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Sample records for infected bovine erythrocytes

  1. Brucella melitensis Invades Murine Erythrocytes during Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitry, Marie-Alice; Hanot Mambres, Delphine; Deghelt, Michaël; Hack, Katrin; Machelart, Arnaud; Lhomme, Frédéric; Vanderwinden, Jean-Marie; Vermeersch, Marjorie; De Trez, Carl; Pérez-Morga, David; Letesson, Jean-Jacques

    2014-01-01

    Brucella spp. are facultative intracellular Gram-negative coccobacilli responsible for brucellosis, a worldwide zoonosis. We observed that Brucella melitensis is able to persist for several weeks in the blood of intraperitoneally infected mice and that transferred blood at any time point tested is able to induce infection in naive recipient mice. Bacterial persistence in the blood is dramatically impaired by specific antibodies induced following Brucella vaccination. In contrast to Bartonella, the type IV secretion system and flagellar expression are not critically required for the persistence of Brucella in blood. ImageStream analysis of blood cells showed that following a brief extracellular phase, Brucella is associated mainly with the erythrocytes. Examination by confocal microscopy and transmission electron microscopy formally demonstrated that B. melitensis is able to invade erythrocytes in vivo. The bacteria do not seem to multiply in erythrocytes and are found free in the cytoplasm. Our results open up new areas for investigation and should serve in the development of novel strategies for the treatment or prophylaxis of brucellosis. Invasion of erythrocytes could potentially protect the bacterial cells from the host's immune response and hamper antibiotic treatment and suggests possible Brucella transmission by bloodsucking insects in nature. PMID:25001604

  2. Phospholipid organization in monkey erythrocytes upon Plasmodium knowlesi infection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schaft, P.H. van der; Beaumelle, B.; Vial, H.; Roelofsen, B.; Kamp, J.A.F. op den; Deenen, L.L.M. van

    1987-01-01

    The phospholipid organization in monkey erythrocytes upon Plasmodium knowlesi infection has been studied. Parasitized and nonparasitized erythrocytes from malaria-infected blood were separated and pure erythrocyte membranes from parasitized cells were isolated using Affi-Gel beads. In this way, the

  3. Identification of Babesia bigemina infected erythrocyte surface antigens containing epitopes conserved among strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shompole, S; McElwain, T F; Jasmer, D P; Hines, S A; Katende, J; Musoke, A J; Rurangirwa, F R; McGuire, T C

    1994-03-01

    The presence of previously uncharacterized antigens (new antigens) on the surface of intact erythrocytes infected with three strains of Babesia bigemina from Kenya and one each from Puerto Rico, Mexico, St. Croix, and Texcoco-Mexico was demonstrated by indirect immunofluorescent antibody (IFA) reactions. These antigens were not strain specific because antibodies in bovine immune serum to either the Mexico or Kenya isolates reacted with all seven strains tested. Homologous and heterologous immune serum antibodies bound a maximum of 83% and 55%, respectively, of intact erythrocytes infected with the Kenya-Ngong strain but not uninfected erythrocytes. Both sera caused agglutination of only infected erythrocytes. Antibodies eluted from the surface of glutaraldehyde (0.25%) fixed infected erythrocytes had IFA reaction patterns among strains similar to those of immune sera before elution. Eluted antibodies were used to determine if these antigens were protein and encoded by B. bigemina. Eluted antibodies bound seven parasite-encoded proteins of 240, 220, 66, 62, 58, 52 and 38 kDa in an erythrocyte surface-specific immunoprecipitation reaction of 35S-methionine labelled proteins. It was concluded that the surface of B. bigemina infected erythrocytes had parasite-encoded proteins and that these proteins had surface exposed epitopes that were conserved among the seven strains examined which were from two continents.

  4. Evidence for a relationship between bovine erythrocyte lipid membrane peculiarities and immune pressure from ruminal ciliates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erythrocytes of bovines and other ruminants have a strikingly anomalous phospholipid composition, with low or absent phosphatidylcholine (PC) together with high sphingomyelin (SM) content. Here, we report the presence in normal bovine serum of high levels of anti-phospholipid antibodies of IgM isoty...

  5. Bovine herpesvirus 1 infection and infectious bovine rhinotracheitis

    OpenAIRE

    2007-01-01

    International audience; Bovine herpesvirus 1 (BoHV-1), classified as an alphaherpesvirus, is a major pathogen of cattle. Primary infection is accompanied by various clinical manifestations such as infectious bovine rhinotracheitis, abortion, infectious pustular vulvovaginitis, and systemic infection in neonates. When animals survive, a life-long latent infection is established in nervous sensory ganglia. Several reactivation stimuli can lead to viral re-excretion, which is responsible for the...

  6. Bovine Herpesvirus 4 infections and bovine mastitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wellenberg, Gerardus Johannus

    2002-01-01

    Mastitis is an often occurring disease in dairy cattle with an enormous economic impact for milk producers worldwide. Despite intensive research, which is historically based on the detection of bacterial udder pathogens, still around 20-35% of clinical cases of bovine mastitis have an unknown

  7. Bovine Herpesvirus 4 infections and bovine mastitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wellenberg, Gerardus Johannus

    2002-01-01

    Mastitis is an often occurring disease in dairy cattle with an enormous economic impact for milk producers worldwide. Despite intensive research, which is historically based on the detection of bacterial udder pathogens, still around 20-35% of clinical cases of bovine mastitis have an unknown aetiol

  8. Bovine Herpesvirus 4 infections and bovine mastitis

    OpenAIRE

    Wellenberg, Gerardus Johannus

    2002-01-01

    Mastitis is an often occurring disease in dairy cattle with an enormous economic impact for milk producers worldwide. Despite intensive research, which is historically based on the detection of bacterial udder pathogens, still around 20-35% of clinical cases of bovine mastitis have an unknown aetiology. Due to the high number of unknown causes of clinical mastitis, studies were undertaken to gain more insight into the role of viruses in this important disease. For the first time, we found tha...

  9. Protective effects of bacterial osmoprotectant ectoine on bovine erythrocytes subjected to staphylococcal alpha-haemolysin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bownik, Adam; Stępniewska, Zofia

    2015-06-01

    Ectoine (ECT) is a bacterial compatible solute with documented protective action however no data are available on its effects on various cells against bacterial toxins. Therefore, we determined the in vitro influence of ECT on bovine erythrocytes subjected to staphylococcal α-haemolysin (HlyA). The cells exposed to HlyA alone showed a distinct haemolysis and reduced glutathione (GSH)/oxidised glutathione (GSSG) level, however the toxic effects were attenuated in the combinations of HlyA + ECT suggesting ECT-induced protection of erythrocytes from HlyA.

  10. Electrophysiological studies of malaria parasite-infected erythrocytes: Current status

    OpenAIRE

    Staines, Henry M.; Alkhalil, Abdulnaser; Allen, Richard J.; De Jonge, Hugo R.; Derbyshire, Elvira; Egée, Stéphane; Ginsburg, Hagai; Hill, David A.; Huber, Stephan M.; Kirk, Kiaran; Lang, Florian; Lisk, Godfrey; Oteng, Eugene; Pillai, Ajay D.; Rayavara, Kempaiah

    2007-01-01

    The altered permeability characteristics of erythrocytes infected with malaria parasites have been a source of interest for over 30 years. Recent electrophysiological studies have provided strong evidence that these changes reflect transmembrane transport through ion channels in the host erythrocyte plasma membrane. However, conflicting results and differing interpretations of the data have led to confusion in this field. In an effort to unravel these issues, the groups involved recently came...

  11. Alterations of erythrocyte antioxidant mechanisms: antioxidant enzymes, lipid peroxidation and serum trace elements associated with anemia in bovine tropical theileriosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razavi, S M; Nazifi, S; Bateni, M; Rakhshandehroo, E

    2011-08-25

    In order to investigate the alterations of erythrocyte protective antioxidant mechanisms, lipid peroxidation and trace elements associated with anemia in bovine tropical theileriosis, an infected group comprised of 50 crossbred Holstein cattle, about 1-2 years old, naturally infected with Theileria annulata, were divided into 4 subgroups according to their parasitemia rates (5%) and also 10 healthy cattle as control were selected. Blood samples were taken and hematological parameters, the activities of antioxidant enzymes including superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione peroxidase (GPX) and catalase and serum concentrations of some antioxidant trace elements (copper, iron, zinc, manganese and selenium) were measured. As an index of lipid peroxidation, the level of Malondialdehyde (MDA) was also determined. The results showed a conspicuous decrease in the activities of SOD, GPX and catalase (P<0.01), and a significant decrease in the serum concentrations of Cu, Zn, Mn and Se in cattle with higher than 1% parasitemia (P<0.05) compared to the control. In addition, remarkable elevations in the MDA level (P<0.01) and serum concentration of iron (P<0.05) were observed in the infected animals. These findings pointed to the occurrence of exacerbating oxidative injuries to erythrocytes during parasitemia. Furthermore, it can be concluded that infection with T. annulata can interfere with protective antioxidant mechanisms of RBCs against oxidative damages, which promote the development of anemia.

  12. Identification of Novel Membrane Structures in Plasmodium falciparum Infected Erythrocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clavijo Carlos A

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available Little is known about the molecular mechanisms underlying the release of merozoites from malaria infected erythrocytes. In this study membranous structures present in the culture medium at the time of merozoite release have been characterized. Biochemical and ultrastructural evidence indicate that membranous structures consist of the infected erythrocyte membrane, the parasitophorous vacuolar membrane and a residual body containing electron dense material. These are subcellular compartments expected in a structure that arises as a consequence of merozoite release from the infected cell. Ultrastructural studies show that a novel structure extends from the former parasite compartment to the surface membrane. Since these membrane modifications are detected only after merozoites have been released from the infected erythrocyte, it is proposed that they might play a role in the release of merozoites from the host cell

  13. Purification and characterization of Band 3, the major intrinsic membrane protein of the bovine erythrocyte membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakashima, H; Makino, S

    1980-03-01

    Band 3 from bovine erythrocyte membranes was isolated in a state of high purity by the following steps in the presence of a nonionic detergent, nonaethyleneglycol n-dodecyl ether (C12E9): (1) selective removal of Band 2.6 from ghosts by solubilization with 2% C12E9 (2) extraction of Band 3-rich fraction with 4% C12E9 from 2% C12E9-treated membrane residues, and (3) purification of Band 3 by aminoethyl-conjugated Sepharose 4B column chromatography. Human Band 3 was also purified in good yield by aminoethyl-conjugated Sepharose 4B column chromatography of erythrocyte membrane proteins solubilized with 1% C12E9 and treated with 2,3-dimethymaleic anhydride. There were no significant differences in CD spectra in C12E9, amino acid compositions, and migration mobilities in sodium dodecyl sulfate-gel electrophoresis between bovine and human Band 3. Calculations of average hydrophobicity and discriminant function demonstrated that bovine Band 3 could be categorized as a typical integral membrane protein. Bovine Band 3 showed a tendency to form a dimer and higher aggregates in 0.1% C12E9; these were resistant to dissociation into monomers in sodium dodecyl sulfate solution and, further, the protein retained residual secondary structure in highly concentrated guanidine hydrochloride solution, indicating the possible presence of an extended sequence of hydrophobic amino acid residues.

  14. Bovine respiratory disease model based on dual infections with infection with bovine viral diarrhea virus and bovine corona virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bovine respiratory disease complex (BRDC) is the leading cause of economic loss in the U.S. cattle industry. BRDC likely results from simultaneous or sequential infections with multiple pathogens including both viruses and bacteria. Bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) and bovine corona virus (BoCV...

  15. Extraction of DNA from malaria-infected erythrocytes using isotachophoresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, Lewis A; Han, Crystal M; Santiago, Juan G

    2011-12-15

    We demonstrate a technique for purification of nucleic acids from malaria parasites infecting human erythrocytes using isotachophoresis (ITP). We release nucleic acids from malaria-infected erythrocytes by lysing with heat and proteinase K for 10 min and immediately, thereafter, load sample onto a capillary device. We study the effect of temperature on lysis efficiency. We also implement pressure-driven counterflow during ITP extraction to extend focusing time and increase nucleic acid yield. We show that the purified genomic DNA samples are compatible with polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and demonstrate a clinically relevant limit of detection of 0.5 parasites per nanoliter using quantitative PCR.

  16. Erythrocyte sedimentation rate in tropical intraerythrocytic blood infection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Viroj Wiwanitkit

    2009-01-01

    Erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR)determination is a classical hematological test.Although it is a non spe-cific laboratory parameter it is still widely used in present medicine.The author hereby briefly reviews and dis-cuses on clinical importance of ESR test for important tropical intraerythrocytic blood infection (malaria,leish-maniasis and babesiosis).

  17. Electrophysiological studies of malaria parasite-infected erythrocytes: Current status

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staines, Henry M.; Alkhalil, Abdulnaser; Allen, Richard J.; De Jonge, Hugo R.; Derbyshire, Elvira; Egée, Stéphane; Ginsburg, Hagai; Hill, David A.; Huber, Stephan M.; Kirk, Kiaran; Lang, Florian; Lisk, Godfrey; Oteng, Eugene; Pillai, Ajay D.; Rayavara, Kempaiah; Rouhani, Sherin; Saliba, Kevin J.; Shen, Crystal; Solomon, Tsione; Thomas, Serge L. Y.; Verloo, Patrick; Desai, Sanjay A.

    2009-01-01

    The altered permeability characteristics of erythrocytes infected with malaria parasites have been a source of interest for over 30 years. Recent electrophysiological studies have provided strong evidence that these changes reflect transmembrane transport through ion channels in the host erythrocyte plasma membrane. However, conflicting results and differing interpretations of the data have led to confusion in this field. In an effort to unravel these issues, the groups involved recently came together for a week of discussion and experimentation. In this article, the various models for altered transport are reviewed, together with the areas of consensus in the field and those that require a better understanding. PMID:17292372

  18. Cytoadhesion of Plasmodium falciparum-infected erythrocytes and the infected placenta: a two-way pathway

    OpenAIRE

    Costa, F.T.M.; Avril, M.; Nogueira,P.A.; Gysin, J

    2006-01-01

    Malaria is undoubtedly the world's most devastating parasitic disease, affecting 300 to 500 million people every year. Some cases of Plasmodium falciparum infection progress to the deadly forms of the disease responsible for 1 to 3 million deaths annually. P. falciparum-infected erythrocytes adhere to host receptors in the deep microvasculature of several organs. The cytoadhesion of infected erythrocytes to placental syncytiotrophoblast receptors leads to pregnancy-associated malaria (PAM). T...

  19. Cytoadhesion of Plasmodium falciparum-infected erythrocytes and the infected placenta: a two-way pathway

    OpenAIRE

    Costa,F.T.M.; Avril, M.; Nogueira, P. A; Gysin, J.

    2006-01-01

    Malaria is undoubtedly the world's most devastating parasitic disease, affecting 300 to 500 million people every year. Some cases of Plasmodium falciparum infection progress to the deadly forms of the disease responsible for 1 to 3 million deaths annually. P. falciparum-infected erythrocytes adhere to host receptors in the deep microvasculature of several organs. The cytoadhesion of infected erythrocytes to placental syncytiotrophoblast receptors leads to pregnancy-associated malaria (PAM). T...

  20. Adhesion of Plasmodium falciparum infected erythrocytes in ex vivo perfused placental tissue

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pehrson, Caroline; Mathiesen, Line; Heno, Kristine K;

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Placental malaria occurs when Plasmodium falciparum infected erythrocytes sequester in the placenta. Placental parasite isolates bind to chondroitin sulphate A (CSA) by expression of VAR2CSA on the surface of infected erythrocytes, but may sequester by other VAR2CSA mediated mechanisms...... placental tissue. RESULTS: The ex vivo placental perfusion model was modified to study adhesion of infected erythrocytes binding to CSA, endothelial protein C receptor (EPCR) or a transgenic parasite where P. falciparum erythrocyte membrane protein 1 expression had been shut down. Infected erythrocytes...... expressing VAR2CSA accumulated in perfused placental tissue whereas the EPCR binding and the transgenic parasite did not. Soluble CSA and antibodies specific against VAR2CSA inhibited binding of infected erythrocytes. CONCLUSION: The ex vivo model provides a novel way of studying receptor-ligand interactions...

  1. Detection of antibodies to variant antigens on Plasmodium falciparum-infected erythrocytes by flow cytometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Staalsoe, T; Giha, H A; Dodoo, D;

    1999-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Naturally induced antibodies binding to surface antigens of Plasmodium falciparum-infected erythrocytes can be detected by direct agglutination of infected erythrocytes or by indirect immunofluorescence on intact, unfixed, infected erythrocytes. Agglutinating antibodies have previously...... been shown to recognise Plasmodium falciparum erythrocyte membrane protein 1 (PfEMP1). This protein is inserted by the parasite into the host cell membrane and mediates the adhesion to the venular endothelium of the host organism in vivo. METHODS: Erythrocytes infected at high parasitaemias...... with ethidium-bromide-labelled mature forms of P. falciparum parasites were sequentially exposed to immune plasma, goat anti-human immunoglobulin (Ig) G, and fluorescein-isothiocyanate-conjugated rabbit anti-goat Ig. Plasma antibodies recognising antigens exposed on the surface of parasitised erythrocytes were...

  2. A spin label study of the effects of asbestos, quartz, and titanium dioxide dusts on the bovine erythrocyte membrane.

    OpenAIRE

    Leyko, W; Gendek, E

    1985-01-01

    The effects of five UICC asbestos samples, titanium dioxide, and quartz on the bovine red cell membrane have been studied in erythrocyte ghosts by the spin labelling technique. Analysis of the electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectra of two sulphydryl reactive spin labels and one fatty acid spin label in red cell ghosts showed modifications in membrane protein after asbestos treatment but no alterations in membrane lipids. In experiments with quartz no membrane changes were noted but tit...

  3. Kinetics of viral load and erythrocytic inclusion body formation in pacific herring artificially infected with erythrocytic necrosis virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glenn, Jolene A.; Emmenegger, Eveline J.; Grady, Courtney A.; Roon, Sean R.; Gregg, Jacob L.; Conway, Carla M.; Winton, James R.; Hershberger, Paul K.

    2012-01-01

    Viral erythrocytic necrosis (VEN) is a condition that affects marine and anadromous fish species, including herrings and salmonids, in the Atlantic and Pacific oceans. Infection is frequently associated with severe anemia and causes episodic mortality among wild and hatchery fish when accompanied by additional stressors; VEN can be presumptively diagnosed by (1) light microscopic identification of a single characteristic—a round, magenta-colored, 0.8-μm-diameter inclusion body (IB) within the cytoplasm of erythrocytes and their precursors on Giemsa-stained blood films; or (2) observation (via transmission electron microscopy [TEM]) of the causative iridovirus, erythrocytic necrosis virus (ENV), within erythrocytes or their precursors. To better understand the kinetics of VEN, specific-pathogen-free Pacific herring Clupea pallasii were infected with ENV by intraperitoneal injection. At 1, 4, 7, 10, 14, 21, and 28 d postexposure, samples of blood, spleen, and kidney were collected and assessed (1) via light microscopy for the number of intracytoplasmic IBs in blood smears and (2) via TEM for the number of virions within erythrocytes. The mean prevalence of intracytoplasmic IBs in the blood cells increased from 0% at 0–4 d postexposure to 94% at 28 d postexposure. Viral load within circulating red blood cells peaked at 7 d postexposure, fell slightly, and then reached a plateau. However, blood cells observed within the kidney and spleen tissues demonstrated high levels of ENV between 14 and 28 d postexposure. The results indicate that the viral load within erythrocytes does not correlate well with IB prevalence and that the virus can persist in infected fish for more than 28 d.

  4. Parasite Sequestration in Plasmodium falciparum Malaria: Spleen and Antibody Modulation of Cytoadherence of Infected Erythrocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    David, Peter H.; Hommel, Marcel; Miller, Louis H.; Udeinya, Iroka J.; Oligino, Lynette D.

    1983-08-01

    Sequestration, the adherence of infected erythrocytes containing late developmental stages of the parasite (trophozoites and schizonts) to the endothelium of capillaries and venules, is characteristic of Plasmodium falciparum infections. We have studied two host factors, the spleen and antibody, that influence sequestration of P. falciparum in the squirrel monkey. Sequestration of trophozoite/schizont-infected erythrocytes that occurs in intact animals is reduced in splenectomized animals; in vitro, when infected blood is incubated with monolayers of human melanoma cells, trophozoite/schizont-infected erythrocytes from intact animals but not from splenectomized animals bind to the melanoma cells. The switch in cytoadherence characteristics of the infected erythrocytes from nonbinding to binding occurs with a cloned parasite. Immune serum can inhibit and reverse in vitro binding to melanoma cells of infected erythrocytes from intact animals. Similarly, antibody can reverse in vivo sequestration as shown by the appearance of trophozoite/schizont-infected erythrocytes in the peripheral blood of an intact animal after inoculation with immune serum. These results indicate that the spleen modulates the expression of parasite alterations of the infected erythrocyte membrane responsible for sequestration and suggest that the prevention and reversal of sequestration could be one of the effector mechanisms involved in antibody-mediated protection against P. falciparum malaria.

  5. Viral infections and bovine mastitis: a review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wellenberg, G.J.; Poel, van der W.H.M.; Oirschot, van J.T.

    2002-01-01

    This review deals with the role of viruses in the aetiology of bovine mastitis. Bovine herpesvirus 1, bovine herpesvirus 4, foot-and-mouth disease virus, and parainfluenza 3 virus have been isolated from milk from cows with clinical mastitis. Intramammary inoculations of bovine herpesvirus 1 or

  6. Viral infections and bovine mastitis: a review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wellenberg, G.J.; Poel, van der W.H.M.; Oirschot, van J.T.

    2002-01-01

    This review deals with the role of viruses in the aetiology of bovine mastitis. Bovine herpesvirus 1, bovine herpesvirus 4, foot-and-mouth disease virus, and parainfluenza 3 virus have been isolated from milk from cows with clinical mastitis. Intramammary inoculations of bovine herpesvirus 1 or para

  7. Characterization of human placental glycosaminoglycans and regional binding to VAR2CSA in malaria infected erythrocytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beaudet, Julie M; Mansur, Leandra; Joo, Eun Ji;

    2014-01-01

    expressing VAR2CSA on the erythrocyte surface. This protein adheres to a low-sulfated chondroitin sulfate-A found in placental tissue causing great harm to both mother and developing fetus. In rare cases, the localization of infected erythrocytes to the placenta can even result in the vertical transmission...

  8. Cryo scanning electron microscopy of Plasmodium falciparum-infected erythrocytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hempel, Casper

    2017-01-01

    Plasmodium falciparum invades erythrocytes as an essential part of their life cycle. While living inside erythrocytes, the parasite remodels the cell's intracellular organization as well as its outer surface. Late trophozoite-stage parasites and schizonts introduce numerous small protrusions on t...... microscopy under cryogenic conditions allowing for high resolution and magnification of erythrocytes. This novel technique can be used for precise estimates of knob density and for studies on cytoadhesion....

  9. Activity of histidine in peripheral blood erythrocytes of pregnant women during exacerbation of cytomegalovirus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lutsenko, M T; Andrievskaya, I A

    2014-10-01

    We studied the effect of active cytomegalovirus infection on histidine content in peripheral blood erythrocytes of pregnant women at gestation weeks 20-22 and its involvement into hemoglobin oxygenation. Using the histochemical technique developed by us, we studied the distribution of products of specific reaction for histidine in peripheral blood erythrocytes of pregnant women. The percentage of histidine-positive erythrocytes and their area were evaluated. The relationship between the distribution of the products of the reaction for histidine in peripheral blood erythrocytes of pregnant women and the titer of anti-cytomegalovirus IgG was revealed. The histidine content in peripheral blood erythrocytes of pregnant women with active cytomegalovirus infection was reduced, which impaired heme binding to globin and decreased the formation of oxyhemoglobin.

  10. Physiological and hematological changes in Chum Salmon artificially infected with Erythrocytic Necrosis virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haney, D.C.; Hursh, D.A.; Mix, M.C.; Winton, J.R.

    1992-01-01

    Chum salmon Oncorhynchus keta were injected with erythrocytic necrosis virus (ENV) to study the physiological and hematological consequences of ENV infection. Infected and control fish were held in pathogen-free seawater and sampled for 5 weeks. Physiological tests included measures of plasma cortisol, glucose, protein, and osmolality; blood lactic acid; and liver glycogen. In general, ENV-infected fish had lower plasma glucose and blood lactic acid, and higher liver glycogen concentrations than did control fish. Hematological tests included red and white blood cell (RBC and WBC) counts, hematocrit, measurement of blood hemoglobin concentration, and a determination of erythrocyte fragility. Infected fish had lower RBC counts, hematocrits, and hemoglobin concentrations; higher WBC counts; and less fragile erythrocytes than did control fish. The hematology data indicated that erythrocytes of infected fish had higher mean corpuscular volume, depressed mean corpuscular hemoglobin concentration, and slightly lower mean corpuscular hemoglobin. Erythrocytic inclusions were observed in the cytoplasm of RBCs from infected fish. The infection progressed steadily through week 4, after which the fish appeared to begin recovering. In a second study, fish were infected with ENV for 3 weeks, and recovery from a stress challenge test was measured. Plasma glucose concentrations and osmclality were higher in infected fish, whereas plasma cortisol and blood lactate were only slightly elevated. These studies indicate that chum salmon withstood the effects of ENV infection without in-eversible physiological consequences. However, when subjected to a stress challenge test, infected fish recovered more slowly than control fish and had increased osmoregulatory difficulties.

  11. Relevant assay to study the adhesion of Plasmodium falciparum-infected erythrocytes to the placental epithelium.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philippe Boeuf

    Full Text Available In placental malaria, Plasmodium falciparum-infected erythrocytes adhere to the apical plasma membrane of the placental epithelium, triggering an impairment of placental function detrimental to the fetus. The design of anti-adhesion intervention strategies requires a detailed understanding of the mechanisms involved. However, most adhesion assays lack in vivo relevance and are hardly quantitative. Here, we describe a flow cytometry-based adhesion assay that is fully relevant by using apical epithelial plasma membrane vesicles as the adhesion matrix, and being applicable to infected erythrocytes directly isolated from patients. Adhesion is measured both as the percentage of pathogens bound to epithelial membrane vesicles as well as the mean number of vesicles bound per infected erythrocytes. We show that adhesins alternative to those currently identified could be involved. This demonstrates the power of this assay to advance our understanding of epithelial adhesion of infected erythrocytes and in the design of intervention strategies.

  12. A spin label study of the effects of asbestos, quartz, and titanium dioxide dusts on the bovine erythrocyte membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leyko, W; Gendek, E

    1985-04-01

    The effects of five UICC asbestos samples, titanium dioxide, and quartz on the bovine red cell membrane have been studied in erythrocyte ghosts by the spin labelling technique. Analysis of the electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectra of two sulphydryl reactive spin labels and one fatty acid spin label in red cell ghosts showed modifications in membrane protein after asbestos treatment but no alterations in membrane lipids. In experiments with quartz no membrane changes were noted but titanium dioxide altered the proteins bound with the protein reactive spin label used in the present study. The possible mechanism for these effects is discussed.

  13. Rapid and highly sensitive detection of malaria-infected erythrocytes using a cell microarray chip.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shouki Yatsushiro

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Malaria is one of the major human infectious diseases in many endemic countries. For prevention of the spread of malaria, it is necessary to develop an early, sensitive, accurate and conventional diagnosis system. METHODS AND FINDINGS: A cell microarray chip was used to detect for malaria-infected erythrocytes. The chip, with 20,944 microchambers (105 µm width and 50 µm depth, was made from polystyrene, and the formation of monolayers of erythrocytes in the microchambers was observed. Cultured Plasmodium falciparum strain 3D7 was used to examine the potential of the cell microarray chip for malaria diagnosis. An erythrocyte suspension in a nuclear staining dye, SYTO 59, was dispersed on the chip surface, followed by 10 min standing to allow the erythrocytes to settle down into the microchambers. About 130 erythrocytes were accommodated in each microchamber, there being over 2,700,000 erythrocytes in total on a chip. A microarray scanner was employed to detect any fluorescence-positive erythrocytes within 5 min, and 0.0001% parasitemia could be detected. To examine the contamination by leukocytes of purified erythrocytes from human blood, 20 µl of whole blood was mixed with 10 ml of RPMI 1640, and the mixture was passed through a leukocyte isolation filter. The eluted portion was centrifuged at 1,000×g for 2 min, and the pellet was dispersed in 1.0 ml of medium. SYTO 59 was added to the erythrocyte suspension, followed by analysis on a cell microarray chip. Similar accommodation of cells in the microchambers was observed. The number of contaminating leukocytes was less than 1 on a cell microarray chip. CONCLUSION: The potential of the cell microarray chip for the detection of malaria-infected erythrocytes was shown, it offering 10-100 times higher sensitivity than that of conventional light microscopy and easy operation in 15 min with purified erythrocytes.

  14. [Erythrocytes infected by Plasmodium falciparum activate human platelets].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polack, B; Peyron, F; Sheick Zadiuddin, I; Kolodié, L; Ambroise-Thomas, P

    1990-01-01

    Blood platelets are involved in Plasmodium falciparum malaria pathology as shown by thrombocytopenia and increased plasma level of two alpha granule proteins: beta thromboglobulin (beta TG) and platelet factor 4 (PF4). In this study we demonstrate that Plasmodium falciparum parasitized erythrocytes activate directly the secretion of beta TG and PF4 by human platelets. This secretion is related to parasitemia and occurs immediately after contact. Treatment of parasited erythrocytes by trypsin and diffusion chamber experiments suggest that platelet activation is triggered by parasitic substances shed on erythrocyte membrane and released in the culture medium.

  15. An automated method for determining the cytoadhesion of Plasmodium falciparum-infected erythrocytes to immobilized cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hempel, Casper; Boisen, Ida M; Efunshile, Akinwale;

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Plasmodium falciparum exports antigens to the surface of infected erythrocytes causing cytoadhesion to the host vasculature. This is central in malaria pathogenesis but in vitro studies of cytoadhesion rely mainly on manual counting methods. The current study aimed at developing...... an automated high-throughput method for this purpose utilizing the pseudoperoxidase activity of intra-erythrocytic haemoglobin. METHODS: Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells were grown to confluence in chamber slides and microtiter plates. Cytoadhesion of co-cultured P. falciparum, selected for binding to CHO...... using: i) binding of P. falciparum-infected erythrocytes to CHO cells over-expressing chondroitin sulfate A and ii) CHO cells transfected with CD36. Binding of infected erythrocytes including field isolates to primary endothelial cells was also performed. Data was analysed using linear regression...

  16. Cryo scanning electron microscopy of Plasmodium falciparum-infected erythrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hempel, Casper

    2017-07-01

    Plasmodium falciparum invades erythrocytes as an essential part of their life cycle. While living inside erythrocytes, the parasite remodels the cell's intracellular organization as well as its outer surface. Late trophozoite-stage parasites and schizonts introduce numerous small protrusions on the erythrocyte surface, called knobs. Current methods for studying these knobs include atomic force microscopy and electron microscopy. Standard electron microscopy methods rely on chemical fixation and dehydration modifying cell size. Here, a novel method is presented using rapid freezing and scanning electron microscopy under cryogenic conditions allowing for high resolution and magnification of erythrocytes. This novel technique can be used for precise estimates of knob density and for studies on cytoadhesion. © 2017 APMIS. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Overlapping antigenic repertoires of variant antigens expressed on the surface of erythrocytes infected by Plasmodium falciparum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Giha, H A; Staalsoe, T; Dodoo, D;

    1999-01-01

    Antibodies against variable antigens expressed on the surface of Plasmodium falciparum-infected erythrocytes are believed to be important for protection against malaria. A target for these antibodies is the P. falciparum erythrocyte membrane protein 1, PfEMP1, which is encoded by around 50 var...... genes and undergoes clonal variation. Using agglutination and mixed agglutination tests and flow cytometry to analyse the recognition of variant antigens on parasitized erythrocytes by plasma antibodies from individuals living in Daraweesh in eastern Sudan, an area of seasonal and unstable malaria...

  18. Cytoadherence of the malaria-infected erythrocyte membrane to C32 melanoma cells after merozoites are released from parasitized infected cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winograd, E; Robles, W M; Caldas, M L; Cortes, G T

    2001-04-01

    Infections with the human malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum are characterized by cytoadherence of infected erythrocytes to the venular endothelium of several organs. Video microscopy studies have shown that at the end of the asexual life of P. falciparum, the residual body containing haemozoin is released to the extracellular environment along with merozoites, leaving behind an infected erythrocyte "ghost". It is possible that these infected erythrocyte "ghosts" could remain sequestered within the blood vessels of patients infected with P. falciparum even after merozoites have been released from infected erythrocytes. In this study an in vitro cytoadherence assay was developed to show that infected erythrocyte "ghosts" can interact with C32 melanoma cells. Adherent infected erythrocyte "ghosts" contain some of the subcellular compartments of the malaria-infected red blood cell such as the tubo-vesicular membrane network and remnants of the parasitophorous vacuolar membrane, but lack haemozoin.

  19. Suicide for survival--death of infected erythrocytes as a host mechanism to survive malaria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Föller, Michael; Bobbala, Diwakar; Koka, Saisudha; Huber, Stephan M; Gulbins, Erich; Lang, Florian

    2009-01-01

    The pathogen of malaria, Plasmodium, enters erythrocytes and thus escapes recognition by the immune system. The pathogen induces oxidative stress to the host erythrocyte, which triggers eryptosis, the suicidal death of erythrocytes. Eryptosis is characterized by cell shrinkage, membrane blebbing and cell membrane phospholipid scrambling with phosphatidylserine exposure at the cell surface. Phosphatidylserine-exposing erythrocytes are identified by macrophages which engulf and degrade the eryptotic cells. To the extent that infected erythrocytes undergo eryptosis prior to exit of Plasmodiaand subsequent infection of other erythrocytes, the premature eryptosis may protect against malaria. Accordingly, any therapeutical intervention accelerating suicidal death of infected erythrocytes has the potential to foster elimination of infected erythrocytes, delay the development of parasitemia and favorably influence the course of malaria. Eryptosis is stimulated by a wide variety of triggers including osmotic shock, oxidative stress, energy depletion and a wide variety of xenobiotics. Diseases associated with accelerated eryptosis include sepsis, haemolytic uremic syndrome, malaria, sickle-cell anemia, beta-thalassemia, glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD)-deficiency, phosphate depletion, iron deficiency and Wilson's disease. Among the known stimulators of eryptosis, paclitaxel, chlorpromazine, cyclosporine, curcumin, PGE2 and lead have indeed been shown to favourably influence the course of malaria. Moreover, sickle-cell trait, beta-thalassemia trait, glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD)-deficiency and iron deficiency confer some protection against a severe course of malaria. Importantly, counteracting Plasmodia by inducing eryptosis is not expected to generate resistance of the pathogen, as the proteins involved in suicidal death of the host cell are not encoded by the pathogen and thus cannot be modified by mutations of its genes.

  20. Combining kriging, multispectral and multimodal microscopy to resolve malaria-infected erythrocyte contents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dabo-Niang, S; Zoueu, J T

    2012-09-01

    In this communication, we demonstrate how kriging, combine with multispectral and multimodal microscopy can enhance the resolution of malaria-infected images and provide more details on their composition, for analysis and diagnosis. The results of this interpolation applied to the two principal components of multispectral and multimodal images illustrate that the examination of the content of Plasmodium falciparum infected human erythrocyte is improved.

  1. Concomitant infection of Neospora caninum and Bovine Herpesvirus type 5 in spontaneous bovine abortions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maia S. Marin

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Bovine Herpesvirus type 5 (BoHV-5 has not been conclusively demonstrated to cause bovine abortion. Brain lesions produced by Neospora caninum and Bovine Herpesvirus type 1 (BoHV-1 exhibit common features. Therefore, careful microscopic evaluation and additional diagnostic procedures are required to achieve an accurate final etiological diagnosis. The aim of the present work was to investigate the occurrence of infections due to BoHV-1, BoHV-5 and N. caninum in 68 cases of spontaneous bovine abortions which showed microscopic lesions in the fetal central nervous system. This study allowed the identification of 4 (5.9% fetuses with dual infection by BoHV-5 and N. caninum and 33 (48.5% cases in which N. caninum was the sole pathogen identified. All cases were negative to BoHV-1. The results of this study provide evidence that dual infection by BoHV-5 and N. caninum occur during pregnancy in cattle; however, the role of BoHV-5 as a primary cause of bovine abortion needs further research. Molecular diagnosis of BoHV-5 and N. caninum confirmed the importance of applying complementary assays to improve the sensitivity of diagnosing bovine abortion.

  2. Optimization and inhibition of the adherent ability of Plasmodium falciparum-infected erythrocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heidi Smith

    1992-01-01

    Full Text Available The vast majority of the 1-2 million malaria associated deaths that occur each year are due to anemia and cerebral malaria (the attachment of erythrocytes containing mature forms of Plasmodium falciparum to the endothelial cells that line the vascular beds of the brain. A "model" system"for the study of cerebral malaria employs amelanotic melanoma cells as the "target"cells in an vitro cytoadherence assay. Using this model system we determined that the optimum pH for adherence is 6.6 to 6.8, that high concentrations of Ca²* (50mM result in increased levels of binding, and that the type of buffer used influences adherence (Bis Tris > MOPS > HEPES > PIPES. We also observed that the ability of infected erythrocytes to cytoadhere varied from (erythrocyte donor to donor. We have produced murine monoclonal antibodies against P. falciparum-infected red cells which recognized modified forms of human band 3; these inhibit the adherence of infected erythrocytes to melanoma cells in a doso responsive fashion. Antimalarials (chloroquine, quinacrine, mefloquine, artemisinin, on the other hand, affected adherence in an indirect fashion i.e. since cytoadherence is due, in part to the presence of knobs on the surface of the infected erythrocyte, and knob formation is dependent on intracellular parasite growth, when plasmodial development is inhibited so is knob production, and consequently adherence is ablated.

  3. Adenosine deaminase activity in serum, erythrocytes and lymphocytes of rats infected with Leptospira icterohaemorrhagiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tonin, Alexandre A; Pimentel, Victor C; da Silva, Aleksandro S; de Azevedo, Maria Isabel; Souza, Viviane C G; Wolkmer, Patrícia; Rezer, João F P; Badke, Manoel R T; Leal, Daniela B R; Schetinger, Maria Rosa C; Monteiro, Silvia G; Lopes, Sonia T A

    2012-04-01

    Leptospirosis is a systemic disease of humans and domestic animals, mainly dogs, cattle and swine. The course of human leptospirosis varies from mild to severe fatal forms and the most severe form of human leptospirosis is principally caused by Leptospira interrogans serovar icterohaemorrhagiae (L. icterohaemorrhagiae). The enzyme adenosine deaminase (ADA) plays an important role in the production and differentiation of blood cells. The aim of this study was to evaluate the activity of ADA in serum, erythrocytes and lymphocytes of rats infected with L. icterohaemorrhagiae, as compared with non-infected rats. Twenty-four adult rats, divided into two uniform groups (A and B) were used for the enzymatic assays. The animals in Group B were inoculated intraperitoneally with 2×10(8) leptospires/rat, and the rodents in Group A (control) were not-inoculated. Blood collection was performed on days 5 and 15 post-infection (PI) and the blood used to assess the ADA activity. The infection by L.icterohaemorrhagiae altered erythrocyte count, hemoglobin concentration and hematocrit, causing a decrease in all these parameters on day 15 PI. Lymphocytes decreased significantly on day 15 PI, and ADA activity in serum was inhibited in infected rats on days 5 and 15 PI and its activity in erythrocytes were increased on day 5 PI. On day 5 PI, we found an increase in ADA activity in erythrocytes of infected rats. No correlation was observed between hematocrit and erythrocyte ADA activity on days 5 and 15 PI. The ADA activity was inhibited in rats infected on day 15 PI. A positive correlation (r(2)=60) was also observed between the number of lymphocytes and ADA activity in lymphocytes on day 15 PI (Perythrocytes in experimental infection by L.icterohaemorrhagiae in rats, concomitantly with hematological parameters.

  4. VAR2CSA expression on the surface of placenta-derived Plasmodium falciparum-infected erythrocytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Magistrado, Pamela; Salanti, Ali; Tuikue Ndam, Nicaise G;

    2008-01-01

    Malaria remains a major threat, in sub-Saharan Africa primarily, and the most deadly infections are those with Plasmodium falciparum. Pregnancy-associated malaria is a clinically important complication of infection; it results from a unique interaction between proteoglycans in the placental inter...... on the surface of infected erythrocytes from placenta. Importantly, this was achieved with cross-reactive antibodies against VAR2CSA....

  5. Cytoadhesion of Plasmodium falciparum-infected erythrocytes and the infected placenta: a two-way pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, F T M; Avril, M; Nogueira, P A; Gysin, J

    2006-12-01

    Malaria is undoubtedly the world's most devastating parasitic disease, affecting 300 to 500 million people every year. Some cases of Plasmodium falciparum infection progress to the deadly forms of the disease responsible for 1 to 3 million deaths annually. P. falciparum-infected erythrocytes adhere to host receptors in the deep microvasculature of several organs. The cytoadhesion of infected erythrocytes to placental syncytiotrophoblast receptors leads to pregnancy-associated malaria (PAM). This specific maternal-fetal syndrome causes maternal anemia, low birth weight and the death of 62,000 to 363,000 infants per year in sub-Saharan Africa, and thus has a poor outcome for both mother and fetus. However, PAM and non-PAM parasites have been shown to differ antigenically and genetically. After multiple pregnancies, women from different geographical areas develop adhesion-blocking antibodies that protect against placental parasitemia and clinical symptoms of PAM. The recent description of a new parasite ligand encoded by the var2CSA gene as the only gene up-regulated in PAM parasites renders the development of an anti-PAM vaccine more feasible. The search for a vaccine to prevent P. falciparum sequestration in the placenta by eliciting adhesion-blocking antibodies and a cellular immune response, and the development of new methods for evaluating such antibodies should be key priorities in mother-child health programs in areas of endemic malaria. This review summarizes the main molecular, immunological and physiopathological aspects of PAM, including findings related to new targets in the P. falciparum var gene family. Finally, we focus on a new methodology for mimicking cytoadhesion under blood flow conditions in human placental tissue.

  6. Cytoadhesion of Plasmodium falciparum-infected erythrocytes and the infected placenta: a two-way pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F.T.M. Costa

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Malaria is undoubtedly the world's most devastating parasitic disease, affecting 300 to 500 million people every year. Some cases of Plasmodium falciparum infection progress to the deadly forms of the disease responsible for 1 to 3 million deaths annually. P. falciparum-infected erythrocytes adhere to host receptors in the deep microvasculature of several organs. The cytoadhesion of infected erythrocytes to placental syncytiotrophoblast receptors leads to pregnancy-associated malaria (PAM. This specific maternal-fetal syndrome causes maternal anemia, low birth weight and the death of 62,000 to 363,000 infants per year in sub-Saharan Africa, and thus has a poor outcome for both mother and fetus. However, PAM and non-PAM parasites have been shown to differ antigenically and genetically. After multiple pregnancies, women from different geographical areas develop adhesion-blocking antibodies that protect against placental parasitemia and clinical symptoms of PAM. The recent description of a new parasite ligand encoded by the var2CSA gene as the only gene up-regulated in PAM parasites renders the development of an anti-PAM vaccine more feasible. The search for a vaccine to prevent P. falciparum sequestration in the placenta by eliciting adhesion-blocking antibodies and a cellular immune response, and the development of new methods for evaluating such antibodies should be key priorities in mother-child health programs in areas of endemic malaria. This review summarizes the main molecular, immunological and physiopathological aspects of PAM, including findings related to new targets in the P. falciparum var gene family. Finally, we focus on a new methodology for mimicking cytoadhesion under blood flow conditions in human placental tissue.

  7. Chondroitin sulfate A-adhering Plasmodium falciparum-infected erythrocytes express functionally important antibody epitopes shared by multiple variants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barfod, Lea; Dobrilovic, Tina; Magistrado, Pamela

    2010-01-01

    Acquired protection from Plasmodium falciparum placental malaria, a major cause of maternal, fetal, and infant morbidity, is mediated by IgG specific for the P. falciparum erythrocyte membrane protein 1 variant VAR2CSA. This protein enables adhesion of P. falciparum-infected erythrocytes to chond......Acquired protection from Plasmodium falciparum placental malaria, a major cause of maternal, fetal, and infant morbidity, is mediated by IgG specific for the P. falciparum erythrocyte membrane protein 1 variant VAR2CSA. This protein enables adhesion of P. falciparum-infected erythrocytes...

  8. Anemia and mechanism of erythrocyte destruction in ducks with acute Leucocytozoon infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kocan, R.M.

    1968-01-01

    In the anemia which accompanies infection by Leucocytozoon simondi in Pekin ducks there was a far greater loss of erythrocytes than could be accounted for as a result of direct physical rupture by the parasite. Erythrocyte loss began at the same time the 1st parasites appeared in the blood and was severest just prior to maximum parasitemia. Blood replacement and parasite loss occurred simultaneously. Examination of the spleen and bone marrow revealed that erythrophagocytosis was not the cause of anemia as reported for infections of Plasmodium, Babesia and Anaplasma. An anti-erythrocyte (A-E) factor was found in the serum of acutely infected ducks which agglutinated and hemolyzed normal untreated duck erythrocytes as well as infected cells. This A-E factor appeared when the 1st red cell loss was detected and reached its maximum titer just prior to the greatest red cell loss. Titers of the A-E factor were determined using normal uninfected erythrocytes at temperatures between 4 and 42 C. Cells agglutinated below 25 C and hemolyzed at 37 and 42 C. These results indicated that the A-E factor could be responsible for loss of cells other than those which were infected and could thus produce an excess loss of red cells. Attempts to implicate the A-E factor as an autoantibody were all negative. The A-E factor was present in the gamma fraction of acute serum but no anamnestic response could be detected when recovered ducks were reinfected. Anemia was never as severe in reinfections as in primary infections. The A-E factor also never reached as high a titer and was removed from the circulation very rapidly in reinfected ducks. It is concluded that red cell loss in ducks with acute Leucocytozoon disease results from intravascular hemolysis rather than erythrophagocytosis. The A-E factor responsible for hemolysis is more likely a parasite product rather than autoantibody.

  9. J-dot targeting of an exported HSP40 in Plasmodium falciparum-infected erythrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersen, Wiebke; Külzer, Simone; Engels, Sonja; Zhang, Qi; Ingmundson, Alyssa; Rug, Melanie; Maier, Alexander G; Przyborski, Jude M

    2016-07-01

    Plasmodium falciparum exports a large number of proteins to its host cell, the mature human erythrocyte, where they are involved in host cell modification. Amongst the proteins trafficked to the host cell, many are heat shock protein (HSP)40 homologues. We previously demonstrated that at least two exported PfHSP40s (referred to as PFE55 and PFA660) localise to mobile structures in the P. falciparum-infected erythrocyte (Kulzer et al., 2010), termed J-dots. The complete molecular content of these structures has not yet been completely resolved, however it is known that they also contain an exported HSP70, PfHSP70x, and are potentially involved in transport of the major cytoadherance ligand, PfEMP1, through the host cell. To understand more about the nature of the association of exported HSP40s with J-dots, here we have studied the signal requirements for recruitment of the proteins to these structures. By expressing various exported GFP chimeras, we can demonstrate that the predicted substrate binding domain is necessary and sufficient for J-dot targeting. This targeting only occurs in human erythrocytes infected with P. falciparum, as it is not conserved when expressing a P. falciparum HSP40 in Plasmodium berghei-infected murine red blood cells, suggesting that J-dots are P. falciparum-specific. This data reveals a new mechanism for targeting of exported proteins to intracellular structures in the P. falciparum-infected erythrocyte.

  10. Cytoadhesion of Plasmodium falciparum-infected erythrocytes to chondroitin-4-sulfate is cooperative and shear enhanced

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rieger, Harden; Yoshikawa, Hiroshi Y; Quadt, Katharina

    2015-01-01

    Infections with the human malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum during pregnancy can lead to severe complications for both mother and child, resulting from the cytoadhesion of parasitized erythrocytes in the intervillous space of the placenta. Cytoadherence is conferred by the specific interaction...

  11. Monoclonal antibody to a conserved epitope on proteins encoded by Babesia bigemina and present on the surface of intact infected erythrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shompole, S; Perryman, L E; Rurangirwa, F R; McElwain, T F; Jasmer, D P; Musoke, A J; Wells, C W; McGuire, T C

    1995-09-01

    To define Babesia bigemina-specific antigens on the surface of infected erythrocytes, monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) were identified by live-cell immunofluorescence. As determined by live-cell immunofluorescence, two MAbs made to the Mexico strain reacted with the Mexico strain and three Kenya strains, while three MAbs made to the Kenya-Ngong strain reacted with the Kenya strains but not the Mexico strain. Binding of MAb 44.18 (made to the Mexico strain) to a strain-common epitope was confirmed by immunoelectron microscopy and by surface-specific immunoprecipitation of [35S]methionine-labeled proteins (200, 28, and 16 kDa in size), which also demonstrated that the MAb recognized an epitope on proteins encoded by B. bigemina. In immunoblots, the MAb bound to predominant antigens with sizes of 200 and 220 kDa in erythrocyte lysates infected with strains from Puerto Rico, St. Croix, Texcoco (Mexico), Kenya, and Mexico. Major antigens with sizes of 200 and 220 kDa were isolated from a MAb 44.18 affinity matrix. Calf serum antibodies to these isolated antigens bound to erythrocytes infected with either the Mexico or Kenya strains as determined by live-cell immunofluorescence, allowing the conclusion that at least one conserved surface epitope was recognized. Calf serum antibodies identified major labeled proteins with sizes of 200 and 72 kDa by surface-specific immunoprecipitation, and infected erythrocytes sensitized with these antibodies were phagocytized by cultured bovine peripheral blood monocytes. These results provide a rationale for evaluating antigens identified by MAb 44.18 individually and as components of subunit vaccines.

  12. Quantification of malaria parasite release from infected erythrocytes: inhibition by protein-free media

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zimmerberg Joshua

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Intracellular malaria parasites leave their host erythrocytes to infect neighbouring cells after each cycle of asexual replication. No method is currently available for the direct quantification of parasite release. Method and results To quantify parasite release process, human erythrocytes infected with Plasmodium falciparum were injected into sealed chambers at optimal density, where they progressed through the end of the erythrocyte cycle. Each event of parasite release inside the chamber at the site of erythrocyte rupture leaves on the chamber wall a footprint, composed of 1 separated parasites, 2 a digestive vacuole with haemozoin, and 3 fragments of the ruptured membranes. These footprints are stable for hours, allowing precise identification using differential interference contrast (DIC microscopy. The relative rate of parasite release is defined as the percent of such footprints out of all schizonts injected and incubated into chamber at 37°C for two hours. The method is highly reproducible, easy to perform, and does not require expensive equipment. Additionally, this method allows one to analyse cell and release site morphology, which adds information about the release process and the quality of the culture. The method is used here to show that swelling of schizonts caused by protein-free media inhibits parasite release. Conclusion In this study, a novel method is described to count sites of parasite release by microscopy. Besides the direct estimation of parasite release from infected erythrocytes, this method provides a morphological evaluation of normal infected cells approaching the end of the plasmodial life cycle, or pathological forms accumulated as the result of experimental intervention in the parasite release process. One may now accurately estimate the relative parasite release rate at the time of cycle transition, without any obligatory coupling to parasite invasion.

  13. A kinetic fluorescence assay reveals unusual features of Ca++ uptake in Plasmodium falciparum-infected erythrocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background To facilitate development within erythrocytes, malaria parasites increase their host cell uptake of diverse solutes including Ca++. The mechanism and molecular basis of increased Ca++ permeability remains less well studied than that of other solutes. Methods Based on an appropriate Ca++ affinity and its greater brightness than related fluorophores, Fluo-8 was selected and used to develop a robust fluorescence-based assay for Ca++ uptake by human erythrocytes infected with Plasmodium falciparum. Results Both uninfected and infected cells exhibited a large Ca++-dependent fluorescence signal after loading with the Fluo-8 dye. Probenecid, an inhibitor of erythrocyte organic anion transporters, abolished the fluorescence signal in uninfected cells; in infected cells, this agent increased fluorescence via mechanisms that depend on parasite genotype. Kinetic fluorescence measurements in 384-well microplates revealed that the infected cell Ca++ uptake is not mediated by the plasmodial surface anion channel (PSAC), a parasite nutrient channel at the host membrane; it also appears to be distinct from mammalian Ca++ channels. Imaging studies confirmed a low intracellular Ca++ in uninfected cells and higher levels in both the host and parasite compartments of infected cells. Parasite growth inhibition studies revealed a conserved requirement for extracellular Ca++. Conclusions Nondestructive loading of Fluo-8 into human erythrocytes permits measurement of Ca++ uptake kinetics. The greater Ca++ permeability of cells infected with malaria parasites is apparent when probenecid is used to inhibit Fluo-8 efflux at the host membrane. This permeability is mediated by a distinct pathway and may be essential for intracellular parasite development. The miniaturized assay presented here should help clarify the precise transport mechanism and may identify inhibitors suitable for antimalarial drug development. PMID:24885754

  14. Increase of a Calcium Independent Transglutaminase Activity in the Erythrocyte during the Infection with Plasmodium falciparum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wasserman Moisés

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available We have studied the activity of a calcium dependent transglutaminase (EC 2.3.2.13 during the growth of the parasite Plasmodium falciparum inside the infected human erythrocyte. There is only one detectable transglutaminase in the two-cell-system, and its origin is erythrocytic. No activity was detected in preparations of the parasite devoid of erythrocyte cytoplasm. The Michaelis Menten constants (Km of the enzyme for the substrates N'N'dimethylcaseine and putrescine were undistinguishable whether the cell extracts used in their determination were obtained from normal or from infected red cells. The total activity of transglutaminase in stringently synchronized cultures, measured at 0.5mM Ca2+, decreased with the maturation of the parasite. However, a fraction which became irreversibly activated and independent of calcium concentration was detected. The proportion of this fraction grew with maturation; it represented only 20% of the activity in 20 hr-old-trophozoites while in 48-hr-schizonts it was more than 85% of the total activity. The activation of this fraction of transglutaminase did not depend on an increase in the erythrocyte cytoplasmic calcium, since most of the calcium was shown to be located in the parasite.

  15. The density of knobs on Plasmodium falciparum-infected erythrocytes depends on developmental age and varies among isolates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Quadt, Katharina A; Barfod, Lea; Andersen, Daniel;

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The virulence of Plasmodium falciparum malaria is related to the parasite's ability to evade host immunity through clonal antigenic variation and tissue-specific adhesion of infected erythrocytes (IEs). The P. falciparum erythrocyte membrane protein 1 (PfEMP1) family expressed on dome....... Therefore, the aim of this study was to provide detailed information on isolate- and time-dependent differences in knob size and density. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We used atomic force microscopy to characterize knobs on the surface of P. falciparum-infected erythrocytes. Fourteen ex vivo isolates...

  16. Seroepidemiology of infectious bovine rhinotracheitis infection in unvaccinated cattle

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Aim: The present study aimed to investigate the seroepidemiology of infectious bovine rhinotracheitis (IBR) infection in the non-vaccinated cattle population in northern part of Tamil Nadu, India. Materials and Methods: A total of 255 sera samples were collected from cattle having the history of respiratory and reproductive disorder from cattle of different age, breeds, and sex. All the sera samples were subjected to indirect ELISA for the diagnosis of IBR antibodies. Results: Results reveale...

  17. Antibodies to variant antigens on the surfaces of infected erythrocytes are associated with protection from malaria in Ghanaian children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dodoo, D; Staalsoe, T; Giha, H;

    2001-01-01

    Plasmodium falciparum erythrocyte membrane protein 1 (PfEMP1) is a variant antigen expressed on the surface of infected erythrocytes. Each parasite genome contains about 40 PfEMP1 genes, but only 1 PfEMP1 gene is expressed at a given time. PfEMP1 serves as a parasite-sequestering ligand...... to endothelial cells and enables the parasites to avoid splenic passage. PfEMP1 antibodies may protect from disease by inhibiting sequestration, thus facilitating the destruction of infected erythrocytes in the spleen. In this study, we have measured antibodies in Ghanaian children to a conserved region of Pf......EMP1 by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and antibodies to variant molecules on erythrocytes infected with field isolates of P. falciparum by flow cytometry. Based on close clinical monitoring, the children were grouped into those who did (susceptible) and those who did not (protected) have malaria...

  18. Co-infection of Bovine Papillomavirus and feline-associated Papillomavirus in bovine cutaneous warts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, M A R; Carvalho, C C R; Coutinho, L C A; Reis, M C; de Aragão Batista, M V; de Castro, R S; Dos Anjos, F B R; de Freitas, A C

    2012-12-01

    The diversity of papillomavirus (PV) found in bovine cutaneous warts from Brazilian cattle was evaluated using the PCR technique with the utilization of consensus primers MY09/11 and by PCR using Bovine Papillomavirus (BPV) type-specific primers followed by sequencing. Eleven cutaneous warts from 6 cattle herds were selected. Six warts were positive for the presence of PV. The presence of BPV types 1, 2, 3, 6 and feline sarcoid-associated PV (FeSarPV) in cutaneous wart lesions, as well as the presence of co-infections, was found. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first time that FeSarPV is described co-infecting a cutaneous wart in Brazil. The present study confirms the previous finding of FeSarPV infecting cattle. These results show the necessity of more studies to investigate the diversity of PV in cattle, its diversity and the possibility of co-infection in cattle and other animals. © 2012 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  19. Cytoplasmic free Ca2+ is essential for multiple steps in malaria parasite egress from infected erythrocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Glushakova Svetlana

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Egress of Plasmodium falciparum, from erythrocytes at the end of its asexual cycle and subsequent parasite invasion into new host cells, is responsible for parasite dissemination in the human body. The egress pathway is emerging as a coordinated multistep programme that extends in time for tens of minutes, ending with rapid parasite extrusion from erythrocytes. While the Ca2+ regulation of the invasion of P. falciparum in erythrocytes is well established, the role of Ca2+ in parasite egress is poorly understood. This study analysed the involvement of cytoplasmic free Ca2+ in infected erythrocytes during the multistep egress programme of malaria parasites. Methods Live-cell fluorescence microscopy was used to image parasite egress from infected erythrocytes, assessing the effect of drugs modulating Ca2+ homeostasis on the egress programme. Results A steady increase in cytoplasmic free Ca2+ is found to precede parasite egress. This increase is independent of extracellular Ca2+ for at least the last two hours of the cycle, but is dependent upon Ca2+ release from internal stores. Intracellular BAPTA chelation of Ca2+ within the last 45 minutes of the cycle inhibits egress prior to parasitophorous vacuole swelling and erythrocyte membrane poration, two characteristic morphological transformations preceding parasite egress. Inhibitors of the parasite endoplasmic reticulum (ER Ca2+-ATPase accelerate parasite egress, indicating that Ca2+ stores within the ER are sufficient in supporting egress. Markedly accelerated egress of apparently viable parasites was achieved in mature schizonts using Ca2+ ionophore A23187. Ionophore treatment overcomes the BAPTA-induced block of parasite egress, confirming that free Ca2+ is essential in egress initiation. Ionophore treatment of immature schizonts had an adverse effect inducing parasitophorous vacuole swelling and killing the parasites within the host cell. Conclusions The parasite egress

  20. Erythrocytic Iron Deficiency Enhances Susceptibility to Plasmodium chabaudi Infection in Mice Carrying a Missense Mutation in Transferrin Receptor 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lelliott, Patrick M; McMorran, Brendan J; Foote, Simon J; Burgio, Gaetan

    2015-11-01

    The treatment of iron deficiency in areas of high malaria transmission is complicated by evidence which suggests that iron deficiency anemia protects against malaria, while iron supplementation increases malaria risk. Iron deficiency anemia results in an array of pathologies, including reduced systemic iron bioavailability and abnormal erythrocyte physiology; however, the mechanisms by which these pathologies influence malaria infection are not well defined. In the present study, the response to malaria infection was examined in a mutant mouse line, Tfrc(MRI24910), identified during an N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea (ENU) screen. This line carries a missense mutation in the gene for transferrin receptor 1 (TFR1). Heterozygous mice exhibited reduced erythrocyte volume and density, a phenotype consistent with dietary iron deficiency anemia. However, unlike the case in dietary deficiency, the erythrocyte half-life, mean corpuscular hemoglobin concentration, and intraerythrocytic ferritin content were unchanged. Systemic iron bioavailability was also unchanged, indicating that this mutation results in erythrocytic iron deficiency without significantly altering overall iron homeostasis. When infected with the rodent malaria parasite Plasmodium chabaudi adami, mice displayed increased parasitemia and succumbed to infection more quickly than their wild-type littermates. Transfusion of fluorescently labeled erythrocytes into malaria parasite-infected mice demonstrated an erythrocyte-autonomous enhanced survival of parasites within mutant erythrocytes. Together, these results indicate that TFR1 deficiency alters erythrocyte physiology in a way that is similar to dietary iron deficiency anemia, albeit to a lesser degree, and that this promotes intraerythrocytic parasite survival and an increased susceptibility to malaria in mice. These findings may have implications for the management of iron deficiency in the context of malaria.

  1. Fraction of bovine leukemia virus-infected dairy cattle developing enzootic bovine leukosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsutsui, Toshiyuki; Kobayashi, Sota; Hayama, Yoko; Yamamoto, Takehisa

    2016-02-01

    Enzootic bovine leucosis (EBL) is a transmissible disease caused by the bovine leukemia virus that is prevalent in cattle herds in many countries. Only a small fraction of infected animals develops clinical symptoms, such as malignant lymphosarcoma, after a long incubation period. In the present study, we aimed to determine the fraction of EBL-infected dairy cattle that develop lymphosarcoma and the length of the incubation period before clinical symptoms emerge. These parameters were determined by a mathematical modeling approach based on the maximum-likelihood estimation method, using the results of a nationwide serological survey of prevalence in cattle and passive surveillance records. The best-fit distribution to estimate the disease incubation period was determined to be the Weibull distribution, with a median and average incubation period of 7.0 years. The fraction of infected animals developing clinical disease was estimated to be 1.4% with a 95% confidence interval of 1.2-1.6%. The parameters estimated here contribute to an examination of efficient control strategies making quantitative evaluation available.

  2. Exported Epoxide Hydrolases Modulate Erythrocyte Vasoactive Lipids during Plasmodium falciparum Infection

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    Natalie J. Spillman

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Erythrocytes are reservoirs of important epoxide-containing lipid signaling molecules, including epoxyeicosatrienoic acids (EETs. EETs function as vasodilators and anti-inflammatory modulators in the bloodstream. Bioactive EETs are hydrolyzed to less active diols (dihydroxyeicosatrienoic acids by epoxide hydrolases (EHs. The malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum infects host red blood cells (RBCs and exports hundreds of proteins into the RBC compartment. In this study, we show that two parasite epoxide hydrolases, P. falciparum epoxide hydrolases 1 (PfEH1 and 2 (PfEH2, both with noncanonical serine nucleophiles, are exported to the periphery of infected RBCs. PfEH1 and PfEH2 were successfully expressed in Escherichia coli, and they hydrolyzed physiologically relevant erythrocyte EETs. Mutations in active site residues of PfEH1 ablated the ability of the enzyme to hydrolyze an epoxide substrate. Overexpression of PfEH1 or PfEH2 in parasite-infected RBCs resulted in a significant alteration in the epoxide fatty acids stored in RBC phospholipids. We hypothesize that the parasite disruption of epoxide-containing signaling lipids leads to perturbed vascular function, creating favorable conditions for binding and sequestration of infected RBCs to the microvascular endothelium.

  3. Hemoglobin S and C affect protein export in Plasmodium falciparum-infected erythrocytes

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    Nicole Kilian

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Malaria is a potentially deadly disease. However, not every infected person develops severe symptoms. Some people are protected by naturally occurring mechanisms that frequently involve inheritable modifications in their hemoglobin. The best studied protective hemoglobins are the sickle cell hemoglobin (HbS and hemoglobin C (HbC which both result from a single amino acid substitution in β-globin: glutamic acid at position 6 is replaced by valine or lysine, respectively. How these hemoglobinopathies protect from severe malaria is only partly understood. Models currently proposed in the literature include reduced disease-mediating cytoadherence of parasitized hemoglobinopathic erythrocytes, impaired intraerythrocytic development of the parasite, dampened inflammatory responses, or a combination thereof. Using a conditional protein export system and tightly synchronized Plasmodium falciparum cultures, we now show that export of parasite-encoded proteins across the parasitophorous vacuolar membrane is delayed, slower, and reduced in amount in hemoglobinopathic erythrocytes as compared to parasitized wild type red blood cells. Impaired protein export affects proteins targeted to the host cell cytoplasm, Maurer's clefts, and the host cell plasma membrane. Impaired protein export into the host cell compartment provides a mechanistic explanation for the reduced cytoadherence phenotype associated with parasitized hemoglobinopathic erythrocytes.

  4. Microarray chip based identification of a mixed infection of bovine herpesvirus 1 and bovine viral diarrhea 2 from Indian cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratta, Barkha; Yadav, Brijesh Singh; Pokhriyal, Mayank; Saxena, Meeta; Sharma, Bhaskar

    2014-01-01

    Bovine herpesvirus 1 (BHV1) and bovine viral diarrhea virus 2 (BVD2) are endemic in India although no mixed infection with these viruses has been reported from India. We report first mixed infection of these viruses in cattle during routine screening with a microarray chip. 62 of the 69 probes of BHV1 and 42 of the 57 BVD2 probes in the chip gave positive signals for the virus. The virus infections were subsequently confirmed by RT-PCR. We also discuss the implications of these findings.

  5. cAMP-Signalling Regulates Gametocyte-Infected Erythrocyte Deformability Required for Malaria Parasite Transmission.

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    Ghania Ramdani

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Blocking Plasmodium falciparum transmission to mosquitoes has been designated a strategic objective in the global agenda of malaria elimination. Transmission is ensured by gametocyte-infected erythrocytes (GIE that sequester in the bone marrow and at maturation are released into peripheral blood from where they are taken up during a mosquito blood meal. Release into the blood circulation is accompanied by an increase in GIE deformability that allows them to pass through the spleen. Here, we used a microsphere matrix to mimic splenic filtration and investigated the role of cAMP-signalling in regulating GIE deformability. We demonstrated that mature GIE deformability is dependent on reduced cAMP-signalling and on increased phosphodiesterase expression in stage V gametocytes, and that parasite cAMP-dependent kinase activity contributes to the stiffness of immature gametocytes. Importantly, pharmacological agents that raise cAMP levels in transmissible stage V gametocytes render them less deformable and hence less likely to circulate through the spleen. Therefore, phosphodiesterase inhibitors that raise cAMP levels in P. falciparum infected erythrocytes, such as sildenafil, represent new candidate drugs to block transmission of malaria parasites.

  6. Quantitative non-invasive intracellular imaging of Plasmodium falciparum infected human erythrocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edward, Kert; Farahi, Faramarz

    2014-05-01

    Malaria is a virulent pathological condition which results in over a million annual deaths. The parasitic agent Plasmodium falciparum has been extensively studied in connection with this epidemic but much remains unknown about its development inside the red blood cell host. Optical and fluorescence imaging are among the two most common procedures for investigating infected erythrocytes but both require the introduction of exogenous contrast agents. In this letter, we present a procedure for the non-invasive in situ imaging of malaria infected red blood cells. The procedure is based on the utilization of simultaneously acquired quantitative phase and independent topography data to extract intracellular information. Our method allows for the identification of the developmental stages of the parasite and facilitates in situ analysis of the morphological changes associated with the progression of this disease. This information may assist in the development of efficacious treatment therapies for this condition.

  7. Effects of Parasitic Infections on Erythrocyte Indices of Camels in Nigeria

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    Jalailudeen Lawal Rabana

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available This study was conducted to determine the prevalence and effect of parasitic infection on erythrocyte indices in trade camels slaughtered in Maiduguri, Nigeria. Two hundred adult one humped camels comprised of 87 (43.5 % males and 113 (56.5 % females were examined for helminths and hemoparasites at their slaughter time according to the standard procedures. An overall prevalence of 79 % for single and mixed infections was observed. Examination of faecal samples from camels shows 82 (41 % were harbouring different nematodes, mostly Strongyle, Strongyloides and Hemonchus species. Buffy coat and thin smear examination of blood samples showed Babesia and Anaplasma species. More females (44.5 % than males (34.5 % were positive for various parasitic infections. But the percentage was not statistically significant (P > 0.05. Packed cell volume (PCV, mean haemoglobin concentration (MCH, mean corpuscular haemoglobin concentration (MCHC and red blood cell counts were significantly (P < 0.01 affected in the infected camels compared to the non-infected ones. Parasite infection in camels leads to macrocytic anaemia.

  8. Inhibition of Mayaro virus infection by bovine lactoferrin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho, Carlos A M; Sousa, Ivanildo P; Silva, Jerson L; Oliveira, Andréa C; Gonçalves, Rafael B; Gomes, Andre M O

    2014-03-01

    Mayaro virus (MAYV) is an arbovirus linked to several sporadic outbreaks of a highly debilitating febrile illness in many regions of South America. MAYV is on the verge of urbanization from the Amazon region and no effective antiviral intervention is available against human infections. Our aim was to investigate whether bovine lactoferrin (bLf), an iron-binding glycoprotein, could hinder MAYV infection. We show that bLf promotes a strong inhibition of virus infection with no cytotoxic effects. Monitoring the effect of bLf on different stages of infection, we observed that virus entry into the cell is the heavily compromised event. Moreover, we found that binding of bLf to the cell is highly dependent on the sulfation of glycosaminoglycans, suggesting that bLf impairs virus entry by blocking these molecules. Our findings highlight the antiviral potential of bLf and reveal an effective strategy against one of the major emerging human pathogens in the neotropics.

  9. Seroepidemiology of infectious bovine rhinotracheitis infection in unvaccinated cattle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saravanajayam, M.; Kumanan, K.; Balasubramaniam, A.

    2015-01-01

    Aim: The present study aimed to investigate the seroepidemiology of infectious bovine rhinotracheitis (IBR) infection in the non-vaccinated cattle population in northern part of Tamil Nadu, India. Materials and Methods: A total of 255 sera samples were collected from cattle having the history of respiratory and reproductive disorder from cattle of different age, breeds, and sex. All the sera samples were subjected to indirect ELISA for the diagnosis of IBR antibodies. Results: Results revealed that the seroprevalence of IBR infection among non-vaccinated cattle population was of 65.88%. No significant difference was noticed in the prevalence of IBR infection between cattle showing respiratory (63.64%) and reproductive form (70.89%) (p≥0.05). A higher prevalence was noticed in animals above 3 years of age (59.60%) and in crossbred animals (71.26%) than young and non-descript animals. This study showed the higher prevalence of IBR infection in female (67.92%) than in male (33.33%). Conclusion: Cattle population in this part can better be protected with vaccination than leaving them unvaccinated and sero-monitoring shall have to be stressed with regular attempts to isolate and characterize the causative agent for IBR. PMID:27047054

  10. Seroepidemiology of infectious bovine rhinotracheitis infection in unvaccinated cattle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Saravanajayam

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The present study aimed to investigate the seroepidemiology of infectious bovine rhinotracheitis (IBR infection in the non-vaccinated cattle population in northern part of Tamil Nadu, India. Materials and Methods: A total of 255 sera samples were collected from cattle having the history of respiratory and reproductive disorder from cattle of different age, breeds, and sex. All the sera samples were subjected to indirect ELISA for the diagnosis of IBR antibodies. Results: Results revealed that the seroprevalence of IBR infection among non-vaccinated cattle population was of 65.88%. No significant difference was noticed in the prevalence of IBR infection between cattle showing respiratory (63.64% and reproductive form (70.89% (p≥0.05. A higher prevalence was noticed in animals above 3 years of age (59.60% and in crossbred animals (71.26% than young and non-descript animals. This study showed the higher prevalence of IBR infection in female (67.92% than in male (33.33%. Conclusion: Cattle population in this part can better be protected with vaccination than leaving them unvaccinated and seromonitoring shall have to be stressed with regular attempts to isolate and characterize the causative agent for IBR.

