regardless of either CagA seropositivity or AG status. In contrast, CagA+ infection was associated with a strongly increased risk of gastric cancer, especially non-cardia gastric cancer, and this association was particularly pronounced in the presence of AG. Compared to people without AG and without CagA+ infection, people with both risk factors had a significantly increased risk of non-cardia gastric cancer (HR = 32.4; 7.6-137.6). This large cohort study did not observe an association of H. pylori infection or AG with colonic or pancreatic cancer, but underlines that the vast majority of non-cardia gastric cancers arise from AG and infection with CagA+ H. pylori strains.

  13. Histologic scoring of gastritis and gastric cancer in mouse models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, Arlin B

    2012-01-01

    Histopathology is a defining endpoint in mouse models of experimental gastritis and gastric adenocarcinoma. Presented here is an overview of the histology of gastritis and gastric cancer in mice experimentally infected with Helicobacter pylori or H. felis. A modular histopathologic scoring scheme is provided that incorporates relevant disease-associated changes. Whereas the guide uses Helicobacter infection as the prototype challenge, features may be applied to chemical and genetically engineered mouse models of stomach cancer as well. Specific criteria included in the combined gastric histologic activity index (HAI) include inflammation, epithelial defects, oxyntic atrophy, hyperplasia, pseudopyloric metaplasia, and dysplasia or neoplasia. Representative photomicrographs accompany descriptions for each lesion grade. Differentiation of genuine tumor invasion from pseudoinvasion is highlighted. A brief comparison of normal rodent versus human stomach anatomy and physiology is accompanied by an introduction to mouse-specific lesions including mucous metaplasia and eosinophilic droplets (hyalinosis). In conjunction with qualified pathology support, this guide is intended to assist research scientists, postdoctoral fellows, graduate students, and medical professionals from affiliated disciplines in the interpretation and histologic grading of chronic gastritis and gastric carcinoma in mouse models.

  14. Helicobacter pylori and oral pathology: relationship with the gastric infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adler, Isabel; Muiño, Andrea; Aguas, Silvia; Harada, Laura; Diaz, Mariana; Lence, Adriana; Labbrozzi, Mario; Muiño, Juan Manuel; Elsner, Boris; Avagnina, Alejandra; Denninghoff, Valeria

    2014-08-07

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) has been found in the oral cavity and stomach, and its infection is one of the most frequent worldwide. We reviewed the literature and conducted a Topic Highlight, which identified studies reporting an association between H. pylori-infection in the oral cavity and H. pylori-positive stomach bacterium. This work was designed to determine whether H. pylori is the etiologic agent in periodontal disease, recurrent aphthous stomatitis (RAS), squamous cell carcinoma, burning and halitosis. Record selection focused on the highest quality studies and meta-analyses. We selected 48 articles reporting on the association between saliva and plaque and H. pylori-infection. In order to assess periodontal disease data, we included 12 clinical trials and 1 meta-analysis. We evaluated 13 published articles that addressed the potential association with RAS, and 6 with squamous cell carcinoma. Fourteen publications focused on our questions on burning and halitosis. There is a close relation between H. pylori infection in the oral cavity and the stomach. The mouth is the first extra-gastric reservoir. Regarding the role of H. pylori in the etiology of squamous cell carcinoma, no evidence is still available.

  15. Blood Group Substances as Potential Therapeutic Agents for the Prevention and Treatment of Infection with Noroviruses Proving Novel Binding Patterns in Human Tissues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yazawa, Shin; Yokobori, Takehiko; Ueta, Gen; Ide, Munenori; Altan, Bolag; Thongprachum, Aksara; Nishimura, Toyo; Nakajima, Tamiko; Kominato, Yoshihiko; Asao, Takayuki; Saniabadi, Abby R.; Furukawa, Kiyoshi; Kuwano, Hiroyuki; Le Pendu, Jacques; Ushijima, Hiroshi

    2014-01-01

    Blood group-related glycans determining ABO and Lewis blood groups are known to function as attachment factors for most of the norovirus (NoV) strains. To identify binding specificity of each NoV, recombinant norovirus-like particles (VLPs) and human saliva samples with different ABO, Lewis phenotypes and secretor status have been commonly applied. When binding specificities of VLPs prepared from 16 different genotypes of NoVs in GI and GII genogroups were characterized in samples of human gastric mucosa compared to human saliva based on blood group phenotypes, considerable differences were observed for several strains. Novel binding specificities determined by an ELISA using preparations from human gastric mucosa were also ascertained by immunohistochemical analyses using human jejunal mucosa, widely believed to be susceptible to NoV infection. Further, A, B and O(H) blood group substances prepared from porcine and squid tissues were found to be effective for preventing ABO blood group-specific binding of VLPs to both saliva and mucosa samples. Therefore, these blood group substances might have potential for the prevention and treatment of NoV infection. PMID:24558470

  16. Predictive value of CHFR and MLH1 methylation in human gastric cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yazhuo; Yang, Yunsheng; Lu, Youyong; Herman, James G; Brock, Malcolm V; Zhao, Po; Guo, Mingzhou

    2015-04-01

    Gastric carcinoma (GC) has one of the highest mortality rates of cancer diseases and has a high incidence rate in China. Palliative chemotherapy is the main treatment for advanced gastric cancer. It is necessary to compare the effectiveness and toxicities of different regimens. This study explores the possibility of methylation of DNA damage repair genes serving as a prognostic and chemo-sensitive marker in human gastric cancer. The methylation status of five DNA damage repair genes (CHFR, FANCF, MGMT, MLH1, and RASSF1A) was detected by nested methylation-specific PCR in 102 paraffin-embedded gastric cancer samples. Chi-square or Fisher's exact tests were used to evaluate the association of methylation status and clinic-pathological factors. The Kaplan-Meier method and Cox proportional hazards models were employed to analyze the association of methylation status and chemo-sensitivity. The results indicate that CHFR, MLH1, RASSF1A, MGMT, and FANCF were methylated in 34.3% (35/102), 21.6% (22/102), 12.7% (13/102), 9.8% (10/102), and 0% (0/102) of samples, respectively. No association was found between methylation of CHFR, MLH1, RASSF1A, MGMT, or FANCF with gender, age, tumor size, tumor differentiation, lymph node metastasis, and TNM stage. In docetaxel-treated gastric cancer patients, resistance to docetaxel was found in CHFR unmethylated patients by Cox proportional hazards model (HR 0.243, 95% CI, 0.069-0.859, p = 0.028), and overall survival is longer in the CHFR methylated group compared with the CHFR unmethylated group (log-rank, p = 0.036). In oxaliplatin-treated gastric cancer patients, resistance to oxaliplatin was found in MLH1 methylated patients (HR 2.988, 95% CI, 1.064-8.394, p = 0.038), and overall survival was longer in the MLH1 unmethylated group compared with the MLH1 methylated group (log-rank, p = 0.046). CHFR is frequently methylated in human gastric cancer, and CHFR methylation may serve as a docetaxel-sensitive marker. MLH1 methylation was

  17. Tissue metabolic profiling of human gastric cancer assessed by 1H NMR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Huijuan; Zhang, Hailong; Deng, Pengchi; Liu, Chunqi; Li, Dandan; Jie, Hui; Zhang, Hu; Zhou, Zongguang; Zhao, Ying-Lan

    2016-01-01

    Gastric cancer is the fourth most common cancer and the second most deadly cancer worldwide. Study on molecular mechanisms of carcinogenesis will play a significant role in diagnosing and treating gastric cancer. Metabolic profiling may offer the opportunity to understand the molecular mechanism of carcinogenesis and help to identify the potential biomarkers for the early diagnosis of gastric cancer. In this study, we reported the metabolic profiling of tissue samples on a large cohort of human gastric cancer subjects (n = 125) and normal controls (n = 54) based on 1 H nuclear magnetic resonance ( 1 H NMR) together with multivariate statistical analyses (PCA, PLS-DA, OPLS-DA and ROC curve). The OPLS-DA model showed adequate discrimination between cancer tissues and normal controls, and meanwhile, the model excellently discriminated the stage-related of tissue samples (stage I, 30; stage II, 46; stage III, 37; stage IV, 12) and normal controls. A total of 48 endogenous distinguishing metabolites (VIP > 1 and p < 0.05) were identified, 13 of which were changed with the progression of gastric cancer. These modified metabolites revealed disturbance of glycolysis, glutaminolysis, TCA, amino acids and choline metabolism, which were correlated with the occurrence and development of human gastric cancer. The receiver operating characteristic diagnostic AUC of OPLS-DA model between cancer tissues and normal controls was 0.945. And the ROC curves among different stages cancer subjects and normal controls were gradually improved, the corresponding AUC values were 0.952, 0.994, 0.998 and 0.999, demonstrating the robust diagnostic power of this metabolic profiling approach. As far as we know, the present study firstly identified the differential metabolites in various stages of gastric cancer tissues. And the AUC values were relatively high. So these results suggest that the metabolic profiling of gastric cancer tissues has great potential in detecting this disease and helping

  18. Helicobacter pylori virulence factors in development of gastric carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ming-Yi; Liu, Xiao-Fei; Gao, Xiao-Zhong

    2015-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori plays a vital role in the pathogenesis of gastric carcinoma. However, only a relatively small proportion of individuals infected with H. pylori develop gastric carcinoma. Differences in the incidence of gastric carcinoma among infected individuals can be explained, at least partly, by the different genotypes of H. pylori virulence factors. Thus far, many virulence factors of H. pylori, such as Cag PAI, VacA, OMPs and DupA, have been reported to be involved in the development of gastric cancer. The risk of developing gastric cancer during H. pylori infection is affected by specific host-microbe interactions that are independent of H. pylori virulence factors. In this review, we discuss virulence factors of H. pylori and their role in the development of gastric carcinoma that will provide further understanding of the biological interactions of H. pylori with the host.

  19. Gastric and Peritoneal Involvement of Human Herpes Virus 8 Related Kaposi Sarcoma in a Patient with Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nuno Ribeiro Ferreira

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Kaposi's sarcoma (KS is one of the most frequent neoplastic diseases in patients infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV. The authors report the case of a 40-year-old male with ascites, peripheral edema and peritoneal carcinomatosis secondary to a gastric KS related to human herpes virus type 8 (HHV-8. The patient had severe immunodeficiency, with a TCD4+ count of 86 cells/µl and newly diagnosed acquired immunodeficiency syndrome. His clinical condition rapidly deteriorated, with multiorgan failure, and he died without the possibility of initiating antiretroviral therapy or chemotherapy. To the authors’ knowledge, carcinomatosis is a rare feature in KS.

  20. Consensus on the clinical management, screening-to-treat, and surveillance of Helicobacter pylori infection to improve gastric cancer control on a nationwide scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheu, Bor-Shyang; Wu, Ming-Shiang; Chiu, Cheng-Tang; Lo, Jing-Chuan; Wu, Deng-Chyang; Liou, Jyh-Ming; Wu, Chun-Ying; Cheng, Hsiu-Chi; Lee, Yi-Chia; Hsu, Ping-I; Chang, Chun-Chao; Chang, Wei-Lun; Lin, Jaw-Town

    2017-06-01

    Previous international consensus statements provided general policies for the management of Helicobacter pylori infection. However, there are geographic differences in the prevalence and antimicrobial resistance of H. pylori, and in the availability of medications and endoscopy. Thus, nationwide or regional consensus statements are needed to improve control of H. pylori infection and gastric cancer. This consensus statement for management of H. pylori in Taiwan has three major sections: (1) optimal diagnosis and indications; (2) current treatment strategies; and (3) screening-to-treat and surveillance for control of gastric cancer. The literature review emphasized recent data for development of draft statements and determination of levels of evidence. Twenty-five Taiwan experts conducted a consensus conference, by a modified Delphi process, to modify the draft statements. Consensus, defined as an agreement of least 80% of the experts, and recommendation grade were determined by anonymous voting. There were 24 consensus statements. Section 1 has seven statements on recommendations for the diagnosis and indications for treatment of H. pylori infection. Section 2 has 10 statements that provide an updated treatment algorithm for first-line, second-line, and third-line regimens. Section 3 has seven statements regarding H. pylori eradication for reducing the risk of gastric cancer, with a cost-benefit analysis. After H. pylori eradication, the consensus highlights the use of endoscopic surveillance and/or chemoprevention to further reduce the burden of gastric cancer. This consensus statement has updated recommendations for improving the clinical management of H. pylori infection in areas such as Taiwan, which have high prevalence of H. pylori infection and gastric cancer. © 2017 The Authors. Helicobacter Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Impact of human milk pasteurization on gastric digestion in preterm infants: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Oliveira, Samira C; Bellanger, Amandine; Ménard, Olivia; Pladys, Patrick; Le Gouar, Yann; Dirson, Emelyne; Kroell, Florian; Dupont, Didier; Deglaire, Amélie; Bourlieu, Claire

    2017-02-01

    Holder pasteurization has been reported to modify human milk composition and structure by inactivating bile salt-stimulated lipase (BSSL) and partially denaturing some of its proteins, potentially affecting its subsequent digestion. We sought to determine the impact of human milk pasteurization on gastric digestion (particularly for proteins and lipids) in preterm infants who were fed their mothers' own milk either raw or pasteurized. In a randomized controlled trial, 12 hospitalized tube-fed preterm infants were their own control group in comparing the gastric digestion of raw human milk (RHM) with pasteurized human milk (PHM). Over a 6-d sequence, gastric aspirates were collected 2 times/d before and after RHM or PHM ingestion. The impact of milk pasteurization digestive kinetics and disintegration was tested with the use of a general linear mixed model. Despite inactivating BSSL, instantaneous lipolysis was not affected by pasteurization (mean ± SD at 90 min: 12.6% ± 4.7%; P > 0.05). Lipolysis occurred in milk before digestion and was higher for PHM than for RHM (mean ± SD: 3.2% ± 0.6% and 2.2% ± 0.8%, respectively; P Pasteurization enhanced the proteolysis of lactoferrin (P Pasteurization did not affect gastric emptying (∼30-min half time) or pH (mean ± SD: 4.4 ± 0.8) at 90 min. Overall, pasteurization had no impact on the gastric digestion of lipids and some proteins from human milk but did affect lactoferrin and α-lactalbumin proteolysis and emulsion disintegration. Freeze-thawing and pasteurization increased the milk lipolysis before digestion but did not affect gastric lipolysis. Possible consequences on intestinal digestion and associated nutritional outcomes were not considered in this study. This trial was registered at clinicaltrials.gov as NCT02112331. © 2017 American Society for Nutrition.

  2. Homeostatic Mass Control in Gastric Non-Neoplastic Epithelia under Infection of Helicobacter pylori: An Immunohistochemical Analysis of Cell Growth, Stem Cells and Programmed Cell Death

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kato, Kenji; Hasui, Kazuhisa; Wang, Jia; Kawano, Yoshifumi; Aikou, Takashi; Murata, Fusayoshi

    2008-01-01

    We evaluated homeostatic mass control in non-neoplastic gastric epithelia under Helicobacter pylori (HP) infection in the macroscopically normal-appearing mucosa resected from the stomach with gastric cancer, immunohistochemically analyzing the proliferation, kinetics of stem cells and programmed cell death occurring in them. Ki67 antigen-positive proliferating cells were found dominantly in the elongated neck portion, sparsely in the fundic areas and sporadically in the stroma with chronic infiltrates. CD117 could monitor the kinetics of gastric stem cells and showed its expression in two stages of gastric epithelial differentiation, namely, in transient cells from the gastric epithelial stem cells to the foveolar and glandular cells in the neck portion and in what are apparently progenitor cells from the gastric stem cells in the stroma among the infiltrates. Most of the nuclei were positive for ssDNA in the almost normal mucosa, suggesting DNA damage. Cleaved caspase-3-positive foveolar cells were noted under the surface, suggesting the suppression of apoptosis in the surface foveolar cells. Besides such apoptosis of the foveolar cells, in the severely inflamed mucosa apoptotic cells were found in the neck portion where most of the cells were Ki67 antigen-positive proliferating cells. Beclin-1 was recognized in the cytoplasm and in a few nuclei of the fundic glandular cells, suggesting their autophagic cell death and mutated beclin-1 in the nuclei. Taken together, the direct and indirect effects of HP infection on the gastric epithelial proliferation, differentiation and programmed cell death suggested the in-situ occurrence of gastric cancer under HP infection

  3. β-Elemene-induced autophagy protects human gastric cancer cells from undergoing apoptosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Jing; Zhang, Ye; Qu, Jinglei; Xu, Ling; Hou, Kezuo; Zhang, Jingdong; Qu, Xiujuan; Liu, Yunpeng

    2011-01-01

    β-Elemene, a compound found in an herb used in traditional Chinese medicine, has shown promising anti-cancer effects against a broad spectrum of tumors. The mechanism by which β-elemene kills cells remains unclear. The aim of the present study is to investigate the anti-tumor effect of β-elemene on human gastric cancer cells and the molecular mechanism involved. β-Elemene inhibited the viability of human gastric cancer MGC803 and SGC7901 cells in a dose-dependent manner. The suppression of cell viability was due to the induction of apoptosis. A robust autophagy was observed in the cells treated with β-elemene; it was characterized by the increase of punctate LC3 dots, the cellular morphology, and the increased levels of LC3-II protein. Further study showed that β-elemene treatment up-regulated Atg5-Atg12 conjugated protein but had little effect on other autophagy-related proteins. PI3K/Akt/mTOR/p70S6K1 activity was inhibited by β-elemene. Knockdown of Beclin 1 with small interfering RNA, or co-treatment with the autophagy inhibitor, 3-methyladenine or chlorochine enhanced significantly the antitumor effects of β-elemene. Our data provides the first evidence that β-elemene induces protective autophagy and prevents human gastric cancer cells from undergoing apoptosis. A combination of β-elemene with autophagy inhibitor might thus be a useful therapeutic option for advanced gastric cancer

  4. CT-Guided Percutaneous Drainage of Infected Collections Due to Gastric Leak After Sleeve Gastrectomy for Morbid Obesity: Initial Experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kelogrigoris, M.; Sotiropoulou, E.; Stathopoulos, K.; Georgiadou, V.; Philippousis, P.; Thanos, L.

    2011-01-01

    This study was designed to evaluate the efficacy and safety of computed tomography (CT)-guided drainage in treating infected collections due to gastric leak after laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy for morbid obesity. From January 2007 to June 2009, 21 patients (9 men and 12 women; mean age, 39.2 (range, 26–52) years) with infected collections due to gastric leak after laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy for morbid obesity underwent image-guided percutaneous drainage. All procedures were performed using CT guidance and 8- to 12-Fr pigtail drainage catheters. Immediate technical success was achieved in all 21 infected collections. In 18 of 21 collections, we obtained progressive shrinkage of the collection with consequent clinical success (success rate 86%). In three cases, the abdominal fluid collection was not resolved, and the patients were reoperated. Among the 18 patients who avoided surgery, 2 needed replacement of the catheter due to obstruction. No major complications occurred during the procedure. The results of our study support that CT-guided percutaneous drainage is an effective and safe method to treat infected abdominal fluid collections due to gastric leak in patients who had previously underwent laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy for morbid obesity. It may be considered both as a preparatory step for surgery and a valuable alternative to open surgery. Failure of the procedure does not, however, preclude a subsequent surgical operation.

  5. ERC/mesothelin is expressed in human gastric cancer tissues and cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Tomoaki; Kajino, Kazunori; Abe, Masaaki; Sato, Koichi; Maekawa, Hiroshi; Sakurada, Mutsumi; Orita, Hajime; Wada, Ryo; Kajiyama, Yoshiaki; Hino, Okio

    2014-01-01

    ERC/mesothelin is expressed in mesothelioma and other malignancies. The ERC/mesothelin gene (MSLN) encodes a 71-kDa precursor protein, which is cleaved to yield 31-kDa N-terminal (N-ERC/mesothelin) and 40-kDa C-terminal (C-ERC/mesothelin) proteins. N-ERC/mesothelin is a soluble protein and has been reported to be a diagnostic serum marker of mesothelioma and ovarian cancer. Gastric cancer tissue also expresses C-ERC/mesothelin, but the significance of serum N-ERC levels for diagnosing gastric cancer has not yet been studied. We examined the latter issue in the present study as well as C-ERC/mesothelin expression in human gastric cancer tissues and cell lines. We immunohistochemically examined C-ERC/mesothelin expression in tissue samples from 50 cases of gastric cancer, and we also assessed the C-ERC/mesothelin expression in 6 gastric cancer cell lines (MKN-1, MKN-7, MKN-74, NUGC-3, NUGC-4 and TMK-1) using reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction, flow cytometry, immunohistochemistry and immunoblotting. We also examined the N-ERC/mesothelin concentrations in the supernatants of cultured cells and in the sera of gastric cancer patients using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). N-ERC/mesothelin was detected in the supernatants of 3 gastric cancer cell lines (MKN-1, NUGC-4 and TMK-1) by ELISA, but its concentration in the sera of gastric cancer patients was almost same as that observed in the sera of the normal controls. In the gastric cancer tissues, C-ERC/mesothelin expression was associated with lymphatic invasion. N-ERC/mesothelin was secreted into the supernatants of gastric cancer cell lines, but does not appear to be a useful serum marker of gastric cancer.

  6. Expression of cathepsins B, L, S, and D by gastric epithelial cells implicates them as antigen presenting cells in local immune responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrera, C; Ye, G; Espejo, R; Gunasena, S; Almanza, R; Leary, J; Crowe, S; Ernst, P; Reyes, V E

    2001-10-01

    Helicobacter pylori infection is linked to chronic gastritis, peptic ulcer and gastric carcinoma. During H. pylori infection, class II MHC expression by the gastric epithelium increases, as does the number of local CD4(+) T cells, which appear to be important in the associated pathogenesis. These observations suggested that the epithelium might present antigens to T cells. Thus, we sought to determine whether gastric epithelial cells process antigens to establish their function as local antigen presenting cells (APC). We examined a panel of gastric epithelial cell lines for expression of the antigen processing cathepsins B (CB), L (CL), S (CS), and D (CD). The mRNA for these enzymes were detected by RT-PCR and the enzymes in the gastric epithelial cells were identified by various independent methods. We corroborated the expression of CB and CD on gastric epithelial cells from human biopsy samples. The functions of these proteases were confirmed by assessing their ability to digest ovalbumin, a conventional dietary antigen, and proteins from H. pylori. In summary, multiple lines of evidence suggest gastric epithelial cells process antigens for presentation to CD4(+) T cells. To our knowledge, these are the first studies to document the antigen processing capacity of human gastric epithelial cells.

  7. The influence of cytokine gene polymorphisms on the risk of developing gastric cancer in patients with Helicobacter pylori infection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stubljar, David; Jeverica, Samo; Jukic, Tomislav; Skvarc, Miha; Pintar, Tadeja; Tepes, Bojan; Kavalar, Rajko; Stabuc, Borut; Peterlin, Borut; Ihan, Alojz

    2015-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori infection is the main cause of gastric cancer. The disease progression is influenced by the host inflammatory responses, and cytokine single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) may have a role in the course of the disease. The aim of our study was to investigate proinflammatory cytokine polymorphisms, previously associated with the development of gastric cancer, in a Slovenian population. In total 318 patients and controls were selected for the study and divided into three groups: (i) patients with gastric cancer (n = 58), (ii) patients with chronic gastritis (n = 60) and (iii) healthy control group (n = 200). H. pylori infection in patient groups was determined by serology, histology and culture. Four proinflammatory gene polymorphisms were determined (IL-1β, IL-1ra, TNF-α, TLR-4) in all subjects. We found a statistically significant difference between males and females for the groups (p = 0.025). Odds ratio (OR) for gastric cancer risk for females was 0.557 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.233–1.329) and for chronic gastritis 2.073 (95% CI: 1.005–4.277). IL-1B-511*T/T homozygous allele for cancer group had OR = 2.349 (95% CI: 0.583–9.462), heterozygous IL-1B-511*T had OR = 1.470 (95% CI: 0.583–3.709) and heterozygotes in TNF-A-308 genotype for chronic gastritis had OR = 1.402 (95% CI: 0.626–3.139). Other alleles had OR less than 1. We could not prove association between gastric cancer and chronic gastritis due to H. pylori in any cytokine SNPs studied in Slovenian population. Other SNPs might be responsible besides infection with H. pylori for the progression from atrophy to neoplastic transformation

  8. Impact of intra-operative intraperitoneal chemotherapy on organ/space surgical site infection in patients with gastric cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, X; Duan, X; Xu, J; Jin, Q; Chen, F; Wang, P; Yang, Y; Tang, X

    2015-11-01

    Various risk factors for surgical site infection (SSI) have been identified such as age, overweight, duration of surgery, blood loss, etc. Intraperitoneal chemotherapy during surgery is a common procedure in patients with gastric cancer, yet its impact on SSI has not been evaluated. To evaluate whether intra-operative intraperitoneal chemotherapy is a key risk factor for organ/space SSI in patients with gastric cancer. All patients with gastric cancer who underwent surgery at the Department of Gastrointestinal Surgery between January 2008 and December 2013 were studied. The organ/space SSI rates were compared between patients who received intra-operative intraperitoneal chemotherapy and patients who did not receive intra-operative intraperitoneal chemotherapy, and the risk factors for organ/space SSI were analysed by univariate and multi-variate regression analyses. The microbial causes of organ/space SSI were also identified. Of the eligible 845 patients, 356 received intra-operative intraperitoneal chemotherapy, and the organ/space SSI rate was higher in these patients compared with patients who did not receive intra-operative intraperitoneal chemotherapy (9.01% vs 3.88%; P = 0.002). Univariate analysis confirmed the significance of this finding (odds ratio 2.443; P = 0.003). As a result, hospital stay was increased in patients who received intra-operative intraperitoneal chemotherapy {mean 20.91 days [95% confidence interval (CI) 19.76-22.06] vs 29.72 days (95% CI 25.46-33.99); P = 0.000}. The results also suggested that intra-operative intraperitoneal chemotherapy may be associated with more Gram-negative bacterial infections. Intra-operative intraperitoneal chemotherapy is a significant risk factor for organ/space SSI in patients with gastric cancer. Copyright © 2015 The Healthcare Infection Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Radiolysis of human gastric glycopolypeptides in aqueous solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagrani, S.; Bisby, R.H.

    1986-01-01

    The degradation of human gastric glycopolypeptides by hydroxyl radicals formed in irradiated N 2 0-saturated aqueous solution has been investigated. Gel exclusion chromatography shows the formation of lower molecular weight degradation products after irradiation and the appearance of unsaturated carbonyl-containing products which absorb in the ultra-violet. The radiation-induced destruction of individual monosaccharides in three human glycopolypeptides having different oligosaccharide chains has been measured. The results indicate that the structure of the oligosaccharide chain determines the extent of destruction of each type of monosaccharide present. (author)

  10. [Gastric cancer risk estimate in patients with chronic gastritis associated with Helicobacter pylori infection in a clinical setting].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arismendi-Morillo, G; Hernández, I; Mengual, E; Abreu, N; Molero, N; Fuenmayor, A; Romero, G; Lizarzábal, M

    2013-01-01

    Severity of chronic gastritis associated with Helicobacter pylori infection (CGAHpI) could play a role in evaluating the potential risk to develop gastric cancer. Our aim was to estimate the risk for gastric cancer in a clinical setting, according to histopathologic criteria, by applying the gastric cancer risk index (GCRI) METHODS: Histopathologic study of the gastric biopsies (corpus-antrum) from consecutive adult patients that underwent gastroesophageal duodenoscopy was carried out, and the GCRI was applied in patients presenting with CGAHpI. One hundred eleven patients (77% female) with a mean age of 38.6±13.1 years were included. Active Helicobacter pylori infection (aHpi) was diagnosed in 77 cases (69.40%). In 45% of the cases with aHpi, pangastritis (23%) or corpus-predominant gastritis (22%) was diagnosed. Nine cases were diagnosed with intestinal metaplasia (8%), 7 of which (77.70%) were in the aHpi group. Twenty one percent of the patients with aHpi had a GCRI of 2 (18.10%) or 3 (2.50%) points (high risk index), while 79.10% accumulated a GCRI of 0 or 1 points (low risk index). Of the patients with no aHpi, none of them had 3 points (p=0.001). Of the 18 patients that accumulated 2 or 3 points, 6 (33.30%) presented with intestinal metaplasia (all with pangastritis and corpus-predominant gastritis), of which 4 cases (66.60%) had aHpi. The estimated gastric cancer risk in patients with CGAHpI in the clinical setting studied was relatively low and 5% of the patients had a histopathologic phenotype associated with an elevated risk for developing gastric cancer. Copyright © 2012 Asociación Mexicana de Gastroenterología. Published by Masson Doyma México S.A. All rights reserved.

  11. p75 Neurotrophin Receptor Suppresses the Proliferation of Human Gastric Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haifeng Jin

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Identifying an effective therapeutic target is pivotal in the treatment of gastric cancer. In this study, we investigated the expression of p75 neurotrophin receptor (p75NTR in gastric cancer and the impact of its alteration on tumor growth. p75NTR expression was absent or significantly decreased in 212 cases of gastric cancers compared with the normal gastric mucosa (P < .05. Moreover, p75NTR expression was also lost or significantly decreased in various human gastric cancer cell lines. p75NTR inhibited in vitro growth activities and caused dramatic attenuation of tumor growth in animal models by induction of cell cycle arrest. Upregulation of p75NTR led to downregulation of cyclin A, cyclin D1, cyclin E, cyclin-dependent kinase 2, p-Rb, and PCNA, but to upregulation of Rb and p27 expressions. Conversely, downregulating p75NTR with specific siRNA yielded inverse results. The rescue of tumor cells from cell cycle progression by a death domain-deleted dominant-negative antagonist of p75NTR (Δp75NTR showed that the death domain transduced antiproliferative activity in a ligandindependent manner and further demonstrated the inhibitive effect of p75NTR on growth in gastric cancer. Therefore, we provided evidence that p75NTR was a potential tumor suppressor and may be used as a therapeutic target for gastric cancer.

  12. Helicobacter pylori Infection and Development of Gastric Cancer a 10-Year Follow-up Population-Based Study in a High Incidence Area

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sadjadi, Alireza; Alizadeh, Behrooz Z.; Babaei, Masoud; Derakhshan, Mohammad H.; Ahmadi, Emad; Etemadi, Arash; Houshiar, Afshin; Pourfarzi, Farhad; Yazdanbod, Abbas; Sotoudeh, Masoud; de Bock, Geertruida H.; Malekzadeh, Reza

    Backgrounds & Aim: H. pylori (HP) infection is the most important etiology of gastric cancer (GC) in the world but it causes GC in only a minority of those infected .Eradication of HP can decrease the development of GC only in the subgroup of HP infected subjects without precancerous lesions.

  13. Fisetin inhibits cellular proliferation and induces mitochondria-dependent apoptosis in human gastric cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabarwal, Akash; Agarwal, Rajesh; Singh, Rana P

    2017-02-01

    The anticancer effects of fisetin, a dietary agent, are largely unknown against human gastric cancer. Herein, we investigated the mechanisms of fisetin-induced inhibition of growth and survival of human gastric carcinoma AGS and SNU-1 cells. Fisetin (25-100 μM) caused significant decrease in the levels of G1 phase cyclins and CDKs, and increased the levels of p53 and its S15 phosphorylation in gastric cancer cells. We also observed that growth suppression and death of non-neoplastic human intestinal FHs74int cells were minimally affected by fisetin. Fisetin strongly increased apoptotic cells and showed mitochondrial membrane depolarization in gastric cancer cells. DNA damage was observed as early as 3 h after fisetin treatment which was accompanied with gamma-H2A.X(S139) phosphorylation and cleavage of PARP. Fisetin-induced apoptosis was observed to be independent of p53. DCFDA and MitoSOX analyses showed an increase in mitochondrial ROS generation in time- and dose-dependent fashion. It also increased cellular nitrite and superoxide generation. Pre-treatment with N-acetyl cysteine (NAC) inhibited ROS generation and also caused protection from fisetin-induced DNA damage. The formation of comets were observed in only fisetin treated cells which was blocked by NAC pre-treatment. Further investigation of the source of ROS, using mitochondrial respiratory chain (MRC) complex inhibitors, suggested that fisetin caused ROS generation specifically through complex I. Collectively, these results for the first time demonstrated that fisetin possesses anticancer potential through ROS production most likely via MRC complex I leading to apoptosis in human gastric carcinoma cells. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. CD147 expression in human gastric cancer is associated with tumor recurrence and prognosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dake Chu

    Full Text Available CD147 is correlated with tumor aggressiveness in various human malignancies. Here, we investigated CD147 protein expression in 223 patients with gastric cancer by immunohistochemistry and analyzed its association with disease-free and overall survival. CD147 was increased in gastric cancer compared to normal tissues. Additionally, CD147 expression was associated with gastric cancer invasion, metastasis and TNM stage, whereas it was not related to age, sex, differentiation status, tumor site or Lauren classification. Kaplan-Meier analysis confirmed that CD147 was associated with disease-free and overall survival in patients with gastric cancer; i.e., patients with positive CD147 staining tend to have worse disease-free and overall survival. Moreover, Cox's proportional hazards analysis demonstrated that CD147 was an independent marker of disease-free and overall survival for patients with gastric cancer. These results confirm the association of CD147 with gastric cancer invasion and metastasis and prove that CD147 might be an indicator of tumor recurrence and prognosis in gastric cancer.

  15. Nuclear factor-kappaB activation correlates with better prognosis and Akt activation in human gastric cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Byung Lan; Lee, Hye Seung; Jung, Jieun; Cho, Sung Jin; Chung, Hee-Yong; Kim, Woo Ho; Jin, Young-Woo; Kim, Chong Soon; Nam, Seon Young

    2005-04-01

    Because the biological significance of constitutive nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-kappaB) activation in human gastric cancer is unclear, we undertook this study to clarify the regulatory mechanism of NF-kappaB activation and its clinical significance. Immunohistochemistry for NF-kappaB/RelA was done on 290 human gastric carcinoma specimens placed on tissue array slides. The correlations between NF-kappaB activation and clinicopathologic features, prognosis, Akt activation, tumor suppressor gene expression, or Bcl-2 expression were analyzed. We also did luciferase reporter assay, Western blot analysis, and reverse transcription-PCR using the SNU-216 human gastric cancer cell line transduced with retroviral vectors containing constitutively active Akt or the NF-kappaB repressor mutant of IkappaBalpha. Nuclear expression of RelA was found in 18% of the gastric carcinomas and was higher in early-stage pathologic tumor-node-metastasis (P = 0.019). A negative correlation was observed between NF-kappaB activation and lymphatic invasion (P = 0.034) and a positive correlation between NF-kappaB activation and overall survival rate of gastric cancer patients (P = 0.0228). In addition, NF-kappaB activation was positively correlated with pAkt (P = 0.047), p16 (P = 0.004), adenomatous polyposis coli (P Smad4 (P = 0.002), and kangai 1 (P Akt. NF-kappaB activation was frequently observed in early-stage gastric carcinoma and was significantly correlated with better prognosis and Akt activation. These findings suggest that NF-kappaB activation is a valuable prognostic variable in gastric carcinoma.

  16. Apoptosis induced by GanoPoly in human gastric cancer cell line ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    use

    2011-12-12

    Dec 12, 2011 ... ... cancer's active therapy. Key words: Apoptosis, polysaccharide, human gastric cancer cells. ... The active components of polysaccharides are all glucans, which have a ... for the treatment of alleviated fatigue, night sweating,.

  17. BAK overexpression mediates p53-independent apoptosis inducing effects on human gastric cancer cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Jun

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background BAK (Bcl-2 homologous antagonist/killer is a novel pro-apoptotic gene of the Bcl-2 family. It has been reported that gastric tumors have reduced BAK levels when compared with the normal mucosa. Moreover, mutations of the BAK gene have been identified in human gastrointestinal cancers, suggesting that a perturbation of BAK-mediated apoptosis may contribute to the pathogenesis of gastric cancer. In this study, we explored the therapeutic effects of gene transfer mediated elevations in BAK expression on human gastric cancer cells in vitro. Methods Eukaryotic expression vector for the BAK gene was constructed and transferred into gastric cancer cell lines, MKN-45 (wild-type p53 and MKN-28 (mutant-type p53. RT-PCR and Western Blotting detected cellular BAK gene expression. Cell growth activities were detected by MTT colorimetry and flow cytometry, while apoptosis was assayed by electronic microscopy and TUNEL. Western Blotting and colorimetry investigated cellular caspase-3 activities. Results BAK gene transfer could result in significant BAK overexpression, decreased in vitro growth, cell cycle G0/G1 arrest, and induced apoptosis in gastric cancer cells. In transferred cells, inactive caspase-3 precursor was cleaved into the active subunits p20 and p17, during BAK overexpression-induced apoptosis. In addition, this process occurred equally well in p53 wild-type (MKN-45, or in p53 mutant-type (MKN-28 gastric cancer cells. Conclusions The data presented suggests that overexpression of the BAK gene can lead to apoptosis of gastric cancer cells in vitro, which does not appear to be dependent on p53 status. The action mechanism of BAK mediated apoptosis correlates with activation of caspase-3. This could be served as a potential strategy for further development of gastric cancer therapies.

  18. BAK overexpression mediates p53-independent apoptosis inducing effects on human gastric cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tong, Qiang-Song; Zheng, Li-Duan; Wang, Liang; Liu, Jun; Qian, Wei

    2004-01-01

    BAK (Bcl-2 homologous antagonist/killer) is a novel pro-apoptotic gene of the Bcl-2 family. It has been reported that gastric tumors have reduced BAK levels when compared with the normal mucosa. Moreover, mutations of the BAK gene have been identified in human gastrointestinal cancers, suggesting that a perturbation of BAK-mediated apoptosis may contribute to the pathogenesis of gastric cancer. In this study, we explored the therapeutic effects of gene transfer mediated elevations in BAK expression on human gastric cancer cells in vitro. Eukaryotic expression vector for the BAK gene was constructed and transferred into gastric cancer cell lines, MKN-45 (wild-type p53) and MKN-28 (mutant-type p53). RT-PCR and Western Blotting detected cellular BAK gene expression. Cell growth activities were detected by MTT colorimetry and flow cytometry, while apoptosis was assayed by electronic microscopy and TUNEL. Western Blotting and colorimetry investigated cellular caspase-3 activities. BAK gene transfer could result in significant BAK overexpression, decreased in vitro growth, cell cycle G 0 /G 1 arrest, and induced apoptosis in gastric cancer cells. In transferred cells, inactive caspase-3 precursor was cleaved into the active subunits p20 and p17, during BAK overexpression-induced apoptosis. In addition, this process occurred equally well in p53 wild-type (MKN-45), or in p53 mutant-type (MKN-28) gastric cancer cells. The data presented suggests that overexpression of the BAK gene can lead to apoptosis of gastric cancer cells in vitro, which does not appear to be dependent on p53 status. The action mechanism of BAK mediated apoptosis correlates with activation of caspase-3. This could be served as a potential strategy for further development of gastric cancer therapies

  19. Opioid-induced delay in gastric emptying: a peripheral mechanism in humans.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Murphy, D B

    2012-02-03

    BACKGROUND: Opioids delay gastric emptying, which in turn may increase the risk of vomiting and pulmonary aspiration. Naloxone reverses this opiate action on gastric emptying, but it is not known whether this effect in humans is mediated by central or peripheral opiate antagonism. The importance of peripheral opioid receptor antagonism in modulating opioid-induced delay in gastric emptying was evaluated using methylnaltrexone, a quaternary derivative of the opiate antagonist naltrexone, which does not cross the blood-brain barrier. METHODS: In a randomized, double-blind, crossover placebo-controlled study, 11 healthy volunteers were given either placebo (saline), 0.09 mg\\/kg morphine, or 0.09 mg\\/kg morphine plus 0.3 mg\\/kg methylnaltrexone on three separate occasions before ingesting 500 ml deionized water. The rate of gastric emptying was measured by two methods: a noninvasive epigastric bioimpedance technique and the acetaminophen absorption test. RESULTS: The epigastric bioimpedance technique was sufficiently sensitive to detect opioid-induced changes in the rate of gastric emptying. The mean +\\/- SD time taken for the gastric volume to decrease to 50% (t0.5) after placebo was 5.5 +\\/- 2.1 min. Morphine prolonged gastric emptying to (t0.5) of 21 +\\/- 9.0 min (P < 0.03). Methylnaltrexone given concomitantly with morphine reversed the morphine-induced delay in gastric emptying to a t0.5 of 7.4 +\\/- 3.0 (P < 0.04). Maximum concentrations and area under the concentration curve from 0 to 90 min of serum acetaminophen concentrations after morphine were significantly different from placebo and morphine administered concomitantly with methylnaltrexone (P < 0.05). No difference in maximum concentration or area under the concentration curve from 0 to 90 min was noted between placebo and methylnaltrexone coadministered with morphine. CONCLUSIONS: The attenuation of morphine-induced delay in gastric emptying by methylnaltrexone suggests that the opioid effect is

  20. /sup 99m/Tc-labeled solid-phase meal: a quantitative clinical measurement of human gastric emptying

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, J.L.; Beck, W.J.; McDonald, A.P.; Carlson, G.M.; Mathias, J.R.

    1983-08-01

    A solid-phase meal labeled with /sup 99m/Tc-sulfur colloid provides an improved clinical test for the quantitative evaluation of human gastric emptying. We studied 12 healthy male controls and five male patients with known gastric stasis secondary to a vagotomy and drainage procedure. All subjects were fasted for 8 hours before the study, and each consumed an unbuttered biscuit and a poached egg white containing 1 mCi of /sup 99m/Tc-sulfur colloid. For 2 hours, 60-second counts were measured every 10 minutes by a Pho Gamma III scintillation camera. The t/sup 1///sup 2/ for control subjects was 60 minutes, at which time patients with gastric stasis had retained 98% of the test meal. At 120 minutes, control subjects and patients with gastric stasis had 4.7% and 89%, respectively, of the meal remaining in the stomach. The solid-phase test meal labeled with /sup 99m/Tc-sulfur colloid is easy to perform and can be used clinically to quantitatively measure gastric emptying in humans. This test can discriminate between control subjects and patients with known gastric stasis.

  1. /sup 99m/Tc-labeled solid-phase meal: a quantitative clinical measurement of human gastric emptying

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, J.L.; Beck, W.J.; McDonald, A.P.; Carlson, G.M.; Mathias, J.R.

    1983-01-01

    A solid-phase meal labeled with /sup 99m/Tc-sulfur colloid provides an improved clinical test for the quantitative evaluation of human gastric emptying. We studied 12 healthy male controls and five male patients with known gastric stasis secondary to a vagotomy and drainage procedure. All subjects were fasted for 8 hours before the study, and each consumed an unbuttered biscuit and a poached egg white containing 1 mCi of /sup 99m/Tc-sulfur colloid. For 2 hours, 60-second counts were measured every 10 minutes by a Pho Gamma III scintillation camera. The t 1 / 2 for control subjects was 60 minutes, at which time patients with gastric stasis had retained 98% of the test meal. At 120 minutes, control subjects and patients with gastric stasis had 4.7% and 89%, respectively, of the meal remaining in the stomach. The solid-phase test meal labeled with /sup 99m/Tc-sulfur colloid is easy to perform and can be used clinically to quantitatively measure gastric emptying in humans. This test can discriminate between control subjects and patients with known gastric stasis

  2. Stomach (Gastric) Cancer—Patient Version

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stomach (gastric) cancer occurs when cancer cells form in the lining of the stomach. Risk factors include smoking, infection with H. pylori bacteria, and certain inherited conditions. Start here to find information on stomach (gastric) cancer treatment, causes and prevention, screening, research, and statistics.

  3. Gastric cancer arising from the remnant stomach after distal gastrectomy: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeno, Shinsuke; Hashimoto, Tatsuya; Maki, Kenji; Shibata, Ryosuke; Shiwaku, Hironari; Yamana, Ippei; Yamashita, Risako; Yamashita, Yuichi

    2014-10-14

    Gastric stump carcinoma was initially reported by Balfore in 1922, and many reports of this disease have since been published. We herein review previous reports of gastric stump carcinoma with respect to epidemiology, carcinogenesis, Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection, Epstein-Barr virus infection, clinicopathologic characteristics and endoscopic treatment. In particular, it is noteworthy that no prognostic differences are observed between gastric stump carcinoma and primary upper third gastric cancer. In addition, endoscopic submucosal dissection has recently been used to treat gastric stump carcinoma in the early stage. In contrast, many issues concerning gastric stump carcinoma remain to be clarified, including molecular biological characteristics and the carcinogenesis of H. pylori infection. We herein review the previous pertinent literature and summarize the characteristics of gastric stump carcinoma reported to date.

  4. VacA and CagA Status as Biomarker of Two Opposite End Outcomes of Helicobacter pylori Infection (Gastric Cancer and Duodenal Ulcer) in a Moroccan Population

    OpenAIRE

    El Khadir, Mounia; Alaoui Boukhris, Samia; Benajah, Dafr-Allah; El Rhazi, Karima; Ibrahimi, Sidi Adil; El Abkari, Mohamed; Harmouch, Taoufiq; Nejjari, Chakib; Mahmoud, Mustapha; Benlemlih, Mohamed; Bennani, Bahia

    2017-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection induces inflammation of the gastric mucosa, which may progress to precancerous lesions leading to gastric cancer. Pathological determinism is associated to some virulence genes of the bacterium, notably the vacA and cagA genes. The present study aimed to determine the H. pylori genotypes distribution and their association with sex, age and gastric diseases in a Moroccan population. Gastric biopsy was taken from 1079 consenting patients. The specimens ...

  5. Synchrotron-radiation phase-contrast imaging of human stomach and gastric cancer: in vitro studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Lei; Li, Gang; Sun, Ying-Shi; Li, Jie; Zhang, Xiao-Peng

    2012-05-01

    The electron density resolution of synchrotron-radiation phase-contrast imaging (SR-PCI) is 1000 times higher than that of conventional X-ray absorption imaging in light elements, through which high-resolution X-ray imaging of biological soft tissue can be achieved. For biological soft tissue, SR-PCI can give better imaging contrast than conventional X-ray absorption imaging. In this study, human resected stomach and gastric cancer were investigated using in-line holography and diffraction enhanced imaging at beamline 4W1A of the Beijing Synchrotron Radiation Facility. It was possible to depict gastric pits, measuring 50-70 µm, gastric grooves and tiny blood vessels in the submucosa layer by SR-PCI. The fine structure of a cancerous ulcer was displayed clearly on imaging the mucosa. The delamination of the gastric wall and infiltration of cancer in the submucosa layer were also demonstrated on cross-sectional imaging. In conclusion, SR-PCI can demonstrate the subtle structures of stomach and gastric cancer that cannot be detected by conventional X-ray absorption imaging, which prompt the X-ray diagnosis of gastric disease to the level of the gastric pit, and has the potential to provide new methods for the imageology of gastric cancer.

  6. Expression of Fas ligand by human gastric adenocarcinomas: a potential mechanism of immune escape in stomach cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, M W; O'connell, J; O'sullivan, G C; Roche, D; Brady, C; Kelly, J; Collins, J K; Shanahan, F

    1999-02-01

    Despite being immunogenic, gastric cancers overcome antitumour immune responses by mechanisms that have yet to be fully elucidated. Fas ligand (FasL) is a molecule that induces Fas receptor mediated apoptosis of activated immunocytes, thereby mediating normal immune downregulatory roles including immune response termination, tolerance acquisition, and immune privilege. Colon cancer cell lines have previously been shown to express FasL and kill lymphoid cells by Fas mediated apoptosis in vitro. Many diverse tumours have since been found to express FasL suggesting that a "Fas counterattack" against antitumour immune effector cells may contribute to tumour immune escape. To ascertain if human gastric tumours express FasL in vivo, as a potential mediator of immune escape in stomach cancer. Thirty paraffin wax embedded human gastric adenocarcinomas. FasL protein was detected in gastric tumours using immunohistochemistry; FasL mRNA was detected in the tumours using in situ hybridisation. Cell death was detected in situ in tumour infiltrating lymphocytes using terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase mediated dUTP nick end labelling (TUNEL). Prevalent expression of FasL was detected in all 30 resected gastric adenocarcinomas examined. In the tumours, FasL protein and mRNA were co-localised to neoplastic gastric epithelial cells, confirming expression by the tumour cells. FasL expression was independent of tumour stage, suggesting that it may be expressed throughout gastric cancer progression. TUNEL staining disclosed a high level of cell death among lymphocytes infiltrating FasL positive areas of tumour. Human gastric adenocarcinomas express the immune downregulatory molecule, FasL. The results suggest that FasL is a prevalent mediator of immune privilege in stomach cancer.

  7. Expression of Fas ligand by human gastric adenocarcinomas: a potential mechanism of immune escape in stomach cancer.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Bennett, M W

    2012-02-03

    BACKGROUND: Despite being immunogenic, gastric cancers overcome antitumour immune responses by mechanisms that have yet to be fully elucidated. Fas ligand (FasL) is a molecule that induces Fas receptor mediated apoptosis of activated immunocytes, thereby mediating normal immune downregulatory roles including immune response termination, tolerance acquisition, and immune privilege. Colon cancer cell lines have previously been shown to express FasL and kill lymphoid cells by Fas mediated apoptosis in vitro. Many diverse tumours have since been found to express FasL suggesting that a "Fas counterattack" against antitumour immune effector cells may contribute to tumour immune escape. AIM: To ascertain if human gastric tumours express FasL in vivo, as a potential mediator of immune escape in stomach cancer. SPECIMENS: Thirty paraffin wax embedded human gastric adenocarcinomas. METHODS: FasL protein was detected in gastric tumours using immunohistochemistry; FasL mRNA was detected in the tumours using in situ hybridisation. Cell death was detected in situ in tumour infiltrating lymphocytes using terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase mediated dUTP nick end labelling (TUNEL). RESULTS: Prevalent expression of FasL was detected in all 30 resected gastric adenocarcinomas examined. In the tumours, FasL protein and mRNA were co-localised to neoplastic gastric epithelial cells, confirming expression by the tumour cells. FasL expression was independent of tumour stage, suggesting that it may be expressed throughout gastric cancer progression. TUNEL staining disclosed a high level of cell death among lymphocytes infiltrating FasL positive areas of tumour. CONCLUSIONS: Human gastric adenocarcinomas express the immune downregulatory molecule, FasL. The results suggest that FasL is a prevalent mediator of immune privilege in stomach cancer.

  8. Effects of the H(2)-receptor antagonist ranitidine on gastric motor function after a liquid meal in healthy humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Jan Lysgård; Graff, J

    2008-01-01

    Objective. Studies on animals have shown that histamine may be involved in the regulation of gastrointestinal smooth muscle tone. However, the role of histamine in the regulation of human gastric motor function is not clear. This study examined the effect of ranitidine, an H(2)-receptor antagonist......, on gastric volume and gastric emptying after a liquid meal in healthy humans. Material and methods. Twelve healthy volunteers participated in a randomized crossover study with 50 mg ranitidine as a bolus intravenously versus no medication. Gastric volume at baseline was determined with single photon emission...... computed tomography (SPECT) after intravenous injection of 99(m)Tc-pertechnetate. After ingestion of a 600-mL liquid meal radiolabelled with (111)In-diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid, dual-isotope technique with SPECT and planar imaging assessed gastric volume as well as gastric emptying. Results...

  9. Effects of the H2-receptor antagonist ranitidine on gastric motor function after a liquid meal in healthy humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, J.L.; Graff, J.

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Studies on animals have shown that histamine may be involved in the regulation of gastrointestinal smooth muscle tone. However, the role of histamine in the regulation of human gastric motor function is not clear. This study examined the effect of ranitidine, an H(2)-receptor antagonist......, on gastric volume and gastric emptying after a liquid meal in healthy humans. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Twelve healthy volunteers participated in a randomized crossover study with 50 mg ranitidine as a bolus intravenously versus no medication. Gastric volume at baseline was determined with single photon emission...... computed tomography (SPECT) after intravenous injection of 99(m)Tc-pertechnetate. After ingestion of a 600-mL liquid meal radiolabelled with (111)In-diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid, dual-isotope technique with SPECT and planar imaging assessed gastric volume as well as gastric emptying. RESULTS...