  11. Tetracysteine-based fluorescent tags to study protein localization and trafficking in Plasmodium falciparum-infected erythrocytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georgeta Crivat

    Full Text Available Plasmodium falciparum (Pf malaria parasites remodel host erythrocytes by placing membranous structures in the host cell cytoplasm and inserting proteins into the surrounding erythrocyte membranes. Dynamic imaging techniques with high spatial and temporal resolutions are required to study the trafficking pathways of proteins and the time courses of their delivery to the host erythrocyte membrane.Using a tetracysteine (TC motif tag and TC-binding biarsenical fluorophores (BAFs including fluorescein arsenical hairpin (FlAsH and resorufin arsenical hairpin (ReAsH, we detected knob-associated histidine-rich protein (KAHRP constructs in Pf-parasitized erythrocytes and compared their fluorescence signals to those of GFP (green fluorescent protein-tagged KAHRP. Rigorous treatment with BAL (2, 3 dimercaptopropanol; British anti-Lewisite was required to reduce high background due to nonspecific BAF interactions with endogenous cysteine-rich proteins. After this background reduction, similar patterns of fluorescence were obtained from the TC- and GFP-tagged proteins. The fluorescence from FlAsH and ReAsH-labeled protein bleached at faster rates than the fluorescence from GFP-labeled protein.While TC/BAF labeling to Pf-infected erythrocytes is presently limited by high background signals, it may offer a useful complement or alternative to GFP labeling methods. Our observations are in agreement with the currently-accepted model of KAHRP movement through the cytoplasm, including transient association of KAHRP with Maurer's clefts before its incorporation into knobs in the host erythrocyte membrane.

  12. Towards functional antibody-based vaccines to prevent pre-erythrocytic malaria infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sack, Brandon; Kappe, Stefan H I; Sather, D Noah

    2017-05-01

    An effective malaria vaccine would be considered a milestone of modern medicine, yet has so far eluded research and development efforts. This can be attributed to the extreme complexity of the malaria parasites, presenting with a multi-stage life cycle, high genome complexity and the parasite's sophisticated immune evasion measures, particularly antigenic variation during pathogenic blood stage infection. However, the pre-erythrocytic (PE) early infection forms of the parasite exhibit relatively invariant proteomes, and are attractive vaccine targets as they offer multiple points of immune system attack. Areas covered: We cover the current state of and roadblocks to the development of an effective, antibody-based PE vaccine, including current vaccine candidates, limited biological knowledge, genetic heterogeneity, parasite complexity, and suboptimal preclinical models as well as the power of early stage clinical models. Expert commentary: PE vaccines will need to elicit broad and durable immunity to prevent infection. This could be achievable if recent innovations in studying the parasites' infection biology, rational vaccine selection and design as well as adjuvant formulation are combined in a synergistic and multipronged approach. Improved preclinical assays as well as the iterative testing of vaccine candidates in controlled human malaria infection trials will further accelerate this effort.

  13. Plasmodium chabaudi-Infected Erythrocytes Adhere to CD36 and Bind to Microvascular Endothelial Cells in an Organ-Specific Way

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mota, Maria M.; Jarra, William; Hirst, Elizabeth; Patnaik, Pradeep K.; Holder, Anthony A.

    2000-01-01

    Adherence of erythrocytes infected with Plasmodium falciparum to microvascular endothelial cells (sequestration) is considered to play an important role in parasite virulence and pathogenesis. However, the real importance of sequestration for infection and disease has never been fully assessed. The absence of an appropriate in vivo model for sequestration has been a major barrier. We have examined the rodent malaria parasite Plasmodium chabaudi chabaudi AS in mice as a potential model. Erythrocytes infected with this parasite adhere in vitro to purified CD36, a critical endothelium receptor for binding P. falciparum-infected erythrocytes. P. c. chabaudi-infected erythrocytes adhere in vitro to endothelial cells in a gamma interferon-dependent manner, suggesting the involvement of additional adhesion molecules in the binding process, as is also the case with P. falciparum-infected cells. Furthermore, plasma or sera from infected and hyperimmune mice, respectively, have the ability to block binding of infected erythrocytes to endothelial cells. In vivo, erythrocytes containing mature P. c. chabaudi parasites are sequestered from the peripheral circulation. Sequestration is organ specific, occurring primarily in the liver, although intimate contact between infected erythrocytes and endothelial cells is also observed in the spleen and brain. The results are discussed in the context of the use of this model to study (i) the relationship between endothelial cell activation and the level of sequestration and (ii) the primary function of sequestration in malaria infection. PMID:10858230

  14. Efficacy of erythrocyte sedimentation rate and C-reactive protein level in determining periprosthetic hip infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Christopher R; Johnson, Aaron J; Naziri, Qais; Maralunda, German A; Delanois, Ronald E; Mont, Michael A

    2012-04-01

    The diagnosis of periprosthetic hip infections is often challenging. Erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) and C-reactive protein (CRP) level blood laboratory tests are commonly used to aid in the diagnosis. We studied the sensitivity, specificity, and false-negative rates of ESR and CRP level in a prospective group of patients who underwent revision total hip arthroplasty between 2000 and 2008. Seventy-seven patients with periprosthetic hip infections and ESR and CRP data were identified. Chi-square analysis was performed to determine the significance of false-negatives, compared with sex, body mass index, primary diagnosis, infection type, and immunity status. ESR had 89% sensitivity and 69% specificity. CRP level had 93% sensitivity and 40% specificity. The false-negative rate was 10.8% for ESR and 7% for CRP level. The false-negative rate for ESR and CRP level combined (with either result positive) was 3%. All false-negatives in the combined group were immunocompromised. Chi-square analysis did not find a significant correlation between false-negatives and any other variables. ESR and CRP level are useful in the diagnosis of periprosthetic hip infections. Ordering these tests concurrently reduces the chance of false-negative results.

  15. Dynamics in the cytoadherence phenotypes of Plasmodium falciparum infected erythrocytes isolated during pregnancy.

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    Justin Doritchamou

    Full Text Available Pregnant women become susceptible to malaria infection despite their acquired immunity to this disease from childhood. The placental sequestration of Plasmodium falciparum infected erythrocytes (IE is the major feature of malaria during pregnancy, due to ability of these parasites to bind chondroitin sulfate A (CSA in the placenta through the VAR2CSA protein that parasites express on the surface of IE. We collected parasites at different times of pregnancy and investigated the adhesion pattern of freshly collected isolates on the three well described host receptors (CSPG, CD36 and ICAM-1. Var genes transcription profile and VAR2CSA surface-expression were assessed in these isolates. Although adhesion of IE to CD36 and ICAM-1 was observed in some isolates, CSA-adhesion was the predominant binding feature in all isolates analyzed. Co-existence in the peripheral blood of several adhesion phenotypes in early pregnancy isolates was observed, a diversity that gradually tightens with gestational age in favour of the CSA-adhesion phenotype. Infections occurring in primigravidae were often by parasites that adhered more to CSA than those from multigravidae. Data from this study further emphasize the specificity of CSA adhesion and VAR2CSA expression by parasites responsible for pregnancy malaria, while drawing attention to the phenotypic complexity of infections occurring early in pregnancy as well as in multigravidae.

  16. Adhesion of Plasmodium falciparum infected erythrocytes in ex vivo perfused placental tissue

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pehrson, Caroline; Mathiesen, Line; Heno, Kristine K;

    2016-01-01

    expressing VAR2CSA accumulated in perfused placental tissue whereas the EPCR binding and the transgenic parasite did not. Soluble CSA and antibodies specific against VAR2CSA inhibited binding of infected erythrocytes. CONCLUSION: The ex vivo model provides a novel way of studying receptor-ligand interactions...

  17. Dual fluorescence labeling of surface-exposed and internal proteins in erythrocytes infected with the malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bengtsson, Dominique C; Sowa, Kordai M P; Arnot, David E

    2008-01-01

    There is a need for improved methods for in situ localization of surface proteins on Plasmodium falciparum-infected erythrocytes to help understand how these antigens are trafficked to, and positioned within, the host cell membrane. This protocol for confocal immunofluorescence microscopy combines...

  18. Potential of novel antimicrobial peptide P3 from bovine erythrocytes and its analogs to disrupt bacterial membranes in vitro and display activity against drug-resistant bacteria in a mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qinghua; Xu, Yanzhao; Wang, Qing; Hang, Bolin; Sun, Yawei; Wei, Xiaoxiao; Hu, Jianhe

    2015-05-01

    With the emergence of many antibiotic-resistant strains worldwide, antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are being evaluated as promising alternatives to conventional antibiotics. P3, a novel hemoglobin peptide derived from bovine erythrocytes, exhibited modest antimicrobial activity in vitro. We evaluated the antimicrobial activities of P3 and an analog, JH-3, both in vitro and in vivo. The MICs of P3 and JH-3 ranged from 3.125 μg/ml to 50 μg/ml when a wide spectrum of bacteria was tested, including multidrug-resistant strains. P3 killed bacteria within 30 min by disrupting the bacterial cytoplasmic membrane and disturbing the intracellular calcium balance. Circular dichroism (CD) spectrometry showed that P3 assumed an α-helical conformation in bacterial lipid membranes, which was indispensable for antimicrobial activity. Importantly, the 50% lethal dose (LD50) of JH-3 was 180 mg/kg of mouse body weight after intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection, and no death was observed at any dose up to 240 mg/kg body weight following subcutaneous (s.c.) injection. Furthermore, JH-3 significantly decreased the bacterial count and rescued infected mice in a model of mouse bacteremia. In conclusion, P3 and an analog exhibited potent antimicrobial activities and relatively low toxicities in a mouse model, indicating that they may be useful for treating infections caused by drug-resistant bacteria.

  19. Transcriptomic microarray analysis of BoMac cells after infection with bovine foamy virus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rola-Luszczak, M.; Materniak, M.; Pluta, A.; Hulst, M.M.; Kuz'mak, J.

    2014-01-01

    Bovine foamy virus (BFV) infections are highly prevalent among cattle worldwide. However, relatively little is known about the impact of this virus on the host immune system. In our study, we focused on a bovine macrophage cell line (BoMac) and examined changes in the BoMac transcriptome after in vi

  20. C-reactive protein, erythrocyte sedimentation rate and orthopedic implant infection.

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    Kerryl E Piper

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: C-reactive protein (CRP and erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR have been shown to be useful for diagnosis of prosthetic hip and knee infection. Little information is available on CRP and ESR in patients undergoing revision or resection of shoulder arthroplasties or spine implants. METHODS/RESULTS: We analyzed preoperative CRP and ESR in 636 subjects who underwent knee (n=297, hip (n=221 or shoulder (n=64 arthroplasty, or spine implant (n=54 removal. A standardized definition of orthopedic implant-associated infection was applied. Receiver operating curve analysis was used to determine ideal cutoff values for differentiating infected from non-infected cases. ESR was significantly different in subjects with aseptic failure infection of knee (median 11 and 53.5 mm/h, respectively, p=<0.0001 and hip (median 11 and 30 mm/h, respectively, p=<0.0001 arthroplasties and spine implants (median 10 and 48.5 mm/h, respectively, p=0.0033, but not shoulder arthroplasties (median 10 and 9 mm/h, respectively, p=0.9883. Optimized ESR cutoffs for knee, hip and shoulder arthroplasties and spine implants were 19, 13, 26, and 45 mm/h, respectively. Using these cutoffs, sensitivity and specificity to detect infection were 89 and 74% for knee, 82 and 60% for hip, and 32 and 93% for shoulder arthroplasties, and 57 and 90% for spine implants. CRP was significantly different in subjects with aseptic failure and infection of knee (median 4 and 51 mg/l, respectively, p<0.0001, hip (median 3 and 18 mg/l, respectively, p<0.0001, and shoulder (median 3 and 10 mg/l, respectively, p=0.01 arthroplasties, and spine implants (median 3 and 20 mg/l, respectively, p=0.0011. Optimized CRP cutoffs for knee, hip, and shoulder arthroplasties, and spine implants were 14.5, 10.3, 7, and 4.6 mg/l, respectively. Using these cutoffs, sensitivity and specificity to detect infection were 79 and 88% for knee, 74 and 79% for hip, and 63 and 73% for shoulder arthroplasties, and 79 and

  1. Two-Color Flow Cytometric Analysis of Intraerythrocytic Malaria Parasite DNA and Surface Membrane-Associated Antigen in Erythrocytes Infected with Plasmodium falciparum

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-01-01

    Infected erythrocytes were fixea with 0.025% glutaraidehyde, followed by treatment with 1%saponiu to gain acceiss to intramembranous components and...Antigen in Erythrocytes Infected With Plasmodium falciparum 1 Kovit Pattanapanyasat,2 Rachanee Udomsangpetch, and H. Kyle Webster The Thalassemia Center...glutaral- izonts. Simultaneous measurement of dehyde followed by treatment with 1% parasite DNA and antigen in the infected saponin to gain access to

  2. Comparative experimental infection of Listeria monocytogenes and Listeria ivanovii in bovine trophoblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocha, Cláudia E; Mol, Juliana P S; Garcia, Luize N N; Costa, Luciana F; Santos, Renato L; Paixão, Tatiane A

    2017-01-01

    Listeria monocytogenes is a Gram-positive, facultative intracellular and invasive bacterium that has tropism to the placenta, and causes fetal morbidity and mortality in several mammalian species. While infection with L. monocytogenes and L. ivanovii are known as important causes of abortion and reproductive failure in cattle, the pathogenesis of maternal-fetal listeriosis in this species is poorly known. This study used the bovine chorioallantoic membrane explant model to investigate the kinetics of L. monocytogenes, L. ivanovii, and L. innocua infections in bovine trophoblastic cells for up to 8 h post infection. L. monocytogenes and L. ivanovii were able to invade and multiply in trophoblastic cells without causing cell death or inducing expression of pro-inflammatory genes. Although L. innocua was unable to multiply in bovine trophoblastic cells, it induced transcription of the pro-inflammatory mediator CXCL6. This study demonstrated for the first time the susceptibility of bovine trophoblastic cells to L. monocytogenes and L. ivanovii infection.

  3. Insect cells are superior to Escherichia coli in producing malaria proteins inducing IgG targeting PfEMP1 on infected erythrocytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Victor, Michala E; Bengtsson, Anja; Andersen, Gorm

    2010-01-01

    The PFD1235w Plasmodium falciparum erythrocyte membrane protein 1 (PfEMP1) antigen is associated with severe malaria in children and can be expressed on the surface of infected erythrocytes (IE) adhering to ICAM1. However, the exact three-dimensional structure of this PfEMP1 and its surface-expos...

  4. Surface co-expression of two different PfEMP1 antigens on single Plasmodium falciparum-infected erythrocytes facilitates binding to ICAM1 and PECAM1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Joergensen, Louise; Bengtsson, Dominique C; Bengtsson, Anja;

    2010-01-01

    The Plasmodium falciparum erythrocyte membrane protein 1 (PfEMP1) antigens play a major role in cytoadhesion of infected erythrocytes (IE), antigenic variation, and immunity to malaria. The current consensus on control of variant surface antigen expression is that only one PfEMP1 encoded by one var...

  5. Cell Infectivity in relation to bovine leukemia virus gp51 and p24 in bovine milk exosomes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tetsuya Yamada

    Full Text Available Exosomes are small membranous microvesicles (40-100 nm in diameter and are extracellularly released from a wide variety of cells. Exosomes contain microRNA, mRNA, and cellular proteins, which are delivered into recipient cells via these exosomes, and play a role in intercellular communication. In bovine leukemia virus (BLV infection of cattle, although it is thought to be a minor route of infection, BLV can be transmitted to calves via milk. Here, we investigated the association between exosomes and BLV in bovine milk. BLV structural proteins, gp51 (Env and p24 (Gag, were detected in bovine milk exosomes from BLV-infected cattle by Western blot analysis. In cells inoculated with these milk exosomes, BLV DNA was not detected during three serial passages by nested PCR. Purification of exosomes from persistently BLV-infected cells was achieved by immuno-magnetic separation using an antibody against exosomes coupled to magnetic beads. Consistently, BLV gp51 and p24 proteins were detected in purified exosomes. Moreover, reverse transcriptase activity was observed in purified exosomes, meaning that exosomes also contain viral enzyme. However, BLV DNA was not detected in serially passaged cells after inoculation of purified exosomes, indicating that exosomes carrying BLV proteins appeared to be not infectious. These results suggest that BLV proteins are released with milk exosomes and could be transferred into recipient cells of calves via milk exosomes as an alternative route not requiring virus infection. Moreover it is also possible that bovine milk exosomes play a role in clearance of BLV proteins from infected cells.

  6. The Role of MicroRNAs in Bovine Infection and Immunity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathan eLawless

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available MicroRNAs (miRNAs are a class of small, non-coding RNAs that are recognised as critical regulators of immune gene expression during infection. Many immunologically significant human miRNAs have been found to be conserved in agriculturally important species, including cattle. Discovering how bovine miRNAs mediate the immune defence during infection is critical to understanding the aetiology of the most prevalent bovine diseases. Here, we review current knowledge of miRNAs in the bovine genome, and discuss the advances in understanding of miRNAs as regulators of immune cell function, and bovine immune response activation, regulation, and resolution. Finally, we consider the future perspectives on miRNAs in bovine viral disease, their role as potential biomarkers and in therapy.

  7. A kinetic fluorescence assay reveals unusual features of Ca⁺⁺ uptake in Plasmodium falciparum-infected erythrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zipprer, Elizabeth M; Neggers, McKinzie; Kushwaha, Ambuj; Rayavara, Kempaiah; Desai, Sanjay A

    2014-05-18

    To facilitate development within erythrocytes, malaria parasites increase their host cell uptake of diverse solutes including Ca++. The mechanism and molecular basis of increased Ca++ permeability remains less well studied than that of other solutes. Based on an appropriate Ca++ affinity and its greater brightness than related fluorophores, Fluo-8 was selected and used to develop a robust fluorescence-based assay for Ca++ uptake by human erythrocytes infected with Plasmodium falciparum. Both uninfected and infected cells exhibited a large Ca++-dependent fluorescence signal after loading with the Fluo-8 dye. Probenecid, an inhibitor of erythrocyte organic anion transporters, abolished the fluorescence signal in uninfected cells; in infected cells, this agent increased fluorescence via mechanisms that depend on parasite genotype. Kinetic fluorescence measurements in 384-well microplates revealed that the infected cell Ca++ uptake is not mediated by the plasmodial surface anion channel (PSAC), a parasite nutrient channel at the host membrane; it also appears to be distinct from mammalian Ca++ channels. Imaging studies confirmed a low intracellular Ca++ in uninfected cells and higher levels in both the host and parasite compartments of infected cells. Parasite growth inhibition studies revealed a conserved requirement for extracellular Ca++. Nondestructive loading of Fluo-8 into human erythrocytes permits measurement of Ca++ uptake kinetics. The greater Ca++ permeability of cells infected with malaria parasites is apparent when probenecid is used to inhibit Fluo-8 efflux at the host membrane. This permeability is mediated by a distinct pathway and may be essential for intracellular parasite development. The miniaturized assay presented here should help clarify the precise transport mechanism and may identify inhibitors suitable for antimalarial drug development.

  8. Trafficking of STEVOR to the Maurer's clefts in Plasmodium falciparum -infected erythrocytes

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Przyborski, Jude M; Miller, Susanne K; Rohrbach, Petra; Pfahler, Judith M; Crabb, Brendan S; Henrich, Philipp P; Lanzer, Michael

    2005-01-01

    The human malarial parasite Plasmodium falciparum exports proteins to destinations within its host erythrocyte, including cytosol, surface and membranous profiles of parasite origin termed Maurer's clefts...

  9. Expression of Bovine Leukemia Virus Genome is Blocked by a Nonimmunoglobulin Protein in Plasma from Infected Cattle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, P.; Ferrer, J. F.

    1982-01-01

    Plasma of cattle infected with bovine leukemia virus contains a soluble factor that blocks the expression of the viral genome in cultured lymphocytes. The blocking factor is not present in plasma of bovine leukemia virus-free cattle or of cattle infected with common bovine viruses. Blocking of bovine leukemia virus expression by the plasma factor is reversible, and seems to be mediated by a nonimmunoglobulin protein molecule.

  10. Experimental infection of pregnant goats with bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV)1 or 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Infections with bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) of the genus pestivirus, family Flaviviridae, are not limited to cattle but occur in various artiodactyls. Persistently infected (PI) cattle are the main source of BVDV. Persistent infections also occur in heterologous hosts such as sheep and deer. ...

  11. Identification of phosphorylated proteins in erythrocytes infected by the human malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xia Dong

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Previous comparative proteomic analysis on Plasmodium falciparum isolates of different adhesion properties suggested that protein phosphorylation varies between isolates with different cytoadherence properties. But the extent and dynamic changes in phosphorylation have not been systematically studied. As a baseline for these future studies, this paper examined changes in the phosphoproteome of parasitized red blood cells (pRBC. Methods Metabolic labelling with [35S] methionine on pRBC and 2D gel electrophoresis (2-DE has previously been used to show the expression of parasite proteins and changes in protein iso-electric point (PI. 2-DE of different parasite strains was combined with immunoblotting using monoclonal antibodies specifically to phosphorylated serine/threonine and tyrosine, to obtain the phosphorylation profiles throughout the erythrocytic lifecycle. Affinity chromatography was used to purify/enrich phosphorylated proteins and these proteins from mature trophozoite stages which were identified using high-accuracy mass spectrometry and MASCOT search. Results 2D-immunoblots showed that P. falciparum infection greatly increased phosphorylation of a set of proteins in pRBC, the dominant size classes for phosphorylated tyrosine proteins were 95, 60, 50 and 30 kDa and for phosphorylated serine/threonine were 120, 95, 60, 50, 43, 40 and 30 kDa. The most abundant molecules from 2D-gel mapping of phosphorylated proteins in ItG infected RBCs were identified by MALDI-TOF. A proteomic overview of phosphorylated proteins in pRBC was achieved by using complementary phosphorylated protein enrichment techniques combined with nano-flow LC/MS/MS analysis and MASCOT MS/MS ions search with phosphorylation as variable modifications. The definite phosphoproteins of pRBC are reported and discussed. Conclusion Protein phosphorylation is a major process in P. falciparum-parasitized erythrocytes. Preliminary screens identified 170 P

  12. Detection of lipomannan in cattle infected with bovine tuberculosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Early and rapid detection of bovine tuberculosis (bTB) is critical to controlling the spread of this disease in cattle and other animals. In this study, we demonstrate the development of an immunoassay for the direct detection of the bovine bTB biomarker, lipomannan (LM) in serum using a waveguide-...

  13. Plasmodium Falciparum: Adhesion Phenotype of Infected Erythrocytes Using Classical and Mini-Column Cytoadherence Techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N Kalantari

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Cytoadherence of Plasmodium falciparum- infected erythrocytes to host cells is an impor­tant trait for parasite survival and has a major role in pathology of malaria disease. Infections with P. falciparum usually consist of several subpopulations of parasites with different adhesive proper­ties. This study aimed to compare relative sizes of various binding subpopulations of different P. falciparum isolates. It also investigated the adhesive phenotype of a laboratory P. falciparum line, A4, using different binding techniques.Methods: Seven different P. falciparum isolates (ITG, A4, 3D7 and four field isolates were cultivated to late trophozoite and schizont and then cytoadherence to cell differentiation 36 (CD36, intercellu­lar cell adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1, and vascular cell adhesion molecule (V-CAM and E-selectin were examined. The relative binding sizes of parasite subpopulations to human receptors were meas­ured by mini-column cytoadherence method. The adhesion phenotype of P. falciparum-A4 line was evaluated by in vitro static, flow-based and mini-column binding assays.Results: The relative binding size of ITG, A4 and 3D7 clones to a column made with CHO/ICAM-1 was 68%, 54% and 0%, respectively. The relative binding sizes of these lines to CHO/CD36 were 59.7%, 28.7% and 0%, respectively. Different field isolates had variable sizes of respective CD36 and ICAM1-binding subpopulations. A4 line had five different subpopulations each with different binding sizes.Conclusion: This study provided further evidence that P. falciparum isolates have different binding subpopulations sizes in an infection. Furthermore, measurement of ICAM-1 or CD36 binding subpopula­tions may practical to study the cytoadherence phenotypes of P. falciparum field isolates at the molecular level.

  14. Regulation of extracellular ATP in human erythrocytes infected with Plasmodium falciparum.

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    Cora Lilia Alvarez

    Full Text Available In human erythrocytes (h-RBCs various stimuli induce increases in [cAMP] that trigger ATP release. The resulting pattern of extracellular ATP accumulation (ATPe kinetics depends on both ATP release and ATPe degradation by ectoATPase activity. In this study we evaluated ATPe kinetics from primary cultures of h-RBCs infected with P. falciparum at various stages of infection (ring, trophozoite and schizont stages. A "3V" mixture containing isoproterenol (β-adrenergic agonist, forskolin (adenylate kinase activator and papaverine (phosphodiesterase inhibitor was used to induce cAMP-dependent ATP release. ATPe kinetics of r-RBCs (ring-infected RBCs, t-RBCs (trophozoite-infected RBCs and s-RBCs (schizont-infected RBCs showed [ATPe] to peak acutely to a maximum value followed by a slower time dependent decrease. In all intraerythrocytic stages, values of ΔATP1 (difference between [ATPe] measured 1 min post-stimulus and basal [ATPe] increased nonlinearly with parasitemia (from 2 to 12.5%. Under 3V exposure, t-RBCs at parasitemia 94% (t94-RBCs showed 3.8-fold higher ΔATP1 values than in h-RBCs, indicative of upregulated ATP release. Pre-exposure to either 100 µM carbenoxolone, 100 nM mefloquine or 100 µM NPPB reduced ΔATP1 to 83-87% for h-RBCs and 63-74% for t94-RBCs. EctoATPase activity, assayed at both low nM concentrations (300-900 nM and 500 µM exogenous ATPe concentrations increased approx. 400-fold in t94-RBCs, as compared to h-RBCs, while intracellular ATP concentrations of t94-RBCs were 65% that of h-RBCs. In t94-RBCs, production of nitric oxide (NO was approx. 7-fold higher than in h-RBCs, and was partially inhibited by L-NAME pre-treatment. In media with L-NAME, ΔATP1 values were 2.7-times higher in h-RBCs and 4.2-times higher in t94-RBCs, than without L-NAME. Results suggest that P. falciparum infection of h-RBCs strongly activates ATP release via Pannexin 1 in these cells. Several processes partially counteracted ATPe accumulation: an

  15. The Severity of Plasmodium falciparum infection is associated with transcript levels of var genes encoding endothelial protein C receptor-binding P. falciparum erythrocyte membrane protein 1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mkumbaye, Sixbert I; Wang, Christian W; Lyimo, Eric

    2017-01-01

    By attaching infected erythrocytes to the vascular lining, Plasmodium falciparum parasites leave blood circulation and avoid splenic clearance. This sequestration is central to pathogenesis. Severe malaria is associated with parasites expressing an antigenically distinct P. falciparum erythrocyte...

  16. Plasmodium falciparum-infected erythrocyte knob density is linked to the PfEMP1 variant expressed

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Subramani, Ramesh; Quadt, Katharina; Jeppesen, Anine Engholm

    2015-01-01

    regardless of the PfEMP1 expressed. Our study documents for the first time that knob density is related to the PfEMP1 variant expressed. This may reflect topological requirements to ensure optimal adhesive properties of the IEs. IMPORTANCE: Infections with Plasmodium falciparum malaria parasites are still...... responsible for many deaths, especially among children and pregnant women. New interventions are needed to reduce severe illness and deaths caused by this malaria parasite. Thus, a better understanding of the mechanisms behind the pathogenesis is essential. A main reason why Plasmodium falciparum malaria......UNLABELLED: Members of the clonally variant Plasmodium falciparum erythrocyte membrane protein 1 (PfEMP1) family mediate adhesion of infected erythrocytes (IEs) to vascular receptors. PfEMP1 expression is normally confined to nanoscale knob protrusions on the IE surface membrane. To investigate...

  17. Plasmodium falciparum-Infected Erythrocyte Knob Density Is Linked to the PfEMP1 Variant Expressed

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Subramani, Ramesh; Quadt, Katharina; Jeppesen, Anine Engholm;

    2015-01-01

    UNLABELLED: Members of the clonally variant Plasmodium falciparum erythrocyte membrane protein 1 (PfEMP1) family mediate adhesion of infected erythrocytes (IEs) to vascular receptors. PfEMP1 expression is normally confined to nanoscale knob protrusions on the IE surface membrane. To investigate...... regardless of the PfEMP1 expressed. Our study documents for the first time that knob density is related to the PfEMP1 variant expressed. This may reflect topological requirements to ensure optimal adhesive properties of the IEs. IMPORTANCE: Infections with Plasmodium falciparum malaria parasites are still...... responsible for many deaths, especially among children and pregnant women. New interventions are needed to reduce severe illness and deaths caused by this malaria parasite. Thus, a better understanding of the mechanisms behind the pathogenesis is essential. A main reason why Plasmodium falciparum malaria...

  18. Bio-inspired artemether-loaded human serum albumin nanoparticles for effective control of malaria-infected erythrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sidhaye, Aditi A; Bhuran, Kanchan C; Zambare, Sneha; Abubaker, Munna; Nirmalan, Niroshini; Singh, Kamalinder K

    2016-10-19

    The intra-erythrocytic development of the malarial parasite is dependent on active uptake of nutrients, including human serum albumin (HSA), into parasitized red blood cells (pRBCs). We have designed HSA-based nanoparticles as a potential drug-delivery option for antimalarials. Artemether-loaded nanoparticles (AANs) were designed and antimalarial activity evaluated in vitro/in vivo using Plasmodium falciparum/Plasmodium berghei species, respectively. Selective internalization of AAN into Plasmodium-infected RBCs in preference to healthy erythrocytes was observed using confocal imaging. In vitro studies showed 50% dose reduction for AAN as compared with drug-only controls to achieve IC50 levels of inhibition. The nanoparticles exhibited twofold higher peak drug concentrations in RBCs with antimalarial activity at 50% of therapeutic doses in P. bergei infected mice. Novel HSA-based nanoparticles offer safe and effective approach for selective targeting of antimalarial drugs.

  19. Acquisition and decay of antibodies to pregnancy-associated variant antigens on the surface of Plasmodium falciparum-infected erythrocytes that protect against placental parasitemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Staalsoe, T; Megnekou, R; Fievét, N

    2001-01-01

    Otherwise clinically immune women in areas endemic for malaria are highly susceptible to Plasmodium falciparum malaria during their first pregnancy. Pregnancy-associated malaria (PAM) is characterized by placental accumulation of infected erythrocytes that adhere to chondroitin sulfate A (CSA...

  20. 2-Hexadecynoic Acid Inhibits Plasmodial FAS-II Enzymes and Arrest Erythrocytic and Liver Stage Plasmodium Infections

    OpenAIRE

    Tasdemir, Deniz; Sanabria, David; Lauinger, Ina L.; Tarun, Alice; Herman, Rob; Perozzo, Remo; Zloh, Mire; Kappe, Stefan H.; Brun, Reto; Carballeira, Néstor M.

    2010-01-01

    Acetylenic fatty acids are known to display several biological activities, but their antimalarial activity has remained unexplored. In this study, we synthesized the 2-, 5-, 6-, and 9-hexadecynoic acids (HDAs) and evaluated their in vitro activity against erythrocytic (blood) stages of Plasmodium falciparum and liver stages of P. yoelii infections. Since the type II fatty acid biosynthesis pathway (PfFAS-II) has recently been shown to be indispensable for liver stage malaria parasites, the in...

  1. A novel ENU-induced ankyrin-1 mutation impairs parasite invasion and increases erythrocyte clearance during malaria infection in mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Hong Ming; Bauer, Denis C.; Lelliott, Patrick M.; Greth, Andreas; McMorran, Brendan J.; Foote, Simon J.; Burgio, Gaetan

    2016-01-01

    Genetic defects in various red blood cell (RBC) cytoskeletal proteins have been long associated with changes in susceptibility towards malaria infection. In particular, while ankyrin (Ank-1) mutations account for approximately 50% of hereditary spherocytosis (HS) cases, an association with malaria is not well-established, and conflicting evidence has been reported. We describe a novel N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea (ENU)-induced ankyrin mutation MRI61689 that gives rise to two different ankyrin transcripts: one with an introduced splice acceptor site resulting a frameshift, the other with a skipped exon. Ank-1(MRI61689/+) mice exhibit an HS-like phenotype including reduction in mean corpuscular volume (MCV), increased osmotic fragility and reduced RBC deformability. They were also found to be resistant to rodent malaria Plasmodium chabaudi infection. Parasites in Ank-1(MRI61689/+) erythrocytes grew normally, but red cells showed resistance to merozoite invasion. Uninfected Ank-1(MRI61689/+) erythrocytes were also more likely to be cleared from circulation during infection; the “bystander effect”. This increased clearance is a novel resistance mechanism which was not observed in previous ankyrin mouse models. We propose that this bystander effect is due to reduced deformability of Ank-1(MRI61689/+) erythrocytes. This paper highlights the complex roles ankyrin plays in mediating malaria resistance. PMID:27848995

  2. Effects ofPlasmodium falciparum-infected erythrocytes on matrix metalloproteinase-9 regulation in human microvascular endothelial cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sarah D Alessandro; Nicoletta Basilico; Mauro Prato

    2013-01-01

    Objective:To investigate the regulation of matrix metalloproteinases(MMPs) and tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinases(TIMPs) in human microvascular endothelium(HMEC-1) exposed to erythrocytes infected by different strains ofPlasmodium falciparum (P. falciparum).Methods:HMEC-1 cells were co-incubated for72 h with erythrocytes infected by late stage trophozoite of D10(chloroquine-sensitive) orW2(chloroquine-resistant)P. falciparum strains.Cell supernatants were then collected and the levels of pro- or active gelatinasesMMP-9 andMMP-2 were evaluated by gelatin zymography and densitometry.The release of pro-MMP-9,MMP-3,MMP-1 andTIMP-1 proteins was analyzed by western blotting and densitometry.Results:Infected erythrocytes inducedde novo proMMP-9 andMMP-9 release.Neither basal levels of proMMP-2 were altered, nor activeMMP-2 was found.MMP-3 andMMP-1 secretion was significantly enhanced, whereas basalTIMP-1 was unaffected.All effects were similar for both strains. Conclusions:P. falciparum parasites, either chloroquine-sensitive or -resistant, induce the release of activeMMP-9 protein from human microvascular endothelium, by impairing balances between proMMP-9 and its inhibitor, and by enhancing the levels of its activators.This work provides new evidence onMMP involvement in malaria, pointing atMMP-9 as a possible target in adjuvant therapy.

  3. HIV-1 inhibits phagocytosis and inflammatory cytokine responses of human monocyte-derived macrophages to P. falciparum infected erythrocytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Louise E Ludlow

    Full Text Available HIV-1 infection increases the risk and severity of malaria by poorly defined mechanisms. We investigated the effect of HIV-1(Ba-L infection of monocyte-derived macrophages (MDM on phagocytosis of opsonised P. falciparum infected erythrocytes (IE and subsequent proinflammatory cytokine secretion. Compared to mock-infected MDM, HIV-1 infection significantly inhibited phagocytosis of IE (median (IQR (10 (0-28 versus (34 (27-108; IE internalised/100 MDM; p = 0.001 and decreased secretion of IL-6 (1,116 (352-3,387 versus 1,552 (889-6,331; pg/mL; p = 0.0078 and IL-1β (16 (7-21 versus 33 (27-65; pg/mL; p = 0.0078. Thus inadequate phagocytosis and cytokine production may contribute to impaired control of malaria in HIV-1 infected individuals.

  4. The Plasmodium falciparum STEVOR multigene family mediates antigenic variation of the infected erythrocyte.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Makhtar Niang

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Modifications of the Plasmodium falciparum-infected red blood cell (iRBC surface have been linked to parasite-associated pathology. Such modifications enable the parasite to establish long-lasting chronic infection by evading antibody mediate immune recognition and splenic clearance. With the exception of the well-demonstrated roles of var-encoded PfEMP1 in virulence and immune evasion, the biological significance of other variant surface antigens (rif and stevor is largely unknown. While PfEMP1 and RIFIN have been located on the iRBC surface, recent studies have located STEVOR at the iRBC membrane where it may be exposed on the erythrocyte surface. To investigate the role of STEVOR in more detail, we have developed antibodies against two putative STEVOR proteins and used a combination of indirect immunofluorescence assays (IFA, live IFA, flow cytometry, as well as agglutination assays, which enable us to demonstrate that STEVOR is clonally variant at the surface of schizont stage parasites. Crucially, expression of different STEVOR on the surface of the iRBC changes the antigenic property of the parasite. Taken together, our data for the first time demonstrate that STEVOR plays a role in creating antigenic diversity of schizont stage parasites, thereby adding additional complexity to the immunogenic properties of the iRBC. Furthermore, it clearly demonstrates that to obtain a complete understanding of how parasite-induced pathology is linked to variation on the surface of the iRBC, focusing the interactions of multiple multigene families needs to be considered.

  5. Global mass spectrometry based metabolomics profiling of erythrocytes infected with Plasmodium falciparum.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Theodore R Sana

    Full Text Available Malaria is a global infectious disease that threatens the lives of millions of people. Transcriptomics, proteomics and functional genomics studies, as well as sequencing of the Plasmodium falciparum and Homo sapiens genomes, have shed new light on this host-parasite relationship. Recent advances in accurate mass measurement mass spectrometry, sophisticated data analysis software, and availability of biological pathway databases, have converged to facilitate our global, untargeted biochemical profiling study of in vitro P. falciparum-infected (IRBC and uninfected (NRBC erythrocytes. In order to expand the number of detectable metabolites, several key analytical steps in our workflows were optimized. Untargeted and targeted data mining resulted in detection of over one thousand features or chemical entities. Untargeted features were annotated via matching to the METLIN metabolite database. For targeted data mining, we queried the data using a compound database derived from a metabolic reconstruction of the P. falciparum genome. In total, over one hundred and fifty differential annotated metabolites were observed. To corroborate the representation of known biochemical pathways from our data, an inferential pathway analysis strategy was used to map annotated metabolites onto the BioCyc pathway collection. This hypothesis-generating approach resulted in over-representation of many metabolites onto several IRBC pathways, most prominently glycolysis. In addition, components of the "branched" TCA cycle, partial urea cycle, and nucleotide, amino acid, chorismate, sphingolipid and fatty acid metabolism were found to be altered in IRBCs. Interestingly, we detected and confirmed elevated levels for cyclic ADP ribose and phosphoribosyl AMP in IRBCs, a novel observation. These metabolites may play a role in regulating the release of intracellular Ca(2+ during P. falciparum infection. Our results support a strategy of global metabolite profiling by untargeted

  6. Immunohistochemical distinction between preclinical bovine spongiform encephalopathy and scrapie infection in sheep

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thuring, C.M.A.; Keulen, van L.J.M.; Langeveld, J.P.M.; Vromans, M.E.W.; Zijderveld, van F.G.; Sweeney, T.

    2005-01-01

    Sheep are susceptible experimentally to bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE), the clinical signs being indistinguishable from those of scrapie. Because of the possibility of natural ovine BSE infection, laboratory tests are needed to distinguish between scrapie and BSE infection. The objectives of

  7. Therapeutic Chlamydophila abortus and C. pecorum vaccination transiently reduces bovine mastitis associated with Chlamydophila infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biesenkamp-Uhe, Carolin; Li, Yihang; Hehnen, Hans-Robert; Sachse, Konrad; Kaltenboeck, Bernhard

    2007-02-01

    Infections with Chlamydophila abortus and C. pecorum are highly prevalent in cattle and have been associated with bovine mastitis. A prospective cohort study was conducted with a herd of 140 Holstein dairy cows to investigate the influence of Chlamydophila infection on subclinical inflammation of the bovine mammary gland as characterized by somatic cell numbers in milk. PCR detection of C. abortus and low serum antibody levels against Chlamydophila spp. were significantly associated with subclinical mastitis. To examine the effect of the infection by response modification, immune perturbation was done by two subcutaneous administrations of an experimental vaccine preparation of inactivated C. abortus and C. pecorum elementary bodies. Vaccination against Chlamydophila highly significantly decreased milk somatic cell numbers, thus reducing bovine mastitis, and increased antibody levels against Chlamydophila but did not eliminate shedding of C. abortus in milk as detected by PCR. The protective effect peaked at 11 weeks after vaccination and lasted for a total of 14 weeks. Vaccination with the Chlamydophila vaccine, a mock vaccine, or a combination vaccine against bovine viral diseases highly significantly increased C. abortus shedding in milk for 1 week, presumably mediated by the vaccine adjuvant. In summary, this study shows an etiological involvement of the widespread Chlamydophila infections in bovine mastitis, a herd disease of critical importance for the dairy industry. Furthermore, this investigation shows the potential for temporary improvement of chlamydial disease by therapeutic vaccination. Chlamydophila vaccination of cattle might serve as a testing ground for vaccines against human chlamydial infections.

  8. Histopathological and molecular study of Neospora caninum infection in bovine aborted fetuses

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Amir Kamali; HesamAdin Seifi; Ahmad Reza Movassaghi; Gholam Reza Razmi; Zahra Naseri

    2014-01-01

    To estimate the extent to which abortion in dairy cows was associated with of Neospora caninum (N. caninum) and to determine the risk factors of neosporosis in dairy farms from 9 provinces in Iran. Methods: Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) test was used to detect Neospora infection in the brain of 395 bovine aborted fetuses from 9 provinces of Iran. In addition, the brains of aborted fetuses were taken for histopathological examination. To identify the risk factors associated with neosporosis, data analysis was performed by SAS. Results: N. caninum was detected in 179 (45%) out of 395 fetal brain samples of bovine aborted fetuses using PCR. Among the PCR-positive brain samples, only 56 samples were suited for histopathological examination. The characteristic lesions of Neospora infection including non-suppurative encephalitis were found in 16 (28%) of PCR-positive samples. The risk factors including season, parity of dam, history of bovine virus diarrhea and infectious bovine rhinotracheitis infection in herd, cow’s milk production, herd size and fetal appearance did not show association with the infection. This study showed that Neospora caused abortion was significantly more in the second trimester of pregnancy than other periods. In addition, a significant association was observed between Neospora infection and stillbirth. Conclusions: The results showed N. caninum infection was detected in high percentage of aborted fetuses. In addition, at least one fourth of abortions caused by Neospora infection. These results indicate increasing number of abortions associated with the protozoa more than reported before in Iran.

  9. Generation of a persistently infected MDBK cell line with natural bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dongseob Tark

    Full Text Available Bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE is a zoonotic transmissible spongiform encephalopathy (TSE thought to be caused by the same prion strain as variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (vCJD. Unlike scrapie and chronic wasting disease there is no cell culture model allowing the replication of proteinase K resistant BSE (PrPBSE and the further in vitro study of this disease. We have generated a cell line based on the Madin-Darby Bovine Kidney (MDBK cell line over-expressing the bovine prion protein. After exposure to naturally BSE-infected bovine brain homogenate this cell line has shown to replicate and accumulate PrPBSE and maintain infection up to passage 83 after initial challenge. Collectively, we demonstrate, for the first time, that the BSE agent can infect cell lines over-expressing the bovine prion protein similar to other prion diseases. These BSE infected cells will provide a useful tool to facilitate the study of potential therapeutic agents and the diagnosis of BSE.

  10. Generation of a persistently infected MDBK cell line with natural bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tark, Dongseob; Kim, Hyojin; Neale, Michael H; Kim, Minjeong; Sohn, Hyunjoo; Lee, Yoonhee; Cho, Insoo; Joo, Yiseok; Windl, Otto

    2015-01-01

    Bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) is a zoonotic transmissible spongiform encephalopathy (TSE) thought to be caused by the same prion strain as variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (vCJD). Unlike scrapie and chronic wasting disease there is no cell culture model allowing the replication of proteinase K resistant BSE (PrPBSE) and the further in vitro study of this disease. We have generated a cell line based on the Madin-Darby Bovine Kidney (MDBK) cell line over-expressing the bovine prion protein. After exposure to naturally BSE-infected bovine brain homogenate this cell line has shown to replicate and accumulate PrPBSE and maintain infection up to passage 83 after initial challenge. Collectively, we demonstrate, for the first time, that the BSE agent can infect cell lines over-expressing the bovine prion protein similar to other prion diseases. These BSE infected cells will provide a useful tool to facilitate the study of potential therapeutic agents and the diagnosis of BSE.

  11. Bovine viral diarrhea virus infections: manifestations of infection and recent advances in understanding pathogenesis and control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brodersen, B W

    2014-03-01

    Bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) continues to be of economic significance to the livestock industry in terms of acute disease and fetal loss. Many of the lesions relating to BVDV infection have been well described previously. The virus is perpetuated in herds through the presence of calves that are persistently infected. Relationships between various species and biotypes of BVDV and host defenses are increasingly understood. Understanding of the host defense mechanisms of innate immunity and adaptive immunity continues to improve, and the effects of the virus on these immune mechanisms are being used to explain how persistent infection develops. The noncytopathic biotype of BVDV plays the major role in its effects on the host defenses by inhibiting various aspects of the innate immune system and creation of immunotolerance in the fetus during early gestation. Recent advances have allowed for development of affordable test strategies to identify and remove persistently infected animals. With these improved tests and removal strategies, the livestock industry can begin more widespread effective control programs.

  12. Respiratory disease associated with bovine coronavirus infection in cattle herds in Southern Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Decaro, Nicola; Campolo, Marco; Desario, Costantina; Cirone, Francesco; D'Abramo, Maria; Lorusso, Eleonora; Greco, Grazia; Mari, Viviana; Colaianni, Maria Loredana; Elia, Gabriella; Martella, Vito; Buonavoglia, Canio

    2008-01-01

    Four outbreaks of bovine respiratory disease (BRD) associated with bovine coronavirus (BCoV) infection in Italian cattle herds were reported. In 3 outbreaks, BRD was observed only in 2-3-month-old feedlot calves, whereas in the remaining outbreak, lactating cows, heifers, and calves were simultaneously affected. By using reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), BCoV RNA was detected in all outbreaks without evidence of concurrent viral pathogens (i.e., bovine respiratory syncytial virus, bovine herpesvirus type 1, bovine viral diarrhea virus, bovine parainfluenza virus). Common bacteria of cattle were recovered only from 2 outbreaks of BRD: Staphylococcus spp. and Proteus mirabilis (outbreak 1) and Mannheimia haemolytica (outbreak 4). A recently established real-time RT-PCR assay showed that viral RNA loads in nasal secretions ranged between 3.10 x 10(2) and 7.50 x 10(7) RNA copies/microl of template. Bovine coronavirus was isolated from respiratory specimens from all outbreaks except outbreak 1, in which real-time RT-PCR found very low viral titers in nasal swabs.

  13. Effect of the bovine viral diarrhoea virus (BVDV) infection on dairy calf rearing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diéguez, Francisco J; Yus, Eduardo; Vilar, María J; Sanjuán, María L; Arnaiz, Ignacio

    2009-08-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the cumulative incidence of mortality, clinical diarrhoea and respiratory disease in calves, during their first six months of age, in herds with different bovine viral diarrhoea virus (BVDV) infection status. Calves' health indicators were tested by comparing proportions in 101 farms with dissimilar infection condition. The results indicate that there was a significant relationship between the BVDV status (actively infected herd or not) and the cumulative incidence of mortality and respiratory disorders.

  14. Evasion of immunity to Plasmodium falciparum malaria by IgM masking of protective IgG epitopes in infected erythrocyte surface-exposed PfEMP1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barfod, Lea; Dalgaard, Michael B; Pleman, Suzan T

    2011-01-01

    Plasmodium falciparum malaria is a major cause of mortality and severe morbidity. Its virulence is related to the parasite's ability to evade host immunity through clonal antigenic variation and tissue-specific adhesion of infected erythrocytes (IEs). The P. falciparum erythrocyte membrane protein...... epitopes not prone to IgM masking are likely to be particularly important targets of acquired protective immunity to P. falciparum malaria....

  15. Nonimmune immunoglobulin binding and multiple adhesion characterize Plasmodium falciparum-infected erythrocytes of placental origin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasti, Niloofar; Namusoke, Fatuma; Chêne, Arnaud;

    2006-01-01

    . A P. falciparum erythrocyte membrane protein 1 variant, VAR2CSA, and the placental receptor chondroitin sulfate A (CSA) are currently the focus of PAM research. A role for immunoglobulins (IgG and IgM) from normal human serum and hyaluronic acid as additional receptors in placental sequestration have...

  16. The influence of host genetics on erythrocytes and malaria infection: is there therapeutic potential?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lelliott, Patrick M; McMorran, Brendan J; Foote, Simon J; Burgio, Gaetan

    2015-07-29

    As parasites, Plasmodium species depend upon their host for survival. During the blood stage of their life-cycle parasites invade and reside within erythrocytes, commandeering host proteins and resources towards their own ends, and dramatically transforming the host cell. Parasites aptly avoid immune detection by minimizing the exposure of parasite proteins and removing themselves from circulation through cytoadherence. Erythrocytic disorders brought on by host genetic mutations can interfere with one or more of these processes, thereby providing a measure of protection against malaria to the host. This review summarizes recent findings regarding the mechanistic aspects of this protection, as mediated through the parasites interaction with abnormal erythrocytes. These novel findings include the reliance of the parasite on the host enzyme ferrochelatase, and the discovery of basigin and CD55 as obligate erythrocyte receptors for parasite invasion. The elucidation of these naturally occurring malaria resistance mechanisms is increasing the understanding of the host-parasite interaction, and as discussed below, is providing new insights into the development of therapies to prevent this disease.

  17. Experimental infection of reindeer with bovine viral diarrhea virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.K. Morton

    1990-08-01

    Full Text Available Two 8-month reindeer (Rangifer tarandus and a 1-month-old Hereford-Holstein calf (Bos taurus were inoculated intranasally with the Singer (cytopathogenic strain of bovine viral diarrhea (BVD virus. Clinical signs in reindeer included loose stools containing blood and mucus, and transient laminitis or coronitis. Signs in the calf were limited to bloody mucus in the stool and lesions in the nasal mucosa. Antibody titers to BVD virus in the reindeer were intermittent, and titers in the calf persisted from days 14 to 63 post-inoculation (PI. Viremia was detected on PI day 4 in one reindeer, days 3-7 in the other, and days 2-7 in the calf. Bovine viral diarrhea virus was isolated from the lung of the calf at necropsy (PI day 63.

  18. Social isolation may influence responsiveness to infection with bovine herpesvirus 1 in veal calves

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reenen, van C.G.; Mars, M.H.; Leushuis, I.E.; Rijsewijk, F.A.M.; Oirschot, van J.T.; Blokhuis, H.J.

    2000-01-01

    An experiment was performed to develop a model to study the impact of stress on responsiveness to infection with bovine herpesvirus 1 (BHV1) in veal calves. Social isolation after previous group-housing was used as a putatively stressful treatment. Group-housed specific pathogen-free veal calves (n=

  19. Herd-level diagnosis for Salmonella enterica subsp enterica serovar Dublin infection in bovine dairy herds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veling, J.; Barkema, H.W.; Schans, van de J.; Zijderveld, van F.G.; Verhoeff, J.

    2002-01-01

    Herd-level sensitivities of bacteriological and serological methods were compared in 79 bovine dairy herds, recently infected with Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Dublin. All farms experienced clinical signs of salmonellosis for the first time and had no history of vaccination against sa

  20. The transcription factor relish controls anaplasma marginale infection in the bovine tick rhipicephalus microplus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhipicephalus microplus is an important biological vector of Anaplasma marginale, the etiological agent of bovine anaplasmosis. The knowledge of tick immune responses to control bacterial infections remains limited. In this study, we demonstrate that transcription factor Relish from the Imd signalin...

  1. Virulence and genotype of a bovine herpesvirus 1 isolate from semen of a subclinically infected bull

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oirschot, van J.T.; Rijsewijk, F.A.M.; Straver, P.J.; Ruuls, R.C.; Quak, J.; Davidse, A.; Westenbrink, E.; Gielkens, A.L.J.; Dijk, van J.E.; Moerman, A.

    1995-01-01

    A bovine herpesvirus 1 (BHV-1) isolate from the semen of a subclinically infected bull was administered to cattle by various routes to assess its virulence. Cattle that were artificially inseminated or inoculated intrapreputially did not develop clinical signs, but did transmit the virus to contact

  2. Case Report: Emergence of bovine viral diarrhea virus persistently infected calves in a closed herd

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) continues to have significant economic impact on the cattle industry worldwide. The virus is primarily maintained in the cattle population due to persistently infected animals. Herd surveillance along with good vaccination programs and biosecurity practices are the...

  3. Resolving bovine viral diarrhea virus subtypes from persistently infected US beef calves with complete genome sequence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) is classified into 2 genotypes, BVDV-1 and BVDV-2, each of which contains distinct subtypes with genetic and antigenic differences. Currently, three major subtypes circulate in the United States: BVDV-1a, 1b, and 2a. In addition, a single case of BVDV-2b infection ...

  4. Schmallenberg virus detection in bovine semen after experimental infection of bulls.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Poel, van der W.H.M.; Parlevliet, J.M.; Verstraten, E.R.A.M.; Kooi, E.A.; Hakze-van der Honing, van der R.W.; Stockhofe-Zurwieden, N.

    2014-01-01

    To study Schmallenberg virus (SBV) excretion in bovine semen after experimental infection, two bulls were inoculated subcutaneously with a SBV isolate (1 ml Vero cell culture 106 TCID50). After inoculation (at day 0), semen was collected daily from both animals for 21 days and samples were tested fo

  5. Comparison of virulence factors and capsular types of Streptococcus agalactiae isolated from human and bovine infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emaneini, Mohammad; Khoramian, Babak; Jabalameli, Fereshteh; Abani, Samira; Dabiri, Hossein; Beigverdi, Reza

    2016-02-01

    Streptococcus agalactiae is a leading cause of human and bovine infections. A total of 194 S. agalactiae isolates, 55 isolates from bovines and 139 from humans, were analyzed for capsular types, virulence genes (scpB, hly, rib, bca and bac) and mobile genetic elements (IS1548 and GBSi1) using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and multiplex PCR. Capsular type III was predominant (61%), followed by types V, II, Ib, and IV. The scpB, hly, bca and bac virulence genes were only found among human isolates. Twelve and 2 distinct virulence gene profiles were identified among human and bovine isolates respectively. The virulence gene profiles scpB- hly- IS1548- rib-bca (51%) and scpB- hly- IS1548- bca (19%) were only predominant among human isolates. The rib gene was the most common virulence gene in both human and bovine isolates. The study showed a high prevalence of virulence genes in S. agalactiae strains isolated from human infections, these result can support the idea that S. agalactiae isolated from humans and bovines are generally unrelated and probably belonged to separate populations.

  6. Susceptibility of neuron-like cells derived from bovine Wharton’s jelly to bovine herpesvirus type 5 infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cardoso Tereza C

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Bovine herpesvirus type 5 (BoHV-5, frequently lethal in cattle, is associated with significant agricultural economic losses due to neurological disease. Cattle and rabbits are frequently used as models to study the biology and pathogenesis of BoHV-5 infection. In particular, neural invasion and proliferation are two of the factors important in BoHV-5 infection. The present study investigated the potential of bovine Wharton’s jelly mesenchymal stromal cells (bWJ-MSCs to differentiate into a neuronal phenotype and support robust BoHV-5 replication. Results Upon inducing differentiation within a defined neuronal specific medium, most bWJ-MSCs acquired the distinctive neuronal morphological features and stained positively for the neuronal/glial markers MAP2 (neuronal microtubule associated protein 2, N200 (neurofilament 200, NT3 (neutrophin 3, tau and GFAP (glial fibrillary acidic protein. Expression of nestin, N200, β-tubulin III (TuJI and GFAP was further demonstrated by reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR. Following BoHV-5 inoculation, there were low rates of cell detachment, good cell viability at 96 h post-infection (p.i., and small vesicles developed along neuronal branches. Levels of BoHV-5 antigens and DNA were associated with the peak in viral titres at 72 h p.i. BoHV-5 glycoprotein C mRNA expression was significantly correlated with production of progeny virus at 72 h p.i. (p  Conclusion The results demonstrated the ability of bWJ-MSCs to differentiate into a neuronal phenotype in vitro and support productive BoHV-5 replication. These findings constitute a remarkable contribution to the in vitro study of neurotropic viruses. This work may pave the way for bWJ-MSCs to be used as an alternative to animal models in the study of BoHV-5 biology.

  7. Histopathological and molecular study of Neospora caninum infection in bovine aborted fetuses

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Amir; Kamali; Hesam; Adin; Seifi; Ahmad; Reza; Movassaghi; Gholam; Reza; Razmi; Zahra; Naseri

    2014-01-01

    Objective:To estimate the extent to which abortion in dairy cows was associated with of Neospom caninum(N.caninum) and to determine the risk factors of neosporosis in dairy farms from 9 provinces in Iran.Methods:Polymerase chain reaction(PCR) test was used to detect Neospora infection in the brain of 395 bovine aborted fetuses from 9 provinces of Iran.In addition,the brains of aborted fetuses were taken for histopathological examination.To identify the risk factors associated with neosporosis,data analysis was performed by SAS.Results:N.caninum was detected in 179(45%) out of 395 fetal brain samples of bovine aborted fetuses using PCR.Among the PCR-positive brain samples,only 56 samples were suited for histopathological examination.The characteristic lesions of Neospora infection including non-suppurative encephalitis were found in 16(28%) of PCR-positive samples.The risk factors including season,parity of dam,history of bovine virus diarrhea and infectious bovine rhinotracheitis infection in herd,cow’s milk production,herd size and fetal appearance did not show association with the infection.This study showed that Neospora caused abortion was significantly more in the second trimester of pregnancy than other periods.In addition,a significant association was observed between Neospora infection and stillbirth.Conclusions:The results showed N.caninum infection was detected in high percentage of aborted fetuses.In addition,at least one fourth of abortions caused by Neospora infection.These results indicate increasing number of abortions associated with the protozoa more than reported before in Iran.

  8. The density of knobs on Plasmodium falciparum-infected erythrocytes depends on developmental age and varies among isolates.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katharina A Quadt

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The virulence of Plasmodium falciparum malaria is related to the parasite's ability to evade host immunity through clonal antigenic variation and tissue-specific adhesion of infected erythrocytes (IEs. The P. falciparum erythrocyte membrane protein 1 (PfEMP1 family expressed on dome-shaped protrusions called knobs on the IE surface is central to both. Differences in receptor specificity and affinity of expressed PfEMP1 are important for IE adhesiveness, but it is not known whether differences in the number and size of the knobs on which the PfEMP1 proteins are expressed also play a role. Therefore, the aim of this study was to provide detailed information on isolate- and time-dependent differences in knob size and density. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We used atomic force microscopy to characterize knobs on the surface of P. falciparum-infected erythrocytes. Fourteen ex vivo isolates from Ghanaian children with malaria and 10 P. falciparum isolates selected in vitro for expression of a particular PfEMP1 protein (VAR2CSA were examined. Knob density increased from ∼20 h to ∼35 h post-invasion, with significant variation among isolates. The knob density ex vivo, which was about five-fold higher than following long-term in vitro culture, started to decline within a few months of culture. Although knob diameter and height varied among isolates, we did not observe significant time-dependent variation in these dimensions. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The density of knobs on the P. falciparum-IE surface depends on time since invasion, but is also determined by the infecting isolate in a time-independent manner. This is the first study to quantitatively evaluate knob densities and dimensions on different P. falciparum isolates, to examine ex vivo isolates from humans, and to compare ex vivo and long-term in vitro-cultured isolates. Our findings contribute to the understanding of the interaction between P. falciparum parasites and the

  9. Multilocus sequence types of Finnish bovine Campylobacter jejuni isolates and their attribution to human infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Corander Jukka

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Campylobacter jejuni is the most common bacterial cause of human gastroenteritis worldwide. Due to the sporadic nature of infection, sources often remain unknown. Multilocus sequence typing (MLST has been successfully applied to population genetics of Campylobacter jejuni and mathematical modelling can be applied to the sequence data. Here, we analysed the population structure of a total of 250 Finnish C. jejuni isolates from bovines, poultry meat and humans collected in 2003 using a combination of Bayesian clustering (BAPS software and phylogenetic analysis. Results In the first phase we analysed sequence types (STs of 102 Finnish bovine C. jejuni isolates by MLST and found a high diversity totalling 50 STs of which nearly half were novel. In the second phase we included MLST data from domestic human isolates as well as poultry C. jejuni isolates from the same time period. Between the human and bovine isolates we found an overlap of 72.2%, while 69% of the human isolates were overlapping with the chicken isolates. In the BAPS analysis 44.3% of the human isolates were found in bovine-associated BAPS clusters and 45.4% of the human isolates were found in the poultry-associated BAPS cluster. BAPS reflected the phylogeny of our data very well. Conclusions These findings suggest that bovines and poultry were equally important as reservoirs for human C. jejuni infections in Finland in 2003. Our results differ from those obtained in other countries where poultry has been identified as the most important source for human infections. The low prevalence of C. jejuni in poultry flocks in Finland could explain the lower attribution of human infection to poultry. Of the human isolates 10.3% were found in clusters not associated with any host which warrants further investigation, with particular focus on waterborne transmission routes and companion animals.

  10. Bovine viral diarrhoea, bovine herpesvirus and parainfluenza-3 virus infection in three cattle herds in Egypt in 2000.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aly, N M; Shehab, G G; Abd el-Rahim, I H A

    2003-12-01

    This study reported field outbreaks of bovine viral diarrhoea virus (BVDV) infection, either alone or mixed with bovine herpesvirus-1 (BHV-1) and/or parainfluenza-3 virus (PI-3V) in Egypt during 2000. In Lower Egypt, young calves in three cattle herds in El-Minufiya Province, El-Fayoum Province and in governmental quarantine in El-Behira Province, showed symptoms of enteritis, either alone or accompanied by respiratory manifestations. The affected herds were visited and the diseased animals were clinically examined. Many epidemiological aspects, such as morbidities, mortalities and case fatalities, as well as the abortive rate, were calculated. Ethylenediamine tetra-acetic acid-blood samples, sterile nasal swabs and serum samples were obtained for virological and serological diagnosis. The laboratory investigations revealed that the main cause of calf mortalities in the three herds was infection with BVDV, either alone, as on the El-Minufiya farm, or mixed with PI-3V, as on the El-Fayoum farm, or mixed with both BHV-1 and PI-3V, as in the herd in governmental quarantine in El-Behira Province. A total of nine dead calves from the three herds were submitted for thorough post-mortem examination. Tissue samples from recently dead calves were obtained for immunohistochemical and histopathological studies. The most prominent histopathological findings were massive degeneration, necrosis and erosions of the lining epithelium of the alimentary tract. Most of the lymphoreticular organs were depleted of lymphocytes. In pneumonic cases, bronchopneumonia and atypical interstitial pneumonia were evident. The present study suggested that the immunosuppressive effect of BVDV had predisposed the animals to secondary infection with BHV-1 and PI-3V. This study concluded that concurrent infection with BVDV, BHV-1 and PI-3V should be considered as one of the infectious causes of pneumoenteritis and, subsequently, the high morbidities and mortalities among young calves in Egypt

  11. Bovine natural killer cells are present in Escherichia coli infected mammary gland tissue and show antimicrobial activity in vitro

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sipka, Anja; Pomeroy, Brianna; Klaessig, Suzanne; Schukken, Ynte

    2016-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells are early responders in bacterial infections but their role in bovine mastitis has not been characterized. For the first time, we show the presence of NK cells (NKp46+/CD3) in bovine mammary gland tissue after an intramammary challenge with Escheri

  12. Cytoskeleton remodling and alterations in smooth muscle contractility in the bovine jejunum during the early stage of Cooperia oncophora infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gastrointestinal nematodes of the genus Cooperia are arguably the most important parasites of cattle. We characterized the bovine jejunal transcriptome in response to C. oncophora infection using RNA-seq technology. Approximately 71% of the 25,670 bovine genes were detected in the jejunal transcript...

  13. Antibodies from malaria-exposed pregnant women recognize trypsin resistant epitopes on the surface of Plasmodium falciparum-infected erythrocytes selected for adhesion to chondroitin sulphate A

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sharling, Lisa; Enevold, Anders; Sowa, Kordai M P;

    2004-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The ability of Plasmodium falciparum-infected erythrocytes to adhere to the microvasculature endothelium is thought to play a causal role in malaria pathogenesis. Cytoadhesion to endothelial receptors is generally found to be highly sensitive to trypsinization of the infected erythroc......BACKGROUND: The ability of Plasmodium falciparum-infected erythrocytes to adhere to the microvasculature endothelium is thought to play a causal role in malaria pathogenesis. Cytoadhesion to endothelial receptors is generally found to be highly sensitive to trypsinization of the infected...... erythrocyte surface. However, several studies have found that parasite adhesion to placental receptors can be markedly less sensitive to trypsin. This study investigates whether chondroitin sulphate A (CSA) binding parasites express trypsin-resistant variant surface antigens (VSA) that bind female......-specific antibodies induced as a result of pregnancy associated malaria (PAM). METHODS: Fluorescence activated cell sorting (FACS) was used to measure the levels of adult Scottish and Ghanaian male, and Ghanaian pregnant female plasma immunoglobulin G (IgG) that bind to the surface of infected erythrocytes. P...

  14. Suppression of lymphocyte proliferation by parainfluenza virus type 3-infected bovine alveolar macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basaraba, R J; Brown, P R; Laegreid, W W; Silflow, R M; Evermann, J F; Leid, R W

    1993-06-01

    Lymphocytes stimulated with concanavalin A (Con A) or antigen in the presence of bovine parainfluenza virus type 3 (PIV-3) infected bovine alveolar macrophages (BAM) or monocytes, had depressed [3H]thymidine incorporation. This failure of lymphocytes to incorporate radiolabel required live virus, was time dependent and was most pronounced when BAM were infected for 48 hr prior to the addition of lymphocytes. The rate of infection of alveolar macrophages and the release of infectious virus into culture supernatants paralleled suppression of lymphocyte mitogenesis by PIV-3. However, the peak titre of exogenous, live or inactivated virus was not suppressive when added to lymphocyte macrophage cultures just prior to Con A stimulation. Neither the loss of viable alveolar macrophages nor a shift in antigen or mitogen dose response in virally infected cultures could account for the deficit in [3H]thymidine incorporation by lymphocytes. Despite the presence of lymphocyte-associated virus antigen detected by direct immunofluorescence, no increase in PIV-3 titre above baseline was seen from infected lymphocytes, irrespective of mitogen stimulation. Likewise, lymphocytes did not contribute to the extracellular virus pool in lymphocyte-macrophage cultures as the increases in viral titre above basal levels in supernatants were equal to levels released by macrophages alone. The expression of viral antigen on lymphocytes stimulated in the presence of PIV-3-infected BAM suggests a non-productive or abortive infection of lymphocytes mediated through contact with infected macrophages.

  15. Plasmodium falciparum-infected erythrocyte knob density is linked to the PfEMP1 variant expressed

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Subramani, Ramesh; Quadt, Katharina; Jeppesen, Anine Engholm;

    2015-01-01

    UNLABELLED: Members of the clonally variant Plasmodium falciparum erythrocyte membrane protein 1 (PfEMP1) family mediate adhesion of infected erythrocytes (IEs) to vascular receptors. PfEMP1 expression is normally confined to nanoscale knob protrusions on the IE surface membrane. To investigate...... the relationship between the densities of these IE surface knobs and the PfEMP1 variant expressed, we used specific antibody panning to generate three sublines of the P. falciparum clone IT4, which expresses the PfEMP1 variants IT4VAR04, IT4VAR32b, and IT4VAR60. The knob density in each subline was then determined...... by atomic force microscopy (AFM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and compared to PfEMP1 and knob-associated histidine-rich protein (KAHRP) expression. Selection for uniform expression of IT4VAR04 produced little change in knob density, compared to unselected IEs. In contrast, selection for IT4VAR32b...

  16. Antibodies to variable Plasmodium falciparum-infected erythrocyte surface antigens are associated with protection from novel malaria infections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Giha, H A; Staalsoe, T; Dodoo, D

    2000-01-01

    is maintained at low densities. Here, we test the hypothesis that the presence or absence of antibodies against variant antigens on the surface of P. falciparum-infected erythrocytes protect individuals against some infectious challenges and render them susceptible to others. Plasma collected in Daraweesh...... susceptible and protected individuals. Together, the results indicate that pre-existing anti-PfEMP1 antibodies can reduce the risk of contracting clinical malaria when challenged by novel parasite clones expressing homologous, but not heterologous variable surface antigens. The results also confirm...

  17. Antibodies from malaria-exposed pregnant women recognize trypsin resistant epitopes on the surface of Plasmodium falciparum-infected erythrocytes selected for adhesion to chondroitin sulphate A

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Staalsoe Trine

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The ability of Plasmodium falciparum-infected erythrocytes to adhere to the microvasculature endothelium is thought to play a causal role in malaria pathogenesis. Cytoadhesion to endothelial receptors is generally found to be highly sensitive to trypsinization of the infected erythrocyte surface. However, several studies have found that parasite adhesion to placental receptors can be markedly less sensitive to trypsin. This study investigates whether chondroitin sulphate A (CSA binding parasites express trypsin-resistant variant surface antigens (VSA that bind female-specific antibodies induced as a result of pregnancy associated malaria (PAM. Methods Fluorescence activated cell sorting (FACS was used to measure the levels of adult Scottish and Ghanaian male, and Ghanaian pregnant female plasma immunoglobulin G (IgG that bind to the surface of infected erythrocytes. P. falciparum clone FCR3 cultures were used to assay surface IgG binding before and after selection of the parasite for adhesion to CSA. The effect of proteolytic digestion of parasite erythrocyte surface antigens on surface IgG binding and adhesion to CSA and hyaluronic acid (HA was also studied. Results P. falciparum infected erythrocytes selected for adhesion to CSA were found to express trypsin-resistant VSA that are the target of naturally acquired antibodies from pregnant women living in a malaria endemic region of Ghana. However in vitro adhesion to CSA and HA was relatively trypsin sensitive. An improved labelling technique for the detection of VSA expressed by CSA binding isolates has also been described. Conclusion The VSA expressed by CSA binding P. falciparum isolates are currently considered potential targets for a vaccine against PAM. This study identifies discordance between the trypsin sensitivity of CSA binding and surface recognition of CSA selected parasites by serum IgG from malaria exposed pregnant women. Thus, the complete molecular

  18. Ticket to ride: export of proteins to the Plasmodium falciparum-infected erythrocyte.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Przyborski, Jude M; Nyboer, Britta; Lanzer, Michael

    2016-07-01

    The malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum exports numerous proteins to its chosen host cell, the mature human erythrocyte. Many of these proteins are important for parasite survival. To reach the host cell, parasites must cross multiple membrane barriers and then furthermore be targeted to their correct sub-cellular localisation. This novel transport pathway has received much research attention in the past decades, especially as many of the mechanisms are expected to be parasite-specific and thus potential targets for drug development. In this article we summarize some of the most recent advances in this field, and highlight areas in which further research is needed.

  19. Significance of higher drug concentration in erythrocytes of mice infected with Schistosoma japonicum and treated orally with mefloquine at single doses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Yi; Xue, Jian; Jiang, Bin; Zhang, Hao-Bing; Xiao, Shu-Hua

    2015-12-01

    The purpose of the present study is to understand the pharmacokinetic feature of mefloquine measured by erythrocytes and plasma in Schistosoma japonicum (S. j.)-infected mice and non-infected mice after oral administration of the drug at single doses. A high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) method was used to measure the plasma and erythrocyte concentrations of mefloquine at varying intervals posttreatment. Our results demonstrated that in non-infected mice treated orally with mefloquine at an ineffective dose of 50 mg/kg or effective dose of 200 mg/kg for 2-72 h, the erythrocyte-to-plasma ratios of mefloquine were 5.8-11.2 or 2-14.2. On the other hand, in S. j.-infected mice treated with the same single doses of the drug, the erythrocyte and plasma drug concentration ratios were 3.1-4.6 or 2.9-8.5, manifesting that either in infected mice or in non-infected mice that received oral mefloquine resulted in higher concentration of mefloquine in erythrocytes than that in plasma. Unexpectedly, under oral administration of mefloquine at a higher single dose of 200 mg/kg, the pharmacokinetic parameter C max values for plasma from S. j.-infected and non-infected mice were 1.6 ± 0.3 and 2.0 ± 0.4 μg/mL, respectively, which were below the determined in vitro LC50 (50 % lethal concentration) value of 4.93 μg/mL. Therefore, the plasma concentration of mefloquine may display a little effect against schistosomes during the treatment. Although the values of T 1/2 and AUC0-∞ for erythrocytes were significantly longer and higher in infected mice than those of corresponding non-infect mice that received the same single mefloqine dose of 50 mg/kg, the C max value was only 2.6 ± 0.4 μg/mL lower than the determined in vitro LC50, which may explain why this low single dose is ineffective against schistosomes in vivo. After administration of higher mefloquine dose of 200 mg/kg, the C max value for erythrocytes in infected mice was 30 % (7.4 ± 0

  20. Isolation of Leptospira spp from dogs, bovine and swine naturally infected

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Freitas Julio Cesar de

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Leptospira isolation allows definitive diagnosis of the infection. Contamination by microorganisms is one of the inconveniences of the culture. The objective of this study was to describe the isolation of Leptospira from dogs, bovine and swine naturally infected. Urine samples from 14 dogs and three bovines, and kidney, liver, ovary, and uterus body samples from 36 slaughtered sows with unknown health history, were used. The urine and organ samples were cultured in culture medium. Modified Ellinghausen-McCullough-Johnson-Harris medium (EMJH culture medium was used with addition of 5-fluorouracil, chloramphenicol, vancomycin, nalidixic acid and neomycin. Incubation was performed at 28oC for 24 hours, followed by subculture in modified EMJH without antibiotics. The cultures were assessed weekly for up to eight weeks for the dog and swine samples and for up to 16 weeks for the bovine samples. With this methodology, Leptospira spp could be isolated from 11 dogs, two bovines and liver fragments from two sows.

  1. Detection of bovine respiratory syncytial virus infections in young dairy and beef cattle in Poland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urban-Chmiel, Renata; Wernicki, Andrzej; Puchalski, Andrzej; Dec, Marta; Stęgierska, Diana; Grooms, Daniel L; Barbu, Nicolas I

    2015-03-01

    Bovine respiratory syncytial virus (BRSV) is a major contributor to bovine respiratory disease complex in dairy and beef calves, especially during the first year of life. There is a lack of comprehensive information about the prevalence of infection in cattle herds in Poland as well as in European countries outside the European Union. The aim of this study was to estimate the prevalence of BRSV infections in young beef and dairy cattle in southeastern Poland, a region that has direct contact with non-EU countries. Animals & methods: Nasal swabs and sera (n = 120) were obtained from young cattle aged 6-12 months from 45 farms in eastern and southeastern Poland. BRSV antigen detection in the nasal swabs was carried out using a rapid immunomigration assay used in diagnosing human respiratory syncytial virus (hRSV) infections in humans, while antibodies to BRSV were detected in the sera by ELISA antibody detection. The study confirmed the presence of BRSV infections in young cattle under 12 months of age from both dairy and beef herds. BRSV was detected in 27 of the 45 herds (60%) sampled. Findings from this study indicate a high prevalence of BRSV infections in cattle in Poland, which may have a significant influence on health status and animal performance. The prevalence of infection is similar to that in other parts of Poland and other countries in Europe. Development of strategies to reduce BRSV infections is needed to improve health and productivity.

  2. Interaction between Bovine leukemia virus (BLV) infection and age on telomerase misregulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemmatzadeh, Farhid; Keyvanfar, Hadi; Hasan, Noor Haliza; Niap, Faustina; Bani Hassan, Ebrahim; Hematzade, Azar; Ebrahimie, Esmaeil; McWhorter, Andrea; Ignjatovic, Jagoda

    2015-06-01

    Bovine leukemia virus (BLV) is the causative agent of enzootic bovine leukosis (EBL). BLV can interact with telomerase and inhibits telomere shortening, contributing in leukemogenesis and tumour induction. The role of telomerase in BLV-induced lymphosarcoma and aging has been extensively studied. To date, the interaction of both BLV and aging on telomerase mis-regulation have, however, not been investigated. In the present study, telomerase activity in BLV positive and negative cows was compared over a wide range of ages (11-85 months). Lymphocyte counts were also measured in both BLV positive and negative groups. Telomerase activity was detected in all BLV infected animals with persistent lymphocytosis (PL), especially in older individuals. This study revealed that the cells undergo the natural telomerase shortening even in the presence of an existing viral infection. We also show that viral infection, especially during the PL phase of the disease, increases telomerase activity. A statistically significant interaction between age and viral infection was observed for telomere shortening during BLV infection. Older animals with BLV infection, especially those with persistent lymphocytosis or visible tumors, exhibited a sharp increase in telomerase activity. This study demonstrates that there is a significant interaction between BLV infection and telomerase up-regulation and lymphocytosis.

  3. Bovine natural killer cells are present in Escherichia coli infected mammary gland tissue and show antimicrobial activity in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sipka, Anja; Pomeroy, Brianna; Klaessig, Suzanne; Schukken, Ynte

    2016-10-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells are early responders in bacterial infections but their role in bovine mastitis has not been characterized. For the first time, we show the presence of NK cells (NKp46(+)/CD3(-)) in bovine mammary gland tissue after an intramammary challenge with Escherichia (E.) coli. A small number of NK cells was detected in milk from quarters before and during an E. coli challenge. In vitro cultures of primary bovine mammary gland epithelial cells stimulated with UV irradiated E. coli induced significant migration of peripheral blood NK cells (pbNK) within 2h. Furthermore, pbNK cells significantly reduced counts of live E. coli in vitro within 2h of culture. The results show that bovine NK cells have the capacity to migrate to the site of infection and produce antibacterial mediators. These findings introduce NK cells as a leukocyte population in the mammary gland with potential functions in the innate immune response in bovine mastitis.

  4. The detergent solubility properties of a malarial (Plasmodium knowlesi) variant antigen expressed on the surface of infected erythrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, R J; Barnwell, J W

    1984-01-01

    Four detergents have been compared for identification of the Plasmodium knowlesi variant antigen on infected erythrocytes by immunoprecipitation analysis. Erythrocytes infected with late trophozoite and schizont forms of cloned asexual parasites were labeled by lactoperoxidase-catalyzed radioiodination and extracted either with the anionic detergents sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) or cholate, the neutral detergent Triton X-100, or the zwitterion 3-[(3-cholamidopropyl)dimethylammonio]-1-propane sulfonate (CHAPS). After addition of Triton X-100 to SDS and cholate extracts, parallel immunoprecipitations of the four extracts were performed using rhesus monkey antisera of defined agglutinability. Identical results were obtained with clone Pk1(A+), which has 125I-variant antigens of Mr 210,000 and 190,000, and with clone Pk1(B+)1+, which has variant antigens of Mr 200,000-205,000. SDS yielded maximal levels of immunoprecipitated 125I-variant antigens. Variant-specific immunoprecipitation was detected in some experiments with Triton X-100 and cholic acid but with significantly lower recovery than with SDS. CHAPS extraction did not yield the variant antigens on immunoprecipitation. The variant antigens could also be identified in Triton X-100-insoluble material by subsequent extraction with SDS, indicating that failure to recover these proteins in the Triton X-100-soluble fraction is due to failure of this detergent to extract the variant antigens rather than to degradation during extraction. We suggest that the 125I-variant antigens either have a structure that renders them intrinsically insoluble in Triton X-100, cholate, or CHAPS, or that they are associated in some way with host cell membrane components that also resist solubilization by these detergents.

  5. Use of erythrocyte sedimentation rate and C-reactive protein level to diagnose infection before revision total knee arthroplasty. A prospective evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greidanus, Nelson V; Masri, Bassam A; Garbuz, Donald S; Wilson, S Darrin; McAlinden, M Gavan; Xu, Min; Duncan, Clive P

    2007-07-01

    Despite the widespread use of several diagnostic tests, there is still no perfect test for the diagnosis of infection at the site of a total knee arthroplasty. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the diagnostic test characteristics of the erythrocyte sedimentation rate and C-reactive protein level for the assessment of infection in patients presenting for revision total knee arthroplasty. One hundred and fifty-one knees in 145 patients presenting for revision total knee arthroplasty were evaluated prospectively for the presence of infection with measurement of the erythrocyte sedimentation rate and the C-reactive protein level. The characteristics of these tests were assessed with use of two different techniques: first, receiver-operating-characteristic curve analysis was performed to determine the optimal positivity criterion for the diagnostic test, and, second, previously accepted criteria for establishing positivity of the tests were used. A diagnosis of infection was established for forty-five of the 151 knees that underwent revision total knee arthroplasty. The receiver-operating-characteristic curves indicated that the optimal positivity criterion was 22.5 mm/hr for the erythrocyte sedimentation rate and 13.5 mg/L for the C-reactive protein level. Both the erythrocyte sedimentation rate (sensitivity, 0.93; specificity, 0.83; positive likelihood ratio, 5.81; accuracy, 0.86) and the C-reactive protein level (sensitivity, 0.91; specificity, 0.86; positive likelihood ratio, 6.89; accuracy, 0.88) have excellent diagnostic test performance. The erythrocyte sedimentation rate and the C-reactive protein level provide excellent diagnostic test information for establishing the presence or absence of infection prior to surgical intervention in patients with pain at the site of a knee arthroplasty.

  6. Investigation of the effect of Mycobacterium bovis infection on bovine neutrophils functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jin; Zhou, Xiangmei; Pan, Bo; Yang, Lifeng; Yin, Xiaomin; Xu, Binrui; Zhao, Deming

    2013-11-01

    Bovine tuberculosis is a disease in cattle caused by infection with Mycobacterium bovis. The disease has posed significant economic losses and remains a public health hazard worldwide. Interactions between M. bovis and bovine macrophages have been extensively characterized in various studies, while similar analyses in neutrophils, which are one of the other types of white blood cells in mammals, were often overlooked. Neutrophils provide defense against all microbes and can present a diverse collection of antimicrobial molecules, which play an important role in the control of tuberculosis progression. Much of the available data about the involvement of neutrophils in the killing M. bovis is controversial. In this study, we assessed the effect of in vitro infection with M. bovis on some parameters of neutrophils functions including phenotypic changes, apoptosis rate and inflammatory cytokines production. Our results demonstrated that phagocytosis of M. bovis activated and enhanced bovine neutrophils functions as well as initialed their defense mechanism, but failed to eliminate the mycobacteria. Moreover, autophagy might get involved in the defense infection process functioning as a protective mechanism, and inducible-autophagy by lipopolysaccharides stimulation and starvation treatment could efficiently reverse the inability of neutrophils for killing M. bovis, suggesting a potential target for anti-mycobacterial drug-therapy.

  7. A bovine cell line that can be infected by natural sheep scrapie prions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oelschlegel, Anja M; Geissen, Markus; Lenk, Matthias; Riebe, Roland; Angermann, Marlies; Schatzl, Herman; Schaetzl, Hermann; Groschup, Martin H

    2015-01-01

    Cell culture systems represent a crucial part in basic prion research; yet, cell lines that are susceptible to prions, especially to field isolated prions that were not adapted to rodents, are very rare. The purpose of this study was to identify and characterize a cell line that was susceptible to ruminant-derived prions and to establish a stable prion infection within it. Based on species and tissue of origin as well as PrP expression rate, we pre-selected a total of 33 cell lines that were then challenged with natural and with mouse propagated BSE or scrapie inocula. Here, we report the successful infection of a non-transgenic bovine cell line, a sub-line of the bovine kidney cell line MDBK, with natural sheep scrapie prions. This cell line retained the scrapie infection for more than 200 passages. Selective cloning resulted in cell populations with increased accumulation of PrPres, although this treatment was not mandatory for retaining the infection. The infection remained stable, even under suboptimal culture conditions. The resulting infectivity of the cells was confirmed by mouse bioassay (Tgbov mice, Tgshp mice). We believe that PES cells used together with other prion permissive cell lines will prove a valuable tool for ongoing efforts to understand and defeat prions and prion diseases.

  8. A bovine cell line that can be infected by natural sheep scrapie prions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anja M Oelschlegel

    Full Text Available Cell culture systems represent a crucial part in basic prion research; yet, cell lines that are susceptible to prions, especially to field isolated prions that were not adapted to rodents, are very rare. The purpose of this study was to identify and characterize a cell line that was susceptible to ruminant-derived prions and to establish a stable prion infection within it. Based on species and tissue of origin as well as PrP expression rate, we pre-selected a total of 33 cell lines that were then challenged with natural and with mouse propagated BSE or scrapie inocula. Here, we report the successful infection of a non-transgenic bovine cell line, a sub-line of the bovine kidney cell line MDBK, with natural sheep scrapie prions. This cell line retained the scrapie infection for more than 200 passages. Selective cloning resulted in cell populations with increased accumulation of PrPres, although this treatment was not mandatory for retaining the infection. The infection remained stable, even under suboptimal culture conditions. The resulting infectivity of the cells was confirmed by mouse bioassay (Tgbov mice, Tgshp mice. We believe that PES cells used together with other prion permissive cell lines will prove a valuable tool for ongoing efforts to understand and defeat prions and prion diseases.

  9. Gene expression in the medulla following oral infection of cattle with bovine spongiform encephalopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almeida, Luciane M; Basu, Urmila; Khaniya, Bina; Taniguchi, Masaaki; Williams, John L; Moore, Stephen S; Guan, Le Luo

    2011-01-01

    The identification of variations in gene expression in response to bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) may help to elucidate the mechanisms of neuropathology and prion replication and discover biomarkers for disease. In this study, genes that are differentially expressed in the caudal medulla tissues of animals infected with different doses of PrP(BSE) at 12 and 45 mo post infection were compared using array containing 24,000 oligonucleotide probes. Data analysis identified 966 differentially expressed (DE) genes between control and infected animals. Genes identified in at least two of four experiments (control versus 1-g infected animals at 12 and 45-mo; control versus 100-g infected animals at 12 and 45 mo) were considered to be the genes that may be associated with BSE disease. From the 176 DE genes associated with BSE, 84 had functions described in the Gene Ontology (GO) database. Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) pathway analysis of 14 genes revealed that prion infection may cause dysfunction of several different networks, including extracellular matrix (ECM), cell adhesion, neuroactive ligand-receptor interaction, complement and coagulation cascades, MAPK signaling, neurodegenerative disorder, SNARE interactions in vesicular transport, and the transforming growth factor (TGF) beta signaling pathways. The identification of DE genes will contribute to a better understanding of the molecular mechanisms of neuropathology in bovine species. Additional studies on larger number of animals are in progress in our laboratory to investigate the roles of these DE genes in pathogenesis of BSE.

  10. Detection of bovine herpesvirus 2 and bovine herpesvirus 4 DNA in trigeminal ganglia of naturally infected cattle by polymerase chain reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campos, F S; Franco, A C; Oliveira, M T; Firpo, R; Strelczuk, G; Fontoura, F E; Kulmann, M I R; Maidana, S; Romera, S A; Spilki, F R; Silva, A D; Hübner, S O; Roehe, P M

    2014-06-25

    Establishment of latent infection within specific tissues in the host is a common biological feature of the herpesviruses. In the case of bovine herpesvirus 2 (BoHV-2), latency is established in neuronal tissues, while bovine herpesvirus 4 (BoHV-4) and ovine herpesvirus 2 (OvHV-2) latent virus targets on cells of the monocytic lineage. This study was conducted in quest of BoHV-2, BoHV-4 and OvHV-2 DNA in two hundred trigeminal ganglia (TG) specimens, derived from one hundred clinically healthy cattle, majority of them naturally infected with bovine herpesvirus 1 (BoHV-1) and bovine herpesvirus 5 (BoHV-5). Total DNA extracted from ganglia was analyzed by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) designed to amplify part of the genes coding for BoHV-2, and BoHV-4 glycoprotein B and, for OvHV-2, the gene coding for phosphoribosylformylglycinamidine synthase-like protein. BoHV-2 DNA was detected in TG samples of two (2%) and BoHV-4 DNA in nine (9%) of the animals, whereas OvHV-2 DNA could not be detected in any of the TG DNA. The two animals in which BoHV-2 DNA was identified were also co-infected with BoHV-1 and BoHV-5. Within the nine animals in which BoHV-4 DNA was detected, six were also co-infected with BoHV-1 and BoHV-5. This report provides for the first time evidence that viral DNA from BoHV-2 and BoHV-4 can be occasionally detected in TG of naturally infected cattle. Likewise, in this report we provided for the first time evidence that the co-infection of cattle with three distinct bovine herpesviruses might be a naturally occurring phenomenon.

  11. The role of neighboring infected cattle in bovine leukemia virus transmission risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Sota; Tsutsui, Toshiyuki; Yamamoto, Takehisa; Hayama, Yoko; Muroga, Norihiko; Konishi, Misako; Kameyama, Ken-Ichiro; Murakami, Kenji

    2015-07-01

    A cohort study was conducted to evaluate the risk of bovine leukemia virus (BLV) transmission to uninfected cattle by adjacent infected cattle in 6 dairy farms. Animals were initially tested in 2010-2011 using a commercial ELISA kit. Uninfected cattle were repeatedly tested every 4 to 6 months until fall of 2012. The Cox proportional hazard model with frailty showed that uninfected cattle neighboring to infected cattle (n=53) had a significant higher risk of seroconversion than those without any infected neighbors (n=81) (hazard ratio: 12.4, P=0.001), implying that neighboring infected cattle were a significant risk factor for BLV transmission. This finding provides scientific support for animal health authorities and farmers to segregate infected cattle on farms to prevent spread of BLV.

  12. Targeted disruption of a ring-infected erythrocyte surface antigen (RESA)-like export protein gene in Plasmodium falciparum confers stable chondroitin 4-sulfate cytoadherence capacity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Goel, Suchi; Muthusamy, Arivalagan; Miao, Jun

    2014-01-01

    . In this study, microarray transcriptome analysis showed that the absence of a gene cluster, comprising kahrp, pfemp3, and four other genes, results in the loss of parasitized erythrocytes adhering to chondroitin 4-sulfate (C4S). The role of one of these genes, PF3D7_0201600/PFB0080c, which encodes PHISTb......The Plasmodium falciparum erythrocyte membrane protein 1 (PfEMP1) family proteins mediate the adherence of infected erythrocytes to microvascular endothelia of various organs, including the placenta, thereby contributing to cerebral, placental, and other severe malaria pathogenesis. Several...... that the loss of PFB0080c markedly compromises the var gene switching process, leading to a marked reduction in the switching rate and additional PfEMP1 expression by a minor population of parasites. PFB0080c interacts with VAR2CSA and modulates knob-associated Hsp40 expression. Thus, PFB0080c may regulate VAR2...

  13. No miRNA were found in Plasmodium and the ones identified in erythrocytes could not be correlated with infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feng Le

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The transcriptional regulation of Plasmodium during its complex life cycle requires sequential activation and/or repression of different genetic programmes. MicroRNAs (miRNAs are a highly conserved class of non-coding RNAs that are important in regulating diverse cellular functions by sequence-specific inhibition of gene expression. What is know about double-stranded RNA-mediated gene silencing (RNAi and posttranscriptional gene silencing (PTGS in Plasmodium parasites entice us to speculate whether miRNAs can also function in Plasmodium-infected RBCs. Results Of 132 small RNA sequences, no Plasmodium-specific miRNAs have been found. However, a human miRNA, miR-451, was highly expressed, comprising approximately one third of the total identified miRNAs. Further analysis of miR-451 expression and malaria infection showed no association between the accumulation of miR-451 in Plasmodium falciparum-iRBCs, the life cycle stage of P. falciparum in the erythrocyte, or of P. berghei in mice. Moreover, treatment with an antisense oligonucleotide to miR-451 had no significant effect on the growth of the erythrocytic-stage P. falciparum. Methods Short RNAs from a mixed-stage of P. falciparum-iRBC were separated in a denaturing polyacrylamide gel and cloned into T vectors to create a cDNA library. Individual clones were then sequenced and further analysed by bioinformatics prediction to discover probable miRNAs in P. falciparum-iRBC. The association between miR-451 expression and the parasite were analysed by Northern blotting and antisense oligonucleotide (ASO of miR-451. Conclusion These results contribute to eliminate the probability of miRNAs in P. falciparum. The absence of miRNA in P. falciparum could be correlated with absence of argonaute/dicer genes. In addition, the miR-451 accumulation in Plasmodium-infected RBCs is independent of parasite infection. Its accumulation might be only the residual of erythroid differentiation or a

  14. Synthetic analogues of bovine bactenecin dodecapeptide reduce herpes simplex virus type 2 infectivity in mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jenssen, Håvard; Shestakov, Andrey; Hancock, Robert E. W

    2013-01-01

    We have evaluated the potential of four synthetic peptides (denoted HH-2, 1002, 1006, 1018) with a distant relationship to the host defense peptide bovine bactenecin dodecapeptide for their ability to prevent genital infections with herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2) in mice. All four peptides...... infectious doses of HSV-2. These data show that peptides HH-2 and 1018 have antiviral properties and can be used to prevent genital herpes infection in mice. (C) 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved....

  15. Bovine Lactoferrin Inhibits Toscana Virus Infection by Binding to Heparan Sulphate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agostina Pietrantoni

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Toscana virus is an emerging sandfly-borne bunyavirus in Mediterranean Europe responsible for neurological diseases in humans. It accounts for about 80% of paediatric meningitis cases during the summer. Despite the important impact of Toscana virus infection-associated disease on human health, currently approved vaccines or effective antiviral treatments are not available. In this research, we have analyzed the effect of bovine lactoferrin, a bi-globular iron-binding glycoprotein with potent antimicrobial and immunomodulatory activities, on Toscana virus infection in vitro. Our results showed that lactoferrin was capable of inhibiting Toscana virus replication in a dose-dependent manner. Results obtained when lactoferrin was added to the cells during different phases of viral infection showed that lactoferrin was able to prevent viral replication when added during the viral adsorption step or during the entire cycle of virus infection, demonstrating that its action takes place in an early phase of viral infection. In particular, our results demonstrated that the anti-Toscana virus action of lactoferrin took place on virus attachment to the cell membrane, mainly through a competition for common glycosaminoglycan receptors. These findings provide further insights on the antiviral activity of bovine lactoferrin.

  16. Bovine herpesvirus type 4 infection modulates autophagy in a permissive cell line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montagnaro, Serena; Ciarcia, Roberto; Pagnini, Francesco; De Martino, Luisa; Puzio, Maria Valeria; Granato, Giovanna Elvira; Avino, Franca; Pagnini, Ugo; Iovane, Giuseppe; Giordano, Antonio

    2013-07-01

    Bovine herpesvirus type 4 (BoHV-4), like other herpesviruses, induces a series of alterations in the host cell that modify the intracellular environment in favor of viral replication, survival and spread. This research examined the impact of BoHV-4 infection on autophagy in BoHV-4 infected Madin Darby bovine kidney (MDBK) cells. Protein extracts of BoHV-4 infected and control MDBK cells were subjected to Western blot. The concentrations of the autophagy and apoptosis-related proteins Beclin 1, p21, PI3 kinase, Akt1/2, mTOR, phospho mTOR, p62 and the light chain three (LC3) were normalized to the actin level and expressed as the densitometric ratio. Western blot analysis of virus-infected cells revealed that autophagic degradation pathway was induced in the late phase of BoHV-4 infection. After 48 h post-infection the protein LC3II, which is essential for autophagy was found to be markedly increased, while infection of MDBK cells with BoHV-4 resulted in a depletion of p62 levels. Becline 1, PI3 kinase, Akt1/2 and p21 expression increased between 24 and 48 h post-infection. Surprisingly, mTOR and its phosphorylated form, which are negative regulators of autophagy, also increased after 24 h post-infection. In conclusion, our findings suggest that BoHV-4 has developed mechanisms for modulation of autophagy that are probably part of a strategy designed to enhance viral replication and to evade the immune system. Additional studies on the relationship between autophagy and BoHV-4 replication and survival, in both lytic and latent replication phases, are needed to understand the role of autophagy in BoHV-4 pathogenesis.

  17. Spatial Targeting for Bovine Tuberculosis Control: Can the Locations of Infected Cattle Be Used to Find Infected Badgers?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Catherine M; Downs, Sara H; Mitchell, Andy; Hayward, Andrew C; Fry, Hannah; Le Comber, Steven C

    2015-01-01

    Bovine tuberculosis is a disease of historical importance to human health in the UK that remains a major animal health and economic issue. Control of the disease in cattle is complicated by the presence of a reservoir species, the Eurasian badger. In spite of uncertainty in the degree to which cattle disease results from transmission from badgers, and opposition from environmental groups, culling of badgers has been licenced in two large areas in England. Methods to limit culls to smaller areas that target badgers infected with TB whilst minimising the number of uninfected badgers culled is therefore of considerable interest. Here, we use historical data from a large-scale field trial of badger culling to assess two alternative hypothetical methods of targeting TB-infected badgers based on the distribution of cattle TB incidents: (i) a simple circular 'ring cull'; and (ii) geographic profiling, a novel technique for spatial targeting of infectious disease control that predicts the locations of sources of infection based on the distribution of linked cases. Our results showed that both methods required coverage of very large areas to ensure a substantial proportion of infected badgers were removed, and would result in many uninfected badgers being culled. Geographic profiling, which accounts for clustering of infections in badger and cattle populations, produced a small but non-significant increase in the proportion of setts with TB-infected compared to uninfected badgers included in a cull. It also provided no overall improvement at targeting setts with infected badgers compared to the ring cull. Cattle TB incidents in this study were therefore insufficiently clustered around TB-infected badger setts to design an efficient spatially targeted cull; and this analysis provided no evidence to support a move towards spatially targeted badger culling policies for bovine TB control.

  18. Pathogenesis of a Chinese strain of bovine adenovirus type 3 infection in albino guinea pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Hong-Fei; Zhu, Yuan-Mao; Yan, Hao; Ma, Lei; Wang, Xue-Zhi; Xue, Fei

    2014-12-01

    Bovine adenovirus type 3 (BAV-3) is considered one of the most important respiratory tract agents of cattle and is widespread among cattle around the world. A BAV-3 strain was isolated from a bovine nasal swab for the first time in China in 2009 and named HLJ0955. Subsequently, BAV-3 has frequently been isolated from calves with respiratory diseases in China. To date, only limited study on the pathogenesis of BAV-3 infection in cotton rats has been conducted, and the pathogenesis of BAV-3 infection in guinea pigs has not been reported. Therefore, sixteen albino guinea pigs were inoculated intranasally with HLJ0955. All of the infected guinea pigs had apparently elevated rectal temperatures (39.2 °C-39.9 °C) at 2-7 days post-inoculation (PI). Consolidation and petechial hemorrhage were also observed in guinea pigs experimentally infected with HLJ0955. Viral replication was detectable by virus isolation and titration and by immunohistochemistry in the lungs of guinea pigs as early as 24 h PI. Viral DNA was detectable in the lungs of infected guinea pigs during 11 days of observation by real-time PCR. Virus-neutralizing antibodies against BAV-3 were detectable from 11 days PI and reached a peak titer at 15 days PI. Histopathological changes mainly occurred in the lungs of infected guinea pigs and were characterized by thickening of alveolar septa, mononuclear cell infiltration, hemorrhage and alveolar epithelial necrosis. These results indicate that HLJ0955 can replicate in the lungs of guinea pigs and cause fever and gross and histological lesions. The guinea pig infection model of BAV-3 would serve as a useful system for monitoring the infection process and pathogenesis of the Chinese BAV-3 strain HLJ0955, as well as immune responses to BAV-3 vaccines.

  19. Immunohistochemical distinction between preclinical bovine spongiform encephalopathy and scrapie infection in sheep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thuring, C M A; van Keulen, L J M; Langeveld, J P M; Vromans, M E W; van Zijderveld, F G; Sweeney, T

    2005-01-01

    Sheep are susceptible experimentally to bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE), the clinical signs being indistinguishable from those of scrapie. Because of the possibility of natural ovine BSE infection, laboratory tests are needed to distinguish between scrapie and BSE infection. The objectives of this study were to determine whether (1) PrPSc accumulates in biopsy samples of the tonsil or third eyelid, or both, of BSE-infected sheep before the appearance of clinical disease, and (2) such samples from BSE- and scrapie-infected sheep differ in respect of PrPSc accumulations. Homozygous ARQ sheep (n = 10) were dosed orally at 4-5 months of age with a brain homogenate from BSE-infected cattle. Third eyelid and tonsillar biopsy samples were taken at macrophages (TBMs) between BSE- and scrapie-infected sheep were detected with anti-peptide antibodies directed towards amino acids 93-106 of the ovine prion protein: thus, PrPSc appeared as single granules in TBMs of tonsillar sections from BSE-infected sheep, whereas clusters of PrPSc granules were observed within TBMs in the tonsils of scrapie-infected sheep. In contrast, antibodies against epitopes situated N- and C-terminally from the 93-106 region of the ovine prion protein revealed no differences between BSE- and scrapie-infected sheep in terms of PrPSc granules in TBMs.

  20. Comparison of the copy numbers of bovine leukemia virus in the lymph nodes of cattle with enzootic bovine leukosis and cattle with latent infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somura, Yoshiko; Sugiyama, Emi; Fujikawa, Hiroshi; Murakami, Kenji

    2014-10-01

    To establish a diagnostic index for predicting enzootic bovine leukosis (EBL), proviral bovine leukemia virus (BLV) copies in whole blood, lymph nodes and spleen were examined by quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR). Cattle were divided into two groups, EBL and BLV-infected, based on meat inspection data. The number of BLV copies in all specimens of EBL cattle was significantly higher than those of BLV-infected cattle (p < 0.0001), and the number of BLV copies in the lymph nodes was particularly large. Over 70 % of the superficial cervical, medial iliac and jejunal lymph nodes from EBL cattle had more than 1,000 copies/10 ng DNA, whereas lymph nodes from BLV-infected cattle did not. These findings suggest that the cattle harboring more than 1,000 BLV copies may be diagnosed with EBL.

  1. Absence of Bovine leukemia virus (BLV) infection in buffaloes from Amazon and southeast region in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Oliveira, Cairo H S; Resende, Cláudia F; Oliveira, Carlos M C; Barbosa, José D; Fonseca, Antônio A; Leite, Rômulo C; Reis, Jenner K P

    2016-07-01

    Enzootic bovine leucosis is an infectious disease caused by Bovine leukemia virus (BLV) and is well described in bovines. The majority of infected animals are asymptomatic, one to five percent develop lymphoma and from 30 to 50% present a persistent lymphocytosis. The virus occurs naturally in cattle and experimentally in buffaloes, capybaras and rabbits. The occurrence of lymphoma in buffaloes has been attributed to BLV infection by some authors in India and Venezuela, but not confirmed by other studies and little information on natural BLV infection in buffaloes is available. The aim of this study was to evaluate the occurrence of BLV in a sub-sample of buffalo from Amazon and southeast regions in Brazil. Three hundred and fifteen serum samples were negative using commercial AGID and ELISA (ELISA-gp51) which detect anti-BLV glycoprotein gp51 antibodies. The same samples were also evaluated for antibodies to whole virus through a commercial ELISA (ELISA-BLV) in which 77 (24.44%) were found seropositive and two (0.63%) inconclusive. On the other hand, all animals were negative by PCR to BLV targeted to the env and tax genes. These results suggest that ELISA-BLV produces false positive results in buffalo serum (pAmazon basin and the southeast region of Brazil. Serological tests, like ELISA-BLV, usually used for cattle may produce false-positive results for BLV in buffaloes and direct detection tests such as PCR should be chosen in these surveys. The occurrence of lymphoma in buffalo was not associated with BLV infection in the one case analyzed in this work and the etiology and pathogenesis of this disease should be clarified.

  2. Gut transcriptome of replete adult female cattle ticks, Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus, feeding upon a Babesia bovis-infected bovine host.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heekin, Andrew M; Guerrero, Felix D; Bendele, Kylie G; Saldivar, Leo; Scoles, Glen A; Dowd, Scot E; Gondro, Cedric; Nene, Vishvanath; Djikeng, Appolinaire; Brayton, Kelly A

    2013-09-01

    As it feeds upon cattle, Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus is capable of transmitting a number of pathogenic organisms, including the apicomplexan hemoparasite Babesia bovis, a causative agent of bovine babesiosis. The R. microplus female gut transcriptome was studied for two cohorts: adult females feeding on a bovine host infected with B. bovis and adult females feeding on an uninfected bovine. RNA was purified and used to generate a subtracted cDNA library from B. bovis-infected female gut, and 4,077 expressed sequence tags (ESTs) were sequenced. Gene expression was also measured by a microarray designed from the publicly available R. microplus gene index: BmiGI Version 2. We compared gene expression in the tick gut from females feeding upon an uninfected bovine to gene expression in tick gut from females feeding upon a splenectomized bovine infected with B. bovis. Thirty-three ESTs represented on the microarray were expressed at a higher level in female gut samples from the ticks feeding upon a B. bovis-infected calf compared to expression levels in female gut samples from ticks feeding on an uninfected calf. Forty-three transcripts were expressed at a lower level in the ticks feeding upon B. bovis-infected female guts compared with expression in female gut samples from ticks feeding on the uninfected calf. These array data were used as initial characterization of gene expression associated with the infection of R. microplus by B. bovis.

  3. The gamma-2-herpesvirus bovine herpesvirus 4 causes apoptotic infection in permissive cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sciortino, M T; Perri, D; Medici, M A; Foti, M; Orlandella, B M; Mastino, A

    2000-11-10

    Increasing evidence suggests that regulation of apoptosis in infected cells is associated with several viral infections. The gammaherpesvirus bovine herpesvirus 4 (BHV-4) has been shown to harbor genes with antiapoptotic potentialities. However, here we have demonstrated that productive infection of adherent, permissive cell lines by BHV-4 resulted in a cytopathic effect characterized by induction of apoptosis. This phenomenon was confirmed using different techniques to detect apoptosis and using different virus strains and cell targets. Apoptosis induced by BHV-4 was inhibited by (1) treatment with doses of heparin, which completely inhibited virus attachment and infectivity; (2) UV treatment, which completely abrogated infectivity; and (3) treatment with a dose of phosphonoacetic acid, which blocked virus replication. Virus-induced apoptosis was associated with a down-regulation of Bcl-2 expression and was reduced by Z-VAD-FMK, but not by Z-DEVD-FMK (caspase-3-specific) caspase inhibitors. Inhibition of apoptosis by Z-VAD-FMK treatment during infection did not modify virus yield. Therefore, despite the presence of antiapoptotic genes in its genoma, BHV-4 could complete its cycle of productive infection while inducing apoptosis of infected cells. This finding might have implications for the pathobiology of BHV-4 and other gammaherpesviruses in vivo. Copyright 2000 Academic Press.

  4. Age-dependent differences in cytokine and antibody responses after experimental RSV infection in a bovine model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grell, S.N.; Riber, Ulla; Tjørnehøj, Kirsten

    2005-01-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) causes severe respiratory disease in both infants and calves. As in humans, bovine RSV (BRSV) infections are most severe in the first 6 months of life. In this study, experimental infection with BRSV was performed in calves aged 1-5, 9-16 or 32-37 weeks. Compared...

  5. Platelets and erythrocyte-bound platelets bind infectious HIV-1 in plasma of chronically infected patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, Zoltan; Jagodzinski, Linda L; Eller, Michael A; Thelian, Doris; Matyas, Gary R; Kunz, Anjali N; Alving, Carl R

    2013-01-01

    Chronic HIV-1 infection is associated with persistent viremia in most patients, but it remains unclear how free virus may survive the potential hostile effects of plasma. We investigated whether sites might exist on the surfaces of circulating blood cells for protection of infectious HIV-1 particles. Red blood cells (RBC) either from blood of uninfected normal individuals, or from blood obtained without EDTA from chronically infected HIV-1 patients, invariably contained a small number of RBC having attached platelets as determined by flow cytometry, light microscopy, and immunofluorescence microscopy. After mixing normal RBC with platelet-rich plasma, discrete populations of RBC, platelets, and complexes of platelets attached to RBC were purified by fluorescence-activated cell sorting. Upon incubation of purified cells or platelets with HIV-1 followed by washing and co-incubation with CD4-positive peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC), platelets, and platelet-RBC complexes, but not platelet-free RBC, caused infection of PBMC. Infection was prevented by pre-treating the platelet-RBC complexes with EDTA. Plasma and RBC (comprising a RBC/platelet-RBC mixture) from chronically infected patients with low viral loads were also co-incubated with PBMC ex vivo to determine the presence of infectious HIV-1. All freshly isolated plasmas from the HIV-1-infected donors, obtained in the absence of anticoagulant, were noninfectious. Interestingly, the RBC from most of the patients caused cell-cell infection of PBMC that was prevented by stripping the RBC with EDTA. A monoclonal antibody to DC-SIGN partially inhibited cell-cell HIV-1 infection of PBMC by normal RBC pre-incubated with platelets and HIV-1. We conclude: (a) platelet-free EDTA-free plasma from chronically infected HIV-1 patients, although containing viral RNA, is an environment that lacks detectable infectious HIV-1; (b) platelets and platelet-RBC complexes, but not purified RBC, bind infectious HIV-1; (c) DC

  6. Platelets and erythrocyte-bound platelets bind infectious HIV-1 in plasma of chronically infected patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zoltan Beck

    Full Text Available Chronic HIV-1 infection is associated with persistent viremia in most patients, but it remains unclear how free virus may survive the potential hostile effects of plasma. We investigated whether sites might exist on the surfaces of circulating blood cells for protection of infectious HIV-1 particles. Red blood cells (RBC either from blood of uninfected normal individuals, or from blood obtained without EDTA from chronically infected HIV-1 patients, invariably contained a small number of RBC having attached platelets as determined by flow cytometry, light microscopy, and immunofluorescence microscopy. After mixing normal RBC with platelet-rich plasma, discrete populations of RBC, platelets, and complexes of platelets attached to RBC were purified by fluorescence-activated cell sorting. Upon incubation of purified cells or platelets with HIV-1 followed by washing and co-incubation with CD4-positive peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC, platelets, and platelet-RBC complexes, but not platelet-free RBC, caused infection of PBMC. Infection was prevented by pre-treating the platelet-RBC complexes with EDTA. Plasma and RBC (comprising a RBC/platelet-RBC mixture from chronically infected patients with low viral loads were also co-incubated with PBMC ex vivo to determine the presence of infectious HIV-1. All freshly isolated plasmas from the HIV-1-infected donors, obtained in the absence of anticoagulant, were noninfectious. Interestingly, the RBC from most of the patients caused cell-cell infection of PBMC that was prevented by stripping the RBC with EDTA. A monoclonal antibody to DC-SIGN partially inhibited cell-cell HIV-1 infection of PBMC by normal RBC pre-incubated with platelets and HIV-1. We conclude: (a platelet-free EDTA-free plasma from chronically infected HIV-1 patients, although containing viral RNA, is an environment that lacks detectable infectious HIV-1; (b platelets and platelet-RBC complexes, but not purified RBC, bind infectious HIV

  7. Persistent fetal infection with bovine viral diarrhea virus differentially affects maternal blood cell signal transduction pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smirnova, Natalia P; Ptitsyn, Andrey A; Austin, Kathleen J; Bielefeldt-Ohmann, Helle; Van Campen, Hana; Han, Hyungchul; van Olphen, Alberto L; Hansen, Thomas R

    2009-02-02

    The consequences of viral infection during pregnancy include impact on fetal and maternal immune responses and on fetal development. Transplacental infection in cattle with noncytopathic bovine viral diarrhea virus (ncpBVDV) during early gestation results in persistently infected (PI) fetuses with life-long viremia and susceptibility to infections. Infection of the fetus during the third trimester or after birth leads to a transient infection cleared by a competent immune system. We hypothesized that ncpBVDV infection and presence of an infected fetus would alter immune response and lead to downregulation of proinflammatory processes in pregnant dams. Naïve pregnant heifers were challenged with ncpBVDV2 on day 75 (PI fetus) and day 175 [transiently infected (TI) fetus] or kept uninfected (healthy control fetus). Maternal blood samples were collected up to day 190 of gestation. Genome-wide microarray analysis of gene expression in maternal peripheral white blood cells, performed on days 160 and 190 of gestation, revealed multiple signal transduction pathways affected by ncpBVDV infection. Acute infection and presence of a TI fetus caused upregulation of the type I interferon (IFN) pathway genes, including dsRNA sensors and IFN-stimulated genes. The presence of a PI fetus caused prolonged downregulation of chemokine receptor 4 (CXCR4) and T cell receptor (TCR) signaling in maternal blood cells. We conclude that: 1) infection with ncpBVDV induces a vigorous type I IFN response, and 2) presence of a PI fetus causes downregulation of important signaling pathways in the blood of the dam, which could have deleterious consequences on fetal development and the immune response.

  8. Multiplicity of Plasmodium falciparum infection in asymptomatic children in Senegal: relation to transmission, age and erythrocyte variants

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    Anchang Judith

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Individuals living in malaria endemic areas generally harbour multiple parasite strains. Multiplicity of infection (MOI can be an indicator of immune status. However, whether this is good or bad for the development of immunity to malaria, is still a matter of debate. This study aimed to examine the MOI in asymptomatic children between two and ten years of age and to relate it to erythrocyte variants, clinical attacks, transmission levels and other parasitological indexes. Methods Study took place in Niakhar area in Senegal, where malaria is mesoendemic and seasonal. Three hundred and seventy two asymptomatic children were included. Sickle-cell trait, G6PD deficiency (A- and Santamaria and α+-thalassaemia (-α3.7 type were determined using PCR. Multiplicity of Plasmodium falciparum infection, i.e. number of concurrent clones, was defined by PCR-based genotyping of the merozoite surface protein-2 (msp2, before and at the end of the malaria transmission season. The χ2-test, ANOVA, multivariate linear regression and logistic regression statistical tests were used for data analysis. Results MOI was significantly higher at the end of transmission season. The majority of PCR positive subjects had multiple infections at both time points (64% before and 87% after the transmission season. MOI did not increase in α-thalassaemic and G6PD mutated children. The ABO system and HbAS did not affect MOI at any time points. No association between MOI and clinical attack was observed. MOI did not vary over age at any time points. There was a significant correlation between MOI and parasite density, as the higher parasite counts increases the probability of having multiple infections. Conclusion Taken together our data revealed that α-thalassaemia may have a role in protection against certain parasite strains. The protection against the increase in MOI after the transmission season conferred by G6PD deficiency is probably due to clearance of

  9. Evaluation of a simple Theileria annulata culture protocol from experimentally infected bovine whole blood

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    Gharbi M.

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available We have evaluated a new simple technique using whole blood from experimentally infected cattle for the isolation and cultivation of Theileria annulata. The study was carried out on 20 Holstein-Frisian bovines that had been experimentally infected with a virulent lethal dose of Theileria annulata. This technique has been compared to the classical peripheral blood monocyte isolation with Ficoll carried out on 22 experimentally infected Holstein-Friesian calves. The effectiveness of the reference technique was estimated to 86.4%, whilst the effectiveness of the new technique was 100%. Moreover, this new technique leads to time and money saving estimated to € 3.06 per sample. It decreases the contamination risks by reducing the steps of sample manipulation.

  10. Evaluation of a simple Theileria annulata culture protocol from experimentally infected bovine whole blood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gharbi, M; Latrach, R; Sassi, L; Darghouth, M A

    2012-08-01

    We have evaluated a new simple technique using whole blood from experimentally infected cattle for the isolation and cultivation of Theileria annulata. The study was carried out on 20 Holstein-Frisian bovines that had been experimentally infected with a virulent lethal dose of Theileria annulata. This technique has been compared to the classical peripheral blood monocyte isolation with Ficoll carried out on 22 experimentally infected Holstein-Friesian calves. The effectiveness of the reference technique was estimated to 86.4%, whilst the effectiveness of the new technique was 100%. Moreover, this new technique leads to time and money saving estimated to € 3.06 per sample. It decreases the contamination risks by reducing the steps of sample manipulation.

  11. A method for visualizing surface-exposed and internal PfEMP1 adhesion antigens in Plasmodium falciparum infected erythrocytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bengtsson, Dominique; Sowa, Kordai M; Salanti, Ali;

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The insertion of parasite antigens into the host erythrocyte membrane and the structure and distribution of Plasmodium falciparum adhesion receptors on that membrane are poorly understood. Laser scanning confocal microscopy (LSCM) and a novel labelling and fixation method have been used...... to obtain high resolution immuno-fluorescent images of erythrocyte surface PfEMP1 and internal antigens which allow analysis of the accumulation of PfEMP1 on the erythrocyte membrane during asexual development. METHODS: A novel staining technique has been developed which permits distinction between...... erythrocyte surface PfEMP1 and intracellular PfEMP1, in parasites whose nuclear material is exceptionally well resolved. Primary antibody detection by fluorescence is carried out on the live parasitized erythrocyte. The surface labelled cells are then fixed using paraformaldehyde and permeabilized with a non...

  12. INFLUENCE OF COMPOSITION OF POLYUNSATURATED FATTY ACIDS ON MICROVISCOSITY OF THE MEMBRANE OF ERYTHROCYTES OF THE NAVEL OF THE BLOOD AT HERPES INFECTION CONTAMINATIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. A. Isutina

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The method of gas-liquid chromatography investigates composition of polyunsaturated fatty acids of membrane of erythrocytes, discharged of navel bloods neonatal from mothers who have transferred in the season gestation exacerbation herpes of an infection contamination and his influence on microviscosity of membrane. Essential infringements of data exchange of bonds in navel bloods neonatal with an exacerbation  herpes  infection  contaminations  (antiserum  capacity  IgG  to  virus  of  simple  herpes  of  1  type 1 : 12 800 which show deficiency essential ω-3 acids at simultaneous augmentation of the precursor proinflammatory eicosanoid ω-6 arachidonic acids, promoting augmentation of relative microviscosity of membrane of erythrocytes that will be one of probable causes of development of hypoxia are found.

  13. Genomic clones of bovine parvovirus: Construction and effect of deletions and terminal sequence inversions on infectivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shull, B.C.; Chen, K.C.; Lederman, M.; Stout, E.R.; Bates, R.C. (Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State Univ., Blacksburg (USA))

    1988-02-01

    Genomic clones of the autonomous parvovirus bovine parvovirus (BPV) were constructed by blunt-end ligation of reannealed virion plus and minus DNA strands into the plasmid pUC8. These clones were stable during propagation in Escherichia coli JM107. All clones tested were found to be infectious by the criteria of plaque titer and progressive cytophathic effect after transfection into bovine fetal lung cells. Sequencing of the recombinant plasmids demonstrated that all of the BPV inserts had left-end (3{prime})-terminal deletions of up to 34 bases. Defective genomes could also be detected in the progeny DNA even though the infection was initiated with homogeneous, cloned DNA. Full-length genomic clones with 3{prime} flip and 3{prime} flop conformations were constructed and were found to have equal infectivity. Expression of capsid proteins from tranfected genomes was demonstrated by hemagglutination, indirect immunofluorescence, and immunoprecipitation of ({sup 35}S)methionine-labeled cell lysates. Use of appropriate antiserum for immunoprecipitation showed the synthesis of BPV capsid and noncapsid proteins after transfection. Independently, a series of genomic clones with increasingly larger 3{prime}-terminal deletions was prepared from separately subcloned 3{prime}-terminal fragments. Transfection of these clones into bovine fetal lung cells revealed that deletions of up to 34 bases at the 3{prime} end lowered but did not abolish infectivity, while deletions of greater than 52 bases were lethal. End-label analysis showed that the 34-base deletion was repaired to wild-type length in the progeny virus.

  14. Bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) infection in dairy cattle herds in northeast Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nilnont, Theerakul; Aiumlamai, Suneerat; Kanistanont, Kwankate; Inchaisri, Chaidate; Kampa, Jaruwan

    2016-08-01

    Bovine viral diarrhea virus causes a wide range of clinical manifestation with subsequent economic losses in dairy production worldwide. Our study of a population of dairy cattle in Thailand based on 933 bulk tank milk samples from nine public milk collection centers aimed to monitor infective status and to evaluate the effect of the infection in cows as well as to examine the reproductive performance of heifers to provide effective recommendations for disease control in Thailand. The results showed a moderate antibody-positive prevalence in the herd (62.5 %), with the proportion of class-3 herd, actively infected stage, being 17.3 %. Fourteen persistently infected (PI) animals were identified among 1196 young animals from the class-3 herds. Most of the identified PI animals, 11/14, were born in one sub-area where bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) investigation has not been performed to date. With respect to reproductive performance, class-3 herds also showed higher median values of reproductive indices than those of class-0 herds. Cows and heifers in class-3 herds had higher odds ratio of calving interval (CI) and age at first service (AFS) above the median, respectively, compared to class-0 herds (OR = 1.29; P = 0.02 and OR = 1.63; P = 0.02). Our study showed that PI animals were still in the area that was previously studied. Furthermore, a newly studied area had a high prevalence of BVDV infection and the infection affected the reproductive performance of cows and heifers. Although 37.5 % of the population was free of BVDV, the lack of official disease prevention and less awareness of herd biosecurity may have resulted in continuing viral spread and silent economic losses have potentially occurred due to BVDV. We found that BVDV is still circulating in the region and, hence, a national control program is required.

  15. Seasonal variation in agglutination of Plasmodium falciparum-infected erythrocytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Giha, H A; Theander, T G; Staalsø, T;

    1998-01-01

    place in the absence of disease, presumably as a consequence of subclinical infection. This is the first demonstration of marked seasonal fluctuations in the capacity of individuals' sera to agglutinate parasitized red blood cells. Possible explanations for this effect include a decrease in the levels...... malaria infection samples taken from five of the cohort members. Our data show that the capacity of donor plasma samples to agglutinate parasitized cells depended largely on the time of sampling relative to the transmission season, at least within this epidemiologic setting. Thus, although less than half...

  16. Agglutination of Mouse Erythrocytes by Eperythrozoon coccoides

    OpenAIRE

    Iralu, Vichazelhu; Ganong, Kevin D.

    1983-01-01

    Erythrocytes from blood of mice infected with Eperythrozoon coccoides for 3 or 4 days agglutinated spontaneously. Washed E. coccoides particles agglutinated washed erythrocytes of uninfected mice. E. coccoides-mediated agglutination of normal mouse erythrocytes would be an excellent system for studies of bacterial adhesion.

  17. Agglutination of Mouse Erythrocytes by Eperythrozoon coccoides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iralu, Vichazelhu; Ganong, Kevin D.

    1983-01-01

    Erythrocytes from blood of mice infected with Eperythrozoon coccoides for 3 or 4 days agglutinated spontaneously. Washed E. coccoides particles agglutinated washed erythrocytes of uninfected mice. E. coccoides-mediated agglutination of normal mouse erythrocytes would be an excellent system for studies of bacterial adhesion. Images PMID:6832825

  18. Agglutination of Mouse Erythrocytes by Eperythrozoon coccoides

    OpenAIRE

    Iralu, Vichazelhu; Ganong, Kevin D.

    1983-01-01

    Erythrocytes from blood of mice infected with Eperythrozoon coccoides for 3 or 4 days agglutinated spontaneously. Washed E. coccoides particles agglutinated washed erythrocytes of uninfected mice. E. coccoides-mediated agglutination of normal mouse erythrocytes would be an excellent system for studies of bacterial adhesion.

  19. Toll-like receptor expression in the nervous system of bovine alpha-herpesvirus-infected calves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marin, M S; Quintana, S; Leunda, M R; Odeón, A C; Pérez, S E

    2014-10-01

    In this study, the expression levels of viral Toll-like receptors (TLRs) in the nervous system of bovine herpesvirus type 5 (BoHV-5)-infected calves were investigated. A significant increase in the expression of TLRs 3 and 7-9 was found in the anterior cerebral cortex during acute infection and viral reactivation. In the trigeminal ganglia, only TLR9 expression was significantly affected. The magnitude of the increase was lower in BoHV-1-infected calves, suggesting that a restricted immune response might protect against exacerbated inflammatory responses in the brain. This work describes, for the first time, the involvement of TLRs 3 and 7-9 in the recognition of BoHV in the bovine nervous system, indicating that the expression of these receptors might be associated with the development of neurological disease. Modulation of the signalling pathways mediated by TLRs might provide an effective approach to control the neuro-immune response to BoHV-5, which may be responsible for neurological lesions.

  20. First Report of Bovine Leukemia Virus Infection in Yaks (Bos mutus in China

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    Jian-Gang Ma

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Enzootic bovine leukosis (EBL is a chronic lymphosarcoma disease of cattle caused by bovine leukemia virus (BLV. No information is available concerning the epidemiology of BLV infection in yaks (Bos mutus. One thousand five hundred and eighty-four serum samples from 610 black yaks and 974 white yaks from Gansu province, northwest China, were collected between April 2013 and March 2014 and tested for BLV antibodies using a commercially available ELISA kit. The overall BLV seroprevalence in yaks was 21.09% (334/1584, with 24.26% (148/610 black yaks and 19.10% (186/974 white yaks yielding positive results. Risk factor analysis indicated that with the exception of breed (OR = 1.36, 95% CI = 1.06–1.73, P<0.05, the age, region, gender, farm, and the numbers of pregnancies were not considered as risk factors for the presence of BLV in yaks included in this study. This is the first report of BLV infection in yaks in China, which provides information for controlling BLV infection in yaks.

  1. The molecular epidemiological study of bovine leukemia virus infection in Myanmar cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polat, Meripet; Moe, Hla Hla; Shimogiri, Takeshi; Moe, Kyaw Kyaw; Takeshima, Shin-Nosuke; Aida, Yoko

    2017-02-01

    Bovine leukemia virus (BLV) is the etiological agent of enzootic bovine leukosis, which is the most common neoplastic disease of cattle. BLV infects cattle worldwide and affects both health status and productivity. However, no studies have examined the distribution of BLV in Myanmar, and the genetic characteristics of Myanmar BLV strains are unknown. Therefore, the aim of this study was to detect BLV infection in Myanmar and examine genetic variability. Blood samples were obtained from 66 cattle from different farms in four townships of the Nay Pyi Taw Union Territory of central Myanmar. BLV provirus was detected by nested PCR and real-time PCR targeting BLV long terminal repeats. Results were confirmed by nested PCR targeting the BLV env-gp51 gene and real-time PCR targeting the BLV tax gene. Out of 66 samples, six (9.1 %) were positive for BLV provirus. A phylogenetic tree, constructed using five distinct partial and complete env-gp51 sequences from BLV strains isolated from three different townships, indicated that Myanmar strains were genotype-10. A phylogenetic tree constructed from whole genome sequences obtained by sequencing cloned, overlapping PCR products from two Myanmar strains confirmed the existence of genotype-10 in Myanmar. Comparative analysis of complete genome sequences identified genotype-10-specific amino acid substitutions in both structural and non-structural genes, thereby distinguishing genotype-10 strains from other known genotypes. This study provides information regarding BLV infection levels in Myanmar and confirms that genotype-10 is circulating in Myanmar.

  2. Infectivity in skeletal muscle of cattle with atypical bovine spongiform encephalopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suardi, Silvia; Vimercati, Chiara; Casalone, Cristina; Gelmetti, Daniela; Corona, Cristiano; Iulini, Barbara; Mazza, Maria; Lombardi, Guerino; Moda, Fabio; Ruggerone, Margherita; Campagnani, Ilaria; Piccoli, Elena; Catania, Marcella; Groschup, Martin H; Balkema-Buschmann, Anne; Caramelli, Maria; Monaco, Salvatore; Zanusso, Gianluigi; Tagliavini, Fabrizio

    2012-01-01

    The amyloidotic form of bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) termed BASE is caused by a prion strain whose biological properties differ from those of typical BSE, resulting in a clinically and pathologically distinct phenotype. Whether peripheral tissues of BASE-affected cattle contain infectivity is unknown. This is a critical issue since the BASE prion is readily transmissible to a variety of hosts including primates, suggesting that humans may be susceptible. We carried out bioassays in transgenic mice overexpressing bovine PrP (Tgbov XV) and found infectivity in a variety of skeletal muscles from cattle with natural and experimental BASE. Noteworthy, all BASE muscles used for inoculation transmitted disease, although the attack rate differed between experimental and natural cases (∼70% versus ∼10%, respectively). This difference was likely related to different prion titers, possibly due to different stages of disease in the two conditions, i.e. terminal stage in experimental BASE and pre-symptomatic stage in natural BASE. The neuropathological phenotype and PrP(res) type were consistent in all affected mice and matched those of Tgbov XV mice infected with brain homogenate from natural BASE. The immunohistochemical analysis of skeletal muscles from cattle with natural and experimental BASE showed the presence of abnormal prion protein deposits within muscle fibers. Conversely, Tgbov XV mice challenged with lymphoid tissue and kidney from natural and experimental BASE did not develop disease. The novel information on the neuromuscular tropism of the BASE strain, efficiently overcoming species barriers, underlines the relevance of maintaining an active surveillance.

  3. Usefulness of serological ELISA assay forTaenia saginata to detect naturally infected bovines

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    Silvana de Cássia Paulan

    Full Text Available Bovine cysticercosis, a cosmopolitan disease caused by Taenia saginata, leads to economic losses due to carcass devaluation at slaughter. Sanitary inspection at slaughterhouses, the routine diagnostic method in Brazil, lacks the necessary sensitivity to detect the mildly infected cattle that are typically encoutered in Brazil. In this study we have tested cattle sera from animals diagnosed as positive and negative by veterianry inspection for (1 anti-parasite antibodies using metacestodes antigens (T. solium vesicular fluid and T. saginata secretions and (2 the HP10 secreted antigen of viable metacestodes. The cut-off values were calculated by ROC curve for intense and mild infections conditions, and by the classical method ( for negative samples. The sensitivity and specificity of these diagnostic tests were different depending on the assumed cut-off value and, importantly, whether the infection was mild or intense. In spite of these observations, however, such ELISA assays for serum antibodies and parasite antigens constitute an important tool for epidemiological porposes, and in establishing priorities for the control of bovine cysticercosis.

  4. Effects of interferon-tau on cattle persistently infected with bovine viral diarrhea virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohara, Junko; Nishikura, Yumiko; Konnai, Satoru; Tajima, Motoshi; Onuma, Misao

    2012-08-01

    In this study, the antiviral effects of bovine interferon-tau (boIFN-tau) on bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) were examined in vitro and in vivo. In the in vitro experiments, the replication of cytopathic and non-cytopathic BVDV was inhibited in the bovine cells treated with boIFN-tau. The replication of BVDV was completely suppressed by boIFN-tau at a concentration higher than 10(2) U/ml. In order to examine the effect of boIFN-tau on virus propagation in cattle persistently infected (PI) with non-cytopathic BVDV, boIFN-tau was subcutaneously administered to PI cattle at 10(5) U/kg or 10(6) U/kg body weight 5 times per week for 2 weeks. No physical abnormality such as depression was observed in the cattle during the experiment. The mean BVDV titers in the serum of the PI cattle decreased slightly during the boIFN-tau administration period with the dose of 10(6) U/kg. However, the BVDV titers in the serum returned to the pre-administration level after the final boIFN-tau administration. These results suggest that boIFN-tau demonstrates an anti-BVDV effect, reducing the BVDV level in serum transiently when injected into PI cattle.

  5. A New Indicator Cell Line Established to Monitor Bovine Foamy Virus Infection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hong-yan Guo; Zhi-bin Liang; Yue Li; Juan Tan; Qi-min Chen; Wen-tao Qiao

    2011-01-01

    In order to improve the accuracy for quantitating the bovine foamy virus(BFV)in vitro,we developed a baby hamster kidney cell(BHK)-21-derived indicator cell line containing a plasmid that encodes the firefly luciferase driven by the BFV long terminal repeat promoter(LTR,from -7 to 1012). The BFV titer could be determined by detecting the luciferase expression since the viral trans-activator BTas protein activates the promoter activity of the LTR. One clone,designated BFVL,was selected from ten neomycin-resistant clones.BFVL showed a specific and inducible dose-and time-dependent luciferase activity in response to BFV infection.Although the changes in luciferase activity of BFVL peaked at 84 h post infection,it was possible to differentiate infected and uninfected cells at 48 h post infection. A linear relationship was established between the multiplicity of infection(MOI)of BFV and the activated ratio of luciferase expression in BFVL. Moreover,the sensitivity of the BFVL-based assay for detecting infectious BFV was 10,000 times higher than the conventional CPE-based assay at 48 h post infection. These findings suggest that the BFVL-based assay is rapid,easy,sensitive,quantitative and specific for detection of BFV infection.

  6. Innate and adaptive immune responses to in utero infection with bovine viral diarrhea virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Thomas R; Smirnova, Natalia P; Webb, Brett T; Bielefeldt-Ohmann, Helle; Sacco, Randy E; Van Campen, Hana

    2015-06-01

    Infection of pregnant cows with noncytopathic (ncp) bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) induces rapid innate and adaptive immune responses, resulting in clearance of the virus in less than 3 weeks. Seven to 14 days after inoculation of the cow, ncpBVDV crosses the placenta and induces a fetal viremia. Establishment of persistent infection with ncpBVDV in the fetus has been attributed to the inability to mount an immune response before 90-150 days of gestational age. The result is 'immune tolerance', persistent viral replication and shedding of ncpBVDV. In contrast, we describe the chronic upregulation of fetal Type I interferon (IFN) pathway genes and the induction of IFN-γ pathways in fetuses of cows infected on day 75 of gestation. Persistently infected (PI) fetal IFN-γ concentrations also increased at day 97 at the peak of fetal viremia and IFN-γ mRNA was significantly elevated in fetal thymus, liver and spleen 14-22 days post maternal inoculation. PI fetuses respond to ncpBVDV infection through induction of Type I IFN and IFN-γ activated genes leading to a reduction in ncpBVDV titer. We hypothesize that fetal infection with BVDV persists because of impaired induction of IFN-γ in the face of activated Type I IFN responses. Clarification of the mechanisms involved in the IFN-associated pathways during BVDV fetal infection may lead to better detection methods, antiviral compounds and selection of genetically resistant breeding animals.

  7. Expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase, caspase-3 and production of reactive oxygen intermediate on endothelial cells culture (HUVECs treated with P. falciparum infected erythrocytes and tumour necrosis factor-α

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    Loeki E. Fitri

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Cytoadherence of P. falciparum infected erythrocytes on endothelial cells is a key factor in development of severe malaria. This process may associated with the activation of local immune that was enhanced by tumour necrosis factor-α (TNF-α. This study was conducted to see the influence of P.falciparum infected erythrocytes cytoadherence and TNF-α treatment in inducing endothelial cells activation in vitro. inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS and caspase-3 expression, also reactive oxygen intermediate (ROI production were used as parameters. An Experimental laboratory study had been done to observe endothelial cells activation (HUVECs after treatment with TNF-α for 20 hours or P. falciparum infected erythrocytes for 1 hour or both of them. Normal endothelial cells culture had been used as a control. Using immunocytochemistry local immune activation of endothelial cells was determined by iNOS and caspase-3 expression. Nitro Blue Tetrazolium reduction-assay was conducted to see the ROI production semi quantitatively. inducible nitric oxide synthase expression only found on endothelial cells culture treated with P. falciparum infected erythrocytes or both P. falciparum infected erythrocytes and TNF-α. Caspase-3 expression found slightly on normal endothelial cells culture. This expression increased significantly on endothelial cells culture treated with both P.falciparum infected erythrocytes and TNF-α (p=0.000. The normal endothelial cells release low level of ROI in the presence of non-specific trigger, PMA. In the presence of P. falciparum infected erythrocytes or TNF-α or both of them, some cells showed medium to high levels of ROI. Cytoadherence of P. falciparum infected erythrocytes and TNF α treatment on endothelial cells can induce activation of local immune marked by increase inducible nitric oxide synthase and release of free radicals that cause cell damage. (Med J Indones 2006; 15:151-6 Keywords: P.falciparum ,HUVECs, TNF-α, i

  8. Assessing the histopathology to depict the different stages of bovine tuberculosis infection in a naturally infected herd

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    Luciana S. Medeiros

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available The standard method for detection of bovine tuberculosis (TB is the single intradermal tuberculin test (SITT. Nevertheless, current studies suggest that a single test is not enough to detect all cattle infected by TB, particularly when animals present different stages of infection. A dairy herd comprised of 270 cows was studied and 15 were reactive to SITT plus nine inconclusive animals. Blood samples (for IFN and ELISA were collected from these 24 cows. At 30 days after injection of PPD, all the cows that were reactive to any of the employed tests were slaughtered, and tissues were processed by Bacteriology, Histopathology (HP and PCR. According to HP 33.4% of the animals were positive, 45.8% inconclusive and 20.8% were negative. The inconclusive samples came from IFN positive animals, signalizing recent infection. Regarding the animals that were negative to HP, all of them were identified by IFN while ELISA was negative. Immune responses are different in recent and advanced infections, what supports the identification between chronically or recently infected animals. This multidisciplinary approach is mandatory for the interpretation of the various tools that are frequently employed for the diagnosis of TB and mainly to identify all infected animals.

  9. Characterization of immune response in Staphylococcus aureus chronically infected bovine mammary glands during active involution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreotti, Carolina S; Baravalle, Celina; Sacco, Sofía C; Lovato, Melisa; Pereyra, Elizabet A L; Renna, María S; Ortega, Hugo H; Calvinho, Luis F; Dallard, Bibiana E

    2017-10-01

    The aim of this study was to characterize the immune response in Staphylococcus aureus chronically infected bovine mammary glands during active involution. Twenty-one Holstein non-pregnant cows in late lactation either uninfected or with chronic naturally acquired S. aureus intramammary infections (IMI) were included in this study. Cows were slaughtered at 7, 14 and 21 d after cessation of milking and samples for immunohistochemical analysis were taken. Protein expression of toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2) and TLR4 was significantly higher in S. aureus-infected quarters than in uninfected controls at the three involution stages studied. Protein expression of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α), interleukin (IL)-1α and IL-17 was significantly affected by IMI; being higher in S. aureus-infected than uninfected quarters during all evaluated stages. In S. aureus-infected and uninfected quarters protein expression of lactoferrin increased from day 7-14 of involution, decreasing significantly to day 21 in mammary quarters with chronic infections. The number of monocytes-macrophages was significantly higher in S. aureus-infected than in uninfected control quarters at 7 and 21 d of involution. The number of T lymphocytes was significantly higher in S. aureus-infected than in uninfected quarters at 7 and 14 d of involution while the number of B lymphocytes was significantly higher in S. aureus-infected than in uninfected quarters during all evaluated stages, showing a progressive increase as involution advanced. These results demonstrated a sustained and exacerbated innate and adaptive immune response during chronic S. aureus IMI, playing a critical role in the infection control during active involution. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Fine mapping of Loci on BTA2 and BTA26 Associated with Bovine Viral Diarrhea Persistent Infection and Linked with Bovine Respiratory Disease in Cattle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo eZanella

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Bovine respiratory disease (BRD is considered to be the most costly infectious disease in the cattle industry. Bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV is one of the pathogens involved with the BRD complex of disease. Bovine viral diarrhea virus infection also negatively impacts cow reproduction and calf performance. Loci associated with persistently infected animals (BVD-PI and linked with BRD have previously been identified near 14 Mb on bovine chromosome 2 (BTA2 and 15.3 Mb on bovine chromosome 26 (BTA26. The objective of this study was to refine the loci associated with BVD-PIand linked with BRD. Association testing for BVD-PI was performed on a population of 65 BVD-PI calves, 51 of their dams, and 60 unaffected calves (controls with 175 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs on BTA2 and 209 SNPs on BTA26. Comparisons were made between BVD-PI calves and controls calves and the dams of BVD-PI calves and controls calves. For the linkage analysis of BRD, the same markers were used to genotype 2 half sib-families consisting of the sires and 72 BRD positive and 148 BRD negative offspring. Using an allelic chi-square test, 11 loci on BTA2 and 8 loci on BTA26 were associated with the dams of the BVD-PI calves (P < 0.05 and 5 loci on BTA2 and 10 loci on BTA26 were associated with BVD-PI calves. One locus on BTA2 and two loci on BTA26 were found to be linked (P < 0.05 with BRD. These results further refined the loci associated and linked with BVD-PI and BRD, respectively.

  11. Development of an antibody to bovine IL-2 reveals multifunctional CD4 T(EM cells in cattle naturally infected with bovine tuberculosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam O Whelan

    Full Text Available Gaining a better understanding of the T cell mechanisms underlying natural immunity to bovine tuberculosis would help to identify immune correlates of disease progression and facilitate the rational design of improved vaccine and diagnostic strategies. CD4 T cells play an established central role in immunity to TB, and recent interest has focussed on the potential role of multifunctional CD4 T cells expressing IFN-γ, IL-2 and TNF-α. Until now, it has not been possible to assess the contribution of these multifunctional CD4 T cells in cattle due to the lack of reagents to detect bovine IL-2 (bIL-2. Using recombinant phage display technology, we have identified an antibody that recognises biologically active bIL-2. Using this antibody, we have developed a polychromatic flow cytometric staining panel that has allowed the investigation of multifunctional CD4 T-cells responses in cattle naturally infected with M. bovis. Assessment of the frequency of antigen specific CD4 T cell subsets reveals a dominant IFN-γ(+IL-2(+TNF-α(+ and IFN-γ(+ TNF-α(+ response in naturally infected cattle. These multifunctional CD4 T cells express a CD44(hiCD45RO(+CD62L(lo T-effector memory (T(EM phenotype and display higher cytokine median fluorescence intensities than single cytokine producers, consistent with an enhanced 'quality of response' as reported for multifunctional cells in human and murine systems. Through our development of these novel immunological bovine tools, we provide the first description of multifunctional T(EM cells in cattle. Application of these tools will improve our understanding of protective immunity in bovine TB and allow more direct comparisons of the complex T cell mediated immune responses between murine models, human clinical studies and bovine TB models in the future.

  12. Seroprevalence of bovine leukemia virus (BLV) infection in dairy cattle in Isfahan Province, Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morovati, Hassan; Shirvani, Edris; Noaman, Vahid; Lotfi, Mohsen; Kamalzadeh, Morteza; Hatami, Alireza; Bahreyari, Masoume; Shahramyar, Zahra; Morovati, Mohammad H; Azimi, Mahmoud; Sakhaei, Davoud

    2012-08-01

    Bovine leukemia virus (BLV), the causative agent of enzootic bovine leukosis (EBL) is an exogenous C-type oncovirus in the Retroviridae family. It causes significant economic losses associated with the costs of control and eradication programs due to carcass condemnation at slaughter and restrictions of export of cattle and semen to importing countries. The main objective of this research was to determine the seroprevalence of BLV infection in cattle herds in central region of Iran (Isfahan province) using a commercial enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) to detect serum antibodies against BLV. Samples of blood serum were collected from 403 female dairy cattle (Holstein-Friesian) from 21 livestock farms and 303 animals (81.9%) were BLV seropositive. A significant association was found between age as a potential risk factor and BVL seroprevalence with animals ≥ 4 years (86.6%) having a significantly (χ(2) = 35.6, p 0.1). It is concluded that BLV infection is a very common problem in the study area. Hence, control measures should be instituted to combat the disease and further studies are required to investigate the impact of this disease on dairy production in the country.

  13. Enterocytozoon bieneusi in Bovine Viral Diarrhea Virus (BVDV) infected and noninfected cattle herds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juránková, J; Kamler, M; Kovařčík, K; Koudela, B

    2013-02-01

    Enterocytozoon bieneusi known as a causative agent of opportunistic infections instigating diarrhoea in AIDS patients was identified also in a number of immunocompetent patients and in a wide range of animals, including cattle. In the present study we tested if the Bovine Viral Diarrhea Virus (BVDV), the most common pathogen underlying immunosuppressive Bovine Viral Diarrhoea (BVD), can enhance the occurrence of opportunistic infections with E. bieneusi in cattle. Six dairy farms were investigated using ELISA to detect antibodies against or antigens arising from BVDV in collected sera. A total of 240 individual faecal samples from four age groups were examined for the presence of E. bieneusi by nested PCR. Sequence analysis of six E. bieneusi positive samples revealed the presence of the genotype I of E. bieneusi, previously described in cattle. The hypothesis expecting higher prevalence of E. bieneusi in BVDV positive cattle herds was not confirmed in this study; however this is the first description about E. bieneusi in cattle in the Czech Republic.

  14. Rational Discovery of T Helper Epitopes Specific for Bovine Infections with Mycobacterium avium ssp paratuberculosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundegaard, Claus; Aagaard, C.; Ussery, David;

    2011-01-01

    bioinformatics tools has been used to identify peptides in the MAP genome, which are predicted to bind to bovine MHC (BoLA) class II antigen presenting molecules. Comparative genomics tools has been used to further select MAP specific peptides 100% conserved in the two MAP strains and with low similarity...... to peptides from any of the M. bovis strains according to available sequence data. Unique MAP specific predicted epitopes is selected and is to be synthesized as 15–20 aa peptides. In addition we will select peptides specifically from antigens, which have previously shown to induce a CD4+ T cell response......, again with the emphasis of avoiding similarities to M. bovis sequences. Blood from cattle experimentally infected with MAP will be used for proliferation and cytokine assays to determine if and which of the selected peptides that will be recognized specifically by CD4+ T cells from infected cattle...