  10. Effect of sildenafil on gastric emptying and postprandial frequency of antral contractions in healthy humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Jan Lysgård; Søndergaard, S B; Fuglsang, Stefan

    2004-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Sildenafil is known to block phosphodiesterase type 5, which degrades nitric oxide-stimulated cyclic guanosine monophosphate, thereby relaxing smooth muscle cells in various organs. The effect of sildenafil on gastric motor function after a meal was investigated in healthy humans...... gastric emptying and postprandial frequency of antral contractions. RESULTS: The area under the curve of gastric retention versus time of liquid or solid radiolabelled marker was not changed by sildenafil intake, nor was the postprandial frequency of antral contractions affected by sildenafil. CONCLUSION......: A single dose of 50 mg sildenafil does not change gastric emptying or postprandial frequency of antral contractions in healthy volunteers....

  11. Helicobacter pylori promotes angiogenesis depending on Wnt/beta-catenin-mediated vascular endothelial growth factor via the cyclooxygenase-2 pathway in gastric cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Ningning; Zhou, Ning; Chai, Ni; Liu, Xuan; Jiang, Haili; Wu, Qiong; Li, Qi

    2016-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori is an important pathogenic factor in gastric carcinogenesis. Angiogenesis (i.e., the growth of new blood vessels) is closely associated with the incidence and development of gastric cancer. Our previous study found that COX-2 stimulates gastric cancer cells to induce expression of the angiogenic growth factor VEGF through an unknown mechanism. Therefore, the aim of this study was to clarify the role of angiogenesis in H. pylori-induced gastric cancer development. To clarify the relationship between H. pylori infection and angiogenesis, we first investigated H. pylori colonization, COX-2, VEGF, beta-catenin expression, and microvessel density (MVD) in gastric cancer tissues from 106 patients. In addition, COX-2, phospho-beta-catenin, and beta-catenin expression were measured by western blotting, and VEGF expression was measured by ELISA in H. pylori-infected SGC7901 and MKN45 human gastric cancer cells. H. pylori colonization occurred in 36.8 % of gastric carcinoma samples. Furthermore, COX-2, beta-catenin, and VEGF expression, and MVD were significantly higher in H. pylori-positive gastric cancer tissues than in H. pylori-negative gastric cancer tissues (P < 0.01). H. pylori infection was not related to sex or age in gastric cancer patients, but correlated with the depth of tumor invasion, lymph node metastasis, and tumor–node–metastasis stage (P < 0.05) and correlated with the COX-2 expression and beta-catenin expression(P < 0.01). Further cell experiments confirmed that H. pylori infection upregulated VEGF in vitro. Further analysis revealed that H. pylori-induced VEGF expression was mediated by COX-2 via activation of the Wnt/beta-catenin pathway. The COX-2/Wnt/beta-catenin/VEGF pathway plays an important role in H. pylori-associated gastric cancer development. The COX-2/Wnt/beta-catenin pathway is therefore a novel therapeutic target for H. pylori-associated gastric cancers

  12. Helicobacter pylori induces cell migration and invasion through casein kinase 2 in gastric epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yeo Song; Lee, Do Yeon; Yu, Da Yeon; Kim, Shin; Lee, Yong Chan

    2014-12-01

    Chronic infection with Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) is causally linked with gastric carcinogenesis. Virulent H. pylori strains deliver bacterial CagA into gastric epithelial cells. Induction of high motility and an elongated phenotype is considered to be CagA-dependent process. Casein kinase 2 plays a critical role in carcinogenesis through signaling pathways related to the epithelial mesenchymal transition. This study was aimed to investigate the effect of H. pylori infection on the casein kinase 2-mediated migration and invasion in gastric epithelial cells. AGS or MKN28 cells as human gastric epithelial cells and H. pylori strains Hp60190 (ATCC 49503, CagA(+)) and Hp8822 (CagA(-)) were used. Cells were infected with H. pylori at multiplicity of infection of 100 : 1 for various times. We measured in vitro kinase assay to examine casein kinase 2 activity and performed immunofluorescent staining to observe E-cadherin complex. We also examined β-catenin transactivation through promoter assay and MMP7 expression by real-time PCR and ELISA. H. pylori upregulates casein kinase 2 activity and inhibition of casein kinase 2 in H. pylori-infected cells profoundly suppressed cell invasiveness and motility. We confirmed that casein kinase 2 mediates membranous α-catenin depletion through dissociation of the α-/β-catenin complex in H. pylori-infected cells. We also found that H. pylori induces β-catenin nuclear translocation and increases MMP7 expressions mediated through casein kinase 2. We show for the first time that CagA(+) H. pylori upregulates cellular invasiveness and motility through casein kinase 2. The demonstration of a mechanistic interplay between H. pylori and casein kinase 2 provides important insights into the role of CagA(+) H. pylori in the gastric cancer invasion and metastasis. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Enhanced M1 macrophage polarization in human helicobacter pylori-associated atrophic gastritis and in vaccinated mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marianne Quiding-Järbrink

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Infection with Helicobacter pylori triggers a chronic gastric inflammation that can progress to atrophy and gastric adenocarcinoma. Polarization of macrophages is a characteristic of both cancer and infection, and may promote progression or resolution of disease. However, the role of macrophages and their polarization during H. pylori infection has not been well defined. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: By using a mouse model of infection and gastric biopsies from 29 individuals, we have analyzed macrophage recruitment and polarization during H. pylori infection by flow cytometry and real-time PCR. We found a sequential recruitment of neutrophils, eosinophils and macrophages to the gastric mucosa of infected mice. Gene expression analysis of stomach tissue and sorted macrophages revealed that gastric macrophages were polarized to M1 after H. pylori infection, and this process was substantially accelerated by prior vaccination. Human H. pylori infection was characterized by a mixed M1/M2 polarization of macrophages. However, in H. pylori-associated atrophic gastritis, the expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase was markedly increased compared to uncomplicated gastritis, indicative of an enhanced M1 macrophage polarization in this pre-malignant lesion. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These results show that vaccination of mice against H. pylori amplifies M1 polarization of gastric macrophages, and that a similar enhanced M1 polarization is present in human H. pylori-induced atrophic gastritis.

  14. Influence of cure of Helicobacter pylori infection on gastric acidity and gastroesophageal reflux: study by 24-h pH monitoring in patients with gastric or duodenal ulcer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuchi, Takumi; Ashida, Kiyoshi; Yamashita, Hiroshi; Kiyota, Naomi; Tsukamoto, Reiko; Takahashi, Hajime; Ito, Dai; Nagamatsu, Ryousuke

    2005-04-01

    Whether or not the eradication of Helicobacter pylori is a risk factor for reflux esophagitis (RE) is a question at issue. To find an answer, it is necessary to clarify the influence of H. pylori eradication on the mechanism of RE. The authors investigated the influence of H. pylori eradication on gastric acidity and gastroesophageal reflux in ten gastric ulcer (GU) patients and ten duodenal ulcer (DU) patients by 24-h simultaneous determination of pH in the stomach and esophagus. Though the results indicated enhanced gastric acidity in GU patients at night after H. pylori eradication, no such influence was observed in DU patients. No significant changes in gastroesophageal reflux occurred in GU or DU patients before and after H. pylori eradication. RE after H. pylori eradication occurred in only one patient, with GU. This patient had several risk factors for RE, such as obesity, male sex, and dietary habits to add to the increase in gastric acidity at night that occurred after H. pylori eradication. No increase in gastroesophageal reflux occurred in any DU patients or in the other GU patients that demonstrated enhanced gastric acidity at night after H. pylori eradication. The cure of H. pylori infection does not, by itself, cause RE in patients who have few other risk factors for RE.

  15. EGFR, HER-2 and KRAS in canine gastric epithelial tumors: a potential human model?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rossella Terragni

    Full Text Available Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR or HER-1 and its analog c-erbB-2 (HER-2 are protein tyrosine kinases correlated with prognosis and response to therapy in a variety of human cancers. KRAS mediates the transduction of signals between EGFR and the nucleus, and its mutation has been identified as a predictor of resistance to anti-EGFR drugs. In human oncology, the importance of the EGFR/HER-2/KRAS signalling pathway in gastric cancer is well established, and HER-2 testing is required before initiating therapy. Conversely, this pathway has never been investigated in canine gastric tumours. A total of 19 canine gastric epithelial neoplasms (5 adenomas and 14 carcinomas were retrospectively evaluated for EGFR/HER-2 immunohistochemical expression and KRAS mutational status. Five (35.7% carcinomas were classified as intestinal-type and 9 (64.3% as diffuse-type. EGFR was overexpressed (≥ 1+ in 8 (42.1% cases and HER-2 (3+ in 11 (57.9% cases, regardless of tumour location or biological behaviour. The percentage of EGFR-positive tumours was significantly higher in the intestinal-type (80% than in the diffuse-type (11.1%, p = 0.023. KRAS gene was wild type in 18 cases, whereas one mucinous carcinoma harboured a point mutation at codon 12 (G12R. EGFR and HER-2 may be promising prognostic and therapeutic targets in canine gastric epithelial neoplasms. The potential presence of KRAS mutation should be taken into account as a possible mechanism of drug resistance. Further studies are necessary to evaluate the role of dog as a model for human gastric cancer.

  16. Characterization of human gastric carcinoma-related methylation of 9 miR CpG islands and repression of their expressions in vitro and in vivo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Du, Yantao; Liu, Zhaojun; Gu, Liankun; Zhou, Jing; Zhu, Bu-dong; Ji, Jiafu; Deng, Dajun

    2012-01-01

    Many miR genes are located within or around CpG islands. It is unclear whether methylation of these CpG islands represses miR transcription regularly. The aims of this study are to characterize gastric carcinoma (GC)-related methylation of miR CpG islands and its relationship with miRNA expression. Methylation status of 9 representative miR CpG islands in a panel of cell lines and human gastric samples (including 13 normal biopsies, 38 gastritis biopsies, 112 pairs of GCs and their surgical margin samples) was analyzed by bisulfite-DHPLC and sequencing. Mature miRNA levels were determined with quantitative RT-PCR. Relationships between miR methylation, transcription, GC development, and clinicopathological characteristics were statistically analyzed. Methylation frequency of 5 miR CpG islands (miR-9-1, miR-9-3, miR-137, miR-34b, and miR-210) gradually increased while the proportion of methylated miR-200b gradually decreased during gastric carcinogenesis (Ps < 0.01). More miR-9-1 methylation was detected in 62%-64% of the GC samples and 4% of the normal or gastritis samples (18/28 versus 2/48; Odds ratio, 41.4; P < 0.01). miR-210 methylation showed high correlation with H. pylori infection. miR-375, miR-203, and miR-193b methylation might be host adaptation to the development of GCs. Methylation of these miR CpG islands was consistently shown to significantly decrease the corresponding miRNA levels presented in human cell lines. The inverse relationship was also observed for miR-9-1, miR-9-3, miR-137, and miR-200b in gastric samples. Among 112 GC patients, miR-9-1 methylation was an independent favourable predictor of overall survival of GC patients in both univariate and multivariate analysis (P < 0.02). In conclusion, alteration of methylation status of 6 of 9 tested miR CpG islands was characterized in gastric carcinogenesis. miR-210 methylation correlated with H. pylori infection. miR-9-1 methylation may be a GC-specific event. Methylation of miR CpG islands may

  17. Milk fermented by Propionibacterium freudenreichii induces apoptosis of HGT-1 human gastric cancer cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabien J Cousin

    Full Text Available Gastric cancer is one of the most common cancers in the world. The "economically developed countries" life style, including diet, constitutes a risk factor favoring this cancer. Diet modulation may lower digestive cancer incidence. Among promising food components, dairy propionibacteria were shown to trigger apoptosis of human colon cancer cells, via the release of short-chain fatty acids acetate and propionate.A fermented milk, exclusively fermented by P. freudenreichii, was recently designed. In this work, the pro-apoptotic potential of this new fermented milk was demonstrated on HGT-1 human gastric cancer cells. Fermented milk supernatant induced typical features of apoptosis including chromatin condensation, formation of apoptotic bodies, DNA laddering, cell cycle arrest and emergence of a subG1 population, phosphatidylserine exposure at the plasma membrane outer leaflet, reactive oxygen species accumulation, mitochondrial transmembrane potential disruption, caspase activation and cytochrome c release. Remarkably, this new fermented milk containing P. freudenreichii enhanced the cytotoxicity of camptothecin, a drug used in gastric cancer chemotherapy.Such new probiotic fermented milk may thus be useful as part of a preventive diet designed to prevent gastric cancer and/or as a food supplement to potentiate cancer therapeutic treatments.

  18. Serum metabolic profiling of human gastric cancer based on gas chromatography/mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, Hu; Peng, Jun-Sheng; Yao, Dong-Sheng; Yang, Zu-Li; Liu, Huan-Liang; Zeng, Yi-Ke; Shi, Xian-Ping; Lu, Bi-Yan

    2011-01-01

    Research on molecular mechanisms of carcinogenesis plays an important role in diagnosing and treating gastric cancer. Metabolic profiling may offer the opportunity to understand the molecular mechanism of carcinogenesis and help to non-invasively identify the potential biomarkers for the early diagnosis of human gastric cancer. The aims of this study were to explore the underlying metabolic mechanisms of gastric cancer and to identify biomarkers associated with morbidity. Gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) was used to analyze the serum metabolites of 30 Chinese gastric cancer patients and 30 healthy controls. Diagnostic models for gastric cancer were constructed using orthogonal partial least squares discriminant analysis (OPLS-DA). Acquired metabolomic data were analyzed by the nonparametric Wilcoxon test to find serum metabolic biomarkers for gastric cancer. The OPLS-DA model showed adequate discrimination between cancer and non-cancer cohorts while the model failed to discriminate different pathological stages (I-IV) of gastric cancer patients. A total of 44 endogenous metabolites such as amino acids, organic acids, carbohydrates, fatty acids, and steroids were detected, of which 18 differential metabolites were identified with significant differences. A total of 13 variables were obtained for their greatest contribution in the discriminating OPLS-DA model [variable importance in the projection (VIP) value >1.0], among which 11 metabolites were identified using both VIP values (VIP >1) and the Wilcoxon test. These metabolites potentially revealed perturbations of glycolysis and of amino acid, fatty acid, cholesterol, and nucleotide metabolism of gastric cancer patients. These results suggest that gastric cancer serum metabolic profiling has great potential in detecting this disease and helping to understand its metabolic mechanisms

  19. Human induced pluripotent stem cells labeled with fluorescent magnetic nanoparticles for targeted imaging and hyperthermia therapy for gastric cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Chao; Ruan, Jing; Yang, Meng; Pan, Fei; Gao, Guo; Qu, Su; Shen, You-Lan; Dang, Yong-Jun; Wang, Kan; Jin, Wei-Lin; Cui, Da-Xiang

    2015-01-01

    Human induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells exhibit great potential for generating functional human cells for medical therapies. In this paper, we report for use of human iPS cells labeled with fluorescent magnetic nanoparticles (FMNPs) for targeted imaging and synergistic therapy of gastric cancer cells in vivo. Human iPS cells were prepared and cultured for 72 h. The culture medium was collected, and then was co-incubated with MGC803 cells. Cell viability was analyzed by the MTT method. FMNP-labeled human iPS cells were prepared and injected into gastric cancer-bearing nude mice. The mouse model was observed using a small-animal imaging system. The nude mice were irradiated under an external alternating magnetic field and evaluated using an infrared thermal mapping instrument. Tumor sizes were measured weekly. iPS cells and the collected culture medium inhibited the growth of MGC803 cells. FMNP-labeled human iPS cells targeted and imaged gastric cancer cells in vivo, as well as inhibited cancer growth in vivo through the external magnetic field. FMNP-labeled human iPS cells exhibit considerable potential in applications such as targeted dual-mode imaging and synergistic therapy for early gastric cancer

  20. Relationship between VacA Toxin and Host Cell Autophagy in Helicobacter pylori Infection of the Human Stomach: A Few Answers, Many Questions

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    Vittorio Ricci

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Helicobacter pylori is a Gram-negative bacterium that colonizes the stomach of about half the global population and represents the greatest risk factor for gastric malignancy. The relevance of H. pylori for gastric cancer development is equivalent to that of tobacco smoking for lung cancer. VacA toxin seems to play a pivotal role in the overall strategy of H. pylori towards achieving persistent gastric colonization. This strategy appears to involve the modulation of host cell autophagy. After an overview of autophagy and its role in infection and carcinogenesis, I critically review current knowledge about the action of VacA on host cell autophagy during H. pylori infection of the human stomach. Although VacA is a key player in modulation of H. pylori-induced autophagy, a few discrepancies in the data are also evident and many questions remain to be answered. We are thus still far from a definitive understanding of the molecular mechanisms through which VacA affects autophagy and the consequences of this toxin action on the overall pathogenic activity of H. pylori.

  1. Failure of ethamsylate to reduce aspirin-induced gastric mucosal bleeding in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daneshmend, T K; Stein, A G; Bhaskar, N K; Hawkey, C J

    1989-07-01

    1. We investigated the effect of the haemostatic agent ethamsylate on aspirin-induced gastric mucosal bleeding. 2. Eighteen healthy subjects were studied three times: at the end of 48 h periods of treatment with (a) placebo, (b) aspirin 600 mg four times daily, (9 doses) and (c) aspirin 600 mg four times daily with each dose preceded by ethamsylate 500 mg. 3. At the end of each treatment period gastric mucosal bleeding into timed gastric washings was quantified using the orthotolidine reaction. 4. Aspirin increased bleeding from a rate on placebo of 1.2 microliters 10 min-1 geometric mean (95% confidence limits) (0.7-1.8) microliters 10 min-1 to 20.0 (11.6-34.2) microliters 10 min-1, (P less than 0.01). The rate of bleeding after aspirin preceded by ethamsylate [14.1 (8.5-23.4) microliters 10 min-1] was not significantly different from that after aspirin alone. 5. We conclude that ethamsylate does not reduce acute aspirin-induced gastric mucosal bleeding in healthy humans.

  2. Nitrergic Pathway Is the Main Contributing Mechanism in the Human Gastric Fundus Relaxation: An In Vitro Study.

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    Yang Won Min

    Full Text Available Human gastric fundus relaxation is mediated by intrinsic inhibitory pathway. We investigated the roles of nitrergic and purinergic pathways, two known inhibitory factors in gastric motility, on spontaneous and nerve-evoked contractions in human gastric fundus muscles.Gastric fundus muscle strips (12 circular and 13 longitudinal were obtained from patients without previous gastrointestinal motility disorder who underwent gastrectomy for stomach cancer. Using these specimens, we examined basal tone, peak, amplitude, and frequency of spontaneous contractions, and peak and nadir values under electrical field stimulation (EFS, 150 V, 0.3 ms, 10 Hz, 20 s. To examine responses to purinergic and nitrergic inhibition without cholinergic innervation, atropine (muscarinic antagonist, 1 μM, MRS2500 (a purinergic P2Y1 receptor antagonist, 1 μM, and N-nitro-L-arginine (L-NNA, a nitric oxide synthase inhibitor, 100 μM were added sequentially for spontaneous and electrically-stimulated contractions. Tetrodotoxin was used to confirm any neuronal involvement.In spontaneous contraction, L-NNA increased basal tone and peak in both muscle layers, while amplitude and frequency were unaffected. EFS (up to 10 Hz uniformly induced initial contraction and subsequent relaxation in a frequency-dependent manner. Atropine abolished initial on-contraction and induced only relaxation during EFS. While MRS2500 showed no additional influence, L-NNA reversed relaxation (p = 0.012 in circular muscle, and p = 0.006 in longitudinal muscle. Tetrodotoxin abolished any EFS-induced motor response.The relaxation of human gastric fundus muscle is reduced by nitrergic inhibition. Hence, nitrergic pathway appears to be the main mechanism for the human gastric fundus relaxation.

  3. Helicobacter pylori detection in gastric biopsies, saliva and dental plaque of Brazilian dyspeptic patients

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    Lucas Trevizani Rasmussen

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Helicobacter pylori is an important human pathogen that causes chronic gastritis and is associated with the development of peptic ulcer disease and gastric malignancies. The oral cavity has been implicated as a potential H. pylori reservoir and may therefore be involved in the reinfection of the stomach, which can sometimes occur following treatment of an H. pylori infection. The objectives of this paper were (i to determine the presence of H. pylori in the oral cavity and (ii to examine the relationship between oral H. pylori and subsequent gastritis. Gastric biopsies, saliva samples and dental plaques were obtained from 78 dyspeptic adults. DNA was extracted and evaluated for the presence of H. pylori using polymerase chain reaction and Southern blotting methods. Persons with gastritis were frequently positive for H. pylori in their stomachs (p < 0.0001 and there was a statistically significant correlation between the presence of H. pylori in gastric biopsies and the oral cavity (p < 0.0001. Our results suggest a relationship between gastric infection and the presence of this bacterium in the oral cavity. Despite this, H. pylori were present in the oral cavity with variable distribution between saliva and dental plaques, suggesting the existence of a reservoir for the species and a potential association with gastric reinfection.

  4. Suppressed Gastric Mucosal TGF-β1 Increases Susceptibility to H. pylori-Induced Gastric Inflammation and Ulceration: A Stupid Host Defense Response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jo, Yunjeong; Han, Sang Uk; Kim, Yoon Jae; Kim, Ju Hyeon; Kim, Shin Tae; Kim, Seong-Jin

    2010-01-01

    Background/Aims Loss of transforming growth factor β1 (TGF-β1) exhibits a similar pathology to that seen in a subset of individuals infected with Helicobacter pylori, including propagated gastric inflammation, oxidative stress, and autoimmune features. We thus hypothesized that gastric mucosal TGF-β1 levels could be used to determine the outcome after H. pylori infection. Methods Northern blot for the TGF-β1 transcript, staining of TGF-β1 expression, luciferase reporter assay, and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for TGF-β1 levels were performed at different times after H. pylori infection. Results The TGF-β1 level was markedly lower in patients with H. pylori-induced gastritis than in patients with a similar degree of gastritis induced by nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. There was a significant negative correlation between the severity of inflammation and gastric mucosal TGF-β1 levels. SNU-16 cells showing intact TGF-β signaling exhibited a marked decrease in TGF-β1 expression, whereas SNU-638 cells defective in TGF-β signaling exhibited no such decrease after H. pylori infection. The decreased expressions of TGF-β1 in SNU-16 cells recovered to normal after 24 hr of H. pylori infection, but lasted very spatial times, suggesting that attenuated expression of TGF-β1 is a host defense mechanism to avoid attachment of H. pylori. Conclusions H. pylori infection was associated with depressed gastric mucosal TGF-β1 for up to 24 hr, but this apparent strategy for rescuing cells from H. pylori attachment exacerbated the gastric inflammation. PMID:20479912

  5. Suppressed Gastric Mucosal TGF-beta1 Increases Susceptibility to H. pylori-Induced Gastric Inflammation and Ulceration: A Stupid Host Defense Response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jo, Yunjeong; Han, Sang Uk; Kim, Yoon Jae; Kim, Ju Hyeon; Kim, Shin Tae; Kim, Seong-Jin; Hahm, Ki-Baik

    2010-03-01

    Loss of transforming growth factor beta1 (TGF-beta1) exhibits a similar pathology to that seen in a subset of individuals infected with Helicobacter pylori, including propagated gastric inflammation, oxidative stress, and autoimmune features. We thus hypothesized that gastric mucosal TGF-beta1 levels could be used to determine the outcome after H. pylori infection. Northern blot for the TGF-beta1 transcript, staining of TGF-beta1 expression, luciferase reporter assay, and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for TGF-beta1 levels were performed at different times after H. pylori infection. The TGF-beta1 level was markedly lower in patients with H. pylori-induced gastritis than in patients with a similar degree of gastritis induced by nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. There was a significant negative correlation between the severity of inflammation and gastric mucosal TGF-beta1 levels. SNU-16 cells showing intact TGF-beta signaling exhibited a marked decrease in TGF-beta1 expression, whereas SNU-638 cells defective in TGF-beta signaling exhibited no such decrease after H. pylori infection. The decreased expressions of TGF-beta1 in SNU-16 cells recovered to normal after 24 hr of H. pylori infection, but lasted very spatial times, suggesting that attenuated expression of TGF-beta1 is a host defense mechanism to avoid attachment of H. pylori. H. pylori infection was associated with depressed gastric mucosal TGF-beta1 for up to 24 hr, but this apparent strategy for rescuing cells from H. pylori attachment exacerbated the gastric inflammation.

  6. Gene expression profiling in gastric mucosa from Helicobacter pylori-infected and uninfected patients undergoing chronic superficial gastritis.

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    Ze-Min Yang

    Full Text Available Helicobacter pylori infection reprograms host gene expression and influences various cellular processes, which have been investigated by cDNA microarray using in vitro culture cells and in vivo gastric biopsies from patients of the Chronic Abdominal Complaint. To further explore the effects of H. pylori infection on host gene expression, we have collected the gastric antral mucosa samples from 6 untreated patients with gastroscopic and pathologic confirmation of chronic superficial gastritis. Among them three patients were infected by H. pylori and the other three patients were not. These samples were analyzed by a microarray chip which contains 14,112 cloned cDNAs, and microarray data were analyzed via BRB ArrayTools software and Ingenuity Pathways Analysis (IPA website. The results showed 34 genes of 38 differentially expressed genes regulated by H. pylori infection had been annotated. The annotated genes were involved in protein metabolism, inflammatory and immunological reaction, signal transduction, gene transcription, trace element metabolism, and so on. The 82% of these genes (28/34 were categorized in three molecular interaction networks involved in gene expression, cancer progress, antigen presentation and inflammatory response. The expression data of the array hybridization was confirmed by quantitative real-time PCR assays. Taken together, these data indicated that H. pylori infection could alter cellular gene expression processes, escape host defense mechanism, increase inflammatory and immune responses, activate NF-κB and Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway, disturb metal ion homeostasis, and induce carcinogenesis. All of these might help to explain H. pylori pathogenic mechanism and the gastroduodenal pathogenesis induced by H. pylori infection.

  7. The corpus-predominant gastritis index can be an early and reversible marker to identify the gastric cancer risk of Helicobacter pylori-infected nonulcer dyspepsia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Hsiu-Chi; Tsai, Yu-Ching; Yang, Hsiao-Bai; Yeh, Yi-Chun; Chang, Wei-Lun; Kuo, Hsin-Yu; Lu, Cheng-Chan; Sheu, Bor-Shyang

    2017-08-01

    Corpus-predominant gastritis index (CGI) is an early histological marker to identify Helicobacter pylori-infected gastric cancer relatives at risk of cancer. This study validated whether CGI is more prevalent in H. pylori-infected nonulcer dyspepsia (NUD) subjects than in duodenal ulcer (DU) controls and whether it is reversible after H. pylori eradication or is correlated with noninvasive biomarkers. In this longitudinal cohort study, 573 H. pylori-infected subjects were enrolled, including 349 NUD and 224 DU. Gastric specimens were provided to assess CGI, spasmolyic polypeptide-expressing metaplasia (SPEM), and Operative Link on Gastric Intestinal Metaplasia assessment (OLGIM). Serum pepsinogen I and II levels were assessed using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. CGI subjected were followed up at least 1 year after H. pylori eradication. NUD subjects had higher prevalence rates of CGI (47.0% vs 29.9%, Pgastritis and intestinal metaplasia. NUD subjects with CGI had higher risk of SPEM (OR 2.86, P<.001) and lower serum pepsinogen I/II ratios (P<.001) than those without CGI. Serum pepsinogen I/II ratios <9 could predict CGI modestly (AUROC 0.69, 95% CI: 0.63-0.74). CGI was regressed after eradication (P<.001). CGI was more prevalent in H. pylori-infected NUD subjects than in controls, was correlated with SPEM, and may serve as a marker earlier than OLGIM to indicate risk of gastric cancer. Moreover, CGI could be regressed after eradication. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Immunoproteomics of Helicobacter pylori infection in patients with atrophic body gastritis, a predisposing condition for gastric cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lahner, Edith; Bernardini, Giulia; Possenti, Silvia; Renzone, Giovanni; Scaloni, Andrea; Santucci, Annalisa; Annibale, Bruno

    2011-02-01

    Atrophic body gastritis is considered an outcome of H. pylori infection at high risk for gastric cancer. Immunoproteomics has been used to detect H. pylori antigens, which may act as potential markers for neoplastic disease and may be used in specific serological tests. We used immunoproteome technology to identify H. pylori antigens, recognized by sera from patients with atrophic body gastritis. Here, we performed 2DE protein maps of H. pylori strain 10K, probed against single sera from 3 groups of H. pylori-positive patients (atrophic body gastritis; intestinal-type gastric cancer; peptic ulcer) and negative controls. Immunoreactive spots were identified by MALDI-TOF-MS. A total of 155 immunoreactive spots were detected corresponding to 14.1% of total spots detected in our reference map of H. pylori strain 10K. Sera from atrophic body gastritis (40.5±2%) and gastric cancer patients (25.9±1.8%) showed a significantly higher and stronger mean immunoreactivity versus H. pylori antigens compared to peptic ulcer patients (11.2±1.3%). The average intensity of immunoreactivity of sera from atrophic body gastritis and gastric cancer patients was significantly stronger compared to peptic ulcer patients. Sera from atrophic body gastritis and gastric cancer patients differentially recognized 17 H. pylori spots. Immunoproteome technology may discriminate between different H. pylori-related disease phenotypes showing a serological immunorecognition pattern common to patients with gastric cancer and atrophic body gastritis, its precursor condition. This tool may be promising for developing specific serological tests to identify patients with gastritis at high risk for gastric cancer, to be evaluated in prospective investigations. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  9. Effect of hGC-MSCs from human gastric cancer tissue on cell proliferation, invasion and epithelial-mesenchymal transition in tumor tissue of gastric cancer tumor-bearing mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Lin; Zhou, Xin; Jia, Hong-Jun; Du, Mei; Zhang, Jin-Ling; Li, Liang

    2016-08-01

    To study the effect of hGC-MSCs from human gastric cancer tissue on cell proliferation, invasion and epithelial-mesenchymal transition in tumor tissue of gastric cancer tumor-bearing mice. BABL/c nude mice were selected as experimental animals and gastric cancer tumor-bearing mice model were established by subcutaneous injection of gastric cancer cells, randomly divided into different intervention groups. hGC-MSCs group were given different amounts of gastric cancer cells for subcutaneous injection, PBS group was given equal volume of PBS for subcutaneous injection. Then tumor tissue volume were determined, tumor-bearing mice were killed and tumor tissues were collected, mRNA expression of proliferation, invasion, EMT-related molecules were determined. 4, 8, 12, 16, 20 d after intervention, tumor tissue volume of hGC-MSCs group were significantly higher than those of PBS group and the more the number of hGC-MSCs, the higher the tumor tissue volume; mRNA contents of Ki-67, PCNA, Bcl-2, MMP-2, MMP-7, MMP-9, MMP-14, N-cadherin, vimentin, Snail and Twist in tumor tissue of hGC-MSCs group were higher than those of PBS group, and mRNA contents of Bax, TIMP1, TIMP2 and E-cadherin were lower than those of PBS group. hGC-MSCs from human gastric cancer tissue can promote the tumor growth in gastric cancer tumor-bearing mice, and the molecular mechanism includes promoting cell proliferation, invasion and epithelial-mesenchymal transition. Copyright © 2016 Hainan Medical College. Production and hosting by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Metabolic Interaction of Helicobacter pylori Infection and Gut Microbiota

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    Yao-Jong Yang

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available As a barrier, gut commensal microbiota can protect against potential pathogenic microbes in the gastrointestinal tract. Crosstalk between gut microbes and immune cells promotes human intestinal homeostasis. Dysbiosis of gut microbiota has been implicated in the development of many human metabolic disorders like obesity, hepatic steatohepatitis, and insulin resistance in type 2 diabetes (T2D. Certain microbes, such as butyrate-producing bacteria, are lower in T2D patients. The transfer of intestinal microbiota from lean donors increases insulin sensitivity in individuals with metabolic syndrome, but the exact pathogenesis remains unclear. H. pylori in the human stomach cause chronic gastritis, peptic ulcers, and gastric cancers. H. pylori infection also induces insulin resistance and has been defined as a predisposing factor to T2D development. Gastric and fecal microbiota may have been changed in H. pylori-infected persons and mice to promote gastric inflammation and specific diseases. However, the interaction of H. pylori and gut microbiota in regulating host metabolism also remains unknown. Further studies aim to identify the H. pylori-microbiota-host metabolism axis and to test if H. pylori eradication or modification of gut microbiota can improve the control of human metabolic disorders.

  11. INFILTRATE PULMONARY TUBERCULOSIS, GASTRIC ULCER AND HIV INFECTION (COMORBIDITY AND MULTIMORBIDITY

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    E. S. Skvortsova

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Peptic ulcer is registered in 20,5% of those suffering from infiltrate pulmonary tuberculosis and in 19,5% of HIV patients at C2 stage, ill with infiltrate pulmonary tuberculosis and presenting complaints about dyspeptic disorders. The following is typical of multimorbidity of pulmonary tuberculosis, HIV infection and peptic ulcer: oligosymptomatic start of tuberculosis, asthenic syndrome dominating among clinical symptoms, manifestations of gastric and intestinal indigestion, weight loss (2-4 times more often compared to HIV negative patients, less expressed lung tissue destruction (2 time less compared to HIV negative patients. H. pylori is a causative agent of the peptic ulcer in 62,5% of patients with infiltrate pulmonary tuberculosis and in 58,7% of HIV infected patients at C2 stage, suffering from pulmonary tuberculosis. Comorbidity of H. pilori negative peptic ulcer and infiltrate pulmonary tuberculosis differs from comorbidity of H. pilori positive peptic ulcer and infiltrate pulmonary tuberculosis since the first has confidently true unfavorable forecast of the outcome.

  12. Correlation Between Infection Status of Epstein-Barr Virus and 18F-Fluorodeoxyglucose Uptake in Patients with Advanced Gastric Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Na, Sae Jung; Park, Hye Lim; O, Joo Hyun; Lee, Sung Yong; Song, Kyo Young; Kim, Sung Hoon

    2017-01-01

    Epstein-Barr virus-associated gastric cancer (EBVaGC) is one of the four molecular subtypes of gastric cancer, as defined by the classification recently proposed by The Cancer Genome Atlas. We evaluated the correlation between EBV positivity and 18 F-fluorodeoxyglucose ( 18 F-FDG) uptake by positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) in patients with gastric cancer. We retrospectively enrolled patients with gastric cancer who underwent pretreatment 18 F-FDG PET/CT and subsequent surgical resection, and then were diagnosed with advanced gastric cancer (pathologic stage ≥T2 with any N stage). Maximum standardized uptake values (SUV max ) of gastric cancer were measured by pretreatment 18 F-FDG PET/CT. EBV sequences were detected by in situ hybridization (ISH) techniques. We analyzed the correlation between EBV positivity, clinicopathologic features and metabolic activity of the primary tumor. A total of 205 patients were included and 15 (7.3%) patients were identified as having EBV-positive gastric cancer. Age, gender, tumor location, and histological type showed no significant differences between EBV-positive and negative groups. EBV-positive cancer is significantly more frequent in the higher-metabolic-tumor group than in the lower one (p=0.032). The mean SUV max of gastric cancers showed significant differences between EBV-positive and negative groups (9.9±4.2 vs. 7.0±4.8, p=0.026). The infection status of EBV was significantly related to the 18 F-FDG uptake of primary tumors in patients with advanced gastric cancer. Copyright© 2017, International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. George J. Delinasios), All rights reserved.

  13. Oxygenated hemoglobin diffuse reflectance ratio for in vitro detection of human gastric pre-cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, L. Q.; Wei, H. J.; Guo, Z. Y.; Yang, H. Q.; Wu, G. Y.; Xie, S. S.; Zhong, H. Q.; Li, X. Y.; Zhao, Q. L.; Guo, X.

    2010-07-01

    Oxygenated hemoglobin diffuse reflectance (DR) ratio (R540/R575) method based on DR spectral signatures is used for early diagnosis of malignant lesions of human gastric epithelial tissues in vitro. The DR spectra for four different kinds of gastric epithelial tissues were measured using a spectrometer with an integrating sphere detector in the spectral range from 400 to 650 nm. The results of measurement showed that the average DR spectral intensity for the epithelial tissues of normal stomach is higher than that for the epithelial tissues of chronic and malignant stomach and that for the epithelial tissues of chronic gastric ulcer is higher than that for the epithelial tissues of malignant stomach. The average DR spectra for four different kinds of gastric epithelial tissues show dips at 542 and 577 nm owing to absorption from oxygenated Hemoglobin (HbO2). The differences in the mean R540/R575 ratios of HbO2 bands are 6.84% between the epithelial tissues of normal stomach and chronic gastric ulcer, 14.7% between the epithelial tissues of normal stomach and poorly differentiated gastric adenocarcinoma and 22.6% between the epithelial tissues of normal stomach and undifferentiated gastric adenocarcinoma. It is evident from results that there were significant differences in the mean R540/R575 ratios of HbO2 bands for four different kinds of gastric epithelial tissues in vitro ( P < 0.01).

  14. Genetic Alterations in Gastric Cancer Associated with Helicobacter pylori Infection

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    Gonzalo Castillo-Rojas

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Gastric cancer is a world health problem and depicts the fourth leading mortality cause from malignancy in Mexico. Causation of gastric cancer is not only due to the combined effects of environmental factors and genetic variants. Recent molecular studies have transgressed a number of genes involved in gastric carcinogenesis. The aim of this review is to understand the recent basics of gene expression in the development of the process of gastric carcinogenesis. Genetic variants, polymorphisms, desoxyribonucleic acid methylation, and genes involved in mediating inflammation have been associated with the development of gastric carcinogenesis. Recently, these genes (interleukin 10, Il-17, mucin 1, β-catenin, CDX1, SMAD4, SERPINE1, hypoxia-inducible factor 1 subunit alpha, GSK3β, CDH17, matrix metalloproteinase 7, RUNX3, RASSF1A, TFF1, HAI-2, and COX-2 have been studied in association with oncogenic activation or inactivation of tumor suppressor genes. All these mechanisms have been investigated to elucidate the process of gastric carcinogenesis, as well as their potential use as biomarkers and/or molecular targets to treatment of disease.

  15. Delayed gastric emptying and Helicobacter pylori infection in patients with chronic renal failure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kao Chiahung; Hsu Yuehhan; Wang Shyhjen

    1995-01-01

    Forty patients with chronic renal failure (CRF) were enrolled in this study. Twelve of the 40 patients had upper gastrointestinal symptoms or signs (GI Sx). Twenty of the 40 patients had been receiving regular haemodialysis (HD) for at least 1 year prior to the study. Radionuclide-labelled solid metals were used to calculate gastric emptying times (GETs). The carbon-14 urea breath test ( 14 C4-UBT) was used to diagnose Helicobacter pylori (HP) infection. Among the 40 patients, 35 (88%) had an abnormal HP infection. There were no statistically significant differences in the incidence of abnormal GET among patients with HP infection and patients without HP infection. There were also no significant differences in the incidence of HP infection among patients with abnormal and normal GETs. In addition, the incidences of abnormal GET in patients with and without upper GI Sx were 83% and 89% respectively. The incidences of HP infection in patients with and without upper GI Sx were 58% and 54%, respectively. The incidences of abnormal GET in HD and non-HD patients were 95% and 80%, respectively. The incidences of HP infection in HD and non-HD patients were 45% and 65%, respectively. The differences in the incidences of abnormal GET and HP infection among HD and non-HD patients, as well as among patients with and without upper GI Sx, were not statistically significant. (orig.)

  16. Transduction motif analysis of gastric cancer based on a human signaling network

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, G.; Li, D.Z.; Jiang, C.S.; Wang, W. [Fuzhou General Hospital of Nanjing Command, Department of Gastroenterology, Fuzhou, China, Department of Gastroenterology, Fuzhou General Hospital of Nanjing Command, Fuzhou (China)

    2014-04-04

    To investigate signal regulation models of gastric cancer, databases and literature were used to construct the signaling network in humans. Topological characteristics of the network were analyzed by CytoScape. After marking gastric cancer-related genes extracted from the CancerResource, GeneRIF, and COSMIC databases, the FANMOD software was used for the mining of gastric cancer-related motifs in a network with three vertices. The significant motif difference method was adopted to identify significantly different motifs in the normal and cancer states. Finally, we conducted a series of analyses of the significantly different motifs, including gene ontology, function annotation of genes, and model classification. A human signaling network was constructed, with 1643 nodes and 5089 regulating interactions. The network was configured to have the characteristics of other biological networks. There were 57,942 motifs marked with gastric cancer-related genes out of a total of 69,492 motifs, and 264 motifs were selected as significantly different motifs by calculating the significant motif difference (SMD) scores. Genes in significantly different motifs were mainly enriched in functions associated with cancer genesis, such as regulation of cell death, amino acid phosphorylation of proteins, and intracellular signaling cascades. The top five significantly different motifs were mainly cascade and positive feedback types. Almost all genes in the five motifs were cancer related, including EPOR, MAPK14, BCL2L1, KRT18, PTPN6, CASP3, TGFBR2, AR, and CASP7. The development of cancer might be curbed by inhibiting signal transductions upstream and downstream of the selected motifs.

  17. Milk Fermented by Propionibacterium freudenreichii Induces Apoptosis of HGT-1 Human Gastric Cancer Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cousin, Fabien J.; Jouan-Lanhouet, Sandrine; Dimanche-Boitrel, Marie-Thérèse; Corcos, Laurent; Jan, Gwénaël

    2012-01-01

    Background Gastric cancer is one of the most common cancers in the world. The “economically developed countries” life style, including diet, constitutes a risk factor favoring this cancer. Diet modulation may lower digestive cancer incidence. Among promising food components, dairy propionibacteria were shown to trigger apoptosis of human colon cancer cells, via the release of short-chain fatty acids acetate and propionate. Methodology/Principal Findings A fermented milk, exclusively fermented by P. freudenreichii, was recently designed. In this work, the pro-apoptotic potential of this new fermented milk was demonstrated on HGT-1 human gastric cancer cells. Fermented milk supernatant induced typical features of apoptosis including chromatin condensation, formation of apoptotic bodies, DNA laddering, cell cycle arrest and emergence of a subG1 population, phosphatidylserine exposure at the plasma membrane outer leaflet, reactive oxygen species accumulation, mitochondrial transmembrane potential disruption, caspase activation and cytochrome c release. Remarkably, this new fermented milk containing P. freudenreichii enhanced the cytotoxicity of camptothecin, a drug used in gastric cancer chemotherapy. Conclusions/Significance Such new probiotic fermented milk may thus be useful as part of a preventive diet designed to prevent gastric cancer and/or as a food supplement to potentiate cancer therapeutic treatments. PMID:22442660

  18. Increased risk of gastric adenocarcinoma after treatment of primary gastric diffuse large B-cell lymphoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inaba, Koji; Morota, Madoka; Mayahara, Hiroshi; Ito, Yoshinori; Sumi, Minako; Uno, Takashi; Itami, Jun; Kushima, Ryoji; Murakami, Naoya; Kuroda, Yuuki; Harada, Ken; Kitaguchi, Mayuka; Yoshio, Kotaro; Sekii, Shuhei; Takahashi, Kana

    2013-01-01

    There have been sporadic reports about synchronous as well as metachronous gastric adenocarcinoma and primary gastric lymphoma. Many reports have dealt with metachronous gastric adenocarcinoma in mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma of stomach. But to our knowledge, there have been no reports that document the increased incidence of metachronous gastric adenocarcinoma in patients with gastric diffuse large B-cell lymphoma. This retrospective study was conducted to estimate the incidence of metachronous gastric adenocarcinoma after primary gastric lymphoma treatment, especially in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma. The retrospective cohort study of 139 primary gastric lymphoma patients treated with radiotherapy at our hospital. Mean observation period was 61.5 months (range: 3.7-124.6 months). Patients profile, characteristics of primary gastric lymphoma and metachronous gastric adenocarcinoma were retrieved from medical records. The risk of metachronous gastric adenocarcinoma was compared with the risk of gastric adenocarcinoma in Japanese population. There were 10 (7.2%) metachronous gastric adenocarcinoma patients after treatment of primary gastric lymphomas. It was quite high risk compared with the risk of gastric carcinoma in Japanese population of 54.7/100,000. Seven patients of 10 were diffuse large B-cell lymphoma and other 3 patients were mixed type of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma and mucosa associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma. Four patients of 10 metachronous gastric adenocarcinomas were signet-ring cell carcinoma and two patients died of gastric adenocarcinoma. Metachronous gastric adenocarcinoma may have a more malignant potential than sporadic gastric adenocarcinoma. Old age, Helicobacter pylori infection and gastric mucosal change of chronic gastritis and intestinal metaplasia were possible risk factors for metachronous gastric adenocarcinoma. There was an increased risk of gastric adenocarcinoma after treatment of primary gastric lymphoma

  19. Effects of the H(2)-receptor antagonist ranitidine on gastric motor function after a liquid meal in healthy humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Jan Lysgård; Graff, J

    2008-01-01

    , on gastric volume and gastric emptying after a liquid meal in healthy humans. Material and methods. Twelve healthy volunteers participated in a randomized crossover study with 50 mg ranitidine as a bolus intravenously versus no medication. Gastric volume at baseline was determined with single photon emission...... computed tomography (SPECT) after intravenous injection of 99(m)Tc-pertechnetate. After ingestion of a 600-mL liquid meal radiolabelled with (111)In-diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid, dual-isotope technique with SPECT and planar imaging assessed gastric volume as well as gastric emptying. Results....... Ranitidine did not change gastric volume before the meal, nor at 0 h or 1 h after it. Furthermore, ranitidine did not influence gastric retention of meal components after 0.5 h and 1 h. Conclusions. Intravenous bolus injection of 50 mg ranitidine does not modify gastric volume or gastric emptying after a 600...

  20. Immunopathological and Modulatory Effects of Cag A+ Genotype on Gastric Mucosa, Inflammatory Response, Pepsinogens, and Gastrin-17 Secretion in Iraqi Patients infected with H. pylori.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Ezzy, Ali Ibrahim Ali

    2018-05-20

    To determine the immunopathological correlation between Cag A+ H. pylori -specific IgG; pepsinogen I&II (PI&PII); gastrin-17 (G-17); status of gastric and duodenal mucosa and inflammatory activities on different gastroduodenal disorders. Eighty gastroduodenal biopsies were taken from patients with gastroduodenal disorders for histopathological evaluation and H. pylori diagnosis. Serum samples were used for evaluation of gastric hormones and detection of H. pylori -specific IgG antibodies. The tissue expression of H. pylori Cag A gene was detected by in situ hybridisation. H. pylori IgG antibodies were detected in (88.8%) of enrolled patients. According to Cag A gene expression, Significant difference (P value ˂ 0.05) was detected in levels of PG I; PGII, PG I/PG II among patients with gastric disorders. Serum G-17 level was negatively correlated with Cag A gene expression (P-value = 0.04). There was a significant correlation between H. pylori IgG and PG I; PG II; G-17. The current study revealed that corpus atrophic gastritis was diagnosed histologically with (5%) gastric ulcer cases; (3.75%) of duodenal ulcer cases; (3.75%) of duodenitis cases; (1.25%) of gastropathy cases and (8.75%) of gastritis cases. At the same time H. pylori gastritis diagnosed concurrently with (8.75%) of gastric ulcer cases; (11.25%) of duodenal ulcer cases; (17.5%) of gastropathy cases; (3.75%) of duodenitis cases and (2.5%) of prepyloric ulcer cases. A significant correlation was reported between the Immunopathological status of gastric mucosa and endoscopic mucosal finding among duodenal ulcer cases and gastritis cases only. A positive correlation was reported between serum levels of PGI; PGII; PGI/PGII; G-17; PMNs grade and Immunopathological status of the gastroduodenal mucosa of H. pylori Infected patients. A significant difference was reported in lymphocyte grades among gastric disorders without correlation with immunohistopathological changes in the mucosa (P-value = 0.002). A

  1. Association between reduction of plasma adiponectin levels and risk of bacterial infection after gastric cancer surgery.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroshi Yamamoto

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Infections are important causes of postoperative morbidity after gastric surgery; currently, no factors have been identified that can predict postoperative infection. Adiponectin (ADN mediates energy metabolism and functions as an immunomodulator. Perioperative ADN levels and perioperative immune functioning could be mutually related. Here we evaluated a potential biological marker to reliably predict the incidence of postoperative infections to prevent such comorbidities. METHODS: We analyzed 150 consecutive patients who underwent elective gastric cancer surgery at the Shiga University of Medical Science Hospital (Shiga, Japan from 1997 to 2009; of these, most surgeries (n = 100 were performed 2008 onwards. The patient characteristics and surgery-related factors between two groups (with and without infection were compared by the paired t-test and χ(2 test, including preoperative ADN levels, postoperative day 1 ADN levels, and ADN ratio (postoperative ADN levels/preoperative ADN levels as baseline factors. Logistic regression analysis was performed to access the independent association between ADN ratio and postoperative infection. Finally, receiver operating curves (ROCs were constructed to examine its clinical utility. RESULTS: Sixty patients (40% experienced postoperative infections. The baseline values of age, American Society of Anesthesiologists physical status, total operating time, blood loss, surgical procedure, C-reactive protein (CRP levels, preoperative ADN levels, and ADN ratio were significantly different between groups. Logistic regression analysis using these factors indicated that type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM and ADN ratio were significantly independent variables (*p<0.05, ** p<0.01, respectively. ROC analysis revealed that the useful cutoff values (sensitivity/specificity for preoperative ADN levels, ADN ratio, blood loss, operating time, and CRP levels were 8.81(0.567/0.568, 0.76 (0

  2. Identification of DNA methylation changes associated with human gastric cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Park Jung-Hoon

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Epigenetic alteration of gene expression is a common event in human cancer. DNA methylation is a well-known epigenetic process, but verifying the exact nature of epigenetic changes associated with cancer remains difficult. Methods We profiled the methylome of human gastric cancer tissue at 50-bp resolution using a methylated DNA enrichment technique (methylated CpG island recovery assay in combination with a genome analyzer and a new normalization algorithm. Results We were able to gain a comprehensive view of promoters with various CpG densities, including CpG Islands (CGIs, transcript bodies, and various repeat classes. We found that gastric cancer was associated with hypermethylation of 5' CGIs and the 5'-end of coding exons as well as hypomethylation of repeat elements, such as short interspersed nuclear elements and the composite element SVA. Hypermethylation of 5' CGIs was significantly correlated with downregulation of associated genes, such as those in the HOX and histone gene families. We also discovered long-range epigenetic silencing (LRES regions in gastric cancer tissue and identified several hypermethylated genes (MDM2, DYRK2, and LYZ within these regions. The methylation status of CGIs and gene annotation elements in metastatic lymph nodes was intermediate between normal and cancerous tissue, indicating that methylation of specific genes is gradually increased in cancerous tissue. Conclusions Our findings will provide valuable data for future analysis of CpG methylation patterns, useful markers for the diagnosis of stomach cancer, as well as a new analysis method for clinical epigenomics investigations.

  3. Increased expression of argininosuccinate synthetase protein predicts poor prognosis in human gastric cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    SHAN, YAN-SHEN; HSU, HUI-PING; LAI, MING-DERG; YEN, MENG-CHI; LUO, YI-PEY; CHEN, YI-LING

    2015-01-01

    Aberrant expression of argininosuccinate synthetase (ASS1, also known as ASS) has been found in cancer cells and is involved in the carcinogenesis of gastric cancer. The aim of the present study was to investigate the level of ASS expression in human gastric cancer and to determine the possible correlations between ASS expression and clinicopathological findings. Immunohistochemistry was performed on paraffin-embedded tissues to determine whether ASS was expressed in 11 of 11 specimens from patients with gastric cancer. The protein was localized primarily to the cytoplasm of cancer cells and normal epithelium. In the Oncomine cancer microarray database, expression of the ASS gene was significantly increased in gastric cancer tissues. To investigate the clinicopathological and prognostic roles of ASS expression, we performed western blot analysis of 35 matched specimens of gastric adenocarcinomas and normal tissue obtained from patients treated at the National Cheng Kung University Hospital. The ratio of relative ASS expression (expressed as the ASS/β-actin ratio) in tumor tissues to that in normal tissues was correlated with large tumor size (P=0.007) and with the tumor, node, metastasis (TNM) stage of the American Joint Committee on Cancer staging system (P=0.031). Patients whose cancer had increased the relative expression of ASS were positive for perineural invasion and had poor recurrence-free survival. In summary, ASS expression in gastric cancer was associated with a poor prognosis. Further study of mechanisms to silence the ASS gene or decrease the enzymatic activity of ASS protein has the potential to provide new treatments for patients with gastric cancer. PMID:25333458

  4. Glucagon-like peptide 2 stimulates glucagon secretion, enhances lipid absorption, and inhibits gastric acid secretion in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meier, Juris J; Nauck, Michael A; Pott, Andrea

    2006-01-01

    or placebo during the ingestion of a solid test meal. Gastric emptying was determined using a 13C-sodium-octanote breath test. Plasma concentrations of glucose, insulin, C-peptide, glucagon, GLP-2, free fatty acids, free glycerol, and triglycerides were determined. RESULTS: GLP-2 administration led...... (P = .07). GLP-2 administration caused an approximately 15% reduction in pentagastrin-stimulated gastric acid and chloride secretion (P gastric emptying was not affected (P = .99). CONCLUSIONS: GLP-2 reduces gastric acid secretion but does not seem to have an influence on gastric......BACKGROUND & AIMS: The gut-derived peptide glucagon-like peptide 2 (GLP-2) has been suggested as a potential drug candidate for the treatment of various intestinal diseases. However, the acute effects of GLP-2 on gastric functions as well as on glucose and lipid homeostasis in humans are less well...

  5. H pylori receptor MHC class II contributes to the dynamic gastric epithelial apoptotic response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bland, David A; Suarez, Giovanni; Beswick, Ellen J; Sierra, Johanna C; Reyes, Victor E

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the role of MHC class II in the modulation of gastric epithelial cell apoptosis induced by H pylori infection. METHODS: After stimulating a human gastric epithelial cell line with bacteria or agonist antibodies specific for MHC class II and CD95, the quantitation of apoptotic and anti-apoptotic events, including caspase activation, BCL-2 activation, and FADD recruitment, was performed with a fluorometric assay, a cytometric bead array, and confocal microscopy, respectively. RESULTS: Pretreatment of N87 cells with the anti-MHC class II IgM antibody RFD1 resulted in a reduction in global caspase activation at 24 h of H pylori infection. When caspase 3 activation was specifically measured, crosslinking of MHC class II resulted in a marked reduced caspase activation, while simple ligation of MHC class II did not. Crosslinking of MHC class II also resulted in an increased activation of the anti-apoptosis molecule BCL-2 compared to simple ligation. Confocal microscope analysis demonstrated that the pretreatment of gastric epithelial cells with a crosslinking anti-MHC class II IgM blocked the recruitment of FADD to the cell surface. CONCLUSION: The results presented here demonstrate that the ability of MHC class II to modulate gastric epithelial apoptosis is at least partially dependent on its crosslinking. Furthermore, while previous research has demonstrated that MHC class II signaling can be pro-apoptotic during extended ligation, we have shown that the crosslinking of this molecule has anti-apoptotic effects during the earlier time points of H pylori infection. This effect is possibly mediated by the ability of MHC class II to modulate the activation of the pro-apoptotic receptor Fas by blocking the recruitment of the accessory molecule FADD, and this delay in apoptosis induction could allow for prolonged cytokine secretion by H pylori-infected gastric epithelial cells. PMID:16981259

  6. Helicobacter pylori infection generates genetic instability in gastric cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Machado, Ana Manuel; Figueiredo, C.; Seruca, R.

    2010-01-01

    The discovery that Helicobacter pylori is associated with gastric cancer has led to numerous studies that investigate the mechanisms by which H. pylori induces carcinogenesis. Gastric cancer shows genetic instability both in nuclear and mitochondrial DNA, besides impairment of important DNA repai...

  7. Helicobacter pylori SabA Adhesin in Persistent Infection and Chronic Inflammation

    OpenAIRE

    Mahdavi, Jafar; Sondén, Berit; Hurtig, Marina; Olfat, Farzad O.; Forsberg, Lina; Roche, Niamh; Ångström, Jonas; Larsson, Thomas; Teneberg, Susann; Karlsson, Karl-Anders; Altraja, Siiri; Wadström, Torkel; Kersulyte, Dangeruta; Berg, Douglas E.; Dubois, Andre

    2002-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori adherence in the human gastric mucosa involves specific bacterial adhesins and cognate host receptors. Here, we identify sialyl-dimeric-Lewis x glycosphingolipid as a receptor for H. pylori and show that H. pylori infection induced formation of sialyl-Lewis x antigens in gastric epithelium in humans and in a Rhesus monkey. The corresponding sialic acid-binding adhesin (SabA) was isolated with the "retagging" method, and the underlying sabA gene (JHP662/HP0725) wa...

  8. Human gastric emptying and colonic filling of solids characterized by a new method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Camilleri, M.; Colemont, L.J.; Phillips, S.F.; Brown, M.L.; Thomforde, G.M.; Chapman, N.; Zinsmeister, A.R. (Mayo Clinic and Foundation, Rochester, MN (USA))

    1989-08-01

    Our first aim was to compare {sup 111}In-labeled Amberlite IR-12OP resin pellets and {sup 131}I-labeled fiber in the assessment of gastric and small bowel transit and colonic filling in healthy humans. Both radiolabels were highly stable for 3 h in an in vitro stomach model and remained predominantly bound to solid phase of stools collected over 5 days (90.5 +/- 2.1 (SE)% for {sup 131}I and 87.4 +/- 1.4% for {sup 111}In). The lag phase of gastric emptying was shorter for {sup 111}In-pellets (30 +/- 11 min compared with 58 +/- 12 min for {sup 131}I-fiber, P less than 0.05). However, the slope of the postlag phase of gastric emptying and the half time of small bowel transit were not significantly different for {sup 111}In-pellets and {sup 131}I-fiber. Filling of the colon was characterized by bolus movements of the radiolabel (10-80% range, 26% mean) followed by plateaus (periods of no movement of isotope into colon lasting 15-120 min, range; 51 min, mean). Half of the bolus movements occurred within 1 h of the intake of a second meal. Thus {sup 111}In-labeled Amberlite pellets provide an excellent marker for the study of gastric and small bowel transit and colonic filling in humans. The ileum acts as a reservoir and transfers boluses of variable sizes into the colon, often soon after the intake of a subsequent meal.

  9. Helicobacter pylori Diversity and Gastric Cancer Risk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timothy L. Cover

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Gastric cancer is a leading cause of cancer-related death worldwide. Helicobacter pylori infection is the strongest known risk factor for this malignancy. An important goal is to identify H. pylori-infected persons at high risk for gastric cancer, so that these individuals can be targeted for therapeutic intervention. H. pylori exhibits a high level of intraspecies genetic diversity, and over the past two decades, many studies have endeavored to identify strain-specific features of H. pylori that are linked to development of gastric cancer. One of the most prominent differences among H. pylori strains is the presence or absence of a 40-kb chromosomal region known as the cag pathogenicity island (PAI. Current evidence suggests that the risk of gastric cancer is very low among persons harboring H. pylori strains that lack the cag PAI. Among persons harboring strains that contain the cag PAI, the risk of gastric cancer is shaped by a complex interplay among multiple strain-specific bacterial factors as well as host factors. This review discusses the strain-specific properties of H. pylori that correlate with increased gastric cancer risk, focusing in particular on secreted proteins and surface-exposed proteins, and describes evidence from cell culture and animal models linking these factors to gastric cancer pathogenesis. Strain-specific features of H. pylori that may account for geographic variation in gastric cancer incidence are also discussed.

  10. Oral and gastric Helicobacter pylori: effects and associations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veiga, Nélio; Pereira, Carlos; Resende, Carlos; Amaral, Odete; Ferreira, Manuela; Nelas, Paula; Chaves, Claudia; Duarte, João; Cirnes, Luis; Machado, José Carlos; Ferreira, Paula; Correia, Ilídio J

    2015-01-01

    This study consisted in the comparison of the prevalence of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) present in the stomach and in saliva of a sample of Portuguese adolescents and the assessment of the association between H. pylori infection with socio-demographic variables and prevalence of dental caries. A cross-sectional study was designed including a sample of 447 adolescents aged 12 to 19 years old, attending a public school in Sátão, Portugal. A questionnaire about socio-demographic variables and oral health behaviors was applied. Gastric H. pylori infection was determined using the urease breath test (UBT). Saliva collection was obtained and DNA was extracted by Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) in order to detect the presence of oral H. pylori. The prevalence of gastric H. pylori detected by UBT was 35.9%. Within the adolescents with a gastric UBT positive, only 1.9% were positive for oral H. pylori. The presence of gastric H. pylori was found to be associated with age (>15years, Odds ratio (OR)=1.64, 95%CI=1.08-2.52), residence area (urban, OR=1.48, 95%CI=1.03-2.29) and parents´ professional situation (unemployed, OR=1.22, 95%CI=1.02-1.23). Among those with detected dental caries during the intra-oral observation, 37.4% were positive for gastric H. pylori and 40.2% negative for the same bacterial strain (p=0.3). The oral cavity cannot be considered a reservoir for infection of H. pylori. Gastric H. pylori infection was found to be associated with socio-demographic variables such as age, residence area and socioeconomic status.

  11. Oral and gastric Helicobacter pylori: effects and associations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nélio Veiga

    Full Text Available This study consisted in the comparison of the prevalence of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori present in the stomach and in saliva of a sample of Portuguese adolescents and the assessment of the association between H. pylori infection with socio-demographic variables and prevalence of dental caries.A cross-sectional study was designed including a sample of 447 adolescents aged 12 to 19 years old, attending a public school in Sátão, Portugal. A questionnaire about socio-demographic variables and oral health behaviors was applied. Gastric H. pylori infection was determined using the urease breath test (UBT. Saliva collection was obtained and DNA was extracted by Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR in order to detect the presence of oral H. pylori.The prevalence of gastric H. pylori detected by UBT was 35.9%. Within the adolescents with a gastric UBT positive, only 1.9% were positive for oral H. pylori. The presence of gastric H. pylori was found to be associated with age (>15years, Odds ratio (OR=1.64, 95%CI=1.08-2.52, residence area (urban, OR=1.48, 95%CI=1.03-2.29 and parents´ professional situation (unemployed, OR=1.22, 95%CI=1.02-1.23. Among those with detected dental caries during the intra-oral observation, 37.4% were positive for gastric H. pylori and 40.2% negative for the same bacterial strain (p=0.3.The oral cavity cannot be considered a reservoir for infection of H. pylori. Gastric H. pylori infection was found to be associated with socio-demographic variables such as age, residence area and socioeconomic status.

  12. Alterations in Helicobacter pylori triggered by contact with gastric epithelial cells

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    Elizabeth M. Johnson

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Helicobacter pylori lives within the mucus layer of the human stomach, in close proximity to gastric epithelial cells. While a great deal is known about the effects of H. pylori on human cells and the specific bacterial products that mediate these effects, relatively little work has been done to investigate alterations in H. pylori that may be triggered by bacterial contact with human cells. In this review, we discuss the spectrum of changes in bacterial physiology and morphology that occur when H. pylori is in contact with gastric epithelial cells. Several studies have reported that cell contact causes alterations in H. pylori gene transcription. In addition, H. pylori contact with gastric epithelial cells promotes the formation of pilus-like structures at the bacteria-host cell interface. The formation of these structures requires multiple genes in the cag pathogenicity island, and these structures are proposed to have an important role in the type IV secretion system-dependent process through which CagA enters host cells. Finally, H. pylori contact with epithelial cells can promote bacterial replication and the formation of microcolonies, phenomena that are facilitated by the acquisition of iron and other nutrients from infected cells. In summary, the gastric epithelial cell surface represents an important niche for H. pylori, and upon entry into this niche, the bacteria alter their behavior in a manner that optimizes bacterial proliferation and persistent colonization of the host.

  13. Helicobacter pylori infection induces genetic instability of nuclear and mitochondrial DNA in gastric cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Machado, Ana Manuel Dantas; Figueiredo, Ceu; Touati, Eliette

    2009-01-01

    of genetic instabilities in the nuclear and mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) were examined. EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN: We observed the effects of H. pylori infection on a gastric cell line (AGS), on C57BL/6 mice, and on individuals with chronic gastritis. In AGS cells, the effect of H. pylori infection on base excision...... cells and chronic gastritis tissue were determined by PCR, single-stranded conformation polymorphism, and sequencing. H. pylori vacA and cagA genotyping was determined by multiplex PCR and reverse hybridization. RESULTS: Following H. pylori infection, the activity and expression of base excision repair...... and MMR are down-regulated both in vitro and in vivo. Moreover, H. pylori induces genomic instability in nuclear CA repeats in mice and in mtDNA of AGS cells and chronic gastritis tissue, and this effect in mtDNA is associated with bacterial virulence. CONCLUSIONS: Our results suggest that H. pylori...

  14. The 14C-urea breath-test for the detection of gastric Campylobacter pylori infection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Surveyor, I.; Goodwin, C.S.; Mullan, B.P.; Geelhoed, E.; Warren, J.R.; Murray, R.N.; Waters, T.E.; Sanderson, C.R.

    1989-01-01

    Sixty-three patients who were undergoing endoscopy were studied. The radioactivity in exhaled breath which was sampled within five minutes of 14 C -urea administration was attributed to the presence of urease enzyme in mouth organisms and was discounted. The time-radioactivity curves for breath samples from five to 30 minutes after the administration of 14 C-urea gave an excellent separation between subjects with negative results of the examination of gastric-biopsy samples and patients with microbiological and histological evidence of infection with Campylobacter (C.) pylori. The area under the time-radioactivity curve at between five and 30 minutes after the administration of 14 C-urea in 24 patients with negative microbiological results was 6.9±4.4 area units; in 35 of 39 patients with positive microbiological results, this area was greater than 40 area units. Measured against the results of the microbiological examination of gastricbiopsy samples, the sensitivity of breath-testing was 90% and the specificity was 100%. Measured against the results of histological examination for the presence of C. pylori infection, breath-testing had a sensitivity of 94% and a specificity of 93%. A positive breath-test result also correlated well (P=0.0001) with the serological antibody test-result. The role of non-invasive tests - enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays and 14 C-urea breath-testing - in the management of gastritis and peptic ulcer disease is discussed. We consider that the 14 C-urea breath-test has an important role in the noninvasive confirmation of gastric infection with C. pylori and in the follow-up of patients after treatment. 38 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab

  15. Effect of Interlukin-1β on proliferation of gastric epithelial cells in culture

    OpenAIRE

    Beales, Ian LP

    2002-01-01

    Abstract Background Helicobacter pylori is the main risk factor for the development of non-cardia gastric cancer. Increased proliferation of the gastric mucosa is a feature of H. pylori infection. Mucosal interkeukin-1β production is increased in H. pylori infection and IL-1β genotypes associated with increased pro-inflammatory activity are risk factors for the development of gastric cancer. The effect of IL-1β on gastric epithelial cell proliferation has been examined in this study. Methods ...

  16. PCR detection of Helicobacter pylori in string-absorbed gastric juice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domínguez-Bello, M G; Cienfuentes, C; Romero, R; García, P; Gómez, I; Mago, V; Reyes, N; Gueneau de Novoa, P

    2001-04-20

    Molecular methods for detection of Helicobacter pylori infection have been shown to be highly sensitive in gastric biopsies and cultures. The objective of this work was to compare PCR detection of H. pylori DNA in string-absorbed gastric juice and in gastric biopsies. The study was performed in 47 dyspeptic adult patients undergoing endoscopy, and infection was detected by amplification of a segment of H. pylori ureA gene. Of the 29 patients positive in biopsy analysis, 23 (79%) were also positive in the gastric string. PCR analysis of gastric strings is a sensitive and safe procedure to detect H. pylori when endoscopy is not indicated, and may be of great clinical and epidemiological usefulness in determining effectiveness of eradication therapies, typing virulence genes and detecting antibiotic resistance mutations.

  17. Effect of intravenous infusion of glyceryl trinitrate on gastric and small intestinal motor function in healthy humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Jan Lysgård; Fuglsang, Stefan; Graff, J

    2006-01-01

    : To examine the effect of intravenous infusion of glyceryl trinitrate on gastric and small intestinal motor function after a meal in healthy humans. METHODS: Nine healthy volunteers participated in a placebo-controlled, double-blind, crossover study. Each volunteer was examined during intravenous infusion...... of glyceryl trinitrate 1 microg/kg x min or saline. A gamma camera technique was used to measure gastric emptying and small intestinal transit after a 1600-kJ mixed liquid and solid meal. Furthermore, duodenal motility was assessed by manometry. RESULTS: Glyceryl trinitrate did not change gastric mean...... emptying time, gastric half emptying time, gastric retention at 15 min or small intestinal mean transit time. Glyceryl trinitrate did not influence the frequency of duodenal contractions, the amplitude of duodenal contractions or the duodenal motility index. CONCLUSIONS: Intravenous infusion of glyceryl...

  18. Genomic dysregulation in gastric tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janjigian, Yelena Y; Kelsen, David P

    2013-03-01

    Gastric cancer is among the most common human malignancies and the second leading cause of cancer-related death. The different epidemiologic and histopathology of subtypes of gastric cancer are associated with different genomic patterns. Data suggests that gene expression patterns of proximal, distal gastric cancers-intestinal type, and diffuse/signet cell are well separated. This review summarizes the genetic and epigenetic changes thought to drive gastric cancer and the emerging paradigm of gastric cancer as three unique disease subtypes. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Gastric cancer associated with refractory cytomegalovirus gastritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueno, Masayuki; Shimodate, Yuichi; Yamamoto, Shumpei; Yamamoto, Hiroshi; Mizuno, Motowo

    2017-12-01

    Cytomegalovirus (CMV) sometimes causes gastritis, especially in immunocompromised patients, but whether CMV gastritis promotes the development of gastric cancer is unknown. Here, we report a case of gastric cancer that developed in the presence of CMV gastritis, which had been present for at least 4 years and was refractory to treatment. An 80-year-old woman had noted epigastric discomfort and appetite loss. Esophagogastroduodenoscopy revealed a shallow geographical ulcer extending from the upper body to the pylorus. Histological findings of the biopsy and serology were suggestive of CMV gastritis. Serum anti-Helicobacter pylori antibody test was positive, suggesting co-infection with CMV and H. pylori. Her gastritis was unimproved with repeated antiviral therapy and eradication of H. pylori. Thirty months later, wide-spread gastric cancer had developed. We suggest the possibility that the addition of chronic inflammation of CMV infection to H. pylori-induced gastritis facilitated the development of gastric cancer.

  20. Historical Perspective on Familial Gastric CancerSummary

    OpenAIRE

    C. Richard Boland; Matthew B. Yurgelun

    2017-01-01

    Gastric cancer is a common disease worldwide, typically associated with acquired chronic inflammation in the stomach, related in most instances to infection by Helicobacter pylori. A small percentage of cases occurs in familial clusters, and some of these can be linked to specific germline mutations. This article reviews the historical background to the current understanding of familial gastric cancer, focuses on the entity of hereditary diffuse gastric cancer, and also reviews the risks for ...

  1. Inhibitory effects of 3-bromopyruvate on human gastric cancer implant tumors in nude mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xian, Shu-Lin; Cao, Wei; Zhang, Xiao-Dong; Lu, Yun-Fei

    2014-01-01

    Gastric cancer is a common malignant tumor. Our previous study demonstrated inhibitory effects of 3-bromopyruvate (3-BrPA) on pleural mesothelioma. Moreover, we found that 3-BrPA could inhibit human gastric cancer cell line SGC-7901 proliferation in vitro, but whether similar effects might be exerted in vivo have remained unclear. To investigate the effect of 3-BrPA to human gastric cancer implant tumors in nude mice. Animals were randomly divided into 6 groups: 3-BrPA low, medium and high dose groups, PBS negative control group 1 (PH7.4), control group 2 (PH 6.8-7.8) and positive control group receiving 5-FU. The TUNEL method was used to detect apoptosis, and cell morphology and structural changes of tumor tissue were observed under transmission electron microscopy (TEM). 3-BrPA low, medium, high dose group, and 5-FU group, the tumor volume inhibition rates were 34.5%, 40.2%, 45.1%, 47.3%, tumor volume of experimental group compared with 2 PBS groups (p0.05). TEM showed typical characteristics of apoptosis. TUNEL demonstrated apoptosis indices of 28.7%, 39.7%, 48.7% for the 3-BrPA low, medium, high dose groups, 42.2% for the 5-FU group and 5% and 4.3% for the PBS1 (PH7.4) and PBS2 (PH6.8-7.8) groups. Compared each experimental group with 2 negative control groups, there was significant difference (p0.05), but there was between the 5-FU and high dose groups (p<0.05). This study indicated that 3-BrPA in vivo has strong inhibitory effects on human gastric cancer implant tumors in nude mice .

  2. Mechanistic understanding of time-dependent oral absorption based on gastric motor activity in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higaki, Kazutaka; Choe, Sally Y; Löbenberg, Raimar; Welage, Lynda S; Amidon, Gordon L

    2008-09-01

    The relationship of gastric motor activity and gastric emptying of 0.7 mm caffeine pellets with their absorption was investigated in the fed state in healthy human subjects by simultaneous monitoring of antral motility and plasma concentrations. A kinetic model for gastric emptying-dependent absorption yielded multiple phases of gastric emptying and rate constants (k(g)) with large inter-individual differences and large variability in onset of gastric emptying (50-175 min). The model suggests that 50% of the dose is emptied in 1-2h and over 90% emptied by 3.5h following dosing, in all subjects. The maximum values of k(g) (k(g)(max)) were much greater than those reported for emptying of liquids in the fasted state and were comparable to k(g) values in the late Phase II/III of the migrating motor complex (MMC). The model described the observed irregular absorption rate-time and plasma concentration-time profiles adequately but not in detail. The model was more successful at simulating double-peak phenomena in absorption rate profiles and onset of caffeine absorption. The results suggest that gastric emptying regulates drug absorption of small particles in the fed state. Further, estimates of k(a) derived using the time-dependent absorption model were closer to the intrinsic absorption rate constant for caffeine.

  3. Gastric cancer-derived MSC-secreted PDGF-DD promotes gastric cancer progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Feng; Wang, Mei; Yang, Tingting; Cai, Jie; Zhang, Qiang; Sun, Zixuan; Wu, Xiaodan; Zhang, Xu; Zhu, Wei; Qian, Hui; Xu, Wenrong

    2014-11-01

    This study was designed to investigate the role of PDGF-DD secreted by gastric cancer-derived mesenchymal stem cells (GC-MSCs) in human gastric cancer progression. Gastric cancer cells were indirectly co-cultured with GC-MSCs in a transwell system. The growth and migration of gastric cancer cells were evaluated by cell colony formation assay and transwell migration assay, respectively. The production of PDGF-DD in GC-MSCs was determined by using Luminex and ELISA. Neutralization of PDGFR-β by su16f and siRNA interference of PDGF-DD in GC-MSCs was used to demonstrate the role of PDGF-DD produced by GC-MSCs in gastric cancer progression. GC-MSC conditioned medium promoted gastric cancer cell proliferation and migration in vitro and in vivo. Co-culture with GC-MSCs increased the phosphorylation of PDGFR-β in SGC-7901 cells. Neutralization of PDGFR-β by su16f blocked the promoting role of GC-MSC conditioned medium in gastric cancer cell proliferation and migration. Recombinant PDGF-DD duplicated the effects of GC-MSC conditioned medium on gastric cancer cells. Knockdown of PDGF-DD in GC-MSCs abolished its effects on gastric cancer cells in vitro and in vivo. PDGF-DD secreted by GC-MSCs is capable of promoting gastric cancer cell progression in vitro and in vivo. Targeting the PDGF-DD/PDGFR-β interaction between MSCs and gastric cancer cells may represent a novel strategy for gastric cancer therapy.

  4. Diversity of the Gastric Microbiota in Thoroughbred Racehorses Having Gastric Ulcer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Hee-Jin; Ho, Hungwui; Hwang, Hyeshin; Kim, Yongbaek; Han, Janet; Lee, Inhyung; Cho, Seongbeom

    2016-04-28

    Equine gastric ulcer syndrome is one of the most frequently reported diseases in thoroughbred racehorses. Although several risk factors for the development of gastric ulcers have been widely studied, investigation of microbiological factors has been limited. In this study, the presence of Helicobacter spp. and the gastric microbial communities of thoroughbred racehorses having mild to severe gastric ulcers were investigated. Although Helicobacter spp. were not detected using culture and PCR techniques from 52 gastric biopsies and 52 fecal samples, the genomic sequences of H. pylori and H. ganmani were detected using nextgeneration sequencing techniques from 2 out of 10 representative gastric samples. The gastric microbiota of horses was mainly composed of Firmicutes (50.0%), Proteobacteria (18.7%), Bacteroidetes (14.4%), and Actinobacteria (9.7%), but the proportion of each phylum varied among samples. There was no major difference in microbial composition among samples having mild to severe gastric ulcers. Using phylogenetic analysis, three distinct clusters were observed, and one cluster differed from the other two clusters in the frequency of feeding, amount of water consumption, and type of bedding. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study to investigate the gastric microbiota of thoroughbred racehorses having gastric ulcer and to evaluate the microbial diversity in relation to the severity of gastric ulcer and management factors. This study is important for further exploration of the gastric microbiota in racehorses and is ultimately applicable to improving animal and human health.

  5. Effects of Helicobacter pylori infection on the expressions of Bax and Bcl-2 in patients with chronic gastritis and gastric cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartchewsky, Waldemar; Martini, Mariana R; Squassoni, Aline C; Alvarez, Marisa C; Ladeira, Marcelo S P; Salvatore, Daisy M F; Trevisan, Miriam A; Pedrazzoli, José; Ribeiro, Marcelo L

    2010-01-01

    The aim of the present study is to evaluate the influence of Helicobacter pylori on Bax and Bcl-2 mRNA and protein levels in patients with chronic gastritis and gastric cancer. The study included 217 patients, of which 26 were uninfected; 127 had chronic gastritis and were H. pylori-positive, and 64 had gastric cancer. Bacterial genotypes were evaluated by PCR, and the expression values were determined by quantitative real-time PCR and immunohistochemistry. Our data showed that the up-regulationary effects of H. pylori infection on the pro-apoptotic gene, Bax, were stronger than its induction of Bcl-2; this effect may increase apoptosis in patients with chronic gastritis. In patients with gastric cancer, the up-regulation of the anti-apoptotic gene, Bcl-2, counteracted the pro-apoptotic effects of Bax, leading to a deregulation of apoptosis-associated gene expression, favoring cell proliferation. Thus, the disturbance in Bax and Bcl-2 balance, induced by H. pylori, might be important in gastric cancer development.

  6. Growth inhibitory effect of 4-phenyl butyric acid on human gastric cancer cells is associated with cell cycle arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Long-Zhu; Deng, Hong-Xia; Lou, Wen-Zhu; Sun, Xue-Yan; Song, Meng-Wan; Tao, Jing; Xiao, Bing-Xiu; Guo, Jun-Ming

    2012-01-07

    To investigate the growth effects of 4-phenyl butyric acid (PBA) on human gastric carcinoma cells and their mechanisms. Moderately-differentiated human gastric carcinoma SGC-7901 and lowly-differentiated MGC-803 cells were treated with 5, 10, 20, 40, and 60 μmol/L PBA for 1-4 d. Cell proliferation was detected using the MTT colorimetric assay. Cell cycle distributions were examined using flow cytometry. The proliferation of gastric carcinoma cells was inhibited by PBA in a dose- and time-dependent fashion. Flow cytometry showed that SGC-7901 cells treated with low concentrations of PBA were arrested at the G₀/G₁ phase, whereas cells treated with high concentrations of PBA were arrested at the G₂/M phase. Although MGC-803 cells treated with low concentrations of PBA were also arrested at the G₀/ G₁ phase, cells treated with high concentrations of PBA were arrested at the S phase. The growth inhibitory effect of PBA on gastric cancer cells is associated with alteration of the cell cycle. For moderately-differentiated gastric cancer cells, the cell cycle was arrested at the G₀ /G₁ and G₂/M phases. For lowly-differentiated gastric cancer cells, the cell cycle was arrested at the G₀/G₁ and S phases.

  7. A comparison of Helicobacter pylori and non-Helicobacter pylori Helicobacter spp. Binding to canine gastric mucosa with defined gastric glycophenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amorim, Irina; Freitas, Daniela P; Magalhães, Ana; Faria, Fátima; Lopes, Célia; Faustino, Augusto M; Smet, Annemieke; Haesebrouck, Freddy; Reis, Celso A; Gärtner, Fátima

    2014-08-01

    The gastric mucosa of dogs is often colonized by non-Helicobacter pylori helicobacters (NHPH), while H. pylori is the predominant gastric Helicobacter species in humans. The colonization of the human gastric mucosa by H. pylori is highly dependent on the recognition of host glycan receptors. Our goal was to define the canine gastric mucosa glycophenotype and to evaluate the capacity of different gastric Helicobacter species to adhere to the canine gastric mucosa. The glycosylation profile in body and antral compartments of the canine gastric mucosa, with focus on the expression of histo-blood group antigens was evaluated. The in vitro binding capacity of FITC-labeled H. pylori and NHPH to the canine gastric mucosa was assessed in cases representative of the canine glycosylation pattern. The canine gastric mucosa lacks expression of type 1 Lewis antigens and presents a broad expression of type 2 structures and A antigen, both in the surface and glandular epithelium. Regarding the canine antral mucosa, H. heilmannii s.s. presented the highest adhesion score whereas in the body region the SabA-positive H. pylori strain was the strain that adhered more. The canine gastric mucosa showed a glycosylation profile different from the human gastric mucosa suggesting that alternative glycan receptors may be involved in Helicobacter spp. binding. Helicobacter pylori and NHPH strains differ in their ability to adhere to canine gastric mucosa. Among the NHPH, H. heilmannii s.s. presented the highest adhesion capacity in agreement with its reported colonization of the canine stomach. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Why is the coexistence of gastric cancer and duodenal ulcer rare? Examination of factors related to both gastric cancer and duodenal ulcer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ubukata, Hideyuki; Nagata, Hiroyuki; Tabuchi, Takanobu; Konishi, Satoru; Kasuga, Teruhiko; Tabuchi, Takafumi

    2011-03-01

    The coexistence of gastric cancer with duodenal ulcer has been found empirically to be rare, but why it is rare is difficult to explain satisfactorily. To elucidate this question, we carried out a literature review of the subject. The frequency with which the two diseases coexist is 0.1-1.7%, and the main factor associated with both gastric cancer and duodenal ulcer is Helicobacter pylori infection. However, there are marked differences between the disorders of hyperchlorhydria in duodenal ulcer, and hypochlorhydria in gastric cancer. The most acceptable view of the reason for the difference may be that the acquisition of H. pylori infection occurs mainly in childhood, so that the time of acquisition of atrophic gastritis may be the most important, and if atrophic gastritis is not acquired early, high levels of gastric acid may occur, and consequently acute antral gastritis and duodenal ulcer may occur in youth, whereas, in elderly individuals, persistent H. pylori infections and the early appearance of atrophic gastritis may be the causes of low gastric acid, and consequently gastric cancer may occur. In patients with duodenal ulcer, factors such as nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and dupA-H. pylori strains may contribute to preventing the early acquisition of atrophic gastritis, while acid-suppressive therapy and vascular endothelial growth factor and other entities may inhibit atrophic gastritis. In contrast, in gastric cancer, factors such as excessive salt intake, acid-suppressive therapy, polymorphisms of inflammatory cytokines, and the homB-H. pylori strain may contribute to the early acquisition of atrophic gastritis, while factors such as NSAIDs; fruits and vegetables; vitamins A, C, and E; and good nutrition may inhibit it.

  9. The sup 14 C-urea breath-test for the detection of gastric Campylobacter pylori infection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Surveyor, I; Goodwin, C S; Mullan, B P; Geelhoed, E; Warren, J R; Murray, R N; Waters, T E; Sanderson, C R [Royal Perth Hospital (Australia)

    1989-10-16

    Sixty-three patients who were undergoing endoscopy were studied. The radioactivity in exhaled breath which was sampled within five minutes of {sup 14}C -urea administration was attributed to the presence of urease enzyme in mouth organisms and was discounted. The time-radioactivity curves for breath samples from five to 30 minutes after the administration of {sup 14}C-urea gave an excellent separation between subjects with negative results of the examination of gastric-biopsy samples and patients with microbiological and histological evidence of infection with Campylobacter (C.) pylori. The area under the time-radioactivity curve at between five and 30 minutes after the administration of {sup 14}C-urea in 24 patients with negative microbiological results was 6.9{plus minus}4.4 area units; in 35 of 39 patients with positive microbiological results, this area was greater than 40 area units. Measured against the results of the microbiological examination of gastricbiopsy samples, the sensitivity of breath-testing was 90% and the specificity was 100%. Measured against the results of histological examination for the presence of C. pylori infection, breath-testing had a sensitivity of 94% and a specificity of 93%. A positive breath-test result also correlated well (P=0.0001) with the serological antibody test-result. The role of non-invasive tests - enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays and {sup 14}C-urea breath-testing - in the management of gastritis and peptic ulcer disease is discussed. We consider that the {sup 14}C-urea breath-test has an important role in the noninvasive confirmation of gastric infection with C. pylori and in the follow-up of patients after treatment. 38 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  10. Lipid nanoparticles to counteract gastric infection without affecting gut microbiota.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seabra, Catarina Leal; Nunes, Cláudia; Brás, Manuela; Gomez-Lazaro, Maria; Reis, Celso A; Gonçalves, Inês C; Reis, Salette; Martins, M Cristina L

    2018-06-01

    Helicobacter pylori infection is one of the major risk factors for gastric cancer development. Available antibiotic-based treatments not only fail in around 20% of patients but also have a severe negative impact on the gut microbiota. Recently, we demonstrated that nanostructured lipid carriers (NLC), even without any drug loaded, are bactericidal against H. pylori at low concentrations. This work aims to clarify NLC mode of action and to evaluate if their bactericidal effect is specific to H. pylori without affecting bacteria from microbiota. NLC were produced by hot homogenization followed by ultrasonication method, using Precirol®ATO5 and Miglyol®812 as lipids and Tween®60 as a surfactant. NLC were able to eradicate H. pylori without affecting the other tested bacteria (Lactobacillus, E. coli, S. epidermidis and S. aureus). Bioimaging assays demonstrated that NLC rapidly bind to and cross the H. pylori bacterial membrane, destabilizing and disrupting it, which leads to leakage of the cytoplasmic contents and consequent bacterial death. In an era where efficient alternatives to antibiotics are urgent, NLC are an interesting route to be explored in the quest for new antibiotic-free therapies to fight H. pylori infection. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Lack of effect of synthetic human gastric inhibitory polypeptide and glucagon-like peptide 1 [7-36 amide] infused at near-physiological concentrations on pentagastrin-stimulated gastric acid secretion in normal human subjects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nauck, M A; Bartels, E; Orskov, C

    1992-01-01

    -stimulated (0.1 micrograms/kg/h from -90 to 120 min) gastric volume, acid and chloride output, on separate occasions, synthetic human GIP (1 pmol/kg/min) and/or GLP-1 [7-36 amide] (0.3 pmol/kg/min) or placebo (0.9% NaCl with 1% albumin) were infused intravenously (from -30 to 120 min) in 9 healthy volunteers...... secretion). In conclusion, (penta)gastrin-stimulated gastric acid secretion is not inhibited by physiological circulating concentrations of GIP or GLP-1 [7-36 amide]. Therefore, the insulinotropic action of these intestinal hormones is physiologically more important than their possible role...

  12. Ulcerative Gastritis and Esophagitis in Two Children with Sarcina ventriculi Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tim G. J. de Meij

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Sarcina ventriculi is a Gram-positive, obligate anaerobic coccus, with a characteristic morphology. Only 22 cases of human infections by this microorganism, including 7 in children, have been reported in literature so far. Affected subjects usually present with abdominal pain, nausea, vomiting, and delayed gastric emptying. However, life-threatening complications, like emphysematous gastritis and gastric perforation have also been described. Gastroparesis and gastric outlet obstruction have been considered as a potential etiologic factor. All pediatric cases described thus far presented with concomitant gastrointestinal pathology, such as Helicobacter pylori gastritis, celiac disease, infection with Giardia lamblia or Candida spp. Here, we report two children with S. ventriculi infection, in whom the diagnosis was established by typical histological findings in mucosal biopsies. The first child presented with hematemesis due to ulcerative esophagitis and gastritis, the second child with a history of esophageal stricture had ulcerative gastritis. Confirmation of S. ventriculi infection is feasible by molecular microbiota detection methods, since this microorganism cannot be detected by classical culture techniques. Prompt treatment with antibiotics could prevent life-threatening complications.

  13. Pathobiology of Helicobacter pylori-induced Gastric Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amieva, Manuel; Peek, Richard M.

    2015-01-01

    Colonization of the human stomach by Helicobacter pylori and its role in causing gastric cancer is one of the richest examples of complex relationship among human cells, microbes, and their environment. It is also a puzzle of enormous medical importance given the incidence and lethality of gastric cancer worldwide. We review recent findings that have changed how we view these relationships and affected the direction of gastric cancer research. For example, recent data indicate that subtle mismatches between host and microbe genetic traits greatly affect risk of gastric cancer. The ability of H pylori and its oncoprotein CagA to reprogram epithelial cells and activate properties of stemness demonstrates the sophisticated relationship among H pylori and progenitor cells in the gastric mucosa. The observation that cell-associated H pylori can colonize the gastric glands and directly affect precursor and stem cells supports these observations. The ability to mimic these interactions in human gastric organoid cultures as well as animal models will allow investigators to more fully unravel the extent of H pylori control on the renewing gastric epithelium. Finally, our realization that external environmental factors, such as dietary components and essential micronutrients, as well as the gastrointestinal microbiota, can change the balance between H pylori’s activity as a commensal or a pathogen has provided direction to studies aimed at defining the full carcinogenic potential of this organism. PMID:26385073

  14. Reduction of hexavalent chromium by fasted and fed human gastric fluid. I. Chemical reduction and mitigation of mutagenicity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Flora, Silvio, E-mail: sdf@unige.it [Department of Health Sciences, University of Genoa, 16132 Genoa (Italy); Camoirano, Anna, E-mail: Anna.Fiorenza.Camoirano@unige.it [Department of Health Sciences, University of Genoa, 16132 Genoa (Italy); Micale, Rosanna T., E-mail: rosannamicale@yahoo.it [Department of Health Sciences, University of Genoa, 16132 Genoa (Italy); La Maestra, Sebastiano, E-mail: lamaestra78@yahoo.it [Department of Health Sciences, University of Genoa, 16132 Genoa (Italy); Savarino, Vincenzo, E-mail: vsavarin@unige.it [Gastroenterology Unit, Department of Internal Medicine, University of Genoa, 16132 Genoa (Italy); Zentilin, Patrizia, E-mail: Patrizia.Zentilin@unige.it [Gastroenterology Unit, Department of Internal Medicine, University of Genoa, 16132 Genoa (Italy); Marabotto, Elisa, E-mail: emarabotto@libero.it [Gastroenterology Unit, Department of Internal Medicine, University of Genoa, 16132 Genoa (Italy); Suh, Mina, E-mail: msuh@toxstrategies.com [ToxStrategies, Mission Viejo, CA 92692 (United States); Proctor, Deborah M., E-mail: dproctor@toxstrategies.com [ToxStrategies, Mission Viejo, CA 92692 (United States)

    2016-09-01

    Evaluation of the reducing capacity of human gastric fluid from healthy individuals, under fasted and fed conditions, is critical for assessing the cancer hazard posed by ingested hexavalent chromium [Cr(VI)] and for developing quantitative physiologically-based pharmacokinetic models used in risk assessment. In the present study, the patterns of Cr(VI) reduction were evaluated in 16 paired pre- and post-meal gastric fluid samples collected from 8 healthy volunteers. Human gastric fluid was effective both in reducing Cr(VI), as measured by using the s-diphenylcarbazide colorimetric method, and in attenuating mutagenicity in the Ames test. The mean (± SE) Cr(VI)-reducing ability of post-meal samples (20.4 ± 2.6 μg Cr(VI)/mL gastric fluid) was significantly higher than that of pre-meal samples (10.2 ± 2.3 μg Cr(VI)/mL gastric fluid). When using the mutagenicity assay, the decrease of mutagenicity produced by pre-meal and post-meal samples corresponded to reduction of 13.3 ± 1.9 and 25.6 ± 2.8 μg Cr(VI)/mL gastric fluid, respectively. These data are comparable to parallel results conducted by using speciated isotope dilution mass spectrometry. Cr(VI) reduction was rapid, with > 70% of total reduction occurring within 1 min and 98% of reduction is achieved within 30 min with post-meal gastric fluid at pH 2.0. pH dependence was observed with decreasing Cr(VI) reducing capacity at higher pH. Attenuation of the mutagenic response is consistent with the lack of DNA damage observed in the gastrointestinal tract of rodents following administration of ≤ 180 ppm Cr(VI) for up to 90 days in drinking water. Quantifying Cr(VI) reduction kinetics in the human gastrointestinal tract is necessary for assessing the potential hazards posed by Cr(VI) in drinking water. - Highlights: • Cr(VI) reduction capacity was greater in post-meal than paired pre-meal samples. • Cr(VI) reduction was rapid, pH dependent, and due to heat stable components. • Gastric fluid attenuates

  15. Epstein-Barr virus-positive gastric cancer: a distinct molecular subtype of the disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jácome, Alexandre Andrade Dos Anjos; Lima, Enaldo Melo de; Kazzi, Ana Izabela; Chaves, Gabriela Freitas; Mendonça, Diego Cavalheiro de; Maciel, Marina Mara; Santos, José Sebastião Dos

    2016-04-01

    Approximately 90% of the world population is infected by Epstein-Barr virus (EBV). Usually, it infects B lymphocytes, predisposing them to malignant transformation. Infection of epithelial cells occurs rarely, and it is estimated that about to 10% of gastric cancer patients harbor EBV in their malignant cells. Given that gastric cancer is the third leading cause of cancer-related mortality worldwide, with a global annual incidence of over 950,000 cases, EBV-positive gastric cancer is the largest group of EBV-associated malignancies. Based on gene expression profile studies, gastric cancer was recently categorized into four subtypes; EBV-positive, microsatellite unstable, genomically stable and chromosomal instability. Together with previous studies, this report provided a more detailed molecular characterization of gastric cancer, demonstrating that EBV-positive gastric cancer is a distinct molecular subtype of the disease, with unique genetic and epigenetic abnormalities, reflected in a specific phenotype. The recognition of characteristic molecular alterations in gastric cancer allows the identification of molecular pathways involved in cell proliferation and survival, with the potential to identify therapeutic targets. These findings highlight the enormous heterogeneity of gastric cancer, and the complex interplay between genetic and epigenetic alterations in the disease, and provide a roadmap to implementation of genome-guided personalized therapy in gastric cancer. The present review discusses the initial studies describing EBV-positive gastric cancer as a distinct clinical entity, presents recently described genetic and epigenetic alterations, and considers potential therapeutic insights derived from the recognition of this new molecular subtype of gastric adenocarcinoma.

  16. Molecular Diagnostics in Esophageal and Gastric Neoplasms: 2018 Update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zulfiqar, Muhammad; Bluth, Martin H; Bhalla, Amarpreet

    2018-06-01

    Esophageal cancer (EC) is rapidly increasing in incidence in the United States. Genetic changes associated with the development of EC involve the p16, p53, and APC genes. Human epidermal growth factor 2 (HER-2) overexpression is seen in gastroesophageal junction carcinoma and a subset gastric carcinoma (GC). Interestingly, up to 50% cases of GC are related to Helicobacter pylori infection and up to 16% are related to EBV infection. Microsatellite instability is observed in up to 39% of GC and cell free nucleic acid analysis provides additional opportunities for diagnosis and prognosis of disease. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Incidence of Helicobacter felis and the effect of coinfection with Helicobacter pylori on the gastric mucosa in the African population

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fritz, E. Lekunze; Slavik, Tomas; Delport, Wayne; Olivier, Brenda; van der Merwe, Schalk W.

    2006-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori and Helicobacter felis are two of the Helicobacter spp. that infect humans. H. pylori has been linked to significant gastric pathology. Coinfection with Helicobacter spp. may influence infectious burden, pathogenesis, and antibiotic resistance; however, this has not been studied.

  18. C5b-9 Staining Correlates With Clinical and Tumor Stage in Gastric Adenocarcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jian; Yang, Wei-Jun; Sun, Hai-Jian; Yang, Xia; Wu, Yu-Zhang

    2016-08-01

    The complement system is a critical part of the immune response, acting in defense against viral infections, clearance of immune complexes, and maintenance of tissue homeostasis. Upregulated expression of the terminal complement complex, C5b-9, has been observed on various tumor cells, such as stomach carcinoma cells, and on cells in the necrotic regions of these tumors as well; however, whether and how C5b-9 is related to gastric cancer progression and severity remains unknown. In this study, human gastric adenocarcinoma (HGAC) tissues (n=47 cases) and patient-matched adjacent nontumoral parenchyma (n=20 cases) were evaluated by tissue microarray and immunohistochemistry. The HGAC tissues showed upregulated C5b-9 expression. Multinomial logistic regression and likelihood ratio testing showed that overexpression of C5b-9 in HGAC tissue was significantly correlated with clinical stage (P=0.007) and tumor stage (P=0.005), but not with tumor distant organ metastasis, lymphoid nodal status, sex, or age. Patients with late-stage gastric adenocarcinoma had a higher amount of tumor cells showing positive staining for C5b-9 than patients with early-stage disease. These results may help in diagnosis and assessment of disease severity of human gastric carcinoma.

  19. Ghrelin stimulates gastric emptying and hunger in normal-weight humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Levin, F; Edholm, T; Schmidt, P T

    2006-01-01

    CONTEXT: Ghrelin is produced primarily by enteroendocrine cells in the gastric mucosa and increases gastric emptying in patients with gastroparesis. MAIN OBJECTIVE: The objective of the study was to evaluate the effect of ghrelin on gastric emptying, appetite, and postprandial hormone secretion i...

  20. Characterization of Gastric Microbiota in Twins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Quanjiang; Xin, Yongning; Wang, Lili; Meng, Xinying; Yu, Xinjuan; Lu, Linlin; Xuan, Shiying

    2017-02-01

    Contribution of host genetic backgrounds in the development of gastric microbiota has not been clearly defined. This study was aimed to characterize the biodiversity, structure and composition of gastric microbiota among twins. A total of four pairs of twins and eight unrelated individuals were enrolled in the study. Antral biopsies were obtained during endoscopy. The bacterial 16S rRNA gene was amplified and pyrosequenced. Sequences were analyzed for the composition, structure, and α and β diversities of gastric microbiota. Proteobacteria, Firmicutes, Bacteroidetes, Actinobacteria, and Fusobacteria were the most predominant phyla of gastric microbiota. Each individual, twins as well as unrelated individuals, harbored a microbiota of distinct composition. There was no evidence of additional similarity in the richness and evenness of gastric microbiota among co-twins as compared to unrelated individuals. Calculations of θ YC and PCoA demonstrated that the structure similarity of gastric microbial community between co-twins did not increase compared to unrelated individuals. In contrast, the structure of microbiota was altered enormously by Helicobacter pylori infection. These results suggest that host genetic backgrounds had little effect in shaping the gastric microbiota. This property of gastric microbiota could facilitate the studies discerning the role of microbiota from genetic grounds in the pathogenesis.

  1. N-methyl-N-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine-mediated ING4 downregulation contributed to the angiogenesis of transformed human gastric epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yansu; Fu, Rui; Xu, Mengdie; Huang, Yefei; Sun, Guixiang; Xu, Lichun

    2018-04-15

    Angiogenesis is associated with the progression and mortality of gastric cancer. Epidemiological evidences indicate that long-term N-nitroso compounds (NOCs) exposure predominantly contributes to the mortality of gastric cancer. Therefore, further reduced mortality of gastric cancer demands to explore the exact mechanisms of NOCs induced angiogenesis. As a tumor suppressor gene, inhibitor of growth protein 4 (ING4) plays an important role in pathological angiogenesis. In this study, we will investigate ING4 expression level in human gastric epithelial cells after the long-term low dose exposure of N-methyl-N-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine (MNNG) and the pathological impact of MNNG-reduced ING4 on angiogenesis of transformed cells. The soft agar colony formation assay, Western blotting, immunofluorescence and wound healing assay were used to evaluate the characteristics of transformed cells. HUVEC growth and tube formation assays were performed to test the angiogenic abilities. EMSA, luciferase reporter gene assay, real-time PCR and Western blotting were used to explore the exact mechanism. By establishing transformed human gastric epithelial cells via chronic low dose treatment, a gradually ING4 downregulation was observed in the later-stage of MNNG-induced cell transformation. Moreover, we demonstrated that MNNG exposure-reduced ING4 expression significantly resulted into aggravating angiogenesis through increasing the phosphorylation level of NF-κB p65 and subsequently DAN binding activity and regulating the expressions of NF-κB p65 downstream pro-angiogenic genes, MMP-2 and MMP-9. Our findings provided a significant mechanistic insight into angiogenesis of MNNG-transformed human gastric epithelial cell and supported the concept that ING4 may be a relevant therapeutic target for gastric cancer. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. [Gastric cancer detection using kubelka-Munk spectral function of DNA and protein absorption bands].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Lan-quan; Wei, Hua-jiang; Guo, Zhou-yi; Yang, Hong-qin; Xie, Shu-sen; Chen, Xue-mei; Li, Li-bo; He, Bol-hua; Wu, Guo-yong; Lu, Jian-jun

    2009-09-01

    Differential diagnosis for epithelial tissues of normal human gastric, undifferentiation gastric adenocarcinoma, gastric squamous cell carcinomas, and poorly differentiated gastric adenocarcinoma were studied using the Kubelka-Munk spectral function of the DNA and protein absorption bands at 260 and 280 nm in vitro. Diffuse reflectance spectra of tissue were measured using a spectrophotometer with an integrating sphere attachment. The results of measurement showed that for the spectral range from 250 to 650 nm, pathological changes of gastric epithelial tissues induced that there were significant differences in the averaged value of the Kubelka-Munk function f(r infinity) and logarithmic Kubelka-Munk function log[f(r infinity)] of the DNA absorption bands at 260 nm between epithelial tissues of normal human stomach and human undifferentiation gastric cancer, between epithelial tissues of normal human stomach and human gastric squamous cell carcinomas, and between epithelial tissues of normal human stomach and human poorly differentiated cancer. Their differences were 68.5% (p function f(r infinity) and logarithmic Kubelka-Munk function log[f(r infinity)] of the protein absorption bands at 280 nm between epithelial tissues of normal human stomach and human undifferentiation gastric cancer, between epithelial tissues of normal human stomach and human gastric squamous cell carcinomas, and between epithelial tissues of normal human stomach and human poorly differentiated cancer. Their differences were 86.8% (p function f(r infinity) and logarithmic Kubelka-Munk function log[f(r infinity)] of the carotene absorption bands at 480 nm between epithelial tissues of normal human stomach and human undifferentiation gastric cancer, between epithelial tissues of normal human stomach and human gastric squamous cell carcinomas, and between epithelial tissues of normal human stomach and human poorly differentiated cancer. Their differences were 59.5% (p < 0.05), 73% (p < 0

  3. Human gastric mucins differently regulate Helicobacter pylori proliferation, gene expression and interactions with host cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emma C Skoog

    Full Text Available Helicobacter pylori colonizes the mucus niche of the gastric mucosa and is a risk factor for gastritis, ulcers and cancer. The main components of the mucus layer are heavily glycosylated mucins, to which H. pylori can adhere. Mucin glycosylation differs between individuals and changes during disease. Here we have examined the H. pylori response to purified mucins from a range of tumor and normal human gastric tissue samples. Our results demonstrate that mucins from different individuals differ in how they modulate both proliferation and gene expression of H. pylori. The mucin effect on proliferation varied significantly between samples, and ranged from stimulatory to inhibitory, depending on the type of mucins and the ability of the mucins to bind to H. pylori. Tumor-derived mucins and mucins from the surface mucosa had potential to stimulate proliferation, while gland-derived mucins tended to inhibit proliferation and mucins from healthy uninfected individuals showed little effect. Artificial glycoconjugates containing H. pylori ligands also modulated H. pylori proliferation, albeit to a lesser degree than human mucins. Expression of genes important for the pathogenicity of H. pylori (babA, sabA, cagA, flaA and ureA appeared co-regulated in response to mucins. The addition of mucins to co-cultures of H. pylori and gastric epithelial cells protected the viability of the cells and modulated the cytokine production in a manner that differed between individuals, was partially dependent of adhesion of H. pylori to the gastric cells, but also revealed that other mucin factors in addition to adhesion are important for H. pylori-induced host signaling. The combined data reveal host-specific effects on proliferation, gene expression and virulence of H. pylori due to the gastric mucin environment, demonstrating a dynamic interplay between the bacterium and its host.