  15. Impact of external sources of infection on the dynamics of bovine tuberculosis in modelled badger populations

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    Hardstaff Joanne L

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The persistence of bovine TB (bTB in various countries throughout the world is enhanced by the existence of wildlife hosts for the infection. In Britain and Ireland, the principal wildlife host for bTB is the badger (Meles meles. The objective of our study was to examine the dynamics of bTB in badgers in relation to both badger-derived infection from within the population and externally-derived, trickle-type, infection, such as could occur from other species or environmental sources, using a spatial stochastic simulation model. Results The presence of external sources of infection can increase mean prevalence and reduce the threshold group size for disease persistence. Above the threshold equilibrium group size of 6–8 individuals predicted by the model for bTB persistence in badgers based on internal infection alone, external sources of infection have relatively little impact on the persistence or level of disease. However, within a critical range of group sizes just below this threshold level, external infection becomes much more important in determining disease dynamics. Within this critical range, external infection increases the ratio of intra- to inter-group infections due to the greater probability of external infections entering fully-susceptible groups. The effect is to enable bTB persistence and increase bTB prevalence in badger populations which would not be able to maintain bTB based on internal infection alone. Conclusions External sources of bTB infection can contribute to the persistence of bTB in badger populations. In high-density badger populations, internal badger-derived infections occur at a sufficient rate that the additional effect of external sources in exacerbating disease is minimal. However, in lower-density populations, external sources of infection are much more important in enhancing bTB prevalence and persistence. In such circumstances, it is particularly important that control strategies to

  16. Potential immunosuppressive effects of Escherichia coli O157:H7 experimental infection on the bovine host.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kieckens, E; Rybarczyk, J; Li, R W; Vanrompay, D; Cox, E

    2016-12-21

    Enterohaemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC), like E. coli O157:H7 are frequently detected in bovine faecal samples at slaughter. Cattle do not show clinical symptoms upon infection, but for humans the consequences after consuming contaminated beef can be severe. The immune response against EHEC in cattle cannot always clear the infection as persistent colonization and shedding in infected animals over a period of months often occurs. In previous infection trials, we observed a primary immune response after infection which was unable to protect cattle from re-infection. These results may reflect a suppression of certain immune pathways, making cattle more prone to persistent colonization after re-infection. To test this, RNA-Seq was used for transcriptome analysis of recto-anal junction tissue and ileal Peyer's patches in nine Holstein-Friesian calves in response to a primary and secondary Escherichia coli O157:H7 infection with the Shiga toxin (Stx) negative NCTC12900 strain. Non-infected calves served as controls. In tissue of the recto-anal junction, only 15 genes were found to be significantly affected by a first infection compared to 1159 genes in the ileal Peyer's patches. Whereas, re-infection significantly changed the expression of 10 and 17 genes in the recto-anal junction tissue and the Peyer's patches, respectively. A significant downregulation of 69 immunostimulatory genes and a significant upregulation of seven immune suppressing genes was observed. Although the recto-anal junction is a major site of colonization, this area does not seem to be modulated upon infection to the same extent as ileal Peyer's patches as the changes in gene expression were remarkably higher in the ileal Peyer's patches than in the recto-anal junction during a primary but not a secondary infection. We can conclude that the main effect on the transcriptome was immunosuppression by E. coli O157:H7 (Stx(-)) due to an upregulation of immune suppressive effects (7/12 genes) or a

  17. Bio-inspired artemether-loaded human serum albumin nanoparticles for effective control of malaria-infected erythrocytes

    OpenAIRE

    Sidhaye, AA; Bhuran, KC; Zambare, S; Abubaker, M; Nirmalan, NJ; Singh, KK

    2016-01-01

    Background: The intra-erythrocytic development of the malarial parasite is dependent on active uptake of nutrients, including human serum albumin(HSA), into parasitized erythrocytes(pRBCs). We have designed HSA-based nanoparticles as a potential drugdelivery\\ud option for antimalarials. \\ud Methods: Artemether-loaded nanoparticles(AAN) were designed and antimalarial activity evaluated in-vitro/in-vivo using Plasmodium falciparum/Plasmodium berghei species, respectively. \\ud Results: Selective...

  18. Visualizing the 3D Architecture of Multiple Erythrocytes Infected with Plasmodium at Nanoscale by Focused Ion Beam-Scanning Electron Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soares Medeiros, Lia Carolina; De Souza, Wanderley; Jiao, Chengge; Barrabin, Hector; Miranda, Kildare

    2012-01-01

    Different methods for three-dimensional visualization of biological structures have been developed and extensively applied by different research groups. In the field of electron microscopy, a new technique that has emerged is the use of a focused ion beam and scanning electron microscopy for 3D reconstruction at nanoscale resolution. The higher extent of volume that can be reconstructed with this instrument represent one of the main benefits of this technique, which can provide statistically relevant 3D morphometrical data. As the life cycle of Plasmodium species is a process that involves several structurally complex developmental stages that are responsible for a series of modifications in the erythrocyte surface and cytoplasm, a high number of features within the parasites and the host cells has to be sampled for the correct interpretation of their 3D organization. Here, we used FIB-SEM to visualize the 3D architecture of multiple erythrocytes infected with Plasmodium chabaudi and analyzed their morphometrical parameters in a 3D space. We analyzed and quantified alterations on the host cells, such as the variety of shapes and sizes of their membrane profiles and parasite internal structures such as a polymorphic organization of hemoglobin-filled tubules. The results show the complex 3D organization of Plasmodium and infected erythrocyte, and demonstrate the contribution of FIB-SEM for the obtainment of statistical data for an accurate interpretation of complex biological structures. PMID:22432024

  19. Hemolytic and antimalarial effects of tight-binding glyoxalase 1 inhibitors on the host-parasite unit of erythrocytes infected with Plasmodium falciparum

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    Cletus A. Wezena

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Glyoxalases prevent the formation of advanced glycation end products by converting glycolysis-derived methylglyoxal to d-lactate with the help of glutathione. Vander Jagt and colleagues previously showed that erythrocytes release about thirty times more d-lactate after infection with the human malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum. Functional glyoxalases in the host-parasite unit might therefore be crucial for parasite survival. Here, we determined the antimalarial and hemolytic activity of two tight-binding glyoxalase inhibitors using infected and uninfected erythrocytes. In addition, we synthesized and analyzed a set of diester derivates of both tight-binding inhibitors resulting in up to threefold lower IC50 values and an altered methemoglobin formation and hemolytic activity depending on the type of ester. Inhibitor treatments of uninfected erythrocytes revealed an extremely slow inactivation of the host cell glyoxalase, irrespective of inhibitor modifications, and a potential dispensability of the host cell enzyme for parasite survival. Our study highlights the benefits and drawbacks of different esterifications of glutathione-derived inhibitors and demonstrates the suitability of glyoxalase inhibitors as a tool for deciphering the relevance and mode of action of different glyoxalase systems in a host-parasite unit.

  20. Malaria Parasite CLAG3, a Protein Linked to Nutrient Channels, Participates in High Molecular Weight Membrane-Associated Complexes in the Infected Erythrocyte.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kayvan Zainabadi

    Full Text Available Malaria infected erythrocytes show increased permeability to a number of solutes important for parasite growth as mediated by the Plasmodial Surface Anion Channel (PSAC. The P. falciparum clag3 genes have recently been identified as key determinants of PSAC, though exactly how they contribute to channel function and whether additional host/parasite proteins are required remain unknown. To begin to answer these questions, I have taken a biochemical approach. Here I have used an epitope-tagged CLAG3 parasite to perform co-immunoprecipitation experiments using membrane fractions of infected erythrocytes. Native PAGE and mass spectrometry studies reveal that CLAG3 participate in at least three different high molecular weight complexes: a ~720kDa complex consisting of CLAG3, RHOPH2 and RHOPH3; a ~620kDa complex consisting of CLAG3 and RHOPH2; and a ~480kDa complex composed solely of CLAG3. Importantly, these complexes can be found throughout the parasite lifecycle but are absent in untransfected controls. Extracellular biotin labeling and protease susceptibility studies localize the 480kDa complex to the erythrocyte membrane. This complex, likely composed of a homo-oligomer of 160kDa CLAG3, may represent a functional subunit, possibly the pore, of PSAC.

  1. Visualizing the 3D architecture of multiple erythrocytes infected with Plasmodium at nanoscale by focused ion beam-scanning electron microscopy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lia Carolina Soares Medeiros

    Full Text Available Different methods for three-dimensional visualization of biological structures have been developed and extensively applied by different research groups. In the field of electron microscopy, a new technique that has emerged is the use of a focused ion beam and scanning electron microscopy for 3D reconstruction at nanoscale resolution. The higher extent of volume that can be reconstructed with this instrument represent one of the main benefits of this technique, which can provide statistically relevant 3D morphometrical data. As the life cycle of Plasmodium species is a process that involves several structurally complex developmental stages that are responsible for a series of modifications in the erythrocyte surface and cytoplasm, a high number of features within the parasites and the host cells has to be sampled for the correct interpretation of their 3D organization. Here, we used FIB-SEM to visualize the 3D architecture of multiple erythrocytes infected with Plasmodium chabaudi and analyzed their morphometrical parameters in a 3D space. We analyzed and quantified alterations on the host cells, such as the variety of shapes and sizes of their membrane profiles and parasite internal structures such as a polymorphic organization of hemoglobin-filled tubules. The results show the complex 3D organization of Plasmodium and infected erythrocyte, and demonstrate the contribution of FIB-SEM for the obtainment of statistical data for an accurate interpretation of complex biological structures.

  2. Deformability based cell margination--a simple microfluidic design for malaria-infected erythrocyte separation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Han Wei; Bhagat, Ali Asgar S; Chong, Alvin Guo Lin; Mao, Pan; Tan, Kevin Shyong Wei; Han, Jongyoon; Lim, Chwee Teck

    2010-10-07

    In blood vessels with luminal diameter less than 300 µm, red blood cells (RBCs) which are smaller in size and more deformable than leukocytes, migrate to the axial centre of the vessel due to flow velocity gradient within the vessels. This phenomenon displaces the leukocytes to the vessel wall and is aptly termed as margination. Here, we demonstrate using microfluidics that stiffer malaria-infected RBCs (iRBCs) behave similar to leukocytes and undergo margination towards the sidewalls. This provides better understanding of the hemodynamic effects of iRBCs in microcirculation and its contribution to pathophysiological outcome relating to cytoadherence to endothelium. In this work, cell margination is mimicked for the separation of iRBCs from whole blood based on their reduced deformability. The malaria infected sample was tested in a simple long straight channel microfluidic device fabricated in polydimethylsiloxane. In this microchannel, cell margination was directed along the channel width with the iRBCs aligning near each sidewall and then subsequently removed using a 3-outlet system, thus achieving separation. Tests were conducted using ring stage and late trophozoite/schizont stage iRBCs. Device performance was quantified by analyzing the distribution of these iRBCs across the microchannel width at the outlet and also conducting flow cytometry analysis. Results indicate recovery of approximately 75% for early stage iRBCs and >90% for late stage iRBCs at the side outlets. The simple and passive system operation makes this technique ideal for on-site iRBCs enrichment in resource-limited settings, and can be applied to other blood cell diseases, e.g. sickle cell anemia and leukemia, characterized by changes in cell stiffness.

  3. Herd-level risk factors for infection with bovine leukemia virus in Canadian dairy herds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nekouei, Omid; VanLeeuwen, John; Sanchez, Javier; Kelton, David; Tiwari, Ashwani; Keefe, Greg

    2015-05-01

    Enzootic bovine leukosis (EBL) is an economically important infection of dairy cattle worldwide, which is caused by bovine leukemia virus (BLV). The prevalence of infection in Canadian dairy herds is high and continues to increase; however, there has not been a national program to control BLV. This cross-sectional study was conducted to identify potentially important risk factors for BLV infection on Canadian dairy herds, which is a prerequisite to developing an effective control program. During 1998-2003, based on a stratified two-stage random sampling process, 315 dairy farms from seven provinces of Canada were selected. Within each farm, 9-45 cows were bled and tested with a commercial serum ELISA kit for BLV antibodies. A comprehensive questionnaire, targeting potentially important herd-level management indicators, was successfully administered in 272 herds. A zero-inflated negative binomial (ZINB) regression model was fit to the resulting data to assess the potential associations between BLV seropositivity and a variety of herd-level factors. Seventy-eight percent of the herds were identified as BLV-positive (had one or more test positive animals). In the negative-binomial part of the final ZINB model, herds with clinical cases of leukosis during the 12 months prior to sampling, as well as herds which purchased animals with unknown BLV infection status in the last five years, had a significantly larger proportion of BLV positive animals. Based on a significant interaction between two of the risk factors, changing gloves between cows during pregnancy examination was not statistically associated with lower proportion of infected cows compared with not changing gloves, in the western Canadian provinces. In the logistic part of the model, herds from eastern Canadian provinces and those not purchasing cows in the last five years had increased odds of being free from BLV. The high prevalence of infection across Canada should be addressed through the development and

  4. Increase in proto-oncogene mRNA transcript levels in bovine lymphoid cells infected with a cytopathic type 2 bovine viral diarrhea virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neill, John D; Ridpath, Julia F

    2008-08-01

    Infection of susceptible animals with bovine viral diarrhea viruses (BVDV) can result in an array of disease symptoms that are dependent in part on the strain of infecting virus and the physiological status of the host. BVDV are lymphotrophic and exist as two biotypes. Cytopathic BVDV kill cells outright while noncytopathic strains can readily establish persistent infections. The molecular mechanisms behind these different affects are unknown. To gain a better understanding of the mechanisms of disease, serial analysis of gene expression (SAGE), a powerful method for global gene expression analysis, was employed to examine gene expression changes in BVDV-infected BL3 cells, a bovine B-cell lymphosarcoma cell line. SAGE libraries were constructed from mRNA derived from BL3 cells that were noninfected or infected with the cytopathic BVDV2 strain 296c. Annotation of the SAGE data showed the expression of many genes that are characteristic of B cells and integral to their function. Comparison of the SAGE databases also revealed a number of genes that were differentially expressed. Of particular interest was the increased numbers of transcripts encoding proto-oncogenes (c-fos, c-jun, junB, junD) in 296c-infected cells, all of which are constituents of the AP-1 transcriptional activation complex. Real-time RT-PCR confirmed these results and indicated that the actual increases were larger than that predicted by SAGE. In contrast, there was no corresponding increase in protein levels, but instead a significant decrease of c-jun and junB protein levels in the infected BL3 cells was observed. Rather than an increase in transcription of these genes, it appeared that these proto-oncogenes transcripts accumulated in the BVDV2-infected cells.

  5. Effects of sevuparin on rosette formation and cytoadherence of Plasmodium falciparum infected erythrocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saiwaew, Somporn; Sritabal, Juntima; Piaraksa, Nattaporn; Keayarsa, Srisuda; Ruengweerayut, Ronnatrai; Utaisin, Chirapong; Sila, Patima; Niramis, Rangsan; Udomsangpetch, Rachanee; Charunwatthana, Prakaykaew; Pongponratn, Emsri; Pukrittayakamee, Sasithon; Leitgeb, Anna M.; Wahlgren, Mats; Lee, Sue J.; Day, Nicholas P. J.; White, Nicholas J.; Dondorp, Arjen M.; Chotivanich, Kesinee

    2017-01-01

    In severe falciparum malaria cytoadherence of parasitised red blood cells (PRBCs) to vascular endothelium (causing sequestration) and to uninfected red cells (causing rosette formation) contribute to microcirculatory flow obstruction in vital organs. Heparin can reverse the underlying ligand-receptor interactions, but may increase the bleeding risks. As a heparin-derived polysaccharide, sevuparin has been designed to retain anti-adhesive properties, while the antithrombin-binding domains have been eliminated, substantially diminishing its anticoagulant activity. Sevuparin has been evaluated recently in patients with uncomplicated falciparum malaria, and is currently investigated in a clinical trial for sickle cell disease. The effects of sevuparin on rosette formation and cytoadherence of Plasmodium falciparum isolates from Thailand were investigated. Trophozoite stages of P. falciparum-infected RBCs (Pf-iRBCs) were cultured from 49 patients with malaria. Pf-iRBCs were treated with sevuparin at 37°C and assessed in rosetting and in cytoadhesion assays with human dermal microvascular endothelial cells (HDMECs) under static and flow conditions. The proportion of Pf-iRBCs forming rosettes ranged from 6.5% to 26.0% (median = 12.2%). Rosetting was dose dependently disrupted by sevuparin (50% disruption by 250 μg/mL). Overall 57% of P. falciparum isolates bound to HDMECs under static conditions; median (interquartile range) Pf-iRBC binding was 8.5 (3.0–38.0) Pf-iRBCs/1000 HDMECs. Sevuparin in concentrations ≥ 100 μg/mL inhibited cytoadherence. Sevuparin disrupts P. falciparum rosette formation in a dose dependent manner and inhibits cytoadherence to endothelial cells. The data support assessment of sevuparin as an adjunctive treatment to the standard therapy in severe falciparum malaria. PMID:28249043

  6. Infectivity in skeletal muscle of cattle with atypical bovine spongiform encephalopathy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Suardi

    Full Text Available The amyloidotic form of bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE termed BASE is caused by a prion strain whose biological properties differ from those of typical BSE, resulting in a clinically and pathologically distinct phenotype. Whether peripheral tissues of BASE-affected cattle contain infectivity is unknown. This is a critical issue since the BASE prion is readily transmissible to a variety of hosts including primates, suggesting that humans may be susceptible. We carried out bioassays in transgenic mice overexpressing bovine PrP (Tgbov XV and found infectivity in a variety of skeletal muscles from cattle with natural and experimental BASE. Noteworthy, all BASE muscles used for inoculation transmitted disease, although the attack rate differed between experimental and natural cases (∼70% versus ∼10%, respectively. This difference was likely related to different prion titers, possibly due to different stages of disease in the two conditions, i.e. terminal stage in experimental BASE and pre-symptomatic stage in natural BASE. The neuropathological phenotype and PrP(res type were consistent in all affected mice and matched those of Tgbov XV mice infected with brain homogenate from natural BASE. The immunohistochemical analysis of skeletal muscles from cattle with natural and experimental BASE showed the presence of abnormal prion protein deposits within muscle fibers. Conversely, Tgbov XV mice challenged with lymphoid tissue and kidney from natural and experimental BASE did not develop disease. The novel information on the neuromuscular tropism of the BASE strain, efficiently overcoming species barriers, underlines the relevance of maintaining an active surveillance.

  7. Investigation of some hematological and blood biochemical parameters in cattle spontaneously infected with bovine leukosis virus

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    Sandev Nikolay

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study was to follow out the alterations in some haematological and blood biochemical parameters in cattle spontaneously infected with enzootic bovine leukosis virus with regard to the invivodifferentiation of bovine leukosis stages. The experiment included 76 cows at various ages and body weight. Serological leukosis tests were done by agar-gel immunodiffusion test with a commercial kit of Synbiotiсs (France, containing standardised gp 51 antigen and positive serum approved by the EU. On the basis of haematological results, the cows were divided into three groups: first group – EBL-seropositive with normal haemogramme; second group – EBL seropositive with altered haemogramme and third group – controls. In cows from the first and the second group, a statistically significantly increased blood cell counts was established compared to healthy controls. The total WBC were increased in the second group (leukocytosis up to 33.21×109/l vs reference range of 5-10×109/l as well as lymphocyte percentages (lymphocytosis – 81.89% (reference 40–63%. A reduction in the proportion of neutrophils to 12.78% (relative neutropenia vs the reference range of 22-49% and monocytes (monocytopenia to 1.78% (reference range 2–6% was observed. A statistically significant reduction in Ca concentrations (4.41 mg/dl and higher inorganic phosphate levels (5.28 mg/dl were established in cows from the second group. Also, ASAT activity was considerably lower – 47.03 U/l, while alkaline phosphatase increased slightly within the reference range up to 167.68 U/l and 165.81 U/l in groups one and two, respectively. The present haematological and whole blood/serum biochemical results in cows spontaneously infected with EBL virus could be used as prognostic markers of the course of the disease, to distinguish the stages of infection with regard to alive diagnostics.

  8. Identification of bovine viral diarrhea virus infection in Saanen goats in the Republic of Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Yu-Jung; Chae, Jeong-Byoung; Chae, Joon-Seok; Yu, Do-Hyeon; Park, Jinho; Park, Bae-Keun; Kim, Hyeon-Cheol; Yoo, Jae-Gyu; Choi, Kyoung-Seong

    2016-06-01

    Bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) is one of the most important viral pathogens of livestock and causes substantial economic losses to the livestock industry worldwide. BVDV is not necessarily species specific and is known to infect domesticated and wild ruminants. In the present study, BVDV infection was identified in two Saanen goats from one farm, and two different viral subtypes were found, BVDV-1a and BVDV-2a. Each isolate was closely related to cattle isolates identified in the Republic of Korea. The two sequences obtained in this study were not consistent with border disease virus (BDV). The incidence of BVDV in this farm apparently occurred in the absence of contact with cattle and may be associated with grazing. This study demonstrates that BVDV infection may be possible to transmit among goats without exposure to cattle. Therefore, this result indicates that Saanen goats may act as natural reservoirs for BVDV. This is the first report of BVDV-1a infection in a Saanen goat.

  9. Using PCR for early diagnosis of bovine leukemia virus infection in some native cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammadabadi, M R; Soflaei, M; Mostafavi, H; Honarmand, M

    2011-10-27

    Bovine leukemia virus (BLV), the causative agent of enzootic bovine leukosis, is an exogenous, B lymphotropic retrovirus belonging to the Retroviridae family that induces persistent lymphocytosis in cattle and sheep. PCR has proven to be particularly suitable for investigating herds of cattle with a very low incidence of BLV infection and for clarifying doubtful serological results obtained by immunodiffusion or ELISA. The native Iranian and Russian cattle have a series of valuable traits that discriminate them as unique breeds that are well able to compete with western analogues. However, their gene pools have not been analyzed with molecular markers, including detection of BLV by PCR. Two pairs of primers were used: gag1 and gag2, and pol1 and pol2, which encompass 347- and 599-bp fragments of the BLV gene, respectively. Sixty-five Iranian Sistani, 120 Yaroslavl, 50 Mongolian, and 35 Black Pied cows were investigated. Among these 270 animals, we obtained 42 positive and 15 doubtful results in the first PCR. The second PCR was very effective in increasing BLV test reliability data to support detection of BLV.

  10. [Detection of bovine leukaemia virus (BLV) in tissue samples of naturally and experimentally infected cattle].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teifke, Jens P; Vahlenkamp, Thomas W

    2008-01-01

    Enzootic bovine leukaemia (EBL) which is caused by the bovine leukaemia virus (BLV) still plays a remarkable role despite a significant success in sanitation programmes. In the Federal Republic of Germany it was not possible to eradicate the disease until today. Sporadically during slaughter or necropsy of cattle neoplastic lesions of the lymphatic tissues are observed that need to be clarified with regard to BLV as etiological agent. Due to the fact that in most instances no serological data are available from the respective animals and blood drawings from the original holdings are not easy to obtain the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) opens new avenues as supplementary diagnostic tool to test unfixed lymphatic tissues for the presence of BLV proviral DNA. Lymph node tissues from 10 naturally or experimentally BLV-infected cattle, which have been monitored virologically and serologically, and tissues from 4 negative animals were processed, DNA was extracted and subjected to PCR to amplify BLV env gene specific sequences. The results show that in cattle with BLV-induced leukosis as well as in cattle, which were clinically healthy and unsuspicious at slaughter or at post-mortem, either with persistent lymphocytosis (PL) or without, BLV proviral DNA could be detected easily in samples of lymphatic tissues and in high concordance with serological data. In this article data from the National and OIE reference laboratory for EBL at the Friedrich-Loeffler-Institut (FLI, Germany) are presented. Elaborated laboratory protocols for processing of tissue samples and performing of BLV-PCR are recommended.

  11. Sites of replication of bovine respiratory syncytial virus in naturally infected calves as determined by in situ hybridization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Viuff, B.; Uttenthal, Åse; Tegtmeier, C.

    1996-01-01

    Replication of bovine respiratory syncytial virus (BRSV) was studied in three naturally infected calves by in situ hybridization using strand-specific RNA probes. One of the calves was a 5-month-old Friesian, the other two calves were a 3-month-old and a 2-week-old Jersey. Two Jersey calves, 3 mo...

  12. A novel approach to probe host-pathogen interactions of bovine digital dermatitis, a model of a complex polymicrobial infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marcatili, Paolo; Weiss Nielsen, Martin; Sicheritz-Pontén, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Polymicrobial infections represent a great challenge for the clarification of disease etiology and the development of comprehensive diagnostic or therapeutic tools, particularly for fastidious and difficult-to-cultivate bacteria. Using bovine digital dermatitis (DD) as a disease model, we introdu...

  13. Induction of interferon-gamma and downstream pathways during establishment of fetal persistent infection with bovine viral diarrhea virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Development of transplacental infection depends on the ability of the virus to cross the placenta and replicate within the fetus while counteracting maternal and fetal immune responses.Unfortunately, little is known about this complex process. Non-cytopathic (ncp) strains of bovine viral diarrhea vi...

  14. A genome-wide association study for the incidence of persistent bovine viral diarrhea virus infection in cattle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bovine Viral Diarrhea Viruses (BVDV) comprises a diverse group of viruses that causes disease in cattle. BVDV may establish both, transient and persistent infections depending on the developmental stage of the animal at exposure. The objective was to determine if genomic regions harboring single nuc...

  15. Survival analysis on aggregate data to assess time to sero-conversion after experimental infection with Bovine Leukemia virus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Monti, G.E.; Frankena, K.

    2005-01-01

    Bovine Leukemia virus (BLV) is a ubiquitous retrovirus that affects mainly cattle. Knowledge of the precise moment of infection is fundamental for identification and evaluation of factors related to BLV transmission. Systematic reviews and meta-analyses provide good evidence on the effects of medica

  16. Effect of culling and vaccination on bovine tuberculosis infection in a European badger (Meles meles) population by spatial simulation modelling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abdou, Marwa; Frankena, Klaas; O'Keeffe, James; Byrne, Andrew W.

    2016-01-01

    The control of bovine tuberculosis (bTB) in cattle herds in the Republic of Ireland (ROI) is partially hindered by spill-back infection from wild badgers (Meles meles). The aim of this study was to determine the relative effects of interventions (combinations of culling and/or vaccination) on bTB

  17. Severity of bovine tuberculosis is associated with co-infection with common pathogens in wild boar.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Risco

    Full Text Available Co-infections with parasites or viruses drive tuberculosis dynamics in humans, but little is known about their effects in other non-human hosts. This work aims to investigate the relationship between Mycobacterium bovis infection and other pathogens in wild boar (Sus scrofa, a recognized reservoir of bovine tuberculosis (bTB in Mediterranean ecosystems. For this purpose, it has been assessed whether contacts with common concomitant pathogens are associated with the development of severe bTB lesions in 165 wild boar from mid-western Spain. The presence of bTB lesions affecting only one anatomic location (cervical lymph nodes, or more severe patterns affecting more than one location (mainly cervical lymph nodes and lungs, was assessed in infected animals. In addition, the existence of contacts with other pathogens such as porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV2, Aujeszky's disease virus (ADV, swine influenza virus, porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus, Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae, Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae, Haemophilus parasuis and Metastrongylus spp, was evaluated by means of serological, microbiological and parasitological techniques. The existence of contacts with a structured community of pathogens in wild boar infected by M. bovis was statistically investigated by null models. Association between this community of pathogens and bTB severity was examined using a Partial Least Squares regression approach. Results showed that adult wild boar infected by M. bovis had contacted with some specific, non-random pathogen combinations. Contact with PCV2, ADV and infection by Metastrongylus spp, was positively correlated to tuberculosis severity. Therefore, measures against these concomitant pathogens such as vaccination or deworming, might be useful in tuberculosis control programmes in the wild boar. However, given the unexpected consequences of altering any community of organisms, further research should evaluate the impact of such measures

  18. Severity of Bovine Tuberculosis Is Associated with Co-Infection with Common Pathogens in Wild Boar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Risco, David; Serrano, Emmanuel; Fernández-Llario, Pedro; Cuesta, Jesús M.; Gonçalves, Pilar; García-Jiménez, Waldo L.; Martínez, Remigio; Cerrato, Rosario; Velarde, Roser; Gómez, Luis; Segalés, Joaquím; Hermoso de Mendoza, Javier

    2014-01-01

    Co-infections with parasites or viruses drive tuberculosis dynamics in humans, but little is known about their effects in other non-human hosts. This work aims to investigate the relationship between Mycobacterium bovis infection and other pathogens in wild boar (Sus scrofa), a recognized reservoir of bovine tuberculosis (bTB) in Mediterranean ecosystems. For this purpose, it has been assessed whether contacts with common concomitant pathogens are associated with the development of severe bTB lesions in 165 wild boar from mid-western Spain. The presence of bTB lesions affecting only one anatomic location (cervical lymph nodes), or more severe patterns affecting more than one location (mainly cervical lymph nodes and lungs), was assessed in infected animals. In addition, the existence of contacts with other pathogens such as porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV2), Aujeszky's disease virus (ADV), swine influenza virus, porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus, Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae, Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae, Haemophilus parasuis and Metastrongylus spp, was evaluated by means of serological, microbiological and parasitological techniques. The existence of contacts with a structured community of pathogens in wild boar infected by M. bovis was statistically investigated by null models. Association between this community of pathogens and bTB severity was examined using a Partial Least Squares regression approach. Results showed that adult wild boar infected by M. bovis had contacted with some specific, non-random pathogen combinations. Contact with PCV2, ADV and infection by Metastrongylus spp, was positively correlated to tuberculosis severity. Therefore, measures against these concomitant pathogens such as vaccination or deworming, might be useful in tuberculosis control programmes in the wild boar. However, given the unexpected consequences of altering any community of organisms, further research should evaluate the impact of such measures under

  19. Evaluation of reverse transcription-PCR protocols based on the fusion gene for diagnosis of bovine respiratory syncytial virus infections

    OpenAIRE

    Selim A.; Gaede W.

    2013-01-01

    Bovine respiratory syncytial virus (BRSV) is a pneumovirus in the family paramyxoviridae, is an important cause of acute respiratory disease in postweaning calves and feedlot cattle. The real-time reverse transcriptase PCR protocols were developed to detect BRSV infection in infected animals. The sensitivity of RT-PCR protocols based on fusion gene were evaluated using different Mastermixes such as Qiagen One Step RT-PCR (Qiagen) for conventional RT-PCR, Su...

  20. Nine-year longitudinal study of antibodies to variant antigens on the surface of Plasmodium falciparum-infected erythrocytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Giha, H A; Staalsoe, T; Dodoo, D;

    1999-01-01

    PfEMP1 is an antigenically variable molecule which mediates the adhesion of parasitized erythrocytes to a variety of cell types and which is believed to constitute an important target for naturally acquired protective immune responses in malaria. For 9 years we have monitored individuals living...... in an area of low-intensity, seasonal, and unstable malaria transmission in eastern Sudan, and we have used this database to study the acquisition, specificity, and duration of the antibody response to variant parasitized erythrocyte surface antigens. Both the levels and the spectrum of reactivity...... of these antibodies varied considerably among individuals, ranging from low levels of antibodies recognizing only few parasitized erythrocyte surface antigens to high levels of broad-specificity antibodies. In general, episodes of clinical malaria were associated with increases in the levels of parasitized...

  1. Molecular and serological in-herd prevalence of Anaplasma marginale infection in Texas cattle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bovine anaplasmosis is an infectious, non-contagious disease caused by the rickettsial pathogen Anaplasma marginale (A. marginale). The organism has a global distribution and infects erythrocytes, resulting in anemia, jaundice, fever, abortions and death. Once infected, animals remain carriers for l...

  2. Bioeconomic modeling of lactational antimicrobial treatment of new bovine subclinical intramammary infections caused by contagious pathogens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Van den Borne, B. H. P.; Hisham Beshara Halasa, Tariq; Van Schaik, G.;

    2010-01-01

    of Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus uberis, Streptococcus dysgalactiae, and Escherichia coli during lactation and the dry period in a 100-cow dairy herd during 1 quota year. Input parameters on cure were obtained from recent Dutch field data. The costs of clinical IMI, subclinical IMI, and intervention were....... Changing the probability of cure resulted in a nonlinear change in the cumulative incidence of IMI cases and associated costs. Lactational treatment was able to prevent IMI epidemics in dairy herds at high transmission rates of Strep. uberis, Strep. dysgalactiae, and E. coli. Lactational treatment did......This study determined the direct and indirect epidemiologic and economic effects of lactational treatment of new bovine subclinical intramammary infections (IMI) caused by contagious pathogens using an existing bioeconomic model. The dynamic and stochastic model simulated the dynamics...

  3. Isolation and Genetic Analysis of Bovine Viral Diarrhea Virus from Infected Cattle in Indiana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roman M. Pogranichniy

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Species and biotype distribution was determined in 44 bovine viral diarrhea virus- (BVDV- positive samples submitted to the Animal Disease Diagnostic Laboratory (ADDL in Indiana during 2006–2008. BVDV RNA was detected in the 5′-untranslated region and Npro region using reverse transcriptase PCR followed by sequencing analysis of the PCR product. Additionally, cases were classified into one of six categories according to history and/or lesions: acute symptomatic, hemorrhagic, respiratory distress, reproductive, persistent infection (PI, and mucosal disease (MD. Of 44 BVDV-positive samples, 33 were noncytopathic (ncp, 10 were cytopathic (cp, and one presented both ncp and cp biotypes. Sequencing analysis demonstrated that all samples belonged to BVDV-1a, BVDV-1b, or BVDV-2. The most common isolate was ncp BVDV-1b, (44% followed by ncp BVDV-2a (24%. Among the six categories, respiratory clinical signs were the most common (36% followed by PI (25% and MD (16%.

  4. Transcriptional changes in the brains of cattle orally infected with the bovine spongiform encephalopathy agent precede detection of infectivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Yue; Xiang, Wei; Hawkins, Steve A C; Kretzschmar, Hans A; Windl, Otto

    2009-09-01

    Bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) is a fatal, transmissible, neurodegenerative disease of cattle. BSE can be transmitted experimentally between cattle through the oral route, and in this study, brain tissue samples from animals at different time points postinoculation were analyzed for changes in gene expression. The aims of this study were to identify differentially regulated genes during the progression of BSE using microarray-based gene expression profiling and to understand the effect of prion pathogenesis on gene expression. A total of 114 genes were found to be differentially regulated over the time course of the infection, and many of these 114 genes encode proteins involved in immune response, apoptosis, cell adhesion, stress response, and transcription. This study also revealed a broad correlation between gene expression profiles and the progression of BSE in cattle. At 21 months postinoculation, the largest number of differentially regulated genes was detected, suggesting that there are many pathogenic processes in the animal brain even prior to the detection of infectivity in the central nervous systems of these orally infected cattle. Moreover, evidence is presented to suggest that it is possible to predict the infectious status of animals using the expression profiles from this study.

  5. Murine and bovine γδ T cells enhance innate immunity against Brucella abortus infections.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jerod A Skyberg

    Full Text Available γδ T cells have been postulated to act as a first line of defense against infectious agents, particularly intracellular pathogens, representing an important link between the innate and adaptive immune responses. Human γδ T cells expand in the blood of brucellosis patients and are active against Brucella in vitro. However, the role of γδ T cells in vivo during experimental brucellosis has not been studied. Here we report TCRδ(-/- mice are more susceptible to B. abortus infection than C57BL/6 mice at one week post-infection as measured by splenic colonization and splenomegaly. An increase in TCRγδ cells was observed in the spleens of B. abortus-infected C57BL/6 mice, which peaked at two weeks post-infection and occurred concomitantly with diminished brucellae. γδ T cells were the major source of IL-17 following infection and also produced IFN-γ. Depletion of γδ T cells from C57BL/6, IL-17Rα(-/-, and GMCSF(-/- mice enhanced susceptibility to B. abortus infection although this susceptibility was unaltered in the mutant mice; however, when γδ T cells were depleted from IFN-γ(-/- mice, enhanced susceptibility was observed. Neutralization of γδ T cells in the absence of TNF-α did not further impair immunity. In the absence of TNF-α or γδ T cells, B. abortus-infected mice showed enhanced IFN-γ, suggesting that they augmented production to compensate for the loss of γδ T cells and/or TNF-α. While the protective role of γδ T cells was TNF-α-dependent, γδ T cells were not the major source of TNF-α and activation of γδ T cells following B. abortus infection was TNF-α-independent. Additionally, bovine TCRγδ cells were found to respond rapidly to B. abortus infection upon co-culture with autologous macrophages and could impair the intramacrophage replication of B. abortus via IFN-γ. Collectively, these results demonstrate γδ T cells are important for early protection to B. abortus infections.

  6. The use of bovine pericardial patch for vascular reconstruction in infected fields for transplant recipients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Garcia Aroz, MD

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Infectious vascular complications affecting transplant recipients may lead to severe morbidity and graft loss. This is a retrospective review of vascular repair with bovine pericardial patch (BPP in infected fields for immunosuppressed patients. BPP was used as either a patch or an interposition graft. Five cases of arterial reconstruction in infected fields using BPP were performed. There were no complications related to bleeding, thrombosis, or recurrent infection. In our limited experience, the use of BPP as a vascular patch is successful, and it represents an alternative when vascular reconstruction is needed in the context of infected fields.

  7. Increased pulmonary secretion of tumor necrosis factor-alpha in calves experimentally infected with bovine respiratory syncytial virus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rontved, C. M.; Tjørnehøj, Kirsten; Viuff, B.

    2000-01-01

    Bovine respiratory syncytial virus (BRSV) is an important cause of respiratory disease among calves in the Danish cattle industry. An experimental BRSV infection model was used to study the pathogenesis of the disease in calves. Broncho alveolar lung lavage (BAL) was performed on 28 Jersey calves...... of the infection, as well as BRSV-infected calves free of bacteria reached the same level of TNF-alpha as animals from which bacteria were isolated from the lungs. It is concluded that significant quantities of TNF-alpha are produced in the lungs of the calves on PID 6-7 of BRSV infection. The involvement of TNF...

  8. Coxiella burnetii Infects Primary Bovine Macrophages and Limits Their Host Cell Response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobotta, Katharina; Hillarius, Kirstin; Mager, Marvin; Kerner, Katharina; Heydel, Carsten; Menge, Christian

    2016-06-01

    Although domestic ruminants have long been recognized as the main source of human Q fever, little is known about the lifestyle that the obligate intracellular Gram-negative bacterium Coxiella burnetii adopts in its animal host. Because macrophages are considered natural target cells of the pathogen, we established primary bovine monocyte-derived macrophages (MDM) as an in vitro infection model to study reservoir host-pathogen interactions at the cellular level. In addition, bovine alveolar macrophages were included to take cell type peculiarities at a host entry site into account. Cell cultures were inoculated with the virulent strain Nine Mile I (NMI; phase I) or the avirulent strain Nine Mile II (NMII; phase II). Macrophages from both sources internalized NMI and NMII. MDM were particularly permissive for NMI internalization, but NMI and NMII replicated with similar kinetics in these cells. MDM responded to inoculation with a general upregulation of Th1-related cytokines such as interleukin-1β (IL-1β), IL-12, and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) early on (3 h postinfection). However, inflammatory responses rapidly declined when C. burnetii replication started. C. burnetii infection inhibited translation and release of IL-1β and vastly failed to stimulate increased expression of activation markers, such as CD40, CD80, CD86, and major histocompatibility complex (MHC) molecules. Such capability of limiting proinflammatory responses may help Coxiella to protect itself from clearance by the host immune system. The findings provide the first detailed insight into C. burnetii-macrophage interactions in ruminants and may serve as a basis for assessing the virulence and the host adaptation of C. burnetii strains. Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  9. Implementation of immunohistochemistry on frozen ear notch tissue samples in diagnosis of bovine viral diarrhea virus in persistently infected cattle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bedeković Tomislav

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Bovine viral diarrhea is a contagious disease of domestic and wild ruminants and one of the most economically important diseases in cattle. Bovine viral diarrhea virus belongs to the genus Pestivirus, within the family Flaviviridae. The identification and elimination of the persistently infected animals from herds is the initial step in the control and eradication programs. It is therefore necessary to have reliable methods for diagnosis of bovine viral diarrhea virus. One of those methods is immunohistochemistry. Immunohistochemistry on formalin fixed, paraffin embedded tissue is a routine technique in diagnosis of persistently infected cattle from ear notch tissue samples. However, such technique is inappropriate due to complicated tissue fixation process and it requires more days for preparation. On the contrary, immunohistochemistry on frozen tissue was usually applied on organs from dead animals. In this paper, for the first time, the imunohistochemistry on frozen ear notch tissue samples was described. Findings Seventeen ear notch tissue samples were obtained during the period 2008-2009 from persistently infected cattle. Samples were fixed in liquid nitrogen and stored on -20°C until testing. Ear notch tissue samples from all persistently infected cattle showed positive results with good section quality and possibility to determinate type of infected cells. Conclusions Although the number of samples was limited, this study indicated that immunohistochemistry on formalin fixed paraffin embedded tissue can be successfully replaced with immunohistochemistry on frozen ear notch tissue samples in diagnosis of persistently infected cattle.

  10. Distribution of diuretics and hypoglycemic sulfonylureas in rabbit erythrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshitomi, H; Kiko, S; Ikeda, K; Goto, S

    1983-03-01

    The distribution of three sulfonylureas and six diuretics in rabbit erythrocytes was studied in vitro at 37 degrees C. The drugs were taken up by the erythrocyte compartment, and distribution equilibrium was reached within 60 min of incubation. A distribution percentage in erythrocyte compartment was maintained at roughly constant value over the whole concentration range of drugs. Therefore, a linear relationship was established between total concentrations of drug in whole blood or erythrocyte suspension and in the erythrocyte compartment. Bovine serum albumin combined with the erythrocyte suspension appeared to reduce drug distribution in the erythrocyte compartment. Whole blood obtained from renal failure rabbits showed greater distribution of drug in the erythrocyte compartment compared with the whole blood of a normal rabbit. This might be due to a change in plasma protein binding ability related to the progress of renal failure.

  11. Detection of Different Bovine Papillomavirus Types and Co-infection in Bloodstream of Cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, E U D; Silva, M A R; Pontes, N E; Coutinho, L C A; Paiva, S S L; Castro, R S; Freitas, A C

    2016-02-01

    Bovine papillomavirus (BPV) is a diverse group of double-stranded DNA oncogenic viruses. BPVs are classically described as epitheliotropic, however, they have been detected in body fluids, such as blood and semen. The presence of BPV in these sites can have implications for the dissemination of BPV. The aim of this study was to verify the prevalence of BPV types in cattle blood. A total of 57 blood samples were analyzed by PCR using BPV type-specific primers to BPVs 1-6 and 8-10, and subsequent sequencing. Sequencing quality was determined using Staden package with Phred 20. Similarity analysis was performed with BioEdit and BLAST programs to assess the identity with known BPV types. Statistical analysis was performed by Fisher's exact test. The results showed seven different types of BPVs in the blood, with the exception of BPV 5 and 9. This is the first study that demonstrates BPVs 3, 6, 8 and 10 DNA in cattle blood. BPVs 1 and 2 were the viral types most frequent in blood, while BPVs 4 and 10 were the least frequent types. All the samples showed co-infection by at least two BPV types. These data suggest that several BPV types may infect blood cells at the same time and demonstrate the possibility that the BPV infection in non-epithelial tissue can occur without restriction to one or two viral types. These results can contribute to future studies aimed at the control and prevention of papillomaviruses.

  12. Chemoresistance to Valproate Treatment of Bovine Leukemia Virus-Infected Sheep; Identification of Improved HDAC Inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillet, Nicolas; Vandermeers, Fabian; de Brogniez, Alix; Florins, Arnaud; Nigro, Annamaria; François, Carole; Bouzar, Amel-Baya; Verlaeten, Olivier; Stern, Eric; Lambert, Didier M; Wouters, Johan; Willems, Luc

    2012-10-08

    We previously proved that a histone deacetylase inhibitor (valproate, VPA) decreases the number of leukemic cells in bovine leukemia virus (BLV)-infected sheep. Here, we characterize the mechanisms initiated upon interruption of treatment. We observed that VPA treatment is followed by a decrease of the B cell counts and proviral loads (copies per blood volume). However, all sheep eventually relapsed after different periods of time and became refractory to further VPA treatment. Sheep remained persistently infected with BLV. B lymphocytes isolated throughout treatment and relapse were responsive to VPA-induced apoptosis in cell culture. B cell proliferation is only marginally affected by VPA ex vivo. Interestingly, in four out of five sheep, ex vivo viral expression was nearly undetectable at the time of relapse. In two sheep, a new tumoral clone arose, most likely revealing a selection process exerted by VPA in vivo. We conclude that the interruption of VPA treatment leads to the resurgence of the leukemia in BLV-infected sheep and hypothesize that resistance to further treatment might be due to the failure of viral expression induction. The development of more potent HDAC inhibitors and/or the combination with other compounds can overcome chemoresistance. These observations in the BLV model may be important for therapies against the related Human T-lymphotropic virus type 1.

  13. Chemoresistance to Valproate Treatment of Bovine Leukemia Virus-Infected Sheep; Identification of Improved HDAC Inhibitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolas Gillet

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available We previously proved that a histone deacetylase inhibitor (valproate, VPA decreases the number of leukemic cells in bovine leukemia virus (BLV-infected sheep. Here, we characterize the mechanisms initiated upon interruption of treatment. We observed that VPA treatment is followed by a decrease of the B cell counts and proviral loads (copies per blood volume. However, all sheep eventually relapsed after different periods of time and became refractory to further VPA treatment. Sheep remained persistently infected with BLV. B lymphocytes isolated throughout treatment and relapse were responsive to VPA-induced apoptosis in cell culture. B cell proliferation is only marginally affected by VPA ex vivo. Interestingly, in four out of five sheep, ex vivo viral expression was nearly undetectable at the time of relapse. In two sheep, a new tumoral clone arose, most likely revealing a selection process exerted by VPA in vivo. We conclude that the interruption of VPA treatment leads to the resurgence of the leukemia in BLV-infected sheep and hypothesize that resistance to further treatment might be due to the failure of viral expression induction. The development of more potent HDAC inhibitors and/or the combination with other compounds can overcome chemoresistance. These observations in the BLV model may be important for therapies against the related Human T-lymphotropic virus type 1.

  14. Diagnosis of a mixed mycoplasma infection associated with a severe outbreak of bovine pinkeye in young calves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levisohn, Sharon; Garazi, Shlomo; Gerchman, Irinna; Brenner, Jacob

    2004-11-01

    Mycoplasma bovoculi and Mycoplasma bovis were both isolated from conjunctival swabs taken from young calves showing symptoms consistent with infectious bovine keratoconjunctivitis (pinkeye). No Moraxella spp. or other nonmycoplasma bacteria were isolated in association with this severe clinical outbreak. Based on laboratory tests and clinical observations, the first phase of the disease was likely pneumonic in nature, possibly caused by bovine respiratory syncytial virus and M. bovis. In the subsequent phase of the disease course, infection with both M. bovoculi and M. bovis resulted in ocular disease. A combination of microbiological, serological, and molecular diagnosticmethods was used to elucidate the etiology of the outbreak.

  15. Evidence of bovine viral diarrhea virus infection in three species of sympatric wild ungulates in Nevada: Life history strategies may maintain endemic infections in wild populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evidence for bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) infection was detected in 2009-10 during a pneumonia die-off in Rocky Mountain bighorn sheep (Ovis canadensis canadensis), and sympatric mountain goats (Oreamnos americanum) in adjacent mountain ranges in Elko County, Nevada. Seroprevalence to BVDV-1 ...

  16. Erythrocyte Features for Malaria Parasite Detection in Microscopic Images of Thin Blood Smear: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salam Shuleenda Devi

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Microscopic image analysis of blood smear plays a very important role in characterization of erythrocytes in screening of malaria parasites. The characteristics feature of erythrocyte changes due to malaria parasite infection. The microscopic features of the erythrocyte include morphology, intensity and texture. In this paper, the different features used to differentiate the non- infected and malaria infected erythrocyte have been reviewed.

  17. The Analysis of Average Diameter of Erythrocytes in Children of Early Age with Pneumonia and Acute Respiratory Viral Infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. S. Shevchenko,

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Development of inflammatory bronkholegochny process in children is followed by the permanent changes in system of an eritron aggravating finally the phenomena of a hypoxia of bodies and fabrics. Work purpose: studying of average diameter of erythrocytes at children of early age, patients with pneumonia and ARVI. Determination of average diameter of erythrocytes was carried out by a diffraction method on identical structure of chaotic objects at 36 children with pneumonia and at 41 children with a ARVI aged from 4 months till 3 years. The control group was made by 20 almost healthy children of the same age. During the sharp period of a disease the average diameter of erythrocytes was authentically increased both at pneumonia, and at a ARVI. Reliable difference of these indicators when comparing a toxic syndrome at pneumonia and a ARVI is revealed. Thus, at children of early age, patients with pneumonia and ARVI, in dynamics of a disease the natural changes of average diameter of erythrocytes having differential and diagnostic and predictive value are revealed.

  18. Transcriptional Response of Bovine Monocyte-Derived Macrophages after the Infection with Different Argentinean Mycobacterium bovis Isolates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karina Caimi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Infection of bovines with Mycobacterium bovis causes important financial hardship in many countries presenting also a risk for humans. M. bovis is known to be adapted to survive and thrive within the intramacrophage environment. In spite of its relevance, at present the information about macrophage expression patterns is scarce, particularly regarding the bovine host. In this study, transcriptomic analysis was used to detect genes differentially expressed in macrophages derived from peripheral blood mononuclear cells at early stages of infection with two Argentinean strains of M. bovis, a virulent and an attenuated strains. The results showed that the number of differentially expressed genes in the cells infected with the virulent strain (5 was significantly lower than those in the cells infected with the attenuated strain (172. Several genes were more strongly expressed in infected macrophages. Among them, we detected encoding transcription factors, anthrax toxin receptor, cell division and apoptosis regulator, ankyrin proteins, cytoskeleton proteins, protein of cell differentiation, and regulators of endocytic traffic of membrane. Quantitative real-time PCR of a selected group of differentially expressed genes confirmed the microarrays results. Altogether, the present results contribute to understanding the mechanisms involved in the early interaction of M. bovis with the bovine macrophage.

  19. Repertoire of bovine miRNA and miRNA-like small regulatory RNAs expressed upon viral infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evgeny A Glazov

    Full Text Available MicroRNA (miRNA and other types of small regulatory RNAs play a crucial role in the regulation of gene expression in eukaryotes. Several distinct classes of small regulatory RNAs have been discovered in recent years. To extend the repertoire of small RNAs characterized in mammals and to examine relationship between host miRNA expression and viral infection we used Illumina's ultrahigh throughput sequencing approach. We sequenced three small RNA libraries prepared from cell line derived from the adult bovine kidney under normal conditions and upon infection of the cell line with Bovine herpesvirus 1. We used a bioinformatics approach to distinguish authentic mature miRNA sequences from other classes of small RNAs and short RNA fragments represented in the sequencing data. Using this approach we detected 219 out of 356 known bovine miRNAs and 115 respective miRNA* sequences. In addition we identified five new bovine orthologs of known mammalian miRNAs and discovered 268 new cow miRNAs many of which are not identifiable in other mammalian genomes and thus might be specific to the ruminant lineage. In addition we found seven new bovine mirtron candidates. We also discovered 10 small nucleolar RNA (snoRNA loci that give rise to small RNA with possible miRNA-like function. Results presented in this study extend our knowledge of the biology and evolution of small regulatory RNAs in mammals and illuminate mechanisms of small RNA biogenesis and function. New miRNA sequences and the original sequencing data have been submitted to miRNA repository (miRBase and NCBI GEO archive respectively. We envisage that these resources will facilitate functional annotation of the bovine genome and promote further functional and comparative genomics studies of small regulatory RNA in mammals.

  20. Analysis of the bovine monocyte-derived macrophage response to Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis infection using RNA-seq

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maura E Casey

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Johne’s disease, caused by infection with Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis, (MAP, is a chronic intestinal disease of ruminants with serious economic consequences for cattle production in the United States and elsewhere. During infection, MAP bacilli are phagocytosed and subvert host macrophage processes, resulting in subclinical infections that can lead to immunopathology and dissemination of disease. Analysis of the host macrophage transcriptome during infection can therefore shed light on the molecular mechanisms and host-pathogen interplay associated with Johne’s disease. Here we describe results of an in vitro study of the bovine monocyte-derived macrophage (MDM transcriptome response during MAP infection using RNA-seq. MDM were obtained from seven age- and sex-matched Holstein-Friesian cattle and were infected with MAP across a six-hour infection time course with non-infected controls. We observed 245 and 574 differentially expressed genes in MAP-infected versus non-infected control samples (adjusted P value ≤ 0.05 at 2 and 6 hours post-infection, respectively. Functional analyses of these differentially expressed genes, including biological pathway enrichment, highlighted potential functional roles for genes that have not been previously described in the host response to infection with MAP bacilli. In addition, differential expression of pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokine genes, such as those associated with the IL-10 signaling pathway, and other immune-related genes that encode proteins involved in the bovine macrophage response to MAP infection emphasize the balance between protective host immunity and bacilli survival and proliferation. Systematic comparisons of RNA-seq gene expression results with Affymetrix® microarray data generated from the same experimental samples also demonstrated that RNA-seq represents a superior technology for studying host transcriptional responses to intracellular infection.

  1. Whole Blood Gene Expression Profiling in Preclinical and Clinical Cattle Infected with Atypical Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xerxa, Elena; Barbisin, Maura; Chieppa, Maria Novella; Krmac, Helena; Vallino Costassa, Elena; Vatta, Paolo; Simmons, Marion; Caramelli, Maria; Casalone, Cristina; Corona, Cristiano

    2016-01-01

    Prion diseases, such as bovine spongiform encephalopathies (BSE), are transmissible neurodegenerative disorders affecting humans and a wide variety of mammals. Variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (vCJD), a prion disease in humans, has been linked to exposure to BSE prions. This classical BSE (cBSE) is now rapidly disappearing as a result of appropriate measures to control animal feeding. Besides cBSE, two atypical forms (named H- and L-type BSE) have recently been described in Europe, Japan, and North America. Here we describe the first wide-spectrum microarray analysis in whole blood of atypical BSE-infected cattle. Transcriptome changes in infected animals were analyzed prior to and after the onset of clinical signs. The microarray analysis revealed gene expression changes in blood prior to the appearance of the clinical signs and during the progression of the disease. A set of 32 differentially expressed genes was found to be in common between clinical and preclinical stages and showed a very similar expression pattern in the two phases. A 22-gene signature showed an oscillating pattern of expression, being differentially expressed in the preclinical stage and then going back to control levels in the symptomatic phase. One gene, SEL1L3, was downregulated during the progression of the disease. Most of the studies performed up to date utilized various tissues, which are not suitable for a rapid analysis of infected animals and patients. Our findings suggest the intriguing possibility to take advantage of whole blood RNA transcriptional profiling for the preclinical identification of prion infection. Further, this study highlighted several pathways, such as immune response and metabolism that may play an important role in peripheral prion pathogenesis. Finally, the gene expression changes identified in the present study may be further investigated as a fingerprint for monitoring the progression of disease and for developing targeted therapeutic interventions. PMID

  2. Whole Blood Gene Expression Profiling in Preclinical and Clinical Cattle Infected with Atypical Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xerxa, Elena; Barbisin, Maura; Chieppa, Maria Novella; Krmac, Helena; Vallino Costassa, Elena; Vatta, Paolo; Simmons, Marion; Caramelli, Maria; Casalone, Cristina; Corona, Cristiano; Legname, Giuseppe

    2016-01-01

    Prion diseases, such as bovine spongiform encephalopathies (BSE), are transmissible neurodegenerative disorders affecting humans and a wide variety of mammals. Variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (vCJD), a prion disease in humans, has been linked to exposure to BSE prions. This classical BSE (cBSE) is now rapidly disappearing as a result of appropriate measures to control animal feeding. Besides cBSE, two atypical forms (named H- and L-type BSE) have recently been described in Europe, Japan, and North America. Here we describe the first wide-spectrum microarray analysis in whole blood of atypical BSE-infected cattle. Transcriptome changes in infected animals were analyzed prior to and after the onset of clinical signs. The microarray analysis revealed gene expression changes in blood prior to the appearance of the clinical signs and during the progression of the disease. A set of 32 differentially expressed genes was found to be in common between clinical and preclinical stages and showed a very similar expression pattern in the two phases. A 22-gene signature showed an oscillating pattern of expression, being differentially expressed in the preclinical stage and then going back to control levels in the symptomatic phase. One gene, SEL1L3, was downregulated during the progression of the disease. Most of the studies performed up to date utilized various tissues, which are not suitable for a rapid analysis of infected animals and patients. Our findings suggest the intriguing possibility to take advantage of whole blood RNA transcriptional profiling for the preclinical identification of prion infection. Further, this study highlighted several pathways, such as immune response and metabolism that may play an important role in peripheral prion pathogenesis. Finally, the gene expression changes identified in the present study may be further investigated as a fingerprint for monitoring the progression of disease and for developing targeted therapeutic interventions.

  3. Predominant involvement of the cerebellum in guinea pigs infected with bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furuoka, H; Horiuchi, M; Yamakawa, Y; Sata, T

    2011-05-01

    This study reports the experimental transmission of bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) to guinea pigs and describes the cerebellar lesions in these animals. Guinea pigs were inoculated intracerebrally with 10% brain homogenates from BSE-affected cattle. These animals were designated as the first passage. Second and third passages were subsequently performed. All guinea pigs developed infection at each passage. The mean incubation period of the first passage was 370 days post-infection (dpi) and this decreased to 307 dpi and 309 dpi for the second and third passages, respectively. Mild to severe spongiform degeneration and gliosis were observed in the cerebral cortex, thalamus and brainstem. In addition, the affected animals had marked pathological changes in the cerebellum characterized by severe cortical atrophy associated with Bergmann radial gliosis of the molecular layer and reduction in the width of the granular cell layer. Immunohistochemically, intense PrP(Sc) deposition and scattered plaque-like deposits were observed in the molecular and granular cell layers. Cerebellar lesions associated with severe atrophy of the cortex have not been reported in animal prion diseases, including in the experimental transmission of PrP(Sc) to small rodents. These lesions were similar to the lesions of human kuru or the VV2 variant of sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, although typical kuru plaques or florid plaques were not observed in the affected animals.

  4. Virulent Properties of Russian Bovine Viral Diarrhea Virus Strains in Experimentally Infected Calves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander G. Glotov

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The results of experimental study of three noncytopathic and two cytopathic bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV strains isolated from cattle in the Siberian region and belonging to the type 1 (subtypes 1a, 1b, and 1d have been presented. All investigated strains caused the development of infectious process in the seronegative 4–6-month-old calves after aerosol challenge with the dose of 6 log10 TCID50. The greatest virulence had noncytopathic strain and cytopathic strain related to the subtypes 1d and 1b, respectively. All strains in infected calves caused some signs of moderate acute respiratory disease and diarrhea: depression 3–5 days postinfection (p.i., refusal to food, severe hyperthermia to 41.9°С, serous exudate discharges from the nasal cavity and eyes, transient diarrhea with blood, leukopenia (up to 2700 cells/mm3, and macroscopic changes in the respiratory organs and intestine. The infected animals recovered from 12 to 15 days p.i. and in 90% cases formed humoral immune response 25 days p.i. (antibody titers to BVDV: 1 : 4–1 : 16. Our results confirmed the presence of virulent BVDV1 strains and showed the need for researches on the molecular epidemiology of the disease, development of more effective diagnostic systems, and optimization of control programs with use of vaccines.

  5. Squirrel monkeys (Saimiri sciureus) infected with the agent of bovine spongiform encephalopathy develop tau pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piccardo, P; Cervenak, J; Yakovleva, O; Gregori, L; Pomeroy, K; Cook, A; Muhammad, F S; Seuberlich, T; Cervenakova, L; Asher, D M

    2012-07-01

    Squirrel monkeys (Saimiri sciureus) were infected experimentally with the agent of classical bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE). Two to four years later, six of the monkeys developed alterations in interactive behaviour and cognition and other neurological signs typical of transmissible spongiform encephalopathy (TSE). At necropsy examination, the brains from all of the monkeys showed pathological changes similar to those described in variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (vCJD) of man, except that the squirrel monkey brains contained no PrP-amyloid plaques typical of that disease. Constant neuropathological features included spongiform degeneration, gliosis, deposition of abnormal prion protein (PrP(TSE)) and many deposits of abnormally phosphorylated tau protein (p-Tau) in several areas of the cerebrum and cerebellum. Western blots showed large amounts of proteinase K-resistant prion protein in the central nervous system. The striking absence of PrP plaques (prominent in brains of cynomolgus macaques [Macaca fascicularis] with experimentally-induced BSE and vCJD and in human patients with vCJD) reinforces the conclusion that the host plays a major role in determining the neuropathology of TSEs. Results of this study suggest that p-Tau, found in the brains of all BSE-infected monkeys, might play a role in the pathogenesis of TSEs. Whether p-Tau contributes to development of disease or appears as a secondary change late in the course of illness remains to be determined.

  6. Dynamic stochastic simulation as a tool for studying bovine virus diarrhoea virus infections at the herd level

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, J.T.; Enevoldsen, Carsten

    1994-01-01

    Infectious diseases, such as bovine virus diarrhoea (BVD) virus infections in cattle, are often studied by Markov chain models. However, it is difficult to simulate dynamic interactions between production of a reproductive herd and the disease by this type of model. As an alternative, a dynamic...... stochastic model simulating the herd production was suggested. A dynamic stochastic model simulating the effect of BVD virus infection in a dairy cattle herd was used to exemplify how this type of model could be applied in research. The simulation example demonstrated that the effect of a BVD virus infection...

  7. Intestinal Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli bacteria mitigate bovine leukemia virus infection in experimentally infected sheep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferens, Witold A; Cobbold, Rowland; Hovde, Carolyn J

    2006-05-01

    Ruminants often carry gastrointestinal Shiga toxin (Stx)-producing Escherichia coli (STEC). Stxs belong to a large family of ribosome-inactivating proteins (RIPs), found in many plants and some bacteria. Plant RIPs, secreted into extracellular spaces, limit the spread of viruses through plant tissues by penetrating and killing virally infected cells. Previously, we showed Stx activity against bovine leukemia virus (BLV)-infected cells in vitro and hypothesized that STEC bacteria have antiviral activity in ruminant hosts. Here, we investigated the impact of STEC on the initial phases of BLV infection in sheep. Sheep were treated with biweekly oral doses of E. coli O157:H7 (an STEC) or an isogenic stx mutant strain. A different group of sheep were similarly treated with five naturally occurring ovine STEC isolates or stx-negative E. coli. Intestinal STEC bacteria were enumerated and identified by standard fecal culture and DNA hybridization. Oral STEC treatment did not always result in carriage of STEC, although many animals consistently presented with >10(4) CFU/g feces. BLV viremia was assessed by spontaneous lymphocyte proliferation (SLP) in cultures of blood mononuclear cells and by syncytium formation in cocultures of the same with F-81 indicator cells. SLP was lower (P < 0.05) and syncytia were fewer (P < 0.05) in STEC-treated sheep than in untreated sheep. Both lower SLP and fewer syncytia positively correlated with fecal STEC numbers. Average weight gain post-BLV challenge was higher in STEC-treated sheep than in untreated sheep (P < 0.05). These results support the hypothesis that in ruminants, intestinal STEC bacteria have antiviral activity and mitigate BLV-induced disease.

  8. Ovine and Bovine Congenital Abnormalities Associated With Intrauterine Infection With Schmallenberg Virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peperkamp, N H; Luttikholt, S J; Dijkman, R; Vos, J H; Junker, K; Greijdanus, S; Roumen, M P; van Garderen, E; Meertens, N; van Maanen, C; Lievaart, K; van Wuyckhuise, L; Wouda, W

    2015-11-01

    In December 2011, a previously unknown congenital syndrome of arthrogryposis and hydranencephaly in sheep and cattle appeared in the Netherlands as an emerging epizootic due to Schmallenberg virus (SBV). Gross lesions in 102 lambs and 204 calves included porencephaly, hydranencephaly, cerebellar dysplasia and dysplasia of the brainstem and spinal cord, a flattened skull with brachygnathia inferior, arthrogryposis, and vertebral column malformations. Microscopic lesions in the central nervous system showed rarefaction and cavitation in the white matter, as well as degeneration, necrosis, and loss of neurons in the gray matter. Brain and spinal cord lesions were more severe in lambs than in calves. Ovine and bovine cases examined early in the outbreak showed encephalomyelitis. SBV infection was confirmed by real-time quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR) in brain samples in 46 of 102 lambs (45%) and in 32 of 204 calves (16%). Immunohistochemistry, performed on tissue samples from 18 RT-qPCR-positive lambs, confirmed the presence of bunyaviral antigen in neurons of the brain in 16 cases. SBV antibodies were detected by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay in fetal blood in 56 of 61 sampled ovine cases (92%). In a virus neutralization test, all tested dams of affected newborns, 46 ewes and 190 cows, were seropositive. Compared with other teratogenic viral infections, the pathogenesis and lesions of SBV in sheep and cattle fetuses are similar to those of other ruminant orthobunyaviruses. However, the loss of spinal ventral motor neurons and their tracts, resulting in micromyelia, distinguishes SBV infection from other viral central nervous system lesions in newborn ruminants.

  9. A stochastic model for simulation of the economic consequences of bovine virus diarrhoea virus infection in a dairy herd

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, J.T.; Enevoldsen, Carsten; Houe, H.

    1995-01-01

    A dynamic, stochastic model simulating the technical and economic consequences of bovine virus diarrhoea virus (BVDV) infections for a dairy cattle herd for use on a personal computer was developed. The production and state changes of the herd were simulated by state changes of the individual cows...... modelling principle. The validation problem in relation to the model was discussed. A comparison between real and simulated data using data from a published case report was shown to illustrate how user acceptance can be obtained....

  10. Polymorphism and expression of the tumor necrosis factor receptor II gene in cows infected with the bovine leukemia virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stachura, A; Brym, P; Bojarojć-Nosowicz, B; Kaczmarczyk, E

    2016-01-01

    A single T>C nucleotide polymorphism (rs42686850) of bovine tumor necrosis factor receptor type II gene (TNF-RII) is located within a sequence with allele-specific affinity to bind E2F transcription factors, considered pivotal in the regulation of cell cycle and cell proliferation. The objective of the study was to determine the effect of this SNP and BLV infection on the TNF-RII gene expression at the mRNA and protein levels in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC). We noted that analyzed TNF-RII gene polymorphism influenced the expression of the TNF-RII gene at the mRNA level but only in BLV-positive cows. Concurrently, no statistically significant association was found between gene polymorphism and TNF-RII expression at the protein level. However, we found a significant effect of BLV infection status on the amount of TNF-RII mRNA and the percentage of PBMC expressing TNF-RII. These results show an unclear effect of considered T>C polymorphism on TNF-RII gene expression in bovine leukocytes and they suggest the involvement of BLV in modifying the TNF-RII expression in BLV-infected cows potentially implying the EBL (Enzootic Bovine Leukosis) associated pathogenesis.

  11. Diverse outcomes of bovine viral diarrhea virus infections in a herd naturally infected during pregnancy - a case study

    Science.gov (United States)

    A beef producer purchased Angus crossbred cattle that were pregnant with nursing calves. The purchased cattle, their nursing calves, and subsequent born calves were not initially tested for BVDV. Bovine viral diarrhea virus subtype 2a (BVDV2a) was isolated from an aborted bovine fetus, 6.5 months,...

  12. Complementary studies detecting classical bovine spongiform encephalopathy infectivity in jejunum, ileum and ileocaecal junction in incubating cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fast, Christine; Keller, Markus; Balkema-Buschmann, Anne; Hills, Bob; Groschup, Martin H

    2013-12-21

    Recently we have described the distribution of bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) infectivity and/or PrPSc in Peyer's patches (PP) of the small intestine of orally BSE infected cattle. In this follow-up study additional jejunal and ileal PP's and ileocaecal-junction tissue samples from 1, 4, and 24 months post infection (mpi) were examined by mouse (Tgbov XV) bioassay. Infectivity was demonstrated in ileal PP's 4 mpi and the distribution/extent of infectivity at 24 mpi was comparable to those seen at earlier time points, revealing no indication for a decline/clearance. These data are relevant for the definition of Specified Risk Materials in the context of the TSE legislation worldwide.

  13. Use of PCR for detection of milk naturally infected with bacilli of bovine tuberculosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo César Tavares Carvalho

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The causative agent of bovine tuberculosis (BTB is Mycobacterium bovis, a bacteria belonging to M. tuberculosis complex (MTC. The definitive diagnosis is realized by isolation and identification of the M. bovis from clinical samples, using a combination of traditional culture and biochemical methods, which is considered the “gold standard”. This procedure is cumbersome and time-consuming. We evaluated a PCR assay for the direct detection of MTC DNA in naturally contaminated milk, using primers that were previously tested and proven reliable to target the IS6110 element. Milk previously seeded with M. bovis was used as the starting material, for padronization of the technique. The procedure involved extracting the DNA by enzymatic lysis (proteinase K and lysozyme, phenol, chloroform, isoamyl alcohol, followed by ethanol precipitation and PCR. The PCR assay allowed us to detect BTB in artificially contaminated milk, with a detection limit of 100 CFU/mL, and was also able to detect the bacillus in 50% (75/150 of samples from naturally infected animals. This procedure could be used to assist the in vivo diagnosis for BTB, complementing the sorological or microbiological tests and becomes an alternative option for implementation in epidemiological studies of BTB transmission and to prevent contaminated milk from entering the food supply.

  14. Comparative analysis of Pasteurella multocida strains isolated from bovine respiratory infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sellyei, Boglárka; Rónai, Zsuzsanna; Jánosi, Szilárd; Makrai, László

    2015-12-01

    Bovine respiratory disease (BRD) is the leading cause of significant economic losses in the intensive beef industry worldwide. Beside numerous risk factors Pasteurella multocida, which is regarded as a secondary pathogen, may play a role in the development of the disease. Previous studies of strains from swine pneumonia revealed that there are a few clones associated with clinical disease, suggesting that some strains may be more virulent than others. This linkage may be true in the BRD, however composition of P. multocida populations in the herds are slightly characterized. Thus, we decided to perform phenotypic and genotypic characterisation of strains isolated from calves with respiratory infection at 31 different herds in Hungary. The results demonstrated the presence of two dominant strain types. At the identical taxonomic background (P. multocida subsp. multocida) with slight phenotypic variability they could be separated by trehalose fermentation capacity, α-glucosidase activity and molecular fingerprint patterns of ERIC- and M13-PCR. Independent prevalence and geographical origin of the strain types may refer to their significance in the illness, but their comparison with strains isolated from healthy individuals is taken into consideration.

  15. Induction of interferon and interferon-induced antiviral effector genes following a primary bovine herpesvirus-1 (BHV-1) respiratory infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osman, Rahwa; Gonzalez-Cano, Patricia; Brownlie, Robert; Griebel, Philip J

    2017-07-01

    Invitro investigations have identified a variety of mechanisms by which herpesviruses evade interferon-stimulated antiviral effector mechanisms. However, these immune evasion mechanisms have not been evaluated during a bovine herpesvirus-1 (BHV-1) infection. This study investigated the transcription and secretion of type I and II interferons (IFNs) and the transcription of IFN-stimulated genes (ISGs) during a primary BHV-1 infection of the upper respiratory tract (URT) in naïve calves. IFN-α, -β and -γ transcription in nasal turbinates and protein levels in nasal secretions increased following infection. Increased IFN type I and II secretion was detected 3 days post-infection (p.i.) and IFN production increased in parallel with virus shedding. Expression of ISGs, including Mx1, OAS and BST-2, also increased significantly (P<0.05) in nasal turbinates on day 3 p.i. and elevated ISG expression persisted throughout the period of viral shedding. In contrast, RNAase L gene expression was not induced during the BHV-1 infection in the nasal turbinates, but was induced on day 10 p.i. in the trachea. In vitro studies confirmed that recombinant bovine (rBo)IFN-α, -β and -γ induced expression of Mx1, OAS and BST-2, but decreased RNAse L transcript in bovine epithelial cells. Relative to vesicular stomatitisvirus (VSV), BHV-1 was resistant to the antiviral activity of rBoIFN-α and -γ, but treatment of epithelial cells with 10 ng rBoIFN-β ml-1 effected an 80 % inhibition of BHV-1 replication and complete inhibition of VSV replication. These observations confirm that the transcription and translation of type I and II IFNs increase during BHV-1 infection, while the transcription of some ISGs is not inhibited.

  16. Permissiveness of bovine epithelial cells from lung, intestine, placenta and udder for infection with Coxiella burnetii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobotta, Katharina; Bonkowski, Katharina; Liebler-Tenorio, Elisabeth; Germon, Pierre; Rainard, Pascal; Hambruch, Nina; Pfarrer, Christiane; Jacobsen, Ilse D; Menge, Christian

    2017-04-12

    Ruminants are the main source of human infections with the obligate intracellular bacterium Coxiella (C.) burnetii. Infected animals shed high numbers of C. burnetii by milk, feces, and birth products. In goats, shedding by the latter route coincides with C. burnetii replication in epithelial (trophoblast) cells of the placenta, which led us to hypothesize that epithelial cells are generally implicated in replication and shedding of C. burnetii. We therefore aimed at analyzing the interactions of C. burnetii with epithelial cells of the bovine host (1) at the entry site (lung epithelium) which govern host immune responses and (2) in epithelial cells of gut, udder and placenta decisive for the quantity of pathogen excretion. Epithelial cell lines [PS (udder), FKD-R 971 (small intestine), BCEC (maternal placenta), F3 (fetal placenta), BEL-26 (lung)] were inoculated with C. burnetii strains Nine Mile I (NMI) and NMII at different cultivation conditions. The cell lines exhibited different permissiveness for C. burnetii. While maintaining cell viability, udder cells allowed the highest replication rates with formation of large cell-filling Coxiella containing vacuoles. Intestinal cells showed an enhanced susceptibility to invasion but supported C. burnetii replication only at intermediate levels. Lung and placental cells also internalized the bacteria but in strikingly smaller numbers. In any of the epithelial cells, both Coxiella strains failed to trigger a substantial IL-1β, IL-6 and TNF-α response. Epithelial cells, with mammary epithelial cells in particular, may therefore serve as a niche for C. burnetii replication in vivo without alerting the host's immune response.