  4. Overview of Current Concepts in Gastric Intestinal Metaplasia and Gastric Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jencks, David S; Adam, Jason D; Borum, Marie L; Koh, Joyce M; Stephen, Sindu; Doman, David B

    2018-02-01

    Gastric intestinal metaplasia is a precancerous change of the mucosa of the stomach with intestinal epithelium, and is associated with an increased risk of dysplasia and cancer. The pathogenesis to gastric cancer is proposed by the Correa hypothesis as the transition from normal gastric epithelium to invasive cancer via inflammation followed by intramucosal cancer and invasion. Multiple risk factors have been associated with the development of gastric intestinal metaplasia interplay, including Helicobacter pylori infection and associated genomics, host genetic factors, environmental milieu, rheumatologic disorders, diet, and intestinal microbiota. Globally, screening guidelines have been established in countries with high incidence. In the United States, no such guidelines have been developed due to lower, albeit increasing, incidence. The American Society for Gastrointestinal Endoscopy recommends a case-by-case patient assessment based upon epidemiology, genetics, and environmental risk factors. Studies have examined the use of a serologic biopsy to stratify risk based upon factors such as H pylori status and virulence factors, along with serologic markers of chronic inflammation including pepsinogen I, pepsinogen II, and gastrin. High-risk patients may then be advised to undergo endoscopic evaluation with mapping biopsies from the antrum (greater curvature, lesser curvature), incisura angularis, and corpus (greater curvature, lesser curvature). Surveillance guidelines have not been firmly established for patients with known gastric intestinal metaplasia, but include repeat endoscopy at intervals according to the histologic risk for malignant transformation.

  5. Effect of intravenous infusion of glyceryl trinitrate on gastric and small intestinal motor function in healthy humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Jan Lysgård; Fuglsang, Stefan; Graff, J

    2006-01-01

    of glyceryl trinitrate 1 microg/kg x min or saline. A gamma camera technique was used to measure gastric emptying and small intestinal transit after a 1600-kJ mixed liquid and solid meal. Furthermore, duodenal motility was assessed by manometry. RESULTS: Glyceryl trinitrate did not change gastric mean......BACKGROUND: Glyceryl trinitrate is a donor of nitric oxide that relaxes smooth muscle cells of the gastrointestinal tract. Little is known about the effect of glyceryl trinitrate on gastric emptying and no data exist on the possible effect of glyceryl trinitrate on small intestinal transit. AIM......: To examine the effect of intravenous infusion of glyceryl trinitrate on gastric and small intestinal motor function after a meal in healthy humans. METHODS: Nine healthy volunteers participated in a placebo-controlled, double-blind, crossover study. Each volunteer was examined during intravenous infusion...

  6. Atrophic gastritis and enlarged gastric folds diagnosed by double-contrast upper gastrointestinal barium X-ray radiography are useful to predict future gastric cancer development based on the 3-year prospective observation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamichi, Nobutake; Hirano, Chigaya; Ichinose, Masao; Takahashi, Yu; Minatsuki, Chihiro; Matsuda, Rie; Nakayama, Chiemi; Shimamoto, Takeshi; Kodashima, Shinya; Ono, Satoshi; Tsuji, Yosuke; Niimi, Keiko; Sakaguchi, Yoshiki; Kataoka, Yosuke; Saito, Itaru; Asada-Hirayama, Itsuko; Takeuchi, Chihiro; Yakabi, Seiichi; Kaikimoto, Hikaru; Matsumoto, Yuta; Yamaguchi, Daisuke; Kageyama-Yahara, Natsuko; Fujishiro, Mitsuhiro; Wada, Ryoichi; Mitsushima, Toru; Koike, Kazuhiko

    2016-07-01

    Double-contrast upper gastrointestinal barium X-ray radiography (UGI-XR) is the standard gastric cancer screening method in Japan. Atrophic gastritis and enlarged gastric folds are considered the two major features of Helicobacter pylori-induced chronic gastritis, but the clinical meaning of evaluating them by UGI-XR has not been elucidated. We analyzed healthy UGI-XR examinees without a history of gastrectomy, previous Helicobacter pylori eradication and usage of gastric acid suppressants. Of the 6433 subjects, 1936 (30.1 %) had atrophic gastritis and 1253 (19.5 %) had enlarged gastric folds. During the 3-year prospective observational follow-up, gastric cancer developed in seven subjects, six of whom (85.7 %) had atrophic gastritis with H. pylori infection and five of whom (71.4 %) had enlarged gastric folds with H. pylori infection. The Kaplan-Meier method with log-rank testing revealed that both UGI-XR-based atrophic gastritis (p = 0.0011) and enlarged gastric folds (p = 0.0003) are significant predictors for future gastric cancer incidence.

  7. Serological response to Helicobacter pylori infection among Latin American populations with contrasting risks of gastric cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camargo, M. Constanza; Beltran, Mauricio; Conde-Glez, Carlos; Harris, Paul R.; Michel, Angelika; Waterboer, Tim; Flórez, Astrid Carolina; Torres, Javier; Ferreccio, Catterina; Sampson, Joshua N.; Pawlita, Michael; Rabkin, Charles S.

    2015-01-01

    Gastric cancer is a rare outcome of chronic Helicobacter pylori infection. Serologic profiles may reveal bacterial, environmental and/or host factors associated with cancer risk. We therefore compared specific anti-H. pylori antibodies among populations with at least 2-fold differences in gastric cancer mortality from Mexico, Colombia and Chile. Our study included 1,776 adults (mean age 42 years) from three nationally representative surveys, equally divided between residents of high- and low-risk areas. Antibodies to 15 immunogenic H. pylori antigens were measured by fluorescent bead-based multiplex assays; results were summarized to identify overall H. pylori seropositivity. We used logistic regression to model associations between antibody seroreactivity and regional cancer risk (high vs. low), adjusting for country, age and sex. Both risk areas had similar H. pylori seroprevalence. Residents in high- and low-risk areas were seroreactive to a similar number of antigens (means 8.2 vs. 7.9, respectively; adjusted-odds ratio, OR: 1.02, p=0.05). Seroreactivities to Catalase and the known virulence proteins CagA and VacA were each significantly (p<0.05) associated with residence in high-risk areas, but ORs were moderate (1.26, 1.42, and 1.41, respectively) and their discriminatory power was low (ROC area under curve <0.6). The association of Catalase was independent from effects of either CagA or VacA. Sensitivity analyses for antibody associations restricted to H. pylori-seropositive individuals generally replicated significant associations. Our findings suggest that humoral responses to H. pylori are insufficient to distinguish high and low gastric cancer risk in Latin America. Factors determining population variation of gastric cancer burden remain to be identified. PMID:26178251

  8. TET2 functions as a resistance factor against DNA methylation acquisition during Epstein-Barr virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Namba-Fukuyo, Hiroe; Funata, Sayaka; Matsusaka, Keisuke; Fukuyo, Masaki; Rahmutulla, Bahityar; Mano, Yasunobu; Fukayama, Masashi; Aburatani, Hiroyuki; Kaneda, Atsushi

    2016-12-06

    Extensive DNA methylation is observed in gastric cancer with Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection, and EBV infection is the cause to induce this extensive hypermethylaton phenotype in gastric epithelial cells. However, some 5' regions of genes do not undergo de novo methylation, despite the induction of methylation in surrounding regions, suggesting the existence of a resistance factor against DNA methylation acquisition. We conducted an RNA-seq analysis of gastric epithelial cells with and without EBV infection and found that TET family genes, especially TET2, were repressed by EBV infection at both mRNA and protein levels. TET2 was found to be downregulated by EBV transcripts, e.g. BARF0 and LMP2A, and also by seven human miRNAs targeting TET2, e.g., miR-93 and miR-29a, which were upregulated by EBV infection, and transfection of which into gastric cells repressed TET2. Hydroxymethylation target genes by TET2 were detected by hydroxymethylated DNA immunoprecipitation sequencing (hMeDIP-seq) with and without TET2 overexpression, and overlapped significantly with methylation target genes in EBV-infected cells. When TET2 was knocked down by shRNA, EBV infection induced de novo methylation more severely, including even higher methylation in methylation-acquired promoters or de novo methylation acquisition in methylation-protected promoters, leading to gene repression. TET2 knockdown alone without EBV infection did not induce de novo DNA methylation. These data suggested that TET2 functions as a resistance factor against DNA methylation in gastric epithelial cells and repression of TET2 contributes to DNA methylation acquisition during EBV infection.

  9. Epithelial cell kinetics of the gastric mucosa during Helicobacter pylori infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holck, Susanne; Holm, I.L.; Holck, P.P.

    2007-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori is an important pathogen in major gastroduodenal diseases, including inflammation with ulceration and gastric malignancies. Alterations in H. pylori associated cell turnover in gastric epithelial cells are examined in relation to inflammatory activity, bacteria load and cytoki...

  10. Association of selected human leukocyte antigen alleles (HLA-DQA1*0102, HLA-DQA1*0103 and HLA–DQB1*0301 with Helicobacter pylori infection among dyspeptic patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piyumali Sandareka Arachchi

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Helicobacter pylori has been identified as a group I carcinogenic bacteria that infect the gastric mucosa leading to gastritis, peptic ulcer disease, lymphoma and gastric cancer. Pathogenesis of H. pylori depends on the virulence of the strain, host immune response and modulating factors like smoking and diet. Objective: This study aimed to assess the association of selected HLA (Human Leukocyte Antigen alleles; HLA-DQA1*0102, HLA-DQA1*0103 and HLA-DQB1*0301, with the presence of H. pylori infection and disease severity among dyspeptic patients. Methods: Gastric tissue samples from 100 dyspeptic patients, who underwent upper gastrointestinal endoscopy at a tertiary care hospital, were collected. Presence of HLA alleles was confirmed using Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR. H. pylori infection was determined using PCR and Histology. The histological interpretation was done according to the ‘Sydney classification’. Statistical analysis was done with the Statistical Package of Social Sciences (SPSS (version 22; SPSS, Inc., Chicago, Illinois, USA. Results: Respective percentages of HLA-DQA1*0102, HLA-DQA1*0103 and HLA-DQB1*0301 were 39%, 31% and 20%. Of the 25 samples positive for H. pylori infection respectively 56% (14/25, 36% (9/25 and 12% (3/25 were positive for HLA-DQA1*0102, HLA-DQA1*0103 and HLA-DQB1*0301 alleles. Considering the association with H. pylori infection, only HLA-DQA1*0102 showed significant association (p=0.044. No significant association was found between the HLA alleles and the histological severity among the H. pylori infected patients. Conclusion: In conclusion, HLA-DQA1*0102 allele has a significant association with H. pylori infection while HLA-DQA1*0103 and HLA-DQB1*0301 shows no significant association in a Sri Lankan dyspeptic patient population.

  11. Murine models of H. pylori-induced gastritis and gastric adenocarcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krueger, Sabine; Roessner, Albert; Kuester, Doerthe

    2011-10-15

    Laboratory mice have become one of the best animal species for mechanistic studies in gastrointestinal research. Their abundant genetic information, the way of causing carcinogenesis easily by transgenic and gene knockout techniques, limited effort in time and costs, and their practicability provide advantages over other animal models. Meanwhile, several murine practical models have been established for the investigation of the initiation, expansion, and progression of gastritis and gastric carcinoma, for assessing the effects of bacterial, genetic and environmental factors, and for evaluating therapeutic and preventive strategies in gastric diseases. This article gives a review of murine models of gastritis and gastric cancer, placing emphasis on the models associated with Helicobacter pylori infection and techniques used in our laboratory. We discuss matters of murine gastric anatomy, as well as techniques of infection, tissue preparation, and histology. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  12. Fungi that Infect Humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Köhler, Julia R; Hube, Bernhard; Puccia, Rosana; Casadevall, Arturo; Perfect, John R

    2017-06-01

    Fungi must meet four criteria to infect humans: growth at human body temperatures, circumvention or penetration of surface barriers, lysis and absorption of tissue, and resistance to immune defenses, including elevated body temperatures. Morphogenesis between small round, detachable cells and long, connected cells is the mechanism by which fungi solve problems of locomotion around or through host barriers. Secretion of lytic enzymes, and uptake systems for the released nutrients, are necessary if a fungus is to nutritionally utilize human tissue. Last, the potent human immune system evolved in the interaction with potential fungal pathogens, so few fungi meet all four conditions for a healthy human host. Paradoxically, the advances of modern medicine have made millions of people newly susceptible to fungal infections by disrupting immune defenses. This article explores how different members of four fungal phyla use different strategies to fulfill the four criteria to infect humans: the Entomophthorales, the Mucorales, the Ascomycota, and the Basidiomycota. Unique traits confer human pathogenic potential on various important members of these phyla: pathogenic Onygenales comprising thermal dimorphs such as Histoplasma and Coccidioides ; the Cryptococcus spp. that infect immunocompromised as well as healthy humans; and important pathogens of immunocompromised patients- Candida , Pneumocystis , and Aspergillus spp. Also discussed are agents of neglected tropical diseases important in global health such as mycetoma and paracoccidiomycosis and common pathogens rarely implicated in serious illness such as dermatophytes. Commensalism is considered, as well as parasitism, in shaping genomes and physiological systems of hosts and fungi during evolution.

  13. Endoscopic gastritis, serum pepsinogen assay, and Helicobacter pylori infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sun-Young

    2016-09-01

    Endoscopic findings of the background gastric mucosa are important in the Helicobacter pylori-seroprevalent population. It is strongly correlated not only with the risk of gastric cancer, but also with the excretion ability of gastric mucosa cells. In noninfected subjects, common endoscopic findings are regular arrangement of collecting venules, chronic superficial gastritis, and erosive gastritis. In cases of active H. pylori infection, nodularity on the antrum, hemorrhagic spots on the fundus, and thickened gastric folds are common endoscopic findings. The secreting ability of the gastric mucosa cells is usually intact in both noninfected and actively infected stomachs, and the intragastric condition becomes hyperacidic upon inflammation. Increased serum pepsinogen II concentration correlates well with active H. pylori infection, and also indicates an increased risk of diffuse-type gastric cancer. In chronic inactive H. pylori infection, metaplastic gastritis and atrophic gastritis extending from the antrum (closed-type chronic atrophic gastritis) toward the corpus (open-type chronic atrophic gastritis) are common endoscopic findings. The intragastric environment is hypoacidic and the risk of intestinal-type gastric cancer is increased in such conditions. Furthermore, there is a decrease in serum pepsinogen I concentration when the secreting ability of the gastric mucosa cells is damaged. Serologic and endoscopic changes that occur upon H. pylori infection are important findings for estimating the secreting ability of the gastric mucosa cells, and could be applied for the secondary prevention of gastric cancer.

  14. Antimicrobial and anti-inflammatory activities of Apis mellifera honey on the Helicobacter pylori infection of Wistar rats gastric mucosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thiago Yamamoto AMARAL

    Full Text Available Abstract Considering that Helicobacter pylori, a bacterium able to colonize the upper gastrointestinal tract and cause mucosal injury, not always can be effectively eradicated by the traditional approaches, there is an interest in alternative therapies until a vaccine be available. Honey is a food supplement with high carbohydrate content and antioxidant activity, as well as broad antimicrobial spectrum. After analyzing the physicochemical and in vitro antimicrobial properties of an Apis mellifera honey from the Atlantic forest of Alagoas / Brazil, the purpose of the present work was evaluate its in vivo effects against Helicobacter pylori in the gastric mucosa of Wistar rats. First, it was verified the success of inoculation/infection of the pathogen in the gastric mucosa of the rats, through the subsequent removal of their stomachs for histological analysis (hematoxylin and eosin stain and Giemsa stain. Then, four groups of animals were treated with sterilized distilled deionized water, the Apis mellifera honey, a combination of omeprazole, amoxicillin and clarithromycin, and an association of such medicines and honey (1:1. Except the control, all treatments were effective in combating infection, however, honey reduced the inflammatory process, whilst the antibiotics increase the number of eosinophils.

  15. Overview of Current Concepts in Gastric Intestinal Metaplasia and Gastric Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adam, Jason D.; Borum, Marie L.; Koh, Joyce M.; Stephen, Sindu

    2018-01-01

    Gastric intestinal metaplasia is a precancerous change of the mucosa of the stomach with intestinal epithelium, and is associated with an increased risk of dysplasia and cancer. The pathogenesis to gastric cancer is proposed by the Correa hypothesis as the transition from normal gastric epithelium to invasive cancer via inflammation followed by intramucosal cancer and invasion. Multiple risk factors have been associated with the development of gastric intestinal metaplasia interplay, including Helicobacter pylori infection and associated genomics, host genetic factors, environmental milieu, rheumatologic disorders, diet, and intestinal microbiota. Globally, screening guidelines have been established in countries with high incidence. In the United States, no such guidelines have been developed due to lower, albeit increasing, incidence. The American Society for Gastrointestinal Endoscopy recommends a case-by-case patient assessment based upon epidemiology, genetics, and environmental risk factors. Studies have examined the use of a serologic biopsy to stratify risk based upon factors such as H pylori status and virulence factors, along with serologic markers of chronic inflammation including pepsinogen I, pepsinogen II, and gastrin. High-risk patients may then be advised to undergo endoscopic evaluation with mapping biopsies from the antrum (greater curvature, lesser curvature), incisura angularis, and corpus (greater curvature, lesser curvature). Surveillance guidelines have not been firmly established for patients with known gastric intestinal metaplasia, but include repeat endoscopy at intervals according to the histologic risk for malignant transformation. PMID:29606921

  16. Inhibition of Sphingolipid Metabolism Enhances Resveratrol Chemotherapy in Human Gastric Cancer Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Shin, Kyong-Oh; Park, Nam-Young; Seo, Cho-Hee; Hong, Seon-Pyo; Oh, Ki-Wan; Hong, Jin-Tae; Han, Sang-Kil; Lee, Yong-Moon

    2012-01-01

    Resveratrol, a chemopreventive agent, is rapidly metabolized in the intestine and liver via glucuronidation. Thus, the pharmacokinetics of resveratrol limits its efficacy. To improve efficacy, the activity of resveratrol was investigated in the context of sphingolipid metabolism in human gastric cancer cells. Diverse sphingolipid metabolites, including dihydroceramides (DHCer), were tested for their ability to induce resveratrol cytotoxicity. Exposure to resveratrol (100 ?M) for 24 hr induced...

  17. Infección, inflamación y cáncer gástrico Infection, inflammation and gastric cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ezequiel Fuentes-Pananá

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Existe una sólida relación entre la infección persistente, la inflamación crónica y el cáncer. Helicobacter pylori es la principal causa del cáncer gástrico, con 900 000 casos nuevos registrados cada año. Este patógeno estimula a las células del epitelio gástrico para secretar IL-8, un quimioatrayente de leucocitos que infiltra el tejido infectado de manera persistente. También se observan concentraciones elevadas de citocinas inflamatorias que promueven la pérdida de la homeostasis local debido a la alteración de la proliferación y apoptosis celular. No es claro el mecanismo por el cual esta reacción inflamatoria lleva al cáncer, pero los radicales libres de O2 y N2 podrían contribuir de modo directo al daño genómico de la mucosa. El virus de Epstein-Barr es otro microorganismo vinculado con el cáncer gástrico. En esta revisión se describen los mecanismos inflamatorios importantes que intervienen en el desarrollo de la tumoración, tal vez compartidos con otros patógenos, lo cual es de gran relevancia ya que alrededor de 25% de los cánceres se relaciona con infección.A strong association between persistent infection, chronic inflammation and cancer has been described. Helicobacter pylori is the main cause of gastric cancer, with 900 000 new cases yearly. Helicobacter colonization triggers the gastric epithelial cells to secret IL-8, a chemoattractant of immune cells, which persistently infiltrate the infected tissue. High levels of inflammatory cytokines are found, leading to loss of local homeostasis due to altered cell proliferation and apoptosis. It is not known how this local inflammatory response leads to cancer but the expression of mutagenic O2 and N2 free radicals might directly contribute to the irreversible mucosal genomic damage. Epstein Barr Virus is another pathogen associated with gastric cancer. We review here our current knowledge of inflammatory mechanisms at the site of infection that could be

  18. Rising trends of gastric cancer and peptic ulcer in the 19th century.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonnenberg, A; Baron, J H

    2010-10-01

    The risk of dying from gastric cancer appears to have increased among consecutive generations born during the 19th century. To follow the time trends of hospitalization for gastric cancer and test whether they confirm such increase. Inpatient records of the last two centuries from four hospitals in Scotland and three US hospitals were analysed. Proportional rates of hospitalization for gastric cancer, gastric ulcer and duodenal ulcer were calculated during consecutive 5-year periods. The data from all seven cities revealed strikingly similar patterns. No hospital admissions for gastric cancer or peptic ulcer were recorded prior to 1800. Hospital admissions for gastric cancer increased in an exponential fashion throughout the 19th and the beginning of the 20th century. In a majority of cities, the rise in hospitalization for gastric cancer preceded a similar rise in hospitalization for gastric ulcer. Hospitalization for these two latter diagnoses clearly preceded hospitalization for duodenal ulcer by 20-40 years. The occurrence of gastric cancer, gastric ulcer and duodenal ulcer markedly increased during the 19th century. Improvements in hygiene may have resulted in the decline of infections by other gastrointestinal organisms that had previously kept concomitant infection by Helicobacter pylori suppressed. Published 2010. This article is a US Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  19. Antioxidant properties of natural compounds used in popular medicine for gastric ulcers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.G. Repetto

    2002-05-01

    Full Text Available There is evidence concerning the participation of reactive oxygen species in the etiology and physiopathology of human diseases, such as neurodegenerative disorders, inflammation, viral infections, autoimmune pathologies, and digestive system disorders such as gastrointestinal inflammation and gastric ulcer. The role of these reactive oxygen species in several diseases and the potential antioxidant protective effect of natural compounds on affected tissues are topics of high current interest. To consider a natural compound or a drug as an antioxidant substance it is necessary to investigate its antioxidant properties in vitro and then to evaluate its antioxidant functions in biological systems. In this review article, we shall consider the role of natural antioxidants derived from popular plants to reduce or prevent the oxidative stress in gastric ulcer induced by ethanol.

  20. A case of cardiac cancer diagnosed after 30 Gy radiation therapy for gastric mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT) lymphoma without helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ito, Kazuhiro; Akamatsu, Taiji; Shinji, Akihiro

    2005-01-01

    An 80-year-old man was referred to Shinshu University Hospital in April 2001 for treatment of gastric mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT) lymphoma. He had received anti-biotic therapy in spite of no evidence of H. pylori infection in the former hospital 3 years ago, but no remarkable improvement was recognized and endoscopic findings were progressive. An esophagogastroduodenoscopy (EGD) revealed mucosal redness on the greater curvature and the anterior wall of the body. Biopsy specimens taken from the lesions showed remarkable infiltration of atypical small lymphocytes, and this lesions were diagnosed MALT lymphoma by an immunophenotypic studies. Endoscopic ultrasonography (EUS) showed that MALT lymphoma was limited within the mucosa and submucosa. Staging work up revealed stage I. After written informed consent, he was treated by 30 Gy radiation therapy for gastric MALT lymphoma. Response assessment was performed by EGD, EUS, and biopsy specimens, and a complete remission was confirmed. After that, he was followed up with regular intervals, and EGD was performed every 6 months. He was diagnosed to have O I type cardiac cancer at 21 months after radiation therapy. He underwent proximal partial gastrectomy, and histopathological findings showed as follows: O I type, 17 x 12 mm, tub 2, SM, ly 1, v 1, n 0, PM (-), DM (-), INFγ, stage I A. No residual lesion of gastric MALT lymphoma and no dysplasia of gastric mucosa was recognized. Causal relationship between radiation therapy and carcinogenesis in this case is unclear. However, it might be suggested by the facts that cancer occurred in the radiation field where MALT lymphoma had been presented and gastric cancer was rare in the stomach without H. pylori infection. (author)

  1. Immune Reactions Against Elongation Factor 2 Kinase: Specific Pathogenesis of Gastric Ulcer from Helicobacter pylori Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kiyoshi Ayada

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori infection is a definite causative factor for gastric ulcers (GUs. In the present study we detected a specific antigen of gastric epithelial cells (HGC-27 using cell ELISA, which was recognized by the sera of GU patients (n=20 but not in patients with chronic gastritis (CG; n=20 or in healthy volunteers (HC; n=10. This antigen was over-expressed by a stressful (heat-stressed environment, and was identified as elongation factor 2 kinase (EF-2K by western blotting. The GU patients' lymphocytes stimulated by H. pylori specifically disrupted heat-stressed HGC-27 cells in a cytotoxic assay. In flow cytometry, the effector cells (lymphocytes from GU patients were significantly differentiated to T helper type 1 lymphocyte (Th1 and cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL as opposed to those from CG patients. The target cells (HGC-27 expressed EF-2K and MHC-class I together with costimulatory molecules from heat stress. This antigen specific immune mechanism could have a prominent role in the pathogenesis of GU.

  2. Gastric tissue biopsy and culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... symptoms may include: Loss of appetite or weight loss Nausea and vomiting Pain in the upper part of the belly Black stools Vomiting blood or coffee ground-like material A gastric tissue biopsy and culture can help detect: Cancer Infections, most commonly Helicobacter ...

  3. Case-Control Study of Dietary Pattern and Other Risk Factors for Gastric Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abbas Naghizadeh Baghi

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: The rates of gastric cancer reported from Ardabil Province of Iran, are among thehighest in the world. The aim of this study was to investigate the risk factors for gastric cancer inArdabil Province.Methods: This case-control study was conducted on 128 adults with mean age of 56.5 ± 12.8 yrold in Ardebil City, Iran in 2010 – 2011. Forty-two people with gastric cancer and 86 healthypeople were recruited. Participants were interviewed using a structured questionnaire. Fastingblood samples were taken for measurement of IgG and IgA indices against Helicobacter pylori infection.Data were analyzed using the Chi-square and Independent sample t-test.Results: Diet and H. pylori infection indices had the significant relationship with gastric cancer(P<0.05. Among dietary patterns, drinking hot tea, low intake of fresh vegetables and fruits, andunsaturated fat were the most significant risk factors (P<0.05. In gastric cancer patients, the levelsof serum IgG and IgA as indicator of H. pylori infection were significantly (P<0.05 higherthan the healthy subjects (IgG 37.7 ± 29.3 vs. 16.9 ± 11.1 U/ml and IgA 50.5 ± 44.7 vs. 22.9 ±15.8 U/ml. No significant relationship was observed between tobacco smoking and alcohol consumptionwith gastric cancer.Conclusion: Dietary pattern especially drinking hot tea and low consumption of unsaturated fat,fresh vegetables, and fruits, as well as H. pylori infection were the most important risk factors ingastric cancer patients.

  4. Binding of Helocobacter pyori to Human Gastric Mucose: Identification and Characterization of a Lewis b Bingind Protein

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Biegel, Susan

    1995-01-01

    .... With the isolation of a Gram-negative, spiral shaped bacterium from human gastric mucosa, Helicobacter pylori, came the answers to many questions concerning peptic ulcer disease, including this one. Recently...

  5. Helicobacter pylori infection assessed by ELISA and by immunoblot and noncardia gastric cancer risk in a prospective study: the Eurgast-EPIC project

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    González, C A; Megraud, F; Buissoniere, A

    2012-01-01

    of its effect on gastric cancer (GC) risk. Antibodies detected by western blot are known to persist longer after the loss of the infection. In a nested case-control study from the Eurogast-EPIC cohort, including 88 noncardia GC cases and 338 controls, we assessed the association between noncardia GC...

  6. Gastric inhibitory polypeptide (GIP) dose-dependently stimulates glucagon secretion in healthy human subjects at euglycaemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meier, J J; Gallwitz, B; Siepmann, N

    2003-01-01

    AIMS/HYPOTHESIS: In the isolated perfused pancreas, gastric inhibitory polypeptide (GIP) has been shown to enhance glucagon secretion at basal glucose concentrations, but in healthy humans no glucagonotropic effect of GIP has yet been reported. Therefore, we studied the effect of GIP on glucagon ...

  7. Measurement of gastric emptying rate in humans. Simplified scanning method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holt, S.; Colliver, J.; Guram, M.; Neal, C.; Verhulst, S.J.; Taylor, T.V. (Univ. of South Carolina School of Medicine, Columbia (USA))

    1990-11-01

    Simultaneous measurements of the gastric emptying rate of the solid and liquid phase of a dual-isotope-labeled test meal were made using a gamma camera and a simple scintillation detector, similar to that used in a hand-held probe. A simple scanning apparatus, similar to that used in a hand-held scintillation probe, was compared with simultaneous measurements made by a gamma camera in 16 healthy males. A dual-labeled test meal was utilized to measure liquid and solid emptying simultaneously. Anterior and posterior scans were taken at intervals up to 120 min using both a gamma camera and the scintillation probe. Good relative agreement between the methods was obtained both for solid-phase (correlation range 0.92-0.99, mean 0.97) and for liquid-phase data (correlation range 0.93-0.99, mean 0.97). For solid emptying data regression line slopes varied from 0.75 to 1.03 (mean 0.84). Liquid emptying data indicated that slopes ranged from 0.71 to 1.06 (mean 0.87). These results suggested that an estimate of the gamma measurement could be obtained by multiplying the scintillation measurement by a factor of 0.84 for the solid phase and 0.87 for the liquid phase. Correlation between repeat studies was 0.97 and 0.96 for solids and liquids, respectively. The application of a hand-held probe technique provides a noninvasive and inexpensive method for accurately assessing solid- and liquid-phase gastric emptying from the human stomach that correlates well with the use of a gamma camera, within the range of gastric emptying rate in the normal individuals in this study.

  8. Measurement of gastric emptying rate in humans. Simplified scanning method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holt, S.; Colliver, J.; Guram, M.; Neal, C.; Verhulst, S.J.; Taylor, T.V.

    1990-01-01

    Simultaneous measurements of the gastric emptying rate of the solid and liquid phase of a dual-isotope-labeled test meal were made using a gamma camera and a simple scintillation detector, similar to that used in a hand-held probe. A simple scanning apparatus, similar to that used in a hand-held scintillation probe, was compared with simultaneous measurements made by a gamma camera in 16 healthy males. A dual-labeled test meal was utilized to measure liquid and solid emptying simultaneously. Anterior and posterior scans were taken at intervals up to 120 min using both a gamma camera and the scintillation probe. Good relative agreement between the methods was obtained both for solid-phase (correlation range 0.92-0.99, mean 0.97) and for liquid-phase data (correlation range 0.93-0.99, mean 0.97). For solid emptying data regression line slopes varied from 0.75 to 1.03 (mean 0.84). Liquid emptying data indicated that slopes ranged from 0.71 to 1.06 (mean 0.87). These results suggested that an estimate of the gamma measurement could be obtained by multiplying the scintillation measurement by a factor of 0.84 for the solid phase and 0.87 for the liquid phase. Correlation between repeat studies was 0.97 and 0.96 for solids and liquids, respectively. The application of a hand-held probe technique provides a noninvasive and inexpensive method for accurately assessing solid- and liquid-phase gastric emptying from the human stomach that correlates well with the use of a gamma camera, within the range of gastric emptying rate in the normal individuals in this study

  9. Treatment of gastric candidiasis in patients with gastric ulcer disease: are antifungal agents necessary?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Min Kyu; Jeon, Seong Woo; Cho, Chang Min; Tak, Won Young; Kweon, Young Oh; Kim, Sung Kook; Choi, Yong Hwan

    2009-03-01

    The inadequacy of information on the treatment of gastric candidiasis with antifungal agents promoted us to evaluate patients with fungal infections who had gastric ulcers and assess the need for proton-pump inhibitors or antifungal agents. Sixteen patients were included in the study. The criterion for the diagnosis of candidiasis was finding yeast and hyphae in the tissue or an ulcer on histological sections of biopsy samples. Surface fungi were not considered infections. In all cases with benign ulcers, follow-up endoscopy performed 6 weeks after proton-pump-inhibitor treatment revealed that the ulcer had improved without antifungal medication. However, in patients with malignant ulcers, surgical resection was necessary for a definitive cure. Two patients with lymphoma received combined chemotherapy and a proton-pump inhibitor, which improved their condition. The results of this study suggest that benign ulcers with candidiasis can be effectively treated by a proton-pump inhibitor without antifungal medication. However, surgical resection should be considered for malignant ulcers with candidiasis.

  10. Noncoding Genomics in Gastric Cancer and the Gastric Precancerous Cascade: Pathogenesis and Biomarkers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alejandra Sandoval-Bórquez

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Gastric cancer is the fifth most common cancer and the third leading cause of cancer-related death, whose patterns vary among geographical regions and ethnicities. It is a multifactorial disease, and its development depends on infection by Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori and Epstein-Barr virus (EBV, host genetic factors, and environmental factors. The heterogeneity of the disease has begun to be unraveled by a comprehensive mutational evaluation of primary tumors. The low-abundance of mutations suggests that other mechanisms participate in the evolution of the disease, such as those found through analyses of noncoding genomics. Noncoding genomics includes single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs, regulation of gene expression through DNA methylation of promoter sites, miRNAs, other noncoding RNAs in regulatory regions, and other topics. These processes and molecules ultimately control gene expression. Potential biomarkers are appearing from analyses of noncoding genomics. This review focuses on noncoding genomics and potential biomarkers in the context of gastric cancer and the gastric precancerous cascade.

  11. Variations in Helicobacter pylori cytotoxin-associated genes and their influence in progression to gastric cancer: implications for prevention.

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    Cosmeri Rizzato

    Full Text Available Helicobacter pylori (HP is a bacterium that colonizes the human stomach and can establish a long-term infection of the gastric mucosa. Persistent Hp infection often induces gastritis and is associated with the development of peptic ulcer disease, atrophic gastritis, and gastric adenocarcinoma. Virulent HP isolates harbor the cag (cytotoxin-associated genes pathogenicity island (cagPAI, a 40 kb stretch of DNA that encodes components of a type IV secretion system (T4SS. This T4SS forms a pilus for the injection of virulence factors into host target cells, such as the CagA oncoprotein. We analyzed the genetic variability in cagA and other selected genes of the HP cagPAI (cagC, cagE, cagL, cagT, cagV and cag Gamma using DNA extracted from frozen gastric biopsies or from clinical isolates. Study subjects were 95 cagA+ patients that were histologically diagnosed with chronic gastritis or gastric cancer in Venezuela and Mexico, areas with high prevalence of Hp infection. Sequencing reactions were carried out by both Sanger and next-generation pyrosequencing (454 Roche methods. We found a total of 381 variants with unambiguous calls observed in at least 10% of the originally tested samples and reference strains. We compared the frequencies of these genetic variants between gastric cancer and chronic gastritis cases. Twenty-six SNPs (11 non-synonymous and 14 synonymous showed statistically significant differences (P<0.05, and two SNPs, in position 1039 and 1041 of cagE, showed a highly significant association with cancer (p-value = 2.07×10⁻⁶, and the variant codon was located in the VirB3 homology domain of Agrobacterium. The results of this study may provide preliminary information to target antibiotic treatment to high-risk individuals, if effects of these variants are confirmed in further investigations.

  12. Gastric cancer stem cells: A novel therapeutic target

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Shree Ram

    2013-01-01

    Gastric cancer remains one of the leading causes of global cancer mortality. Multipotent gastric stem cells have been identified in both mouse and human stomachs, and they play an essential role in the self-renewal and homeostasis of gastric mucosa. There are several environmental and genetic factors known to promote gastric cancer. In recent years, numerous in vitro and in vivo studies suggest that gastric cancer may originate from normal stem cells or bone marrow–derived mesenchymal cells, and that gastric tumors contain cancer stem cells. Cancer stem cells are believed to share a common microenvironment with normal niche, which play an important role in gastric cancer and tumor growth. This mini-review presents a brief overview of the recent developments in gastric cancer stem cell research. The knowledge gained by studying cancer stem cells in gastric mucosa will support the development of novel therapeutic strategies for gastric cancer. PMID:23583679

  13. INFLAMMATORY INFILTRATION IN THE GASTRIC MUCOSA OF PATIENTS WITH EPSTEIN-BARR VIRUS-ASSOCIATED GASTRIC DYSPLASIA AND CANCER

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    М. V. Vusik

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Characteristics of inflammatory infiltrate in the gastric mucosa of patients with gastric dysplasia (n=56 and gastric cancer (n=50 with different levels of humoral immune response to Epstein-Barr virus (EBV and EBV viral load were studied. In patients with dysplasia of the gastric mucosa, the increase in antibody titers to VCA IgG leaded to a significant decrease in the level of lymphocytes, neutrophils and macrophages and an increase in the number of eosinophils and plasma cells. When the levels of IgA to viral capsid antigen (VCA and IgG to EBV early antigens (EA were increased, the number of neutrophils in the composition of the cellular infiltrate was significantly decreased. In gastric cancer patients with different levels of humoral immune response to EBV, the number of plasma cells and eosinophils in the inflammatory infiltrate of the tumor was decreased when increasing the titers of IgG to VCA and IgA to VCA. When VCA/IgA titer was high, the number of neutrophils in a tumor was decreased and the proportion of macrophages was slightly increased. The data obtained can serve as additional criteria for indentifying markers for viral infection of the gastric mucosa.

  14. Synthesis and characterization of C@CdS dots in aqueous solution and their application in labeling human gastric carcinoma cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dong, Wei, E-mail: dongwei5873@126.com [Shenyang Medical College, Department of Chemistry (China); Zhou, Siqi [Fengtian Hospital Affiliated to Shenyang Medical College, ICU (China); Dong, Yan [Shenyang Pharmaceutical University, Experiment Center of Traditional Chinese Medicine Department (China); Wang, Jingwen; Liu, Shuang; Zhu, Pengxia [Shenyang Medical College, Department of Chemistry (China)

    2015-03-15

    Colloidal carbon spheres coated with cadmium sulfide nanoparticle quantum dots (C@CdS dots) with the particle size smaller than 50 nm were synthesized by an aqueous approach. The effects of different reaction times, temperatures, and pH values were carefully investigated to optimize the synthesis conditions. The as-prepared C@CdS dots were linked with mouse anti-human carcinoembryonic antigen antibody and goat anti-mouse immunoglobulin (IgG) to directly and indirectly label fixed human gastric carcinoma cells, respectively. The cytotoxicity of the C@CdS dots was also tested using the human gastric carcinoma cells. No apparent cytotoxicity was observed, which suggested the potential application of the as-prepared C@CdS dots in bioimaging.

  15. Low concentrations of zinc in gastric mucosa are associated with increased severity of Helicobacter pylori-induced inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sempértegui, Fernando; Díaz, Myriam; Mejía, Ricardo; Rodríguez-Mora, Oswaldo G; Rentería, Edgar; Guarderas, Carlos; Estrella, Bertha; Recalde, Ramiro; Hamer, Davidson H; Reeves, Philip G

    2007-02-01

    Chronic Helicobacter pylori infection is the most common cause of gastric cancer. H. pylori induces oxidative stress while zinc deficiency results in increased sensitivity to it. In Ecuador, the prevalence of gastric cancer and zinc deficiency are high. We hypothesized that zinc deficiency in Ecuadorian people would cause increased H. pylori-induced inflammation in the gastric mucosa associated with lower tissue zinc concentrations. Three hundred and fifty-two patients with dyspepsia underwent endoscopy to obtain gastric mucosa biopsies. Diagnosis of H. pylori infection and its severity, histopathology, mucosal zinc concentration, and inflammation intensity were determined. H. pylori-infected patients with non-atrophic chronic gastritis had lower concentrations of zinc in gastric mucosa than uninfected patients with the same type of gastritis (251.3 +/- 225.3 vs. 426.2 +/- 279.9 ng/mg of protein; p = .016). Considering all patients, the more severe the H. pylori infection, the higher the percentage of subjects with infiltration by polymorphonuclear (PMN) cells (p = .0001). Patients with high PMN infiltration had lower mucosal zinc concentrations than patients with low PMN infiltration (35.2 +/- 20.7 vs. 242.9 +/- 191.8 ng/mg of protein; p = .021). The degree of inflammation in H. pylori-induced gastritis appears to be modulated by gastric tissue zinc concentrations.

  16. Human case of gastric infection by a fourth larval stage of Pseudoterranova decipiens (Nematoda, Anisakidae

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    Mercado Rubén

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available Only three cases of human infection by anisakid nematodes have been reported in Chile since 1976. In the present case, an anisakid worm, identified as a fourth-stage Pseudoterranova decipiens larva, was removed with a gastroendoscopic biopsy clipper from the stomach of a 45 year-old man from southern Chile. The patient, who presented acute epigastric pain and a continuous sensation of having an empty stomach, reported having eaten smoked fish. The worm was fixed in 70% ethanol and cleaned in lactophenol for morphological study. The morphometric characteristics of the worm are described and drawn. Anisakid larvae in fish flesh can be killed by freezing or cooking.

  17. Human case of gastric infection by a fourth larval stage of Pseudoterranova decipiens (Nematoda, Anisakidae

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    Rubén Mercado

    1997-04-01

    Full Text Available Only three cases of human infection by anisakid nematodes have been reported in Chile since 1976. In the present case, an anisakid worm, identified as a fourth-stage Pseudoterranova decipiens larva, was removed with a gastroendoscopic biopsy clipper from the stomach of a 45 year-old man from southern Chile. The patient, who presented acute epigastric pain and a continuous sensation of having an empty stomach, reported having eaten smoked fish. The worm was fixed in 70% ethanol and cleaned in lactophenol for morphological study. The morphometric characteristics of the worm are described and drawn. Anisakid larvae in fish flesh can be killed by freezing or cooking.

  18. Helicobacter pylori infection and inflammatory bowel disease: Is there a link?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papamichael, Konstantinos; Konstantopoulos, Panagiotis; Mantzaris, Gerassimos J

    2014-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection is one of the most widely spread infectious diseases in humans. It can cause chronic gastritis, peptic ulcer disease and gastric malignancies and has been associated with extra-gastric disorders. H. pylori elicit a chronic systemic inflammatory response which, under certain conditions, may trigger autoimmune reactions and may be implicated in the pathogenesis of autoimmune diseases. Although the pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is unknown, it is thought to result from complex interactions between environmental factors and microbiota in the gut of individuals who are genetically susceptible. Several bacterial and viral agents have been implicated in the aetiology of IBD. In theory, H. pylori infection could be involved in the pathogenesis of IBD by inducing alterations in gastric and/or intestinal permeability or by causing immunological derangements resulting in absorption of antigenic material and autoimmunity via various immunological pathways. Similar mechanisms may also be responsible for the co-existence of IBD with other autoimmune diseases and/or extra-intestinal manifestations. However, the epidemiological data fail to support this association. In fact, various studies indicate that the prevalence of H. pylori infection is low in patients with IBD, suggesting a protective role for this infection in the development of IBD. In this report, we aim to shed light on proposed mechanisms and confounding factors underlying the potential link between H. pylori infection and IBD. PMID:24914359

  19. Pathogenesis of Gastric Cancer: Genetics and Molecular Classification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figueiredo, Ceu; Camargo, M C; Leite, Marina; Fuentes-Pananá, Ezequiel M; Rabkin, Charles S; Machado, José C

    Gastric cancer is the fifth most incident and the third most common cause of cancer-related death in the world. Infection with Helicobacter pylori is the major risk factor for this disease. Gastric cancer is the final outcome of a cascade of events that takes decades to occur and results from the accumulation of multiple genetic and epigenetic alterations. These changes are crucial for tumor cells to expedite and sustain the array of pathways involved in the cancer development, such as cell cycle, DNA repair, metabolism, cell-to-cell and cell-to-matrix interactions, apoptosis, angiogenesis, and immune surveillance. Comprehensive molecular analyses of gastric cancer have disclosed the complex heterogeneity of this disease. In particular, these analyses have confirmed that Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-positive gastric cancer is a distinct entity. The identification of gastric cancer subtypes characterized by recognizable molecular profiles may pave the way for a more personalized clinical management and to the identification of novel therapeutic targets and biomarkers for screening, prognosis, prediction of response to treatment, and monitoring of gastric cancer progression.

  20. Differences in gastric mucosal microbiota profiling in patients with chronic gastritis, intestinal metaplasia, and gastric cancer using pyrosequencing methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eun, Chang Soo; Kim, Byung Kwon; Han, Dong Soo; Kim, Seon Young; Kim, Kyung Mo; Choi, Bo Youl; Song, Kyu Sang; Kim, Yong Sung; Kim, Jihyun F

    2014-12-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection plays an important role in the early stage of cancer development. However, various bacteria that promote the synthesis of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species may be involved in the later stages. We aimed to determine the microbial composition of gastric mucosa from the patients with chronic gastritis, intestinal metaplasia, and gastric cancer using 454 GS FLX Titanium. Gastric mucosal biopsy samples were collected from 31 patients during endoscopy. After the extraction of genomic DNA, variable region V5 of the 16S rRNA gene was amplified. PCR products were sequenced using 454 high-throughput sequencer. The composition, diversity, and richness of microbial communities were compared between three groups. The composition of H. pylori-containing Epsilonproteobacteria class appeared to be the most prevalent, but the relative increase in the Bacilli class in the gastric cancer group was noticed, resulting in a significant difference compared with the chronic gastritis group. By analyzing the Helicobacter-dominant group at a family level, the relative abundance of Helicobacteraceae family was significantly lower in the gastric cancer group compared with chronic gastritis and intestinal metaplasia groups, while the relative abundance of Streptococcaceae family significantly increased. In a UPGMA clustering of Helicobacter-dominant group based on UniFrac distance, the chronic gastritis group and gastric cancer group were clearly separated, while the intestinal metaplasia group was distributed in between the two groups. The evenness and diversity of gastric microbiota in the gastric cancer group was increased compared with other groups. In Helicobacter predominant patients, the microbial compositions of gastric mucosa from gastric cancer patients are significantly different to chronic gastritis and intestinal metaplasia patients. These alterations of gastric microbial composition may play an important, as-yet-undetermined role in

  1. Effect of sildenafil on gastric emptying and postprandial frequency of antral contractions in healthy humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, J L; Søndergaard, S B; Fuglsang, S

    2004-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Sildenafil is known to block phosphodiesterase type 5, which degrades nitric oxide-stimulated cyclic guanosine monophosphate, thereby relaxing smooth muscle cells in various organs. The effect of sildenafil on gastric motor function after a meal was investigated in healthy humans....... METHODS: Ten healthy male volunteers (21-28 years) participated in a placebo-controlled, double-blind, cross-over study. In random order and on two separate days each volunteer ingested either 50 mg sildenafil (Viagra, Pfizer, New York, N.Y., USA) or placebo. A gamma camera technique was used to measure......: A single dose of 50 mg sildenafil does not change gastric emptying or postprandial frequency of antral contractions in healthy volunteers....

  2. Asymptomatic gastric heterotopia in the rectum with Helicobacter pylori infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swatek, Jarosław; Wronecki, Lech; Ciechanek, Roman; Szumiło, Justyna

    2015-12-01

    Gastric heterotopia is very rare in the rectum - less than 50 cases have been reported so far. Only in six of them Helicobacter pylori has been observed in heterotopic mucosa. We report a case of a 58-year-old woman with asymptomatic gastric heterotopia in the rectum, incidentally revealed during colonoscopy as a small, sessile polyp. The presence of H. pylori was confirmed by immunohistochemistry. This finding supports the opinion that H. pylori may pass along the gastrointestinal tract in a viable form and that the fecal-oral route of transmission is possible.

  3. Correlation analysis of riboflavin, RFT2 and Helicobater pylori in gastric carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matnuri, Muattar; Zheng, Chao; Sidik, Dildar; Bai, Ge; Abdukerim, Mamatjan; Abdukadier, Aliye; Ahmat, Kilara; Ma, Yue; Eli, Maynur

    2015-01-01

    To investigate the relationship between tissue riboflavin level and riboflavin transporter 2 (RFT2) protein expression, and the relationship between Helicobacter pylori (H.pylori) infection and the plasma riboflavin level in gastric carcinoma (GC). Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) was used to detect tissue riboflavin level in patients with GC. Western blotting was applied to analyze the expression of RFT2 protein in 60 tissue samples from gastric carcinoma together with their normal tissues. The Warthin-starry method, rapid urease test and (14)C-UBT were administered to detect the infection of H.pylori. High performance liquid chromatography (H.PYLORILC) was performed to detect plasma riboflavin level in the GC. A significant decrease in the tissue riboflavin level was detected in GC samples compared to those in the normal mucous membrane (17.02 ± 3.91 vs. 21.0 ± 4.73; P = 0.043), and a significant decrease in the RFT2 protein was found in GC samples compared to those in the normal mucous membrane (0.92 ± 0.39 vs. 1.23 ± 0.51; P = 0.042). A positive correlation of tissue riboflavin level with defective expression of RFT2 protein was observed in GC patients (χ(2) = 1.969; P = 0.039). Plasma riboflavin level in gastric cancer without H.pylori infection group (1.6674 ng/mL ± 0.37009 ng/mL) was higher than H.pylori infection group (1.2207 ng/mL ± 0.17727 ng/mL, P = 0.043). The results indicate that RFT2 plays an important role in gastric carcinogenesis by modulating riboflavin absorption. H.pylori infection affects plasma riboflavin level and the prognosis of patients with gastric cancer.

  4. Humanized Mouse Models of Staphylococcus aureus Infection

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    Dane Parker

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Staphylococcus aureus is a successful human pathogen that has adapted itself in response to selection pressure by the human immune system. A commensal of the human skin and nose, it is a leading cause of several conditions: skin and soft tissue infection, pneumonia, septicemia, peritonitis, bacteremia, and endocarditis. Mice have been used extensively in all these conditions to identify virulence factors and host components important for pathogenesis. Although significant effort has gone toward development of an anti-staphylococcal vaccine, antibodies have proven ineffective in preventing infection in humans after successful studies in mice. These results have raised questions as to the utility of mice to predict patient outcome and suggest that humanized mice might prove useful in modeling infection. The development of humanized mouse models of S. aureus infection will allow us to assess the contribution of several human-specific virulence factors, in addition to exploring components of the human immune system in protection against S. aureus infection. Their use is discussed in light of several recently reported studies.

  5. Effects of gastric pH on oral drug absorption: In vitro assessment using a dissolution/permeation system reflecting the gastric dissolution process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kataoka, Makoto; Fukahori, Miho; Ikemura, Atsumi; Kubota, Ayaka; Higashino, Haruki; Sakuma, Shinji; Yamashita, Shinji

    2016-04-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effects of gastric pH on the oral absorption of poorly water-soluble drugs using an in vitro system. A dissolution/permeation system (D/P system) equipped with a Caco-2 cell monolayer was used as the in vitro system to evaluate oral drug absorption, while a small vessel filled with simulated gastric fluid (SGF) was used to reflect the gastric dissolution phase. After applying drugs in their solid forms to SGF, SGF solution containing a 1/100 clinical dose of each drug was mixed with the apical solution of the D/P system, which was changed to fasted state-simulated intestinal fluid. Dissolved and permeated amounts on applied amount of drugs were then monitored for 2h. Similar experiments were performed using the same drugs, but without the gastric phase. Oral absorption with or without the gastric phase was predicted in humans based on the amount of the drug that permeated in the D/P system, assuming that the system without the gastric phase reflected human absorption with an elevated gastric pH. The dissolved amounts of basic drugs with poor water solubility, namely albendazole, dipyridamole, and ketoconazole, in the apical solution and their permeation across a Caco-2 cell monolayer were significantly enhanced when the gastric dissolution process was reflected due to the physicochemical properties of basic drugs. These amounts resulted in the prediction of higher oral absorption with normal gastric pH than with high gastric pH. On the other hand, when diclofenac sodium, the salt form of an acidic drug, was applied to the D/P system with the gastric phase, its dissolved and permeated amounts were significantly lower than those without the gastric phase. However, the oral absorption of diclofenac was predicted to be complete (96-98%) irrespective of gastric pH because the permeated amounts of diclofenac under both conditions were sufficiently high to achieve complete absorption. These estimations of the effects of

  6. Natural Gastric Infection with Helicobacter pylori in Monkeys: A Model for Spiral Bacteria Infection in Humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-01-01

    Methods: Infection and gastritis were have facilitated larger epidemiological studies. Another graded blindly by histological analysis and culture of...infec- with both types of bacteria by histological analysis and tion. Gastritis scores began to decrease 1 month after culture of H. pylori. In these 3...indicated that monkeys were not Infected. Gastritis score was :1.5 this organism belongs in the Helicobacter genus, and it in animals uninfected or

  7. Current Status on Stem Cells and Cancers of the Gastric Epithelium

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    Werner Hoffmann

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Gastric cancer is still a leading cause of cancer-related mortality worldwide in spite of declining incidence. Gastric cancers are, essentially, adenocarcinomas and one of the strongest risk factors is still infection with Helicobacter pylori. Within the last years, it became clear that gastric self-renewal and carcinogenesis are intimately linked, particularly during chronic inflammatory conditions. Generally, gastric cancer is now regarded as a disease resulting from dysregulated differentiation of stem and progenitor cells, mainly due to an inflammatory environment. However, the situation in the stomach is rather complex, consisting of two types of gastric units which show bidirectional self-renewal from an unexpectedly large variety of progenitor/stem cell populations. As in many other tumors, cancer stem cells have also been characterized for gastric cancer. This review focuses on the various gastric epithelial stem cells, how they contribute to self-renewal and which routes are known to gastric adenocarcinomas, including their stem cells.

  8. Gastric cancers of Western European and African patients show different patterns of genomic instability

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    Mulder Chris JJ

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Infection with H. pylori is important in the etiology of gastric cancer. Gastric cancer is infrequent in Africa, despite high frequencies of H. pylori infection, referred to as the African enigma. Variation in environmental and host factors influencing gastric cancer risk between different populations have been reported but little is known about the biological differences between gastric cancers from different geographic locations. We aim to study genomic instability patterns of gastric cancers obtained from patients from United Kingdom (UK and South Africa (SA, in an attempt to support the African enigma hypothesis at the biological level. Methods DNA was isolated from 67 gastric adenocarcinomas, 33 UK patients, 9 Caucasian SA patients and 25 native SA patients. Microsatellite instability and chromosomal instability were analyzed by PCR and microarray comparative genomic hybridization, respectively. Data was analyzed by supervised univariate and multivariate analyses as well as unsupervised hierarchical cluster analysis. Results Tumors from Caucasian and native SA patients showed significantly more microsatellite instable tumors (p Conclusions Gastric cancers from SA and UK patients show differences in genetic instability patterns, indicating possible different biological mechanisms in patients from different geographical origin. This is of future clinical relevance for stratification of gastric cancer therapy.

  9. PIV and CFD studies on analyzing intragastric flow phenomena induced by peristalsis using a human gastric flow simulator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozu, Hiroyuki; Kobayashi, Isao; Neves, Marcos A; Nakajima, Mitsutoshi; Uemura, Kunihiko; Sato, Seigo; Ichikawa, Sosaku

    2014-08-01

    This study quantitatively analyzed the flow phenomena in model gastric contents induced by peristalsis using a human gastric flow simulator (GFS). Major functions of the GFS include gastric peristalsis simulation by controlled deformation of rubber walls and direct observation of inner flow through parallel transparent windows. For liquid gastric contents (water and starch syrup solutions), retropulsive flow against the direction of peristalsis was observed using both particle image velocimetry (PIV) and computational fluid dynamics (CFD). The maximum flow velocity was obtained in the region occluded by peristalsis. The maximum value was 9 mm s(-1) when the standard value of peristalsis speed in healthy adults (UACW = 2.5 mm s(-1)) was applied. The intragastric flow-field was laminar with the maximum Reynolds number (Re = 125). The viscosity of liquid gastric contents hardly affected the maximum flow velocity in the applied range of this study (1 to 100 mPa s). These PIV results agreed well with the CFD results. The maximum shear rate in the liquid gastric contents was below 20 s(-1) at UACW = 2.5 mm s(-1). We also measured the flow-field in solid-liquid gastric contents containing model solid food particles (plastic beads). The direction of velocity vectors was influenced by the presence of the model solid food particle surface. The maximum flow velocity near the model solid food particles ranged from 8 to 10 mm s(-1) at UACW = 2.5 mm s(-1). The maximum shear rate around the model solid food particles was low, with a value of up to 20 s(-1).

  10. N-acetylcysteine prevents the development of gastritis induced by Helicobacter pylori infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Sungil; Bak, Eun-Jung; Cha, Jeong-Heon

    2017-05-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) is a human gastric pathogen, causing various gastric diseases ranging from gastritis to gastric adenocarcinoma. It has been reported that combining N-acetylcysteine (NAC) with conventional antibiotic therapy increases the success rate of H. pylori eradication. We evaluated the effect of NAC itself on the growth and colonization of H. pylori, and development of gastritis, using in vitro liquid culture system and in vivo animal models. H. pylori growth was evaluated in broth culture containing NAC. The H. pylori load and histopathological scores of stomachs were measured in Mongolian gerbils infected with H. pylori strain 7.13, and fed with NAC-containing diet. In liquid culture, NAC inhibited H. pylori growth in a concentration-dependent manner. In the animal model, 3-day administration of NAC after 1 week from infection reduced the H. pylori load; 6-week administration of NAC after 1 week from infection prevented the development of gastritis and reduced H. pylori colonization. However, no reduction in the bacterial load or degree of gastritis was observed with a 6-week administration of NAC following 6-week infection period. Our results indicate that NAC may exert a beneficial effect on reduction of bacterial colonization, and prevents the development of severe inflammation, in people with initial asymptomatic or mild H. pylori infection.

  11. Glycoproteomic analysis of serum from patients with gastric precancerous lesions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gomes, Catarina; Almeida, Andreia; Ferreira, José Alexandre

    2013-01-01

    Gastric cancer is preceded by a carcinogenesis pathway that includes gastritis caused by Helicobacter pylori infection, chronic atrophic gastritis that may progress to intestinal metaplasia (IM), dysplasia, and ultimately gastric carcinoma of the more common intestinal subtype. The identification...... of glycosylation changes in circulating serum proteins in patients with precursor lesions of gastric cancer is of high interest and represents a source of putative new biomarkers for early diagnosis and intervention. This study applies a glycoproteomic approach to identify altered glycoproteins expressing...... the simple mucin-type carbohydrate antigens T and STn in the serum of patients with gastritis, IM (complete and incomplete subtypes), and control healthy individuals. The immunohistochemistry analysis of the gastric mucosa of these patients showed expression of T and STn antigens in gastric lesions, with STn...

  12. The Gastric Ganglion of Octopus vulgaris: Preliminary Characterization of Gene- and Putative Neurochemical-Complexity, and the Effect of Aggregata octopiana Digestive Tract Infection on Gene Expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Baldascino

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The gastric ganglion is the largest visceral ganglion in cephalopods. It is connected to the brain and is implicated in regulation of digestive tract functions. Here we have investigated the neurochemical complexity (through in silico gene expression analysis and immunohistochemistry of the gastric ganglion in Octopus vulgaris and tested whether the expression of a selected number of genes was influenced by the magnitude of digestive tract parasitic infection by Aggregata octopiana. Novel evidence was obtained for putative peptide and non-peptide neurotransmitters in the gastric ganglion: cephalotocin, corticotrophin releasing factor, FMRFamide, gamma amino butyric acid, 5-hydroxytryptamine, molluscan insulin-related peptide 3, peptide PRQFV-amide, and tachykinin–related peptide. Receptors for cholecystokininA and cholecystokininB, and orexin2 were also identified in this context for the first time. We report evidence for acetylcholine, dopamine, noradrenaline, octopamine, small cardioactive peptide related peptide, and receptors for cephalotocin and octopressin, confirming previous publications. The effects of Aggregata observed here extend those previously described by showing effects on the gastric ganglion; in animals with a higher level of infection, genes implicated in inflammation (NFκB, fascin, serpinB10 and the toll-like 3 receptor increased their relative expression, but TNF-α gene expression was lower as was expression of other genes implicated in oxidative stress (i.e., superoxide dismutase, peroxiredoxin 6, and glutathione peroxidase. Elevated Aggregata levels in the octopuses corresponded to an increase in the expression of the cholecystokininA receptor and the small cardioactive peptide-related peptide. In contrast, we observed decreased relative expression of cephalotocin, dopamine β-hydroxylase, peptide PRQFV-amide, and tachykinin-related peptide genes. A discussion is provided on (i potential roles of the various molecules

  13. The Gastric Ganglion of Octopus vulgaris: Preliminary Characterization of Gene- and Putative Neurochemical-Complexity, and the Effect of Aggregata octopiana Digestive Tract Infection on Gene Expression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldascino, Elena; Di Cristina, Giulia; Tedesco, Perla; Hobbs, Carl; Shaw, Tanya J.; Ponte, Giovanna; Andrews, Paul L. R.

    2017-01-01

    The gastric ganglion is the largest visceral ganglion in cephalopods. It is connected to the brain and is implicated in regulation of digestive tract functions. Here we have investigated the neurochemical complexity (through in silico gene expression analysis and immunohistochemistry) of the gastric ganglion in Octopus vulgaris and tested whether the expression of a selected number of genes was influenced by the magnitude of digestive tract parasitic infection by Aggregata octopiana. Novel evidence was obtained for putative peptide and non-peptide neurotransmitters in the gastric ganglion: cephalotocin, corticotrophin releasing factor, FMRFamide, gamma amino butyric acid, 5-hydroxytryptamine, molluscan insulin-related peptide 3, peptide PRQFV-amide, and tachykinin–related peptide. Receptors for cholecystokininA and cholecystokininB, and orexin2 were also identified in this context for the first time. We report evidence for acetylcholine, dopamine, noradrenaline, octopamine, small cardioactive peptide related peptide, and receptors for cephalotocin and octopressin, confirming previous publications. The effects of Aggregata observed here extend those previously described by showing effects on the gastric ganglion; in animals with a higher level of infection, genes implicated in inflammation (NFκB, fascin, serpinB10 and the toll-like 3 receptor) increased their relative expression, but TNF-α gene expression was lower as was expression of other genes implicated in oxidative stress (i.e., superoxide dismutase, peroxiredoxin 6, and glutathione peroxidase). Elevated Aggregata levels in the octopuses corresponded to an increase in the expression of the cholecystokininA receptor and the small cardioactive peptide-related peptide. In contrast, we observed decreased relative expression of cephalotocin, dopamine β-hydroxylase, peptide PRQFV-amide, and tachykinin-related peptide genes. A discussion is provided on (i) potential roles of the various molecules in food intake

  14. Human epidermal growth factor receptor2 expression in unresectable gastric cancers: Relationship with CT characteristics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jeong Sub [Dept. of Radiology, Jeju National University Hospital, Jeju (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Se Hyung; Im, Seock Ah; Kim, Min A; Han, Joon Koo [Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-09-15

    To retrospectively analyze the qualitative CT features that correlate with human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2)-expression in pathologically-proven gastric cancers. A total of 181 patients with pathologically-proven unresectable gastric cancers with HER2-expression (HER2-positive [n = 32] and negative [n = 149]) were included. CT features of primary gastric and metastatic tumors were reviewed. The prevalence of each CT finding was compared in both groups. Thereafter, binary logistic regression determined the most significant differential CT features. Clinical outcomes were compared using Kaplan-Meier method. HER2-postive cancers showed lower clinical T stage (21.9% vs. 8.1%; p = 0.015), hyperattenuation on portal phase (62.5% vs. 30.9%; p = 0.003), and was more frequently metastasized to the liver (62.5% vs. 32.2%; p = 0.001), than HER2-negative cancers. On binary regression analysis, hyperattenuation of the tumor (odds ratio [OR], 4.68; p < 0.001) and hepatic metastasis (OR, 4.43; p = 0.001) were significant independent factors that predict HER2-positive cancers. Median survival of HER2-positive cancers (13.7 months) was significantly longer than HER2-negative cancers (9.6 months) (p = 0.035). HER2-positive gastric cancers show less-advanced T stage, hyperattenuation on the portal phase, and frequently metastasize to the liver, as compared to HER2-negative cancers.

  15. Human epidermal growth factor receptor2 expression in unresectable gastric cancers: Relationship with CT characteristics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jeong Sub; Kim, Se Hyung; Im, Seock Ah; Kim, Min A; Han, Joon Koo

    2017-01-01

    To retrospectively analyze the qualitative CT features that correlate with human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2)-expression in pathologically-proven gastric cancers. A total of 181 patients with pathologically-proven unresectable gastric cancers with HER2-expression (HER2-positive [n = 32] and negative [n = 149]) were included. CT features of primary gastric and metastatic tumors were reviewed. The prevalence of each CT finding was compared in both groups. Thereafter, binary logistic regression determined the most significant differential CT features. Clinical outcomes were compared using Kaplan-Meier method. HER2-postive cancers showed lower clinical T stage (21.9% vs. 8.1%; p = 0.015), hyperattenuation on portal phase (62.5% vs. 30.9%; p = 0.003), and was more frequently metastasized to the liver (62.5% vs. 32.2%; p = 0.001), than HER2-negative cancers. On binary regression analysis, hyperattenuation of the tumor (odds ratio [OR], 4.68; p < 0.001) and hepatic metastasis (OR, 4.43; p = 0.001) were significant independent factors that predict HER2-positive cancers. Median survival of HER2-positive cancers (13.7 months) was significantly longer than HER2-negative cancers (9.6 months) (p = 0.035). HER2-positive gastric cancers show less-advanced T stage, hyperattenuation on the portal phase, and frequently metastasize to the liver, as compared to HER2-negative cancers

  16. Effect of ERCC8 tagSNPs and their association with H. pylori infection, smoking, and alcohol consumption on gastric cancer and atrophic gastritis risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jing, Jing-Jing; Sun, Li-Ping; Xu, Qian; Yuan, Yuan

    2015-12-01

    Excision repair cross-complementing group 8 (ERCC8) plays a critical role in DNA repair. Genetic polymorphisms in ERCC8 may contribute to the risk of cancer development. We selected tag single nucleotide polymorphisms (tagSNPs) in Chinese patients from the HapMap database to investigate associations with gastric cancer and its precursors. Genomic DNA was extracted from 394 controls, 394 atrophic gastritis, and 394 gastric cancer cases in northern Chinese patients, and genotypes were identified using the Sequenom MassARRAY system. We found that the ERCC8 rs158572 GG+GA genotype showed a 1.651-fold (95 % confidence interval (CI) = 1.109-2.457, P = 0.013) increased risk of gastric cancer compared with the AA genotype, especially in diffuse type. Stratified analysis comparing the common genotype revealed significantly increased gastric cancer risk in males and individuals older than 50 years with rs158572 GA/GG/GG+GA genotypes, while individuals older than 50 years with rs158916 CT/CC+CT genotypes were less susceptible to atrophic gastritis. Haplotype analysis showed that the G-T haplotype was associated with increased risk of gastric cancer. Statistically significant interactions between the two ERCC8 tagSNPs and Helicobacter pylori infection were observed for gastric cancer and atrophic gastritis risk (P cancer compared with non-smokers and non-drinkers homozygous for AA. Our findings suggested that ERCC8 rs158572 and rs158916, alone or together with environmental factors, might be associated with gastric cancer and atrophic gastritis susceptibility. Further validation of our results in larger populations along with additional studies evaluating the underlying molecular function is required.

  17. Coffee intake and gastric cancer risk: The Singapore Chinese Health Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ainslie-Waldman, Cheryl E.; Koh, Woon-Puay; Jin, Aizhen; Yeoh, Khay Guan; Zhu, Feng; Wang, Renwei; Yuan, Jian-Min; Butler, Lesley M.

    2014-01-01

    Background Despite experimental evidence showing chemopreventive effects of coffee-related compounds on gastric carcinogenesis, epidemiologic studies generally do not support coffee-gastric cancer associations. Observational data are lacking among high-risk populations with sufficient regular coffee consumption. Methods We examined the association between caffeinated coffee intake and gastric cancer risk in a population-based cohort that enrolled 63,257 Chinese men and women aged 45–74 years between 1993 and 1998 in Singapore. Incident gastric cancer cases (n=647) were identified after a mean follow-up of 14.7 years. Biomarkers of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection were measured in a subset of gastric cancer cases with blood collected prior to cancer diagnosis and their matched controls. Results In the total cohort, daily versus non-daily coffee intake was associated with a statistically non-significant decrease in gastric cancer risk [hazards ratio (HR) = 0.85; 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.69, 1.04). In women, the inverse association strengthened and reached statistical significance (HR=0.63; 95% CI: 0.46, 0.87). In analyses restricted to never smokers and nondrinkers of alcohol, inverse associations strengthened in the total cohort (HR=0.69; 95% CI: 0.52, 0.91) and in women (HR=0.52; 95% CI: 0.37, 0.74). There was no coffee-gastric cancer risk association among men, regardless of smoking status or alcohol consumption. Similar results were observed in the nested case-control study after adjustment for H. pylori infection. Conclusion Daily coffee consumption may reduce the risk of gastric cancer in high-risk populations, especially among women. Impact: Research aimed at identifying the compounds in coffee that may protect against gastric carcinogenesis is warranted. PMID:24608187

  18. Human papilloma virus infection and psoriasis: Did human papilloma virus infection trigger psoriasis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Sonia P; Gulhane, Sachin; Pandey, Neha; Bisne, Esha

    2015-01-01

    Psoriasis is an autoimmune chronic inflammatory skin disease known to be triggered by streptococcal and HIV infections. However, human papilloma virus infection (HPV) as a triggering factor for the development of psoriasis has not been reported yet. We, hereby report a case of plaque type with inverse psoriasis which probably could have been triggered by genital warts (HPV infection) and discuss the possible pathomechanisms for their coexistence and its management.

  19. A Preliminary Observation of Weight Loss Following Left Gastric Artery Embolization in Humans

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    Andrew J. Gunn

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Objectives. Embolization of the left gastric artery (LGA, which preferentially supplies the gastric fundus, has been shown to produce weight loss in animal models. However, weight loss after LGA embolization in humans has not been previously established. The aim of this study was to evaluate postprocedural weight loss in patients following LGA embolization. Subjects/Methods. A retrospective analysis of the medical records of patients who underwent LGA embolization for upper gastrointestinal (GI bleeding was performed. Postprocedural weight loss in this group was compared to a control group of patients who had undergone embolization of other arteries for upper GI bleeding. Results. The experimental group (N=19 lost an average of 7.3% of their initial body weight within three months of LGA embolization, which was significantly greater than the 2% weight loss observed in the control group (N=28 (P=0.006. No significant differences were seen between the groups in preprocedural body mass index (BMI, age, postprocedural care in the intensive care unit, history of malignancy, serum creatinine, or left ventricular ejection fraction. Conclusions. The current data suggest that body weight in humans may be modulated via LGA embolization. Continued research is warranted with prospective studies to further investigate this phenomenon.

  20. IL33 Is a Stomach Alarmin That Initiates a Skewed Th2 Response to Injury and InfectionSummary

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    Jon N. Buzzelli

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Background & Aims: Interleukin (IL33 is a recently described alarmin that is highly expressed in the gastric mucosa and potently activates Th2 immunity. It may play a pivotal role during Helicobacter pylori infection. Here, we delineate the role of IL33 in the normal gastric mucosa and in response to gastropathy. Methods: IL33 expression was evaluated in mice and human biopsy specimens infected with H pylori and in mice after dosing with aspirin. IL33 expression was localized in the gastric mucosa using immunofluorescence. Mice were given 1 or 7 daily doses of recombinant IL33 (1 μg/dose, and the stomach and the spleen responses were quantified morphologically, by flow cytometry and using quantitative reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction and immunoblotting. Results: In mice, the IL33 protein was localized to the nucleus of a subpopulation of surface mucus cells, and co-localized with the surface mucus cell markers Ulex Europaeus 1 (UEA1, and Mucin 5AC (Muc5AC. A small proportion of IL33-positive epithelial cells also were Ki-67 positive. IL33 and its receptor Interleukin 1 receptor-like 1 (ST2 were increased 4-fold after acute (1-day H pylori infection, however, this increase was not apparent after 7 days and IL33 expression was reduced 2-fold after 2 months. Similarly, human biopsy specimens positive for H pylori had a reduced IL33 expression. Chronic IL33 treatment in mice caused systemic activation of innate lymphoid cell 2 and polarization of macrophages to the M2 phenotype. In the stomach, IL33-treated mice developed transmural inflammation and mucous metaplasia that was mediated by Th2/signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 signaling. Rag-1-/- mice, lacking mature lymphocytes, were protected from IL33-induced gastric pathology. Conclusions: IL33 is highly expressed in the gastric mucosa and promotes the activation of T helper 2–cytokine–expressing cells. The loss of IL33 expression after prolonged H

  1. Correlation of PTPN11 polymorphism at intron 3 with gastric cancer

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    Li ZHANG

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective To explore the correlation of protein-tyrosine-phosphatase nonreceptor-type 11(PTPN11 polymorphism at intron 3 with gastric cancer in Chinese population,and the feasibility and accuracy of employing mastrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrogram(MALDI-TOF-MS in genotyping of this SNP.Methods Two hundred and forty-seven patients with gastric cancer,212 cancer-free patients and 160 cord blood samples were enrolled in present study.Genotypes of PTPN11 G/A polymorphism at intron 3 were determined by MALDI-TOF-MS analysis,and direct sequencing of PCR products with 20 samples of the gene locus was done for checking the accuracy of MALDI-TOF-MS.Histological examination,Helicobacter pylori culture,rapid urease test,serum anti-H.pylori antibodies(ELISA and urease colloidal gold test were performed to evaluate H.pylori infection.Results Direct sequencing of 20 random selected samples were well consistent with the MALDI-TOF-MS results.The rates of H.pylori infection were 73.68% in gastric cancer patients and 75.47% in cancer-free patients,implying no significant difference between the two groups.The distributions of genotypes were in Hardy Weinberg equilibrium in both gastric cancer patients and controls.There were no significant differences in the genotype frequencies between the 2 groups(P>0.05.Compared with the GG genotype,GA+AA genotype could not influence the risk of gastric cancer.When stratified for status,PTPN11 polymorphism was not associated with age,gender and H.pylori infection states in both cancer patients and controls.Conclusion It seems that PTPN11 G/A polymorphism at intron 3 has no affection on the risk of gastric cancer in Chinese population.

  2. Factors affecting gastric uptake in whole body FDG-PET imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tomemori, Takashi; Kitagawa, Mami; Nakahara, Tadaki; Wu, Jin; Nakagawa, Keiichi; Uno, Kimiichi; Abe, Kinji; Tomiyoshi, Katsumi

    2001-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) using 2-deoxy-2-[ 18 F]-fluoro-D-glucose (FDG) is very useful for the detection and staging of tumors. However, FDG is also accumulated in the normal tissues in various degrees. This physiological FDG uptake is often seen in intestine, making confusion with malignant tumor. The aim of this study was to identify factors influencing physiological FDG uptake in the stomach. A total of 136 people who underwent cancer screening or staging of tumors except for gastric cancer using FDG whole-body PET was examined (mean age: 55.6 yrs). All subjects fasted for at least 4 hours before the PET study and were administrated with FDG intravenously (mean FDG dose: 308.9 MBq). Emission images were acquired on a whole-body PET scanner and images were reconstructed without attenuation correction. The intensity of gastric uptake of FDG whole-body PET image was visually classified into 3 grades; grade 2 = the intensity of gastric uptake more than pulmonary uptake, grade 1 = the intensity of gastric uptake equal to or less than pulmonary uptake, grade 0 = no contrast between gastric uptake and background. Twenty-eight subjects (20.6%) were classified into grade 2, 42 subjects (30.9%) were grade 1 and 66 subjects (48.5%) were grade 0. Subjects' age, fasting time, FDG dose, serum glucose level, free fatty acid level and insulin level were not significantly correlated with the intensity of gastric uptake. But the subjects with higher gastric uptake tended to have anti-Helicobactor pylori (H. pylori) antibodies. The rate of having anti-H.pylori antibodies in the grade 2 group is significantly higher than the grade 1 group (85.7% vs. 72.5%, p<0.05), and that of the grade 1 group is significantly higher than the grade 0 group (72.5% vs. 42.2%, p<0.01). Gastric uptake was observed in about half of subjects. Especially, approximately 20% of all showed high gastric uptake, which was associated with H.pylori infection. Therefore, most of the subjects with high

  3. Factors affecting gastric uptake in whole body FDG-PET imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tomemori, Takashi; Kitagawa, Mami; Nakahara, Tadaki; Wu, Jin; Nakagawa, Keiichi; Uno, Kimiichi; Abe, Kinji; Tomiyoshi, Katsumi [Nishidai Clinic Diagnostic Imaging Center, Tokyo (Japan)

    2001-06-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) using 2-deoxy-2-[{sup 18}F]-fluoro-D-glucose (FDG) is very useful for the detection and staging of tumors. However, FDG is also accumulated in the normal tissues in various degrees. This physiological FDG uptake is often seen in intestine, making confusion with malignant tumor. The aim of this study was to identify factors influencing physiological FDG uptake in the stomach. A total of 136 people who underwent cancer screening or staging of tumors except for gastric cancer using FDG whole-body PET was examined (mean age: 55.6 yrs). All subjects fasted for at least 4 hours before the PET study and were administrated with FDG intravenously (mean FDG dose: 308.9 MBq). Emission images were acquired on a whole-body PET scanner and images were reconstructed without attenuation correction. The intensity of gastric uptake of FDG whole-body PET image was visually classified into 3 grades; grade 2 = the intensity of gastric uptake more than pulmonary uptake, grade 1 = the intensity of gastric uptake equal to or less than pulmonary uptake, grade 0 = no contrast between gastric uptake and background. Twenty-eight subjects (20.6%) were classified into grade 2, 42 subjects (30.9%) were grade 1 and 66 subjects (48.5%) were grade 0. Subjects' age, fasting time, FDG dose, serum glucose level, free fatty acid level and insulin level were not significantly correlated with the intensity of gastric uptake. But the subjects with higher gastric uptake tended to have anti-Helicobactor pylori (H. pylori) antibodies. The rate of having anti-H.pylori antibodies in the grade 2 group is significantly higher than the grade 1 group (85.7% vs. 72.5%, p<0.05), and that of the grade 1 group is significantly higher than the grade 0 group (72.5% vs. 42.2%, p<0.01). Gastric uptake was observed in about half of subjects. Especially, approximately 20% of all showed high gastric uptake, which was associated with H.pylori infection. Therefore, most of the subjects

  4. The relevance of gastric cancer biomarkers in prognosis and pre- and post- chemotherapy in clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbas, Muhammad; Habib, Murad; Naveed, Muhammad; Karthik, Kumaragurubaran; Dhama, Kuldeep; Shi, Meiqi; Dingding, Chen

    2017-11-01

    Gastric cancer (GC) is one among the major cancer types, causing human deaths and present noticeable heterogeneity. The incidences and mortality rates are higher in males in comparison to females with a male to female ratio of 2.3:1. A lot of studies have revealed out the molecular basis, pathogenesis, invasion and metastasis related findings of gastric stomach cancer. Present review encompasses the salient information on various biomarkers for the early diagnosis, treatment and prognosis of gastric cancer elaborate the clinical importance of serum tumor markers in patients with this cancer as well as checking the growths, together with epigenetic changes and genetic polymorphisms. A deep and rigorous search was carried out in Pub Med/MEDLINE using specific key words; "gastric cancer", with "tumor marker". Our search yielded 4947 important reports about related topic from books and articles that were published before the end of August 2017. Conclusively, Scientists are utilizing high time and resource to salvage this nemesis which is of global importance and cause health burden. Classical and novel biomarkers are important for treatment as well as pre- and post- diagnosis of GC. Major causes for GC are cigarette smoking, infection by Helicobacter pylori, atrophic gastritis, sex/gender, and high salt intake. Early diagnoses of GC is important for the management, treatment, pathological diagnoses by stage prognosis and metastatic setting; although the treatment outcome proved to be not much fruitful following chemotherapy, and oral medication with oxaliplatin, capecitabine, cisplatin and 5- fluorouracil (5-FU). More research studies and exploring the practical usage of gastric cancer biomarkers in diagnosis, prognosis and pre- and post- chemotherapy in clinical practice for countering gastric cancers would alleviate to some extent the ill health sufferings of humans being caused by this important and common cancerous condition. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS

  5. Dual-targeting hybrid nanoparticles for the delivery of SN38 to Her2 and CD44 overexpressed human gastric cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zhe; Luo, Huiyan; Cao, Zhong; Chen, Ya; Gao, Jinbiao; Li, Yingqin; Jiang, Qing; Xu, Ruihua; Liu, Jie

    2016-06-01

    Gastric cancer (GC), particularly of the type with high expression of both human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (Her2) and cluster determinant 44 (CD44), is one of the most malignant human tumors which causes a high mortality rate due to rapid tumor growth and metastasis. To develop effective therapeutic treatments, a dual-targeting hybrid nanoparticle (NP) system was designed and constructed to deliver the SN38 agent specifically to human solid gastric tumors bearing excessive Her2 and CD44. The hybrid NPs consist of a particle core made of the biodegradable polymer PLGA and a lipoid shell prepared by conjugating the AHNP peptides and n-hexadecylamine (HDA) to the carboxyl groups of hyaluronic acid (HA). Upon encapsulation of the SN38 agent in the NPs, the AHNP peptides and HA on the NP surface allow preferential delivery of the drug to gastric cancer cells (e.g., HGC27 cells) by targeting Her2 and CD44. Cellular uptake and in vivo biodistribution experiments verified the active targeting and prolonged in vivo circulation properties of the dual-targeting hybrid NPs, leading to enhanced accumulation of the drug in tumors. Furthermore, the anti-proliferation mechanism studies revealed that the inhibition of the growth and invasive activity of HGC27 cells was not only attributed to the enhanced cellular uptake of dual-targeting NPs, but also benefited from the suppression of CD44 and Her2 expression by HA and AHNP moieties. Finally, intravenous administration of the SN38-loaded dual-targeting hybrid NPs induced significant growth inhibition of HGC27 tumor xenografted in nude mice compared with a clinical antitumor agent, Irinotecan (CPT-11), and the other NP formulations. These results demonstrate that the designed dual-targeting hybrid NPs are promising for targeted anti-cancer drug delivery to treat human gastric tumors over-expressing Her2 and CD44.Gastric cancer (GC), particularly of the type with high expression of both human epidermal growth factor receptor

  6. Adherence of Helicobacter pylori to the Gastric Mucosa

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    Marguerite Clyne

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available Bacterial adhesion to the intestinal epithelium is a critical initial step in the pathogenesis of many enteric diseases. Helicobacter pylori is a duodenal pathogen that adheres to the gastric epithelium and causes gastritis and peptic ulceration. The mechanism by which H pylori causes disease has not yet been elucidated but adherence to the gastric mucosa is thought to be an important virulence determinant of the organism. What is known about adherence of H pylori to the gastric mucosa is summarized. Topics discussed are the mechanism of H pylori adherence; in vitro and in vivo models of H pylori infection; and adherence and potential adhesins and receptors for H pylori.

  7. Correlation between pepsinogens and gastric cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang Mengjun; Xiao Zhijian; Yang Xizhen; Huang Xuquan; Yu Huixin; Zhang Rongjun; Tao Yonghui; Zhang Lianfen; Cai Gangming; Tan Cheng; Xiao Ye; Jin Jian; Wang Bocheng

    2001-01-01

    Pepsinogen I and Pepsinogen II (PG I and PG II) were purified from human gastric mucosa using DE-52 anion exchange chromatography, Gel filtration HPLC and Q-2 anion exchange fast pressure chromatography. The antiserums against at both PG I and PG II were established respectively by preparing 125 I-PG I and 125 I-PG II using the chloramine-T method. Serum Pepsinogen I and II levels were measured by RIA in 190 healthy controls and other gastric diseases. The results were analyzed by statistics method. Compared with healthy controls, the serum PG I levels of duodenal ulcer patients and gastric ulcer were significantly higher. The serum PG I levels of gastritis patients were significantly lower and the serum PG I levels and PG I/PG II ratio of gastric cancer patients were much more lower. After total gastrectomy, the serum PG I and PG II levels of patients with recurrence of gastric cancer were significantly higher than those without recurrence. The changes of serum PG I and PG II levels are valuable for the diagnosis of gastric cancer and detecting the recurrence of gastric cancer after total gastrectomy

  8. Correlation between pepsinogens and gastric cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mengjun, Jiang; Zhijian, Xiao; Xizhen, Yang; Xuquan, Huang; Huixin, Yu; Rongjun, Zhang; Yonghui, Tao; Lianfen, Zhang; Gangming, Cai; Cheng, Tan; Ye, Xiao; Jian, Jin; Bocheng, Wang [Jiangsu Inst. of Nuclear Medicine, Wuxi (China). State Key Laboratory of Nuclear Medicine

    2001-04-01

    Pepsinogen I and Pepsinogen II (PG I and PG II) were purified from human gastric mucosa using DE-52 anion exchange chromatography, Gel filtration HPLC and Q-2 anion exchange fast pressure chromatography. The antiserums against at both PG I and PG II were established respectively by preparing {sup 125}I-PG I and {sup 125}I-PG II using the chloramine-T method. Serum Pepsinogen I and II levels were measured by RIA in 190 healthy controls and other gastric diseases. The results were analyzed by statistics method. Compared with healthy controls, the serum PG I levels of duodenal ulcer patients and gastric ulcer were significantly higher. The serum PG I levels of gastritis patients were significantly lower and the serum PG I levels and PG I/PG II ratio of gastric cancer patients were much more lower. After total gastrectomy, the serum PG I and PG II levels of patients with recurrence of gastric cancer were significantly higher than those without recurrence. The changes of serum PG I and PG II levels are valuable for the diagnosis of gastric cancer and detecting the recurrence of gastric cancer after total gastrectomy.

  9. DETECTION OF Helicobacter pylori IN GASTRIC MUCOSA OF SHEEP: PRELIMINARY RESULTS

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    A. Rella

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Helicobacter pylori is an organism widespread in humans and sometimes responsible for serious illnesses. It has been hypothesized the existence of animal reservoirs, and that the infection route by H. pylori involves multiple pathways including food-borne transmission as the microorganism has been detected from sheep, goat and cow milk. This work reports the preliminary results of a survey conducted in order to investigate the presence of H. pylori in gastric mucosa of sheep slaughtered in Apulia region (Italy employing a Nested Polymerase Chain Reaction (Nested-PCR assay for the detection of the phosphoglucosamine mutase gene (glmM, as screening method followed by conventional bacteriological isolation. Out of the 50 gastric mucosa samples examined, 3 (6% resulted positive for the presence of glmMgene, but at this time no strains were isolated. The results deserve further investigations to asses the role of ruminants as possible reservoirs of H. pylori.

  10. Epidemiological studies on viral infections and co-infections : Human immunodeficiency virus, hepatitis C virus and human papillomavirus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Santen, D.K.

    2018-01-01

    The research described in this thesis aimed to increase our understanding of the incidence, disease progression and treatment of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), hepatitis C virus (HCV), and human papillomavirus (HPV) infections and co-infections in key populations. Chapter 1 contains an overview

  11. Therapeutic effects of lentivirus-mediated shRNA targeting of cyclin D1 in human gastric cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seo, Jin-Hee; Jeong, Eui-Suk; Choi, Yang-Kyu

    2014-01-01

    Gastric cancer is the second most common cause of cancer-related death in males and the fourth in females. Traditional treatment has poor prognosis because of recurrence and systemic side effects. Therefore, the development of new therapeutic strategies is an important issue. Lentivirus-mediated shRNA stably inhibits target genes and can efficiently transduce most cells. Since overexpressed cyclin D1 is closely related to human gastric cancer progression, inhibition of cyclin D1 using specific targeting could be an effective treatment method of human gastric cancer. The therapeutic effect of lentivirus-mediated shRNA targeting of cyclin D1 (ShCCND1) was analyzed both in vitro and in vivo experiments. In vitro, NCI-N87 cells with downregulation of cyclin D1 by ShCCND1 showed significant inhibition of cell proliferation, cell motility, and clonogenicity. Downregulation of cyclin D1 in NCI-N87 cells also resulted in significantly increased G1 arrest and apoptosis. In vivo, stable NCI-N87 cells expressing ShCCND1 were engrafted into nude mice. Then, the cancer-growth inhibition effect of lentivirus was confirmed. To assess lentivirus including ShCCND1 as a therapeutic agent, intratumoral injection was conducted. Tumor growth of the lentivirus-treated group was significantly inhibited compared to growth of the control group. These results are in accordance with the in vitro data and lend support to the mitotic figure count and apoptosis analysis of the tumor mass. The lentivirus-mediated ShCCND1 was constructed, which effectively inhibited growth of NCI-N87-derived cancer both in vitro and in vivo. The efficiency of shRNA knockdown and variation in the degree of inhibition is mediated by different shRNA sequences and cancer cell lines. These experimental results suggest the possibility of developing new gastric cancer therapies using lentivirus-mediated shRNA

  12. Recent Advances in Helicobacter pylori Infection in Children: From the Petri Dish to the Playgound

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    Peng-Yuan Zheng

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Helicobacter pylori infection is acquired in childhood, plays a causative role in chronic gastritis and peptic ulcer disease, and is associated with the development of gastric cancer. The present review focuses on recent advances in the scientific knowledge of H pylori infection in children, including clinical sequelae, diagnosis and treatment. In addition, recent insights regarding both bacterial and host factors that mediate human diseases associated with H pylori infection are discussed.

  13. Expression of claudin-11, -23 in different gastric tissues and its relationship with the risk and prognosis of gastric cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Youzhu; Jing, Jingjing; Sun, Liping; Gong, Yuehua; Chen, Moye; Wang, Zeyang; Sun, Mingjun; Yuan, Yuan

    2017-01-01

    Claudins play an important role in regulating the permeability of epithelial and endothelial cells and in the maintenance of cell polarity. We aimed to investigate expression of claudin-11, -23 in different gastric tissues and its relationship with clinicopathologic parameters and prognosis of gastric cancer. We compared their expression levels in the paired cancerous tissues versus those in the adjacent noncancerous tissues by real-time PCR, western blotting and immunohistochemistry. The results showed that the expression of claudin-11, -23 was greatly increased in paracancerous gastric tissue compared with cancerous tissue. We also compared their expression levels of tissues from gastric cancer, superficial gastritis, and atrophic gastritis by immunohistochemistry. The results indicated that the expression of claudin-11 and 23 was significantly higher in superficial gastritis than that in atrophic gastritis and gastric cancer. The expression of claudin-23 was significantly lower in atrophic gastritis than that in gastric cancer, but no obviously difference was observed for claudin-11. As for analysis of clinicopathologic parameters of gastric cancer, logistic multiple regression indicated that claudin-11 was significantly associated with sex, smoking, alcohol, H. pylori infection and Borrmann classification while claudin-23 was significantly associated with vessel cancer embolus. Cox multivariate survival analysis indicated that gastric cancer patients with negative claudin-23 expression had significantly longer overall survival. In conclusion, the expression of claudin-11, -23 was remarkably downregulated in gastric cancer. Abnormal expression of these proteins was significantly correlated with some clinicopathologic parameters. In particular, claudin-23 positive expression was associated with poor prognostic outcomes of gastric cancer patients and may therefore serve as an independent prognosticator of patient survival.

  14. Rituximab Treatment Prevents Lymphoma Onset in Gastric Cancer Patient-Derived Xenografts

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    Simona Corso

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Patient-Derived Xenografts (PDXs, entailing implantation of cancer specimens in immunocompromised mice, are emerging as a valuable translational model that could help validate biologically relevant targets and assist the clinical development of novel therapeutic strategies for gastric cancer.More than 30% of PDXs generated from gastric carcinoma samples developed human B-cell lymphomas instead of gastric cancer. These lymphomas were monoclonal, Epstein Barr Virus (EBV positive, originated tumorigenic cell cultures and displayed a mutational burden and an expression profile distinct from gastric adenocarcinomas. The ability of grafted samples to develop lymphomas did not correlate with patient outcome, nor with the histotype, the lymphocyte infiltration level, or the EBV status of the original gastric tumor, impeding from foreseeing lymphoma onset. Interestingly, lymphoma development was significantly more frequent when primary rather than metastatic samples were grafted.Notably, the development of such lympho-proliferative disease could be prevented by a short rituximab treatment upon mice implant, without negatively affecting gastric carcinoma engraftment.Due to the high frequency of human lymphoma onset, our data show that a careful histologic analysis is mandatory when generating gastric cancer PDXs. Such care would avoid misleading results that could occur if testing of putative gastric cancer therapies is performed in lymphoma PDXs. We propose rituximab treatment of mice to prevent lymphoma development in PDX models, averting the loss of human-derived samples.

  15. Eradication of Helicobacter pylori infection favourably affects altered gastric mucosal MMP-9 levels

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kubben, F.J.G.M.; Sier, C.F.M.; Schram, M.; Witte, T.A.M.C.; Veenendaal, R.A.; Duijn, W. van; Verheijen, J.H.; Hanemaaijer, R.; Lamers, C.B.H.W.; Verspaget, H.W.

    2007-01-01

    Background: Helicobacter pylori gastritis is recognized as an important pathogenetic factor in peptic ulcer disease and gastric carcinogenesis, and is accompanied by strongly enhanced gastric mucosal matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) levels. Aim: This study was performed to investigate whether H.

  16. GTPBP4 Promotes Gastric Cancer Progression via Regulating P53 Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Li

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: gastric cancer is a serious health concern with high morbidity and mortality. Therefore, it is urgent to find novel targets for gastric cancer diagnosis and treatment. Methods: qRT-PCR and immunohistochemistry assays were used to detect GTPBP4 expression in gastric cancer tissues, and gastric cancer and gastric epithelial cells. Lentivirus infection was used to construct GTPBP4 stable knockdown cells. Annexin V/PI apoptosis, CCK8, EdU incorporation and cell clone formation analysis were performed to evaluate the effects of GTPBP4 on gastric cancer cell proliferation and apoptosis. Further RNA-based high-throughput sequencing and co-IP assays were constructed to explore the related mechanisms contributing to GTPBP4-mediated effects. Results: GTPBP4 expression was significantly increased in gastric cancer tissues compared with that in adjacent normal tissues, and positively correlated with gastric cancer stages. Meanwhile, GTPBP4 level was markedly upregulated in gastric cancer cells than in gastric epithelial cells. Additionaly, stable knockdown of GTPBP4 inhibited cell proliferation and promoted cell apoptosis. Mechanistically, p53 and its related signaling were significantly activated in GTPBP4 stable knockdown cells. And GTPBP4 interacted with p53 in gastric cancer cells. Conclusions: our results provide insights into mechanistic regulation and linkage of the GTPBP4-p53 in gastric cancer, and also a valuable potential target for gastric cancer.

  17. In vitro anti-proliferative activity of clove extract on human gastric carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Karimi

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Background and objectives: Cancer cell resistance to common chemotherapy agents is on rise. Plants are considered valuable sources of herbal drugs for cancer therapy. The present study was conducted to investigate the in vitro antioxidant, anti-proliferative, and apoptosis-inducing properties of clove (Syzygium aromaticum L. extract in human gastric carcinoma (AGS. Methods: Crude ethanol extract of S. aromaticum dried buds was prepared and  in vitro anti-proliferative effects of the extract on AGS and normal Human dermal fibroblasts (HDF cell lines were studied by MTT assay. To examine apoptosis induction, AGS cells were incubated with IC50 concentrations of the extract, stained with propidium iodide (PI and annexin V-fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC, and analyzed by flow cytometry. Antioxidant activity and total phenolics and flavonoids contents were evaluated by 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH assay, Folin-Ciocalteu method, and aluminum chloride colorimetric method, respectively. Results: The IC50 of DPPH and total phenolics and flavonoids contents of the extract were 10.05±1.93 μg/mL, 225.6±40 mg GAE/g, and 29.30±2.35 mgRUT/g, respectively. The IC50 of the extract against HDFs was 649 µg/mL, higher than AGS cells, which was 118.7 g/mL at 48 h after treatment. Flow cytometric analysis showed that the extract induced cell apoptosis. Conclusions: Crude ethanol S. aromaticum extract had high total phenolics content, and suppressed the proliferation of human gastric cancer cells, likely due to apoptosis induction. Further studies should be conducted to determine the mechanisms of its anticancer effects.

  18. The NOD-like receptor signalling pathway in Helicobacter pylori infection and related gastric cancer: a case-control study and gene expression analyses.

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    Natalia Castaño-Rodríguez

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Currently, it is well established that cancer arises in chronically inflamed tissue. A number of NOD-like receptors (NLRs form inflammasomes, intracellular multiprotein complexes critical for generating mature pro-inflammatory cytokines (IL-1β and IL-18. As chronic inflammation of the gastric mucosa is a consequence of Helicobacter pylori infection, we investigated the role of genetic polymorphisms and expression of genes involved in the NLR signalling pathway in H. pylori infection and related gastric cancer (GC. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Fifty-one genetic polymorphisms were genotyped in 310 ethnic Chinese (87 non-cardia GC cases and 223 controls with functional dyspepsia. In addition, gene expression of 84 molecules involved in the NLR signalling pathway was assessed in THP-1 cells challenged with two H. pylori strains, GC026 (GC and 26695 (gastritis. RESULTS: CARD8-rs11672725, NLRP3-rs10754558, NLRP3-rs4612666, NLRP12-rs199475867 and NLRX1-rs10790286 showed significant associations with GC. On multivariate analysis, CARD8-rs11672725 remained a risk factor (OR: 4.80, 95% CI: 1.39-16.58. Further, NLRP12-rs2866112 increased the risk of H. pylori infection (OR: 2.13, 95% CI: 1.22-3.71. Statistical analyses assessing the joint effect of H. pylori infection and the selected polymorphisms revealed strong associations with GC (CARD8, NLRP3, CASP1 and NLRP12 polymorphisms. In gene expression analyses, five genes encoding NLRs were significantly regulated in H. pylori-challenged cells (NLRC4, NLRC5, NLRP9, NLRP12 and NLRX1. Interestingly, persistent up-regulation of NFKB1 with simultaneous down-regulation of NLRP12 and NLRX1 was observed in H. pylori GC026-challenged cells. Further, NF-κB target genes encoding pro-inflammatory cytokines, chemokines and molecules involved in carcinogenesis were markedly up-regulated in H. pylori GC026-challenged cells. CONCLUSIONS: Novel associations between polymorphisms in the NLR signalling pathway (CARD8

  19. [Gastritis associated with duodeno-gastric reflux].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diarra, M; Konate, A; Traore, C B; Drabo, M; Soukho, A espouse Diarra; Kalle, A; Dembele, M; Traore, H A; Maiga, M Y

    2007-01-01

    Our main objective was to study gastritis associated to duodeno-gastric reflux. It is about a longitudinal study case/witness, paired according to the sex and the age. It was unrolled from February 2005 to January 2006 in the digestive diseases department of the hospital Gabriél Touré, and endoscopic centers of Promenade des Angevins, and clinique Farako. The patients profited from an upper digestive endoscopy to appreciate endoscopic aspect of gastritis associated to bile in the stomach mucus lake. The gastric biopsies were systematic. This study included 50 patients having gastritis associated to bile in gastric mucus lake compared to 50 patients having gastritis associated to clearly gastric mucus lake. The sex-ratio was 1.26 in favour of men. The average age of the patients was of 41.30 +/- 15.43 years. On the symptomatic hand, fetid breath was significantly met in duodeno-gastric reflux (p = 0.013). Potash consumption in the "tô" (millet cake) was significantly reported in gastritis associated to bile in gastric mucus lake (p = 0.042). The endoscopic aspects were comparable. Histological aspects of nonatrophic chronic gastritis were significantly mint in witnesses as well into the antrum as into the fundus (p = 0.0001 and p = 0.00023). The reactional gastritis aspect was the prerogative of duodenogastric reflux (p ranging between 10(-6) and 3.10 (-6). Helicobacter pylori infection was found comparable in the two groups (p = 0.297). Dysplasia although rare was found only in gastritis associated to duodeno-gastric reflux. Gastritis associated to bile in gastric mucus does not se,nm to have specific clinical, endoscopic and histological presentation. However the presence of dysplasia must have an attentive monitoring.

  20. Infection of the left sided gallbladder simulating liver abscess and gastric antral tumor

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    Kim, Jong Woo; Ahn, Jae Sung [St Mary' s Hospital Catholic Medical College, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1972-12-15

    The left sided gallbladder, being a rare occurrence, may create diagnostic problem especially when it becomes infected. Recently, we have experienced 2 cases of infection of left sided gallbladder at the Department of Radiology, St Mary's Hospital, Catholic Medical College. Case I was a 32-year-old housewife with dyspepsia, epigastric pain and recurring bouts of high fever of 2 months duration. Under the provisional diagnosis of liver abscess liver scan was performed which revealed well defined cold area in the left lobe supporting the provisional diagnosis. Tender cystic mass was aspirated and pus was drained. The injected air at the occasion of aspiration outlined well defined cystic structure. Because aspiration failed to control the symptoms, laparotomy was performed. Surgeon found a left sided gallbladder which was empyematous. Case II was a 38 year old business man admitted to the hospital because of tender ill defined mass in mid epigastrium. The patient was febrile (39.4 .deg. C) and anemic. An upper GI series disclosed an irregular filling defect involving the antrum of the stomach. The mass was primarily extrinsic but was closely fixed to the gastric wall. Surgical intervention revealed chronic cholecystitis and pericholecystitis with thick adhesion to the distal stomach.

  1. Antibiotic drug tigecycline inhibited cell proliferation and induced autophagy in gastric cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tang, Chunling; Yang, Liqun; Jiang, Xiaolan; Xu, Chuan; Wang, Mei; Wang, Qinrui; Zhou, Zhansong; Xiang, Zhonghuai; Cui, Hongjuan

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Tigecycline inhibited cell growth and proliferation in human gastric cancer cells. • Tigecycline induced autophagy not apoptosis in human gastric cancer cells. • AMPK/mTOR/p70S6K pathway was activated after tigecycline treatment. • Tigecycline inhibited tumor growth in xenograft model of human gastric cancer cells. - Abstract: Tigecycline acts as a glycylcycline class bacteriostatic agent, and actively resists a series of bacteria, specifically drug fast bacteria. However, accumulating evidence showed that tetracycline and their derivatives such as doxycycline and minocycline have anti-cancer properties, which are out of their broader antimicrobial activity. We found that tigecycline dramatically inhibited gastric cancer cell proliferation and provided an evidence that tigecycline induced autophagy but not apoptosis in human gastric cancer cells. Further experiments demonstrated that AMPK pathway was activated accompanied with the suppression of its downstream targets including mTOR and p70S6K, and ultimately induced cell autophagy and inhibited cell growth. So our data suggested that tigecycline might act as a candidate agent for pre-clinical evaluation in treatment of patients suffering from gastric cancer

  2. Antibiotic drug tigecycline inhibited cell proliferation and induced autophagy in gastric cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang, Chunling; Yang, Liqun; Jiang, Xiaolan [State Key Laboratory of Silkworm Genome Biology, Southwest University, Chongqing 400716 (China); Xu, Chuan [Division of Scientific Research and Training, General Hospital of PLA Chengdu Military Area Command, Chengdu, Sichuan 610083 (China); Wang, Mei; Wang, Qinrui [State Key Laboratory of Silkworm Genome Biology, Southwest University, Chongqing 400716 (China); Zhou, Zhansong, E-mail: zhouzhans@sina.com [Institute of Urinary Surgery, Southwest Hospital, Third Military Medical University, Chongqing 400038 (China); Xiang, Zhonghuai [State Key Laboratory of Silkworm Genome Biology, Southwest University, Chongqing 400716 (China); Cui, Hongjuan, E-mail: hcui@swu.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Silkworm Genome Biology, Southwest University, Chongqing 400716 (China)

    2014-03-28

    Highlights: • Tigecycline inhibited cell growth and proliferation in human gastric cancer cells. • Tigecycline induced autophagy not apoptosis in human gastric cancer cells. • AMPK/mTOR/p70S6K pathway was activated after tigecycline treatment. • Tigecycline inhibited tumor growth in xenograft model of human gastric cancer cells. - Abstract: Tigecycline acts as a glycylcycline class bacteriostatic agent, and actively resists a series of bacteria, specifically drug fast bacteria. However, accumulating evidence showed that tetracycline and their derivatives such as doxycycline and minocycline have anti-cancer properties, which are out of their broader antimicrobial activity. We found that tigecycline dramatically inhibited gastric cancer cell proliferation and provided an evidence that tigecycline induced autophagy but not apoptosis in human gastric cancer cells. Further experiments demonstrated that AMPK pathway was activated accompanied with the suppression of its downstream targets including mTOR and p70S6K, and ultimately induced cell autophagy and inhibited cell growth. So our data suggested that tigecycline might act as a candidate agent for pre-clinical evaluation in treatment of patients suffering from gastric cancer.