  17. Evaluation of goat based 'indigenous vaccine' against bovine Johne's disease in endemically infected native cattle herds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Shoor Vir; Singh, Pravin Kumar; Kumar, Naveen; Gupta, Saurabh; Chaubey, Kundan Kumar; Singh, Brajesh; Srivastav, Abhishek; Yadav, Sharad; Dhama, Kuldeep

    2015-01-01

    'Indigenous vaccine' prepared from 'Indian Bison Type' a native bio-type of Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis strain 'S5' of goat origin (goat based) was evaluated in indigenous cattle herds located in gaushalas (cow shelters), endemic for Bovine Johne's disease. Cows (893) were randomly divided into vaccinated (702 = 626 adults + 76 calves) and control (191 = 173 adults + 18 calves) groups. Response to vaccination was evaluated on the basis of health (mortality, morbidity), productivity (growth rate, reproductive performance, total milk yield), immunological parameters (LTT, ELISA titer), survivability of animals naturally infected with MAP, bacterimia (by specific blood PCR), seroconversion (by indigenous ELISA) and status of shedding of MAP in feces (by microscopy) in the two groups before and after vaccination. Reduction in MAP shedding [to the extent of 100% in Herd A; and from 82.1% (0 DPV) to 10.7% (270 DPV) in Herd C] was the major finding in vaccinated cows. Whereas, the control group cows have shown no improvement. As the first indicator of vaccine efficacy, MAP bacilli disappeared from the blood circulation as early as 15 days post vaccination, however, peak titers were achieved around 90 DPV. Peak titers initially declined slightly but were maintained later throughout the study period. Control animals did not show any pattern in antibody titers. Mortality was low in vaccinated as compared to the control groups. Vaccination of endemically infected native cattle herds with inactivated whole-cell bacterin of novel 'Indian Bison Type' bio-type of goat origin strain 'S5' effectively restored health and productivity and reduced clinical BJD. Application of goat based 'indigenous vaccine' for therapeutic management of BJD in native cattle herds (gaushalas) is the first of its kind.

  18. Presence of subclinical infection in gene-targeted human prion protein transgenic mice exposed to atypical bovine spongiform encephalopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Rona; Dobie, Karen; Hunter, Nora; Casalone, Cristina; Baron, Thierry; Barron, Rona M

    2013-12-01

    The transmission of bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) to humans, leading to variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease has demonstrated that cattle transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs) can pose a risk to human health. Until recently, TSE disease in cattle was thought to be caused by a single agent strain, BSE, also known as classical BSE, or BSE-C. However, due to the initiation of a large-scale surveillance programme throughout Europe, two atypical BSE strains, bovine amyloidotic spongiform encephalopathy (BASE, also named BSE-L) and BSE-H have since been discovered. To model the risk to human health, we previously inoculated these two forms of atypical BSE (BASE and BSE-H) into gene-targeted transgenic (Tg) mice expressing the human prion protein (PrP) (HuTg) but were unable to detect any signs of TSE pathology in these mice. However, despite the absence of TSE pathology, upon subpassage of some BASE-challenged HuTg mice, a TSE was observed in recipient gene-targeted bovine PrP Tg (Bov6) mice but not in HuTg mice. Disease transmission from apparently healthy individuals indicates the presence of subclinical BASE infection in mice expressing human PrP that cannot be identified by current diagnostic methods. However, due to the lack of transmission to HuTg mice on subpassage, the efficiency of mouse-to-mouse transmission of BASE appears to be low when mice express human rather than bovine PrP.

  19. A stochastic model for simulation of the economic consequences of bovine virus diarrhoea virus infection in a dairy herd

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, J.T.; Enevoldsen, Carsten; Houe, H.

    1995-01-01

    A dynamic, stochastic model simulating the technical and economic consequences of bovine virus diarrhoea virus (BVDV) infections for a dairy cattle herd for use on a personal computer was developed. The production and state changes of the herd were simulated by state changes of the individual cows...... variables describing biologic and management variables including 21 decision variables describing the effect of BVDV infection on the production of the individual animal. Two markedly different scenarios were simulated to demonstrate the behaviour of the developed model and the potentials of the applied...

  20. Flow cytometric determination of osmotic behaviour of animal erythrocytes toward their engineering for drug delivery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kostić Ivana T.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Despite the fact that the methods based on the osmotic properties of the cells are the most widely used for loading of drugs in human and animal erythrocytes, data related to the osmotic properties of erythrocytes derived from animal blood are scarce. This work was performed with an aim to investigate the possibility of use the flow cytometry as a tool for determination the osmotic behaviour of porcine and bovine erythrocytes, and thus facilitate the engineering of erythrocytes from animal blood to be drug carriers. The method of flow cytometry successfully provided the information about bovine and porcine erythrocyte osmotic fragility, and made the initial steps in assessment of erythrocyte shape in a large number of erythrocytes. Although this method is not able to confirm the swelling of pig erythrocytes, it indicated to the differences in pig erythrocytes that had basic hematological parameters inside and outside the reference values. In order to apply/use the porcine and bovine erythrocytes as drug carriers, the method of flow cytometry, confirming the presence of osmotically different fractions of red blood cells, indicated that various amounts of the encapsulated drug in porcine and bovine erythrocytes can be expected.

  1. Anti-Inflammatory and Antiapoptotic Responses to Infection: A Common Denominator of Human and Bovine Macrophages Infected with Mycobacterium avium Subsp. paratuberculosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naiara Abendaño

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (Map is the causative agent of a chronic intestinal inflammation in ruminants named Johne's disease or paratuberculosis and a possible etiopathological agent of human Crohn's disease (CD. Analysis of macrophage transcriptomes in response to Map infection is expected to provide key missing information in the understanding of the role of this pathogen in establishing an inappropriate and persistent infection in a susceptible host and of the molecular mechanisms that might underlie the early phases of CD. In this paper we summarize transcriptomic studies of human and bovine peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC, monocyte-derived macrophages (MDMs, and macrophages-like cell lines in vitro infected with Map. Most studies included in this paper consistently reported common gene expression signatures of bovine and human macrophages in response to Map such as enhanced expression of the anti-inflammatory cytokines IL-10 and IL-6, which promote bacterial survival. Overexpression of IL-10 could be responsible for the Map-associated reduction in the expression of the proapoptotic TNF-α gene observed in bovine and human macrophages.

  2. C-reactive protein and erythrocyte sedimentation rate changes after arthroscopic anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction: guideline to diagnose and monitor postoperative infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Cheng; Ao, Yingfang; Fan, Xiaohua; Wang, Jianquan; Cui, Guoqing; Hu, Yuelin; Yu, Jiakuo

    2014-09-01

    The purposes of our study were to determine normative C-reactive protein (CRP) and erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) values from a retrospective review of patients with and without infection after anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction and to determine CRP and ESR threshold levels that can serve as diagnostic indicators of infection. We also tried to draw a curve of CRP and ESR value changes after treatment of ACL infection to evaluate the response to treatment of the infection. A retrospective chart review was performed of arthroscopic ACL reconstruction patients from 2007 to 2008 (noninfection group) and all patients with postoperative intra-articular infection from 1997 to 2010 (infection group). We collected the CRP and ESR values on the third and fifth postoperative days in the noninfection group and before infection treatment and on the first, third, fifth, seventh, 10th, 14th, 21st, 28th, and 35th days after infection treatment in the infection group. Sensitivity, specificity, and Youden's index were calculated for different threshold values of CRP and ESR as predictors of infection. Receiver operator curves were obtained for CRP and ESR on the fifth postoperative day. Of 122 patients, 83 had normal joints and 39 had septic joints. The mean CRP and ESR values in patients with septic joints were 101.9 mg/L and 57.1 mm/h, respectively, which were significantly higher than those in the noninfection group (P sensitivity values of 94.1% and 91.2%, respectively, and specificity values of 97.6% and 80.5%, respectively. The peak CRP level after infection treatment occurred earlier than the peak ESR level (first day v third day) and returned to normal more quickly (21st day v 28th day). Both CRP and ESR were helpful in determining the presence of a normal or septic joint. The threshold values of 41 mg/L for CRP and 32 mm/h for ESR had the most optimal sensitivity and specificity. The peak CRP level occurred earlier than the peak ESR level after treatment

  3. The acute phase response of haptoglobin and serum amyloid A (SAA) in cattle undergoing experimental infection with bovine respiratory syncytial virus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heegaard, Peter M. H.; Godson, D.L.; Toussaint, M.J.M.;

    2000-01-01

    respiratory syncytial virus (BRSV), analysing the induction of the two most dominant bovine acute phase proteins haptoglobin and serum amyloid A (SAA). Strong and reproducible acute phase responses were detected for both proteins, peaking at around 7-8 days after inoculation of BRSV, while no response...... was seen in mock-inoculated control animals. The serum concentrations reached for SAA and haptoglobin during the BRSV-induced acute phase response were generally the same or higher than previously reported for bacterial infections in calves. The magnitude and the duration of the haptoglobin response......The ability of a pure virus infection to induce an acute phase protein response is of interest as viral infections are normally considered to be less efficient in inducing an acute phase protein response than bacterial infections. This was studied in a bovine model for infection with bovine...

  4. Experimental treatment of Staphylococcus aureus bovine intramammary infection using a guanine riboswitch ligand analog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ster, C; Allard, M; Boulanger, S; Lamontagne Boulet, M; Mulhbacher, J; Lafontaine, D A; Marsault, E; Lacasse, P; Malouin, F

    2013-02-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a leading cause of intramammary infections (IMI). We recently demonstrated that Staph. aureus strains express the gene guaA during bovine IMI. This gene codes for a guanosine monophosphate synthetase and its expression is regulated by a guanine riboswitch. The guanine analog 2,5,6-triaminopyrimidine-4-one (PC1) is a ligand of the guanine riboswitch. Interactions between PC1 and its target result in inhibition of guanosine monophosphate synthesis and subsequent death of the bacterium. The present study describes the investigational use of PC1 for therapy of Staph. aureus IMI in lactating cows. The in vitro minimal inhibitory concentration of PC1 ranged from 0.5 to 4 μg/mL for a variety of Staph. aureus and Staphylococcus epidermidis strains and required a reducing agent for stability and full potency. A safety assessment study was performed, whereby the healthy quarters of 4 cows were infused with increasing doses of PC1 (0, 150, 250, and 500 mg). Over the 44 h following infusions, no obvious adverse effect was observed. Ten Holstein multiparous cows in mid lactation were then experimentally infused into 3 of the quarters with approximately 50 cfu of Staph. aureus strain SHY97-3906 and infection was allowed to progress for 2 wk before starting PC1 treatment. Bacterial counts reached then about 10(3) to 10(4) cfu/mL of milk. Infected quarters were treated with 1 of 3 doses of PC1 (0, 250, or 500 mg) after each morning and evening milking for 7d (i.e., 14 intramammary infusions of PC1). During the treatment period, milk from PC1-treated quarters showed a significant reduction in bacterial concentrations. However, this reduction of Staph. aureus count in milk was not maintained during the 4 wk following the end of the treatment and only 15% of the PC1-treated quarters underwent bacteriological cure. The somatic cell count and the quarter milk production were not affected by treatments. Although bacterial clearance was not achieved following

  5. Naturally acquired bovine besnoitiosis: Differential distribution of parasites in the skin of chronically infected cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schares, G; Langenmayer, M C; Majzoub-Altweck, M; Scharr, J C; Gentile, A; Maksimov, A; Schares, S; Conraths, F J; Gollnick, N S

    2016-01-30

    Bovine besnoitiosis is caused by Besnoitia besnoiti, an apicomplexan parasite closely related to Toxoplasma gondii and Neospora caninum. In the acute stage of besnoitiosis, cattle suffer from pyrexia, swollen lymph nodes, anorexia and subcutaneous edema. In the chronic stage, tissue cysts are formed in a variety of tissues including the skin. Knowledge about the distribution of tissue cysts of different parts of the skin of infected animals is scarce. Four chronically infected cattle were euthanized and skin samples were taken from a total of 77 standardized cutaneous locations per animal. Portions of the dermis were taken, from which DNA was extracted and examined by real-time PCR. Cycle of transition (Ct) values reflecting the amount of parasite DNA in the samples were determined. For statistical analysis, samples were attributed to 11 larger skin regions ('OuterHindlegDistal', 'Rump, ForelegMiddle', 'NoseFrontEars', 'CheekEye', 'SideLowerPart', 'ForelegDistal', 'SideUpperPart', 'LegsInner', 'VentralHeadNeck', 'DorsalNeckWithersBackTail'). While all samples revealed a positive result in three female cattle, only 63.6% (49/77) of the samples of a bull showed positive results. For statistical analysis, a Ct value of 45 was assumed for samples with a negative result. The dams showed median Ct values of 16.1, 17.5 and 19.4, while in skin samples of the bull a median Ct value of 37.6 was observed. To determine the differences in DNA concentrations between different locations of the skin of the animals, a relative Ct (relCt) was determined by subtracting for each animal indv the MedianCtindv from each sample Ct. Analyses of the relCt values showed that the highest relative parasite DNA concentrations were observed in the categories 'OuterHindlegDistal', 'Rump', 'ForelegMiddle' and 'NoseFrontEars'. The relCt values in these categories differed statistically significantly from those determined for the categories 'VentralHeadNeck' and 'DorsalNeckWithersBackTail'. The

  6. [Comparison of methods of detection of bovine adenovirus serotype 3 in infected culture of calf kidney cells (MDBK)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaliuzhnaia, A N; Trifonov, V D; Zil'berman, M I; Zalmanzon, E S; Kaledin, A S

    1988-10-01

    The comparative study of the dynamics of the main antigen (hexon) and viral DNA of the bovine adenovirus type 3 accumulation in the established cell line MDBK under the conditions of single- or multistep cycle of infection has been undertaken. The quantitative immunoelectrophoresis and immunoenzyme assay detected the viral antigens on the late stages of infection in the period of cellular monolayer degradation. The immunofluorescence reaction and histochemical immunoenzyme method detected the antigen in the infected cells concurrently with the primary expression of the viral cytopathic effect. The reaction of the spot molecular hybridization with the [32P]-DNA probes detected the viral DNA considerably earlier than the antigen was detected by the immunological methods, before the appearance of degenerative changes in the infected cells. Preference of the immunoenzyme assay and DNA-probes in diagnosis of the virus are discussed.

  7. Multiple bovine papillomavirus infections associated with cutaneous papillomatosis in brazilian cattle herds

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    Marlise Pompeo Claus

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Cutaneous papillomatosis is a pathological condition commonly found in cattle and is characterized by the presence of benign proliferative tumors caused by bovine papillomavirus (BPV infection. While multiple infections with human papillomavirus (HPV are common in healthy and immunodeficient humans, studies with the aim of identifying mixed infections are still sporadic in veterinary medicine. The aim of this study is to describe the occurrence of multiple BPV infections in cattle affected by cutaneous papillomatosis. Fifteen skin warts were collected from at least two diverse anatomical regions of six bovines with papillomatosis belonging to three cattle herds from the Paraná state in Brazil. The BPV types present in the skin wart samples were determined by a PCR assay performed with the FAP primer pair for partial L1 gene amplification followed by direct sequencing or by cloning and sequencing of the inserts. Sequence analysis of the obtained amplicons allowed the identification of four characterized BPV types (BPV-1, -2, -6, and -8 and three previously described putative new BPV types (BPV/BR-UEL3, BPV/BR-UEL4, and BPV/BR-UEL5. Double infections were identified in four (A, B, D, and E of the six animals included in this study. In this work, the strategy adopted to evaluate skin warts from diverse anatomical sites of the same animal allowed the identification of multiple infections with two or three different BPV types. The analysis of four animals belonging to a single cattle herd also showed the presence of six different viral types. These results clearly suggest that both multiple papillomaviral infection and a high viral diversity can be as frequent in cattle as in human beings.A papilomatose cutânea é comumente observada nos rebanhos bovinos e caracterizada pela presença de tumores proliferativos benignos causados pela infecção pelo papilomavírus bovino (BPV. Enquanto a infecção múltipla pelo papilomavírus humano (HPV é um

  8. Gene polymorphisms in African buffalo associated with susceptibility to bovine tuberculosis infection.

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    Nikki le Roex

    Full Text Available Bovine tuberculosis (BTB is a chronic, highly infectious disease that affects humans, cattle and numerous species of wildlife. In developing countries such as South Africa, the existence of extensive wildlife-human-livestock interfaces poses a significant risk of Mycobacterium bovis transmission between these groups, and has far-reaching ecological, economic and public health impacts. The African buffalo (Syncerus caffer, acts as a maintenance host for Mycobacterium bovis, and maintains and transmits the disease within the buffalo and to other species. In this study we aimed to investigate genetic susceptibility of buffalo for Mycobacterium bovis infection. Samples from 868 African buffalo of the Cape buffalo subspecies were used in this study. SNPs (n = 69, with predicted functional consequences in genes related to the immune system, were genotyped in this buffalo population by competitive allele-specific SNP genotyping. Case-control association testing and statistical analyses identified three SNPs associated with BTB status in buffalo. These SNPs, SNP41, SNP137 and SNP144, are located in the SLC7A13, DMBT1 and IL1α genes, respectively. SNP137 remained significantly associated after permutation testing. The three genetic polymorphisms identified are located in promising candidate genes for further exploration into genetic susceptibility to BTB in buffalo and other bovids, such as the domestic cow. These polymorphisms/genes may also hold potential for marker-assisted breeding programmes, with the aim of breeding more BTB-resistant animals and herds within both the national parks and the private sector.

  9. Experimental infection with cytopathic bovine viral diarrhea virus in mice induces megakaryopoiesis in the spleen and bone marrow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seong, Giyong; Lee, Jin-Sol; Lee, Kyung-Hyun; Choi, Kyoung-Seong

    2016-02-01

    Here, we infected mice with cytopathic bovine viral diarrhea virus 1 (cp BVDV1) by oral inoculation and investigated the effects of infection by histopathological, immunohistochemical (IHC), hematological methods. Twelve mice were infected, and samples were obtained at day 2, 5, and 9 postinfection (pi). Most of the infected mice exhibited clinical signs of illness such as reduced movement, crouching, loose feces, loss of appetite, and reduced water intake. Blood samples from six mice were positive for BVDV based on reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Blood analysis also revealed thrombocytopenia and lymphopenia. Viral antigens were detected in the spleen (12/12), bone marrow (12/12), and/or mesenteric lymph nodes (4/12) of all infected mice by IHC analysis. The spleens showed significant histopathological changes including (i) substantially increased numbers of megakaryocytes, (ii) lymphocyte depletion, and (iii) hemorrhages. The bone marrow also had an increased number of megakaryocytes, although this increase was not as strong as it was in the spleen. Severe lymphoid depletion was observed in the mesenteric lymph nodes. Viral infections were present in the lymphocytes but not detected in megakaryocytes of the spleen, bone marrow, or mesenteric lymph nodes. These results suggest that the increased numbers of megakaryocytes may be a direct result of BVDV infection. BVDV infection in mice following oral inoculation of cp BVDV1 leads to megakaryopoiesis in the spleen and bone marrow to replenish the platelets.

  10. Characterization of bovine gamma delta T cells phenotype during post-natal development and following Mycobacterium bovis vaccination or virulent infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bovine tuberculosis caused by Mycobacterium bovis is a globally significant veterinary health problem. Gamma delta T cells are known to participate in the immune control of mycobacterial infections. Data in human and non-human primates suggest that mycobacterial infection regulates memory/effector p...

  11. A glycoprotein E deletion mutant of bovine herpesvirus 1 infects the same limited number of tissues in calves as wild-type virus, but for a shorter period

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Engelenburg, van F.A.C.; Kaashoek, M.J.; Oirschot, van J.T.; Rijsewijk, F.A.M.

    1995-01-01

    To gain insight into the role of glycoprotein E of bovine herpesvirus 1 (BHV-1), we compared the distribution of wild-type (wt) BHV-1 with that of a gE deletion mutant (gE-) in calves after intranasal inoculation. The wt-infected calves had severe clinical signs, but the gE--infected calves were vir

  12. HoBi-like virus challenge of pregnant cows that had previously given birth to calves persistently infected with bovine viral diarrhea virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    The ability of bovine viral diarrhea viruses (BVDV) to establish persistent infection (PI) following fetal infection is central to keeping these viruses circulating. Similarly, an emerging species of pestivirus, HoBi-like viruses, is also able to establish PIs. Dams that are not PI, but carrying PI ...

  13. BLV-CoCoMo-qPCR: a useful tool for evaluating bovine leukemia virus infection status

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    Jimba Mayuko

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Bovine leukemia virus (BLV is associated with enzootic bovine leukosis, which is the most common neoplastic disease of cattle. BLV infects cattle worldwide, imposing a severe economic impact on the dairy cattle industry. Recently, we developed a new quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR method using Coordination of Common Motifs (CoCoMo primers to measure the proviral load of known and novel BLV variants in BLV-infected animals. Indeed, the assay was highly effective in detecting BLV in cattle from a range of international locations. This assay enabled us to demonstrate that proviral load correlates not only with BLV infection capacity as assessed by syncytium formation, but also with BLV disease progression. In this study, we compared the sensitivity of our BLV-CoCoMo-qPCR method for detecting BLV proviruses with the sensitivities of two real-time PCR systems, and also determined the differences of proviral load with serotests. Results BLV-CoCoMo-qPCR was found to be highly sensitive when compared with the real-time PCR-based TaqMan MGB assay developed by Lew et al. and the commercial TaKaRa cycleave PCR system. The BLV copy number determined by BLV-CoCoMo-qPCR was only partially correlated with the positive rate for anti-BLV antibody as determined by the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, passive hemagglutination reaction, or agar gel immunodiffusion. This result indicates that, although serotests are widely used for the diagnosis of BLV infection, it is difficult to detect BLV infection with confidence by using serological tests alone. Two cattle were experimentally infected with BLV. The kinetics of the provirus did not precisely correlate with the change in anti-BLV antibody production. Moreover, both reactions were different in cattle that carried different bovine leukocyte antigen (BoLA-DRB3 genotypes. Conclusions Our results suggest that the quantitative measurement of proviral load by BLV

  14. Whole genome detection of rotavirus mixed infections in human, porcine and bovine samples co-infected with various rotavirus strains collected from sub-Saharan Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyaga, Martin M; Jere, Khuzwayo C; Esona, Mathew D; Seheri, Mapaseka L; Stucker, Karla M; Halpin, Rebecca A; Akopov, Asmik; Stockwell, Timothy B; Peenze, Ina; Diop, Amadou; Ndiaye, Kader; Boula, Angeline; Maphalala, Gugu; Berejena, Chipo; Mwenda, Jason M; Steele, A Duncan; Wentworth, David E; Mphahlele, M Jeffrey

    2015-04-01

    Group A rotaviruses (RVA) are among the main global causes of severe diarrhea in children under the age of 5years. Strain diversity, mixed infections and untypeable RVA strains are frequently reported in Africa. We analysed rotavirus-positive human stool samples (n=13) obtained from hospitalised children under the age of 5years who presented with acute gastroenteritis at sentinel hospital sites in six African countries, as well as bovine and porcine stool samples (n=1 each), to gain insights into rotavirus diversity and evolution. Polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE) analysis and genotyping with G-(VP7) and P-specific (VP4) typing primers suggested that 13 of the 15 samples contained more than 11 segments and/or mixed G/P genotypes. Full-length amplicons for each segment were generated using RVA-specific primers and sequenced using the Ion Torrent and/or Illumina MiSeq next-generation sequencing platforms. Sequencing detected at least one segment in each sample for which duplicate sequences, often having distinct genotypes, existed. This supported and extended the PAGE and RT-PCR genotyping findings that suggested these samples were collected from individuals that had mixed rotavirus infections. The study reports the first porcine (MRC-DPRU1567) and bovine (MRC-DPRU3010) mixed infections. We also report a unique genome segment 9 (VP7), whose G9 genotype belongs to lineage VI and clusters with porcine reference strains. Previously, African G9 strains have all been in lineage III. Furthermore, additional RVA segments isolated from humans have a clear evolutionary relationship with porcine, bovine and ovine rotavirus sequences, indicating relatively recent interspecies transmission and reassortment. Thus, multiple RVA strains from sub-Saharan Africa are infecting mammalian hosts with unpredictable variations in their gene segment combinations. Whole-genome sequence analyses of mixed RVA strains underscore the considerable diversity of rotavirus sequences and

  15. Iron and ferritin levels in the serum and milk of bovine leukemia virus-infected dairy cows

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    KOICHI eORINO

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Iron metabolism was examined in 15 bovine leukemia virus (BLV -infected dairy cows (2.6-7.8 years old. BLV infection was detected by measuring serum antibody titer against BLV virus antigen (gp51. The anti-BLV antibody titers of the BLV-infected cows were significantly higher in serum than in milk; a single serum-positive animal lacked detectable anti-BLV antibodies in its milk. Iron and ferritin concentrations also were significantly higher in serum than in milk. Although most of the BLV-infected dairy cows had past or present anamneses (such as inflammatory diseases, including intramammary infection, the milk ferritin concentrations of the infected cows were significantly lower than those of normal cows; serum ferritin concentrations did not differ significantly between these two groups. The anti-BLV antibody titers in milk samples showed significant correlation with serum iron concentrations. These results suggest that BLV infection affects iron homeostasis through iron metabolism in the dairy cow mammary gland.

  16. Serological Study on Bovine Viral Diarrhoea Virus Infection in Pig Population in Poland Between 2008 and 2011

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    Lipowski Andrzej

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available In total, 14 608 pig sera, collected between 2008 and 2011, were tested with ELISA using antibodies specific for bovine viral diarrhoea virus (BVDV. All doubtful and positive samples were retested by virus neutralisation test (neutralising peroxidase-linked assay. The BVDV seroreagents were detected in 11 (68.75% out of 16 provinces, the seroprevalence varied from 0.1% to 1.04% (average 0.31%. The obtained results indicate that the prevalence of BVDV infection in pig population in Poland is low.

  17. Insect cells are superior to Escherichia coli in producing malaria proteins inducing IgG targeting PfEMP1 on infected erythrocytes

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    Joergensen Louise

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The PFD1235w Plasmodium falciparum erythrocyte membrane protein 1 (PfEMP1 antigen is associated with severe malaria in children and can be expressed on the surface of infected erythrocytes (IE adhering to ICAM1. However, the exact three-dimensional structure of this PfEMP1 and its surface-exposed epitopes are unknown. An insect cell and Escherichia coli based system was used to express single and double domains encoded by the pfd1235w var gene. The resulting recombinant proteins have been evaluated for yield and purity and their ability to induce rat antibodies, which react with the native PFD1235w PfEMP1 antigen expressed on 3D7PFD1235w-IE. Their recognition by human anti-malaria antibodies from previously infected Tanzanian donors was also analysed. Methods The recombinant proteins were run on SDS-PAGE and Western blots for quantification and size estimation. Insect cell and E. coli-produced recombinant proteins were coupled to a bead-based Luminex assay to measure the plasma antibody reactivity of 180 samples collected from Tanzanian individuals. The recombinant proteins used for immunization of rats and antisera were also tested by flow cytometry for their ability to surface label 3D7PFD1235w-IE. Results All seven pAcGP67A constructs were successfully expressed as recombinant protein in baculovirus-infected insect cells and subsequently produced to a purity of 60-97% and a yield of 2-15 mg/L. By comparison, only three of seven pET101/D-TOPO constructs expressed in the E. coli system could be produced at all with purity and yield ranging from 3-95% and 6-11 mg/L. All seven insect cell, but only two of the E. coli produced proteins induced antibodies reactive with native PFD1235w expressed on 3D7PFD1235w-IE. The recombinant proteins were recognized in an age- and transmission intensity-dependent manner by antibodies from 180 Tanzanian individuals in a bead-based Luminex assay. Conclusions The baculovirus based insect cell

  18. Wildlife Interactions on Baited Places and Waterholes in a French Area Infected by Bovine Tuberculosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Payne, Ariane; Philipon, Sixtine; Hars, Jean; Dufour, Barbara; Gilot-Fromont, Emmanuelle

    2017-01-01

    Interactions among wildlife species are major drivers for the transmission of multi-host pathogens, such as Mycobacterium bovis, which also affect livestock. Although France is officially free from bovine tuberculosis (bTB), some areas are still harboring infection in cattle and wildlife. We aimed at characterizing the visits of susceptible wild species (badger, red deer, and wild boar) at baited places and waterholes, considered as possible hotspots for contacts. We described the visits in terms of frequency, duration, and number of individuals and studied the influence of the season. Then, we estimated the frequency of intraspecies and interspecies interactions occurring at baited places and waterholes which may lead to bTB transmission, including direct and indirect contacts through the soil or water. We used camera traps placed on baited places and waterholes on 13 locations monitored during 21 months. The number of visits, their duration, and the number of individuals per visit were analyzed by generalized linear mixed models for each targeted species. The frequency of the interspecies and intraspecies interactions was also analyzed separately. The season, the type of site (baited place or waterhole), and the location were the explanatory variables. Badgers’ visits and interactions were more frequent than for other species (mean: 0.60 visit/day and 5.42 interactions/day) especially on baited places. Red deer only visited waterholes. Wild boars visited most often baited places in spring–summer and waterholes in autumn–winter. They came in higher number than other species, especially on baited places. Direct interactions were uncommon. The most frequent interspecies interactions occurred between red deer and wild boar (mean: 4.02 interactions/day). Baited places and waterholes are important interfaces between the different wild species involved in the bTB multi-host system in this area. They can thus promote intraspecies and interspecies b

  19. Experimental infection with non-cytopathic bovine viral diarrhea virus 1 in mice induces inflammatory cell infiltration in the spleen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Yu-Jung; Kwon, Young-Je; Lee, Kyung-Hyun; Choi, Eun-Jin; Choi, Kyoung-Seong

    2016-09-01

    Previously, our study showed that oral inoculation of mice with cytopathic (cp) bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) led to lymphocyte depletion and increased numbers of megakaryocytes in the spleen as well as thrombocytopenia and lymphopenia. In the present study, to investigate the possible differences in the detection of viral antigen, histopathological lesions, and hematologic changes between non-cytopathic (ncp) BVDV1 and cp BVDV1, mice were orally administered low and high doses of ncp BVDV1 and were necropsied at days 0, 2, 5, and 9 postinfection (pi). None of the ncp BVDV1-infected mice exhibited clinical signs of illness, unlike those infected with cp BVDV1. Statistically significant thrombocytopenia was observed during ncp BVDV1 infection, and lymphopenia was found only in mice infected with a high dose at day 9 pi. Interestingly, ncp BVDV1 infection increased the numbers of basophils, eosinophils, neutrophils, and monocytes in some infected mice. Viral antigen was detected in the lymphocytes of the spleen, mesenteric lymph nodes, Peyer's patches, and bone marrow by immunohistochemistry. Lymphoid depletion was evident in the mesenteric lymph nodes of mice infected with a high dose and also found in the Peyer's patches of some infected mice. Infiltration of inflammatory cells, including neutrophils and monocytes, and an increased number of megakaryocytes were seen in the spleen. These results suggest that the distribution of viral antigens is not associated with the presence of histopathological lesions. Inflammatory cell infiltration was observed in the spleens as a result of viral replication and may be attributable to the host reaction to ncp BVDV1 infection. Together, these findings support the possibility that mice can be used as an animal model for BVDV infection.

  20. Massive depletion of bovine leukemia virus proviral clones located in genomic transcriptionally active sites during primary infection.

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    Nicolas A Gillet

    Full Text Available Deltaretroviruses such as human T-lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1 and bovine leukemia virus (BLV induce a persistent infection that remains generally asymptomatic but can also lead to leukemia or lymphoma. These viruses replicate by infecting new lymphocytes (i.e. the infectious cycle or via clonal expansion of the infected cells (mitotic cycle. The relative importance of these two cycles in viral replication varies during infection. The majority of infected clones are created early before the onset of an efficient immune response. Later on, the main replication route is mitotic expansion of pre-existing infected clones. Due to the paucity of available samples and for ethical reasons, only scarce data is available on early infection by HTLV-1. Therefore, we addressed this question in a comparative BLV model. We used high-throughput sequencing to map and quantify the insertion sites of the provirus in order to monitor the clonality of the BLV-infected cells population (i.e. the number of distinct clones and abundance of each clone. We found that BLV propagation shifts from cell neoinfection to clonal proliferation in about 2 months from inoculation. Initially, BLV proviral integration significantly favors transcribed regions of the genome. Negative selection then eliminates 97% of the clones detected at seroconversion and disfavors BLV-infected cells carrying a provirus located close to a promoter or a gene. Nevertheless, among the surviving proviruses, clone abundance positively correlates with proximity of the provirus to a transcribed region. Two opposite forces thus operate during primary infection and dictate the fate of long term clonal composition: (1 initial integration inside genes or promoters and (2 host negative selection disfavoring proviruses located next to transcribed regions. The result of this initial response will contribute to the proviral load set point value as clonal abundance will benefit from carrying a provirus in

  1. Isolation of a mutant MDBK cell line resistant to bovine viral diarrhea virus infection due to a block in viral entry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flores, E F; Donis, R O

    1995-04-20

    A cell line, termed CRIB, resistant to infection with bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) has been derived from the MDBK bovine kidney cell line. CRIB cells were obtained by selection and cloning of cells surviving infection with a highly cytolytic BVDV strain. CRIB cells contain no detectable infectious or defective BVDV as ascertained by cocultivation, animal inoculation, indirect immunofluorescence, Western immunoblot, Northern hybridization, and RNA PCR. Inoculation of CRIB cells with 24 cytopathic and noncytopathic BVDV strains does not result in expression of viral genes or amplification of input virus. Karyotype and isoenzyme analyses demonstrated that CRIB are genuine bovine cells. CRIB cells are as susceptible as the parental MDBK cells to 10 other bovine viruses, indicating that these cells do not have a broad defect blocking viral replication. Transfection of CRIB cells with BVDV RNA or virus inoculation in the presence of polyethylene-glycol results in productive infection, indicating that the defect of CRIB cells is at the level of virus entry. CRIB cells are the first bovine cells reported to be resistant to BVDV infection in vitro and may be a useful tool for studying the early interactions of pestiviruses with host cells.

  2. Flow Cytometric Determination of the Expression of gp 51 Protein of Bovine Leukaemia Virus in Experimentally Infected Sheep

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    Szczotka Maria

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The study was performed on lambs experimentally infected with bovine leukaemia virus (BLV. The presence of BLV antibodies in sera of infected animals was detected by agar gel immunodiffusion test and ELISA. Proviral DNA was detected by PCR and nested PCR. Dual-colour flow cytometry analysis was performed with the use of specific monoclonal antibodies against lymphocyte CD markers and gp51 viral envelope protein, followed by incubation with fluorescent-labelled secondary antibodies conjugated with FITC or PE. Gp51 viral envelope protein was detected in tumours caused by BLV infection. The BLV infection resulted in depletion of CD4+ lymphocytes, increase in CD8+ lymphocytes, and decrease in CD4+ to CD8+ ratio in infected sheep. Proliferation of IgM+ CD19+ cells was also detected. These cells had an immature character without tendency to differentiate, and their vitality was prolonged. Flow cytometry enabled detection of gp51 expression in sheep blood lymphocytes at the early stages of the infection, before detection of serum antibodies using ELISA.

  3. Early gametocytes of the malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum specifically remodel the adhesive properties of infected erythrocyte surface

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tibúrcio, Marta; Silvestrini, Francesco; Bertuccini, Lucia

    2013-01-01

    In Plasmodium falciparum infections the parasite transmission stages, the gametocytes, mature in 10 days sequestered in internal organs. Recent studies suggest that cell mechanical properties rather than adhesive interactions play a role in sequestration during gametocyte maturation. It remains i...

  4. Measuring bovine gamma delta T cell function at the site of Mycobacterium bovis infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    The causative agent of tuberculosis (TB) in cattle is Mycobacterium bovis. The characteristic lesions of bovine TB are well-organized pulmonary granulomas. Gamma delta T cells are a unique subset of nonconventional T cells that play major roles in both the innate and adaptive arms of the immune sys...

  5. Innate immune responses of calves during transient infection with a noncytopathic strain of bovine viral diarrhea virus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Muller-Doblies, D.; Arquint, A.; Schaller, P.

    2004-01-01

    with the temporal activation of the alpha/beta interferon-regulated Mx gene in white blood cells (WBC) and skin as well as the upregulation of the acute-phase serum proteins haptoglobin (Hp) and serum amyloid A (SAA). The viral strain used did provoke transient health impairment, namely, fever and leukopenia...... that were associated with viremia, viral shedding with nasal secretions, and antiviral seroconversion. Complete recovery was observed within 3 weeks. Elevated levels of SAA and Hp were apparent from days 4 to 13 and 8 to 11, respectively. In WBC, the levels of Mx mRNA and Mx protein were elevated from days......In this study, six immunocompetent calves were experimentally infected with a noncytopathic strain of bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV), and the effects of the viral infection on parameters of the innate immune response of the host were analyzed. Clinical and virological data were compared...

  6. Nationwide survey of bovine leukemia virus infection among dairy and beef breeding cattle in Japan from 2009-2011.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murakami, Kenji; Kobayashi, Sota; Konishi, Misako; Kameyama, Ken-ichiro; Tsutsui, Toshiyuki

    2013-01-01

    A nationwide survey of bovine leukemia virus (BLV) infection was conducted among dairy and beef breeding cattle in Japan from 2009-2011 using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Of a total of 20,835 cattle tested, 35.2% were seropositive for BLV and the animal type-level seroprevalences in dairy and beef breeding cattle were 40.9 and 28.7%, respectively. By the time animals were 1 year old, 21.0% of dairy and 13.7% of beef breeding cattle were considered infected. Our findings indicate that BLV is widespread among dairy and beef breeding cattle in Japan with the BLV seroprevalences approximately 10- and 4-fold higher, respectively, than previously reported for 1980-1982 in Japan.

  7. Effect of bovine lactoferrin on functions of activated feline peripheral blood mononuclear cells during chronic feline immunodeficiency virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Saori; Sato, Reeko; Aoki, Takako; Omoe, Katsuhiko; Inanami, Osamu; Hankanga, Careen; Yamada, Yuichi; Tomizawa, Nobuyuki; Yasuda, Jun; Sasaki, Juso

    2008-05-01

    Feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) infection is characterized by chronic overactivation of immune and inflammatory system, resulting in anergic state and dysfunction of immune cells. Lactoferrin (LF), a glycoprotein present in exocrine secretions and neutrophils, plays an important role in host defense system. Our previous study showed that oral administration of bovine LF (bLF) suppressed oral inflammation, improved the clinical symptoms and decreased serum gamma-globulin as a marker of inflammation in FIV-infected cats with intractable stomatitis. The anti-inflammatory effect was partly involved in regulation of neutrophil function by bLF. In this study, to clarify the relationship between anti-inflammatory effects of bLF and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC), we examined the effect of bLF on proliferation, cell cycle progression and cytokine expression in mitogen-activated PBMC. MTT [3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)- 2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide] assay showed that bLF inhibited the concanavalin A (ConA)-induced cell proliferation in FIV-infected cats with the asymptomatic carrier and AIDS-related complex (ARC) phase. Bovine LF restored ConA-induced cell cycle progression and resulted in suppression of the induced apoptosis in feline PBMC. Real-time RT-PCR showed that bLF suppressed ConA-induced expression of interferon-gamma and interleukin-2 in cells of the ARC group regardless of the time of its addition to the medium. These results suggest the hypothesis that therapy with bLF may have the potential to improve and protect functions of overactivated lymphocytes by modulating the cell proliferation, cell cycle and cytokines expression in cats in terminal stage of FIV infection.

  8. Full-length CD4 electroinserted in the erythrocyte membrane as a long-lived inhibitor of infection by human immunodeficiency virus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zeira, M.; Volsky, D.J. (Columbia Univ., New York, NY (United States)); Tosi, P.F.; Mouneimne, Y.; Lazarte, J.; Sneed, L.; Nicolau, C. (Texas A and M Univ., College Station (United States))

    1991-05-15

    Recombinant full-length CD4 expressed in Spodoptera frugiperda 9 cells with the baculovirus system was electroinserted in erythrocyte (RBC) membranes. Of the inserted CD4, 70% was correctly oriented as shown by fluorescence quenching experiments with fluorescein-labeled CD4. The inserted CD4 displayed the same epitopes as the naturally occurring CD4 in human T4 cells. Double-labeling experiments ({sup 125}I-CD4 and {sup 51}Cr-RBC) showed that the half-life of CD4 electroinserted in RBC membrane in rabbits was approximately 7 days. Using the fluorescence dequenching technique with octadecylrhodamine B-labeled human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-1, the authors showed fusion of the HIV envelope with the plasma membrane of RBC-CD4, whereas no such fusion could be detected with RBC. The dequenching efficiency of RBC-CD4 is the same as that of CEM cells. Exposure to anti-CD4 monoclonal antibody OKT4A, which binds to the CD4 region that attaches to envelope glycoprotein gp120, caused a significant decrease in the dequenching of fluorescence. In vitro infectivity studies showed that preincubation of HIV-1 with RBC-CD4 reduced by 80-90% the appearance of HIV antigens in target cells, the amount of viral reverse transcriptase, and the amount of p24 core antigen produced by the target cells. RBC-CD4, but not RBCs, aggregated with chronically HIV-1-infected T cells and caused formation of giant cells. These data show that the RBC-CD4 reagent is relatively long lived in circulation and efficient in attaching to HIV-1 and HIV-infected cells, and thus it may have value as a therapeutic agent against AIDS.

  9. Induction of interferon-gamma and downstream pathways during establishment of fetal persistent infection with bovine viral diarrhea virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smirnova, Natalia P; Webb, Brett T; McGill, Jodi L; Schaut, Robert G; Bielefeldt-Ohmann, Helle; Van Campen, Hana; Sacco, Randy E; Hansen, Thomas R

    2014-04-01

    Development of transplacental infection depends on the ability of the virus to cross the placenta and replicate within the fetus while counteracting maternal and fetal immune responses. Unfortunately, little is known about this complex process. Non-cytopathic (ncp) strains of bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV), a pestivirus in the Flaviviridae family, cause persistent infection in early gestational fetuses (infected, PI), but are cleared by immunocompetent animals and late gestational fetuses (>150 days; transiently infected, TI). Evasion of innate immune response and development of immunotolerance to ncp BVDV have been suggested as possible mechanisms for the establishment of the persistent infection. Previously we have observed a robust temporal induction of interferon (IFN) type I (innate immune response) and upregulation of IFN stimulated genes (ISGs) in BVDV TI fetuses. Modest chronic upregulation of ISGs in PI fetuses and calves reflects a stimulated innate immune response during persistent BVDV infection. We hypothesized that establishing persistent fetal BVDV infection is also accompanied by the induction of IFN-gamma (IFN-γ). The aims of the present study were to determine IFN-γ concentration in blood and amniotic fluid from control, TI and PI fetuses during BVDV infection and analyze induction of the IFN-γ downstream pathways in fetal lymphoid tissues. Two experiments with in vivo BVDV infections were completed. In Experiment 1, pregnant heifers were infected with ncp BVDV type 2 on day 75 or 175 of gestation or kept naïve to generate PI, TI and control fetuses, respectively. Fetuses were collected by Cesarean section on day 190. In Experiment 2, fetuses were collected on days 82, 89, 97, 192 and 245 following infection of pregnant heifers on day 75 of gestation. The results were consistent with the hypothesis that ncp BVDV infection induces IFN-γ secretion during acute infection in both TI and PI fetuses and that lymphoid tissues such as spleen

  10. Evidence of a pro-apoptotic effect of specific antibodies in a bovine macrophage model of infection with Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jolly, Ana; Lompardía, Silvina; Hajos, Silvia E; Mundo, Silvia L

    2016-01-01

    Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis (MAP) is the causative agent of Johne's disease (JD), a chronic granulomatous enteritis in ruminants. Understanding the protective immune response following infection is crucial to improve the diagnosis and the development of vaccines against this disease. The goal of this work was to assess whether specific antibodies were able to modulate the macrophage response to MAP infection by evaluating apoptosis and TNF-α secretion in an in vitro model. Sera from healthy (n=2), MAP-infected (n=3) and lipoarabinomannan (LAM)-immunized (n=3) bovines were evaluated. LAM was chosen as immunogen due to its relevant role in mycobacterial pathogenesis. We demonstrated by two different techniques (Acridine Orange/Ethidium Bromide microscopy and Annexin V/7-Amino-Actinomycin D flow cytometry) that the immune sera from both, MAP-infected and LAM-immunized bovines, significantly increased macrophage apoptosis in infected cultures. Comparable levels of apoptosis were detected when MAP was pre-incubated with purified specific antibodies instead of whole serum. Furthermore, this effect was accompanied by a significantly higher secretion of TNF-α. These results strongly suggest that specific antibodies could limit the impact of MAP on the apoptosis of bovine cells. This work would contribute to elucidate the role of the specific antibody response in bovine JD and its prevention.

  11. Development of fetal and placental innate immune responses during establishment of persistent infection with bovine viral diarrhea virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smirnova, Natalia P; Webb, Brett T; Bielefeldt-Ohmann, Helle; Van Campen, Hana; Antoniazzi, Alfredo Q; Morarie, Susan E; Hansen, Thomas R

    2012-08-01

    Transplacental viral infections are dependent upon complex interactions between feto-placental and maternal immune responses and the stage of fetal development at which the infection occurs. Bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) has the ability to cross the placenta and infect the fetus. Infection early in gestation with non-cytopathic (ncp) BVDV leads to persistent infection. Establishment of fetal persistent infection results in life-long viremia, virus-specific immunotolerance, and may have detrimental developmental consequences. We have previously shown that heifers infected experimentally with ncp BVDV type 2 on d. 75 of gestation had transient robust up-regulation of the type I interferon (IFN) stimulated genes (ISGs) 3-15 days after viral inoculation. Blood from persistently infected (PI) fetuses, collected 115 days post maternal infection, demonstrated moderate chronic up-regulation of ISGs. This infection model was used to delineate timing of the development of innate immune responses in the fetus and placenta during establishment of persistent infection. It was hypothesized that: (i) chronic stimulation of innate immune responses occurs following infection of the fetus and (ii) placental production of the type I IFN contributes to up-regulation of ISGs in PI fetuses. PI fetuses, generated by intranasal inoculation of pregnant heifers with ncp BVDV, and control fetuses from uninfected heifers, were collected via Cesarean sections on d. 82, 89, 97, 192, and 245 of gestation. Fetal viremia was confirmed starting on d. 89. Significant up-regulation of mRNA encoding cytosolic dsRNA sensors -RIG-I and MDA5 - was detected on d. 82-192. Detection of viral dsRNA by cytosolic sensors leads to the stimulation of ISGs, which was reflected in significant up-regulation of ISG15 mRNA in fetal blood on d. 89, 97, and 192. No difference in IFN-α and IFN-β mRNA concentration was found in fetal blood or caruncular tissue, while a significant increase in both IFN-α and IFN

  12. Solubilization and immunoprecipitation of 125I-labelled antigens from Plasmodium knowlesi schizont-infected erythrocytes using non-ionic, anionic and zwitterionic detergents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, R J; Barnwell, J W

    1984-02-01

    Plasmodium knowlesi malaria-infected erythrocytes were radio-iodinated and several non-ionic, anionic and zwitterionic detergents were compared in their capacity to extract the labelled membrane proteins. The use of these detergents for antigen identification was tested by immunoprecipitation, after addition of Triton X-100 to some detergent extracts, using hyperimmune monkey antiserum and protein A-Sepharose. 125I-labelled antigens were specifically immunoprecipitated with all detergents tested, including the anionic detergents sodium dodecyl sulphate (SDS), deoxycholate and cholate; the zwitterions Zwittergent-312 and -314, CHAPS and Empigen BB, as well as several non-ionic detergents. The SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis patterns of 125I-labelled antigens varied after extraction with different detergents, there being no consistent pattern for detergents of a particular class. A total of 14 125I-labelled antigens were identified, 11 of them using Triton X-100. Some minor 125I-labelled antigens identified with Triton X-100 were immunoprecipitated in greater amount after extraction in other detergents. Most importantly, two antigens Mr 200 000 and 180 000 were detected only after extraction with deoxycholate or SDS.

  13. Risk factors associated with increased bovine leukemia virus proviral load in infected cattle in Japan from 2012 to 2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohno, Ayumu; Takeshima, Shin-nosuke; Matsumoto, Yuki; Aida, Yoko

    2015-12-02

    Bovine leukemia virus (BLV) is the causative agent of enzootic bovine leukosis, a malignant B cell lymphoma. BLV has spread worldwide and causes serious problems. After infection, the BLV genome is integrated into the host DNA and can be amplified during periods of latency. We previously designed degenerate primers using the Coordination of Common Motifs (CoCoMo) algorithm to establish a new quantitative real-time PCR method (BLV-CoCoMo-qPCR-2) of measuring the proviral load of both known and novel BLV variants. Here, we aimed to examine the correlation between proviral load and risk factors for BLV infection, such as breeding systems, parousity, and colostrum feeding. Blood and serum samples were collected from 83 BLV-positive farms in 22 prefectures of Japan, and the BLV proviral load and anti-BLV antibody levels were measured. BLV was detected in 73.3% (1039/1,417) of cattle by BLV-CoCoMo-qPCR-2 and the provirus was detected in 93 of 1039 antibody-negative samples. The results showed that the proviral load increased with progression of lymphocytosis. Next, the risk factors associated with increasing BLV infection rate were examined along with any association with proviral load. The proviral load was higher in cattle with lymphocytosis than in healthy cattle, and higher in multiparous cows than in nulliparous cows. Finally, proviral loads were higher in contact breeding systems than in non-contact breeding systems. Taken together, these findings may help to formulate a plan for eliminating BLV from contaminated farms. This is the first nationwide study to estimate BLV proviral load in Japanese cattle.

  14. Experimental Infection of Cattle With a Novel Prion Derived From Atypical H-Type Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okada, Hiroyuki; Masujin, Kentaro; Miyazawa, Kohtaro; Iwamaru, Yoshihumi; Imamura, Morikazu; Matsuura, Yuichi; Arai, Shozo; Fukuda, Shigeo; Murayama, Yuichi; Yokoyama, Takashi

    2017-01-01

    H-type bovine spongiform encephalopathy (H-BSE) is an atypical form of BSE in cattle. During passaging of H-BSE in transgenic bovinized (TgBoPrP) mice, a novel phenotype of BSE, termed BSE-SW emerged and was characterized by a short incubation time and host weight loss. To investigate the biological and biochemical properties of the BSE-SW prion, a transmission study was conducted in cattle, which were inoculated intracerebrally with brain homogenate from BSE-SW-infected TgBoPrP mice. The disease incubation period was approximately 15 months. The animals showed characteristic neurological signs of dullness, and severe spongiform changes and a widespread, uniform distribution of disease-associated prion protein (PrP(Sc)) were observed throughout the brain of infected cattle. Immunohistochemical PrP(Sc) staining of the brain revealed the presence of intraglial accumulations and plaque-like deposits. No remarkable differences were identified in vacuolar lesion scores, topographical distribution patterns, and staining types of PrP(Sc) in the brains of BSE-SW- vs H-BSE-infected cattle. PrP(Sc) deposition was detected in the ganglia, vagus nerve, spinal nerve, cauda equina, adrenal medulla, and ocular muscle. Western blot analysis revealed that the specific biochemical properties of the BSE-SW prion, with an additional 10- to 12-kDa fragment, were well maintained after transmission. These findings indicated that the BSE-SW prion has biochemical properties distinct from those of H-BSE in cattle, although clinical and pathologic features of BSW-SW in cattle are indistinguishable from those of H-BSE. The results suggest that the 2 infectious agents, BSE-SW and H-BSE, are closely related strains.

  15. Regulation of Innate Immune Responses by Bovine Herpesvirus 1 and Infected Cell Protein 0 (bICP0

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clinton Jones

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Bovine herpesvirus 1 (BoHV-1 infected cell protein 0 (bICP0 is an important transcriptional regulatory protein that stimulates productive infection. In transient transfection assays, bICP0 also inhibits interferon dependent transcription. bICP0 can induce degradation of interferon stimulatory factor 3 (IRF3, a cellular transcription factor that is crucial for activating beta interferon (IFN-β promoter activity. Recent studies also concluded that interactions between bICP0 and IRF7 inhibit trans-activation of IFN-β promoter activity. The C3HC4 zinc RING (really important new gene finger located near the amino terminus of bICP0 is important for all known functions of bICP0. A recombinant virus that contains a single amino acid change in a well conserved cysteine residue of the C3HC4 zinc RING finger of bICP0 grows poorly in cultured cells, and does not reactivate from latency in cattle confirming that the C3HC4 zinc RING finger is crucial for viral growth and pathogenesis. A bICP0 deletion mutant does not induce plaques in permissive cells, but induces autophagy in a cell type dependent manner. In summary, the ability of bICP0 to stimulate productive infection, and repress IFN dependent transcription plays a crucial role in the BoHV-1 infection cycle.

  16. Evaluation of a new antibody-based enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for the detection of bovine leukemia virus infection in dairy cattle

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Monti, G.E.; Frankena, K.; Engel, B.; Buist, W.; Tarabla, H.D.; Jong, de M.C.M.

    2005-01-01

    The objective of this study was to validate a new blocking enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) (designated M108 for milk and S108 for serum samples) for detecting bovine leukemia virus (BLV) infection in dairy cattle. Milk, serum, and ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid-blood samples were collecte

  17. Molecular and serological detection of Babesia bovis- and Babesiabigemina-infection in bovines and water buffaloes raised jointly in anendemic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    tBabesia bovis and Babesia bigemina are causative agents of bovine babesiosis, a tick-borne disease of cattlein tropical and subtropical regions. Babesia spp. infection adversely affects cattle health and can be fatalresulting in considerable economic loss worldwide. Under endemic stability conditio...

  18. Full-length coding sequence for 12 bovine viral diarrhea virus isolates from persistently infected cattle in a feedyard in Kansas

    Science.gov (United States)

    We report here the full-length coding sequence of 12 bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) isolates from persistently infected cattle from a feedyard in southwest Kansas, USA. These 12 genomes represent the three major genotypes (BVDV 1a, 1b, and 2a) of BVDV currently circulating in the United States....

  19. ß-catenin, a transcription factor activated by canonical Wnt signaling, is expressed in sensory neurons of calves latently infected with bovine herpesvirus 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Like many a-herpesvirinae subfamily members, bovine herpes virus 1 (BoHV-1) expresses an abundant transcript in latently infected sensory neurons: the latency-related (LR) RNA. LR-RNA encodes a protein (ORF2) that inhibits apoptosis, interacts with Notch family members, interferes with Notch mediate...

  20. Use of self-assembling GFP to determine protein topology and compartmentalisation in the Plasmodium falciparum-infected erythrocyte.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Külzer, Simone; Petersen, Wiebke; Baser, Avni; Mandel, Katharina; Przyborski, Jude M

    2013-02-01

    In recent years, and largely supported by the increasing use of transfection technology, much research attention has been given to protein trafficking in the Plasmodium falciparum infected red blood cell. By expression of fluorescent reporter proteins, much information has been gained on both the signals and mechanisms directing proteins to their correct sub-cellular localisation within the parasite and infected host cell. Generally however, verification of the observed fluorescent phenotype is carried out using more traditional techniques such as co-immunofluorescence, protease protection, and cell fractionation followed by Western blot. Here we apply a self-assembling split GFP (saGFP) system and show that this can be used to determine both membrane topology and compartmentalisation using transfection technology alone. As an example, we verify the topology of an ER membrane protein, hDer1-1, and of an exported parasite Hsp40 co-chaperone, PFE55. Additionally, we can demonstrate that this system has the potential to be applied to analysis of organellar proteins.

  1. The presence of disease-associated prion protein in skeletal muscle of cattle infected with classical bovine spongiform encephalopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okada, Hiroyuki; Miyazawa, Kohtaro; Fukuda, Shigeo; Iwamaru, Yoshifumi; Imamura, Morikazu; Masujin, Kentaro; Matsuura, Yuichi; Fujii, Takashi; Fujii, Kei; Kageyama, Soichi; Yoshioka, Miyako; Murayama, Yuichi; Yokoyama, Takashi

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the presence of disease-associated prion protein (PrP(Sc)) in the skeletal muscle of cattle infected with classical bovine spongiform encephalopathy (C-BSE). The study was carried out systematically in 12 different muscle samples from 43 (3 field and 40 experimental) cases of C-BSE; however, muscle spindles were not available in many of these cases. Therefore, analysis became restricted to a total of 31 muscles in 23 cattle. Even after this restriction, low levels of PrP(Sc) were detected in the muscle spindles of the masseter, intercostal, triceps brachii, psoas major, quadriceps femoris and semitendinosus muscles from 3 field and 6 experimental clinical-stage cases. The present data indicate that small amounts of PrP(Sc) are detectable by immunohistochemistry in the skeletal muscles of animals terminally affected with C-BSE.

  2. Regulatory networks and pathways in the bovine small intestine during Cooperia oncophora infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooperia oncophora is an important parasitic nematode of cattle with a wide distribution in temperate areas. Twenty Holstein nematode-naïve bull calves were experimentally infected with approximately 100,000 infective L3s and infection was allowed to progress for 7, 14, 28, 42 days, respectively. Th...

  3. Transcriptome MicroRNA Profiling of Bovine Mammary Glands Infected with Staphylococcus aureus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rui Li

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available MicroRNAs are small non-coding RNA molecules that are important regulators of gene expression at the post-transcriptional level. miRNAs impact the processes of cell proliferation, differentiation and apoptosis. Thus, the regulation of miRNA expression profiles associated with mastitis will be conducive for its control. In this study, Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus was administered to the mammary gland of Chinese Holstein cows to construct a bacteria-type mastitis model. Total RNA was isolated from bovine mammary gland tissue samples from the S. aureus-induced mastitis group and controls. miRNAs were analyzed using Solexa sequencing and bioinformatics processing for the experimental group and control group. Two miRNA libraries were constructed respectively. A total of 370 known bovine miRNAs and 341 novel mi RNAs were detected for the S. aureus and 358 known bovine miRNAs and 232 novel miRNAs for control groups. A total of 77 miRNAs in the S. aureus group showed significant differences compared to the control group. GO (Gene Ontology analysis showed these target genes were involved in the regulation of cells, binding, etc., while KEGG (Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes analysis showed that these genes were enriched in endocytosis, and olfactory transduction pathways involved in cancer. These results provide an experimental basis to reveal the cause and regulatory mechanism of mastitis and also suggest the potential of miRNAs to serve as biomarkers for the diagnosis of mastitis in dairy cows.

  4. Surface area loss and increased sphericity account for the splenic entrapment of subpopulations of Plasmodium falciparum ring-infected erythrocytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Innocent Safeukui

    Full Text Available Ex vivo perfusion of human spleens revealed innate retention of numerous cultured Plasmodium falciparum ring-infected red blood cells (ring-iRBCs. Ring-iRBC retention was confirmed by a microsphiltration device, a microbead-based technology that mimics the mechanical filtering function of the human spleen. However, the cellular alterations underpinning this retention remain unclear. Here, we use ImageStream technology to analyze infected RBCs' morphology and cell dimensions before and after fractionation with microsphiltration. Compared to fresh normal RBCs, the mean cell membrane surface area loss of trophozoite-iRBCs, ring-iRBCs and uninfected co-cultured RBCs (uRBCs was 14.2% (range: 8.3-21.9%, 9.6% (7.3-12.2% and 3.7% (0-8.4, respectively. Microsphilters retained 100%, ∼50% and 4% of trophozoite-iRBCs, ring-iRBCs and uRBCs, respectively. Retained ring-iRBCs display reduced surface area values (estimated mean, range: 17%, 15-18%, similar to the previously shown threshold of surface-deficient RBCs retention in the human spleen (surface area loss: >18%. By contrast, ring-iRBCs that successfully traversed microsphilters had minimal surface area loss and normal sphericity, suggesting that these parameters are determinants of their retention. To confirm this hypothesis, fresh normal RBCs were exposed to lysophosphatidylcholine to induce a controlled loss of surface area. This resulted in a dose-dependent retention in microsphilters, with complete retention occurring for RBCs displaying >14% surface area loss. Taken together, these data demonstrate that surface area loss and resultant increased sphericity drive ring-iRBC retention in microsphilters, and contribute to splenic entrapment of a subpopulation of ring-iRBCs. These findings trigger more interest in malaria research fields, including modeling of infection kinetics, estimation of parasite load, and analysis of risk factors for severe clinical forms. The determination of the threshold of

  5. Milk losses due to bovine tropical theileriosis (Theileria annulata infection) in Algeria

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ouarda Ayadi; Mohamed Gharbi

    2016-01-01

    The authors studied the impact of tropical theileriosis onset on milk yield decrease in 10 local bred cows in Skikda (Northern Algeria) during 2015 summer season. The milk yield decrease estimated weekly during two months was 2.76 L/day/cow corresponding to 31.92%of the total milk yield. This decrease corresponds to 110.5 Algerian Dinars (1.02 US$)/day/diseased cow. The relative variation of milk yield showed a dramatic decrease from 82.72% to 0.76% at Day 21 then became constant. Further studies are needed to improve these estimations of financial losses due to bovine tropical theileriosis in Algeria.

  6. Serological and Virological Investigation of Bovine Viral Diarrhea Virus (BVDV) infection in Candidate Bulls before taken in Artifical Insemination Centers by Enzyme Linked Immunosorbent Assay (ELISA)

    OpenAIRE

    Yavru, Sibel; Bulut, Oya; Yapıcı, Orhan; Kale, Mehmet; Ata, Ayhan

    2014-01-01

    Bovine Viral Diarrhea (BVD) is a common infection all over the world. It causes important economical losses in cattle breeding. In this study, a total of 46 blood samples were examined taken into tubes with and without EDTA from bulls in Artifical Insemination Centers. Blood serum samples were tested to detect for antibodies against Bovine Viral Diarrhea Virus (BVDV) and leukocyte samples were tested for BVDV antigens by ELISA methods.  Eight (17.3%) out of 46 serum samples were found as posi...

  7. A species-specific activation of Toll-like receptor signaling in bovine and sheep bronchial epithelial cells triggered by Mycobacterial infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Yan; Han, Fei; Liang, Jinping; Yang, Jiali; Shi, Juan; Xue, Jing; Yang, Li; Li, Yong; Luo, Meihui; Wang, Yujiong; Wei, Jun; Liu, Xiaoming

    2016-03-01

    Pulmonary tuberculosis caused by a Mycobacterium infection remains a major public health problem in most part of the world, in part owing to the transmission of its pathogens between hosts including human, domestic and wild animals. To date, molecular mechanisms of the pathogenesis of TB are still incompletely understood. In addition to alveolar macrophages, airway epithelial cells have also been recently recognized as main targets for Mycobacteria infections. In an effort to understand the pathogen-host interaction between Mycobacteria and airway epithelial cells in domestic animals, in present study, we investigated the Toll-like receptor (TLR) signaling in bovine and sheep airway epithelial cells in response to an infection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis avirulent H37Ra stain or Mycobacterium bovis BCG vaccine strain, using primary air-liquid interface (ALI) bronchial epithelial culture models. Our results revealed a host and pathogen species-specific TLR-mediated recognition of pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs), induction and activation of TLR signaling pathways, and substantial induction of inflammatory response in bronchial epithelial cells in response to Mycobacteria infections between these two species. Interestingly, the activation TLR signaling in bovine bronchial epithelial cells induced by Mycobacteria infection was mainly through a myeloid differentiation factor 88 (MyD88)-independent TLR signaling pathway, while both MyD88-dependent and independent TLR signaling cascades could be induced in sheep epithelial cells. Equally noteworthy, a BCG infection was able to induce both MyD88-dependent and independent signaling in sheep and bovine airway epithelial cells, but more robust inflammatory responses were induced in sheep epithelial cells relative to the bovines; whereas an H37Ra infection displayed an ability to mainly trigger a MyD88-independent TLR signaling cascade in these two host species, and induce a more extent expression of

  8. Clinical and virological characteristics of calves experimentally infected with a Brazilian isolate of bovine viral diarrhea virus type 1a

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luana Marchi Quadros

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: To study the pathogenicity of the Brazilian bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV type 1a 241.10 isolate, four calves were intranasally inoculated with a viral suspension containing 107.2 TCID50 mL-1. One calf was left uninoculated and kept in contact with the other calves to investigate viral transmissibility. After inoculation, the animals were monitored daily for clinical signs of infection. The presence of the virus in the blood and nasal secretions was confirmed by virus isolation in cell culture. White blood cells were quantified prior to and every 3 days after infection, and the presence of antibodies was checked every 7 days, starting at day 0 until day 42 post-inoculation (pi. After infection, nasal and ocular serous secretions were observed between days 1 and 5 pi, along with a mild cough from days 2 to 4 pi; however, no severe clinical signs were present. Body temperature was slightly elevated between days 4 and 6 pi. The control calf did not develop any of the signs observed in the infected animals. Cell culture-mediated virus isolation confirmed viremia between days 4 and 8 pi and the presence of the virus in the nasal secretions between days 1 and 10 pi. All infected animals showed a decrease in white blood cell count. Antibodies could be detected from day 14 pi, and these levels remained high until day 35 pi. The control calf had no viremia, viral presence in nasal secretions, or positive serology, indicating the absence of viral transmission. Thus, isolate BVDV 1a 241.10 has low pathogenicity and transmissibility but retains immunosuppressive capacity.

  9. A single point in protein trafficking by Plasmodium falciparum determines the expression of major antigens on the surface of infected erythrocytes targeted by human antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Jo-Anne; Howell, Katherine B; Langer, Christine; Maier, Alexander G; Hasang, Wina; Rogerson, Stephen J; Petter, Michaela; Chesson, Joanne; Stanisic, Danielle I; Duffy, Michael F; Cooke, Brian M; Siba, Peter M; Mueller, Ivo; Bull, Peter C; Marsh, Kevin; Fowkes, Freya J I; Beeson, James G

    2016-11-01

    Antibodies to blood-stage antigens of Plasmodium falciparum play a pivotal role in human immunity to malaria. During parasite development, multiple proteins are trafficked from the intracellular parasite to the surface of P. falciparum-infected erythrocytes (IEs). However, the relative importance of different proteins as targets of acquired antibodies, and key pathways involved in trafficking major antigens remain to be clearly defined. We quantified antibodies to surface antigens among children, adults, and pregnant women from different malaria-exposed regions. We quantified the importance of antigens as antibody targets using genetically engineered P. falciparum with modified surface antigen expression. Genetic deletion of the trafficking protein skeleton-binding protein-1 (SBP1), which is involved in trafficking the surface antigen PfEMP1, led to a dramatic reduction in antibody recognition of IEs and the ability of human antibodies to promote opsonic phagocytosis of IEs, a key mechanism of parasite clearance. The great majority of antibody epitopes on the IE surface were SBP1-dependent. This was demonstrated using parasite isolates with different genetic or phenotypic backgrounds, and among antibodies from children, adults, and pregnant women in different populations. Comparisons of antibody reactivity to parasite isolates with SBP1 deletion or inhibited PfEMP1 expression suggest that PfEMP1 is the dominant target of acquired human antibodies, and that other P. falciparum IE surface proteins are minor targets. These results establish SBP1 as part of a critical pathway for the trafficking of major surface antigens targeted by human immunity, and have key implications for vaccine development, and quantifying immunity in populations.

  10. Effect of culling and vaccination on bovine tuberculosis infection in a European badger (Meles meles) population by spatial simulation modelling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdou, Marwa; Frankena, Klaas; O'Keeffe, James; Byrne, Andrew W

    2016-03-01

    The control of bovine tuberculosis (bTB) in cattle herds in the Republic of Ireland (ROI) is partially hindered by spill-back infection from wild badgers (Meles meles). The aim of this study was to determine the relative effects of interventions (combinations of culling and/or vaccination) on bTB dynamics in an Irish badger population. A spatial agent-based stochastic simulation model was developed to evaluate the effect of various control strategies for bovine tuberculosis in badgers: single control strategies (culling, selective culling, vaccination, and vaccine baits), and combined strategies (Test vaccinate/cull (TVC)), split area approaches using culling and vaccination, or selective culling and vaccination, and mixed scenarios where culling was conducted for five years and followed by vaccination or by a TVC strategy. The effect of each control strategy was evaluated over a 20-year period. Badger control was simulated in 25%, 50%, and 75% area (limited area strategy) or in the entire area (100%, wide area strategy). For endemic bTB, a culling strategy was successful in eradicating bTB from the population only if applied as an area-wide strategy. However, this was achieved only by risking the extinction of the badger population. Selective culling strategies (selective culling or TVC) mitigated this negative impact on the badger population's viability. Furthermore, both strategies (selective culling and TVC) allowed the badger population to recover gradually, in compensation for the population reduction following the initial use of removal strategies. The model predicted that vaccination can be effective in reducing bTB prevalence in badgers, when used in combination with culling strategies (i.e. TVC or other strategies). If fecundity was reduced below its natural levels (e.g. by using wildlife contraceptives), the effectiveness of vaccination strategies improved. Split-area simulations highlighted that interventions can have indirect effects (e.g. on

  11. Predicting within-herd prevalence of infection with bovine leukemia virus using bulk-tank milk antibody levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nekouei, Omid; Stryhn, Henrik; VanLeeuwen, John; Kelton, David; Hanna, Paul; Keefe, Greg

    2015-11-01

    Enzootic bovine leukosis (EBL) is an economically important infection of dairy cattle caused by bovine leukemia virus (BLV). Estimating the prevalence of BLV within dairy herds is a fundamental step towards pursuing efficient control programs. The objectives of this study were: (1) to determine the prevalence of BLV infection at the herd level using a bulk-tank milk (BTM) antibody ELISA in the Maritime region of Canada (3 provinces); and (2) to develop appropriate statistical models for predicting within-herd prevalence of BLV infection using BTM antibody ELISA titers. During 2013, three monthly BTM samples were collected from all dairy farms in the Maritime region of Canada (n=623) and tested for BLV milk antibodies using a commercial indirect ELISA. Based on the mean of the 3 BTM titers, 15 strata of herds (5 per province) were defined. From each stratum, 6 herds were randomly selected for a total of 90 farms. Within every selected herd, an additional BTM sample was taken (round 4), approximately 2 months after the third round. On the same day of BTM sampling, all cows that contributed milk to the fourth BTM sample were individually tested for BLV milk antibodies (n=6111) to estimate the true within-herd prevalence for the 90 herds. The association between true within-herd prevalence of BLV and means of various combinations of the BTM titers was assessed using linear regression models, adjusting for the stratified random sampling design. Herd level prevalence of BLV in the region was 90.8%. In the individual testing, 30.4% of cows were positive. True within-herd prevalences ranged from 0 to 94%. All linear regression models were able to predict the true within-herd prevalence of BLV reasonably well (R(2)>0.69). Predictions from the models were particularly accurate for low-to-medium spectrums of the BTM titers. In general, as a greater number of the four repeated BTM titers were incorporated in the models, narrower confidence intervals around the prediction lines

  12. α2-Macroglobulin Can Crosslink Multiple Plasmodium falciparum Erythrocyte Membrane Protein 1 (PfEMP1) Molecules and May Facilitate Adhesion of Parasitized Erythrocytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stevenson, Liz; Laursen, Erik; Cowan, Graeme J;

    2015-01-01

    Rosetting, the adhesion of Plasmodium falciparum-infected erythrocytes to uninfected erythrocytes, involves clonal variants of the parasite protein P. falciparum erythrocyte membrane protein 1 (PfEMP1) and soluble serum factors. While rosetting is a well-known phenotypic marker of parasites...

  13. Milk losses due to bovine tropical theileriosis (Theileria annulata infection in Algeria

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    Ouarda Ayadi

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The authors studied the impact of tropical theileriosis onset on milk yield decrease in 10 local bred cows in Skikda (Northern Algeria during 2015 summer season. The milk yield decrease estimated weekly during two months was 2.76 L/day/cow corresponding to 31.92% of the total milk yield. This decrease corresponds to 110.5 Algerian Dinars (1.02 US$/day/diseased cow. The relative variation of milk yield showed a dramatic decrease from 82.72% to 0.76% at Day 21 then became constant. Further studies are needed to improve these estimations of financial losses due to bovine tropical theileriosis in Algeria.

  14. Heterogeneous distributions of Escherichia coli O157 within naturally infected bovine faecal pats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Susan E; Brown, Patrick E; John Wright, E; Bennett, Malcolm; Hart, C Anthony; French, Nigel P

    2005-03-15

    Escherichia coli O157 is an important human pathogen for which cattle are considered a reservoir. This paper describes and models the variation in counts of E. coli O157 that exists within individual bovine faecal pats. The presence and concentration of E. coli O157 in faecal samples was determined using a combination of direct spiral plating followed by a more sensitive isolation procedure. The data were modelled using multilevel random effect models, in which the random effects were allowed to be correlated to allow for the fact that pooled and individual samples come from the same pat. Up to a two log difference in the concentration of E. coli O157 was demonstrated in samples from different areas within a faecal pat. Pooling of individual samples from throughout the faecal pat and processing it as one composite sample allows this heterogeneity to be overcome.

  15. Histopathological and molecular study of Neospora caninum infection in bovine aborted fetuses

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    Amir Kamali

    2014-12-01

    Conclusions: The results showed N. caninum infection was detected in high percentage of aborted fetuses. In addition, at least one fourth of abortions caused by Neospora infection. These results indicate increasing number of abortions associated with the protozoa more than reported before in Iran.

  16. Evidence of bovine viral diarrhea virus infection in three species of sympatric wild ungulates in Nevada: life history strategies may maintain endemic infections in wild populations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peregrine Lee Wolff

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Evidence for bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV infection was detected in 2009-10 while investigating a pneumonia die-off in Rocky Mountain bighorn sheep (Ovis canadensis canadensis, and sympatric mountain goats (Oreamnos americanum in adjacent mountain ranges in Elko County, Nevada. Seroprevalence to BVDV-1 was 81% (N=32 in the bighorns and 100% (N=3 in the mountain goats. Serosurveillance from 2011 to 2015 of surviving bighorns and mountain goats as well as sympatric mule deer (Odocoileus hemionus, indicated a prevalence of 72% (N=45, 45% (N=51, and 51% (N=342 respectively. All species had antibody titers to BVDV1 and BVDV2. BVDV1 was isolated in cell culture from three bighorn sheep and a mountain goat kid. BVDV2 was isolated from two mule deer. Six deer (N=96 sampled in 2013 were positive for BVDV by antigen-capture ELISA on ear notch. Wild ungulates and cattle concurrently graze public and private lands in these two mountain ranges, thus providing potential for interspecies viral transmission. Like cattle, mule deer, mountain goats, and bighorn sheep can be infected with BVDV and can develop clinical disease including immunosuppression. Winter migration patterns that increase densities and species interaction during the first and second trimester of gestation may contribute to the long term maintenance of the virus in these wild ungulates. More studies are needed to determine the population level impacts of BVDV infection on these three species.

  17. Evidence of Bovine viral diarrhea virus Infection in Three Species of Sympatric Wild Ungulates in Nevada: Life History Strategies May Maintain Endemic Infections in Wild Populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolff, Peregrine L; Schroeder, Cody; McAdoo, Caleb; Cox, Mike; Nelson, Danielle D; Evermann, James F; Ridpath, Julia F

    2016-01-01

    Evidence for bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) infection was detected in 2009-2010 while investigating a pneumonia die-off in Rocky Mountain bighorn sheep (Ovis canadensis, canadensis), and sympatric mountain goats (Oreamnos americanum) in adjacent mountain ranges in Elko County, Nevada. Seroprevalence to BVDV-1 was 81% (N = 32) in the bighorns and 100% (N = 3) in the mountain goats. Serosurveillance from 2011 to 2015 of surviving bighorns and mountain goats as well as sympatric mule deer (Odocoileus hemionus), indicated a prevalence of 72% (N = 45), 45% (N = 51), and 51% (N = 342) respectively. All species had antibody titers to BVDV1 and BVDV2. BVDV1 was isolated in cell culture from three bighorn sheep and a mountain goat kid. BVDV2 was isolated from two mule deer. Six deer (N = 96) sampled in 2013 were positive for BVDV by antigen-capture ELISA on a single ear notch. Wild ungulates and cattle concurrently graze public and private lands in these two mountain ranges, thus providing potential for interspecies viral transmission. Like cattle, mule deer, mountain goats, and bighorn sheep can be infected with BVDV and can develop clinical disease including immunosuppression. Winter migration patterns that increase densities and species interaction during the first and second trimester of gestation may contribute to the long term maintenance of the virus in these wild ungulates. More studies are needed to determine the population level impacts of BVDV infection on these three species.

  18. Polymorphisms in the gene encoding bovine interleukin-10 receptor alpha are associated with Mycobacterium avium ssp. paratuberculosis infection status

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    Kelton David F

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Johne's disease is a chronic inflammatory bowel disease (IBD of ruminants caused by Mycobacterium avium ssp. paratuberculosis (MAP. Since this pathogen has been implicated in the pathogenesis of human IBDs, the goal of this study was to assess whether single nucleotide polymorphism (SNPs in several well-known candidate genes for human IBD are associated with susceptibility to MAP infection in dairy cattle. Methods The bovine candidate genes, interleukin-10 (IL10, IL10 receptor alpha/beta (IL10RA/B, transforming growth factor beta 1 (TGFB1, TGFB receptor class I/II (TGFBR1/2, and natural resistance-associated macrophage protein 1 (SLC11A1 were sequenced for SNP discovery using pooled DNA samples, and the identified SNPs were genotyped in a case-control association study comprised of 242 MAP negative and 204 MAP positive Holstein dairy cattle. Logistic regression was used to determine the association of SNPs and reconstructed haplotypes with MAP infection status. Results A total of 13 SNPs were identified. Four SNPs in IL10RA (984G > A, 1098C > T, 1269T > C, and 1302A > G were tightly linked, and showed a strong additive and dominance relationship with MAP infection status. Haplotypes AGC and AAT, containing the SNPs IL10RA 633C > A, 984G > A and 1185C > T, were associated with an elevated and reduced likelihood of positive diagnosis by serum ELISA, respectively. Conclusions SNPs in IL10RA are associated with MAP infection status in dairy cattle. The functional significance of these SNPs warrants further investigation.

  19. Bovine spongiform encephalopathy infection alters endogenous retrovirus expression in distinct brain regions of cynomolgus macaques (Macaca fascicularis

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    Montag Judith

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Prion diseases such as bovine spongiform encephalopathies (BSE are transmissible neurodegenerative diseases which are presumably caused by an infectious conformational isoform of the cellular prion protein. Previous work has provided evidence that in murine prion disease the endogenous retrovirus (ERV expression is altered in the brain. To determine if prion-induced changes in ERV expression are a general phenomenon we used a non-human primate model for prion disease. Results Cynomolgus macaques (Macaca fasicularis were infected intracerebrally with BSE-positive brain stem material from cattle and allowed to develop prion disease. Brain tissue from the basis pontis and vermis cerebelli of the six animals and the same regions from four healthy controls were subjected to ERV expression profiling using a retrovirus-specific microarray and quantitative real-time PCR. We could show that Class I gammaretroviruses HERV-E4-1, ERV-9, and MacERV-4 increase expression in BSE-infected macaques. In a second approach, we analysed ERV-K-(HML-2 RNA and protein expression in extracts from the same cynomolgus macaques. Here we found a significant downregulation of both, the macaque ERV-K-(HML-2 Gag protein and RNA in the frontal/parietal cortex of BSE-infected macaques. Conclusions We provide evidence that dysregulation of ERVs in response to BSE-infection can be detected on both, the RNA and the protein level. To our knowledge, this is the first report on the differential expression of ERV-derived structural proteins in prion disorders. Our findings suggest that endogenous retroviruses may induce or exacerbate the pathological consequences of prion-associated neurodegeneration.

  20. Improved detection of Mycobacterium bovis infection in bovine lymph node tissue using immunomagnetic separation (IMS-based methods.

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    Linda D Stewart

    Full Text Available Immunomagnetic separation (IMS can selectively isolate and concentrate Mycobacterium bovis cells from lymph node tissue to facilitate subsequent detection by PCR (IMS-PCR or culture (IMS-MGIT. This study describes application of these novel IMS-based methods to test for M. bovis in a survey of 280 bovine lymph nodes (206 visibly lesioned (VL, 74 non-visibly lesioned (NVL collected at slaughter as part of the Northern Ireland bovine TB eradication programme. Their performance was evaluated relative to culture. Overall, 174 (62.1% lymph node samples tested positive by culture, 162 (57.8% by IMS-PCR (targeting IS6110, and 191 (68.2% by IMS-MGIT culture. Twelve (6.9% of the 174 culture positive lymph node samples were not detected by either of the IMS-based methods. However, an additional 79 M. bovis positive lymph node samples (27 (13.1% VL and 52 (70.3% NVL were detected by the IMS-based methods and not by culture. When low numbers of viable M. bovis are present in lymph nodes (e.g. in NVLs of skin test reactor cattle decontamination prior to culture may adversely affect viability, leading to false negative culture results. In contrast, IMS specifically captures whole M. bovis cells (live, dead or potentially dormant which are not subject to any deleterious treatment before detection by PCR or MGIT culture. During this study only 2.7% of NVL lymph nodes tested culture positive, whereas 70.3% of the same samples tested M. bovis positive by the IMS-based tests. Results clearly demonstrate that not only are the IMS-based methods more rapid but they have greater detection sensitivity than the culture approach currently used for the detection of M. bovis infection in cattle. Adoption of the IMS-based methods for lymph node testing would have the potential to improve M. bovis detection in clinical samples.

  1. Erythritol Availability in Bovine, Murine and Human Models Highlights a Potential Role for the Host Aldose Reductase during Brucella Infection

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    Thibault Barbier

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Erythritol is the preferential carbon source for most brucellae, a group of facultative intracellular bacteria that cause a worldwide zoonosis. Since this polyol is abundant in genital organs of ruminants and swine, it is widely accepted that erythritol accounts at least in part for the characteristic genital tropism of brucellae. Nevertheless, proof of erythritol availability and essentiality during Brucella intracellular multiplication has remained elusive. To investigate this relationship, we compared ΔeryH (erythritol-sensitive and thus predicted to be attenuated if erythritol is present, ΔeryA (erythritol-tolerant but showing reduced growth if erythritol is a crucial nutrient and wild type B. abortus in various infection models. This reporting system indicated that erythritol was available but not required for B. abortus multiplication in bovine trophoblasts. However, mice and humans have been considered to lack erythritol, and we found that it was available but not required for B. abortus multiplication in human and murine trophoblastic and macrophage-like cells, and in mouse spleen and conceptus (fetus, placenta and envelopes. Using this animal model, we found that B. abortus infected cells and tissues contained aldose reductase, an enzyme that can account for the production of erythritol from pentose cycle precursors.

  2. Phenotype definition is a main point in genome-wide association studies for bovine Mycobacterium avium ssp. paratuberculosis infection status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Küpper, J; Brandt, H; Donat, K; Erhardt, G

    2014-10-01

    Paratuberculosis caused by Mycobacterium avium ssp. paratuberculosis (MAP) causes economic losses and is present in dairy herds worldwide. Different studies used different diagnostic tests to detect infection status and are the basis of genome-wide association (GWA) studies with inconsistent results. Therefore, the aim of this study was to identify and compare genomic regions associated with MAP susceptibility in the same cohort of cattle using different diagnostic tests. The GWA study was performed in German Holsteins within a case-control assay using 305 cows tested for MAP by fecal culture and additional with four different commercial ELISA-tests. Genotyping was performed with the Illumina Bovine SNP50 BeadChip. The results using fecal culture or ELISA test led to the identification of different genetic loci. Two single-nucleotide polymorphisms showed significant association with the ELISA-status. However, no significant association for MAP infection could be confirmed. Our results show that the definition of the MAP-phenotype has an important impact on the outcome of GWA studies for paratuberculosis.

  3. Innate immune response in experimentally induced bovine intramammary infection with Staphylococcus simulans and S. epidermidis

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    Simojoki Heli

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Coagulase-negative staphylococci (CNS are in several countries the most common bacteria isolated in subclinical mastitis. To investigate the innate immune response of cows to infections with two common mastitis-causing CNS species, Staphylococcus epidermidis and Staphylococcus simulans, experimental intramammary infection was induced in eight cows using a crossover design. The milk somatic cell count (SCC, N-acetyl-β-D-glucosaminidase (NAGase activity, milk amyloid A (MAA, serum amyloid A (SAA and proinflammatory cytokines interleukin (IL-1β, IL-8, and tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α were determined at several time points before and after challenge. All cows became infected and showed mild to moderate clinical signs of mastitis. The spontaneous elimination rate of the 16 infections was 31.3%, with no difference between species. Infections triggered a local cytokine response in the experimental udder quarters, but cytokines were not detected in the uninfected control quarters or in systemic circulation. The innate local immune response for S. simulans was slightly stronger, with significantly higher concentrations of IL-1β and IL-8. The IL-8 response could be divided into early, delayed, or combined types of response. The CNS species or persistency of infection was not associated with the type of IL-8 response. No significant differences were seen between spontaneously eliminated or persistent infections.

  4. Phylo-typing of clinical Escherichia coli isolates originating from bovine mastitis and canine pyometra and urinary tract infection by means of quadruplex PCR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müştak, Hamit Kaan; Günaydin, Elçin; Kaya, İnci Başak; Salar, Merve Özdal; Babacan, Orkun; Önat, Kaan; Ata, Zafer; Diker, Kadir Serdar

    2015-01-01

    Escherichia coli is one of the major causative agents of bovine mastitis worldwide, and is typically associated with acute, clinical mastitis. Besides this, E. coli strains which belong to the extra-intestinal pathogenic group are also the major cause of urinary tract infections and pyometra in dogs. In this study, it was aimed to investigate phylo-groups/subgroups in 155 E. coli isolates obtained from acute bovine mastitis, 43 from urinary tract infections of dogs and 20 from canine pyometra by a formerly described triplex PCR and recently described new quadruplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR) method. Group A1 (n = 118; 76%) and B1 (n = 71; 46%) were found to be the most prevalent groups by triplex and quadruplex PCR assays in mastitis isolates, respectively. Phylo-typing of 43 urinary tract isolates also revealed that most of the isolates belonged to A1 (n = 23; 54%) by triplex and B2 (n = 36; 84%) by quadruplex PCR assays. The isolates assigned as group A1 (n = 17; 85%) by triplex PCR could not be classified by quadruplex PCR in pyometra isolates. The results support the hypothesis that E. coli strains isolated from bovine mastitis cases are environmental. Also, groups C, E and F were identified as new phylo-groups for the first time in acute bovine mastitis cases. The comparison of triplex PCR with quadruplex PCR results revealed that most of the groups assigned in triplex PCR were altered by quadruplex PCR assay.

  5. Antithrombin Activity of Erythrocyte Microvesicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levin, G Ya; Sukhareva, E G

    2017-04-01

    Coagulation and optical (based on chromogenic substrate) methods were employed to examine antithrombin activity of erythrocytes and erythrocyte-derived microvesicles isolated days 7, 14, 21, and 28 on erythrocyte storage. The erythrocyte-derived microvesicles decelerated fibrin clot formation from fibrinogen in the presence of exogenous thrombin both with and without heparin. Microvesicles reduced optical density of chromogenic substrate. These data suggest that erythrocyte-derived microvesicles display a prominent antithrombin activity, which significantly increases during erythrocyte storage.

  6. Bovine viral diarrhea virus type 2 in vivo infection modulates TLR4 responsiveness in differentiated myeloid cells which is associated with decreased MyD88 expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaut, Robert G; McGill, Jodi L; Neill, John D; Ridpath, Julia F; Sacco, Randy E

    2015-10-02

    Symptoms of bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) infection range from subclinical to severe, depending on strain virulence. Several in vitro studies showed BVDV infection impaired leukocyte function. Fewer studies have examined the effects of in vivo BVDV infection on monocyte/macrophage function, especially with strains of differing virulence. We characterized cytokine production by bovine myeloid cells isolated early or late in high (HV) or low virulence (LV) BVDV2 infection. Given BVDV infection may enhance susceptibility to secondary bacterial infection, LPS responses were examined as well. Monocytes from HV and LV infected calves produced higher levels of cytokines compared to cells from controls. In contrast, monocyte-derived macrophage cytokine levels were generally reduced. Modulated cytokine expression in HV BVDV2 macrophages was associated with decreased MyD88 expression, likely due to its interaction with viral NS5A. These data and those of others, suggest that certain Flaviviridae may have evolved strategies for subverting receptor signaling pathways involving MyD88.

  7. Use of three-dimensional accelerometers to evaluate behavioral changes in cattle experimentally infected with bovine viral diarrhea virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayne, Jenna E; Walz, Paul H; Passler, Thomas; White, Brad J; Theurer, Miles E; van Santen, Edzard

    2016-06-01

    OBJECTIVE To assess the use of 3-D accelerometers to evaluate behavioral changes in cattle experimentally infected with a low-virulent strain of bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV). ANIMALS 20 beef steers (mean weight, 238 kg). PROCEDURES Calves were allocated to a BVDV (n = 10) or control (10) group. On day 0, calves in the BVDV group were inoculated with a low-virulent strain of BVDV (4 × 10(6) TCID50, intranasally), and calves in the control group were sham inoculated with BVDV-free medium (4 mL; intranasally). An accelerometer was affixed to the right hind limb of each calf on day -7 to record activity (lying, walking, and standing) continuously until 35 days after inoculation. Baseline was defined as days -7 to -1. Blood samples were collected at predetermined times for CBC, serum biochemical analysis, virus isolation, and determination of anti-BVDV antibody titers. RESULTS All calves in the BVDV group developed viremia and anti-BVDV antibodies but developed only subclinical or mild disease. Calves in the control group did not develop viremia or anti-BVDV antibodies. Mean time allocated to each activity did not differ significantly between the BVDV and control groups on any day except day 8, when calves in the BVDV group spent less time standing than the calves in the control group. Following inoculation, calves in both groups tended to spend more time lying and less time walking and standing than they did during baseline. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Results indicated that behavioral data obtained by accelerometers could not distinguish calves subclinically infected with BVDV from healthy control calves. However, subtle changes in the behavior of the BVDV-infected calves were detected and warrant further investigation.

  8. Principles for eradication of bovine viral diarrhoea virus (BVDV) infections in cattle populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindberg, A L; Alenius, S

    1999-01-01

    Systematic eradication of BVDV without vaccination started in Scandinavia in 1993. In principle, the schemes include; (1) identification of non-infected and infected herds using different combinations of serological herd tests such as bulk milk tests and spot tests (sample of animals in a certain age), (2) monitoring/certification of non-infected herds by repeated sampling, applying one of the above-mentioned methods and (3) virus clearance in infected herds aimed at removing persistently infected (PI) animals in a cost- and time-efficient manner. In the virus clearance protocol described, an initial test is performed on all animals with subsequent follow-up of calves born as well as of dams seronegative in the initial test. It is generally recommended to perform an initial antibody test on all samples. This should be done not only to screen for seronegative animals on which virus isolation should be attempted (i.e. possible PI animals), but more in order to identify non-immune animals in reproductive age, that is, the key animals in herd-level persistence of infection. In Sweden, a common finding has been self-clearance, where the infection ceases without any other intervention than controlled introduction of new animals. Other epidemiological observations concern the course of events following virus introduction. Important risk factors for spreading BVDV are discussed, where livestock trade is perceived as the most central to control. Live vaccines, imported semen and embryos constitute special hazards, since they may act as vehicles for the introduction of new BVDV strains. The importance of making farmers aware of herd biosecurity and their own responsibility for it is stressed, and in order to maintain a favourable situation after a scheme has been concluded, effort must be put into establishing such a persisting attitude in the farming community.

  9. A combination of lactic acid bacteria regulates Escherichia coli infection and inflammation of the bovine endometrium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genís, Sandra; Sánchez-Chardi, Alejandro; Bach, Àlex; Fàbregas, Francesc; Arís, Anna

    2017-01-01

    Uterine function in cattle is compromised by bacterial contamination and inflammation after calving. The objective of this study was to select a combination of lactic acid bacteria (LAB) to decrease endometrium inflammation and Escherichia coli infection. Primary endometrial epithelial cells were cultured in vitro to select the most favorable LAB combination modulating basal tissue inflammation and E. coli infection. Supernatants were obtained to determine expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines, and E. coli infection was evaluated after harvesting the tissue and plate counting. The selected LAB combination was tested in uterus explants to assess its capacity to modulate basal and acute inflammation (associated with E. coli infection). The combination of Lactobacillus rhamnosus, Pediococcus acidilactici, and Lactobacillus reuteri at a ratio of 25:25:2, respectively, reduced E. coli infection in vitro with (89.77%) or without basal tissue inflammation (95.10%) compared with single LAB strains. Lactic acid bacteria treatment reduced CXCL8 and IL1B expression 4.7- and 2.2-fold, respectively, under acute inflammation. Ex vivo, the tested LAB combination reduced acute inflammation under E. coli infection, decreasing IL-8, IL-1β, and IL-6 up to 2.2-, 2.5-, and 2.2-fold, respectively. In the total inflammation model, the LAB combination decreased IL-8 1.6-fold and IL-6 1.2-fold. Ultrastructural evaluation of the tissue suggested no direct interaction between the LAB and E. coli, although pathological effects of E. coli in endometrial cells were greatly diminished or even reversed by the LAB combination. This study shows the promising potential of LAB probiotics for therapeutic use against endometrial inflammation and infection. Copyright © 2017 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Host responses to persistent Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis infection in surgically isolated bovine ileal segments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charavaryamath, Chandrashekhar; Gonzalez-Cano, Patricia; Fries, Patrick; Gomis, Susantha; Doig, Kimberley; Scruten, Erin; Potter, Andrew; Napper, Scott; Griebel, Philip J

    2013-02-01

    A lack of appropriate disease models has limited our understanding of the pathogenesis of persistent enteric infections with Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis. A model was developed for the controlled delivery of a defined dose of M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis to surgically isolated ileal segments in newborn calves. The stable intestinal segments enabled the characterization of host responses to persistent M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis infections after a 9-month period, including an analysis of local mucosal immune responses relative to an adjacent uninfected intestinal compartment. M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis remained localized at the initial site of intestinal infection and was not detected by PCR in the mesenteric lymph node. M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis-specific T cell proliferative responses included both CD4 and γδ T cell receptor (γδTcR) T cell responses in the draining mesenteric lymph node. The levels of CD8(+) and γδTcR(+) T cells increased significantly (P avium subsp. paratuberculosis-specific tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) and gamma interferon secretion by lamina propria leukocytes was also significantly (P avium subsp. paratuberculosis infection. In conclusion, surgically isolated ileal segments provided a model system for the establishment of a persistent and localized enteric M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis infection in cattle and facilitated the analysis of M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis-specific changes in mucosal leukocyte phenotype and function. The accumulation of DC subpopulations in the lamina propria suggests that further investigation of mucosal DCs may provide insight into host responses to M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis infection and improve vaccine strategies to prevent M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis infection.

  11. Antibacterial susceptibility of bovine-mastitis pathogens tested directly in milk from infected quarters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Louhi-Lehtiö, M; Sandholm, M; Myllys, V; Honkanen-Buzalski, T

    1994-04-01

    Antibacterial susceptibilities of bovine-mastitis pathogens were analysed directly in 57 mastitic milk samples without inoculation with exogenous organisms. Aseptically collected milk was mixed with serial dilutions of antibacterials and the growth was observed using 2,3,5-triphenyltetrazolium chloride (TTC) reduction the following day. The results were compared with those obtained by using calibrated bacterial inocula in turbidimetric minimum-inhibitory-concentration (MIC) determination in broth cultures, and in TTC-broth culture-test and TTC-normal milk-test. The results of different methods all correlated positively when the entire data was used. However, taking the direct test in mastitic milk as the 'true' result, the total discrepancies varied from 34.7% to 48.8%. Antibacterial activities of the trimethoprim-sulphadoxine combination, and of spiramycin and ampicillin, decreased significantly when nutrient broth was replaced by milk as the test medium. The efficacy of trimethoprim-sulphadoxine as an antibacterial agent was also dependent on the source of milk.

  12. Control of Bovine Brucellosis from Persistently Infected Holdings Using RB51 Vaccination with Test-and-Slaughter: A Comparative Case Report from a High Incidence Area in Portugal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caetano, M C; Afonso, F; Ribeiro, R; Fonseca, A P; Abernethy, D A; Boinas, F

    2016-02-01

    Bovine brucellosis due to Brucella abortus infection causes significant reproductive and production losses in cattle and is a major zoonosis. Eradication of this disease has proved difficult to achieve in Portugal where it still occurs in some regions despite an ongoing national eradication programme. In 2004, the Alentejo region, a major cattle producing area, reported one of the highest levels of bovine brucellosis in the country, especially in one divisional area. In that area, bovine brucellosis was particularly problematic in a holding of ten herds, the largest extensive cattle unit in the country, which remained infected despite an extensive test-and-slaughter programme and depopulation of five herds. A 5-year programme of RB51 vaccination with biannual test-and-slaughter was thus implemented in 2004. The apparent animal seroprevalence decreased from 19% (646/3,400) to 3% (88/2930) on the third herd-level test and remained below 0.8% (27/3324) after the fourth test. After the tenth test, the holding had a prevalence of 0.1% (2/2332) and only one herd remained positive with a within-herd prevalence of 1.1% (2/177). The results were compared to all other herds (n = 10) in the divisional area that were also persistently infected but were subject only to test-and-slaughter before being depopulated. In these herds, the strategy of test-and-slaughter did not reduce the prevalence, which remained significantly higher than the vaccinated group (median = 0.48% and 8.5% in vaccinated versus non-vaccinated herds; Wilcoxon rank sum test; P Portugal provided a valuable case study to the official veterinary services by illustrating the value of RB51 vaccination with parallel testing and improved biosecurity as a comprehensive and sustainable strategy for bovine brucellosis control in persistently infected herds.

  13. Survival analysis on aggregate data to assess time to sero-conversion after experimental infection with Bovine Leukemia virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monti, G E; Frankena, K

    2005-05-10

    Bovine Leukemia virus (BLV) is a ubiquitous retrovirus that affects mainly cattle. Knowledge of the precise moment of infection is fundamental for identification and evaluation of factors related to BLV transmission. Systematic reviews and meta-analyses provide good evidence on the effects of medical interventions. The objectives were to estimate time to sero-conversion after experimental infection using data from retrieved literature and to detect factors that may influence the length of that interval using survival analysis on pooled data. An analysis using aggregate data from 36 studies totalling 438 observations was performed. From this, four sets were created and analysed by interval-censored accelerated failure time models (AFT) with different distributions (exponential, Weibull, log-logistic, lognormal and generalized gamma), and some variants of the Cox model (Andersen-Gill, smoothing splines) with and without a frailty effect. The AFT gamma model fit best and the estimated median time to sero-conversion in the null model was 57 days (95% confidence interval (CI): 49; 75) using all data and 47 days (95% CI: 39; 55) when only studies using experimental inoculation were considered. Some factors were consistently associated with time to sero-conversion. These included exposure by animal-to-animal contact (resulting in a seven-fold increase in time to sero-conversion compared to direct inoculation), diagnostic method to detect sero-conversion (time to sero-conversion was 1.4 times shorter when AGID was used compared to ELISA), and transmission by insect bites (biological media) delayed sero-conversion 2.3 times compared transmission via needles or other inanimate media. After fitting a frailty Cox model, results showed that sero-conversion in susceptible animals after infection using donors, in which presence of virus before the experiment started was confirmed, increased the hazard of sero-conversion two times in comparison with donors in which virus presence

  14. Comparison of the IFAT and Iscom-ELISA response in bovine foetuses with Neospora caninum infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Slotved, H.C.; Jensen, L.; Lind, Peter

    1999-01-01

    foetuses without demonstrable infection (Group C) were examined. The age of the foetuses ranged from 4.5 months to 9 months. Albumin concentration (measured by Rocket Immunoelectrophoresis) was not significantly different in Group A compared with that in both Groups B and C, while that in Group B...

  15. Some features of immune status of animals infected with bovine leukosis background unbalanced on feeding

    OpenAIRE

    TURKO I.; SEMANYUK V.; PELENYO R.; KULYABA O.; TURKO YA.; VERHOLYUK M.

    2012-01-01

    The features of protein metabolism and immunity in cows with leukemia by unbalanced feeding of animals. The peculiarities of the dynamics of total protein, protein fractions, immunoglobulins, Tand B-lymphocytes in cows under violation of the sugar-protein ratio of diet and infection with a virus leukemia.

  16. Innate and adaptive immune responses to in utero infection with bovine viral diarrhea virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Infection of pregnant cows with noncytopathic (ncp) BVDV induces rapid innate and adaptive immune responses resulting in clearance of the virus in less than 3 weeks. Seven to 14 days after inoculation of the cow, ncpBVDV crosses the placenta and induces a fetal viremia. Establishment of persistent ...

  17. Bovine paramphistomosis in Galicia (Spain): prevalence, intensity, aetiology and geospatial distribution of the infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Warleta, Marta; Lladosa, Silvia; Castro-Hermida, José Antonio; Martínez-Ibeas, Ana María; Conesa, David; Muñoz, Facundo; López-Quílez, Antonio; Manga-González, Yolanda; Mezo, Mercedes

    2013-01-31

    The present study explored various basic aspects of the epidemiology of paramphistomosis in Galicia, the main cattle producing region in Spain. In total, 589 cows from different farms located across the region were selected at random in the slaughterhouse for examination of the rumens and reticula for the presence of Paramphistomidae flukes. Paramphistomes were found in 111 of 589 necropsied cows (18.8%; 95% CI: 15.7-21.9%), with higher prevalences of infection in beef cows than in dairy cows (29.2% vs 13.9%). Although the number of flukes per animal was generally low (median=266 flukes), some cows harboured large parasite burdens (up to 11,895 flukes), which may have harmful effects on their health or productivity. Cows with higher parasite burdens also excreted greater numbers of fluke eggs in their faeces, which suggests that heavily parasitized mature cows play an important role in the transmission of paramphistomosis. This role may be particularly important in Galicia, where the roe deer, which is the only wild ruminant in the study area, was found not to be a reservoir for the infection. The use of morpho-anatomical and molecular techniques applied to a large number of fluke specimens provided reliable confirmation that Calicophoron daubneyi is the only species of the family Paramphistomidae that parasitizes cattle in Galicia. The environmental data from the farms of origin of the necropsied cows were used in Bayesian geostatistical models to predict the probability of infection by C. daubneyi throughout the region. The results revealed the role of environmental risk factors in explaining the geographical heterogeneity in the probability of infection in beef and dairy cattle. These explanatory factors were used to construct predictive maps showing the areas with the highest predicted risk of infection as well as the uncertainty associated with the predictions.

  18. Excretion of (3H)prednisolone in clinically normal and experimentally infected bovine udders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geleta, J.N.; Shimoda, W.; Mercer, H.D.

    1984-08-01

    The excretion rate of (3H)prednisolone from clinically normal and experimentally infected udders of 10 lactating cows was studied. Each quarter of 6 cows was injected with a single dose of (3H)prednisolone mixed with non-radioactive prednisolone equivalent to 10 mg in 10 ml of peanut oil base. Each of the remaining 4 cows was given 40 mg of nonradioactive prednisolone and (3H)prednisolone in 60% ethanol IV. Control and postadministration samples of blood, milk, and urine were examined for radioactivity. The effects of (3H)prednisolone were evaluated in the same cows, first in clinically normal udders, then 2 weeks later in udders experimentally infected with Streptococcus agalactiae. Absorption and elimination of prednisolone were the same before and after induced infection. Within 3 hours after intramammary injection, 95% of the labeled prednisolone was absorbed systemically, less than 5% of this dose was recovered in milk, and 29% was excreted in urine. After IV injection of (3H)prednisolone, less than 0.2% of the total radioactivity was recovered in milk and less than 46% was excreted in urine. Clinical mastitis induced by S agalactiae was moderate. Circulating blood leukocytes and somatic cells in the milk of normal cows remained essentially unchanged. The leukocyte response to induced infection was rapid in blood and milk. Large numbers of leukocytes were noticed in the milk and a severe leukopenia occurred. Prednisolone treatment did not alter the number of somatic cells in milk or reduce the inflammatory response of experimentally infected cows.

  19. Bovine Leukemia Virus Infection in Dairy Cattle: Effect on Serological Response to Immunization against J5 Escherichia coli Bacterin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ronald J. Erskine

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Thirteen bovine leukemia virus- (BLV- negative and 22 BLV-positive Holstein cows were immunized with J5 Escherichia coli bacterin at dry off, three weeks before calving, during the second week after calving, and three weeks after the third immunization. Serum was collected before the initial immunization, immediately before the third and fourth immunizations, and 21 days after the fourth immunization. Anti-J5 E. coli IgM, IgG1, and IgG2 titers were determined by ELISA. Anti-J5 E. coli IgM titers did not differ significantly (P=.98 between groups. Increases in anti-J5 E. coli IgG1 titers were higher in the BLV-negative cows (P=.057. Geometric mean anti-J5 E. coli IgG2 titers increased fourfold in the BLV-negative cows, which was significantly higher (P=.007 than the twofold increase in the BLV-positive cows. Cattle infected with BLV may have impaired serologic responses following immunization with J5 bacterin, and response may differ according to antibody isotype.

  20. Bovine Papillomavirus Type 2 Infection and Microscopic Patterns of Urothelial Tumors of the Urinary Bladder in Water Buffaloes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paola Maiolino

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Microscopic patterns of thirty-four urothelial tumors of the urinary bladder of water buffaloes from the Marmara and Black Sea Regions of Turkey are here described. All the animals grazed on lands rich in bracken fern. Histological diagnosis was assessed using morphological parameters recently suggested for the urinary bladder tumors of cattle. Papillary carcinoma was the most common neoplastic lesion (22/34 observed in this study, and low-grade carcinoma was more common (seventeen cases than high-grade carcinoma (five cases. Papilloma, papillary urothelial neoplasm of low malignant potential (PUNLMP, and invasive carcinomas were less frequently seen. Carcinoma in situ (CIS was often detected associated with some papillary and invasive carcinomas. De novo (primary CIS was rare representing 3% of tumors of this series. A peculiar feature of the most urothelial tumors was the presence in the tumor stroma of immune cells anatomically organized in tertiary lymphoid organs (TLOs. Bovine papillomavirus type-2 (PV-2 E5 oncoprotein was detected by molecular and immunohistochemistry procedures. Early protein, E2, and late protein, L1, were also detected by immunohistochemical studies. Morphological and molecular findings show that BPV-2 infection contributes to the development of urothelial bladder carcinogenesis also in water buffaloes.

  1. Bovine Papillomavirus Type 2 Infection and a Series of Mesenchymal Tumors of the Urinary Bladder in Cattle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuela Martano

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This report describes the histopathology of two hundred and fifty-three mesenchymal tumors of the urinary bladder in cattle grazing on lands rich in bracken fern. Approximately 80% were hemangiomas and angiosarcomas. Hemangioma (capillary, cavernous, and large vessels was the most frequent mesenchymal tumor and was more common than angiosarcoma. Although the appearance of endothelial cells can vary remarkably, epithelioid angiosarcomas, often containing multinucleated cells, were the most frequent malignant vascular tumors. Hemangiopericytoma and tumors of muscle and soft connective tissue origin, alone and/or in association with tumor-like lesions, were less frequently seen. Furthermore, forty-five cases of intravascular papillary endothelial hyperplasia (IPEH, a lesion not previously reported in the urinary bladder of cattle, were also described. Bovine papillomavirus type-2 DNA was amplified in tumor samples. Forty vascular tumors were investigated by dual-labeling immunofluorescence, and, for the first time, a coexpression of E5 and platelet-derived growth factor β receptor (PDGFβR was shown to occur. The results show that the BPV-2 E5 oncoprotein binds to the activated form of the PDGFβ receptor thus playing an important role in mesenchymal as well as epithelial carcinogenesis of the urinary bladder. Furthermore, these findings demonstrate that BPV-2 infects both epithelial and mesenchymal cells.

  2. Identification of Mycobacterium bovis antigens by analysis of bovine T-cell responses after infection with a virulent strain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Alito

    2003-11-01

    Full Text Available Purification and characterization of individual antigenic proteins are essential for the understanding of the pathogenic mechanisms of mycobacteria and the immune response against them. In the present study, we used anion-exchange chromatography to fractionate cell extracts and culture supernatant proteins from Mycobacterium bovis to identify T-cell-stimulating antigens. These fractions were incubated with peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC from M. bovis-infected cattle in lymphoproliferation assays. This procedure does not denature proteins and permits the testing of mixtures of potential antigens that could be later identified. We characterized protein fractions with high stimulation indices from both culture supernatants and cell extracts. Proteins were identified by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis followed by N-terminal sequencing or MALDI-TOF. Culture supernatant fractions containing low molecular weight proteins such as ESAT6 and CFP10 and other proteins (85B, MPB70, and the novel antigens TPX and TRB-B were associated with a high stimulation index. These results reinforce the concept that some low molecular weight proteins such as ESAT6 and CFP10 play an important role in immune responses. Also, Rv3747 and L7/L12 were identified in high stimulation index cell extract fractions. These data show that protein fractions with high lymphoproliferative activity for bovine PBMC can be characterized and antigens which have been already described and new protein antigens can also be identified in these fractions.

  3. Babesia bovis: expression of adhesion molecules in bovine umbilical endothelial cells stimulated with plasma from infected cattle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marlene I. Vargas

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Ten male, 12-month-old Jersey with intact spleens, serologically and parasitologically free from Babesia were housed individually in an arthropod-free isolation system from birth and throughout entire experiment. The animals were randomly divided into two groups. Five animals (group A were intravenously inoculated with 6.6 X10(7 red blood cells parasitized with pathogenic sample of Babesia bovis (passage 7 BboUFV-1, for the subsequent "ex vivo" determination of the expression of adhesion molecules. Five non-inoculated animals (group B were used as the negative control. The expression of the adhesion molecules ICAM-1, VCAM, PECAM-1 E-selectin and thrombospondin (TSP was measured in bovine umbilical vein endothelial cells (BUVECs. The endothelial cells stimulated with a pool of plasma from animals infected with the BboUFV-1 7th passage sample had a much more intense immunostaining of ICAM-1, VCAM, PECAM-1 E-selectin and TSP, compared to the cells which did not received the stimulus. The results suggest that proinflammatory cytokines released in the acute phase of babesiosis may be involved in the expression of adhesion molecules thereby implicating them in the pathophysiology of babesiosis caused by B. bovis.

  4. Effects of subclinical bovine leukemia virus infection on some production parameters in a dairy farm in southern Turkey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Kale

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Some production parameters of seropositive cows (age, first calving age, 305 day mature equivalent last milk yield production, lifetime mature equivalent milk yield production, lifetime total milk production, lifetime total milking period, lifetime monthly milk production, lifetime daily milk production, lifetime total days of milking, number of inseminations per pregnancy (for last pregnancy, number of calves and calving interval (for last pregnancy were analysed in the current study. The study population was clinically healthy Holstein cows from a commercial dairy herd in southern Turkey. Of 109 animals, 65 cows were seropositive by ELISA and the prevalence of bovine leukemia virus (BLV infection was 59.6 %. The prevalence of seropositive cows in 2nd (62.8 %, 3rd (64.7 %, 4th (61.5 %, and 5th (66.6 % lactations was slightly higher than that of cows in 1st (52.6 % lactations. No statistical differences were observed between BLV seronegative and seropositive cows for production and reproduction parameters analysed in this study (P > 0.05.

  5. Stages of in vitro phagocytosis of Plasmodium falciparum-infected erythrocytes by human monocytes Estágios da fagocitose in vitro por monócitos humanos de eritrócitos infectados por Plasmodium falciparum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Imaculada Muniz-Junqueira

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Monocytes/macrophages play a critical role in the defense mechanisms against malaria parasites, and are the main cells responsible for the elimination of malaria parasites from the blood circulation. We carried out a microscope-aided evaluation of the stages of in vitro phagocytosis of Plasmodium falciparum-infected erythrocytes, by human monocytes. These cells were obtained from healthy adult individuals by means of centrifugation through a cushion of Percoll density medium and were incubated with erythrocytes infected with Plasmodium falciparum that had previously been incubated with a pool of anti-plasmodial immune serum. We described the stages of phagocytosis, starting from adherence of infected erythrocytes to the phagocyte membrane and ending with their destruction within the phagolisosomes of the monocytes. We observed that the different erythrocytic forms of the parasite were ingested by monocytes, and that the process of phagocytosis may be completed in around 30 minutes. Furthermore, we showed that phagocytosis may occur continuously, such that different phases of the process were observed in the same phagocyte.Monócitos/macrófagos desempenham uma função crítica nos mecanismos de defesa antiplasmódio e constituem as principais células responsáveis pela eliminação das formas eritrocitárias do plasmódio da circulação sangüínea. Realizamos uma avaliação microscópica dos estágios da fagocitose in vitro de eritrócitos infectados por Plasmodium falciparum por monócitos humanos. Essas células foram obtidas de indivíduos adultos sadios por centrifugação em Percoll e incubadas com eritrócitos infectados por Plasmodium falciparum previamente incubados com um pool de soro imune contra plasmódio. Descrevemos os estágios da fagocitose, desde a aderência dos eritrócitos infectados até sua destruição nos fagolisossomas dos monócitos. Observou-se que eritrócitos infectados por todos os diferentes est

  6. Platelet aggregation responses and virus isolation from platelets in calves experimentally infected with type I or type II bovine viral diarrhea virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walz, P H; Bell, T G; Grooms, D L; Kaiser, L; Maes, R K; Baker, J C

    2001-10-01

    Altered platelet function has been reported in calves experimentally infected with type II bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV). The purpose of the present study was to further evaluate the ability of BVDV isolates to alter platelet function and to examine for the presence of a virus-platelet interaction during BVDV infection. Colostrum-deprived Holstein calves were obtained immediately after birth, housed in isolation, and assigned to 1 of 4 groups (1 control and 3 treatment groups). Control calves (n = 4) were sham inoculated, while calves in the infected groups (n = 4 for each group) were inoculated by intranasal instillation with 10(7) TCID50 of either BVDV 890 (type II), BVDV 7937 (type II), or BVDV TGAN (type I). Whole blood was collected prior to inoculation (day 0) and on days 4, 6, 8, 10, and 12 after inoculation for platelet function testing by optical aggregometry by using adenosine diphosphate and platelet activating factor. The maximum percentage aggregation and the slope of the aggregation curve decreased over time in BVDV-infected calves; however, statistically significant differences (Freidman repeated measures ANOVA on ranks, P infected with the type II BVDV isolates. Bovine viral diarrhea virus was not isolated from control calves, but was isolated from all calves infected with both type II BVDV isolates from days 4 through 12 after inoculation. In calves infected with type I BVDV, virus was isolated from 1 of 4 calves on days 4 and 12 after inoculation and from all calves on days 6 and 8 after inoculation. Altered platelet function was observed in calves infected with both type II BVDV isolates, but was not observed in calves infected with type I BVDV. Altered platelet function may be important as a difference in virulence between type I and type II BVDV infection.

  7. Elimination of toxicity and enhanced detection of lumpy skin disease virus on cell culture from experimentally infected bovine semen samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagla, V P; Osuagwuh, U I; Annandale, C H; Irons, P C; Venter, E H

    2006-12-01

    Lumpy skin disease virus (LSDV), a poxvirus of the genus Capripoxvirus, is shed in the semen of infected bulls. The screening of semen for infectious virus requires a sensitive diagnostic method. The isolation of the virus on cell cultures and/or the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) are sensitive diagnostic tests which may be used to screen semen for LSD viral DNA prior to artificial insemination. Although cell culture detects infectious virus and is a sensitive method, there are major difficulties in using this method due to the toxic effect of semen on the cells. The aim of this study was to find a method that decreases the toxic effect of semen and enhances the isolation of LSDV on cell culture. Semen samples from LSDV sero-negative bulls were collected and infected with a field isolate of LSDV, strain V248/93, with a titre of 6.5 log TCID50. The semen samples were treated with one of four different methods: centrifugation, serial dilution, filtration and chemical treatment with kaolin. The samples subjected to centrifugation, serial dilution and filtration were supplemented with gentamycin. Semen toxicity on cell cultures was eliminated when supernatants of semen samples centrifuged at 2000 rpm for 1, 3 and 5 min and serially diluted were used to inoculate confluent monolayer bovine dermis cells. The toxicity recorded when the pellet fractions of semen samples centrifuged for 5 min at 2000 rpm was comparable to results obtained from serially diluted samples supplemented with gentamycin. Filtration and kaolin treatment of semen samples did not remove the toxic effect.

  8. Whole-Genome Sequences of Mycobacterium bovis Strain MbURU-001, Isolated from Fresh Bovine Infected Samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lasserre, Moira; Berná, Luisa; Greif, Gonzalo; Díaz-Viraqué, Florencia; Naya, Hugo; Castro-Ramos, Miguel; Juambeltz, Arturo

    2015-01-01

    Bovine tuberculosis in cattle has a high incidence in Uruguay, where it is considered a disease of national importance. We present the genome sequence of Mycobacterium bovis strain MbURU-001, isolated from pectoral lymph nodes of a bovine host from a cattle farm. PMID:26543108

  9. MicroRNA regulation of bovine monocyte inflammatory and metabolic networks in an in vivo infection model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bovine mastitis is an inflammation-driven disease of the bovine mammary gland that costs the global dairy industry several billion dollars per annum. Because disease susceptibility is a multi-factorial complex phenotype, a multi-omic integrative biology approach is required to dissect the multilayer...

  10. A thymidine kinase-negative bovine herpesvirus 5 is highly attenuated for rabbits, but is neuroinvasive and establishes latent infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Campos da Silva

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Mutant viral strains deleted in non-essential genes represent useful tools to study the function of specific gene products in the biology of the virus. We herein describe an investigation on the phenotype of a bovine herpesvirus 5 (BoHV-5 recombinant deleted in the gene encoding the enzyme thymidine kinase (TK in rabbits, with special emphasis to neuroinvasiveness and the ability to establish and reactivate latent infection. Rabbits inoculated with the parental virus (SV-507/99 (n=18 at a low titer (10(5.5TCID50 shed virus in nasal secretions in titers up to 10(4.5TCID50 for up to 12 days (average: 9.8 days [5-12] and 5/ 16 developed neurological disease and were euthanized in extremis. Rabbits inoculated with the recombinant BoHV-5TKΔ at a high dose (10(7.1TCID50 also shed virus in nasal secretions, yet to lower titers (maximum: 10(2.3TCID50 and for a shorter period (average: 6.6 days [2-11] and remained healthy. PCR examination of brain sections of inoculated rabbits at day 6 post-infection (pi revealed a widespread distribution of the parental virus, whereas DNA of the recombinant BoHV-5TKΔ-was detected only in the trigeminal ganglia [TG] and olfactory bulbs [OB]. Nevertheless, during latent infection (52pi, DNA of the recombinant virus was detected in the TGs, OBs and also in other areas of the brain, demonstrating the ability of the virus to invade the brain. Dexamethasone (Dx administration at day 65 pi was followed by virus reactivation and shedding by 5/8 rabbits inoculated with the parental strain (mean duration of 4.2 days [1 - 9] and by none of seven rabbits inoculated with the recombinant virus. Again, PCR examination at day 30 post-Dx treatment revealed the presence of latent DNA in the TGs, OBs and in other areas of the brain of both groups. Taken together, these results confirm that the recombinant BoHV-5TKΔ is highly attenuated for rabbits. It shows a reduced ability to replicate in the nose but retains the ability to invade

  11. Pathogenesis of a genotype C strain of bovine parainfluenza virus type 3 infection in albino guinea pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Hong-Fei; Zhu, Yuan-Mao; Dong, Xiu-Mei; Cai, Hong; Ma, Lei; Wang, Shu; Yan, Hao; Wang, Xue-Zhi; Xue, Fei

    2014-08-08

    Bovine parainfluenza virus type 3 (BPIV3) is one of the most important of the known viral respiratory tract agents of both young and adult cattle and widespread among cattle around the world. Up to present, three genotypes A, B and C of BPIV3 have been described on the basis of genetic and phylogenetic analysis and only limited studies on the pathogenesis of the genotype A of BPIV3 infection in calves and laboratory animals have been performed. The report about experimental infections of the genotypes B and C of BPIV3 in laboratory animals and calves was scant. Therefore, an experimental infection of guinea pigs with the Chinese BPIV3 strain SD0835 of the genotype C was performed. Sixteen guinea pigs were intranasally inoculated with the suspension of SD0835, while eight control guinea pigs were also intranasally inoculated with the same volume of supernatant from uninfected MDBK cells. The virus-inoculated guinea pigs displayed a few observable clinical signs that were related to the respiratory tract disease and two of the sixteen experimentally infected guinea pigs died at 2 and 3 days post inoculation (PI), respectively, and apparent gross pneumonic lesions were observed at necropsy. The gross pneumonic lesions in guinea pigs inoculated with SD0835 consisted of dark red, slightly depressed, irregular areas of consolidation in the lung lobes from the second to 9th day of infection at necropsy, and almost complete consolidation and atelectasis of the lung lobes were seen at 7 days PI. Histopathological changes including alveoli septa thickening and focal cellulose pneumonia were also observed in the lungs of guinea pigs experimentally infected with SD0835. Viral replication was detectable by virus isolation and titration, real-time RT-PCR and immunohistochemistry (IHC) staining in the respiratory tissues of guinea pigs as early as 24h after intranasal inoculation with SD0835. The results of virus isolation and titration showed that guinea pigs were permissive for

  12. Hierarchical, domain type-specific acquisition of antibodies to Plasmodium falciparum erythrocyte membrane protein 1 in Tanzanian children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cham, Gerald K K; Turner, Louise; Kurtis, Jonathan D

    2010-01-01

    Plasmodium falciparum erythrocyte membrane protein 1 (PfEMP1) is a variant antigen expressed on the surface of malaria-infected erythrocytes. PfEMP1 attaches to the vascular lining and allows infected erythrocytes to avoid filtration through the spleen. Each parasite genome encodes about 60...

  13. Bovine gamma delta T cells contribute to exacerbated IL-17 production in response to co-infection with Bovine RSV and Mannheimia haemolytica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Human respiratory syncytial virus (HRSV) is a leading cause of severe lower respiratory tract infection in children under five years of age. IL-17 and Th17 responses are increased in children infected with HRSV and have been implicated in both protective and pathogenic roles during infection. Bovi...

  14. An 8-year longitudinal sero-epidemiological study of bovine leukaemia virus (BLV) infection in dairy cattle in Turkey and analysis of risk factors associated with BLV seropositivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Şevik, Murat; Avcı, Oğuzhan; İnce, Ömer Barış

    2015-04-01

    Enzootic bovine leukosis (EBL) which is caused by bovine leukaemia virus (BLV) has an important economic impact on dairy herds due to reduced milk production and restrictions on livestock exports. This study was conducted to determine the BLV infection status in Central Anatolia Region of Turkey, an important milk production centre, and to examine the risk factors such as purchasing cattle, increasing cattle age, cattle breed and herd size associated with transmission of BLV infection. To estimate the rate of BLV infection, a survey for specific antibodies in 28,982 serum samples from animals belonging to 1116 different herds situated in Central Anatolia Region of Turkey were tested from January 2006 to December 2013. A generalized mixed linear model was used to evaluate the risk factors that influenced BLV seroprevalence. Antibodies against BLV were detected in 431 (2.28 %) of 18,822 Holstein and 29 (0.28 %) of 10,160 Brown Swiss cows. Among 1116 herds, 132 herds (11.82 %) had one or more positive animals. Also results of our study show that the prevalence of BLV infection increased from 2006 to 2011, and it tends to reduce with BLV control programme. Furthermore, we found positive associations between percentage of seropositive animal and increasing cattle age, herd size, cattle breed and purchased cattle. Age-specific prevalence showed that BLV prevalence increased with age. These factors should be taken into consideration for control of BLV infection.

  15. Immunohistochemical approach to the pathogenesis of clinical cases of Bovine Herpesvirus type 5 infections

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    Cardoso Tereza C

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Meningoencephalitis by Herpesvirus type 5 (BoHV-5 in cattle has some features that are similar to those of herpetic encephalitis in humans and other animal species. Human Herpesvirus 3 (commonly known as Varicella-zoster virus 1, herpes simplex viruses (HSV, and equid Herpesvirus 1 (EHV-1 induce an intense inflammatory, vascular and cellular response. In spite of the many reports describing the histological lesions associated with natural and experimental infections, the immunopathological mechanisms for the development of neurological disorder have not been established. A total of twenty calf brains were selected from the Veterinary School, University of São Paulo State, Araçatuba, Brazil, after confirmation of BoHV-5 infection by virus isolation as well as by a molecular approach. The first part of the study characterized the microscopic lesions associated with the brain areas in the central nervous system (CNS that tested positive in a viral US9 gene hybridization assay. The frontal cortex (Fc, parietal cortex (Pc, thalamus (T and mesencephalon (M were studied. Secondly, distinct pathogenesis mechanisms that take place in acute cases were investigated by an immunohistochemistry assay. This study found the frontal cortex to be the main region where intense oxidative stress phenomena (AOP-1 and synaptic protein expression (SNAP-25 were closely related to inflammatory cuffs, satellitosis and gliosis, which represent the most frequently observed neurological lesions. Moreover, MMP-9 expression was shown to be localized in the leptomeninges, in the parenchyma and around mononuclear infiltrates (p

  16. Evaluation of pulmonary dysfunctions and acid-base imbalances induced by Chlamydia psittaci in a bovine model of respiratory infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostermann, Carola; Linde, Susanna; Siegling-Vlitakis, Christiane; Reinhold, Petra

    2014-01-01

    of decreased strong ion difference (SID), mediated by the interplay between hypochloraemia (alkalotic effect) and hyponatraemia (acidic effect). This bovine model was found to be suitable for studying pathophysiology of respiratory Cp infection and may help elucidating functional host-pathogen interactions in the mammalian lung.

  17. Dexamethasone-induced reactivation of bovine herpesvirus type 5 latent infection in experimentally infected rabbits results in a broader distribution of latent viral DNA in the brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.V. Mayer

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Bovine herpesvirus type 5 (BHV-5 is a major agent of meningoencephalitis in cattle and establishes latent infections mainly in sensory nerve ganglia. The distribution of latent BHV-5 DNA in the brain of rabbits prior to and after virus reactivation was studied using a nested PCR. Fifteen rabbits inoculated intranasally with BHV-5 were euthanized 60 days post-inoculation (group A, N = 8 or submitted to dexamethasone treatment (2.6 mg kg-1 day-1, im, for 5 days and euthanized 60 days later (group B, N = 7 for tissue examination. Two groups of BHV-1-infected rabbits (C, N = 3 and D, N = 3 submitted to each treatment were used as controls. Viral DNA of group A rabbits was consistently detected in trigeminal ganglia (8/8, frequently in cerebellum (5/8, anterior cerebral cortex and pons-medulla (3/8 and occasionally in dorsolateral (2/8, ventrolateral and posterior cerebral cortices, midbrain and thalamus (1/8. Viral DNA of group B rabbits showed a broader distribution, being detected at higher frequency in ventrolateral (6/7 and posterior cerebral cortices (5/7, pons-medulla (6/7, thalamus (4/7, and midbrain (3/7. In contrast, rabbits inoculated with BHV-1 harbored viral DNA almost completely restricted to trigeminal ganglia and the distribution did not change post-reactivation. These results demonstrate that latency by BHV-5 is established in several areas of the rabbit's brain and that virus reactivation leads to a broader distribution of latent viral DNA. Spread of virus from trigeminal ganglia and other areas of the brain likely contributes to this dissemination and may contribute to the recrudescence of neurological disease frequently observed upon BHV-5 reactivation.

  18. Storage of Erythrocytes Induces Suicidal Erythrocyte Death

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    Elisabeth Lang

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Similar to apoptosis of nucleated cells, red blood cells (RBC can undergo suicidal cell death - called eryptosis. It is characterized by cell shrinkage and phosphatidylserine translocation. Eryptosis is triggered by an increase of intracellular calcium concentration due to activation of nonselective cation channels. The cation channels and consequently eryptosis are inhibited by erythropoietin. Eryptotic RBC are engulfed by macrophages and thus rapidly cleared from circulating blood. In this study, we explored whether storage of RBC influences the rate of eryptosis. Methods: Flow cytometry was employed to quantify phosphatidylserine exposing erythrocytes from annexin V binding and cytosolic Ca2+ activity from Fluo-3 fluorescence. Clearance of stored murine RBC was tested by injection of carboxyfluorescein succinimidyl ester (CFSE-labelled erythrocytes. Results: Storage for 42 days significantly increased the percentage of phosphatidylserine exposing and haemolytic erythrocytes, an effect blunted by removal of extracellular calcium. Phosphatidylserine exposure could be inhibited by addition of erythropoietin. Upon transfusion, the clearance of murine CFSE-labelled RBC from circulating blood was significantly higher following storage for 10 days when compared to 2 days of storage. Conclusion: Storage of RBC triggers eryptosis by Ca2+ and erythropoietin sensitive mechanisms.

  19. The Role and Mechanism of Erythrocyte Invasion by Francisella tularensis

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    Deanna M. Schmitt

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Francisella tularensis is an extremely virulent bacterium that can be transmitted naturally by blood sucking arthropods. During mammalian infection, F. tularensis infects numerous types of host cells, including erythrocytes. As erythrocytes do not undergo phagocytosis or endocytosis, it remains unknown how F. tularensis invades these cells. Furthermore, the consequence of inhabiting the intracellular space of red blood cells (RBCs has not been determined. Here, we provide evidence indicating that residing within an erythrocyte enhances the ability of F. tularensis to colonize ticks following a blood meal. Erythrocyte residence protected F. tularensis from a low pH environment similar to that of gut cells of a feeding tick. Mechanistic studies revealed that the F. tularensis type VI secretion system (T6SS was required for erythrocyte invasion as mutation of mglA (a transcriptional regulator of T6SS genes, dotU, or iglC (two genes encoding T6SS machinery severely diminished bacterial entry into RBCs. Invasion was also inhibited upon treatment of erythrocytes with venom from the Blue-bellied black snake (Pseudechis guttatus, which aggregates spectrin in the cytoskeleton, but not inhibitors of actin polymerization and depolymerization. These data suggest that erythrocyte invasion by F. tularensis is dependent on spectrin utilization which is likely mediated by effectors delivered through the T6SS. Our results begin to elucidate the mechanism of a unique biological process facilitated by F. tularensis to invade erythrocytes, allowing for enhanced colonization of ticks.

  20. Cytoplasmic localized infected cell protein 0 (bICP0) encoded by bovine herpesvirus 1 inhibits beta interferon promoter activity and reduces IRF3 (interferon response factor 3) protein levels

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, Leticia Frizzo; Gaudreault, Natasha; Jones, Clinton

    2011-01-01

    Bovine herpesvirus 1 (BHV-1), an alpha-herpesvirinae subfamily member, establishes a life-long latent infection in sensory neurons. Periodically, BHV-1 reactivates from latency, infectious virus is spread, and consequently virus transmission occurs. BHV-1 acute infection causes upper respiratory track infections and conjunctivitis in infected cattle. As a result of transient immunesuppression, BHV-1 infections can also lead to life-threatening secondary bacterial pneumonia that is referred to as bovine respiratory disease. The infected cell protein 0 (bICP0) encoded by BHV-1 reduces human beta-interferon (IFN-β) promoter activity, in part, by inducing degradation of interferon response factor 3 (IRF3) and interacting with IRF7. In contrast to humans, cattle contain three IFN-β genes. All three bovine IFN-β proteins have anti-viral activity: but each IFN-β gene has a distinct transcriptional promoter. We have recently cloned and characterized the three bovine IFN-β promoters. Relative to the human IFN-β promoter, each of the three IFN-β promoters contain differences in the four positive regulatory domains that are required for virus-induced activity. In this study, we demonstrate that bICP0 effectively inhibits bovine IFN-β promoter activity following transfection of low passage bovine cells with interferon response factor 3 (IRF3) or IRF7. A bICP0 mutant that localizes to the cytoplasm inhibits bovine IFN-β promoter activity as efficiently as wt bICP0. The cytoplasmic localized bICP0 protein also induced IRF3 degradation with similar efficiency as wt bICP0. In summary, these studies suggested that cytoplasmic localized bICP0 plays a role in inhibiting the IFN-β response during productive infection. PMID:21689696

  1. Productive infection of bovine papillomavirus type 2 in the urothelial cells of naturally occurring urinary bladder tumors in cattle and water buffaloes.

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    Sante Roperto

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Papillomaviruses (PVs are highly epitheliotropic as they usually establish productive infections within squamous epithelia of the skin, the anogenital tract and the oral cavity. In this study, early (E and late (L protein expression of bovine papillomavirus type 2 (BPV-2 in the urothelium of the urinary bladder is described in cows and water buffaloes suffering from naturally occurring papillomavirus-associated urothelial bladder tumors. METHODS AND FINDINGS: E5 protein, the major oncoprotein of the BPV-2, was detected in all tumors. L1 DNA was amplified by PCR, cloned and sequenced and confirmed to be L1 DNA. The major capsid protein, L1, believed to be only expressed in productive papillomavirus infection was detected by Western blot analysis. Immunohistochemical investigations confirmed the presence of L1 protein both in the cytoplasm and nuclei of cells of the neoplastic urothelium. Finally, the early protein E2, required for viral DNA replication and known to be a pivotal factor for both productive and persistent infection, was detected by Western blot and immunohistochemically. Electron microscopic investigations detected electron dense particles, the shape and size of which are consistent with submicroscopic features of viral particles, in nuclei of neoplastic urothelium. CONCLUSION: This study shows that both active and productive infections by BPV-2 in the urothelium of the bovine and bubaline urinary bladder can occur in vivo.

  2. Productive Infection of Bovine Papillomavirus Type 2 in the Urothelial Cells of Naturally Occurring Urinary Bladder Tumors in Cattle and Water Buffaloes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roperto, Sante; Russo, Valeria; Ozkul, Ayhan; Corteggio, Annunziata; Sepici-Dincel, Aylin; Catoi, Cornel; Esposito, Iolanda; Riccardi, Marita G.; Urraro, Chiara; Lucà, Roberta; Ceccarelli, Dora M.; Longo, Michele; Roperto, Franco

    2013-01-01

    Background Papillomaviruses (PVs) are highly epitheliotropic as they usually establish productive infections within squamous epithelia of the skin, the anogenital tract and the oral cavity. In this study, early (E) and late (L) protein expression of bovine papillomavirus type 2 (BPV-2) in the urothelium of the urinary bladder is described in cows and water buffaloes suffering from naturally occurring papillomavirus-associated urothelial bladder tumors. Methods and Findings E5 protein, the major oncoprotein of the BPV-2, was detected in all tumors. L1 DNA was amplified by PCR, cloned and sequenced and confirmed to be L1 DNA. The major capsid protein, L1, believed to be only expressed in productive papillomavirus infection was detected by Western blot analysis. Immunohistochemical investigations confirmed the presence of L1 protein both in the cytoplasm and nuclei of cells of the neoplastic urothelium. Finally, the early protein E2, required for viral DNA replication and known to be a pivotal factor for both productive and persistent infection, was detected by Western blot and immunohistochemically. Electron microscopic investigations detected electron dense particles, the shape and size of which are consistent with submicroscopic features of viral particles, in nuclei of neoplastic urothelium. Conclusion This study shows that both active and productive infections by BPV-2 in the urothelium of the bovine and bubaline urinary bladder can occur in vivo. PMID:23667460

  3. Relationship between clinical signs and postmortem test status in cattle experimentally infected with the bovine spongiform encephalopathy agent

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    Stack Michael J

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Various clinical protocols have been developed to aid in the clinical diagnosis of classical bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE, which is confirmed by postmortem examinations based on vacuolation and accumulation of disease-associated prion protein (PrPd in the brain. The present study investigated the occurrence and progression of sixty selected clinical signs and behaviour combinations in 513 experimentally exposed cattle subsequently categorised postmortem as confirmed or unconfirmed BSE cases. Appropriate undosed or saline inoculated controls were examined similarly and the data analysed to explore the possible occurrence of BSE-specific clinical expression in animals unconfirmed by postmortem examinations. Results Based on the display of selected behavioural, sensory and locomotor changes, 20 (67% orally dosed and 17 (77% intracerebrally inoculated pathologically confirmed BSE cases and 21 (13% orally dosed and 18 (6% intracerebrally inoculated but unconfirmed cases were considered clinical BSE suspects. None of 103 controls showed significant signs and were all negative on diagnostic postmortem examinations. Signs indicative of BSE suspects, particularly over-reactivity and ataxia, were more frequently displayed in confirmed cases with vacuolar changes in the brain. The display of several BSE-associated signs over time, including repeated startle responses and nervousness, was significantly more frequent in confirmed BSE cases compared to controls, but these two signs were also significantly more frequent in orally dosed cattle unconfirmed by postmortem examinations. Conclusions The findings confirm that in experimentally infected cattle clinical abnormalities indicative of BSE are accompanied by vacuolar changes and PrPd accumulation in the brainstem. The presence of more frequently expressed signs in cases with vacuolar changes is consistent with this pathology representing a more advanced stage of disease. That

  4. Sero prevalence and risk factors associated with bovine herpes virus type 1 (BHV1) infection in non-vaccinated cattle herds in Andalusia (South of Spain)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonzalez-Garcia, M. A.; Arenas-Casas, A.; Carbonero-Martinez, A.; Borge-Rodriguez, C.; Garcia-Bocanegra, I.; Maldonado, J. L.; Gomez-Pacheco, J. M.; Perea-Remujo, J. A.

    2009-07-01

    An epidemiological and serological survey of bovine herpes virus 1 (BHV1) infection was conducted in Andalusia from January to April of 2000. A total of 4,035 blood samples were collected from 164 herds. A questionnaire, which included variables potentially associated with infection, was filled out for each herd. Serum samples were obtained to identify specific BHV1 antibodies and were tested using a blocking ELISA test. The observed crude odds ratio (OR) (estimate of the chance of a particular event occurring in an exposed group in relation to its rate of occurrence in a nonexposed group) for vaccination is 9.8 (95 % confidence interval: 8.3-11.7). The vaccinated group comprised large dairy farms. This study can only be considered as representative of unvaccinated, small to medium size dairy farms and beef farms in Andalusia. True sero prevalence of the BHV1 virus in non vaccinated bovine populations in Andalusia reached 45.7% of individuals and 70.4% of herds. Risk factors for BHV1 infection in bovine Andalusian non vaccinated herds are nonexistence of specific cattle infrastructure (OR: 3.07), beef crossbreeding (OR: 7.90), affiliation with Livestock Health Defence Associations (OR: 2.57), a history of reproductive disorders (OR: 8.39), external replacement (OR: 2.74), proximity to an urban area (OR: 6.11) and herd size (41.98). To control for confounding effects, a binomial logistic regression model was developed. From this regression, BHV1 infections are concentrated in large herds, with external replacement, located close to urban areas. This is the first published report on BHV1 prevalence in the South of Spain. (Author) 14 refs.

  5. Bovine mastitis in the metropolitan area of Curitiba: antibiotic resistance and antimicrobial control of the infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Luis Parada

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available A study from cows with mastitis was performed and Staphylococcus aureus was the predominant pathogen in 46.4 % among 153 studied strains from 276 milk samples of infected cows. Antibiotic resistance of 71 S. aureus isolates was determined in order to search resistant strains to antibiotics of clinical interest, as well as to determine their degree of multi-resistance. It was found that 60% of the S. aureus strains presented resistance to β-lactams, but none to oxacillin, teicoplamin or vancomycin. On the other hand, with the aim of reducing the use of current antibiotics and their associated resistance, a new formulation was introduced. The antimicrobial compounds (P22-P32, demonstrated to be effective in 55% of the 76 mastitis cases studied. The use of P22-P32 reduced the number of somatic cell to less than 300,000 SCC/mL-1 in 75.2 % of milk samples analyzed, normalizing the milk quality, fat and lactose levels and increasing the volume of production in 10.1 %.

  6. Bayesian Modeling of MPSS Data: Gene Expression Analysis of Bovine Salmonella Infection

    KAUST Repository

    Dhavala, Soma S.

    2010-09-01

    Massively Parallel Signature Sequencing (MPSS) is a high-throughput, counting-based technology available for gene expression profiling. It produces output that is similar to Serial Analysis of Gene Expression and is ideal for building complex relational databases for gene expression. Our goal is to compare the in vivo global gene expression profiles of tissues infected with different strains of Salmonella obtained using the MPSS technology. In this article, we develop an exact ANOVA type model for this count data using a zero-inflatedPoisson distribution, different from existing methods that assume continuous densities. We adopt two Bayesian hierarchical models-one parametric and the other semiparametric with a Dirichlet process prior that has the ability to "borrow strength" across related signatures, where a signature is a specific arrangement of the nucleotides, usually 16-21 base pairs long. We utilize the discreteness of Dirichlet process prior to cluster signatures that exhibit similar differential expression profiles. Tests for differential expression are carried out using nonparametric approaches, while controlling the false discovery rate. We identify several differentially expressed genes that have important biological significance and conclude with a summary of the biological discoveries. This article has supplementary materials online. © 2010 American Statistical Association.

  7. Erythrocyte migration and gap formation in rabbit blood clots in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueki, T; Yazama, F; Horiuchi, T; Yamada, M

    2008-04-01

    Thrombolytic agents must be carried by the blood circulation to thrombi to exert their functions. Structural gaps exist between blood vessels and thrombi or in the area surrounding thrombi. Therefore, information about fundamental gap formation at thrombotic areas is critically important for thrombolytic therapy. We previously reported that t-PA accelerates the activities of bovine erythrocytes and hemoglobin (Hb) towards bovine plasminogen activation. Here, we examined gap generation by observing morphological changes during thrombolytic processes in rabbit blood clots deformation of erythrocytes from blood clots and Hb transfer from erythrocytes to serum in vitro. Rabbit venous blood samples (1 ml) were stored under sterile conditions in glass tubes at 37 degrees C for 2, 24, 48 h, 1, and 2 weeks. We examined clot diameter, erythrocyte diameter and number as well as Hb volume in the serum, as well as histological changes in the clots. The diameter of blood clots did not change until 2 weeks after sampling. Erythrocyte diameter decreased within 48 h and at 2 weeks after sampling at the clot surface (p erythrocytes in the serum started to increase starting from 24 h after sampling (p erythrocyte envelope became disrupted and cytoplasm started to flow through pores into the serum at 24 h. The results indicated that blood clots are reduced due to clot retraction, erythrocyte dissociation and cytoplasm leakage without a distinct fibrinolytic reaction. These results indicated that gaps start to form between 2 and 24 h after blood clotting.

  8. Comparison between DNA Detection in Trigeminal Nerve Ganglia and Serology to Detect Cattle Infected with Bovine Herpesviruses Types 1 and 5

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furtado, Agustin; Torres, Fabrício Dias; Franco, Ana Cláudia; Maisonnave, Jacqueline; Roehe, Paulo Michel

    2016-01-01

    Bovine herpesviruses (BoHVs) types 1 (BoHV-1) and 5 (BoHV-5) are alphaherpesviruses of major importance to the bovine production chain. Such viruses are capable of establishing latent infections in neuronal tissues. Infected animals tend to develop a serological response to infection; however, such response—usually investigated by antibody assays in serum—may eventually not be detected in laboratory assays. Nevertheless, serological tests such as virus neutralization (VN) and various enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs) are widely employed to check individual or herd status of BoHV infections. The correlation between detection of antibodies and the presence of viral nucleic acids as indicatives of infection in infected cattle has not been deeply examined. In order to investigate such correlation, 248 bovine serum samples were tested by VN to BoHV-1 and BoHV-5, as well as in a widely employed (though not type-differential) gB ELISA (IDEXX IBR gB X2 Ab Test) in search for antibodies to BoHVs. Immediately after blood withdrawal, cattle were slaughtered and trigeminal ganglia (TG) excised for DNA extraction and viral nucleic acid detection (NAD) by nested PCR. Neutralizing antibodies to BoHV-1 and/or BoHV-5 were detected in 44.8% (111/248) of sera, whereas the gB ELISA detected antibodies in 51.2% (127/248) of the samples. However, genomes of either BoHV-1, BoHV-5, or both, were detected in TGs of 85.9% (213/248) of the animals. These findings reveal that the assays designed to detect antibodies to BoHV-1 and/or BoHV-5 employed here may fail to detect a significant number of latently infected animals (in this study, 35.7%). From such data, it is clear that antibody assays are poorly correlated with detection of viral genomes in BoHV-1 and BoHV-5-infected animals. PMID:27224314

  9. Comparison between DNA Detection in Trigeminal Nerve Ganglia and Serology to Detect Cattle Infected with Bovine Herpesviruses Types 1 and 5.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puentes, Rodrigo; Campos, Fabrício Souza; Furtado, Agustin; Torres, Fabrício Dias; Franco, Ana Cláudia; Maisonnave, Jacqueline; Roehe, Paulo Michel

    2016-01-01

    Bovine herpesviruses (BoHVs) types 1 (BoHV-1) and 5 (BoHV-5) are alphaherpesviruses of major importance to the bovine production chain. Such viruses are capable of establishing latent infections in neuronal tissues. Infected animals tend to develop a serological response to infection; however, such response-usually investigated by antibody assays in serum-may eventually not be detected in laboratory assays. Nevertheless, serological tests such as virus neutralization (VN) and various enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs) are widely employed to check individual or herd status of BoHV infections. The correlation between detection of antibodies and the presence of viral nucleic acids as indicatives of infection in infected cattle has not been deeply examined. In order to investigate such correlation, 248 bovine serum samples were tested by VN to BoHV-1 and BoHV-5, as well as in a widely employed (though not type-differential) gB ELISA (IDEXX IBR gB X2 Ab Test) in search for antibodies to BoHVs. Immediately after blood withdrawal, cattle were slaughtered and trigeminal ganglia (TG) excised for DNA extraction and viral nucleic acid detection (NAD) by nested PCR. Neutralizing antibodies to BoHV-1 and/or BoHV-5 were detected in 44.8% (111/248) of sera, whereas the gB ELISA detected antibodies in 51.2% (127/248) of the samples. However, genomes of either BoHV-1, BoHV-5, or both, were detected in TGs of 85.9% (213/248) of the animals. These findings reveal that the assays designed to detect antibodies to BoHV-1 and/or BoHV-5 employed here may fail to detect a significant number of latently infected animals (in this study, 35.7%). From such data, it is clear that antibody assays are poorly correlated with detection of viral genomes in BoHV-1 and BoHV-5-infected animals.