  3. Slovenian society for gastroenterology and hepatology guidelines on the management of Helicobacter pylori infection

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    Bojan Tepeš

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Infection with Helicobacter pylori (Hp is the most common infecion in the world. Half of the world population is infected. The prevalence of infection is declining in the developed world and also in Slovenia, because of better sanitation and eradication therapies. The prevalence of infection with Hp in Slovenia is 25.1 %. Only 20 % of the infected will develop a duodenal or gastric ulcer, ALT lymphoma or cancer in their lifetime. Hp infection is a risk factor for ulcer bleeding in patients on nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs and salicylates. Gastoenterologists diagnose the infection with Hp and prescribe therapy. A general practitioner can diagnose the infection by urea breath test or Hp stool test and prescribe therapy in cases of patients with a proven ulcer disease or in patients with first- degree relatives with gastric cancer. The guidelines on the management of Hp infection, published by the Slovenian Society for Gastroenterology and Hepatology (SZGH in 2010, recommend one week therapy with proton pump inhibitor (PPI bid, clarithromycin 500 mg bid and amoxiclline 1000 mg bid in patients without prior therapy with clarithromycin. In the case of prior therapy with macrolides, clarithromycin must be changed for metronidazole 400 mg bid. In the case of therapeutic failure second-line therapy should last 10 days. Secondline therapy can be based on Hp culture and bacterial resistance. The other possibility is PPI bid, colloidal bismuth subcitrate 120 mg qid, oxytetracycline 250 mg qid, metronidazole 400 mg qid; sequential therapy: PI bid 10 days, amoxicillin 1000 mg bid for first 5 days, clarithromycin 500 mg bid and metronidazole 400 mg bid for second 5 days; or PPI bid, amoxicilline 1000 mg bid and levofloxacin 500 mg bid. Hp is a group I human carcinogen responsible for 65 % of all gastric cancers. National screening for Hp infection in younger population without precancerous lesions in the stomach can reduce the incidence of gastric

  4. miR-449 inhibits cell proliferation and is down-regulated in gastric cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bou Kheir, Tony; Futoma-Kazmierczak, Ewa; Jacobsen, Anders

    2011-01-01

    Gastric cancer is the fourth most common cancer in the world and the second most prevalent cause of cancer related death. The development of gastric cancer is mainly associated with H. Pylori infection leading to a focus in pathology studies on bacterial and environmental factors, and to a lesser...... malignancies. The current study is focused on identifying microRNAs involved in gastric carcinogenesis and to explore their mechanistic relevance by characterizing their targets....

  5. Did transmission of Helicobacter pylori from humans cause a disease outbreak in a colony of Stripe-faced Dunnarts (Sminthopsis macroura?

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    Every Alison L

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Since the discovery that Helicobacter pylori causes a range of pathologies in the stomachs of infected humans, it has become apparent that Helicobacters are found in a diverse range of animal species where they are frequently associated with disease. In 2003 and 2004, there were two outbreaks of increased mortality associated with gastric bleeding and weight-loss in a captive colony of the Australian marsupial, the Stripe-faced Dunnart (Sminthopsis macroura. The presence of gastric pathology led to an investigation of potential Helicobacter pathogenesis in these animals. Histological examination revealed the presence of gastritis, and PCR analysis confirmed the presence of Helicobacter infection in the stomachs of these marsupials. Surprisingly, sequencing of 16S rRNA from these bacteria identified the species as H. pylori and PCR confirmed the strain to be positive for the important pathogenesis factor, cagA. We therefore describe, for the first time, an apparent reverse zoonotic infection of Stripe-faced Dunnarts with H. pylori. Already prone to pathological effects of stress (as experienced during breeding season, concomitant H. pylori infection appears to be a possible essential but not sufficient co-factor in prototypic gastric bleeding and weight loss in these marsupials. The Stripe-faced Dunnart could represent a new model for investigating Helicobacter-driven gastric pathology. Infections from their human handlers, specifically of H. pylori, may be a potential risk to captive colonies of marsupials.

  6. Up-regulation of CLDN1 in gastric cancer is correlated with reduced survival

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eftang, Lars L; Esbensen, Ying; Tannæs, Tone M; Blom, Gustav P; Bukholm, Ida RK; Bukholm, Geir

    2013-01-01

    The genetic changes in gastric adenocarcinoma are extremely complex and reliable tumor markers have not yet been identified. There are also remarkable geographical differences in the distribution of this disease. Our aim was to identify the most differentially regulated genes in 20 gastric adenocarcinomas from a Norwegian selection, compared to matched normal mucosa, and we have related our findings to prognosis, survival and chronic Helicobacter pylori infection. Biopsies from gastric adenocarcinomas and adjacent normal gastric mucosa were obtained from 20 patients immediately following surgical resection of the tumor. Whole genome, cDNA microarray analysis was performed on the RNA isolated from the sample pairs to compare the gene expression profiles between the tumor against matched mucosa. The samples were microscopically examined to classify gastritis. The presence of H. pylori was examined using microscopy and immunohistochemistry. 130 genes showed differential regulation above a predefined cut-off level. Interleukin-8 (IL-8) and Claudin-1 (CLDN1) were the most consistently up-regulated genes in the tumors. Very high CLDN1 expression in the tumor was identified as an independent and significant predictor gene of reduced post-operative survival. There were distinctly different expression profiles between the tumor group and the control mucosa group, and the histological subsets of mixed type, diffuse type and intestinal type cancer demonstrated further sub-clustering. Up-regulated genes were mapped to cell-adhesion, collagen-related processes and angiogenesis, whereas normal intestinal functions such as digestion and excretion were associated with down-regulated genes. We relate the current findings to our previous study on the gene response of gastric epithelial cells to H. pylori infection. CLDN1 was highly up-regulated in gastric cancer, and CLDN1 expression was independently associated with a poor post-operative prognosis, and may have important prognostic

  7. Helicobacter pylori infection in Africa: Pathology and microbiological ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Infection with the bacterium which leads to chronic gastritis, peptic ulceration, gastric cancers and gastric MALT lymphoma has been reported to follow a pattern linked to geographic and socio-demographic factors. However; the infection rate in various populations does not parallel the incidence of morbidity caused by the ...

  8. Evidence of Epstein-Barr Virus Association with Gastric Cancer and Non-Atrophic Gastritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-López, Juan L.E.; Torres, Javier; Camorlinga-Ponce, Margarita; Mantilla, Alejandra; Leal, Yelda A.; Fuentes-Pananá, Ezequiel M.

    2014-01-01

    Different lines of evidence support an association between Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) and gastric cancer (GC). The main understood risk factor to develop GC is infection by Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori), which triggers a local inflammatory response critical for progression from gastritis to GC. The role of EBV in early inflammatory gastric lesions has been poorly studied. A recent study proposed a cutoff value of 2000 EBV particles to identify patients with increased chances of infection of the gastric epithelium, which may favor the inflammatory process. To better understand the role of EBV in cancer progression, we analyzed 75 samples of GC, 147 control samples of non-tumor gastric tissue derived from GC patients and 75 biopsies from patients with non-atrophic gastritis (NAG). A first-round PCR was used for EBV detection in tumor and non-tumor controls and a more sensitive nested PCR for gastritis samples; both PCRs had lower detection limits above the proposed cutoff value. With this strategy 10.67% of GC, 1.3% of non-tumor controls and 8% of gastritis samples were found positive. An EBER1 in situ hybridization showed EBV infection of epithelial cells in GC and in a third of NAG samples, while in the other NAGs infection was restricted to the mononuclear cell infiltrate. EBV-positive GCs were enriched in lace and cribriform patterns, while these rare patterns were not observed in EBV negative samples. Our results support a role for EBV in GC and early precursor lesions, either as directly oncogenic infecting epithelial cells or indirectly as an inflammatory trigger. PMID:24448220

  9. Evidence of Epstein-Barr virus association with gastric cancer and non-atrophic gastritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-López, Juan L E; Torres, Javier; Camorlinga-Ponce, Margarita; Mantilla, Alejandra; Leal, Yelda A; Fuentes-Pananá, Ezequiel M

    2014-01-20

    Different lines of evidence support an association between Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) and gastric cancer (GC). The main understood risk factor to develop GC is infection by Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori), which triggers a local inflammatory response critical for progression from gastritis to GC. The role of EBV in early inflammatory gastric lesions has been poorly studied. A recent study proposed a cutoff value of 2000 EBV particles to identify patients with increased chances of infection of the gastric epithelium, which may favor the inflammatory process. To better understand the role of EBV in cancer progression, we analyzed 75 samples of GC, 147 control samples of non-tumor gastric tissue derived from GC patients and 75 biopsies from patients with non-atrophic gastritis (NAG). A first-round PCR was used for EBV detection in tumor and non-tumor controls and a more sensitive nested PCR for gastritis samples; both PCRs had lower detection limits above the proposed cutoff value. With this strategy 10.67% of GC, 1.3% of non-tumor controls and 8% of gastritis samples were found positive. An EBER1 in situ hybridization showed EBV infection of epithelial cells in GC and in a third of NAG samples, while in the other NAGs infection was restricted to the mononuclear cell infiltrate. EBV-positive GCs were enriched in lace and cribriform patterns, while these rare patterns were not observed in EBV negative samples. Our results support a role for EBV in GC and early precursor lesions, either as directly oncogenic infecting epithelial cells or indirectly as an inflammatory trigger.

  10. Release of prostaglandin E2 into gastric juice during stimulation of muscarinic- and gastrin receptors in dogs and in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Jørgen Rask; Bukhave, K; Hovendal, C P

    1981-01-01

    To investigate the causal relationship, if any, between gastric PG formation and gastric acid output, the release of PGE2 into gastric juice has been studied in eight beagle dogs with a gastric fistula, using sustained half-maximal stimulation by bethanechol and pentagastrin, and in eight duodenal...... ulcer patients, using the combined sham feeding/pentagastrin test. Immunoreactive PGE2 was determined by a method validated by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and PGE2 values were normalized by expressing them as ng PGE2 released per meq H+ secreted. In the dogs "steady state" PGE2 output (0...... minutes significantly (p less than 0.01) higher (3.9-46 ng/meq H+) than in pentagastrin experiments (0.8-20 ng/meq H+). In humans the peak PGE2 output during sham feeding (3.4-41 ng/meq H+) was significantly (p less than 0.02) larger than following bolus stimulation (6/micrograms/kg) by pentagastrin (2...

  11. Consecutive regression of MALT lymphomas coexisting in the pharyngeal and gastric tissue after the eradication of Helicobacter pylori

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    Giuseppe Ivan Potente

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The stomach is one of the most common organs in which mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT lymphoma develops. It is well established that Helicobacter pylori (Hp infection plays a major role in the development of gastric MALT lymphoma and that the presence of Hp in the gastric mucosa is connected with mucosa-associated lymphatic tissue (MALT.The same tissue is located in the oral cavity and pharynx in Waldayer’s circuit. Recently, the oral cavity was proposed as an extragastric reservoir of Hp infection. We report the case of a 79-year-old female patient with concomitant pharyngeal (MALT lymphoma and Hp-related gastric MALT lymphoma. Gastric MALT lymphoma was detected both through endoscopic examination as well as in biopsies. Pharyngeal MALT lymphoma was also detected in biopsies. Hp has been recognized in the gastric mucosa by positive serum H. pylori antibody and urease tests. Treatment of the Hp infection in our patient using antibiotics led to the regression of both lesions. This is the first case report on the regression of a pharyngeal MALT lymphoma after Hp eradication.

  12. Conifer Green Needle Complex in Patients with Precancerous Gastric Lesions: An Observational Pilot Study

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    Vladimir Bespalov

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. Helicobacter pylori infection is common and can lead to precancerous gastric lesions. Standard antibiotic therapy has a failure rate of more than 25% from antibiotic resistance. The primary aim of this observational pilot study was to test the feasibility of a large-scale clinical trial of Conifer Green Needle Complex (CGNC to treat precancerous gastric lesions. Secondary aims were to investigate H. pylori infection, stomach function, and histopathology of the gastric mucosa. Methods. A tablet form of CGNC (extracted from Pinus sylvestris and Picea abies (L Karst was prescribed to 26 patients with precancerous gastric lesions (two tablets, 100 mg CGNC/tablet, three times per day for six months. Another 24 patients received no treatment. Results. Compared with control patients, CGNC-treated patients showed total or partial regression (using the quantitative Rome III diagnostic criteria of dyspeptic symptoms (92.3%, p<0.0001, eradication of H. pylori infection (57.1%, p<0.03, a reduction in endoscopic signs of gastritis (92.3%, p<0.001, an increase of pepsinogen-pepsin in the gastric juice (57.7%, p<0.05, and total regression or reduction in the degree of intestinal metaplasia (46.2%, p<0.05 and lymphoplasmacytic infiltration (53.8%, p<0.05. Conclusions. This study justifies a randomised-controlled trial with CGNC in patients with atrophic gastritis.

  13. The co-evolved Helicobacter pylori and gastric cancer: trinity of bacterial virulence, host susceptibility and lifestyle

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    Devi S Manjulata

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Helicobacter pylori is an important yet unproven etiological agent of gastric cancer. H. pylori infection is more prevalent in developing Asian countries like India and it is usually acquired at an early age. It has been two decades since Marshall and Warren (1984 first described curved bacilli in the stomach of ulcer and gastritis patients. This discovery has won them the Nobel Prize recently, but the debate whether H. pylori is a pathogen or a commensal organism is still hot. Associations with disease-specific factors remain illusive years after the genome sequences were made available. Cytotoxin-associated antigen A (CagA and the so-called plasticity region cluster genes are implicated in pathogenesis of the carcinoma of stomach. Another virulence factor VacA whose role is still debatable, has recently been projected in pathology of gastric cancer. Studies of the evolution through genetic variation in H. pylori populations have provided a window into the history of human population migrations and a possible co-evolution of this pathogen with its human host. Possible symbiotic relationships were seriously debated since the discovery of this pathogen. The debate has been further intensified as some studies proposed H. pylori infection to be beneficial in some humans. In this commentary, we attempt to briefly discuss about H. pylori as a human pathogen, and some of the important issues linked to its pathophysiology in different hosts. 'We dance around in a ring and suppose, the secret sits in the middle and knows' – Robert Frost

  14. A Polysaccharide Isolated from Mycelia of the Lion's Mane Medicinal Mushroom Hericium erinaceus (Agaricomycetes) Induced Apoptosis in Precancerous Human Gastric Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Mingxing; Zhang, Yanqiu; Xiao, Xulang; Xu, Duoduo; Gao, Yang; Gao, Qipin

    2017-01-01

    Hericium erinaceus is typically used in traditional Chinese medicine for mucosal protection, healing of gastric ulcers, and treatment of gastritis. We purified from the cultured mycelia of H. erinaceus a polysaccharide with anti-gastric ulcer and antigastritis activity, but its effects on gastric malignancy have not been elucidated. We examined the differential effects of this purified polysaccharide, named EP-1, on the human gastric (GES-1) cell line and a precancerous cell line (MC) that was transformed from GES-1 using N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine. We observed that the polysaccharide potently induced cell apoptosis and cell cycle arrest at the G0/G1 phase in the MC cell line but did not have any effect on the GES-1 cell line at the same doses. Further mechanistic studies revealed that the polysaccharide exerted its activity through an apoptosis-associated pathway by modulating the expression of Bax, Bcl-2, and caspase-3. Differential effects of the polysaccharide on the GES-1 and MC cell lines indicate that the polysaccharide was effective in preventing gastric cancer progression.

  15. Cancer-associated fibroblasts are positively correlated with metastatic potential of human gastric cancers

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    Zhang Hao

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The prognosis of gastric cancer patients is difficult to predict because of defects in establishing the surgical-pathological features. Cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs have been found to play prominent role in promoting tumor growth, invasion and metastasis. Thus raises the hypothesis that the extent of CAFs prevalence may help to establish the prognosis of gastric cancer patients. Methods Immunochemistry and realtime-PCR experiments were carried out to compare the expression of proteins which are specific markers of CAFs or secreted by CAFs in the tumor and normal tissue specimens. The extent of CAFs' prevalence was graded according to immunochemical staining, and correlation was further analyzed between CAFs' prevalence and other tumor characteristics which may influence the prognosis of gastric cancer patients. Results Nearly 80 percent of normal gastric tissues were negative or weak positive for CAFs staining, while more than 60 percent of gastric cancer tissues were moderate or strong positive for CAFs staining. Realtime-PCR results also showed significant elevated expression of FAP, SDF-1 and TGF-β1 in gastric cancer tissues compared to normal gastric tissues. Further analysis showed that CAFs' prevalence was correlated with tumor size, depth of the tumor, lymph node metastasis, liver metastasis or peritoneum metastasis. Conclusions Reactive cancer associated fibroblasts (CAFs were frequently accumulated in gastric cancer tissues, and the prevalence of CAFs was correlated with tumor size, depth of the tumor and tumor metastasis, thus give some supports for establishing the prognosis of the gastric cancer patients.

  16. Dehydroeffusol effectively inhibits human gastric cancer cell-mediated vasculogenic mimicry with low toxicity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Wenming; Meng, Mei; Zhang, Bin; Du, Longsheng; Pan, Yanyan; Yang, Ping; Gu, Zhenlun; Zhou, Quansheng, E-mail: quanshengzhou@yahoo.com; Cao, Zhifei, E-mail: hunancao@163.com

    2015-09-01

    Accumulated data has shown that various vasculogenic tumor cells, including gastric cancer cells, are able to directly form tumor blood vessels via vasculogenic mimicry, supplying oxygen and nutrients to tumors, and facilitating progression and metastasis of malignant tumors. Therefore, tumor vasculogenic mimicry is a rational target for developing novel anticancer therapeutics. However, effective antitumor vasculogenic mimicry-targeting drugs are not clinically available. In this study, we purified 2,7-dihydroxyl-1-methyl-5-vinyl-phenanthrene, termed dehydroeffusol, from the traditional Chinese medicinal herb Juncus effusus L., and found that dehydroeffusol effectively inhibited gastric cancer cell-mediated vasculogenic mimicry in vitro and in vivo with very low toxicity. Dehydroeffusol significantly suppressed gastric cancer cell adhesion, migration, and invasion. Molecular mechanistic studies revealed that dehydroeffusol markedly inhibited the expression of a vasculogenic mimicry master gene VE-cadherin and reduced adherent protein exposure on the cell surface by inhibiting gene promoter activity. In addition, dehydroeffusol significantly decreased the expression of a key vasculogenic gene matrix metalloproteinase 2 (MMP2) in gastric cancer cells, and diminished MMP2 protease activity. Together, our results showed that dehydroeffusol effectively inhibited gastric cancer cell-mediated vasculogenic mimicry with very low toxicity, suggesting that dehydroeffusol is a potential drug candidate for anti-gastric cancer neovascularization and anti-gastric cancer therapy. - Highlights: • Dehydroeffusol markedly inhibits gastric cancer cell-mediated vasculogenic mimicry. • Dehydroeffusol suppresses the expression of vasculogenic mimicry key gene VE-cadherin. • Dehydroeffusol decreases the MMP2 expression and activity in gastric cancer cells. • Dehydroeffusol is a potential anti-cancer drug candidate with very low toxicity.

  17. Effect of Interlukin-1β on proliferation of gastric epithelial cells in culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beales Ian LP

    2002-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Helicobacter pylori is the main risk factor for the development of non-cardia gastric cancer. Increased proliferation of the gastric mucosa is a feature of H. pylori infection. Mucosal interkeukin-1β production is increased in H. pylori infection and IL-1β genotypes associated with increased pro-inflammatory activity are risk factors for the development of gastric cancer. The effect of IL-1β on gastric epithelial cell proliferation has been examined in this study. Methods AGS cells were cultured with IL-1β. DNA synthesis was assed by [3H]thymidine incorporation and total viable cell numbers by MTT assay. Results IL-1β dose dependently increased DNA synthesis and cell numbers. The enhanced proliferation was blocked by interleukin-1 receptor antagonist. Addition of neutralising antibody to GM-CSF reduced IL-1β-stimulated proliferation by 31 ± 4 %. GM-CSF alone significantly stimulated proliferation. Addition or neutralisation of IL-8 had no effect on basal or IL-1β-stimulated proliferation. The tyrosine kinase inhibitor genistein completely blocked IL-1β-stimulated proliferation and inhibition of the extracellular signal related kinase pathway with PD 98059 inhibited IL-1β stimulated proliferation by 58 ± 5 %. Conclusions IL-1β stimulates proliferation in gastric epithelial cells. Autocrine stimulation by GM-CSF contributes to this proliferative response. Signalling via tyrosine kinase activity is essential to the mitogenic response to IL-1β. The extracellular signal related kinase pathway is involved in, but not essential to downstream signalling. IL-1β may contribute to the hyperproliferation seen in H. pylori- infected gastric mucosa, and be involved in the carcinogenic process.

  18. Recent Advances in the Gastric Mucosal Protection Against Stress-induced Gastric Lesions. Importance of Renin-angiotensin Vasoactive Metabolites, Gaseous Mediators and Appetite Peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brzozowski, Tomasz; Magierowska, Katarzyna; Magierowski, Marcin; Ptak-Belowska, Agata; Pajdo, Robert; Kwiecien, Slawomir; Olszanecki, Rafal; Korbut, Ryszard

    2017-01-01

    Stress is known to cause severe adverse effects in the human gastrointestinal tract including mucosal microbleedings and erosions or even gastric ulceration but the mechanism of these complications has not been fully elucidated. The pathogenesis of stress-induced gastric damage involves the fall in Gastric Blood Flow (GBF), an increase in gastric acid secretion and gastric motility, enhanced adrenergic and cholinergic nerve activity and the rise in gastric mucosal generation of reactive oxygen species. The gastric mucosal defense mechanisms against the deleterious effect of stress include the activation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis which has been linked with glucocorticoids release capable of counteracting of stress-induced gastric lesions. Here we summarize the novel gastroprotective mechanisms against stress damage exhibited by angiotensin-(1-7), the newly discovered metabolite of Renin-Angiotensin System (RAS), the gaseous mediators such as nitric oxide (NO), hydrogen sulfide (H2S) or Carbon Monoxide (CO), and the food intake controlling peptides ghrelin, nesfatin- 1 and apelin possibly acting via brain-gut axis. These bioactive molecules such as RAS vasoactive metabolite angiotensin-(1-7) and appetite peptides have been shown to afford gastroprotective effect against stressinduced gastric lesions mainly mediated by an increase in gastric microcirculation. Gaseous mediators protect the gastric mucosa against stress lesions by mechanism involving the activation of PG/COX and CO/HO-1 biosynthetic pathways, and their anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidizing properties. Thus, these new components add new mechanistic aspects to the common cooperation of NO/NO-synthase, PG/COX systems and vasoactive sensory neuropeptides including CGRP but their gastroprotective efficacy against experimental stress ulcerogenesis requires the confirmation in human clinical trials. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  19. Toxoplasma gondii infection in humans in China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    He Shenyi

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Toxoplasmosis is a zoonotic infection of humans and animals, caused by the opportunistic protozoan Toxoplasma gondii, a parasite belonging to the phylum Apicomplexa. Infection in pregnant women may lead to abortion, stillbirth or other serious consequences in newborns. Infection in immunocompromised patients can be fatal if not treated. On average, one third of people are chronically infected worldwide. Although very limited information from China has been published in the English journals, T. gondii infection is actually a significant human health problem in China. In the present article, we reviewed the clinical features, transmission, prevalence of T. gondii infection in humans in China, and summarized genetic characterizations of reported T. gondii isolates. Educating the public about the risks associated with unhealthy food and life style habits, tracking serological examinations to special populations, and measures to strengthen food and occupational safety are discussed.

  20. Concurrent overexpression of serum p53 mutation related with Helicobacter pylori infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorenzo-Peñuelas Antonio

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background & Aims In the province of Cadiz (Spain, the adjusted mortality rate for gastric cancer in the coastal town of Barbate is 10/100.000 inhabitants, whereas in the inland town of Ubrique, the rate is twice as high. The rate of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori infection (H. pylori antibodies in the normal population was 54% in Ubrique, but only 32% in Barbate. In the two decades since its original discovery, p53 has found a singularly prominent place in our understanding of human gastric cancer and H. pylori cause accumulation of reactive oxygen species in the mucosa compartment. This study was designed to compare serum levels of p53 in a population characterized by high mortality due to stomach cancer and a high prevalence of H. pylori infection and another population in which mortality from this cause and the prevalence of H. pylori infection are low. Materials and methods 319 subjects from the low mortality population and 308 from the high mortality population were studied, as were 71 patients with stomach cancer. We measured serum immunoglobulin G antibody to H. pylori and serum mutant p53 protein and ceruloplasmin. Results The difference between the two populations in the prevalence of H. pylori infection was significant (p Conclusions There is a significant association between infection with H. pylori, elevated titers of H. pylori antibodies, and positivity for serum mutant p53 protein. Such information can significantly increase our basic knowledge in molecular pathology of gastric cancer and protection against H. pylori infection.

  1. Helicobacter pylori eradication and gastric cancer: when is the horse out of the barn?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Vries, A. C.; Kuipers, E. J.; Rauws, E. A. J.

    2009-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori infection is a major risk factor for gastric cancer development. Therefore, H. pylori eradication may be an important approach in the prevention of gastric cancer. However, long-term data proving the efficacy of this approach are lacking. This report describes two patients who

  2. Effect of Native Gastric Mucus on in vivo Hybridization Therapies Directed at Helicobacter pylori

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Santos, Rita S; Dakwar, George R; Xiong, Ranhua

    2015-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori infects more than 50% of the worldwide population. It is mostly found deep in the gastric mucus lining of the stomach, being a major cause of peptic ulcers and gastric adenocarcinoma. To face the increasing resistance of H. pylori to antibiotics, antimicrobial nucleic acid...... barriers-the highly viscoelastic gastric mucus and the bacterial cell envelope. We found that LNA/2'OMe is capable of diffusing rapidly through native, undiluted, gastric mucus isolated from porcine stomachs, without degradation. Moreover, although LNA/2'OMe hybridization was still successful without...

  3. Subclinical human papillomavirus infection of the cervix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Waiz, M.; Al-Saadi, Rabab N.; Al-Saadi, Zahida A.; Al-Rawi, Faiza A.

    2001-01-01

    A prospective study to investigate a group of Iraqi woman with proved genital vulval warts, to seek evidence of human papillomavirus infection in apparently normal looking cervixes and to investigate the natural history of infection. From December 1997 to August 1998, 20 women with vulval warts were enrolled along with 20 aged-matched control cases without warts. Their ages ranged between 19-48 years with a mean of 30.4 years, (+/- standard deviation = 2.3) for patients and 18-48 years with a mean of 29.7 (+/- standard deviation = 2.7) for the control group. General and gynecological examinations were carried out. Cervical swabs for associated genital infection, papilloma smears, speculoscopy and directed punch biopsies were carried out to detect subclinical human papillomavirus infections of the cervix and associated intraepithelial neoplasm. Cytology results showed that 11 (55%) of patients had evidence of cervical infection by human papillomavirus, 6 (30%) showed mild dysplastic changes, 3 (15%) showed moderate dysplastic changes, whilst 2 (10%) showed no dysplastic changes. Speculoscopy and acetowhitening was positive in 11 (55%) and collated histological results showed evidence of human papillomavirus infection in 9 patients (45%). As for the control group one case (5%) had evidence of human papillomavirus infection. Subclinical human papillomavirus infection is more common than was previously thought among Iraqi women. It may appear alone or in association with vulval or exophytic cervical warts, or both, and may be more common than the clinically obvious disease. Speculoscopy as an adjunctive method to colposcopy was found to be a simple and an easy to perform technique. Its combination with cytology gave relatively good results when it was used as a triage instrument, and may have a more promising performance in the future. (author)

  4. Plasma membrane proteomic analysis of human Gastric Cancer tissues: revealing flotillin 1 as a marker for Gastric Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gao, Wen; Xu, Jing; Wang, Fuqiang; Zhang, Long; Peng, Rui; Shu, Yongqian; Wu, Jindao; Tang, Qiyun; Zhu, Yunxia

    2015-01-01

    Gastric cancer remains the second leading cause of cancer-related deaths in the world. Successful early gastric cancer detection is hampered by lack of highly sensitive and specific biomarkers. Plasma membrane proteins participate and/or have a central role in the metastatic process of cancer cells and are potentially useful for cancer therapy due to easy accessibility of the targets. In the present research, TMT method followed by mass spectrometry analysis was used to compare the relative expression levels of plasma membrane proteins between noncancer and gastric cancer tissues. Of a total data set that included 501 identified proteins, about 35% of the identified proteins were found to be plasma membrane and associated proteins. Among them, 82 proteins were at least 1.5-fold up- or down-regulated in gastric cancer compared with the adherent normal tissues. A number of markers (e.g. annexin A6, caveolin 1, epidermal growth factor receptor, integrin beta 4) were previously reported as biomarkers of GC. Additionally, several potential biomarkers participated in endocytosis pathway and integrin signaling pathways were firstly identified as differentially expressed proteins in GC samples. Our findings also supported the notion that flotillin 1 is a potential biomarker that could be exploited for molecular imaging-based detection of gastric cancer. Together, the results show that subcellular proteomics of tumor tissue is a feasible and promising avenue for exploring oncogenesis. The online version of this article (doi:10.1186/s12885-015-1343-5) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users

  5. Gastric secretion elicited by conditioning in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caboclo, José Liberato Ferreira; Cury, Francico de Assis; Borin, Aldenis Albanese; Caboclo, Luís Otávio Sales Ferreira; Ribeiro, Maria Fernanda Sales Caboclo; de Freitas, Pedro José; Andersson, Sven

    2009-01-01

    To investigate whether interdigestive gastric acid secretion can be controlled by a possible memory-related cortical mechanism. To evaluate gastric secretion in rats, we used a methodology that allows gastric juice collection in rats in their habitual conditions (without any restraining) by pairing sound as the conditioning stimulus (CS) and food as the unconditioning stimulus (US). The levels of gastric acid secretion under basal conditions and under sound stimulation were recorded and the circulating gastrin levels determined. When the gastric juice was collected in the course of the conditioning procedure, the results showed that under noise stimulation a significant increase in gastric acid secretion occurred after 10 days of conditioning (p<0.01). The significance was definitively demonstrated after 13 days of conditioning (p<0.001). Basal secretions of the conditioned rats reached a significant level after 16 days of conditioning. The levels of noise-stimulated gastric acid secretion were the highest so far described in physiological experiments carried out in rats and there were no significant increases in the circulating gastrin levels. The results point to the important role played by cortical structures in the control of interdigestive gastric acid secretion in rats. If this mechanism is also present in humans, it may be involved in diseases caused by inappropriate gastric acid secretion during the interprandial periods.

  6. Survey of Helicobacter infection in domestic and feral cats in Korea

    OpenAIRE

    Ghil, Heh-Myung; Yoo, Jong-Hyeon; Jung, Woo-Sung; Chung, Tae-Ho; Youn, Hwa-Young; Hwang, Cheol-Yong

    2009-01-01

    Discovery of Helicobacter (H.) pylori has led to a fundamental change in our understanding of gastric diseases in humans. Previous studies have found various Helicobacter spp. in dogs and cats, and pets have been questioned as a zoonotic carrier. The present study surveyed the Helicobacter infections and investigated the presence of H. felis and H. pylori infections in domestic and feral cats in Korea. Sixty-four domestic cats and 101 feral cats were selected from an animal shelter. Saliva an...

  7. Normalization of pH level and gastric mucosa after eradication of H. pylori in the remnant stomach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Shunji; Matsukura, Norio; Matsuda, Noriko; Tsuchiya, Shinichi; Naito, Zenya; Tajiri, Takashi

    2008-12-01

    The Updated Sydney System (USS) is used to evaluate chronic gastritis and chronic atrophic gastritis (CAG) due to H. pylori infection. Here, we investigated USS scores and gastric juice pH levels in H. pylori infection-positive or -eradicated patients with remnant stomach after surgery. Gastric juice pH levels were measured using pH test-tape in 197 patients (112 H. pylori-positive and 85 H. pylori-negative after eradication) who had undergone distal gastrectomy and conventional H. pylori eradication therapy. In H. pylori infection-positive remnant stomach cases, gastric juice pH showed a reverse correlation with pepsinogen I/II ratio, and H. pylori infection-negative patients following eradication showed associations with the degree of atrophy and intestinal metaplasia at both the anastomosis and in the corpus. Further, pH levels in these patients were normalized time depending after the eradication in the remnant stomach. Eradication therapy for the remnant stomach contributes to the possible improvement of stomach conditions by controlling the pH level of gastric juice. This effect will be protective against the risk of secondary stomach carcinogenesis in the remnant stomach.

  8. A radioimmunoassay of gastric inhibitory polypeptide in human plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sarson, D.L.; Bryant, M.G.; Bloom, S.R.

    1980-01-01

    A sensitive radioimmunoassay for the measurement of human gastric inhibitory polypeptide (GIP), using pure porcine GIP, has been developed. Cross-reactivity of the antiserum with all available mammalian gut peptide preparations was negligible with the exception of glucagon when it was approximately 1%. Two major molecular forms of GIP were detectable in plasma and tissue extracts, one of large molecular size and the other corresponding to the elution coefficient of pure porcine standard. Concentrations of GIP in plasma from 50 normal subjects after overnight fasting were 9+-1.0(S.E.M.) pmol/1 rising to a peak of 34+-2.8 pmol/1 following the ingestion of a small mixed test meal. Ingestion of glucose or fat resulted in a similar rise of plasma GIP, whereas no change was observed after the ingestion of protein. (author)

  9. Cryptolepine, isolated from Sida acuta, sensitizes human gastric adenocarcinoma cells to TRAIL-induced apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Firoj; Toume, Kazufumi; Ohtsuki, Takashi; Rahman, Mahmudur; Sadhu, Samir Kumar; Ishibashi, Masami

    2011-01-01

    Bioassay guided separation of Sida acuta whole plants led to the isolation of an alkaloid, cryptolepine (1), along with two kaempferol glycosides (2-3). Compound 1 showed strong activity in overcoming TRAIL-resistance in human gastric adenocarcinoma (AGS) cells at 1.25, 2.5 and 5 μm. Combined treatment of 1 and TRAIL sensitized AGS cells to TRAIL-induced apoptosis at the aforementioned concentrations. Copyright © 2010 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  10. Gastric microbial community profiling reveals a dysbiotic cancer-associated microbiota

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira-Marques, Joana; Pinto-Ribeiro, Ines; Costa, Jose L; Carneiro, Fatima; Machado, Jose C

    2018-01-01

    Objective Gastric carcinoma development is triggered by Helicobacter pylori. Chronic H. pylori infection leads to reduced acid secretion, which may allow the growth of a different gastric bacterial community. This change in the microbiome may increase aggression to the gastric mucosa and contribute to malignancy. Our aim was to evaluate the composition of the gastric microbiota in chronic gastritis and in gastric carcinoma. Design The gastric microbiota was retrospectively investigated in 54 patients with gastric carcinoma and 81 patients with chronic gastritis by 16S rRNA gene profiling, using next-generation sequencing. Differences in microbial composition of the two patient groups were assessed using linear discriminant analysis effect size. Associations between the most relevant taxa and clinical diagnosis were validated by real-time quantitative PCR. Predictive functional profiling of microbial communities was obtained with PICRUSt. Results The gastric carcinoma microbiota was characterised by reduced microbial diversity, by decreased abundance of Helicobacter and by the enrichment of other bacterial genera, mostly represented by intestinal commensals. The combination of these taxa into a microbial dysbiosis index revealed that dysbiosis has excellent capacity to discriminate between gastritis and gastric carcinoma. Analysis of the functional features of the microbiota was compatible with the presence of a nitrosating microbial community in carcinoma. The major observations were confirmed in validation cohorts from different geographic origins. Conclusions Detailed analysis of the gastric microbiota revealed for the first time that patients with gastric carcinoma exhibit a dysbiotic microbial community with genotoxic potential, which is distinct from that of patients with chronic gastritis. PMID:29102920

  11. Clinicopathological correlation and prognostic significance of sonic hedgehog protein overexpression in human gastric cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Yanyang; Li, Fang; Tang, Bo; Shi, Yan; Hao, Yingxue; Yu, Peiwu

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated the expression of Sonic Hedgehog (Shh) protein in gastric cancer, and correlated it with clinicopathological parameters. The prognostic significance of Shh protein was analyzed. Shh protein expression was evaluated in 113 cases of gastric cancer and 60 cases of normal gastric mucosa. The immunoreactivity was scored semi quantitatively as: 0 = absent; 1 = weak; 2 = moderate; and 3 = strong. All cases were further classified into two groups, namely non-overexpression group with score 0 or 1, and overexpression group with score 2 or 3. The overexpression of Shh protein was correlated with clinicopathological parameters. Survival analysis was then performed to determine the Shh protein prognostic significance in gastric cancer. In immunohistochemistry study, nineteen (31.7%) normal gastric mucosa revealed Shh protein overexpression, while eighty-one (71.7%) gastric cancer revealed overexpression. The expression of Shh protein were significantly higher in gastric cancer tissues than in normal gastric mucosa (P overexpression and non-expression groups P = 0.168 and 0.071). However, Shh overexpression emerged as a significant independent prognostic factor in multivariate Cox regression analysis (hazard ratio 1.187, P = 0.041). Shh protein expression is upregulated and is statistically correlated with age, tumor differentiation, depth of invasion, pathologic staging, and nodal metastasis. The Shh protein overexpression is a significant independent prognostic factor in multivariate Cox regression analysis in gastric cancer.

  12. [Riddles in human tuberculous infection].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuyuguchi, I

    2000-10-01

    Tuberculosis is indeed an infectious disease caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis. However, only a small percentage of individuals infected develops overt disease, tuberculosis whereas the infected bacilli persist alive years long within the vast majority of persons infected but remained healthy. There are several riddles or enigmas in the natural history of M. tuberculosis infection in humans. Some of them are as follows: 1. What is the virulence of M. tuberculosis? 2. How does M. tuberculosis persist dormant within the host? 3. What determines the development of disease from remaining healthy after infection with M. tuberculosis? 4. What is the mechanism of "endogenous reactivation" of dormant M. tuberculosis within the host? 5. Can we expect more potent anti-TB vaccine than BCG in near future? Most of these issues cited above remain unsolved. What is urgently needed today to answer correctly to these questions is the production of appropriate animal model of tuberculosis infection which mimics human tuberculosis. Murine TB does not reflect human TB at all. What characterizes the mycobacterial organism is its armour-plated unique cell wall structure which is rich in lipid and carbohydrate. Cord factor or trehalose dimycolate (TDM), the main component of cell wall, has once been regarded as the virulence factor of mycobacteria. Cord factor is responsible for the pathogenesis of TB and cachexia or even death of the patients infected. However, cord factor in itself is not toxic but exerts its detrimental effect to the host through the excessive stimulation of the host's immune system to produce abundant varied cytokines including TNF-alpha. How to evade this embarrassing effect of mycobacterial cell wall component on the host immune system seems very important for the future development of better TB vaccine than the currently used BCG.

  13. Impact of homogenization of pasteurized human milk on gastric digestion in the preterm infant: A randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Oliveira, Samira C; Bellanger, Amandine; Ménard, Olivia; Pladys, Patrick; Le Gouar, Yann; Henry, Gwénaële; Dirson, Emelyne; Rousseau, Florence; Carrière, Frédéric; Dupont, Didier; Bourlieu, Claire; Deglaire, Amélie

    2017-08-01

    It has been suggested that homogenization of Holder-pasteurized human milk (PHM) could improve fat absorption and weight gain in preterm infants, but the impact on the PHM digestive kinetics has never been studied. Our objective was to determine the impact of PHM homogenization on gastric digestion in preterm infants. In a randomized controlled trial, eight hospitalized tube-fed preterm infants were their own control to compare the gastric digestion of PHM and of homogenized PHM (PHHM). PHM was obtained from donors and, for half of it, was homogenized by ultrasonication. Over a six-day sequence, gastric aspirates were collected twice a day, before and 35, 60 or 90 min after the start of PHM or PHHM ingestion. The impact of homogenization on PHM digestive kinetics and disintegration was tested using a general linear mixed model. Results were expressed as means ± SD. Homogenization leaded to a six-fold increase in the specific surface (P Homogenization increased the gastric lipolysis level (P Homogenization enhanced the proteolysis of serum albumin (P Homogenization of PHM increased the gastric lipolysis level. This could be a potential strategy to improve fat absorption, and thus growth and development in infants fed with PHM; however, its gastrointestinal tolerance needs to be investigated further. This trial was registered at clinicaltrials.gov as NCT02112331. Copyright © 2017 European Society for Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Poncirin Induces Apoptosis in AGS Human Gastric Cancer Cells through Extrinsic Apoptotic Pathway by up-Regulation of Fas Ligand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saralamma, Venu Venkatarame Gowda; Nagappan, Arulkumar; Hong, Gyeong Eun; Lee, Ho Jeong; Yumnam, Silvia; Raha, Suchismita; Heo, Jeong Doo; Lee, Sang Joon; Lee, Won Sup; Kim, Eun Hee; Kim, Gon Sup

    2015-09-18

    Poncirin, a natural bitter flavanone glycoside abundantly present in many species of citrus fruits, has various biological benefits such as anti-oxidant, anti-microbial, anti-inflammatory and anti-cancer activities. The anti-cancer mechanism of Poncirin remains elusive to date. In this study, we investigated the anti-cancer effects of Poncirin in AGS human gastric cancer cells (gastric adenocarcinoma). The results revealed that Poncirin could inhibit the proliferation of AGS cells in a dose-dependent manner. It was observed Poncirin induced accumulation of sub-G1 DNA content, apoptotic cell population, apoptotic bodies, chromatin condensation, and DNA fragmentation in a dose-dependent manner in AGS cells. The expression of Fas Ligand (FasL) protein was up-regulated dose dependently in Poncirin-treated AGS cells Moreover, Poncirin in AGS cells induced activation of Caspase-8 and -3, and subsequent cleavage of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP). Inhibitor studies' results confirm that the induction of caspase-dependent apoptotic cell death in Poncirin-treated AGS cells was led by the Fas death receptor. Interestingly, Poncirin did not show any effect on mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm), pro-apoptotic proteins (Bax and Bak) and anti-apoptotic protein (Bcl-xL) in AGS-treated cells followed by no activation in the mitochondrial apoptotic protein caspase-9. This result suggests that the mitochondrial-mediated pathway is not involved in Poncirin-induced cell death in gastric cancer. These findings suggest that Poncirin has a potential anti-cancer effect via extrinsic pathway-mediated apoptosis, possibly making it a strong therapeutic agent for human gastric cancer.

  15. Gastric Necrosis due to Acute Massive Gastric Dilatation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ibrahim Aydin

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Gastric necrosis due to acute massive gastric dilatation is relatively rare. Vascular reasons, herniation, volvulus, acute gastric dilatation, anorexia, and bulimia nervosa play a role in the etiology of the disease. Early diagnosis and treatment are highly important as the associated morbidity and mortality rates are high. In this case report, we present a case of gastric necrosis due to acute gastric dilatation accompanied with the relevant literature.

  16. Gastric Necrosis due to Acute Massive Gastric Dilatation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aydin, Ibrahim; Pergel, Ahmet; Yucel, Ahmet Fikret; Sahin, Dursun Ali; Ozer, Ender

    2013-01-01

    Gastric necrosis due to acute massive gastric dilatation is relatively rare. Vascular reasons, herniation, volvulus, acute gastric dilatation, anorexia, and bulimia nervosa play a role in the etiology of the disease. Early diagnosis and treatment are highly important as the associated morbidity and mortality rates are high. In this case report, we present a case of gastric necrosis due to acute gastric dilatation accompanied with the relevant literature.

  17. Demonstration of constant upregulation of the telomerase RNA component in human gastric carcinomas using in situ hybridization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heine, B; Hummel, M; Demel, G; Stein, H

    1998-06-01

    Upregulation of the ribonucleoprotein telomerase seems to be a prerequisite for immortality, a feature of malignant cells. Using a polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based assay, it is possible to demonstrate telomerase activity (TA) in specimens of most human malignancies, whereas it is absent from most normal tissues. It remains unclear, however, why between 5 and 50 per cent of various malignant tumour samples give negative results when TA is measured by the telomeric repeat amplification protocol (TRAP). The expectation that reverse transcription (RT)-PCR for detection of the telomerase RNA component (hTR) would be able to complement or to replace the TRAP assay failed, since malignant as well as non-malignant tissue samples gave positive results in most instances. In the present study, in situ hybridization (ISH) was developed to demonstrate the RNA component of human telomerase at the single cell level. With this method, 13 specimens of fresh frozen gastric carcinoma and four of normal, dysplastic, or inflamed gastric mucosa were investigated and the results were compared with those obtained by RT-PCR and the TRAP assay. In addition, ISH was performed on formalin-fixed sections of the same cases. The TRAP assay revealed positive results in 8 out of 13 gastric carcinomas and was negative in all non-malignant tissues. RT-PCR led to amplification of the telomerase RNA component in all specimens tested, irrespective of the presence or absence of malignant cells. By ISH, all gastric carcinomas showed strong telomerase RNA component-specific signals over malignant cells, whereas only a few grains were detectable over some types of normal somatic cells, including activated lymphocytes. In conclusion, high expression of the telomerase RNA component was restricted to the malignant cells of all the gastric carcinomas investigated, as shown by ISH. This indicates that the absence of TA in a proportion of carcinomas is due to methodological problems of the TRAP assay and is

  18. Human Infection with Rickettsia felis, Kenya

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    Human Infection with Rickettsia felis, Kenya Allen L. Richards, Ju Jiang, Sylvia Omulo, Ryan Dare, Khalif Abdirah~a~, P:bdile Ali, Shanaaz K...infection with obligate intracellular rickettsiae , which are transmitted to humans by arthropod vectors (e.g., lice, fleas, ticks, and mites... Rickettsiae are associated with arthropods for a least a part of their life cycle and are passed to other arthropods by transovarial transmission or

  19. Helicobacter pylori vacA and cagA genotype diversity and interferon gamma expression in patients with chronic gastritis and patients with gastric cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Carrillo, D N; Atrisco-Morales, J; Hernández-Pando, R; Reyes-Navarrete, S; Betancourt-Linares, R; Cruz-del Carmen, I; Illades Aguiar, B; Román-Román, A; Fernández-Tilapa, G

    2014-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) is the main risk factor for the development of chronic gastritis, gastric ulcer, and gastric cancer. In H. pylori-infected individuals, the clinical result is dependent on various factors, among which are bacterial components, the immune response, and environmental influence. To compare IFN-γ expression with the H. pylori vacA and cagA genotypes in patients with chronic gastritis and patients with gastric cancer. Ninety-five patients diagnosed with chronic gastritis and 20 with gastric cancer were included in the study. Three gastric biopsies were taken; one was used for the molecular detection and genotyping of H. pylori; another was fixed in absolute alcohol and histologic sections were made for determining IFN-γ expression through immunohistochemistry. No differences were found in the cells that expressed IFN-γ between the patients with chronic gastritis (median percentage of positive cells: 82.6% in patients without H. pylori and 82% in infected persons) and those with gastric cancer (70.5% in H. pylori-negative patients and 78.5% in infected persons). IFN-γ expression was 69% in chronic gastritis patients infected with H. pylori vacAs2m2/cagA⁻ it was 86.5% in patients infected with H. pylori vacAs1m2/cagA⁻, 86.5% in vacAs1m1/cagA⁻, and 82% in vacAs1m1/cagA⁺. Similar data were found in the patients with gastric cancer. IFN-γ expression varied depending on the H. pylori vacA and cagA genotype, but not in accordance with the presence of chronic gastritis or gastric cancer.

  20. Failure of ethamsylate to reduce aspirin-induced gastric mucosal bleeding in humans.

    OpenAIRE

    Daneshmend, T K; Stein, A G; Bhaskar, N K; Hawkey, C J

    1989-01-01

    1. We investigated the effect of the haemostatic agent ethamsylate on aspirin-induced gastric mucosal bleeding. 2. Eighteen healthy subjects were studied three times: at the end of 48 h periods of treatment with (a) placebo, (b) aspirin 600 mg four times daily, (9 doses) and (c) aspirin 600 mg four times daily with each dose preceded by ethamsylate 500 mg. 3. At the end of each treatment period gastric mucosal bleeding into timed gastric washings was quantified using the orthotolidine reactio...

  1. Biomagnetic and bioelectric detection of gastric slow wave activity in normal human subjects—a correlation study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Somarajan, S; Muszynski, N D; Obioha, C; Bradshaw, L A; Richards, W O

    2012-01-01

    We measured gastric slow wave activity simultaneously with a Superconducting Quantum Interference Device (SQUID) magnetometer, mucosal electrodes and cutaneous electrodes in 18 normal human subjects (11 women and 7 men). We processed signals with Fourier spectral analysis and SOBI blind-source separation techniques. We observed a high waveform correlation between the mucosal electromyogram (EMG) and multichannel SQUID magnetogastrogram (MGG). There was a lower waveform correlation between the mucosal EMG and cutaneous electrogastrogram (EGG), but the correlation improved with the application of SOBI. There was also a high correlation between the frequency of the electrical activity recorded in the MGG and in mucosal electrodes (r = 0.97). We concluded that SQUID magnetometers noninvasively record gastric slow wave activity that is highly correlated with the activity recorded by invasive mucosal electrodes. (paper)

  2. Human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 status of gastric cancer patients in Asia: results from a large, multicountry study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pathmanathan, Nirmala; Geng, Jing-Shu; Li, Wencai; Nie, Xiu; Veloso, Januario; Wang, John; Hill, Julie; Mccloud, Philip; Bilous, Michael

    2017-06-01

    Current estimates of the human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2)-positivity rate in gastric cancer vary widely in the literature, and there are limited data from countries in Asia. The primary aim of this study was to conduct a clinical audit of laboratories across seven countries in Asia to determine the incidence of HER2-positive gastric cancer in this region. Pathologists were asked to collect data on patient gender, age, cancer site, specimen type, tumor spread, type and grade, HER2 test results, including protein and/or gene copy enumeration, and final HER2 status on consecutive gastric cancer cases tested for HER2 in their laboratory over a 2-year period. HER2 results from 5,301 gastric cancers were submitted by 50 laboratories. The overall HER2-positivity rate was 9.7% which, after the exclusion of China, increased to 18.1%. The rate between countries ranged from 0% to 23.1%, and from 0% to 50.0% between laboratories. An equivocal HER2 result was recorded in 19.5% of cases. Despite the lack of centralized testing to confirm the accuracy of HER2 diagnoses, the incidence of HER2-positive gastric cancer observed here was comparable to that reported in the literature. Nevertheless, rates were highly variable between countries and laboratories, which suggests a lack of HER2 testing expertise in gastric cancer. Given that the mortality rates for gastric cancer in Eastern Asia are the highest in the world, efforts should focus on improving HER2 testing expertise in the region so that patients receive the appropriate treatment early in their disease. © 2016 The Authors. Asia-Pacific Journal of Clinical Oncology Published by John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  3. Selective induction of apoptosis in human gastric cancer cells by Lactobacillus kefiri (PFT), a novel kefir product.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghoneum, Mamdooh; Felo, Nouran

    2015-10-01

    The present study was undertaken to evaluate the effect of Lactobacillus kefiri (PFT), a novel kefir product, on apoptosis of gastric cancer cells (AGS), breast cancer cells (4T1), and human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). Cells were cultured with PFT and apoptosis was determined by flow cytometry using 7-AAD dye and cytospin preparation. Mitochondrial dysfunction and expression of Bcl2 were monitored by flow cytometry. Results showed that PFT induced apoptosis in AGS gastric cancer cells in a dose-dependent manner. Apoptosis was detected at a concentration of 0.3 mg/ml (20.8%), increased to 25.8% at 0.6 mg/ml, 37% at 1.2 mg/ml, 53.1% at 2.5 mg/ml, and peaked at 66.3% at 5.0 mg/ml. Apoptosis is associated with the decreased polarization of mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) and decreased Bcl2 expression. PFT-treated AGS cells manifested membrane blebbing, nuclear condensation, and fragmentation as identified in cytospin cytocentrifuge Giemsa stained preparations. On the other hand, flow cytometry analysis showed that PFT did not induce apoptosis in 4T1 breast cancer cells nor in PBMCs. These results suggest that PFT is safe for white blood cells and selectively induces apoptotic effects in gastric cancer cells. Hence, it may have potential as a therapeutic agent for the treatment of gastric cancers.

  4. The Development of Spasmolytic Polypeptide/TFF2-Expressing Metaplasia (SPEM During Gastric Repair Is Absent in the Aged StomachSummary

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    Amy C. Engevik

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Background & Aims: During aging, physiological changes in the stomach result in more tenuous gastric tissue that is less capable of repairing injury, leading to increased susceptibility to chronic ulceration. Spasmolytic polypeptide/trefoil factor 2–expressing metaplasia (SPEM is known to emerge after parietal cell loss and during Helicobacter pylori infection, however, its role in gastric ulcer repair is unknown. Therefore, we sought to investigate if SPEM plays a role in epithelial regeneration. Methods: Acetic acid ulcers were induced in young (2–3 mo and aged (18–24 mo C57BL/6 mice to determine the quality of ulcer repair with advancing age. Yellow chameleon 3.0 mice were used to generate yellow fluorescent protein–expressing organoids for transplantation. Yellow fluorescent protein–positive gastric organoids were transplanted into the submucosa and lumen of the stomach immediately after ulcer induction. Gastric tissue was collected and analyzed to determine the engraftment of organoid-derived cells within the regenerating epithelium. Results: Wound healing in young mice coincided with the emergence of SPEM within the ulcerated region, a response that was absent in the aged stomach. Although aged mice showed less metaplasia surrounding the ulcerated tissue, organoid-transplanted aged mice showed regenerated gastric glands containing organoid-derived cells. Organoid transplantation in the aged mice led to the emergence of SPEM and gastric regeneration. Conclusions: These data show the development of SPEM during gastric repair in response to injury that is absent in the aged stomach. In addition, gastric organoids in an injury/transplantation mouse model promoted gastric regeneration. Keywords: Epithelial Regeneration, Gastric Cancer, Human Gastric Organoids, CD44v

  5. Interleukin-6 mediates epithelial-stromal interactions and promotes gastric tumorigenesis.

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    Hiroto Kinoshita

    Full Text Available Interleukin-6 (IL-6 is a pleiotropic cytokine that affects various functions, including tumor development. Although the importance of IL-6 in gastric cancer has been documented in experimental and clinical studies, the mechanism by which IL-6 promotes gastric cancer remains unclear. In this study, we investigated the role of IL-6 in the epithelial-stromal interaction in gastric tumorigenesis. Immunohistochemical analysis of human gastritis, gastric adenoma, and gastric cancer tissues revealed that IL-6 was frequently detected in the stroma. IL-6-positive cells in the stroma showed positive staining for the fibroblast marker α-smooth muscle actin, suggesting that stromal fibroblasts produce IL-6. We compared IL-6 knockout (IL-6(-/- mice with wild-type (WT mice in a model of gastric tumorigenesis induced by the chemical carcinogen N-methyl-N-nitrosourea. The stromal fibroblasts expressed IL-6 in tumors from WT mice. Gastric tumorigenesis was attenuated in IL-6(-/- mice, compared with WT mice. Impaired tumor development in IL-6(-/- mice was correlated with the decreased activation of STAT3, a factor associated with gastric cancer cell proliferation. In vitro, when gastric cancer cell line was co-cultured with primary human gastric fibroblast, STAT3-related genes including COX-2 and iNOS were induced in gastric cancer cells and this response was attenuated with neutralizing anti-IL-6 receptor antibody. IL-6 production from fibroblasts was increased when fibroblasts were cultured in the presence of gastric cancer cell-conditioned media. IL-6 production from fibroblasts was suppressed by an interleukin-1 (IL-1 receptor antagonist and siRNA inhibition of IL-1α in the fibroblasts. IL-1α mRNA and protein were increased in fibroblast lysate, suggesting that cell-associated IL-1α in fibroblasts may be involved. Our results suggest the importance of IL-6 mediated stromal-epithelial cell interaction in gastric tumorigenesis.

  6. Rebamipide inhibits gastric cancer growth by targeting survivin and Aurora-B

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tarnawski, A.; Pai, R.; Chiou, S.-K.; Chai, J.; Chu, E.C.

    2005-01-01

    Rebamipide accelerates healing of gastric ulcers and gastritis but its actions on gastric cancer are not known. Survivin, an anti-apoptosis protein, is overexpressed in stem, progenitor, and cancer cells. In gastric cancer, increased and sustained survivin expression provides survival advantage and facilitates tumor progression and resistance to anti-cancer drugs. Aurora-B kinase is essential for chromosome alignment and mitosis progression but surprisingly its role in gastric cancer has not been explored. We examined in human gastric cancer AGS cells: (1) survivin expression, (2) localization of survivin and Aurora-B (3) cell proliferation, and (4) effects of specific survivin siRNA and/or rebamipide (free radical scavenging drug) on survivin and Aurora-B expression and cell proliferation. Survivin and Aurora-B are strongly expressed in human AGS gastric cancer cells and co-localize during mitosis. Survivin siRNA significantly reduces AGS cell viability. Rebamipide significantly downregulates in AGS cell survivin expression, its association with Aurora-B and cell proliferation. Rebamipide-induced downregulation of survivin is at the transcription level and does not involve ubiquitin-proteasome pathway

  7. Mastication suppresses initial gastric emptying by modulating gastric activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohmure, H; Takada, H; Nagayama, K; Sakiyama, T; Tsubouchi, H; Miyawaki, S

    2012-03-01

    Because various mastication-related factors influence gastric activity, the functional relationship between mastication and gastric function has not been fully elucidated. To investigate the influence of mastication on gastric emptying and motility, we conducted a randomized trial to compare the effects of mastication on gastric emptying and gastric myoelectrical activity under conditions that excluded the influences of food comminution, taste, and olfaction. A (13)C-acetate breath test with electrogastrography and electrocardiography was performed in 14 healthy men who ingested a test meal with or without chewing gum. Autonomic nerve activity was evaluated by fluctuation analysis of heart rate. Gastric emptying was significantly delayed in the 'ingestion with mastication' group. Gastric myoelectrical activity was significantly suppressed during mastication and increased gradually in the post-mastication phase. A decrease in the high-frequency power of heart rate variability was observed coincidentally with gastric myoelectrical activity suppression. These findings suggest that initial gastric emptying is suppressed by mastication, and that the suppression is caused by mastication-induced inhibition of gastric activity (UMIN Clinical Trial Registration no. UMIN000005351).

  8. [Emphysematous gastritis secondary to gastric mucormycosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarado-Lezama, Julio; Espinosa-González, Omar; García-Cano, Eugenio; Sánchez-Córdova, Gabriela

    2015-01-01

    Mucormycosis is a rare fungal infection of the mucorales order, which affects mostly immunocompromised patients. The association with emphysematous gastritis is rare and often fatal produced by gas -forming bacteria. We report the case of a trauma patient with type 1 diabetes mellitus, and diabetic ketoacidosis complicated with gastric mucormycosis associated with emphysematous gastritis. A male aged 32 who is involved in a car accident, who suffered head trauma, is admitted to the Intensive Care Unit, presenting diabetic ketoacidosis and upper gastrointestinal bleeding. An endoscopy was performed and an erosive esophagitis Class C, ischemia and gastric necrosis was found. A computed tomography scan showed emphysematous gastritis and gastric necrosis. He underwent total gastrectomy with a histopathology report of gastric mucormycosis. After the surgical procedure the patient died because of sepsis secondary to pulmonary mucormycosis Mucormycosis is a rare fungical disease which infrequently affects the gastrointestinal tract, being the stomach the most affected site. The mortality is high if the diagnosis is not done promptly and appropriate treatment is given. Suspecting its existence is necessary in patients with immunocompromised status to diagnose and provide timely treatment to increase survival, because of its high mortality. Copyright © 2015. Published by Masson Doyma México S.A.

  9. Prolyl oligopeptidase inhibition-induced growth arrest of human gastric cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suzuki, Kanayo [Laboratory of Cell Biology, Osaka University of Pharmaceutical Sciences, 4-20-1 Nasahara, Takatsuki, Osaka 569-1094 (Japan); Sakaguchi, Minoru, E-mail: sakaguti@gly.oups.ac.jp [Laboratory of Cell Biology, Osaka University of Pharmaceutical Sciences, 4-20-1 Nasahara, Takatsuki, Osaka 569-1094 (Japan); Tanaka, Satoshi [Laboratory of Cell Biology, Osaka University of Pharmaceutical Sciences, 4-20-1 Nasahara, Takatsuki, Osaka 569-1094 (Japan); Yoshimoto, Tadashi [Department of Life Science, Setsunan University, 17-8 Ikeda-Nakamachi, Neyagawa, Osaka 572-8508 (Japan); Takaoka, Masanori [Laboratory of Cell Biology, Osaka University of Pharmaceutical Sciences, 4-20-1 Nasahara, Takatsuki, Osaka 569-1094 (Japan)

    2014-01-03

    Highlights: •We examined the effects of prolyl oligopeptidase (POP) inhibition on p53 null gastric cancer cell growth. •POP inhibition-induced cell growth suppression was associated with an increase in a quiescent G{sub 0} state. •POP might regulate the exit from and/or reentry into the cell cycle. -- Abstract: Prolyl oligopeptidase (POP) is a serine endopeptidase that hydrolyzes post-proline peptide bonds in peptides that are <30 amino acids in length. We recently reported that POP inhibition suppressed the growth of human neuroblastoma cells. The growth suppression was associated with pronounced G{sub 0}/G{sub 1} cell cycle arrest and increased levels of the CDK inhibitor p27{sup kip1} and the tumor suppressor p53. In this study, we investigated the mechanism of POP inhibition-induced cell growth arrest using a human gastric cancer cell line, KATO III cells, which had a p53 gene deletion. POP specific inhibitors, 3-((4-[2-(E)-styrylphenoxy]butanoyl)-L-4-hydroxyprolyl)-thiazolidine (SUAM-14746) and benzyloxycarbonyl-thioprolyl-thioprolinal, or RNAi-mediated POP knockdown inhibited the growth of KATO III cells irrespective of their p53 status. SUAM-14746-induced growth inhibition was associated with G{sub 0}/G{sub 1} cell cycle phase arrest and increased levels of p27{sup kip1} in the nuclei and the pRb2/p130 protein expression. Moreover, SUAM-14746-mediated cell cycle arrest of KATO III cells was associated with an increase in the quiescent G{sub 0} state, defined by low level staining for the proliferation marker, Ki-67. These results indicate that POP may be a positive regulator of cell cycle progression by regulating the exit from and/or reentry into the cell cycle by KATO III cells.

  10. P27Kip1, regulated by glycogen synthase kinase-3β, results in HMBA-induced differentiation of human gastric cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wei, Min; Gu, Qinlong; Wang, Zhiwei; Yao, Hongliang; Yang, Zhongyin; Zhang, Qing; Liu, Bingya; Yu, Yingyan; Su, Liping; Zhu, Zhenggang

    2011-01-01

    Gastric cancer is the second most common cause of global cancer-related mortality. Although dedifferentiation predicts poor prognosis in gastric cancer, the molecular mechanism underlying dedifferentiation, which could provide fundamental insights into tumor development and progression, has yet to be elucidated. Furthermore, the molecular mechanism underlying the effects of hexamethylene bisacetamide (HMBA), a recently discovered differentiation inducer, requires investigation and there are no reported studies concerning the effect of HMBA on gastric cancer. Based on the results of FACS analysis, the levels of proteins involved in the cell cycle or apoptosis were determined using western blotting after single treatments and sequential combinations of HMBA and LiCl. GSK-3β and proton pump were investigated by western blotting after up-regulating Akt expression by Ad-Akt infection. To investigate the effects of HMBA on protein localization and the activities of GSK-3β, CDK2 and CDK4, kinase assays, immunoprecipitation and western blotting were performed. In addition, northern blotting and RNase protection assays were carried out to determine the functional concentration of HMBA. HMBA increased p27Kip1 expression and induced cell cycle arrest associated with gastric epithelial cell differentiation. In addition, treating gastric-derived cells with HMBA induced G0/G1 arrest and up-regulation of the proton pump, a marker of gastric cancer differentiation. Moreover, treatment with HMBA increased the expression and activity of GSK-3β in the nucleus but not the cytosol. HMBA decreased CDK2 activity and induced p27Kip1 expression, which could be rescued by inhibition of GSK-3β. Furthermore, HMBA increased p27Kip1 binding to CDK2, and this was abolished by GSK-3β inhibition. The results presented herein suggest that GSK-3β functions by regulating p27Kip1 assembly with CDK2, thereby playing a critical role in G0/G1 arrest associated with HMBA-induced gastric epithelial

  11. Helicobacter pylori Type IV Secretion System and Its Adhesin Subunit, CagL, Mediate Potent Inflammatory Responses in Primary Human Endothelial Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mona Tafreshi

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The Gram-negative bacterium, Helicobacter pylori, causes chronic gastritis, peptic ulcers, and gastric cancer in humans. Although the gastric epithelium is the primary site of H. pylori colonization, H. pylori can gain access to deeper tissues. Concurring with this notion, H. pylori has been found in the vicinity of endothelial cells in gastric submucosa. Endothelial cells play crucial roles in innate immune response, wound healing and tumorigenesis. This study examines the molecular mechanisms by which H. pylori interacts with and triggers inflammatory responses in endothelial cells. We observed that H. pylori infection of primary human endothelial cells stimulated secretion of the key inflammatory cytokines, interleukin-6 (IL-6 and interleukin-8 (IL-8. In particular, IL-8, a potent chemokine and angiogenic factor, was secreted by H. pylori-infected endothelial cells to levels ~10- to 20-fold higher than that typically observed in H. pylori-infected gastric epithelial cells. These inflammatory responses were triggered by the H. pylori type IV secretion system (T4SS and the T4SS-associated adhesin CagL, but not the translocation substrate CagA. Moreover, in contrast to integrin α5β1 playing an essential role in IL-8 induction by H. pylori upon infection of gastric epithelial cells, both integrin α5β1 and integrin αvβ3 were dispensable for IL-8 induction in H. pylori-infected endothelial cells. However, epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR is crucial for mediating the potent H. pylori-induced IL-8 response in endothelial cells. This study reveals a novel mechanism by which the H. pylori T4SS and its adhesin subunit, CagL, may contribute to H. pylori pathogenesis by stimulating the endothelial innate immune responses, while highlighting EGFR as a potential therapeutic target for controlling H. pylori-induced inflammation.

  12. Various Statistical Methods in Use for Evaluating Human Malignant Gastric Specimens

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    Ventzeslav Enchev

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the use of certain statistical methods (comparison of means – independent samples t‐test, multiple linear regression analysis, multiple logistic regression analysis, analysis of clusters, etc. included in the SPSS Statistical Package used to classify the patients quantitatively evaluated after a subtotal resection of their stomachs. The group consisted of 40 patients subdivided into two groups: primary neoplasia of the stomach (20 patients, and corresponding lymphogenic deposits in the abdominal perigastric lymph nodes (20 patients. Paraffin‐embedded tissue sections (thickness 4–5µm prepared as consecutive hematoxylin‐eosin‐stained slides were morphometrically measured by a rotation of a graduated eyepiece‐micrometer; thus, we obtained the minor and major axes’ lengths of the elliptic nuclear profiles and the minor and major caliper diameters of the corresponding cellular profiles. These four variables were used to determine the dynamic changes in quantitative features of human gastric lesions when passing from normal histological structures, through hyperplastic processes (chronic gastritis, gastric precancer (ulcers and polyps with or without malignancy till the development of primary carcinomas and their corresponding lymphogeneous metastases. Besides the increased cytomorphometrical measures, we also noted an opportunity to classify the patients according to these data as well as to add to the knowledge of our consultation system for clinical aid and use, recently published in the literature.

  13. Early or late antibiotic intervention prevents Helicobacter pylori-induced gastric cancer in a mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Songhua; Lee, Dong Soo; Morrissey, Rhiannon; Aponte-Pieras, Jose R; Rogers, Arlin B; Moss, Steven F

    2014-12-01

    H. pylori infection causes gastritis, peptic ulcers and gastric cancer. Eradicating H. pylori prevents ulcers, but to what extent this prevents cancer remains unknown, especially if given after intestinal metaplasia has developed. H. pylori infected wild-type (WT) mice do not develop cancer, but mice lacking the tumor suppressor p27 do so, thus providing an experimental model of H. pylori-induced cancer. We infected p27-deficient mice with H. pylori strain SS1 at 6-8 weeks of age. Persistently H. pylori-infected WT C57BL/6 mice served as controls. Mice in the eradication arms received antimicrobial therapy (omeprazole, metronidazole and clarithromycin) either "early" (at 15 weeks post infection, WPI) or "late" at 45 WPI. At 70 WPI, mice were euthanized for H. pylori determination, histopathology and cytokine/chemokine expression. Persistently infected mice developed premalignant lesions including high-grade dysplasia, whereas those given antibiotics did not. Histologic activity scores in the eradication groups were similar to each other, and were significantly decreased compared with controls for inflammation, epithelial defects, hyperplasia, metaplasia, atrophy and dysplasia. IP-10 and MIG levels in groups that received antibiotics were significantly lower than controls. There were no significant differences in expression of IFN-γ, TNF-α, IL-1β, RANTES, MCP-1, MIP-1α or MIP-1β among the three groups. Thus, H. pylori eradication given either early or late after infection significantly attenuated gastric inflammation, gastric atrophy, hyperplasia, and dysplasia in the p27-deficient mice model of H. pylori-induced gastric cancer, irrespective of the timing of antibiotic administration. This was associated with reduced expression of IP-10 and MIG. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Gastric cancer: epidemiology, prevention, classification, and treatment

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    Sitarz R

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Robert Sitarz,1–3 Małgorzata Skierucha,1,2 Jerzy Mielko,1 G Johan A Offerhaus,3 Ryszard Maciejewski,2 Wojciech P Polkowski1 1Department of Surgical Oncology, Medical University of Lublin, Lublin, Poland; 2Department of Human Anatomy, Medical University of Lublin, Lublin, Poland; 3Department of Pathology, University Medical Centre, Utrecht, The Netherlands Abstract: Gastric cancer is the second most common cause of cancer-related deaths in the world, the epidemiology of which has changed within last decades. A trend of steady decline in gastric cancer incidence rates is the effect of the increased standards of hygiene, conscious nutrition, and Helicobacter pylori eradication, which together constitute primary prevention. Avoidance of gastric cancer remains a priority. However, patients with higher risk should be screened for early detection and chemoprevention. Surgical resection enhanced by standardized lymphadenectomy remains the gold standard in gastric cancer therapy. This review briefly summarizes the most important aspects of gastric cancers, which include epidemiology, risk factors, classification, diagnosis, prevention, and treatment. The paper is mostly addressed to physicians who are interested in updating the state of art concerning gastric carcinoma from easily accessible and credible source. Keywords: gastric cancer, epidemiology, classification, risk factors, treatment

  15. Let-7b is involved in the inflammation and immune responses associated with Helicobacter pylori infection by targeting Toll-like receptor 4.

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    Gui-gen Teng

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: Toll-like receptors (TLRs are important initiators in native immune responses to microbial infections. TLR4 is up-regulated in response to H.pylori infection in gastric epithelial cells. However, the regulatory mechanisms for the expression of TLR4 in H.pylori infection have not been clearly defined. The aims of this study are to present the evidence that microRNA let-7b directly regulates TLR4 expression in human gastric epithelial cells, and subsequently influences the activation of NF-κB and the expression of the downstream genes in H.pylori infection. METHODS: The expression of let-7b was determined in gastric mucosa specimens and in two gastric epithelial cell lines using quantitative RT-PCR. The expression of TLR4 was determined by immunohistochemistry staining and RT-PCR. The potential target of let-7b was identified by luciferase reporter assay and Western blot. Let-7b mimics and inhibitors were used to examine the effects of let-7b on NF-κB activity. The expression of the downstream genes of NF-κB was also determined in cells infected with H.pylori 26695. RESULTS: Let-7b was significantly decreased in gastric mucosa specimens and in gastric epithelial cell lines (AGS, GES-1 infected with H.pylori 26695 (cagA+. Let-7b was complementary to the 3'-UTR of TLR4 mRNA and regulated TLR4 expression via post-transcriptional suppression in gastric epithelium. Infection of H.pylori induced the expression of TLR4 and activated NF-κB in AGS and GES-1 cells. Overexpression of let-7b by mimics downregulated TLR4, and subsequently attenuated NF-κB, MyD88, NF-κB1/p50, RelA/p65. The expression of IL-8, COX-2 and CyclinD1 was inhibited in H.pylori infected cells with let-7b overexpression. Both TAK-242 (TLR4 inhibitor and SN50 (NF-κB inhibitor significantly inhibited the H.pylori induced downregulation of let-7b. CONCLUSIONS: Let-7b targets at TLR4 mRNA, and regulates the activation of NF-κB and the expression of the downstream genes

  16. Identification of proteins specific for human herpesvirus 6-infected human T cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balachandran, N.; Amelse, R.E.; Zhou, W.W.; Chang, C.K.

    1989-01-01

    Proteins specific for human herpesvirus 6 (HHV-6)-infected human T cells (HSB-2) were examined by using polyclonal rabbit antibodies and monoclonal antibodies against HHV-6-infected cells and human sera. More than 20 proteins and six glycoproteins specific for HHV-6-infected cells were identified from [ 35 S]methionine- and [ 3 H]glucosamine-labeled total-cell extracts. Polyclonal rabbit antibodies immunoprecipitated 33 [ 35 S]methionine-labeled HHV-6-specific polypeptides with approximate molecular weights ranging from 180,000 to 31,000. In immunoprecipitation and Western immunoblot reactions, a patient's serum also recognized more than 30 HHV-6-specific proteins and seven glycoproteins. In contrast, sera from individuals with high-titered antibodies against other human herpesviruses reacted with fewer HHV-6-infected cell proteins, and only a 135,000-M r polypeptide was prominent. Monoclonal antibodies to HHV-6-infected cells reacted with single and multiple polypeptides specific for virus-infected cells and immunoprecipitated three distinct sets of glycoproteins, which were designated gp105k and gp82k, gp116k, gp64k, and gp54k, and gp102k

  17. Identification of proteins specific for human herpesvirus 6-infected human T cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balachandran, N.; Amelse, R.E.; Zhou, W.W.; Chang, C.K.

    1989-01-01

    Proteins specific for human herpesvirus 6 (HHV-6)-infected human T cells (HSB-2) were examined by using polyclonal rabbit antibodies and monoclonal antibodies against HHV-6-infected cells and human sera. More than 20 proteins and six glycoproteins specific for HHV-6-infected cells were identified from [ 35 S]methionine- and [ 3 H]glucosamine-labeled total-cell extracts. Polyclonal rabbit antibodies immunoprecipitated 33 [ 35 S]methionine-labeled HHV-6-specific polypeptides with approximate molecular weights ranging from 180,000 to 31,000. In immunoprecipitation and Western immunoblot reactions, a patient's serum also recognized more than 30 HHV-6-specific proteins and seven glycoproteins. In contrast, sera from individuals with high-titered antibodies against other human herpes viruses reacted with few HHV-6-infected cell proteins, and only a 135,000-M/sub r/ polypeptide was prominent. Monoclonal antibodies to HHV-6-infected cells reacted with single and multiple polypeptides specific for virus-infected cells and immunoprecipitated three distinct sets of glycoproteins, which were designated gp105K and gp92k, gp116k, gp64k, and gp54k, and gp102k

  18. Plasma sample based analysis of gastric cancer progression using targeted metabolomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lario, Sergio; Ramírez-Lázaro, Maria José; Sanjuan-Herráez, Daniel; Brunet-Vega, Anna; Pericay, Carles; Gombau, Lourdes; Junquera, Félix; Quintás, Guillermo; Calvet, Xavier

    2017-12-19

    Gastric carcinogenesis is a multifactorial process described as a stepwise progression from non-active gastritis (NAG), chronic active gastritis (CAG), precursor lesions of gastric cancer (PLGC) and gastric adenocarcinoma. Gastric cancer (GC) 5-year survival rate is highly dependent upon stage of disease at diagnosis, which is based on endoscopy, biopsy and pathological examinations. Non-invasive GC biomarkers would facilitate its diagnosis at early stages leading to improved GC prognosis. We analyzed plasma samples collected from 80 patients diagnosed with NAG without H. pylori infection (NAG-), CAG with H. pylori infection (CAG+), PLGC and GC. A panel of 208 metabolites including acylcarnitines, amino acids and biogenic amines, sphingolipids, glycerophospholipids, hexoses, and tryptophan and phenylalanine metabolites were quantified using two complementary quantitative approaches: Biocrates AbsoluteIDQ®p180 kit and a LC-MS method designed for the analysis of 29 tryptophan pathway and phenylalanine metabolites. Significantly altered metabolic profiles were found in GC patients that allowing discrimination from NAG-, CAG+ and PLGC patients. Pathway analysis showed significantly altered tryptophan and nitrogen metabolic pathways (FDR P < 0.01). Three metabolites (histidine, tryprophan and phenylacetylglutamine) discriminated between non-GC and GC groups. These metabolic signatures open new possibilities to improve surveillance of PLGC patients using a minimally invasive blood analysis.

  19. Management of Helicobacter Pylori Infection

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dr Olaleye

    90%, the sequential therapy seems to have a potential of becoming the standard first-line treatment for H pylori infection in the interim, while search is being made for the ideal antimicrobial monotherapy. . Keywords: Helicobacter pylori, Dyspepsia, Gastric cancer, Gastric Ulcer, Duodenal ulcer. INTRODUCTION. 1. Since the ...

  20. Virulence genes of Helicobacter pylori in gastritis, peptic ulcer and gastric cancer in Laos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vannarath, Sengdao; Vilaichone, Ratha-korn; Rasachak, Bouachanh; Mairiang, Pisaln; Yamaoka, Yoshio; Shiota, Seiji; Binh, Tran Thanh; Mahachai, Varocha

    2014-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection is an established cause of peptic ulcers and gastric cancer. The aim of this study was to identify H. pylori genotypes and to examine their associations with geographical regions and gastritis, peptic ulcers and gastric cancer in Laos. A total of 329 Lao dyspeptic patients who underwent gastroscopy at Mahosot Hospital, Vientiane, Laos during December 2010--March 2012 were enrolled. Two biopsy specimens (one each from the antrum and corpus) were obtained for CLO testing and only CLO test-positive gastric tissue were used to extract DNA. PCR and sequencing were identified for variants of the cagA and vacA genotypes. Some 119 Laos patients (36.2%) were found to be infected with H. pylori including 83 with gastritis, 13 with gastric ulcers (GU), 20 with duodenal ulcers (DU) and 3 with gastric cancer. cagA was detected in 99.2%. East-Asian-type cagA (62%) and vacA s1c (64.7%) were predominant genotypes in Laos. vacA s1c-m1b was significantly higher in GU than gastritis (53.8% vs. 24.1%; P-value=0.04) whereas vacA s1a-m2 was significantly higher in DU than gastritis (40.0% vs. 16.9%; P-value=0.03). East-Asian-type cagA and vacA s1c were significantly higher in highland than lowland Lao (100% vs. 55.8%; P-value=0.001 and 88.2% vs. 61.5%, P-value=0.03 respectively). H. pylori is a common infection in Laos, as in other countries in Southeast Asia. The cagA gene was demonstrated in nearly all Laos patients, cagA and vacA genotypes being possible important factors in explaining H. pylori infection and disease outcomes in Laos.

  1. Promoter hypermethylation of CDH1, FHIT, MTAP and PLAGL1 in gastric adenocarcinoma in individuals from Northern Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leal, Mariana Ferreira; Lima, Eleonidas Moura; Silva, Patrícia Natália Oliveira; Assumpção, Paulo Pimentel; Calcagno, Danielle Queiroz; Payão, Spencer Luiz Marques; Burbano, Rommel Rodríguez; Smith, Marília de Arruda Cardoso

    2007-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the methylation status of CDH1, FHIT, MTAP and PLAGL1 promoters and the association of these findings with clinico-pathological characteristics. METHODS: Methylation-specific PCR (MSP) assay was performed in 13 nonneoplastic gastric adenocarcinoma, 30 intestinal-type gastric adenocarcinoma and 35 diffuse-type gastric adenocarcinoma samples from individuals in Northern Brazil. Statistical analyses were performed using the chi-square or Fisher's exact test to assess associations between methylation status and clinico-pathological characteristics. RESULTS: Hypermethylation frequencies of CDH1, FHIT, MTAP and PLAGL1 promoter were 98.7%, 53.9%, 23.1% and 29.5%, respectively. Hypermethylation of three or four genes revealed a significant association with diffuse-type gastric cancer compared with nonneoplastic cancer. A higher hypermethylation frequency was significantly associated with H pylori infection in gastric cancers, especially with diffuse-type. Cancer samples without lymph node metastasis showed a higher FHIT hypermethylation frequency. MTAP hypermethylation was associated with H pylori in gastric cancer samples, as well as with diffuse-type compared with intestinal-type. In diffuse-type, MTAP hypermethylation was associated with female gender. CONCLUSION: Our findings show differential gene methylation in tumoral tissue, which allows us to conclude that hypermethylation is associated with gastric carcinogenesis. MTAP promoter hypermethylation can be characterized as a marker of diffuse-type gastric cancer, especially in women and may help in diagnosis, prognosis and therapies. The H pylori infectious agent was present in 44.9% of the samples. This infection may be correlated with the carcinogenic process through the gene promoter hypermethylation, especially the MTAP promoter in diffuse-type. A higher H pylori infection in diffuse-type may be due to greater genetic predisposition. PMID:17552003

  2. [Nodular gastritis and gastric cancer in young adult].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamada, Tomoari; Shiotani, Akiko; Haruma, Ken

    2012-10-01

    Nodular gastritis is a popular endoscopic gastritis in H. pylori-positive children and young adults. The endoscopic findings of nodular gastritis were mainly characterized by a unique, small granulated pattern in the antrum of the stomach. The cases of gastric cancer with nodular gastritis showed the same characteristics: all were diagnosed histologically as the diffuse-type and were located in the corpus with H. pylori infection. We recommended that endoscopists should carefully examine not only the antrum but also the corpus in patients with nodular gastritis, and H. pylori should be eradicated as soon as possible to prevent gastric cancer.

  3. Anti Helicobacter pylori IgG and IgA response in patients with gastric cancer and chronic gastritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manojlovic, Nebojsa; Babic, Dragana; Filipovic-Ljeshovic, Ivana; Pilcevic, Dijana

    2008-01-01

    Immune response against Helicobacter pylori is important for the course and outcome of infection. We conducted study looking for the difference in anti H. pylori IgG and IgA between patients with intestinal type of gastric cancer, superficial and atrophic gastritis. For this study, 133 patients infected with H. pylori were enrolled: 50 with superficial gastritis, 42 with atrophic gastritis and 41 with gastric cancer. Anti H. pylori IgG and IgA ELISA tests were performed. The difference in antibody titers of IgG and IgA, frequency of IgA > IgG ratio and combination of low IgG and IgA > IgG ratio were analyzed. The patients with gastritis had higher titer of IgG that the patients with gastric cancer (p gastritis had higher titer of IgA than the patients with gastric cancer (p IgG ratio is more frequent in patients with gastric cancer than in the patients with superficial gastritis (p IgG is more frequent in the patients with gastric cancer than in the patients with gastritis (p cancer elicit different anti H. pylori IgG and IgA response than the patients with superficial and atrophic gastritis. Low IgG and IgA predominance seems characteristic for gastric cancer.

  4. Peptide inhibition of human cytomegalovirus infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morris Cindy A

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV is the most prevalent congenital viral infection in the United States and Europe causing significant morbidity and mortality to both mother and child. HCMV is also an opportunistic pathogen in immunocompromised individuals, including human immunodeficiency virus (HIV- infected patients with AIDS, and solid organ and allogeneic stem cell transplantation recipients. Current treatments for HCMV-associated diseases are insufficient due to the emergence of drug-induced resistance and cytotoxicity, necessitating novel approaches to limit HCMV infection. The aim of this study was to develop therapeutic peptides targeting glycoprotein B (gB, a major glycoprotein of HCMV that is highly conserved across the Herpesviridae family, that specifically inhibit fusion of the viral envelope with the host cell membrane preventing HCMV entry and infection. Results Using the Wimley-White Interfacial Hydrophobicity Scale (WWIHS, several regions within gB were identified that display a high potential to interact with lipid bilayers of cell membranes and hydrophobic surfaces within proteins. The ability of synthetic peptides analogous to WWIHS-positive sequences of HCMV gB to inhibit viral infectivity was evaluated. Human foreskin fibroblasts (HFF were infected with the Towne-GFP strain of HCMV (0.5 MOI, preincubated with peptides at a range of concentrations (78 nm to 100 μM, and GFP-positive cells were visualized 48 hours post-infection by fluorescence microscopy and analyzed quantitatively by flow cytometry. Peptides that inhibited HCMV infection demonstrated different inhibitory concentration curves indicating that each peptide possesses distinct biophysical properties. Peptide 174-200 showed 80% inhibition of viral infection at a concentration of 100 μM, and 51% and 62% inhibition at concentrations of 5 μM and 2.5 μM, respectively. Peptide 233-263 inhibited infection by 97% and 92% at concentrations of 100

  5. Human Infection in Wild Mountain Gorillas

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    This podcast discusses a study about the transmission of Human Metapneumovirus Infection to wild mountain gorillas in Rwanda in 2009, published in the April 2011 issue of Emerging Infectious Diseases. Dr. Ian Lipkin, Director of the Center for Infection and Immunity and Dr. Gustavo Palacios, investigator in the Center of Infection & Immunity share details of this study.

  6. Tamoxifen reduces P-gp-mediated multidrug resistance via inhibiting the PI3K/Akt signaling pathway in ER-negative human gastric cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Zonglei; Zhou, Jin; Luan, Junwei; Sheng, Weihua; Shen, Xiaochun; Dong, Xiaoqiang

    2014-03-01

    Multidrug resistance (MDR), mediated by overexpression of drug efflux transporters such as P-glycoprotein (P-gp), is a major problem limiting successful chemotherapy of gastric cancer. Tamoxifen (TAM), a triphenylethylene nonsteroidal antiestrogen agent, shows broad-spectrum antitumor properties. Emerging studies demonstrated that TAM could significantly reduce the MDR in a variety of human cancers. Here we investigated the effects and possible underlying mechanisms of action of TAM on the reversion of MDR in ER-negative human gastric cancer cells. Our results demonstrated that in MDR phenotype SGC7901/CDDP gastric cancer cells TAM dramatically lowered the IC50 of CDDP, 5-FU and ADM, increased the intracellular Rhodamine123 accumulation and induced G0/G1 phase arrest, while G2/M phase decreased accordingly. Furthermore, at the molecular level, TAM substantially decreased the expression of P-gp, p-Akt and the Akt-regulated downstream effectors such as p-GSK-3β, p-BAD, Bcl-XL and cyclinD1 proteins without affecting the expression of t-Akt, t-GSK-3β, t-BAD proteins in SGC7901/CDDP cells. Thus, our findings demonstrate that TAM reverses P-gp-mediated gastric cancer cell MDR via inhibiting the PI3K/Akt signaling pathway. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  7. Effect of Evodiamine on Inducing Apoptosis of Human Gastric Cancer Cell Line SGC-7901 in Vitro

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    LIU Shao-ping

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To explore the proliferation inhibition and apoptosis-inducing effect of evodiamine in human gastric cancer SGC-7901 cells. Methods: After 48 or 24 h exposure to different concentrations of evodiamine, cell proliferation was analyzed using tetrazolium blue (MTT assay while apoptosis and cell-cycle phase distribution using flow cytometry. Results: In 0.01~30.00 μg/mL range of concentrations, evodiamine inhibited the proliferation of SGC-7901 cells in dose-dependent manner, and the overall mean IC50 was (3.79±0.16 μg/mL; the apoptosis rate was increased from 3.4% to 7.0%, 13.8% and 36.3% at concentrations of 0, 0.5, 1.5 and 30 μg/mL of evodiamine, respectively; the percentage of cells accumulated in G2/M phase was increased from 17.26% to 98.92% in the cells treated with evodiamine for 24 h in 0.01~30.00 μg/mL range of concentrations. Conclusion: Evodiamine can inhibit the proliferation, induce apoptosis in human gastric cancer cell line SGC-7901 in vitro and arrest the cell cycle at the G2/M phase.

  8. Infection of Helicobacter pylori and Atrophic Gastritis Influence Lactobacillus in Gut Microbiota in a Japanese Population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chikara Iino

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundSuppression of gastric acid by proton pump inhibitors is associated with the increase of Lactobacillus in human gut microbiota. Gastric acid secretion is also suppressed by Helicobacter pylori infection and following atrophic gastritis. However, few studies have examined the association between H. pylori infection and Lactobacillus species in gut microbiota particularly in Japan.MethodsA total of 1,123 adult subjects who participated in a health survey in Hirosaki City were studied. Infection of H. pylori was defined by both serum antibody and stool antigen test. The presence and the severity of atrophic gastritis were defined by the serum level of serum pepsinogens. Using 16S ribosomal RNA amplification from fecal samples, the relative abundance of Lactobacillus was calculated, and the composition ratio of each Lactobacillus species was surveyed.ResultsThe relative abundance of the Lactobacillus in H. pylori-infected subjects with severe atrophic gastritis was higher comparing with those in subjects with mild atrophic gastritis and without atrophic gastritis (0.591 vs 0.068% and 0.033%, respectively; p < 0.001 and also that of non-infected subjects (0.033%; p < 0.001. In H. pylori non-infected subjects, both gender and age were not associated with the relative abundance of Lactobacillus in fecal samples. The proportion of Lactobacillus salivarius was high in H. pylori-infected subjects while that of Lactobacillus acidophilus was high in non-infected subjects.ConclusionLactobacillus in human gut microbiota could be influenced by H. pylori infection and severity of atrophic gastritis in Japanese subjects.

  9. NLRP3 Controls the Development of Gastrointestinal CD11b+ Dendritic Cells in the Steady State and during Chronic Bacterial Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabelle C. Arnold

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The gastric lamina propria is largely uncharted immunological territory. Here we describe the evolution and composition of the gastric, small intestinal, and colonic lamina propria mononuclear phagocyte system during the steady state and infection with the gastric pathogen Helicobacter pylori. We show that monocytes, CX3CR1hi macrophages, and CD11b+ dendritic cells are recruited to the infected stomach in a CCR2-dependent manner. All three populations, but not BATF3-dependent CD103+ DCs, sample red fluorescent protein (RFP+ Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori. Mice reconstituted with human hematopoietic stem cells recapitulate several features of the myeloid cell-H. pylori interaction. The differentiation in and/or recruitment to gastrointestinal, lung, and lymphoid tissues of CD11b+ DCs requires NLRP3, but not apoptosis-associated speck-like protein containing a carboxy-terminal CARD (ASC or caspase-1, during steady-state and chronic infection. NLRP3−/− mice fail to generate Treg responses to H. pylori and control the infection more effectively than wild-type mice. The results demonstrate a non-canonical inflammasome-independent function of NLRP3 in DC development and immune regulation.

  10. Human Infection with MERS coronavirus after exposure to infected camels, Saudi Arabia, 2013

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Memish, Ziad A.; Cotten, Matthew; Meyer, Benjamin; Watson, Simon J.; Alsahafi, Abdullah J.; Al Rabeeah, Abdullah A.; Corman, Victor Max; Sieberg, Andrea; Makhdoom, Hatem Q.; Assiri, Abdullah; Al Masri, Malaki; Aldabbagh, Souhaib; Bosch, Berend Jan|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/273306049; Beer, Martin; Müller, Marcel A.; Kellam, Paul; Drosten, Christian

    2014-01-01

    We investigated a case of human infection with Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) after exposure to infected camels. Analysis of the whole human-derived virus and 15% of the camel-derived virus sequence yielded nucleotide polymorphism signatures suggestive of cross-species

  11. Exosomes derived from human mesenchymal stem cells confer drug resistance in gastric cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Runbi; Zhang, Bin; Zhang, Xu; Xue, Jianguo; Yuan, Xiao; Yan, Yongmin; Wang, Mei; Zhu, Wei; Qian, Hui; Xu, Wenrong

    2015-08-03

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) play an important role in chemoresistance. Exosomes have been reported to modify cellular phenotype and function by mediating cell-cell communication. In this study, we aimed to investigate whether exosomes derived from MSCs (MSC-exosomes) are involved in mediating the resistance to chemotherapy in gastric cancer and to explore the underlying molecular mechanism. We found that MSC-exosomes significantly induced the resistance of gastric cancer cells to 5-fluorouracil both in vivo and ex vivo. MSC-exosomes antagonized 5-fluorouracil-induced apoptosis and enhanced the expression of multi-drug resistance associated proteins, including MDR, MRP and LRP. Mechanistically, MSC-exosomes triggered the activation of calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinases (CaM-Ks) and Raf/MEK/ERK kinase cascade in gastric cancer cells. Blocking the CaM-Ks/Raf/MEK/ERK pathway inhibited the promoting role of MSC-exosomes in chemoresistance. Collectively, MSC-exosomes could induce drug resistance in gastric cancer cells by activating CaM-Ks/Raf/MEK/ERK pathway. Our findings suggest that MSC-exosomes have profound effects on modifying gastric cancer cells in the development of drug resistance. Targeting the interaction between MSC-exosomes and cancer cells may help improve the efficacy of chemotherapy in gastric cancer.

  12. A DNA Vaccine Protects Human Immune Cells against Zika Virus Infection in Humanized Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guohua Yi

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available A DNA vaccine encoding prM and E protein has been shown to induce protection against Zika virus (ZIKV infection in mice and monkeys. However, its effectiveness in humans remains undefined. Moreover, identification of which immune cell types are specifically infected in humans is unclear. We show that human myeloid cells and B cells are primary targets of ZIKV in humanized mice. We also show that a DNA vaccine encoding full length prM and E protein protects humanized mice from ZIKV infection. Following administration of the DNA vaccine, humanized DRAG mice developed antibodies targeting ZIKV as measured by ELISA and neutralization assays. Moreover, following ZIKV challenge, vaccinated animals presented virtually no detectable virus in human cells and in serum, whereas unvaccinated animals displayed robust infection, as measured by qRT-PCR. Our results utilizing humanized mice show potential efficacy for a targeted DNA vaccine against ZIKV in humans.

  13. Expression of a LINE-1 endonuclease variant in gastric cancer: its association with clinicopathological parameters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Gangshi; Wu, Benyan; Wang, Mengwei; Gao, Jie; Huang, Haili; Tian, Yu; Xue, Liyan; Wang, Weihua; You, Weidi; Lian, Hongwei; Duan, Xiaojian

    2013-01-01

    Long interspersed nuclear element-1 (LINE-1 or L1), the most abundant and only autonomously active family of non-LTR retrotransposons in the human genome, expressed not only in the germ lines but also in somatic tissues. It contributes to genetic instability, aging, and age-related diseases, such as cancer. Our previous study identified in human gastric adenocarcinoma an upregulated transcript GCRG213, which shared 88% homology with human L1 sequence and contained a putative conserved apurinic/apyrimidinic endonucleas1 domain. Immunohistochemistry was carried out by using a monoclonal mouse anti-human GCRG213 protein (GCRG213p) antibody produced in our laboratory, on tissue microarray constructed with specimens from 175 gastric adenocarcinoma patients. The correlation between GCRG213p expression and patient clinicopathological parameters was evaluated. GCRG213p expression in gastric cancer cell lines were studied using Western blotting analysis. L1 promoter methylation status of gastric cancer cells was tested using methylation-specific PCR. BLASTP was used at the NCBI Blast server to identify GCRG213p sequence to any alignments in the Protein Data Bank databases. Most primary gastric cancer, lymph node metastases and gastric intestinal metaplasia glands showed positive GCRG213p immunoreactivity. High GCRG213p immunostaining score in the primary gastric cancer was positively correlated with tumor differentiation (well differentiated, p = 0.001), Lauren’s classification (intestinal type, p < 0.05) and a late age onset of gastric adenocarcinoma (≥65 yrs; p < 0.05). GCRG213p expression has no association with other clinicopathological parameters, including survival. Western blotting analysis of GCRG213p expression in gastric cancer cells indicated that GCRG213p level was higher in gastric cancer cell lines than in human normal gastric epithelium immortalized cell line GES-1. Partial methylation of L1 in gastric cancer cells was confirmed by methylation

  14. Helicobacter pylori induces vascular endothelial growth factor production in gastric epithelial cells through hypoxia-inducible factor-1α-dependent pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Min-Jung; Song, Eun-Jung; Kim, Bo-Yeon; Kim, Dong-Jae; Park, Jong-Hwan

    2014-12-01

    Although Helicobacter pylori have been known to induce vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) production in gastric epithelial cells, the precise mechanism for cellular signaling is incompletely understood. In this study, we investigated the role of bacterial virulence factor and host cellular signaling in VEGF production of H. pylori-infected gastric epithelial cells. We evaluated production of VEGF, activation of nuclear factor nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-κB) and mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) and hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) stabilization in gastric epithelial cells infected with H. pylori WT or isogenic mutants deficient in type IV secretion system (T4SS). H. pylori induced VEGF production in gastric epithelial cells via both T4SS-dependent and T4SS-independent pathways, although T4SS-independent pathway seems to be the dominant signaling. The inhibitor assay implicated that activation of NF-κB and MAPKs is dispensable for H. pylori-induced VEGF production in gastric epithelial cells. H. pylori led to HIF-1α stabilization in gastric epithelial cells independently of T4SS, NF-κB, and MAPKs, which was essential for VEGF production in these cells. N-acetyl-cysteine (NAC), a reactive oxygen species (ROS) inhibitor, treatment impaired H. pylori-induced HIF-1α stabilization and VEGF production in gastric epithelial cells. We defined the important role of ROS-HIF-1α axis in VEGF production of H. pylori-infected gastric epithelial cells, and bacterial T4SS has a minor role in H. pylori-induced VEGF production of gastric epithelial cells. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Transmission of Helicobacter pylori Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuseppina Oderda

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Helicobacter pylori infection is one of the most common bacterial infections worldwide. It is accepted as the major cause of chronic gastritis, peptic ulcer, carcinoma of the distal part of the stomach and gastric lymphoma. However, how and when the infection is acquired remain largely unknown. Identification of mode of transmission is vital for developing preventive measures to interrupt its spread, but studies focused on this issue are difficult to implement. From epidemiological studies, it is known that there are great differences in the prevalence of infection in different populations and in ethnic groups originating from high prevalence regions. This is likely related to inferior hygienic conditions and sanitation. In developing countries, infection occurs at a much earlier age. In developed countries, the prevalence of infection is related to poor socioeconomic conditions, particularly density of living. Humans seem to be the only reservoir of H pylori, which spread from person to person by oral-oral, fecal-oral or gastro-oral routes. Most infections are acquired in childhood, possibly from parents or other children living as close contacts. Infection from the environment or from animals cannot be entirely excluded.

  16. Blueberry proanthocyanidins against human norovirus surrogates in model foods and under simulated gastric conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, Snehal; Howell, Amy B; D'Souza, Doris H

    2017-05-01

    Blueberry proanthocyanidins (B-PAC) are known to decrease titers of human norovirus surrogates in vitro. The application of B-PAC as therapeutic or preventive options against foodborne viral illness needs to be determined using model foods and simulated gastric conditions in vitro. The objective of this study was to evaluate the antiviral effect of B-PAC in model foods (apple juice (AJ) and 2% reduced fat milk) and simulated gastrointestinal fluids against cultivable human norovirus surrogates (feline calicivirus; FCV-F9 and murine norovirus; MNV-1) over 24 h at 37 °C. Equal amounts of each virus (5 log PFU/ml) was mixed with B-PAC (1, 2 and 5 mg/ml) prepared either in AJ, or 2% milk, or simulated gastric fluids and incubated over 24 h at 37 °C. Controls included phosphate buffered saline, malic acid (pH 7.2), AJ, 2% milk or simulated gastric and intestinal fluids incubated with virus over 24 h at 37 °C. The tested viruses were reduced to undetectable levels within 15 min with B-PAC (1, 2 and 5 mg/ml) in AJ (pH 3.6). However, antiviral activity of B-PAC was reduced in milk. FCV-F9 was reduced by 0.4 and 1.09 log PFU/ml with 2 and 5 mg/ml B-PAC in milk, respectively and MNV-1 titers were reduced by 0.81 log PFU/ml with 5 mg/ml B-PAC in milk after 24 h. B-PAC at 5 mg/ml in simulated intestinal fluid reduced titers of the tested viruses to undetectable levels within 30 min. Overall, these results show the potential of B-PAC as preventive and therapeutic options for foodborne viral illnesses. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  17. Pneumothorax in human immunodeficiency virus infection

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    Sibes Kumar Das

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Pneumothorax occurs more frequently in people with Human immunodeficiency virus infection in comparison with the general population. In most cases it is secondary the underlying pulmonary disorder, especially pulmonary infections. Though Pneumocystis jiroveci pneumonia is most common pulmonary infection associated with pneumothorax, other infections, non-infective etiology and iatrogenic causes are also encountered. Pneumothorax in these patients are associated with persistent bronchopleural fistula, prolonged hospital stay, poor success with intercostal tube drain, frequent requirement of surgical intervention and increased mortality. Optimal therapeutic approach in these patients is still not well-defined.

  18. Incidence of cervical human papillomavirus infection in systemic lupus erythematosus women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendoza-Pinto, C; García-Carrasco, M; Vallejo-Ruiz, V; Méndez-Martínez, S; Taboada-Cole, A; Etchegaray-Morales, I; Muñóz-Guarneros, M; Reyes-Leyva, J; López-Colombo, A

    2017-08-01

    Objectives Our objective was to study the incidence, persistence and clearance of human papillomavirus infection in systemic lupus erythematosus women and assess risk factors for persistence of human papillomavirus infection. Methods We carried out a prospective, observational cohort study of 127 systemic lupus erythematosus women. Patients were evaluated at baseline and at three years. Traditional and systemic lupus erythematosus women-related disease risk factors were collected. Gynaecological evaluations and cervical cytology screening were made. Human papillomavirus detection and genotyping were made by polymerase chain reaction and linear array. Results The cumulative prevalence of human papillomavirus infection increased from 22.8% at baseline to 33.8% at three years; p = lupus erythematosus women, the cumulative prevalence of human papillomavirus infection, including high risk-human papillomavirus and multiple human papillomavirus infections, may increase over time. Most persistent infections were low risk-human papillomavirus. The number of lifetime sexual partners and the cumulative cyclophosphamide dose were independently associated with incident human papillomavirus infection.

  19. Effects of different sweet preloads on incretin hormone secretion, gastric emptying, and postprandial glycemia in healthy humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Tongzhi; Zhao, Beiyi R; Bound, Michelle J; Checklin, Helen L; Bellon, Max; Little, Tanya J; Young, Richard L; Jones, Karen L; Horowitz, Michael; Rayner, Christopher K

    2012-01-01

    Macronutrient "preloads" can stimulate glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) and glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP), slow gastric emptying, and reduce postprandial glycemic excursions. After sweet preloads, these effects may be signaled by sodium-glucose cotransporter-1 (SGLT1), sweet taste receptors, or both. We determined the effects of 4 sweet preloads on GIP and GLP-1 release, gastric emptying, and postprandial glycemia. Ten healthy subjects were studied on 4 separate occasions each. A preload drink containing 40 g glucose, 40 g tagatose/isomalt mixture (TIM), 40 g 3-O-methylglucose (3OMG; a nonmetabolized substrate of SGLT1), or 60 mg sucralose was consumed 15 min before a (13)C-octanoic acid-labeled mashed potato meal. Blood glucose, plasma total GLP-1 and GIP, serum insulin, and gastric emptying were determined. Both glucose and 3OMG stimulated GLP-1 and GIP release in advance of the meal (each P < 0.05), whereas TIM and sucralose did not. The overall postprandial GLP-1 response was greater after glucose, 3OMG, and TIM than after sucralose (P < 0.05), albeit later after TIM than the other preloads. The blood glucose and insulin responses in the first 30 min after the meal were greatest after glucose (each P < 0.05). Gastric emptying was slower after both 3OMG and TIM than after sucralose (each P < 0.05). In healthy humans, SGLT1 substrates stimulate GLP-1 and GIP and slow gastric emptying, regardless of whether they are metabolized, whereas the artificial sweetener sucralose does not. Poorly absorbed sweet tastants (TIM), which probably expose a greater length of gut to nutrients, result in delayed GLP-1 secretion but not in delayed GIP release. These observations have the potential to optimize the use of preloads for glycemic control. This trial was registered at www.actr.org.au as ACTRN12611000775910.

  20. Non-Human Primate Models of Orthopoxvirus Infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne Schmitt

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Smallpox, one of the most destructive diseases, has been successfully eradicated through a worldwide vaccination campaign. Since immunization programs have been stopped, the number of people with vaccinia virus induced immunity is declining. This leads to an increase in orthopoxvirus (OPXV infections in humans, as well as in animals. Additionally, potential abuse of Variola virus (VARV, the causative agent of smallpox, or monkeypox virus, as agents of bioterrorism, has renewed interest in development of antiviral therapeutics and of safer vaccines. Due to its high risk potential, research with VARV is restricted to two laboratories worldwide. Therefore, numerous animal models of other OPXV infections have been developed in the last decades. Non-human primates are especially suitable due to their close relationship to humans. This article provides a review about on non-human primate models of orthopoxvirus infections.