  10. Comparison between DNA Detection in Trigeminal Nerve Ganglia and Serology to Detect Cattle Infected with Bovine Herpesviruses Types 1 and 5.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo Puentes

    Full Text Available Bovine herpesviruses (BoHVs types 1 (BoHV-1 and 5 (BoHV-5 are alphaherpesviruses of major importance to the bovine production chain. Such viruses are capable of establishing latent infections in neuronal tissues. Infected animals tend to develop a serological response to infection; however, such response-usually investigated by antibody assays in serum-may eventually not be detected in laboratory assays. Nevertheless, serological tests such as virus neutralization (VN and various enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs are widely employed to check individual or herd status of BoHV infections. The correlation between detection of antibodies and the presence of viral nucleic acids as indicatives of infection in infected cattle has not been deeply examined. In order to investigate such correlation, 248 bovine serum samples were tested by VN to BoHV-1 and BoHV-5, as well as in a widely employed (though not type-differential gB ELISA (IDEXX IBR gB X2 Ab Test in search for antibodies to BoHVs. Immediately after blood withdrawal, cattle were slaughtered and trigeminal ganglia (TG excised for DNA extraction and viral nucleic acid detection (NAD by nested PCR. Neutralizing antibodies to BoHV-1 and/or BoHV-5 were detected in 44.8% (111/248 of sera, whereas the gB ELISA detected antibodies in 51.2% (127/248 of the samples. However, genomes of either BoHV-1, BoHV-5, or both, were detected in TGs of 85.9% (213/248 of the animals. These findings reveal that the assays designed to detect antibodies to BoHV-1 and/or BoHV-5 employed here may fail to detect a significant number of latently infected animals (in this study, 35.7%. From such data, it is clear that antibody assays are poorly correlated with detection of viral genomes in BoHV-1 and BoHV-5-infected animals.

  11. Replication and clearance of respiratory syncytial virus - Apoptosis is an important pathway of virus clearance after experimental infection with bovine respiratory syncytial virus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Viuff, B.; Tjørnehøj, Kirsten; Larsen, Lars Erik

    2002-01-01

    Human respiratory syncytial virus is an important cause of severe respiratory disease in young children, the elderly, and in immunocompromised adults. Similarly, bovine respiratory syncytial virus (BRSV) is causing severe, sometimes fatal, respiratory disease in calves. Both viruses are pneumovirus...... and clearance in a natural target animal. Replication of BRSV was demonstrated in the luminal part of the respiratory epithelial cells and replication in the upper respiratory tract preceded the replication in the lower respiratory tract. Virus excreted to the lumen of the respiratory tract was cleared...... and the infections with human respiratory syncytial. virus and BRSV have similar clinical, pathological, and epidemiological characteristics. In this study we used experimental BRSV infection in calves as a model of respiratory syncytial virus infection to demonstrate important aspects of viral replication...

  12. Comparison of the breadth and complexity of bovine viral diarrhea (BVDV) populations circulating in 34 persistently infected cattle generated in one outbreak.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ridpath, J F; Bayles, D O; Neill, J D; Falkenberg, S M; Bauermann, F V; Holler, L; Braun, L J; Young, D B; Kane, S E; Chase, C C L

    2015-11-01

    Exposure to bovine viral diarrhea viruses (BVDV) results in acute and persistent infections. Persistent infections result from in utero exposure during the first trimester of gestation. Clinical presentation, in persistently infected cattle (PI), is highly variable. The reasons for this variation is largely unknown. The BVDV circulating in PI exist as quasispecies (swarms of individual viruses). An outbreak resulting in 34 PI cattle presented an opportunity to compare a large number of PI׳s. Methods were developed to compare the circulating viral populations within PI animals. It was found that PI animals generated in the same outbreak carry circulating viral populations that differ widely in size and diversity. Further, it was demonstrated that variation in PI viral populations could be used as a quantifiable phenotype. This observation makes it possible to test the correlation of this phenotype to other phenotypes such as growth rate, congenital defects, viral shed and cytokine expression.

  13. Mammary Gland Pathology Subsequent to Acute Infection with Strong versus Weak Biofilm Forming Staphylococcus aureus Bovine Mastitis Isolates: A Pilot Study Using Non-Invasive Mouse Mastitis Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gogoi-Tiwari, Jully; Williams, Vincent; Waryah, Charlene Babra; Costantino, Paul; Al-Salami, Hani; Mathavan, Sangeetha; Wells, Kelsi; Tiwari, Harish Kumar; Hegde, Nagendra; Isloor, Shrikrishna; Al-Sallami, Hesham; Mukkur, Trilochan

    2017-01-01

    Background Biofilm formation by Staphylococcus aureus is an important virulence attribute because of its potential to induce persistent antibiotic resistance, retard phagocytosis and either attenuate or promote inflammation, depending upon the disease syndrome, in vivo. This study was undertaken to evaluate the potential significance of strength of biofilm formation by clinical bovine mastitis-associated S. aureus in mammary tissue damage by using a mouse mastitis model. Methods Two S. aureus strains of the same capsular phenotype with different biofilm forming strengths were used to non-invasively infect mammary glands of lactating mice. Biofilm forming potential of these strains were determined by tissue culture plate method, ica typing and virulence gene profile per detection by PCR. Delivery of the infectious dose of S. aureus was directly through the teat lactiferous duct without invasive scraping of the teat surface. Both bacteriological and histological methods were used for analysis of mammary gland pathology of mice post-infection. Results Histopathological analysis of the infected mammary glands revealed that mice inoculated with the strong biofilm forming S. aureus strain produced marked acute mastitic lesions, showing profuse infiltration predominantly with neutrophils, with evidence of necrosis in the affected mammary glands. In contrast, the damage was significantly less severe in mammary glands of mice infected with the weak biofilm-forming S. aureus strain. Although both IL-1β and TNF-α inflammatory biomarkers were produced in infected mice, level of TNF-α produced was significantly higher (p<0.05) in mice inoculated with strong biofilm forming S. aureus than the weak biofilm forming strain. Conclusion This finding suggests an important role of TNF-α in mammary gland pathology post-infection with strong biofilm-forming S. aureus in the acute mouse mastitis model, and offers an opportunity for the development of novel strategies for reduction of

  14. Growth of Theileria annulata and Theileria parva macroschizont-infected bovine cells in immunodeficient mice: effect of irradiation and tumour load on lymphocyte subsets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fell, A.H.; Preston, P.M. (Edinburgh Univ. (United Kingdom))

    1992-07-01

    Bovine cells infected with macroschizonts of the protozoan parasites Theileria annulata and Theileria parva formed solid tumours when injected into irradiated Balb/c and irradiated Balb/c nude mice. T. annulata tumours grew more vigorously than T. parva tumours, when initiated with similar doses of infected cells in mice exposed to the same doses of gamma-irradiation. In irradiated Balb/c mice, tumours of both species of parasites began to regress 2-3 weeks after injection of cells but grew without regression in irradiated Balb/c nude mice. Haemorrhage and necrosis of tumours, induced by macrophages and neutrophils, were seen in both mouse strains but were insufficient to cause regression in Balb/c nude mice. Theileria-infected bovine cells failed to establish in C57 beige mice, which lack functional natural killer (NK) cells. Flow cytometry, using monoclonal antibodies to murine leukocyte/lymphocyte antigens, showed that the radiation dose required to allow establishment of T. annulata tumours in Balb/c mice caused a severe depletion of splenic lymphocytes. B cells, helper T and cytotoxic T cells showed differing levels of susceptibility to irradiation. (Author).

  15. Saquinavir Induced Suicidal Death of Human Erythrocytes

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    Sabrina Waibel

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: The antiretroviral protease inhibitor saquinavir is used for the treatment of HIV infections. Effects of saquinavir include induction of apoptosis, the suicidal death of nucleated cells. Saquinavir treatment may further lead to anemia. In theory, anemia could result from accelerated erythrocyte loss by enhanced suicidal erythrocyte death or eryptosis, which is characterized by cell shrinkage and cell membrane scrambling with phosphatidylserine translocation to the erythrocyte surface. Stimulators of eryptosis include Ca2+ entry with increase of cytosolic Ca2+ activity ([Ca2+]i, oxidative stress with increase of reactive oxygen species (ROS and ceramide. The present study explored, whether and how saquinavir induces eryptosis. Methods: To this end, flow cytometry was employed to estimate erythrocyte volume from forward scatter, phosphatidylserine exposure at the cell surface from annexin-V-binding, [Ca2+]i from Fluo3-fluorescence, ROS abundance from DCFDA fluorescence and ceramide abundance utilizing specific antibodies. Results: A 48 hours exposure of human erythrocytes to saquinavir significantly decreased forward scatter (≥ 5 µg/ml, significantly increased the percentage of annexin-V-binding cells (≥ 10 µg/ml, significantly increased Fluo3-fluorescence (15 µg/ml, significantly increased DCFDA fluorescence (15 µg/ml, but did not significantly modify ceramide abundance. The effect of saquinavir on annexin-V-binding was significantly blunted, but not abolished by removal of extracellular Ca2+. Conclusions: Saquinavir triggers cell shrinkage and phospholipid scrambling of the erythrocyte cell membrane, an effect in part due to stimulation of ROS formation and Ca2+ entry.

  16. Mammary Gland Pathology Subsequent to Acute Infection with Strong versus Weak Biofilm Forming Staphylococcus aureus Bovine Mastitis Isolates: A Pilot Study Using Non-Invasive Mouse Mastitis Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gogoi-Tiwari, Jully; Williams, Vincent; Waryah, Charlene Babra; Costantino, Paul; Al-Salami, Hani; Mathavan, Sangeetha; Wells, Kelsi; Tiwari, Harish Kumar; Hegde, Nagendra; Isloor, Shrikrishna; Al-Sallami, Hesham; Mukkur, Trilochan

    2017-01-01

    Biofilm formation by Staphylococcus aureus is an important virulence attribute because of its potential to induce persistent antibiotic resistance, retard phagocytosis and either attenuate or promote inflammation, depending upon the disease syndrome, in vivo. This study was undertaken to evaluate the potential significance of strength of biofilm formation by clinical bovine mastitis-associated S. aureus in mammary tissue damage by using a mouse mastitis model. Two S. aureus strains of the same capsular phenotype with different biofilm forming strengths were used to non-invasively infect mammary glands of lactating mice. Biofilm forming potential of these strains were determined by tissue culture plate method, ica typing and virulence gene profile per detection by PCR. Delivery of the infectious dose of S. aureus was directly through the teat lactiferous duct without invasive scraping of the teat surface. Both bacteriological and histological methods were used for analysis of mammary gland pathology of mice post-infection. Histopathological analysis of the infected mammary glands revealed that mice inoculated with the strong biofilm forming S. aureus strain produced marked acute mastitic lesions, showing profuse infiltration predominantly with neutrophils, with evidence of necrosis in the affected mammary glands. In contrast, the damage was significantly less severe in mammary glands of mice infected with the weak biofilm-forming S. aureus strain. Although both IL-1β and TNF-α inflammatory biomarkers were produced in infected mice, level of TNF-α produced was significantly higher (pmastitis model, and offers an opportunity for the development of novel strategies for reduction of mammary tissue damage, with or without use of antimicrobials and/or anti-inflammatory compounds for the treatment of bovine mastitis.

  17. Short communication: Milk ELISA status for bovine leukosis virus infection is not associated with milk production in dairy cows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorge, U S; Lissemore, K; Cantin, R; Kelton, D F

    2011-10-01

    The objective of this study was to assess whether the milk ELISA status for antibodies against bovine leukemia virus was associated with 305-d milk production in Canadian dairy cattle. Test results and test-day production data from 19,785 dairy cows were available for analysis. A linear mixed model was used with the estimated 305-d milk production as the outcome and lactation number, somatic cell count, calving season, days in milk, and breed as fixed effects. Herd nested in province was included as random effect. In conclusion, bovine leukemia virus antibody milk ELISA status was not associated with milk production.

  18. Experimental infection in cattle: kinetics of production of IgM and IgG against bovine cysticercosis and inflammatory response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafaella Paola Meneguete dos Guimarães-Peixoto

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Bovine cysticercosis is a zoonosis that affects humans in their adult form (taeniasis and its larval is found inserted in the musculature of infected cattle (cysticerci. It is still not entirely clear how animal immune response against infection occurs, being the comprehension of this process necessary for the enhancement of diagnostic capacity and disease prevention. This work aimed to evaluate the evolution of the immune response in experimentally infected cattle, compared with findings in cell response by optical microscopy. Nine animals were infected at a rate of 120,000 eggs of Taenia saginata. Five of the animals were similar in the kinetics of antibody production against cysticerci, with maximal levels of IgG and IgM. The other four animals showed an immune response different from the majority, with two of them showing delayed response to infection by cysticerci while the others apparently did not have initial contact with antigens secreted by cysticerci. Regarding the cellular response, it was found that, in lesions of viable cysticerci, inflammatory cells predominated, whereas in nonviable cysticerci there were tissue repair cells in the most part, being possible to notice that the amount of migratory calcareous corpuscles are related to the death stage of the parasite. These findings are important for the understanding immune response of cattle infected with cysticercosis.

  19. Oxidative Hemolysis of Erythrocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wlodek, Lidia; Kusior, Dorota

    2006-01-01

    This exercise for students will allow them to simultaneously observe lipid peroxidation and consequent hemolysis of rat erythrocytes and the effect of sodium azide, a catalase inhibitor, on these processes. It will also demonstrate a protective action of antioxidants, the therapeutically used N-acetylcysteine and albumins present in plasma.

  20. Oxidative Hemolysis of Erythrocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wlodek, Lidia; Kusior, Dorota

    2006-01-01

    This exercise for students will allow them to simultaneously observe lipid peroxidation and consequent hemolysis of rat erythrocytes and the effect of sodium azide, a catalase inhibitor, on these processes. It will also demonstrate a protective action of antioxidants, the therapeutically used N-acetylcysteine and albumins present in plasma.

  1. Immune Evasion Strategies of Pre-Erythrocytic Malaria Parasites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong Zheng

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Malaria is a mosquito-borne infectious disease of humans. It begins with a bite from an infected female Anopheles mosquito and leads to the development of the pre-erythrocytic and blood stages. Blood-stage infection is the exclusive cause of clinical symptoms of malaria. In contrast, the pre-erythrocytic stage is clinically asymptomatic and could be an excellent target for preventive therapies. Although the robust host immune responses limit the development of the liver stage, malaria parasites have also evolved strategies to suppress host defenses at the pre-erythrocytic stage. This paper reviews the immune evasion strategies of malaria parasites at the pre-erythrocytic stage, which could provide us with potential targets to design prophylactic strategies against malaria.

  2. Concentrated bovine colostrum protein supplementation reduces the incidence of self-reported symptoms of upper respiratory tract infection in adult males.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brinkworth, Grant D; Buckley, Jonathan D

    2003-08-01

    Anecdotal reports suggest that bovine colostrum may prevent upper respiratory tract infection (URTI). There is scant evidence to support such claims, although salivary IgA protects against URTI, and it was recently shown that bovine colostrum increases salivary IgA. The present invesigation examined whether concentrated bovine colostrum protein (CBC) affected the incidence or duration of self-reported symptoms of URTI in adult males. We examined logbooks containing self-reported symptoms of illness from previous studies which examined physiological effects of CBC. In these double-blind, placebo controlled studies, subjects had been randomly allocated to consume 60g. day(-1) of CBC (n = 93) or whey protein (WP) (n = 81) for eight weeks. Symptoms were coded using established criteria to identify those related to URTI. Since the incubation period for an URTI is up to five days, symptoms reported during the first week of supplementation (PRE-EXP) were analysed separately to preclude those arising from infection prior to study commencement. During PRE-EXP, there was no difference in the proportion of subjects taking the different supplements who reported symptoms of URTI (CBC, 11%,WP, 5%; 95% Confidence Interval (95% CI) -14% to 2%; P = 0.16). During the subsequent seven weeks (i. e. the experimental period), a significantly lesser proportion of subjects taking CBC reported symptoms of URTI compared with those taking WP (CBC, 32%,WP, 48%, P = 0.03; 95 % CI -30 % to -2 %), but symptom duration did not differ (CBC, 6.8 +/- 4.2 days,WP, 6.0 +/- 4.4 days; P = 0.27). This study provides preliminary evidence that CBC may enhance resistance to the development of symptoms of URTI.

  3. Evaluation of transmission of bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) between persistently infected and naive cattle by the horn fly (Haematobia irritans).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamorro, Manuel F; Passler, Thomas; Givens, M Daniel; Edmondson, Misty A; Wolfe, Dwight F; Walz, Paul H

    2011-02-01

    Identifying reservoirs and transmission routes for bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) are important in developing biosecurity programs. The aim of this study was to evaluate BVDV transmission by the hematophagous horn fly (Haematobia irritans). Flies collected from four persistently infected cattle were placed in fly cages attached to principal (n = 4) and control (n = 4) BVDV-naïve calves housed individually in isolation rooms. Flies were able to feed on principal calves, but a barrier prevented fly feeding from control calves. Flies were tested for BVDV by RT-PCR and virus isolation at time of collection from PI cattle and after 48 h of exposure on BVDV-naïve calves. Blood samples were collected from calves and tested for BVDV infection. Virus was isolated from fly homogenates at collection from PI animals and at removal from control and principal calves. All calves remained negative for BVDV by virus isolation and serology throughout the study. Bovine viral diarrhea virus may be detected in horn flies collected from PI cattle, but horn flies do not appear to be an important vector for BVDV transmission.

  4. Safety and efficacy of an E2 glycoprotein subunit vaccine produced in mammalian cells to prevent experimental infection with bovine viral diarrhoea virus in cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pecora, Andrea; Aguirreburualde, María Sol Pérez; Aguirreburualde, Alejandra; Leunda, Maria Rosa; Odeon, Anselmo; Chiavenna, Sebastián; Bochoeyer, Diego; Spitteler, Marcelo; Filippi, Jorge L; Dus Santos, Maria J; Levy, Susana M; Wigdorovitz, Andrés

    2012-09-01

    Bovine viral diarrhea (BVD) infection caused by bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV), a Pestivirus of the Flaviviridae family, is an important cause of morbidity, mortality and economical losses in cattle worldwide. E2 protein is the major glycoprotein of BVDV envelope and the main target for neutralising antibodies (NAbs). Different studies on protection against BVDV infection have focused on E2, supporting its putative use in subunit vaccines. A truncated version of type 1a BVDV E2 (tE2) expressed in mammalian cells was used to formulate an experimental oleous monovalent vaccine. Immunogenicity was studied through immunisation of guinea pigs and followed by trials in cattle. Calves of 8-12 months were vaccinated, twice with a 4 week interval, with either a tE2 subunit vaccine (n = 8), a whole virus inactivated vaccine (n = 8) or left untreated as negative control group (n = 8). Four weeks after the last immunisation the animals were experimentally challenged intranasally with a non-cythopathic BVDV strain. Following challenge, BVDV was isolated from all unvaccinated animals, while 6 out of 8 animals vaccinated with tE2 showed complete virological protection indicating that the tE2 vaccine presented a similar performance to a satisfactory whole virus inactivated vaccine.

  5. Selected biochemical and oxidative stress parameters and ceruloplasmin as acute phase protein associated with bovine leukaemia virus infection in dairy cows

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akalın Pınar Peker

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to determine the ceruloplasmin (Cp and vitamin C concentrations, the total antioxidant status (TAS, and selected biochemical parameters in dairy cows spontaneously infected with bovine leukaemia virus (BLV. Of the 27 cows included in the study, 18 animals were seropositive for enzootic bovine leukosis (EBL, whereas nine cows were seronegative and were used as controls. The serum aspartate aminotransferase (AST (P = 0.003 and Cp concentrations (P = 0.03 decreased (65.17 ± 5.03 and 7.70 ± 0.72 respectively in BLV-infected cows, as compared to healthy animals (100.67 ± 11.50 and 10.40 ± 0.70 respectively. A slight insignificant increase in alkaline phosphatase activity and unchanged levels of alanine aminotransferase, lactate dehydrogenase, calcium, magnesium, and TAS were demonstrated in EBL cows. As the TAS and vitamin C levels remained unchanged in EBL cows, it may be suggested that ruminants may compensate for the impaired oxidative/antioxidative balance. The results obtained also indicate that BLV may suppress AST and Cp synthesis or secretion in the liver through an unknown mechanism. The mechanism of action of BLV in hepatocytes, especially on AST and Cp, requires further investigation to elucidate the immune suppression caused by oncogenic retroviruses.

  6. Antibody responses against epitopes on the F protein of bovine respiratory syncytial virus differ in infected or vaccinated cattle

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schrijver, R.S.; Hensen, E.J.; Langedijk, J.P.M.; Daus, F.; Middel, W.G.J.; Kramps, J.A.; Oirschot, van J.T.

    1997-01-01

    The fusion protein F of bovine respiratory syncytial virus (BRSV) is an important target for humoral and cellular immune responses, and antibodies against the F protein have been associated with protection. However, the F protein can induce antibodies with different biological activity, possibly

  7. Interaction of isoflavones and endophyte-infected tall fescue seed extract on vasoactivity of bovine mesenteric vasculature

    Science.gov (United States)

    It was hypothesized that isoflavones may attenuate ergot alkaloid-induced vasoconstriction and possibly alleviate diminished contractility of vasculature after exposure to ergot alkaloids. The objective of this study was to determine if prior incubation of bovine mesenteric vasculature with the isof...

  8. A rural worker infected with a bovine-prevalent genotype of Campylobacter fetus subsp. fetus supports zoonotic transmission and inconsistency of MLST and whole-genome typing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iraola, G; Betancor, L; Calleros, L; Gadea, P; Algorta, G; Galeano, S; Muxi, P; Greif, G; Pérez, R

    2015-08-01

    Whole-genome characterisation in clinical microbiology enables to detect trends in infection dynamics and disease transmission. Here, we report a case of bacteraemia due to Campylobacter fetus subsp. fetus in a rural worker under cancer treatment that was diagnosed with cellulitis; the patient was treated with antibiotics and recovered. The routine typing methods were not able to identify the microorganism causing the infection, so it was further analysed by molecular methods and whole-genome sequencing. The multi-locus sequence typing (MLST) revealed the presence of the bovine-associated ST-4 genotype. Whole-genome comparisons with other C. fetus strains revealed an inconsistent phylogenetic position based on the core genome, discordant with previous ST-4 strains. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first C. fetus subsp. fetus carrying the ST-4 isolated from humans and represents a probable case of zoonotic transmission from cattle.

  9. Diagnosis of enzootic pneumonia in Danish cattle: reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction assay for detection of bovine respiratory syncytial virus in naturally and experimentally infected cattle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Lars Erik; Tjørnehøj, Kirsten; Viuff, B.;

    1999-01-01

    A reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) assay was developed for detection of bovine respiratory syncytial virus (BRSV) in lung tissue of naturally and experimentally infected cattle. Primers were selected from the gene coding the F fusion protein, which is relatively conserved...... among BRSV isolates. The RT-PCR assay was highly specific, it yielded positive reactions only when performed on BRSV-infected cell cultures or tissues. The detection limit of the RT-PCR assay was assessed as 5 TCID50. BRSV was detected in tissues of the respiratory tract and in the tracheobroncheal....... (7%), and Pasteurella haemolytica (7%) were the most common bacterial agents found in the lungs. BRSV was identified using a conventional antigen enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) in 23 (17%) animals. The established BRSV-specific RT-PCR assay yielded positive results for the same 23 animals...

  10. Diagnosis of enzootic pneumonia in Danish cattle: reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction assay for detection of bovine respiratory syncytial virus in naturally and experimentally infected cattle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Lars Erik; Tjørnehøj, Kirsten; Viuff, B.

    1999-01-01

    A reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) assay was developed for detection of bovine respiratory syncytial virus (BRSV) in lung tissue of naturally and experimentally infected cattle. Primers were selected from the gene coding the F fusion protein, which is relatively conserved...... among BRSV isolates. The RT-PCR assay was highly specific, it yielded positive reactions only when performed on BRSV-infected cell cultures or tissues. The detection limit of the RT-PCR assay was assessed as 5 TCID50. BRSV was detected in tissues of the respiratory tract and in the tracheobroncheal....... (7%), and Pasteurella haemolytica (7%) were the most common bacterial agents found in the lungs. BRSV was identified using a conventional antigen enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) in 23 (17%) animals. The established BRSV-specific RT-PCR assay yielded positive results for the same 23 animals...

  11. Effect of the inoculation site of bovine purified protein derivative (PPD) on the skin fold thickness increase in cattle from officially tuberculosis free and tuberculosis-infected herds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casal, Carmen; Alvarez, Julio; Bezos, Javier; Quick, Harrison; Díez-Guerrier, Alberto; Romero, Beatriz; Saez, Jose L; Liandris, Emmanouil; Navarro, Alejandro; Perez, Andrés; Domínguez, Lucas; de Juan, Lucía

    2015-09-01

    The official technique for diagnosis of bovine tuberculosis (bTB) worldwide is the tuberculin skin test, based on the evaluation of the skin thickness increase after the intradermal inoculation of a purified protein derivative (PPD) in cattle. A number of studies performed on experimentally infected or sensitized cattle have suggested that the relative sensitivity of the cervical test (performed in the neck) may vary depending on the exact location in which the PPD is injected. However, quantitative evidence on the variation of the test accuracy associated to changes in the site of inoculation in naturally infected animals (the population in which performance of the test is most critical for disease eradication) is lacking. Here, the probability of obtaining a positive reaction (>2 or 4 millimeters and/or presence of local clinical signs) after multiple inoculations of bovine PPD in different cervical and scapular locations was assessed in animals from five bTB-infected herds (818 cattle receiving eight inoculations) using a hierarchical Bayesian logistic regression model and adjusting for the potential effect of age and sex. The effect of the inoculation site was also assessed qualitatively in animals from four officially tuberculosis free (OTF) herds (two inoculations in 210 animals and eight inoculations in 38 cattle). Although no differences in the qualitative outcome of the test were observed in cattle from OTF herds, a statistically important association between the test outcome and the inoculation site in animals from infected herds was observed, with higher probabilities of positive results when the test was performed in the neck anterior area. Our results suggest that test sensitivity may be maximized by considering the area of the neck in which the test is applied, although lack of effect of the inoculation site in the specificity of the test should be confirmed in a larger sample.

  12. Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) is caused by a novel contagion, known to as a prion. Prions are proteins capable of converting a normal cellular protein into a prion, thereby propagating an infection. BSE is the first known prion zoonotic. As such it has attracted broad scientific and, to a r...

  13. Spontaneous obesity-linked type 2 diabetes in the absence of islet amyloid in a cynomolgus monkey infected with bovine spongiform encephalopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strom, A; Yutzy, B; Kruip, C; Völker, I; Schloot, N C; Roden, M; Scott, F W; Löwer, J; Holznagel, E

    2013-09-01

    A 9-year-old cynomolgus monkey (Macaca fascicularis) infected orally with bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) was presented for necropsy following euthanasia 4 years post infection (p.i.). This macaque R984 was exposed to a BSE dose that causes a simian form of variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (vCJD) within 5 years p.i. in other macaques. All orally BSE-infected macaques developed a significant weight gain within the first 2 years p.i. compared with non-BSE-infected age- and sex-matched control animals, suggesting increased risk of type 2 diabetes (T2D). In contrast, macaque R984 developed rapid weight loss, hyperglycemia, and glucosuria and had to be euthanatized 4 years p.i. before clinical signs of vCJD. Pancreas histopathological evaluation revealed severe islet degeneration but, remarkably, no islet amyloid deposits were present. Immunostaining of pancreas sections for insulin and glucagon confirmed the loss of endocrine cells. In addition, prions were present in the adenohypophysis but not in other areas of the brain, indicating centripetal prion spread from the gut during the preclinical phase of BSE infection. Plasma glucose and insulin concentrations of macaque R984 became abnormal with age and resembled T2D. This unusual case of spontaneous T2D in the absence of islet amyloid deposits could have been due to early prion spread from the periphery to the endocrine system or could have occurred spontaneously.

  14. A stochastic simulation model to determine the sample size of repeated national surveys to document freedom from bovine herpesvirus 1 (BoHV-1 infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schwermer Heinzpeter

    2007-05-01

    importance than infection through animals of either import pathway. Conclusion The model estimated the pre-survey probability of freedom from infection accurately as was shown in the case of infectious bovine rhinotracheitis (IBR. With this model, a generic tool becomes available which can be adapted to changing conditions related to either importing or exporting countries.

  15. Bovine Herpes Virus 1 (BHV-1) and Herpes Simplex Virus Type 1 (HSV-1) Promote Survival of Latently Infected Sensory Neurons, in Part by Inhibiting Apoptosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Clinton

    2013-01-01

    α-Herpesvirinae subfamily members, including herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) and bovine herpes virus 1 (BHV-1), initiate infection in mucosal surfaces. BHV-1 and HSV-1 enter sensory neurons by cell-cell spread where a burst of viral gene expression occurs. When compared to non-neuronal cells, viral gene expression is quickly extinguished in sensory neurons resulting in neuronal survival and latency. The HSV-1 latency associated transcript (LAT), which is abundantly expressed in latently infected neurons, inhibits apoptosis, viral transcription, and productive infection, and directly or indirectly enhances reactivation from latency in small animal models. Three anti-apoptosis genes can be substituted for LAT, which will restore wild type levels of reactivation from latency to a LAT null mutant virus. Two small non-coding RNAs encoded by LAT possess anti-apoptosis functions in transfected cells. The BHV-1 latency related RNA (LR-RNA), like LAT, is abundantly expressed during latency. The LR-RNA encodes a protein (ORF2) and two microRNAs that are expressed in certain latently infected neurons. Wild-type expression of LR gene products is required for stress-induced reactivation from latency in cattle. ORF2 has anti-apoptosis functions and interacts with certain cellular transcription factors that stimulate viral transcription and productive infection. ORF2 is predicted to promote survival of infected neurons by inhibiting apoptosis and sequestering cellular transcription factors which stimulate productive infection. In addition, the LR encoded microRNAs inhibit viral transcription and apoptosis. In summary, the ability of BHV-1 and HSV-1 to interfere with apoptosis and productive infection in sensory neurons is crucial for the life-long latency-reactivation cycle in their respective hosts. PMID:25278776

  16. Increase of cells expressing PD-L1 in bovine leukemia virus infection and enhancement of anti-viral immune responses in vitro via PD-L1 blockade

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ikebuchi Ryoyo

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The inhibitory receptor programmed death-1 (PD-1 and its ligand, programmed death-ligand 1 (PD-L1 are involved in immune evasion mechanisms for several pathogens causing chronic infections. Blockade of the PD-1/PD-L1 pathway restores anti-virus immune responses, with concomitant reduction in viral load. In a previous report, we showed that, in bovine leukemia virus (BLV infection, the expression of bovine PD-1 is closely associated with disease progression. However, the functions of bovine PD-L1 are still unknown. To investigate the role of PD-L1 in BLV infection, we identified the bovine PD-L1 gene, and examined PD-L1 expression in BLV-infected cattle in comparison with uninfected cattle. The deduced amino acid sequence of bovine PD-L1 shows high homology to the human and mouse PD-L1. The proportion of PD-L1 positive cells, especially among B cells, was upregulated in cattle with the late stage of the disease compared to cattle at the aleukemic infection stage or uninfected cattle. The proportion of PD-L1 positive cells correlated positively with prediction markers for the progression of the disease such as leukocyte number, virus load and virus titer whilst on the contrary, it inversely correlated with the degree of interferon-gamma expression. Blockade of the PD-1/PD-L1 pathway in vitro by PD-L1-specific antibody upregulated the production of interleukin-2 and interferon-gamma, and correspondingly, downregulated the BLV provirus load and the proportion of BLV-gp51 expressing cells. These data suggest that PD-L1 induces immunoinhibition in disease progressed cattle during chronic BLV infection. Therefore, PD-L1 would be a potential target for developing immunotherapies against BLV infection.

  17. Greater numbers of nucleotide substitutions are introduced into the genomic RNA of bovine viral diarrhea virus during acute infections of pregnant cattle than of non-pregnant cattle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neill John D

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV strains circulating in livestock herds show significant sequence variation. Conventional wisdom states that most sequence variation arises during acute infections in response to immune or other environmental pressures. A recent study showed that more nucleotide changes were introduced into the BVDV genomic RNA during the establishment of a single fetal persistent infection than following a series of acute infections of naïve cattle. However, it was not known if nucleotide changes were introduce when the virus crossed the placenta and infected the fetus or during the acute infection of the dam. Methods The sequence of the open reading frame (ORF from viruses isolated from four acutely infected pregnant heifers following exposure to persistently infected (PI calves was compared to the sequences of the virus from the progenitor PI calf and the virus from the resulting progeny PI calf to determine when genetic change was introduced. This was compared to genetic change found in viruses isolated from a pregnant PI cow and its PI calf, and in three viruses isolated from acutely infected, non-pregnant cattle exposed to PI calves. Results Most genetic changes previously identified between the progenitor and progeny PI viruses were in place in the acute phase viruses isolated from the dams six days post-exposure to the progenitor PI calf. Additionally, each progeny PI virus had two to three unique nucleotide substitutions that were introduced in crossing the placenta and infection of the fetus. The nucleotide sequence of two acute phase viruses isolated from steers exposed to PI calves revealed that six and seven nucleotide changes were introduced during the acute infection. The sequence of the BVDV-2 virus isolated from an acute infection of a PI calf (BVDV-1a co-housed with a BVDV-2 PI calf had ten nucleotides that were different from the progenitor PI virus. Finally, twenty nucleotide changes were

  18. Erythroeyte and erythrocyte fnnction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1993-01-01

    930160 Erythrocyte deformability in severalhematological disorders.WU Wankun(吴宛堃),et al.Dept Radiation Med,Xinjing Hosp,4th Milit Med Univ.J 4th Milit Med Univ1992;13(5):359-361.The erythrocyte deformability of 29 cases in iron-dificiency anemia(IDA),asplastic anemia(AA)and myelodysplastic syndrome(MDS)was studied by ektacytometry,a laser diffrac-tion method.The blood samples from elbowveins were heparinized.Three fluid stresses act-ing on red blood cells(RBCs)were 54 dyn/cm~2,166 dyn/cm~2 and 309 dyn/cm~2.The changes inlaser diffraction patterns from circularity to el-

  19. Spatial modelling of the between-herd infection dynamics of bovine virus diarrhoea virus (BVDV) in dairy herds in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ersbøll, Annette Kjær; Ersbøll, Bjarne Kjær; Houe, H.

    2010-01-01

    According to the current literature BVDV-infected neighbours probably impose a high risk of infection of susceptible cattle herds. In the present study, the objective was to evaluate the risk of a dairy herd changing infection status (from not having persistently infected (PI) animals to having PI-animals...

  20. Replication of Bovine Papillomavirus Type 1 (BPV-1) DNA in Saccharomyces cerevisiae following Infection with BPV-1 Virions

    OpenAIRE

    Zhao, Kong-Nan; Frazer, Ian H

    2002-01-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae protoplasts exposed to bovine papillomavirus type 1 (BPV-1) virions demonstrated uptake of virions on electron microscopy. S. cerevisiae cells looked larger after exposure to BPV-1 virions, and cell wall regeneration was delayed. Southern blot hybridization of Hirt DNA from cells exposed to BPV-1 virions demonstrated BPV-1 DNA, which could be detected over 80 days of culture and at least 13 rounds of division. Two-dimensional gel analysis of Hirt DNA showed replicativ...

  1. 巴贝斯虫感染对宿主红细胞及免疫系统的影响%INFLUENCE OF BABESIA INFECTION ON HOST ERYTHROCYTES AND IMMUNE SYSTEMS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    魏金龙; 周金林

    2015-01-01

    巴贝斯虫(Babesia)是一种寄生于宿主红细胞的顶复门寄生虫,硬蜱为其传播媒介。由于巴贝斯虫感染后可以引起人或动物严重的临床症状,甚至造成死亡,给畜牧业和人类健康带来了极大威胁。本文主要综合国内外近年的研究成果,从巴贝斯虫入侵红细胞并对红细胞造成的影响,宿主感染后机体免疫状态的变化,以及共感染等方面进行综述,旨在为巴贝斯虫相关研究提供参考。%Babesia parasites are tick-transmitted intraerythrocytic protozoa of the phylum Apicomplexa, causing severe and even fatal disease and posing a great threaten for animal husbandry and human health. In this article, parasitic invasion to erythrocytes, changes of the host immune status after infection and aspects of co-infection are summarized according to the published results up to date. which will provide a reference for Babesia research.

  2. Co-infection with Mycobacterium bovis does not alter the response to bovine leukemia virus in BoLA DRB3*0902, genetically resistant cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lützelschwab, Claudia M; Forletti, Agustina; Cepeda, Rosana; Esteban, Eduardo N; Confalonieri, Omar; Gutiérrez, Silvina E

    2016-12-01

    High proviral load (HPL) profile in bovine leukemia virus infected animals poses increased risk of transmission, and development of HPL or low proviral load (LPL) profile may be attributed to host genetics. Genetic resistance and susceptibility has been mapped to the Major Histocompatibility Complex class II DRB3 gene (BoLA DRB3). The aim of this work was to determine the effect of Mycobacterium bovis infection on certain virological and host immunological parameters of BLV experimental infection. Twenty-six Argentinian Holstein calves carrying the resistance-associated marker allele BoLA DRB3*0902, susceptibility-associated marker allele BoLA DRB3*1501, or neutral BoLA DRB3 alleles, exposed to M. bovis were used. Twenty calves were inoculated with BLV, three were naturally infected and other three were BLV-negative. Seven from twenty six (27%) of the animals resulted positive to the PPD test. The proviral load, absolute leukocyte and lymphocyte counts, time to seroconversion, antibody titer against BLV, and viral antigen expression in vitro at various times post inoculation were determined and compared between PPD+ and PPD- animals. From a total of 23 BLV positive animals (naturally and experimentally infected), 13 (56.5%) developed HPL, and 10 (43.5%) developed LPL. None of the investigated parameters were affected by infection with M. bovis. We concluded that the ability of cattle carrying resistance-associated marker to control BLV and to progress towards a LPL phenotype was not altered by M. bovis co-infection.

  3. Frequency and Pathological Phenotype of Bovine Astrovirus CH13/NeuroS1 Infection in Neurologically-Diseased Cattle: Towards Assessment of Causality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Senija Selimovic-Hamza

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Next-generation sequencing (NGS has opened up the possibility of detecting new viruses in unresolved diseases. Recently, astrovirus brain infections have been identified in neurologically diseased humans and animals by NGS, among them bovine astrovirus (BoAstV CH13/NeuroS1, which has been found in brain tissues of cattle with non-suppurative encephalitis. Only a few studies are available on neurotropic astroviruses and a causal relationship between BoAstV CH13/NeuroS1 infections and neurological disease has been postulated, but remains unproven. Aiming at making a step forward towards assessing the causality, we collected brain samples of 97 cases of cattle diagnosed with unresolved non-suppurative encephalitis, and analyzed them by in situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry, to determine the frequency and neuropathological distribution of the BoAstV CH13/NeuroS1 and its topographical correlation to the pathology. We detected BoAstV CH13/NeuroS1 RNA or proteins in neurons throughout all parts of the central nervous system (CNS in 34% of all cases, but none were detected in cattle of the control group. In general, brain lesions had a high correlation with the presence of the virus. These findings show that a substantial proportion of cattle with non-suppurative encephalitis are infected with BoAstV CH13/NeuroS1 and further substantiate the causal relationship between neurological disease and astrovirus infections.

  4. Frequency and Pathological Phenotype of Bovine Astrovirus CH13/NeuroS1 Infection in Neurologically-Diseased Cattle: Towards Assessment of Causality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selimovic-Hamza, Senija; Boujon, Céline L.; Hilbe, Monika; Oevermann, Anna; Seuberlich, Torsten

    2017-01-01

    Next-generation sequencing (NGS) has opened up the possibility of detecting new viruses in unresolved diseases. Recently, astrovirus brain infections have been identified in neurologically diseased humans and animals by NGS, among them bovine astrovirus (BoAstV) CH13/NeuroS1, which has been found in brain tissues of cattle with non-suppurative encephalitis. Only a few studies are available on neurotropic astroviruses and a causal relationship between BoAstV CH13/NeuroS1 infections and neurological disease has been postulated, but remains unproven. Aiming at making a step forward towards assessing the causality, we collected brain samples of 97 cases of cattle diagnosed with unresolved non-suppurative encephalitis, and analyzed them by in situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry, to determine the frequency and neuropathological distribution of the BoAstV CH13/NeuroS1 and its topographical correlation to the pathology. We detected BoAstV CH13/NeuroS1 RNA or proteins in neurons throughout all parts of the central nervous system (CNS) in 34% of all cases, but none were detected in cattle of the control group. In general, brain lesions had a high correlation with the presence of the virus. These findings show that a substantial proportion of cattle with non-suppurative encephalitis are infected with BoAstV CH13/NeuroS1 and further substantiate the causal relationship between neurological disease and astrovirus infections. PMID:28106800

  5. Expression of CD14 and toll-like receptors 2 and 4 by milk neutrophils in bovine mammary glands infected with Corynebacterium bovis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maiara G. Blagitz

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This study evaluated the expression of CD14, toll-like receptor (TLR 2 and TLR4 on the surface of milk neutrophils in bovine mammary glands infected with Corynebacterium bovis. Here, we used 23 culture-negative control quarters with no abnormal secretion on the strip cup test and milk somatic cell count lower than 1x105 cells/mL, and 14 C. bovis infected quarters. The identification of neutrophils, as well as, the percentage of neutrophils that expressed CD14, TLR2 and TLR4 were analyzed by flow cytometry using monoclonal antibodies. The present study encountered no significant difference in the percentages of milk neutrophils that expressed TLR2 and TLR4 or in the expression of TLR4 by milk neutrophils. Conversely, a lower median fluorescence intensity of TLR2 in milk neutrophils was observed in C. bovis-infected quarters. The percentage of neutrophils that expressed CD14 and the median fluorescence intensity of CD14 in milk neutrophils was also lower in C. bovis-infected quarters.

  6. Enzootic bovine leukosis and Bovine leukemia virus

    OpenAIRE

    Amauri Alcindo Alfieri; Alice Fernandes Alfieri; Luis Álvaro Leuzzi Junior

    2004-01-01

    All over de World the Enzootic Bovine Leukosis is a important viral infection in cattle herds. This revision points out topics relative to the etiological agent, clinical signals, diagnosis methods, control and prophylaxis of the infection.A Leucose Enzoótica Bovina é uma infecção viral amplamente disseminada em rebanhos bovinos de todo o mundo. Esta revisão tem por objetivo apresentar tópicos relacionados ao agente etiológico, à doença clínica e aos métodos de diagnóstico, controle e profila...

  7. Subcritical Water Hydrolysis Effectively Reduces the In Vitro Seeding Activity of PrPSc but Fails to Inactivate the Infectivity of Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy Prions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murayama, Yuichi; Yoshioka, Miyako; Okada, Hiroyuki; Takata, Eri; Masujin, Kentaro; Iwamaru, Yoshifumi; Shimozaki, Noriko; Yamamura, Tomoaki; Yokoyama, Takashi; Mohri, Shirou; Tsutsumi, Yuji

    2015-01-01

    The global outbreak of bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) has been attributed to the recycling of contaminated meat and bone meals (MBMs) as feed supplements. The use of MBMs has been prohibited in many countries; however, the development of a method for inactivating BSE prions could enable the efficient and safe use of these products as an organic resource. Subcritical water (SCW), which is water heated under pressure to maintain a liquid state at temperatures below the critical temperature (374°C), exhibits strong hydrolytic activity against organic compounds. In this study, we examined the residual in vitro seeding activity of protease-resistant prion protein (PrPSc) and the infectivity of BSE prions after SCW treatments. Spinal cord homogenates prepared from BSE-infected cows were treated with SCW at 230-280°C for 5-7.5 min and used to intracerebrally inoculate transgenic mice overexpressing bovine prion protein. Serial protein misfolding cyclic amplification (sPMCA) analysis detected no PrPSc in the SCW-treated homogenates, and the mice treated with these samples survived for more than 700 days without any signs of disease. However, sPMCA analyses detected PrPSc accumulation in the brains of all inoculated mice. Furthermore, secondary passage mice, which inoculated with brain homogenates derived from a western blotting (WB)-positive primary passage mouse, died after an average of 240 days, similar to mice inoculated with untreated BSE-infected spinal cord homogenates. The PrPSc accumulation and vacuolation typically observed in the brains of BSE-infected mice were confirmed in these secondary passage mice, suggesting that the BSE prions maintained their infectivity after SCW treatment. One late-onset case, as well as asymptomatic but sPMCA-positive cases, were also recognized in secondary passage mice inoculated with brain homogenates from WB-negative but sPMCA-positive primary passage mice. These results indicated that SCW-mediated hydrolysis was

  8. Weaning management of newly received beef calves with or without continuous exposure to a persistently infected bovine viral diarrhea virus pen mate: Effects on rectal temperature and serum proinflammatory cytokine and haptog

    Science.gov (United States)

    Exposure to animals persistently infected (PI) with bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) results in immunomodulation in cohorts. It is hypothesized that the extent of modulation differs for low-risk, preconditioned (PC) vs. high-risk, auction market (AM) beef cattle. Our objective was to compare immun...

  9. Weaning management of newly received beef calves with or without continuous exposure to a persistently infected bovine viral diarrhea virus pen mate: Effects on rectal temperature, peripheral blood leukocytes and serum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Exposure to animals persistently infected (PI) with bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) results in immunomodulation in cohorts. It is hypothesized that the extent of modulation differs for preconditioned (PC) vs. auction market (AM) cattle. Our objective was to compare immune responses of PC or AM ca...

  10. Assessment of the rabbit as a wildlife reservoir of bovine viral diarrhoea virus: serological analysis and generation of trans-placentally infected offspring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dawn M Grant

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Eradication of Bovine viral diarrhoea virus (BVDV is ongoing in many European countries and is based on removal of persistently infected (PI cattle. In this context, low-level risks, including alternative reservoirs of infection, may become more important as the number of BVDV-free herds increases. Alternative reservoirs include livestock, such as sheep and goats, as well as wildlife, including deer and rabbits. Due to the extensive nature of the beef industry in Scotland, where eradication started in 2010, contact between cattle and alternative reservoir hosts is common.Seroprevalence to BVDV in rabbit populations can be high. In addition, rabbits can be infected with BVDV by natural routes, indicating that they could be a wildlife reservoir of infection. We analysed the potential risk to livestock from rabbit populations in the UK by two approaches. First, approximately 260 serum samples from free-ranging wild rabbits in Scotland and northern England were tested for BVDV-specific antibodies by ELISA. Only three samples exhibited low level BVDV-specific reactivity, suggesting that BVDV infection of rabbits was not frequent. Second, rabbits were challenged with BVDV at day 7 or 12 of pregnancy. This did not lead to any clinical signs in the infected animals or obvious increases in abortion or stillbirth in the infected dams. Samples from the dams, placental material and approximately 130 offspring were tested by BVDV-specific RT-PCR and antibody ELISA. Positive PCR results in the placentas and in the tissues and body fluids of rabbits up to 10 days old showed that trans-placental infection of rabbits with BVDV had occurred. Many of the offspring had BVDV-specific antibodies.These data support the view that a wildlife reservoir of BVDV in rabbit poses a small but non-zero risk of re-infection for BVDV-free cattle herds. Rabbits are susceptible to infection with BVDV but a small proportion of free-living rabbits in the UK appear to have been

  11. A Unique Feature of Iron Loss via Close Adhesion of Helicobacter pylori to Host Erythrocytes

    OpenAIRE

    Zhiwei Wang; Lijuan Zhang; Zhi Guo; Lei Liu; Jun Ji; Jianian Zhang; Xuehua Chen; Bingya Liu; Jun Zhang(UT Austin); Qiulan Ding; Xuefeng Wang; Wei Zhao; Zhenggang Zhu; Yingyan Yu

    2012-01-01

    Iron deficiency anemia is an extra-stomach disease experienced in H. pylori carriers. Individuals with type A blood are more prone to suffering from H. pylori infection than other individuals. To clarify the molecular mechanisms underlying H. pylori-associated anemia, we collected erythrocytes from A, B, O, and AB blood donors and analyzed morphology, the number of erythrocytes with H. pylori colonies attached to them, and iron contents in erythrocytes and H. pylori (NCTC11637 and SS1 strains...

  12. Lesions and distribution of viral antigen following an experimental infection of young seronegative calves with virulent bovine virus diarrhea virus-type II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, J A; West, K H; Cortese, V S; Myers, S L; Carman, S; Martin, K M; Haines, D M

    1998-07-01

    During the past several years, acute infections with bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) have been causally linked to hemorrhagic and acute mucosal disease-like syndromes with high mortality. The majority of BVDVs isolated in such cases have been classified as type II on the basis of genetic and antigenic characteristics. It was our objective to examine clinical disease, lesions and potential sites of viral replication, following experimental BVDV type II infection in young calves. On approximately day 35 after birth, calves that had received BVDV-antibody-negative colostrum were infected by intranasal inoculation of 5 x 10(5) TCID50 of BVDV type II isolate 24,515 in 5 mL of tissue culture fluid (2.5 mL/nostril). Calves were monitored twice daily for signs of clinical disease. Approximately 48-72 h after infection, all calves developed transient pyrexia (39.4-40.5 degrees C) and leukopenia. Beginning on approximately day 7 after infection, all calves developed watery diarrhea, pyrexia (40.5-41.6 degrees C), marked leukopenia (> or = 75% drop from preinoculation values), variable thrombocytopenia, and moderate to severe depression. Calves were euthanized on days 10, 11, or 12 after infection due to severe disease. Gross and histological lesions consisted of multifocal bronchointerstitial pneumonia (involving 10%-25% of affected lungs), bone marrow hypoplasia and necrosis, and minimal erosive lesions in the alimentary tract. Immunohistochemical staining for BVDV revealed widespread viral antigen usually within epithelial cells, smooth muscle cells and mononuclear phagocytes in multiple organs, including lung, Peyer's patches, gastric mucosa, thymus, adrenal gland, spleen, lymph nodes, bone marrow, and skin. This BVDV type II isolate caused rapidly progressive, severe multisystemic disease in seronegative calves that was associated with widespread distribution of viral antigen and few gross or histological inflammatory lesions.

  13. Dairy Cows Naturally Infected with Bovine Leukemia Virus Exhibit Abnormal B- and T-Cell Phenotypes after Primary and Secondary Exposures to Keyhole Limpet Hemocyanin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meredith C. Frie

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Bovine leukemia virus (BLV is a retrovirus that is highly prevalent in US dairy herds: over 83% are BLV infected and the within-herd infection rate can be almost 50% on average. While BLV is known to cause lymphosarcomas, only 5% or fewer infected cattle will develop lymphoma; this low prevalence of cancer has historically not been a concern to dairy producers. However, more recent research has found that BLV+ cows without lymphoma produce less milk and have shorter lifespans than uninfected herdmates. It has been hypothesized that BLV infection interferes with normal immune function in infected cattle, and this could lead to reduced dairy production. To assess how naturally infected BLV+ cows responded to a primary and secondary immune challenge, 10 BLV+ and 10 BLV− cows were injected subcutaneously with keyhole limpet hemocyanin (KLH and dimethyldioctadecylammonium bromide. B- and T-cell responses were characterized over the following 28 days. A total of 56 days after primary KLH exposure, cows were re-injected with KLH and B- and T-cell responses were characterized again over the following 28 days. BLV+ cows produced less KLH-specific IgM after primary immune stimulation; demonstrated fewer CD45R0+ B cells, altered proportions of CD5+ B cells, altered expression of CD5 on CD5+ B cells, and reduced MHCII surface expression on B cells ex vivo; exhibited reduced B-cell activation in vitro; and displayed an increase in BLV proviral load after KLH exposure. In addition, BLV+ cows had a reduced CD45R0+γδ+ T-cell population in the periphery and demonstrated a greater prevalence of IL4-producing T cells in vitro. All together, our results demonstrate that both B- and T-cell immunities are disrupted in BLV+ cows and that antigen-specific deficiencies can be detected in BLV+ cows even after a primary immune exposure.

  14. An inactivated gE-negative marker vaccine and an experimental gD-subunit vaccine reduce the incidence of bovine herpesvirus 1 infections in the field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosch, J C; De Jong, M C; Franken, P; Frankena, K; Hage, J J; Kaashoek, M J; Maris-Veldhuis, M A; Noordhuizen, J P; Van der Poel, W H; Verhoeff, J; Weerdmeester, K; Zimmer, G M; Van Oirschot, J T

    1998-01-01

    An inactivated glycoprotein E-negative vaccine and an experimental glycoprotein D-subunit vaccine against bovine herpesvirus 1 (V1) were examined for their effectiveness in a randomized, double-bline, placebo-controlled field trial comprising 130 dairy farms. The use of these marker vaccines enabled us to monitor the incidence of infections in vaccinated populations. The aims of this trial were to evaluate whether these vaccines: (1) reduce the proportion of outbreaks in dairy herds; and (2) reduced virus transmission within dairy herds and to what extent. Vaccination with either of the two vaccines significantly reduced the proportion of herds wherein an outbreak occurred as well as the virus transmission within herds, as compared to placebo-treated herds. The estimated number of secondary cases caused by one infectious animal, expressed as the reproduction ratio R, was for both vaccines significantly > 1. This indicates that when BHV1 is introduced into vaccinated herds, major outbreaks may still occur.

  15. Coexistence of two forms of disease-associated prion protein in extracerebral tissues of cattle infected with H-type bovine spongiform encephalopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okada, Hiroyuki; Miyazawa, Kohtaro; Masujin, Kentaro; Yokoyama, Takashi

    2016-08-01

    H-type bovine spongiform encephalopathy (H-BSE) is an atypical form of BSE in aged cattle. H-BSE is characterized by the presence of two proteinase K-resistant forms of disease-associated prion protein (PrP(Sc)), identified as PrP(Sc) #1 and PrP(Sc) #2, in the brain. To investigate the coexistence of different PrP(Sc) forms in the extracerebral tissues of cattle experimentally infected with H-BSE, immunohistochemical and molecular analyses were performed by using N-terminal-, core-region- and C-terminal-specific anti-prion protein antibodies. Our results demonstrated that two distinct forms of PrP(Sc) coexisted in the various extracerebral tissues.

  16. BOVINE LEUKEMIA VIRUS INFECTION IN TAIWAN : EVALUATION OF THE ENZYME-LINKED IMMUNOSORBENT ASSAY AND AGAR GEL IMMUNODIFFUSION TEST

    OpenAIRE

    WANG, Chun-Tshen

    1991-01-01

    I evaluated an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and agar gel immunodiffusion (AGID) test simultaneously for the detection of bovine leukemia virus (BLV) antibodies. Total 1,293 serum samples were tested for ELISA and AGID test and the results were compared. The results of ELISA and AGID agreed by 1,156 out of 1,293 (89.4%). All of AGID-positive 356 sera were positive by ELISA. However, of 451 ELISA-positive sera, 95 sera were either negative or equivocal by AGID test. Eleven animals ...

  17. Bovine Leukemia ProVirus: Evidence of Presence of Part of Gag Gene in Seminal Plasma of Naturally Infected Bulls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Razi Jafari

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available It is of critical importance to understand the modalities of BLV presence in semen, especially with regard to artificial insemination (AI. Presence of bovine leukemia provirus was demonstrated in fresh and frozen semen samples by researchers. In this study paired blood and semen samples from 45 bulls were assessed for the presence of part of gag gene and antibodies to BLV in blood, semen and cell-free fraction of the semen (seminal plasma. Proviral DNA was detected in 5 out of 45 seminal plasma samples. PCR products were sequenced and submitted to gene bank. This data strongly suggested that seminal plasma of seropositive bulls can be positive in PCR.

  18. Efficacy of a control program for bovine trichomonosis based on testing and culling infected bulls in beef cattle managed under mountain pastoral systems of Northern Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collantes-Fernández, Esther; Mendoza-Ibarra, Jesús Alberto; Pedraza-Díaz, Susana; Rojo-Montejo, Silvia; Navarro-Lozano, Vanesa; Sánchez-Sánchez, Roberto; Ruiz-Santa-Quiteria, Jose Antonio; Ortega-Mora, Luis Miguel; Osoro, Koldo

    2014-04-01

    Bovine trichomonosis (BT) is a sexually transmitted disease that is considered a cause of early reproductive failure in cattle under extensive management conditions. Recently, Tritrichomonas foetus was detected in 41.5% of herds from one representative beef cattle breed (Asturiana de la Montaña; AM) reared in traditional mountain systems in Spain. The objective of the present study was to evaluate the effect of BT on reproductive performance and the economic consequences in AM herds. The benefits of a control program based on testing and culling infected bulls were also studied by comparing T. foetus prevalence and reproductive data before and after the implementation of the control measures. In infected herds, T. foetus infection increased calving intervals by 79 days (P0.05) and the herd incidence was 22.72%. The testing and culling policy was effective in improving reproductive efficiency but the complete elimination of BT without substantial changes in management appears unlikely because putative risk factors associated with the disease are present in the management of this breed.

  19. Association of TNF-α gene promoter region polymorphisms in bovine leukemia virus (BLV)-infected cattle with different proviral loads.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lendez, Pamela Anahi; Passucci, Juan Antonio; Poli, Mario Andres; Gutierrez, Silvina Elena; Dolcini, Guillermina Laura; Ceriani, Maria Carolina

    2015-08-01

    Tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) is a pleiotropic cytokine involved in the immune response against viral and other infections. Its expression levels are affected by a polymorphism in the promoter region of the gene. Bovine leukemia virus is a retrovirus that infects cattle and develops two different infection profiles in the host. One profile is characterized by a high number of proviral copies integrated into the host genome and a strong immune response against the virus, while the most relevant property of the other profile is that the number of copies integrated into the host genome is almost undetectable and the immune response is very weak. We selected a population of cattle sufficiently large for statistical analysis and classified them according to whether they had a high or low proviral load (HPL or LPL). Polymorphisms in the promoter region were identified by PCR-RFLP. The results indicated that, in the HPL group, the three possible genotypes were normally distributed and that, in the LPL group, there was a significant association between the proviral load and a low frequency of the G/G genotype at position -824.

  20. High concentration of human lactoferrin in milk of rhLf-transgenic cows relieves signs of bovine experimental Staphylococcus chromogenes intramammary infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simojoki, Heli; Hyvönen, Paula; Orro, Toomas; Pyörälä, Satu

    2010-08-15

    Six transgenic cows producing recombinant human lactoferrin (rhLf) in their milk and five normal cows at the same lactation stage were experimentally infected with Staphylococcus chromogenes to study the effect of a high concentration of lactoferrin in milk. Coagulase-negative staphylococci such as S. chromogenes have become very common as agents causing mild or subclinical mastitis. All transgenic cows became infected but showed no clinical signs, unlike the control cows, which developed mild clinical mastitis. Transgenic cows eliminated bacteria faster from the quarters than did the controls. Local clinical signs were milder, and the inflammatory reaction assessed by NAGase activity in the milk and by the concentration of milk amyloid A was lower in the transgenic cows. The mild response probably reflected the rapid elimination of bacteria. The milk concentration of rhLf remained constant throughout the study period, but the total concentration of bovine lactoferrin in the milk peaked in both groups at 46h post-challenge. Three cows, all in the control group, exhibited systemic acute phase response as increased concentrations of serum amyloid A in the blood circulation. Transgenic cows with a high concentration of human lactoferrin in their milk seemed to be protected from clinical disease and from prolonged inflammatory reaction, but not from experimental intramammary infection induced by S. chromogenes.

  1. Amplification of bovine papillomavirus DNA by N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine, ultraviolet irradiation, or infection with herpes simplex virus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmitt, J.; Schlehofer, J.R.; Mergener, K.; Gissmann, L.; zur Hausen, H. (Deutsches Krebsforschungszentrum, Heidelberg (Germany, F.R.))

    1989-09-01

    Treatment with N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine (MNNG) or irradiation with ultraviolet light (uv254 nm) induces amplification of integrated as well as episomal sequences of bovine papillomavirus (BPV) type 1 DNA in BPV-1-transformed mouse C127 cells (i.e., ID13 cells). This is shown by filter in situ hybridization and Southern blot analysis of cellular DNA. Similarly, infection of ID13 cells with herpes simplex virus (HSV) type 1 which has been shown to be mutagenic for host cell DNA leads to amplification of BPV DNA sequences. In contrast to this induction of DNA amplification by initiators, treatment of ID13 cells with the tumor promoter 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA) does not result in increased synthesis of BPV DNA nor does TPA treatment modulate the initiator-induced DNA amplification. Similar to other cell systems infection with adeno-associated virus (AAV) type 2 inhibits BPV-1 DNA amplification irrespective of the inducing agent. In contrast to initiator-induced DNA amplification, treatment with carcinogen (MNNG) or tumor promoters or combination of MNNG and promoter of C127 cells prior to transformation by BPV-1 does not lead to an increase in the number of transformed foci. The induction of amplification of papillomavirus DNA by initiating agents possibly represents one of the mechanisms by which the observed synergism between papillomavirus infection and initiators in tumorigenesis might occur.

  2. Significant differences in incubation times in sheep infected with bovine spongiform encephalopathy result from variation at codon 141 in the PRNP gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Boon Chin; Blanco, Anthony R Alejo; Houston, E Fiona; Stewart, Paula; Goldmann, Wilfred; Gill, Andrew C; de Wolf, Christopher; Manson, Jean C; McCutcheon, Sandra

    2012-12-01

    The susceptibility of sheep to prion infection is linked to variation in the PRNP gene, which encodes the prion protein. Common polymorphisms occur at codons 136, 154 and 171. Sheep which are homozygous for the A(136)R(154)Q(171) allele are the most susceptible to bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE). The effect of other polymorphisms on BSE susceptibility is unknown. We orally infected ARQ/ARQ Cheviot sheep with equal amounts of BSE brain homogenate and a range of incubation periods was observed. When we segregated sheep according to the amino acid (L or F) encoded at codon 141 of the PRNP gene, the shortest incubation period was observed in LL(141) sheep, whilst incubation periods in FF(141) and LF(141) sheep were significantly longer. No statistically significant differences existed in the expression of total prion protein or the disease-associated isoform in BSE-infected sheep within each genotype subgroup. This suggested that the amino acid encoded at codon 141 probably affects incubation times through direct effects on protein misfolding rates.

  3. Prevalence of and risk factors for bovine respiratory syncytial virus (BRSV) infection in non-vaccinated dairy and dual-purpose cattle herds in Ecuador.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saa, Luis Rodrigo; Perea, Anselmo; Jara, Diego Vinicio; Arenas, Antonio José; Garcia-Bocanegra, Ignacio; Borge, Carmen; Carbonero, Alfonso

    2012-10-01

    A cross-sectional study was carried out to determine the seroprevalence and risk factors associated with bovine respiratory syncytial virus (BRSV) infection in non-vaccinated dairy and dual-purpose cattle herds from Ecuador. A total of 2,367 serum samples from 346 herds were collected from June 2008 to February 2009. A questionnaire, which included variables related to cattle, health, management measures, and the environment, was filled out in each herd. Presence of antibodies against BRSV was analyzed using a commercial indirect ELISA test. A logistic regression model was used to determine risk factors associated with BRSV at herd level. The individual seroprevalence against BRSV in non-vaccinated herds in Ecuador was 80.48% [1,905/2,367; 95% confidence interval (CI) = 78.9-82.1]. The herd prevalence was 91.3% (316/346; 95% CI = 88.3-94.3), and the intra-herd prevalence ranged between 25% and 100% (mean, 90.47%). The logistic regression model showed that the existence of bordering cattle farms, the dual-purpose farms, and the altitude of the farm (more than 2,338 m above sea level) were risk factors associated with BRSV infection. This is the first study about BRSV prevalence in Ecuador. It shows the wide spread of the BRSV infection in the country. The risk factors found will help to design effective control strategies.

  4. Implementing a probabilistic definition of freedom from infection to facilitate trade of livestock: putting theory into praxis for the example of bovine herpes virus-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuppers, M E; Stegeman, J A; Kramps, J A; Stärk, K D C

    2012-07-01

    International trade of livestock and livestock products poses a significant potential threat for spread of diseases, and importing countries therefore often require that imported animals and products are free from certain pathogens. However, absolute freedom from infection cannot be documented, since all test protocols are imperfect and can lead to false-negative results. It is possible instead to estimate the "probability of freedom from infection" and its opposite, the probability of infection despite having a negative test result. These probabilities can be estimated based on a pre-defined target prevalence, known surveillance efforts in the target population and known test characteristics of any pre-export test. Here, calculations are demonstrated using the example of bovine herpes virus-1 (BoHV-1). In a population that recently became free of BoHV-1 without using vaccination, the probability of being infected of an animal randomly selected for trade is 800 per 1 million and this probability is reduced to 64 (95% probability interval PI 6-161) per 1 million when this animal is tested negatively prior to export with a gB-ELISA. In a population that recently became free of BoHV-1 using vaccination, the probability of being infected of an animal randomly selected for trade is 200 per 1 million, and this probability can be reduced to 63 (95% PI 42-87) when this animal is tested negatively prior to export with a gE-ELISA. Similar estimations can be made on a herd level when assumptions are made about the herd size and the intensity of the surveillance efforts. Subsequently, the overall probability for an importing country of importing at least 1 infected animal can be assessed by taking into account the trade volume. Definition of the acceptable level of risk, including the probability of false-negative results to occur, is part of risk management. Internationally harmonized target prevalence levels for the declaration of freedom from infection from selected

  5. A proteomic study of the differential protein expression in MDBK cells after bovine herpesvirus type 1 infection (BHV-1) strain treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Li; Yang, Yanling; Liu, Linna; Liao, Peng; Wen, Yongjun; Wu, Hua; Cheng, Shipeng

    2015-01-01

    Different BHV-1 strains, such as the virulent IBRV LN01/08 strains and the attenuated vaccine strain IBRV LNM, produces different clinical immune responses; however, the study of the differential protein expression in Madin-Darby bovine kidney (MDBK) cells after BHV-1-infection still remains unclear. Here, we applied a comparative proteomic strategy, based on 2D and MALDI-TOF/MS platforms, to examine the differential expression of proteins in MDBK cells that were treated and not treated with virulent IBRV LN01/08 and attenuated IBRV LNM strains. A total of eight differential proteins, including pyruvate kinase, heat shock protein (HSP) 90 (HSP90AA1 and HSP90AB1), annexin A, albumin (ALB), scinderin (SCIN), tubulin (alpha 1a) and vimentin (VIM), were identified. Among these proteins, pyruvate kinase, and HSP90 (HSP90AB1), tubulin and vimentin were identified in the virulent IBRV LN01/08 strain group, but were not identified in the attenuated IBRV LNM group. These results play an important role in tumor formation and development, cell migration, tumor cell line apoptosis, cell invasion and viral infection. The HSP90 (HSP90AA1) protein was identified in the control group and the attenuated IBRV LNM-infected group. Most studies have shown that HSP90 proteins were more of a cancer gene target, and inhibiting its function would result to oncogene degradation during cancer treatment. On the other hand, ALB is associated to cell differentiation, apoptosis, necrosis, cell death, viral infection, autophagy, interstitial tissue inflammation, and cell survival. These results provide a theoretical basis for the systematic understanding of BHV-1-infection mechanisms and BHV-1-induced immune responses.

  6. A rapid method for counting nucleated erythrocytes on stained blood smears by digital image analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gering, E.; Atkinson, C.T.

    2004-01-01

    Measures of parasitemia by intraerythrocytic hematozoan parasites are normally expressed as the number of infected erythrocytes per n erythrocytes and are notoriously tedious and time consuming to measure. We describe a protocol for generating rapid counts of nucleated erythrocytes from digital micrographs of thin blood smears that can be used to estimate intensity of hematozoan infections in nonmammalian vertebrate hosts. This method takes advantage of the bold contrast and relatively uniform size and morphology of erythrocyte nuclei on Giemsa-stained blood smears and uses ImageJ, a java-based image analysis program developed at the U.S. National Institutes of Health and available on the internet, to recognize and count these nuclei. This technique makes feasible rapid and accurate counts of total erythrocytes in large numbers of microscope fields, which can be used in the calculation of peripheral parasitemias in low-intensity infections.

  7. Mannose-binding lectin is a disease modifier in clinical malaria and may function as opsonin for Plasmodium falciparum-infected erythrocytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Garred, Peter; Nielsen, Morten A; Kurtzhals, Jørgen

    2003-01-01

    associated with the occurrence and outcome parameters of Plasmodium falciparum malaria and asked whether MBL may function as an opsonin for P. falciparum. No difference in MBL genotype frequency was observed between infected and noninfected children or between children with cerebral malaria and/or severe...

  8. Recognition of Plasmodium falciparum mature gametocyte-infected erythrocytes by antibodies of semi-immune adults and malaria-exposed children from Gabon

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gebru, Tamirat; Ajua, Anthony; Theisen, Michael

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Transmission of malaria from man to mosquito depends on the presence of gametocytes, the sexual stage of Plasmodium parasites in the infected host. Naturally acquired antibodies against gametocytes exist and may play a role in controlling transmission by limiting the gametocyte develo...

  9. Maternally transmitted antibodies to pregnancy-associated variant antigens on the surface of erythrocytes infected with Plasmodium falciparum: relation to child susceptibility to malaria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cot, Michel; Le Hesran, Jean Yves; Staalsoe, Trine;

    2003-01-01

    The consequences of pregnancy-associated malaria on a child's health have been poorly investigated. Malarial infection of the placenta seems to result in a higher susceptibility of children to the parasite during their first year of life. In 1993-1995, the authors investigated the role of antibod...

  10. Tuning SERS for living erythrocytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brazhe, Nadezda; Parshina, E.Y.; Khabanova, V.V.;

    2013-01-01

    Surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) is a unique technique to study submembrane hemoglobin (Hbsm) in erythrocytes. We report the detailed design of SERS experiments on living erythrocytes to estimate dependence of the enhancemen t factor for main Raman bands of Hbsm on silver nanoparticle (Ag...

  11. Plasmodium falciparum Erythrocyte Membrane Protein 1 Diversity in Seven Genomes – Divide and Conquer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rask, Thomas Salhøj; Hansen, Daniel Aaen; Theander, Thor G.

    2010-01-01

    The var gene encoded hyper-variable Plasmodium falciparum erythrocyte membrane protein 1 (PfEMP1) family mediates cytoadhesion of infected erythrocytes to human endothelium. Antibodies blocking cytoadhesion are important mediators of malaria immunity acquired by endemic populations. The development...

  12. Dielectric inspection of erythrocyte morphology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, Yoshihito; Oshige, Ikuya; Katsumoto, Yoichi; Omori, Shinji; Yasuda, Akio; Asami, Koji

    2008-05-01

    We performed a systematic study of the sensitivity of dielectric spectroscopy to erythrocyte morphology. Namely, rabbit erythrocytes of four different shapes were prepared by precisely controlling the pH of the suspending medium, and their complex permittivities over the frequency range from 0.1 to 110 MHz were measured and analyzed. Their quantitative analysis shows that the characteristic frequency and the broadening parameter of the dielectric relaxation of interfacial polarization are highly specific to the erythrocyte shape, while they are insensitive to the cell volume fraction. Therefore, these two dielectric parameters can be used to differentiate erythrocytes of different shapes, if dielectric spectroscopy is applied to flow-cytometric inspection of single blood cells. In addition, we revealed the applicability and limitations of the analytical theory of interfacial polarization to explain the experimental permittivities of non-spherical erythrocytes.

  13. Deep sequencing-based transcriptional analysis of bovine mammary epithelial cells gene expression in response to in vitro infection with Staphylococcus aureus stains.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao Wang

    Full Text Available Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus is an important etiological organism in chronic and subclinical mastitis in lactating cows. Given the fundamental role the primary bovine mammary epithelial cells (pBMECs play as a major first line of defense against invading pathogens, their interactions with S. aureus was hypothesized to be crucial to the establishment of the latter's infection process. This hypothesis was tested by investigating the global transcriptional responses of pBMECs to three S. aureus strains (S56,S178 and S36 with different virulent factors, using a tag-based high-throughput transcriptome sequencing technique. Approximately 4.9 million total sequence tags were obtained from each of the three S. aureus-infected libraries and the control library. Referenced to the control, 1720, 219, and 427 differentially expressed unique genes were identified in the pBMECs infected with S56, S178 and S36 S. aureus strains respectively. Gene ontology (GO and pathway analysis of the S56-infected pBMECs referenced to those of the control revealed that the differentially expressed genes in S56-infected pBMECs were significantly involved in inflammatory response, cell signalling pathways and apoptosis. In the same vein, the clustered GO terms of the differentially expressed genes of the S178-infected pBMECs were found to comprise immune responses, metabolism transformation, and apoptosis, while those of the S36-infected pBMECs were primarily involved in cell cycle progression and immune responses. Furthermore, fundamental differences were observed in the levels of expression of immune-related genes in response to treatments with the three S. aureus strains. These differences were especially noted for the expression of important pro-inflammatory molecules, including IL-1α, TNF, EFNB1, IL-8, and EGR1. The transcriptional changes associated with cellular signaling and the inflammatory response in this study may reflect different immunomodulatory mechanisms

  14. Identification of Bartonella Trw host-specific receptor on erythrocytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hon Kuan Deng

    Full Text Available Each Bartonella species appears to be highly adapted to one or a limited number of reservoir hosts, in which it establishes long-lasting intraerythrocytic bacteremia as the hallmark of infection. Recently, we identified Trw as the bacterial system involved in recognition of erythrocytes according to their animal origin. The T4SS Trw is characterized by a multiprotein complex that spans the inner and outer bacterial membranes, and possesses a hypothetical pilus structure. TrwJ, I, H and trwL are present in variable copy numbers in different species and the multiple copies of trwL and trwJ in the Bartonella trw locus are considered to encode variant forms of surface-exposed pilus components. We therefore aimed to identify which of the candidate Trw pilus components were located on the bacterial surface and involved in adhesion to erythrocytes, together with their erythrocytic receptor. Using different technologies (electron microscopy, phage display, invasion inhibition assay, far western blot, we found that only TrwJ1 and TrwJ2 were expressed and localized at the cell surface of B. birtlesii and had the ability to bind to mouse erythrocytes, and that their receptor was band3, one of the major outer-membrane glycoproteins of erythrocytes, (anion exchanger. According to these results, we propose that the interaction between TrwJ1, TrwJ2 and band 3 leads to the critical host-specific adherence of Bartonella to its host cells, erythrocytes.

  15. Detection of Bovine IgG Isotypes in a PPA-ELISA for Johne's Disease Diagnosis in Infected Herds

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    Bárbara Fernández

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Johne's Disease or Paratuberculosis is a chronic granulomatous enteritis disease affecting ruminants. Detection of subclinically infected animals is difficult, hampering the control of this disease. The aim of this work was to evaluate the performance of detection of IgG isotypes in a PPA-ELISA to improve the recognition of cattle naturally infected with Map in different stages. A total of 108 animals from Tuberculosis-free herds were grouped as follows: exposed (n=30, subclinically infected (n=26, clinically infected (n=14, and healthy controls (n=38. Receiver-operating characteristic (ROC curves of isotypes/PPA-ELISAs were constructed and areas under the curves were compared to evaluate the performance of each test. Our study demonstrated that the conventional PPA-ELISA (detecting IgG is the best to identify clinically infected animals with high sensitivity (92.9% and specificity (100%. Meanwhile, IgG2/PPA-ELISA improved the number of subclinically infected cattle detected as compared with conventional IgG/PPA-ELISA (53.8 versus 23.1%. In addition, it had the maximum sensitivity (65.0%, taking into account all Map-infected cattle. In conclusion, the combination of IgG and IgG2/PPA-ELISAs may improve the identification of Map-infected cattle in different stages of disease. The usefulness of IgG2 detection in serological tests for Johne's Disease diagnosis should be further evaluated.

  16. Alterations in serotonin receptor-induced contractility of bovine lateral saphenous vein in cattle grazing endophyte-infected tall fescue

    Science.gov (United States)

    As part of a large 2-year study documenting the physiologic impact of grazing endophyte-infected tall fescue on growing cattle, 2 experiments were conducted to characterize and evaluate the effects of grazing 2 levels of toxic endophyte-infected tall fescue pastures on vascular contractility and ser...

  17. Comparative Suitability of Ear Notch Biopsy and Serum Pairs for Detecting Nature of Bovine Viral Diarrhoea Virus Infection in Dairy Herds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arfan Ahmad, Masood Rabbani, Muhammad Zubair Shabbir, Khushi Muhammad1, Tahir Yaqub, Muhammad Kashif Saleemi2, Rana Khurram Khalid, Muhammad Abu Bakr Shabbir3 and Shumaila Yousaf Alvi4

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Suitability of ear notch biopsy (EN and serum pairs (n= 307 collected from 10 Holstein dairy herds located in Charlottetown, Canada was evaluated for simultaneous detection, nature of bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV infection and genotype of the prevailing BVDV through Real time RT-PCR. Depending upon vaccination status and age, the sampled animals were categorized into two groups, A (n=123, ≤ 6 month of age and B (n=184, ≥ 6 months of age originating from 4 vaccinated (n=108 and 3 non-vaccinated (n=76 animal herds. On first round of testing a discrepancy between ear notch biopsies and sera pairs (3.25 and 6.50%; P<0.05 of groups A was observed, however, a complete harmony (50% for EN and sera each, P<0.01 was found on second round of testing that confirmed the presence of 4 persistent infection (PI animals harboring genotype 1 of BVDV. Complete concordance between EN and sera pairs (P<0.01 on first and follow up testing in group B was observed (2.77%, each, depicting 3 PI animals with the same genotype as in group A. In the study, ear notch biopsies did not detect any transient infection (TI but sera samples detected 3.25% transiently infected animals in group A that was 1.30 % among all the test samples (n=307 while no TI animal was found in group B. It may be concluded that both the serum and ear notch biopsy can be used to detect PI animals and that, serum samples are more sensitive than ear notch (P < 0.05 for detection of TI using real time RT-PCR.

  18. Interactions of opsonized immune complexes with whole blood cells: binding to erythrocytes restricts complex uptake by leucocyte populations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, C H; Svehag, S E; Marquart, H V;

    1994-01-01

    The binding of opsonized, fluorescein-labelled bovine serum albumin (BSA)/rabbit anti-BSA complexes (IC) to washed human whole blood cells and isolated leucocytes in the presence of autologous serum was investigated by flow cytometry. In the presence of erythrocytes (E), the IC-binding to granulo......The binding of opsonized, fluorescein-labelled bovine serum albumin (BSA)/rabbit anti-BSA complexes (IC) to washed human whole blood cells and isolated leucocytes in the presence of autologous serum was investigated by flow cytometry. In the presence of erythrocytes (E), the IC...

  19. Acute exposure to ergot alkaloids from endophyte-infected tall fescue does not alter absorptive or barrier function of the isolated bovine ruminal epithelium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foote, A P; Penner, G B; Walpole, M E; Klotz, J L; Brown, K R; Bush, L P; Harmon, D L

    2014-07-01

    Ergot alkaloids in endophyte-infected (Neotyphodium coenophialum) tall fescue (Lolium arundinaceum) have been shown to cause a reduction in blood flow to the rumen epithelium as well as a decrease in volatile fatty acids (VFA) absorption from the washed rumen of steers. Previous data also indicates that incubating an extract of endophyte-infected tall fescue seed causes an increase in the amount of VFA absorbed per unit of blood flow, which could result from an alteration in the absorptive or barrier function of the rumen epithelium. An experiment was conducted to determine the acute effects of an endophyte-infected tall fescue seed extract (EXT) on total, passive or facilitated acetate and butyrate flux across the isolated bovine rumen as well as the barrier function measured by inulin flux and tissue conductance (G t ). Flux of ergovaline across the rumen epithelium was also evaluated. Rumen tissue from the caudal dorsal sac of Holstein steers (n=6), fed a common diet, was collected and isolated shortly after slaughter and mounted between two halves of Ussing chambers. In vitro treatments included vehicle control (80% methanol, 0.5% of total volume), Low EXT (50 ng ergovaline/ml) and High EXT (250 ng ergovaline/ml). Results indicate that there is no effect of acute exposure to ergot alkaloids on total, passive or facilitated flux of acetate or butyrate across the isolate bovine rumen epithelium (P>0.51). Inulin flux (P=0.16) and G t (P>0.17) were not affected by EXT treatment, indicating no alteration in barrier function due to acute ergot alkaloid exposure. Ergovaline was detected in the serosal buffer of the High EXT treatment indicating that the flux rate is ~0.25 to 0.44 ng/cm2 per hour. Data indicate that specific pathways for VFA absorption and barrier function of the rumen epithelium are not affected by acute exposure to ergot alkaloids from tall fescue at the concentrations tested. Ergovaline has the potential to be absorbed from the rumen of cattle that

  20. Risk and prevention of bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) transmission through embryo production via somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) using oocytes from persistently infected donors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregg, K; Riddell, K P; Chen, S H; Galik, P K; Xiang, T; Guerra, T; Marley, M S; Polejaeva, I; Givens, M D

    2010-07-01

    The objective was to assess the risk of transmission of bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) through embryo production via somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT), with oocytes obtained from persistently infected (PI) donors. Using ultrasound-guided follicular aspiration following superstimulation, oocytes were obtained from five female beef cattle, including three that were PI and two that were negative for BVDV. In the three PI cattle, seven aspirations yielded 32 oocytes (PI-1: three aspirations yielding six oocytes; PI-2: two aspirations yielding 14 oocytes; and PI-3: two aspirations yielding 12 oocytes). The oocyte recovery rate was better in negative control cattle, with 32 oocytes obtained from the two cattle in a single superstimulation and aspiration session. Oocytes were processed individually for SCNT, evaluated, and tested for BVDV. Nearly all (31/32) oocytes from the three PI donors were positive for BVDV by PCR, with detected viral RNA copy number ranging from 1 to 1.1 x 10(5). The proportion of oocytes acceptable for SCNT embryo production (based on oocyte quality and maturation status) was only 16 to 35% from PI donors, but was 81% from control donors. Therefore, routine testing of unacceptable (discarded) oocytes could be an effective approach to identify batches that might contain infected oocytes from PI donors. Identification and removal of high-risk batches of oocytes would minimize the risk of BVDV transmission through SCNT embryo production.

  1. Plasmodium falciparum Plasmodium helical interspersed subtelomeric proteins contribute to cytoadherence and anchor P. falciparum erythrocyte membrane protein 1 to the host cell cytoskeleton

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oberli, Alexander; Zurbrügg, Laura; Rusch, Sebastian;

    2016-01-01

    Adherence of Plasmodium falciparum-infected erythrocytes to host endothelium is conferred through the parasite-derived virulence factor P. falciparum erythrocyte membrane protein 1 (PfEMP1), the major contributor to malaria severity. PfEMP1 located at knob structures on the erythrocyte surface is...

  2. Distribution pattern of bovine viral diarrhoea virus type 1 genome in lymphoid tissues of experimentally infected sheep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karikalan, M; Rajukumar, K; Mishra, N; Kumar, M; Kalaiyarasu, S; Rajesh, K; Gavade, V; Behera, S P; Dubey, S C

    2016-06-01

    In this study, cellular localization and the distribution pattern of BVDV genome in lymphoid tissues during the course of experimental acute BVDV-1 infection of sheep was investigated. Tonsils, mesenteric lymph nodes (MLN) and spleen were collected on 3, 6, 9, 12 and 15 days post infection (dpi) from twenty 4-month-old lambs, experimentally inoculated intra-nasally with 5 × 10(5) TCID50 of a non-cytopathic (ncp) BVDV-1 isolate, Ind-17555. Tissues collected from ten mock-infected lambs served as controls. In situ hybridization (ISH) was carried out in paraformaldehyde fixed paraffin embedded tissue sections using digoxigenin labelled riboprobe targeting 5'-UTR of BVDV-1. BVDV genome was detected at all the intervals from 3 dpi to 15 dpi in the lymphoid tissues with variations between the intervals and also amongst the infected sheep. During the early phase of acute infection, presence of viral genome was more in tonsils than MLN and spleen, whereas the distribution was higher in MLN during later stages. BVDV-1 genome positive cells included lymphocytes, macrophages, plasma cells, reticular cells and sometimes crypt epithelial cells. Genome distribution was frequently observed in the lymphoid follicles of tonsils, MLN and spleen, besides the crypt epithelium in tonsils, paracortex and medullary sinus and cords of MLN. Most abundant and widespread distribution of BVDV-1 genome was observed on 6 dpi while there was a reduction in number and intensity of positive signals by 15 dpi in most of the infected animals. This is the first attempt made to study the localisation of BVDV-1 in lymphoid tissues of acutely infected sheep by in situ hybridization. The results show that the kinetics of BVDV-1 distribution in lymphoid tissues of experimentally infected non-pregnant sheep follows almost a similar pattern to that demonstrated in BVDV infected cattle.

  3. A novel approach to probe host-pathogen interactions of bovine digital dermatitis, a model of a complex polymicrobial infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marcatili, Paolo; Nielsen, Martin W.; Sicheritz-Ponten, Thomas;

    2016-01-01

    , we introduce a novel strategy to study the pathogenesis of complex infections. Results: The strategy combines meta-transcriptomics with high-density peptide-microarray technology to screen for in vivo-expressed microbial genes and the host antibody response at the site of infection. Bacterial...... factors defining the disease. Conclusions: The extraordinary diversity observed in bacterial expression, antigens and host antibody responses between individual cows pointed toward microbial variability as a hallmark of DD. Persistence of infection and DD reinfection in the same individual is common; thus...

  4. Disorders of erythrocyte volume homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glogowska, E; Gallagher, P G

    2015-05-01

    Inherited disorders of erythrocyte volume homeostasis are a heterogeneous group of rare disorders with phenotypes ranging from dehydrated to overhydrated erythrocytes. Clinical, laboratory, physiologic, and genetic heterogeneities characterize this group of disorders. A series of recent reports have provided novel insights into our understanding of the genetic bases underlying some of these disorders of red cell volume regulation. This report reviews this progress in understanding determinants that influence erythrocyte hydration and how they have yielded a better understanding of the pathways that influence cellular water and solute homeostasis.

  5. Assessing the impact of a cattle risk-based trading scheme on the movement of bovine tuberculosis infected animals in England and Wales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adkin, A; Brouwer, A; Downs, S H; Kelly, L

    2016-01-01

    The adoption of bovine tuberculosis (bTB) risk-based trading (RBT) schemes has the potential to reduce the risk of bTB spread. However, any scheme will have cost implications that need to be balanced against its likely success in reducing bTB. This paper describes the first stochastic quantitative model assessing the impact of the implementation of a cattle risk-based trading scheme to inform policy makers and contribute to cost-benefit analyses. A risk assessment for England and Wales was developed to estimate the number of infected cattle traded using historic movement data recorded between July 2010 and June 2011. Three scenarios were implemented: cattle traded with no RBT scheme in place, voluntary provision of the score and a compulsory, statutory scheme applying a bTB risk score to each farm. For each scenario, changes in trade were estimated due to provision of the risk score to potential purchasers. An estimated mean of 3981 bTB infected animals were sold to purchasers with no RBT scheme in place in one year, with 90% confidence the true value was between 2775 and 5288. This result is dependent on the estimated between herd prevalence used in the risk assessment which is uncertain. With the voluntary provision of the risk score by farmers, on average, 17% of movements was affected (purchaser did not wish to buy once the risk score was available), with a reduction of 23% in infected animals being purchased initially. The compulsory provision of the risk score in a statutory scheme resulted in an estimated mean change to 26% of movements, with a reduction of 37% in infected animals being purchased initially, increasing to a 53% reduction in infected movements from higher risk sellers (score 4 and 5). The estimated mean reduction in infected animals being purchased could be improved to 45% given a 10% reduction in risky purchase behaviour by farmers which may be achieved through education programmes, or to an estimated mean of 49% if a rule was implemented

  6. Biphasic activation of PI3K/Akt and MAPK/Erk1/2 signaling pathways in bovine herpesvirus type 1 infection of MDBK cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhu Liqian

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Many viruses have been known to control key cellular signaling pathways to facilitate the virus infection. The possible involvement of signaling pathways in bovine herpesvirus type 1 (BoHV-1 infection is unknown. This study indicated that infection of MDBK cells with BoHV-1 induced an early-stage transient and a late-stage sustained activation of both phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K/Akt and mitogen activated protein kinases/extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (MAPK/Erk1/2 signaling pathways. Analysis with the stimulation of UV-irradiated virus indicated that the virus binding and/or entry process was enough to trigger the early phase activations, while the late phase activations were viral protein expression dependent. Biphasic activation of both pathways was suppressed by the selective inhibitor, Ly294002 for PI3K and U0126 for MAPK kinase (MEK1/2, respectively. Furthermore, treatment of MDBK cells with Ly294002 caused a 1.5-log reduction in virus titer, while U0126 had little effect on the virus production. In addition, the inhibition effect of Ly294002 mainly occurred at the post-entry stage of the virus replication cycle. This revealed for the first time that BoHV-1 actively induced both PI3K/Akt and MAPK/Erk1/2 signaling pathways, and the activation of PI3K was important for fully efficient replication, especially for the post-entry stage.

  7. BOLA-DRB3 gene polymorphisms influence bovine leukaemia virus infection levels in Holstein and Holstein × Jersey crossbreed dairy cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carignano, H A; Beribe, M J; Caffaro, M E; Amadio, A; Nani, J P; Gutierrez, G; Alvarez, I; Trono, K; Miretti, M M; Poli, M A

    2017-08-01

    Bovine leukemia virus (BLV) infections, causing persistent lymphocytosis and lethal lymphosarcoma in cattle, have reached high endemicity on dairy farms. We observed extensive inter-individual variation in the level of infection (LI) by assessing differences in proviral load in peripheral blood. This phenotypic variation appears to be determined by host genetics variants, especially those located in the BoLA-DRB3 MHCII molecule. We performed an association study using sequencing-based typed BOLA-DRB3 alleles from over 800 Holstein and Holstein × Jersey cows considering LI in vivo and accounting for filial relationships. The DBR3*0902 allele was associated with a low level of infection (LLI) (BOLA-DRB3 alleles were associated with LI. DRB3*0902 had unique haplotypes for each of the pockets: Ser(13) -Glu(70) -Arg(71) -Glu(74) (pocket 4), Ser(11) -Ser(30) (pocket 6), Glu(28) -Trp(61) -Arg(71) (pocket 7) and Asn(37) -Asp(57) (pocket 9), and all of them were significantly associated with LLI. Conversely, Lys(13) -Arg(70) -Ala(71) -Ala(74) and Ser(13) -Arg(70) -Ala(71) -Ala(74) , corresponding to the DRB3*1001 and *1201 alleles respectively, were associated with HLI. We showed that the specific amino acid pattern in the DRB3*0902 peptide-binding cleft may be related to the set point of a very low proviral load level in adult cows. Moreover, we identified two BOLA-DRB3 alleles associated with a HLI, which is compatible with a highly contagious profile. © 2017 Stichting International Foundation for Animal Genetics.

  8. Evaluation of a new antibody-based enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for the detection of bovine leukemia virus infection in dairy cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monti, Gustavo E; Frankena, Klaas; Engel, Bas; Buist, Willem; Tarabla, Héctor D; de Jong, Mart C M

    2005-09-01

    The objective of this study was to validate a new blocking enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) (designated M108 for milk and S108 for serum samples) for detecting bovine leukemia virus (BLV) infection in dairy cattle. Milk, serum, and ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid-blood samples were collected from 524 adult Holstein cows originating from 6 dairy herds in Central Argentina. The M108 and S108 were compared with agar gel immunodiffusion (AGID), polymerase chain reaction and a commercial ELISA. Because there is currently no reference test capable of serving as a gold standard, the test sensitivity (SE) and specificity (SP) were evaluated by the use of a latent class model. Statistical inference was performed by classical maximum likelihood and by Bayesian techniques. The maximum-likelihood analysis was performed assuming conditional independence of tests, whereas the Bayesian approach allowed for conditional dependence. No clear conclusion could be drawn about conditional dependence of tests. Results with maximum likelihood (under conditional independence) and posterior Bayes (under conditional dependence) were practically the same. Conservative estimates of SE and SP (with 95% confidence intervals) for M108 were 98.6 (96.7; 99.6) and 96.7 (92.9; 98.8) and for S108 99.5 (98.2; 99.9) and 95.4 (90.9; 98.1), respectively. The ELISA 108 using either milk or serum to detect BLV-infected animals had comparable SE and SP with the official AGID and a commercial ELISA test, which are currently the most widely accepted tests for the serological diagnosis of BLV infection. Therefore, ELISA 108 can be used as an alternative test in monitoring and control programs.

  9. Enrofloxacin and macrolides alone or in combination with rifampicin as antimicrobial treatment in a bovine model of acute Chlamydia psittaci infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annette Prohl

    Full Text Available Chlamydia psittaci is a zoonotic bacterium with a wide host range that can cause respiratory disease in humans and cattle. In the present study, effects of treatment with macrolides and quinolones applied alone or in combination with rifampicin were tested in a previously established bovine model of respiratory C. psittaci infection. Fifty animals were inoculated intrabronchially at the age of 6-8 weeks. Seven served as untreated controls, the others were assigned to seven treatment groups: (i rifampicin, (ii enrofloxacin, (iii enrofloxacin + rifampicin, (iv azithromycin, (v azithromycin + rifampicin, (vi erythromycin, and (vii erythromycin + rifampicin. Treatment started 30 hours after inoculation and continued until 14 days after inoculation (dpi, when all animals were necropsied. The infection was successful in all animals and sufficient antibiotic levels were detected in blood plasma and tissue of the treated animals. Reisolation of the pathogen was achieved more often from untreated animals than from other groups. Nevertheless, pathogen detection by PCR was possible to the same extent in all animals and there were no significant differences between treated and untreated animals in terms of local (i.e., cell count and differentiation of BALF-cells and systemic inflammation (i.e. white blood cells and concentration of acute phase protein LBP, clinical signs, and pathological findings at necropsy. Regardless of the reduced reisolation rate in treated animals, the treatment of experimentally induced respiratory C. psittaci infection with enrofloxacin, azithromycin or erythromycin alone or in combination with rifampicin was without obvious benefit for the host, since no significant differences in clinical and pathological findings or inflammatory parameters were detected and all animals recovered clinically within two weeks.

  10. Epidemiological characteristics of bovine herpesvirus 1 infections determined by bulk milk testing of all Dutch dairy herds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Wuijckhuise, L; Bosch, J; Franken, P; Frankena, K; Elbers, A R

    1998-02-21

    Samples of bulk milk were taken from all 33,636 Dutch dairy herds in November 1994 and tested for the presence of bovine herpesvirus 1 (BHV-1) antibodies with a gB-blocking ELISA. Sixteen per cent of the herds had a negative BHV-1 status in the bulk milk. Farms with only dairy cows were 1.9 times more likely to have a negative or weakly positive BHV-1 status than herds which also had beef/veal animals. Farms in areas containing less than one herd/km2 were 1.5 times more likely to have a negative or weakly positive BHV-1 status than herds in areas with more than three herds/km2. Differences in numbers of animals per unit area were not significantly associated with BHV-1 status. The probability of herds having a negative or weakly positive BHV-1 status decreased linearly with herd size by a factor of 1.2 per 10 animals. The purchase of stock was significantly associated with a negative or weakly positive BHV-1 status, but there was an interaction between farm type and purchase of stock. For farms with both dairy and beef/veal animals there was a weak association between the purchase of stock and BHV-1 status. For pure dairy herds the probability of having a negative or weakly positive BHV-1 status decreased linearly with the numbers of purchased stock by a factor of 1.3 per 10 animals purchased.

  11. New method for early detection of two random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD groups of Staphylococcus aureus causing bovine mastitis infection in Paraná State, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dicezar Gonçalves

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work was to develop a fast and accurate molecular approach to allow early detection of two RAPD groups of S. aureus causing bovine mastitis. Seventy five S. aureus isolates from infected animals were characterized by RAPD. Genomic fragments isolated from the unique bands present in either group were cloned and sequenced. Based on the DNA sequences, specific primers were designed to allow for the simultaneous detection of either group by multiplex PCR of S. aureus DNA isolated from clinical and subclinical bovine mastitis. Results showed that these proposed primers set could be used to detect various clinical and subclinical S. aureus isolates as well as the detection of the microorganism in bulk milk. Their use as a specific method for effective and early diagnostic tool for S. aureus infection in dairy herds is suggested.Esta pesquisa objetivou o desenvolvimento de técnica rápida e eficiente para diagnosticar precocemente diferentes linhagens de S. aureus causadoras de mastite bovina. Como resultados da metodologia empregada, foram isoladas duas linhagens destas bactérias que causam diferentes tipos de mastite bovina. Os fragmentos de DNA genômico caracterizando ambas as linhagens, por meio de RAPD foram inseridos em vetor plasmidial pGEM e clonados por meio de clones T10 F1 de Escherichia coli. As seqüências obtidas permitiram desenhar iniciadores específicos para o reconhecimento de ambas as linhagens, os quais foram testados com amostras de S. aureus e com outras linhagens próximas. O diagnóstico por meios moleculares, pode ser realizado diretamente de amostras coletadas de rebanhos leiteiros assim como dos equipamentos de ordenha. A significância deste estudo consiste em um rápido e acurado método para localizar animais infectados, representando importante ferramenta no manejo do rebanho, na redução de custos com tratamentos e, rápida recuperação de rebanhos infectados.

  12. The Trw type IV secretion system of Bartonella mediates host-specific adhesion to erythrocytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muriel Vayssier-Taussat

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Bacterial pathogens typically infect only a limited range of hosts; however, the genetic mechanisms governing host-specificity are poorly understood. The alpha-proteobacterial genus Bartonella comprises 21 species that cause host-specific intraerythrocytic bacteremia as hallmark of infection in their respective mammalian reservoirs, including the human-specific pathogens Bartonella quintana and Bartonella bacilliformis that cause trench fever and Oroya fever, respectively. Here, we have identified bacterial factors that mediate host-specific erythrocyte colonization in the mammalian reservoirs. Using mouse-specific Bartonella birtlesii, human-specific Bartonella quintana, cat-specific Bartonella henselae and rat-specific Bartonella tribocorum, we established in vitro adhesion and invasion assays with isolated erythrocytes that fully reproduce the host-specificity of erythrocyte infection as observed in vivo. By signature-tagged mutagenesis of B. birtlesii and mutant selection in a mouse infection model we identified mutants impaired in establishing intraerythrocytic bacteremia. Among 45 abacteremic mutants, five failed to adhere to and invade mouse erythrocytes in vitro. The corresponding genes encode components of the type IV secretion system (T4SS Trw, demonstrating that this virulence factor laterally acquired by the Bartonella lineage is directly involved in adherence to erythrocytes. Strikingly, ectopic expression of Trw of rat-specific B. tribocorum in cat-specific B. henselae or human-specific B. quintana expanded their host range for erythrocyte infection to rat, demonstrating that Trw mediates host-specific erythrocyte infection. A molecular evolutionary analysis of the trw locus further indicated that the variable, surface-located TrwL and TrwJ might represent the T4SS components that determine host-specificity of erythrocyte parasitism. In conclusion, we show that the laterally acquired Trw T4SS diversified in the Bartonella lineage

  13. The Trw type IV secretion system of Bartonella mediates host-specific adhesion to erythrocytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muriel Vayssier-Taussat

    Full Text Available Bacterial pathogens typically infect only a limited range of hosts; however, the genetic mechanisms governing host-specificity are poorly understood. The alpha-proteobacterial genus Bartonella comprises 21 species that cause host-specific intraerythrocytic bacteremia as hallmark of infection in their respective mammalian reservoirs, including the human-specific pathogens Bartonella quintana and Bartonella bacilliformis that cause trench fever and Oroya fever, respectively. Here, we have identified bacterial factors that mediate host-specific erythrocyte colonization in the mammalian reservoirs. Using mouse-specific Bartonella birtlesii, human-specific Bartonella quintana, cat-specific Bartonella henselae and rat-specific Bartonella tribocorum, we established in vitro adhesion and invasion assays with isolated erythrocytes that fully reproduce the host-specificity of erythrocyte infection as observed in vivo. By signature-tagged mutagenesis of B. birtlesii and mutant selection in a mouse infection model we identified mutants impaired in establishing intraerythrocytic bacteremia. Among 45 abacteremic mutants, five failed to adhere to and invade mouse erythrocytes in vitro. The corresponding genes encode components of the type IV secretion system (T4SS Trw, demonstrating that this virulence factor laterally acquired by the Bartonella lineage is directly involved in adherence to erythrocytes. Strikingly, ectopic expression of Trw of rat-specific B. tribocorum in cat-specific B. henselae or human-specific B. quintana expanded their host range for erythrocyte infection to rat, demonstrating that Trw mediates host-specific erythrocyte infection. A molecular evolutionary analysis of the trw locus further indicated that the variable, surface-located TrwL and TrwJ might represent the T4SS components that determine host-specificity of erythrocyte parasitism. In conclusion, we show that the laterally acquired Trw T4SS diversified in the Bartonella lineage

  14. Fetal-maternal erythrocyte distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003407.htm Fetal-maternal erythrocyte distribution To use the sharing features ... unborn baby is leaking into the mother's blood circulation. The more of the baby's cells there are, ...

  15. Disorders of Erythrocyte Volume Homeostasis

    OpenAIRE

    Glogowska, Edyta; Gallagher, Patrick G.

    2015-01-01

    Inherited disorders of erythrocyte volume homeostasis are a heterogeneous group of rare disorders with phenotypes ranging from dehydrated to overhydrated erythrocytes. Clinical, laboratory, physiologic, and genetic heterogeneity characterize this group of disorders. A series of recent reports have provided novel insights into our understanding of the genetic bases underlying some of these disorders of red cell volume regulation. This report reviews this progress in understanding determinants ...

  16. Viral erythrocytic necrosis: Chapter 2.2.7

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winton, James R.; Hershberger, Paul K.

    2014-01-01

    Viral erythrocytic necrosis (VEN), originally termed piscine erythrocytic necrosis, is a condition that has been reported to affect the red blood cells (RBCs) of many species of marine and anadromous fishes in both the Atlantic and Pacific Oceans (Nicholson and Reno 1981; Smail 1982; Wolf 1988; Dannevig and Thorud 1999). Fish with VEN may develop a severe anemia that can reduce their stamina, predispose them to other infections or increase the impact of other stressors (MacMillan et al. 1980; Nicholson and Reno 1981; Meyers et al. 1986; Haney et al. 1992) resulting in population-scale impacts in susceptible species (Hershberger et al. 2009).

  17. Effects of age, hemoglobin type and parasite strain on IgG recognition of Plasmodium falciparum-infected erythrocytes in Malian children.

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    Amir E Zeituni

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Naturally-acquired antibody responses to antigens on the surface of Plasmodium falciparum-infected red blood cells (iRBCs have been implicated in antimalarial immunity. To profile the development of this immunity, we have been studying a cohort of Malian children living in an area with intense seasonal malaria transmission. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We collected plasma from a sub-cohort of 176 Malian children aged 3-11 years, before (May and after (December the 2009 transmission season. To measure the effect of hemoglobin (Hb type on antibody responses, we enrolled age-matched HbAA, HbAS and HbAC children. To quantify antibody recognition of iRBCs, we designed a high-throughput flow cytometry assay to rapidly test numerous plasma samples against multiple parasite strains. We evaluated antibody reactivity of each plasma sample to 3 laboratory-adapted parasite lines (FCR3, D10, PC26 and 4 short-term-cultured parasite isolates (2 Malian and 2 Cambodian. 97% of children recognized ≥1 parasite strain and the proportion of IgG responders increased significantly during the transmission season for most parasite strains. Both strain-specific and strain-transcending IgG responses were detected, and varied by age, Hb type and parasite strain. In addition, the breadth of IgG responses to parasite strains increased with age in HbAA, but not in HbAS or HbAC, children. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our assay detects both strain-specific and strain-transcending IgG responses to iRBCs. The magnitude and breadth of these responses varied not only by age, but also by Hb type and parasite strain used. These findings indicate that studies of acquired humoral immunity should account for Hb type and test large numbers of diverse parasite strains.

  18. Plasmodium induces swelling-activated ClC-2 anion channels in the host erythrocyte

    OpenAIRE

    Huber, Stephan M.; Duranton, Christophe; Henke, Guido; Van De Sand, Claudia; Heussler, Volker; Shumilina, Ekaterina; Sandu, Ciprian D.; Tanneur, Valerie; Brand, Verena; Kasinathan, Ravi S.; Lang, Karl S; Peter G Kremsner; Hübner, Christian A; Marco B Rust; Dedek, Karin

    2004-01-01

    Intraerythrocytic growth of the human malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum depends on delivery of nutrients. Moreover, infection challenges cell volume constancy of the host erythrocyte requiring enhanced activity of cell volume regulatory mechanisms. Patch clamp recording demonstrated inwardly and outwardly rectifying anion channels in infected but not in control erythrocytes. The molecular identity of those channels remained elusive. We show here for one channel type that voltage dependen...

  19. Plasmodium induces swelling-activated ClC-2 anion channels in the host erythrocyte

    OpenAIRE

    Huber, Stephan M.; Duranton, Christophe; Henke, Guido; Van De Sand, Claudia; Heussler, Volker; Shumilina, Ekaterina; Sandu, Ciprian D.; Tanneur, Valerie; Brand, Verena; Kasinathan, Ravi S.; Lang, Karl S; Peter G Kremsner; Christian A. Hübner; Rust, Marco B.; Dedek, Karin

    2004-01-01

    Intraerythrocytic growth of the human malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum depends on delivery of nutrients. Moreover, infection challenges cell volume constancy of the host erythrocyte requiring enhanced activity of cell volume regulatory mechanisms. Patch clamp recording demonstrated inwardly and outwardly rectifying anion channels in infected but not in control erythrocytes. The molecular identity of those channels remained elusive. We show here for one channel type that voltage dependen...

  20. Dynamics of bovine spleen cell populations during the acute response to Babesia bovis infection: an immunohistological study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, D A; Yan, H; Bastos, R G; Johnson, W C; Gavin, P R; Allen, A J; Barrington, G M; Herrmann-Hoesing, L M; Knowles, D P; Goff, W L

    2011-01-01

    The spleen is a critical organ in defence against haemoparasitic diseases like babesiosis. Many in vitro and ex vivo studies have identified splenic cells working in concert to activate mechanisms required for successful resolution of infection. The techniques used in those studies, however, remove cells from the anatomical context in which cell interaction and trafficking take place. In this study, an immunohistological approach was used to monitor the splenic distribution of defined cells during the acute response of naïve calves to Babesia bovis infection. Splenomegaly was characterized by disproportionate hyperplasia of large versus small leucocytes and altered distribution of several cell types thought to be important in mounting an effective immune response. In particular, the results suggest that the initial crosstalk between NK cells and immature dendritic cells occurs within the marginal zone and that immature dendritic cells are first redirected to encounter pathogens as they enter the spleen and then mature as they process antigen and migrate to T-cell-rich areas. The results of this study are remarkably similar to those observed in a mouse model of malarial infection, suggesting these dynamic events may be central to the acute response of naïve animals to haemoparasitic infection.

  1. The Ovarian transcriptome of the cattle tick, Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus, feeding upon a bovine host infected with Babesia bovis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Background: Cattle babesiosis is a tick-borne disease of cattle with the most severe form of the disease caused by the apicomplexan, Babesia bovis. Babesiosis is transmitted to cattle through the bite of infected cattle ticks of the genus Rhipicephalus. The most prevalent species is Rhipicephalus (B...

  2. MicroRNA content in milk exosomes as a phenotypic indicator of Staphylococcus aureus infection in the bovine mammary gland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Previous gene mapping research to understand the host genetic response to mammary infection based on somatic cell score has been unsuccessful due to the poor correlation of this confounding trait with mastitis, a disease costing the dairy industry an estimated $2 billion in annual costs. Recently, ...

  3. Genotypic and phenotypic detection of capsular polysaccharides in Staphylococcus aureus isolated from bovine intramammary infections in Argentina

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    C. Camussone

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Staphylococcus aureus (n=157 isolated from intramammary infections in Argentine dairy areas were evaluated for presence of cap5 and cap8 loci. Isolates carrying cap5 and cap8 were serotyped using specific antisera. Sixty four percent of the isolates were genotyped as cap5 or cap8 and 50% of them expressed CP5 or 8.

  4. Computational analysis of bovine milk exosomal miRNAs profiles derived from uninfected and Streptococcus uberis infected mammary gland

    Science.gov (United States)

    The dairy cattle industry in the U.S. contributes an estimated 7 billion dollars to the agribusiness economy. Bacterial infections that cause disease like mastitis, affect health of the lactating mammary gland, and negatively impacts milk production and milk quality, costing producers an estimated 2...

  5. Global distribution of Bartonella infections in domestic bovine and characterization of Bartonella bovis strains using multi-locus sequence typing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Ying; Malania, Lile; Alvarez Castillo, Danilo; Moran, David; Boonmar, Sumalee; Chanlun, Aran; Suksawat, Fanan; Maruyama, Soichi; Knobel, Darryn; Kosoy, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Bartonella bovis is commonly detected in cattle. One B. bovis strain was recently isolated from a cow with endocarditis in the USA, suggesting its role as an animal pathogen. In the present study, we investigated bartonella infections in 893 cattle from five countries (Kenya, Thailand, Japan, Georgia, and Guatemala) and 103 water buffaloes from Thailand to compare the prevalence of the infection among different regions and different bovid hosts. We developed a multi-locus sequence typing (MLST) scheme based on nine loci (16S rRNA, gltA, ftsZ, groEL, nuoG, ribC, rpoB, ssrA, and ITS) to compare genetic divergence of B. bovis strains, including 26 representatives from the present study and two previously described reference strains (one from French cows and another from a cow with endocarditis in the USA). Bartonella bacteria were cultured in 6.8% (7/103) of water buffaloes from Thailand; all were B. bovis. The prevalence of bartonella infections in cattle varied tremendously across the investigated regions. In Japan, Kenya, and the Mestia district of Georgia, cattle were free from the infection; in Thailand, Guatemala, and the Dusheti and Marneuli districts of Georgia, cattle were infected with prevalences of 10-90%. The Bartonella isolates from cattle belonged to three species: B. bovis (n=165), B. chomelii (n=9), and B. schoenbuchensis (n=1), with the latter two species found in Georgia only. MLST analysis suggested genetic variations among the 28 analyzed B. bovis strains, which fall into 3 lineages (I, II, and III). Lineages I and II were found in cattle while lineage III was restricted to water buffaloes. The majority of strains (17/28), together with the strain causing endocarditis in a cow in the USA, belonged to lineage I. Further investigations are needed to determine whether B. bovis causes disease in bovids.

  6. Global distribution of Bartonella infections in domestic bovine and characterization of Bartonella bovis strains using multi-locus sequence typing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying Bai

    Full Text Available Bartonella bovis is commonly detected in cattle. One B. bovis strain was recently isolated from a cow with endocarditis in the USA, suggesting its role as an animal pathogen. In the present study, we investigated bartonella infections in 893 cattle from five countries (Kenya, Thailand, Japan, Georgia, and Guatemala and 103 water buffaloes from Thailand to compare the prevalence of the infection among different regions and different bovid hosts. We developed a multi-locus sequence typing (MLST scheme based on nine loci (16S rRNA, gltA, ftsZ, groEL, nuoG, ribC, rpoB, ssrA, and ITS to compare genetic divergence of B. bovis strains, including 26 representatives from the present study and two previously described reference strains (one from French cows and another from a cow with endocarditis in the USA. Bartonella bacteria were cultured in 6.8% (7/103 of water buffaloes from Thailand; all were B. bovis. The prevalence of bartonella infections in cattle varied tremendously across the investigated regions. In Japan, Kenya, and the Mestia district of Georgia, cattle were free from the infection; in Thailand, Guatemala, and the Dusheti and Marneuli districts of Georgia, cattle were infected with prevalences of 10-90%. The Bartonella isolates from cattle belonged to three species: B. bovis (n=165, B. chomelii (n=9, and B. schoenbuchensis (n=1, with the latter two species found in Georgia only. MLST analysis suggested genetic variations among the 28 analyzed B. bovis strains, which fall into 3 lineages (I, II, and III. Lineages I and II were found in cattle while lineage III was restricted to water buffaloes. The majority of strains (17/28, together with the strain causing endocarditis in a cow in the USA, belonged to lineage I. Further investigations are needed to determine whether B. bovis causes disease in bovids.

  7. Plasmodium falciparum secretome in erythrocyte and beyond

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    Rani eSoni

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Plasmodium falciparum is the causative agent of deadly malaria disease. It is an intracellular eukaryote and completes its multi-stage life cycle spanning the two hosts viz, mosquito and human. In order to habituate within host environment, parasite conform several strategies to evade host immune responses such as surface antigen polymorphism or modulation of host immune system and it is mediated by secretion of proteins from parasite to the host erythrocyte and beyond, collectively known as, malaria secretome. In this review, we will discuss about the deployment of parasitic secretory protein in mechanism implicated for immune evasion, protein trafficking, providing virulence, changing permeability and cyto-adherence of infected erythrocyte. We will be covering the possibilities of developing malaria secretome as a drug/vaccine target. This gathered information will be worthwhile in depicting a well-organized picture for host-pathogen interplay during the malaria infection and may also provide some clues for development of novel anti-malarial therapies.

  8. Triggers, Inhibitors, Mechanisms, and Significance of Eryptosis: The Suicidal Erythrocyte Death

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    Elisabeth Lang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Suicidal erythrocyte death or eryptosis is characterized by erythrocyte shrinkage, cell membrane blebbing, and cell membrane scrambling with phosphatidylserine translocation to the erythrocyte surface. Triggers of eryptosis include Ca2+ entry, ceramide formation, stimulation of caspases, calpain activation, energy depletion, oxidative stress, and dysregulation of several kinases. Eryptosis is triggered by a wide variety of xenobiotics. It is inhibited by several xenobiotics and endogenous molecules including NO and erythropoietin. The susceptibility of erythrocytes to eryptosis increases with erythrocyte age. Phosphatidylserine exposing erythrocytes adhere to the vascular wall by binding to endothelial CXC-Motiv-Chemokin-16/Scavenger-receptor for phosphatidylserine and oxidized low density lipoprotein (CXCL16. Phosphatidylserine exposing erythrocytes are further engulfed by phagocytosing cells and are thus rapidly cleared from circulating blood. Eryptosis eliminates infected or defective erythrocytes thus counteracting parasitemia in malaria and preventing detrimental hemolysis of defective cells. Excessive eryptosis, however, may lead to anemia and may interfere with microcirculation. Enhanced eryptosis contributes to the pathophysiology of several clinical disorders including metabolic syndrome and diabetes, malignancy, cardiac and renal insufficiency, hemolytic uremic syndrome, sepsis, mycoplasma infection, malaria, iron deficiency, sickle cell anemia, thalassemia, glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency, and Wilson’s disease. Facilitating or inhibiting eryptosis may be a therapeutic option in those disorders.

  9. Triggers, inhibitors, mechanisms, and significance of eryptosis: the suicidal erythrocyte death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, Elisabeth; Lang, Florian

    2015-01-01

    Suicidal erythrocyte death or eryptosis is characterized by erythrocyte shrinkage, cell membrane blebbing, and cell membrane scrambling with phosphatidylserine translocation to the erythrocyte surface. Triggers of eryptosis include Ca(2+) entry, ceramide formation, stimulation of caspases, calpain activation, energy depletion, oxidative stress, and dysregulation of several kinases. Eryptosis is triggered by a wide variety of xenobiotics. It is inhibited by several xenobiotics and endogenous molecules including NO and erythropoietin. The susceptibility of erythrocytes to eryptosis increases with erythrocyte age. Phosphatidylserine exposing erythrocytes adhere to the vascular wall by binding to endothelial CXC-Motiv-Chemokin-16/Scavenger-receptor for phosphatidylserine and oxidized low density lipoprotein (CXCL16). Phosphatidylserine exposing erythrocytes are further engulfed by phagocytosing cells and are thus rapidly cleared from circulating blood. Eryptosis eliminates infected or defective erythrocytes thus counteracting parasitemia in malaria and preventing detrimental hemolysis of defective cells. Excessive eryptosis, however, may lead to anemia and may interfere with microcirculation. Enhanced eryptosis contributes to the pathophysiology of several clinical disorders including metabolic syndrome and diabetes, malignancy, cardiac and renal insufficiency, hemolytic uremic syndrome, sepsis, mycoplasma infection, malaria, iron deficiency, sickle cell anemia, thalassemia, glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency, and Wilson's disease. Facilitating or inhibiting eryptosis may be a therapeutic option in those disorders.

  10. Genetic Variability of Bovine Viral Diarrhea Virus and Evidence for a Possible Genetic Bottleneck during Vertical Transmission in Persistently Infected Cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dow, Natalie; Chernick, Adam; Orsel, Karin; van Marle, Guido; van der Meer, Frank

    2015-01-01

    Bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV), a Pestivirus in the family Flaviviridae, is an economically important pathogen of cattle worldwide. The primary propagators of the virus are immunotolerant persistently infected (PI) cattle, which shed large quantities of virus throughout life. Despite the absence of an acquired immunity against BVDV in these PI cattle there are strong indications of viral variability that are of clinical and epidemiological importance. In this study the variability of E2 and NS5B sequences in multiple body compartments of PI cattle were characterized using clonal sequencing. Phylogenetic analyses revealed that BVDV exists as a quasispecies within PI cattle. Viral variants were clustered by tissue compartment significantly more often than expected by chance alone with the central nervous system appearing to be a particularly important viral reservoir. We also found strong indications for a genetic bottleneck during vertical transmission from PI animals to their offspring. These quasispecies analyses within PI cattle exemplify the role of the PI host in viral propagation and highlight the complex dynamics of BVDV pathogenesis, transmission and evolution.

  11. Genetic Variability of Bovine Viral Diarrhea Virus and Evidence for a Possible Genetic Bottleneck during Vertical Transmission in Persistently Infected Cattle.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalie Dow

    Full Text Available Bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV, a Pestivirus in the family Flaviviridae, is an economically important pathogen of cattle worldwide. The primary propagators of the virus are immunotolerant persistently infected (PI cattle, which shed large quantities of virus throughout life. Despite the absence of an acquired immunity against BVDV in these PI cattle there are strong indications of viral variability that are of clinical and epidemiological importance. In this study the variability of E2 and NS5B sequences in multiple body compartments of PI cattle were characterized using clonal sequencing. Phylogenetic analyses revealed that BVDV exists as a quasispecies within PI cattle. Viral variants were clustered by tissue compartment significantly more often than expected by chance alone with the central nervous system appearing to be a particularly important viral reservoir. We also found strong indications for a genetic bottleneck during vertical transmission from PI animals to their offspring. These quasispecies analyses within PI cattle exemplify the role of the PI host in viral propagation and highlight the complex dynamics of BVDV pathogenesis, transmission and evolution.

  12. Genetic characterization of bovine viral diarrhea virus strains in Beijing, China and innate immune responses of peripheral blood mononuclear cells in persistently infected dairy cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weng, Xiao Gang; Song, Quan Jiang; Wu, Qiong; Liu, Ming Chao; Wang, Meng Ling; Wang, Jiu Feng

    2015-01-01

    To acquire epidemiological data on the bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) and identify cattle persistently infected (PI) with this virus, 4,327 samples from Holstein dairy cows were screened over a four-year period in Beijing, China. Eighteen BVD viruses were isolated, 12 from PI cattle. Based on genetic analysis of their 5'-untranslated region (5'-UTR), the 18 isolates were assigned to subgenotype BVDV-1m, 1a, 1d, 1q, and 1b. To investigate the innate immune responses in the peripheral-blood mononuclear cells of PI cattle, the expression of Toll-like receptors (TLRs), RIG-I-like receptors, interferon-α (IFN-α), IFN-β, myxovirus (influenza virus) resistance 1 (MX1), and interferon stimulatory gene 15 (ISG15) was assessed by qPCR. When compared with healthy cattle, the expression of TLR-7, IFN-α, and IFN-β mRNA was downregulated, but the expression of MX1 and ISG-15 mRNA was upregulated in PI cattle. Immunoblotting analysis revealed that the expression of interferon regulatory factor 3 (IRF-3) and IRF-7 was lower in PI cattle than in healthy cattle. Thus, BVDV-1m and 1a are the predominant subgenotypes in the Beijing region, and the strains are highly divergent. Our findings also suggest that the TLR-7/IRF-7 signaling pathway plays a role in evasion of host restriction by BVDV.

  13. Regulation of Notch-mediated transcription by a bovine herpesvirus 1 encoded protein (ORF2) that is expressed in latently infected sensory neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yilin; Jones, Clinton

    2016-08-01

    Bovine herpesvirus 1 (BoHV-1) is an Alphaherpesvirinae subfamily member that establishes life-long latency in sensory neurons. The latency-related RNA (LR-RNA) is abundantly expressed during latency. An LR mutant virus containing stop codons at the amino-terminus of open reading frame (ORF)2 does not reactivate from latency and replicates less efficiently in tonsils and trigeminal ganglia. ORF2 inhibits apoptosis, interacts with Notch family members, and interferes with Notch-dependent transcription suggesting ORF2 expression enhances survival of infected neurons. The Notch signaling pathway is crucial for neuronal differentiation and survival suggesting that interactions between ORF2 and Notch family members regulate certain aspects of latency. Consequently, for this study, we compared whether ORF2 interfered with the four mammalian Notch family members. ORF2 consistently interfered with Notch1-3-mediated transactivation of three cellular promoters. Conversely, Notch4-mediated transcription was not consistently inhibited by ORF2. Electrophoretic shift mobility assays using four copies of a consensus-DNA binding site for Notch/CSL (core binding factor (CBF)-1, Suppressor of Hairless, Lag-2) as a probe revealed ORF2 interfered with Notch1 and 3 interactions with a CSL family member bound to DNA. Additional studies demonstrated ORF2 enhances neurite sprouting in mouse neuroblastoma cells that express Notch1-3, but not Notch4. Collectively, these studies indicate that ORF2 inhibits Notch-mediated transcription and signaling by interfering with Notch interacting with CSL bound to DNA.

  14. Embryos produced from fertilization with bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV)-infected semen and the risk of disease transmission to embryo transfer (ET) recipients and offspring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bielanski, A; Algire, J; Lalonde, A; Garceac, A

    2013-09-15

    Bovine diarrhea virus (BVDV) causes a variety of economically important enteric and infertility problems in cattle. For that reason, several countries have eradicated the disease, and some others have schemes in progress to achieve freedom. Although there is a considerable amount of information about the risk of BVDV transmission through contaminated semen used for artificial insemination (AI), there is no evidence to indicate whether the resulting embryos, when used for embryo transfer, can lead to the transmission of BVDV to recipients or offspring. For this experiment, semen from a bull persistently infected with BVDV (10(5) 50% tissue culture infective doses/mL NY strain) was used for insemination (two times at estrus) of BVDV-seronegative, superovulated cows (N = 35). Embryos were collected 7 days after insemination and subsequently were washed according to the International Embryo Transfer Society recommendations or left unwashed. Out of 302 collected oocytes and embryos, 173 (57%) were fertilized and the remaining 129 (43%) had degenerated. Infectious BVDV was detected in 24% (17/71) of unwashed and 10% (8/77) of washed embryos, and in all (N = 11) follicular fluid samples, oviductal epithelial cells, endometrium, and corpora lutea tissues as determined by the virus isolation test. After transfer of 39 washed embryos to 27 BVDV-seronegative recipients, 12 (44%) cows became pregnant and 17 calves free of BVDV and BVDV antibodies, including five sets of twins, were born. After embryo transfer, all pregnant and nonpregnant recipients remained free of BVDV and antibodies. In conclusion, results herein suggest that BVDV can be transmitted by AI resulting in the production of some proportion of contaminated embryos. However, it appears that such embryos, when washed according to International Embryo Transfer Society and the World Organization for Animal Health guidelines do not cause BVDV transmission to recipients or their offspring. Crown Copyright © 2013

  15. A prospective study of the effect of Neospora caninum and BVDV infections on bovine abortions in a dairy herd in Arequipa, Peru.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ståhl, K; Björkman, C; Emanuelson, U; Rivera, H; Zelada, A; Moreno-López, J

    2006-08-17

    We used a prospective seroepidemiological approach to investigate endemic abortion in a dairy herd in Arequipa, Peru, and its association with Neospora caninum and bovine viral-diarrhoea virus (BVDV) infections. Between January 2002 and March 2004, 1094 pregnancies were confirmed in 538 cows. Of these, 137 pregnancies (13%) in 121 cows ended in abortion. The serological status to N. caninum was assessed using a single serological screening, whereas BVDV status was assessed at the herd level through consecutive samplings of young stock. Cox proportional-hazards models were used to estimate the effect of N. caninum and BVDV on the hazard of early (between day 42 and day 100 in gestation), and late (after day 100) abortions, respectively. Serological status to N. caninum was included as a dichotomous variable, and the effect of BVDV estimated at the herd level, as a time-dependent seasonal effect. Because data from repeated pregnancies were included, we considered possible lack of independence between observations and included frailty effects into the models. Our models also considered the possible confounding by parity and animal origin. Only multiparity was associated with the hazard of early abortion (HR=2.8 compared to nulliparous heifers). N. caninum seropositivity significantly affected the hazard of late abortion, but interacted with parity. The HRs for Neospora-positive animals were 6.4, 3.7 and 1.9, respectively, for nulliparous heifers, first-lactation cows and multiparous cows. Evidence of BVDV circulating (or not) among the young stock was not associated with abortions, but few cows in this herd were susceptible to incident infection.

  16. Immunogenicity of an inactivated Chinese bovine viral diarrhea virus 1a (BVDV 1a) vaccine cross protects from BVDV 1b infection in young calves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wei; Shi, Xinchuan; Wu, Yongwang; Li, Xiaoxin; Ji, Ye; Meng, Qingsen; Zhang, Shucheng; Wu, Hua

    2014-08-15

    Bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) 1a and 1b strains are the predominant subgenotypes in China. Because of the genetic and antigenic variability among different BVDV strains, a vaccine effective in one region may fail to protect against infections caused by different virus strains in another region. No BVDV vaccine developed with the predominant strains in China are available. In this study, the immunogenicity of an inactivated Chinese BVDV 1a NM01 vaccine strain was evaluated by challenging with a Chinese BVDV 1b JL strain. Ten 2-4-month-old calves were intramuscularly vaccinated with a single dose of the vaccine strain and boosted with same dose three weeks after the first vaccination, with five mock immunized calves serving as a control group. The average titer of neutralization antibody to BVDV 1a and BVDV 1b of immunized calves reached 1:410 and 1:96, respectively, at 21 days post the second vaccination. Twenty-one days post the second vaccination, all calves were challenged with strain JL. The clinical signs, such as the temperature and leukopenia of the immunized calves and viral shedding, were significantly less than the mock immunized calves after challenging with the virulent BVDV 1b strain, indicating that the BVDV 1a vaccine strain elicited efficacious protection against the endemic BVDV 1b strain in China. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of an inactivated BVDV vaccine which demonstrated effective cross-protection against BVDV type 1b infection in China.

  17. Human Polyclonal Antibodies Produced in Transchromosomal Bovine Prevent Lethal Zika Virus Infection and Testicular Atrophy in Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-03-21

    Guillain- Barre syndrome (3-­‐6). There are currently 76 countries with confirmed mosquito-borne ZIKV transmission worldwide, including recent cases...reproductive tract leading to documented cases of sexual transmission (8,   9). Animal models of ZIKV infection have rapidly been established and...a Rh-positive fetus (18). More recently monoclonal antibody approaches have been used to prevent emerging infectious diseases , most notably the

  18. Use of PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis for identification of yeast species isolated from bovine intramammary infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fadda, M E; Pisano, M B; Scaccabarozzi, L; Mossa, V; Deplano, M; Moroni, P; Liciardi, M; Cosentino, S

    2013-01-01

    This study reports a rapid PCR-based technique using a one-enzyme RFLP for discrimination of yeasts isolated from bovine clinical and subclinical mastitis milk samples. We analyzed a total of 1,486 milk samples collected over 1 yr in south Sardinia and northern Italy, and 142 yeast strains were preliminarily grouped based on their cultural morphology and physiological characteristics. Assimilation tests were conducted using the identification kit API ID 32C and APILAB Plus software (bioMérieux, Marcy l'Etoile, France). For PCR-RFLP analysis, the 18S-ITS1-5.8S ribosomal(r)DNA region was amplified and then digested with HaeIII, and dendrogram analysis of RFLP fragments was carried out. Furthermore, within each of the groups identified by the API or PCR-RFLP methods, the identification of isolates was confirmed by sequencing of the D1/D2 region using an ABI Prism 310 automatic sequencer (Applied Biosystems, Foster City, CA). The combined phenotypic and molecular approach enabled the identification of 17 yeast species belonging to the genera Candida (47.9%), Cryptococcus (21.1%), Trichosporon (19.7%), Geotrichum (7.1%), and Rhodotorula (4.2%). All Candida species were correctly identified by the API test and their identification confirmed by sequencing. All strains identified with the API system as Geotrichum candidum, Cryptococcus uniguttulatus, and Rhodotorula glutinis also produced characteristic restriction patterns and were confirmed as Galactomyces geotrichum (a teleomorph of G. candidum), Filobasidium uniguttulatum (teleomorph of Crypt. uniguttulatus), and R. glutinis, respectively, by D1/D2 rDNA sequencing. With regard to the genus Trichosporon, preliminary identification by API was problematic, whereas the RFLP technique used in this study gave characteristic restriction profiles for each species. Moreover, sequencing of the D1/D2 region allowed not only successful identification of Trichosporon gracile where API could not, but also correct identification of

  19. Simulation of the K-function in the analysis of spatial clustering for non-randomly distributed locations-Exemplified by bovine virus diarrhoea virus (BVDV) infection in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ersbøll, Annette Kjær; Ersbøll, Bjarne Kjær

    2009-01-01

    The K-function is often used to detect spatial clustering in spatial point processes, e.g. clustering of infected herds. Clustering is identified by testing the observed K-function for complete spatial randomness modelled, e.g. by a homogeneous Poisson process. The approach provides information a...... of the herd locations in general. The approach also overcomes edge effects and problems with complex shapes of the study region. An application to bovine virus diarrhoea virus (BVDV) infection in Denmark is described....

  20. Influence of breed and genotype on the onset and distribution of infectivity and disease-associated prion protein in sheep following oral infection with the bovine spongiform encephalopathy agent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGovern, G; Martin, S; Jeffrey, M; Bellworthy, S J; Spiropoulos, J; Green, R; Lockey, R; Vickery, C M; Thurston, L; Dexter, G; Hawkins, S A C; González, L

    2015-01-01

    The onset and distribution of infectivity and disease-specific prion protein (PrP(d)) accumulation was studied in Romney and Suffolk sheep of the ARQ/ARQ, ARQ/ARR and ARR/ARR prion protein gene (Prnp) genotypes (where A stands for alanine, R for arginine and Q for glutamine at codons 136, 154 and 171 of PrP), following experimental oral infection with cattle-derived bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) agent. Groups of sheep were killed at regular intervals and a wide range of tissues taken for mouse bioassay or immunohistochemistry (IHC), or both. Bioassay results for infectivity were mostly coincident with those of PrP(d) detection by IHC both in terms of tissues and time post infection. Neither PrP(d) nor infectivity was detected in any tissues of BSE-dosed ARQ/ARR or ARR/ARR sheep or of undosed controls. Moreover, four ARQ/ARQ Suffolk sheep, which were methionine (M)/threonine heterozygous at codon 112 of the Prnp gene, did not show any biological or immunohistochemical evidence of infection, while those homozygous for methionine (MARQ/MARQ) did. In MARQ/MARQ sheep of both breeds, initial PrP(d) accumulation was identified in lymphoreticular system (LRS) tissues followed by the central nervous system (CNS) and enteric nervous system (ENS) and finally by the autonomic nervous system and peripheral nervous system and other organs. Detection of infectivity closely mimicked this sequence. No PrP(d) was observed in the ENS prior to its accumulation in the CNS, suggesting that ENS involvement occurred simultaneously to that of, or followed centrifugal spread from, the CNS. The distribution of PrP(d) within the ENS further suggested a progressive spread from the ileal plexus to other ENS segments via neuronal connections of the gut wall. Differences between the two breeds were noted in terms of involvement of LRS and ENS tissues, with Romney sheep showing a more delayed and less consistent PrP(d) accumulation than Suffolk sheep in such tissues. Whether this

  1. Experimentally induced infections bovine keratoconjunctivitis: effectiveness of a pilus vaccine against exposure to homologous strains of Moraxella bovis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pugh, G W; Hughes, D E; Booth, G D

    1977-10-01

    A study was conducted to determine whether vaccination with sonicated pili of Moraxella bovis would protect cattle from subsequent infection and disease when experimentally challenged by exposure to homologous cultures of M bovis. Some calves were intramuscularly inoculated 2 times with pili of M bovis suspended in water, and others were subcutaneously inoculated 2 times with pili of M bovis suspended in oil; 21 days were allowed between inculations. Controls were nonvaccinated calves. Fourteen days after the last inculation, all calves were exposed to virulent homologous cultures of M bovis. The results indicated that vaccination with sonicated pili of M bovis may induce protective immunity against homologous strain challenge exposure. Vaccines in oil that were injected subcutaneously protected to a greater extent than did vaccines in water that were injected intramuscularly. The development of inflammatory nodules at the site of inoculation was associated with resistance to infection and disease. Only 1 of the vaccinated calves that resisted disease lacked precipitating antibodies against sonicated pili at the time of the challenge exposure. This calf had antibodies 2 weeks later.

  2. Bovine viral diarrhea virus in free-ranging wild ruminants in Switzerland: low prevalence of infection despite regular interactions with domestic livestock

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Casaubon Julien

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In the frame of an eradication program for bovine viral diarrhea (BVD in Swiss livestock, the question was raised whether free-ranging wildlife could threaten the success of this sanitary measure. Therefore, we conducted serological and virological investigations on BVD virus (BVDV infections in the four indigenous wild ruminant species (roe deer, red deer, Alpine chamois and Alpine ibex from 2009 to 2011, and gathered information on interactions between wild and domestic ruminants in an alpine environment by questionnaire survey. Results Thirty-two sera out of 1’877 (1.7%, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.2-2.4 were seropositive for BVDV, and a BVDV1 sub genotype h virus was found in a seropositive chamois (0.05%, 95% CI 0.001-0.3. The seropositive animals originated from sub-alpine or alpine regions and significantly more seropositive red deer, chamois and ibex than roe deer were found. There were no statistically significant differences between sampling units, age classes, genders, and sampling years. The obtained prevalences were significantly lower than those documented in livestock, and most positive wild ruminants were found in proximity of domestic outbreaks. Additionally, BVDV seroprevalence in ibex was significantly lower than previously reported from Switzerland. The survey on interspecific interactions revealed that interactions expected to allow BVDV transmission, from physical contacts to non-simultaneous use of the same areas, regularly occur on pastures among all investigated ruminant species. Interactions involving cervids were more often observed with cattle than with small ruminants, chamois were observed with all three domestic species, and ibex interacted mostly with small ruminants. Interactions related to the use of anthropogenic food sources were frequently observed, especially between red deer and cattle in wintertime. Conclusions To our knowledge, this is the first report of BVDV RNA isolated from an

  3. Herd-level prevalence and risk factors for bovine viral diarrhea virus infection in cattle in the State of Paraíba, Northeastern Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, Leise Gomes; Nogueira, Adriana Hellmeister de Campos; De Stefano, Eliana; Pituco, Edviges Maristela; Ribeiro, Cláudia Pestana; Alves, Clebert José; Oliveira, Tainara Sombra; Clementino, Inácio José; de Azevedo, Sérgio Santos

    2016-01-01

    Serological surveys based on a planned sampling on bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) infection in Brazilian cattle herds are scarce. A cross-sectional study was carried out to determine herd- and animal-level seroprevalences and to identify risk factors associated with herd-level seroprevalence for BVDV infection in the State of Paraíba, Northeastern Brazil, from September 2012 to January 2013. The state was divided into three sampling strata, and for each stratum, the prevalence of herds infected with BVDV and the prevalence of seropositive animals was estimated by a two-stage sampling survey. In total, 2443 animals were sampled from 478 herds. A virus-neutralization test was used for BVDV antibody detection. A herd was considered positive when at least one seropositive animal was detected. The herd- and animal-level prevalences in the State of Paraíba were 65.5% (95% confidence interval (CI) = 61.1-69.7%) and 39.1% (95% CI = 33.1-45.6%), respectively. The frequency of seropositive animals per herd ranged from 10 to 100% (median of 50%). The risk factors identified were as follows: more than six calves aged ≤12 months (odds ratio (OR) = 3.72; 95% CI = 2.08-6.66), animal purchasing (OR = 1.66; 95% CI = 1.08-2.55), pasture rental (OR = 2.15; 95% CI = 1.35-3.55), and presence of veterinary assistance (OR = 2.04; 95% CI = 1.10-3.79). Our findings suggest that the implementation of control and prevention measures among farmers, with the aim of preventing dissemination of the agent in the herds, is necessary. Special attention should be given to addressing the identified risk factors, such as sanitary control prior to animal purchasing and to discourage the pasture rental, as well as to encourage the vaccination in the herds.

  4. HoBi-Like Virus RNA Detected in Foetuses Following Challenge of Pregnant Cows that had Previously Given Birth to Calves Persistently Infected with Bovine Viral Diarrhoea Virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauermann, F V; Falkenberg, S M; Ridpath, J F

    2016-09-11

    The ability of ruminant pestivirus including bovine viral diarrhoea virus (BVDV) and the related emerging pestivirus, HoBi-like virus, to establish persistent infection (PI) following foetal infection is central to keeping these viruses in circulation. Non-PI dams carrying BVDV PI calves develop high levels of immunity due constantly viral exposure. A study to determine whether the immunity developed following the generation of a BVDV PI is enough to prevent HoBi-like virus infection of a subsequent foetus was performed. This study consisted of nine pregnant cows, four had birthed BVDV-1 PI calves in a previous pregnancy, three cows had birthed BVDV-2 PIs and two had birthed pestivirus negative calves. From this, six pregnant cows were challenged with HoBi-like virus about day 85 of gestation (four BVDV-1 and two BVDV-2 cows) and three non-challenged cows (negative control). At the day of challenge, the serum neutralizing titres against the homologous BVDV strains of the first inoculation ranged from 1148 to 5793. At day 6 post-challenge, HoBi-like RNA was detected in the serum of all four BVDV-1 cows but not in the two BVDV-2 cows. The foetuses harvested from five of the exposed dams (three BVDV-1 and two BVDV-2 cows) at day 30 post-challenge were positive for HoBi-like virus RNA. The sixth cow, BVDV-1 cow #541, while pregnant at the time of exposure, had no foetus 30 days after exposure. Foetuses from HoBi-like virus exposed dams were significantly smaller and lighter than control foetuses. HoBi-like RNA was detected in samples of all challenged foetuses. The identification of viral RNA in the serum of 4 cows at day 6 post-challenge, as well viral RNA detection in all foetuses 30 days post-inoculation, indicates that the foetuses of dams with high antibodies titres against BVDV-1 or BVDV-2 would not be protected from challenge with a HoBi-like virus.

  5. Complete suppression of viral gene expression is associated with the onset and progression of lymphoid malignancy: observations in Bovine Leukemia Virus-infected sheep

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Burny Arsène

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background During malignant progression, tumor cells need to acquire novel characteristics that lead to uncontrolled growth and reduced immunogenicity. In the Bovine Leukemia Virus-induced ovine leukemia model, silencing of viral gene expression has been proposed as a mechanism leading to immune evasion. However, whether proviral expression in tumors is completely suppressed in vivo was not conclusively demonstrated. Therefore, we studied viral expression in two selected experimentally-infected sheep, the virus or the disease of which had features that made it possible to distinguish tumor cells from their nontransformed counterparts. Results In the first animal, we observed the emergence of a genetically modified provirus simultaneously with leukemia onset. We found a Tax-mutated (TaxK303 replication-deficient provirus in the malignant B-cell clone while functional provirus (TaxE303 had been consistently monitored over the 17-month aleukemic period. In the second case, both non-transformed and transformed BLV-infected cells were present at the same time, but at distinct sites. While there was potentially-active provirus in the non-leukemic blood B-cell population, as demonstrated by ex-vivo culture and injection into naïve sheep, virus expression was completely suppressed in the malignant B-cells isolated from the lymphoid tumors despite the absence of genetic alterations in the proviral genome. These observations suggest that silencing of viral genes, including the oncoprotein Tax, is associated with tumor onset. Conclusion Our findings suggest that silencing is critical for tumor progression and identify two distinct mechanisms-genetic and epigenetic-involved in the complete suppression of virus and Tax expression. We demonstrate that, in contrast to systems that require sustained oncogene expression, the major viral transforming protein Tax can be turned-off without reversing the transformed phenotype. We propose that suppression

  6. Altered expression of CRMPs in the brain of bovine spongiform encephalopathy-infected mice during disease progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auvergnon, Nathalie; Reibel, Sophie; Touret, Monique; Honnorat, Jérôme; Baron, Thierry; Giraudon, Pascale; Bencsik, Anna

    2009-03-19

    While recent studies suggest that synaptic alterations are first events in the mechanisms of prion-mediated neurodegeneration, little is known on the identity of the neuronal plasticity-related genes potentially concerned. Here the expression of 4 Collapsin Response Mediator Proteins (CRMPs), a family of signal transduction proteins involved in brain development and altered in Alzheimer's disease, was studied in the brain of C57Bl/6 mice infected with the BSE strain of prion agent, using RT-PCR and Western-blot methods. At the terminal stage of the disease, gene expression of each CRMP had decreased, while at the mid-stage of the disease only CRMP4 (mRNA and protein) expression had increased, concomitant to the start of PrP(Sc) accumulation in the brainstem. Altogether our findings picked out originally CRMPs, and especially CRMP4, as potential contributors to prion pathogenesis.

  7. Disorders of the erythrocyte membrane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sophia Delicou

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Hemolytic anemia due to abnormalities of the erythrocyte membrane comprises an important group of inherited disorders. These include hereditary spherocytosis, hereditary elliptocytosis, hereditary pyropoikilocytosis, and the hereditary stomatocytosis syndromes. The erythrocyte membrane skeleton composed of spectrin, actin, and several other proteins is essential for the maintenance of the erythrocyte shape, reversible deformability, and membrane structural integrity in addition to controlling the lateral mobility of integral membrane proteins. These disorders are characterized by clinical and laboratory heterogeneity and, as evidenced by recent molecular studies, by genetic heterogeneity. Defects in various proteins involved in linking the lipid bilayer to membrane skeleton result in loss in membrane cohesion leading to surface area loss and hereditary spherocytosis while defects in proteins involved in lateral interactions of the spectrin-based skeleton lead to decreased mechanical stability, membrane fragmentation and hereditary elliptocytosis. The disease severity is primarily dependent on the extent of membrane surface area loss. Treatment with splenectomy is curative in most patients.

  8. Bovine Virus Diarrhea (BVD)

    OpenAIRE

    Hoar, Bruce R

    2004-01-01

    Bovine virus diarrhea (BVD) is a complicated disease to discuss as it can result in a wide variety of disease problems from very mild to very severe. BVD can be one of the most devastating diseases cattle encounter and one of the hardest to get rid of when it attacks a herd. The viruses that cause BVD have been grouped into two genotypes, Type I and Type II. The disease syndrome caused by the two genotypes is basically the same, however disease caused by Type II infection is often more severe...