  1. Activation of EGFR and ERBB2 by Helicobacter pylori Results in Survival of Gastric Epithelial Cells with DNA Damage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaturvedi, Rupesh; Asim, Mohammad; Piazuelo, M. Blanca; Yan, Fang; Barry, Daniel P.; Sierra, Johanna Carolina; Delgado, Alberto G.; Hill, Salisha; Casero, Robert A.; Bravo, Luis E.; Dominguez, Ricardo L.; Correa, Pelayo; Polk, D. Brent; Washington, M. Kay; Rose, Kristie L.; Schey, Kevin L.; Morgan, Douglas R.; Peek, Richard M.; Wilson, Keith T.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND & AIMS The gastric cancer-causing pathogen Helicobacter pylori upregulates spermine oxidase (SMOX) in gastric epithelial cells, causing oxidative stress-induced apoptosis and DNA damage. A subpopulation of SMOXhigh cells are resistant to apoptosis, despite their high levels of DNA damage. Because epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) activation can regulate apoptosis, we determined its role in SMOX-mediated effects. METHODS SMOX, apoptosis, and DNA damage were measured in gastric epithelial cells from H pylori-infected Egfrwa5 mice (which have attenuated EGFR activity), Egfr wild-type mice, or in infected cells incubated with EGFR inhibitors or deficient in EGFR. Phosphoproteomic analysis was performed. Two independent tissue microarrays containing each stage of disease, from gastritis to carcinoma, and gastric biopsies from Colombian and Honduran cohorts were analyzed by immunohistochemistry. RESULTS SMOX expression and DNA damage were decreased, and apoptosis increased in H pylori-infected Egfrwa5 mice. H pylori-infected cells with deletion or inhibition of EGFR had reduced levels of SMOX, DNA damage, and DNA damagehigh apoptosislow cells. Phosphoproteomic analysis revealed increased EGFR and ERBB2 signaling. Immunoblot analysis demonstrated the presence of a phosphorylated (p)EGFR–ERBB2 heterodimer and pERBB2; knockdown of ErbB2 facilitated apoptosis of DNA damagehigh apoptosislow cells. SMOX was increased in all stages of gastric disease, peaking in tissues with intestinal metaplasia, whereas pEGFR, pEGFR–ERBB2, and pERBB2 were increased predominantly in tissues demonstrating gastritis or atrophic gastritis. Principal component analysis separated gastritis tissues from patients with cancer vs those without cancer. pEGFR, pEGFR–ERBB2, pERBB2, and SMOX were increased in gastric samples from patients whose disease progressed to intestinal metaplasia or dysplasia, compared with patients whose disease did not progress. CONCLUSIONS In an analysis

  2. [Assesing the effect of Lepidium meyenii "Maca" on the gastric mucosa in patients with functional dyspepsia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benites Goñi, Harold Eduardo; Cok García, Jaime; Bussalleu Cavero, Alejandra; Bustamente Robles, Katherine Yelenia; Zegarra Chang, Arturo; Bravo, Eduar; Bussalleu Rivera, Alejandro

    2014-01-01

    The present study was designed to determine the histological effect of Lepidium meyenii "Maca" on the gastric mucosa in patients with functional dyspepsia. This study consists of a clinical case series, in which the effect of Maca on the gastric histopathology of 29 Peruvian patients diagnosed with functional dyspepsia was examined. The presence of H. pylori, as well as the degree and depth of the gastric mucosa inflammation was evaluated from biopsies obtained before and after the treatment based solely of Maca 3 grams per day for four weeks. Average values of the degree and depth of mucosal inflammation before and after the treatment were compared showing no statistical difference among the samples. Sixteen patients were infected with H. pylori, and they remained infected after the treatment with Maca. A four week long treatment with Maca does not produce significant changes on gastric mucosa of patients with functional dyspepsia, neither on H. pylori eradication.

  3. Histopathology of the gastric oxyntic mucosa in two different patient groups during long-term treatment with omeprazole

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hage, Esther; Hendel, Lene; Gustafsen, Jens

    2003-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Hypochlorhydria, hypergastrinaemia, inflammation and Helicobacter pylori infection, dose and duration of omeprazole treatment may separately, or in combination, influence the proliferation of enterochromaffin-like (ECL) cells and parietal cell changes in gastric mucosa. To assess the ...... of gastric mucosal inflammation, omeprazole dose, duration of treatment and acid inhibition. The level of gastrin secretion and high plasma gastrin appear to accelerate ECL cell proliferation and parietal cell changes possibly influenced by chronic gastritis and H. pylori infection....

  4. Tracking Human Immunodeficiency Virus-1 Infection in the Humanized DRAG Mouse Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jiae; Peachman, Kristina K.; Jobe, Ousman; Morrison, Elaine B.; Allam, Atef; Jagodzinski, Linda; Casares, Sofia A.; Rao, Mangala

    2017-01-01

    Humanized mice are emerging as an alternative model system to well-established non-human primate (NHP) models for studying human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-1 biology and pathogenesis. Although both NHP and humanized mice have their own strengths and could never truly reflect the complex human immune system and biology, there are several advantages of using the humanized mice in terms of using primary HIV-1 for infection instead of simian immunodeficiency virus or chimera simian/HIV. Several different types of humanized mice have been developed with varying levels of reconstitution of human CD45+ cells. In this study, we utilized humanized Rag1KO.IL2RγcKO.NOD mice expressing HLA class II (DR4) molecule (DRAG mice) infused with HLA-matched hematopoietic stem cells from umbilical cord blood to study early events after HIV-1 infection, since the mucosal tissues of these mice are highly enriched for human lymphocytes and express the receptors and coreceptors needed for HIV-1 entry. We examined the various tissues on days 4, 7, 14, and 21 after an intravaginal administration of a single dose of purified primary HIV-1. Plasma HIV-1 RNA was detected as early as day 7, with 100% of the animals becoming plasma RNA positive by day 21 post-infection. Single cells were isolated from lymph nodes, bone marrow, spleen, gut, female reproductive tissue, and brain and analyzed for gag RNA and strong stop DNA by quantitative (RT)-PCR. Our data demonstrated the presence of HIV-1 viral RNA and DNA in all of the tissues examined and that the virus was replication competent and spread rapidly. Bone marrow, gut, and lymph nodes were viral RNA positive by day 4 post-infection, while other tissues and plasma became positive typically between 7 and 14 days post-infection. Interestingly, the brain was the last tissue to become HIV-1 viral RNA and DNA positive by day 21 post-infection. These data support the notion that humanized DRAG mice could serve as an excellent model for studying the

  5. Tracking Human Immunodeficiency Virus-1 Infection in the Humanized DRAG Mouse Model

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    Jiae Kim

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Humanized mice are emerging as an alternative model system to well-established non-human primate (NHP models for studying human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1 biology and pathogenesis. Although both NHP and humanized mice have their own strengths and could never truly reflect the complex human immune system and biology, there are several advantages of using the humanized mice in terms of using primary HIV-1 for infection instead of simian immunodeficiency virus or chimera simian/HIV. Several different types of humanized mice have been developed with varying levels of reconstitution of human CD45+ cells. In this study, we utilized humanized Rag1KO.IL2RγcKO.NOD mice expressing HLA class II (DR4 molecule (DRAG mice infused with HLA-matched hematopoietic stem cells from umbilical cord blood to study early events after HIV-1 infection, since the mucosal tissues of these mice are highly enriched for human lymphocytes and express the receptors and coreceptors needed for HIV-1 entry. We examined the various tissues on days 4, 7, 14, and 21 after an intravaginal administration of a single dose of purified primary HIV-1. Plasma HIV-1 RNA was detected as early as day 7, with 100% of the animals becoming plasma RNA positive by day 21 post-infection. Single cells were isolated from lymph nodes, bone marrow, spleen, gut, female reproductive tissue, and brain and analyzed for gag RNA and strong stop DNA by quantitative (RT-PCR. Our data demonstrated the presence of HIV-1 viral RNA and DNA in all of the tissues examined and that the virus was replication competent and spread rapidly. Bone marrow, gut, and lymph nodes were viral RNA positive by day 4 post-infection, while other tissues and plasma became positive typically between 7 and 14 days post-infection. Interestingly, the brain was the last tissue to become HIV-1 viral RNA and DNA positive by day 21 post-infection. These data support the notion that humanized DRAG mice could serve as an excellent model

  6. Nucleosomes correlate with in vivo progression pattern of de novo methylation of p16 CpG islands in human gastric carcinogenesis.

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    Zhe-Ming Lu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The exact relationship between nucleosome positioning and methylation of CpG islands in human pathogenesis is unknown. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In the present study, we characterized the nucleosome position within the p16 CpG island and established a seeding methylation-specific PCR (sMSP assay based on bisulfite modification to enrich the p16 alleles containing methylated-CpG at the methylation "seeding" sites within its intron-1 in gastric carcinogenesis. The sMSP-positive rate in primary gastric carcinoma (GC samples (36/40 was significantly higher than that observed in gastritis (19/45 or normal samples (7/13 (P<0.01. Extensive clone sequencing of these sMSP products showed that the density of methylated-CpGs in p16 CpG islands increased gradually along with the severity of pathological changes in gastric tissues. In gastritis lesions the methylation was frequently observed in the region corresponding to the exon-1 coding-nucleosome and the 5'UTR-nucleosome; the methylation was further extended to the region corresponding to the promoter-nucleosome in GC samples. Only few methylated-CpG sites were randomly detected within p16 CpG islands in normal tissues. The significantly inversed relationship between the p16 exon-1 methylation and its transcription was observed in GC samples. An exact p16 promoter-specific 83 bp-MSP assay confirms the result of sMSP (33/55 vs. 1/6, P<0.01. In addition, p16 methylation in chronic gastritis lesions significantly correlated with H. pylori infection; however, such correlation was not observed in GC specimens. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: It was determined that de novo methylation was initiated in the coding region of p16 exon-1 in gastritis, then progressed to its 5'UTR, and ultimately to the proximal promoter in GCs. Nucleosomes may function as the basic extension/progression unit of de novo methylation of p16 CpG islands in vivo.

  7. Inactivation of Smad4 in gastric carcinomas.

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    Powell, S M; Harper, J C; Hamilton, S R; Robinson, C R; Cummings, O W

    1997-10-01

    Allelic loss of chromosome 18q has been noted in intestinal type gastric adenocarcinomas. Smad4 is a gene located at 18q that was recently cloned in humans and found to be significantly altered in pancreatic cancers. We sought to determine whether Smad4 genetic alterations played a significant role in gastric tumorigenesis by studying 35 gastric adenocarcinomas of all histopathological types and pathological stages. Microdissected specimens were used for mutational analysis of Smad4 at the nucleotide level, including the entire coding region and intron/exon boundaries. Allelic imbalance was also analyzed at the Smad4 locus using two nearby microsatellite markers. One case of apparent biallelic inactivation of Smad4 was found in our study of 35 gastric carcinomas. A nonsense point mutation at codon 334 was demonstrated, which, similar to other Smad4 mutations, is predicted to truncate the conserved COOH-terminal domain of this protein. This Smad4 C to T transition mutation was proven to be somatically acquired. Allelic loss was also noted on chromosome 18q at a marker near Smad4 in this mutated gastric cancer, apparently producing complete inactivation of Smad4 in this tumor. Significant 18q allelic loss (56% of 34 informative cases) was noted in our gastric carcinomas using microsatellite markers near the Smad4 locus, regardless of histological subtype or pathological stage. Additionally, three cases of microsatellite instability were observed. Thus, Smad4 inactivation was noted in our gastric carcinomas; however, this event was rare. The frequent loss of chromosomal arm 18q observed in gastric cancers suggests the presence of other tumor suppressor genes in this region that are involved in gastric tumorigenesis. Further studies are needed to identify these other targets of inactivation during gastric cancer development.

  8. Human hepatocyte depletion in the presence of HIV-1 infection in dual reconstituted humanized mice

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    Wang, Weimin; Cheng, Yan; Makarov, Edward; Ganesan, Murali; Gebhart, Catherine L.; Gorantla, Santhi; Osna, Natalia

    2018-01-01

    ABSTRACT Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection impairs liver function, and liver diseases have become a leading cause of morbidity in infected patients. The immunopathology of liver damage caused by HIV-1 remains unclear. We used chimeric mice dually reconstituted with a human immune system and hepatocytes to address the relevance of the model to pathobiology questions related to human hepatocyte survival in the presence of systemic infection. TK-NOG males were transplanted with mismatched human hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells and hepatocytes, human albumin concentration and the presence of human immune cells in blood were monitored for hepatocytes and immune reconstitution, and mice were infected with HIV-1. HIV-1-infected animals showed a decline in human albumin concentration with a significant reduction in percentage of human hepatocytes compared to uninfected mice. The decrease in human albumin levels correlated with a decline in CD4+ cells in the liver and with an increase in HIV-1 viral load. HIV-1 infection elicited proinflammatory response in the immunological milieu of the liver in HIV-infected mice compared to uninfected animals, as determined by upregulation of IL23, CXCL10 and multiple toll-like receptor expression. The inflammatory reaction associated with HIV-1 infection in vivo could contribute to the depletion and dysfunction of hepatocytes. The dual reconstituted TK-NOG mouse model is a feasible platform to investigate hepatocyte-related HIV-1 immunopathogenesis. This article has an associated First Person interview with the first author of the paper. PMID:29361613

  9. Human hepatocyte depletion in the presence of HIV-1 infection in dual reconstituted humanized mice

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    Raghubendra Singh Dagur

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1 infection impairs liver function, and liver diseases have become a leading cause of morbidity in infected patients. The immunopathology of liver damage caused by HIV-1 remains unclear. We used chimeric mice dually reconstituted with a human immune system and hepatocytes to address the relevance of the model to pathobiology questions related to human hepatocyte survival in the presence of systemic infection. TK-NOG males were transplanted with mismatched human hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells and hepatocytes, human albumin concentration and the presence of human immune cells in blood were monitored for hepatocytes and immune reconstitution, and mice were infected with HIV-1. HIV-1-infected animals showed a decline in human albumin concentration with a significant reduction in percentage of human hepatocytes compared to uninfected mice. The decrease in human albumin levels correlated with a decline in CD4+ cells in the liver and with an increase in HIV-1 viral load. HIV-1 infection elicited proinflammatory response in the immunological milieu of the liver in HIV-infected mice compared to uninfected animals, as determined by upregulation of IL23, CXCL10 and multiple toll-like receptor expression. The inflammatory reaction associated with HIV-1 infection in vivo could contribute to the depletion and dysfunction of hepatocytes. The dual reconstituted TK-NOG mouse model is a feasible platform to investigate hepatocyte-related HIV-1 immunopathogenesis. This article has an associated First Person interview with the first author of the paper.

  10. Inhibition of growth and metastasis of human gastric cancer implanted in nude mice by d-limonene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Xiao-Guang; Zhan, Li-Bin; Feng, Bing-An; Qu, Ming-Yang; Yu, Li-Hua; Xie, Ji-Hong

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the effects and mechanism of d-limonene on the growth and metastasis of gastric cancer in vivo. METHODS: Metastatic model simulating human gastric cancer was established by orthotopic implantation of histologically intact human tumor tissue into gastric wall of nude mice. One percent d-limonene was orally administered at dose of 15 ml/kg every other day for seven weeks. Eight weeks after implantation, tumor weight, inhibition rate, apoptotic index (AI), microvessel density (MVD), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), variation of ultrastructure, and the presence of metastasis were evaluated, respectively, after the mice were sacrificed. RESULTS: The tumor weight was significantly reduced in 5-FU group (2.55 ± 0.28 g), d-limonene group (1.49 ± 0.09 g) and combined treatment group (1.48 ± 0.21 g) compared with the control group(2.73 ± 0.23 g, P limonene group, combined treatment group, the inhibition rates were 2.60%, 47.58% and 46.84% and 0, respectively; AI was (3.31 ± 0.33)%, (8.26 ± 1.21)%, (20.99 ± 1.84)% and (19.34 ± 2.19)%, respectively; MVD was (8.64 ± 2.81), (16.77 ± 1.39), (5.32 ± 4.26) and (5.86 ± 2.27), respectively; VEGF expression was (45.77 ± 4.79), (41.34 ± 5.41), (29.71 ± 8.92) and (28.24 ± 8.55), respectively. The incidences of peritoneal metastasis also decreased significantly in 5-FU group(77.8%), d-limonene group (20.0%) and combined group (22.2%) compared with control group (100%) versus 62.5%, 30% and 22.2%) (P limonene group and combined group than that in control group (87.5% vs 55.5%, 20.0% and 22.2% respectively) (P limonene group and combined group was 25.0%, 22.2%, 0, 0, respectively and 12.5%, 11.1% 0, 0, with respect to the metastasis rate to other organs. CONCLUSION: d-limonene has antiangiogenic and proapoptotic effects on gastric cancer, thereby inhibits tumor growth and metastasis. Combination of d-limonene with cytotoxic agents may be more effective. PMID:15237454

  11. Synchronous gastric and duodenal metastases from head and neck squamous cell carcinoma: a unique presentation of upper gastrointestinal bleeding.

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    Tarangelo, Nicholas P; Kistler, C Andrew; Daitch, Zachary; Jiang, Wei; Quirk, Daniel M

    2018-01-01

    Metastatic disease to the stomach or duodenum is an infrequent diagnosis, and head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) is one of the least common primary malignancies that lead to gastric or duodenal metastases. We report the case of a 65-year-old man with human immunodeficiency virus infection and previously diagnosed HNSCC who presented with melena. The patient had a percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy tube placed 3 months prior to his presentation. Laboratory testing was significant for normocytic anemia and a digital rectal examination was positive for melena. Esophagogastroduodenoscopy revealed numerous cratered nodules with contact bleeding in the stomach as well as the duodenum that appeared malignant. Biopsies of the gastric and duodenal nodules were positive for p40 and CK 5/6, consistent with metastatic squamous cell carcinoma.

  12. Gastric volvulus with partial and complete gastric necrosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shukla, Ram Mohan; Mandal, Kartik Chandra; Maitra, Sujay; Ray, Amit; Sarkar, Ruchirendu; Mukhopadhyay, Biswanath; Bhattacharya, Malay

    2014-01-01

    Here, we report two interesting cases of gastric necrosis in acute gastric volvulus due to eventration of the diaphragm. Both the cases presented with a significant challenge and were managed successfully. The management of the cases is presented and relevant literature is discussed. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first case report of gastric volvulus with gastric necrosis requiring complete and partial gastrectomy in the available English literature. PMID:24604987

  13. Gastric volvulus with partial and complete gastric necrosis

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    Ram Mohan Shukla

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Here, we report two interesting cases of gastric necrosis in acute gastric volvulus due to eventration of the diaphragm. Both the cases presented with a significant challenge and were managed successfully. The management of the cases is presented and relevant literature is discussed. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first case report of gastric volvulus with gastric necrosis requiring complete and partial gastrectomy in the available English literature.

  14. Phylogenetic evidence that two distinct Trichuris genotypes infect both humans and non-human primates.

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    Damiana F Ravasi

    Full Text Available Although there has been extensive debate about whether Trichuris suis and Trichuris trichiura are separate species, only one species of the whipworm T. trichiura has been considered to infect humans and non-human primates. In order to investigate potential cross infection of Trichuris sp. between baboons and humans in the Cape Peninsula, South Africa, we sequenced the ITS1-5.8S-ITS2 region of adult Trichuris sp. worms isolated from five baboons from three different troops, namely the Cape Peninsula troop, Groot Olifantsbos troop and Da Gama Park troop. This region was also sequenced from T. trichiura isolated from a human patient from central Africa (Cameroon for comparison. By combining this dataset with Genbank records for Trichuris isolated from other humans, non-human primates and pigs from several different countries in Europe, Asia, and Africa, we confirmed the identification of two distinct Trichuris genotypes that infect primates. Trichuris sp. isolated from the Peninsula baboons fell into two distinct clades that were found to also infect human patients from Cameroon, Uganda and Jamaica (named the CP-GOB clade and China, Thailand, the Czech Republic, and Uganda (named the DG clade, respectively. The divergence of these Trichuris clades is ancient and precedes the diversification of T. suis which clustered closely to the CP-GOB clade. The identification of two distinct Trichuris genotypes infecting both humans and non-human primates is important for the ongoing treatment of Trichuris which is estimated to infect 600 million people worldwide. Currently baboons in the Cape Peninsula, which visit urban areas, provide a constant risk of infection to local communities. A reduction in spatial overlap between humans and baboons is thus an important measure to reduce both cross-transmission and zoonoses of helminthes in Southern Africa.

  15. A Burkholderia pseudomallei colony variant necessary for gastric colonization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Austin, C R; Goodyear, A W; Bartek, I L; Stewart, A; Sutherland, M D; Silva, E B; Zweifel, A; Vitko, N P; Tuanyok, A; Highnam, G; Mittelman, D; Keim, P; Schweizer, H P; Vázquez-Torres, A; Dow, S W C; Voskuil, M I

    2015-02-03

    Diverse colony morphologies are a hallmark of Burkholderia pseudomallei recovered from infected patients. We observed that stresses that inhibit aerobic respiration shifted populations of B. pseudomallei from the canonical white colony morphotype toward two distinct, reversible, yet relatively stable yellow colony variants (YA and YB). As accumulating evidence supports the importance of B. pseudomallei enteric infection and gastric colonization, we tested the response of yellow variants to hypoxia, acidity, and stomach colonization. Yellow variants exhibited a competitive advantage under hypoxic and acidic conditions and alkalized culture media. The YB variant, although highly attenuated in acute virulence, was the only form capable of colonization and persistence in the murine stomach. The accumulation of extracellular DNA (eDNA) was a characteristic of YB as observed by 4',6-diamidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI) staining of gastric tissues, as well as in an in vitro stomach model where large amounts of eDNA were produced without cell lysis. Transposon mutagenesis identified a transcriptional regulator (BPSL1887, designated YelR) that when overexpressed produced the yellow phenotype. Deletion of yelR blocked a shift from white to the yellow forms. These data demonstrate that YB is a unique B. pseudomallei pathovariant controlled by YelR that is specifically adapted to the harsh gastric environment and necessary for persistent stomach colonization. Seemingly uniform populations of bacteria often contain subpopulations that are genetically identical but display unique characteristics which offer advantages when the population is faced with infrequent but predictable stresses. The pathogen Burkholderia pseudomallei is capable of forming several reversible colony types, and it interconverted between one white type and two yellow types under certain environmental stresses. The two yellow forms exhibited distinct advantages in low-oxygen and acidic environments. One yellow

  16. Treatment of low-grade gastric malt lymphoma using Helicobacter pylori eradication

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    Grgov Saša

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. Lymphoma of mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT lymphoma of the stomach usually occurs as a consequence of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori infection. The aim of this study was to investigate the long-term effect of treatment of low-grade gastric MALT lymphoma with the H. pylori eradication method. Methods. In the period 2002-2012 in 20 patients with dyspepsia, mean age 55.1 years, the endoscopic and histologic diagnosis of gastric MALT lymphoma in the early stages were made. Histological preparations of endoscopic biopsy specimens were stained with hematoxyllineosin (HE, histochemical and immunohistochemical methods. Results. Endoscopic findings of gastritis were documented in 25% of the patients, and 75% of the patients had hypertrophic folds, severe mucosal hyperemia, fragility, nodularity, exulcerations and rigidity. Histopathologically, pathognomonic diagnostic criterion were infiltration and destruction of glandular epithelium with neoplastic lymphoid cells, the so-called lymphoepithelial lesions. In all 20 patients H. pylori was verified by rapid urease test and Giemsa stain. After the triple eradication therapy complete remission of MALT lymphoma was achieved in 85% of the patients, with no recurrence of lymphoma and H. pylori infection in the average follow-up period of 48 months. In 3 (15% of the patients, there was no remission of MALT lymphoma 12 months after the eradication therapy. Of these 3 patients 2 had progression of MALT lymphoma to diffuse large-cell lymphoma. Conclusion. Durable complete re-mission of low-grade gastric MALT lymphoma is achieved in a high percentage after eradication of H. pylori infection, thus preventing the formation of diffuse large-cell lymphoma and gastric adenocarcinoma.

  17. Evaluation of gastric histology in children and adolescents with Helicobacter pylori gastritis using the Update Sydney System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langner, Marini; Machado, Rodrigo Strehl; Patrício, Francy R S; Kawakami, Elisabete

    2009-01-01

    Although Helicobacter pylori infection is prevalent in our country, there are few studies evaluating the associated histological abnormalities in children. To evaluate the histological features of the gastric mucosa in children and adolescents with Helicobacter pylori gastritis. One hundred and thirty two gastric biopsies from 22 symptomatic patients infected with H. pylori (14F/8M, median age 10 y 5 mo, age range 2 y 11 mo to 16 y 9 mo) were evaluated. Evaluated gastric regions included: antrum (lesser and greater curvature), corpus (lesser and greater curvature), incisura angularis and fundus. Histological examination was performed according to the Updated Sydney System, and regional scores for polymorphonuclear and mononuclear cell infiltrate as well as bacterial density were generated. Fifteen (68.2%) patients presented H. pylori-chronic active gastritis, six (27.3%) presented antrum-predominant H. pylori-chronic active gastritis, and one (4.5%) presented corpus-predominant H. pylori-chronic active gastritis. Polymorphonuclear cell infiltrate and mononuclear cell infiltrate were observed in 93.9% and 98.5% of the biopsy specimens, respectively. Higher histological scores for polymorphonuclear infiltrate, mononuclear infiltrate, and bacterial density were observed in the gastric antrum. Intestinal metaplasia and gastric atrophy were not identified in any patient. Lymphoid aggregates and lymphoid follicles were observed in the gastric antrum of three (13.6%) and seven (31.8%) patients, respectively, but they were not related to antral nodularity. Chronic active gastritis was observed in all patients with H. pylori infection. However, antral or corporeal predominance was not observed in most patients.

  18. Oxygen tension level and human viral infections

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    Morinet, Frédéric, E-mail: frederic.morinet@sls.aphp.fr [Centre des Innovations Thérapeutiques en Oncologie et Hématologie (CITOH), CHU Saint-Louis, Paris (France); Université Denis Diderot, Sorbonne Paris Cité Paris, Paris (France); Casetti, Luana [Institut Cochin INSERM U1016, Paris (France); François, Jean-Hugues; Capron, Claude [Institut Cochin INSERM U1016, Paris (France); Laboratoire d' Hématologie, Hôpital Ambroise Paré, Boulogne (France); Université de Versailles Saint-Quentin en Yvelynes, Versailles (France); Pillet, Sylvie [Laboratoire de Bactériologie-Virologie-Hygiène, CHU de Saint-Etienne, Saint-Etienne (France); Université de Lyon et Université de Saint-Etienne, Jean Monnet, GIMAP EA3064, F-42023 Saint-Etienne, Lyon (France)

    2013-09-15

    The role of oxygen tension level is a well-known phenomenon that has been studied in oncology and radiotherapy since about 60 years. Oxygen tension may inhibit or stimulate propagation of viruses in vitro as well as in vivo. In turn modulating oxygen metabolism may constitute a novel approach to treat viral infections as an adjuvant therapy. The major transcription factor which regulates oxygen tension level is hypoxia-inducible factor-1 alpha (HIF-1α). Down-regulating the expression of HIF-1α is a possible method in the treatment of chronic viral infection such as human immunodeficiency virus infection, chronic hepatitis B and C viral infections and Kaposi sarcoma in addition to classic chemotherapy. The aim of this review is to supply an updating concerning the influence of oxygen tension level in human viral infections and to evoke possible new therapeutic strategies regarding this environmental condition. - Highlights: • Oxygen tension level regulates viral replication in vitro and possibly in vivo. • Hypoxia-inducible factor 1 (HIF-1α) is the principal factor involved in Oxygen tension level. • HIF-1α upregulates gene expression for example of HIV, JC and Kaposi sarcoma viruses. • In addition to classical chemotherapy inhibition of HIF-1α may constitute a new track to treat human viral infections.

  19. The Prevalence of Helicobacter pylori Virulence Factors in Bhutan, Vietnam, and Myanmar Is Related to Gastric Cancer Incidence

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    Tran Thi Huyen Trang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Gastric cancer is a significant health problem in Asia. Although the prevalence of Helicobacter pylori infection is similar in Bhutan, Vietnam, and Myanmar, the incidence of gastric cancer is highest in Bhutan, followed by Vietnam and Myanmar. We hypothesized that H. pylori virulence factors contribute to the differences. The status of cagA, vacA, jhp0562, and β-(1,3galT(jhp0563 was examined in 371 H. pylori-infected patients from Bhutan, Vietnam, and Myanmar. Each virulence factor could not explain the difference of the incidence of gastric cancer. However, the prevalence of quadruple-positive for cagA, vacA s1, vacA m1, and jhp0562-positive/β-(1,3galT-negative was significantly higher in Bhutan than in Vietnam and Myanmar and correlated with gastric cancer incidence. Moreover, gastritis-staging scores measured by histology of gastric mucosa were significantly higher in quadruple-positive strains. We suggest that the cagA, vacA s1, vacA m1, and jhp0562-positive/β-(1,3galT-negative genotype may play a role in the development of gastric cancer.

  20. Measurement of gastric emptying by intragastric gamma scintigraphy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malbert, C H; Mathis, C; Bobillier, E; Laplace, J P; Horowitz, M

    1997-09-01

    Gastric emptying is usually measured in animals and humans by dilution/sampling or external scintigraphy. These methods are either time consuming or require expensive equipment. The capacity of a miniature gamma counter positioned in the stomach to measure emptying of liquid and solid meals was evaluated. In eight conscious pigs fitted with gastric and duodenal cannulae, gastric emptying of saline (500 mL), dextrose (20%, 500 mL), porridge (300 g) and scrambled eggs (300 g), all labelled with 3.5 MBq 99mTC, was evaluated. When positioned in the antrum the probe was unable to quantify gastric emptying. In contrast, measurements of the fractional emptying of saline over 4-min periods by the probe positioned in the corpus and quantification of radioactivity in the duodenal effluent correlated closely (r = 0.88, P < 0.05). Gastric emptying (50% emptying time) of saline and both solid meals measured by the probe was not significantly different from quantification of the duodenal effluent volume. No difference was observed also for the dextrose meal but only while gastric acid secretion was suppressed by omeprazole. We conclude that an intragastric gamma counter permits measurement of gastric emptying of homogeneous meals provided meal stimulation of gastric secretion was not extensive. This was possible probably by monitoring emptying from the proximal stomach.

  1. Correlation between virulence markers of Helicobacter pylori in the oral cavity and gastric biopsies

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    Myriam Lucrecia MEDINA

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT BACKGROUND: The clinical outcome of Helicobacter pylori infection has been associated with virulence factors. The presence of these factors is useful as molecular markers in the identification of the high risk for developing severe gastric pathologies. OBJECTIVE: To correlate the presence of virulence markers cagA and bab2A of H. pylori in oral and gastric biopsy samples. METHODS: An observational, prospective, descriptive, and cross-sectional study was carried out between September 2011 and September 2012. Patients suffering dyspepsia with indication for upper gastrointestinal video endoscopy who attended the Gastroenterology Service of the Hospital Dr. Julio C. Perrando were included. Epidemiological investigation was completed. To detect the bacteria and their virulence genes, samples of saliva, dental plaque and gastric biopsy were taken and processed by PCR. RESULTS: Sixty-one patients were selected for this study (30 women and 31 men. H. pylori was detected in 31 gastric biopsies and 31 oral samples. Significant difference between oral and gastric samples was found in cagA genotype. Agreement between oral and gastric genotypes was found in 38.7% of samples from the same patient. CONCLUSION: This study is the first in provide information about the genotypes of the Argentinean Northeast H. pylori strains. Despite the high prevalence of H. pylori infection, the most of patients had less virulent genotypes in oral cavity and gastric tissue. The cagA / babA2 combination was not frequent in the samples studied. There was not a statistical correlation between the virulence genes and gastroduodenal or oral diseases. Although in some patients the same genotype was found both in oral and gastric samples, it cannot be ensure that they corresponding to the same strain because a DNA sequencing was not performed.

  2. Apigenin has anti-atrophic gastritis and anti-gastric cancer progression effects in Helicobacter pylori-infected Mongolian gerbils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, Chao-Hung; Weng, Bi-Chuang; Wu, Chun-Chieh; Yang, Sheau-Fang; Wu, Deng-Chang; Wang, Yuan-Chuen

    2014-02-12

    Apigenin, one of the most common flavonoids, is abundant in celery, parsley, chamomile, passionflower, and other vegetables and fruits. Celery is recognized as a medicinal vegetable in Oriental countries to traditionally treat inflammation, swelling, blood pressure, serum lipid, and toothache. In this study, we investigated apigenin treatment effects on Helicobacter pylori-induced atrophic gastritis and gastric cancer progression in Mongolian gerbils. Five to eight-week-old Mongolian gerbils were inoculated with Helicobacter pylori for four weeks without (atrophic gastritis group) or with N'-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitroso-guanidine (MNNG) (gastric cancer group) in drinking water, and were then rested for two weeks. During the 7th-32th (atrophic gastritis group) or the 7th-52th (gastric cancer group) weeks, they were given various doses (0-60 mg/kgbw/day) of apigenin. At the end of the 32th (atrophic gastritis group) or the 52th (atrophic gastritis group) week, all Mongolian gerbils were sacrificed using the CO2 asphyxia method. The histological changes of Helicobacter pylori colonization, neutrophil and monocyte infiltrations, and atrophic gastritis in both atrophic gastritis and gastric cancer Mongolian gerbils were examined using immunohistochemistry stain and Sydney System scoring. Apigenin treatments (30-60 mg/kgbw/day) effectively decreased atrophic gastritis (atrophic gastritis group) and dysplasia/gastric cancer (gastric cancer group) rates in Mongolian gerbils. Apigenin treatment (60 mg/kgbw/day) significantly decreased Helicobacter pylori colonization and Helicobacter pylori-induced histological changes of neutrophil and monocyte infiltrations and atrophic gastritis in both atrophic gastritis and gastric cancer Mongolian gerbils. Apigenin has the remarkable ability to inhibit Helicobacter pylori-induced atrophic gastritis and gastric cancer progression as well as possessing potent anti-gastric cancer activity. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights

  3. Silencing of B7-H4 suppresses the tumorigenicity of the MGC-803 human gastric cancer cell line and promotes cell apoptosis via the mitochondrial signaling pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Donghui; Zhou, Yong; Li, Chao; Yang, Lina

    2018-04-01

    B7-H4 is a transmembrane protein which is a member of the B7 superfamily. It is overexpressed in various types of cancer, including gastric cancer. However, the effects of B7-H4 on the tumorigenicity of gastric cancer and the underlying mechanisms have not yet been fully explored. Thus, the aim of this study was to examine the effects of B7-H4 on the tumorigenicity of gastric cancer cells and to elucidate the underlying mechanisms. For this purpose, B7-H4 expression in gastric cancer tissues was detected by immunohistochemical staining. The effects of B7-H4 on the biological behavior of the MGC-803 human gastric cancer cell line were examined by Cell Counting kit-8 (CCK-8) assay, cell cycle analysis, wound healing assay, Annexin V/propidium iodide staining and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick-end labeling (TUNEL) assay. Moreover, the expression levels of apoptotic markers, such as cleaved caspase‑3, cleaved caspase‑9, Bcl-2 and Bax were examined by western blot analysis. Immunohistochemical staining revealed that a high expression of B7-H4 was found in about 41.8% of tissues obtained from patients with gastric cancer. Comparative analysis revealed that B7-H4 expression significantly correlated with lymph node metastasis and the TNM stage. The results of CCK-8 assay, cell cycle analysis, wound healing assay, Annexin V/propidium iodide staining assay and TUNEL assay all demonstrated that the silencing of B7-H4 by small interfering RNA decreased cell proliferation, suppressed cell motility, and induced cell cycle arrest and the apoptosis of MGC-803 human gastric cancer cells. Furthermore, the results of western blot analysis indicated that the downregulation of B7-H4 induced the apoptosis of the MGC-803 cells via the mitochondrial signaling pathway through the activation of caspase‑3 and caspase‑9, and by altering the Bax/Bcl-2 ratio in a manner that favored apoptosis. Based on the findings on human gastric cancer cell line MGC-803, the

  4. Prolapsing Gastric Polyp Causing Intermittent Gastric Outlet Obstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosai, Nik Ritza; Gendeh, Hardip Singh; Norfaezan, Abdul Rashid; Razman, Jamin; Sutton, Paul Anthony; Das, Srijit

    2015-06-01

    Gastric polyps are often an incidental finding on upper gastrointestinal endoscopy, with an incidence up to 5%. The majority of gastric polyps are asymptomatic, occurring secondary to inflammation. Prior reviews discussed Helicobacter pylori (H pylori)-associated singular gastric polyposis; however, we present a rare and unusual case of recurrent multiple benign gastric polyposis post H pylori eradication resulting in intermittent gastric outlet obstruction. A 70-year-old independent male, Chinese in ethnicity, with a background of diabetes mellitus, hypertension, and a simple renal cyst presented with a combination of melena, anemia, and intermittent vomiting of partially digested food after meals. Initial gastroscopy was positive for H pylori; thus he was treated with H pylori eradication and proton pump inhibitors. Serial gastroscopy demonstrated multiple sessile gastric antral polyps, the largest measuring 4 cm. Histopathologic examination confirmed a benign hyperplastic lesion. Computed tomography identified a pyloric mass with absent surrounding infiltration or metastasis. A distal gastrectomy was performed, whereby multiple small pyloric polyps were found, the largest prolapsing into the pyloric opening, thus explaining the intermittent nature of gastric outlet obstruction. Such polyps often develop from gastric ulcers and, if left untreated, may undergo neoplasia to form malignant cells. A distal gastrectomy was an effective choice of treatment, taking into account the polyp size, quantity, and potential for malignancy as opposed to an endoscopic approach, which may not guarantee a complete removal of safer margins and depth. Therefore, surgical excision is favorable for multiple large gastric polyps with risk of malignancy.

  5. Understanding gastric forces calculated from high-resolution pill tracking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laulicht, Bryan; Tripathi, Anubhav; Schlageter, Vincent; Kucera, Pavel; Mathiowitz, Edith

    2010-05-04

    Although other methods exist for monitoring gastrointestinal motility and contractility, this study exclusively provides direct and quantitative measurements of the forces experienced by an orally ingested pill. We report motive forces and torques calculated from real-time, in vivo measurements of the movement of a magnetic pill in the stomachs of fasted and fed humans. Three-dimensional net force and two-dimensional net torque vectors as a function of time data during gastric residence are evaluated using instantaneous translational and rotational position data. Additionally, the net force calculations described can be applied to high-resolution pill tracking acquired by any modality. The fraction of time pills experience ranges of forces and torques are analyzed and correlate with the physiological phases of gastric digestion. We also report the maximum forces and torques experienced in vivo by pills as a quantitative measure of the amount of force pills experience during the muscular contractions leading to gastric emptying. Results calculated from human data are compared with small and large animal models with a translational research focus. The reported magnitude and direction of gastric forces experienced by pills in healthy stomachs serves as a baseline for comparison with pathophysiological states. Of clinical significance, the directionality associated with force vector data may be useful in determining the muscle groups associated with gastrointestinal dysmotility. Additionally, the quantitative comparison between human and animal models improves insight into comparative gastric contractility that will aid rational pill design and provide a quantitative framework for interpreting gastroretentive oral formulation test results.

  6. Gastric microbiota and carcinogenesis: the role of non-Helicobacter pylori bacteria: a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emanuel Dias-Jácome

    Full Text Available Background and aim: Helicobacter pylori is the strongest risk factor for gastric cancer. However, recent advances in DNA sequencing technology have revealed a complex microbial community in the stomach that could also contribute to the development of gastric cancer. The aim of this study was to present recent scientific evidence regarding the role of non-Helicobacter pylori bacteria in gastric carcinogenesis. Methods: A systematic review of original articles published in PubMed in the last ten years related to gastric microbiota and gastric cancer in humans was performed. Results: Thirteen original articles were included. The constitution of gastric microbiota appears to be significantly affected by gastric cancer and premalignant lesions. In fact, differences in gastric microbiota have been documented, depending on Helicobacter pylori status and gastric conditions, such as non-atrophic gastritis, intestinal metaplasia and cancer. Gastric carcinogenesis can be associated with an increase in many bacteria (such as Lactobacillus coleohominis, Klebsiella pneumoniae or Acinetobacter baumannii as well as decrease in others (such as Porphyromonas spp, Neisseria spp, Prevotella pallens or Streptococcus sinensis. However, there is no conclusive data that confirms if these changes in microbiota are a cause or consequence of the process of carcinogenesis. Conclusions: Even though there is limited evidence in humans, microbiota differences between normal individuals, pre-malignant lesions and gastric cancer could suggest a progressive shift in the constitution of gastric microbiota in carcinogenesis, possibly resulting from a complex cross-talk between gastric microbiota and Helicobacter pylori. However, further studies are needed to elucidate the specific role (if any of different microorganisms.

  7. Gastric microbiota and carcinogenesis: the role of non-Helicobacter pylori bacteria - A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dias-Jácome, Emanuel; Libânio, Diogo; Borges-Canha, Marta; Galaghar, Ana; Pimentel-Nunes, Pedro

    2016-09-01

    Helicobacter pylori is the strongest risk factor for gastric cancer. However, recent advances in DNA sequencing technology have revealed a complex microbial community in the stomach that could also contribute to the development of gastric cancer. The aim of this study was to present recent scientific evidence regarding the role of non-Helicobacter pylori bacteria in gastric carcinogenesis. A systematic review of original articles published in PubMed in the last ten years related to gastric microbiota and gastric cancer in humans was performed. Thirteen original articles were included. The constitution of gastric microbiota appears to be significantly affected by gastric cancer and premalignant lesions. In fact, differences in gastric microbiota have been documented, depending on Helicobacter pylori status and gastric conditions, such as non-atrophic gastritis, intestinal metaplasia and cancer. Gastric carcinogenesis can be associated with an increase in many bacteria (such as Lactobacillus coleohominis, Klebsiella pneumoniae or Acinetobacter baumannii) as well as decrease in others (such as Porphyromonas spp, Neisseria spp, Prevotella pallens or Streptococcus sinensis). However, there is no conclusive data that confirms if these changes in microbiota are a cause or consequence of the process of carcinogenesis. Even though there is limited evidence in humans, microbiota differences between normal individuals, pre-malignant lesions and gastric cancer could suggest a progressive shift in the constitution of gastric microbiota in carcinogenesis, possibly resulting from a complex cross-talk between gastric microbiota and Helicobacter pylori. However, further studies are needed to elucidate the specific role (if any) of different microorganisms.

  8. Cellular schwannoma arising from the gastric wall misdiagnosed as a gastric stromal tumor: A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Guangyao; Chen, Ping; Zong, Liang; Shi, Lei; Zhao, Wei

    2014-02-01

    Cellular schwannomas have been previously described at almost every anatomic location of the human body, but reports in the gastric wall are rare. The current study presents a rare case of cellular schwannoma originating from the gastric wall. Computed tomography revealed a 5.6×5.3×4.0-cm 3 solid mass located in the posterior wall of the stomach. Open laparotomy confirmed its mesenchymal origin. Microscopically, the tissue was composed of spindle-shaped and fascicularly-arranged cells, but mitotic figures were rare. Immunohistochemical staining showed that the tumor was negative for cluster of differentiation (CD)117, CD34, smooth muscle actin and desmin, but positive for S-100 and Ki67. The patient presented no evidence of recurrence and metastasis during follow-up. Gastric cellular schwannomas may be diagnosed by clinical characteristics, histological observations and immunohistochemical markers.

  9. An experimental study of the diagnosing value to nude mice model of transplanted human gastric cancer with folate-receptor MR contrast agent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ding Jianhui; Zeng Mengsu; Zhou Kangrong; Shen Jizhang; Chen Caizhong; Zhong Gaoren; Xue Qiong; Gu Haiyan

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the tumor targeting characteristic by observing signal varying of human gastric cancer transplanted nude mice (SGC-7901 ) using Folate-Receptor MR contrast agent. Methods: As a Folate-Receptor MR contrast agent, Gd-DTPA-Folate was obtained by conjugation of DTPA-Folate and GdCl 3 under specific conditions. Nude mice of subcutaneously transplanted human gastric cancer (SGC-7901) were used as animal models, 12 mice were divided into experimental group (n=6) and control group (n=6) randomly. Both were injected with Gd-DTPA-Folate and Gd-DTPA (contained same gadolinium) via abdominal cavity respectively. Tumor signal varying was observed by T 1 WI after injection of contrast agent immediately, 1, 2, 3, 4, 6, 12 and 24 h, and tumor signal changing of experimental group was compared with that of control group. CNR (contrast noise ratio) was regarded as evaluating mark. Results: Tumor signal intensity of experimental group was increased evidently between 1-2 hours after injecting Gd-DTPA-Folate. Comparison with pre-injection, there was a significant difference (evaluating mark is CNR: q 1 =5.80, q 2 =4.64; P 1 =0.64, q 2 =1.19, P>0.05). Conclusion: Gd-DTPA-Folate shows definite characteristic of tumor targeting effect to nude mice of subcutaneously transplanted human gastric cancer (SGC-7901). (authors)

  10. Knowledge about gastric cancer in Popayán, Colombia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edwin Oveimar Muñoz-Ruiz

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: The gastric cancer is the second major cause of death by malignance in the worldwide. In Colombia the department of Cauca has the major incidence rate of this disease. Objectives: To determine the degree of knowledge about main symptoms and the three principal causal factors of the gastric cancer. Moreover to determine the existence of promotion program about this disease in primary health care centers client users and workers in Popayan, Colombia, 2009-2010. Methods: In cross-section study, we interviewed 532 adults: 6 directors, 64 health workers and 462 client-users of 9 health service provider institutions of primary care. Results: 68% and 78 % of users and workers respectively know that gastric cancer is very frequent disease. The percentage of Users that know the main risk factors are: Helycobacter pylori infection (16%, excessive salt consumption (24%, food with high concentration of nitrosamines (0.3 %. We do not found significative difference by gender, age and socioeconomic status for knowledge of main symptoms of gastric cancer (p< 0.05. Conclusions: Gastric cancer is a disease that needs special attention within governmental efforts. Regardless illness has high incidence rate in the department, there is not a clear knowledge about it, in the risk population.

  11. The RNA-binding protein PCBP2 facilitates gastric carcinoma growth by targeting miR-34a

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu, Cheng-En; Liu, Yong-Chao; Zhang, Hui-Dong; Huang, Guang-Jian

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • PCBP2 is overexpressed in human gastric cancer. • PCBP2 high expression predicts poor survival. • PCBP2 regulates gastric cancer growth in vitro and in vivo. • PCBP2 regulates gastric cancer apoptosis by targeting miR-34a. - Abstract: Gastric carcinoma is the fourth most common cancer worldwide, with a high rate of death and low 5-year survival rate. However, the mechanism underling gastric cancer is still not fully understood. Here in the present study, we identify the RNA-binding protein PCBP2 as an oncogenic protein in human gastric carcinoma. Our results show that PCBP2 is up-regulated in human gastric cancer tissues compared to adjacent normal tissues, and that high level of PCBP2 predicts poor overall and disease-free survival. Knockdown of PCBP2 in gastric cancer cells inhibits cell proliferation and colony formation in vitro, whereas opposing results are obtained when PCBP2 is overexpressed. Our in vivo subcutaneous xenograft results also show that PCBP2 can critically regulate gastric cancer cell growth. In addition, we find that PCBP2-depletion induces apoptosis in gastric cancer cells via up-regulating expression of pro-apoptotic proteins and down-regulating anti-apoptotic proteins. Mechanically, we identify that miR-34a as a target of PCBP2, and that miR-34a is critically essential for the function of PCBP2. In summary, PCBP2 promotes gastric carcinoma development by regulating the level of miR-34a

  12. A study on the effect of Helicobacter pylori infection on p53 expression in gastric cancer and gastritis tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salih, Barik A; Gucin, Zuhal; Bayyurt, Nizamettin

    2013-09-16

    Helicobacter pylori cause damage to gastric epithelial cells and alterations in the p53 gene that lead to cancer development. This study aimed to determine the correlation of p53 expression with H. pylori using immunohistochemistry, RFLP-PCR, and histopathology. Gastric biopsy samples from gastric cancer (GC) (n = 54) and gastritis (n = 31) patients were examined for histopathological changes and expression of p53 protein by immunohistochemistry. Immunohistochemical analysis of p53 protein expression in H. pylori-positive GC sections showed an average of 44.3% positive cells in tumors and 6.9% in normal tissues, as compared to 16.4% and 4.4% in H. pylori-negative sections. P53 expression showed significant association with H. pylori (P = 0.005), invasion depth (P = 0.029) and inflammation reaction (P = 0.008). In gastritis sections, no difference in the average p53 staining in H. pylori-positive or -negative sections was seen. PCR-RFLP results also showed no difference in genotype frequencies of p53 in H. pylori-positive or -negative gastritis sections. Histopathology study of H. pylori-positive GC sections showed that 97.2% were the intestinal type and 2.8% the diffuse type, while in H. pylori-negative sections 35.2% were the intestinal type and 64.8% the diffuse type. Biopsy sections from H. pylori-positive gastritis patients revealed more severe inflammation than those of H. pylori-negative patients. Our results show that H. pylori infection affects p53 expression in GC. The average p53 expression was significantly higher in tumor than in normal tissues. In gastritis sections p53 expression was significantly associated with H. pylori.

  13. Time Trends in Helicobacter pylori Infection and Atrophic Gastritis Over 40 Years in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamada, Tomoari; Haruma, Ken; Ito, Masanori; Inoue, Kazuhiko; Manabe, Noriaki; Matsumoto, Hiroshi; Kusunoki, Hiroaki; Hata, Jiro; Yoshihara, Masaharu; Sumii, Koji; Akiyama, Takashi; Tanaka, Shinji; Shiotani, Akiko; Graham, David Y

    2015-06-01

    Helicobacter pylori infection produces progressive mucosal damage that may eventually result in gastric cancer. We studied the changes that occurred in the presence and severity of atrophic gastritis and the prevalence of H. pylori infection that occurred coincident with improvements in economic and hygienic conditions in Japan since World War II. The prevalence of H. pylori infection and histologic grades of gastric damage were retrospectively evaluated using gastric biopsy specimens obtained over a 40-year period. Gastric atrophy and intestinal metaplasia were scored using the updated Sydney classification system. The prevalence of H. pylori and severity of atrophy were examined in 1381 patients including 289 patients examined in the 1970s (158 men; mean age, 44.9 years), 787 in the 1990s (430 men; 44.2 years), and 305 in the 2010s (163 men; 53.2 years). Overall, the prevalence of H. pylori infection decreased significantly from 74.7% (1970s) to 53% (1990s) and 35.1% (2010s) (p pylori infection. There has been a progressive and rapid decline in the prevalence of H. pylori infection as well a fall in the rate of progression of gastric atrophy among H. pylori-infected Japanese coincident with the westernization and improvements in economic and hygienic conditions in Japan since World War II. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Prevalence of Helicobacter Pylori in gastric cancer in a south-east Asian population by 14C-urea breath test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung, A.Y-F; Chow, P.K.H.; Yu, W-K.; Ho, J.M.S.; Chan, H-S.; Wong, W-K.; Soo, K-C.

    2001-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori is believed to play an important role in the aetiology of gastric cancer. There is a great variability in seropositivity and histological frequency of H. pylori in gastric cancer. The present prospective study investigates the prevalence of H. pylori infection in gastric cancer patients using 14C-urea breath testing. Patients with endoscopic biopsy-proven gastric cancer were fasted for 6 h prior to ingesting 18.5 x 104 Bq of 14C-urea cocktail orally. Breath samples were collected after 20 min by AS/King them to blow into a hyamine solution and measurements were read in a scintillation counter. Fifty out of 51 patients (98%) with gastric cancer were positive on the 14C-urea breath test compared to 29 patients (61%) who were positive on histology. There was no association between sex, age or tumour site, stage, differentiation, Lauren type and H. pylori status. The test was negative in one patient with cardiac tumour in which histology of the resected specimen was also negative for the bacteria. Active H. pylori infection is highly prevalent in gastric cancer in a South-East Asian population. The 14C-urea breath test is a highly sensitive method for detecting the presence of H. pylori even in gastric adenocarcinoma irrespective of the stage